2.3L. BEAT ESS LA Ne.

RS AAR EE PE
ES ARMAS OP wET ee





Mr. Philip Gray Ms Mimi Roberts Ms Michele Finlayson
President Vice President Treasurer

Dr Marvin Smith
The Commonwealth Pharmacist
Association Representative
for The Bahamas

Ms Omar Saunders
Regional Vice President
Eastern Bahamas

fp Se PERO F

Ms Melanie Obregon
’ Assistant Treasurer

.

Ms Calliope Smith
Regional Vice President
New Providences

Ms M Gail Cartwright
Secretary

Mr Lenorad Sturrup —
Regional Vice President
Northern Bahamas







12 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008 : ;



Live Broadcas
"Herbal (Bush) Medicine" 1

it FPReeal CSood for Wou






;
3
:



‘Tuesday 16th September, 2008 a
Speaker: Dx. Aloina Htiggs | Las :
The General Public is Invited |





ver tena hyy



Filling Your Prescripton is the Most “3
Important Part of Our Business |

Congratulations To

On Being Honoured By

The Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association










2.3L. BEAT ESS LA Ne.

RS AAR EE PE
ES ARMAS OP wET ee


Mr. Philip Gray Ms Mimi Roberts Ms Michele Finlayson
President Vice President Treasurer

Dr Marvin Smith
The Commonwealth Pharmacist
Association Representative
for The Bahamas

Ms Omar Saunders
Regional Vice President
Eastern Bahamas

fp Se PERO F

Ms Melanie Obregon
’ Assistant Treasurer

.

Ms Calliope Smith
Regional Vice President
New Providences

Ms M Gail Cartwright
Secretary

Mr Lenorad Sturrup —
Regional Vice President
Northern Bahamas




12 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008 : ;



Live Broadcas
"Herbal (Bush) Medicine" 1

it FPReeal CSood for Wou






;
3
:



‘Tuesday 16th September, 2008 a
Speaker: Dx. Aloina Htiggs | Las :
The General Public is Invited |





ver tena hyy



Filling Your Prescripton is the Most “3
Important Part of Our Business |

Congratulations To

On Being Honoured By

The Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association











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Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





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CLOUDS
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The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1









GUESS
‘Next Top

‘BAHAMAS EDITION ©

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER ua 2008





CALL FOR WASTE
DISPOSAL AND

PRICE — 75¢



Sports Minister
meets Chinese
Ambassador



Firebomb' set off
at court building

Chief Magistrate calls
incident ‘disturbing’

Hi By NATARIO McKENZIE

POLICE are investigating
what appeared to be a home-
. made firebomb that went off at
a magistrate’s court — sparking

renewed concerns about the |

security at the lower courts.

Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez called the incident “dis-
turbing” coming as it did after
several fire attacks on magis-
trate’s courts in the last few
years.

“T'm not certain whether they
threw an object there, like a
Molotov cocktail, or whether
they actually went to the door

and poured the substance onto
it," he said. He noted that if the
door had been a wooden one
the damage could have been
much worse.

Cases at Court 8 in Bank
Lane did not begin at 10am as
usual yesterday, as police offi-

cers investigated the burnt |

remains of what appeared to be
a plastic container on the'steps
of the court.

The bottom of the steel door
at the entrance to Magistrate
Carolita Bethel’s court was
charred.

_SEE page eight

Moored commercial barge
creates ‘hazard and eyesore’ |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MARINE construction firm is being accused of abusing
maritime custom by keeping a large commercial barge moored
in a residential waterway, creating a hazard and an eyesore for

residents.

The Devcon vessel, described by Coral Harbour homeowner
Tracy Ferguson as around 200 feet long and 75 feet wide, has
been moored opposite her property in the Flamingo waterway

since August 28.

SEE page eight

i

my erro

3: PANS



_ with the murder of 28- |

’ returned to his Windsor Lane





Franklyn G Ferguson

THE DOOR of Court 8 in Bank Lane shows signs of the ‘firebomb’
_ Which was let off yesterday. — ,

24-year-old man in ‘custody i in
connection with weekend murder

POLICE have a 24-
year-old man in cus-
tody in connection

neighbourhood at
around 10pm on Sat-
urday.

He reportedly got
into an argument with
a group of men outside
the home of Haitians,
L’Orture Williams and
his wife, Pricel Petibay.

As the dispute
‘became heated, one of
the men in the group
reportedly put Mr
Smith in’ a headlock
while another stabbed him and

SEE page eight
Police investigate GB murder

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

year-old Jason Smith.
Mr Smith, a father
of two, died on Satur- |
day night after he and
his wife were attacked
in front of their chil-
dren by a group of
men.
Eye-witnesses
reported that Mr
Smith, who was allegedly in an
intoxicated state at the time,



JASON SMITH
died after an attack
on Saturday.

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Police are searching for suspects
involved in the stabbing death of a 26-year-old Eight Mile Rock man.

‘Chief Superintendent Basil Rahming said police have launched an
intensive investigations into the island’s eighth homicide for the year
on Grand Bahama. ;

SEE page eight

VIA DELLA OSA

Coral Harbour

$3.5m worth of
cocaine seized

MORE than $3.5 million worth of cocaine was seized by officers from
the Grand Bahama Drug Enforcement Unit shortly affer it arrived on

the island.

Chief Supt Basil Rahming said officers, acting on information, went
to Freeport Container Port around 4pm on Sunday, where they began

inquiries.

While inspecting coniterits of a 40-foot metal container that had just
been off-loaded on to the storage bay, officers discovered three large
black duffle bags concealed among a shipment of sugar.

The bags were taken to DEU headquarters where, upon inspection,
they were found to contain 128 kilos of cocaine, estimated street val-

ue $3.5 million.

The concealed narcotics had just arrived aboard the MSC Peru,
inbourid from Buenaventura, Colombia, and its cargo of containers
were in transit to Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

The captain and crew were interviewed, but no arrests were made,
The seized contraband has been flown to New Providence aboard an
“Operation Bat” helicopter, where DEU officials will continue inves- -
tigations with International‘-Law Enforcement agencies.

Jury selection for trial of pair
charged in Mario Miller murder

i By NATARIO McKENZIE

A JURY has been selected in
the trial of two brothers charged in
the murder of Mario Miller, the

. son of former Cabinet minister®
Leslie Miller.

‘The trial is expected to begin
today. Following brief submissions
in closed coyrt on an application
brought on behalf of Ryan Miller,
the jury of eight women, four men,
with three alternatives was select-
ed. Brothers Ryan Miller and
Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar Lee,
are accused of Mario Miller’s mur-
der.

Lawyer Romona Farquharson
represents Ryan Miller and Ricar-
do Miller is represented by lawyer
Romauld Ferreira. Deputy Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions Cheryl

_Grant-Bethel, with Neil Brath-
. waite and Sean Adderley of the

Attorney General’s Office appear
for the Crown.

-Mario Miller was killed on June
22, 2002. His stabbed body was
found in bushes near the Super
Value Food Store in Winton. Both
Ryan and Ricardo Miller initially
stood trial for Mario’s murder in
2006. In the final stages of the tri-
al, however, one of the jurors was

found to have been closely con-—

nected to a family member of the
accused and was cited for con-
tempt. Justice Anita Allen subse- /
quently ordered a retrial. /

Since his son’s death’six years

_ ago Mr Miller, who says his fami-

ly has been left tramautised by the
incident, has campaigned for jus-
tice in Mario’s murder. |

HANNA-MARTIN
DISMISSES CLAIM
SHE IS TRYING T0
DIVIDE PLP :

e PAGE TWO

BAHAMAS 10 SIGN EPA
IN MID-OCTOBER

e PAGE THREE

SLACK IMMIGRATION CONTROLS
‘MAKE THE BAHAMAS A NATURAL
BASE FOR TERRORISTS’ —

e PAGE FIVE



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin said that the idea that
she is attempting to divide the
PLP through their local branch
elections is “utter foolishness”.

While a guest on the radio
programme “Jeffrey” with host
Jeffrey Lloyd, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin said that the idea that the
PLP is conducting haphazard
rules that only applied to some
and not everyone is simply
“ridiculous”.

“It’s utterly ridiculous, and I
try not to, but there may come a
time when I may speak on this.
But I have to respect the
process and I think it’s impor-
tant to respect the process
because when you don’t respect
the process you may by your
actions cause the party to come
into some form of disrepute. :

“Tt is not that Iam unable to
be very explicit. I am very able

Fine i ere

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Bivd
















Cla i

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight

on Mondays |

nn Hotta

ANY of your

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Hanna-Martin dismisses idea she is trying to
divide PLP through local branch elections



Glenys Hanna-Martin

to do that. And there are
aspects of my personality that
would love to do it. But I think
it is important for me to uphold

&&

...1 think it is important
for me to uphold the prin-
ciples of our party. We
have a process, the
process is being carried
out and it will go to full
completion

Glenys
Hanna-Martin



the principles of our ane We
have a process, the process is
being carried out and it will go
to full completion,” she said.

Mrs Hanna-Martin has been
in a power struggle within her
own party over the selection of
officers to the National Gener-
al Council through their branch
elections. The constituencies of
Kennedy, Marathon, and St
Cecilia is where Mrs Hanna-
Martin has received her more
aggressive challenges. |

On Friday night, at the St
Cecilia branch meeting, the

Perry Christie



election of Paul Moss, who is
seen as the front-runner for the
nomination for the St Cecilia
constituency, was called into
question by a challenge from
the branch level.

This challenge, which is based

on the constitution of the party,

dictates that for persons to be
elected to the NGC, they must
first be residents of the con-
stituency which they seek to
represent. In the cases where

they are not, these persons must -

then gain at least two thirds of

«| “This is utter foolishness’

the support of the branch.

It is with this in mind that the
meeting was held. However, the
meeting quickly dissolved into
anarchy, with Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin being overshadowed by the
bickering both inside, and out-
side of the Yellow Elder class-
room where the meeting was
being held.

Some detractors insinuated
that Mrs Hanna-Martin’s inten-
tions were not pure in her
attempts to uphold the consti-
tution of the party. They said
she simply was seeking to block
Mr Moss and his growing pop-
ularity within the party.

However, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin has fully denied these alle-
gations and maintains that she
has the full support of the party,
including its leader Perry
Christie.

“This idea that there is some
division, or that I am taking
some maverick action that is
unprincipled is utter foolishness.
Let me say this, I have known
the leader of our party for a
very long time, and he has
known me for a long time, and
certainly I have no doubt as
chairman of this party, he
respects the office I- hold, the
authority I hold, and We are
constantly in dialogue and the
party moves forward on a basis,
on consensus,” she said.

Online petition over the
rising cost of electricity

â„¢ By ALEX MISSICK _

A CONCERNED Bahamian
has taken matters into her own
hands, beginning an online peti-
tion against the Ministry of
Environment and the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation due to
the increasing cost of electricity.

The BEC Electricity Bill and

Fuel Surcharge Petition to the.

Ministry of Environment and
BEC was created and written
by Darcy Moss.

She joins many Bahamians in
saying that changes must be

made-to the eleotieity: fuels Sus:

charge. ra
“T started this petition

because I felt that the fuel sur-

charge rates were increasing too
much, too fast and when I final-
ly got through to BEC no one



Pressure on Environment Minister and
BEC to make changes to fuel surcharge



“My goal is to
offer suggestions
to BEC in
attempts to help
quell this sn
we are in.” uncon

his pray







aS Moss:

seemed to be able to answer any
questions about it,” Ms Moss



said. Ms Moss said she is not
trying to tear down BEC, but
thinks the public has the right
to seek answers as some peti-

tioners feel that BEC is not

being honest and upfront about
the matter.

“My goal is to offer sugges-
tions to BEC in attempts to help
quell this crisis we are now in..
There are questions. that have
come upcas a result of the peti-
tion and we would like to have
answers to those questions on
behalf of our petitioners.

“T will soon be contacting
BEC and asking them to meet
with me and other concerned
citizens and my hope is that they
will be open and willing to do
so,” Ms Moss said.

Ms Moss said she wants to
gather 20,000 signatures to show
the government that the people
of the Bahamas want a change
as there is strength in numbers.

“When I started this petition,
I had no idea of the response I
would have gotten but to date I
have received almost 3,200 sig-
natures,” she said.

After reading some of the
questions and comments she has
received from the general pub-
lic, Ms Moss said it seems that
the fuel surcharge is only part
of the problem.

“People are really in crisis,”
Ms Moss said.

Up to press time the petition
has attained 1,729 online signa-
tures and 1,504 written signa-
tures from concerned Bahami-
an.
The petition can be viewed
online. at
www.petitiononline.com/bec123
4.com.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 3



a De i ES oie ee |



In brief

Man charged
with killing
while driving
dangerously

A MAN charged with killing
in the course of dangerous dri-
ving was arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Jeffrey Saunders, 44, of Peter
Street was arraigned before
Magistrate Renee McKay at
Court Six in Parliament Street.

According to court dockets, it
is alleged that on Friday, July 11
at about 5.40pm, Saunders
drove a white 2006 Ford F 150
pickup truck along Coral Har-
bour in a dangerous manner,
thereby causing the death of
Sean Munroe. According to
police reports, Munroe, 43, for-
merly a Civil Aviation Depart-
ment employee, was driving a
white Suzuki, which collided
with a white Ford F-150 truck.

Munroe was the country’s
24th traffic fatality for the year.

Saunders pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was granted
$10,000 bail. The case was
adjourned to December 8.

inagua wildlife
appeal after
Hurricane ike

BAHAMIANS are being
urged to help starving birdlife and
wild animals on Inagua following
the damaging impact of Hurri-
cane Ike. Nassau resident Kim
Aranha is asking for donations
of sunflower seed, dry dog food
and other items to help stricken
creatures on the island.

Ike’s 130mph winds tore leaves
and berries off trees throughout

Inagua, severely reducing the |

foodstock of birds and animals.
The parrot population was also
hits.

° Mrs Aranha can be contacted :

at 362-4727.

Turning |

Bahamas to sign
EPA in mid-October

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas will sign onto
the controversial Economic Part-
nership Agreement in mid-Octo-
ber despite local resistance to the
trade agreement, Minister of State
for Finance Zhivargo Laing said
yesterday.

Signing onto the agreement
would cost the government $6 mil-
lion annually at the end of a 25-
year period in lost customs duties
on goods imported from Europe,
but not signing it could impact the
$90 million in foreign reserves the
country receives annually from
the European Union, he said at
a press conference at the Ministry
of Finance yesterday.

When the Bahamas signs onto
the agreement next month, it will
sign a “goods only” agreement,
with the intent of following
through with the services portion
of the agreement at a later, yet
unspecified, date.

The EPA would allow Bahami-
an manufactures to continue to
supply their products to the Euro-
pean market duty-free and lower
customs duty on goods from the
EU and the forum of Caribbean
States (CARIFORUM) into the
Bahamas so customers will have
lower prices and wider choices.

Yesterday, EPA opponents
renewed their call for government
to reconsider the agreement,
claiming it does not bode well for
the country.

"It's a dark, sad day for the
Bahamas. The EPA is not good
for this country, its development,
and its health," attorney Fayne
Thompson said.

"Bahamian manufactures, local |

businesses must now look to the
competition coming from
(Europe) at-an obscene pace. The
competition will undermine local



Zhivargo mn

“It’s a dark, sad
day for the
Bahamas. The EPA
is not good for this
country, its
development and
its health.” '

Ee
Fayne Thompson

business," he said, arguing that
government should focus on

attaining grants. from its biggest

trading partner — the United
States ~ instead of submitting-to
the EU..Attorney Paul Moss,
member of Bahamians Agitating
for a Referendum on Free Trade
(BARF), said signing the agree-
ment made no economic sense as

it would remove customs duties’.

on a significant revenue stream.

"I call for a demonstration of
historic proportions to ensure that
the government of the Bahamas
understands that they must (suc-
cumb) to the will of the Bahamian
people and they ought not to sign
this agreement," he said.

According to Mr Laing, the ©

country has not presented its ser-

“Govt intends to

vices agreement to the EU yet
and does not have to sign onto
the services aspect until six
months after the signing date. ~

"Which means for us, if we sign
in October we will essentially be
signing a ‘goods only' agreement
because we would have no bene-
fits or obligations arising from the
services schedule until we attach

’ our services schedule. And if we

indefinitely do not attach our ser-
vices schedule, we will have no

benefits, no obligations until then. .

"And so we will in effect, come

' the signing, be signing a goods

only agreement. . . with the inten-
tion of following through on the
services side of things," he said.
The services schedule mirrors
the current National Investment
Policy, which presently reserves
13 areas for Bahamians — whole-
sale and retail; real estate; local
media; nightclubs and restaurants;
construction; cosmetic establish-
ments; auto and appliance service
operations; and public transport.
Minister Laing said he would
not release the specific signing
date until it is confirmed by
CARICOM with the European
Union, as the date may.be sub-

_ject to change.

He said there was not signifi-

cant public education over the five -

year EPA negotiating period, but
stressed that the FNM has con-
ducted "enough consultation"
with Bahamian traders,since
assuming office in May, 2007.

The agreement also calls for a
Competition Commission which
has to be set up by 2013.

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' By LLOYD ALLEN Mr Neymour said climate
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‘OF FABRICS"





THE government says it is |-

‘looking into turning everyday STATE Minister for Envi-

garbage into usable energy.
For years the Harrold Road
dump has been seen as a prob-
iem for locals, taking into
account ifs growth rate as well

trolled, - including burning,
garbage separation, and bur-
ial. On Monday, State Minister
i for Environment Phenton Ney-
mean told The Tribune that the
proposals submitted to the gov-

‘| ernment relating to renewable |

| energy inciude.a considerable
number focused on establish-
jing waste recycling plants.
' Inthe United States, numer-
ous companies have estab-
|| lished < slectricity plants which
j generate cnergy from waste }
sites Essentially the key ingre-
a is methane, which is a
byproduct generated iby]



ronment Phenton Neymour
announced that “‘as soon as pos-
sible” the government intends
to*approve a renewable energy
supplier.

He said: “BEC has recently
received proposals for renew-
able energy, they — proposal
submissions — were closed on
Friday. ’'ve been informed that
there has been a very good
response to the request for pro-
posals for renewable energy.”

The minister also indicated
that the proposals can be for
different islands. “So we may
have more than one supplier
throughout the Bahamas.”

In his announcement, the
minister made it clear that
though renewable energy is the

government’s decision to begin
the process of establishing such
an initiative.

He warned that for any pri-
vate company to be approved
for such a project, there are
three key requirements: finan-
cial sustainability, technologi-
cal capability, and affordabili-
ty on the consumer level.

“I am of the view that this
initiative should have started
many yéars ago, and we are
actually playing catch up at this
particular time,
ister. ~
Adding that the proposals
have not yet been reviewed, Mr
Neymour said the government
will announce “at the appropri-
ate time” any successful pro-
ject.

” said the min-’

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way forward for the Bahamas, it
is not always the most afford-
‘able option.

The minister explained: “Tt is”
important that the Bahamian
people understand that renew-
able energy does not always
mean cheaper. For insiance,

‘solar energy in some locations,
is more expensive than the tra-
ditional form of energy genera-
tion that we use now.”

He suggested that an impor-
tant consideration in adopting
renewable energy on a national
level, is that it would help in the
reduction of carbon emissions
produced by petroleum prod-
ucts.

decomposing waste.
Without



| as the meams-by which it is con-.
| |
such plants. |
methane has been proven to |
be a contributing factor to |
global warming. However, |
!

technologi ical advancements



,

|

|

i8

| have. eed Ways tO 5 ss this |
gas, which can ‘then be con- Days i 99

| verted into an environmental- Tices On The Island

| ly friendly energy source.

| Minister Neymour said:,

“We are looking at that area,

and we do have the desire to

| obtain energy from our waste,

|. which will assist us also in the

organisation of the dump. It

will also assist in reducing the

| amotn! of debris at the dump,

| and in the rate of garbage accu-

| mulation.”

| The minister also indicated,

that in order for the govern-

| ment to generate an under-

standing of how Bahamians

| feel about the ministry and its

| role, on Monday September

i 29, at the Sheraton Cable
Betck resort, it will host a one

; day forum allowing person to

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008.

a
The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publistier/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352- -6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Inaguans beware of unionists

WE WONDER if the local employees of
Morton Salt (Bahamas) understand yet that
only a fool bites the hand that feeds it. *

The miracle of Inagua is that no matter
how many times that hand has been bitten it
is always there in a crises to help Inaguans.

Despite many angry exchanges with union-
ists, damage to company property and a two-
week strike in the weeks preceding the hur-
ricane, Morton’s was there to assist their staff
who lost so much on September 7 when Hur-
ricane Ike blew over Great Inagua.

Yesterday Morton’s International
announced that within the next week each
staff member will receive $1,000 to assist
them over the hard times ahead.

Staff also will be paid.to help clean up the
company’s compound, which suffered mil-
lions of dollars in damage.

Bahamians have always heard that Mor-
ton’s was a vital ingredient to the success ot :
Inagua.

However, those flying from Nassau into
this nation’s most southerly outpost this week
were surprised at the importance of the com-
pany to the existence of every person who
calls Inagua home. If Morton’s shuts down, so
will Inagua.

Morton supplies everything for Inagua,
including bringing food supplies from the
US. on its.vessels to stock the general storé. .

Mr Bernard Dupuch, who like his father
the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, represented
Inagua in the House of Assembly for many
years, recalls the early days — just before
the Ericksons sold their West India Chemicals
company to Morton Salt — when there were.
rumblings to introduce unions to-Inagua.

It was 1962 and Mr Dupuch was in Inagua
to fight his first election.

Several supporters went with him from
Nassau.

Among them was Herbert Smith, aunion .

man at heart. After the election when they.
had all returned to Nassau, Mr Smith con-
fessed to Mr Dupuch that he didn’t really go
to Inagua to help him in his election, but to
get to know the people and try to quietly
establish a union.

However, he said, he quselly realised that
Inaguans were so dependent on the Erickson
family and their salt company for their very
existence that a union could never work in
Inagua. ;

They could never strike, Mr Smith rea-
soned, because this New England family

could return to their roots, and Inaguans
would be left high and dry with no food in the
store.

Realising what was: ‘afoot, Mr Dupuch — °

unlike Inagua’s present MP Alfred Gray who
decided to remain silent during the industri-
al unrest because he didp’t want to be blamed
for interfering — Mr Dupuch decided, for
the sake of his constituents’ future, to inter-
fere. He gathered all the company’s senior
staff around him one evening to discuss

unions. By the time the discussion was over, .
the men realised that a union would destroy

them and their island.

By contrast Mr Gray, by his own admission
last week, said he knew that Morton’s was
“very upset by the last labour unrest.” He
also knew that Morton’s management had
discussed moving their operations to Mexico
if they could not reach agreement with union-
ists. But instead of — as did Mr Dupuch —
sitting down and discussing with union lead-
ers the consequences of a strike and contin-
ued industrial discord, he put himself first.

“T stayed out of it because I did not want to
be blamed by the Government or the union
or management for political interference,”
he confessed.

To see Mr Gray pointing his finger, and
loud-mouthing it in the House of Assembly,
silence seemed out of character — especially
at such a critical time for his constituents.

No one knows if Morton wiil resume its
operations in Inagua. However, we do know
that if the company returns it will not be

under the same conditions. As someone _
~yémarked “they can’t continue to work under

these conditions.” -

And what Inaguans must remember is
that they will no longer he deating with Mor-
ton’s. The crippled salt company now has

_new owners who have no emotional connec-

tions with the people of Inagua.

If Inaguans know what side their bread is '

buttered on, they will disband their union
and in times of trouble sit down and discuss
their problems as a family.

And if they are wise, they will ban all
union leaders from Nassau. Remember at the
end of a strike, these so-called union advisers
can pack their bags and head back to three

square meals and the comfortable home |

awaiting them in Nassau.

At the end of it all, some might even send
them a bill for what the locals thought was
free advice: ae

BEC tax holida

THE TRIBUNE



is no picnic for
consumers

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN HIS 2008/2009.budget com- - .

munication, the Prime Minister
proposed a two year tax holiday
for BEC amounting to a 17 per
cent rebate on the cost of import-
ed fuel. He suggested that this
tax holiday would translate into
significant savings to Bahamian
households. He further stated that
these tax concessions were the
most important in recent history.
To date, the empirical data from
BEC do not support the
expressed policy intents of the
government. Specifically, Prime
Minister Ingraham had this to say:

“The tax holiday afforded to
BEC for a two year period in this
Budget is designed to slow the
continued increase in energy sur-
charge passed on to customers by
BEC. Additionally, the two year

tax relief now being given should

ease BEC back to a position of
financial soundness.

We expect that the relief given
to BEC for two years on customs
duties and what was stamp tax
amounting to 17 per cent over-
all, will. allow BEC to limit any
further fuel surcharge. The impact
on household’s incomes and sav-
ings could be significant.

“As with consumer retail items,






MUS

letters@tribunemedia.net

we will also monitor BEC pric-
ing closely so as to ensure that
any further fuel surcharge increas-
es are limited by the amount of
the concessions siven to BEC on
Stamp Tax.

“The reductions in the customs
duties in the 2008/09 are among
the most important tax conces-
sions granted to families in the
recent history of this country”.

Further, the Minister of State
with responsibility for utilities
promised significant relief by
August of this year. He and his
government argued that the sig-
nificant increase in the cost of
electricity was due to the hike in
oil prices and beyond the control
of the government and BEC. To
add perspective to this, between
May and July of this year, BEC

increased its surcharge from 21.2"

cents per kilowatt hour.to 24.8
cents per kilowatt hour, or 3.6
cents. One can only imagine what
the surcharge increases over the
past eighteen months were. Dur-
ing the last three months, BEC
has benefitted from revenue

windfalls on two fronts: Firstly, a
17 per cent tax concession on duty
and stamp tax on imported oil,
and secondly, a'significant reduc-
tion (some 30 per cent) in the
price of oil on the international
market. It is important to note
that BEC pays the oil companies

‘current market prices on con-
signment. BEC carries no inven- |

tory and their benefits from glob-
al price reductions are immedi-
ate. Having said that, it is disap-
pointing and unsatisfactory to
consumers, to learn that during
the August 2008 billing cycle,
BEC passed on a paltry one cent
per Kilowatt hour to its valued
customers. J dare say that monop-
oly has its privileges.

If the policy intent of the gov-
ernment was to focus on the bal-
ance sheet of BEC rather than
facilitating the “impact on house-
hold’s incomes and savings,” they
should have said so.

Suffice it to say editor, BEC is
enjoying one hell of a “tax holi-
day”, but the empirical data
shows that consumers across the

board must work overtime to pay .—

for this holiday,

ELCOTT COLEBY
Nassau,
September, 2008.

Adults need to set example to children

EDITOR, The Tribune.

'

THE announcer on the radio
stated that we are going to have
to teach our children how to
resolve their conflicts in a dif-
ferent manner, if we are to see a

change in the climate. of. vio-._..-

lence that is swallowing up so
many young lives. I agree with

him but I must add ‘that our

children need to see the adults
set some kind of example.

Maybe it is just a problem
that we are not seeing or we
have got absolution from some-
where, but the adults in this
country are playing. _

There is an insidious nasti-

ness that is present amount the. -

older folk that makes it very
difficult for the young to escape
its effects.

Church, numbers and sweét-
heartin’ are seen as “doin’ ya
lil dirt” and seen as being
acceptable.

Doing whatever you can,
whenever you can, to whomev-

“er you can in the name of
putting food on the table is also ©

seen as acceptable as long as no
one is caught.

The young in this:nation have
a front seat to all of this, some
of them are also active partici-
pants in the drama.as they have
to pay with their bodies to pay
the bills of living; and some of

‘us think the problem is “con-

flict resolution:”
The government needs to get

the statistics together on how ,

many of our young people are

fending for themselves.
We-need some statistics on

the parents who have reneged

on their responsibility to pro-- -

vide and care for their offspring.

We need some statistics on ~

those parents who are of the
opinion that their children have
been placed on this earth to
work for them, these are the
ones who keep. the bank
accounts while their kids are

_involved in all kinds of stuff.
We need statistics on those par- .

ents, fathers especially who only
show up after a child has strug-
gled on their own to get some-
where; often blaming a cold
hearted mother for not letting
him become involved in the life,
of one of his many children. °

If we can put the stats on a
very large board or screen and
then stand back, maybe we will
get the bigger picture and put
the blame where it is supposed
to be.

The conflict is not with the

child, it is with a very messed

environment that us older folks

perpetuate as we continue to.

act our shoe size and not our
chronological ages, taking up
much needed space and time
that belongs to our children by
right.

Outs isa society where too
many adults are childish in the
way they go about this business
of setting the example for those
they are responsible for —

politicians, teachers, pastors,,.

preachers, apostles, business-

-men;-garbage men, ‘street

sweepers, this list includes
everybody.

It is not our children who are
conflicted, it is us older folk who
are messed up.

We have not cleared up our

garbage from the past genera-
tion or attempted any kind of
transformation and we know as
a Bible believing nation that
what is not transformed has to
be transferred.

Our young people will not be
able to do better than what we

have done until we “show

them.”

Maybe my old from friend
from Farm Road is right about
a generation having to die out,
before we see any changes.
However, he says that those
changes will be carried out by
persons who will truly own what
it is to Bahamian, even though
they may have come from
another country.

There are too many nicely
dressed imposters parading
around this little place.

=ZDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 5 |



Olin brief

Superclubs —
Breezes
Bahamas
starts new
phase of
development

SUPERCLUBS
Breezes Bahamas has
commenced the second
phase of its development
programme which was

launched last September.
‘This fall, Breezes will

undertake further renova-

tions to its east wing.

The work will introduce
remodeled guest bath-
rooms, sliding glass doors,
flat screen plasma televi-
sions and numerous sup-
plementary product
enhancements.

Renovations

Additionally, the entire
banquet and meeting
facilities will also undergo
renovations during this
period.

Last fall, all of the guest |

bedrooms in.the west
wing were refurbished.

Breezes emphasised.
that guest amenities and
services will not be affect-
ed as the work will be tak-
ing place inside individual
rooms.

Afternoon showers take their toll

Slack immigration contro

Is ‘make the

Bahamas a natural base for terrorists’

SLACK immigration con-
trols in the Bahamas make the
country a natural base for ter-
rorists, a former police chief
has warned.

With thousands of undocu-
mented, unregistererd illegals,
the Bahamas had no means of
controlling a would-be terror-
ist’s ability to carry out an
attack, says former assistant
commissioner Paul Thompson.

His comments come in a
document sent to Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, Cabinet
ministers and leading civil ser-
vants in an attempt to alert the
nation to the implications of
illegal immigration.

“These persons reside or
work in most of our islands, yet
we don’t know who they are,”
said Mr Thompson, “There is
no register, no photograph or
fingerprint.records.”

The former officer said ter-
rorist incidents occur when
three conditions are met, with
would-be terrorists having the
desire, ability and opportunity
to. attack.

“We cannot control either
the terrorist’s desire or ability
to commit a terrorist attack,”
he added, “We can, however,
limit his or her opportunity by

“remaining diligent and vigilant

at our borders and in identify-
ing criminal behaviour, which
must be reported to our law
enforcement agencies immedi-
ately.”

Mr Thompson said there must
be a “zero tolerance” approach
to the illegal immigrant prob-
lem “as we may. well have the
enemy living among us.”

Former assistant commissioner
Paul Thompson sounds warning

Among his suggestions
for tackling the problem
are:

e An enlarged immigration
department, with properly
equipped personnel working
round-the-clock to liaise with
other law enforcement agen-
cies.

e A more secure detention
centre, with higher fences,

trained guard dogs, improved
lighting and monitored cam-
eras.

e An ID card with photo-
graph, thumb or fingerprint,
full name and address, for all
immigrants’ born in the
Bahamas.

¢ Residential status for those
who qualify.

e Improved checking proce-

dures, including proof of sta-
tus when applying for driving
licences.

° Use of schools, medical

_ institutions, banks and tenancy

agreements for routine status
checks.

e Prosecution of captains and
crews involved in human traf-
ficking.

‘e Elimination of all squatting

in shanty towns, wherever they

exist.

¢ Cash rewards for informa-
tion leading to apprehension
of illegal immigrants.

e Prosecution of all illegal
immigrants who return to the
Bahamas after deportation.

Mr Thompson also urged
top-level talks with Haitian
authorities and the US govern-
ment aimed at preventing
human trafficking.

He suggested joint patrols to
stop and search boats leaving
Haiti bound for the Bahamas
and the United States.

2008 International Cultural
Weekend ‘has been cancelled’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THERE may be no fanciful, cosmopoli-
tan parade of nations on what would have
been the 14th annual International Cultur-
al Weekend, The Tribune has learned.

According to Aquapure’s marketing
manager, Ryan Knowles, an employee of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs informed
him that the 2008 cultural weekend had
been cancelled.

Aquapure water was the festival’s answer -

to the October heat and a Bahamian alter-

native to the world of international bever-

ages both alcoholic and unleaded.
“Usually we hear about it from Mr

- (James) Catalyn at least two months in

Z
we
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se
A



THESE VEHICLES were left in flood waters in the Clarence A Bain building parking lot after brief but

heavy showers yesterday afternoon.

After Ike, Texas survivors clamour for gas, food

@ GALVESTON, Texas

RESCUERS flew into a hard-to-
reach area of the swamped Gulf
Coast Monday and uncovered.a
devastated landscape: Hurricane Ike
had obliterated entire subdivisons,
and emergency crews feared they
would find more victims than sur-
vivors, according to Associated Press.

It was the first time anyone had
gotten a look at the damaged resort
barrier island of Bolivar Peninsula,
just east of hard-hit Galveston.
Homes were splintered or com-
pletely washed away in the beach-

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora -
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

Pe
aera



front community that is home to
about 30,000 people in the peak
summer season. .

"'They had a lot of devastation
over there,
leader of the'task force that landed
on the island.

Two days after Ike battered the
Texas and Louisiana coasts before
striking Houston, the death toll rose
to 30 in eight states, many of them
far to the north of the Gulf Coast as
the storm slogged across the nation's
midsection, leaving a trail of flood-
ing.

A massive effort was under way

DEATH NOTICE

long time

2008

'' said Chuck Jones, the ©

- community's 60,000 residents

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across Texas to get food, water and
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could be weeks until the more than
2 million without power have their
lights turned on again. Lines snaked
for blocks down side streets at gas
stations that had little fuel to pump,
and thousands packed shelters look- .
ing for dry places to sleep.

Quite frankly we are reaching
a health crisis for the people who
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advance and I.haven’t heard from him in a
while,” said Mr Knowles.

“So we actually called there (Ministry of |

Foreign Affairs) this morning and the lady
informed us.”

Mr Catalyn resigned his position as chair-
man of the cultural weekend's committee
last year.

The Tribune contacted Minister of For-
eign affairs, Brent Symonette, regarding
the cancellation. He said-he would have to
confirm that the 2008 festival had in indeed
been cancelled. He did not call back up to
press time.

For 13 years now, the Cultural Weekend
has allowed Bahamians to experience the
sights, sounds, tastes and scents of coun-
tries around the world and provided indi-

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-viduals from those countries who live here,

a two-day visa back to their homes.
Music, food and exotic libations were the
highlights of the festival, held at the beau-
tiful botanical gardens in Chippingham.
People indigenous to the countries repre-
sented, showed off the best their nations

-had to offer.

The annual event began in October of
1995 and each year has drawn more and
more Bahamian patrons who come to learn
about countries beyond their borders for a
nominal fee — much less than an airline
ticket.

“Pretty much the worst part about it is
not having it, besides the work aspect (for
us), a lot of people look forward to it,” said
Mr Knowles. “It’s just a good time.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

RG ea a ee ee

REAL ESTATE CONTROVERSY

Lawyer: Stephen’s Close subdivision case
totally different from Exuma land dispute

LAWYER Desmond Edwards,
who represented the developer
in the Stephen’s Close subdivi-
sion — approved in principle by
government, but later stopped —
said his client’s case.was not the
same as the Exuma land case
recently decided by Mr Justice
John Lyons.

Handing down his judgment
in a contract dispute involving a
40-acre subdivision in Exuma, Mr
Justice Lyons held that Bahamian
courts could not “enforce” con-
tracts for the sale of lots in subdi-
visions that had not been fully
approved because to do so would
breach the Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act. He warned all
subdivision and real estate devel-
opers and their lawyers, that
according to the Act’s wording,
selling subdivision lots without
full approval was “a criminal
offence.”

Mr Edwards maintained that
his client’s subdivision was not
the same as the Exuma case.
“The facts and circumstances in
the Exuma case are totally and
demonstrably different from the
facts relating to Stephen’s Close,”
he said.

“In the Exuma case,” said Mr
Edwards, “there was absolutely
no infrastructure in place. In the
Stephen’s Close matter, there was
considerable infrastructure in
place.”

On the other hand, he said,
“the lots in the Exuma case were
sold from an architectural plan
’ of lots; the tract of land was unde-

veloped; and the applicable laws
‘governing subdivisions were
under the Private Roads and Sub-
divisions Act (Out Island), 1956,
Chapter 257.”
However, said Mr Edwards,
“in the Stephen Close develop-
ment, the roads were formed and

graded, electrical infrastructure .

was partially completed, the lots
were surveyed and marked,
approximately 50 per cént of the
lots lay on an existing road, and
construction of homes were at
completion stage.”

He said his client, Ms Denise
Burrows, the developer of
Stephen’s Close, “purchased a

tract of land in March 2004 for
the development and sale of
home packages. The property,
which emanated from a Certifi-
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Mr Edwards said that with
“this considerable level of devel-
opment in place, lots were sold
by the developer and mortgages
were granted by the purchasers’
banks pursuant to and based on
an ‘approval in prin-
ciple’ which was pre-
viously granted on
September 15, 2004.”

Mr Edwards said
that this type of
approval has been
generally accepted as
sufficient authority to
commence develop-
ment and the sale of
lots by way of “cus-
tom and usage” by
the legal profession °
and financial institutions for
almost 50 years.

“In Section 5 of the Private
Roads and Subdivisions Act,
1961, Chapter 256,”. he said, “it
does not distinguish between an
‘approval in principle’ and a ‘final

approval’. The Act only refers to °

‘approval.’ Consequently, it has
been general practice in the legal
and banking community to accept
a subdivision ‘approval in princi-
ple’ as the basis for the sale of
lots in a subdivision.”

During the Christie, adminis-
tration, said Mr Edwards, the
Ministry of Works granted the
“approval in principle” to
Stephen Close developer, Ms
Burrows. The Ministry later
issued a stop order.

“This stop order was made,”
Mr Edwards explained, “because

of incorrect positioning of elec-

3k





Dion Foulkes

“In the Exuma case, there was
absolutely ‘no infrastructure in
place. In the Stephen’s Close

matter, there was considerable
infrastructure in place.”

&

trical poles, the re-positioning of
the existing road which emanated
from a boundary dispute between
the original developer and an
adjoining developer, and other
technical issues connected to the
development of the subdivision.”

The financing institution

. involved in the transaction, said

Mr Edwards, is in possession of
all the relevant deeds and infor-
mation, and is working with the
developer in an
attempt to reach a
resolution so that the
subdivision can be
completed and the lot
owners can take pos-
session of their
homes.

who bought lots in
the subdivision have
complained about the
apparent lack. of
progress, claiming



Eleven persons. °

that they are paying off loans on -

partially built homes in the sub-
division.

One of them, Shaaron Davis,
who was represented by lawyer
Dion Foulkes when he was in pri-
vate practice and before he
became a Cabinet minister,
claimed that Mr Foulkes had kept
the $50,000 that he had given him
to purchase property in the sub-
division.

Mr Foulkes denied this. He
said the money was forwarded to
Ms Burrows, the developer, and a
“conveyance was duly executed.”

“My former law firm,” he said
at the time, “is totally blameless.
Mr Davis has good and legal title
to the lots. Their case is against

.-the developer.”

The matter then turned politi-
cal. In late 2007 former cabinet
minister Bradley Roberts, who

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a

‘Desmond Edwards

was minister of works, and Omar
Archer, who ran for chairman of
the PLP, called for Mr Foulkes’
resignation.

Last week two of the clients
— one of Mr Edward’s clients
and Mr Davis, Mr Foulkes’ client
— claimed that the police were
afraid to pursue the matter

because of the personalities —

involved.

Mr Edwards denied this. “As a
result of complaints made to the
Police,” he said, “I have on behalf
of the developer, fully cooperated
with the police investigation and
have provided them with all the
relevant documents and informa-
tion in this matter.”

‘In a lengthy statement to police
explaining the delays and sup-
ported by documents, Mr

Edwards said that “communica-

tion between the Ministry of
Works, the vendor’s attorney and
the developer has been taking
place to unravel the situation. The
developer also met with the home

buyers to assure them that their

dream of owning their homes is
not denied, but delayed.”

Mr Edwards then added:

“As you will note, the matter
took on a political bent, when the
former Minister of Works,
Bradley Roberts chose to inter-
meddle. /

“These home buyers had
sought the assistance of Mr
Roberts during his tenure as Min-
ister of Works, but he failed to

assist in bringing any resolution to ©

. the problem then, which proves
that-his belated interest is purely
political. .

“You will also-note that this
matter has no criminal implica-
tions from the facts disclosed,,and
is therefore a civil matter,”

THE TRIBUNE

Developer trying to
get ‘fair solution’ for
clients with mortgages

AFTER a long silence, the Stephen Close developer has told
clients saddled with mortgages for controversial property in her
subdivision, that she is doing her best to get “a fair solution to

what has been a difficult situation for them.”

Lawyers have been blamed for failing to represent clients
who ended up tens of thousands of dollars in debt after taking out
mortgages to buy property in a subdivision that did not have final

- approval from the PLP government to continue.

The controversy resurfaced recently when Mr Justice John
Lyons ruled in an Exuma case that Bahamian courts could not
“enforce” contracts for the sale of lots in subdivisions that had not
been fully approved because to do so would breach the Private
Roads and Subdivisions Act.

Ms Denise Burrows issued a statement over the weekend to
outline her continuing efforts to resolve the land dispute in the
subdivision and clear up “various inaccuracies and misleading
statements made by others regarding this issue.”

“T know,” she said, “that this matter has been extraordinari-
ly difficult for many of my clients. But I wish to assure them that
I have acted in good faith. Indeed my ultimate responsibility is to
ensure that this matter is brought to an equitable conclusion for

my clients.”
She said she purchased a tract
“I know that this of land from another developer in

matter has been - early 2004. She then obtained

. -,. . Approval in Principle from the
extraordinarily § | Ministry of Works to proceed with

. difficult for many developing that tract into a subdi-

vision known as Stephen's Close.

After obtaining the approval
and in conjunction with the original
developer, significant sums were
invested in infrastructural devel-
opment inclusive. of land clearing
and surveying and the forming and grading of the road.

Additionally, electrical installations and paving of the main
road were partly completed, she said.

“Consequent to a Ministry of Works stop order in 2005,” she
said, “I met with the Town Planning Board to discuss what
efforts I needed to undertake to have the said order lifted as expe-
ditiously as possible. Towards this end I undertook various
efforts to resolve the matter.

“For a period of time I paid interest and/or rent to my clients.
Since the stop order I have worked almost daily to fulfil the
requirements necessary to bring this matter to completion, includ-
ing additional design. work.

“Moreover, I have submitted all of the legal documents relat-
ing to the subdivision and my clients to the financing institution.
Through my attorney I am currently in talks with that institution
to bring a resolution to this matter.

“First, it should be noted that following the stop order the
financial institution suspended payments by all clients whose
houses.were under construction.

“Throughout this process I have been in contact with my
clients, worked diligently with my lawyer, the Ministry of Works
and the financial institution to bring resolution to these mat-
ters. :
“I will continue my efforts until my clients are satisfied that
they have received a fair solution to what has been a difficult sit-

of my clien

ie ee ed
Denise Burrows

' uation for them.”



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COTED meeting to
fliscuss tourism,
transportation

A SPECIAL Meeting of |
CARICOM Council for :

Trade and Economic Devel-
opment will be held in Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad and Toba-
go on September 18.

The meeting will be held
to discuss tourism and trans-
portation/ civil aviation.

The Twenty-Eighth Spe-

cial COTED will be con- |

vened to fulfill a mandate
given by the heads of gov-
ernment of CARICOM to
develop recommendations
on a regional tourism mar-
keting campaign.

The recommendations are
to include a budget, a
method of funding and a
time-line for implementation.

At the 29th meeting of the
conference of heads of gov-
ernment in Antigua and Bar-

buda in July, the heads of

government also ee
that a special meeting of the
COTED be convened to
address the implementation
of decisions taken and the
outstanding matters relating |
to tourism and regional and
international transportation. :

The establishment of a

CARICOM ministerial |

organ for tourism, the pro-

motion and development of
airline hubs, and possibilities :

for a single air space, are
among the issues that are to
be discussed.

The ministerial meeting

will be preceded by a

preparatory meeting of offi- :

cials today.

Franklyn G Ferguson

THE damage inside the court building.



Minister calls for national waste -
- disposal and cleanliness campaign

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

ENVIRONMENT Minister
Earl Deveaux yesterday called
for the immediate implementa-
tion of a national waste disposal

- and cleanliness campaign.

With the Bahamas continually
redefining itself in an effort to
become established within the
global market, Mr Deveaux,
along with State Minister Phenton
Neymour, told ministry person-

aa thinking is needed!’ in
ee EN TA Bas

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

MINISTER of Environment Earl Deveaux says that “informed
thinking” is what is needed in the planning of a modern National
Emergency Policy, intended to minimise the level to which the
local eco-system is affected by pollution. .

According to the minister, his vision for various agencies and
departments within the ministry includes:

¢ the introduction of a waste-to-energy recycling initiative

e the implementation of new building standards

¢ the formulation of research to evaluate the ne of climate

, change

the development of strategies of lifestyle changes should glob-

‘al warming affect the Bahamas

e the establishment of a Bahamas Maritime Institute with the

University of the Bahamas.

° the establishment of an efficient docks committee .

e the safeguarding of ground water resources

° the production of local trees for landscaping all public places

Most notably, the minister said: “For BEC we would like to see
the conversion of the Bahamas to an energy mix which results in
greater energy security, through the-use of renewable resources, and

a sound energy policy.’

The minister added that for these and other initiatives to be ful-
ly effective in the reduction of.pollution and in the preservation of
natural resources, it is crucial that all Bahamians take part.

“If we do not engage the Bahamian public, and if we do not

relentlessly ensure that the Bahamian public accept responsibility |

for the grime, and the filth, and the waste that populate our

national floor and marine environment, we will fail,”

ister.

said the min-



nel yesterday that it is important
to not only understand the sig-
nificance of the Ministry of Envi-
ronment, but to also strive to
establish ways to balance envi-

ronmental preservation with

infrastructural development. |

During the. ministry’s first offi-
cial forum since it was established
in July of this year, Mr Deveaux
highlighted a number of initia-
tives which are a part of his over-
all vision statement for the Min-
istry for Environment.

“It is a vision that seeks to

manage the natural resource

endowment of the Bahamas in a
way to produce lasting employ-
ment and prosperity, propelled
by the global demand in areas

_ such as agriculture, tourism, com-

mercial fishing, sport fishing,

- forestry, bio-technology, renew-

able energy, and do it all in an
environmentally friendly way,”
Mr Deveaux said.

“I would like to see an imme-
diate national waste disposal and
cleanliness campaign implement-
ed. And I'd like to see waste to
energy production with recycling,
and re-use implemented.”

Mr Neymour told the forum’s

attendees that the issue of energy
is a political hot topic, not only in’

the United States, but also here in
the Bahamas
“That is why it is critical that

-we continue our hard work on a_
National Energy Policy: (NEP),
~ and we must inform the public of

how this NEP affects all govern-
mental agencies and ministries,”
he said.

Included under the umbrella

of the Ministry of Environment’

are the Department of Meteorol-
ogy; the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services (DEHS);
the Bahamas Environment, Sci-
ence and Technology Commis-
sion (BEST); the Department of

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Heavy rain ‘causes water —
damage’ in court building

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

EXTENSIVE water damage from a leaking
roof in Senior Justice Anita Allen's court has cre-
ated cumbersome working conditions for Supreme
Court officers.

According to sources, heavy rains the night
before last flooded the building, causing haz-
ardous working conditions and significant water

. damage.

A Tribune photographer was on scene to cap-
ture the damage in the office, where documents
were being stored in boxes, evidently for safe-
keeping.

Earlier this year, Justice Allen's courtroom,
located in the Hansard Building, was deemed
unfit to,be occupied by a Ministry of Works
inspector after it was determined that a portion of
the floor was "sinking".

The Ministry of Works recommended that Jus-

Earl Deveaux



trades

Physical Planning; the forestry
section; the Botanical Gardens;
the Bahamas Electrical Corpora-
tion; the Water and Sewerage ©
Corporation; the Bahamas

National Geographic Information
System (BNGIS); the Bahamas
Maritime Authority (BHA), and
the Port Department where the
ministry is eaten

iw.





tice Allen's court be moved to an alternate loca-
tion; however she is still hearing cases in the same
building.

"What happened was that heres was portion
of the floor that was having problems and we
sent our engineers to investigate. A portion of
the floor was sinking and it was a possibility that
the floor joist needed to be replaced," Ministry of
Works director Gordon Major told.The Tribune

yesterday. -

"But we were setting about to do was to have an
independent engineer do an analysis just to deter-
mine what we were recommending was correct
(but) that hasn't been done yet".

He said the building is not up to standards and
is unsafe.

"We realised that it needed to be addressed, I

‘think they were looking for suitable alternate

space to be used for courts," said Mr Major, who —
was surprised to learn Justice Allen was still hear-
ing cases in the building.

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Police are
investigating
murder on

Grand Bahama |

FROM page one

According to reports, the :
stabbing occurred at the Pepper :
Pot Takeaway Restaurant on ;
East Sunrise Highway last Fri- :

day.

stabbed at the Pepper Pot.

When uniformed and plain-

clothes officers arrived at the

scene, they saw the victim
bleeding profusely from stab :

wounds to his upper back.

EMS personnel were dis- }
patched to the scene and took
the victim to the Trauma Sec- :
tion at the Rand Memorial :
Hospital, where his condition :

was described.as critical.

Police were later notified by
hospital officials that the young :
man had died of his injuries ;

around 3pm Friday .

According to reports, the :
deceased was at the Pepper Pot :
when a vehicle pulled up with :
two male occupants. The pas- :
senger engaged in aconfronta- :
tion with the deceased and }
stabbed hirh several times in ;

the back.

The suspects fled in the vehi- :
cle. Anyone with information :
that can assist the police with :
their investigation is asked to :

' call CDU at 350-3107/8.

As a

Supt Rahming said sometime :
around 1.12am on September :
12, police received information :
that a young man had just been :

privately-owned,

- Moored commercial barge
creates ‘hazard and eyesore’

_FROM page one

The Port Department gave

_ the company permission to

use the waterway on a tem-
porary basis when a storm
warning came into effect for
the Bahamas as Tropical
Storm Hanna approached.
But attorney Tracy Fergu-
son maintains that the barge’s
continued presence in the res-
idential waterway is unjusti-
fied as all storm and hurricane
warnings for the Bahamas
have long been dropped.
Despite this all attempts
thus far to get Devcon to

move the vessel have failed.

and she is afraid that if it
remains in the waterway it has
the potential to come loose
and cause massive damage to
hers and neighbouring homes.

“If your intention was only
to take shelter, why are you

‘still in our. waterway now

becoming a nuisance to the
residents as well as a threat?.
Whoever gave the permission
surely did not give it indefi-

nitely,” said Ms Ferguson.

Devcon is currently con-
tracted by Albany to under-
take dredging work related to
their proposed marina. The

mid-sized

Bahamian Company and the authorized
Caterpillar dealer in the Bahamas, we
are seeking an Electrical Technician. The
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THE DEVCON VESSEL, described by Coral Harbour homeowner Tracy eau as around 200 feet long
‘and 75 feet wide, has been moored opposite her,property in the Flamingo waterway since August 28.

barge has numerous pieces of
‘heavy equipment on board.

Ms Ferguson said: “It is
unfair that Devcon does what
it wants to protect its million
dollar vessel but my invest-
ment should face jeopardy
without opposition.”

She suggests that Devcon
had “ample time to make
_proper legitimate and legal
arrangements to take shelter”
somewhere else where it
would have been safe from the
storms but sees the company
as having “for economic rea-

”

sons,
Coral Harbour instead.

“It’s like they’re saying, “To
hell with everybody’,” Ms Fer-
guson said.

After writing to Devcon to
express her displeasure, Dev-
con’s attorney, Gail Lockhart
Charles, proposed in a Sep-
tember 5th response that Ms
Ferguson “adopt a more char-
itable attitude” in light of the
pending storms.

The Devcon representative
also denied her request to give
a written undertaking that it

chosen to come to.

would cover the costs of any
damage that could result from
its barge being in the water-
way.

With the storms long’ passed
Ms Ferguson said, her “lack
of charity, as (Lockhart

Charles) put it, is fortifying

into something else: Anger.”

. An e-mail to Ms Lockhart
Charles indicating her posi-.

tion, has had no response.
Ms Ferguson said that never
in the 38 years that her moth-
er, who owns property. near
to her. own, has lived in Coral

Harbour has “a vessel of this
size ever attempted, let alone
been allowed, to moor in this
waterway.”

Herbert Bain, the official at
the Port Department who told

_ Devcon to moor inside Coral

Harbour, told Ms Ferguson
that his directions were that
it should do so in a “dead
end” area and not in front of
people’s homes.

Ms Ferguson said she has
been informed that the owner
of the undeveloped lot oppo-
site hers — in breach of the
rules that govern the develop-

’ ment — is-charging Devcon

to keep their vessel moored
there and does not appear to
object to the situation as does
she and other residents.

Tyrone Mckenzie, vice. pres-
ident at Albany, denied yes-
terday that his company has
anything to do with the con-
tinued mooring of the vessel in
Flamingo Waterway.

He said he has been
informed that during the
storm expatriate workers on
the barge left the country and
have yet to return to continue
their work.

“They were supposed to
move the vessels as soon as
the storm was passed. We said
basically the flak we are going
to get for this means they have
to do that. But quite frankly

a are a private company
whatever arrangement
they have with the individual
who owns the land is a private
matter.”

A message left for Ms Lock-
hart Charles was not returned
up to press time yesterday.

‘Firebomb’ set off

at court building

FROM page one

Court officials said that they believed
that the incident may have occurred Sun-
day night.

Speaking briefly with The Tribune yes-

terday Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
- said he hopes to have security measures
stepped up to ensure that such incidents

do not occur.

“We had a similar incident six weeks
ago on Nassau Street where someone
tried to cause a fire in court number 11.
It only affected the blinds it didn’t
spread, they threw it through the win-
dow,” Magistrate Gomez said.

"There have also been prior incidents

FROM page one

_ of courts being burned down. Court 6

was burnt down a few years ago. -.
“There were some prior attempts to
burn the courts on Nassau Street, that
was burnt down a couple of years ago
and they had to refurbish it.
“Arson is a common threat now
around the courts,” he said.

Magistrate Gomez said he did not
know much about the apparent arson
attempt on Court 8, only.that it appeared
as though sometime Sunday. night some-
one attempted to set fire to the door of
the court.

“In this profession you have to be

careful, you get threats sometimes. One
of the things we hope to address with

the new courts is that we will have secu-
rity cameras set up and it will be much
easier to watch because all of the courts
will be in one building but as they are
now: they are spread all over and it is
much harder to watch all of them,” Mag-
istrate Gomez said.

Magistrate Gomez said he hopes to
have security cameras installed to deter
such activity.

However, he could not say when the
security measures would be implement- |
ed.

Police press liaison officer ASP Wal-
ter Evans confirmed yesterday that the
matter is currently under police investi-

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“burst” him across the head
with beer bottles.

Mr Smith, who lives 50 feet
away from where he was

‘attacked, was able to briefly

escape his attackers and
run for his life towards his
home.

The men chased him said as
he reached his front door one
took out a cutlass and
“chopped his shoulder.”

The attackers then turned

their attention to Mr Smith’s

24-year-old man in custody in
connection with weekend murder

25-year-old wife, Tamara
Smith.

They stabbed her twice in
her back when she came out
to see what was going on.

Mr Smith bled to death in .
the front room of his home as,

his children stood by, said one
witness. However, police

reported that Mr Smith died
shortly after he and his wife
were taken to hospital for
treatment.

In an allegedly misdirected
act of retaliation, the homes of
two Haitian families were
burnt to the ground, leaving
them with nothing.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 9





PHARMACY
PROFESSIONALS

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LOCAL NEWS

BA's Nassau flights moving
to Heathrow’s Terminal 5

BRITISH Airways’ Nassau
flights will move to the new state-
of-the-art Terminal 5 at London
Heathrow Airport on September
17:

“We are pleased to offer our
Nassau, Providenciales and Cay-
man customers an enhanced trav-
el experience in Terminal 5,” said
Diane Corrie, British Airways
commercial manager for the
Caribbean.

“The terminal has now been
open since March 27, 2007. More
than six million people have expe-
rienced its state-of-the-art sys-
tems and luxury amenities and
we believe Terminal 5 will exceed
the expectations of our passen-

gers travelling this route,” she.

said.

The service from London to.

Nassau was scheduled to start fly-
ing out of Terminal 5 earlier this
year, but a major glitch in the
baggage handling system, which

.cost British Airways tens of mil-

lions of dollars, delayed the move.

Covering a space as large as
London’s Hyde Park, British Air-
ways’ London Heathrow Termi-
nal 5 was designed to redefine air
travel by replacing queues,

’ crowds and stress with space, light

and calm.

The £4.3 billion ($7.7 million)

building, designed by the Richard
Rogers Partnership, features floor
to ceiling windows and views of
the runways, aircraft, countryside



HEATHROW’S Terminal 5

and even Windsor Castle and
Wembley Stadium.

Terminal 5 offers 96 check-in
kiosks designed to eliminate
queuing. The rapid transit system
connection between the two
buildings moves passengers and a
new super-efficient baggage sys-
tem is designed to minimise wait-

._ ing times for baggage collection

when passengers land.

The environmentally friendly
Terminal 5 also boasts the largest
airline lounge complex in the
world, large enough to cater to
2,500 passengers, along with an

. extensive range of dining options.

Travellers can enjoy shopping
at stores such as Harrods, Coach,
Prada, and well-known British
stores. Terminal 5 is built on
reclaimed land from previous
sludge works. Among green ini-

tiatives already in place at Ter:
minal 5 are the collection and re-

_ use of rainwater for non-potable

uses. Additionally, a 85 per cent
of heating for Terminal 5 is sup-
plied by excess heat produced
from the Heathrow heat and
power station, piped through an
underground tunnel.
Landscaping includes 30,000
native woodland plants and 4,000
trees arid shrubs, while smarter
runway and airport design mean

aircraft engines idle less, reducing
‘ emissions. “Whether departing,

arriving or connecting through,
to travel with British Airways and
to fly from or to Terminal 5, is to
change the way you fly forever.
We’re proud to be a global air-

Jine, connecting people, places,

cultures and businesses,”
pone!

said Ms

Be 3315 eel

PRIME LOCATIONS NOW AVAILABLE.
. © Residential Lots 60 x 100 - $80,000

e Residential Corner Lots 64 x 100 -

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¢ Duplex Lots 9976 Sq Ft - $130,000
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e Estate Size Lots - $250,000

Financing Available - Only 5% Down

DON’T DELAY CALL JIMMY K
PH:322-8588/356-0466 OR 477-7757 |

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd, a subsidiary of EFG International,
provides Private Banking and Wealth Management services to clients around -
the world. Our client relationship officers combine their strong relationship-
management. skills with the resources that are available at EFG, helping
them provide a full range of quality wealth management services. In order to
strengthen our IT team in Nassau, we are ooking for a qualified candidate for

the following position:

IT Systems Engineer

In this: challenging position, your responsibilities will include:

¢ Support and management of Windows servers, including domain.
controllers, application and Exchange Server 2003.
Support Citrix Metaframe and other Enterprise applications.
Ongoing system administration of the Windows Server infrastructure
services including Active Directory, DHCP, DNS, and WINS.
Support and manage Window XP desktops and laptors; including °
all user application support.
Create server and network documentation and generate reports
for internal and audit review. ;
Manage network security systems for LAN/WAN and VoIP

integration.

Troubleshoot network-related performance problems.
Provide technical support to local and remote users in regional
offices including Grand Cayman, Canada and Central/South

America.

Review and maintain disaster recovery plan.

You will be expected to be a self-starter, time oriented individual with good time
management and project management skills as well as Good interpersonal and
communications skills. The successful candidate must be a team player, with
the ability to travel and work with local and international team members.

Minimum Requirements.

At least 4 — 6 years experience in Network/Server Infrastructure with

troubleshooting experience in O/S, network, database technologies and

server hardware in a medium to large scale environment.

. B.S. Information Systems, Computer Science or related field

Strong analytical and problem solving skills with the willingness and

capability of multi-tasking effectively.

A background in the financial services industry (Retail and/or Private

Banking) will be a plus.

Advanced knowledge in;
* Operating Systems; Windows (2000, Server 2003 and XP) and

LINUX/UNIX.

Network Infrastructure Management (TCP/IP, DHCP, DNS, WINS,

Citrix)

* WAN Technologies (Circuits, routers, firewalls)
* LAN (Switches, structured cabling) and PBX

Cisco Certified Network Associate desirable.
Proficient in Data Centre management.

Certifications a plus (MCP, CCNA, MCSE, Servert) —





FAUE 1U, |UESUAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 IHE PHIBUiwe



| TUESDAY EVENING ; SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

7:30 8:00



NETWORK CHANNELS
Florida Roadtrip |The Forgetting: A Portrait of Alzheimer’s Despite advances in Where We Stand: America’s

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\(CC) abducted from a coffee shop.














Access Holly- |The Biggest Loser: Families (Season Premiere) Four husband-and-wife |Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

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Miller’s

sporting

solution
to help
fight -
crime

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH all the crime and
violence taking place in the
country, Bahamas Olympic
Association (BOA) president
Wellington Miller says he
may have an answer to help
alleviate the problem.

Miller said one of the best
ways to help to fight crime is
to get more young men
involyed in sporting activi-
ties so that they can have a
heaiihier environment to
‘yent their frustrations.

“During this weekend, I
was thinking about the two

"recent murders and three
persons who were killed in
the car accident and I was
thinking that it would be

good if we can start encour- -

aging sports leaders in their
community,” he said.

“At one time, that was the
norm for the sports leaders
to take the forefront in
encouraging persons in their
community to get more
involved in sports.”

Miller, who is also. presi-
dent of the Amateur Boxing
Federation of the Bahamas,
said the BOA is going:'to take
the initiative and make their
contribution to the develop-
ment. of sports in various
communities. :

He noted that in short
order, the BOA will host a
series of sports rallies in com-
munities such as the “Big
Yard” © and. Cordeaux
Avenue where they will be
encouraging all of the core
sports involved in the asso-
ciation to participate.

- “As you know, sports is a
very, very good alternative,”
Miller pointed out. “It disci-
plines you, it gives you a
healthy body and a’strong
mind. It helps you to stay
away from negative things.”

Having attended the
XXIX Olympic Games last
month in Beijing, China,
where he watched the
Jamaican dominance in ath-
letics, Miller said the public
should be aware of the fact
that two of their stars, Usain

‘ Bolt and Sherry-Ann Fraser,
came from areas that have
been infested by crime. |,

‘He said if they could have
been transformed into the
top male and female sprint-
ers at the Olympics, he does-
n’t.see why the Bahamas
can’t produce its own share
of world-beaters by the next
Olympics - slated for Lon-
don in 2012.

“Tf the. people in the com-
munity can take on the lead
and show the youngsters that
there is a better way through
sports, we can see a more
vibrant country on the inter-
national scene again,” he
said. ce

As a result of Bolt’s incred-
ible feat in Beijing, Miller
said the sprinter is now a mil-
lionaire. And he said Fraser
should ‘be handsomely
rewarded when the Olympic
celebrations are held in
Jamaica starting on October
3. .
“It’s just no limit to what

could be done,” Miller
stressed. “You never know
what to expect from your
involvement in sports. So I
think it’s time for us as the
Olympic Association and
sporting bodies to walk
through these communities
and hold sports rallies to
encourage more Bahamians
to get involved in sports.”

SEE page 13

THE TRIBUNE









Ranger's show they

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter.’

n a series that was pushed to
its five- game limit, the Real
Deal Rangers captured the
Bahamas Government
Departmental Basketball
Association (BGDBA) championship
for the second time in the last three

' years.

The Rangers closed out the series

_ with a 79-75 win over the Bamboo

Shack Aces to take the series 3-2 on
Saturday night at the Kendal G L
Isaacs Gymnasium in the season finale.

Ian Pinder stepped up when it mat-

MINISTER Bannister speaks w
Chinese Ambassador Hu Ding
Xian and first secretary Tan Jian to
discuss the way forward...

(

BOA expects
Team Bahamas’
welcome-home
celebrations to
‘go very well) |
says Miller...

See Page 13

are the ‘real deal’

Close out series with 79-75 win over Bamboo

Shack Aces to capture BGDBA championship

tered most, leading the Rangers and all
scorers, scoring 30 points in the close-.

out game.
Kevin McPhee chipped in with 22
while Brandon Ingraham added 19.

Mark Hanna led the Aces with 25.

while Valentino Richardson, slowed
considerably by injury, was limited to

18. Lamont Bain added 16.
The depth of the Rangers’ bench

and the performances of their role’

players like Scooter Reid and Sonny
Miller proved to be the difference in

thé series and one of the key factors in |

the championship series.
. The series proved to be a matchup

of the top teams in the league, evident
of its back and forth natyre, neither

team won consecutive games and the’

largest margin of victory was just eight
points.
The teams split the first four games

SEE page 13

}



~ambassador to ‘discuss.

matters of mutual interest’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

- bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Sports Desmond
Bannister, after traveling to the
XXIX Olympic Games in Beijing,
China, is eager to continue a rela-
tionship with the Chinese here in
the Bahamas.

At his office yesterday, Minis-
ter Bannister and Archie Nairn,
the permanent secretary, met with
Chinese Ambassador Hu Ding
Xian and first secretary Tan Jian to
discuss the way forward.

“After our successful visit to
China, we are delighted that we
can sit with you and discuss matters
of mutual interest,” Bannister said.

“I want to thank you for provid-
ing us the opportunity while in Chi-
na to meet with the All China
Youth Federation, which was a
very productive meeting.”

As a result of the meeting, Ban-
nister said there are many ways in
which both countries can come
together for the betterment of

“Through these games, China
has shown to the world that it
is a peaceful country, it’s not
a threat to anyone and it’s a
country with a great heritage
and it is moving forward...”

— Chinese Ambassador Hu Ding Xian

sports and youth.

“We are looking forward to con-
tinuing to work with you,” he said.

Now that he and Nairn are back
home, Bannister said they want to
get on the ball right away to discuss
their further relationship with Chi-
na.

When asked about the much
anticipated proposed national sta-
dium and reconstruction of the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Center,
Bannister said those matters are

also on their agenda for discussion.

“We are looking forward to con-
tinued dialogue on those issues,”
he said.

Not only did he view the games,
but Bannister said he had a chance
to walk on the Great Wall of Chi-
na and was able to purchase a
unique straw hat as a reminder of
the trip for years to come.

Bannister said the Chinese won
the most gold medals ever at the
Olympics and their athletes per-



formed exceptionally well. And he
said the performance of Team
Bahamas was just as exceptional,
adding that he was happy that the
two countries have been able to



meet now that the games are over.

Ding Xian said he was elated to
meet with Minister Bannister. “I
am very glad to be here with the
honourable minister and I am very
glad that he and the permanent
secretary had a very good time in
Beijing.”

He said the Bahamian govern-
ment provided a lot of support to
help China to provide an opportu-
nity to display to the world that
they can host the games.

“Through these games, China
has shown to the world that it is a



peaceful country, it’s not a threat
to anyone and it’s a country with a
great heritage and it is moving for-
ward,” he said.

Ding Xian said with the diplo-
matic ties established between the
two countries, they will continue
to discuss ways in which they can
further enhance their,relationship.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

| Minister meets with Chinese



‘
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4

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Forrest clobbers Mora for the
win by unanimous decision

Takes WBC super welterweight championship belt

AY CSTE MEO) Wee cere Ba (0 AN
from Vernon Forrest during the
ninth round of their 12 round
WBC super welterweight title
match in Las Vegas Saturday...

VERNON FORREST celebrates victory by unanimous
decision over Sergio Mora...

Sti NO\ mel stat eo mom elnrensaect
body blow to Sergio Mora in the
seventh round...

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SERGIO MORA (left) is knocked down by Vernon For-
rest in the seventh round

(





TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 13



LOCAL SPORTS

Miller’s

sporting

solution

to help
fight

crime—|-

FROM page 11

With the country filled
with so many former athletes
who have competed on the
international level in the var-
ious sports, Miller said it’s
their goal to encourage a lot
of them to give back to the
BOA’s initiative by coming
out and sharing their person-
al experiences.

“We want to get them
involved by telling: what it’s
like to be representing your
country, what it feels like to
have the Bahamas placed
across your chest, what it
feels like to march in the
parade and what it feels like
to have the national anthem
or the flag raised at the
games,” Miller said.

“What a feeling. That is
what ‘we want to encourage
them to do because I believe
that we can find a lot more
athletes and have a good pro-
gramme for the next
Olympics. We have good
qualified coaches. It’s just a
matter of getting the people
committed to getting
involved in the sports.”

Miller said this is a way for
those persons to make their

parents and family proud and -

even the country proud.

- “T really want to. start. this
programme soon because I
believe that the time is right,”
Miller projected. “We just
need to let them know that
the world is much bigger than
just living through their cor-
ner,

“We want them to come

and travel. with-us. Let them: :.|:

sit down with some of these
top athletes and hear how
they got to where they are
and what are they doing to
make-sure that they are
ready to compete at the next
games.”

BOA expects Team



P= WELLINGTON MILLER
says the BOA is making
progress in the right
direction

Â¥
,

Bahamas’

welcome-home celebrations
to ‘go very well,’ says Miller

@ By BRENT STUBBS '
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net_.

BAHAMAS Olympic Association
president Wellington Miller says the
BOA expects that the welcome-home
celebrations for Team Bahamas’
Olympians “will go very well.”

With the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture preparing for the celebrations
next month, he said two BOA officers
have been designated to work on the
organising committee.

The ministry has not yet released the
official dates or details of the celebra-
tions.

“That’s going good,” Miller said. “We
expect that it will go very well.”

While it has been less than two months
since the new executive board took office,
Miller said they are making progress in

the right direction.

“Everybody is upbeat and we have

. been having meetings and we hope to
have an all-day meeting on Saturday
when we really put our plan of action to
the general body,” he said.

One of the immediate goals of the asso-

- ciation, according to Miller, is to have

eltics mark 17th

the office properly staffed with a manag-
er and a secretary. He said they have a
number of résumés that they are care-

‘fully looking over before they make a

final decision. °
Meanwhile, Miller said he has been
spending some time at the office during

the day to answer any and all inquiries,

from the affiliated sporting organisations.

He noted that the other officers are
posted there during the evening. “There
are a lot of things that we are looking
at,” he said. “So Iam very happy with the
way things have been going.”

Elected on July 24, Miller said he and
his executive board found themselves
smashed into the travel of the national
team to the XXIX Olympic Games in
Beijing, China that ran from August 8-24.

‘He said secretary general Rommel
“Fish” Knowles was able to start working
right away and they had a number of per-
sons who were given some specific
responsibilities, such as vice president

‘Mike Sands, who dealt with the rein-

statement of long jumper Jackie Edwards
on the Olympic team.

Having had the opportunity to travel to

Beijing for his first official visit as presi-

dent of the BOA, Miller said he and -

NBA Championship |

Knowles are now y gearing up to bcaial to
Mexico for the Pan American Sports

Organisation meeting, slated for Octo-

ber 9-11.
“Since this is our first meeting we have
to go. there and see what the set up is all

about and what we can get from it first,” _

he said. ‘We certainly want to see what

‘ kind of help we will get and then we can

start lobbying for it.”

Miller said if the. trip-to Beijing was ©

any indication, he can’t wait to go to
Mexico. “It was very good being intro-
duced to all of the big mucks in the
Olympic movement,” he said. “It was
good. It was good.”

With the BOA being the highest sport-
ing body in the country, Miller said they
intend to have the office reflect.that, so

once they are properly set up, the sport-.

ing bodies look forward to an. efficient

organisation that will definitely make a _ :

difference.

He said that all of the officers, Who
are directly involved in the majority of
the.core sporting bodies in the country,
are all eager to get to work to turn things



around, especially after the fiasco that -

they experienced over the last two years
in getting the elections off the ground.

by bringing the trophy to Vermont



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Rangers

show they
are the
‘real deal’

when Rangers took game
one 78-74, the Aces.respond-
ed to take game two 97-89,

_ the Rangers again won game

three 92-84, and the Aces
held off elimination in game

_ four with an 88-82 win.

Tom Grant Sr, president
of the BGDBA, congratulat-
ed the Rangers on an out-
standing season and noted
their depth as the determin-
ing factor.

“They came a-really long
way...At the beginning of the ~
season they were playing
more like individuals, but
after the break they came ©
together and started to gel
more as a team,” he said.
“They stood out because of
their supporting cast. All the
teams have a few stars but
it’s how the players around
those guys and how they step
up that could decide a game
and a series.

Grant said the league
experienced growth ina very
successful season and. looks
to continue this growth in the
near future.

“This year was a great year.”
for us and J am really excited, '
about the league and its
future moving forward,” he
said. “From what we have
seen all season and especial-
ly in the championship I
think the league is ready to
move on to that next level.
The league was very well
organised this year. We com-
pleted the season in the exact
four month window we
established and the anticipa-
tion built as the vest went

~ on.”




The final three seeds of thi
playoff seeds were decided”
by tiebreakers.
’ Grant said-the association
has major plans as it moves

- forward which will include

fostering relationships with
other local leagues and seek-
ing possible schotarship -

‘opportunities for its players.

“In the near future we
hope to stage a complete all-
star weekend,” he said. “It
would be good if we would
be able to establish all-star
teams to play against the oth-
er leagues and also to play
against COB and other col-
lege teams when they come
to town. What they can do is
maybe give some of the
younger guys an opportunity
to get noticed by one of those .
schools and get a scholarship
opportunity.”



CELTICS guard Rajon Rondo holds
the NBA Championship trophy...

FANS are reflected in the NBA Championship trophy during a celebration on the Church St Marketplace yesterday in Burlington, Vermont. The Celtics celebrated their 17th NBA Cham-
pionship by bringing the trophy to Vermont...
(AP Photos: Toby Talbot)



PAGE 14, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS






JUVENTUS’ Amauri out-
jumps teammate Giorgio
Chiellini and Udinese’s
Aleksandar Lukovic, from
rear...

mes |
SeaRRes |
aes

en en ETE CT TS STN SSN CL TTT

ar Sele ae

emer
eet d bea

mee een



JUVENTUS’ Amauri controls the ball during the Italian
Serie A soccer match between Juventus and Udinese in
Turin’s Olympic Stadium, northern Italy, on Sunday.
Juventus won 1-0 with a goal scored by Amauri...



"JUVENTUS? Amauri (left) and teammate Mauro German
Camoranesi (second right) eye the ball...

Photos:.Aiberto Ramella & Massimo Pinca/AF



JUVENTUS’ Vincenzo laquinta (right) celedrates alter
. agoal...

JUVENTUS’ Mohamed Sissoko (background) and
Udinese’s Gokhan Inler compete for the ball...





igs

JUVENTUS’ Amauri reacts after scoring the winning 's , JUVENTUS' Christian Poulsen (right) in action with the
goal... — : Udinese’s Gokhan Inler...





THE TRIBUNE _ TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 15















4
ix
La

hwteaiaeest

rey
,
27”



;
J

L JAM TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIP

wr SSS





KWASI THOMPSON (MP
for the Pineridge) along

with Back to School Jam
tennis participants and ~
coach




FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES |








The launch of FG Capital Markets

included a Golden Opportunity to win

a $500 mutual fund certificate. Official
certificates were presented to winners

at Family Guardian's Corporate Centre.



John Bull hosts

orand opening

at Bimini Bay —
Resort






FG Capital Markets provides brokerage |
and advisory services to individual investors
and is a trading and sponsor member of BISX. »

an







PICTURED (left to right) RICK
Hazlewood, corporate director of
the John Bull Group of Companies;
Gerardo Capo, CEO of the Bimini
Bay Resort; Tamica Romer, man-
ager of the John Bull Bimini Bay
(centre, flanked by store staff);
Charity Armbrister, manager of
Family Islands, Ministry of Tourism,
and Sean Grimberg, president of
Bimini Bay esort.



BIMINI — John Bull hosted a
grand opening celebration for its
new store located at the Bimini
Bay Resort and Marina. —

Several government officials
from the Bahamas Tourism
Office as well as John Bull exec-
utives attended a ribbon-cutting
ceremony that took place on
August 29 at the store, which is .
located in the resort’s Fisherman’s
Village.

Charity Armbrister, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s general man-
ager for the Family Islands, John
Bull executives’ Rick Hazlewood
and Inga Bowleg, and president
of the Bimini Bay Resort Sean
Grimberg all gave remarks at the
event.

“The grand opening was an
exciting day for Bimini because
John Bull represents the finest in
Bahamian businesses,” said Mr
Grimberg.

“Tourists from all around the
world have enjoyed the John Bull
experience, and now they can

_ enjoy it right here in Bimini.”

John Bull, a family-owned
company since 1929, offers the
most sought-after names in jew-
elry, timepieces and other luxury
gifts including Cartier, David
Yurman, Gucci, Movado and
Mikimoto.

John Bull has also been the
official Bahamas retailer for
Rolex for more than 50 years.

The Bimini Bay Resort loca-
tion, which is the first-ever John
Bull store on the island of Bimini,
also sells luxury handbags by
Kate Spade, Dooney and Bourke
and more.

Sela a

For the stories

Lyrone Burrows, Vice President, FG Capital Markets (left) and winner
Elton Kemp Me i




Wesley Percentie, Manager, FG Capital Markets (left) and winner Sybil Allen







rs Ww 4 ed
: Oem

Obie Turnquest, Assistant Broker-Dealer/Securities Trader, FG Capital
Markets (left) and winner Janet French

“a Be 3g "ise A
Tamekia Stubbs, Investment Manager, Family Guardian (left) and winner
Vaughan Delaney



A SUBSIDIARY OF

“3 FAMGUARD

CORPORATION EIMITED

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbahamas.com

behind the news,
cE Co pI [o/s 4
on Mondays

© 2008 ADWORKS





PAGE 16, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Internationa

Coastal Cleanup Day

Bahamas taking part in
global event aimed at
stemming pollution of
marine environment





















-conne
friends and business








¢ yo

Becta

_ associates each day? —
BIC has embarked on
a public awareness
campaign “Be-Smart”



to provide you with
practical advice about
safety, privacy and
courtesy when using
your wireless phone.



Be-Smart



l Make driving your first cell-phone is not in easy reach, ‘Save all of your telephone
priority. Always let.the persons | let the call go to voicemail bers to your SIM ca
you are speaking with know yt 8 ee
you are driving and end the Syuse hands free devices

like'a bluetooth which will
allow you, to keep both hands

on the wh eel

conversation if you need to.












D Pisition your wire-

less phone within

_ easy reach. If
your









5 Dont use your phone in

Be courteous. Place your
hazardous weather conditions

phone on silent or vibrate
if you are in a meeting, a
restaurant, the cinema or in

church.














” 4 Don’t engage in
stressful or emo-
» tional con-
versa-

ae
9 Do not send text messages,
take pictures, look up numbers
of jot notes while driving






















, 6 Protect your personal
information. Lock your

screens and set
passwords



0 Make safety your most

important call. In case
of emergency dial
919.

ett
mem == NuGcEeTs Comso

BRL





LAST YEAR hundreds of volunteers gathered on several islands in The
Bahamas to take part in International Coastal Clean Up Day. All trash col-
lected was sorted and-filed by type. The data was sent to the Ocean Con-
servancy which tracks global marine debris.

VOLUNTEERS throughout the Bahamas are preparing to ‘take
part in the Ocean Conservancy’s 23rd annual International Coastal
Cleanup Day on September 20. Pat

International Coastal Cleanup Day (ICC) is the world’s largest
one-day volunteer event aimed at stemming pollution of the marine
environment. Last year, 378,000 volunteers from 76 countries and 45
states cleared six million pounds of trash from oceans and waterways
and recorded every piece of trash collected.

The ICC started as a local programme in Texas and gradually
expanded to include every major body of water in the world.

As such, it not only makes a powerful statement about global con-
cern for the environment, it also empowers local communities to do
something about pollution.

“Last year record numbers of volunteers came out to clean-up
shorelines and waterways in the Bahamas on International Coastal
Cleanup Day,” said Tanya Moss, education co-ordinator for Dolphin
Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island and national co-ordinator of Inter-
national Coastal Cleanup Day in the Bahamas.

“Volunteers collected 16,436 debris items in New Providence alone
and that is a tremendous achievement. We hope that this year even
more people volunteer to participate in this important event. There are
many ways to become involved.”

How To Participate

In Nassau - 2

Dolphin Encounters — Project BEACH will host a beach cleanup on
International Coastal Cleanup Day, Saturday, September 20, from
Jam to 2pm at Yamacraw Beach, just past Stoke’s Cabana. The pub-
lic is invited to volunteer and attend. Call Tanya Moss at 363-7180 ext
303 or 359-0278 for more information or to volunteer.

Project BEACH will also be hosting month-long Beach Buddies and
Project Green programmes with local students. Please call the educa-
tion department at 363-7180 extension 303 to co-ordinate a pro-
gramme. | :

In Abaco :

Friends of the Environment, the International Coastal Cleanup co-
ordinators for Abaco, together with the Ministry of Tourism Office in
Abaco, have organised events including beach cleanups. For more
information contact Anita Knowles at Friends of the Environment at
242-367-2721, email her at: anita@friendsoftheenvironment.org, or
visit www.friendsoftheenvironment.org.

In Grand Bahama 4

On Saturday, September 20 under the theme “Keep Grand Bahama
Beautiful”, volunteers will clean up 12 beaches and shorelines; from
8am to 1pm. Pepsi, Coke-a Cola, hotels and local government councils
are sponsoring the refreshments for the volunteers. The Ministry of
Tourism office in Grand Bahama serves as the Grand Bahama co-ordi-
nator for International Coastal Cleanup. Call Renamae Symonette at
242-352-8044 or email rsymonette@bahamas.com for more information.

All Other Islands :

Contact Tanya Moss at Dolphin Encounters for information pack-
ets on forming your own cleanups for International Cleanup Day at 363-
7180 ext 303 or 359-0278. For more or email: tanya.moss@dolphinen-
counters.com .

DousBLe STACK
ComBo

$3.99

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Bi eee ht Bo

JR. FROSTY











TUESDAY,

‘Significant change’ to
development model

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Supreme
Court ruling will °
“significantly
change how
development
occurs” in the
Bahamas by pre-
venting develop-
ers from pre-sell-
ing lots to fund
subdivision infra-
structure build-
out, a government minister yes-
terday telling Tribune Business
that regulatory oversight need-
ed to be strengthened.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, which has
responsibility for Town Plan-
ning issues, said Justice John
Lyons’ ruling that selling lots in
subdivisions which did not have
full approval was a criminal
offence would “have an effect”
on developers who sought to
parcel up their land into lots
and sell them to finance infra-
structure build-out.

yee a

As full subdivision approval is-

only given to developers who
have either lodged a perfor-



Subdivision regulation —
needs ‘stronger oversight’

mance bond with the Ministry
of Works to cover infrastruc-
ture costs should they default
on their obligations, or those
who have already put in the
necessary utilities, Justice Lyon-
s’s ruling effectively neuters this
method for financing subdivi-
sion growth.

Sources have told Tribune

Business that attorneys are like- —

ly to appeal the Justice’s ruling,

.given that lot pre-selling has

been widely used to fund real
estate development - both local
and international - for decades.
In these cases, clients who have
acquired pre-sold lots place the
funds into escrow and they are
released at certain stages as the
infrastructure work is complet-
ed. ~
“That will come under con-
siderable scrutiny as a result of
the ruling,” Dr Deveaux said of
this development method. Peo-
ple who are seeking to buy land

will ask the developer: ‘Do you .

SEE page 6B

Don’t ‘capitulate
to fearful and the

insular’ over EPA

Mi By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business. Editor

INDUSTRIES
ranging from
organic farming
to high-end fash-
ion are potential-
ly ripe export
opportunities for
Bahamian entre-
preneurs via the
Economic Part-
nership Agree- -



“Bas teen Roan #4293



Minister outlines
Opportunities on
top of current $90m
exports to Europe

ment (EPA), a government
minister said yesterday, as he
urged this nation “not to capit-
ulate to the fearful and insular”.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, said that by
signing on to the EPA agree-
ment with the European Union
(EU) next month, as the Gov-
ernment planned to do, it would
not only preserve preferential,
duty-free market access terms
for $90. million worth. of

- Bahamian exports, but also cre--
~ ate.export opportunities for oth-

er sectors.

“If you ask me, I think the -
‘Bahamas has opportunities in

organic farming,” Mr Laing told

- Tribune Business. “I think the

Bahamas has opportunities in

biofuels, given our natural envi- .
ronment, and alternative ener--

gy, to the extent that we can
ally ourselves with leading:
providers of this kind of thing.

“T think high-end crafts are

_an opportunity for us, where we |
| cater to the. upscale end of the
_ Inarket. ‘There are also high- -end

fashion opportunities for us.’
Me Laing added: There are

SEE page 4B

Wateriront property (FO.817 xq. ft.) sofidiy built 3 &edrocen 2 bath
howse plus 2-car garage and gardener's shed. Lush, mature landscape.
Lass of potential, can upgrade to become an ewotic seaside ville.
BEST VALUE ON THE SEA! NEW! PRICE $588,000. Eactissve
Ridley. Carreli@Setheiyeteallycom 242.477.7928

SEPTEMBER

EG

: SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

here is “no evi-

- dence” that major

foreign direct

investment pro-

jects are being encouraged to

adopt sustainable develop-

ment practices and use renew-

‘able resources, a Bahamian

engineering group has

warned, saying it was “imper-

ative” for the Government to

finalise its National van:
mental Policy.

A-research paper adduced
for an international confer-
ence by Bahamians David
Davis (now permanent secre-
tary in the Prime Minister’s
Office), Hammond Rahming,
Michael Diggiss and Lelawat-
tee Manoo-Rahming, said all
project
Impact Assessments (EIAs)

. needed to answer how much
their impact was. vbeing
reduced or minimised. -

“There is.no evidence that
the projects are being encour-



‘Third World’ practices hurt Bahamas

lm By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ce
Business Reporter —



THE Bahamas is attempting
to do business with first-world -
clients while still employing
third world practices, the
Bahamian Contractors Associ-
ation’s president said yesterday,

in response to a World Bank ~"

survey that highlighted the dif-

‘ficulties involved in obtaining

building permits in this nation.

Stephen Wrinkle said the
results of the survey were very
important and “brought to light
what the industry has already
known; that thereis insufficient
staffing or resources in place to
accommodate any change in
doing business”.

Mr Wrinkle said the Bahamas
must implement more efficient
operations, particularly as it
relates to the Government
approval process.

Environmental



2008 !

‘No evidence’ developers
urged to be eco-friendly

Minister says draft environmental
_ policy will not be ‘one cap fits
all’ developments

aged to minimise consump-
tion of non-renweable
resources and maximise con-
sumption of renewable
resources,” they wrote in their
paper, presented at the Con-
struction in Developing
Countries International Sym-
posium in Trinidad.

- “As an example, the
Bahamas has an abundance
of sun days, yet no project has
-been required to use solar
energy for the production of

electricity for heating water

_or air conditioning.

“The use of solar energy
minimises atmospheric emis-
sions by reducing the use of
grid power, the production of
which has negative environ-
mental impacts, especially in

He stressed
that delays in the
approval process
were extremely
costly, particular-
ly when dealing
with investors |.
spending millions
- or in some cases
billions - on a
development.

Mr. Wrinkle

ands

said that having to wait years

for all the relevant approval
processes to be completed can
drive interest payments alone
to hundreds of thousands, or
even millions, of dollars.

“Tf this happens year after
year, you cannot expect devel-
opers to just stay in the game,”
he said.

Mr Wrinkle maintained that
this “dragging of feet” is part of
the reason why the previously
estimated $50 billion in invest-
ments slated to begin in this



terms of global warming.”

.marina/resort/second home
- type of development inher-.
’ the consumption of land is an
- ernment would soon finalise

development of each Bahami-

Deveaux, minister of the envi-



)







The authors added: “The



ently utilises a substantial
amount of land. Minimising





important aspect of the draft
Environ mental Policy.......
“Tt is hoped that the Gov-






the National Environment
Policy, and that this would
lead to a master plan for the







an island that will benefit all
Bahamians.”
However,




‘Dr! “Earl




ronment, yesterday said it was

SEE page 2B








country had now nese down
to $3 billion.

“That is a tragic toss and

‘waste of resources.” He said it
also impacted the approval
process for Bahamian projects,
because alleviating the lengthy
delays in foreign direct invest-

ment approvals took away _./

human and other resources
from the local process.

Mr Wrinkle called for there
to be a greater level of collabo-
ration between the Government
and the private sector to ensure
that the process can.run more
smoothly.

The Doing Business 2009
report, published by the World

Bank and its International .

Finance Corporation (IFC)
arm, found that when it came
to overcoming the bureaucracy
and red tape that every busi-
ness in this country knows stifles

SEE page 2B

\



investment bank

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Bahamas
‘Can't sit
hack’ over

Lehman

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas
“cannot sit back
and wring its
hands” over the
fallout from the
collapse of top
Wall Street



Lehman Broth-
ers, a former
minister telling
Tribune Business
yesterday that it
could “slowdown” some resort
investment projects and force
this nation to “re-position” its
tourism industry.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance under
the Christie administration, said
the latest financial meltdown
resulting from the global cred-
it/liquidity crunch and sub-
prime mortgage binge was
“very likely” to impact an
already-struggling Bahamian
economy.

Mr Smith, now CFAL’s chair-
man, said there was going to be

P 4

Smith

. amajor “knock down” effect in -

the Bahamas and around the
world from Lehman Brothers’
decision to seek Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection after fail-
ing to find a buyer in the wake
of multi-billion dollar losses.
Besides Lehman Brothers’
bankruptcy, Mr Smith said pre-
vious developments in the US
financial markets - the bailout
of fellow investment bank Bear
Stearns, and taxpayer under-
writing of mortgage giants Fan-
nie Mae and Freddie Mac - had
increased the US fiscal deficit
and national debt.
Combined with rising oil

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

a
BEC fuel surcharge is key debate topic

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE fourth annual free legal clinic
sponsored by Halisbury Chambers is
to focus on issues as increased fuel
costs, BEC’s fuel surcharge, construc-
tion woes, real estate and crime, it was
announced yesterday.

At a press conference to announce
this years agenda, Nerissa Greene, a
partner in Halisbury Chambers, said
the topics were chosen based on the
concerns that persons raised when
coming into their offices.

“For example, we have had persons
come in and ask if they can take action

higher fuel surcharge.
Lots of companies have
been impacted by the
customs duties, for
example, and so what
we want to do is empow-
er people and give them
the information they
need for the life they
want,” she said.

Now in its fourth year,
the clinic, which com-
bines free one-on-one
consultations with the firm’s attorneys
and the guest speakers, has grown each
year.

a
seASOle A



“We see this as our way of giving
back to the community,” Ms Greene
said.

The clinic will be held on'Saturday,
October 4, begirining at 8.45 pm at the
New Providence Community Centre
on Blake Road.

Scheduled to make presentations

are Rachel Pinder, who will discuss ~

the value of getting your home
appraised, particularly in an econom-
ic climate that may be experiencing a
downturn.

She that many people think their
homes are valued at more than they
are, and in the case of persons wishing
to sell, she said she can give pointers

on actually increasing your home’s val-
ue by making small changes.
Stephen Wrinkle, president of the

. Bahamian Contractors Association,

will speak to concerns persons have
about dealing with unscrupulous con-
tractors and how to safeguard against
this.

Kevin Basden, BEC’s general man-

ager, will take the hot seat to explain

the fuel surcharges and Berchenal
Bethel, deputy comptroller, and
Charles Turner, superintendent, will
discuss the changes in Customs duty
rates.

Two other topics - the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA) and

THE TRIBUNE

the Automated Clearing House - will
be discussed by Simon Wilson, the
director of economic planning at the
Ministry of Finance, and Brian Smith,
the ACH business manager.

Work permits, permanent residen-
cy and the right to work will be dis-
cussed by Lambert Campbell, the

_ deputy director of the Department of

Immigration.

Ms Greene will speak on surviving
divorce or a husband’s death.

Rounding out the day’s presenta-
tion will be ACP Hulan Hanna, who ~
will speak about protecting children
from gangs and how to spot negative
signs in children.



‘No evidence’ developers urged to be eco-friendly

FROM page 1B

wrong to suggest that a Nation-

al Environmental Policy would
present “a one cap fits all”
guide for dealing with the envi-
ronmental impact of Bahamas-
based development projects.

All were different, he
explained, and as a result would
have different requirements to
live up to.

“We have a draft Marina pol-












Once your number is scheduled for port
have access to your voice mail and text messaging features.

BTC’s Wireless Department and Cyber World in the Mall at Marathon:
will be open starting September 8th 9:00am - 8:00pm

Last day for TDMA Nationwide is October 31st, 2008

CALL BTC 225-5282 | www.bicbahamas.com
























4 Reanald Wireless

SUBSCRIBERS

icy, we have a Wetlands policy,
we have a Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act,” Dr Deveaux
told Tribune Business.

“We have very clear environ-
mental guidelines for any devel-
opment that are specified by
science with respect to their
interaction with the marine
environment, coastal environ-
ment and the mangroves.

“To speak to a National Envi-
ronmental Policy suggests one
cap will fit ali and it won’t. The

Ministry of the Environment
Act will have a set of regula-
tions and be an evolving piece
of legislation, setting out in
descriptive terms what we plan
to do.”

The Environmental Policy
would be a “dynamic document
that addresses our specific
risks”, Dr Deveaux said, point-
ing to the Schooner Bay pro-
ject in Abaco as an example of
an environmentally friendly,
sustainable development.





| 9 By 20
y ae a - Dacre 4

| Geum e Con Ode 20 - 06



EXTENDED HOURS

Monday - - Saturday just for you!





ing you will not

“Much of what I have
described to you has been writ-
ten,” he added, stating that a
Forum scheduled for Septem-

ber 29, 2008, would present the:

environmental legislation and
National Energy Policy to the
public for review and feedback.

They are badly needed. The
Bahamian authors, in their
paper, wrote: “Currently, sus-
tainability and green design
concepts are not integral to the
Bahamian built environment.

4



‘But with approximately $20 bil-
lion worth of current and pro-_

jected foreign ‘direct invest-
ments for the Bahamas, no one
can afford to ignore. the issue
of sustainable development........

“Minimising the consumption
of water is another area that
deserves special attention. In
order to meet the water needs
of these mega developments,
the Bahamas is heavily investing

in reverse osmosis facilities, but

[these] have ‘embedded

increased energy consumption
and operating costs.”

Urging the Government to
encourage water conservation
and recycling, as well as upgrad-

ing the water supply, the
research paper’s authors also
expressed concern about the

, harmful discharge of liquids into

the ecosystem.
“Most of the Bahamas is at

sea level with a very high water

table, and a significant portion
of the total land area is made up
of wetlands, especially man-
groves,” the paper warned.

“Tt is an accepted fact that
mangroves are the nurseries for
most marine life. Any pollution
of the ecosystem, through the

discharge of harmful liquid

effluents, will have an adverse
effect on the groundwater as
well as the marine life.”







“FROM page 1B.

Bahamian commerce, the

Bahamas had slipped from 51st __
‘place to 55th out of 181 nations.

One problem area for the
Bahamas was construction per-
mits, where it ranked 92nd. The
World Bank report assessed the
procedures, time and costs asso-
ciated with buildifiz a similar



‘size warehouse i in all countries,

~ including obtaining all the nec-

essary licences and permits,
‘completing all inspections and
getting utility connections.
When it came to the number
of procedures dealing with con-
struction permits, only Trinidad
_and Puerto Rico - out of the
whole Caribbean - had more
than the Bahamas” 18 processes.
It took some 197 days to deal
with construction permits in the
Bahamas, the report found,
placing the Bahamas near the
bottom of the Caribbean, while
the cost of dealing with the per-
mits, as a percentage of income

’ per capita, was pegged at 241.6

per cent for the Bahamas. Only
four more Caribbean nations
were more expensive.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 3B



-Mayaguana project in
hotel partner talks ©

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



THE Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas is currently in negotiations
with undisclosed parties to develop two
or three medium-sized hotels for its
$1.8 billion joint venture property on
Mayaguana.

Sir Baltron Bethel, its managing
director, told Tribune Business yester-
day that the Corporation was in nego-

tiations with parties to discuss the addi-
tion of the properties to the project.

Sir Baltron was recently in Boston
to meet the Corporation’s Mayaguana
project partner, the Boston-based I-
Group developers.

He indicated that construction work
on the joint venture was progressing
well. Both parties own the project
through the Mayaguana Development
Company.

Sir Baltron said that to date, work

on the infrastructure portion of the pro-
ject was actually ahead of schedule.
That included putting in place 10 miles
of road, a technical centre, water desali-
nation plant and concrete batch plant .

He said the airport’s runway was now
complete, with the design for the ter-

minal finished and approved. The steel -

shell for the terminal was already up,
and a hospitality centre will also be
built.

The project’s vertical construction is

progressing at a slower pace, Sir Bal-
tron said, something that was a direct
result of the slowdown in real estate
sales due to the current state of the US
economy. That slowdown caused the
scale of the project to be modified.

The development covers some 10,000
acres and includes an airport, utilities,
marina village, residential lots, private
village and condos, a boutique resort
and condos, a boutique resort and
nature preserves.

Oil closes below $100 a barrel for first time in six months

m@ By STEVENSON JACOBS -

AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices closed below $100 a bar-
rel for the first time in six
months Monday, tumbling in
another dramatic sell-off as the
demise of Lehman Brothers
and the sale of Merrill Lynch
deepened worries about the US

economy.

Crude prices shed more than
$5 a barrel and have now given
up virtually all their gains for
the year, extending a steep,
two-month slide from record
levels above $147 a barrel.

Oil’s pullback also came as
early signs suggested that Hur-
ricane Ike delivered less dam-

Coast energy oil and gas infra-
structure. But pump prices
jumped above $4 a gallon in
parts of the country as a pre-

- cautionary shutdown of Gulf

refineries caused gasoline short-
ages.

The latest sell-off in oil began
Sunday and accelerated Mon-

day as traders’ digested a day ~

of dramatic upheaval on Wall

‘oil analyst and trader in Vil-

lanova, Pa., who said the pull-
back could reflect selling by
Lehman or possibly a hedge

fund struggling to raise capital.
"When you see price drops of
this size, it eks of someone
being in trouble."

Breezes targets
autumn start for
| ew upgraties

SuperClubs Breezes (Bahamas)
is to begin the second phase of its
development programme this
autumn, continuing renovations
that were begun last September.

The resort has announced it will
undertake further renovations to
the East Wing guest bedrooms,
bathrooms and general-facilities.

It stressed that guest amenities
and services will not be affected,
as work would be taking place
inside individual bedrooms.

The work will introduce remod-
elled guest bathrooms, sliding glass
doors, flat screen plasma televisions
and numerous supplementary prod-
uct enhancements.

Additionally, the entire Banquet
and Meeting facilities are also
undergoing refurbishments during
this period:

Last autumn, all the guest bed-
rooms in the West Wing were
refurbished.

age than feared to the Gulf
Street: Lehman Brothers Hold-

ings Inc., a 158-year-old invest-

ment bank, filed for bankrupt-

cy after failing to find a buyer

and Merrill Lynch & Co.

agreed to be bought out by

| Bank of America Corp.

Lehman, Merrill and other,
big institutional investors were
major participants in the com-
modities boom of the past year,
helping push the price of oil,
precious metals and grains to
historic highs until a slowing
global economy helped bring a
halt to the rally.

Analysts said investors feared
that the upheaval in the finan-
cial sector could trigger anoth-
er round of commodities liqui-
dation — especially with
Lehman likely to unwind its
holdings. Other investors may
also unload commodities, fear-
ing that the deepening eco-
nomic.crisis will further reduce
demand for energy and raw
materials futures.

“T think this is/giving the bulls:
further.reason to.exit the mar)»
ket,” said Stephen Schork, an «>.

SUNSHINE INSURANCE

(Acunty & Taney Latin

Cariap iain far Mi A R 5 H
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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(Nor45 of 2000)

MR. LAVELLE M. HAMILTON

COURT ENGINEERING LIMITED

In VoluntaryLliquidation

is no longer employed with Sunshine.
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and is no longer authorized to conduct

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ance or any of it’s affiliates.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the

International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), COURT
ENGINEERING LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 22nd day of August, 2008.

James Andrew Ramsden
of Harbour Reach
Rue de Carteret
St. Helier, Jersey:
Channel Islands
Liquidator



25

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER,
CORPORATE CREDIT



DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED | |
Core responsibilities: ?

Invites applications for the position of

¢ Acts as Relationship Manager to high risk clientele by liaising with
clients to determine needs and resolve issues, providing answers
and communication wherever necessary.
‘© Perform maintenance and records management on existing
portfolios and advise Corporate Credit Consultants of any issues.
¢ Perform constant follow up on high risk/impaired accounts and
institutes proper procedures regarding the collection of same.
¢ Assess financial position of high risk/impaired loans.
¢ Prepare credit proposals by conducting comprehensive financial
and non-financial analysis.
° Provide coaching, guidance, and direction to line lenders in the
assessment and structuring of credit facilities.

COMPLIANCE MANAGER

a

Responsibilities will include:

_ Maintaining and developing a robust compliance and control regime in Deltec to
ensure compliance with all relevant laws, regulations, guidelines and internal
policies and procedures
Developing, administering and implementing a stringent compliance program

-across' Deltec’s business in The Bahamas that identifies all applicable regulations,
risks and internal requirements.

Implementing a comprehensive self-testing program that is derived from risk
assessment

Reviewing KYC documentation for all new and existing clients

Ensuring that Corrective Action Plans are developed, controlled and implemented
effectively; periodically monitoring and reporting on progress in resolving issues
Advising and assisting with the training of staff in regulatory and internal poucy
compliance requirements — | °
Reporting to Executive Management and Board of Directors °
Ability to work independently and under pressure to meet deadlines

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

Bachelor’s Degree and five or more years of credit experience.
Strong accounting skills and the ability to provide financial
analyses.

¢ Strong negotiation skills.

The successful candidate should have the following qualifications: ¢ Detailed knowledge of credit and collections.

¢ Core knowledge of legal practices and documentation.

> A thorough knowledge and understanding of all applicable legislation, ou

and guidelines
> Minimum Bachelors degree in banking or accounting
> Minimum 3 years relevant experience in a compliance position with an offshore

bank
> Excellent written, oral and presentation skills

Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may submit resumes to the Human Resources Manager c/o Fax No.
362-4623 or by email to anh@deltechank.com.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED



Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental
and vision) and life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than

September 26", 2008 to:

. The Tribune

DA#63405

P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

.

THE TRIBUNE



a, A a Se ee ee a es
Don’t ‘capitulate to fearful and the insular’ over EPA

FROM page 1B

significant services opportuni-
ties for those daring enough to
explore the possibilities. I
believe our entrepreneurs can
step up to the plate and manage
those opportunities.

“We shouldn’t tie our hands
mentally before we’ve even
explored the possibilities. At

INSIGHT

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behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays





delivered to the highest standard.

CLASSICAL LATIN

PRICE: $ 250.00 per course

1) go to ADMINISTRATION

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CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE II
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least explore them. We say to
our children when they’re grow-
ing up: ‘Nothing beats failure
like a try’.

“The issue is not going to be
for us to capitulate to the fear-
ful and the insular, but tapping

into our own creativity and say-

ing it’s possible.”

Urging Bahamian businesses
to draw inspiration from the
performances of this nation’s
athletes, and emulate them in
a commercial sense, Mr Laing
said entrepreneurs needed to
“open every door as opposed
to closing every door because
we’re scared”.

The minister confirmed that
following last week’s CARI-
COM Heéads of Government
conference on the EPA in Bar-
bados, the agreement’s signing
by the Bahamas and others was
set for mid-October 2008. The
exact date, he explained, will
be determined by CARICOM



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

VACANCY

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified persons
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT

°

CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II

QHMSUNETAT IGN: 6

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE

LLCS

Heads of Government in con-
sultation with the EU.

The Bahamas, though, will
initially be signing a ‘good-only’
EPA that deal'with market
access issues. The draft agree-
ment initialled last year gave
the Bahamas up to six months
after its signing to decide on
whether it wanted to submit a
services offer.

While the services offer has
been completed, Mr Laing said
it had not been presented to the
EU yet. Whether the Euro-
peans will accept it is unknown,
but the minister said it was “a
lot more liberal" than most
CARICOM countries.

“We've not presented our
services agreement to Europe
as yet,” Mr Laing said. “The ini-
tial intent was to release it to
the public, submit it to the
Caribbean Regional Negotiat-
ing Machinery and get their
input on it.

The purpose of the Assistant Director, Training and Development is to act as key contact for employees seeking
professional development and training, including providing information and support for staff as required. Also, to
d ensure that core and customized training programmes are

For a detailed job description and application persons should visits www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates
should submit a detailed resume and a cover letter of interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience
no later than Wednesday, 17th September, 2008. :

COURSE OFFERINGS: FALL 2008 — Beginning October 6"





FEY TO GLOGAL UNPEHSTANGING

LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC, Nassau Street): Room 15

DURATION: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours

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SEMESTER: FALL 2008
ALL COURSES MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK (*) INDICATES THE COURSE MUST BE TAKEN AT THE SCHEDULED TIME IN‘ORDER TO COMPLETE THE PROGRAMME
| _THE COST OF BOOKS/RESOURCE MATERIALS IS INCLUDED IN THE FEES
CODE | SEC COURSE/PROGRAMME | bay | MAXs | RMS | DURATION | [ STARTS | LECTURER | TUITION
| be Me | cate eel
| MASSAGE THERAPY PROG, Rae ee oe eal ele A oe
| Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
& BUC General Science
MAsG90 [ICI] Massage Therapy Essentials I* 9:30am | 12:30pm [16 | TBA Mun Buld | _8-Sept | TBA $670
APUY90[ 1C1_| Anatomy & Physiology* | F| 6:00pm | 9:00pm [25 [TBA 1Owks | BLVDLT | 12-Sept | E: Grant $400
; [MEDT900 | 1CI_| Medical Terminoldgy* [ W | 6:00pm] 9:00pm [25 | TBA[ _10wks | DRSHP_|_24-Sept | J. Infremeta $225
| een eee 2 TOTAL
COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN PROG. a
Prerequisites: BJC Math and English OR
High School Diploma
COMPS? [ICI [PC Support| TBA Twks | Mun Buld | 12-Sept [TBA $500
Icl_| CONTINUED |S | 9:00am TBA 12wks | Mun Buld | 13-Sept | TBA aoe
| teow : ;
| compsa | 1C1_| Keyboarding _ | Ss [| 11:00am] 2:00pm|20 |LAB| __Swks | CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie $200
| comps30[ 1CI_| Web Page Design I [TWF | 9:30am | 4:30pm[20 _[LAB| _2days | CEES 16-Oct $500
———
za ae aa =
CODE | SEC | COURSE/PROGRAMME [pay| ss Timm ~=~—S—| MAX® | RMS | DURATION | VENUE | STARTS | LECTURER | TUITION
MEDICAL SECRETARY'S PROG.
Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
& BJC General Science
MEDT900__| I1CI_| Medical Terminology* / 6: 9:00p 5 2 1Dwks | DRS HP 24-Sept | J. Infremeta $225
xpuyon T1CI_| Anatomy & Physiology* BLVDLT | 12-Sept | E. Grant $400
compso0 | 1CI_| Keyboarding 00pm | 20 LAB ‘Swks | CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie $200
L TOTAL $825 |
oa Peale |
MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING PROG. ae ee eee
| Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
4 & BJC General Science
MEDI900 | 1CI_| Medical Terminology* [ W | 6:00pm | 9:00pm | 25 TBA DRSHP_| 24-Sept | J. Infremeta $225
APHY900 | ICI | Anatomy & Physiology* 9:00pm | 25 TBA BLVDLT | 12-Sept | E. Grant $400
comp900 | 1CI_| Keyboarding S| 11:00am | 2:00pm | 20 LAB Swks [ CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie -_ $200
= [ TOTAL $825
| [ WEDDING AND EVENT PLANNING PROG.
| Prerequisites: BJC Math and English
| OR High School Diploma :
| [Wepps00 ici [Wedding Planning TTR] 6:00pm | 7:30pm [25 TBA[ 12wks | BLVDLT | 9-Sept [TBA $450
comp900 | 1CI_| Keyboarding S 11:00am | 2:00pm | 20 LAB Swks [ CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie $200
| TOTAL 5650
ST ts ee ee ae a ee ee









CEES RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION, FEES. COURSE ONTENT, COURSE SCHEDULE, COURSE MATERIAL AND CANCEL COURSES

does not include the one tume $-10 application tee



| ENQUIRIES. Contact the Coordinator at Tel (242) 325-S714 / 328-0093 / 328-1
|

or email peda, Ga coty bt bys



“But for the Bahamas, at the
moment there's no rush. Our
services schedule does not have
to be attached to this agreement
until six months following the
signing of the agreement. Which
means for us, if we sign in Octo-
ber we will essentially be signing
a 'goods only' agreement,
because we would have no ben-
efits or obligations arising from
the services schedule until we
attach it.

“And if we indefinitely do not
attach our services schedule, we

will have no benefits, no oblig- .

ations until then. So we will, in
effect, come the signing be sign-
ing a goods-only agreement. .
.with the intention of following
through on the services side of
things.

“We're comfortable with the
services offer that we have
made, given that it essentially

mirrors our current National

Investment Policy.”

By signing the EPA, Mr
Laing said the Government
would preserve duty-free mar-
ket access to the EU for
Bahamian exporters and main-
tain their products’ price com-
petitiveness.

Besides the implementation
costs the Bahamas will incur,
the minister said the Govern-
ment was likely to only lose $6
million in import duties on EU
goods that will have to be
allowed into this nation duty-
free. The EPA requires the
Bahamas to phase-out tariff
rates on 85 per cent of EU.
imports over a 25-year period.

Mr Laing implied that the
revenue loss and. implementa-
tion costs were worth it, given
that preserving duty-free EU
access would safeguard $90 mil-
lion worth of exports and for-
eign currency earnings. It would
also protect a positive trade bal-
ance with the EU.

“In the first instance, we have
preserved some advantages that
we presently enjoy - $90 mil-
lion-plus advantages,” Mr Laing
said.

He added that the EPA
would also improve the
Bahamas’ cost competitiveness
as it relates to other countries,
and could encourage EU firms
to establish themselves in the
Bahamas to “take advantage of
the access to their own mar-
kets” as opposed to going else-
where.

“Our ‘own Bahamian
investors can exploit these mar-
kets and possibilities. It is also a
benefit to maintain our trade
relationship with one of the
world’s largest and most impor-
tant trading blocs,” Mr Laing
said.

“The field is wide open. It is
really for the ingenuity and cre-
ativity of entrepreneurs to
exploit the possibilities.”















































: +. es ep 8 . : Pe, _ Le
*LHE D A
eileen? wlll L. pend adeeall of -s & ie
THOATINCG £72 ATRINC
FDUCATING & 1 RAINING
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - FALL SEMESTER 042008
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION DAY ___ START _DUR_| FEE
ogee ie ae cg eee
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ACCAg00 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS | 8:00pm Thurs 23-Sep-10 wks | $250.00
: 6:00pm - :
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: 6:00pm -
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ee AY Sen
BUSINESS Po
: ° 6:00pm-
| BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 8:00pm Thurs 25-Sep 8wks | $225.00
6:00pm-
BUSI901 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS Il 8:00pm Tues 23-Sep 8wks | $250.00
9:30am-
cuSsT900 01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S | 4:30pm Thurs .9-Oct ida $170.00
\ 6:00pm-
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 9:00pm Thurs 25-Sep 10 wks | $225.00
: 9:30am- :
TSMg900 01 TIME & STRESS MANAGEMENT 4:30pm Thurs 23-Oct ida $180.00
COMPUTERS
11:00am- "
comMPs01 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 2:00pm Tues . 23-Sep 12 wks | $450.00 je-j4:; .
ps Posi 6:00pm- , : rf
coMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 9:00pm ~~ | Mon ‘22-ep ‘12 wks |’ $450.00 ;
: 9:00pm :
6:00pm- ;
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN Il 9:00pm Mon 22-Sep 8wks | $250.00
: 6:00pm-
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III Thurs 25-Sep 8wks | $275.00
fie ee
ENGLISH
[" 6:00pm-
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 9:00pm _ | Tues 7-Oct 10 wks | $300.00
fee we eee oe
MANAGEMENT fe Re ee
3 ; 6:00pm-
MGMTS900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTI | 9:00pm Thurs ‘18-Sep. 10 wks | $250.00
, 6:00pm-
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTII | 9:00pm Mon 15-Sep 10 wks | $300.00
: Uist cm a oe es Se eS le
SEWING &
CRAFT
’ . 6:00pm-
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING | 9:00pm Mon" 22-Sep &8wks | $225.00
® 6:00pm-
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 9:00pm Wed 24-Sep 8wks | $250.00
. 10:00am-
SEW.804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING 1:00pm Sat 20-Sep 8wks | $225.00
6:00pm-
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 9:00pm Tues 23-Sep 8wks | $225.00
6:00pm-
_CRASOO 01 JEWELLERY MAKING 8:00pm Tues 23-Sep 8 wks $250.00
MEDICAL ees
; 6:00pm-
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 9:00pm Wed 24-Sep 10 wks | $225.00
HEALTH AND
FITNESS
6:00pm-
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/ 6:00pm- :
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9:30am- é
BWAX3900 01 BODY WAXING 4:30pm Tues/Wed 21-Sep 2 days | $300.00
DANCE
6:00pm-
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; : 6:00pm-
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ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email
persdev@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.
CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 042008 (SESSIONS 02) |
|








COURSE



Bah: .mian
Cuisine




Gourmet
Cooking |
Gourmet
Cooking Il




Cake & Pastry
Making!
Cake & Pastry
Making II



COOK 6:00 -
1 | 806 Oct. 23 Nov. 27 6 weeks Thursda 9:00pm $375.00 | MK

eto tee

823 Oct. 20 Nov. 24 6 weeks
a foam |
824 Oct. 20 Nov. 24
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813 Oct. 21 Nov. 20





SESSION 2

DURATION -













Monda

6 weeks

5 weeks

5 weeks



Monda
— nday

Tues/Thurs.

Tues/Thurs.





Bread Making 1





Oct. 21 Nov. 20
Oct. 23 Nov. 27

Thursday





Cake
Decorating |






oO
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x
@

Decorating Il
HOLIDAY
BAKING



Oct. 20 Nov. 19

TS foam [now |
1 | 818 Oct. 20 Nov. 19
2 Locran Lnova |
830 Oct. 20 Nov. 24

5 weeks





5 weeks





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Deadline for applications, October 10, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.

MONDAY




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Bahamas ‘can’t sit back’
over Lehman collapse

FROM page 1B

prices, increased energy and
food costs, and growing unem-
ployment, Mr Smith said the
financial meltdown had reduced
consumers’ disposable incomes
and hit confidence.

This was likely to immediate-
ly impact the Bahamian tourism
industry through decreased
arrivals and per capita visitor
spending, he suggested, given
that this nation was reliant on
the US to supply 85 per cent of
its visitors.

Mr Smith said of develop-
ments on Wall Street: “This is
shaking consumer confidence,
very much so in the US, and
will be translated into cutbacks
in consumer spending, includ-
ing on vacations. I think it’s
really cause for concern.

“What may be required of us
at this stage is to look more
closely at our [tourism] markets
within the US, and see who is
most affected by this. If the
impact is greatest in the north-
east, where most of our tourists
come from, but not the west,
we may have to re-position our-
selves. I’m_sure the people at
the Ministry of Tourism are on
top of that.

“We can’t sit back and wring
our hands. Things are happen-
ing too quickly around us.
We’re being hit from so many
angles.”

Apart from the impact on
tourism spending and arrivals,
the Lehman Brothers meltdown
could have a direct effect on the
Bahamas given that the compa-
ny was a financier or equity
partner in numerous foreign
direct investment projects.

For instance, the investment
bank is an equity partner in the
$1 billion Ritz-Carlton Rose
Island mixed-use resort project,
alongside the Miami-based
developer, Gencom Group, and
the likes of Marriott Interna-
tional. *

Nick .Ward, Gencom’s pro-



ject manager for the Ritz-Carl-
ton Rose Island development,
did not return Tribune Busi-
ness’s call seeking comment on
whether Lehman Brothers’
bankruptcy would impact the
project and its financing.
Earlier this year, he told Tri-

bune Business that some $100 .

million had already been spent
on the development, particu-
larly its marina excavation.

Still, Mr Smith said the bank-
ruptcy was likely to at least
“slow down” the build-out of
Bahamas-based resort projects
that are dependent on Lehman
Brothers for financing, either
debt or equity.

Much is likely to depend on
whether funding from Lehman
Brothers has been released, and
the terms and conditions
attached to it. If it was debt
financing, that loan could be
acquired by a buyer, while if it
was an equity stake that, too,

could be sold-off to generate ~

funds to help the investment
bank regain solvency and
emerge from Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy protection.

. Those projects still waiting
for Lehman Brothers financing
could be doing so in vain, as it
may now never come through
or, if it does, arrive with less
advantageous strings attached.

“We need to follow it very
closely,” Mr Smith told Tribune
Business. “We don’t know how
many [resort] projects they have
here. It may be just a few.

“If we don’t see a withdrawal,
we may see a slowdown in
[these projects’] implementa-
tion.”

Lehman Brothers has
reduced its Bahamas-based
resort holdings in recent years.
In combination with Driftwood
Hospitality, the operating part-
ner in which it also held a stake,
it exited the Royal Oasis after
pocketing the 2004 hurricane
insurance proceeds through the
$33 million sale to Harcourt

. Developments.

STH ANNUAL
OACO

Understand The Present: Plan For The Future

Thursday, September 25, 2008 | New Vision Ministries Centre, Marsh Harbo

The same combination also
sold two Nassau resort proper-
ties, the former Holiday Inn on
Paradise Island and the Nassau
Palm on West Bay Street, to the
Gencom Group’s principal,
Karim Alibhai, although their
continued involvement cannot
be ruled out due to the close
relationship with the buyer as
evidenced at the Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island.

Lehman Brothers/Driftwood
also sold the Hurricane Hole
marina complex to Kerzner
International.

“In a way that might have
been fortunate for us,” Mr
Smith said, “because those

see



SPEAKERS

properties would now be in
trouble at a time when we can
least afford it.”

Meanwhile, the former
finance minister said the
Bahamas was likely to gener-
ate gross domestic product
(GDP) growth of between 1-2
per cent for 2008, adding that
he “would be surprised if we
made 2 per cent this year”.

With the Bahamian economy
having been hit by record glob-
al oil prices, the tourism slow-
down, hurricane repair costs
and a slowdown in government

" spending, whether this nation

avoided slipping into recession
would “have a lot to do with



how we perform in the last
quarter”.

Traditionally, late November
and December, coupled with
the first four months of every
year, were the high points of
the tourism season, and Mr
Smith said recessionary signs
would be evidence if hotel occu-
pancies over the Thanksgiving









this notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY. DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GISELLE CHRISTINA
CARTWRIGHT of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, intend to change my name to GISELLE CHRISTINA
COLLYMORE. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas,
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

Holiday were below last year’s
comparatives.

“If we see a fall-off there, we
will have to brace ourselves,”
Mr Smith warned. “We can
brace for some trying times over
the next few months and into
2009. I think we’re going to be
growing sluggishly well into’
next year.” |



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BIANTA JANVIER of
SOUTH BEACH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of SEPTEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.












Business Outlook |

SEMINAR

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHONY MEME of
BROWN’S ALLEY OFF KEMP ROAD, P.O. BOX SP-
60858, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9TH day of SEPTEMBER 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.













6

ur, Abaco
Pee

ie







* Henry Romer, V.P., BIC, Grand Bahama

° Robert Deal, Asst. G.M., Water & Sewerage Corporation-
Family Island & Marine Operations

e Owen Bethel, CEO, Montaque Group

e Judy Johnston, Airport Task Force

e Roscoe Thompson, Manager, Abaco Shopping Centre

.° The Hon. Earl Deveaux, Minister for the Environment

° Michael Albury, President, Abaco Chamber of Commerce
¢ Livingston Marshall, Marine & Environmental Consultant

¢ Frank Comito, Executive V.P., Bahamas Hotel Association

e Romauld Ferreira, Environmental Consultant & Lawyer

e Frederik Gottlieb, Chairman, BEC

REGISTER TODAY! Contact:

Eileen Fielder, The Counsellors Lid. - T: 242322-7505 © F: 242-325-2482 « E: efielder@thecounsellorsltd.com
Wynsome Ferguson, Ministry of Tourism, Abaco - T: 242-367-3067 ° F: 242-367-0129 © Email: wferguson@bahamas.com
Leazona Richard - T: 242-367-6279 * Email: leazona@gmail.com

CARI ‘
= 3
e \e S/
ers” Sun Oil Limited

rete enrys

ie Bank of The Bahamas

@AiINTERNATIONAL

Ww

Baker's Bap

GOLF & OCEAN CLU

&
aD

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FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK





TCLGROUP or register online at www.tclevents.com







seamen

PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



‘Significant change’ to
development model

LS a
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
+) TA CITC

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BORAXXAMME LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORANGE HILL GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 9th day of September 2008. The Liquidator |
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice.

NOTICE
CEDAR CONES LTD.

(Im Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
1cD Iannee,

. S. John:
Premier Real. Estate

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

S52wk-Low
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
cok ND Holdings .

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

FROM page 1B

have final approval, and when
will infrastructure be available’.
It’s certainly a cautionary note
to attorneys.”

Emphasising that his ministry
had “absolutely no issue with
the rulings” by Justice Lyons,
Dr Deveaux emphasised: “The
law is very clear. An approval in
principle is just that, and full

approval is just that. Anyone’

who is buying a lot in an unap-
proved subdivision is taking a
risk.

“We don’t authorise the sell-
ing of lots in unapproved sub-
divisions. We are advising peo-
ple who are proposing to do
that that no building permit will
be issued until final approval is
given.

“As a citizen in this country,
you hear any number of stories
from people who bought land,
and there is no light, no roads
and no water. People then have
to pay thousands of dollars to

put in infrastructure they legit-
imately thought would be there.

“We’re only confronted with
it when someone ha sought
land, built a home and the infra-
structure is not there.”

Existing

Dr Deveaux said, though,
that the existing development
model where landowners
carved up their land into lots,
then sold them to the Bahamian
public, had “worked” in meet-
ing the demand for housing. _

“The Bahamas has one of the
largest proportions of owner-
occupied homes in the world,
close to 60 per cent of homes,”
the minister told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Yet he acknowledged that
stronger: regulation was now
required from the Ministry of
the Environment, Department
of Physical Planning and Town
Planning Committee to cope
with the problems resulting

ulation by developers as the
supply of land ran out, espe-
cially on New Providence.

“As the price of land goes up,
speculation increases and the
regulatory functions need
stronger oversight,” Dr
Deveaux said.

The Government is currently
reviewing the Private Roads
and Subdivisions Act, with a
view to amending it and pre-
senting the proposed changes
to the Bahamian people for dis-
cussion and feedback at a sem-
inar to be held on September
29, 2008.

Among the issues the amend-
ments will seek to.deal with are
the quality of utilities and infra-
structure provided in subdivi-
sions.

Pressure

With pressure for the provi-
sion of quality services that
meet buyer expectations ever-
increasing, Dr Deveaux said:
“These are the kinds of thing
we hope to speak to in the new
Act and regulations. We are try-
ing to learn from experience
and issues that have arisen.”

Legal Notice
NOTICE

LINDUS, TROY & CO., LTD
In Voluntary Liquidation

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOLLENDRUZ INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of August 2008. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Bor! N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POLDATORM LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
“on the 28th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EG CAPITAL MA

BROKERAGE & ADPVISORY SERVICES

oa 19 October, 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October, 2022
7% 30 May, 2013
Prime - am ee 29 May, 2015

0.300
0.480
DOO a

MA MONE

1s. 80 2 * 0.900

cae

“RISK Listed wiaisal Funds
~*~

Fund Name AV

Colina Bond Fund 7 3320
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.0250
Colina Money Market Fund 1.4119
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.5807
Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.3870
CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.0000
CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000
Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.4075
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0147
FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0027
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Market Terms

1.0119

TO%, Last Months i Yield%
3.09% 5.27%

4.78%
4.21%
5.40%
5.77%

1.01%

-10,40%
1.47%
0.27%
1.19% . ; us 31-Jul-08

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the pri
EPS $ - A company’s reported Saranas'> per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 ~ 100
- Nomi | value = $1000.00

Hit e Da ‘200
EO TRADE GALL: CrAL 242-50247040 of FIDELITY 2AZ-3SE-T1E4 t EG CAPITAL MARKETS BA2-396-4000 Pan Ze Se See Z j

FOR MORE | iN FORMATION CALL BISx @ 242-394-2503

from ever-increasing land spec-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,

2000, LINDUS, TROY & CO., LTD is in dissolu-
tion as of September 12, 2008.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

‘Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the

Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



IN THE ESTATE OF PRINCE ALBERT DEVEAUX
JR. A.K.A. PRINCE DEVEAUX of Taylor Street in the
Southern District of the Island of New: Providence one }

of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Saaieen
deceased. Pe SNe!

; NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim

or demand against the above Estate are required to send the

- same duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before

Friday the 21st day of November A. D., 2008 after which
date the Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having
regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

MICHELLE Y. CAMPBELL & CO.
Chambers
#55 Mackey Street
P. O. Box N-9180
Nassau, Bahamas
Executrix of the above Estate

Lem trrp

Abaco Markets Limited, a leading food distribution
company with five retail and club outlets in New
Providence, Freeport and Marsh Harbor Abaco is seeking
applications for the position of:

SENIOR TECHNICIAN

The Job
To manage the company’s Air Conditioning and
Refrigeration/Freezer Equipment.

Which involves completing routine repairs and
maintenance, implementing and maintaining a preventive
maintenance program, installation of new equipment and
managing the company’s energy saving program.

Requirements

¢ Certification in the field of Air Conditioning
/Refrigeration
Familiarity with electronic computer controlled boards,
programmable boards, air and water cooled
refrigeration and air conditioning systems a must.
Minimum of 5 years experience
A proven track record of success in the area of A/C
repairs & maintenance
Possess strong leadership skills with excellent People
and Communication skills

Outstanding compensation, benefit packages (inclusive
of incentive based bonuses provided)

Only serious applicants need apply and should send their

resumes to hr @abacomarkets.com.





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

COMIC PAGE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 7B







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itures Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved

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several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





s. Dist. by King Features Syndicate. Inc.

















©2008 Conceptis Puzzle

Difficulty Level kK & *& * 9/13



fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum





of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty



level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



HERSELF IN THE

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13 Syndicate, Inc World rights reservea.

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won several crucial games in recent
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6 A musical character to 2 Noe how an * es
have on the staff (4) undergraduate is working? ;
10 Stable unit in the market - i 6) Cc arean me t Bridge
. (5) irl wasn’t well brought up Dene ge en ,
11 A ruinous craft (9) (5) oo teve Bec ker
12 Beat this for a political slo- 4 Adour disposition is, to us, .
gan (8) hard to bear (7) 3
13 Test the patience of a 5 Its aura somehow appeals A M U / ti I ayer ed Ta le
j to those who like mountain
good man at a meeting (5) holidays (7
15 Distances covered by a 7 poe eats Ato hue ; ; ;
number of vaults (7) band (3,2) it North dealer. four rounds and then attempted to
17 It is pressed into use when 8 Enthusiacn experienced Neither side vulnerable. run the clubs. But when the clubs
distribution by air is by a new poker player? NORTH turned out to be divided 4-1, declarer
required (7) (5,5) ‘ A102 could not come to more than nine
19 Make another entrance in 9 Standards are judged by VA83 tricks, finishing ws ith five hearts,
a more entertaining way them (8) %Q three clubs and a spade for down
(25) 14 Piece of rough material —#KQ7642_ one. ;
21 Main roads? (7) that could be smoother WEST EAST At the other table, declarer wisely
22 It sounds — like fruit (5) . (5,5) @95 @KQI84 — elected not to put all, his: faith in a
24 Writer is about to approve 16 Retaliates and strikes a uw Across Down ¥ 10 9765 favorable club division and instead
a colour (3-5) player (4,4) _I 1 Very comfortable sit- 1 Portend (4) #KI7642 A993 led a diamond from dummy at trick
‘27 Head teacher is asource -} 18 Void contest? (5,4) N uation (3,2,5) 2 Harm (9) #51083 &9 two. He was planning to ruff a dia-
of interest (9) 20 Decorate from top to bot- N 6 Continued pain (4) 3 Absurd proceedings SOUTH mond in dummy next and thus secure
28 How pointless to follow a tom, or bottom to top (7) —_ 10 Discourage (5) (5) 4763 10 tricks without having to rely on
‘girl in a state (5) 21 Everything in the show is QW 11 Attractive (9) 4 Enthusiastic recep- ¥KQI42 the club suit.
29 Rush in three directions at superficial (7) > 12 Hearth (8) tion (7) #1085 This was certainly a reasonable
once! (4) 23 Untie tricky knot (5) n” 13 Metallic ringing 5 To voice (7) &A5 plan, but an inspired East found the
30 It necessitates a lot of 25 They fly or take a train (5) < sound (5) 7 Porcelain (5) The bidding: winning coynterstroke. After taking
extra work in the theatre 26 Fuel considered all right in Ww 15 Infest (7) 8 Battle (10) North East South West the aactond with the ace at trick
(5,5) church (4) 17 Scornful 9 Gambling card game 1% 1¢ me Pass two, he cashed the K-Q of spades
language (7) (8) 49% and returned d fourth spade. Declarer
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 19 Shock grossly (7) 14 Crowning ceremony Opening lead — nine of spades. was now a goner regardless of what
: ; 21 Old hand (7) (10) Some deals have a lot more to — he did.

Across: 1 Pibroch, 5 Sugar, 8 Across: 1 Impetus, 5 Crisp, 8 Ad 22 Accumulate (5) 16 Restore confidence them than initially meets the eye. In practice, South discarded a dia-
Cassandra, 9 Mar, 10 Nile, 12 Good nauseam, 9 Run, 10 Elbe, 12 In per- 54 Unique (8) to (8) Take this rather prosaic-looking hand = mond, whereupon West did his part
hand, 14 Debtor, 15 Armies, 17 son, 14 Absorb, 15 Accrue, 17 27 To place 18 Pleasant (9) from a team-of-four contest. by ruffing the spade with the ten of
sueners, 18 emia, #1 Goa,:22 Grandeur, 18 Pert, 21 End, 22 between (9) 20 One part of serial (7) At both tables, North-South — hearts. Dummy overruffed with the
Dodge City, 24 Stein, 25 Express. Extricate, 24 Surly, 25 Exalted. 28 Confusion of voices 21 Extremely forceful (7) reached four hearts on the bidding ace, but Fast’s 9-7-6-5 of hearts now
Down Pecan, 2 Bus: 3 Ofel 4 Down: 'v Image, 2 Pen. pert (5) 23 Garret (5) shown and West led a spade. Both constituted a trump trick for the
Hudsons: Standald, B/Cymnasiom 7. Seeing: s/ Commerce, © UnReSeN 29 Small cut (4) 25 Brownish yellow (5) declarers, upon seeing dummy, were defense, and again the contract went
Reredos, 11 Lubricate, 13 Looked on, 7 Penance, 11 Bystander, 13 30 Amelioration (10) 26 Oversupply (4) annoyed at not having reached what down one.

And so, both declarers wound up
with only nine tricks on a deal where
slam was an odds-on proposition, but
that simple statement doesn’t come
close to telling the full story.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



Seven Bahamas
Environmental
Steward Scholars
(BESS) begin year-
long programme

â„¢ By LISA LAWLOR

THE ISLAND SCHOOL promotes the interconnectedness of health
4 —teaching about environmental health, as well as the health of
mind, body, and spirit.

. THE Island School (IS), based in
Eleuthera, welcomed its second class

_of exemplary Bahamian high school
students to the Bahamas Environ-
mental Steward Scholars (BESS)
programme for the 2008-2009 acad-
emic year.

The BESS programme offers
Bahamian students a unique work
and study opportunity that includes
a 14-week semester at The Island
School, a three-month semester
leadership programme for high
school students. Participants have
come from‘over 300 schools to study
the tropical marine environment and
take place-based courses in math,
history, English, research, and art.

The BESS programme also
involves a six-month paid internship
at a conservation-minded organisa-
tion or an exchange with the College
of the Bahamas.

‘This year the BESS programme
has provided the highest number of
Bahamian enrollees in Island School
history. Jasmine Wilchcombe, Alan-
nah Vellacott, Bradley Watson Jr,
and Theodore Thompson will be
attending the fall semester at The
Island School. Walcott Miller Jr,
Oprah Davis, and Latario Moxey
will be joining IS in the spring. ~

Through the BESS programme,
motivated Bahamian high school
graduates work on authentic, scien-
- tific projects in the field of tropical
island ecology. Throughout the IS
semester and related internship,
BESS participants get high level
exposure to critical environmental

: and marine challenges faced in the
’ Bahamas, Caribbean, and similar
island nations around the world.

The previous two BESS scholars,

Stan Burnside and Alexio Brown,
performed extensive research on
the Cape Eleuthera Institute aqua-



Sav
one

@ By LISA LAWLOR

g the environment
student at a time

Eleuthera
e Waste management initiative

"It is the waters and marine life of the

traditional teaching methods and learn
Caribbean, the fruits and plants grown

by doing. Over 750 students of the Unit-

THE future health of the
earth is of growing concern
fo more and more people
as the negative impact of
global warming, specie

extinction and the burning
of fossil fuels are felt by the
earth's population.

Leading the charge for a Bahamian
initiative to soothe the negative impacts
and to prevent further damage to the
ecosystem is The Cape Eleuthera Island
School.

Communications manager Andrea
Krol said the school "is founded on the
belief that young people, given the right
tools, can build anything. The goal is to

excite and educate young people about
the world around them.

"Using the land and waters of
Eleuthera as their classroom, students -

and teachers quickly become inspired
and motivated by breaking away from

ed States, the Bahamas, Canada, and
around the world have become lead-
ers and agents of change in their home
communities as they influence the way
we think about conservation, resource
management, and community," she
said. /

On-campus sustainable systems intro-
duce students to conservation and
resource management as they live in a
community powered by wind and solar
energy and-supported by rain-water
collection, waste-water management,
and bio-diesel.

"The Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI)
is a research facility that collaborates
with scientists worldwide to model sus-
tainable systems and find solutions for
resource management through research

- and education. CEI's programmes con-

centrate on critical issues of develop-
ment’and conservation in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, while working to
link people to their environment," she
said. .

Ms Krol said the school exposes the
environment as the natural, economical
and biological resources of Eleuthera.

on the land, and the essential beauty
of the Bahamian environment that sup-
ports the well-being of everyone who
lives here.

"It is the resources - crystal clear div-
ing waters, fresh seafood such as conch
and grouper, and the immaculate pink
sands - that make Eleuthera and the
Bahamas an incredible place to share
with the rest of the world," she said.

"Because the environment is one of
the most important resources for the
Bahamas it is imperative that young:
Bahamian leaders are educated in envi-
ronmental studies."

At the school, students, scientists,

‘and faculty have worked on and devel-

oped many real-world applicable pro-
jects including:

e Aquaculture and aquaponics - sus-
tainable food development

¢ Data collection for relevant marine
ecology issues <

¢ Bonefish handling techniques

e Establishing a no-take marine pro-
tected area

e Shark research

e Reemergence of Diadema in South

e Converting used yegclaple oil to
bio-diesel

¢ Renewable energy sources such as
wind and solar power

The Island School promotes the
interconnectedness of health — teaching
about environmental health, as well as
the health of mind, body, and spirit.
Students partake in daily morning exer-
cise to energize their minds by waking
and strengthening their bodies.

There are also influential outdoor
programmes: kayak expeditions, SCU-
BA certification and diving, and island
exploration. These programmes intro-
duce students to the tropical environ-
ment and help students recognise and
understand a sense of place.

Students depart from their semester
at The Island School with an aware-
ness of their surrounding environment,
effective leadership skills, and the abil-
ity to tackle real-world problems. With
their expertise, these students lead the
charge in preserving the resources of
Eleuthera, the Bahamas, and the rest of
the world.



FOOTWEAR professionals
“and consumers constantly
speak of shoe comfort. The
questions to be addressed are
what is comfort? What is prop-
er fit?

It has long been said that if
the shoe fits correctly, comfort
automatically follows. Believe it
or not that statement, as logical
as it sounds, is incorrect. Shoe
comfort involves much more
than proper size and fit. While
size is obviously important, we
tend to over-magnify its impor-
tance by the assumption that if
the shoe is the right size it will
automatically deliver the prop-
er fit. Shoe comfort and fit are
influenced by the delivery of
all or most of the following ele-
ments:

e Fit: This is most significant.
Shoe size must conform to the
foot size. However, this is not
simply the length and ball
width, but also proper fit heel-
to-ball, heel, towlines, throat,



inner volume space, etc. In
essence, proper fit means a cor-
rect dimensional mating of foot
and shoe throughout the whole
shoe.

e Shape: There must be a
reasonable match between shoe
shape and foot shape. If not,
the fit regardless of 'proper
size', is largely nullified. The
shape of the shoe must conform
to the shape of the foot.

e Design or style: Certain
styles are more comfortable for
some people than others,
whether it is an oxford, pump,
sandal, etc. The design of a
shoe also involves heel heights



and heel styles, patterns and
other styling features. These
style elements are important
because they influence comfort.
Many would say, 'only the
wearer knows where the shoe
pinches’ and can conclude com-

- fort.

e Weight: Many persons
would select a lightweight shoe
as opposed to a heavy weight.
This is quite natural because
the heavier the shoe the more
‘foot-lift' workload on the foot.
It does not follow that a heavy
work or out-door boot can't be
comfortable.

¢ Materials: In selecting
materials, shoe comfort

‘




ossible?

depends largely on:
a) conformability
b) breathability
c) weight
d) suppleness or softness

There again, materials play
a significant role especially
when we address certain foot
conditions.

° Inside-shoe climate: Inside
shoe temperature, humidity,
moisture, breathability and
insulation are all important fac-
tors. These all bear an influ-
ence on the sense of comfort
as we all know too well the dan-
gers of moisture trapped
between the toes and elsewhere
on the foot.

¢ Construction: The quality
of the construction determines
the structural integrity of the
shoe's components, which in
turn determine the shape reten-
tion quality and dimensional
stability of the shoe with wear.

e Underfoot resilience: It is
assumed that the feet receive
an average of 8,000 ‘step
shocks' a day. A cushioned
buffer between the foot and
non-resilient ground makes an
important difference in com-
fort. It is extremely important
that the shoe has proper foot
beds (inserts) to support the
arches and balls of your feet,
especially if you are walking on
hard and flat surfaces daily.

e Health condition of the
foot: If the foot has some seri-
ous defect or malfunction; a
shoe having the essential ele-
ments for comfort will not nec-
essarily deliver its full poten-
tial for comfort. This will pre-
sent certain fitting challenges
which must be addressed.

In conclusion, the question
remains, 'is 'perfect' shoe fit
possible? The answer is no.
Why? As shown by foot-mea-
surement studies, no person has
two feet of exactly the same

culture programme, a:marine
research facility that works with uni-
versities to model sustainable sys-
tems and find solutions for resource
management, before attending uni-
versity at Ithaca College (New
York) and COB, respectively.

This year-long academic and

applied experience programme
helps prepare students for universi-
ty and teaches future leaders of the
Bahamas how to protect the coun-
try's most valuable asset: the envi-
ronment.

e The BESS programme is spon-

sored in part by the generous financial
support of the Lyford Cay Foundation,
the Cape Eleuthera Foundation, and
local donors. For more information
email BESS@islandschool.org. For
more information on The Cape
Eleuthera Institute and The Island
School visit www.ceibahamas.org and
www.islandschool.org respectively.
Both programmes are supported by
the Cape Eleuthera Foundation.

size, shape, proportions or func-
tional character. Furthermore,
a study conducted in 1982 by
the Pedorthic Footwear Asso-
ciation on 6,800 adult male and
female subjects in 23 cities
throughout the United States
found that all people have 'mis-
mated' feet. However, footwear
professionals can provide reme-
dies to support the 'mismated' |
feet and allow for 'perfect' shoe
fit.

° Bernadette D Gibson, a board
certified pedorthist, is the proprietor
of Foot Solutions, a health and well-
ness franchise that focuses on foot
care and proper shoe fit, located
in the Sandyport Plaza.

The views expressed are those of
the author and does not necessar-
ily represent those of Foot Solu-
tions Incorporated or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any questions
or comments to nassau@footso-
lutions.com or 242-327-feet
(3338).



GREEN SCENE BY JACK GARDENER

5
te

Otto Jurgenson/ Photo .











experience of

viewcrmonigie eee E oO @3 t ha t i

come and see our selection of
Televisions LCD and Plasma.



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 9B ..




wl

all the vegetables we grow in
our gardens it is tomatoes that
ttract the greatest attention. —

The plants are large and the fruits are
handsome, tending to dominate the
other veggies. As long as we have

cessful garden.

The original tomatoes
that were taken to Europe
by the Spanish from the
slopes of the Peruvian
Andes were very small and
were mostly yellow. Toma-
toes are easy to cross breed
and they soon grew in size
and developed red and pink
varieties as well as yellow.

Most tomato seeds we
grow these days are
hybrids, the result of cross
breeding to ensure standard
size, fruiting time, disease
resistance and taste. Hybrid
tomatoes are wonderful in
the home vegetable garden
as we get the chance to pick
and eat them when they are.
fully ripe. Imported toma-
toes are picked early before
full sweetness has devel-
oped and never taste as
good as home grown. .

Even better are heirloom *
tomatoes. These are open

_ pollinated varieties that

have been around for a
long time. Itis generally |
agreed that the best tasting
tomatoes of all are, heir-
loom varieties. Pink
Brandywine is often quoted
as being the perfect tomato:
good size, lovely shape, old-
fashioned real tomato taste.
The big difference
between hybrid and heir-
loom tomatoes is the fact
that you can save heirloom
seeds and use them for you
next season’s crop. Hybrid
seeds are not designed to

‘be replanted after the first

sowing. ais 3

- All tomatoes fall into the
category of determinate or
indeterminate. Determinate
tomato plants produce fruit
over a short period and
then die. Indeterminate
plants will continue to pro-
duce over a long period and
in the Bahamas are usually
pulled up when the garden-
er gets fed up with them.

Tomatoes come in many
sizes, Shapes and colours.

e Cherry tomatoes are all
small but can be round,
grape-like or pear-shaped.
They can also be pink, red
or yellow. |

e Paste tomatoes tend to
be blocky or pear-shaped
and usually ripen to an —
intense red.

e Salad tomatoes are
round, or almost so, and

’

-_ have a wide variety of

colours and colour combi-
nations including white and
a yellow and green mixture
when ripe. .

e Beefsteak tomatoes are
generally large because.



“magnificent tomatoes we have a suc-

they are basically two or
three tomatoes joined
together as one on a single
stalk.

e Heirloom tomatoes
tend to have the weirdest of
shapes, including ruffles
and flutes.

Here in the Bahamas we
can plant our tomato seeds
directly into the soil where
we want them to grow. If

_you start them off in a seed

box and then transplant the '
seedlings, bury them deep

as roots will develop from

the part of the stalk that is
underground. The seedlings

_appreciate plenty of water-

ing but do not apply fertil-
izer (except for liquids like
Miracle Gro) until the |
plants have reached the
staking stage.

Tomatoes like well- .
drained soil that has been
conditioned and lightly fer-
tilized well ahead of sowing
seeds or transplanting
seedlings. I find the best
conditioner to be commer-
cial cow manure. '

More fruit will be pro-
duced and reach maturity
safely if your tomato plants
are staked. There are
dozens, of different staking
systems but even the worst
is better than no staking at
all. If your tomatoes ever
touch the ground they are
almost certain to be
attacked by predators.

I hope you like the photo
that.accompanies this arti-
cle. My old friend Madis
Tambre of Mississauga,

- Canada, is a keen gardener

who grows all his vegeta-
bles in containers. His _
growing season is much

_ shorter than ours and it

usually happens that he is

off on vacation when the

main crop is produced.
While Madis was in Esto-

: Si

_ nia this summer his cousin

Otto picked his ripe toma-
toes, etc, and took a photo-
graph of them. I was so
impressed by it that I
thought Tribune readers ew
would also like to see it.
Many of the varieties are
Estonian heirlooms Madis Aes
brought back in 2007. He =
sent seeds to me and I had
an overabundance of cherry bey
tomatoes in the summer. .
Some of the larger and ae
more interesting varieties
are already in Bahamian win
soil and looking good. Tye

° j hardy@coralwave.com



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

+

THE TRIBUNE



PRT Le aT ec) ie a al
Cancer and your pet dog

CANCER or malignant tumours
usually refers to an abnormal
growth of cells that interferes with
normal body function. All body
cells have a life span, When ney
die, cells are replaced through
process called mitosis in w ich
a single cell splits into two cells
identical to the parent cell. For
reasons unknown to us, normal
cells sometimes mutate during
mitosis, producing fast growing
abnormal cells that act like par-
asites, invading and replacing
healthy tissue.

Under ideal circumstances, the body’s
immune system recognizes these cells as
foreign and eliminates them before they
cause problems. Sometimes, however,
the body can’t fight off the attack by
these cells resulting in growth of abnor-
mal cells, called tumours or neoplasms.
Those that remain localized and rela-
tively harmless are termed benign, while
potentially deadly spreading tumours
are called malignant.

Malignant tumours or cancer can be
confined to one area, but often they
spread or metastasize throughout the
body. The most dangerous cancer is
already spreading at the early stages,
when the point of origination is still
very small or even nearly undetectable.
A malignant tumour becomes deadly
wheg it interferes with normal body
processes.

Cancer is considered a disease of old-

er dogs and the incidence of tumours in

dogs increases with age.
Approximately 20. per cent of aM pet



dogs will develop cancer. The preva-
lence of cancer is difficult to determine.
The exact cause of cancer remains a

. mystery, but we do know that cancer

causing agents, referred to as 'carcino-
gens', may increase the risk of devel-
oping certain kinds of diseases, for
example exposure to sunlight increases
the risk of skin cancer. The relation of
sexual hormones and some cancers has
also been documented. Also, mammary

cancer in female dogs and prostrate and ~

testicular cancer in males.

CLINICAL SIGNS OF CANCER

1. Abnormal swelling that persists or
continues to grow

2. Sores that do not heal

3. Weight loss

4. Loss of appetite

5. Bleeding or discharge from any
body opening

6. Offensive odour

7. Difficulty eating and swallowing

8. Hesitation to exercise or loss of
stamina

9. Persistent lameness or stiffness

10. Difficulty in breathing, urinating
or defecating

Dogs can suffer from more kinds of
cancer than any other domestic animal.
Skin cancer is the most common canine
cancer. The most common skin tumours
are sebaceous adenomas and then mast
cell tumours.

‘ Mammary gland cancer is considered
the second leading cancer in dog. This
type, of cancer is seen in middle age,
intact (non-spayed) females: Usually, a

painless lump or enlargement appears in
the breast closest to the rear legs.

Lymph gland cancers are devastating .

because. they commonly spread
throughout the body. Oral tumours are
also very common. Bone cancer or
(Osteosarcoma) which are almost
always malignant tumours that spread
to the lungs is also common.

The cancer treatment of choice in
veterinary medicine is surgical removed
of the tumour, which is particularly
effective when the cancer is localized
and has not spread. For instance, bone
cancer is usually treated by amputation
of the affected limb.

Unfortunately, surgical cure is rare
because it is difficult to remove every
cancerous cell. Leaving behind a single
cell allows the cancer to recur and/or
spread. Some cancers that encroach

upon vital organs, nerves, or muscle can |
be difficult to surgically remove without

damaging normal tissue. In those

CANCER is considered a
disease of older dogs and

the incidence of tumours in
pe increases with age.

instances radiation may be used. How-
ever, in the Bahamas there is no veteri-
nary hospital equipped to perform this
expensive treatment.

Chemotherapy is the third cancer
treatment commonly used with dogs
and it is most useful in treating cancer
that has spread throughout the body.
A wide variety of cytoxic (cell poison-
ing) drugs are available and may be
used singly or in combination with pills
or intravenous injections. The specific
drugs used will depend on the type of
cancer.

Many of the same human medica-
tions are effective against cancer in
dogs.

¢ Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at the
Central Animal Hospital. Questions or com-
ments should be directed to potcake59@hot-

mail.com. Dr Sands can also be contacted at .

325-1288


































Equal opportunity employer Doctors Ho pital



promotes differences through diversity

DENALDO Henfield had a
difficult time getting a job before
he was hired by Doctors Hos-
pital. The 18-year-old, graduate
of CC Sweeting High School,
whosé academic achievements.
include Bahamas 'Geieral' Cer
tificate of Secondary Education
(BGCSE) passes in art and
design, Bahamas Junior Certifi-
cates (BJC) passes in math,
English language and health:sci-
ence, and Pitman examination
passes in typing and computer
studies, never expected he
would have to endure so many
job interviews before finding a
company that would hire him.
On paper, he looked like a first-
rate job candidate.

But Denaldo had one chal-
lenge against him: he is deaf.
And many of the companies
that interviewed him didn't want
to risk hiring a deaf person - no
matter how talented, pleasant
and smart he is. Many deaf per-
sons are facing similar chal-
lenges. Potential employers are
reluctant to hire persons with
disabilities because of assump-
tions that meeting their needs
in the workplace would be
inconvenient and/or impose a
financial burden on the compa-
ny.

As an aspiring surgeon,
Denaldo was previously placed
in Doctors Hospital's School to
Work Programme in the Emer-
gency Room through collabo-
ration between Guidance Coun-
sellor Patrice Francis and Doc-
tors Hospital's Training Officer,
Elizabeth Grant. ‘

During his four weeks of on-
the-job-training, Denaldo per-
formed impressively; he

arranged paper work, organised
files, ran specimens to the lab
and delivered forms to the X-
ray Department. Denaldo com-

municates verbally and can read
lips. Written forms of’ commu-

vey his thoughts and accomplish
his tasks.
“The interview at Doctors

‘Hospital was a total turnaround

of what I experienced else-
where,” Denaldo said. “Rather
than a wall of resistance, I was
welcomed, and no one looked
down on me because of my
deafness. They saw me as an
equal regardless of my handi-
cap. I'm glad to have the oppor-
tunity. to work here because a
lot of deaf people are not hired
by a lot of employers. Doctors
Hospital gave me a chance once
and they are doing it again, I'm
happy to be working here."'
While many companies have
shied away from hiring the dis-
abled because of:perceived
stumbling blocks, Doctors Hos-
pital, an equal opportunity
employer, took the opportunity
to broaden even further the
diversity of its associates:
“Doctors Hospital has a long
history of promoting diversity
among our associates. Recruit-
ing and cultivating diverse talent
is central to our workforce
diversity strategy. Through hir-
ing, Denaldo, we are playing an
active role in eliminating bias
and stigma towards persons with

' disabilities. At Doctors Hospital,

we pride ourselves on being an
equal opportunity employer”
Michele Rassin, vice president
of Operations, said.

Doctors Hospital's Market-



Doctors Hospital/Photo

DOCTORS HOSPITAL welcomes the hearing impaired on staff. Pictured from left are Charles Sealy, CEO,
Doctors Hospital; Denaldo Henfield, dietary assistant; Sandy Wilson, coordinator, Food and Beverage Depart-
ment and Paul Haven, vice president, Human Resources.

ing Assistant, Lisa Humes, is
elated about the-stand that Doc-
tors Hospital has taken with
regard to Denaldo as she has a
son who is hearing impaired and
often wonders about his future
in the Bahamas.

“Most persons in the general
public and corporate Bahamas
are ignorant of the deaf and
hearing impaired. They wrongly
assume that they are not intelli-
gent and that they cannot func-
tion in a hearing world. The
reality is that if you give them a
chance, they are indeed quite
intelligent, are scored on the

same level as their hearing peers
and they work twice as hard to
succeed.

"Communication may be
challenging but with patience
and creativity, it's easy to
accommodate their needs.
Deaf/hard-of-hearing candidates
are just like any other hearing
job seeker, each has unique
skills and I am proud that Doc-
tors Hospital is taking notice,”
she said.

‘Denaldo, who is described as
a very keen, diligent and enthu-
siastic young man with a very
pleasant demeanor, will start

_his tenure in Doctors Hospital's

Dietary Department to provide
quality service to the patients

and customers. To assist with .

his communication, Denaldo
will wear a badge that identi-
fies him as hearing impaired
and instructs patients/associates
to speak directly to him, which
will assist his superior lip read-
ing skills. ;

sveeee lecescececececececscscececocessccscecesesececscecebenseees,

e For more information an taking
steps to diversify your company
with bright young talent, call the
Centre for the Deaf at 323-6767.



OF any step in skin care,
cleansing is the most critical to
your skin's health. Why?
Because most of us spend our
days in environmentally toxic
air, with pollutants constantly
drawn to the surface of our skin.
Add to that, your body also uses
the skin's surface to rid the
body of toxins. And if that does-
n't have you convinced, think
of this - a large percentage of
dust is the result of dried
sewage!

So, if cleansing is so vital, why
do so many people do it incor-
rectly? From rinsing with hot
water instead of warm, to using
soap with is drying alkaline
base, many people assault their
skin on a daily basis in the name
of cleansing.

In the short term, this results
in dry, taut skin. Over longer
periods of time, the skin's lack
of natural defenses leaves it
open to attack, so ironically, it is
overly-fervent cleansing that
actually worsens the very prob-
lems it is intended to solve.

WHEN IS A BAR NOT A SOAP?
Is your daily cleanse attacking
your skin? Well, if you are using

a soap bar, chances are that it is.

Because soap is made primarily
from a caustic blend of boiled
animal fat, lye and soda, it is
very highly alkaline.

When soap is applied to the

' face, it neutralizes the skin's

natural acid mantle, stripping
the skin of its most important
line of defence against infec-
tion, dehydration and environ-
mental assault. To make mat-
ters worse, most consumers
select their soap bar for its
smell, which is usually nothing
more than a highly irritating
artificial fragrance. The result?
A taut, dry complexion that's
completely susceptible to envi-
ronmental damage.

What's surprising about soap
is that over 80 per cent of the
worlds population is still using
it, despite its skin damaging
properties.

Fortunately, you can now find

non-soap bars with skin care
quality agents. These new
cleansing bars combine skin-
friendly benefits of high quality
liquid cleansers with the conve-
nience of a bar and are formu-
lated to match your skin's pH.
Finding the correct skin-friend-
ly bar is a great substitute to

using dehydrating soap. Ask
you skin care therapist about
finding the correct cleanser for
your skin.

This information was taken from
www.dermalogica.bs
e Sarah Simpson is a skin care



therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Vis-
it her and her team of skin and
body therapists at One Sandyport
Plaza (the same building as Ballys
Gym). For more information about
their September Face Treatment
special for all new clients visit
www.dermal-clinic.com or call
327.6788

Photoaging:

‘The SU ages you



OVER time skin ages and

: loses its youthful appearance.
: Wrinkles appear around the
: eyes, fine lines bloom around
: the lips and age spots appear °
: on the hands. While some of
: these factors are natural and
: unavoidable, many of the vis-
: ible signs of aging are caused
: by the sun, and can be avoid-
: ed.

Skin is composed of three

i layers:
: © The epidermis or outer layer
: . The dermis or middle layer
' | ¢ The subcutis or basement lay-
: er

The second layer or the

: dermis is the part of the skin

: that contains collagen, elastin

: and other fibres that support

: the skin’s structure. It is these

? elements that are responsi-

. : ble for giving skin its smooth
: and youthful appearance. It is
: also this area that is damaged
: by the UV radiation.

There are two types of UV

? rays - UVA and UVB. When

: the UV rays hit the skin, the

: cells in the dermis try to pro-

: duce melanin to send to the
: surface layer of skin. This
: prevents fhe rays from pene- °
: trating the skin. This is the
: process by which you devel-
i opa tan.

UVB rays are shorter than

: UVA rays and are responsi-
+ ble for the sunburn. The
: UVA rays however have
: longer wavelengths and are
: responsible for the photoag-
i ing. They penetrate deep into
: the dermis where they dam- .
: age the collagen fibres. The
: skin then atfempts to rebuild
: this damaged collagen by
: producing enzymes. The
: enzymes however often mal-
: function and degrade.the col-
: lagen resulting in-incorrectly
? rebuilt skin. .

Since this process is repeat-

: ed with daily UVA exposure,
: the incorrectly rebuilt skin
: forms wrinkles, and the
: depleted collagen results in
: leathery type skin.

Repeated sun exposure

: also causes age spots or liver
: spots. These spots have noth-
: ing to do with your liver, but

' everything to do with the sun.
: An age spot is a small bit of
? pigmentation caused by sun
? exposure and is called a solar
: lentigo. They are usually
: found on the hands, arms,
: chest and face.

The best way to fight pho-

: toaging is prevention. Daily
: application of a sunscreen
: that is SPF 15 or higher to
: areas that are prone to pho-
: toaging will not only help
: prevent photoaging, but can
: actually reverse some of the
: signs you already have.

Reducing your exposure to

: UV radiation will also lower
: your risk of developing skin
: Cancer or pre-cancer type
: lesions.

e /f you have any questions

: please do not hesitate to con-
: tact Dr. Knowles at 327-

: 8718/9 at the Olde Town Mall
i Sandyport or email her at

: drknowles1@hotmail.com.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 11B

Bahamas Girl Guides Association

camp 2009 .-

Bahamian beauties
get ready for
model showdown

FROM page 12

said it was nerve wracking
waiting to find out if she made
it into the contest.

“After my casting,” she told
Tribune Women, “it was a
constant back and forth. One
day I would say that some-
thing's wrong, and the next
day I would be saying 'you'll
do fine’.”

When she finally got the
message that she had made it
into the show, Michel said it
an extremely big relief. “This
was like my exhale moment.”

The young lady, who is also
part Barbadian, said that win-
ning the Supermodel of the
Bahamas would be like having
the opportunity to make foot-
prints in the industry for
young people from the
Bahamas.and Barbados.

Modeling has always been a
passion for another super-
model prospect, 17 year old
Erinn Treco. ,

_ “My dream is to become a
model, so I couldn't pass this
opportunity up” said the
young high school student.
When she saw the ad about

the event on Facebook, Erinn i

said she immediately went to
the Ford online site and regis-
tered.

“You have to understand, I
read and collect Vogue, Teen

’ Vogue, Seventeen and Cosmo
Girl, and sometimes I get the
New York Times fashion mag-
azine. I study the designers,
the photographers, what the
makeup artists are doing, and
the different models. If any-
thing new comes up, that way
I will have the upper hand.”

Even though she feels that
she knows a lot about the busi-
ness and has a look she con-
siders to be multi-ethnic, Erin
said that you just never know
what the judges are looking
for. “You just have to block
it out and try to become the
winner.”

She said that she realises
becoming a Ford model is
going to take a lot of hard
work and determination, and
she has already begun mak-
ing frequent trips to the gym.

“Once my mind is settled
on something, I go after it. I
am very determined,” Erinn

said.

“My mom wants me to fin-
ish school, but she also knows
that modeling is something
that I want to do. So, she is
excited for me, and she is
showing me a lot of support.”

College of the Bahamas'
student, Jourdana Rodgers,
21, thought that entering the
contest would be a good
opportunity to try and get

more modeling experience, +

see how she would stand up
against other potential
Bahamian “supermodels,” and
then, see how far she can take
her modeling career with the
experience iearned from being
a part of this contest.

“When I was growing up, I
was always taller than every-
one else my age. I didn't like
my height too much, but did-
n't want it to go to waste. I
didn't like sports, so I started
model training,” said Jour-
dana. ‘

And despite having person-
al issues with her height as a
youngster, the exotic 5'11
beauty said that with her
moms help, she learned how
to love her height. She told
Tribune Woman, “I didn't
always like my height, but
now, I love it!”

“My height is what. makes
me different from all the oth-
er girls,” Jourdana said,
remembering the day when
she went in for the final cast-
ing.
“T was okay when I was out-
side,” she recalls, “but when I
got inside the gym, I started
having butterflies wondering
how I would stack up to the
other girls, but after a while, I
realised that all of the girls had
their own attributes that they
were bringing to the contest. I
knew that I couldn't bring it
all, but I had my legs and
height as an advantage over
most of the other girls.”

If she were the one to rep-
resent the Bahamas in Mon-
tenegro in January of 2009,
Jourdana said that she will be
ready to mix it up with the 50
other “Supermodel” hopefuls
at the international event.

° Tickets for the 1st Annual
Ford Models' Supermodel of the
Bahamas and Models242 Male
Face of 242 is scheduled to go on
sale Wednesday, September 17
and will be available at Diamonds
International, Carlos Valentino on
Bay and Victoria, Flaunt It Cloth-
ing Store on Rosetta Street,
Urban Nation in the Mall at
Marathon, and Coco Nuts
Bahama Grill, West Bay Street.

THE Bahamas Girl Guides Association has been invited by the
Caribbean Link of Guiding to host Caricamp 2009. This camp is expect-
ed to attract some 200 girls and leaders from 20 countries in the
Caribbean including Canada, England and the US.

This event, scheduled for Easter of 2009, will run for five days and will
be based in New Providence at St Augustine's College. It is expected
that this will be a time of adventure, challenges, forging new friendships
and developing each person's potential under the theme of: Forging
Friendships. Nurturing Caribbean Unity through Guiding.

GIRL GUIDES CELEBRATES COMMONWEALTH DAY

prepares for Cari

The Bahamas Girl Guides celebrated Commonwealth Day in a
fashion show and luncheon on May 24.

Representatives of the Commonwealth of Nations here in the
Bahamas joined with the guides in a fashion show to model their
national dress. Mrs Clarice Granger, former chief commissioner,
chaired the annual event.

LADY DOROTHY CASH REMEMBERED hoe

Members of the Bahamas Girl Guides Association paid tribute to the
late Lady Cash who died on May 19.

Lady Cash was actively involved in Guiding for many years. She
served as a member of Council and in 1984 became the patron of the
association.

In the latter capacity, she chaired the annual general meetings and
gave her full support by attending various other events, notably, the
launching of the annual Cookie Week drive.

In one of her many addresses she said, "The principles of Girl
Guiding here plays a vital role in the lives of many of our young
women who are making valuable contributions to our community.

"Girl Guides have an opportunity to learn and develop many skills,
and are exposed to discipline and a sense of dedication and loyalty to

countr







Decision paralysis

YOU have probably already seen "Decision Paralysis" in - inac-
tion. It isn't very selective, it can show up in any office at any time. It
happens when a decision needs to be made and the decision maker,
who can be an executive, manager, supervisor or employee, seems
oblivious of the need to make a decision and get things moving.

Sometimes managers, super-
visors and employees are afraid
to make a decision because at
some time or another, they
took what they thought was a
calculated risk only to have it

backfire in a humiliating out-.

burst of power, disappointment
or outrage by a senior manager
or executive. Senior managers
sometimes don't grasp the

: notion that if, instead of coach-

ing, you berate an employee or

.a supervisor for a mistake, you

create a culture of fear, risk
aversion and homogeneity.
There are many more rea-
sons why decision makers can
become paralyzed or inopera-
tive. Some leaders are just not
comfortable with making a
decision about a trouble maker
or non-performer who is nega-
tively impacting the team
because they don't want to be
responsible for creating hard-
ship for the trouble maker and
their family. I often hear the
term, "I don't.want to take
bread out their mouths" so the
cancer festers and spreads
among the team while the team
leader sticks their head in the
sand. The key issue here is that
as a leader, you are being paid
to make both the easy and the
tough decisions so you need to
rise to the expectations of your
tole.
From the opposite perspec-
tive, there are managers who

neglect to make a decision to-

promote strong performers
because of petty jealousies or
because they can't afford to
lose their top performers. The
problem here may be that the
leader has not developed a
competent team and is relying
on one person to pull the
weight. If your team isn't.com-
petent it means you need to
make a decision or a combina-
tion of decisions to train, trans-
fer, disengage or restructure.
Another sign of decision
paralysis is the manager who
is petrified by the prospect of

“conflict. There are many, many

managers who fear being con-
fronted. The perceived poten-
tial for disrespect rattles them
to their core so they take great
pains to avoid taking a stand.
They usually lack the confi-
dence, training, skills and will to
harness or even acknowledge
any type of conflict and trans-
form it into a positive process
and outcome.

Then there is a group of
immobilized managers who
over-analyze a problem to the
point where they start to lose

sight of the relevant facts and
get caught up with the incon-
sequential and petty. These
managers see themselves as

_ cerebral or intelligent but they .

take their ability to think to an
unproductive level. The key

skill they need to learn here is -

execution.

There are some managers
who can't separate facts from
emotion so their emotions stop

them from making a decision’:

or cause-them to take an inap-

propriate position. Everyone ~

else perceives the inaction or
emotionalism for what it is
except the emotive manager.
While sometimes stalling tac-
tics are appropriate, employ-
ees and support persons can
tell (over time) if you are
stalling purposefully or if you
are in a place of abject indeci-
sion. Sometimes stalling or
waiting will make the decision
easier because circumstances
may sort themselves out but

keep in mind that timing is |

everything, so if you are stuck
and you miss an important win-
dow of opportunity you will
seem ineffective or impotent.

Here are some of the nega-
tive effects of indecision:

1. A loss of confidence in and
respect of your leadership.

2. Low morale due to frus-
tration.

3. Missed opportunities.

4. Issues piling up on each
other, compounding a situation
or making resolution more
complex than it needs to be.

5. You stand to lose your top
performers who become frus-
trated by the perceived lack of
direction and stasis.

There are numerous decision
making tools available to assist
anyone who needs to strength-
en their decisiveness. One of
them is called the "Six Think-

ing Hats". Each hat represents:

a perspective of the challenge
or problem that you can con-
sider:

¢ The White Hat: Look at
past trends and identify gaps
in your knowledge

¢ The Red Hat: Look at the
optional solutions at a gut level.
You can also make an effort to
understand how employees or
members will probably react.
Keep in mind that a negative
reaction isn't always a reason to
decide against a solution.

e The Black Hat: This form
of thinking makes your deci-

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





A

B By YWETTE
catela

sion more resilient. Weigh the
cons of the options. This is
important because it exposes

the weaknesses in the solu-

tions.

e The Yellow Hat: This is
the optimistic viewpoint. Use
this approach to identify the
value and opportunities in
your options.

¢ The Green Hat: This hat

. is about introducing creativity

to the process. One tool of cre-

ativity is brainstorming (ie, |
~ true brainstorming that sus-



Career appartunity for an amebitions carver ovtented individual:



Major Responsibilities:



pends judgment of ideas dur-
ing the process). ®
e The Blue Hat: This hat is

about procéss control. Did the |

meeting leader prepare an
agenda and facilitate the dis-
cussion effectively or did you
walk away from the meeting
thinking it was a waste of
time?
(Source: Mindtools)

Once you review your chal-
lenge using the six thinking
hats or any tool or combina-

#@ PARTICIPANTS in costume
(above), representing different
countries in the Commonwealth.

«

PICTURED are Mrs Elma Garraway
(cente), Mr James Catalyn and Miss
Betty Cole (left), directors of Parade.




tion of decision making tools
of your choice, you can ven-
ture into the world of risk gak-
ing. If your decision is not a
confidential matter, you can

‘minimize your risk by testing

your ideas on your coworkers
of boss. The execution process
will test the applicability and
adaptability of. four plans. It
will test your leadership skills
because it is inevitable that
recalibration will probably be
necessary. '

senemeneeceneenesteaecceacseccccenssaureccsesereneeeeeeseenneete

e Yvette Bethel is the presi-
dent of Organizational Soul. She
can be contacted by telephone
at 242.424.7166 or fax -
242.324.1631 or write to her at
PO Box N-511, Nassau,
Bahamas. Interested persons
can also check out her website
at: www.orgsoul.com.



‘

‘sg Claims Advisor

PRN NAUMAN ‘Tonay, ToMORREN.

» Provide enstomer service, advice and axstvtance to walkin contomereand
aver the (dephane
Deal with agencies and other insurance companion

> Complete reparty and input data

+ Axsist with subrogation

+ Maintain Claims Bordereauy

~ Ansletance with special projects

> Must he able to work shifts

Quullfteations:

AA. Dogree in tisiness or related sabject

Minimum 2-3 years experience in claims handling
~ Supervisory skills _

Computer proflelency required

Strong customer service, communication and ierpersnnal skills

Compensation commeisurate with relevant experience and qualifications, Qn.thie
job training will be provided,

The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casially insurance company
in the Bahamas and hax an A- (Excellent) Rating from A. M, Best, reflecting the
company’s financial stability and sound risk management practiers.

Moase apply Mefore September 19, 2008 fo:

Group HR & Training Manager
Rahamas First Corporate Services
32 Collins Avenue
P.O, Box $8 = 6234
Nassau, Hahamas

Or email io: careers”! hahamastiret.com












































i

Mark Humes/Photos





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,



SEPTEMBER 16,






2008







pare for the upcoming

one of them winning a
modeling contract worth
$250,000, and the title of
the Bahamas’ first super-
model and Ford Models’
‘Supermodel of the World’.

Se rt NRE NEEM







R nearly a decade, young Bahamian girls have been watching Tyra

— Peer announce to anxious and often fanatical contestants on her tele-

vision reality series America's Next Top Model (ANTM) that one of the
- prizes that they are vying for is a multi-million dollar contract with “the leg-

endary modeling agency, Ford Models.”

For the throngs of young Bahamian women who’
religiously watch ANTM, they can only imagine such
an opportunity, and the overwhelming response to the
locally produced spin-off, Bahamas Next Top Model,
is a testament to this desire for the chance to live the
dream of one of Bank's contestants.

Now, with the founding of Models242, aspiring
Bahamian beauties have the chance to realise their
dream. Models242 has partnered with Ford, and as a
Spe have opened the door for young women to get

"real life” opportunity.

“Bor one week, beginning September 28, they will
work it out in front of the camera and on the runway
hoping to show their own unique brand of Bahamian
beauty to the prestigious agency known for develop-
ing the careers of some of the world's original super-
models, such as Naomi Campbell, Brooke Shields,
and ANTM winner Eva.

Billed as a “Night Under The Stars,” the final event,
which is scheduled to take over Fort Charlotte on
West Bay Street on October 4, will pay tribute to a
legendary pioneer in the fashion industry in the
Bahamas, Pepper Johnson.

In preparation for the whirlwind of activity, four of
the countries up and coming models sat with Tribune



Violet [|





4 Nature
i Harmony fh Fresh

{

Woman to talk bout: their thoughts and experiences

surrounding the contest which has put them on the
fast track to winning $250,000 in modeling contracts as
the Bahamas' first supermodel and Ford Models'
‘Supermodel of the World’.

Nineteen year old Erika Adderley, one of this
year's finalists, said she was happy and excited about
the opportunity. “Now that it is happening, I am going
to look at it as a learning experience. I am getting an
opportunity to work with and present myself to repre-
sentatives from Ford. That is an exciting experience.”

The model hopeful thinks that it is funny how the
same modeling agency, whose name she heard many
times on the Tyra Bank' television reality show, is
now coming to the Bahamas.

“This shows that the Bahamas is moving on to
another level” she said, adding, "It's about time”.

And what if she doesn't win? Erika said that she
would not feel bad because she knows that “when one
door is closed, many other doors open up”.

Another young beauty vying for the same chance to
represent the Bahamas at the Supermodel of the World
competition is Michel Archer. Sixteen year old Michel

SEE page 11

oe Reeth
“fragrances!

Ensueno at
your favourite
store.

BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759

BAHAMIAN MODELS pre-

competition which will see





ae tua) se tnonoriss rr Ih Z Tass ePNcTAPTSN AMEE



ROP sll



THEME: THE DEFINING MOMENT
OR THE WAY FORWARD

SECOND BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL
ASSOCIATION SUMMIT and —

THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION





ait





2 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008

“Reaching out to better serve the community”

Community Pharmacy

P.O. Box N-10823 eCarmicheal Rd.
Ph/Fax: 341-2086
Palmetto Point Eleuthera

Ph:332-1512

Bi der Vai tec eh
“ Sophia Fisher

The Community Pharmacy Offers:

¢ Free Blood Pressure Check
e Blood Glucose NEN Cols
e Health & Beauty Aids &Jots more
We Deliver to ANY ata Ya

Fax or Call and it will be there the next time available.

Opening Hours
Monday - Saturday 8am - 9pm and -
Sunday & Holiday 9am - 5pm

“Your health comes first”

Special Discount PTAA aa

ea Se accepted.

RR RE IRBRBRERER
: Menno PHARMACY

“THE PHARMACY OF DISTINCT ON®







"TRIED AND TRUSTED” |
R COSMETICS
fe JEWELLERY

%s _ OPEN:8:00 TO 8:00 MON-SAT —_KIM MAJOR - PHARMAC!
| MT ROYAL AVE & KENILWORTH CLINTON McCARTNEY PHARMACIST
P.O. BOX N-979

nq OR 326-6548

0 cho: senneerenneannanennnrnnnnnenr tannin





Giemsa

’ : FAX: 328- 3546

SBBRBBE BEBRRRE

Sota Circia: Moise.





p24 Dn Baie ie ORAL...

PARADISE
PI OAR EOAC as

Z Prescription Dr ugs-Filec for Pi Dactors.
~ ver thes counter rugs
‘Registered Pharmacist Ory IDasty

4 SB Sericr CHizen * Hotel Workers
Disceouint/civit Servants: og
Neiturert. ‘Heecaltin. Products

~ Greeting arcs « Howisehotc items

&
a

ite Mohaays

Fex: (242) 393-5078 :
validated Re a aed de ed we emi eles em wl 2th ede ed a

i yr “TP Per PRO Posen” :

Cast Bony Streak crt Fetatey ‘Geast «ot tire Bricitac

‘Centreville Pharmacy .
www.centrevillerx.com

We accept the following: an
INSURANCE PLANS 3











= Atlantic Medical -



A 7 Imperial
Life Pnancial




Bahan Healt oS

SHEEN â„¢. GOLINA
RS Modiftex Commonwealth TORS
wo, Oo eras : The Options Plan





' “We deliver to the Centreville and Palmdale areas
and to the mall boats.”



“Jour one stop shop for all 3
yous Medical needs & more

Tel: 325-4644 ~
Fax: a









iu era py LSsais. Vs trip ai
si pay 3s yeeyrt Mee a ore cie

fen evil







PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, pharmacists are highly educated and
trained healthcare professionals who, having become certi-
fied in recognised specialty areas, and having passed exam-
inations administered by credentialing boards, are experts
in the field of preparing and dispensing pharmaceutical

| drugs and medicines;

AND WHEREAS, pharmacists, in some cases, are the
first ones to be contacted by patients with inquiries about
undiagnosed or diagnosed health conditions;

AND WHEREAS, one of the most important roles
which pharmacists are called upon to perform is the assum-
ing of direct and overall responsibility for the effective man-
agement of medications for patients in diseased states, so
that the state of health of ‘each patient is progressively
improved;

AND WHEREAS, the Government of the Bahamas is
pleased to be partnering with the Bahamas Pharmaceutical

THE RT. HON. HUBERT A. INGRAH

| PRIME MINISTER, COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS —



THE HON. H

MINISTER OF HEALTH





A: THE Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association hosts its 2008 summit, it is a
pleasure for me *Sps tea gas

to welcome international delegate and presen-
ters to The Bahamas, and to commend this asso-
ciation for its commitment to the provision of con-
tinuing education for its Membership.

This year’s theme, “The Defining Moment—The
Way Forward” is significant, as it transports The
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association beyond past
achievements. E

It allows this association to assess the challenges
that remain and look ahead with the goal of con-
fronting them with renewed determination. In set-
ting objectives and formulating policies, the
Ministry of Health remains cognizant of the influ-
ential role that professional bodies such as The
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association could play in
this process.

In this regard, I have noted that among other
matters, this year’s summit also seeks to focus two
major initiatives. These are’the proposed National
Prescription Drug Plan for chronic non-communi-
cable diseases and Pharmacy Legislation. This
provides a unique opportunity for pharmacists
along with their colleagues in other disciplines to
engage in meaningful discussions on issues perti-
nent to advancing their initiatives. To this end, The
Ministry of Health welcomes the submission of any

_additional recommendations emanating from these
discussions. ;

It is our hope that through this united and coor-
dinated effort, these initiatives that are geared

Tuesday, September 16, 2008 3



Association in making determinations on critical issues con-
nected with the implementation of the Government’s
healthcare initiative: The National Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Plan, and in the drafting of legislation to
regulate the practice of pharmacy in the Bahamas,

NOW THEREFORE, I, Hubert A Ingraham, Prime
Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, do hereby
proclaim the week beginning Sunday, 14th September and
ending Saturday, 20th September 2008 as “Pharmacy
Week”. ;

IN WITNESS WHEREOEF, I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 10th day of September 2008. _~

Hubert A. Dre

we




BERT MINNIS

toward enhancing the capacity of our health care
services to effectively respond to the changing
needs of the population will produce the desired
results.

I am therefore grateful to The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association for the activities that
are planned for this week, which serve as an invalu-
able complement to the work of the Ministry of
Health. .

I take this opportunity to encourage you as ded-
icated pharmacists to remain committed to the
concept of excellence, and I extend wishes for the
continued growth and success of The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association.

Iam therefore grateful to The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association for the activities that
are planned for this week, which serve as an invalu-
able complement to the work of the Ministry of
Health.

I take this opportunity to encourage you as ded-
icated pharmacists to remain committed to the
concept of excellence, and I extend wishes for the
continued growth and success of The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association.

I am thetefore grateful to The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association for the activities that
are planned for this week, Which serve as an
invaluable complement to the work of the Ministry
of Health. ;

I take this opportunity to encourage you as ded-
icated pharmacists to remain committed to the
concept of excellence, and I extend wishes for the
continued growth and success of The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association.









4 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008







x ASTRAZENECA |

* Abbott Diagnostics

* Abbott Laboratories Puerto Lid......... Seisun Shampoo, Murine, Ensure
* Boehringer ingelheim Canada Ltd

* Roche Diagnostics -

x Boot Healthcare... Nurofen Tabiets , Strepsils Boots

W:. BOC OF sass cccoiaticavassvedariatess Pharmaton/Ginsana

* Smith & Nephew... Wound Care

Fe Ooi tcssiptcscrstneienenes Histatussin Cough Syrup
* Bayer A.G

* Collins Ltd.

* Novartis

x Connaught Laboratories Ltd.
* Eli Lilly Exports S. A.

* Hawaiian Tropic

* Janssen Cilag

*« Glaxosmith Kline

* Nature’s Bounty Vitamins




Nassau Agencies (1995) Ltd.

Pharmaceutical Supplies (Wholesale)

AGENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING : ALSO, APOTEX —

E-Mail: naipharm@bc ~—s>t._bs
Web Site: www.nalohans.:.com

SERVING YOUR HEALTH NEEDS
Appointed stocking agents for the following
manufacturers of: Pharmaceuticals,
Nutritionals, Health & Beauty Aids, Wound —
Care & Diabetic Supplies, Rental of Oxygen
Concentrators, School Supplies

* Loreal Martindale

* Ferrero

* Pharmaton

* Riker 3M

* Sanofi Pharma S.A. .
* Schering Las Americas os

* Servier international

* Seven Seas

* Stiefel Labs., inc.

* Winthrop Pharmaceutical inc.

* Wyeth Ayerst Int'l U. S.A. PO. &B. < S$S-6288

* Bausch & Lomb
* Schering Plough COR. Jerome & Mt.
* Merck _ Pléasant Aves.

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 393-4854
Fax: (242) 394-0533





Pharmacy Ltd.

Open Daily 8am-9pm
Holidays & Sundays
EU ERY ETL
Ridgeland Mall, Robinson Rd.

P.0. Box CR-54891, Nassau, Bahamas

The Pharmacy that never says “No”
Delton “Doc” Bain
Chief Pharmacist

Best Prices in Town
e Friendly Environment, Quick Service
¢ Computerized Prescription Service
¢ Special Discounts for all our regular customers
¢ Over the counter Drugs, Vitamin, Toiletries
-e Hair Care Products, School Supplies

Tel: 322-4560/322-3627







MR. PHILIP GRA\

President of the Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association |

HIS IS an exciting time in the practice of Pharmacy in the Bahamas.
There is new pharmacy legislation on the horizon, a pharmacy coun-
cil will be formed in short order. é :

The National Prescription Drug Plan for chronic non-communicable
decease will assist in defining the new model for pharmacy business.

Career path opportunities are numerous.

The profession has never been more viable, lucrative or in the spot light. It
is indeed “The defining moment in time" for the profession of pharmacy.

“To whom much is given much is expected”. The mandate given to us to
police and protect the integrity of the profession is voluminous.

The age of pharmaceutical care gives us a wonderful avenue to not only dis-
pense medications with accuracy that will relieve symptoms, but to be agents
through counseling and development of relationships with our patients to get
to the root causes of their illnesses.

In truly understanding this, we grasp the awesomeness of our charge for the
entire pharmaceutical industry. The urgency our mandate must also propel
us to seek out the potential in our youth and steer the right skill set into our
most noble profession. — : :

Pharmacy week and summit 2008 is most important for us and our country.
The need to enlighten our patrons and clients is among our goals. The sum-

Brats ta out cert 47 Gee ae) CT ra Dec




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i Tuesday, September 16, 2008 * 5

sional and social development
which will empower us for the
way forward.

To our guests from the
Caribbean region and our com-
panion association in South
Florida we welcome you and
thank you for sharing in our
moment in time. a

We promise to be the best host
as you experience the land where
God lives. ;

It is my prayer that as God did for Jabez that He would bless us indeed and
continue to enlarge our territory, that God's hand will be upon us so that we
will never cause harm to one another or our clients.

Do enjoy and absorb all that pharmacy week and Summit 2008 has to offer.

It is my prayer that as God did for Jabez that He would bless us indeed and
continue to enlarge our territory, that God's hand will be upon us so that we
will never cause harm to one another or our clients.

Do enjoy absorb all that pharmacy week and Summit 2008 has to offer.






Your Faull Service

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6 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008

THE BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION
SUMMIT SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

SUNDAY 14TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

7:00am.— 9:00am.
12:00pm.— 6:00pm.



MONDAY 15TH SEPTEMBER, 2008



12:00pm.— 3:00pm. ‘ ‘Decoration & Judging of Pharmacies : :

TUESDAY 16TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

Newspaper Supplement -

9:00am. — 1:00pm. Brown Bag Day

1:00pm. — 2:00pm. — > bimch

2:00am. — 5:00pm. . Brown Bag Day Cont’ a

5:00pm. — 7:00pm: Break

8:00pm. — 9:00pm. —. Live LV. Broadcast—Public Ed on
Herbal Medicine ©

WEDNESDAY 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

9:00am. . Registration

10:00am.— 11:00am. : Coffee Break

11:00am.— 1:00pm. Registration Cont’d

1:00pm.— 2:00pm. Lamch. =

2:00pm.— 5:00pm. ___._ Registration Cont'd ee
5:00pm.— 6:00pm. - -Break . i

7:00pm.— 9:00pm. Opening Ceremony

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

THURSDAY 18TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

8:00am.— 9:00pm. Inspiration Hour.
9:00am.— 10:00am. ___ Biostatistics for Pharmacy
: Documentation
10:00am.— 11:00am. : Coffee Break
11:00am.— 12:00pm. Pharmacovigalnce Bahamas
12:00pm.— 1:00pm Chronic Disease Management
1:00am.— 2:00pm. . . Lunch
2:00pm. — 3:00pm. -. Pharmacy LT. Tech. ©
3:00pm. — 5:00pm. > Pharmacy Tours.
5:00pm. — 7:00pm. Break :
7:00pm. — 8:00pm. Evening Session >



8:00pm. — 9:00pm. - Metabolic Syndrome



Tuesday, September 16, 2008 © 7

THE BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION
SUMMIT SCHEDULE OFEVENTS; =

FRIDAY 19TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

8:00am. — 9:00am.

9:00pm. — 10:00pm.
10:00am.— 11:00am.
11:00am.— 12:00am.

1:00pm.— 2:00pm.
2:00pm.— 4:00pm.
7:30pm.

9:00am.— 11:00am.
1:00pm. — 2:00pm.
7:00pm.



ete eo Pe whe Pe FELCH ESS” S Sh EKER ERED CR. EE ae Oe ae
ARSE? miaciat’ 23 Regilered pp SAMS Registered Pharmacist
Me Senior Critirert & Civil oe Experienced Praarmacists
Servants Miscou mts $8 Elernergaenoay Orcertng Syatearnt
CARMICHAEL ROAD

PRINCE CHARLES OnIVE SOLDIER ROAD ar Ce ee oe
St ee Se ee ee WEES ESE ERED oe ORES a sar ear «

- lO A oe EI it SE rae, Mas 368 OPEN 7:000.m. - 10:00p.em. DAILY

ax: Mao: 39-4-O723 OPEM 9:OOa.rn. - bO:00Op.0. DARLY INCLUDING SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS

OPEM B:00a.rm. ~ 12:00p.m. DAILY TICLUDING SUNDAYS
INCLUDING SUNOAYS & HOLIDAYS

ww A LE rrten poor LIS PARC CFLS
ass E>. BOx EE-16575

WORLILE BOREARLLES EOS CPLIEL PITMBERE COORRE CIEE







Tuesday, September 16, 2008 ° 8

Honouree Mr. Ci





















( linton McCartney affec-
/tidnately called CMc by
his staff has pioneered the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association by
bridging the gap amongst pharmacists
when he served as president in 1978.
He conducted walk abouts with execu-
tives to all Pharmacists in their workplace.
He also organized an AGM meeting in
Freeport to address their current con-
cerns.

Clinton started his pharmacy career at
the Princess Margaret Hospital under the
apprenticeship programme.

He preceptored under Mr. Pedro
Roberts (now deceased).

‘In 1972 he opened his own Pharmacy
- called McCartney's Pharmacy where he
is currently.





He also has preceptored many
Bahamian Pharmacist. His motto being'to
be the Best Pharmacist in your practice.

He comes from a family of Pharmacist,
his brother William McCartney, a nephew
Kurt McCartney, and a niece Kim Major.

Anyone who is affiliated with him is
accepted as part of his family. The cus-
tomers who visit his practice can expect
empathy, accuracy and integrity when
providing pharmaceutical care.

The Caribbean Association of
Pharmacist and Wesley Methodist
Church. He is a exceptional listener and
often you can envision him surrounded by
friends and family.

Clint is married to the former Myrtle
Nee Clare and they have one son Clint

. junior affectionately called CJ.

PHARMACISTS
PROFESSIONAL
LOVEPEOPLE

DISPENSE

CONFIDANT

FRIEND





COCO OOOO OOOO O HOES OOO DE OOOO OO OOO TOOL OSOELO HEHE HOEOOSEOOOTC ESO TOOHODHOTOHHOOHHHSOSHHOSOSSEHD SDSL SOLE ESOELO OOS OOOO Oe



COUNSEL
PATIENT
QUALITY
SERVICE
CARING
KIND
MEDICINE
LABEL
PILL
Orc
HUMBLE
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secre nmemmemnonetanerew RS



THE BAHAMAS





The Bahamas Government seeks to establish
a program for the supply of certain pharma-
ceutical products via government owned and

- other health facilities at an economic cost, in
the treatment of certain chronic diseases, and has out-
line the primary objectives of the “Chronic Diseases
Prescription Drug Plan” as follows:

To increase access to cost effec-
tive drugs for the treatment of specif-
ic chronic diseases and specified

' medical conditions

°To reduce the financial burden of
beneficiaries in respect of the pur-
chase of prescription drugs and spec-
ified medical supplies.

In order to provide funding for the
“Chronic Diseases Prescription Drug
Plan” the Bahamas Government
intends to establish a “Prescription

| INFINITY HEALTH CARE PHARMACY

v Free Blood
Pressure Checks

Â¥ Sugar & Cholesterol
Checks Also Avaliable

Drug Fund” which will be under the
control and management of the
National Insurance Board (NIB) and
which will consist of: 7

eContributions collected by NIB
from insured persons, employers and
any other category of persons as may
be prescribed.

eSums received by way of on or
donation.

eMonies collected by NIB on

behalf of the Prescription Drug Fund.



eSums approved by Parliament for
payment into the fund.

Monies collected by the
Prescription Drug Fund will be used
solely to pay for:

eThe purchase and financing of
prescription drugs and medical sup-
plies for beneficiaries.

_°Costs and expenses incurred by
NIB in the management of the Drug
Plan.

eHealth education, health promo-
tion, and to meet the cost of studies
for the implementation of measures
to prevent illnesses.

Specified diseases. and medical

. conditions covered by the “Chronic

Diseases Prescription Drug Plan” are
expected to include: e. Arthritis ¢
Asthma

e Breast Cancer ¢Prostate Cancer
e Diabetes e Benign Prostate
Hyperplasia (Enlarged Prosatate)

eHypoetension ¢ Glaucoma

e Ischemic Heart Disease

Tuesday, September 16, 2008 ° 9

e Major Depression e¢- Psychosis

In addition to providing beneficiar-
ies of the Plan with the necessary pre-
scription drugs and specified medical
supplies from Government owed
pharmacies and clinics, it is intended
that the Bahamas Government enter
into contractual arrangements with
owners of Bahamian registered phar-
macies in order to be able to provide
this service as well.

To ensure that an orderly and

transparent facilitation of the

“Chronic Diseases Prescription Plan”
takes place, it is imperative that the
specific needs of all stakeholders
(NIB, PHA, BNDA, Pharmaceutical
Wholesalers, Government
Pharmacies/Clinics, Private Hospital
Pharmacies and Retail Pharmacies)
are addressed and incorporated.

"The Family Pharmacy"



Â¥ Healthcare Providers for:

Atlantic Medical, Bahama Health
Clico and Colina

Discounts Offered to Senior Citizens,
: Students and Hote! and
Government Workers.

Accept All Major Credit Cards
Pharmacy Hours
Monday -Thursday 8:30am. — 9:00pm.

Friday 8:30am. —- 8:00pm

Saturday 6:00pm. — 8:00pm

Sunday & Holidays 9:00am, — 8:00pm.



Tuesday, September 16, 2008 ° 10

OVERVIEW OF THE PROPOSED PHARMACY ACT

he current legislation, which

governs the practice of phar-
macy (Chapter 212. The Pharmacy
Act) was enacted by Parliament on the
23rd of May, 1962. The act outlined a process for
registering pharmacists via the office of the
Minister responsible for Pharmacy. The current
legislation that governs the registration of
Pharmacists and Pharmacy technicians
(Chapter 220. The Health Professions Act) was
enacted by Parliament on the 6th of August,
1998. This act outlined the process for the for-



mation of the Health Professionals Council that:

would register and license all applicable health
professionals, of which pharmacists and phar-
macy technicians were included. It also provid-
ed a mechanism for general regulations for all
aforementioned health professionals, for their
governance.

At the present time, The Bahamas is the only
member-state of CARICOM in which the pro-
fession of pharmacy is not regulated via a
Pharmacy Board or Council.

Over the past ten years, the profession of

pharmacy has seen significant changes in the |

scope of practice, qualifications, new treatment

modalities, and emerging technological
advances. In addition, the profession is facing a

global crisis relating to the in creased influx of _

counterfeit medications and fraud via the
Internet practice of pharmacy.

It is now clear that the legislative tools avail-
able for governance must be improved. The
development of proper guidelines necessary for
the regulation of the profession is a task best
accomplished by those involved in- the profes-
sion.

With the repeal of the current Pharmacy Act
1962, and all sections of the Health Professions
Act 1998, which relate to the profession of phar-
macy, the proposed Pharmacy Act (2008) seeks
to address the following:

eEstablishment of a nine-member council
known as The Bahamas Pharmacy Council,
comprised of experienced pharmacists and
pharmacy professionals, along with requisite

representation from the Minister responsible

for Pharmacy (via the Chief Medical Officer
and the Director of the Bahamas National Drug
Agency).
An overview of the core responsibilities of the
Council will show the following functions:
eRegister and license premises and persons

involved in the profession.

eRegulate and control the practice of phar-
macy
eDevelop and govern standards of practice
eDevelop and enforce standards of profes-
sional ethics.
°Facilitate the receipt of official complaints
relative to the profession and/or professionals.
eWork with relevant government agencies to
inspect licensees and enforce compliance.
’ eImplementation of a proper process for the
registration and licensure of:
- Pharmacy health-care facilities ©
- Pharmacists, technicians, interns and
relevant healthcare practitioners
- Pharmacy wholesale, import/export, and
manufacturing facilities and businesses.
Pharmacists with sub-specialty practice areas
including but not limited to clinical pharmacy
practice, nuclear pharmacy, oncology-pharmacy
practice, specialized disease-state management
pharmaceutical care (e.g. out-patient diabetes
management, coumadin-clinic management,
etc). The Council in accordance with accepted
international guidelines will define standards
for practice in any sub-specialty area.

PHARMACcw

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Full Text





HAVE A







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The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1









GUESS
‘Next Top

‘BAHAMAS EDITION ©

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER ua 2008





CALL FOR WASTE
DISPOSAL AND

PRICE — 75¢



Sports Minister
meets Chinese
Ambassador



Firebomb' set off
at court building

Chief Magistrate calls
incident ‘disturbing’

Hi By NATARIO McKENZIE

POLICE are investigating
what appeared to be a home-
. made firebomb that went off at
a magistrate’s court — sparking

renewed concerns about the |

security at the lower courts.

Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez called the incident “dis-
turbing” coming as it did after
several fire attacks on magis-
trate’s courts in the last few
years.

“T'm not certain whether they
threw an object there, like a
Molotov cocktail, or whether
they actually went to the door

and poured the substance onto
it," he said. He noted that if the
door had been a wooden one
the damage could have been
much worse.

Cases at Court 8 in Bank
Lane did not begin at 10am as
usual yesterday, as police offi-

cers investigated the burnt |

remains of what appeared to be
a plastic container on the'steps
of the court.

The bottom of the steel door
at the entrance to Magistrate
Carolita Bethel’s court was
charred.

_SEE page eight

Moored commercial barge
creates ‘hazard and eyesore’ |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A MARINE construction firm is being accused of abusing
maritime custom by keeping a large commercial barge moored
in a residential waterway, creating a hazard and an eyesore for

residents.

The Devcon vessel, described by Coral Harbour homeowner
Tracy Ferguson as around 200 feet long and 75 feet wide, has
been moored opposite her property in the Flamingo waterway

since August 28.

SEE page eight

i

my erro

3: PANS



_ with the murder of 28- |

’ returned to his Windsor Lane





Franklyn G Ferguson

THE DOOR of Court 8 in Bank Lane shows signs of the ‘firebomb’
_ Which was let off yesterday. — ,

24-year-old man in ‘custody i in
connection with weekend murder

POLICE have a 24-
year-old man in cus-
tody in connection

neighbourhood at
around 10pm on Sat-
urday.

He reportedly got
into an argument with
a group of men outside
the home of Haitians,
L’Orture Williams and
his wife, Pricel Petibay.

As the dispute
‘became heated, one of
the men in the group
reportedly put Mr
Smith in’ a headlock
while another stabbed him and

SEE page eight
Police investigate GB murder

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

year-old Jason Smith.
Mr Smith, a father
of two, died on Satur- |
day night after he and
his wife were attacked
in front of their chil-
dren by a group of
men.
Eye-witnesses
reported that Mr
Smith, who was allegedly in an
intoxicated state at the time,



JASON SMITH
died after an attack
on Saturday.

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama Police are searching for suspects
involved in the stabbing death of a 26-year-old Eight Mile Rock man.

‘Chief Superintendent Basil Rahming said police have launched an
intensive investigations into the island’s eighth homicide for the year
on Grand Bahama. ;

SEE page eight

VIA DELLA OSA

Coral Harbour

$3.5m worth of
cocaine seized

MORE than $3.5 million worth of cocaine was seized by officers from
the Grand Bahama Drug Enforcement Unit shortly affer it arrived on

the island.

Chief Supt Basil Rahming said officers, acting on information, went
to Freeport Container Port around 4pm on Sunday, where they began

inquiries.

While inspecting coniterits of a 40-foot metal container that had just
been off-loaded on to the storage bay, officers discovered three large
black duffle bags concealed among a shipment of sugar.

The bags were taken to DEU headquarters where, upon inspection,
they were found to contain 128 kilos of cocaine, estimated street val-

ue $3.5 million.

The concealed narcotics had just arrived aboard the MSC Peru,
inbourid from Buenaventura, Colombia, and its cargo of containers
were in transit to Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

The captain and crew were interviewed, but no arrests were made,
The seized contraband has been flown to New Providence aboard an
“Operation Bat” helicopter, where DEU officials will continue inves- -
tigations with International‘-Law Enforcement agencies.

Jury selection for trial of pair
charged in Mario Miller murder

i By NATARIO McKENZIE

A JURY has been selected in
the trial of two brothers charged in
the murder of Mario Miller, the

. son of former Cabinet minister®
Leslie Miller.

‘The trial is expected to begin
today. Following brief submissions
in closed coyrt on an application
brought on behalf of Ryan Miller,
the jury of eight women, four men,
with three alternatives was select-
ed. Brothers Ryan Miller and
Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar Lee,
are accused of Mario Miller’s mur-
der.

Lawyer Romona Farquharson
represents Ryan Miller and Ricar-
do Miller is represented by lawyer
Romauld Ferreira. Deputy Direc-
tor of Public Prosecutions Cheryl

_Grant-Bethel, with Neil Brath-
. waite and Sean Adderley of the

Attorney General’s Office appear
for the Crown.

-Mario Miller was killed on June
22, 2002. His stabbed body was
found in bushes near the Super
Value Food Store in Winton. Both
Ryan and Ricardo Miller initially
stood trial for Mario’s murder in
2006. In the final stages of the tri-
al, however, one of the jurors was

found to have been closely con-—

nected to a family member of the
accused and was cited for con-
tempt. Justice Anita Allen subse- /
quently ordered a retrial. /

Since his son’s death’six years

_ ago Mr Miller, who says his fami-

ly has been left tramautised by the
incident, has campaigned for jus-
tice in Mario’s murder. |

HANNA-MARTIN
DISMISSES CLAIM
SHE IS TRYING T0
DIVIDE PLP :

e PAGE TWO

BAHAMAS 10 SIGN EPA
IN MID-OCTOBER

e PAGE THREE

SLACK IMMIGRATION CONTROLS
‘MAKE THE BAHAMAS A NATURAL
BASE FOR TERRORISTS’ —

e PAGE FIVE



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

PLP chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin said that the idea that
she is attempting to divide the
PLP through their local branch
elections is “utter foolishness”.

While a guest on the radio
programme “Jeffrey” with host
Jeffrey Lloyd, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin said that the idea that the
PLP is conducting haphazard
rules that only applied to some
and not everyone is simply
“ridiculous”.

“It’s utterly ridiculous, and I
try not to, but there may come a
time when I may speak on this.
But I have to respect the
process and I think it’s impor-
tant to respect the process
because when you don’t respect
the process you may by your
actions cause the party to come
into some form of disrepute. :

“Tt is not that Iam unable to
be very explicit. I am very able

Fine i ere

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Bivd
















Cla i

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight

on Mondays |

nn Hotta

ANY of your

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

Hanna-Martin dismisses idea she is trying to
divide PLP through local branch elections



Glenys Hanna-Martin

to do that. And there are
aspects of my personality that
would love to do it. But I think
it is important for me to uphold

&&

...1 think it is important
for me to uphold the prin-
ciples of our party. We
have a process, the
process is being carried
out and it will go to full
completion

Glenys
Hanna-Martin



the principles of our ane We
have a process, the process is
being carried out and it will go
to full completion,” she said.

Mrs Hanna-Martin has been
in a power struggle within her
own party over the selection of
officers to the National Gener-
al Council through their branch
elections. The constituencies of
Kennedy, Marathon, and St
Cecilia is where Mrs Hanna-
Martin has received her more
aggressive challenges. |

On Friday night, at the St
Cecilia branch meeting, the

Perry Christie



election of Paul Moss, who is
seen as the front-runner for the
nomination for the St Cecilia
constituency, was called into
question by a challenge from
the branch level.

This challenge, which is based

on the constitution of the party,

dictates that for persons to be
elected to the NGC, they must
first be residents of the con-
stituency which they seek to
represent. In the cases where

they are not, these persons must -

then gain at least two thirds of

«| “This is utter foolishness’

the support of the branch.

It is with this in mind that the
meeting was held. However, the
meeting quickly dissolved into
anarchy, with Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin being overshadowed by the
bickering both inside, and out-
side of the Yellow Elder class-
room where the meeting was
being held.

Some detractors insinuated
that Mrs Hanna-Martin’s inten-
tions were not pure in her
attempts to uphold the consti-
tution of the party. They said
she simply was seeking to block
Mr Moss and his growing pop-
ularity within the party.

However, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin has fully denied these alle-
gations and maintains that she
has the full support of the party,
including its leader Perry
Christie.

“This idea that there is some
division, or that I am taking
some maverick action that is
unprincipled is utter foolishness.
Let me say this, I have known
the leader of our party for a
very long time, and he has
known me for a long time, and
certainly I have no doubt as
chairman of this party, he
respects the office I- hold, the
authority I hold, and We are
constantly in dialogue and the
party moves forward on a basis,
on consensus,” she said.

Online petition over the
rising cost of electricity

â„¢ By ALEX MISSICK _

A CONCERNED Bahamian
has taken matters into her own
hands, beginning an online peti-
tion against the Ministry of
Environment and the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation due to
the increasing cost of electricity.

The BEC Electricity Bill and

Fuel Surcharge Petition to the.

Ministry of Environment and
BEC was created and written
by Darcy Moss.

She joins many Bahamians in
saying that changes must be

made-to the eleotieity: fuels Sus:

charge. ra
“T started this petition

because I felt that the fuel sur-

charge rates were increasing too
much, too fast and when I final-
ly got through to BEC no one



Pressure on Environment Minister and
BEC to make changes to fuel surcharge



“My goal is to
offer suggestions
to BEC in
attempts to help
quell this sn
we are in.” uncon

his pray







aS Moss:

seemed to be able to answer any
questions about it,” Ms Moss



said. Ms Moss said she is not
trying to tear down BEC, but
thinks the public has the right
to seek answers as some peti-

tioners feel that BEC is not

being honest and upfront about
the matter.

“My goal is to offer sugges-
tions to BEC in attempts to help
quell this crisis we are now in..
There are questions. that have
come upcas a result of the peti-
tion and we would like to have
answers to those questions on
behalf of our petitioners.

“T will soon be contacting
BEC and asking them to meet
with me and other concerned
citizens and my hope is that they
will be open and willing to do
so,” Ms Moss said.

Ms Moss said she wants to
gather 20,000 signatures to show
the government that the people
of the Bahamas want a change
as there is strength in numbers.

“When I started this petition,
I had no idea of the response I
would have gotten but to date I
have received almost 3,200 sig-
natures,” she said.

After reading some of the
questions and comments she has
received from the general pub-
lic, Ms Moss said it seems that
the fuel surcharge is only part
of the problem.

“People are really in crisis,”
Ms Moss said.

Up to press time the petition
has attained 1,729 online signa-
tures and 1,504 written signa-
tures from concerned Bahami-
an.
The petition can be viewed
online. at
www.petitiononline.com/bec123
4.com.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 3



a De i ES oie ee |



In brief

Man charged
with killing
while driving
dangerously

A MAN charged with killing
in the course of dangerous dri-
ving was arraigned in a Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Jeffrey Saunders, 44, of Peter
Street was arraigned before
Magistrate Renee McKay at
Court Six in Parliament Street.

According to court dockets, it
is alleged that on Friday, July 11
at about 5.40pm, Saunders
drove a white 2006 Ford F 150
pickup truck along Coral Har-
bour in a dangerous manner,
thereby causing the death of
Sean Munroe. According to
police reports, Munroe, 43, for-
merly a Civil Aviation Depart-
ment employee, was driving a
white Suzuki, which collided
with a white Ford F-150 truck.

Munroe was the country’s
24th traffic fatality for the year.

Saunders pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was granted
$10,000 bail. The case was
adjourned to December 8.

inagua wildlife
appeal after
Hurricane ike

BAHAMIANS are being
urged to help starving birdlife and
wild animals on Inagua following
the damaging impact of Hurri-
cane Ike. Nassau resident Kim
Aranha is asking for donations
of sunflower seed, dry dog food
and other items to help stricken
creatures on the island.

Ike’s 130mph winds tore leaves
and berries off trees throughout

Inagua, severely reducing the |

foodstock of birds and animals.
The parrot population was also
hits.

° Mrs Aranha can be contacted :

at 362-4727.

Turning |

Bahamas to sign
EPA in mid-October

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas will sign onto
the controversial Economic Part-
nership Agreement in mid-Octo-
ber despite local resistance to the
trade agreement, Minister of State
for Finance Zhivargo Laing said
yesterday.

Signing onto the agreement
would cost the government $6 mil-
lion annually at the end of a 25-
year period in lost customs duties
on goods imported from Europe,
but not signing it could impact the
$90 million in foreign reserves the
country receives annually from
the European Union, he said at
a press conference at the Ministry
of Finance yesterday.

When the Bahamas signs onto
the agreement next month, it will
sign a “goods only” agreement,
with the intent of following
through with the services portion
of the agreement at a later, yet
unspecified, date.

The EPA would allow Bahami-
an manufactures to continue to
supply their products to the Euro-
pean market duty-free and lower
customs duty on goods from the
EU and the forum of Caribbean
States (CARIFORUM) into the
Bahamas so customers will have
lower prices and wider choices.

Yesterday, EPA opponents
renewed their call for government
to reconsider the agreement,
claiming it does not bode well for
the country.

"It's a dark, sad day for the
Bahamas. The EPA is not good
for this country, its development,
and its health," attorney Fayne
Thompson said.

"Bahamian manufactures, local |

businesses must now look to the
competition coming from
(Europe) at-an obscene pace. The
competition will undermine local



Zhivargo mn

“It’s a dark, sad
day for the
Bahamas. The EPA
is not good for this
country, its
development and
its health.” '

Ee
Fayne Thompson

business," he said, arguing that
government should focus on

attaining grants. from its biggest

trading partner — the United
States ~ instead of submitting-to
the EU..Attorney Paul Moss,
member of Bahamians Agitating
for a Referendum on Free Trade
(BARF), said signing the agree-
ment made no economic sense as

it would remove customs duties’.

on a significant revenue stream.

"I call for a demonstration of
historic proportions to ensure that
the government of the Bahamas
understands that they must (suc-
cumb) to the will of the Bahamian
people and they ought not to sign
this agreement," he said.

According to Mr Laing, the ©

country has not presented its ser-

“Govt intends to

vices agreement to the EU yet
and does not have to sign onto
the services aspect until six
months after the signing date. ~

"Which means for us, if we sign
in October we will essentially be
signing a ‘goods only' agreement
because we would have no bene-
fits or obligations arising from the
services schedule until we attach

’ our services schedule. And if we

indefinitely do not attach our ser-
vices schedule, we will have no

benefits, no obligations until then. .

"And so we will in effect, come

' the signing, be signing a goods

only agreement. . . with the inten-
tion of following through on the
services side of things," he said.
The services schedule mirrors
the current National Investment
Policy, which presently reserves
13 areas for Bahamians — whole-
sale and retail; real estate; local
media; nightclubs and restaurants;
construction; cosmetic establish-
ments; auto and appliance service
operations; and public transport.
Minister Laing said he would
not release the specific signing
date until it is confirmed by
CARICOM with the European
Union, as the date may.be sub-

_ject to change.

He said there was not signifi-

cant public education over the five -

year EPA negotiating period, but
stressed that the FNM has con-
ducted "enough consultation"
with Bahamian traders,since
assuming office in May, 2007.

The agreement also calls for a
Competition Commission which
has to be set up by 2013.

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garbage into usable energy.
For years the Harrold Road
dump has been seen as a prob-
iem for locals, taking into
account ifs growth rate as well

trolled, - including burning,
garbage separation, and bur-
ial. On Monday, State Minister
i for Environment Phenton Ney-
mean told The Tribune that the
proposals submitted to the gov-

‘| ernment relating to renewable |

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able energy, they — proposal
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Friday. ’'ve been informed that
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response to the request for pro-
posals for renewable energy.”

The minister also indicated
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throughout the Bahamas.”

In his announcement, the
minister made it clear that
though renewable energy is the

government’s decision to begin
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an initiative.

He warned that for any pri-
vate company to be approved
for such a project, there are
three key requirements: finan-
cial sustainability, technologi-
cal capability, and affordabili-
ty on the consumer level.

“I am of the view that this
initiative should have started
many yéars ago, and we are
actually playing catch up at this
particular time,
ister. ~
Adding that the proposals
have not yet been reviewed, Mr
Neymour said the government
will announce “at the appropri-
ate time” any successful pro-
ject.

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people understand that renew-
able energy does not always
mean cheaper. For insiance,

‘solar energy in some locations,
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reduction of carbon emissions
produced by petroleum prod-
ucts.

decomposing waste.
Without



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008.

a
The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publistier/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352- -6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Inaguans beware of unionists

WE WONDER if the local employees of
Morton Salt (Bahamas) understand yet that
only a fool bites the hand that feeds it. *

The miracle of Inagua is that no matter
how many times that hand has been bitten it
is always there in a crises to help Inaguans.

Despite many angry exchanges with union-
ists, damage to company property and a two-
week strike in the weeks preceding the hur-
ricane, Morton’s was there to assist their staff
who lost so much on September 7 when Hur-
ricane Ike blew over Great Inagua.

Yesterday Morton’s International
announced that within the next week each
staff member will receive $1,000 to assist
them over the hard times ahead.

Staff also will be paid.to help clean up the
company’s compound, which suffered mil-
lions of dollars in damage.

Bahamians have always heard that Mor-
ton’s was a vital ingredient to the success ot :
Inagua.

However, those flying from Nassau into
this nation’s most southerly outpost this week
were surprised at the importance of the com-
pany to the existence of every person who
calls Inagua home. If Morton’s shuts down, so
will Inagua.

Morton supplies everything for Inagua,
including bringing food supplies from the
US. on its.vessels to stock the general storé. .

Mr Bernard Dupuch, who like his father
the late Sir Etienne Dupuch, represented
Inagua in the House of Assembly for many
years, recalls the early days — just before
the Ericksons sold their West India Chemicals
company to Morton Salt — when there were.
rumblings to introduce unions to-Inagua.

It was 1962 and Mr Dupuch was in Inagua
to fight his first election.

Several supporters went with him from
Nassau.

Among them was Herbert Smith, aunion .

man at heart. After the election when they.
had all returned to Nassau, Mr Smith con-
fessed to Mr Dupuch that he didn’t really go
to Inagua to help him in his election, but to
get to know the people and try to quietly
establish a union.

However, he said, he quselly realised that
Inaguans were so dependent on the Erickson
family and their salt company for their very
existence that a union could never work in
Inagua. ;

They could never strike, Mr Smith rea-
soned, because this New England family

could return to their roots, and Inaguans
would be left high and dry with no food in the
store.

Realising what was: ‘afoot, Mr Dupuch — °

unlike Inagua’s present MP Alfred Gray who
decided to remain silent during the industri-
al unrest because he didp’t want to be blamed
for interfering — Mr Dupuch decided, for
the sake of his constituents’ future, to inter-
fere. He gathered all the company’s senior
staff around him one evening to discuss

unions. By the time the discussion was over, .
the men realised that a union would destroy

them and their island.

By contrast Mr Gray, by his own admission
last week, said he knew that Morton’s was
“very upset by the last labour unrest.” He
also knew that Morton’s management had
discussed moving their operations to Mexico
if they could not reach agreement with union-
ists. But instead of — as did Mr Dupuch —
sitting down and discussing with union lead-
ers the consequences of a strike and contin-
ued industrial discord, he put himself first.

“T stayed out of it because I did not want to
be blamed by the Government or the union
or management for political interference,”
he confessed.

To see Mr Gray pointing his finger, and
loud-mouthing it in the House of Assembly,
silence seemed out of character — especially
at such a critical time for his constituents.

No one knows if Morton wiil resume its
operations in Inagua. However, we do know
that if the company returns it will not be

under the same conditions. As someone _
~yémarked “they can’t continue to work under

these conditions.” -

And what Inaguans must remember is
that they will no longer he deating with Mor-
ton’s. The crippled salt company now has

_new owners who have no emotional connec-

tions with the people of Inagua.

If Inaguans know what side their bread is '

buttered on, they will disband their union
and in times of trouble sit down and discuss
their problems as a family.

And if they are wise, they will ban all
union leaders from Nassau. Remember at the
end of a strike, these so-called union advisers
can pack their bags and head back to three

square meals and the comfortable home |

awaiting them in Nassau.

At the end of it all, some might even send
them a bill for what the locals thought was
free advice: ae

BEC tax holida

THE TRIBUNE



is no picnic for
consumers

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN HIS 2008/2009.budget com- - .

munication, the Prime Minister
proposed a two year tax holiday
for BEC amounting to a 17 per
cent rebate on the cost of import-
ed fuel. He suggested that this
tax holiday would translate into
significant savings to Bahamian
households. He further stated that
these tax concessions were the
most important in recent history.
To date, the empirical data from
BEC do not support the
expressed policy intents of the
government. Specifically, Prime
Minister Ingraham had this to say:

“The tax holiday afforded to
BEC for a two year period in this
Budget is designed to slow the
continued increase in energy sur-
charge passed on to customers by
BEC. Additionally, the two year

tax relief now being given should

ease BEC back to a position of
financial soundness.

We expect that the relief given
to BEC for two years on customs
duties and what was stamp tax
amounting to 17 per cent over-
all, will. allow BEC to limit any
further fuel surcharge. The impact
on household’s incomes and sav-
ings could be significant.

“As with consumer retail items,






MUS

letters@tribunemedia.net

we will also monitor BEC pric-
ing closely so as to ensure that
any further fuel surcharge increas-
es are limited by the amount of
the concessions siven to BEC on
Stamp Tax.

“The reductions in the customs
duties in the 2008/09 are among
the most important tax conces-
sions granted to families in the
recent history of this country”.

Further, the Minister of State
with responsibility for utilities
promised significant relief by
August of this year. He and his
government argued that the sig-
nificant increase in the cost of
electricity was due to the hike in
oil prices and beyond the control
of the government and BEC. To
add perspective to this, between
May and July of this year, BEC

increased its surcharge from 21.2"

cents per kilowatt hour.to 24.8
cents per kilowatt hour, or 3.6
cents. One can only imagine what
the surcharge increases over the
past eighteen months were. Dur-
ing the last three months, BEC
has benefitted from revenue

windfalls on two fronts: Firstly, a
17 per cent tax concession on duty
and stamp tax on imported oil,
and secondly, a'significant reduc-
tion (some 30 per cent) in the
price of oil on the international
market. It is important to note
that BEC pays the oil companies

‘current market prices on con-
signment. BEC carries no inven- |

tory and their benefits from glob-
al price reductions are immedi-
ate. Having said that, it is disap-
pointing and unsatisfactory to
consumers, to learn that during
the August 2008 billing cycle,
BEC passed on a paltry one cent
per Kilowatt hour to its valued
customers. J dare say that monop-
oly has its privileges.

If the policy intent of the gov-
ernment was to focus on the bal-
ance sheet of BEC rather than
facilitating the “impact on house-
hold’s incomes and savings,” they
should have said so.

Suffice it to say editor, BEC is
enjoying one hell of a “tax holi-
day”, but the empirical data
shows that consumers across the

board must work overtime to pay .—

for this holiday,

ELCOTT COLEBY
Nassau,
September, 2008.

Adults need to set example to children

EDITOR, The Tribune.

'

THE announcer on the radio
stated that we are going to have
to teach our children how to
resolve their conflicts in a dif-
ferent manner, if we are to see a

change in the climate. of. vio-._..-

lence that is swallowing up so
many young lives. I agree with

him but I must add ‘that our

children need to see the adults
set some kind of example.

Maybe it is just a problem
that we are not seeing or we
have got absolution from some-
where, but the adults in this
country are playing. _

There is an insidious nasti-

ness that is present amount the. -

older folk that makes it very
difficult for the young to escape
its effects.

Church, numbers and sweét-
heartin’ are seen as “doin’ ya
lil dirt” and seen as being
acceptable.

Doing whatever you can,
whenever you can, to whomev-

“er you can in the name of
putting food on the table is also ©

seen as acceptable as long as no
one is caught.

The young in this:nation have
a front seat to all of this, some
of them are also active partici-
pants in the drama.as they have
to pay with their bodies to pay
the bills of living; and some of

‘us think the problem is “con-

flict resolution:”
The government needs to get

the statistics together on how ,

many of our young people are

fending for themselves.
We-need some statistics on

the parents who have reneged

on their responsibility to pro-- -

vide and care for their offspring.

We need some statistics on ~

those parents who are of the
opinion that their children have
been placed on this earth to
work for them, these are the
ones who keep. the bank
accounts while their kids are

_involved in all kinds of stuff.
We need statistics on those par- .

ents, fathers especially who only
show up after a child has strug-
gled on their own to get some-
where; often blaming a cold
hearted mother for not letting
him become involved in the life,
of one of his many children. °

If we can put the stats on a
very large board or screen and
then stand back, maybe we will
get the bigger picture and put
the blame where it is supposed
to be.

The conflict is not with the

child, it is with a very messed

environment that us older folks

perpetuate as we continue to.

act our shoe size and not our
chronological ages, taking up
much needed space and time
that belongs to our children by
right.

Outs isa society where too
many adults are childish in the
way they go about this business
of setting the example for those
they are responsible for —

politicians, teachers, pastors,,.

preachers, apostles, business-

-men;-garbage men, ‘street

sweepers, this list includes
everybody.

It is not our children who are
conflicted, it is us older folk who
are messed up.

We have not cleared up our

garbage from the past genera-
tion or attempted any kind of
transformation and we know as
a Bible believing nation that
what is not transformed has to
be transferred.

Our young people will not be
able to do better than what we

have done until we “show

them.”

Maybe my old from friend
from Farm Road is right about
a generation having to die out,
before we see any changes.
However, he says that those
changes will be carried out by
persons who will truly own what
it is to Bahamian, even though
they may have come from
another country.

There are too many nicely
dressed imposters parading
around this little place.

=ZDWARD HUTCHESON
Nassau.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 5 |



Olin brief

Superclubs —
Breezes
Bahamas
starts new
phase of
development

SUPERCLUBS
Breezes Bahamas has
commenced the second
phase of its development
programme which was

launched last September.
‘This fall, Breezes will

undertake further renova-

tions to its east wing.

The work will introduce
remodeled guest bath-
rooms, sliding glass doors,
flat screen plasma televi-
sions and numerous sup-
plementary product
enhancements.

Renovations

Additionally, the entire
banquet and meeting
facilities will also undergo
renovations during this
period.

Last fall, all of the guest |

bedrooms in.the west
wing were refurbished.

Breezes emphasised.
that guest amenities and
services will not be affect-
ed as the work will be tak-
ing place inside individual
rooms.

Afternoon showers take their toll

Slack immigration contro

Is ‘make the

Bahamas a natural base for terrorists’

SLACK immigration con-
trols in the Bahamas make the
country a natural base for ter-
rorists, a former police chief
has warned.

With thousands of undocu-
mented, unregistererd illegals,
the Bahamas had no means of
controlling a would-be terror-
ist’s ability to carry out an
attack, says former assistant
commissioner Paul Thompson.

His comments come in a
document sent to Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, Cabinet
ministers and leading civil ser-
vants in an attempt to alert the
nation to the implications of
illegal immigration.

“These persons reside or
work in most of our islands, yet
we don’t know who they are,”
said Mr Thompson, “There is
no register, no photograph or
fingerprint.records.”

The former officer said ter-
rorist incidents occur when
three conditions are met, with
would-be terrorists having the
desire, ability and opportunity
to. attack.

“We cannot control either
the terrorist’s desire or ability
to commit a terrorist attack,”
he added, “We can, however,
limit his or her opportunity by

“remaining diligent and vigilant

at our borders and in identify-
ing criminal behaviour, which
must be reported to our law
enforcement agencies immedi-
ately.”

Mr Thompson said there must
be a “zero tolerance” approach
to the illegal immigrant prob-
lem “as we may. well have the
enemy living among us.”

Former assistant commissioner
Paul Thompson sounds warning

Among his suggestions
for tackling the problem
are:

e An enlarged immigration
department, with properly
equipped personnel working
round-the-clock to liaise with
other law enforcement agen-
cies.

e A more secure detention
centre, with higher fences,

trained guard dogs, improved
lighting and monitored cam-
eras.

e An ID card with photo-
graph, thumb or fingerprint,
full name and address, for all
immigrants’ born in the
Bahamas.

¢ Residential status for those
who qualify.

e Improved checking proce-

dures, including proof of sta-
tus when applying for driving
licences.

° Use of schools, medical

_ institutions, banks and tenancy

agreements for routine status
checks.

e Prosecution of captains and
crews involved in human traf-
ficking.

‘e Elimination of all squatting

in shanty towns, wherever they

exist.

¢ Cash rewards for informa-
tion leading to apprehension
of illegal immigrants.

e Prosecution of all illegal
immigrants who return to the
Bahamas after deportation.

Mr Thompson also urged
top-level talks with Haitian
authorities and the US govern-
ment aimed at preventing
human trafficking.

He suggested joint patrols to
stop and search boats leaving
Haiti bound for the Bahamas
and the United States.

2008 International Cultural
Weekend ‘has been cancelled’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THERE may be no fanciful, cosmopoli-
tan parade of nations on what would have
been the 14th annual International Cultur-
al Weekend, The Tribune has learned.

According to Aquapure’s marketing
manager, Ryan Knowles, an employee of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs informed
him that the 2008 cultural weekend had
been cancelled.

Aquapure water was the festival’s answer -

to the October heat and a Bahamian alter-

native to the world of international bever-

ages both alcoholic and unleaded.
“Usually we hear about it from Mr

- (James) Catalyn at least two months in

Z
we
oS
zB
Z
se
A



THESE VEHICLES were left in flood waters in the Clarence A Bain building parking lot after brief but

heavy showers yesterday afternoon.

After Ike, Texas survivors clamour for gas, food

@ GALVESTON, Texas

RESCUERS flew into a hard-to-
reach area of the swamped Gulf
Coast Monday and uncovered.a
devastated landscape: Hurricane Ike
had obliterated entire subdivisons,
and emergency crews feared they
would find more victims than sur-
vivors, according to Associated Press.

It was the first time anyone had
gotten a look at the damaged resort
barrier island of Bolivar Peninsula,
just east of hard-hit Galveston.
Homes were splintered or com-
pletely washed away in the beach-

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora -
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

Pe
aera



front community that is home to
about 30,000 people in the peak
summer season. .

"'They had a lot of devastation
over there,
leader of the'task force that landed
on the island.

Two days after Ike battered the
Texas and Louisiana coasts before
striking Houston, the death toll rose
to 30 in eight states, many of them
far to the north of the Gulf Coast as
the storm slogged across the nation's
midsection, leaving a trail of flood-
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A massive effort was under way

DEATH NOTICE

long time

2008

'' said Chuck Jones, the ©

- community's 60,000 residents

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could be weeks until the more than
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lights turned on again. Lines snaked
for blocks down side streets at gas
stations that had little fuel to pump,
and thousands packed shelters look- .
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Quite frankly we are reaching
a health crisis for the people who
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advance and I.haven’t heard from him in a
while,” said Mr Knowles.

“So we actually called there (Ministry of |

Foreign Affairs) this morning and the lady
informed us.”

Mr Catalyn resigned his position as chair-
man of the cultural weekend's committee
last year.

The Tribune contacted Minister of For-
eign affairs, Brent Symonette, regarding
the cancellation. He said-he would have to
confirm that the 2008 festival had in indeed
been cancelled. He did not call back up to
press time.

For 13 years now, the Cultural Weekend
has allowed Bahamians to experience the
sights, sounds, tastes and scents of coun-
tries around the world and provided indi-

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-viduals from those countries who live here,

a two-day visa back to their homes.
Music, food and exotic libations were the
highlights of the festival, held at the beau-
tiful botanical gardens in Chippingham.
People indigenous to the countries repre-
sented, showed off the best their nations

-had to offer.

The annual event began in October of
1995 and each year has drawn more and
more Bahamian patrons who come to learn
about countries beyond their borders for a
nominal fee — much less than an airline
ticket.

“Pretty much the worst part about it is
not having it, besides the work aspect (for
us), a lot of people look forward to it,” said
Mr Knowles. “It’s just a good time.”

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RG ea a ee ee

REAL ESTATE CONTROVERSY

Lawyer: Stephen’s Close subdivision case
totally different from Exuma land dispute

LAWYER Desmond Edwards,
who represented the developer
in the Stephen’s Close subdivi-
sion — approved in principle by
government, but later stopped —
said his client’s case.was not the
same as the Exuma land case
recently decided by Mr Justice
John Lyons.

Handing down his judgment
in a contract dispute involving a
40-acre subdivision in Exuma, Mr
Justice Lyons held that Bahamian
courts could not “enforce” con-
tracts for the sale of lots in subdi-
visions that had not been fully
approved because to do so would
breach the Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act. He warned all
subdivision and real estate devel-
opers and their lawyers, that
according to the Act’s wording,
selling subdivision lots without
full approval was “a criminal
offence.”

Mr Edwards maintained that
his client’s subdivision was not
the same as the Exuma case.
“The facts and circumstances in
the Exuma case are totally and
demonstrably different from the
facts relating to Stephen’s Close,”
he said.

“In the Exuma case,” said Mr
Edwards, “there was absolutely
no infrastructure in place. In the
Stephen’s Close matter, there was
considerable infrastructure in
place.”

On the other hand, he said,
“the lots in the Exuma case were
sold from an architectural plan
’ of lots; the tract of land was unde-

veloped; and the applicable laws
‘governing subdivisions were
under the Private Roads and Sub-
divisions Act (Out Island), 1956,
Chapter 257.”
However, said Mr Edwards,
“in the Stephen Close develop-
ment, the roads were formed and

graded, electrical infrastructure .

was partially completed, the lots
were surveyed and marked,
approximately 50 per cént of the
lots lay on an existing road, and
construction of homes were at
completion stage.”

He said his client, Ms Denise
Burrows, the developer of
Stephen’s Close, “purchased a

tract of land in March 2004 for
the development and sale of
home packages. The property,
which emanated from a Certifi-
cate of Title, was conveyed to her



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free and clear by way of a Con-
veyance dated March 10, 2004,
thereby allowing her to sell the
land and give free and clear title
to each home buyer, who became
the owners of their ]\ is.”

Mr Edwards said that with
“this considerable level of devel-
opment in place, lots were sold
by the developer and mortgages
were granted by the purchasers’
banks pursuant to and based on
an ‘approval in prin-
ciple’ which was pre-
viously granted on
September 15, 2004.”

Mr Edwards said
that this type of
approval has been
generally accepted as
sufficient authority to
commence develop-
ment and the sale of
lots by way of “cus-
tom and usage” by
the legal profession °
and financial institutions for
almost 50 years.

“In Section 5 of the Private
Roads and Subdivisions Act,
1961, Chapter 256,”. he said, “it
does not distinguish between an
‘approval in principle’ and a ‘final

approval’. The Act only refers to °

‘approval.’ Consequently, it has
been general practice in the legal
and banking community to accept
a subdivision ‘approval in princi-
ple’ as the basis for the sale of
lots in a subdivision.”

During the Christie, adminis-
tration, said Mr Edwards, the
Ministry of Works granted the
“approval in principle” to
Stephen Close developer, Ms
Burrows. The Ministry later
issued a stop order.

“This stop order was made,”
Mr Edwards explained, “because

of incorrect positioning of elec-

3k





Dion Foulkes

“In the Exuma case, there was
absolutely ‘no infrastructure in
place. In the Stephen’s Close

matter, there was considerable
infrastructure in place.”

&

trical poles, the re-positioning of
the existing road which emanated
from a boundary dispute between
the original developer and an
adjoining developer, and other
technical issues connected to the
development of the subdivision.”

The financing institution

. involved in the transaction, said

Mr Edwards, is in possession of
all the relevant deeds and infor-
mation, and is working with the
developer in an
attempt to reach a
resolution so that the
subdivision can be
completed and the lot
owners can take pos-
session of their
homes.

who bought lots in
the subdivision have
complained about the
apparent lack. of
progress, claiming



Eleven persons. °

that they are paying off loans on -

partially built homes in the sub-
division.

One of them, Shaaron Davis,
who was represented by lawyer
Dion Foulkes when he was in pri-
vate practice and before he
became a Cabinet minister,
claimed that Mr Foulkes had kept
the $50,000 that he had given him
to purchase property in the sub-
division.

Mr Foulkes denied this. He
said the money was forwarded to
Ms Burrows, the developer, and a
“conveyance was duly executed.”

“My former law firm,” he said
at the time, “is totally blameless.
Mr Davis has good and legal title
to the lots. Their case is against

.-the developer.”

The matter then turned politi-
cal. In late 2007 former cabinet
minister Bradley Roberts, who

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‘Desmond Edwards

was minister of works, and Omar
Archer, who ran for chairman of
the PLP, called for Mr Foulkes’
resignation.

Last week two of the clients
— one of Mr Edward’s clients
and Mr Davis, Mr Foulkes’ client
— claimed that the police were
afraid to pursue the matter

because of the personalities —

involved.

Mr Edwards denied this. “As a
result of complaints made to the
Police,” he said, “I have on behalf
of the developer, fully cooperated
with the police investigation and
have provided them with all the
relevant documents and informa-
tion in this matter.”

‘In a lengthy statement to police
explaining the delays and sup-
ported by documents, Mr

Edwards said that “communica-

tion between the Ministry of
Works, the vendor’s attorney and
the developer has been taking
place to unravel the situation. The
developer also met with the home

buyers to assure them that their

dream of owning their homes is
not denied, but delayed.”

Mr Edwards then added:

“As you will note, the matter
took on a political bent, when the
former Minister of Works,
Bradley Roberts chose to inter-
meddle. /

“These home buyers had
sought the assistance of Mr
Roberts during his tenure as Min-
ister of Works, but he failed to

assist in bringing any resolution to ©

. the problem then, which proves
that-his belated interest is purely
political. .

“You will also-note that this
matter has no criminal implica-
tions from the facts disclosed,,and
is therefore a civil matter,”

THE TRIBUNE

Developer trying to
get ‘fair solution’ for
clients with mortgages

AFTER a long silence, the Stephen Close developer has told
clients saddled with mortgages for controversial property in her
subdivision, that she is doing her best to get “a fair solution to

what has been a difficult situation for them.”

Lawyers have been blamed for failing to represent clients
who ended up tens of thousands of dollars in debt after taking out
mortgages to buy property in a subdivision that did not have final

- approval from the PLP government to continue.

The controversy resurfaced recently when Mr Justice John
Lyons ruled in an Exuma case that Bahamian courts could not
“enforce” contracts for the sale of lots in subdivisions that had not
been fully approved because to do so would breach the Private
Roads and Subdivisions Act.

Ms Denise Burrows issued a statement over the weekend to
outline her continuing efforts to resolve the land dispute in the
subdivision and clear up “various inaccuracies and misleading
statements made by others regarding this issue.”

“T know,” she said, “that this matter has been extraordinari-
ly difficult for many of my clients. But I wish to assure them that
I have acted in good faith. Indeed my ultimate responsibility is to
ensure that this matter is brought to an equitable conclusion for

my clients.”
She said she purchased a tract
“I know that this of land from another developer in

matter has been - early 2004. She then obtained

. -,. . Approval in Principle from the
extraordinarily § | Ministry of Works to proceed with

. difficult for many developing that tract into a subdi-

vision known as Stephen's Close.

After obtaining the approval
and in conjunction with the original
developer, significant sums were
invested in infrastructural devel-
opment inclusive. of land clearing
and surveying and the forming and grading of the road.

Additionally, electrical installations and paving of the main
road were partly completed, she said.

“Consequent to a Ministry of Works stop order in 2005,” she
said, “I met with the Town Planning Board to discuss what
efforts I needed to undertake to have the said order lifted as expe-
ditiously as possible. Towards this end I undertook various
efforts to resolve the matter.

“For a period of time I paid interest and/or rent to my clients.
Since the stop order I have worked almost daily to fulfil the
requirements necessary to bring this matter to completion, includ-
ing additional design. work.

“Moreover, I have submitted all of the legal documents relat-
ing to the subdivision and my clients to the financing institution.
Through my attorney I am currently in talks with that institution
to bring a resolution to this matter.

“First, it should be noted that following the stop order the
financial institution suspended payments by all clients whose
houses.were under construction.

“Throughout this process I have been in contact with my
clients, worked diligently with my lawyer, the Ministry of Works
and the financial institution to bring resolution to these mat-
ters. :
“I will continue my efforts until my clients are satisfied that
they have received a fair solution to what has been a difficult sit-

of my clien

ie ee ed
Denise Burrows

' uation for them.”



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Interested companies/firms may collect a fender
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COTED meeting to
fliscuss tourism,
transportation

A SPECIAL Meeting of |
CARICOM Council for :

Trade and Economic Devel-
opment will be held in Port-
of-Spain, Trinidad and Toba-
go on September 18.

The meeting will be held
to discuss tourism and trans-
portation/ civil aviation.

The Twenty-Eighth Spe-

cial COTED will be con- |

vened to fulfill a mandate
given by the heads of gov-
ernment of CARICOM to
develop recommendations
on a regional tourism mar-
keting campaign.

The recommendations are
to include a budget, a
method of funding and a
time-line for implementation.

At the 29th meeting of the
conference of heads of gov-
ernment in Antigua and Bar-

buda in July, the heads of

government also ee
that a special meeting of the
COTED be convened to
address the implementation
of decisions taken and the
outstanding matters relating |
to tourism and regional and
international transportation. :

The establishment of a

CARICOM ministerial |

organ for tourism, the pro-

motion and development of
airline hubs, and possibilities :

for a single air space, are
among the issues that are to
be discussed.

The ministerial meeting

will be preceded by a

preparatory meeting of offi- :

cials today.

Franklyn G Ferguson

THE damage inside the court building.



Minister calls for national waste -
- disposal and cleanliness campaign

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

ENVIRONMENT Minister
Earl Deveaux yesterday called
for the immediate implementa-
tion of a national waste disposal

- and cleanliness campaign.

With the Bahamas continually
redefining itself in an effort to
become established within the
global market, Mr Deveaux,
along with State Minister Phenton
Neymour, told ministry person-

aa thinking is needed!’ in
ee EN TA Bas

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

MINISTER of Environment Earl Deveaux says that “informed
thinking” is what is needed in the planning of a modern National
Emergency Policy, intended to minimise the level to which the
local eco-system is affected by pollution. .

According to the minister, his vision for various agencies and
departments within the ministry includes:

¢ the introduction of a waste-to-energy recycling initiative

e the implementation of new building standards

¢ the formulation of research to evaluate the ne of climate

, change

the development of strategies of lifestyle changes should glob-

‘al warming affect the Bahamas

e the establishment of a Bahamas Maritime Institute with the

University of the Bahamas.

° the establishment of an efficient docks committee .

e the safeguarding of ground water resources

° the production of local trees for landscaping all public places

Most notably, the minister said: “For BEC we would like to see
the conversion of the Bahamas to an energy mix which results in
greater energy security, through the-use of renewable resources, and

a sound energy policy.’

The minister added that for these and other initiatives to be ful-
ly effective in the reduction of.pollution and in the preservation of
natural resources, it is crucial that all Bahamians take part.

“If we do not engage the Bahamian public, and if we do not

relentlessly ensure that the Bahamian public accept responsibility |

for the grime, and the filth, and the waste that populate our

national floor and marine environment, we will fail,”

ister.

said the min-



nel yesterday that it is important
to not only understand the sig-
nificance of the Ministry of Envi-
ronment, but to also strive to
establish ways to balance envi-

ronmental preservation with

infrastructural development. |

During the. ministry’s first offi-
cial forum since it was established
in July of this year, Mr Deveaux
highlighted a number of initia-
tives which are a part of his over-
all vision statement for the Min-
istry for Environment.

“It is a vision that seeks to

manage the natural resource

endowment of the Bahamas in a
way to produce lasting employ-
ment and prosperity, propelled
by the global demand in areas

_ such as agriculture, tourism, com-

mercial fishing, sport fishing,

- forestry, bio-technology, renew-

able energy, and do it all in an
environmentally friendly way,”
Mr Deveaux said.

“I would like to see an imme-
diate national waste disposal and
cleanliness campaign implement-
ed. And I'd like to see waste to
energy production with recycling,
and re-use implemented.”

Mr Neymour told the forum’s

attendees that the issue of energy
is a political hot topic, not only in’

the United States, but also here in
the Bahamas
“That is why it is critical that

-we continue our hard work on a_
National Energy Policy: (NEP),
~ and we must inform the public of

how this NEP affects all govern-
mental agencies and ministries,”
he said.

Included under the umbrella

of the Ministry of Environment’

are the Department of Meteorol-
ogy; the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services (DEHS);
the Bahamas Environment, Sci-
ence and Technology Commis-
sion (BEST); the Department of

JOIN THE LEADING CONSERVATION
ORGANIZATION IN THE COUNTRY

POSITION: ASSISTANT GIS OFFICER

Summary Description: The Bahamas National Trust seeks to employ
an Assistant GIS Officer. This individual will develop and implement
GIS applications to support planning and management of National Parks.
The individual will produce spatial data sets, statistics, indicators and
maps. The position will report to the Director of Parks and Science.

Major Responsibilities:

1. Performing spatial analyses and developing GIS applications,
databases, maps, statistics, and indicators in support of a range
of BNT products and programs;
Maintaining GIS hardware and software; installing software
upgrades;
Providing GIS technical support | to other park staff;

Acquiring relevant GIS data from Governments, NGO partners,
Scientists and the private sector;
Documenting data, procedures, and analyses;

Researching background literature on relevant issues; preparing
papers and reports summarizing findings and conclusions derived
from GIS analyses;
Responding to requests for information on GIS activities at BNT
Travel will be required to meet with data providers and
collaborators, and participate in national and international meetings
and workshops.

Qualifications

Associates degree or higher in geography or the social/natural sciences
with a minimum of three to five years of experience.

Application of GIS to environmental issues a plus.

Some degree of knowledge about the Bahamian natural environment
is desirable.
Proficiency in industry standard GIS software and some cartographic
skills and knowledge of graphics software and ability to produce high
quality maps for publication required.

Apply: Interested persons should provide, cover letter, resume, and three
references to; Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N 4105, Nassau,
Bahamas or bnt@bnt.bs by September 24, 2008.



Heavy rain ‘causes water —
damage’ in court building

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

EXTENSIVE water damage from a leaking
roof in Senior Justice Anita Allen's court has cre-
ated cumbersome working conditions for Supreme
Court officers.

According to sources, heavy rains the night
before last flooded the building, causing haz-
ardous working conditions and significant water

. damage.

A Tribune photographer was on scene to cap-
ture the damage in the office, where documents
were being stored in boxes, evidently for safe-
keeping.

Earlier this year, Justice Allen's courtroom,
located in the Hansard Building, was deemed
unfit to,be occupied by a Ministry of Works
inspector after it was determined that a portion of
the floor was "sinking".

The Ministry of Works recommended that Jus-

Earl Deveaux



trades

Physical Planning; the forestry
section; the Botanical Gardens;
the Bahamas Electrical Corpora-
tion; the Water and Sewerage ©
Corporation; the Bahamas

National Geographic Information
System (BNGIS); the Bahamas
Maritime Authority (BHA), and
the Port Department where the
ministry is eaten

iw.





tice Allen's court be moved to an alternate loca-
tion; however she is still hearing cases in the same
building.

"What happened was that heres was portion
of the floor that was having problems and we
sent our engineers to investigate. A portion of
the floor was sinking and it was a possibility that
the floor joist needed to be replaced," Ministry of
Works director Gordon Major told.The Tribune

yesterday. -

"But we were setting about to do was to have an
independent engineer do an analysis just to deter-
mine what we were recommending was correct
(but) that hasn't been done yet".

He said the building is not up to standards and
is unsafe.

"We realised that it needed to be addressed, I

‘think they were looking for suitable alternate

space to be used for courts," said Mr Major, who —
was surprised to learn Justice Allen was still hear-
ing cases in the building.

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job experience and training.

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Will be required to reside and be fully: responsible
for the operation of the entire island.
Must be computer literate
Be proactive, self motivated and willing to work
long hours

‘Be able to lead a team of technicians with varied

Be able to set the trend for uel and quality
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Strong communications ailis oral and written
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Police are
investigating
murder on

Grand Bahama |

FROM page one

According to reports, the :
stabbing occurred at the Pepper :
Pot Takeaway Restaurant on ;
East Sunrise Highway last Fri- :

day.

stabbed at the Pepper Pot.

When uniformed and plain-

clothes officers arrived at the

scene, they saw the victim
bleeding profusely from stab :

wounds to his upper back.

EMS personnel were dis- }
patched to the scene and took
the victim to the Trauma Sec- :
tion at the Rand Memorial :
Hospital, where his condition :

was described.as critical.

Police were later notified by
hospital officials that the young :
man had died of his injuries ;

around 3pm Friday .

According to reports, the :
deceased was at the Pepper Pot :
when a vehicle pulled up with :
two male occupants. The pas- :
senger engaged in aconfronta- :
tion with the deceased and }
stabbed hirh several times in ;

the back.

The suspects fled in the vehi- :
cle. Anyone with information :
that can assist the police with :
their investigation is asked to :

' call CDU at 350-3107/8.

As a

Supt Rahming said sometime :
around 1.12am on September :
12, police received information :
that a young man had just been :

privately-owned,

- Moored commercial barge
creates ‘hazard and eyesore’

_FROM page one

The Port Department gave

_ the company permission to

use the waterway on a tem-
porary basis when a storm
warning came into effect for
the Bahamas as Tropical
Storm Hanna approached.
But attorney Tracy Fergu-
son maintains that the barge’s
continued presence in the res-
idential waterway is unjusti-
fied as all storm and hurricane
warnings for the Bahamas
have long been dropped.
Despite this all attempts
thus far to get Devcon to

move the vessel have failed.

and she is afraid that if it
remains in the waterway it has
the potential to come loose
and cause massive damage to
hers and neighbouring homes.

“If your intention was only
to take shelter, why are you

‘still in our. waterway now

becoming a nuisance to the
residents as well as a threat?.
Whoever gave the permission
surely did not give it indefi-

nitely,” said Ms Ferguson.

Devcon is currently con-
tracted by Albany to under-
take dredging work related to
their proposed marina. The

mid-sized

Bahamian Company and the authorized
Caterpillar dealer in the Bahamas, we
are seeking an Electrical Technician. The
candidate/s should have proven experience
in Generators with more than -I50KW’s,

Transfer

Switches,

-and Generation.

Applicants with formal education in electri-

cal work are preferred.

Send complete resume with education
and work experience to:

M&E Limited, P.O.Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: |
Human Resources Department,

or email:me@me-lItd.com

Only persons being interviewed for
this position will be contacted.

Bank
Financing
Available

on the

Spot. °

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Lo:





THE DEVCON VESSEL, described by Coral Harbour homeowner Tracy eau as around 200 feet long
‘and 75 feet wide, has been moored opposite her,property in the Flamingo waterway since August 28.

barge has numerous pieces of
‘heavy equipment on board.

Ms Ferguson said: “It is
unfair that Devcon does what
it wants to protect its million
dollar vessel but my invest-
ment should face jeopardy
without opposition.”

She suggests that Devcon
had “ample time to make
_proper legitimate and legal
arrangements to take shelter”
somewhere else where it
would have been safe from the
storms but sees the company
as having “for economic rea-

”

sons,
Coral Harbour instead.

“It’s like they’re saying, “To
hell with everybody’,” Ms Fer-
guson said.

After writing to Devcon to
express her displeasure, Dev-
con’s attorney, Gail Lockhart
Charles, proposed in a Sep-
tember 5th response that Ms
Ferguson “adopt a more char-
itable attitude” in light of the
pending storms.

The Devcon representative
also denied her request to give
a written undertaking that it

chosen to come to.

would cover the costs of any
damage that could result from
its barge being in the water-
way.

With the storms long’ passed
Ms Ferguson said, her “lack
of charity, as (Lockhart

Charles) put it, is fortifying

into something else: Anger.”

. An e-mail to Ms Lockhart
Charles indicating her posi-.

tion, has had no response.
Ms Ferguson said that never
in the 38 years that her moth-
er, who owns property. near
to her. own, has lived in Coral

Harbour has “a vessel of this
size ever attempted, let alone
been allowed, to moor in this
waterway.”

Herbert Bain, the official at
the Port Department who told

_ Devcon to moor inside Coral

Harbour, told Ms Ferguson
that his directions were that
it should do so in a “dead
end” area and not in front of
people’s homes.

Ms Ferguson said she has
been informed that the owner
of the undeveloped lot oppo-
site hers — in breach of the
rules that govern the develop-

’ ment — is-charging Devcon

to keep their vessel moored
there and does not appear to
object to the situation as does
she and other residents.

Tyrone Mckenzie, vice. pres-
ident at Albany, denied yes-
terday that his company has
anything to do with the con-
tinued mooring of the vessel in
Flamingo Waterway.

He said he has been
informed that during the
storm expatriate workers on
the barge left the country and
have yet to return to continue
their work.

“They were supposed to
move the vessels as soon as
the storm was passed. We said
basically the flak we are going
to get for this means they have
to do that. But quite frankly

a are a private company
whatever arrangement
they have with the individual
who owns the land is a private
matter.”

A message left for Ms Lock-
hart Charles was not returned
up to press time yesterday.

‘Firebomb’ set off

at court building

FROM page one

Court officials said that they believed
that the incident may have occurred Sun-
day night.

Speaking briefly with The Tribune yes-

terday Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
- said he hopes to have security measures
stepped up to ensure that such incidents

do not occur.

“We had a similar incident six weeks
ago on Nassau Street where someone
tried to cause a fire in court number 11.
It only affected the blinds it didn’t
spread, they threw it through the win-
dow,” Magistrate Gomez said.

"There have also been prior incidents

FROM page one

_ of courts being burned down. Court 6

was burnt down a few years ago. -.
“There were some prior attempts to
burn the courts on Nassau Street, that
was burnt down a couple of years ago
and they had to refurbish it.
“Arson is a common threat now
around the courts,” he said.

Magistrate Gomez said he did not
know much about the apparent arson
attempt on Court 8, only.that it appeared
as though sometime Sunday. night some-
one attempted to set fire to the door of
the court.

“In this profession you have to be

careful, you get threats sometimes. One
of the things we hope to address with

the new courts is that we will have secu-
rity cameras set up and it will be much
easier to watch because all of the courts
will be in one building but as they are
now: they are spread all over and it is
much harder to watch all of them,” Mag-
istrate Gomez said.

Magistrate Gomez said he hopes to
have security cameras installed to deter
such activity.

However, he could not say when the
security measures would be implement- |
ed.

Police press liaison officer ASP Wal-
ter Evans confirmed yesterday that the
matter is currently under police investi-

gation.

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“burst” him across the head
with beer bottles.

Mr Smith, who lives 50 feet
away from where he was

‘attacked, was able to briefly

escape his attackers and
run for his life towards his
home.

The men chased him said as
he reached his front door one
took out a cutlass and
“chopped his shoulder.”

The attackers then turned

their attention to Mr Smith’s

24-year-old man in custody in
connection with weekend murder

25-year-old wife, Tamara
Smith.

They stabbed her twice in
her back when she came out
to see what was going on.

Mr Smith bled to death in .
the front room of his home as,

his children stood by, said one
witness. However, police

reported that Mr Smith died
shortly after he and his wife
were taken to hospital for
treatment.

In an allegedly misdirected
act of retaliation, the homes of
two Haitian families were
burnt to the ground, leaving
them with nothing.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 9





PHARMACY
PROFESSIONALS

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LOCAL NEWS

BA's Nassau flights moving
to Heathrow’s Terminal 5

BRITISH Airways’ Nassau
flights will move to the new state-
of-the-art Terminal 5 at London
Heathrow Airport on September
17:

“We are pleased to offer our
Nassau, Providenciales and Cay-
man customers an enhanced trav-
el experience in Terminal 5,” said
Diane Corrie, British Airways
commercial manager for the
Caribbean.

“The terminal has now been
open since March 27, 2007. More
than six million people have expe-
rienced its state-of-the-art sys-
tems and luxury amenities and
we believe Terminal 5 will exceed
the expectations of our passen-

gers travelling this route,” she.

said.

The service from London to.

Nassau was scheduled to start fly-
ing out of Terminal 5 earlier this
year, but a major glitch in the
baggage handling system, which

.cost British Airways tens of mil-

lions of dollars, delayed the move.

Covering a space as large as
London’s Hyde Park, British Air-
ways’ London Heathrow Termi-
nal 5 was designed to redefine air
travel by replacing queues,

’ crowds and stress with space, light

and calm.

The £4.3 billion ($7.7 million)

building, designed by the Richard
Rogers Partnership, features floor
to ceiling windows and views of
the runways, aircraft, countryside



HEATHROW’S Terminal 5

and even Windsor Castle and
Wembley Stadium.

Terminal 5 offers 96 check-in
kiosks designed to eliminate
queuing. The rapid transit system
connection between the two
buildings moves passengers and a
new super-efficient baggage sys-
tem is designed to minimise wait-

._ ing times for baggage collection

when passengers land.

The environmentally friendly
Terminal 5 also boasts the largest
airline lounge complex in the
world, large enough to cater to
2,500 passengers, along with an

. extensive range of dining options.

Travellers can enjoy shopping
at stores such as Harrods, Coach,
Prada, and well-known British
stores. Terminal 5 is built on
reclaimed land from previous
sludge works. Among green ini-

tiatives already in place at Ter:
minal 5 are the collection and re-

_ use of rainwater for non-potable

uses. Additionally, a 85 per cent
of heating for Terminal 5 is sup-
plied by excess heat produced
from the Heathrow heat and
power station, piped through an
underground tunnel.
Landscaping includes 30,000
native woodland plants and 4,000
trees arid shrubs, while smarter
runway and airport design mean

aircraft engines idle less, reducing
‘ emissions. “Whether departing,

arriving or connecting through,
to travel with British Airways and
to fly from or to Terminal 5, is to
change the way you fly forever.
We’re proud to be a global air-

Jine, connecting people, places,

cultures and businesses,”
pone!

said Ms

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Support Citrix Metaframe and other Enterprise applications.
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Create server and network documentation and generate reports
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* LAN (Switches, structured cabling) and PBX

Cisco Certified Network Associate desirable.
Proficient in Data Centre management.

Certifications a plus (MCP, CCNA, MCSE, Servert) —


FAUE 1U, |UESUAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 IHE PHIBUiwe



| TUESDAY EVENING ; SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

7:30 8:00



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Miller’s

sporting

solution
to help
fight -
crime

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH all the crime and
violence taking place in the
country, Bahamas Olympic
Association (BOA) president
Wellington Miller says he
may have an answer to help
alleviate the problem.

Miller said one of the best
ways to help to fight crime is
to get more young men
involyed in sporting activi-
ties so that they can have a
heaiihier environment to
‘yent their frustrations.

“During this weekend, I
was thinking about the two

"recent murders and three
persons who were killed in
the car accident and I was
thinking that it would be

good if we can start encour- -

aging sports leaders in their
community,” he said.

“At one time, that was the
norm for the sports leaders
to take the forefront in
encouraging persons in their
community to get more
involved in sports.”

Miller, who is also. presi-
dent of the Amateur Boxing
Federation of the Bahamas,
said the BOA is going:'to take
the initiative and make their
contribution to the develop-
ment. of sports in various
communities. :

He noted that in short
order, the BOA will host a
series of sports rallies in com-
munities such as the “Big
Yard” © and. Cordeaux
Avenue where they will be
encouraging all of the core
sports involved in the asso-
ciation to participate.

- “As you know, sports is a
very, very good alternative,”
Miller pointed out. “It disci-
plines you, it gives you a
healthy body and a’strong
mind. It helps you to stay
away from negative things.”

Having attended the
XXIX Olympic Games last
month in Beijing, China,
where he watched the
Jamaican dominance in ath-
letics, Miller said the public
should be aware of the fact
that two of their stars, Usain

‘ Bolt and Sherry-Ann Fraser,
came from areas that have
been infested by crime. |,

‘He said if they could have
been transformed into the
top male and female sprint-
ers at the Olympics, he does-
n’t.see why the Bahamas
can’t produce its own share
of world-beaters by the next
Olympics - slated for Lon-
don in 2012.

“Tf the. people in the com-
munity can take on the lead
and show the youngsters that
there is a better way through
sports, we can see a more
vibrant country on the inter-
national scene again,” he
said. ce

As a result of Bolt’s incred-
ible feat in Beijing, Miller
said the sprinter is now a mil-
lionaire. And he said Fraser
should ‘be handsomely
rewarded when the Olympic
celebrations are held in
Jamaica starting on October
3. .
“It’s just no limit to what

could be done,” Miller
stressed. “You never know
what to expect from your
involvement in sports. So I
think it’s time for us as the
Olympic Association and
sporting bodies to walk
through these communities
and hold sports rallies to
encourage more Bahamians
to get involved in sports.”

SEE page 13

THE TRIBUNE









Ranger's show they

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter.’

n a series that was pushed to
its five- game limit, the Real
Deal Rangers captured the
Bahamas Government
Departmental Basketball
Association (BGDBA) championship
for the second time in the last three

' years.

The Rangers closed out the series

_ with a 79-75 win over the Bamboo

Shack Aces to take the series 3-2 on
Saturday night at the Kendal G L
Isaacs Gymnasium in the season finale.

Ian Pinder stepped up when it mat-

MINISTER Bannister speaks w
Chinese Ambassador Hu Ding
Xian and first secretary Tan Jian to
discuss the way forward...

(

BOA expects
Team Bahamas’
welcome-home
celebrations to
‘go very well) |
says Miller...

See Page 13

are the ‘real deal’

Close out series with 79-75 win over Bamboo

Shack Aces to capture BGDBA championship

tered most, leading the Rangers and all
scorers, scoring 30 points in the close-.

out game.
Kevin McPhee chipped in with 22
while Brandon Ingraham added 19.

Mark Hanna led the Aces with 25.

while Valentino Richardson, slowed
considerably by injury, was limited to

18. Lamont Bain added 16.
The depth of the Rangers’ bench

and the performances of their role’

players like Scooter Reid and Sonny
Miller proved to be the difference in

thé series and one of the key factors in |

the championship series.
. The series proved to be a matchup

of the top teams in the league, evident
of its back and forth natyre, neither

team won consecutive games and the’

largest margin of victory was just eight
points.
The teams split the first four games

SEE page 13

}



~ambassador to ‘discuss.

matters of mutual interest’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

- bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Sports Desmond
Bannister, after traveling to the
XXIX Olympic Games in Beijing,
China, is eager to continue a rela-
tionship with the Chinese here in
the Bahamas.

At his office yesterday, Minis-
ter Bannister and Archie Nairn,
the permanent secretary, met with
Chinese Ambassador Hu Ding
Xian and first secretary Tan Jian to
discuss the way forward.

“After our successful visit to
China, we are delighted that we
can sit with you and discuss matters
of mutual interest,” Bannister said.

“I want to thank you for provid-
ing us the opportunity while in Chi-
na to meet with the All China
Youth Federation, which was a
very productive meeting.”

As a result of the meeting, Ban-
nister said there are many ways in
which both countries can come
together for the betterment of

“Through these games, China
has shown to the world that it
is a peaceful country, it’s not
a threat to anyone and it’s a
country with a great heritage
and it is moving forward...”

— Chinese Ambassador Hu Ding Xian

sports and youth.

“We are looking forward to con-
tinuing to work with you,” he said.

Now that he and Nairn are back
home, Bannister said they want to
get on the ball right away to discuss
their further relationship with Chi-
na.

When asked about the much
anticipated proposed national sta-
dium and reconstruction of the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Center,
Bannister said those matters are

also on their agenda for discussion.

“We are looking forward to con-
tinued dialogue on those issues,”
he said.

Not only did he view the games,
but Bannister said he had a chance
to walk on the Great Wall of Chi-
na and was able to purchase a
unique straw hat as a reminder of
the trip for years to come.

Bannister said the Chinese won
the most gold medals ever at the
Olympics and their athletes per-



formed exceptionally well. And he
said the performance of Team
Bahamas was just as exceptional,
adding that he was happy that the
two countries have been able to



meet now that the games are over.

Ding Xian said he was elated to
meet with Minister Bannister. “I
am very glad to be here with the
honourable minister and I am very
glad that he and the permanent
secretary had a very good time in
Beijing.”

He said the Bahamian govern-
ment provided a lot of support to
help China to provide an opportu-
nity to display to the world that
they can host the games.

“Through these games, China
has shown to the world that it is a



peaceful country, it’s not a threat
to anyone and it’s a country with a
great heritage and it is moving for-
ward,” he said.

Ding Xian said with the diplo-
matic ties established between the
two countries, they will continue
to discuss ways in which they can
further enhance their,relationship.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

| Minister meets with Chinese



‘
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SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Forrest clobbers Mora for the
win by unanimous decision

Takes WBC super welterweight championship belt

AY CSTE MEO) Wee cere Ba (0 AN
from Vernon Forrest during the
ninth round of their 12 round
WBC super welterweight title
match in Las Vegas Saturday...

VERNON FORREST celebrates victory by unanimous
decision over Sergio Mora...

Sti NO\ mel stat eo mom elnrensaect
body blow to Sergio Mora in the
seventh round...

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SERGIO MORA (left) is knocked down by Vernon For-
rest in the seventh round

(


TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 13



LOCAL SPORTS

Miller’s

sporting

solution

to help
fight

crime—|-

FROM page 11

With the country filled
with so many former athletes
who have competed on the
international level in the var-
ious sports, Miller said it’s
their goal to encourage a lot
of them to give back to the
BOA’s initiative by coming
out and sharing their person-
al experiences.

“We want to get them
involved by telling: what it’s
like to be representing your
country, what it feels like to
have the Bahamas placed
across your chest, what it
feels like to march in the
parade and what it feels like
to have the national anthem
or the flag raised at the
games,” Miller said.

“What a feeling. That is
what ‘we want to encourage
them to do because I believe
that we can find a lot more
athletes and have a good pro-
gramme for the next
Olympics. We have good
qualified coaches. It’s just a
matter of getting the people
committed to getting
involved in the sports.”

Miller said this is a way for
those persons to make their

parents and family proud and -

even the country proud.

- “T really want to. start. this
programme soon because I
believe that the time is right,”
Miller projected. “We just
need to let them know that
the world is much bigger than
just living through their cor-
ner,

“We want them to come

and travel. with-us. Let them: :.|:

sit down with some of these
top athletes and hear how
they got to where they are
and what are they doing to
make-sure that they are
ready to compete at the next
games.”

BOA expects Team



P= WELLINGTON MILLER
says the BOA is making
progress in the right
direction

Â¥
,

Bahamas’

welcome-home celebrations
to ‘go very well,’ says Miller

@ By BRENT STUBBS '
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net_.

BAHAMAS Olympic Association
president Wellington Miller says the
BOA expects that the welcome-home
celebrations for Team Bahamas’
Olympians “will go very well.”

With the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture preparing for the celebrations
next month, he said two BOA officers
have been designated to work on the
organising committee.

The ministry has not yet released the
official dates or details of the celebra-
tions.

“That’s going good,” Miller said. “We
expect that it will go very well.”

While it has been less than two months
since the new executive board took office,
Miller said they are making progress in

the right direction.

“Everybody is upbeat and we have

. been having meetings and we hope to
have an all-day meeting on Saturday
when we really put our plan of action to
the general body,” he said.

One of the immediate goals of the asso-

- ciation, according to Miller, is to have

eltics mark 17th

the office properly staffed with a manag-
er and a secretary. He said they have a
number of résumés that they are care-

‘fully looking over before they make a

final decision. °
Meanwhile, Miller said he has been
spending some time at the office during

the day to answer any and all inquiries,

from the affiliated sporting organisations.

He noted that the other officers are
posted there during the evening. “There
are a lot of things that we are looking
at,” he said. “So Iam very happy with the
way things have been going.”

Elected on July 24, Miller said he and
his executive board found themselves
smashed into the travel of the national
team to the XXIX Olympic Games in
Beijing, China that ran from August 8-24.

‘He said secretary general Rommel
“Fish” Knowles was able to start working
right away and they had a number of per-
sons who were given some specific
responsibilities, such as vice president

‘Mike Sands, who dealt with the rein-

statement of long jumper Jackie Edwards
on the Olympic team.

Having had the opportunity to travel to

Beijing for his first official visit as presi-

dent of the BOA, Miller said he and -

NBA Championship |

Knowles are now y gearing up to bcaial to
Mexico for the Pan American Sports

Organisation meeting, slated for Octo-

ber 9-11.
“Since this is our first meeting we have
to go. there and see what the set up is all

about and what we can get from it first,” _

he said. ‘We certainly want to see what

‘ kind of help we will get and then we can

start lobbying for it.”

Miller said if the. trip-to Beijing was ©

any indication, he can’t wait to go to
Mexico. “It was very good being intro-
duced to all of the big mucks in the
Olympic movement,” he said. “It was
good. It was good.”

With the BOA being the highest sport-
ing body in the country, Miller said they
intend to have the office reflect.that, so

once they are properly set up, the sport-.

ing bodies look forward to an. efficient

organisation that will definitely make a _ :

difference.

He said that all of the officers, Who
are directly involved in the majority of
the.core sporting bodies in the country,
are all eager to get to work to turn things



around, especially after the fiasco that -

they experienced over the last two years
in getting the elections off the ground.

by bringing the trophy to Vermont



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Rangers

show they
are the
‘real deal’

when Rangers took game
one 78-74, the Aces.respond-
ed to take game two 97-89,

_ the Rangers again won game

three 92-84, and the Aces
held off elimination in game

_ four with an 88-82 win.

Tom Grant Sr, president
of the BGDBA, congratulat-
ed the Rangers on an out-
standing season and noted
their depth as the determin-
ing factor.

“They came a-really long
way...At the beginning of the ~
season they were playing
more like individuals, but
after the break they came ©
together and started to gel
more as a team,” he said.
“They stood out because of
their supporting cast. All the
teams have a few stars but
it’s how the players around
those guys and how they step
up that could decide a game
and a series.

Grant said the league
experienced growth ina very
successful season and. looks
to continue this growth in the
near future.

“This year was a great year.”
for us and J am really excited, '
about the league and its
future moving forward,” he
said. “From what we have
seen all season and especial-
ly in the championship I
think the league is ready to
move on to that next level.
The league was very well
organised this year. We com-
pleted the season in the exact
four month window we
established and the anticipa-
tion built as the vest went

~ on.”




The final three seeds of thi
playoff seeds were decided”
by tiebreakers.
’ Grant said-the association
has major plans as it moves

- forward which will include

fostering relationships with
other local leagues and seek-
ing possible schotarship -

‘opportunities for its players.

“In the near future we
hope to stage a complete all-
star weekend,” he said. “It
would be good if we would
be able to establish all-star
teams to play against the oth-
er leagues and also to play
against COB and other col-
lege teams when they come
to town. What they can do is
maybe give some of the
younger guys an opportunity
to get noticed by one of those .
schools and get a scholarship
opportunity.”



CELTICS guard Rajon Rondo holds
the NBA Championship trophy...

FANS are reflected in the NBA Championship trophy during a celebration on the Church St Marketplace yesterday in Burlington, Vermont. The Celtics celebrated their 17th NBA Cham-
pionship by bringing the trophy to Vermont...
(AP Photos: Toby Talbot)
PAGE 14, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS






JUVENTUS’ Amauri out-
jumps teammate Giorgio
Chiellini and Udinese’s
Aleksandar Lukovic, from
rear...

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JUVENTUS’ Amauri controls the ball during the Italian
Serie A soccer match between Juventus and Udinese in
Turin’s Olympic Stadium, northern Italy, on Sunday.
Juventus won 1-0 with a goal scored by Amauri...



"JUVENTUS? Amauri (left) and teammate Mauro German
Camoranesi (second right) eye the ball...

Photos:.Aiberto Ramella & Massimo Pinca/AF



JUVENTUS’ Vincenzo laquinta (right) celedrates alter
. agoal...

JUVENTUS’ Mohamed Sissoko (background) and
Udinese’s Gokhan Inler compete for the ball...





igs

JUVENTUS’ Amauri reacts after scoring the winning 's , JUVENTUS' Christian Poulsen (right) in action with the
goal... — : Udinese’s Gokhan Inler...


THE TRIBUNE _ TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 15















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KWASI THOMPSON (MP
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Resort






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and advisory services to individual investors
and is a trading and sponsor member of BISX. »

an







PICTURED (left to right) RICK
Hazlewood, corporate director of
the John Bull Group of Companies;
Gerardo Capo, CEO of the Bimini
Bay Resort; Tamica Romer, man-
ager of the John Bull Bimini Bay
(centre, flanked by store staff);
Charity Armbrister, manager of
Family Islands, Ministry of Tourism,
and Sean Grimberg, president of
Bimini Bay esort.



BIMINI — John Bull hosted a
grand opening celebration for its
new store located at the Bimini
Bay Resort and Marina. —

Several government officials
from the Bahamas Tourism
Office as well as John Bull exec-
utives attended a ribbon-cutting
ceremony that took place on
August 29 at the store, which is .
located in the resort’s Fisherman’s
Village.

Charity Armbrister, the Min-
istry of Tourism’s general man-
ager for the Family Islands, John
Bull executives’ Rick Hazlewood
and Inga Bowleg, and president
of the Bimini Bay Resort Sean
Grimberg all gave remarks at the
event.

“The grand opening was an
exciting day for Bimini because
John Bull represents the finest in
Bahamian businesses,” said Mr
Grimberg.

“Tourists from all around the
world have enjoyed the John Bull
experience, and now they can

_ enjoy it right here in Bimini.”

John Bull, a family-owned
company since 1929, offers the
most sought-after names in jew-
elry, timepieces and other luxury
gifts including Cartier, David
Yurman, Gucci, Movado and
Mikimoto.

John Bull has also been the
official Bahamas retailer for
Rolex for more than 50 years.

The Bimini Bay Resort loca-
tion, which is the first-ever John
Bull store on the island of Bimini,
also sells luxury handbags by
Kate Spade, Dooney and Bourke
and more.

Sela a

For the stories

Lyrone Burrows, Vice President, FG Capital Markets (left) and winner
Elton Kemp Me i




Wesley Percentie, Manager, FG Capital Markets (left) and winner Sybil Allen







rs Ww 4 ed
: Oem

Obie Turnquest, Assistant Broker-Dealer/Securities Trader, FG Capital
Markets (left) and winner Janet French

“a Be 3g "ise A
Tamekia Stubbs, Investment Manager, Family Guardian (left) and winner
Vaughan Delaney



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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Internationa

Coastal Cleanup Day

Bahamas taking part in
global event aimed at
stemming pollution of
marine environment





















-conne
friends and business








¢ yo

Becta

_ associates each day? —
BIC has embarked on
a public awareness
campaign “Be-Smart”



to provide you with
practical advice about
safety, privacy and
courtesy when using
your wireless phone.



Be-Smart



l Make driving your first cell-phone is not in easy reach, ‘Save all of your telephone
priority. Always let.the persons | let the call go to voicemail bers to your SIM ca
you are speaking with know yt 8 ee
you are driving and end the Syuse hands free devices

like'a bluetooth which will
allow you, to keep both hands

on the wh eel

conversation if you need to.












D Pisition your wire-

less phone within

_ easy reach. If
your









5 Dont use your phone in

Be courteous. Place your
hazardous weather conditions

phone on silent or vibrate
if you are in a meeting, a
restaurant, the cinema or in

church.














” 4 Don’t engage in
stressful or emo-
» tional con-
versa-

ae
9 Do not send text messages,
take pictures, look up numbers
of jot notes while driving






















, 6 Protect your personal
information. Lock your

screens and set
passwords



0 Make safety your most

important call. In case
of emergency dial
919.

ett
mem == NuGcEeTs Comso

BRL





LAST YEAR hundreds of volunteers gathered on several islands in The
Bahamas to take part in International Coastal Clean Up Day. All trash col-
lected was sorted and-filed by type. The data was sent to the Ocean Con-
servancy which tracks global marine debris.

VOLUNTEERS throughout the Bahamas are preparing to ‘take
part in the Ocean Conservancy’s 23rd annual International Coastal
Cleanup Day on September 20. Pat

International Coastal Cleanup Day (ICC) is the world’s largest
one-day volunteer event aimed at stemming pollution of the marine
environment. Last year, 378,000 volunteers from 76 countries and 45
states cleared six million pounds of trash from oceans and waterways
and recorded every piece of trash collected.

The ICC started as a local programme in Texas and gradually
expanded to include every major body of water in the world.

As such, it not only makes a powerful statement about global con-
cern for the environment, it also empowers local communities to do
something about pollution.

“Last year record numbers of volunteers came out to clean-up
shorelines and waterways in the Bahamas on International Coastal
Cleanup Day,” said Tanya Moss, education co-ordinator for Dolphin
Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island and national co-ordinator of Inter-
national Coastal Cleanup Day in the Bahamas.

“Volunteers collected 16,436 debris items in New Providence alone
and that is a tremendous achievement. We hope that this year even
more people volunteer to participate in this important event. There are
many ways to become involved.”

How To Participate

In Nassau - 2

Dolphin Encounters — Project BEACH will host a beach cleanup on
International Coastal Cleanup Day, Saturday, September 20, from
Jam to 2pm at Yamacraw Beach, just past Stoke’s Cabana. The pub-
lic is invited to volunteer and attend. Call Tanya Moss at 363-7180 ext
303 or 359-0278 for more information or to volunteer.

Project BEACH will also be hosting month-long Beach Buddies and
Project Green programmes with local students. Please call the educa-
tion department at 363-7180 extension 303 to co-ordinate a pro-
gramme. | :

In Abaco :

Friends of the Environment, the International Coastal Cleanup co-
ordinators for Abaco, together with the Ministry of Tourism Office in
Abaco, have organised events including beach cleanups. For more
information contact Anita Knowles at Friends of the Environment at
242-367-2721, email her at: anita@friendsoftheenvironment.org, or
visit www.friendsoftheenvironment.org.

In Grand Bahama 4

On Saturday, September 20 under the theme “Keep Grand Bahama
Beautiful”, volunteers will clean up 12 beaches and shorelines; from
8am to 1pm. Pepsi, Coke-a Cola, hotels and local government councils
are sponsoring the refreshments for the volunteers. The Ministry of
Tourism office in Grand Bahama serves as the Grand Bahama co-ordi-
nator for International Coastal Cleanup. Call Renamae Symonette at
242-352-8044 or email rsymonette@bahamas.com for more information.

All Other Islands :

Contact Tanya Moss at Dolphin Encounters for information pack-
ets on forming your own cleanups for International Cleanup Day at 363-
7180 ext 303 or 359-0278. For more or email: tanya.moss@dolphinen-
counters.com .

DousBLe STACK
ComBo

$3.99

Ai Me eth
i a etl

th

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JR. FROSTY








TUESDAY,

‘Significant change’ to
development model

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Supreme
Court ruling will °
“significantly
change how
development
occurs” in the
Bahamas by pre-
venting develop-
ers from pre-sell-
ing lots to fund
subdivision infra-
structure build-
out, a government minister yes-
terday telling Tribune Business
that regulatory oversight need-
ed to be strengthened.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, which has
responsibility for Town Plan-
ning issues, said Justice John
Lyons’ ruling that selling lots in
subdivisions which did not have
full approval was a criminal
offence would “have an effect”
on developers who sought to
parcel up their land into lots
and sell them to finance infra-
structure build-out.

yee a

As full subdivision approval is-

only given to developers who
have either lodged a perfor-



Subdivision regulation —
needs ‘stronger oversight’

mance bond with the Ministry
of Works to cover infrastruc-
ture costs should they default
on their obligations, or those
who have already put in the
necessary utilities, Justice Lyon-
s’s ruling effectively neuters this
method for financing subdivi-
sion growth.

Sources have told Tribune

Business that attorneys are like- —

ly to appeal the Justice’s ruling,

.given that lot pre-selling has

been widely used to fund real
estate development - both local
and international - for decades.
In these cases, clients who have
acquired pre-sold lots place the
funds into escrow and they are
released at certain stages as the
infrastructure work is complet-
ed. ~
“That will come under con-
siderable scrutiny as a result of
the ruling,” Dr Deveaux said of
this development method. Peo-
ple who are seeking to buy land

will ask the developer: ‘Do you .

SEE page 6B

Don’t ‘capitulate
to fearful and the

insular’ over EPA

Mi By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business. Editor

INDUSTRIES
ranging from
organic farming
to high-end fash-
ion are potential-
ly ripe export
opportunities for
Bahamian entre-
preneurs via the
Economic Part-
nership Agree- -



“Bas teen Roan #4293



Minister outlines
Opportunities on
top of current $90m
exports to Europe

ment (EPA), a government
minister said yesterday, as he
urged this nation “not to capit-
ulate to the fearful and insular”.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, said that by
signing on to the EPA agree-
ment with the European Union
(EU) next month, as the Gov-
ernment planned to do, it would
not only preserve preferential,
duty-free market access terms
for $90. million worth. of

- Bahamian exports, but also cre--
~ ate.export opportunities for oth-

er sectors.

“If you ask me, I think the -
‘Bahamas has opportunities in

organic farming,” Mr Laing told

- Tribune Business. “I think the

Bahamas has opportunities in

biofuels, given our natural envi- .
ronment, and alternative ener--

gy, to the extent that we can
ally ourselves with leading:
providers of this kind of thing.

“T think high-end crafts are

_an opportunity for us, where we |
| cater to the. upscale end of the
_ Inarket. ‘There are also high- -end

fashion opportunities for us.’
Me Laing added: There are

SEE page 4B

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SEPTEMBER

EG

: SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

here is “no evi-

- dence” that major

foreign direct

investment pro-

jects are being encouraged to

adopt sustainable develop-

ment practices and use renew-

‘able resources, a Bahamian

engineering group has

warned, saying it was “imper-

ative” for the Government to

finalise its National van:
mental Policy.

A-research paper adduced
for an international confer-
ence by Bahamians David
Davis (now permanent secre-
tary in the Prime Minister’s
Office), Hammond Rahming,
Michael Diggiss and Lelawat-
tee Manoo-Rahming, said all
project
Impact Assessments (EIAs)

. needed to answer how much
their impact was. vbeing
reduced or minimised. -

“There is.no evidence that
the projects are being encour-



‘Third World’ practices hurt Bahamas

lm By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ce
Business Reporter —



THE Bahamas is attempting
to do business with first-world -
clients while still employing
third world practices, the
Bahamian Contractors Associ-
ation’s president said yesterday,

in response to a World Bank ~"

survey that highlighted the dif-

‘ficulties involved in obtaining

building permits in this nation.

Stephen Wrinkle said the
results of the survey were very
important and “brought to light
what the industry has already
known; that thereis insufficient
staffing or resources in place to
accommodate any change in
doing business”.

Mr Wrinkle said the Bahamas
must implement more efficient
operations, particularly as it
relates to the Government
approval process.

Environmental



2008 !

‘No evidence’ developers
urged to be eco-friendly

Minister says draft environmental
_ policy will not be ‘one cap fits
all’ developments

aged to minimise consump-
tion of non-renweable
resources and maximise con-
sumption of renewable
resources,” they wrote in their
paper, presented at the Con-
struction in Developing
Countries International Sym-
posium in Trinidad.

- “As an example, the
Bahamas has an abundance
of sun days, yet no project has
-been required to use solar
energy for the production of

electricity for heating water

_or air conditioning.

“The use of solar energy
minimises atmospheric emis-
sions by reducing the use of
grid power, the production of
which has negative environ-
mental impacts, especially in

He stressed
that delays in the
approval process
were extremely
costly, particular-
ly when dealing
with investors |.
spending millions
- or in some cases
billions - on a
development.

Mr. Wrinkle

ands

said that having to wait years

for all the relevant approval
processes to be completed can
drive interest payments alone
to hundreds of thousands, or
even millions, of dollars.

“Tf this happens year after
year, you cannot expect devel-
opers to just stay in the game,”
he said.

Mr Wrinkle maintained that
this “dragging of feet” is part of
the reason why the previously
estimated $50 billion in invest-
ments slated to begin in this



terms of global warming.”

.marina/resort/second home
- type of development inher-.
’ the consumption of land is an
- ernment would soon finalise

development of each Bahami-

Deveaux, minister of the envi-



)







The authors added: “The



ently utilises a substantial
amount of land. Minimising





important aspect of the draft
Environ mental Policy.......
“Tt is hoped that the Gov-






the National Environment
Policy, and that this would
lead to a master plan for the







an island that will benefit all
Bahamians.”
However,




‘Dr! “Earl




ronment, yesterday said it was

SEE page 2B








country had now nese down
to $3 billion.

“That is a tragic toss and

‘waste of resources.” He said it
also impacted the approval
process for Bahamian projects,
because alleviating the lengthy
delays in foreign direct invest-

ment approvals took away _./

human and other resources
from the local process.

Mr Wrinkle called for there
to be a greater level of collabo-
ration between the Government
and the private sector to ensure
that the process can.run more
smoothly.

The Doing Business 2009
report, published by the World

Bank and its International .

Finance Corporation (IFC)
arm, found that when it came
to overcoming the bureaucracy
and red tape that every busi-
ness in this country knows stifles

SEE page 2B

\



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Bahamas
‘Can't sit
hack’ over

Lehman

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas
“cannot sit back
and wring its
hands” over the
fallout from the
collapse of top
Wall Street



Lehman Broth-
ers, a former
minister telling
Tribune Business
yesterday that it
could “slowdown” some resort
investment projects and force
this nation to “re-position” its
tourism industry.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance under
the Christie administration, said
the latest financial meltdown
resulting from the global cred-
it/liquidity crunch and sub-
prime mortgage binge was
“very likely” to impact an
already-struggling Bahamian
economy.

Mr Smith, now CFAL’s chair-
man, said there was going to be

P 4

Smith

. amajor “knock down” effect in -

the Bahamas and around the
world from Lehman Brothers’
decision to seek Chapter 11
bankruptcy protection after fail-
ing to find a buyer in the wake
of multi-billion dollar losses.
Besides Lehman Brothers’
bankruptcy, Mr Smith said pre-
vious developments in the US
financial markets - the bailout
of fellow investment bank Bear
Stearns, and taxpayer under-
writing of mortgage giants Fan-
nie Mae and Freddie Mac - had
increased the US fiscal deficit
and national debt.
Combined with rising oil

SEE page 5B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

a
BEC fuel surcharge is key debate topic

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE fourth annual free legal clinic
sponsored by Halisbury Chambers is
to focus on issues as increased fuel
costs, BEC’s fuel surcharge, construc-
tion woes, real estate and crime, it was
announced yesterday.

At a press conference to announce
this years agenda, Nerissa Greene, a
partner in Halisbury Chambers, said
the topics were chosen based on the
concerns that persons raised when
coming into their offices.

“For example, we have had persons
come in and ask if they can take action

higher fuel surcharge.
Lots of companies have
been impacted by the
customs duties, for
example, and so what
we want to do is empow-
er people and give them
the information they
need for the life they
want,” she said.

Now in its fourth year,
the clinic, which com-
bines free one-on-one
consultations with the firm’s attorneys
and the guest speakers, has grown each
year.

a
seASOle A



“We see this as our way of giving
back to the community,” Ms Greene
said.

The clinic will be held on'Saturday,
October 4, begirining at 8.45 pm at the
New Providence Community Centre
on Blake Road.

Scheduled to make presentations

are Rachel Pinder, who will discuss ~

the value of getting your home
appraised, particularly in an econom-
ic climate that may be experiencing a
downturn.

She that many people think their
homes are valued at more than they
are, and in the case of persons wishing
to sell, she said she can give pointers

on actually increasing your home’s val-
ue by making small changes.
Stephen Wrinkle, president of the

. Bahamian Contractors Association,

will speak to concerns persons have
about dealing with unscrupulous con-
tractors and how to safeguard against
this.

Kevin Basden, BEC’s general man-

ager, will take the hot seat to explain

the fuel surcharges and Berchenal
Bethel, deputy comptroller, and
Charles Turner, superintendent, will
discuss the changes in Customs duty
rates.

Two other topics - the Economic
Partnership Agreement (EPA) and

THE TRIBUNE

the Automated Clearing House - will
be discussed by Simon Wilson, the
director of economic planning at the
Ministry of Finance, and Brian Smith,
the ACH business manager.

Work permits, permanent residen-
cy and the right to work will be dis-
cussed by Lambert Campbell, the

_ deputy director of the Department of

Immigration.

Ms Greene will speak on surviving
divorce or a husband’s death.

Rounding out the day’s presenta-
tion will be ACP Hulan Hanna, who ~
will speak about protecting children
from gangs and how to spot negative
signs in children.



‘No evidence’ developers urged to be eco-friendly

FROM page 1B

wrong to suggest that a Nation-

al Environmental Policy would
present “a one cap fits all”
guide for dealing with the envi-
ronmental impact of Bahamas-
based development projects.

All were different, he
explained, and as a result would
have different requirements to
live up to.

“We have a draft Marina pol-












Once your number is scheduled for port
have access to your voice mail and text messaging features.

BTC’s Wireless Department and Cyber World in the Mall at Marathon:
will be open starting September 8th 9:00am - 8:00pm

Last day for TDMA Nationwide is October 31st, 2008

CALL BTC 225-5282 | www.bicbahamas.com
























4 Reanald Wireless

SUBSCRIBERS

icy, we have a Wetlands policy,
we have a Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act,” Dr Deveaux
told Tribune Business.

“We have very clear environ-
mental guidelines for any devel-
opment that are specified by
science with respect to their
interaction with the marine
environment, coastal environ-
ment and the mangroves.

“To speak to a National Envi-
ronmental Policy suggests one
cap will fit ali and it won’t. The

Ministry of the Environment
Act will have a set of regula-
tions and be an evolving piece
of legislation, setting out in
descriptive terms what we plan
to do.”

The Environmental Policy
would be a “dynamic document
that addresses our specific
risks”, Dr Deveaux said, point-
ing to the Schooner Bay pro-
ject in Abaco as an example of
an environmentally friendly,
sustainable development.





| 9 By 20
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ing you will not

“Much of what I have
described to you has been writ-
ten,” he added, stating that a
Forum scheduled for Septem-

ber 29, 2008, would present the:

environmental legislation and
National Energy Policy to the
public for review and feedback.

They are badly needed. The
Bahamian authors, in their
paper, wrote: “Currently, sus-
tainability and green design
concepts are not integral to the
Bahamian built environment.

4



‘But with approximately $20 bil-
lion worth of current and pro-_

jected foreign ‘direct invest-
ments for the Bahamas, no one
can afford to ignore. the issue
of sustainable development........

“Minimising the consumption
of water is another area that
deserves special attention. In
order to meet the water needs
of these mega developments,
the Bahamas is heavily investing

in reverse osmosis facilities, but

[these] have ‘embedded

increased energy consumption
and operating costs.”

Urging the Government to
encourage water conservation
and recycling, as well as upgrad-

ing the water supply, the
research paper’s authors also
expressed concern about the

, harmful discharge of liquids into

the ecosystem.
“Most of the Bahamas is at

sea level with a very high water

table, and a significant portion
of the total land area is made up
of wetlands, especially man-
groves,” the paper warned.

“Tt is an accepted fact that
mangroves are the nurseries for
most marine life. Any pollution
of the ecosystem, through the

discharge of harmful liquid

effluents, will have an adverse
effect on the groundwater as
well as the marine life.”







“FROM page 1B.

Bahamian commerce, the

Bahamas had slipped from 51st __
‘place to 55th out of 181 nations.

One problem area for the
Bahamas was construction per-
mits, where it ranked 92nd. The
World Bank report assessed the
procedures, time and costs asso-
ciated with buildifiz a similar



‘size warehouse i in all countries,

~ including obtaining all the nec-

essary licences and permits,
‘completing all inspections and
getting utility connections.
When it came to the number
of procedures dealing with con-
struction permits, only Trinidad
_and Puerto Rico - out of the
whole Caribbean - had more
than the Bahamas” 18 processes.
It took some 197 days to deal
with construction permits in the
Bahamas, the report found,
placing the Bahamas near the
bottom of the Caribbean, while
the cost of dealing with the per-
mits, as a percentage of income

’ per capita, was pegged at 241.6

per cent for the Bahamas. Only
four more Caribbean nations
were more expensive.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 3B



-Mayaguana project in
hotel partner talks ©

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



THE Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas is currently in negotiations
with undisclosed parties to develop two
or three medium-sized hotels for its
$1.8 billion joint venture property on
Mayaguana.

Sir Baltron Bethel, its managing
director, told Tribune Business yester-
day that the Corporation was in nego-

tiations with parties to discuss the addi-
tion of the properties to the project.

Sir Baltron was recently in Boston
to meet the Corporation’s Mayaguana
project partner, the Boston-based I-
Group developers.

He indicated that construction work
on the joint venture was progressing
well. Both parties own the project
through the Mayaguana Development
Company.

Sir Baltron said that to date, work

on the infrastructure portion of the pro-
ject was actually ahead of schedule.
That included putting in place 10 miles
of road, a technical centre, water desali-
nation plant and concrete batch plant .

He said the airport’s runway was now
complete, with the design for the ter-

minal finished and approved. The steel -

shell for the terminal was already up,
and a hospitality centre will also be
built.

The project’s vertical construction is

progressing at a slower pace, Sir Bal-
tron said, something that was a direct
result of the slowdown in real estate
sales due to the current state of the US
economy. That slowdown caused the
scale of the project to be modified.

The development covers some 10,000
acres and includes an airport, utilities,
marina village, residential lots, private
village and condos, a boutique resort
and condos, a boutique resort and
nature preserves.

Oil closes below $100 a barrel for first time in six months

m@ By STEVENSON JACOBS -

AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil
prices closed below $100 a bar-
rel for the first time in six
months Monday, tumbling in
another dramatic sell-off as the
demise of Lehman Brothers
and the sale of Merrill Lynch
deepened worries about the US

economy.

Crude prices shed more than
$5 a barrel and have now given
up virtually all their gains for
the year, extending a steep,
two-month slide from record
levels above $147 a barrel.

Oil’s pullback also came as
early signs suggested that Hur-
ricane Ike delivered less dam-

Coast energy oil and gas infra-
structure. But pump prices
jumped above $4 a gallon in
parts of the country as a pre-

- cautionary shutdown of Gulf

refineries caused gasoline short-
ages.

The latest sell-off in oil began
Sunday and accelerated Mon-

day as traders’ digested a day ~

of dramatic upheaval on Wall

‘oil analyst and trader in Vil-

lanova, Pa., who said the pull-
back could reflect selling by
Lehman or possibly a hedge

fund struggling to raise capital.
"When you see price drops of
this size, it eks of someone
being in trouble."

Breezes targets
autumn start for
| ew upgraties

SuperClubs Breezes (Bahamas)
is to begin the second phase of its
development programme this
autumn, continuing renovations
that were begun last September.

The resort has announced it will
undertake further renovations to
the East Wing guest bedrooms,
bathrooms and general-facilities.

It stressed that guest amenities
and services will not be affected,
as work would be taking place
inside individual bedrooms.

The work will introduce remod-
elled guest bathrooms, sliding glass
doors, flat screen plasma televisions
and numerous supplementary prod-
uct enhancements.

Additionally, the entire Banquet
and Meeting facilities are also
undergoing refurbishments during
this period:

Last autumn, all the guest bed-
rooms in the West Wing were
refurbished.

age than feared to the Gulf
Street: Lehman Brothers Hold-

ings Inc., a 158-year-old invest-

ment bank, filed for bankrupt-

cy after failing to find a buyer

and Merrill Lynch & Co.

agreed to be bought out by

| Bank of America Corp.

Lehman, Merrill and other,
big institutional investors were
major participants in the com-
modities boom of the past year,
helping push the price of oil,
precious metals and grains to
historic highs until a slowing
global economy helped bring a
halt to the rally.

Analysts said investors feared
that the upheaval in the finan-
cial sector could trigger anoth-
er round of commodities liqui-
dation — especially with
Lehman likely to unwind its
holdings. Other investors may
also unload commodities, fear-
ing that the deepening eco-
nomic.crisis will further reduce
demand for energy and raw
materials futures.

“T think this is/giving the bulls:
further.reason to.exit the mar)»
ket,” said Stephen Schork, an «>.

SUNSHINE INSURANCE

(Acunty & Taney Latin

Cariap iain far Mi A R 5 H
The world’s #1 nek apaniaist

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(Nor45 of 2000)

MR. LAVELLE M. HAMILTON

COURT ENGINEERING LIMITED

In VoluntaryLliquidation

is no longer employed with Sunshine.
Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Ltd.

and is no longer authorized to conduct

business on behalf of Sunshine Insur-
ance or any of it’s affiliates.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the

International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), COURT
ENGINEERING LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 22nd day of August, 2008.

James Andrew Ramsden
of Harbour Reach
Rue de Carteret
St. Helier, Jersey:
Channel Islands
Liquidator



25

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER,
CORPORATE CREDIT



DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED | |
Core responsibilities: ?

Invites applications for the position of

¢ Acts as Relationship Manager to high risk clientele by liaising with
clients to determine needs and resolve issues, providing answers
and communication wherever necessary.
‘© Perform maintenance and records management on existing
portfolios and advise Corporate Credit Consultants of any issues.
¢ Perform constant follow up on high risk/impaired accounts and
institutes proper procedures regarding the collection of same.
¢ Assess financial position of high risk/impaired loans.
¢ Prepare credit proposals by conducting comprehensive financial
and non-financial analysis.
° Provide coaching, guidance, and direction to line lenders in the
assessment and structuring of credit facilities.

COMPLIANCE MANAGER

a

Responsibilities will include:

_ Maintaining and developing a robust compliance and control regime in Deltec to
ensure compliance with all relevant laws, regulations, guidelines and internal
policies and procedures
Developing, administering and implementing a stringent compliance program

-across' Deltec’s business in The Bahamas that identifies all applicable regulations,
risks and internal requirements.

Implementing a comprehensive self-testing program that is derived from risk
assessment

Reviewing KYC documentation for all new and existing clients

Ensuring that Corrective Action Plans are developed, controlled and implemented
effectively; periodically monitoring and reporting on progress in resolving issues
Advising and assisting with the training of staff in regulatory and internal poucy
compliance requirements — | °
Reporting to Executive Management and Board of Directors °
Ability to work independently and under pressure to meet deadlines

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

Bachelor’s Degree and five or more years of credit experience.
Strong accounting skills and the ability to provide financial
analyses.

¢ Strong negotiation skills.

The successful candidate should have the following qualifications: ¢ Detailed knowledge of credit and collections.

¢ Core knowledge of legal practices and documentation.

> A thorough knowledge and understanding of all applicable legislation, ou

and guidelines
> Minimum Bachelors degree in banking or accounting
> Minimum 3 years relevant experience in a compliance position with an offshore

bank
> Excellent written, oral and presentation skills

Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may submit resumes to the Human Resources Manager c/o Fax No.
362-4623 or by email to anh@deltechank.com.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED



Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental
and vision) and life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than

September 26", 2008 to:

. The Tribune

DA#63405

P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

.

THE TRIBUNE



a, A a Se ee ee a es
Don’t ‘capitulate to fearful and the insular’ over EPA

FROM page 1B

significant services opportuni-
ties for those daring enough to
explore the possibilities. I
believe our entrepreneurs can
step up to the plate and manage
those opportunities.

“We shouldn’t tie our hands
mentally before we’ve even
explored the possibilities. At

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least explore them. We say to
our children when they’re grow-
ing up: ‘Nothing beats failure
like a try’.

“The issue is not going to be
for us to capitulate to the fear-
ful and the insular, but tapping

into our own creativity and say-

ing it’s possible.”

Urging Bahamian businesses
to draw inspiration from the
performances of this nation’s
athletes, and emulate them in
a commercial sense, Mr Laing
said entrepreneurs needed to
“open every door as opposed
to closing every door because
we’re scared”.

The minister confirmed that
following last week’s CARI-
COM Heéads of Government
conference on the EPA in Bar-
bados, the agreement’s signing
by the Bahamas and others was
set for mid-October 2008. The
exact date, he explained, will
be determined by CARICOM



Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

VACANCY

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified persons
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT

°

CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II

QHMSUNETAT IGN: 6

INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE

LLCS

Heads of Government in con-
sultation with the EU.

The Bahamas, though, will
initially be signing a ‘good-only’
EPA that deal'with market
access issues. The draft agree-
ment initialled last year gave
the Bahamas up to six months
after its signing to decide on
whether it wanted to submit a
services offer.

While the services offer has
been completed, Mr Laing said
it had not been presented to the
EU yet. Whether the Euro-
peans will accept it is unknown,
but the minister said it was “a
lot more liberal" than most
CARICOM countries.

“We've not presented our
services agreement to Europe
as yet,” Mr Laing said. “The ini-
tial intent was to release it to
the public, submit it to the
Caribbean Regional Negotiat-
ing Machinery and get their
input on it.

The purpose of the Assistant Director, Training and Development is to act as key contact for employees seeking
professional development and training, including providing information and support for staff as required. Also, to
d ensure that core and customized training programmes are

For a detailed job description and application persons should visits www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates
should submit a detailed resume and a cover letter of interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience
no later than Wednesday, 17th September, 2008. :

COURSE OFFERINGS: FALL 2008 — Beginning October 6"





FEY TO GLOGAL UNPEHSTANGING

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DURATION: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours

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CAREER INSTITUTE SCHEDULE













































































































SEMESTER: FALL 2008
ALL COURSES MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK (*) INDICATES THE COURSE MUST BE TAKEN AT THE SCHEDULED TIME IN‘ORDER TO COMPLETE THE PROGRAMME
| _THE COST OF BOOKS/RESOURCE MATERIALS IS INCLUDED IN THE FEES
CODE | SEC COURSE/PROGRAMME | bay | MAXs | RMS | DURATION | [ STARTS | LECTURER | TUITION
| be Me | cate eel
| MASSAGE THERAPY PROG, Rae ee oe eal ele A oe
| Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
& BUC General Science
MAsG90 [ICI] Massage Therapy Essentials I* 9:30am | 12:30pm [16 | TBA Mun Buld | _8-Sept | TBA $670
APUY90[ 1C1_| Anatomy & Physiology* | F| 6:00pm | 9:00pm [25 [TBA 1Owks | BLVDLT | 12-Sept | E: Grant $400
; [MEDT900 | 1CI_| Medical Terminoldgy* [ W | 6:00pm] 9:00pm [25 | TBA[ _10wks | DRSHP_|_24-Sept | J. Infremeta $225
| een eee 2 TOTAL
COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN PROG. a
Prerequisites: BJC Math and English OR
High School Diploma
COMPS? [ICI [PC Support| TBA Twks | Mun Buld | 12-Sept [TBA $500
Icl_| CONTINUED |S | 9:00am TBA 12wks | Mun Buld | 13-Sept | TBA aoe
| teow : ;
| compsa | 1C1_| Keyboarding _ | Ss [| 11:00am] 2:00pm|20 |LAB| __Swks | CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie $200
| comps30[ 1CI_| Web Page Design I [TWF | 9:30am | 4:30pm[20 _[LAB| _2days | CEES 16-Oct $500
———
za ae aa =
CODE | SEC | COURSE/PROGRAMME [pay| ss Timm ~=~—S—| MAX® | RMS | DURATION | VENUE | STARTS | LECTURER | TUITION
MEDICAL SECRETARY'S PROG.
Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
& BJC General Science
MEDT900__| I1CI_| Medical Terminology* / 6: 9:00p 5 2 1Dwks | DRS HP 24-Sept | J. Infremeta $225
xpuyon T1CI_| Anatomy & Physiology* BLVDLT | 12-Sept | E. Grant $400
compso0 | 1CI_| Keyboarding 00pm | 20 LAB ‘Swks | CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie $200
L TOTAL $825 |
oa Peale |
MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING PROG. ae ee eee
| Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
4 & BJC General Science
MEDI900 | 1CI_| Medical Terminology* [ W | 6:00pm | 9:00pm | 25 TBA DRSHP_| 24-Sept | J. Infremeta $225
APHY900 | ICI | Anatomy & Physiology* 9:00pm | 25 TBA BLVDLT | 12-Sept | E. Grant $400
comp900 | 1CI_| Keyboarding S| 11:00am | 2:00pm | 20 LAB Swks [ CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie -_ $200
= [ TOTAL $825
| [ WEDDING AND EVENT PLANNING PROG.
| Prerequisites: BJC Math and English
| OR High School Diploma :
| [Wepps00 ici [Wedding Planning TTR] 6:00pm | 7:30pm [25 TBA[ 12wks | BLVDLT | 9-Sept [TBA $450
comp900 | 1CI_| Keyboarding S 11:00am | 2:00pm | 20 LAB Swks [ CEES 13-Sept | V. Collie $200
| TOTAL 5650
ST ts ee ee ae a ee ee









CEES RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION, FEES. COURSE ONTENT, COURSE SCHEDULE, COURSE MATERIAL AND CANCEL COURSES

does not include the one tume $-10 application tee



| ENQUIRIES. Contact the Coordinator at Tel (242) 325-S714 / 328-0093 / 328-1
|

or email peda, Ga coty bt bys



“But for the Bahamas, at the
moment there's no rush. Our
services schedule does not have
to be attached to this agreement
until six months following the
signing of the agreement. Which
means for us, if we sign in Octo-
ber we will essentially be signing
a 'goods only' agreement,
because we would have no ben-
efits or obligations arising from
the services schedule until we
attach it.

“And if we indefinitely do not
attach our services schedule, we

will have no benefits, no oblig- .

ations until then. So we will, in
effect, come the signing be sign-
ing a goods-only agreement. .
.with the intention of following
through on the services side of
things.

“We're comfortable with the
services offer that we have
made, given that it essentially

mirrors our current National

Investment Policy.”

By signing the EPA, Mr
Laing said the Government
would preserve duty-free mar-
ket access to the EU for
Bahamian exporters and main-
tain their products’ price com-
petitiveness.

Besides the implementation
costs the Bahamas will incur,
the minister said the Govern-
ment was likely to only lose $6
million in import duties on EU
goods that will have to be
allowed into this nation duty-
free. The EPA requires the
Bahamas to phase-out tariff
rates on 85 per cent of EU.
imports over a 25-year period.

Mr Laing implied that the
revenue loss and. implementa-
tion costs were worth it, given
that preserving duty-free EU
access would safeguard $90 mil-
lion worth of exports and for-
eign currency earnings. It would
also protect a positive trade bal-
ance with the EU.

“In the first instance, we have
preserved some advantages that
we presently enjoy - $90 mil-
lion-plus advantages,” Mr Laing
said.

He added that the EPA
would also improve the
Bahamas’ cost competitiveness
as it relates to other countries,
and could encourage EU firms
to establish themselves in the
Bahamas to “take advantage of
the access to their own mar-
kets” as opposed to going else-
where.

“Our ‘own Bahamian
investors can exploit these mar-
kets and possibilities. It is also a
benefit to maintain our trade
relationship with one of the
world’s largest and most impor-
tant trading blocs,” Mr Laing
said.

“The field is wide open. It is
really for the ingenuity and cre-
ativity of entrepreneurs to
exploit the possibilities.”















































: +. es ep 8 . : Pe, _ Le
*LHE D A
eileen? wlll L. pend adeeall of -s & ie
THOATINCG £72 ATRINC
FDUCATING & 1 RAINING
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - FALL SEMESTER 042008
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION DAY ___ START _DUR_| FEE
ogee ie ae cg eee
ACCOUNTING :
6:00pm - Tues/ ;
ACCAg00 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS | 8:00pm Thurs 23-Sep-10 wks | $250.00
: 6:00pm - :
ACCA901 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS II 8:00pm Mon/Wed 22-Sep 10 wks | $275.00
: 6:00pm -
ACCA902 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS III 8:00pm Mon/Wed 22-Sep-10 wks | $300.00
ee AY Sen
BUSINESS Po
: ° 6:00pm-
| BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 8:00pm Thurs 25-Sep 8wks | $225.00
6:00pm-
BUSI901 01 CREDIT & COLLECTIONS Il 8:00pm Tues 23-Sep 8wks | $250.00
9:30am-
cuSsT900 01 SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S | 4:30pm Thurs .9-Oct ida $170.00
\ 6:00pm-
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | 9:00pm Thurs 25-Sep 10 wks | $225.00
: 9:30am- :
TSMg900 01 TIME & STRESS MANAGEMENT 4:30pm Thurs 23-Oct ida $180.00
COMPUTERS
11:00am- "
comMPs01 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 2:00pm Tues . 23-Sep 12 wks | $450.00 je-j4:; .
ps Posi 6:00pm- , : rf
coMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 9:00pm ~~ | Mon ‘22-ep ‘12 wks |’ $450.00 ;
: 9:00pm :
6:00pm- ;
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN Il 9:00pm Mon 22-Sep 8wks | $250.00
: 6:00pm-
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III Thurs 25-Sep 8wks | $275.00
fie ee
ENGLISH
[" 6:00pm-
ENG 900 01 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 9:00pm _ | Tues 7-Oct 10 wks | $300.00
fee we eee oe
MANAGEMENT fe Re ee
3 ; 6:00pm-
MGMTS900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTI | 9:00pm Thurs ‘18-Sep. 10 wks | $250.00
, 6:00pm-
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTII | 9:00pm Mon 15-Sep 10 wks | $300.00
: Uist cm a oe es Se eS le
SEWING &
CRAFT
’ . 6:00pm-
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING | 9:00pm Mon" 22-Sep &8wks | $225.00
® 6:00pm-
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. 10:00am-
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6:00pm-
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING | 9:00pm Tues 23-Sep 8wks | $225.00
6:00pm-
_CRASOO 01 JEWELLERY MAKING 8:00pm Tues 23-Sep 8 wks $250.00
MEDICAL ees
; 6:00pm-
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 9:00pm Wed 24-Sep 10 wks | $225.00
HEALTH AND
FITNESS
6:00pm-
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 9:00pm Thurs - 25-Sep-10 wks | $465.00
/ 6:00pm- :
MASG901 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II__| 9:00pm Mon 22-Sep 10 wks | $620.00
9:30am- é
BWAX3900 01 BODY WAXING 4:30pm Tues/Wed 21-Sep 2 days | $300.00
DANCE
6:00pm-
DANC900 01 BAHAMIAN FOLKLORE AND DANCE _| 8:30pm Tues 23-Sep 8 wks $275.00
; : 6:00pm-
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INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 042008 (SESSIONS 02) |
|








COURSE



Bah: .mian
Cuisine




Gourmet
Cooking |
Gourmet
Cooking Il




Cake & Pastry
Making!
Cake & Pastry
Making II



COOK 6:00 -
1 | 806 Oct. 23 Nov. 27 6 weeks Thursda 9:00pm $375.00 | MK

eto tee

823 Oct. 20 Nov. 24 6 weeks
a foam |
824 Oct. 20 Nov. 24
Pe Tea |

813 Oct. 21 Nov. 20





SESSION 2

DURATION -













Monda

6 weeks

5 weeks

5 weeks



Monda
— nday

Tues/Thurs.

Tues/Thurs.





Bread Making 1





Oct. 21 Nov. 20
Oct. 23 Nov. 27

Thursday





Cake
Decorating |






oO
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@

Decorating Il
HOLIDAY
BAKING



Oct. 20 Nov. 19

TS foam [now |
1 | 818 Oct. 20 Nov. 19
2 Locran Lnova |
830 Oct. 20 Nov. 24

5 weeks





5 weeks





Mon/Wed.

Mon/Wed.

















Deadline for applications, October 10, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.

MONDAY




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RTT ean LS ee ee
Bahamas ‘can’t sit back’
over Lehman collapse

FROM page 1B

prices, increased energy and
food costs, and growing unem-
ployment, Mr Smith said the
financial meltdown had reduced
consumers’ disposable incomes
and hit confidence.

This was likely to immediate-
ly impact the Bahamian tourism
industry through decreased
arrivals and per capita visitor
spending, he suggested, given
that this nation was reliant on
the US to supply 85 per cent of
its visitors.

Mr Smith said of develop-
ments on Wall Street: “This is
shaking consumer confidence,
very much so in the US, and
will be translated into cutbacks
in consumer spending, includ-
ing on vacations. I think it’s
really cause for concern.

“What may be required of us
at this stage is to look more
closely at our [tourism] markets
within the US, and see who is
most affected by this. If the
impact is greatest in the north-
east, where most of our tourists
come from, but not the west,
we may have to re-position our-
selves. I’m_sure the people at
the Ministry of Tourism are on
top of that.

“We can’t sit back and wring
our hands. Things are happen-
ing too quickly around us.
We’re being hit from so many
angles.”

Apart from the impact on
tourism spending and arrivals,
the Lehman Brothers meltdown
could have a direct effect on the
Bahamas given that the compa-
ny was a financier or equity
partner in numerous foreign
direct investment projects.

For instance, the investment
bank is an equity partner in the
$1 billion Ritz-Carlton Rose
Island mixed-use resort project,
alongside the Miami-based
developer, Gencom Group, and
the likes of Marriott Interna-
tional. *

Nick .Ward, Gencom’s pro-



ject manager for the Ritz-Carl-
ton Rose Island development,
did not return Tribune Busi-
ness’s call seeking comment on
whether Lehman Brothers’
bankruptcy would impact the
project and its financing.
Earlier this year, he told Tri-

bune Business that some $100 .

million had already been spent
on the development, particu-
larly its marina excavation.

Still, Mr Smith said the bank-
ruptcy was likely to at least
“slow down” the build-out of
Bahamas-based resort projects
that are dependent on Lehman
Brothers for financing, either
debt or equity.

Much is likely to depend on
whether funding from Lehman
Brothers has been released, and
the terms and conditions
attached to it. If it was debt
financing, that loan could be
acquired by a buyer, while if it
was an equity stake that, too,

could be sold-off to generate ~

funds to help the investment
bank regain solvency and
emerge from Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy protection.

. Those projects still waiting
for Lehman Brothers financing
could be doing so in vain, as it
may now never come through
or, if it does, arrive with less
advantageous strings attached.

“We need to follow it very
closely,” Mr Smith told Tribune
Business. “We don’t know how
many [resort] projects they have
here. It may be just a few.

“If we don’t see a withdrawal,
we may see a slowdown in
[these projects’] implementa-
tion.”

Lehman Brothers has
reduced its Bahamas-based
resort holdings in recent years.
In combination with Driftwood
Hospitality, the operating part-
ner in which it also held a stake,
it exited the Royal Oasis after
pocketing the 2004 hurricane
insurance proceeds through the
$33 million sale to Harcourt

. Developments.

STH ANNUAL
OACO

Understand The Present: Plan For The Future

Thursday, September 25, 2008 | New Vision Ministries Centre, Marsh Harbo

The same combination also
sold two Nassau resort proper-
ties, the former Holiday Inn on
Paradise Island and the Nassau
Palm on West Bay Street, to the
Gencom Group’s principal,
Karim Alibhai, although their
continued involvement cannot
be ruled out due to the close
relationship with the buyer as
evidenced at the Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island.

Lehman Brothers/Driftwood
also sold the Hurricane Hole
marina complex to Kerzner
International.

“In a way that might have
been fortunate for us,” Mr
Smith said, “because those

see



SPEAKERS

properties would now be in
trouble at a time when we can
least afford it.”

Meanwhile, the former
finance minister said the
Bahamas was likely to gener-
ate gross domestic product
(GDP) growth of between 1-2
per cent for 2008, adding that
he “would be surprised if we
made 2 per cent this year”.

With the Bahamian economy
having been hit by record glob-
al oil prices, the tourism slow-
down, hurricane repair costs
and a slowdown in government

" spending, whether this nation

avoided slipping into recession
would “have a lot to do with



how we perform in the last
quarter”.

Traditionally, late November
and December, coupled with
the first four months of every
year, were the high points of
the tourism season, and Mr
Smith said recessionary signs
would be evidence if hotel occu-
pancies over the Thanksgiving









this notice.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY. DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, GISELLE CHRISTINA
CARTWRIGHT of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, intend to change my name to GISELLE CHRISTINA
COLLYMORE. If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas,
no later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

Holiday were below last year’s
comparatives.

“If we see a fall-off there, we
will have to brace ourselves,”
Mr Smith warned. “We can
brace for some trying times over
the next few months and into
2009. I think we’re going to be
growing sluggishly well into’
next year.” |



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BIANTA JANVIER of
SOUTH BEACH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of SEPTEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.












Business Outlook |

SEMINAR

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHONY MEME of
BROWN’S ALLEY OFF KEMP ROAD, P.O. BOX SP-
60858, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 9TH day of SEPTEMBER 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.













6

ur, Abaco
Pee

ie







* Henry Romer, V.P., BIC, Grand Bahama

° Robert Deal, Asst. G.M., Water & Sewerage Corporation-
Family Island & Marine Operations

e Owen Bethel, CEO, Montaque Group

e Judy Johnston, Airport Task Force

e Roscoe Thompson, Manager, Abaco Shopping Centre

.° The Hon. Earl Deveaux, Minister for the Environment

° Michael Albury, President, Abaco Chamber of Commerce
¢ Livingston Marshall, Marine & Environmental Consultant

¢ Frank Comito, Executive V.P., Bahamas Hotel Association

e Romauld Ferreira, Environmental Consultant & Lawyer

e Frederik Gottlieb, Chairman, BEC

REGISTER TODAY! Contact:

Eileen Fielder, The Counsellors Lid. - T: 242322-7505 © F: 242-325-2482 « E: efielder@thecounsellorsltd.com
Wynsome Ferguson, Ministry of Tourism, Abaco - T: 242-367-3067 ° F: 242-367-0129 © Email: wferguson@bahamas.com
Leazona Richard - T: 242-367-6279 * Email: leazona@gmail.com

CARI ‘
= 3
e \e S/
ers” Sun Oil Limited

rete enrys

ie Bank of The Bahamas

@AiINTERNATIONAL

Ww

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GOLF & OCEAN CLU

&
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TCLGROUP or register online at www.tclevents.com




seamen

PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



‘Significant change’ to
development model

LS a
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
+) TA CITC

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BORAXXAMME LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORANGE HILL GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 9th day of September 2008. The Liquidator |
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice.

NOTICE
CEDAR CONES LTD.

(Im Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
1cD Iannee,

. S. John:
Premier Real. Estate

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13
1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

S52wk-Low
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
cok ND Holdings .

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

FROM page 1B

have final approval, and when
will infrastructure be available’.
It’s certainly a cautionary note
to attorneys.”

Emphasising that his ministry
had “absolutely no issue with
the rulings” by Justice Lyons,
Dr Deveaux emphasised: “The
law is very clear. An approval in
principle is just that, and full

approval is just that. Anyone’

who is buying a lot in an unap-
proved subdivision is taking a
risk.

“We don’t authorise the sell-
ing of lots in unapproved sub-
divisions. We are advising peo-
ple who are proposing to do
that that no building permit will
be issued until final approval is
given.

“As a citizen in this country,
you hear any number of stories
from people who bought land,
and there is no light, no roads
and no water. People then have
to pay thousands of dollars to

put in infrastructure they legit-
imately thought would be there.

“We’re only confronted with
it when someone ha sought
land, built a home and the infra-
structure is not there.”

Existing

Dr Deveaux said, though,
that the existing development
model where landowners
carved up their land into lots,
then sold them to the Bahamian
public, had “worked” in meet-
ing the demand for housing. _

“The Bahamas has one of the
largest proportions of owner-
occupied homes in the world,
close to 60 per cent of homes,”
the minister told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Yet he acknowledged that
stronger: regulation was now
required from the Ministry of
the Environment, Department
of Physical Planning and Town
Planning Committee to cope
with the problems resulting

ulation by developers as the
supply of land ran out, espe-
cially on New Providence.

“As the price of land goes up,
speculation increases and the
regulatory functions need
stronger oversight,” Dr
Deveaux said.

The Government is currently
reviewing the Private Roads
and Subdivisions Act, with a
view to amending it and pre-
senting the proposed changes
to the Bahamian people for dis-
cussion and feedback at a sem-
inar to be held on September
29, 2008.

Among the issues the amend-
ments will seek to.deal with are
the quality of utilities and infra-
structure provided in subdivi-
sions.

Pressure

With pressure for the provi-
sion of quality services that
meet buyer expectations ever-
increasing, Dr Deveaux said:
“These are the kinds of thing
we hope to speak to in the new
Act and regulations. We are try-
ing to learn from experience
and issues that have arisen.”

Legal Notice
NOTICE

LINDUS, TROY & CO., LTD
In Voluntary Liquidation

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOLLENDRUZ INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of August 2008. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Bor! N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POLDATORM LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
“on the 28th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EG CAPITAL MA

BROKERAGE & ADPVISORY SERVICES

oa 19 October, 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October, 2022
7% 30 May, 2013
Prime - am ee 29 May, 2015

0.300
0.480
DOO a

MA MONE

1s. 80 2 * 0.900

cae

“RISK Listed wiaisal Funds
~*~

Fund Name AV

Colina Bond Fund 7 3320
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.0250
Colina Money Market Fund 1.4119
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.5807
Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.3870
CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.0000
CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000
Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.4075
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0147
FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0027
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Market Terms

1.0119

TO%, Last Months i Yield%
3.09% 5.27%

4.78%
4.21%
5.40%
5.77%

1.01%

-10,40%
1.47%
0.27%
1.19% . ; us 31-Jul-08

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the pri
EPS $ - A company’s reported Saranas'> per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 ~ 100
- Nomi | value = $1000.00

Hit e Da ‘200
EO TRADE GALL: CrAL 242-50247040 of FIDELITY 2AZ-3SE-T1E4 t EG CAPITAL MARKETS BA2-396-4000 Pan Ze Se See Z j

FOR MORE | iN FORMATION CALL BISx @ 242-394-2503

from ever-increasing land spec-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,

2000, LINDUS, TROY & CO., LTD is in dissolu-
tion as of September 12, 2008.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

‘Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the

Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



IN THE ESTATE OF PRINCE ALBERT DEVEAUX
JR. A.K.A. PRINCE DEVEAUX of Taylor Street in the
Southern District of the Island of New: Providence one }

of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Saaieen
deceased. Pe SNe!

; NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim

or demand against the above Estate are required to send the

- same duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on or before

Friday the 21st day of November A. D., 2008 after which
date the Executrix will proceed to distribute the assets having
regard only to the claims of which she shall then have had
notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

MICHELLE Y. CAMPBELL & CO.
Chambers
#55 Mackey Street
P. O. Box N-9180
Nassau, Bahamas
Executrix of the above Estate

Lem trrp

Abaco Markets Limited, a leading food distribution
company with five retail and club outlets in New
Providence, Freeport and Marsh Harbor Abaco is seeking
applications for the position of:

SENIOR TECHNICIAN

The Job
To manage the company’s Air Conditioning and
Refrigeration/Freezer Equipment.

Which involves completing routine repairs and
maintenance, implementing and maintaining a preventive
maintenance program, installation of new equipment and
managing the company’s energy saving program.

Requirements

¢ Certification in the field of Air Conditioning
/Refrigeration
Familiarity with electronic computer controlled boards,
programmable boards, air and water cooled
refrigeration and air conditioning systems a must.
Minimum of 5 years experience
A proven track record of success in the area of A/C
repairs & maintenance
Possess strong leadership skills with excellent People
and Communication skills

Outstanding compensation, benefit packages (inclusive
of incentive based bonuses provided)

Only serious applicants need apply and should send their

resumes to hr @abacomarkets.com.


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

COMIC PAGE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 7B







AS ALAN HEAPS FOR THE
CALLERY...

WHAT AM 1 GOING TO Do?
I BARELY HAVE ENOUGH]?
DOPE FOR TOM/GAT//,












JUIEANWHILE, AT JONES! PLACE oe
VW

Hl, ALAN, JONES ISN'T HERE,
HE’S OUT OF TOWN UNTIL
NEXT WEEK.






YES, DEAR, UP
AND AT 'EM



itures Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved

AFTER HE WENT
INTO ONE OF HIS
VIOLENT RAGES
IN FRONT OF

MS. WALKER /

a O

HIS MOTHER
CAME AND
TOOK HIM

HOME






WHERE'S
‘BRUCE,
THE NEW









www.kingfeatures.com

oy GOO TIME FOR
»MOVU:TO. BRUSH.-.}..-
YOUR TEETH

IGH IS ALL T CARE















L STEPPEV ON
THE TUBE OF
. TOOTHPASTE



é
%
®
2

©2008 by North Amenca Syndicate. inc. Wor

ND, FACE IT, GETTING

ISSSSI
agms

BSRS"
Ps







ey aCe I NEVER
g¢ —( UNDERSTOOD
“PT HOW THAT DUMB
PHRASE EVER
CAUGHT ON
IN THE FIRST

CALVIN & HOBBES

MAY T BE



“Hey, DAP... L DONT SEE ANYBOPY TALKIN’ ©
BEMIND His BACK.”






WHAT ARE YOU
DOING HOME ?/

£
3
g
&
3
&
é
g
z
2
3
®

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





s. Dist. by King Features Syndicate. Inc.

















©2008 Conceptis Puzzle

Difficulty Level kK & *& * 9/13



fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum





of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty



level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



HERSELF IN THE

SUPPLY CLOSET

AND REFUSES

TO €OME OUT
et

















13 Syndicate, Inc World rights reservea.

©2008 by King Feature:















©2008 Conceptis Puzzles. Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.









won several crucial games in recent
months by gambling material

to create psychological tension

and hazardous, hard-to-catculate
complications. Here, finding
himself a pawn down, he has boldly
sacrificed two more to expose the
black king. Former FIDE world
champion Topalov's last move was



Magnus Carlsen v Veselin fopalov,
Linares 2008. The 17-year-old
Norwegian is already widely tipped
as a future world champion, and
finished runner-up at Linares, the
“chess Wimbledon’, ta India’s Vishy
Anand who currently holds the
crown. The teenager, who likes
skiing and saccer and also keeps

Ai ak RES

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to ;



Soa OLE eR

nits ATELea Ae SANE

Sone ees

ALIS EAN GPTEOT

SEAS RAST AEE PRPS

ReteEEIe RATED:

wercereeanct

RTRs EN TT

Sain GNI

tn RR ae a LL

up with his college studies, has Na3-c6 when the better Qb5-d5

wauld have drawn. The Sulgarian
thought he had everything covered,




































14 Dosages, 16 Bridge, 19 Abyss, 20
Keep, 23 Ice.

Drudgery, 14 Algiers, 16 Subtle, 19
Tweed, 20 Diva, 23 Art.










appeared to be an excellent slam in
hearts.

At one table, South gave little
thought to the play. He won the
spade with the ace, drew trumps in













i YOU DIDN'T
i NOTICE HER/
S
3 The HOW many words ef four
2 | Target letters or iore can you make
g ‘ from the letters shown here?
2 SEE In making a word, each letter
2 words in may be used once only. Each
2 i must contabi the centre letter
if the malt = and there must be at lear one
g nine-letter word. Ne plurals.
2 wall TODAY'S TARGET :
& ant Crood 23; very good 34;
24st excellent 45 lor more).
Century Soiution tomorrow.
Bictionaty YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
CRYPTIC PUZZLE (4999 aerial alike aria ariel bail
: ae ier bier bike biker hile
edition}. BREAK juiler
Across — Down air liar like lira
1 Taking money out for 1 Beheaded, it would be © 1 i yiel rile
retirement (10) - even more venomous (4) ps ;
6 A musical character to 2 Noe how an * es
have on the staff (4) undergraduate is working? ;
10 Stable unit in the market - i 6) Cc arean me t Bridge
. (5) irl wasn’t well brought up Dene ge en ,
11 A ruinous craft (9) (5) oo teve Bec ker
12 Beat this for a political slo- 4 Adour disposition is, to us, .
gan (8) hard to bear (7) 3
13 Test the patience of a 5 Its aura somehow appeals A M U / ti I ayer ed Ta le
j to those who like mountain
good man at a meeting (5) holidays (7
15 Distances covered by a 7 poe eats Ato hue ; ; ;
number of vaults (7) band (3,2) it North dealer. four rounds and then attempted to
17 It is pressed into use when 8 Enthusiacn experienced Neither side vulnerable. run the clubs. But when the clubs
distribution by air is by a new poker player? NORTH turned out to be divided 4-1, declarer
required (7) (5,5) ‘ A102 could not come to more than nine
19 Make another entrance in 9 Standards are judged by VA83 tricks, finishing ws ith five hearts,
a more entertaining way them (8) %Q three clubs and a spade for down
(25) 14 Piece of rough material —#KQ7642_ one. ;
21 Main roads? (7) that could be smoother WEST EAST At the other table, declarer wisely
22 It sounds — like fruit (5) . (5,5) @95 @KQI84 — elected not to put all, his: faith in a
24 Writer is about to approve 16 Retaliates and strikes a uw Across Down ¥ 10 9765 favorable club division and instead
a colour (3-5) player (4,4) _I 1 Very comfortable sit- 1 Portend (4) #KI7642 A993 led a diamond from dummy at trick
‘27 Head teacher is asource -} 18 Void contest? (5,4) N uation (3,2,5) 2 Harm (9) #51083 &9 two. He was planning to ruff a dia-
of interest (9) 20 Decorate from top to bot- N 6 Continued pain (4) 3 Absurd proceedings SOUTH mond in dummy next and thus secure
28 How pointless to follow a tom, or bottom to top (7) —_ 10 Discourage (5) (5) 4763 10 tricks without having to rely on
‘girl in a state (5) 21 Everything in the show is QW 11 Attractive (9) 4 Enthusiastic recep- ¥KQI42 the club suit.
29 Rush in three directions at superficial (7) > 12 Hearth (8) tion (7) #1085 This was certainly a reasonable
once! (4) 23 Untie tricky knot (5) n” 13 Metallic ringing 5 To voice (7) &A5 plan, but an inspired East found the
30 It necessitates a lot of 25 They fly or take a train (5) < sound (5) 7 Porcelain (5) The bidding: winning coynterstroke. After taking
extra work in the theatre 26 Fuel considered all right in Ww 15 Infest (7) 8 Battle (10) North East South West the aactond with the ace at trick
(5,5) church (4) 17 Scornful 9 Gambling card game 1% 1¢ me Pass two, he cashed the K-Q of spades
language (7) (8) 49% and returned d fourth spade. Declarer
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 19 Shock grossly (7) 14 Crowning ceremony Opening lead — nine of spades. was now a goner regardless of what
: ; 21 Old hand (7) (10) Some deals have a lot more to — he did.

Across: 1 Pibroch, 5 Sugar, 8 Across: 1 Impetus, 5 Crisp, 8 Ad 22 Accumulate (5) 16 Restore confidence them than initially meets the eye. In practice, South discarded a dia-
Cassandra, 9 Mar, 10 Nile, 12 Good nauseam, 9 Run, 10 Elbe, 12 In per- 54 Unique (8) to (8) Take this rather prosaic-looking hand = mond, whereupon West did his part
hand, 14 Debtor, 15 Armies, 17 son, 14 Absorb, 15 Accrue, 17 27 To place 18 Pleasant (9) from a team-of-four contest. by ruffing the spade with the ten of
sueners, 18 emia, #1 Goa,:22 Grandeur, 18 Pert, 21 End, 22 between (9) 20 One part of serial (7) At both tables, North-South — hearts. Dummy overruffed with the
Dodge City, 24 Stein, 25 Express. Extricate, 24 Surly, 25 Exalted. 28 Confusion of voices 21 Extremely forceful (7) reached four hearts on the bidding ace, but Fast’s 9-7-6-5 of hearts now
Down Pecan, 2 Bus: 3 Ofel 4 Down: 'v Image, 2 Pen. pert (5) 23 Garret (5) shown and West led a spade. Both constituted a trump trick for the
Hudsons: Standald, B/Cymnasiom 7. Seeing: s/ Commerce, © UnReSeN 29 Small cut (4) 25 Brownish yellow (5) declarers, upon seeing dummy, were defense, and again the contract went
Reredos, 11 Lubricate, 13 Looked on, 7 Penance, 11 Bystander, 13 30 Amelioration (10) 26 Oversupply (4) annoyed at not having reached what down one.

And so, both declarers wound up
with only nine tricks on a deal where
slam was an odds-on proposition, but
that simple statement doesn’t come
close to telling the full story.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune



Seven Bahamas
Environmental
Steward Scholars
(BESS) begin year-
long programme

â„¢ By LISA LAWLOR

THE ISLAND SCHOOL promotes the interconnectedness of health
4 —teaching about environmental health, as well as the health of
mind, body, and spirit.

. THE Island School (IS), based in
Eleuthera, welcomed its second class

_of exemplary Bahamian high school
students to the Bahamas Environ-
mental Steward Scholars (BESS)
programme for the 2008-2009 acad-
emic year.

The BESS programme offers
Bahamian students a unique work
and study opportunity that includes
a 14-week semester at The Island
School, a three-month semester
leadership programme for high
school students. Participants have
come from‘over 300 schools to study
the tropical marine environment and
take place-based courses in math,
history, English, research, and art.

The BESS programme also
involves a six-month paid internship
at a conservation-minded organisa-
tion or an exchange with the College
of the Bahamas.

‘This year the BESS programme
has provided the highest number of
Bahamian enrollees in Island School
history. Jasmine Wilchcombe, Alan-
nah Vellacott, Bradley Watson Jr,
and Theodore Thompson will be
attending the fall semester at The
Island School. Walcott Miller Jr,
Oprah Davis, and Latario Moxey
will be joining IS in the spring. ~

Through the BESS programme,
motivated Bahamian high school
graduates work on authentic, scien-
- tific projects in the field of tropical
island ecology. Throughout the IS
semester and related internship,
BESS participants get high level
exposure to critical environmental

: and marine challenges faced in the
’ Bahamas, Caribbean, and similar
island nations around the world.

The previous two BESS scholars,

Stan Burnside and Alexio Brown,
performed extensive research on
the Cape Eleuthera Institute aqua-



Sav
one

@ By LISA LAWLOR

g the environment
student at a time

Eleuthera
e Waste management initiative

"It is the waters and marine life of the

traditional teaching methods and learn
Caribbean, the fruits and plants grown

by doing. Over 750 students of the Unit-

THE future health of the
earth is of growing concern
fo more and more people
as the negative impact of
global warming, specie

extinction and the burning
of fossil fuels are felt by the
earth's population.

Leading the charge for a Bahamian
initiative to soothe the negative impacts
and to prevent further damage to the
ecosystem is The Cape Eleuthera Island
School.

Communications manager Andrea
Krol said the school "is founded on the
belief that young people, given the right
tools, can build anything. The goal is to

excite and educate young people about
the world around them.

"Using the land and waters of
Eleuthera as their classroom, students -

and teachers quickly become inspired
and motivated by breaking away from

ed States, the Bahamas, Canada, and
around the world have become lead-
ers and agents of change in their home
communities as they influence the way
we think about conservation, resource
management, and community," she
said. /

On-campus sustainable systems intro-
duce students to conservation and
resource management as they live in a
community powered by wind and solar
energy and-supported by rain-water
collection, waste-water management,
and bio-diesel.

"The Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI)
is a research facility that collaborates
with scientists worldwide to model sus-
tainable systems and find solutions for
resource management through research

- and education. CEI's programmes con-

centrate on critical issues of develop-
ment’and conservation in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean, while working to
link people to their environment," she
said. .

Ms Krol said the school exposes the
environment as the natural, economical
and biological resources of Eleuthera.

on the land, and the essential beauty
of the Bahamian environment that sup-
ports the well-being of everyone who
lives here.

"It is the resources - crystal clear div-
ing waters, fresh seafood such as conch
and grouper, and the immaculate pink
sands - that make Eleuthera and the
Bahamas an incredible place to share
with the rest of the world," she said.

"Because the environment is one of
the most important resources for the
Bahamas it is imperative that young:
Bahamian leaders are educated in envi-
ronmental studies."

At the school, students, scientists,

‘and faculty have worked on and devel-

oped many real-world applicable pro-
jects including:

e Aquaculture and aquaponics - sus-
tainable food development

¢ Data collection for relevant marine
ecology issues <

¢ Bonefish handling techniques

e Establishing a no-take marine pro-
tected area

e Shark research

e Reemergence of Diadema in South

e Converting used yegclaple oil to
bio-diesel

¢ Renewable energy sources such as
wind and solar power

The Island School promotes the
interconnectedness of health — teaching
about environmental health, as well as
the health of mind, body, and spirit.
Students partake in daily morning exer-
cise to energize their minds by waking
and strengthening their bodies.

There are also influential outdoor
programmes: kayak expeditions, SCU-
BA certification and diving, and island
exploration. These programmes intro-
duce students to the tropical environ-
ment and help students recognise and
understand a sense of place.

Students depart from their semester
at The Island School with an aware-
ness of their surrounding environment,
effective leadership skills, and the abil-
ity to tackle real-world problems. With
their expertise, these students lead the
charge in preserving the resources of
Eleuthera, the Bahamas, and the rest of
the world.



FOOTWEAR professionals
“and consumers constantly
speak of shoe comfort. The
questions to be addressed are
what is comfort? What is prop-
er fit?

It has long been said that if
the shoe fits correctly, comfort
automatically follows. Believe it
or not that statement, as logical
as it sounds, is incorrect. Shoe
comfort involves much more
than proper size and fit. While
size is obviously important, we
tend to over-magnify its impor-
tance by the assumption that if
the shoe is the right size it will
automatically deliver the prop-
er fit. Shoe comfort and fit are
influenced by the delivery of
all or most of the following ele-
ments:

e Fit: This is most significant.
Shoe size must conform to the
foot size. However, this is not
simply the length and ball
width, but also proper fit heel-
to-ball, heel, towlines, throat,



inner volume space, etc. In
essence, proper fit means a cor-
rect dimensional mating of foot
and shoe throughout the whole
shoe.

e Shape: There must be a
reasonable match between shoe
shape and foot shape. If not,
the fit regardless of 'proper
size', is largely nullified. The
shape of the shoe must conform
to the shape of the foot.

e Design or style: Certain
styles are more comfortable for
some people than others,
whether it is an oxford, pump,
sandal, etc. The design of a
shoe also involves heel heights



and heel styles, patterns and
other styling features. These
style elements are important
because they influence comfort.
Many would say, 'only the
wearer knows where the shoe
pinches’ and can conclude com-

- fort.

e Weight: Many persons
would select a lightweight shoe
as opposed to a heavy weight.
This is quite natural because
the heavier the shoe the more
‘foot-lift' workload on the foot.
It does not follow that a heavy
work or out-door boot can't be
comfortable.

¢ Materials: In selecting
materials, shoe comfort

‘




ossible?

depends largely on:
a) conformability
b) breathability
c) weight
d) suppleness or softness

There again, materials play
a significant role especially
when we address certain foot
conditions.

° Inside-shoe climate: Inside
shoe temperature, humidity,
moisture, breathability and
insulation are all important fac-
tors. These all bear an influ-
ence on the sense of comfort
as we all know too well the dan-
gers of moisture trapped
between the toes and elsewhere
on the foot.

¢ Construction: The quality
of the construction determines
the structural integrity of the
shoe's components, which in
turn determine the shape reten-
tion quality and dimensional
stability of the shoe with wear.

e Underfoot resilience: It is
assumed that the feet receive
an average of 8,000 ‘step
shocks' a day. A cushioned
buffer between the foot and
non-resilient ground makes an
important difference in com-
fort. It is extremely important
that the shoe has proper foot
beds (inserts) to support the
arches and balls of your feet,
especially if you are walking on
hard and flat surfaces daily.

e Health condition of the
foot: If the foot has some seri-
ous defect or malfunction; a
shoe having the essential ele-
ments for comfort will not nec-
essarily deliver its full poten-
tial for comfort. This will pre-
sent certain fitting challenges
which must be addressed.

In conclusion, the question
remains, 'is 'perfect' shoe fit
possible? The answer is no.
Why? As shown by foot-mea-
surement studies, no person has
two feet of exactly the same

culture programme, a:marine
research facility that works with uni-
versities to model sustainable sys-
tems and find solutions for resource
management, before attending uni-
versity at Ithaca College (New
York) and COB, respectively.

This year-long academic and

applied experience programme
helps prepare students for universi-
ty and teaches future leaders of the
Bahamas how to protect the coun-
try's most valuable asset: the envi-
ronment.

e The BESS programme is spon-

sored in part by the generous financial
support of the Lyford Cay Foundation,
the Cape Eleuthera Foundation, and
local donors. For more information
email BESS@islandschool.org. For
more information on The Cape
Eleuthera Institute and The Island
School visit www.ceibahamas.org and
www.islandschool.org respectively.
Both programmes are supported by
the Cape Eleuthera Foundation.

size, shape, proportions or func-
tional character. Furthermore,
a study conducted in 1982 by
the Pedorthic Footwear Asso-
ciation on 6,800 adult male and
female subjects in 23 cities
throughout the United States
found that all people have 'mis-
mated' feet. However, footwear
professionals can provide reme-
dies to support the 'mismated' |
feet and allow for 'perfect' shoe
fit.

° Bernadette D Gibson, a board
certified pedorthist, is the proprietor
of Foot Solutions, a health and well-
ness franchise that focuses on foot
care and proper shoe fit, located
in the Sandyport Plaza.

The views expressed are those of
the author and does not necessar-
ily represent those of Foot Solu-
tions Incorporated or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any questions
or comments to nassau@footso-
lutions.com or 242-327-feet
(3338).
GREEN SCENE BY JACK GARDENER

5
te

Otto Jurgenson/ Photo .











experience of

viewcrmonigie eee E oO @3 t ha t i

come and see our selection of
Televisions LCD and Plasma.



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 9B ..




wl

all the vegetables we grow in
our gardens it is tomatoes that
ttract the greatest attention. —

The plants are large and the fruits are
handsome, tending to dominate the
other veggies. As long as we have

cessful garden.

The original tomatoes
that were taken to Europe
by the Spanish from the
slopes of the Peruvian
Andes were very small and
were mostly yellow. Toma-
toes are easy to cross breed
and they soon grew in size
and developed red and pink
varieties as well as yellow.

Most tomato seeds we
grow these days are
hybrids, the result of cross
breeding to ensure standard
size, fruiting time, disease
resistance and taste. Hybrid
tomatoes are wonderful in
the home vegetable garden
as we get the chance to pick
and eat them when they are.
fully ripe. Imported toma-
toes are picked early before
full sweetness has devel-
oped and never taste as
good as home grown. .

Even better are heirloom *
tomatoes. These are open

_ pollinated varieties that

have been around for a
long time. Itis generally |
agreed that the best tasting
tomatoes of all are, heir-
loom varieties. Pink
Brandywine is often quoted
as being the perfect tomato:
good size, lovely shape, old-
fashioned real tomato taste.
The big difference
between hybrid and heir-
loom tomatoes is the fact
that you can save heirloom
seeds and use them for you
next season’s crop. Hybrid
seeds are not designed to

‘be replanted after the first

sowing. ais 3

- All tomatoes fall into the
category of determinate or
indeterminate. Determinate
tomato plants produce fruit
over a short period and
then die. Indeterminate
plants will continue to pro-
duce over a long period and
in the Bahamas are usually
pulled up when the garden-
er gets fed up with them.

Tomatoes come in many
sizes, Shapes and colours.

e Cherry tomatoes are all
small but can be round,
grape-like or pear-shaped.
They can also be pink, red
or yellow. |

e Paste tomatoes tend to
be blocky or pear-shaped
and usually ripen to an —
intense red.

e Salad tomatoes are
round, or almost so, and

’

-_ have a wide variety of

colours and colour combi-
nations including white and
a yellow and green mixture
when ripe. .

e Beefsteak tomatoes are
generally large because.



“magnificent tomatoes we have a suc-

they are basically two or
three tomatoes joined
together as one on a single
stalk.

e Heirloom tomatoes
tend to have the weirdest of
shapes, including ruffles
and flutes.

Here in the Bahamas we
can plant our tomato seeds
directly into the soil where
we want them to grow. If

_you start them off in a seed

box and then transplant the '
seedlings, bury them deep

as roots will develop from

the part of the stalk that is
underground. The seedlings

_appreciate plenty of water-

ing but do not apply fertil-
izer (except for liquids like
Miracle Gro) until the |
plants have reached the
staking stage.

Tomatoes like well- .
drained soil that has been
conditioned and lightly fer-
tilized well ahead of sowing
seeds or transplanting
seedlings. I find the best
conditioner to be commer-
cial cow manure. '

More fruit will be pro-
duced and reach maturity
safely if your tomato plants
are staked. There are
dozens, of different staking
systems but even the worst
is better than no staking at
all. If your tomatoes ever
touch the ground they are
almost certain to be
attacked by predators.

I hope you like the photo
that.accompanies this arti-
cle. My old friend Madis
Tambre of Mississauga,

- Canada, is a keen gardener

who grows all his vegeta-
bles in containers. His _
growing season is much

_ shorter than ours and it

usually happens that he is

off on vacation when the

main crop is produced.
While Madis was in Esto-

: Si

_ nia this summer his cousin

Otto picked his ripe toma-
toes, etc, and took a photo-
graph of them. I was so
impressed by it that I
thought Tribune readers ew
would also like to see it.
Many of the varieties are
Estonian heirlooms Madis Aes
brought back in 2007. He =
sent seeds to me and I had
an overabundance of cherry bey
tomatoes in the summer. .
Some of the larger and ae
more interesting varieties
are already in Bahamian win
soil and looking good. Tye

° j hardy@coralwave.com
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008

+

THE TRIBUNE



PRT Le aT ec) ie a al
Cancer and your pet dog

CANCER or malignant tumours
usually refers to an abnormal
growth of cells that interferes with
normal body function. All body
cells have a life span, When ney
die, cells are replaced through
process called mitosis in w ich
a single cell splits into two cells
identical to the parent cell. For
reasons unknown to us, normal
cells sometimes mutate during
mitosis, producing fast growing
abnormal cells that act like par-
asites, invading and replacing
healthy tissue.

Under ideal circumstances, the body’s
immune system recognizes these cells as
foreign and eliminates them before they
cause problems. Sometimes, however,
the body can’t fight off the attack by
these cells resulting in growth of abnor-
mal cells, called tumours or neoplasms.
Those that remain localized and rela-
tively harmless are termed benign, while
potentially deadly spreading tumours
are called malignant.

Malignant tumours or cancer can be
confined to one area, but often they
spread or metastasize throughout the
body. The most dangerous cancer is
already spreading at the early stages,
when the point of origination is still
very small or even nearly undetectable.
A malignant tumour becomes deadly
wheg it interferes with normal body
processes.

Cancer is considered a disease of old-

er dogs and the incidence of tumours in

dogs increases with age.
Approximately 20. per cent of aM pet



dogs will develop cancer. The preva-
lence of cancer is difficult to determine.
The exact cause of cancer remains a

. mystery, but we do know that cancer

causing agents, referred to as 'carcino-
gens', may increase the risk of devel-
oping certain kinds of diseases, for
example exposure to sunlight increases
the risk of skin cancer. The relation of
sexual hormones and some cancers has
also been documented. Also, mammary

cancer in female dogs and prostrate and ~

testicular cancer in males.

CLINICAL SIGNS OF CANCER

1. Abnormal swelling that persists or
continues to grow

2. Sores that do not heal

3. Weight loss

4. Loss of appetite

5. Bleeding or discharge from any
body opening

6. Offensive odour

7. Difficulty eating and swallowing

8. Hesitation to exercise or loss of
stamina

9. Persistent lameness or stiffness

10. Difficulty in breathing, urinating
or defecating

Dogs can suffer from more kinds of
cancer than any other domestic animal.
Skin cancer is the most common canine
cancer. The most common skin tumours
are sebaceous adenomas and then mast
cell tumours.

‘ Mammary gland cancer is considered
the second leading cancer in dog. This
type, of cancer is seen in middle age,
intact (non-spayed) females: Usually, a

painless lump or enlargement appears in
the breast closest to the rear legs.

Lymph gland cancers are devastating .

because. they commonly spread
throughout the body. Oral tumours are
also very common. Bone cancer or
(Osteosarcoma) which are almost
always malignant tumours that spread
to the lungs is also common.

The cancer treatment of choice in
veterinary medicine is surgical removed
of the tumour, which is particularly
effective when the cancer is localized
and has not spread. For instance, bone
cancer is usually treated by amputation
of the affected limb.

Unfortunately, surgical cure is rare
because it is difficult to remove every
cancerous cell. Leaving behind a single
cell allows the cancer to recur and/or
spread. Some cancers that encroach

upon vital organs, nerves, or muscle can |
be difficult to surgically remove without

damaging normal tissue. In those

CANCER is considered a
disease of older dogs and

the incidence of tumours in
pe increases with age.

instances radiation may be used. How-
ever, in the Bahamas there is no veteri-
nary hospital equipped to perform this
expensive treatment.

Chemotherapy is the third cancer
treatment commonly used with dogs
and it is most useful in treating cancer
that has spread throughout the body.
A wide variety of cytoxic (cell poison-
ing) drugs are available and may be
used singly or in combination with pills
or intravenous injections. The specific
drugs used will depend on the type of
cancer.

Many of the same human medica-
tions are effective against cancer in
dogs.

¢ Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at the
Central Animal Hospital. Questions or com-
ments should be directed to potcake59@hot-

mail.com. Dr Sands can also be contacted at .

325-1288


































Equal opportunity employer Doctors Ho pital



promotes differences through diversity

DENALDO Henfield had a
difficult time getting a job before
he was hired by Doctors Hos-
pital. The 18-year-old, graduate
of CC Sweeting High School,
whosé academic achievements.
include Bahamas 'Geieral' Cer
tificate of Secondary Education
(BGCSE) passes in art and
design, Bahamas Junior Certifi-
cates (BJC) passes in math,
English language and health:sci-
ence, and Pitman examination
passes in typing and computer
studies, never expected he
would have to endure so many
job interviews before finding a
company that would hire him.
On paper, he looked like a first-
rate job candidate.

But Denaldo had one chal-
lenge against him: he is deaf.
And many of the companies
that interviewed him didn't want
to risk hiring a deaf person - no
matter how talented, pleasant
and smart he is. Many deaf per-
sons are facing similar chal-
lenges. Potential employers are
reluctant to hire persons with
disabilities because of assump-
tions that meeting their needs
in the workplace would be
inconvenient and/or impose a
financial burden on the compa-
ny.

As an aspiring surgeon,
Denaldo was previously placed
in Doctors Hospital's School to
Work Programme in the Emer-
gency Room through collabo-
ration between Guidance Coun-
sellor Patrice Francis and Doc-
tors Hospital's Training Officer,
Elizabeth Grant. ‘

During his four weeks of on-
the-job-training, Denaldo per-
formed impressively; he

arranged paper work, organised
files, ran specimens to the lab
and delivered forms to the X-
ray Department. Denaldo com-

municates verbally and can read
lips. Written forms of’ commu-

vey his thoughts and accomplish
his tasks.
“The interview at Doctors

‘Hospital was a total turnaround

of what I experienced else-
where,” Denaldo said. “Rather
than a wall of resistance, I was
welcomed, and no one looked
down on me because of my
deafness. They saw me as an
equal regardless of my handi-
cap. I'm glad to have the oppor-
tunity. to work here because a
lot of deaf people are not hired
by a lot of employers. Doctors
Hospital gave me a chance once
and they are doing it again, I'm
happy to be working here."'
While many companies have
shied away from hiring the dis-
abled because of:perceived
stumbling blocks, Doctors Hos-
pital, an equal opportunity
employer, took the opportunity
to broaden even further the
diversity of its associates:
“Doctors Hospital has a long
history of promoting diversity
among our associates. Recruit-
ing and cultivating diverse talent
is central to our workforce
diversity strategy. Through hir-
ing, Denaldo, we are playing an
active role in eliminating bias
and stigma towards persons with

' disabilities. At Doctors Hospital,

we pride ourselves on being an
equal opportunity employer”
Michele Rassin, vice president
of Operations, said.

Doctors Hospital's Market-



Doctors Hospital/Photo

DOCTORS HOSPITAL welcomes the hearing impaired on staff. Pictured from left are Charles Sealy, CEO,
Doctors Hospital; Denaldo Henfield, dietary assistant; Sandy Wilson, coordinator, Food and Beverage Depart-
ment and Paul Haven, vice president, Human Resources.

ing Assistant, Lisa Humes, is
elated about the-stand that Doc-
tors Hospital has taken with
regard to Denaldo as she has a
son who is hearing impaired and
often wonders about his future
in the Bahamas.

“Most persons in the general
public and corporate Bahamas
are ignorant of the deaf and
hearing impaired. They wrongly
assume that they are not intelli-
gent and that they cannot func-
tion in a hearing world. The
reality is that if you give them a
chance, they are indeed quite
intelligent, are scored on the

same level as their hearing peers
and they work twice as hard to
succeed.

"Communication may be
challenging but with patience
and creativity, it's easy to
accommodate their needs.
Deaf/hard-of-hearing candidates
are just like any other hearing
job seeker, each has unique
skills and I am proud that Doc-
tors Hospital is taking notice,”
she said.

‘Denaldo, who is described as
a very keen, diligent and enthu-
siastic young man with a very
pleasant demeanor, will start

_his tenure in Doctors Hospital's

Dietary Department to provide
quality service to the patients

and customers. To assist with .

his communication, Denaldo
will wear a badge that identi-
fies him as hearing impaired
and instructs patients/associates
to speak directly to him, which
will assist his superior lip read-
ing skills. ;

sveeee lecescececececececscscececocessccscecesesececscecebenseees,

e For more information an taking
steps to diversify your company
with bright young talent, call the
Centre for the Deaf at 323-6767.



OF any step in skin care,
cleansing is the most critical to
your skin's health. Why?
Because most of us spend our
days in environmentally toxic
air, with pollutants constantly
drawn to the surface of our skin.
Add to that, your body also uses
the skin's surface to rid the
body of toxins. And if that does-
n't have you convinced, think
of this - a large percentage of
dust is the result of dried
sewage!

So, if cleansing is so vital, why
do so many people do it incor-
rectly? From rinsing with hot
water instead of warm, to using
soap with is drying alkaline
base, many people assault their
skin on a daily basis in the name
of cleansing.

In the short term, this results
in dry, taut skin. Over longer
periods of time, the skin's lack
of natural defenses leaves it
open to attack, so ironically, it is
overly-fervent cleansing that
actually worsens the very prob-
lems it is intended to solve.

WHEN IS A BAR NOT A SOAP?
Is your daily cleanse attacking
your skin? Well, if you are using

a soap bar, chances are that it is.

Because soap is made primarily
from a caustic blend of boiled
animal fat, lye and soda, it is
very highly alkaline.

When soap is applied to the

' face, it neutralizes the skin's

natural acid mantle, stripping
the skin of its most important
line of defence against infec-
tion, dehydration and environ-
mental assault. To make mat-
ters worse, most consumers
select their soap bar for its
smell, which is usually nothing
more than a highly irritating
artificial fragrance. The result?
A taut, dry complexion that's
completely susceptible to envi-
ronmental damage.

What's surprising about soap
is that over 80 per cent of the
worlds population is still using
it, despite its skin damaging
properties.

Fortunately, you can now find

non-soap bars with skin care
quality agents. These new
cleansing bars combine skin-
friendly benefits of high quality
liquid cleansers with the conve-
nience of a bar and are formu-
lated to match your skin's pH.
Finding the correct skin-friend-
ly bar is a great substitute to

using dehydrating soap. Ask
you skin care therapist about
finding the correct cleanser for
your skin.

This information was taken from
www.dermalogica.bs
e Sarah Simpson is a skin care



therapist at the Dermal Clinic. Vis-
it her and her team of skin and
body therapists at One Sandyport
Plaza (the same building as Ballys
Gym). For more information about
their September Face Treatment
special for all new clients visit
www.dermal-clinic.com or call
327.6788

Photoaging:

‘The SU ages you



OVER time skin ages and

: loses its youthful appearance.
: Wrinkles appear around the
: eyes, fine lines bloom around
: the lips and age spots appear °
: on the hands. While some of
: these factors are natural and
: unavoidable, many of the vis-
: ible signs of aging are caused
: by the sun, and can be avoid-
: ed.

Skin is composed of three

i layers:
: © The epidermis or outer layer
: . The dermis or middle layer
' | ¢ The subcutis or basement lay-
: er

The second layer or the

: dermis is the part of the skin

: that contains collagen, elastin

: and other fibres that support

: the skin’s structure. It is these

? elements that are responsi-

. : ble for giving skin its smooth
: and youthful appearance. It is
: also this area that is damaged
: by the UV radiation.

There are two types of UV

? rays - UVA and UVB. When

: the UV rays hit the skin, the

: cells in the dermis try to pro-

: duce melanin to send to the
: surface layer of skin. This
: prevents fhe rays from pene- °
: trating the skin. This is the
: process by which you devel-
i opa tan.

UVB rays are shorter than

: UVA rays and are responsi-
+ ble for the sunburn. The
: UVA rays however have
: longer wavelengths and are
: responsible for the photoag-
i ing. They penetrate deep into
: the dermis where they dam- .
: age the collagen fibres. The
: skin then atfempts to rebuild
: this damaged collagen by
: producing enzymes. The
: enzymes however often mal-
: function and degrade.the col-
: lagen resulting in-incorrectly
? rebuilt skin. .

Since this process is repeat-

: ed with daily UVA exposure,
: the incorrectly rebuilt skin
: forms wrinkles, and the
: depleted collagen results in
: leathery type skin.

Repeated sun exposure

: also causes age spots or liver
: spots. These spots have noth-
: ing to do with your liver, but

' everything to do with the sun.
: An age spot is a small bit of
? pigmentation caused by sun
? exposure and is called a solar
: lentigo. They are usually
: found on the hands, arms,
: chest and face.

The best way to fight pho-

: toaging is prevention. Daily
: application of a sunscreen
: that is SPF 15 or higher to
: areas that are prone to pho-
: toaging will not only help
: prevent photoaging, but can
: actually reverse some of the
: signs you already have.

Reducing your exposure to

: UV radiation will also lower
: your risk of developing skin
: Cancer or pre-cancer type
: lesions.

e /f you have any questions

: please do not hesitate to con-
: tact Dr. Knowles at 327-

: 8718/9 at the Olde Town Mall
i Sandyport or email her at

: drknowles1@hotmail.com.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2008, PAGE 11B

Bahamas Girl Guides Association

camp 2009 .-

Bahamian beauties
get ready for
model showdown

FROM page 12

said it was nerve wracking
waiting to find out if she made
it into the contest.

“After my casting,” she told
Tribune Women, “it was a
constant back and forth. One
day I would say that some-
thing's wrong, and the next
day I would be saying 'you'll
do fine’.”

When she finally got the
message that she had made it
into the show, Michel said it
an extremely big relief. “This
was like my exhale moment.”

The young lady, who is also
part Barbadian, said that win-
ning the Supermodel of the
Bahamas would be like having
the opportunity to make foot-
prints in the industry for
young people from the
Bahamas.and Barbados.

Modeling has always been a
passion for another super-
model prospect, 17 year old
Erinn Treco. ,

_ “My dream is to become a
model, so I couldn't pass this
opportunity up” said the
young high school student.
When she saw the ad about

the event on Facebook, Erinn i

said she immediately went to
the Ford online site and regis-
tered.

“You have to understand, I
read and collect Vogue, Teen

’ Vogue, Seventeen and Cosmo
Girl, and sometimes I get the
New York Times fashion mag-
azine. I study the designers,
the photographers, what the
makeup artists are doing, and
the different models. If any-
thing new comes up, that way
I will have the upper hand.”

Even though she feels that
she knows a lot about the busi-
ness and has a look she con-
siders to be multi-ethnic, Erin
said that you just never know
what the judges are looking
for. “You just have to block
it out and try to become the
winner.”

She said that she realises
becoming a Ford model is
going to take a lot of hard
work and determination, and
she has already begun mak-
ing frequent trips to the gym.

“Once my mind is settled
on something, I go after it. I
am very determined,” Erinn

said.

“My mom wants me to fin-
ish school, but she also knows
that modeling is something
that I want to do. So, she is
excited for me, and she is
showing me a lot of support.”

College of the Bahamas'
student, Jourdana Rodgers,
21, thought that entering the
contest would be a good
opportunity to try and get

more modeling experience, +

see how she would stand up
against other potential
Bahamian “supermodels,” and
then, see how far she can take
her modeling career with the
experience iearned from being
a part of this contest.

“When I was growing up, I
was always taller than every-
one else my age. I didn't like
my height too much, but did-
n't want it to go to waste. I
didn't like sports, so I started
model training,” said Jour-
dana. ‘

And despite having person-
al issues with her height as a
youngster, the exotic 5'11
beauty said that with her
moms help, she learned how
to love her height. She told
Tribune Woman, “I didn't
always like my height, but
now, I love it!”

“My height is what. makes
me different from all the oth-
er girls,” Jourdana said,
remembering the day when
she went in for the final cast-
ing.
“T was okay when I was out-
side,” she recalls, “but when I
got inside the gym, I started
having butterflies wondering
how I would stack up to the
other girls, but after a while, I
realised that all of the girls had
their own attributes that they
were bringing to the contest. I
knew that I couldn't bring it
all, but I had my legs and
height as an advantage over
most of the other girls.”

If she were the one to rep-
resent the Bahamas in Mon-
tenegro in January of 2009,
Jourdana said that she will be
ready to mix it up with the 50
other “Supermodel” hopefuls
at the international event.

° Tickets for the 1st Annual
Ford Models' Supermodel of the
Bahamas and Models242 Male
Face of 242 is scheduled to go on
sale Wednesday, September 17
and will be available at Diamonds
International, Carlos Valentino on
Bay and Victoria, Flaunt It Cloth-
ing Store on Rosetta Street,
Urban Nation in the Mall at
Marathon, and Coco Nuts
Bahama Grill, West Bay Street.

THE Bahamas Girl Guides Association has been invited by the
Caribbean Link of Guiding to host Caricamp 2009. This camp is expect-
ed to attract some 200 girls and leaders from 20 countries in the
Caribbean including Canada, England and the US.

This event, scheduled for Easter of 2009, will run for five days and will
be based in New Providence at St Augustine's College. It is expected
that this will be a time of adventure, challenges, forging new friendships
and developing each person's potential under the theme of: Forging
Friendships. Nurturing Caribbean Unity through Guiding.

GIRL GUIDES CELEBRATES COMMONWEALTH DAY

prepares for Cari

The Bahamas Girl Guides celebrated Commonwealth Day in a
fashion show and luncheon on May 24.

Representatives of the Commonwealth of Nations here in the
Bahamas joined with the guides in a fashion show to model their
national dress. Mrs Clarice Granger, former chief commissioner,
chaired the annual event.

LADY DOROTHY CASH REMEMBERED hoe

Members of the Bahamas Girl Guides Association paid tribute to the
late Lady Cash who died on May 19.

Lady Cash was actively involved in Guiding for many years. She
served as a member of Council and in 1984 became the patron of the
association.

In the latter capacity, she chaired the annual general meetings and
gave her full support by attending various other events, notably, the
launching of the annual Cookie Week drive.

In one of her many addresses she said, "The principles of Girl
Guiding here plays a vital role in the lives of many of our young
women who are making valuable contributions to our community.

"Girl Guides have an opportunity to learn and develop many skills,
and are exposed to discipline and a sense of dedication and loyalty to

countr







Decision paralysis

YOU have probably already seen "Decision Paralysis" in - inac-
tion. It isn't very selective, it can show up in any office at any time. It
happens when a decision needs to be made and the decision maker,
who can be an executive, manager, supervisor or employee, seems
oblivious of the need to make a decision and get things moving.

Sometimes managers, super-
visors and employees are afraid
to make a decision because at
some time or another, they
took what they thought was a
calculated risk only to have it

backfire in a humiliating out-.

burst of power, disappointment
or outrage by a senior manager
or executive. Senior managers
sometimes don't grasp the

: notion that if, instead of coach-

ing, you berate an employee or

.a supervisor for a mistake, you

create a culture of fear, risk
aversion and homogeneity.
There are many more rea-
sons why decision makers can
become paralyzed or inopera-
tive. Some leaders are just not
comfortable with making a
decision about a trouble maker
or non-performer who is nega-
tively impacting the team
because they don't want to be
responsible for creating hard-
ship for the trouble maker and
their family. I often hear the
term, "I don't.want to take
bread out their mouths" so the
cancer festers and spreads
among the team while the team
leader sticks their head in the
sand. The key issue here is that
as a leader, you are being paid
to make both the easy and the
tough decisions so you need to
rise to the expectations of your
tole.
From the opposite perspec-
tive, there are managers who

neglect to make a decision to-

promote strong performers
because of petty jealousies or
because they can't afford to
lose their top performers. The
problem here may be that the
leader has not developed a
competent team and is relying
on one person to pull the
weight. If your team isn't.com-
petent it means you need to
make a decision or a combina-
tion of decisions to train, trans-
fer, disengage or restructure.
Another sign of decision
paralysis is the manager who
is petrified by the prospect of

“conflict. There are many, many

managers who fear being con-
fronted. The perceived poten-
tial for disrespect rattles them
to their core so they take great
pains to avoid taking a stand.
They usually lack the confi-
dence, training, skills and will to
harness or even acknowledge
any type of conflict and trans-
form it into a positive process
and outcome.

Then there is a group of
immobilized managers who
over-analyze a problem to the
point where they start to lose

sight of the relevant facts and
get caught up with the incon-
sequential and petty. These
managers see themselves as

_ cerebral or intelligent but they .

take their ability to think to an
unproductive level. The key

skill they need to learn here is -

execution.

There are some managers
who can't separate facts from
emotion so their emotions stop

them from making a decision’:

or cause-them to take an inap-

propriate position. Everyone ~

else perceives the inaction or
emotionalism for what it is
except the emotive manager.
While sometimes stalling tac-
tics are appropriate, employ-
ees and support persons can
tell (over time) if you are
stalling purposefully or if you
are in a place of abject indeci-
sion. Sometimes stalling or
waiting will make the decision
easier because circumstances
may sort themselves out but

keep in mind that timing is |

everything, so if you are stuck
and you miss an important win-
dow of opportunity you will
seem ineffective or impotent.

Here are some of the nega-
tive effects of indecision:

1. A loss of confidence in and
respect of your leadership.

2. Low morale due to frus-
tration.

3. Missed opportunities.

4. Issues piling up on each
other, compounding a situation
or making resolution more
complex than it needs to be.

5. You stand to lose your top
performers who become frus-
trated by the perceived lack of
direction and stasis.

There are numerous decision
making tools available to assist
anyone who needs to strength-
en their decisiveness. One of
them is called the "Six Think-

ing Hats". Each hat represents:

a perspective of the challenge
or problem that you can con-
sider:

¢ The White Hat: Look at
past trends and identify gaps
in your knowledge

¢ The Red Hat: Look at the
optional solutions at a gut level.
You can also make an effort to
understand how employees or
members will probably react.
Keep in mind that a negative
reaction isn't always a reason to
decide against a solution.

e The Black Hat: This form
of thinking makes your deci-

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





A

B By YWETTE
catela

sion more resilient. Weigh the
cons of the options. This is
important because it exposes

the weaknesses in the solu-

tions.

e The Yellow Hat: This is
the optimistic viewpoint. Use
this approach to identify the
value and opportunities in
your options.

¢ The Green Hat: This hat

. is about introducing creativity

to the process. One tool of cre-

ativity is brainstorming (ie, |
~ true brainstorming that sus-



Career appartunity for an amebitions carver ovtented individual:



Major Responsibilities:



pends judgment of ideas dur-
ing the process). ®
e The Blue Hat: This hat is

about procéss control. Did the |

meeting leader prepare an
agenda and facilitate the dis-
cussion effectively or did you
walk away from the meeting
thinking it was a waste of
time?
(Source: Mindtools)

Once you review your chal-
lenge using the six thinking
hats or any tool or combina-

#@ PARTICIPANTS in costume
(above), representing different
countries in the Commonwealth.

«

PICTURED are Mrs Elma Garraway
(cente), Mr James Catalyn and Miss
Betty Cole (left), directors of Parade.




tion of decision making tools
of your choice, you can ven-
ture into the world of risk gak-
ing. If your decision is not a
confidential matter, you can

‘minimize your risk by testing

your ideas on your coworkers
of boss. The execution process
will test the applicability and
adaptability of. four plans. It
will test your leadership skills
because it is inevitable that
recalibration will probably be
necessary. '

senemeneeceneenesteaecceacseccccenssaureccsesereneeeeeeseenneete

e Yvette Bethel is the presi-
dent of Organizational Soul. She
can be contacted by telephone
at 242.424.7166 or fax -
242.324.1631 or write to her at
PO Box N-511, Nassau,
Bahamas. Interested persons
can also check out her website
at: www.orgsoul.com.



‘

‘sg Claims Advisor

PRN NAUMAN ‘Tonay, ToMORREN.

» Provide enstomer service, advice and axstvtance to walkin contomereand
aver the (dephane
Deal with agencies and other insurance companion

> Complete reparty and input data

+ Axsist with subrogation

+ Maintain Claims Bordereauy

~ Ansletance with special projects

> Must he able to work shifts

Quullfteations:

AA. Dogree in tisiness or related sabject

Minimum 2-3 years experience in claims handling
~ Supervisory skills _

Computer proflelency required

Strong customer service, communication and ierpersnnal skills

Compensation commeisurate with relevant experience and qualifications, Qn.thie
job training will be provided,

The Bahamas First Group is the largest property and casially insurance company
in the Bahamas and hax an A- (Excellent) Rating from A. M, Best, reflecting the
company’s financial stability and sound risk management practiers.

Moase apply Mefore September 19, 2008 fo:

Group HR & Training Manager
Rahamas First Corporate Services
32 Collins Avenue
P.O, Box $8 = 6234
Nassau, Hahamas

Or email io: careers”! hahamastiret.com









































i

Mark Humes/Photos





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,



SEPTEMBER 16,






2008







pare for the upcoming

one of them winning a
modeling contract worth
$250,000, and the title of
the Bahamas’ first super-
model and Ford Models’
‘Supermodel of the World’.

Se rt NRE NEEM







R nearly a decade, young Bahamian girls have been watching Tyra

— Peer announce to anxious and often fanatical contestants on her tele-

vision reality series America's Next Top Model (ANTM) that one of the
- prizes that they are vying for is a multi-million dollar contract with “the leg-

endary modeling agency, Ford Models.”

For the throngs of young Bahamian women who’
religiously watch ANTM, they can only imagine such
an opportunity, and the overwhelming response to the
locally produced spin-off, Bahamas Next Top Model,
is a testament to this desire for the chance to live the
dream of one of Bank's contestants.

Now, with the founding of Models242, aspiring
Bahamian beauties have the chance to realise their
dream. Models242 has partnered with Ford, and as a
Spe have opened the door for young women to get

"real life” opportunity.

“Bor one week, beginning September 28, they will
work it out in front of the camera and on the runway
hoping to show their own unique brand of Bahamian
beauty to the prestigious agency known for develop-
ing the careers of some of the world's original super-
models, such as Naomi Campbell, Brooke Shields,
and ANTM winner Eva.

Billed as a “Night Under The Stars,” the final event,
which is scheduled to take over Fort Charlotte on
West Bay Street on October 4, will pay tribute to a
legendary pioneer in the fashion industry in the
Bahamas, Pepper Johnson.

In preparation for the whirlwind of activity, four of
the countries up and coming models sat with Tribune



Violet [|





4 Nature
i Harmony fh Fresh

{

Woman to talk bout: their thoughts and experiences

surrounding the contest which has put them on the
fast track to winning $250,000 in modeling contracts as
the Bahamas' first supermodel and Ford Models'
‘Supermodel of the World’.

Nineteen year old Erika Adderley, one of this
year's finalists, said she was happy and excited about
the opportunity. “Now that it is happening, I am going
to look at it as a learning experience. I am getting an
opportunity to work with and present myself to repre-
sentatives from Ford. That is an exciting experience.”

The model hopeful thinks that it is funny how the
same modeling agency, whose name she heard many
times on the Tyra Bank' television reality show, is
now coming to the Bahamas.

“This shows that the Bahamas is moving on to
another level” she said, adding, "It's about time”.

And what if she doesn't win? Erika said that she
would not feel bad because she knows that “when one
door is closed, many other doors open up”.

Another young beauty vying for the same chance to
represent the Bahamas at the Supermodel of the World
competition is Michel Archer. Sixteen year old Michel

SEE page 11

oe Reeth
“fragrances!

Ensueno at
your favourite
store.

BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759

BAHAMIAN MODELS pre-

competition which will see





ae tua) se tnonoriss rr Ih Z Tass ePNcTAPTSN AMEE
ROP sll



THEME: THE DEFINING MOMENT
OR THE WAY FORWARD

SECOND BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL
ASSOCIATION SUMMIT and —

THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION





ait


2 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008

“Reaching out to better serve the community”

Community Pharmacy

P.O. Box N-10823 eCarmicheal Rd.
Ph/Fax: 341-2086
Palmetto Point Eleuthera

Ph:332-1512

Bi der Vai tec eh
“ Sophia Fisher

The Community Pharmacy Offers:

¢ Free Blood Pressure Check
e Blood Glucose NEN Cols
e Health & Beauty Aids &Jots more
We Deliver to ANY ata Ya

Fax or Call and it will be there the next time available.

Opening Hours
Monday - Saturday 8am - 9pm and -
Sunday & Holiday 9am - 5pm

“Your health comes first”

Special Discount PTAA aa

ea Se accepted.

RR RE IRBRBRERER
: Menno PHARMACY

“THE PHARMACY OF DISTINCT ON®







"TRIED AND TRUSTED” |
R COSMETICS
fe JEWELLERY

%s _ OPEN:8:00 TO 8:00 MON-SAT —_KIM MAJOR - PHARMAC!
| MT ROYAL AVE & KENILWORTH CLINTON McCARTNEY PHARMACIST
P.O. BOX N-979

nq OR 326-6548

0 cho: senneerenneannanennnrnnnnnenr tannin





Giemsa

’ : FAX: 328- 3546

SBBRBBE BEBRRRE

Sota Circia: Moise.





p24 Dn Baie ie ORAL...

PARADISE
PI OAR EOAC as

Z Prescription Dr ugs-Filec for Pi Dactors.
~ ver thes counter rugs
‘Registered Pharmacist Ory IDasty

4 SB Sericr CHizen * Hotel Workers
Disceouint/civit Servants: og
Neiturert. ‘Heecaltin. Products

~ Greeting arcs « Howisehotc items

&
a

ite Mohaays

Fex: (242) 393-5078 :
validated Re a aed de ed we emi eles em wl 2th ede ed a

i yr “TP Per PRO Posen” :

Cast Bony Streak crt Fetatey ‘Geast «ot tire Bricitac

‘Centreville Pharmacy .
www.centrevillerx.com

We accept the following: an
INSURANCE PLANS 3











= Atlantic Medical -



A 7 Imperial
Life Pnancial




Bahan Healt oS

SHEEN â„¢. GOLINA
RS Modiftex Commonwealth TORS
wo, Oo eras : The Options Plan





' “We deliver to the Centreville and Palmdale areas
and to the mall boats.”



“Jour one stop shop for all 3
yous Medical needs & more

Tel: 325-4644 ~
Fax: a









iu era py LSsais. Vs trip ai
si pay 3s yeeyrt Mee a ore cie

fen evil




PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, pharmacists are highly educated and
trained healthcare professionals who, having become certi-
fied in recognised specialty areas, and having passed exam-
inations administered by credentialing boards, are experts
in the field of preparing and dispensing pharmaceutical

| drugs and medicines;

AND WHEREAS, pharmacists, in some cases, are the
first ones to be contacted by patients with inquiries about
undiagnosed or diagnosed health conditions;

AND WHEREAS, one of the most important roles
which pharmacists are called upon to perform is the assum-
ing of direct and overall responsibility for the effective man-
agement of medications for patients in diseased states, so
that the state of health of ‘each patient is progressively
improved;

AND WHEREAS, the Government of the Bahamas is
pleased to be partnering with the Bahamas Pharmaceutical

THE RT. HON. HUBERT A. INGRAH

| PRIME MINISTER, COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS —



THE HON. H

MINISTER OF HEALTH





A: THE Bahamas Pharmaceutical
Association hosts its 2008 summit, it is a
pleasure for me *Sps tea gas

to welcome international delegate and presen-
ters to The Bahamas, and to commend this asso-
ciation for its commitment to the provision of con-
tinuing education for its Membership.

This year’s theme, “The Defining Moment—The
Way Forward” is significant, as it transports The
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association beyond past
achievements. E

It allows this association to assess the challenges
that remain and look ahead with the goal of con-
fronting them with renewed determination. In set-
ting objectives and formulating policies, the
Ministry of Health remains cognizant of the influ-
ential role that professional bodies such as The
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association could play in
this process.

In this regard, I have noted that among other
matters, this year’s summit also seeks to focus two
major initiatives. These are’the proposed National
Prescription Drug Plan for chronic non-communi-
cable diseases and Pharmacy Legislation. This
provides a unique opportunity for pharmacists
along with their colleagues in other disciplines to
engage in meaningful discussions on issues perti-
nent to advancing their initiatives. To this end, The
Ministry of Health welcomes the submission of any

_additional recommendations emanating from these
discussions. ;

It is our hope that through this united and coor-
dinated effort, these initiatives that are geared

Tuesday, September 16, 2008 3



Association in making determinations on critical issues con-
nected with the implementation of the Government’s
healthcare initiative: The National Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Plan, and in the drafting of legislation to
regulate the practice of pharmacy in the Bahamas,

NOW THEREFORE, I, Hubert A Ingraham, Prime
Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, do hereby
proclaim the week beginning Sunday, 14th September and
ending Saturday, 20th September 2008 as “Pharmacy
Week”. ;

IN WITNESS WHEREOEF, I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 10th day of September 2008. _~

Hubert A. Dre

we




BERT MINNIS

toward enhancing the capacity of our health care
services to effectively respond to the changing
needs of the population will produce the desired
results.

I am therefore grateful to The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association for the activities that
are planned for this week, which serve as an invalu-
able complement to the work of the Ministry of
Health. .

I take this opportunity to encourage you as ded-
icated pharmacists to remain committed to the
concept of excellence, and I extend wishes for the
continued growth and success of The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association.

Iam therefore grateful to The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association for the activities that
are planned for this week, which serve as an invalu-
able complement to the work of the Ministry of
Health.

I take this opportunity to encourage you as ded-
icated pharmacists to remain committed to the
concept of excellence, and I extend wishes for the
continued growth and success of The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association.

I am thetefore grateful to The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association for the activities that
are planned for this week, Which serve as an
invaluable complement to the work of the Ministry
of Health. ;

I take this opportunity to encourage you as ded-
icated pharmacists to remain committed to the
concept of excellence, and I extend wishes for the
continued growth and success of The Bahamas
Pharmaceutical Association.






4 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008







x ASTRAZENECA |

* Abbott Diagnostics

* Abbott Laboratories Puerto Lid......... Seisun Shampoo, Murine, Ensure
* Boehringer ingelheim Canada Ltd

* Roche Diagnostics -

x Boot Healthcare... Nurofen Tabiets , Strepsils Boots

W:. BOC OF sass cccoiaticavassvedariatess Pharmaton/Ginsana

* Smith & Nephew... Wound Care

Fe Ooi tcssiptcscrstneienenes Histatussin Cough Syrup
* Bayer A.G

* Collins Ltd.

* Novartis

x Connaught Laboratories Ltd.
* Eli Lilly Exports S. A.

* Hawaiian Tropic

* Janssen Cilag

*« Glaxosmith Kline

* Nature’s Bounty Vitamins




Nassau Agencies (1995) Ltd.

Pharmaceutical Supplies (Wholesale)

AGENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING : ALSO, APOTEX —

E-Mail: naipharm@bc ~—s>t._bs
Web Site: www.nalohans.:.com

SERVING YOUR HEALTH NEEDS
Appointed stocking agents for the following
manufacturers of: Pharmaceuticals,
Nutritionals, Health & Beauty Aids, Wound —
Care & Diabetic Supplies, Rental of Oxygen
Concentrators, School Supplies

* Loreal Martindale

* Ferrero

* Pharmaton

* Riker 3M

* Sanofi Pharma S.A. .
* Schering Las Americas os

* Servier international

* Seven Seas

* Stiefel Labs., inc.

* Winthrop Pharmaceutical inc.

* Wyeth Ayerst Int'l U. S.A. PO. &B. < S$S-6288

* Bausch & Lomb
* Schering Plough COR. Jerome & Mt.
* Merck _ Pléasant Aves.

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 393-4854
Fax: (242) 394-0533





Pharmacy Ltd.

Open Daily 8am-9pm
Holidays & Sundays
EU ERY ETL
Ridgeland Mall, Robinson Rd.

P.0. Box CR-54891, Nassau, Bahamas

The Pharmacy that never says “No”
Delton “Doc” Bain
Chief Pharmacist

Best Prices in Town
e Friendly Environment, Quick Service
¢ Computerized Prescription Service
¢ Special Discounts for all our regular customers
¢ Over the counter Drugs, Vitamin, Toiletries
-e Hair Care Products, School Supplies

Tel: 322-4560/322-3627




MR. PHILIP GRA\

President of the Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association |

HIS IS an exciting time in the practice of Pharmacy in the Bahamas.
There is new pharmacy legislation on the horizon, a pharmacy coun-
cil will be formed in short order. é :

The National Prescription Drug Plan for chronic non-communicable
decease will assist in defining the new model for pharmacy business.

Career path opportunities are numerous.

The profession has never been more viable, lucrative or in the spot light. It
is indeed “The defining moment in time" for the profession of pharmacy.

“To whom much is given much is expected”. The mandate given to us to
police and protect the integrity of the profession is voluminous.

The age of pharmaceutical care gives us a wonderful avenue to not only dis-
pense medications with accuracy that will relieve symptoms, but to be agents
through counseling and development of relationships with our patients to get
to the root causes of their illnesses.

In truly understanding this, we grasp the awesomeness of our charge for the
entire pharmaceutical industry. The urgency our mandate must also propel
us to seek out the potential in our youth and steer the right skill set into our
most noble profession. — : :

Pharmacy week and summit 2008 is most important for us and our country.
The need to enlighten our patrons and clients is among our goals. The sum-

Brats ta out cert 47 Gee ae) CT ra Dec




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we « LB SEGA

i Tuesday, September 16, 2008 * 5

sional and social development
which will empower us for the
way forward.

To our guests from the
Caribbean region and our com-
panion association in South
Florida we welcome you and
thank you for sharing in our
moment in time. a

We promise to be the best host
as you experience the land where
God lives. ;

It is my prayer that as God did for Jabez that He would bless us indeed and
continue to enlarge our territory, that God's hand will be upon us so that we
will never cause harm to one another or our clients.

Do enjoy and absorb all that pharmacy week and Summit 2008 has to offer.

It is my prayer that as God did for Jabez that He would bless us indeed and
continue to enlarge our territory, that God's hand will be upon us so that we
will never cause harm to one another or our clients.

Do enjoy absorb all that pharmacy week and Summit 2008 has to offer.






Your Faull Service

Prescription Clevritre



bdealich (lure Professionals are
licensed Pharcnaciar or cdutcy

Bree Blood Pressure, Glucose and



Clholesrerol menircoring sarcvices

awailable. <>









Peescriprions ace safely and
comvenioently delivered cro
your coor.

We ships to the Fuarriily daterrecds.

3 tea a friend and save.

a eligi eo tt eater
eae prescription. :
6 © Tuesday, September 16, 2008

THE BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION
SUMMIT SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

SUNDAY 14TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

7:00am.— 9:00am.
12:00pm.— 6:00pm.



MONDAY 15TH SEPTEMBER, 2008



12:00pm.— 3:00pm. ‘ ‘Decoration & Judging of Pharmacies : :

TUESDAY 16TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

Newspaper Supplement -

9:00am. — 1:00pm. Brown Bag Day

1:00pm. — 2:00pm. — > bimch

2:00am. — 5:00pm. . Brown Bag Day Cont’ a

5:00pm. — 7:00pm: Break

8:00pm. — 9:00pm. —. Live LV. Broadcast—Public Ed on
Herbal Medicine ©

WEDNESDAY 17TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

9:00am. . Registration

10:00am.— 11:00am. : Coffee Break

11:00am.— 1:00pm. Registration Cont’d

1:00pm.— 2:00pm. Lamch. =

2:00pm.— 5:00pm. ___._ Registration Cont'd ee
5:00pm.— 6:00pm. - -Break . i

7:00pm.— 9:00pm. Opening Ceremony

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

THURSDAY 18TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

8:00am.— 9:00pm. Inspiration Hour.
9:00am.— 10:00am. ___ Biostatistics for Pharmacy
: Documentation
10:00am.— 11:00am. : Coffee Break
11:00am.— 12:00pm. Pharmacovigalnce Bahamas
12:00pm.— 1:00pm Chronic Disease Management
1:00am.— 2:00pm. . . Lunch
2:00pm. — 3:00pm. -. Pharmacy LT. Tech. ©
3:00pm. — 5:00pm. > Pharmacy Tours.
5:00pm. — 7:00pm. Break :
7:00pm. — 8:00pm. Evening Session >



8:00pm. — 9:00pm. - Metabolic Syndrome
Tuesday, September 16, 2008 © 7

THE BAHAMAS PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION
SUMMIT SCHEDULE OFEVENTS; =

FRIDAY 19TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

8:00am. — 9:00am.

9:00pm. — 10:00pm.
10:00am.— 11:00am.
11:00am.— 12:00am.

1:00pm.— 2:00pm.
2:00pm.— 4:00pm.
7:30pm.

9:00am.— 11:00am.
1:00pm. — 2:00pm.
7:00pm.



ete eo Pe whe Pe FELCH ESS” S Sh EKER ERED CR. EE ae Oe ae
ARSE? miaciat’ 23 Regilered pp SAMS Registered Pharmacist
Me Senior Critirert & Civil oe Experienced Praarmacists
Servants Miscou mts $8 Elernergaenoay Orcertng Syatearnt
CARMICHAEL ROAD

PRINCE CHARLES OnIVE SOLDIER ROAD ar Ce ee oe
St ee Se ee ee WEES ESE ERED oe ORES a sar ear «

- lO A oe EI it SE rae, Mas 368 OPEN 7:000.m. - 10:00p.em. DAILY

ax: Mao: 39-4-O723 OPEM 9:OOa.rn. - bO:00Op.0. DARLY INCLUDING SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS

OPEM B:00a.rm. ~ 12:00p.m. DAILY TICLUDING SUNDAYS
INCLUDING SUNOAYS & HOLIDAYS

ww A LE rrten poor LIS PARC CFLS
ass E>. BOx EE-16575

WORLILE BOREARLLES EOS CPLIEL PITMBERE COORRE CIEE




Tuesday, September 16, 2008 ° 8

Honouree Mr. Ci





















( linton McCartney affec-
/tidnately called CMc by
his staff has pioneered the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Association by
bridging the gap amongst pharmacists
when he served as president in 1978.
He conducted walk abouts with execu-
tives to all Pharmacists in their workplace.
He also organized an AGM meeting in
Freeport to address their current con-
cerns.

Clinton started his pharmacy career at
the Princess Margaret Hospital under the
apprenticeship programme.

He preceptored under Mr. Pedro
Roberts (now deceased).

‘In 1972 he opened his own Pharmacy
- called McCartney's Pharmacy where he
is currently.





He also has preceptored many
Bahamian Pharmacist. His motto being'to
be the Best Pharmacist in your practice.

He comes from a family of Pharmacist,
his brother William McCartney, a nephew
Kurt McCartney, and a niece Kim Major.

Anyone who is affiliated with him is
accepted as part of his family. The cus-
tomers who visit his practice can expect
empathy, accuracy and integrity when
providing pharmaceutical care.

The Caribbean Association of
Pharmacist and Wesley Methodist
Church. He is a exceptional listener and
often you can envision him surrounded by
friends and family.

Clint is married to the former Myrtle
Nee Clare and they have one son Clint

. junior affectionately called CJ.

PHARMACISTS
PROFESSIONAL
LOVEPEOPLE

DISPENSE

CONFIDANT

FRIEND





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COUNSEL
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QUALITY
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MEDICINE
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THE BAHAMAS





The Bahamas Government seeks to establish
a program for the supply of certain pharma-
ceutical products via government owned and

- other health facilities at an economic cost, in
the treatment of certain chronic diseases, and has out-
line the primary objectives of the “Chronic Diseases
Prescription Drug Plan” as follows:

To increase access to cost effec-
tive drugs for the treatment of specif-
ic chronic diseases and specified

' medical conditions

°To reduce the financial burden of
beneficiaries in respect of the pur-
chase of prescription drugs and spec-
ified medical supplies.

In order to provide funding for the
“Chronic Diseases Prescription Drug
Plan” the Bahamas Government
intends to establish a “Prescription

| INFINITY HEALTH CARE PHARMACY

v Free Blood
Pressure Checks

Â¥ Sugar & Cholesterol
Checks Also Avaliable

Drug Fund” which will be under the
control and management of the
National Insurance Board (NIB) and
which will consist of: 7

eContributions collected by NIB
from insured persons, employers and
any other category of persons as may
be prescribed.

eSums received by way of on or
donation.

eMonies collected by NIB on

behalf of the Prescription Drug Fund.



eSums approved by Parliament for
payment into the fund.

Monies collected by the
Prescription Drug Fund will be used
solely to pay for:

eThe purchase and financing of
prescription drugs and medical sup-
plies for beneficiaries.

_°Costs and expenses incurred by
NIB in the management of the Drug
Plan.

eHealth education, health promo-
tion, and to meet the cost of studies
for the implementation of measures
to prevent illnesses.

Specified diseases. and medical

. conditions covered by the “Chronic

Diseases Prescription Drug Plan” are
expected to include: e. Arthritis ¢
Asthma

e Breast Cancer ¢Prostate Cancer
e Diabetes e Benign Prostate
Hyperplasia (Enlarged Prosatate)

eHypoetension ¢ Glaucoma

e Ischemic Heart Disease

Tuesday, September 16, 2008 ° 9

e Major Depression e¢- Psychosis

In addition to providing beneficiar-
ies of the Plan with the necessary pre-
scription drugs and specified medical
supplies from Government owed
pharmacies and clinics, it is intended
that the Bahamas Government enter
into contractual arrangements with
owners of Bahamian registered phar-
macies in order to be able to provide
this service as well.

To ensure that an orderly and

transparent facilitation of the

“Chronic Diseases Prescription Plan”
takes place, it is imperative that the
specific needs of all stakeholders
(NIB, PHA, BNDA, Pharmaceutical
Wholesalers, Government
Pharmacies/Clinics, Private Hospital
Pharmacies and Retail Pharmacies)
are addressed and incorporated.

"The Family Pharmacy"



Â¥ Healthcare Providers for:

Atlantic Medical, Bahama Health
Clico and Colina

Discounts Offered to Senior Citizens,
: Students and Hote! and
Government Workers.

Accept All Major Credit Cards
Pharmacy Hours
Monday -Thursday 8:30am. — 9:00pm.

Friday 8:30am. —- 8:00pm

Saturday 6:00pm. — 8:00pm

Sunday & Holidays 9:00am, — 8:00pm.
Tuesday, September 16, 2008 ° 10

OVERVIEW OF THE PROPOSED PHARMACY ACT

he current legislation, which

governs the practice of phar-
macy (Chapter 212. The Pharmacy
Act) was enacted by Parliament on the
23rd of May, 1962. The act outlined a process for
registering pharmacists via the office of the
Minister responsible for Pharmacy. The current
legislation that governs the registration of
Pharmacists and Pharmacy technicians
(Chapter 220. The Health Professions Act) was
enacted by Parliament on the 6th of August,
1998. This act outlined the process for the for-



mation of the Health Professionals Council that:

would register and license all applicable health
professionals, of which pharmacists and phar-
macy technicians were included. It also provid-
ed a mechanism for general regulations for all
aforementioned health professionals, for their
governance.

At the present time, The Bahamas is the only
member-state of CARICOM in which the pro-
fession of pharmacy is not regulated via a
Pharmacy Board or Council.

Over the past ten years, the profession of

pharmacy has seen significant changes in the |

scope of practice, qualifications, new treatment

modalities, and emerging technological
advances. In addition, the profession is facing a

global crisis relating to the in creased influx of _

counterfeit medications and fraud via the
Internet practice of pharmacy.

It is now clear that the legislative tools avail-
able for governance must be improved. The
development of proper guidelines necessary for
the regulation of the profession is a task best
accomplished by those involved in- the profes-
sion.

With the repeal of the current Pharmacy Act
1962, and all sections of the Health Professions
Act 1998, which relate to the profession of phar-
macy, the proposed Pharmacy Act (2008) seeks
to address the following:

eEstablishment of a nine-member council
known as The Bahamas Pharmacy Council,
comprised of experienced pharmacists and
pharmacy professionals, along with requisite

representation from the Minister responsible

for Pharmacy (via the Chief Medical Officer
and the Director of the Bahamas National Drug
Agency).
An overview of the core responsibilities of the
Council will show the following functions:
eRegister and license premises and persons

involved in the profession.

eRegulate and control the practice of phar-
macy
eDevelop and govern standards of practice
eDevelop and enforce standards of profes-
sional ethics.
°Facilitate the receipt of official complaints
relative to the profession and/or professionals.
eWork with relevant government agencies to
inspect licensees and enforce compliance.
’ eImplementation of a proper process for the
registration and licensure of:
- Pharmacy health-care facilities ©
- Pharmacists, technicians, interns and
relevant healthcare practitioners
- Pharmacy wholesale, import/export, and
manufacturing facilities and businesses.
Pharmacists with sub-specialty practice areas
including but not limited to clinical pharmacy
practice, nuclear pharmacy, oncology-pharmacy
practice, specialized disease-state management
pharmaceutical care (e.g. out-patient diabetes
management, coumadin-clinic management,
etc). The Council in accordance with accepted
international guidelines will define standards
for practice in any sub-specialty area.

PHARMACcw

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