Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text


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Volume: 104 No.201



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EUSA TODAY

- BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

SLU)

OCCUR

Raa aal a

ont - mre

Juvenile
surrenders
to police
in Exuma

lm By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEVEN weeks’ after Marvin
Wilson was brutally murdered
at his Centreville apartment, a —
juvenile suspect surrendered to
police in Exuma for question-
ing.

Press liaison officer Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans
said the suspect — who was
wanted for questioning in con-
nection with Wilson's murder
— turned himself into police in
George Town, Exuma around
8.15 pm Monday.

Central Detective Unit offi-
cers from New Providence went -
to the island yesterday. morn-
ing to get the suspect and bring
him to Nassau, ASP Evans said.

Wilson, a 32-year-old
Jamaican, was stabbed to death
at his Gregory House apart-
ment on Rusty Bethel Avenue,
near ZNS radio station during
the early morning hours of June
3. Unconfirmed reports claimed
that his killer ran a broad blade
dagger — reportedly from
Wilson's sword collection —
through his chest.

Although bleeding profuse-
ly, Wilson, clad only in his
underwear, staggered to an

SEE page eight






















INSURANCE

FIGHTING THE blaze at Maxwell’ s food store yesterday.

: By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A FIRE yesterday destroyed

: Marsh Harbour’s largest food
: store, devastating the Abaco
: community in these harsh eco-
+ nomic times.

More than 40 persons lost

: their jobs and Abaconians
> were left without their primary
: source for supplies: and gro-
: ceries when Maxwell’s food
: store burned down in the early
: morning hours.

Kathleen Ralph of the Aba-

we eae

: lierer age no matter which
way ‘the wind blows.

gy obody does it better.

1 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

J Gio Buna Lae!
PTR

Abo
[ea

| Heater | Eva
et

conian newspaper, who togeth:
er with her husband Dave
Ralph is the town’s primary
fire dispatcher, told The Tri-
bune that the fire started

- around 10pm Monday night in

the warehouse section of the
building.
The blaze was initially con-
tained by firefighters,
However, a few hours later
the fire suddenly flared up
again and was completely

uncontrollable by 5am yester-

day.

Mrs Ralph said that fire
fighters from the volunteer fire
brigade from Marsh Harbour,
from Treasure Cay, Casuarina
Point and Hope Town came to
fight the blaze.

The Hope Town fire fight-
ers, she said, brought two boats
carrying equipment to put out
the fire, all to no avail. In the
end, the entire stock and inte-
rior of Maxwell’s was lost to
the flames.

Although the walls of the
food store are still standing,
Mrs Ralph said that the build-
ing is now structurally unsafe
and will have to be demol-
ished.

Abaco resident Julian Lock-
hart told The Tribune yester-

SEE page eight



TE p




ae
gasoline again

By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net




_ FOR the second time in
recent months, the island of
San Salvador has run out of
gasoline, leaving residents to
order fuel and have it
shipped by mailboat to the
far-flung island.

Today mv Lady Frances
is expected to leave Potter’s
Cay Dock at 5pm, laden
with barrels and an assort-
ment of containers filled
with gasoline.

Last month, the vessel
sailed with more than 150
gallons of petroleum prod-
ucts, as San Salvador was hit
with a shortage of fuel when
the oil tanker Ficus went
aground.

At the time, Ficus was





SEE page eight |
J



Be Tes 600 mat



wi ~

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

ACCUSED wife killer Asa
Bethel, 53,.is believed to have
committed suicide hours before

his scheduled appearance in
court yesterday. He was found.

hanging in a bathroom at Her

Majesty’s Prison by another

prisoner.
Mr Bethel was on remand at

‘HMP charged with killing his

41-year-old wife, Bloneva

Bethel. She was found stabbed -

to death with .a steak knife on
July 15th at their Cox Way
apartment off East Street south.

The victim had severe and
extensive knife wounds to her
right arm and shoulder.

Mr Bethel was being housed.

at the Sick Bay at HMP due toa
renal tract blockage.

-The Ministry of National
Security, in a statement released
yesterday afternoon, said: that
Mr Bethel was last seen “alive
and well by.a prison officer”

around 7.30am. Shortly after ~

this Mr Bethel went into the
shower.

Moments later, he was dis-
covered by an inmate hanging
in the bathroom — reportedly

- from the shower — with a bath

towel around his neck, accord-





iller



Ns] SAU



ing to the ministry. An uniden-
tified inmate untied him and
called for assistance.

“Officers and members of the
medical team responded imme-
diately and administered CPR
without success,” said the min-
istry.

Mr Bethel was pronounced
dead. at 8.31am. The ministry

.said, that he showed no signs of

being suicidal and was there-
fore not on suicide watch.

His attorney Devard
Williams, however, told The
Tribune that Mr Bethel was on

SEE page eight

Tourists stranded in Abaco after
airline shuts down its service

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EMERGENCY arrangements had to be made to get 130 strand- »
ed tourists out of Abaco over the weekend after a Florida-based air-
line unexpectedly shut down its service to and from the islands.

Vintage Props and Jets (VPJ) has provided airlift to Abaco for
the past 16 years, but was forced out of business after rising fuel and
business costs and dwindling passenger numbers led to the air-
lines’ revenue taking a turn for the worst.

Director of Airlift Development at the Ministry of Tourism
Tyrone Sawyer said government did not know in advance that
the airline was going to announce the closure of its operations

with immediate effect.

He said that while the Bahamas stands to suffer a “tremendous
bloody nose” as a result of the incident, the ministry’s Abaco team
“did a magnificent job” in off-setting the potential fallout from the

shutdown.

Airlines like Continental Connections increased their seat capac-

SEE page eight













- &

PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





© In brief



Two men detained in connection

with illegal fishing allegations

TWO men, a Bahamian and a Haitian, were taken in for ques-
tioning on Monday afternoon by members of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force in connection with illegal fishing allegations in the
northern Bahamas.

While on routine patrol off West End; Grand Bahama, a Defence
Force patrol craft under the command of Petty Officer Freddy
Rolle reported coming a a 15-foot open hulled fishing vessel.

Onboard, they allegedly discovered 300 lbs of scale fish.

The officers said occupants of the vessel failed to produce the doc-
uments needed for commercial fishing.

The vessel and its crew were taken into West End, and the two
men are now helping’ the police with their inquiries into the matter.








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from people who are
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you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

j area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.






_ Buy? Sell?

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Corporate Advisory
» dhe nistration | Shareholder Services

Nassau - T: 242-502-7010 | F: 242-356-3677
: Freeport - T: 242-351-8928 | F: 242-351-4050

“A shocking act
of betra

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



_ OPPOSITION Senate mem-
bers denounced as a "shocking
act of betrayal" government's
apparent increases to the tariffs
by changing the customs duty
rates.

While debating three Supple-
mentary Appropriation Bills,
the opposition took govern-
ment to task for what they claim
was a failure to clearly present
all the facts on tax increases dur-
ing the recent budget presenta-
tion.

During her contribution,
Opposition Leader Senator
Allyson Maynard Gibson, said
government claimed the budget
would "cushion" low-income
families from economic hard
times but did not clearly state
the duty increases on 160,000
items, including all clothing,
underwear and toiletries.

In some cases the duty
increases are as much as 10 per
cent, Senator Gibson said.

"There was not one new tax
between 2002 and 2007. We
already have had significant
increases in taxation this year
as a result of this budget and
without people knowing.

“I don't support Madame
President, any democracy where
taxes are increased without citi-
zens knowing that the taxes are
going to be increased and that is
a shocking event.”

Senator Gibson chastised the



al’

Opposition Senators attack
apparent increases to tariffs.



“I don’t support Madame Presi-
dent, any democracy where tax-
es are increased without citizens
knowing that the taxes are going
to be increased and that is a

shocking event.” »



Allyson Maynard Gibson

prime minister's budget state-
ments which said the budget
reflects the FNM's commitment
to "cushion" low-income. citi-
zens from economic hard times.

"But, lo and behold, Madame

‘President, what do we see?

“Ten per cent increases on all

Bahamians; not just low income ;

families, Madame President:
‘And these Bahamians are ask-
ing, can they trust the govern-
ment"?

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
also. questioned the tariff
increase and government's

transparency. There has been
some debate back and forth as
to the implications of this tariff
and who's responsibility I guess
it was to say to the Bahamian
people what the implications of
this tariff was. And it really goes

to the issue of credibility and |

trust. ;

"During the past year with all
of the inconsistencies that have
been brought about and brought
to the attention of the public

and to myself, I never really |

anticipated that an act of betray-
al, not only to Parliamentarians,



but also to the Bahamian public,
would have occurred to the

extent at which it has happened |

in regards to this last budget.
"One would expect, Madame
President, that any trusting,

transparent government that's -

been accountable to the people

and the Parliament. would dis- ,

close during the presentation of

‘the budget to some extent that

they have increased tariffs essen-
tially on a wide scale, the

Bahamian people deserve to .
know," said Senator Fitzgerald. —
The Senate will meet again |

on Thursday.






Wanted: Local artists

ahi





















"THE Sandals Royal Bahami-




CAN YOU DO iD Artists lee Peau (sa rm vlan mel cans into a care of art. The winner will a $500.

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

an Resort is searching for local
artists to work on a project to
raise awareness of recycling
in the Bahamas.

The resort will be commis-
sioning a local artist to utilise
old cans to create something
memorable. The winner will
receive $500.

“Sandals Royal Bahamian is
on the hunt for an artist with a
real ‘can do’ attitude to join
them for a unique recycling
project — turning old cans into
a work of art,” the resort said
in a statement.

Melissa Nichols, environ-

So RTT RN NE AN eT

2 Bedroom, 2 112 Bathroom 3 storey Townhouses. Gated property includes pool, |
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From $229,000 with only $5,000 reservation deposit required



sereTenaaet ncaa

Resario West Condominiums Under Construction

_ NEW CONDOS FOR SALE










unveils unique recycling project

mental manager at Sandals
Royal Bahamian, said: ““We’re
challenging local artists with
a passion for the environment
to tell us what they’d create
out of the empty cans. The
best and most innovative idea
will be commissioned.

“The environment is top of
everyone’s agenda at the pre-
sent time and so rather than
SHEE TY handing the cans

a aS OORT NO



PH. 325-1325 No Agents Please



straight over for recycling, we
thought why not use the mate-
rials for something fun and
which helps to underline the
importance of preserving the
-earth as well as the benefit of
recycling,” she said.

To submit ideas, artists are
invited to send a short writ-
ten description of their idea
to mnichols@grp.sandals.com
or by calling 327-6400 exten-
sion 6316 no later than Fri-
day, August 15.

The winner will be notified
by telephone on Tuesday,
August 19, and the winning
artist will be given up toa
month to create a master-
piece.

“Sandals Royal Bahamian
has long been committed to
preserving the natural beauty
of its surroundings and, along
with all of Sandals and Beach-
es resorts, has been awarded
the much coveted Green
Globe 21 Award for Environ-
mental Stewardship.

“The resort plans to unveil
the artwork during Septem-
ber before recycling the cans,”
Sandals said in its statement.









THE TRIBUNE



In brief

Man charged

with robbery |

A 25-YEAR-OLD
Pinedale man was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday,
charged with robbery.

Randy Ferguson

appeared before Magistrate

Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, on the robbery
charge.

It is alleged that Fergu-
son on Saturday, July 19,

while being concerned with

another, robbed Doris Jau-
regui of a brown leather
purse containing $950.
Despite Ferguson’s plea
for bail, the prosecution
objected to him being
granted bail, citing that he
has similar cases pending
before the courts. Accord-
ing to the prosecution, Fer-

guson is currently on bail in }

the Supreme Court ona

murder and armed robbery

charge.

Ferguson was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison
and his case was adjourned
to September 5.

Hope Town to

he seen on
hit TV show

HOPE Town, Abaco, will
be seen by millions of tele-
vision viewers worldwide
when a recently filmed
episode of the hit American
comedy show Scrubs goes
on air.

According to internation-
al media reports, 84 mem-
bers of the cast and crew
from the show, which airs
on ABC, swarmed the small
island to shoot a wedding
scene.

Series creator Bill
Lawrence told one enter-
tainment web site that local
officials on the island “foot-
ed the bill” for the event.

_ “There were no roads, .
and they had rolling black-
outs every couple of hours,
but it was one of the best ©
expefiends Tweed; hie”
said.

The Emmy and Peabody
Award-winning fictional
show revolves around the
lives of staff members work-
ing in a teaching hospital
called Sacred Heart.

The Hope Town special,
said the creator, is “a janie
tically funny episode, where
(actor) Neil Flynn gets mar-
ried in the Bahamas.

“He invites 700 people to
the Bahamas on three days

notice because all he wanted

was the gifts. He didn't want
anybody to show up,” said
Mr Lawrence.

The series creator himself
plays the priest who marries
actor Flynn and his wife-to-
be.

Juvenile is
at'rested
after handgun
discovery

A JUVENILE was
arrested in connection
with the discovery of a
handgun in the Windsor
Lane area.

Police said around
3.30pm yesterday, con-
cerned citizens saw a per-
son with a handgun in the
area of a Super Value
Food Store on Windsor
Lane around 3.30 pm yes-
terday.

Police were immediately
alerted and responded.

The juvenile was arrest-
ed by officers from South-
ern Police Station and is
being questioned in con-
nection with the incident.

@ ARMED ROBBERY

ARMED robbers made
off with cash and a cell
phone after robbing Uni-
versal Beauty Supply Store
on Carmichael Road.

Police report that
around 6pm on Monday,
an employee of the store
was at work when two
gunmen entered demand-
ing cash.

The employee was
robbed of cash and a
patron was robbed of cash
and a cell phone.





Meter. yi eS)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 3

Environmentalist hits



out at new AES offer

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A LOCAL environmen-
talist is claiming that a new
offer by AES corporation to
pump liquefied natural gas

(LNG) to the Bahamas-

comes in the form of a trade-
off which will cost this coun-
try significant revenue
should it choose to sign on
to the Ocean Cay project on
the new terms.

Sam Duncombe of
reEarth, an outspoken critic
of the entire LNG project,
said that the newest offer is
yet another example of AES’
“failure to be upfront” about
the project.

In a full-page advert pub-
lished two weeks ago and on
a local radio show on Sun-
day, Aaron Samson, AES’
managing director, touted
the benefits of the Bahamas
giving the go-ahead for the
controversial LNG plant on
Ocean Cay, near Bimini.

The company recently pro-
posed that it will construct
an additional pipeline to the
Bahamas, separate to the
one which will take the liq-
uefied natural gas. to Flori-
da.

This additional pipeline
would bring the liquefied
natural gas to the Bahamas.

Sul Duncombe

Mr Samson claimed that
BEC could use the gas,
which is currently cheaper
than oil and a “cleaner” form
of energy, to run its turbines
to produce power.

In turn, BEC could then
pass on the savings — which
he claims would amount to
between $1.4 billion and $4
billion over a 15 year period
— to its consumers.

Speaking on IslandFM’s
Sunday Conversation show
this past wes Mr Sam-



_ Aaron Samson

son confirmed to Ms Dun-
combe —-a caller to the show
— that if the Bahamas choos-
es to take up his company’s
offer to build an LNG
pipeline from the plant on
Ocean Cay to Clifton, it will

. be in return for the company

keeping any revenues that it
previously agreed to pass on
to the government in
the form of a “through-put
fee.”

That fee would have been
a continuous source of rev-

Bahamian and Haitian are
accused of illegal fishing

A BAHAMIAN and a Haitian were appre-
hended on Monday afternoon by members of:
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and
accused of illegal fishing in the Northern

Bahamas.

While on.routine patrol off West End, Grand
: Bahama, a Defence Force patrol craft under
i. the command of Petty Officer Freddy Rolle
me a a eee open hull fishing vessel.

adeveeceececcecteeseenseccceeccsacececsecssserseseeeens

~ Women ’s Ministry of the

fish.

Onboard were two occupants, who had
approximately 300 pounds of assorted scaled

They were not in possession of the neces-

sary documents needed for commercial fishing,

and were subsequently: taken into-custody::»
The vessel and‘its. crew were-taken into West
' End, where they were turnéd over to'the 'rele~"
_vant authorities.





Commonvwealth Baptist Church
hosts a two- day conference

A TWO-DAY CONFER-
ENCE, hosted by the Wom-
en’s Ministry of the Com-
monwealth Baptist Church,
starts today with the aim of
helping Bahamian women
with their struggles.

Now in its seventh year,

the “Get It Real Ladies, (let’s ©
discuss) Family, Relation- —

ships, Independence, Ene-
mies, Needs, and Don’ts”

\ (GIRLFRIEND) Conference

was founded by senior pas-
tor Bishop Arnold Josey and
is hosted by his wife, Elder
Vernita Josey.

“Relationships are in

shambles, abuse and violence
have taken over, causing
families to fall apart and
divert from God's divine
order for the family. In other
words women just can't seem
to get it together,” the Joseys
said. .
In view of this, the couple
decided that Bahamian
women “don't need just
another conference where
they meet to sing, shout, get
happy for the moment and
end up going right back into
their hostile environment of
stress and much struggle.

“What is needed is for us
to get women to a place
where they remove the mask,
the facade and get real, to
meet them at where they are,
discussing real issues that
they face without sugar coat-
ing. God's desire is for us to
help women to reach their
full potential in him,” the
Joseys said.

According to the couple,
since its inception, the con-
ference has impacted the
lives of countless women in
Bahamian society who attend
the event in large numbers
each year.

“The response from the
conference attendees has
been overwhelming.

“Many have concluded that

PUTS Lae CONST}

their lives have been trans-
formed and empowered
through the life changing
testimonies, the powerful
praise and ~~ worship
experience, the anointed
speakers who themselves
have been chosen because of
challenges that they have
overcome.

“This conference has
brought hope to the hopeless
and courage and strength to
those on the verge of giving
up,” the Joseys said.

The conference starts
today and continues through
Friday, July 25.

It is held nightly at 7.30pm
at the Commonwealth Bap-
tist Church, located on Com-
monwealth Bouleyard in
Elizabeth Estates.

Speakers include Minister
Joy Simmons of the Church
Of God Of Prophecy Taber-
nacle on East Street, Pastor
Dolly King of the Hosanna
Full Gospel Baptist Church
on Abundant Life Road, and

ia ee
a WUT

eta hy
Pers eae



Minister Whitlean Burrows



Minister Whitlean Burrows
of Commonwealth Baptist
Church.

enue for the Bahamian gov-
ernment, consisting of a cer-
tain amount of money per
1000 cubic feet of liquefied
natural gas that the company
pumps to Florida via its pro-
posed 94-mile pipeline from
Ocean Cay.

It was estimated by AES
that, based on natural gas
prices, the fee would have
generated $40 - $50 million
for the Bahamas in 2005.

Instead, the company has
suggested the government
will benefit from the “35 per
cent import duties and seven
per cent Stamp Tax, ‘or
equivalent payment’,” it will
make to the government on
the gas it sells to BEC,
should the government sign
on and choose the pipeline
option.

Ms Duncombe claims that
in promoting this option, Mr
Samson has “very conve-
niently worded” his state-
ments to downplay the fact
that the Bahamas will lose
the through-put revenue.

“It seems to me this is a.

way to make this project
more palatable ‘to the
Bahamian public as they
were getting no positive trac-
tion otherwise, and also for
AES to pay the Bahamas
less at the end of the day.”
Mr Samson failed to return
messages left for him on

Monday seeking comment
on the matter.

However, in a previous
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, AES’ managing direc-
tor said that the Bahamas
could collect between $20 -
$30 million in duty on the
LNG it supplies to BEC in
the first year, increasing to
between $30 - $40 million
some 16 years later in 2028.

The AES Ocean Express
terminal would re-gasify
LNG brought to Ocean Cay
by ship, then pump it to
Florida via a pipeline to gen-
erate electricity there.

Its proponents say it will
create additional revenue,
jobs and some much needed
diversification to the
Bahamian economy, and if
the Bahamas accepts the
pipeline offer, cheaper elec-
tricity.

Opponents say it is an
“inherently dangerous indus-
try” which may hurt the envi-
ronment and would only pro-

long the Bahamas’ “addic-
tion” to fossil fuels.
The plan was given

approval in principle under
the former FNM govern-
ment.

The FNM was removed
from office before the pro-
ject went any further and no

' forward movement on LNG

occurred under the PLP.

Great S elections
For T he Home

havpanl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 562.652), Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

ancing Available Thr.







PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN i CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation nd Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Fraud scams keep coming

EVERY MORNING when we check our e-
mail we discover we are millionaires — by the
end of the day we have become millionaires
many times over. In fact if all of these pie-in-the
sky winnings had materialised, we probably
could have helped government make a sizeable
dent in the public debt.

It is alarming the number of crooks and
fraudsters unleashed on the world through the
Internet. And it is probably also incredible the
number of gullible people who have fallen for
the scams. Instead of reaping the promised mil-
lions, they are robbed of their savings.

These crooks must be profiting, because |

instead of disappearing they are increasing.
Several years ago Nigeria was known as the

scam capital of the world. Today, these scam- -

mers come from every corner of the globe. One
even had the nerve to pose as representing the
Cyber Wiretap and Funds Recovery Depart-
ment of the FBI in the J Edgar Hoover Building
on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. Two
others claimed they were with the US military in
Iraq. According to them they had got their
sticky fingers on-a sizeable portion of Saddam
Hussein’s loot and needed a partner to help
them get it out of the country. Of course, the
aider and abettor was to share in a millionaire’s
percentage of the stolen goods.

These scams started small — by the occa-
sional letter sent by air mail. Today, thanks to
the Internet, they arrive on one’s desk daily.

. There are so many of them operating that by the
time we have cleared them out of our system,
we fear we might have deleted some of our
legitimate mail. ‘At the end of the task our delete
finger is exhausted and our delete key seems .to
have settled into a perpetual depressed posi-
tion.

Years ago the Nigerian scams mdde world
news as people were warned not to fall into
their trap. The Tribune also wrote about them.
By that time there were reports that persons
who had gone to Nigeria to collect their money
had been killed.

One day we received a call from a Bahamian
couple. They were distraught. We forget the
details of their case, but remember that they
lost more than they could afford. We advised
them not to attempt to go to Nigeria to redeem
their losses. We do not recall how their sorry
story ended.

Even Microsoft’s name is being used in what
is called a Microsoft Mega Jackpot e-mail win-
ning programme. As Bill Gates’ company has
stated in its warning to its software users: If
you haven’t played in such a lotto, then obvi-
ously you have won nothing. In other words, if
you have not entered a lotto, either by pur-
chasing a ticket, or submitting your e-mail, how

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can you expect to be a winner of anything?
Don’t let your greed get in the way of your
commonsense, 7 you do, you are certain to be a
loser.

And these seoplé have no conscience. Here
is one example. This person claims to be a rev-
erend gentleman. He gives a name, and says
he is a public relations secretary of a certain
church in Lagos — he also names the church.
All of which are obviously bogus. He claims he
was “accosted by the accounts manager of the
Union Bank of Nigeria, Lagos branch, of an
eventually, but rather obscene act of financial
misappropriation by the past Minister of Petro-
leum ... and an oil merchant.”

According to. the tall tale, the oil merchant
died in a plane crash — in most of these stories
someone is bumped off, leaving a packet of
cash to be disposed of. Apparently, this now
dead merchant left cash in a numbered account
for the former Minister of Petroleum from the
proceeds of a crude oil sale. However, with the
depositor now dead, leaving no information of
next of kin, the minister, who supposedly should
claim the money, is afraid to come forward
b. cause the “financial crime securities are trail-
ing his activities.”

Now this is where the priest comes in.
According to the priest he was requested to
use his collar to “‘seek out a respectable investor
who can be trustworthy to receive this fund for
investment purposes on an agreeable term of 20
per cent. Value of fund presently stands at $16.5
million.”

Now this is where we are supposed to come
in: For this 20 per cent of $16.5 million we have
been invited to pose as next of kin to justify
the documents being probated ‘in the Lagos
court so that the money can be paid to us as next
of kin. He says that because he is a priest he can
assure us that this is not a scam and he wants us
to “observe this instruction religiously.” He
said he sends us this “mail not without a mea-
sure of fear as to what the consequences are ...
but I know within me,” he adds, “that nothing
ventured is nothing gained and that success and
riches never come easy or on a a platter of gold.

“This is the one truth,” he continued, “I
have learned from my experience as a reverend
father. Do not betray my,confidence. If we can
be of one accord, we should commence the
business asap. I await your response.”

Our response was immediate. We sent his e-
mil to Fraud Watch International at
ac 2in@fraudwatchinternational.com

We suggest that if any of our readers are
invited to join in any of these scams, they do the
same. To do otherwise could prove disastrous —

riot only a personal loss of money, but also the

theft of your identity.



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Take these
daredevil bus
drivers off
the streets

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There cannot be one single
Bahamian that would be able
to defend the existing fact that
“some bus drivers” in the
Bahamas are a menace to
society.

They intentionally put pas-'

sengers’ lives at risk with dis-
regard and disrespect every-
day with their “high wire
acts”.

Innocent passengers, like
“lambs to the slaughter” sit

- on these buses without crack-
ing their teeth, while drivers

perform their daredevil acts.

Every day motorists witness
how aggressive bus drivers,
loaded with passengers some
children, overtake as many as
ten vehicles in an effort to gain
an advantage over another
bus driver.

These maniacs could care

less who their passengers are

because their mission is to get
the passenger that they could
see in a distance to make just
one more dollar.

It is almost acceptable to see
a bus driver take a short cut
across someone’s property
without fear. '

The police force could care
less because many times the
occupants of the buses are
officers in uniform.

This makes.one wonder if
the officers remain silent just

' to get a free ride.

Many times officers can be
seen chatting with bus drivers

becoming too familiar which,

obviously compromises their




Dae

letters@tribunemedia.net



position. The bus driver then
does what he wishes because
he believes that the police are
“his boy”.

The lazy police officers
watch while buses packed to
capacity, weave in and out of

congested streets, but do not °

say one single word.

The officers do not have the
balls or the interest to stop
this behaviour before some
innocent passenger loses his
life, but is seen all over the
television making silly com-
mentary after the tragedy
occurs.

The lip service paid to

“cracking down” on bus dri-
vers makes me sick .to my
stomach.

The consequences that
should be meted out to viola-
tors of reckless driving are
nothing more than a “big bag
of foul air.”

These concerns expressed
will’go by unnoticed until
someone is maimed or killed
and then some stop gap mea-
sure would be announced for
a short while and it would
quickly return to business as
usual.

It.is time for harsher penal-
ties to be given to bus drivers
and taxi drivers who put his

passengers’ lives in danger,
and who consume alcohol

while driving. .

Any bus driver or taxi dri-
ver who drive in a manner
dangerous to the public should
be treated just like anyone
who is attempting to murder,
since driving recklessly could
possibly cause lives.

We in the Bahamas must
begin to look like we are not a

_ banana republic and not only

implement but carry out the
laws that fit the crime. _

It is high time that not only
bus and taxi drivers licenses
be revoked when found vio-
lating a law that may cause
lives, but the franchise holder
too must be heavily penalised
because they are guilty of
greed by pressuring the dri-
ver to meet unrealistic quo-
tas.

We become like hogs when
we focus too much on the
mean green almighty dollar to
the detriment of the welfare -
and safety of the public.

It is time to bite the bullet.
If the laws are on the books
implement them, if they are

“not, make harsher laws that

would go a long way to pro-
tecting the general public and
make a bus system that is
needed much safer.

Still fearless.

IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau, ~~
July, 2008:

Attending Independence Day events
should not be a measure of patriotism

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing in response to
the discussion that has been
coming up each Independence
Day for the last few years
regarding white Bahamians

not attending this event and

what it means.

I think Rev. C.B. Moss
raised the issue a couple of
years ago and I remember
being somewhat amused, and

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this is why. In 2006, the newly
formed Adult National Choir
was asked to sing at.the Inde-
pendence Day celebrations at
Clifford Park.

Several white Bahamians,
including myself, were part of
this choir and sang that night.
So not only were we present
at the celebrations, we were
part of the entertainment.

So.imagine my surprise
afterwards when I read the
claims that there were no
white Bahamians there!

How did they miss us on the
stage under those glaring
lights that made us so unbear-
ably hot in the middle of July?

I concluded at that time,
and still believe, that people
often see what they want to
see.

However, since this issue
has continued to come up
each year, I would like to put
on the record that I know that

at least in 2006, at the Inde-

pendence Day celebrations

there were several white
Bahamians taking part!

Having said that, I don't
think that attendance at the
Independence Day celebra-
tions should be used as a mea-
sure of a Bahamian's patrio-
tism, love of country, feeling
of unity, etc. Kudos to Mike
Stevenson for his study to find
out why people don't attend
this event.

The next step would be to
survey the people that do
attend to find out why they
go, before assuming it is
national pride, and thereby
assuming people who don't
attend don't have any.

FRANCES FARMER
Nassau,
July 22, 2008

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS’

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 5



tj

Missions

OC)

to

i

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS’ @ Tribune Staff Reporter





CONSTRUCTION PROJECT:
BUILDING FOUR CLASSROOMS

THE Grace Community
Church Short-Term Missions
teams have been working with
Haitian communities in Haiti
and throughout the Caribbean
for 23 years, so when they were
invited by a Haitian pastor in
Nassau to assist a church in Port-
de-Paix they took the opportu-
nity to help an area with a local
connection.

Pastor Wilme Joseph, a Hait-
ian-Bahamian preacher at the
Haitian Evangelical church on
Carmichael Road, asked the
team at Grace Community
Church to assist the Good Shep-
herd Evangelical Church in his
home rn by helping to build
four classrooms at the expanding
school there.

The Good Shepherd Church
was founded by Pastor Frangois
Renaud 21 years ago with a con-
gregation of just 16.

Today, it has grown to a com-
munity of around 1,700 people,
with a school offering affordable
education to.258 children, ages
five to 12.

But with just four cramped
classrooms for the students, the
Good Shepherd needed help, so
the Grace Community Church
on Palmetto Drive, Nassau,
raised $6,000 for building mate-
rials and the missions team set
out to Port-de-Paix to help build
four more classrooms on the site.

Freelance contractor Tony
Wilson, 45, of Blake Road, Nas-
sau, has been managing con-
struction projects for the mis-
sionary team since 1988, and
was keen to lead the construc-
tion team to Haiti once again.

"Since my first trip I felt God
had called me into short-term
missions," Mr Wilson said.



"T always had a desire to help,
I have these skills to help others,

and the short-term missions
really made that happen."
Pastor Renaud was over-

whelmed with gratitude for the ©

missionaries’ contribution to
such a desperate community.

"We have problems getting
help, and the people here need
help. They need food, shoes,
clothes, some people can't pay
for school, and they come to me
for help, but I don't have money
even for myself,” he said.

During the five days the mis-
sionaries worked on the site in
Haiti, the walls of the four class-
rooms »«.ere completed. Only
the roofs need to be finished
now.

Pastor Renaud hopes to also
build a medical clinic at the
church as there are not adequate
facilities for people in the com-



Rotaract Club of
Southeast Nassau
Centennial unveils
hook and school
supply drive

THE Rotaract Club of
Southeast Nassau Centenni-
al has announced a book
and school supply drive to
benefit the students of Ade-
laide Primary School.

A spokesperson for the
club said they are looking
for books for students in
grades one to six.

“Give the tools of knowl-
edge to our future genera-
tion,” he said. “Every child
deserves a chance to excel.”

The event will be held at
the Town Centre Mall from
noon to 4pm on Saturday,
July 26.

Every donor will receive a
token of appreciation from
the Rotaract SENC.

The club said it needs vol-
unteers for the drive. Inter-
ested persons were asked to
email: rotaract.senc@gmail.com.

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THEMISSION -

munity, many of whom are suf-
fering from a range of treatable
infections and diseases.

The Grace Church Short-
Term Missions teams will con-
tinue to help the Good Shep-
herd Evangelical Church to con-
tribute to the development in
the community the best way
they can.

THE MEDICAL CLINIC

PUBLIC Health Nurse Fred-
erica Sands, 65, has helped to
heal people in Haiti and Hait-
ian communities throughout the
Caribbean since the Grace
Short-Term Missions team was
formed 23 years ago.

.Mrs Sands, of Shirlea, Nassau,
said after her first mission to
Haiti in 1988 she was “sold”.

“When I saw the need, and
the sense of satisfaction I got
from helping, I was determined
within myself that Haiti was
going to be my mission, and the
people here are so grateful for
everything we do.

"They show such gratitude,

you could not help but be a part,

of it,” she said.

However, this year's mission
to Port-de-Paix was somewhat
disappointing for Nurse Sands,



The nurses were instead lim-
ited to helping the children who
attended the Vacation Bible
School (VBS) at the church on
Wednesday and Friday last
week.

Five-year-old Dorilas Riben-
son was one of the VBS children
who had a consultation with the
nurse, and Mrs Sands diagnosed
a bacterial infection on his scalp
and gave him the appropriate
ointment.

Surplus medicines were sent
on to a nurse known to the mis-

- sionaries in Guischard, who is

in need of inedication.
Other medication. was left
with the community nurse in



who works at the College of the
Bahamas in Nassau, and mis-
sionary Lisa Adderley, 47, a pub-
lic health nurse at the Blue Hill
Road clinic.

Medical supplies did not arrive
with the team when their last
Pineapple Air flight landed on
Saturday.

. The painkillers, fever reduc-
ers, antacids for the hundreds of
people who do not eat regularly,
and medicines for worms, ring-
worm, head lice, and fungal
infections did not arrive until
Wednesday afternoon.

This deprived the communi-
ty of the free medical attention
the missionaries hoped to pro-
vide for two of the four days that
they worked in Haiti.




DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

Port-de-Paix.
"It has not been the usual
medical clinic we have when we

‘come to Haiti," Nurse Sands

said.
"We usually have hundreds of

_ people come, but without the

supplies there was nothing we
could do."

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

CLASSES at the Vacation
Bible School in Port-de-Paix
took a creative turn as the
school’s leader Lyric Hanna was
forced to work without supplies
for three out of five days during
her classes this year.

‘The 21-year-old Sea Breeze
resident, who. is studying Ele-
mentary Education at Barry
University in Miami, has been

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involved with VBS on the

Grace Short-Term missions ,
‘since she was eight years old.

Without supplies, Lyric and
her team of six teenagers, were
faced with a challenge of keep-
ing 100 children entertained
with the help of translator Pas-
tor Desirjean Eneck from Port-
au-Prince.

"We acted out three stories
of Noah, Joseph and his coat of
many colours, and Adam and
Eve," Lyric said.

"All the young girls sang a
song for the kids, Beijing and
Randy (two young missionar-
ies) did a rap and got the kids
involved, and we played soccer





before the Bible school."

With the crayons, markers
and construction paper they did
have, children made cards and
cardboard visors to take home.
When supplies arrived in time

for Friday's class, children were

given re-usable plastic cups,
bracelets reading 'What Would
Jesus Do', as well as treats and
candies.

Lyric said: "I like to provide
the kids with some sense of edu-

- cation they would not normally

get in their regular school or
Sunday school, and to see the
expressions on their faces when
they are exposed to something
that seems so ordinary to us but

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they might have never seen
before.

"We give them treats, and
sometimes that is the only thing -
they have to eat for the whole
day.

"It is heartbreaking every
time I come, and I know we are
doing something good, but I
also feel so helpless.

"After all these years I have
not gotten used. to roughing it,
but a week of discomfort to
bring somebody else some hap-
piness is worth it.,

"I want to keep doing it, and
try to change people's attitude
at home so they will be more
sympathetic,” Lyric said.







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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





Commissioner of

Strachan laid out

St Francis Xavier

LOCAL NEWS :





OPPOSITION leader Perry Christie, former Speaker of the House of
Assembly Sir Arlington Butler, Hartlyn Roberts and businessman
Bradley Roberts.



FAMILY OF COURTNEY STRACHAN SR; front row left to right: Sybil Louise Coakley Strachan, wife, Flora Hanna, sister-in-law, Courtney
Strachan Jr, son, Marilyn Strachan, daughter-in-law, Desiree and Dashanda Pinder, granddaughters, Kyron Strachan, daughter, Kvon Stra-

chan, grandson



i
A POLICE honour guard leaves St Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street yesterday afternoon with the body of former
Assistant Commissioner of Police Courtney Strachan. Mr Stra-
chan was buried at St Agnes graveyard.





Franklyn Fergusan/Photos



FORMER
Assistant

Police Courtney
in the foyer at

Cathedral
yesterday.



RETIRED senior officers of the Royal Bahamas Police Force listening to Acting Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson reflect on the life of Courtney Strachan.



THE BAHAMAS SUPPORT PROGRAM FOR TRANSFORMING
EDUCATION AND TRAINING

ae | Drive itl, Drag iti,



. The Government of The Bahamas (GOB) has secured a loan of US$18 million from the Inter-
American Development Bank (IDB) as partial funding for thBahamas Support Program for —
Transforming Education & Training (SPTET), the total cost of which is US$22.5 million.
The project will support the development and implenentation of activities aimed at improving
the quality of education throughout the Bahamas.

One critical aspect of the Progam is to build capacity amongpersons involved in teaching and
supervising students with specill needs throughoutthe entire system, with emphasis at the
primary level age groups.

The Bahamas Ministry of Education is nowseeking the services of a suitably qualified
consultant to improve the overall capacity of the ducation system to deliver efficient services to

the special needs population, speéfically to provide capacity building support for curriculum
adaptation, enhanced instructinal strategies, strengthening shool and classroom management
and develop monitoring and evaluation systems angpractices relative to an inclusive educational
setting. ‘ ‘



The expected duration of this consultancy is fo up to 250 non-consecutivedays to be delivered
over a 24 month period.

Individuals with a Masters Degree or higher in Sgcial Education with specialization in inclusive : "
education practices and with training and expeise in curriculum development should apply. Special Trade in

Candidates should demonstrate leadership in thdesign, delivery and evaluation of training in

Special Education in the Englis-speaking Caribbean. Ti i ad a ’S , Ni u r a Am © z S$

Shortlisted candidates may be required to attendn on-site interview before final selection. r Oo nti j e rs, a n ad 1 5 S e aa : By us
Fmd? Sop

Kindly submit resumes of not more tha_n 4 pages (including references and
work done) electronically or in hard copy to the address below_:

The Permanent Secretary y

Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture ’

The IDB Project Management Unit

P.O. Box N 3913/4 ’

te | WEWILL TRADE ITIN
Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy. :

Nassau, Bahamas o
Attn: John R Haughton, Project Manager

Telephone: (242) 325-4725/4748

Email: jhaughtonidbproject@yahoo.com
And tmunningsidbproject@yahoo.com

Ed
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THE TRIBUNE

WEVINEOVAY, JULY 25, ZUUG, FAUL /



lL aa ee
Great ship designer who

called the Bahamas home

ing at State University of New ©
S HIPPING is the lifeblood

of the global economy.
And while most people know
that the Bahamas is a major flag
of convenience (with over 1600
vessels registered), few are aware
that one of the world's greatest
ship designers once called our
islands home.

George Campbell left his
imprint on an entire global
industry, but moved about large-
ly ufinoticed — and nowhere
more so than here. In fact, when
his estate recently gave $10 mil-
lion to the College of the
Bahamas, most Bahamians had
never heard his name, although
he had lived in Nassau intermit-
tently since the late 1960s.

His, contribution to industrial
development goes back to the
dark days of the Second World
War, when the first mass-pro-
duced freighter — known as the
Liberty ship — helped win the
war and drove the resurgence of
global trade afterwards.

But Campbell had nothing to
do witia the Liberty ship — a sim-
ple 11,000-ton freighter fitted
with a crude reciprocating steam
engine capable of pushing it at a
leisurely 10 1/2 knots. Mass pro-
duced in American shipyards to
a British design, these ships
delivered the troops and supplies
that were crucial to the Allied
war effort.

They were designed for econ-
omy and speed of construction,
and by the middle of the war
they were being churned out in
under 60 days at $2 million a
pop. Altogether, about 2700
were built and several hundred
managed to survive the war.
They were acquired by shipown-
ers who wanted to rebuild their
fleets.

"The sale of about 100 Liber-
ties to Greek shippers launched a
wave of expansion and prosper-
ity that has continued for almost
60 years," retired Nassau-based
shipping consultant Bill
Bardelmeier told me recently.
"Throughout the 1950s the Lib-
erty ship was the benchmark-set-
ter for world shipping."





















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But as we said, George Camp-
bell had absolutely nothing to do
with that.

A former shipyard apprentice
of Scottish descent, Campbell
had been posted to Canada by
the Royal Navy in 1941 to help
salvage and repair war-damaged
ships. After the war he stayed
on, setting up a small marine
engineering firm in Montreal
with his brother Jack.

But in 1949, as the Japanese
ship industry began to revive, he
moved to Tokyo. It was the
beginning of a relationship that
lasted 35 years and produced the
world's most influential ship
design firm - GTR Campbell &
Co. Campbell attracted billions
of dollars to Japan, and was a
major factor in the country's rise
to dominance in world ship-
building.

I: was the Liberty ship that
led to his amazing success.
By the 1960s these workhorses
had become obsolete and ship-
pers were clamouring for a
replacement. Campbell — as the
lead designer for Ishikawajima
Harima Heavy Industries (IHI)
— was in an ideal position to
develop a hew vessel. It was
called the Freedom class, and
hundreds were produced from
1965 onwards.

According to Bardelmeier,
"these new vessels were capable
of fitting economically into mod-
ern shipyard production meth-
ods, thus becoming cheaper to
produce and able to be marketed
at an attractive price. :

Campbell and IHI became the
most famous team in the indus-
try.

Bardelmeier had a passing

acquaintance with Campbell

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years ago: "We met in Nassau
and Tokyo, but were never very
friendly toward each other —
not for any particular reason
except we both had rather snot-
ty egos professionally. He was a
bit of a dour curmudgeon I
thought."

The Japanese shipbuilder, THI,
became one of.the world's
largest, while GTR Campbell &
Co produced a stream of
advanced but simple to operate
vessels that could be mass pro-
duced. Shipyards around the
world began buying licences to
use Campbell’s designs for

tankers, bulk carriers, research .

ships, coast guard cutters and ice-

_ breakers.

On delivery of the first Free-
dom ship in 1965, the head of
IHI acknowledged that “Mass
production of commercial ships
has never been carried out,
except in the case of the Liberty
ships during the war. But there
should be no reason for not
adopting the idea for shipbuild-

”

Campbell had developed one

’ of the most successful standard

vessel designs ever conceived.
And in time, he became a
shipowner himself.

"He lived frugally and needed
an investment outlet for the sub-
stantial design fees that were
pouring in," Bardelmeier
explained. "He established a
Nassau office in the late 60s and
owned one of the Chertsey pent-
houses on West Bay Street."

Campbell's shipping opera- .

tions were to take the name
Dockendale, after the family
farm where he was raised in
northern England. The compa-
ny was managed by an engineer
named Les Fernandes, and grew
to control a fleet of 33 vessels.

u



Welc

Fernandes developed a substan-
tial staff of Bahamians who run
the day-to-day operation in Nas-
sau with satellite offices in other
major world entrepots.

"T attended a luncheon for the
whole Dockendale staff some
years ago," Bardelmeier said,
"and came away with the distinct
feeling that they had an unusual
degree of group spirit and loy-
alty exceeding anything I had
ever seen. Focused effort was
being made to send Nassau staff
to fill vacation slots in Australia



“It was the
Liberty ship that
led to his amazing
success. By the
1960s these
workhorses had
become obsolete
and shippers were
clamouring for a
replacement.
Campbell — as
the lead designer
for Ishikawajima
Harima Heavy
Industries (HI) —
was in an ideal
position to
develop a new -
vessel.”
ee ee

and the Far East; and'the
Bahamians seemed delighted at
the chance to gain a broader
view of the organization and
enjoyed working directly with
employees around the world
with whom they normally only
had electronic contact."

By the early 1990s Dockendale
had formed a joint venture part-
nership with Danish shipowner
Torben Jensen's Clipper Group.

Clipper controls about 250 ves-
sels and makes the decisions on
freight contracts and charters,
while Dockendale handles the
management details of hiring and
paying the international crews,
scheduling repairs and mainte-
nance, and provisioning all the
ships.

Dockendale is owned today
by Fernandes and Jensen. And
the Clipper Group operates
about 10 per cent of the 1600
plus ships flying the Bahamian
flag around the world. Both com-
panies are based at Dockendale
House on West Bay Street.

Meanwhile, Campbell's design
firm was taken over by another
Indian engineer named Anthony
Prince, and is based at Sandy
Port.

GT R Campbell Marine Con-
sultants supervises shipbuilding
projects in China, Japan, Singa-

_pore, South Korea‘and India.

Clipper has built over 40 ships
with Prince, most of them under
technical management by Dock-
endale. Prince also took the time
to design a new inter-island trad-
ing vessel for the Bahamas.

The Fiesta Mail operated by
the Mailboat Company is fitted
with many advanced features
and is said to be safer and more
efficient than many of the older
inter-island vessels that still are
seen around Potters Cay. The

_ 225-foot vessel can carry 46 cars,

eight trailers or 20 containers, as

well as up to 600 passengers.
Campbell's interests in Nas-

sau have always been looked

after by a Bahamian lawyer .

named Lowell Mortimer, who
first met him in 1973 as a fresh-
faced attorney in Darrel Rolle's
law office.

"He didn't have many local
investments and he spent only a
month or so a year here, but our
relationship continued until his
death in 1994.

‘The Freedom Foundation was.

set up 10 years before that to
give scholarships to Bahamians
to study agriculture and engi-
neering. Over the years we have
given about 30 of them — there
are six doing marine engineer-



Paved Roads —
Water and Sewerage ~
Phone and Cable
Electricity =
Street Lights

Recreational Park include:

Tennis Courts
Ornamental Pond

“325-6456




' or 325-6447
ome to our Open Ho

Saturday July 26, 2008

| - Jogging Trails & Playground
a Basketball Court
Gazebos & Grills

é








10 am -6 pm



use

York right now."

According to Mortimer,
Campbell liked to consider him-
self a gentleman farmer and was
very interested in promoting
agricultural development:

H: foundation helped
to create the College

of the Bahamas' Poultry
Research unit at Gladstone
Road in the late 1990s, and
recently agreed to fund a degree
programme in environmental sci-
ence and sustainable develop-
ment.

"We felt that contributing to
the College itself, rather than
simply handing out scholarships,
would benefit the Bahamas in a
more universal and sustainable
way," said Mortimer, who is now
the Campbell estate's only
trustee.

The foundation draws on
Campbell's estate, which has
assets of $200 million in ships.

“This gift will support a pro-

‘gramme that is central to nation-

al development and imperative
for our future," COB President
Jayne Hodder told the press
recently. "Small island sustain-
ability will be a flagship pro-
gramme for the new University
of The Bahamas where we will
graduate students who will make
a difference to this country
through eco-tourism, environ-

mental management, agricultur-

al development, and policy
development."

As a result of this donation,,.

many Bahamians are hearing
George Campbell's name for the
first time — 14 years after he
died at the age of 84. He was one
of the great global innovators,
an "invisible giant" who man-
aged the remarkable feat of
changing an industry while
scrupulously avoiding public
attention. f

What do you think?

Send comments to:
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit:
www.bahamapundit.com




eR



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

upstairs neighbour screaming
for help around 12.30 am,
friends said. Neighbours fran-
tically called the police. He was
taken to hospital where he lat-
er died.

A trail of blood was found at
the nearby Temple Christian
Primary School, suggesting
Wilson's attacker fled the
scene on foot.

His death, coupled with the
killing of AIDS activist
Wellington Adderley days ear-
lier and the 2007 murders of
handbag designer Harl Taylor
and college professor Thad-
deus McDonald, prompted
speculation of a gay serial
killer.

Police have disputed this
theory citing a lack of evidence
linking the four 'gay' murders.

On June 23 and 24, police
released two sketches of men

Man turns”
himself in

wanted for questioning in rela- ;

tion to Wilson's murder.
The first was a composite

sketch of a man with a shaved
eyebrow and pierced ears :
believed to be 19 or 20,5 ft 8 :
inches, who witnesses said was :

seen running bare-chested on

Collins Avenue onto McCul- :
lough Corner the morning of :

Wilson's murder.
He was reportedly bleeding.
The second sketch was of a

man witnesses said was seen :
leaving Wilson's apartment :

the evening before he was
killed.

medium-brown complexion,

between 18 and 25, of medi-
um build and around 140 to }

150 pounds.

San Salvador runs out of gasoline

FROM page one

transporting more than 120,000 gallons of fuel for Shell, Texaco,
and Esso. Along with gasoline, the tanker also carried aviation :

kerosene and light automotive diesel.

However, with no tanker grounded or any noticeable shortage
in New Providence, it is uncertain as to why San Salvador has once :
again been unable to keep up with its fuel needs. In the past, when :
the island was hit with fuel shortages residents were restricted to :
purchases of only $20 worth of diesel or gasoline until supplies :

could be replenished.

However, with this $20-a-day restriction, residents were limit- :

ed to only a little over three gallons of fuel a day.

Sources say that San Salvador, like many other Out Islands, is :
supposed to have a fuel depot that can hold at least 4,000 gallons :
of petroleum. These depots, or “satellite plants”, ;
called in the fuel industry, are supposed to be tested regularly to ;
ensure they can be filled with the optimum amount of fuel to sus- :

tain the island in case of any unforeseen emergencies.

However, it is unknown if this procedure is being properly

followed and maintained in San Salvador.

HORTICULTURAL
CONSULTANT

Sandals Resorts International invites applications

for the following position

Horticultural Consultant for Sandals Northern Caribbean
Properties including the Bahamas and Turks & Caicos

Islands

The applicant must meet the following criteria;

¢ Minimum 15 years agronomic and horticultural
experience with a minimum 5 years in a supervisory

position

Diploma in a turf, horticultural related field of study

Thorough knowledge of tropical and sub tropical
plants, grasses, diseases and insects control

Thorough knowledge of all related pesticides, uses
and safe handling procedures

Thorough knowledge of fertilizers both liquids and
solids, and able to calibrate spraying equipment

Thorough knowledge of electrical and manual

irrigation systems

Willing and able to travel

Applications should be email to:
Cmajor@grp.sandals.com

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He was described as of

as they are :

Alleged wife killer
‘commits suicide’

FROM page one

anti-depressants and was see-
ing a psychotherapist even

before the death of his wife. Mr:

Bethel was
depressed,” he said.

Mr Williams also said that he
verbally advised officials at the
prison last Thursday during a
visit that Mr Bethel should be
watched.

He said that he went to the
prison the day after Mr Bethel
was remanded and “spoke to
the parties concerned and (he)
told the officers, you
know...‘watch this man’ because
on my interview I realized
something was wrong with
him.”

The following day (Friday),
Mr Williams said that he sent
an official letter to the prison
requesting that the doctor
ensured that Mr Bethel saw a
urologist as was promised. ,

Mr Williams said he also not-
ed in his letter that Mr Bethel
needed psychiatric help based

Page

on his interaction with him in
an interview. The attorney fur-
ther requested that Mr Williams
receive his medication, includ-
ing anti-depressants, and drugs
to treat the blockage, that were
at the Central Detective Unit.

Yesterday morning when Mr
Bethel was to appear in court
for the first time since the
arraignment, Mr Williams said
he was going to ask for a court
order to-ensure that these things
were done.

The prison has been unable
for some reason to say whether
at this stage Mr Bethel had seen
a psychiatrist, said Mr William
He has instead been referred t
prison doctors who so far he has
been unable to reach. The attor-
ney said, however, that he
intends to attempt to speak with
them again today.

Police were made aware of
the death of Mr Bethel shortly
after it occurred. CDU is now
conducting an investigation. A
coroner’s inquest is also being
organized, according to the

USC



FIREFIGHTERS LEAVE a house next to a Texaco Station on East Bay
Street yesterday after extinguishing a fire there. Photo: Tim Clarke

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Ministry of National Security.

Neighbours recalled being
awakened by the screams of
Mrs Bethel at around 11 o’clock
on the night of her murder. Her
cries for help led them to call
for police assistance. Mrs Bethel
was heard screaming “I rebuke
you” and “Lord have mercy”
in the final minutes of her life.

She was pronounced dead at
Princess Margaret Hospital lat-
er that night.

At Mr Bethel’s arraignment

‘on July 16th at Court 1, Bank

Lane, his attorney Devard
Williams told the court that Mr
Bethel urgently needed to be



FROM page one

er.

Fire at Marsh Harhour's largest food store

day that the destruction of Maxwell’s will have a devastating
effect on the island’s economy.

In addition to over 40 people being out of a job, Mr Lockhart
said that Abaconians have also lost their major grocery suppli-

“People were already experiencing difficulties finding basic
things like milk, bread and cheese. The shelves of the (fo
stores) are often empty. It was bad enough before, but now with
Maxwell’s gone, it’s going to be even worse,” he ‘said.

One resident of Abaco said that Maxwell's serviced “so
many” communities on the island.

Those communities, she said, will now struggle to find anoth-
er source from which to purchase their supplies and necessities.

seen by a doctor. He had a renal
tract blockage, his lawyer said at
the time.

Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez agreed to the request
and ordered that he be
taken to a doctor after the
arraignment and that the prison
doctor be made aware of his
condition.

There have been conflicting
reports of what was at the cen-
tre of the dispute between the
Bethels, which led her husband
to stab her to death. Uncon-
firmed reports suggest the two
might have been arguing over
money.






od







Tourists stranded in Abaco

FROM page one

ity to absorb the stranded visi- ’

tors.

“When these things happen
it causes a lot of disruption,”
said Mr Sawyer.

“We made sure that those
people had the ability to get off
the island by Saturday evening.”

Vintage Props and Jets pro-
vided a twice-daily, primarily
scheduled commuter service to
Abaco, and the option of pri-
vate charters for passengers and
cargo. The summer was tradi-
tionally the airline’s peak sea-
son.

In 2006, the airline transport-
ed 16,399 people between Flori-
da and Abaco.

However, in 2007, this num-
ber fell to 11,913, according to
Stephen Cooke, director of
business development at the air-
line’s hub, Daytona Beach

_ International Airport (DBIA).

The airline’s closure is a tan-
gible sign that the Bahamas’
main industry, tourism, cannot
escape the fallout from the glob-
al economic turbulence and the
downturn in the American
economy in particular.

Yesterday, Mr Sawyer was .

optimistic that in the long-term
the market will provide: addi-
tional airlift to compensate for
VPJ’s decline.

“It usually does, and I think
that will happen in this case as
well,” he said. :

Meanwhile, on its web site,

When you’ve loved someone
deeply they are never lost to you.

PRECIOUS MEMORIES OF

OCTAVIAS BASTIAN (UNCLE)

Sunset: 1% July, 2001
Will Live On In Our Hearts Forever...

Daddy it's been 7 years but it feel’s like just yesterday

you were here with us. You are 80 deeply missed by

all of us who were left behind to carry on, even more

by the additions to the family whom we tell old time

stories of you their grandfather on a daily basis. You
will forever be with us all.

Your loving earthly strong Lower wife Barbara, devoted
children and grandchildren, in-laws, brothers, sisters,
nicces and nephews.

You are missed but your memories
shall live on for many generations.



the airline said that it. intends
to “reorganise and resume
operations as soon as possible.”

It.added: “The company sin-
cerely apologises to all cus-
tomers affected, but the finan-
cial burdens put upon us have

_ exceeded our ability to continue

operations as usual.”

In June, the airline said that
the past year has been “the
most challenging year in the his-
tory of Vintage’s operations.”

Problems included increased
government regulation and ris-
ing costs that required fare
increases, according to a state-
ment.

Last month’s launch of a new
50-seater service from DBIA to
Marsh’ Harbour and Treasure
Cay, with a stop in between in
Fort Lauderdale, failed to
secure the business’s foothold
in the industry.

The company said on its web
site that its “current plan is to
issue vouchers for all unflown
reservations,” to would-be pas-
sengers.

“We completely understand
that this may be no consolation
to you at this current time.
However, until we are able to
restructure, this is the best solu-
tion to record what the compa-
ny owes you,” VPJ said.

It is suggested that customers
“left in a lurch” by VPJ’s clo-
sure try airlines such as
Bahamasair, Bimini Island Air,
Yellow. Air, Baer Ajr,
Continental Gulf Stream or
Twin Air.



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

New Labyrinth at Garden of the Groves
now part of one-hour tour schedule

‘A NIRVANA FOR REFLECTION’







TATU ACM ROOM MACS NR RNC RSL cect CUO |

GRAND Bahama - The
new Labyrinth at Garden of
the Groves can now be seen as
part of the garden’s one-hour
tour schedule, it was
announced yesterday.

The garden will officially
open to the public on Octo-
ber 1 and the Labyrinth will
then be available for use any
time during park hours.

Facilitated Labyrinth walks
will be available in Septem-
ber for those persons needing
guidance.

In the meantime, the guided
tours are held every weekday
at 10am or 2pm.

A spokesperson for the gar-
den said: “A Labyrinth is a
sacred healing tool; a place of
beauty where you can recon-
nect with your Creator, Moth-
er Earth and your own soul. It
is a place to calm, centre and
rebalance vour body and mind

and receive guidance and ,

blessings of love and peace.
“A Labyrinth can be
walked, skipped or even
danced. It provides a quiet,
holy place — a nirvana - for

reflection, meditation, suppli- :

cation and celebration.”
The ~ Chartres-style
Labyrinth is an important fea-
ture of the newly restored
Garden of the Groves.
“The land supporting the

Labyrinth had been awaiting

its arrival; the exact piece of
ground, perfect in dimension
and location near the little
Church, presented itself to
us,” the
explained. ©
“Now, this week, with the
great help of Gaby and her
team from Lucaya Nursery,
and the ongoing support of

Erika Gates and Michelle >
Hansom and their wonderful :

team, we are starting the land-

Scaping and beautifying of our

spokesperson’

Labyrinth Garden in which,
with the help of Blue Water
Pools and Dr Kevin Bethel,
we are creating a lily pond for
reflection. We will be provid-
ing natural shade and seating
for people wishing to contem-
plate and journal in this sacred
garden space which will be
entered through a beautiful
arbour.”

Much of the work and some
materials were donated to the
project, including the actual
piece of land in the Garden
of the Groves.

The Labyrinth team say
there are still, however, many
bills to meet and funding
needed to complete the “his-
torical community project”.

Everyone gifting time, tal-
ent, materials and funding will
be known as an ‘Illuminator’,
and will have their name
carved in stone in the
Labyrinth.

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAG







The RM Bailey Senior High School
class of 1988 is celebrating its 20th
anniversary this year, and has planned
a series of events which run right up to

the end of the year.

The first fundraiser was a grill-out
held on July 5, during which former
classmates got a‘chance to raise funds
for the school, and at the same time
their fellowship.

There also have been Several “meet
and greet” events, and a number more
are scheduled for the coming months.

The next major event is a boat cruise
planned for September 20. followed
by a walkathon on September 27.
There will be a church service the nex!
day.

A grand banquet is to be held on
October 4 at the Atlantis Resort.

All graduates of 1988 were asked to

support these events “and be a part of

the fun and fellowship.”
Meetings of the graduating class arc
held every Thursday at 7pm al the

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008



F JULY 23, 2008

WEDNESDAY EVENING
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THE TRIBUNE

Movie Gift Certificates}
| make great gi ao

Let Charlie the

: > Bahamian Puppet and

his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the

McHappy Hour at McDonald's in

Malborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
| month of July2008.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

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i'm lovin’ it



THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY,

PAG E- 11





JAE YS 220354

INSIDE ¢ International sports n¢

2008



Renaldo’s
Ramblings

See page 13



Fine
tuning
for i
Olympics

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Cu Rvs
“Bay” Brown
is confident
that with a lit-
tle bit of fine |
tuning when |
he 4 returns
from Europe,
he will be
ready for the
xX LX



Paes turn up the heat in Sweden

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

uarter-miler Chris “Bay”
Brown and sprinter Chan-
dra Sturrup turned in the
best performances com-
pared to other Bahamians
competin night in the DN Galan ath-
letics event in Stockholm, Sweden.
Brown, in another showdown with Amer-
ican Olympic and world champion Jeremy
Wariner, placed second in the men’s 400m
in a time of 44.53. Wariner won in 44.29.
Sturrup, the veteran sprinter who is near-
ing the end of her career, had a third place
finish overall in the women’s 100m. She
ran 11.15 for third place in race one.’
And in the 400m, NCAA champion

| Andretti Bain opened his post-Oral Roberts

University campaign on the international

scene with a fourth place finish in race two

in 46.12. Bain was 11th overall.
Americans Lauryn Williams and Mar-

shevet Hooker took the top two spots in
11.10 and 11.13 respectively.

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, competing
in race two, was second in 11.15 behind
American Bianca Knight, who won in 11.15.

On the men’s side, World Champi-

onships’ silver medalist Derrick Atkins did-
n’t fear so well in the showdown with the
Jamaican 1-2 punch of world record holder
Usain Bolt and former world record holder
Asafa Powell.
. Atlkins ran 10.20 for fifth and eighth
overall as Powell sped to victory in 9.88 to
avenge his defeat to Bolt at the Jamaican
Olympic trials in June. Bolt had to settle for
second in 9.89. ;

Jamaica completed a sweep of the top
four spots with Nesta Carter taking third in
9.98 and Michael Frater fourth in 10.04.

On the field, World champion Donald
Thomas and Leevan “Superman” Sands

Olympiad next

month in Beijing, China.

_ Brown, one of six Bahami-
ans in action, is coming off a
second place finish in the men’s
400m at the DN Galan in
Stockholm as he' clocked 44.84
seconds behind American
defending Olympic champion
Jeremy Wariner, who won in
44.29.

Also in the men’s 400m was
NCAA champion Andretti
Bain, who is also heading to
Beijing. In his first internation-
al meet since completing his eli-
gibility at Oral Roberts Uni-
versity, Bain finished fourth in
race two in a time of 46.12 for~
11th overall. Sean Wroe won
the race in 45.20.

“Tt was pretty good. First and
foremost, I just want to give the
Lord praise and credit for it,”
said Brown during an interview
with The Tribune yesterday.

“T went in there and I’ve
been racing these fellows all
season. But this was my last
race before I go home, so I told
them to run the race for me. I
just executed all of my phrases
in the race and just gave it to
him.”

Since winning the Scotiabank
Olympic trials in June, Brown
has competed in five races in
Europe against international
athletes, led by Wariner.

While he has not been able to
pull off the upset, Brown said
he’s right where he wants to be
going into Beijing.

“I feel pretty good and I feel
pretty. confident,” he said.
“Missing last season and rac-
ing against these guys, until the
World Championships and not
racing them at all in 2006, I felt
confident.

“I’m under a new coach now '
and I’ve been learning the tech-
nique of the race, so with me
‘racing these guys at least three

ymore times at the Olympics, I
feel that my chance will come. I
just have to be patient, execute
and focus on my race.”

Brown, who is hoping to be
one of the medalists in the
400m in Beijing, said the race
was what he had expected.

“T thought the time would
have been a little faster because
I gave it my all,” he pointed
out. “I just felt that the time
would have been a little faster
when I finished.

“But I feel confident and
pretty good about the time. I
just have to go home and get ~-
stronger and work on the things
that I need to do to get ready
for Beijing.”

Bain was unavailable for
comment up to press time last
night.

.,, viken

ATKINS f

ivy

JAMAICA’S Asafa Powell (center), wins the
men’s 100m ahead of Usain Bolt (right) also
of Jamaica, and Derrick Atkins of the
Bahamas, who placed fifth, at the DN Galan
athletics event at Stockholm Olympic Stadium
yesterday...

See more photos on page 13

JEREMY WARINER of the
United States reacts after
winning the men’s 400m
at the DN Galan athletics
event...



encountered some problems getting into
Stockholm and they didn’t recuperate in

time for their showdown with their Swedish

counterparts.
In the high jump, Thomas could jump no

‘better than 7-2 1/2 for eighth place. For-

mer world champion and defending
Olympic champion Stefan Holm took
advantage of his home turf to win with 7-6
1/2.

Holm’s teammate Linus Thornblad was
second with 7-5 1/4, while Kabelo Kgosie-
mang was third with 7-4 1/4.

And in the triple jump, Sands’ leap of
55-0 3/4 had him placed last in a field of
six competitors. Former world champion
Christian Olsson from Sweden, who made
his return to the track after a brief hiatus,
was third with 55-9 1/4.

Romanian Marian Oprea won the event
with his leap of 56-7 1/4.

Atkins places fifth at DN Galan




Photos: Jonas Ekstromer/AP

Flight delays take toll on Sands, Thomas

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

LEEVAN “Superman” Sands and
Donald Thomas experienced their share
of problems getting into Stockholm,
Sweden, for the DN Galan meet yes-
terday.

As a result of their encounters, neither
competed as well as they anticipated in
their rematches with Sweden’s Stefan
Holm and Christian Olsson respective-
ly in the triple and high jumps.

In an exclusive interview with The

Tribune from the hotel room that they
shared, Sands said they arrived in Swe-
den on Monday after their flight from
Atlanta, Georgia, was delayed.

“We started flying from Atlanta on
Saturday, but the flight was delayed and
we missed our connecting flight to Swe-
den,” Sands said. “The next flight was
Sunday night, so we were walking
around the airport all day and that took
a toll on us. We got into Sweden without
any bags.”

Sands said it was an experience that
they won’t forget. He said the delay def-
initely took its toll, although he didn’t

want to use it as an excuse for his per-
formance.

In the triple jump, Sands had to settle
for last place in a field of six competitors
with a leap of 55-feet, 3/4-inches.

Olsson, the Olympic and former world
champion who competed in his first
meet of the year, was third with 55-9
1/4.

Winning the event was Romania’s
Marian Opera with a mark of 56-7 1/4,
while Dmitrij Valukevic was second with
55-9 3/4.

In the high jump, Thomas and three
other competitors cleared 7-2 1/4, but

he had to settle for eighth out of a field
of nine competitors.

Holm, whom Thomas defeated last
year when he won the world title, cap-
tured first place with his leap of 76-6
1/2 to lead a Sweden sweep with team-
mate Linus Thornblad second with 7-5
1/4. Thomas was unavailable for com-
ment up to press time last night.

But Sands noted that they will both
travel to Monaco to compete in their
next meet this weekend. And he said
they are looking forward to improving
on their performances as they prepare
for the final stretch until Beijing.

. to be

Miller to
run for
president
of BOA

Association
to go to polls
Thursday night

& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CLAIMING
the
“peacemaker,”
Wellington
Miller, presi-
dent of the
Amateur Box-
ing Associa-
tion of the
Bahamas, has
announced —
on the eve of
the recalled Bahamas Olympic
Association — that he will be
running for the post of presi-
dent.

The BOA, which has been
embattled over its elections
process since November ‘07, is
set to.go to the polls Thursday
night at Nassau Yacht Club to
elect a slate of officers to
replace the executives voted
into office in May this year.

Miller, who served in the new
executive board as one of the
vice presidents headed by Rev
Enoch Backford, said the BOA
is in dire need of new leader-
ship and he feels that he has the

Miller



capability of getting the job

done.

“The opportunity has come.
You don’t pass up opportuni-
ties,” Miller said. “The federa-
tions called on me to go forth
and run for president and I
accept it. I mean if someone
nominates you, sometimes you
refuse it. But I think the time
has come to do it. So if they
nominate me, I will accept.”

Nominations for all of the
positions will be accepted from
the floor when the elections are
recalled.

Going into the elections,
Miller said he has teamed up
with the majority of the affiliat-
ed federation executives and
they have put together a slate of
officers to contest against Back-
ford’s slate.

Included on Miller’s slate are
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ president
Mike Sands, Bahamas Football
Association’s president Anton
Sealy and Bahamas Swimming
Federation’s president Alger-
non Cargill as vice presidents.

Additionally, Rommel “Fish”
Knowles, the president of the
Bahamas Softball Federation,
is vying for the post of secre-
tary general with former
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion’s executive Larry Wilson
as treasurer.

Should he be elected, Miller
will be following in the foot-
steps of. his long-time mentor,
Sir Arlington Butler, the imme-
diate past president, who had
declined to seek another term in
office after serving for more
than three decades.

Buuer, however, agitated that
the recent election process was
not in compliance with the
Olympic charter as he limited
the involvement of the federa-
tions.

“Sir Arlington has been there
for a long time and he has his
style of management and I have
mine,” said Miller of the con-
trast between the two. “I’m not
going to try and walk in his foot-
steps.

“I consider myself to be the
peacemaker. I’m the one to
bring it together. I will bring it
to conclusion.”

If elected, Miller said he will
immediately meet with his exec-
utives and map out a plan of
direction that they intend to fol-
low in pushing the association

SEE page 13





REL

a)

PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Olympic Basketball



Americans say big deal
to questions about size

@ By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketbail Writer

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The -
United States says being a lit-
tle small is really no big deal.
Especially since Dwight
Howard is feeling like Super-
man again.

The Americans opened
training camp Monday with
their 12-man roster that fea-
tures only one true center, out
to prove that in this case, size
doesn’t matter.

“Tt’s not a concern really.
We all play basketball and
that’s what it’s about,” said
Chris Bosh, a power forward
for the Toronto Raptors who ,
could end up as a backup cen-
ter in the Olympics.

“If you look at other teams
that play in other countries, I
think we have a good post
player for their post players.
Their 5s move out a lot, they
shoot the ball a little bit. I
mean it really goes hand in
hand with everything. We’re
talented enough to make that
small adjustment.”

It could mean multiple
adjustments. Besides shifting
Bosh and Utah’s Carlos Booz-
er to the center spot, LeBron
James will also change from
his normal NBA position, tak-
ing the power forward spot .
instead of his usual small for-
ward one.

At least the Americans have
Howard back where they want
him.

The team’s lone center is
recovered from a stress frac-
ture to the sternum that side-
lined him for practice last
month, and he participated in
the opening of a four-day |
training camp on Monday.
Howard seemed a bit winded
after his first 5-on-5 workout
since the NBA playoffs, when
the Orlando Magic star got
hurt against the Detroit Pis-

tons.’
| Good

“T feel real good out there,.’
Howard said after the closed’
workout at Valley High
School. “I didn’t have any
problems. I’m looking to get
in better shape. I’m just ready
to go.

“It feels good just to be able
to play again and knowing
that it could have been a lot
worse,” said Howard, who
donned a Superman cape to
win the NBA All-Star slam-
dunk contest.

Howard, who has played in
25 games for the Americans,
downplayed concerns about
the team’s depth in the front
court. “We really don’t need a
lot of big men,” Howard said.
“We’ve got some of the great-
est players in the world on our
team. We know what we’ve
got to do to control the paint.”

The Americans expected to
have additional big man help
in camp, but learned over the
weekend that 7-foot-1 Tyson
Chandler has an inflamed big
toe and will not be available as
an alternate. He had been
invited to train with the team
to keep him prepared in case
there was an injury that forced
another player off the roster.

“Dwight looked really
good,” coach Mike Krzyzews-
ki said. “I asked him after-
wards if he experienced any
pain. He said no, no hesita-
tion. Obviously, his wind, even
though he’s been running, it’s
different when you're playing
defense like that.”

Selected

When they selected the
team, the Americans favoured
shooting and athleticism over
size. Krzyzewski said he’s not
concerned about being short
of big men.

“We feel comfortable with
Boozer, Bosh (and Howard),”
Krzyzewski said.

Krzyzewski said he’s pre-
pared to move the 6-foot-8
James to power forward at
times. James will start at small
forward, but Krzyzewski
wants to take advantage of his
250-pound frame and his abili-
ty to guard bigger players.

“When we selected this
team — LeBron is a very
unique player,” Krzyzewski
said. “You don’t want to
pigeon-hole him and say he’s
the three. That would be not
making effective use of him.”

When he’s starring for the
Cleveland Cavaliers, James
spends much of his time on
the perimeter. But he said he
can adjust, and he expects his
teammates to do the same.

~ “We may get to the point
where we guard bigger guys
that we don’t usually guard
because we play on the
perimeter a lot,” James said.
“But as far as us going out and
competing, it shouldn’t change
our role.”

Howard said his injury was
extremely painful, although he
managed to play two games in
the playoffs afterward.

“Tt felt like a heart attack,”
Howard said. “I wanted to
win. I tried not to think about
it as much as I could. It was
bothering me a lot. There was
a lot of days and practices and
games where I couldn’t even
lift my arm up. But I just tried
to push through it.”

Howard reported no prob-
lems after a physical full-court
workout against a select team
of young NBA players.

“That’s what we like to see,
guys coming out and being:
very physical,” Howard said.
“When we play in the
Olympics, everybody’s going
to be very physical against us.”



\

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5



Tour de France

Schleck holds lead after 16th stage

lm By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press Writer

JAUSIERS, France (AP) —
Frank Schleck of Luxembourg
kept the yellow jersey in the
Tour de France on Tuesday,
with riders pushing themselves
through the Alps as cycling’s
showcase race left Italy and
returned to France.

French rider Cyril Dessel
won the 16th stage for his first
stage victory in this race. He led
a breakaway group of four rid-
ers to a downhill finish, com-
pleting the 98-mile trip from
Cuneo, Italy.

“It makes me incredibly hap-
py,” said Dessel, who is no
threat to Schleck at more than
32 minutes behind. “The tactic
was to try to join a breakaway.”

Schleck finished 1 minute, 28
seconds after Dessel, but did-
n’t lose any time to his main
title rivals. Bernhard Kohl of
Austria is second overall, seven
seconds behind, and Cadel
Evans of Australia is third, eight
seconds back. Carlos Sastre, a
CSC teammate of Schleck, is
fourth, 49 seconds behind.

“Tt was hard today. I wasn’t

BERNHARD KOHL (far left) of Austria, second overall and wearing the best climber’s dotted jersey, Frank Schleck (centre) of Luxemburg, wearing
the overall leader’s yellow jersey, and Carlos Sastre of Spain, climb Bonette-Restefond pass during the 16th stage of the Tour de France cycling race
between Cuneo, northern Italy, and Jausiers, French Alps, yesterday...

able to attack,” Schleck said. “I
think everybody was pushing
the limit.”



two mostly flat rides followed
by Saturday’s crucial time trial.
The race ends Sunday in Paris.

Riders face a third ride in the
Alps on Wednesday — the
hardest stage this year — before



Bas Czerwinski/AP

Schleck and Evans made time
on another pre-race favourite,
Denis Menchov of Russia. He

slipped to fifth place, 1:13 back,
after coming into the stage 38
seconds behind, in fourth place.

US rider Christian Vande
Velde lost even more ground,
falling to sixth place, 3:15
behind. He started the ride in
fifth place, 39 seconds behind
Schleck.

The stage took riders along
two climbs beyond classifica-
tion: the 13-mile Lombarde pass
and the 16-mile La Bonette-
Restefond pass.

South Africa’s John-Lee
Augustyn was the first over the
peak of La Bonette-Restefond,
but he skidded off the road on a
turn onto a rock-strewn moun-
tainside. A spectator had to
help him up to the road before
he rejoined the race.

Augustyn’s Barloworld team
can’t afford to lose him: Injuries
and a doping case have reduced
the squad to the minimum of
five riders. He finished 5:27
behind Dessel.

The 17th stage Wednesday is
a 131-mile ride featuring the
Galibier and Croix de Fer pass-
es and a finish up the L’Alpe
d’Huez — all three climbs are
beyond classification.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

‘Do the right thing
Mr Favre...because
you Owe us one’

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

DEAR Mr Favre,

You owe us one.

You see as a Dolphins fan,
there are few ideals we hold
onto to fill the void of a Super-
bowl deficiency over the past
36 years. ‘

We argue that the ‘72 team
was the best ever. We argue
that the ‘85 team would have
beaten the Bears again if they
had reached the Superbowl in a
rematch of the week 15 Dol-
phin upset, and we argue that
Dan Marino’s phenomenal
numbers, surrounded by a less
than stellar supporting cast,
made him the greatest quarter-
back of all time.

For all of the physical attrib-
utes that made Marino best
Moftana, Elway, Unitas, Man-
ning and Brady on the field,
what he didn’t have was that
one season where he led his
team to a Super Bowl win.

: What he had was sole pos-
session or a share of 26 passing

_records at the time:of his retire-
ment.

This is the case we make for
Dan Marino being the best
ever, and if Bush 43:and Slim
Charles have taught me any-
thing, it’s that even if it’s a
lie...then we fight on that lie.

Extending your career, the
past few seasons, you’ve
chopped Marino’s record num-
ber down to 19.

Will you be content with
15...10...5?

Should each and every one

of Daniel Constantine Marino’s



INCOM ACLU LELERY



IN THIS January 20, 2008 file photo, Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett
Favre throws a pass in the first half of the NFC Championship football game
against the New York Giants in Green Bay, Wis. Favre demanded his

release from the Packers last week..: |

historic feats be completely
erased from the record books
leaving us with nothing left to
hold onto? We’re hanging by a
thread as it is.

Therefore, be inspired by
Spike Lee and Do the Right
Thing.

Apollo Creed’s trainer did

‘

(AP Photo: David Duprey)

the right thing backing Rocky
when he was about to face Ivan
Drago. Batman did the right
thing rescuing Harvey Dent
when he gave himself up claim-
ing to be the Dark Knight and
The Fellowship of the Ring did
the right thing when they decid-
ed to help Frodo carry the One

Ring to Mordor.

Follow suit good sir.

The entire comeback fiasco
has been a terrible public rela-
tions saga for both you and the
Packers organisation.

Fact is, you will never stand
for being a backup to Aaron
Rodgers.

Fact is, they will never trade
you within the division, so rule
out the Bears, Vikings, and
Lions.

A trade within the conference
is more probable but remains
unlikely and the only teams
with voids at quarterback. and
would gamble. on a short term
Favre solution are the 49ers,
Buccaneers, or Panthers — less
than desirable destinations.

Jump to the AFC and go with
the great storyline.

What would be a greater
made-for-TV movie than to fin-
ish your career resurrecting the
franchise that plummeted to a
record setting low after being
discarded by the Packers?

Request a trade to Miami.

The right thing would be to
pick up the mantle from the
man you continuously usurp in
the record books and rescue the
franchise from the quarterback
abyss it has been engrossed in
since 1999.

At least this way, if we have
to hear Chris Berman say week
after week on NFL Primetime

. “And with this pass, Brett Favre

surpasses Dan Marino on the
(insert random record here)
list,” please allow it to be done
in a Dolphin uniform.

Do the right thing Mr
Favre...because you owe us one.














WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 13

LISBON, Portugal (AP)
— American soccer star
Freddy Adu will move from
Portugal’s Benfica to play
with Monaco next season in
the French league.

Benfica said late Monday
that the 19-year-old mid-
fielder will join Monaco on
a season-long loan, and the
French club then will have
the option of signing him to
a permanent contract.
Adu joined Benfica in

Olympic Soccer

IN THIS March 20, 2008 file photo, United States’ Freddy Adu
(11) works against Canada during the second half of CONCACAF
Olympic qualifying semifinal soccer match in Nashville, Tenn.
Freddy Adu, Jozy Altidore and Michael Bradley will lead the US
men’s soccer team into the Beijing Olympics. Coach Peter
Nowak announced the 18-man roster last Thursday.

Freddy Adu heads to
Monaco next season



(AP Photo: Bill Waugh)

a

July last year but started
oniy two matches, scoring -
five goals in 21 appearances
as the team finished fifth in
the Portuguese league and
had three different coach-
es in an unsettled season.

He will play with the US
team at the Beijing
Olympics next month and
is then expected to join
Monaco, which finished
12th in the French league
last season.





Miller to
run for

president
of BOA

FROM page 11

forward.

With the Olympic Games
just about three weeks away,
Miller said it might be a little
too late to change the man-
agement team that will rep-
resent the Bahamas in Bei-
jing, China.

But he admitted that if
changes can be made, he and
his executives will make sure
that they are done.



DN Galan Highlights



PORTUGUESE Naide Gomes is seen prior to winning the women’s

long jump...





co Mi



O-ODOS



AP Photos

YELENA ISINBAYEVA of Russia wins the women’s pole vault...

“OROZ

NORDIC SPORT.C








LOLO JONES of the US is seen prior to winning the women’s 110m hurdles...



PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS

,

BEIJING OLYMPICS 2008



Taureano Johnson































Age: 24 years.
Birthday: February 12th.

Height: 5-feet, 10-inches.

Weight: 152 pounds.

High School: C.V. Bethel Secondary High School. .

College: Bahamas Baptist Community College and
Cuba Espa.

Training School: The Geraldo Codova Cardin Boxing
Academy Pan-American Village Havana, Cuba.

Major: History & Sports Medicine.

Sport events: Amateur Boxing.

Personal Best Performance: Commonwealth Cham-
pionship’s silver medal in 2003 in Kula Lumpa,

Malaysia.




Favourite colour: Gray/Black.

‘Favourite Food: Mom's Peas Soup & Dumpling.
Favourite song: ‘/ Will Get There’ by Boyz to Men
Favourite Movie: Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe.

Hobbies: Reading documentaries and biographies,
fishing and camping and watching sports via T.V or on
the bleachers. nde"

Interest: World peace; to reach as many young people
to encourage and introduce them to do some type of
sporting discipline.

Idols Father, Erwin Johnson, a man of impeccable
strength and will power.

Daughter: Tatiana Johnson, nine months old.
Parents: Erwin & Ikenna Johnson

Status: Amateur Boxer.

Siblings: Leticia Burrows, Chiszelle Johnson, Erkell,
Bianca & Kayla Johnson, De'Angelo Minus and Brenden
Johnson - five sisters and two brothers.








)
Bxiying 2008

RLY

official restaurant

AAA AAA,








' THE TRIBUNE



Zimbabwe president —
is under pressure
to share power

B JOHANNESBURG,
South Africa

EUROPE turned up pres-
sure on Zimbabwe’s president
to share power with the oppo-
sition, toughening sanctions
Tuesday against Robert
Mugabe just as his ruling party

was to begin talks with its chief

rival mediated by South Africa,
according to Associated Press.

Mugabe and opposition
leader Morgan Tsvangirai met
face-to-face Monday for the
first time in 10 years and
agreed to formal talks about
power sharing after three
months of state-sponsored elec-
toral violence. The negotiations
were expected to start either
late Tuesday or Wednesday at
an undisclosed location around
the South African capital
Johannesburg.

Analysts said growing inter-
national pressure coupled with
Zimbabwe’s economic melt-
down left Mugabe little choice
but to sign the agreement with
the opposition. The central
bank issued a 100 billion-dollar
note this week in the face of
the world’s worst inflation —
which officials estimate at 2.2
million percent annually but
independent finance houses say
is closef*to 12.5 million percent.

‘When you start to hit these
kinds of figures, you know the
wheels have come off in a big
way,” said Richard Cornwell,
researcher at the Pretoria-
based Institute for Security
Studies in South Africa.

Zimbabwe’s latest political
crisis began in March with a
presidential election: where
Tsvangirai garnered the most
votes — but not enough to win
outright.

Tsvangirai pulled out of the
June 27 runoff against Mugabe,
citing escalating state-spon-

sored violence against his sup- *:

porters. His party says more
than 120 of its activists have
been killed by Mugabe’s police,
soldiers and party militants
since the March vote. Thou-
sands have been injured and
tens of thousands have had
their homes torched or been
forced to leave areas where
opposition legislators were
elected.

Monitors

_ African election monitors
Said the June runoff was not
free and fair and several
African leaders broke ranks to
declare they did not recognize
him as president of Zimbab-
we.

“It is impossible to accept
the second round of elections
in Zimbabwe, with children
being tortured, with barbarous
acts being committed, with vio-
lation of basic democratic
tules,” French Foreign Minister
Bernard Kouchner. told
reporters” .lesday after the EU
decided to expand satictions
against Mugabe.

The EU agreed to éxpand
their sanctions blacklist of peo-

ple linked to Mugabe’s gov- ° :

ernment to 172 people, adding
37 individuals and four com-

panies believed to financially :

support Mugabe and his
ZANU-PF party. The list
alryady had 131 people, includ-
ing Mugabe and members of
his Cabinet, under measures
passed in 2002.

British Foreign Secretary
David Miliband said EU
nations were expecting more
proof that Mugabe was willing
to sign on to a transitional gov-
ernment with the opposition.

“It requires an end to the
violence, it requires an end to
the ban on humanitarian
NGO’s getting around Zim-
babwe. Those are the first steps
toward a resolution of the Zim-
babwean crisis,” Miliband told
reporters.

Beyond the political crisis,
Zimbabwe’s economy is in
ruins. Mugabe’s seizures of
white-owned commercial farms
have destroyed the former
food-exporting nation. One
third of the population has fled

the country, another third is !

dependent on food aid and
some 80 percent are unem-
ployed. There are chronic
shortages of fuel, medicine and
food with daily cuts in power
and water service.

Zimbabwe’s myriad prob-
lems are spilling over its bor-
ders, with millions of econom-
ic and political refugees flee-
ing to neighbors.

Cornwell said that delaying
negotiations with the opposi-
tion would prevent any inter-
national assistance. Without
plans to rescue the economy
and facing a situation where he
soon might be unable to pay
soldiers, Mugabe “had to try

and work out a way forward,”.

Cornwell said.





WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 15

‘Business professionals
‘Mix N Mingle’ at event

GREAT people, food, drinks
and music along with lots of prizes
and surprises are some of the trade-
marks of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s “Mix N Mingle” net-

working receptions which..contin-**

ue to see a huge turn out of mem-
bers of the business community.

For most people though, the
event is an opportunity to meet
and exchange cards with leading
business professionals from vari-
ous industries in a safe and fun-
filled environment.

An estimated 500 businessper-
sons along with College of the
Bahamas alumi filled the Balmoral
Ballroom at Sandals for the cham-
ber’s and Sandal’s Resort and Spa
“Sizzling Hot Mix N Mingle” —
which kicked off the non-profit
organisation’s ‘Chamber Week’
activities last month.

Leading the charge was the
chamber’s president Dionisio
D’Aguilar and executive director
Philip Simon along with members
of the chamber’s executive team.

Mr D’Aguilar said: “The
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
is pleased to hold its Mix N Mingle
networking receptions, which con-
tinue to provide a unique oppor-
tunity for leading-business profes-
sionals to meet one-on-one, and

: engage in meaningful discussions

and exchange of ideas in a won-
derful laid-back environment.”

Mr Simon pointed out that the
receptions have become the pre-
mier business-networking event in
the country.

“There is nowhere else where
one can bring together this amount
of professionals that come with the
expressed purpose of mixing and
mingling, and that’s an important
part of business; developing rela-
tionships, and to be able to do it in
an informal environment such as
this is a tremendous opportunity,”
he said.

The chamber executives

thanked their sponsors, particu- -

larly Sandals, Burns House and

. Diamonds International along with

members of College of the
Bahamas Alumni Association.
Andre Newbold, director of
sales for Sandals Resort and Spa,
said the resort is extremely pleased
to sponsor.the chamber’s Mix N
Mingle networking receptions.
“We have been a partner now with

“the chamber going on five plus

years, and that’s a partnership that

we will like to continue throughout

the remaining years, simply
because of the exposure that we
receive*from the local corporate
community.”

The event is also an opportunity
for participants to walk away with
top prizes. Such was the case for
Etienne Christen of Tommy Hil-
figer, who was presented with the
first door prize, which included a
sapphire diamond necklace donat-
ed by Diamonds International.

‘ Natasha Russell of Scotia Bank
won the College of the Bahamas
alumni first door prize, which
included a BlackBerry donated by
the Bahamas Telecommunications
Company.

Cecilia Cox won a heart shaped
sapphire diamond necklace donat-
ed by Diamonds International.

- Other winners also walked away
with diamond necklaces, Black-
berries as well as round trip tickets
to any Family Island serviced by
Bahamas Ferries and a one-year
membership to Red Lane Spa.

“Tt was very interesting, innova-
tive, and I got an opportunity to
meet a lot of new people...and dis-
cuss new ideas,” said aspiring
lawyer Taneka Russell, a student at
the University of the West Indies.









GERSHAN MAJOR, CEO of Mailboxes Etc and second vice president of the chamber i is all smiles as he is pictured networking with a group

of business professionals —
Hi

ABOVE: A Diamonds International representative speaking to a
guest

LEFT: Chamber President Dionisio D’Aguilar, second from right, is
pictured with, from left to right: Eva Pyfrom and Nicky Saddleton of
Karma Design and Roslyn Brown of EFG



sSaRES 5

Kermit |

MONDAY — SATURDAY
10 A.M. — 2 P.M.



5, \ E

STAR FM’S Buena Wright and Senator Tanya Wright, immediate past president of the Bahamas Cham- Y 301 9 y
ber of Commerce, are pictured with Carla Lynch, marketing manager at Sandals Resort, and Antoinette eehead “6
eleprating years o

Butler of the chamber









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THE



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

downtown Nassau property
owner has proposed two
options for allowing com-
mercial shipping to remain
on Bay Street and simulta-
“an attractive tourist and
yesterday telling
Tribune Business that the planned move
to Arawak Cay would be more costly and
involved complex engineering considera-

neously create
residential environment”,

tions.

. John Bethell, a principal at Bethell
Mstates, said the Living Waterfront - Busi-
ness Improvement District plan his com-
had commissioned, and which had
been presented to both the Christie and
Ingraham administrations, had presented
two options for consolidating commercial
shipping within Nassau Harbour in the

pany

short-term.

The two options presented iaveived using
the fill created by the dredging of Nassau
Harbour to accommodate the larger Liberty
Class cruise ships. The first was to create an
expanded ‘bulkhead’ on the existing har-

SEE page 2B

TRIBUNE





sagen ener:

WEDNESDAY,

semeeeesee

JULY 23,



2008

‘SECTION B ¢ Mi amoeenetsunsunmnts. a

Rival Bethell port ee
‘cheaper’ than Arawak Cay



Landowner proposes two options for keeping

port facilities in Nassau Harbour short-term



THE TWO commercial shipping port. options proposed by Bethell Estates and their designers, :

Design Workshop, in the Living Waterfront - Business Improvement District plan submitted to the

Government...

ROYAL @ FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
_ (242) 351-3010



Bank liquidity

‘pretty strong’
at near $340m

Bi By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Business Editor

COMMERCIAL banking
system liquidity “is pretty
strong” at around $340 mil-
lion, a senior bank executive
told Tribune Business yester-
day, although this is unlikely
to reduce interest margin
pressures before year-end
due to locked-in deposit rates.

Paul McWeeney, Bank of
the Bahamas International’s
managing director, said
excess liquidity - the surplus
assets within the Bahamian
commercial banking system
available for onward lending
purposes - was running $80
million ahead of 2007 year-



to-date, with the industry

- using the slow down in lend-
ing and credit growth to con-
solidate.

“So far, it’s looking pretty
good. Liquidity is pretty
strong, with excess mney
around $340 million,”

Ex-minister fears Planning gives developers

EPA’s impact on

tax exchange and

pre-clearance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER government
minister has expressed concern
that the European Union (EU)
might use the Most Favoured
Nation (MEN) status it is likely

to be granted under the Eco- -

nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) as a way to pressure the
Bahamas into agreeing Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs) with its mem-
ber states.

James Smith, minister of state
for finance under the former
Christie administration and also
an ex-ambassador for trade,
told Tribune Business that while
financial services and the con-
cept’ of ‘tax information
exchange’ had been removed
from the EPA negotiations and

‘agreement, the EU was always

-

likely to raise it as an issue at
some stage.

Currently, the Bahamas has
signed only one TIEA with the
US, a move made easier by the

fact it received economic bene-
fits in return through the con-
vention tax deduction break
that aided tourism: But what
the Bahamas might receive in
return economically from any
EU member state appears less
obvious.

Mr Smith warned that since
the Bahamas had signed a
TIEA with the US, the EU
could argue that as this nation’s
MFN trading partner via the
EPA, it was not being treated as
such when it came to tax infor-
mation exchange.

Therefore, as a result of the
MEN status bestowed on it by
the EPA, the EU would have
weight to its argument that it
and its members should receive
the same benefits as the US.
This would require the
Bahamas to create a ‘level play-
ing field’ on tax information
exchange by signing similar
agreements with European

SEE page 3B

Bahamian companies
are turning to debt
collection agencies

@ By CARA BRENNEN-

BETHEL
Tribune Business

~ Reporter

BAHAMIAN companies are
increasingly turning to debt col-
lection agencies as a means of
ensuring that they receive their
payments as the current eco-
nomic climate leads to more
clients being unable to make
monthly payments:

Gretal Hanna, the general
manager of the Ben-Bo Collec-
tion and Management Co Ltd
spoke with Tribune Business
recently and explained that her
agency has seen an influx of
businesses inquiries,

“We're seeing a lot more per-
sons coming inquiring about our
services as a tool they can use to
collect their funds.”

Although most businesses
factor in a certain percentage
loss of their funds to delinquent
clients, more businesses are try-
ing to decrease the amount that
they actually lose.

“ A lot of times, businesses
feel that they can still hold on
and attempt to collect the funds

\

themselves, but what is hap-
pening is that they do not have
the manpower to aggressively
go after the funds and so what
happens is that the amount
owed just gets higher and high-
er,” said Ms Hanna: “I tell my
clients that the best time to
attempt to collect a debt is very
quickly in the initial stages,
because that is when you are
more likely to get the funds.
However, Ms Hanna also
noted that, because bill collec-

tion agencies are only paid if |

they can collect, the service is
cost effective to companies,
because they can turn the
accounts over and then dedi-
cate the manpower on their
most current accounts and not
have to worry about a loss of
productivity in chasing down
funds.

Ms Hanna also pointed out
that while they are not neces-
sarily seeing a huge increase in
the amounts that people are
being delinquent with, they are
noticing that more people are
running into problems finding
the money to pay their basic
bills.

and stronger sales”

‘better prices and sales’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SUBDIVISION developers

are likely to get “better prices

for their
developments if they are well-
designed and planned, a gov-
ernment minister told Tribune

Business, through an emphasis

on green space and inclusion of

all amenities and utilities.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, said that
among the planned amend-
ments to the Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act were the use
of more detailed designs where
“green space is left intact” and
the height of buildings pre-
defined. If the amount of green
space to be left was not clearly

How do you attract and retain

defined, then a minimum area
of land would be left uncleared.

The proposed amendments
were, also intended “to accom-

“plish the desired traffic amelio-
ration”, Dr Deveaux telling Tri- -

bune Business that the Gov-
ernment’s ultimate goal was to
create “a sense of community”
that used to be present in many
Family Islands.

This, he added, would be
achieved by constructing well-
designed communities and sub-
divisions where persons were
living in close proximity to
parks, schools, stores and
churches.

Both the Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act and the Town
Planning Act are being

reviewed by a Canadian con-

sultant, with Dr Deveaux saying

other areas targeted for reform ©
included ensuring all roads‘had ©:

kerbs and adequate drainage.

He added that there were “a
lot of developments taking
place that accommodate these
principles”, citing the Baker’s
Bay and Schooner Bay projects
in Abaco, plus Serenity, a real
estate project being developed
on land-acquired from New
Providence Development Com-
pany by Martin Solomon and
Kingsley Edgecombe.

On the latter, Dr Deveaux
said: “It’s a relatively big subdi-
vision, but they’re putting in all
the infrastructure, green space

SEE page 2B

But deposit and interest
margin pressures unlikely
to ease until end-2008,
beginning of 2009 due to
savers’ locked-in rates

McWeeney told Tribune
Business. “That’s very good,
very healthy.

“The foreign reserves are
also holding firm, and both
numbers are above the same ,
period last year. What has
assisted the build-up in both
numbers is the slowdown in
credit growth compared to
last year. That has assisted _
the banking system’s funda-
mentals.”

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ report on month-
ly economic developments in

. May oo ee that sur-

SEE oe 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Rival Bethell port proposal
‘cheaper’ than Arawak Cay

FROM page 1B

bourfront, between Victoria

Avenue and Armstrong Street,
with the alternative involving
the creation of an ‘offshore

island’ in the middle of Nassau
harbour to accommodate the

The ‘offshore island’ would
again lie between Victoria
Avenue and Armstrong Streets.

commercial shipping facilities.

Mr Bethell told Tribune Busi-
ness that the two solutions pro-
posed by Bethell Estates and
its designers would have cost
less than $100 million, com-
pared to the $175 cost estimates
placed on the Arawak Cay facil-
ity by the group led by Tropical
Shippin

“As I recall, our designers
said the costs would be in the
region of $60-$75 million,” Mr
Bethell said yesterday.

The proposal, drawn up by
Design Workshop, was first sub-
mitted to the former Christie
government when international
consultants EDAW were
engaged to develop a master-
plan for the city of Nassau’s
redevelopment and move the
commercial shipping facilities
off Bay Street.

Mr Bethell said his proposal
was ranked as the second best,
ahead of the Arawak Cay and
Coral Harbour proposals, but
behind the now-seemingly
abandoned plan for a new com-
mercial shipping port in south-
western New Providence. That
was to have been located
between Commonwealth Brew-
ery and BEC’s Clifton Pier
power station.

Mr Bethell said their report
was ranked second only because
EDAW’s terms of reference
had been to move commercial
shipping facilities from Bay
Street.

Following the change in gov-
ernment, the plan was resub-
mitted to the Ingraham admin-
istration, but “they haven’ t said
anything”,

Apart from the extra cost, Mr
Bethell said another complica-
tion with situating the commer-
cial shipping facilities at Arawak

BRITISH AMERICAN’S
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Annual” Night School

LECTURE SERIES

FROM page 1B

and public utilities before they

sell the first lot. That may not be

possible for every development,
but it illustrates the principle.

“What is evident is the appeal

it has to people wanting to live

in these communities. The ear-

_ ly.indications are that they

[developers] get better: prices

and stronger sales. People are

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Cay was that the proposed site
was relatively unprotected
against ocean swells, which at
times made it difficult to offload
cargoes.

“We still don’t fee] Arawak
Cay is the best solution,” Mr
Bethell told Tribune Business,
arguing that his company’s pro-
posal provided a blueprint for
how the commercial shipping
facilities could be relocated to a
purpose-built site in Nassau
Harbour, yet co-exist with
downtown’s tourist and shop-
ping facilities.

Mr Bethell added that con-
solidating all commercial ship-
ping facilities in one Nassau
Harbour location would ensure
people did “not see a marked
increase in the cost of shipping
and freight coming into Nas-
sau”.

Revenues

In addition, the revenues gen-
erated from dockage and wharf
fees, plus land'rental, could
eventually be used to upgrade
East Bay Street into a ‘Living
Waterfront’.

In a letter to Tribune Busi-

‘ness, Mr Bethell said: .“There

was no request for funding: or
any large incentives [from the
Government]. We had offered,
at our expense, to dredge the
harbour, as some fill was neces-
sary for the redevelopment. The
remainder would be sold to con-
tractors on the island, which
might have saved some of the
hills that have been destroyed
for fill.

“This project was to be

financed by the stakeholders, .

and once it came on line, a por-
tion of it was to be sold to the
Bahamian public so that every-
one would have a chance to par-
ticipate.”

asking that their communities |

give them access to public
spaces, their schools are close,
the amenities and resources are
put in, and that they have the
feel of a village.”

While the Government, its
consultants and the private sec-
tor had “a lot of good ideas”
relating to the proposed reforms

He added: “This plan could
have been built quickly and
incorporated an inland termi-
nal, which we have been trying
to get permission to build for
some years. It would have
moved a substantial amount of
trucking off of Bay Street.

“Using funds generated by
this ‘new port’, we would then
have moved on to the redevel-
opment of East Bay Street.
Instead, government still looks
to Arawak Cay for redevelop-
ment, which will cost a good
deal more than this plan, and
can only be recovered through
higher wharfage and landing
fees in the future.” -

Mr Bethell said he had been
especially interested to note that
the recent planning charette,
held by architect Jackson Burn-
side and other stakeholders to
chart the way forward on down-
town Nassau’s redevelopment,
had proposed “putting islands
in the harbour as a way to use
up the spill from the dredging”

With the $100 million-plus
New. Providence’ Road
Improvement Project about to
commence, Mr _ Bethell
described as “ludicrous” the
idea of the contractor paying to
bring in sand.

With the Nassau Harbour
dredging likely to extract two
to three million cubic feet of
sand, priced at $8-$0 per yard,
from a 72-acre site, Mr Bethell

said his proposal could have

helped cover the estimated $45
million dredging costs.

He pointed out that with both
proposed Nassau Harbour
options, their use as a commer-
cial shipping port would only
be short-term, as they would
both be converted for tourist
and residential use when the
port facilities moved elsewhere
on New Providence.

Planning gives developers < —
“better prices and sales’

to both Acts, Dr Deveaux said:
“How we effect that in legisla-
tion is going to be the challenge.

“We have a lot of looks, a lot
of ideas, and plenty of exam-
ples, but we want to make sure
it’s straightforward so that it
doesn’t compromise develop-
ment, but Tespects Bahamian
traditions.”

The Weekly meeting of
The Rotary Club of West
Nassau will be held on

_ Thursday 24th July at
Graycliff Restaurant beginning
~ at lp.m.

William Wong

This week’s

speaker will be William

Wong, President of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association. His topic will be: The
Challenges and Issues facing The Real
Estate Industry in 2008

This page is kindly donated by:
Pat Strachan Realty Sales

PAT STRACHAN
Really Sales



=r

oat



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 3B



Ministry: Six per cent drop in overall arrivals

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter



THE Ministry of Tourism
revealed that the April year-to-
date figures indicate a six per
cent drop in overall arrivals,
despite a 27 per cent increase in
tourist arrivals from Canada and
a seven per cent increase in
European arrivals.

It attributed the overall
decline to the seven per cent
drop in visitors from the United
States which offset any gains
made in the other markets.

The ministry attributed the
US decline to the fact that the
US dollar was struggling against
the Canadian dollar and the
Euro, the ‘act that oil prices con-
tinue to fluctuate causing high
fuel costs - placing a strain on
the airline companies who trav-
el internationally, a weakening
manufacturing industry, lower
consumer spending and the
housing market crisis.

The upcoming general elec-
tion in the US has also had some
impact, the ministry said.

However, the picture was sub-
stantially different with regards
to visitors from Canada where
there was a 27 per cent increase
in arrivals for the April year to
date.

The ministry attributes this
strong performance to an aggres-
sive marketing campaign from
the new tourism office in Cana-

da and marketing firm Punch
Communications, the strong per-
formance of the Canadian dollar,
more direct airlift between the
two countries and the fact that
there is no housing crisis and’a
diverse manufacturing industry.

According to the latest figures,
the islands which reported an
increase in arrivals included:
Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini,
Cat Cay, Cat Island, Half Moon
Cay, Inagua and San Sal Sal-
vador.

The islands which are down
included: Nassau/Paradise
Island, Grand Bahama, Abaco
and Eleuthera, Exuma and Long
Island.

The ministry also reported
that with regards to cruise
arrivals as a first port of entry
for the April year to date, Aba-
co, (Castaway Cay) Berry
Islands (Great Stirrup Cay &
Little Stirrup Cay/Coco Cay)
and Half Moon Cay were all up,
indicating that the cruise lines
continue to call into their pri-
vate islands.

The islands which were down
as a first port of entry included
Nassau/Paradise Island, Grand
Bahama, Bimini, Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma and
San Salvador.

The statistics for cruise arrivals
as a first of port of entry for the
month of April alone indicated
that Abaco, Berry Islands and
Half Moon Cay were all up
while cruise arrivals to Nas-
sau/P.I., Grand Bahama, Bimini,



EPA, from 1B

nations that wanted it.

“My fear is that Europe, since
we put services on the table,
might use the EPA to demand a
level playing field on tax infor-
mation exchange agreements,”
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“The Europeans are very
slick. They'll wait until you sign
the agreement, and then say
they don’t have that and need
it. ”

Mr Smith also pointed to the
fact that the Bahamas, if it
signed the EPA as part of the
CARIFORUM group, was giv-
ing MEN status to “a third par-
ty” in the shape of the EU,
rather than the US - its main
trading partner from which it

“imports around 85 per.cent of
the goods eqpsumigh in, this
nation.

With the Bahamas unlikely,
in his view, to be able to obtain
a bilateral free trade agreement
with Washington due to the US
preference for signing a single
trade agreement with CARI-
COM to replace the Caribbean
Basin Initiative (CBI), Mr
Smith said he was also con-

cerned about the impact sign--

ing the EPA would have on this
nation’s pre-clearance status.

“I think there’s some things
that are not on the table yet that
I would be worried about,” Mr
Smith said. “Noticeably, some
members of CARICOM and
some Latin American countries
-are asking for pre-clearance
privileges,” Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business.

Currently, only the Bahamas,
Mexico and Canada have such

facilities, which are seen.as crit- ,

ical to this nation’s tourism
product by facilitating the

Eleuthera and Exuma were all
down.

Further, the ministry reported
that visitor arrivals for the month
of April alone revealed that the
Berry Islands, Cat Island, Half

’ Moon Cay, Inagua, and San Sal-

vador were up.

The islands which were down
included Nassau/Paradise Island,
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros,
Bimini, Cat Cay, Eleuthera,
Exuma and Long Island.

The ministry also said that

cruise arrivals to the Bahamas -

overall were down during the
month of April by seven per
cent, saying this was in part due
to the fact that both Nassau/Par-
adise Island and Grand Bahama
suffered declines in cruise
arrivals during the month.

The Out Islands received 14
per cent more cruise passengers

in April 2008 than in April 2007 -
“not .

but this increase was
enough to offset the declines
experienced by Nassau/Paradise
Island and Grand Bahama for
the month.”

The ministry further said that
cruise arrivals were down in Nas-
sau/Paradise Island because
cruise lines such as Carnival

.Cruise lines, Disney Cruises,

Costa Cruises, especially Royal
Caribbean brought in fewer pas-
sengers during the month of
April 2008 than in April 2007
and because Carnival Cruise
lines brought in fewer passen-
gers (as a first port of call) to
Grand Bahama.

speedy return of US visitors. If
others are able to also obtain
pre-clearance facilities, it would
further negate a Bahamian
competitive advantage.

Mr Smith pointed out that
while Mexico and Canada had a
trade agreement with the US
through the North American
Free Trade Agreement (NAF-
TA), the Bahamas had no trade
agreements protecting its pre-
clearance arrangements.

“The Bahamas is not a trad-
ing partner of the US, but it-has
a pre-clearance facility,” Mr
Smith said. “If these other coun-
tries keep pressing for this, but
don’t get it, they could accuse
the US of favouring a third par-
ty.

“That’s why a starting point is
to ensure your US trade rela-
tions. are. not. affected. by
attempts fo formalise trading

. relationships with others.”

CFA Society of The Bahamas

2008/2009 Officers & Directors

President

David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4837, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 2217

Fax: (242) 327 6610

Email:dramirez@pictet.com

Vice-President
Christopher Dorsett, CFA
Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 8668
* Fax: (242) 302 8569
Email: Christopher.a.dorsett(@citigroup.com

Treasurer:

Sonia Beneby, CFA

ScotiaTrust

PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5718

Fax: (242) 502 6944

Email: soniacurry@bloomberg.net

Secretary ”

Karen Pinder, CFA

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5400

Fax: (242) 502 5428

Email: karen.pinder(@efgbank.com

Programs & Public Relations

Jeremy Dyck, CFA

LOM Securities (Bahamas) Ltd.

PO Box CB 12762-525, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 323 0032

Fax: (242) 323-0084

Email: jeremy.dyck@lom.com

Education

Velma Miller

Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Limited
PO Box N 4853, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 356 7764

Fax: (242) 326 3000

Email: velma.miller@royalfidelity.com

Scholarships

Warren Pustam

EverKey Global Partners

PO Box N 7776-518, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 3093

Fax: (242) 362 6950

Email: warren@everkeyglobal.com

Membership

Pamela Musgrove, CFA

Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.

PO Box CB 12407, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7008

Fax: (242) 356 3677

Email: pmusgrove@cfal.com

Past President

Kristina M. Fox, CFA

CIT Holdings Limited

PO Box N 1328, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 363 1501

Fax: (242) 362 1502

Email: kf@ait.co.uk

MONTHLY SPEAKER EVENT
“Commodities: The Complementary Role of Real Asset

Beta i in Your Portfolio”

Thursday July 31, 2008

12:00 pm
12:30 pm

Location:
Cagliari Room

Speaker: _ David Burkart, CFA

Luciano’s Of Chicago

General Meeting
Speaker’s Address
Please arrive promptly!

Senior Portfolio Manager/Strategist

Barclays Global Investors

San Francisco, CA

Members

$25.00
Non-Members $35.00

(Cheques payable to: CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Reservations:

PRE-REGISTRATON REQUIRED -

by Wednesday July 30, 2008, contact:
Jeremy Dyck, CFA, tel. 323-0032, jeremy. dyck@lom.com

*Prepayment required through one of the Board Members

management, new — product





Mr. Burkart holds a BA in economics from UC Santa Barbara, an
MA in foreign affairs, focusing on the emerging economies of East-
Central Europe, from the University of Virginia, and an MBA in
finance from the Wharton School of Business

| Mr. Burkart leads marketing, portfolio management, and investment

research for Barclays Global Investors’ institutional and retail
commodities-related products in the Americas and Asia, where he is
assisted by two portfolio managers with day-to-day fund
development, and
research. Previously, he managed macro asset allocation. strategies
for BGI, which exposed him to the diversification benefits of the
commodities asset class and motivated him to build BGI’s U.S.
commodities business. Mr. Burkart also worked at Gap Inc. in
international treasury and corporate finance and Bank of America in
foreign exchange and syndicated lending. He has been quoted by
Pensions & Investments, Bloomberg, and CBS Marketwatch and
holds the NASD 3, 7, and 63 licenses.

signal









Summit Insurance Company Limited
fiucerperated wider tho kawe of the Common of Ube Boies:






Balance Sheet
As of 31 Decaober 2007
(Amounts experesce) i Buhanian dhllarat





ASSES











Cash in band and al banks % 4315 ZI KGAi
Teac deposits a LS201 73S 15,34 B.U68
Dine from reinar recs : / 281 R RG cS
Dyes from agent 13 TAA, Fo OTT 24F
Teter opromissinn 82 pest 32H BTS 4 DE SEN
Prepaynrents anid piher assets : & 127,621 R53
Jowes{rents in) securities: A .
Avvealable-fer-aube 4,126,931 Apb8.ig
Loans aod ceredenbles 1,119,203 LPnG gw
Tnveabvent property & 210,906 214813
Property. plant and equizoiedt Fi MOB oc ernom ME sana







Total assets ABASL IMD 35,7853




LiAKILTTTES
Ceneral (SRGACH fares




Tinra.ted prem: im ceseree 4, 108, 363. 11,2304
TLloramed cnr ssi ian trksnine 1,859,275 i, 1Ae7 rh
Mhatstancing cloims rexarve 5 Ey 24k +E







I 8. N71 RM 5 TEMA SG

Ochre dieubitdeey,





Ping ta teinxurers BANA TAU S4é
Accougle payable ad ace ued Gs ace af 231 343, 5405





Al BAT 8




Total abilities BRIS







LOWY
shee cepa:
Authonyed: [0A 0080 shares of #1 enol, °







Tagued at filly ped: 5,090,0840 shane ad $1 each 3,00), 20) 4,000,000
Geaeral reserve of 1,00
bars vale reserve Se he 1.450,074 raat
_Betesned enmings eat oon AAS G2 6,4 15,257







Tietaal eqadty T4505, T42 IR 8S TOE
Total Hlabilifger and oqpulty SAMI __ 35,107,953





APPROVED BY THE HOA RI CF DIRECTORS AND sane on x BEHALF EY;

KG Yo NN









Dineclor

tity





_ UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the Caribbean.
- Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look after-wealthy private
clients by providing them with comprehensive, value enhancing services.




In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following position:





Credit Risk Officer

The successful candidate will be responsible for:
§ Maintaining credit facilities
8 Analysis of counter party risks including settlement,
trading and cross border risk :
. 8 Collateral assessment & monitoring , :
& Transaction investigation nee a |
We are searching for an individual with broad experience in credit risk
who meets the following requirements:
8 Proven track record and familiarity with service orientated Offshore bank
8 Credit Services to High Net Worth Clients
} Analytic approach to Credit Risk management Transaction Control














Product & Process Knowledge:
8 Detailed understanding of collateralized loan products and documentation
requirements
8 Ability to assess new credit-linked products and processes

ae rin of Operations and IT-Systems
8 In-depth understanding of OTC an Exchange Traded derivative instruments











Professional behavior
8 Ability to bring together and assess information from a range of sources

Effective workload prioritization and meeting of deadlines

Capacity to work under own initiative with little Supervision

Methodical and independent approach to forty Bpinions and arguments

Good communication skills

General risk awareness with expertise/focus on credit risk and analysis
a




mm DPD



=
mS





mit D







Education and Certification: ;
8 Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Finance or EeeHbimics from a recaps
and accredited educational institution.
8 Minimum of 3 years Credit Risk experience essential
Local regulatory certificates an advantage







Interested persons should reply on or before July 31"



UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

brbahamas@eubs.com or







PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

GN-713



COURT

No. 2008/PRO/npr/0037 1

Whereas AUDLEY FARRINGTON, of Elizabeth :
Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of es and oe ce
of ELROY FARRINGTON, late of Pratt Alley, | the Probate Court of Dallas County, Texas, for |
Central District, New Providence, one of the : the County of Dallas, on the 11th day of |

| September, 2006.

~ Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 | deceased.

: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration |

: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :

: will be made to the Supreme Court of The :

Whereas REMONDA MOORE of the City of | Bahamas in the Probate Division by |

: SHANNELLE SMITH, of the Western District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the :

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :

: for obtaining.the Resealing of.Grant an i

iin the above estate’ granted to IAN :

Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the | BEARDMORE the Executor in the Supreme |
: court of British Columbia on the 19th day of :

Notice is hereby given that such applications September, A.D, 2006.

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00372

Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of

the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the ;
Real and Personal Estate of ZEPHANIAH :

HERBERT MOORE, late of the City of Freeport,

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
’ (for) Registrar

2008/PRO/NPR/00382

BADLEY,

of the States of the United ae of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application ;
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by LOUREY :

New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealing of Certificate of :
Appointment, in the above estate granted to :
DAVID R. HOPE the Personal Representative :
of the in the Estate, by the Carroll Probate Court, :
in the state of New Hampshire, on the 29th day

of January, A.D, 2008.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |

24TH JULY, 2008 | 9098/PRO/npr/00387

Whereas PATRICIA JOHNSON of Evans Street |

: off East Street in the City of Nassau in the Island :

IN THE ESTATE OF MARTIN EAST, late and | of New Providence, one of the Islands of the :

domiciled of 41 Avenue Close Road, London | Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made :
: application to the Supreme Court of The |
: Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate of DWAYNE EDNAL :
JOHNSON late of Evans Street, off East Street ;
in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :
: Providence, one of the Islands of the :

Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the : Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased.
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- : jiotice is hereby given that such applications |

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas © will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

for obtaining the Resealing of Letters :
Testamentary, in the above estate granted to : Ofté Gaysdirom te date heree!.
RICHARD CHARLES KIRBY, JOHN RICHARD :

ALAN EAST AND BR’AN ANTHONY :

2008/PRO/NPR/00383

NW8 6DA England, decéased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :
of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by CARLSON :

H. SHURLAND, of Kipling Building, Freeport,

PROBATE DIVISION 2008/PRO/NPR/00385

24TH JULY, 2008 :

2 ALEXANDER EAST the Executors and Trustees
: in the High Court of Justice, Principal Registry :
: of the Family Division, on the 27th day of April, :

- 2006.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008 :
_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00384

: IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM D. BARRETT,
? (a.k.a WILLIAM DURELLE BARRETT) late
? and domiciled of 11085 Strayhorn Drive, Dallas :
: County in the Sate of Texas, one of the States
: of the United States of America, deceased.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS ':
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION :
24TH JULY, 2008 :
i : Whereas CLARENCE BASIL CLARE of Soldier
: 2008/PRO/NPR/00384(A) : Road in the Island of New Providence, one of
: : the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
: IN THE ESTATE OF BRIAN ERNEST :
STANLEY, late and domiciled of Powell River :

in the Province of British Columbia, Canada,

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008

: Whereas RUBY M. FOX of South Beach in the
. : Southern District of the Island of New

? IN THE ESTATE OF ANGELO V. GLIONNA, :
: late and domiciled of 350 Greenwood Avenue,
‘ + Volusia County, Ormond Beach, Florida, one :
IN THE ESTATE OF CAROLINE SUCCOP :
late and domiciled of Center : docessed:

Tuftonboro in the State of New Hampshire, one | NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration |

: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
: Bahamas in the Probate Division by PETRA M. :
HANNA-WEEKES, of Pioneers Professional :
Plaza, Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama :
a of the Islands of We cena of The :
: Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized :
C. SMITH, of Mareva House, 4 George Street, | Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the :
Resealing of Letters. Administration, in :
the- above estate granted to ROBERT
(the Single Personal :
Representative) of the Estate, in the Circuit :
‘Court, Seventh Judicial Circuit, in and out Volusia }

of the States of the United States of America,

CROASMUN

County, on the 23rd day of December, 2005.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

* COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION ;
24TH JULY, 2008 :

: LIGHTBOURN of Mareva House in the Island

: of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

THE TRIBUNE ~

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

| 2008/PRO/npr/00388

| IN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT WILFRED
: PASHLEY, late of Lee County in the State of

Florida, one of the States of the United States
of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The

Bahamas in the Probate Division by SHANELLE
SMITH of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence. one of the Islands of the

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At-
: Law. the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :
of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
? Bahamas in the Probate Division by PATRICK :
: A. KNOWLES, of Nassau East, Eastern District, :
i New Providence one of the Islands of the
: Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At- :
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
: for obtaining the Resealing of Order Admitting :
Will and Codicils to Probate and Authorizing :
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate :
granted to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A and JOHN :
MARTIN DAVIS, Independent Co-Executors in

for obtaining the resealed Letters of
Administration (multiple personal
representatives) in the above estate granted to
LINDA R. PASHLEY, GLENN S. PASHLEY

: and BRUCE R. PASHLEY the Personal

Representatives of the Estate, by the Circuit -
Court for Lee County, Florida, Probate Division.
on the 28th day of August. 2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00389

Bahamas has made application to the Supreme’

‘Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
: administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of DAVID MICHAEL CLARE SR. late of Soldier
: Road in the Island of New Providence, one of

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications

: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar _

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No, 2008/PRO/npr/00391

Providence. one of the Islands of the

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made

application to the Supreme Court of The

: Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
i Real and Personal Estate of GORDON
? RANDOLPH FOX a.k.a. GORDON FOX late of

South Beach in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence. one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00392
Whereas RICHARD HERBERT ROGER

Deed of Power of Attorney for Suzanne Cleare,
Irma Cleare, Eleanor Cleare, Edith Cleare,

Theodora Cleare, Lynn Cleare and Gale Cleare
has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate
of SYBIL CLARE, late of Dumore Town, Harbour
Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



WLWIVLOUAT, JULI CU, CUUYU, PAU va

THE TRIBUNE



GN-713 Bahamas has made application to the Supreme



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00393

Whereas JILLIAN T. CHASE a cean of }

ew :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney: by :
Deed of Power of Attorney for Kevin Branweil
McClory has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Personal Estate of KEVIN
McCLORY, late of Pebbles on the Rocks, Banks :
Road in the Settlement of Governor’s Harbour :
on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands of ;
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Jacaranda in the Western. District

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of :

21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT |
PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008 |

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00394

Whereas RUBY FARQUHARSON, of Star :
Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of:
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of GENESTA MORRISON a.k.a. GENESTA :
D.J. ROLLE a.k.a. GENESTA DORETT A:
ROLLE, late Star Estates, Eastern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |.

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00395

Whereas CLARENCE JOHNSON, of Windsor :
Place, CLIFFORD JOHNSON of Golden Gates }
and DAISYMAE MCKENZIE of Garden Hills :
all of the Island New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
have made application to the Supreme Court :
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Personal Estate of FELIX :
LIVINGSTONE JOHNSON, late of Cowpen :
Road, Western District, New Providence, one }
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications 3
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00396

Whereas BRAD ALEC ROLLE of Yamacraw |
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Court of The Bahamas. for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of WILLIAM PETER ROLLE late of Yamacraw :
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas, deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00399

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications |
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00400.

Whereas LUCILLE AIELLO nee MCDONALD |
of 5615 Lake Front Drive in Wall in the State :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00403

Whereas CONSUELA CARTER, of Thompson
Lane, Southern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

: administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of EBENEZER CARTER a.k.a. EBENEZER
i Whereas C. YVETTE MCCARTNEY: :

PEDROCHE of Skyline Drive in the Western :
District of the Island of New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate i
of LOUIS NASH a.k.a. LAWRENCE NASH :
late of the City of Lutz in the County of :
Hillsborough in the State of Florida, one of the :
States of the Untied States of America,

JAMES CARTER, late of Thompson Lane,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

_ PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00404

: Whereas FLORENCE LOUISE RUSSELL, of
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAIIAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate

#6 Sandpiper Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

of STANFORD LEROY RUSSELL, late of Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

of Mississippi, one of the States. of the United :

| States:of America has made application.to the :
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ELIZABETH ROLLE late of Rock Sound in :
the Island of Eleuthera. one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 }

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00401

‘Whereas BERNARD STORER, of Pine Crest :
Street, Sunset Park, Southern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate of HELEN LOUISE
STORR, late of Chrysanthemum Avenue, :
Garden Hills, No.1 Subdivision, Southern :
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications 3
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00402

Whereas CLEO R. NAIRN, of Perpall Tract, :
Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
has made application to the Supreme Court of :
The Bahamas, for letters of administration of :
: the Real and Personal Estate of PHILIP |
: FREDERICK NAIRN, late of Perpall Tract, :
Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :

deceased.

‘Notice is hereby given. that. such applications

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |
of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00405

Whereas SAMUEL MOREE of Palmetto
Avenue in the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

‘administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of HOWARD MOREE late of No. 73 Montrose
.Avenue in the Central District of the Island of

New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00406

: Whereas EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ROSALINA ALI
late of Julan Dharmahusada Indah |/L8-9.
Surabaya, Jatim 60115 in the Republic of
Indonesia, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008
SR an TOTS eS

Bank liquidity ‘pretty strong’ at near $340m

FROM page 1B

plus assets in the Bahamian
commercial banking system
were ahead by 26.6 per cent
year-over-year at $319.03 mil-
lion, compared to $251.94 mil-
lion the year before.

External reserves were also
slightly ahead, standing at
$698.34 million compared to
$690.83 million at May-end
2007.

Despite the year-on-year 30.7
per cent increase in the Bahami-
an commercial banking system’s
excess liquidity, Mr McWeeney
said the increase in money sup-
ply had yet to impact deposit
rates because many savers had
been wise enough to lock-in
long-term rates.

Depositors had done so dur-
ing the period when banks were
competing for relatively scarce
funds, Mr McWeeney
explained, something that
increased the sector’s funding
costs. Depositors had therefore
been able to exploit the situa-
tion by obtaining relatively high
interest rates in return for plac-
ing their money.

As a result, deposit rates had
been pushed to relatively high
levels. In contrast, lending rates
are linked to the Bahamian
Prime rate, which has only
changed once this century. This
meant, with lending rates

’ remaining static, that Bahamian

commercial banks’ interest mar-

gins and spreads were squeezed

by the rise in deposit rates.
“The interest rates have not











NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JESILIA SIMILIEN OF MACKEY
STREET, HILLSIDE ESTATE, P.O. BOX N-772, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 16th day of JULY, 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TUZIA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company .is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

This is to inform the General Public that
all that private thoroughfare or roadway
situate between Lots 7 and 8 in the
Subdivision known as “Fox Hill Creek”
on the Island of New Providence will be
closed to the public from 6:00 a.m. on
Sunday, 3rd August, 2008 to 6:00 a.m.
on Monday, 4th August 2008.

Don S Wrinkle and Jean Wrinkle



Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas :
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

45) ae

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings ss

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Fund Name NAV
Colina Bond Fund 1.323145°**
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990639"**
Colina Money Market Fund

52wk-Hi
1.3231
3.0008
1.4020
3.7969
12.2702
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
10.5000
1.0077
1.0119
1.0086

S2wk-Low
1.2576
2.7399
1.3467
3.3971 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.6581 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00°*
9.5611 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund
_ Market Terms

BIS* ALL SHARE INDEX
82 -Hi

- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
ri st 52 weeks











last 52 weeks

weighted price for daily volume

hted price for daily volume

om day to day

Bs traded today

he last 12 months

st 12 month earnings
c plit - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S 1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFRAL 242-802-7010

fallen off significantly,” Mr
McWeeney explained. “Depos-
itors locked in long-term rates,
and had the advantage during
periods of low liquidity. Even
though liquidity has improved, a
lot of deposits have not come
up for renewal.

“Tt will be at least six months
from now before we see some
fall-off in deposit rates consis-
tent with the growth of liquidi-
ty.

“Towards the end of the year,
beginning of next year, it should
ease somewhat and we will see
a lowering of rates when
deposits rollover.”

Mr McWeeney said that
although he could not speak for
other Bahamas-based commer-
cial banks, 2008 was likely to
be a “consolidation” year for
the industry, as it sought to
manage non-performing loans

' and “ensure the safety and

soundness of the system”.

“Given the economic condi-
tions and environment, I would
think banks will be very cau-
tious in terms of lending and
investment opportunities,” Mr
McWeeney said.

With both banks and the
industry taking a conservative
approach, and credit growth

commercial banking industry
was “looking inward. It’s a time
of consolidation”.

He added: “We’re very cau-
tious about the outlook, and
have to make sure decisions are
prudent and take into consid-
eration the economy may
remain in an anaemic state for
another 12-18 months.”

As a result, Bank of the
Bahamas International and oth-
ers were “paying very close
attention to asset quality”.

Meanwhile, Mr McWeeney
said the Clearing Banks Asso-
ciation’s (CBA) planned Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH)
project was “going very well”,
with the live testing between his
bank and Commonwealth Bank
due to be completed either this
week or next.

“The project seems to be
moving as planned, and the
ACH team fairly soon should
commence public relations con-
sultations so the public will be
aware of what impact the ACH
will have on the way they con-
duct their day-to-day business,”
Mr McWeeney said.

“The October deadline [for
the ACH to go live] appears
realistic.”

The ACH is intended to

actions, where cheques drawn
on one bank but due to be
deposited at another have to be
taken by armoured car to a cen-
tral location where they are set-
tled by representatives of the
various institutions.

Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time per-
sons spent in line waiting to
cash and deposit pay cheques,
as they could be deposited to
their account.

Bahamian consumers would
also,be able to use direct debits
from their bank accounts to pay
bills such as cable television and

THE TRIBUNE

electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one
back office system for the entire
Bahamas. It may also help
develop SWITCH products,
where Bahamians could use
their cash cards at any bank's
ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the open-
ing up a whole range of elec-
tronic banking services in the
Bahamas, including its use in
the online purchase of govern-
ment goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through electron-
ic means, the ACH will provide
buyers and sellers with more
certainty and confidence, espe-
cially when it comes to settling
their transactions.

It will also enhance econom-
ic and business efficiency by set-
tling transactions quicker,
boosting business cash flows.

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share forthe last12mths ttt - 27 June 2008

replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-

having slowed compared to
2007, Mr McWeeney said the

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, LORENA DESMOND
of Palm Beach Street, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to LORENA DESMANGLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, LO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.






Notice

Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Stock
Name: Cyndi William-Rahming
Certificate Number: 61160
Year: 2020
Interest Rate: 0.5% APR
Stock Amount: $6,000.00
I intend to request the Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. .
If this certificate is found, please mail to:
P.O.Box SP-63927
. Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE |
ECHO PIER INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of June 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FG CAPITAL MARKET.

KERAGE & ADVISORY eer

12.00
10.00

Lee GEES Over-The-Caunter Sacuritios



NUM

Yield%

NLALV. Key
* -31 March 2008
** - 31 December 2007
** -30 June 2008
** -31 April 2008
meeins, - 31 May 2008

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

FIDELITY 242 SREY 764 [HE CAPITAL MW ARKETS 343-406-4600 [FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL 242-394-2603











NOTICE is hereby given that IRMA TASSY OF PALM TREE
AVENUE, THE GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The. Bahamas,
‘and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
16th day of JULY, 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147> Freeport, Bahamas"














PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, SOPHIA LUNDY, mother
of DESHANNUN DANICIO LUNDY of Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my son’s name to DESHANNUN DANICIO
LUNDY MUSGROVE. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GENESIS | HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

GUN POINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED

This is to inform the General Public that all that
private thoroughfare or roadway known as Gun
Point situate northeastwards of the Settlement
of Spanish Wells at the northwestern end of the
Island of North Eleuthera will be closed to the
public from 6:00 a.m. on Saturday, 3rd August,
2008 to 6:00 a.m on Monday, 4th August, 2008
to protect the right of ownership.

Everette Sands
President





\
q
+!

|
|

VP Lt

ti



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 7B





CALVIN & HOBBES

WON OME THE | So THEN DONT] [ DOES THE 200] DONT BE. \
ALLIGATORS. ARE.| GET OUT AND] | EVER THRON
EMT PEOPLE. | | ANYONE. IN?










Tribune Comics

HOW SOON UNTIL
WE GO HOME P

JUDGE PARKER




I THINK BILL
CLINTON WAS
STILL IN THE

TAKE A LOOK
AT THE HEADS.--
THERE'S NOT A
MARK ON THEM!

YOU WERE GOING TO START
PLAYING, $0 I BOUGHT
THOSE FOR YOU!

ARE YOU SURE IVE
NEVER USED THESE
CLUBS?

Syncicate













©1988 Universal Press



Sudoku Puzzle

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunda’

TIM 1S ALIVE, JUST AS :

L BELIEVED.’










—
T SSS
HORRORS (SSSA Y || SAW TIM MILLS
NEWS WILL REACH RAS MY 1 Obese ME] ALIVE AT THE
YOU THERE. BROTHER 7 > Se PRISON
ENDUREDAZ\C:, 7% TEMPLE

IN LHASA...



008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

mo | f
cabal

WELL, CAN YOU SNEAK
A LITTLE HAMBURGER
INTO THE MEAL
ON THE SLY?

FRANK BOLLE—





/
“Vy



NI

5
Vy LM yeti ‘




YES! WE WANT SOMETHING
TO TEASE THEM ABOUT
AFTER THE PARTY!

OUR IN-LAWS ARE STRICT
VEGETARIANS! CAN YOU
CATER A DINNER
THAT CONTAINS









Med a



a

VOW

“CONGRATULATIONS ! YOU PASSED
THE RUFE TEST!”















©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

©2008 by King Features Syndicate. inc. World Rights reserved

www.Blondie.com













MAYBE ILL HAVE TIME TO

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME
DUCK UNDER MY SEAT

YOU CAUGHT A
BASEBALL , BERNIE?

DON'T WORRY, ROY, I
BROUGHT MY MITT IN.
CASE AFLY BALL HEADS






IN HIGH



www.kingteatures.com

I GOT SOMETHING
ON MY BIKE THAT.
MAKES IT SQUMNS.
JUST LUKE Aang
MOTORCYCLE
















SCHOOL

















ae
tT



















Difficulty Level *&

ah ga ER RS

reserved.

White mates in four moves,
against any defence. Chess
problems normally comprise a
unique white first move, then a
variety of black defences with a
specific answer to each. Today
it's different. White's fourmove
sequence in this composition by



[©2008 by King Foatures Syndicate, Ine. World vights

COULDN'T I EAT SOME

r 4 ce
LUCKY EDDIE, WAN APPLE APPLES
YOU SHOULD A DAY ARE HARD APPLESAUCE EVERY Rudolph Willmers isplayed in
REMEMBER THE KEEPS THE ON MY DY INSTEAD 2 the identical order however
OLD SAYING... DOCTOR TEETH, :
DOCTOR., Black responds, As a further



. Across
1 Dismiss 1
someone
taking money (7)
5- Girl that is unhappy being
in the lead (5)
8 Does he write
notes hoping to make
people better? (6.2,5) 4
9 Having eaten a meal I’d
' end a different shape (5) 5
Let’s look first for some
openings (7) .





o









10






11 Global outbreak of herpes .
(6)
12 Lost form due to a rise in © 7
temperature (6) 11
15 Free to enter into another
tenancy agreement? (7) 13
17 \|t should be enough to
cover the rent (5)
19 Soldier gets pay for work; 14
others may get it without
work (7,6) 16
20 Aview that makes sense
(5) 18
21 Gets ready to eat, or to be
eaten (7)










Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Lance, 8 Returned, 9
Spain, 10 Electric storm, 11 Typed, 12
Ada, 16 Airing, 17 Untrue, 18 Oak, 23
Leant, 24 Turnover, 25 Demon, 26
Rationed, 27 Plant.

Down: 2 Asphyxia, 3 Criteria, 4
Sealed, 5 Dunce, 6 Entry, 7 Edict, 12
Ago, 13 Auk, 14 Ethereal, 15 Turn
down, 19 Aneled, 21 Grate, 22 Colon.





ovOSHHODWON mMZ0:2-: 084




CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

clue, White’s first turn is with his
af rook and does not check the
black king, With these hints, can
you work out the checkmating
sequence?

©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved.





























Such a message won't be
plain (5)

A boxer normally has one,
even if not hungry (6,7)
Tidy description of a
monk? (2,5)

Firmly established as a










growing concern (6)

Some thousand held cap-
tive in battle (5)

Disaster is not changed by

these discourses (13) -
Pardoned and released (7)
They reward or punish



unruly priests (7)

Cost an unknown amount wi Across Down

of small coins, we hear (7) < 1 Petty complaint (7) 4 Hunt (5)

Gt ee Test N 5 Schism (5) 2 Asa result (2,11)

an old story (6) = eae ie meta

s oman’s private

Girl has exercises QW eral suppor (12) P

to get fit (5) > 9 Latin American dance room (7)

The flighty take ” (5) 4 To pass (6)

to them (5) < 10 Bag for schoolbooks 5 Used up (5)

(7) 6 Central European
Yesterday’s Easy Solution 11 Genial (6) principality (13)
12 Gor lothes (6 7 Absolutely (7

Across: 1 Trade, 8 Farewell, 9 iareunclomeee) sas ms
Known, 10 Illusion, 11 Verse, 12 15 Loot (7) 11 Slavish imitator (7)
Fat, 16 Muddle, 17 Random, 18 17 Elementary (5) 13 Concisely (2,5)
Wry, 23 Spade, 24 Headlong, 25 :
Sheen, 26 Shartage, 27 State. 19 In regular order (13) 14 Sufficient reason (6)
Down: 2 Runner-up, 3 Downside, 4 20 General 16 Fear greatly (5)
Paella, 5 Get-up, 6 Merit, 7 Glint, 12
Few, 13 Try, 14 Snapshot, 15 Cold tendency (5) 18 Underground vault

feet, 19 Renege, 20 Chase, 21
Major, 22 Flute.

(5)

No longer existing (7)



@|)o;o}N|o







DES
=|D}o}A

122







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
IN) lolm|ajo|] < &

| =| 2
| INfwlolfm] ¢







Chess solution 8338: 1 Ba7, 2 NaS (with or witbout
check according ta Mack's reply), 3 RhT Glittea and 4
b4 mates. .

HOW many words of
four letters or more can
you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each

- Jetter may be used once
only, Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals, or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words
with initial capitals and
no words with a hyphen
or apostrophe
permitted. The first
word of a phrase is
permitted (e.g. inkjet in -
inkjet printer):
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 15; very good 23;
excellent 30 for more),



NOINTIOS S.AVGa: LSBA

wBAap Tap oyEp wep



qQU IIS put pam apre ape









param

a2BAL PAB JIT
aIep pase pany

WALYMaAGIL
pear peel paw.

peu payeaxy ROI; pear tres ar
Bopy Jaye pares aeip 7

Contract Bridge
by Steve Becker” -

Hook, Line and Sinker

North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
@K 5343
Â¥Q105
@A6
KIS3
WEST EAST
$76 a9
9974 ¥862
#KQI73 #109852
bAT4 &Q 1095
SOUTH
@AQ10852
VAKI3
4
&62
The bidding:
North Kast South West
| Pass 1% Pass
24 Pass 6%

Opening lead — king of diamonds.

Every so often a hand arises where
there’s a distinct disadvantage to
being a good player. The expert who
sees all and knows all sometimes
makes plays that wouldn’t occur to a

* lesser player, and as a result occa-

sionally pays a price for his superior
knowledge. The moral is that igno-
rance is sometimes bliss.

Consider this deal played in a
national pair championship. South
quickly got to six spades, and West
led a diamond, taken by dummy’s
ace,

‘

Declarer, a well-known expert,
played two rounds of trumps and
then four rounds of hearts, discarding
a diamond from dummy. The dia-
mond discard wasn't important as
such, but it was by no means a hap-
hazard play. South had a very shrewd
purpose in mind.

Declarer next Ied a club, and
West, also a top-notch player,
stepped right up with the ace. That
ended the play, and declarer made
the slam.

Had West followed low on the
club lead, South would have had a
difficult guess as to whether to play
the king or the jack from dummy.

Whether he would have guessed
correctly no one will ever know. In
the actual layout, declarer succeeds
by playing the king, but if West has
the queen and Fast the ace, the jack
is the winning play.

South’s method of play would
probably have been a waste of time
against an inferior West player.
Declarer intentionally went out of his
way to show West he had started
with six spades and four hearts.

By cashing his hearts and discard-
ing a diamond from dummy, South
hoped to persuade West that he had
started with two diamonds and one
club. The actual: West swallowed the
bait, apparently believing he'd lose
his ace unless he took it while he had
the chance.

Tomorrow: To win or not to win?
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Grand Bahama Chorale electritfies
Washington audiences



THE Bahamas! 35th Independence Anniver-
sary took on special meaning for Bahami-
ans, members of the Diplomatic Corp in

Wiadatgice DC, and friends of the Bahamas as the
popular Grand Bahama Chorale celebrated the
occasion with performances at the Organization of
American States (OAS) and the People's Community
Baptist Church in Silver Spring, Maryland

The chorale accepted the
invitation of Cornelius A Smith,
Bahamas Ambassador to the
United States, to participate in
the embassy's activities com-
memorating the 35th Anniver-
sary of the birth of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.

Chorale director Clayton
Curtis said that the occasion
provided the group with a
unique experience as members
were moved by the apprecia-
tion of their audiences as they
presented a short programme
of select Bahamian folk songs.

At the OAS the rendering of
the national anthems of the
United States and the Bahamas

_ were received by a capacity
crowd with thundering
applause, and following the
short programme of select
Bahamian pieces, thoroughly
pleased those in attendance.
Also performing at the event
was the famed Edwin 'Apple'
Elliott Trio made up of Patrick
Russell, percussionist; Ralph
"Ossie" Hall, saxophonist, and
Miss Grace Anne Adderley,
pianist.

' At the People's Community
Church, where former Gover-
nor General of the Bahamas
Sir Orville Turnquest was in

attendance, the chorale staged’

a full-length concert showcas-
ing the full:scope of their reper-
toire, from classical to calyp-
SO.

They effortlessly moved
from classical music, sung in
English and Latin, to the rous-

ing sounds of Negro spirituals, :

contemporary, sacred, and
gospel music. Of particular

note were ‘Ain't Got Time to
Die'; 'God and God Alone';
'My Help (Cometh from the
Lord)'; 'Gossip, Gossip'; and
others, all of which received
rousing applause, and in many
cases repeated standing ova-
tions...

The African song, 'Siyaham-
ba' and the passionate rendi-
tion of 'Kyrie Eleison', written
by the chorale's late accompa-
nist, Mr Edwin 'Apple' Elliott,
were also crowd favourites. As

an encore, the chorale deliv- .

ered the ever popular gospel
song ‘Order My Steps' which
again received thunderous
applause and ovation.

Sir Orville made brief
remarks in which he drew par-
allels between the United
States and the Bahamas, saying
that they are both former
British colonies. He noted fur-
ther that through several gen-
erations the histories of the two
countries have been closely

linked, particularly during the .

period of the African Diaspora
and the migration of Bahami-
ans who came in search of
employment, and even now,
through trade and commerce.

Sir Orville made mention of
how privileged he was to have

_been one of the persons who

signed the Bahamian Declara-
tion of Independence.

The former governor gener-
al also expressed his delight in
hearing the chorale and com-
mented on how, in Ambas-
sador Smith's first year as the
Bahamas Government's repre-
sentative to the United States,
there was no better way for





FORMER GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Orville Turnquest, centre, and Ambassador Cornelius Smith, ‘ight,
chat with guests at a reception at the ambassador's residence in Washington, DC.

him to create an impression
than to bring a contingent from
his island home and former
constituency, thrilling all with a
landmark performance and
experience that will linger in
his mind as one of the best
independence celebrations that
he has ever attended.

The evening was also high-
lighted by remarks from the
host pastor Rev Dr Haywood
Robinson, II, who was thrilled
that his church was chosen as
the venue for such a celebra-
tion. In his remarks he indicat-
ed that he could not help but
note the high standard and pro-
ficiency displayed by the choir.

VACANCY NOTICE
Clerk of Works - Buildings Department ME S

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Clerk of Works at The National

Insurance Board.

JOB SUMMARY

The individual would be responsible under the Assistant Director - Buildings to represent The National Insurance
Board on projects being z undertaken and ensuring contractors’ compliance with design and materials specification
and to ensure consistent standards in soeeenaiiehis:

QUALIFICATIONS » SKILLS AND REQUIREMENTS

Applicants should have a Bachelor’s of Science degree or equivalent in Engineering or a related field from an

accredited College or University.

Be honest, and vigilant to ensure that the work and materials meet the required standard.

Must have a broad understanding and diverse experience in the building sey, including knowledge of materials,
trades, methods and legal requirements.

Be attentive to details when checking work and materials.

Have good written and verbal communication skills

Must demonstrate the ability to:

(1) define objectives, plan the work and communicate priorities,

(2} be able

to establish an appropriate working relationship with the contractor’s staff while remaining diplomatic and
independent; and (3)-be keen, decisive and persuasive in communicating any inconsistencies that may require

corrections or compromise.

DUTIES AND'RESPONSIBILITIES

Be familiar with legal requirements and ensure that work complies with them.

2. Be familiar with all the relevant drawings and written instructions, checking them, and using them ds a
reference when inspecting the work.

’

Takes measurements and samples on site to ensure that the work and materials meet the specifications and

quality standards.

Provides accurate estimates for work when necessary.

Writes specifications; compiles Autoc ad drawings and obtains competitive estimates /quotations ie builders’

work to be carried out.

Ensures that work on various projects are carried out to the client’s standards, specitications and schedule.

Ensures that correct materials and procedures are used and that the chent is given quality work and value

for money.

. Advise contractor(s) about certain aspects of the work but not give advice that could be interpreted as an
instruction which would involve additional expenditure to the contract.

Inspects work as projects proceeds,

. Keeps detailed records of various aspects of the work.

. Produces regular status reports which would include progress and any delays, the number
and type of workers em iployed, weather conditions, visitors to the site, drawings received,
deliveries, instructions and details of any significant event.

12. Participates in mectings and working groups as requested and undertake any work necessary to

implement

APPLICATION

fanagement’s initiatives.

Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the necessary proof of
qualifications, on or before Monday, July 28, 2008, to:

The Acting Director

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Chittord Darling Complex
P.O. Box N-7508

Nassau , Baharnas





THE GRAND BAHAMA CHORALE on the steps of the Organization of
American States in Washington, DC, where they performed as a
part of the 35th Anniversary of Independence sponsored by the

_ Embassy of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

European designer leads
line-up of international
ouest designers at Islands
of the World Fashion Week

MODE Iles, Ltd, organis-
ers of Islands of the World
Fashion Week scheduled to
be held November 5 - 8 at the
British Colonial Hilton and
Atlantis Resort, have
announced.that NOIR. Ilu-
minati II of Denmark will
lead the list of international
guest designers presenting
their latest creations at the
event this Fall, with NOIR
taking centre stage during the
opening reception.

"It is a pleasure to have the
caliber of design and the
message projected by NOIR
grace the catwalk of this pre-
miere event," said Owen
Bethel, president of Mode
fles, Ltd and founder of
Islands of the World Fashion

Week.

"Through their unified pre-
sentation of elegant fashion,
Mr [Peter] Ingwersen, and
NOIR represent the global
concerns of the environment,
labour and human rights, and
initiatives in respect of
poverty alleviation, all rele-
vant to the issues to be high-
lighted by Islands of the
World Fashion Week, and at
the core of the themes of the
United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO),
which has endorsed the
event."

Mr Bethel explained fur-
ther that, "NOIR is one of
several non-island designers
chosen to participate for their
contributions to the fashion
industry in one form or
another. These are the inter-
national guest designers. The
event is intended, primarily,
to showcase the collections of
established and new design-
ers from islands around the
world."

Mr Ingwersen, a designer
at NOIR, is known for his
attention to detail and focus
on environmentally-friendly
materials and processes with-
in his designs. This has placed
him at the vanguard of the
eco-fashion industry.

Previously head of design

for Levi's Nordic Region,
global brand director for
Levi's Vintage Clothing and
Levi's RED, and a member
of the Levi's brand manage-
ment leadership team, Mr
Ingwersen established
NOIR. Iiluminati I in March
2005.

NOIR appeals to the fash-
ion and social conscience
consumer by encouraging
consumption which gives
back globally through the
support of sustainable busi-
ness practices in the Third
World.

"We want to be known as
the first brand to bring
sophistication and sexiness to
corporate social responsibili-
ty," Mr Ingwersen said of his
company's mission.

The NOIR Foundation is a
fund that allocates the rev-
enue from a percentage of
the sales of cotton suits and
fabric to support the African
cotton workers in the supply
chain called Proud Harvest.

According to Mr Bethel,
organisers are set to
announce the names of
designers selected from the
islands in late July/early
August as the deadline for
submission of applications is
the end of July and the
screening committee is still
processing the applications.

To date, the Islands of the
World Fashion Week event
has designers registered from
Barbados, Cuba, Dominican
Republic, Fiji, Indonesia,
Jamaica, St Lucia, St Vincent,
Trinidad and Tobago, and
the Bahamas. Interest has
also been expressed by
designers from Grenada,
Guadeloupe, Madagascar,
Martinique, Mauritius and
Puerto Rico.

° For more information on
Islands of the World Fashion
Week, interested persons are
invited to visit the website

www.islandsfashionweek.com or :

contact either Ms Arianne Etuk or
Ms Rekenya Dean at 242-356-
6133.

the Visual Arts invites one



* The public is invited to

_ Versatile, featuring the

new works of Edrin
Symonette, Lemero Wright
and Ryan Turnquest at the
Central Bank of the ©
Bahamas Art Gallery; Mar-
ket Street.



¢ SCRIMMAGE 08: |
PopopStudios/Centre for i;
and all to their ongoing
summer exhibition show-
casing a rotation of artists .
and artworks. The exhibi- —
tion is open all summer
long. Gallery hours are

Tuesday - Saturday from
oan to 7pm.



“eThis July & August; The
- National Art Gallery will be

hosting its first Summer
Concert Series! Come and
enjoy great performances -

_ by talented Bahamian,
‘musicians. ~~

Ronnie Butler & Elon "The
Crab Man“ Moxey

- Friday, July 25 at 7: :30pm

Terneille "Ta Da" Burrows &
Ithalia Johnson

Friday, August 8 at

7:30pm
Kim Welcome & Pam
Woods
Friday, August 15 at
7:30pm

Tickets are available at the
NAGB Store: Contact Noel
Thompson, manager at
328.5800/1 or at nthomp-
son@nagb.org.bs

¢ Mur-mi-don: Marie
Jeanne Dupuch will be fea-
turing new paintings at The
Hub, No 2 Colebrooke Lane,
(Bay Street). The exhibition
runs until August 19. For
more information check
out
www.thehubbahamas.org
or call 322.4333.



Tr Nar iri Ans Guibert oo Ton Banares



FOURTH
NATIONAL
EXHIBITION

2008

¢ The National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas (NAGB)
has invited the general
public to view its Fourth
National Exhibition (The
NE4). The exhibition fea-
tures an exciting array of
51 works produced within
the last two years by 31
artists. This artwork repre-
sents a rich diversity of art
and ranges from paintings,
sculptures, installations,
prints and mixed media
works to photographs and
alternative media. The exhi-
bition will be on display
from July 9 to January 30,
2009 at the NAGB on West
Hill Street.



THE TRIBUNE

Emerging voices

FROM page 12

Not just edgy and scandalous
however, NE4 also proffers
work that is of a remarkable
beauty, like Ritchie Eyma's
Composition With Red 20 x 20
oil, and Lynn Parotti's trio of
works The Blastocyst's Ball: fea-
turing Ovitrelle's Luteal Lune,
Crinone's Crave and Follistimi-
tus Irreconcilibus on canvas. The
depth of colour and weight of
the images immediately draw
the viewer in, and at first glance
masks...or perhaps points to the
intimate, stressful nature of the
work - it is a journey through
the drug induced stages of IVF
(In Vitro Fertilization).

One of the most interesting
pieces, for me, was Frorup's sec-
ond piece, Tickled Pink, a psy-
chedelic merry-go-round of
sorts, that is at once menacing
and childlike.

Imagine a giant circular wood-
en platform that has a_ single
rail across the middle and a pull
pivot. At one end of the rail
atop wooden blocks, a pile of
dishes, and a delicate pink tea
cup is the eerie vision of a little
girl's head, replete with fat plaits
kept in place by the thick, round
bobbles of grade school- all in
bright, bubble gum pink.

Initially, as my seven-year-old
niece and I came across the
piece, I was intimidated by the
sheer size of the work and
uncertain whether entrance to
the room was allowed so I
steered her in another direction.
Returning to the room later
however, we decided to venture
inside and walked around the
piece - still hesitant, not touch-
ing, but looking at it, uncertain
of what we were seeing - of what
we were supposed to see. It was
not until another visitor to the
gallery appeared and immedi-
ately grasped one end of the rail
and began walking and turning
the mammoth dial did we relax
and understand that we could
participate in the work.

With the room now filling up,
another viewer invited my niece
to participate and at long last
she had the chance to do what I
think she had wanted to do since
we entered the room, grab hold
of the merry-go-round and push
it - to the delight of thei piped in
sounds of a little girl giggling
and shouting for the participant
to do it again.

Frorup's interactive piece - of
wood, metal, wax and bronze -
has a nightmarish quality to it
though - the menace seems to
come because the piece revolves
around child's play, but there is

nothing that speaks of life or.

youth in the room.

According to Erica James,
director of the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, the
purpose of the NE4 is to gauge
the direction Bahamian artists
have been moving in for the past
two years. "This is where artists
are, this is what is on their mind,
this is what artists are thinking
about. This is their personal
vision - they wanted to share
that with the public," Ms James
said of exhibition.

All of the work submitted for
consideration for the NE4 had to
be created in 2006 or after.

It was in January that the
NAGB sent out a call for works,
giving a deadline of May, which
gave artists who wanted to par-
ticipate in the exhibition a
chance to complete a piece or
find work they wanted to sub-
mit.

The process of whittling down
the submissions began with the

‘selection of a group of reviewers.

According to Ms James, the
reviewers are never the same
group of people from year to
year.

In the end 51 works by 32
artists were chosen and the next
step was to focus on the installa-
tion and to decide how that
process would work - that is how
the various works would be
appointed to accurately reflect

‘the national statement being

made by this group of Bahamian
artists. It would need to reflect
what their concerns are in the
moment, and show what they
feel is important enough to work
on.

In an unprecedented showing,
this year's exhibition featured
more women than ever (Imo-

‘gene Walkine, whose Swept -

low fired earthenware - was
straight-up awe inspiring; Sue
Bennett Williams, Tamara Rus-
sell, and her fantastically rich
and beautiful Violet Scorpion -
clay; Chantal Bethel, Marie
Jeanne, Dupuch and Samantha
Moree to name a few), with half
of the artists laying claim to a
double X chromosome. Said Ms
James, "It seems this year
women got it together". As a
group, she noted, they were able

to produce work that was of a
standard that allowed them to
participate fully in the national
exhibition.

Another interesting note in
terms of demographics, Ms
James pointed out, is that eight
of the artists were Bahamians
living abroad, "doing their thing"
in London, New York, Atlanta,
across the globe, but who were

still able to engage with what is .

happening locally.

Speaking about the artists, Ms
James said that thematically,
many of them wanted the viewer
to focus on a specific aspect of
their work, pointing to Heino
Schmid's digital projection, enti-
tled North Star, that moves
across New Providence, but nev-
er loses sight of Atlantis.

As someone who often walks:

about the island, the artist was
curious about the fact that where
ever he walked he could see
Atlantis. The resort has become
a north star that sort of orients
you on New Providence, she
said. She noted further that in
contrast to Europe, where the
tallest buildings are usually
churches, in the Bahamas, that
revered role - as the tallest build-
ing in the land - has been taken
over by a hotel.

The technical excellence or the
artist' ability to take command
of the media selected was also a
marked aspect of a number of
works. Both Thierry Lamare and
Sue Katz-Lightbourn were noted
for their strong sense of drawing
and human form, "we also
noticed a little bit of daring," Ms
James said.

With the hard work of the
show now over, and the results
open for interpretation by the
Bahamian public, NE4 stands as
an ambitious effort by a very
diverse group of artists to pro-
vide an overview of the coun-
try's art scene. Most important
perhaps, the exhibition also
opens the door for the introduc-
tion of new names, new faces,

new passions - previously -

unheard of - to that community,
and symbolizes the continuing
development of the artistic voice
of the nation.

¢ NE4, which is the only exhibi-
tion currently.on display at the |
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, runs through the rest
of the year. Beginning next year,
the gallery plans to produce an .
exhibit by Max Taylor.



., Madeira Street, Palmdale.



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 9B

Participating Artists

», Leen Che ay RO
hlere’s how to enters
1. Buy any 3 or the 5 featured KRAFT items (including KRAFT
BBQ Sauce, KRAFT Singles, KRAFT Salad Dressing and

OSCAR MAYER Hot Dogs. ;

1

2. Circle item on your original store receipi, answer the
question on entry forms provided.

3. Write your name, address and telephone number on original |
store receipt.

4. Deposit receipt and entry torm into entry box, located in all
participating stores or drop off at The d’Albenas Agency,

be chosen on August 8, 2008.

5. Promotion runs from July 7 to August 1, 2008, Winner wil

dressing Se alip
Le





leet)
rhc
bo Bo dd




epaicerexncassewecats2 xo

To qualify to win, fill in the blanks :
and attach to your original reccipt. :
Drop in entry boxes or bring to
The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

if | were an i
O___fM___r Weiner |








PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

Some of R.M. Bailey guys
: class of 1988 pose for a
fs wip group shot.





SO ey
eS ese

eet

he 1988 graduating class of RM Bailey
Senior High School is celebrating it's
20th Anniversary this year until
December 31.

Numerous activities have been planned. The
first event held was a grill-out fundraiser on
July 5. Classmates got a chance to raise funds
for the school, and also fellowship at the same
time. There have been several meet and greets
to date, and these will continue throughout the
year.

1988 graduating class of RM Bailey Senior High School celebrates their

O" Anniversary

THE TRIBUNE






Upcoming major events include:

¢ A boat cruise planned for September 20

° A walk-a-thon on September 27

° A church service on September 28

° To close out the year a grand banquet will
be held Saturday, October 4 at the Atlantis
Resort.

All graduates of the RM Bailey class of 1988
are asked to support these events and be a
part of the fun and fellowship. Meetings are
held every Thursday at 7pm at the school on
Robinson Road.





4

THE TRIBUNE



st Annual -

Grand Bahama

RILLOFF



ice it

Grilled Rack of Lamb

INGDQM EXPLOUIONS |
Ist SNN UAL Grand



Essence & Tamarind Drizzle

@ By SOUSE CHEF
GEORGE WILLIAMS III
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort and Spa

Lamb Rack
1 (French) or American rack
of lamb
7 guavas (fresh, peeled, blended
and strained)
Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Season the lamb with the salt
and pepper to taste then add
2o0z of blended guava on to the
lamb and marinate for 30 min-
utes. Heat up a medium frying
pan and sear off the lamb until
golden brown. Then place in
the oven for 15 minutes for
medium rare. Take out of the
oven and let cool before cut-
ting.

Guava Essence

50z blended guava

30z lamb stock

Salt and pepper to taste

¢

Method
Add the stock to a small

sauce pot and bring to'a boil: ~

Once it is boiling add your gua-
va and let reduce Sy half, then
season.

Note: The guava will thicken

the essence.

Tamarind Glaze.

1bag (shocked) fresh tamarind
1cup sugar

3cups water

Pinch salt

10z cornstarch

Method

Add all of the ingredients
except for the cornstarch into
a small sauce pot. Bring sauce
to a boil for 30 seconds and then
turn the heat down and simmer
for 10 minutes, then add the
cornstarch to thicken it up.
After thickening strain the glaze
into a new container and let
cool down until you are ready
to use.

Rosemary potatoes

4 red bliss potato (cut in half)
-1 sprig fresh rosemary
(chopped)

A drizzle of olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Method
“Mix all the ingredients

together and place in the oven .

until done. Once a toothpick
can go through the potato is
done.

ee a a es 3)

MAREE gtct tp ie EDS



1/20z coconut milk .

2 sprigs of fresh thyme

30z julienne (strips) market
vegetables

Salt & pepper to taste

Method

Heat up a medium frying pan
with a little oil. Then add your
vegetables, thyme and season-
ing to taste. Then add your
milk.

»

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 11B

lm By DENISE MAYCOCK >
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Plans for the grill-off competi-
tion were announced this week
by the Ministry of Tourism.

Shirley Lowe, event coordina-
tor, said the grill-off will be held at
Pirates of the Bahamas on Jolly

Roger Drive on Saturday, August

2, from 10am until.

Ms Lowe explained that chefs,
schools, community athletic teams,
local restaurants and Bahamians

throughout the island are invited .

‘tition.
' Ms Lowe hopes that the com-
petition will bring several bene-

FREEPORT - Tourism officials hope that the 1st Annu-
al Grand Bahama Grill-Off competition next month will
help boost the island's sluggish economy,

to participate or view the’ compe-

fits to Grand Bahama.

“It is hoped to boost Graad, _
Bahama’s economy, help youths —
turn to constructive hobbies'such |

as music rather than gangs, while

bringing cohesion to Grand
Bahama’s community and lift the é
spirits of local Te niss ¢ ‘she said. |




FROM left are the -
judges: Devon Johnson,
food and beverage man-
ager, Our Lucaya Resort;
Dwayne Cleare, execu-
tive chef, Our Lucaya;
Shirly Lowe, event coor-
dinator; Mr Popple,

~ sponser, and Lisa Willis,
Food Extraordinaire,
Casa Mederia. Judges
not pictured are Simeon
Hall Jr, Food Services
Company director, 3
Restaurant Mgmt Group

_ Ltd and Mike Mosko of

' Mosko Realty Ltd.

Several companies, she said,
have lent their support to the com-
petition, including Fenestration
Glass Co, the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Betco Ltd, and Kel-
ly’s.

The judges for the event are

‘Dwane Clare, executive chef at:
- the Our Lucaya Resort; Devon

Johnson, food and beverage man-
ager at the Our Lucaya Resort;

Lisa Willis of the Casa Mederia;

Simeon Hall Jr, director of food

_ services at the 3 Restaurant Man-

agement Group; and Mike Mosko
of Mosko Realty. i
Ms Lowe said she hopes that
the. grill-off competition will
become the premier annual cook-

~ ing competition in the Bahamas

and perhaps an international culi-
Bah competition.

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July. 14: RFP available for pick-up at security desk of
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PO Box N3048,Nassau, NP — Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com | CALL BTC 225-5282











WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

Emerging

O



Chef George Williams
[ll serves up Grill

Rack of Lamb

See page 11



=.



Full Text


Beijing 2one

McCOMBO < HIGH

official oaaent

OIF | a

m Lhe Tribune









LOW

soe — SUNSHINE



Volume: 104 No.201



79F |
gms CLOUDS AND

Sutil!

Voices

4 SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



EUSA TODAY

- BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

SLU)

OCCUR

Raa aal a

ont - mre

Juvenile
surrenders
to police
in Exuma

lm By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEVEN weeks’ after Marvin
Wilson was brutally murdered
at his Centreville apartment, a —
juvenile suspect surrendered to
police in Exuma for question-
ing.

Press liaison officer Assistant
Superintendent Walter Evans
said the suspect — who was
wanted for questioning in con-
nection with Wilson's murder
— turned himself into police in
George Town, Exuma around
8.15 pm Monday.

Central Detective Unit offi-
cers from New Providence went -
to the island yesterday. morn-
ing to get the suspect and bring
him to Nassau, ASP Evans said.

Wilson, a 32-year-old
Jamaican, was stabbed to death
at his Gregory House apart-
ment on Rusty Bethel Avenue,
near ZNS radio station during
the early morning hours of June
3. Unconfirmed reports claimed
that his killer ran a broad blade
dagger — reportedly from
Wilson's sword collection —
through his chest.

Although bleeding profuse-
ly, Wilson, clad only in his
underwear, staggered to an

SEE page eight






















INSURANCE

FIGHTING THE blaze at Maxwell’ s food store yesterday.

: By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A FIRE yesterday destroyed

: Marsh Harbour’s largest food
: store, devastating the Abaco
: community in these harsh eco-
+ nomic times.

More than 40 persons lost

: their jobs and Abaconians
> were left without their primary
: source for supplies: and gro-
: ceries when Maxwell’s food
: store burned down in the early
: morning hours.

Kathleen Ralph of the Aba-

we eae

: lierer age no matter which
way ‘the wind blows.

gy obody does it better.

1 INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

J Gio Buna Lae!
PTR

Abo
[ea

| Heater | Eva
et

conian newspaper, who togeth:
er with her husband Dave
Ralph is the town’s primary
fire dispatcher, told The Tri-
bune that the fire started

- around 10pm Monday night in

the warehouse section of the
building.
The blaze was initially con-
tained by firefighters,
However, a few hours later
the fire suddenly flared up
again and was completely

uncontrollable by 5am yester-

day.

Mrs Ralph said that fire
fighters from the volunteer fire
brigade from Marsh Harbour,
from Treasure Cay, Casuarina
Point and Hope Town came to
fight the blaze.

The Hope Town fire fight-
ers, she said, brought two boats
carrying equipment to put out
the fire, all to no avail. In the
end, the entire stock and inte-
rior of Maxwell’s was lost to
the flames.

Although the walls of the
food store are still standing,
Mrs Ralph said that the build-
ing is now structurally unsafe
and will have to be demol-
ished.

Abaco resident Julian Lock-
hart told The Tribune yester-

SEE page eight



TE p




ae
gasoline again

By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net




_ FOR the second time in
recent months, the island of
San Salvador has run out of
gasoline, leaving residents to
order fuel and have it
shipped by mailboat to the
far-flung island.

Today mv Lady Frances
is expected to leave Potter’s
Cay Dock at 5pm, laden
with barrels and an assort-
ment of containers filled
with gasoline.

Last month, the vessel
sailed with more than 150
gallons of petroleum prod-
ucts, as San Salvador was hit
with a shortage of fuel when
the oil tanker Ficus went
aground.

At the time, Ficus was





SEE page eight |
J



Be Tes 600 mat



wi ~

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

ACCUSED wife killer Asa
Bethel, 53,.is believed to have
committed suicide hours before

his scheduled appearance in
court yesterday. He was found.

hanging in a bathroom at Her

Majesty’s Prison by another

prisoner.
Mr Bethel was on remand at

‘HMP charged with killing his

41-year-old wife, Bloneva

Bethel. She was found stabbed -

to death with .a steak knife on
July 15th at their Cox Way
apartment off East Street south.

The victim had severe and
extensive knife wounds to her
right arm and shoulder.

Mr Bethel was being housed.

at the Sick Bay at HMP due toa
renal tract blockage.

-The Ministry of National
Security, in a statement released
yesterday afternoon, said: that
Mr Bethel was last seen “alive
and well by.a prison officer”

around 7.30am. Shortly after ~

this Mr Bethel went into the
shower.

Moments later, he was dis-
covered by an inmate hanging
in the bathroom — reportedly

- from the shower — with a bath

towel around his neck, accord-





iller



Ns] SAU



ing to the ministry. An uniden-
tified inmate untied him and
called for assistance.

“Officers and members of the
medical team responded imme-
diately and administered CPR
without success,” said the min-
istry.

Mr Bethel was pronounced
dead. at 8.31am. The ministry

.said, that he showed no signs of

being suicidal and was there-
fore not on suicide watch.

His attorney Devard
Williams, however, told The
Tribune that Mr Bethel was on

SEE page eight

Tourists stranded in Abaco after
airline shuts down its service

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EMERGENCY arrangements had to be made to get 130 strand- »
ed tourists out of Abaco over the weekend after a Florida-based air-
line unexpectedly shut down its service to and from the islands.

Vintage Props and Jets (VPJ) has provided airlift to Abaco for
the past 16 years, but was forced out of business after rising fuel and
business costs and dwindling passenger numbers led to the air-
lines’ revenue taking a turn for the worst.

Director of Airlift Development at the Ministry of Tourism
Tyrone Sawyer said government did not know in advance that
the airline was going to announce the closure of its operations

with immediate effect.

He said that while the Bahamas stands to suffer a “tremendous
bloody nose” as a result of the incident, the ministry’s Abaco team
“did a magnificent job” in off-setting the potential fallout from the

shutdown.

Airlines like Continental Connections increased their seat capac-

SEE page eight










- &

PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





© In brief



Two men detained in connection

with illegal fishing allegations

TWO men, a Bahamian and a Haitian, were taken in for ques-
tioning on Monday afternoon by members of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force in connection with illegal fishing allegations in the
northern Bahamas.

While on routine patrol off West End; Grand Bahama, a Defence
Force patrol craft under the command of Petty Officer Freddy
Rolle reported coming a a 15-foot open hulled fishing vessel.

Onboard, they allegedly discovered 300 lbs of scale fish.

The officers said occupants of the vessel failed to produce the doc-
uments needed for commercial fishing.

The vessel and its crew were taken into West End, and the two
men are now helping’ the police with their inquiries into the matter.








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“A shocking act
of betra

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



_ OPPOSITION Senate mem-
bers denounced as a "shocking
act of betrayal" government's
apparent increases to the tariffs
by changing the customs duty
rates.

While debating three Supple-
mentary Appropriation Bills,
the opposition took govern-
ment to task for what they claim
was a failure to clearly present
all the facts on tax increases dur-
ing the recent budget presenta-
tion.

During her contribution,
Opposition Leader Senator
Allyson Maynard Gibson, said
government claimed the budget
would "cushion" low-income
families from economic hard
times but did not clearly state
the duty increases on 160,000
items, including all clothing,
underwear and toiletries.

In some cases the duty
increases are as much as 10 per
cent, Senator Gibson said.

"There was not one new tax
between 2002 and 2007. We
already have had significant
increases in taxation this year
as a result of this budget and
without people knowing.

“I don't support Madame
President, any democracy where
taxes are increased without citi-
zens knowing that the taxes are
going to be increased and that is
a shocking event.”

Senator Gibson chastised the



al’

Opposition Senators attack
apparent increases to tariffs.



“I don’t support Madame Presi-
dent, any democracy where tax-
es are increased without citizens
knowing that the taxes are going
to be increased and that is a

shocking event.” »



Allyson Maynard Gibson

prime minister's budget state-
ments which said the budget
reflects the FNM's commitment
to "cushion" low-income. citi-
zens from economic hard times.

"But, lo and behold, Madame

‘President, what do we see?

“Ten per cent increases on all

Bahamians; not just low income ;

families, Madame President:
‘And these Bahamians are ask-
ing, can they trust the govern-
ment"?

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald
also. questioned the tariff
increase and government's

transparency. There has been
some debate back and forth as
to the implications of this tariff
and who's responsibility I guess
it was to say to the Bahamian
people what the implications of
this tariff was. And it really goes

to the issue of credibility and |

trust. ;

"During the past year with all
of the inconsistencies that have
been brought about and brought
to the attention of the public

and to myself, I never really |

anticipated that an act of betray-
al, not only to Parliamentarians,



but also to the Bahamian public,
would have occurred to the

extent at which it has happened |

in regards to this last budget.
"One would expect, Madame
President, that any trusting,

transparent government that's -

been accountable to the people

and the Parliament. would dis- ,

close during the presentation of

‘the budget to some extent that

they have increased tariffs essen-
tially on a wide scale, the

Bahamian people deserve to .
know," said Senator Fitzgerald. —
The Senate will meet again |

on Thursday.






Wanted: Local artists

ahi





















"THE Sandals Royal Bahami-




CAN YOU DO iD Artists lee Peau (sa rm vlan mel cans into a care of art. The winner will a $500.

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

an Resort is searching for local
artists to work on a project to
raise awareness of recycling
in the Bahamas.

The resort will be commis-
sioning a local artist to utilise
old cans to create something
memorable. The winner will
receive $500.

“Sandals Royal Bahamian is
on the hunt for an artist with a
real ‘can do’ attitude to join
them for a unique recycling
project — turning old cans into
a work of art,” the resort said
in a statement.

Melissa Nichols, environ-

So RTT RN NE AN eT

2 Bedroom, 2 112 Bathroom 3 storey Townhouses. Gated property includes pool, |
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Resario West Condominiums Under Construction

_ NEW CONDOS FOR SALE










unveils unique recycling project

mental manager at Sandals
Royal Bahamian, said: ““We’re
challenging local artists with
a passion for the environment
to tell us what they’d create
out of the empty cans. The
best and most innovative idea
will be commissioned.

“The environment is top of
everyone’s agenda at the pre-
sent time and so rather than
SHEE TY handing the cans

a aS OORT NO



PH. 325-1325 No Agents Please



straight over for recycling, we
thought why not use the mate-
rials for something fun and
which helps to underline the
importance of preserving the
-earth as well as the benefit of
recycling,” she said.

To submit ideas, artists are
invited to send a short writ-
ten description of their idea
to mnichols@grp.sandals.com
or by calling 327-6400 exten-
sion 6316 no later than Fri-
day, August 15.

The winner will be notified
by telephone on Tuesday,
August 19, and the winning
artist will be given up toa
month to create a master-
piece.

“Sandals Royal Bahamian
has long been committed to
preserving the natural beauty
of its surroundings and, along
with all of Sandals and Beach-
es resorts, has been awarded
the much coveted Green
Globe 21 Award for Environ-
mental Stewardship.

“The resort plans to unveil
the artwork during Septem-
ber before recycling the cans,”
Sandals said in its statement.






THE TRIBUNE



In brief

Man charged

with robbery |

A 25-YEAR-OLD
Pinedale man was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday,
charged with robbery.

Randy Ferguson

appeared before Magistrate

Derrence Rolle in Court 5,
Bank Lane, on the robbery
charge.

It is alleged that Fergu-
son on Saturday, July 19,

while being concerned with

another, robbed Doris Jau-
regui of a brown leather
purse containing $950.
Despite Ferguson’s plea
for bail, the prosecution
objected to him being
granted bail, citing that he
has similar cases pending
before the courts. Accord-
ing to the prosecution, Fer-

guson is currently on bail in }

the Supreme Court ona

murder and armed robbery

charge.

Ferguson was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison
and his case was adjourned
to September 5.

Hope Town to

he seen on
hit TV show

HOPE Town, Abaco, will
be seen by millions of tele-
vision viewers worldwide
when a recently filmed
episode of the hit American
comedy show Scrubs goes
on air.

According to internation-
al media reports, 84 mem-
bers of the cast and crew
from the show, which airs
on ABC, swarmed the small
island to shoot a wedding
scene.

Series creator Bill
Lawrence told one enter-
tainment web site that local
officials on the island “foot-
ed the bill” for the event.

_ “There were no roads, .
and they had rolling black-
outs every couple of hours,
but it was one of the best ©
expefiends Tweed; hie”
said.

The Emmy and Peabody
Award-winning fictional
show revolves around the
lives of staff members work-
ing in a teaching hospital
called Sacred Heart.

The Hope Town special,
said the creator, is “a janie
tically funny episode, where
(actor) Neil Flynn gets mar-
ried in the Bahamas.

“He invites 700 people to
the Bahamas on three days

notice because all he wanted

was the gifts. He didn't want
anybody to show up,” said
Mr Lawrence.

The series creator himself
plays the priest who marries
actor Flynn and his wife-to-
be.

Juvenile is
at'rested
after handgun
discovery

A JUVENILE was
arrested in connection
with the discovery of a
handgun in the Windsor
Lane area.

Police said around
3.30pm yesterday, con-
cerned citizens saw a per-
son with a handgun in the
area of a Super Value
Food Store on Windsor
Lane around 3.30 pm yes-
terday.

Police were immediately
alerted and responded.

The juvenile was arrest-
ed by officers from South-
ern Police Station and is
being questioned in con-
nection with the incident.

@ ARMED ROBBERY

ARMED robbers made
off with cash and a cell
phone after robbing Uni-
versal Beauty Supply Store
on Carmichael Road.

Police report that
around 6pm on Monday,
an employee of the store
was at work when two
gunmen entered demand-
ing cash.

The employee was
robbed of cash and a
patron was robbed of cash
and a cell phone.





Meter. yi eS)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 3

Environmentalist hits



out at new AES offer

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A LOCAL environmen-
talist is claiming that a new
offer by AES corporation to
pump liquefied natural gas

(LNG) to the Bahamas-

comes in the form of a trade-
off which will cost this coun-
try significant revenue
should it choose to sign on
to the Ocean Cay project on
the new terms.

Sam Duncombe of
reEarth, an outspoken critic
of the entire LNG project,
said that the newest offer is
yet another example of AES’
“failure to be upfront” about
the project.

In a full-page advert pub-
lished two weeks ago and on
a local radio show on Sun-
day, Aaron Samson, AES’
managing director, touted
the benefits of the Bahamas
giving the go-ahead for the
controversial LNG plant on
Ocean Cay, near Bimini.

The company recently pro-
posed that it will construct
an additional pipeline to the
Bahamas, separate to the
one which will take the liq-
uefied natural gas. to Flori-
da.

This additional pipeline
would bring the liquefied
natural gas to the Bahamas.

Sul Duncombe

Mr Samson claimed that
BEC could use the gas,
which is currently cheaper
than oil and a “cleaner” form
of energy, to run its turbines
to produce power.

In turn, BEC could then
pass on the savings — which
he claims would amount to
between $1.4 billion and $4
billion over a 15 year period
— to its consumers.

Speaking on IslandFM’s
Sunday Conversation show
this past wes Mr Sam-



_ Aaron Samson

son confirmed to Ms Dun-
combe —-a caller to the show
— that if the Bahamas choos-
es to take up his company’s
offer to build an LNG
pipeline from the plant on
Ocean Cay to Clifton, it will

. be in return for the company

keeping any revenues that it
previously agreed to pass on
to the government in
the form of a “through-put
fee.”

That fee would have been
a continuous source of rev-

Bahamian and Haitian are
accused of illegal fishing

A BAHAMIAN and a Haitian were appre-
hended on Monday afternoon by members of:
the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and
accused of illegal fishing in the Northern

Bahamas.

While on.routine patrol off West End, Grand
: Bahama, a Defence Force patrol craft under
i. the command of Petty Officer Freddy Rolle
me a a eee open hull fishing vessel.

adeveeceececcecteeseenseccceeccsacececsecssserseseeeens

~ Women ’s Ministry of the

fish.

Onboard were two occupants, who had
approximately 300 pounds of assorted scaled

They were not in possession of the neces-

sary documents needed for commercial fishing,

and were subsequently: taken into-custody::»
The vessel and‘its. crew were-taken into West
' End, where they were turnéd over to'the 'rele~"
_vant authorities.





Commonvwealth Baptist Church
hosts a two- day conference

A TWO-DAY CONFER-
ENCE, hosted by the Wom-
en’s Ministry of the Com-
monwealth Baptist Church,
starts today with the aim of
helping Bahamian women
with their struggles.

Now in its seventh year,

the “Get It Real Ladies, (let’s ©
discuss) Family, Relation- —

ships, Independence, Ene-
mies, Needs, and Don’ts”

\ (GIRLFRIEND) Conference

was founded by senior pas-
tor Bishop Arnold Josey and
is hosted by his wife, Elder
Vernita Josey.

“Relationships are in

shambles, abuse and violence
have taken over, causing
families to fall apart and
divert from God's divine
order for the family. In other
words women just can't seem
to get it together,” the Joseys
said. .
In view of this, the couple
decided that Bahamian
women “don't need just
another conference where
they meet to sing, shout, get
happy for the moment and
end up going right back into
their hostile environment of
stress and much struggle.

“What is needed is for us
to get women to a place
where they remove the mask,
the facade and get real, to
meet them at where they are,
discussing real issues that
they face without sugar coat-
ing. God's desire is for us to
help women to reach their
full potential in him,” the
Joseys said.

According to the couple,
since its inception, the con-
ference has impacted the
lives of countless women in
Bahamian society who attend
the event in large numbers
each year.

“The response from the
conference attendees has
been overwhelming.

“Many have concluded that

PUTS Lae CONST}

their lives have been trans-
formed and empowered
through the life changing
testimonies, the powerful
praise and ~~ worship
experience, the anointed
speakers who themselves
have been chosen because of
challenges that they have
overcome.

“This conference has
brought hope to the hopeless
and courage and strength to
those on the verge of giving
up,” the Joseys said.

The conference starts
today and continues through
Friday, July 25.

It is held nightly at 7.30pm
at the Commonwealth Bap-
tist Church, located on Com-
monwealth Bouleyard in
Elizabeth Estates.

Speakers include Minister
Joy Simmons of the Church
Of God Of Prophecy Taber-
nacle on East Street, Pastor
Dolly King of the Hosanna
Full Gospel Baptist Church
on Abundant Life Road, and

ia ee
a WUT

eta hy
Pers eae



Minister Whitlean Burrows



Minister Whitlean Burrows
of Commonwealth Baptist
Church.

enue for the Bahamian gov-
ernment, consisting of a cer-
tain amount of money per
1000 cubic feet of liquefied
natural gas that the company
pumps to Florida via its pro-
posed 94-mile pipeline from
Ocean Cay.

It was estimated by AES
that, based on natural gas
prices, the fee would have
generated $40 - $50 million
for the Bahamas in 2005.

Instead, the company has
suggested the government
will benefit from the “35 per
cent import duties and seven
per cent Stamp Tax, ‘or
equivalent payment’,” it will
make to the government on
the gas it sells to BEC,
should the government sign
on and choose the pipeline
option.

Ms Duncombe claims that
in promoting this option, Mr
Samson has “very conve-
niently worded” his state-
ments to downplay the fact
that the Bahamas will lose
the through-put revenue.

“It seems to me this is a.

way to make this project
more palatable ‘to the
Bahamian public as they
were getting no positive trac-
tion otherwise, and also for
AES to pay the Bahamas
less at the end of the day.”
Mr Samson failed to return
messages left for him on

Monday seeking comment
on the matter.

However, in a previous
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, AES’ managing direc-
tor said that the Bahamas
could collect between $20 -
$30 million in duty on the
LNG it supplies to BEC in
the first year, increasing to
between $30 - $40 million
some 16 years later in 2028.

The AES Ocean Express
terminal would re-gasify
LNG brought to Ocean Cay
by ship, then pump it to
Florida via a pipeline to gen-
erate electricity there.

Its proponents say it will
create additional revenue,
jobs and some much needed
diversification to the
Bahamian economy, and if
the Bahamas accepts the
pipeline offer, cheaper elec-
tricity.

Opponents say it is an
“inherently dangerous indus-
try” which may hurt the envi-
ronment and would only pro-

long the Bahamas’ “addic-
tion” to fossil fuels.
The plan was given

approval in principle under
the former FNM govern-
ment.

The FNM was removed
from office before the pro-
ject went any further and no

' forward movement on LNG

occurred under the PLP.

Great S elections
For T he Home

havpanl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 562.652), Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

ancing Available Thr.




PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN i CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation nd Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Fraud scams keep coming

EVERY MORNING when we check our e-
mail we discover we are millionaires — by the
end of the day we have become millionaires
many times over. In fact if all of these pie-in-the
sky winnings had materialised, we probably
could have helped government make a sizeable
dent in the public debt.

It is alarming the number of crooks and
fraudsters unleashed on the world through the
Internet. And it is probably also incredible the
number of gullible people who have fallen for
the scams. Instead of reaping the promised mil-
lions, they are robbed of their savings.

These crooks must be profiting, because |

instead of disappearing they are increasing.
Several years ago Nigeria was known as the

scam capital of the world. Today, these scam- -

mers come from every corner of the globe. One
even had the nerve to pose as representing the
Cyber Wiretap and Funds Recovery Depart-
ment of the FBI in the J Edgar Hoover Building
on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. Two
others claimed they were with the US military in
Iraq. According to them they had got their
sticky fingers on-a sizeable portion of Saddam
Hussein’s loot and needed a partner to help
them get it out of the country. Of course, the
aider and abettor was to share in a millionaire’s
percentage of the stolen goods.

These scams started small — by the occa-
sional letter sent by air mail. Today, thanks to
the Internet, they arrive on one’s desk daily.

. There are so many of them operating that by the
time we have cleared them out of our system,
we fear we might have deleted some of our
legitimate mail. ‘At the end of the task our delete
finger is exhausted and our delete key seems .to
have settled into a perpetual depressed posi-
tion.

Years ago the Nigerian scams mdde world
news as people were warned not to fall into
their trap. The Tribune also wrote about them.
By that time there were reports that persons
who had gone to Nigeria to collect their money
had been killed.

One day we received a call from a Bahamian
couple. They were distraught. We forget the
details of their case, but remember that they
lost more than they could afford. We advised
them not to attempt to go to Nigeria to redeem
their losses. We do not recall how their sorry
story ended.

Even Microsoft’s name is being used in what
is called a Microsoft Mega Jackpot e-mail win-
ning programme. As Bill Gates’ company has
stated in its warning to its software users: If
you haven’t played in such a lotto, then obvi-
ously you have won nothing. In other words, if
you have not entered a lotto, either by pur-
chasing a ticket, or submitting your e-mail, how

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can you expect to be a winner of anything?
Don’t let your greed get in the way of your
commonsense, 7 you do, you are certain to be a
loser.

And these seoplé have no conscience. Here
is one example. This person claims to be a rev-
erend gentleman. He gives a name, and says
he is a public relations secretary of a certain
church in Lagos — he also names the church.
All of which are obviously bogus. He claims he
was “accosted by the accounts manager of the
Union Bank of Nigeria, Lagos branch, of an
eventually, but rather obscene act of financial
misappropriation by the past Minister of Petro-
leum ... and an oil merchant.”

According to. the tall tale, the oil merchant
died in a plane crash — in most of these stories
someone is bumped off, leaving a packet of
cash to be disposed of. Apparently, this now
dead merchant left cash in a numbered account
for the former Minister of Petroleum from the
proceeds of a crude oil sale. However, with the
depositor now dead, leaving no information of
next of kin, the minister, who supposedly should
claim the money, is afraid to come forward
b. cause the “financial crime securities are trail-
ing his activities.”

Now this is where the priest comes in.
According to the priest he was requested to
use his collar to “‘seek out a respectable investor
who can be trustworthy to receive this fund for
investment purposes on an agreeable term of 20
per cent. Value of fund presently stands at $16.5
million.”

Now this is where we are supposed to come
in: For this 20 per cent of $16.5 million we have
been invited to pose as next of kin to justify
the documents being probated ‘in the Lagos
court so that the money can be paid to us as next
of kin. He says that because he is a priest he can
assure us that this is not a scam and he wants us
to “observe this instruction religiously.” He
said he sends us this “mail not without a mea-
sure of fear as to what the consequences are ...
but I know within me,” he adds, “that nothing
ventured is nothing gained and that success and
riches never come easy or on a a platter of gold.

“This is the one truth,” he continued, “I
have learned from my experience as a reverend
father. Do not betray my,confidence. If we can
be of one accord, we should commence the
business asap. I await your response.”

Our response was immediate. We sent his e-
mil to Fraud Watch International at
ac 2in@fraudwatchinternational.com

We suggest that if any of our readers are
invited to join in any of these scams, they do the
same. To do otherwise could prove disastrous —

riot only a personal loss of money, but also the

theft of your identity.



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Take these
daredevil bus
drivers off
the streets

EDITOR, The Tribune.

There cannot be one single
Bahamian that would be able
to defend the existing fact that
“some bus drivers” in the
Bahamas are a menace to
society.

They intentionally put pas-'

sengers’ lives at risk with dis-
regard and disrespect every-
day with their “high wire
acts”.

Innocent passengers, like
“lambs to the slaughter” sit

- on these buses without crack-
ing their teeth, while drivers

perform their daredevil acts.

Every day motorists witness
how aggressive bus drivers,
loaded with passengers some
children, overtake as many as
ten vehicles in an effort to gain
an advantage over another
bus driver.

These maniacs could care

less who their passengers are

because their mission is to get
the passenger that they could
see in a distance to make just
one more dollar.

It is almost acceptable to see
a bus driver take a short cut
across someone’s property
without fear. '

The police force could care
less because many times the
occupants of the buses are
officers in uniform.

This makes.one wonder if
the officers remain silent just

' to get a free ride.

Many times officers can be
seen chatting with bus drivers

becoming too familiar which,

obviously compromises their




Dae

letters@tribunemedia.net



position. The bus driver then
does what he wishes because
he believes that the police are
“his boy”.

The lazy police officers
watch while buses packed to
capacity, weave in and out of

congested streets, but do not °

say one single word.

The officers do not have the
balls or the interest to stop
this behaviour before some
innocent passenger loses his
life, but is seen all over the
television making silly com-
mentary after the tragedy
occurs.

The lip service paid to

“cracking down” on bus dri-
vers makes me sick .to my
stomach.

The consequences that
should be meted out to viola-
tors of reckless driving are
nothing more than a “big bag
of foul air.”

These concerns expressed
will’go by unnoticed until
someone is maimed or killed
and then some stop gap mea-
sure would be announced for
a short while and it would
quickly return to business as
usual.

It.is time for harsher penal-
ties to be given to bus drivers
and taxi drivers who put his

passengers’ lives in danger,
and who consume alcohol

while driving. .

Any bus driver or taxi dri-
ver who drive in a manner
dangerous to the public should
be treated just like anyone
who is attempting to murder,
since driving recklessly could
possibly cause lives.

We in the Bahamas must
begin to look like we are not a

_ banana republic and not only

implement but carry out the
laws that fit the crime. _

It is high time that not only
bus and taxi drivers licenses
be revoked when found vio-
lating a law that may cause
lives, but the franchise holder
too must be heavily penalised
because they are guilty of
greed by pressuring the dri-
ver to meet unrealistic quo-
tas.

We become like hogs when
we focus too much on the
mean green almighty dollar to
the detriment of the welfare -
and safety of the public.

It is time to bite the bullet.
If the laws are on the books
implement them, if they are

“not, make harsher laws that

would go a long way to pro-
tecting the general public and
make a bus system that is
needed much safer.

Still fearless.

IVOINE INGRAHAM
Nassau, ~~
July, 2008:

Attending Independence Day events
should not be a measure of patriotism

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am writing in response to
the discussion that has been
coming up each Independence
Day for the last few years
regarding white Bahamians

not attending this event and

what it means.

I think Rev. C.B. Moss
raised the issue a couple of
years ago and I remember
being somewhat amused, and

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ahamas

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this is why. In 2006, the newly
formed Adult National Choir
was asked to sing at.the Inde-
pendence Day celebrations at
Clifford Park.

Several white Bahamians,
including myself, were part of
this choir and sang that night.
So not only were we present
at the celebrations, we were
part of the entertainment.

So.imagine my surprise
afterwards when I read the
claims that there were no
white Bahamians there!

How did they miss us on the
stage under those glaring
lights that made us so unbear-
ably hot in the middle of July?

I concluded at that time,
and still believe, that people
often see what they want to
see.

However, since this issue
has continued to come up
each year, I would like to put
on the record that I know that

at least in 2006, at the Inde-

pendence Day celebrations

there were several white
Bahamians taking part!

Having said that, I don't
think that attendance at the
Independence Day celebra-
tions should be used as a mea-
sure of a Bahamian's patrio-
tism, love of country, feeling
of unity, etc. Kudos to Mike
Stevenson for his study to find
out why people don't attend
this event.

The next step would be to
survey the people that do
attend to find out why they
go, before assuming it is
national pride, and thereby
assuming people who don't
attend don't have any.

FRANCES FARMER
Nassau,
July 22, 2008

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS’

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 5



tj

Missions

OC)

to

i

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS’ @ Tribune Staff Reporter





CONSTRUCTION PROJECT:
BUILDING FOUR CLASSROOMS

THE Grace Community
Church Short-Term Missions
teams have been working with
Haitian communities in Haiti
and throughout the Caribbean
for 23 years, so when they were
invited by a Haitian pastor in
Nassau to assist a church in Port-
de-Paix they took the opportu-
nity to help an area with a local
connection.

Pastor Wilme Joseph, a Hait-
ian-Bahamian preacher at the
Haitian Evangelical church on
Carmichael Road, asked the
team at Grace Community
Church to assist the Good Shep-
herd Evangelical Church in his
home rn by helping to build
four classrooms at the expanding
school there.

The Good Shepherd Church
was founded by Pastor Frangois
Renaud 21 years ago with a con-
gregation of just 16.

Today, it has grown to a com-
munity of around 1,700 people,
with a school offering affordable
education to.258 children, ages
five to 12.

But with just four cramped
classrooms for the students, the
Good Shepherd needed help, so
the Grace Community Church
on Palmetto Drive, Nassau,
raised $6,000 for building mate-
rials and the missions team set
out to Port-de-Paix to help build
four more classrooms on the site.

Freelance contractor Tony
Wilson, 45, of Blake Road, Nas-
sau, has been managing con-
struction projects for the mis-
sionary team since 1988, and
was keen to lead the construc-
tion team to Haiti once again.

"Since my first trip I felt God
had called me into short-term
missions," Mr Wilson said.



"T always had a desire to help,
I have these skills to help others,

and the short-term missions
really made that happen."
Pastor Renaud was over-

whelmed with gratitude for the ©

missionaries’ contribution to
such a desperate community.

"We have problems getting
help, and the people here need
help. They need food, shoes,
clothes, some people can't pay
for school, and they come to me
for help, but I don't have money
even for myself,” he said.

During the five days the mis-
sionaries worked on the site in
Haiti, the walls of the four class-
rooms »«.ere completed. Only
the roofs need to be finished
now.

Pastor Renaud hopes to also
build a medical clinic at the
church as there are not adequate
facilities for people in the com-



Rotaract Club of
Southeast Nassau
Centennial unveils
hook and school
supply drive

THE Rotaract Club of
Southeast Nassau Centenni-
al has announced a book
and school supply drive to
benefit the students of Ade-
laide Primary School.

A spokesperson for the
club said they are looking
for books for students in
grades one to six.

“Give the tools of knowl-
edge to our future genera-
tion,” he said. “Every child
deserves a chance to excel.”

The event will be held at
the Town Centre Mall from
noon to 4pm on Saturday,
July 26.

Every donor will receive a
token of appreciation from
the Rotaract SENC.

The club said it needs vol-
unteers for the drive. Inter-
ested persons were asked to
email: rotaract.senc@gmail.com.

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THEMISSION -

munity, many of whom are suf-
fering from a range of treatable
infections and diseases.

The Grace Church Short-
Term Missions teams will con-
tinue to help the Good Shep-
herd Evangelical Church to con-
tribute to the development in
the community the best way
they can.

THE MEDICAL CLINIC

PUBLIC Health Nurse Fred-
erica Sands, 65, has helped to
heal people in Haiti and Hait-
ian communities throughout the
Caribbean since the Grace
Short-Term Missions team was
formed 23 years ago.

.Mrs Sands, of Shirlea, Nassau,
said after her first mission to
Haiti in 1988 she was “sold”.

“When I saw the need, and
the sense of satisfaction I got
from helping, I was determined
within myself that Haiti was
going to be my mission, and the
people here are so grateful for
everything we do.

"They show such gratitude,

you could not help but be a part,

of it,” she said.

However, this year's mission
to Port-de-Paix was somewhat
disappointing for Nurse Sands,



The nurses were instead lim-
ited to helping the children who
attended the Vacation Bible
School (VBS) at the church on
Wednesday and Friday last
week.

Five-year-old Dorilas Riben-
son was one of the VBS children
who had a consultation with the
nurse, and Mrs Sands diagnosed
a bacterial infection on his scalp
and gave him the appropriate
ointment.

Surplus medicines were sent
on to a nurse known to the mis-

- sionaries in Guischard, who is

in need of inedication.
Other medication. was left
with the community nurse in



who works at the College of the
Bahamas in Nassau, and mis-
sionary Lisa Adderley, 47, a pub-
lic health nurse at the Blue Hill
Road clinic.

Medical supplies did not arrive
with the team when their last
Pineapple Air flight landed on
Saturday.

. The painkillers, fever reduc-
ers, antacids for the hundreds of
people who do not eat regularly,
and medicines for worms, ring-
worm, head lice, and fungal
infections did not arrive until
Wednesday afternoon.

This deprived the communi-
ty of the free medical attention
the missionaries hoped to pro-
vide for two of the four days that
they worked in Haiti.




DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

Port-de-Paix.
"It has not been the usual
medical clinic we have when we

‘come to Haiti," Nurse Sands

said.
"We usually have hundreds of

_ people come, but without the

supplies there was nothing we
could do."

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

CLASSES at the Vacation
Bible School in Port-de-Paix
took a creative turn as the
school’s leader Lyric Hanna was
forced to work without supplies
for three out of five days during
her classes this year.

‘The 21-year-old Sea Breeze
resident, who. is studying Ele-
mentary Education at Barry
University in Miami, has been

i eet: Estimates




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involved with VBS on the

Grace Short-Term missions ,
‘since she was eight years old.

Without supplies, Lyric and
her team of six teenagers, were
faced with a challenge of keep-
ing 100 children entertained
with the help of translator Pas-
tor Desirjean Eneck from Port-
au-Prince.

"We acted out three stories
of Noah, Joseph and his coat of
many colours, and Adam and
Eve," Lyric said.

"All the young girls sang a
song for the kids, Beijing and
Randy (two young missionar-
ies) did a rap and got the kids
involved, and we played soccer





before the Bible school."

With the crayons, markers
and construction paper they did
have, children made cards and
cardboard visors to take home.
When supplies arrived in time

for Friday's class, children were

given re-usable plastic cups,
bracelets reading 'What Would
Jesus Do', as well as treats and
candies.

Lyric said: "I like to provide
the kids with some sense of edu-

- cation they would not normally

get in their regular school or
Sunday school, and to see the
expressions on their faces when
they are exposed to something
that seems so ordinary to us but

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they might have never seen
before.

"We give them treats, and
sometimes that is the only thing -
they have to eat for the whole
day.

"It is heartbreaking every
time I come, and I know we are
doing something good, but I
also feel so helpless.

"After all these years I have
not gotten used. to roughing it,
but a week of discomfort to
bring somebody else some hap-
piness is worth it.,

"I want to keep doing it, and
try to change people's attitude
at home so they will be more
sympathetic,” Lyric said.







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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





Commissioner of

Strachan laid out

St Francis Xavier

LOCAL NEWS :





OPPOSITION leader Perry Christie, former Speaker of the House of
Assembly Sir Arlington Butler, Hartlyn Roberts and businessman
Bradley Roberts.



FAMILY OF COURTNEY STRACHAN SR; front row left to right: Sybil Louise Coakley Strachan, wife, Flora Hanna, sister-in-law, Courtney
Strachan Jr, son, Marilyn Strachan, daughter-in-law, Desiree and Dashanda Pinder, granddaughters, Kyron Strachan, daughter, Kvon Stra-

chan, grandson



i
A POLICE honour guard leaves St Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street yesterday afternoon with the body of former
Assistant Commissioner of Police Courtney Strachan. Mr Stra-
chan was buried at St Agnes graveyard.





Franklyn Fergusan/Photos



FORMER
Assistant

Police Courtney
in the foyer at

Cathedral
yesterday.



RETIRED senior officers of the Royal Bahamas Police Force listening to Acting Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson reflect on the life of Courtney Strachan.



THE BAHAMAS SUPPORT PROGRAM FOR TRANSFORMING
EDUCATION AND TRAINING

ae | Drive itl, Drag iti,



. The Government of The Bahamas (GOB) has secured a loan of US$18 million from the Inter-
American Development Bank (IDB) as partial funding for thBahamas Support Program for —
Transforming Education & Training (SPTET), the total cost of which is US$22.5 million.
The project will support the development and implenentation of activities aimed at improving
the quality of education throughout the Bahamas.

One critical aspect of the Progam is to build capacity amongpersons involved in teaching and
supervising students with specill needs throughoutthe entire system, with emphasis at the
primary level age groups.

The Bahamas Ministry of Education is nowseeking the services of a suitably qualified
consultant to improve the overall capacity of the ducation system to deliver efficient services to

the special needs population, speéfically to provide capacity building support for curriculum
adaptation, enhanced instructinal strategies, strengthening shool and classroom management
and develop monitoring and evaluation systems angpractices relative to an inclusive educational
setting. ‘ ‘



The expected duration of this consultancy is fo up to 250 non-consecutivedays to be delivered
over a 24 month period.

Individuals with a Masters Degree or higher in Sgcial Education with specialization in inclusive : "
education practices and with training and expeise in curriculum development should apply. Special Trade in

Candidates should demonstrate leadership in thdesign, delivery and evaluation of training in

Special Education in the Englis-speaking Caribbean. Ti i ad a ’S , Ni u r a Am © z S$

Shortlisted candidates may be required to attendn on-site interview before final selection. r Oo nti j e rs, a n ad 1 5 S e aa : By us
Fmd? Sop

Kindly submit resumes of not more tha_n 4 pages (including references and
work done) electronically or in hard copy to the address below_:

The Permanent Secretary y

Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture ’

The IDB Project Management Unit

P.O. Box N 3913/4 ’

te | WEWILL TRADE ITIN
Tonique Williams-Darling Hwy. :

Nassau, Bahamas o
Attn: John R Haughton, Project Manager

Telephone: (242) 325-4725/4748

Email: jhaughtonidbproject@yahoo.com
And tmunningsidbproject@yahoo.com

Ed
The closing date for applic ations is Friday August 15" , 2008. S a ii a : i i og rs li

Your Nissan Dealers in The Bahamas.





SLANE LAAAEAELAE HAA HAA REE RA AYR I AR IMA IN



LERIEOSIE EISELE EISEN








THE TRIBUNE

WEVINEOVAY, JULY 25, ZUUG, FAUL /



lL aa ee
Great ship designer who

called the Bahamas home

ing at State University of New ©
S HIPPING is the lifeblood

of the global economy.
And while most people know
that the Bahamas is a major flag
of convenience (with over 1600
vessels registered), few are aware
that one of the world's greatest
ship designers once called our
islands home.

George Campbell left his
imprint on an entire global
industry, but moved about large-
ly ufinoticed — and nowhere
more so than here. In fact, when
his estate recently gave $10 mil-
lion to the College of the
Bahamas, most Bahamians had
never heard his name, although
he had lived in Nassau intermit-
tently since the late 1960s.

His, contribution to industrial
development goes back to the
dark days of the Second World
War, when the first mass-pro-
duced freighter — known as the
Liberty ship — helped win the
war and drove the resurgence of
global trade afterwards.

But Campbell had nothing to
do witia the Liberty ship — a sim-
ple 11,000-ton freighter fitted
with a crude reciprocating steam
engine capable of pushing it at a
leisurely 10 1/2 knots. Mass pro-
duced in American shipyards to
a British design, these ships
delivered the troops and supplies
that were crucial to the Allied
war effort.

They were designed for econ-
omy and speed of construction,
and by the middle of the war
they were being churned out in
under 60 days at $2 million a
pop. Altogether, about 2700
were built and several hundred
managed to survive the war.
They were acquired by shipown-
ers who wanted to rebuild their
fleets.

"The sale of about 100 Liber-
ties to Greek shippers launched a
wave of expansion and prosper-
ity that has continued for almost
60 years," retired Nassau-based
shipping consultant Bill
Bardelmeier told me recently.
"Throughout the 1950s the Lib-
erty ship was the benchmark-set-
ter for world shipping."





















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But as we said, George Camp-
bell had absolutely nothing to do
with that.

A former shipyard apprentice
of Scottish descent, Campbell
had been posted to Canada by
the Royal Navy in 1941 to help
salvage and repair war-damaged
ships. After the war he stayed
on, setting up a small marine
engineering firm in Montreal
with his brother Jack.

But in 1949, as the Japanese
ship industry began to revive, he
moved to Tokyo. It was the
beginning of a relationship that
lasted 35 years and produced the
world's most influential ship
design firm - GTR Campbell &
Co. Campbell attracted billions
of dollars to Japan, and was a
major factor in the country's rise
to dominance in world ship-
building.

I: was the Liberty ship that
led to his amazing success.
By the 1960s these workhorses
had become obsolete and ship-
pers were clamouring for a
replacement. Campbell — as the
lead designer for Ishikawajima
Harima Heavy Industries (IHI)
— was in an ideal position to
develop a hew vessel. It was
called the Freedom class, and
hundreds were produced from
1965 onwards.

According to Bardelmeier,
"these new vessels were capable
of fitting economically into mod-
ern shipyard production meth-
ods, thus becoming cheaper to
produce and able to be marketed
at an attractive price. :

Campbell and IHI became the
most famous team in the indus-
try.

Bardelmeier had a passing

acquaintance with Campbell

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years ago: "We met in Nassau
and Tokyo, but were never very
friendly toward each other —
not for any particular reason
except we both had rather snot-
ty egos professionally. He was a
bit of a dour curmudgeon I
thought."

The Japanese shipbuilder, THI,
became one of.the world's
largest, while GTR Campbell &
Co produced a stream of
advanced but simple to operate
vessels that could be mass pro-
duced. Shipyards around the
world began buying licences to
use Campbell’s designs for

tankers, bulk carriers, research .

ships, coast guard cutters and ice-

_ breakers.

On delivery of the first Free-
dom ship in 1965, the head of
IHI acknowledged that “Mass
production of commercial ships
has never been carried out,
except in the case of the Liberty
ships during the war. But there
should be no reason for not
adopting the idea for shipbuild-

”

Campbell had developed one

’ of the most successful standard

vessel designs ever conceived.
And in time, he became a
shipowner himself.

"He lived frugally and needed
an investment outlet for the sub-
stantial design fees that were
pouring in," Bardelmeier
explained. "He established a
Nassau office in the late 60s and
owned one of the Chertsey pent-
houses on West Bay Street."

Campbell's shipping opera- .

tions were to take the name
Dockendale, after the family
farm where he was raised in
northern England. The compa-
ny was managed by an engineer
named Les Fernandes, and grew
to control a fleet of 33 vessels.

u



Welc

Fernandes developed a substan-
tial staff of Bahamians who run
the day-to-day operation in Nas-
sau with satellite offices in other
major world entrepots.

"T attended a luncheon for the
whole Dockendale staff some
years ago," Bardelmeier said,
"and came away with the distinct
feeling that they had an unusual
degree of group spirit and loy-
alty exceeding anything I had
ever seen. Focused effort was
being made to send Nassau staff
to fill vacation slots in Australia



“It was the
Liberty ship that
led to his amazing
success. By the
1960s these
workhorses had
become obsolete
and shippers were
clamouring for a
replacement.
Campbell — as
the lead designer
for Ishikawajima
Harima Heavy
Industries (HI) —
was in an ideal
position to
develop a new -
vessel.”
ee ee

and the Far East; and'the
Bahamians seemed delighted at
the chance to gain a broader
view of the organization and
enjoyed working directly with
employees around the world
with whom they normally only
had electronic contact."

By the early 1990s Dockendale
had formed a joint venture part-
nership with Danish shipowner
Torben Jensen's Clipper Group.

Clipper controls about 250 ves-
sels and makes the decisions on
freight contracts and charters,
while Dockendale handles the
management details of hiring and
paying the international crews,
scheduling repairs and mainte-
nance, and provisioning all the
ships.

Dockendale is owned today
by Fernandes and Jensen. And
the Clipper Group operates
about 10 per cent of the 1600
plus ships flying the Bahamian
flag around the world. Both com-
panies are based at Dockendale
House on West Bay Street.

Meanwhile, Campbell's design
firm was taken over by another
Indian engineer named Anthony
Prince, and is based at Sandy
Port.

GT R Campbell Marine Con-
sultants supervises shipbuilding
projects in China, Japan, Singa-

_pore, South Korea‘and India.

Clipper has built over 40 ships
with Prince, most of them under
technical management by Dock-
endale. Prince also took the time
to design a new inter-island trad-
ing vessel for the Bahamas.

The Fiesta Mail operated by
the Mailboat Company is fitted
with many advanced features
and is said to be safer and more
efficient than many of the older
inter-island vessels that still are
seen around Potters Cay. The

_ 225-foot vessel can carry 46 cars,

eight trailers or 20 containers, as

well as up to 600 passengers.
Campbell's interests in Nas-

sau have always been looked

after by a Bahamian lawyer .

named Lowell Mortimer, who
first met him in 1973 as a fresh-
faced attorney in Darrel Rolle's
law office.

"He didn't have many local
investments and he spent only a
month or so a year here, but our
relationship continued until his
death in 1994.

‘The Freedom Foundation was.

set up 10 years before that to
give scholarships to Bahamians
to study agriculture and engi-
neering. Over the years we have
given about 30 of them — there
are six doing marine engineer-



Paved Roads —
Water and Sewerage ~
Phone and Cable
Electricity =
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Recreational Park include:

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use

York right now."

According to Mortimer,
Campbell liked to consider him-
self a gentleman farmer and was
very interested in promoting
agricultural development:

H: foundation helped
to create the College

of the Bahamas' Poultry
Research unit at Gladstone
Road in the late 1990s, and
recently agreed to fund a degree
programme in environmental sci-
ence and sustainable develop-
ment.

"We felt that contributing to
the College itself, rather than
simply handing out scholarships,
would benefit the Bahamas in a
more universal and sustainable
way," said Mortimer, who is now
the Campbell estate's only
trustee.

The foundation draws on
Campbell's estate, which has
assets of $200 million in ships.

“This gift will support a pro-

‘gramme that is central to nation-

al development and imperative
for our future," COB President
Jayne Hodder told the press
recently. "Small island sustain-
ability will be a flagship pro-
gramme for the new University
of The Bahamas where we will
graduate students who will make
a difference to this country
through eco-tourism, environ-

mental management, agricultur-

al development, and policy
development."

As a result of this donation,,.

many Bahamians are hearing
George Campbell's name for the
first time — 14 years after he
died at the age of 84. He was one
of the great global innovators,
an "invisible giant" who man-
aged the remarkable feat of
changing an industry while
scrupulously avoiding public
attention. f

What do you think?

Send comments to:
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit:
www.bahamapundit.com




eR
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

upstairs neighbour screaming
for help around 12.30 am,
friends said. Neighbours fran-
tically called the police. He was
taken to hospital where he lat-
er died.

A trail of blood was found at
the nearby Temple Christian
Primary School, suggesting
Wilson's attacker fled the
scene on foot.

His death, coupled with the
killing of AIDS activist
Wellington Adderley days ear-
lier and the 2007 murders of
handbag designer Harl Taylor
and college professor Thad-
deus McDonald, prompted
speculation of a gay serial
killer.

Police have disputed this
theory citing a lack of evidence
linking the four 'gay' murders.

On June 23 and 24, police
released two sketches of men

Man turns”
himself in

wanted for questioning in rela- ;

tion to Wilson's murder.
The first was a composite

sketch of a man with a shaved
eyebrow and pierced ears :
believed to be 19 or 20,5 ft 8 :
inches, who witnesses said was :

seen running bare-chested on

Collins Avenue onto McCul- :
lough Corner the morning of :

Wilson's murder.
He was reportedly bleeding.
The second sketch was of a

man witnesses said was seen :
leaving Wilson's apartment :

the evening before he was
killed.

medium-brown complexion,

between 18 and 25, of medi-
um build and around 140 to }

150 pounds.

San Salvador runs out of gasoline

FROM page one

transporting more than 120,000 gallons of fuel for Shell, Texaco,
and Esso. Along with gasoline, the tanker also carried aviation :

kerosene and light automotive diesel.

However, with no tanker grounded or any noticeable shortage
in New Providence, it is uncertain as to why San Salvador has once :
again been unable to keep up with its fuel needs. In the past, when :
the island was hit with fuel shortages residents were restricted to :
purchases of only $20 worth of diesel or gasoline until supplies :

could be replenished.

However, with this $20-a-day restriction, residents were limit- :

ed to only a little over three gallons of fuel a day.

Sources say that San Salvador, like many other Out Islands, is :
supposed to have a fuel depot that can hold at least 4,000 gallons :
of petroleum. These depots, or “satellite plants”, ;
called in the fuel industry, are supposed to be tested regularly to ;
ensure they can be filled with the optimum amount of fuel to sus- :

tain the island in case of any unforeseen emergencies.

However, it is unknown if this procedure is being properly

followed and maintained in San Salvador.

HORTICULTURAL
CONSULTANT

Sandals Resorts International invites applications

for the following position

Horticultural Consultant for Sandals Northern Caribbean
Properties including the Bahamas and Turks & Caicos

Islands

The applicant must meet the following criteria;

¢ Minimum 15 years agronomic and horticultural
experience with a minimum 5 years in a supervisory

position

Diploma in a turf, horticultural related field of study

Thorough knowledge of tropical and sub tropical
plants, grasses, diseases and insects control

Thorough knowledge of all related pesticides, uses
and safe handling procedures

Thorough knowledge of fertilizers both liquids and
solids, and able to calibrate spraying equipment

Thorough knowledge of electrical and manual

irrigation systems

Willing and able to travel

Applications should be email to:
Cmajor@grp.sandals.com

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He was described as of

as they are :

Alleged wife killer
‘commits suicide’

FROM page one

anti-depressants and was see-
ing a psychotherapist even

before the death of his wife. Mr:

Bethel was
depressed,” he said.

Mr Williams also said that he
verbally advised officials at the
prison last Thursday during a
visit that Mr Bethel should be
watched.

He said that he went to the
prison the day after Mr Bethel
was remanded and “spoke to
the parties concerned and (he)
told the officers, you
know...‘watch this man’ because
on my interview I realized
something was wrong with
him.”

The following day (Friday),
Mr Williams said that he sent
an official letter to the prison
requesting that the doctor
ensured that Mr Bethel saw a
urologist as was promised. ,

Mr Williams said he also not-
ed in his letter that Mr Bethel
needed psychiatric help based

Page

on his interaction with him in
an interview. The attorney fur-
ther requested that Mr Williams
receive his medication, includ-
ing anti-depressants, and drugs
to treat the blockage, that were
at the Central Detective Unit.

Yesterday morning when Mr
Bethel was to appear in court
for the first time since the
arraignment, Mr Williams said
he was going to ask for a court
order to-ensure that these things
were done.

The prison has been unable
for some reason to say whether
at this stage Mr Bethel had seen
a psychiatrist, said Mr William
He has instead been referred t
prison doctors who so far he has
been unable to reach. The attor-
ney said, however, that he
intends to attempt to speak with
them again today.

Police were made aware of
the death of Mr Bethel shortly
after it occurred. CDU is now
conducting an investigation. A
coroner’s inquest is also being
organized, according to the

USC



FIREFIGHTERS LEAVE a house next to a Texaco Station on East Bay
Street yesterday after extinguishing a fire there. Photo: Tim Clarke

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Neighbours recalled being
awakened by the screams of
Mrs Bethel at around 11 o’clock
on the night of her murder. Her
cries for help led them to call
for police assistance. Mrs Bethel
was heard screaming “I rebuke
you” and “Lord have mercy”
in the final minutes of her life.

She was pronounced dead at
Princess Margaret Hospital lat-
er that night.

At Mr Bethel’s arraignment

‘on July 16th at Court 1, Bank

Lane, his attorney Devard
Williams told the court that Mr
Bethel urgently needed to be



FROM page one

er.

Fire at Marsh Harhour's largest food store

day that the destruction of Maxwell’s will have a devastating
effect on the island’s economy.

In addition to over 40 people being out of a job, Mr Lockhart
said that Abaconians have also lost their major grocery suppli-

“People were already experiencing difficulties finding basic
things like milk, bread and cheese. The shelves of the (fo
stores) are often empty. It was bad enough before, but now with
Maxwell’s gone, it’s going to be even worse,” he ‘said.

One resident of Abaco said that Maxwell's serviced “so
many” communities on the island.

Those communities, she said, will now struggle to find anoth-
er source from which to purchase their supplies and necessities.

seen by a doctor. He had a renal
tract blockage, his lawyer said at
the time.

Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez agreed to the request
and ordered that he be
taken to a doctor after the
arraignment and that the prison
doctor be made aware of his
condition.

There have been conflicting
reports of what was at the cen-
tre of the dispute between the
Bethels, which led her husband
to stab her to death. Uncon-
firmed reports suggest the two
might have been arguing over
money.






od







Tourists stranded in Abaco

FROM page one

ity to absorb the stranded visi- ’

tors.

“When these things happen
it causes a lot of disruption,”
said Mr Sawyer.

“We made sure that those
people had the ability to get off
the island by Saturday evening.”

Vintage Props and Jets pro-
vided a twice-daily, primarily
scheduled commuter service to
Abaco, and the option of pri-
vate charters for passengers and
cargo. The summer was tradi-
tionally the airline’s peak sea-
son.

In 2006, the airline transport-
ed 16,399 people between Flori-
da and Abaco.

However, in 2007, this num-
ber fell to 11,913, according to
Stephen Cooke, director of
business development at the air-
line’s hub, Daytona Beach

_ International Airport (DBIA).

The airline’s closure is a tan-
gible sign that the Bahamas’
main industry, tourism, cannot
escape the fallout from the glob-
al economic turbulence and the
downturn in the American
economy in particular.

Yesterday, Mr Sawyer was .

optimistic that in the long-term
the market will provide: addi-
tional airlift to compensate for
VPJ’s decline.

“It usually does, and I think
that will happen in this case as
well,” he said. :

Meanwhile, on its web site,

When you’ve loved someone
deeply they are never lost to you.

PRECIOUS MEMORIES OF

OCTAVIAS BASTIAN (UNCLE)

Sunset: 1% July, 2001
Will Live On In Our Hearts Forever...

Daddy it's been 7 years but it feel’s like just yesterday

you were here with us. You are 80 deeply missed by

all of us who were left behind to carry on, even more

by the additions to the family whom we tell old time

stories of you their grandfather on a daily basis. You
will forever be with us all.

Your loving earthly strong Lower wife Barbara, devoted
children and grandchildren, in-laws, brothers, sisters,
nicces and nephews.

You are missed but your memories
shall live on for many generations.



the airline said that it. intends
to “reorganise and resume
operations as soon as possible.”

It.added: “The company sin-
cerely apologises to all cus-
tomers affected, but the finan-
cial burdens put upon us have

_ exceeded our ability to continue

operations as usual.”

In June, the airline said that
the past year has been “the
most challenging year in the his-
tory of Vintage’s operations.”

Problems included increased
government regulation and ris-
ing costs that required fare
increases, according to a state-
ment.

Last month’s launch of a new
50-seater service from DBIA to
Marsh’ Harbour and Treasure
Cay, with a stop in between in
Fort Lauderdale, failed to
secure the business’s foothold
in the industry.

The company said on its web
site that its “current plan is to
issue vouchers for all unflown
reservations,” to would-be pas-
sengers.

“We completely understand
that this may be no consolation
to you at this current time.
However, until we are able to
restructure, this is the best solu-
tion to record what the compa-
ny owes you,” VPJ said.

It is suggested that customers
“left in a lurch” by VPJ’s clo-
sure try airlines such as
Bahamasair, Bimini Island Air,
Yellow. Air, Baer Ajr,
Continental Gulf Stream or
Twin Air.
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

New Labyrinth at Garden of the Groves
now part of one-hour tour schedule

‘A NIRVANA FOR REFLECTION’







TATU ACM ROOM MACS NR RNC RSL cect CUO |

GRAND Bahama - The
new Labyrinth at Garden of
the Groves can now be seen as
part of the garden’s one-hour
tour schedule, it was
announced yesterday.

The garden will officially
open to the public on Octo-
ber 1 and the Labyrinth will
then be available for use any
time during park hours.

Facilitated Labyrinth walks
will be available in Septem-
ber for those persons needing
guidance.

In the meantime, the guided
tours are held every weekday
at 10am or 2pm.

A spokesperson for the gar-
den said: “A Labyrinth is a
sacred healing tool; a place of
beauty where you can recon-
nect with your Creator, Moth-
er Earth and your own soul. It
is a place to calm, centre and
rebalance vour body and mind

and receive guidance and ,

blessings of love and peace.
“A Labyrinth can be
walked, skipped or even
danced. It provides a quiet,
holy place — a nirvana - for

reflection, meditation, suppli- :

cation and celebration.”
The ~ Chartres-style
Labyrinth is an important fea-
ture of the newly restored
Garden of the Groves.
“The land supporting the

Labyrinth had been awaiting

its arrival; the exact piece of
ground, perfect in dimension
and location near the little
Church, presented itself to
us,” the
explained. ©
“Now, this week, with the
great help of Gaby and her
team from Lucaya Nursery,
and the ongoing support of

Erika Gates and Michelle >
Hansom and their wonderful :

team, we are starting the land-

Scaping and beautifying of our

spokesperson’

Labyrinth Garden in which,
with the help of Blue Water
Pools and Dr Kevin Bethel,
we are creating a lily pond for
reflection. We will be provid-
ing natural shade and seating
for people wishing to contem-
plate and journal in this sacred
garden space which will be
entered through a beautiful
arbour.”

Much of the work and some
materials were donated to the
project, including the actual
piece of land in the Garden
of the Groves.

The Labyrinth team say
there are still, however, many
bills to meet and funding
needed to complete the “his-
torical community project”.

Everyone gifting time, tal-
ent, materials and funding will
be known as an ‘Illuminator’,
and will have their name
carved in stone in the
Labyrinth.

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAG







The RM Bailey Senior High School
class of 1988 is celebrating its 20th
anniversary this year, and has planned
a series of events which run right up to

the end of the year.

The first fundraiser was a grill-out
held on July 5, during which former
classmates got a‘chance to raise funds
for the school, and at the same time
their fellowship.

There also have been Several “meet
and greet” events, and a number more
are scheduled for the coming months.

The next major event is a boat cruise
planned for September 20. followed
by a walkathon on September 27.
There will be a church service the nex!
day.

A grand banquet is to be held on
October 4 at the Atlantis Resort.

All graduates of 1988 were asked to

support these events “and be a part of

the fun and fellowship.”
Meetings of the graduating class arc
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THE TRIBUNE

Movie Gift Certificates}
| make great gi ao

Let Charlie the

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his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the

McHappy Hour at McDonald's in

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| month of July2008.

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WEDNESDAY,

PAG E- 11





JAE YS 220354

INSIDE ¢ International sports n¢

2008



Renaldo’s
Ramblings

See page 13



Fine
tuning
for i
Olympics

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Cu Rvs
“Bay” Brown
is confident
that with a lit-
tle bit of fine |
tuning when |
he 4 returns
from Europe,
he will be
ready for the
xX LX



Paes turn up the heat in Sweden

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

uarter-miler Chris “Bay”
Brown and sprinter Chan-
dra Sturrup turned in the
best performances com-
pared to other Bahamians
competin night in the DN Galan ath-
letics event in Stockholm, Sweden.
Brown, in another showdown with Amer-
ican Olympic and world champion Jeremy
Wariner, placed second in the men’s 400m
in a time of 44.53. Wariner won in 44.29.
Sturrup, the veteran sprinter who is near-
ing the end of her career, had a third place
finish overall in the women’s 100m. She
ran 11.15 for third place in race one.’
And in the 400m, NCAA champion

| Andretti Bain opened his post-Oral Roberts

University campaign on the international

scene with a fourth place finish in race two

in 46.12. Bain was 11th overall.
Americans Lauryn Williams and Mar-

shevet Hooker took the top two spots in
11.10 and 11.13 respectively.

Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, competing
in race two, was second in 11.15 behind
American Bianca Knight, who won in 11.15.

On the men’s side, World Champi-

onships’ silver medalist Derrick Atkins did-
n’t fear so well in the showdown with the
Jamaican 1-2 punch of world record holder
Usain Bolt and former world record holder
Asafa Powell.
. Atlkins ran 10.20 for fifth and eighth
overall as Powell sped to victory in 9.88 to
avenge his defeat to Bolt at the Jamaican
Olympic trials in June. Bolt had to settle for
second in 9.89. ;

Jamaica completed a sweep of the top
four spots with Nesta Carter taking third in
9.98 and Michael Frater fourth in 10.04.

On the field, World champion Donald
Thomas and Leevan “Superman” Sands

Olympiad next

month in Beijing, China.

_ Brown, one of six Bahami-
ans in action, is coming off a
second place finish in the men’s
400m at the DN Galan in
Stockholm as he' clocked 44.84
seconds behind American
defending Olympic champion
Jeremy Wariner, who won in
44.29.

Also in the men’s 400m was
NCAA champion Andretti
Bain, who is also heading to
Beijing. In his first internation-
al meet since completing his eli-
gibility at Oral Roberts Uni-
versity, Bain finished fourth in
race two in a time of 46.12 for~
11th overall. Sean Wroe won
the race in 45.20.

“Tt was pretty good. First and
foremost, I just want to give the
Lord praise and credit for it,”
said Brown during an interview
with The Tribune yesterday.

“T went in there and I’ve
been racing these fellows all
season. But this was my last
race before I go home, so I told
them to run the race for me. I
just executed all of my phrases
in the race and just gave it to
him.”

Since winning the Scotiabank
Olympic trials in June, Brown
has competed in five races in
Europe against international
athletes, led by Wariner.

While he has not been able to
pull off the upset, Brown said
he’s right where he wants to be
going into Beijing.

“I feel pretty good and I feel
pretty. confident,” he said.
“Missing last season and rac-
ing against these guys, until the
World Championships and not
racing them at all in 2006, I felt
confident.

“I’m under a new coach now '
and I’ve been learning the tech-
nique of the race, so with me
‘racing these guys at least three

ymore times at the Olympics, I
feel that my chance will come. I
just have to be patient, execute
and focus on my race.”

Brown, who is hoping to be
one of the medalists in the
400m in Beijing, said the race
was what he had expected.

“T thought the time would
have been a little faster because
I gave it my all,” he pointed
out. “I just felt that the time
would have been a little faster
when I finished.

“But I feel confident and
pretty good about the time. I
just have to go home and get ~-
stronger and work on the things
that I need to do to get ready
for Beijing.”

Bain was unavailable for
comment up to press time last
night.

.,, viken

ATKINS f

ivy

JAMAICA’S Asafa Powell (center), wins the
men’s 100m ahead of Usain Bolt (right) also
of Jamaica, and Derrick Atkins of the
Bahamas, who placed fifth, at the DN Galan
athletics event at Stockholm Olympic Stadium
yesterday...

See more photos on page 13

JEREMY WARINER of the
United States reacts after
winning the men’s 400m
at the DN Galan athletics
event...



encountered some problems getting into
Stockholm and they didn’t recuperate in

time for their showdown with their Swedish

counterparts.
In the high jump, Thomas could jump no

‘better than 7-2 1/2 for eighth place. For-

mer world champion and defending
Olympic champion Stefan Holm took
advantage of his home turf to win with 7-6
1/2.

Holm’s teammate Linus Thornblad was
second with 7-5 1/4, while Kabelo Kgosie-
mang was third with 7-4 1/4.

And in the triple jump, Sands’ leap of
55-0 3/4 had him placed last in a field of
six competitors. Former world champion
Christian Olsson from Sweden, who made
his return to the track after a brief hiatus,
was third with 55-9 1/4.

Romanian Marian Oprea won the event
with his leap of 56-7 1/4.

Atkins places fifth at DN Galan




Photos: Jonas Ekstromer/AP

Flight delays take toll on Sands, Thomas

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

LEEVAN “Superman” Sands and
Donald Thomas experienced their share
of problems getting into Stockholm,
Sweden, for the DN Galan meet yes-
terday.

As a result of their encounters, neither
competed as well as they anticipated in
their rematches with Sweden’s Stefan
Holm and Christian Olsson respective-
ly in the triple and high jumps.

In an exclusive interview with The

Tribune from the hotel room that they
shared, Sands said they arrived in Swe-
den on Monday after their flight from
Atlanta, Georgia, was delayed.

“We started flying from Atlanta on
Saturday, but the flight was delayed and
we missed our connecting flight to Swe-
den,” Sands said. “The next flight was
Sunday night, so we were walking
around the airport all day and that took
a toll on us. We got into Sweden without
any bags.”

Sands said it was an experience that
they won’t forget. He said the delay def-
initely took its toll, although he didn’t

want to use it as an excuse for his per-
formance.

In the triple jump, Sands had to settle
for last place in a field of six competitors
with a leap of 55-feet, 3/4-inches.

Olsson, the Olympic and former world
champion who competed in his first
meet of the year, was third with 55-9
1/4.

Winning the event was Romania’s
Marian Opera with a mark of 56-7 1/4,
while Dmitrij Valukevic was second with
55-9 3/4.

In the high jump, Thomas and three
other competitors cleared 7-2 1/4, but

he had to settle for eighth out of a field
of nine competitors.

Holm, whom Thomas defeated last
year when he won the world title, cap-
tured first place with his leap of 76-6
1/2 to lead a Sweden sweep with team-
mate Linus Thornblad second with 7-5
1/4. Thomas was unavailable for com-
ment up to press time last night.

But Sands noted that they will both
travel to Monaco to compete in their
next meet this weekend. And he said
they are looking forward to improving
on their performances as they prepare
for the final stretch until Beijing.

. to be

Miller to
run for
president
of BOA

Association
to go to polls
Thursday night

& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

CLAIMING
the
“peacemaker,”
Wellington
Miller, presi-
dent of the
Amateur Box-
ing Associa-
tion of the
Bahamas, has
announced —
on the eve of
the recalled Bahamas Olympic
Association — that he will be
running for the post of presi-
dent.

The BOA, which has been
embattled over its elections
process since November ‘07, is
set to.go to the polls Thursday
night at Nassau Yacht Club to
elect a slate of officers to
replace the executives voted
into office in May this year.

Miller, who served in the new
executive board as one of the
vice presidents headed by Rev
Enoch Backford, said the BOA
is in dire need of new leader-
ship and he feels that he has the

Miller



capability of getting the job

done.

“The opportunity has come.
You don’t pass up opportuni-
ties,” Miller said. “The federa-
tions called on me to go forth
and run for president and I
accept it. I mean if someone
nominates you, sometimes you
refuse it. But I think the time
has come to do it. So if they
nominate me, I will accept.”

Nominations for all of the
positions will be accepted from
the floor when the elections are
recalled.

Going into the elections,
Miller said he has teamed up
with the majority of the affiliat-
ed federation executives and
they have put together a slate of
officers to contest against Back-
ford’s slate.

Included on Miller’s slate are
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations’ president
Mike Sands, Bahamas Football
Association’s president Anton
Sealy and Bahamas Swimming
Federation’s president Alger-
non Cargill as vice presidents.

Additionally, Rommel “Fish”
Knowles, the president of the
Bahamas Softball Federation,
is vying for the post of secre-
tary general with former
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion’s executive Larry Wilson
as treasurer.

Should he be elected, Miller
will be following in the foot-
steps of. his long-time mentor,
Sir Arlington Butler, the imme-
diate past president, who had
declined to seek another term in
office after serving for more
than three decades.

Buuer, however, agitated that
the recent election process was
not in compliance with the
Olympic charter as he limited
the involvement of the federa-
tions.

“Sir Arlington has been there
for a long time and he has his
style of management and I have
mine,” said Miller of the con-
trast between the two. “I’m not
going to try and walk in his foot-
steps.

“I consider myself to be the
peacemaker. I’m the one to
bring it together. I will bring it
to conclusion.”

If elected, Miller said he will
immediately meet with his exec-
utives and map out a plan of
direction that they intend to fol-
low in pushing the association

SEE page 13


REL

a)

PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Olympic Basketball



Americans say big deal
to questions about size

@ By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketbail Writer

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The -
United States says being a lit-
tle small is really no big deal.
Especially since Dwight
Howard is feeling like Super-
man again.

The Americans opened
training camp Monday with
their 12-man roster that fea-
tures only one true center, out
to prove that in this case, size
doesn’t matter.

“Tt’s not a concern really.
We all play basketball and
that’s what it’s about,” said
Chris Bosh, a power forward
for the Toronto Raptors who ,
could end up as a backup cen-
ter in the Olympics.

“If you look at other teams
that play in other countries, I
think we have a good post
player for their post players.
Their 5s move out a lot, they
shoot the ball a little bit. I
mean it really goes hand in
hand with everything. We’re
talented enough to make that
small adjustment.”

It could mean multiple
adjustments. Besides shifting
Bosh and Utah’s Carlos Booz-
er to the center spot, LeBron
James will also change from
his normal NBA position, tak-
ing the power forward spot .
instead of his usual small for-
ward one.

At least the Americans have
Howard back where they want
him.

The team’s lone center is
recovered from a stress frac-
ture to the sternum that side-
lined him for practice last
month, and he participated in
the opening of a four-day |
training camp on Monday.
Howard seemed a bit winded
after his first 5-on-5 workout
since the NBA playoffs, when
the Orlando Magic star got
hurt against the Detroit Pis-

tons.’
| Good

“T feel real good out there,.’
Howard said after the closed’
workout at Valley High
School. “I didn’t have any
problems. I’m looking to get
in better shape. I’m just ready
to go.

“It feels good just to be able
to play again and knowing
that it could have been a lot
worse,” said Howard, who
donned a Superman cape to
win the NBA All-Star slam-
dunk contest.

Howard, who has played in
25 games for the Americans,
downplayed concerns about
the team’s depth in the front
court. “We really don’t need a
lot of big men,” Howard said.
“We’ve got some of the great-
est players in the world on our
team. We know what we’ve
got to do to control the paint.”

The Americans expected to
have additional big man help
in camp, but learned over the
weekend that 7-foot-1 Tyson
Chandler has an inflamed big
toe and will not be available as
an alternate. He had been
invited to train with the team
to keep him prepared in case
there was an injury that forced
another player off the roster.

“Dwight looked really
good,” coach Mike Krzyzews-
ki said. “I asked him after-
wards if he experienced any
pain. He said no, no hesita-
tion. Obviously, his wind, even
though he’s been running, it’s
different when you're playing
defense like that.”

Selected

When they selected the
team, the Americans favoured
shooting and athleticism over
size. Krzyzewski said he’s not
concerned about being short
of big men.

“We feel comfortable with
Boozer, Bosh (and Howard),”
Krzyzewski said.

Krzyzewski said he’s pre-
pared to move the 6-foot-8
James to power forward at
times. James will start at small
forward, but Krzyzewski
wants to take advantage of his
250-pound frame and his abili-
ty to guard bigger players.

“When we selected this
team — LeBron is a very
unique player,” Krzyzewski
said. “You don’t want to
pigeon-hole him and say he’s
the three. That would be not
making effective use of him.”

When he’s starring for the
Cleveland Cavaliers, James
spends much of his time on
the perimeter. But he said he
can adjust, and he expects his
teammates to do the same.

~ “We may get to the point
where we guard bigger guys
that we don’t usually guard
because we play on the
perimeter a lot,” James said.
“But as far as us going out and
competing, it shouldn’t change
our role.”

Howard said his injury was
extremely painful, although he
managed to play two games in
the playoffs afterward.

“Tt felt like a heart attack,”
Howard said. “I wanted to
win. I tried not to think about
it as much as I could. It was
bothering me a lot. There was
a lot of days and practices and
games where I couldn’t even
lift my arm up. But I just tried
to push through it.”

Howard reported no prob-
lems after a physical full-court
workout against a select team
of young NBA players.

“That’s what we like to see,
guys coming out and being:
very physical,” Howard said.
“When we play in the
Olympics, everybody’s going
to be very physical against us.”



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=
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—
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5



Tour de France

Schleck holds lead after 16th stage

lm By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press Writer

JAUSIERS, France (AP) —
Frank Schleck of Luxembourg
kept the yellow jersey in the
Tour de France on Tuesday,
with riders pushing themselves
through the Alps as cycling’s
showcase race left Italy and
returned to France.

French rider Cyril Dessel
won the 16th stage for his first
stage victory in this race. He led
a breakaway group of four rid-
ers to a downhill finish, com-
pleting the 98-mile trip from
Cuneo, Italy.

“It makes me incredibly hap-
py,” said Dessel, who is no
threat to Schleck at more than
32 minutes behind. “The tactic
was to try to join a breakaway.”

Schleck finished 1 minute, 28
seconds after Dessel, but did-
n’t lose any time to his main
title rivals. Bernhard Kohl of
Austria is second overall, seven
seconds behind, and Cadel
Evans of Australia is third, eight
seconds back. Carlos Sastre, a
CSC teammate of Schleck, is
fourth, 49 seconds behind.

“Tt was hard today. I wasn’t

BERNHARD KOHL (far left) of Austria, second overall and wearing the best climber’s dotted jersey, Frank Schleck (centre) of Luxemburg, wearing
the overall leader’s yellow jersey, and Carlos Sastre of Spain, climb Bonette-Restefond pass during the 16th stage of the Tour de France cycling race
between Cuneo, northern Italy, and Jausiers, French Alps, yesterday...

able to attack,” Schleck said. “I
think everybody was pushing
the limit.”



two mostly flat rides followed
by Saturday’s crucial time trial.
The race ends Sunday in Paris.

Riders face a third ride in the
Alps on Wednesday — the
hardest stage this year — before



Bas Czerwinski/AP

Schleck and Evans made time
on another pre-race favourite,
Denis Menchov of Russia. He

slipped to fifth place, 1:13 back,
after coming into the stage 38
seconds behind, in fourth place.

US rider Christian Vande
Velde lost even more ground,
falling to sixth place, 3:15
behind. He started the ride in
fifth place, 39 seconds behind
Schleck.

The stage took riders along
two climbs beyond classifica-
tion: the 13-mile Lombarde pass
and the 16-mile La Bonette-
Restefond pass.

South Africa’s John-Lee
Augustyn was the first over the
peak of La Bonette-Restefond,
but he skidded off the road on a
turn onto a rock-strewn moun-
tainside. A spectator had to
help him up to the road before
he rejoined the race.

Augustyn’s Barloworld team
can’t afford to lose him: Injuries
and a doping case have reduced
the squad to the minimum of
five riders. He finished 5:27
behind Dessel.

The 17th stage Wednesday is
a 131-mile ride featuring the
Galibier and Croix de Fer pass-
es and a finish up the L’Alpe
d’Huez — all three climbs are
beyond classification.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

‘Do the right thing
Mr Favre...because
you Owe us one’

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

DEAR Mr Favre,

You owe us one.

You see as a Dolphins fan,
there are few ideals we hold
onto to fill the void of a Super-
bowl deficiency over the past
36 years. ‘

We argue that the ‘72 team
was the best ever. We argue
that the ‘85 team would have
beaten the Bears again if they
had reached the Superbowl in a
rematch of the week 15 Dol-
phin upset, and we argue that
Dan Marino’s phenomenal
numbers, surrounded by a less
than stellar supporting cast,
made him the greatest quarter-
back of all time.

For all of the physical attrib-
utes that made Marino best
Moftana, Elway, Unitas, Man-
ning and Brady on the field,
what he didn’t have was that
one season where he led his
team to a Super Bowl win.

: What he had was sole pos-
session or a share of 26 passing

_records at the time:of his retire-
ment.

This is the case we make for
Dan Marino being the best
ever, and if Bush 43:and Slim
Charles have taught me any-
thing, it’s that even if it’s a
lie...then we fight on that lie.

Extending your career, the
past few seasons, you’ve
chopped Marino’s record num-
ber down to 19.

Will you be content with
15...10...5?

Should each and every one

of Daniel Constantine Marino’s



INCOM ACLU LELERY



IN THIS January 20, 2008 file photo, Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett
Favre throws a pass in the first half of the NFC Championship football game
against the New York Giants in Green Bay, Wis. Favre demanded his

release from the Packers last week..: |

historic feats be completely
erased from the record books
leaving us with nothing left to
hold onto? We’re hanging by a
thread as it is.

Therefore, be inspired by
Spike Lee and Do the Right
Thing.

Apollo Creed’s trainer did

‘

(AP Photo: David Duprey)

the right thing backing Rocky
when he was about to face Ivan
Drago. Batman did the right
thing rescuing Harvey Dent
when he gave himself up claim-
ing to be the Dark Knight and
The Fellowship of the Ring did
the right thing when they decid-
ed to help Frodo carry the One

Ring to Mordor.

Follow suit good sir.

The entire comeback fiasco
has been a terrible public rela-
tions saga for both you and the
Packers organisation.

Fact is, you will never stand
for being a backup to Aaron
Rodgers.

Fact is, they will never trade
you within the division, so rule
out the Bears, Vikings, and
Lions.

A trade within the conference
is more probable but remains
unlikely and the only teams
with voids at quarterback. and
would gamble. on a short term
Favre solution are the 49ers,
Buccaneers, or Panthers — less
than desirable destinations.

Jump to the AFC and go with
the great storyline.

What would be a greater
made-for-TV movie than to fin-
ish your career resurrecting the
franchise that plummeted to a
record setting low after being
discarded by the Packers?

Request a trade to Miami.

The right thing would be to
pick up the mantle from the
man you continuously usurp in
the record books and rescue the
franchise from the quarterback
abyss it has been engrossed in
since 1999.

At least this way, if we have
to hear Chris Berman say week
after week on NFL Primetime

. “And with this pass, Brett Favre

surpasses Dan Marino on the
(insert random record here)
list,” please allow it to be done
in a Dolphin uniform.

Do the right thing Mr
Favre...because you owe us one.














WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 13

LISBON, Portugal (AP)
— American soccer star
Freddy Adu will move from
Portugal’s Benfica to play
with Monaco next season in
the French league.

Benfica said late Monday
that the 19-year-old mid-
fielder will join Monaco on
a season-long loan, and the
French club then will have
the option of signing him to
a permanent contract.
Adu joined Benfica in

Olympic Soccer

IN THIS March 20, 2008 file photo, United States’ Freddy Adu
(11) works against Canada during the second half of CONCACAF
Olympic qualifying semifinal soccer match in Nashville, Tenn.
Freddy Adu, Jozy Altidore and Michael Bradley will lead the US
men’s soccer team into the Beijing Olympics. Coach Peter
Nowak announced the 18-man roster last Thursday.

Freddy Adu heads to
Monaco next season



(AP Photo: Bill Waugh)

a

July last year but started
oniy two matches, scoring -
five goals in 21 appearances
as the team finished fifth in
the Portuguese league and
had three different coach-
es in an unsettled season.

He will play with the US
team at the Beijing
Olympics next month and
is then expected to join
Monaco, which finished
12th in the French league
last season.





Miller to
run for

president
of BOA

FROM page 11

forward.

With the Olympic Games
just about three weeks away,
Miller said it might be a little
too late to change the man-
agement team that will rep-
resent the Bahamas in Bei-
jing, China.

But he admitted that if
changes can be made, he and
his executives will make sure
that they are done.



DN Galan Highlights



PORTUGUESE Naide Gomes is seen prior to winning the women’s

long jump...





co Mi



O-ODOS



AP Photos

YELENA ISINBAYEVA of Russia wins the women’s pole vault...

“OROZ

NORDIC SPORT.C








LOLO JONES of the US is seen prior to winning the women’s 110m hurdles...
PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS

,

BEIJING OLYMPICS 2008



Taureano Johnson































Age: 24 years.
Birthday: February 12th.

Height: 5-feet, 10-inches.

Weight: 152 pounds.

High School: C.V. Bethel Secondary High School. .

College: Bahamas Baptist Community College and
Cuba Espa.

Training School: The Geraldo Codova Cardin Boxing
Academy Pan-American Village Havana, Cuba.

Major: History & Sports Medicine.

Sport events: Amateur Boxing.

Personal Best Performance: Commonwealth Cham-
pionship’s silver medal in 2003 in Kula Lumpa,

Malaysia.




Favourite colour: Gray/Black.

‘Favourite Food: Mom's Peas Soup & Dumpling.
Favourite song: ‘/ Will Get There’ by Boyz to Men
Favourite Movie: Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe.

Hobbies: Reading documentaries and biographies,
fishing and camping and watching sports via T.V or on
the bleachers. nde"

Interest: World peace; to reach as many young people
to encourage and introduce them to do some type of
sporting discipline.

Idols Father, Erwin Johnson, a man of impeccable
strength and will power.

Daughter: Tatiana Johnson, nine months old.
Parents: Erwin & Ikenna Johnson

Status: Amateur Boxer.

Siblings: Leticia Burrows, Chiszelle Johnson, Erkell,
Bianca & Kayla Johnson, De'Angelo Minus and Brenden
Johnson - five sisters and two brothers.








)
Bxiying 2008

RLY

official restaurant

AAA AAA,





' THE TRIBUNE



Zimbabwe president —
is under pressure
to share power

B JOHANNESBURG,
South Africa

EUROPE turned up pres-
sure on Zimbabwe’s president
to share power with the oppo-
sition, toughening sanctions
Tuesday against Robert
Mugabe just as his ruling party

was to begin talks with its chief

rival mediated by South Africa,
according to Associated Press.

Mugabe and opposition
leader Morgan Tsvangirai met
face-to-face Monday for the
first time in 10 years and
agreed to formal talks about
power sharing after three
months of state-sponsored elec-
toral violence. The negotiations
were expected to start either
late Tuesday or Wednesday at
an undisclosed location around
the South African capital
Johannesburg.

Analysts said growing inter-
national pressure coupled with
Zimbabwe’s economic melt-
down left Mugabe little choice
but to sign the agreement with
the opposition. The central
bank issued a 100 billion-dollar
note this week in the face of
the world’s worst inflation —
which officials estimate at 2.2
million percent annually but
independent finance houses say
is closef*to 12.5 million percent.

‘When you start to hit these
kinds of figures, you know the
wheels have come off in a big
way,” said Richard Cornwell,
researcher at the Pretoria-
based Institute for Security
Studies in South Africa.

Zimbabwe’s latest political
crisis began in March with a
presidential election: where
Tsvangirai garnered the most
votes — but not enough to win
outright.

Tsvangirai pulled out of the
June 27 runoff against Mugabe,
citing escalating state-spon-

sored violence against his sup- *:

porters. His party says more
than 120 of its activists have
been killed by Mugabe’s police,
soldiers and party militants
since the March vote. Thou-
sands have been injured and
tens of thousands have had
their homes torched or been
forced to leave areas where
opposition legislators were
elected.

Monitors

_ African election monitors
Said the June runoff was not
free and fair and several
African leaders broke ranks to
declare they did not recognize
him as president of Zimbab-
we.

“It is impossible to accept
the second round of elections
in Zimbabwe, with children
being tortured, with barbarous
acts being committed, with vio-
lation of basic democratic
tules,” French Foreign Minister
Bernard Kouchner. told
reporters” .lesday after the EU
decided to expand satictions
against Mugabe.

The EU agreed to éxpand
their sanctions blacklist of peo-

ple linked to Mugabe’s gov- ° :

ernment to 172 people, adding
37 individuals and four com-

panies believed to financially :

support Mugabe and his
ZANU-PF party. The list
alryady had 131 people, includ-
ing Mugabe and members of
his Cabinet, under measures
passed in 2002.

British Foreign Secretary
David Miliband said EU
nations were expecting more
proof that Mugabe was willing
to sign on to a transitional gov-
ernment with the opposition.

“It requires an end to the
violence, it requires an end to
the ban on humanitarian
NGO’s getting around Zim-
babwe. Those are the first steps
toward a resolution of the Zim-
babwean crisis,” Miliband told
reporters.

Beyond the political crisis,
Zimbabwe’s economy is in
ruins. Mugabe’s seizures of
white-owned commercial farms
have destroyed the former
food-exporting nation. One
third of the population has fled

the country, another third is !

dependent on food aid and
some 80 percent are unem-
ployed. There are chronic
shortages of fuel, medicine and
food with daily cuts in power
and water service.

Zimbabwe’s myriad prob-
lems are spilling over its bor-
ders, with millions of econom-
ic and political refugees flee-
ing to neighbors.

Cornwell said that delaying
negotiations with the opposi-
tion would prevent any inter-
national assistance. Without
plans to rescue the economy
and facing a situation where he
soon might be unable to pay
soldiers, Mugabe “had to try

and work out a way forward,”.

Cornwell said.





WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 15

‘Business professionals
‘Mix N Mingle’ at event

GREAT people, food, drinks
and music along with lots of prizes
and surprises are some of the trade-
marks of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s “Mix N Mingle” net-

working receptions which..contin-**

ue to see a huge turn out of mem-
bers of the business community.

For most people though, the
event is an opportunity to meet
and exchange cards with leading
business professionals from vari-
ous industries in a safe and fun-
filled environment.

An estimated 500 businessper-
sons along with College of the
Bahamas alumi filled the Balmoral
Ballroom at Sandals for the cham-
ber’s and Sandal’s Resort and Spa
“Sizzling Hot Mix N Mingle” —
which kicked off the non-profit
organisation’s ‘Chamber Week’
activities last month.

Leading the charge was the
chamber’s president Dionisio
D’Aguilar and executive director
Philip Simon along with members
of the chamber’s executive team.

Mr D’Aguilar said: “The
Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
is pleased to hold its Mix N Mingle
networking receptions, which con-
tinue to provide a unique oppor-
tunity for leading-business profes-
sionals to meet one-on-one, and

: engage in meaningful discussions

and exchange of ideas in a won-
derful laid-back environment.”

Mr Simon pointed out that the
receptions have become the pre-
mier business-networking event in
the country.

“There is nowhere else where
one can bring together this amount
of professionals that come with the
expressed purpose of mixing and
mingling, and that’s an important
part of business; developing rela-
tionships, and to be able to do it in
an informal environment such as
this is a tremendous opportunity,”
he said.

The chamber executives

thanked their sponsors, particu- -

larly Sandals, Burns House and

. Diamonds International along with

members of College of the
Bahamas Alumni Association.
Andre Newbold, director of
sales for Sandals Resort and Spa,
said the resort is extremely pleased
to sponsor.the chamber’s Mix N
Mingle networking receptions.
“We have been a partner now with

“the chamber going on five plus

years, and that’s a partnership that

we will like to continue throughout

the remaining years, simply
because of the exposure that we
receive*from the local corporate
community.”

The event is also an opportunity
for participants to walk away with
top prizes. Such was the case for
Etienne Christen of Tommy Hil-
figer, who was presented with the
first door prize, which included a
sapphire diamond necklace donat-
ed by Diamonds International.

‘ Natasha Russell of Scotia Bank
won the College of the Bahamas
alumni first door prize, which
included a BlackBerry donated by
the Bahamas Telecommunications
Company.

Cecilia Cox won a heart shaped
sapphire diamond necklace donat-
ed by Diamonds International.

- Other winners also walked away
with diamond necklaces, Black-
berries as well as round trip tickets
to any Family Island serviced by
Bahamas Ferries and a one-year
membership to Red Lane Spa.

“Tt was very interesting, innova-
tive, and I got an opportunity to
meet a lot of new people...and dis-
cuss new ideas,” said aspiring
lawyer Taneka Russell, a student at
the University of the West Indies.









GERSHAN MAJOR, CEO of Mailboxes Etc and second vice president of the chamber i is all smiles as he is pictured networking with a group

of business professionals —
Hi

ABOVE: A Diamonds International representative speaking to a
guest

LEFT: Chamber President Dionisio D’Aguilar, second from right, is
pictured with, from left to right: Eva Pyfrom and Nicky Saddleton of
Karma Design and Roslyn Brown of EFG



sSaRES 5

Kermit |

MONDAY — SATURDAY
10 A.M. — 2 P.M.



5, \ E

STAR FM’S Buena Wright and Senator Tanya Wright, immediate past president of the Bahamas Cham- Y 301 9 y
ber of Commerce, are pictured with Carla Lynch, marketing manager at Sandals Resort, and Antoinette eehead “6
eleprating years o

Butler of the chamber






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THE



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

downtown Nassau property
owner has proposed two
options for allowing com-
mercial shipping to remain
on Bay Street and simulta-
“an attractive tourist and
yesterday telling
Tribune Business that the planned move
to Arawak Cay would be more costly and
involved complex engineering considera-

neously create
residential environment”,

tions.

. John Bethell, a principal at Bethell
Mstates, said the Living Waterfront - Busi-
ness Improvement District plan his com-
had commissioned, and which had
been presented to both the Christie and
Ingraham administrations, had presented
two options for consolidating commercial
shipping within Nassau Harbour in the

pany

short-term.

The two options presented iaveived using
the fill created by the dredging of Nassau
Harbour to accommodate the larger Liberty
Class cruise ships. The first was to create an
expanded ‘bulkhead’ on the existing har-

SEE page 2B

TRIBUNE





sagen ener:

WEDNESDAY,

semeeeesee

JULY 23,



2008

‘SECTION B ¢ Mi amoeenetsunsunmnts. a

Rival Bethell port ee
‘cheaper’ than Arawak Cay



Landowner proposes two options for keeping

port facilities in Nassau Harbour short-term



THE TWO commercial shipping port. options proposed by Bethell Estates and their designers, :

Design Workshop, in the Living Waterfront - Business Improvement District plan submitted to the

Government...

ROYAL @ FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
_ (242) 351-3010



Bank liquidity

‘pretty strong’
at near $340m

Bi By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Business Editor

COMMERCIAL banking
system liquidity “is pretty
strong” at around $340 mil-
lion, a senior bank executive
told Tribune Business yester-
day, although this is unlikely
to reduce interest margin
pressures before year-end
due to locked-in deposit rates.

Paul McWeeney, Bank of
the Bahamas International’s
managing director, said
excess liquidity - the surplus
assets within the Bahamian
commercial banking system
available for onward lending
purposes - was running $80
million ahead of 2007 year-



to-date, with the industry

- using the slow down in lend-
ing and credit growth to con-
solidate.

“So far, it’s looking pretty
good. Liquidity is pretty
strong, with excess mney
around $340 million,”

Ex-minister fears Planning gives developers

EPA’s impact on

tax exchange and

pre-clearance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER government
minister has expressed concern
that the European Union (EU)
might use the Most Favoured
Nation (MEN) status it is likely

to be granted under the Eco- -

nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) as a way to pressure the
Bahamas into agreeing Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs) with its mem-
ber states.

James Smith, minister of state
for finance under the former
Christie administration and also
an ex-ambassador for trade,
told Tribune Business that while
financial services and the con-
cept’ of ‘tax information
exchange’ had been removed
from the EPA negotiations and

‘agreement, the EU was always

-

likely to raise it as an issue at
some stage.

Currently, the Bahamas has
signed only one TIEA with the
US, a move made easier by the

fact it received economic bene-
fits in return through the con-
vention tax deduction break
that aided tourism: But what
the Bahamas might receive in
return economically from any
EU member state appears less
obvious.

Mr Smith warned that since
the Bahamas had signed a
TIEA with the US, the EU
could argue that as this nation’s
MFN trading partner via the
EPA, it was not being treated as
such when it came to tax infor-
mation exchange.

Therefore, as a result of the
MEN status bestowed on it by
the EPA, the EU would have
weight to its argument that it
and its members should receive
the same benefits as the US.
This would require the
Bahamas to create a ‘level play-
ing field’ on tax information
exchange by signing similar
agreements with European

SEE page 3B

Bahamian companies
are turning to debt
collection agencies

@ By CARA BRENNEN-

BETHEL
Tribune Business

~ Reporter

BAHAMIAN companies are
increasingly turning to debt col-
lection agencies as a means of
ensuring that they receive their
payments as the current eco-
nomic climate leads to more
clients being unable to make
monthly payments:

Gretal Hanna, the general
manager of the Ben-Bo Collec-
tion and Management Co Ltd
spoke with Tribune Business
recently and explained that her
agency has seen an influx of
businesses inquiries,

“We're seeing a lot more per-
sons coming inquiring about our
services as a tool they can use to
collect their funds.”

Although most businesses
factor in a certain percentage
loss of their funds to delinquent
clients, more businesses are try-
ing to decrease the amount that
they actually lose.

“ A lot of times, businesses
feel that they can still hold on
and attempt to collect the funds

\

themselves, but what is hap-
pening is that they do not have
the manpower to aggressively
go after the funds and so what
happens is that the amount
owed just gets higher and high-
er,” said Ms Hanna: “I tell my
clients that the best time to
attempt to collect a debt is very
quickly in the initial stages,
because that is when you are
more likely to get the funds.
However, Ms Hanna also
noted that, because bill collec-

tion agencies are only paid if |

they can collect, the service is
cost effective to companies,
because they can turn the
accounts over and then dedi-
cate the manpower on their
most current accounts and not
have to worry about a loss of
productivity in chasing down
funds.

Ms Hanna also pointed out
that while they are not neces-
sarily seeing a huge increase in
the amounts that people are
being delinquent with, they are
noticing that more people are
running into problems finding
the money to pay their basic
bills.

and stronger sales”

‘better prices and sales’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
SUBDIVISION developers

are likely to get “better prices

for their
developments if they are well-
designed and planned, a gov-
ernment minister told Tribune

Business, through an emphasis

on green space and inclusion of

all amenities and utilities.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, said that
among the planned amend-
ments to the Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act were the use
of more detailed designs where
“green space is left intact” and
the height of buildings pre-
defined. If the amount of green
space to be left was not clearly

How do you attract and retain

defined, then a minimum area
of land would be left uncleared.

The proposed amendments
were, also intended “to accom-

“plish the desired traffic amelio-
ration”, Dr Deveaux telling Tri- -

bune Business that the Gov-
ernment’s ultimate goal was to
create “a sense of community”
that used to be present in many
Family Islands.

This, he added, would be
achieved by constructing well-
designed communities and sub-
divisions where persons were
living in close proximity to
parks, schools, stores and
churches.

Both the Private Roads and
Subdivisions Act and the Town
Planning Act are being

reviewed by a Canadian con-

sultant, with Dr Deveaux saying

other areas targeted for reform ©
included ensuring all roads‘had ©:

kerbs and adequate drainage.

He added that there were “a
lot of developments taking
place that accommodate these
principles”, citing the Baker’s
Bay and Schooner Bay projects
in Abaco, plus Serenity, a real
estate project being developed
on land-acquired from New
Providence Development Com-
pany by Martin Solomon and
Kingsley Edgecombe.

On the latter, Dr Deveaux
said: “It’s a relatively big subdi-
vision, but they’re putting in all
the infrastructure, green space

SEE page 2B

But deposit and interest
margin pressures unlikely
to ease until end-2008,
beginning of 2009 due to
savers’ locked-in rates

McWeeney told Tribune
Business. “That’s very good,
very healthy.

“The foreign reserves are
also holding firm, and both
numbers are above the same ,
period last year. What has
assisted the build-up in both
numbers is the slowdown in
credit growth compared to
last year. That has assisted _
the banking system’s funda-
mentals.”

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ report on month-
ly economic developments in

. May oo ee that sur-

SEE oe 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Rival Bethell port proposal
‘cheaper’ than Arawak Cay

FROM page 1B

bourfront, between Victoria

Avenue and Armstrong Street,
with the alternative involving
the creation of an ‘offshore

island’ in the middle of Nassau
harbour to accommodate the

The ‘offshore island’ would
again lie between Victoria
Avenue and Armstrong Streets.

commercial shipping facilities.

Mr Bethell told Tribune Busi-
ness that the two solutions pro-
posed by Bethell Estates and
its designers would have cost
less than $100 million, com-
pared to the $175 cost estimates
placed on the Arawak Cay facil-
ity by the group led by Tropical
Shippin

“As I recall, our designers
said the costs would be in the
region of $60-$75 million,” Mr
Bethell said yesterday.

The proposal, drawn up by
Design Workshop, was first sub-
mitted to the former Christie
government when international
consultants EDAW were
engaged to develop a master-
plan for the city of Nassau’s
redevelopment and move the
commercial shipping facilities
off Bay Street.

Mr Bethell said his proposal
was ranked as the second best,
ahead of the Arawak Cay and
Coral Harbour proposals, but
behind the now-seemingly
abandoned plan for a new com-
mercial shipping port in south-
western New Providence. That
was to have been located
between Commonwealth Brew-
ery and BEC’s Clifton Pier
power station.

Mr Bethell said their report
was ranked second only because
EDAW’s terms of reference
had been to move commercial
shipping facilities from Bay
Street.

Following the change in gov-
ernment, the plan was resub-
mitted to the Ingraham admin-
istration, but “they haven’ t said
anything”,

Apart from the extra cost, Mr
Bethell said another complica-
tion with situating the commer-
cial shipping facilities at Arawak

BRITISH AMERICAN’S
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sum

Annual” Night School

LECTURE SERIES

FROM page 1B

and public utilities before they

sell the first lot. That may not be

possible for every development,
but it illustrates the principle.

“What is evident is the appeal

it has to people wanting to live

in these communities. The ear-

_ ly.indications are that they

[developers] get better: prices

and stronger sales. People are

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Cay was that the proposed site
was relatively unprotected
against ocean swells, which at
times made it difficult to offload
cargoes.

“We still don’t fee] Arawak
Cay is the best solution,” Mr
Bethell told Tribune Business,
arguing that his company’s pro-
posal provided a blueprint for
how the commercial shipping
facilities could be relocated to a
purpose-built site in Nassau
Harbour, yet co-exist with
downtown’s tourist and shop-
ping facilities.

Mr Bethell added that con-
solidating all commercial ship-
ping facilities in one Nassau
Harbour location would ensure
people did “not see a marked
increase in the cost of shipping
and freight coming into Nas-
sau”.

Revenues

In addition, the revenues gen-
erated from dockage and wharf
fees, plus land'rental, could
eventually be used to upgrade
East Bay Street into a ‘Living
Waterfront’.

In a letter to Tribune Busi-

‘ness, Mr Bethell said: .“There

was no request for funding: or
any large incentives [from the
Government]. We had offered,
at our expense, to dredge the
harbour, as some fill was neces-
sary for the redevelopment. The
remainder would be sold to con-
tractors on the island, which
might have saved some of the
hills that have been destroyed
for fill.

“This project was to be

financed by the stakeholders, .

and once it came on line, a por-
tion of it was to be sold to the
Bahamian public so that every-
one would have a chance to par-
ticipate.”

asking that their communities |

give them access to public
spaces, their schools are close,
the amenities and resources are
put in, and that they have the
feel of a village.”

While the Government, its
consultants and the private sec-
tor had “a lot of good ideas”
relating to the proposed reforms

He added: “This plan could
have been built quickly and
incorporated an inland termi-
nal, which we have been trying
to get permission to build for
some years. It would have
moved a substantial amount of
trucking off of Bay Street.

“Using funds generated by
this ‘new port’, we would then
have moved on to the redevel-
opment of East Bay Street.
Instead, government still looks
to Arawak Cay for redevelop-
ment, which will cost a good
deal more than this plan, and
can only be recovered through
higher wharfage and landing
fees in the future.” -

Mr Bethell said he had been
especially interested to note that
the recent planning charette,
held by architect Jackson Burn-
side and other stakeholders to
chart the way forward on down-
town Nassau’s redevelopment,
had proposed “putting islands
in the harbour as a way to use
up the spill from the dredging”

With the $100 million-plus
New. Providence’ Road
Improvement Project about to
commence, Mr _ Bethell
described as “ludicrous” the
idea of the contractor paying to
bring in sand.

With the Nassau Harbour
dredging likely to extract two
to three million cubic feet of
sand, priced at $8-$0 per yard,
from a 72-acre site, Mr Bethell

said his proposal could have

helped cover the estimated $45
million dredging costs.

He pointed out that with both
proposed Nassau Harbour
options, their use as a commer-
cial shipping port would only
be short-term, as they would
both be converted for tourist
and residential use when the
port facilities moved elsewhere
on New Providence.

Planning gives developers < —
“better prices and sales’

to both Acts, Dr Deveaux said:
“How we effect that in legisla-
tion is going to be the challenge.

“We have a lot of looks, a lot
of ideas, and plenty of exam-
ples, but we want to make sure
it’s straightforward so that it
doesn’t compromise develop-
ment, but Tespects Bahamian
traditions.”

The Weekly meeting of
The Rotary Club of West
Nassau will be held on

_ Thursday 24th July at
Graycliff Restaurant beginning
~ at lp.m.

William Wong

This week’s

speaker will be William

Wong, President of the Bahamas Real
Estate Association. His topic will be: The
Challenges and Issues facing The Real
Estate Industry in 2008

This page is kindly donated by:
Pat Strachan Realty Sales

PAT STRACHAN
Really Sales



=r

oat
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 3B



Ministry: Six per cent drop in overall arrivals

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter



THE Ministry of Tourism
revealed that the April year-to-
date figures indicate a six per
cent drop in overall arrivals,
despite a 27 per cent increase in
tourist arrivals from Canada and
a seven per cent increase in
European arrivals.

It attributed the overall
decline to the seven per cent
drop in visitors from the United
States which offset any gains
made in the other markets.

The ministry attributed the
US decline to the fact that the
US dollar was struggling against
the Canadian dollar and the
Euro, the ‘act that oil prices con-
tinue to fluctuate causing high
fuel costs - placing a strain on
the airline companies who trav-
el internationally, a weakening
manufacturing industry, lower
consumer spending and the
housing market crisis.

The upcoming general elec-
tion in the US has also had some
impact, the ministry said.

However, the picture was sub-
stantially different with regards
to visitors from Canada where
there was a 27 per cent increase
in arrivals for the April year to
date.

The ministry attributes this
strong performance to an aggres-
sive marketing campaign from
the new tourism office in Cana-

da and marketing firm Punch
Communications, the strong per-
formance of the Canadian dollar,
more direct airlift between the
two countries and the fact that
there is no housing crisis and’a
diverse manufacturing industry.

According to the latest figures,
the islands which reported an
increase in arrivals included:
Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini,
Cat Cay, Cat Island, Half Moon
Cay, Inagua and San Sal Sal-
vador.

The islands which are down
included: Nassau/Paradise
Island, Grand Bahama, Abaco
and Eleuthera, Exuma and Long
Island.

The ministry also reported
that with regards to cruise
arrivals as a first port of entry
for the April year to date, Aba-
co, (Castaway Cay) Berry
Islands (Great Stirrup Cay &
Little Stirrup Cay/Coco Cay)
and Half Moon Cay were all up,
indicating that the cruise lines
continue to call into their pri-
vate islands.

The islands which were down
as a first port of entry included
Nassau/Paradise Island, Grand
Bahama, Bimini, Grand
Bahama, Eleuthera, Exuma and
San Salvador.

The statistics for cruise arrivals
as a first of port of entry for the
month of April alone indicated
that Abaco, Berry Islands and
Half Moon Cay were all up
while cruise arrivals to Nas-
sau/P.I., Grand Bahama, Bimini,



EPA, from 1B

nations that wanted it.

“My fear is that Europe, since
we put services on the table,
might use the EPA to demand a
level playing field on tax infor-
mation exchange agreements,”
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“The Europeans are very
slick. They'll wait until you sign
the agreement, and then say
they don’t have that and need
it. ”

Mr Smith also pointed to the
fact that the Bahamas, if it
signed the EPA as part of the
CARIFORUM group, was giv-
ing MEN status to “a third par-
ty” in the shape of the EU,
rather than the US - its main
trading partner from which it

“imports around 85 per.cent of
the goods eqpsumigh in, this
nation.

With the Bahamas unlikely,
in his view, to be able to obtain
a bilateral free trade agreement
with Washington due to the US
preference for signing a single
trade agreement with CARI-
COM to replace the Caribbean
Basin Initiative (CBI), Mr
Smith said he was also con-

cerned about the impact sign--

ing the EPA would have on this
nation’s pre-clearance status.

“I think there’s some things
that are not on the table yet that
I would be worried about,” Mr
Smith said. “Noticeably, some
members of CARICOM and
some Latin American countries
-are asking for pre-clearance
privileges,” Mr Smith told Tri-
bune Business.

Currently, only the Bahamas,
Mexico and Canada have such

facilities, which are seen.as crit- ,

ical to this nation’s tourism
product by facilitating the

Eleuthera and Exuma were all
down.

Further, the ministry reported
that visitor arrivals for the month
of April alone revealed that the
Berry Islands, Cat Island, Half

’ Moon Cay, Inagua, and San Sal-

vador were up.

The islands which were down
included Nassau/Paradise Island,
Grand Bahama, Abaco, Andros,
Bimini, Cat Cay, Eleuthera,
Exuma and Long Island.

The ministry also said that

cruise arrivals to the Bahamas -

overall were down during the
month of April by seven per
cent, saying this was in part due
to the fact that both Nassau/Par-
adise Island and Grand Bahama
suffered declines in cruise
arrivals during the month.

The Out Islands received 14
per cent more cruise passengers

in April 2008 than in April 2007 -
“not .

but this increase was
enough to offset the declines
experienced by Nassau/Paradise
Island and Grand Bahama for
the month.”

The ministry further said that
cruise arrivals were down in Nas-
sau/Paradise Island because
cruise lines such as Carnival

.Cruise lines, Disney Cruises,

Costa Cruises, especially Royal
Caribbean brought in fewer pas-
sengers during the month of
April 2008 than in April 2007
and because Carnival Cruise
lines brought in fewer passen-
gers (as a first port of call) to
Grand Bahama.

speedy return of US visitors. If
others are able to also obtain
pre-clearance facilities, it would
further negate a Bahamian
competitive advantage.

Mr Smith pointed out that
while Mexico and Canada had a
trade agreement with the US
through the North American
Free Trade Agreement (NAF-
TA), the Bahamas had no trade
agreements protecting its pre-
clearance arrangements.

“The Bahamas is not a trad-
ing partner of the US, but it-has
a pre-clearance facility,” Mr
Smith said. “If these other coun-
tries keep pressing for this, but
don’t get it, they could accuse
the US of favouring a third par-
ty.

“That’s why a starting point is
to ensure your US trade rela-
tions. are. not. affected. by
attempts fo formalise trading

. relationships with others.”

CFA Society of The Bahamas

2008/2009 Officers & Directors

President

David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.

PO Box N-4837, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 2217

Fax: (242) 327 6610

Email:dramirez@pictet.com

Vice-President
Christopher Dorsett, CFA
Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302 8668
* Fax: (242) 302 8569
Email: Christopher.a.dorsett(@citigroup.com

Treasurer:

Sonia Beneby, CFA

ScotiaTrust

PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5718

Fax: (242) 502 6944

Email: soniacurry@bloomberg.net

Secretary ”

Karen Pinder, CFA

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5400

Fax: (242) 502 5428

Email: karen.pinder(@efgbank.com

Programs & Public Relations

Jeremy Dyck, CFA

LOM Securities (Bahamas) Ltd.

PO Box CB 12762-525, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 323 0032

Fax: (242) 323-0084

Email: jeremy.dyck@lom.com

Education

Velma Miller

Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Limited
PO Box N 4853, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 356 7764

Fax: (242) 326 3000

Email: velma.miller@royalfidelity.com

Scholarships

Warren Pustam

EverKey Global Partners

PO Box N 7776-518, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 3093

Fax: (242) 362 6950

Email: warren@everkeyglobal.com

Membership

Pamela Musgrove, CFA

Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.

PO Box CB 12407, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7008

Fax: (242) 356 3677

Email: pmusgrove@cfal.com

Past President

Kristina M. Fox, CFA

CIT Holdings Limited

PO Box N 1328, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 363 1501

Fax: (242) 362 1502

Email: kf@ait.co.uk

MONTHLY SPEAKER EVENT
“Commodities: The Complementary Role of Real Asset

Beta i in Your Portfolio”

Thursday July 31, 2008

12:00 pm
12:30 pm

Location:
Cagliari Room

Speaker: _ David Burkart, CFA

Luciano’s Of Chicago

General Meeting
Speaker’s Address
Please arrive promptly!

Senior Portfolio Manager/Strategist

Barclays Global Investors

San Francisco, CA

Members

$25.00
Non-Members $35.00

(Cheques payable to: CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Reservations:

PRE-REGISTRATON REQUIRED -

by Wednesday July 30, 2008, contact:
Jeremy Dyck, CFA, tel. 323-0032, jeremy. dyck@lom.com

*Prepayment required through one of the Board Members

management, new — product





Mr. Burkart holds a BA in economics from UC Santa Barbara, an
MA in foreign affairs, focusing on the emerging economies of East-
Central Europe, from the University of Virginia, and an MBA in
finance from the Wharton School of Business

| Mr. Burkart leads marketing, portfolio management, and investment

research for Barclays Global Investors’ institutional and retail
commodities-related products in the Americas and Asia, where he is
assisted by two portfolio managers with day-to-day fund
development, and
research. Previously, he managed macro asset allocation. strategies
for BGI, which exposed him to the diversification benefits of the
commodities asset class and motivated him to build BGI’s U.S.
commodities business. Mr. Burkart also worked at Gap Inc. in
international treasury and corporate finance and Bank of America in
foreign exchange and syndicated lending. He has been quoted by
Pensions & Investments, Bloomberg, and CBS Marketwatch and
holds the NASD 3, 7, and 63 licenses.

signal









Summit Insurance Company Limited
fiucerperated wider tho kawe of the Common of Ube Boies:






Balance Sheet
As of 31 Decaober 2007
(Amounts experesce) i Buhanian dhllarat





ASSES











Cash in band and al banks % 4315 ZI KGAi
Teac deposits a LS201 73S 15,34 B.U68
Dine from reinar recs : / 281 R RG cS
Dyes from agent 13 TAA, Fo OTT 24F
Teter opromissinn 82 pest 32H BTS 4 DE SEN
Prepaynrents anid piher assets : & 127,621 R53
Jowes{rents in) securities: A .
Avvealable-fer-aube 4,126,931 Apb8.ig
Loans aod ceredenbles 1,119,203 LPnG gw
Tnveabvent property & 210,906 214813
Property. plant and equizoiedt Fi MOB oc ernom ME sana







Total assets ABASL IMD 35,7853




LiAKILTTTES
Ceneral (SRGACH fares




Tinra.ted prem: im ceseree 4, 108, 363. 11,2304
TLloramed cnr ssi ian trksnine 1,859,275 i, 1Ae7 rh
Mhatstancing cloims rexarve 5 Ey 24k +E







I 8. N71 RM 5 TEMA SG

Ochre dieubitdeey,





Ping ta teinxurers BANA TAU S4é
Accougle payable ad ace ued Gs ace af 231 343, 5405





Al BAT 8




Total abilities BRIS







LOWY
shee cepa:
Authonyed: [0A 0080 shares of #1 enol, °







Tagued at filly ped: 5,090,0840 shane ad $1 each 3,00), 20) 4,000,000
Geaeral reserve of 1,00
bars vale reserve Se he 1.450,074 raat
_Betesned enmings eat oon AAS G2 6,4 15,257







Tietaal eqadty T4505, T42 IR 8S TOE
Total Hlabilifger and oqpulty SAMI __ 35,107,953





APPROVED BY THE HOA RI CF DIRECTORS AND sane on x BEHALF EY;

KG Yo NN









Dineclor

tity





_ UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the Caribbean.
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clients by providing them with comprehensive, value enhancing services.




In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following position:





Credit Risk Officer

The successful candidate will be responsible for:
§ Maintaining credit facilities
8 Analysis of counter party risks including settlement,
trading and cross border risk :
. 8 Collateral assessment & monitoring , :
& Transaction investigation nee a |
We are searching for an individual with broad experience in credit risk
who meets the following requirements:
8 Proven track record and familiarity with service orientated Offshore bank
8 Credit Services to High Net Worth Clients
} Analytic approach to Credit Risk management Transaction Control














Product & Process Knowledge:
8 Detailed understanding of collateralized loan products and documentation
requirements
8 Ability to assess new credit-linked products and processes

ae rin of Operations and IT-Systems
8 In-depth understanding of OTC an Exchange Traded derivative instruments











Professional behavior
8 Ability to bring together and assess information from a range of sources

Effective workload prioritization and meeting of deadlines

Capacity to work under own initiative with little Supervision

Methodical and independent approach to forty Bpinions and arguments

Good communication skills

General risk awareness with expertise/focus on credit risk and analysis
a




mm DPD



=
mS





mit D







Education and Certification: ;
8 Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Finance or EeeHbimics from a recaps
and accredited educational institution.
8 Minimum of 3 years Credit Risk experience essential
Local regulatory certificates an advantage







Interested persons should reply on or before July 31"



UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

brbahamas@eubs.com or




PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

GN-713



COURT

No. 2008/PRO/npr/0037 1

Whereas AUDLEY FARRINGTON, of Elizabeth :
Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of es and oe ce
of ELROY FARRINGTON, late of Pratt Alley, | the Probate Court of Dallas County, Texas, for |
Central District, New Providence, one of the : the County of Dallas, on the 11th day of |

| September, 2006.

~ Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 | deceased.

: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration |

: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :

: will be made to the Supreme Court of The :

Whereas REMONDA MOORE of the City of | Bahamas in the Probate Division by |

: SHANNELLE SMITH, of the Western District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the :

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :

: for obtaining.the Resealing of.Grant an i

iin the above estate’ granted to IAN :

Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the | BEARDMORE the Executor in the Supreme |
: court of British Columbia on the 19th day of :

Notice is hereby given that such applications September, A.D, 2006.

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00372

Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of

the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the ;
Real and Personal Estate of ZEPHANIAH :

HERBERT MOORE, late of the City of Freeport,

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
’ (for) Registrar

2008/PRO/NPR/00382

BADLEY,

of the States of the United ae of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application ;
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by LOUREY :

New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealing of Certificate of :
Appointment, in the above estate granted to :
DAVID R. HOPE the Personal Representative :
of the in the Estate, by the Carroll Probate Court, :
in the state of New Hampshire, on the 29th day

of January, A.D, 2008.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |

24TH JULY, 2008 | 9098/PRO/npr/00387

Whereas PATRICIA JOHNSON of Evans Street |

: off East Street in the City of Nassau in the Island :

IN THE ESTATE OF MARTIN EAST, late and | of New Providence, one of the Islands of the :

domiciled of 41 Avenue Close Road, London | Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made :
: application to the Supreme Court of The |
: Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate of DWAYNE EDNAL :
JOHNSON late of Evans Street, off East Street ;
in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :
: Providence, one of the Islands of the :

Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the : Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased.
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- : jiotice is hereby given that such applications |

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas © will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

for obtaining the Resealing of Letters :
Testamentary, in the above estate granted to : Ofté Gaysdirom te date heree!.
RICHARD CHARLES KIRBY, JOHN RICHARD :

ALAN EAST AND BR’AN ANTHONY :

2008/PRO/NPR/00383

NW8 6DA England, decéased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :
of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by CARLSON :

H. SHURLAND, of Kipling Building, Freeport,

PROBATE DIVISION 2008/PRO/NPR/00385

24TH JULY, 2008 :

2 ALEXANDER EAST the Executors and Trustees
: in the High Court of Justice, Principal Registry :
: of the Family Division, on the 27th day of April, :

- 2006.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008 :
_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00384

: IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM D. BARRETT,
? (a.k.a WILLIAM DURELLE BARRETT) late
? and domiciled of 11085 Strayhorn Drive, Dallas :
: County in the Sate of Texas, one of the States
: of the United States of America, deceased.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS ':
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION :
24TH JULY, 2008 :
i : Whereas CLARENCE BASIL CLARE of Soldier
: 2008/PRO/NPR/00384(A) : Road in the Island of New Providence, one of
: : the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
: IN THE ESTATE OF BRIAN ERNEST :
STANLEY, late and domiciled of Powell River :

in the Province of British Columbia, Canada,

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008

: Whereas RUBY M. FOX of South Beach in the
. : Southern District of the Island of New

? IN THE ESTATE OF ANGELO V. GLIONNA, :
: late and domiciled of 350 Greenwood Avenue,
‘ + Volusia County, Ormond Beach, Florida, one :
IN THE ESTATE OF CAROLINE SUCCOP :
late and domiciled of Center : docessed:

Tuftonboro in the State of New Hampshire, one | NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration |

: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
: Bahamas in the Probate Division by PETRA M. :
HANNA-WEEKES, of Pioneers Professional :
Plaza, Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama :
a of the Islands of We cena of The :
: Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized :
C. SMITH, of Mareva House, 4 George Street, | Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the :
Resealing of Letters. Administration, in :
the- above estate granted to ROBERT
(the Single Personal :
Representative) of the Estate, in the Circuit :
‘Court, Seventh Judicial Circuit, in and out Volusia }

of the States of the United States of America,

CROASMUN

County, on the 23rd day of December, 2005.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

* COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION ;
24TH JULY, 2008 :

: LIGHTBOURN of Mareva House in the Island

: of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

THE TRIBUNE ~

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

| 2008/PRO/npr/00388

| IN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT WILFRED
: PASHLEY, late of Lee County in the State of

Florida, one of the States of the United States
of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The

Bahamas in the Probate Division by SHANELLE
SMITH of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence. one of the Islands of the

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At-
: Law. the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :
of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
? Bahamas in the Probate Division by PATRICK :
: A. KNOWLES, of Nassau East, Eastern District, :
i New Providence one of the Islands of the
: Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At- :
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
: for obtaining the Resealing of Order Admitting :
Will and Codicils to Probate and Authorizing :
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate :
granted to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A and JOHN :
MARTIN DAVIS, Independent Co-Executors in

for obtaining the resealed Letters of
Administration (multiple personal
representatives) in the above estate granted to
LINDA R. PASHLEY, GLENN S. PASHLEY

: and BRUCE R. PASHLEY the Personal

Representatives of the Estate, by the Circuit -
Court for Lee County, Florida, Probate Division.
on the 28th day of August. 2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00389

Bahamas has made application to the Supreme’

‘Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
: administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of DAVID MICHAEL CLARE SR. late of Soldier
: Road in the Island of New Providence, one of

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications

: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar _

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No, 2008/PRO/npr/00391

Providence. one of the Islands of the

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made

application to the Supreme Court of The

: Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
i Real and Personal Estate of GORDON
? RANDOLPH FOX a.k.a. GORDON FOX late of

South Beach in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence. one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00392
Whereas RICHARD HERBERT ROGER

Deed of Power of Attorney for Suzanne Cleare,
Irma Cleare, Eleanor Cleare, Edith Cleare,

Theodora Cleare, Lynn Cleare and Gale Cleare
has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate
of SYBIL CLARE, late of Dumore Town, Harbour
Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
WLWIVLOUAT, JULI CU, CUUYU, PAU va

THE TRIBUNE



GN-713 Bahamas has made application to the Supreme



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00393

Whereas JILLIAN T. CHASE a cean of }

ew :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney: by :
Deed of Power of Attorney for Kevin Branweil
McClory has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Personal Estate of KEVIN
McCLORY, late of Pebbles on the Rocks, Banks :
Road in the Settlement of Governor’s Harbour :
on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands of ;
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Jacaranda in the Western. District

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of :

21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT |
PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008 |

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00394

Whereas RUBY FARQUHARSON, of Star :
Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of:
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of GENESTA MORRISON a.k.a. GENESTA :
D.J. ROLLE a.k.a. GENESTA DORETT A:
ROLLE, late Star Estates, Eastern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |.

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00395

Whereas CLARENCE JOHNSON, of Windsor :
Place, CLIFFORD JOHNSON of Golden Gates }
and DAISYMAE MCKENZIE of Garden Hills :
all of the Island New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
have made application to the Supreme Court :
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Personal Estate of FELIX :
LIVINGSTONE JOHNSON, late of Cowpen :
Road, Western District, New Providence, one }
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications 3
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00396

Whereas BRAD ALEC ROLLE of Yamacraw |
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Court of The Bahamas. for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of WILLIAM PETER ROLLE late of Yamacraw :
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas, deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00399

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications |
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00400.

Whereas LUCILLE AIELLO nee MCDONALD |
of 5615 Lake Front Drive in Wall in the State :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00403

Whereas CONSUELA CARTER, of Thompson
Lane, Southern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

: administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of EBENEZER CARTER a.k.a. EBENEZER
i Whereas C. YVETTE MCCARTNEY: :

PEDROCHE of Skyline Drive in the Western :
District of the Island of New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate i
of LOUIS NASH a.k.a. LAWRENCE NASH :
late of the City of Lutz in the County of :
Hillsborough in the State of Florida, one of the :
States of the Untied States of America,

JAMES CARTER, late of Thompson Lane,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

_ PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00404

: Whereas FLORENCE LOUISE RUSSELL, of
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAIIAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate

#6 Sandpiper Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

of STANFORD LEROY RUSSELL, late of Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

of Mississippi, one of the States. of the United :

| States:of America has made application.to the :
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ELIZABETH ROLLE late of Rock Sound in :
the Island of Eleuthera. one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 }

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00401

‘Whereas BERNARD STORER, of Pine Crest :
Street, Sunset Park, Southern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate of HELEN LOUISE
STORR, late of Chrysanthemum Avenue, :
Garden Hills, No.1 Subdivision, Southern :
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications 3
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00402

Whereas CLEO R. NAIRN, of Perpall Tract, :
Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
has made application to the Supreme Court of :
The Bahamas, for letters of administration of :
: the Real and Personal Estate of PHILIP |
: FREDERICK NAIRN, late of Perpall Tract, :
Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :

deceased.

‘Notice is hereby given. that. such applications

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |
of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00405

Whereas SAMUEL MOREE of Palmetto
Avenue in the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

‘administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of HOWARD MOREE late of No. 73 Montrose
.Avenue in the Central District of the Island of

New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00406

: Whereas EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ROSALINA ALI
late of Julan Dharmahusada Indah |/L8-9.
Surabaya, Jatim 60115 in the Republic of
Indonesia, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008
SR an TOTS eS

Bank liquidity ‘pretty strong’ at near $340m

FROM page 1B

plus assets in the Bahamian
commercial banking system
were ahead by 26.6 per cent
year-over-year at $319.03 mil-
lion, compared to $251.94 mil-
lion the year before.

External reserves were also
slightly ahead, standing at
$698.34 million compared to
$690.83 million at May-end
2007.

Despite the year-on-year 30.7
per cent increase in the Bahami-
an commercial banking system’s
excess liquidity, Mr McWeeney
said the increase in money sup-
ply had yet to impact deposit
rates because many savers had
been wise enough to lock-in
long-term rates.

Depositors had done so dur-
ing the period when banks were
competing for relatively scarce
funds, Mr McWeeney
explained, something that
increased the sector’s funding
costs. Depositors had therefore
been able to exploit the situa-
tion by obtaining relatively high
interest rates in return for plac-
ing their money.

As a result, deposit rates had
been pushed to relatively high
levels. In contrast, lending rates
are linked to the Bahamian
Prime rate, which has only
changed once this century. This
meant, with lending rates

’ remaining static, that Bahamian

commercial banks’ interest mar-

gins and spreads were squeezed

by the rise in deposit rates.
“The interest rates have not











NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JESILIA SIMILIEN OF MACKEY
STREET, HILLSIDE ESTATE, P.O. BOX N-772, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 16th day of JULY, 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TUZIA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company .is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 7th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



NOTICE

This is to inform the General Public that
all that private thoroughfare or roadway
situate between Lots 7 and 8 in the
Subdivision known as “Fox Hill Creek”
on the Island of New Providence will be
closed to the public from 6:00 a.m. on
Sunday, 3rd August, 2008 to 6:00 a.m.
on Monday, 4th August 2008.

Don S Wrinkle and Jean Wrinkle



Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas :
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

45) ae

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings ss

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Fund Name NAV
Colina Bond Fund 1.323145°**
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990639"**
Colina Money Market Fund

52wk-Hi
1.3231
3.0008
1.4020
3.7969
12.2702
100.0000
100.0000
1.0000
10.5000
1.0077
1.0119
1.0086

S2wk-Low
1.2576
2.7399
1.3467
3.3971 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
11.6581 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00°*
9.5611 Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund
_ Market Terms

BIS* ALL SHARE INDEX
82 -Hi

- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
ri st 52 weeks











last 52 weeks

weighted price for daily volume

hted price for daily volume

om day to day

Bs traded today

he last 12 months

st 12 month earnings
c plit - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S 1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFRAL 242-802-7010

fallen off significantly,” Mr
McWeeney explained. “Depos-
itors locked in long-term rates,
and had the advantage during
periods of low liquidity. Even
though liquidity has improved, a
lot of deposits have not come
up for renewal.

“Tt will be at least six months
from now before we see some
fall-off in deposit rates consis-
tent with the growth of liquidi-
ty.

“Towards the end of the year,
beginning of next year, it should
ease somewhat and we will see
a lowering of rates when
deposits rollover.”

Mr McWeeney said that
although he could not speak for
other Bahamas-based commer-
cial banks, 2008 was likely to
be a “consolidation” year for
the industry, as it sought to
manage non-performing loans

' and “ensure the safety and

soundness of the system”.

“Given the economic condi-
tions and environment, I would
think banks will be very cau-
tious in terms of lending and
investment opportunities,” Mr
McWeeney said.

With both banks and the
industry taking a conservative
approach, and credit growth

commercial banking industry
was “looking inward. It’s a time
of consolidation”.

He added: “We’re very cau-
tious about the outlook, and
have to make sure decisions are
prudent and take into consid-
eration the economy may
remain in an anaemic state for
another 12-18 months.”

As a result, Bank of the
Bahamas International and oth-
ers were “paying very close
attention to asset quality”.

Meanwhile, Mr McWeeney
said the Clearing Banks Asso-
ciation’s (CBA) planned Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH)
project was “going very well”,
with the live testing between his
bank and Commonwealth Bank
due to be completed either this
week or next.

“The project seems to be
moving as planned, and the
ACH team fairly soon should
commence public relations con-
sultations so the public will be
aware of what impact the ACH
will have on the way they con-
duct their day-to-day business,”
Mr McWeeney said.

“The October deadline [for
the ACH to go live] appears
realistic.”

The ACH is intended to

actions, where cheques drawn
on one bank but due to be
deposited at another have to be
taken by armoured car to a cen-
tral location where they are set-
tled by representatives of the
various institutions.

Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time per-
sons spent in line waiting to
cash and deposit pay cheques,
as they could be deposited to
their account.

Bahamian consumers would
also,be able to use direct debits
from their bank accounts to pay
bills such as cable television and

THE TRIBUNE

electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one
back office system for the entire
Bahamas. It may also help
develop SWITCH products,
where Bahamians could use
their cash cards at any bank's
ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the open-
ing up a whole range of elec-
tronic banking services in the
Bahamas, including its use in
the online purchase of govern-
ment goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through electron-
ic means, the ACH will provide
buyers and sellers with more
certainty and confidence, espe-
cially when it comes to settling
their transactions.

It will also enhance econom-
ic and business efficiency by set-
tling transactions quicker,
boosting business cash flows.

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share forthe last12mths ttt - 27 June 2008

replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-

having slowed compared to
2007, Mr McWeeney said the

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, LORENA DESMOND
of Palm Beach Street, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to LORENA DESMANGLE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, LO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.






Notice

Notice is hereby given of the loss of Bahamas Government Stock
Name: Cyndi William-Rahming
Certificate Number: 61160
Year: 2020
Interest Rate: 0.5% APR
Stock Amount: $6,000.00
I intend to request the Registrar to issue a replacement certificate. .
If this certificate is found, please mail to:
P.O.Box SP-63927
. Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE |
ECHO PIER INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 6th day of June 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FG CAPITAL MARKET.

KERAGE & ADVISORY eer

12.00
10.00

Lee GEES Over-The-Caunter Sacuritios



NUM

Yield%

NLALV. Key
* -31 March 2008
** - 31 December 2007
** -30 June 2008
** -31 April 2008
meeins, - 31 May 2008

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

FIDELITY 242 SREY 764 [HE CAPITAL MW ARKETS 343-406-4600 [FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL 242-394-2603











NOTICE is hereby given that IRMA TASSY OF PALM TREE
AVENUE, THE GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The. Bahamas,
‘and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
16th day of JULY, 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147> Freeport, Bahamas"














PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, SOPHIA LUNDY, mother
of DESHANNUN DANICIO LUNDY of Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my son’s name to DESHANNUN DANICIO
LUNDY MUSGROVE. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
GENESIS | HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 17th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

GUN POINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED

This is to inform the General Public that all that
private thoroughfare or roadway known as Gun
Point situate northeastwards of the Settlement
of Spanish Wells at the northwestern end of the
Island of North Eleuthera will be closed to the
public from 6:00 a.m. on Saturday, 3rd August,
2008 to 6:00 a.m on Monday, 4th August, 2008
to protect the right of ownership.

Everette Sands
President





\
q
+!

|
|

VP Lt

ti
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 7B





CALVIN & HOBBES

WON OME THE | So THEN DONT] [ DOES THE 200] DONT BE. \
ALLIGATORS. ARE.| GET OUT AND] | EVER THRON
EMT PEOPLE. | | ANYONE. IN?










Tribune Comics

HOW SOON UNTIL
WE GO HOME P

JUDGE PARKER




I THINK BILL
CLINTON WAS
STILL IN THE

TAKE A LOOK
AT THE HEADS.--
THERE'S NOT A
MARK ON THEM!

YOU WERE GOING TO START
PLAYING, $0 I BOUGHT
THOSE FOR YOU!

ARE YOU SURE IVE
NEVER USED THESE
CLUBS?

Syncicate













©1988 Universal Press



Sudoku Puzzle

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunda’

TIM 1S ALIVE, JUST AS :

L BELIEVED.’










—
T SSS
HORRORS (SSSA Y || SAW TIM MILLS
NEWS WILL REACH RAS MY 1 Obese ME] ALIVE AT THE
YOU THERE. BROTHER 7 > Se PRISON
ENDUREDAZ\C:, 7% TEMPLE

IN LHASA...



008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

mo | f
cabal

WELL, CAN YOU SNEAK
A LITTLE HAMBURGER
INTO THE MEAL
ON THE SLY?

FRANK BOLLE—





/
“Vy



NI

5
Vy LM yeti ‘




YES! WE WANT SOMETHING
TO TEASE THEM ABOUT
AFTER THE PARTY!

OUR IN-LAWS ARE STRICT
VEGETARIANS! CAN YOU
CATER A DINNER
THAT CONTAINS









Med a



a

VOW

“CONGRATULATIONS ! YOU PASSED
THE RUFE TEST!”















©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

©2008 by King Features Syndicate. inc. World Rights reserved

www.Blondie.com













MAYBE ILL HAVE TIME TO

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME
DUCK UNDER MY SEAT

YOU CAUGHT A
BASEBALL , BERNIE?

DON'T WORRY, ROY, I
BROUGHT MY MITT IN.
CASE AFLY BALL HEADS






IN HIGH



www.kingteatures.com

I GOT SOMETHING
ON MY BIKE THAT.
MAKES IT SQUMNS.
JUST LUKE Aang
MOTORCYCLE
















SCHOOL

















ae
tT



















Difficulty Level *&

ah ga ER RS

reserved.

White mates in four moves,
against any defence. Chess
problems normally comprise a
unique white first move, then a
variety of black defences with a
specific answer to each. Today
it's different. White's fourmove
sequence in this composition by



[©2008 by King Foatures Syndicate, Ine. World vights

COULDN'T I EAT SOME

r 4 ce
LUCKY EDDIE, WAN APPLE APPLES
YOU SHOULD A DAY ARE HARD APPLESAUCE EVERY Rudolph Willmers isplayed in
REMEMBER THE KEEPS THE ON MY DY INSTEAD 2 the identical order however
OLD SAYING... DOCTOR TEETH, :
DOCTOR., Black responds, As a further



. Across
1 Dismiss 1
someone
taking money (7)
5- Girl that is unhappy being
in the lead (5)
8 Does he write
notes hoping to make
people better? (6.2,5) 4
9 Having eaten a meal I’d
' end a different shape (5) 5
Let’s look first for some
openings (7) .





o









10






11 Global outbreak of herpes .
(6)
12 Lost form due to a rise in © 7
temperature (6) 11
15 Free to enter into another
tenancy agreement? (7) 13
17 \|t should be enough to
cover the rent (5)
19 Soldier gets pay for work; 14
others may get it without
work (7,6) 16
20 Aview that makes sense
(5) 18
21 Gets ready to eat, or to be
eaten (7)










Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Lance, 8 Returned, 9
Spain, 10 Electric storm, 11 Typed, 12
Ada, 16 Airing, 17 Untrue, 18 Oak, 23
Leant, 24 Turnover, 25 Demon, 26
Rationed, 27 Plant.

Down: 2 Asphyxia, 3 Criteria, 4
Sealed, 5 Dunce, 6 Entry, 7 Edict, 12
Ago, 13 Auk, 14 Ethereal, 15 Turn
down, 19 Aneled, 21 Grate, 22 Colon.





ovOSHHODWON mMZ0:2-: 084




CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

clue, White’s first turn is with his
af rook and does not check the
black king, With these hints, can
you work out the checkmating
sequence?

©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc, World rights reserved.





























Such a message won't be
plain (5)

A boxer normally has one,
even if not hungry (6,7)
Tidy description of a
monk? (2,5)

Firmly established as a










growing concern (6)

Some thousand held cap-
tive in battle (5)

Disaster is not changed by

these discourses (13) -
Pardoned and released (7)
They reward or punish



unruly priests (7)

Cost an unknown amount wi Across Down

of small coins, we hear (7) < 1 Petty complaint (7) 4 Hunt (5)

Gt ee Test N 5 Schism (5) 2 Asa result (2,11)

an old story (6) = eae ie meta

s oman’s private

Girl has exercises QW eral suppor (12) P

to get fit (5) > 9 Latin American dance room (7)

The flighty take ” (5) 4 To pass (6)

to them (5) < 10 Bag for schoolbooks 5 Used up (5)

(7) 6 Central European
Yesterday’s Easy Solution 11 Genial (6) principality (13)
12 Gor lothes (6 7 Absolutely (7

Across: 1 Trade, 8 Farewell, 9 iareunclomeee) sas ms
Known, 10 Illusion, 11 Verse, 12 15 Loot (7) 11 Slavish imitator (7)
Fat, 16 Muddle, 17 Random, 18 17 Elementary (5) 13 Concisely (2,5)
Wry, 23 Spade, 24 Headlong, 25 :
Sheen, 26 Shartage, 27 State. 19 In regular order (13) 14 Sufficient reason (6)
Down: 2 Runner-up, 3 Downside, 4 20 General 16 Fear greatly (5)
Paella, 5 Get-up, 6 Merit, 7 Glint, 12
Few, 13 Try, 14 Snapshot, 15 Cold tendency (5) 18 Underground vault

feet, 19 Renege, 20 Chase, 21
Major, 22 Flute.

(5)

No longer existing (7)



@|)o;o}N|o







DES
=|D}o}A

122







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
IN) lolm|ajo|] < &

| =| 2
| INfwlolfm] ¢







Chess solution 8338: 1 Ba7, 2 NaS (with or witbout
check according ta Mack's reply), 3 RhT Glittea and 4
b4 mates. .

HOW many words of
four letters or more can
you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each

- Jetter may be used once
only, Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals, or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words
with initial capitals and
no words with a hyphen
or apostrophe
permitted. The first
word of a phrase is
permitted (e.g. inkjet in -
inkjet printer):
TODAY'S TARGET
Good 15; very good 23;
excellent 30 for more),



NOINTIOS S.AVGa: LSBA

wBAap Tap oyEp wep



qQU IIS put pam apre ape









param

a2BAL PAB JIT
aIep pase pany

WALYMaAGIL
pear peel paw.

peu payeaxy ROI; pear tres ar
Bopy Jaye pares aeip 7

Contract Bridge
by Steve Becker” -

Hook, Line and Sinker

North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
@K 5343
Â¥Q105
@A6
KIS3
WEST EAST
$76 a9
9974 ¥862
#KQI73 #109852
bAT4 &Q 1095
SOUTH
@AQ10852
VAKI3
4
&62
The bidding:
North Kast South West
| Pass 1% Pass
24 Pass 6%

Opening lead — king of diamonds.

Every so often a hand arises where
there’s a distinct disadvantage to
being a good player. The expert who
sees all and knows all sometimes
makes plays that wouldn’t occur to a

* lesser player, and as a result occa-

sionally pays a price for his superior
knowledge. The moral is that igno-
rance is sometimes bliss.

Consider this deal played in a
national pair championship. South
quickly got to six spades, and West
led a diamond, taken by dummy’s
ace,

‘

Declarer, a well-known expert,
played two rounds of trumps and
then four rounds of hearts, discarding
a diamond from dummy. The dia-
mond discard wasn't important as
such, but it was by no means a hap-
hazard play. South had a very shrewd
purpose in mind.

Declarer next Ied a club, and
West, also a top-notch player,
stepped right up with the ace. That
ended the play, and declarer made
the slam.

Had West followed low on the
club lead, South would have had a
difficult guess as to whether to play
the king or the jack from dummy.

Whether he would have guessed
correctly no one will ever know. In
the actual layout, declarer succeeds
by playing the king, but if West has
the queen and Fast the ace, the jack
is the winning play.

South’s method of play would
probably have been a waste of time
against an inferior West player.
Declarer intentionally went out of his
way to show West he had started
with six spades and four hearts.

By cashing his hearts and discard-
ing a diamond from dummy, South
hoped to persuade West that he had
started with two diamonds and one
club. The actual: West swallowed the
bait, apparently believing he'd lose
his ace unless he took it while he had
the chance.

Tomorrow: To win or not to win?
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Grand Bahama Chorale electritfies
Washington audiences



THE Bahamas! 35th Independence Anniver-
sary took on special meaning for Bahami-
ans, members of the Diplomatic Corp in

Wiadatgice DC, and friends of the Bahamas as the
popular Grand Bahama Chorale celebrated the
occasion with performances at the Organization of
American States (OAS) and the People's Community
Baptist Church in Silver Spring, Maryland

The chorale accepted the
invitation of Cornelius A Smith,
Bahamas Ambassador to the
United States, to participate in
the embassy's activities com-
memorating the 35th Anniver-
sary of the birth of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.

Chorale director Clayton
Curtis said that the occasion
provided the group with a
unique experience as members
were moved by the apprecia-
tion of their audiences as they
presented a short programme
of select Bahamian folk songs.

At the OAS the rendering of
the national anthems of the
United States and the Bahamas

_ were received by a capacity
crowd with thundering
applause, and following the
short programme of select
Bahamian pieces, thoroughly
pleased those in attendance.
Also performing at the event
was the famed Edwin 'Apple'
Elliott Trio made up of Patrick
Russell, percussionist; Ralph
"Ossie" Hall, saxophonist, and
Miss Grace Anne Adderley,
pianist.

' At the People's Community
Church, where former Gover-
nor General of the Bahamas
Sir Orville Turnquest was in

attendance, the chorale staged’

a full-length concert showcas-
ing the full:scope of their reper-
toire, from classical to calyp-
SO.

They effortlessly moved
from classical music, sung in
English and Latin, to the rous-

ing sounds of Negro spirituals, :

contemporary, sacred, and
gospel music. Of particular

note were ‘Ain't Got Time to
Die'; 'God and God Alone';
'My Help (Cometh from the
Lord)'; 'Gossip, Gossip'; and
others, all of which received
rousing applause, and in many
cases repeated standing ova-
tions...

The African song, 'Siyaham-
ba' and the passionate rendi-
tion of 'Kyrie Eleison', written
by the chorale's late accompa-
nist, Mr Edwin 'Apple' Elliott,
were also crowd favourites. As

an encore, the chorale deliv- .

ered the ever popular gospel
song ‘Order My Steps' which
again received thunderous
applause and ovation.

Sir Orville made brief
remarks in which he drew par-
allels between the United
States and the Bahamas, saying
that they are both former
British colonies. He noted fur-
ther that through several gen-
erations the histories of the two
countries have been closely

linked, particularly during the .

period of the African Diaspora
and the migration of Bahami-
ans who came in search of
employment, and even now,
through trade and commerce.

Sir Orville made mention of
how privileged he was to have

_been one of the persons who

signed the Bahamian Declara-
tion of Independence.

The former governor gener-
al also expressed his delight in
hearing the chorale and com-
mented on how, in Ambas-
sador Smith's first year as the
Bahamas Government's repre-
sentative to the United States,
there was no better way for





FORMER GOVERNOR GENERAL Sir Orville Turnquest, centre, and Ambassador Cornelius Smith, ‘ight,
chat with guests at a reception at the ambassador's residence in Washington, DC.

him to create an impression
than to bring a contingent from
his island home and former
constituency, thrilling all with a
landmark performance and
experience that will linger in
his mind as one of the best
independence celebrations that
he has ever attended.

The evening was also high-
lighted by remarks from the
host pastor Rev Dr Haywood
Robinson, II, who was thrilled
that his church was chosen as
the venue for such a celebra-
tion. In his remarks he indicat-
ed that he could not help but
note the high standard and pro-
ficiency displayed by the choir.

VACANCY NOTICE
Clerk of Works - Buildings Department ME S

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Clerk of Works at The National

Insurance Board.

JOB SUMMARY

The individual would be responsible under the Assistant Director - Buildings to represent The National Insurance
Board on projects being z undertaken and ensuring contractors’ compliance with design and materials specification
and to ensure consistent standards in soeeenaiiehis:

QUALIFICATIONS » SKILLS AND REQUIREMENTS

Applicants should have a Bachelor’s of Science degree or equivalent in Engineering or a related field from an

accredited College or University.

Be honest, and vigilant to ensure that the work and materials meet the required standard.

Must have a broad understanding and diverse experience in the building sey, including knowledge of materials,
trades, methods and legal requirements.

Be attentive to details when checking work and materials.

Have good written and verbal communication skills

Must demonstrate the ability to:

(1) define objectives, plan the work and communicate priorities,

(2} be able

to establish an appropriate working relationship with the contractor’s staff while remaining diplomatic and
independent; and (3)-be keen, decisive and persuasive in communicating any inconsistencies that may require

corrections or compromise.

DUTIES AND'RESPONSIBILITIES

Be familiar with legal requirements and ensure that work complies with them.

2. Be familiar with all the relevant drawings and written instructions, checking them, and using them ds a
reference when inspecting the work.

’

Takes measurements and samples on site to ensure that the work and materials meet the specifications and

quality standards.

Provides accurate estimates for work when necessary.

Writes specifications; compiles Autoc ad drawings and obtains competitive estimates /quotations ie builders’

work to be carried out.

Ensures that work on various projects are carried out to the client’s standards, specitications and schedule.

Ensures that correct materials and procedures are used and that the chent is given quality work and value

for money.

. Advise contractor(s) about certain aspects of the work but not give advice that could be interpreted as an
instruction which would involve additional expenditure to the contract.

Inspects work as projects proceeds,

. Keeps detailed records of various aspects of the work.

. Produces regular status reports which would include progress and any delays, the number
and type of workers em iployed, weather conditions, visitors to the site, drawings received,
deliveries, instructions and details of any significant event.

12. Participates in mectings and working groups as requested and undertake any work necessary to

implement

APPLICATION

fanagement’s initiatives.

Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the necessary proof of
qualifications, on or before Monday, July 28, 2008, to:

The Acting Director

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Chittord Darling Complex
P.O. Box N-7508

Nassau , Baharnas





THE GRAND BAHAMA CHORALE on the steps of the Organization of
American States in Washington, DC, where they performed as a
part of the 35th Anniversary of Independence sponsored by the

_ Embassy of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

European designer leads
line-up of international
ouest designers at Islands
of the World Fashion Week

MODE Iles, Ltd, organis-
ers of Islands of the World
Fashion Week scheduled to
be held November 5 - 8 at the
British Colonial Hilton and
Atlantis Resort, have
announced.that NOIR. Ilu-
minati II of Denmark will
lead the list of international
guest designers presenting
their latest creations at the
event this Fall, with NOIR
taking centre stage during the
opening reception.

"It is a pleasure to have the
caliber of design and the
message projected by NOIR
grace the catwalk of this pre-
miere event," said Owen
Bethel, president of Mode
fles, Ltd and founder of
Islands of the World Fashion

Week.

"Through their unified pre-
sentation of elegant fashion,
Mr [Peter] Ingwersen, and
NOIR represent the global
concerns of the environment,
labour and human rights, and
initiatives in respect of
poverty alleviation, all rele-
vant to the issues to be high-
lighted by Islands of the
World Fashion Week, and at
the core of the themes of the
United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO),
which has endorsed the
event."

Mr Bethel explained fur-
ther that, "NOIR is one of
several non-island designers
chosen to participate for their
contributions to the fashion
industry in one form or
another. These are the inter-
national guest designers. The
event is intended, primarily,
to showcase the collections of
established and new design-
ers from islands around the
world."

Mr Ingwersen, a designer
at NOIR, is known for his
attention to detail and focus
on environmentally-friendly
materials and processes with-
in his designs. This has placed
him at the vanguard of the
eco-fashion industry.

Previously head of design

for Levi's Nordic Region,
global brand director for
Levi's Vintage Clothing and
Levi's RED, and a member
of the Levi's brand manage-
ment leadership team, Mr
Ingwersen established
NOIR. Iiluminati I in March
2005.

NOIR appeals to the fash-
ion and social conscience
consumer by encouraging
consumption which gives
back globally through the
support of sustainable busi-
ness practices in the Third
World.

"We want to be known as
the first brand to bring
sophistication and sexiness to
corporate social responsibili-
ty," Mr Ingwersen said of his
company's mission.

The NOIR Foundation is a
fund that allocates the rev-
enue from a percentage of
the sales of cotton suits and
fabric to support the African
cotton workers in the supply
chain called Proud Harvest.

According to Mr Bethel,
organisers are set to
announce the names of
designers selected from the
islands in late July/early
August as the deadline for
submission of applications is
the end of July and the
screening committee is still
processing the applications.

To date, the Islands of the
World Fashion Week event
has designers registered from
Barbados, Cuba, Dominican
Republic, Fiji, Indonesia,
Jamaica, St Lucia, St Vincent,
Trinidad and Tobago, and
the Bahamas. Interest has
also been expressed by
designers from Grenada,
Guadeloupe, Madagascar,
Martinique, Mauritius and
Puerto Rico.

° For more information on
Islands of the World Fashion
Week, interested persons are
invited to visit the website

www.islandsfashionweek.com or :

contact either Ms Arianne Etuk or
Ms Rekenya Dean at 242-356-
6133.

the Visual Arts invites one



* The public is invited to

_ Versatile, featuring the

new works of Edrin
Symonette, Lemero Wright
and Ryan Turnquest at the
Central Bank of the ©
Bahamas Art Gallery; Mar-
ket Street.



¢ SCRIMMAGE 08: |
PopopStudios/Centre for i;
and all to their ongoing
summer exhibition show-
casing a rotation of artists .
and artworks. The exhibi- —
tion is open all summer
long. Gallery hours are

Tuesday - Saturday from
oan to 7pm.



“eThis July & August; The
- National Art Gallery will be

hosting its first Summer
Concert Series! Come and
enjoy great performances -

_ by talented Bahamian,
‘musicians. ~~

Ronnie Butler & Elon "The
Crab Man“ Moxey

- Friday, July 25 at 7: :30pm

Terneille "Ta Da" Burrows &
Ithalia Johnson

Friday, August 8 at

7:30pm
Kim Welcome & Pam
Woods
Friday, August 15 at
7:30pm

Tickets are available at the
NAGB Store: Contact Noel
Thompson, manager at
328.5800/1 or at nthomp-
son@nagb.org.bs

¢ Mur-mi-don: Marie
Jeanne Dupuch will be fea-
turing new paintings at The
Hub, No 2 Colebrooke Lane,
(Bay Street). The exhibition
runs until August 19. For
more information check
out
www.thehubbahamas.org
or call 322.4333.



Tr Nar iri Ans Guibert oo Ton Banares



FOURTH
NATIONAL
EXHIBITION

2008

¢ The National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas (NAGB)
has invited the general
public to view its Fourth
National Exhibition (The
NE4). The exhibition fea-
tures an exciting array of
51 works produced within
the last two years by 31
artists. This artwork repre-
sents a rich diversity of art
and ranges from paintings,
sculptures, installations,
prints and mixed media
works to photographs and
alternative media. The exhi-
bition will be on display
from July 9 to January 30,
2009 at the NAGB on West
Hill Street.
THE TRIBUNE

Emerging voices

FROM page 12

Not just edgy and scandalous
however, NE4 also proffers
work that is of a remarkable
beauty, like Ritchie Eyma's
Composition With Red 20 x 20
oil, and Lynn Parotti's trio of
works The Blastocyst's Ball: fea-
turing Ovitrelle's Luteal Lune,
Crinone's Crave and Follistimi-
tus Irreconcilibus on canvas. The
depth of colour and weight of
the images immediately draw
the viewer in, and at first glance
masks...or perhaps points to the
intimate, stressful nature of the
work - it is a journey through
the drug induced stages of IVF
(In Vitro Fertilization).

One of the most interesting
pieces, for me, was Frorup's sec-
ond piece, Tickled Pink, a psy-
chedelic merry-go-round of
sorts, that is at once menacing
and childlike.

Imagine a giant circular wood-
en platform that has a_ single
rail across the middle and a pull
pivot. At one end of the rail
atop wooden blocks, a pile of
dishes, and a delicate pink tea
cup is the eerie vision of a little
girl's head, replete with fat plaits
kept in place by the thick, round
bobbles of grade school- all in
bright, bubble gum pink.

Initially, as my seven-year-old
niece and I came across the
piece, I was intimidated by the
sheer size of the work and
uncertain whether entrance to
the room was allowed so I
steered her in another direction.
Returning to the room later
however, we decided to venture
inside and walked around the
piece - still hesitant, not touch-
ing, but looking at it, uncertain
of what we were seeing - of what
we were supposed to see. It was
not until another visitor to the
gallery appeared and immedi-
ately grasped one end of the rail
and began walking and turning
the mammoth dial did we relax
and understand that we could
participate in the work.

With the room now filling up,
another viewer invited my niece
to participate and at long last
she had the chance to do what I
think she had wanted to do since
we entered the room, grab hold
of the merry-go-round and push
it - to the delight of thei piped in
sounds of a little girl giggling
and shouting for the participant
to do it again.

Frorup's interactive piece - of
wood, metal, wax and bronze -
has a nightmarish quality to it
though - the menace seems to
come because the piece revolves
around child's play, but there is

nothing that speaks of life or.

youth in the room.

According to Erica James,
director of the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas, the
purpose of the NE4 is to gauge
the direction Bahamian artists
have been moving in for the past
two years. "This is where artists
are, this is what is on their mind,
this is what artists are thinking
about. This is their personal
vision - they wanted to share
that with the public," Ms James
said of exhibition.

All of the work submitted for
consideration for the NE4 had to
be created in 2006 or after.

It was in January that the
NAGB sent out a call for works,
giving a deadline of May, which
gave artists who wanted to par-
ticipate in the exhibition a
chance to complete a piece or
find work they wanted to sub-
mit.

The process of whittling down
the submissions began with the

‘selection of a group of reviewers.

According to Ms James, the
reviewers are never the same
group of people from year to
year.

In the end 51 works by 32
artists were chosen and the next
step was to focus on the installa-
tion and to decide how that
process would work - that is how
the various works would be
appointed to accurately reflect

‘the national statement being

made by this group of Bahamian
artists. It would need to reflect
what their concerns are in the
moment, and show what they
feel is important enough to work
on.

In an unprecedented showing,
this year's exhibition featured
more women than ever (Imo-

‘gene Walkine, whose Swept -

low fired earthenware - was
straight-up awe inspiring; Sue
Bennett Williams, Tamara Rus-
sell, and her fantastically rich
and beautiful Violet Scorpion -
clay; Chantal Bethel, Marie
Jeanne, Dupuch and Samantha
Moree to name a few), with half
of the artists laying claim to a
double X chromosome. Said Ms
James, "It seems this year
women got it together". As a
group, she noted, they were able

to produce work that was of a
standard that allowed them to
participate fully in the national
exhibition.

Another interesting note in
terms of demographics, Ms
James pointed out, is that eight
of the artists were Bahamians
living abroad, "doing their thing"
in London, New York, Atlanta,
across the globe, but who were

still able to engage with what is .

happening locally.

Speaking about the artists, Ms
James said that thematically,
many of them wanted the viewer
to focus on a specific aspect of
their work, pointing to Heino
Schmid's digital projection, enti-
tled North Star, that moves
across New Providence, but nev-
er loses sight of Atlantis.

As someone who often walks:

about the island, the artist was
curious about the fact that where
ever he walked he could see
Atlantis. The resort has become
a north star that sort of orients
you on New Providence, she
said. She noted further that in
contrast to Europe, where the
tallest buildings are usually
churches, in the Bahamas, that
revered role - as the tallest build-
ing in the land - has been taken
over by a hotel.

The technical excellence or the
artist' ability to take command
of the media selected was also a
marked aspect of a number of
works. Both Thierry Lamare and
Sue Katz-Lightbourn were noted
for their strong sense of drawing
and human form, "we also
noticed a little bit of daring," Ms
James said.

With the hard work of the
show now over, and the results
open for interpretation by the
Bahamian public, NE4 stands as
an ambitious effort by a very
diverse group of artists to pro-
vide an overview of the coun-
try's art scene. Most important
perhaps, the exhibition also
opens the door for the introduc-
tion of new names, new faces,

new passions - previously -

unheard of - to that community,
and symbolizes the continuing
development of the artistic voice
of the nation.

¢ NE4, which is the only exhibi-
tion currently.on display at the |
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, runs through the rest
of the year. Beginning next year,
the gallery plans to produce an .
exhibit by Max Taylor.



., Madeira Street, Palmdale.



WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 9B

Participating Artists

», Leen Che ay RO
hlere’s how to enters
1. Buy any 3 or the 5 featured KRAFT items (including KRAFT
BBQ Sauce, KRAFT Singles, KRAFT Salad Dressing and

OSCAR MAYER Hot Dogs. ;

1

2. Circle item on your original store receipi, answer the
question on entry forms provided.

3. Write your name, address and telephone number on original |
store receipt.

4. Deposit receipt and entry torm into entry box, located in all
participating stores or drop off at The d’Albenas Agency,

be chosen on August 8, 2008.

5. Promotion runs from July 7 to August 1, 2008, Winner wil

dressing Se alip
Le





leet)
rhc
bo Bo dd




epaicerexncassewecats2 xo

To qualify to win, fill in the blanks :
and attach to your original reccipt. :
Drop in entry boxes or bring to
The d’Albenas Agency, Palmdale.

if | were an i
O___fM___r Weiner |





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

Some of R.M. Bailey guys
: class of 1988 pose for a
fs wip group shot.





SO ey
eS ese

eet

he 1988 graduating class of RM Bailey
Senior High School is celebrating it's
20th Anniversary this year until
December 31.

Numerous activities have been planned. The
first event held was a grill-out fundraiser on
July 5. Classmates got a chance to raise funds
for the school, and also fellowship at the same
time. There have been several meet and greets
to date, and these will continue throughout the
year.

1988 graduating class of RM Bailey Senior High School celebrates their

O" Anniversary

THE TRIBUNE






Upcoming major events include:

¢ A boat cruise planned for September 20

° A walk-a-thon on September 27

° A church service on September 28

° To close out the year a grand banquet will
be held Saturday, October 4 at the Atlantis
Resort.

All graduates of the RM Bailey class of 1988
are asked to support these events and be a
part of the fun and fellowship. Meetings are
held every Thursday at 7pm at the school on
Robinson Road.


4

THE TRIBUNE



st Annual -

Grand Bahama

RILLOFF



ice it

Grilled Rack of Lamb

INGDQM EXPLOUIONS |
Ist SNN UAL Grand



Essence & Tamarind Drizzle

@ By SOUSE CHEF
GEORGE WILLIAMS III
Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort and Spa

Lamb Rack
1 (French) or American rack
of lamb
7 guavas (fresh, peeled, blended
and strained)
Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Season the lamb with the salt
and pepper to taste then add
2o0z of blended guava on to the
lamb and marinate for 30 min-
utes. Heat up a medium frying
pan and sear off the lamb until
golden brown. Then place in
the oven for 15 minutes for
medium rare. Take out of the
oven and let cool before cut-
ting.

Guava Essence

50z blended guava

30z lamb stock

Salt and pepper to taste

¢

Method
Add the stock to a small

sauce pot and bring to'a boil: ~

Once it is boiling add your gua-
va and let reduce Sy half, then
season.

Note: The guava will thicken

the essence.

Tamarind Glaze.

1bag (shocked) fresh tamarind
1cup sugar

3cups water

Pinch salt

10z cornstarch

Method

Add all of the ingredients
except for the cornstarch into
a small sauce pot. Bring sauce
to a boil for 30 seconds and then
turn the heat down and simmer
for 10 minutes, then add the
cornstarch to thicken it up.
After thickening strain the glaze
into a new container and let
cool down until you are ready
to use.

Rosemary potatoes

4 red bliss potato (cut in half)
-1 sprig fresh rosemary
(chopped)

A drizzle of olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Method
“Mix all the ingredients

together and place in the oven .

until done. Once a toothpick
can go through the potato is
done.

ee a a es 3)

MAREE gtct tp ie EDS



1/20z coconut milk .

2 sprigs of fresh thyme

30z julienne (strips) market
vegetables

Salt & pepper to taste

Method

Heat up a medium frying pan
with a little oil. Then add your
vegetables, thyme and season-
ing to taste. Then add your
milk.

»

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008, PAGE 11B

lm By DENISE MAYCOCK >
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

Plans for the grill-off competi-
tion were announced this week
by the Ministry of Tourism.

Shirley Lowe, event coordina-
tor, said the grill-off will be held at
Pirates of the Bahamas on Jolly

Roger Drive on Saturday, August

2, from 10am until.

Ms Lowe explained that chefs,
schools, community athletic teams,
local restaurants and Bahamians

throughout the island are invited .

‘tition.
' Ms Lowe hopes that the com-
petition will bring several bene-

FREEPORT - Tourism officials hope that the 1st Annu-
al Grand Bahama Grill-Off competition next month will
help boost the island's sluggish economy,

to participate or view the’ compe-

fits to Grand Bahama.

“It is hoped to boost Graad, _
Bahama’s economy, help youths —
turn to constructive hobbies'such |

as music rather than gangs, while

bringing cohesion to Grand
Bahama’s community and lift the é
spirits of local Te niss ¢ ‘she said. |




FROM left are the -
judges: Devon Johnson,
food and beverage man-
ager, Our Lucaya Resort;
Dwayne Cleare, execu-
tive chef, Our Lucaya;
Shirly Lowe, event coor-
dinator; Mr Popple,

~ sponser, and Lisa Willis,
Food Extraordinaire,
Casa Mederia. Judges
not pictured are Simeon
Hall Jr, Food Services
Company director, 3
Restaurant Mgmt Group

_ Ltd and Mike Mosko of

' Mosko Realty Ltd.

Several companies, she said,
have lent their support to the com-
petition, including Fenestration
Glass Co, the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, Betco Ltd, and Kel-
ly’s.

The judges for the event are

‘Dwane Clare, executive chef at:
- the Our Lucaya Resort; Devon

Johnson, food and beverage man-
ager at the Our Lucaya Resort;

Lisa Willis of the Casa Mederia;

Simeon Hall Jr, director of food

_ services at the 3 Restaurant Man-

agement Group; and Mike Mosko
of Mosko Realty. i
Ms Lowe said she hopes that
the. grill-off competition will
become the premier annual cook-

~ ing competition in the Bahamas

and perhaps an international culi-
Bah competition.

TENDER FOR Dy 1304] TOP UP SOLUTIONS



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited invites qualified vendor(s) to provide
direct top-up solutions for wireless prepaid
services. If your company offers top-up solutions

“OR, prepaid and is interested in participating in

this selection process please see the following
guidelines relative to the application Drocess.

Selection Process Schedule:



July 11: NDA document will be available for pick-up
at security desk of BTC’s JFK Headquarters.
July. 14: RFP available for pick-up at security desk of
! - 'BIC’s JFK Headquarters. RFPs will not be

issued until a signed NDA has been

completed and returned to BIC.
July 25: RFP responses should be submitted to:

(Attention: eTop-up)

| Kirk Griffin, EVP (BTC Building) 21 JFK Drive,
PO Box N3048,Nassau, NP — Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com | CALL BTC 225-5282








WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2008

Emerging

O



Chef George Williams
[ll serves up Grill

Rack of Lamb

See page 11



=.



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