Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’ RE Fl

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION








HIGH SOF
LOW 79F
gem, CLOUDS AND
‘sot SUNSHINE









Volume: 104 No.199



aol Were
mr

Seven year wail Ris
for LNG necision residents to

A GS. eerie Mean their
ut. | Artist is I Py ae | Boe :
official bi Hd lA de a USI eS

FOR MACKEY



says the i

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

and/or knife. Grand Bahama

comp any Tribune Freeport: ' police have reported that two
Reporter women were raped after being

is still
optimistic

lm By PAUL G






dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

_ FREEPORT - As police con-

tinue the manhunt,for a‘serial
rapist, Grand Bahama residents
are being urged to properly
secure their premises at night

awakened by an armed man
who entered their homes during
the early morning hours. |
There has been a report that
a 14-year-old boy was also
raped, however, police have nei-
ther confirmed nor denied this

before going to bed. report. :
Soe Report t Chief Superintendent, Basil _ It is believed that the rapist
Tribune Staff Reporter Rahming, press liaison officer, may have stalked his victims
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net @ — said police are “fully engaged _ before striking. The attacker is
SEVEN ahead aieteini 3 -in a manhunt for a male sus- careful not to leave any evi-
Jot years alter their ini- = —_—_ pected of committing several :
tial investment, the developers recent rape attacks that were SEE page 13
of ‘ BE ENG Meee uae = reported in the city of ce
ural gas N termina at oO Freeport.” aie : Bi e 8 : ‘
Ocean Cay are still awaiting E According to Supt Rahming, ~ Minister SayS areas
on a formal decision from gov- u ou ce J the perpetrator was described ; ’
ele Slee as to oe the — ARTIST MARIE JEANNE DUPUCH discusses some of her work with a guest at her art exhibition ‘(mur-mi-don)’. a uP dae dark lee ao Goodman 4
roject can proceed as_ The exhibition opened on Friday and runs until August 9th at The Hub on Colebrooke Lane. , 3
pignnede ys ae learn Rael te sim build, wearing derk cloth’ Bay to be examine

While admitting that the
normal waiting time for
approyal for such a facility is
three or four years, Aaron
Samson, the head of LNG

: Developer allegedly



blocks | (ERD



cy

Remi crn

for dangerous spots
@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net



projects for AES said yester-
day that the company is still
awaiting approval and is still
optimistic.

Mr Samson’s comments
echo those of Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, who
‘told The Tribune. yesterday
that government has yet to
give AES an answer “one

access to Long Island attraction

™@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST —
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net (







TEAMS of surveyors and
divers will examine the areas
around Goodman’s Bay and
Saunders Beach to check for
dangerous spots following the
drowning of a police officer last
week, Minister of Environment
Earl Deveaux said yesterday.

In response to the accidental
death of Corporal 2453
Desmond Burrows, who
drowned in a firearms training

UNREST is brewing in Long Island today, after a Canadian
developer allegedly blocked access to one of the island’s main
attractions — Dean’s Blue Hole.

According to reports reaching The Tribune yesterday it 1s
understood that the developer of Turtle Cove erected a barri-

SEE page 13



SEE page 12






Firearms and
bullets seized
by the police

POLICE this weekend
removed several illegal
firearms and more than 60
bullets from New Providence’s
streets in their continuing fight
to eradicate crime in the coun-
try’s capital.

On Friday at around
5.30pm, officers from the
Drug Enforcement Unit, act-
ing on a tip from a concerned

SEE page 13

i








JERMAINE ‘CHOO CHOO’ MACKEY made history as he became the first
Bahamian in 21 years to win a British Commonwealth boxing title. On Satur-
day night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, Mackey pulled off a 12-round unan-
imous decision over African Michael ‘the Amazing’ Gbenga to clinch the
British Commonwealth super middleweight title. Pictured is Mackey with his
right hand hoisted in the air by referee Matthew Rolle. At right is Archie
Nairn, the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Sports, who represented Min-
ister Desmond Bannister. Mackey’s trainer Ray Minus Jr. was the last Bahami-
an to hold a British title when he won the bantamweight title in 1987. See
Sports for more details. (Photo: Tim Clarke).

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exercise, Mr Deveaux said that
his ministry is looking into mea-
sures to protect swimmers in
those areas.

The crews conducting the |
mooring survey for the dredging
of Harbour and the divers who
are currently examining the
reefs where the Shell tanker
Ficus ran aground in February,
will this week check the area in
question for potentially dan-
gerous spots.

The authorities will then put
marking buoys in those loca-
tions, the minister said.

Mr Deveaux said that from
his personal experience the sand
bank in that area often shifts
due to the undertow and rough

SEE page 13











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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008 | THE TRIBUNE







LITTLE CHALFONT,
United Kingdom —
Junkanoo is taking
over even the small
towns in the United
Kingdom. The
Junkanoo group tour-
ing the country per-
forms for an excited
crowd in Little Chal-
font, Wednesday,
July 16. The Ren-
dezvous _ Travel
Agency aided in get-
ting the group the
necessary approvals
to perform in one of
its main shopping
area.



Bi By Llonella Gilbert
Bahamas Information Services
LITTLE CHALFONT, UNITED KINGDON



he Junkanoo invasion of the United King-
dom continued in the quaint county of Lit-
tle Chalfont. The people could not help
but get into the act as they just got a taste
of the sounds and the sights of Junkanoo.
Lillian and Vic Podbury, an elderly couple heard that






f a contingent of 33 performers from various A and B : ; i 4
3 Junkanoo groups'and members out of Grand Bahama [Ba es ona
1g and Eleuthera were to perform in their area... .. -LITTLE.CHALFONT, United Kingdom — The

However, it was only when they heard the sounds of brass section of the group gives the crowd a
the cowbells, the trombones, the scrapers, whistles and taste of Junkanoo sounds. However. mem-
ne hows ase ee decided they had to come and see hers of the group advised them to come to The

. for themselves what was going on. it hi

Vic, who uses a cane, had to walk slowly with his Bahamas to see it bigger and better.
wife for a quarter of a mile and arrived just as the per-
formance had ended. :

Upon finding out about this, Quentin “Barabbas”
Woodside, leader of the backline group decided that
they would do a special performance just for the couple.

Those who were able to see the first performance
said they thoroughly enjoyed themselves and gushed
about it with excitement. ;

Callum, a young man.who saw the performance said,
“I was going past my car, I saw you guys preparing to
perform. I live near here, so I quickly went to park my
car and ran back with my camera.”

Then describing what he thought of the act he said, “It
was amazing — it is not quite something you see every- —
day. I had to get me pictures and experience it; especially. LITTLE CHALFONT, United Kingdom — Lillian: «
when they crossed the road, it was amazing: Everyone...and Vic Rodbury, get a special performance, as

é

q
5



LITTLE CHALFONT, United Kingdom Ong,of the performers playing the cowbells and blowing on





e : ! = ONQ,01t 1 ) just stopped and watched, it was amazing.” they just missed:the,graup's act. Vic:;walksiwith:
4 the whistle with all his.strength to get the British interested in Junkanoo and coming to The Bahamas. Still visibly excited, he added, “It was the most unex- a cane so, by thésitinge’thi® couple arrived td dp
is : pected thing — it just made my whole week.” the Junkanoo performance, the group had

Another enthusiastic lady noted that the costumes -completed their show.
were lovely, and that she loved the ‘brightly coloured
shoes the group members were wearing.

Silvia, an owner of a store, said she actually was able to experience a big Junkanoo Parade in Nas-
sau-two or three years ago. i

“There were lots of people out there; much bigger than this,” she said. “We really got into it. It was
hypnotic and you feel yourself moving. It was wonderful with all of the colourful instruments.”

The group is able to make this tour with the sponsorship of Arts Council England. Partnering with
the Council are the Ministry of Sports, Youth and Culture, the Ministry of Tourism and Ms. Zena Bur- ,
land, a frequent British visitor to The Bahamas.

The Ministry of Tourism helped with getting this venue for the group.

District Sales Manager Bahamas Tourism Office (UK) Giovanni Grant said his office asked Ren-
dezvous Travel Agency to help with getting the necessary approvals to perform in Little Chalfont. He
said, “We are going to basically take over the High Street, grab anyone who is around and bring some
crowd to the stores and generate some interest. :

“We have some Bahama Mamas here, a couple of Kaliks, Bahamas flags, and travel brochures basi-
cally to raise awareness to get people interested in the Bahamas.”

Angelique McKay, project manager of the Junkanoo Live initiative and manager of the National
Junkanoo Museum of the Bahamas, said only 15 members of the group were supposed to perform in
- Little Chalfont. i

“But once the guys realised that we were coming to a travel agency,” Ms. McKay said, “they
amongst themselves decided they really wanted to push the culture of the Bahamas a little bit further.
So, they collectively decided they would come as one body to give a larger presence at the travel agency.”

She added, “I thought that was quite commendable of these guys who are part of the troop,
although only half of them were identified because of the space.

“We totally blew the crowd away by our presence, by our size, the colours of the costumes and the
volume of the music — it really shook up the town.”

Lynden Miller, one of the lead bellers of the group and a member of One Family, said it is the best
performance he has ever had off the island.

“It really came together now that we’ are relaxed and free. So everybody is feeling it now; it is
Junkanoo.”

TPN

Bea ee Ne a ana set

fas Pa RE Sg pian kee bad eed nd ae a ea eee ee TS teen ee ee ee ee MEst te Samsun ae teed

i
of

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LE

LITTLE CHALFONT, United
Kingdom — These little babies
get a taste of Junkanoo in Little
Chalfont, while their proud par-
ents look on as well.




{BIS Photos/ .
Lionella
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 3



© In brief BISHOP SIMEON HALL URGES FORMATION OF NATIONAL BLUE COMMITTEE

Police arrest
man, 23, in
connection
with robbery

POLICE arrested a 23-year-
old man on Saturday in con-
nection with the robbery of a
pedestrian.

While walking in the area
of Old Trail Road around
6.30pm on Saturday, a 55-
year-old woman was
approached by two men who
grabbed her handbag and ran
off heading north.

Police were alerted and offi-
cers from the Wulff Road Sta-
tion who were in the area of R
M Bailey playing field
observed a man fitting the
description of one of the rob-
bers.

A 23-year-old resident of
Pinedale was arrested. The
second robber is still being
sought. :

Officers make
drug arrests in
joint operation

OFFICERS from the
Grove, South East, and
Carmichael Divisions pooled
efforts in a combined opera-
tion on Friday in the area of
the Town Centre Mall.

During the “Operation Uni-
ty”, officers made. two.drug
arrests and executed two war-
rants for arrest.

Some 59 persons were also
cited for traffic infractions dur-
ing the exercise.

Report of
boat stolen
from Hope

Town, Abaco.

POLICE in the Northern
Bahamas are searching for a
vessel that was reportedly
stolen from Hope Town, Aba-
co, on Friday.

According to reports, Hal
Turner of No 727 Baldwin
Drive, South Carolina, report-
ed to police that sometime
between 10.30pm on July 17,
and 7.30pm on July 18, some-
one stole his 31ft dark blue
2008 Contender boat.

The vessel — named ‘Iron
Man’ — is equipped with twin
250 Yamaha outboard
engines.

It is also outfitted with state-
of-the-art navigation and
sound equipment and is val-
ued at $170,000.

Mr Turner, who was stay-
ing at Elbow Cay at the time,
had moored the vessel at the
dock on Bay Street in Hope
Town.

Police are asking anyone
who may have seen the ves-
sel to contact the Central
Detective Unit on Grand
Bahama at telephone 350-
3107 or 8.

your

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the:
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986,
and share your story.

te ee MeN sly les
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157





Call

LOCAL NEWS

for study

into the effects
of alcoholism

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net_

FORMER President of the
Christian Council Bishop Sime-
on Hall, has called on govern-
ment to form a National Blue
Ribbon committee to study the
effects of alcoholism through-
out the country.

In a letter-addressed to the
Minister of Heath Dr Hubert
Minnis, Bishop Hall, who now
heads the New Covenant Bap-
tist Church said that alcoholism
— teenage drinking — is the
next “monstrous challenge we
will face as a nation.”

“You would be aware that
the legal and illegal sale of alco-
hol has become an accepted
part of our social life.

“I note that while the num-
bers: of liquor outlets are
increasing, government spon-
sored education on this silent
killer is non-existent,” he said.

However, Bishop Hall said
tne tragedy the country now
faces is that alcohol has become
a “sacred cow” — woven into
the fabric of the nation’s “cul-

. tural life.”

“Reports are ripe that per-
sons in high places benefit from

of our national life”.

this habit that has reached epi-
demic levels while we say noth-
ing.
“T note that in all your (Dr
Minnis) pronouncements, very
little. or nothing is said about
alcoholism,” he said.

It’s with this in mind, Bishop
Hall urged the minister to form
the Blue Ribbon committee to
study this problem, and to
ascertain how this “accepted
killer is affecting various parts

“You would be
aware that the
legal and illegal
sale of alcohol
has become an.
accepted part of
our social life.”

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | We need to
upgrade our
home base

industries

EDITOR, The Tribune. eosunD my 5

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES a
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

ture. You cannot just spend or
give away free gifts. All these
items will show up in the budget
and must be reconciled. Even





I WISH to commend the
Government for an excellent

Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
‘Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Morton Salt workers talk strike

BECAUSE OF the difficult economic cli-
mate the Bahamas is now experiencing, Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes has urged employers to
do all in their power not to cut costs by firing
staff.

He said that the present economic down-
turn has caused much concern about job secu-
rity. Sota

“Do what you have to with reduced work
weeks if necessary,” he pleaded, “but please
do not lay anyone off.” ;

Obviously the seriousness of what the world
is now going through-has not trickled down as
far south as Inagua where 73 of 74 union mem-
bers employed by Morton Salt (Bahamas) vot-
ed to strike. tase

“We're all elated,” said Jennifer Brown, sec-
retary-general of the Bahamas Industrial Man-

ufacturing and Allied Workers Union.

(BIMAAWU), commenting on the mood of
Morton Salt workers after the vote.

We wonder how elated they will be should
Dow Chemicals cut them adrift when it discov-
ers that among its new acquisitions is a compa-
ny with industrial unrest? Less than a week
after Inagua’s strike vote, it was announced
that Dow Chemicals had bought Rohm and
Haas, owners of Morton Salt. Dow Chemicals,
which will be occupied with the reorganization
of its new enterprises, will be in no mood to
play games with Trade Union president Obie

Ferguson, executives of the BIMAAWW, or”
elated union members itching for a strikesDow

Chemicals, having undertaken an $18 billion
investment, will probably not even let Morton
Salt (Bahamas) and its problems surface on its
radar screen.

When unionists sit down with management at —

the Department of Labour today, it is hoped
that reality will have set in and they will realise
that if they go on strike they might never shov-
el salt again.

The strike vote was called because unionists
claim that the firing of 30-year staff member,

Ken Rolle, who was also the union’s vice pres-’

ident, was a union busting tactic.

However, an old-timer at Inagua does not
believe the company had any intention of firing
Mr Rolle.

According to this person it was just a matter
of discipline for a breach of company policy. It

was the old-timer’s understanding that Mr Rolle.

was asked to sign a letter of apology after which
he was to go back to work.
According to our informant, it is believed
that on the advice of his lawyer Mr Rolle
refused to sign. ;
This dispute threatens to disrupt the lives
of more than 60 per cent of Inagua’s population,

all employed by Inagua’s sole employer — Mor-

ton Salt (Bahamas).

“Glen Bannister can sleep with a good con-
science,” said our informant, “he has done
everything to save these people’s jobs. This
company has been very good to our people
here. The people have been treated fairly.”

In this person’s opinion Mr Bannister “went
out on a limb” to save Mr Rolle’s job.

“All he asked him to.do was sign a paper
saying he was sorry.”

But Morton Salt’s workers never had any
intention of going on strike, our informant
claimed. “All the people down here know is
how to produce salt,” he said.

“No strike down here ever lasts more than
three or four days,” he said.

“While they’re out on strike the company
doesn’t have to pay them, but the salt continues
to grow. They can’t afford to go out on strike.

_ After three or four days they’ll be begging to go

back to work. These people’s bark is louder
than their bite.” ;

However, if they do strike it is hoped that Mr
Ferguson’s union strike fund — if there is such

a thing — will be large enough to support the .

unionists who down their tools.
Mr Bannister said that so far the sale of the

’ company has had no negative impact on Inagua.
-He didn’t:think it wouldthave. “We’re part of #7}:
the salt division,” he said, “which has companies’
“iH the US, Cariada aiid ‘the Batiaritas:” rns
It is because Dow Chemicals now has other. .,

companies that it is possible to drop’ whatever
company is not operating up to full potential
and gets “elated” over a strike vote.

Last year unprecedented rains closed the salt
pans, causing temporary lay-offs. This put Mor-
ton (Bahamas) way behind its harvesting quotas,
which it hoped to catch up on by next year.

However, what Inaguans must remember is
that they will be dealing.with hard-nosed busi-
nessmen in the new take-over who will look at
the charts and see that costs in salt producing
nations, such as Mexico and Chile, are far low-
er than the Bahamas, and their production much
higher. For example in Mexico five million
tonnes of salt are produced in a year — with the
capacity to increase to seven million —com-
pared to Inagua’s annual production of 1.2 mil-
lion tonnes.

Considering those costs and that perfor-
mance, coupled with strike threats, in six months
time news from the north might not be so cheer-
ful for the people of Inagua.

Rather than following union leaders, who
will turn their backs on them in their hour of
need, Inaguans would be well advised to con-
sider their own future and that of their families.







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budget in these difficult eco-
nomic times, because of the pri-
orities given in the budget to
the less developed islands and
communities to build their
homes and upgrade their town-
ships, and for the emphasis
placed on allowing duty free
items for the health and wel-

fare of all residents.

It seems that a couple of
Freeporters are either out of
touch with reality, the down-
turn in the United States’ econ-
omy, the downsizing of compa-
nies such as Home Depot, Star-
bucks, etc, automobile compa-
nies, airlines, etc, the closure of
banks with consequent loss of
jobs to thousands, and all the
mortgage foreclosures forcing
people from their homes, or the
resulting consequence on our
main industry, tourism.

When it was noted that an
identical paragraph was lifted
from one letter by a writer and
was used in a communication
by another person, one could
have dismissed the content for
what it is, pure politicking,
where the intent is to promote
discord once again.

However, the fact that some
people in Freeport are still
importing bins of furniture and
heavy appliances such as wash-
ing machines to equip new

homes, as well as more cloth-
«ding, this would suggest that

Some tips for s

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LAST week, the country

recorded two tragic traffic fatal-

ities in one week which claimed.
‘the lives of two people. These

fatalities and many others. I
must say that have occurred
could have been avoided by all
means.

Firstly, seat belts are devices

designed for you to wear at all .

times when travelling in a vehi-
cle. Many persons fail and con-
tinue to refuse to wear their seat
belts which cause them to have

fatal injuries or even die when |

involved with an accident.
Wearing your seat belt helps to
protect you and keep you safe
when you encounter an ‘acci-
dent. The seat belt law needs
to be enforced in order to keep




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letters@tribunemedia.net



either they have lots of money
to spend in the United States, or
they are not budgeting or pri-
oritising their funds taking into
account the slowing economy.
One would have thought that
some of that money would be
spent locally to support local

firms — at least support:

employment at home.

At this time, instead of poli-
ticking and backbiting, steps
should be taken to consolidate
and upgrade one’s home base
industries.

In Nassau, there are stores
which are passing on to cus-
tomers the savings due to the
duty free items passed in the
National Budget, and many of
us patronise these stores.

I recall that this Government
came to the rescue of persons
whose jobs had been terminated
due to the closure of a hotel in
Freeport. Those persons know
who they are. Well, these pay-
ments had to be taken from
monies which would have been
used for the benefit of all
Bahamians. Perhaps there
should be some gratitude.

- As far as taxes are concerned,
both the developed and the
developing countries must per-
form a balancing exercise of
expected revenue and expendi-

persons who refuse the wear-
ing of seat belts.

Secondly, driving under the
influence of alcohol is very dan-
gerous. I urge folks to be
responsible drivers; do not drink
and drive. If persons feel that
they cannot drive let someone
who is sober drive. Being on the
phone, eating, picking up some-
thing from the car floor and
éven women breast feeding all
contributes to accidents on the
streets.

Thirdly, when driving we
must not speed and drive reck-
lessly. Drive at the speed limits
that are posted on signs in dif-
ferent areas. In addition to this,
many people tend to drive at a
fast speed when they are in a
hurry and are late for an
appointment. This is why acci-
dents are inevitable to happen.
To avoid this, for instance when
one has an appointment for
7pm, it will be better for them
to be on the road by 6pm,
instead of 7.45pm where you
have to be in.a rush and who
knows it is a chance that you
can rush your life away...sadly.

Fourthly, when coming
around a corner, folks tend to
speed around it. When doing
this, it is a 50 per cent chance
that you can lose control of your
car and ‘run’ into a utility pole
or off the road into the bushes.

‘So I urge you that when

approaching a corner, try to
decelerate your speed. Also, I
have seen persons overtake
another vehicle when approach-



in one’s own personal account-
ing, one cannot spend more
than he/she earns. Parents
should instil this attitude into
the minds of their children so
that they learn at an early age to
spend wisely, earn what they
can, and they should not expect
to always be the recipients of

free stuff. When they grow old-

er they will, in turn, assume
their responsibility to family,
home and the nation.

It seems appropriate at this
time and on the nation’s 35th
birthday to quote here the late
President John F Kennedy who
said: “Ask not what your coun-
try can do for you, but what you
can do for your country.”

Therefore, let us build together. ,

For the Christians in our
community, surely they remem-

ber that taxing goes back over.

2000 years when it was Jesus
who said on an occasion to his
disciples “Render to Caesar the
things that are Caesar’s and to
God the things that are God’s”
and the disciples paid the
required tax. ©

May God continue to bless
our country, and fill us with love
for one another and peace in
our land.

A NASSAUVIA
Nassau, ‘
July 17, 2008.

driving

ing a corner. This is a very dan-
gerous risk to take because
another car coming from the
opposite direction can be com-
ing around the corner the same
time and it will be a head on
collision and sadly lives can be
taken away.

Finally, taking over on main

.strips can be risky also and

cause accidents. For example,
if a car wants to overtake anoth-
er car and a next car from the
other direction is coming, that
person who wants to overtake
may judge that they can make it
before the car comes from the
opposite direction. In a case like
this, it might be too late for the
overtaking car to switch back
on their lane. So in this case
they have misjudged the dis-
tance between them and the
opposite car from the direction.
This might cause them to run
off the road or hit the car from
the opposite direction.

So in this case, make sure
there is a great distance
between you and the vehicle on
the opposite lane, which will
afford you enough time to over-
take the car on your lane and
get back on your lane.

In conclusion with these tips,

’ I am sure many accidents will

be avoided. Take precaution on
the street. Be safe out there.
Remember, save a life and it
could be yours.

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
July, 2008.

Please be advised that

Mr. Alpheus F; McKenzie is
no longer employed with the
Law Firm of
‘Harry B. Sands, Lobosky
and Company.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 5



TRIBUNE SURVEY REVEALS NON-ATTENDANCE AT NATIONAL CELEBRATIONS HAS LITTLE TO DO WITH RACE

Class difference stops some white Bahamians
attending Independence Day events — poll

@ By LISA LAWLOR



RESPONDENTS to a Tri-
bune poll say class difference is
the main reason some white
Bahamians do not attend the
Independence Day celebrations.

This year's poll was launched
July 4 as a survey to measure
the "racial exclusion" hypoth-
esized by associate professor
Michael Stevenson in the Col-
lege of the Bahamas' Distin-
guished Lecture Series, July 1.

Mr Stevenson's observation
came from his studies of the
Bahamas' past in racial and

‘Versatile’
AVM EN
opens at
Central

LPM e mals
Bahamas



“,..1 do not
enjoy being part
of a huge

Crow
SS ee a ee)
political relations, and he quot-
ed Rev. C B Moss who said a
few years ago that "the coun-
try was 'plagued' by the non-
involvement of white Bahami-
ans in national affairs."
Stevenson further posed the

response by Normon Solomon
"a great Bahamian" who ques-
tioned: "What has my love of
country and loyalty to my coun-
try got to do with my appear-
ance at Clifford Park?"

While Stevenson concluded
that it was up to white Bahami-
ans to form a more inclusive
nation by attending national
events, most respondents — of
all ethnic backgrounds — said it

has little to do with race, but’

more to do with class.

One Bahamas resident who
wished to remain. anonymous
said, "I am a white Bahamian

AV Vie eden

and, like the majority of my
friends, both black and white,
I do not attend (the celebra-
tions). I can find other forms of
entertainment that I prefer and
generally, I do not enjoy being
part of a huge crowd."

But, she added, "Pride swells
in (white Bahamians') hearts
just as much as in the hearts of
those who go along to the large,
organized celebrations.

“However, we generally do
not feel that it is a duty to
attend and make a public
demonstration of our national
prides

Another respondent, a
"proud, loyal and black"
Bahamian woman with “roots
buried deep in the Bahamas"

has never attended any inde-.

pendence celebrations, not even
the very first one.

She’ feels "the PLP seemed
to think (in 1973) and still do
that 'independence' was a PLP
thing for PLPs only," thereby
she thinks there is a political
exclusion.

Other responses received by
The Tribune included reasons
of too much traffic, not enough
parking, repetitive speeches —

AN ART EXHIBITION
"Versatile’ was held at the
Central Bank of the
Bahamas on Friday July
18, 2008 and will run

until August 2, 2008.
Pictured is one of the
artists, Edrin Symonette,
(third from left) explain-
ing one of the paintings.

"they say the same thing over
and over!" too much noise, and
one lady said she didn't need
to go because she "was there

for the real t’ing in''73".

While not the majority, there
were responses supporting Mr
Stevenson's thesis, and giving
racial exclusion as the reason
for not attending national
events like this one.

A black Bahamian said she
has seen the "boorish and
insulting behaviour" white peo-
ple are subjected to at these
events, and said "If I were them
I would not go either."

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Friday July 18,
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PRESIDENT of the Bahamas _ seminars here i in The Bahamas. seriously think about. how they Black
Chamber of Commerce Dionisio “This in itself, says a great deal. can reduce their energy costs, as Tan
D’Aguilar lauded the proactive — about the extremely close ties that well as the amount of kilowatt
measures being taken by the _exist between The Bahamas, the _ hours they actually use, by using Brown
‘United States government and United States and our sister coun- _ alternative forms of energy,” Mr Silver

regional energy officials and
stakeholders to develop sustain-
able energy options for the
Caribbean, as they prepare to
meet during two high-powered
energy conferences slated for July
23 and 24; 2008 at the Sheraton
Cable Beach ‘Resort.

The Caribbean Regional Sus-
tainable Energy High Level Sem-
inar, sponsored by the General
Secretariat of the Organisation
of American States (GS/OAS),
the Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) and the Inter-Amer-
ican Institute for Cooperation on
Agriculture (IICA) and the gov-

ernment of the United States, is’

slated for Wednesday, July 23,
‘2008.

The Opportunities for Renew-
able Energy in the Caribbean
Seminar, sponsored by the gov-
ernment of the United States, will
be held, the following day, on
Thursday, July 24, 2008.

“For too long we have all been
reactive in dealing with the varied
challenges of ever increasing
energy costs. Now, it is imperative
that we become proactive and
begin as a nation and a region to
develop sustainable energy
options,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is incredibly grateful
to the United States Ambassador
to the Bahamas Ned Siegel, the
Organisation of American States
as well as the other regional bod-
ies and stakeholders for convinc-
ing the powers that be, to hold
these two very important energy

a Le
EXTERMINATORS

ay ha
PHONE: 322-2157



tries throughout the Caribbean,

especially when one considers

that these seminars could have
very well been held in any other
country in the Caribbean or city

_ in the United States,” he said.

He said the Chamber of Com-
merce is very excited to partici-
pate in the two energy seminars.
He explained that the organisa-
tion, which represents the inter-
ests of the private sector in the
country, has repeatedly articulat-
ed its concerns that energy costs
in the country continue to rise at
a very expeditious rate.

“High energy costs continue to
be a pressing concern for major
business establishments from a
broad spectrum of industries from:
tourism to retail as well as for
individual household owners.
Every business and energy con-
sumer in this country needs to

D’ Aguilar said.

Pointing to countries such as
Barbados and St Lucia which
have taken proactive steps in
using alternative forms of energy,

. Mr D’Aguilar, who recently vis-

ited St Lucia, noted that many of
the homes on that island nation,
used solar panel systems in order
to heat water.

“Inevitably oil prices will con-
tinue to rise, and really there is
very little that the Government
can do about it. As a result, con-
sumers need to become more
informed and proactive and take
their concerns into their own
hands,” he said.

He ‘added, “Now the govern-
ment can provide incentives and

can educate you about it, but at”

the end of the day it is you as the
consumer who is going to have
to make the decision.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008



THE TRIBUNE

@ BY ERIKA RAHMING

My name is Erika Rahming, I
am 16 years old and I am the
Olympic Youth Ambassador of
the Bahamas.

From August 6 to August 17,

Bahamian athlete, will be attend-
ing the Beijing 2008 Olympic
Youth Camp. . .




















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I, along with another young >

This youth camp gives young
people the opportunity to make

friends from other countries or .

regions and to learn about each
other's cultures.

- During the camp I will attend,
some of the Olympic Games and
learn about the culture of China.
While in Beijing I will be sending
a journal of what is going on, not
only concerning the. Olympics,
but also about the culture of Chi-
na and my experience while

’ there.

I was chosen to be an Olympic
Youth Ambassador based on my
academic achievements as well as

Betty Taylor
Journalist / Entrepreneur



athletic accomplishments. My
sport is judo and I am the
Bahamas’ top lightweight female

fighter. I have also medaled in

international competitions. Let
me tell you about my prepara-
tions for the camp.

"Today is a good day for
judo," I hear my father's voice
say every morning. And indeed
today is a good day for judo. With
the US Junior Open only days
away, the intense team workouts
have been toned down to simple
workouts mostly consisting of
perfecting technique and

defences. The Bahamian. judo

“You may have
darkness in your life
today, but remember,
there is a tomorrow the

sun will shine for you.

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A chance to make friends and
learn about Chinese culture

Erika Rahming

team has trained hard for the past
few months and the team mem-
bers are eager to fight once again
in the tournament.

Last year, the team training at
All-Star Family Centre and Gym-
nasium on Joe Farrington road
had paid off and several athletes
were able to win medals, includ-
ing a gold and a few silvers. This
year, many of the team members
hope to win, myself included,
especially since the programme
has been enhanced with the assis-
tance of the American coach, Jer-
ry Lafon, as well as some local
Senseis (who are teachers of the
art): Sensei Rahming, Sensei
Mickey, Sensei Oneysi and Sensei
Role.

Judo is'a very physical sport
requiring flexibility, strength and
also intelligence. In judo, two

_ judokas (judo players) fight each

other until time runs out or until
one of the players, receives an

‘"Ippon," which is a full point.

This can be'achieved by throwing
the opponent fully on their back,
pinning the opponent on their
back for 25 seconds or by making
the opponent tap out through an
armbar or by choking. Of course,
only those over the age of 13 can
perform chokes and those over
the age of 16, armbars.

I want to bei in the best physi-
cal condition for the camp so that
I can represent the Bahamas t6
the best of my ability. Look out
for my journal which I will be















*\



4





THE TRIBUNE



| Frances Singer-Haywar d a ae aa

honours ‘Amigo’ the
potcake at fashi

Ambassator
to US courts

potential new

investors to
the Bahamas

BAHAMAS Ambas-
sador to the United States
C A Smith this weekend
courted potential new
investors to the Bahamas
during the 12th annual
National Association of
Black Hotel Owners,
Operators and Developer
Summit.

Speaking at the summit,
which was held iu Atlanta
from July 16-20, Ambas-
sador Smith highlighted
the tax free benefits for
international investors in
the Bahamas.

“Tourism has brought
the brightest sparkle to the
archipelagic jewels called

- the Bahamas, and our
work in this area has
brought great rewards,” he
said.

Ambassador Smith, with
Prime Minister David
Thompson of Barbados
courted hundreds attend-
ing the summit.

Pointing to governmen-
t’s red carpet versus red
tape policy, the Ambas-
sador said the Bahamas
has established generous
legal incentives to attract
foreign investors and has
streamlined government
bureaucracy for timely
project approval.

Today those categories
of investment include

tourism, financial services,’ :

international services, e-
business, manufacturing,
agriculture and fisheries _
and real estate develop-
ment,” he said.

A veteran politician and
former Cabinet Minister,
Mr Smith who was recent-
ly appointed Ambassador
to Washington, DC, was
accompanied to the sum-

‘mit by Consul General:
gudys Sands ofthe |.

Bahamas Consulate int®
Miata and: Honorary: €
sul Mike Young of
Atlanta.

~ “Our country has been
faithfully committed for
more than 60 years to the
ideals necessary to foster
the right environment to
attract the wealthy to live
and conduct business in
the Bahamas,” the Ambas-
sador said.

The Ambassador said
that considering that this
year’s approvals by the
National Economic Com-

’ mittee of the Bahamas

exceed $10.2 billion, the
next two decades will see
the country transformed as
the destination of choice
for luxury vacations and

high-end real estate devel-

opment.

“Therefore, ladies and
gentlemen, the islands of
the Bahamas’ envious
location as the closest off-
shore destination to the
east coast of the USA,
offering easy access as well
as lower ticket.prices by
air is of great benefit to
developers and end pur-
chasers.

“The government and
péople of the Bahamas
extend a warm invitation
to you to consider and
invest in the islands of the
Bahamas.”




FOR the second year,
Frances Singer Hayward
walked the runway in the
“Paws for Style” fashion show
in New York -— this time, in
honour of her famous potcake
Amigo, who died of cancer
last September.

The glamorous and star-
studded event, in aid of the
Humane Society of New York
has become a yearly favourite
in the city that never sleeps.

Wearing an elegant
turquoise outfit by designer
Jackie Rogers, and sporting a
red satin “I love Amigo”
heart, which was. specially
designed by Ms Rogers for the
event, Ms Singer-Hayward
had as her animal companion
a Chihuahua from the
Humane Society named “Bec-
ca” who is presently up for
adoption.

“This was a very bitter-
sweet night for me, filled with
memories of Amigo and the
fun we had last year,” said Ms
Singer Hayward.

“Amigo will always be my
soul and inspiration, in my
devotion to my life’s calling
of making the world a better
place for animals.

“T can only pray that people
will help fulfil his mission by
being more sympathetic to the
suffering of so many animals
and, of course, by supporting
organisations like the Humane
Society of Grand Bahama —
for whom he was the mascot

FRANCES SINGER-HAYWARD walks the runway in honour of late



WEARING A specially designed
“| Love Amgio” red satin .
brooch, Frances Singer Hay-
ward stands back stage at the
Paws for Style fashion show
benefitting the Humane Society
of New York.

and “poster dog” for so many
years — and all Humane Soci-
eties throughout the Bahamas
who work so heroically and
tirelessly.”

The Humane Society of
Grand Bahama has recently
opened a new state-of-the-art
animal shelter, which features
“Amigo’s Friendship Park,”
which Ms Singer-Hayward
describes as “a beautiful and
befitting tribute to him.”

potcake star Amigo at the Paws for Style fashion show in New York
in aid of the Humane Society of New York.





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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Evidence compelling

Caribbean review of
EU agreement



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@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

T SEEMS - that
Caribbean countries
can now forget any idea
of Britain being help-
ful to them in any attempt to
review or re-negotiate aspects
of the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) between the

European Union (EU) and

Cariforum countries initialled
last December.

Foreign Ministers of Carifo-
rum countries, who travelled to
London for a two-day meeting
of the UK-Caribbean forum on
15-16 July, found a commu-
niqué already written mostly by
the British but with input from
some Caribbean High Com-
missioners.

The draft was a one- -sided
affair which took no cognizance
of the serious disagreements
over the EPA that now exist in
both the Caribbean and the EU.
Reading it, anyone would be
forgiven for believing that the
EU had given the Caribbean
everything, asking nothing in
return. Indeed, it read as if the

EPA was the Caribbean’ s sal-

vation.

This is how it read in part:

“Ministers welcomed the
conclusion of the EU-Carifo-
rum EPA and looked forward
to its signature in Bridgetown”.

It continued: “Services
exports to EU markets had also
been facilitated by the Agree-
ment so that since 1 January
2008, there is better access for
Caribbean professionals to sell
services as Contractual Service
Suppliers and as Independent

Professionals or self employed. -

persons, so that regional
tourism professionals, chefs,
models and entertainers now
have guaranteed access to the

EU.”

Fortunately, those words did
not stand. The section on ser-
vices was eliminated and instead
of “welcoming” the “conclu-
sion” of the EPA, Ministers
“noted” that several CARI-
COM countries “have complet-
ed their internal consultations”
and instead of “looked forward
to its signature”, Ministers

“expressed a readiness to sign.

with the EU”, but they also had
to note that “Guyana would be
undertaking national consulta-
tions to review aspects of the
initialled EPA before taking a
decision on signing”, and that





“the newly elected Government
of Grenada would also be
undertaking a review of the
Agreement”. It was left to the
UK alone to “encourage timely
signing and nuplementaion of
the EPA”.

While a gloss of success was
put on the outcome of the meet-
ing, it was’ evident that
Caribbean ministers were not
altogether happy with the meet-
ing. Unusually, the Caribbean
co-chair of the meeting,
Antigua and Barbuda’s Prime
Minister Baldwin Spencer, in
his closing remarks drew atten-
tion to the fact that the two

sides had “agreed to disagree .

on some issues”. ;
But the disagreements were

_not_all over the EPA, There
appeared to be a remarkable ©

insensitivity by British minis-
ters over the consequences of
the loss of a preferential market
in the EU for Caribbean
banana farmers. When it was
suggested the farmers would
turn to the growing of marijua-
na as a means of survival, a
British official shot down the
idea causing some Caribbean
ministers to show some annoy-
ance with the complete lack of
understanding of the dire posi-
tion of banana farmers.

But, the EPA remained the
most worrying consequence of
the UK-Caribbean forum com-

muniqué.: While Guyana and,

Grenada have made their posi-

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“There appeared
to be a remarkable
insensitivity by

. British ministers

over the

. consequences of

the loss of a
preferential
market in the EU
for Caribbean

banana farmers.”
a ee ee eae

tion clear — and it is to be hoped
that the governments of the two
countries will now try to mount
a joint team to review the EPA
and consider their options,

. rather than working alone —

other Caribbean governments
accepted UK language in the
communiqué that is not help-
ful.

Much has been made by the
EU of access to its markets for
the Caribbean’s services sectors.
I and others have already point-
ed out that the authority for
“the movement of natural per-
sons” and therefore the right to
grant or deny visas rests with
individual EU countries not
with the European Commission.
Therefore, referencés t6'this in
the EPA are misleading.

Serious though that restric-
tion is, it is not the only problem:

related to services. Professor
Jane Kelsey of the School of
Law at the University of Auck-
land has produced a report for
the countries of the Pacific high-
lighting the one-sided nature of
the EPA on services.

- She points ta: the surrender-

ing of autonomy in policy mak- -

ing, the granting to the EU of
measures not agreed in the
global trade rules at the World
Trade Organisation, the harm-
ful effects on development, the
onerous and costly obligations
of implementing the EPA, and
the dangers it poses to cpio
integration.

For instance, she says quite
bluntly: “The EC has used the
CARIFORUM EPA to secure
‘state of the art’ rules and com-
mitments under Title IJ: Invest-
ment, Services and E-commerce
that it hasn’t been able to
achieve at the WTO. The EC
is expected to use this to under-
mine their continued opposi-
tion to these issues at the WTO
if it can get more ACP states to
sign a similar agreement”.

Professor Kelsey told the
Pacific countries that: “The lev-
el of sectoral commitments
made by CARIFORUM states
in the EPA exceeds the contro-
versial benchmarks proposed
by the EC in the GATS 2000
negotiations... “. And, she
warned them: “Comparable lib-'
eralisation commitments in the
Pacific would have a massive
impact on the nature, function
and objectives of ‘services and
the right of governments to reg-
ulate them”:

Tellingly, she observes: “The -
EPA promises support for small
and medium enterprises. Yet
governments that make ‘nation-
al treatment’ commitments in:
Title II sign away the right to
give small or infant enterprises
the additional support they may
need to survive once their mar-
kets are opened to Europe’s
corporations.

“Only large-scale local firms
will be competitive and the
most successful of these may .
become targets for foreign
takeovers”.

Caribbean governments ini-
tialled the EPA first while oth-
ers waited. The EU pushed the
Caribbean, and it was clear
from the outcome of the UK-
Caribbean forum, that the agen-
da of some EU governments is
to hold the Caribbean to signing

’afull EPA in the EU’s interest.

But, it remains in the
Caribbean’s interest to review
and renegotiate what is clearly
harmful to Caribbean business-
es and Caribbean autonomy.

_ The body of evidence justi-
fying the review is compelling.

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.co

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 9





ABOVE

LEFT

closing ceremony.



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is presently considering applications for a

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The Human Resources Department is accepting applications for a position in

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The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
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PC Literacy (MS Word, Excel)

A Bachelor’s degree with concentration in Finance, Accounting
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The candidate will be expected to perform the following duties:
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. Personal Qualities: ‘
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ONLY PERSONS MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEE

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

- P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS 25" JULY, 2008



LEFT

MRS SANDRA EDGECOMBE, District Superintendent, Hector Delva, Chief
Inspector, Police Training College GB, and School Board Security Officers
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

The focus of Eleuthera

mi By LEONARDO KNOWLES

Hzetners. oh my
island, held back from

its original meaning “Freedom”



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instead enslaved by an economi-
cal giant. This island that has nur-
tured me for so many years has so

-much to offer, lovely pink sand

beaches, rolling green hills, quaint
villages, rugged cliffs, red soil,



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good for growing pineapples,
caves and beautiful caring peo-

ple. It seems to have been lost in

the world of economic possibili-
ties, this is why I feel that it is so
important for me to give back to
an island that has given so much
to me.

Some may recall the glory days
of Eleuthera when every islander
was able to enjoy full-time
employment and a vibrant econ-
omy. In the 1950’s the French
Leave hotel in Governor’s Har-
bour, later replaced by Club Med,
was said to have been the driving
force of the Eleuthera economy.

For the past 15 years, both past
and present governments of The
Bahamas made promises to the
residents of Eleuthera in good
faith, the economy declined due
to Government’s promises being
backed by solemn guarantees,
which were sometimes not hon-
oured. As a result, major resorts
on the mainland were forced to
close their doors, compounded
with the setbacks resulting from
the devastating hurricane
Andrew, but more importantly
the failure to attract new invest-
ment.

The truth of the matter in my
opinion is that politicians and
governments are extremely men-
dacious. Politicians might lie
about whether they are guilty of
adultery, misappropriation of
funds, and representing their con-
stituencies, but there are some
promises that they should stand
behind. How is it that during an
election campaign politicians/gov-
ernment ask for the support of
the people with the intention of
defaulting on their promises made
during the campaign? In my opin-










Available at

NOTICE

Christian Churches Pray for
Christians United for Israel
meeting in Washington D.C.
July 21/24

Under the leadership of
Pastor John Haigi pray also
for our Bahama Land to be
spared from all hurricanes

this year and the Islands
surrounding us.

Thank You
Jesus



Leonardo Knowles
ion it is just irresponsible.

Stagnated

| he glory days of the once

thriving Rock Sound
Club and exclusive Pottatch Club
have disappeared. The Winder-
mere Island development, Davis
Harbour, Cape Eleuthera, and
Cotton Bay, with its world-class
golf course and expensive homes,
have not yet achieved the level
of success expected.

Indeed, it is quite remarkable
that the once promising growth
trends emerging in Eleuthera
have stagnated. The promises of



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“It is
essential for
Eleutherians
to understand
the
importance of
community...”



help and hope, being right around
the corner, have been heard many
times in the last few years.

Accordingly, a high degree of .
scepticism greets any pronounce-'

ment of major economic: devel-
opment projects on the island.

Presently, there are a number
of projects expected to signifi-
cantly impact the residents —
South Eleuthera in particular. I
am particularly concerned that
once the word “development” is
mentioned most persons allow
themselves to become overly
excited thinking only of econom-
ic growth and nothing else.

It is essential for Eleutherians
to understand the importance of
community, and the role the com-
munity ought to play in the devel-
opmental process of the island.

Firstly, development takes

place through awareness and the ~

interplay of reflection and action
by people in the community.

Secondly, growth in human
capacity, not superimposed eco-
nomic growth, produces sustained
development.

Thirdly, people’s participation
in their own development as they
take control of their own future is
crucial. In order for a community
to participate in determining its
needs, the motivation of the peo-
ple is essential. In this case the
elécted representative for the con-
stituency, better known as the
Member of Parliament, acts as
the facilitator/motivator on behalf
of the Government of The
Bahamas, promising the resi-
dences help and hope for the
problems that plague their com-
munities. Motivation is the initial

- process whereby the oppressed

and powerless become aware of
their conditions and its causes.
Community motivation leads to
the sharing of responsibilities,
which gives the community a
sense’ of ownership. For a com-
munity to participate in its own
development, mutual trust must
be established between the
MP/Government and the com-
munity.

Presently, the trend that began










THE TRIBUNE

about 15 years ago seems to have
accelerated in recent years due
to the lack of opportunities and
the general decline in the econo-
my of Eleuthera. As a result,
many persons from Eleuthera
have left either for the island of
New Providence and/or other
countries in order to find employ-
ment, boost their incomes, and
to further their education.
Notwithstanding, many persons
of Eleutherian descent have been
very successful in the fields of
education, construction, medicine,
and business.

However, the fact that many
have not returned to invest and
contribute to the further devel-
opment of Eleuthera has served
to hinder progress. Meanwhile,
the lack of incentives to migrate
from New Providence presents
another hurdle.

[ is my hope that the Goy-
ernment of The Bahamas

would grant title to commonage
land to enable development for
residential or commercial pur-
poses as it has done and is doing
presently for other islands, such as
Abaco, Exuma and Long Island.
‘Also, put in place measures for
land reform. Apparently, large
tracts of land have been pur- -
chased by non-residents and held
for a long period of time without
any development taking place.

The under-utilisation of
resources and of the facilities such
as the naval bases, standout upon
visiting Eleuthera. In part, this is
a remnant of slavery specifically;
people who have not had to think
for themselves and plan for the
future tend to focus on day-to-
day activities.

Despite the arduous economic
times in Eleuthera, I can honest-
ly attest to the hard work, perse-
verance, initiatives, ambition and
vision of local entrepreneurs, such
as the late Mr Albert T Sands and
family, Mr Ray Carey and family
and Mr Oswald Ingraham and
family (in Rock Sound).just to
name a few. Their commitments
to the island of Eleuthera and its
residents speak volumes to the ~
further development of the island.

Instead of simply waiting for
foreign investment, a fair num-
ber of locals show the determi-
nation and ability to push ahead
with their own plans. Eleuthera °
has the potential to supply the
tourist sector with a fair amount
of the fruit, vegetables, and
marine demands once given the
attention and proper develop-
ment. Given the fact that many

' Bahamians may not elect to work

in the hot sun, further expansion
of the agriculture sector will
require the import of foreign
labourers and appropriate tech-
nology. Ultimately, the recovery’
of Eleuthera depends on the
inhabitants. They can play a key
role in making investments on the
island a success. They have to
demand the attention of their rep-
resentatives and attract those
individuals who have the vision
and imagination to foster devel-
opment.



TENDERS FOR

Customs Clearance &
Delivery Services

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

invites Tenders from eligible bidders for

Customs Clearance & Delivery oo
to and from:

(1) Docks

(2) Airports & Post Offices.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation’s Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by con-
tacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
July 31st, 2008, 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 672/08
Customs Clearance & Delivery
Services to and from Docks

Marked; Tender No. 673/08
Customs Clearance & Delivery
Services to and from Airports & Post

Offices

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject
the whole or such part of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.



THE TRIBUNE a MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 11





DOCTORS.
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Five bombs explode in northern Spain after warning Sool

@ LAREDO, Spain

FIVE bombs exploded in northern Spain on Sun-
day causing damage but no injuries, officials said. A
person, claiming to be speaking on behalf of Basque
separatist group ETA, had phoned in warnings about
four of the bombs, according to Associated Press.

The first detonated without warning around 5 a.m.
outside a bank in the Basque town of Getxo, dam-
aging a cash dispenser and breaking windows, the
regional Interior Ministry said in Bilbao.

<

Five hours later, a caller warned the Basque fire ser-

vice that four bombs would explode in Laredo and

Noja in the neighboring province of Cantabria, the
ministry said.

A bomb exploded in the sand next to Laredo’s
beach-front promenade at around 12:20 p.m. In Noja,
two devices detonated at the beach, the first around
1 p.m., the second about an hour later near a lifeguard
hut, and another bomb exploded at a golf course at
about 3 p.m., according to Cantabria’s regional Inte-
rior Ministry in Santander.

NASSAU LISTINGS

1. TWYNAM HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 117

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residence

PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. tt

LOCATION: Take Portland Boulevard east

of Super Value Food Store Prince Charles
Drive - south to the 2nd corner (Continental
Avenue) on the left. Continue around the
curve then take ‘the 3rd corner on the left
(Tropical Avenue), Traveling north the property
is the 10th lot on the left or first property after
passing Tote Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

2. SOUTH BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 22

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split Level
Residential Building with 3 Apts.
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel.south along East Street
from Bamboo Boulevard take:1st corner
on right - Bougainvillea Blvd. Heading west
on Bougainvillea Blvd. take the 2nd corner
on the right Madeira Avenue come to the
“T” junction and turn left onto Oxford Drive.
Property is 3rd house on the right at the
western corner of Serville Drive and Oxford
Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $397,000

3._BEL-AIR ESTATES, CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storey

' Residence _.

PROPERTY. SIZE: 6: 000 sq. ft

LOCATION: East on.Carmichael.Road from
Faith Avenue take the 4th scorner on the right
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th lot on right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

4. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES II

LOT NO. 1372

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storey
Residence, 4 Bed/ 2 Bath

- PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: From the junction of Carmichael “|

* Road and Cedar Way (corner opposite BFM)
travel south to the T-Junction, turn right

onto Golden Gates Straight, then take the
first corner right onto Comet Terrace. The
property 3rd lot or the 2nd house on the right,
yellow with white trim. :
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

5, BRICEVILLE SUBDIVISION, PINE BARREN

ROAD

LOT OF LAND —

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Five Unit
Apartment Complex

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,200:sq. ft.

LOCATION: Heading west along Prince
Charles from Fox Hill Road take the third
corner on the left (Pine Barren Road). Travel
“west along Pine Barren Road take the second
corner on the left (Ceira Close) then take the
second corner on the right. Subject building
is at the dead end on the right painted white.
APPRAISED VALUE: $292,000

6. PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1467

_ PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Storey

Triplex Apatite 2 - 1 bed/bath; 1-2 bed
/bath;

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Enter Pinewood Gardens from
South Beach Police Station - drive East

to Thatch Palm Avenue, take first right off
Thatch Palm, the property is second building
on right hand side fenced in.

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

1. GARDEN HILLS ESTATES .

LOT NO. 1021

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 7,024 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on Independence
Highway, exiting at British American, turn

left and travel south to the top of the hill at the
T-junction, turn left and travel East to the end
of this road which is a T-Junction; at the
T-Junction turn left (north) and the subject lot
is first left on the southern corner.
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

. CHIPPINGHAM

LOT NO. 106

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of Providence
Avenue (opposite house No. 45)
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

, ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 10 Block 47

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Commercial
Development

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,062 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel west on Wulff Road from
Pinedale Street take the first left onto Minnie
Street. The subject property is on the eastern
side of Minnie Street about 1,050 ft. south of
Homestead Avenue. (liquor Store erected on
property).

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION .

LOT NO. 9 Block 47 /
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Commercial
Development

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel west on Wulff Road from
Pinedale Street take the first left onto Minnie
Street. The subject property is on the eastern
side of Minnie Street about 1,000 ft. south of
Homestead Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS

LOT NO. 65

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Townhouse

Unit One :

FLOOR AREA: 1,215 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Eastern Side of Faith Avenue
passed Texaco Gas Station and 100 feet

south of Hamster Road.

APPRAISED VALUE: $154,000

10. PA PASTEL GARDENS

LOT NO. 149

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residence, 3 bed / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,701 sq. ft.

Location: Traveling north along the main
entrance to Pastel Gardens from Marshall
Road, come to the four-way junction and
continue to head north onto Lemon Street.

The subject property is the 11th house on the:
left painted white with yellow boxing and light,
“brown asphalt ‘shingled roof.

oF

APPRAISED VALUE: $142,000

. GHIPPINGHAM

LOT NO. 17

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single ‘Storey
Residence, 2 beds/1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North side of Quarry Mission
Road 500 ft West of Nassau Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $130,000

12. ROCKY PINE ROAD

LOT NO. “A”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-Family
Duplex Apartment

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. it.

LOCATION: Travel West on Rocky Pine Road
off Carmichael Road,

property is midway on the third corner on
the left. :

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

VACANT LOTS

. CARMICHAEL ROAD & FAITH AVENUE

LOT OF LAND “A”

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 4,651 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southeast of Carmichael

Road and South West of Faith Avenue
South.

APPRAISED VALUE: $72,000.00

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND
POSTAL ADDRESS) TO: THE A.V.P. MORTGAGE & COMMERCIAL LENDING,

P. O. BOX-SS-6263, NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM

OR IN FREEPORT TO : CHRISTOPHER.KNOWLES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



©2008 CreativeRelations.net

- Seven year
wait for LNG
decision

FROM page one

way, or the other.”

Recently, AES issued an
advertisement outlining its
commitments to the
Bahamas. These included
benefits to BEC not only in
fuel savings but also in: the
reduction of emissions of
pollution from the burning
of diesel fuel. In upgrading
its Blue Hills turbines to run
on natural gas, BEC is
expected to save between $3
and $4 billion over the first
15 years, the advertisement
stated. However, according
to Mr Deveaux, the govern-
ment has not received any
new proposals from AES or
from BEC’s Energy Review
Committee.

Referring to the recent
full-page advertisements and
radio appearances by Mr
Samson, Mr Deveaux said
he believed Mr Samson was
acting on his own to bring

‘his business ideas to the pub-

lic.

However, yesterday as the
guest on the radio pro-
gramme Sunday Conversa-
tions, Mr Samson continued
his campaign to debunking
rumours and mistruths about
LNG while outlining the
benefits for the Bahamas
with the installation of the
Ocean Cay facility.

Quickly denying the
notion-that the project was

_ being earmarked for the,














Bahamas simply to avoid US
regulations, Mr Samson
reminded the listening audi-
ence: of the Island FM pro-

gramme that since 2001,,

some 24 LNG projects have
been approved in the United

States. However, with the ©

lack of any site along the
Florida coastline that has a
buffering zone of at least a
mile from the population,
Ocean Cay — which sits 22
miles south of Bimini and

‘nine miles from Cat Cay —

remains a viable option for
AES to supply that state
with natural gas.

In fact, Mr Samson said, if

‘there were a site in Florida

that permitted the building
of the LNG terminal, one
would have been constructed
there three or four years
ago.

“All infrastructure pro-
jects of this magnitude,
whether it’s large power
plants or LNG terminals

they always take a long time.

Now, seven years is on the
outside of what is normal,
but we have had very suc-
cessful projects that have
taken 10 years to get into
construction. But when you
build large power plants and
liquid gas terminals, you
don’t get a lot of invita-
tions,” he laughed.

Natural gas, Mr Samson
said, is acknowledged not
only for its cleanliness to the
environment but also for its

‘reduced carbonsignature:

e

IRS MEO did

rit

While admitting that the
world will not change to
using renewable energy
“over night” Mr Samson is

optimistic that the increased

use of natural gas can go a
long way in helping to solve
the global warming effects
of the more conventional
energy sources.

However, the main oppo-
nent to the AES project,
local activist Sam Dun-
combe, remains unconvinced
of the project’s environmen-
tal impact.

Calling in to the show, Mrs
Duncombe took Mr Samson
to task over the proposed
facility.

“Your company, and other
companies that are into this
addictive fuel source that we
have, needs to get off the
bandwagon lot and stop
thinking about how much
money we are going to make
today and in the. next 15
years, and start thinking
about the impacts that all
these global warming gases
are going to do to future
generations.”

Interjecting, Mr Samson
asked: “So the first step
shouldn’t be to reduce
150,000 tonnes a year car-
bon from BEC just to switch
to natural gas?”

“So we are going to stop
emitting green house gases
at BEC and let you do it at
Ocean Cay?” Mrs Dun-
combe asked.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 13



Serial rapist:
police urge
residents to
secure their
premises

FROM page one

dence at the scene of the
crime.

He uses condoms during
sexual intercourse and
makes his victims shower.

He also wears a mask and
gloves.

Supt Rahming stated that
the attacker usually com-
mits his crime during the
early morning hours.

“Since these attacks have
reportedly occurred during
the early morning hours,
residents are asked to
ensure that they properly
secure their premises before
retiring to bed, have the
outside of their dwellings
well lit, and blinds drawn
when inside using the inte-
rior lights,” he said.

Mr Rahming said persons
should immediately alert
the police at 919 or 911,
should they hear or see any-
thing suspicious.

FROM page one

cade across the main road,
blocking access to the tourist
attraction from vehicular traf-
fic. .

It is claimed that the area was
closed after some locals were
alleged to have held a beach
party there, leaving all of their
garbage and other refuse scat-
tered over the area.

This developer, sources
alleged, issued keys to various
home and land owners within
the area so that they can still

have access to the beach and ©

Blue Hole.

However, it is understood
that this action is not going-over
well with a number of locals
who frequent the landmark site
for recreation. These locals,
sources indicate, are also con-
cerned for the number of
tourists who travel from near

' and*farto'visit what is said to be

the deepest inland blue hole in
the world.

Dean’s Blue Hole plunges
more than 660 feet to the ocean
floor in the settlement of
Clarence Town. The massive
blue hole is said to-open up into
a mammoth chamber where
fresh water and salt water mix.

ALL TIMES:
10 am to 1pm

Firearms and
bullets are
eized by police

FROM page one

citizen, searched the area around Big Pond at
around 5.30pm.

The officers found a car parked in the area.
A plastic bag containing a pillow case was hid-
den underneath the car. Opening the pillow
case, officers discovered a .38 handgun and 50
live rounds of ammunition.

Also on Friday, a police car chase ended .

with the capture of another illegal firearm.
At around 4am, officers of the mobile divi-

sion observed a 2004 Chevrolet Cavalier with a

male driver in the Dowdeswell Street area.

On seeing the police, the driver sped off.

The officers gave chase and followed the
Chevrolet east on Dowdeswell Street onto East
Bay Street.

The car chase ended near the East Villa
Restaurant when the Chevrolet Cavalier hit a
wall.

The driver escaped in the area. Officers

searched the car and found a .38 handgun with
six live rounds of ammunition.

Then on Saturday, at around 7am, a con-
cerned citizen was in a yard in the western
area of New Providence when he found a .9mm
handgun with eight bullets under a tree. The
weapon was handed over to the police.

In addition to the capture of illegal firearms,
police on Saturday recovered a stolen vehicle
which had been used in an armed robbery.

At around 8pm on Saturday, two men, one
carrying a handgun, entered the Texaco Service
Station on Prince Charles Drive and robbed’an
employee of cash.

The robbers, described as slim, one about
5'4" tall, and the other about 6 feet tall, escaped
in a 1999 Honda Accord.

The car was recovered shortly afterwards in
the Lumumba Lane area. The robbers fled the
area leaving the vehicle. On processing this
car, police discovered that it was stolen some-
time earlier. :

Private Resorts

Invites applications for the position of

PROJECT MANAGER

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum

requirements:

Have at least 10 years experience in construction or
a related field, or former hotel chief engineer.

Have a qualification in engineering or construction
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Be computer literate

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Faxed to. 242-341-4419



Developer

It is said that at this depth,
where the waters mix, the water
gives the impression of a plate
of glass in which divers can see

their reflection, and fish swim
“upside down.”

Attempts to reach Long
Island MP Larry Cartwright for
comment on the matter were
unsuccessful up to press time
last night.

Minister says areas around Goodman's
Bay to be examined for dangerous spots

FROM page one

seas, which can cause crevices to be created on the ocean floor.
Last week’s police exercise, which was conducted in the afternoon

at Goodman’s Bay, resulted in the death of Corporal Burrows, a 13-

year veteran with the police’s criminal records office. Ten other offi-

cers were also injured.

Eyewitnesses claimed that the training exercise was poorly struc-

tured and ill-advised. They said the group was in the water towards

the eastern end of the beach when the accident occurred. .

The men and women were weighted down with weapons belts,
military; boots and full dress uniform in the water, in tempera-
tures around 90 degrees Fahrenheit, when several officers became

distressed, witnesses said.

A regular swimmer who frequents Goodman’s Bay told The
‘Tribune last week that he believes the location for the police train-
ing exercise was badly chosen and not properly researched.

Jason Rahming, 39, an electrician with the Ministry of Works
explained that there are many sinkholes in the area, which swim-

' mers can get stuck in with their feet.

“There are a lot of big underwater craters in that area. You can
suddenly drop and have four to five feet of water above your

‘head.

“Sometimes it can take you a while to get free. If you are not a
strong swimmer then the situation can turn serious,” he said,

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Haiti food aid lags
and hunger deepens

wrinkled skin. The 18-month-old
had been crying for so long in the
hospital malnutrition ward that his
mother no longer tried to console
him, according to Associated Press.

@ DESCHAPELLES, Haiti

EVERY inch of Rivilade Fil-
same’s body hurt, from his swollen,
empty stomach to his dried-out,



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Special daily programs for kids ages 3-5 years old.

After soaring food prices led to
deadly riots in April, the U.S. and
the U.N. promised millions of dol-
lars in aid to poor families like Riv-
ilade’s, as well as help for farmers to
break Haiti’s dependence on
imported food.

But three months later, The
Associated Press has learned that
only a fraction of a key U.S. food
pledge — less than 2 percent as of
early July — has been distributed.

Even those who oversee the food
aid programs say they are stopgap
measures while programs to create
jobs and help Haitian farmers to
increase production are more criti-
cal to ending the country’s chronic
hunger once and for all.

But right now, aid workers say,
the poorest families need immedi-
ate help, and little of the emergency
food promised has reached them.
Most of what has reached Haiti is
stuck in port. Nearly all the rest is
still inside warehouses — victim of
high fuel prices, bad roads and a
weak national government.

Barely any food at all has gone to
the desperate countryside, where
more than half of Haiti’s 8:7 million
people live.

Even in the Artibonite Valley,
Haiti’s most fertile region, child
malnutrition is rampant. Farmers
— reeling from last year’s floods
and a dry spring, and lacking equip-
ment that was promised to increase
their yields — are eating the very
seeds they should be planting to
avoid future hunger.

* One in three children is mal-
nourished in the most rural areas of
the Artibonite Valley, according to
the Hospital Albert Schweitzer in
Deschapelles, where Rivilade was
treated in June. Doctors there
admitted 113 children to the mal-
nutrition ward from May through
June, almost two and a half times
more than last year. In April and
May alone, there were 361 children
under five who were severely mal-
nourished and more than 2,500 oth-
ers moderately so.

“Kids who would have been
moderately malnourished last year
are severely malnourished this
year,” said hospital official Adeline
Azrack. “Families that were once
just vulnerable are now in crisis.”

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their meager me seasbttet and with



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small group of demonstrators
burned tires and threw rocks at
police and U.N. peacekeepers in
Les Cayes, where the April riots
began.

“Life is even more difficult than
it was in April,” said Pierre
Antoinier St.-Cyr, who works in
agricultural development in Les
Cayes. “Community organizations
are meeting weekly to see if they
are going to start the protests
again.”

The April riots spread from the
countryside to Port-au-Prince and
left at least six Haitians and a U.N.
peacekeeper dead. The prime min-
ister was dismissed in their wake,
and he still hasn’t been replaced.

They also caused an outpouring
of international pledges. The U.S.
government and U.N. World Food
Program promised a combined

‘ total of $117. million this year in
food and agricultural aid.

That included more than 40,000
tons of beans, rice and other food
intended to quell the emergency.
But a U.S. Agency for Internation-
al Development report obtained by
The Associated Press says that as of
early July, less than 2 percent of
that had been distributed.

Some 16,000 tons has reached
Haiti. But more than 11,000 tons
of that is still in port; nearly all the
rest lies undistributed in World
Vision International and Catholic
Relief Services warehouses. Only
724 tons of food has reached distri-
bution centers.

Haiti already had a customs bot-
tleneck in its ports as officials
cracked down on drug smuggling
and tried to better collect duties.

In the Artibonite Valley, aid
workers say not a single ration had
arrived as of mid-July. Nor had any
of the $150,000 in emergency seeds
and tools promised to help 20,000
Haitian farmers nationwide plant
basic food crops.

. Hunger is a bitter irony in the
valley known as “Haiti’s rice bowl,”
where farms have been in decline
for decades, unable to compete with
subsidized U.S, food imported
under low tariffs. Political instabil-
ity has left the government with-
out effective agricultural policies
or ways to deal with nearly annual
hurricanes and floods.

That meant there was no pro-
tection when the price of imported
rice increased by more than 60 per-
cent, and that of corn by 91 per-
cent, over the first six months of

. the year, according to the World

Food Program.

The U.N. agency and many
countries’ programs are focused
largely in urban areas. Brazilian sol-
diers have distributed rice, beans
and cooking oil donated by their
country in the seaside slum of Cite
Soleil, where sprawling shantytowns
are home to thousands of refugees
from the impoverished countryside.
. In rural communities where
USAID food is slated to be dis-
tributed by World Vision Interna-
tional, delivery has been hampered
by logistical problems and high fuel
prices — which topped $6 a gallon
in Haiti in June.



Ariana Cubillos/AP

SILVITHA SAINTHERAN holds her son Fradelson, 2, who suffers from mal-
nutrition at the Albert Schweitzer hospital in Deschapelles, Haiti, Tuesday,
June 17, 2008. Funding delays, a dysfunctional central government and
transportation problems along crumbling rural roads are keeping aid from
reaching critical areas such as the fertile Artibonite Valley, where one out of
three children are malnurished.

Nearly everything that has been
distributed has gone through
Catholic Relief Services, which has
been relying on pre-existing stocks,

said country represéntative Bill .

Canny.

World Vision country director
Wesley Charles blamed USAID
for its delays in delivering food, say-
ing U.S. funding was held up in
Congress’ emergency supplemen-
tal appropriations bill as lawmakers
debated the portions that fund the
Iraq War.

“I think that at the USAID level
they need to be more sensitive,”

_ Charles said. “You cannot manage

an emergency situation like a nor-
mal procedure.”

The U.S. Embassy said there
were also delays during the han-
dover of the food distribution and
agricultural projects to World
Vision from its previous operator,
Save the Children. It referred ques-
tions about distribution to those
agencies.

Canny said U.S. food aid is also
often slowed because it consists of
excess food from -American pro-
ducers that must be purchased,
transported and shipped, rather
than bought locally in Haiti.

World Food
spokesman Alejandro Lopez-
Chicheri said it’s complicated to get
food into Haiti, and that his agency
is focusing on urban areas that are
easiest to reach.

“We're trying to help as much

as we can, but that doesn’t mean‘

we'll’ solve everything,” he said.
When AP journalists visited the
Artibonite Valley in June, farmers
hacked at the soil using the same
hand-planting methods employed
centuries ago by their enslaved
ancestors. Lemare Forrestal, a 60-
year-old farmer in the mountains,
said his family sometimes resorts
to eating corn and bean seeds.
“We have kids we can’t feed. We
have to eat what we have,” he said.

SERIE



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YVONNE |
MARION RITCHIE

wish to express our heartfelt
thanks and appreciation for your
prayers, telephone calls and other
acts of kindness extended to us
_| during our recent time of bereave-
“ment. A special thanks to the doc-
tors and nurses of Princess |
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mM Surgical 1 and 2, Nurse Vanessa
Father Kendrick Forbes
and Holy Family Catholic Church,
Monsignor Ambrose Mackinnon |
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Tharh you from the Ritchie Yar

And even when there is food,
mothers leave their children at
home while they seek work in far-
off markets with no one to énsure
they eat properly.

Sylvieta Saintera, 38, said her 8-
year-old daughter cooks for her six
other children when she’s gone.

Hunger victims filled the low-
slung, tree-lined Schweitzer hospi-
tal complex in June. Flies buzzed
from bed to bed as mothers spoon-
fed vegetable mixtures prepared
over charcoal fires in an outdoor
kitchen.

A photo of Rivilade from
months earlier showed a baby with
fat arms and black hair. But his
bald, naked body was covered with
an old man’s wrinkled skin. Diar-
rhea had shrunk his weight to 15
pounds, a quarter less than doctors
say is healthy.

“He was fine, and then he got
sick,” said his mother, 22-year-old
Nimose Jisesle. It costs 150 Hait-
ian gourdes a week — $3.95 — to
feed him, she said, but she earns
just 100 gourdes, $2.63, selling knap-
sacks and firewood. His father went
to the neighboring Dominican
Republic to find work and does not
support the child.

uffering from diarrhea, pneu-
monia and mouth and skin infec-
tions, Rivilade was treated and fed
with intravenous liquids and food.

‘He was released a few days later

with his weight up and diarrhea
gone, said Dr. Erlantz Hyppolite.

Some of the children receive.a
super-high-protein mixture of
peanut butter, oil, milk and vita-
mins known here as “Medika
Mamba” that has also been used
in African famines. But once they
go home, mothers struggle to follow
doctors’ advice to thoroughly clean
their homes and prepare more bal-
anced meals for their children, Hyp-
polite said.

Some, he said, eat the peanut
butter mixture themselves.


































y






|
mnily 1










A

THE TRIBUNE

Afghan officials:
US-led forces
killed nine police

@ KABUL, Afghanistan

U.S.-LED troops and
Afghan forces killed nine
Afghan police Sunday, calling
in airstrikes and fighting on
the ground for four hours
after both sides mistook the
other for militants, Afghan
officials said, according to
Associated Press.

In a separate incident,

. NATO said it accidentally
killed at least four Afghan
civilians Saturday night. A
NATO soldier also was killed
in the east.

The two cases of accidental

_ killings could further under-

z cut popular support for the

e g povernment and foreign

= forces operating here. Presi-

= dent Hamid Karzai has plead-
-», ed with the U.S. and other

= nations fighting resurgent mil-

=, itants to avoid civilian casual-

_ ties.

In the western province of
Farah near the Iranian bor-
der, a convoy of foreign

‘forces showed up in Anar

10 Dara district and clashed with
Afghan police, killing nine of

_ them, said provincial Deputy

°'Governor Younus Rasuli.

‘8° He said the foreign troops

~' had not informed local offi-

>“'cials they were coming, and
_ the police thought they were
” enemy fighters. The two sides
: xi:fonghe from about midnight
until 4 a.m. Sunday, and the
~'foreign forces used airstrikes,

-' Rasuli said.

D<. The U.S.-led coalition said
‘Tit was investigating the report.
“It said its forces, along with
ie troops, had retaliated

_ in defense against “a non-uni-

" formed hostile force.”

“The combined patrol sig-

i naled their status as coalition

forces, but continued to
‘receive fire,” a military state-
ment said. “Coalition forces
then returned small arms fire

_ and engaged the enemy with

, precision close air support.”

Tn eastern Paktika

~’ province, NATO’s Interna-
tional Security Assistance .
“Force said it killed at least
“four civilians Saturday night
when its troops fired two mor-
“tar rounds that landed nearly
“half a mile short of their tar-,

_, get. NATO said it was investi- H “meal”

“ gating Whether three other~
civilians also were killed in
t phe Barmal district.

“ISAF deeply regrets this
'° accident, and an investigation
-as to the exact circumstances

_ of this tragic event is now
‘ under way,” NATO said in a
“statement.

~The alliance said it was pro-
* viding medical aid to four
*
vs Also Sunday, a NATO sol-
dier was killed during fighting
“in the eastern Khost province,
‘the alliance said in a state-

“ment. NATO did not identify
the soldier’s nationality, but
‘most of the troops in that area
are Amer: an.

Afghanistan faces intensify-
ing militancy nearly seven
-years after the U.S.-led inva-
sion of the country ousted the
‘hard-line Islamic Taliban

movement from power.

More than 2,500 people
have died in insurgency-relat-
ed violence this year in the
country, according to an

_ Associated Press tally of offi-
cial figures. Most have been
militants, but the total
includes hundreds of ordinary
citizens.

NATO and the coalition
insist they take great precau-
tions to avoid civilian casual-
ties.

Commanders accuse insur-

» gents of endangering innocent
people by launching attacks
from residential areas and
carrying out suicide attacks
that kill far more bystanders
than security personnel.

In other violence, ‘the Min-
istry of Defense said Afghan

_ troops battled insurgents in
the southern Kandahar
province Saturday, killing 18
militants and injuring 25.
They also detained 15.

In neighboring Zabul
province, Afghan troops
killed nine militants and
wounded seven, a ministry
statement said. .

Neither claim could be
independently verified.

In the southern province of
Helmand, a mine exploded
Sunday under a civilian vehi-
cle in Gereshk district, killing
three children and wounding
four people, said provincial
police Chief Mohammad
Hussein Andiwal.

+Andiwal accused Taliban
militants of planting the mine
on a road frequently used by
Afghan and foreign troops.

On Saturday, militants
attacked a police checkpoint
in the same district but in the
ensuing gunfight three Tal-

: iban fighters were killed,
Andiwal said. No police were
injured in that clash, he
added.

Vatican says

350,000 pack
Randwick race
track for event

POPE Benedict XVI end-
ed his farthest pilgrimage
Sunday, one intended to
inspire a new generation of
faithful while trying to over-
come a dark chapter for his
church from a. clerical sex
abuse scandal.

Summing up his message,
Benedict told young pil-
grims at.a Mass in Sydney
that a “spiritual desert” was
spreading throughout the
world and challenged them
to shed the greed and cyni-
cism of their time to create
a.new age of hope, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The Vatican said some
350,000 faithful from almost
170 countries packed the
Randwick race track —
many of them camping out

in sleeping bags in the mild
chill of the Australian win-

ter — as well as aiglobal
television audience.

Vatican spokesman the
Rev. Federico Lombardi
said it was Sydney’s biggest
crowd since the eayipic
Games in 2000.

Asked how the 81-year-
old pope fared with the
audience at the World
Youth Day event — alter-
nately football- stadium
boisterous or chapel quiet
depending on the occasion
— Lombardi said Benedict’ s

; -\speeches were “positive,

constructive, never polemi-

“Benedict touched on

“themes for the universal

church as well as Australia
in particular — raising the
need for the world to
change its lifestyles because
of global warming, relations
with non-Catholics and
the struggle here to rejuve-
nate a crisis-battered
Church.

At Sunday’s Mass under
threatening skies, Benedict
urged young Christians
to be agents of change
because “the world needs
renewal.” —

“In so many of our soci-
eties, side by side with

material. prosperity, a spiri-.

tual desert is spreading: an
interior emptiness, an
unnamed fear, a quiet sense
_of despair,” the pontiff said.

Welcomed

The pope said it was up
to a new generation of
Christians to build a world
in “which God’s gift of life

‘is welcomed, respected and

cherished — not rejected,
feared as a threat and
destroyed.”

They must embrace the
power of God “to let it

: _ break through the curse of

our indifference, our spiri-
tual weariness, our blind
conformity to the spirit of
this age,” he said. ©

The aim was “a new age
in which hope liberates us
from the shallowness, apa-
thy and self-absorption
which deadens our souls
and poisons our relation-
ships,” he said.

It is a primary theme of
his papacy, with him
acknowledging on his way
to Australia that the Church
in the West was “in crisis”
because people no longer
see the need for God. But
he insisted it was not in
decline. “I am an optimist”
about its future, he said.

Benedict announced that,
as expected, Madrid, Spain,
would host the next World
Youth Day in 2011 and told
the pilgrims.

The more than 20 hour
flight from Rome to Aus-
tralia was the longest dis-
tance Benedict has traveled
as pope.

He flew over the scene of
the Mass early Sunday in a
helicopter — dubbed “the

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 15



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Pope wraps up visit to
Australia with final Mass













POPE BENEDICT XVI is shown ona
giant screen as more than 200,000
pilgrims attend the Final Mass at
Randwick Racecourse in Sydney,
Sunday, July 20, 2008. Pope bene-
dict XVI is in Sydney for World
Youth Day activities till Monday
July 21.

holy-copter” by bleary-eyed
pilgrims below. He saw the
assemblage swarming all
over the track in a jumble
of sleeping bags and. back-
packs.

“It’s been crazy, hectic,
nuts — but it’s also been
serene, calming and very
fulfilling,” said Margaret
Mazzella, 48, of Westch-
ester,
rested on a sleeping bag and
picked at a tuna sandwich
following ‘the festival’s final
Mass on Sunday.

Crowd

He later drove slowly
through the crowd, stopping
once to kiss the forehead of
a toddler held up to the
popemobile’s window.

Pilgrims gave him a rock-

. Star welcome, waving the
flags of their nations, cheer-

ing and chanting his name.
Some pilgrims at World
Youth Day complained
Pope Benedict XVI sped
past them during two drive-
throughs in Sydney — so
quickly they barely caught
a glimpse of the pontiff
before he was gone.
Australian media gave
prominent attention to
Benedict’s apology Satur-
day for the sexual abuse of
minors by Catholic clergy,

headlining his word’s “I Am

Deeply Sorry:”
He said he wanted “to
acknowledge the shame

which we have all felt” and °

called for those responsible
to be “brought to justice.”
The acts were “evil” and a
“erave betrayal of trust,” he
said.

The pope’s apology was
not enough to satisfy repre-
sentatives of the victims of
clergy sexual abuse, who
said it must be backed by
Vatican orders to Aus-
tralian bishops to stop what
they say are efforts to cover
up the extent of the prob-
lem and to block survivors’
attempts to win compensa-
tion.

The apology followed
similar statements in the
United States in April,
where he also met with a
small group of victims.

Even as the papal
entourage prepared to leave
Monday morning, it was still
unclear whether Benedict
would do the same in Aus-
tralia. Lombardi would not
rule out tHe possibility in
the waning hours of the vis-
it.

The pope was. due to
leave Australia for the Vat-
ican.on Monday.

New York, as she.



pocheine

_dack Atley/AP

POPE BENEDICT -
XVI waves from.
his pope mobile
as he arrives at
Bangaroo for his -
official World
Youth Day wel-—
come in Sydney,
Australia, Thurs- .
day, July 17,
2008.



Andrew Brownbill/AP
















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E-Mai: ri<@B8chamaselectricity.com |
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corporation will be final.




le te



PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

Beijing restricts car

use in bid to avoid
Olympic smog

ASainpnannainonetoeniearevay” 3



CONSTRUCTION WorKere ‘stand on scaffolding erected to build an Olympic exhibit as the city is covered with

Oded Balilty/AP

smog and pollution, a month before the opening of the Olympic Games in Beijing Tuesday, July 8, 2008.

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WITH the Olympics less
than three weeks away, Bei-
jing began restricting car use
and limiting factory emissions
on Sunday in a final drastic
effort to clear its smog-
choked skies, according to
Associated Press.

Under the two-month plan,
half of the capital’s 3.3 mil-
lion cars will be removed
from city streets on alternate
days, depending on whether
the license plate ends in an
odd or even number.

Skies were relatively clear.

on Sunday after some morn-
ing haze, and traffic was light
for a weekend, flowing
smoothly on highways and
city streets.

But the real test will come
when the work week begins.
“Things are fine today,”
taxi driver who gave only her
surname, Li, said as she
sailed through normally traf-
fic-snarled intersections. “But
tomorrow, it may be different
as people go to work.” :

In addition to the traffic
plan, chemical plants, power
stations and foundries had to
cut emissions by 30 percent
beginning Sunday.

Dust-spewing construction
in the capital was to stop
entirely.

While the government has
said it hopes to reduce vehi-
cle emissions, one of Beijing’s
chief sources of pollution, it
is unclear how the effective-
ness of the plan will be
gauged. —

The government has not
made publica specific target
for emissions levels or said
how it will measure air qual-
ity.

Despite architecturally
adventurous venues and $40
billion spent on improving

‘infrastructure, China’s great-
est challenge has been keep- ©

ing the city’s air clean for the
world’s greatest athletes par-
ticipating in the Aug. 8-24
games.

Beijing’s skyline is normal-

ly shrouded with a thick pray»
haze.

Already, many competitors
are choosing to train away
from Beijing, and Interna-
tional Olympic Committee

President Jacques Rogge has ©

said outdoor: endurance
events lasting more than an

hour will be postponed if air

quality if poor.
The world’s greatest dis-
tance runner, Haile Gebrse-

‘lassie of Ethiopia, has decid-

ed not to run the marathon
event because the city’s
pollution irritates his breath-

ing.
Some 300, 000 heavily pol-
luting vehicles — aging

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THE TRIBUNE

Alexander F. Yuan/AP

A CHINESE worker rests on top of the National Stadium, also
known as the Bird's Nest, in Beijing, China, Friday, July 11, 2008.

industrial trucks, many of
which operate only at night
— were banned beginning
July 1.

To further ease the grid-
lock, employers have been
asked to stagger work sched-
ules and public institutions
will open an hour later than
normal.

And those driving on the
wrong days will be fined $14,
a pricey penalty for many in
Beijing.

The government has also
beefed up public transporta-
tion options for the estimated
4 million extra people who
will be off the roads because
of. the traffic plan, the offi-
cial Xinhua News Agency
said.

The city is scheduled to
add up to 3,000 more buses
by the time the Olympics
start, raising the daily capac-
ity for passengers from
12.5 million to 15 million, it
said.

A rare 95 percent of buses
reached their stops on time
on Sunday because the roads
were less congested, Xinhua

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

cited Yao Zhenping, assistant
to the general manager
of the Beijing Public
Transport Holdings Group,
as saying.

Two new subway iines and
an airport rail link opened
on. Saturday, with the pro-
jected number of passengers
on all three routes expected
to carry 1.1 million people
daily during the Olympics.

“JTt’s much faster than a
taxi, so it’s very good,” said
Ola Tunamder, who arrived
Sunday from Helsinki, Fin-
land, and took the airport
train into the city.

And on July 25, special
Olympic traffic lanes will
begin operating and will stay
in place until Sept. 25.

The city will set aside 165
miles of roadway on which
certified Olympic vehicles
will be allowed to move from
hotels, Olympic venues and
the Athletes’ Village.

The average speed is
expected to be 35 mph.

Experts say the pollution-
curbing experiment could still
go wrong.

Unpredictable winds could.
blow pollution into Beijing
despite factory shutdowns in

the city and five surrounding

provinces.

Or it could go the other
way, with August generally
being the month with little
wind, potentially allowing
pollution to build up.

Also Sunday, Xinhua said
that China’s civil aviation
authorities had begun imple-
menting air traffic control
measures to deal with poten-
tial emergencies.

Citing Su Langen, an avia-
tion official, the report said
that authorities “will main-
tain closer monitoring of air
traffic” but did not give any
details.

“They will respond quickly
to emergency situations such

as terror attacks, hijacking of
civil aircraft, and unautho-
rized entry of no-fly zone,”
Xinhua said.







Mar ‘st



MONDAY

PE 2 as



2008

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net



. Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Mic





not where’

‘it wants on existing otels

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

a. hrea

Mar’s#

t w og

existing |

resorts “are still not |
where we’d like to #
_be”, the company’s
' senior vice-president
for external affairs
told Tribune Busi-




|_| By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

-BAHAMIANS “focus too
much” on mega-billion- pro-

multiple smaller develop-
$30- ‘million, are helping to
keep this nation’s economy

moving,

, Business.
~T. B. Donaldson. esd that

r construction as’ ae





) Bahamas Jong |
Way: from starving
_ economically’

0- -shows.
jects and fail to realise that _

ments, valued at between $10-.°
Peale Bahamian-led devel: |

Commonwealth *
. Bank’s.chairman told’ Tribune Ei

despite the failure of on
oer sAMajor reson t projects.

: Developer looking to increase e Wyndham’ s average room rates by $10 and achieve 70-72 per cent snide occupancies

pancy.levels..

Smaller $10-$30m projects |
fill void left by mega resort



Bahamas was “a long: way |
feat starvation economical-




” because a number of |





opments were filling the void.. |

Among those taking up the |
slack‘are two projects Mr |
Donaldson is intimately |
involved with: Common:





ness, its main project being to increase
the Wyndham’s room rates and: ‘oceu-

Robert Sands said the developer's was '
detecting “Positive signs” of i eee

BIC exclusivity unlikely to.
last more than three years |











a. mBy NEIL HARTNELL ”
_ Tribune Business Editor

THE Sxcliasivieg: period
enjoyed by the Bahamas -

Telecommunications: Compa-

‘ny’s (BTC) privatization. part-_

ner is unlikely to be longer than

three years, the chairman of the’,

committee charged with over-
seeing the process has told ‘Th

/. bune Business.
TB. ‘Donaldson, ae is also

Commonwealth Bank’s chair-
man, said the Government.and

the privatization committee it -
had appointed had effectively
-agreed on two general princi-: '

ples = the length of any exclu-

I, sivity period, and: the, fact that. we

‘the: Government, post-privati-

ment in the financial performance of its —
two’ properties, especially the Shera-
- ton, as it continues its search for a »
“replacement equity partner for its $2.4
Dillion: Cable Beach redevelopment

Concerns over uneven liberalisation ‘playing field’

BIC’ ’s majority shareholder.
“The Government said basi- _

cally two things, on which we
all agree,” Mr Donaldson told
Tribune Business. |

“The Government does not
necessarily want to be, or need
to be, the majority shareholder.

What percentage will be sald.

hasn’t been determined. A lot
depends on'the feedback we get
from entities interested i in Pa
vatizing BTC.”

He added: “There can’t be”

any long exclusivity period.'I
can tell you; it won’t be ‘over

_ three years. It won’t be a.Cable . is
“Bahamas. We’ve ‘learnt from

following Harrah’ S Entertainment’ s
withdrawal.

While that search, led by Swiss Danke
UBS, remains a work in progress, Baha ©
Mars s. immediate short, term goal “Gs,

* ‘Positive signs’ from Sheraton conversion, with mid-$190s rates, as 78-79 per cent occupancies targeted
* Resort owner mulls future room numbers it wants to work with at evendhan |
* Search for $2.4bn project partner * ongoing’ ,

to get the Wyndham to where we’d
like it to-be. That isa vast af OPPOrUUBAty

‘SEE. page Be

cellular services, Ras
Mr Donaldson’ s comments
are likely to be ‘music'to the |’
‘ears’ of BTC’s existing com-.
petitors, such as ‘Systems Be
Resource Group (SRG) and
Cable Bahamas, plus potential”.
new market entrants such as.
Digicel. ah
‘For they suggest ‘that ‘the
Ingraham government’s empha-
“sis, at least when it comes to the ‘
telecommunications. sector, is)
different from that of its prede- ,
cessor. Liberalisation and com-
pation seemtobe the current [iidaibaabaaad

Drive’a Honda Fit and ren up re

SEE Page 5B





















oe m2 SEE paige Th



~ Planning process must
become ‘more formal
and transparent’

| sation, would not: necessarily, be.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor,

THE Town Planning and

land-use zoning processes need
to become more formalized and
transparent, a government min-

ister has told Tribune Business,

with proposed legislative
amendments designed to tackle
‘poth these areas.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, ‘said the zon-
ing regulations and processes

were one ape being assessed *:

- Haband: ‘passes.
the test’ over US [

‘as part of the planned amend-

ments to the Town Planning
Act and Private Roads'and Sub-
divisions Act; given the “very
limited input from the public” in

planning decisions until the ven-:

tures ‘in question were
approved.
In meetings with a team from

the Massachusetts Institute of . :
Technology (MIT), which is _ }
_ working in partnership ye the

_ SEE page 2B.

tax compliance -

_ Mi By NEIL HARTNELL
: Tribune Business Editor’

THE Bahamas has “passed

the test” when it comes to shar- -:

ing tax-related information with

the US authorities, a former _

minister of state for finance has
told Tribune Business, and
ought not to be targeted or

penalized further “unless the

goal posts have changed’’.
James Smith, who held the
post under the Christie admin-
istration, said Washington could
not ask any more of the
Bahamas given that it had



signed a Tax Information -
Exchange Agreement (TIEA) —

covering both civil and crimi-
nal matters — with the US.

-. This nation had also obtained
Qualified Jurisdiction (QJ) sta-

tus with the Internal Revenue

Service (IRS), with many of its
institutions becoming QIs.
‘Given that the TEA “Spelt

out the circumstances and par- -

ticular cases” in which this
nation was able to share tax
information on US financial ser-

. SEE page 7B.



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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

THE Bahamian stock market
buzzed with trading activity last
week, investors trading in six
out of the 19 listed stocks with
349,885 shares changing hands.
The week closed with the largest
trading volume for the year.

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required.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
led the volume with 309,595
shares, closing unchanged at $7.
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) followed with
16,740 of its shares trading, also
closing unchanged at $11.65.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) came in third with
15,000 of its shares trading, also





eee

ending the week unchanged at
$2.85. Cable Bahamas (CAB)
was market leader with 6,350
shares trading, rising by $0.04
or 0.29 per cent to close at
$14.04.

Abaco Markets (AML) was
the laggard of the week with
1,000 of its shares trading,
declining by $0.03 to close at



$1.81.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Abaco Markets (AML)
released its financial results for
the quarter ended April 30,
2008. Net profit for the period
was $82,000, a sharp decline
compared to $766,000 in the
2007 first quarter.

AML reported sales for the

quarter of $21.9 million, repre- .

senting. an increase of 7.09 per
cent or $1.4 million from $20.4
million for the same period in
2007. Net profit from continu-
ing operations stood at $82,000,
a decline of $271,000 or 76.8 per
cent from $353,000 in 2007, due
primarily to higher:cost of sales
and selling general and admin-
istrative expenses aE eRONeT
quarter.

A restructuring reserve of
$350,000 recognized in the prior
year also accounted for the
change in the company's net

- profits. Total assets and liabili-

ties stood at $26.2 million and
$16.4 million respectively, being
consistent with amounts repott-
ed at year end.

Private Placement Offerings:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline for its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a

- dividend rate of prime + 1.75

per cent, payable semi-annually.

































BISX

|, record date July. 4, 2008.

Royal Palm Way, Freeport.

Colonial Hilton Hotel.

The Bahamian Stock Market

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

SYMBOL PRICE
AML $1.81 $-0.03
BBL _ $0.89 $-
BOB $9.30 $-
BPF $11.80 $-
BSL $14.60 $
BWL $3.49 $-
CAB $14.04 $+0.04
CBL _ $7.00 $-
CHL — $2.88 $-
CIB $11.65 $-
CWCB_ $3.32 $40.05
DHS $2.85 us
FAM _ $8.00 $-
FBB $2.35 $-
FCC {; } $0.44 $-
FCL $5.53 $-
FIN - $12.50 $-
ICD $550." > $-
JSJ. SIZ.000 °°, Ge
PRE $10.00 $-
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

e Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) declared a
quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on August 7,
2008, to all shareholders of record date June 30, 2008.

e ICD Utilities (ICD) has declared a quarterly dividend of
$0.10 per share, payable on July 25, 2008, to all shareholders of

e ICD Utilities (ICD) will hold its Annual General Meeting
on Tuesday, July 22, 2008 at 6pm at the Manor House, Great
. Harbour Cay, The Westin Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya,

¢ Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on Thursday, July 24, 2008 at 6:30pm at the British

e Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (FBB) announced it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 31, 2008, at
6pm in the Victoria Room at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel,
No.1 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. |

CHANGE

1 9.04%
0 4.71%
“0 -3.23%
0 _ 0.00%
0 0.00%
' -4.64%
16.51%
-16.96%
-8.57%
-20.21%
0 -34.13%
21.28%
11.11%
0 -11.32%
0 -42.86%
0: 6.76%
0 -3.47%
1
0
0

-24.14%
9.09%
0.00%







PLANNING, from 1B

‘Government on developing a

framework for sustainable
development in the Bahamas,
Dr Deveaux said he ‘had been
“pleasantly surprised” to find
that other nations dealt with
town planning and zoning issues
through Acts and regulations.

Specified checks and balances
were in place in these countries,
“rather than the normal process
of compromise” that took place
in the Bahamas.

“You take it out of the realm
of discretion, and then the com-
munity hhas a say when the
change takes place in their
neighbourhood,” Dr Deveaux

told Tribune’ Business. “It’s a:
sumore. transparent -way. ‘Fhe:
process needs. to.be formal.’

ized.”

_Among the more controver-:

sial planning applications that
have reared their heads in
recent times have been the pro-

posed Wendy’s outlet at Cable.

Beach, plus the construction of
commercial warehouses on
Shirley Street: and Lightbourn
Lane.

“All these are taking place in
residential areas where people
have strong views on change,”
Dr Deveaux confirmed. “What
we would like to see is a more
open and facilitation approach,
where the community has a
greater incentive and involve-
ment.” ;

The Bahamas Chamber of

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Commerce’s report on Vexing —

Business Issues, submitted to
the Government earlier this
year, detailed the saga of
Wendy’s Cable Beach store.
The Town Planning Committee
approved the development in
principle, as it was in compli-
ance with zoning and covenant
stipulations, only for that per-
mission to be rescinded when
there was a public outcry after
persons living nearby found out
about the proposed. fae food
eatery.

The end result was that, from
Wendy’s perspective, it was left

closed on the purchase of land
for the project. The company
was left at a disadvantage finan-
cially, with considerable. OPPar: -..
tunity ‘costs. * **

“Although not commenting

directly on the Wendy’s situa

tion, Dr Deveaux told Tribune
Business: “When some of these
decisions are.made, the financial
cost of reversing them is.a huge
deterrent, both for business and
the Government.”

As local government devel-
oped deeper roots in the
Bahamas, Dr Deveaux indicat-
ed the Government wanted to
formalize the community con-
sultation process on planning
decisions.

As an example of the discre-

tion involved in the process -

now, Dr Deveaux said that
while he was required by law
to publish a 28-day notice
informing communities about
impending ‘no-build’ or zoning
changes, there was no statutory
requirement to hold a Town
Meeting to discuss them.

OR TRIOS eal 1S

The major zoning issues in
this country occur when com-
mercially-zoned land is situat-
ed alongside residentially-zoned
land. Another frequent prob-
lem is that Bahamians often
purchase land intending to use it
for multi-family development,
only to find out — usually when
they seek approval for the archi-
tects’ plans at the Ministry’ of
Works — that the land is zoned
for single-family use only.

Describing the proposed
reforms to the Town Planning
Act'and Private Roads and Sub-

* divisions Acts as his “first leg-
‘high and dry’, having already ©

islative priority”, Dr Deveaux
told Tribune Business he had
been given until the end of this
summer to complete. their,
fee Following’ that; it Would:

Cabingt’s, decision.as.to#
when to place them on the leg-

islative agenda i in Parliament.

The draft legislation creating |
the Ministry of Environment
also needed to receive approval,
as this would inform its struc-
ture going forward. Finally, Dr
Deveaux said his ministry
would then review legislation,
and regulations on the drawing
board since the early part of this’
century — the Environmental
Management Act, and regula-
tions to govern Environmental ':
Impact Assessments and Pollu-
tion Control and Waste Man- _
agement.

When these reviews were
completed, and amendments
made, Dr Devéaux said the .
Government would consult the
opposition before bringing them
to Parliament because the leg-
islation.and regulations were
“broad and far-reaching”.

nikkiaBro Ken

WEEKENDS



ee

Ns
Pa !

Celebrating § years



: THE TRIBUNE

]

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

TRADING volumes have
increased, and share prices
dipped, on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) as retail investors, in
particular, seek to generate liq-

uidity and cash, with the market -

likely to generate no more ‘than
single-digit returns in 2008.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors chief executive, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
he believes that investors are
increasingly looking for cash
options.

_“I think one of the principal
reasons that the market has per-
formed the way it has is that
more people are looking to exit
and raise money,” Mr Kerr said.

He explained that in most
cases, people were looking to
buy and sell stocks to achieve
capital appreciation.

Mr Kerr added that Bahami-
an investors were now looking
away from stocks and seeking
more stable, fixed-income
investment options such as
bonds.

“There is not that much of an
appetite for stocks right now. I
think that at a micro level, you
have people who are raising
stocks for liquidity,” he said.
However, he added that there
were still some stocks which



represented good value for
money.

Mr Kerr also explained that
the market gains achieved last
year will have to be adjusted by
the degree of decline experi-
enced this year.

He said that, at best, the mar-
ket could see a single digit
return, but not the 22-23 per
cent gains seen in the previous
two years..

“That is not going to happen,
Mr Kerr said. “ The best that
we can hope for is a single dig-
it.”

For the period ending June
30, 2008, the BISX All-Share
Index closed down 243.78 points
or 11.8 per cent for the first half
at 1,822.97.

By comparison, for the period
ending June 29, 2007, the BISX
All-Share Index posted an
increase: of 138.94 or 6.02 per
cent to close at 1,815.13. Effec-
tively, the 2008 first half wiped
out the Index’s gains in the 2007
second half.

During the 2008 first half,
trading volumes decreased
when compared with the same
period in 2007, yet the value of
shares traded increased when
compared to the same period
last year.

Trading volume for the peri-
od for all issuers listed on BISX
was 2,288,160 shares, which

totalled a trade value of $15.275

million. This represented a
decrease in traded volume of

Register Now & Save |

Leadership Skills
One Day Coaching Workshop

Contact:

Michelle Miller
Executive Director
Ph: 242-429-6770
or Register Online at:
www. coachmetorward.com,



Kenwood Kerr

665,711 shares or 22.54 per cent.
When compared to the half-
year 2007 total volume of
2,953,871, the value of shares
traded on BISX increased by
$2.115 million or 16.06 per cent
when compared to last year’s
$13.161 million.

The top five share volume
leaders on BISX for the first
half.of 2008 were:

Commonwealth Bank -
724,358 (31.7 per cent)

Doctors Hospital 347,438
(15.2 per cent)



qualifications:

skills

‘Te A good work ethic and an outgoing

personality




UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the Caribbean.
Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look after wealthy private
clients by providing them with comprehensive, value enhancing services.

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following position:

Credit Risk Officer

The successful candidate will be responsible for:
Maintaining credit facilities

Analysis of counter party risks including settlement,
trading and cross border risk
Collateral assessment & monitoring
Transaction investigation
We are searching for an individual with broad experience in credit risk
who meets the following requirements:
8 - Proven track record and familiarity with service -e otlentated Offshore bank
“B Credit Services to High Net Worth Clients
8 . Analytic approach to Credit Risk management Transaction Control

Product & Process Knowledge:
8 Detailed understanding of collateralized loan products and documentation

requirements

8 Ability to assess new credit-linked products and processes

8 Knowledge of Operations and [T-Systems
8 In-depth understanding of OTC and Exchange Traded derivative instruments

Professional behavior

8 Ability to bring together and assess information from a range of sources
Effective workload prioritization and meeting of deadlines
Capacity to work under own initiative with little supervision
Methodical and independent approach to forming opinions and arguments
Good communication skills
General risk awareness with expertise/focus on credit risk and analysis

Education and Certification:
Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Finance or Economics from a recognized
and accredited educational institution.
Minimum of 3 years Credit Risk experience essential
Local regulatory certificates an advantage

Interested persons should reply on or before July 31" to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com

Coenen plana

or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O, Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



DENTAL CLINIC
SEEKS

Two dynamic people to join our team;
a dental and front office assistant.

Applicants should have the puowile
° Great leadership and organizational

° Computer skills are required

Qualified applicants can email their resume to
attention dental position: caribsuppliers@yahoo.com

Colina Holdings 247,126 (10.8
per cent)

FOCOL Holdings 196,529
(8.6 per cent)

FINCO 135,222 (5.9 per cent)

The top five share value lead-
ers on BISX for the first half of

- 2008 were:

Commonwealth Bank $5.377
million (35.2 per cent)

Cable Bahamas $1.798 mil-
lion (11.8 per cent)

FINCO $1.708 million (11.2
per cent)

FirstCaribbean $1.374 a
(9 per cent)

FOCOL Holdings $1.027 mil-
lion (6.7 per cent)

As of 30 June, 2008, there
were 20 BISX listed securities
trading with a market capital-
ization of about $3.58 billion.
There were 21 listed mutual
funds with about $300 million
in assets under management.










IMIVINUAAT, JULY 21, 2UU0, FAUL OD

DP a a re
BISX set for ‘single digit’ return in ‘08

To advertise in The Tribune,
just call 502-2371 today!

Are you ready to join
the finest sales team in
Trt es

Burns House Group of Companies is looking for an ambi-
tious Sales Representative with an energetic spirit.

Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is the leading
beverage company in the Bahamas. With its broad portfo-
lio of consumer brands, extending from beer to spirits and
wines, BHG is the market leader and trend setter in the

respective categories.

Within our sales department we seek to fill the position
of Sales Representative. In this position you will be re-

| sponsible for managing a group of customers (stores, bars,

restaurants) in terms of sales, profitability and account

development.

| The person we are looking for is a team player, a true

winner and an excellent planner with great passion for
execution.

BHG will offer you a challenging environment with inter- .
national growth potential and training opportunities. We
offer an excellent salary and bonus incentive.

Profile of the ideal candidate
Associate Degree
Ambitious; goal getter and energetic
3-5 years of sales experience
Computer Literate, Microsoft Word, Excel,
Internet
Interested?
Send your Resume by email to:

ccash@burnshouse.com or fax to:
Human Resources Manager: (242) 323-4561



AUCTION

U.S. EMBASSY

Saturday, July 26, 2008
SHIPAHOY COMPLEX

(Western Gate)

_ West Bay Street, opposite Well’s Service Stations

DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION & REGISTRATION
9A.M. — 1OA.M. |

AUCTION

10 A.M. — 2 P.M.

Office Furniture, household furniture,Computer equipment

and other Supplies

Construction and miscellaneous supplies

Vehicles (successful bidders on vehicles must pay a
minimum 10% non-refundable deposit immediately at
the end of auction. Bids for all other items must be paid
in full at conclusion of auction).

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED





Fema e =.

PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

“My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune











THE TRIBUNE





THE TRIBUNE

BTC, from page 1B

administration’s focus, and
improvements in pricing and
service quality, not trying to
protect whatever value is left in
BTC through protectionist poli-
cles.

Several business contacts had
previously expressed concern
to Tribune Business that the
Bahamian telecommunications
sector could experience an
‘uneven playing field’ when it
came to liberalization, due to
the fact that different compa-
nies’ exclusivity periods expired
at different times.

Ceble Bahamas’, which is at
least 70 per cent owned by
Bahamian institutional and



retail shareholders, will see its
15-year cable TV monopoly
franchise come to an end some
time next year, allowing rivals to
potentially enter the market and
provide competition for the first
time.

Those rivals would include
BTC, which has again reiterated
that it is exploring whether to
enter the cable television mar-
ket. Indeed, Bluewater Com-
munications Holdings, the lead-
ing contender to purchase the
stake in BTC, has given every
appearance that it, too, is inter-
ested in doing that and going
head-to-head with Cable
Bahamas, ‘bundling’ TV, Inter-

net and phone services to deliv-
er ‘triple play’ down one fibre-
optic line via convergence.

Yet thanks to BTC’s ongoing
privatization, now in its 10th
year, and subsequent exclusivi-
ty period any buyer will enjoy,
Cable Bahamas will itself be
unable to enter fixed-line and
cellular voice services despite
the state-owned incumbent

. being allowed to intrude on its

home territory.

While a maximum three-year
exclusivity period may be exact-
ly what BTC’s existing and
potential competitors may want,
the reaction of Bluewater and
any other potential privatiza-
tion partners may be different.

They will want the maximum

possible time period to restruc-
ture and prepare BTC for com-
petition, and the shorter the
exclusivity period — especially
on cellular — the lower the price
they are likely to pay the Gov-
ernment.

Bluewater, which still has
time remaining on its exclusivi-
ty period, agreed a deal in prin-
ciple with the former Christie
administration that would have
seen it pay a total $260 million
for 49 per cent of BTC.

Some $225 million would
have been paid up front, anoth-
er $30 million five years after
the privatization date (when an

exclusivity period was likely to

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 5B
sR?

have expired), and $5 million
in year six.

To ease concerns over the
exclusivity period’s length, Tri-
bune Business ‘was previously
told by James Smith, then-min-
ister of state for finance, that
Bluewater had offered to set-
up a virtual mobile network
after three years. This would
have allowed other cellular
competitors to enter the mar-
ket through leasing or renting
BTC’s existing cellular infra-
structure, although concerns
were raised about whether
Bluewater’s wholesale pricing
would have allowed rivals in at
a viable price point.

Meanwhile, Mr Donaldson
said the privatization commit-
tee was confident it would meet
the Government’s mandate that
it produce a recommendation
on the way forward for BTC by.
year’s end.

“We intend to meet the Gov-
ernment’s mandate to give them
a recommendation for the pri-
vatization of the company by
the end of the year,” Mr Don-
aldson said. oe

“It’s doable and we'll get it
done. The public deserves bet-
ter than what it’s getting now
[in terms of service and price]:
We’re moving forward at full
speed.”

Aaa i)
GRAND BAHAMAISLAND _—_ Siferaton |
OUR LUCAYA BE ciieb steerer chee

bea SES? LUCAYA
Resort lah

EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES EXIST FOR
DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGEMENT

DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGMENT
The successful candidate for this senior level position will work
closely with the resort’s executive team and law enforcement
agencies and will be responsible for maintaining a proactive

loss prevention program, designed to ensure a safe and secure
environment for hotel guests and employees and will train security
officers and monitor suspicious, harmful and or unlawful activities.

Individual must posses the following minimum requirements:
Must be knowledgeable in all security matters and programs
including but not limited to CPR, fire and hurricane preparedness,
evacuation drills, surveillance, safety inspections, etc.
DT ECM CT Me Cer et mt
the security field, preferably at a resort/hotel;
A Bachelor degree in law enforcement and or security related field
preferred; Current CPR certification and First Aid training required;
Excellent interpersonal, communication and customer service skills.
Technological proficiency in computer programs, Excel and

Microsoft Word.

We offer exceptional pay and benefits.
Qualified applicants should submit their resumes in writing no later than
5 July 31%, 2008 to
RSS EER
The Westin and Sheraton Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya Resort
Attn: Human.Resources Department

P.O. Box F-42500
Freeport, Grand Bahama





WATER & SEWERAGE CORPORATION

PUBLIC NOTICE



TENDER FOR CCTV/SURVEILLANCE SERVICES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation is pleased to invite qualified
companies to submit Tender to upgrade and maintain CCTV equipment for the
Water and Sewerage Corporation. .

Interested companies can pick up a set of documents at the Corporation’s Main
Headquarters #87 Thompson for a fee of Fifty dollars ($50.00). A Pre-Bid Tour
of the facilities is scheduled for Wednesday, July 23" at 11:00am. All
completed Bid Documents and supporting information must be sealed and
submitted to the WSC by 11:00 am on Wednesday, July 30° 2008.

Tender are to be sealed in an envelope marked “Tender for
CCTV/Surveillance_& Equipment Services” and to include service
replacement and repair of all equipments under warranty, repair of equipments, .
and delivered to the attention of: |

The General Manager ,
Water & Sewerage Corporation
Administration Building

- No. 87 Thompson Boulevard
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mr, Godfrey Sherman
General Manager

Telephone: (242) 302-5504 .
Please note that the Corporation reserves the right to evaluate each proposal
based on merit and qualifications, and that award will not necessary go to the
lowest bidder. Proposals will be evaluated based on Price, Experience
Qualifications, and Capacity.

The Corporation reserves the right to reject any or all tenders, and /or amend the
scope of works prior to award,

Tender-for CCTV Services June 2008





OF THE BA

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Prucernn: a Tear

VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following vacant positions in the Business Office:






1, DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTING/SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

The Director of Accounting/Senior Accountant is responsible for the overall financial management systems of The
College of The Bahamas and oversees the functions of accounts payable, accounts receivable, asset and cash
management, scholarship accounting, general ledger, and financial management reporting. The Director of Accounting
reports to the Financial Controller of The College of The Bahamas.

2. FINANCIAL SYSTEMS ANALYST/ACCOUNTANT

' The Financial Systems Analyst assists the Director of Accounting in implementing the improvement of internal’
control systems and procedures for overall financial management functions of The College. The Financial Systems
Analyst will focus on the areas’ of preparation for external audit requirements, accounting, cash management,
budgeting and management reporting. A

Specific duties include but not limited to: Financial Accounting/Accounts Analyses and Government Compliance
for Audit: Reviews, analyzes accounts and ensures audit trail, completeness, propriety and accuracy of supporting
documents for journal transactions. Posts and organizes approved journal transactions to the computerized books
of the College. Prepares schedules of temporary investments and interest income on a monthly basis. Gathers,
verifies and organizes the monthly schedules and reconciliation of all accounts such as cash accounts, fixed assets,
prepayments, inventories, liabilities, expenses and revenue accounts, and ensures (a) agreement with general ledger
balances; and (b) completeness, propriety and accuracy of supporting documents. Prepares movements and analyses
of unrestricted fund balances. Follows-up resolution of or adjusts reconciling items between general ledger and
schedules of all accounts analyzed. Oversees organization of files and external audit trail for Accounts Receivable
Department. :

3. FINANCIAL SYSTEMS ANALYST

The Financial Systems Analyst assists the Director of Accounting in implementing the improvement of internal
control systems and procedures for overall financial management functions of The College specifically in the areas
of preparation for external audit requirements, accounting, cash management, budgeting and management reporting.

* Specific duties include but not limited to:
Financial Accounting/Accounts Analyses and Government Compliance for Audit: Reviews monthly schedule
and analyzes receivable and payable accounts with students (tuition and refunds) and ensures reconciliation with
general ledger. Reviews monthly schedule of scholarship donor accounts and ensures reconciliation with general _
ledger. Gathers, verifies and organizes the monthly schedules and reconciliation of all payroll-related liabilities and
expenses, all expense and revenue accounts and ensures (a) agreement with general ledger balances; and (b)

- completeness, propriety and accuracy of supporting documents. Follows-up resolution of or adjusts reconciling
items between general ledger and schedules of all accounts analyzed. Prepares movements and analyses of restricted
fund balances related to student scholarships/financial aid.

4. ASSOCIATE EDITOR

The Associate Editor with responsibility for News & Publicationsswill maintain overall responsibility for the
production of all College of The Bahamas publications of a news, general information and public awareness nature.
The incumbent will be responsible for the overall management of The College’s media relations and will maintain
supervisory responsibility of writing and relevant public relations staff, which from time-to-time may include
freelance writers. Associate Editors report to the Director Communications/Editor-in-Chief.

For a detailed job description and application, persons should visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates
should submit a detailed resume and a cover letter of interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience
no later than Friday, July 25, 2008 to:

The Director ’
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas

P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
INSTITUTE

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 042008 (SESSIONS 02)










9:00pm

6:00 -
ewes $465.0

6:00 -
50.0 | tx
6:00 -
5.00 | px |
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Gourmet
Cooking Il






824

SESSION 1
gag ees [nce [nce [ance [py [OE Ta
SEC | CODE DURATION | DAYS TIME & FEES

Be alee lea Be [en a
Cuisine 806 D 6 weeks Thursda’ 9:00pm $375.00

ate es SD a ae fie 2a d ef Ae a es ee
Gourmet COOK 6:00 -
Cooking | oe 6 weeks baie $380.00 Fa

Cake & Pastry COOK
Making |
‘ Cake & Pastry

Making Il

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COOK 6:00 - fue
Bread Making 1 | 810 6 weeks Thursda 9:00pm $290.00 }| LK

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6:00 -
5 weeks Mon/Wed. 9:00pm $325.00 | LK

6:00 -
wowwes | St0pm | sa7so0 |x |

COOK

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Cake

Decorating | 817 Se
Cake

COOK
Decorating Il 1 | 818 Sept. 1

Deadline for applications, August 15, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.

Oo
Pa
=



‘ONLINE

REGISTRATION



All current students at The College of The Bahamas
are encouraged to register online for Fall classes.
Students have until Friday, August 1st to register
online. Persons who register after this time will be
assessed a late registration fee of $150.00. Online
registration means you can register from your home
or at any computer that has internet access. Log onto,
www.cob.edu.bs and begin your registration process
today.









PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Baha Mar ‘still not where’
it wants on existing hotels

»
6





' LEGAL NOTICE FROM page 1B the Cable Beach Golf Course, rebranded it as a Sheraton,” Mr _ may reduce its number of avail-
‘ Mr Sands told Tribune Busi- Sands told Tribune Business. able rooms. The $2.4 billion
NOTICE ie a ness: “The opportunity remains “We’re now beginning to see Cable Beach redevelopment
‘ : : to get them all on a good finan- improvement year-over-year. had called for the eventual
Mr Sands said year-to-date cial footing... We’ve gone from an all-inclu- demolition of two towers at the
‘| INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT the 850-room Wyndham was “We would the like the Wyn- sive to a European-plan hotel, Wyndham, although it is

generating an average room ~~ gham’s rate to be around $120, and itis beginning to gointhe unclear whether this factors into
(No.45 of 2000) rate of $110 per night, with and annualised occupancies to direction that a snticipated current considerations.
In Voluntary Liquidation occupancy rates flat compared he around the $70-72 percent That’s been quite a bright spot “We’re currently operating
to 2007. The $110 room rate level. Certainly, with the Sher- _ for us. with all our 850 rooms, although
eee es ahead of the pre- aton we’re in the range on rates, “We're still not where we’d __ we’re assessing going forward
vious year’s $100, giving Baha ang would like occupancies to like to be, but there are posi- whether that will be the total
settle at around 78-79 per cent tive signs. We’re beginning to amount we’re going to work
on an annualised basis.” tweak all marketing and admin- _—with,” Mr Sands said. ©
The Sheraton’s room rates istrative efforts at the Wynd- Baha Mar was “aggressively
have averaged in the mid-$190 ham, so we can put this partic- | working on marketing” to drive
range for the 2008 first half, Mr _ ular property on the same track more visitors to the Crystal
Sands said, with its occupancy _as the Sheraton. There’s major _ Palace Casino, and was employ-
INSIG aa levels “much improved”. The growth at the Sheraton.” ing flexibility when it came to
resort only had 337 room open A major factor in the planned _rostering its 1900 staff, due to
last year, as construction work improvements atthe Wyndham fluctuations in business levels.
i to convert it from a Radisson — will be the switch from a fran- Pointing out that the Wynd-
dy Slt to the Sheraton was still ongo- _chise agreement with that brand ham had been full the last two
behind the bate ing, and the resort is now back to a management agreement. weekends, but quieter during
pi to its full 700-room comple- This will see the Wyndham __ the week, Mr Sands said: “We
ero) Ue fo la) § | =§=6ment. become directly involved inthe have ups and down, and are giv-
on Mondays “We believe that we are see- _ resort’s management and oper- ing staff the benefit that when
: ing a turnaround from what the _ ations, with the property hav- _ there are good business levels,
Radisson used to be, since we ing to meet the brand’s specified __ they will be rostered to work.”
standards. Confirming that a replace-
“We’re going to leverage ment for Harrah’s was still
. their [Wyndham’s] brand and being actively sought, at the
Legal Notice their marketing opportunities, same time as Baha Mar’s legal
along with what’s happening in —_ action against the gaming giant
NOTICE the destination, to parlay that remained ongoing, Mr Sands
into higher occupancies with said: “We have engaged UBS

IK ope Marketi ng Ltd i | higher rates,” Mr Sands said. to take the lead on this for us.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act, Mar “some growth on rates”.
(No.45 of 2000), HOWARTH LIMITED is in dissolu- Referring to both resorts, plus

the Crystal Palace Casino and

tion. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough &
Queens Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. Al] persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before the 25th July, 2008.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
Jaworzno S.A. —

A AR A A A A I REE CI ee OE ae EN




“With that comes service . Things are happening.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) standards, and hopefully an “We are continuing to work
improvement in customer sat- _ towards the finish line. We are
isfaction.” trying to find a new partner to

The Baha Mar executive hint- complete the vision of Baha
Notice is hereby given that the above named ed, though, that the Wyndham =— Mar.”
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of Hope Marketing Ltd. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
'(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

SR IR DRE I a em NR mn A A A a Af

ARGOSA CORP. INC."
(Liquidator) aon

a

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000), BORORO LIMITED is in dissolu-
tion. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough &
Queens Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts .
or claims to the Liquidator before the 7th August, 2008.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
Maximus Elite Inc.

Notice |

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of
the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), NOTICE is hereby given .
that ROMGAR LTD. is in dissolution and the
date of commencement of the dissolution is

July 17, 2008.









—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of Maximus Elite Inc. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



Legal Notice

| NOTICE
Calan International

Ventures Limited





Lorna Kemp and Margaret Taterm-Gilbert
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
1 Bay Street
2nd Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O. Box SS-6289
Nassu, Bahamas





(In Voluntary Liquidation)




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.



EJ FG CAPITAL MARKETS
. sk BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson z 12.00 12.00

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OPAL TWENTY-EIGHT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

_.,eremier Estate . s . . 10.00 10.00 : z
eee is ES Fidelity Over-the-Counter Securities ©
KS

. BidS As!
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25
__..RND Holdings 0.35 0.40
sue acee ano eu srioirm ay , Solina Over-The-Counter Securities
43.00
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60
see at CII DS. rise : 0.45

Last Price

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of April 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

55
Sec ee ) (BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
Colina Bond Fund 1.323145*** 2.41%
Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.990639*"*" -0.349 9.15%
Colina Money Market Fund 7 je ‘o 4.23%
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund -5. o 9.38%
Fidelity Prime Income Fund ts baad! B29 5.73%
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund * -O. % -0.04%
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund Oo
Fidelity International Investment Fund is -a -8. fo -8.94%
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund ‘ -77% 0.77%
FG Financial Growth Fund - ‘ fo 1.19%
FG Financial Diversified Fund -B86% 0.86%
Dati iti é 3 NLA. Key
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price * - 31 March 2008
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity ** - 31 December 2007
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *** - 30 June 2008
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price *"** 314 April 2008
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week - 31 May 2008
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths - 27 June 2008
Daity Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
OW S$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Clbsing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
MIS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
s' Date 7/11/2007

BAL

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 7B



i

FROM page 1B

wealth Bank’s $4 million new
branch in-eastern New Provi-
dence, witile in his capacity as
chair of its council; he is also
likely to oversee the combined
530 million expansion of the
College of the Bahamas (COB)
library and Grand. Bahama
campus.

“What some people don’t
realise is that while some of the
inega projects have not come
on stream, there’s a lot of $20-
530 million projects coming in,
ind that’s keeping things
going,” Mr Donaldson told Tri-
hune Business.

“You've got a lot of small

projects in the building sector, .

and building is a great multipli-
er. Baha Mar has fallen off, but
you've still got Albany. Gov-
ernment’s got a $100 million
road improvement project,
financed mostly by the IDB,
and that’s a lot of money.
“There must be hundreds of
these projects going on in the
country. People focus too much

on these $200-$300 million pro-

Bahamas ‘long way fr

jects; when you’ve got 10 of
these $0-$30 million projects,
that’s $300 million right there.

“We’re certainly a long way
from starvation economically,
and that’s what people have to
focus on. Things in Abaco are
booming,”

Osprey Developers had
already started construction on
Commonwealth Bank’s new
eastern New Providence branch
on Prince Charles Drive, which
should be open by mid-2009.

Estimating that the new
branch would cost $4 million,
the same amount spent by the
bank on its Golden Gates
branch excluding furniture and
fixtures, Mr Donaldson said:
“They’ve done all the siting, and
are getting ready to pour the
foundations. We’re looking for
completion some time in the
middle of next year.”

The Commonwealth Bank
chairman said he was anticipat-
ing a “spike” in lending during
the current 2008 third quarter,
due to a combination of spend-
ing by Bahamian consumers on
vacations and back-to-school,
and the traditional replenish-
ment of inventories by busi-

nesses in preparation for the
Christmas season.

“1 don’t know if people are
getting more cautious, but that’s
likely to change for us in the
third quarter, because people
are going to borrow for their
vacations, back-to-school and
school fees,” said Mr Donald-
son.

“It’s a big quarter for us.
Your’re likely to see a spike in
lending at that time for those
very reasons. We anticipate it
being very strong again. A num-
ber of factors converge togeth-
er for the third quarter.”

After a tight 2007, Mr Don-
aldson said banking system liq-
uidity — including liquidity at
Commonwealth Bank — had
recovered to “very healthy lev-
els”. As a result, competition
for previously scarce deposits
had slackened, resulting in
deposit rates coming off rela-
tively high levels. In turn, and
because lending rates - mostly
linked to Bahamian Prime —
had not changed, the pressure
on interest margins has also
eased,

“The whole system is now liq-
uid, and because of that deposit

BUSINESS

om starving economically’

rates have dropped dramatical-
ly,” Mr Donaldson said.
“Deposit rates have come off
because all the banks are liq-
uid. Banks are not competing
as fiercely as they did at one
time for deposits.”

Commonwealth Bank’s hold-
ings of investments, govern-
ment-registered stock and Trea-
sury Bills rose by 38 per cent to
$135.409 million during the 2008
first half, something Mr Don-
aldson attributed to the bank’s
desire to obtain a higher return
rate on its increasingly liquid
assets.

“Tf you are sitting on a lot of
excess liquidity, you don’t want
a large amount of cash balances
not earning interest,” Mr Don-
aldson added.

Commonwealth Bank saw its
2008 first half net income
increase by 10.4 per cent to
$24.5 million, with total assets
climbing 8 per cent over the
same period to more than $1.25
billion.

Return on common share-
holders equity rose to 35.5 per

cent compared to 33.9 per cent -

in the same period during 2007,
although the 22 per cent rise in

Bahamas ‘passes the test’
over US tax compliance

FROM page 1B

vices clients, Mr Smith said:
“The Bahamas has already met
the requirements for informa-
tion sharing, unless the goal
posts have changed.

“The Bahamas has already
passed the test. This is really
based on whether we are mak-
ing a fair assessment of the
Bahamas regulations relative to

US regulations. The legitimate .





LOT NUMBER

(ITA oe sDIOg26 m1

assessment is that the Bahamas
has already passed the test, and
the US ought not to change it.”

Speaking after a week when
international financial centres
and tax evasion by US clients
became the focus of another US
Senate inquiry, Mr Smith said
US legislators were “missing the
opportunity to go after their
own citizens” and make the sys-

' tem for disclosing taxes easier

by focusing on so-called off-

20~ BLOCK 8 OF SEA BREEZE

Ve



A- Four Bedrooms, two bathrooms, single-family residence, with living room, dining room,
family room, covered porch, foyer, kitchen, laundry room with own half bathroom and a

} two-car carport. Building has an effective age of Twenty-two years and a gross floor area
of 3,395 sq, ft. Land size is 10,000 sq, ff.

The bullding is located on the southern side of Silver Palm Grove, 400 feet west of Silver
Paim Lane or 200 feet of Silver Palm Boulevard,

For conditions af sale and any other information, please contact:
Credit Risk Management - Collection Unit At: |

Ԥ02-0929 or 356-1608 .

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management-Collection Unit

shore centres.

Due to the high regulatory
and compliance burdens
involved in servicing US clients,
and potential reputational risks
if something went wrong, Mr
Smith said many Bahamas-
based financial institutions no
longer took on American clients
as a matter of policy.

He added that many had
been shedding US clients from
as far back as the Bank of Nova




SRR







Scotia case in the early 1980s
when the IRS, frustrated in its
inability to obtain data on US
clients with assets held at the
bank’s Nassau branch, imposed
a fine of several thousand dol-
lars per day on its Miami unit in
an attempt to obtain the
required information. °
“From that point on, many
of the offshore banks simply
stopped doing business with US
citizens or made them sign a

- disclaimer saying that if the IRS

wanted their account informa-
tion, they were free to give it
to them,” Mr Smith, now
CFAL’s chairman, said.






cash and securities saw the
bank’s return on assets drop to
3.5 per cent from 3.65 per cent.

Impaired loans stood at only
1.4 per cent of the total loan
portfolio, something Mr Don-
aldson attributed to Common-
wealth Bank’s credit scoring

Dy neels

exercise. This was a test applied
to all borrowers to ensure they
had the ability to repay loans,
and had “eliminated the risk
factor that might have been
there three, four, five years ago.
That’s translated into less pro-
visions and less write-offs”.

‘ORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

OSITION

Responsibilities: ©

Provides nutrition cae for ail age groups including nutrition assessment, nuttin care planning and
implementation, monitoring, and putition education including food and druginteraction education. =

Works in collaboration with other health care professionals 0 support, restore, and maintain optimal
Axatition heaiti for thase individuals with potential or knows alterations in nutrition status,

Conteioutes to community health initiatives such as providing ieclures and artices fot the general pubic
and media :

Frovides education and training of hospitalized patients, outpatients, caregivess and health cate personel
including medical professtonals concerning theories, ofinciples and practices cf nutrition care.

Provides medical nutrition therapy for outpatients and for the general public.

Participates in the development of hospital poticies and procedures

Requirements:

Minimum Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition by accredited US, Canadian oF equivaient institution

Masters degree preferred

Additional certifications 3 plus ( e.g. Nutrition Support, Diahetes Educator)

| — 3 years previous clinicat nutrition experience
Fogtered and iicensed by the Bahamas Health Professions Council
Excellent communication & Presentation skills

Strong Computer skills

Salary {commensurate with expesence}

Please submit resume to:Human Resou

Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 |
or call 302-4618 | Webs

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT _

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the
following Contracted Services for The Port Department, Ministry



i eo Se ws






P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before July 31, 2008 8

Serious Enquires Only




PUBLIC NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
EAST BAY STREET DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENT

The Ministry of Public Works & Transport wishes to advise the
Public that drainage improvement works will be carried out along
East Bay Street, in the vicinity of Montagu Beach.

As a result, the most southern Eastbound lane along East Bay
Street will be closed between One Montague Place and the KPMG
Building from 22nd July, 2008 to the 22nd September 2008
between the hours of 9:00am and 3:00pm. Single lane traffic will
continue on the north lane.

The Ministry apologizes for any inconvenience caused during this
time.

Signed: Anita Bernard
Permanent Secretary





of The Environment.





1. The Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock




Interested parties may obtain further information, and may collect
the bidding document as of 28th July, 2008 from:





Port Department
Prince George Dock

Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone Number: 356-5639






Between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm, Monday to Friday

Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in a sealed envelope(s)
marked “Tender For Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock” addressed to:





The Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Telephone Number (242) 327-1530







No later than 4:30pm on the I1th day of August, 2008




Tenders will be opened at 10:00am on the 12th August, 2008 at
the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.





The Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

abe ein sn eeactaunuwe— os —



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

GN-713



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

| A. KNOWLES, of Nassau East, Eastem District, |
: New Providence one of the Islands of the :

Whereas AUDLEY FARRINGTON, of Elizabeth | COmmonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At- |

Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of ELROY FARRINGTON, late of Pratt Alley, :

: the Probate Court of Dallas County, Texas, for :

Central District, New Providence, one of the : the County of Dallas, on the 11th day of

-No. 2008/PRO/npr/0037 1

Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 2 September, 2006.

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration ;

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :
24TH JULY, 2008 :

| NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application ;

Whereas REMONDA MOORE of the City of _ will be made to the Supreme Court of The :

Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The ;
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate,of ZEPHANIAH :

HERBERT MOORE , late of th 6 City of Freeport, : for obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Probate, :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00372

Grand Bahama, one of th

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. | Court of British Columbia on the 19th day of |

Notice is hereby given that such applications meptembel.:D: 2008;

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

2008/PRO/NPR/00382

deceased.

DAVID R. HOPE the Personal Representative :
of the in the Estate, by the Carroll Probate Court, :
in the state of New Hampshire, on the 29th day :

of January, A.D, 2008.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |

24TH JULY, 2008 5998/PRO/npr/00387

| Whereas PATRICIA JOHNSON of Evans Street

IN THE ESTATE OF MARTIN EAST. late and off East Street in the City of Nassau in the Island

- domiciled of 41 Avenue Close Road, London Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made |

! application to the Supreme Court of The |

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration ; Bahamas, for letters of administration of the

of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by CARLSON :
H. SHURLAND, of Kipling Building, Freeport, :.
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- ;

: Notice is hereby given that such applications

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas © will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |

for obtaining the Resealing of Letters :
Testamentary, in the above estate granted to : of 14 days from the date hereof.
RICHARD CHARLES KIRBY, JOHN RICHARD :

ALAN EAST AND BRIAN ANTHONY :

2008/PRO/NPR/00383 —

NW8 6DA England, deceased.

: ALEXANDER EAST the Executors and Trustees
: in the High Court of Justice, Principal Registry ©
: of the Family Division, on the 27th day of April,
? 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



PROBATE DIVISION
24TH JULY, 2008

_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00384
_ IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM D. BARRETT,

(a.k.a WILLIAM DURELLE BARRETT) late

? and domiciled of 11085 Strayhorn Drive, Dallas
? County in the Sate of Texas, one of the States |
: of the United States of America, deceased. |
: Law. the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :

of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by PATRICK :

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealing of Order Admitting :
Will and Codicils to Probate and Authorizing :
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate ;
granted to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A and JOHN :
MARTIN DAVIS, Independent Co-Executors in ; —

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

_ PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :
: Whereas CLARENCE BASIL CLARE of Soldier
i Road in the Island of New Providence, one of

_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00384(A)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS | INTHE ESTATE OF BRIAN ERNEST |

STANLEY, late and domiciled of Powell River :
in the Province of British Columbia, Canada, :
? of DAVID MICHAEL CLARE SR. late of Soldier
: Road in the Island of New Providence, one of

deceased.

Bahamas in the Probate Division by :
SHANNELLE SMITH, of the Western District, :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the :

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-

eeenee,

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :

lgkands of the _ inthe above estate granted to IAN |

BEARDMORE the Executor in the Supreme :

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |

24TH JULY, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION | 2008/PRO/NPR/00385

24TH JULY, 2008 | jy THE ESTATE OF ANGELO V. GLIONNA,

: late and domiciled of 350 Greenwood Avenue,
? Volusia County, Ormond Beach, Florida, one

IN THE ESTATE OF CAROLINE SUCCOP of the States of the United States of America,

BADLEY, late and domiciled of Center :
Tuftonboro in the State of New Hampshire, one :

of the States of the United States of America, | of fourteen days from the date hereof, application

' will be made Weg rene pa SL
._,. 4 Bahamas in the Probate Division by M.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration : : :
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application : HANNA-WEEKES, of Pioneers Professional
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by LOUREY :
C. SMITH, of Mareva House, 4 George Street, :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealing of Certificate of :
Appointment, in the above estate granted to :

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration

Plaza, Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing of Letters Administration, in
the above estate granted to ROBERT
CROASMUN (the Single Personal
Representative) of the Estate, in the Circuit

Court, Seventh Judicial Circuit, in and out Volusia :
County, on the 23rd day of December, 2005. :

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :
_ | LIGHTBOURN of Mareva House in the Island

THE TRIBUNE



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008

2008/PRO/npr/00388

IN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT WILFRED
PASHLEY, late of Lee County in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States
of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas in the Probate Division by SHANELLE
SMITH of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence. one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At-

for obtaining the resealed Letters of
Administration (multiple personal
representatives) in the above estate granted to
LINDA R. PASHLEY, GLENN S. PASHLEY
and BRUCE R. PASHLEY the Personal
Representatives of the Estate, by the Circuit
Court for Lee County, Florida, Probate Division.
on the 28th day of August. 2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00389

i the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

_Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

~~ ga WEE sarah

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No, 2008/PRO/npr/00391

Whereas RUBY M. FOX of South Beach in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence. one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of GORDON.
RANDOLPH FOX a.k.a. GORDON FOX late of
South Beach in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence. one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
, THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00392
Whereas RICHARD HERBERT ROGER

i of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

of New Providence, one of the Islands of the ;

Real and Personal Estate of DWAYNE EDNAL |
JOHNSON late of Evans Street, off East Street :
in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the |
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased. ;
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by

Deed of Power of Attorney for Suzanne Cleare,
Irma Cleare, Eleanor Cleare, Edith Cleare,
Theodora Cleare, Lynn Cleare and Gale Cleare
has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate
of SYBIL CLARE, late of Dumore Town, Harbour
Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar —



THE TRIBUNE

GN-713



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :
24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00393

Whereas JILLIAN T. CHASE HOMES of :

ew :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by :
Deed of Power of Attorney for Kevin Branwell :
McClory has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Personal Estate of KEVIN |
McCLORY, late of Pebbles on the Rocks, Banks :.
Road in the Settlement of Governor's Harbour :
on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Jacaranda in the Western District,

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of :

21 days from the date hereof. ©

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS bol
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00394 >

Whereas RUBY FARQUHARSON, of Star :
Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of GENESTA MORRISON a.k.a. GENESTA :
D.J. ROLLE a.k.a. GENESTA DORETT A:
- ROLLE, late Star Estates, Eastern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00395

Whereas CLARENCE JOHNSON, of Windsor :
Place, CLIFFORD JOHNSON of Golden Gates :
and DAISYMAE MCKENZIE of Garden Hills :
all of the Island New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
have made application to the Supreme Court :
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Persona! Estate of FELIX :
LIVINGSTONE JOHNSON, late of Cowpen :
Road, Western District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :

Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications :
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar .

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00396.

Whereas BRAD ALEC ROLLE of Yamacraw :
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

' No. 2008/PRO/npr/00399

Whereas C. YVETTE MCCARTNEY: :
PEDROCHE of Skyline Drive in the Western :
District of the Island of New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
‘ Bahamas has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of LOUIS NASH a.k.a. LAWRENCE NASH :
late of the City of Lutz in the County of :
Hillsborough in the State of Florida, one of the :
States of the Untied States of America, by

Bahamas has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas. for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of WILLIAM PETER ROLLE late of Yamacraw :
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The : -

Bahamas, deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications !
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly |
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00400

Whereas LUCILLE AIELLO nee » MCDONALD i
of 5615 Lake Front Drive in Wall in the State :
of Mississippi, one of the States of the United :
: States of America has made application to the :
: Supreme,Gourt of The;Bahamas, for letters of :
! Ladministration of the Real and’Personal Estate ;
of ELIZABETH ROLLE late of Rock Sound in :
the Island of Eleuthera. one of the Islands of :- .
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased. : -

Notice is hereby given that such applications :
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

_ PROBATE: DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00401

Notice is hereby given that such applications 2
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00402

: Whereas CLEO R. NAIRN, of Perpall Tract, :
Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
has made application to the Supreme Court of :
The Bahamas, for letters of administration of :
+ the Real and Personal Estate of PHILIP :
: FREDERICK NAIRN, late of Perpall Tract, :
: Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :

deceased.

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 9B

= he a se NING es ee ee

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00403

Whereas CONSUELA CARTER, of Thompson
Lane, Southern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court: of The Bahamas, for letters of

administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of EBENEZER CARTER a.k.a. EBENEZER

JAMES CARTER, late of Thompson Lane,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

_ PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00404

Rbieagets 4 bere : Whereas FLORENCE LOUISE RUSSELL, of
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAIIAMAS :
‘THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

'- 24TH JULY, 2008 :

: : administration of the Real and Personal Estate

i of STANFORD LEROY RUSSELL , late of Eight

#6 Sandpiper Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama,

one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court. of The Bahamas, for letters of

Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the eexpleation
of 21 eda fronj,the date hereof.

- Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00405 ~

Whereas SAMUEL MOREE of Palmetto
Avenue in the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

: administration of the Real and Personal Estate
! of HOWARD MOREE late of No. 73 Montrose
? Whereas BERNARD STORR, of Pine Crest :

Street, Sunset Park, Southern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate of HELEN LOUISE :
STORR, late of Chrysanthemum Avenue, :
Garden Hills, No.1 Subdivision, Southern :
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Avenue in the Central District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00406

. : Whereas EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME. COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

’ 24TH JULY, 2008 :

Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ROSALINA ALI
late of Julan Dnarmahusada Indah 1|/L8-9.
Surabaya, Jatim 60115 in the Republic of
Indonesia, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



Se ee

|
|
|
|
|



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas must be ‘proactive’
on alternative energy moves

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
urged businessmen and the
Bahamas as a whole to become
“proactive” in developing a sus-
tainable energy plan, rather
than continue to be reactive.

Dionisio D’Aguilar laudied
proactive measures being tak-
en by the US Government and
regional energy officials and
stakeholders to develop sus-

Fat eo atl 008 tess et

MGRNGRGES « - ART PS

tainable energy options for the
Caribbean, as they prepare to
meet during two energy confer-
ences slated for July 23 and 24,
2008, at the Sheraton Cable
Beach Resort.

The Caribbean Regional Sus-

tainable Energy High Level

Seminar, sponsored by the Gen-
eral Secretariat of the Organi-
zation of American States
(GS/OAS), the Inter-American

| F
ETON NEO

Development Bank (IADB)
and the Inter-American Insti-
tute for Cooperation on Agri-
culture (IICA, and the US gov-
ernment is slated for Wednes-
day, July 23, 2008.’

The Opportunities: for
Renewable Energy in the
Caribbean Seminar, sponsored
by the Government of the US,

will be held the following day, .

on Thursday, July 24, 2008.

Foi wm mw ee ke

LURE: ARE » BET SRR

SURES © PEON POS PCE PLE: Se EES





“For-too long we have all
been reactive in dealing with
the varied challenges of ever-
increasing energy costs. Now, it
is imperative that we become
proactive and begin as a nation
and a region to develop sus-
tainable energy options,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said.

“The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is incredibly grateful
to the US Ambassador to the
Bahamas, Ned Siegel, the Orga-
nization of American States, as
well as the other regional bodies
and stakeholders for convinc-
ing the powers that be to hold
these two very important ener-
gy seminars here. in the
Bahamas.

“This, in itself, says a great
deal about the extremely close
ties that exist between the

’ Bahamas, the US and our sister

countries throughout the
Caribbean, especially when one
considers that these seminars
could have very well been held
in any other country in the
Caribbean or city in the United

Dionisio A

States.”
Mr D’Aguilar said the Cham-

ber of Commerce was excited
to participate in the two energy
seminars. He explained that the
organization, which represents
_ the interests of the private sec-



Coordinator Medical/Surgical Unit

Qualifications:
* Registered nurse from an approved. nursing program,
* BSN required, MBA/MHA preferred,
, Currently registered with the Nursing Council of the Bahamas,
* Minimum of 3 years managerial experience,
. Strong computer skills,

* Excellent interpersonal, organizational and leadership skills.

Position Summary:
* Responsible for the day to day management of the Medical/Surgical Unit,
* Supervision and evaluation of nursing staff to meet patient needs,
* Coordination of support services and resources to facilitate the total care

of patients.

Excellent benefits | Salary commensurate with experience

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
or call'302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com





tor in the country, has repeat-
edly articulated its concerns that
energy costs in the Bahamas
continue to rise at a rapid rate.
“High energy costs continue
to be a pressing concern for
major. business establishments
from a broad spectrum of indus-
tries, from tourism to retail, as ‘
well as for individual household
owners. Every business and
energy consumer in this country
needs to seriously think about
how they can reduce their ene
gy costs, as well as the amouit
of kilowatt hours they actu
use, by using alternative







_ have taken eter steps in

using alternative forms of ener-
gy; Mr D’ Aguilar, who recently
visited St. Lucia, noted that
many of the homes on that
island nation used solar panel
systems in order to heat water.

“Inevitably oil prices will con-
tinue to rise, and really there is
very little that the Government
can do about it. As a result, con-
sumers need to become more
informed and proactive and
take their concerns into their
own hands,” Mr D’Aguilar said.

“Now the Government can
provide incentives and can edu-
cate you about it, but at the end
of the day it is you as the con-|
sumer who is going to have to
make the decision... You have
to be educated to the point that
when you walk into a store and
a hot water heater costs $500
and a solar panelled one costs
$3,000, and you say well obvi-
ously the traditional hot water is
cheaper. Yes, it may be cheaper
on day one, but essentially it
costs more to operate. So you
have to be educated on how to
make that calculation and say
yes, this is worth my while.”

Mr D’Aguilar, who is also the
president of Superwash Laun-
dromat, New Providence’s
largest chain of laundromats,
which uses a considerable
amount of energy to run its
operations, has made repeated
calls for reverse metering, a sys-
tem in which persons using
alternative forms of energy can
resell unused energy back to
electrical suppliers such as the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion. .

“So this seminar, while it is
more on a macro-level as
opposed to a micro-level, will
begin to sow the seeds of what
we should do, firstly, as a nation
and secondly, as individual busi-

nesses to address this extreme-

ly vexing problem,” he added.



PROGRAMME OF ACTIVITIES

TUESDAY JULY 22, 2008

2:00pm—6:00pm Registration and Exhibitor Set-up

WEDNESDAY JULY 23, 2008



7:00am — 4:00pm’ Secretariat Open/Registration

8:30am — 2:00pm

Wellness Symposium

7:00pm — 10:00pm Opening Ceremony and Welcome Reception

THURSDAY JULY 24, 2008

7:00am — 4:00pm

Secretariat Open/Registration

8:00am — 10:00am SCIENTIFIC SESSION I
MSD PLATINUM Cardiovascular Technology Update Session

10:00am — 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am — 12:00pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION II
PROF. CHARLES DENBOW .- Interventional Cardiology Session

12:00pm — 1:00pm

SCIENTIFIC SESSION UI

MEDTRONIC GOLD Electrophysiology Session
1:00pm—2:00pm MSD Sponsored Lunch Session
2:15pm -- 3:30pm CCS Biennial General Meeting (CCS Members Only)

7:00pm— 11:90pm Annual Awards Banquet

FRIDAY JULY 25,2008

7:00am — 4:00pm
. 8:00am — 10:00am

Secretariat Open/Registration
SCIENTIFIC SESSION IV

Memorial Regional Hospital Platinum Cardiac Surgery Session

10:00am — 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am — 12:00pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION V

Astra Zeneca Platinum Session
12:00pm — 1:00pm

Servier Silver Session
1:00pm — 2:00pm

8:00pm — 1:00am

SATURDAY JULY 26, 2008

7:00am — 3:00pm
8:00am — 10:00am

Scientific Session VI

PFIZER Sponsored Lunch

Conference Dinner and Party

Secretariat Open/Registration
SCIENTIFIC SESSION VII

Boehringer-Ingelheim Platinum - Congestive Heart Failure Session

10:00am — 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am — 12:00pm SCIENTIFIC SE

Dr. Ivan Perot Geheral Cardiology Se
12:00pm — 1:00pm | SCIENTIRIC S

1:00pm — 2:00pm

2:00pm-2:15pm






SSION VIIL
sion

CSSION TX
The CCS President’s Research Session

MSD Sponsored Lunch

" CONFERENCE CLOSING CEREMONY



Full Text


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FILES


The Tribune

ANY TIME..-ANY PLACE, WE’ RE Fl

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION








HIGH SOF
LOW 79F
gem, CLOUDS AND
‘sot SUNSHINE









Volume: 104 No.199



aol Were
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Seven year wail Ris
for LNG necision residents to

A GS. eerie Mean their
ut. | Artist is I Py ae | Boe :
official bi Hd lA de a USI eS

FOR MACKEY



says the i

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

and/or knife. Grand Bahama

comp any Tribune Freeport: ' police have reported that two
Reporter women were raped after being

is still
optimistic

lm By PAUL G






dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

_ FREEPORT - As police con-

tinue the manhunt,for a‘serial
rapist, Grand Bahama residents
are being urged to properly
secure their premises at night

awakened by an armed man
who entered their homes during
the early morning hours. |
There has been a report that
a 14-year-old boy was also
raped, however, police have nei-
ther confirmed nor denied this

before going to bed. report. :
Soe Report t Chief Superintendent, Basil _ It is believed that the rapist
Tribune Staff Reporter Rahming, press liaison officer, may have stalked his victims
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net @ — said police are “fully engaged _ before striking. The attacker is
SEVEN ahead aieteini 3 -in a manhunt for a male sus- careful not to leave any evi-
Jot years alter their ini- = —_—_ pected of committing several :
tial investment, the developers recent rape attacks that were SEE page 13
of ‘ BE ENG Meee uae = reported in the city of ce
ural gas N termina at oO Freeport.” aie : Bi e 8 : ‘
Ocean Cay are still awaiting E According to Supt Rahming, ~ Minister SayS areas
on a formal decision from gov- u ou ce J the perpetrator was described ; ’
ele Slee as to oe the — ARTIST MARIE JEANNE DUPUCH discusses some of her work with a guest at her art exhibition ‘(mur-mi-don)’. a uP dae dark lee ao Goodman 4
roject can proceed as_ The exhibition opened on Friday and runs until August 9th at The Hub on Colebrooke Lane. , 3
pignnede ys ae learn Rael te sim build, wearing derk cloth’ Bay to be examine

While admitting that the
normal waiting time for
approyal for such a facility is
three or four years, Aaron
Samson, the head of LNG

: Developer allegedly



blocks | (ERD



cy

Remi crn

for dangerous spots
@ By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net



projects for AES said yester-
day that the company is still
awaiting approval and is still
optimistic.

Mr Samson’s comments
echo those of Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, who
‘told The Tribune. yesterday
that government has yet to
give AES an answer “one

access to Long Island attraction

™@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST —
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net (







TEAMS of surveyors and
divers will examine the areas
around Goodman’s Bay and
Saunders Beach to check for
dangerous spots following the
drowning of a police officer last
week, Minister of Environment
Earl Deveaux said yesterday.

In response to the accidental
death of Corporal 2453
Desmond Burrows, who
drowned in a firearms training

UNREST is brewing in Long Island today, after a Canadian
developer allegedly blocked access to one of the island’s main
attractions — Dean’s Blue Hole.

According to reports reaching The Tribune yesterday it 1s
understood that the developer of Turtle Cove erected a barri-

SEE page 13



SEE page 12






Firearms and
bullets seized
by the police

POLICE this weekend
removed several illegal
firearms and more than 60
bullets from New Providence’s
streets in their continuing fight
to eradicate crime in the coun-
try’s capital.

On Friday at around
5.30pm, officers from the
Drug Enforcement Unit, act-
ing on a tip from a concerned

SEE page 13

i








JERMAINE ‘CHOO CHOO’ MACKEY made history as he became the first
Bahamian in 21 years to win a British Commonwealth boxing title. On Satur-
day night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, Mackey pulled off a 12-round unan-
imous decision over African Michael ‘the Amazing’ Gbenga to clinch the
British Commonwealth super middleweight title. Pictured is Mackey with his
right hand hoisted in the air by referee Matthew Rolle. At right is Archie
Nairn, the Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Sports, who represented Min-
ister Desmond Bannister. Mackey’s trainer Ray Minus Jr. was the last Bahami-
an to hold a British title when he won the bantamweight title in 1987. See
Sports for more details. (Photo: Tim Clarke).

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exercise, Mr Deveaux said that
his ministry is looking into mea-
sures to protect swimmers in
those areas.

The crews conducting the |
mooring survey for the dredging
of Harbour and the divers who
are currently examining the
reefs where the Shell tanker
Ficus ran aground in February,
will this week check the area in
question for potentially dan-
gerous spots.

The authorities will then put
marking buoys in those loca-
tions, the minister said.

Mr Deveaux said that from
his personal experience the sand
bank in that area often shifts
due to the undertow and rough

SEE page 13











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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008 | THE TRIBUNE







LITTLE CHALFONT,
United Kingdom —
Junkanoo is taking
over even the small
towns in the United
Kingdom. The
Junkanoo group tour-
ing the country per-
forms for an excited
crowd in Little Chal-
font, Wednesday,
July 16. The Ren-
dezvous _ Travel
Agency aided in get-
ting the group the
necessary approvals
to perform in one of
its main shopping
area.



Bi By Llonella Gilbert
Bahamas Information Services
LITTLE CHALFONT, UNITED KINGDON



he Junkanoo invasion of the United King-
dom continued in the quaint county of Lit-
tle Chalfont. The people could not help
but get into the act as they just got a taste
of the sounds and the sights of Junkanoo.
Lillian and Vic Podbury, an elderly couple heard that






f a contingent of 33 performers from various A and B : ; i 4
3 Junkanoo groups'and members out of Grand Bahama [Ba es ona
1g and Eleuthera were to perform in their area... .. -LITTLE.CHALFONT, United Kingdom — The

However, it was only when they heard the sounds of brass section of the group gives the crowd a
the cowbells, the trombones, the scrapers, whistles and taste of Junkanoo sounds. However. mem-
ne hows ase ee decided they had to come and see hers of the group advised them to come to The

. for themselves what was going on. it hi

Vic, who uses a cane, had to walk slowly with his Bahamas to see it bigger and better.
wife for a quarter of a mile and arrived just as the per-
formance had ended. :

Upon finding out about this, Quentin “Barabbas”
Woodside, leader of the backline group decided that
they would do a special performance just for the couple.

Those who were able to see the first performance
said they thoroughly enjoyed themselves and gushed
about it with excitement. ;

Callum, a young man.who saw the performance said,
“I was going past my car, I saw you guys preparing to
perform. I live near here, so I quickly went to park my
car and ran back with my camera.”

Then describing what he thought of the act he said, “It
was amazing — it is not quite something you see every- —
day. I had to get me pictures and experience it; especially. LITTLE CHALFONT, United Kingdom — Lillian: «
when they crossed the road, it was amazing: Everyone...and Vic Rodbury, get a special performance, as

é

q
5



LITTLE CHALFONT, United Kingdom Ong,of the performers playing the cowbells and blowing on





e : ! = ONQ,01t 1 ) just stopped and watched, it was amazing.” they just missed:the,graup's act. Vic:;walksiwith:
4 the whistle with all his.strength to get the British interested in Junkanoo and coming to The Bahamas. Still visibly excited, he added, “It was the most unex- a cane so, by thésitinge’thi® couple arrived td dp
is : pected thing — it just made my whole week.” the Junkanoo performance, the group had

Another enthusiastic lady noted that the costumes -completed their show.
were lovely, and that she loved the ‘brightly coloured
shoes the group members were wearing.

Silvia, an owner of a store, said she actually was able to experience a big Junkanoo Parade in Nas-
sau-two or three years ago. i

“There were lots of people out there; much bigger than this,” she said. “We really got into it. It was
hypnotic and you feel yourself moving. It was wonderful with all of the colourful instruments.”

The group is able to make this tour with the sponsorship of Arts Council England. Partnering with
the Council are the Ministry of Sports, Youth and Culture, the Ministry of Tourism and Ms. Zena Bur- ,
land, a frequent British visitor to The Bahamas.

The Ministry of Tourism helped with getting this venue for the group.

District Sales Manager Bahamas Tourism Office (UK) Giovanni Grant said his office asked Ren-
dezvous Travel Agency to help with getting the necessary approvals to perform in Little Chalfont. He
said, “We are going to basically take over the High Street, grab anyone who is around and bring some
crowd to the stores and generate some interest. :

“We have some Bahama Mamas here, a couple of Kaliks, Bahamas flags, and travel brochures basi-
cally to raise awareness to get people interested in the Bahamas.”

Angelique McKay, project manager of the Junkanoo Live initiative and manager of the National
Junkanoo Museum of the Bahamas, said only 15 members of the group were supposed to perform in
- Little Chalfont. i

“But once the guys realised that we were coming to a travel agency,” Ms. McKay said, “they
amongst themselves decided they really wanted to push the culture of the Bahamas a little bit further.
So, they collectively decided they would come as one body to give a larger presence at the travel agency.”

She added, “I thought that was quite commendable of these guys who are part of the troop,
although only half of them were identified because of the space.

“We totally blew the crowd away by our presence, by our size, the colours of the costumes and the
volume of the music — it really shook up the town.”

Lynden Miller, one of the lead bellers of the group and a member of One Family, said it is the best
performance he has ever had off the island.

“It really came together now that we’ are relaxed and free. So everybody is feeling it now; it is
Junkanoo.”

TPN

Bea ee Ne a ana set

fas Pa RE Sg pian kee bad eed nd ae a ea eee ee TS teen ee ee ee ee MEst te Samsun ae teed

i
of

Resario West Condominiums Under Construction /

LE

LITTLE CHALFONT, United
Kingdom — These little babies
get a taste of Junkanoo in Little
Chalfont, while their proud par-
ents look on as well.




{BIS Photos/ .
Lionella
Gilbert) .

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 3



© In brief BISHOP SIMEON HALL URGES FORMATION OF NATIONAL BLUE COMMITTEE

Police arrest
man, 23, in
connection
with robbery

POLICE arrested a 23-year-
old man on Saturday in con-
nection with the robbery of a
pedestrian.

While walking in the area
of Old Trail Road around
6.30pm on Saturday, a 55-
year-old woman was
approached by two men who
grabbed her handbag and ran
off heading north.

Police were alerted and offi-
cers from the Wulff Road Sta-
tion who were in the area of R
M Bailey playing field
observed a man fitting the
description of one of the rob-
bers.

A 23-year-old resident of
Pinedale was arrested. The
second robber is still being
sought. :

Officers make
drug arrests in
joint operation

OFFICERS from the
Grove, South East, and
Carmichael Divisions pooled
efforts in a combined opera-
tion on Friday in the area of
the Town Centre Mall.

During the “Operation Uni-
ty”, officers made. two.drug
arrests and executed two war-
rants for arrest.

Some 59 persons were also
cited for traffic infractions dur-
ing the exercise.

Report of
boat stolen
from Hope

Town, Abaco.

POLICE in the Northern
Bahamas are searching for a
vessel that was reportedly
stolen from Hope Town, Aba-
co, on Friday.

According to reports, Hal
Turner of No 727 Baldwin
Drive, South Carolina, report-
ed to police that sometime
between 10.30pm on July 17,
and 7.30pm on July 18, some-
one stole his 31ft dark blue
2008 Contender boat.

The vessel — named ‘Iron
Man’ — is equipped with twin
250 Yamaha outboard
engines.

It is also outfitted with state-
of-the-art navigation and
sound equipment and is val-
ued at $170,000.

Mr Turner, who was stay-
ing at Elbow Cay at the time,
had moored the vessel at the
dock on Bay Street in Hope
Town.

Police are asking anyone
who may have seen the ves-
sel to contact the Central
Detective Unit on Grand
Bahama at telephone 350-
3107 or 8.

your

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the:
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986,
and share your story.

te ee MeN sly les
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157





Call

LOCAL NEWS

for study

into the effects
of alcoholism

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net_

FORMER President of the
Christian Council Bishop Sime-
on Hall, has called on govern-
ment to form a National Blue
Ribbon committee to study the
effects of alcoholism through-
out the country.

In a letter-addressed to the
Minister of Heath Dr Hubert
Minnis, Bishop Hall, who now
heads the New Covenant Bap-
tist Church said that alcoholism
— teenage drinking — is the
next “monstrous challenge we
will face as a nation.”

“You would be aware that
the legal and illegal sale of alco-
hol has become an accepted
part of our social life.

“I note that while the num-
bers: of liquor outlets are
increasing, government spon-
sored education on this silent
killer is non-existent,” he said.

However, Bishop Hall said
tne tragedy the country now
faces is that alcohol has become
a “sacred cow” — woven into
the fabric of the nation’s “cul-

. tural life.”

“Reports are ripe that per-
sons in high places benefit from

of our national life”.

this habit that has reached epi-
demic levels while we say noth-
ing.
“T note that in all your (Dr
Minnis) pronouncements, very
little. or nothing is said about
alcoholism,” he said.

It’s with this in mind, Bishop
Hall urged the minister to form
the Blue Ribbon committee to
study this problem, and to
ascertain how this “accepted
killer is affecting various parts

“You would be
aware that the
legal and illegal
sale of alcohol
has become an.
accepted part of
our social life.”

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited | We need to
upgrade our
home base

industries

EDITOR, The Tribune. eosunD my 5

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES a
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

ture. You cannot just spend or
give away free gifts. All these
items will show up in the budget
and must be reconciled. Even





I WISH to commend the
Government for an excellent

Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
‘Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Morton Salt workers talk strike

BECAUSE OF the difficult economic cli-
mate the Bahamas is now experiencing, Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes has urged employers to
do all in their power not to cut costs by firing
staff.

He said that the present economic down-
turn has caused much concern about job secu-
rity. Sota

“Do what you have to with reduced work
weeks if necessary,” he pleaded, “but please
do not lay anyone off.” ;

Obviously the seriousness of what the world
is now going through-has not trickled down as
far south as Inagua where 73 of 74 union mem-
bers employed by Morton Salt (Bahamas) vot-
ed to strike. tase

“We're all elated,” said Jennifer Brown, sec-
retary-general of the Bahamas Industrial Man-

ufacturing and Allied Workers Union.

(BIMAAWU), commenting on the mood of
Morton Salt workers after the vote.

We wonder how elated they will be should
Dow Chemicals cut them adrift when it discov-
ers that among its new acquisitions is a compa-
ny with industrial unrest? Less than a week
after Inagua’s strike vote, it was announced
that Dow Chemicals had bought Rohm and
Haas, owners of Morton Salt. Dow Chemicals,
which will be occupied with the reorganization
of its new enterprises, will be in no mood to
play games with Trade Union president Obie

Ferguson, executives of the BIMAAWW, or”
elated union members itching for a strikesDow

Chemicals, having undertaken an $18 billion
investment, will probably not even let Morton
Salt (Bahamas) and its problems surface on its
radar screen.

When unionists sit down with management at —

the Department of Labour today, it is hoped
that reality will have set in and they will realise
that if they go on strike they might never shov-
el salt again.

The strike vote was called because unionists
claim that the firing of 30-year staff member,

Ken Rolle, who was also the union’s vice pres-’

ident, was a union busting tactic.

However, an old-timer at Inagua does not
believe the company had any intention of firing
Mr Rolle.

According to this person it was just a matter
of discipline for a breach of company policy. It

was the old-timer’s understanding that Mr Rolle.

was asked to sign a letter of apology after which
he was to go back to work.
According to our informant, it is believed
that on the advice of his lawyer Mr Rolle
refused to sign. ;
This dispute threatens to disrupt the lives
of more than 60 per cent of Inagua’s population,

all employed by Inagua’s sole employer — Mor-

ton Salt (Bahamas).

“Glen Bannister can sleep with a good con-
science,” said our informant, “he has done
everything to save these people’s jobs. This
company has been very good to our people
here. The people have been treated fairly.”

In this person’s opinion Mr Bannister “went
out on a limb” to save Mr Rolle’s job.

“All he asked him to.do was sign a paper
saying he was sorry.”

But Morton Salt’s workers never had any
intention of going on strike, our informant
claimed. “All the people down here know is
how to produce salt,” he said.

“No strike down here ever lasts more than
three or four days,” he said.

“While they’re out on strike the company
doesn’t have to pay them, but the salt continues
to grow. They can’t afford to go out on strike.

_ After three or four days they’ll be begging to go

back to work. These people’s bark is louder
than their bite.” ;

However, if they do strike it is hoped that Mr
Ferguson’s union strike fund — if there is such

a thing — will be large enough to support the .

unionists who down their tools.
Mr Bannister said that so far the sale of the

’ company has had no negative impact on Inagua.
-He didn’t:think it wouldthave. “We’re part of #7}:
the salt division,” he said, “which has companies’
“iH the US, Cariada aiid ‘the Batiaritas:” rns
It is because Dow Chemicals now has other. .,

companies that it is possible to drop’ whatever
company is not operating up to full potential
and gets “elated” over a strike vote.

Last year unprecedented rains closed the salt
pans, causing temporary lay-offs. This put Mor-
ton (Bahamas) way behind its harvesting quotas,
which it hoped to catch up on by next year.

However, what Inaguans must remember is
that they will be dealing.with hard-nosed busi-
nessmen in the new take-over who will look at
the charts and see that costs in salt producing
nations, such as Mexico and Chile, are far low-
er than the Bahamas, and their production much
higher. For example in Mexico five million
tonnes of salt are produced in a year — with the
capacity to increase to seven million —com-
pared to Inagua’s annual production of 1.2 mil-
lion tonnes.

Considering those costs and that perfor-
mance, coupled with strike threats, in six months
time news from the north might not be so cheer-
ful for the people of Inagua.

Rather than following union leaders, who
will turn their backs on them in their hour of
need, Inaguans would be well advised to con-
sider their own future and that of their families.







F Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

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budget in these difficult eco-
nomic times, because of the pri-
orities given in the budget to
the less developed islands and
communities to build their
homes and upgrade their town-
ships, and for the emphasis
placed on allowing duty free
items for the health and wel-

fare of all residents.

It seems that a couple of
Freeporters are either out of
touch with reality, the down-
turn in the United States’ econ-
omy, the downsizing of compa-
nies such as Home Depot, Star-
bucks, etc, automobile compa-
nies, airlines, etc, the closure of
banks with consequent loss of
jobs to thousands, and all the
mortgage foreclosures forcing
people from their homes, or the
resulting consequence on our
main industry, tourism.

When it was noted that an
identical paragraph was lifted
from one letter by a writer and
was used in a communication
by another person, one could
have dismissed the content for
what it is, pure politicking,
where the intent is to promote
discord once again.

However, the fact that some
people in Freeport are still
importing bins of furniture and
heavy appliances such as wash-
ing machines to equip new

homes, as well as more cloth-
«ding, this would suggest that

Some tips for s

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LAST week, the country

recorded two tragic traffic fatal-

ities in one week which claimed.
‘the lives of two people. These

fatalities and many others. I
must say that have occurred
could have been avoided by all
means.

Firstly, seat belts are devices

designed for you to wear at all .

times when travelling in a vehi-
cle. Many persons fail and con-
tinue to refuse to wear their seat
belts which cause them to have

fatal injuries or even die when |

involved with an accident.
Wearing your seat belt helps to
protect you and keep you safe
when you encounter an ‘acci-
dent. The seat belt law needs
to be enforced in order to keep




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letters@tribunemedia.net



either they have lots of money
to spend in the United States, or
they are not budgeting or pri-
oritising their funds taking into
account the slowing economy.
One would have thought that
some of that money would be
spent locally to support local

firms — at least support:

employment at home.

At this time, instead of poli-
ticking and backbiting, steps
should be taken to consolidate
and upgrade one’s home base
industries.

In Nassau, there are stores
which are passing on to cus-
tomers the savings due to the
duty free items passed in the
National Budget, and many of
us patronise these stores.

I recall that this Government
came to the rescue of persons
whose jobs had been terminated
due to the closure of a hotel in
Freeport. Those persons know
who they are. Well, these pay-
ments had to be taken from
monies which would have been
used for the benefit of all
Bahamians. Perhaps there
should be some gratitude.

- As far as taxes are concerned,
both the developed and the
developing countries must per-
form a balancing exercise of
expected revenue and expendi-

persons who refuse the wear-
ing of seat belts.

Secondly, driving under the
influence of alcohol is very dan-
gerous. I urge folks to be
responsible drivers; do not drink
and drive. If persons feel that
they cannot drive let someone
who is sober drive. Being on the
phone, eating, picking up some-
thing from the car floor and
éven women breast feeding all
contributes to accidents on the
streets.

Thirdly, when driving we
must not speed and drive reck-
lessly. Drive at the speed limits
that are posted on signs in dif-
ferent areas. In addition to this,
many people tend to drive at a
fast speed when they are in a
hurry and are late for an
appointment. This is why acci-
dents are inevitable to happen.
To avoid this, for instance when
one has an appointment for
7pm, it will be better for them
to be on the road by 6pm,
instead of 7.45pm where you
have to be in.a rush and who
knows it is a chance that you
can rush your life away...sadly.

Fourthly, when coming
around a corner, folks tend to
speed around it. When doing
this, it is a 50 per cent chance
that you can lose control of your
car and ‘run’ into a utility pole
or off the road into the bushes.

‘So I urge you that when

approaching a corner, try to
decelerate your speed. Also, I
have seen persons overtake
another vehicle when approach-



in one’s own personal account-
ing, one cannot spend more
than he/she earns. Parents
should instil this attitude into
the minds of their children so
that they learn at an early age to
spend wisely, earn what they
can, and they should not expect
to always be the recipients of

free stuff. When they grow old-

er they will, in turn, assume
their responsibility to family,
home and the nation.

It seems appropriate at this
time and on the nation’s 35th
birthday to quote here the late
President John F Kennedy who
said: “Ask not what your coun-
try can do for you, but what you
can do for your country.”

Therefore, let us build together. ,

For the Christians in our
community, surely they remem-

ber that taxing goes back over.

2000 years when it was Jesus
who said on an occasion to his
disciples “Render to Caesar the
things that are Caesar’s and to
God the things that are God’s”
and the disciples paid the
required tax. ©

May God continue to bless
our country, and fill us with love
for one another and peace in
our land.

A NASSAUVIA
Nassau, ‘
July 17, 2008.

driving

ing a corner. This is a very dan-
gerous risk to take because
another car coming from the
opposite direction can be com-
ing around the corner the same
time and it will be a head on
collision and sadly lives can be
taken away.

Finally, taking over on main

.strips can be risky also and

cause accidents. For example,
if a car wants to overtake anoth-
er car and a next car from the
other direction is coming, that
person who wants to overtake
may judge that they can make it
before the car comes from the
opposite direction. In a case like
this, it might be too late for the
overtaking car to switch back
on their lane. So in this case
they have misjudged the dis-
tance between them and the
opposite car from the direction.
This might cause them to run
off the road or hit the car from
the opposite direction.

So in this case, make sure
there is a great distance
between you and the vehicle on
the opposite lane, which will
afford you enough time to over-
take the car on your lane and
get back on your lane.

In conclusion with these tips,

’ I am sure many accidents will

be avoided. Take precaution on
the street. Be safe out there.
Remember, save a life and it
could be yours.

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
July, 2008.

Please be advised that

Mr. Alpheus F; McKenzie is
no longer employed with the
Law Firm of
‘Harry B. Sands, Lobosky
and Company.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 5



TRIBUNE SURVEY REVEALS NON-ATTENDANCE AT NATIONAL CELEBRATIONS HAS LITTLE TO DO WITH RACE

Class difference stops some white Bahamians
attending Independence Day events — poll

@ By LISA LAWLOR



RESPONDENTS to a Tri-
bune poll say class difference is
the main reason some white
Bahamians do not attend the
Independence Day celebrations.

This year's poll was launched
July 4 as a survey to measure
the "racial exclusion" hypoth-
esized by associate professor
Michael Stevenson in the Col-
lege of the Bahamas' Distin-
guished Lecture Series, July 1.

Mr Stevenson's observation
came from his studies of the
Bahamas' past in racial and

‘Versatile’
AVM EN
opens at
Central

LPM e mals
Bahamas



“,..1 do not
enjoy being part
of a huge

Crow
SS ee a ee)
political relations, and he quot-
ed Rev. C B Moss who said a
few years ago that "the coun-
try was 'plagued' by the non-
involvement of white Bahami-
ans in national affairs."
Stevenson further posed the

response by Normon Solomon
"a great Bahamian" who ques-
tioned: "What has my love of
country and loyalty to my coun-
try got to do with my appear-
ance at Clifford Park?"

While Stevenson concluded
that it was up to white Bahami-
ans to form a more inclusive
nation by attending national
events, most respondents — of
all ethnic backgrounds — said it

has little to do with race, but’

more to do with class.

One Bahamas resident who
wished to remain. anonymous
said, "I am a white Bahamian

AV Vie eden

and, like the majority of my
friends, both black and white,
I do not attend (the celebra-
tions). I can find other forms of
entertainment that I prefer and
generally, I do not enjoy being
part of a huge crowd."

But, she added, "Pride swells
in (white Bahamians') hearts
just as much as in the hearts of
those who go along to the large,
organized celebrations.

“However, we generally do
not feel that it is a duty to
attend and make a public
demonstration of our national
prides

Another respondent, a
"proud, loyal and black"
Bahamian woman with “roots
buried deep in the Bahamas"

has never attended any inde-.

pendence celebrations, not even
the very first one.

She’ feels "the PLP seemed
to think (in 1973) and still do
that 'independence' was a PLP
thing for PLPs only," thereby
she thinks there is a political
exclusion.

Other responses received by
The Tribune included reasons
of too much traffic, not enough
parking, repetitive speeches —

AN ART EXHIBITION
"Versatile’ was held at the
Central Bank of the
Bahamas on Friday July
18, 2008 and will run

until August 2, 2008.
Pictured is one of the
artists, Edrin Symonette,
(third from left) explain-
ing one of the paintings.

"they say the same thing over
and over!" too much noise, and
one lady said she didn't need
to go because she "was there

for the real t’ing in''73".

While not the majority, there
were responses supporting Mr
Stevenson's thesis, and giving
racial exclusion as the reason
for not attending national
events like this one.

A black Bahamian said she
has seen the "boorish and
insulting behaviour" white peo-
ple are subjected to at these
events, and said "If I were them
I would not go either."

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

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PRESIDENT of the Bahamas _ seminars here i in The Bahamas. seriously think about. how they Black
Chamber of Commerce Dionisio “This in itself, says a great deal. can reduce their energy costs, as Tan
D’Aguilar lauded the proactive — about the extremely close ties that well as the amount of kilowatt
measures being taken by the _exist between The Bahamas, the _ hours they actually use, by using Brown
‘United States government and United States and our sister coun- _ alternative forms of energy,” Mr Silver

regional energy officials and
stakeholders to develop sustain-
able energy options for the
Caribbean, as they prepare to
meet during two high-powered
energy conferences slated for July
23 and 24; 2008 at the Sheraton
Cable Beach ‘Resort.

The Caribbean Regional Sus-
tainable Energy High Level Sem-
inar, sponsored by the General
Secretariat of the Organisation
of American States (GS/OAS),
the Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) and the Inter-Amer-
ican Institute for Cooperation on
Agriculture (IICA) and the gov-

ernment of the United States, is’

slated for Wednesday, July 23,
‘2008.

The Opportunities for Renew-
able Energy in the Caribbean
Seminar, sponsored by the gov-
ernment of the United States, will
be held, the following day, on
Thursday, July 24, 2008.

“For too long we have all been
reactive in dealing with the varied
challenges of ever increasing
energy costs. Now, it is imperative
that we become proactive and
begin as a nation and a region to
develop sustainable energy
options,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is incredibly grateful
to the United States Ambassador
to the Bahamas Ned Siegel, the
Organisation of American States
as well as the other regional bod-
ies and stakeholders for convinc-
ing the powers that be, to hold
these two very important energy

a Le
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ay ha
PHONE: 322-2157



tries throughout the Caribbean,

especially when one considers

that these seminars could have
very well been held in any other
country in the Caribbean or city

_ in the United States,” he said.

He said the Chamber of Com-
merce is very excited to partici-
pate in the two energy seminars.
He explained that the organisa-
tion, which represents the inter-
ests of the private sector in the
country, has repeatedly articulat-
ed its concerns that energy costs
in the country continue to rise at
a very expeditious rate.

“High energy costs continue to
be a pressing concern for major
business establishments from a
broad spectrum of industries from:
tourism to retail as well as for
individual household owners.
Every business and energy con-
sumer in this country needs to

D’ Aguilar said.

Pointing to countries such as
Barbados and St Lucia which
have taken proactive steps in
using alternative forms of energy,

. Mr D’Aguilar, who recently vis-

ited St Lucia, noted that many of
the homes on that island nation,
used solar panel systems in order
to heat water.

“Inevitably oil prices will con-
tinue to rise, and really there is
very little that the Government
can do about it. As a result, con-
sumers need to become more
informed and proactive and take
their concerns into their own
hands,” he said.

He ‘added, “Now the govern-
ment can provide incentives and

can educate you about it, but at”

the end of the day it is you as the
consumer who is going to have
to make the decision.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008



THE TRIBUNE

@ BY ERIKA RAHMING

My name is Erika Rahming, I
am 16 years old and I am the
Olympic Youth Ambassador of
the Bahamas.

From August 6 to August 17,

Bahamian athlete, will be attend-
ing the Beijing 2008 Olympic
Youth Camp. . .




















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I, along with another young >

This youth camp gives young
people the opportunity to make

friends from other countries or .

regions and to learn about each
other's cultures.

- During the camp I will attend,
some of the Olympic Games and
learn about the culture of China.
While in Beijing I will be sending
a journal of what is going on, not
only concerning the. Olympics,
but also about the culture of Chi-
na and my experience while

’ there.

I was chosen to be an Olympic
Youth Ambassador based on my
academic achievements as well as

Betty Taylor
Journalist / Entrepreneur



athletic accomplishments. My
sport is judo and I am the
Bahamas’ top lightweight female

fighter. I have also medaled in

international competitions. Let
me tell you about my prepara-
tions for the camp.

"Today is a good day for
judo," I hear my father's voice
say every morning. And indeed
today is a good day for judo. With
the US Junior Open only days
away, the intense team workouts
have been toned down to simple
workouts mostly consisting of
perfecting technique and

defences. The Bahamian. judo

“You may have
darkness in your life
today, but remember,
there is a tomorrow the

sun will shine for you.

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A chance to make friends and
learn about Chinese culture

Erika Rahming

team has trained hard for the past
few months and the team mem-
bers are eager to fight once again
in the tournament.

Last year, the team training at
All-Star Family Centre and Gym-
nasium on Joe Farrington road
had paid off and several athletes
were able to win medals, includ-
ing a gold and a few silvers. This
year, many of the team members
hope to win, myself included,
especially since the programme
has been enhanced with the assis-
tance of the American coach, Jer-
ry Lafon, as well as some local
Senseis (who are teachers of the
art): Sensei Rahming, Sensei
Mickey, Sensei Oneysi and Sensei
Role.

Judo is'a very physical sport
requiring flexibility, strength and
also intelligence. In judo, two

_ judokas (judo players) fight each

other until time runs out or until
one of the players, receives an

‘"Ippon," which is a full point.

This can be'achieved by throwing
the opponent fully on their back,
pinning the opponent on their
back for 25 seconds or by making
the opponent tap out through an
armbar or by choking. Of course,
only those over the age of 13 can
perform chokes and those over
the age of 16, armbars.

I want to bei in the best physi-
cal condition for the camp so that
I can represent the Bahamas t6
the best of my ability. Look out
for my journal which I will be















*\



4


THE TRIBUNE



| Frances Singer-Haywar d a ae aa

honours ‘Amigo’ the
potcake at fashi

Ambassator
to US courts

potential new

investors to
the Bahamas

BAHAMAS Ambas-
sador to the United States
C A Smith this weekend
courted potential new
investors to the Bahamas
during the 12th annual
National Association of
Black Hotel Owners,
Operators and Developer
Summit.

Speaking at the summit,
which was held iu Atlanta
from July 16-20, Ambas-
sador Smith highlighted
the tax free benefits for
international investors in
the Bahamas.

“Tourism has brought
the brightest sparkle to the
archipelagic jewels called

- the Bahamas, and our
work in this area has
brought great rewards,” he
said.

Ambassador Smith, with
Prime Minister David
Thompson of Barbados
courted hundreds attend-
ing the summit.

Pointing to governmen-
t’s red carpet versus red
tape policy, the Ambas-
sador said the Bahamas
has established generous
legal incentives to attract
foreign investors and has
streamlined government
bureaucracy for timely
project approval.

Today those categories
of investment include

tourism, financial services,’ :

international services, e-
business, manufacturing,
agriculture and fisheries _
and real estate develop-
ment,” he said.

A veteran politician and
former Cabinet Minister,
Mr Smith who was recent-
ly appointed Ambassador
to Washington, DC, was
accompanied to the sum-

‘mit by Consul General:
gudys Sands ofthe |.

Bahamas Consulate int®
Miata and: Honorary: €
sul Mike Young of
Atlanta.

~ “Our country has been
faithfully committed for
more than 60 years to the
ideals necessary to foster
the right environment to
attract the wealthy to live
and conduct business in
the Bahamas,” the Ambas-
sador said.

The Ambassador said
that considering that this
year’s approvals by the
National Economic Com-

’ mittee of the Bahamas

exceed $10.2 billion, the
next two decades will see
the country transformed as
the destination of choice
for luxury vacations and

high-end real estate devel-

opment.

“Therefore, ladies and
gentlemen, the islands of
the Bahamas’ envious
location as the closest off-
shore destination to the
east coast of the USA,
offering easy access as well
as lower ticket.prices by
air is of great benefit to
developers and end pur-
chasers.

“The government and
péople of the Bahamas
extend a warm invitation
to you to consider and
invest in the islands of the
Bahamas.”




FOR the second year,
Frances Singer Hayward
walked the runway in the
“Paws for Style” fashion show
in New York -— this time, in
honour of her famous potcake
Amigo, who died of cancer
last September.

The glamorous and star-
studded event, in aid of the
Humane Society of New York
has become a yearly favourite
in the city that never sleeps.

Wearing an elegant
turquoise outfit by designer
Jackie Rogers, and sporting a
red satin “I love Amigo”
heart, which was. specially
designed by Ms Rogers for the
event, Ms Singer-Hayward
had as her animal companion
a Chihuahua from the
Humane Society named “Bec-
ca” who is presently up for
adoption.

“This was a very bitter-
sweet night for me, filled with
memories of Amigo and the
fun we had last year,” said Ms
Singer Hayward.

“Amigo will always be my
soul and inspiration, in my
devotion to my life’s calling
of making the world a better
place for animals.

“T can only pray that people
will help fulfil his mission by
being more sympathetic to the
suffering of so many animals
and, of course, by supporting
organisations like the Humane
Society of Grand Bahama —
for whom he was the mascot

FRANCES SINGER-HAYWARD walks the runway in honour of late



WEARING A specially designed
“| Love Amgio” red satin .
brooch, Frances Singer Hay-
ward stands back stage at the
Paws for Style fashion show
benefitting the Humane Society
of New York.

and “poster dog” for so many
years — and all Humane Soci-
eties throughout the Bahamas
who work so heroically and
tirelessly.”

The Humane Society of
Grand Bahama has recently
opened a new state-of-the-art
animal shelter, which features
“Amigo’s Friendship Park,”
which Ms Singer-Hayward
describes as “a beautiful and
befitting tribute to him.”

potcake star Amigo at the Paws for Style fashion show in New York
in aid of the Humane Society of New York.





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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Evidence compelling

Caribbean review of
EU agreement



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@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

T SEEMS - that
Caribbean countries
can now forget any idea
of Britain being help-
ful to them in any attempt to
review or re-negotiate aspects
of the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) between the

European Union (EU) and

Cariforum countries initialled
last December.

Foreign Ministers of Carifo-
rum countries, who travelled to
London for a two-day meeting
of the UK-Caribbean forum on
15-16 July, found a commu-
niqué already written mostly by
the British but with input from
some Caribbean High Com-
missioners.

The draft was a one- -sided
affair which took no cognizance
of the serious disagreements
over the EPA that now exist in
both the Caribbean and the EU.
Reading it, anyone would be
forgiven for believing that the
EU had given the Caribbean
everything, asking nothing in
return. Indeed, it read as if the

EPA was the Caribbean’ s sal-

vation.

This is how it read in part:

“Ministers welcomed the
conclusion of the EU-Carifo-
rum EPA and looked forward
to its signature in Bridgetown”.

It continued: “Services
exports to EU markets had also
been facilitated by the Agree-
ment so that since 1 January
2008, there is better access for
Caribbean professionals to sell
services as Contractual Service
Suppliers and as Independent

Professionals or self employed. -

persons, so that regional
tourism professionals, chefs,
models and entertainers now
have guaranteed access to the

EU.”

Fortunately, those words did
not stand. The section on ser-
vices was eliminated and instead
of “welcoming” the “conclu-
sion” of the EPA, Ministers
“noted” that several CARI-
COM countries “have complet-
ed their internal consultations”
and instead of “looked forward
to its signature”, Ministers

“expressed a readiness to sign.

with the EU”, but they also had
to note that “Guyana would be
undertaking national consulta-
tions to review aspects of the
initialled EPA before taking a
decision on signing”, and that





“the newly elected Government
of Grenada would also be
undertaking a review of the
Agreement”. It was left to the
UK alone to “encourage timely
signing and nuplementaion of
the EPA”.

While a gloss of success was
put on the outcome of the meet-
ing, it was’ evident that
Caribbean ministers were not
altogether happy with the meet-
ing. Unusually, the Caribbean
co-chair of the meeting,
Antigua and Barbuda’s Prime
Minister Baldwin Spencer, in
his closing remarks drew atten-
tion to the fact that the two

sides had “agreed to disagree .

on some issues”. ;
But the disagreements were

_not_all over the EPA, There
appeared to be a remarkable ©

insensitivity by British minis-
ters over the consequences of
the loss of a preferential market
in the EU for Caribbean
banana farmers. When it was
suggested the farmers would
turn to the growing of marijua-
na as a means of survival, a
British official shot down the
idea causing some Caribbean
ministers to show some annoy-
ance with the complete lack of
understanding of the dire posi-
tion of banana farmers.

But, the EPA remained the
most worrying consequence of
the UK-Caribbean forum com-

muniqué.: While Guyana and,

Grenada have made their posi-

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“There appeared
to be a remarkable
insensitivity by

. British ministers

over the

. consequences of

the loss of a
preferential
market in the EU
for Caribbean

banana farmers.”
a ee ee eae

tion clear — and it is to be hoped
that the governments of the two
countries will now try to mount
a joint team to review the EPA
and consider their options,

. rather than working alone —

other Caribbean governments
accepted UK language in the
communiqué that is not help-
ful.

Much has been made by the
EU of access to its markets for
the Caribbean’s services sectors.
I and others have already point-
ed out that the authority for
“the movement of natural per-
sons” and therefore the right to
grant or deny visas rests with
individual EU countries not
with the European Commission.
Therefore, referencés t6'this in
the EPA are misleading.

Serious though that restric-
tion is, it is not the only problem:

related to services. Professor
Jane Kelsey of the School of
Law at the University of Auck-
land has produced a report for
the countries of the Pacific high-
lighting the one-sided nature of
the EPA on services.

- She points ta: the surrender-

ing of autonomy in policy mak- -

ing, the granting to the EU of
measures not agreed in the
global trade rules at the World
Trade Organisation, the harm-
ful effects on development, the
onerous and costly obligations
of implementing the EPA, and
the dangers it poses to cpio
integration.

For instance, she says quite
bluntly: “The EC has used the
CARIFORUM EPA to secure
‘state of the art’ rules and com-
mitments under Title IJ: Invest-
ment, Services and E-commerce
that it hasn’t been able to
achieve at the WTO. The EC
is expected to use this to under-
mine their continued opposi-
tion to these issues at the WTO
if it can get more ACP states to
sign a similar agreement”.

Professor Kelsey told the
Pacific countries that: “The lev-
el of sectoral commitments
made by CARIFORUM states
in the EPA exceeds the contro-
versial benchmarks proposed
by the EC in the GATS 2000
negotiations... “. And, she
warned them: “Comparable lib-'
eralisation commitments in the
Pacific would have a massive
impact on the nature, function
and objectives of ‘services and
the right of governments to reg-
ulate them”:

Tellingly, she observes: “The -
EPA promises support for small
and medium enterprises. Yet
governments that make ‘nation-
al treatment’ commitments in:
Title II sign away the right to
give small or infant enterprises
the additional support they may
need to survive once their mar-
kets are opened to Europe’s
corporations.

“Only large-scale local firms
will be competitive and the
most successful of these may .
become targets for foreign
takeovers”.

Caribbean governments ini-
tialled the EPA first while oth-
ers waited. The EU pushed the
Caribbean, and it was clear
from the outcome of the UK-
Caribbean forum, that the agen-
da of some EU governments is
to hold the Caribbean to signing

’afull EPA in the EU’s interest.

But, it remains in the
Caribbean’s interest to review
and renegotiate what is clearly
harmful to Caribbean business-
es and Caribbean autonomy.

_ The body of evidence justi-
fying the review is compelling.

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.co

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 9





ABOVE

LEFT

closing ceremony.



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or via fax 356-8148

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LEFT

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at the ceremony at the Police Training College Auditorium.

INSET 2
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

The focus of Eleuthera

mi By LEONARDO KNOWLES

Hzetners. oh my
island, held back from

its original meaning “Freedom”



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instead enslaved by an economi-
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good for growing pineapples,
caves and beautiful caring peo-

ple. It seems to have been lost in

the world of economic possibili-
ties, this is why I feel that it is so
important for me to give back to
an island that has given so much
to me.

Some may recall the glory days
of Eleuthera when every islander
was able to enjoy full-time
employment and a vibrant econ-
omy. In the 1950’s the French
Leave hotel in Governor’s Har-
bour, later replaced by Club Med,
was said to have been the driving
force of the Eleuthera economy.

For the past 15 years, both past
and present governments of The
Bahamas made promises to the
residents of Eleuthera in good
faith, the economy declined due
to Government’s promises being
backed by solemn guarantees,
which were sometimes not hon-
oured. As a result, major resorts
on the mainland were forced to
close their doors, compounded
with the setbacks resulting from
the devastating hurricane
Andrew, but more importantly
the failure to attract new invest-
ment.

The truth of the matter in my
opinion is that politicians and
governments are extremely men-
dacious. Politicians might lie
about whether they are guilty of
adultery, misappropriation of
funds, and representing their con-
stituencies, but there are some
promises that they should stand
behind. How is it that during an
election campaign politicians/gov-
ernment ask for the support of
the people with the intention of
defaulting on their promises made
during the campaign? In my opin-










Available at

NOTICE

Christian Churches Pray for
Christians United for Israel
meeting in Washington D.C.
July 21/24

Under the leadership of
Pastor John Haigi pray also
for our Bahama Land to be
spared from all hurricanes

this year and the Islands
surrounding us.

Thank You
Jesus



Leonardo Knowles
ion it is just irresponsible.

Stagnated

| he glory days of the once

thriving Rock Sound
Club and exclusive Pottatch Club
have disappeared. The Winder-
mere Island development, Davis
Harbour, Cape Eleuthera, and
Cotton Bay, with its world-class
golf course and expensive homes,
have not yet achieved the level
of success expected.

Indeed, it is quite remarkable
that the once promising growth
trends emerging in Eleuthera
have stagnated. The promises of



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“It is
essential for
Eleutherians
to understand
the
importance of
community...”



help and hope, being right around
the corner, have been heard many
times in the last few years.

Accordingly, a high degree of .
scepticism greets any pronounce-'

ment of major economic: devel-
opment projects on the island.

Presently, there are a number
of projects expected to signifi-
cantly impact the residents —
South Eleuthera in particular. I
am particularly concerned that
once the word “development” is
mentioned most persons allow
themselves to become overly
excited thinking only of econom-
ic growth and nothing else.

It is essential for Eleutherians
to understand the importance of
community, and the role the com-
munity ought to play in the devel-
opmental process of the island.

Firstly, development takes

place through awareness and the ~

interplay of reflection and action
by people in the community.

Secondly, growth in human
capacity, not superimposed eco-
nomic growth, produces sustained
development.

Thirdly, people’s participation
in their own development as they
take control of their own future is
crucial. In order for a community
to participate in determining its
needs, the motivation of the peo-
ple is essential. In this case the
elécted representative for the con-
stituency, better known as the
Member of Parliament, acts as
the facilitator/motivator on behalf
of the Government of The
Bahamas, promising the resi-
dences help and hope for the
problems that plague their com-
munities. Motivation is the initial

- process whereby the oppressed

and powerless become aware of
their conditions and its causes.
Community motivation leads to
the sharing of responsibilities,
which gives the community a
sense’ of ownership. For a com-
munity to participate in its own
development, mutual trust must
be established between the
MP/Government and the com-
munity.

Presently, the trend that began










THE TRIBUNE

about 15 years ago seems to have
accelerated in recent years due
to the lack of opportunities and
the general decline in the econo-
my of Eleuthera. As a result,
many persons from Eleuthera
have left either for the island of
New Providence and/or other
countries in order to find employ-
ment, boost their incomes, and
to further their education.
Notwithstanding, many persons
of Eleutherian descent have been
very successful in the fields of
education, construction, medicine,
and business.

However, the fact that many
have not returned to invest and
contribute to the further devel-
opment of Eleuthera has served
to hinder progress. Meanwhile,
the lack of incentives to migrate
from New Providence presents
another hurdle.

[ is my hope that the Goy-
ernment of The Bahamas

would grant title to commonage
land to enable development for
residential or commercial pur-
poses as it has done and is doing
presently for other islands, such as
Abaco, Exuma and Long Island.
‘Also, put in place measures for
land reform. Apparently, large
tracts of land have been pur- -
chased by non-residents and held
for a long period of time without
any development taking place.

The under-utilisation of
resources and of the facilities such
as the naval bases, standout upon
visiting Eleuthera. In part, this is
a remnant of slavery specifically;
people who have not had to think
for themselves and plan for the
future tend to focus on day-to-
day activities.

Despite the arduous economic
times in Eleuthera, I can honest-
ly attest to the hard work, perse-
verance, initiatives, ambition and
vision of local entrepreneurs, such
as the late Mr Albert T Sands and
family, Mr Ray Carey and family
and Mr Oswald Ingraham and
family (in Rock Sound).just to
name a few. Their commitments
to the island of Eleuthera and its
residents speak volumes to the ~
further development of the island.

Instead of simply waiting for
foreign investment, a fair num-
ber of locals show the determi-
nation and ability to push ahead
with their own plans. Eleuthera °
has the potential to supply the
tourist sector with a fair amount
of the fruit, vegetables, and
marine demands once given the
attention and proper develop-
ment. Given the fact that many

' Bahamians may not elect to work

in the hot sun, further expansion
of the agriculture sector will
require the import of foreign
labourers and appropriate tech-
nology. Ultimately, the recovery’
of Eleuthera depends on the
inhabitants. They can play a key
role in making investments on the
island a success. They have to
demand the attention of their rep-
resentatives and attract those
individuals who have the vision
and imagination to foster devel-
opment.



TENDERS FOR

Customs Clearance &
Delivery Services

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

invites Tenders from eligible bidders for

Customs Clearance & Delivery oo
to and from:

(1) Docks

(2) Airports & Post Offices.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation’s Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by con-
tacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
July 31st, 2008, 4:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 672/08
Customs Clearance & Delivery
Services to and from Docks

Marked; Tender No. 673/08
Customs Clearance & Delivery
Services to and from Airports & Post

Offices

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject
the whole or such part of any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.
THE TRIBUNE a MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 11





DOCTORS.
~ HOSPITAL

DR. MEYER RASSIN
FOUNDATION



There are many ways to care

for the future and contribute

. __ to the well being of the
community. We can show
you that with a little planning,
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; AP TET Aare
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good use and provide not

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generations tocome.


PAGE 12, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Five bombs explode in northern Spain after warning Sool

@ LAREDO, Spain

FIVE bombs exploded in northern Spain on Sun-
day causing damage but no injuries, officials said. A
person, claiming to be speaking on behalf of Basque
separatist group ETA, had phoned in warnings about
four of the bombs, according to Associated Press.

The first detonated without warning around 5 a.m.
outside a bank in the Basque town of Getxo, dam-
aging a cash dispenser and breaking windows, the
regional Interior Ministry said in Bilbao.

<

Five hours later, a caller warned the Basque fire ser-

vice that four bombs would explode in Laredo and

Noja in the neighboring province of Cantabria, the
ministry said.

A bomb exploded in the sand next to Laredo’s
beach-front promenade at around 12:20 p.m. In Noja,
two devices detonated at the beach, the first around
1 p.m., the second about an hour later near a lifeguard
hut, and another bomb exploded at a golf course at
about 3 p.m., according to Cantabria’s regional Inte-
rior Ministry in Santander.

NASSAU LISTINGS

1. TWYNAM HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 117

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residence

PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. tt

LOCATION: Take Portland Boulevard east

of Super Value Food Store Prince Charles
Drive - south to the 2nd corner (Continental
Avenue) on the left. Continue around the
curve then take ‘the 3rd corner on the left
(Tropical Avenue), Traveling north the property
is the 10th lot on the left or first property after
passing Tote Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

2. SOUTH BEACH ESTATES SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1 Block 22

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split Level
Residential Building with 3 Apts.
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel.south along East Street
from Bamboo Boulevard take:1st corner
on right - Bougainvillea Blvd. Heading west
on Bougainvillea Blvd. take the 2nd corner
on the right Madeira Avenue come to the
“T” junction and turn left onto Oxford Drive.
Property is 3rd house on the right at the
western corner of Serville Drive and Oxford
Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $397,000

3._BEL-AIR ESTATES, CARMICHAEL ROAD

LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storey

' Residence _.

PROPERTY. SIZE: 6: 000 sq. ft

LOCATION: East on.Carmichael.Road from
Faith Avenue take the 4th scorner on the right
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th lot on right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

4. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES II

LOT NO. 1372

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-storey
Residence, 4 Bed/ 2 Bath

- PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: From the junction of Carmichael “|

* Road and Cedar Way (corner opposite BFM)
travel south to the T-Junction, turn right

onto Golden Gates Straight, then take the
first corner right onto Comet Terrace. The
property 3rd lot or the 2nd house on the right,
yellow with white trim. :
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

5, BRICEVILLE SUBDIVISION, PINE BARREN

ROAD

LOT OF LAND —

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Five Unit
Apartment Complex

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,200:sq. ft.

LOCATION: Heading west along Prince
Charles from Fox Hill Road take the third
corner on the left (Pine Barren Road). Travel
“west along Pine Barren Road take the second
corner on the left (Ceira Close) then take the
second corner on the right. Subject building
is at the dead end on the right painted white.
APPRAISED VALUE: $292,000

6. PINEWOOD GARDENS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 1467

_ PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Storey

Triplex Apatite 2 - 1 bed/bath; 1-2 bed
/bath;

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Enter Pinewood Gardens from
South Beach Police Station - drive East

to Thatch Palm Avenue, take first right off
Thatch Palm, the property is second building
on right hand side fenced in.

APPRAISED VALUE: $145,000

1. GARDEN HILLS ESTATES .

LOT NO. 1021

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 7,024 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on Independence
Highway, exiting at British American, turn

left and travel south to the top of the hill at the
T-junction, turn left and travel East to the end
of this road which is a T-Junction; at the
T-Junction turn left (north) and the subject lot
is first left on the southern corner.
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

. CHIPPINGHAM

LOT NO. 106

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Western side of Providence
Avenue (opposite house No. 45)
APPRAISED VALUE: $85,000

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

, ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 10 Block 47

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Commercial
Development

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,062 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel west on Wulff Road from
Pinedale Street take the first left onto Minnie
Street. The subject property is on the eastern
side of Minnie Street about 1,050 ft. south of
Homestead Avenue. (liquor Store erected on
property).

APPRAISED VALUE: $137,000

. ENGLERSTON SUBDIVISION .

LOT NO. 9 Block 47 /
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Commercial
Development

PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Travel west on Wulff Road from
Pinedale Street take the first left onto Minnie
Street. The subject property is on the eastern
side of Minnie Street about 1,000 ft. south of
Homestead Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $115,000

. PARADISE CONDOMINIUMS

LOT NO. 65

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Townhouse

Unit One :

FLOOR AREA: 1,215 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Eastern Side of Faith Avenue
passed Texaco Gas Station and 100 feet

south of Hamster Road.

APPRAISED VALUE: $154,000

10. PA PASTEL GARDENS

LOT NO. 149

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single Family
Residence, 3 bed / 1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,701 sq. ft.

Location: Traveling north along the main
entrance to Pastel Gardens from Marshall
Road, come to the four-way junction and
continue to head north onto Lemon Street.

The subject property is the 11th house on the:
left painted white with yellow boxing and light,
“brown asphalt ‘shingled roof.

oF

APPRAISED VALUE: $142,000

. GHIPPINGHAM

LOT NO. 17

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single ‘Storey
Residence, 2 beds/1 bath

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: North side of Quarry Mission
Road 500 ft West of Nassau Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $130,000

12. ROCKY PINE ROAD

LOT NO. “A”

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-Family
Duplex Apartment

PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. it.

LOCATION: Travel West on Rocky Pine Road
off Carmichael Road,

property is midway on the third corner on
the left. :

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

VACANT LOTS

. CARMICHAEL ROAD & FAITH AVENUE

LOT OF LAND “A”

PROPERTY SIZE: Single-family, 4,651 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Southeast of Carmichael

Road and South West of Faith Avenue
South.

APPRAISED VALUE: $72,000.00

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS (INCLUDE TELEPHONE CONTACT AND
POSTAL ADDRESS) TO: THE A.V.P. MORTGAGE & COMMERCIAL LENDING,

P. O. BOX-SS-6263, NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR VIA EMAIL: CHERRY.MISSICK@COMBANKLTD.COM

OR IN FREEPORT TO : CHRISTOPHER.KNOWLES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



©2008 CreativeRelations.net

- Seven year
wait for LNG
decision

FROM page one

way, or the other.”

Recently, AES issued an
advertisement outlining its
commitments to the
Bahamas. These included
benefits to BEC not only in
fuel savings but also in: the
reduction of emissions of
pollution from the burning
of diesel fuel. In upgrading
its Blue Hills turbines to run
on natural gas, BEC is
expected to save between $3
and $4 billion over the first
15 years, the advertisement
stated. However, according
to Mr Deveaux, the govern-
ment has not received any
new proposals from AES or
from BEC’s Energy Review
Committee.

Referring to the recent
full-page advertisements and
radio appearances by Mr
Samson, Mr Deveaux said
he believed Mr Samson was
acting on his own to bring

‘his business ideas to the pub-

lic.

However, yesterday as the
guest on the radio pro-
gramme Sunday Conversa-
tions, Mr Samson continued
his campaign to debunking
rumours and mistruths about
LNG while outlining the
benefits for the Bahamas
with the installation of the
Ocean Cay facility.

Quickly denying the
notion-that the project was

_ being earmarked for the,














Bahamas simply to avoid US
regulations, Mr Samson
reminded the listening audi-
ence: of the Island FM pro-

gramme that since 2001,,

some 24 LNG projects have
been approved in the United

States. However, with the ©

lack of any site along the
Florida coastline that has a
buffering zone of at least a
mile from the population,
Ocean Cay — which sits 22
miles south of Bimini and

‘nine miles from Cat Cay —

remains a viable option for
AES to supply that state
with natural gas.

In fact, Mr Samson said, if

‘there were a site in Florida

that permitted the building
of the LNG terminal, one
would have been constructed
there three or four years
ago.

“All infrastructure pro-
jects of this magnitude,
whether it’s large power
plants or LNG terminals

they always take a long time.

Now, seven years is on the
outside of what is normal,
but we have had very suc-
cessful projects that have
taken 10 years to get into
construction. But when you
build large power plants and
liquid gas terminals, you
don’t get a lot of invita-
tions,” he laughed.

Natural gas, Mr Samson
said, is acknowledged not
only for its cleanliness to the
environment but also for its

‘reduced carbonsignature:

e

IRS MEO did

rit

While admitting that the
world will not change to
using renewable energy
“over night” Mr Samson is

optimistic that the increased

use of natural gas can go a
long way in helping to solve
the global warming effects
of the more conventional
energy sources.

However, the main oppo-
nent to the AES project,
local activist Sam Dun-
combe, remains unconvinced
of the project’s environmen-
tal impact.

Calling in to the show, Mrs
Duncombe took Mr Samson
to task over the proposed
facility.

“Your company, and other
companies that are into this
addictive fuel source that we
have, needs to get off the
bandwagon lot and stop
thinking about how much
money we are going to make
today and in the. next 15
years, and start thinking
about the impacts that all
these global warming gases
are going to do to future
generations.”

Interjecting, Mr Samson
asked: “So the first step
shouldn’t be to reduce
150,000 tonnes a year car-
bon from BEC just to switch
to natural gas?”

“So we are going to stop
emitting green house gases
at BEC and let you do it at
Ocean Cay?” Mrs Dun-
combe asked.

whe



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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 13



Serial rapist:
police urge
residents to
secure their
premises

FROM page one

dence at the scene of the
crime.

He uses condoms during
sexual intercourse and
makes his victims shower.

He also wears a mask and
gloves.

Supt Rahming stated that
the attacker usually com-
mits his crime during the
early morning hours.

“Since these attacks have
reportedly occurred during
the early morning hours,
residents are asked to
ensure that they properly
secure their premises before
retiring to bed, have the
outside of their dwellings
well lit, and blinds drawn
when inside using the inte-
rior lights,” he said.

Mr Rahming said persons
should immediately alert
the police at 919 or 911,
should they hear or see any-
thing suspicious.

FROM page one

cade across the main road,
blocking access to the tourist
attraction from vehicular traf-
fic. .

It is claimed that the area was
closed after some locals were
alleged to have held a beach
party there, leaving all of their
garbage and other refuse scat-
tered over the area.

This developer, sources
alleged, issued keys to various
home and land owners within
the area so that they can still

have access to the beach and ©

Blue Hole.

However, it is understood
that this action is not going-over
well with a number of locals
who frequent the landmark site
for recreation. These locals,
sources indicate, are also con-
cerned for the number of
tourists who travel from near

' and*farto'visit what is said to be

the deepest inland blue hole in
the world.

Dean’s Blue Hole plunges
more than 660 feet to the ocean
floor in the settlement of
Clarence Town. The massive
blue hole is said to-open up into
a mammoth chamber where
fresh water and salt water mix.

ALL TIMES:
10 am to 1pm

Firearms and
bullets are
eized by police

FROM page one

citizen, searched the area around Big Pond at
around 5.30pm.

The officers found a car parked in the area.
A plastic bag containing a pillow case was hid-
den underneath the car. Opening the pillow
case, officers discovered a .38 handgun and 50
live rounds of ammunition.

Also on Friday, a police car chase ended .

with the capture of another illegal firearm.
At around 4am, officers of the mobile divi-

sion observed a 2004 Chevrolet Cavalier with a

male driver in the Dowdeswell Street area.

On seeing the police, the driver sped off.

The officers gave chase and followed the
Chevrolet east on Dowdeswell Street onto East
Bay Street.

The car chase ended near the East Villa
Restaurant when the Chevrolet Cavalier hit a
wall.

The driver escaped in the area. Officers

searched the car and found a .38 handgun with
six live rounds of ammunition.

Then on Saturday, at around 7am, a con-
cerned citizen was in a yard in the western
area of New Providence when he found a .9mm
handgun with eight bullets under a tree. The
weapon was handed over to the police.

In addition to the capture of illegal firearms,
police on Saturday recovered a stolen vehicle
which had been used in an armed robbery.

At around 8pm on Saturday, two men, one
carrying a handgun, entered the Texaco Service
Station on Prince Charles Drive and robbed’an
employee of cash.

The robbers, described as slim, one about
5'4" tall, and the other about 6 feet tall, escaped
in a 1999 Honda Accord.

The car was recovered shortly afterwards in
the Lumumba Lane area. The robbers fled the
area leaving the vehicle. On processing this
car, police discovered that it was stolen some-
time earlier. :

Private Resorts

Invites applications for the position of

PROJECT MANAGER

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum

requirements:

Have at least 10 years experience in construction or
a related field, or former hotel chief engineer.

Have a qualification in engineering or construction
Be.a team leader, able to add value

Be familiar with Design Management .

Be able to manage multiple projects in several locations
Be computer literate

Be a project planner

Be able to travel

Be a strong communicator and coordinator

Be an initiator, able to achieve deadlines

The ideal candidate will have previous experience in
resort / hotel construction, expansion and improvement
together with a strong knowledge of the design process.
In addition, familiarity with quality control of finishes
and understanding of the mechanical and electrical
components of construction is a. advantage.

Applications and resumes should be
mailed or faxed to:
P. O. Box 6092 SS
Nassau Bahamas.
Faxed to. 242-341-4419



Developer

It is said that at this depth,
where the waters mix, the water
gives the impression of a plate
of glass in which divers can see

their reflection, and fish swim
“upside down.”

Attempts to reach Long
Island MP Larry Cartwright for
comment on the matter were
unsuccessful up to press time
last night.

Minister says areas around Goodman's
Bay to be examined for dangerous spots

FROM page one

seas, which can cause crevices to be created on the ocean floor.
Last week’s police exercise, which was conducted in the afternoon

at Goodman’s Bay, resulted in the death of Corporal Burrows, a 13-

year veteran with the police’s criminal records office. Ten other offi-

cers were also injured.

Eyewitnesses claimed that the training exercise was poorly struc-

tured and ill-advised. They said the group was in the water towards

the eastern end of the beach when the accident occurred. .

The men and women were weighted down with weapons belts,
military; boots and full dress uniform in the water, in tempera-
tures around 90 degrees Fahrenheit, when several officers became

distressed, witnesses said.

A regular swimmer who frequents Goodman’s Bay told The
‘Tribune last week that he believes the location for the police train-
ing exercise was badly chosen and not properly researched.

Jason Rahming, 39, an electrician with the Ministry of Works
explained that there are many sinkholes in the area, which swim-

' mers can get stuck in with their feet.

“There are a lot of big underwater craters in that area. You can
suddenly drop and have four to five feet of water above your

‘head.

“Sometimes it can take you a while to get free. If you are not a
strong swimmer then the situation can turn serious,” he said,

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Haiti food aid lags
and hunger deepens

wrinkled skin. The 18-month-old
had been crying for so long in the
hospital malnutrition ward that his
mother no longer tried to console
him, according to Associated Press.

@ DESCHAPELLES, Haiti

EVERY inch of Rivilade Fil-
same’s body hurt, from his swollen,
empty stomach to his dried-out,



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Special daily programs for kids ages 3-5 years old.

After soaring food prices led to
deadly riots in April, the U.S. and
the U.N. promised millions of dol-
lars in aid to poor families like Riv-
ilade’s, as well as help for farmers to
break Haiti’s dependence on
imported food.

But three months later, The
Associated Press has learned that
only a fraction of a key U.S. food
pledge — less than 2 percent as of
early July — has been distributed.

Even those who oversee the food
aid programs say they are stopgap
measures while programs to create
jobs and help Haitian farmers to
increase production are more criti-
cal to ending the country’s chronic
hunger once and for all.

But right now, aid workers say,
the poorest families need immedi-
ate help, and little of the emergency
food promised has reached them.
Most of what has reached Haiti is
stuck in port. Nearly all the rest is
still inside warehouses — victim of
high fuel prices, bad roads and a
weak national government.

Barely any food at all has gone to
the desperate countryside, where
more than half of Haiti’s 8:7 million
people live.

Even in the Artibonite Valley,
Haiti’s most fertile region, child
malnutrition is rampant. Farmers
— reeling from last year’s floods
and a dry spring, and lacking equip-
ment that was promised to increase
their yields — are eating the very
seeds they should be planting to
avoid future hunger.

* One in three children is mal-
nourished in the most rural areas of
the Artibonite Valley, according to
the Hospital Albert Schweitzer in
Deschapelles, where Rivilade was
treated in June. Doctors there
admitted 113 children to the mal-
nutrition ward from May through
June, almost two and a half times
more than last year. In April and
May alone, there were 361 children
under five who were severely mal-
nourished and more than 2,500 oth-
ers moderately so.

“Kids who would have been
moderately malnourished last year
are severely malnourished this
year,” said hospital official Adeline
Azrack. “Families that were once
just vulnerable are now in crisis.”

With families eating through
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small group of demonstrators
burned tires and threw rocks at
police and U.N. peacekeepers in
Les Cayes, where the April riots
began.

“Life is even more difficult than
it was in April,” said Pierre
Antoinier St.-Cyr, who works in
agricultural development in Les
Cayes. “Community organizations
are meeting weekly to see if they
are going to start the protests
again.”

The April riots spread from the
countryside to Port-au-Prince and
left at least six Haitians and a U.N.
peacekeeper dead. The prime min-
ister was dismissed in their wake,
and he still hasn’t been replaced.

They also caused an outpouring
of international pledges. The U.S.
government and U.N. World Food
Program promised a combined

‘ total of $117. million this year in
food and agricultural aid.

That included more than 40,000
tons of beans, rice and other food
intended to quell the emergency.
But a U.S. Agency for Internation-
al Development report obtained by
The Associated Press says that as of
early July, less than 2 percent of
that had been distributed.

Some 16,000 tons has reached
Haiti. But more than 11,000 tons
of that is still in port; nearly all the
rest lies undistributed in World
Vision International and Catholic
Relief Services warehouses. Only
724 tons of food has reached distri-
bution centers.

Haiti already had a customs bot-
tleneck in its ports as officials
cracked down on drug smuggling
and tried to better collect duties.

In the Artibonite Valley, aid
workers say not a single ration had
arrived as of mid-July. Nor had any
of the $150,000 in emergency seeds
and tools promised to help 20,000
Haitian farmers nationwide plant
basic food crops.

. Hunger is a bitter irony in the
valley known as “Haiti’s rice bowl,”
where farms have been in decline
for decades, unable to compete with
subsidized U.S, food imported
under low tariffs. Political instabil-
ity has left the government with-
out effective agricultural policies
or ways to deal with nearly annual
hurricanes and floods.

That meant there was no pro-
tection when the price of imported
rice increased by more than 60 per-
cent, and that of corn by 91 per-
cent, over the first six months of

. the year, according to the World

Food Program.

The U.N. agency and many
countries’ programs are focused
largely in urban areas. Brazilian sol-
diers have distributed rice, beans
and cooking oil donated by their
country in the seaside slum of Cite
Soleil, where sprawling shantytowns
are home to thousands of refugees
from the impoverished countryside.
. In rural communities where
USAID food is slated to be dis-
tributed by World Vision Interna-
tional, delivery has been hampered
by logistical problems and high fuel
prices — which topped $6 a gallon
in Haiti in June.



Ariana Cubillos/AP

SILVITHA SAINTHERAN holds her son Fradelson, 2, who suffers from mal-
nutrition at the Albert Schweitzer hospital in Deschapelles, Haiti, Tuesday,
June 17, 2008. Funding delays, a dysfunctional central government and
transportation problems along crumbling rural roads are keeping aid from
reaching critical areas such as the fertile Artibonite Valley, where one out of
three children are malnurished.

Nearly everything that has been
distributed has gone through
Catholic Relief Services, which has
been relying on pre-existing stocks,

said country represéntative Bill .

Canny.

World Vision country director
Wesley Charles blamed USAID
for its delays in delivering food, say-
ing U.S. funding was held up in
Congress’ emergency supplemen-
tal appropriations bill as lawmakers
debated the portions that fund the
Iraq War.

“I think that at the USAID level
they need to be more sensitive,”

_ Charles said. “You cannot manage

an emergency situation like a nor-
mal procedure.”

The U.S. Embassy said there
were also delays during the han-
dover of the food distribution and
agricultural projects to World
Vision from its previous operator,
Save the Children. It referred ques-
tions about distribution to those
agencies.

Canny said U.S. food aid is also
often slowed because it consists of
excess food from -American pro-
ducers that must be purchased,
transported and shipped, rather
than bought locally in Haiti.

World Food
spokesman Alejandro Lopez-
Chicheri said it’s complicated to get
food into Haiti, and that his agency
is focusing on urban areas that are
easiest to reach.

“We're trying to help as much

as we can, but that doesn’t mean‘

we'll’ solve everything,” he said.
When AP journalists visited the
Artibonite Valley in June, farmers
hacked at the soil using the same
hand-planting methods employed
centuries ago by their enslaved
ancestors. Lemare Forrestal, a 60-
year-old farmer in the mountains,
said his family sometimes resorts
to eating corn and bean seeds.
“We have kids we can’t feed. We
have to eat what we have,” he said.

SERIE



Card of Thanks














Small,

ESSIEN METI CII ASE SOLEMN, AIOE LLL LILLE LLL LELIE IESE ILE LOI



ne sa ats Pe



Program :

We the family of the late

YVONNE |
MARION RITCHIE

wish to express our heartfelt
thanks and appreciation for your
prayers, telephone calls and other
acts of kindness extended to us
_| during our recent time of bereave-
“ment. A special thanks to the doc-
tors and nurses of Princess |
_ | Margaret Hospital A & E, Female |
mM Surgical 1 and 2, Nurse Vanessa
Father Kendrick Forbes
and Holy Family Catholic Church,
Monsignor Ambrose Mackinnon |
r and Mary, Star of the Sea
Catholic Charen: Pastor Cedric Beckles and Life Community Church |
(Freeport) and The Knights of Columbus. We also wish to thank the man
agement and staff of FirstCaribbean International Bank, Bank of The
Bahamas International, Innovative Designs and Magnolia Café, Devco i
Legal Department, BORCO, Mary, Star of the Sea Catholic School, Bishop |
| Michael Eldon Anglican School, Ritchie’s Calypso, Butler's Funeral Home -
| and Crematorium, Creative Avenues, BTC Freeport, BFSWMU, Financial -
_ Services and Human Resources RBPF (Freeport) and SAC Class of 1978 |
| and 1980. A special thanks to Katherine Adderley and Dottie Turnquest for |
| all their assistance and all of her friends and relatives who were there in |
} her time of need. We thank you all and will never forget what you did. May |
) God's continuous blessings be with all of you.

Tharh you from the Ritchie Yar

And even when there is food,
mothers leave their children at
home while they seek work in far-
off markets with no one to énsure
they eat properly.

Sylvieta Saintera, 38, said her 8-
year-old daughter cooks for her six
other children when she’s gone.

Hunger victims filled the low-
slung, tree-lined Schweitzer hospi-
tal complex in June. Flies buzzed
from bed to bed as mothers spoon-
fed vegetable mixtures prepared
over charcoal fires in an outdoor
kitchen.

A photo of Rivilade from
months earlier showed a baby with
fat arms and black hair. But his
bald, naked body was covered with
an old man’s wrinkled skin. Diar-
rhea had shrunk his weight to 15
pounds, a quarter less than doctors
say is healthy.

“He was fine, and then he got
sick,” said his mother, 22-year-old
Nimose Jisesle. It costs 150 Hait-
ian gourdes a week — $3.95 — to
feed him, she said, but she earns
just 100 gourdes, $2.63, selling knap-
sacks and firewood. His father went
to the neighboring Dominican
Republic to find work and does not
support the child.

uffering from diarrhea, pneu-
monia and mouth and skin infec-
tions, Rivilade was treated and fed
with intravenous liquids and food.

‘He was released a few days later

with his weight up and diarrhea
gone, said Dr. Erlantz Hyppolite.

Some of the children receive.a
super-high-protein mixture of
peanut butter, oil, milk and vita-
mins known here as “Medika
Mamba” that has also been used
in African famines. But once they
go home, mothers struggle to follow
doctors’ advice to thoroughly clean
their homes and prepare more bal-
anced meals for their children, Hyp-
polite said.

Some, he said, eat the peanut
butter mixture themselves.


































y






|
mnily 1







A

THE TRIBUNE

Afghan officials:
US-led forces
killed nine police

@ KABUL, Afghanistan

U.S.-LED troops and
Afghan forces killed nine
Afghan police Sunday, calling
in airstrikes and fighting on
the ground for four hours
after both sides mistook the
other for militants, Afghan
officials said, according to
Associated Press.

In a separate incident,

. NATO said it accidentally
killed at least four Afghan
civilians Saturday night. A
NATO soldier also was killed
in the east.

The two cases of accidental

_ killings could further under-

z cut popular support for the

e g povernment and foreign

= forces operating here. Presi-

= dent Hamid Karzai has plead-
-», ed with the U.S. and other

= nations fighting resurgent mil-

=, itants to avoid civilian casual-

_ ties.

In the western province of
Farah near the Iranian bor-
der, a convoy of foreign

‘forces showed up in Anar

10 Dara district and clashed with
Afghan police, killing nine of

_ them, said provincial Deputy

°'Governor Younus Rasuli.

‘8° He said the foreign troops

~' had not informed local offi-

>“'cials they were coming, and
_ the police thought they were
” enemy fighters. The two sides
: xi:fonghe from about midnight
until 4 a.m. Sunday, and the
~'foreign forces used airstrikes,

-' Rasuli said.

D<. The U.S.-led coalition said
‘Tit was investigating the report.
“It said its forces, along with
ie troops, had retaliated

_ in defense against “a non-uni-

" formed hostile force.”

“The combined patrol sig-

i naled their status as coalition

forces, but continued to
‘receive fire,” a military state-
ment said. “Coalition forces
then returned small arms fire

_ and engaged the enemy with

, precision close air support.”

Tn eastern Paktika

~’ province, NATO’s Interna-
tional Security Assistance .
“Force said it killed at least
“four civilians Saturday night
when its troops fired two mor-
“tar rounds that landed nearly
“half a mile short of their tar-,

_, get. NATO said it was investi- H “meal”

“ gating Whether three other~
civilians also were killed in
t phe Barmal district.

“ISAF deeply regrets this
'° accident, and an investigation
-as to the exact circumstances

_ of this tragic event is now
‘ under way,” NATO said in a
“statement.

~The alliance said it was pro-
* viding medical aid to four
*
vs Also Sunday, a NATO sol-
dier was killed during fighting
“in the eastern Khost province,
‘the alliance said in a state-

“ment. NATO did not identify
the soldier’s nationality, but
‘most of the troops in that area
are Amer: an.

Afghanistan faces intensify-
ing militancy nearly seven
-years after the U.S.-led inva-
sion of the country ousted the
‘hard-line Islamic Taliban

movement from power.

More than 2,500 people
have died in insurgency-relat-
ed violence this year in the
country, according to an

_ Associated Press tally of offi-
cial figures. Most have been
militants, but the total
includes hundreds of ordinary
citizens.

NATO and the coalition
insist they take great precau-
tions to avoid civilian casual-
ties.

Commanders accuse insur-

» gents of endangering innocent
people by launching attacks
from residential areas and
carrying out suicide attacks
that kill far more bystanders
than security personnel.

In other violence, ‘the Min-
istry of Defense said Afghan

_ troops battled insurgents in
the southern Kandahar
province Saturday, killing 18
militants and injuring 25.
They also detained 15.

In neighboring Zabul
province, Afghan troops
killed nine militants and
wounded seven, a ministry
statement said. .

Neither claim could be
independently verified.

In the southern province of
Helmand, a mine exploded
Sunday under a civilian vehi-
cle in Gereshk district, killing
three children and wounding
four people, said provincial
police Chief Mohammad
Hussein Andiwal.

+Andiwal accused Taliban
militants of planting the mine
on a road frequently used by
Afghan and foreign troops.

On Saturday, militants
attacked a police checkpoint
in the same district but in the
ensuing gunfight three Tal-

: iban fighters were killed,
Andiwal said. No police were
injured in that clash, he
added.

Vatican says

350,000 pack
Randwick race
track for event

POPE Benedict XVI end-
ed his farthest pilgrimage
Sunday, one intended to
inspire a new generation of
faithful while trying to over-
come a dark chapter for his
church from a. clerical sex
abuse scandal.

Summing up his message,
Benedict told young pil-
grims at.a Mass in Sydney
that a “spiritual desert” was
spreading throughout the
world and challenged them
to shed the greed and cyni-
cism of their time to create
a.new age of hope, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

The Vatican said some
350,000 faithful from almost
170 countries packed the
Randwick race track —
many of them camping out

in sleeping bags in the mild
chill of the Australian win-

ter — as well as aiglobal
television audience.

Vatican spokesman the
Rev. Federico Lombardi
said it was Sydney’s biggest
crowd since the eayipic
Games in 2000.

Asked how the 81-year-
old pope fared with the
audience at the World
Youth Day event — alter-
nately football- stadium
boisterous or chapel quiet
depending on the occasion
— Lombardi said Benedict’ s

; -\speeches were “positive,

constructive, never polemi-

“Benedict touched on

“themes for the universal

church as well as Australia
in particular — raising the
need for the world to
change its lifestyles because
of global warming, relations
with non-Catholics and
the struggle here to rejuve-
nate a crisis-battered
Church.

At Sunday’s Mass under
threatening skies, Benedict
urged young Christians
to be agents of change
because “the world needs
renewal.” —

“In so many of our soci-
eties, side by side with

material. prosperity, a spiri-.

tual desert is spreading: an
interior emptiness, an
unnamed fear, a quiet sense
_of despair,” the pontiff said.

Welcomed

The pope said it was up
to a new generation of
Christians to build a world
in “which God’s gift of life

‘is welcomed, respected and

cherished — not rejected,
feared as a threat and
destroyed.”

They must embrace the
power of God “to let it

: _ break through the curse of

our indifference, our spiri-
tual weariness, our blind
conformity to the spirit of
this age,” he said. ©

The aim was “a new age
in which hope liberates us
from the shallowness, apa-
thy and self-absorption
which deadens our souls
and poisons our relation-
ships,” he said.

It is a primary theme of
his papacy, with him
acknowledging on his way
to Australia that the Church
in the West was “in crisis”
because people no longer
see the need for God. But
he insisted it was not in
decline. “I am an optimist”
about its future, he said.

Benedict announced that,
as expected, Madrid, Spain,
would host the next World
Youth Day in 2011 and told
the pilgrims.

The more than 20 hour
flight from Rome to Aus-
tralia was the longest dis-
tance Benedict has traveled
as pope.

He flew over the scene of
the Mass early Sunday in a
helicopter — dubbed “the

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 15



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Pope wraps up visit to
Australia with final Mass













POPE BENEDICT XVI is shown ona
giant screen as more than 200,000
pilgrims attend the Final Mass at
Randwick Racecourse in Sydney,
Sunday, July 20, 2008. Pope bene-
dict XVI is in Sydney for World
Youth Day activities till Monday
July 21.

holy-copter” by bleary-eyed
pilgrims below. He saw the
assemblage swarming all
over the track in a jumble
of sleeping bags and. back-
packs.

“It’s been crazy, hectic,
nuts — but it’s also been
serene, calming and very
fulfilling,” said Margaret
Mazzella, 48, of Westch-
ester,
rested on a sleeping bag and
picked at a tuna sandwich
following ‘the festival’s final
Mass on Sunday.

Crowd

He later drove slowly
through the crowd, stopping
once to kiss the forehead of
a toddler held up to the
popemobile’s window.

Pilgrims gave him a rock-

. Star welcome, waving the
flags of their nations, cheer-

ing and chanting his name.
Some pilgrims at World
Youth Day complained
Pope Benedict XVI sped
past them during two drive-
throughs in Sydney — so
quickly they barely caught
a glimpse of the pontiff
before he was gone.
Australian media gave
prominent attention to
Benedict’s apology Satur-
day for the sexual abuse of
minors by Catholic clergy,

headlining his word’s “I Am

Deeply Sorry:”
He said he wanted “to
acknowledge the shame

which we have all felt” and °

called for those responsible
to be “brought to justice.”
The acts were “evil” and a
“erave betrayal of trust,” he
said.

The pope’s apology was
not enough to satisfy repre-
sentatives of the victims of
clergy sexual abuse, who
said it must be backed by
Vatican orders to Aus-
tralian bishops to stop what
they say are efforts to cover
up the extent of the prob-
lem and to block survivors’
attempts to win compensa-
tion.

The apology followed
similar statements in the
United States in April,
where he also met with a
small group of victims.

Even as the papal
entourage prepared to leave
Monday morning, it was still
unclear whether Benedict
would do the same in Aus-
tralia. Lombardi would not
rule out tHe possibility in
the waning hours of the vis-
it.

The pope was. due to
leave Australia for the Vat-
ican.on Monday.

New York, as she.



pocheine

_dack Atley/AP

POPE BENEDICT -
XVI waves from.
his pope mobile
as he arrives at
Bangaroo for his -
official World
Youth Day wel-—
come in Sydney,
Australia, Thurs- .
day, July 17,
2008.



Andrew Brownbill/AP
















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le te
PAGE 16, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

Beijing restricts car

use in bid to avoid
Olympic smog

ASainpnannainonetoeniearevay” 3



CONSTRUCTION WorKere ‘stand on scaffolding erected to build an Olympic exhibit as the city is covered with

Oded Balilty/AP

smog and pollution, a month before the opening of the Olympic Games in Beijing Tuesday, July 8, 2008.

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@ BEIJING

WITH the Olympics less
than three weeks away, Bei-
jing began restricting car use
and limiting factory emissions
on Sunday in a final drastic
effort to clear its smog-
choked skies, according to
Associated Press.

Under the two-month plan,
half of the capital’s 3.3 mil-
lion cars will be removed
from city streets on alternate
days, depending on whether
the license plate ends in an
odd or even number.

Skies were relatively clear.

on Sunday after some morn-
ing haze, and traffic was light
for a weekend, flowing
smoothly on highways and
city streets.

But the real test will come
when the work week begins.
“Things are fine today,”
taxi driver who gave only her
surname, Li, said as she
sailed through normally traf-
fic-snarled intersections. “But
tomorrow, it may be different
as people go to work.” :

In addition to the traffic
plan, chemical plants, power
stations and foundries had to
cut emissions by 30 percent
beginning Sunday.

Dust-spewing construction
in the capital was to stop
entirely.

While the government has
said it hopes to reduce vehi-
cle emissions, one of Beijing’s
chief sources of pollution, it
is unclear how the effective-
ness of the plan will be
gauged. —

The government has not
made publica specific target
for emissions levels or said
how it will measure air qual-
ity.

Despite architecturally
adventurous venues and $40
billion spent on improving

‘infrastructure, China’s great-
est challenge has been keep- ©

ing the city’s air clean for the
world’s greatest athletes par-
ticipating in the Aug. 8-24
games.

Beijing’s skyline is normal-

ly shrouded with a thick pray»
haze.

Already, many competitors
are choosing to train away
from Beijing, and Interna-
tional Olympic Committee

President Jacques Rogge has ©

said outdoor: endurance
events lasting more than an

hour will be postponed if air

quality if poor.
The world’s greatest dis-
tance runner, Haile Gebrse-

‘lassie of Ethiopia, has decid-

ed not to run the marathon
event because the city’s
pollution irritates his breath-

ing.
Some 300, 000 heavily pol-
luting vehicles — aging

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THE TRIBUNE

Alexander F. Yuan/AP

A CHINESE worker rests on top of the National Stadium, also
known as the Bird's Nest, in Beijing, China, Friday, July 11, 2008.

industrial trucks, many of
which operate only at night
— were banned beginning
July 1.

To further ease the grid-
lock, employers have been
asked to stagger work sched-
ules and public institutions
will open an hour later than
normal.

And those driving on the
wrong days will be fined $14,
a pricey penalty for many in
Beijing.

The government has also
beefed up public transporta-
tion options for the estimated
4 million extra people who
will be off the roads because
of. the traffic plan, the offi-
cial Xinhua News Agency
said.

The city is scheduled to
add up to 3,000 more buses
by the time the Olympics
start, raising the daily capac-
ity for passengers from
12.5 million to 15 million, it
said.

A rare 95 percent of buses
reached their stops on time
on Sunday because the roads
were less congested, Xinhua

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

cited Yao Zhenping, assistant
to the general manager
of the Beijing Public
Transport Holdings Group,
as saying.

Two new subway iines and
an airport rail link opened
on. Saturday, with the pro-
jected number of passengers
on all three routes expected
to carry 1.1 million people
daily during the Olympics.

“JTt’s much faster than a
taxi, so it’s very good,” said
Ola Tunamder, who arrived
Sunday from Helsinki, Fin-
land, and took the airport
train into the city.

And on July 25, special
Olympic traffic lanes will
begin operating and will stay
in place until Sept. 25.

The city will set aside 165
miles of roadway on which
certified Olympic vehicles
will be allowed to move from
hotels, Olympic venues and
the Athletes’ Village.

The average speed is
expected to be 35 mph.

Experts say the pollution-
curbing experiment could still
go wrong.

Unpredictable winds could.
blow pollution into Beijing
despite factory shutdowns in

the city and five surrounding

provinces.

Or it could go the other
way, with August generally
being the month with little
wind, potentially allowing
pollution to build up.

Also Sunday, Xinhua said
that China’s civil aviation
authorities had begun imple-
menting air traffic control
measures to deal with poten-
tial emergencies.

Citing Su Langen, an avia-
tion official, the report said
that authorities “will main-
tain closer monitoring of air
traffic” but did not give any
details.

“They will respond quickly
to emergency situations such

as terror attacks, hijacking of
civil aircraft, and unautho-
rized entry of no-fly zone,”
Xinhua said.




Mar ‘st



MONDAY

PE 2 as



2008

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net



. Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Mic





not where’

‘it wants on existing otels

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

a. hrea

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t w og

existing |

resorts “are still not |
where we’d like to #
_be”, the company’s
' senior vice-president
for external affairs
told Tribune Busi-




|_| By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

-BAHAMIANS “focus too
much” on mega-billion- pro-

multiple smaller develop-
$30- ‘million, are helping to
keep this nation’s economy

moving,

, Business.
~T. B. Donaldson. esd that

r construction as’ ae





) Bahamas Jong |
Way: from starving
_ economically’

0- -shows.
jects and fail to realise that _

ments, valued at between $10-.°
Peale Bahamian-led devel: |

Commonwealth *
. Bank’s.chairman told’ Tribune Ei

despite the failure of on
oer sAMajor reson t projects.

: Developer looking to increase e Wyndham’ s average room rates by $10 and achieve 70-72 per cent snide occupancies

pancy.levels..

Smaller $10-$30m projects |
fill void left by mega resort



Bahamas was “a long: way |
feat starvation economical-




” because a number of |





opments were filling the void.. |

Among those taking up the |
slack‘are two projects Mr |
Donaldson is intimately |
involved with: Common:





ness, its main project being to increase
the Wyndham’s room rates and: ‘oceu-

Robert Sands said the developer's was '
detecting “Positive signs” of i eee

BIC exclusivity unlikely to.
last more than three years |











a. mBy NEIL HARTNELL ”
_ Tribune Business Editor

THE Sxcliasivieg: period
enjoyed by the Bahamas -

Telecommunications: Compa-

‘ny’s (BTC) privatization. part-_

ner is unlikely to be longer than

three years, the chairman of the’,

committee charged with over-
seeing the process has told ‘Th

/. bune Business.
TB. ‘Donaldson, ae is also

Commonwealth Bank’s chair-
man, said the Government.and

the privatization committee it -
had appointed had effectively
-agreed on two general princi-: '

ples = the length of any exclu-

I, sivity period, and: the, fact that. we

‘the: Government, post-privati-

ment in the financial performance of its —
two’ properties, especially the Shera-
- ton, as it continues its search for a »
“replacement equity partner for its $2.4
Dillion: Cable Beach redevelopment

Concerns over uneven liberalisation ‘playing field’

BIC’ ’s majority shareholder.
“The Government said basi- _

cally two things, on which we
all agree,” Mr Donaldson told
Tribune Business. |

“The Government does not
necessarily want to be, or need
to be, the majority shareholder.

What percentage will be sald.

hasn’t been determined. A lot
depends on'the feedback we get
from entities interested i in Pa
vatizing BTC.”

He added: “There can’t be”

any long exclusivity period.'I
can tell you; it won’t be ‘over

_ three years. It won’t be a.Cable . is
“Bahamas. We’ve ‘learnt from

following Harrah’ S Entertainment’ s
withdrawal.

While that search, led by Swiss Danke
UBS, remains a work in progress, Baha ©
Mars s. immediate short, term goal “Gs,

* ‘Positive signs’ from Sheraton conversion, with mid-$190s rates, as 78-79 per cent occupancies targeted
* Resort owner mulls future room numbers it wants to work with at evendhan |
* Search for $2.4bn project partner * ongoing’ ,

to get the Wyndham to where we’d
like it to-be. That isa vast af OPPOrUUBAty

‘SEE. page Be

cellular services, Ras
Mr Donaldson’ s comments
are likely to be ‘music'to the |’
‘ears’ of BTC’s existing com-.
petitors, such as ‘Systems Be
Resource Group (SRG) and
Cable Bahamas, plus potential”.
new market entrants such as.
Digicel. ah
‘For they suggest ‘that ‘the
Ingraham government’s empha-
“sis, at least when it comes to the ‘
telecommunications. sector, is)
different from that of its prede- ,
cessor. Liberalisation and com-
pation seemtobe the current [iidaibaabaaad

Drive’a Honda Fit and ren up re

SEE Page 5B





















oe m2 SEE paige Th



~ Planning process must
become ‘more formal
and transparent’

| sation, would not: necessarily, be.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor,

THE Town Planning and

land-use zoning processes need
to become more formalized and
transparent, a government min-

ister has told Tribune Business,

with proposed legislative
amendments designed to tackle
‘poth these areas.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, ‘said the zon-
ing regulations and processes

were one ape being assessed *:

- Haband: ‘passes.
the test’ over US [

‘as part of the planned amend-

ments to the Town Planning
Act and Private Roads'and Sub-
divisions Act; given the “very
limited input from the public” in

planning decisions until the ven-:

tures ‘in question were
approved.
In meetings with a team from

the Massachusetts Institute of . :
Technology (MIT), which is _ }
_ working in partnership ye the

_ SEE page 2B.

tax compliance -

_ Mi By NEIL HARTNELL
: Tribune Business Editor’

THE Bahamas has “passed

the test” when it comes to shar- -:

ing tax-related information with

the US authorities, a former _

minister of state for finance has
told Tribune Business, and
ought not to be targeted or

penalized further “unless the

goal posts have changed’’.
James Smith, who held the
post under the Christie admin-
istration, said Washington could
not ask any more of the
Bahamas given that it had



signed a Tax Information -
Exchange Agreement (TIEA) —

covering both civil and crimi-
nal matters — with the US.

-. This nation had also obtained
Qualified Jurisdiction (QJ) sta-

tus with the Internal Revenue

Service (IRS), with many of its
institutions becoming QIs.
‘Given that the TEA “Spelt

out the circumstances and par- -

ticular cases” in which this
nation was able to share tax
information on US financial ser-

. SEE page 7B.



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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

THE Bahamian stock market
buzzed with trading activity last
week, investors trading in six
out of the 19 listed stocks with
349,885 shares changing hands.
The week closed with the largest
trading volume for the year.

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required.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
led the volume with 309,595
shares, closing unchanged at $7.
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) followed with
16,740 of its shares trading, also
closing unchanged at $11.65.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) came in third with
15,000 of its shares trading, also





eee

ending the week unchanged at
$2.85. Cable Bahamas (CAB)
was market leader with 6,350
shares trading, rising by $0.04
or 0.29 per cent to close at
$14.04.

Abaco Markets (AML) was
the laggard of the week with
1,000 of its shares trading,
declining by $0.03 to close at



$1.81.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

Abaco Markets (AML)
released its financial results for
the quarter ended April 30,
2008. Net profit for the period
was $82,000, a sharp decline
compared to $766,000 in the
2007 first quarter.

AML reported sales for the

quarter of $21.9 million, repre- .

senting. an increase of 7.09 per
cent or $1.4 million from $20.4
million for the same period in
2007. Net profit from continu-
ing operations stood at $82,000,
a decline of $271,000 or 76.8 per
cent from $353,000 in 2007, due
primarily to higher:cost of sales
and selling general and admin-
istrative expenses aE eRONeT
quarter.

A restructuring reserve of
$350,000 recognized in the prior
year also accounted for the
change in the company's net

- profits. Total assets and liabili-

ties stood at $26.2 million and
$16.4 million respectively, being
consistent with amounts repott-
ed at year end.

Private Placement Offerings:
FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline for its private
placement offering. The pre-
ferred shares will be paying a

- dividend rate of prime + 1.75

per cent, payable semi-annually.

































BISX

|, record date July. 4, 2008.

Royal Palm Way, Freeport.

Colonial Hilton Hotel.

The Bahamian Stock Market

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

SYMBOL PRICE
AML $1.81 $-0.03
BBL _ $0.89 $-
BOB $9.30 $-
BPF $11.80 $-
BSL $14.60 $
BWL $3.49 $-
CAB $14.04 $+0.04
CBL _ $7.00 $-
CHL — $2.88 $-
CIB $11.65 $-
CWCB_ $3.32 $40.05
DHS $2.85 us
FAM _ $8.00 $-
FBB $2.35 $-
FCC {; } $0.44 $-
FCL $5.53 $-
FIN - $12.50 $-
ICD $550." > $-
JSJ. SIZ.000 °°, Ge
PRE $10.00 $-
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

e Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) declared a
quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on August 7,
2008, to all shareholders of record date June 30, 2008.

e ICD Utilities (ICD) has declared a quarterly dividend of
$0.10 per share, payable on July 25, 2008, to all shareholders of

e ICD Utilities (ICD) will hold its Annual General Meeting
on Tuesday, July 22, 2008 at 6pm at the Manor House, Great
. Harbour Cay, The Westin Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya,

¢ Benchmark (Bahamas) (BBL) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on Thursday, July 24, 2008 at 6:30pm at the British

e Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) (FBB) announced it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meeting on Thursday, July 31, 2008, at
6pm in the Victoria Room at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel,
No.1 Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. |

CHANGE

1 9.04%
0 4.71%
“0 -3.23%
0 _ 0.00%
0 0.00%
' -4.64%
16.51%
-16.96%
-8.57%
-20.21%
0 -34.13%
21.28%
11.11%
0 -11.32%
0 -42.86%
0: 6.76%
0 -3.47%
1
0
0

-24.14%
9.09%
0.00%







PLANNING, from 1B

‘Government on developing a

framework for sustainable
development in the Bahamas,
Dr Deveaux said he ‘had been
“pleasantly surprised” to find
that other nations dealt with
town planning and zoning issues
through Acts and regulations.

Specified checks and balances
were in place in these countries,
“rather than the normal process
of compromise” that took place
in the Bahamas.

“You take it out of the realm
of discretion, and then the com-
munity hhas a say when the
change takes place in their
neighbourhood,” Dr Deveaux

told Tribune’ Business. “It’s a:
sumore. transparent -way. ‘Fhe:
process needs. to.be formal.’

ized.”

_Among the more controver-:

sial planning applications that
have reared their heads in
recent times have been the pro-

posed Wendy’s outlet at Cable.

Beach, plus the construction of
commercial warehouses on
Shirley Street: and Lightbourn
Lane.

“All these are taking place in
residential areas where people
have strong views on change,”
Dr Deveaux confirmed. “What
we would like to see is a more
open and facilitation approach,
where the community has a
greater incentive and involve-
ment.” ;

The Bahamas Chamber of

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Commerce’s report on Vexing —

Business Issues, submitted to
the Government earlier this
year, detailed the saga of
Wendy’s Cable Beach store.
The Town Planning Committee
approved the development in
principle, as it was in compli-
ance with zoning and covenant
stipulations, only for that per-
mission to be rescinded when
there was a public outcry after
persons living nearby found out
about the proposed. fae food
eatery.

The end result was that, from
Wendy’s perspective, it was left

closed on the purchase of land
for the project. The company
was left at a disadvantage finan-
cially, with considerable. OPPar: -..
tunity ‘costs. * **

“Although not commenting

directly on the Wendy’s situa

tion, Dr Deveaux told Tribune
Business: “When some of these
decisions are.made, the financial
cost of reversing them is.a huge
deterrent, both for business and
the Government.”

As local government devel-
oped deeper roots in the
Bahamas, Dr Deveaux indicat-
ed the Government wanted to
formalize the community con-
sultation process on planning
decisions.

As an example of the discre-

tion involved in the process -

now, Dr Deveaux said that
while he was required by law
to publish a 28-day notice
informing communities about
impending ‘no-build’ or zoning
changes, there was no statutory
requirement to hold a Town
Meeting to discuss them.

OR TRIOS eal 1S

The major zoning issues in
this country occur when com-
mercially-zoned land is situat-
ed alongside residentially-zoned
land. Another frequent prob-
lem is that Bahamians often
purchase land intending to use it
for multi-family development,
only to find out — usually when
they seek approval for the archi-
tects’ plans at the Ministry’ of
Works — that the land is zoned
for single-family use only.

Describing the proposed
reforms to the Town Planning
Act'and Private Roads and Sub-

* divisions Acts as his “first leg-
‘high and dry’, having already ©

islative priority”, Dr Deveaux
told Tribune Business he had
been given until the end of this
summer to complete. their,
fee Following’ that; it Would:

Cabingt’s, decision.as.to#
when to place them on the leg-

islative agenda i in Parliament.

The draft legislation creating |
the Ministry of Environment
also needed to receive approval,
as this would inform its struc-
ture going forward. Finally, Dr
Deveaux said his ministry
would then review legislation,
and regulations on the drawing
board since the early part of this’
century — the Environmental
Management Act, and regula-
tions to govern Environmental ':
Impact Assessments and Pollu-
tion Control and Waste Man- _
agement.

When these reviews were
completed, and amendments
made, Dr Devéaux said the .
Government would consult the
opposition before bringing them
to Parliament because the leg-
islation.and regulations were
“broad and far-reaching”.

nikkiaBro Ken

WEEKENDS



ee

Ns
Pa !

Celebrating § years
: THE TRIBUNE

]

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

TRADING volumes have
increased, and share prices
dipped, on the Bahamas Inter-
national Securities Exchange
(BISX) as retail investors, in
particular, seek to generate liq-

uidity and cash, with the market -

likely to generate no more ‘than
single-digit returns in 2008.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors chief executive, told
Tribune Business yesterday that
he believes that investors are
increasingly looking for cash
options.

_“I think one of the principal
reasons that the market has per-
formed the way it has is that
more people are looking to exit
and raise money,” Mr Kerr said.

He explained that in most
cases, people were looking to
buy and sell stocks to achieve
capital appreciation.

Mr Kerr added that Bahami-
an investors were now looking
away from stocks and seeking
more stable, fixed-income
investment options such as
bonds.

“There is not that much of an
appetite for stocks right now. I
think that at a micro level, you
have people who are raising
stocks for liquidity,” he said.
However, he added that there
were still some stocks which



represented good value for
money.

Mr Kerr also explained that
the market gains achieved last
year will have to be adjusted by
the degree of decline experi-
enced this year.

He said that, at best, the mar-
ket could see a single digit
return, but not the 22-23 per
cent gains seen in the previous
two years..

“That is not going to happen,
Mr Kerr said. “ The best that
we can hope for is a single dig-
it.”

For the period ending June
30, 2008, the BISX All-Share
Index closed down 243.78 points
or 11.8 per cent for the first half
at 1,822.97.

By comparison, for the period
ending June 29, 2007, the BISX
All-Share Index posted an
increase: of 138.94 or 6.02 per
cent to close at 1,815.13. Effec-
tively, the 2008 first half wiped
out the Index’s gains in the 2007
second half.

During the 2008 first half,
trading volumes decreased
when compared with the same
period in 2007, yet the value of
shares traded increased when
compared to the same period
last year.

Trading volume for the peri-
od for all issuers listed on BISX
was 2,288,160 shares, which

totalled a trade value of $15.275

million. This represented a
decrease in traded volume of

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665,711 shares or 22.54 per cent.
When compared to the half-
year 2007 total volume of
2,953,871, the value of shares
traded on BISX increased by
$2.115 million or 16.06 per cent
when compared to last year’s
$13.161 million.

The top five share volume
leaders on BISX for the first
half.of 2008 were:

Commonwealth Bank -
724,358 (31.7 per cent)

Doctors Hospital 347,438
(15.2 per cent)



qualifications:

skills

‘Te A good work ethic and an outgoing

personality




UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the Caribbean.
Through our Business Area Wealth Management International we look after wealthy private
clients by providing them with comprehensive, value enhancing services.

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the following position:

Credit Risk Officer

The successful candidate will be responsible for:
Maintaining credit facilities

Analysis of counter party risks including settlement,
trading and cross border risk
Collateral assessment & monitoring
Transaction investigation
We are searching for an individual with broad experience in credit risk
who meets the following requirements:
8 - Proven track record and familiarity with service -e otlentated Offshore bank
“B Credit Services to High Net Worth Clients
8 . Analytic approach to Credit Risk management Transaction Control

Product & Process Knowledge:
8 Detailed understanding of collateralized loan products and documentation

requirements

8 Ability to assess new credit-linked products and processes

8 Knowledge of Operations and [T-Systems
8 In-depth understanding of OTC and Exchange Traded derivative instruments

Professional behavior

8 Ability to bring together and assess information from a range of sources
Effective workload prioritization and meeting of deadlines
Capacity to work under own initiative with little supervision
Methodical and independent approach to forming opinions and arguments
Good communication skills
General risk awareness with expertise/focus on credit risk and analysis

Education and Certification:
Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Finance or Economics from a recognized
and accredited educational institution.
Minimum of 3 years Credit Risk experience essential
Local regulatory certificates an advantage

Interested persons should reply on or before July 31" to:

hrbahamas@ubs.com

Coenen plana

or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O, Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



DENTAL CLINIC
SEEKS

Two dynamic people to join our team;
a dental and front office assistant.

Applicants should have the puowile
° Great leadership and organizational

° Computer skills are required

Qualified applicants can email their resume to
attention dental position: caribsuppliers@yahoo.com

Colina Holdings 247,126 (10.8
per cent)

FOCOL Holdings 196,529
(8.6 per cent)

FINCO 135,222 (5.9 per cent)

The top five share value lead-
ers on BISX for the first half of

- 2008 were:

Commonwealth Bank $5.377
million (35.2 per cent)

Cable Bahamas $1.798 mil-
lion (11.8 per cent)

FINCO $1.708 million (11.2
per cent)

FirstCaribbean $1.374 a
(9 per cent)

FOCOL Holdings $1.027 mil-
lion (6.7 per cent)

As of 30 June, 2008, there
were 20 BISX listed securities
trading with a market capital-
ization of about $3.58 billion.
There were 21 listed mutual
funds with about $300 million
in assets under management.










IMIVINUAAT, JULY 21, 2UU0, FAUL OD

DP a a re
BISX set for ‘single digit’ return in ‘08

To advertise in The Tribune,
just call 502-2371 today!

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the finest sales team in
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Burns House Group of Companies is looking for an ambi-
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Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is the leading
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AUCTION

U.S. EMBASSY

Saturday, July 26, 2008
SHIPAHOY COMPLEX

(Western Gate)

_ West Bay Street, opposite Well’s Service Stations

DOORS OPEN FOR INSPECTION & REGISTRATION
9A.M. — 1OA.M. |

AUCTION

10 A.M. — 2 P.M.

Office Furniture, household furniture,Computer equipment

and other Supplies

Construction and miscellaneous supplies

Vehicles (successful bidders on vehicles must pay a
minimum 10% non-refundable deposit immediately at
the end of auction. Bids for all other items must be paid
in full at conclusion of auction).

GENERAL PUBLIC IS INVITED


Fema e =.

PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

“My work at The Tribune is rewarding
and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
I am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune











THE TRIBUNE


THE TRIBUNE

BTC, from page 1B

administration’s focus, and
improvements in pricing and
service quality, not trying to
protect whatever value is left in
BTC through protectionist poli-
cles.

Several business contacts had
previously expressed concern
to Tribune Business that the
Bahamian telecommunications
sector could experience an
‘uneven playing field’ when it
came to liberalization, due to
the fact that different compa-
nies’ exclusivity periods expired
at different times.

Ceble Bahamas’, which is at
least 70 per cent owned by
Bahamian institutional and



retail shareholders, will see its
15-year cable TV monopoly
franchise come to an end some
time next year, allowing rivals to
potentially enter the market and
provide competition for the first
time.

Those rivals would include
BTC, which has again reiterated
that it is exploring whether to
enter the cable television mar-
ket. Indeed, Bluewater Com-
munications Holdings, the lead-
ing contender to purchase the
stake in BTC, has given every
appearance that it, too, is inter-
ested in doing that and going
head-to-head with Cable
Bahamas, ‘bundling’ TV, Inter-

net and phone services to deliv-
er ‘triple play’ down one fibre-
optic line via convergence.

Yet thanks to BTC’s ongoing
privatization, now in its 10th
year, and subsequent exclusivi-
ty period any buyer will enjoy,
Cable Bahamas will itself be
unable to enter fixed-line and
cellular voice services despite
the state-owned incumbent

. being allowed to intrude on its

home territory.

While a maximum three-year
exclusivity period may be exact-
ly what BTC’s existing and
potential competitors may want,
the reaction of Bluewater and
any other potential privatiza-
tion partners may be different.

They will want the maximum

possible time period to restruc-
ture and prepare BTC for com-
petition, and the shorter the
exclusivity period — especially
on cellular — the lower the price
they are likely to pay the Gov-
ernment.

Bluewater, which still has
time remaining on its exclusivi-
ty period, agreed a deal in prin-
ciple with the former Christie
administration that would have
seen it pay a total $260 million
for 49 per cent of BTC.

Some $225 million would
have been paid up front, anoth-
er $30 million five years after
the privatization date (when an

exclusivity period was likely to

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 5B
sR?

have expired), and $5 million
in year six.

To ease concerns over the
exclusivity period’s length, Tri-
bune Business ‘was previously
told by James Smith, then-min-
ister of state for finance, that
Bluewater had offered to set-
up a virtual mobile network
after three years. This would
have allowed other cellular
competitors to enter the mar-
ket through leasing or renting
BTC’s existing cellular infra-
structure, although concerns
were raised about whether
Bluewater’s wholesale pricing
would have allowed rivals in at
a viable price point.

Meanwhile, Mr Donaldson
said the privatization commit-
tee was confident it would meet
the Government’s mandate that
it produce a recommendation
on the way forward for BTC by.
year’s end.

“We intend to meet the Gov-
ernment’s mandate to give them
a recommendation for the pri-
vatization of the company by
the end of the year,” Mr Don-
aldson said. oe

“It’s doable and we'll get it
done. The public deserves bet-
ter than what it’s getting now
[in terms of service and price]:
We’re moving forward at full
speed.”

Aaa i)
GRAND BAHAMAISLAND _—_ Siferaton |
OUR LUCAYA BE ciieb steerer chee

bea SES? LUCAYA
Resort lah

EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES EXIST FOR
DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGEMENT

DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGMENT
The successful candidate for this senior level position will work
closely with the resort’s executive team and law enforcement
agencies and will be responsible for maintaining a proactive

loss prevention program, designed to ensure a safe and secure
environment for hotel guests and employees and will train security
officers and monitor suspicious, harmful and or unlawful activities.

Individual must posses the following minimum requirements:
Must be knowledgeable in all security matters and programs
including but not limited to CPR, fire and hurricane preparedness,
evacuation drills, surveillance, safety inspections, etc.
DT ECM CT Me Cer et mt
the security field, preferably at a resort/hotel;
A Bachelor degree in law enforcement and or security related field
preferred; Current CPR certification and First Aid training required;
Excellent interpersonal, communication and customer service skills.
Technological proficiency in computer programs, Excel and

Microsoft Word.

We offer exceptional pay and benefits.
Qualified applicants should submit their resumes in writing no later than
5 July 31%, 2008 to
RSS EER
The Westin and Sheraton Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya Resort
Attn: Human.Resources Department

P.O. Box F-42500
Freeport, Grand Bahama





WATER & SEWERAGE CORPORATION

PUBLIC NOTICE



TENDER FOR CCTV/SURVEILLANCE SERVICES

The Water and Sewerage Corporation is pleased to invite qualified
companies to submit Tender to upgrade and maintain CCTV equipment for the
Water and Sewerage Corporation. .

Interested companies can pick up a set of documents at the Corporation’s Main
Headquarters #87 Thompson for a fee of Fifty dollars ($50.00). A Pre-Bid Tour
of the facilities is scheduled for Wednesday, July 23" at 11:00am. All
completed Bid Documents and supporting information must be sealed and
submitted to the WSC by 11:00 am on Wednesday, July 30° 2008.

Tender are to be sealed in an envelope marked “Tender for
CCTV/Surveillance_& Equipment Services” and to include service
replacement and repair of all equipments under warranty, repair of equipments, .
and delivered to the attention of: |

The General Manager ,
Water & Sewerage Corporation
Administration Building

- No. 87 Thompson Boulevard
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mr, Godfrey Sherman
General Manager

Telephone: (242) 302-5504 .
Please note that the Corporation reserves the right to evaluate each proposal
based on merit and qualifications, and that award will not necessary go to the
lowest bidder. Proposals will be evaluated based on Price, Experience
Qualifications, and Capacity.

The Corporation reserves the right to reject any or all tenders, and /or amend the
scope of works prior to award,

Tender-for CCTV Services June 2008





OF THE BA

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Prucernn: a Tear

VACANCIES

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following vacant positions in the Business Office:






1, DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTING/SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

The Director of Accounting/Senior Accountant is responsible for the overall financial management systems of The
College of The Bahamas and oversees the functions of accounts payable, accounts receivable, asset and cash
management, scholarship accounting, general ledger, and financial management reporting. The Director of Accounting
reports to the Financial Controller of The College of The Bahamas.

2. FINANCIAL SYSTEMS ANALYST/ACCOUNTANT

' The Financial Systems Analyst assists the Director of Accounting in implementing the improvement of internal’
control systems and procedures for overall financial management functions of The College. The Financial Systems
Analyst will focus on the areas’ of preparation for external audit requirements, accounting, cash management,
budgeting and management reporting. A

Specific duties include but not limited to: Financial Accounting/Accounts Analyses and Government Compliance
for Audit: Reviews, analyzes accounts and ensures audit trail, completeness, propriety and accuracy of supporting
documents for journal transactions. Posts and organizes approved journal transactions to the computerized books
of the College. Prepares schedules of temporary investments and interest income on a monthly basis. Gathers,
verifies and organizes the monthly schedules and reconciliation of all accounts such as cash accounts, fixed assets,
prepayments, inventories, liabilities, expenses and revenue accounts, and ensures (a) agreement with general ledger
balances; and (b) completeness, propriety and accuracy of supporting documents. Prepares movements and analyses
of unrestricted fund balances. Follows-up resolution of or adjusts reconciling items between general ledger and
schedules of all accounts analyzed. Oversees organization of files and external audit trail for Accounts Receivable
Department. :

3. FINANCIAL SYSTEMS ANALYST

The Financial Systems Analyst assists the Director of Accounting in implementing the improvement of internal
control systems and procedures for overall financial management functions of The College specifically in the areas
of preparation for external audit requirements, accounting, cash management, budgeting and management reporting.

* Specific duties include but not limited to:
Financial Accounting/Accounts Analyses and Government Compliance for Audit: Reviews monthly schedule
and analyzes receivable and payable accounts with students (tuition and refunds) and ensures reconciliation with
general ledger. Reviews monthly schedule of scholarship donor accounts and ensures reconciliation with general _
ledger. Gathers, verifies and organizes the monthly schedules and reconciliation of all payroll-related liabilities and
expenses, all expense and revenue accounts and ensures (a) agreement with general ledger balances; and (b)

- completeness, propriety and accuracy of supporting documents. Follows-up resolution of or adjusts reconciling
items between general ledger and schedules of all accounts analyzed. Prepares movements and analyses of restricted
fund balances related to student scholarships/financial aid.

4. ASSOCIATE EDITOR

The Associate Editor with responsibility for News & Publicationsswill maintain overall responsibility for the
production of all College of The Bahamas publications of a news, general information and public awareness nature.
The incumbent will be responsible for the overall management of The College’s media relations and will maintain
supervisory responsibility of writing and relevant public relations staff, which from time-to-time may include
freelance writers. Associate Editors report to the Director Communications/Editor-in-Chief.

For a detailed job description and application, persons should visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested candidates
should submit a detailed resume and a cover letter of interest, giving full particulars of qualifications and experience
no later than Friday, July 25, 2008 to:

The Director ’
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas

P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
INSTITUTE

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — FALL SEMESTER 042008 (SESSIONS 02)










9:00pm

6:00 -
ewes $465.0

6:00 -
50.0 | tx
6:00 -
5.00 | px |
os

Gourmet
Cooking Il






824

SESSION 1
gag ees [nce [nce [ance [py [OE Ta
SEC | CODE DURATION | DAYS TIME & FEES

Be alee lea Be [en a
Cuisine 806 D 6 weeks Thursda’ 9:00pm $375.00

ate es SD a ae fie 2a d ef Ae a es ee
Gourmet COOK 6:00 -
Cooking | oe 6 weeks baie $380.00 Fa

Cake & Pastry COOK
Making |
‘ Cake & Pastry

Making Il

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COOK 6:00 - fue
Bread Making 1 | 810 6 weeks Thursda 9:00pm $290.00 }| LK

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6:00 -
5 weeks Mon/Wed. 9:00pm $325.00 | LK

6:00 -
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COOK

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Cake

Decorating | 817 Se
Cake

COOK
Decorating Il 1 | 818 Sept. 1

Deadline for applications, August 15, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.

Oo
Pa
=



‘ONLINE

REGISTRATION



All current students at The College of The Bahamas
are encouraged to register online for Fall classes.
Students have until Friday, August 1st to register
online. Persons who register after this time will be
assessed a late registration fee of $150.00. Online
registration means you can register from your home
or at any computer that has internet access. Log onto,
www.cob.edu.bs and begin your registration process
today.






PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Baha Mar ‘still not where’
it wants on existing hotels

»
6





' LEGAL NOTICE FROM page 1B the Cable Beach Golf Course, rebranded it as a Sheraton,” Mr _ may reduce its number of avail-
‘ Mr Sands told Tribune Busi- Sands told Tribune Business. able rooms. The $2.4 billion
NOTICE ie a ness: “The opportunity remains “We’re now beginning to see Cable Beach redevelopment
‘ : : to get them all on a good finan- improvement year-over-year. had called for the eventual
Mr Sands said year-to-date cial footing... We’ve gone from an all-inclu- demolition of two towers at the
‘| INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT the 850-room Wyndham was “We would the like the Wyn- sive to a European-plan hotel, Wyndham, although it is

generating an average room ~~ gham’s rate to be around $120, and itis beginning to gointhe unclear whether this factors into
(No.45 of 2000) rate of $110 per night, with and annualised occupancies to direction that a snticipated current considerations.
In Voluntary Liquidation occupancy rates flat compared he around the $70-72 percent That’s been quite a bright spot “We’re currently operating
to 2007. The $110 room rate level. Certainly, with the Sher- _ for us. with all our 850 rooms, although
eee es ahead of the pre- aton we’re in the range on rates, “We're still not where we’d __ we’re assessing going forward
vious year’s $100, giving Baha ang would like occupancies to like to be, but there are posi- whether that will be the total
settle at around 78-79 per cent tive signs. We’re beginning to amount we’re going to work
on an annualised basis.” tweak all marketing and admin- _—with,” Mr Sands said. ©
The Sheraton’s room rates istrative efforts at the Wynd- Baha Mar was “aggressively
have averaged in the mid-$190 ham, so we can put this partic- | working on marketing” to drive
range for the 2008 first half, Mr _ ular property on the same track more visitors to the Crystal
Sands said, with its occupancy _as the Sheraton. There’s major _ Palace Casino, and was employ-
INSIG aa levels “much improved”. The growth at the Sheraton.” ing flexibility when it came to
resort only had 337 room open A major factor in the planned _rostering its 1900 staff, due to
last year, as construction work improvements atthe Wyndham fluctuations in business levels.
i to convert it from a Radisson — will be the switch from a fran- Pointing out that the Wynd-
dy Slt to the Sheraton was still ongo- _chise agreement with that brand ham had been full the last two
behind the bate ing, and the resort is now back to a management agreement. weekends, but quieter during
pi to its full 700-room comple- This will see the Wyndham __ the week, Mr Sands said: “We
ero) Ue fo la) § | =§=6ment. become directly involved inthe have ups and down, and are giv-
on Mondays “We believe that we are see- _ resort’s management and oper- ing staff the benefit that when
: ing a turnaround from what the _ ations, with the property hav- _ there are good business levels,
Radisson used to be, since we ing to meet the brand’s specified __ they will be rostered to work.”
standards. Confirming that a replace-
“We’re going to leverage ment for Harrah’s was still
. their [Wyndham’s] brand and being actively sought, at the
Legal Notice their marketing opportunities, same time as Baha Mar’s legal
along with what’s happening in —_ action against the gaming giant
NOTICE the destination, to parlay that remained ongoing, Mr Sands
into higher occupancies with said: “We have engaged UBS

IK ope Marketi ng Ltd i | higher rates,” Mr Sands said. to take the lead on this for us.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act, Mar “some growth on rates”.
(No.45 of 2000), HOWARTH LIMITED is in dissolu- Referring to both resorts, plus

the Crystal Palace Casino and

tion. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough &
Queens Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. Al] persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts
or claims to the Liquidator before the 25th July, 2008.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
Jaworzno S.A. —

A AR A A A A I REE CI ee OE ae EN




“With that comes service . Things are happening.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) standards, and hopefully an “We are continuing to work
improvement in customer sat- _ towards the finish line. We are
isfaction.” trying to find a new partner to

The Baha Mar executive hint- complete the vision of Baha
Notice is hereby given that the above named ed, though, that the Wyndham =— Mar.”
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of Hope Marketing Ltd. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
'(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

SR IR DRE I a em NR mn A A A a Af

ARGOSA CORP. INC."
(Liquidator) aon

a

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000), BORORO LIMITED is in dissolu-
tion. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be
contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough &
Queens Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to
send their names, addresses and particulars of their debts .
or claims to the Liquidator before the 7th August, 2008.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
Maximus Elite Inc.

Notice |

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of
the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), NOTICE is hereby given .
that ROMGAR LTD. is in dissolution and the
date of commencement of the dissolution is

July 17, 2008.









—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of Maximus Elite Inc. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



Legal Notice

| NOTICE
Calan International

Ventures Limited





Lorna Kemp and Margaret Taterm-Gilbert
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd
1 Bay Street
2nd Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O. Box SS-6289
Nassu, Bahamas





(In Voluntary Liquidation)




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 18th day of July 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., PR. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.



EJ FG CAPITAL MARKETS
. sk BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson z 12.00 12.00

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OPAL TWENTY-EIGHT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

_.,eremier Estate . s . . 10.00 10.00 : z
eee is ES Fidelity Over-the-Counter Securities ©
KS

. BidS As!
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25
__..RND Holdings 0.35 0.40
sue acee ano eu srioirm ay , Solina Over-The-Counter Securities
43.00
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60
see at CII DS. rise : 0.45

Last Price

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of April 2008. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

55
Sec ee ) (BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
Colina Bond Fund 1.323145*** 2.41%
Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.990639*"*" -0.349 9.15%
Colina Money Market Fund 7 je ‘o 4.23%
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund -5. o 9.38%
Fidelity Prime Income Fund ts baad! B29 5.73%
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund * -O. % -0.04%
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund Oo
Fidelity International Investment Fund is -a -8. fo -8.94%
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund ‘ -77% 0.77%
FG Financial Growth Fund - ‘ fo 1.19%
FG Financial Diversified Fund -B86% 0.86%
Dati iti é 3 NLA. Key
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price * - 31 March 2008
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity ** - 31 December 2007
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *** - 30 June 2008
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price *"** 314 April 2008
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week - 31 May 2008
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths - 27 June 2008
Daity Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
OW S$ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Clbsing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
MIS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
s' Date 7/11/2007

BAL

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 7B



i

FROM page 1B

wealth Bank’s $4 million new
branch in-eastern New Provi-
dence, witile in his capacity as
chair of its council; he is also
likely to oversee the combined
530 million expansion of the
College of the Bahamas (COB)
library and Grand. Bahama
campus.

“What some people don’t
realise is that while some of the
inega projects have not come
on stream, there’s a lot of $20-
530 million projects coming in,
ind that’s keeping things
going,” Mr Donaldson told Tri-
hune Business.

“You've got a lot of small

projects in the building sector, .

and building is a great multipli-
er. Baha Mar has fallen off, but
you've still got Albany. Gov-
ernment’s got a $100 million
road improvement project,
financed mostly by the IDB,
and that’s a lot of money.
“There must be hundreds of
these projects going on in the
country. People focus too much

on these $200-$300 million pro-

Bahamas ‘long way fr

jects; when you’ve got 10 of
these $0-$30 million projects,
that’s $300 million right there.

“We’re certainly a long way
from starvation economically,
and that’s what people have to
focus on. Things in Abaco are
booming,”

Osprey Developers had
already started construction on
Commonwealth Bank’s new
eastern New Providence branch
on Prince Charles Drive, which
should be open by mid-2009.

Estimating that the new
branch would cost $4 million,
the same amount spent by the
bank on its Golden Gates
branch excluding furniture and
fixtures, Mr Donaldson said:
“They’ve done all the siting, and
are getting ready to pour the
foundations. We’re looking for
completion some time in the
middle of next year.”

The Commonwealth Bank
chairman said he was anticipat-
ing a “spike” in lending during
the current 2008 third quarter,
due to a combination of spend-
ing by Bahamian consumers on
vacations and back-to-school,
and the traditional replenish-
ment of inventories by busi-

nesses in preparation for the
Christmas season.

“1 don’t know if people are
getting more cautious, but that’s
likely to change for us in the
third quarter, because people
are going to borrow for their
vacations, back-to-school and
school fees,” said Mr Donald-
son.

“It’s a big quarter for us.
Your’re likely to see a spike in
lending at that time for those
very reasons. We anticipate it
being very strong again. A num-
ber of factors converge togeth-
er for the third quarter.”

After a tight 2007, Mr Don-
aldson said banking system liq-
uidity — including liquidity at
Commonwealth Bank — had
recovered to “very healthy lev-
els”. As a result, competition
for previously scarce deposits
had slackened, resulting in
deposit rates coming off rela-
tively high levels. In turn, and
because lending rates - mostly
linked to Bahamian Prime —
had not changed, the pressure
on interest margins has also
eased,

“The whole system is now liq-
uid, and because of that deposit

BUSINESS

om starving economically’

rates have dropped dramatical-
ly,” Mr Donaldson said.
“Deposit rates have come off
because all the banks are liq-
uid. Banks are not competing
as fiercely as they did at one
time for deposits.”

Commonwealth Bank’s hold-
ings of investments, govern-
ment-registered stock and Trea-
sury Bills rose by 38 per cent to
$135.409 million during the 2008
first half, something Mr Don-
aldson attributed to the bank’s
desire to obtain a higher return
rate on its increasingly liquid
assets.

“Tf you are sitting on a lot of
excess liquidity, you don’t want
a large amount of cash balances
not earning interest,” Mr Don-
aldson added.

Commonwealth Bank saw its
2008 first half net income
increase by 10.4 per cent to
$24.5 million, with total assets
climbing 8 per cent over the
same period to more than $1.25
billion.

Return on common share-
holders equity rose to 35.5 per

cent compared to 33.9 per cent -

in the same period during 2007,
although the 22 per cent rise in

Bahamas ‘passes the test’
over US tax compliance

FROM page 1B

vices clients, Mr Smith said:
“The Bahamas has already met
the requirements for informa-
tion sharing, unless the goal
posts have changed.

“The Bahamas has already
passed the test. This is really
based on whether we are mak-
ing a fair assessment of the
Bahamas regulations relative to

US regulations. The legitimate .





LOT NUMBER

(ITA oe sDIOg26 m1

assessment is that the Bahamas
has already passed the test, and
the US ought not to change it.”

Speaking after a week when
international financial centres
and tax evasion by US clients
became the focus of another US
Senate inquiry, Mr Smith said
US legislators were “missing the
opportunity to go after their
own citizens” and make the sys-

' tem for disclosing taxes easier

by focusing on so-called off-

20~ BLOCK 8 OF SEA BREEZE

Ve



A- Four Bedrooms, two bathrooms, single-family residence, with living room, dining room,
family room, covered porch, foyer, kitchen, laundry room with own half bathroom and a

} two-car carport. Building has an effective age of Twenty-two years and a gross floor area
of 3,395 sq, ft. Land size is 10,000 sq, ff.

The bullding is located on the southern side of Silver Palm Grove, 400 feet west of Silver
Paim Lane or 200 feet of Silver Palm Boulevard,

For conditions af sale and any other information, please contact:
Credit Risk Management - Collection Unit At: |

Ԥ02-0929 or 356-1608 .

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management-Collection Unit

shore centres.

Due to the high regulatory
and compliance burdens
involved in servicing US clients,
and potential reputational risks
if something went wrong, Mr
Smith said many Bahamas-
based financial institutions no
longer took on American clients
as a matter of policy.

He added that many had
been shedding US clients from
as far back as the Bank of Nova




SRR







Scotia case in the early 1980s
when the IRS, frustrated in its
inability to obtain data on US
clients with assets held at the
bank’s Nassau branch, imposed
a fine of several thousand dol-
lars per day on its Miami unit in
an attempt to obtain the
required information. °
“From that point on, many
of the offshore banks simply
stopped doing business with US
citizens or made them sign a

- disclaimer saying that if the IRS

wanted their account informa-
tion, they were free to give it
to them,” Mr Smith, now
CFAL’s chairman, said.






cash and securities saw the
bank’s return on assets drop to
3.5 per cent from 3.65 per cent.

Impaired loans stood at only
1.4 per cent of the total loan
portfolio, something Mr Don-
aldson attributed to Common-
wealth Bank’s credit scoring

Dy neels

exercise. This was a test applied
to all borrowers to ensure they
had the ability to repay loans,
and had “eliminated the risk
factor that might have been
there three, four, five years ago.
That’s translated into less pro-
visions and less write-offs”.

‘ORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

OSITION

Responsibilities: ©

Provides nutrition cae for ail age groups including nutrition assessment, nuttin care planning and
implementation, monitoring, and putition education including food and druginteraction education. =

Works in collaboration with other health care professionals 0 support, restore, and maintain optimal
Axatition heaiti for thase individuals with potential or knows alterations in nutrition status,

Conteioutes to community health initiatives such as providing ieclures and artices fot the general pubic
and media :

Frovides education and training of hospitalized patients, outpatients, caregivess and health cate personel
including medical professtonals concerning theories, ofinciples and practices cf nutrition care.

Provides medical nutrition therapy for outpatients and for the general public.

Participates in the development of hospital poticies and procedures

Requirements:

Minimum Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition by accredited US, Canadian oF equivaient institution

Masters degree preferred

Additional certifications 3 plus ( e.g. Nutrition Support, Diahetes Educator)

| — 3 years previous clinicat nutrition experience
Fogtered and iicensed by the Bahamas Health Professions Council
Excellent communication & Presentation skills

Strong Computer skills

Salary {commensurate with expesence}

Please submit resume to:Human Resou

Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 |
or call 302-4618 | Webs

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT _

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the
following Contracted Services for The Port Department, Ministry



i eo Se ws






P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before July 31, 2008 8

Serious Enquires Only




PUBLIC NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT
EAST BAY STREET DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENT

The Ministry of Public Works & Transport wishes to advise the
Public that drainage improvement works will be carried out along
East Bay Street, in the vicinity of Montagu Beach.

As a result, the most southern Eastbound lane along East Bay
Street will be closed between One Montague Place and the KPMG
Building from 22nd July, 2008 to the 22nd September 2008
between the hours of 9:00am and 3:00pm. Single lane traffic will
continue on the north lane.

The Ministry apologizes for any inconvenience caused during this
time.

Signed: Anita Bernard
Permanent Secretary





of The Environment.





1. The Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock




Interested parties may obtain further information, and may collect
the bidding document as of 28th July, 2008 from:





Port Department
Prince George Dock

Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone Number: 356-5639






Between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm, Monday to Friday

Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate (3) in a sealed envelope(s)
marked “Tender For Cleaning of Potters Cay Dock” addressed to:





The Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Telephone Number (242) 327-1530







No later than 4:30pm on the I1th day of August, 2008




Tenders will be opened at 10:00am on the 12th August, 2008 at
the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance.





The Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.

abe ein sn eeactaunuwe— os —
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

GN-713



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

| A. KNOWLES, of Nassau East, Eastem District, |
: New Providence one of the Islands of the :

Whereas AUDLEY FARRINGTON, of Elizabeth | COmmonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At- |

Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of ELROY FARRINGTON, late of Pratt Alley, :

: the Probate Court of Dallas County, Texas, for :

Central District, New Providence, one of the : the County of Dallas, on the 11th day of

-No. 2008/PRO/npr/0037 1

Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, 2 September, 2006.

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration ;

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :
24TH JULY, 2008 :

| NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application ;

Whereas REMONDA MOORE of the City of _ will be made to the Supreme Court of The :

Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The ;
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate,of ZEPHANIAH :

HERBERT MOORE , late of th 6 City of Freeport, : for obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Probate, :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00372

Grand Bahama, one of th

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. | Court of British Columbia on the 19th day of |

Notice is hereby given that such applications meptembel.:D: 2008;

will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

2008/PRO/NPR/00382

deceased.

DAVID R. HOPE the Personal Representative :
of the in the Estate, by the Carroll Probate Court, :
in the state of New Hampshire, on the 29th day :

of January, A.D, 2008.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |

24TH JULY, 2008 5998/PRO/npr/00387

| Whereas PATRICIA JOHNSON of Evans Street

IN THE ESTATE OF MARTIN EAST. late and off East Street in the City of Nassau in the Island

- domiciled of 41 Avenue Close Road, London Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made |

! application to the Supreme Court of The |

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration ; Bahamas, for letters of administration of the

of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by CARLSON :
H. SHURLAND, of Kipling Building, Freeport, :.
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- ;

: Notice is hereby given that such applications

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas © will be heard by the said Court at the expiration |

for obtaining the Resealing of Letters :
Testamentary, in the above estate granted to : of 14 days from the date hereof.
RICHARD CHARLES KIRBY, JOHN RICHARD :

ALAN EAST AND BRIAN ANTHONY :

2008/PRO/NPR/00383 —

NW8 6DA England, deceased.

: ALEXANDER EAST the Executors and Trustees
: in the High Court of Justice, Principal Registry ©
: of the Family Division, on the 27th day of April,
? 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



PROBATE DIVISION
24TH JULY, 2008

_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00384
_ IN THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM D. BARRETT,

(a.k.a WILLIAM DURELLE BARRETT) late

? and domiciled of 11085 Strayhorn Drive, Dallas
? County in the Sate of Texas, one of the States |
: of the United States of America, deceased. |
: Law. the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :

of fourteen days from the date hereof application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by PATRICK :

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealing of Order Admitting :
Will and Codicils to Probate and Authorizing :
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate ;
granted to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A and JOHN :
MARTIN DAVIS, Independent Co-Executors in ; —

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

_ PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :
: Whereas CLARENCE BASIL CLARE of Soldier
i Road in the Island of New Providence, one of

_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00384(A)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS | INTHE ESTATE OF BRIAN ERNEST |

STANLEY, late and domiciled of Powell River :
in the Province of British Columbia, Canada, :
? of DAVID MICHAEL CLARE SR. late of Soldier
: Road in the Island of New Providence, one of

deceased.

Bahamas in the Probate Division by :
SHANNELLE SMITH, of the Western District, :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the :

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-

eeenee,

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :

lgkands of the _ inthe above estate granted to IAN |

BEARDMORE the Executor in the Supreme :

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION |

24TH JULY, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION | 2008/PRO/NPR/00385

24TH JULY, 2008 | jy THE ESTATE OF ANGELO V. GLIONNA,

: late and domiciled of 350 Greenwood Avenue,
? Volusia County, Ormond Beach, Florida, one

IN THE ESTATE OF CAROLINE SUCCOP of the States of the United States of America,

BADLEY, late and domiciled of Center :
Tuftonboro in the State of New Hampshire, one :

of the States of the United States of America, | of fourteen days from the date hereof, application

' will be made Weg rene pa SL
._,. 4 Bahamas in the Probate Division by M.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration : : :
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application : HANNA-WEEKES, of Pioneers Professional
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by LOUREY :
C. SMITH, of Mareva House, 4 George Street, :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealing of Certificate of :
Appointment, in the above estate granted to :

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration

Plaza, Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing of Letters Administration, in
the above estate granted to ROBERT
CROASMUN (the Single Personal
Representative) of the Estate, in the Circuit

Court, Seventh Judicial Circuit, in and out Volusia :
County, on the 23rd day of December, 2005. :

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :
_ | LIGHTBOURN of Mareva House in the Island

THE TRIBUNE



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION |
24TH JULY, 2008

2008/PRO/npr/00388

IN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT WILFRED
PASHLEY, late of Lee County in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States
of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas in the Probate Division by SHANELLE
SMITH of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence. one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. Attorney-At-

for obtaining the resealed Letters of
Administration (multiple personal
representatives) in the above estate granted to
LINDA R. PASHLEY, GLENN S. PASHLEY
and BRUCE R. PASHLEY the Personal
Representatives of the Estate, by the Circuit
Court for Lee County, Florida, Probate Division.
on the 28th day of August. 2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00389

i the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

_Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

~~ ga WEE sarah

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No, 2008/PRO/npr/00391

Whereas RUBY M. FOX of South Beach in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence. one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of GORDON.
RANDOLPH FOX a.k.a. GORDON FOX late of
South Beach in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence. one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased,

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
, THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00392
Whereas RICHARD HERBERT ROGER

i of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

of New Providence, one of the Islands of the ;

Real and Personal Estate of DWAYNE EDNAL |
JOHNSON late of Evans Street, off East Street :
in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the |
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased. ;
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

: Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by

Deed of Power of Attorney for Suzanne Cleare,
Irma Cleare, Eleanor Cleare, Edith Cleare,
Theodora Cleare, Lynn Cleare and Gale Cleare
has made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate
of SYBIL CLARE, late of Dumore Town, Harbour
Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar —
THE TRIBUNE

GN-713



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :
24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00393

Whereas JILLIAN T. CHASE HOMES of :

ew :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by :
Deed of Power of Attorney for Kevin Branwell :
McClory has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Personal Estate of KEVIN |
McCLORY, late of Pebbles on the Rocks, Banks :.
Road in the Settlement of Governor's Harbour :
on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Jacaranda in the Western District,

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of :

21 days from the date hereof. ©

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS bol
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00394 >

Whereas RUBY FARQUHARSON, of Star :
Estates, Eastern District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of GENESTA MORRISON a.k.a. GENESTA :
D.J. ROLLE a.k.a. GENESTA DORETT A:
- ROLLE, late Star Estates, Eastern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00395

Whereas CLARENCE JOHNSON, of Windsor :
Place, CLIFFORD JOHNSON of Golden Gates :
and DAISYMAE MCKENZIE of Garden Hills :
all of the Island New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
have made application to the Supreme Court :
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration :
of the Real and Persona! Estate of FELIX :
LIVINGSTONE JOHNSON, late of Cowpen :
Road, Western District, New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The :

Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications :
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar .

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00396.

Whereas BRAD ALEC ROLLE of Yamacraw :
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

' No. 2008/PRO/npr/00399

Whereas C. YVETTE MCCARTNEY: :
PEDROCHE of Skyline Drive in the Western :
District of the Island of New Providence, one :
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
‘ Bahamas has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of :
administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of LOUIS NASH a.k.a. LAWRENCE NASH :
late of the City of Lutz in the County of :
Hillsborough in the State of Florida, one of the :
States of the Untied States of America, by

Bahamas has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas. for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate :
of WILLIAM PETER ROLLE late of Yamacraw :
Beach Drive in the Island of New Providence, :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The : -

Bahamas, deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the expiration

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications !
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly |
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00400

Whereas LUCILLE AIELLO nee » MCDONALD i
of 5615 Lake Front Drive in Wall in the State :
of Mississippi, one of the States of the United :
: States of America has made application to the :
: Supreme,Gourt of The;Bahamas, for letters of :
! Ladministration of the Real and’Personal Estate ;
of ELIZABETH ROLLE late of Rock Sound in :
the Island of Eleuthera. one of the Islands of :- .
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. deceased. : -

Notice is hereby given that such applications :
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 21 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :

_ PROBATE: DIVISION :

24TH JULY, 2008 :

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00401

Notice is hereby given that such applications 2
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration :

of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00402

: Whereas CLEO R. NAIRN, of Perpall Tract, :
Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :
has made application to the Supreme Court of :
The Bahamas, for letters of administration of :
+ the Real and Personal Estate of PHILIP :
: FREDERICK NAIRN, late of Perpall Tract, :
: Western District, New Providence, one of the :
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, :

deceased.

MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008, PAGE 9B

= he a se NING es ee ee

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00403

Whereas CONSUELA CARTER, of Thompson
Lane, Southern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court: of The Bahamas, for letters of

administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of EBENEZER CARTER a.k.a. EBENEZER

JAMES CARTER, late of Thompson Lane,
Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

_ PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00404

Rbieagets 4 bere : Whereas FLORENCE LOUISE RUSSELL, of
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAIIAMAS :
‘THE SUPREME COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

'- 24TH JULY, 2008 :

: : administration of the Real and Personal Estate

i of STANFORD LEROY RUSSELL , late of Eight

#6 Sandpiper Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama,

one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court. of The Bahamas, for letters of

Mile Rock, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the eexpleation
of 21 eda fronj,the date hereof.

- Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00405 ~

Whereas SAMUEL MOREE of Palmetto
Avenue in the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of

: administration of the Real and Personal Estate
! of HOWARD MOREE late of No. 73 Montrose
? Whereas BERNARD STORR, of Pine Crest :

Street, Sunset Park, Southern District, New :
Providence, one of the Islands of the:
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made :
application to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
Real and Personal Estate of HELEN LOUISE :
STORR, late of Chrysanthemum Avenue, :
Garden Hills, No.1 Subdivision, Southern :
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Avenue in the Central District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

24TH JULY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00406

. : Whereas EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME. COURT :

PROBATE DIVISION :

’ 24TH JULY, 2008 :

Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ROSALINA ALI
late of Julan Dnarmahusada Indah 1|/L8-9.
Surabaya, Jatim 60115 in the Republic of
Indonesia, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar
Se ee

|
|
|
|
|



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JULY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas must be ‘proactive’
on alternative energy moves

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
urged businessmen and the
Bahamas as a whole to become
“proactive” in developing a sus-
tainable energy plan, rather
than continue to be reactive.

Dionisio D’Aguilar laudied
proactive measures being tak-
en by the US Government and
regional energy officials and
stakeholders to develop sus-

Fat eo atl 008 tess et

MGRNGRGES « - ART PS

tainable energy options for the
Caribbean, as they prepare to
meet during two energy confer-
ences slated for July 23 and 24,
2008, at the Sheraton Cable
Beach Resort.

The Caribbean Regional Sus-

tainable Energy High Level

Seminar, sponsored by the Gen-
eral Secretariat of the Organi-
zation of American States
(GS/OAS), the Inter-American

| F
ETON NEO

Development Bank (IADB)
and the Inter-American Insti-
tute for Cooperation on Agri-
culture (IICA, and the US gov-
ernment is slated for Wednes-
day, July 23, 2008.’

The Opportunities: for
Renewable Energy in the
Caribbean Seminar, sponsored
by the Government of the US,

will be held the following day, .

on Thursday, July 24, 2008.

Foi wm mw ee ke

LURE: ARE » BET SRR

SURES © PEON POS PCE PLE: Se EES





“For-too long we have all
been reactive in dealing with
the varied challenges of ever-
increasing energy costs. Now, it
is imperative that we become
proactive and begin as a nation
and a region to develop sus-
tainable energy options,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said.

“The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce is incredibly grateful
to the US Ambassador to the
Bahamas, Ned Siegel, the Orga-
nization of American States, as
well as the other regional bodies
and stakeholders for convinc-
ing the powers that be to hold
these two very important ener-
gy seminars here. in the
Bahamas.

“This, in itself, says a great
deal about the extremely close
ties that exist between the

’ Bahamas, the US and our sister

countries throughout the
Caribbean, especially when one
considers that these seminars
could have very well been held
in any other country in the
Caribbean or city in the United

Dionisio A

States.”
Mr D’Aguilar said the Cham-

ber of Commerce was excited
to participate in the two energy
seminars. He explained that the
organization, which represents
_ the interests of the private sec-



Coordinator Medical/Surgical Unit

Qualifications:
* Registered nurse from an approved. nursing program,
* BSN required, MBA/MHA preferred,
, Currently registered with the Nursing Council of the Bahamas,
* Minimum of 3 years managerial experience,
. Strong computer skills,

* Excellent interpersonal, organizational and leadership skills.

Position Summary:
* Responsible for the day to day management of the Medical/Surgical Unit,
* Supervision and evaluation of nursing staff to meet patient needs,
* Coordination of support services and resources to facilitate the total care

of patients.

Excellent benefits | Salary commensurate with experience

Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department
Doctors Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
or call'302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com





tor in the country, has repeat-
edly articulated its concerns that
energy costs in the Bahamas
continue to rise at a rapid rate.
“High energy costs continue
to be a pressing concern for
major. business establishments
from a broad spectrum of indus-
tries, from tourism to retail, as ‘
well as for individual household
owners. Every business and
energy consumer in this country
needs to seriously think about
how they can reduce their ene
gy costs, as well as the amouit
of kilowatt hours they actu
use, by using alternative







_ have taken eter steps in

using alternative forms of ener-
gy; Mr D’ Aguilar, who recently
visited St. Lucia, noted that
many of the homes on that
island nation used solar panel
systems in order to heat water.

“Inevitably oil prices will con-
tinue to rise, and really there is
very little that the Government
can do about it. As a result, con-
sumers need to become more
informed and proactive and
take their concerns into their
own hands,” Mr D’Aguilar said.

“Now the Government can
provide incentives and can edu-
cate you about it, but at the end
of the day it is you as the con-|
sumer who is going to have to
make the decision... You have
to be educated to the point that
when you walk into a store and
a hot water heater costs $500
and a solar panelled one costs
$3,000, and you say well obvi-
ously the traditional hot water is
cheaper. Yes, it may be cheaper
on day one, but essentially it
costs more to operate. So you
have to be educated on how to
make that calculation and say
yes, this is worth my while.”

Mr D’Aguilar, who is also the
president of Superwash Laun-
dromat, New Providence’s
largest chain of laundromats,
which uses a considerable
amount of energy to run its
operations, has made repeated
calls for reverse metering, a sys-
tem in which persons using
alternative forms of energy can
resell unused energy back to
electrical suppliers such as the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion. .

“So this seminar, while it is
more on a macro-level as
opposed to a micro-level, will
begin to sow the seeds of what
we should do, firstly, as a nation
and secondly, as individual busi-

nesses to address this extreme-

ly vexing problem,” he added.



PROGRAMME OF ACTIVITIES

TUESDAY JULY 22, 2008

2:00pm—6:00pm Registration and Exhibitor Set-up

WEDNESDAY JULY 23, 2008



7:00am — 4:00pm’ Secretariat Open/Registration

8:30am — 2:00pm

Wellness Symposium

7:00pm — 10:00pm Opening Ceremony and Welcome Reception

THURSDAY JULY 24, 2008

7:00am — 4:00pm

Secretariat Open/Registration

8:00am — 10:00am SCIENTIFIC SESSION I
MSD PLATINUM Cardiovascular Technology Update Session

10:00am — 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am — 12:00pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION II
PROF. CHARLES DENBOW .- Interventional Cardiology Session

12:00pm — 1:00pm

SCIENTIFIC SESSION UI

MEDTRONIC GOLD Electrophysiology Session
1:00pm—2:00pm MSD Sponsored Lunch Session
2:15pm -- 3:30pm CCS Biennial General Meeting (CCS Members Only)

7:00pm— 11:90pm Annual Awards Banquet

FRIDAY JULY 25,2008

7:00am — 4:00pm
. 8:00am — 10:00am

Secretariat Open/Registration
SCIENTIFIC SESSION IV

Memorial Regional Hospital Platinum Cardiac Surgery Session

10:00am — 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am — 12:00pm SCIENTIFIC SESSION V

Astra Zeneca Platinum Session
12:00pm — 1:00pm

Servier Silver Session
1:00pm — 2:00pm

8:00pm — 1:00am

SATURDAY JULY 26, 2008

7:00am — 3:00pm
8:00am — 10:00am

Scientific Session VI

PFIZER Sponsored Lunch

Conference Dinner and Party

Secretariat Open/Registration
SCIENTIFIC SESSION VII

Boehringer-Ingelheim Platinum - Congestive Heart Failure Session

10:00am — 10:30am Coffee Break

10:30am — 12:00pm SCIENTIFIC SE

Dr. Ivan Perot Geheral Cardiology Se
12:00pm — 1:00pm | SCIENTIRIC S

1:00pm — 2:00pm

2:00pm-2:15pm






SSION VIIL
sion

CSSION TX
The CCS President’s Research Session

MSD Sponsored Lunch

" CONFERENCE CLOSING CEREMONY