Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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mi

i'm lovin’ it.







Volume: 104 No.170

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Ex-officer’s refusal to answer a pointed,
question said all we need to know

B By PAUL G
TURNQUEST |
Tribune Staff Reporter.
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AN ISLAND-WIDE search
was underway last night after

. four male detainees escaped

from. Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.

Disappearing around 10am
yesterday, the four men, three
Cubans and one Honduran,
are believed to have jumped a
12-foot wall and fled into
nearby bushes.

This latest escape is one of
many in recent months where

The Tribune &

SF ALN
78F

A COUPLE OF
TSTORMS



=USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION |

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

A deafening

STC

PUTA aN UN a S|

Four escape from P
‘Detention Centre

Island-wide search
for male detainees

Cuban migrants have broken

out of the facility despite

numerous security upgrades.

__ As a result, the Detention ~
Centre remained. on “lock.

down” most of yesterday as
immigration officials attempt-
ed to figure out “exactly what
happened”.

The Cubans who escaped
are said to be 36-year-old
Ariel Delgardo Rodriguez, 31-
year-old Felipe Espinoza
Leon and 45-year-old Alberto
Diaz Maes. The Honduran
was identified as 28-year-old

SEE page 14

Headless body
found in canal

THE headless body of a man was found Saturday evening in a

canal close to South Beach Pools.

The head was lying nearby in a bushy area off Marshall Road.

Police have classified the case as a “suspicious death.”

However, it is believed the man may been part of a group of
Haitians who drowned off New Providence earlier this year and were
washed ashore in the southern part of the island.

According to police, the body is badly decayed and it is believed

it was submerged in water for “quite some time.”

SEE page 14

et the F FUN | begin

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CARNIVAL S ot PIRIT m

Sep 3rd - 7 Day
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C= =
trom S 75

@ RESIDENTS of Hope Town,
~ Abaco, are delighted with their

new-look lighthouse after a two-
week paint job which has given
the famous landmark a new

dease of life.

Experts from.the United
States used special cleaning and

spraying methods that stopped

debris blowing on to surround-

ing trees and buildings.

The candy-striped Victorian
Hghihouse; one of the best-



known buildings in the
Bahamas, has taken on a new
sheen since painters completed
the project.

“Everyone is very pleased
with it,” said an islander. “It
looks beautiful.”

The lighthouse’s paintwork
suffered from sand- -blasting in
recent hurricanes and was begin-
ning to look shabby.

Photo: Anne Potts

Bahamas Against Pn
TUS TCS ATT

good things” about fathers.

“It is said that the family is the foundation of }
the society, and that the father is the head of the |
foundation. And so this event is designed to cel-
ebrate fathers, elevate fathers, and to recognise
the wonderful fathers we have in our society.

“Also, it is designed to provide an afternoon of
entertainment, and fun, and enjoyment for the.
residents of this particular part of the island. And
we trust that as we move through the inner city
community, people would appreciate the fact |
that this event was staged for them, their fathers,
and their-families, and enjoy it as we enjoy bring-

ing it to them,” he said.

MEMBERS of the Bahamas Against Crime
organisation held a Father’s Day Parade yester-
day with a march from Southern Recreation |B
Ground to the College of the Bahamas.
Leading the charge, Rev Dr C B Moss said it is
vitally important for the nation to recognise “the






: 4 \
ANGRY residents of Nas-
sau Village pelted a police
squad car and officers with
rocks following the funeral of
15-year-old murder victim Joel
Simeus on Saturday.
According to eye-witness
reports, after the funeral, a num-

- ber of men gathered on the

area’s basketball court.
The atmosphere turned hos-

* "tile When police allegedly

refused to allow the community

‘to “finish its (mourning) pro-

ceedings.”
One teenage resident of Nas-

sau Village said he felt that “the



e
police were not respectful
towards us.”

The situation escalated and
during a confrontation between
residents and police, rocks were
thrown at the officers and their
car.

Police, however, yesterday
stressed that.the.incident was
not a “riot.”

There. were reportedly no.
injuries.

Police were stationed in the
area during the funeral, as'it was
feared that tension in the com-

SEE page 14

Anglican split may be ‘inevitable’
alter the wedding of gay priests

@ By KARIN HERIG
- Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A SPLIT in the worldwide Anglican community may now be
“inevitable” following a wedding between two gay Anglican priests
in the United. Kingdom, according to religious observers. ~
Despite Archbishop Drexel Gomez’s assertions that he is “opti-
mistic” that there will not be a split in the 70-million strong com-
munion, observers are now saying that this “wedding” is a turning
point in the debate about how the church should handle the issue

of homosexuality

Controversy over same sex civil partnerships was reignited after
New Zealander Rev Dr David Lord walked down the aisle with his
hospital chaplain Rev Peter Cowell.

SEE page 14






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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008 2 a | . THE TRIBUNE
; LOCAL NEWS





MARCHING FOR





BAHAMAS AGAINST CRIME: Banner headlines.



The Bahamas Against Crime organization held a Father’s Day
Parade yesterday with a march from the Southern Recreation
Grounds to the College of the Bahamas. Reverend Dr CB Moss led
the parade, saying it wasy important for the nation to recognise
“the good things” about fathers.









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THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Man charged
with drug
possession

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 29-
year-old Freeport man was
charged with drug posses-
sion in Freeport Magis-
trate’s Court on Friday.

Magistrate Andrew
Forbes charged Christo-
pher Leon Stuart, of 279
Jack Fish Street, Caravel
Beach, with possessing
marijuana. He was also
charged with possession of
drugs with intent to supply.

Stuart was represented
by Simeon Brown. It is
alleged that the accused on
June 3, at Freeport, was
found in possession of 12.5
_ grams of marijuana, which

was contained in 10 small
packages intended for sale,
at an apartment on Bone-
‘fish Street.

Stuart pleaded guilty to
possession of the marijua-
na, but pleaded not guilty
to possession of drugs with
intent to supply.

Magistrate Forbes
adjourned the matter to
November 3, and granted
the defendant $10,000 bail

with one surety. Sentencing, :*

on the guilty plea will take
place on completion of the
trial.

Couple are expected =
in court in connection =
with firearm, ammunition |
possession and stealing

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter ;
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net_ :

FREEPORT - A Freeport }
couple is expected to be :
arraigned on Monday in the :
Freeport Magistrate’s Court in :
connection with firearm:and
ammunition possession. and 4 a
stealing.

Chief Supt Basil: Rahming |
reported that a 40-year-old man ’ L
and his 29-year-old girlfriend,
of Garden Villas, were arfested's
on Friday after police execut- :
ed a search warrant on an apart- i
ment at Weddell Avenue. :

According to reports, a team :

of officers went to a residence: }
around 1.10pm and discovered
a .223 calibre Intratech Scorpi- :
on sub machine gun.and 28 live :
.223 rounds of ammunition.

Various items suspected of |i). °

being stolen were also discov-
ered during a search. Officers :
seized jewellery, including one :
gold watch, five gold hand }
chains, and 16 gold rings. i

They also found a wall :
foamer compressor, two weed :
whackers, five chainsaws, one
grey Nokia cellphone, one pink }
RZR cellphone, one sliver :
Motorola cellphone and one RF :
modulator, all suspected of |
being stolen.

As a result, occupants of the i

apartment were arrested and
taken into custody.

Mr Rahming said a number : |
of Lucaya residents have :
already visited Port Lucaya :
police station and identified the :

items as personal property :
stolen from their homes pee
break-ins.

Police seize

firearm and

GRAND Bahama police dis-
covered and seized a firearm :
and ammunition at an apart-
ment on Bass Lane on Satur- :

day.

into custody in connection with
the matter.

According to reports, officers :
from the Eastern Division exe- :
cuted a search warrant around :
8.15pm at a residence on Bass :
Lane which was suspected of :
containing firearms and ammu-

nition.
Officers discovered a 380 3

semi-automatic pistol contain- :

ing .380 ammunition.

Mr Rahming said the suspect :

is expected to be formally :
charged today in Freeport Mag- :
istrate’s Court in connection
with this incident.

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ORGANISERS BELIEVE the turnout for the Independence Day march could be bigger than that of the

Labour Day event (pictured above).

-Anpther pro-hanging

march planned for
Independence Day

ANOTHER mass march
calling for murderers to be
hanged is planned for Inde-
pendence Day next month.

Organisers encouraged by
the success of the Labour Day
march believe the turnout
could be even bigger next time.

Relatives of murdered
schoolboy Khodee Davis are
seeking the police commis-
sioner’s permission to march
from Fox Hill Parade to Nas-
sau Village and back on July
10, the 35th anniversary of
Bahamas independence.

The march is a response to
the rising murder rate, and in

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death at the entrance to Cab-
bage Beach last month.

Organisers say they want to
stage “a peaceful and orderly
march and demonstration”
calling for all murderers to be
hanged, and for all murder sus-
pects to be denied bail.

The march, set to begin at
Fox Hill Parade at 9am, will
head south to Prince Charles
Drive, west to Soldier Road,
south to Taylor Street, then to
Alexander Boulevard and Nas-
sau Village Park.

After a rally at the park,
marchers will head back to Sol-

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porters as we covered the
route.

“It was a great success and

we're hoping for an even better _

response this time.”

Though the death penalty
remains on the Bahamas
statute books, it has not been
used since January, 2000, when
Abaconian David Mitchell was
hanged for the murder of two
foreigners at their island holi-
day home.

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EDITORIAL/LETTERS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas.of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
_ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

The weapon of rape

WORLD leaders fight terrorism all the time,
with summit meetings and sound bites and secu-
rity initiatives.

But they have studiously ignored one of the
most common and brutal varieties of terrorism
in the world today.

This is a kind of terrorism that dispropor-
tionately targets children.

It involves not WMD but simply AK-47s,
machetes and pointed sticks. It is mass rape —
and it will be elevated, belatedly, to a spot on
the international agenda this week.

The U.N. Security Council will hold a special
session on sexual violence this Thursday, with
Condoleezza Rice coming to New York to lead
the debate. This session, sponsored by the Unit-
ed States and backed by a Security Council res-
olution calling for regular follow-up reports,
just may help mass rape graduate from an
unmentionable to a serious foreign policy issue.

The world woke up to this phenomenon in
1993, after discovering that Serbian forces had
set up a network of “rape camps” in which

‘women and: girls, some as young as 12, were

enslaved. Since then, we’ve seen similar pat-..
terns of systematic:rape in many countries, and .

it has become clear that mass rape is not just a
byproduct of war but also sometimes a deliber-
ate weapon.

“Rape in war has been going on since time
immemorial,” said Stephen Lewis, a former

Canadian ambassador who was the U.N? s:

’ envoy for AIDS in Africa.

“But it has taken a new twist as comman-

_ ders have used it as a strategy of war.”

There ‘are two reasons for this. First, mass
rape is very effective militarily.

From the viewpoint of a militia, getting into a
firefight is risky, so it’s preferable to terrorize
civilians sympathetic to a rival group and drive
them away, depriving the rivals of support.

Second, miass rape attracts less international
scrutiny than piles of bodies do, because the
issue is indelicate and the victims are usually too
ashamed to speak up.

In Sudan, the government has turned all of
Darfur into a rape camp.

The first person to alert me to this was a
woman named Zahra Abdelkarim, who had
been kidnapped, gang-raped, mutilated —
slashed with a sword on her leg — and then
left naked and bleeding to wander back to her
Zaghawa tribe. In effect, she had become a
message to her people: Flee, or else.

Since then, this practice of “marking” the
Darfur rape victims has become widespread:

typically, the women are scatred or branded, or’

occasionally have their ears cut off.
This.is often done by police officers or sol-

diers, in uniform, as part of a coordinated gov-'

ernment policy. When the governments of
South Africa, China, Libya and Indonesia sup-
port Sudan’s positions in Darfur, do they really
mean to adopt a pro-rape foreign policy?

The rape capital of the world is eastern Con-
go, where in some areas three- -quarters of
women have been raped.

Sometimes the rapes are conducted with
pointed sticks that leave the victims inconti-
nent from internal injuries, and a former U.N.
force commander there, Patrick Cammaert,
says it is “more dangerous to be a woman than
to be a soldier.”

The international community’s response so
far? Approximately: “Not our problem.”

Yet such rapes also complicate post-conflict

_recovery, with sexual violence lingering even

after peace has been restored.

In Liberia, the civil war is over but rape is still
epidemic — and half of all reported rapes
involve girls younger than 14.

Painfully slowly, the United Nations and its
member states seem to be recognizing the fact
that systematic mass rape is at least as much an
international outrage as, say, pirated DVDs.
Yet China and Russia are resisting any new
reporting mechanism for sexual violence, seeing

. such rapes as tragic but simply a criminal matter.

On the contrary; systematic rape has proper-
ly been found by international tribunals to con-
stitute a crime against humanity, and it thrives
in part because the world shrugs. ,

The U.N. could do far more to provide health
services to victims of mass rape and to insist
that peacekeepers at least try to stop it.

In Congo, the doctors at Heal Africa Hospi-
tal and Panzi Hospital (healafrica.org and panz-
ihospitalbukavu.org) repair the internal injuries

of rape victims with skill and humanity.

But my most indelible memory from my most
recent visit, last year, came as I was interviewing
a young woman who had been gang-raped.

I had taken her aside to protect her privacy,
but a large group of women pudden’y,
approached. :

I tried to shoo them away, and then the
women explained that they had all been gang-
raped.and had decided that despite the stigma
and: risk of reprisal, they would all tell their
stories.

So let’s hope that this week the world’s lead-

ers and diplomats stop offering excuses for
paralysis and begin emulating the courageous
outspokenness of those Congolese women.

( This article is by Nicholas D. Krist of c.2008



New York Times News Service).

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

the position of:

| TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





Haiti’s Flag
Day should
be respected

EDITOR, The Tribune.

MAY 18th, 2008 ‘is cele-
brated by Haiti as its Flag
Day.

The meaning of Flag Day
for Haitians and those of Hait-
ian descent appear to have a
very special meaning, even for
those residing in other coun-
tries throughout the world
where they have migrated to.

On May 18th Haitians
throughout the Bahamas, legal
or illegal as well as those who
label themselves as a “Hait-
ian Bahamian”, adorned their
Haitian flag on their vehicles
and Jitney buses throughout
the islands of the Bahamas, in
particular the island of New
Providence, and displayed
“their” Haitian national pride.

Having a keen interest in

Caribbean history and the .

subject matter, as a Bahamian,
it is with pride that I recog-

iaise the meaning and the pur-

jpose of the May 18th Haitian
IFlag Day celebration and
respect it’s meaning the same.
Jt is a reminder of the strug-
giles and freedoms as Haitian
people valiantly fought for
their freedom and ultimate
victory over the three great-
est military powers in the
world at that time (England,
France and Spain).

So Haitian Flag Day

becomes a celebration of the.

Haitian revolution, and they
ate to be nobly commended
for such’a display of national
pride, even when their country
is experiencing extreme diffi-
culties.

Unfortunately in the |

Bzihamas today, it appears
thiat the Haitian Flag Day has
taken on another meaning in a
dif ferent country, in a differ-
enit century, with an insidious
tone, but with an undermin-
ing motive and not the intent
of tthe past.

It appears to be a celebra-
tio11 of another nation being
born within the Bahamas, in
“the face” of Bahamians in

theiir very own country, in an

ostentatious manner.
Hlaiti’s contributions in a

free black society throughout ~

the ‘world are known. Haitians
residing in the Bahamas and
othe:r countries must realise it
is ncrt what you do to celebrate
your’ culture or your national
prid2, but is how you do it in
anotiher man’s land. Whatever
the ‘underlying message is
behitid your celebration today,

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LETTERS

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it would be better if you share
its history and meaning so that
others will learn about it,
understand it, and not get
offended by your actions,
especially when you indis-
criminately change your last

name to sound like the Eng- .

lish surnames that dominate
the Bahamas, or call yourself a
Bahamian when it’s conve-
nient for you to get employed,
especially in a Bahamian Gov-
ernment Department.

Without prejudice, I have
observed many neighbouring
nations in the Caribbean more
frequently have discounted
the intellect and aptitude of
Bahamian people for whatev-
er reason. ©

I must enlighten them to the
facts that Bahamians can artic-
ulate, read and understand
when they are being disre-
spected in their own country,
or undermined the like by
nefarious schemes.

Like we often say'in the
Bahamas, “You don’t know
me hey”? So, “don’t sleep on
me.”

The Bahamian people know
that all governments of the
Bahamas, past and present,
have failed and are failing

them when it comes to the ille- |

gal immigration ‘issue in this
country, no matter what
nationality is breaking the
immigration laws of the
Bahamas.

Our efforts continue to
FAIL because of corrupt
Bahamians, both “black and
white”
country for one dollar.

The intent of the Haitian
Flag Day should be an exam-
ple of many nations who have

. struggled for freedom.

It should not be a symbol
of disrespect.
-It should not be used to
demonstrate how many of

your citizens are present and
‘exist in the Bahamas, whether

by illegally being born here,
or illegally migrating here with
blatant disrespect for the laws,
or simply using the system and
its people by the Machiavel-
lian approach.

If you feel so strongly about
your Haitian Flag Day, you
should simply go back to Haiti
on your own, and celebrate it
where it belongs.

This is still and will remain

the Bahamas.

The United States closes
their embassy and celebrate
their national events at their
Ambassador’s residence; they
also invite many Bahamian
Government officials to par-
ticipate.

Maybe this action, and pro-

, who will sell their .-

Bahamas. It would be more
respectful to the citizens of the
Bahamas and would not
appear to have a subterfuge
motive.,

With full knowledge of your
provocative action on May
18th, The Bahamas continues
to cope with many of Haiti’s
citizens by granting them a
free education in our schools
at the expense of the Bahami-
an tax payers.

The abuse of the many gov-
ernment systems continue,
squatting at will, and blatant
abuse of our health care sys-
tem, with the majority of Hait-
ian and migrants of other
nations making no contribu-
tions to National Insurance.

The Catholic Church, which
has for many years aided this
situation, may want to recon-
sider how it is assisting the
immigration process that is
changing the face of our
nation through its subtle, but
extremely powerful influence
and. programmes.

“Through unity, we find
strength” (L’union fait la
force) is the famous phrase on
Haiti’s flag, which on Febru-
ary 25, 1986, after the fall of
Baby Doc and the Duvalier
regime, was requested back
by the people.

It is my hope through infor-
mation sharing, and education
we can foster a better under-
standing of other nations, and
would have greater respect
and regard for each others
country and their national
events.

Blatant disrespect for anoth-
er country and its citizens, that
allowed you to live a better
life from where you or.your
parent/s came from, or assist
you in your migratory move-
ment to other countries of
your dream, will eventually be
met with ultimate resistance

’ and eventual bloodshed.

I urge all who participate in
Haiti’s Flag Day to do it
respectfully and to encourage
others to join you in celebrat-
ing its real meaning if they so
desire.

The International Food Fair
held at the Botanical Gardens
is an event where you can
experience and learn of so
many cultures with respect.
You can go around the world
without having to buy a plane
ticket.

On the Bahamas Coat of
Arms, our motto.is “Forward,
Upward, Onward, Together”.

We are all in this country
by the grace of God, so I
would urge people of all
nations calling the Bahamas
their home, to respect its peo-
ple and its culture.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 5





Road to improvement

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@Tribunemedia.net

THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment launched its first Public
Service Drivers’ manual on
Friday — calling on all current
and future jitney, surrey horse,
taxi-cab and tour car drivers to
adhere to the rules and guide-
lines which lie within.

From driving “furiously” to
“refusing to use a poop bag”
for a surrey horse, not taking
daily baths or using deodor-
ant to stopping your bus in
non-designated areas, the
Road Traffic Department has
included them all in the man-
ual as rerninders of what not
to do as a driver in the public
transportation industry.

. It wants those working in

the sector to be better mindful
of these things, so that “best
services will be carried out and
passengers’ expectations can
be met.”

The manual was launched
at a press conference by Min-
ister of Works Earl Deveaux
and Road Traffic Controller
Jack Thompson on Friday,

The launch goes hand-in-
hand with the start of a 100
Day Challenge for Jitney dri-
vers to improve the service
which they provide to the pub-
lic, beginning today.

Manual contains rules for jitney, surrey
horse, taxicab and tour car drivers





SSS
Earl Deveaux



Recognition by the govern-
ment, and increasingly by
stakeholders in the industry,
that the public, often avoid
using the services that are on
offer for fear of being subject
to an unpleasant or danger-

ous experience, inspired the
latest efforts to raise standards
in the sector.

The government ultimately
wants to get more people out
of their cars and into buses so

that traffic congestion can be.

minimised, and bus drivers
stand to benefit from
increased business if they
change the less than savoury
ways of many who do the job.

In the 28-page manual,
which Mr Deveaux said all of
those who apply for a licence
to work in the industry will be
required to read, regulations
governing the various busi-
nesses are laid out, all with a
“Code of Conduct and Ethics”
and other responsibilities that
drivers in each respective area
are deemed to have.

The manual says the Road

Traffic Department wants to,

“impress upon drivers how
important a role each of them
play in our economy, espe-
cially in the tourism industry.”

Under tlie code of conduct

_ section, drivers are recom-

mended to offer value for

money, create a “unique and.
fun-filled experience” and
provide excellent service.

Companies are told they
should look for drivers who
are “caring, enthusiastic and
friendly” and knowledgeable
about the Bahamas. :

Those who “drive wantonly
or furiously” or use insulting
or abusive language, or wil-
fully cause injury to any per-
son or property, are reminded
within the manual that they
are guilty of an offence and
are liable to a fine, or a fine
and imprisonment for a sec-
ond offence

Drivers are told to take care
over their appearance, as
“how we look and appear to
our guests provides a first
impression of our destina-
tion.”

Fresh breath, well-kept uni-
forms; and neat hairstyles are
all suggested and “mashed-up,
shabby dress and poor per-
sonal cleanliness” could result
in a driver being suspended
for the day if found upon
inspection, warns the docu-



-senger Bill of Rights” section.



RAGGED ISLAND often calls itself
the ‘Cinderella’ isle of the Bahamas, but
not when it comes to its children’s acade-
mic and musical achievements.

The island school - run by Robert and
Ophelia Boodram - has notched up an
impressive tally of successes this year,
including national championships in song
- and drama.

The school won two titles at the E
Clement Bethel National Arts Festival
and took first and second places in a dis-
trict essay and poetry competition.

Mr Boodram told The Tribune: “We
are very proud of the students’ perfor-

Ragged Island school notch up successes

mances, not only in the extra-curriculum
areas but also academically. “The school
is well supported by the parents, commu-
nity and Ministry of Education.”

The national drama champions were
Lovell Lockhart, Sade Lockhart-Bain,
Rhesa Boodram and Davontay Wallace.

Their skit was about a single mother
who was always drunk and both physi-
cally and mentally abusive to her chil-

- dren.

Rap song winners were Myron Lock-
hart-Bain 11, Alfred Francis, Nino Fran-
cis, D’Marcio Wallace, Ashton Brooks
and Aaron Boykins.

The song, about different forms of child ©

abuse, was composed by Alfred and
Myron. Child abuse was also the theme of
the district essay and poetry competition,
organised by the Department of Social
Services in Exuma. Ragged Island was
winner and runner-up.

Students have also embarked on a Cans
for Kids campaign, recycling soda cans to
help less fortunate children in the
Bahamas. :

So far about 4,000 cans have been
shipped towards the non-profit venture.

Mr and :Mrs Boodram ‘teach’ children:::

in grades one to nine.



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Busy time
for writers

BAHAMIAN writers
have a busy six months
ahead, with several events
planned leading up to a sto-
rytellers’ convention next
January. Over the weekend,
members of the Bahamas
writers’ group set up a com-
mittee to plan a cultural his-
tory day in October, a writ-
ers’ lunch, the January con-
vention and the junior writ-
ers book launch.



ment. Passengers are entitled
to a driver who obeys all traf-
fic laws, air conditioning, a
smoke and radio free ride and
have no obligation to tip dri- LSS e

vers, it adds, under the “Pas- IN i sal
For the stories behind
the news, read Insight

on Mondays

The manual is available
from the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.
















Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort &
Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:
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REQUIREMENTS:



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Posess a sound culinary background

Must be a self motivated person.
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Being able to develop budgets. and necessary controls
Good leadership skills are a must

College or culinary institute training is an asset

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Florida Democrats seek

Obama unity at fundraiser

i HOLLYWOOD, Fla.

THE Florida Democratic Party
made a huge effort to unify
activists behind Barack Obama
after more than a year of drama
over the state’s primary and the
prolonged battle to see who would
secure the nomination, according
to Associated Press.

It pretty much worked.

More than 1,400 attended the
state party’s annual Jefferson-Jack-

son dinner and there were plenty ,

of signs, stickers and buttons for
Obama. Speaker after speaker
urged the crowd to get behind the
Illinois senator whether or not they
supported Hillary Clinton.

“The truth of the matter is, my
friends, those of you who support-
ed Hillary Clinton are in many
ways the most important people



Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur








in the room,” said U.S. Rep.
Robert Wexler. “We understand
how hard you worked, we under-
stand how emotional and passion-
ate you all are.”

But now, Wexler said, Democ-
rats have to come together as a
family and Clinton supporters
need to work just as hard for Oba-
ma. The crowd’s response was less
than raucous, but there were cer-
tainly signs that party activists were
moving forward after a nearly
evenly divided primary.

Still, many Clinton supporters
were feeling the sting of defeat a
week after she conceded the race.

“I’m not wearing an Obama
sticker only because it’s so raw,”
said Diana Wasserman-Rubin, a
Broward County Commissioner
who was a Clinton fundraiser. “We
worked so hard for her.”

‘Don’t waste time ©
waiting for people to
recognize you.
Fach individual is
different, and
you are special in
your own way.”

quoteoftheweek@live.com





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eos

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00 cases of beer to restaurants, Rts atl Mee Pl , aC mith ;

of Kalik

KALIK celebrated its 20th
anniversary recently at the
Commonwealth Brewery,

commemorating the 1988

launch of the original national
beer of the Bahamas.

In remarks to the press,
Leroy Archer, managing

director of Kalik, emphasised °

the good reputation that the

.Bahamian'beer has developed

at home and abroad.

“From the very beginning,
we’ve aimed to offer a great
tasting premium beer that
Bahamians could be proud of,
and we have strived ever since
to maintain this quality.

“Today in the international
marketplace, and particularly
in North America, Kalik has

made its mark,” he said.

According to Mr Archer,
Kalik exports more than
100,000 cases of beer to
restaurants, stores and bars all
over the world.

In order to keep up with the
demand for Kalik, he said, the

.Commonwealth Brewery pro-

duces 1.7 million cases of the
beer annually.

In addition to the original
Kalik, Kalik Gold, Kalik Light

- were created in 1992 and 1997

respectively.

Further plans for the 20th
anniversary celebrations were
announced at the event, where
persons were able to partake
of light refreshments and
enjoy Kalik products.





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We thank all applicants for their interest but only
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THE TRIBUNE

MUNDAY, JUINE 10, ZUUG, PFAUE /



LOCAL NEWS



No more Yen for whales

@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

ominica’s Prime

Minister, Roo-

sevelt Skerrit,

and his cabinet
have taken a decision that will
not endear them to the Japan
Whaling Association or to some
of the governments in nearby
Caribbean states. But, it may
help to stop the wanton slaugh-
ter of hundreds of whales every
year and, at the same time, con-
tribute to a growing tourist
attraction in the Caribbean —
whale watching.

Skerrit has announced, in
advance of the 60th meeting of
the International Whaling Com-
mission (IWC) on June 23rd,
that the country’s representa-
tive will abstain on a vote for
“the sustainable use of marine
resources”. Read “sustainable
- use of marine resources” to
mean “killing whales”.

Every year the Japanese
hunt and kill 1,200 whales and it
defends its position at the IWC.
With an increasing number of
countries, including many in
Latin America, Asia and Africa,
opposing the unjustified killing
of whales, Japan is outnum-
bered. So, it set out to recruit
small countries to join the [WC
as supporters in exchange for
giving them fisheries facilities.

Over time, these mostly
refrigerated storage units, have
become white elephants. They
sit on the shores underutiliséd,
and not serving the fishing com-
munity which lacks the capacity
to catch the amount of fish nec-
essary to fillthem. They may
have served a purpose at the
time of their establishment
when the governments of these
small states pointed to them as
' indicators of investment in their
- small and less well-off fishing
communities. Today, it is clear
the fishing communities would
have done better if investment
had been made in improving
their capacity to fish with bigger
boats and more modern tech-
nology by giving grants or very
low interest loans.

Many of the countries that
Japan recruited to bolster. its
position in the IWC cannot
afford to join other interna-
tional organisations that are of
importance to them or send del-
egations to meetings. Yet, they
' have somehow managed both
to meet the cost of membership
of the IWC and to send vocif-
erous delegations to its meet-
ings.

Observers point out that
many of these small countries
have no provision in their bud-
gets for membership of the
IWC. And reports by the
media, including the BBC, sug-

gest that the Japanese Whaling ~

Association pays the costs, and
calls the tune. It is also pointed
out that, apart from St Vincent
and the Grenadines, there is no
history of whale hunting among
the small Caribbean islands and
no “national interest” reason
for supporting the Japanese
position. d

Indeed, the reverse may be
true since there is a vibrant and
growing “whale watching” sec-
tor to the tourism industry in
the Caribbean, including
Dominica. The value of “whale
watching’ to Caribbean tourism
is estimated by some at US$22
million.. Others argue that this
figure is conservative, and if
capacity were strengthened it
could earn much more.

Many international organi-
sations — and knowledgeable
persons within Caribbean coun-
tries — have accused the Japan-
ese of “buying” the votes of six
small Caribbean countries of
which Dominica is one. Indeed,
when Skerrit made _ his
announcement, Andrew
Armour, President of Carib
Whale, a group advocating for
the protection of marine
resources, is reported by the
Caribbean Media Corporation
as saying that Japan is no longer
interested in “buying votes.”

' Those who support the
Japanese position in the
Caribbean — now only repre-
sentatives of five countries —
claim, that they do so for two
reasons. The first is that
“whales eat fish” and therefore
deprive Caribbean fishermen
and Caribbean people of the
food they need. However, there
is no scientific evidence to sup-
port the notion that whales are
depleting the fish stocks avail-
able to man in the region — the
claim is a red herring. The sec-
ond is that “the denial of sus-
tainable use of whales today,

Uda
ity

FOR PEST PROBLEMS §

PHONE: 322-2157





Syl ee DELO ES



can lead to the denial of the use
of other marine sources tomor-
row.” This is a fear-mongering
argument that has no eviden-
tiary basis, but is promoted by
the Japanese and echoed by
their few vocal Caribbean
clients. :

Japan has long opposed the
prohibition of whale hunting by
the IWC and has ignored inter-

national treaties, such as the
United Nations Convention on
the Law of the Sea. When
Japanese fishermen kill up to
1,200 whales a year, Japan
defends this action as being in
conformity with the IWC scien-
tific whaling criteria. But, a dis-
tinguished panel of lawyers in
2006 found that Japanese sci-
entific whaling is unlawful and
contravenes several interna-
tional conventions, including
the International Convention
for the Regulation of Whaling.
Among the panel of legal
experts is the internationally-
recognised British lawyer,
Philppe Sands, the author of
“Lawless World: America and
the making and breaking of
global rules”, an account of the
US disregarding international
law and rules.

Prime Minister Skerrit and
his government deserve con-
gratulations for taking the deci-
sion to abstain on the vote. In
doing so, Dominica is “breaking
a trend that (Dominica has)
maintained for a number of
years,” as Skerrit himself said.
He has done so in recognition
not of Japan’s ambitions, but of
Dominica’s national interest.
The other Caribbean countries



should do the same. In a high-
ly competitive world in which
small island states are at the far
margins of international con-
cern, Dominica’s economy has
already been ripped to shreds
by the loss of its preferential
access for its bananas into the
market of the European Union.
Its financial services sector has
also been:destroyed by the
actions of big countries, includ-
ing Japan which was a hawk in
crushing offshore financial cen-
tres in 2000 when the Organi-
sation for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development (OECD)
imposed its so-called ‘harmful
tax competition initiative’.
Dominica is now clinging to
its attraction as the ‘nature
island of the Caribbean’; its pris-
tine rainforests; and its won-
derful Caribbean charm to
develop a, tourism industry to
bolster its economy. As Skerrit
himself alluded in announcing

- his decision not to support the

Japanese anymore: the pursuit
of the goal of promoting the
natural environment is incon-
sistent with killing one of its
most magnificent species.

It is time that the yen for
whale killing be rejected by all.

_ (The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)

Responses’ to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.co
m>

Itsuo Inouye/AP Photo

A HUMPBACK WHALE jumps at a whale watching point, off Okinawa, southwestern Japan, Tuesday, March
25, 2008.

Japan on June 21, 2007.





David Guttenfelder/AP Photo

JAPANESE SCHOOL CHILDREN watch whalers butcher a Baird’s Beaked whale on a port deck in Wada,



A JAPAN COAST
GUARD boat guards
the Japan’s whaling
ship “Nisshin Maru”
afterreturning from the
Antarctia at a Tokyo
pier on April 15. The
fleet killed only 60 per-
cent of its target of
1,000 whales.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





How can we kick the carbon habit?

@ Energy conservation & Car pooling @ Solar energy technology

@ BY DR MICHAEL
TURNER
Undersecretary in the
Ministry of Health
and Social Development

T has been generally

accepted by profes-

sionals in the study of

human behaviour and

ecology that human activities

are fundamental to the mainte-
nance of the environment.

Scholars of the Bible have

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concluded that man is endowed
by his creator and given the
responsibility to take care of the
environment around him.
According to the Genesis story,
the Lord God took man and
placed him in the Garden of
Eden to dress it and to keep it.
The inference here is clearly
that man was given stewardship
of the environment.

We therefore must all come
to understand that protection
of the environment is necessary
to ensure the optimal well-being
of man and that of many other
social animals inhabiting planet
earth.

It must also be emphasised
that the uncontrolled activities
of man have the potential to



















325-2609.







radically change the environ-
ment, and thereby alter habi-
tats, create stress and displace
species that are not able to
quickly adjust, sometimes to the
point of extinction.
Observation and research
indicates that man’s manipula-

tion of the environment and |

earth’s natural resourcés
accounts for the greatest impact

’ on the planet, whether that

impact be positive or negative.

The evidence of this conclu-
sion can be seen right in our
local communities when we cut
down many of our trees to
make way for construction and
other development projects.

Conversely, poor garbage and
refuse handling practices evi-
denced by littered streets, pri-
vate and public properties,
including recreational premis-
es with refuse ranging from
food waste to derelict vehicles
creates habitats for vectors of
public health importance, such
as rats and mosquitoes.

Our belief that our creator
God has given us protective
responsibility for the environ-
ment is affirmed by our use of
the maxim “cleanliness is next
to godliness.” :

Looking around us today in
the wider Bahamas, we may
have reason to question either
this maxim, or to question our
godliness, because the state of
the national environment has
become a cause for concern.

On Thursday June 5, along
with other UN member coun-
tries, we celebrated World
Environment Day.

World Environment Day was
established in 1972 by the Unit-
ed Nations General Assembly,
marking the Stockholm Con-
ference on the human environ-
ment.

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“Looking around us today in
the wider Bahamas, we may
have reason to question either
this maxim (cleanliness is next
to godliness) or to question
our godliness, because the
state of the national
environment has become a
cause for concern.”

Litter scars the Bahamian environment.

Subsequently each. year June
5 is commemorated by member
countries of the UN, highlight-
ing a common or similar theme
and encouraging activities ben-
eficial to the environment.

The theme this year was
“Kick the Habit: Towards a
Low Carbon Economy.

This theme calls our atten-
tion to the fact that the major
energy source fueling the
economies of both the industri-
alised world and developing
economies are carbon based,
and implicated with the pro-
duction of green house-gases
associated: with global warming.

Scientists are of the view that
the apparent increase in
Atlantic hurricane activities,
both in numbers and intensity
are associated with the margin-
al rise in temperature over the
last decade or more.

Nevertheless,:the» world
appears to be growing no less
dependent on coal and oil for

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2008



industrial progress and devel-
opment, despite their known
damaging effects on the envi-
ronment.

Despite our small size, we in
the Bahamas should be encour-
aged to do all that we can to
slow the world’s dependence on
fossil fuels, if only because of

’ the fact that we are positioned

to be among the first to suffer
from negative fallout from glob-
al warming and climate change.
In addition to our low-lying
landscape, being vulnerable to
sea level rise, we sit in the
Atlantic hurricane belt, perched

in the path of more frequent

and severe hurricanes.

Higher temperatures also
seem to be supportive of more
severe drought conditions and
thereby giving rise to more
destructive forest fires.

“~-Global-warming ‘is or’should:

be of special interest to us in

the Bahamas; also bécausé we’

stands to lose precious limited

land space becoming sub-
merged due to sea level rise
brought on by global warming
and climate change.

« What can we in the Bahamas
do to help kick the carbon habit
you may ask.

I offer that a good place to
start is with energy conserva-
tion. Energy conservation
should be doubly attractive at
this time, both because of the
desirability to minimise the
damaging effects on the envi-
ronment and the economic pain
being experienced as a result of
the escalating price of gas and
diesel fuels. Car pooling, espe-
cially within households, could
bring much needed relief from
the hardship that most of us are
now experiencing by driving
one person per vehicle.

Secondly, I offer that we in
the Bahamas should make full
use of the solar energy technol-
ogy available and encourage
further reduction in the use of
fossil fuels.

The raw material of solar
energy is available year round in
The Bahamas. It is perhaps the
most reliable renewable ener-
gy source, and it is available free
of charge. Expenditure designed
to perfect this technology
should be considered a reason-
able investment proposal for
companies in the Bahamas.

As was mentioned earlier in
this presentation, we in the
Bahamas hold to the maxim
that “cleanliness is next to god-
liness”.

By the universal commemo-
ration of this day June 5 each
year, we are reminded of the
God-given responsibility we
share to care for the environ-
ment in order to ensure its
health, not only to our own ben-
efit, but that of generations to
come. It is my sincere hope that
we see ourselves as partners at
all levels and that we are con-
tinuously motivated to action
in shouldering our responsibili-

“ties to the Environment’ each

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the month, and every month of
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Re eae a ee |
Fathers from
‘over-the-hill’
are treated
to luncheon

i By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information ~—
Services

THE Bain and Grants Town
Urban Renewal Centre, in con-
junction with Farm Road Urban
Renewal Centre, treated fathers
in the over-the-hill communi-
ties to a Father’s Day luncheon
last Thursday.

The fathers were not only
treated to lunch but also
received gifts ranging from
radios, DVD players, tele-
phones, silk neckties and gift
baskets.

Bain and Grants Town
Urban Renewal Centre manag-
er Mary Jean Lightbourn
explained that there was a.two-
fold motivation for hosting the
fathers to a luncheon.

Ms Lighbourn said: “We
want them to become mentors
for our young men in the area,
and we also want them to be
role models for some of the
younger fathers in the commu-
nity.”

The second motive was to get

more men to become part of '

the Centre’s senior citizen’s
group. —

Ms Lightbourn said the Bain
and Grants Town senior citi-
zen’s group has 69 females and
only two males, so the plan is to
get the men interested in join-
ing.

But the event was not only
attended by men from Bain and

; Lair Local Company |

Grants: Town or Farm Road.
She said the nine Urban
Renewal Centres throughout
New Providence were asked to
bring at least 10 fathers.

To pull off the luncheon,
sponsors were needed but they
were not in-short supply.
According to the centre man-
ager, many businesses in the
community sponsored the
event.

Ms Lightbourn explained that
the morning of the event busi-
ness persons were still calling
to find out what they could con-
tribute.

Florists

Florist Jeffrey Thompson,
who was asked to contribute,
got 10 other florists to donate
flower arrangements.

During the lunch, co-ordina-
tor of Urban Renewal Liveable
Neighbourhood Programme in
New Providence Ella Lewis told
fathers that when they are
absent in the home something is
missing.

Ms Lewis said urban renewal
is about the promotion of fam-
ilies and fathers will never be
forgotten or forsaken by the
programme.

“You are important to us and
we will do all we can to make
your lives more comfortable
and let you know we appreciate
and love you,” she said.

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Brown, rector and priest at St
Agnes Anglican. Church who
spoke at the event, said Father’s
Day must be a bigger celebra-

tion than it is today.

“T still believe we need to
work on the celebration of
fatherhood,” Father Brown
said. “Society has allowed such
an important role in the life of
creation to be.so downplayed
and so superficial.

“T am tired of the many ways

and tunes with which men of:

our country are treated and
described.”

He said many times when
man is labelled as a failure he is
really a failure of the society,

. including the church.

“Despite the fact that some
of our men have fallen to the

-vices of life it does not mean

that there are not women who
have not done the same He
Father Brown said.

“Therefore, if we are not

prepared to call women ‘wut-
less’ on Mother’s Day, then we

need to stop calling our fathers ~

‘wutless’ on Father’s Day,
because man cannot be ‘wut-
less’ by himself.

. “Father’s Day must be a big-
ger celebration than it is today
and the challenge of this event
today must be the catalyst used
to cause greater recognition to
the male population in

this country, more so in

our immediate communities
in many instances are what
they are because of social rea-
sons.”

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



EPA ae made me cringe

But beyond the demonstrations is an important point
.. Bahamians need to be informed about the issue

!

MISSION TO INFORM: Zhivargo
Laing must seek to engage the
populace about the EPA.







“Must be 2 years old
- by November 1. —
gue -day/Half-day/3-day program



AB Re LRN

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com —

N an attempt to score
cheap political points,
Paul Moss’s and Fayne
Thompson’s oppor-

* tunistic protest in condemna-

tion of the European Partner-
ship Agreement (two weeks
ago) by parading puppet-like,
unapprised straw vendors
throughout Rawson Square
appears to have been nothing
short of a discomfiting ruse.
Mr Moss, the political busy-
body and leader of the activist
group Bahamians Agitating for

Lake Waterloo, East Bay Street .
. Waterloo Compound —

‘Tel: (242) 394-4781 /3 for further information

Ears

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

July 7 - ae 1
Ages 2-12.



GIBSON

a Referendum on Free Trade
(BARF), appears to have
directed a disastrous demon-
stration centred on a group of
less affluent, rowdy protesters

who appeared to be thoroughly
ignorant to the issues.

As I watched the side- -split-
ting, awkward ZNS segment
featuring these protesters, I
cringed as one demonstrator

after another suggested that.

parliamentarians would be
using monies to “over-educate
their children” or that they
would be pushing up grass while
their children would be eating
flowers (whatever that means
or has to do with the EPA is



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“Even today,
the average
Bahamian can
hardly discuss,
to any
appreciative
extent, what the
EPA entails!”



beyond me).

The so-called picket-line
appears to have been a
wretched handful of clueless
straw vendors, who seemed
incapable of defending their

_opposition to the EPA though

they repeatedly bellowed “no
EPA” and waved home-made
placards.

Oddly enough, while those
apparently uninformed straw
vendors are expressing fears
about foreigners coming from
Europe to compete with them,
they are disregarding the Hait-

ian and Jamaican immigrants.

already: operating in the
straw/flea market.

The EPA, which is set to be
signed between the European
Union and the Bahamas/Cari-
forum countries, is an accord
which succeeds the Cotonou
Agreement that governed trade
between the African Caribbean
and Pacific (ACP) countries
and the EU. It appears that the
EPA is designed to increase
access to markets and services.

Like many discerning
Bahamians, I am also question-
ing the extent to which the EPA
allows for European companies
to compete and the commercial
sectors that will be opened to
European competition.

To carry out a countrywide

mission ‘to: inform: Bahamians:'*
about the EPA, .Minister:of :

State for Finance Zhivargo
Laing must seek to.effectively

engage the populace in a public
education programme/dialogue,
particularly to avoid further
misleading misinformed or
uninformed Bahamians. Even
today, the average Bahamian
can hardly discuss, to any appre-
ciable extent, what the EPA
entails!

On June 12 and 13, Mr Moss
and a BARF delegation were
scheduled to demonstrate
against this economic partner-
ship agreement in Trinidad and
Tobago. However, I’m won-

' dering if he also took that group

of irate straw vendors on his
Caribbean expedition?

Bishop William
Thompson has
found his voice!

Although former Bahamas
Christian Council (BCC) presi-
dent Bishop William Thomp-
son’s ‘in-your-face’ scorching of
National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest bears some
merit, especially since the pre-
sentation of promised strategic
crime fighting is yet to appear,
why didn’t he speak similarly
when serious crime was spi-
ralling out of control under the

‘PLP, and more specifically, for-

mer National Security Minister
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt? Is this
an out-and-out case of political
favouritism?

While some of the Bishop’s
charges are meritorious, his
recent speech at the National
Baptist Missionary and Educa-
tional Convention can be inter-
preted as a misuse of the pulpit,
a political staging ground.

Dressed in his priestly garb,
Bishop Thompson seemed like
a disingenuous politico who was
sermonising and peddling a
politically biased speech which
would have been more forceful
had he taken the same stance

-under the former government

instead of remaining conspicu-
ously mute in the face of dis-
tasteful scandals and allegations
of-outright corruption. The
Bishop should also speak to the
growing number of morally
bankrupt, religious hawkers
being dragged before the courts
for “tiefin”, rape, fraud and var-
ious other felonious acts.

Has Mr Thompson just
realised that serious crime has
increased or that legal immi-
grants and their Bahamas-born
children who apply and are
deserving of citizenship should
be naturalised?

Why hasn’t the Bishop
addressed the indiscretions of
public officials, infidelity
between pastors and_parish-
ioners and the predatory
attempts of some pastors to
fleece congregants and exploit
their vulnerable, credulous
parishioners?

Frankly, the clergyman’s pon-
tification suggests a degree of
hypocrisy and an indefensible

‘double standard since he was

tight-lipped as BCC president

‘ when the PLP was in power.

Sadly, Bishop Thompson has
strayed from the impetus to
speak ‘what thus says the Lord’
to delving in the political arena.

Instead of engaging in cock-
eyed political ‘posturing, lead-
ers in our society — particular-

ly the church — should employ:

hands-on tactics in the fight to
reduce crime, poverty and oth-
er social ills through outreach

‘programmes and social initia-

tives, and assist in developing
better citizens.

When religious and civic
leaders send signals to an
impressionable society that they
are seemingly selective in
addressing social ills/issues
based upon political leanings,
their divisive actions lend to an
atmosphere of chaos.

Is there any wonder why

“many Bahamians only attend

churches for pune these
days?

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 11



——
l@ YOUNG MAN’S VIEW



PIONEER SHIPPING: Closed operations.
The National Insurance

Board bungles another one!

Recently, Pioneer Shipping closed its operations and termi-
nated several employees, who were later shocked to discover
that their National Insurance payments were not up-to-date
although it was being deducted from their wages.

For such an outrageous episode to recur, even after the Roy-
al Oasis debacle, the blatant ineptitude of the National Insur-
ance department and their failure to verify payments is inex-
cusable.

Now that the National Insurance Board has once again
failed to ensure that contributions are paid on time, I’m curious
as to why NIB officers haven’t been dispatched to companies
that default on payments and why haven’t these businesses
faced hefty fines or criminal charges since they steal - via
deductions - NIB contributions from their employees’ earnings?

Who will protect workers, many of whom barely earn above
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Pilot project conducted for 40 coaches
and PE teachers in the public schools

@ By Llonella Gilbert
_ Bahamas Information
Services

THE College of the
Bahamas and the Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports and
Culture conducted a pilot pro-
ject for 40 coaches and physi-
cal education teachers in the
public schools, including pri-
mary, junior and high schools.

A professional development ,

workshop focused on the the-
ory and practice of coaching
basketball and the art of injury
prevention, vice-president of
the outreach programme at
COB, Dr Pandora Johnson
told a press conference. .

John Reynolds, head coach
of the Florida Tech women’s
basketball programme and
local facilitator Edwurdo
Thompson, sports therapist
International Orthopaedic
Sports Therapy, facilitated the
workshop.

Should the pilot project
prove successful, Dr Johnson
said it will provide an excellent
medium through which the
college can make a positive
impact through the educa-
tional system.

She said: “Arguably, it is
our coaches and physical edu-
cation teachers who have a
tremendous opportunity to
hone the ‘soft skills’ in
extracurricular environments
which support that which we
do in our academic settings.”

Dr Johnson also noted that °

the college/university wishes
to establish a Professional
Development Institute for
Athletics Personnel that will
address the needs of coaches,
physical education teachers,
student athletes, statisticians,
referees and other sports
administrators.

President of the Bahamas
Basketball Federation
Lawrence Hepburn said the
federation, which is also a
partner in the venture, endors-
es the professional develop-
ment opportunity ‘for coach-

es and physical education

teachers.



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Workshop focuses on theory and practice of
coaching basketball and injury prevention

Mr Hepburn said: “We are
particularly pleased to learn
of the involvement of physi-
cal education teachers and
coaches at the primary school
level, as we believe that it is at
this level where young play-
ers learn the fundamentals of
the game so critical to the
development of basketball in
general and to our national
programmes in particular.”

He said the federation is
also pleased that the col-
lege/university intends to
attach continuing education
units upon the completion of
the workshop.

He added that, based on the
modules proposed, physical
education teachers and coach-
es who complete the work-
shop in its entirety will also
be eligible for an Internation-
al Basketball Federation
(FIBA) coaching certification,
the level of which will be con-

firmed once reviewed and ~

approved by FIBA.

“What I can confirm,” Mr
Hepburn said, “even in the
absence of this review, it is
clear that the topics to be cov-
ered meet at the very mini-
mum Level I designation, and
cover some of the topics
required by Level II.”

The modules for the work-
shop included fundamentals
of coaching basketball, offen-
sive and defensive fundamen-
tals of basketball and the art
of injury prevention.

Explaining his coaching
technique, Coach Reynolds
said: “I can guarantee that the
coaches that attend in the 10
hours I instruct will not only
meet the standard that you
have, but they will probably
need the physical therapists
for the ice they will be using
on their bodies.”

The therapist, Mr Thomp-
son, explained it has always
been his dream to help coach-

“ es and athletes enhance their

performance, preyent injuries
and maintain a consistent lev-

_ el of performance.

He said: “I thank COB for
allowing us to have this plat-
form and to be an influence
to our young coaches, athletes
and also to instructors.

“There is a lot of new infor-
mation out there; there are a
lot of new technologies out
there and we are going to get
an opportunity to see first

hand, first class and world
class techniques and tools to
enhance and maintain a con-
sistent level of performance.”

Senior education officer,
Department of Education for
Primary Schools in the MOE,
Dawn Knowles, said next year
the ministry hopes to include
teachers and coaches from the
Family Islands and eventually
include private schools in the
workshop.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

pial NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Flooding i in China kills 55; one million flee —

8 BENING downstream, especially in the coastal
7 7 manufacturing powerhouse of Guangdong, Xin-
hua says.

Most of those areas are expected to receive more
heavy rain over the next 10 days.

Just to the south, communities with tens of thou-
sands of people were threatened by the swollen
Xijiang River in the Guangxi region, where a 130-
foot crack had opened in an embankment near
Changzhou, Xinhua said.

Nearly 120,000 people fled to high ground in the
nearby town of Longhua when river water began to
pour oe the gap, it said.



AT LEAST 55 people have died and seven are
missing in flooding across a broad stretch of south-
ern China, state media reported Sunday, according
(0 Associated Press.

More than 1.2 million people have been forced to
flee their homes across nine provinces, including
Sichuan, which is still reeling from last month’s
earthquake that killed almost 70,000 people, the
official Xinhua News Agency said.

Heavy rain in Sichuan, Guizhou and Yunnan,
provinces will further raise water levels

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Govt's national

security approach
‘yields results’

‘MN By MATT MAURA

Bahamas Information
Services

THE government’s co-oper-
ative and collaborative
approach to national security
yielded “significant results” dur-
ing the 2007/2008 Budget year,
Minister of National Security
and Immigration Tommy Turn-
quest told House of PRED
members.

Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment is working assiduously
to combat crime and criminali-
ty in a “determined effort” to
halt and reverse some current
crime trends.

Speaking during the budget
debate, Mr Turnquest said
transnational crimes, such as the
illicit trafficking in drugs and
firearms, illegal immigration
and the illegal smuggling of
migrants, are on the list of “pri-
ority” national security issues
facing the Bahamas.

He said the “serious situa-
tion” of crime and criminality
in the Bahamas, engendered in
part, by transnational crime, is
the over-riding concern of the
government and the people of
the Bahamas alike.

Statistics

Mr Turnquest said that while
the country remains in a “spi-
ral” of crime and criminality,
the statistics for January 1
through June 10, 2008, are
“instructive.” :

The national security minister
said that while the number of
house break-ins (1,318 as com-
pared to 1,134 in 2007); shop
break-ins (682 as compared to
648 in 2007), stolen vehicles
(522 in 2008 compared to 433
in 2007) and rapes (60 in 2008
compared to 55 in 2007) rose,
there were decreases in the
murder rate, cases of
manslaughter and armed FOB:
beries.

He said that up to June 10,
2008, 32 murders had been com-
mitted in The Bahamas, com-
pared to 35 for the same time-
frame in 2007.

Drug trafficking, arguments,
revenge killings and domestic
violence continued to impact
the murder rate while illegal
guns continued to be the
weapon of choice.

Mr Turnquest said that no

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Tommy Turnquest



cases of manslaughter
were reported for the year
2008 as compared to three for
2007.

He said armed robberies also
decreased from 365 to 344
for the same time period of
2007.

“It would be unhelpful at this
stage to speculate from these
figures what our crime statistics
would be by the end of 2008,”
Mr Turnquest said.

“Let me assure the Bahamian
public, however, that the gov-
ernment is working assiduously
to combat crime and criminali-
ty in our communities and in
our country in a determined
effort to halt and reverse dis-
turbing crime trends.”

Mr Turnquest told MPs that
to combat crime and criminali-
ty in the Bahamas, the govern-
ment, in general, and the Min-
istry of National Security, in
particular, had approached and
will continue to approach the
national security issues of the
Bahamas “from the broadest
perspective” to bring resolution
tothe problem. ~°

The ‘minister said law
enforcement and security agen-
cies such as the Royal Bahamas
Police and Defence Forces, the
Department of Immigration
and Her Majesty’s Prison, in
addition to the Parliamentary
Registration Department, have
been.incorporated into a single
portfolio to accomplish such an
objective.

“While each agency imple-
ments its own mandate, the
oversight by a single ministry



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permits greater cohesion and
co-operation among agencies
and improves the response to,
and management of, national
security issues,’ ” Mr Turnquest
said.

“The advantages of this
approach are self-evident.

“For example, the Defence
Force is working closely with
the Department of Immigration
in apprehending migrants at sea
and in providing security for the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

“With both the Commander,
Defence Force, and the Direc-
tor of Immigration interacting
under the umbrella of the Min-
istry of National Security, deci-
sion-making in these cross-cut-
ting matters is decidedly more
organised and coherent,” Mr
Turnquest added.

Mr Turnquest said other
examples of continuing co-oper-
ation under the umbrella of the
Ministry of National Security
includes that between the
Defence Force and the police
which has resulted in the appre-
hension of persons involved in

transnational crime at sea.

Co-operation

He said co-operation between
law enforcement agencies and
the ministry’s National Anti-.
Drug Secretariat had led to a
more accurate assessment of the
“drug problem” in The.
Bahamas, thereby allowing for
more effective policymaking
and reporting to meet the,
Bahamas’ international obliga- |
tions in drug control.

Mr Turnquest said: “This co-
operative and collaborative
approach to national security...
yielded significant results during
the 2007/2008 budget year.

“If we measure the perfor-
mance of the Ministry of;
National Security and its agen- ©
cies over the course of the.
financial year 2007/2008 by any
yardstick, we must conclude «
that it was a year in which we |
moved forward decisively to.
accomplish ‘the people’s busi-
ness,” Mr Turnquest said.

“What we accomplished was »
not by good fortune; it was not.

by coincidence; it was not by:

chance. »
“It was by deliberate policy ~

and‘action taken by this gov- ;

ernment,” Mr Turnquest added.















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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 13



a

Reyer AS
: ics”.

Marley Resort and Spa
comes alive with
holiday concert

THE Marley Resort and
Spa, West Bay Street, came
- alive on Labour Day weekend
with the sounds of Pliers, one
half of Jamaica’s dynamic duo,
“Chacka Demus and Pliers”.

Rita Marley, proprietor of
the resort and widow of leg-
endary singer Bob Marley,
was on hand to celebrate with
staff and invited guests dur-
ing the holiday concert. .

“It was wonderful. Big Up
Nassau. I love it,” she said of
the event. She was seen danc-
ing along with staff of the
resort.

Pliers, proud of his
Jamaican roots and the legacy
of Bob Marley, promises to
recommend the resort to
everyone that he comes in
contact with.

“T love the setting; it is: very
beautiful. The rooms are very
nice, but I did not expect any-
thing less: I know Mrs (Rita)
Marley very well. She is a

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Reflecting on his career,
Pliers shrugged. his shoulders
and smiled as he reminisced
about the unusual amount of
success that he has enjoyed.
It was difficult for him to find
a place to start. And it is no

RITA MARLEY (left), proprietor
of the Marley Resort and Spa,
along with international recording
artist Pliers, of the dynamic
Jamaican duo, “Chaka Demus
and Pliers”.

wonder; his career in music
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“We [the group Chacka
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_ THE TRIBUNE






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or fax: 363-5055















Anglican split may He ‘inevitable’ after werlding of gay priests

FROM page one

The couple reportedly met and fell in love
while working together at St Bart’s Hospital in
London.

This first ceremony to held for a homosexual
couple in an Anglican Church was conducted in
defiance of the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr
Rowan Williams, who has banned all same-sex
unions.

News of the wedding comes just weeks before
Anglican bishops prepare to attend the Lambeth
Conference in Canterbury, England, next month.

In an earlier interview with The Tribune, Arch-
bishop Gomez said that while he believes that
the issue of homosexuality and same-sex unions
will be one of contentious debate during this
year’s conference, he is praying that it will not
lead to a split in the church.

However, the Archbishop admitted that he

Police are attacked
in Nassau Village

FROM page one

munity may have escalated and
led to yiolence.

Joel became the country’s
30th murder victim of the year
when he was stabbed to death
near Solomon’s Super Centre
on May 31.

.A juvenile male was charged
in Magistrate’s Court last week
with his murder.

Joel is believed to have been
the younger brother of the
teenager shot by police in 2005
leading up to the Nassau Vil-
lage riot.

Mr

FROM page one

Dredivan Galiano Lopez.

Anyone with information about the escapees
is asked to contact the nearest police station or
the police control room at 322-3333.

In March, The Tribune received reports of a
another escape at the Detention Centre when
a Cuban was alleged to have escaped from an
immigration bus.














The riots — sparked when a
Haitian woman was hit by a car
and an angry crowd gathered
in pursuit of the driver —
involved an altercation between
police officers and a Mr Simeus.
Simeus’
Guyanne approached the offi-
cers and reprimanded them for
the way they spoke to her
father. She claimed she was hit
with the butt of a gun.

Then her brother, Wilson
Simeus, made an attempt to get
closer to his sister and was shot
in the face as he held his two-
year-old son in his arms.

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does not believe it likely that the Anglican Church
will exist in its current form beyond 2008.

Archbishop Gomez has repeatedly stated his
belief that homosexual relationships are against
God’s will.

This weekend the Bishop of London, Rev
Richard Charles, ordered an inquiry into the mat-
ter and the priest who officiated the ceremony,
Rev Martin Dudley.

According to international media reports, one
of the grooms, Rev Dr Lord — who was ordained
at Waikato Cathedral Church in New Zealand last
year — in a joint statement with the Bishop of
Waikato yesterday said that he “felt it apPEOpE
ate to lay down his clergy licence.”

Tension between different factions within the .

Anglican Church first reached boiling point in ~
2004, after the US’s Episcopal Church allowed the

consecration of the openly gay Bishop Gene
Robinson of the Diocese of New Hampshire.

Body found

FROM page one

While the head may have
been removed in an act of
violence, police say it is also
possible that the body had’
been lying out in the open
for so long that the elements,
and possibly stray. dogs and
other animals, may have
been responsible for the
head becoming detached.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the
cause of death.

In March this year, several
bodies of men, believed to
be Haitians, were found near
South Beach Pools.

It is believed the men were
passengers of a Haitian sloop
which ran aground off south-
ern New Providence.

daughter

Four escape from Detention Centre

during a night-time escape.

During that incident, the detainees were said
to have scaled both chain-linked and barbed
wired fences surrounding the centre. It is
thought these men may have sustained injuries.
However, no-one was recaptured.

‘ Before that, six Cubans escaped the centre on
August 21, 2007. Unlike previous breakouts,
the public and press were not notified about the
escape until four days later.

In total last year, the Detention Centre expe-

tienced two’ separate breakouts, with nine

Cubans escaping.

















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THE TRIBUNE oe MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 15



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Shuttle Discovery crew glad to be back

Successful expansion
job at international
space station



= Renna/AP Photo

SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY lands at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fa Saturday, June 14, 2008, capping a acceeetul expansion
job at the international space station, now more spacious and robust thanks to a new billion-dollar science lab.

Peter Cosgrove/AP Photo



ASTRONAUT KAREN NYBERG answers questions at a news confer-
ence, after a 14 day mission to the International Space Station, at
Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, June 14,
2008 ;

@ By MARCIA DUNN ©
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida

Space shuttle Discovery and its crew of seven returned to Earth
on Saturday and capped a successful expansion job at the interna-
tional space station, more spacious and robust thanks to a new bil-
lion-dollar science lab, according to the Associated Press.

The shuttle descended through a few puffy clouds and landed at
11:15 a.m., under the control of commander Mark Kelly. :

Two hours later, all the astronauts — including Garrett Reisman, j oo 3 Meee Gr LOBAI Ay :D
looking remarkably fresh and fit after 95 days in space — walked 2 :
out, shook hands with NASA’s senior managers and admired the . at af
ship that safely brought them home. Reisman enjoyed feeling the Be ;
sunshine again.

“Tt’s great to be here on the runway in sunny Florida,” Kelly said.

“It was really an exciting mission.’ from
Discovery’s flight spanned 14 days, 217 orbits and 5.7 million : a . eee ate

miles, and was described by NASA as being about as smooth asit | ae : oo at the Brit

gets. L

Kelly and his crew accomplished everything they set out to do in
orbit. They delivered and installed Japan’s Kibo lab, now the space
station’s biggest room and most sophisticated science workshop, and
dropped off a new pump that the two Russians on board used to fix
their toilet.

The space station also got a new American resident who took
Reisman’s place.

Reisman’s wife, Simone Francis, was s waiting for him at the
Kennedy Space Center. Over the past week, Reisman had described
in quite romantic terms how much he missed her, calling her “my
favorite Earthling” and “doll face.”

NASA’s associate administrator, Christopher Scolese, reveled in
the “outstanding” successes of the past month: landing a spacecraft
on Mars and scooping up dirt, and seeing the space station grow and
“looking really like a space station, ” with the Discovery crew’s help.
The space agency also launched a telescope into orbit last week to
search the universe for elusive gamma rays.

Although the mission itself unfolded almost flawlessly, Discov-
ery left behind a battered launch pad on May 31. Some 5,300
bricks flew off the flame trench when Discovery blasted away,
most likely because they were not attached properly to the under-
lying concrete wall when the pad was built in the 1960s for the Apol-
lo moon shots.

_ NASA managers are confident the launch pad can be fixed in
time for the next shuttle flight in October, by Atlantis to the Hub-
ble Space Telescope.

The next time a shuttle flies to the space station, now three-
quarters complete, isn’t until November. That’s because NASA
needs to have a shuttle ready to rush to Atlantis’ aid in case of seri- - a ae ‘ :
ous damage to its thermal shielding. Atlantis’ astronauts will not be _ |; es ate:
able to get from Hubble to the space station for shelter. ‘ oe : ables.

NASA had no such rescue plan in place-when Columbia took off _
in 2003 on a solo-flying research mission. In any event, mission man-
agers had no idea Columbia’s left wing was severely damaged at
liftoff, and the shuttle shattered during re-entry. All seven on
board were killed.

Shades of Columbia briefly surfaced Friday when Discovery’s
astronauts spotted something floating away from their spaceship.
It turned out to be a little metal clip that broke off the rudder, and
engineers ascertained within just four hours that its absence posed
no danger for Discovery’s re-entry.

The three space station residents watched Discovery’s smooth
landing on live TV transmitted from Mission Control. Astronaut
Gregory Chamitoff, who’s just starting a six-month mission, called
it “an awesome sight.”

“Before you know it, you'll Sag catching your own ride home,”
Mission Control said.

Ten shuttle flights remain before the fleet is retired in 2010, all but
one to the space station.

Launch director Mike Leinbach said he’s encouraging his team
to take time off this summer, since there are no flights, and rest up
for a busy fall. The shuttle work force finds itself in the unusual posi-
tion of scheduling summer vacations and actually being able to take
them on time, he said.

“It’s a good feeling for us,” Leinbach said, smiling.

John Raoux/AP Photo



THE CREW of the space shuttle Discovery from left, commander Mark Kel-
ly, pilot Ken Ham, mission specialists Karen Nyberg, Ron Garan, Garrett
Reisman and Mike Fossum and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
‘astronaut Akihiko Hoshide answer questions at a news conference, after
a 14 day mission to the International Space Station, at Kennedy Space Cen-
ter in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, June 14, 2008. Reisman returned after
95 days on the space station.





PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ee — ne - 7 a . ar aa



!

POLICE OFFICERS search for missing persons at a place where a landslide was triggered by Saturday’s pow-
erful earthquake at Kurihara, northern Japan, on Sunday June 15, 2008. Soldiers fighting through a torrent
of mud and rocks dug out three bodies at.a hot'spring Sunday, bringing the death toll from a magnitude
7.2-earthquake that hit the mountains of northern Japan to at least nine, with more than 200 injured.





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Kyodo News/AP Photo



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Crews search for missing —






Gs aeons
R
ern Japan, Sunday June 15, 2008.

@ By ERIC TALMADGE
KURIHARA, Japan

Rescue teams using shovels
and buckets tried Sunday to dig
their way to seven people
believed trapped in a landslide
at a hot springs resort after ‘a
deadly earthquake pounded the
mountains of northern Japan,
killing at least six and injuring
more than 200.

The fire department squads

worked as military helicopters
buzzed overhead and frequent
aftershocks posed the threat of
the ground collapsing under
their feet.

Saturday’s 7.2-magnitude.

quake triggered several major
landslides, blocking roads and
stranding bathers: at the
Komanoyu hot spring resort,
which is located in a heavily
forested mountainous area out-
side the small city of Kurihara.
Crews searching for the miss-
ing had to hike mountain trails
and dig their way to. the worst-
hit areas.

“It was the worst quake I
have ever felt,” said Rinji Sato,
whose grocery store in this town
near the epicenter was a mess of
shattered bottles and food
thrown from shelves. “We were
just lucky this didn’t hit a big
city.” Search teams have
already recovered the bodies of

ESCUE WORKERS, right, surround a body they retrieved from
destroyed by a landslide triggered by Saturda'

Bet.

six dead, but believe at least
nine more may be missing.
News reports put the number
of injured at about 260.

Emperor Akihito, in an
address at a tree-planting cere-
mony in nearby Akita prefec-
ture, expressed sympathy Sun-
day for those affected by the
quake. “I hope the missing peo-
ple are rescued promptly,” he
said. “I hope peace will return
to people’s lives as soon as pos-
sible.”

Sato described. the temblor
as a sharp vertical jolt followed
by a powerful sideways sway-
ing. “It was impossible to stay
on your feet,” he said.

-Tohoku University geologist
Motoki Kazama said the area
was especially vulnerable to
landslides because it is of vol-
canic origin, and contains a
large amount of loose ash.
Some of the landslides contin-
ued off of the sides of-the hills
for several hundred feet, he
said.

“With a quake of this magni- .

tude, it isn’t surprising that
there was this amount of land
movement,” he said.

The government responded
quickly, mobilizing troops,
police and fire department res-
cue teams to find and care for
the injured and to recover the
dead. “Our most important task

‘

a two-sto



rey hot spa inn, left, which was
y’s earthquake in Kurihara, Miyagi prefecture (state), north-

in Japan’s 7.2 earthquake





Kyodo News/AP Photo

is to save as many lives a2 pos-
sible, and we are doing the best
we can,” Prime Minister Yasuo
Fukuda said.

Access, however, was a major
obstacle. The quake — followed
by more than 200 aftershocks
— buckled.roads, including one
highway that was severed when
a stretch of land collapsed, turn-
ing it into a sudden drop-off.

Train service, water and elec-
tricity, which had been cut, was
restored to most areas on Sun-
day. About 2,800 homes in
Kurihara city.were still without
power, however. j

More than 200 people —
many of them near the hot
springs — remained stranded
Sunday, and were being slowly

. flown out by helicopter. |

“We're getting growing
reports of damage, but we can’t
even get out there to assess the
situation with roads closed. off
because of landslides,” said city
official Norio Sato in Kurihara,
one of the worst-hit cities in
northern Miyagi prefecture
(state). At a nuclear power
plant in Fukushima, about 60
miles away, the jolt splashed a
small amount of radioactive
water from two pools storing
spent fuel. Trade and Industry
Ministry official Yoshinori
Moriyama said there was no
leakage outside the plant:

At {s left

an Culture







SECTION B «© business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY,

JUNE

1°6,°°2:0 08



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



Government to pay $0.5m
for resort oil spill clean-up

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Business Reporter



he government and

Baha Mar will have to

pay additional money

for the clean-up process

of an oil spill at the site
of the former Radisson Laundry site,
Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette told members of the House of
Assembly during the 2008/2009 bud-
get debate.

According to Mr Symonette, Baha
Mar had assumed responsibility from
the hotel corporation for the balance
of the oilspill clean-up at the site,



Hospital’s net
income for Q1
was $0.98m
compared to
$1.3m last year

which occurred
both before and
since the sale of
the property.
Mr Symonette
explained that
the government |j
had by way of
contingency
warrant allocat-
ed $5.16 million
in 2006 for the
remediation
exercises. He
said that, to
date, $3,439,514.01 had been spent,

_ but the costs to complete the exer-

\







COMMONWEALTH Bank. has

- announced it will pay a quarterly divi-

. dend of $.05 per share on June 30 to
shareholders of record as of June 13.

It will-be the second regular quarterly
dividend in'2008 paid to some 6,000
shareholders in addition to an extraor-
dinary dividend paid in April, a com-
bined total of $0.16 per share since
December 31.

“Commonwealth Bank is the largest
public company traded on the Bahamas
International. Securities Exchange,
accounting for more than $9 million

worth of equities traded on the exchange.
in 2007 or 32 per cent of the value of all

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL: :
Business Reporter



DOCTORS Hospital report-

ed that net income for the first
quarter of 2008 was $0.98 mil-
lion compared to $1.3 million
collected last year, the compa-
’ ny’s chairman saying that the
results are evidence of the high
cost of doing business in this
uncertain economic time.

The company further report-
ed that there was an increase in
self -pay patients, which includ-
ed indigent patients who were
treated at the hospital, and
uninsured or underinsured

patients for the period and not-.

ed that because of the current
unstable economic environ-
ment it has been more difficult
to collect from patients.

In his report to sharehold-
ers, Joseph Krukowski said
earnings per share were ten
cents, a decrease from the 13

Drive a Honda Fit Peat to
40 miles per gallon



‘cents for the comparable peri-

od last year.

“Total revenues were $10.8
million compared to $10.5 mil-
lion in the previous year. Net
income for the period was
$0.98 million compared to $1.3
million last year. The first

quarter of fiscal 2009 has evi- .

denced the high cost of doing
business in this uncertain eco-
nomic time as health care costs
continue to rise.”

Mr Krukowski indicated that
the hospital’s total expenses
rose by 7.3 per cent to $0.7 mil-
lion with salaries and benefits
accounting for 47 per cent of
the cost.

He said that contributing
factors included cost of living
increases, health insurance pre-
mium increases and successful
recruitment of filling needed
nursing vaccines.

He also. noted that bad debt

SEE next page

DPM: 5,382

e-passports
have been
issued since
June 8

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter ;

DEPUTY Prime Minister
Brent Symonette told MPs
that, to date, 5,382 e-passports

’ have been issued as of June 8,

2008.
During the budget debate,
Mr Symonette said the pilot

SEE page 4B

__._SEE next page _

cise were likely to significantly exceed
$5 million. Therefore, he said that
government will pay an additional
$500,000 and Baha Mar will pay the
remainder of the costs.

Mr Symonette also explained that,
as it relates to the Baha Mar’ devel-
opment, the aspect of the sales agree-
ment for conveyance of the Hobby
Horse parcel, the Wyndham parcel
and the British American Bank parcel
remain pending, and are subject to
the fulfilment of certain conditions
of its financing and procurement of

world-class equity hotel and casino .

partners as set out in the heads of
agreement dated April 6, 2005.

ntaining your netwe



He also explained that the compa-
ny had been granted a further exten-
sion from March,,2009. _

Other notable changes in the Baha
Mar supplemental heads of agree-
ment: government will retain the
Development Bank and Gaming
Board premises, Baha Mar will pay
the cost of the new BEC sub-station
and, when completed, the hotel will

convey at no cost way leave parcel to

Baha Mar, Mr Symonette explained.

“The corporation is very actively .

pursuing the privatisation and dispo-
sition of its remaining properties in
Andros and Eleuthera. Towards this
end, negotiations with several

Bank to pay dividend of five cents per share

t we ra Let as qualified Microsoftâ„¢

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investors are at an advanced stage,”
he also said.

The Lighthouse Yacht Club in
Andros has deteriorated to such an
extent that a large capital expendi-
ture would be required to complete-
ly repair and refurbish it and Mr
Symonette said its continued operat-
ing losses cannot be sustained by the
Hotel Corporation.

Therefore he noted that the gov--
ernment will place a priority on secur-
ing a substantial purchaser to rede-
velop the property into a viable cul-
tural tourism project which could sig-

nificantly impact the economy of Cen-

tral Andros.

























PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





LAW DEGREE] Bank to pay

Are you interested in studying Law? Holborn College in conjunction with the Univer-

sity of Huddersfield is currently accepting students for the September session. To
learn more plan to attend an information session Wednesday July 2 at 6 p.m. at the
British Colonial Hilton Resort. Prof Michael Newns from the university will be in

attendance. Call Success Training College at 324-7770 to register.



BIE Bank & Trust Bahamas Ltd.
Is seeking the services ofa
Human Resources Generalist

The successful applicant is expected to demonstrate sound
ethical judgment and exercise the highest discretion when
dealing with confidential matters.

e Responsible for the day-to-day operations of the H.R.
Department;

¢ Assist with Training, Compensation, Performance Evaluation,
Budgeting, etc.;

e Address and advise staff on personnel and staffing related issues;

¢ Undertake all areas of Human Resources Administration
inclusive of letter writing, report and correspondence preparation
and research;

e Administer the bank’s, benefits programme inclusive of pension,
medical and life insurance plans;

¢ Calculate and process payroll information;

e Liaise with managers on an operational level;

¢ Coordinate the advertising of job vacancies;

¢ Work with and maintain staff confidential personnel records;

Skills:

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills:
e Proficient office skills:

e Strong problem solving abilities;

e Reliable with confidential information.

Education and Experience:

¢ Bachelor’s degree in business, human resources, or equivalent
combination of education and. experience preferred; '

e Minimum of three years experience as a Human Resources

¢ Generalist or Assistant Manager in a small to medium size
organization. Prior experience with payroll processing and
administration is a plus;

¢ Sound knowledge of local Labour Laws.

with qualiticatious and

Salary will be commensurate

experience.

Interested applicants meeting the above qualifications should
submit a recent resume to:

The President & Chief Operating Officer
BIE Bank & Trust Bahamas Ltd.
Charlotte House
P.O. Box N-3930
Nassau, Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of all resumes is

Wednesday, 18th June 2008.



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dividend of five



cents per share

FROM page 1B

trades,” said chairman TB
Donaldson. “There is a good
reason for such strong demand.
When the bank is successful,

__ we share that success with our

shareholders. They are. the
owners.’ They are the benefi-
ciaries who reap the rewards.”

Those shareholders fared
well in fiscal 2007. Return on
shareholders’ equity for the

year January 1 to December
31 topped 38 per cent and
earnings per share were $0.43,
up 23 per cent over 2006 - par-
alleling the increase in net
income.

At its annual ne dtiney in
May, the bank reported its
11th consecutive year of record
profits with assets at $1.179 bil-
lion as of December 31 and
$1.25 billion at the AGM date
of May 21.

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_ Rosetta & Montgomery Streets ©
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il: Geofflones@comcast.net





Commonwealth Bank oper-
ates 10 full service branches in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Abaco.

Hospital’s net income
for Q1 was $0.98m
compared to
$1.3 last year

FROM page 1B

expense is 45 per-cent of the
increase due in part to an
increase of self pay patients in
the first quarter and utility
expenses accounted for seven
per cent of the increase.

The chairman further report-
ed that days revenue in
accounts receivable fell to 47.3
days, the lowest in history, as
compared to 67.8 in the same
period of fiscal 2008.

“Cash collection, is up by
$2.1 million...we are pleased to
report that our cash position
allowed the company to pay
down $2 million in long-term
debt as well as a $0.02 dividend
to our shareholders based on
year end results.”

On the capital expenditure
side, Mr Krukowski said the
company spent $1.6 million on
a Phillips Achieva MRI scan-
ner.

“With the acquisition of the

. new MRI machine, the hospi-

tal’s MRI centre currently
located on Christie Street will
be housed inside the hospital,
making it more convenient for
patients and relatives. It also
made significant improvements
in its website security.”

The American passy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

Commerical Assisant

Assit with promoting all trade events locally and in the U.S.

Maintains all commercial subject files, Scludiig newspaper dligping files, US
company database, and investments database

e

Drafts and distribute commercial newsletter and maintains database of

Econ-Commercial contacts.

Assists with research for major reports including the Counrty Commercial Guide,
the Investment Climate Report, and other special reports. .

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Associates Degree in Business Management, Economics or Finance
Three years job expereince in economic resesarch, business
management, marketing, investment, trade promotion or other related
business expereince

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Some knowledge of the business climate and rules for doing business in
The Bahamas

Good organizational and computer skills, particularly word-processing ane
excell.

Good writing skills

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through
Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the United States Embassy: addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than, June 24, 2008. Telephone calls will not
be accepted.





THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 3B



Minister to be keynote speaker

at World Religious

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter

MINISTER of Tourism
Neko Grant is expected to be
one of the keynote speakers at
the World Religious Travel
Expo 2008 in Orlando, Florida,
this fall and will highlight the
ministry’s effort to fully devel-
op this sector.

He will also discuss the

growth and diversity of today’s




















Manager.

Engineering Department

Programs

below.



Engineer Managenent
Employment Opportunity

Position Available
Engineer Manager

A leading hotel invites qualified persons in the above
mentioned field to apply for the position of Engineer
The successful candidate must possess the following:

- A minimum of 5 years experience as a Supervisor in the
+ Must be proficient in Preventative Maintenance
- Must possess a proven record of Team Leadership

skills, amd able to work with little or no supervision.

- Must possess strong interpersonal, communication,
problem solving and customer service skills

+ Must possess knowledge of Electrical & Mechanical
Systems i.e. HVAC, Plumbing & Heating

* Must possess basic Administrative skills with some
knowledge of Microsoft Excel

- Must be able to work long and flexible hours

Applicants with supporting documents also including a
clean Police Certificate should be sent to the address

Competitive salary and benefits package are
commensurate with experience.

Applicants for Engineering Manager,
DA 64086, c/o The Tribune,

PO Box N-3207 |

Nassau, Bahamas

faith and tourism industry.

Mr Grant was selected
because the Bahamas has
developed itself into the top
destination for this vast and
lucrative market, serving as an
ideal getaway for faith-based
events, meetings, cruises, mis-
sionary travel, leisure vaca-
tions, and much more, organ-
isers said.

“Mr Grant oversees one of
the world’s most proactive
tourist offices involved in faith



tourism. The Bahamas has the
distinction of being one of the
few countries in the world with
a fully-dedicated religious trav-

el department, led by director

Linville J. Johnson,”
added.

Maurice Zarmati, president
and CEO of Costa Cruise
Lines, will be the other
keynote speaker. That compa-
ny represents one of the
newest and most popular vaca-
tion choices of today's faith-
based consumet...cruising.
Today, hundreds of churches
and religious organisations
embark each year on cruises
to the Caribbean, Alaska and
the Mediterranean, among
other places.

“As this fall’s Expo will
serve as a pivotal moment in
shaping new leaders in faith
tourism, we are honoured with
the confirmation of these dis-

they

‘tinguished individuals as

keynote speakers. Both repre-
sent different facets in the ‘new
era’ of faith tourism,” said

Kevin J. Wright, president of.

the World Religious Travel
Association.
The World Religious Travel

Expo serves as the most impor-



s Y Care’s

TT

Ph: 324-6413
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Financial Intelligence Unit ©

DOCUMENT IMAGING CLERK

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Document
Imaging Clerk at the Findncial Intelligence Unit (the “FIU”).

[OB SUMMARY:

The successful candidate will be resuensible for coordinating and executing the
daily processes of prepping, scanning, indexing and verifying documents, managing
and maintaining high volume scanners and adhering to deadlines assigned by

mane been.

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:
The successful applicant must have:
° Strong Data Entry and keyboarding skills;
: A working knowledge of Microsoft Office Products (Word, Excel, Power

Point etc.);

Pay attention to details, and takes pride in their work;
Good.interpersonal skills;
Ability to effectively work individually or in a team environment;
Competence in performing multiple functional tasks;

Excellent communication skills both verbal and written.



Travel Expo

Neko Grant

tant gathering of the “Who's
Who” in today’s faith tourism
marketplace. More than 100
exhibitors and more than 400
participants are expected at the
unprecedented event.

The Expo will be held Octo-
ber 29-November 1, 2008, at
the Gaylord Palms Resort
Hotel and Convention Center
in Orlando, Florida.

The World Religious Travel
Association (WRTA) looks at
shaping, enriching and expand-
ing the $18 billion global faith
tourism industry.

WRITA exists to bring the
travel trade and religious con-

sumer together for the primary

purpose of promoting and pro-
viding quality faith travel expe-
riences around the globe.

RT aa (Go

aT

MIE
23/1 today!

NOTICE.



Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-eigth (28th) An-
nual General Meeting of THE PUBLIC.WORKERS’
CO-OPERATIVE. CREDIT UNION LIMITED will
be held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel, West Bay
Street, on Friday, July 4, 2008 commencing at 6:30 p.m.
for the following purposes:

¢ To receive the report of The Board of Directors.

* To receive the Audited Accounts for 2007

¢ To elect members of The Board of Directors, and
Supervisory Committee

¢ To discuss and approve the budget for 2009.

All eligible members wishing to run for a position on the
Board of Directors or Supervisory Commitee are asked to
submit their names to any of the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Friday, June 27, 2008
by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend, and
refreshments will be served!



Travel Agent Training

Learn ticketing and reservations procedures in
just a few short weeks, Travel agents are in high
demand. Get the training you need to qualify for a
| high-paying job or to start your own business.







Betty K. Agencies Ltd.

To Our Valued Customer

We have now re-opened our Nassau office and
- warehouse on Saturday until further notice

Please contact our customer service
Representative for further information

Nassau (Office).

Telephone (242) 322-2142

Betty K Agencies Ltd. Fax (242) 322-6809

C.Trevor Kelly Bldg.
East Street North
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

° Responsible for retrieving files and eeu ane them for filing;
Assemble and prepare documents for imaging;
Scanning and indexing of documents for up to eight hours a day;
Review imaged documents as a quality control measure to ensure
acceptable image was captured;
Independently operate scanning hardware;
Maintain all logs and reporting documentation;
Adhere to organizational procedures and guidelines;
Perform other tasks as assigned by manager.

Abaco (Office)
Don Mackay Blvd.
Marsh Harbour

3701 NW. South River Dr. P.O. Box AB 20116,

Miami Florida 33142 Abaco, Bahamas
Telephone (305) 635-4650 Telephone (242) 367-0593
Fax (305) 635-4661 Fax (242) 367-0594

Miami (Office)
Betty K Agencies (USA)
EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE: LLC
° Minimum requirement: An Associate Degree from an accredited tertiary
institution;
Related experience is preferred but not required.

Interested persons should submit their applications and resumes in writing along
with the relevant certificates by 27" June 2008 to:

Anthony M. Johnson
Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Serving the Bahamas with Pride from 1920!





PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



DPM: 5,382 e-passports have been issued

FROM page 1B

stage of the passport pro-
gramme is providing the

opportunity to work through
the irregularities and correct
them in conjunction with
Indusa Global and its affiliates.

Mr Symonette also report-
ed that technical difficulties
have prevented the issuance of

certificates of identify for non -
Bahamians under the new sys-
tem. However, he said that
action is being taken to rectify
the situation in a timely man-
ner.

“We are looking at produc-

Vacancy for
Sr. Area Director, Development & Construction

A minimum of twenty (20) years experience in the Construction industry with specific documented
experience in project and/or construction management.

A minimum of ten (10) years experience leading project teams on multiple projects in remote,
international locations with single-point accountability for capital budgets and schedules.
Professional degree in technical field from an accredited university

Strong leadership, management, and communication skills providing the ability to work in a
dynamic, multi-functional matrix management Gry enment as a “Team Player”. Pro-active,
assertive, motivated and disciplined.

Experience in leading, managing, and coordinating design, construction, and other professionals.
Experience in qualifying, contract negotiation, recommendation, and administration of
Professional and Contractor Agreements.

Proven ability to understand the business goals of stakeholders and implement a partnering
relationship that will enable mutual success.

Experience in legislative/ jurisdictional approval processes.

Proven ability to comprehend, and critique design and contract documents.

Lead and coordinate resources to achieve complete technically acceptable design and contract
documents within Design Guides, Construction Operations Manual, project scope, schedule, and
cost.

Computer literacy on Microsoft Office products, Primavera P3 or Suretrak (or other scheduling)
and, Primavera Expedition (or other Project Management) software applications.

Ability to reside full-time in Abaco for the full duration of the project.

Please send resume to the.attention of: Director of Human Resources °





seo

Qual



\NN.

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas
OR
Email: humanresouroes@theabacoctub. com



aah Bay

GOLF &@ OCEAN CLUB

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

: You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

; - Sous Chef i ae,

Key Responsibilities

Required to skillfully prepare intornational cuisine.

Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as needed.
Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods of food
preparation.

Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees i in the finer
points of cooking.

Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning prices.
Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for cooking.

ifications

High School diploma or equivalent

Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an approved
apprentice program is preferred

5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the kitchens including
sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine position.

Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.

Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including the ability to
prepare various ethnic cuisines.

Experience working in multiple operations preferred.

A minimum of two years international experience an asset.

Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

lf you are progressive and prepared to advance A career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, h r@bakersbyclub. com or by fax

at 24



2-367-0804.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

penyrcscticnarapersstputcwennsce santo ft

-goageeeagenmnnanenmonaannneasesarerseenunnt const

ing some 270,000 to 300,000 e-
passports alone with a staffing
complement of 45. We are also
looking at a complex techni-
cally-driven process plagued
by equipment breakdowns,
and uneven or snail’s pace
connectivity. We also have to
contend with the cultural
uniqueness of our people,” Mr
Symonette said.

He explained that the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs is com-
mitted to ensuring the suc-
cessfulness of the project.

“All solutions, whether they
be training, adjusted longer
hours, a shift system, a cus-
tomer service crash course
must depart from the acknowl-
edgment that we are in part-
nership with you, the public.”

He also reported that for the
year to date 6,693 visas were
issued, 2,826 in Miami, 357 in
Cuba, 65 in Ottawa, 322 in













London, 758 in Washington
and 886 in Nassau. He said the
consular division is gradually
going through a restructuring
process.

Mr Symonette said that, as it
relates to the Schengen visa
negotiations, a particular con-
cern for Bahamian business
persons, indications remain
positive for a successful out-
come.

“The approval of the Euro-
pean Commission’s recom-
mended short stay visa agree-
ments was given by the council
of the European Union at their
meeting of the Justices and
Home Affairs Council from
June 5-6, 2008.”

He said the Bahamas High
Commission in London had
been invited to an opening
round of negotiations in Brus-
sels on July 4, where it will

receive a draft of the proposed .

EMPLOYMENT
ee

Media Company seeks young persons
who are computer literate and have
some experience in QuarkXPress.

Please apply to:

DA60743
c/o Tribune

P.O. Box N-3207
~-Nassau, Bahamas Leaceccineee

or fax to (242) 328- 2398













visa agreement prior to the
stated meeting.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Can LION FISH be
our next fishery ©
resource?

Wednesday, June 25

at 7:00pm —
The Retreat, Village Road

For more information call 393-1317

Public meeting will feature a presentation on the
Natural History of the Lionfish presented by
Lakeshia Anderson,

The Bahamas

Department of Marine Resources.
The presentation will be followed by

a hands-on demonstration by
Bahamian lawyer, conservationist and fisherman
Alexander Maillis Il,

who will teach you how to cook and clean
LION FISH, a delicacy in the Asian kitchen.

This lecture is
sponsored by the
BNT and the
Department of
Marine





|
j
|
|



THE TRIBUNE

MUNDAY, JUINE 16, 2UU8, PAGE ob





The Financial Voice set to [atau
hold its first town meeting

“The Financial Voice”
(TFV) will hold its first town
meeting at the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort on Wednesday,
June 18, at 8pm with a non-
partisan review of the pro-
posed 2008/2009 budget as its
first.subject for discussion.

Noted “You and Your Mon-
ey” television show host, Jef-

frey Lloyd, will host the pro-

gramme.

Organisers consider a pub- »

lic review of the budget ‘to be
an appropriate and exciting
topic as the government’s sub-
mission has been touted by
many as the most visionary
budget in recent times while
_ Others are criticising it.as being
- “a day late and a dollar short.”

Panelists for the evening will
include chartered accountant
and president of Colina Gen-
eral Lynden Nairn; president
of CFAL Anthony Ferguson;
Frank Comito, executive vice-
’ president of The Bahamas

Hotel Association; economist
Rupert Pinder; Eric Carey,
executive director of The
Bahamas National Trust, and
president of The Bahamas
Real Estate Association,
William Wong, and president
of Providence Advisors, Ken-
wood Kerr.

Address

They will address the poten-
tial impact of the new budget

on such areas of the economy -

as tourism and hospitality,
financial services, the environ-
ment and consumer issues.

This new community service ©

initiative is a production of The
Counsellors Ltd., sponsored in
part by CFAL, Baha Mar
Resorts, KPMG and Sun Oil
Limited.

The objectives of The Finan-
cial Voice are generally to
stimulate dialogue with and
among members of the gener-

Sn CHW AA

the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 002-2371 today!





a

TUR ON:

Make your weekends work for you! Earn
.in Business,
Computers, Human Resource Manage-
ment or Public Administration.

degree

* New classes are forming now. Call Success for registration and program details. 324-7770

CIBC Private
Wealth Management

CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited —

is presently considering applications for a

Requirements:

Trust Administrator

al public on the state of the
economy, to have financial
issues placed in perspective by
the brightest minds in the rel-
evant areas.

The purpose of the pro-
gramme is to explain the impli-
cations and potential impact

of such issues on the lives of’

Bahamians of all walks of life

-and economic engagement.

Government officials have

said that the proposed new .

budget is particularly geared
towards providing relief and
assistance to low-income
Bahamians and those continu-
ing to be adversely affected by
the rising cost of living in the
country. Others have
expressed the view that the
benefits being promoted are
just a transference of govern-
ment funds.

The tax breaks, according to
officials, will include new ben-
efits for homeowners, conces-
sions relating to Nassau and
Family Island development,
increases in allocations for the
police and social services,
stamp tax elimination on
imported food items, as well
as pay rises for public officers,
among other critical issues,

Next Wednesday’s TFV pro-
gramme will be the first in a
series of presentations dealing
specifically with economic
issues affecting Bahamians and
their. Caribbean neigbours.



Accounting,





Applicants should posses a degree in Business Administration or eevee
combination of education and experience .

STEP Foundation Certificate or equivalent

At least 2 years experience in trust administration

Good oral and written communication skills

Excellent organizational skills

Good computer literacy on PC and host software.

Duties will include:

Day to day administration of a small group of client relationships
Monitor account activity from a money laundering perspective
Communicate in an effective, professional and courteous manner —
Open and close accounts
Prepare administrative, investment and risk reviews and complete corrective

action

Initiate and complete process to incorporate and dissolve companies
Process Investment Authorities for the purchase and sale of investments,

securities, etc,

Review and prepare documents to open bank/custody/investment
management accounts

ONLY BAHAMIANS MEETING

THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

P.O. Box N-3933
Nassau, Bahamas

Applications only should be submitted to
Manager, Human Resources

(No phone calls, faxes, emails will-be accepted)

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

JUNE 27, 2008



For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight

on Mondays



NOTICE

The payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for June 2008 will
be made as follows:

i) On Tuesday, June 17, 2008, ao pensioners whose funds are deposited to thar bank

accounts; and

ii) Beginning Thursday, June 19, 2008 at the Board’s Fox Hill, Wulff Road and Jumbey
Village Local Offices. Cheques may be collected from these offices between the hours
of 9:00.a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in
order to collect their cheques.

Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National tisutanee Registration
Card, together with any one of the following:

1. A Passport;

2. A Voter's Card; or

3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect his/her cheque, the Repre-
sentative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter
from the Pensioner authorizing the Board’to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the
Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himself/her-
self. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory iden-

tifying documents.

Please Note: Pensioners born in June and December are now due for Verification.



Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments.

Name:
Institution: Contact: _.

Phone #:
Walk: O

Emergency Contact: / _
Run: 0

Stroller (Push): a

The Central Bank of Bahamas will not be held responsible for + any injury/sickness
caused as a result of the fun, run walk, push. Persons With any medical conditions
should refrain from signing up for the race. Entrarits should consult their physician
before participation i in the event.

Signature of Participant: Date:

Refreshments will be served





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Utility finds foes to renewable

@ By ELLIOT SPAGAT -
AP Business Writer

SAN DIEGO (AP) — It
seems like an idea any envi-
ronmentalist would embrace:
Build one of the world’s largest
solar power operations in the
Southern California desert and

surround it with plants that run
on wind and underground
heat. ,

Yet San Diego Gas & Elec-
tric Co. and its potential part-
ners face fierce opposition
because the plan also calls for a
150-mile, high-voltage trans-
mission line that would cut

A leading wholesaler seeks to hire a highly motivated

individual for the position of:

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible for
coordinating office services such as records control,
follow up, and other administrative activities for a
department/division. The person will compile data
and format reports, graphs, tables, and records as
well as categorizing facts and figures for computation.

through pristine parkland to
reach the nation’s eighth-
largest city.

The showdown over how to
get renewable energy to con-
sumers will likely play out else-
where around the country as
well, as state regulators require
electric utilities to rely less on
coal and natural gas to fire
their plants — the biggest
source of carbon dioxide emis-
sions in the US.

Providers of renewable pow-
er covet cheap land and abun-
dant sunshine and wind in
places like west Texas, Mon-
tana, Wyoming and Californi-
a’s Mojave Desert and Imper-
ial Valley. But utility execu-
tives say no one will build
plants without power lines to
connect those remote spots to

_ big cities.

“This is a classic chicken and
the egg,” said Mike Niggli,
chief operating officer of Sem-
pra Energy’s utilities business,
which includes SDG&E. “No
one can develop a project if

they can’t send (the electricity)
anywhere. You need transmis-
sion.”

SDG&E’s $1.5-billion power
line would cut 23 miles through
the middle of Anza-Borrego
Desert State Park, a spot
known for its hiking trails,
wildflowers, palm groves, cac-
ti and spectacular mountain
views.

“This transmission line will
cross through some of the most
scenic areas of San Diego,”
said David Hogan of the Cen-
ter for Biological Diversity. “It
would just ruin it with giant,
metal industrial power lines.”

Environmentalists are push-
ing for renewable power to be
generated closer to heavily
populated areas, rather than
brought in from distant sites.
They point to Southern Cz.1i-
fornia Edison’s ambitious plan
for solar panels on Los Ange-
les-area rooftops as an exam-
ple of a better approach.

Utilities say the roof panels
will help but won’t produce

nearly enough power to satisfy
state requirements.

The California Public Utili-
ties Commission is scheduled
to vote as soon as August on
SDG&E’s proposed Sunrise
Powerlink, which would carry
enough power for about
750,000 homes — or more than
half of the utility’s customers.

Regulators in 29 states and
the District of Columbia are
forcing utilities to boost the
use of renewable energy to run
electric plants.

California has been among
the most aggressive, with the
Sstate’s three investor-owned
utilities required to get 20 per
cent of power from renewables

by the end of 2010:

Governor Arnold
Schwarzenegger wants to reach
33 per cent by 2020.

SDG&E, with 1.4 million
customers, is California’s lag-
gard, getting just six per cent of
its power from renewables.
PG&E Corp.’s Pacific Gas and
Electric, with 5.1 million cus-
tomers, gets 12 per cent. Edi-
son International’s Southern

Nationwide, utilities get only
two per cent of electricity from
renewables, said Jone-Linn
Wang, managing director of
the global power group at
Cambridge Energy Research
Associates.

Edison hopes to draw more
on solar and wind power by
building a transmission line
from the Mojave Desert to the
Los Angeles area.

“It’s a trade-off,” said Stu-
art Hemphill, Edison’s vice
president for renewable and
alternative power. “Clean
energy perhaps requires build-
ing infrastructure in potential-
ly sensitive areas. There’s no
way around it.”

SDG&E’s proposed route
through Anza-Borrego, Cali-
fornia’s largest state park,
ranked second worst among

seven possible routes studied

by state and federal regulators
for environmental damage.
The plan calls for 141 towers
through the park at an aver-
age height of 130 feet. The
entire route would include 554
towers from the wind-swept

Interested persons should possess:
An Associate’s degree in business or equivalent
Excellent administrative/clerical skills
At least two years’ experience working in a
business environment
Excellent communication and presentation skills
Proficiency in various computer applications

Please send application letter and resumé
by June 25, 2008 to:

Administrative Assistant
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however;
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

PEt oe
and ready for a change?

Burns House Grou lh Companies’ is looking
for an ambitious Marketing Manager with a
proven track record in consumer marketing.

Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is the
leading beverage company in the Bahamas. With its

| broad portfolio of consumer brands, extending from
beer to spirits and wines, BHG is the market leader
and trend setter in the respective categories.

Within our marketing department we seek to fill the
position of Marketing Manager. In this position you
will be responsible for a large portfolio. of co st ner
brands like Budweiser beer, Ricardo rums, Climax
Â¥ energy drink, Hennessy cognac and Carlo Rossi
wines to name a few
The marketing manager we are looking for is a team
| player has profound knowledge of the marketing mix
and is an excellent planner with great passion for
execution.

BHG will offer you a challenging environment with
international growth potential. "

We offer an above market average incentive
programme and international training opportunities.

Profile of the ideal candidate
Bachelor Degree in Marketing or Business
Administration is essential; Masters in Business
an advantage
3-5 years of supervisory experience in marketing
Team building skills
Consumer goods Marketing experience

Interested?
Send your Resume by email to:
ccash@burnshouse.com or fax to:
Human Resources Manager: (242) 326-6078



LEDEECAMPBEL Weer ia ey, RT Gseae TE!



| COMMONWEALTH |
'? BREWERY LTD. —

ADVERTISEMENT

ACCOUNTS
MANAGER

The successful candidate should
possess Bachelor’s degree
in Accounting and CPA certified,
and a minimum of 5 years
experience.

Candidate will be required to
compile and analyze operational and
financial data to produce financial
reports.

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes: to (242) 302-2939

Saffrey Square
Bay Street

www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

PRIME OFFICE SUITES

® Ranging From 1,332 to 2,807 sq. ft.
© Finished Shell

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NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD



California Edison, with 4.8 mil-
lion customers; gets 16 per
cent.

desert of the Imperial Valley to
SEE page ?B

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that 1, SEAN BROOKS of
Kennedy Subdivision, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change
| my name to SEAN SANDS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VOLVICK DORMEUS of
PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX N-1072, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed -

statement of the facts within twénty-eight days fromn the |"

9TH day of JUNE 2008 to the- Minister responsible: for:
Nationality and Citizenship, EOF Box N- Iai; Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROTNEL RENA of INFANT -
VIEW ROAD, P.O. BOX GT-2557, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any |
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
JUNE 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000),, KITTEN PRODUCTS, INC. is in
dissolution. Alrena Moxey is the. Liquidator and: can
be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough
& Queens Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas. All person
having claims against the above-named company are re-
quired to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the JUNE
19, 2008.

Liquidator







Summer Special
only $350.
4 week /1 bedroom apariment

Check out

| Home-Away-From-Home Program |
| and rent a comfortable, fully furnished pets






OT ee a ae aa er Fs le a eel id bi aaa Elta inches rte Benita

Rleetticsiienelte edie bt teadenatmratirniiaint alta tetas a at ena ete ae ert ie tt per ht ae i

aac 2



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 7B



energy line plan

a site near the Pacific Ocean
in San Diego.

SDG&E would build the
power line but buy the juice
from a host of generating com-
panies whose proposed plants
harness energy from the sun,
wind and underground heat.

The most ambitious gener-
ation project relies on a com-
mercially untested technology
for a gigantic solar plant.

Stirling Energy Systems Inc.,
a Phoenix startup, wants to
build 12,000 solar dishes, each
four stories tall, near El Cen-
tro, about 100 miles east of San
Diego.

Stirling says a $100 million
investment from NTR PLC, an
Irish energy holding company,
will pay for permits and design
work, with construction to
begin by the end of 2009.
Bruce Osborn, Stirling’s chief
operating officer, estimates the
plant itself will cost about $400
million.

That plant. would initially

feed into an existing power line
and provide enough electricity
for more than 200,000 homes,
Osborn said. Stirling, however,
would need more transmission
capacity to pursue plans to
triple the size of the plant, he
said.

Technology

The technology relies on
mirrored dishes collecting sun-
light to heat gas and drive the
cylinders of an engine. It has
been tested on six solar dishes
in New Mexico but now would
move to mass production —
drawing plenty of skepticism
from environmentalists.

“It’s what we call new prod-
uct introduction,” responds
Osborn, a former project man-
ager at Ford Motor Co.
“Everyone who builds a widget
does the same thing. This is a
big widget.”

Even without Stirling,
SDG&E has other, traditional

renewable power generators
knocking on its door with deals
to provide power — far more
than the utility could accom-
modate, Niggli said.

Environmentalists have
dueled for years with
SDG&E’s parent company,
Sempra Energy, over opera-
tions just south of the border in
Mexico that help supply power
to the western US.

Critics claim Sempra built
the plants in Mexico to skirt
more rigorous environmental
reviews in the U.S. They sug-
gest SDG&E’s proposed pow-
er line, which would start near
the Mexican border, is part of
a disguised effort to get elec-
tricity into the U.S. from Mex-
ico, where Sempra has an elec-
tricity plant and the first liq-
uefied natural gas terminal on
the West Coast.

SDG&E dismisses those
claims as a conspiracy theory.

“Tt’s like the myth that won’t
die,” Niggli said.

LAW REVIEW

All candidates for the LLB degree with the University of Huddersfield/Holborn Col-
lege are invited to register for review sessions scheduled for June 30 — July 2.
All sessions will be conducted by a senior professor from the university. Candidates
who are preparing for upcoming exams are especially urged to attend.

Call Success for registration information. 324-7770

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
“THE PROMENADE’

ERT tM dae

0.8 Acre

Retail/Commercials Lots

ete EET CER LH

Call |
(242) 351-5263
(242) 477-9573

NOTICE.

The National Insurance Board

will yet.free

Seminars for Employers & SelfsEmployed Persons
for the remainder of 2008 as follows:

_ Tuesday, June 24

Tuesday, September 3



"Tuesday, October 28

{
|

Tuesday, November 25

Sessions will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the ‘Training Room of
N.LB’s Wulff Road Complex, Wulff Road at Minnie Street

Refreshments will be served

Seminar Description

For everyone - from the self-employed person who works alone, to the employer of a
Jew persons, to the person responsible for the payment of contributions on behalf of
an employer of thousands. The Seminar will give an overview of the National

Insurance programme, inclusive of its benefits and assistance programmes, and

explore the scope and impact of the National Insurance lund on the economy of

the country.

Questions and/or concerns about the monthly payment of contributions or other

administrative/ compliance issues, will also be addressed.

Persons interested in attending a Seminar

should reserve a space by calling the
Board’s Public Relations Department

at 356-2070,

ext.

236 /234/232





_ (2,026sq..





New Providence

1. Vacant lot #1038 (6,000sq.
ft.)-Garden Hills #3.
(Appraised Value $35,000.00)
2. Property 40’x36'x100’ (3,
933sq. ft.) w/building (1,
428sq. ft.)-Sutton Street &
ST. Bedes Lane of Kemp
Road (Appraised Value $100,
000.00)

3. Lot #30 (60’x100") w/duplex
(1,686sq.ft.)-Golden Gates
Estate #1 (Appraised Value
$231,136.00)

4, Lots #3 & #4 (50’x100'), Bik
#47 widuplex & shop (1
§32sq. ft.)}~Forbes St Nassau
Village (Appraised © Value
$120,000.00)

5. Vacant lot #302 (8,500sq..

ft)-Winton Meadows
Subdivision #2 (Appraised
Value $85,000.00)

6. Vacant lot #4 (17,899sq. ft.)
~Black Beard Ter, Black
Beards Tower Sub (Appraised
Value $134,000.00)

7. Lot #90, Bik #5-Gamble
Heights Sub

8. Vacant lot #5, Blk #13 (7,
180sq. ff.}-Yorkshire St,
Westward Villas (Appraised
Value $100,000.00)

9. Lot #135 (50'x90°) w/hse (1,
342sq. ft.) Sunflower (South)
Sunshine Park Sub House #8
{Appraised Value $139,000.
00)

10. Lot #18 (50’x100’) w/hse
(1,155sq. ff.) Blk #16~-Talbot
Street (East) Shirley Heights
Sub (Appraised Value $130,
000.00} «.

TT. Lota (407 400°) iuiise
ft.) House #28-
Sunset Ridge Drive, Sunset
Ridge Sub (Appraised Value
$206,000.00)

12. Lots #29 & #80, (50'x100’
), Bik #47 w/building (1,140sq.
ft.)-Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised Value $86,
820.00)

13. Lots #5 & #6 (180x100’)

| whse-Silver Palm = Ln
imperial Park (Appraised
Value $313,650.00)
Andros —

14. Lot #119 (22, 500sq. ft)
wicomplex (3,440sq.. ft.}-Sir
Henry Morgan Dr Andros
Beach Colony Sub Nicholls’s
Town Andros (Appraised
Value $322,900.00)

15. Beach front lot (9,000sq.-

ft.) w/building (2,100sq. ft.) -

Pinders Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised Value
$200,000.00)
Vessels

-- 53' Vessel (1977) Shabak

* 29’ (1983) Vessel (Lady

« 45'(1992) Defender Vessel (Liminos)

+ 48° North Carolina Hull (1989)

- 52’ Halters Fiber Glass Vessel (1979) MV Budd
.* 47’ Fiber Glass (1980) Vessel (Miss Quality)

+ 39’ (1985) Defender Vessel (Future C)

Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

PROPERTIES
New Providence

16. Property (4,344sq._ ft.)
widuplex (1,174sq, ft.)-Fresh
Creek Central Andros
(Appraised Value $96,640.00
17. Lot #32 (20,560sq. ft.)
w/building (1,200sq. ft.)~Congo
Town Andros (Appraised Value
$126,000.00)

18. Vacant property 150’x150’
in the — settlement of
Pinders, Mangrove

Cay South Andros (Appraised
Value $15,000.00)

Grand Bahama

19. Vacant Lot #8 Bik #12 Unit
#3 (11,250sq. ft.}-Henny Ave
Derby Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $131,700.00)
20. Vacant 11,250sq. ft. lot #19,
Bik #22, Unit 5—Lincoln Green
Sub Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $30,000.00)

21. Lot #15, Bik #15 Unit #3 (90
’x125')-Derby Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $23,
000.00)

22. Vacant lot #25, Bik #15 (17,
866sq. ft}-Culwater Ln
Shannon Country Club Sub
Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $38,000.00)

23. Vacant lot’#110 Section #1
(12,500sq. ft.)-Bonefish St &
Polaris Dr, Carvel Beach Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $40,
000.00)

24. Lot #59 (17,276sq._ ft.)
Section #1 with an incomplete
fourplex-Amberjack St &
Polaris Dr Carvel Beach Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $74,
970.00)

25. Lot ‘#2 (20, 000sq. ft.)

30. Portion of vacant lot #69
(15,000sq. ft.)-Front St Murphy
Town Abaco (Appraised Value
$29,250.00

31, Lot #51 (15,000sq. ft.)
w/building—Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised Value $102,
420.00)

32, Lot #55 (6,900sq. ft.)
w/building—-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised Value $82,
075.00)

33. Lot #45 (60°x160')
wibuilding (3,900sq. ft.)-Sandy
Point Abaco (Appraised Value
$485,700.00)

Eleuthera

34. Property 31'x111' w/house

Lord Street in the settlement of |

Tapum Bay — Eleuthera.
{Appraised Value $40,000.00)

35. Portion of lot #90 w/building
(2,6118q, ft.)~Parliament St,
Cupids Cay Governors Harbour
Eleuthera (Appraised Value
$55,000,00)

36. Vacant portion of lot #7 (50
*x110’}-West James Cistern
Eleuthera {Appraised Value
$20,000.00) -

Cat Island

37. Property w/twelve (12)
room motel 1.39 acres-In the
settlement of Arthur’s Town Cat
island (Appraised Value $630,
000.00) .

38, One. acre of land beach
front w/building-Devil’s Point
Cat Island (Appraised Value
$260,000.00)

ingaua

39, Lot #43 (90°x100’)
w/building~Russell St, Matthew





wibuilding- complex & coins Town Ingaua: thong Value fp

Laundromat-Queens . Highway...$120,000, BD). 6.

Holmes Rock Commonage
Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $178,600.00)

Rock . Commonage Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value
$178,600.00) |

26. Vacant lot #5, Bik #31,
Section B-Royal Bahamian
Estate Sub Grand Bahama(
Appraised Value $31,000.00) |
27. Vacant lot #89 (14,397sa.



Exuma
40, Lot 134 (75'x85") w/two
storey building—George Town,
Exuma (Appraised Value $468,
000.0

ft.) Bik | #9~Yorkshire Dr,

Bahamia West Replat Grand
Bahama iAppralse? Value $16,
300.00)

Abaco

28. Lot #54 E (6,500sq. ft.)
Witriplex foundation (2,788sq.
ft.)}-Murphy Town Abaco
(Appraised Value $24,896.00)

29. Lot #6 Vacant 2 acres—Fox
Town Abaco (Appraised Value
$50,000.00)

ASSETS

Rece)

+ 51’ Defender Vessel (1981) Equility

* 120’ Twin. Screw Steel H

ull Vessel (1978) with

(2) Detroit Diesel V16-92 engine, fully loaded

+ 122’ Single Screw Steel

Hull (1960) MV Lisa ill,

vessel has a new engine requiring installation. And
can be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahama

(i
(i

Vehicles
1) 03 Dodge Caravan

1) 96 Ford Explorer
97 Dodge Stratus

(
(
(1)

(1) 01 Hyundai H-100 Bus
(1
(
(

) 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater
1) 02 Kitchen Van Trailer
1) 00 Ford Ranger Truck
) 03 Toyota Coaster Bus
) 1989 Chevy Caprice

Hearse

The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas
Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas attention
Financial Controller, faxed bids will not be accepted or telephone 327-5780
for additional information. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned
properties and assets should be received by or on June 23, 2008. The
Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.
All assets are sold as is.







panies

soba BIB

005 RSLODROSSIOOSEOIS TS PUES SERIE Ele



AUT

ALANA

ig
; Hees is :
cesar psi p31 berate cncKe pana sont raeescebaan ost ir santas: eitaapcneswmnaimeiin Aas cagnesssainseiel

PAGE. 8B;. MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008





nvaniial 97

seoson abeste









AY MOVES

reecieal ogie



THE TRIBUNE



ure syeertehi hence

“Every day I look forward to reading The Tribune. - :
It always provides valuable information and something
to talk about like local news, sports, entertainment

and world news. The Tribune provides everything



I need to know about life in The Bahamas and

internationally. The Tribune is my. newspaper.”

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN



amass cane cou tanme cram anenoaneenc antes ey RONEN RR BARON TONNE UH HNANE AONE MNENR ENA HENAINTTN TAINAN AT OAT ATT IT



THE TRIBUNE.

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 9B



US drivers

take advantage

of Mexico’s
cheap gas

SAN DIEGO (AP) — If
there’s pain at the pump in
the US, Mexico may just
have a remedy.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

THE EAST EUROPE INVESTMENT & ed gasoline in San Diego
REAL ESTATE FUND LTD.
$4.61 a gallon. A few miles
south, in Tijuana, it’s about
$2.54 — even less if you pay
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the in pesos.

International Business Companies Act 2000 THE EAST EUROPE More and more people

INVESTMENTS & REAL ESTATE FUND LTD. is in dissolution. appear to be taking advan-
tage of the lower price.

“I used to buy exclusively

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 12th June 2008.
David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves
Village, RO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of THE EAST EUROPE
INVESTMENTS & REAL ESTATE FUND LTD. All persons hav-
ing claims against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 12th
July 2008.

elementary school in San
Diego who lives in Tijuana.

all my gas in Tijuana.”
The lower prices mean a
. US motorist could save
almost $54 filling up a two-
- year-old Ford F150 pickup
with a 26-gallon fuel tank in
Mexico.



Diesel
_ Legal Notice

NOTICE

even greater, selling at $5.04

and $2.20 in Tijuana.
EAST EUROPE INVESTMENT Paul Covatrubias, 26, who
MANAGEMENT LTD. lives in Chula Vista and

works in construction in San
Diego, crosses the border
each week just to refuel his
dual-cab Ford F-250 pickup.
“T fill it up with diesel in
Tijuana for $60,” he said. “It

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 EAST EUROPE
INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LTD. is in dissolution.

San Diego.”
Gas is cheaper in Mexico

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 12th June 2008.
David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves
* Village, RO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of EAST EUROPE IN-
VESTMENT MANAGEMENT LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send’ their address
and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 12th July
2008.

sidy intended to keep infla-
tionary forces in check.

: everyone. The wait getting
Ure back into the US at the bor-
fry der in Tijuana frequently '
“p takes longer than two hours
and cars can burn about a
gallon of gas for each hour
they idle.



_ MINISTRY OF LANDS AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - GN701
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
. CHAPTER 339 ;
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) { ) REGULATIONS, 2002



The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
GASOLINE sold by ESSO STANDARD OIL S. A. LIMITED will become effective on
Monday June i. 2008.

GASOLINE SCHEDULE



PLACE ARTICLE
SUPPLIERS’ | DISTRIBUTORS’
PRICE PRICE
$ $
PARTA
NEW PROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ESSO Standard Oil | LEAD FREE ' 5.25
S.A. Limited
PART C
GRAND BAHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FREEP,)
ESSO Standard Ol ~— | LEAD FREE 5.73
S.A. Limited a
PARTD
ABACO, ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA
ESSO Standard Oi | LEAD FREE 5.25 5.46 5.85
S.A. Limited
PARTE
ALL OTHER NOT ‘INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLAND
ESSO Standard Of | LEAD FREE 5.26 5.48 5.88
S.A. Limited
PERMANENT SECRETARY

A gallon of regular unlead-

retails for an average price of

in the US before gas started ©
really going up,” said Patrick
Garcia, a drama teacher at an

“Since then, I’ve been buying

The differential in diesel is

a gallon in San Diego County

would be almost twice that in

because of a government sub-

Still, international gas-buy-
ing trips don’t make sense for

GN699



Ministry of National Security

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Form of Public Notice of Withdrawal of a Nomination
Where the Election remains contested

The Nicholl’s Town

stipe aeeenes teteuen seuttsaewanenwsetimesmtnntwatosesaarseusbenpenesnpamarannansaranenes evans eeneaneee ny nee®

District/Town Area
NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL OF NOMINATION

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidate name below has withdrawn his .
candidature, and no longer stands nominated in the above mentioned election, .
and NOTICE is hereby given that the Poll will take piace et at the place and on.
the day as ae published.

Other Names Tn Full

Candidate’s Surname

WALKES

Sign: Huntley Christie _

RETURNING OFFICER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Form of Public Notice of Nomination Where the Withdrawal
Results in an Uncontested Election

MICAL Constituency Polling Division S$
Snug Corner, Hard Hill and Mason’s Bay
in the Acklins District

DECLARATION OF RESULT

CONSEQUENCE UPON
NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL

NOTICE is hereby giver that the following candidate has withdrawn his
candidature, and no longer stands nominated in the above ee
election. tes Fe



Candidate’s Surname Other nee ao fall :

1A pacateamannnnvaraenenineenienensaeneeenrererannenrntarenny see temtinmeoee: eateeeeme as '

Shantell L. _

AND the candidates named below, being the only candidates remaining,
standing nominated ARE HEREBY DECLARED elected to serve as a
District Councillor/fown Committee Member for the said District/Town
Area.

¢ ther ales



Candidates Qccupation Place of
Surname in full Residence
COX cine RUPEE Businessman Snug Cor cones Acklins
ROLLE Henry ah Businessman ___ Snug Com mer, Ac Acklins

Date: 9" June, 2008
Sign: Stephen Wilson
RETURNING OFFICER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

‘Form of Public Notice of Nomination Where the Withdrawal ”
Results in an Uncontested Election ~~

y MICAL Constituency Polling Division 1B
Moss Town, Cripple Hill, Richmond Hill & Sea View .
In the Crooked Island and Long Cay District

DECLARATION OF RESULT

CONSEQUENCE UPON
NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL

NOTICE is hereby given‘that the following candidate has withdrawn his/tier |.

‘candidature, and no longer stands nominated in the above mentioned
: _ election.

Candidate’s Surname Other names in full

KNOWLES

Annafaye sis)

AND the candidate named below, being the only candidate remaining
standing nominated IS HEREBY DECLARED elected to serve as a
District Councillor/Town Committee Member for the said District/Town
Area.

Candidates Other names Occupation Pinse of
Surname in full ; Residence

DAXON__ Don Arlington __Station Diesel Mechanic _Cripple Hill
Date: 9" June, 2008

Sign: Francita Neely
RETURNING OFFICER

~











Bem MEW Coe ey

PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ee Te ee NOSIS ee ee se ae
To ativertise, call 502-2371

GN-697



SU
COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008
2008/PRO/NPR/00298

IN THE ESTATE OF BLODWEN A.
ZEIGLER, late of 73 Oak Ridge A venue in the

United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by HEATHER:

_ L. THOMPSON, Pilot House Condominiums,

, 2008/PRO/NPR/00293

ee.

Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in

' The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of

Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted

Estate, of the Superior Court, Chancery Division,
by the Probate Part, in the county of Union, in
the State of New Jersey on the 16th day
of January, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

t

Bergen and State of New Jersey, one of the States
of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration |
of fourteen days from the date. hereof, application
: 2008/PRO/NPR/00297

will be made to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas in the Probate Division by A.
PAMELA THOMPSON, Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas

Administration with the Will Annexed, in the
above estate granted to RICHARD
BOGGIANO the Executor of the Estate, by the
Probate Division, in the Superior Court for the
county of Bergen in the state of New Jersey on
the 28th day of May, 1992.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008
2008/PRO/NPR/00294

IN THE ESTATE OF JAMES E. MARR, JR.,

Late of 525 Highland Avenue in the County of
Malden in the City of Middlesex in the Sate of :
Massachusetts, one of the States of the United :

States Of America, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration

will be made to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas in the Probate Division by KEVIN M.

‘RUSSELL, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized

Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing of Probate of Will Without Sureties,
in the above estate granted to THOMAS C.
MARR and JAMES E. MARR, III the
Executors of the Estate, by the Probate Division,
in the Probate and Family Court Department,
The Trial Court, Commonwealth of
Massachusetts on the

30th day of March, 2007.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00295

FOUN». : 2008/PRO/NPR/00296
Eastern District, New Providence one of the |
: IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN D. BRITTO, late
? of No.4919 Hollywood Boulevard in the City
: of Hollywood in the State of Florida, one of the
: States of the United States of America, deceased.
to PAUL L. ZEIGLER the Executor of the :
: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof; application
: will ‘be made to the Supreme Court of The
: Bahamas in the Probate Division by ANDREW
+ DWAYNE FORBES, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
: one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The:
' + Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
: Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
: Resealing Grant of Letters of Administration, in
: the above estate granted to JOSEPH A. BRITT
: the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the
: Circuit Court for Broward County, in the state
: of Florida, Probate Division on the 5th, say of
th : poy: 1976. :
: IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN ANTHONY ::
BOGGIANO, late of 8 Marion Aventié in the: ~~
Borough of Cliffside Park in the County of |

? No. 2008/PRO/NPR/00299
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :

: Whereas HOWITT (a.k.a HOWETT
? MUNROE) of, Ridgeland Park, in the Southern
: District one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
: of The Bahamas has made application to the
: Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
: Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of BEATRICE MUNROE, late of Fleming
: Street in the Southern District of New Providence,
: one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
: Bahamas, deceased.

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

: IN THE ESTATE OF GUY SANDERSON, late

: of 51 Riverview Heights in the city of Winterport

: in the County of Waldo in the gtate of Maine,

: one of the States of the United States of America,
. | deceased.

? NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The
: Bahamas in the Probate Division by KEVIN M.
: RUSSELL, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of
i the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
-} Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
: Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
: Resealing of the Certificate of Appointment, in
: the above estate granted to SANDRA BLAIS
: the Personal Representative of the Estate, by the
: Probate Division, in the County of Waldo, in the

ee . ee : state of Maine on the 12th day of February, 2007.
City of Summit in the County of Union in the :

State of New Jersey, one of the States of the

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

~ DESIREE ROBINSON -
(for) REGISTRAR °

- PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

: IN THE ESTATE OF FRANK EUGENE -
: MANN, late of 218 S. Royal Street, Alexandria
: in the State of Virginia 22314 one of the States
: of the United States of America, deceased.
for obtaining the Resealing Grant of Letters of |
: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof: application *
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The
: Baharnas in the Probate Division by RICHARD
: HERBERT ROGER LIGIITBOURN, of No.4
: George Street, McKinney Bancroft & Hughes,
: Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
: The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing Grant
: of Resealing Certificate/Letter of Qualification,
: in the above estate granted to ANITA LYNN
: MANN the Executrix of the Estate, by the
: Probate Division, Circuit Court of the City of
: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia on the
: 8th day of May, 2007.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

JUNE 19, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the
: expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TELUCIA DORMEUS of
PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX N-1072, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
‘who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
9TH day of JUNE 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ARNOLD JOSEPH of 2ND
ST. GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of JUNE 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ESSAY COMPETITION

Ninth Annual Public Service Week

The Department of Public Service will host an
Essay Competition as one of the activities for the
Ninth Annual Public Service Week. The
Competition is open to Junior and Senior School
Students.

Students interested in participating should write
a 250-300 words (Junior High), and 450-500 words
(Senior High), essay on the topic: “The Public
Service - _ Focused on Improving Customer
Service.”

The Hicaaline for entries, which should be referred
- to the attention of Ms. Antoinette Thompson,
Deputy Permanent Secretary, Department of Public
Service, is Friday, 27th June, 2008. :

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be
awarded to the winner in each category.

The winners will be announced during the Ninth
Annual Public Service Week Awards Ceremony
scheduled for 11th October, 2008.



GOVERNMENT NOTICE .-
MINISTRY OF MARITIME AFFAIRS
AND LABOUR

DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Pursuant to Section 21 of the Industrial relations Act
Chapter 321 Statute Law of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas it is hereby ordered that Nominations

of Officers in The Bahamas Commercial Stores
Supermarkets Warehouse Workers Union shall take

| place on 17th June, 2008 from 12 noon to 2p.m. at The

Bahamas Communications and Public officers Union |
Hall’s Farrington Road, New Providence and shall
be supervised by The Registrar of Trade Unions.
All financial members of the Union as of June 13th,
2008, will be allowed to participate in the upcoming
Nominations of Executive Officers for the Union.

The Elections of Officers shall be conducted on |
Monday 23rd June, 2008 9a.m. to 4p.m. at the
Bahamas Communications and Public Officers
Union’s Hall, Farrington Road and shall be super-
vised by the Registrar. Only members of the Union
who are financial as of June 13th, 2008, shall be
eligible to vote.

Signed
Harcourt V, Brown
Registrar of Trade Unions
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 11B

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
; Bist ROYAL 2 FIDELITY kg BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
J HIGGS é& JOHNSON S >.
Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law — :

invites applications for an attorney for our Abaco

7 : : Abaco Markets
Office. 3 eG Bahamas Property Fund
) Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Applicants must have a minimum of 3-5 years} [iz Pape sce canes
. . Te . " 7 7 - Colina Holdings

experience in Litigation and Real Estate,) - |e ‘80 Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Doctor's Hospital

demonstrate an ability to work independently| |: 02 Femguard

. | . Finco
and possess a thorough working knowledge and] |; 230 FirtCarbboan
Focol Class B Preference

technical competence in the areas mentioned.) |i: at Eeanea Concecte

ICD Utilities

(Applicants with experience in only one of the} :2. 60 J. S, Johnson

rR
ceaeneut

mentioned areas may also apply). Pe Senet ow

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Successful applicants can look forward to oon ee
Bahamas Supermarkets

competitive remuneration and benefits. a0 40. RND Holdings

un
( E 2 Colina Bond Fund 1.315228***
: . : fs Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.998763***
Apply in confidence to: i : : , Colina Money Market Fund _ 1.393169"**""*
6 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.6707***
11.6049 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.2142***
100.0000. 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00**
100.0000 98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.956603*
Vacancy 1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00**
4 9.6346 Fidelity Int H nt und 10.0060***

P; O. Box N 3247 . n " BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 S) YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price *- 31 March 2008
+ 52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity ** - 31 December 2007
Nassau Bahamas , 52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *** - 30 May 2008
? ( Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price see" - 31 April 2008
? - ery: Eyles wage Ae de Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week - ***** - 30 April 2008
or Via email at: shastian@chigess ohnson e com Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths *eree* . 6 June 2008
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007



jf : , : ' DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Chairman’s Report i
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited _ * , Consolidated Statement of Revenue and Expenses

Three months ended April 30, 2008 with comparative figures for the three months ended April 30, 2007



+ Dear Shareholder, (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
On behalf of the Board of Directors of Doctors Hospital Health Saw I f esent the unaudited financial : i ais i |
results for the first quarter ending April 30, 2008. RE Le eT
Earnings per share were ten cents, a decrease from thirteen cents for the comparable period last year. Total Revenues a , 4
revenues were $10.8 million compared to $10.5 million in the. previous year. Net income for the period was ne service revenue,net_ $ bs Oe
“aM: “VW: er $
$0.98 million compared to $1.3 million last year. Réel SL EL Ld OSs
The first quarter of fiscal 2009 has evidenced the high cost of doing business in this uncertain economic time ; Expenses :
as healthcare’ costs continue to rise. / i "Salaries and benefits 4 4,015 3,705
i Medical supplies and services 2,639 2,628
Total expenses increased $0.7 million or 7.3%. Salaries and benefits account for 47% of the total increase, Bad debt expense, net of recoveries ie Rae
Paes ; : rien : ny ; Depreciation and amortization 610 579
contributing factors: include: cost of living increases, health insurance premium increases and _ successful : Other operating 511 462
recruitment of filling needed nursing vacancies. Bad debt expense is 45% of the increase due in part to an Utilities , 345 5 ; 297
increase of self-pay patients in the first quarter. Utility expenses account for 7% of the increase. Government taxes and fees 251 : 249
, ae : Outside services 5 ; 211- . 219
2 i Ai Receivable fell to 473 d the | inhi ny d to 67.8 in th f Insurance ~ é f 181 176
; Days revenue in Accounts eceivat € le to 47. ays, the owest in history, compare to 67.8 in the same Repairs and maintenance 133 , 113
period of fiscal 2008: Cash collection is up by $2.1 million over the comparable period last year. We are Rent 97 as 95
pleased:to report that our cash position allowed the Company to pay down $2.0 millions in long-term debt as: Dietary expenses 5 85 89
well as a $0.02 dividend to our shareholders based on year end results. ; Heewal expenses (ei. "Re Ae SP e Sere ake Oa SSR OR Se LS
: ; Es : Total expenses 9,752 - 9,085
The Company’ made a significant capital expenditure with the pacha of a new state of the art Phillips ae Income before interest 1114 1,467
Achieva 3.0 T capable MRI scanner at a cost of cost $1.6 million. The complete cost of the project is $2.2 Interest expense (133) (153)
. million.. The new Philips Achieva MRI system uses new’ technology (magnet, gradients, RF) to provide repr 5 Rese yer ae Te ; ey
: cutting-edge whole-body 3.0T imaging, enhanced performance on an advanced platform that delivers fast, high Net income for the period $ 981 1,314
quality diagnostic results. With the acquisition of the new MRI machine, the Hospital’s MRI center, currently
located on Christie Street will be housed inside the hospital, panne it more convenient for patients and Earnings per‘common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars): :
relatives. . Basic and fully diluted $ 0.10 0.13



The Company also acquired the U-Systems somo.vâ„¢ breast ultrasound unit at a cost of $0.2 million. The .
main advantage of the somo.vâ„¢ is that it can screen for breast cancer just like a mammogram can in those DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
women for whom a mammogram is considered too painful, or for those whose breast is too dense for the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

mammogram. The newly acquired breast ultrasound system sets a new standard in the Bahamas and is the first
of its kind in the Caribbean. The breast ultrasound machine together with the new MRI breast scanning
capabilities will enhance our quality and accuracy resulting in better patient care and breast diagnostics.

Three months ended April 30, 2008 with comparative figures for the three months ended April 30, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)























: 6 te be * , ‘ 4 Ae + April 30, 2008 April 30, 2007
The Hospital added strong authentication to its website deployment by implementing SafeWord for Citrix. : a ,
SafeWord secures remote access with hardware tokens that generate secure, one-time passcodes for each user ‘Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
~ login which enhance the level of security for our physicians and end users.
: ‘ OPERATING ACTIVITIES: eS
These achievements are due in large measure to the hard work and commitment of our department Leaders, NenincoMe eee § - lou
A ¢ xu fs Bis ‘ Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash s
Aégsociates and the invaluable support and patronage of our credentialed physicians and patients. provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization ¢ 611 579
The Board joins me in ‘thanking our valued shareholders, for your continued support and confidence. We Provision for doubtful accounts eis - 639 342
extend an invitation for you to join us at our company’s Annual General Meeting on June 26, 2008 at 5:30pm, _. Gain on disposal of property; plant and equipment 1 Sst 16)
at the British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street. 2,231 oe
3 thee : i Decrease (increase) in accounts receivable 27 (1,591)
J oseph Krukowski v ; : Increase in inventories (97) (78)
Chairman ‘ : Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses and other assets (1,358) 62
_ May 28,2008 Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and other liabilities 318 198):
‘ : f een Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities 1,121 414
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (809) (208).
Purchase of intangible assets : (9) ° (85)
Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment 2 1,038
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities (818) 745
DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED FINANCING ena ie)
: i Repayment of long-term debt (2,236) (
Consolidiyed Balancershect . Dividends paid to shareholders _(199)

. : : Cash and cash equivalents used i i iviti 4. 236
April 30, 2008 with comparative figures at January 31, 2008 ‘ash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (2,435) (236)
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (2,132) © 923
April 30, 2008 January 31, 2008 ;
; Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 6,630 : 1,989
Assets : : : ;
Currentiassets: : Cash and cash equivalents at end of period. $ 4,498 2,912
Cash and cash equivalents $ 4,498 ‘ 6,630
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) 1,230 1,270 5
Accounts receivable—third party payors, net (note 2) ; 4,139 4,787 Cash a an equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of three
‘Inventories - 1,263 1,166 months or less.
Other assets j 2,108° 729
: 15238 pone DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
ion shirreh Gassetse Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
Investments ; : 30 30 Three months ended April 30, 2008
Goodwill, net 431 431 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
Other intangible assets 2,161 2,423 P ceeate dene ae re
Investment property 4,823 4,868 a
Property, plant and equipment 9,436 8,921 Number of shares Share capital Contributed surplus __ Retained earnings
16,881 16,673 Bal tJ 4 $ 399 $ 12,358 $ 7,048
Total assets $ 30,119 31,255 erence as Jelmuary:3 T2008 PEL SS ; ; ?
Net income for the period - - . , 981
emery 4 ,
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity Dividends paid (199)
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and other liabilities 3,760 3,442 : = —¢€ 19358. § 7830.
Long-term debt, current portion 942 942 Bealeice a ApGUSO22008 8 O27 OB8 th oh Se
4,702 4,384
Non-current liabilities .
Long-term debt ; 4.830 7.066 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Total liabilities 9,532 11,450 Notes to Interim Consvlidated Financial Statements



. Three months ended April 30, 2008
Shareholders’ equity: Foe ee ee

Share capital:
Authorized 12,500,000 common shares at par value 1. Significant accounting policies
of B$0.04 each (January 31, 2007 — 12,500, 000 shares)

Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard



(January 31, 2007 — 9,971,634 shares) 399 399 No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting, using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2008 audited
Contributed surpius 12,358 12,358 consolidated financial statements.
Bee cerungs 7,830 7,048 2. Accounts receivable
20,587 19,805 i ; 7
‘Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity... +§ 30,19. 31,255. Accounts receivable are stated net of provisions for doubtful accounts of $6.6 million.

~



PAGE 1B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008 | | THE TRIBUNE

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Volume: 104 No.170

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Ex-officer’s refusal to answer a pointed,
question said all we need to know

B By PAUL G
TURNQUEST |
Tribune Staff Reporter.
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AN ISLAND-WIDE search
was underway last night after

. four male detainees escaped

from. Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.

Disappearing around 10am
yesterday, the four men, three
Cubans and one Honduran,
are believed to have jumped a
12-foot wall and fled into
nearby bushes.

This latest escape is one of
many in recent months where

The Tribune &

SF ALN
78F

A COUPLE OF
TSTORMS



=USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION |

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

A deafening

STC

PUTA aN UN a S|

Four escape from P
‘Detention Centre

Island-wide search
for male detainees

Cuban migrants have broken

out of the facility despite

numerous security upgrades.

__ As a result, the Detention ~
Centre remained. on “lock.

down” most of yesterday as
immigration officials attempt-
ed to figure out “exactly what
happened”.

The Cubans who escaped
are said to be 36-year-old
Ariel Delgardo Rodriguez, 31-
year-old Felipe Espinoza
Leon and 45-year-old Alberto
Diaz Maes. The Honduran
was identified as 28-year-old

SEE page 14

Headless body
found in canal

THE headless body of a man was found Saturday evening in a

canal close to South Beach Pools.

The head was lying nearby in a bushy area off Marshall Road.

Police have classified the case as a “suspicious death.”

However, it is believed the man may been part of a group of
Haitians who drowned off New Providence earlier this year and were
washed ashore in the southern part of the island.

According to police, the body is badly decayed and it is believed

it was submerged in water for “quite some time.”

SEE page 14

et the F FUN | begin

CARNIVAL VICTORY @
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C= =
trom S 75

@ RESIDENTS of Hope Town,
~ Abaco, are delighted with their

new-look lighthouse after a two-
week paint job which has given
the famous landmark a new

dease of life.

Experts from.the United
States used special cleaning and

spraying methods that stopped

debris blowing on to surround-

ing trees and buildings.

The candy-striped Victorian
Hghihouse; one of the best-



known buildings in the
Bahamas, has taken on a new
sheen since painters completed
the project.

“Everyone is very pleased
with it,” said an islander. “It
looks beautiful.”

The lighthouse’s paintwork
suffered from sand- -blasting in
recent hurricanes and was begin-
ning to look shabby.

Photo: Anne Potts

Bahamas Against Pn
TUS TCS ATT

good things” about fathers.

“It is said that the family is the foundation of }
the society, and that the father is the head of the |
foundation. And so this event is designed to cel-
ebrate fathers, elevate fathers, and to recognise
the wonderful fathers we have in our society.

“Also, it is designed to provide an afternoon of
entertainment, and fun, and enjoyment for the.
residents of this particular part of the island. And
we trust that as we move through the inner city
community, people would appreciate the fact |
that this event was staged for them, their fathers,
and their-families, and enjoy it as we enjoy bring-

ing it to them,” he said.

MEMBERS of the Bahamas Against Crime
organisation held a Father’s Day Parade yester-
day with a march from Southern Recreation |B
Ground to the College of the Bahamas.
Leading the charge, Rev Dr C B Moss said it is
vitally important for the nation to recognise “the






: 4 \
ANGRY residents of Nas-
sau Village pelted a police
squad car and officers with
rocks following the funeral of
15-year-old murder victim Joel
Simeus on Saturday.
According to eye-witness
reports, after the funeral, a num-

- ber of men gathered on the

area’s basketball court.
The atmosphere turned hos-

* "tile When police allegedly

refused to allow the community

‘to “finish its (mourning) pro-

ceedings.”
One teenage resident of Nas-

sau Village said he felt that “the



e
police were not respectful
towards us.”

The situation escalated and
during a confrontation between
residents and police, rocks were
thrown at the officers and their
car.

Police, however, yesterday
stressed that.the.incident was
not a “riot.”

There. were reportedly no.
injuries.

Police were stationed in the
area during the funeral, as'it was
feared that tension in the com-

SEE page 14

Anglican split may be ‘inevitable’
alter the wedding of gay priests

@ By KARIN HERIG
- Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

A SPLIT in the worldwide Anglican community may now be
“inevitable” following a wedding between two gay Anglican priests
in the United. Kingdom, according to religious observers. ~
Despite Archbishop Drexel Gomez’s assertions that he is “opti-
mistic” that there will not be a split in the 70-million strong com-
munion, observers are now saying that this “wedding” is a turning
point in the debate about how the church should handle the issue

of homosexuality

Controversy over same sex civil partnerships was reignited after
New Zealander Rev Dr David Lord walked down the aisle with his
hospital chaplain Rev Peter Cowell.

SEE page 14






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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008 2 a | . THE TRIBUNE
; LOCAL NEWS





MARCHING FOR





BAHAMAS AGAINST CRIME: Banner headlines.



The Bahamas Against Crime organization held a Father’s Day
Parade yesterday with a march from the Southern Recreation
Grounds to the College of the Bahamas. Reverend Dr CB Moss led
the parade, saying it wasy important for the nation to recognise
“the good things” about fathers.









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THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Man charged
with drug
possession

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 29-
year-old Freeport man was
charged with drug posses-
sion in Freeport Magis-
trate’s Court on Friday.

Magistrate Andrew
Forbes charged Christo-
pher Leon Stuart, of 279
Jack Fish Street, Caravel
Beach, with possessing
marijuana. He was also
charged with possession of
drugs with intent to supply.

Stuart was represented
by Simeon Brown. It is
alleged that the accused on
June 3, at Freeport, was
found in possession of 12.5
_ grams of marijuana, which

was contained in 10 small
packages intended for sale,
at an apartment on Bone-
‘fish Street.

Stuart pleaded guilty to
possession of the marijua-
na, but pleaded not guilty
to possession of drugs with
intent to supply.

Magistrate Forbes
adjourned the matter to
November 3, and granted
the defendant $10,000 bail

with one surety. Sentencing, :*

on the guilty plea will take
place on completion of the
trial.

Couple are expected =
in court in connection =
with firearm, ammunition |
possession and stealing

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter ;
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net_ :

FREEPORT - A Freeport }
couple is expected to be :
arraigned on Monday in the :
Freeport Magistrate’s Court in :
connection with firearm:and
ammunition possession. and 4 a
stealing.

Chief Supt Basil: Rahming |
reported that a 40-year-old man ’ L
and his 29-year-old girlfriend,
of Garden Villas, were arfested's
on Friday after police execut- :
ed a search warrant on an apart- i
ment at Weddell Avenue. :

According to reports, a team :

of officers went to a residence: }
around 1.10pm and discovered
a .223 calibre Intratech Scorpi- :
on sub machine gun.and 28 live :
.223 rounds of ammunition.

Various items suspected of |i). °

being stolen were also discov-
ered during a search. Officers :
seized jewellery, including one :
gold watch, five gold hand }
chains, and 16 gold rings. i

They also found a wall :
foamer compressor, two weed :
whackers, five chainsaws, one
grey Nokia cellphone, one pink }
RZR cellphone, one sliver :
Motorola cellphone and one RF :
modulator, all suspected of |
being stolen.

As a result, occupants of the i

apartment were arrested and
taken into custody.

Mr Rahming said a number : |
of Lucaya residents have :
already visited Port Lucaya :
police station and identified the :

items as personal property :
stolen from their homes pee
break-ins.

Police seize

firearm and

GRAND Bahama police dis-
covered and seized a firearm :
and ammunition at an apart-
ment on Bass Lane on Satur- :

day.

into custody in connection with
the matter.

According to reports, officers :
from the Eastern Division exe- :
cuted a search warrant around :
8.15pm at a residence on Bass :
Lane which was suspected of :
containing firearms and ammu-

nition.
Officers discovered a 380 3

semi-automatic pistol contain- :

ing .380 ammunition.

Mr Rahming said the suspect :

is expected to be formally :
charged today in Freeport Mag- :
istrate’s Court in connection
with this incident.

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ORGANISERS BELIEVE the turnout for the Independence Day march could be bigger than that of the

Labour Day event (pictured above).

-Anpther pro-hanging

march planned for
Independence Day

ANOTHER mass march
calling for murderers to be
hanged is planned for Inde-
pendence Day next month.

Organisers encouraged by
the success of the Labour Day
march believe the turnout
could be even bigger next time.

Relatives of murdered
schoolboy Khodee Davis are
seeking the police commis-
sioner’s permission to march
from Fox Hill Parade to Nas-
sau Village and back on July
10, the 35th anniversary of
Bahamas independence.

The march is a response to
the rising murder rate, and in

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particular Khodee’s stabbing
death at the entrance to Cab-
bage Beach last month.

Organisers say they want to
stage “a peaceful and orderly
march and demonstration”
calling for all murderers to be
hanged, and for all murder sus-
pects to be denied bail.

The march, set to begin at
Fox Hill Parade at 9am, will
head south to Prince Charles
Drive, west to Soldier Road,
south to Taylor Street, then to
Alexander Boulevard and Nas-
sau Village Park.

After a rally at the park,
marchers will head back to Sol-

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Fox Hill Parade.

‘A family spokesman said:
“During the last march,
we were joined by many sup-
porters as we covered the
route.

“It was a great success and

we're hoping for an even better _

response this time.”

Though the death penalty
remains on the Bahamas
statute books, it has not been
used since January, 2000, when
Abaconian David Mitchell was
hanged for the murder of two
foreigners at their island holi-
day home.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008





EDITORIAL/LETTERS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas.of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
_ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

The weapon of rape

WORLD leaders fight terrorism all the time,
with summit meetings and sound bites and secu-
rity initiatives.

But they have studiously ignored one of the
most common and brutal varieties of terrorism
in the world today.

This is a kind of terrorism that dispropor-
tionately targets children.

It involves not WMD but simply AK-47s,
machetes and pointed sticks. It is mass rape —
and it will be elevated, belatedly, to a spot on
the international agenda this week.

The U.N. Security Council will hold a special
session on sexual violence this Thursday, with
Condoleezza Rice coming to New York to lead
the debate. This session, sponsored by the Unit-
ed States and backed by a Security Council res-
olution calling for regular follow-up reports,
just may help mass rape graduate from an
unmentionable to a serious foreign policy issue.

The world woke up to this phenomenon in
1993, after discovering that Serbian forces had
set up a network of “rape camps” in which

‘women and: girls, some as young as 12, were

enslaved. Since then, we’ve seen similar pat-..
terns of systematic:rape in many countries, and .

it has become clear that mass rape is not just a
byproduct of war but also sometimes a deliber-
ate weapon.

“Rape in war has been going on since time
immemorial,” said Stephen Lewis, a former

Canadian ambassador who was the U.N? s:

’ envoy for AIDS in Africa.

“But it has taken a new twist as comman-

_ ders have used it as a strategy of war.”

There ‘are two reasons for this. First, mass
rape is very effective militarily.

From the viewpoint of a militia, getting into a
firefight is risky, so it’s preferable to terrorize
civilians sympathetic to a rival group and drive
them away, depriving the rivals of support.

Second, miass rape attracts less international
scrutiny than piles of bodies do, because the
issue is indelicate and the victims are usually too
ashamed to speak up.

In Sudan, the government has turned all of
Darfur into a rape camp.

The first person to alert me to this was a
woman named Zahra Abdelkarim, who had
been kidnapped, gang-raped, mutilated —
slashed with a sword on her leg — and then
left naked and bleeding to wander back to her
Zaghawa tribe. In effect, she had become a
message to her people: Flee, or else.

Since then, this practice of “marking” the
Darfur rape victims has become widespread:

typically, the women are scatred or branded, or’

occasionally have their ears cut off.
This.is often done by police officers or sol-

diers, in uniform, as part of a coordinated gov-'

ernment policy. When the governments of
South Africa, China, Libya and Indonesia sup-
port Sudan’s positions in Darfur, do they really
mean to adopt a pro-rape foreign policy?

The rape capital of the world is eastern Con-
go, where in some areas three- -quarters of
women have been raped.

Sometimes the rapes are conducted with
pointed sticks that leave the victims inconti-
nent from internal injuries, and a former U.N.
force commander there, Patrick Cammaert,
says it is “more dangerous to be a woman than
to be a soldier.”

The international community’s response so
far? Approximately: “Not our problem.”

Yet such rapes also complicate post-conflict

_recovery, with sexual violence lingering even

after peace has been restored.

In Liberia, the civil war is over but rape is still
epidemic — and half of all reported rapes
involve girls younger than 14.

Painfully slowly, the United Nations and its
member states seem to be recognizing the fact
that systematic mass rape is at least as much an
international outrage as, say, pirated DVDs.
Yet China and Russia are resisting any new
reporting mechanism for sexual violence, seeing

. such rapes as tragic but simply a criminal matter.

On the contrary; systematic rape has proper-
ly been found by international tribunals to con-
stitute a crime against humanity, and it thrives
in part because the world shrugs. ,

The U.N. could do far more to provide health
services to victims of mass rape and to insist
that peacekeepers at least try to stop it.

In Congo, the doctors at Heal Africa Hospi-
tal and Panzi Hospital (healafrica.org and panz-
ihospitalbukavu.org) repair the internal injuries

of rape victims with skill and humanity.

But my most indelible memory from my most
recent visit, last year, came as I was interviewing
a young woman who had been gang-raped.

I had taken her aside to protect her privacy,
but a large group of women pudden’y,
approached. :

I tried to shoo them away, and then the
women explained that they had all been gang-
raped.and had decided that despite the stigma
and: risk of reprisal, they would all tell their
stories.

So let’s hope that this week the world’s lead-

ers and diplomats stop offering excuses for
paralysis and begin emulating the courageous
outspokenness of those Congolese women.

( This article is by Nicholas D. Krist of c.2008



New York Times News Service).

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

the position of:

| TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





Haiti’s Flag
Day should
be respected

EDITOR, The Tribune.

MAY 18th, 2008 ‘is cele-
brated by Haiti as its Flag
Day.

The meaning of Flag Day
for Haitians and those of Hait-
ian descent appear to have a
very special meaning, even for
those residing in other coun-
tries throughout the world
where they have migrated to.

On May 18th Haitians
throughout the Bahamas, legal
or illegal as well as those who
label themselves as a “Hait-
ian Bahamian”, adorned their
Haitian flag on their vehicles
and Jitney buses throughout
the islands of the Bahamas, in
particular the island of New
Providence, and displayed
“their” Haitian national pride.

Having a keen interest in

Caribbean history and the .

subject matter, as a Bahamian,
it is with pride that I recog-

iaise the meaning and the pur-

jpose of the May 18th Haitian
IFlag Day celebration and
respect it’s meaning the same.
Jt is a reminder of the strug-
giles and freedoms as Haitian
people valiantly fought for
their freedom and ultimate
victory over the three great-
est military powers in the
world at that time (England,
France and Spain).

So Haitian Flag Day

becomes a celebration of the.

Haitian revolution, and they
ate to be nobly commended
for such’a display of national
pride, even when their country
is experiencing extreme diffi-
culties.

Unfortunately in the |

Bzihamas today, it appears
thiat the Haitian Flag Day has
taken on another meaning in a
dif ferent country, in a differ-
enit century, with an insidious
tone, but with an undermin-
ing motive and not the intent
of tthe past.

It appears to be a celebra-
tio11 of another nation being
born within the Bahamas, in
“the face” of Bahamians in

theiir very own country, in an

ostentatious manner.
Hlaiti’s contributions in a

free black society throughout ~

the ‘world are known. Haitians
residing in the Bahamas and
othe:r countries must realise it
is ncrt what you do to celebrate
your’ culture or your national
prid2, but is how you do it in
anotiher man’s land. Whatever
the ‘underlying message is
behitid your celebration today,

A leading wholesaler seeks a qualified person for

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LETTERS

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it would be better if you share
its history and meaning so that
others will learn about it,
understand it, and not get
offended by your actions,
especially when you indis-
criminately change your last

name to sound like the Eng- .

lish surnames that dominate
the Bahamas, or call yourself a
Bahamian when it’s conve-
nient for you to get employed,
especially in a Bahamian Gov-
ernment Department.

Without prejudice, I have
observed many neighbouring
nations in the Caribbean more
frequently have discounted
the intellect and aptitude of
Bahamian people for whatev-
er reason. ©

I must enlighten them to the
facts that Bahamians can artic-
ulate, read and understand
when they are being disre-
spected in their own country,
or undermined the like by
nefarious schemes.

Like we often say'in the
Bahamas, “You don’t know
me hey”? So, “don’t sleep on
me.”

The Bahamian people know
that all governments of the
Bahamas, past and present,
have failed and are failing

them when it comes to the ille- |

gal immigration ‘issue in this
country, no matter what
nationality is breaking the
immigration laws of the
Bahamas.

Our efforts continue to
FAIL because of corrupt
Bahamians, both “black and
white”
country for one dollar.

The intent of the Haitian
Flag Day should be an exam-
ple of many nations who have

. struggled for freedom.

It should not be a symbol
of disrespect.
-It should not be used to
demonstrate how many of

your citizens are present and
‘exist in the Bahamas, whether

by illegally being born here,
or illegally migrating here with
blatant disrespect for the laws,
or simply using the system and
its people by the Machiavel-
lian approach.

If you feel so strongly about
your Haitian Flag Day, you
should simply go back to Haiti
on your own, and celebrate it
where it belongs.

This is still and will remain

the Bahamas.

The United States closes
their embassy and celebrate
their national events at their
Ambassador’s residence; they
also invite many Bahamian
Government officials to par-
ticipate.

Maybe this action, and pro-

, who will sell their .-

Bahamas. It would be more
respectful to the citizens of the
Bahamas and would not
appear to have a subterfuge
motive.,

With full knowledge of your
provocative action on May
18th, The Bahamas continues
to cope with many of Haiti’s
citizens by granting them a
free education in our schools
at the expense of the Bahami-
an tax payers.

The abuse of the many gov-
ernment systems continue,
squatting at will, and blatant
abuse of our health care sys-
tem, with the majority of Hait-
ian and migrants of other
nations making no contribu-
tions to National Insurance.

The Catholic Church, which
has for many years aided this
situation, may want to recon-
sider how it is assisting the
immigration process that is
changing the face of our
nation through its subtle, but
extremely powerful influence
and. programmes.

“Through unity, we find
strength” (L’union fait la
force) is the famous phrase on
Haiti’s flag, which on Febru-
ary 25, 1986, after the fall of
Baby Doc and the Duvalier
regime, was requested back
by the people.

It is my hope through infor-
mation sharing, and education
we can foster a better under-
standing of other nations, and
would have greater respect
and regard for each others
country and their national
events.

Blatant disrespect for anoth-
er country and its citizens, that
allowed you to live a better
life from where you or.your
parent/s came from, or assist
you in your migratory move-
ment to other countries of
your dream, will eventually be
met with ultimate resistance

’ and eventual bloodshed.

I urge all who participate in
Haiti’s Flag Day to do it
respectfully and to encourage
others to join you in celebrat-
ing its real meaning if they so
desire.

The International Food Fair
held at the Botanical Gardens
is an event where you can
experience and learn of so
many cultures with respect.
You can go around the world
without having to buy a plane
ticket.

On the Bahamas Coat of
Arms, our motto.is “Forward,
Upward, Onward, Together”.

We are all in this country
by the grace of God, so I
would urge people of all
nations calling the Bahamas
their home, to respect its peo-
ple and its culture.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 5





Road to improvement

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@Tribunemedia.net

THE Road Traffic Depart-
ment launched its first Public
Service Drivers’ manual on
Friday — calling on all current
and future jitney, surrey horse,
taxi-cab and tour car drivers to
adhere to the rules and guide-
lines which lie within.

From driving “furiously” to
“refusing to use a poop bag”
for a surrey horse, not taking
daily baths or using deodor-
ant to stopping your bus in
non-designated areas, the
Road Traffic Department has
included them all in the man-
ual as rerninders of what not
to do as a driver in the public
transportation industry.

. It wants those working in

the sector to be better mindful
of these things, so that “best
services will be carried out and
passengers’ expectations can
be met.”

The manual was launched
at a press conference by Min-
ister of Works Earl Deveaux
and Road Traffic Controller
Jack Thompson on Friday,

The launch goes hand-in-
hand with the start of a 100
Day Challenge for Jitney dri-
vers to improve the service
which they provide to the pub-
lic, beginning today.

Manual contains rules for jitney, surrey
horse, taxicab and tour car drivers





SSS
Earl Deveaux



Recognition by the govern-
ment, and increasingly by
stakeholders in the industry,
that the public, often avoid
using the services that are on
offer for fear of being subject
to an unpleasant or danger-

ous experience, inspired the
latest efforts to raise standards
in the sector.

The government ultimately
wants to get more people out
of their cars and into buses so

that traffic congestion can be.

minimised, and bus drivers
stand to benefit from
increased business if they
change the less than savoury
ways of many who do the job.

In the 28-page manual,
which Mr Deveaux said all of
those who apply for a licence
to work in the industry will be
required to read, regulations
governing the various busi-
nesses are laid out, all with a
“Code of Conduct and Ethics”
and other responsibilities that
drivers in each respective area
are deemed to have.

The manual says the Road

Traffic Department wants to,

“impress upon drivers how
important a role each of them
play in our economy, espe-
cially in the tourism industry.”

Under tlie code of conduct

_ section, drivers are recom-

mended to offer value for

money, create a “unique and.
fun-filled experience” and
provide excellent service.

Companies are told they
should look for drivers who
are “caring, enthusiastic and
friendly” and knowledgeable
about the Bahamas. :

Those who “drive wantonly
or furiously” or use insulting
or abusive language, or wil-
fully cause injury to any per-
son or property, are reminded
within the manual that they
are guilty of an offence and
are liable to a fine, or a fine
and imprisonment for a sec-
ond offence

Drivers are told to take care
over their appearance, as
“how we look and appear to
our guests provides a first
impression of our destina-
tion.”

Fresh breath, well-kept uni-
forms; and neat hairstyles are
all suggested and “mashed-up,
shabby dress and poor per-
sonal cleanliness” could result
in a driver being suspended
for the day if found upon
inspection, warns the docu-



-senger Bill of Rights” section.



RAGGED ISLAND often calls itself
the ‘Cinderella’ isle of the Bahamas, but
not when it comes to its children’s acade-
mic and musical achievements.

The island school - run by Robert and
Ophelia Boodram - has notched up an
impressive tally of successes this year,
including national championships in song
- and drama.

The school won two titles at the E
Clement Bethel National Arts Festival
and took first and second places in a dis-
trict essay and poetry competition.

Mr Boodram told The Tribune: “We
are very proud of the students’ perfor-

Ragged Island school notch up successes

mances, not only in the extra-curriculum
areas but also academically. “The school
is well supported by the parents, commu-
nity and Ministry of Education.”

The national drama champions were
Lovell Lockhart, Sade Lockhart-Bain,
Rhesa Boodram and Davontay Wallace.

Their skit was about a single mother
who was always drunk and both physi-
cally and mentally abusive to her chil-

- dren.

Rap song winners were Myron Lock-
hart-Bain 11, Alfred Francis, Nino Fran-
cis, D’Marcio Wallace, Ashton Brooks
and Aaron Boykins.

The song, about different forms of child ©

abuse, was composed by Alfred and
Myron. Child abuse was also the theme of
the district essay and poetry competition,
organised by the Department of Social
Services in Exuma. Ragged Island was
winner and runner-up.

Students have also embarked on a Cans
for Kids campaign, recycling soda cans to
help less fortunate children in the
Bahamas. :

So far about 4,000 cans have been
shipped towards the non-profit venture.

Mr and :Mrs Boodram ‘teach’ children:::

in grades one to nine.



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Busy time
for writers

BAHAMIAN writers
have a busy six months
ahead, with several events
planned leading up to a sto-
rytellers’ convention next
January. Over the weekend,
members of the Bahamas
writers’ group set up a com-
mittee to plan a cultural his-
tory day in October, a writ-
ers’ lunch, the January con-
vention and the junior writ-
ers book launch.



ment. Passengers are entitled
to a driver who obeys all traf-
fic laws, air conditioning, a
smoke and radio free ride and
have no obligation to tip dri- LSS e

vers, it adds, under the “Pas- IN i sal
For the stories behind
the news, read Insight

on Mondays

The manual is available
from the Road Traffic Depart-
ment.
















Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort &
Offshore Island

Invites application for the position of:
EXECUTIVE CHEF .

REQUIREMENTS:



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Posess a sound culinary background

Must be a self motivated person.
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Being able to develop budgets. and necessary controls
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College or culinary institute training is an asset

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=~
PAGE 6, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Florida Democrats seek

Obama unity at fundraiser

i HOLLYWOOD, Fla.

THE Florida Democratic Party
made a huge effort to unify
activists behind Barack Obama
after more than a year of drama
over the state’s primary and the
prolonged battle to see who would
secure the nomination, according
to Associated Press.

It pretty much worked.

More than 1,400 attended the
state party’s annual Jefferson-Jack-

son dinner and there were plenty ,

of signs, stickers and buttons for
Obama. Speaker after speaker
urged the crowd to get behind the
Illinois senator whether or not they
supported Hillary Clinton.

“The truth of the matter is, my
friends, those of you who support-
ed Hillary Clinton are in many
ways the most important people



Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur








in the room,” said U.S. Rep.
Robert Wexler. “We understand
how hard you worked, we under-
stand how emotional and passion-
ate you all are.”

But now, Wexler said, Democ-
rats have to come together as a
family and Clinton supporters
need to work just as hard for Oba-
ma. The crowd’s response was less
than raucous, but there were cer-
tainly signs that party activists were
moving forward after a nearly
evenly divided primary.

Still, many Clinton supporters
were feeling the sting of defeat a
week after she conceded the race.

“I’m not wearing an Obama
sticker only because it’s so raw,”
said Diana Wasserman-Rubin, a
Broward County Commissioner
who was a Clinton fundraiser. “We
worked so hard for her.”

‘Don’t waste time ©
waiting for people to
recognize you.
Fach individual is
different, and
you are special in
your own way.”

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Raising a glass to
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00 cases of beer to restaurants, Rts atl Mee Pl , aC mith ;

of Kalik

KALIK celebrated its 20th
anniversary recently at the
Commonwealth Brewery,

commemorating the 1988

launch of the original national
beer of the Bahamas.

In remarks to the press,
Leroy Archer, managing

director of Kalik, emphasised °

the good reputation that the

.Bahamian'beer has developed

at home and abroad.

“From the very beginning,
we’ve aimed to offer a great
tasting premium beer that
Bahamians could be proud of,
and we have strived ever since
to maintain this quality.

“Today in the international
marketplace, and particularly
in North America, Kalik has

made its mark,” he said.

According to Mr Archer,
Kalik exports more than
100,000 cases of beer to
restaurants, stores and bars all
over the world.

In order to keep up with the
demand for Kalik, he said, the

.Commonwealth Brewery pro-

duces 1.7 million cases of the
beer annually.

In addition to the original
Kalik, Kalik Gold, Kalik Light

- were created in 1992 and 1997

respectively.

Further plans for the 20th
anniversary celebrations were
announced at the event, where
persons were able to partake
of light refreshments and
enjoy Kalik products.





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THE TRIBUNE

MUNDAY, JUINE 10, ZUUG, PFAUE /



LOCAL NEWS



No more Yen for whales

@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

ominica’s Prime

Minister, Roo-

sevelt Skerrit,

and his cabinet
have taken a decision that will
not endear them to the Japan
Whaling Association or to some
of the governments in nearby
Caribbean states. But, it may
help to stop the wanton slaugh-
ter of hundreds of whales every
year and, at the same time, con-
tribute to a growing tourist
attraction in the Caribbean —
whale watching.

Skerrit has announced, in
advance of the 60th meeting of
the International Whaling Com-
mission (IWC) on June 23rd,
that the country’s representa-
tive will abstain on a vote for
“the sustainable use of marine
resources”. Read “sustainable
- use of marine resources” to
mean “killing whales”.

Every year the Japanese
hunt and kill 1,200 whales and it
defends its position at the IWC.
With an increasing number of
countries, including many in
Latin America, Asia and Africa,
opposing the unjustified killing
of whales, Japan is outnum-
bered. So, it set out to recruit
small countries to join the [WC
as supporters in exchange for
giving them fisheries facilities.

Over time, these mostly
refrigerated storage units, have
become white elephants. They
sit on the shores underutiliséd,
and not serving the fishing com-
munity which lacks the capacity
to catch the amount of fish nec-
essary to fillthem. They may
have served a purpose at the
time of their establishment
when the governments of these
small states pointed to them as
' indicators of investment in their
- small and less well-off fishing
communities. Today, it is clear
the fishing communities would
have done better if investment
had been made in improving
their capacity to fish with bigger
boats and more modern tech-
nology by giving grants or very
low interest loans.

Many of the countries that
Japan recruited to bolster. its
position in the IWC cannot
afford to join other interna-
tional organisations that are of
importance to them or send del-
egations to meetings. Yet, they
' have somehow managed both
to meet the cost of membership
of the IWC and to send vocif-
erous delegations to its meet-
ings.

Observers point out that
many of these small countries
have no provision in their bud-
gets for membership of the
IWC. And reports by the
media, including the BBC, sug-

gest that the Japanese Whaling ~

Association pays the costs, and
calls the tune. It is also pointed
out that, apart from St Vincent
and the Grenadines, there is no
history of whale hunting among
the small Caribbean islands and
no “national interest” reason
for supporting the Japanese
position. d

Indeed, the reverse may be
true since there is a vibrant and
growing “whale watching” sec-
tor to the tourism industry in
the Caribbean, including
Dominica. The value of “whale
watching’ to Caribbean tourism
is estimated by some at US$22
million.. Others argue that this
figure is conservative, and if
capacity were strengthened it
could earn much more.

Many international organi-
sations — and knowledgeable
persons within Caribbean coun-
tries — have accused the Japan-
ese of “buying” the votes of six
small Caribbean countries of
which Dominica is one. Indeed,
when Skerrit made _ his
announcement, Andrew
Armour, President of Carib
Whale, a group advocating for
the protection of marine
resources, is reported by the
Caribbean Media Corporation
as saying that Japan is no longer
interested in “buying votes.”

' Those who support the
Japanese position in the
Caribbean — now only repre-
sentatives of five countries —
claim, that they do so for two
reasons. The first is that
“whales eat fish” and therefore
deprive Caribbean fishermen
and Caribbean people of the
food they need. However, there
is no scientific evidence to sup-
port the notion that whales are
depleting the fish stocks avail-
able to man in the region — the
claim is a red herring. The sec-
ond is that “the denial of sus-
tainable use of whales today,

Uda
ity

FOR PEST PROBLEMS §

PHONE: 322-2157





Syl ee DELO ES



can lead to the denial of the use
of other marine sources tomor-
row.” This is a fear-mongering
argument that has no eviden-
tiary basis, but is promoted by
the Japanese and echoed by
their few vocal Caribbean
clients. :

Japan has long opposed the
prohibition of whale hunting by
the IWC and has ignored inter-

national treaties, such as the
United Nations Convention on
the Law of the Sea. When
Japanese fishermen kill up to
1,200 whales a year, Japan
defends this action as being in
conformity with the IWC scien-
tific whaling criteria. But, a dis-
tinguished panel of lawyers in
2006 found that Japanese sci-
entific whaling is unlawful and
contravenes several interna-
tional conventions, including
the International Convention
for the Regulation of Whaling.
Among the panel of legal
experts is the internationally-
recognised British lawyer,
Philppe Sands, the author of
“Lawless World: America and
the making and breaking of
global rules”, an account of the
US disregarding international
law and rules.

Prime Minister Skerrit and
his government deserve con-
gratulations for taking the deci-
sion to abstain on the vote. In
doing so, Dominica is “breaking
a trend that (Dominica has)
maintained for a number of
years,” as Skerrit himself said.
He has done so in recognition
not of Japan’s ambitions, but of
Dominica’s national interest.
The other Caribbean countries



should do the same. In a high-
ly competitive world in which
small island states are at the far
margins of international con-
cern, Dominica’s economy has
already been ripped to shreds
by the loss of its preferential
access for its bananas into the
market of the European Union.
Its financial services sector has
also been:destroyed by the
actions of big countries, includ-
ing Japan which was a hawk in
crushing offshore financial cen-
tres in 2000 when the Organi-
sation for Economic Coopera-
tion and Development (OECD)
imposed its so-called ‘harmful
tax competition initiative’.
Dominica is now clinging to
its attraction as the ‘nature
island of the Caribbean’; its pris-
tine rainforests; and its won-
derful Caribbean charm to
develop a, tourism industry to
bolster its economy. As Skerrit
himself alluded in announcing

- his decision not to support the

Japanese anymore: the pursuit
of the goal of promoting the
natural environment is incon-
sistent with killing one of its
most magnificent species.

It is time that the yen for
whale killing be rejected by all.

_ (The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)

Responses’ to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.co
m>

Itsuo Inouye/AP Photo

A HUMPBACK WHALE jumps at a whale watching point, off Okinawa, southwestern Japan, Tuesday, March
25, 2008.

Japan on June 21, 2007.





David Guttenfelder/AP Photo

JAPANESE SCHOOL CHILDREN watch whalers butcher a Baird’s Beaked whale on a port deck in Wada,



A JAPAN COAST
GUARD boat guards
the Japan’s whaling
ship “Nisshin Maru”
afterreturning from the
Antarctia at a Tokyo
pier on April 15. The
fleet killed only 60 per-
cent of its target of
1,000 whales.

La Resa } eC i

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





How can we kick the carbon habit?

@ Energy conservation & Car pooling @ Solar energy technology

@ BY DR MICHAEL
TURNER
Undersecretary in the
Ministry of Health
and Social Development

T has been generally

accepted by profes-

sionals in the study of

human behaviour and

ecology that human activities

are fundamental to the mainte-
nance of the environment.

Scholars of the Bible have

F the
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concluded that man is endowed
by his creator and given the
responsibility to take care of the
environment around him.
According to the Genesis story,
the Lord God took man and
placed him in the Garden of
Eden to dress it and to keep it.
The inference here is clearly
that man was given stewardship
of the environment.

We therefore must all come
to understand that protection
of the environment is necessary
to ensure the optimal well-being
of man and that of many other
social animals inhabiting planet
earth.

It must also be emphasised
that the uncontrolled activities
of man have the potential to



















325-2609.







radically change the environ-
ment, and thereby alter habi-
tats, create stress and displace
species that are not able to
quickly adjust, sometimes to the
point of extinction.
Observation and research
indicates that man’s manipula-

tion of the environment and |

earth’s natural resourcés
accounts for the greatest impact

’ on the planet, whether that

impact be positive or negative.

The evidence of this conclu-
sion can be seen right in our
local communities when we cut
down many of our trees to
make way for construction and
other development projects.

Conversely, poor garbage and
refuse handling practices evi-
denced by littered streets, pri-
vate and public properties,
including recreational premis-
es with refuse ranging from
food waste to derelict vehicles
creates habitats for vectors of
public health importance, such
as rats and mosquitoes.

Our belief that our creator
God has given us protective
responsibility for the environ-
ment is affirmed by our use of
the maxim “cleanliness is next
to godliness.” :

Looking around us today in
the wider Bahamas, we may
have reason to question either
this maxim, or to question our
godliness, because the state of
the national environment has
become a cause for concern.

On Thursday June 5, along
with other UN member coun-
tries, we celebrated World
Environment Day.

World Environment Day was
established in 1972 by the Unit-
ed Nations General Assembly,
marking the Stockholm Con-
ference on the human environ-
ment.

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“Looking around us today in
the wider Bahamas, we may
have reason to question either
this maxim (cleanliness is next
to godliness) or to question
our godliness, because the
state of the national
environment has become a
cause for concern.”

Litter scars the Bahamian environment.

Subsequently each. year June
5 is commemorated by member
countries of the UN, highlight-
ing a common or similar theme
and encouraging activities ben-
eficial to the environment.

The theme this year was
“Kick the Habit: Towards a
Low Carbon Economy.

This theme calls our atten-
tion to the fact that the major
energy source fueling the
economies of both the industri-
alised world and developing
economies are carbon based,
and implicated with the pro-
duction of green house-gases
associated: with global warming.

Scientists are of the view that
the apparent increase in
Atlantic hurricane activities,
both in numbers and intensity
are associated with the margin-
al rise in temperature over the
last decade or more.

Nevertheless,:the» world
appears to be growing no less
dependent on coal and oil for

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industrial progress and devel-
opment, despite their known
damaging effects on the envi-
ronment.

Despite our small size, we in
the Bahamas should be encour-
aged to do all that we can to
slow the world’s dependence on
fossil fuels, if only because of

’ the fact that we are positioned

to be among the first to suffer
from negative fallout from glob-
al warming and climate change.
In addition to our low-lying
landscape, being vulnerable to
sea level rise, we sit in the
Atlantic hurricane belt, perched

in the path of more frequent

and severe hurricanes.

Higher temperatures also
seem to be supportive of more
severe drought conditions and
thereby giving rise to more
destructive forest fires.

“~-Global-warming ‘is or’should:

be of special interest to us in

the Bahamas; also bécausé we’

stands to lose precious limited

land space becoming sub-
merged due to sea level rise
brought on by global warming
and climate change.

« What can we in the Bahamas
do to help kick the carbon habit
you may ask.

I offer that a good place to
start is with energy conserva-
tion. Energy conservation
should be doubly attractive at
this time, both because of the
desirability to minimise the
damaging effects on the envi-
ronment and the economic pain
being experienced as a result of
the escalating price of gas and
diesel fuels. Car pooling, espe-
cially within households, could
bring much needed relief from
the hardship that most of us are
now experiencing by driving
one person per vehicle.

Secondly, I offer that we in
the Bahamas should make full
use of the solar energy technol-
ogy available and encourage
further reduction in the use of
fossil fuels.

The raw material of solar
energy is available year round in
The Bahamas. It is perhaps the
most reliable renewable ener-
gy source, and it is available free
of charge. Expenditure designed
to perfect this technology
should be considered a reason-
able investment proposal for
companies in the Bahamas.

As was mentioned earlier in
this presentation, we in the
Bahamas hold to the maxim
that “cleanliness is next to god-
liness”.

By the universal commemo-
ration of this day June 5 each
year, we are reminded of the
God-given responsibility we
share to care for the environ-
ment in order to ensure its
health, not only to our own ben-
efit, but that of generations to
come. It is my sincere hope that
we see ourselves as partners at
all levels and that we are con-
tinuously motivated to action
in shouldering our responsibili-

“ties to the Environment’ each

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the month, and every month of
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Re eae a ee |
Fathers from
‘over-the-hill’
are treated
to luncheon

i By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information ~—
Services

THE Bain and Grants Town
Urban Renewal Centre, in con-
junction with Farm Road Urban
Renewal Centre, treated fathers
in the over-the-hill communi-
ties to a Father’s Day luncheon
last Thursday.

The fathers were not only
treated to lunch but also
received gifts ranging from
radios, DVD players, tele-
phones, silk neckties and gift
baskets.

Bain and Grants Town
Urban Renewal Centre manag-
er Mary Jean Lightbourn
explained that there was a.two-
fold motivation for hosting the
fathers to a luncheon.

Ms Lighbourn said: “We
want them to become mentors
for our young men in the area,
and we also want them to be
role models for some of the
younger fathers in the commu-
nity.”

The second motive was to get

more men to become part of '

the Centre’s senior citizen’s
group. —

Ms Lightbourn said the Bain
and Grants Town senior citi-
zen’s group has 69 females and
only two males, so the plan is to
get the men interested in join-
ing.

But the event was not only
attended by men from Bain and

; Lair Local Company |

Grants: Town or Farm Road.
She said the nine Urban
Renewal Centres throughout
New Providence were asked to
bring at least 10 fathers.

To pull off the luncheon,
sponsors were needed but they
were not in-short supply.
According to the centre man-
ager, many businesses in the
community sponsored the
event.

Ms Lightbourn explained that
the morning of the event busi-
ness persons were still calling
to find out what they could con-
tribute.

Florists

Florist Jeffrey Thompson,
who was asked to contribute,
got 10 other florists to donate
flower arrangements.

During the lunch, co-ordina-
tor of Urban Renewal Liveable
Neighbourhood Programme in
New Providence Ella Lewis told
fathers that when they are
absent in the home something is
missing.

Ms Lewis said urban renewal
is about the promotion of fam-
ilies and fathers will never be
forgotten or forsaken by the
programme.

“You are important to us and
we will do all we can to make
your lives more comfortable
and let you know we appreciate
and love you,” she said.

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Brown, rector and priest at St
Agnes Anglican. Church who
spoke at the event, said Father’s
Day must be a bigger celebra-

tion than it is today.

“T still believe we need to
work on the celebration of
fatherhood,” Father Brown
said. “Society has allowed such
an important role in the life of
creation to be.so downplayed
and so superficial.

“T am tired of the many ways

and tunes with which men of:

our country are treated and
described.”

He said many times when
man is labelled as a failure he is
really a failure of the society,

. including the church.

“Despite the fact that some
of our men have fallen to the

-vices of life it does not mean

that there are not women who
have not done the same He
Father Brown said.

“Therefore, if we are not

prepared to call women ‘wut-
less’ on Mother’s Day, then we

need to stop calling our fathers ~

‘wutless’ on Father’s Day,
because man cannot be ‘wut-
less’ by himself.

. “Father’s Day must be a big-
ger celebration than it is today
and the challenge of this event
today must be the catalyst used
to cause greater recognition to
the male population in

this country, more so in

our immediate communities
in many instances are what
they are because of social rea-
sons.”

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



EPA ae made me cringe

But beyond the demonstrations is an important point
.. Bahamians need to be informed about the issue

!

MISSION TO INFORM: Zhivargo
Laing must seek to engage the
populace about the EPA.







“Must be 2 years old
- by November 1. —
gue -day/Half-day/3-day program



AB Re LRN

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com —

N an attempt to score
cheap political points,
Paul Moss’s and Fayne
Thompson’s oppor-

* tunistic protest in condemna-

tion of the European Partner-
ship Agreement (two weeks
ago) by parading puppet-like,
unapprised straw vendors
throughout Rawson Square
appears to have been nothing
short of a discomfiting ruse.
Mr Moss, the political busy-
body and leader of the activist
group Bahamians Agitating for

Lake Waterloo, East Bay Street .
. Waterloo Compound —

‘Tel: (242) 394-4781 /3 for further information

Ears

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

July 7 - ae 1
Ages 2-12.



GIBSON

a Referendum on Free Trade
(BARF), appears to have
directed a disastrous demon-
stration centred on a group of
less affluent, rowdy protesters

who appeared to be thoroughly
ignorant to the issues.

As I watched the side- -split-
ting, awkward ZNS segment
featuring these protesters, I
cringed as one demonstrator

after another suggested that.

parliamentarians would be
using monies to “over-educate
their children” or that they
would be pushing up grass while
their children would be eating
flowers (whatever that means
or has to do with the EPA is



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“Even today,
the average
Bahamian can
hardly discuss,
to any
appreciative
extent, what the
EPA entails!”



beyond me).

The so-called picket-line
appears to have been a
wretched handful of clueless
straw vendors, who seemed
incapable of defending their

_opposition to the EPA though

they repeatedly bellowed “no
EPA” and waved home-made
placards.

Oddly enough, while those
apparently uninformed straw
vendors are expressing fears
about foreigners coming from
Europe to compete with them,
they are disregarding the Hait-

ian and Jamaican immigrants.

already: operating in the
straw/flea market.

The EPA, which is set to be
signed between the European
Union and the Bahamas/Cari-
forum countries, is an accord
which succeeds the Cotonou
Agreement that governed trade
between the African Caribbean
and Pacific (ACP) countries
and the EU. It appears that the
EPA is designed to increase
access to markets and services.

Like many discerning
Bahamians, I am also question-
ing the extent to which the EPA
allows for European companies
to compete and the commercial
sectors that will be opened to
European competition.

To carry out a countrywide

mission ‘to: inform: Bahamians:'*
about the EPA, .Minister:of :

State for Finance Zhivargo
Laing must seek to.effectively

engage the populace in a public
education programme/dialogue,
particularly to avoid further
misleading misinformed or
uninformed Bahamians. Even
today, the average Bahamian
can hardly discuss, to any appre-
ciable extent, what the EPA
entails!

On June 12 and 13, Mr Moss
and a BARF delegation were
scheduled to demonstrate
against this economic partner-
ship agreement in Trinidad and
Tobago. However, I’m won-

' dering if he also took that group

of irate straw vendors on his
Caribbean expedition?

Bishop William
Thompson has
found his voice!

Although former Bahamas
Christian Council (BCC) presi-
dent Bishop William Thomp-
son’s ‘in-your-face’ scorching of
National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest bears some
merit, especially since the pre-
sentation of promised strategic
crime fighting is yet to appear,
why didn’t he speak similarly
when serious crime was spi-
ralling out of control under the

‘PLP, and more specifically, for-

mer National Security Minister
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt? Is this
an out-and-out case of political
favouritism?

While some of the Bishop’s
charges are meritorious, his
recent speech at the National
Baptist Missionary and Educa-
tional Convention can be inter-
preted as a misuse of the pulpit,
a political staging ground.

Dressed in his priestly garb,
Bishop Thompson seemed like
a disingenuous politico who was
sermonising and peddling a
politically biased speech which
would have been more forceful
had he taken the same stance

-under the former government

instead of remaining conspicu-
ously mute in the face of dis-
tasteful scandals and allegations
of-outright corruption. The
Bishop should also speak to the
growing number of morally
bankrupt, religious hawkers
being dragged before the courts
for “tiefin”, rape, fraud and var-
ious other felonious acts.

Has Mr Thompson just
realised that serious crime has
increased or that legal immi-
grants and their Bahamas-born
children who apply and are
deserving of citizenship should
be naturalised?

Why hasn’t the Bishop
addressed the indiscretions of
public officials, infidelity
between pastors and_parish-
ioners and the predatory
attempts of some pastors to
fleece congregants and exploit
their vulnerable, credulous
parishioners?

Frankly, the clergyman’s pon-
tification suggests a degree of
hypocrisy and an indefensible

‘double standard since he was

tight-lipped as BCC president

‘ when the PLP was in power.

Sadly, Bishop Thompson has
strayed from the impetus to
speak ‘what thus says the Lord’
to delving in the political arena.

Instead of engaging in cock-
eyed political ‘posturing, lead-
ers in our society — particular-

ly the church — should employ:

hands-on tactics in the fight to
reduce crime, poverty and oth-
er social ills through outreach

‘programmes and social initia-

tives, and assist in developing
better citizens.

When religious and civic
leaders send signals to an
impressionable society that they
are seemingly selective in
addressing social ills/issues
based upon political leanings,
their divisive actions lend to an
atmosphere of chaos.

Is there any wonder why

“many Bahamians only attend

churches for pune these
days?

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 11



——
l@ YOUNG MAN’S VIEW



PIONEER SHIPPING: Closed operations.
The National Insurance

Board bungles another one!

Recently, Pioneer Shipping closed its operations and termi-
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that their National Insurance payments were not up-to-date
although it was being deducted from their wages.

For such an outrageous episode to recur, even after the Roy-
al Oasis debacle, the blatant ineptitude of the National Insur-
ance department and their failure to verify payments is inex-
cusable.

Now that the National Insurance Board has once again
failed to ensure that contributions are paid on time, I’m curious
as to why NIB officers haven’t been dispatched to companies
that default on payments and why haven’t these businesses
faced hefty fines or criminal charges since they steal - via
deductions - NIB contributions from their employees’ earnings?

Who will protect workers, many of whom barely earn above
the minimum wage, when NIB is failing to perform its duties?



Tim = ribune staff

FORMER PIONEER workers upset about not = bh paid they
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Pilot project conducted for 40 coaches
and PE teachers in the public schools

@ By Llonella Gilbert
_ Bahamas Information
Services

THE College of the
Bahamas and the Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports and
Culture conducted a pilot pro-
ject for 40 coaches and physi-
cal education teachers in the
public schools, including pri-
mary, junior and high schools.

A professional development ,

workshop focused on the the-
ory and practice of coaching
basketball and the art of injury
prevention, vice-president of
the outreach programme at
COB, Dr Pandora Johnson
told a press conference. .

John Reynolds, head coach
of the Florida Tech women’s
basketball programme and
local facilitator Edwurdo
Thompson, sports therapist
International Orthopaedic
Sports Therapy, facilitated the
workshop.

Should the pilot project
prove successful, Dr Johnson
said it will provide an excellent
medium through which the
college can make a positive
impact through the educa-
tional system.

She said: “Arguably, it is
our coaches and physical edu-
cation teachers who have a
tremendous opportunity to
hone the ‘soft skills’ in
extracurricular environments
which support that which we
do in our academic settings.”

Dr Johnson also noted that °

the college/university wishes
to establish a Professional
Development Institute for
Athletics Personnel that will
address the needs of coaches,
physical education teachers,
student athletes, statisticians,
referees and other sports
administrators.

President of the Bahamas
Basketball Federation
Lawrence Hepburn said the
federation, which is also a
partner in the venture, endors-
es the professional develop-
ment opportunity ‘for coach-

es and physical education

teachers.



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Workshop focuses on theory and practice of
coaching basketball and injury prevention

Mr Hepburn said: “We are
particularly pleased to learn
of the involvement of physi-
cal education teachers and
coaches at the primary school
level, as we believe that it is at
this level where young play-
ers learn the fundamentals of
the game so critical to the
development of basketball in
general and to our national
programmes in particular.”

He said the federation is
also pleased that the col-
lege/university intends to
attach continuing education
units upon the completion of
the workshop.

He added that, based on the
modules proposed, physical
education teachers and coach-
es who complete the work-
shop in its entirety will also
be eligible for an Internation-
al Basketball Federation
(FIBA) coaching certification,
the level of which will be con-

firmed once reviewed and ~

approved by FIBA.

“What I can confirm,” Mr
Hepburn said, “even in the
absence of this review, it is
clear that the topics to be cov-
ered meet at the very mini-
mum Level I designation, and
cover some of the topics
required by Level II.”

The modules for the work-
shop included fundamentals
of coaching basketball, offen-
sive and defensive fundamen-
tals of basketball and the art
of injury prevention.

Explaining his coaching
technique, Coach Reynolds
said: “I can guarantee that the
coaches that attend in the 10
hours I instruct will not only
meet the standard that you
have, but they will probably
need the physical therapists
for the ice they will be using
on their bodies.”

The therapist, Mr Thomp-
son, explained it has always
been his dream to help coach-

“ es and athletes enhance their

performance, preyent injuries
and maintain a consistent lev-

_ el of performance.

He said: “I thank COB for
allowing us to have this plat-
form and to be an influence
to our young coaches, athletes
and also to instructors.

“There is a lot of new infor-
mation out there; there are a
lot of new technologies out
there and we are going to get
an opportunity to see first

hand, first class and world
class techniques and tools to
enhance and maintain a con-
sistent level of performance.”

Senior education officer,
Department of Education for
Primary Schools in the MOE,
Dawn Knowles, said next year
the ministry hopes to include
teachers and coaches from the
Family Islands and eventually
include private schools in the
workshop.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

pial NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Flooding i in China kills 55; one million flee —

8 BENING downstream, especially in the coastal
7 7 manufacturing powerhouse of Guangdong, Xin-
hua says.

Most of those areas are expected to receive more
heavy rain over the next 10 days.

Just to the south, communities with tens of thou-
sands of people were threatened by the swollen
Xijiang River in the Guangxi region, where a 130-
foot crack had opened in an embankment near
Changzhou, Xinhua said.

Nearly 120,000 people fled to high ground in the
nearby town of Longhua when river water began to
pour oe the gap, it said.



AT LEAST 55 people have died and seven are
missing in flooding across a broad stretch of south-
ern China, state media reported Sunday, according
(0 Associated Press.

More than 1.2 million people have been forced to
flee their homes across nine provinces, including
Sichuan, which is still reeling from last month’s
earthquake that killed almost 70,000 people, the
official Xinhua News Agency said.

Heavy rain in Sichuan, Guizhou and Yunnan,
provinces will further raise water levels

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Govt's national

security approach
‘yields results’

‘MN By MATT MAURA

Bahamas Information
Services

THE government’s co-oper-
ative and collaborative
approach to national security
yielded “significant results” dur-
ing the 2007/2008 Budget year,
Minister of National Security
and Immigration Tommy Turn-
quest told House of PRED
members.

Mr Turnquest said the gov-
ernment is working assiduously
to combat crime and criminali-
ty in a “determined effort” to
halt and reverse some current
crime trends.

Speaking during the budget
debate, Mr Turnquest said
transnational crimes, such as the
illicit trafficking in drugs and
firearms, illegal immigration
and the illegal smuggling of
migrants, are on the list of “pri-
ority” national security issues
facing the Bahamas.

He said the “serious situa-
tion” of crime and criminality
in the Bahamas, engendered in
part, by transnational crime, is
the over-riding concern of the
government and the people of
the Bahamas alike.

Statistics

Mr Turnquest said that while
the country remains in a “spi-
ral” of crime and criminality,
the statistics for January 1
through June 10, 2008, are
“instructive.” :

The national security minister
said that while the number of
house break-ins (1,318 as com-
pared to 1,134 in 2007); shop
break-ins (682 as compared to
648 in 2007), stolen vehicles
(522 in 2008 compared to 433
in 2007) and rapes (60 in 2008
compared to 55 in 2007) rose,
there were decreases in the
murder rate, cases of
manslaughter and armed FOB:
beries.

He said that up to June 10,
2008, 32 murders had been com-
mitted in The Bahamas, com-
pared to 35 for the same time-
frame in 2007.

Drug trafficking, arguments,
revenge killings and domestic
violence continued to impact
the murder rate while illegal
guns continued to be the
weapon of choice.

Mr Turnquest said that no

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Tommy Turnquest



cases of manslaughter
were reported for the year
2008 as compared to three for
2007.

He said armed robberies also
decreased from 365 to 344
for the same time period of
2007.

“It would be unhelpful at this
stage to speculate from these
figures what our crime statistics
would be by the end of 2008,”
Mr Turnquest said.

“Let me assure the Bahamian
public, however, that the gov-
ernment is working assiduously
to combat crime and criminali-
ty in our communities and in
our country in a determined
effort to halt and reverse dis-
turbing crime trends.”

Mr Turnquest told MPs that
to combat crime and criminali-
ty in the Bahamas, the govern-
ment, in general, and the Min-
istry of National Security, in
particular, had approached and
will continue to approach the
national security issues of the
Bahamas “from the broadest
perspective” to bring resolution
tothe problem. ~°

The ‘minister said law
enforcement and security agen-
cies such as the Royal Bahamas
Police and Defence Forces, the
Department of Immigration
and Her Majesty’s Prison, in
addition to the Parliamentary
Registration Department, have
been.incorporated into a single
portfolio to accomplish such an
objective.

“While each agency imple-
ments its own mandate, the
oversight by a single ministry



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permits greater cohesion and
co-operation among agencies
and improves the response to,
and management of, national
security issues,’ ” Mr Turnquest
said.

“The advantages of this
approach are self-evident.

“For example, the Defence
Force is working closely with
the Department of Immigration
in apprehending migrants at sea
and in providing security for the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

“With both the Commander,
Defence Force, and the Direc-
tor of Immigration interacting
under the umbrella of the Min-
istry of National Security, deci-
sion-making in these cross-cut-
ting matters is decidedly more
organised and coherent,” Mr
Turnquest added.

Mr Turnquest said other
examples of continuing co-oper-
ation under the umbrella of the
Ministry of National Security
includes that between the
Defence Force and the police
which has resulted in the appre-
hension of persons involved in

transnational crime at sea.

Co-operation

He said co-operation between
law enforcement agencies and
the ministry’s National Anti-.
Drug Secretariat had led to a
more accurate assessment of the
“drug problem” in The.
Bahamas, thereby allowing for
more effective policymaking
and reporting to meet the,
Bahamas’ international obliga- |
tions in drug control.

Mr Turnquest said: “This co-
operative and collaborative
approach to national security...
yielded significant results during
the 2007/2008 budget year.

“If we measure the perfor-
mance of the Ministry of;
National Security and its agen- ©
cies over the course of the.
financial year 2007/2008 by any
yardstick, we must conclude «
that it was a year in which we |
moved forward decisively to.
accomplish ‘the people’s busi-
ness,” Mr Turnquest said.

“What we accomplished was »
not by good fortune; it was not.

by coincidence; it was not by:

chance. »
“It was by deliberate policy ~

and‘action taken by this gov- ;

ernment,” Mr Turnquest added.















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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 13



a

Reyer AS
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Marley Resort and Spa
comes alive with
holiday concert

THE Marley Resort and
Spa, West Bay Street, came
- alive on Labour Day weekend
with the sounds of Pliers, one
half of Jamaica’s dynamic duo,
“Chacka Demus and Pliers”.

Rita Marley, proprietor of
the resort and widow of leg-
endary singer Bob Marley,
was on hand to celebrate with
staff and invited guests dur-
ing the holiday concert. .

“It was wonderful. Big Up
Nassau. I love it,” she said of
the event. She was seen danc-
ing along with staff of the
resort.

Pliers, proud of his
Jamaican roots and the legacy
of Bob Marley, promises to
recommend the resort to
everyone that he comes in
contact with.

“T love the setting; it is: very
beautiful. The rooms are very
nice, but I did not expect any-
thing less: I know Mrs (Rita)
Marley very well. She is a

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Reflecting on his career,
Pliers shrugged. his shoulders
and smiled as he reminisced
about the unusual amount of
success that he has enjoyed.
It was difficult for him to find
a place to start. And it is no

RITA MARLEY (left), proprietor
of the Marley Resort and Spa,
along with international recording
artist Pliers, of the dynamic
Jamaican duo, “Chaka Demus
and Pliers”.

wonder; his career in music
has been long, with numerous
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“We [the group Chacka
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_ THE TRIBUNE






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Anglican split may He ‘inevitable’ after werlding of gay priests

FROM page one

The couple reportedly met and fell in love
while working together at St Bart’s Hospital in
London.

This first ceremony to held for a homosexual
couple in an Anglican Church was conducted in
defiance of the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr
Rowan Williams, who has banned all same-sex
unions.

News of the wedding comes just weeks before
Anglican bishops prepare to attend the Lambeth
Conference in Canterbury, England, next month.

In an earlier interview with The Tribune, Arch-
bishop Gomez said that while he believes that
the issue of homosexuality and same-sex unions
will be one of contentious debate during this
year’s conference, he is praying that it will not
lead to a split in the church.

However, the Archbishop admitted that he

Police are attacked
in Nassau Village

FROM page one

munity may have escalated and
led to yiolence.

Joel became the country’s
30th murder victim of the year
when he was stabbed to death
near Solomon’s Super Centre
on May 31.

.A juvenile male was charged
in Magistrate’s Court last week
with his murder.

Joel is believed to have been
the younger brother of the
teenager shot by police in 2005
leading up to the Nassau Vil-
lage riot.

Mr

FROM page one

Dredivan Galiano Lopez.

Anyone with information about the escapees
is asked to contact the nearest police station or
the police control room at 322-3333.

In March, The Tribune received reports of a
another escape at the Detention Centre when
a Cuban was alleged to have escaped from an
immigration bus.














The riots — sparked when a
Haitian woman was hit by a car
and an angry crowd gathered
in pursuit of the driver —
involved an altercation between
police officers and a Mr Simeus.
Simeus’
Guyanne approached the offi-
cers and reprimanded them for
the way they spoke to her
father. She claimed she was hit
with the butt of a gun.

Then her brother, Wilson
Simeus, made an attempt to get
closer to his sister and was shot
in the face as he held his two-
year-old son in his arms.

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does not believe it likely that the Anglican Church
will exist in its current form beyond 2008.

Archbishop Gomez has repeatedly stated his
belief that homosexual relationships are against
God’s will.

This weekend the Bishop of London, Rev
Richard Charles, ordered an inquiry into the mat-
ter and the priest who officiated the ceremony,
Rev Martin Dudley.

According to international media reports, one
of the grooms, Rev Dr Lord — who was ordained
at Waikato Cathedral Church in New Zealand last
year — in a joint statement with the Bishop of
Waikato yesterday said that he “felt it apPEOpE
ate to lay down his clergy licence.”

Tension between different factions within the .

Anglican Church first reached boiling point in ~
2004, after the US’s Episcopal Church allowed the

consecration of the openly gay Bishop Gene
Robinson of the Diocese of New Hampshire.

Body found

FROM page one

While the head may have
been removed in an act of
violence, police say it is also
possible that the body had’
been lying out in the open
for so long that the elements,
and possibly stray. dogs and
other animals, may have
been responsible for the
head becoming detached.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the
cause of death.

In March this year, several
bodies of men, believed to
be Haitians, were found near
South Beach Pools.

It is believed the men were
passengers of a Haitian sloop
which ran aground off south-
ern New Providence.

daughter

Four escape from Detention Centre

during a night-time escape.

During that incident, the detainees were said
to have scaled both chain-linked and barbed
wired fences surrounding the centre. It is
thought these men may have sustained injuries.
However, no-one was recaptured.

‘ Before that, six Cubans escaped the centre on
August 21, 2007. Unlike previous breakouts,
the public and press were not notified about the
escape until four days later.

In total last year, the Detention Centre expe-

tienced two’ separate breakouts, with nine

Cubans escaping.

















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THE TRIBUNE oe MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 15



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Shuttle Discovery crew glad to be back

Successful expansion
job at international
space station



= Renna/AP Photo

SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY lands at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fa Saturday, June 14, 2008, capping a acceeetul expansion
job at the international space station, now more spacious and robust thanks to a new billion-dollar science lab.

Peter Cosgrove/AP Photo



ASTRONAUT KAREN NYBERG answers questions at a news confer-
ence, after a 14 day mission to the International Space Station, at
Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, June 14,
2008 ;

@ By MARCIA DUNN ©
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida

Space shuttle Discovery and its crew of seven returned to Earth
on Saturday and capped a successful expansion job at the interna-
tional space station, more spacious and robust thanks to a new bil-
lion-dollar science lab, according to the Associated Press.

The shuttle descended through a few puffy clouds and landed at
11:15 a.m., under the control of commander Mark Kelly. :

Two hours later, all the astronauts — including Garrett Reisman, j oo 3 Meee Gr LOBAI Ay :D
looking remarkably fresh and fit after 95 days in space — walked 2 :
out, shook hands with NASA’s senior managers and admired the . at af
ship that safely brought them home. Reisman enjoyed feeling the Be ;
sunshine again.

“Tt’s great to be here on the runway in sunny Florida,” Kelly said.

“It was really an exciting mission.’ from
Discovery’s flight spanned 14 days, 217 orbits and 5.7 million : a . eee ate

miles, and was described by NASA as being about as smooth asit | ae : oo at the Brit

gets. L

Kelly and his crew accomplished everything they set out to do in
orbit. They delivered and installed Japan’s Kibo lab, now the space
station’s biggest room and most sophisticated science workshop, and
dropped off a new pump that the two Russians on board used to fix
their toilet.

The space station also got a new American resident who took
Reisman’s place.

Reisman’s wife, Simone Francis, was s waiting for him at the
Kennedy Space Center. Over the past week, Reisman had described
in quite romantic terms how much he missed her, calling her “my
favorite Earthling” and “doll face.”

NASA’s associate administrator, Christopher Scolese, reveled in
the “outstanding” successes of the past month: landing a spacecraft
on Mars and scooping up dirt, and seeing the space station grow and
“looking really like a space station, ” with the Discovery crew’s help.
The space agency also launched a telescope into orbit last week to
search the universe for elusive gamma rays.

Although the mission itself unfolded almost flawlessly, Discov-
ery left behind a battered launch pad on May 31. Some 5,300
bricks flew off the flame trench when Discovery blasted away,
most likely because they were not attached properly to the under-
lying concrete wall when the pad was built in the 1960s for the Apol-
lo moon shots.

_ NASA managers are confident the launch pad can be fixed in
time for the next shuttle flight in October, by Atlantis to the Hub-
ble Space Telescope.

The next time a shuttle flies to the space station, now three-
quarters complete, isn’t until November. That’s because NASA
needs to have a shuttle ready to rush to Atlantis’ aid in case of seri- - a ae ‘ :
ous damage to its thermal shielding. Atlantis’ astronauts will not be _ |; es ate:
able to get from Hubble to the space station for shelter. ‘ oe : ables.

NASA had no such rescue plan in place-when Columbia took off _
in 2003 on a solo-flying research mission. In any event, mission man-
agers had no idea Columbia’s left wing was severely damaged at
liftoff, and the shuttle shattered during re-entry. All seven on
board were killed.

Shades of Columbia briefly surfaced Friday when Discovery’s
astronauts spotted something floating away from their spaceship.
It turned out to be a little metal clip that broke off the rudder, and
engineers ascertained within just four hours that its absence posed
no danger for Discovery’s re-entry.

The three space station residents watched Discovery’s smooth
landing on live TV transmitted from Mission Control. Astronaut
Gregory Chamitoff, who’s just starting a six-month mission, called
it “an awesome sight.”

“Before you know it, you'll Sag catching your own ride home,”
Mission Control said.

Ten shuttle flights remain before the fleet is retired in 2010, all but
one to the space station.

Launch director Mike Leinbach said he’s encouraging his team
to take time off this summer, since there are no flights, and rest up
for a busy fall. The shuttle work force finds itself in the unusual posi-
tion of scheduling summer vacations and actually being able to take
them on time, he said.

“It’s a good feeling for us,” Leinbach said, smiling.

John Raoux/AP Photo



THE CREW of the space shuttle Discovery from left, commander Mark Kel-
ly, pilot Ken Ham, mission specialists Karen Nyberg, Ron Garan, Garrett
Reisman and Mike Fossum and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
‘astronaut Akihiko Hoshide answer questions at a news conference, after
a 14 day mission to the International Space Station, at Kennedy Space Cen-
ter in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Saturday, June 14, 2008. Reisman returned after
95 days on the space station.


PAGE 16, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ee — ne - 7 a . ar aa



!

POLICE OFFICERS search for missing persons at a place where a landslide was triggered by Saturday’s pow-
erful earthquake at Kurihara, northern Japan, on Sunday June 15, 2008. Soldiers fighting through a torrent
of mud and rocks dug out three bodies at.a hot'spring Sunday, bringing the death toll from a magnitude
7.2-earthquake that hit the mountains of northern Japan to at least nine, with more than 200 injured.





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BAHAMAS



Kyodo News/AP Photo



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Crews search for missing —






Gs aeons
R
ern Japan, Sunday June 15, 2008.

@ By ERIC TALMADGE
KURIHARA, Japan

Rescue teams using shovels
and buckets tried Sunday to dig
their way to seven people
believed trapped in a landslide
at a hot springs resort after ‘a
deadly earthquake pounded the
mountains of northern Japan,
killing at least six and injuring
more than 200.

The fire department squads

worked as military helicopters
buzzed overhead and frequent
aftershocks posed the threat of
the ground collapsing under
their feet.

Saturday’s 7.2-magnitude.

quake triggered several major
landslides, blocking roads and
stranding bathers: at the
Komanoyu hot spring resort,
which is located in a heavily
forested mountainous area out-
side the small city of Kurihara.
Crews searching for the miss-
ing had to hike mountain trails
and dig their way to. the worst-
hit areas.

“It was the worst quake I
have ever felt,” said Rinji Sato,
whose grocery store in this town
near the epicenter was a mess of
shattered bottles and food
thrown from shelves. “We were
just lucky this didn’t hit a big
city.” Search teams have
already recovered the bodies of

ESCUE WORKERS, right, surround a body they retrieved from
destroyed by a landslide triggered by Saturda'

Bet.

six dead, but believe at least
nine more may be missing.
News reports put the number
of injured at about 260.

Emperor Akihito, in an
address at a tree-planting cere-
mony in nearby Akita prefec-
ture, expressed sympathy Sun-
day for those affected by the
quake. “I hope the missing peo-
ple are rescued promptly,” he
said. “I hope peace will return
to people’s lives as soon as pos-
sible.”

Sato described. the temblor
as a sharp vertical jolt followed
by a powerful sideways sway-
ing. “It was impossible to stay
on your feet,” he said.

-Tohoku University geologist
Motoki Kazama said the area
was especially vulnerable to
landslides because it is of vol-
canic origin, and contains a
large amount of loose ash.
Some of the landslides contin-
ued off of the sides of-the hills
for several hundred feet, he
said.

“With a quake of this magni- .

tude, it isn’t surprising that
there was this amount of land
movement,” he said.

The government responded
quickly, mobilizing troops,
police and fire department res-
cue teams to find and care for
the injured and to recover the
dead. “Our most important task

‘

a two-sto



rey hot spa inn, left, which was
y’s earthquake in Kurihara, Miyagi prefecture (state), north-

in Japan’s 7.2 earthquake





Kyodo News/AP Photo

is to save as many lives a2 pos-
sible, and we are doing the best
we can,” Prime Minister Yasuo
Fukuda said.

Access, however, was a major
obstacle. The quake — followed
by more than 200 aftershocks
— buckled.roads, including one
highway that was severed when
a stretch of land collapsed, turn-
ing it into a sudden drop-off.

Train service, water and elec-
tricity, which had been cut, was
restored to most areas on Sun-
day. About 2,800 homes in
Kurihara city.were still without
power, however. j

More than 200 people —
many of them near the hot
springs — remained stranded
Sunday, and were being slowly

. flown out by helicopter. |

“We're getting growing
reports of damage, but we can’t
even get out there to assess the
situation with roads closed. off
because of landslides,” said city
official Norio Sato in Kurihara,
one of the worst-hit cities in
northern Miyagi prefecture
(state). At a nuclear power
plant in Fukushima, about 60
miles away, the jolt splashed a
small amount of radioactive
water from two pools storing
spent fuel. Trade and Industry
Ministry official Yoshinori
Moriyama said there was no
leakage outside the plant:

At {s left

an Culture




SECTION B «© business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY,

JUNE

1°6,°°2:0 08



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life



Government to pay $0.5m
for resort oil spill clean-up

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Business Reporter



he government and

Baha Mar will have to

pay additional money

for the clean-up process

of an oil spill at the site
of the former Radisson Laundry site,
Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette told members of the House of
Assembly during the 2008/2009 bud-
get debate.

According to Mr Symonette, Baha
Mar had assumed responsibility from
the hotel corporation for the balance
of the oilspill clean-up at the site,



Hospital’s net
income for Q1
was $0.98m
compared to
$1.3m last year

which occurred
both before and
since the sale of
the property.
Mr Symonette
explained that
the government |j
had by way of
contingency
warrant allocat-
ed $5.16 million
in 2006 for the
remediation
exercises. He
said that, to
date, $3,439,514.01 had been spent,

_ but the costs to complete the exer-

\







COMMONWEALTH Bank. has

- announced it will pay a quarterly divi-

. dend of $.05 per share on June 30 to
shareholders of record as of June 13.

It will-be the second regular quarterly
dividend in'2008 paid to some 6,000
shareholders in addition to an extraor-
dinary dividend paid in April, a com-
bined total of $0.16 per share since
December 31.

“Commonwealth Bank is the largest
public company traded on the Bahamas
International. Securities Exchange,
accounting for more than $9 million

worth of equities traded on the exchange.
in 2007 or 32 per cent of the value of all

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL: :
Business Reporter



DOCTORS Hospital report-

ed that net income for the first
quarter of 2008 was $0.98 mil-
lion compared to $1.3 million
collected last year, the compa-
’ ny’s chairman saying that the
results are evidence of the high
cost of doing business in this
uncertain economic time.

The company further report-
ed that there was an increase in
self -pay patients, which includ-
ed indigent patients who were
treated at the hospital, and
uninsured or underinsured

patients for the period and not-.

ed that because of the current
unstable economic environ-
ment it has been more difficult
to collect from patients.

In his report to sharehold-
ers, Joseph Krukowski said
earnings per share were ten
cents, a decrease from the 13

Drive a Honda Fit Peat to
40 miles per gallon



‘cents for the comparable peri-

od last year.

“Total revenues were $10.8
million compared to $10.5 mil-
lion in the previous year. Net
income for the period was
$0.98 million compared to $1.3
million last year. The first

quarter of fiscal 2009 has evi- .

denced the high cost of doing
business in this uncertain eco-
nomic time as health care costs
continue to rise.”

Mr Krukowski indicated that
the hospital’s total expenses
rose by 7.3 per cent to $0.7 mil-
lion with salaries and benefits
accounting for 47 per cent of
the cost.

He said that contributing
factors included cost of living
increases, health insurance pre-
mium increases and successful
recruitment of filling needed
nursing vaccines.

He also. noted that bad debt

SEE next page

DPM: 5,382

e-passports
have been
issued since
June 8

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter ;

DEPUTY Prime Minister
Brent Symonette told MPs
that, to date, 5,382 e-passports

’ have been issued as of June 8,

2008.
During the budget debate,
Mr Symonette said the pilot

SEE page 4B

__._SEE next page _

cise were likely to significantly exceed
$5 million. Therefore, he said that
government will pay an additional
$500,000 and Baha Mar will pay the
remainder of the costs.

Mr Symonette also explained that,
as it relates to the Baha Mar’ devel-
opment, the aspect of the sales agree-
ment for conveyance of the Hobby
Horse parcel, the Wyndham parcel
and the British American Bank parcel
remain pending, and are subject to
the fulfilment of certain conditions
of its financing and procurement of

world-class equity hotel and casino .

partners as set out in the heads of
agreement dated April 6, 2005.

ntaining your netwe



He also explained that the compa-
ny had been granted a further exten-
sion from March,,2009. _

Other notable changes in the Baha
Mar supplemental heads of agree-
ment: government will retain the
Development Bank and Gaming
Board premises, Baha Mar will pay
the cost of the new BEC sub-station
and, when completed, the hotel will

convey at no cost way leave parcel to

Baha Mar, Mr Symonette explained.

“The corporation is very actively .

pursuing the privatisation and dispo-
sition of its remaining properties in
Andros and Eleuthera. Towards this
end, negotiations with several

Bank to pay dividend of five cents per share

t we ra Let as qualified Microsoftâ„¢

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investors are at an advanced stage,”
he also said.

The Lighthouse Yacht Club in
Andros has deteriorated to such an
extent that a large capital expendi-
ture would be required to complete-
ly repair and refurbish it and Mr
Symonette said its continued operat-
ing losses cannot be sustained by the
Hotel Corporation.

Therefore he noted that the gov--
ernment will place a priority on secur-
ing a substantial purchaser to rede-
velop the property into a viable cul-
tural tourism project which could sig-

nificantly impact the economy of Cen-

tral Andros.






















PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





LAW DEGREE] Bank to pay

Are you interested in studying Law? Holborn College in conjunction with the Univer-

sity of Huddersfield is currently accepting students for the September session. To
learn more plan to attend an information session Wednesday July 2 at 6 p.m. at the
British Colonial Hilton Resort. Prof Michael Newns from the university will be in

attendance. Call Success Training College at 324-7770 to register.



BIE Bank & Trust Bahamas Ltd.
Is seeking the services ofa
Human Resources Generalist

The successful applicant is expected to demonstrate sound
ethical judgment and exercise the highest discretion when
dealing with confidential matters.

e Responsible for the day-to-day operations of the H.R.
Department;

¢ Assist with Training, Compensation, Performance Evaluation,
Budgeting, etc.;

e Address and advise staff on personnel and staffing related issues;

¢ Undertake all areas of Human Resources Administration
inclusive of letter writing, report and correspondence preparation
and research;

e Administer the bank’s, benefits programme inclusive of pension,
medical and life insurance plans;

¢ Calculate and process payroll information;

e Liaise with managers on an operational level;

¢ Coordinate the advertising of job vacancies;

¢ Work with and maintain staff confidential personnel records;

Skills:

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills:
e Proficient office skills:

e Strong problem solving abilities;

e Reliable with confidential information.

Education and Experience:

¢ Bachelor’s degree in business, human resources, or equivalent
combination of education and. experience preferred; '

e Minimum of three years experience as a Human Resources

¢ Generalist or Assistant Manager in a small to medium size
organization. Prior experience with payroll processing and
administration is a plus;

¢ Sound knowledge of local Labour Laws.

with qualiticatious and

Salary will be commensurate

experience.

Interested applicants meeting the above qualifications should
submit a recent resume to:

The President & Chief Operating Officer
BIE Bank & Trust Bahamas Ltd.
Charlotte House
P.O. Box N-3930
Nassau, Bahamas.

The closing date for receipt of all resumes is

Wednesday, 18th June 2008.



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FROM page 1B

trades,” said chairman TB
Donaldson. “There is a good
reason for such strong demand.
When the bank is successful,

__ we share that success with our

shareholders. They are. the
owners.’ They are the benefi-
ciaries who reap the rewards.”

Those shareholders fared
well in fiscal 2007. Return on
shareholders’ equity for the

year January 1 to December
31 topped 38 per cent and
earnings per share were $0.43,
up 23 per cent over 2006 - par-
alleling the increase in net
income.

At its annual ne dtiney in
May, the bank reported its
11th consecutive year of record
profits with assets at $1.179 bil-
lion as of December 31 and
$1.25 billion at the AGM date
of May 21.

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Commonwealth Bank oper-
ates 10 full service branches in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and Abaco.

Hospital’s net income
for Q1 was $0.98m
compared to
$1.3 last year

FROM page 1B

expense is 45 per-cent of the
increase due in part to an
increase of self pay patients in
the first quarter and utility
expenses accounted for seven
per cent of the increase.

The chairman further report-
ed that days revenue in
accounts receivable fell to 47.3
days, the lowest in history, as
compared to 67.8 in the same
period of fiscal 2008.

“Cash collection, is up by
$2.1 million...we are pleased to
report that our cash position
allowed the company to pay
down $2 million in long-term
debt as well as a $0.02 dividend
to our shareholders based on
year end results.”

On the capital expenditure
side, Mr Krukowski said the
company spent $1.6 million on
a Phillips Achieva MRI scan-
ner.

“With the acquisition of the

. new MRI machine, the hospi-

tal’s MRI centre currently
located on Christie Street will
be housed inside the hospital,
making it more convenient for
patients and relatives. It also
made significant improvements
in its website security.”

The American passy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

Commerical Assisant

Assit with promoting all trade events locally and in the U.S.

Maintains all commercial subject files, Scludiig newspaper dligping files, US
company database, and investments database

e

Drafts and distribute commercial newsletter and maintains database of

Econ-Commercial contacts.

Assists with research for major reports including the Counrty Commercial Guide,
the Investment Climate Report, and other special reports. .

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Associates Degree in Business Management, Economics or Finance
Three years job expereince in economic resesarch, business
management, marketing, investment, trade promotion or other related
business expereince

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Some knowledge of the business climate and rules for doing business in
The Bahamas

Good organizational and computer skills, particularly word-processing ane
excell.

Good writing skills

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package
including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through
Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the United States Embassy: addressed to the
Human Resources Office no later than, June 24, 2008. Telephone calls will not
be accepted.


THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 3B



Minister to be keynote speaker

at World Religious

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter

MINISTER of Tourism
Neko Grant is expected to be
one of the keynote speakers at
the World Religious Travel
Expo 2008 in Orlando, Florida,
this fall and will highlight the
ministry’s effort to fully devel-
op this sector.

He will also discuss the

growth and diversity of today’s




















Manager.

Engineering Department

Programs

below.



Engineer Managenent
Employment Opportunity

Position Available
Engineer Manager

A leading hotel invites qualified persons in the above
mentioned field to apply for the position of Engineer
The successful candidate must possess the following:

- A minimum of 5 years experience as a Supervisor in the
+ Must be proficient in Preventative Maintenance
- Must possess a proven record of Team Leadership

skills, amd able to work with little or no supervision.

- Must possess strong interpersonal, communication,
problem solving and customer service skills

+ Must possess knowledge of Electrical & Mechanical
Systems i.e. HVAC, Plumbing & Heating

* Must possess basic Administrative skills with some
knowledge of Microsoft Excel

- Must be able to work long and flexible hours

Applicants with supporting documents also including a
clean Police Certificate should be sent to the address

Competitive salary and benefits package are
commensurate with experience.

Applicants for Engineering Manager,
DA 64086, c/o The Tribune,

PO Box N-3207 |

Nassau, Bahamas

faith and tourism industry.

Mr Grant was selected
because the Bahamas has
developed itself into the top
destination for this vast and
lucrative market, serving as an
ideal getaway for faith-based
events, meetings, cruises, mis-
sionary travel, leisure vaca-
tions, and much more, organ-
isers said.

“Mr Grant oversees one of
the world’s most proactive
tourist offices involved in faith



tourism. The Bahamas has the
distinction of being one of the
few countries in the world with
a fully-dedicated religious trav-

el department, led by director

Linville J. Johnson,”
added.

Maurice Zarmati, president
and CEO of Costa Cruise
Lines, will be the other
keynote speaker. That compa-
ny represents one of the
newest and most popular vaca-
tion choices of today's faith-
based consumet...cruising.
Today, hundreds of churches
and religious organisations
embark each year on cruises
to the Caribbean, Alaska and
the Mediterranean, among
other places.

“As this fall’s Expo will
serve as a pivotal moment in
shaping new leaders in faith
tourism, we are honoured with
the confirmation of these dis-

they

‘tinguished individuals as

keynote speakers. Both repre-
sent different facets in the ‘new
era’ of faith tourism,” said

Kevin J. Wright, president of.

the World Religious Travel
Association.
The World Religious Travel

Expo serves as the most impor-



s Y Care’s

TT

Ph: 324-6413
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Financial Intelligence Unit ©

DOCUMENT IMAGING CLERK

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Document
Imaging Clerk at the Findncial Intelligence Unit (the “FIU”).

[OB SUMMARY:

The successful candidate will be resuensible for coordinating and executing the
daily processes of prepping, scanning, indexing and verifying documents, managing
and maintaining high volume scanners and adhering to deadlines assigned by

mane been.

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:
The successful applicant must have:
° Strong Data Entry and keyboarding skills;
: A working knowledge of Microsoft Office Products (Word, Excel, Power

Point etc.);

Pay attention to details, and takes pride in their work;
Good.interpersonal skills;
Ability to effectively work individually or in a team environment;
Competence in performing multiple functional tasks;

Excellent communication skills both verbal and written.



Travel Expo

Neko Grant

tant gathering of the “Who's
Who” in today’s faith tourism
marketplace. More than 100
exhibitors and more than 400
participants are expected at the
unprecedented event.

The Expo will be held Octo-
ber 29-November 1, 2008, at
the Gaylord Palms Resort
Hotel and Convention Center
in Orlando, Florida.

The World Religious Travel
Association (WRTA) looks at
shaping, enriching and expand-
ing the $18 billion global faith
tourism industry.

WRITA exists to bring the
travel trade and religious con-

sumer together for the primary

purpose of promoting and pro-
viding quality faith travel expe-
riences around the globe.

RT aa (Go

aT

MIE
23/1 today!

NOTICE.



Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-eigth (28th) An-
nual General Meeting of THE PUBLIC.WORKERS’
CO-OPERATIVE. CREDIT UNION LIMITED will
be held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel, West Bay
Street, on Friday, July 4, 2008 commencing at 6:30 p.m.
for the following purposes:

¢ To receive the report of The Board of Directors.

* To receive the Audited Accounts for 2007

¢ To elect members of The Board of Directors, and
Supervisory Committee

¢ To discuss and approve the budget for 2009.

All eligible members wishing to run for a position on the
Board of Directors or Supervisory Commitee are asked to
submit their names to any of the Credit Union’s Offices
in Nassau or Freeport, no later than Friday, June 27, 2008
by 4:00 p.m.

All members are urged to attend, and
refreshments will be served!



Travel Agent Training

Learn ticketing and reservations procedures in
just a few short weeks, Travel agents are in high
demand. Get the training you need to qualify for a
| high-paying job or to start your own business.







Betty K. Agencies Ltd.

To Our Valued Customer

We have now re-opened our Nassau office and
- warehouse on Saturday until further notice

Please contact our customer service
Representative for further information

Nassau (Office).

Telephone (242) 322-2142

Betty K Agencies Ltd. Fax (242) 322-6809

C.Trevor Kelly Bldg.
East Street North
P.O. Box N-351
Nassau, Bahamas

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

° Responsible for retrieving files and eeu ane them for filing;
Assemble and prepare documents for imaging;
Scanning and indexing of documents for up to eight hours a day;
Review imaged documents as a quality control measure to ensure
acceptable image was captured;
Independently operate scanning hardware;
Maintain all logs and reporting documentation;
Adhere to organizational procedures and guidelines;
Perform other tasks as assigned by manager.

Abaco (Office)
Don Mackay Blvd.
Marsh Harbour

3701 NW. South River Dr. P.O. Box AB 20116,

Miami Florida 33142 Abaco, Bahamas
Telephone (305) 635-4650 Telephone (242) 367-0593
Fax (305) 635-4661 Fax (242) 367-0594

Miami (Office)
Betty K Agencies (USA)
EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE: LLC
° Minimum requirement: An Associate Degree from an accredited tertiary
institution;
Related experience is preferred but not required.

Interested persons should submit their applications and resumes in writing along
with the relevant certificates by 27" June 2008 to:

Anthony M. Johnson
Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Serving the Bahamas with Pride from 1920!


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



DPM: 5,382 e-passports have been issued

FROM page 1B

stage of the passport pro-
gramme is providing the

opportunity to work through
the irregularities and correct
them in conjunction with
Indusa Global and its affiliates.

Mr Symonette also report-
ed that technical difficulties
have prevented the issuance of

certificates of identify for non -
Bahamians under the new sys-
tem. However, he said that
action is being taken to rectify
the situation in a timely man-
ner.

“We are looking at produc-

Vacancy for
Sr. Area Director, Development & Construction

A minimum of twenty (20) years experience in the Construction industry with specific documented
experience in project and/or construction management.

A minimum of ten (10) years experience leading project teams on multiple projects in remote,
international locations with single-point accountability for capital budgets and schedules.
Professional degree in technical field from an accredited university

Strong leadership, management, and communication skills providing the ability to work in a
dynamic, multi-functional matrix management Gry enment as a “Team Player”. Pro-active,
assertive, motivated and disciplined.

Experience in leading, managing, and coordinating design, construction, and other professionals.
Experience in qualifying, contract negotiation, recommendation, and administration of
Professional and Contractor Agreements.

Proven ability to understand the business goals of stakeholders and implement a partnering
relationship that will enable mutual success.

Experience in legislative/ jurisdictional approval processes.

Proven ability to comprehend, and critique design and contract documents.

Lead and coordinate resources to achieve complete technically acceptable design and contract
documents within Design Guides, Construction Operations Manual, project scope, schedule, and
cost.

Computer literacy on Microsoft Office products, Primavera P3 or Suretrak (or other scheduling)
and, Primavera Expedition (or other Project Management) software applications.

Ability to reside full-time in Abaco for the full duration of the project.

Please send resume to the.attention of: Director of Human Resources °





seo

Qual



\NN.

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB-20571
Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Bahamas
OR
Email: humanresouroes@theabacoctub. com



aah Bay

GOLF &@ OCEAN CLUB

Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

: You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.

; - Sous Chef i ae,

Key Responsibilities

Required to skillfully prepare intornational cuisine.

Assist in ordering food supplies and kitchen equipment as needed.
Will be required to oversee majority of cooking and methods of food
preparation.

Along with the Executive Chef, instruct kitchen employees i in the finer
points of cooking.

Assist in planning meals; making of menus, and assigning prices.
Assist in butchering and/or prepares meats and poultry for cooking.

ifications

High School diploma or equivalent

Culinary degree from approved school or completion of an approved
apprentice program is preferred

5 to 10 years in different supervisory positions in the kitchens including
sous chef and/or chef d’ cuisine position.

Previous experience in a hotel or private club preferred.

Highly skilled cooking ability in all areas of kitchen including the ability to
prepare various ethnic cuisines.

Experience working in multiple operations preferred.

A minimum of two years international experience an asset.

Experience in opening a property a plus

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing and
dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work at the highest
standards of performance, and meet deadlines.

lf you are progressive and prepared to advance A career, submit your resume
to the attention of the Director of HR & Training, h r@bakersbyclub. com or by fax

at 24



2-367-0804.

“Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamas!”

penyrcscticnarapersstputcwennsce santo ft

-goageeeagenmnnanenmonaannneasesarerseenunnt const

ing some 270,000 to 300,000 e-
passports alone with a staffing
complement of 45. We are also
looking at a complex techni-
cally-driven process plagued
by equipment breakdowns,
and uneven or snail’s pace
connectivity. We also have to
contend with the cultural
uniqueness of our people,” Mr
Symonette said.

He explained that the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs is com-
mitted to ensuring the suc-
cessfulness of the project.

“All solutions, whether they
be training, adjusted longer
hours, a shift system, a cus-
tomer service crash course
must depart from the acknowl-
edgment that we are in part-
nership with you, the public.”

He also reported that for the
year to date 6,693 visas were
issued, 2,826 in Miami, 357 in
Cuba, 65 in Ottawa, 322 in













London, 758 in Washington
and 886 in Nassau. He said the
consular division is gradually
going through a restructuring
process.

Mr Symonette said that, as it
relates to the Schengen visa
negotiations, a particular con-
cern for Bahamian business
persons, indications remain
positive for a successful out-
come.

“The approval of the Euro-
pean Commission’s recom-
mended short stay visa agree-
ments was given by the council
of the European Union at their
meeting of the Justices and
Home Affairs Council from
June 5-6, 2008.”

He said the Bahamas High
Commission in London had
been invited to an opening
round of negotiations in Brus-
sels on July 4, where it will

receive a draft of the proposed .

EMPLOYMENT
ee

Media Company seeks young persons
who are computer literate and have
some experience in QuarkXPress.

Please apply to:

DA60743
c/o Tribune

P.O. Box N-3207
~-Nassau, Bahamas Leaceccineee

or fax to (242) 328- 2398













visa agreement prior to the
stated meeting.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Can LION FISH be
our next fishery ©
resource?

Wednesday, June 25

at 7:00pm —
The Retreat, Village Road

For more information call 393-1317

Public meeting will feature a presentation on the
Natural History of the Lionfish presented by
Lakeshia Anderson,

The Bahamas

Department of Marine Resources.
The presentation will be followed by

a hands-on demonstration by
Bahamian lawyer, conservationist and fisherman
Alexander Maillis Il,

who will teach you how to cook and clean
LION FISH, a delicacy in the Asian kitchen.

This lecture is
sponsored by the
BNT and the
Department of
Marine





|
j
|
|
THE TRIBUNE

MUNDAY, JUINE 16, 2UU8, PAGE ob





The Financial Voice set to [atau
hold its first town meeting

“The Financial Voice”
(TFV) will hold its first town
meeting at the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort on Wednesday,
June 18, at 8pm with a non-
partisan review of the pro-
posed 2008/2009 budget as its
first.subject for discussion.

Noted “You and Your Mon-
ey” television show host, Jef-

frey Lloyd, will host the pro-

gramme.

Organisers consider a pub- »

lic review of the budget ‘to be
an appropriate and exciting
topic as the government’s sub-
mission has been touted by
many as the most visionary
budget in recent times while
_ Others are criticising it.as being
- “a day late and a dollar short.”

Panelists for the evening will
include chartered accountant
and president of Colina Gen-
eral Lynden Nairn; president
of CFAL Anthony Ferguson;
Frank Comito, executive vice-
’ president of The Bahamas

Hotel Association; economist
Rupert Pinder; Eric Carey,
executive director of The
Bahamas National Trust, and
president of The Bahamas
Real Estate Association,
William Wong, and president
of Providence Advisors, Ken-
wood Kerr.

Address

They will address the poten-
tial impact of the new budget

on such areas of the economy -

as tourism and hospitality,
financial services, the environ-
ment and consumer issues.

This new community service ©

initiative is a production of The
Counsellors Ltd., sponsored in
part by CFAL, Baha Mar
Resorts, KPMG and Sun Oil
Limited.

The objectives of The Finan-
cial Voice are generally to
stimulate dialogue with and
among members of the gener-

Sn CHW AA

the #1 newspaper in circulation,
just call 002-2371 today!





a

TUR ON:

Make your weekends work for you! Earn
.in Business,
Computers, Human Resource Manage-
ment or Public Administration.

degree

* New classes are forming now. Call Success for registration and program details. 324-7770

CIBC Private
Wealth Management

CIBC Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited —

is presently considering applications for a

Requirements:

Trust Administrator

al public on the state of the
economy, to have financial
issues placed in perspective by
the brightest minds in the rel-
evant areas.

The purpose of the pro-
gramme is to explain the impli-
cations and potential impact

of such issues on the lives of’

Bahamians of all walks of life

-and economic engagement.

Government officials have

said that the proposed new .

budget is particularly geared
towards providing relief and
assistance to low-income
Bahamians and those continu-
ing to be adversely affected by
the rising cost of living in the
country. Others have
expressed the view that the
benefits being promoted are
just a transference of govern-
ment funds.

The tax breaks, according to
officials, will include new ben-
efits for homeowners, conces-
sions relating to Nassau and
Family Island development,
increases in allocations for the
police and social services,
stamp tax elimination on
imported food items, as well
as pay rises for public officers,
among other critical issues,

Next Wednesday’s TFV pro-
gramme will be the first in a
series of presentations dealing
specifically with economic
issues affecting Bahamians and
their. Caribbean neigbours.



Accounting,





Applicants should posses a degree in Business Administration or eevee
combination of education and experience .

STEP Foundation Certificate or equivalent

At least 2 years experience in trust administration

Good oral and written communication skills

Excellent organizational skills

Good computer literacy on PC and host software.

Duties will include:

Day to day administration of a small group of client relationships
Monitor account activity from a money laundering perspective
Communicate in an effective, professional and courteous manner —
Open and close accounts
Prepare administrative, investment and risk reviews and complete corrective

action

Initiate and complete process to incorporate and dissolve companies
Process Investment Authorities for the purchase and sale of investments,

securities, etc,

Review and prepare documents to open bank/custody/investment
management accounts

ONLY BAHAMIANS MEETING

THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

P.O. Box N-3933
Nassau, Bahamas

Applications only should be submitted to
Manager, Human Resources

(No phone calls, faxes, emails will-be accepted)

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS

JUNE 27, 2008



For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight

on Mondays



NOTICE

The payment of Long-Term Benefits and Assistance in New Providence for June 2008 will
be made as follows:

i) On Tuesday, June 17, 2008, ao pensioners whose funds are deposited to thar bank

accounts; and

ii) Beginning Thursday, June 19, 2008 at the Board’s Fox Hill, Wulff Road and Jumbey
Village Local Offices. Cheques may be collected from these offices between the hours
of 9:00.a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

Pensioners and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in
order to collect their cheques.

Acceptable forms of identification for Pensioners are the National tisutanee Registration
Card, together with any one of the following:

1. A Passport;

2. A Voter's Card; or

3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the Pensioner is sending a Representative to collect his/her cheque, the Repre-
sentative should present an Authorization Form, completed by the Pensioner, or a letter
from the Pensioner authorizing the Board’to release his/her cheque. Additionally, the
Representative should present any one of the above-listed items to identify himself/her-
self. Cheques will not be released to Representatives who fail to provide satisfactory iden-

tifying documents.

Please Note: Pensioners born in June and December are now due for Verification.



Failure to be verified on-time, will result in the suspension of payments.

Name:
Institution: Contact: _.

Phone #:
Walk: O

Emergency Contact: / _
Run: 0

Stroller (Push): a

The Central Bank of Bahamas will not be held responsible for + any injury/sickness
caused as a result of the fun, run walk, push. Persons With any medical conditions
should refrain from signing up for the race. Entrarits should consult their physician
before participation i in the event.

Signature of Participant: Date:

Refreshments will be served


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Utility finds foes to renewable

@ By ELLIOT SPAGAT -
AP Business Writer

SAN DIEGO (AP) — It
seems like an idea any envi-
ronmentalist would embrace:
Build one of the world’s largest
solar power operations in the
Southern California desert and

surround it with plants that run
on wind and underground
heat. ,

Yet San Diego Gas & Elec-
tric Co. and its potential part-
ners face fierce opposition
because the plan also calls for a
150-mile, high-voltage trans-
mission line that would cut

A leading wholesaler seeks to hire a highly motivated

individual for the position of:

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible for
coordinating office services such as records control,
follow up, and other administrative activities for a
department/division. The person will compile data
and format reports, graphs, tables, and records as
well as categorizing facts and figures for computation.

through pristine parkland to
reach the nation’s eighth-
largest city.

The showdown over how to
get renewable energy to con-
sumers will likely play out else-
where around the country as
well, as state regulators require
electric utilities to rely less on
coal and natural gas to fire
their plants — the biggest
source of carbon dioxide emis-
sions in the US.

Providers of renewable pow-
er covet cheap land and abun-
dant sunshine and wind in
places like west Texas, Mon-
tana, Wyoming and Californi-
a’s Mojave Desert and Imper-
ial Valley. But utility execu-
tives say no one will build
plants without power lines to
connect those remote spots to

_ big cities.

“This is a classic chicken and
the egg,” said Mike Niggli,
chief operating officer of Sem-
pra Energy’s utilities business,
which includes SDG&E. “No
one can develop a project if

they can’t send (the electricity)
anywhere. You need transmis-
sion.”

SDG&E’s $1.5-billion power
line would cut 23 miles through
the middle of Anza-Borrego
Desert State Park, a spot
known for its hiking trails,
wildflowers, palm groves, cac-
ti and spectacular mountain
views.

“This transmission line will
cross through some of the most
scenic areas of San Diego,”
said David Hogan of the Cen-
ter for Biological Diversity. “It
would just ruin it with giant,
metal industrial power lines.”

Environmentalists are push-
ing for renewable power to be
generated closer to heavily
populated areas, rather than
brought in from distant sites.
They point to Southern Cz.1i-
fornia Edison’s ambitious plan
for solar panels on Los Ange-
les-area rooftops as an exam-
ple of a better approach.

Utilities say the roof panels
will help but won’t produce

nearly enough power to satisfy
state requirements.

The California Public Utili-
ties Commission is scheduled
to vote as soon as August on
SDG&E’s proposed Sunrise
Powerlink, which would carry
enough power for about
750,000 homes — or more than
half of the utility’s customers.

Regulators in 29 states and
the District of Columbia are
forcing utilities to boost the
use of renewable energy to run
electric plants.

California has been among
the most aggressive, with the
Sstate’s three investor-owned
utilities required to get 20 per
cent of power from renewables

by the end of 2010:

Governor Arnold
Schwarzenegger wants to reach
33 per cent by 2020.

SDG&E, with 1.4 million
customers, is California’s lag-
gard, getting just six per cent of
its power from renewables.
PG&E Corp.’s Pacific Gas and
Electric, with 5.1 million cus-
tomers, gets 12 per cent. Edi-
son International’s Southern

Nationwide, utilities get only
two per cent of electricity from
renewables, said Jone-Linn
Wang, managing director of
the global power group at
Cambridge Energy Research
Associates.

Edison hopes to draw more
on solar and wind power by
building a transmission line
from the Mojave Desert to the
Los Angeles area.

“It’s a trade-off,” said Stu-
art Hemphill, Edison’s vice
president for renewable and
alternative power. “Clean
energy perhaps requires build-
ing infrastructure in potential-
ly sensitive areas. There’s no
way around it.”

SDG&E’s proposed route
through Anza-Borrego, Cali-
fornia’s largest state park,
ranked second worst among

seven possible routes studied

by state and federal regulators
for environmental damage.
The plan calls for 141 towers
through the park at an aver-
age height of 130 feet. The
entire route would include 554
towers from the wind-swept

Interested persons should possess:
An Associate’s degree in business or equivalent
Excellent administrative/clerical skills
At least two years’ experience working in a
business environment
Excellent communication and presentation skills
Proficiency in various computer applications

Please send application letter and resumé
by June 25, 2008 to:

Administrative Assistant
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest, however;
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

PEt oe
and ready for a change?

Burns House Grou lh Companies’ is looking
for an ambitious Marketing Manager with a
proven track record in consumer marketing.

Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is the
leading beverage company in the Bahamas. With its

| broad portfolio of consumer brands, extending from
beer to spirits and wines, BHG is the market leader
and trend setter in the respective categories.

Within our marketing department we seek to fill the
position of Marketing Manager. In this position you
will be responsible for a large portfolio. of co st ner
brands like Budweiser beer, Ricardo rums, Climax
Â¥ energy drink, Hennessy cognac and Carlo Rossi
wines to name a few
The marketing manager we are looking for is a team
| player has profound knowledge of the marketing mix
and is an excellent planner with great passion for
execution.

BHG will offer you a challenging environment with
international growth potential. "

We offer an above market average incentive
programme and international training opportunities.

Profile of the ideal candidate
Bachelor Degree in Marketing or Business
Administration is essential; Masters in Business
an advantage
3-5 years of supervisory experience in marketing
Team building skills
Consumer goods Marketing experience

Interested?
Send your Resume by email to:
ccash@burnshouse.com or fax to:
Human Resources Manager: (242) 326-6078



LEDEECAMPBEL Weer ia ey, RT Gseae TE!



| COMMONWEALTH |
'? BREWERY LTD. —

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ACCOUNTS
MANAGER

The successful candidate should
possess Bachelor’s degree
in Accounting and CPA certified,
and a minimum of 5 years
experience.

Candidate will be required to
compile and analyze operational and
financial data to produce financial
reports.

All interested persons are asked to
fax resumes: to (242) 302-2939

Saffrey Square
Bay Street

www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

PRIME OFFICE SUITES

® Ranging From 1,332 to 2,807 sq. ft.
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NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD



California Edison, with 4.8 mil-
lion customers; gets 16 per
cent.

desert of the Imperial Valley to
SEE page ?B

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that 1, SEAN BROOKS of
Kennedy Subdivision, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change
| my name to SEAN SANDS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VOLVICK DORMEUS of
PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX N-1072, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed -

statement of the facts within twénty-eight days fromn the |"

9TH day of JUNE 2008 to the- Minister responsible: for:
Nationality and Citizenship, EOF Box N- Iai; Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROTNEL RENA of INFANT -
VIEW ROAD, P.O. BOX GT-2557, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any |
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
JUNE 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No.45 of 2000),, KITTEN PRODUCTS, INC. is in
dissolution. Alrena Moxey is the. Liquidator and: can
be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough
& Queens Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas. All person
having claims against the above-named company are re-
quired to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the JUNE
19, 2008.

Liquidator







Summer Special
only $350.
4 week /1 bedroom apariment

Check out

| Home-Away-From-Home Program |
| and rent a comfortable, fully furnished pets






OT ee a ae aa er Fs le a eel id bi aaa Elta inches rte Benita

Rleetticsiienelte edie bt teadenatmratirniiaint alta tetas a at ena ete ae ert ie tt per ht ae i

aac 2
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 7B



energy line plan

a site near the Pacific Ocean
in San Diego.

SDG&E would build the
power line but buy the juice
from a host of generating com-
panies whose proposed plants
harness energy from the sun,
wind and underground heat.

The most ambitious gener-
ation project relies on a com-
mercially untested technology
for a gigantic solar plant.

Stirling Energy Systems Inc.,
a Phoenix startup, wants to
build 12,000 solar dishes, each
four stories tall, near El Cen-
tro, about 100 miles east of San
Diego.

Stirling says a $100 million
investment from NTR PLC, an
Irish energy holding company,
will pay for permits and design
work, with construction to
begin by the end of 2009.
Bruce Osborn, Stirling’s chief
operating officer, estimates the
plant itself will cost about $400
million.

That plant. would initially

feed into an existing power line
and provide enough electricity
for more than 200,000 homes,
Osborn said. Stirling, however,
would need more transmission
capacity to pursue plans to
triple the size of the plant, he
said.

Technology

The technology relies on
mirrored dishes collecting sun-
light to heat gas and drive the
cylinders of an engine. It has
been tested on six solar dishes
in New Mexico but now would
move to mass production —
drawing plenty of skepticism
from environmentalists.

“It’s what we call new prod-
uct introduction,” responds
Osborn, a former project man-
ager at Ford Motor Co.
“Everyone who builds a widget
does the same thing. This is a
big widget.”

Even without Stirling,
SDG&E has other, traditional

renewable power generators
knocking on its door with deals
to provide power — far more
than the utility could accom-
modate, Niggli said.

Environmentalists have
dueled for years with
SDG&E’s parent company,
Sempra Energy, over opera-
tions just south of the border in
Mexico that help supply power
to the western US.

Critics claim Sempra built
the plants in Mexico to skirt
more rigorous environmental
reviews in the U.S. They sug-
gest SDG&E’s proposed pow-
er line, which would start near
the Mexican border, is part of
a disguised effort to get elec-
tricity into the U.S. from Mex-
ico, where Sempra has an elec-
tricity plant and the first liq-
uefied natural gas terminal on
the West Coast.

SDG&E dismisses those
claims as a conspiracy theory.

“Tt’s like the myth that won’t
die,” Niggli said.

LAW REVIEW

All candidates for the LLB degree with the University of Huddersfield/Holborn Col-
lege are invited to register for review sessions scheduled for June 30 — July 2.
All sessions will be conducted by a senior professor from the university. Candidates
who are preparing for upcoming exams are especially urged to attend.

Call Success for registration information. 324-7770

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
“THE PROMENADE’

ERT tM dae

0.8 Acre

Retail/Commercials Lots

ete EET CER LH

Call |
(242) 351-5263
(242) 477-9573

NOTICE.

The National Insurance Board

will yet.free

Seminars for Employers & SelfsEmployed Persons
for the remainder of 2008 as follows:

_ Tuesday, June 24

Tuesday, September 3



"Tuesday, October 28

{
|

Tuesday, November 25

Sessions will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the ‘Training Room of
N.LB’s Wulff Road Complex, Wulff Road at Minnie Street

Refreshments will be served

Seminar Description

For everyone - from the self-employed person who works alone, to the employer of a
Jew persons, to the person responsible for the payment of contributions on behalf of
an employer of thousands. The Seminar will give an overview of the National

Insurance programme, inclusive of its benefits and assistance programmes, and

explore the scope and impact of the National Insurance lund on the economy of

the country.

Questions and/or concerns about the monthly payment of contributions or other

administrative/ compliance issues, will also be addressed.

Persons interested in attending a Seminar

should reserve a space by calling the
Board’s Public Relations Department

at 356-2070,

ext.

236 /234/232





_ (2,026sq..





New Providence

1. Vacant lot #1038 (6,000sq.
ft.)-Garden Hills #3.
(Appraised Value $35,000.00)
2. Property 40’x36'x100’ (3,
933sq. ft.) w/building (1,
428sq. ft.)-Sutton Street &
ST. Bedes Lane of Kemp
Road (Appraised Value $100,
000.00)

3. Lot #30 (60’x100") w/duplex
(1,686sq.ft.)-Golden Gates
Estate #1 (Appraised Value
$231,136.00)

4, Lots #3 & #4 (50’x100'), Bik
#47 widuplex & shop (1
§32sq. ft.)}~Forbes St Nassau
Village (Appraised © Value
$120,000.00)

5. Vacant lot #302 (8,500sq..

ft)-Winton Meadows
Subdivision #2 (Appraised
Value $85,000.00)

6. Vacant lot #4 (17,899sq. ft.)
~Black Beard Ter, Black
Beards Tower Sub (Appraised
Value $134,000.00)

7. Lot #90, Bik #5-Gamble
Heights Sub

8. Vacant lot #5, Blk #13 (7,
180sq. ff.}-Yorkshire St,
Westward Villas (Appraised
Value $100,000.00)

9. Lot #135 (50'x90°) w/hse (1,
342sq. ft.) Sunflower (South)
Sunshine Park Sub House #8
{Appraised Value $139,000.
00)

10. Lot #18 (50’x100’) w/hse
(1,155sq. ff.) Blk #16~-Talbot
Street (East) Shirley Heights
Sub (Appraised Value $130,
000.00} «.

TT. Lota (407 400°) iuiise
ft.) House #28-
Sunset Ridge Drive, Sunset
Ridge Sub (Appraised Value
$206,000.00)

12. Lots #29 & #80, (50'x100’
), Bik #47 w/building (1,140sq.
ft.)-Matthew St, Nassau
Village (Appraised Value $86,
820.00)

13. Lots #5 & #6 (180x100’)

| whse-Silver Palm = Ln
imperial Park (Appraised
Value $313,650.00)
Andros —

14. Lot #119 (22, 500sq. ft)
wicomplex (3,440sq.. ft.}-Sir
Henry Morgan Dr Andros
Beach Colony Sub Nicholls’s
Town Andros (Appraised
Value $322,900.00)

15. Beach front lot (9,000sq.-

ft.) w/building (2,100sq. ft.) -

Pinders Mangrove Cay
Andros (Appraised Value
$200,000.00)
Vessels

-- 53' Vessel (1977) Shabak

* 29’ (1983) Vessel (Lady

« 45'(1992) Defender Vessel (Liminos)

+ 48° North Carolina Hull (1989)

- 52’ Halters Fiber Glass Vessel (1979) MV Budd
.* 47’ Fiber Glass (1980) Vessel (Miss Quality)

+ 39’ (1985) Defender Vessel (Future C)

Cable Beach, West Bay Street,
P.O.Box N-3034
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel:(242) 327-5780/327-5793-6
Fax:(242) 327-5047, 327-1258
www.bahamasdevelopmentbank.com

PROPERTIES
New Providence

16. Property (4,344sq._ ft.)
widuplex (1,174sq, ft.)-Fresh
Creek Central Andros
(Appraised Value $96,640.00
17. Lot #32 (20,560sq. ft.)
w/building (1,200sq. ft.)~Congo
Town Andros (Appraised Value
$126,000.00)

18. Vacant property 150’x150’
in the — settlement of
Pinders, Mangrove

Cay South Andros (Appraised
Value $15,000.00)

Grand Bahama

19. Vacant Lot #8 Bik #12 Unit
#3 (11,250sq. ft.}-Henny Ave
Derby Sub Grand Bahama
(Appraised Value $131,700.00)
20. Vacant 11,250sq. ft. lot #19,
Bik #22, Unit 5—Lincoln Green
Sub Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $30,000.00)

21. Lot #15, Bik #15 Unit #3 (90
’x125')-Derby Sub Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $23,
000.00)

22. Vacant lot #25, Bik #15 (17,
866sq. ft}-Culwater Ln
Shannon Country Club Sub
Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $38,000.00)

23. Vacant lot’#110 Section #1
(12,500sq. ft.)-Bonefish St &
Polaris Dr, Carvel Beach Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $40,
000.00)

24. Lot #59 (17,276sq._ ft.)
Section #1 with an incomplete
fourplex-Amberjack St &
Polaris Dr Carvel Beach Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value $74,
970.00)

25. Lot ‘#2 (20, 000sq. ft.)

30. Portion of vacant lot #69
(15,000sq. ft.)-Front St Murphy
Town Abaco (Appraised Value
$29,250.00

31, Lot #51 (15,000sq. ft.)
w/building—Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised Value $102,
420.00)

32, Lot #55 (6,900sq. ft.)
w/building—-Murphy Town
Abaco (Appraised Value $82,
075.00)

33. Lot #45 (60°x160')
wibuilding (3,900sq. ft.)-Sandy
Point Abaco (Appraised Value
$485,700.00)

Eleuthera

34. Property 31'x111' w/house

Lord Street in the settlement of |

Tapum Bay — Eleuthera.
{Appraised Value $40,000.00)

35. Portion of lot #90 w/building
(2,6118q, ft.)~Parliament St,
Cupids Cay Governors Harbour
Eleuthera (Appraised Value
$55,000,00)

36. Vacant portion of lot #7 (50
*x110’}-West James Cistern
Eleuthera {Appraised Value
$20,000.00) -

Cat Island

37. Property w/twelve (12)
room motel 1.39 acres-In the
settlement of Arthur’s Town Cat
island (Appraised Value $630,
000.00) .

38, One. acre of land beach
front w/building-Devil’s Point
Cat Island (Appraised Value
$260,000.00)

ingaua

39, Lot #43 (90°x100’)
w/building~Russell St, Matthew





wibuilding- complex & coins Town Ingaua: thong Value fp

Laundromat-Queens . Highway...$120,000, BD). 6.

Holmes Rock Commonage
Grand Bahama (Appraised
Value $178,600.00)

Rock . Commonage Grand
Bahama (Appraised Value
$178,600.00) |

26. Vacant lot #5, Bik #31,
Section B-Royal Bahamian
Estate Sub Grand Bahama(
Appraised Value $31,000.00) |
27. Vacant lot #89 (14,397sa.



Exuma
40, Lot 134 (75'x85") w/two
storey building—George Town,
Exuma (Appraised Value $468,
000.0

ft.) Bik | #9~Yorkshire Dr,

Bahamia West Replat Grand
Bahama iAppralse? Value $16,
300.00)

Abaco

28. Lot #54 E (6,500sq. ft.)
Witriplex foundation (2,788sq.
ft.)}-Murphy Town Abaco
(Appraised Value $24,896.00)

29. Lot #6 Vacant 2 acres—Fox
Town Abaco (Appraised Value
$50,000.00)

ASSETS

Rece)

+ 51’ Defender Vessel (1981) Equility

* 120’ Twin. Screw Steel H

ull Vessel (1978) with

(2) Detroit Diesel V16-92 engine, fully loaded

+ 122’ Single Screw Steel

Hull (1960) MV Lisa ill,

vessel has a new engine requiring installation. And
can be view at Bradford Marine, Grand Bahama

(i
(i

Vehicles
1) 03 Dodge Caravan

1) 96 Ford Explorer
97 Dodge Stratus

(
(
(1)

(1) 01 Hyundai H-100 Bus
(1
(
(

) 01 Kia Bus 12 Seater
1) 02 Kitchen Van Trailer
1) 00 Ford Ranger Truck
) 03 Toyota Coaster Bus
) 1989 Chevy Caprice

Hearse

The public is invited to submit Sealed bids marked "Tender" to Bahamas
Development Bank, P.O. Box N-3034, Nassau, Bahamas attention
Financial Controller, faxed bids will not be accepted or telephone 327-5780
for additional information. Please note that all bids on the aforementioned
properties and assets should be received by or on June 23, 2008. The
Bahamas Development Bank reserves the right to reject any or all offers.
All assets are sold as is.




panies

soba BIB

005 RSLODROSSIOOSEOIS TS PUES SERIE Ele



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ALANA

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; Hees is :
cesar psi p31 berate cncKe pana sont raeescebaan ost ir santas: eitaapcneswmnaimeiin Aas cagnesssainseiel

PAGE. 8B;. MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008





nvaniial 97

seoson abeste









AY MOVES

reecieal ogie



THE TRIBUNE



ure syeertehi hence

“Every day I look forward to reading The Tribune. - :
It always provides valuable information and something
to talk about like local news, sports, entertainment

and world news. The Tribune provides everything



I need to know about life in The Bahamas and

internationally. The Tribune is my. newspaper.”

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN



amass cane cou tanme cram anenoaneenc antes ey RONEN RR BARON TONNE UH HNANE AONE MNENR ENA HENAINTTN TAINAN AT OAT ATT IT
THE TRIBUNE.

MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 9B



US drivers

take advantage

of Mexico’s
cheap gas

SAN DIEGO (AP) — If
there’s pain at the pump in
the US, Mexico may just
have a remedy.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

THE EAST EUROPE INVESTMENT & ed gasoline in San Diego
REAL ESTATE FUND LTD.
$4.61 a gallon. A few miles
south, in Tijuana, it’s about
$2.54 — even less if you pay
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the in pesos.

International Business Companies Act 2000 THE EAST EUROPE More and more people

INVESTMENTS & REAL ESTATE FUND LTD. is in dissolution. appear to be taking advan-
tage of the lower price.

“I used to buy exclusively

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 12th June 2008.
David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves
Village, RO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of THE EAST EUROPE
INVESTMENTS & REAL ESTATE FUND LTD. All persons hav-
ing claims against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 12th
July 2008.

elementary school in San
Diego who lives in Tijuana.

all my gas in Tijuana.”
The lower prices mean a
. US motorist could save
almost $54 filling up a two-
- year-old Ford F150 pickup
with a 26-gallon fuel tank in
Mexico.



Diesel
_ Legal Notice

NOTICE

even greater, selling at $5.04

and $2.20 in Tijuana.
EAST EUROPE INVESTMENT Paul Covatrubias, 26, who
MANAGEMENT LTD. lives in Chula Vista and

works in construction in San
Diego, crosses the border
each week just to refuel his
dual-cab Ford F-250 pickup.
“T fill it up with diesel in
Tijuana for $60,” he said. “It

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 EAST EUROPE
INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT LTD. is in dissolution.

San Diego.”
Gas is cheaper in Mexico

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 12th June 2008.
David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Building 2 Caves
* Village, RO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of EAST EUROPE IN-
VESTMENT MANAGEMENT LTD. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send’ their address
and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 12th July
2008.

sidy intended to keep infla-
tionary forces in check.

: everyone. The wait getting
Ure back into the US at the bor-
fry der in Tijuana frequently '
“p takes longer than two hours
and cars can burn about a
gallon of gas for each hour
they idle.



_ MINISTRY OF LANDS AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT - GN701
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
. CHAPTER 339 ;
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) { ) REGULATIONS, 2002



The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE
GASOLINE sold by ESSO STANDARD OIL S. A. LIMITED will become effective on
Monday June i. 2008.

GASOLINE SCHEDULE



PLACE ARTICLE
SUPPLIERS’ | DISTRIBUTORS’
PRICE PRICE
$ $
PARTA
NEW PROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ESSO Standard Oil | LEAD FREE ' 5.25
S.A. Limited
PART C
GRAND BAHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FREEP,)
ESSO Standard Ol ~— | LEAD FREE 5.73
S.A. Limited a
PARTD
ABACO, ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
ELEUTHERA
ESSO Standard Oi | LEAD FREE 5.25 5.46 5.85
S.A. Limited
PARTE
ALL OTHER NOT ‘INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLAND
ESSO Standard Of | LEAD FREE 5.26 5.48 5.88
S.A. Limited
PERMANENT SECRETARY

A gallon of regular unlead-

retails for an average price of

in the US before gas started ©
really going up,” said Patrick
Garcia, a drama teacher at an

“Since then, I’ve been buying

The differential in diesel is

a gallon in San Diego County

would be almost twice that in

because of a government sub-

Still, international gas-buy-
ing trips don’t make sense for

GN699



Ministry of National Security

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Form of Public Notice of Withdrawal of a Nomination
Where the Election remains contested

The Nicholl’s Town

stipe aeeenes teteuen seuttsaewanenwsetimesmtnntwatosesaarseusbenpenesnpamarannansaranenes evans eeneaneee ny nee®

District/Town Area
NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL OF NOMINATION

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidate name below has withdrawn his .
candidature, and no longer stands nominated in the above mentioned election, .
and NOTICE is hereby given that the Poll will take piace et at the place and on.
the day as ae published.

Other Names Tn Full

Candidate’s Surname

WALKES

Sign: Huntley Christie _

RETURNING OFFICER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Form of Public Notice of Nomination Where the Withdrawal
Results in an Uncontested Election

MICAL Constituency Polling Division S$
Snug Corner, Hard Hill and Mason’s Bay
in the Acklins District

DECLARATION OF RESULT

CONSEQUENCE UPON
NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL

NOTICE is hereby giver that the following candidate has withdrawn his
candidature, and no longer stands nominated in the above ee
election. tes Fe



Candidate’s Surname Other nee ao fall :

1A pacateamannnnvaraenenineenienensaeneeenrererannenrntarenny see temtinmeoee: eateeeeme as '

Shantell L. _

AND the candidates named below, being the only candidates remaining,
standing nominated ARE HEREBY DECLARED elected to serve as a
District Councillor/fown Committee Member for the said District/Town
Area.

¢ ther ales



Candidates Qccupation Place of
Surname in full Residence
COX cine RUPEE Businessman Snug Cor cones Acklins
ROLLE Henry ah Businessman ___ Snug Com mer, Ac Acklins

Date: 9" June, 2008
Sign: Stephen Wilson
RETURNING OFFICER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

‘Form of Public Notice of Nomination Where the Withdrawal ”
Results in an Uncontested Election ~~

y MICAL Constituency Polling Division 1B
Moss Town, Cripple Hill, Richmond Hill & Sea View .
In the Crooked Island and Long Cay District

DECLARATION OF RESULT

CONSEQUENCE UPON
NOTICE OF WITHDRAWAL

NOTICE is hereby given‘that the following candidate has withdrawn his/tier |.

‘candidature, and no longer stands nominated in the above mentioned
: _ election.

Candidate’s Surname Other names in full

KNOWLES

Annafaye sis)

AND the candidate named below, being the only candidate remaining
standing nominated IS HEREBY DECLARED elected to serve as a
District Councillor/Town Committee Member for the said District/Town
Area.

Candidates Other names Occupation Pinse of
Surname in full ; Residence

DAXON__ Don Arlington __Station Diesel Mechanic _Cripple Hill
Date: 9" June, 2008

Sign: Francita Neely
RETURNING OFFICER

~








Bem MEW Coe ey

PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ee Te ee NOSIS ee ee se ae
To ativertise, call 502-2371

GN-697



SU
COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008
2008/PRO/NPR/00298

IN THE ESTATE OF BLODWEN A.
ZEIGLER, late of 73 Oak Ridge A venue in the

United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration :
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :
will be made to the Supreme Court of The :
Bahamas in the Probate Division by HEATHER:

_ L. THOMPSON, Pilot House Condominiums,

, 2008/PRO/NPR/00293

ee.

Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in

' The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of

Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted

Estate, of the Superior Court, Chancery Division,
by the Probate Part, in the county of Union, in
the State of New Jersey on the 16th day
of January, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

t

Bergen and State of New Jersey, one of the States
of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration |
of fourteen days from the date. hereof, application
: 2008/PRO/NPR/00297

will be made to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas in the Probate Division by A.
PAMELA THOMPSON, Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas

Administration with the Will Annexed, in the
above estate granted to RICHARD
BOGGIANO the Executor of the Estate, by the
Probate Division, in the Superior Court for the
county of Bergen in the state of New Jersey on
the 28th day of May, 1992.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008
2008/PRO/NPR/00294

IN THE ESTATE OF JAMES E. MARR, JR.,

Late of 525 Highland Avenue in the County of
Malden in the City of Middlesex in the Sate of :
Massachusetts, one of the States of the United :

States Of America, deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration

will be made to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas in the Probate Division by KEVIN M.

‘RUSSELL, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized

Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing of Probate of Will Without Sureties,
in the above estate granted to THOMAS C.
MARR and JAMES E. MARR, III the
Executors of the Estate, by the Probate Division,
in the Probate and Family Court Department,
The Trial Court, Commonwealth of
Massachusetts on the

30th day of March, 2007.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

_ 2008/PRO/NPR/00295

FOUN». : 2008/PRO/NPR/00296
Eastern District, New Providence one of the |
: IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN D. BRITTO, late
? of No.4919 Hollywood Boulevard in the City
: of Hollywood in the State of Florida, one of the
: States of the United States of America, deceased.
to PAUL L. ZEIGLER the Executor of the :
: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof; application
: will ‘be made to the Supreme Court of The
: Bahamas in the Probate Division by ANDREW
+ DWAYNE FORBES, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
: one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The:
' + Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
: Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
: Resealing Grant of Letters of Administration, in
: the above estate granted to JOSEPH A. BRITT
: the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the
: Circuit Court for Broward County, in the state
: of Florida, Probate Division on the 5th, say of
th : poy: 1976. :
: IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN ANTHONY ::
BOGGIANO, late of 8 Marion Aventié in the: ~~
Borough of Cliffside Park in the County of |

? No. 2008/PRO/NPR/00299
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application :

: Whereas HOWITT (a.k.a HOWETT
? MUNROE) of, Ridgeland Park, in the Southern
: District one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
: of The Bahamas has made application to the
: Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
: Administration of the Real and Personal Estate
: of BEATRICE MUNROE, late of Fleming
: Street in the Southern District of New Providence,
: one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
: Bahamas, deceased.

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

: IN THE ESTATE OF GUY SANDERSON, late

: of 51 Riverview Heights in the city of Winterport

: in the County of Waldo in the gtate of Maine,

: one of the States of the United States of America,
. | deceased.

? NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The
: Bahamas in the Probate Division by KEVIN M.
: RUSSELL, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of
i the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
-} Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
: Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
: Resealing of the Certificate of Appointment, in
: the above estate granted to SANDRA BLAIS
: the Personal Representative of the Estate, by the
: Probate Division, in the County of Waldo, in the

ee . ee : state of Maine on the 12th day of February, 2007.
City of Summit in the County of Union in the :

State of New Jersey, one of the States of the

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

~ DESIREE ROBINSON -
(for) REGISTRAR °

- PROBATE DIVISION
JUNE 19, 2008

: IN THE ESTATE OF FRANK EUGENE -
: MANN, late of 218 S. Royal Street, Alexandria
: in the State of Virginia 22314 one of the States
: of the United States of America, deceased.
for obtaining the Resealing Grant of Letters of |
: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
: of fourteen days from the date hereof: application *
: will be made to the Supreme Court of The
: Baharnas in the Probate Division by RICHARD
: HERBERT ROGER LIGIITBOURN, of No.4
: George Street, McKinney Bancroft & Hughes,
: Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
: The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing Grant
: of Resealing Certificate/Letter of Qualification,
: in the above estate granted to ANITA LYNN
: MANN the Executrix of the Estate, by the
: Probate Division, Circuit Court of the City of
: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia on the
: 8th day of May, 2007.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

JUNE 19, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications
: will be heard by the said Court at the
: expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TELUCIA DORMEUS of
PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX N-1072, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
‘who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
9TH day of JUNE 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ARNOLD JOSEPH of 2ND
ST. GROVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of JUNE 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ESSAY COMPETITION

Ninth Annual Public Service Week

The Department of Public Service will host an
Essay Competition as one of the activities for the
Ninth Annual Public Service Week. The
Competition is open to Junior and Senior School
Students.

Students interested in participating should write
a 250-300 words (Junior High), and 450-500 words
(Senior High), essay on the topic: “The Public
Service - _ Focused on Improving Customer
Service.”

The Hicaaline for entries, which should be referred
- to the attention of Ms. Antoinette Thompson,
Deputy Permanent Secretary, Department of Public
Service, is Friday, 27th June, 2008. :

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be
awarded to the winner in each category.

The winners will be announced during the Ninth
Annual Public Service Week Awards Ceremony
scheduled for 11th October, 2008.



GOVERNMENT NOTICE .-
MINISTRY OF MARITIME AFFAIRS
AND LABOUR

DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Pursuant to Section 21 of the Industrial relations Act
Chapter 321 Statute Law of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas it is hereby ordered that Nominations

of Officers in The Bahamas Commercial Stores
Supermarkets Warehouse Workers Union shall take

| place on 17th June, 2008 from 12 noon to 2p.m. at The

Bahamas Communications and Public officers Union |
Hall’s Farrington Road, New Providence and shall
be supervised by The Registrar of Trade Unions.
All financial members of the Union as of June 13th,
2008, will be allowed to participate in the upcoming
Nominations of Executive Officers for the Union.

The Elections of Officers shall be conducted on |
Monday 23rd June, 2008 9a.m. to 4p.m. at the
Bahamas Communications and Public Officers
Union’s Hall, Farrington Road and shall be super-
vised by the Registrar. Only members of the Union
who are financial as of June 13th, 2008, shall be
eligible to vote.

Signed
Harcourt V, Brown
Registrar of Trade Unions
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008, PAGE 11B

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
; Bist ROYAL 2 FIDELITY kg BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES
J HIGGS é& JOHNSON S >.
Counsel & Attorneys-at-Law — :

invites applications for an attorney for our Abaco

7 : : Abaco Markets
Office. 3 eG Bahamas Property Fund
) Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Applicants must have a minimum of 3-5 years} [iz Pape sce canes
. . Te . " 7 7 - Colina Holdings

experience in Litigation and Real Estate,) - |e ‘80 Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Doctor's Hospital

demonstrate an ability to work independently| |: 02 Femguard

. | . Finco
and possess a thorough working knowledge and] |; 230 FirtCarbboan
Focol Class B Preference

technical competence in the areas mentioned.) |i: at Eeanea Concecte

ICD Utilities

(Applicants with experience in only one of the} :2. 60 J. S, Johnson

rR
ceaeneut

mentioned areas may also apply). Pe Senet ow

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Successful applicants can look forward to oon ee
Bahamas Supermarkets

competitive remuneration and benefits. a0 40. RND Holdings

un
( E 2 Colina Bond Fund 1.315228***
: . : fs Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.998763***
Apply in confidence to: i : : , Colina Money Market Fund _ 1.393169"**""*
6 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.6707***
11.6049 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.2142***
100.0000. 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00**
100.0000 98.2100 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.956603*
Vacancy 1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00**
4 9.6346 Fidelity Int H nt und 10.0060***

P; O. Box N 3247 . n " BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 S) YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price *- 31 March 2008
+ 52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity ** - 31 December 2007
Nassau Bahamas , 52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *** - 30 May 2008
? ( Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price see" - 31 April 2008
? - ery: Eyles wage Ae de Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week - ***** - 30 April 2008
or Via email at: shastian@chigess ohnson e com Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths *eree* . 6 June 2008
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value
DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007



jf : , : ' DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED

Chairman’s Report i
Doctors Hospital Health System Limited _ * , Consolidated Statement of Revenue and Expenses

Three months ended April 30, 2008 with comparative figures for the three months ended April 30, 2007



+ Dear Shareholder, (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
On behalf of the Board of Directors of Doctors Hospital Health Saw I f esent the unaudited financial : i ais i |
results for the first quarter ending April 30, 2008. RE Le eT
Earnings per share were ten cents, a decrease from thirteen cents for the comparable period last year. Total Revenues a , 4
revenues were $10.8 million compared to $10.5 million in the. previous year. Net income for the period was ne service revenue,net_ $ bs Oe
“aM: “VW: er $
$0.98 million compared to $1.3 million last year. Réel SL EL Ld OSs
The first quarter of fiscal 2009 has evidenced the high cost of doing business in this uncertain economic time ; Expenses :
as healthcare’ costs continue to rise. / i "Salaries and benefits 4 4,015 3,705
i Medical supplies and services 2,639 2,628
Total expenses increased $0.7 million or 7.3%. Salaries and benefits account for 47% of the total increase, Bad debt expense, net of recoveries ie Rae
Paes ; : rien : ny ; Depreciation and amortization 610 579
contributing factors: include: cost of living increases, health insurance premium increases and _ successful : Other operating 511 462
recruitment of filling needed nursing vacancies. Bad debt expense is 45% of the increase due in part to an Utilities , 345 5 ; 297
increase of self-pay patients in the first quarter. Utility expenses account for 7% of the increase. Government taxes and fees 251 : 249
, ae : Outside services 5 ; 211- . 219
2 i Ai Receivable fell to 473 d the | inhi ny d to 67.8 in th f Insurance ~ é f 181 176
; Days revenue in Accounts eceivat € le to 47. ays, the owest in history, compare to 67.8 in the same Repairs and maintenance 133 , 113
period of fiscal 2008: Cash collection is up by $2.1 million over the comparable period last year. We are Rent 97 as 95
pleased:to report that our cash position allowed the Company to pay down $2.0 millions in long-term debt as: Dietary expenses 5 85 89
well as a $0.02 dividend to our shareholders based on year end results. ; Heewal expenses (ei. "Re Ae SP e Sere ake Oa SSR OR Se LS
: ; Es : Total expenses 9,752 - 9,085
The Company’ made a significant capital expenditure with the pacha of a new state of the art Phillips ae Income before interest 1114 1,467
Achieva 3.0 T capable MRI scanner at a cost of cost $1.6 million. The complete cost of the project is $2.2 Interest expense (133) (153)
. million.. The new Philips Achieva MRI system uses new’ technology (magnet, gradients, RF) to provide repr 5 Rese yer ae Te ; ey
: cutting-edge whole-body 3.0T imaging, enhanced performance on an advanced platform that delivers fast, high Net income for the period $ 981 1,314
quality diagnostic results. With the acquisition of the new MRI machine, the Hospital’s MRI center, currently
located on Christie Street will be housed inside the hospital, panne it more convenient for patients and Earnings per‘common share (expressed in Bahamian dollars): :
relatives. . Basic and fully diluted $ 0.10 0.13



The Company also acquired the U-Systems somo.vâ„¢ breast ultrasound unit at a cost of $0.2 million. The .
main advantage of the somo.vâ„¢ is that it can screen for breast cancer just like a mammogram can in those DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
women for whom a mammogram is considered too painful, or for those whose breast is too dense for the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

mammogram. The newly acquired breast ultrasound system sets a new standard in the Bahamas and is the first
of its kind in the Caribbean. The breast ultrasound machine together with the new MRI breast scanning
capabilities will enhance our quality and accuracy resulting in better patient care and breast diagnostics.

Three months ended April 30, 2008 with comparative figures for the three months ended April 30, 2007
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)























: 6 te be * , ‘ 4 Ae + April 30, 2008 April 30, 2007
The Hospital added strong authentication to its website deployment by implementing SafeWord for Citrix. : a ,
SafeWord secures remote access with hardware tokens that generate secure, one-time passcodes for each user ‘Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in):
~ login which enhance the level of security for our physicians and end users.
: ‘ OPERATING ACTIVITIES: eS
These achievements are due in large measure to the hard work and commitment of our department Leaders, NenincoMe eee § - lou
A ¢ xu fs Bis ‘ Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash s
Aégsociates and the invaluable support and patronage of our credentialed physicians and patients. provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization ¢ 611 579
The Board joins me in ‘thanking our valued shareholders, for your continued support and confidence. We Provision for doubtful accounts eis - 639 342
extend an invitation for you to join us at our company’s Annual General Meeting on June 26, 2008 at 5:30pm, _. Gain on disposal of property; plant and equipment 1 Sst 16)
at the British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street. 2,231 oe
3 thee : i Decrease (increase) in accounts receivable 27 (1,591)
J oseph Krukowski v ; : Increase in inventories (97) (78)
Chairman ‘ : Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses and other assets (1,358) 62
_ May 28,2008 Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and other liabilities 318 198):
‘ : f een Cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities 1,121 414
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (809) (208).
Purchase of intangible assets : (9) ° (85)
Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment 2 1,038
Cash and cash equivalents provided by (used in) investing activities (818) 745
DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED FINANCING ena ie)
: i Repayment of long-term debt (2,236) (
Consolidiyed Balancershect . Dividends paid to shareholders _(199)

. : : Cash and cash equivalents used i i iviti 4. 236
April 30, 2008 with comparative figures at January 31, 2008 ‘ash and cash equivalents used in financing activities (2,435) (236)
(Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (2,132) © 923
April 30, 2008 January 31, 2008 ;
; Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 6,630 : 1,989
Assets : : : ;
Currentiassets: : Cash and cash equivalents at end of period. $ 4,498 2,912
Cash and cash equivalents $ 4,498 ‘ 6,630
Accounts receivable—patients, net (note 2) 1,230 1,270 5
Accounts receivable—third party payors, net (note 2) ; 4,139 4,787 Cash a an equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand, short-term deposits with an original maturity of three
‘Inventories - 1,263 1,166 months or less.
Other assets j 2,108° 729
: 15238 pone DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
ion shirreh Gassetse Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
Investments ; : 30 30 Three months ended April 30, 2008
Goodwill, net 431 431 (Expressed in thousands of Bahamian dollars)
Other intangible assets 2,161 2,423 P ceeate dene ae re
Investment property 4,823 4,868 a
Property, plant and equipment 9,436 8,921 Number of shares Share capital Contributed surplus __ Retained earnings
16,881 16,673 Bal tJ 4 $ 399 $ 12,358 $ 7,048
Total assets $ 30,119 31,255 erence as Jelmuary:3 T2008 PEL SS ; ; ?
Net income for the period - - . , 981
emery 4 ,
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity Dividends paid (199)
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and other liabilities 3,760 3,442 : = —¢€ 19358. § 7830.
Long-term debt, current portion 942 942 Bealeice a ApGUSO22008 8 O27 OB8 th oh Se
4,702 4,384
Non-current liabilities .
Long-term debt ; 4.830 7.066 DOCTORS HOSPITAL HEALTH SYSTEM LIMITED
Total liabilities 9,532 11,450 Notes to Interim Consvlidated Financial Statements



. Three months ended April 30, 2008
Shareholders’ equity: Foe ee ee

Share capital:
Authorized 12,500,000 common shares at par value 1. Significant accounting policies
of B$0.04 each (January 31, 2007 — 12,500, 000 shares)

Issued and fully paid 9,971,634 shares These interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard



(January 31, 2007 — 9,971,634 shares) 399 399 No. 34, Interim Financial Reporting, using the same accounting policies applied in the January 31, 2008 audited
Contributed surpius 12,358 12,358 consolidated financial statements.
Bee cerungs 7,830 7,048 2. Accounts receivable
20,587 19,805 i ; 7
‘Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity... +§ 30,19. 31,255. Accounts receivable are stated net of provisions for doubtful accounts of $6.6 million.

~
PAGE 1B, MONDAY, JUNE 16, 2008 | | THE TRIBUNE

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