Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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‘WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

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Student Sex



eis involve two pupils
at New Providence School



5 aie Assistant Commissioner Hulan Hanna

‘Conflict of interest no bar to
hospital complaint inquiry’

@ By ALISON LOWE
: Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE chairman of the board
which licenses private medical
facilities yesterday denied that a
conflict of interest has prevent-

ed the board from investigating
a complaint about Doctor’s
Hospital.

Dr Kirtland Culmer is cur-
rent chairman of the Hospital
and Healthcare Facilities

SEE page 15

Cricket match turns ‘violent’

LOCAL cricket) players were

reportedly more interested in

landing blows with fans and players of an opposing team than
scoring points on the field during a Sunday match at Windsor
Park, unconfirmed reports to The Tribune claim.

SEE page eight

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@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
_ Tribune Staff: Reporter
Ghomppsen@iribunsimediasnat

POLICE have committed themselves |
to investigating an alleged sex scandal
involving two students at a New Provi-
dence school which although receiving
significant media coverage was not report-
ed by school officials or parents, it
emerged Tuesday. _

Yesterday Acting Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Hulan Hanna said police

were investigating the issue and asked
the public to be patient while the investi-
gation is carried out.

“Why school officials failed to.report

lines.





@ By BRENT DEAN
—Tribuné Staff Reporter"
bdean@tribunemedia.net___





THE FEMALE teacher
| involved in a sex scandal with a
17-year-old male student at a
public school several months
ago, is still employed with the
ministry, but has been -reas-
signed to a role away from chil-
dren.



Sex scandal teacher given
‘new job away from children




the alleged incident involving a 17-year-
,old male-and a 14-year-old female caught
in a sexual act has been’a point of public
debate after the issue hit-national head-

Although the boy is a minor the inci-

SEE page 15

Ministry-of Education Per-
manent Secretary Elma Gar-
raway confirmed this to The
Tribune yesterday. .

She said the treatment given

to this teacher, through reas- |’
“sigpnnrent toa ministry role.|..




away from children, is the
same treatment that would be
given to a male teacher in the
same situation.

The story made headlines in
February as the teacher, who is
in her thirties, was suspected

SEE page eight









Cop shooting suspects to
appear in court today.

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter .
~~ +-tthompson@tribunemedia-net- -.

TWO male suspects in cus-
tody in connection with the
shooting and attempted robbery
of a vacationing New Jersey cop
will be arraigned in Magistrate's

Court on related charges today, -

senior police officials revealed
Tuesday.

The suspects were picked up
Monday — not over the week-



end as initial police reports indi-
cated — Acting Commissioner
of. Police Christopher McCoy
said at a press briefing at the
RBPF headquarters yesterday.

This brings the police investi-
gation to a "swift" close a week
after the brazen shooting of 49-
year-old John Casper in the
heart of the popular Cable
Beach tourist district. Fielding
questions from the media,

SEE page eight



BEC workers

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Pe Sy0) ane

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

BEC workers uncovered the
skeletal remains of a human

. body yesterday morning undera ~*

sidewalk at the entrance to
Montagu Beach.

The entire road was cut open
from just in front of the One
Montague Place office building
to the other side of the street
where the bones were slowly
unearthed piece by piece by
police and forensic officials.

The initial discovery occurred
at 11.30am, according to Asst

‘Supt Leon Bethell, officer in

charge of the Homicide Squad
at the Central Detective Unit. .
A human skull was visible

-yesterday on the sidewalk in

front of the beach. It was placed
on top of a white medical cloth,
along with what appeared to be
leg bones, vertebrae and other
miscellaneous bones police were
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Major/Tribune staff

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TT Chee mn?

Mr Bethell said that authori-
ties currently have no informa-
tion on the identity of the per-
son. The bones will now be tak-
en in for medical evaluation,
and at that time, the sex of the
individual will be determined.

SEE page eight




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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







Arawak Cay is a popular hangout for Bahamians
and tourists alike. Its stalls and shacks are packed
every day with patrons indulging in fried snapper,
cracked conch and conch fritters, or cooling down
with an ice-cold daiquiri or a Kalik beer.

Development plans for the hot spot were discussed
at a meeting on Monday called by Agriculture Minis-
ter Larry Cartwright. Officials from the Arawak Cay
Association and vendors were invited to attend.

Members of the press, though invited, were turned
away at the door. Left in the lurch, The Tribune decid-
ed to canvass the area and interview vendors who did
not attend the meeting — but most.were reluctant.to
voice their concerns and suggestions for improving the
area. However, The Tribune did stumble on a few
outspoken individuals — including a Bahamian celebri-
ty who said their piece on the way forward for Arawak
Cay.





TIM CLARKE





= DARROLD MILLER

‘There i is tremendous potential here’




As easy-going, mellow Darrold
Miller was'on duty at the
Conch Crawl Stall.

The Tribune found the former TV and
radio personality cleaning the bar, where
customers enjoy small Bahamian dishes
and drinks.

Mr Miller, former Chief Operating
Officer at GEMS radio network, started

. working there on Monday. When asked
what he does at-the stall, Mr Miller
replied, “I am the boss, under a man-
‘agement contract, I manage this place.”

While speaking to the reporter, Mr

Miller greeted passersby. He said busi-
“ness is very slow at Arawak Cay, but
there is “tremendous potential.”

Proper lighting for the area is a con-
cern, he said, as it raises safety issues
for customers who’ park their cars at
night.

“Police neéd to get up off their laurels,
and patrol this area,” Mr Miller said,
adding that if officers were more visible,
drug chases like the one that occurred
last week would not take place there.

“Persons would think twice about

using thisport for illegal purposes if
police would be on the lookout,” he
said, “and apparently others have gotten
away with this many times before.”






































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EPORTS and PHOTOS:
REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Staff Photographer

ARAWAK CAY: ‘the way forward



JAMES SMITH

he said.

According to Mr Smith, some of
the police officers assigned to the
“carefree” about their

cay seem too
jobs.

He said that more must be done to
“ensure that Bahamian vendors have

first priority.

Concern over illegal practices

Sports bar owner James Smith said
that illegal practices “go down” very
often at Arawak Cay.

He said the public does not hear
about these incidents, because they
are “swept under the rug.”

“People dredging the harbours,
and Haitians bringing all the dope,
the coke, the guns, and everything,”



“These immigrants coming in and taking over,” said Mr Smith.

M ALEX MILLER
Bahamian band needed

Alex Miller, a fisherman
who supplies conch and fish
to vendors, believes that
Arawak Cay lacks “real”
Bahamian entertainment.

“We need a live Bahamian
band out here,” Mr Miller
explained. “We have all this
American music playing dur-
ing the day, when tourists
come here to get a taste of
our Bahamas.”

Parking is also a concern for Mr Miller. He
believes that government needs to Stop customers
from parking on the pavement in font of the



- stalls.

- “It hurts business here at the fry,” he eaid!

mi GENESTA WILLIAMS
Vendors must follow rules

Fresh to her new secre-
tarial post at an informa-
tion booth at Arawak Cay,
35-year-old Genesta
Williams believes that ven-
dors need to follow the
rules better. “In my first
days here, I notice that some vendors don’t close on
time, and some of these stalls stay open till 1am.”

She said the main office has received complaints
from vendors and owners about rest rooms not
being open for customers and persons to use after
hours. “These vendors want us close after. 12.to
accommodate their slackness,” Mrs Williams said.
“That’s not right.” She hopes that these concerns are
addressed in the redevelopment plan.



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He is pleased with government’s efforts to remove the garbage
that has accumulated over the years at Arawak Cay beach.

li MICHAEL JOHNSON
Limited parking a problem

Twenty-two year old Michael
Johnson is concerned that limited

cause a low turnout at this year’s
Junkanoo in June festivities.

Mr Johnson said customers are
not permitted to park “across the
road” this year. “The parking
spaces are a little too small now,” he said. “At one
point they were,big enough to hold all the cars, but not
anymore”. Mr Johnson added that immigrants opening
new businesses have become a big problem for
Bahamian vendors at “the fry.” He said that Bahami-
an vendors taught many of the immigrants to prepare
native dishes, but now they feel they have “rights” to
operate their businesses as Bahamian vendors do.

“This has been happening for two or three years” he
said, “and we have to do something about that.”

lj ELANOR ROBERTS
Cay workers ‘doing well’

Vendors at the cay are doing
well, 56-year-old Elanor
Roberts said.

She believes they shouldn’t
complain too much about their
lot. “They making more money
than most of us,” she said, “and
Sunday evenings is be really
lucrative here for them.”

Mrs Roberts has been employed-at Arawak Cay



for eight years, and said she has experienced the -

“highs and lows” of business at the cay:

She agreed that vendors have not:been, keeping,
regular operating hours. Mrs Roberts explained ~
that all workers at Arawak Cay should operate. apm
to 4pm; or 4pm to midnight shifts.













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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS |

Man charged
in connection
with teen reat
tragedy

A MAN was charged yes-
terday in connection with an
incident over the weekend in
which a police officer was shot
at and a teenager died.

Don Murphy, 31, was
arraigned before Magistrate

Guillemina Archer at Court |

10 in Nassau Street, charged
with possession of a firearm
with the intent to endanger
life as well as causing damage.

According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that on Sat-
urday, May 17, Murphy was
in possession of a shotgun with
the intent to endanger the life
of police constable 2820
Ezekiel Pratt.

Court dockets also allege
that Murphy caused $800 in
damage to a 2000 Chevrolet
Impala, the property of P/C
2820 Ezekiel Pratt.

Murphy pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was grant-
ed bail in the sum of $10,000
with one surety. The case has
been adjourned to July 15 for
the start of a preliminary
inquiry.

According to police reports,
a 17-year-old male passenger
of a red 2000 Chevy 1500
truck died after the vehicle he
was in collided with a 2000

Chevy Impala which was"

attempting to escape gunfire
from another vehicle.

Court hears

drug allegation

e A 20-year-old man was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday charged with
possession of marijuana with
the intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Sunday,
“May 18, Anthonious Adder-
ley was found in possession of::|:

10 grams of marijuana. Adder-
ley, who was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez, pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted
bail in the sum of $3,500 with
one surety.

The case was adjourned to
June 3 and transferred to
Court Eight, Bank Lane.

Man faces
fraud charges

e A 38-year-old Sea Breeze
Lane man was arraigned in

' Magistrate's Court yesterday

on fraud charges.

According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on Wednes-
day, May 14, Justin Todd was
found in possession of a
forged Bahamian passport
bearing the name of Michael
Pinder.

Court dockets also allege
that on the same day, Todd
uttered the forged document
and attempted to obtain
$298.45 cash from the Super
Value foodstore in the Golden
Gates Shopping Plaza:

your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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‘black file’ of PLP names
linked with Harl Taylor

THE FNM is set to disclose
PLP links with murdered
homosexual handbag designer
Harl Taylor if the opposition
goes ahead with its plan to
raise the school sex scandal in
the House of Assembly today,
it was claimed last night.

The government is said to
have a “black file” containing
PLP names known to have
been closely associated with
the gay entrepreneur and his
alleged lover, Dr Thaddeus
McDonald.

If the PLP goes through
with its threat to “name
names” in the recent school
sex scandal, when a 17-year-
old boy related to an MP was
caught in a sex act with a 14-
year-old girl, the FNM report-

edly plans to use its file to

pour shame on the opposition.

Police are said to be in pos-
session of Taylor’s “personal
organiser” — a book of his

many social contacts — which’

FNM insiders claim throws
much light of his clandestine
sexual activities.

“There is no doubt that
names will be named if the
PLP goes ahead with its plan
to embarrass the. family
involved in the sex affair,” a
source told The Tribune.

“The plan is that, if the PLP
can use parliamentary protec-
tion to name names in the
school sex matter, then the
FNM can name names in the
Taylor-McDonald affair.

“The fact is that police
uncovered layers and layers
of filth in gay society during
their investigations and there
is no doubt that gay society
here is a powerful force.

“The FNM will be naming
names and saying who was
associated with whom. I
understand Taylor’s organiser

contains the names of all the

people he associated with.”
Some of these names, he
said, were in the “political

Mrs MUCH seam er

Move follows Opposition plan
to raise sex scandal in House



“There is no doubt that names
will be named if the PLP goes
ahead with its plan to
embarrass the family involved
in the sex affair.” 3



establishment”. and their dis-
closure would shake Nassau
society to the core.

The source also said that
plans were afoot, should the
PLP go ahead withiits plan, to
reveal more about rape alle-
gations made against Bradley
Roberts when he was a PLP
Cabinet minister...

..The brutal murders of Tay-
lor and*McDonald:in their
homes last November have
not yet been solved, even
though police are said to have

..ted these murders,”

strong forensic evidence in
their possession.
Critics claim detectives have

been thwarted by influential .

closet homosexuals who fear
exposure if the culprit is
caught.

It is believed that “every-
one in the influential gay com-
munity, knows who. commit-
the source
-claimed.

what would be revealed if the
matter came to court.”

Man accused of 1996 killing of club manager

has bail on more recent charges reduced

THE man accused of the
1996 shooting death of night-
club manager Joyanne
Cartwright had his bail on
more recent charges reduced
yesterday.

Ashley Newbold, 41, of
Lifebuoy Street, is accused of
attempting to extort money
from Michael Stuart on March

ei 1

He was also accused of
threatening to kill Stuart.
Police allegedly found New-
bold with counterfeit US $370,
a .357 revolver and 20 bullets
for the gun on April 4. New-
bold, who was arraigned on
the charges before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel last month,
pleaded not guilty to the

charges and was granted bail
in a total sum of $25,000.

Yesterday his attorney
Tamara T. Taylor was suc-
cessful.in getting his’ bail
reduced to $15,000 by Acting
Supreme Court Justice Elliot
Lockhart.

- Newbold was charged
with the murder of former 601

_ manager Joyanne Cartwright,

24, in 2001, five years after her
death and convicted two years

- later.

His conviction, however,
was overturned and a retrial
was ordered. Newbold was
freed on bail in 2006 pending

the retrial which has not yet

taken place.

Murder accused faces firearm
and ammo possession charges

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — A 29-year-
old Freeport man on bail in
connection with a murder
charge was brought before the
courts again to face firearm
and ammunition possession

' charges.

Herbert Lewis, a resident of
108 Grenfell Avenue, was
charged before Magistrate
Andrew Forbes with posses-
sion of an unlicensed firearm.
He was also charged with pos-

_ session of six live rounds of

ammunition.
It was alleged that on May
18, Lewis had in his posses-

. sion a..38 special revolver and ~

six .38 bullets without being
the holder of a special licence
from the Licensing Authori-
ty.

Lewis was represented by
lawyer Simeon Brown.

He pleaded not guilty to
both charges.

Magistrate Forbes
adjourned the matter to Octo-
ber 28 and remanded Lewis

to Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox

‘ Hill, until that date. Lewis was
charged with the 2000 murder
of Johannes Laleb, a 49-year-
old man who was employed
as an engine foreman on The
Big Red Boat.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

Looking at
crime and
FNM solutions

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S.; B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department. (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Police are not above the law

THIS WEEK a police officer, who pleaded
not guilty to assaulting an elderly woman, was
escorted to court in handcuffs. He protested
the cuffs.

He complained that by being cuffed he was
being made look like a criminal. He appeared
reluctant to go to court when he realised that
press photographers were waiting to take his
picture.

A member of an elite force, he expected

special treatment.

In-March this year there was a similar inci-
‘dent, but in that case the accused officer did
get special treatment — no cuffs. His police
colleagues rallied around to protect him from
the press.

The public objected as did the press.

In this case the police officer was one of two
men charged with aiding the escape of a pris-
oner from the Elizabeth Estates police station.

This incident brought to a head years of pub-
lic complaints about the: way police officers,
escorting fellow officers facing charges, give
special treatment to their accused colleagues
— treatment that civilian defengauts do oo
get.

Arraigned police officers were ecrendy
taken to court without handcuffs, shielded from
media cameras by the jackets of the officers

__escorting them, and taken through the back
door of the court house, in an effort to bypass
the media.

“Often when divifian defendants are cent aa

taken to court they try to hold their heads down
or away from the cameras. The escorting officers
are heard to say, “Hold your head up! Hold
your head up!”
Immediately acting Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson put his foot down.
In future, he ordered, if a police officer falls
_ afoul of the law, he was to be treated as any-cit-
izen brought before the bar of the court.
He was to be escorted to court in handcuffs
without the moral support of fellow officers.
This should be a lesson for all police officers

— betray your uniform and you will be stripped —

of its protection.

The choice is the officer’s to make.

As far as the Commissioner is Concerned if
one of his officers crosses the line he is on his
own — in cuffs on his way to face the mast
trate.

Apparently the Police Staff Association is
upset by the Commissioner’ s edict. It is too
bad.

Unfortunately, although many fine men and
women make up the ‘Royal Bahamas Police
Force today, it is not the respected force ey it
once was.

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~ Too many of the young officers, brought up in
the troubled, materialistic society of today’s

. Bahamas do not appreciate the strict discipline

that moulded Reginald Ferguson into the man
he is now.

Raised on the unsophisticated island of Ack-
lins, where after school he fished from the rocks
with the boys and played softball, he was a
teenager when he joined the police force.

He came under that strict British discipline
that would not have tolerated any of the liber-
ties that some members of the force take today.
If they betrayed their uniform they were severe-
ly punished.

Mr Ferguson is a disciplinarian and hopefully
he will be able to pull the force back in line to
the point where all of them will not only under-
stand, but obey the rules.

They must accept that if they are accused of
committing a criminal offence, they too will be
paraded in cuffs to the courts. The first thing
that they must learn is that they are not above
the law. If they break the law they should

expect no special consideration from the col-

leagues they have failed.

Several police officers — former assistant
police commissioner Paul Thompson being fore-
most among them — stftuggled long and hard
for the local force to have its own police asso-
ciation.

Mr Thompson admired ‘the strength of the
British associations, both in England and

throughout the Commonwealth.

He saw how much good an association could
do for its members:

Here the local association was instrumental in
obtaining regular working hours, ‘better death
benefits and insurance policies, gmong other
benefits for its members.

However, time would suggest that there is at
least one flaw in the local association.

In the British and: Commonwealth models,
the association is made up of two divisions —
the first division whose members are from con-
stables to inspectors, and the second division
made. up of Assistant Superintendents to the
Commissioner.

The Commissioner is always a member of
the staff association. All ranks work together
with the Commissioner and present a united
front for the good of their members.

However, in the local association, there is
only the first division.

The Commissioner and his assistants are not

- members.

And so the public is given the unfortunate
impression that the force is divided — the asso-
ciation against the Commission. This is not
good. It breaks down public confidence.






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EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHY has 800 police reservists,

working an average of 300 hours ..

a month, not been paid since
December 2007? Another glitz in
the system, I suppose?

Carl Bethel gave that same
lousy, lame excuse for withhold-
ing salary payments and other
benefits, from Mr Stephen
Plakaris, Director of school secu-
rity, for about six:'months and
when he complained, publicly, he
was fired him from his post.

Why has the police association
been ordered to discontinue
allowing police officers to per-
form “off duty” services to those
private businesses that wish to
hire them?

Black crab disease, I suppose?

Tell me, where are the FNM
government’s “trust agenda”
solutions to the many, escalating,
crime problems we are confront-
ed with in this country? Their
answer cannot be to not pay
police officers; take police pres-
ence from the schools; withhold
salary payments of key security
personnel; fire all suspected PLP
supporters from the governmen-
t’s employ and generally, to dis-

' mantle the police force the way

they have; that cannot be all they
can come up with.

I am reliably informed that, ~

about 30 police officers reported
“SICK” last week Wednesday or
Thursday, at central police sta-
tion in Nassau; the problem?

They caught a virus from being
disallowed from performing “off
duty” private security jobs, where
they were being paid, well, for
their services. Any jackass knows
that it makes good common sense
not to dismantle, completely, a
system unless you have an avail-
able, better, replacement.

What they (FNM government)
did, with respect to removing
police officers from providing
security to our schools and their

~ attachment to the Urban Renew-
‘al programme, was criminal in my .

opinion, to say the least.

The government, because of its
lack of wisdom and asinine deci-
sions, has created a minefield of
potential for a “bee-hive” of crim-
inal activity.

Thursday of last week, we wit-
nessed a major altercation
between police officers and some
high school students, from one of
our schools in Nassau. The police
on the scene, had to summon
reinforcements to help get the sit-
uation under control. We can
expect an escalation of these
kinds of incidents, as lawlessness
continues to take centre stage and
spiral out of control.

Tommy Turnquest and Ingra-
ham’s FNM government obvi-

ously have no solutions; else they —

would have employed them by
now.

Say what they like, Urban
Renewal as structured and intro-













LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia, net



duced by Perry Christie’s PLP
government, had the potential of
controlling and reducing the com-
mission of crime, across the
board, by at least 75 per cent; if
allowed to continue to operate
effectively. Coupled with
Christie’s, very effective school
policing programme, I would
have dared to predict that crime,
by now, would have been well on
its way to becoming minimal; but
it wasn’t their (FNM) ideas so

_ they dismantled the programmes,

Can anyone tell us how many
school children have been killed
on school grounds since the FNM

_ removed the police?

How many stabbed? How
many legs broken?

How mapy serious injuries.

from altercations? We probably
will never know, because they
hide the statistics, and what of
the after school programmes for

THE TRIBUNE





neither worthwhile nor prudent
for us to continue, as a nation, to
attempt to fight crime and crimi-
nal activity, after the fact. There
needs to be developed and
emphasis placéd on a new
approach; a new and different
mindset, if you will, where pre-
vention gets prjonitised; as
opposed to cure.

The root cause for crime must
be dealt with if we are to ever
make any inroads and get results
from our very feeble efforts.

We will never solve our crimi-
nal problems, if all we do is try
and catch the perpetrators after
the commission of a crime and if
we happen to be successful in
apprehending the right culprit;
just lock them away in Fox Hill
prison.

That will not aaarees our prob-
lem. While we are in.a fight for
our very survival, they tell me
that your “matter of trust” with its
“trust agenda” FNM government,
is preparing a review of the
salaries of Government Ministers
and members of parliament with
the view to giving themselves an

: OEP. increase;.well that will be the day.
the children, initiated and man- i

aged by Christie’s Urban Renew- FORRESTER

al? The 100 strong Farm Road J CARROLL JP

marching band and others? All Freeport,

dismantled. vis OX, Grand Bahama,
I am of the opinion, that it is May 19, 2008.

Decent people look on PLP
hatchet slingers with disgust

EDITOR, The Tribune

I've seen some nasty things in politics but the PLP's hatchet slingers
(including those on the internet) going after a teenager for an alleged
sexual encounter in a private school beats all.

While pretending to talk about double standards, what they are in
fact doing is trying to expose the identity of the children involved, at
least the identity of the boy, just to bring public embarrassment to his
parents. That's the lowest of the low.

I wonder if these people ever stop to think that they too have chil-
dren or grandchildren and if they don't, certainly people..close.to

them. What goes around! Also they were once young and probably. did:

things they would be ashamed of as adults.

That's why the law protects the identity of minors. Trying to
expose a boy allegedly involved in sexual misbehaviour because of who
his parents are is really nasty.

If the police should look at anything, they should look at that. And
everybody ought to know that you don't have to call names to identi-
fy someone. That's what the police should investigate. They should also
investigate and prosecute the old. gray men who prey on underage girls.

Every one of these ‘hatchet slingers live in the same country I live in
and so they know what's going on in our schools and in our society
where children are swamped with sexual stuff electronically. They
know that minors who misbehave sexually are seldom if ever prose-
cuted.

The parents and the school are in the best position to give the
right punishment without destroying the children. I believe I read in one
of your editorials or a letter that what should happen is that the parents
should show love to. these children and give them the professional
counseling they need.

Why should one boy. be crucified and a girl exposed because of who
the boy's parents are? These hypocrites are the ones guilty of double
standards. And it won't gain them any political points. To the contrary,
decent people, including PLPs, look on with disgust.

I think the newspapers should be careful not to facilitate the scan-
dal-mongers with the misinformation they spew. I was glad to see
that The Tribune corrected a report that there was a video of this
alleged incident. If there was one going the rounds on the internet as
rumoured then it should be easy to produce it.

The truth is that the teacher who was reported to have seen the
alleged incident saw nothing. It turns out she was repeating what
another student told her.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

oe eee
Genocide survivor
to tell her story

@ MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GENOCIDE survivor who
escaped death when more than
one million people were ruth-
lessly slaughtered in Rwanda is
coming to Nassau to share her
story with 1,000 high school stu-
dents.

Immaculée Ilibagiza survived
the 100-day genocide in 1994 by
hiding in a bathroom for three
months while her friends and
family were brutally murdered.

When Ms Ilibagiza emerged
her parents, brothers and friends
were among the mounds of bod-
ies, and yet she found the com-
passion to personally forgive her
enemies.

Ms Ilibagiza, who has docu- .

mented her story in ‘Left to Tell:
Discovering God Amidst The
Rwandan Holocaust’, serves as
an inspiration to thousands of
people around the world.

Bahamian Tina Klonaris-
Robinson was so inspired by her
story she travelled to Rwanda
with Ms IJlibagiza to support her
project educating hundreds of
children who were orphaned in
the genocide, and met a people
who are willing to forgive and
move forward.

With sponsorship from the
John Templeton Foundation and
the support of The Counsellors
Limited, Mrs Klonaris-Robinson
is bringing Ms Ilibagiza to Nassau
to share her story.

Mrs Klonaris-Robinson said:
“So many of us don’t want to
hear a difficult story because it is
too much trauma, but when you
hear her story and experience her

you will be left inspired and feel-

ing that hope.
“Her visit to the Bahamas i is

going to be so important for all of



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PERSONAL FRIEND of Ms Ilibagiza, Tina Klonaris-Robinson speaks to
members of the media yesterday about the survival of llibagiza during the
Rwanda genocide period.

us because there is so much anger
and so much hatred in our school
system, and children are looking
to gangs and’violence as a way
out of their trauma and suffering,
but she shows us another way.

“It is about learning to have
compassion for those that have
wronged you.”

She added: “Perhaps you think
you don’t know how to move for-

. ward in forgiveness and love, but

she did, and I can only say that I
was forever changed, and many
people are changed, by her expe-
rience. You can feel love emanate
from her and you will feel as
though you are in the presence
of a saint.”

Ms Ilibagiza, who was 24 when
she lost her family in the geno-
cide, said: “When this whole thing
happened it did not exclude any-
body and students and. children
can understand that more than
many adults because their minds

are so open. They understand

_ that horrible things can happen.
. to children their age.

“There is a way out of this hor-

rible situation. We can face any

hardship. Just know that this is
not the end of the world, or a rea-
son to hate and retaliate. Just
know that after night there is
always day, there is joy that will
come of every suffering.”

Her charity, The Left to Tell

‘Charitable Foundation, helps chil-

dren in Rwanda and around the
world. Ms Ilibagiza will speak to
around 1,000 grade 10 and 11 stu-
dents from public and private
high schools on Thursday, June
5, and will hold a free lecture
open to all at St Francis Xavier

* Cathedral in West Street Nassau

at 7pm that evening.

Her book is available from
Logos book store and Chapter
One. For more information log
on to www.lefttotell.org.bs

Major movie ‘Duplicity’
being shot in Nassau

oWALKING onto a movie Set-
is usually a bit‘disconcerting'—
people moving everywhere,
wires running in all directions,
_ cameras poking out at all angles
and folks bellowing out instruc-
‘tions across the set.

Not so for the set of Duplici-
ty, the Universal Pictures film in
principal photography at the
Atlantis Resort. Members of
the team say the air on the set is
distinctly tamer and more tem-
pered than on others.

Producers Jennifer Fox and
Kerry Orent shed some light on
this phenomenon.

’ Mr Orent, who’s worked on
such diverse films as Kate and
Leopold, The Pelican Brief and
The Journey of August King,
said: “It’s the nature of the
crew. It starts with Tony, the
director. It’s very low-key, very
professional. It’s the way we
like to work.”

Having 10 years of studio
experience and producing on
films like Syriana and Good
Night and Good Luck, Ms Fox
said:
worked together before. We did
Michael Clayton together, so we
have a short hand and a confi-
dence with one.another. . . it’s
nice.”

Duplicity has a total shoot in
Nassau of about a week, mainly
in the Atlantis Casino, the Roy-
al Towers and at the One and
Only Ocean Club resort.

It’s a film by Academy
Award-winning director and
writer Tony Gilmore, known
for critically-acclaimed films
Michael Clayton, the Bourne
Identity, the Bourne Suprema-
cy and the Bourne Ultimatum,
and older favorites like
Armageddon and Dolores Clai-
borne.

The film’s megastars are Julia
Roberts and Clive Owen.

Roberts plays Claire and Owen ©

plays Ray — both corporate
spies secretly working together
and secretly having a relation-
ship. They follow a compulsive
gambler, a high roller with a
huge secret to the casino, to
entrap him.

The script was originally writ-
ten about five years ago and

“it’s also a crew that has -

“Academy Award-winner ” :
Tony Gilroy directing film





DIRECTOR TONY GILROY shows a local Bahamian croupier how to pre-

pare for her time on-camera.

‘was written by Tony Gilroy

expressly for the Atlantis loca-
tion.

Fortunately for the filmmak-
ers, the Bahamas is not unfa-
miliar with the movie business,
and they say there was a decent
pool of local talent on hand
from which they could select
the best-suited for work on the



film. The Casting Co, a local

talent/ casting agency in Nas-
sau, operated by Heather
Carey, is handling the extras
casting for the film.

Some 400 extras were hired,
as well as one lucky person ina
speaking role.

The film was largely shot in
New York City. From Nassau,
the crew will move to Rome for
some of the film’s final scenes.

The Bahamas Film Commis-
sion and Ministry of Tourism
said they are “more than
pleased with the current pro-
duction”.

According to Film Commis-
sioner Craig Woods, “this is cer-
tainly helping the development
of our film industry. In the last
four years, four major studio
films have shot on Nassau and
Paradise Island — New Line Cin-
ema’s After the Sunset, MGM’s
Into the Blue; Sony Pictures’
Casino Royale; and now Uni-
versal’s Duplicity.”

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







CT? d
like to
grow
old,
spend
all my
money

and die
broke.”



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ON HARTFORD, 1911 2008





@ By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor



NE of the
most colourful
figures of the
modern
Bahamas, Huntington Hart-

ford — who gave Paradise .

Island its name — has died at

. his Lyford Cay home. He was
97.
The A and P grocery chain.

heir, who somehow got
through a fortune of at least
$600 million in a series of
madcap business ventures,
passed away on Monday — just
over four years after he had
returned to his beloved
Bahamas to spend his final

i days.

The legendary ex-playboy,
born into phenomenal wealth,
was a dreamer who had the
cash to make most of his
dreams. come true. Unfortu-
nately, few of them ever did.

When he bought Hog Island
in 1959 from the Swedish
industrialist Axel Wenner-
Gren, he devised grandiose
schemes on classical themes
to entice the super- rich to the
Bahamas.

His first move was to
change the island’s name to
Paradise. Then he set about
importing the now famous
cloisters from Italy as part of a
plan to introduce chariot-rac-

ing to Paradise in his own Col-
isseum.
However, - Hartford’s

dreams for Paradise were
soured by the old UBP gov-

.-ernment. They denied him a
»»gasino licence — and prevented. ~

him building a bridge to Nas-
sau.

It was only after he sold out
to James Crosby of Resorts
International that his dreams
for Paradise came true. And

by then he had left Nassau—a .

visionary whose dazzling ideas
were never allowed to reach
fruition while he was here.

However, there was no bit-
terness when when he was res-
cued from a reclusive life in
New York by his daughter
Juliet in 2004 and brought
back to Lyford Cay to spend
his final days and revisit old
haunts..

He had always said: “T’d like

to grow old, spend all.my.

money and die broke” — an
ambition he very nearly
achieved, though Juliet insists
he was never broke in the true

sense, not with $11 million.

stashed away in a trust fund.

-Lothario

I: March, 2004, I met
him at the Ocean Club,
one of his own fantastic cre-
ations, and — though some-
what vague by then — he man-
aged to express his joy at
being back on his old stamp-
ing ground, where he once
hosted Sir Winston Churchill,
Earl Mountbatten, The Beat-
les and President Richard
Nixon, among many others,
and lived life in grand style.

“They were the best days of
my life,” the by then frail
Hunt — as his friends all knew
him — told me on the sun-
splashed club terrace he had
regretfully left behind 40 years
before.

He said the Bahamas, his
home when he was in his
prime as the suave lothario
and friend of the stars, was
where he wanted to spend the
rest of his life. He had grown

\ tired of New York, where he

lived as a recluse in a Man-
hattan brownstone, and want-
ed to escape the cold to enjoy
once more the kinder climate
of Nassau.

Juliet, a model and artist,
said at the time that he always

i ee
UU ty

Mey hy
PHONE: 322-2157





Boyish good
looks faded with
his fortune

ORN in New York on April 18, 1911, George Hust
’ ington Hartford II was named for his grandfather, who
] efabiehed the Great Atlantic and ee Tea Co., which later
became the supefmarket giant A and P.
- Hartford came into 10 per cent of the c company at the ape of 11
after the death of his father, Edward, who had made his own for-
tune as an inventor and ‘manufacturer of automobile compo-
nents. When his mother, Henrietta, GA in 1948, she left him $4
_ million and her jewellery. a
Like his father, Hartford had n no role in running the super-
market empire. He served one brief stint as a clerk after gradu-
ating from Harvard in 1934, but that ended when two uncles
_ fired him for skipping work to attend a Harvard-Yale game.
___ His only other dabble in day-to-day work was six months as a
Ee reporter for the experimental newspaper PM in 1940. He got the _
_ job, which paid $120 a month, after investing $100,000 in the ven- _
ture. By then an eight-year marriage to Mary Lee Epling had end-~
ed. They divorced i in 1939 and she: promptly pee actor Dou-
| glas Fairbanks Jr. oe
__ The couple had produce children but, accor ing to hi
_ biography, he fathered a son: in 1938 with chorus girl Mary B I
_. ton. His second wife was Marjorie Steele, an actress and artist
_ married in 1949. She had a major role in Face to Face, his one try
at film production, in 1951. It got respectable reviews but lost _
_ money. They had a son, John, and daughter, Catherine, before
parting in 1961.
_ Hartford’s next wife was ‘Diane Brown, a model and the first
" picture-spread subject in Show magazine. Their marriage lasted _
Le fom 1962 to 1970 and produced daughter Juliet. ae
Hartford's boyish good looks faded with his fortune. He mat-
ned wife number four, hairdresser Elaine Kay, in 1974, when he _
was 63 and she was in her 20s. They were divorced in ae but .
continued living under the same roof for years. _ oo
Some of Hartford's domestic disarray became public in 1981 -
_ when his neighbors ousted him from a 21-room Manhattan apart-





ment, saying undesirables streamed through his doors at all hi

_. hours. In 1986, Diane, wife number three, and their daughter. wen
« to court in an. unsuccessful effort to have a conservator named. fo:
Hartford, arguing that he was too befogged by drugs and mal-
nutrition to tend to his affairs.
By then, Hartford’s world had shrunk to a rumpled third-.
floor bedroom of his home. Gone were the 100-foot oceangoing
yacht, the spreads i in Palm Beach, the Riviera and Hollywood, and



the town house in London’s Mayfair.

retained fond memories of the

Bahamas, and especially Par- .

adise Island, during the four
decades he had been away.

“He has always ‘spoken

fondly of it,” she said, “It has
always meant a lot to him.”
Juliet and Hartford’s niece,
Sibilla O’Donnell Clark,
drove him in an open-topped
car to The Cloisters, where he
was able to see his own classi-
cal creation atop the terraced
gardens laid out by Wenner-
Gren during the early post-
war years. Then he was tak-
en to the Royal Towers - a
sight which left him slightly
aghast. Massive resort hotels
were never part of his plans
for Paradise - and the hotel,
with its fairy-castle cupolas
and bronze swordfish, was far
removed from his own vision
of a tasteful retreat with build-
ings no higher than surround-
ing Casuarina trees.
Hartford’s escapades as the
free-spending gossip column

legend who courted some of .

the world’s most fabled beau-
ties added much colour to an
already colourful era.

Like Howard Hughes, he
was a superyrich lover of life -
and women - who finally
retreated into the shadows.

“My father is still a vision-

ary,” Juliet told me during his
tour of Paradise in 2004, “He

still had wonderful ideas,

including a tennis game he
devised which he would like
to see in use worldwide.

Eccentric

“He is a gentle, kindly, com-
passionate man. I don’t think
he has many regrets. He has
lived a good life.”

Following his death on

.Monday, Juliet told Associat-

ed Press: “He wanted to be
thought of like a philosopher
or a thinker.” She described
him as a handsome, charming,
if slightly eccentric man.
Hartford’s record as a busi-
nessman was notable for its
failures. Paradise Island was
one of his most costly ven-
tures, lopping about $100 mil-
lion off his fortune. He spent



$30 million developing the
island, then lost millions more
when he was forced to sell.

He also Jost money on artis-
tic ventures in New York and ©
California, but when his for-
tune dwindled to about $30
million in 1973, he told The
Wall Street Journal: “You
can’t judge everything by its
dollar value.”

QO): loss-makers ©
were a handwriting

‘institute, a modelling agency

and a Broadway production
of Jane Eyre which Hartford ©
wrote and produced himself.
He kept a valuable art collec-
tion in a museum named after
him in 1964 but it closed years
later with a $7.4 million loss.
Little Hartford did went right
- but he had a heck of a time
doing it. In an INSIGHT fea-
ture four years ago, I recalled
his friendship with the Holly-
wood star Errol Flynn and
their hedonistic adventures
together.

I also reflected on how the
smoothie of the 1960s had by
then become deaf, chairbound
and physically fragile and
barely able to take in the
transformation of the island

» he raised from obscurity to

worldwide renown.

From a closely protected
offshore enclave, Paradise
Island became a rich source
of society gossip under Hart-
ford’s watch. But it cost him
dearly - a fact made all the
more poignant when Resorts
International later sold it’on
for $250 million. “I made a lot
of people millionaires,” Hunt
said grimly.

However, the man who
always saw himself as a force
for good was never fazed by
his reverses. When Newsweek
reported he had lost $9 mil-
lion in a year, he told worried
friends: “You don’t have to
worry about me. Nine million
dollars? At that rate, I’ll be
broke in 100 years.”

This week, time ran out on
the most colourful playboy of
his time. Whatever the cost,
he did things his way. That’s
probably the epitaph he would
have enjoyed most of all.



THE TRIBUNE



WEUINESUAY, MAY 21, ZUU8, PAGE /

LOCAL NEWS

Volunteers hold first

Neighbourhood Crime

Watch Workshop”

ae egeeeeeeees, Puen enseeaccescceceneeeaseeeces

Residents reclaiming
their communities

CRIME PREVENT

SEARCHING for a sense
of security and familiarity
within their communities, res-
idents of Royal Bahamas
Police Force Southeastern

Division Crime Watch Asso-~

ciations under the theme,
“Building stronger neigh-
bourhoods - Police & Com-
munity United”, hosted its
first ''Neighbourhood Crime
Watch Workshop” on Satur-
day, May 17.

The workshop was held at
Holy Cross Anglican Church
Activity Centte off Soldier
Road from 9am to 3pm .-

This workshop, designed to
give community volunteers
and crime watch members
additional strategies and prac-
tical solutions to enhance their
crime prevention efforts, was
attended by about 50 persons
representing residents and
police officers from the South-
eastern Division and several
other policing divisions

throughout New Providence.

Many of them were members
of their local homeowners
associations and crime watch
groups seeking tips on how to
start a new neighbourhood
watch and maintaining a suc-
cessful Neighbourhood Crime
Watch group.

The workshop, facilitated
by experts, covered topics
such as how to establish and
sustain a viable crime watch
group and how to secure and
sustain financial support with-
in the neighbourhood crime
watch groups.

In addition to these produc-
tive sessions those attending
had an opportunity to net-
work and participate in‘a dis-
cussion period. During the dis-
cussions the participants sug-
gested the following as solu-
tions to the nation's crime
problem:

e The bail act should be
athended;

¢ Government should intro-
duce a law making it manda-
tory for persons on bail to
wear ankle bracelets;

e Crime watch should
become a nationally recog-
nized programme with a view
to getting all communities
involved in the fight against
crime;

¢ More after school pro-
grammes for young people
should be developed.

Presenter Mr. Gordon Pin-
der from the Blair Estates
Crime Watch Group told par-



“These residents
can make a
significant
difference just by
working together
and educating
themselves...”



Gordon Pinder

ticipants that the creation of
Neigbourhood Crime Watch
groups is a great opportunity
for residents to get more
involved in the safety of their
community. “These residents
can make a significant differ-
ence just by working together
and educating themselves
about their own personal safe-
ty and about the safety of
those around them,” he said.

The Blair Estates crime
watch association has been in





existence for over 30 years.
Another presenter, Acting
Assistant Commissioner
Hulan Hanna, led the partici-
pants through a step by step
process of establishing and
sustaining crime watch groups.

In a very candid way Mr Han-.

na told participants that the
police cannot prevent or solve
crime alone; the police and
the community must work in
partnership to maintain safe
and confident communities.
Also attending the work-
shop were Mr. Branville
McCartney, junior Minister of
State for Tourism, Mr. Phen-
ton Neymour, junior Minister
of State for Utilities, and Act-

ing Assistant Commissioner:
. Mr Shannondor Evans.

Overall participants agreed
that the workshop was very

productive as they were

exposed to new information
and were provided with useful
tools to help build stronger
programmes for healthier and
safer communities.

Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island

Invites applications for the positions of:



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FOOD & BEVERAGE |







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as the Director of a Five Star Restaurant must
have excellent teaching, written and oral
communication organizational and interpersonal
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able to establish and maintain high standards.
Formal qualifications and computer skills
desirable, be able to work flexible and long hours.

Fax or email résumés with proof of qualifications

and experience to:

cmajor@grp.sandals.com
Fax 327-6961

Closing date May 30, 2008.



Halsbury Chambers
announces Exuma’s
first free legal clinic

Halsbury Chambers has announced that it will host Exuma’s
first-ever free legal clinic May 31. p

Called “Information You Need for the Life You Want,” the
clinic will feature expert speakers from Nassau and Exuma as
well as allow the public to meet one-on-one with attorneys for
limited sessions without charge.

“Speakers will address timely topics ranging from Exuma
business opportunities and clearing title on generation land to
immigration and real estate in Great Exuma and the Exuma
cays,” said the law firm in a statement.

The clinic will be held at St Andrew’s Anglican Parish
Community Centre, George Town, from 9.30am to 1.30pm
with registration starting at 8.30am.

“This will be our fourth free legal clinic, but our first in Exu-
ma and we are very excited about hosting this forum on the
island,” said Halsbury Chambers partner Nerissa A Greene.
“Exuma’s dramatic growth, which has brought prosperity and
allowed many Bahamians to return home or move to the
island, has also raised new issues from increases in property
value to immigration matters. We want to provide a forum that
allows participants to discuss those matters openly with busi-
nesspersons, officials and attorneys.”

At the same time, Ms Greene noted, growth has also boost-
ed opportunities.

“Exumians want to know where the best opportunities are,
how to get a new business idea financed, are there any bargains
left in property, how to expedite work permit applications,
what’s more appropriate — a will or a trust and whether there
is a way to quiet the title on generation land,” she said.

Discussion will be led by a featured speaker with two pan-
ellists available for extensive question and answer sessions.

Attorney Troy Kellman, who heads the Halsbury Chambers
Exuma office, said Bahamas Chamber of Commerce executive
director Philip Simon will present ‘Entrepreneurship: What It
Takes to Start. and Succeed in Business.’

Wentworth Musgrove of British American will discuss busi-
ness financing.

Successful Exumian businesspersons will also participate,
including media giant Dwight Hart and Amie Bowe of Mail
Boxes Etc. A major Bahamian contractor who has completed
projects in Exuma, Peter Whitehead of Osprey Development
and Gunite Pools, ‘will lead the session on succeeding in busi-
ness in a Family Island.

The session on real estate, including current market trends
and where the buys are in Exuma, will be led by real estate vet-
eran Judy Hurlock, president of Dillycrab Realty.

Participants will be able to select a property at the clinic,
talk with an attorney and apply for a loan or mortgage at the
same time.

“Tf the response from our last legal clinic in Nassau when
more than 300 persons overflowed the meeting space is any
indication of what to expect in Exuma, we urge everyone .
who is interested in attending to book their seat in advance. It
is free of charge but seating will be limited to 175 people.
Appointments with attorneys will be made during registra-

tion,” said Mr Kellman. Halsbury Chambers launched its free

legal clinics in 2005 as a community service. The firm said it
hoped the clinics would lessen the perceived barrier between
the legal profession and the general public:





r



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Sa

RT. REV. WILLIAM
GRANT, 79

of Prince Charles Drive and formerly
of Fox Town, Abaco will be held on
Thursday at 11:00 a.m. at Church of
God Auditorium, Joe Farrington
Road. Officiating will be Rt. Rev.
Carlos Moody-Pres. Home Foreign
Mission C.O.G.I.C., Rt. Rev. T.L.
Hanna-Prelate Bahamas Jur., Rt. Rev.
. Matthew William-Adjutant General
C.O.G.1LC., and Rt. Rey. Marton
4 Luther Johnson-Prelate New Jersey
| Jur. Interment in The Eastern
Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street.






















He is survived by his wife, Mother Cynthia Grant; children, Rev. Ishmael
| William Grant, Sandra Grant-Rolle, W/RC 391 Cynthia Grant Cooper of
the Royal Bahamas Police Reserves, and Sgt. Marlon Grant of the Royal
| Bahamas Police Force; two sons-in-law, Richard Rolle, and Elder Lyvade
Cooper Sr.; two daughters-in-law, Evangelist Missionary Avalyn Grant,
First Lady of Pentecostal Temple COGIC and Natishka Grant; twelve
grandchildren, Marlon Jr., Marlisha, Marissa, Alpheus, Colette, Rhonald
and Shanece Grant, Shawayne and Laveme Rolle, Ryan and Chandra Rolle,
Devard and Shereka Bain, Alexis, Ebony Bain and Lyvade Cooper Jr.; six
great grandchildren, Shawayne Jr., Charlotte and Shandrea Rolle, Akeil,
Asia and Dekimo Bain; one brother, Alexander Grant of Providenciales,
Turks and Caicos Islands; three sisters, Pearlene Lightbourne of Atlanta
Georgia, Dorothy Thomas of New York and Mazie Moss; two sisters-in-
law, Vionelle Grant and Maria Forbes; three brothers-in-law, Hawton
Forbes, Albert Forbes and Hilton Moss; thirty-four nieces and nephews
including, Brucelee, Catherine and Deloria Grant and Maureen and Matthew
Williams, Joseph and Ann, Dencil and Cynthia, Samuel and Mizpah and
Gwendolyn Forbes, Rev. Franklyn, Rev. Samuel, Freddie, Robert, David,
Joseph and Joylene Lightbourne, Minister Nelrose Frazier, Jennie Scott of
New York, Mary and Michelle Lightbourne of Atlanta, Georgia and Daniel
Lightbourne of Miami, Florida, Ruthmae, William, Joseph and Evelyn
Rubins all of New York, Vernell Lisa Thompson, Vincent Parker, Sharon,
Kacy, Nathaniel and Nakia Moss, Ella Pratt, Charlotte Thurston, James,
Ruben, Margaret, Solomon and Patricia Forbes, Bishop Tony Leroy Hanna-
COGIC Jurisdictional Prelate for the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and
First Lady A. Nancy Hanna and family, the Williams and Thomas family
of Turks and Caicos Islands, Joseph, George and Livingston, Dennis, Isula,
Ashton, and Rodlin Henfield and family, Bishop Enoch Henfield and family
of Ft. Laudersale, Florida, Mary Wells and family, Velma Brennen and
family, Gwendolyn Smith and family, Telon Henfield and family, Glorene
Seymour and family, Rev. Leyvon and Joyce Miller and family, Shirley ,
Small and family, Kathy Smith and family, Wenzil Culmer, Lorene and
Charles Clarke and family, Sir Gareth and Lady Rowena Finlayson and
family, Alpheus, Dawn, Roosevelt, Iris, Spence and Anika Finlayson,
Margie Stuart and family, Deselene Cumberbath, Victor and Lolamae Rolle
and family, Lee Rolle and family, Maxine Cox and family, Willamae
Williams and family, Rev. Andrew Rolle and family, Annie, Hessiemae
and family, Jenniemae Rolle and family, Mother Gloria Dawkins and Greater
Bethel family, Supervisor Mother Johnnie Dawson Harrison and family,
the sixteen fellowship churches in The Bahamas including the Presiding
Bishop Charles E. Blake and the entire COGIC family worldwide, volunteer
. nurses, Beneby, Johnson, Wright, and live'in caregiver, Yvonne Orr, Bishop
William Johnson and family, Bishop Ross Davis and family, Bishop Samuel
Green and family, Bishop Ervin Hart and family, the Coleby’s family, the
Cooper’s family, the Rolle family and the Ferguson family and Evangelist
Sylvia Kemp McKenzie and family. and other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention.














































The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Raod and
Fifth Street’on Wednesday’ from’ 10:00 A.M. until 5:00 P’M. and at the
church on Thursday from 10:00 A.M. unti}; service time.









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BEC workers
make grisly
discovery

FROM page one “)

Pathologists will also examine the body to determine if there is
any identifiable trauma, which may indicate if the person was mur-
dered.

Police blocked off East Bay from in front of Waterloo Night Club
and diverted traffic through the road just in front of Montagu
Beach.

Despite this obvious detour, over-zealous police and prison offi-
cers escorting three bus loads of prisoners back to Her Majesty’s
Prison from the courts, sped through the road block with sirens blaz-
ing.

They were forced, however, to come to a screeching halt just in
front of the trench where the body was discovered, which led to a
comical scene as the officers had to figure out how to reverse
three large buses and a convoy of patrol cars backward, as passers-
by, the media and their fellow officers at the murder scene watched

_ the awkward scene. -

Prison officers with machine guns had to get out of some of the
buses to stand guard as colleagues driving the buses spun around in
some confusion until they finally reversed back through the detour
and took the path around the beach as other drivers had to do.

Mr Bethell said that it was “very unusual” to find a body under

a sidewalk and police will obviously have td question those who did.

the structure.

Sex scandal teacher given
new job away from children

tion Lionel Sands to'ZNS TV a
FROM page one week after the scandal made

newspaper headlines.



The Long Islanders’ Association
Annual Raffle Winners List - May 3rd, 2008




Winner’s Name
| Craig Armbrister

eur Lionel & Durell ;

Max

Barry Johnson,

Ali & Sheila Butler

Missy

| Miranda Russell

| notes ae

Holly Knowles

Adeiell Fox | i

Jerome Knowles

T. Pratt

of being involved with the male

student. He was stripped of his .

position at the school, and both
he and the teacher were sent
for “counselling”, ministry offi-
cials confirmed at the time.
The file on the issue was sent
to the Attorney General’s
Office for review, as it is an
offence in the Bahamas for an
adult to have sexual relations
with a minor under their

authority, according to The Sex="

ual Offences and Domestic Vio-
lence Act. This was confirmed
by, Acting Director. of Educa-










povenceeeeennnnneencenereynenvenernsnerenenanesenannnananannnannnanananaed

The opposition PLP intends
to raise another school sex inci-
dent in the House of Assembly
this morning. This regards the
private school sex scandal
involving the son of an FNM
parliamentarian.

According to a high ranking
opposition source who did not
wish to be named, the PLP will
take particular issue with the

perceived “cover-up”.atthe,.
school, involving a group.of offi-;;

cials close to the governing par-
tysd 3 rod

PLP sources The Tribune
spoke to yesterday could not
confirm if the opposition will
also raise for debate the gov-
ernment’s handling of the issue

- with this teacher as it too

involves prominent people close
to the FNM.

Johnley Ferguson, FNM
chairman, would only say yes-
terday that he would be, “very
disappointed” if the PLP
brought the issue of the parlia-
mentarian’s son to the floor of
the House. Mr Ferguson said
that he would reserve further

comment on the issue, pending -

the: decision by the PLP today
on this issue. ,

The Tribune was unable to.

reach the leader of Government

Business in the House, Tommy °
- Turnquest, yesterday, as he was

in cabinet.

YOUR! CONNECTIO



G. Thomas

Cop shooting
suspects to
appear in|
court today

FROM page one

senior officers of the RBPF stressed that a "thorough" investigation
netted the right suspects.

"The Bahamian public is assured that after thorough and com-
prehensive investigations we are satisfied that we have the (right
suspects).

"This just happened to be one of those incidents where, because
everything was happening at the right time, the right sequence
and the right places we were able to (solve the case). So I want to
salute the Bahamian public for the assistance given and I want .to
commend the Bahamian police officers on the wonderful job they
did in (solving) this matter as quickly as they did," said Acting Assis-
tant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna flanked by the acting
assistant commissioner, Chief Superintendent of Police Glenn
Miller, ASP Walter Evans, Acting ACP Raymond Gibson, other
senior officers and spokesmen from New Jersey. '

He refrained from releasing the particulars surrounding the

.arrests for fear of prejudicing the case.
_.. "The incident was nothing more than an isolated random act of
violence and that's the way the people in New Jersey see it and

that's the way the police in New Jersey see it. Crime can happen
anywhere," President of the New Jersey State Police Benevolent
Association Anthony Wieners said.
He expressed gratitude to the RBPF and the Bahamian people
for how the investigation was conducted.
Mr Casper and three female friends were walking on West Bay
Street when they were accosted by two gunmen last Wednesday

| -who demanded cash. During the exchange the 23-year law enforce-

ment veteran and father of three was shot once in the chest.

Police said an officer responded to the scene and commandeered
a private vehicle to take the victim to hospital. The two suspects
reportedly fled the scene in a white vehicle. Rs,

The incident sparked fears that the nation's tourism industry
would be affected by the international attention it attracted while
the public called for increased police patrols.

Acting Commissioner McCoy said police will step up patrols in
areas frequented by tourists. "Yes we have (sought) to increase
patrols in that area, not as a result of this incident but because of the
visitors who frequent that area. (We) would always want to have a
visible presence in that area to make sure that the visitors to our
shores are protected at all times and feel safe," he said.

According to policé, Mr Casper was transferred to a New Jersey
area hospital Monday and is "doing very well." ;

Cricket match takes ‘violent’ turn
FROM page one ao il oat dh
Reports indicate the weekend match took a "violent" turn after

a few players physically "attacked" members and fans of a rival

team. The brawl was reportedly broken up by game officials but not

before one cricket player and a fan were injured.

Officers from the Southern Police Station reportedly visited the
scene and referred the injured persons to the nearby police station
to make a statement. Attempts were made to secure a comment
from the station but were unsuccessful up to press time.

After the fight a few players reportedly threw rocks at the fans

and officials in the seating area. No one was injured, it was
claimed yesterday.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods. _
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area

or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story. —



QO THE WORLD

TENDER



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to provide for the printing and delivery of the 2009 and
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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 9





THE FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY ILLUSION

Agriculture is a difficult and costly enterprise
few Bahamians are interested in pursuing

ATELY, there's

been a rash of calls

for Bahamians to

turn to large-scale
farming to address skyrocket-
ing fuel and food prices.

A developer named Tony
Joudi made several attempts to
get the government to back his
cock-eyed scheme to grow.corn
on hundreds of thousands of
acres throughout the country.

He was asking us to clear our
remaining forests so we could
make ethanol to run our expen-
sive sport utility vehicles on our
over-congested roads.

More recently, strange nois-
es have been made about grow-
ing rice in our brackish man-
grove wetlands by none other
than the Minister. of Agricul-
ture himself (who should know
better).

And according to Edison
Key, a one-time citrus farmer
from Abaco who is now chair-
man of the. Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation, "we are
trying to fast forward the agri-
cultural sector — we just need
to get serious."

Thankfully, we have yet to
hear calls for Bahamian pothole
farmers to plant wheat fields to
help lower the price of import-
ed flour.

Food self-sufficiency for the
Bahamas is an illusion. The fact
is that ever since the failure of
the loyalist plantations, large-
scale agriculture has never
worked here, despite exceptions
like the brief export trade in
pineapples and sisal during the
19th century.

Bahamian conditions are ,

simply not conducive to com-
mercial agriculture. Pineapple
fields for example, had to
remain fallow for 15 to 20 years
after producing only four or five

crops, and the industry was nev- .

er large enough to justify a reg-
ular steamship run (as the
banana trade did in the West
Indies and Central America).

Pineapple farmers faced the
same problems of soil exhaus-
tion and pests that the loyalists
had faced before them. And
competition from more efficient
producers in America, Cuba
and the Philippines put an end
to both the pineapple and sisal
industries by the early 20th cen-
tury.

Even subsistence agriculture
is a problem for the Bahamas.
Historians Michael Craton and
Gail Saunders note that the pre-
dominant out island economy
from emancipation to the 20th

‘century was a shifting form of
peasant farming. "The practices
of rotational slash and burn

agriculture and the overcrop-
ping of the meagre surface veg- ~

etation by livestock hastened
the process whereby the land
became insufficient even for a
steady population."

Bahamians were’ "rooted to a
soil that gave heartbreakingly

meagre returns for the most-



Aucerding to former prime min-
ister Sir Lynden Pindling, it was
to become "the greatest success
story in Bahamian agricultural
history", but it closed in disarray
nine years later and was never
resuscitated.

- In 1973, on 2000 acres of vir-
gin land on Andros, an even

bigger project was launched

with even greater fanfare, her-
alded as "the capstone of

Bahamian agricultural self-sut-

ficiency".
The Bahamas ‘apricultural
Research Centre was funded by

a $10 million Independence gift.

from the United States to devel-
op commercial agriculture
based on family farming. Two
American universities provid-
ed technical support and the
best and brightest young
Bahamian technocrats were
enlisted to help run the project
— including Earl Deveaux, the
present minister of works.

. Research
BARC had a herd of 300

' Santa Gertrudis cattle from

Texas and a flock of 600 sheep
used to improve the country's
breeding stock. The project
included a 500-acre research
farm, 16 model farms of up to
80 acres each, credit facilities,

marketing support and training '

programmes. Among the crops
researched were soybeans, corn
and sorghum as well as citrus,
avocadoes and mangoes.

' The farmers planted citrus,
plantains, winter vegetables and
feed crops for sheep, goats, and
hogs. Initially, BARC provid-
ed all the inputs and guaran-
teed incomes. Farmers were

then given a long-term land >

lease and credit facilities with
loeal banks. A co-operative was
formed to acquire machinery
and produce was marketed
through the government pack-
ing house. A training facility
with a modern hibrary, was also
included. «

But by the late 1980s - after
the Americans left - the project
had dwindled to nothing. Hors-
es and livestock were left to
starve and-expensive equipment
discarded to rust. The machine
shop, training centre and other
central facilities were aban-
doned. Government officials,
including then agriculture min-
ister Perry Christie, tried to cov-
er up the failure:

As a Tribune editorial said at
the time: "The government

.talks constantly of diversifica-

tion; of developing agriculture
to the point where Bahamians
can feed themselves. But really







they are not serious. look at the
rotting fish landing complex on
Potters Cay, Hatchet Bay and
the Andros farms and realise

' that they are taking you, the

public, for fools."

Aside from our small labour
force and the general disinterest
most Bahamians have today in
making a living from the soil,
agriculture is a complex busi-
ness that requires a great deal of
infrastructure to distribute the
crops and livestock that are pro-
duced. And the biggest draw-
backs in the Bahamas have

always been transportation and

marketing.
Food processing requires

consistent production of high.

volumes of quality produce. The
same is true for hotels and oth-
er large consumers of produce.
According to geographer Neil
Sealey, in his text book, The
Bahamas Today, our fas*:re to
develop a modern agricultural
sector is due to a number of fac-
tors, including the reality that
the Bahamas is a nation of mer-
chants with a history of living
on imported staples.

Other reasons are competi-
tion from: the United States,
which produces huge farm sur-
pluses at low cost only 50 miles
from the nearest Bahamian
island, and the limitations of
our natural environment.

Bahamian soils are poor, thin
and patchy — making them
suitable only for traditional
shifting cultivation in their nat-
ural state, experts say. Mecha-
nised agriculture is restricted by
frequent outcrops of bare rock.
Water resources are also scarce,
and crops require heavy irriga-

tion. To pursue commercial!

farming the ground must be
specially prepared at great cost
and large amounts of fertiliser
must be used.

In short, agriculture is a dif-
ficult and costly enterprise that
few Bahamians are interested
in pursuing.

But some commentators
have suggested that the real rea-
son we don't feed ourselves is
because of a racist business con-
spiracy against poor black
Bahamians.

Last month Tribune colum-
nist Adrian Gibson said succes-
sive governments had "slight-

ed" Bahamian agriculture (com-





pletely overlooking the potted

history. presented above). He’

included suggestions that the
"merchant elite” had orches-
trated this in order to maintain
its economic control.

And now we are talking
about rice paddies in the creeks
of Andros. When will it end?

Obama vs
eee

Keerlia

W ell, we are living in
history-making

times.
The American presidential

election is very likely to be con-
tested by an inexperienced 46-
year-old bi-racial lawyer with
an arabic name and a hardbitten
72-year-old Scots-Irish ex-POW
with a penchant for Sere
change.

Frankly, it's the most inter-
esting presidential race in mem-
ory.

Unlike other African-Amer-
icans who have run for presi-
dent, like AJ Sharpton and Jesse
Jackson, Barak Obama's cam-
paign is real Father than sym-

bolic.

- Anticipation
And most Bahamians. seem
to be waiting with bated breath

in trembling anticipation of a
black man in the White House.

As columnist George Will -

said "(Obama) has chosen his
racial identity, but chosen not to
make it matter much."

And in many ways his suc-
cess at (almost) gaining the
Democratic nomination refutes
the theory of social determin-
ism popular with many black
leaders in the US.

McCain is a third generation
naval officer who was held pris-
oner by the Vietnamese com-

munists for over five years after -.

bombing the hell out of them.
He was first elected to Congress
in 1982 and later returned to
Vietnam as part of the normal-
isation process carried out by
the Clinton administration.

According to one compari-
son of the two men by the New
York Times, "Obama wrote
‘very bad poetry’ in college.
McCain once contemplated
joining the French Foreign
Legion.

Obama is the former rebel,
who used to hang out with
friends who wore leather jackets
and stayed up late discussing
'‘neocolonialism, Franz Fanon,
Eurocentrism and patriarchy.’
McCain is the hell-raiser who
hides an introspective bent
behind his pose as a cocky fly-
boy."

But the most interesting
aspect of this campaign is the
message it sends about the evo-
lution of racial politics in Amer-
ica.

According to Obama, "it is a
profoundly distorted view that
white racism is endemic...but
race is an issue we cannot afford
to ignoré. We need to work
through the complexities of
race. "We don't have to recite
the past injustices, but we have
to recognise that the past has
made the present.

"Blacks must not become
victims‘of the past and must
take full responsibility for their
own lives.

“America can change — that
is the true genius of the nation.
In no other country on Earth

- would my story be possible."

"And despite all temptations
to view my candidacy through
purely racial lines, we won com-
manding victories among white
Americans."

What do you think? Send

comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net

Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com
pundit.com/>



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backbreaking toil...There was

nothing romantic about out

island subsistence farming in

the late 19th century. At best it

was a triumph of necessity

against the most unfavourable

conditions — poor soil, harsh

climate, natural disasters, ani- _
mal pests." ,

Before the Second: World
War, about a third of all
Bahamians were considered
farmers — a figure which fell
to about 10 per cent by the
1950s. In 2005 there were only
about 1200 people classified as
farmers in the entire country.
And it is clear that without
_ Haitian labour ‘there would be
virtually no agriculture today.

Nevertheless, there have
been ringing calls for a diversi-
fication of the Bahamian econ-
omy away from tourism and
finance for as long as I can
remember. As an Official
speechwriter at the Bahamas
News Bureau in the 1970s, I
wrote about linkages between
agriculture and tourism so often .
it became boilerplate — some-
thing to be inserted at the -
appropriate point in every text.

The Pindling regime was big
on talk about self-sufficiency
and developing farming on the
_ out islands. And in fact, there
were two major agricultural
developments initiated by the
government during the Inde-
pendence period, when nation-
alist fires were stoked to their
highest point.. }

In 1936 an American
investor named Austin Levy
had set up a dairy and poultry
farm on thousands of acres at
Hatchet Bay on Eleuthera, sup-
plying milk, eggs and ice cream
to the Nassau market for
decades. His plantation provid-
ed much of the infrastructure
‘and prosperity for nearby Alice

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008



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THE TRIBUNE

of

NMovie Gift Certificates

make great gifts!)

~ Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek jut

some smiles on your

kkids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of May 2008.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

ff)

i'm lovin’ it























THE TRIBUNE

Nyy S
OQQQQ11egn




PAGE 11




WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

Choo Choo’ Mackey

is ‘reatly to ru

@ By BRENT STUBBS
- . Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ith just a few

days left before

the much antici-

pated. British

Commonwealth
super middleweight title bout is
held, Bahamian champion Jermaine
‘Choo Choo’ Mackey said he’s
ready to rumble.

“T’ve been waiting on this oppor-
tunity to come to fruition, I just
want to thank God for making it
happen,” Mackey stressed. “I just
can’t wait for it to come to fruition.”

Having had to endure three dif-.

ferent changes in dates and two
opponents who couldn’t make it to
town, Mackey is now awaiting the
arrival of African’ Michael Gben-
ga, who is due here today.
On Saturday, the two will tangle
-in the 12-round main event at
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. The
fight is being staged by First Class
Promotions.
The show will honour Mackey’s
- trainer Ray Minus Jr., the last

Bahamian to hold a British Com- ©

monwealth title back in 1986, some
21 years ago. J

For Mackey, it seemed as if it had
taken 21 years for the many changes
he encountered waiting for Satur-
day to finally materalise.

_“T never gave up. I knew that
eventually the fight would come
off,” Mackey stressed. “So I tried to
stay in the gym training and waiting
for this opportunity to come.”

Unlike when he fought and won
the unified WBA and WBC
Caribbean titles last year over
Trinidad and Tobago’s Kirk ‘The
Technician’ Sinnette, Mackey said

-he had to take his training regimen
to a totally different level.

“This is for the British Common-
wealth title. It’s a big fight,” Mack-
ey pointed out. “So I had to step
up my training. It’s been hard, but
I’ve been able to get-through it.”

Mackey thanked God for giving



~ ey said he will have a simple mes-

‘fit to step into the ring.

Palm Grove basketball
tourney on weekend

'

him the opportunity and he said he
will make the best of it.

“T really want this title,” he
charged. “There’s nothing like
being the Commonwealth champi-
on. I worked hard and I waited a
long time for this.”

Coming off two straight defeats at
the end of last year, Mackey will
be making his first appearance in
the ring for the year. The 28-year-
old 6ft lin southpaw will put his 15-
3 win-loss record with 12 knock-
outs on the line against 29-year-old
5-11 Gbenga, who is 5-3 with five
KOs. ;

Whenever Gbenga arrives, Mack-

sage for him: “Welcome, welcome,
welcome to the Bahamas. 5

“I know we.are a friendly peo-
ple and I guess I have to be hos-
pitable to our visitors,” Mackey
said, “But I want him to know that
when he steps in the ring, it’s only-
going to be me and him. I won’t
have to worry about our hospitality
then.”

Mackey said he doesn’t know
much about Gbenga, who was born
in Lagos, Nigeria, but lives in Accra,
Ghana. He said he’s not concerned
about what his opponent will bring
to the ring either.

“T just want to get into the ring so
that I can do what I have to do,” he
said. “This has been a long time
coming and I’m just excited that
I’m going to finally fight for the
British Commonwealth title.”

A number of fights are scheduled
for the undercard. But promoter
Michelle Minus said the card is sub-
ject to change on fight night.

It all depends on whether a fight-
er makes his weight or is physically

Scheduled to fight in the co-main
event is Meacher ‘Pain’ Major, the
Bahamas’ lightweight champion,
against Luis Bolano. |

One of the fights on the under-
card that everybody is hoping will
come off is the heavyweight show-
down between Jerry ‘Big Daddy’
Butler and James ‘Killer’ Coakley.



THREE Family Island
teams are heading to Har-
bour Isiand to play the Pan-
thers in the Palm Grove
Basketball Tournament this
weekend.

Sean Bastian, who along
with Andrew ‘Tiny’ Johnson
is hosting the event, said
they hope that this will be
the beginning of a series of

‘tournaments that will be
held in the future.

Teams flying into Harbour
Island, just off the north
coast of Eleuthera, to par-
ticipate in the tournament
are the D’s Truckers from
Exuma, the Full Gospel
Crusaders from Abaco and
the Cat Island team.

They will join the Har-
bour Island Panthers in the
four-team pool that will play
in a double elimination for-
mat to determine the even-
tual winner.

“We (Bastian and John-
son) talked’ with a number
of the Family Islands, but
these are the only three who
have agreed to participate
at this time,” Bastian stat-
ed. :

“Hopefully, as we contin-
ue the tournament next
year, more and more islands
will be interested in partici-
pating.”

The tournament is sanc-






























tioned by the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation, who
recently staged their Nation-
al Championships in Math-
ew Town, Inagua.

“We are trying to encour-
age more participation for
basketball on the Family
Islands,” ‘Bastian pro-
claimed.

“And by doing that, we
will get more participation
at the national level.”

Although there are just
four islands participating,
Bastian said they are confi-
dent that the tournament
will be a very competitive
one for fans to enjoy.

“T can’t really say much
about the competition, but
of what we saw from Abaco
and Eleuthera when they
played in the federation’s
nationals, I think they will
be the teams to watch,” he
projected.

Bastian said the tourna-
ment will provide the oppor-
tunity for more Family
Islands to get involved and
host similar tournaments of
their own.

Within the next three
months, Bastian said Aba-

co has agreed to host their -

inter-island tournament. He
said the same teams, along
with Grand Bahama, are
expected to participate.

m By BRENT STUBBS
- Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WILL veteran champion Larry Rolle be
able to hold off another strong challenge from
the young guns to retain his men’s title? Will
we see the emergence of a new female cham-
pion?

Those questions will be answered when the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association hosts the
annual Gatorade National Open Tennis

_ Championships.

Starting on Friday, the championships will
run through Sunday, June 1, with competi-
tion being held in the men’s and women’s sin-
gles and the men’s and women’s doubles as
well'as the mixed doubles.

“We’re starting on Friday because we have
a lot of adults who are working during the
week, so we are trying to get in as many
matches as we can over the weekend,” said
Bradley Bain, the tournament director.

“During the week, most of the matches will
be in the evening because the adults work.
So.if we can get in the majority of the match-
es this weekend, it will make it a lot easier for
us during the week.”

Players have until Thursday at Spm to offi-
cially sign up for the tournament at the NTC.
Once the deadline is reached, Bain said they
will work on the seeding and the schedule.

“We are hoping that a lot of the juniors,
who are playing 16s and 18s and even some
who play 14s, will sign up because this is a
good testing ground for them to get some
match play against the more seasoned and
veteran players,” Bain pointed out.

Bain noted that last year, Larry Rolle had a
difficult time going through the tournament
playing against the younger players, many of
whom are returning home from school.

Marae Te nn Ga ann ceetieec Nm ince



- Annual Gatorade tennis
championships start Friday

This year, a lot of the collegiate players will
be back and they will try to use their strength
to get past the experience that Rolle possess-
es. ;
Three players coming home from school to
try and dethrone Rolle are Ceron Rolle of
Tyler Community College, Jonathan Hanna of
Florida Tech and Jacob Fountain of Tufts
University. Ceron Rolle came close last’ year,
but. Larry Rolle’s experience prevailed in the
end.

On the ladies’ side, Bain said it’s wide open
because he’s not sure exactly who will come
out to participate. He’s hoping that Danielle
Thompson will be back to defend her title.

Others he’s looking to see participate are
Elanqua Griffin, Chelsea Powell and Erin
Strachan.

- But Bain said they are also hoping to intro-
duce three new sisters from pop singer Cory
Hart’s family. They are Bahamians who now

live in Lyford Cay. They live in Canada, but

train in the United States.

“They’re finally home,” Bain disclosed.
“The youngest player is playing 16s. She will
be a handful for the other girls. We don’t have
that many girls, but all of a sudden we have
three talented girls. So it will be interesting to
see.

“One of the good things about their par-
ticipation is that we will get to know them. I
knew of them, but now everybody else will get
to know them, too, as they try to become a
part of the Bahamian mix.” ;

Bain thanked Thompson Trading, distribu-

tors of Gatorade, for again sponsoring the ,

tournament.

“We are looking forward to a continual
relationship where they will continue to spon-
sor Our nationals,” Bain summed up.

“This should be very exciting tournament
this year.”

y



Rolle to



ise eae
Tea AMEN

executive
board

mâ„¢ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR the second consecutive :
year, Wesley Rolle will serve
as president of the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association. But
he will have a virtually new
executive board to work with
this time around.

At the elections held on
Wednesday, April'30, at the
National Tennis Centre, Rolle
was returned for another one-
year term in office.

Voted in to serve with. him
on the executive board are

- Stephen Turnquest, first vice-

president; Neil McTaggert, sec-
ond vice-president; Leah
Major, treasurer; Sharon Coak-
ley, assistant treasurer; Erica
Rolle, secretary, and Paulette
Major, assistant secretary.

The council members elected
to serve are Ricardo Bowe,
Stephen Thompson, Bradley
Bain, Nikkita Fountain and
Kim O’Kelley.

“J think it’s a pretty good
group of persons to work
with,” said Rolle, of his execu-
tive board. “JI think each of
them has something that they
can offer to make the associa-
tion that much stronger.”

Rolle said he’s pretty excited
about possibilities for the asso-
ciation. a

He revealed that they are in
the process of applying for a
person from the International
Tennis Committee to come in
and set up an academy-type
programme, similar to what is

. being done in soccer with the
* Bahamas Football Association.

If approved, Rolle said the
person will work with the
BLTA for about‘six months.
He will train various persons,
who will eventually take over
once he departs. .

‘And next month, Rolle said
they intend to’ widen their
coaching base by hosting a
beginners’ coaching clinic at
the NTC. : i

He said he’s hoping that a
number of persons interested
in coaching the sport will come
out.

While the executives will
serve for one year, Rolle said
they are also in the process of
calling an extraordinary meet-
ing to make.amendments to
the constitution that will allow
the term in office to be extend-
ed from‘one to two years,
beginning with next year’s elec- .
tions.

Bradley Bain, one of the
council members who will be
called upon to advise the exec-
utives, noted that the BLTA is
heading in the right direction
under its present leadership.

“We have a lot of new peo-.
ple, but they are people who
are willing to try and do some
things to grow the game of ten-
nis,” Bain pointed out.

“So I think in the next year,
there will be a ton of activities
in tennis to create more aware-
ness and to get more kids
involved.”

Bain said he’s been particu-
larly pleased with the school
programme spearheaded by
Ricardo Bowe. Without the
school programme, which is
used as a feeder system, Bain
said the sport won’t grow.

“That is something that we
have been lacking for a long
time,” he insisted. “There’s
been a lot of talk about it, but
nobody really took the bull by
the horns and made it happen.
Ricardo Bowe is doing that
right now.”

Additionally, Bain said
including female player Nikki-
ta Fountain and former nation-
al champion turned coach Kim
O’Kelley on the council will
help to bring more awareness
to the sport as they further
seek to expand their base.



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



NFL owners opt out

of labour agreement

@ By DAVE GOLDBERG
AP Football Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — NFL owners
voted unanimously Tuesday to end
their labour agreement with the play-
ers’ union in 2011. The league and
union, however, insisted the next
three seasons won’t be interrupted
by a contract dispute and both sides
are working toward a new deal.

“We have guaranteed three more
years of NFL football,” commission-
er Roger Goodell said after the own-
ers used the opt-out clause built into
the agreement signed more than two
years ago. “We are not in dire straits.
We’ve never said that. But the agree-
ment isn’t working, and we’re look-
ing to get a more fair an equitable
deal.”

The decision by the owners was
anticipated, although not this early.
The 2006 agreement allowed either
side to negate the contract by
November 8.

Goodell said the owners acted ear-
ly “to get talks rolling.”

“I don’t think it was a shock to
anyone,” said Gene Upshaw, execu-
tive director of the NFL Players
Association. -

Upshaw said he learned of the
move by e-mail from Goodell. The
union head said his response was:

commissioner Roger Goodell addresses
the media
(AP Photo: Paul Sancya)

“Thanks, what a surprise.”
“All this means is that we will have
football now until 2010 and not until



IN THIS August 16, 2007 file photo, NFL .

2012,” Upshaw added during a con-
ference call. “We will move ahead.
This just starts the clock ticking. If
we can’t reach agreement by 2010,
then we go to no man’s land, which is
2011.”

The agreement signed two years
ago was to last until 2013 with the
option to terminate in 2011, which is
what the owners did Tuesday.
League officials and owners, includ-
ing several who helped push through
the last deal, have been saying for
almost a year that while the previous
contract may have been too benefi-
cial to the owners, the current one
had swung too far toward the play-
ers.

The owners noted that they are
paying $4.5 billion to players this
year, just under 60 percent of their
total revenues as specified in the
2006 agreement. League revenues
are estimated at about $8.5 billion,
although none of the teams except
the publicly owned Green Bay Pack-
‘ers discloses figures.

The owners also want a change in
the system to distribute the money
more to veterans than to unproven
rookies. Their argument is based on
a disparity in salaries that leaves
them spending far more on unproven
rookies than on dependable veter-
ans.

For example, offensive tackle Jake
Long, taken-first in the NFL draft
last month, got a $30 million guaran-
teed before playing an NFL game.
David Diehl, a fifth-round pick in
2003 who has started every game of
his. career and played left tackle for
the New York Giants in their Super
Bowl victory, signed a six-year $31
million extension with less than half
of that guaranteed.

Upshaw made his argument in a
half-hour conference call that ended
a few minutes before Goodell made
his in a news conference.

The debate will continue in negoti-
ations and through the media over a
course of months and years. Both
conceded there might be no agree-
ment until the deadline, which
Upshaw suggested might not happen
until the winter of 2010. That would
be a year without a salary cap under
terms of the deal.

“We'd like to get things done,”
Goodell said. “But often it’s not until
you have a deadline that people real-
ize the consequences of not reaching
a deal.”

Upshaw added: “March of 2010 —
that’s what we see as the realistic
deadline. I’m not going to sell the
players on a cap again. Once we go
through the cap, why should we
agree to it again?”

Ryan signs
six-year,
$72m
contract
with the
Falcons

ATLANTA (AP) — Matt
Ryan has signed a six-year,
$72-million contract with the
Atlanta Falcons.

Ryan, the No. 3 overall pick
in last month’s NFL draft, is
guaranteed $34.75 million in
the deal signed Tuesday. Fal-
cons spokesman Reggie
Roberts confirms the signing
and says the team has sched-
uled a news conference for
Tuesday night.

Ryan’s guaranteed money is
$4.75 million more than
received by Jake Long, the No.
1 overall pick who also is rep-
resented by agent Tom Con-
don.

Ryan worked behind quar-
terbacks Chris Redman and
Joey Harrington at his first
minicamp with the team this
month, but it wouldn’t be a
surprise if the former Boston
College star earns the starting
job in 2008.



Hornets won games and hearts in New Orleans

@ By BRETT MARTEL
AP Sports Writer

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
Glum economic forecasts .
greeted the Hornets upon their
return to New Orleans follow-
ing a two-year displacement
forced by Hurricane Katrina.

George Shinn, the team’s
majority owner, said his
accountants initially projécted
the ‘franchise would run’a
deficit of about $20 million this
season, but he was determined
to do right by a city recovering
from the worst natural disaster
in American history, then hope
for the best.

Players, coaches and team
employees had misgivings
about moving back to the Big
Easy from Oklahoma City.
Seeing a half-empty New
Orleans Arena back in
November and December did-
n’t help.

“When we first came here,
so many writers and reporters
were saying it wouldn’t work,
we didn’t have chance and I
was stupid,” Shinn recalled
. Tuesday, the day after the
Hornets’ season ended with a
Game 7 loss to the defending
champion San Antonio Spurs
in the Western Conference
semifinals.

The nay-sayers, it turned
out, failed to account for the
way an exciting young team,
led by an emerging superstar in
Chris Paul and fellow first-time
All-Star David West, could gal-
vanize a community.

The Hornets set a franchise
record with 56 regular season
victories en route to a first divi-
sion title.

A first-round playoff series
triumph over the Dallas May-
ericks followed before the sea-
son came to a tearful end Mon-
day night.

There was more. Even while
residents bemoaned the city’s
struggles with crime and a lack
of progress in some neighbor-
hoods that remain largely
deserted disaster zones more
than two years after the storm,
Hornets players never wavered
from a message of hope.

They incorporated the city’s
fleur-de-lis symbol in their uni-
forms, a sign of solidarity with
recovery efforts, then spent
hundreds of hours at rebuild-
ing projects across town.

In between pounding oppo-
nents on the court, they pound-
ed nails with Habitat for
Humanity, rebuilt playgrounds,
refurbished school libraries
and met with children.

The entire NBA pitched in
when New Orleans hosted the
All-Star game, and by the sec-
ond half of the season, big
crowds at the arena were a
common sight, as were Hor-
nets jerseys being worn around
town.

Public basketball courts,
fixed up with the help of the
Hornets or other teams during

mets ¢ swarms of kids playing hoops.
their visits to the city, drew

The last 13 Hornets home

j

games were all sellouts. Shinn
said the Hornets far exceeded



broken even.

revenue goals and might have

NEW ORLEANS Hornets guard Chris Paul'(3) goes between San Antonio Spurs forwards Tim Duncan (left) and Fabricio Oberto (7) during the
second half of Game 7 in the Western Conference semifinals playoff series in New Orleans on Monday. The Spurs defeated the Hornets 91-
82 to advance to the Western Conference championship.

Bill Haber/AP

“Now you wouldn’t find one
player who’d rather play some-

where else,” Shinn said. “Our
staff has been uplifted by all
of this and we’re really at stage
for us to do something great
next year. I believe it, really. I
feel it in my bones.”

During the playoffs, the
Hornets launched a season
ticket drive, achieving a 90 per
cent renewal rate while selling
an additional 3,500. 4

The Hornets will need the
resulting revenue boost. Paul,
with only one season remain-
ing on his contract, is expected
to get a lucrative extension as

- early as this summer.

“We’ll step up and do what
we’ve got to do to keep him,”
Shinn said. “He’s the best
point guard in the NBA and
one of top franchise players.”

NBA coach of the year
Byron Scott also is due an
extension soon.

“He can buy out of his con-
tract, but we’re trying to put
together something to keep
him,” Shinn said. “We’re going
to be fair and step up with the
goal to make him one of the
highest (paid) coaches in the
league.”

Scott has shown no interest
in leaving a young team which
he had a major hand in
rebuilding after going 18-64 in
2004-05, his first season with
the club.

“I’m very proud of this team,
this organization,” Scott said
Monday night.

“It’s an honor to be part of
this team.”

Paul’s averages of 21.1 points
and 11.6 assists per game made
him a bona fide MVP candi-
date; he finished second in vot-
ing behind the Los Angeles
Lakers’ Kobe Bryant.

If he gets the anticipated
extension, the Hornets could
be a force for years to come.
West (20.6 points per game,
8.9 rebounds per game) is
under contract for at least
three more seasons with a
player option for a fourth.

Center Tyson Chandler (11.8
ppg, 11.7 rpg) has at least two
more years left on his deal.
Sharpshooter Peja Stojakovic
(16.4 ppg) has three seasons
left, while versatile, high-fly-
ing rookie Julian Wright
showed enormous potential
with several highlight-reel
plays in the postseason.

This year, it wasn’t quite
enough to get the Hornets past
the conference semifinals for
the first time in the franchise’s
20-year history. Maybe next
year.

“Every great team has to go
through things like this,” Paul
said. “The make of our team is
special. We really play for each
other.

“The City of New Orleans —
I think our hats go off to them.
They made this season unbe-
lievably special for us. There’s
no doubt about it,” Paul said.
“I’m not even worried that
we'll be back (in the playoffs)
next year,” he said.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 13





NBA

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD
Wednesday, May 21

San Antonio at L.A. Lak-
ers (9 p.m. EDT). The Lak-
ers and Spurs both closed
out their second-round
series with road wins.

STAR
Monday

— Manu Ginobili, Spurs,
scored 26 points, sending
San Antonio to the West-
ern Conference finals with a
91-82 Game 7 victory at
New Orleans.

GOOD OMEN

SAN Antonio and the
Lakers met five times in the
playoffs in a six-season span
(1999-2004) with Los Ange-
les winning three series.
The winner won the NBA
title four times and lost in
the finals the other time.

BACK AGAIN

SAN Antonio’s 91-82 vic-
tory over New Orleans on
Monday night was coach
Gregg Popovich’s 100th of
the postseason, moving him
into a tie with Larry Brown
for third on the NBA’s
career list. The Spurs
advanced to the Western
Conference finals for the
sixth time in 10 seasons, but
only the first time after win-
ning the championship the
previous year.

LAYOFF

BOSTON has played
three games since Detroit
won its conference semifi-
nal in five games against
Orlando last Tuesday. The
Celtics advanced with a 97-

“92 victory over Cleveland
on Sunday in which Paul
Pierce scored 41 points.
Boston was 8-0 at home but
0-6 on the road in the first

two rounds. The Pistons.

have three road wins in this
postseason and are 5-1 at
home.

NOT YET

THE Hornets fell to 0-5
in second-round series fol-
lowing Monday night’s 91-
82 loss to San Antonio in
Game 7.

SURGERY

UTAH forward Paul
Millsap will have surgery
Thursday to repair his left
thumb, which was injured
during the Western Con-
ference semifinals against
the Lakers.

SPEAKING

“ONE thing I want them
to remember when they
start working out next sea-
son is how they feel right
now. You have to go
through some things before
you can really understand
how good it’s going to feel
when you get to that next
level. You don’t go from
not making the playoffs to
winning a championship. It
just doesn’t work that way.
... We’re headed in the right
direction.”

— Hornets coach Byron
Scott after losing Game 7 of
the Western Conference
semifinals Mongay night,
91-82 to defending NBA
champion San Antonio.

TS

For the stories



TRU ee
ES
on Mondays



@ By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer

A LOOK at the matchup between the
Los Angeles Lakers and San Antonio
Spurs in the Western Conference finals,
which begin Wednesday night (with reg-
ular-season record, playoff series marks
in parentheses): No. 1 LOS ANGELES

. LAKERS (57-25, 8-2) vs. No. 3 SAN

ANTONIO SPURS (56-26, 8-4).

Season Series: Tied, 2-2, with each team
winning both its home games. The Spurs

were never at full strength in Los Ange-

les, missing Tim Duncan and Tony Park-
er in their first loss and Manu Ginobili on
April 13, when the Lakers rolled to a
106-85 victory to clinch the Pacific Divi-
sion title. That was the only meeting after
the Lakers acquired Pau Gasol. Kobe
Bryant averaged 24.3 points for the Lak-
ers, while Parker scored 20.7 per game
for the Spurs. Ginobili managed just 14.3
on 31 percent shooting. ,

Storyline: The sixth postseason meeting
between the Western Conference powers
in the last 10 years, but the first since
2004. The Spurs knocked out the Lakers
on their way to titles in 1999 and 2003,
while the Lakers eliminated the Spurs in
2001, ‘02 and ‘04, winning championships
the first two times.

Ginobili proves why he holds NBA Sixth Man trophy

SAN ANTONIO Spurs forward Manu Ginobili (20) gets around New Orleans Hornets center Tyson Chandler (6) in the first half of Game 7 in
the Western Conference semifinal series in New Orleans on Monday. He scored 26 points, sending San Antonio to the eatin Conference
finals with a 91-82 victory.



Key Matchup I: Bryant vs. Bruce
Bowen. Bowen, perhaps the league’s best
perimeter defender, tries to contain the
NBA’s MVP. Bryant, the leading scorer
in the playoffs with 33.3 points per game,
said the back injury that slowed him in

Lakers vs Spurs

the WC finals

the second round is healed. Bowen will

certainly try to find out if that’s true,
using his physical defensive tendencies
that have annoyed plenty of opponents.
And the Lakers better be alert when
Bowen has the ball. He made-12 of 15 3-
pointers and averaged 12.3 points against
Los Angeles, his best performance.

against any opponent.

get some chances to check Bryant.
¢ Prediction: Lakers in 5



,
\

A look at the matchup
between Los Angeles
and San Antonio in.

X-Factor: Ime Udoka. Bowen’s backup
seemed to win coach Gregg Popovich’s
trust in the latter half of the second round
and played well during his extended min-
utes, making 11 of 17 3-pointers (65 per
cent) in the final four games. He should



Charles Barkley
Mike Wintroath/AP

Key Matchup IT: Derek Fisher vs. Park-
er. Spurs fans need no reminder that
Fisher is a clutch postseason performer,
recalling his game-winning jumper with
0.4 seconds left in the Lakers’ Game 5
victory at San Antonio in 2004. He is ,
averaging 11.9 points in the playoffs,
shooting 51 percent from the floor and
making 17 of 29 3-pointers. He might be
more important defensively, because the

_ Lakers must control Parker’s penetra-
tion and keep the NBA finals MVP out
of the paint. If Fisher can’t do it, Bryant
may have to expend energy to guard him.

Barkley
hasn’t paid
$400,000
gambling
debt, says
prosecutor

LAS VEGAS (AP) —A
Nevada prosecutor and a Las
Vegas Strip casino say Charles
Barkley hasn’t settled his
$400,000 gambling debt,
despite what he said on tele-
vision.

Officials with the Wynn Las
Vegas resort and the Clark
County district attorney’s
office say there’s been no pay-
ment and no contact with the
former NBA star and TV ana-
lyst.

During Turner Network
Television’s pre-game show
before the NBA playoffs Mon-
day, Barkley said the debt had
been paid and he was giving
up gambling.

The Wynn Las Vegas resort
alleges in a civil complaint filed
May 14 in Nevada state court
that Barkley failed to repay
four $100,000 casino markers,
or loans, received last October
18 and 19.

District Attorney David
Roger has. promised.to file a
criminal complaint if Barkley
doesn’t pay up by June 9.



Spurs’
departure
delayed

SAN ANTONIO (AP) —
The San Antonio Spurs’ depar-
ture from New Orleans after
winning Game 7 of the West-
ern Conference semifinals was
delayed several hours after
their plane had mechanical
problems, the team said Tues-
day.

The team could not find
hotel rooms in the city, so the
players had to sleep on the
plane, team spokesman Cliff
Puchalski said.

“We slept on the plane —
as much as_you can sleep,”
Puchalski said. “We tried to
keep some normal semblance
of order.”

The team was not practicing
Tuesday.

Ann Heisentfelt/AP

Donaghy’s lawyer says relationships among officials,
coaches and players ‘affected the outcome of games’



Tim Donaghy

Haraz N Ghanbari/AP

NEW YORK (AP) — Disgraced
basketball referee Tim Donaghy told
investigators in the NBA betting probe
that relationships among officials,
coaches and players “affected the out-
come of games,” his attorney said. The
league said the charges were unfound-
ed.

Donaghy’s attorney made the asser-
tions in a letter filed in United States
District Court in Brooklyn on Monday,
in which he argued that his client should
be sentenced to probation because he
fully cooperated with prosecutors and
has been undergoing treatment for his
gambling addiction.

The attorney also suggested that
Donaghy told investigators about the
gambling activities of other NBA offi-
cials and about a referee that passed
“confidential” information to an
unidentified coach.

The attorney, John F Lauro, wrote
that the US attorney’s office for the
Eastern District agreed to plea agree-
ments with other defendants in the case,
even though his client told investiga-
tors about NBA matters outside of the

government’s initial investigation.

Lauro said the disparity in treatment
could not be fully explained because
prosecutors have “surrounded this case
with a cone of silence.”

The US attorney’s office said Tues-
day it has no comment.

In a footnote, the attorney suggested
that the NBA might have “pressured”
the attorney’s office “into shutting
down this prosecution to avoid the dis-
closure of information unrelated to
Tim’s conduct.”

“The letter filed today on Mr Don-
aghy’s behalf contains an assortment
of lies, unfounded allegations, and facts
that have been previously acknowl-
edged, such as the fact that certain
NBA referees engaged in casino gam-
bling in violation of NBA rules,” said
Joel Litvin, the NBA president for
league and basketball operations, in a
statement.

“The letter is the desperate act of a
convicted felon who is hoping to avoid
prison time.”

The veteran referee pleaded guilty
last year to felony charges for taking

t

cash payoffs from gamblers and bet-
ting on games he officiated.

While citing Donaghy’s commitment
to his family, charitable activities and
positive feedback for his career as a
referee prior to his “tragic fall from
grace,” his attorney said that his clien-
t’s “aberrant conduct” can only be
understood in the context of his gam-
bling addiction, a “crippling disease,
which prevented him from exercising
complete rational self control.”

Lauro wrote that Donaghy is taking

steps to get treatment for his condition,
including therapy with a gambling coun-
selor and attending Gamblers Anony-
mous meetings.
_ “Without a doubt, Tim made signifi-
cant errors in judgment, but he also
tried to right the wrongs of his conduct
by assisting the government and | seeking
treatment for his disorder,” Lauro
wrote.

Donaghy is scheduled to be sen-
tenced on July 14. By law, he faces up
to 25 years in prison, though the term
could be much lower under sentencing
guidelines.



PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



! SPORTS |

Late start time for an historic all-
English Champions League final

@ By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Soccer Writer

MOSCOW (AP) — Manchester
United and Chelsea are making his-
tory with the first all-English Cham-
pions League final — and the one with
the latest starting time.

Kickoff at Luzhniki Stadium on
Wednesday is 10:45 pm (2:45 pm
EDT), which is 8:45 pm for television
viewers in Western Europe. If the
game goes to overtime and a
shootout, the new champion won’t
be crowned until about 1:30 am.
Trains on the Moscow subway sys-
tem are running two hours later than
usual to accommodate fans.

““We’ve only had two days here so
there is no adjustment,” Chelsea mid-
fielder Frank Lampard said. “Our
body clock is basically ready to deal
with that time.”

United has been playing in Euro-
pean soccer for more than a half cen-
tury but has never kicked off this late.

“Even if we had it at four in the
morning, that’s not really going to
bother me,” United defender Rio Fer-
dinand said. “It’s not something that
has played on our minds. We will just
deal with it.”

By kickoff, 40,000 English fans who
traveled to the match should have
had plenty of time to down a pint —
or perhaps a few. Because most hotel
rooms were booked up months ago,
many supporters are taking chartered
flights, will go to the game and then
fly home at breakfast time Thursday.

“We don’t care how late it kicks
off, as long as we win,” said Man
United fan Jimmy Westmancoat, who
flew out from England on Monday.

United its seeking its third Cham-
pions Cup title following victories in
1968-over Benfica and 1989 against
Bayern Munich. Chelsea is in the final
for the first time.

The matchup comes in the 50th
anniversary year of the plane crash
in Munich, Germany, that killed eight
United players and 15 others on Feb.
6, 1958. "And it comes 10 days after
Manchester United won its second

straightBnplish'Premier beaguettitle;:

finishing two points ahead Chelsea.
The Red Devils won 2-0 at Wigan on
the final day of the season, with the
Blues held to a 1-1 tie at home against
Bolton.

English weather was expected —
with rain, gusts and thunderstorms
forecast, according to the Moscow
weather center.

A new grass field was installed at
Luzhniki, where England’s national
team lost on the regular artificial sur-
face last October, a defeat that helped
eliminate the English in European
Championship qualifying. The field
was uneven as the lines were being
painted Tuesday, the new sections of
grass easily visible.

“This is the most prestigious club
game in Europe and the players real-
ly deserve a top quality surface,”
FIFA executive committee member
Franz Beckenbauer said.

The teams split their league match-
es, with United winning 2-0 at Old
Trafford in September in Avram
Grant’s first game after replacing Jose
Mourinho as Chelsea’s coach. The

IN THIS Wednesday, September
12, 2007, file photo, Portugal’s
Cristiano Ronaldo controls the ball
during their Euro 2008 qualifying
match against Serbia, at Alvalade
stadium in Lisbon, Portugal.

(AP Photo: Steven Governo)

Blues won 2-1 at Stamford Bridge last
month.

In the Community Shield at Wem-
bley last August, Manchester United
won 3-0 on penalty kicks following a
1-1 tie.

Manchester United is led by Cris-
tiano Ronaldo, who has 41 league and
cup goals this season, Wayne Rooney
and Carlos Tevez. Chelsea has Lam-
pard, Didier Drogba and Michael Bal-
lack. :

United is controlled by Malcolm
Glazer, owner of the NFL’s Tampa

‘Bay Buccaneers. Chelsea has been

owned since 2003 by high-spending
Russian Roman Abramovich, caus-
ing some fans to nickname the club
“Chelski.”

“He comes from here, from
Moscow,” Grant said. “He has always
dreamed of being in the final here,
but it is a dream of every supporter of
Chelsea to be in the final for the first
time.”

SAMSUN
mobil



CHELSEA’S Frank Lampard controls a
ball as he trains at Chelsea’s training
facility in Cobham, England.

(AP Photo: Alastair Grant)

IN THIS March 23, 2008, file photo, Chelsea’s Didier Drogba reacts after scoring his
second goal against Arsenal during their English Premiership soccer match at Chelsea’s
Stamford Bridge Stadium in London.





Petrova defeats
first round of Istanbul Cup

ISTANBUL, Turkey (AP)
— Third-seeded Nadia Petrova
defeated American Lilia
Osterloh 6-1, 6-2 Tuesday in
the first round of the Istanbul
Cup.

The 25th-ranked Russian
will play Marta Domachows-
ka of Poland in the second
round of the clay-court tour-
nament, a warm-up event for
the French Open.

Sorana Cirstea downed
Masa-Zec Peskiric of Slovenia
6-3, 6-4 . She will play second-
seeded Agnieszka Radwans-
ka.

Tsvetana Pironkova of Bul-
garia defeated Polona Hercog
of Slovenia 6-4, 7-5 and Liana
Ungur of Romania stopped
Cagla Buyukakcay of Turkey
6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (2).

Pironkova will next play
Veronika Chvojkova of Czech
Republic, who defeated Pemra
Ozgen of Turkey 7-5, 6-4, and
Ungur will face top-seeded
Elena Dementieva of Russia,
who had bye.








(AP Photo: Alastair Grant)

MANCHESTER UNITED’S Wayne Rooney in action during an English Premier
League soccer match at The JJB Stadium, Wigan, England, on May 11, 2008. °

(AP Photo: Jon Super)

sterloh in

Murad Sezer/AP

NADIA PETROVA of Russia returns the ball to Lilia Osterloh of the US during the WTA Istanbul Cup tennis tournament in Istanbul, Turkey. Nadia Petrova beat Lilia Osterloh 6-1,
6-2 in a first round match.

4



THE | RIBUNE



i i ne
Student sex claims inquiry | ELITE MOTORS LTD.

FROM page one

dent sparked outrage as the girl
involved in the act is under the
legal age of consent.

The alleged sexual encounter
occurred more than a month
ago with initial reports suggest-
ing the act was recorded on the
school's surveillance cameras,
however recent information
received by The Tribune indi-
cates that a teacher caught the
pair in the act. However, there
is a later report that the teacher
was not the witness, but was
told about it by another student.

Speaking to reporters after a
press conference at police head-
quarters, Acting ACP Hanna
declined to divulge specific
details regarding the matter:

"We investigate everything
that comes to our attention, but
we cannot report on (ongoing)
investigations to the public oth-
er than to say investigations

continue.

"I'm saying that all of the
information that has been in
public circulation, that the
police are investigating all of
the information that's been cir-
culated into the alleged mat-
ter," he told The Tribune yes-
terday.

In light of the sensitive nature
of the case, he urged the public
to be patient with police as they
conduct their investigations.

. "People, members of the pub-

- lic, tend to become emotional

over issues. The police follow
leads and anything that comes
to the police’s attention, the
police carry out investigations.
Some investigations are short,
as we said earlier, and some are
long and the police cannot con-
duct investigations in the media,
in the public forum.

"So I'm asking members of
the public to bear that in mind
because of the system that we
operate under in The Bahamas,

we cannot conduct investiga-
tions in the media."

When asked by reporters if
police had seen a copy of the
alleged tape of the act, Acting
ACP Hanna said:

"The police cannot say any-
thing else on that other than
investigations continue."

Chief Superintendent Glenn
Miller was quoted in The Nas-
sau Guardian as saying that
police should have been made
aware of the alleged incident
because it reportedly involved a
minor under 'the age of legal
consent. A little over a week

‘ago CSP Miller told The Tri-

bune neither parents nor the

school had reported the inci-.

dent to police,
In spite of the debate sur-

‘rounding the issue, it is ques-

tionable whether the alleged
incident between two teenagers
is considered a crime under
Bahamian law.

‘Conflict of interest no bar to
hospital complaint inquiry’

FROM page one

Licensing Board, and has been
since 1998, bar a period
between February 2006 and
mid-2007. He was also on the
board of directors at Doctor’s
Hospital between 1986 and
2005. Rett

In 2003 the HHCFLB
received a complaint from Lisa
Esfakis, the wife of Christopher
Esfakis, who died at the private
hospital, asking that bey inves-
tigate his death.

In 2002, Mr Esfakis entered
Doctor’s hospital with an over
95 pr cent chance of survival
suffering burns. In a February
2008 coroner’s court ruling it
was determined that “cumula-
tive errors in his medical care”
partly frittered away his excel-
lent survival rate and con-
tributed to his death in the facil-
ity at the age of 42.

His sister, Leandra Esfakis,
has complained that the board
so far appears to have failed to
have fulfilled the legal require-
ment as set out in the Act that it
initiate investigations into “mat-
ters affecting the treatment of
persons” within facilities
licensed under the Act and
ensure that such premises are
not “being operated in a man-
ner injurious to public health.”

Dr Culmer told The.Tribune
yesterday that despite his affili-
ation there was “no conflict of
interest” when it came to the

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

family’s request that the Board
initiate an investigation into
Doctor’s Hospital, because
when Ms Esfakis “requested
that (he) bowed out,” of taking
responsibility for the matter.

This did not mean that he
stopped being chairman of the
board at that time, but that he
put the matter into the hands
of the board’s deputy chairman,
Eugene Gray to deal with, he
said.

Mr Gray then took the posi-
tion that an investigation into

the matter was “not warrant-,
ed” — although since the Coro- |

ner’s verdict the board is more
vague about exactly what action

_it is taking in relation to the

complaint.

Dr Culmer admitted that the
Board is now looking to have
the requirement that it “initi-
ate investigations” scrapped
because the Act is “vague” and
does not stipulate how it is to be
carried out and furthermore, he

.claimed, because “those things

are taken care of in other acts.”

Rather than seeking to define
the mechanisms by which. it
would carry out such action, Dr
Culmer said the board “(does-
n’t) want that power.”

He added: “We don’t want
to be bothered with that kind
of detailed investigation.”

The chairman also said that
the HHCFLB has proposed
that the requirement in the Act
that all deaths at private med-
ical facilities be forwarded to

the chief medical officer, or else
their administrator should face
a fine and/or custodial sentence,
be disposed of.

He claimed the requirement,

‘which was passed into law along |

with the rest of the Act in 2000,

-is as antiquated and impracti-

cal as a clause in the old Med-
ical Act which said the CMO
should check every boat
approaching Nassau harbour for
“plague and pestilence.”

‘He said that there are already
procedures in place for the
recording of deaths and it is not
necessary that the board, which
licenses private facilities, ‘should
know how many people die in
them. ;

At present, the only facility
which would be aware of how
and why a person died within
the facility is the business itself.
Any review of the death would
also.be carried out by that busi-
ness. ‘

Dr Culmer denied that his
position on the Board of Direc-
tors at Doctor’s Hospital would
have influenced the decision as

-. to whether the hospital would

receive a licence because “the
(rest of the) board decides and
the chairman does not have a
vote unless there is a tie.”

He emphasised also that the
hospital “far exceeds the
requirements” for medical facil-
ities in the Bahamas.

The. chairman and all other

‘members of the HHCFLB are

appointed by the Cabinet.

China faces prospect |
of 5 million homeless

lM CHENGDU, China

Eight days after a massive
earthquake struck southwestern
China, the government began to
grapple Tuesday with what may
be its biggest quandary: what to
do with what it said are thé 5 mil-
lion people left homeless by the
disaster.

As the confirmed death toll
rose to more than 40,000 on Tues-
day, Chinese authorities issued
an urgent appeal for tents. “The
quake zones need more than 3
million tents,” said Li Chengyun;
the vice governor of hard-hit
Sichuan province, according to
the state-run news media. “If the
public wants to donate, please
donate tents.”

The vice minister for civil
affairs, Jiang Li, said that nearly
280,000 tents had been sent to the
area and that 700,000 more had
been ordered. But as he spoke,
refugees continued to pour out
of the devastated mountain
" regions, most bringing with them

little more than the clothes on
their backs.

“All these refugees have lost
their homes,” Li told The Asso-
ciated Press. “Their clothes and
possessions are buried. We are
doing what we can to help them.”

At one sporting goods store in
Mianyang, dozens of people clam-
ored for tents, pushing and shout-
ing outside the small storefront
and waving fistfuls of cash in the
air. A worker at the store stood
atop a counter facing them and
handed out tents in. black bags
after taking their cash. Parked on
the street outside the store, men
selling tents from their white van
were similarly mobbed. Police-
men were among those trying to

‘buy tents.

Small tents cost $39, medium-
size ones $46 and large ones $58.
When China began a three-day
national mourning period on

Monday, people across this coun-
try quietly understood it as mark-
ing an unofficial end to the search
and rescue phase after the disas-
trous earthquake, which the gov-
ernment said had probably killed
more than 50,000 people.

Yet, reports of miraculous res-
cues, while diminishing, contin-
ued to be heard. The Chinese
state news media reported Tues-
day that 129 students and 10

teachers had been rescued in an .. -

isolated small town in Wenchuan
County. Early reports about the
rescue in the town of Yinxing,

carried by the official Xinhua
news agency, provided few details

about the condition of the stu-,

dents or the circumstances of
their rescue, and could not be
confirmed.

The survivors were said to have
been ferried to Chengdu,
Sichuan’s provincial capital,
aboard eight military helicopters
and taken immediately for med-
ical gare. .

China’s propaganda authori-
ties seemed to reassert their:con-
trol over the nation’s news media

.on Tuesday.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE \





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Chinese hostility as spiritual
leader continues foreign tour

@ By JOHN F. BURNS
and ALAN COWELL
LONDON |

The Dalai Lama arrived in
London yesterday as part of a
protracted foreign tour, high-
lighting efforts by European gov-
ernments to balance China’s hos-
tility towards him against their
support for human rights in Tibet.
The Dalai Lama arrived from
Germany where only one gov-
ernment minister agreed to meet
with him, according to the New
York Times News Service.

Chancellor Angela Merkel,
who was on’a weeklong tour of
Latin America, had received him
at her offices last September,
prompting a chill in relations with
Beijing. In London, Prime Minis-
ter Gordon Brown is embroiled
in a contentious debate over the
level of warmth he should display
towards China at the 2008 Sum-
mer Olympics in light of Beijing’s
recent crackdown on dissent in
Tibet.

According to the Dalai Lama’s
official programme in Britain dur-

_ ing an 11-day visit, he-will meet

Brown only at a scheduled
encounter with the Archbishop
of Canterbury, Rowan Williams,
at what the prime minister’s office
has called “an interfaith dialogue
with several other religious lead-
ers.”

But, breaking with a tradition
established by two former British
prime ministers — John Major
and Tony Blair — Brown will not

‘receive the Dalai Lama at 10

Downing Street, his official resi-
dence.

The scheduling inspired com-

plaints.from militants and politi-
cians who support Tibetans in
their struggle against China and
who maintain that the British
authorities have downplayed the
Dalai Lama’s status to avoid.con-
flict with China, a key trade part-
ner. ‘Treating the Dalai Lama as
only a religious leader simply
ignores reality,“ said Sir Menzies
Campbell, the former leader of

‘the small opposition Liberal

Democrats. *There is no reason
why he should not be received at
No. 10 Downing Street,“ he said.
”*Many people will conclude
that the Prime Minister is trying
to have it both ways, to see him
and not offend the Chinese gov-
ernment,“ Sir Menzies said. .
Representatives of the Free
Tibet campaign said Brown will
be the first western leader to meet
the Dalai Lama since widespread
protests and violence between
‘Tibetans and the Chinese author-
ities in March. “’It is vital that the
British government treat the
Dalai Lama not just as a religious
leader but also as a political fig-
ure,” said Matt Whitticase, a rep-

resentative of the Free Tibet cam-
paign.

“Gordon Brown is refusing to
meet him in a political setting,
underplaying his importance as a
political leader especially at a
time when his importance has
been emphasized by the Tibetan
people and people across the
world,” Whitticase told The Press
Association news agency. “There
is a deep-seated political prob-
lem in Tibet and the Dalai Lama
holds the key and he should
therefore, be met in a political
setting.”

The awkward choice facing’

Brown is only one of many at a
time when his critics accuse him
of clumsiness and vacillation in
his handling of public policy. Ear-
lier this year, after initially giv-
ing the impression that he would
travel to Beijing for the opening
of the Olympics, Brown said he
would attend only the closing cer-
emony. At that time, other lead-
ers, including President Nicolas
Sarkozy of France, were consid-
ering a boycott of the opening
ceremony to protest China’s
crackdown.in Tibet.

The Dalai Lama is on a three-
month tour of five countries,
including the United States, and
he used his visit to.Germany to
underline his insistence that he is
not seeking Tibet’s independence
from China.

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Dalai Lama arrives in London

Markus Schreiber/AP Photo



HEIDEMARIE WIECZOREK-ZEUL, right, Germany’ Ss Minister for Economie Cooperation and Development watch-
es the Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama preparing a white scarf aS’a present for her prior to their talks in
Berlin, on Monday. The Dalai Lama wrapped up a tour of Germany on Monday, meeting the nation's develop-
ment minister before heading up a final rally in front of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate. The meeting with Develop-
ment Minister. Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul has triggered anger from China, which says that it violates Germany's
commitment to the "one-China" policy. Beijing filed a formal complaints over the matter Friday. The Dalai Lama
has now arrived in Britain.









WEDNESDAY, MAY 21,

SECTION B e uauiceiha

Worker protection
needed against firms
that ‘up and leave’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FOREIGN companies enter-
ing the Bahamas, éspecially
those with no physical assets
in this ‘nation, should be
required to make contributions
to an escrowed fund that would
provide Bahamian workers
with what they were owed if
the firm “just packed up and
left”, a trade union leader told
The Tribune yesterday.

- Obie Ferguson, the Trades
Union Congress (TUC) presi-
dent, said he had dealt with a
number of cases where
Bahamian workers had been
“left high and dry”, and unable
to receive the statutory redun-
dancy payments due to them
under the Employment Act,

when foreign-owned compa-.

nies “simply packed up and
left”.

“There were two cases where
I had to get a Supreme Court
injunction to stop money being
taken out of the company’s
Bahamas accounts until a cer-
tain amount of dollars was set



aside to pay the workers,” Mr
Ferguson recalled.

’. Describing the possibility
that foreign-owned companies
could simply exit the Bahamas
without paying what is due
under the Employment Act to
their staff as “a major concern”
to the trade union and labour

movement, Mr Ferguson said:___.

“One would expect the Gov-

SEE page 6B

Private sector waiting over
health reform consultation

‘By NEIL HARTNELL
PHBUHE Business Editor |

THE Savas sector group
that opposed the former PLP
government’s National Health
Insurance (NHI).scheme yes-
terday.said it was “actively
waiting” for the Ingraham

administration to “engage” it:

on its healthcare reform plans,
remaining keen to prove its
input.

Winston Rolle, the former
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent now acting as the Coali-
tion for Healthcare Reform’s
spokesman, told The Tribune:
“Our plan remains the same.
‘We do support healthcare
reform, and are actively wait-
ing for the Government to
engage us further so that we
can get involved in the
process.’

Apart from an initial meet-
ing with Dr Hubert Minnis, the
minister of health, last year,
the Government has not met
with the Coalition to discuss
the way forward on its pro-
* posed healthcare reforms, with
the organisation and its mem-
bers remaining keen to pro-
vide such input.

Mr Rolle yesterday said dis-

cussions between the Coalition
and the Government had
involved “nothing other than
the initial meeting we had with
the Minister of Health.

“He indicated there were
going to be some incremental
adjustments made to health-
care reform. That’s the extent

of it, and we’ve not-been™

engaged any further in that
area.”

Mr Rolle added: “We’d like
to know what the plans are, so
that we can provide input into
the plan as it develops - what
should be the focus, and look-
ing to see if it is in line with
our recommendations as
regards healthcare reform”.

When asked whether the
Coalition believed the Ingra-
ham administration would be
more open than the former
Christie government when it
came to its healthcare reform

plans, and discuss them with _

it, Mr Rolle responded: “We
certainly hope so.
“We’d like to think we’d

‘have the opportunity to pro-

vide more input, but that
remains to be seen.”

SEE page 6B

Insurer links with COB on
apprentice programme

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BRITISH American Finan-
‘cial, the insurance and finan-
cial services provider, is devel-
oping an “apprenticeship pro-
gramme” with the College of
. the Bahamas (COB) that it
hopes will start the latter’s
brightest students along a
career path with it.

Chester Cooper, British
American Financial’s president
and chief executive, told The
Tribune that the company was

actively working to attract and .

retain the best talent, and
assessing the development of
management feeder and edu-
cational tracking systems.

On the apprenticeship pro-
gramme the company was
developing with COB, Mr
Cooper said it aimed to
“recruit people from COB in
Nassau, Exuma and Abaco to
basically be apprentices in our
business and learn the busi-
ness”

The British Armetlodn Finan-
cial president and chief execu-
tive said recruits to the appren-
ticeship programme would
work part-time for the compa-
ny while in school during their
second and third years, and

spend the summers in full-time
posts. Up to seven persons may
be recruited by the programme
this year.

“They learn-the-business;~~~

and essentially it will be a feed-
er system for our business,” Mr
Cooper said. “I’m sure you’ve
heard business people and
executive complain about how
hard it is to find talent in this
market. Yes, it’s true, but we’re
addressing that.

“We're starting the on-the-
job training programme for
people who will bring a lot of
new energy and ideas, as we
connect with the younger pro-
fessional market.”

British American Financial
has already targeted that mar-
ket - for consumers. Mr Coop-
er said the company had
moved to “reconnect” with
Bahamian young professionals

through its Symphony offering,
a package of insurance, invest- °

ment and financial planning
products designed to offer a
‘one-stop shop’ for all their
financial needs.

Adding that this market
niche was largely underserved
by Bahamian financial services

SEE page 6B

_ successfully fought off a chal-

. agement’s right to use the

20.08

BTC bidd

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



exclusive talks over the

Bahamas Telecommunica-

tions Company’s (BTC) pri-
. Vatisation is prepared to
modify its original offer if terms are “mutu-
ally beneficial”, its attorney indicated yes-
terday, having had its first meeting with the
Government’s negotiating committee in
early May.

Philip Davis, the Bahamian legal repre-
sentative for the Bluewater Communica-

~ tions Holdings consortium, told The Tri-

bune his clients were “hopeful” that they
would be able to conclude the purchase
of a significant stake - and management
control - in BTC.

Mr Davis said: “My clients are encour-
aged by the meeting that was held, and
we are looking forward to continuing the
process and completing the agreement
arrived at with the previous administra-

“tion, With any modifications that are mutu-

ally beneficial.”
The first meeting between Bluewater
and the Government’s newly-formed pri-

Benchmark subsidiary wins Internet challenge :

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ALLIANCE Investment
Management, the broker/deal-
er subsidiary of BISX-listed
Benchmark (Bahamas), has

lenge to its right to use its Inter-
net. domain name, the chal-
lenge from a US securities firm
having been made in “bad
faith” as an “abuse of adminis-
trative proceedings”.

Alliance Investment Man-

domain name,
allianceinvest.com, had been
challenged by New York-based
securities firm, AllianceBern-
stein, via a complaint that was
filed with the World Intellec-
tual Property Organisation’s
(WIPO) Arbitration and
Media Centre.

In its submissions to WIPO,

a he bidder currently lockedin

AllianceBernstein alleged that
it was the registered proprietor
of trademarks in many compa-
nies for the words Alliance,
AllianceBernstein and Alliance
Capital, having registered the
word ‘Alliance’ in the
March 30, 1993, for the pur-
‘pose of providing investment
management services.

Alliance Investment Man-
agement, though, had regis-
tered the disputed alliancein- ~

. vest.com domain name on
August 28, 1998, to enable it
to set up a website to market its
own services.

In its submissions, Alliance- ~
Bernstein alleged that the two.
companies provided compet-
ing services, and the Bahamian
company’s domain name and
website were “confusingly sim-
ilar” to its trademarks. a
_ “The Complainant [Alliance-
Bernstein] contends that the -

he) se tribunemedia.net

* First meeting between Bluewater
and government negotiators held —

* Financing ready, despite-concerns over
global telecoms slump and credit t crunch

* Fidelity and KPMG among bidders
for advisory contract

vatisation negotiating committee w was held
some two-and-a-half weeks ago, around
May 1-2, and Mr Davis said: “We hope to
get back to the table as soon as possible.”

It is understood that the first meeting
was designed to lay the foundations for

further talks between Bluewater and the -

committee, with both sides outlining what
stage they thought had been reached in
the privatisation process.

It is thought that the Government side

“might now-be- waiting on the selection,

and appointment, of a company ‘that will ~
act in the traditional role of investment
bankers, providing advice to the committee

S on

To os ee cited 5 cae

er prepare
to ‘modify’ its offer.

Respondent [Alliance Invest- »
“ment Management] has no
rights or legitimate interests in.
the disputed domain name,
which it registered five years
after the complainant’s Unit-
ed States ALLIANCE trade-
mark registration, and eight -
years after the complainant ~
first used that mark, which the
complainant’ says is so well ©
known that the respondent
must have-intended to trade
off the complainant’ s reputa-
tion in its ALLIANCE mark,
thereby precluding any finding
of legitimacy,” WIPO recalled.

Yet in response, Alliance
Investment Management and
its president, Julian Brown,
alleged that the two companies
were not competitors.

- “Tt [Alliance Investment

SEE page 2B

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work :

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010





PSE TTR

k
fr
E
of
»
f
and the Advisory group that will assess its
recommendations.
The Tribune can feveal that Royal
Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust and the

Bahamian arm of KPMG are among those.
who submitted bids for the advisory con: .

tract, having responded to the Govern-
ment’s request for proposals (RFP). It is
unknown whether other Bahamian com
panies applied, but it is thought internat
tional firms may also have submitted bids,
pple water, s interest in. acquiring and

SEE page 6B Be a

Sponsored by

Drive a Honda Fit and get up to
40 miles per gallon

How do. you attract and retaan
‘best of class’ ‘employees?

reg the Royal Fidelity peeen agate today!

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Mon ey at

Nassau:

356.9801

¢ Freeport



FECA ETE

i

QE:





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

NOTICE

LAND AND BUILDING FOR SALE

Land Shark Divers Resort Hotel
(In Receivership)
is for sale

All that piece of parcel or lot of land located on West Bay Street having an
area of 23,400 sq.ft being lot numbers 6, 7 and 8. Block #2 situated in the
subdivision known as Westward Villas, the said subdivision situated in the
western district of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This two storey
structure is comprised of 40 rooms, kitchen, open dining area, bar and
swimming poolwitha building sizeofapproximately 12,280sq.ft-This buildingis
equipped with air conditioning units and is elevated to prevent the
possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual
heavy rainy periods. :

Serious prospective purchasers who would like to tour the property prior to
bidding should contact the Hotel Manager at (242) 327-6364 between 9:00am
and ye :00 noon, Monday through Friday.

All otters should be made in writing in a sealed envelope addressed to:
Mr. John S. Bain, Receiver & Manager
HLB Galanis Bain, Shirlaw House, Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3205 Nassau, Bahamas
Marked:”Tender-Land Shark Dive Resort in Receivership.”

Offers must be received by 4:00pm on Friday, May 30th, 2008.

Each bid should be considered a bonifide offer to purchase and shall be
binding upon the bidder after submission to us

The Receivers reserve the right to reject any and all offers.

on new
annuities
during the



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Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-338-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501



month of May!

THE TRIBUNE

Food and drink
retail monopoly
ends at airport

THE Airport Authority’s
chairman said the exclusivity
clause that gave a more than
30-year food and beverage
retail monopoly to one
provider at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
(LPIA) has been “terminated”.

Frank Watson said: “It is
interesting to note that the
exclusivity clause, which one
gave one operator the monop-
oly on the provision of food
services for more than 30 years
has been terminated, and
requests for proposals have
been issued by the Nassau Air-
port Development Company
for the operation of two cof-
fee/snack shops. Other requests
will be issued in 90 days for
additional food services.”

Although Mr Watson did not
name the provider, the monop-
oly is understood to have been

in the hands of an operator
whose owners included former
PLP minister of works, Bradley
Roberts, and businessman
Garet ‘Tiger’ Finlayson.

Comments

Mr Watson’s comments
came as the Nassau Airport
Development Company
(NAD) said it planned to make
a further $2 million worth of
“airside improvements” to
Lynden Pindling International
Airport, focusing on areas such
as runway and taxi lighting.

NAD’s chief executive, Craig
Richmond, said in a statement:
“There are many more short-
term changes coming soon,
including over $2 million worth
of airside improvements, such
as runway and taxi-way light-
ing, additional new washrooms,

especially in the domestic
departure lounge, new and
improved food and beverage
outlets and expanded retail, as
well as premium parking.

He added that NAD was
streamlining the US departures
process and continuing main-
tenance and upgrades to the
existing facility.

Mr Richmond said NAD had
already improved customer ser-
vice in parking and on the curb,
while improving washrooms,
overall cleanliness and infor-
mation displays. He added that
NAD has enhanced the retail
offerings, expanded Bahamian
job opportunities and estab-
lished an operations centre to
maintain safety and control of
the airside and terminal opera-
tions. The company had also
eliminated government subsi-
dies for operating the airport.

Benchmark subsidiary wins Internet challenge

FROM page 1B

Management] denies prior

knowledge of the complainan-
t’s trademark, and says the
principle of constructive
knowledge under US trade-
mark law does not apply
because the respondent does
not conduct business in the
United States of America. The

- respondent denies the Com-

plainant’s contentions,” the

WIPO ruling found. “[Alliance

Investment Management]
notes that similar businesses
appear to be conducted under
the domain names ceinvestment.com> registered
by a company in Jamaica, West
Indies, called Alliance Invest-
ment Limited and investment.com> registered by
a person in Maryland, United
States of America.”

Alliance Investment Man-
agement instead alleged that
the case brought by Alliance-

Bernstein was one of “reverse ~

domain name hijacking”,
where the US firm was looking
to seize its domain name rights
via a WIPO ruling.

The world intellectual prop-
erty watchdog found that the
allianceinvest.com domain
name was confusingly similar
to AllianceBernstein’s regis-
tered trademark, but in
Alliance Investment Manage-
ment’s favour, ruled that the
US firm had failed to establish
it had no rights or legitimate
interest in the domain name.

WIPO ruled: “Here the
Complainant [Alliance Bern-
stein] clearly knew, when it
filed the Complaint, that the
Respondent’s [Alliance Invest-
ment Management] corporate
name is the same as the
domain name, and that the
respondent, based in the
Bahamas, carries on an invest-
ment advisory business under
that corporate name. These
facts, unless rebutted or
explained, demonstrate
[Alliance Investment Manage-
ment’]s rights or legitimate
interest in the disputed domain
name.

“The absence from the
Complaint of a sufficient rebut-
tal or explanation of these
facts, while the complaint

specifically seeks to negate the
other circumstances by which a
respondent might establish
rights or legitimate interests,
leads the panel to conclude
that the complainant appreci-
ated that [Alliance Investment
Management’s| apparent right
or legitimate interest in the dis-
puted domain name, as con-
templated in the policy, was
unassailable and to declare
that the complaint was brought
in bad faith and constitutes an
abuse of the administrative
proceeding.”

The case is the second
WIPO ruling to be won by a
Bahamian firm, IndiGo Net-
works being the first, whose
right to use their Internet -
domain name was challenged: >
by a foreign company. .

The ruling again highlights

how important intellectual

property is going to be as an
issue for Bahamian firms in the
future, as the Bahamas signs
on to more trade agreements.
It also provides evidence of
how exposed this economy is
to international bodies and
their rulings.

\

Position Available

Global United Limited is looking to employ a Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanic
with the following criteria.

Summary

Candidates must be able to perform mechanical repairs on both small Eeonne
vehicles and heavy duty trucks (° ‘mack trucks”).

ite individual must be able to:
¢ Repair large diesel engines.
Perform various tasks on truck chassis, such as the installation differentials,
gearboxes, pneumatic brake systems, etc.
- Perform minimal welding'as necessary.
Perform electrical duties as such as wiring, lights, etc.
Drive tractor heads properly.
Trouble shoot systems and read schematic diagrams.

Axpenlencs

¢ Atleast five years work experience as a diesel mechanic with experience
in executing the above.

All candidates are required to possess,
e Aclean police record

e Adrivers License
e Basic tools

Deadline for Submission of Resumes is May 30, 2008

Please forward cover letter and resume via mail, fax or email to:-
Human Resource Department
Global United Limited
P.O. Box CB-13838
Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Mechanic

Fax: 242-377-1261 |

’ Email:humanresources@gulbahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 3B



Ph eS ee

Central Bank eyes

further exchange
liberalisation

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Central Bank of the Bahamas is con-
tinuing its efforts to relax exchange controls,
having proposed allowing commercial banks
and money transfer providers a new limit of
$500 for customers to make overseas cash gifts
and small purchases.

According to the Central Bank’s 2007 annual
report, its Exchange Control Department mon-
itored the demand for foreign exchange by the
general public, which was particularly robust
with regard to oil payments.

The Central Bank reported that in 2007, he
department continued to monitor the liberali-
sation measures which were put in place in the
first quarter of 2006.

“Notable amoung the measures coming on
stream was the non-sponsored Bahamian
Depository Receipt (BDR) Investment pro-
gramme,” the Central Bank said.

This programme allowed residents to partic-
ipate, via local BISX-licensed broker/dealers, in

foreign capital markets by purchasing foreign = §

securty-backed instruments.

It was reported that activity in the BDR pro-
gramme commenced in the fourth quarter of
2007, with the participation of two licensed bro-
ker/dealers, each of whom received their allot-
ment of foreign exchange from the Central
Bank under the programme’s guidelines tctaling
$4.166 million.

The National Insurance Board also made the
overseas investments under the liberalisation
programme of $9.375 million during the year.

[SALES

A multi facetted communications/coneutting company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer
skills and be able prepare public presentations on behalf of

companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to:

DA#6282
P.O. Box N-3207

by May 31, 2008.



Nassau, Bahamas





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Life. Money. Balance both?







ae
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

FOR PROPOSALS

NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -
EXPANSION PROJECT

4

Request for proposal D-107 IT consultant - design & construction administration
services.

NAD is seeking IT design and construction administration services from
qualified IT Consultants for the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of work
includes:

. Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design ‘requirement
report;
Preparing technical specifications ane drawings for the IT component of
the Project;
Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and

‘ System commissioning and training.

Qualifications:
. Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
’ (AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;
Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and
A design quality control program.

_. TREASURY MANAGEMENT
INTERNAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Bahamian Subsidiary of International Company seeks an Internal Control
and Accounting Manager for its Treasury Investment Operations based in
Nassau.

Responsibilities

* Design and implement internal control and accounting procedures, in
accordance with the company standards. j

* Assess and monitor business risks and controls continuously.

- Supervise the accounting function; prepare monthly accounts statements
and reports to the General Manager.
* Implement control for day-to-day investment operations.

* Monitoring of various investments limits (notional, counterparty, VaR, stop
loss, etc.) in accordance with investment policy. ls

* Design and implement cash flows model and estimates.

* Support for the General Manager in the analysis of investments and
performance measurement.

* Evaluate the risk in investments vehicles (international and emerging
markets) a oe Ae
- Substitute for the General Manager as required.
* Manage special projects as required. ;
* Support internal and external auditors during their periodic reviews. :

Profile | eS a

: Dediee in tuisinass administration, accounting or similar.

* Strong expertise in internal control (implementation of COSO model) and »
audit, CIA certification preferred.

- 5+ years international experience in risk management/audit in a treasury.
and investment environment, including risk measurement (VaR, stress test)
and valuation of financial instruments.

- Knowledge of treasury .and investments processes, from and accounting
and control standpoint.

* French written and spoken (required), Spanish written and spoken
(desirable).

* International experience in financial services auditing at management ever
* Excellent experience with banks and or private company.

* Strong financial, analytical and methodical skills.

Benefits ;
Competitive salary commensurate with banks and or private company.

Medical insurance and pension scheme. .

Apply in confidence to: Treasury Vacancy

P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, The Bahamas

Deadline for Application 30th May, 2008.



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Cable
Beach
hotel in
receivership

THE Land Shark Divers
Resort Hotel on West Bay
Street has been placed into
receivership and is now on the
property market.

An ad in yesterday’s Tribune
Business section invited seri-
ous buyers to view the prop-
erty and make sealed offers to:
- John Bain, the manager and
receiver of the property, (on
behalf of the Bank of the
Bahamas) at HLB Galanis

Bain.

Speaking with The Tribune,
Mr Bain noted that the 42-
room hotel which also has an
open dining area, bar and pool
is in “fairly good shape.”

He said the property was
currently undergoing inspec-
tions by engineers.

Mr Bain said he was working
on behalf of the bank to get a
good offer and sale of the

property.

Lot 3D 23,000 square feet for Sale’

at Airport Industrial Park
Cost: $235,000

Contract: 424-4960 / 394- 9396
email: mturnquest@coralwave.com

3% UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

Business Analyst / Programmer
| In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

Maintenance and development of accounting related
software

Database development using SQL and VBA
programming

Provide training and second level support to users

We are searching for an individual with a strong background
in relational database modeling and sound knowledge i in
software and database development.

Minimum Requirements:

e Programming capabilities in SQL and VBA,
¢ Knowledge of the MS Office Suite of products, with
strong emphasis on MS Access

The ideal candidate must have the following qualifications:

¢ BA/BSc. degree in MIS, Computer Science or similar
qualification

¢ A basic knowledge in the field of Accounting and/or
Accounting systems would be a plus.

Persons interested in the above open position and meeting
the criteria should apply in writing, on or before May 30,
2008 enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

hrbahamas@ubs.com or





Bradesco

_ Banco Bradesco S.A,
Balance Sheet on December 31 - R$ thousand



MULTIPLE BRADESCO

Publicly-Held Company

1,367,718 Stockholders
2.018,673,956 Outstanding stocks
Cospetate Taapagern 60.7466 9466/6091 42
rvadquattar Cigadn de Gaus, Crance, 8P



CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO













Assets 2607 2006 2007 2006
Current aasets 178,280,896 140 497,787 259.884, 466 197.365.329
Funds available (Note 6a} 5.341.363 4,587,190 5.486.606 4.764.972
Interbank investments (Notes 3b and 7} 5$.212.180 36.967.946 36.967.044 2.638.077
Open market investments 32.000 907 24. 270.494 314.960.8777 20,617.$20
interbank deposits 23.221 422 1$.698.440 $.026.516 (4.921.545
Aiiowance tos looses (10.149) (988) (10.149) (968)
Securities and derivative financial instruments (Notes 3c, 3d, 8 and 32b} 47.707.014 21.932.180 98.133.256 T2BE4 AM
Own portfoba CATT AFS 2.445 OS 78.919. B73 $3 §23.157
Subpet ta repurchase agreements 598.625 11 854.136 8.789.382 42.28B.492
Derivative financial inatruments $23,374 523.228 688 262 $20,635
Reaticted deposits « Searzitan Central Bank 7.788,647 216,812 7.7714 B87 448.235
Subjed ta cogateral provided : 992.345 153.650 3.234.782 78O 266
Securities purpose of unresticied purchase and sate comnutments 1.464.853 7.038.964 3.809.376 §.363 68S
interbank arcounts 23.$74.023 18.712.302 23.689.375 48.7 26.069
Unseltied receipts and payments 36.330 50.919 332 $0945
Reatsioted cxedits: (Nate 3}
> Resticied deposits - Brazilian Central Bank 23.27.4133 18.654.226 23.528 587 38.64.7096
~ Naticemd tosasury - axon credit $7 578 S74 578
SFR S.74t 8.678 5.78 6.728
Cosrespondent banks A427 4907 B48 3.142
interdapartmeantal accounts : 426.748 181 B67 $29,362 186.338
“ interond taanstex of funds 426.748 383 B87 483.2 186 238
Laan operations (Notes 3a, 10 and 32b} - 3.348.322 41.325.651 66.400,264 5% B97.772
Lowes operations
« Publis sector 2 68.582 73.BAG . 70,33 75.8
+ Private susctor $7 BAG ABE 48.204.122 73 B55 401 56 256 898
Allowance tor doubtful accounts (Notes 36. 10f, 10g and 16h) ' (A 566,928) {3 952.314} (5,325,670) (4.634. HB}
. Leasing operations (Notes 2, 3e, 10 and $2b) . . 3,086.428 1,798,326
Leasing receivanies. .
- Pubic sector - 4 AQ Gh]
o Private sector ‘ - 5 427,983 3.464.832
Leasing receivables - 2.306.178} §3.632.021}
Alicowance ine pasing dovbitul accounts (Notes Je. 106, 109 and 10h) + . (106.788) (75.4725
Other receivables 22.032.9B4 16.495,096 23.251 898 20.626.267
Receivables on sureties and guarantees honored (Note 10%-2) ; 42.184 38 «40184 B
Foreign exchange portiotio (Note 11a) $826 668 7.945.987 9 BB.732 7 GAB OBE
Repeivabies. 4.768 ABS $, 626.582 WEB G22 VTKOIZ
Negatistion and intermediation of amounts 483.166 358.770 882.879 $98.34
Iqsuranot premums renewable - . 4.276.812 3.257 208
Sundry (Note 1 1b} 7 O1ZOK7 6.623.385 44.877 265 10.744,251
Aiowanos fox other doubthul accounts (Notes Je. 10f, 109 and 10h) (78.5413 (58 666} {392.386} (93.2543
Other assets (Note 12) ‘ G3B.465 315.665 4.870.238 F196 ATE
Other assets 186.970 189. 302 385 251 VWEG2S
Provision for devaluations {104.785} {414.898} (478.584) {3 BE.825}
Prepaid Expenses (Note 2g and 12b) 557.268 241.28% 4.663.289 4.023.374
Long-term assets 403.434.7914 71 BIB.794 VI GZBII7 GASES ABS
Interbank investments (Notes 3b and 7} . 44.890.208 9.088.934 655.081 484,143
Open market investments 64184 . BA.384 -
Interbank daposite 14.826.024 8.088.934 590.897 484.4493
Securitins and derivative financial instruments (Notes 3¢, 3d, 8 and 326} 49,688,723 36,318.780 16,348,453 24.395.525
Own portfatia 4.059.639 9.436.474 &, 359.4698 18.824 693
Sudject ta repurchases agrsemonts 48 590.444 25.76.3466 4.942.038 3.093.581
Denvative fnancal instruments 544,796 28.381 508.838 28.430
Restricted deposits - Srazitan Central Bank $413,283 223.423 581 B05 *
Pryatizaion currencies 9.073 §.964 74.835 WING
Subject te collateral provided 2.381.782 445.802 335.448 14 868
Senuntes purpose of untestricted purchase and sale cammmitments 2.$48,834 MOG 39% 4.204.294 2858.26
interbank accounts 447,439 398.737 487,339 398.737
Restioted credits: (Note 9)
- SFH 447.138 308.737 $47,139 388.727
Loan operations (Notes de, 10 and 32b) 34,890,916 21, S9S.874 44 898.366 28.047. 487
Loot operations:
~ Public sector 887.669 745.029 893.643 734.36
> Pavale sector 32.766 733 22.292.183 43.345 804 28,056.380
Allawance for doubtiul accounts (Notes 30, 101 10g and 10h} : (1,583,428) {4 407 838} (2.144 078) (1.750.183
Leasing operations (Notes 2, Je, 10 and 32h} + - 4.905.967 4,383,232
Leasing seneiveables : .
+ Public aactor . &8.798 108.196
- Private sector ; - 8.374.426 3.762.307
Unearned incare from leasing - {3.422.375 (4.B4G.215}3
Atiowanos for joasing doubttul eccounts (Notes 36, 104, 10g and 10h} . . {43$.$80) (84 368)
‘Other receivabtes §.319,154 3.846,023 14,878,658 $.875.350
Receivables ’ - ri * 2.05 1.498
Nagotation acd intermediation of amounts " 895.253 $40.684 895.253 410. B84
Sundry (Note 1b) 4.817.791 3.538.782 114.188.0723 8.877.013
Attowance for other doubthi accounts (Notes 3e. 10f,.109 and 10h) (2.888) {34433 8.134} (7.845)
Other assets (Note 12) 907.653 494,746 4 S2B.756 778340
Other aasets - : &. 898 8.174
Provision for deyaluations : : : {B36} (7863
Prepaid expenses (Note 3g atxd 12b) 907.65 494.746 4. $28.687 FFOQS2
Bradesco
Banco Bradesco S.A.
Balance Sheet o on December 31 - RS thousand
MULTIPLE BRADESCO CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO
Aasats 2007 2006 2007 2006
Pormenent annets.s 05 Crna bact tne ‘ ¢ - 32,620,414 28.088.076 3.670.184 3.492.450
investonnts (Notes 3h, 13 and 326) ys 30.781.361 26.273.755 804,076 696.582
aft ies: of os . =i inn sae =: eine os e -
< boca: “sa a ae as 29.762.920 25.254.144 487.944 $03.033
- Abroad”* pauet . 994.795 989.275 * -
Other investments. 7 r1 t ; ‘ 60.671 88.062 487.285 651.568
Alowance for fosses (47.025) (55.728) (351.233) neve
Property, and equipment in use (Notes 2i and 14) 124120 1.249.287 2.284.078 f
bulirgs a use : : a 261.090 4.076.053 1.055.640
‘Other property, plant and equipment in use 3.182.063 2.918.957 4,347 893 4.404 B18
Accumulated . (3,940,813) (4.927.750) (3.139.668) (3,020,775)
Leased assets (Note 14) . - - "44424 11M
Leased assets - - 20.777 28.142
Accuruiated depreciation ; si : (9.356) (2.006)
Geferred charges (Notes 2. 3j and 15) 827.820 SE6.024 TOS. 642.948
Organization and expansion costs 1.516.778 2.183.141 1.850.219 1.893.771
Accumulated amortization (888.953) (1.818.117) (1.078.633) (950.822)
TOTAL 314.033.097 249,425,627 344.1846.406 286.547 .273
we an INANC: =
Bradiesco
Banco Bradesco S.A.
._ Balance Sheet on December 31 - R$ thousand
MULTIPLE BRADESCO' CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO .
Liabilities : 2007 2006 2007 - 2006
Curent Hebilities 477, 289.245 128,488,678 213.466.9686 961.256.821
. Dapeaits inotes 3k and 16a) 889.342.8351 8.748.827 F8.79T.442 $0.829.781
Demand deposits 28.429.110 20.304.697 28,495,555 20.526.800
Savings deposits 32,812.974 27.812 S87 32.812.974 27.812.587 *
. erbenk deposits 13.041.838 9.078.640 364.508 290.091
Tone deposits (Note 326) 13.589.722 449.195.4179 13.198.839 11.849,089
Other deposits 989.489 557.724 925.266 553.194
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase (notes 3k and 16} S4.683.2461 32.806.927 34,683,633 | 32.423.178
Own portiotio 18.885.269 ° 214.424.7682 18.924.688 21.343.014
‘Thitd-party partfota 29,777 227 3.471.383 28.878 .200 3.474.383
Unrestricted portioso 6.190.745 7.808.782 6.190.745 7.808.782
issuance of securities (Notes 16¢ and 32b): 1.514.664 - 4,896,593 4.733.438 4.984,401
Exchange Acceptances - - 406 3
Mortgage notes 866.725 839.336 901.490 858.490
Debentures (Note 16c-1) - . 42.821 $1,004
Secuities issued abroad 707,938 1.087.259 788.418 1.056.617
interbank accounts 16.632 7.384 16.832 5.8146
Unestiod receipts and payments fe 30 2
Interbank onlendings { . 157 - -
Corresportent banks : 16.832 §.814 18.632 §.814
accounts 2.619.618 2.224.292 2.824.233 R227
Thad-peny tunds in transit 2.919.618 « 2.224.292 2.921.233 2.225.734
Barrowlngs (Notes 17a and 32) 7,824,278 $,854,606 7.748.270 §.845,103
Local borrowings - official institutions : . 154 267
Local borrowings ~ other institutions . 373 44.487
Betrowings abroad 7.824.178 5.554.606 7.717.743 §.$00,389
Local onlendings - official institutions (Notes 17b and 326) §.168.629 4.D3.586 5.360.030 4.702.433
National treasury 50.260 99.073 $0,303 98.073
BNDES 2.490.548 2.188.507 2.490548 . 2.188, 507
CEF 13.468 8.470 14.780 10.065
FINAME 2.613.980 2.306.767 2.806.048 2.404.019
Other institubons 373 768 373 768
Foreign onlendings (Notes 17b and 32b} : 1.270.361 170 1.287, 281 170
Fornign onlendings. e 1.270.361 170 1.257.281 170
Derivative financial instruments (Notes 3d ard 32) : $44,636 512.226 868.954 510.881
Derivatve fnancial instruments $44,636 312 228 688,954 510.881
Technical provisions for insurance, private pension plans and certificated savings plans (Notes 3t and 2 - a &2.055.115 38.427.382
thas finbitities 14,874,465 9434088 214.625.8564 IAD2ZLOIE
Collection and collection of taxes and other contibutions 171.183 118.472 228,722 175.838
Foreign exchange portfolio (Note 11a) 3.466.147 2.385.341 3.467.189 2.386.817
Social and statutory 2.176.200 473.242 2.198.853 190.916
Fiscal and sodal security (Note 200) 760.408 861 870 2.356.153 2.800.884
Negovation and intermediation of amounts 392.306 129.512 657.700 $22,232
Financial and nt funds. 1,861. 876 1.851 876
Subordinated debts (Notes 18 and 32b) 34,402 39.955 850.635 59.413
Sundry (Note 200) 7.873.978 5.728.820 12.067.638 8.884.242
Long-term liabilities 106,276. 848 899.912.4389 97.038.535 TR AIT190
Deposits (Notes 3k and 16a) $4,478,007 $1,847,840 22,.826.304 23.376.482
interbank Geponits 30.626,773 28.172.259 7.985 .
Time deposits (Note 326) 23.849.234 23.375.581 22.918.339 23,375.452
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase (Notes 3k and 16b} 20,459.048 18.686,413 18.940.016 18,282.284
Own portfoto 20,489,048 18.685.413 18,940.016 18.252.254
Funds from issuance of securities (Notes 16¢ and 32b) 2.211.647 4.139.883 4,763,647 3.679.878
Mortgage notes 181 1.207 151 1.207
Oebentures (Note 16c-1) . “ 2.582.100 2.852.100 |
Securities issued abroad 2.211.396 1.138.676 2.211.308 1.418.871
Raorrowings (Notes 174 and 32b) 37.924 240.123 7.660 232.803
Local borrowings - official inshtutions . * 296 S13
Bortowings abroad 347.923 240.123 347 264 232.292
Local ontendings - official institutions (notes 17b and 32b} 8.393.302 6.778.474 8,726,408 6.933.536
National treasury : $78 -
BNOES ; 3.687.155 3.M3.511 3.887.158 3.343.514
CEF 83.604 $3.768 86,520 $9,844
FINAME : 4.053.691 3.377.028 4.981.301 3.534.018
Other institutions 852 1,163 852 1.163
Detivative financial instruments (Notes 3d and 32) 282.779 8.123 282.779 8.123
Derivative financial instruments 282.779 B23 282.779 8.123
Technical provisions for insurance, private pension plans and certificated savings plans (notes 3) and 23 . - 16.471.180 10,701,862
Other liabilities 20.107.242 14.816.586 24.977 673 19.236.282
Fiscal and social secunty (Note 20a) 3.144.575 2.026.364 7.483.638 5.213.836
Subordinated dabt (Notes 19 and 32b) 35.199.829 11.290.046 15.199.829 11.890 046
Sundry (Note 20b) 1.765.838 4.199.178 2.204.206 2.332.400
Future taxable income 109.662 90.148 189.147 180.460
Future taxable income 109.682 90.1468 489.147 180 460
Minortty interest in subsidiaries (Note 22) - - 188.412 57.440
Stockholders’ equity (Note 23) 30.387.344 24,636,362 30,357.244 26.636.362
Copital:
: Local residents 17.693.485 13,162.481 17.693.485 13.162.481
- Foreign residents 1.306.515 4.037.519 1.306.615 4.037.519
Capital reserves §5.824 5§.008 85.624 $$.008
Prof reserves 9.963.593 8.787.108 9.963.593 8.787.106
Mark-to-market adjustment - TVM and derivatives 1 489.976 1,644,661 1.489.976 1.644 661
Treasury stock (Notes 23¢ and 32b) (131.849) (50.410) (131.849) (50.410)
Stockholders’ equity managed by parent company 30.3867.344 24,636,362 ¥0.812.756 24,693,802
TOTAL 344,033,097 240.128.627 341.1846.406 268.647.273













THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 5B
eee FamGuard
a) Goodwill

In 2007, goodwill calculated by the acquisition of investments in the amount of R$952,543 thousand was fully
amortized,




In the 2â„¢ half of 2006, the existing goodwill was reviewed by the Management Bodies and according to the
Board of Directors’ resolution as of September 18, 2006 and purpose of notice to stockholders on this same date,
the referred goodwill, which corresponded to R$2,108,723 thousand, was fully amortized. The Board of
Directors’ proposals of this date were approved by the Special Stockholders’ Meeting held on October 5, 2006.







b) Other deferred charges
On December - R$ thousand
CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO MULTIPLE BRADESCO
Cost Amortization Residual value Cost —_ Amortization Residual value
2007 2006 2007 2006
Systems development 1,829,601 (1,061,867) 167,734 641,191 1,516,778 (888,958) _ 627,820, 565,024
Other deferred expenditures 20,618 (17,766) 2,852 1,758 - , - - :
Total in 2007 1,880,219 (1,079,633) 770,586 1,516,778 (888,958) 627,820
Total in 2006 1,893,771 (950,822) 642,949 2,183,141 (1,618,117) $65,024
PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS @
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Av. Francisco Matarazzo, 1400
Torre Torino
Caixa Postal 61005
; 05001-9803 S&o Paulo, SP - Brasil
{A free translation of the original in Portuguese) Telefone (11) 3674-2000

Report of Independent Auditors

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders
Banco Bradesco S.A.

1. We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Banco Bradesco S.A. and the
consolidated balance sheets of Banco Bradesco S.A. and its subsidiaries as of
December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the related statements of income, of changes in
stockholders’ equity and of changes in financial position for the years ended December
31, 2007 and 2006 and for the. second half of 2007, as well as the related consolidated. .
statements of income and of changes in financial position, for the years and half year
ended on these same dates. These financial statements are the responsibility of the
— management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial ~
statements.

2. We conducted our audits ‘in accordance with approved Brazilian auditing standards,
which require that we perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
the financial statements are fairly presented in all material respects. Accordingly, our
work included, among other procedures: (a) planning our audit taking into consideration
the significance of balances, the volume of transactions and: the accounting and intemal
control systems of the Bank and its subsidiaries, (b) examining, on a test basis, evidence
and records supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, and (c)
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management of the Bank and its subsidiaries, as well as evaluating the overall financial
statement presentation. :

3. In our opinion, the financial statements audited by us present fairly, in all material
respects, the financial position of Banco Bradesco S.A. and of Banco Bradesco S.A. and
its subsidiaries at December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the results of operations, the
changes in stockholders’ equity and the changes in financial position of Banco Bradesco
S.A., as well as the consolidated results of operatioris and of changes in financial
position, for the years and half year then ended, in accordance with accounting practices
adopted in Brazil.

4. Our audits were conducted for the purpose of issuing our report on the financial
_ statements referred to in the first paragraph, taken as a whole. The statements of cash
flows and of added value for the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006, which are
presented to provide additional information on Banco Bradesco S.A. and Banco
Bradesco S.A. and its subsidiaries, were not specifically required up to December 31,
2007 as an integral part of the financial statements, in accordance with accounting
practices adopted in Brazil. These statements were subjected to the same audit
procedures described in the second paragraph and, in our opinion, are fairly presented in

all material respects in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.

5. As described in Note 15, the goodwill on investments in associated and subsidiary
companies was fully amortized in.the years 2007 and 2006.

S4o Paulo, January 25, 2008

Fite:
PricewaterhouseCoopers

Auditores Independentes
CRC 2SP000160/0-5



n Luiz Pereira Cavalcanti

CRC 1SP172840/0-6 j

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts
from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-7788,
West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas.





subsidiaries

get ‘steady,
positive’
response |

FAMGUARD Corporation,
the BISX-listed parent of Fam-
ily Guardian, the life and
health insurer, said it had
received a “steady, positive”
response to the launch of its
two new subsidiaries.

“We have been pleased with
the early response to our

launch of FG Financial and FG

Capital Markets,” said Patri-
cia Hermanns, Family
Guardian’s president.

“A person who retires at age
65 is now expected to live, on
average, for another 20 to 30
years. That is a long time if you
are not prepared financially.
These issues are resonating
with the public, and I believe
they are responding to these
broader concerns.

“With the launch of these
new companies we are not
changing gears, but instead we
are widening the umbrella of
protection.”

Zhivargo Laing, minister of

state for. finance, who
addressed a 200-strong crowd
at the launch of the two new
subsidiaries, said: “With the
establishment of its two com-



Eee

PTE.

ZHIVARGO LAING



panies, FG Capital Markets
and FG Financial Limited, to
offer pension, mutual funds
and brokerage advisory ser-
vices, Family Guardian is tak-
ing the next step in the evolu-
tion of its business to create a
more competitive financial ser-
vices company, with regional
and global reach.”



a MAAS ETT LUT

Tyre ery A CT



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SAU ON SZETO of NO.
53 BRUCE AVENUE, FREEPORT, .GRAND: BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister. responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within-twenty-eight days from the
21st+ day of May 2008 to the Minister responsible for:
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

se NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND

CALL AS PER THE CO-OPERATIVE
ACT 2008 SECTION 22



The 23 Annual General, Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 24", 2008 —

9:00 am

at

‘Holy Trinity Activities Centre
Trinity Way
Stapledon Gardens

Refreshments will be provided





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Insurer link



UUM O
apprentice
RUE Ce

FROM page 1B

providers, who often steered clear of recent
college graduates because they lacked a
financial track record - and both funds and
collateral - as they built a career.

“We are transforming the goodwill of
many generations of Bahamians that we
have served, and reconnecting with the
younger segment of our population,” Mr
Cooper added.

“We find this market is underserved. It is
looked at as being a liability - no financial

track record, no funds. We have been able .

to cultivate a product that provides flexi-
bility for these people in the early stages of
their career, so we grow as they grow.”

Among the Symphony initiatives, Mr ~

Cooper said, were mortgages with an initial
amortisation (payment) term of 40-45 years.
“As people can afford to pay more, we

reduce the amount of amortisation. It .

makes products and services more afford-
able,” he added.

“It allows these people to build a track
record with us, at the same time as having
their needs met. It sets them on a path ear-
ly before they get into the bad habits many
Bahamians get into.”

British American Financial outsourced
its health insurance policy portfolio, which

PA
Business

was largely group-oriented with 6,500 pol-
icyholders and 200 clients, to Generali some
two years ago.

Mr Cooper described that transition as
having “gone extremely well”.

He added: “We are extremely pleased
to have outsourced it, and can now focus on
our life insurance business and general
insurance-business, and improve the over-
all service we provide to our clients. We
can focus the attention that we spent on
the health business.

“We spent a lot of time, energy and
resources, and it’s a very difficult business in
terms of trends in the marketplace, volatil-
ity, profitability, the state of the health of
the Bahamian public. More preventative
care needs to happen if that business is to
be sustainable in the long-term.”

On British American Financial’s first-
year achievements, following the manage-
ment buy-out led by Mr Cooper himself, he
said: “Over the first year, our objective was
to re-position the business and IJ think we
succeeded. We wanted to build on the core
values of trust, integrity and honesty to
become more innovative, creative and cut-
ting edge..

“To do this, we transformed our busi-
ness from only insurance to full financial
services. We made our product offering
more relevant to the entire Bahamian mar-
ket.”





. BTC bidde

prepared
to ‘modify’
its offer

FROM page 1B

privatising BTC, remain:
strong, despite the global eco-
nomic downturn and credit/liq-
uidity crunch in the financial
system, which has impacted the
telecommunications industry
more than most.

Between July 2, 2007, and
March 3, 2008, the North
American Telecommunica-
tions Index - which measures
the value of telecoms compa-
nies - fell by as much as 30 per
cent, compared to a 15 per cent
decline in the S&P 500 Index.

This, in turn, has raised con-

_cerns over whether Bluewater
would still be prepared to pay
the $260 million price it had
committed to in the agreement
in principle reached with the
Christie administration. .

James Smith, minister of
state for finance in that gov-
ernment, was one who
expressed such doubts last
month in an interview with
The Tribune.

He questioned whether
there was “anyone out there
prepared to pay that price, giv-
en what has happened in the
interim in global markets. We
have let this thing drag on and
on and on”.

Bluewater had agreed to pay

\

the Government $225 million
up front for a 49 per cent BTC
stake, with $30 million to fol-
low five years later after its

‘ exclusivity period ended, and

$5 million in the sixth year.
The Tribune has been told,

* though, that Bluewater, whose

principals feature ex-Time
Warner, NTL and other sea-
soned telecom sector veterans,
already has the financing in
place to complete the deal and
will not be impacted by the
global financial crunch.

Among the key issues in.the
privatisation discussions will
be the length of the exclusivity
periods for fixed-line and cel-
lular services that Bluewater
wants, as this will be critical to
BTC’s value and the price it is
willing to pay, not to mention
further telecoms market liber-
alisation in the Bahamas.

It is understood that all
options are on the table where
the privatisation committee,
led by Commonwealth Bank

chairman T. B. Donaldson and ,

ex-Central Bank governor,
Julian Francis, are concerned,
including the size of the BTC
stake sold.

Bluewater currently has an

exclusivity period with the |

Government on the BTC pri-
vatisation, the administration
believing that this has another
14 working days to run.

Identifying & Creating Opportunities
Keith Stokes, Executive Director

Newport ras of Commerce

Tourism as a Tool in Business & Entrepreneurial
Development: Think Inside The box!

i" Worker

rotection
needed
against
firms
that ‘up
and
leave’

FROM page 1B

ernment to ensure companies
coming into the country, espe-
cially if they are just a ‘shell
company’, to pay ‘x’ amount
of dollars into a fund in case of
bankruptcy, foreclosure, liqui-
dation.

“It’s a very major concern
to us, simply because if that
happens the worker is left real-
ly holding the bag. The com-
pany would, in some instances,
be a shell company with no
assets, and if they were able to
just leave, the worker would
be left without any recourse or
any compensation

“Even where there are com-
panies that do have assets, the
Government ought to consid-

er, where there are companies

coming in, requiring that they
establish a fund and pay into it
on a regular basis, so that if
they up and leave the workers
will be able to recover the larg-
er part of what they are enti-
tled to.”

Mr Ferguson said that under

' the Employment Act, employ-

ees were essentially preferred
creditors, with the amounts
due to them ranking ahead of
other creditors.

Private sector
waiting over

health reform
consultation.

FROM page 1B

As to whether the Coalition
would continue with the man-
date given to it by its mem-
bership, Mr Rolle added:

gliducation
Development
Seminar

“Absolutely. We have an
obligation to the persons that
supported us to continue our |
efforts.”

The Coalition, which is
formed from both employer
and trade union groups, is
working on a report which
compiles all its research and
findings into a single docu-
ment. Mr Rolle said the report
was now being vetted by Coali-
tion members before its public
release.

The former PLP govern-
ment passed the National
Insurance Act into law, via
Parliament, before it was voted |
out of office in last year’s May .
| . 2 general election.

The Christie administration,
Seminar Cost « $100

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Secretary eel
Caribbean Tourism Organization

Making, Maximizing & Protecting
Your Investment (Panel Dis USSD

NclAO elo acre ETO] AE See: ae
Jerome Pinder « Inspector Sandra Miller

Tuesday May 27th, 2008

8am - 5pm

British Colonia! Hilton Doing Business in The Bahamas

GUio me DcrcstnD

Barry Malcolm » Chester Cooper « Mario Cartwright
Andrew Wilson « Chris Mortimer

if it had been re-elected, would
likely have.commenced work
on the regulations to give the
scheme enforcement teeth,
hoping to bring it into effect
by New Year’s Day 2008.

RSVP:
[242] 322-2145

info@thebahamaschamber.com

Bahamas
Development
Bank

Bahamas US Embassy
Chamber of

Commerce



Lyford

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Telephone : 362 4774 x245



The Only School in the Caribbean Offering the Full IB Program



www.lcis.bs



WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 7B

THE TRIBUNE





GN-681

Hotel
revenues

up 8.4% to |

$403.1m

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

TOTAL Bahamian hotel
revenues were 8.4 per cent
higher at $403.1 million in
2007, the Central Bank’s annu-
al report revealed.

According to the Central
Bank, the increase was partly a
result of the addition of new
high-end hotel rooms via the
Cove and Reef properties in
Atlantis’ Phase III expansion,
which elevated the average
daily rate charged by all
Bahamian hotels by an esti-
mated13.5 per cent to $189.42
per night. ~ ;

It was also partially due toa
moderate firming in the aver-
age length of hotel stays to 6.6
nights, from 6.2 nights in 2006.

The Central Bank said that
in New Providence, total room
revenues advanced by 11.4 per
cent. Family Island statistics
showed a lower gain of 4.5 per
cent, with Grand Bahama suf-
fering an 8.3 contraction.

The report indicated that.

' preliminary tourism statistics
suggested an expansion in
overall output, as price
improvements and gains in
other hotel indicators mitigat-
ed the contraction in the num-

ber of tourists.

The Central Bank said there
was a 2.9 per cent visitor
arrival decline in 2007. This
outcome reflected a 4 per cent
reduction in sea arrivals, which
fell to 3.1 million, and a 0.4 per
cent reduction in air visitors to
1.5 million. The report
explained that arrivals to Nas-
sau dropped by 0.8 per cent,
Grand Bahama dropped by 9
per cent, and the Family
Islands dropped by 4.1 per
cent.

The report also. indicated
that construction output mod-

erated during 2007, as both —

commercial and residential

mortgage lending weakened ©
‘and tourism investment activi-

ty slowed in the latter part of
the year.

According to the Central .

Bank, total mortgage dis-
bursements, contracted by 10.5
per cent to $544 million in

2007, based on reductions in .

both the residential, 8.6 per
cent, and commercial, 26.9 per
cent, components.

Mortgage commitments for
new construction and new
repairs, which are a leading
indicator of construction activ-
ity, fell by 27.6 per cent in
number to 1,051 with a corre-

sponding decline in value by.

26.1 per cent to $133.2 million.



OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER

AND MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

GOVERNMENT OF BARBADOS
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES, CAVE BILL CAMPUS
CAVE HILL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS EXPANSION PROJECT

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

The University of the West Indies (UWI) has .received financing from the Caribbean
Development Bank (herein referred to as CDB) towards the cost of the Cave Hill School of
Business (CHSB) Expansion Project, and intends to apply a portion of the proceeds of this
financing to eligible payments under the contract for which this invitation for Pre-qualification is

issued.

CHSB Expansion Project is being implemented by UWI and CHSB. A Project Coordinator
within the UWI1’s, Planning & Projects Office will be responsible for the day-to day management
of project activities. Engineering Consultants have been retained by CHSB to assist in the tender .

administration and supervision of contracts,

The UWI & CHSB intcnd to pre-qualify contractors/joint. ventures of contractors for the

following work under this project.

Alterations and renovations to an existing two-storey training facility (approximately.
821 m*) and the construction of a two storey concrete and block, work extension
(approximately 1,198 m’). The site is located at Cave Hill, St. Michael, Barbados.

It is expected that bids will be invited in the third quarter of 2008.

Consideration will be limited to firms or joint ventures of firms which are legally incorporated or
otherwise organised in, and have their principal place of business in, an eligible country or

countries and are either:

(a) more than 50% beneficially owned by a citizen or citizens and/or a bona fide resident or
residents of an eligible country.or countries, or by a body corporate or bodies corporate _

meeting these requirements; or

(b) owned or controlled by the government of an eligible country provided that it is legally

and financially autonomous and operated under the commercial law of an eligible -

NOTICE moles | country.

NOTICE. is: hereby .given that GREGORY SMITH
| of SOUTH OCEAN GOLF RESIDENCE, P.O. BOX
CB-12951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

Eligible countries,are member countries of CDB.

The requirements for pre-qualification wilJ include:

| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why j-
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of May 2008 to (b) |
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, 1
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

(a) an average annual turnover (defined as billing for works in progress and completed) over
the last five years of United States Dollars (USD) 5,000,000 (five million) or equivalent;

demonstrable cash flow (including access to credit) of USD600,000 (six hundred
thousand) or equivalent;



experience as prime contractor in the construction of at least two assignments of a nature
and complexity comparable to the proposed project activity within the last six years (to
comply with this requirement, work quoted should be at least 80 percent complete); and

Legal Notice... --* >; (c)

SCD

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000) (d) A’Project Manager with 15 years experience in construction, 10 of which have been in

works of an equivalent nature and scope including not less than five years as Project

: Manager.
CONQUEST INTERNATIONAL LIMITED i

ae eee ae Eligible applicants may obtain further information from, and inspect the prequalification
document at, the first address below between the hours of 0830 to 1630 (local time) Monday
through Friday (except public holidays). A complete set of the pre-qualification documents, in
English, may be purchased by interested applicants on submission of a written request to the first
address below and upon payment of a non-refundable fee of Bds$500.00 or its equivalent in a

freely convertible currency. The method of payment will be Banker’s Draft.

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), CONQUEST INTERANTIONAL LIMITED is in
Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 18th day of

April, 2008. The request must clearly state “Request for Pre-qualification Documents for the Cave Hill School

of Business Expansion Project”. Potential applicants who request that documents be forwarded
to them are required to submit an account number from a local courier agent which accepts
freight-collect charges. The Project Coordinator will promptly dispatch the documents but under

no circumstances wil] be responsible for late delivery or loss of the documents.

SGG Services Generaux de Gestion (Suisse) S.A.
Rue de l’Arquebuse 7,
1204 Geneva
Switzerland .
Liquidator



Submission of applications for pre-qualification shall be in English and must be received in
sealed envelopes, clearly marked “Applications to Pre-qualify for Cave Hill School of Business

Expansion Project”.

VACANCIES

Success Training College anticipates the following
full-time vacancies beginning this fail:

Applications must be either delivered by hand or registered mail to the first address below not
later than 1600 hours (local time) on 30 May, 2008. A copy of the Application for Pre
qualification should be simultaneously submitted to CDB at the second address below. a

The UWI and CHSB reserve the right to accept or reject late applications or to annul the process
and seject all applications at any time prior to pre-qualifying contractors without thereby
incurring any liability to the affected prospective contractor(s) or any obligation to inform
prospective contractor(s) of the grounds for their action.

Faculty Positions
Accounting/Business
Information Technology
Mathematics
English Language
Allied Health Science

Applicants will be advised, in due course, of the results of their applications. Only contractors
and joint ventures pre-qualified under this procedure will be invited to bid.

Administrative Position 1. Project Coordinator, Civil Works 2 Procurement Officer
Recruiting Officer Planning & Projects Office * Project Services Division
Student Activities Coordinator Cave Hill Campus Caribbean Development Bank
The University of the West Indies P.O. Box 408, Wildey

Program Dev/Admin Officer University Drive, Cave Hill St. Michael
‘ ‘ St. Michael BARBADOS, W.I., BB11000
Interested persons should submit letter of interest BARBADOS Tel: 1 (246) 431-1600

along with curriculum vitae to the President, Success
Training College, Bernard Road, Nassau, by May 30,
2008. Applicants with relevant mater’s degree and
at least five years experience preferred for faculty
positions, but individuals with bachelor’s level
qualification may also be considered.

Fax: 1'(246) 426-7269

Tel: 1 (246) 417-4080
Email: procurement@caribank.org

Fax: 1 (246) 438-9195
Email: bforde@uwichill.edu.bb





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



eee een NS ee 8 Oh ee, Gee
As economy stumbles, gardeners turn to yard- “grown produce

m By ELLEN SIMON
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — High |

_ prices at the pump and the pro-
duce aisle have sent home gar-
deners into their yards with a
mission: Grow-it-yourself din-
ing. Sales of vegetable seeds,
tomato transplants and fruit
trees are soaring as‘enterpris-
ing planters grow their own
food.

- W Atlee Burpee & Caries
ny, the nation’s largest seed

company, has.sold twice as”

many. seeds this year as it did
last year, with half the increase
from new customers, the com-
pany’s president, George Ball,
estimates.

“When we saw the gas prices

go up, we said, ‘Oh boy,’” Ball
said.

Interest in growing fruits and
vegetables picks up during eco-
nomic downturns, people in
the industry say. Seed compa-
nies say a dime spent on seeds
yields about $1 worth of pro-

duce. Bad economic times can

also mean more time to gar- —

den — people who cancel their
summer vacations are around

to water their tomatoes. The
housing crunch also works in
favour of vegetable gardens: If
you can’t sell your home, you
can replant it.

“Over the past year or two
when my boyfriend and I went
shopping and started seeing
how little we got out of the
grocery store for how much,
we figured we might as well
give it a shot trying or our own
veggies and take some of the
weight off our pockets,” said
Janet Bedell, who works at a
lawn and garden center in
Venice, Florida.

Thinking

That kind of thinking is lead-
ing to a big year for compa-
nies that sell to fruit and veg-
etable gardeners. Seed Savers
Exchange, a nonprofit dedi-

‘cated to preserving heirloom

vegetables, ran out of potatoes
this year and mailed 10,000
tomato and pepper transplants
to customers in early May,

‘double its usual amount. The

organization, based near Dec-
orah, Iowa, sold 34,000 packets

of seed.in the first third of this :



Matt Rourke/AP

GEORGE BALL, chairman, president and chief executive officer of W Atlee Burpee 8 Company poses for
a photograph at the company’s headquarters in Warminster. Burpee & Company, the nation’s largest seed
company, has sold twice as many seeds this year as it did last. year, with half of the increase from new

customers, Ball estimates.

year, more than it did all last
year.

Stark Brothers Nurseries
and Orchards Company, a

fruit-tree nursery based in
Louisiana, Mo., has been so
busy that “we’ve had our
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staffed overtime for the past

’ two-months,” said Lita Eatock,

marketing manager.
“A lot of wholesalers are

ee |





really sold out of things,” said
Michael McConkey, owner of
Edible Landscaping, a fruit-
tree nursery and Web site
based in Afton, Va. “I was
attempting to get some apple
rootstock to graft onto some
apples and I really had to work
to find some.”

The learning curve for home
gardeners can be steep. Janet
Bedell in Florida said her first
fights were with bugs and fun-
gus; now she’s working on

‘keeping birds and squirrels

away.

While some vegetables, like
salad greens, are nearly effort-
less, others, like celery, pre-
sent a challenge. New garden-
ers often don’t what it takes
for a plant to survive, said
Ryan Schmitt, greenhouse
manager at The Flower Bin in
Longmont, Colo. “It’s not a
sculpture. Most people get the .
water thing, but sun and food,
_ they often forget.”

New vegetable gardeners are
packing classes from Skillins
Greenhouses in Falmouth,
Maine to Love Apple Farm in
Ben Lomond, Calif.

“If I think of a name ofa
class, I’ll give it and people will
come,” said Cynthia Sandberg,
owner of Love Apple Farm.
“People will drive three hours
for these classes. It’s not
because of me, it’s because .
they want to learn.”

Burpee’s eight-person hor-
ticulturist hotline at the com-
pany’s Warminster, Penn.
headquarters has been over-

- whelmed with calls from gar-

deners trying to learn the
basics of soil acidity and seed
starting. Absolute beginners
visiting nurseries occasionally
ask questions like, “Oh, toma-
toes are a plant?” said Schmitt
at the Flower Bin. “That’s usu-
ally followed by, ’Oh, I can
grow that?”

“It’s a teaching moment,” -
Schmitt said. “I can fill them

with the right information.”

GRDN, a shop in the New
York City borough of Brook-
lyn, is getting a lot of questions.
about which edible plants can
be grown on a fire escape, said
staffer Cindy Birkhead:
“There’s lots of interest in~
herbs, blueberry bushes, toma-
to plants, any transplants or
shrubs that bear edible fruit.”

People too busy to plant
their own gardens are hiring
specialists like Colin McCrate,
owner of two-year-old Seattle
Urban Farm Co., whose busi-
ness has doubled since last
year. Urban Farm’s projects
range.from building and plant-
ing one or two raised beds:to
ripping out a customer’s front

. lawn, installing drip irrigation

and planting a crop. Most of

his gardens cost $1,000 to-
$2,000; two customers this year

have told him they’re putting

their stimulus checks into their

gardens.

McCrate said he’s been
working 16-hour days; the
company’s staff has grown
from two last year to six. “We
can almost not keep up with
the demand there is for ser-
vices now,” he said.

The last few years of veg-
etable garden sales were “a
yawner,” said Mike Skillin,
owner of Skillins Greenhouses.
“People might plant a few
things here and there, but
they’re much more interested
in patio planting. This year,
people are taking these big
patio planters they have and
they’re planting vegetables in
them.”

Eva Burmeister, a pyofes-
sional violinist who lives in
New York City, began planting
vegetables at her family’s
home on Long Island after
returning from-seven years ia
Germany. “I was shocked at
food prices in the city, includ-
ing the farmer’s market,” she
said. “A few things that are
quite popular in Europe are
difficult to find here.” She’s
starting tomatoes, eggplants
and peppers. indoors under
grow lights and plans to trans-
plant them around Memorial
Day.

Onions, shallots and leeks
have been especially strong
sellers. Wholesale sales rose
one-quarter this year at Dixon-
dale Farms, a family-owned
farm in Carrizo Springs, Texas
that ships onion and leek trans-
plants to individual customers
and sells wholesale to Wal-
Mart Stores Incorporated,
Lowe’s Cos. and Home Depot
Incorporated, said Bruce Frais-
er, the company’s president,

But Fraiser repeats the old
farming joke that the way,.to
make a small fortune farming
is to start off with a large one.

“We'll get it while we can,”
he said. “The next hailstorm
might be around the corner.”



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BAHAMAS EDITION

‘WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

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Student Sex



eis involve two pupils
at New Providence School



5 aie Assistant Commissioner Hulan Hanna

‘Conflict of interest no bar to
hospital complaint inquiry’

@ By ALISON LOWE
: Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE chairman of the board
which licenses private medical
facilities yesterday denied that a
conflict of interest has prevent-

ed the board from investigating
a complaint about Doctor’s
Hospital.

Dr Kirtland Culmer is cur-
rent chairman of the Hospital
and Healthcare Facilities

SEE page 15

Cricket match turns ‘violent’

LOCAL cricket) players were

reportedly more interested in

landing blows with fans and players of an opposing team than
scoring points on the field during a Sunday match at Windsor
Park, unconfirmed reports to The Tribune claim.

SEE page eight

Never st
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Smart people you can trust.

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@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
_ Tribune Staff: Reporter
Ghomppsen@iribunsimediasnat

POLICE have committed themselves |
to investigating an alleged sex scandal
involving two students at a New Provi-
dence school which although receiving
significant media coverage was not report-
ed by school officials or parents, it
emerged Tuesday. _

Yesterday Acting Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Hulan Hanna said police

were investigating the issue and asked
the public to be patient while the investi-
gation is carried out.

“Why school officials failed to.report

lines.





@ By BRENT DEAN
—Tribuné Staff Reporter"
bdean@tribunemedia.net___





THE FEMALE teacher
| involved in a sex scandal with a
17-year-old male student at a
public school several months
ago, is still employed with the
ministry, but has been -reas-
signed to a role away from chil-
dren.



Sex scandal teacher given
‘new job away from children




the alleged incident involving a 17-year-
,old male-and a 14-year-old female caught
in a sexual act has been’a point of public
debate after the issue hit-national head-

Although the boy is a minor the inci-

SEE page 15

Ministry-of Education Per-
manent Secretary Elma Gar-
raway confirmed this to The
Tribune yesterday. .

She said the treatment given

to this teacher, through reas- |’
“sigpnnrent toa ministry role.|..




away from children, is the
same treatment that would be
given to a male teacher in the
same situation.

The story made headlines in
February as the teacher, who is
in her thirties, was suspected

SEE page eight









Cop shooting suspects to
appear in court today.

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter .
~~ +-tthompson@tribunemedia-net- -.

TWO male suspects in cus-
tody in connection with the
shooting and attempted robbery
of a vacationing New Jersey cop
will be arraigned in Magistrate's

Court on related charges today, -

senior police officials revealed
Tuesday.

The suspects were picked up
Monday — not over the week-



end as initial police reports indi-
cated — Acting Commissioner
of. Police Christopher McCoy
said at a press briefing at the
RBPF headquarters yesterday.

This brings the police investi-
gation to a "swift" close a week
after the brazen shooting of 49-
year-old John Casper in the
heart of the popular Cable
Beach tourist district. Fielding
questions from the media,

SEE page eight



BEC workers

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Pe Sy0) ane

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

BEC workers uncovered the
skeletal remains of a human

. body yesterday morning undera ~*

sidewalk at the entrance to
Montagu Beach.

The entire road was cut open
from just in front of the One
Montague Place office building
to the other side of the street
where the bones were slowly
unearthed piece by piece by
police and forensic officials.

The initial discovery occurred
at 11.30am, according to Asst

‘Supt Leon Bethell, officer in

charge of the Homicide Squad
at the Central Detective Unit. .
A human skull was visible

-yesterday on the sidewalk in

front of the beach. It was placed
on top of a white medical cloth,
along with what appeared to be
leg bones, vertebrae and other
miscellaneous bones police were
able to recover.

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Human skeletal remains
found under sidewalk















Major/Tribune staff

Felipé




TT Chee mn?

Mr Bethell said that authori-
ties currently have no informa-
tion on the identity of the per-
son. The bones will now be tak-
en in for medical evaluation,
and at that time, the sex of the
individual will be determined.

SEE page eight




Peer












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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







Arawak Cay is a popular hangout for Bahamians
and tourists alike. Its stalls and shacks are packed
every day with patrons indulging in fried snapper,
cracked conch and conch fritters, or cooling down
with an ice-cold daiquiri or a Kalik beer.

Development plans for the hot spot were discussed
at a meeting on Monday called by Agriculture Minis-
ter Larry Cartwright. Officials from the Arawak Cay
Association and vendors were invited to attend.

Members of the press, though invited, were turned
away at the door. Left in the lurch, The Tribune decid-
ed to canvass the area and interview vendors who did
not attend the meeting — but most.were reluctant.to
voice their concerns and suggestions for improving the
area. However, The Tribune did stumble on a few
outspoken individuals — including a Bahamian celebri-
ty who said their piece on the way forward for Arawak
Cay.





TIM CLARKE





= DARROLD MILLER

‘There i is tremendous potential here’




As easy-going, mellow Darrold
Miller was'on duty at the
Conch Crawl Stall.

The Tribune found the former TV and
radio personality cleaning the bar, where
customers enjoy small Bahamian dishes
and drinks.

Mr Miller, former Chief Operating
Officer at GEMS radio network, started

. working there on Monday. When asked
what he does at-the stall, Mr Miller
replied, “I am the boss, under a man-
‘agement contract, I manage this place.”

While speaking to the reporter, Mr

Miller greeted passersby. He said busi-
“ness is very slow at Arawak Cay, but
there is “tremendous potential.”

Proper lighting for the area is a con-
cern, he said, as it raises safety issues
for customers who’ park their cars at
night.

“Police neéd to get up off their laurels,
and patrol this area,” Mr Miller said,
adding that if officers were more visible,
drug chases like the one that occurred
last week would not take place there.

“Persons would think twice about

using thisport for illegal purposes if
police would be on the lookout,” he
said, “and apparently others have gotten
away with this many times before.”






































A good business
plan is based ona
sound strategy.

Your company pension...
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1 DOWN YOUR



EPORTS and PHOTOS:
REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Staff Photographer

ARAWAK CAY: ‘the way forward



JAMES SMITH

he said.

According to Mr Smith, some of
the police officers assigned to the
“carefree” about their

cay seem too
jobs.

He said that more must be done to
“ensure that Bahamian vendors have

first priority.

Concern over illegal practices

Sports bar owner James Smith said
that illegal practices “go down” very
often at Arawak Cay.

He said the public does not hear
about these incidents, because they
are “swept under the rug.”

“People dredging the harbours,
and Haitians bringing all the dope,
the coke, the guns, and everything,”



“These immigrants coming in and taking over,” said Mr Smith.

M ALEX MILLER
Bahamian band needed

Alex Miller, a fisherman
who supplies conch and fish
to vendors, believes that
Arawak Cay lacks “real”
Bahamian entertainment.

“We need a live Bahamian
band out here,” Mr Miller
explained. “We have all this
American music playing dur-
ing the day, when tourists
come here to get a taste of
our Bahamas.”

Parking is also a concern for Mr Miller. He
believes that government needs to Stop customers
from parking on the pavement in font of the



- stalls.

- “It hurts business here at the fry,” he eaid!

mi GENESTA WILLIAMS
Vendors must follow rules

Fresh to her new secre-
tarial post at an informa-
tion booth at Arawak Cay,
35-year-old Genesta
Williams believes that ven-
dors need to follow the
rules better. “In my first
days here, I notice that some vendors don’t close on
time, and some of these stalls stay open till 1am.”

She said the main office has received complaints
from vendors and owners about rest rooms not
being open for customers and persons to use after
hours. “These vendors want us close after. 12.to
accommodate their slackness,” Mrs Williams said.
“That’s not right.” She hopes that these concerns are
addressed in the redevelopment plan.



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He is pleased with government’s efforts to remove the garbage
that has accumulated over the years at Arawak Cay beach.

li MICHAEL JOHNSON
Limited parking a problem

Twenty-two year old Michael
Johnson is concerned that limited

cause a low turnout at this year’s
Junkanoo in June festivities.

Mr Johnson said customers are
not permitted to park “across the
road” this year. “The parking
spaces are a little too small now,” he said. “At one
point they were,big enough to hold all the cars, but not
anymore”. Mr Johnson added that immigrants opening
new businesses have become a big problem for
Bahamian vendors at “the fry.” He said that Bahami-
an vendors taught many of the immigrants to prepare
native dishes, but now they feel they have “rights” to
operate their businesses as Bahamian vendors do.

“This has been happening for two or three years” he
said, “and we have to do something about that.”

lj ELANOR ROBERTS
Cay workers ‘doing well’

Vendors at the cay are doing
well, 56-year-old Elanor
Roberts said.

She believes they shouldn’t
complain too much about their
lot. “They making more money
than most of us,” she said, “and
Sunday evenings is be really
lucrative here for them.”

Mrs Roberts has been employed-at Arawak Cay



for eight years, and said she has experienced the -

“highs and lows” of business at the cay:

She agreed that vendors have not:been, keeping,
regular operating hours. Mrs Roberts explained ~
that all workers at Arawak Cay should operate. apm
to 4pm; or 4pm to midnight shifts.













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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS |

Man charged
in connection
with teen reat
tragedy

A MAN was charged yes-
terday in connection with an
incident over the weekend in
which a police officer was shot
at and a teenager died.

Don Murphy, 31, was
arraigned before Magistrate

Guillemina Archer at Court |

10 in Nassau Street, charged
with possession of a firearm
with the intent to endanger
life as well as causing damage.

According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that on Sat-
urday, May 17, Murphy was
in possession of a shotgun with
the intent to endanger the life
of police constable 2820
Ezekiel Pratt.

Court dockets also allege
that Murphy caused $800 in
damage to a 2000 Chevrolet
Impala, the property of P/C
2820 Ezekiel Pratt.

Murphy pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was grant-
ed bail in the sum of $10,000
with one surety. The case has
been adjourned to July 15 for
the start of a preliminary
inquiry.

According to police reports,
a 17-year-old male passenger
of a red 2000 Chevy 1500
truck died after the vehicle he
was in collided with a 2000

Chevy Impala which was"

attempting to escape gunfire
from another vehicle.

Court hears

drug allegation

e A 20-year-old man was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday charged with
possession of marijuana with
the intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Sunday,
“May 18, Anthonious Adder-
ley was found in possession of::|:

10 grams of marijuana. Adder-
ley, who was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez, pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted
bail in the sum of $3,500 with
one surety.

The case was adjourned to
June 3 and transferred to
Court Eight, Bank Lane.

Man faces
fraud charges

e A 38-year-old Sea Breeze
Lane man was arraigned in

' Magistrate's Court yesterday

on fraud charges.

According to court dockets,
it is alleged that on Wednes-
day, May 14, Justin Todd was
found in possession of a
forged Bahamian passport
bearing the name of Michael
Pinder.

Court dockets also allege
that on the same day, Todd
uttered the forged document
and attempted to obtain
$298.45 cash from the Super
Value foodstore in the Golden
Gates Shopping Plaza:

your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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‘black file’ of PLP names
linked with Harl Taylor

THE FNM is set to disclose
PLP links with murdered
homosexual handbag designer
Harl Taylor if the opposition
goes ahead with its plan to
raise the school sex scandal in
the House of Assembly today,
it was claimed last night.

The government is said to
have a “black file” containing
PLP names known to have
been closely associated with
the gay entrepreneur and his
alleged lover, Dr Thaddeus
McDonald.

If the PLP goes through
with its threat to “name
names” in the recent school
sex scandal, when a 17-year-
old boy related to an MP was
caught in a sex act with a 14-
year-old girl, the FNM report-

edly plans to use its file to

pour shame on the opposition.

Police are said to be in pos-
session of Taylor’s “personal
organiser” — a book of his

many social contacts — which’

FNM insiders claim throws
much light of his clandestine
sexual activities.

“There is no doubt that
names will be named if the
PLP goes ahead with its plan
to embarrass the. family
involved in the sex affair,” a
source told The Tribune.

“The plan is that, if the PLP
can use parliamentary protec-
tion to name names in the
school sex matter, then the
FNM can name names in the
Taylor-McDonald affair.

“The fact is that police
uncovered layers and layers
of filth in gay society during
their investigations and there
is no doubt that gay society
here is a powerful force.

“The FNM will be naming
names and saying who was
associated with whom. I
understand Taylor’s organiser

contains the names of all the

people he associated with.”
Some of these names, he
said, were in the “political

Mrs MUCH seam er

Move follows Opposition plan
to raise sex scandal in House



“There is no doubt that names
will be named if the PLP goes
ahead with its plan to
embarrass the family involved
in the sex affair.” 3



establishment”. and their dis-
closure would shake Nassau
society to the core.

The source also said that
plans were afoot, should the
PLP go ahead withiits plan, to
reveal more about rape alle-
gations made against Bradley
Roberts when he was a PLP
Cabinet minister...

..The brutal murders of Tay-
lor and*McDonald:in their
homes last November have
not yet been solved, even
though police are said to have

..ted these murders,”

strong forensic evidence in
their possession.
Critics claim detectives have

been thwarted by influential .

closet homosexuals who fear
exposure if the culprit is
caught.

It is believed that “every-
one in the influential gay com-
munity, knows who. commit-
the source
-claimed.

what would be revealed if the
matter came to court.”

Man accused of 1996 killing of club manager

has bail on more recent charges reduced

THE man accused of the
1996 shooting death of night-
club manager Joyanne
Cartwright had his bail on
more recent charges reduced
yesterday.

Ashley Newbold, 41, of
Lifebuoy Street, is accused of
attempting to extort money
from Michael Stuart on March

ei 1

He was also accused of
threatening to kill Stuart.
Police allegedly found New-
bold with counterfeit US $370,
a .357 revolver and 20 bullets
for the gun on April 4. New-
bold, who was arraigned on
the charges before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel last month,
pleaded not guilty to the

charges and was granted bail
in a total sum of $25,000.

Yesterday his attorney
Tamara T. Taylor was suc-
cessful.in getting his’ bail
reduced to $15,000 by Acting
Supreme Court Justice Elliot
Lockhart.

- Newbold was charged
with the murder of former 601

_ manager Joyanne Cartwright,

24, in 2001, five years after her
death and convicted two years

- later.

His conviction, however,
was overturned and a retrial
was ordered. Newbold was
freed on bail in 2006 pending

the retrial which has not yet

taken place.

Murder accused faces firearm
and ammo possession charges

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — A 29-year-
old Freeport man on bail in
connection with a murder
charge was brought before the
courts again to face firearm
and ammunition possession

' charges.

Herbert Lewis, a resident of
108 Grenfell Avenue, was
charged before Magistrate
Andrew Forbes with posses-
sion of an unlicensed firearm.
He was also charged with pos-

_ session of six live rounds of

ammunition.
It was alleged that on May
18, Lewis had in his posses-

. sion a..38 special revolver and ~

six .38 bullets without being
the holder of a special licence
from the Licensing Authori-
ty.

Lewis was represented by
lawyer Simeon Brown.

He pleaded not guilty to
both charges.

Magistrate Forbes
adjourned the matter to Octo-
ber 28 and remanded Lewis

to Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox

‘ Hill, until that date. Lewis was
charged with the 2000 murder
of Johannes Laleb, a 49-year-
old man who was employed
as an engine foreman on The
Big Red Boat.



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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

Looking at
crime and
FNM solutions

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S.; B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department. (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Police are not above the law

THIS WEEK a police officer, who pleaded
not guilty to assaulting an elderly woman, was
escorted to court in handcuffs. He protested
the cuffs.

He complained that by being cuffed he was
being made look like a criminal. He appeared
reluctant to go to court when he realised that
press photographers were waiting to take his
picture.

A member of an elite force, he expected

special treatment.

In-March this year there was a similar inci-
‘dent, but in that case the accused officer did
get special treatment — no cuffs. His police
colleagues rallied around to protect him from
the press.

The public objected as did the press.

In this case the police officer was one of two
men charged with aiding the escape of a pris-
oner from the Elizabeth Estates police station.

This incident brought to a head years of pub-
lic complaints about the: way police officers,
escorting fellow officers facing charges, give
special treatment to their accused colleagues
— treatment that civilian defengauts do oo
get.

Arraigned police officers were ecrendy
taken to court without handcuffs, shielded from
media cameras by the jackets of the officers

__escorting them, and taken through the back
door of the court house, in an effort to bypass
the media.

“Often when divifian defendants are cent aa

taken to court they try to hold their heads down
or away from the cameras. The escorting officers
are heard to say, “Hold your head up! Hold
your head up!”
Immediately acting Police Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson put his foot down.
In future, he ordered, if a police officer falls
_ afoul of the law, he was to be treated as any-cit-
izen brought before the bar of the court.
He was to be escorted to court in handcuffs
without the moral support of fellow officers.
This should be a lesson for all police officers

— betray your uniform and you will be stripped —

of its protection.

The choice is the officer’s to make.

As far as the Commissioner is Concerned if
one of his officers crosses the line he is on his
own — in cuffs on his way to face the mast
trate.

Apparently the Police Staff Association is
upset by the Commissioner’ s edict. It is too
bad.

Unfortunately, although many fine men and
women make up the ‘Royal Bahamas Police
Force today, it is not the respected force ey it
once was.

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~ Too many of the young officers, brought up in
the troubled, materialistic society of today’s

. Bahamas do not appreciate the strict discipline

that moulded Reginald Ferguson into the man
he is now.

Raised on the unsophisticated island of Ack-
lins, where after school he fished from the rocks
with the boys and played softball, he was a
teenager when he joined the police force.

He came under that strict British discipline
that would not have tolerated any of the liber-
ties that some members of the force take today.
If they betrayed their uniform they were severe-
ly punished.

Mr Ferguson is a disciplinarian and hopefully
he will be able to pull the force back in line to
the point where all of them will not only under-
stand, but obey the rules.

They must accept that if they are accused of
committing a criminal offence, they too will be
paraded in cuffs to the courts. The first thing
that they must learn is that they are not above
the law. If they break the law they should

expect no special consideration from the col-

leagues they have failed.

Several police officers — former assistant
police commissioner Paul Thompson being fore-
most among them — stftuggled long and hard
for the local force to have its own police asso-
ciation.

Mr Thompson admired ‘the strength of the
British associations, both in England and

throughout the Commonwealth.

He saw how much good an association could
do for its members:

Here the local association was instrumental in
obtaining regular working hours, ‘better death
benefits and insurance policies, gmong other
benefits for its members.

However, time would suggest that there is at
least one flaw in the local association.

In the British and: Commonwealth models,
the association is made up of two divisions —
the first division whose members are from con-
stables to inspectors, and the second division
made. up of Assistant Superintendents to the
Commissioner.

The Commissioner is always a member of
the staff association. All ranks work together
with the Commissioner and present a united
front for the good of their members.

However, in the local association, there is
only the first division.

The Commissioner and his assistants are not

- members.

And so the public is given the unfortunate
impression that the force is divided — the asso-
ciation against the Commission. This is not
good. It breaks down public confidence.






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EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHY has 800 police reservists,

working an average of 300 hours ..

a month, not been paid since
December 2007? Another glitz in
the system, I suppose?

Carl Bethel gave that same
lousy, lame excuse for withhold-
ing salary payments and other
benefits, from Mr Stephen
Plakaris, Director of school secu-
rity, for about six:'months and
when he complained, publicly, he
was fired him from his post.

Why has the police association
been ordered to discontinue
allowing police officers to per-
form “off duty” services to those
private businesses that wish to
hire them?

Black crab disease, I suppose?

Tell me, where are the FNM
government’s “trust agenda”
solutions to the many, escalating,
crime problems we are confront-
ed with in this country? Their
answer cannot be to not pay
police officers; take police pres-
ence from the schools; withhold
salary payments of key security
personnel; fire all suspected PLP
supporters from the governmen-
t’s employ and generally, to dis-

' mantle the police force the way

they have; that cannot be all they
can come up with.

I am reliably informed that, ~

about 30 police officers reported
“SICK” last week Wednesday or
Thursday, at central police sta-
tion in Nassau; the problem?

They caught a virus from being
disallowed from performing “off
duty” private security jobs, where
they were being paid, well, for
their services. Any jackass knows
that it makes good common sense
not to dismantle, completely, a
system unless you have an avail-
able, better, replacement.

What they (FNM government)
did, with respect to removing
police officers from providing
security to our schools and their

~ attachment to the Urban Renew-
‘al programme, was criminal in my .

opinion, to say the least.

The government, because of its
lack of wisdom and asinine deci-
sions, has created a minefield of
potential for a “bee-hive” of crim-
inal activity.

Thursday of last week, we wit-
nessed a major altercation
between police officers and some
high school students, from one of
our schools in Nassau. The police
on the scene, had to summon
reinforcements to help get the sit-
uation under control. We can
expect an escalation of these
kinds of incidents, as lawlessness
continues to take centre stage and
spiral out of control.

Tommy Turnquest and Ingra-
ham’s FNM government obvi-

ously have no solutions; else they —

would have employed them by
now.

Say what they like, Urban
Renewal as structured and intro-













LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia, net



duced by Perry Christie’s PLP
government, had the potential of
controlling and reducing the com-
mission of crime, across the
board, by at least 75 per cent; if
allowed to continue to operate
effectively. Coupled with
Christie’s, very effective school
policing programme, I would
have dared to predict that crime,
by now, would have been well on
its way to becoming minimal; but
it wasn’t their (FNM) ideas so

_ they dismantled the programmes,

Can anyone tell us how many
school children have been killed
on school grounds since the FNM

_ removed the police?

How many stabbed? How
many legs broken?

How mapy serious injuries.

from altercations? We probably
will never know, because they
hide the statistics, and what of
the after school programmes for

THE TRIBUNE





neither worthwhile nor prudent
for us to continue, as a nation, to
attempt to fight crime and crimi-
nal activity, after the fact. There
needs to be developed and
emphasis placéd on a new
approach; a new and different
mindset, if you will, where pre-
vention gets prjonitised; as
opposed to cure.

The root cause for crime must
be dealt with if we are to ever
make any inroads and get results
from our very feeble efforts.

We will never solve our crimi-
nal problems, if all we do is try
and catch the perpetrators after
the commission of a crime and if
we happen to be successful in
apprehending the right culprit;
just lock them away in Fox Hill
prison.

That will not aaarees our prob-
lem. While we are in.a fight for
our very survival, they tell me
that your “matter of trust” with its
“trust agenda” FNM government,
is preparing a review of the
salaries of Government Ministers
and members of parliament with
the view to giving themselves an

: OEP. increase;.well that will be the day.
the children, initiated and man- i

aged by Christie’s Urban Renew- FORRESTER

al? The 100 strong Farm Road J CARROLL JP

marching band and others? All Freeport,

dismantled. vis OX, Grand Bahama,
I am of the opinion, that it is May 19, 2008.

Decent people look on PLP
hatchet slingers with disgust

EDITOR, The Tribune

I've seen some nasty things in politics but the PLP's hatchet slingers
(including those on the internet) going after a teenager for an alleged
sexual encounter in a private school beats all.

While pretending to talk about double standards, what they are in
fact doing is trying to expose the identity of the children involved, at
least the identity of the boy, just to bring public embarrassment to his
parents. That's the lowest of the low.

I wonder if these people ever stop to think that they too have chil-
dren or grandchildren and if they don't, certainly people..close.to

them. What goes around! Also they were once young and probably. did:

things they would be ashamed of as adults.

That's why the law protects the identity of minors. Trying to
expose a boy allegedly involved in sexual misbehaviour because of who
his parents are is really nasty.

If the police should look at anything, they should look at that. And
everybody ought to know that you don't have to call names to identi-
fy someone. That's what the police should investigate. They should also
investigate and prosecute the old. gray men who prey on underage girls.

Every one of these ‘hatchet slingers live in the same country I live in
and so they know what's going on in our schools and in our society
where children are swamped with sexual stuff electronically. They
know that minors who misbehave sexually are seldom if ever prose-
cuted.

The parents and the school are in the best position to give the
right punishment without destroying the children. I believe I read in one
of your editorials or a letter that what should happen is that the parents
should show love to. these children and give them the professional
counseling they need.

Why should one boy. be crucified and a girl exposed because of who
the boy's parents are? These hypocrites are the ones guilty of double
standards. And it won't gain them any political points. To the contrary,
decent people, including PLPs, look on with disgust.

I think the newspapers should be careful not to facilitate the scan-
dal-mongers with the misinformation they spew. I was glad to see
that The Tribune corrected a report that there was a video of this
alleged incident. If there was one going the rounds on the internet as
rumoured then it should be easy to produce it.

The truth is that the teacher who was reported to have seen the
alleged incident saw nothing. It turns out she was repeating what
another student told her.

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\
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

oe eee
Genocide survivor
to tell her story

@ MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GENOCIDE survivor who
escaped death when more than
one million people were ruth-
lessly slaughtered in Rwanda is
coming to Nassau to share her
story with 1,000 high school stu-
dents.

Immaculée Ilibagiza survived
the 100-day genocide in 1994 by
hiding in a bathroom for three
months while her friends and
family were brutally murdered.

When Ms Ilibagiza emerged
her parents, brothers and friends
were among the mounds of bod-
ies, and yet she found the com-
passion to personally forgive her
enemies.

Ms Ilibagiza, who has docu- .

mented her story in ‘Left to Tell:
Discovering God Amidst The
Rwandan Holocaust’, serves as
an inspiration to thousands of
people around the world.

Bahamian Tina Klonaris-
Robinson was so inspired by her
story she travelled to Rwanda
with Ms IJlibagiza to support her
project educating hundreds of
children who were orphaned in
the genocide, and met a people
who are willing to forgive and
move forward.

With sponsorship from the
John Templeton Foundation and
the support of The Counsellors
Limited, Mrs Klonaris-Robinson
is bringing Ms Ilibagiza to Nassau
to share her story.

Mrs Klonaris-Robinson said:
“So many of us don’t want to
hear a difficult story because it is
too much trauma, but when you
hear her story and experience her

you will be left inspired and feel-

ing that hope.
“Her visit to the Bahamas i is

going to be so important for all of



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

PERSONAL FRIEND of Ms Ilibagiza, Tina Klonaris-Robinson speaks to
members of the media yesterday about the survival of llibagiza during the
Rwanda genocide period.

us because there is so much anger
and so much hatred in our school
system, and children are looking
to gangs and’violence as a way
out of their trauma and suffering,
but she shows us another way.

“It is about learning to have
compassion for those that have
wronged you.”

She added: “Perhaps you think
you don’t know how to move for-

. ward in forgiveness and love, but

she did, and I can only say that I
was forever changed, and many
people are changed, by her expe-
rience. You can feel love emanate
from her and you will feel as
though you are in the presence
of a saint.”

Ms Ilibagiza, who was 24 when
she lost her family in the geno-
cide, said: “When this whole thing
happened it did not exclude any-
body and students and. children
can understand that more than
many adults because their minds

are so open. They understand

_ that horrible things can happen.
. to children their age.

“There is a way out of this hor-

rible situation. We can face any

hardship. Just know that this is
not the end of the world, or a rea-
son to hate and retaliate. Just
know that after night there is
always day, there is joy that will
come of every suffering.”

Her charity, The Left to Tell

‘Charitable Foundation, helps chil-

dren in Rwanda and around the
world. Ms Ilibagiza will speak to
around 1,000 grade 10 and 11 stu-
dents from public and private
high schools on Thursday, June
5, and will hold a free lecture
open to all at St Francis Xavier

* Cathedral in West Street Nassau

at 7pm that evening.

Her book is available from
Logos book store and Chapter
One. For more information log
on to www.lefttotell.org.bs

Major movie ‘Duplicity’
being shot in Nassau

oWALKING onto a movie Set-
is usually a bit‘disconcerting'—
people moving everywhere,
wires running in all directions,
_ cameras poking out at all angles
and folks bellowing out instruc-
‘tions across the set.

Not so for the set of Duplici-
ty, the Universal Pictures film in
principal photography at the
Atlantis Resort. Members of
the team say the air on the set is
distinctly tamer and more tem-
pered than on others.

Producers Jennifer Fox and
Kerry Orent shed some light on
this phenomenon.

’ Mr Orent, who’s worked on
such diverse films as Kate and
Leopold, The Pelican Brief and
The Journey of August King,
said: “It’s the nature of the
crew. It starts with Tony, the
director. It’s very low-key, very
professional. It’s the way we
like to work.”

Having 10 years of studio
experience and producing on
films like Syriana and Good
Night and Good Luck, Ms Fox
said:
worked together before. We did
Michael Clayton together, so we
have a short hand and a confi-
dence with one.another. . . it’s
nice.”

Duplicity has a total shoot in
Nassau of about a week, mainly
in the Atlantis Casino, the Roy-
al Towers and at the One and
Only Ocean Club resort.

It’s a film by Academy
Award-winning director and
writer Tony Gilmore, known
for critically-acclaimed films
Michael Clayton, the Bourne
Identity, the Bourne Suprema-
cy and the Bourne Ultimatum,
and older favorites like
Armageddon and Dolores Clai-
borne.

The film’s megastars are Julia
Roberts and Clive Owen.

Roberts plays Claire and Owen ©

plays Ray — both corporate
spies secretly working together
and secretly having a relation-
ship. They follow a compulsive
gambler, a high roller with a
huge secret to the casino, to
entrap him.

The script was originally writ-
ten about five years ago and

“it’s also a crew that has -

“Academy Award-winner ” :
Tony Gilroy directing film





DIRECTOR TONY GILROY shows a local Bahamian croupier how to pre-

pare for her time on-camera.

‘was written by Tony Gilroy

expressly for the Atlantis loca-
tion.

Fortunately for the filmmak-
ers, the Bahamas is not unfa-
miliar with the movie business,
and they say there was a decent
pool of local talent on hand
from which they could select
the best-suited for work on the



film. The Casting Co, a local

talent/ casting agency in Nas-
sau, operated by Heather
Carey, is handling the extras
casting for the film.

Some 400 extras were hired,
as well as one lucky person ina
speaking role.

The film was largely shot in
New York City. From Nassau,
the crew will move to Rome for
some of the film’s final scenes.

The Bahamas Film Commis-
sion and Ministry of Tourism
said they are “more than
pleased with the current pro-
duction”.

According to Film Commis-
sioner Craig Woods, “this is cer-
tainly helping the development
of our film industry. In the last
four years, four major studio
films have shot on Nassau and
Paradise Island — New Line Cin-
ema’s After the Sunset, MGM’s
Into the Blue; Sony Pictures’
Casino Royale; and now Uni-
versal’s Duplicity.”

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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







CT? d
like to
grow
old,
spend
all my
money

and die
broke.”



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Farewell to the cea
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Paradise Island its name





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ON HARTFORD, 1911 2008





@ By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor



NE of the
most colourful
figures of the
modern
Bahamas, Huntington Hart-

ford — who gave Paradise .

Island its name — has died at

. his Lyford Cay home. He was
97.
The A and P grocery chain.

heir, who somehow got
through a fortune of at least
$600 million in a series of
madcap business ventures,
passed away on Monday — just
over four years after he had
returned to his beloved
Bahamas to spend his final

i days.

The legendary ex-playboy,
born into phenomenal wealth,
was a dreamer who had the
cash to make most of his
dreams. come true. Unfortu-
nately, few of them ever did.

When he bought Hog Island
in 1959 from the Swedish
industrialist Axel Wenner-
Gren, he devised grandiose
schemes on classical themes
to entice the super- rich to the
Bahamas.

His first move was to
change the island’s name to
Paradise. Then he set about
importing the now famous
cloisters from Italy as part of a
plan to introduce chariot-rac-

ing to Paradise in his own Col-
isseum.
However, - Hartford’s

dreams for Paradise were
soured by the old UBP gov-

.-ernment. They denied him a
»»gasino licence — and prevented. ~

him building a bridge to Nas-
sau.

It was only after he sold out
to James Crosby of Resorts
International that his dreams
for Paradise came true. And

by then he had left Nassau—a .

visionary whose dazzling ideas
were never allowed to reach
fruition while he was here.

However, there was no bit-
terness when when he was res-
cued from a reclusive life in
New York by his daughter
Juliet in 2004 and brought
back to Lyford Cay to spend
his final days and revisit old
haunts..

He had always said: “T’d like

to grow old, spend all.my.

money and die broke” — an
ambition he very nearly
achieved, though Juliet insists
he was never broke in the true

sense, not with $11 million.

stashed away in a trust fund.

-Lothario

I: March, 2004, I met
him at the Ocean Club,
one of his own fantastic cre-
ations, and — though some-
what vague by then — he man-
aged to express his joy at
being back on his old stamp-
ing ground, where he once
hosted Sir Winston Churchill,
Earl Mountbatten, The Beat-
les and President Richard
Nixon, among many others,
and lived life in grand style.

“They were the best days of
my life,” the by then frail
Hunt — as his friends all knew
him — told me on the sun-
splashed club terrace he had
regretfully left behind 40 years
before.

He said the Bahamas, his
home when he was in his
prime as the suave lothario
and friend of the stars, was
where he wanted to spend the
rest of his life. He had grown

\ tired of New York, where he

lived as a recluse in a Man-
hattan brownstone, and want-
ed to escape the cold to enjoy
once more the kinder climate
of Nassau.

Juliet, a model and artist,
said at the time that he always

i ee
UU ty

Mey hy
PHONE: 322-2157





Boyish good
looks faded with
his fortune

ORN in New York on April 18, 1911, George Hust
’ ington Hartford II was named for his grandfather, who
] efabiehed the Great Atlantic and ee Tea Co., which later
became the supefmarket giant A and P.
- Hartford came into 10 per cent of the c company at the ape of 11
after the death of his father, Edward, who had made his own for-
tune as an inventor and ‘manufacturer of automobile compo-
nents. When his mother, Henrietta, GA in 1948, she left him $4
_ million and her jewellery. a
Like his father, Hartford had n no role in running the super-
market empire. He served one brief stint as a clerk after gradu-
ating from Harvard in 1934, but that ended when two uncles
_ fired him for skipping work to attend a Harvard-Yale game.
___ His only other dabble in day-to-day work was six months as a
Ee reporter for the experimental newspaper PM in 1940. He got the _
_ job, which paid $120 a month, after investing $100,000 in the ven- _
ture. By then an eight-year marriage to Mary Lee Epling had end-~
ed. They divorced i in 1939 and she: promptly pee actor Dou-
| glas Fairbanks Jr. oe
__ The couple had produce children but, accor ing to hi
_ biography, he fathered a son: in 1938 with chorus girl Mary B I
_. ton. His second wife was Marjorie Steele, an actress and artist
_ married in 1949. She had a major role in Face to Face, his one try
at film production, in 1951. It got respectable reviews but lost _
_ money. They had a son, John, and daughter, Catherine, before
parting in 1961.
_ Hartford’s next wife was ‘Diane Brown, a model and the first
" picture-spread subject in Show magazine. Their marriage lasted _
Le fom 1962 to 1970 and produced daughter Juliet. ae
Hartford's boyish good looks faded with his fortune. He mat-
ned wife number four, hairdresser Elaine Kay, in 1974, when he _
was 63 and she was in her 20s. They were divorced in ae but .
continued living under the same roof for years. _ oo
Some of Hartford's domestic disarray became public in 1981 -
_ when his neighbors ousted him from a 21-room Manhattan apart-





ment, saying undesirables streamed through his doors at all hi

_. hours. In 1986, Diane, wife number three, and their daughter. wen
« to court in an. unsuccessful effort to have a conservator named. fo:
Hartford, arguing that he was too befogged by drugs and mal-
nutrition to tend to his affairs.
By then, Hartford’s world had shrunk to a rumpled third-.
floor bedroom of his home. Gone were the 100-foot oceangoing
yacht, the spreads i in Palm Beach, the Riviera and Hollywood, and



the town house in London’s Mayfair.

retained fond memories of the

Bahamas, and especially Par- .

adise Island, during the four
decades he had been away.

“He has always ‘spoken

fondly of it,” she said, “It has
always meant a lot to him.”
Juliet and Hartford’s niece,
Sibilla O’Donnell Clark,
drove him in an open-topped
car to The Cloisters, where he
was able to see his own classi-
cal creation atop the terraced
gardens laid out by Wenner-
Gren during the early post-
war years. Then he was tak-
en to the Royal Towers - a
sight which left him slightly
aghast. Massive resort hotels
were never part of his plans
for Paradise - and the hotel,
with its fairy-castle cupolas
and bronze swordfish, was far
removed from his own vision
of a tasteful retreat with build-
ings no higher than surround-
ing Casuarina trees.
Hartford’s escapades as the
free-spending gossip column

legend who courted some of .

the world’s most fabled beau-
ties added much colour to an
already colourful era.

Like Howard Hughes, he
was a superyrich lover of life -
and women - who finally
retreated into the shadows.

“My father is still a vision-

ary,” Juliet told me during his
tour of Paradise in 2004, “He

still had wonderful ideas,

including a tennis game he
devised which he would like
to see in use worldwide.

Eccentric

“He is a gentle, kindly, com-
passionate man. I don’t think
he has many regrets. He has
lived a good life.”

Following his death on

.Monday, Juliet told Associat-

ed Press: “He wanted to be
thought of like a philosopher
or a thinker.” She described
him as a handsome, charming,
if slightly eccentric man.
Hartford’s record as a busi-
nessman was notable for its
failures. Paradise Island was
one of his most costly ven-
tures, lopping about $100 mil-
lion off his fortune. He spent



$30 million developing the
island, then lost millions more
when he was forced to sell.

He also Jost money on artis-
tic ventures in New York and ©
California, but when his for-
tune dwindled to about $30
million in 1973, he told The
Wall Street Journal: “You
can’t judge everything by its
dollar value.”

QO): loss-makers ©
were a handwriting

‘institute, a modelling agency

and a Broadway production
of Jane Eyre which Hartford ©
wrote and produced himself.
He kept a valuable art collec-
tion in a museum named after
him in 1964 but it closed years
later with a $7.4 million loss.
Little Hartford did went right
- but he had a heck of a time
doing it. In an INSIGHT fea-
ture four years ago, I recalled
his friendship with the Holly-
wood star Errol Flynn and
their hedonistic adventures
together.

I also reflected on how the
smoothie of the 1960s had by
then become deaf, chairbound
and physically fragile and
barely able to take in the
transformation of the island

» he raised from obscurity to

worldwide renown.

From a closely protected
offshore enclave, Paradise
Island became a rich source
of society gossip under Hart-
ford’s watch. But it cost him
dearly - a fact made all the
more poignant when Resorts
International later sold it’on
for $250 million. “I made a lot
of people millionaires,” Hunt
said grimly.

However, the man who
always saw himself as a force
for good was never fazed by
his reverses. When Newsweek
reported he had lost $9 mil-
lion in a year, he told worried
friends: “You don’t have to
worry about me. Nine million
dollars? At that rate, I’ll be
broke in 100 years.”

This week, time ran out on
the most colourful playboy of
his time. Whatever the cost,
he did things his way. That’s
probably the epitaph he would
have enjoyed most of all.
THE TRIBUNE



WEUINESUAY, MAY 21, ZUU8, PAGE /

LOCAL NEWS

Volunteers hold first

Neighbourhood Crime

Watch Workshop”

ae egeeeeeeees, Puen enseeaccescceceneeeaseeeces

Residents reclaiming
their communities

CRIME PREVENT

SEARCHING for a sense
of security and familiarity
within their communities, res-
idents of Royal Bahamas
Police Force Southeastern

Division Crime Watch Asso-~

ciations under the theme,
“Building stronger neigh-
bourhoods - Police & Com-
munity United”, hosted its
first ''Neighbourhood Crime
Watch Workshop” on Satur-
day, May 17.

The workshop was held at
Holy Cross Anglican Church
Activity Centte off Soldier
Road from 9am to 3pm .-

This workshop, designed to
give community volunteers
and crime watch members
additional strategies and prac-
tical solutions to enhance their
crime prevention efforts, was
attended by about 50 persons
representing residents and
police officers from the South-
eastern Division and several
other policing divisions

throughout New Providence.

Many of them were members
of their local homeowners
associations and crime watch
groups seeking tips on how to
start a new neighbourhood
watch and maintaining a suc-
cessful Neighbourhood Crime
Watch group.

The workshop, facilitated
by experts, covered topics
such as how to establish and
sustain a viable crime watch
group and how to secure and
sustain financial support with-
in the neighbourhood crime
watch groups.

In addition to these produc-
tive sessions those attending
had an opportunity to net-
work and participate in‘a dis-
cussion period. During the dis-
cussions the participants sug-
gested the following as solu-
tions to the nation's crime
problem:

e The bail act should be
athended;

¢ Government should intro-
duce a law making it manda-
tory for persons on bail to
wear ankle bracelets;

e Crime watch should
become a nationally recog-
nized programme with a view
to getting all communities
involved in the fight against
crime;

¢ More after school pro-
grammes for young people
should be developed.

Presenter Mr. Gordon Pin-
der from the Blair Estates
Crime Watch Group told par-



“These residents
can make a
significant
difference just by
working together
and educating
themselves...”



Gordon Pinder

ticipants that the creation of
Neigbourhood Crime Watch
groups is a great opportunity
for residents to get more
involved in the safety of their
community. “These residents
can make a significant differ-
ence just by working together
and educating themselves
about their own personal safe-
ty and about the safety of
those around them,” he said.

The Blair Estates crime
watch association has been in





existence for over 30 years.
Another presenter, Acting
Assistant Commissioner
Hulan Hanna, led the partici-
pants through a step by step
process of establishing and
sustaining crime watch groups.

In a very candid way Mr Han-.

na told participants that the
police cannot prevent or solve
crime alone; the police and
the community must work in
partnership to maintain safe
and confident communities.
Also attending the work-
shop were Mr. Branville
McCartney, junior Minister of
State for Tourism, Mr. Phen-
ton Neymour, junior Minister
of State for Utilities, and Act-

ing Assistant Commissioner:
. Mr Shannondor Evans.

Overall participants agreed
that the workshop was very

productive as they were

exposed to new information
and were provided with useful
tools to help build stronger
programmes for healthier and
safer communities.

Royal Bahamian Resort @ Offshore Island

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Formal qualifications and computer skills
desirable, be able to work flexible and long hours.

Fax or email résumés with proof of qualifications

and experience to:

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Fax 327-6961

Closing date May 30, 2008.



Halsbury Chambers
announces Exuma’s
first free legal clinic

Halsbury Chambers has announced that it will host Exuma’s
first-ever free legal clinic May 31. p

Called “Information You Need for the Life You Want,” the
clinic will feature expert speakers from Nassau and Exuma as
well as allow the public to meet one-on-one with attorneys for
limited sessions without charge.

“Speakers will address timely topics ranging from Exuma
business opportunities and clearing title on generation land to
immigration and real estate in Great Exuma and the Exuma
cays,” said the law firm in a statement.

The clinic will be held at St Andrew’s Anglican Parish
Community Centre, George Town, from 9.30am to 1.30pm
with registration starting at 8.30am.

“This will be our fourth free legal clinic, but our first in Exu-
ma and we are very excited about hosting this forum on the
island,” said Halsbury Chambers partner Nerissa A Greene.
“Exuma’s dramatic growth, which has brought prosperity and
allowed many Bahamians to return home or move to the
island, has also raised new issues from increases in property
value to immigration matters. We want to provide a forum that
allows participants to discuss those matters openly with busi-
nesspersons, officials and attorneys.”

At the same time, Ms Greene noted, growth has also boost-
ed opportunities.

“Exumians want to know where the best opportunities are,
how to get a new business idea financed, are there any bargains
left in property, how to expedite work permit applications,
what’s more appropriate — a will or a trust and whether there
is a way to quiet the title on generation land,” she said.

Discussion will be led by a featured speaker with two pan-
ellists available for extensive question and answer sessions.

Attorney Troy Kellman, who heads the Halsbury Chambers
Exuma office, said Bahamas Chamber of Commerce executive
director Philip Simon will present ‘Entrepreneurship: What It
Takes to Start. and Succeed in Business.’

Wentworth Musgrove of British American will discuss busi-
ness financing.

Successful Exumian businesspersons will also participate,
including media giant Dwight Hart and Amie Bowe of Mail
Boxes Etc. A major Bahamian contractor who has completed
projects in Exuma, Peter Whitehead of Osprey Development
and Gunite Pools, ‘will lead the session on succeeding in busi-
ness in a Family Island.

The session on real estate, including current market trends
and where the buys are in Exuma, will be led by real estate vet-
eran Judy Hurlock, president of Dillycrab Realty.

Participants will be able to select a property at the clinic,
talk with an attorney and apply for a loan or mortgage at the
same time.

“Tf the response from our last legal clinic in Nassau when
more than 300 persons overflowed the meeting space is any
indication of what to expect in Exuma, we urge everyone .
who is interested in attending to book their seat in advance. It
is free of charge but seating will be limited to 175 people.
Appointments with attorneys will be made during registra-

tion,” said Mr Kellman. Halsbury Chambers launched its free

legal clinics in 2005 as a community service. The firm said it
hoped the clinics would lessen the perceived barrier between
the legal profession and the general public:





r
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Sa

RT. REV. WILLIAM
GRANT, 79

of Prince Charles Drive and formerly
of Fox Town, Abaco will be held on
Thursday at 11:00 a.m. at Church of
God Auditorium, Joe Farrington
Road. Officiating will be Rt. Rev.
Carlos Moody-Pres. Home Foreign
Mission C.O.G.I.C., Rt. Rev. T.L.
Hanna-Prelate Bahamas Jur., Rt. Rev.
. Matthew William-Adjutant General
C.O.G.1LC., and Rt. Rey. Marton
4 Luther Johnson-Prelate New Jersey
| Jur. Interment in The Eastern
Cemetery, Dowdeswell Street.






















He is survived by his wife, Mother Cynthia Grant; children, Rev. Ishmael
| William Grant, Sandra Grant-Rolle, W/RC 391 Cynthia Grant Cooper of
the Royal Bahamas Police Reserves, and Sgt. Marlon Grant of the Royal
| Bahamas Police Force; two sons-in-law, Richard Rolle, and Elder Lyvade
Cooper Sr.; two daughters-in-law, Evangelist Missionary Avalyn Grant,
First Lady of Pentecostal Temple COGIC and Natishka Grant; twelve
grandchildren, Marlon Jr., Marlisha, Marissa, Alpheus, Colette, Rhonald
and Shanece Grant, Shawayne and Laveme Rolle, Ryan and Chandra Rolle,
Devard and Shereka Bain, Alexis, Ebony Bain and Lyvade Cooper Jr.; six
great grandchildren, Shawayne Jr., Charlotte and Shandrea Rolle, Akeil,
Asia and Dekimo Bain; one brother, Alexander Grant of Providenciales,
Turks and Caicos Islands; three sisters, Pearlene Lightbourne of Atlanta
Georgia, Dorothy Thomas of New York and Mazie Moss; two sisters-in-
law, Vionelle Grant and Maria Forbes; three brothers-in-law, Hawton
Forbes, Albert Forbes and Hilton Moss; thirty-four nieces and nephews
including, Brucelee, Catherine and Deloria Grant and Maureen and Matthew
Williams, Joseph and Ann, Dencil and Cynthia, Samuel and Mizpah and
Gwendolyn Forbes, Rev. Franklyn, Rev. Samuel, Freddie, Robert, David,
Joseph and Joylene Lightbourne, Minister Nelrose Frazier, Jennie Scott of
New York, Mary and Michelle Lightbourne of Atlanta, Georgia and Daniel
Lightbourne of Miami, Florida, Ruthmae, William, Joseph and Evelyn
Rubins all of New York, Vernell Lisa Thompson, Vincent Parker, Sharon,
Kacy, Nathaniel and Nakia Moss, Ella Pratt, Charlotte Thurston, James,
Ruben, Margaret, Solomon and Patricia Forbes, Bishop Tony Leroy Hanna-
COGIC Jurisdictional Prelate for the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and
First Lady A. Nancy Hanna and family, the Williams and Thomas family
of Turks and Caicos Islands, Joseph, George and Livingston, Dennis, Isula,
Ashton, and Rodlin Henfield and family, Bishop Enoch Henfield and family
of Ft. Laudersale, Florida, Mary Wells and family, Velma Brennen and
family, Gwendolyn Smith and family, Telon Henfield and family, Glorene
Seymour and family, Rev. Leyvon and Joyce Miller and family, Shirley ,
Small and family, Kathy Smith and family, Wenzil Culmer, Lorene and
Charles Clarke and family, Sir Gareth and Lady Rowena Finlayson and
family, Alpheus, Dawn, Roosevelt, Iris, Spence and Anika Finlayson,
Margie Stuart and family, Deselene Cumberbath, Victor and Lolamae Rolle
and family, Lee Rolle and family, Maxine Cox and family, Willamae
Williams and family, Rev. Andrew Rolle and family, Annie, Hessiemae
and family, Jenniemae Rolle and family, Mother Gloria Dawkins and Greater
Bethel family, Supervisor Mother Johnnie Dawson Harrison and family,
the sixteen fellowship churches in The Bahamas including the Presiding
Bishop Charles E. Blake and the entire COGIC family worldwide, volunteer
. nurses, Beneby, Johnson, Wright, and live'in caregiver, Yvonne Orr, Bishop
William Johnson and family, Bishop Ross Davis and family, Bishop Samuel
Green and family, Bishop Ervin Hart and family, the Coleby’s family, the
Cooper’s family, the Rolle family and the Ferguson family and Evangelist
Sylvia Kemp McKenzie and family. and other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention.














































The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Raod and
Fifth Street’on Wednesday’ from’ 10:00 A.M. until 5:00 P’M. and at the
church on Thursday from 10:00 A.M. unti}; service time.









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BEC workers
make grisly
discovery

FROM page one “)

Pathologists will also examine the body to determine if there is
any identifiable trauma, which may indicate if the person was mur-
dered.

Police blocked off East Bay from in front of Waterloo Night Club
and diverted traffic through the road just in front of Montagu
Beach.

Despite this obvious detour, over-zealous police and prison offi-
cers escorting three bus loads of prisoners back to Her Majesty’s
Prison from the courts, sped through the road block with sirens blaz-
ing.

They were forced, however, to come to a screeching halt just in
front of the trench where the body was discovered, which led to a
comical scene as the officers had to figure out how to reverse
three large buses and a convoy of patrol cars backward, as passers-
by, the media and their fellow officers at the murder scene watched

_ the awkward scene. -

Prison officers with machine guns had to get out of some of the
buses to stand guard as colleagues driving the buses spun around in
some confusion until they finally reversed back through the detour
and took the path around the beach as other drivers had to do.

Mr Bethell said that it was “very unusual” to find a body under

a sidewalk and police will obviously have td question those who did.

the structure.

Sex scandal teacher given
new job away from children

tion Lionel Sands to'ZNS TV a
FROM page one week after the scandal made

newspaper headlines.



The Long Islanders’ Association
Annual Raffle Winners List - May 3rd, 2008




Winner’s Name
| Craig Armbrister

eur Lionel & Durell ;

Max

Barry Johnson,

Ali & Sheila Butler

Missy

| Miranda Russell

| notes ae

Holly Knowles

Adeiell Fox | i

Jerome Knowles

T. Pratt

of being involved with the male

student. He was stripped of his .

position at the school, and both
he and the teacher were sent
for “counselling”, ministry offi-
cials confirmed at the time.
The file on the issue was sent
to the Attorney General’s
Office for review, as it is an
offence in the Bahamas for an
adult to have sexual relations
with a minor under their

authority, according to The Sex="

ual Offences and Domestic Vio-
lence Act. This was confirmed
by, Acting Director. of Educa-










povenceeeeennnnneencenereynenvenernsnerenenanesenannnananannnannnanananaed

The opposition PLP intends
to raise another school sex inci-
dent in the House of Assembly
this morning. This regards the
private school sex scandal
involving the son of an FNM
parliamentarian.

According to a high ranking
opposition source who did not
wish to be named, the PLP will
take particular issue with the

perceived “cover-up”.atthe,.
school, involving a group.of offi-;;

cials close to the governing par-
tysd 3 rod

PLP sources The Tribune
spoke to yesterday could not
confirm if the opposition will
also raise for debate the gov-
ernment’s handling of the issue

- with this teacher as it too

involves prominent people close
to the FNM.

Johnley Ferguson, FNM
chairman, would only say yes-
terday that he would be, “very
disappointed” if the PLP
brought the issue of the parlia-
mentarian’s son to the floor of
the House. Mr Ferguson said
that he would reserve further

comment on the issue, pending -

the: decision by the PLP today
on this issue. ,

The Tribune was unable to.

reach the leader of Government

Business in the House, Tommy °
- Turnquest, yesterday, as he was

in cabinet.

YOUR! CONNECTIO



G. Thomas

Cop shooting
suspects to
appear in|
court today

FROM page one

senior officers of the RBPF stressed that a "thorough" investigation
netted the right suspects.

"The Bahamian public is assured that after thorough and com-
prehensive investigations we are satisfied that we have the (right
suspects).

"This just happened to be one of those incidents where, because
everything was happening at the right time, the right sequence
and the right places we were able to (solve the case). So I want to
salute the Bahamian public for the assistance given and I want .to
commend the Bahamian police officers on the wonderful job they
did in (solving) this matter as quickly as they did," said Acting Assis-
tant Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna flanked by the acting
assistant commissioner, Chief Superintendent of Police Glenn
Miller, ASP Walter Evans, Acting ACP Raymond Gibson, other
senior officers and spokesmen from New Jersey. '

He refrained from releasing the particulars surrounding the

.arrests for fear of prejudicing the case.
_.. "The incident was nothing more than an isolated random act of
violence and that's the way the people in New Jersey see it and

that's the way the police in New Jersey see it. Crime can happen
anywhere," President of the New Jersey State Police Benevolent
Association Anthony Wieners said.
He expressed gratitude to the RBPF and the Bahamian people
for how the investigation was conducted.
Mr Casper and three female friends were walking on West Bay
Street when they were accosted by two gunmen last Wednesday

| -who demanded cash. During the exchange the 23-year law enforce-

ment veteran and father of three was shot once in the chest.

Police said an officer responded to the scene and commandeered
a private vehicle to take the victim to hospital. The two suspects
reportedly fled the scene in a white vehicle. Rs,

The incident sparked fears that the nation's tourism industry
would be affected by the international attention it attracted while
the public called for increased police patrols.

Acting Commissioner McCoy said police will step up patrols in
areas frequented by tourists. "Yes we have (sought) to increase
patrols in that area, not as a result of this incident but because of the
visitors who frequent that area. (We) would always want to have a
visible presence in that area to make sure that the visitors to our
shores are protected at all times and feel safe," he said.

According to policé, Mr Casper was transferred to a New Jersey
area hospital Monday and is "doing very well." ;

Cricket match takes ‘violent’ turn
FROM page one ao il oat dh
Reports indicate the weekend match took a "violent" turn after

a few players physically "attacked" members and fans of a rival

team. The brawl was reportedly broken up by game officials but not

before one cricket player and a fan were injured.

Officers from the Southern Police Station reportedly visited the
scene and referred the injured persons to the nearby police station
to make a statement. Attempts were made to secure a comment
from the station but were unsuccessful up to press time.

After the fight a few players reportedly threw rocks at the fans

and officials in the seating area. No one was injured, it was
claimed yesterday.

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or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 9





THE FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY ILLUSION

Agriculture is a difficult and costly enterprise
few Bahamians are interested in pursuing

ATELY, there's

been a rash of calls

for Bahamians to

turn to large-scale
farming to address skyrocket-
ing fuel and food prices.

A developer named Tony
Joudi made several attempts to
get the government to back his
cock-eyed scheme to grow.corn
on hundreds of thousands of
acres throughout the country.

He was asking us to clear our
remaining forests so we could
make ethanol to run our expen-
sive sport utility vehicles on our
over-congested roads.

More recently, strange nois-
es have been made about grow-
ing rice in our brackish man-
grove wetlands by none other
than the Minister. of Agricul-
ture himself (who should know
better).

And according to Edison
Key, a one-time citrus farmer
from Abaco who is now chair-
man of the. Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation, "we are
trying to fast forward the agri-
cultural sector — we just need
to get serious."

Thankfully, we have yet to
hear calls for Bahamian pothole
farmers to plant wheat fields to
help lower the price of import-
ed flour.

Food self-sufficiency for the
Bahamas is an illusion. The fact
is that ever since the failure of
the loyalist plantations, large-
scale agriculture has never
worked here, despite exceptions
like the brief export trade in
pineapples and sisal during the
19th century.

Bahamian conditions are ,

simply not conducive to com-
mercial agriculture. Pineapple
fields for example, had to
remain fallow for 15 to 20 years
after producing only four or five

crops, and the industry was nev- .

er large enough to justify a reg-
ular steamship run (as the
banana trade did in the West
Indies and Central America).

Pineapple farmers faced the
same problems of soil exhaus-
tion and pests that the loyalists
had faced before them. And
competition from more efficient
producers in America, Cuba
and the Philippines put an end
to both the pineapple and sisal
industries by the early 20th cen-
tury.

Even subsistence agriculture
is a problem for the Bahamas.
Historians Michael Craton and
Gail Saunders note that the pre-
dominant out island economy
from emancipation to the 20th

‘century was a shifting form of
peasant farming. "The practices
of rotational slash and burn

agriculture and the overcrop-
ping of the meagre surface veg- ~

etation by livestock hastened
the process whereby the land
became insufficient even for a
steady population."

Bahamians were’ "rooted to a
soil that gave heartbreakingly

meagre returns for the most-



Aucerding to former prime min-
ister Sir Lynden Pindling, it was
to become "the greatest success
story in Bahamian agricultural
history", but it closed in disarray
nine years later and was never
resuscitated.

- In 1973, on 2000 acres of vir-
gin land on Andros, an even

bigger project was launched

with even greater fanfare, her-
alded as "the capstone of

Bahamian agricultural self-sut-

ficiency".
The Bahamas ‘apricultural
Research Centre was funded by

a $10 million Independence gift.

from the United States to devel-
op commercial agriculture
based on family farming. Two
American universities provid-
ed technical support and the
best and brightest young
Bahamian technocrats were
enlisted to help run the project
— including Earl Deveaux, the
present minister of works.

. Research
BARC had a herd of 300

' Santa Gertrudis cattle from

Texas and a flock of 600 sheep
used to improve the country's
breeding stock. The project
included a 500-acre research
farm, 16 model farms of up to
80 acres each, credit facilities,

marketing support and training '

programmes. Among the crops
researched were soybeans, corn
and sorghum as well as citrus,
avocadoes and mangoes.

' The farmers planted citrus,
plantains, winter vegetables and
feed crops for sheep, goats, and
hogs. Initially, BARC provid-
ed all the inputs and guaran-
teed incomes. Farmers were

then given a long-term land >

lease and credit facilities with
loeal banks. A co-operative was
formed to acquire machinery
and produce was marketed
through the government pack-
ing house. A training facility
with a modern hibrary, was also
included. «

But by the late 1980s - after
the Americans left - the project
had dwindled to nothing. Hors-
es and livestock were left to
starve and-expensive equipment
discarded to rust. The machine
shop, training centre and other
central facilities were aban-
doned. Government officials,
including then agriculture min-
ister Perry Christie, tried to cov-
er up the failure:

As a Tribune editorial said at
the time: "The government

.talks constantly of diversifica-

tion; of developing agriculture
to the point where Bahamians
can feed themselves. But really







they are not serious. look at the
rotting fish landing complex on
Potters Cay, Hatchet Bay and
the Andros farms and realise

' that they are taking you, the

public, for fools."

Aside from our small labour
force and the general disinterest
most Bahamians have today in
making a living from the soil,
agriculture is a complex busi-
ness that requires a great deal of
infrastructure to distribute the
crops and livestock that are pro-
duced. And the biggest draw-
backs in the Bahamas have

always been transportation and

marketing.
Food processing requires

consistent production of high.

volumes of quality produce. The
same is true for hotels and oth-
er large consumers of produce.
According to geographer Neil
Sealey, in his text book, The
Bahamas Today, our fas*:re to
develop a modern agricultural
sector is due to a number of fac-
tors, including the reality that
the Bahamas is a nation of mer-
chants with a history of living
on imported staples.

Other reasons are competi-
tion from: the United States,
which produces huge farm sur-
pluses at low cost only 50 miles
from the nearest Bahamian
island, and the limitations of
our natural environment.

Bahamian soils are poor, thin
and patchy — making them
suitable only for traditional
shifting cultivation in their nat-
ural state, experts say. Mecha-
nised agriculture is restricted by
frequent outcrops of bare rock.
Water resources are also scarce,
and crops require heavy irriga-

tion. To pursue commercial!

farming the ground must be
specially prepared at great cost
and large amounts of fertiliser
must be used.

In short, agriculture is a dif-
ficult and costly enterprise that
few Bahamians are interested
in pursuing.

But some commentators
have suggested that the real rea-
son we don't feed ourselves is
because of a racist business con-
spiracy against poor black
Bahamians.

Last month Tribune colum-
nist Adrian Gibson said succes-
sive governments had "slight-

ed" Bahamian agriculture (com-





pletely overlooking the potted

history. presented above). He’

included suggestions that the
"merchant elite” had orches-
trated this in order to maintain
its economic control.

And now we are talking
about rice paddies in the creeks
of Andros. When will it end?

Obama vs
eee

Keerlia

W ell, we are living in
history-making

times.
The American presidential

election is very likely to be con-
tested by an inexperienced 46-
year-old bi-racial lawyer with
an arabic name and a hardbitten
72-year-old Scots-Irish ex-POW
with a penchant for Sere
change.

Frankly, it's the most inter-
esting presidential race in mem-
ory.

Unlike other African-Amer-
icans who have run for presi-
dent, like AJ Sharpton and Jesse
Jackson, Barak Obama's cam-
paign is real Father than sym-

bolic.

- Anticipation
And most Bahamians. seem
to be waiting with bated breath

in trembling anticipation of a
black man in the White House.

As columnist George Will -

said "(Obama) has chosen his
racial identity, but chosen not to
make it matter much."

And in many ways his suc-
cess at (almost) gaining the
Democratic nomination refutes
the theory of social determin-
ism popular with many black
leaders in the US.

McCain is a third generation
naval officer who was held pris-
oner by the Vietnamese com-

munists for over five years after -.

bombing the hell out of them.
He was first elected to Congress
in 1982 and later returned to
Vietnam as part of the normal-
isation process carried out by
the Clinton administration.

According to one compari-
son of the two men by the New
York Times, "Obama wrote
‘very bad poetry’ in college.
McCain once contemplated
joining the French Foreign
Legion.

Obama is the former rebel,
who used to hang out with
friends who wore leather jackets
and stayed up late discussing
'‘neocolonialism, Franz Fanon,
Eurocentrism and patriarchy.’
McCain is the hell-raiser who
hides an introspective bent
behind his pose as a cocky fly-
boy."

But the most interesting
aspect of this campaign is the
message it sends about the evo-
lution of racial politics in Amer-
ica.

According to Obama, "it is a
profoundly distorted view that
white racism is endemic...but
race is an issue we cannot afford
to ignoré. We need to work
through the complexities of
race. "We don't have to recite
the past injustices, but we have
to recognise that the past has
made the present.

"Blacks must not become
victims‘of the past and must
take full responsibility for their
own lives.

“America can change — that
is the true genius of the nation.
In no other country on Earth

- would my story be possible."

"And despite all temptations
to view my candidacy through
purely racial lines, we won com-
manding victories among white
Americans."

What do you think? Send

comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net

Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com
pundit.com/>



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backbreaking toil...There was

nothing romantic about out

island subsistence farming in

the late 19th century. At best it

was a triumph of necessity

against the most unfavourable

conditions — poor soil, harsh

climate, natural disasters, ani- _
mal pests." ,

Before the Second: World
War, about a third of all
Bahamians were considered
farmers — a figure which fell
to about 10 per cent by the
1950s. In 2005 there were only
about 1200 people classified as
farmers in the entire country.
And it is clear that without
_ Haitian labour ‘there would be
virtually no agriculture today.

Nevertheless, there have
been ringing calls for a diversi-
fication of the Bahamian econ-
omy away from tourism and
finance for as long as I can
remember. As an Official
speechwriter at the Bahamas
News Bureau in the 1970s, I
wrote about linkages between
agriculture and tourism so often .
it became boilerplate — some-
thing to be inserted at the -
appropriate point in every text.

The Pindling regime was big
on talk about self-sufficiency
and developing farming on the
_ out islands. And in fact, there
were two major agricultural
developments initiated by the
government during the Inde-
pendence period, when nation-
alist fires were stoked to their
highest point.. }

In 1936 an American
investor named Austin Levy
had set up a dairy and poultry
farm on thousands of acres at
Hatchet Bay on Eleuthera, sup-
plying milk, eggs and ice cream
to the Nassau market for
decades. His plantation provid-
ed much of the infrastructure
‘and prosperity for nearby Alice

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008



WEDNESDAY EVENING MAY

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THE TRIBUNE

of

NMovie Gift Certificates

make great gifts!)

~ Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek jut

some smiles on your

kkids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of May 2008.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

ff)

i'm lovin’ it




















THE TRIBUNE

Nyy S
OQQQQ11egn




PAGE 11




WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

Choo Choo’ Mackey

is ‘reatly to ru

@ By BRENT STUBBS
- . Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ith just a few

days left before

the much antici-

pated. British

Commonwealth
super middleweight title bout is
held, Bahamian champion Jermaine
‘Choo Choo’ Mackey said he’s
ready to rumble.

“T’ve been waiting on this oppor-
tunity to come to fruition, I just
want to thank God for making it
happen,” Mackey stressed. “I just
can’t wait for it to come to fruition.”

Having had to endure three dif-.

ferent changes in dates and two
opponents who couldn’t make it to
town, Mackey is now awaiting the
arrival of African’ Michael Gben-
ga, who is due here today.
On Saturday, the two will tangle
-in the 12-round main event at
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. The
fight is being staged by First Class
Promotions.
The show will honour Mackey’s
- trainer Ray Minus Jr., the last

Bahamian to hold a British Com- ©

monwealth title back in 1986, some
21 years ago. J

For Mackey, it seemed as if it had
taken 21 years for the many changes
he encountered waiting for Satur-
day to finally materalise.

_“T never gave up. I knew that
eventually the fight would come
off,” Mackey stressed. “So I tried to
stay in the gym training and waiting
for this opportunity to come.”

Unlike when he fought and won
the unified WBA and WBC
Caribbean titles last year over
Trinidad and Tobago’s Kirk ‘The
Technician’ Sinnette, Mackey said

-he had to take his training regimen
to a totally different level.

“This is for the British Common-
wealth title. It’s a big fight,” Mack-
ey pointed out. “So I had to step
up my training. It’s been hard, but
I’ve been able to get-through it.”

Mackey thanked God for giving



~ ey said he will have a simple mes-

‘fit to step into the ring.

Palm Grove basketball
tourney on weekend

'

him the opportunity and he said he
will make the best of it.

“T really want this title,” he
charged. “There’s nothing like
being the Commonwealth champi-
on. I worked hard and I waited a
long time for this.”

Coming off two straight defeats at
the end of last year, Mackey will
be making his first appearance in
the ring for the year. The 28-year-
old 6ft lin southpaw will put his 15-
3 win-loss record with 12 knock-
outs on the line against 29-year-old
5-11 Gbenga, who is 5-3 with five
KOs. ;

Whenever Gbenga arrives, Mack-

sage for him: “Welcome, welcome,
welcome to the Bahamas. 5

“I know we.are a friendly peo-
ple and I guess I have to be hos-
pitable to our visitors,” Mackey
said, “But I want him to know that
when he steps in the ring, it’s only-
going to be me and him. I won’t
have to worry about our hospitality
then.”

Mackey said he doesn’t know
much about Gbenga, who was born
in Lagos, Nigeria, but lives in Accra,
Ghana. He said he’s not concerned
about what his opponent will bring
to the ring either.

“T just want to get into the ring so
that I can do what I have to do,” he
said. “This has been a long time
coming and I’m just excited that
I’m going to finally fight for the
British Commonwealth title.”

A number of fights are scheduled
for the undercard. But promoter
Michelle Minus said the card is sub-
ject to change on fight night.

It all depends on whether a fight-
er makes his weight or is physically

Scheduled to fight in the co-main
event is Meacher ‘Pain’ Major, the
Bahamas’ lightweight champion,
against Luis Bolano. |

One of the fights on the under-
card that everybody is hoping will
come off is the heavyweight show-
down between Jerry ‘Big Daddy’
Butler and James ‘Killer’ Coakley.



THREE Family Island
teams are heading to Har-
bour Isiand to play the Pan-
thers in the Palm Grove
Basketball Tournament this
weekend.

Sean Bastian, who along
with Andrew ‘Tiny’ Johnson
is hosting the event, said
they hope that this will be
the beginning of a series of

‘tournaments that will be
held in the future.

Teams flying into Harbour
Island, just off the north
coast of Eleuthera, to par-
ticipate in the tournament
are the D’s Truckers from
Exuma, the Full Gospel
Crusaders from Abaco and
the Cat Island team.

They will join the Har-
bour Island Panthers in the
four-team pool that will play
in a double elimination for-
mat to determine the even-
tual winner.

“We (Bastian and John-
son) talked’ with a number
of the Family Islands, but
these are the only three who
have agreed to participate
at this time,” Bastian stat-
ed. :

“Hopefully, as we contin-
ue the tournament next
year, more and more islands
will be interested in partici-
pating.”

The tournament is sanc-






























tioned by the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation, who
recently staged their Nation-
al Championships in Math-
ew Town, Inagua.

“We are trying to encour-
age more participation for
basketball on the Family
Islands,” ‘Bastian pro-
claimed.

“And by doing that, we
will get more participation
at the national level.”

Although there are just
four islands participating,
Bastian said they are confi-
dent that the tournament
will be a very competitive
one for fans to enjoy.

“T can’t really say much
about the competition, but
of what we saw from Abaco
and Eleuthera when they
played in the federation’s
nationals, I think they will
be the teams to watch,” he
projected.

Bastian said the tourna-
ment will provide the oppor-
tunity for more Family
Islands to get involved and
host similar tournaments of
their own.

Within the next three
months, Bastian said Aba-

co has agreed to host their -

inter-island tournament. He
said the same teams, along
with Grand Bahama, are
expected to participate.

m By BRENT STUBBS
- Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WILL veteran champion Larry Rolle be
able to hold off another strong challenge from
the young guns to retain his men’s title? Will
we see the emergence of a new female cham-
pion?

Those questions will be answered when the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association hosts the
annual Gatorade National Open Tennis

_ Championships.

Starting on Friday, the championships will
run through Sunday, June 1, with competi-
tion being held in the men’s and women’s sin-
gles and the men’s and women’s doubles as
well'as the mixed doubles.

“We’re starting on Friday because we have
a lot of adults who are working during the
week, so we are trying to get in as many
matches as we can over the weekend,” said
Bradley Bain, the tournament director.

“During the week, most of the matches will
be in the evening because the adults work.
So.if we can get in the majority of the match-
es this weekend, it will make it a lot easier for
us during the week.”

Players have until Thursday at Spm to offi-
cially sign up for the tournament at the NTC.
Once the deadline is reached, Bain said they
will work on the seeding and the schedule.

“We are hoping that a lot of the juniors,
who are playing 16s and 18s and even some
who play 14s, will sign up because this is a
good testing ground for them to get some
match play against the more seasoned and
veteran players,” Bain pointed out.

Bain noted that last year, Larry Rolle had a
difficult time going through the tournament
playing against the younger players, many of
whom are returning home from school.

Marae Te nn Ga ann ceetieec Nm ince



- Annual Gatorade tennis
championships start Friday

This year, a lot of the collegiate players will
be back and they will try to use their strength
to get past the experience that Rolle possess-
es. ;
Three players coming home from school to
try and dethrone Rolle are Ceron Rolle of
Tyler Community College, Jonathan Hanna of
Florida Tech and Jacob Fountain of Tufts
University. Ceron Rolle came close last’ year,
but. Larry Rolle’s experience prevailed in the
end.

On the ladies’ side, Bain said it’s wide open
because he’s not sure exactly who will come
out to participate. He’s hoping that Danielle
Thompson will be back to defend her title.

Others he’s looking to see participate are
Elanqua Griffin, Chelsea Powell and Erin
Strachan.

- But Bain said they are also hoping to intro-
duce three new sisters from pop singer Cory
Hart’s family. They are Bahamians who now

live in Lyford Cay. They live in Canada, but

train in the United States.

“They’re finally home,” Bain disclosed.
“The youngest player is playing 16s. She will
be a handful for the other girls. We don’t have
that many girls, but all of a sudden we have
three talented girls. So it will be interesting to
see.

“One of the good things about their par-
ticipation is that we will get to know them. I
knew of them, but now everybody else will get
to know them, too, as they try to become a
part of the Bahamian mix.” ;

Bain thanked Thompson Trading, distribu-

tors of Gatorade, for again sponsoring the ,

tournament.

“We are looking forward to a continual
relationship where they will continue to spon-
sor Our nationals,” Bain summed up.

“This should be very exciting tournament
this year.”

y



Rolle to



ise eae
Tea AMEN

executive
board

mâ„¢ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FOR the second consecutive :
year, Wesley Rolle will serve
as president of the Bahamas
Lawn Tennis Association. But
he will have a virtually new
executive board to work with
this time around.

At the elections held on
Wednesday, April'30, at the
National Tennis Centre, Rolle
was returned for another one-
year term in office.

Voted in to serve with. him
on the executive board are

- Stephen Turnquest, first vice-

president; Neil McTaggert, sec-
ond vice-president; Leah
Major, treasurer; Sharon Coak-
ley, assistant treasurer; Erica
Rolle, secretary, and Paulette
Major, assistant secretary.

The council members elected
to serve are Ricardo Bowe,
Stephen Thompson, Bradley
Bain, Nikkita Fountain and
Kim O’Kelley.

“J think it’s a pretty good
group of persons to work
with,” said Rolle, of his execu-
tive board. “JI think each of
them has something that they
can offer to make the associa-
tion that much stronger.”

Rolle said he’s pretty excited
about possibilities for the asso-
ciation. a

He revealed that they are in
the process of applying for a
person from the International
Tennis Committee to come in
and set up an academy-type
programme, similar to what is

. being done in soccer with the
* Bahamas Football Association.

If approved, Rolle said the
person will work with the
BLTA for about‘six months.
He will train various persons,
who will eventually take over
once he departs. .

‘And next month, Rolle said
they intend to’ widen their
coaching base by hosting a
beginners’ coaching clinic at
the NTC. : i

He said he’s hoping that a
number of persons interested
in coaching the sport will come
out.

While the executives will
serve for one year, Rolle said
they are also in the process of
calling an extraordinary meet-
ing to make.amendments to
the constitution that will allow
the term in office to be extend-
ed from‘one to two years,
beginning with next year’s elec- .
tions.

Bradley Bain, one of the
council members who will be
called upon to advise the exec-
utives, noted that the BLTA is
heading in the right direction
under its present leadership.

“We have a lot of new peo-.
ple, but they are people who
are willing to try and do some
things to grow the game of ten-
nis,” Bain pointed out.

“So I think in the next year,
there will be a ton of activities
in tennis to create more aware-
ness and to get more kids
involved.”

Bain said he’s been particu-
larly pleased with the school
programme spearheaded by
Ricardo Bowe. Without the
school programme, which is
used as a feeder system, Bain
said the sport won’t grow.

“That is something that we
have been lacking for a long
time,” he insisted. “There’s
been a lot of talk about it, but
nobody really took the bull by
the horns and made it happen.
Ricardo Bowe is doing that
right now.”

Additionally, Bain said
including female player Nikki-
ta Fountain and former nation-
al champion turned coach Kim
O’Kelley on the council will
help to bring more awareness
to the sport as they further
seek to expand their base.
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



NFL owners opt out

of labour agreement

@ By DAVE GOLDBERG
AP Football Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — NFL owners
voted unanimously Tuesday to end
their labour agreement with the play-
ers’ union in 2011. The league and
union, however, insisted the next
three seasons won’t be interrupted
by a contract dispute and both sides
are working toward a new deal.

“We have guaranteed three more
years of NFL football,” commission-
er Roger Goodell said after the own-
ers used the opt-out clause built into
the agreement signed more than two
years ago. “We are not in dire straits.
We’ve never said that. But the agree-
ment isn’t working, and we’re look-
ing to get a more fair an equitable
deal.”

The decision by the owners was
anticipated, although not this early.
The 2006 agreement allowed either
side to negate the contract by
November 8.

Goodell said the owners acted ear-
ly “to get talks rolling.”

“I don’t think it was a shock to
anyone,” said Gene Upshaw, execu-
tive director of the NFL Players
Association. -

Upshaw said he learned of the
move by e-mail from Goodell. The
union head said his response was:

commissioner Roger Goodell addresses
the media
(AP Photo: Paul Sancya)

“Thanks, what a surprise.”
“All this means is that we will have
football now until 2010 and not until



IN THIS August 16, 2007 file photo, NFL .

2012,” Upshaw added during a con-
ference call. “We will move ahead.
This just starts the clock ticking. If
we can’t reach agreement by 2010,
then we go to no man’s land, which is
2011.”

The agreement signed two years
ago was to last until 2013 with the
option to terminate in 2011, which is
what the owners did Tuesday.
League officials and owners, includ-
ing several who helped push through
the last deal, have been saying for
almost a year that while the previous
contract may have been too benefi-
cial to the owners, the current one
had swung too far toward the play-
ers.

The owners noted that they are
paying $4.5 billion to players this
year, just under 60 percent of their
total revenues as specified in the
2006 agreement. League revenues
are estimated at about $8.5 billion,
although none of the teams except
the publicly owned Green Bay Pack-
‘ers discloses figures.

The owners also want a change in
the system to distribute the money
more to veterans than to unproven
rookies. Their argument is based on
a disparity in salaries that leaves
them spending far more on unproven
rookies than on dependable veter-
ans.

For example, offensive tackle Jake
Long, taken-first in the NFL draft
last month, got a $30 million guaran-
teed before playing an NFL game.
David Diehl, a fifth-round pick in
2003 who has started every game of
his. career and played left tackle for
the New York Giants in their Super
Bowl victory, signed a six-year $31
million extension with less than half
of that guaranteed.

Upshaw made his argument in a
half-hour conference call that ended
a few minutes before Goodell made
his in a news conference.

The debate will continue in negoti-
ations and through the media over a
course of months and years. Both
conceded there might be no agree-
ment until the deadline, which
Upshaw suggested might not happen
until the winter of 2010. That would
be a year without a salary cap under
terms of the deal.

“We'd like to get things done,”
Goodell said. “But often it’s not until
you have a deadline that people real-
ize the consequences of not reaching
a deal.”

Upshaw added: “March of 2010 —
that’s what we see as the realistic
deadline. I’m not going to sell the
players on a cap again. Once we go
through the cap, why should we
agree to it again?”

Ryan signs
six-year,
$72m
contract
with the
Falcons

ATLANTA (AP) — Matt
Ryan has signed a six-year,
$72-million contract with the
Atlanta Falcons.

Ryan, the No. 3 overall pick
in last month’s NFL draft, is
guaranteed $34.75 million in
the deal signed Tuesday. Fal-
cons spokesman Reggie
Roberts confirms the signing
and says the team has sched-
uled a news conference for
Tuesday night.

Ryan’s guaranteed money is
$4.75 million more than
received by Jake Long, the No.
1 overall pick who also is rep-
resented by agent Tom Con-
don.

Ryan worked behind quar-
terbacks Chris Redman and
Joey Harrington at his first
minicamp with the team this
month, but it wouldn’t be a
surprise if the former Boston
College star earns the starting
job in 2008.



Hornets won games and hearts in New Orleans

@ By BRETT MARTEL
AP Sports Writer

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
Glum economic forecasts .
greeted the Hornets upon their
return to New Orleans follow-
ing a two-year displacement
forced by Hurricane Katrina.

George Shinn, the team’s
majority owner, said his
accountants initially projécted
the ‘franchise would run’a
deficit of about $20 million this
season, but he was determined
to do right by a city recovering
from the worst natural disaster
in American history, then hope
for the best.

Players, coaches and team
employees had misgivings
about moving back to the Big
Easy from Oklahoma City.
Seeing a half-empty New
Orleans Arena back in
November and December did-
n’t help.

“When we first came here,
so many writers and reporters
were saying it wouldn’t work,
we didn’t have chance and I
was stupid,” Shinn recalled
. Tuesday, the day after the
Hornets’ season ended with a
Game 7 loss to the defending
champion San Antonio Spurs
in the Western Conference
semifinals.

The nay-sayers, it turned
out, failed to account for the
way an exciting young team,
led by an emerging superstar in
Chris Paul and fellow first-time
All-Star David West, could gal-
vanize a community.

The Hornets set a franchise
record with 56 regular season
victories en route to a first divi-
sion title.

A first-round playoff series
triumph over the Dallas May-
ericks followed before the sea-
son came to a tearful end Mon-
day night.

There was more. Even while
residents bemoaned the city’s
struggles with crime and a lack
of progress in some neighbor-
hoods that remain largely
deserted disaster zones more
than two years after the storm,
Hornets players never wavered
from a message of hope.

They incorporated the city’s
fleur-de-lis symbol in their uni-
forms, a sign of solidarity with
recovery efforts, then spent
hundreds of hours at rebuild-
ing projects across town.

In between pounding oppo-
nents on the court, they pound-
ed nails with Habitat for
Humanity, rebuilt playgrounds,
refurbished school libraries
and met with children.

The entire NBA pitched in
when New Orleans hosted the
All-Star game, and by the sec-
ond half of the season, big
crowds at the arena were a
common sight, as were Hor-
nets jerseys being worn around
town.

Public basketball courts,
fixed up with the help of the
Hornets or other teams during

mets ¢ swarms of kids playing hoops.
their visits to the city, drew

The last 13 Hornets home

j

games were all sellouts. Shinn
said the Hornets far exceeded



broken even.

revenue goals and might have

NEW ORLEANS Hornets guard Chris Paul'(3) goes between San Antonio Spurs forwards Tim Duncan (left) and Fabricio Oberto (7) during the
second half of Game 7 in the Western Conference semifinals playoff series in New Orleans on Monday. The Spurs defeated the Hornets 91-
82 to advance to the Western Conference championship.

Bill Haber/AP

“Now you wouldn’t find one
player who’d rather play some-

where else,” Shinn said. “Our
staff has been uplifted by all
of this and we’re really at stage
for us to do something great
next year. I believe it, really. I
feel it in my bones.”

During the playoffs, the
Hornets launched a season
ticket drive, achieving a 90 per
cent renewal rate while selling
an additional 3,500. 4

The Hornets will need the
resulting revenue boost. Paul,
with only one season remain-
ing on his contract, is expected
to get a lucrative extension as

- early as this summer.

“We’ll step up and do what
we’ve got to do to keep him,”
Shinn said. “He’s the best
point guard in the NBA and
one of top franchise players.”

NBA coach of the year
Byron Scott also is due an
extension soon.

“He can buy out of his con-
tract, but we’re trying to put
together something to keep
him,” Shinn said. “We’re going
to be fair and step up with the
goal to make him one of the
highest (paid) coaches in the
league.”

Scott has shown no interest
in leaving a young team which
he had a major hand in
rebuilding after going 18-64 in
2004-05, his first season with
the club.

“I’m very proud of this team,
this organization,” Scott said
Monday night.

“It’s an honor to be part of
this team.”

Paul’s averages of 21.1 points
and 11.6 assists per game made
him a bona fide MVP candi-
date; he finished second in vot-
ing behind the Los Angeles
Lakers’ Kobe Bryant.

If he gets the anticipated
extension, the Hornets could
be a force for years to come.
West (20.6 points per game,
8.9 rebounds per game) is
under contract for at least
three more seasons with a
player option for a fourth.

Center Tyson Chandler (11.8
ppg, 11.7 rpg) has at least two
more years left on his deal.
Sharpshooter Peja Stojakovic
(16.4 ppg) has three seasons
left, while versatile, high-fly-
ing rookie Julian Wright
showed enormous potential
with several highlight-reel
plays in the postseason.

This year, it wasn’t quite
enough to get the Hornets past
the conference semifinals for
the first time in the franchise’s
20-year history. Maybe next
year.

“Every great team has to go
through things like this,” Paul
said. “The make of our team is
special. We really play for each
other.

“The City of New Orleans —
I think our hats go off to them.
They made this season unbe-
lievably special for us. There’s
no doubt about it,” Paul said.
“I’m not even worried that
we'll be back (in the playoffs)
next year,” he said.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 13





NBA

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD
Wednesday, May 21

San Antonio at L.A. Lak-
ers (9 p.m. EDT). The Lak-
ers and Spurs both closed
out their second-round
series with road wins.

STAR
Monday

— Manu Ginobili, Spurs,
scored 26 points, sending
San Antonio to the West-
ern Conference finals with a
91-82 Game 7 victory at
New Orleans.

GOOD OMEN

SAN Antonio and the
Lakers met five times in the
playoffs in a six-season span
(1999-2004) with Los Ange-
les winning three series.
The winner won the NBA
title four times and lost in
the finals the other time.

BACK AGAIN

SAN Antonio’s 91-82 vic-
tory over New Orleans on
Monday night was coach
Gregg Popovich’s 100th of
the postseason, moving him
into a tie with Larry Brown
for third on the NBA’s
career list. The Spurs
advanced to the Western
Conference finals for the
sixth time in 10 seasons, but
only the first time after win-
ning the championship the
previous year.

LAYOFF

BOSTON has played
three games since Detroit
won its conference semifi-
nal in five games against
Orlando last Tuesday. The
Celtics advanced with a 97-

“92 victory over Cleveland
on Sunday in which Paul
Pierce scored 41 points.
Boston was 8-0 at home but
0-6 on the road in the first

two rounds. The Pistons.

have three road wins in this
postseason and are 5-1 at
home.

NOT YET

THE Hornets fell to 0-5
in second-round series fol-
lowing Monday night’s 91-
82 loss to San Antonio in
Game 7.

SURGERY

UTAH forward Paul
Millsap will have surgery
Thursday to repair his left
thumb, which was injured
during the Western Con-
ference semifinals against
the Lakers.

SPEAKING

“ONE thing I want them
to remember when they
start working out next sea-
son is how they feel right
now. You have to go
through some things before
you can really understand
how good it’s going to feel
when you get to that next
level. You don’t go from
not making the playoffs to
winning a championship. It
just doesn’t work that way.
... We’re headed in the right
direction.”

— Hornets coach Byron
Scott after losing Game 7 of
the Western Conference
semifinals Mongay night,
91-82 to defending NBA
champion San Antonio.

TS

For the stories



TRU ee
ES
on Mondays



@ By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer

A LOOK at the matchup between the
Los Angeles Lakers and San Antonio
Spurs in the Western Conference finals,
which begin Wednesday night (with reg-
ular-season record, playoff series marks
in parentheses): No. 1 LOS ANGELES

. LAKERS (57-25, 8-2) vs. No. 3 SAN

ANTONIO SPURS (56-26, 8-4).

Season Series: Tied, 2-2, with each team
winning both its home games. The Spurs

were never at full strength in Los Ange-

les, missing Tim Duncan and Tony Park-
er in their first loss and Manu Ginobili on
April 13, when the Lakers rolled to a
106-85 victory to clinch the Pacific Divi-
sion title. That was the only meeting after
the Lakers acquired Pau Gasol. Kobe
Bryant averaged 24.3 points for the Lak-
ers, while Parker scored 20.7 per game
for the Spurs. Ginobili managed just 14.3
on 31 percent shooting. ,

Storyline: The sixth postseason meeting
between the Western Conference powers
in the last 10 years, but the first since
2004. The Spurs knocked out the Lakers
on their way to titles in 1999 and 2003,
while the Lakers eliminated the Spurs in
2001, ‘02 and ‘04, winning championships
the first two times.

Ginobili proves why he holds NBA Sixth Man trophy

SAN ANTONIO Spurs forward Manu Ginobili (20) gets around New Orleans Hornets center Tyson Chandler (6) in the first half of Game 7 in
the Western Conference semifinal series in New Orleans on Monday. He scored 26 points, sending San Antonio to the eatin Conference
finals with a 91-82 victory.



Key Matchup I: Bryant vs. Bruce
Bowen. Bowen, perhaps the league’s best
perimeter defender, tries to contain the
NBA’s MVP. Bryant, the leading scorer
in the playoffs with 33.3 points per game,
said the back injury that slowed him in

Lakers vs Spurs

the WC finals

the second round is healed. Bowen will

certainly try to find out if that’s true,
using his physical defensive tendencies
that have annoyed plenty of opponents.
And the Lakers better be alert when
Bowen has the ball. He made-12 of 15 3-
pointers and averaged 12.3 points against
Los Angeles, his best performance.

against any opponent.

get some chances to check Bryant.
¢ Prediction: Lakers in 5



,
\

A look at the matchup
between Los Angeles
and San Antonio in.

X-Factor: Ime Udoka. Bowen’s backup
seemed to win coach Gregg Popovich’s
trust in the latter half of the second round
and played well during his extended min-
utes, making 11 of 17 3-pointers (65 per
cent) in the final four games. He should



Charles Barkley
Mike Wintroath/AP

Key Matchup IT: Derek Fisher vs. Park-
er. Spurs fans need no reminder that
Fisher is a clutch postseason performer,
recalling his game-winning jumper with
0.4 seconds left in the Lakers’ Game 5
victory at San Antonio in 2004. He is ,
averaging 11.9 points in the playoffs,
shooting 51 percent from the floor and
making 17 of 29 3-pointers. He might be
more important defensively, because the

_ Lakers must control Parker’s penetra-
tion and keep the NBA finals MVP out
of the paint. If Fisher can’t do it, Bryant
may have to expend energy to guard him.

Barkley
hasn’t paid
$400,000
gambling
debt, says
prosecutor

LAS VEGAS (AP) —A
Nevada prosecutor and a Las
Vegas Strip casino say Charles
Barkley hasn’t settled his
$400,000 gambling debt,
despite what he said on tele-
vision.

Officials with the Wynn Las
Vegas resort and the Clark
County district attorney’s
office say there’s been no pay-
ment and no contact with the
former NBA star and TV ana-
lyst.

During Turner Network
Television’s pre-game show
before the NBA playoffs Mon-
day, Barkley said the debt had
been paid and he was giving
up gambling.

The Wynn Las Vegas resort
alleges in a civil complaint filed
May 14 in Nevada state court
that Barkley failed to repay
four $100,000 casino markers,
or loans, received last October
18 and 19.

District Attorney David
Roger has. promised.to file a
criminal complaint if Barkley
doesn’t pay up by June 9.



Spurs’
departure
delayed

SAN ANTONIO (AP) —
The San Antonio Spurs’ depar-
ture from New Orleans after
winning Game 7 of the West-
ern Conference semifinals was
delayed several hours after
their plane had mechanical
problems, the team said Tues-
day.

The team could not find
hotel rooms in the city, so the
players had to sleep on the
plane, team spokesman Cliff
Puchalski said.

“We slept on the plane —
as much as_you can sleep,”
Puchalski said. “We tried to
keep some normal semblance
of order.”

The team was not practicing
Tuesday.

Ann Heisentfelt/AP

Donaghy’s lawyer says relationships among officials,
coaches and players ‘affected the outcome of games’



Tim Donaghy

Haraz N Ghanbari/AP

NEW YORK (AP) — Disgraced
basketball referee Tim Donaghy told
investigators in the NBA betting probe
that relationships among officials,
coaches and players “affected the out-
come of games,” his attorney said. The
league said the charges were unfound-
ed.

Donaghy’s attorney made the asser-
tions in a letter filed in United States
District Court in Brooklyn on Monday,
in which he argued that his client should
be sentenced to probation because he
fully cooperated with prosecutors and
has been undergoing treatment for his
gambling addiction.

The attorney also suggested that
Donaghy told investigators about the
gambling activities of other NBA offi-
cials and about a referee that passed
“confidential” information to an
unidentified coach.

The attorney, John F Lauro, wrote
that the US attorney’s office for the
Eastern District agreed to plea agree-
ments with other defendants in the case,
even though his client told investiga-
tors about NBA matters outside of the

government’s initial investigation.

Lauro said the disparity in treatment
could not be fully explained because
prosecutors have “surrounded this case
with a cone of silence.”

The US attorney’s office said Tues-
day it has no comment.

In a footnote, the attorney suggested
that the NBA might have “pressured”
the attorney’s office “into shutting
down this prosecution to avoid the dis-
closure of information unrelated to
Tim’s conduct.”

“The letter filed today on Mr Don-
aghy’s behalf contains an assortment
of lies, unfounded allegations, and facts
that have been previously acknowl-
edged, such as the fact that certain
NBA referees engaged in casino gam-
bling in violation of NBA rules,” said
Joel Litvin, the NBA president for
league and basketball operations, in a
statement.

“The letter is the desperate act of a
convicted felon who is hoping to avoid
prison time.”

The veteran referee pleaded guilty
last year to felony charges for taking

t

cash payoffs from gamblers and bet-
ting on games he officiated.

While citing Donaghy’s commitment
to his family, charitable activities and
positive feedback for his career as a
referee prior to his “tragic fall from
grace,” his attorney said that his clien-
t’s “aberrant conduct” can only be
understood in the context of his gam-
bling addiction, a “crippling disease,
which prevented him from exercising
complete rational self control.”

Lauro wrote that Donaghy is taking

steps to get treatment for his condition,
including therapy with a gambling coun-
selor and attending Gamblers Anony-
mous meetings.
_ “Without a doubt, Tim made signifi-
cant errors in judgment, but he also
tried to right the wrongs of his conduct
by assisting the government and | seeking
treatment for his disorder,” Lauro
wrote.

Donaghy is scheduled to be sen-
tenced on July 14. By law, he faces up
to 25 years in prison, though the term
could be much lower under sentencing
guidelines.
PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



! SPORTS |

Late start time for an historic all-
English Champions League final

@ By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Soccer Writer

MOSCOW (AP) — Manchester
United and Chelsea are making his-
tory with the first all-English Cham-
pions League final — and the one with
the latest starting time.

Kickoff at Luzhniki Stadium on
Wednesday is 10:45 pm (2:45 pm
EDT), which is 8:45 pm for television
viewers in Western Europe. If the
game goes to overtime and a
shootout, the new champion won’t
be crowned until about 1:30 am.
Trains on the Moscow subway sys-
tem are running two hours later than
usual to accommodate fans.

““We’ve only had two days here so
there is no adjustment,” Chelsea mid-
fielder Frank Lampard said. “Our
body clock is basically ready to deal
with that time.”

United has been playing in Euro-
pean soccer for more than a half cen-
tury but has never kicked off this late.

“Even if we had it at four in the
morning, that’s not really going to
bother me,” United defender Rio Fer-
dinand said. “It’s not something that
has played on our minds. We will just
deal with it.”

By kickoff, 40,000 English fans who
traveled to the match should have
had plenty of time to down a pint —
or perhaps a few. Because most hotel
rooms were booked up months ago,
many supporters are taking chartered
flights, will go to the game and then
fly home at breakfast time Thursday.

“We don’t care how late it kicks
off, as long as we win,” said Man
United fan Jimmy Westmancoat, who
flew out from England on Monday.

United its seeking its third Cham-
pions Cup title following victories in
1968-over Benfica and 1989 against
Bayern Munich. Chelsea is in the final
for the first time.

The matchup comes in the 50th
anniversary year of the plane crash
in Munich, Germany, that killed eight
United players and 15 others on Feb.
6, 1958. "And it comes 10 days after
Manchester United won its second

straightBnplish'Premier beaguettitle;:

finishing two points ahead Chelsea.
The Red Devils won 2-0 at Wigan on
the final day of the season, with the
Blues held to a 1-1 tie at home against
Bolton.

English weather was expected —
with rain, gusts and thunderstorms
forecast, according to the Moscow
weather center.

A new grass field was installed at
Luzhniki, where England’s national
team lost on the regular artificial sur-
face last October, a defeat that helped
eliminate the English in European
Championship qualifying. The field
was uneven as the lines were being
painted Tuesday, the new sections of
grass easily visible.

“This is the most prestigious club
game in Europe and the players real-
ly deserve a top quality surface,”
FIFA executive committee member
Franz Beckenbauer said.

The teams split their league match-
es, with United winning 2-0 at Old
Trafford in September in Avram
Grant’s first game after replacing Jose
Mourinho as Chelsea’s coach. The

IN THIS Wednesday, September
12, 2007, file photo, Portugal’s
Cristiano Ronaldo controls the ball
during their Euro 2008 qualifying
match against Serbia, at Alvalade
stadium in Lisbon, Portugal.

(AP Photo: Steven Governo)

Blues won 2-1 at Stamford Bridge last
month.

In the Community Shield at Wem-
bley last August, Manchester United
won 3-0 on penalty kicks following a
1-1 tie.

Manchester United is led by Cris-
tiano Ronaldo, who has 41 league and
cup goals this season, Wayne Rooney
and Carlos Tevez. Chelsea has Lam-
pard, Didier Drogba and Michael Bal-
lack. :

United is controlled by Malcolm
Glazer, owner of the NFL’s Tampa

‘Bay Buccaneers. Chelsea has been

owned since 2003 by high-spending
Russian Roman Abramovich, caus-
ing some fans to nickname the club
“Chelski.”

“He comes from here, from
Moscow,” Grant said. “He has always
dreamed of being in the final here,
but it is a dream of every supporter of
Chelsea to be in the final for the first
time.”

SAMSUN
mobil



CHELSEA’S Frank Lampard controls a
ball as he trains at Chelsea’s training
facility in Cobham, England.

(AP Photo: Alastair Grant)

IN THIS March 23, 2008, file photo, Chelsea’s Didier Drogba reacts after scoring his
second goal against Arsenal during their English Premiership soccer match at Chelsea’s
Stamford Bridge Stadium in London.





Petrova defeats
first round of Istanbul Cup

ISTANBUL, Turkey (AP)
— Third-seeded Nadia Petrova
defeated American Lilia
Osterloh 6-1, 6-2 Tuesday in
the first round of the Istanbul
Cup.

The 25th-ranked Russian
will play Marta Domachows-
ka of Poland in the second
round of the clay-court tour-
nament, a warm-up event for
the French Open.

Sorana Cirstea downed
Masa-Zec Peskiric of Slovenia
6-3, 6-4 . She will play second-
seeded Agnieszka Radwans-
ka.

Tsvetana Pironkova of Bul-
garia defeated Polona Hercog
of Slovenia 6-4, 7-5 and Liana
Ungur of Romania stopped
Cagla Buyukakcay of Turkey
6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (2).

Pironkova will next play
Veronika Chvojkova of Czech
Republic, who defeated Pemra
Ozgen of Turkey 7-5, 6-4, and
Ungur will face top-seeded
Elena Dementieva of Russia,
who had bye.








(AP Photo: Alastair Grant)

MANCHESTER UNITED’S Wayne Rooney in action during an English Premier
League soccer match at The JJB Stadium, Wigan, England, on May 11, 2008. °

(AP Photo: Jon Super)

sterloh in

Murad Sezer/AP

NADIA PETROVA of Russia returns the ball to Lilia Osterloh of the US during the WTA Istanbul Cup tennis tournament in Istanbul, Turkey. Nadia Petrova beat Lilia Osterloh 6-1,
6-2 in a first round match.

4
THE | RIBUNE



i i ne
Student sex claims inquiry | ELITE MOTORS LTD.

FROM page one

dent sparked outrage as the girl
involved in the act is under the
legal age of consent.

The alleged sexual encounter
occurred more than a month
ago with initial reports suggest-
ing the act was recorded on the
school's surveillance cameras,
however recent information
received by The Tribune indi-
cates that a teacher caught the
pair in the act. However, there
is a later report that the teacher
was not the witness, but was
told about it by another student.

Speaking to reporters after a
press conference at police head-
quarters, Acting ACP Hanna
declined to divulge specific
details regarding the matter:

"We investigate everything
that comes to our attention, but
we cannot report on (ongoing)
investigations to the public oth-
er than to say investigations

continue.

"I'm saying that all of the
information that has been in
public circulation, that the
police are investigating all of
the information that's been cir-
culated into the alleged mat-
ter," he told The Tribune yes-
terday.

In light of the sensitive nature
of the case, he urged the public
to be patient with police as they
conduct their investigations.

. "People, members of the pub-

- lic, tend to become emotional

over issues. The police follow
leads and anything that comes
to the police’s attention, the
police carry out investigations.
Some investigations are short,
as we said earlier, and some are
long and the police cannot con-
duct investigations in the media,
in the public forum.

"So I'm asking members of
the public to bear that in mind
because of the system that we
operate under in The Bahamas,

we cannot conduct investiga-
tions in the media."

When asked by reporters if
police had seen a copy of the
alleged tape of the act, Acting
ACP Hanna said:

"The police cannot say any-
thing else on that other than
investigations continue."

Chief Superintendent Glenn
Miller was quoted in The Nas-
sau Guardian as saying that
police should have been made
aware of the alleged incident
because it reportedly involved a
minor under 'the age of legal
consent. A little over a week

‘ago CSP Miller told The Tri-

bune neither parents nor the

school had reported the inci-.

dent to police,
In spite of the debate sur-

‘rounding the issue, it is ques-

tionable whether the alleged
incident between two teenagers
is considered a crime under
Bahamian law.

‘Conflict of interest no bar to
hospital complaint inquiry’

FROM page one

Licensing Board, and has been
since 1998, bar a period
between February 2006 and
mid-2007. He was also on the
board of directors at Doctor’s
Hospital between 1986 and
2005. Rett

In 2003 the HHCFLB
received a complaint from Lisa
Esfakis, the wife of Christopher
Esfakis, who died at the private
hospital, asking that bey inves-
tigate his death.

In 2002, Mr Esfakis entered
Doctor’s hospital with an over
95 pr cent chance of survival
suffering burns. In a February
2008 coroner’s court ruling it
was determined that “cumula-
tive errors in his medical care”
partly frittered away his excel-
lent survival rate and con-
tributed to his death in the facil-
ity at the age of 42.

His sister, Leandra Esfakis,
has complained that the board
so far appears to have failed to
have fulfilled the legal require-
ment as set out in the Act that it
initiate investigations into “mat-
ters affecting the treatment of
persons” within facilities
licensed under the Act and
ensure that such premises are
not “being operated in a man-
ner injurious to public health.”

Dr Culmer told The.Tribune
yesterday that despite his affili-
ation there was “no conflict of
interest” when it came to the

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

family’s request that the Board
initiate an investigation into
Doctor’s Hospital, because
when Ms Esfakis “requested
that (he) bowed out,” of taking
responsibility for the matter.

This did not mean that he
stopped being chairman of the
board at that time, but that he
put the matter into the hands
of the board’s deputy chairman,
Eugene Gray to deal with, he
said.

Mr Gray then took the posi-
tion that an investigation into

the matter was “not warrant-,
ed” — although since the Coro- |

ner’s verdict the board is more
vague about exactly what action

_it is taking in relation to the

complaint.

Dr Culmer admitted that the
Board is now looking to have
the requirement that it “initi-
ate investigations” scrapped
because the Act is “vague” and
does not stipulate how it is to be
carried out and furthermore, he

.claimed, because “those things

are taken care of in other acts.”

Rather than seeking to define
the mechanisms by which. it
would carry out such action, Dr
Culmer said the board “(does-
n’t) want that power.”

He added: “We don’t want
to be bothered with that kind
of detailed investigation.”

The chairman also said that
the HHCFLB has proposed
that the requirement in the Act
that all deaths at private med-
ical facilities be forwarded to

the chief medical officer, or else
their administrator should face
a fine and/or custodial sentence,
be disposed of.

He claimed the requirement,

‘which was passed into law along |

with the rest of the Act in 2000,

-is as antiquated and impracti-

cal as a clause in the old Med-
ical Act which said the CMO
should check every boat
approaching Nassau harbour for
“plague and pestilence.”

‘He said that there are already
procedures in place for the
recording of deaths and it is not
necessary that the board, which
licenses private facilities, ‘should
know how many people die in
them. ;

At present, the only facility
which would be aware of how
and why a person died within
the facility is the business itself.
Any review of the death would
also.be carried out by that busi-
ness. ‘

Dr Culmer denied that his
position on the Board of Direc-
tors at Doctor’s Hospital would
have influenced the decision as

-. to whether the hospital would

receive a licence because “the
(rest of the) board decides and
the chairman does not have a
vote unless there is a tie.”

He emphasised also that the
hospital “far exceeds the
requirements” for medical facil-
ities in the Bahamas.

The. chairman and all other

‘members of the HHCFLB are

appointed by the Cabinet.

China faces prospect |
of 5 million homeless

lM CHENGDU, China

Eight days after a massive
earthquake struck southwestern
China, the government began to
grapple Tuesday with what may
be its biggest quandary: what to
do with what it said are thé 5 mil-
lion people left homeless by the
disaster.

As the confirmed death toll
rose to more than 40,000 on Tues-
day, Chinese authorities issued
an urgent appeal for tents. “The
quake zones need more than 3
million tents,” said Li Chengyun;
the vice governor of hard-hit
Sichuan province, according to
the state-run news media. “If the
public wants to donate, please
donate tents.”

The vice minister for civil
affairs, Jiang Li, said that nearly
280,000 tents had been sent to the
area and that 700,000 more had
been ordered. But as he spoke,
refugees continued to pour out
of the devastated mountain
" regions, most bringing with them

little more than the clothes on
their backs.

“All these refugees have lost
their homes,” Li told The Asso-
ciated Press. “Their clothes and
possessions are buried. We are
doing what we can to help them.”

At one sporting goods store in
Mianyang, dozens of people clam-
ored for tents, pushing and shout-
ing outside the small storefront
and waving fistfuls of cash in the
air. A worker at the store stood
atop a counter facing them and
handed out tents in. black bags
after taking their cash. Parked on
the street outside the store, men
selling tents from their white van
were similarly mobbed. Police-
men were among those trying to

‘buy tents.

Small tents cost $39, medium-
size ones $46 and large ones $58.
When China began a three-day
national mourning period on

Monday, people across this coun-
try quietly understood it as mark-
ing an unofficial end to the search
and rescue phase after the disas-
trous earthquake, which the gov-
ernment said had probably killed
more than 50,000 people.

Yet, reports of miraculous res-
cues, while diminishing, contin-
ued to be heard. The Chinese
state news media reported Tues-
day that 129 students and 10

teachers had been rescued in an .. -

isolated small town in Wenchuan
County. Early reports about the
rescue in the town of Yinxing,

carried by the official Xinhua
news agency, provided few details

about the condition of the stu-,

dents or the circumstances of
their rescue, and could not be
confirmed.

The survivors were said to have
been ferried to Chengdu,
Sichuan’s provincial capital,
aboard eight military helicopters
and taken immediately for med-
ical gare. .

China’s propaganda authori-
ties seemed to reassert their:con-
trol over the nation’s news media

.on Tuesday.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE \





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Chinese hostility as spiritual
leader continues foreign tour

@ By JOHN F. BURNS
and ALAN COWELL
LONDON |

The Dalai Lama arrived in
London yesterday as part of a
protracted foreign tour, high-
lighting efforts by European gov-
ernments to balance China’s hos-
tility towards him against their
support for human rights in Tibet.
The Dalai Lama arrived from
Germany where only one gov-
ernment minister agreed to meet
with him, according to the New
York Times News Service.

Chancellor Angela Merkel,
who was on’a weeklong tour of
Latin America, had received him
at her offices last September,
prompting a chill in relations with
Beijing. In London, Prime Minis-
ter Gordon Brown is embroiled
in a contentious debate over the
level of warmth he should display
towards China at the 2008 Sum-
mer Olympics in light of Beijing’s
recent crackdown on dissent in
Tibet.

According to the Dalai Lama’s
official programme in Britain dur-

_ ing an 11-day visit, he-will meet

Brown only at a scheduled
encounter with the Archbishop
of Canterbury, Rowan Williams,
at what the prime minister’s office
has called “an interfaith dialogue
with several other religious lead-
ers.”

But, breaking with a tradition
established by two former British
prime ministers — John Major
and Tony Blair — Brown will not

‘receive the Dalai Lama at 10

Downing Street, his official resi-
dence.

The scheduling inspired com-

plaints.from militants and politi-
cians who support Tibetans in
their struggle against China and
who maintain that the British
authorities have downplayed the
Dalai Lama’s status to avoid.con-
flict with China, a key trade part-
ner. ‘Treating the Dalai Lama as
only a religious leader simply
ignores reality,“ said Sir Menzies
Campbell, the former leader of

‘the small opposition Liberal

Democrats. *There is no reason
why he should not be received at
No. 10 Downing Street,“ he said.
”*Many people will conclude
that the Prime Minister is trying
to have it both ways, to see him
and not offend the Chinese gov-
ernment,“ Sir Menzies said. .
Representatives of the Free
Tibet campaign said Brown will
be the first western leader to meet
the Dalai Lama since widespread
protests and violence between
‘Tibetans and the Chinese author-
ities in March. “’It is vital that the
British government treat the
Dalai Lama not just as a religious
leader but also as a political fig-
ure,” said Matt Whitticase, a rep-

resentative of the Free Tibet cam-
paign.

“Gordon Brown is refusing to
meet him in a political setting,
underplaying his importance as a
political leader especially at a
time when his importance has
been emphasized by the Tibetan
people and people across the
world,” Whitticase told The Press
Association news agency. “There
is a deep-seated political prob-
lem in Tibet and the Dalai Lama
holds the key and he should
therefore, be met in a political
setting.”

The awkward choice facing’

Brown is only one of many at a
time when his critics accuse him
of clumsiness and vacillation in
his handling of public policy. Ear-
lier this year, after initially giv-
ing the impression that he would
travel to Beijing for the opening
of the Olympics, Brown said he
would attend only the closing cer-
emony. At that time, other lead-
ers, including President Nicolas
Sarkozy of France, were consid-
ering a boycott of the opening
ceremony to protest China’s
crackdown.in Tibet.

The Dalai Lama is on a three-
month tour of five countries,
including the United States, and
he used his visit to.Germany to
underline his insistence that he is
not seeking Tibet’s independence
from China.

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Dalai Lama arrives in London

Markus Schreiber/AP Photo



HEIDEMARIE WIECZOREK-ZEUL, right, Germany’ Ss Minister for Economie Cooperation and Development watch-
es the Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama preparing a white scarf aS’a present for her prior to their talks in
Berlin, on Monday. The Dalai Lama wrapped up a tour of Germany on Monday, meeting the nation's develop-
ment minister before heading up a final rally in front of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate. The meeting with Develop-
ment Minister. Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul has triggered anger from China, which says that it violates Germany's
commitment to the "one-China" policy. Beijing filed a formal complaints over the matter Friday. The Dalai Lama
has now arrived in Britain.






WEDNESDAY, MAY 21,

SECTION B e uauiceiha

Worker protection
needed against firms
that ‘up and leave’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FOREIGN companies enter-
ing the Bahamas, éspecially
those with no physical assets
in this ‘nation, should be
required to make contributions
to an escrowed fund that would
provide Bahamian workers
with what they were owed if
the firm “just packed up and
left”, a trade union leader told
The Tribune yesterday.

- Obie Ferguson, the Trades
Union Congress (TUC) presi-
dent, said he had dealt with a
number of cases where
Bahamian workers had been
“left high and dry”, and unable
to receive the statutory redun-
dancy payments due to them
under the Employment Act,

when foreign-owned compa-.

nies “simply packed up and
left”.

“There were two cases where
I had to get a Supreme Court
injunction to stop money being
taken out of the company’s
Bahamas accounts until a cer-
tain amount of dollars was set



aside to pay the workers,” Mr
Ferguson recalled.

’. Describing the possibility
that foreign-owned companies
could simply exit the Bahamas
without paying what is due
under the Employment Act to
their staff as “a major concern”
to the trade union and labour

movement, Mr Ferguson said:___.

“One would expect the Gov-

SEE page 6B

Private sector waiting over
health reform consultation

‘By NEIL HARTNELL
PHBUHE Business Editor |

THE Savas sector group
that opposed the former PLP
government’s National Health
Insurance (NHI).scheme yes-
terday.said it was “actively
waiting” for the Ingraham

administration to “engage” it:

on its healthcare reform plans,
remaining keen to prove its
input.

Winston Rolle, the former
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent now acting as the Coali-
tion for Healthcare Reform’s
spokesman, told The Tribune:
“Our plan remains the same.
‘We do support healthcare
reform, and are actively wait-
ing for the Government to
engage us further so that we
can get involved in the
process.’

Apart from an initial meet-
ing with Dr Hubert Minnis, the
minister of health, last year,
the Government has not met
with the Coalition to discuss
the way forward on its pro-
* posed healthcare reforms, with
the organisation and its mem-
bers remaining keen to pro-
vide such input.

Mr Rolle yesterday said dis-

cussions between the Coalition
and the Government had
involved “nothing other than
the initial meeting we had with
the Minister of Health.

“He indicated there were
going to be some incremental
adjustments made to health-
care reform. That’s the extent

of it, and we’ve not-been™

engaged any further in that
area.”

Mr Rolle added: “We’d like
to know what the plans are, so
that we can provide input into
the plan as it develops - what
should be the focus, and look-
ing to see if it is in line with
our recommendations as
regards healthcare reform”.

When asked whether the
Coalition believed the Ingra-
ham administration would be
more open than the former
Christie government when it
came to its healthcare reform

plans, and discuss them with _

it, Mr Rolle responded: “We
certainly hope so.
“We’d like to think we’d

‘have the opportunity to pro-

vide more input, but that
remains to be seen.”

SEE page 6B

Insurer links with COB on
apprentice programme

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BRITISH American Finan-
‘cial, the insurance and finan-
cial services provider, is devel-
oping an “apprenticeship pro-
gramme” with the College of
. the Bahamas (COB) that it
hopes will start the latter’s
brightest students along a
career path with it.

Chester Cooper, British
American Financial’s president
and chief executive, told The
Tribune that the company was

actively working to attract and .

retain the best talent, and
assessing the development of
management feeder and edu-
cational tracking systems.

On the apprenticeship pro-
gramme the company was
developing with COB, Mr
Cooper said it aimed to
“recruit people from COB in
Nassau, Exuma and Abaco to
basically be apprentices in our
business and learn the busi-
ness”

The British Armetlodn Finan-
cial president and chief execu-
tive said recruits to the appren-
ticeship programme would
work part-time for the compa-
ny while in school during their
second and third years, and

spend the summers in full-time
posts. Up to seven persons may
be recruited by the programme
this year.

“They learn-the-business;~~~

and essentially it will be a feed-
er system for our business,” Mr
Cooper said. “I’m sure you’ve
heard business people and
executive complain about how
hard it is to find talent in this
market. Yes, it’s true, but we’re
addressing that.

“We're starting the on-the-
job training programme for
people who will bring a lot of
new energy and ideas, as we
connect with the younger pro-
fessional market.”

British American Financial
has already targeted that mar-
ket - for consumers. Mr Coop-
er said the company had
moved to “reconnect” with
Bahamian young professionals

through its Symphony offering,
a package of insurance, invest- °

ment and financial planning
products designed to offer a
‘one-stop shop’ for all their
financial needs.

Adding that this market
niche was largely underserved
by Bahamian financial services

SEE page 6B

_ successfully fought off a chal-

. agement’s right to use the

20.08

BTC bidd

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



exclusive talks over the

Bahamas Telecommunica-

tions Company’s (BTC) pri-
. Vatisation is prepared to
modify its original offer if terms are “mutu-
ally beneficial”, its attorney indicated yes-
terday, having had its first meeting with the
Government’s negotiating committee in
early May.

Philip Davis, the Bahamian legal repre-
sentative for the Bluewater Communica-

~ tions Holdings consortium, told The Tri-

bune his clients were “hopeful” that they
would be able to conclude the purchase
of a significant stake - and management
control - in BTC.

Mr Davis said: “My clients are encour-
aged by the meeting that was held, and
we are looking forward to continuing the
process and completing the agreement
arrived at with the previous administra-

“tion, With any modifications that are mutu-

ally beneficial.”
The first meeting between Bluewater
and the Government’s newly-formed pri-

Benchmark subsidiary wins Internet challenge :

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ALLIANCE Investment
Management, the broker/deal-
er subsidiary of BISX-listed
Benchmark (Bahamas), has

lenge to its right to use its Inter-
net. domain name, the chal-
lenge from a US securities firm
having been made in “bad
faith” as an “abuse of adminis-
trative proceedings”.

Alliance Investment Man-

domain name,
allianceinvest.com, had been
challenged by New York-based
securities firm, AllianceBern-
stein, via a complaint that was
filed with the World Intellec-
tual Property Organisation’s
(WIPO) Arbitration and
Media Centre.

In its submissions to WIPO,

a he bidder currently lockedin

AllianceBernstein alleged that
it was the registered proprietor
of trademarks in many compa-
nies for the words Alliance,
AllianceBernstein and Alliance
Capital, having registered the
word ‘Alliance’ in the
March 30, 1993, for the pur-
‘pose of providing investment
management services.

Alliance Investment Man-
agement, though, had regis-
tered the disputed alliancein- ~

. vest.com domain name on
August 28, 1998, to enable it
to set up a website to market its
own services.

In its submissions, Alliance- ~
Bernstein alleged that the two.
companies provided compet-
ing services, and the Bahamian
company’s domain name and
website were “confusingly sim-
ilar” to its trademarks. a
_ “The Complainant [Alliance-
Bernstein] contends that the -

he) se tribunemedia.net

* First meeting between Bluewater
and government negotiators held —

* Financing ready, despite-concerns over
global telecoms slump and credit t crunch

* Fidelity and KPMG among bidders
for advisory contract

vatisation negotiating committee w was held
some two-and-a-half weeks ago, around
May 1-2, and Mr Davis said: “We hope to
get back to the table as soon as possible.”

It is understood that the first meeting
was designed to lay the foundations for

further talks between Bluewater and the -

committee, with both sides outlining what
stage they thought had been reached in
the privatisation process.

It is thought that the Government side

“might now-be- waiting on the selection,

and appointment, of a company ‘that will ~
act in the traditional role of investment
bankers, providing advice to the committee

S on

To os ee cited 5 cae

er prepare
to ‘modify’ its offer.

Respondent [Alliance Invest- »
“ment Management] has no
rights or legitimate interests in.
the disputed domain name,
which it registered five years
after the complainant’s Unit-
ed States ALLIANCE trade-
mark registration, and eight -
years after the complainant ~
first used that mark, which the
complainant’ says is so well ©
known that the respondent
must have-intended to trade
off the complainant’ s reputa-
tion in its ALLIANCE mark,
thereby precluding any finding
of legitimacy,” WIPO recalled.

Yet in response, Alliance
Investment Management and
its president, Julian Brown,
alleged that the two companies
were not competitors.

- “Tt [Alliance Investment

SEE page 2B

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work :

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010





PSE TTR

k
fr
E
of
»
f
and the Advisory group that will assess its
recommendations.
The Tribune can feveal that Royal
Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust and the

Bahamian arm of KPMG are among those.
who submitted bids for the advisory con: .

tract, having responded to the Govern-
ment’s request for proposals (RFP). It is
unknown whether other Bahamian com
panies applied, but it is thought internat
tional firms may also have submitted bids,
pple water, s interest in. acquiring and

SEE page 6B Be a

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

NOTICE

LAND AND BUILDING FOR SALE

Land Shark Divers Resort Hotel
(In Receivership)
is for sale

All that piece of parcel or lot of land located on West Bay Street having an
area of 23,400 sq.ft being lot numbers 6, 7 and 8. Block #2 situated in the
subdivision known as Westward Villas, the said subdivision situated in the
western district of the Island of New Providence, Bahamas. This two storey
structure is comprised of 40 rooms, kitchen, open dining area, bar and
swimming poolwitha building sizeofapproximately 12,280sq.ft-This buildingis
equipped with air conditioning units and is elevated to prevent the
possibility of flooding under normal weather condition, including annual
heavy rainy periods. :

Serious prospective purchasers who would like to tour the property prior to
bidding should contact the Hotel Manager at (242) 327-6364 between 9:00am
and ye :00 noon, Monday through Friday.

All otters should be made in writing in a sealed envelope addressed to:
Mr. John S. Bain, Receiver & Manager
HLB Galanis Bain, Shirlaw House, Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3205 Nassau, Bahamas
Marked:”Tender-Land Shark Dive Resort in Receivership.”

Offers must be received by 4:00pm on Friday, May 30th, 2008.

Each bid should be considered a bonifide offer to purchase and shall be
binding upon the bidder after submission to us

The Receivers reserve the right to reject any and all offers.

on new
annuities
during the



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Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-338-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501



month of May!

THE TRIBUNE

Food and drink
retail monopoly
ends at airport

THE Airport Authority’s
chairman said the exclusivity
clause that gave a more than
30-year food and beverage
retail monopoly to one
provider at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
(LPIA) has been “terminated”.

Frank Watson said: “It is
interesting to note that the
exclusivity clause, which one
gave one operator the monop-
oly on the provision of food
services for more than 30 years
has been terminated, and
requests for proposals have
been issued by the Nassau Air-
port Development Company
for the operation of two cof-
fee/snack shops. Other requests
will be issued in 90 days for
additional food services.”

Although Mr Watson did not
name the provider, the monop-
oly is understood to have been

in the hands of an operator
whose owners included former
PLP minister of works, Bradley
Roberts, and businessman
Garet ‘Tiger’ Finlayson.

Comments

Mr Watson’s comments
came as the Nassau Airport
Development Company
(NAD) said it planned to make
a further $2 million worth of
“airside improvements” to
Lynden Pindling International
Airport, focusing on areas such
as runway and taxi lighting.

NAD’s chief executive, Craig
Richmond, said in a statement:
“There are many more short-
term changes coming soon,
including over $2 million worth
of airside improvements, such
as runway and taxi-way light-
ing, additional new washrooms,

especially in the domestic
departure lounge, new and
improved food and beverage
outlets and expanded retail, as
well as premium parking.

He added that NAD was
streamlining the US departures
process and continuing main-
tenance and upgrades to the
existing facility.

Mr Richmond said NAD had
already improved customer ser-
vice in parking and on the curb,
while improving washrooms,
overall cleanliness and infor-
mation displays. He added that
NAD has enhanced the retail
offerings, expanded Bahamian
job opportunities and estab-
lished an operations centre to
maintain safety and control of
the airside and terminal opera-
tions. The company had also
eliminated government subsi-
dies for operating the airport.

Benchmark subsidiary wins Internet challenge

FROM page 1B

Management] denies prior

knowledge of the complainan-
t’s trademark, and says the
principle of constructive
knowledge under US trade-
mark law does not apply
because the respondent does
not conduct business in the
United States of America. The

- respondent denies the Com-

plainant’s contentions,” the

WIPO ruling found. “[Alliance

Investment Management]
notes that similar businesses
appear to be conducted under
the domain names ceinvestment.com> registered
by a company in Jamaica, West
Indies, called Alliance Invest-
ment Limited and investment.com> registered by
a person in Maryland, United
States of America.”

Alliance Investment Man-
agement instead alleged that
the case brought by Alliance-

Bernstein was one of “reverse ~

domain name hijacking”,
where the US firm was looking
to seize its domain name rights
via a WIPO ruling.

The world intellectual prop-
erty watchdog found that the
allianceinvest.com domain
name was confusingly similar
to AllianceBernstein’s regis-
tered trademark, but in
Alliance Investment Manage-
ment’s favour, ruled that the
US firm had failed to establish
it had no rights or legitimate
interest in the domain name.

WIPO ruled: “Here the
Complainant [Alliance Bern-
stein] clearly knew, when it
filed the Complaint, that the
Respondent’s [Alliance Invest-
ment Management] corporate
name is the same as the
domain name, and that the
respondent, based in the
Bahamas, carries on an invest-
ment advisory business under
that corporate name. These
facts, unless rebutted or
explained, demonstrate
[Alliance Investment Manage-
ment’]s rights or legitimate
interest in the disputed domain
name.

“The absence from the
Complaint of a sufficient rebut-
tal or explanation of these
facts, while the complaint

specifically seeks to negate the
other circumstances by which a
respondent might establish
rights or legitimate interests,
leads the panel to conclude
that the complainant appreci-
ated that [Alliance Investment
Management’s| apparent right
or legitimate interest in the dis-
puted domain name, as con-
templated in the policy, was
unassailable and to declare
that the complaint was brought
in bad faith and constitutes an
abuse of the administrative
proceeding.”

The case is the second
WIPO ruling to be won by a
Bahamian firm, IndiGo Net-
works being the first, whose
right to use their Internet -
domain name was challenged: >
by a foreign company. .

The ruling again highlights

how important intellectual

property is going to be as an
issue for Bahamian firms in the
future, as the Bahamas signs
on to more trade agreements.
It also provides evidence of
how exposed this economy is
to international bodies and
their rulings.

\

Position Available

Global United Limited is looking to employ a Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanic
with the following criteria.

Summary

Candidates must be able to perform mechanical repairs on both small Eeonne
vehicles and heavy duty trucks (° ‘mack trucks”).

ite individual must be able to:
¢ Repair large diesel engines.
Perform various tasks on truck chassis, such as the installation differentials,
gearboxes, pneumatic brake systems, etc.
- Perform minimal welding'as necessary.
Perform electrical duties as such as wiring, lights, etc.
Drive tractor heads properly.
Trouble shoot systems and read schematic diagrams.

Axpenlencs

¢ Atleast five years work experience as a diesel mechanic with experience
in executing the above.

All candidates are required to possess,
e Aclean police record

e Adrivers License
e Basic tools

Deadline for Submission of Resumes is May 30, 2008

Please forward cover letter and resume via mail, fax or email to:-
Human Resource Department
Global United Limited
P.O. Box CB-13838
Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Mechanic

Fax: 242-377-1261 |

’ Email:humanresources@gulbahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 3B



Ph eS ee

Central Bank eyes

further exchange
liberalisation

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Central Bank of the Bahamas is con-
tinuing its efforts to relax exchange controls,
having proposed allowing commercial banks
and money transfer providers a new limit of
$500 for customers to make overseas cash gifts
and small purchases.

According to the Central Bank’s 2007 annual
report, its Exchange Control Department mon-
itored the demand for foreign exchange by the
general public, which was particularly robust
with regard to oil payments.

The Central Bank reported that in 2007, he
department continued to monitor the liberali-
sation measures which were put in place in the
first quarter of 2006.

“Notable amoung the measures coming on
stream was the non-sponsored Bahamian
Depository Receipt (BDR) Investment pro-
gramme,” the Central Bank said.

This programme allowed residents to partic-
ipate, via local BISX-licensed broker/dealers, in

foreign capital markets by purchasing foreign = §

securty-backed instruments.

It was reported that activity in the BDR pro-
gramme commenced in the fourth quarter of
2007, with the participation of two licensed bro-
ker/dealers, each of whom received their allot-
ment of foreign exchange from the Central
Bank under the programme’s guidelines tctaling
$4.166 million.

The National Insurance Board also made the
overseas investments under the liberalisation
programme of $9.375 million during the year.

[SALES

A multi facetted communications/coneutting company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer
skills and be able prepare public presentations on behalf of

companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to:

DA#6282
P.O. Box N-3207

by May 31, 2008.



Nassau, Bahamas





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ae
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

FOR PROPOSALS

NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -
EXPANSION PROJECT

4

Request for proposal D-107 IT consultant - design & construction administration
services.

NAD is seeking IT design and construction administration services from
qualified IT Consultants for the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of work
includes:

. Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design ‘requirement
report;
Preparing technical specifications ane drawings for the IT component of
the Project;
Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and

‘ System commissioning and training.

Qualifications:
. Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
’ (AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;
Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and
A design quality control program.

_. TREASURY MANAGEMENT
INTERNAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Bahamian Subsidiary of International Company seeks an Internal Control
and Accounting Manager for its Treasury Investment Operations based in
Nassau.

Responsibilities

* Design and implement internal control and accounting procedures, in
accordance with the company standards. j

* Assess and monitor business risks and controls continuously.

- Supervise the accounting function; prepare monthly accounts statements
and reports to the General Manager.
* Implement control for day-to-day investment operations.

* Monitoring of various investments limits (notional, counterparty, VaR, stop
loss, etc.) in accordance with investment policy. ls

* Design and implement cash flows model and estimates.

* Support for the General Manager in the analysis of investments and
performance measurement.

* Evaluate the risk in investments vehicles (international and emerging
markets) a oe Ae
- Substitute for the General Manager as required.
* Manage special projects as required. ;
* Support internal and external auditors during their periodic reviews. :

Profile | eS a

: Dediee in tuisinass administration, accounting or similar.

* Strong expertise in internal control (implementation of COSO model) and »
audit, CIA certification preferred.

- 5+ years international experience in risk management/audit in a treasury.
and investment environment, including risk measurement (VaR, stress test)
and valuation of financial instruments.

- Knowledge of treasury .and investments processes, from and accounting
and control standpoint.

* French written and spoken (required), Spanish written and spoken
(desirable).

* International experience in financial services auditing at management ever
* Excellent experience with banks and or private company.

* Strong financial, analytical and methodical skills.

Benefits ;
Competitive salary commensurate with banks and or private company.

Medical insurance and pension scheme. .

Apply in confidence to: Treasury Vacancy

P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, The Bahamas

Deadline for Application 30th May, 2008.
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Cable
Beach
hotel in
receivership

THE Land Shark Divers
Resort Hotel on West Bay
Street has been placed into
receivership and is now on the
property market.

An ad in yesterday’s Tribune
Business section invited seri-
ous buyers to view the prop-
erty and make sealed offers to:
- John Bain, the manager and
receiver of the property, (on
behalf of the Bank of the
Bahamas) at HLB Galanis

Bain.

Speaking with The Tribune,
Mr Bain noted that the 42-
room hotel which also has an
open dining area, bar and pool
is in “fairly good shape.”

He said the property was
currently undergoing inspec-
tions by engineers.

Mr Bain said he was working
on behalf of the bank to get a
good offer and sale of the

property.

Lot 3D 23,000 square feet for Sale’

at Airport Industrial Park
Cost: $235,000

Contract: 424-4960 / 394- 9396
email: mturnquest@coralwave.com

3% UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

Business Analyst / Programmer
| In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

Maintenance and development of accounting related
software

Database development using SQL and VBA
programming

Provide training and second level support to users

We are searching for an individual with a strong background
in relational database modeling and sound knowledge i in
software and database development.

Minimum Requirements:

e Programming capabilities in SQL and VBA,
¢ Knowledge of the MS Office Suite of products, with
strong emphasis on MS Access

The ideal candidate must have the following qualifications:

¢ BA/BSc. degree in MIS, Computer Science or similar
qualification

¢ A basic knowledge in the field of Accounting and/or
Accounting systems would be a plus.

Persons interested in the above open position and meeting
the criteria should apply in writing, on or before May 30,
2008 enclosing a full resume with cover letter to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

hrbahamas@ubs.com or





Bradesco

_ Banco Bradesco S.A,
Balance Sheet on December 31 - R$ thousand



MULTIPLE BRADESCO

Publicly-Held Company

1,367,718 Stockholders
2.018,673,956 Outstanding stocks
Cospetate Taapagern 60.7466 9466/6091 42
rvadquattar Cigadn de Gaus, Crance, 8P



CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO













Assets 2607 2006 2007 2006
Current aasets 178,280,896 140 497,787 259.884, 466 197.365.329
Funds available (Note 6a} 5.341.363 4,587,190 5.486.606 4.764.972
Interbank investments (Notes 3b and 7} 5$.212.180 36.967.946 36.967.044 2.638.077
Open market investments 32.000 907 24. 270.494 314.960.8777 20,617.$20
interbank deposits 23.221 422 1$.698.440 $.026.516 (4.921.545
Aiiowance tos looses (10.149) (988) (10.149) (968)
Securities and derivative financial instruments (Notes 3c, 3d, 8 and 32b} 47.707.014 21.932.180 98.133.256 T2BE4 AM
Own portfoba CATT AFS 2.445 OS 78.919. B73 $3 §23.157
Subpet ta repurchase agreements 598.625 11 854.136 8.789.382 42.28B.492
Derivative financial inatruments $23,374 523.228 688 262 $20,635
Reaticted deposits « Searzitan Central Bank 7.788,647 216,812 7.7714 B87 448.235
Subjed ta cogateral provided : 992.345 153.650 3.234.782 78O 266
Securities purpose of unresticied purchase and sate comnutments 1.464.853 7.038.964 3.809.376 §.363 68S
interbank arcounts 23.$74.023 18.712.302 23.689.375 48.7 26.069
Unseltied receipts and payments 36.330 50.919 332 $0945
Reatsioted cxedits: (Nate 3}
> Resticied deposits - Brazilian Central Bank 23.27.4133 18.654.226 23.528 587 38.64.7096
~ Naticemd tosasury - axon credit $7 578 S74 578
SFR S.74t 8.678 5.78 6.728
Cosrespondent banks A427 4907 B48 3.142
interdapartmeantal accounts : 426.748 181 B67 $29,362 186.338
“ interond taanstex of funds 426.748 383 B87 483.2 186 238
Laan operations (Notes 3a, 10 and 32b} - 3.348.322 41.325.651 66.400,264 5% B97.772
Lowes operations
« Publis sector 2 68.582 73.BAG . 70,33 75.8
+ Private susctor $7 BAG ABE 48.204.122 73 B55 401 56 256 898
Allowance tor doubtful accounts (Notes 36. 10f, 10g and 16h) ' (A 566,928) {3 952.314} (5,325,670) (4.634. HB}
. Leasing operations (Notes 2, 3e, 10 and $2b) . . 3,086.428 1,798,326
Leasing receivanies. .
- Pubic sector - 4 AQ Gh]
o Private sector ‘ - 5 427,983 3.464.832
Leasing receivables - 2.306.178} §3.632.021}
Alicowance ine pasing dovbitul accounts (Notes Je. 106, 109 and 10h) + . (106.788) (75.4725
Other receivables 22.032.9B4 16.495,096 23.251 898 20.626.267
Receivables on sureties and guarantees honored (Note 10%-2) ; 42.184 38 «40184 B
Foreign exchange portiotio (Note 11a) $826 668 7.945.987 9 BB.732 7 GAB OBE
Repeivabies. 4.768 ABS $, 626.582 WEB G22 VTKOIZ
Negatistion and intermediation of amounts 483.166 358.770 882.879 $98.34
Iqsuranot premums renewable - . 4.276.812 3.257 208
Sundry (Note 1 1b} 7 O1ZOK7 6.623.385 44.877 265 10.744,251
Aiowanos fox other doubthul accounts (Notes Je. 10f, 109 and 10h) (78.5413 (58 666} {392.386} (93.2543
Other assets (Note 12) ‘ G3B.465 315.665 4.870.238 F196 ATE
Other assets 186.970 189. 302 385 251 VWEG2S
Provision for devaluations {104.785} {414.898} (478.584) {3 BE.825}
Prepaid Expenses (Note 2g and 12b) 557.268 241.28% 4.663.289 4.023.374
Long-term assets 403.434.7914 71 BIB.794 VI GZBII7 GASES ABS
Interbank investments (Notes 3b and 7} . 44.890.208 9.088.934 655.081 484,143
Open market investments 64184 . BA.384 -
Interbank daposite 14.826.024 8.088.934 590.897 484.4493
Securitins and derivative financial instruments (Notes 3¢, 3d, 8 and 326} 49,688,723 36,318.780 16,348,453 24.395.525
Own portfatia 4.059.639 9.436.474 &, 359.4698 18.824 693
Sudject ta repurchases agrsemonts 48 590.444 25.76.3466 4.942.038 3.093.581
Denvative fnancal instruments 544,796 28.381 508.838 28.430
Restricted deposits - Srazitan Central Bank $413,283 223.423 581 B05 *
Pryatizaion currencies 9.073 §.964 74.835 WING
Subject te collateral provided 2.381.782 445.802 335.448 14 868
Senuntes purpose of untestricted purchase and sale cammmitments 2.$48,834 MOG 39% 4.204.294 2858.26
interbank accounts 447,439 398.737 487,339 398.737
Restioted credits: (Note 9)
- SFH 447.138 308.737 $47,139 388.727
Loan operations (Notes de, 10 and 32b) 34,890,916 21, S9S.874 44 898.366 28.047. 487
Loot operations:
~ Public sector 887.669 745.029 893.643 734.36
> Pavale sector 32.766 733 22.292.183 43.345 804 28,056.380
Allawance for doubtiul accounts (Notes 30, 101 10g and 10h} : (1,583,428) {4 407 838} (2.144 078) (1.750.183
Leasing operations (Notes 2, Je, 10 and 32h} + - 4.905.967 4,383,232
Leasing seneiveables : .
+ Public aactor . &8.798 108.196
- Private sector ; - 8.374.426 3.762.307
Unearned incare from leasing - {3.422.375 (4.B4G.215}3
Atiowanos for joasing doubttul eccounts (Notes 36, 104, 10g and 10h} . . {43$.$80) (84 368)
‘Other receivabtes §.319,154 3.846,023 14,878,658 $.875.350
Receivables ’ - ri * 2.05 1.498
Nagotation acd intermediation of amounts " 895.253 $40.684 895.253 410. B84
Sundry (Note 1b) 4.817.791 3.538.782 114.188.0723 8.877.013
Attowance for other doubthi accounts (Notes 3e. 10f,.109 and 10h) (2.888) {34433 8.134} (7.845)
Other assets (Note 12) 907.653 494,746 4 S2B.756 778340
Other aasets - : &. 898 8.174
Provision for deyaluations : : : {B36} (7863
Prepaid expenses (Note 3g atxd 12b) 907.65 494.746 4. $28.687 FFOQS2
Bradesco
Banco Bradesco S.A.
Balance Sheet o on December 31 - RS thousand
MULTIPLE BRADESCO CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO
Aasats 2007 2006 2007 2006
Pormenent annets.s 05 Crna bact tne ‘ ¢ - 32,620,414 28.088.076 3.670.184 3.492.450
investonnts (Notes 3h, 13 and 326) ys 30.781.361 26.273.755 804,076 696.582
aft ies: of os . =i inn sae =: eine os e -
< boca: “sa a ae as 29.762.920 25.254.144 487.944 $03.033
- Abroad”* pauet . 994.795 989.275 * -
Other investments. 7 r1 t ; ‘ 60.671 88.062 487.285 651.568
Alowance for fosses (47.025) (55.728) (351.233) neve
Property, and equipment in use (Notes 2i and 14) 124120 1.249.287 2.284.078 f
bulirgs a use : : a 261.090 4.076.053 1.055.640
‘Other property, plant and equipment in use 3.182.063 2.918.957 4,347 893 4.404 B18
Accumulated . (3,940,813) (4.927.750) (3.139.668) (3,020,775)
Leased assets (Note 14) . - - "44424 11M
Leased assets - - 20.777 28.142
Accuruiated depreciation ; si : (9.356) (2.006)
Geferred charges (Notes 2. 3j and 15) 827.820 SE6.024 TOS. 642.948
Organization and expansion costs 1.516.778 2.183.141 1.850.219 1.893.771
Accumulated amortization (888.953) (1.818.117) (1.078.633) (950.822)
TOTAL 314.033.097 249,425,627 344.1846.406 286.547 .273
we an INANC: =
Bradiesco
Banco Bradesco S.A.
._ Balance Sheet on December 31 - R$ thousand
MULTIPLE BRADESCO' CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO .
Liabilities : 2007 2006 2007 - 2006
Curent Hebilities 477, 289.245 128,488,678 213.466.9686 961.256.821
. Dapeaits inotes 3k and 16a) 889.342.8351 8.748.827 F8.79T.442 $0.829.781
Demand deposits 28.429.110 20.304.697 28,495,555 20.526.800
Savings deposits 32,812.974 27.812 S87 32.812.974 27.812.587 *
. erbenk deposits 13.041.838 9.078.640 364.508 290.091
Tone deposits (Note 326) 13.589.722 449.195.4179 13.198.839 11.849,089
Other deposits 989.489 557.724 925.266 553.194
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase (notes 3k and 16} S4.683.2461 32.806.927 34,683,633 | 32.423.178
Own portiotio 18.885.269 ° 214.424.7682 18.924.688 21.343.014
‘Thitd-party partfota 29,777 227 3.471.383 28.878 .200 3.474.383
Unrestricted portioso 6.190.745 7.808.782 6.190.745 7.808.782
issuance of securities (Notes 16¢ and 32b): 1.514.664 - 4,896,593 4.733.438 4.984,401
Exchange Acceptances - - 406 3
Mortgage notes 866.725 839.336 901.490 858.490
Debentures (Note 16c-1) - . 42.821 $1,004
Secuities issued abroad 707,938 1.087.259 788.418 1.056.617
interbank accounts 16.632 7.384 16.832 5.8146
Unestiod receipts and payments fe 30 2
Interbank onlendings { . 157 - -
Corresportent banks : 16.832 §.814 18.632 §.814
accounts 2.619.618 2.224.292 2.824.233 R227
Thad-peny tunds in transit 2.919.618 « 2.224.292 2.921.233 2.225.734
Barrowlngs (Notes 17a and 32) 7,824,278 $,854,606 7.748.270 §.845,103
Local borrowings - official institutions : . 154 267
Local borrowings ~ other institutions . 373 44.487
Betrowings abroad 7.824.178 5.554.606 7.717.743 §.$00,389
Local onlendings - official institutions (Notes 17b and 326) §.168.629 4.D3.586 5.360.030 4.702.433
National treasury 50.260 99.073 $0,303 98.073
BNDES 2.490.548 2.188.507 2.490548 . 2.188, 507
CEF 13.468 8.470 14.780 10.065
FINAME 2.613.980 2.306.767 2.806.048 2.404.019
Other institubons 373 768 373 768
Foreign onlendings (Notes 17b and 32b} : 1.270.361 170 1.287, 281 170
Fornign onlendings. e 1.270.361 170 1.257.281 170
Derivative financial instruments (Notes 3d ard 32) : $44,636 512.226 868.954 510.881
Derivatve fnancial instruments $44,636 312 228 688,954 510.881
Technical provisions for insurance, private pension plans and certificated savings plans (Notes 3t and 2 - a &2.055.115 38.427.382
thas finbitities 14,874,465 9434088 214.625.8564 IAD2ZLOIE
Collection and collection of taxes and other contibutions 171.183 118.472 228,722 175.838
Foreign exchange portfolio (Note 11a) 3.466.147 2.385.341 3.467.189 2.386.817
Social and statutory 2.176.200 473.242 2.198.853 190.916
Fiscal and sodal security (Note 200) 760.408 861 870 2.356.153 2.800.884
Negovation and intermediation of amounts 392.306 129.512 657.700 $22,232
Financial and nt funds. 1,861. 876 1.851 876
Subordinated debts (Notes 18 and 32b) 34,402 39.955 850.635 59.413
Sundry (Note 200) 7.873.978 5.728.820 12.067.638 8.884.242
Long-term liabilities 106,276. 848 899.912.4389 97.038.535 TR AIT190
Deposits (Notes 3k and 16a) $4,478,007 $1,847,840 22,.826.304 23.376.482
interbank Geponits 30.626,773 28.172.259 7.985 .
Time deposits (Note 326) 23.849.234 23.375.581 22.918.339 23,375.452
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase (Notes 3k and 16b} 20,459.048 18.686,413 18.940.016 18,282.284
Own portfoto 20,489,048 18.685.413 18,940.016 18.252.254
Funds from issuance of securities (Notes 16¢ and 32b) 2.211.647 4.139.883 4,763,647 3.679.878
Mortgage notes 181 1.207 151 1.207
Oebentures (Note 16c-1) . “ 2.582.100 2.852.100 |
Securities issued abroad 2.211.396 1.138.676 2.211.308 1.418.871
Raorrowings (Notes 174 and 32b) 37.924 240.123 7.660 232.803
Local borrowings - official inshtutions . * 296 S13
Bortowings abroad 347.923 240.123 347 264 232.292
Local ontendings - official institutions (notes 17b and 32b} 8.393.302 6.778.474 8,726,408 6.933.536
National treasury : $78 -
BNOES ; 3.687.155 3.M3.511 3.887.158 3.343.514
CEF 83.604 $3.768 86,520 $9,844
FINAME : 4.053.691 3.377.028 4.981.301 3.534.018
Other institutions 852 1,163 852 1.163
Detivative financial instruments (Notes 3d and 32) 282.779 8.123 282.779 8.123
Derivative financial instruments 282.779 B23 282.779 8.123
Technical provisions for insurance, private pension plans and certificated savings plans (notes 3) and 23 . - 16.471.180 10,701,862
Other liabilities 20.107.242 14.816.586 24.977 673 19.236.282
Fiscal and social secunty (Note 20a) 3.144.575 2.026.364 7.483.638 5.213.836
Subordinated dabt (Notes 19 and 32b) 35.199.829 11.290.046 15.199.829 11.890 046
Sundry (Note 20b) 1.765.838 4.199.178 2.204.206 2.332.400
Future taxable income 109.662 90.148 189.147 180.460
Future taxable income 109.682 90.1468 489.147 180 460
Minortty interest in subsidiaries (Note 22) - - 188.412 57.440
Stockholders’ equity (Note 23) 30.387.344 24,636,362 30,357.244 26.636.362
Copital:
: Local residents 17.693.485 13,162.481 17.693.485 13.162.481
- Foreign residents 1.306.515 4.037.519 1.306.615 4.037.519
Capital reserves §5.824 5§.008 85.624 $$.008
Prof reserves 9.963.593 8.787.108 9.963.593 8.787.106
Mark-to-market adjustment - TVM and derivatives 1 489.976 1,644,661 1.489.976 1.644 661
Treasury stock (Notes 23¢ and 32b) (131.849) (50.410) (131.849) (50.410)
Stockholders’ equity managed by parent company 30.3867.344 24,636,362 ¥0.812.756 24,693,802
TOTAL 344,033,097 240.128.627 341.1846.406 268.647.273










THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 5B
eee FamGuard
a) Goodwill

In 2007, goodwill calculated by the acquisition of investments in the amount of R$952,543 thousand was fully
amortized,




In the 2â„¢ half of 2006, the existing goodwill was reviewed by the Management Bodies and according to the
Board of Directors’ resolution as of September 18, 2006 and purpose of notice to stockholders on this same date,
the referred goodwill, which corresponded to R$2,108,723 thousand, was fully amortized. The Board of
Directors’ proposals of this date were approved by the Special Stockholders’ Meeting held on October 5, 2006.







b) Other deferred charges
On December - R$ thousand
CONSOLIDATED BRADESCO MULTIPLE BRADESCO
Cost Amortization Residual value Cost —_ Amortization Residual value
2007 2006 2007 2006
Systems development 1,829,601 (1,061,867) 167,734 641,191 1,516,778 (888,958) _ 627,820, 565,024
Other deferred expenditures 20,618 (17,766) 2,852 1,758 - , - - :
Total in 2007 1,880,219 (1,079,633) 770,586 1,516,778 (888,958) 627,820
Total in 2006 1,893,771 (950,822) 642,949 2,183,141 (1,618,117) $65,024
PRICEWATERHOUSE(COPERS @
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Av. Francisco Matarazzo, 1400
Torre Torino
Caixa Postal 61005
; 05001-9803 S&o Paulo, SP - Brasil
{A free translation of the original in Portuguese) Telefone (11) 3674-2000

Report of Independent Auditors

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders
Banco Bradesco S.A.

1. We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Banco Bradesco S.A. and the
consolidated balance sheets of Banco Bradesco S.A. and its subsidiaries as of
December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the related statements of income, of changes in
stockholders’ equity and of changes in financial position for the years ended December
31, 2007 and 2006 and for the. second half of 2007, as well as the related consolidated. .
statements of income and of changes in financial position, for the years and half year
ended on these same dates. These financial statements are the responsibility of the
— management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial ~
statements.

2. We conducted our audits ‘in accordance with approved Brazilian auditing standards,
which require that we perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
the financial statements are fairly presented in all material respects. Accordingly, our
work included, among other procedures: (a) planning our audit taking into consideration
the significance of balances, the volume of transactions and: the accounting and intemal
control systems of the Bank and its subsidiaries, (b) examining, on a test basis, evidence
and records supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, and (c)
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management of the Bank and its subsidiaries, as well as evaluating the overall financial
statement presentation. :

3. In our opinion, the financial statements audited by us present fairly, in all material
respects, the financial position of Banco Bradesco S.A. and of Banco Bradesco S.A. and
its subsidiaries at December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the results of operations, the
changes in stockholders’ equity and the changes in financial position of Banco Bradesco
S.A., as well as the consolidated results of operatioris and of changes in financial
position, for the years and half year then ended, in accordance with accounting practices
adopted in Brazil.

4. Our audits were conducted for the purpose of issuing our report on the financial
_ statements referred to in the first paragraph, taken as a whole. The statements of cash
flows and of added value for the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006, which are
presented to provide additional information on Banco Bradesco S.A. and Banco
Bradesco S.A. and its subsidiaries, were not specifically required up to December 31,
2007 as an integral part of the financial statements, in accordance with accounting
practices adopted in Brazil. These statements were subjected to the same audit
procedures described in the second paragraph and, in our opinion, are fairly presented in

all material respects in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole.

5. As described in Note 15, the goodwill on investments in associated and subsidiary
companies was fully amortized in.the years 2007 and 2006.

S4o Paulo, January 25, 2008

Fite:
PricewaterhouseCoopers

Auditores Independentes
CRC 2SP000160/0-5



n Luiz Pereira Cavalcanti

CRC 1SP172840/0-6 j

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited Accounts
from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-7788,
West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas.





subsidiaries

get ‘steady,
positive’
response |

FAMGUARD Corporation,
the BISX-listed parent of Fam-
ily Guardian, the life and
health insurer, said it had
received a “steady, positive”
response to the launch of its
two new subsidiaries.

“We have been pleased with
the early response to our

launch of FG Financial and FG

Capital Markets,” said Patri-
cia Hermanns, Family
Guardian’s president.

“A person who retires at age
65 is now expected to live, on
average, for another 20 to 30
years. That is a long time if you
are not prepared financially.
These issues are resonating
with the public, and I believe
they are responding to these
broader concerns.

“With the launch of these
new companies we are not
changing gears, but instead we
are widening the umbrella of
protection.”

Zhivargo Laing, minister of

state for. finance, who
addressed a 200-strong crowd
at the launch of the two new
subsidiaries, said: “With the
establishment of its two com-



Eee

PTE.

ZHIVARGO LAING



panies, FG Capital Markets
and FG Financial Limited, to
offer pension, mutual funds
and brokerage advisory ser-
vices, Family Guardian is tak-
ing the next step in the evolu-
tion of its business to create a
more competitive financial ser-
vices company, with regional
and global reach.”



a MAAS ETT LUT

Tyre ery A CT



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SAU ON SZETO of NO.
53 BRUCE AVENUE, FREEPORT, .GRAND: BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister. responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within-twenty-eight days from the
21st+ day of May 2008 to the Minister responsible for:
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

se NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND

CALL AS PER THE CO-OPERATIVE
ACT 2008 SECTION 22



The 23 Annual General, Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 24", 2008 —

9:00 am

at

‘Holy Trinity Activities Centre
Trinity Way
Stapledon Gardens

Refreshments will be provided


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Insurer link



UUM O
apprentice
RUE Ce

FROM page 1B

providers, who often steered clear of recent
college graduates because they lacked a
financial track record - and both funds and
collateral - as they built a career.

“We are transforming the goodwill of
many generations of Bahamians that we
have served, and reconnecting with the
younger segment of our population,” Mr
Cooper added.

“We find this market is underserved. It is
looked at as being a liability - no financial

track record, no funds. We have been able .

to cultivate a product that provides flexi-
bility for these people in the early stages of
their career, so we grow as they grow.”

Among the Symphony initiatives, Mr ~

Cooper said, were mortgages with an initial
amortisation (payment) term of 40-45 years.
“As people can afford to pay more, we

reduce the amount of amortisation. It .

makes products and services more afford-
able,” he added.

“It allows these people to build a track
record with us, at the same time as having
their needs met. It sets them on a path ear-
ly before they get into the bad habits many
Bahamians get into.”

British American Financial outsourced
its health insurance policy portfolio, which

PA
Business

was largely group-oriented with 6,500 pol-
icyholders and 200 clients, to Generali some
two years ago.

Mr Cooper described that transition as
having “gone extremely well”.

He added: “We are extremely pleased
to have outsourced it, and can now focus on
our life insurance business and general
insurance-business, and improve the over-
all service we provide to our clients. We
can focus the attention that we spent on
the health business.

“We spent a lot of time, energy and
resources, and it’s a very difficult business in
terms of trends in the marketplace, volatil-
ity, profitability, the state of the health of
the Bahamian public. More preventative
care needs to happen if that business is to
be sustainable in the long-term.”

On British American Financial’s first-
year achievements, following the manage-
ment buy-out led by Mr Cooper himself, he
said: “Over the first year, our objective was
to re-position the business and IJ think we
succeeded. We wanted to build on the core
values of trust, integrity and honesty to
become more innovative, creative and cut-
ting edge..

“To do this, we transformed our busi-
ness from only insurance to full financial
services. We made our product offering
more relevant to the entire Bahamian mar-
ket.”





. BTC bidde

prepared
to ‘modify’
its offer

FROM page 1B

privatising BTC, remain:
strong, despite the global eco-
nomic downturn and credit/liq-
uidity crunch in the financial
system, which has impacted the
telecommunications industry
more than most.

Between July 2, 2007, and
March 3, 2008, the North
American Telecommunica-
tions Index - which measures
the value of telecoms compa-
nies - fell by as much as 30 per
cent, compared to a 15 per cent
decline in the S&P 500 Index.

This, in turn, has raised con-

_cerns over whether Bluewater
would still be prepared to pay
the $260 million price it had
committed to in the agreement
in principle reached with the
Christie administration. .

James Smith, minister of
state for finance in that gov-
ernment, was one who
expressed such doubts last
month in an interview with
The Tribune.

He questioned whether
there was “anyone out there
prepared to pay that price, giv-
en what has happened in the
interim in global markets. We
have let this thing drag on and
on and on”.

Bluewater had agreed to pay

\

the Government $225 million
up front for a 49 per cent BTC
stake, with $30 million to fol-
low five years later after its

‘ exclusivity period ended, and

$5 million in the sixth year.
The Tribune has been told,

* though, that Bluewater, whose

principals feature ex-Time
Warner, NTL and other sea-
soned telecom sector veterans,
already has the financing in
place to complete the deal and
will not be impacted by the
global financial crunch.

Among the key issues in.the
privatisation discussions will
be the length of the exclusivity
periods for fixed-line and cel-
lular services that Bluewater
wants, as this will be critical to
BTC’s value and the price it is
willing to pay, not to mention
further telecoms market liber-
alisation in the Bahamas.

It is understood that all
options are on the table where
the privatisation committee,
led by Commonwealth Bank

chairman T. B. Donaldson and ,

ex-Central Bank governor,
Julian Francis, are concerned,
including the size of the BTC
stake sold.

Bluewater currently has an

exclusivity period with the |

Government on the BTC pri-
vatisation, the administration
believing that this has another
14 working days to run.

Identifying & Creating Opportunities
Keith Stokes, Executive Director

Newport ras of Commerce

Tourism as a Tool in Business & Entrepreneurial
Development: Think Inside The box!

i" Worker

rotection
needed
against
firms
that ‘up
and
leave’

FROM page 1B

ernment to ensure companies
coming into the country, espe-
cially if they are just a ‘shell
company’, to pay ‘x’ amount
of dollars into a fund in case of
bankruptcy, foreclosure, liqui-
dation.

“It’s a very major concern
to us, simply because if that
happens the worker is left real-
ly holding the bag. The com-
pany would, in some instances,
be a shell company with no
assets, and if they were able to
just leave, the worker would
be left without any recourse or
any compensation

“Even where there are com-
panies that do have assets, the
Government ought to consid-

er, where there are companies

coming in, requiring that they
establish a fund and pay into it
on a regular basis, so that if
they up and leave the workers
will be able to recover the larg-
er part of what they are enti-
tled to.”

Mr Ferguson said that under

' the Employment Act, employ-

ees were essentially preferred
creditors, with the amounts
due to them ranking ahead of
other creditors.

Private sector
waiting over

health reform
consultation.

FROM page 1B

As to whether the Coalition
would continue with the man-
date given to it by its mem-
bership, Mr Rolle added:

gliducation
Development
Seminar

“Absolutely. We have an
obligation to the persons that
supported us to continue our |
efforts.”

The Coalition, which is
formed from both employer
and trade union groups, is
working on a report which
compiles all its research and
findings into a single docu-
ment. Mr Rolle said the report
was now being vetted by Coali-
tion members before its public
release.

The former PLP govern-
ment passed the National
Insurance Act into law, via
Parliament, before it was voted |
out of office in last year’s May .
| . 2 general election.

The Christie administration,
Seminar Cost « $100

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Secretary eel
Caribbean Tourism Organization

Making, Maximizing & Protecting
Your Investment (Panel Dis USSD

NclAO elo acre ETO] AE See: ae
Jerome Pinder « Inspector Sandra Miller

Tuesday May 27th, 2008

8am - 5pm

British Colonia! Hilton Doing Business in The Bahamas

GUio me DcrcstnD

Barry Malcolm » Chester Cooper « Mario Cartwright
Andrew Wilson « Chris Mortimer

if it had been re-elected, would
likely have.commenced work
on the regulations to give the
scheme enforcement teeth,
hoping to bring it into effect
by New Year’s Day 2008.

RSVP:
[242] 322-2145

info@thebahamaschamber.com

Bahamas
Development
Bank

Bahamas US Embassy
Chamber of

Commerce



Lyford

Inte rnat ional Schoc!

» ee

TRANSFORMING
THE CHILD

sRigorous International Baccalaureate academics (www. ibo.org)
iState of the art technology

Small class sizes; 5:1 student/teacher ratio

Diverse internation’ student body (35% Bahamian)

Robust Financial Aid program










Applications being accepted for Grades 7-12, please contact :
Mrs Rose-Marie Taylor - Admissions Director

rtaylor@lIcis.bs
Telephone : 362 4774 x245



The Only School in the Caribbean Offering the Full IB Program



www.lcis.bs
WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008, PAGE 7B

THE TRIBUNE





GN-681

Hotel
revenues

up 8.4% to |

$403.1m

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

TOTAL Bahamian hotel
revenues were 8.4 per cent
higher at $403.1 million in
2007, the Central Bank’s annu-
al report revealed.

According to the Central
Bank, the increase was partly a
result of the addition of new
high-end hotel rooms via the
Cove and Reef properties in
Atlantis’ Phase III expansion,
which elevated the average
daily rate charged by all
Bahamian hotels by an esti-
mated13.5 per cent to $189.42
per night. ~ ;

It was also partially due toa
moderate firming in the aver-
age length of hotel stays to 6.6
nights, from 6.2 nights in 2006.

The Central Bank said that
in New Providence, total room
revenues advanced by 11.4 per
cent. Family Island statistics
showed a lower gain of 4.5 per
cent, with Grand Bahama suf-
fering an 8.3 contraction.

The report indicated that.

' preliminary tourism statistics
suggested an expansion in
overall output, as price
improvements and gains in
other hotel indicators mitigat-
ed the contraction in the num-

ber of tourists.

The Central Bank said there
was a 2.9 per cent visitor
arrival decline in 2007. This
outcome reflected a 4 per cent
reduction in sea arrivals, which
fell to 3.1 million, and a 0.4 per
cent reduction in air visitors to
1.5 million. The report
explained that arrivals to Nas-
sau dropped by 0.8 per cent,
Grand Bahama dropped by 9
per cent, and the Family
Islands dropped by 4.1 per
cent.

The report also. indicated
that construction output mod-

erated during 2007, as both —

commercial and residential

mortgage lending weakened ©
‘and tourism investment activi-

ty slowed in the latter part of
the year.

According to the Central .

Bank, total mortgage dis-
bursements, contracted by 10.5
per cent to $544 million in

2007, based on reductions in .

both the residential, 8.6 per
cent, and commercial, 26.9 per
cent, components.

Mortgage commitments for
new construction and new
repairs, which are a leading
indicator of construction activ-
ity, fell by 27.6 per cent in
number to 1,051 with a corre-

sponding decline in value by.

26.1 per cent to $133.2 million.



OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER

AND MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

GOVERNMENT OF BARBADOS
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES, CAVE BILL CAMPUS
CAVE HILL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS EXPANSION PROJECT

PRE-QUALIFICATION OF CONTRACTORS

The University of the West Indies (UWI) has .received financing from the Caribbean
Development Bank (herein referred to as CDB) towards the cost of the Cave Hill School of
Business (CHSB) Expansion Project, and intends to apply a portion of the proceeds of this
financing to eligible payments under the contract for which this invitation for Pre-qualification is

issued.

CHSB Expansion Project is being implemented by UWI and CHSB. A Project Coordinator
within the UWI1’s, Planning & Projects Office will be responsible for the day-to day management
of project activities. Engineering Consultants have been retained by CHSB to assist in the tender .

administration and supervision of contracts,

The UWI & CHSB intcnd to pre-qualify contractors/joint. ventures of contractors for the

following work under this project.

Alterations and renovations to an existing two-storey training facility (approximately.
821 m*) and the construction of a two storey concrete and block, work extension
(approximately 1,198 m’). The site is located at Cave Hill, St. Michael, Barbados.

It is expected that bids will be invited in the third quarter of 2008.

Consideration will be limited to firms or joint ventures of firms which are legally incorporated or
otherwise organised in, and have their principal place of business in, an eligible country or

countries and are either:

(a) more than 50% beneficially owned by a citizen or citizens and/or a bona fide resident or
residents of an eligible country.or countries, or by a body corporate or bodies corporate _

meeting these requirements; or

(b) owned or controlled by the government of an eligible country provided that it is legally

and financially autonomous and operated under the commercial law of an eligible -

NOTICE moles | country.

NOTICE. is: hereby .given that GREGORY SMITH
| of SOUTH OCEAN GOLF RESIDENCE, P.O. BOX
CB-12951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

Eligible countries,are member countries of CDB.

The requirements for pre-qualification wilJ include:

| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why j-
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of May 2008 to (b) |
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, 1
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

(a) an average annual turnover (defined as billing for works in progress and completed) over
the last five years of United States Dollars (USD) 5,000,000 (five million) or equivalent;

demonstrable cash flow (including access to credit) of USD600,000 (six hundred
thousand) or equivalent;



experience as prime contractor in the construction of at least two assignments of a nature
and complexity comparable to the proposed project activity within the last six years (to
comply with this requirement, work quoted should be at least 80 percent complete); and

Legal Notice... --* >; (c)

SCD

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000) (d) A’Project Manager with 15 years experience in construction, 10 of which have been in

works of an equivalent nature and scope including not less than five years as Project

: Manager.
CONQUEST INTERNATIONAL LIMITED i

ae eee ae Eligible applicants may obtain further information from, and inspect the prequalification
document at, the first address below between the hours of 0830 to 1630 (local time) Monday
through Friday (except public holidays). A complete set of the pre-qualification documents, in
English, may be purchased by interested applicants on submission of a written request to the first
address below and upon payment of a non-refundable fee of Bds$500.00 or its equivalent in a

freely convertible currency. The method of payment will be Banker’s Draft.

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), CONQUEST INTERANTIONAL LIMITED is in
Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 18th day of

April, 2008. The request must clearly state “Request for Pre-qualification Documents for the Cave Hill School

of Business Expansion Project”. Potential applicants who request that documents be forwarded
to them are required to submit an account number from a local courier agent which accepts
freight-collect charges. The Project Coordinator will promptly dispatch the documents but under

no circumstances wil] be responsible for late delivery or loss of the documents.

SGG Services Generaux de Gestion (Suisse) S.A.
Rue de l’Arquebuse 7,
1204 Geneva
Switzerland .
Liquidator



Submission of applications for pre-qualification shall be in English and must be received in
sealed envelopes, clearly marked “Applications to Pre-qualify for Cave Hill School of Business

Expansion Project”.

VACANCIES

Success Training College anticipates the following
full-time vacancies beginning this fail:

Applications must be either delivered by hand or registered mail to the first address below not
later than 1600 hours (local time) on 30 May, 2008. A copy of the Application for Pre
qualification should be simultaneously submitted to CDB at the second address below. a

The UWI and CHSB reserve the right to accept or reject late applications or to annul the process
and seject all applications at any time prior to pre-qualifying contractors without thereby
incurring any liability to the affected prospective contractor(s) or any obligation to inform
prospective contractor(s) of the grounds for their action.

Faculty Positions
Accounting/Business
Information Technology
Mathematics
English Language
Allied Health Science

Applicants will be advised, in due course, of the results of their applications. Only contractors
and joint ventures pre-qualified under this procedure will be invited to bid.

Administrative Position 1. Project Coordinator, Civil Works 2 Procurement Officer
Recruiting Officer Planning & Projects Office * Project Services Division
Student Activities Coordinator Cave Hill Campus Caribbean Development Bank
The University of the West Indies P.O. Box 408, Wildey

Program Dev/Admin Officer University Drive, Cave Hill St. Michael
‘ ‘ St. Michael BARBADOS, W.I., BB11000
Interested persons should submit letter of interest BARBADOS Tel: 1 (246) 431-1600

along with curriculum vitae to the President, Success
Training College, Bernard Road, Nassau, by May 30,
2008. Applicants with relevant mater’s degree and
at least five years experience preferred for faculty
positions, but individuals with bachelor’s level
qualification may also be considered.

Fax: 1'(246) 426-7269

Tel: 1 (246) 417-4080
Email: procurement@caribank.org

Fax: 1 (246) 438-9195
Email: bforde@uwichill.edu.bb


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



eee een NS ee 8 Oh ee, Gee
As economy stumbles, gardeners turn to yard- “grown produce

m By ELLEN SIMON
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — High |

_ prices at the pump and the pro-
duce aisle have sent home gar-
deners into their yards with a
mission: Grow-it-yourself din-
ing. Sales of vegetable seeds,
tomato transplants and fruit
trees are soaring as‘enterpris-
ing planters grow their own
food.

- W Atlee Burpee & Caries
ny, the nation’s largest seed

company, has.sold twice as”

many. seeds this year as it did
last year, with half the increase
from new customers, the com-
pany’s president, George Ball,
estimates.

“When we saw the gas prices

go up, we said, ‘Oh boy,’” Ball
said.

Interest in growing fruits and
vegetables picks up during eco-
nomic downturns, people in
the industry say. Seed compa-
nies say a dime spent on seeds
yields about $1 worth of pro-

duce. Bad economic times can

also mean more time to gar- —

den — people who cancel their
summer vacations are around

to water their tomatoes. The
housing crunch also works in
favour of vegetable gardens: If
you can’t sell your home, you
can replant it.

“Over the past year or two
when my boyfriend and I went
shopping and started seeing
how little we got out of the
grocery store for how much,
we figured we might as well
give it a shot trying or our own
veggies and take some of the
weight off our pockets,” said
Janet Bedell, who works at a
lawn and garden center in
Venice, Florida.

Thinking

That kind of thinking is lead-
ing to a big year for compa-
nies that sell to fruit and veg-
etable gardeners. Seed Savers
Exchange, a nonprofit dedi-

‘cated to preserving heirloom

vegetables, ran out of potatoes
this year and mailed 10,000
tomato and pepper transplants
to customers in early May,

‘double its usual amount. The

organization, based near Dec-
orah, Iowa, sold 34,000 packets

of seed.in the first third of this :



Matt Rourke/AP

GEORGE BALL, chairman, president and chief executive officer of W Atlee Burpee 8 Company poses for
a photograph at the company’s headquarters in Warminster. Burpee & Company, the nation’s largest seed
company, has sold twice as many seeds this year as it did last. year, with half of the increase from new

customers, Ball estimates.

year, more than it did all last
year.

Stark Brothers Nurseries
and Orchards Company, a

fruit-tree nursery based in
Louisiana, Mo., has been so
busy that “we’ve had our
phones completely staffed and



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staffed overtime for the past

’ two-months,” said Lita Eatock,

marketing manager.
“A lot of wholesalers are

ee |





really sold out of things,” said
Michael McConkey, owner of
Edible Landscaping, a fruit-
tree nursery and Web site
based in Afton, Va. “I was
attempting to get some apple
rootstock to graft onto some
apples and I really had to work
to find some.”

The learning curve for home
gardeners can be steep. Janet
Bedell in Florida said her first
fights were with bugs and fun-
gus; now she’s working on

‘keeping birds and squirrels

away.

While some vegetables, like
salad greens, are nearly effort-
less, others, like celery, pre-
sent a challenge. New garden-
ers often don’t what it takes
for a plant to survive, said
Ryan Schmitt, greenhouse
manager at The Flower Bin in
Longmont, Colo. “It’s not a
sculpture. Most people get the .
water thing, but sun and food,
_ they often forget.”

New vegetable gardeners are
packing classes from Skillins
Greenhouses in Falmouth,
Maine to Love Apple Farm in
Ben Lomond, Calif.

“If I think of a name ofa
class, I’ll give it and people will
come,” said Cynthia Sandberg,
owner of Love Apple Farm.
“People will drive three hours
for these classes. It’s not
because of me, it’s because .
they want to learn.”

Burpee’s eight-person hor-
ticulturist hotline at the com-
pany’s Warminster, Penn.
headquarters has been over-

- whelmed with calls from gar-

deners trying to learn the
basics of soil acidity and seed
starting. Absolute beginners
visiting nurseries occasionally
ask questions like, “Oh, toma-
toes are a plant?” said Schmitt
at the Flower Bin. “That’s usu-
ally followed by, ’Oh, I can
grow that?”

“It’s a teaching moment,” -
Schmitt said. “I can fill them

with the right information.”

GRDN, a shop in the New
York City borough of Brook-
lyn, is getting a lot of questions.
about which edible plants can
be grown on a fire escape, said
staffer Cindy Birkhead:
“There’s lots of interest in~
herbs, blueberry bushes, toma-
to plants, any transplants or
shrubs that bear edible fruit.”

People too busy to plant
their own gardens are hiring
specialists like Colin McCrate,
owner of two-year-old Seattle
Urban Farm Co., whose busi-
ness has doubled since last
year. Urban Farm’s projects
range.from building and plant-
ing one or two raised beds:to
ripping out a customer’s front

. lawn, installing drip irrigation

and planting a crop. Most of

his gardens cost $1,000 to-
$2,000; two customers this year

have told him they’re putting

their stimulus checks into their

gardens.

McCrate said he’s been
working 16-hour days; the
company’s staff has grown
from two last year to six. “We
can almost not keep up with
the demand there is for ser-
vices now,” he said.

The last few years of veg-
etable garden sales were “a
yawner,” said Mike Skillin,
owner of Skillins Greenhouses.
“People might plant a few
things here and there, but
they’re much more interested
in patio planting. This year,
people are taking these big
patio planters they have and
they’re planting vegetables in
them.”

Eva Burmeister, a pyofes-
sional violinist who lives in
New York City, began planting
vegetables at her family’s
home on Long Island after
returning from-seven years ia
Germany. “I was shocked at
food prices in the city, includ-
ing the farmer’s market,” she
said. “A few things that are
quite popular in Europe are
difficult to find here.” She’s
starting tomatoes, eggplants
and peppers. indoors under
grow lights and plans to trans-
plant them around Memorial
Day.

Onions, shallots and leeks
have been especially strong
sellers. Wholesale sales rose
one-quarter this year at Dixon-
dale Farms, a family-owned
farm in Carrizo Springs, Texas
that ships onion and leek trans-
plants to individual customers
and sells wholesale to Wal-
Mart Stores Incorporated,
Lowe’s Cos. and Home Depot
Incorporated, said Bruce Frais-
er, the company’s president,

But Fraiser repeats the old
farming joke that the way,.to
make a small fortune farming
is to start off with a large one.

“We'll get it while we can,”
he said. “The next hailstorm
might be around the corner.”



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