Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
HAPPY MEAL r-





| AMERIC AN IDO IL im eae

HIGH 82F |
| LOW 70F

MOSTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 104 No.144







Va TCM) a RST

aT a

FEATURES

SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



m The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008



ATT a



PRICE — 75¢



oa lit: Paes

Re aaa! sieeehe

cat bed

SOFTBALL ON PAGE 1





for teenager's killer’

Speculation
shooting carried
out as revenge
for Khodee.

Davis’ death.

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

GUNSHOTS fired in Step
Street, Fox Hill, on Monday. ~
night were allegedly intended
for the killer of 16-year-old |
Khodee Davis after he was. . |
stabbed to death on Cabbage
Beach.

At least 17 shots were heard
as far away as the Jungle Club
at around 11pm on Monday,
just seven hours after the Tem-
ple Christian School student
was stabbed in the heart and
died on Paradise Island.

Several people at the scene
of Khodee’s murder were
arrested and questioned by

. police, but the main suspect is
still on the loose.

out by men from Reeves Street,
_ where Khodee lived, who were
-seeking. revenge. for the
teenager’s death.
A source from Fox Hill said:
Speculation has been made

that the shooting was carried SEE page 15

Ship set for Bahamas cruises
fails US sanitation inspection

@ By ALISON LOWE
’ Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A CRUISE ship set to begin providing new three and four-day
cruises to the Bahamas from Florida recently failed a US government
sanitation inspection. .

Tourism: officials and Norwegian Cruise Lines vice president: of

SEE page 15










AUTO INSURANCE




OUT,
It us!







E MANAGEMENT

TED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

| i i He im,





‘

eH a PaCS Davis TUE TT TC



li By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter











FAMILY and friends’ of mur-
dered 16-year-old Khodee Davis
gathered at the morgue at the
Princess Margaret Hospital yes-
terday to identify his body.

Neighbours, friends and col-
leagues of Khodee and his parents,
Dereck Davis and Sonia Dill, wait-
ed outside the morgue to support
the family after they had viewed
the body of Mr Davis and Ms Dil-
1’s only child.

Ms Dill wailed as she left the
building, her knees buckled’ and
she clung to friends for support,
while Mr Davis, a prominent Fox
Hill businessman, quietly con-
trolled his grief as he walked out of
the gates.

The crowd of around 40 people












KENO SEYMOUR, 16, exits the
morgue after viewing the body
of his best friend.

Ms Dill’s friend, Val Walkine,
44, said: “We consider Khodee our
son. He was a nice young man, he
couldn’t be a better person.”

About 10 of Ms Dill’s colleagues
from Bahamas Customs went to
PMH as soon as they heard of her











dispersed, with friends and family _ loss.
returning to the family home. in ;
Fox Hill. SEE page 15



Bishop Hall responds to reported
Dame Joan Sawyer comments

THE irresponsible behaviour of some cannot negate the right of :
others for freedom of faith and speech, Bishop Simeon Hall said yes-
terday. . :
The senior church leader at the New Covenant Baptist Church
was responding to comments that President of the Court of Appeal ;
Dame Joan Sawyer was reported in another daily to have made on :
Saturday. :

The Bahama Journal quoted Dame Joan as saying that “the :
worst thing that ever happened to this country...was freedom of
religion and to speak.” :

She was reported to have said that this is because people “have
taken freedom to mean licence. They do not see that freedom is real- :
ly responsibility.” i

Dame Joan was said to have been speaking on the topic of “Dys- }
functional Families, Dysfunctional Communities” at St Barnabas :
church. i

SEE page 15

\ British
‘American

Pe ry) rir



RIC mT EY
COM mwI ETE
with defrauding|
WO o wie

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE .

A PASTOR was among four
men arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday, charged with
defrauding the Bahamas. Gov-

- ernment of thousands of dollars.

Henry Pratt, 74, of Bain’s
Town, Cat. Island, Kirkland
Lopez, 55, of Blue Hill Heights,
Joseph Ferguson, 52; of Fresh
Creek, Andros, and Patrick
Evans, 60, of Malcolm Allot-
ment appeared before Magis-
trate*Carolita Bethel at’'Gourt'8,
Bank Lane, yesterday afternoon
on-charges of fraud and conspir-
acy to commit fraud.

Court dockets state that Pratt,
Lopez and Ferguson between
November 24,2004 and Octo-
ber 10, 2005 while at Cat Island

with the intent to defraud, con- .

spired to commit fraud. It is also
alleged that on October 10, 2005



Hubert Ingraham

Major FNM

shake-up
may be
ininlnent
A:MAJOR shake-up in the
FNM administration may be
imminent, as sources within the
party suggest that Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham is not
pleased with the performance of
certain members of his Cabinet
after only one year in office.
Initially, reports suggested that

Mr Ingraham was not satisfied
with the performance of a num-

ber of his Ministers of State.’

However, it is now understood
that this lack of enthusiasm for
some members of the Cabinet
now extends to the Ministerial
level.

SEE page 15

jl)



the three men being concerned
together with intent to defraud
obtained cash in the amount of
$25,920 from the Bahamas Gov-
ernment: Court dockets also stat-
ed that Ferguson, Evans and

SEE page 15

ETAT
a TH
SNC at CS aT
on environmental
NU EE rh

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net









HUMAN rights organisa-
tion Amnesty International
has called on its members to
send urgent appeals to
Bahamian government and
police officials calling for an
independent investigation into
a raid by Bahamian security
forces.on an environmental
group.

The “Urgent Action
Appeal” was issued by the

SEE page 15







Retired president ~
of John Bull dies

MRS Macushla Hazelwood, 88,
retired president of John Bull
Limited, died suddenly of an asth-
ma attack at a friend’s home in .
Vancouver, Canada, Monday
morning.» Mrs Hazelwood, who
had been in good health, had suf-
fered from asthma for about 20
years. sy

Arrangements are now being
made to return her body to Nas-
sau when funeral arrangements
will be announced.

Mrs Hazelwood was the daugh-
ter of the late Sir Asa Pritchard,
who founded the John Bull store
in 1929. Her son, Frederick
Hazelwood, is now the proprietor
of the John Bull Group of Com-
panies.

A RUSMRCY: Yh ets
MUTHAL FUNDS
LIFE INSURANGE

ME UO i te

CUBE T SN
ae YEE BS

FINANCIAL PLANNING
& INVESTMENTS






PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



YOUR NON-REPRESENTATIVES

a By TANEKA THOMPSON
* Tribune Staff Reporter’
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
* with additional information

by Reuben Shearer

AFTER the dust from the cam-
paign trail settles and the frenzy
induced from election fever subsides,
it seems as if some members of par-
liament have settled into the comfort
of "MP-hood", shutting the doors to
their offices in the constituencies to!
which they were elected.

Overgrown grass, closed doors and
unanswered phone calls leave many
to wonder how accessible MPs are to
the people they are sworn to repre-
sent,

The Tribune canvassed constituen-
cy offices throughout New Providence
and the informal survey revealed that:
out of the 22 offices contacted, 12 of
them had phone lines that were either
out of service, unlisted on their party's
official website or unanswered.

Only a fraction had staff who

answered the telephone and provided
information about the day-to-day
operations of the office.

The offices of the South Beach,



Bail-

lou Hills, Sea Breeze,

Carmichael, Kilarney, Marathon,

Mount Moriah, Farm Road and Cen-

treville, Golden Gates, Bain and

Grants Town, Fort Charlotte and St

Thomas More constituencies were

not accessible by telephone during

hours of operation listed on their par-
ty's respective websites.

On Tuesday FNM Chairman John-
ley Ferguson said all constituency
offices receive $1,500 a month in gov-
ernment assistance and should be
accessible to the public.

He maintained that all FNM con-
stituency offices are "open at some
level. t

"They are receiving government
funds so it's incumbent on them with-
out the party being involved (to keep
the office open).

The MP himself, or herself, would
have to put some funding into it to





keep it up to scratch. The $1,500 is

really only a drop in the bucket, in
fact that's a starting (point).,That is a
help towards keeping the office going

He stressed that while the con-
stituency office is an essential avenue
for bi-partisan "development of the
constituency", realistically an MP.can-
not spend all of his time meeting face
to face with voters. "In this day and
time, I don't think an MP can be as
accessible as he or.she is expected’ to
(be), but barring all of the things that
he or she would have to do, the MP
must be visible to their constituency.

"(But) the reality is once election is
over and you (take office) then you
have to go and serve the people and
in your service people will begin to
understand that you are working and
I think that's where the FNM is rising
to the occasion — people will see
them in production or performance
rather than in person," Mr Ferguson

said. PLP Chairwoman Glenys Han-
na-Martin said Tuesday that all PLP
constituency offices remain open:

"Our constituency offices are open
everyday and they're staffed, I can
say that."

More than just a place where voters
can air grievances to their member
of parliament, the constituency office
should be a "one-stop-shop" for
learning and guidance she added. ~-

"I think the constituency offices
should be a sort of 'one-stop-shop'
for the constituent to (air) their con-
cerns which may be local, infrastruc-

ture issues or signage, it may be issues’

of a personal nature in terms of the
need to access government agencies.
It may be simple things like having
access to a computer.

"I think it should be a profession-
ally run office that is responsive to
the needs of the community and the
constituent. And they need someone
knowledgeable to help them access
the resources of the state or to be

’ pointed in the right direction, and

that's how I (run) my office," said the
PLP chairperson.

She said she is in her constituency
office about once a week.

Bain and Grants Town
Constituency, MP
Bernard BJ Nottage
open9am-9pm
Called at: 4.32 pm

No phone contacts list-

“ed on-the PLP's web-

site for this constituen-

_ St Cecilia Constituen-
cy, MP Cynthia Pratt
OPED 9am - ‘Tpm Mon- —

_ day-Friday

"We do get a lot of calls

everyday, Mother Pratt —

Fort Charlotte Con
stituency, MP ois
Sears
opened, 9am-9pm
Called at: 4. 47 p

abi

The majority St

» Tecelve, are.

_ regarding job

If residents need tosee ~

4 nin waged 92!

_ her, she goes a their | i
homes,
_ Last event they had was

_in November 2007, the —
_ "Coconut Grove Festi- .
ovalit

103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
~ P.O. Box N-1546

WU ti o. 6 ; ;
Telephone: 328-4900
tee Fax: 328-4903 + Cell: 456-9062

RU enya Bam al

JOHN JEFFERSON
SCAVELLA
aka Jeff Scavella, 60

of #2 Sherwood Drive, .
funeral will be held on
Thursday, May 15th at 10am
at Hillview Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Tonique
Williams Darling Highway.
Officiating will be Pastor
Hugh A. Roach, assisted by
Pastor Peter Joseph and assisted by other ministers of
the gospel. Interment will be made in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road. Ne
Left i to ) herish the memories are the precious gem and |
love of his life, Bernadette; children, Tammy, Gina,
Ailiah, J.J. and Jude; brothers, Glen, Stanley,\Robert,
Peter, Billy, Patrick, Chris, Colin, Dave and Allan; sisters,
Julie, Dale and Sheila; aunts, Angela Simmons, Norma,
Lida and Elaine Scavella and Lillian Bethel; uncles,
Ronald and James Scavella and Buck Johnson; special
family, Mr and Mrs Oswald Ferguson, Mr and Mrs Keith
Mason and family, Renee, Koe, Darlene, Arlene, Darelle,
Maria; adopted chilldren whom he loved dearly, Darion,
Megan, Tianna, Wayne and Romal; other relatives
_including, Mona and Darin; Jeff’s nieces and nephews
cousins Carmen Capron, Marsha Taylor, Katie Smith,
Sheila Armbrister, Wilda and Dorothy, Pam, Diane,
Robin and Wanda Scavella, Raymond, Edwin, Godfrey.
and Commodore Clifford “Butch” Scavella, Mack and
Winkie Pinder, the Simmons family, Mr and Mrs Lester
Farrington, Dr. Dane Bowe, Dr James Constantakis and
family, Walk in Medical Clinic Sandyport, Pat Paul, .
Thaddeus. Paul, Mr Albury (Security at Love 97) Mr
Wendall Jones C.E.O. Love 97, the ZNS family, Teddy
Johnson and family, Mr Leslie O. Miller, the Hon. Kendall
Wright, Rev. Carroll Johnson and family, the Freetown
Lane family, Nurse Joanna Bethel and family, Beverly
Basden and family and a host of other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held today from 12:30 until 6:30p.m.
in the State Room of Jones Brothers Morticians, Mt.
Royal Avenue and Talbot Street and again at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service time. 3













Sak

FNM MPs

Clifton Constituency, MP Kendal Wright

Called at 10.30am

Open: 10 am-6pm Monday to Friday

Last community event was a steak-out on
February 23.

According to MP Wright's personal asstis-
tant, he is there just about two hours a day
and every Saturday he drives around the com-
munity and speaks with constituents.

"A lot of people like to be personal so they
come to see him in the office," his assistant
said.

Bamboo Town, MP Branville McCartney

Called at 11.52 am

Open: 1lam-7pm Monday to Fri-
day

Saturday May 24, 2008 they will be
holding a community steak-out at the
HQ. Every other Friday they have a
senior citizens luncheon and host eight
community programmes, including a literacy
programme and youth outreach. According to
Vivia Ferguson, office manager for the Bam-
boo Town office, "Mr McCartney has no set
time to come in (but he) is still doing walka-
bouts on a regular basis to talk with the resi-

‘dents in his constituéncy and listen*to’ their
“concerns. Mr McCartney and members of his!
family make 'it-a point to worship ata different ;

church each month:in‘Bamboo Town.

"As is stands now, all funds are coming
straight from Minister McCartney's pocket,"
Mrs Ferguson said. "So every quarter we try to
do'some kind of fundraising to assist him."

Pinewood Constituency MP Byran Wood-
side

Called at 12.01pm

Open: 9am-S5pm, Monday to Fri-
day

According to Mrs Johnson, a maid
at the office, every second Monday of
the month they hold a constituency
meeting at Cleveland Eneas Primary School.

A fun/run walk and steak-out had to be
postponed because of the election court, ane
said.

South Beach Constituency, MP Phenton
Neymour

Called at 1.01pm, unsuccessful,
. phone rang 19 times.

Open: 12-8pm (info gathered from
FNM's website — no days listed for
when the office is open.

Baillou Hills Constituency, MP
Sidney Collie

First call attempt made at 12.33
pm; second call, 1pm — no response.
Voicemail came on.

According to the FNM's website, this con-
stituency office is operated between the hours
of 9am and 4.30pm and 5pm to 8pm or later.

Montagu Constituency, MP Loretta Butler-
Turner

Called at: 12.39 pm

Open: 9.30am-4.30 pm Monday to Friday

Office receives calls asking for more speed

bumps to be put on the roads, traffic light mal-
functions.

"A lot of persons call to speak with Mrs
Turner," said Ms Molly, a secretary at the
office. When asked whether they have held
recent events for Montagu constituents, she
said she was unable to give that information
out.

"The releasing of that info does not come
under my portfolio," she said.

Sea Breeze Constituency, MP Carl Bethel

Called at: 1.06 pm, unsuccessful, phone rang
21 times.

Open: noon-6pm, or later

St Anne's Conariuen: MP Brent Symon--
ette

Called at 1.10pm -

Open: 9am-Spm, Monday to ‘Friday .

According to Larry Pinder, a representa-
tive from the office, Mr Symonette is in office
on Thursdays from 5pm until the last resident
who wants to has seen him.

The constituency hasn't had an event in the
community since last year, he added.

According to Mr Pinder, there is an ongoing
programme in St Anne's, involving the clearing
up of the:streets and parks, and a community
surveillance etfort operated by residents and
police.
-- They have a started the process of putting

"up signs on streets that are unnamed.

“We have had a problem where police
couldn't find areas where they received a call
from,” he said.

Carmichael Constituency, MP Desmond
Bannister

Called at: 1.42 pm. Unsuccessful - number
out of service.

Open: 10 am-4pm (no days listed for opera-
tion on FNM's website)

Killarney Constituency, MP Hubert Minnis

Called at: 2.57 pm. No response, voicemail
came on.

According to FNM's website, this-con-
stituency's office is open 12 POE SP or later

Marathon Constituency, MP Earl
Deveaux *

Called at: 3.02 pm. Both numbers
listed on FNM's website are out of
order.

Open: 10am-4pm and 6pm to 8pm.
(No listing of a of operation on
FNM's webpage.)



Mount Moriah, MP Tommy Turnquest
_Called at: 3.11 pm. No response, phone rang
15 times
Open: 9am-Spm, or later

MORE PLPs

Elizabeth Constituency, MP Malcolm
Adderley

Called at 3:15 pm

Open: 1pm-8pm, Monday to Friday

The last community event was in February.

According to Ms Woodside, secretary at the
Elizabeth Constituency HQ, the office has



So what are they doing?

“had a few calls, but they're normally regard-
ing the youngsters in the area. Mr Adderley
who is also concerned about this is addressing
it and is in the planning stages of creating a bas-
ketball programme and a band.

"When he has an appointment, he's in,” she
said.
Centerville Constituency, MP Perry Christie .
Called at: 3.32 pm
Open: 9am-9pm
No one answered the phone

Golden Gates, MP Shane Gib-
son (no phone contact listed on PLP
website for this constituency HQ)

Called at: 3.35 pm

Open: 9am-9pm
----No-one answered the phone



Englerston Constituency, MP
Glenys Hanna-Martin

Called at: 3.57 pm '

Spoke with: Gwen Francis

Open: Monday-Friday, 9am to
5pm, (but most times they end up
staying in office till 6pm).

A representative said: “She's not here every -
day, but she comes in once weekly to check in.
During this time she meets with residents who
request to see her. Residents also visit her at
her office.”

The last event they held for residents was
two weeks ago at EP Roberts Primary School.
“We gave out clothes for babies, children,
adults, and shoes. We have a close communi-
ty. "



_ -—.-The-team is planning to purchase a proper- -

ty for a community centre that will hold a nurs-
‘ery for young mothers to drop their children
off, especially those who can't afford daycare
services. A lot of residents inquire about jobs,

. and request help with their rent, or finding a

house, the representative said.

"In our constituency we have a high Haitian-
Bahamian population. A lot of them are born
here, and grew up in Nassau. When they turn
18 or 19, they apply for citizenship but it isn't a
process fast enough, if at all. So they apply, but
they have problems being naturalised,” she
added.

apa Constituency, MP Melanie Grif-

"Called at: 4.11 pm
Spoke with: the secretary. Said she would
“have someone call back. No call up to press

time.

Fox Hill Constituency, MP Fred Mitchell

Called at: 4.15 pm

Open: 9:30 am-5pm

Spoke with: Laverne McPhee - office man-
ager.

“We don't really get a lot of calls. They get
calls informing of a person that died in the
community. Fox Hill is pretty much working,"
she said. "We are closely knit."

"I speak with him each day, except if he's off
the island."

On the 25th of this month the HQ will host
a parent's day for the community.

“Mr Mitchell does a walkabout very often.
He is visible in the community on a daily basis,
talking to residents,” she said.

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 3

USES eee OS ee ee
oO. in brief Mother surviving loss of murdered son
‘with support of her family and friends’

Two in court
in connection |
@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter _





with seizure
of marijuana

TWO men charged in con-
nection with the seizure of 93
and a half pounds of mari-
juana on Abaco last week
were arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Kendall White, 37 and
Kirkwood Bain, 37, both of

him day and night, and when I
saw him with negative people,
he would say, ‘You know I’m
a leader, they cannot influence
me,’ and it was true.” relatives gathered at the Dill-

Ms Dill said Khodee, her Davis family home in Fox Hill
only child, was allandevery- on Tuesday afternoon
thing to her, and nothing described Khodee as a quiet
could prepare her for his and well-mannered young
death but her Christian faith, man who was impeccably
putting his murder down to_ dressed, loved travelling and

always love him and he
will always remain in my
heart.”
THE MOTHER of mur- Around forty friends and
dered Khodee Davis said she ©
is surviving the loss of her only
son with the unfailing support
of family and friends, and an
unshakeable faith.

Sonia Dill and Khodee’s
father Dereck Davis, of

Abaco, appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
Court Eight in Bank Lane
yesterday, charged with pos-
session of marijuana with the
intent to supply and conspir-
ing to possess the drugs with
the intent to supply.

The offenses were alleged-
ly committed on Thursday
May 8.

Both men pleaded: not
guilty to the charges and were

granted bail.in the sum of

$50,000.
The case has been
adjourned to December 4.

Two Jamaican
men charged in
connection with
drug seizure

TWO Jamaican men
charged in connection with a
massive drug seizure on Long
Island last week were
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison yesterday having been
denied bail.

Curtis Marsden, 33, and
Delroy Brown, 44 appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at Court Eight in
Bank Lane yesterday charged
with possession of marijuana
with the intent to supply,
importation of marijuana;
conspiring to possess mari-
juana and conspiring to
import marijuana’ with the
intent to supply.

According to court dock-
ets, the offenses were alleged-
ly committed on Monday,
May 5.

Both men pleaded not
guilty to the charges but were
denied bail because they have
no status in the country and
are considered flight risks by
the court.

The drug charges stem
from the seizure of 488
pounds of marijuana on mar-
ijuana last week.

Haitian lawmakers

reject president's pick | !

for prime minister

â„¢@ PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

HAITIAN legislators on
Monday rejected President
Rene Preval’s pick for prime
minister, extending a month- :
long period without a func- :
tioning government for the }
troubled nation, according to

_ Associated Press.

Spokesmen in the lower
house of Parliament said inter- ;
_ national banker Ericq Pierre :
lost a vote that ended his can- :
didacy 51 to 35, with nine :

abstentions.

Levaillant Louis Jeune, a
leading opposition deputy, :
said legislators did not have: :
faith in the political leadership
of Pierre, a senior official with
the Inter-American Develop- :

ment Bank.

“We didn’t really believe in
the plan that he had for the :
people of this country,” he :

told reporters in the capital,
Port-au-Prince.

Pierre, 63, could not imme- i
diately be contacted for com- :
ment. In an interview with The ;

Associated Press last week,

the candidate said Haiti must }
concentrate on long-term }
strategies to help the millions
pushed deeper into misery by i

higher food prices.

On April 12, the Senate dis- :
missed Prime Minister Jacques
Edouard Alexis over criticism
that his government failed to :
show leadership and misman-
aged the economy before vio- :
lent food protests that left sev- }
en people dead and destroyed

hundreds of businesses.

Preval will have to nomi- }
nate another candidate, who :
must win a vote of confidence ;
in the two houses of Parlia- ;

ment.

Stephen Benoit, a member
of Preval’s Lespwa party in :

the lower house of Parliament,

said the Caribbean country
must unite behind the next

nominee.

“We need to have a new :

prime minister in office soon,”
Benoit said.

Haiti is struggling to restore :
stability and rebuild its econ- }
omy four years after a violent }
rebellion ousted President }

Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

Reeves Street, Fox Hill, have
been inundated with visitors
since their son was brutally
stabbed and killed while walk-
ing to Cabbage Beach on
Monday afternoon.

The 16-year-old grade 11.
student at Temple Christian
School will be remembered

by hundreds of people nature.



SONIA DILL with her son

throughout Fox Hill and Nas-
sau for his kind ahd gentle

nodee Davis



His mother said: “Khodee
. Was very popular, sometimes
too popular. Girls would call

SEEN FROM left are
Charlene Smith, mother
of Desmond Rolle, Rev
Glenroy Bethel, founder
of Families for Justice
and spokesman for the
mothers, Bridgette Grant,
mother of Jake Grant and
Marilyn Davis, the
guardian and maternal -
grandmother of DeAnge-
lo McKenzie.



Four of the mothers of five murdered boys
request remains be released for burial

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— After five years with still:no trial
date set, four of the mothers of the five murdered
missing boys are requesting the release of their sons’
remains for burial in Grand Bahama.

Rev Glenroy Betliel, the founder of Families for ,

Justice, spoke on behalf of the mothers at a press con-

:* ference on Tuesday at Zion Baptist Church.

He believes that it is a total injustice for the families
to be denied their children’s remains for five long
years. ‘

He said the organisation is demanding that the
Attorney.General release the remains of Jake Grant,
12, Mackinson Colas, 11, DeAngelo McKenzie, 13,
Junior Reme, 11, and Desmond Rolle, 14, to their
mothers in Freeport.

“The mothers of the boys are still suffering emo-
tional and mental stress from the ordeal and want to
give their sons a proper burial,” he said.

Claudette Mitchell, the mother of Mackinson Colas,

: Charlene Smith, the mother of Desmond Rolle, Brid- °

gette Grant, the mother of Jake Grant, and Marilyn
Davis, the guardian and maternal grandmother of
DeAngelo McKenzie, held portraits of the boys.

Myrthi Jean Tinford, the mother of 11-year-old
Junior Reme, was not present.

Cordell Farrington has been charged with the mur-
ders of four boys. And four minors who were charged
in 2004 with manslaughter in the disappearance of
Jake Grant, were acquitted several years ago.

Rev Bethel said that the month of May marks the
fifth anniversary of the beginning of the missing boys’
tragedy in Grand Bahama. He said that the families

: - deserve some closure.

“Tt has been five years now, and the case oe not yet

been brought forth before the courts and the families

' want to know why it is taking so long to bring the

matter to trial. These families are looking for closure
and it is surprising to know that the AG has kept the
remains for five years,” he said.

Rev Bethel said the organisation has written a letter
to the AG’s Office which was delivered last week on
behalf of the grieving mothers for release of the
remains.

He said the AG’s Office does not need to hold the
remains and can proceed without them at the trial.
He feels that to deny the families a proper burial for so
many years is an injustice.

“We demand the release of the remains of these |

boys.

“We believe it is a violation of these families’ con-
stitutional rights. It is unjust to hold on to the remains,”
he said.

* Rev Bethel said that one mother has suffered a
heart attack, and a second is still being forced to pay
insurance for her dead child because she has not

- received a death certificate.
“As we await the response of the AG for the release

of the remains it is our prayer that justice is served in
a timely manner compared to the injustice that has

been administered to this family in the last five years. |

“We the families for justice will continue to fight for
the rights of these families and their loved ones remains
which is rightfully theirs,” he said.

Jake Grant was the first boy to go missing on May 9,
2003. The second was Mackinson, who disappeared on
May 16, DeAngelo vanished on May 27, Junior Reme
on July 30, and Desmond Rolle on September 28.

Cordell Farrington, who was indicted for the mur-
ders of Mackinson, DeAngelo, Junior, and Desmond,
was convicted in the Supreme Court of the murder of
22-year-old Jamaal Robins. His lawyer is appealing
the verdict.

Woman accused of stealing $103,000 by means of fraud

A WOMAN accused of steal-
ing just over $103,000 by means of
fraud was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Sabrina Thurston, 35, of East- .

ern Estates appeared before Mag-
istrate Linda Virgill at Court Nine
in Nassau Street yesterday on 158
fraud related charges.















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. Thurston was arraigned on
charges of fraud, possession of a
forged document and uttering a
forged document.

It is alleged that Thurston
between October 22, 2003 and
April 26, 2005 she forged the
endorsement of at least six people
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cheques.

It is alleged that Thurston
uttered the fake cheques and
obtained varying sums of cash
from the Scotia Bank located on
East Street and Soldier Road.

Thurston allegedly obtained
$103,018.85 in total by means of
fraud.

The accused was not required
to plead to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of $20,000.

The case has been adjourned
to October 28 and November 5, 6

and 7 for the commencement of a, ©

preliminary inquiry.

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God’s will.

Helpful

She said: “Khodee was a

loving child. He was helpful,

and he was constantly telling

me that he loved me and
wanted to make me happy. -

“I asked God to see him
grow and be a fine young man
and marry and have children.
It was just not God’s will.

“T did my part and then

Jesus took over. Khodee was

only loaned to me.”

The popular student who
attended the youth group and
Sunday services at St Mark’s
Native Baptist Church in
Romer Street, Fox Hill, last
went with his best friend Keno
Seymour, his mother and

grandmother, Thelma Dillon «

Mother’s Day on Sunday.
Mrs Dill, 66, who. has 17

grandchildrén and 11‘ great-

grandchildren, said Khodee
visited her every day to wish
her well; including the day he
was killed.

She said: “He was friendly,

loving and kind. A jewel. I will

youth meetings on Friday;

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

BayParl Bldg. - Parliament St.
Telephone: 322-8898 or 328-7157

had a passion for music.

His adopted brother, David
Barr, 25, a Fox Hill musician,
said Khodee enjoyed working
with him and hoped to com-
pose his own music.

Ms Dill said: “He was not a
troublesome child. He always
kept to himself, but he was
very, very popular, with the
school, with the church and
the youth group, everybody
wanted to be in Khodee’s
crew. I was very proud of
him.”

Personable

Pastor Carrington Pinder
from St Mark’s Native Bap- {
tist Church said: “He was a '
very loving, personable per- !
son, he would come to the ‘




nights and he. would be ‘ini
church on Sunday, seedy :
Funeral plans at the hi ere
will be made when Khodee’s
body is released. A delay is
expected because of uncon-
firmed reports of a staff strike
in the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital morgue.

SR RE OR PE OT eT Ee SE RE OE OR Tae Cee eee




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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 -
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Public transport system needed badly

AS READERS of this column know we
have been on an extensive trip to Europe

and in the process have recorded some of |

- our impressions of how Europe is trying to
cope with the new energy crisis and the
escalating costs associated with this.

Hoteliers throughout Europe in the
countries we visited — Austria, Hungary,
the Czech Republic and Britain — all have
in place new rules and regulations to try to
offset the very high energy costs due to
the steep rise of the cost of oil in the glob-
al marketplace.

In addition to the control of hotel room
lights by use of your door key which only
allows you to use the electricity in the room
once your key is inserted in a special slot
inside the room, the maid service leaves a

‘ special “Green Card” on your bed every
day for guests to indicate whether they
want their sheets washed daily, or whether
they would help in the conservation of
water by electing to have them washed
every other day.

Similarly for towels and washcloths, if
you need fresh ones you are told to just

- Jeave them in the bathtub. If not they will
‘be serviced for you for another day.

In the three cities of Vienna, Budapest
and Prague, which we visited, tramways
with fixed tramlines and overhead electric
cables keep the public well serviced
throughout the main roads of the city so
that many office workers can get to work
on the public transport system.

In Vienna the tramways run on a 24/7
basis. Besides these there is also good
underground services, thus relieving the
streets of thousands of vehicles on a daily
basis.

In London these days motorists have to
pay for the luxury of bringing a car into the
metropolitan area for the day and have 24

_ hours to pay the fee or otherwise face a stiff
penalty.

It all helps to cut down on traffic con-
gestion and promote the new green envi-
ronment.

In England also the London Times
reported on May 1 that “tens of thousands
of cars will become almost worthless as a
result of the decision to raise road tax on
older models with higher carbon dioxide

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Full & Mid Size SUY’s

Automatic, AC, Exceptionally Equipped

emissions by up to £245 a year.”

The Times said that many families will
find that they cannot sell their cars even
though they are in good working order and
no more than seven years old.

What is desperately needed in the
Bahamas is an affordable and efficient pub-
lic transport system which would allow
most families to benefit and save thé costs
of having to run a car.

With petrol prices at the pumps escalat-
ing to over $5 a gallon and projected to go
even higher more families will have to
economise on travel and use of the family
car for trips to the foodstore or pharmacy.

If there was a reliable bus system families
would have an alternative means of doing
so.

With our clogged roads during peak traf-
fic periods more and more of our expensive
petrol is wasted in traffic j jams up and down
the island.

Surely this could be relieved if a proper
school bus service to the main public
schools was worked out.

_ This should not be beyond the reach:of

“our government and public officials.

More than half the cars that clog the

_roads every day during school days could

be, taken off the road if a proper and effi-
cient bus service was worked out by all the
schools.

Most modern cities have devised such
schemes to prevent their road systems
being clogged for so many hours each day.

If a government actuary worked out the
total man hours and productivity that was
lost to the country by the horrendous waste

. of time spent in traffic jams.on a daily,

weekly, monthly and yearly basis we think
the results would shock the nation into
doing something about it — seriously!

We know that out of this grows road
rage and we are seeing more and more of
our young people dying or becoming crip-
pled by accidents on the roads.

In a recent U.S. magazine article it was
stated that more and more Africans die
each year from road accidents in Africa
than from AIDS.

T’ ‘sis an amazing statistic, but could be —

a precursor of what might happen here if
our road conditions are not improved. _



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Analysing the
root causes
of violence

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE phrase: ‘Bend the tree
while it’s young’ does not mean
break the tree or its associated
spirit. It does not mean chop it
down and dig it up. ‘Bending’ is
typically a strong action and
firm, but it ¢an also be gentle,
depending on the degree to
which bending is necessary.

It does not always even mean
to bend in the same direction
or way, just the most appropri-
ate way for the time.

It is also done with a view to
health and beauty.

The ugly problem of violence
in the Bahamas has been attrib-

uted to many causes: the per-,

sistence of the drug culture and
the aggression that is associated
with it, the infusion of relative-
ly new and more aggressive cul-
tures into the Bahamas, and the
desensitisation of our con-
sciences as the result of media
glorified violence and games.
While these causes work in tan-
dem and with considerable
impacts, these are only part of
the cause and probably not even
the most significant ones in our
chronological development as
a nation and as individuals. It
has more to do with discipline.

The lack of discipline and
manners is often lamented by
our people — gone are the days

‘when a stranger could discipline
children with a stern look, word -
-or hand; when adults could be

shamed out of perverse speech
and conduct.

Gone are the days when most
people even seemed to care
about those days.

Manners no longer carry us
through the world because it
can hardly get us through a
crowd on Bay Street or a line at
the conch shack.

Manners will not carry you
even through the day because
its back has been largely bro-
ken and it goes under-appreci-
ated.

Clearly, this is not an advo-
cacy for rudeness, or giving up
on discouraging it, but the

emphasis on manners could be -

regarded as a stone at the
Queen’s Staircase.

It has been worn down and
treated as a relic.

One might be tempted to say
‘fossilised’, if only it were pre-
served even half as well.

Consideration should be giv-
en not only to the lack of disci-
pline, but perhaps even more
to the types of discipline.

The methods for meting out
discipline.

The mood and the tone of

discipline.
Abuse veiled as discipline
within our culture.

“iy

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Equipnients

Starting at

- minds’.

Mes



Our culture is gregarious, pas-
sionate and often loud.

A part of the honesty of our
people in terms of speaking
their minds is what I take pride
in when compared to societies
who sacrifice integrity for polit-
ical correctness, so-called inclu-
sion and make-believe neutral-
ity.

Yet an off-shoot of the open-
ness in this emotion continues
to hurt our social order and our
children in many ways, because
we also tend to lack control.

We do not simply, honestly
tell another that we disagree
and why, if we even give a

‘why’.

We shout, berate and often
insult even our family members
and friends; sometimes espe-
cially our family members and
friends, when there is disagree-
ment.

When we are in turn insulted,
we shout back in even louder
and uglier tones, and. that is
assuming that we do not imme-
diately assume a violent pos-
ture.

But our manner and tone do
not shield that distinct possibil-
ity under even the thinnest
veneer. Our emotion is unbri-
dled and this is deemed in the
Bahamas to be ‘speaking our
And this is how we
speak to our children and how
we speak to others in their pres-
ence. If they do not glorify this
behaviour outright, they at least
learn it to be the norm; and
what fear if any they feel ini-
tially, turns to a rage to be
exacted on us or our neighbors
in the country at a time of their
choosing. Even on themselves.

To be clear, I am not an
opponent of corporal punish-
ment in moderation and appro-
priateness. My parents often
said to me, ‘if you can’t hear,
then you'll have to feel’. It was
as simple as that, but I was at
least given the chance to ‘hear’,
and often repeatedly. Some-
times I had to ‘hear’ so often

_ and for so long, that I would
just as soon have gotten to the

‘feel’ part of things.

Regardless, the emphasis is

obviously on moderation,
appropriateness and. effective
communication.

When children are beaten
constantly and in anger, not
only do they become hardened
and calloused, but they learn to

‘resolve’ their conflicts in a sim-_

ilar fashion.
They learn to bully and to hit,

to stab and shoot, and not nec-
essarily in that order.

Human beings are distin-
guished in the animal world
mostly by virtue of reasoning

ability, but that is too infre-

quently on display among our
adults, even often in govern-
ment, learning institutions and
other arenas of responsibility,
prestige and presumed sophis-
tication.

But not only are parents and
other civilians within our com-
munity at fault. So are our
police.

I have witnessed and been
privy to explicit instances of
police brutality when dealing
with citizens of this country.
These instances sometimes
make the news, as they have of
late, which is saying a lot given
our level of acceptance when it
comes to this kind of abuse.
Should they, like criminals,
resort immediately to violent
measures versus civil discussion;
or could their ability to exact
violence but their choice not to

. when it is truly unnecessary, be

the precise lesson that troubled
youth and criminals need?

Even a docile animal when
cornered and confronted vio-
lently responds in kind.

Just as ‘insurgents’ sprang
forth after being in many
instances bullied, cornered and
brutalised on the international
scene, we too have an essen-
tially ‘feverish’ societal response

_ toa foreign or offensive agent.

It is both internal and exter-
nal.
’ It is both far reaching and
sustained.

It is not unfathomable that a
part of our problem with crime
might be largely rooted in that.
We are witnessing both a literal
and symbolic rebellion of
teenagers and young adults that
is tearing our Bahamian family
apart.

Like sharks in a frenzy, they
tear, attack and maim each oth-
er, blinded to all the things that
should be their focus.

To the extent that brutality
and harshness continue and are

. accepted as a part of our cul-

ture, from whatever source, so
too will violence remain.

Bend the tree. Take a strong
and firm action, but remember
that it does not always mean to
bend in the same direction or
way, just the most appropriate

_way for the time.

It is also done with a long-
lasting view to health and beau-

ty.
KENYADA MEADOWS

Nassau,
May, 2008.

Concerns over tourism
‘development projects

: EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open letter to the prime minister.

Dear Rt Hon Mr Ingraham,

I am writing to you concerning the current plans for large-scale
tourism development projects around the Bahamas.

While these projects may draw in some short-term foreign
exchange revenue, the long-term downsides greatly outweigh the
benefits.

Long experience from around the world indicates that large
foreign-owned resorts of this type tend to swallow most of the
tourism dollar and repatriate it to their home countries, while
host countries are left to deal with the social and environmen-
tal consequences.

By bringing in huge investments local people are suffering the
loss of their livelihoods and even their water supplies.

The pristine environment which is a huge draw for overseas
visitors will suffer if not carefully placed at the centre of the
plans, leading in the end to the destruction of what makes the
Bahamas a unique destination and the withdrawal of tourists.

The lack of care taken in building the Bimini Bay and lack of
controls placed on the Baker’s Bay resort on Guana Cay show
that environmental concerns are being overridden by foreign
investors and little thought is given to the impacts.

I urge you strongly to reconsider the model of tourism devel-
opment instituted by the previous government and put a a to
these hugely damaging resorts.

Please do not follow the example of Cambodia where more
than half the islands are now owned by foreign investors, threat-
ening the people and ecosystem.

It is even more imperative now that the Economic Partnership
Agreement with the EU has been agreed, which can be expect-
ed to open the door to even mores investors, that you consider
a tourism model based on fairness, sustainability and local
needs and act to protect the islands.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Midshipman Bovair Davis

Midshipman Byron McClain

Midshipmen
join officers’
corps of RBDF

MIDSHIPMEN Bovair
Davis and Byron McClain
have become the latest-addi-
tion to the officers’ corps of
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.”

They successfully complet-
ed the Royal Naval Young
Officers’ course at Britannia
Royal Naval College
(BRNC), in Dartmouth, Eng-
land.

_ “The young officers join
the growing list of Defence
Force officers to complete
the prestigious year-long
training, which is designed to
prepare naval cadets for
’ careers as military adminis-
trators,” said the force in a
-Statement. “Participants from
the Middle East, Africa, the
Caribbean, Eastern Europe
and the United Kingdom
_ Made up the course’s ethni-
cally diverse grouping, which
eraduaied on April 10, 2008.”
upman
: ieeame only, the second, Fe
‘Defence Force officer to be
awarded the Admiralty:
Binoculars, which is given to
the top international cadet
who has successfully complet-
ed the RNYO Course.

The young naval officer
hopefuls had to endure a rig-
orous period of basic and
leadership-enhancement
training, which .culminated-
with the Able Command
Exercise (ACE).

During ACE, cadets spent
three days and two nights in
the field undergoing practical
leadership evaluations as
their ability to plan, direct
and monitor a given task was
tested under acrimonious
conditions.

They later undergo general

-naval instructions in profes-
sional subjects such as sea- °
manship, navigation (celestial
and coastal), and rules of the
road, prior to spending six
weeks onboard a British war-
‘ship for initial sea training. ~

Whilst stationed aboard
HMS York, a Type 42 Batch |
Destroyet, the students par-
ticipated in chores such as
painting, cleaning, waxing
and polishing, in order to
gain an appreciation of the
hardships endured at sea
from the vantage point of
subordinates.

The ship travelled across
the Mediterranean, and made
visits to Gibraltar, Croatia,
Lisbon, Portugal and Italy.
The final phases of the train-
ing concentrated heavily
upon academics and the sci-
ences, including the study of
disciplines like marine engi-
neering, oceanography, mete-
orology and weapons engi-
neering.

Midshipman Davis gradu-
ated from St Augustine’s
College in 2001 and joined
the Defence Force in 2004 as
a marine recruit. He served
in the Commando Squadron
department prior to his selec-
tion for the officers’ qualify-
ing course.

Midshipman McClain
joined the Defence Force in
August 2005 after graduating
from Jordan Prince William
High School in 2000.

He was attached to the ves-
sel HMBS Nassau in the
squadron department prior to
being selected to attend the
officers’ qualifying course.

ce G c

Photos: Leading Seaman
Jonathan Rolle/RBDF

TROPICAL
UU N)

Teh eas
Wu aera,





-Clain |,:. sears e

‘Some New Providence soil
‘is saturated with sewage’

THE soil in some areas of New
Providence is saturated with
sewage on a daily basis, it has
been revealed.

According to Godfrey Sher-
man, general manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation,
large amounts of sewage make it
into the ground by way of over-
flowing cesspits or septic tanks,
causing contamination to ground
water supplies and ‘& tréating
health threats for many users of
private. well.systems.

He said while many private well
users attempt to chlorinate and
disinfect their private wells, do-
it-yourself methods are often not
consistent or reliable and do not
protect against both bacteriologi-
cal and chemical contaminants, as
do the corporation’s treatment
methods.

“Our policymakers have to
understand that when we make
decisions for WSC, they are not
short-term decisions, they are
long-term decisions, and really
right now we are operating in a
water sector that is completely
unregulated and that is why you
can operate your weli, that is why
hotels can operate their own sys-
tems, but if we are not careful,
dog will eat our lunch and we are
going to be drinking some stuff
that we should not be drinking,”
Mr Sherman said.

The Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration’s panel discussion on the
current state of water emphasised
the need for regulation of the
Bahamas’ water and sewerage
sector, adaptation to climate
change and conservation of nat-
ural groundwater resources.

The panel discussion, which
was held last Thursday evening at
Choices Dining Room, COB
School of Hospitality, included

Water and Sewerage Corporation general manager
says overflowing cesspits or septic tanks can lead
to contamination of ground water supplies

representatives from the Water
and Sewerage Corporation, the
Best Commission, the Bahamas
National Trust and the Bahamas
Nature Conservancy, also stressed
the urgent need to find less expen-

’ sive and renewable sources of

energy to produce water.

Dr Richard Cant, consultant
to the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration, explained that the
Bahamas’ groundwater resources
are very vulnerable to pollution
because fresh water lenses are
close to the surface and the geol-
ogy consists of highly permeable
limestone rock with very little soil
to provide a cleansing buffer
between pollutants and the water
table.

Vulnerability

Due to the vulnerability of
groundwater lenses to contami-
nation, sea level rise and salt intru-
sion, Dr Cant said the practical
option for the Bahamas is desali-
nation of seawater by reverse
osmosis.

Currently the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation produces up
to seven million gallons of water
per day in New Providence by this
process, however, Dr Cant said
reverse osmosis is a great enérgy
consumer and alternate energy
supplies must be found because
of the rising cost of fuel.

Eric Carey, executive director,
Bahamas National Trust and

New water Teen
plant makes ‘high quality
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SELLING drinking water under the name Bahama Clear, a

‘new water purification plant has announced the production of -
“high quality water and ice”:

“In a brand new building with state-of-the-art technology
and machinery, Bahama Clear puts it water through a rigorous

process to create'a perfect tasting water,”

a press release.

said the company in

Safeguards

It said that before it can be sold as Bahama Clear, the water
must go through a nine step purification process. “Each mole-
cule of water is filtered, zapped, filtered, polished, softened, fil-
tered, filtered, zapped and ozonated. Safeguards built into the
process ensures that each glass of Bahama Clear drinking water
is pure and refreshing.

“At Bahama Clear we know that an educated consumer is our
best customer which is why we offer school tours to that children
understand the importance of safe drinking water in the lives as
well as all the steps necessary to produce a high quality drink-
ing water.

“When you drink a glass of Bahama Clear, you know that you
are drinking just water,” the statement said.

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Eleanor Phillips, the Bahamas
Nature Conservancy, both made a
case for protecting natural pine
forests and WSC well fields ir
New Providence, Andros, Abaco
and other islands.

Mr Carey said the forests are
an important part of the water
cycle and serve to recharge and
replenish groundwater lenses. He

‘added that coastal wetlands, par-

ticularly mangroves help to dissi-
pate wave action during storms
and prevent intrusion of salt water
into fresh water lenses.

While acknowledging the val-
ue of reverse osmosis, Mr Carey
said there should always be a
back-up supply in case of a cata-
strophic event.

“If we determine that we can
take out'all of the broadleaf cop-
pice on this island and build
homes like in certain parts of the
well fields in Perpall’s Tract where
people took out some of the
forests to build houses, many of
which are not complete . .
we do that then many species of
birds, snakes, lizards are displaced
and have nowhere to go.

“On islands like this where
development is rapidly increasing
it really becomes a serious issue
which is why we sometimes fight
to save some of these little areas
that people may think of as
insignificant. But 200 acres in the
middle of New Providence is a
wonderful reserve and I always
tell people when I talk about Per-
pall’s that if we’re able to save it
from being destroyed for housing

. . it could still function as a very
effective water reserve and could
become our Central Park when
there is nothing left on this
island,” Mr Carey said.

Mrs. Phillips said a Bahamas
wide ecological gap analysis by
BEST, BNT, the Nature Conser-
vancy and Department of Marine

: Resources has revealed that local-
7 «oly important
Tesources receive absolutely no

groundwater

protection.

. but if :

“The gap analysis recommends
that protection of locally impor-
tant groundwater resources should
be considered for all islands espe-


































Ministry of National Security.

high level ministry official.

Ms McIntosh asked yesterday.

and never get it done.

Bahamas,” she said.

years in the pipeline.

said.

Hope House youth shelter
‘frustrated by govt’ — claim

THE Hope House youth shelter project is being frustrated by
government’s failure to fulfil its promises, one organiser has claimed.
Ali McIntosh, President of National Committee for Youth }
Renewal and Revival (NCYRR), which was spearheading the
effort, said that last September, “verbal support” was given by

Since then, the NCYRR has been busy securing facilities and
attempting to implement its vision for “youth renewal” and the
reduction of crime in the Bahamas.

The verbal promise, according to Ms McIntosh, was followed up
by a formal presentation by the NCYRR and a meeting with a

“Now that the project is up and running, the government of the
Bahamas has made a strategic effort to frustrate the efforts of the
NCYRR by sending them from one ministry to another. Is this gov-
ernment serious or is its rhetoric more important than its action?”

“Bahamian people like to talk about what they are going to do,

Anticipation

“We are doing what we say, and we are working for the better-
ment of Bahamian youth, with the greatest anticipation of even
more positive results to come. I challenge the government to put its
money where its mouth is, and do what it says it will for youth in the

Thursday, May 1, marked the official opening of Hope House,
which Ms McIntosh said came after four months of activity, three
months of building preparations, one year of agitation, and 12

“Having accomplished such a gigantic task on behalf of the’
Bahamian people, the NCYRR is spending more of its time
meeting and calling government officials attempting to
secure funding to keep a roof over its head, when it prefers to be
spending its primary efforts assisting youth in crisis, and diverting
frustrated young men towards more productive lives,” Ms McIntosh

The Hope House Centre, which is a multi-service agency, offers
a variety of resource and crisis services, and enjoys the co-operation
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Department of Social
Services on a very regular basis, she said.

cially islands other than Abaco
and Andros. Minimum conserva-
tion goals have been recom-
mended for groundwater
resources of national importance.
We’ve basically set that conser-
vation goal at 35 per cent. And
for resources of local importance,
for example South Andros and
other areas that rely on ground-
water at 30 per cent protection,”
she said.






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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

i a
New police administrative complex
for Exuma is officially opened



Colombia extradites
14 top paramilitary
warlords to the US

COLOMBIA extradited 14 :



paramilitary warlords to the Unit-

ed States on Tuesday on drug- :
related charges in a surprise move :
that brought praise from Wash- :
ington but raised fears of justice ;

thwarted for thousands of victims,
according to Associated Press.

The extradited include Salva- :
tore Mancuso and most other :
leaders of Colombia’s illegal right- :
wing militias — notorious figures :
blamed for some of modern :

Colombia’s worst atrocities,

including the deaths of at least

10,000 people.

Victims families fear that once :
the warlords are in U.S. prisons, it
will be more difficult to get them :
to confess to human rights viola- :

tions and reveal details of their
connections to Colombian politi-
cians.

tims.

idate or corrupt.”

Uribe said the militia bosses :
kept committing crimes from :

prison, failed to “duly cooperate”

with prosecutors and neglected :
“to compensate victims — hiding :
assets and delaying their delivery. :
The country has been generous :
with them but the government :
can’t tolerate a relapse into :
he said in a pevonal i

crime,”
address.

Medical

7 Enroll in a Certificate, Diploma or
an Associate Degree program.

In brief





But USS. officials promised }
Tuesday to cooperate with :
Colombian prosecutors, and Pres- ;
ident Alvaro Uribe said any inter- :
national assets seized from the
warlords by the United States :
would go to compensate the vic-

“It’s a great day,” U.S. drug }
czar John Walters told The Asso- :
ciated Press. He said the U.S. jus- :
tice system is “far less likely for :
them to be able to attack or intim- :

@ By LLONELLA GILBERT

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
— Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest officially
opened a new police adminis-
trative complex that will help
solve the issue of a lack of space
police officers had to endure at
the George Town Police Head-
quarters.

“T really do want to thank
those officers who still have to
work in less than ideal circum-
stances,” Mr. Turnquest said

‘at the opening ceremony last

week.

He added, “We do want to
thank you for your dedication
to the country and for what you
do in the peace and security of
our island here in Exuma and
our nation in general and we
want to thank you police offi-
cers particularly for all that you
have done.”

Mr Turnquest noted that as a
result of Exuma’s economic
growth, many individuals have
come to the island to find work,
which has presented many chal-
lenges, including that of policing
the island.

Breaking down the crime sta-
tistics in Exuma, he said in 2007,
there were 191 reported cases
(19 crimes against the person,
123 crimes against property and
49 drug offences).

Out of those 191 cases 104
persons have been charged —
16 charged for crimes against
the person, 39 for crimes against
property and 49 for drug
offences.

“What is encouraging,” Mr.
Turnquest said, “is that when



“We do want
to thank you
for your
dedication to
the country
and for what
you do in the
‘peace and
security of our
island here in
Exuma and
our nation in
general.”



Tommy Turnquest

we then extrapolate those fig-
ures for the first quarter of 2008
and we see that we have no
reported crimes against the per-
son — 25 crimes against property
and 15 drug offences, which
relates to 15 persons being
charged so far for the first quar-
ter of 2008.

“T think those figures are nec-
essary because when we think
of the Family Islands in The
Bahamas we have always seen
them as idyllic, crime free places

. where you can leave your car
- keys in your car and your house

door open; but we all know that
as times progress that becomes
less and less the case and there is

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more and more need for police
officers and police work.”

He commended the officers
on the island for “what obvi-
ously is a taxing duty” and
promised to continue ensuring
that reasonable needs are met
through additional resources,
which include training reservists.

‘Mr. Turnquest did not
believe that there was a single

police officer who would say the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
can operate effectively without
police reservists.

“And so we do say thank you
(reservists) for what you have
done and we know that there
are some challenges with regard
to the terms and conditions in
which reservists work and they
are constantly under review.

“But,” he said, “the one thing
that I am glad we can point to at
least in the short tenure since
May 2007 is that we have been

‘able to allow reservists to come

under the umbrella of thé Law
Enforcement Insurance Scheme.

“I think that is a wonderful
achievement because reservists
in many cases work shoulder to
shoulder with career officers
during the particular time they
are on duty and so we are happy
they have been able to achieve
that.”

Mr. Turnquest noted that
there is no magic to effective
policing.

“Policing requires communi-
ty involvement to be truly effec-
tive, so while this new building
sits essentially at the gateway to
the George Town Harbour and
at the apex of the park here in
George Town, it is up to the
community to adopt it, to assist

in taking care of it and to work
closely with the police.”

However, he said that he ful-
ly endorsed the sentiments of
Acting Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson that there is
a zero tolerance on corruption
and that law enforcement offi-
cials must be beyond reproach.

Acting Commissioner Fergu-
son reminded the police officers
that they took an oath to protect
and serve the Bahamian people
professionally, competently, eth-
ically and morally.

“T must also say that this new
building complements your
renewed focus on being that
new police officer that I con-
stantly speak of throughout the
various islands within our arch-
ipelago.

He said, “Members of our
society know that the new police
officer is one whose integrity,
conduct and character can nev-
er be compromised, and wears
the uniform and badge of the
police force with respect and
dignity.”

The new complex consists of
a reception area, multi-purpose
conference room, Police
Reserve Section and an
enlarged holding facility to

‘house individuals charged with
breaking the law.



Kristaan Ingraham/BIS

PERMANENT SECRETARY. in the vite of Toure and Aviation Archie Nairn moderated the government
organised town meeting in George Town, Exuma.

Ministers’ visit prompts
immigration crackdown

THE arrival of several Cabi-
net ministers in Great Exuma
for a town meeting led to a
crackdown on suspected illegal
immigrants.

After being taken to see a
squat on the island occupied by
a number of Haitians, Minister
of National Security Tommy
Turnquest said the problem
would be dealt with by elite
Defence Force commandos.

“They will do what they have
to do to eradicate what is in the
bush,” Mr Turnquest said, “and
we (the government) will also
do what we have to do to stop
illegals working.”

Mr Turnquest, the minister
responsible for immigration, not-

ed that at the time of the meet-

ing, the Defence Force vessel
Yellow Elder was docked at

elm DLE erelU) 4



“But what Exuma has become
in terms of immigration has
expanded beyond border. pro-
tection and has expanded into__.
the apprehension and repatria-
tion exercises like we have in
places like New Providence and
Grand Bahama.”

While the Department of
Immigration is looking for a
solution, Mr Turnquest said res-
idents must come forward if they
have knowledge of illegal immi-
grants working for individuals
or businesses.

Action

“I want you to know that we
are going to step up our appre-
hension exercises to rid our-
selves of a large number of ille-

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George Town and a number of Commando
Squadron officers were on the island.

The contingent of ministers who arrived in
Exuma last week included: Minister of Tourism
and Aviation Neko Grant; Minister of Health
and Social Development Hubert Minnis; Min-
ister of Lands and Local Government Sidney
Collie; Minister of Works and Transport Earl
Deveaux and Mr Turnquest.

Mr Deveaux told those attending the town

‘meeting that what he saw in the bushes alarmed

him.

Labour

He said that although there is a need for
labour in Exuma, the residents there are accom-
modating something that is a “serious detri-
ment” to them.

“So my admonition to you is to let us work
together to resolve this very serious problem,”
Mr Deveaux said.

“The problem I am talking about is not a
Haitian problem, it is not a Jamaican problem,
it is not a Peruvian problem, it is not a Cuban
problem — the problem I am talking about is a
Bahamian problem,” he said.

Responding to concerns about the small num-
ber of immigration officers in Exuma, Mr Turn-

quest told the residents that the officers were.

originally placed there for border protection.

gals and we will also begin to
take action against employers.”

Mr Turnquest then spoke directly to the per-
sons who pick up illegal workers early in the
morning to take them to job sites.

“Please do not do so,” he warned. “You are
likely to be surprised and you do not want that
to happen to you — so you cannot continue to do
so.”

Mr Turnquest added, “I want to make the
Bahamas’ ’position clear in regard to immigrants.
If there is a need for you as a business to have
foreign labour and the request is reasonable
and that the person is not a security threat to
the Bahamas, we are likely to approve that
request.

“But you are not to engage someone, as an
individual or as a business that you do not have
a work permit for.

“It is against the law for illegal immigrants
to be working here illegally; it is also illegal for
an employer to hire someone illegally.

“Tf John Joseph has a work permit to work for
Tommy Turnquest, Earl Deveaux cannot take
John Joseph to work for him without permission.
The Department of Immigration is prepared to
accept an application jointly by Tommy Turn-
quest and Earl Deveaux for John Joseph if that
is what you want.

“You can apply together but we do not expect
persons to be hiring illegal immigrants,” Mr
Turnquest said.



THE TRIBUNE WEUNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

niet, CARIFORUM states set
date for EPA sign on





searching for
arsonist in

Palm Bay

m PALM BAY, Fla.

INVESTIGATORS are
searching for one or more :
arsonists who apparently :
started a string of fires around ;
a city on Florida’s Atlantic }
coast, destroying or damag-
ing about 100 homes, a police :
chief said Tuesday, according :

to Associated Press.

Firefighters in Brevard }
County were trying for the :
third day to contain fires that :
have scorched about 3,800 :
acres, or 6 square miies, in :
Palm Bay and neighboring :

Malabar.

Though the high winds }
fueling the flames Monday :
had slowed significantly, offi- :
cials worried about overnight :
flare-ups and the flames :
spreading quickly in the dry -:

conditions.

“We desperately need
rain,” said Palm Bay Fire :
Marshal Mike Couture. “We :
don’t have any, and we’re not :
projected to get any anytime :

soon.”

All 18 schools in Palm Bay, }
including charter schools, :
* were closed Tuesday. Smoke :
and the proximity of the :
flames have caused the inter- :
mittent closure of major high- :
ways in the area, including a :
34-mile section of Interstate :
95 south of the fires that was :
closed again midmorning :

Tuesday.

“Flames are coming onto
the interstate,” Florida High- :
way Patrol Trooper Kim :

Miller said.

The worst fires raged
uncontrolled in Malabar, :
while officials said they had :
“a majority” of the Palm Bay :

fires contained.

Palm Bay police were }
working with the state fire :
marshall’s office and Brevard :
County Fire Rescue to inves- :
tigate who set an estimated :
niné fires that spread into a :

larger, uncontrollable blaze.

“Some are caused by }
embers that are flying, but the :
locations of the fires indicated ;
that these were initiated sep- ;
arately, which makes us firm- :
ly believe that an individual or :
individuals was involved in ;
setting those,” Palm Bay :
Police Chief Bill Berger said. :

mete Vater d |

CARIFORUM states are set to sign
on to the Economic Partnership
Agreement with the European Com-
mission in July.

The sign on date was confirmed at
the end of the twenty-sixth special
meeting of the Council for Trade and
Development (COTED), which came
to a close on Saturday in Antigua and
Barbuda.

Up until now, the exact date on
which the agreements, which have
already been largely hashed out,
would become legally binding, was
unclear.

The CARICOM secretariat in
Georgetown, Guyana, issued a state-

ment announcing the decision, taken.

after consultations between ministers
at the meeting, yesterday.

The EPA is a trade agreement
between Europe and Caribbean,
Pacific and African states, including

July confirmed at special
meeting of COTED

the Bahamas.
. It requires these countries to liber-
alise their trade in goods and services
if they are to keep traditionally bene-
ficial trade arrangements they have
with Europe.

Agreement

The Bahamas, along with the rest of
CARICOM, initialled a trade in
goods agreement in December, in
order to ensure its duty free access
to European markets for exported

lobsters, polymers and rum were

‘maintained.

While the rest of the Caribbean
states also initialled a trade in ser-
vices agreement at this time, the
Bahamas was given a six-month
extension to forge its offer in terms of
to what extent it will open its services
sectors, such as medical, touristic,
financial or construction.

Other CARICOM states have had
the last six months to review the texts
they initialled prior to the official sign-
on date.

The agreement has been criticised
by some who say that the Bahamas,
and other ACP countries, are giving
up too much in return for too little
from Europe, or opportunities — for
example to set up businesses in
Europe — that would be difficult to
take advantage of due to competi-
tiveness issues.

Economy

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing has down played the
potential negative implications of the
agreement, pointing to the liberality
of the Bahamian economy at present,
the three to 25-year roll-out period
for the agreement’s requirements, and
the relatively small size of imports
coming into the Bahamas from
Europe.

Minister Laing addresses Bahamas Real Estate Association

@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON

GOVERNMENT is continu-
ing its broad consultation on trade
negotiations, and the opportunity
exists for the real estate sector to
determine its strengths and advise
government both on areas that
could be included in future trade
negotiations and on areas that are
sensitive, Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing said.

Mr Laing was addressing the
Bahamas Real Estate’s (BREA)
luncheon on Thursday; May 8, at
the British Colonial Hilton on the
topic, “Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) and the
Impact on the Real Estate Sector
in The Bahamas”.

The EPA is a trade agreement
between the European Commis-
sion and CARIFORUM
(Caribbean Forum of African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
States).

“This is an opportunity for the
sector to determine where its
strengths are and to advise the
government on areas of the real
estate sector which could be
included in future trade negotia-
tions and those areas that are sen-
sitive,” Mr Laing said.

“It has been pointed out that
trade in goods represents a rela-
tively small component of the
Bahamian economy. Importantly
for The Bahamas, the EPA is a
trade agreement that deals with
trade in services and investments,”



“This is an
opportunity for the
sector to determine
where its strengths
are and to advise
the government on
areas of the real
estate sector which
could be included
in future trade
negotiations and
those areas that are
sensitive.”



Zhivargo Laing

“Previous trade agreements
only addressed trade in goods and
do not require beneficiaries like
The Bahamas to do anything
more than ensure that customs
authorities had procedures in
place to verify that the goods
exported to Europe originated in
The Bahamas,” Mr. Laing said.

He said although the EPA is
not a guarantee that there will be
additional investment in any sec-

_tor of the economy, “it provides a

framework for persons seeking to
understand The Bahamas’ invest-
ment regime to readily decipher

which sectors are open for invest-

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openness in these sectors.”

Mr. Laing said that in some
instances, goods exported from
The Bahamas also had to meet
other criteria referred to as sani-
tary requirements to ensure the
exports were treated to prevent
health problems.

“The Bahamas, for the most
part, was able to quietly benefit

’ from trade agreements in the

goods sector without significant
public interest or debate,” he said.

The Bahamas is considered a
major exporter of services and
actively participates in the global
economy with respect to tourism
and financial services.

“The EPA is a new type of
trade agreement for The Bahamas
and the countries of CARIFO-
RUM,” Mr. Laing said. “Howev-
er, this type of agreement is not
new to the developing world. All
around the world countries are
seeking to enter trade agreements
that promote their trading inter-
ests.”

The EPA is an agreement that
has three major parts. The first
section details the rules that gov-

ern trade in goods. The second
part outlines the commitments
with respect to service and invest-
ment and the final section
addresses trade related issues.

Mr. Laing said there are two »

sectors that were not included in
the services schedule for The
Bahamas — telecommunications,
because of the pending privatisa-
tion of the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company, and the real

“estate sector, because of the “sen-

sitivity” of the sector to foreign
participation. 3

“The Government needs more
time to develop a comprehensive
framework for the development
of this sector in consultation with
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation and other stakeholders,”
he said.

“So for The Bahamas, the real
estate sector is not part of the cur-
rent EPA Services Schedule.”

With respect to the European
Union,. there are no restrictions
on commercial establishment,
which means Bahamian realtors
will be allowed to offer this service
into the EU, Mr. Lairig said.



Zhivargo en











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pick up a specifiction document from BTC’s Head Office
located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas,
between the hours. of 9:00 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to
Friday.

#289 Wulff Road
P.O Box N-4904,
Phone#(242)394-4442

Fax#(242)393-8238

A Subsidiary of Sanpin Motors Ltd.







Bids should be received by 4:00 pm, Friday May 23, 2008.
Bids are to be marked, “Tender for the Supply of Telephone
Directories” to the attention of:

New & Used Vehicle Sales
Spare Parts, & Servicing




Mr. Kirk Griffin
Executive Vice President
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd
#21 John F Kennedy Drive
P O Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas

www.btcbahamas.com | CALL BTC 225-5282

Authorized KIA & NISSAN
Service Center

E-MAIL: elite-motors@hotmail.com








PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





Spotlight on



l@ MONIQUE FERNANDER
DOWN YOUR

‘Parking is a
serious issue’



estaurant Owner REP ORTS and PHOTOS:
Monique Fernander has
worked in Nett’s Restaurant and LISA LAWLOR ,
Bar on Deveaux Street off Dowdeswell Street ey oe
for the past two years. . Reporter
Business has noticeably lessened, she said,
because a lot of Bay Street businesses have

been closing down and there is consequently TIM CLARKE

less patronage of her restaurant. oe ,
“The parking is also a serious issue for us Trionune Steff Photographer

workers — tourist patrons as well as locals,” Y

she said, “Without parking there is no business

rotation”. : . . :
As a consequence of the diminishing number THE TRIBUNE is spotlighting the neigh-

of parking spaces, she reports that people park

illegally ae thie end of tie street, making it bourhoods of Nassau to uncover the untold

impossible to see oncoming traffic when turn- i . eae
ng on to Hay Street stories of the characters and personalities
Ms Fernander said there needs to be more who give them their unique flavour. Here is

strategic planning for downtown in order to : : ;
bring business back into the area. the latest in our special Serles..
















@ BRIDGET MORTIMER-SALAKO

Crime is a constant
problem for bakery



ridget Mortimer-Salako has had the Model
Bakery in her family since September 1,
1973.

The bakery moved to its present location on
Dowdeswell Street in order-to attract more business,
in what was at the time a more lucrative spot.

However, since then, crime has been a constant
problem, and the police have had to be called more
than a few times.

“We call for security reasons, especially at closing
time when I feel unsafe leaving the bakery,” she said.
“There are jonesers out there just watching some-
times.”

Another issue that affects Mrs Mortimer-Salako is
the garbage build up on Dowdeswell Street.

The homeless population are attracted to the
garbage cans outside the bakery at night, and spread
refuse.all over the ‘street, she,said.

“Cope bakery“ could therefore ‘benefit considerably
from aicléan up team’ somimg' to-_Dowdeswell, -Mrs
’Mortimer-Salako said.



ll KATELEEN SANDS : “if you are what you Shes you are.... Then have no fear...
Rising murder rate The Ca mera ‘s Here” (Lupe Fiasco)

is cause of concern



n the Dowdeswell Street area, the general con- HIOUSANDS IN MODELING CONTRACTS
sensus is that there aren’t too many crime prob- THREE DAYS OF EDITORIAL SHOOTING

lems — but many opinions about crime. - * COMPLETE HIGH FASHION MAKE-OVERS
- Parking lot attendant Kateleen Sands’ complaint is — ae cee ,
Hite iene miner eater Glas spe cueally as ie peta Sy WUT... ony SIX WOMEN WILT MAKE IT TO THE STAGE OF THE RAINFOREST
the young men. a ee Sih Eee

She believes it is a “contagious issue” because young people THEATER ON OCTO eee a AE
don’t choose to reason out their problems and no one intervenes in =

~ Photo by Mark Humes







disputes anymore. os , : f * MODELS242 FACE OF 242 RULES: NO PURCHLASE NECESS.A TO ENTER OR WIN. Contest is open to alt ‘Bahatiian eitizene mand legal residents

“Life is precious,” she said, “and people need to stop having hot of the Bahamas who are between the ages of 14 to 30 years of nse al the time of entry, Males: 15-30, 6°0"- 62.” Females: 14-23, 5°8 1/2 to 5° 11, 108-130

head and hot temper”. Ibs (height and weight proportional). Contest begins on May 5. 200% and ends September 1, 2008. Mail in entries can be sent to “Models242 Face of 242

Ms Sands noted that business is slowing down in the area, just like Model Search Competition” P.O. Box Nil 17. Nassau. Paharmas and must be postinarked by September 1, 2008. Be sure to include your name, address,
phone number, email address, height, hair and eye color. body measurements. and shoe size. Finalists will be announced Monday, September 15, 2008.

everywhere else in the country.



RET PPE PER SS

Oo) 4 aw RENTER TODAY! BE ONE OF THE TOP SIX!



o to /





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ee
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Ie bans SCM

IPAS












lram D. Lewis & Associates
=» Architects & Project Managerse [—

ews





Bags by TUI a

BAHAMAS









THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 9

| Rely .

GN-675





mi ELVIS EDGECOMBE
‘We need cleaners like

they have on Bay Street’



Be Edgecombe, a Bahamas Experience Lim-

ousines and Tours driver, has been carrying
tourists between the airport and hotels on Paradise
Island for the past five years.

He drives through Dowdeswell Street regularly and says.a seri-
ous problem is the four-way stop at Christie Street.

Mr Edgecombe explained that drivers often simply refuse to
stop, which sometimes results in very serious accidents.

He said that several dilapidated buildings on the street need
more care and upkeep — and are often further damaged during the
frequent car accidents.

Mr Edgecombe said that over the last few years, Dowdeswell
Street has become extremely dirty.

“We need cleaners like they have on Bay Street. This is still
downtown, you know. Horse and carriages drive through here,
and the tourists have time to notice it, take it in ie make a judg-
ment,” he said.

_ BEJUANITA GRANT
A disturbing, frightening
place after 10.30 p.m.



Jeni Grant has been a Dowdeswell resident for

the last 73 years.

She reminisces about the days when it was a nice res-
idential area with hardly any businesses, and was free of dirty
drains and gutters.

“There is a persistent sick scent around here nowadays,” said Mrs

. Grant. “It takes everyone to keep the area clean. I do my part, but
I don’t know what our people have become — it’s a disgrace”.

She reported that the neighbourhood has definitely gone down-
hill, and nearly all her old neighbours have moved away.

Illegal activities,.at night time in particular, affect the peace of
mind of residents like Mrs Grant severely. She said that after
10.30pm, the street becomes very loud, and is a disturbing, fright-
ening place to live.





@ KARA NOTTAGE
‘A little oasis of security’





kK ara Nottage has been the principal of the Little
Schoolhouse: Early Learning Centre for 10 years

now, and agrees that Dowdeswell Street could definitely be
cleaned-up.

While her pre-school is gated in to protect the children,
she has no choice but to clean-up immediately outside the
school’s gates, and agrees that a public effort to keep the
area clean should be implemented.

“At the same time, it’s a great area for parents who
work, to drop off their children,” she said, responding pos-
itively to questions on any problems in the neighbourhood.
“And we are centrally located. We have our own little
oasis with security!” she added.







SUPREME COURT



15TH MAY, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/NPR/00194

IN THE ESTATE OF LOIS EDNA
GIBSON, late of 28 Panther Top Lane in
the Town of Murphy, in the County of
Cherokee, in the State of North Carolina,
one of the States of the United States of
America. deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by FREDERICA
GERTRUDE McCARTNEY of the Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing
of Certificate of Probate in the above estate
granted to WILLIAM L. RAU the Executor
of the Estate, by the Superior Court Division
in the General Court of Justice, in the Sate
of North Carolina on the 18th day of June,
2004.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00226

Whereas LEROY BELL, of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of. the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the

Real and Personal Estate of ANTHONY |

BELL, late of the Settlement of Behring
Point, Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00227

Whereas JAMES MAXWELL
THOMPSON, SR., of First Terrace, Collin
Avenue, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of HAZEL
ROSANNA HENRIETTA THOMPSON,
late of Farrington Road, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00228

Whereas REGINALD MINNIS, of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters
of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HAROLD MINNIS, late of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00229

Whereas FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB, of
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
DR. PETER MEISSNER, the sole executor
has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate.of JUDITH J.A.
MEISSNER a.k.a. JUDITH JOSEFINE
ANNA MEISSNER, late of Berlin,

Charlottenburg, Wilmersdorf Germany and

of Treasure Cay, Abaco one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00231

Whereas JAMIE TERREL TINKER, of
the Western District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Cecil Newry has made.
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of REQUILDA PRATT, late of Faith
Avenue Carmichael Road, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



PAGE 10, . THE TRIBUNE _
WEDNESDAY EVENING MAY 14, 2008 |

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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THE TRIBUNE



PA:G-E. 11

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008




INSIDE e International sports news




a

‘The Knights shine!

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

nother season and anoth-
er title for the school that
has dominated the GSS-
: SA Athletics calendar
from start to finish.

The C R Walker Knights added the
seniar boys softball title to their already
impressive résumé with a dominating
game two series-clinching win against the
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins, 14-
1.

As he was all season long, Knights’ ace
pitcher Lorenzo Williams was the dri-
ving force behind the team’s success, as
he allowed just three hits and recorded
seven strikeouts in the win.

Williams told Tribune Sports that the
growth his team has displayed over the
course of the season culminated in a
championship clinching performance.

“We improved nicely since the start of
the season,” he said. “Today we just had
to keep our composure, reduce our errors
and win the close out game.”

The 11th grader said with ‘the cast of
returning starters, expectations for a title
repeat are high, but can be achieved.

“For next year we have to come out
stronger and improve from where we

were this year and come back to win the’

championship,” he said.

The Knights reached their third con-
secutive championship series and with a
dominating performance from Williams
and consistent run support from the line-
up, were able to reverse the trend this
year.

C R Walker raced out to an early 4-0
lead in the first inning and continued to
build upon their lead with each passing
frame.

The Mystic Marlins experienced a myr-
iad of fielding errors which compounded
the frustrations of trying to catch up with
the speed of Williams’ delivery.

The Knights’ Brian Cambridge took

- full advantage when he stretched a bunt
into an in the park home run due to con-
secutive wild throws by the Marlins
infield.

It took the Mystic Marlins lineup three
innings to finally connect with Williams
for their first hit of the game, and scored
their lone run an inning later.

Tia Rolle, head coach of the Knights,
said her team remained largely untested
throughout the course of the year.

“The journey was kind of easy because
they really did not have much competi-

tion all year,” she said. “The only com- -

petition we thought we had was C V
Bethel and when we played them we won
9-2.”

Rolle said the championship win is
especially gratifying for her senior stu-
dents who have fell short in the past.

“This is their third consecutive year
playing for the championship and they
finally won so my 12th grade students
are very happy today,” she said. “Hope-
fully we should repeat as champions next
year with the returning players but for
now it feels good to add another cham-
pionship to C R Walker.”

On the ‘07-08 year, the Knights also
captured the GSSSA senior boys volley-
ball and basketball, senior girls basket-
ball, track and field and Hugh Campbell
titles.

C R Walker senior boys conquer
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic
Marlins 14-1 to win the title



DRIVING FORCE - As he was all season long, Knights’ ace pitcher Lorenzo Williams (shown) was the driving force behind
the team’s success, as he allowed just three hits and recorded seven strikeouts in the win. See more photos on page 13

Myriad of new champions crowned

at ‘Sonny Boy’ boxing tournament

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN honour of one of the legendary
icons of the ring, Champion Amateur
Boxing Club successfully concluded
its sixth show of the year over the
weekend.

A myriad of new champions were
crowned following the finals of the
“Sonny Boy” Rahming Silver Gloves
boxing tourney at Nirvana Beach on
Saturday.

Seventeen-year-old Rashad Saun-
ders took home the tournament’s most
coveted prize, the “Sonny Boy” Rah-
ming floating trophy awarded to the
Most Outstanding Boxer over the two-
day event.

Jerrano Collins recorded a three-

round decision against Keno Pratt and
was awarded the Most Improved Box-
er.
In the 11-12 age group, Aprachio
Davis recorded two wins on the final
day of competition with a pair of
three-round decisions against Rashad
Flowers and Antonio Duncanson.

Flowers rebounded to top Denash
Dames later in the evening, also in a
three-round decision.

The bout awarded “Best Fight” of
the tournament which featured Jer-
maine Bain defeating Cameron John-
son in three rounds.

Other bouts included Devon King
defeating Shawn Anderson and Ken-
roy Lord defeating Kenvado Brown.

Champion Amateur Boxing Club’s
Ray Minus Jr said the tournament was
a resounding success and hopes to see

continued future growth.

“All the fights were outstanding and
I must say that the boxers have been
stepping up the past few weeks to per-
form,” he said. “The boxers went after
those trophies with all they have and
we want to continue to look forward to
this event being a milestone builder
of boxing in this country.”

Minus Jr said the tournament is a
fitting way for the club to pay homage
to a man who has been responsible
for the development of some of the
country’s greatest fighters.

“Sonny Boy Rahming is a legend
and has done a lot for boxing in pro-
ducing a lot of champions and a lot of
great fighters and it is an honour for
CABC to put on an event in his
name,” he said. “It is an event that is
growing leaps and bounds in the com-

munity. We had a lot of fighters per-
form in this tournament over the years,
boxers like (Jermaine) ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey, Meacher Major, Jerry But-
ler, Elkino Saunders, Taureano John-
son and many others.”

Minus Jr said CABC continues to
develop and looks to make further
improvements to the tournament.

“Next year we are looking to estab-
lish champions per category and pre-
sent them with mini-boxing belts and
organise it in a way that boxers can
defend their belts,” he said.

“Next year we are looking at bring-
ing in an international team. It is still
going strong, we are very excited and
we look forward to growing this event
more nationally and eventually inter-
nationally,” Minus Jr told Tribune
Sports.

“ATP ~Doubles

Tim Clarke/T! ribune staff



Knowles,
Bhupathi
are out
of the
second
round



ATP MASTERS

l@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



FOR the second consecu-
tive clay court tournament,
Mark Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi have taken an ear-
ly fall, getting eliminated
from the second round again.

After getting knocked out
of a tourney in Rome last

' year, Knowles and Bhupathi

made an early exit again at
ATP Masters Series in Ham-
burg, Germany, yesterday.

As the number four seeds,
Knowles and Bhupathi were
upset by the American.team
of Mardy Fish and James
Blake.

In a match that lasted just
53 minutes, the Americans
won 6-2, 6-3 over the
Bahamian-Indian combo.

Fish and Blake, who are
ranked over the 100 mark
individually in the Stanford
Race,

advanced ‘to their first ATP
- doubles quarterfinal of the

year together.

For Knowles and Bhu-
pathi, who are ranked at No
3 and 10 individually in the
race, their departure in the
second round raises a lot of
concern about their perfor-
mances after they got off to
such a great start.

The duo, who teamed up
this year after Knowles split
with his long-time partner
Daniel Nestor from Canada
last year, won two titles back-
to-back in Memphis, Ten-
nessee and Miami, Florida.

Suffered

However, Bhupathi suf-
fered a slight injury prior to
playing in Rome and he was
forced to take a week off. It’s
not certain if he’s fully recov-
ered from the injury.

Up to press time Tuesday
night, Tribune Sports was
unable to contact Knowles in
Germany.

Tuesday’s tournament was
supposed to be the final tour-
nament for Knowles and
Bhupathi as they prepare for
the second Grand Slam at the
French Open in Roland Gar-
ros, starting May 25.

Presently, Knowles and
Bhupathi are sitting in third
place as a team in the ATP
Doubles Race with 374
points, just two points behind
former leaders Jonathan
Erlich and Andy Ram, who
are in second with 376.

American identical twin
brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan, who won the last tour-
nament in Rome, have
surged to the front of the
pack with 456 points.

As former number one
world players, Knowles and
Bhupathi have combined to
win 88 titles. They were close.
to winning the first Grand
Slam at the Australian Open
when they knocked off the
Bryans to advance to the
semifinal.

While Knowles has teamed
up with Nestor to win the
Australian Open in 2002 and
the US Open in 2004, the duo
are the defending champions
of the French Open.

So even though they are
scheduled to return to
Roland Garros with differ-
ent partners, Knowles and °
Bhupathi are hoping to
regain the form they had ear-
lier this year to win their first
Grand Slam title together.



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Davydenko defeats Ljubicic,
cruises into the third round

.@ By NESHA STARCEVIC
_ AP Sports Writer



HAMBURG, Germany
(AP) — Nikolay Davydenko
cruised into the third round of
the Hamburg Masters by
defeating Ivan Ljubicic 6-4, 6-
1 Tuesday, and two more play-
ers retired because of injuries.

Also, David Ferrer defeat-
ed Ivo Minar 6-3, 6-3, while
Andreas Seppi downed eight-
seeded Richard Gasquet 6-3,
6-2.

Luis Horna dropped out
with a calf injury while trail-
ing Potito Starace 6-3, 4-2, and
Kristof Vliegen pulled out with
a back injury with Jose Aca-

-suso leading 5-2. Filippo
Volandri retired Monday with
a knee injury.

Davydenko dominated Lju-
bicic after the two players trad-
ed five breaks of serve early
in the match.

“The first match is always
difficult,” said Davydenko,
who had a first-round bye.

The Russian, who is coming
off a third-round loss to'Tom-
my Robredo in Rome, won the
Masters tournament in Miami
last month.

Losing

“Losing to Robredo was dif-

ficult, but the win in Miami has.

made me mentally stronger,”
Davydenko said.

Ljubicic has not beaten
Davydenko in four years.

Robredo rallied Tuesday to
outlast Philipp Kohlschreiber
. 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3. He won his
first match in Hamburg since
capturing the title in 2006.

The 13th-seeded Robredo
was helped by a disputed call
in the second set. Losing the



HAMBURG MASTERS



point would have put Robredo

- down a break but chair umpire

Gerry Armstrong overruled
the linesman, calling the ball
good. A long discussion involv-
ing both players, Armstrong _
and the tournament supervi-
sor followed. The point was
eventually replayed and
Robredo held his serve.

Shut

“You try to shut it out but
you keep thinking about it,”
Kohlschreiber said. “But it
wasn’t what decided the match.
I made some bad decisions in
my shots.”

Robredo broke serve for a
decisive 4-2 lead in the third.
He double-faulted on one
match point, but used the next
to win.

Withdrawals have become a
common theme in European
clay-court tournaments in the
past month.

At the Rome Masters last
week, five players, withdrew.
No semifinal match was com-
pleted.

The second-ranked Rafael
Nadal,.who lost in Rome.in the
second round after getting
treated for a major blister on
his foot, has blamed the crowd-
ed schedule for the series of
retirements.

In another second-round
match, Fernando Verdasco
defeated Michael Llodra 6-2,
6-0.

In first-round action, 11th-
seeded Carlos Moya rallied to
defeat Julien Benneteau 3-6,
6-4, 7-6 (7), and Janko Tip-
sarevic rallied past Andreas
Beck 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.



RUSSIAN tennis player Nikolay Davydenko returns a ball during first round match against Croatian
Ivan Ljubicic at the ATP Masters Series tennis tournament in Hamburg, Germany, on Tuesday.

Davydenko won in two sets 6-4 and 6-1.

)

/AP ©

immer,

Fabian B

in Rome
ROME (AP) — Unseeded

teenager Victoria Azarenka ,

routed Sybille Bammer 6-1,

6-3 Tuesday in the first round

of the Italian Open before

play was delayed because of

rain. ;
Azarenka has showed
strong form in the last two
weeks, when she lost to even-
tual champion Dinara Safina
at the German Open and
posted a runner-up finish at
the Prague Open.

She is ranked a career-high
19th this week, but hag to ask
for a wild card because she
decided late to enter the
tournament.

Azarenka, an 18-year-old
from Belarus who resides in
Scottsdale, Ariz., improved
to 19-9 this year.

The 22nd-ranked Bammer
was granted a seed when
Safina withdrew because of a
back injury.

Also, wild card Roberta
Vinci held off qualifier Kaia
Kenepi 6-4, 4-6, 6-0; Domini-
ka Cibulkova defeated Gisela
Dulko 7-6 (1), 6-4; and Tsve-
tana Pironkova eliminated
Klara Zakopalova 6-4, 6-2 in
a matchup of two qualifiers.

Pending a restart, both
Williams sisters were slated
to play later.

Seventh-seeded Venus
faced Samantha Stosur and
fifth-seeded Serena was up
against Alona Bondarenko in
the clay-court warmup for the

French Open, which begins
May 25.



Sorenstam to retire after season

LPGA GOLFER Annika Sorenstam (inset), of Sweden, throws out the ceremonial first pitch before a baseball game between the
New York Mets and the Washington Nationals Tuesday in New York. Sorenstam announced Tuesday that she is retiring at the
end of the LPGA season.



Frank Franklin II/AP

Hi By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

ANNIKA Sorenstam will retire
after the season, ending an LPGA
Tour career in which she has won
72 tournaments to date and deliv-
ered a defining moment when she
teed it up against the men on the
PGA Tour.

“I think I’ve achieved more than I -

ever thought I could,” she said dur-
ing a news conference Tuesday at
the Sybase Classic in Clifton, N.J. “I
have given it all, and it’s been fun.”

The 37-year-old Sorenstam has
hinted at retirement the past several
seasons, saying she wanted to
devote more time to her growing
business and to start a family. She is
engaged to Mike McGee, son of
former PGA. Tour player Jerry
McGee.

“This would be very much like
Annika to get on top and then
quit,” said Judy Rankin, a Hall of
Famer and television analyst. |

Sorenstam said her final event
would be the Dubai Ladies Masters
after the LPGA Tour season ends.

“I’m leaving the game on my
terms,” she said.

The decision comes two days
after Sorenstam won the Michelob
Ultra Open at Kingsmill by seven
shots for her third victory of the
season, and first against a field that
included Lorena Ochoa. It was a
sign that Sorenstam had fully recov-
ered from injuries and was poised to
make a strong bid at recapturing
her stature as the best in women’s
golf.

“It’s sad to see the greatest
female golfer of all time step away
from the game,” said Tiger Woods,
who has played practice rounds
with Sorenstam. “But it’s nice to see
Annika did it on her terms. It has
been a pleasure watching Annika
player for all of these years, but
even more an honor to call her a
friend.”

“] just hope to continue this
momentum,” Sorenstam said after
winning. “I’m feeling it. It’s turning
around, and so J can’t wait for the
next month or so to come with big
tournaments, and I’m excited.”

Sorenstam dominated women’s
golf like few others, especially dur-
ing a five-year period when she won
43 times and finished among the top
three nearly 70 percent of the time.
But for all her achievements — the
only woman to shoot 59, 10 majors
and one of six women to complete
the career Grand Slam — she
became most famous for testing
herself against the men.

Sorenstam became the first
woman in 58 years to compete on

the PGA Tour when she played at
the Colonial in 2003. She missed the
cut, but earned worldwide respect
for the way she handled herself
amid massive scrutiny.

She won LPGA Tour player of
the year a record eight times,

’ including five straight seasons until

Ochoa ended the streak in 2006.
Sorenstam was ineffective most of
2007, the first time in 12 years she
failed to win on the LPGA Tour, as
she recovered from, back and neck
injuries.

She won the first founmeal of
the year in Hawaii, picked up a
playoff victory in South Florida
three weeks ago, then continued a
slow rise in the world rankings
toward Ochoa with a dominant vic-
tory in Virginia.

But when asked Sunday if she
would defend her title at Kingsmill,

’ Sorenstam hedged.

“TI hope so,” she said. “I’m going
to continue this year the way I start-

- ed it and at the end of the year. I

always assess it like I have the last
few years. At this point, I feel great
about what I’m doing.”

Sorenstam still faces a large
deficit to reclaim the No. 1 ranking
from Ochoa, although LPGA Tour
players measure themselves more
on winning the money title and the
points-based player of the year

‘award. Those are easily within

reach for Sorenstam with the season
not even halfway over.

Sorenstam’s 72 victories put her
third on the LPGA Tour’s career
list behind Kathy Whitworth (88)
and Mickey Wright (82). She is tied
for fourth in career majors, five
behind record-setter Patty Berg.

But those kind of marks never
appealed to Sorenstam, even when
she was winning at least 10 times
during a season. She often talked
about stopping sooner than people
imagined to pursue other interests,
whether that meant her affinity for
cooking or fitness.

Sorenstam opened a golf acade-
my last year near her home in
Orlando, Fla., also launching her
brand (“Annika”) and a Web site.
Sorenstam plans to marry next
spring.

She is not the first LPGA Tour
star to retire early. Wright, whom
many regard as the best, stopped
playing a full schedule when she
was 34 and won the last of her 82
tournaments at age 37. ’

At the end of the ’07 season,
Sorenstam felt she had arrived at
“the back nine of my career.”

“T’ve done a lot, and I’m satisfied
in a lot of things,” she said. “I’ve
achieved so much more than I ever
thought I could.”



TRIBUNE SPORTS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 13
SPORTS

rimary schoolers take
part in annual torch run

4+—









STARTING at 9 am today,
the New Providence Primary
Schools Sports Association’s
27th annual track and field
championships is scheduled
to get underway at the
Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

The championships kicked
off on Saturday when the
torch run was held through
the streets of New Provi-
dence, climaxing at the
Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasi-
um.

Immediately following the
opening ceremonies, the
track and field competition is
expected to begin.

Former participant Philip-
pa Arnett-Willie and Minis-

_ ter of State for Sports, Bryan
Woodside, are expected to
address the opening.

Ceremony

Adso during the ceremony,
the winning team from the
Cheerleading competition
that took place yesterday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um will put on a repeat per-
formance.

Some 11 schools participat-
ed in the Cheerleading com-
petition sponsored by Muck-
A-Mucks.

The championships, spon-
sored by Thompson Trading
through its product, Milo, °
will run until Friday. More
than 50 schools, both private
and public from New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama and
the Family Islands, are
expected to compete.

While there will be no
overall team champion |
crowned, ribbons will be pre- *
sented to the winners of the
various heats in all events.

The top eight finishers will |
advance to the final where
medals will be presented to .
the first three finishers. The
championships are being co-
ABOVE AND TOP RIGHT - Participants in action during the annual torch run...The championships kicked off on Saturday when the torch run was held through the streets of New = ordinated by Frank ‘Pancho’

Providence, climaxing at the Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasium. Rahming.











C R Walker senior boys conquer Dame Doris 5 John



Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

AC R WALKER KNIGHTS player takes a swing...The Knights added the senior boys softball title to their





already impressive résumé with a dominating game two series shing win against the Dame Doris John-

son Mystic Marlins, 14-1. As he was al season lana, Knichtis’ ace pitcher Lorenzo Williams (not
shown) was the driving force behind the leany’: ree hits and recorded sev- ACR een KNIGHTS player (top) slides to base as another player takes
ar } " tha enfthall

, \



PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



cS ; oe BAO
CLEVELAND Cavaliers’ LeBron James (23)
dunks on Boston Celtics’ Kevin Garnett in the
final two minutes of Game 4 of the NBA
basketball Eastern Conference semifinals |.
Monday, May 12, 2008, in Cleveland. The
Cavaliers beat Boston 88-77 to even the
ey shit) OP

(AP Photo: Tony Dejak)








ll By The Associated Press
e Through May.12 a4

SCORING:
ach eiG 2 VEG FT. PTS . AVG. |
Bryant;LAL). 8” 90 80 273. 34.1
McGrady, Hou. 6 .. 62 33 162 27.0
Nowitzki, Dall. 5 43 42 134 26.8
Parker, S.A. 9 91 48 234 26.0
James, Clev. 10 78 84 254 25.4
Paul, N.O. 9 88 48 228 25.3
Iverson,Den. 4 36 23 98 24.5
Bosh, Tor. 5 42 “35 120 =. 24.0
| Stoudemire, Ph. 5 48 19 116 23.2
Anthony, Den. 4 32 24 90. 22.5
Williams, Utah 10 73 42 211 21.1
West, N.O. 9 74 37 186 20.7
Duncan,S.A. 9 75 34 185. 20.6
Hamilton, Det. 10 82 38 205 20.5
Gasol, LAL 8: 63 36 162 20.3
Lewis, Orl. 9 67 28 181 20.1
Garnett, Bos. 11 OL ~ «B7 220 ~~ =20.0
J. Johnson, Atl. 7 47 30 140 20.0
Howard, Orl. 9 68 39 175 19.4
Ginobili, S.A. 9 59 35 169 18.8






FG PERCENTAGE
FG























Gasol, LAL 63

Haywood, Was. 26 44 591
Prince, Det. 73 124 589
Walton, LAL 30 51 588
Howard, Orl. 68 116 586
Kapono, Tor. 31 53 585
Bell; Phoe. 21 37 568
Diaw, Phoe. 35 64 547
Kleiza, Den. . 22 41 537
Smith, Den. 23... 43 535

REBOUNDS

Q







Howard, Orl. 9 56 85 141 15.7
Camby,Den. 4 11 42. 53 13.3
Boozer, Utah 10 33 88 121 12.1
Duncan, S.A..-.9 38 70 108 12.0
Jamison,:Wash. 6 19 53: - 72 12.0
Nowitzki Dall. 5... 10 50 60 12.0
Okur, Utah 10° 29° 89 118 11.8
Odom,LAL 8 22 65 87 10.9
Chandler,,.N:O; 9 36 58 94 10.4

7 22 51 73 10.4

Horford, Atl,
ASSISTS” =




Paul, N.O. :
Williams, Utah 10 96 9.6
James, Clev. 10 82 8.2

Nash, Phoe. 5 39 7.8
Calderon, Tor. 5 35 7.0
Parker, S.A, 9 62 6.9
Bryant, LAL -- 8 55 6.9
McGrady, Hou: 6 © 41 6.8
Kidd, Dall. 5 34 6.8
Ford, Tor. 5 33 6.6

a





@ By The Associated Press



SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, May 14
Cleveland at Boston (8 p.m. EDT). The
’ Cavaliers are attempting to overcome an
0-2 deficit for the second time in two years.

STAR

Monday

— LeBron James, Cavaliers, had 21
points and 13 assists to lead Cleveland to
a 88-77 win over Boston.

HOMESICK

Cleveland beat Boston 88-77 in Game 4
of their Eastern Conference semifinals
Monday night to tie the best-of-seven
series at 2-2. The Celtics dropped to 0-5 on
the road in the postseason, a stunning slip
for a team that went 31-10 on the road
during the regular season. During a short
visit to Ohio, the Celtics lost their momen-
tum in the series but will head home,
where they went 35-6 before the playoffs
started.

ALL-DEFENSIVE TEAM

League MVP Kobe Bryant and Kevin
Garnett were selected to the NBA All-
Defensive Team on Monday, along with
Marcus Camby, Bruce Bowen and Tim
Duncan. The second team is Shane Batti-
er of the Houston Rockets, Chris Paul of
the New Orleans Hornets, Dwight
Howard of the Orlando Magic, Tayshaun
Prince of the Detroit Pistons and Raja
Bell of the Phoenix Suns.

SPEAKING : :

“He can dunk. Especially if you give
him a running start at the basket. It’s prob-
ably going to be a pretty good dunk and
he’s so darn powerful that once he gets up
there, there’s not a lot you can do.

'— Celtics coach Doc Rivers on LeBron
James after Boston fell to the Cavaliers 88-
77 on Monday night. ,

James delivered a devastating dunk over
a defenseless Kevin Garnett in the final
two minutes.

licks introduce D’ Antoni

as their new head coach |

@ By BRIAN MAHONEY
- AP Basketball Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The

New York Knicks introduced —

Mike D’Antoni as their new
coach Tuesday, hoping his
high-scoring brand of basket-
ball will turn around a team
with seven straight losing sea-
sons.

D’Antoni agreed to leave
the Suns for the Knicks on Sat-
urday, taking over a team com-
ing off a 23-59 finish. He
replaces Isiah Thomas, who
was fired last month after
going 56-108 in two seasons.

D’Antoni won at least 54
games each of the last four sea-
sons and earned coach of the
year honors in 2005. He is
known as one of the NBA’s
top offensive minds, running a
system that helped Steve Nash
win two MVP awards and
making the Suns one of the
league’s most exciting teams.

He brings his entertaining
system to a team that seems
ill-suited to run it. The Knicks
aren’t a quick team, with. Eddy
Curry and Zach Randolph up
front and an unclear situation
at point guard, but D’Antoni
vows he will come up with a
scheme that works with this
group.

“I look at the roster and
that’s'the roster I’m going to
win with,” D’Antoni said at a
news conference at Madison
Square Garden.

The 57-year-old D’Antoni
went 253-136 in Phoenix, but
the Suns let him talk to other
clubs about their jobs after los-

ing to San Antonio in the first -

round. .
When Knicks president
Donnie Walsh learned New
York was one of those teams,
he said he was in Phoenix
probably a day later. Walsh
then beat out the Chicago
Bulls with a $24 million, four-
year contract to land D’An-

‘ toni and make him the 24th

coach in franchise history.
“Mike is a proven winner in

this league with a long impres-

sive coaching resume in the

“ NBA and abroad,” Walsh said.

“While Mike’s style in Phoenix
was extremely successful with a
running offensive team, he can
adjust his style to the person-
nel.”

Walsh took over in New



Richard Drew/AP

NEW YORK Knicks new head coach Mike D’Antoni poses outside New York’s Madison Square Garden
after a news conference Tuesday. The Knicks introduced D’Antoni as their new coach on Tuesday, hop-
ing his high-scoring brand of basketball will turn around a team with seven straight losing seasons.

York last month and has said it
won’t be easy to win right away
with a mismatched roster that
is well over the salary cap. Still,
D’Antoni said he’ll give it a
try. “My focus is to win this
coming year,” he said. “I know
we need to win so that’s my
whole focus.”

D’Antoni said he doesn’t
know if he will use his entire
system, which focuses on trying
to take a shot in the first 7 sec-
onds of the shot clock, many of
them 3-pointers. But he still

é

wants to play fast and believes
many of the players on the ros-
ter are capable of it.

“We were 7 seconds or less
and the rules say you have to
be 24 seconds or less,” D’An-
toni said. “So we can adjust it
to anything we want.”

After firing Thomas, Walsh
took his time with his search,
interviewing TV analyst Mark
Jackson, coaches Rick Carlisle
and Avery Johnson, and
Knicks assistant Herb
Williams. Though he intro-

duced his new coach as Mike
“D’ Antonio,” Walsh knew he
had the right man.

“] thought that Mike was the
best guy to choose because I
think he’s been in situations
like we have right now and he
did a good job with those situ-
ations,” Walsh said.

D’Antoni’s career record is
267-172 in parts of six seasons
with Phoenix and Denver. He
also coached Benetton Treviso
to the 2002 Italian League
championship.

t



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 15 —



Pastor among
four charged
with defrauding

the government
FROM page one

Pratt between November 12,
2004 and December 10, 2004
while at Cat Island conspired
to commit fraud. It is further
alleged that on December 10,
2004, the men by means of
fraud obtained $7,900 from the
Bahamas Government. It is
further alleged that Ferguson
and Pratt on March 8, 2005
while at Cat Island conspired
to commit fraud. Court dock-
ets also state that on March 8,
2005 the two men obtained
$2,100 from the Bahamas
Government.

It is alleged that the funds
belonged to the National
Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA) and the
Ministry of Housing.

The men were not required
to plead to the charges as
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
informed them that the Attor-
ney General had issued a fiat
in the matter authorising the
court to proceed by way of
information. Inspector Ercell
Dorsett informed the court
that the prosecution intends
to proceed with a Voluntary
Bill of Indictment, meaning
that the case will go directly
to Supreme Court. .

Pratt’s attorney Roger Min-
nis told the court yesterday
that his client is a pastor who
ministers at Zion Baptist
Church, Cat Island, and has
no criminal history. Attorney
Raphael Moxey, who
appeared for Evans, told the
court that his client was
employed with the Ministry of
Works as a building’s control
officer and had no previous
convictions. Lopez, who was
not represented by an attor-
ney, told the court that he is
employed at the Ministry of
Education as first assistant sec-
retary. Ferguson who was also
not represented by a lawyer
told the court yesterday that
he works as a senior adminis-
trator in Fresh Creek, Andros.

- Pratt, Lopez and Ferguson
were all granted bail in the
- sum of $25,000 with two
sureties. Evans was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000 with
two sureties.

The case was adjourned to
June 30 when the Voluntary

Bill of Indictment is expected 4

to be ready. The. men were
remanded in custody -yester-

day until their suretors were

approved.
FROM page one

LOCAL NEWS

Major FNM shake-up m

FROM page one

“While the FNM did inherit a lot of challenges when they came into
office, there is no reason why some of them (Minister’s) should not be
doing a better job,” one insider said yesterday.

Besides from the lack of performance, another source within the par-
ty suggested that after their “ascension to power,” some Ministers or
Ministers of State have been “very difficult to access.”

“JT have heard lots of complaints of inaccessibility of certain MPs. And
some people feel that some Ministers are very difficult to access. But
these people : should make themselves accessible — especially to their
constituents,” said another party insider.

Friction at the ground level in various FNM constituencies has also
been a cause of concern for the party, sources suggest.

Reportedly, the unrest has reached the point that a number of
chairmen from the various branches have sought a meeting with the
Prime Minister, to insist that he intervene to “smooth things over”

between the MPs and their branches.

FROM page one .

Bonita Rolle said: “Sonia is a very
special friend. She is always loving
and giving to everybody. We did not

‘want her to go through this alone.”

Khodee’s best friend, Keno Sey-
mour, 16, who grew up with Kodee
in Fox Hill was also at the morgue.
He was walking with Khodee to
Cabbage Beach whén Khodee was

stabbed in the heart and abdomen.

just after 4pm on Monday.

Keno said he and Khodee were
walking together to Cabbage beach
along the path next to the RIU hotel
when an older boy, around age 21;
started an argument with Khodee’s
friend.

Keno explained: “He said to him,
‘It’s time to get you now,’ and
Khodee said, ‘It ain’t like that’, and
he jooked him.

“Then he turned around and tried
to run, and they jooked him in the
back.

“The last thing he said to me was,
‘They got me’. He held up his shirt

‘and I saw him drop. He was just

down on the ground and then I just
lost it. We started to fight.”
Keno said there were two knives

Family and friends

used in the fight, but only Khodee
was stabbed. He said Khodee never
carried a weapon.

Keno, a student at Jordan Prince
William, used to play basketball,
video games and listen to rap music
with Khodee, who was like a broth-
er to him. '

He said: “He was very popular,
in the neighbourhood, and in school.
Everyone knew him and he got
along with everyone. He never used
to pick trouble and people liked him
a lot. He is going to be missed,”

Khodee, a student at Temple
Christian School, was a talented
track runner and basketball player
and had plans to attend boarding
school in the Fall.

Keno said: “I still can’t believe it.
Before we went out, Khodee said
we wouldn’t get into any trouble.
And then I saw him go, just like
that.”

Several people were arrested and
taken into police custody for inter-

view after the incident, but the mur-

der suspect has not yet been
detained.

Bishop Simeon Hall

FROM page one

Bishop Hall yesterday said that he “firmly and fiercely beg(ged) to

differ” with the Court of Appeal president.

He said that in his opinion the commehts she was reported to have
made were, “with the greatest respect, frightening and silly.”

“The evil behaviour of some cannot induce us to return to the
dark ages of the 15th century when persons were burnt at the stake or
sent to gas chambers because they exercised personal faith and freedom

of speech.”

He added: “We cannot remediate the many social problems in our

country by engaging in sweeping generalisations and backward think- .

ing. Freedom must be free even when some use it for excess and

wrong.”

Dame Joan was also reported as stating during the speech that the ‘
country has “plunged headlong. into‘a cesspooliof wickedness, and is
calling it righteousness.” She was quoted.as saying that.the Bahamas “is

adrift.”

According to & Bishop, phil “all well meaning and good think-

ing persons in our society agree that ‘we are adrift’...it ought to be clear
that the greatest area of concern has always been leadership.”

He then added: “I personally find it interesting that the vast major-
ity of our leadership have been lawyers.”

The Tribune attempted to reach Dame Joan Sawyer to clarify her
comments yesterday, but was unsuccessful.

Ship fails inspection

special projects Colin Murphy announced that the
NCL ship — freshly renamed the Norwegian Sky,
_after previously carrying the moniker the Pride of
Aloha — will start cruises to the Bahamas on July 14
this year. .

The 2,002 capacity vessel will offer three and
four-day cruises to Nassau, Grand Bahama and
Great Stirrup Cay and transport hundreds of thou-
sands of passengers over the next year.

However, the cruise ship has received some less
than pleasant press in the United States over the past
few months after it emerged that it failed a Centre
for Disease Control ship inspection in December
of 2007.

The ship received 78 points, below the 86 points
required to pass the bi-annual CDC review. USA
Today’s Cruise Log Blog described the inspection
failure as an occurrence that “almost never hap-
pens at a major line.”

The CDC’s impromptu investigation found that,
among other sanitation violations, there were
“numerous live insect larvae” on one of the ship’s
beverage stations, mould on a counter top, numer-
ous pieces of “heavily soiled” equipment on board,
and the whirlpool was incorrectly chlorinated —
resulting in inspectors immediately evacuating the
pool and “netting the unit.”

The cruise line was reported to have responded to
the investigation, taking steps to rectify the short-
comings.

Yesterday, NCL Vice President Colin Murphy,
when asked about the cleanliness concerns, said
that the newly-named ship will be “operated at the
highest standards.”

“We have a reputation for operating extremely
clean cruise ships. In fact we regularly receive the
very highest scores from the American government
which carries out inspections from time to time.”

According to Mr Murphy, the vessel is also about
to undergo six weeks of remodelling and refurbish-
ment in Miami. When upgraded, the ship will be
“the youngest and highest quality ship in the three
and four-day market”, he said.

Tourism minister Neko Grant said that NCL’s
new itinerary “will have a major affect on our cruise
arrivals and positively impact the bottom lines of
those businesses that focus on this sector of the

’ industry” at a time when tourism figures “have mod-

erated.”

Additionally, the inclusion of Grand Bahama as a
destination will be a major boon to its depressed
economy. Mr Grant said that the ship should make
42 trips to that island over the next year, bringing at
least 39,900 passengers.

It will also ensure more regular employment
opportunities for 15 Berry Islanders who work at the
cruise line’s private island, Great Stirrup Cay, as
the resort will now be open year round rather than
just in winter months. ;

FROM page one

: “It is felt that young men in
i Step Street murdered this
? young man because he is from
? a neighbourhood that has been
? warring with them. I heard at
east 17 rounds fired. It was
i like a war had broken out.”

Neil White, 40, was caught

: in the Step Street crossfire. He
? was shot in the right thigh and
: treated at Princess Margaret
: Hospital.

: Chief Superintendent for
i Bahamas Police Central
: Detective Unit Glenn Miller
i Said: “We know the deceased
? is from Fox Hill and this inci-
: dent happened not far from
: where he lived.

“We are putting pieces

together to see whether there
: was any connection between
? the two incidents.”

A 32-year-old man has been

i arrested in connection with the
? shooting after he was linked
: to a car seen in Step Street at
: the time of the incident.

A spokesman for the Dill-

? Davis family said: “We con-
? demn the killing of our loved
? one, Khodee, and we condemn
-} what appeared to be a retal-
jatory shooting.

Gunshots ‘intended
for teenager’s killer’

“We are opposed to mem-
bers of the community in our
neighbourhood taking any
kind of revenge or retaliating
against any resident of Step
Street.

“We believe the police
ought to be allowed to contin-
ue with their investigations
and if any members of the
community have any informa-

tion go to the police or'come
to the immediate family and
we will pass on the informa-
tion. ”

Anyone with information
which could assist police
inquiries should call Bahamas
Police Central Detective Unit
on 322-2561 or call Crimestop-
pers anonymously on 328-
8477.

Amnesty issues ‘Urgent Action Appeat'

FROM page one

United States branch of Amnesty International yesterday.

It tells its recipients that Emmanuel McKenzie and his Bahamian
environmental organization, the Millar’s Creek Preservation Group
(MCPG), “have been targeted by the Bahamian security forces who
have also accused him of illegal activities in an attempt to discredit
him.”

The notice adds that Amnesty believes that the “harassment” of Mr
McKenzie by security forces in April “may be linked to his environ-
mental activism.”

The global human rights group is calling on its members to “send
appeals to arrive as quickly as possible” to Deputy Prime minister
Brent Symonette, Minister of National Security Tommy Eupieiuest
and Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Troops hike to
quake-buried



inese villages

“=” =

A WOMAN cries as she walks by a line rescuers just before they are going to search for victims after the earth-
quake at Beichuan County in Mianyang of southwest China's Sichuan province.

lm By AUDRA ANG
MIANYANG, China

. Soldiers hiking over landslide-

blocked roads reached the epi- ,

center of China’s devastating
earthquake Tuesday, pulling bod-
ies and a few survivors from col-
lapsed buildings. The death toll
of more than 12,000 is certain to
rise as the buried are found,
according to the Associated Press.

Rescuers worked through a
steady rain-as they searched
wrecked towns across hilly
stretches of Sichuan province that
were stricken by Monday’s mag-
nitude-7.9 quake,. China’s, dead-
liest. in three decades. Tens of
thousands of homeless spent a
second night outdoors, some
sleeping under plastic sheeting,
others bused to a stadium in the
city of Mianyang, on the edge of
the disaster area. -

Street lamps were switched on
in Mianyang on Tuesday night,
but all the buildings were dark
and deserted after the govern-

ment ordered people out of them

for fear of aftershocks. Security
guards were posted at apartment
blocks to keep people out.

The industrial city, of 700,000
people — home to the headquar-
ters of China’s nuclear weapons
industry.— was turned into a
thronging refugee camp, with res-
idents sleeping outdoors.

“T’m cold. I don’t dare to sleep,
and I’m worried a building is
going to fall down on me,” said
Tang Ling, a 20-year-old waitress
wrapped in a borrowed pink
down jacket and camped outside
the Juyuan restaurant with three
co-workers. “What’s happened is
so cruel. In.one minute to have so
many people die is too tragic.”

As night fell, a first wave of
200 troops entered the town of
Wenchuan, near the epicenter,
trudging across ruptured roads
and mudslides, state television
said, Initial reports from soldiers
said one nearby town could
account for only 2,300 survivors
out of 9,000 people, China Cen-
tral Television said.

_. At least 12,012 deaths occurred
.in Sichuan alone while another
"323 died in five other provinces
and the metropolis of Chongqing,
state media reported. That toll
seemed likely to jump sharply as
‘rescue teams reached hard-hit
towns. © |

‘. The devastation and ramped-
‘up rescue-across large, heavily
populated region of farms and
factory towns'strained local gov-
ernments. Food dwindled on the
shelves of the few stores th: t
remained open. Gasoline was
scarce, with long lines outside

some stations and pumps marked |

“empty.” -
Buses carried survivors away

from Beichuan, which was flat-.

tened — a few buildings stand-
ing amid piles of rubble in a nar-
row valley, according to CCTV

video. More than 10,000 people

from there and surrounding areas.

packed Mianyang’s Jiuzhou Gym-

nasium, with empty water bottles, .

boxes of instant noodles and cig-
arette cartons littering the ground.

“T saw rocks and earth rolling
down the hill, and they destroyed
whatever they hit below,” said a
farmer. who only gave his sur-

~ name, Chen, from the village of

Leigu near Beichuan. “There’s
nothing I can do about this. It’s all
in the hands of the government.”

In the provincial capital of
Chengdu, FM-91.4 all-traffic radio
station operated around the clock,
reading text messages sent by sur-
vivors of stricken areas to let rel-
atives know they are alive.

The government’s high-gear
response aimed to reassure Chi-
nese while showing the world it
was capable of handling the dis-
aster and was ready for the Aug.
8-24 Olympics in Beijing.
Although the government said it
welcomed outside aid, officials
said that the assistance would be
confined to money and supplies,
not to foreign personnel.

As Prime Minister Wen Jiabao
crisscrossed the disaster area to

oversee relief efforts, the official -

Xinhua news agency cited the
Defense Ministry as saying that
some 20,000 soldiers and police
arrived in the disaster area, with
30,000 more on the way by plane,
train, truck and on foot.

“We will save the people,”
Wen said through a bullhorn to
survivors in Shifang, where two
chemical plants collapsed and
buried more than 600 people,
according to CCTV. “As long as
the people are there, factories can

be built into even better ones, °

and so can the towns and coun-
thes.” °

The Finance Ministry said it
had allocated $123 million in
quake aid.

At the world famous Wolon
National Nature Reserve, all 86
pandas were reported safe late

Tuesday in the first word since

communications with'the pre-
serve were cut off. A group of 31
British tourists. panda-watching
in,the preserve also returned safe-
ly to Chengdu, the Foreign Min-
istry said, although there was no
word on .12 missing Americans
on a World Wildlife Fund tour. -

Still, prospects for survivors in
the quake zone dwindled. Only
58 people were pulled from
demolished buildings across the
quake area so far, China Seismo-
logical Bureau spokesman Zhang
Hongwei told Xinhua.

Weeping parents held a vigil in '

a steady outside a collapsed
school in the town of Juyuan,
where more than 900 high school
students were initially trapped.
Only one survivor has been
found: a girl pulled free by rescue
team. ;

Bowing to public calls, Beijing
Olympics organizers scaled down

the boisterous ongoing torch
relay, saying Wednesday’s leg in
the southeastern city of Ruijin
will begin with a minute of silence
and more somber ceremonies.
People along the route, which
next month is scheduled to arrive
in quake-hit areas, would be
asked for donations, an organiz-
ing committee spokesman said.
In the areas around Mianyang,
more than 7,300 people died and
another 18,000 were believed
trapped in rubble, most in
Beichuan.’ Amid the:rubble,
CCTV showed the six-story

‘Beichuan Hotel listing, half its

first story collapsed. Medical
teams tried to treat the wounded
in dirt courtyards littered with
broken furniture and concrete. -.
Though Wen and others called
for air drops of emergency sup-_
plies to hard-to-reach areas, rain

impeded efforts for a second day,

and Xinhua said a group of para-
troopers called off a rescue mis-
sion. ‘

Strong aftershocks — one of
magnitude-6, according to Chi-
nese seismologists — hit Cheng-
du, the region’s usually busy com-
mercial center. A KFC outlet ran
out of chicken and cooking oil. -

Expressions of sympathy and
offers of help poured in from
Japan and the European Union.
Russia was sending a plane with
30 tons of relief supplies, the
Interfax news agency said. Chi-
nese President Hu Jintao dis-
cussed the disaster by phone with
President Bush.

The U.S. is offering an initial
$500,000 in relief in anticipation
of an appeal by the International
Red Cross, White House spokes-
woman Dana Perino said.

While welcoming the support,
the Chinese government suggest-
ed that aid would be confined to
supplies and money, not foreign
personnel.

“We welcome funds and sup-
plies. We can’t accommodate per-
sonnel at this point,” Wang
Zhenyao, the Civil Affairs Min-
istry’s top disaster relief official,
told reporters in Beijing.

The Dalai Lama, who has been
vilified by Chinese authorities
who blame him for recent unrest
in Tibet, offered prayers for the
victims. The epicenter skirts the
Tibetan highlands, where some
communities staged anti-govern-
ment protests in March.

Seismologists said the quake
was on a level the tegion sees
once every 50 to 100 years. The
region’s last strong quake was in
1933, when a magnitude 7.5
quake kiiled more than 9,300 peo-

_ ple. Monday’s quake was pow-

ered up the pent-up stress,
experts said. i

“J don’t think this is unheard
of,” said Amy Vaughn of the USS.
Geological Survey. “It’s more an
issue of how long and how much
stress has been built up in this
region.”

Wang Jiaowen/AP Photo ;

DEBRIS of collapsed buildings is seen after the earthquake in Beichuan county in southwest China's Sichuan
province, Tuesday, May 13, 2008. Rescue workers sifted through tangled debris of toppled schools and homes
Tuesday for thousands of victims buried or missing after China's worst earthquake in three decades, where the
deatn toll soared to more than 12,000 people in the hardest-hit province alone.

a





WEDNESDAY,

“MAY

a 2008

: - SECTION B « JLab ncaa hch tt led Munch oh ean

Corporation ‘exhausted’
ability to pay $5.6m bill



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
’ Tribune Business Editor

he Water & Sewerage

Corporation has

“exhausted their [gov-

ernment] subsidy” for the

current 2007-2008 finan-
cial year, the chief executive of its
major water supplier said yesterday,
blaming its cash-strapped position as
the reason his firm is owed $5.6 million
in accounts receivables.

Asked by Wall Street analysts to
explain why that position had accu-
mulated on Consolidated Water’s
books at March 31, 2008, Rick McTag-
gart, the BISX-listed company’s chief
executive, replied: “The Corporation
there in the Bahamas is subsidised by
the Government, and the Budget goes
from June to June.

“It’s our understanding that they’ve
[the Corporation] exhausted their sub-
sidy for this fiscal year, and we’ve been
working with them to ensure they get
- up to date on payments when the new
government: budget is due next
month.”

Bahamas ‘runs the risk’

ROYAL 9 FIDELITY

* But minister questions figure, saying W & S Corporation
will meet ‘all obligations’ and has not run out of money

* Says it has ‘lived up to’ payment plan with Consolidated
Water and ‘made strides’ in reducing accounts receivables

When contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for public utilities, disputed
the figure given by Mr McTaggart.

He said the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s..chief financial officer had
informed him “that as of the end of
March, the outstanding invoices to
Consolidated were approximately $3
million”.

Expressing concern that Consoli-
dated Water, which supplies the Water
& Sewerage Corporation with water
from its Blue Hills and Windsor
reverse osmosis plants, was revealing
information on the Corporation’s
financial position (something it is oblig-
ed to do to comply with Securities &
Exchange Commission requirements),

Mr Neymour acknowledged that it had’;

a number of outstanding accounts.
“The Water & Sewerage Corpora-:

tion is a corporation that has strug-)/

gled financially for a number of years,
and is still facing increasing challenges .
throughout the Bahamas,” Mr Ney- |
mour told The Tribune. i
“However, we have an agreement

“with Consolidated Water in terms of

payments and reducing our outstand:
ing payments, which we have lived up,
to.

_ “We have made strides in reducing
the outstanding fees this year. We
intend to meet out obligations to Con-
solidated Water, and the Water &
Sewerage Corporation has been mak-

ing payments to them since March 31. -

“The Government is right now
' preparing an Action Plan for the

Water & Sewerage Corporation, which
we shall address in short order.”

Mr Neymour added that the $100
million bond issue proposed under the
former Christie’ administration, the
proceeds of which would have financed
upgrades to, and the built out of,
Water & Sewerage Corporation infra-
structure, ‘was: “not a priority for the
Government at this particular time”.

In its 10-Q filing with the SEC in -

the US, Consolidated Water said of
the situation: “Included in our consol-
idated balance sheet as. of March 31,

SEE page 6B



on Act reform delays

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER
government
minister yester- i
day said the
likely failure to
place the
amended Secu-
tities Industry
Act on the Par-
liamentary leg- E
islative agenda
before year-end left the
Bahamas “running the risk of
falling short of international
best practices” in the key cap-
ital markets business.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance in the
Christie administration,
described the delays in bring-
ing the revised Act forward as
“unfortunate”, given that the
Bahamas needed “much
strengthened” securities legis-
lation to grow its capital mar-
kets.

Mr Smith, now CFAL’s
chairman, told The Tribune
that the revised Securities
Industry Act - upon which
work was begun when he was
in office - was part of a bigger
picture, in that it was linked to
regulatory consolidation and
other economic and monetary
reforms the Government was
eyeing.

“It would clarify the grey
areas in terms of what the
Commission could or could not
do.” Mr Smith said, “and how
far it could go in terms of infor-

Speak up,



mation exchange with other —

regulators.

“At the same time, it would
have strengthened the plat-
form BISX [the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange] has to operate on
as ittakes on a more futuristic
role. It would also further the
aim of relaxation of exchange
controls.

“Tt [the Act] is part ofa larg-
er picture. We need a much
strengthened secyrities legis-
lation in place in order to pro-
tect capital markets in the
Bahamas. It’s a pity it will not
‘make the legislative agenda
[this year].°’

A press release issued yes-
terday by the Securities Com-
mission, the capital markets
regulator, confirmed Tribune
Business’s exclusive story of
Tuesday, May 13, stating that
the regulations accompanying
the revised Securities Industry
Act would be released to the
private sector in the 2008
fourth. quarter.

Mr Smith yesterday
acknowledged to The Tribune
that the Government and cap-
ital markets regulators had not
moved fast enough bringing
the Securities Industry Act
reforms forward, saying the
legislation had “sort of been
dragging along”.

“It’s been falling too far

behind,” Mr Smith said. “It.

really has to come up to speed

See ACT, 5B

Flemings

are listening.



in the furure of
Grand Bahama.
ro] EAU eS (eln ct

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas _ has
moved to make its products
“more affordable to a wider
cross-section of consumers”,
through leasing deals for: its
digital set-top and video
recorder boxes,_as it, eagerly.
awaits growth opportunities
that may be produced from the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company’s (BTC) privatisa-
tion.

Barry. Williams, Cable

Bahamas’ vice-president of.

finance, said that while the

BISX-listed company’s leasing

programme had “started slow-
ly”, the roll-out of its promo-
tional and marketing campaign
via radio and TV advertise-
ments was helping it to “take
off now”.

The leasing programme is

. Company eagerly awaits opportunities |

| Cable Bahamas makes products ‘more affordable’

that may follow BTC privatisation
* But comes out on losing end of
US interest rate swap agreement

likely to be greeted warmly by

_ Bahamian consumers, espe-

cially residential ones, whose
disposable incomes and house-
hold budgets are likely com-
ing under increasing strain
from rising electricity, gas and
food costs.

Mr Williams said the leasing
programme, started by Cable
Bahamas at the end of March
2008, was designed to make
the digital set-top boxes need-
ed to access its Ocean’s Digital
TV service more accessible to
consumers.

Such boxes would.cost $150
to purchase outright, but Mr

- Williams said Cable Bahamas

was leasing the first box to sub-

-scribers at the rate of $5 per

month. Depending on how

-many boxes subscribers
applied for, Cable Bahamas

would lease a second for $3
per month, and the third for
$2 per month.

“What we’ve basically done ;

is to make it more affordable
to a wider cross-section of con-
sumers,” Mr Williams added.

“One of our goals is to make”

sure a large cross-section of

See CABLE, 3B

Cal he Raja! Fly pension experts ody "

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Cruise line
could give
$22m boost.

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE Government is
expected to receive almost $8
million between July 2008
and December 2009 in cruise,
passenger head tax through. -
the arrival of the Norwegian |
Sky’s weekly calls, starting
later this summer. Bay Street
merchants could experience a
$22 million spending injec-
tion from tourists brought in
by all the cruise line’s vessels

Tourism Minister Neko |
Grant announced that Nor-
wegian Cruise Lines (NCL)
will reflag, and rename, the
former Pride of Aloha and _.
launch the ship as the Norwe:
gian Sky, offering three and,
four- day cruises to the - ‘
Bahamas from Miami start-"
ing on Friday, July 18. I

NCL is also expected to

See CRUISE, 5B

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SIV ES

Drive a Honda Fit ont ra: up to
40 miles per gallon



Royal Fidelity Pension Plan

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_PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



For many, wages are a real ‘living’ issue

“EARLIER this month, as
the debate about the implica-
tions of rising. oil and food
costs was making the rounds
on the various ‘radio talk
shows’, several callers raised
the issue of whether the
avernment would consider
faising the minimum wage.

* Since July 1, 2000, the min-
imum wage for government
employees in the Bahamas
has been established at $4.45
per hour or about $175 per
























| St. Andrew’s in Exuma.

- _- NURSERY TEACHERS.

pe




t ‘Degrees from an

;

tS



application forms

TEACHING VACANCIES

“The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
_ applications from qualified Teachers for positions
‘ | available at St. John’s College, St. Anne’s School
“and Bishop Michael Eldon School in Freeport and

g Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
accredited University or
‘ . College and Teoching Certificate need apply.

i For further details and applications, from, please
contact the Anglican Central Education Authority on
i , Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

application
with
documents must be sent by Friday, May 30th, 2008 to
| the Anglican Education Department addressed _to:-

t The Director of Education

\ Anglican Central Education Authority
_ P.O.Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas

week. If my memory serves
me correctly, I believe that
the actual legislated rate is $4
per hour or some $160 per
week.

When asked whether the
Government was considering
raising the minimum wage in
light of escalating prices, the
minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, was quoted
as indicating the negative.

Over the years, I have
found that very few persons

completed
required

and/or
copies of










' poor. That last argument is

actually take time to under-
stand the issues involved in
establishing and maintaining
a minimum wage policy. The
arguments in favour of a min-
imum wage seem just as.
strong as those against it.

Informative

Several years ago, I discov-
ered a March 13, 2007, article
by Lisa Smith, entitled
Exploring the Minimum
Wage, posted on
www.investopedia.com. This
provided an excellent and
extremely well written, easy
to read, discussion, which I
regard as a ‘must read’ on the
topic and reprint below:

“The International Labour
Office in Geneva, Switzer-
land, reports that some 90
per cent of countries around
the world have legislation
supporting a minimum wage.
The minimum wage in coun-
tries that rank within the low-
est 20 per cent of the pay
scale is less than $2 per day, |
or about $57 per month. The
minimum wage in the coun-
tries that represent the high-
est 20 per cent of the pay
scale is. about $40 per day, or
about $1,185 per month.

Despite paying one of the
highest minimum wages in
the world, the minimum wage
is a perpetual hot potato
among politicians in the US.
The last time the minimum
wage was federally increased

“in the US was 1997. Propo-

nents of an increase argue
that the cost of living has
risen more than 25 per cent
since then. Since the mini-
mum wage is not indexed to
inflation, it does not system-
atically increase in propor-
tion to changes in the costs of
living.

Arguments in Favour

Those in favour of increas-
ing the minimum wage argue
that such an increase lifts
people out of poverty, helps
low-income families make
ends meet and narrows the
gap between the rich and

Bintthday and




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OA



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| By Larry Gibson



underscored by the exorbi-
tant salaries earned by chief
executives and other corpo-
rate titans, who are also the
same people generally argu-.
ing against an increase in the
minimum wage. The idea of
an increase also has a strong
populist appeal, particularly
in a nation where discussions
about social class - when they
are held at all - are nearly
always framed in terms of the
rich versus the poor.

Arguments Against
On the other side of the

’ discussion is the argument

that increasing the minimum
wage hurts small businesses,
squeezes profit margins,
leads to inflation, encourages
employers to downsize their
staff and increases the cost of
goods to the end consumer.
Interestingly, the arguments
against an increase rarely
focus on the fact that a good
portion of states already
mandate a wage that is higher
than the federal minimum
wage.

By The Numbers

Economically speaking, the
theory of supply and demand
suggests that the imposition
of an artificial value on
wages, which is higher than
the value that would be dic-
tated in a free-market system,
creates an inefficient market
and leads to unemployment.
_ The inefficiency occurs
when there are a greater
number of workers that want
the higher paying jobs than .
there are employers willing
to pay the higher wages. Crit-
ics disagree.

What is generally agreed
upon by all parties is that the
number of individuals relying

on the minimum wage in the ©

US is less than 5 per cent.

However, this statistic is
largely ignored in favor of
citations regarding the num-
ber of people that live in
poverty. Keep in mind that
earning more than the mini-
mum wage does not necessar-
ily mean that one is not living
in poverty. According to esti-
mates from the CIA World
Fact Book, some 13 per cent
of the US population lives in
poverty — that is 37 million
people. — .

To put this in perspective,
the federal poverty level for a
working adult was $9,800 in
2006, according to the US

. Department of Health and

Human Services. At $5.25
per hour, a minimum wage
workers earns $10,920 per
year, which is already greater
than the federally determined
poverty level.

Pay

If the worker's pay jumps
to $7.25, yearly earnings
would move to $15,080 per
year for a 40-hour week.
From a mathematical and
logical perspective, increasing
the minimum wage does not
lift anyone out of poverty
because the prior minimum _
wage already paid more than
the official poverty rate.

The numbers would seem
to put the minimum wage
argument to rest, but only
because of the misaligned
focus on the phrase ‘mini-
mum wage’. When referring
to that phrase, many people
actually seem to be seeking a
living wage, which is general-
ly defined as the amount
required to raise a family on

a single wage-earner’s salary. »

Pegging that number to the
poverty rate for a family of
four moves the bar to $20,000
per year. Looking at the ©
argument from this perspec-
tive, neither the current mini-
mum wage nor the proposed
increased wage will provide a
living wage. Even if an
increase would move the
salary of every worker in the
country to this level, it would
make little difference i in-the

statistical comparison
between the earnings of the
average worker to those of
the highest-paid chief execu-
tives.

No Easy Answers

What is the solution to the
minimum wage/living wage
issue? Statistics can be gath-
ered to support both sides of
the argument. While there
are no easy answers, a good
first step is to frame the

. debate in realistic terms.

Referring to the minimum
wage as a wage designed to
support a family confuses the
issue. Families need a living
wage, not a minimum wage.
With that said, working at
McDonalds or the local gas
station isn't a career. These
are jobs designed to help
entry-level workers join the
workforce, not to support the
(long-term) financial needs of
a family.

On the core issue of mini-
mum wage itself, political
wrangling is unlikely to result
in a real solution. A more
practical solution is to join
the workforce at the low-end
of the wage scale, build your
skills, get an education and
move up the ladder to a bet-
ter-paying job, just as mem-
bers of the workforce have
done for generations.”

Until next week...

_. NB: Larry R. Gibson, a

Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group |
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insur-
ance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies. Please direct any
questions or comments to
rigibson@atlantichouse. com.
bs- eee

JOB OPPORTUNITY
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has been established by statute
for the regulation of the telecommunications, electricity and water and
sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

The PUC is seeking a utility regulatory professional with training and
experience, particularly in the field of telecommunications regulation, to
’ fill the position of Executive Director.

The Executive Director is the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission
reporting to the Chairman, and is responsible for the day-to-day
administration of the affairs of the Commission and for ensuring that the
Commission is provided with high quality technical advice and guidance
in the execution of its functions.

The successful candidate will be required to provide leadership and
management direction to the PUC. The candidate will also be a high-
level practitioner with direct experience in.a wide variety of utility
regulatory activities including liberalization(especially with respect to
telecommunications) granting of licences, approval of rates, service quality,
licence.enforcement measures, universal service policies, radio spectrum
management, and international best practices. This post will be offered

on a contract basis.

The successful applicant will have a Master’s Degree or Professional
Certification in Economics, Management, Law or Engineering and is
expected to have had ten (10) years practice as a trained regulator.

The PUC offers a very attractive remuneration and benefits package
‘together with a pleasant working environment. Further information about
the PUC can be obtained from the website: www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
' 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Fax No. (242) 323-7288

E-mail: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs

Applications should be received by 16 May, 2008. Only applicants who
have been short-listed will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE



@ By CARA BRENNEN- Caribbean Disaster Emer- for understanding and
BETHEL gency Response Agency, in. responding to potential risk
Tribune Business collaboration with the and crisis situations. These
Reporter Caribbean Tourism Organi- include hotel operators, trav-

sation. el agencies, food and service
TOURISM and disaster The purpose of the project organisations, emergency ser-
management officials yester- is to develop standardised vices and local government
day met to discuss strategic methods for hazard mapping authorities”.

plans to help the industry and risk vulnerability assess- 7

recover in the aftermath of a ments in the region, which Pointed

natural disaster. will aid the regional approach
The national workshop to disaster risk prevention She pointed out that con-

held yesterday is a compo- and response. tributing to the development
nent of the Regional Disaster Geneva Cooper, senior of the plan guarantees full

Risk Management for Sus- director of the Ministry of ownership of the end results.

tainable Tourism in the Tourism and Aviation, said Ms Cooper said the work-

Caribbean project. that being one of the pilot shop’s goal was to develop a
The $1 million initiative is countries in the project plan that will complement

largely sponsored by the places the Bahamas, “in a each country’s existing

Inter-American Develop- position to involve a wide national plan.

ment Bank, which donated cross-section of our own “Tt is crucial that we have

$800,000. It is a three-year tourism stakeholders in the such comprehensive plans in

project involving the development of aframework __ place, and persons with the
CABLE, from 1B Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas __ that it would pursue a cellular
is eagerly awaiting new _ licence.

our customer base can afford telecommunications growth Mr Williams now told The

our products.” opportunities that could be Tribune: “The Government

Cable Bahamas has also ushered in if the Bahamas and the Prime Minister have
applied the leasing programme Telecommunications Compa- indicated that BTC should be
to Digital Video Recorders ny (BTC) is privatised by year- privatised by year-end. We
(DVRs), an expensive piece of end 2008, something Prime would hope that with that
equipment that Mr Williams Minister Hubert Ingraham has would come more liberalisa-
said would cost around $800 committed to. tion of the rest of the telecom-
to purchase. The company has in the past, munications market, and we

DVRs allow consumers to under its original chairman and_—_— would be more than willing to
record their favourite pro- former largest shareholder, be participants in that liberali-
grammes, and come in both Philip Keeping, made no secret _ sation.
Standard and High Definitions. of its desire to expand beyond “We are ready and willing
The former can be leased ata — its core cable TV, Internet and __ to take advantage of that. We
rate of $12.96 per month, the data services base, having said feel the Government is one
latter for $29 per month. in a previous annual report _ that is certainly pro-competi-

, tion and liberalisation.”
The only figure in Cable

Bahamas’ 2008 first quarter
>t ag a Lo A results that went in the wrong
direction was the company’s
5; interest rate expenses, which
_ increased by 45.3 per cent to
$1.108 million from $607,000
the year before.
ef Mr Williams attributed this
7 Te =f to an interest rate swap agree-
ment, which had not worked
Peo Bole a ele itol aig ment. which ha
He explained that Cable
1 6 Bahama Sound Exuma Bahamas aid most of its bor-
rowing in US$, in addition to
having to pay US$ for all its
Call s signals -apart from local pro-
; gramming - and electronics.
* “Our borrowing for capital
327-8026 projects is mostly in USS, so
what we:did a year-and-a-half
or ago was to enter into swap
agreements to mitigate interest
359-31 60 rate risk at the time,” Mr
' Williams said.
Cable Bahamas locked in its
interest rate risk exposure at
6 per cent, only for US interest



Kelly’s Team

Learning & Development
_ Manager

Kelly's is seeking a fully-qualified and experienced professional to become the full-
time Learning and Development Manager for the 350 + employees in Kelly's House
& Home and Kelly's Lumber. The position requires an experienced. and resourceful
communicator able to motivate adults with varying educational backgrounds and
qualifications, and capable of continuing the development and implementation of on-
going in-house learning and development programs, with their attendant testing and
evaluation procedures. Such programs will include, but not necessarily be limited to:

* Orientation courses for all new employees

° Supervisory courses for new and prospective supervisors —

¢ Customer Service courses for all retail employees

* Computer familiarisation courses

* Product-specific knowledge courses for all retail employees
¢ Safety courses for drivers and warehouse/yard personnel

¢ Personal development courses for career advancement

The successful applicant will also be expected to develop and maintain strong links
with other providers of on-going work-related courses in specialised and technical
areas. Previous experience in learning and development or in adult education would
be an asset. ,

This is a management position for an experienced and qualified professional, who is
willing to demonstrate a long-term commitment to Kelly's development and expansion.
Benefits include medical, pension, and profit-sharing plans, with remuneration package
dependant on qualifications and experience.

E-mail letter of application with comprehensive resume to info@kellysbahamas.com
with "Learning and Development Manager" as subject.

No phone calls please

Kelly’s "35.

Nel - partner § 6
Tel: (242) 393.4002 Monday-Friday 9:00am8:00pm
Fax: (3434 3934096 ‘Sai’ dea



WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 3B

ee ee as
Tourism plans its Disaster Response

appropriate expertise and ensure the continuity of their _ tection of the industry,” Ms

authority to be able toimme- __ business:and, by default, pro- | Cooper said.
diately respond should a cri-
sis arise,” Ms Cooper said.

She said this was important
regardless of which govern-
ment or private sector agen-
cies persons belonged to, and ,

that Bahamians see them-
selves as having a direct con-

tribution to make in protect-

ing the tourism industry.
Ms Cooper said the min-

istry needs to involve more a A 2 Un @ .S'

stakeholders in workshops sii Ed : é

and training programmes,

and give practical support in
risk management. -

~ “We must recognize that
risk management is not only
reserved for large resorts, but 8

every small business must
also take active steps to

\

rates to go the other way and :
dip below that figure as the US
Federal Ree we enibarced on Ar awak Homes Ltd and Is no
a series of rate cuts to save the
economy from recession.
Accounting treatments
require Cable Bahamas to
record the accrual of any dif-

Jlonger authorized to conduct
Krone sean hfe at business on behalf of Arawak
interest and the interest it is

actually paying until the swap § Homes or an of it’s affiliates.

agreement ends.

BB Vinca PED) 774. tees
See ey com



@ Frost & Young LLP
© Timnes square
ssew. York, New Yar bi te 64



Sl! ERNST & YOUNG



Report of Independent Auditors

Board of Directors
Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)
New York, New York

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate
Bank (USA) (the “Bank” as of December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the related
consolidated statements of income, stockholder’s equity and cash flows for the years then
ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our
tesponsibility is to-express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the
United States. Those standards: require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain
reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements,
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management,
and evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that
our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion. Ban Pa ge en

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in
all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate Bank
(USA) at December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the consolidated results of its operations and

its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principl
accepted in the United States. Ue ae

; Garnet ¥ pong tir

Mizuho Corporate Bank. (USA)

March 27, 2008

Consolidated Balance Sheets

December 31

(In thousands, except share amounts) ; 2007 2006
Assets .
Cash and due from banks (Note 3) ; $ 28,882
Interest-bearing deposits with banks te . ris
Federal funds sold £9 - 710,000
Securities (Note 4) :
Available-for-sale 270,26
Held-to-maturity sai7 ma
Loans and leases (Notes 5 and 21) 2,502,271 2,294,164
Allowance for credit losses (Note 6) (10,289) (12,209)
Net loans and leases 2,491,982 2,281,955
Accrued interest receivable and other assets 72,432 81,570
Total assets , / $2,897,573 $3,680,863
Liabilities :
Noninterest-bearing deposits $ 101,608 $ 103,238
Interest-bearing deposits (Note 9) 1,348,312 1,546,571 :
Total deposits . 1,449,920 1,649,809
Federal funds purchased ‘ 270,000 904,0

J ’ 104,00
Other borrowings (Note 10) - 66,129 a
Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities 91,915 125,794
Total liabilities :

1,877,964 2,679,634

Stockholder’s equity (Note /4)
Common stock—$100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding




984,742 shares in 2007 and 2006) _ 98,474 98,474
Capital surplus 1,222,036 1,222,036
Accumulated deficit (276,240) (3 19.2 86)
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss)/income 24,661 5
Total stockholder’s equity 1,019,609 1,001,229 4
Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity $2,897,573 $3,680,863.

a eer nena
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
. . ale ay
Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited
Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited,

P. O. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas.

You Run YOUr BUSINESS Accept cheques easy as credit cards,

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_ PAGE 4B,
ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited +
(incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)
Balance Sheet
As of December 31, 2007
(Expressed in United States Dollars)
: Notes 2007 2006
$ $
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents il 104,160 | 59,945
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss 3&11 652,132 635,843
Trustee fees receivable, net : , 4 282,946 257,456
' Prepayments and other assets 6 67,751 89,424
Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements 5 254,221 124,715

Total Assets 1,361,210 1,167,383
‘LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Liabilities
Accrued expenses 25,597 25,621.
Accounts payable ' 6 220,573 18,170
Unearmed revenue 38,306 20,962
284,476 64,753
Equity
Share capital: authorized, issued and fully paid
1,000,000 shares of US $1 each 1,000,000 1,000,000
Retained earnings’ * 76,734 102,630
1,076,734 1,102,630

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

1,361,210 1,167,383

Signed as approved on behalf of The Board of Directors:

Director

Date



Director

April 18, 2008

Notes to the Balance Sheet
December 31, 2007

1.

Incorporation, Business Activity and Group Structure

ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited (the “Company” is incorporated under The Companies Act,
1992, and is licensed to carry on trust business in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The
address of its registered office is Providence House, First Floor Eastern Side, East Hill Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas. Its previous registered office was located at the British American Building,
Second Floor, George Street, Nassau, The Bahamas, S

The Company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Amsterdam Trust Corporation (ATC),
Chuchubiweg 17, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles.

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies applied in preparation of this balance sheet are set out below.
These policies have been consistently applied to all years presented, unless otherwise stated.

(a) Basis of presentation

The Company’s balance sheet is prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRS) and under the historical cost convention as modified by the
revaluation of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss.

In the current year, the Company has adopted IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures
and the amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements, which became effective
for fiscal periods beginning on or after January 1, 2007. The impact of the adoption of
IFRS 7 and the changes to IAS 1 Has been to expand the disclosures provided in these
financial statements. regarding the Company’s financial instruments and management of
capital. ,

J
i

The remaining standards and amendments and interpretations to published standards that
became effective for fiscal periods beginning on or after January 1, 2007 were not relevant
to the Company’s operations and accordingly did not impact the Company’s accounting
policies or balance sheet. :

The application of new standards and amendments and interpretations to existing standards
that have been published but are not yet effective are not expected to have a material impact
on the Company’s accounting policies or balance sheet in the period of initial application.

(b) Use of estimates

The preparation of a balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires the use of certain
accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgment in the process
of applying the Company’s accounting policies. Estimates and judgments are continually
evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors including expectations of
future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results
could differ from those estimates. ,

(c) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and at bank, and short-term deposits with
contractual maturities of three months or less from the placement date.

(d) Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

The Company has classified its investments in securities as financial assets at fair value

_ through profit or loss. A financial asset is classified as financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term or if so
designated by management. Management determines the classification of its investments at .
initial recognition.

Regular way purchases and sales of securities are recognized on trade date — the date on
which the Company commits to purchase or sell the asset. ‘Securities are initially recorded
at fair value, and transaction costs are expensed. Securities are derecognized when the rights
to receive cash flows from the investments have expired or when the Company has
transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership.

(e) Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements

Furmiture, equipment and leasehold improvements are stated at historical cost less
accumulated depreciation. Improvements, which extend the useful lives or increase the
value of these assets are capitalized. Upon retirement or other disposition, cost and
accumulated depreciation are relieved from the accounts and any resultant gain or loss is
included in the income statement. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the
following estimated useful lives of the respective assets:

Computers » 3 years
Office equipment 3 years
Fumiture and fixtures 5 years
Leasehold improvements 10 years or term of lease,

whichever is shorter

(f) Provision for impairment of accounts receivable

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

(

A provision for impairment is established if there is objective evidence that the Company will
not be able to collect all amounts due. The provision established is equal to 80% of the
balance outstanding for more than one year and 100% of the balance outstanding for more

than two years.

(g) Investment in subsidiaries

Included in other assets is the Bank’s investment in its three wholly-owned subsidiaries that
are not consolidated, Universal Administrators Limited, Universal Directors Limited and
Universal Shareholders Limited, which are all incorporated under the/International Business
Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The activities of the
subsidiaries are limited to providing nominee services on behalf of the Company’s customers.
The effect of not consolidating these subsidiaries is not material because each subsidiary has a
share capital of $2.

(h) Fiduciary accounts and assets under administration
The Company acts as trustee and in other fiduciary capacities that result in the holding of
assets on behalf of its customers. These assets are excluded from this balance sheet, as they

are not assets of the Company.

Financial Assets at Fair Value through Profit or Loss

$ $

Money market fund ae. Pgh
te bonds 366, ’

a 177,000 174,000

Principal protected minimum return equity linked certificate

Accrued interest on corporate bonds 4,468 4,358

652,132 635,843
During the year, the Company invested $18,058 (2006: $23,042) in the money market fund of

which $4,175 (2006: $3,209) represented the reinvestment of earnings. There were no other
investments or disposals during 2007 (2006: $Nil).

Total financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

The principal protected minimum return equity linked certificate matures on January 6, 2009 at
which time the Company will receive the principal amount of $150,000 plus a distribution equal to
the greater of 9% and an amount based on the percentage change in the S&P 500 Index, subject to a
monthly appreciation cap of 4.5% . :

Trustee Fees Receivable

2007 «2006

$ $

Trustee fees receivable, gross 318,778 322,506
Less: provision for impairment (35,832) (65,050)
Total 282,946 257,456

The movements in the provision for impairment during the year are as follows:

|

2007 2006 |

$ $

|

Balance as of January 1 65,050 63,331 |

Provision charged for the year 32,481 46,773 |

-Receivables written-off (66,383) (48,635) |
Recoveries of bad debt 4,684 3,581

Balance as of December 31 35,832 65,050

Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements

eas : & Office Leasehold
Computers Fixtures Equipment - Improvements Total
$ $ “$ S$ $

As of December 31, 2007 : : 2
Opening net book amount 47,892 25,264 1,798 49,761 124,715
Disposals “aM - - (11) (18)
Additions 32,182 . 53,909 24,773 85,250 196,114
Depreciation charge (27,712) (19,211) (7,380) (12,287) (66,590)
Closing net book amount 52,355 59,962 19,191 713 1
As of December 31, 2007
Cost 99,191 121,950 29,219 135,000 385,360
Accumulated depreciation 46,83 61,988 10,028 12,28 131,139)
Net book améunt 52,355 59,962 19,191 713 1
As of December 31, 2006 ‘ : :
Opening net book amount 14,553 33,290 4,443 10,785 63,071
Additions 51,817 5,303 - 49,750 106,870
Depreciation charge (18,478) (13,329) (2,645) (10,774) (45,226)
Closing net book amount 47,892 25, 1,798 49,761 715
As of December 31, 2006
Cost 67,016 68,041 4,446 49,761 189,264
Accumulated depreciation (19,124) (42,777) (2,648) - (€A,549)
Net book amount 47,892 25, : 1,798 49,761 715

Disposals are in respect of fully depreciated assets that have been relieved from the books of
account. :

Related Party Balances
Related parties include the parent company and its directors, affiliates and their directors and other

entities over which they exercise significant influence. This balance sheet includes the following
balances with related parties not disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements.

2007 2006
$ $
Assets
Prepayments and other assets 16,301 6,594
Liabilities
Accounts payable 160,928 -
Commitments

On November 16, 2006, the Company entered into a sub-lease for the lease of office space
commencing December 1, 2006. The sub-lease term is for an initial period of five (5) years and
expires on November 30, 2011, with an option to renew for a further five (5) years. Prior to
entering into the sub-lease the Company occupied office space under a lease that expired on July
31, 2006, but was extended to February 28, 2007. :

The future minimum lease payments under the lease are as follows:

2007 2006:

\ $ $

No later than 1 year 128,650 144,088
Later than 1 year and no later than 5 years 385,950 514,601 -

514,600 658,689
Capital Management '
The Company’s objectives when managing capital are:

e To comply with the capital requirements set by the Central Bank of The Bahamas (the Central
Bank);

¢ To safeguard the Company’s ability to continue as a going concem so that it can continue to
provide returns for its shareholders and benefits for other stakeholders; and

e To maintain a strong capital base to support the development of its business.

Capital adequacy and the use of regulatory capital are monitored by the Company’s management,
-employing techniques designed to ensure compliance with guidelines established by the Central
Bank. The required information is filed with the Central Bank on a quarterly basis.



3

wi

_

THE TRIBUNE

10.

The Central Bank requires each entity with a public trust license to maintain a regulatory capital
of at least $1,000,000. The Company has complied with all of the externally imposed capital
requirements to which it is subject.

For capital adequacy purposes, the Company’s eligible capital base comprises its issued and fully
paid ordinary shares and retained earnings.

Risk Management
The Company is exposed to various types of risks in the normal course of business, including

fiduciary, credit, market risk (interest rate and price risks) and liquidity risks. The Company’s
financial performance is dependent on its ability to understand and effectively manage these risks.

du risk

The Company is susceptible to fiduciary risk, which is the risk that the Company may fail in
carrying out certain mandates in accordance with the wishes of its clients. To circumvent this risk,
the Company takes a very conservative approach in its undertakings. High risk instruments are not
considered attractive instrument vehicles and are not invested in unless the Company is specifically
advised to do so by its clients and covered by an indemnity agreement.

Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of the counterparty to perform according to the terms of the
ee Most of the Company’s credit exposure consists of cash, investments and trustee fees
receivable. Credit risk is managed by restricting counterparties to approved, well-established. hi

credit quality financial institutions. " , rate

Market risk

Market tisk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due to
changes in general and specific market conditions. The Company’s exposure to such risks is
concentrated in its financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. Market risk is considered
oe as oe Company principally invests in money market instruments, high grade debt
securities and is guaranteed a retum of capital on its princi tected mini i

linked certificate. ee ant —
Liquidity risk = ‘

The objective of liquidity management is to ensure the availability of sufficient funds to honour all
of the Company’s financial commitments. Management is responsible for ensuring a level of liquid
assets is maintained which could be sold immediately to meet cash requirements for normal
operating purposes.

Dividend

During the year, the Company declared and paid a dividend of $300,830 (2006: $300,000) to ATC,
its parent company.

11. Corresponding Figures

"PRICEWATERHOUsE(GoPERS |

The corresponding figures for cash and cash equivalents and financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss have been re-presented to conform to the presentation adopted for the current year.
In particular, the Company’s investment in the money market fund was previously included
within cash and cash equivalents and has now been reclassified to financial assets at fair value
through profit and loss. :



Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O. Box N-3910 ~
Nassau, Bahamas

Website: www.pwe.com
E-mail: pwcbs@bs.pwc.com
Telephone (242) 302-5300

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT
F wfeestoarent Facsimile (242) 302-5350

To the Shareholders of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited as of
December 31, 2007 and a'summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management's Responsibility for the Balance Sheet

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this balance sheet in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing,
implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of
financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting
and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in

- the circumstances.





Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit. We conducted
our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we
comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance
whether the balance sheet is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures
in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or
error. In making those risk assessments, the auditors consider internal control relevant to the entity’s
preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that
are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the
effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of
accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as
well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

We believe that the audit evidence we-have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis
for our audit opinion. .

Opinion

In our opinion, the accompanying balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial
position of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited as of December 31, 2007 for the year then ended in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Emphasis of Matter ;

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasise that the accompanying balance sheet does not
comprise a complete set of financial statements in accordance with Inter:ational Financial Reporting
Standards. Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to
obtain a complete understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial
position of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited.

“bacco Keren Lorps :
Chartered Accountants

Nassau, Bahamas
April 18, 2008

th Publish your
CARD OF THANKS or
IN LOVING MEMORY

in OBITUARY SECTION
Every Thursday) —

Call us today

502-2352 or 502-2354





FROM page 1B

increase calls by a number of
its other vessels, including the
Norwegian Sun and the
Majesty.

“Government head tax
projections from the Norwe-
gian Sky are expected to be
$7.9 million over the period
July 2008- December 2009.
Total head tax projections
from all NCL ships visiting
the Bahamas over the next
year-and-a-half is estimated
at $21.4 million,” Mr Grant
said.

“The redeployment of the
Norwegian Sky on a dedicat-
ed Bahamas itinerary repre-
sents a significant commit-
ment by NCL to the
Bahamas, and will have a
major effect on our cruise
arrivals and positively impact
the bottom lines of those
businesses that focus on this
sector of the industry.

Mr Grant added that feed-
back from Bay Street mer-
chants indicated that NCL’s

ACT, from 1B

as other things are happening.”

He added: “I think the
Bahamas has to now always
keep an eye on the interna-
tional regulatory framework.

“Our Act was not quite up
to speed, and to the extent
we’ve got these apparent
weaknesses, we always run the
risk of falling short of best
international practices. We
need modern securities legis-
lation in place to encourage
the activities of BISX, and to
begin the cross-listing of secu-
rities from other countries.”

Kenwood Kerr, chief execu-
tive at Providence Advisors,
an investment advisory firm,
said he was also “disappoint-
ed” that more progress had not
been made with the revised
Securities Industry Act,
although the delays to the
process were “not a surprise
at all”.

“It’s always a plus to have it
there to enhance the regulato-
ry regime,” Mr Kerr said,
pointing out that while the new

Act was unlikely. to-stimulate: :



Nassau Airport

Development Company

NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 5B

passengers spent consider-
ably more than other cruise
line passengers, which will
bode well for the economy.

Gain

He said the Bahamas could
stand to gain $22 million in
passenger spend between the
period July 2008 and Decem-
ber 2009, with the Norwegian
Sky generating almost 50 per
cent of this amount. The
addition of the Norwegian
Sky brings the number of
NCL vessels calling on the
Bahamas, inclusive of the
Pearl, Dawn, Gem, Majesty
and Spirit, to six, and togeth-
er they are expected to con-
tribute a total visitor spend
by passengers of approxi-
mately $39.86 million over
the next year-and-a-half.

Mr Grant explained that

’ the the Norwegian Sky’s itin-

erary will include Nassau and
Great Stirrup Cay twice a
week, which amounts to a
minimum projection of 96



(ii
Cruise line could give $22m boost

calls per year, bringing poten-
tially some 182,400 passen-
gers. The calls to Great Stir-
rup Cay will mean year-
round employment as
opposed to being open for
the winter months alone.

A minimum of 42 calls are
expected to Grand Bahama
over the course of the year,
which should give that island
a much-needed financial
boost. Twenty-one calls will
be made to the island before
the end of 2008, an average
of one per week, delivering at
least 39,900 passengers

Colin Murphy, vice-presi-
dent of special projects for
NCL, said that with the Nor-
wegian Sky the line is going
back to its. roots, as the com-
pany pioneered cruising from
Miami more than 41 years
ago.

He thanked the Bahamas
and the Government for all
of their support, and encour-
aged Bahamians to show
passengers “the very best of
the Bahamas”.



greater securities trading and
market activity in and of itself,
it was likely to provide greater
protection for minority
investor rights.

Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rities Commission’s executive
director, had told this newspa-
per that the Bahamian capital
markets industry was not very
comfortable” in reviewing the
revised Securities Industry Act
without seeing the accompa-
nying regulations.

A major concern voiced by
many in the Bahamian capital

markets was that the regula- .

tions were critically important,
given that provisions omitted
from the first Securities Indus-

try Act —such as trading from |

a broker’s own account and
the short selling prohibition —
were supposed to have been
transferred to the regulations.
If anything, this increased the
void caused by the regulations’
non-release and non-develop-
ment.

The Securities Commission
opted to place the main
requirements and real details
into the regulations and rules it

EXPANSION PROJECT

Request for proposal D-107 IT consultant - design & construction administration
Services.

NAD is seeking IT design and.construction administration services from

qualified IT Consultants for the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of work
includes:

Qualifications:



can make, leaving the legisla-
tion to set out the general
obligations, so it could better
keep pace with evolving inter-
national best practices and
global standards.

Placing the main details into
the regulations is designed to
enable the Securities Commis-
sion to avoid having to seek
Parliamentary approval every

‘ time any change — however

minor — is needed to the Act,
thus avoiding time-consuming
delays.
Among the main changes
heralded by the reformed
Securities Industry Act are the
registration of industry partic-
ipants by function rather than
title; provisions that ensure
compliance with securities and -
capital markets principals
established by IOSCO, the
international association of
securities regulators; provisions
for information sharing;
enhancement of the Securities
Commission’s regulatory and
investigative powers; simplifi-
cation of the disciplinary
process; and new disclosure
provisions... -

Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design requirement
report; .

Preparing technical specifications and drawings for the IT component of
the Project; ‘

Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and

System commissioning and training.

Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
(AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;

Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and

Adesign quality control program. ,

RFP packages can be picked up between

: May 7th - 23rd, 2008 at:

The Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau Airport Development Company,
Terminal 1, Concourse 2nd Floor,

- PO Box AP-59229°

Nassau, Bahamas



Contact: Ms.Coakley at 377-0209



wa





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

There is an job opportunity in a
general medical practise office
located down town
Anyone interested please call:
322-3347 (office) or
327- 8605(home)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUNETTE PETIT-BEAU
of CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
May 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY SMITH
of SOUTH OCEAN GOLF RESIDENCE, P.O. BOX
CB-12951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any. person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible: for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Are you a Bahamian Artist interested in
displaying your talent in a busy
down town museum and gift store?

If so please call us at (242) 326-0511 and
become a part of a successful business
venture

‘

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEULA PETIT-BEAU of
CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The.

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

'P-O;Box N- 74 47, Nassau, Bahamas.

BEG

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-LOURDES
MONPREVILLE of FIRE TRAIL ROAD, P.O. BOX
N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the

| facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of

May 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE VIRTA ALTIME of
18621 NW 8TH RD, MIAMI FL., 33169 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











THE TRIBUNE





Corporation ‘exhausted’

ability to pay $5.6m bill

FROM page 1B

2008, are approximately $5.6

million in accounts receivable .

due to our Bahamas subsidiary
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.

“This receivable balance
exceeds the amounts billed to
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration during the three months
ended March 31, 2008 by
approximately $1.3 million.

“During April 2008, we met
with representatives of the
Bahamas government to

inquire as to the reasons for

the increase in the receivable

balance. We were informed in

this meeting by the Govern-
ment representatives that the
delay in paying our accounts
receivables was due to operat-
ing issues within the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, that



the delay did not reflect any
type of dispute with us with
respect to the amounts owed,
and that the amounts would
ultimately be paid in full.
“Based upon this meeting,
we believe that the accounts
receivable from the WSC are
fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any
allowance for possible non-
payment of these receivables
as of March 31, 2008.”
Elsewhere, Consolidated
Water said revenues generated
by its bulk segment - into
which the two Bahamas-based
reverse osmosis plants fall -
increased by 18 per cent or just
under $1 million to $6.167 mil-
lion for the 2008 first quarter.
Revenues generated by the
Bahamian operations
increased by $657,000 year-
over-year in the three months
to March 31, 2008, but “higher



diesel and maintenance costs”
at the Windsor plant dropped
gross profit margins (or gross
profits as a percentage of sales)
from 26 per cent in 2007 to 17
per cent in 2008. Gross profits
themselves declined from
$1.339 million in 2007 to $1.028
million this time around.

Mr McTaggart admitted to
analysts that the increase in
bulk sales was “more than off-
set by higher maintenance and
operational costs at the Wind-
sor plant”. The repair and
maintenance costs for the 2008
first quarter were some
$271,000 more than that
incurred during the 2007 .com-
parative period.

He added that the Windsor:
plant’s new Bahamian man- |
.agement team were working

to aggressively reduce costs,
with planned improvements to
the plant having been in the
development stage for more
than nine months.

“New wells and other

* improvements we.are making

will resolve this problem once
and for all”, Mr McTaggart
said, adding that increasing
diesel and fuel costs were

- becoming a “more material
' part of our operations”.

Diesel prices had risen by 58
per cent over a 12-month peri-
od, but while Consolidated
Water’s contract with the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion for the Windsor plant
allows it to pass these fuel
increases on to the Corpora-
tion, it could not do so during
the 2008 first quarter because
stipulated efficiency levels had
not been achieved.

“Our contract with the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration for our Windsor plant
provides for the pass through

A multi facetted communications/consultitig ¢ company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer
skills and be able prepare public presentations on behalf of

compani es clients.

A degree in inanketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to:

by May 31, 2008.

DA#6282 .
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

PRESENTS



Thursday, May 15, 2008

To confirm your attendance e-mail:

MR. GODFREY SHERMAN

General Manager,

_ Water and Sewerage Corporation

| Godfrey Sherman, General Manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation is a fully
qualified civil engineer with over fifteen years
experience at the level of senior management.
Mr. Sherman is especially known for his

outstanding implementation strategies in the
area of project management and extensive
operational experience in the water sector
including sewer treatment and disposal. He is

of increases in diesel costs ‘to

the Corporation if the plant is

operating at or better than the -
efficiency specified in the con-

tract,” Consolidated Water

said in its SEC filing.

“In early 2006, we recontig-
ured the Windsor plant.in
order to mitigate membrane
fouling. However, this recon+
figuration resulted insja
decrease in the fuel efficiency
of the Windsor plant and we
have not been able to pass
through all of our diesel costs
to the Water & Sewerage Cor:
poration.

“This inefficiency was exac:
erbated by a 58 per cent riséin

diesel fuel prices over the past

12 months. Consequently;

$207,000 was incurred in diesel’ -

costs during the first three
months of 2008 that could not
be billed to the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation. |

“Weare currently con-
structing new feed water wells
and will replace the reverse
osmosis membranes on two.of
four of our production trains.!
While we anticipate that these)
improvements will allow us to;
reverse the plant reconfigura=
tion and improve the Windsor.
plant’s fuel efficiency by the’

end of the third quarter of
2008, our gross profit for our |
Bahamas operations in the |

interim will continue to be/

adversely affected by its diesel |

costs.

“The repairs and mainte- |
nance costs for our Bahamas |
operations for the 2008 quarter: ,

exceeded those for the 2007
quarter by approximately
$271,000.”

Mr McTaggart said that
while Consolidated Water had

seen “some” similar issues at
its Blue Hills plant, it had been:

able to address these quickly...

and did not foresee any mote. \

The company is still in talks |
with the Government and the |
Water and Sewerage Corpo- |

ration over its now-completed

non-revenue water contract,
which stipulated that it had to

reduce water leaks from the=
Corporation’s distribution sys-
tem by one million gallons per g

day.

ration said the actual date was
July 1, 2007, forcing the com--
pany to “reserve” the $332,000
it believes the latter owes it for
water supplied between those
two dates.

Mr McTaggart said yester-:
day that the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation had hired an
independent consultant to.
review Consolidated Water’s
calculations on the non-rev-!
enue water project, and

While Consolidated Water:
. Said the project was completed
on March 1, 2007, the Corpo-»

pledged to get back to the” “4

company on that.

He added that Consolidat-)|
ed Water currently had no’ ’

plans to redeem the $10 mil- |

lion bond issue that was used:

to finance construction of the!

Blue Hills plant.

GODFREY SHERMAN, General Manager, The Water & Sewerage Corporation
on The Evolving Role Of Water In An Energy Conscious Environment”

BSE’s Monthly Luncheon » East Villa Restaurant - East Bay Street + Time: 12:00 pm - Donation: $25.00
Quentin.knowles@flameless.com or gracesharma05@yahoo.com or jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com

honours. He also attended Harvard University’s
School of Business Administration Program

for Executive Management. He is amember

of several professional bodies including the

also highly accomplished in policy formulation, Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association
finance and union negotiations. Mr. Sherman — and the Bahamas Society of Professional

graduated from Northeastern University, —
Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a Bachelor of
Science Degree in Civil Engineering with

Industry.

Engineers. He has travelled and trained
extensively in the Water and Wastewater





~ JUDGE PARKER

HOW LONG DID IT TAKE

RIAL I ENTOY
YQU TO LEARN TO WALK

TALKING TO YOU---

PROSTHETICS, ME ANYTHING!

[AND NEWSPRINT INTO
_ DOLLARS./ :

a)

TURNING CHAOS

MORNING, DORIS, INTO ORDER.

READY FOR A CRAZY) WITH DOZENS OF









FOR PETE'S SAKE! WHAT KINO
OR.TWISTED LOGIC IS THAT?!
NN]



WHAT'S WITH THE
OLD SWEATSHIRT?









ISWEATSHIRT DOING IN. THE DONATION



WELL,
ti

ANYMORE, SO I Tone tre. é

B\, THOUGHT WE 2A

MAY AS WELL



wee.Blondie.com











{i FOR I SUGGEST WE AND

"| THE SAKE TRASH THIS JUST GIVE
cat oe STUPID, OUTDATED ME MY
“EXPEDIENCY PIGGY BANK OWN CREDIT

CARD

(©2008 by North America Syndicate, Ine. World rights rasarved.

wer kingfeatures.com







PANELL, | GUESS
oat AIS, ANEWERS :
-CHART: AGE-OLD ©

bo: QUEATION... :

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* GRAFFITI



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. CRYPTIC PUZZLE _

DOWN
9 So free the tied up or incarcerated (9) 1 Ajar containing flowers in the kitchen? (8)
10 Willing to, which is nice (9) - 2 Either give the shivers to or have no
12 The chap doesn't have complete effect on (5,3,4)
B see oes nerve! (6) People move in close: the ne enters (8)
14 Will silver fish be about where there’s Getting the seat does clinch it (6)

Try to win later, locked in battle (8)

tubbish? (7)
15 Don't allow to contain copy writing (9) In sea water, a giant floating ship (10)
Don’t lip-read the word “rumour” (7)

1? Listen to the man and are worried
_ (423) Goes in and talks about teen troubles (10)
11 “Bit of luck,’ you say, “finding a thicket” (5)

= = — =
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CoN DUM HS WwW

2
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|

18 Let move about, lean on for support (7)
19 An expert player? Well, that’s an !

Fu NEVER GET MARRIED



Orst. EY URWE RSP ORESS SYHOICATE

Grae 27 en Features Sire

advantage (6)

20 Still drink (4)

23 Advertising, for a doctor, is getting into
trouble (9)

25 The damned birds! (3,6)

26 She's given the apprentice a day off (4)

27 |'m sorry for being mean to the fellow (6)

29 The spendthritt, a law-breaker, involved
the rest in (7)

32 Various Russians caught, having
infiltrated the plant (9)

34 Is reversed, and covered by another
silly girl (9)

35 Bones not broken though having fallen,
perhaps, from an apple tree (7)

36 Is informed by tips right through (6)

_37 Shouts out “W'thout us? Nonsense!” (4)

38 Means first tr give the religious
denominati 1 (9)

39 Said to foligs1e wrapping paper and
Anbar )

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS,

ACROSS: 4, Bishop 7, Frou-trou 8,
16, Lot 17, Sa-ar 19, L-aid 21, J

DOWN: 1, Of-Al 2, W-oven 3, Of-ta 4,
Cool-l.e. 11, Red 12, Nasal 13
At
33, Part

an ~

EASY PUZZLE THURSDAY 31ST JANUARY 2008 BLOCK 4

ACROSS: 4, Grease 7, Retri
Pew 17, Troe 19, Iron Zi,
32, Deed 33, Aside 34, Caress 35, Tarragon 36, Versus
DOWN: 1. Trust 2, Stain 3, Ti
Meter 13, Dredged 15, Fen 1
Vacata 25, Bid 28, Tests 0,



16 The bad thing about having a tot play
with thread (6)

19 When your number is up, drink (3)

- 21 Why the worn rug was thrown out? (4,8)

22 She might be easiest to get a deduction
for (6)

23 Mum or dad could show you one ~ and
did (10)

24 While away, a tin | threw out, containing
runner beans (2,8)

25 It's “The Unfinished Melody’ child (3)

28 Does get upset aver the ex: it’s very sad (8)

29 Was holding the reins loosely but with
vigilance (8)

30 Having the cover broken early is tough (8)

31 How you said “No. It has police backirig” (7)

33 To disprove it, be back in your old
routine (5)

34 Saves, from frost. half the buds (6)

Scales 10, Arena 13, Who-M 14, Lena 15, Yoyo ————_______
lack-knife 23, Talc 24, Me-et 26, Thy 27, Re-a-d
29, Erin 32, Turn 33, Pro-NE 34, Hit-her 35, Over-cast 36, St.-roll

Bushy (Bushey) 5, S-L-am 6, Open-Ed, 9,
. Wo-rkma-n 15, Yak (Kay) 16, Lie 18, AC-crue 20,
e-R 21, Jay 22, Ned 23, Thrift 25, Yin 28, Errol 30, Royal 31, Neath 32, The-O

leve 8. Nestie 10, Slime 13, Dine 14, T
. A . Tone 15, Fret 16,
Meandered 23, Verb 24, Glee 26, Saw 27, Itom 29, Orip

me 4, Genie 5, Erse 6, Sullen 9, Entire 1

5 A , 1, Lot 12.
5, Pod 18, Rabies 20, Reeds 21, Mew 22, Fim 23,
Ridge 31, Penny 32, Dens 33, Acre

w
wo

BE
a

w

a
Lele =
at 3

EASY PUZZLE

:



ACROSS

9 Jewish building (9)

10 Complicated in
design (9)

12. Darts line (4)

13. Perspires (6)

a (7)

15 *neriuun state
(3,6)

17 Large ape (5-4)

18 Mean or miserly
perso:. (?)

19 Fractures (6)

20 Arm orleg (4)

23 Massacre (9)

25 Chess term (9)

26 Dull pain (4)

27 Wax stick (8)

29 Casta spell over (7)

32 Augments (9)

34 Blocks up (9)

35 Sport for women (7)

36 Takes illegally (6)

+ 37 Entreaty (4)

38 Abode or home (9)
39 Take apart (9)

COMICS PAGE



7

Dennis

MOM WANTS ME
TO MAKE MY BED.



JOEY.
THE ONLY WOMAN IN MY LIFE!’

Ss



Good Partnership Defense

West dealer. .
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
AK Q105
v¥874
@AT7
#952
WEST EAST
343 98 -
VK92 5
KI $Q86532
$A Q1074 #KI83
SOUTH :
4762
Â¥AQJ1063
41094
#6
The bidding:
West North East South
i 1¢ 2 & 29
3 3% 4h 4%

Opening lead — ace of clubs.

Good defense is usually a cooper-
ative effort, with both defenders
making use of every inference and

‘scrap of information they have at
their disposal. An excellent example
of two minds operating on the same
wavelength is provided by today’s
deal.

West led the ace of clubs against
four hearts, and East signaled with
the eight. Had West now blindly con-
tinued with a club, declarer would
have had no trouble scoring 11 tricks.

But West reasoned that since East
had supported clubs twice during the
bidding, South would surely ruff the



The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition).
HOW many words of four letters or
more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 21; very good 32; excellent: 42
(or more). Solution tomorrow.







DOWN
1 Atthe very
moment that

(2,4,2)

2 Inastate of anger
(2,3,7)
Albumen (3,5)
Pleasure craft (6)
Diamond, say (8)
Rickety, derelict (10)
Funeral
procession (7)
8 Fair, average (10)
1 Turnaside (5)
16 Sufficient (6)
_19 Drinks counter (3)
21 Incoherent (12)
22 \“chab spike (6)
23. Writing materials
(10)
24 Medical operation
B
i

NOuUDaw

(10)
25 Actor's prompi (3)
28 Calamity (8)

29 Unfounded (8)
30 Kidnapped people
(8) :

31 Returns to
custody (7)

33 Quotes (5)

34 Exaggerate (6)



next club. It would then be a simple
matter for declarer, after losing a
trick to the heart king, to discard
whatever losers he had left on
dummy’s spades.

So at trick two, West shifted to the
king of diamonds! This did not figure
to cost a trick even if South had the .
queen, because declarer’s diamonds
were due-to disappear on dummy’s
spades eventually.

South took the king with the ace
and led a trump to the queen, losing
to the king. West retumed the jack of
diamonds, and it was now East’s tum
to shine.

He reasoned that since West had
ignored the club signal at trick one,
he must have known declarer had no
more clubs. In addition, the unusual
diamond lead from the K-J made it
clear West was interested in obtain-
ing a diamond ruff. So East overtook

_.the jack with the queen and returned

TARGET

a third diamond, and West tumped
with the nine to set the contract one
trick.

East-West’s excellent: defense
notwithstanding, South should have
made his contract anyway. He should
have recognized the danger of an
opposing diarnond ruff and taken one
simple step to prevent it.

Had he ducked West’s king of
diamonds at trick two, he would have
made it impossible for West to reach
his partner’s hand later, and the con-
tract would have been secured.

v a
> 9
Ba bee
Sng Ga
® Hoe g 2 ome
PAE y 5Sdde
gases @ aS
Seong byes e
zs Ou > do-
tO >> be
(OSORNO Le
Feel, poakas
Bae5 og MS fg
Sysseydears
48° Be eheg
gage S Pt =o ge
-2a8e moe
reakSaeeeea
a®°l? woh aggoe
fo we 2 gedrag
Pee Oe a>
Hegpesseeo bs
‘ BSSIHRHSSE SS



Ia
word
| offense _|

means or tactics
in attempting to
score







Jeff Horner v Milos Pavlovic, Isle of
Man 2007. Horner achieved an
unusual record. He had scored two
of the three required results for the
international master title long ago
back in the 1970s, but then his
teaching work restricted his
opportunities. Aged 58 and newly
retired, he scored his third and final
IM normat Isle of Man, and this win
against an established grandmaster
was the highlight. White (to move)
is rook for knight ahead, but Black's
position looks solid and hard to
break down. A tactical sequence did
it. Can you work out the win? A key
factor is the exposed black rook at
b8. For full solution credit, you need
to spot and defeat a sneaky trap by
which Black hoped to turn the
tables.



COME HELP ME, OK?

” END Do ALL THAT WORK ?/?
NO, WERE GOING TO INVENT
A ORAS NS VED THE BED?

CHESS by Leonard Barden



- PAGE 7B -





















© v989 Universal Press Syndicate

8







WONT INVENTING A ROBOT BE
MORE WORK THAN MAKING:





ITS ONLY WORK
F SOMEBODY
WAKES YOU DO
IT.




WEDNESDAY,
MAY 14°
“AQUARIUS -~ Jan 21/Feb 18

You are not scoring well in the love
department, Aquarius. Fawning over
your partner has only been giving

you the reputation of a pushover.
Define what you want, and go for it.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20

Financial success is imminent this
week, Pisces. Just be sure to share
your wealth with someone deserving.
Tt will make it much more rewarding.

ARIES — March 21/April 20
Risk-taking is not on the agenda this
weck, Aries, Walk the straight and
narrow path, and you'll find that
‘things will go much more smoothly.
Expect Scorpio to pose a concer.
TAURUS — April 21/May 21
See that new project through, Taurus.
Don't give up now that things have
just begun. If you’re feeling over-
whelmed. Seek the assistance of a
family member who wants tv help.
GEMINI — May 22/June 21
Your funk is over. and you have
found a new outlook on life. This
week should be a breeze for you,
Gemini, with particularly good news
atriving on Friday.

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Bad news finds you on. Tuesday,
Cancer. While- it may be a blow,
you ll survive the turmoil. Keep your
chin up ---. better things wil] come
your way next'weck.

LEO - July 23/August 23

The world is still offering you
Icssons, but you've tuned out. Get
those cars working again and accept
the things that you: must change
about yourself,

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22
Flirtation gives rise to passion by
Thursday. Virgo. You’re showing off
your wild side and. loving every
minute of it. Those close to you
might become concemed.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23

A friend comes to you with a serious
‘problem, Libra. In your current staie
you are by no means ready to offer
-solid advice. Guide this person to
someone who can help for now.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Your ego has gotten in the’ way
again. Scorpio, but you can redeem
yourself. That charitable act ‘you've
been pondering could be the perfect
way to showcase your sweet side.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Trouble at home escalates by
Wednesday, Sagittarius. You’ve
made a mountain out of a mole-
hill. Change your strategy and you
could find a quick resolution.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
No one is being fooled by your sincer- .
ity act, Capricorn. They’re all on to
your hidden agenda. Don’t try to deny ©
your motives — it will only make
things worse in the end.

LEONARD BARDEN

——
~—e

Chess: 8559: 1 Bxf7 Qxf7 (if Kxf7 2 Qh7+ and 3 Qxg6 '
wins) 2 Rxg5! fxg5 3 Rxg6+! Qxg6 4 Bxe5+ Kf7 5 :

Qf3+! (avoiding the trap 5 Qxg6+? Kxg6 6 Bxb8 d3! :
and the black pawn queens) Kg8 6 Bxb8 and White ‘

eee won a bishop ahead.





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Royal Bank unveils $600k
branch for Spanish Wells

ROYAL Bank of Canada
this week unveiled its new
$600,000 branch for Spanish
Wells, the building three
times bigger than the 1,000
square foot property it origi-
nally opened on the island in
1973.

Planning for the new Span-
ish Wells branch began in
late 2006, with construction
starting in August 2007. Roy-
al Bank began operating
from the branch when it
opened in November last
year, although the official
opening was postponed until
this week.

Nathaniel Beneby, Royal
Bank’s vice-president and
country head, said in a state-
ment: “This year will make a -
century since we began serv-
ing clients in the Bahamas.
We are proud to have been
able to help generations of
Bahamian families meet their
personal.and business bank-
ing needs.

“Our entry into Spanish
Wells in 1961 marked a peri-
od of great expansion for the
bank into the Family Islands.
Spanish Wells was only our
third Family Island branch,
but in the 47 years that we
have spent here we are proud
to have become a fixture in
this community.”





AY

For the stories



TRUST
reat Insight - SHOWN (i-r) are: Keith Wells, manager of corporate real estate for the Bahamas and Caribbean; Kirkwood Tex.Pinder, manager of client care and operations, RBC Royal Bank of Cana-
da, New Providence and Grand Bahama, and former branch manager for Spanish Wells; Joyce Coleby-Riviere, area manager for the Family Islands, RBC Royal Bank of Canada. Cut-
TH Montays ting the ribbon is Irwin Kelly, former branch manager for Spanish Wells; Nathaniel Beneby, vice-president and country head, Bahamas, RpE Royal Bank of Canada; Walter Carey, branch~
Manager, Spanish Wells; and Jason Sawyer, assistant risk manager, Bahamas Regional Office.





Internet & Telephone Banking ‘ We each have our goals, things we want to achieve. At
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Foreign Exchange and Derivatives INTERNATIONAL BANK
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Full Text


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AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


HAPPY MEAL r-





| AMERIC AN IDO IL im eae

HIGH 82F |
| LOW 70F

MOSTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 104 No.144







Va TCM) a RST

aT a

FEATURES

SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SECTION



m The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008



ATT a



PRICE — 75¢



oa lit: Paes

Re aaa! sieeehe

cat bed

SOFTBALL ON PAGE 1





for teenager's killer’

Speculation
shooting carried
out as revenge
for Khodee.

Davis’ death.

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

GUNSHOTS fired in Step
Street, Fox Hill, on Monday. ~
night were allegedly intended
for the killer of 16-year-old |
Khodee Davis after he was. . |
stabbed to death on Cabbage
Beach.

At least 17 shots were heard
as far away as the Jungle Club
at around 11pm on Monday,
just seven hours after the Tem-
ple Christian School student
was stabbed in the heart and
died on Paradise Island.

Several people at the scene
of Khodee’s murder were
arrested and questioned by

. police, but the main suspect is
still on the loose.

out by men from Reeves Street,
_ where Khodee lived, who were
-seeking. revenge. for the
teenager’s death.
A source from Fox Hill said:
Speculation has been made

that the shooting was carried SEE page 15

Ship set for Bahamas cruises
fails US sanitation inspection

@ By ALISON LOWE
’ Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A CRUISE ship set to begin providing new three and four-day
cruises to the Bahamas from Florida recently failed a US government
sanitation inspection. .

Tourism: officials and Norwegian Cruise Lines vice president: of

SEE page 15










AUTO INSURANCE




OUT,
It us!







E MANAGEMENT

TED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

| i i He im,





‘

eH a PaCS Davis TUE TT TC



li By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter











FAMILY and friends’ of mur-
dered 16-year-old Khodee Davis
gathered at the morgue at the
Princess Margaret Hospital yes-
terday to identify his body.

Neighbours, friends and col-
leagues of Khodee and his parents,
Dereck Davis and Sonia Dill, wait-
ed outside the morgue to support
the family after they had viewed
the body of Mr Davis and Ms Dil-
1’s only child.

Ms Dill wailed as she left the
building, her knees buckled’ and
she clung to friends for support,
while Mr Davis, a prominent Fox
Hill businessman, quietly con-
trolled his grief as he walked out of
the gates.

The crowd of around 40 people












KENO SEYMOUR, 16, exits the
morgue after viewing the body
of his best friend.

Ms Dill’s friend, Val Walkine,
44, said: “We consider Khodee our
son. He was a nice young man, he
couldn’t be a better person.”

About 10 of Ms Dill’s colleagues
from Bahamas Customs went to
PMH as soon as they heard of her











dispersed, with friends and family _ loss.
returning to the family home. in ;
Fox Hill. SEE page 15



Bishop Hall responds to reported
Dame Joan Sawyer comments

THE irresponsible behaviour of some cannot negate the right of :
others for freedom of faith and speech, Bishop Simeon Hall said yes-
terday. . :
The senior church leader at the New Covenant Baptist Church
was responding to comments that President of the Court of Appeal ;
Dame Joan Sawyer was reported in another daily to have made on :
Saturday. :

The Bahama Journal quoted Dame Joan as saying that “the :
worst thing that ever happened to this country...was freedom of
religion and to speak.” :

She was reported to have said that this is because people “have
taken freedom to mean licence. They do not see that freedom is real- :
ly responsibility.” i

Dame Joan was said to have been speaking on the topic of “Dys- }
functional Families, Dysfunctional Communities” at St Barnabas :
church. i

SEE page 15

\ British
‘American

Pe ry) rir



RIC mT EY
COM mwI ETE
with defrauding|
WO o wie

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE .

A PASTOR was among four
men arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday, charged with
defrauding the Bahamas. Gov-

- ernment of thousands of dollars.

Henry Pratt, 74, of Bain’s
Town, Cat. Island, Kirkland
Lopez, 55, of Blue Hill Heights,
Joseph Ferguson, 52; of Fresh
Creek, Andros, and Patrick
Evans, 60, of Malcolm Allot-
ment appeared before Magis-
trate*Carolita Bethel at’'Gourt'8,
Bank Lane, yesterday afternoon
on-charges of fraud and conspir-
acy to commit fraud.

Court dockets state that Pratt,
Lopez and Ferguson between
November 24,2004 and Octo-
ber 10, 2005 while at Cat Island

with the intent to defraud, con- .

spired to commit fraud. It is also
alleged that on October 10, 2005



Hubert Ingraham

Major FNM

shake-up
may be
ininlnent
A:MAJOR shake-up in the
FNM administration may be
imminent, as sources within the
party suggest that Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham is not
pleased with the performance of
certain members of his Cabinet
after only one year in office.
Initially, reports suggested that

Mr Ingraham was not satisfied
with the performance of a num-

ber of his Ministers of State.’

However, it is now understood
that this lack of enthusiasm for
some members of the Cabinet
now extends to the Ministerial
level.

SEE page 15

jl)



the three men being concerned
together with intent to defraud
obtained cash in the amount of
$25,920 from the Bahamas Gov-
ernment: Court dockets also stat-
ed that Ferguson, Evans and

SEE page 15

ETAT
a TH
SNC at CS aT
on environmental
NU EE rh

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net









HUMAN rights organisa-
tion Amnesty International
has called on its members to
send urgent appeals to
Bahamian government and
police officials calling for an
independent investigation into
a raid by Bahamian security
forces.on an environmental
group.

The “Urgent Action
Appeal” was issued by the

SEE page 15







Retired president ~
of John Bull dies

MRS Macushla Hazelwood, 88,
retired president of John Bull
Limited, died suddenly of an asth-
ma attack at a friend’s home in .
Vancouver, Canada, Monday
morning.» Mrs Hazelwood, who
had been in good health, had suf-
fered from asthma for about 20
years. sy

Arrangements are now being
made to return her body to Nas-
sau when funeral arrangements
will be announced.

Mrs Hazelwood was the daugh-
ter of the late Sir Asa Pritchard,
who founded the John Bull store
in 1929. Her son, Frederick
Hazelwood, is now the proprietor
of the John Bull Group of Com-
panies.

A RUSMRCY: Yh ets
MUTHAL FUNDS
LIFE INSURANGE

ME UO i te

CUBE T SN
ae YEE BS

FINANCIAL PLANNING
& INVESTMENTS



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008



LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



YOUR NON-REPRESENTATIVES

a By TANEKA THOMPSON
* Tribune Staff Reporter’
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
* with additional information

by Reuben Shearer

AFTER the dust from the cam-
paign trail settles and the frenzy
induced from election fever subsides,
it seems as if some members of par-
liament have settled into the comfort
of "MP-hood", shutting the doors to
their offices in the constituencies to!
which they were elected.

Overgrown grass, closed doors and
unanswered phone calls leave many
to wonder how accessible MPs are to
the people they are sworn to repre-
sent,

The Tribune canvassed constituen-
cy offices throughout New Providence
and the informal survey revealed that:
out of the 22 offices contacted, 12 of
them had phone lines that were either
out of service, unlisted on their party's
official website or unanswered.

Only a fraction had staff who

answered the telephone and provided
information about the day-to-day
operations of the office.

The offices of the South Beach,



Bail-

lou Hills, Sea Breeze,

Carmichael, Kilarney, Marathon,

Mount Moriah, Farm Road and Cen-

treville, Golden Gates, Bain and

Grants Town, Fort Charlotte and St

Thomas More constituencies were

not accessible by telephone during

hours of operation listed on their par-
ty's respective websites.

On Tuesday FNM Chairman John-
ley Ferguson said all constituency
offices receive $1,500 a month in gov-
ernment assistance and should be
accessible to the public.

He maintained that all FNM con-
stituency offices are "open at some
level. t

"They are receiving government
funds so it's incumbent on them with-
out the party being involved (to keep
the office open).

The MP himself, or herself, would
have to put some funding into it to





keep it up to scratch. The $1,500 is

really only a drop in the bucket, in
fact that's a starting (point).,That is a
help towards keeping the office going

He stressed that while the con-
stituency office is an essential avenue
for bi-partisan "development of the
constituency", realistically an MP.can-
not spend all of his time meeting face
to face with voters. "In this day and
time, I don't think an MP can be as
accessible as he or.she is expected’ to
(be), but barring all of the things that
he or she would have to do, the MP
must be visible to their constituency.

"(But) the reality is once election is
over and you (take office) then you
have to go and serve the people and
in your service people will begin to
understand that you are working and
I think that's where the FNM is rising
to the occasion — people will see
them in production or performance
rather than in person," Mr Ferguson

said. PLP Chairwoman Glenys Han-
na-Martin said Tuesday that all PLP
constituency offices remain open:

"Our constituency offices are open
everyday and they're staffed, I can
say that."

More than just a place where voters
can air grievances to their member
of parliament, the constituency office
should be a "one-stop-shop" for
learning and guidance she added. ~-

"I think the constituency offices
should be a sort of 'one-stop-shop'
for the constituent to (air) their con-
cerns which may be local, infrastruc-

ture issues or signage, it may be issues’

of a personal nature in terms of the
need to access government agencies.
It may be simple things like having
access to a computer.

"I think it should be a profession-
ally run office that is responsive to
the needs of the community and the
constituent. And they need someone
knowledgeable to help them access
the resources of the state or to be

’ pointed in the right direction, and

that's how I (run) my office," said the
PLP chairperson.

She said she is in her constituency
office about once a week.

Bain and Grants Town
Constituency, MP
Bernard BJ Nottage
open9am-9pm
Called at: 4.32 pm

No phone contacts list-

“ed on-the PLP's web-

site for this constituen-

_ St Cecilia Constituen-
cy, MP Cynthia Pratt
OPED 9am - ‘Tpm Mon- —

_ day-Friday

"We do get a lot of calls

everyday, Mother Pratt —

Fort Charlotte Con
stituency, MP ois
Sears
opened, 9am-9pm
Called at: 4. 47 p

abi

The majority St

» Tecelve, are.

_ regarding job

If residents need tosee ~

4 nin waged 92!

_ her, she goes a their | i
homes,
_ Last event they had was

_in November 2007, the —
_ "Coconut Grove Festi- .
ovalit

103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
~ P.O. Box N-1546

WU ti o. 6 ; ;
Telephone: 328-4900
tee Fax: 328-4903 + Cell: 456-9062

RU enya Bam al

JOHN JEFFERSON
SCAVELLA
aka Jeff Scavella, 60

of #2 Sherwood Drive, .
funeral will be held on
Thursday, May 15th at 10am
at Hillview Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Tonique
Williams Darling Highway.
Officiating will be Pastor
Hugh A. Roach, assisted by
Pastor Peter Joseph and assisted by other ministers of
the gospel. Interment will be made in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road. Ne
Left i to ) herish the memories are the precious gem and |
love of his life, Bernadette; children, Tammy, Gina,
Ailiah, J.J. and Jude; brothers, Glen, Stanley,\Robert,
Peter, Billy, Patrick, Chris, Colin, Dave and Allan; sisters,
Julie, Dale and Sheila; aunts, Angela Simmons, Norma,
Lida and Elaine Scavella and Lillian Bethel; uncles,
Ronald and James Scavella and Buck Johnson; special
family, Mr and Mrs Oswald Ferguson, Mr and Mrs Keith
Mason and family, Renee, Koe, Darlene, Arlene, Darelle,
Maria; adopted chilldren whom he loved dearly, Darion,
Megan, Tianna, Wayne and Romal; other relatives
_including, Mona and Darin; Jeff’s nieces and nephews
cousins Carmen Capron, Marsha Taylor, Katie Smith,
Sheila Armbrister, Wilda and Dorothy, Pam, Diane,
Robin and Wanda Scavella, Raymond, Edwin, Godfrey.
and Commodore Clifford “Butch” Scavella, Mack and
Winkie Pinder, the Simmons family, Mr and Mrs Lester
Farrington, Dr. Dane Bowe, Dr James Constantakis and
family, Walk in Medical Clinic Sandyport, Pat Paul, .
Thaddeus. Paul, Mr Albury (Security at Love 97) Mr
Wendall Jones C.E.O. Love 97, the ZNS family, Teddy
Johnson and family, Mr Leslie O. Miller, the Hon. Kendall
Wright, Rev. Carroll Johnson and family, the Freetown
Lane family, Nurse Joanna Bethel and family, Beverly
Basden and family and a host of other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held today from 12:30 until 6:30p.m.
in the State Room of Jones Brothers Morticians, Mt.
Royal Avenue and Talbot Street and again at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service time. 3













Sak

FNM MPs

Clifton Constituency, MP Kendal Wright

Called at 10.30am

Open: 10 am-6pm Monday to Friday

Last community event was a steak-out on
February 23.

According to MP Wright's personal asstis-
tant, he is there just about two hours a day
and every Saturday he drives around the com-
munity and speaks with constituents.

"A lot of people like to be personal so they
come to see him in the office," his assistant
said.

Bamboo Town, MP Branville McCartney

Called at 11.52 am

Open: 1lam-7pm Monday to Fri-
day

Saturday May 24, 2008 they will be
holding a community steak-out at the
HQ. Every other Friday they have a
senior citizens luncheon and host eight
community programmes, including a literacy
programme and youth outreach. According to
Vivia Ferguson, office manager for the Bam-
boo Town office, "Mr McCartney has no set
time to come in (but he) is still doing walka-
bouts on a regular basis to talk with the resi-

‘dents in his constituéncy and listen*to’ their
“concerns. Mr McCartney and members of his!
family make 'it-a point to worship ata different ;

church each month:in‘Bamboo Town.

"As is stands now, all funds are coming
straight from Minister McCartney's pocket,"
Mrs Ferguson said. "So every quarter we try to
do'some kind of fundraising to assist him."

Pinewood Constituency MP Byran Wood-
side

Called at 12.01pm

Open: 9am-S5pm, Monday to Fri-
day

According to Mrs Johnson, a maid
at the office, every second Monday of
the month they hold a constituency
meeting at Cleveland Eneas Primary School.

A fun/run walk and steak-out had to be
postponed because of the election court, ane
said.

South Beach Constituency, MP Phenton
Neymour

Called at 1.01pm, unsuccessful,
. phone rang 19 times.

Open: 12-8pm (info gathered from
FNM's website — no days listed for
when the office is open.

Baillou Hills Constituency, MP
Sidney Collie

First call attempt made at 12.33
pm; second call, 1pm — no response.
Voicemail came on.

According to the FNM's website, this con-
stituency office is operated between the hours
of 9am and 4.30pm and 5pm to 8pm or later.

Montagu Constituency, MP Loretta Butler-
Turner

Called at: 12.39 pm

Open: 9.30am-4.30 pm Monday to Friday

Office receives calls asking for more speed

bumps to be put on the roads, traffic light mal-
functions.

"A lot of persons call to speak with Mrs
Turner," said Ms Molly, a secretary at the
office. When asked whether they have held
recent events for Montagu constituents, she
said she was unable to give that information
out.

"The releasing of that info does not come
under my portfolio," she said.

Sea Breeze Constituency, MP Carl Bethel

Called at: 1.06 pm, unsuccessful, phone rang
21 times.

Open: noon-6pm, or later

St Anne's Conariuen: MP Brent Symon--
ette

Called at 1.10pm -

Open: 9am-Spm, Monday to ‘Friday .

According to Larry Pinder, a representa-
tive from the office, Mr Symonette is in office
on Thursdays from 5pm until the last resident
who wants to has seen him.

The constituency hasn't had an event in the
community since last year, he added.

According to Mr Pinder, there is an ongoing
programme in St Anne's, involving the clearing
up of the:streets and parks, and a community
surveillance etfort operated by residents and
police.
-- They have a started the process of putting

"up signs on streets that are unnamed.

“We have had a problem where police
couldn't find areas where they received a call
from,” he said.

Carmichael Constituency, MP Desmond
Bannister

Called at: 1.42 pm. Unsuccessful - number
out of service.

Open: 10 am-4pm (no days listed for opera-
tion on FNM's website)

Killarney Constituency, MP Hubert Minnis

Called at: 2.57 pm. No response, voicemail
came on.

According to FNM's website, this-con-
stituency's office is open 12 POE SP or later

Marathon Constituency, MP Earl
Deveaux *

Called at: 3.02 pm. Both numbers
listed on FNM's website are out of
order.

Open: 10am-4pm and 6pm to 8pm.
(No listing of a of operation on
FNM's webpage.)



Mount Moriah, MP Tommy Turnquest
_Called at: 3.11 pm. No response, phone rang
15 times
Open: 9am-Spm, or later

MORE PLPs

Elizabeth Constituency, MP Malcolm
Adderley

Called at 3:15 pm

Open: 1pm-8pm, Monday to Friday

The last community event was in February.

According to Ms Woodside, secretary at the
Elizabeth Constituency HQ, the office has



So what are they doing?

“had a few calls, but they're normally regard-
ing the youngsters in the area. Mr Adderley
who is also concerned about this is addressing
it and is in the planning stages of creating a bas-
ketball programme and a band.

"When he has an appointment, he's in,” she
said.
Centerville Constituency, MP Perry Christie .
Called at: 3.32 pm
Open: 9am-9pm
No one answered the phone

Golden Gates, MP Shane Gib-
son (no phone contact listed on PLP
website for this constituency HQ)

Called at: 3.35 pm

Open: 9am-9pm
----No-one answered the phone



Englerston Constituency, MP
Glenys Hanna-Martin

Called at: 3.57 pm '

Spoke with: Gwen Francis

Open: Monday-Friday, 9am to
5pm, (but most times they end up
staying in office till 6pm).

A representative said: “She's not here every -
day, but she comes in once weekly to check in.
During this time she meets with residents who
request to see her. Residents also visit her at
her office.”

The last event they held for residents was
two weeks ago at EP Roberts Primary School.
“We gave out clothes for babies, children,
adults, and shoes. We have a close communi-
ty. "



_ -—.-The-team is planning to purchase a proper- -

ty for a community centre that will hold a nurs-
‘ery for young mothers to drop their children
off, especially those who can't afford daycare
services. A lot of residents inquire about jobs,

. and request help with their rent, or finding a

house, the representative said.

"In our constituency we have a high Haitian-
Bahamian population. A lot of them are born
here, and grew up in Nassau. When they turn
18 or 19, they apply for citizenship but it isn't a
process fast enough, if at all. So they apply, but
they have problems being naturalised,” she
added.

apa Constituency, MP Melanie Grif-

"Called at: 4.11 pm
Spoke with: the secretary. Said she would
“have someone call back. No call up to press

time.

Fox Hill Constituency, MP Fred Mitchell

Called at: 4.15 pm

Open: 9:30 am-5pm

Spoke with: Laverne McPhee - office man-
ager.

“We don't really get a lot of calls. They get
calls informing of a person that died in the
community. Fox Hill is pretty much working,"
she said. "We are closely knit."

"I speak with him each day, except if he's off
the island."

On the 25th of this month the HQ will host
a parent's day for the community.

“Mr Mitchell does a walkabout very often.
He is visible in the community on a daily basis,
talking to residents,” she said.

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 3

USES eee OS ee ee
oO. in brief Mother surviving loss of murdered son
‘with support of her family and friends’

Two in court
in connection |
@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter _





with seizure
of marijuana

TWO men charged in con-
nection with the seizure of 93
and a half pounds of mari-
juana on Abaco last week
were arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Kendall White, 37 and
Kirkwood Bain, 37, both of

him day and night, and when I
saw him with negative people,
he would say, ‘You know I’m
a leader, they cannot influence
me,’ and it was true.” relatives gathered at the Dill-

Ms Dill said Khodee, her Davis family home in Fox Hill
only child, was allandevery- on Tuesday afternoon
thing to her, and nothing described Khodee as a quiet
could prepare her for his and well-mannered young
death but her Christian faith, man who was impeccably
putting his murder down to_ dressed, loved travelling and

always love him and he
will always remain in my
heart.”
THE MOTHER of mur- Around forty friends and
dered Khodee Davis said she ©
is surviving the loss of her only
son with the unfailing support
of family and friends, and an
unshakeable faith.

Sonia Dill and Khodee’s
father Dereck Davis, of

Abaco, appeared before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
Court Eight in Bank Lane
yesterday, charged with pos-
session of marijuana with the
intent to supply and conspir-
ing to possess the drugs with
the intent to supply.

The offenses were alleged-
ly committed on Thursday
May 8.

Both men pleaded: not
guilty to the charges and were

granted bail.in the sum of

$50,000.
The case has been
adjourned to December 4.

Two Jamaican
men charged in
connection with
drug seizure

TWO Jamaican men
charged in connection with a
massive drug seizure on Long
Island last week were
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison yesterday having been
denied bail.

Curtis Marsden, 33, and
Delroy Brown, 44 appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at Court Eight in
Bank Lane yesterday charged
with possession of marijuana
with the intent to supply,
importation of marijuana;
conspiring to possess mari-
juana and conspiring to
import marijuana’ with the
intent to supply.

According to court dock-
ets, the offenses were alleged-
ly committed on Monday,
May 5.

Both men pleaded not
guilty to the charges but were
denied bail because they have
no status in the country and
are considered flight risks by
the court.

The drug charges stem
from the seizure of 488
pounds of marijuana on mar-
ijuana last week.

Haitian lawmakers

reject president's pick | !

for prime minister

â„¢@ PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

HAITIAN legislators on
Monday rejected President
Rene Preval’s pick for prime
minister, extending a month- :
long period without a func- :
tioning government for the }
troubled nation, according to

_ Associated Press.

Spokesmen in the lower
house of Parliament said inter- ;
_ national banker Ericq Pierre :
lost a vote that ended his can- :
didacy 51 to 35, with nine :

abstentions.

Levaillant Louis Jeune, a
leading opposition deputy, :
said legislators did not have: :
faith in the political leadership
of Pierre, a senior official with
the Inter-American Develop- :

ment Bank.

“We didn’t really believe in
the plan that he had for the :
people of this country,” he :

told reporters in the capital,
Port-au-Prince.

Pierre, 63, could not imme- i
diately be contacted for com- :
ment. In an interview with The ;

Associated Press last week,

the candidate said Haiti must }
concentrate on long-term }
strategies to help the millions
pushed deeper into misery by i

higher food prices.

On April 12, the Senate dis- :
missed Prime Minister Jacques
Edouard Alexis over criticism
that his government failed to :
show leadership and misman-
aged the economy before vio- :
lent food protests that left sev- }
en people dead and destroyed

hundreds of businesses.

Preval will have to nomi- }
nate another candidate, who :
must win a vote of confidence ;
in the two houses of Parlia- ;

ment.

Stephen Benoit, a member
of Preval’s Lespwa party in :

the lower house of Parliament,

said the Caribbean country
must unite behind the next

nominee.

“We need to have a new :

prime minister in office soon,”
Benoit said.

Haiti is struggling to restore :
stability and rebuild its econ- }
omy four years after a violent }
rebellion ousted President }

Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

Reeves Street, Fox Hill, have
been inundated with visitors
since their son was brutally
stabbed and killed while walk-
ing to Cabbage Beach on
Monday afternoon.

The 16-year-old grade 11.
student at Temple Christian
School will be remembered

by hundreds of people nature.



SONIA DILL with her son

throughout Fox Hill and Nas-
sau for his kind ahd gentle

nodee Davis



His mother said: “Khodee
. Was very popular, sometimes
too popular. Girls would call

SEEN FROM left are
Charlene Smith, mother
of Desmond Rolle, Rev
Glenroy Bethel, founder
of Families for Justice
and spokesman for the
mothers, Bridgette Grant,
mother of Jake Grant and
Marilyn Davis, the
guardian and maternal -
grandmother of DeAnge-
lo McKenzie.



Four of the mothers of five murdered boys
request remains be released for burial

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— After five years with still:no trial
date set, four of the mothers of the five murdered
missing boys are requesting the release of their sons’
remains for burial in Grand Bahama.

Rev Glenroy Betliel, the founder of Families for ,

Justice, spoke on behalf of the mothers at a press con-

:* ference on Tuesday at Zion Baptist Church.

He believes that it is a total injustice for the families
to be denied their children’s remains for five long
years. ‘

He said the organisation is demanding that the
Attorney.General release the remains of Jake Grant,
12, Mackinson Colas, 11, DeAngelo McKenzie, 13,
Junior Reme, 11, and Desmond Rolle, 14, to their
mothers in Freeport.

“The mothers of the boys are still suffering emo-
tional and mental stress from the ordeal and want to
give their sons a proper burial,” he said.

Claudette Mitchell, the mother of Mackinson Colas,

: Charlene Smith, the mother of Desmond Rolle, Brid- °

gette Grant, the mother of Jake Grant, and Marilyn
Davis, the guardian and maternal grandmother of
DeAngelo McKenzie, held portraits of the boys.

Myrthi Jean Tinford, the mother of 11-year-old
Junior Reme, was not present.

Cordell Farrington has been charged with the mur-
ders of four boys. And four minors who were charged
in 2004 with manslaughter in the disappearance of
Jake Grant, were acquitted several years ago.

Rev Bethel said that the month of May marks the
fifth anniversary of the beginning of the missing boys’
tragedy in Grand Bahama. He said that the families

: - deserve some closure.

“Tt has been five years now, and the case oe not yet

been brought forth before the courts and the families

' want to know why it is taking so long to bring the

matter to trial. These families are looking for closure
and it is surprising to know that the AG has kept the
remains for five years,” he said.

Rev Bethel said the organisation has written a letter
to the AG’s Office which was delivered last week on
behalf of the grieving mothers for release of the
remains.

He said the AG’s Office does not need to hold the
remains and can proceed without them at the trial.
He feels that to deny the families a proper burial for so
many years is an injustice.

“We demand the release of the remains of these |

boys.

“We believe it is a violation of these families’ con-
stitutional rights. It is unjust to hold on to the remains,”
he said.

* Rev Bethel said that one mother has suffered a
heart attack, and a second is still being forced to pay
insurance for her dead child because she has not

- received a death certificate.
“As we await the response of the AG for the release

of the remains it is our prayer that justice is served in
a timely manner compared to the injustice that has

been administered to this family in the last five years. |

“We the families for justice will continue to fight for
the rights of these families and their loved ones remains
which is rightfully theirs,” he said.

Jake Grant was the first boy to go missing on May 9,
2003. The second was Mackinson, who disappeared on
May 16, DeAngelo vanished on May 27, Junior Reme
on July 30, and Desmond Rolle on September 28.

Cordell Farrington, who was indicted for the mur-
ders of Mackinson, DeAngelo, Junior, and Desmond,
was convicted in the Supreme Court of the murder of
22-year-old Jamaal Robins. His lawyer is appealing
the verdict.

Woman accused of stealing $103,000 by means of fraud

A WOMAN accused of steal-
ing just over $103,000 by means of
fraud was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Sabrina Thurston, 35, of East- .

ern Estates appeared before Mag-
istrate Linda Virgill at Court Nine
in Nassau Street yesterday on 158
fraud related charges.















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. Thurston was arraigned on
charges of fraud, possession of a
forged document and uttering a
forged document.

It is alleged that Thurston
between October 22, 2003 and
April 26, 2005 she forged the
endorsement of at least six people
on British American Insurance



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cheques.

It is alleged that Thurston
uttered the fake cheques and
obtained varying sums of cash
from the Scotia Bank located on
East Street and Soldier Road.

Thurston allegedly obtained
$103,018.85 in total by means of
fraud.

The accused was not required
to plead to the charges and was
granted bail in the sum of $20,000.

The case has been adjourned
to October 28 and November 5, 6

and 7 for the commencement of a, ©

preliminary inquiry.

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Solid Wood

God’s will.

Helpful

She said: “Khodee was a

loving child. He was helpful,

and he was constantly telling

me that he loved me and
wanted to make me happy. -

“I asked God to see him
grow and be a fine young man
and marry and have children.
It was just not God’s will.

“T did my part and then

Jesus took over. Khodee was

only loaned to me.”

The popular student who
attended the youth group and
Sunday services at St Mark’s
Native Baptist Church in
Romer Street, Fox Hill, last
went with his best friend Keno
Seymour, his mother and

grandmother, Thelma Dillon «

Mother’s Day on Sunday.
Mrs Dill, 66, who. has 17

grandchildrén and 11‘ great-

grandchildren, said Khodee
visited her every day to wish
her well; including the day he
was killed.

She said: “He was friendly,

loving and kind. A jewel. I will

youth meetings on Friday;

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

BayParl Bldg. - Parliament St.
Telephone: 322-8898 or 328-7157

had a passion for music.

His adopted brother, David
Barr, 25, a Fox Hill musician,
said Khodee enjoyed working
with him and hoped to com-
pose his own music.

Ms Dill said: “He was not a
troublesome child. He always
kept to himself, but he was
very, very popular, with the
school, with the church and
the youth group, everybody
wanted to be in Khodee’s
crew. I was very proud of
him.”

Personable

Pastor Carrington Pinder
from St Mark’s Native Bap- {
tist Church said: “He was a '
very loving, personable per- !
son, he would come to the ‘




nights and he. would be ‘ini
church on Sunday, seedy :
Funeral plans at the hi ere
will be made when Khodee’s
body is released. A delay is
expected because of uncon-
firmed reports of a staff strike
in the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital morgue.

SR RE OR PE OT eT Ee SE RE OE OR Tae Cee eee




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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 -
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Public transport system needed badly

AS READERS of this column know we
have been on an extensive trip to Europe

and in the process have recorded some of |

- our impressions of how Europe is trying to
cope with the new energy crisis and the
escalating costs associated with this.

Hoteliers throughout Europe in the
countries we visited — Austria, Hungary,
the Czech Republic and Britain — all have
in place new rules and regulations to try to
offset the very high energy costs due to
the steep rise of the cost of oil in the glob-
al marketplace.

In addition to the control of hotel room
lights by use of your door key which only
allows you to use the electricity in the room
once your key is inserted in a special slot
inside the room, the maid service leaves a

‘ special “Green Card” on your bed every
day for guests to indicate whether they
want their sheets washed daily, or whether
they would help in the conservation of
water by electing to have them washed
every other day.

Similarly for towels and washcloths, if
you need fresh ones you are told to just

- Jeave them in the bathtub. If not they will
‘be serviced for you for another day.

In the three cities of Vienna, Budapest
and Prague, which we visited, tramways
with fixed tramlines and overhead electric
cables keep the public well serviced
throughout the main roads of the city so
that many office workers can get to work
on the public transport system.

In Vienna the tramways run on a 24/7
basis. Besides these there is also good
underground services, thus relieving the
streets of thousands of vehicles on a daily
basis.

In London these days motorists have to
pay for the luxury of bringing a car into the
metropolitan area for the day and have 24

_ hours to pay the fee or otherwise face a stiff
penalty.

It all helps to cut down on traffic con-
gestion and promote the new green envi-
ronment.

In England also the London Times
reported on May 1 that “tens of thousands
of cars will become almost worthless as a
result of the decision to raise road tax on
older models with higher carbon dioxide

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Automatic, AC, Exceptionally Equipped

emissions by up to £245 a year.”

The Times said that many families will
find that they cannot sell their cars even
though they are in good working order and
no more than seven years old.

What is desperately needed in the
Bahamas is an affordable and efficient pub-
lic transport system which would allow
most families to benefit and save thé costs
of having to run a car.

With petrol prices at the pumps escalat-
ing to over $5 a gallon and projected to go
even higher more families will have to
economise on travel and use of the family
car for trips to the foodstore or pharmacy.

If there was a reliable bus system families
would have an alternative means of doing
so.

With our clogged roads during peak traf-
fic periods more and more of our expensive
petrol is wasted in traffic j jams up and down
the island.

Surely this could be relieved if a proper
school bus service to the main public
schools was worked out.

_ This should not be beyond the reach:of

“our government and public officials.

More than half the cars that clog the

_roads every day during school days could

be, taken off the road if a proper and effi-
cient bus service was worked out by all the
schools.

Most modern cities have devised such
schemes to prevent their road systems
being clogged for so many hours each day.

If a government actuary worked out the
total man hours and productivity that was
lost to the country by the horrendous waste

. of time spent in traffic jams.on a daily,

weekly, monthly and yearly basis we think
the results would shock the nation into
doing something about it — seriously!

We know that out of this grows road
rage and we are seeing more and more of
our young people dying or becoming crip-
pled by accidents on the roads.

In a recent U.S. magazine article it was
stated that more and more Africans die
each year from road accidents in Africa
than from AIDS.

T’ ‘sis an amazing statistic, but could be —

a precursor of what might happen here if
our road conditions are not improved. _



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Analysing the
root causes
of violence

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE phrase: ‘Bend the tree
while it’s young’ does not mean
break the tree or its associated
spirit. It does not mean chop it
down and dig it up. ‘Bending’ is
typically a strong action and
firm, but it ¢an also be gentle,
depending on the degree to
which bending is necessary.

It does not always even mean
to bend in the same direction
or way, just the most appropri-
ate way for the time.

It is also done with a view to
health and beauty.

The ugly problem of violence
in the Bahamas has been attrib-

uted to many causes: the per-,

sistence of the drug culture and
the aggression that is associated
with it, the infusion of relative-
ly new and more aggressive cul-
tures into the Bahamas, and the
desensitisation of our con-
sciences as the result of media
glorified violence and games.
While these causes work in tan-
dem and with considerable
impacts, these are only part of
the cause and probably not even
the most significant ones in our
chronological development as
a nation and as individuals. It
has more to do with discipline.

The lack of discipline and
manners is often lamented by
our people — gone are the days

‘when a stranger could discipline
children with a stern look, word -
-or hand; when adults could be

shamed out of perverse speech
and conduct.

Gone are the days when most
people even seemed to care
about those days.

Manners no longer carry us
through the world because it
can hardly get us through a
crowd on Bay Street or a line at
the conch shack.

Manners will not carry you
even through the day because
its back has been largely bro-
ken and it goes under-appreci-
ated.

Clearly, this is not an advo-
cacy for rudeness, or giving up
on discouraging it, but the

emphasis on manners could be -

regarded as a stone at the
Queen’s Staircase.

It has been worn down and
treated as a relic.

One might be tempted to say
‘fossilised’, if only it were pre-
served even half as well.

Consideration should be giv-
en not only to the lack of disci-
pline, but perhaps even more
to the types of discipline.

The methods for meting out
discipline.

The mood and the tone of

discipline.
Abuse veiled as discipline
within our culture.

“iy

. Rental
Equipnients

Starting at

- minds’.

Mes



Our culture is gregarious, pas-
sionate and often loud.

A part of the honesty of our
people in terms of speaking
their minds is what I take pride
in when compared to societies
who sacrifice integrity for polit-
ical correctness, so-called inclu-
sion and make-believe neutral-
ity.

Yet an off-shoot of the open-
ness in this emotion continues
to hurt our social order and our
children in many ways, because
we also tend to lack control.

We do not simply, honestly
tell another that we disagree
and why, if we even give a

‘why’.

We shout, berate and often
insult even our family members
and friends; sometimes espe-
cially our family members and
friends, when there is disagree-
ment.

When we are in turn insulted,
we shout back in even louder
and uglier tones, and. that is
assuming that we do not imme-
diately assume a violent pos-
ture.

But our manner and tone do
not shield that distinct possibil-
ity under even the thinnest
veneer. Our emotion is unbri-
dled and this is deemed in the
Bahamas to be ‘speaking our
And this is how we
speak to our children and how
we speak to others in their pres-
ence. If they do not glorify this
behaviour outright, they at least
learn it to be the norm; and
what fear if any they feel ini-
tially, turns to a rage to be
exacted on us or our neighbors
in the country at a time of their
choosing. Even on themselves.

To be clear, I am not an
opponent of corporal punish-
ment in moderation and appro-
priateness. My parents often
said to me, ‘if you can’t hear,
then you'll have to feel’. It was
as simple as that, but I was at
least given the chance to ‘hear’,
and often repeatedly. Some-
times I had to ‘hear’ so often

_ and for so long, that I would
just as soon have gotten to the

‘feel’ part of things.

Regardless, the emphasis is

obviously on moderation,
appropriateness and. effective
communication.

When children are beaten
constantly and in anger, not
only do they become hardened
and calloused, but they learn to

‘resolve’ their conflicts in a sim-_

ilar fashion.
They learn to bully and to hit,

to stab and shoot, and not nec-
essarily in that order.

Human beings are distin-
guished in the animal world
mostly by virtue of reasoning

ability, but that is too infre-

quently on display among our
adults, even often in govern-
ment, learning institutions and
other arenas of responsibility,
prestige and presumed sophis-
tication.

But not only are parents and
other civilians within our com-
munity at fault. So are our
police.

I have witnessed and been
privy to explicit instances of
police brutality when dealing
with citizens of this country.
These instances sometimes
make the news, as they have of
late, which is saying a lot given
our level of acceptance when it
comes to this kind of abuse.
Should they, like criminals,
resort immediately to violent
measures versus civil discussion;
or could their ability to exact
violence but their choice not to

. when it is truly unnecessary, be

the precise lesson that troubled
youth and criminals need?

Even a docile animal when
cornered and confronted vio-
lently responds in kind.

Just as ‘insurgents’ sprang
forth after being in many
instances bullied, cornered and
brutalised on the international
scene, we too have an essen-
tially ‘feverish’ societal response

_ toa foreign or offensive agent.

It is both internal and exter-
nal.
’ It is both far reaching and
sustained.

It is not unfathomable that a
part of our problem with crime
might be largely rooted in that.
We are witnessing both a literal
and symbolic rebellion of
teenagers and young adults that
is tearing our Bahamian family
apart.

Like sharks in a frenzy, they
tear, attack and maim each oth-
er, blinded to all the things that
should be their focus.

To the extent that brutality
and harshness continue and are

. accepted as a part of our cul-

ture, from whatever source, so
too will violence remain.

Bend the tree. Take a strong
and firm action, but remember
that it does not always mean to
bend in the same direction or
way, just the most appropriate

_way for the time.

It is also done with a long-
lasting view to health and beau-

ty.
KENYADA MEADOWS

Nassau,
May, 2008.

Concerns over tourism
‘development projects

: EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please publish this open letter to the prime minister.

Dear Rt Hon Mr Ingraham,

I am writing to you concerning the current plans for large-scale
tourism development projects around the Bahamas.

While these projects may draw in some short-term foreign
exchange revenue, the long-term downsides greatly outweigh the
benefits.

Long experience from around the world indicates that large
foreign-owned resorts of this type tend to swallow most of the
tourism dollar and repatriate it to their home countries, while
host countries are left to deal with the social and environmen-
tal consequences.

By bringing in huge investments local people are suffering the
loss of their livelihoods and even their water supplies.

The pristine environment which is a huge draw for overseas
visitors will suffer if not carefully placed at the centre of the
plans, leading in the end to the destruction of what makes the
Bahamas a unique destination and the withdrawal of tourists.

The lack of care taken in building the Bimini Bay and lack of
controls placed on the Baker’s Bay resort on Guana Cay show
that environmental concerns are being overridden by foreign
investors and little thought is given to the impacts.

I urge you strongly to reconsider the model of tourism devel-
opment instituted by the previous government and put a a to
these hugely damaging resorts.

Please do not follow the example of Cambodia where more
than half the islands are now owned by foreign investors, threat-
ening the people and ecosystem.

It is even more imperative now that the Economic Partnership
Agreement with the EU has been agreed, which can be expect-
ed to open the door to even mores investors, that you consider
a tourism model based on fairness, sustainability and local
needs and act to protect the islands.

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———- SED Dt
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Midshipman Bovair Davis

Midshipman Byron McClain

Midshipmen
join officers’
corps of RBDF

MIDSHIPMEN Bovair
Davis and Byron McClain
have become the latest-addi-
tion to the officers’ corps of
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.”

They successfully complet-
ed the Royal Naval Young
Officers’ course at Britannia
Royal Naval College
(BRNC), in Dartmouth, Eng-
land.

_ “The young officers join
the growing list of Defence
Force officers to complete
the prestigious year-long
training, which is designed to
prepare naval cadets for
’ careers as military adminis-
trators,” said the force in a
-Statement. “Participants from
the Middle East, Africa, the
Caribbean, Eastern Europe
and the United Kingdom
_ Made up the course’s ethni-
cally diverse grouping, which
eraduaied on April 10, 2008.”
upman
: ieeame only, the second, Fe
‘Defence Force officer to be
awarded the Admiralty:
Binoculars, which is given to
the top international cadet
who has successfully complet-
ed the RNYO Course.

The young naval officer
hopefuls had to endure a rig-
orous period of basic and
leadership-enhancement
training, which .culminated-
with the Able Command
Exercise (ACE).

During ACE, cadets spent
three days and two nights in
the field undergoing practical
leadership evaluations as
their ability to plan, direct
and monitor a given task was
tested under acrimonious
conditions.

They later undergo general

-naval instructions in profes-
sional subjects such as sea- °
manship, navigation (celestial
and coastal), and rules of the
road, prior to spending six
weeks onboard a British war-
‘ship for initial sea training. ~

Whilst stationed aboard
HMS York, a Type 42 Batch |
Destroyet, the students par-
ticipated in chores such as
painting, cleaning, waxing
and polishing, in order to
gain an appreciation of the
hardships endured at sea
from the vantage point of
subordinates.

The ship travelled across
the Mediterranean, and made
visits to Gibraltar, Croatia,
Lisbon, Portugal and Italy.
The final phases of the train-
ing concentrated heavily
upon academics and the sci-
ences, including the study of
disciplines like marine engi-
neering, oceanography, mete-
orology and weapons engi-
neering.

Midshipman Davis gradu-
ated from St Augustine’s
College in 2001 and joined
the Defence Force in 2004 as
a marine recruit. He served
in the Commando Squadron
department prior to his selec-
tion for the officers’ qualify-
ing course.

Midshipman McClain
joined the Defence Force in
August 2005 after graduating
from Jordan Prince William
High School in 2000.

He was attached to the ves-
sel HMBS Nassau in the
squadron department prior to
being selected to attend the
officers’ qualifying course.

ce G c

Photos: Leading Seaman
Jonathan Rolle/RBDF

TROPICAL
UU N)

Teh eas
Wu aera,





-Clain |,:. sears e

‘Some New Providence soil
‘is saturated with sewage’

THE soil in some areas of New
Providence is saturated with
sewage on a daily basis, it has
been revealed.

According to Godfrey Sher-
man, general manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation,
large amounts of sewage make it
into the ground by way of over-
flowing cesspits or septic tanks,
causing contamination to ground
water supplies and ‘& tréating
health threats for many users of
private. well.systems.

He said while many private well
users attempt to chlorinate and
disinfect their private wells, do-
it-yourself methods are often not
consistent or reliable and do not
protect against both bacteriologi-
cal and chemical contaminants, as
do the corporation’s treatment
methods.

“Our policymakers have to
understand that when we make
decisions for WSC, they are not
short-term decisions, they are
long-term decisions, and really
right now we are operating in a
water sector that is completely
unregulated and that is why you
can operate your weli, that is why
hotels can operate their own sys-
tems, but if we are not careful,
dog will eat our lunch and we are
going to be drinking some stuff
that we should not be drinking,”
Mr Sherman said.

The Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration’s panel discussion on the
current state of water emphasised
the need for regulation of the
Bahamas’ water and sewerage
sector, adaptation to climate
change and conservation of nat-
ural groundwater resources.

The panel discussion, which
was held last Thursday evening at
Choices Dining Room, COB
School of Hospitality, included

Water and Sewerage Corporation general manager
says overflowing cesspits or septic tanks can lead
to contamination of ground water supplies

representatives from the Water
and Sewerage Corporation, the
Best Commission, the Bahamas
National Trust and the Bahamas
Nature Conservancy, also stressed
the urgent need to find less expen-

’ sive and renewable sources of

energy to produce water.

Dr Richard Cant, consultant
to the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration, explained that the
Bahamas’ groundwater resources
are very vulnerable to pollution
because fresh water lenses are
close to the surface and the geol-
ogy consists of highly permeable
limestone rock with very little soil
to provide a cleansing buffer
between pollutants and the water
table.

Vulnerability

Due to the vulnerability of
groundwater lenses to contami-
nation, sea level rise and salt intru-
sion, Dr Cant said the practical
option for the Bahamas is desali-
nation of seawater by reverse
osmosis.

Currently the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation produces up
to seven million gallons of water
per day in New Providence by this
process, however, Dr Cant said
reverse osmosis is a great enérgy
consumer and alternate energy
supplies must be found because
of the rising cost of fuel.

Eric Carey, executive director,
Bahamas National Trust and

New water Teen
plant makes ‘high quality
So ee cu td



ey VPP em ey Mme smiles to these youngsters.
SELLING drinking water under the name Bahama Clear, a

‘new water purification plant has announced the production of -
“high quality water and ice”:

“In a brand new building with state-of-the-art technology
and machinery, Bahama Clear puts it water through a rigorous

process to create'a perfect tasting water,”

a press release.

said the company in

Safeguards

It said that before it can be sold as Bahama Clear, the water
must go through a nine step purification process. “Each mole-
cule of water is filtered, zapped, filtered, polished, softened, fil-
tered, filtered, zapped and ozonated. Safeguards built into the
process ensures that each glass of Bahama Clear drinking water
is pure and refreshing.

“At Bahama Clear we know that an educated consumer is our
best customer which is why we offer school tours to that children
understand the importance of safe drinking water in the lives as
well as all the steps necessary to produce a high quality drink-
ing water.

“When you drink a glass of Bahama Clear, you know that you
are drinking just water,” the statement said.

Rul

Qualification required:
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consulting engineers on medium and large projects as
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A minimum of 10 years experience inclusive of
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Eleanor Phillips, the Bahamas
Nature Conservancy, both made a
case for protecting natural pine
forests and WSC well fields ir
New Providence, Andros, Abaco
and other islands.

Mr Carey said the forests are
an important part of the water
cycle and serve to recharge and
replenish groundwater lenses. He

‘added that coastal wetlands, par-

ticularly mangroves help to dissi-
pate wave action during storms
and prevent intrusion of salt water
into fresh water lenses.

While acknowledging the val-
ue of reverse osmosis, Mr Carey
said there should always be a
back-up supply in case of a cata-
strophic event.

“If we determine that we can
take out'all of the broadleaf cop-
pice on this island and build
homes like in certain parts of the
well fields in Perpall’s Tract where
people took out some of the
forests to build houses, many of
which are not complete . .
we do that then many species of
birds, snakes, lizards are displaced
and have nowhere to go.

“On islands like this where
development is rapidly increasing
it really becomes a serious issue
which is why we sometimes fight
to save some of these little areas
that people may think of as
insignificant. But 200 acres in the
middle of New Providence is a
wonderful reserve and I always
tell people when I talk about Per-
pall’s that if we’re able to save it
from being destroyed for housing

. . it could still function as a very
effective water reserve and could
become our Central Park when
there is nothing left on this
island,” Mr Carey said.

Mrs. Phillips said a Bahamas
wide ecological gap analysis by
BEST, BNT, the Nature Conser-
vancy and Department of Marine

: Resources has revealed that local-
7 «oly important
Tesources receive absolutely no

groundwater

protection.

. but if :

“The gap analysis recommends
that protection of locally impor-
tant groundwater resources should
be considered for all islands espe-


































Ministry of National Security.

high level ministry official.

Ms McIntosh asked yesterday.

and never get it done.

Bahamas,” she said.

years in the pipeline.

said.

Hope House youth shelter
‘frustrated by govt’ — claim

THE Hope House youth shelter project is being frustrated by
government’s failure to fulfil its promises, one organiser has claimed.
Ali McIntosh, President of National Committee for Youth }
Renewal and Revival (NCYRR), which was spearheading the
effort, said that last September, “verbal support” was given by

Since then, the NCYRR has been busy securing facilities and
attempting to implement its vision for “youth renewal” and the
reduction of crime in the Bahamas.

The verbal promise, according to Ms McIntosh, was followed up
by a formal presentation by the NCYRR and a meeting with a

“Now that the project is up and running, the government of the
Bahamas has made a strategic effort to frustrate the efforts of the
NCYRR by sending them from one ministry to another. Is this gov-
ernment serious or is its rhetoric more important than its action?”

“Bahamian people like to talk about what they are going to do,

Anticipation

“We are doing what we say, and we are working for the better-
ment of Bahamian youth, with the greatest anticipation of even
more positive results to come. I challenge the government to put its
money where its mouth is, and do what it says it will for youth in the

Thursday, May 1, marked the official opening of Hope House,
which Ms McIntosh said came after four months of activity, three
months of building preparations, one year of agitation, and 12

“Having accomplished such a gigantic task on behalf of the’
Bahamian people, the NCYRR is spending more of its time
meeting and calling government officials attempting to
secure funding to keep a roof over its head, when it prefers to be
spending its primary efforts assisting youth in crisis, and diverting
frustrated young men towards more productive lives,” Ms McIntosh

The Hope House Centre, which is a multi-service agency, offers
a variety of resource and crisis services, and enjoys the co-operation
of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and the Department of Social
Services on a very regular basis, she said.

cially islands other than Abaco
and Andros. Minimum conserva-
tion goals have been recom-
mended for groundwater
resources of national importance.
We’ve basically set that conser-
vation goal at 35 per cent. And
for resources of local importance,
for example South Andros and
other areas that rely on ground-
water at 30 per cent protection,”
she said.






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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

i a
New police administrative complex
for Exuma is officially opened



Colombia extradites
14 top paramilitary
warlords to the US

COLOMBIA extradited 14 :



paramilitary warlords to the Unit-

ed States on Tuesday on drug- :
related charges in a surprise move :
that brought praise from Wash- :
ington but raised fears of justice ;

thwarted for thousands of victims,
according to Associated Press.

The extradited include Salva- :
tore Mancuso and most other :
leaders of Colombia’s illegal right- :
wing militias — notorious figures :
blamed for some of modern :

Colombia’s worst atrocities,

including the deaths of at least

10,000 people.

Victims families fear that once :
the warlords are in U.S. prisons, it
will be more difficult to get them :
to confess to human rights viola- :

tions and reveal details of their
connections to Colombian politi-
cians.

tims.

idate or corrupt.”

Uribe said the militia bosses :
kept committing crimes from :

prison, failed to “duly cooperate”

with prosecutors and neglected :
“to compensate victims — hiding :
assets and delaying their delivery. :
The country has been generous :
with them but the government :
can’t tolerate a relapse into :
he said in a pevonal i

crime,”
address.

Medical

7 Enroll in a Certificate, Diploma or
an Associate Degree program.

In brief





But USS. officials promised }
Tuesday to cooperate with :
Colombian prosecutors, and Pres- ;
ident Alvaro Uribe said any inter- :
national assets seized from the
warlords by the United States :
would go to compensate the vic-

“It’s a great day,” U.S. drug }
czar John Walters told The Asso- :
ciated Press. He said the U.S. jus- :
tice system is “far less likely for :
them to be able to attack or intim- :

@ By LLONELLA GILBERT

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
— Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest officially
opened a new police adminis-
trative complex that will help
solve the issue of a lack of space
police officers had to endure at
the George Town Police Head-
quarters.

“T really do want to thank
those officers who still have to
work in less than ideal circum-
stances,” Mr. Turnquest said

‘at the opening ceremony last

week.

He added, “We do want to
thank you for your dedication
to the country and for what you
do in the peace and security of
our island here in Exuma and
our nation in general and we
want to thank you police offi-
cers particularly for all that you
have done.”

Mr Turnquest noted that as a
result of Exuma’s economic
growth, many individuals have
come to the island to find work,
which has presented many chal-
lenges, including that of policing
the island.

Breaking down the crime sta-
tistics in Exuma, he said in 2007,
there were 191 reported cases
(19 crimes against the person,
123 crimes against property and
49 drug offences).

Out of those 191 cases 104
persons have been charged —
16 charged for crimes against
the person, 39 for crimes against
property and 49 for drug
offences.

“What is encouraging,” Mr.
Turnquest said, “is that when



“We do want
to thank you
for your
dedication to
the country
and for what
you do in the
‘peace and
security of our
island here in
Exuma and
our nation in
general.”



Tommy Turnquest

we then extrapolate those fig-
ures for the first quarter of 2008
and we see that we have no
reported crimes against the per-
son — 25 crimes against property
and 15 drug offences, which
relates to 15 persons being
charged so far for the first quar-
ter of 2008.

“T think those figures are nec-
essary because when we think
of the Family Islands in The
Bahamas we have always seen
them as idyllic, crime free places

. where you can leave your car
- keys in your car and your house

door open; but we all know that
as times progress that becomes
less and less the case and there is

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more and more need for police
officers and police work.”

He commended the officers
on the island for “what obvi-
ously is a taxing duty” and
promised to continue ensuring
that reasonable needs are met
through additional resources,
which include training reservists.

‘Mr. Turnquest did not
believe that there was a single

police officer who would say the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
can operate effectively without
police reservists.

“And so we do say thank you
(reservists) for what you have
done and we know that there
are some challenges with regard
to the terms and conditions in
which reservists work and they
are constantly under review.

“But,” he said, “the one thing
that I am glad we can point to at
least in the short tenure since
May 2007 is that we have been

‘able to allow reservists to come

under the umbrella of thé Law
Enforcement Insurance Scheme.

“I think that is a wonderful
achievement because reservists
in many cases work shoulder to
shoulder with career officers
during the particular time they
are on duty and so we are happy
they have been able to achieve
that.”

Mr. Turnquest noted that
there is no magic to effective
policing.

“Policing requires communi-
ty involvement to be truly effec-
tive, so while this new building
sits essentially at the gateway to
the George Town Harbour and
at the apex of the park here in
George Town, it is up to the
community to adopt it, to assist

in taking care of it and to work
closely with the police.”

However, he said that he ful-
ly endorsed the sentiments of
Acting Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson that there is
a zero tolerance on corruption
and that law enforcement offi-
cials must be beyond reproach.

Acting Commissioner Fergu-
son reminded the police officers
that they took an oath to protect
and serve the Bahamian people
professionally, competently, eth-
ically and morally.

“T must also say that this new
building complements your
renewed focus on being that
new police officer that I con-
stantly speak of throughout the
various islands within our arch-
ipelago.

He said, “Members of our
society know that the new police
officer is one whose integrity,
conduct and character can nev-
er be compromised, and wears
the uniform and badge of the
police force with respect and
dignity.”

The new complex consists of
a reception area, multi-purpose
conference room, Police
Reserve Section and an
enlarged holding facility to

‘house individuals charged with
breaking the law.



Kristaan Ingraham/BIS

PERMANENT SECRETARY. in the vite of Toure and Aviation Archie Nairn moderated the government
organised town meeting in George Town, Exuma.

Ministers’ visit prompts
immigration crackdown

THE arrival of several Cabi-
net ministers in Great Exuma
for a town meeting led to a
crackdown on suspected illegal
immigrants.

After being taken to see a
squat on the island occupied by
a number of Haitians, Minister
of National Security Tommy
Turnquest said the problem
would be dealt with by elite
Defence Force commandos.

“They will do what they have
to do to eradicate what is in the
bush,” Mr Turnquest said, “and
we (the government) will also
do what we have to do to stop
illegals working.”

Mr Turnquest, the minister
responsible for immigration, not-

ed that at the time of the meet-

ing, the Defence Force vessel
Yellow Elder was docked at

elm DLE erelU) 4



“But what Exuma has become
in terms of immigration has
expanded beyond border. pro-
tection and has expanded into__.
the apprehension and repatria-
tion exercises like we have in
places like New Providence and
Grand Bahama.”

While the Department of
Immigration is looking for a
solution, Mr Turnquest said res-
idents must come forward if they
have knowledge of illegal immi-
grants working for individuals
or businesses.

Action

“I want you to know that we
are going to step up our appre-
hension exercises to rid our-
selves of a large number of ille-

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George Town and a number of Commando
Squadron officers were on the island.

The contingent of ministers who arrived in
Exuma last week included: Minister of Tourism
and Aviation Neko Grant; Minister of Health
and Social Development Hubert Minnis; Min-
ister of Lands and Local Government Sidney
Collie; Minister of Works and Transport Earl
Deveaux and Mr Turnquest.

Mr Deveaux told those attending the town

‘meeting that what he saw in the bushes alarmed

him.

Labour

He said that although there is a need for
labour in Exuma, the residents there are accom-
modating something that is a “serious detri-
ment” to them.

“So my admonition to you is to let us work
together to resolve this very serious problem,”
Mr Deveaux said.

“The problem I am talking about is not a
Haitian problem, it is not a Jamaican problem,
it is not a Peruvian problem, it is not a Cuban
problem — the problem I am talking about is a
Bahamian problem,” he said.

Responding to concerns about the small num-
ber of immigration officers in Exuma, Mr Turn-

quest told the residents that the officers were.

originally placed there for border protection.

gals and we will also begin to
take action against employers.”

Mr Turnquest then spoke directly to the per-
sons who pick up illegal workers early in the
morning to take them to job sites.

“Please do not do so,” he warned. “You are
likely to be surprised and you do not want that
to happen to you — so you cannot continue to do
so.”

Mr Turnquest added, “I want to make the
Bahamas’ ’position clear in regard to immigrants.
If there is a need for you as a business to have
foreign labour and the request is reasonable
and that the person is not a security threat to
the Bahamas, we are likely to approve that
request.

“But you are not to engage someone, as an
individual or as a business that you do not have
a work permit for.

“It is against the law for illegal immigrants
to be working here illegally; it is also illegal for
an employer to hire someone illegally.

“Tf John Joseph has a work permit to work for
Tommy Turnquest, Earl Deveaux cannot take
John Joseph to work for him without permission.
The Department of Immigration is prepared to
accept an application jointly by Tommy Turn-
quest and Earl Deveaux for John Joseph if that
is what you want.

“You can apply together but we do not expect
persons to be hiring illegal immigrants,” Mr
Turnquest said.
THE TRIBUNE WEUNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

niet, CARIFORUM states set
date for EPA sign on





searching for
arsonist in

Palm Bay

m PALM BAY, Fla.

INVESTIGATORS are
searching for one or more :
arsonists who apparently :
started a string of fires around ;
a city on Florida’s Atlantic }
coast, destroying or damag-
ing about 100 homes, a police :
chief said Tuesday, according :

to Associated Press.

Firefighters in Brevard }
County were trying for the :
third day to contain fires that :
have scorched about 3,800 :
acres, or 6 square miies, in :
Palm Bay and neighboring :

Malabar.

Though the high winds }
fueling the flames Monday :
had slowed significantly, offi- :
cials worried about overnight :
flare-ups and the flames :
spreading quickly in the dry -:

conditions.

“We desperately need
rain,” said Palm Bay Fire :
Marshal Mike Couture. “We :
don’t have any, and we’re not :
projected to get any anytime :

soon.”

All 18 schools in Palm Bay, }
including charter schools, :
* were closed Tuesday. Smoke :
and the proximity of the :
flames have caused the inter- :
mittent closure of major high- :
ways in the area, including a :
34-mile section of Interstate :
95 south of the fires that was :
closed again midmorning :

Tuesday.

“Flames are coming onto
the interstate,” Florida High- :
way Patrol Trooper Kim :

Miller said.

The worst fires raged
uncontrolled in Malabar, :
while officials said they had :
“a majority” of the Palm Bay :

fires contained.

Palm Bay police were }
working with the state fire :
marshall’s office and Brevard :
County Fire Rescue to inves- :
tigate who set an estimated :
niné fires that spread into a :

larger, uncontrollable blaze.

“Some are caused by }
embers that are flying, but the :
locations of the fires indicated ;
that these were initiated sep- ;
arately, which makes us firm- :
ly believe that an individual or :
individuals was involved in ;
setting those,” Palm Bay :
Police Chief Bill Berger said. :

mete Vater d |

CARIFORUM states are set to sign
on to the Economic Partnership
Agreement with the European Com-
mission in July.

The sign on date was confirmed at
the end of the twenty-sixth special
meeting of the Council for Trade and
Development (COTED), which came
to a close on Saturday in Antigua and
Barbuda.

Up until now, the exact date on
which the agreements, which have
already been largely hashed out,
would become legally binding, was
unclear.

The CARICOM secretariat in
Georgetown, Guyana, issued a state-

ment announcing the decision, taken.

after consultations between ministers
at the meeting, yesterday.

The EPA is a trade agreement
between Europe and Caribbean,
Pacific and African states, including

July confirmed at special
meeting of COTED

the Bahamas.
. It requires these countries to liber-
alise their trade in goods and services
if they are to keep traditionally bene-
ficial trade arrangements they have
with Europe.

Agreement

The Bahamas, along with the rest of
CARICOM, initialled a trade in
goods agreement in December, in
order to ensure its duty free access
to European markets for exported

lobsters, polymers and rum were

‘maintained.

While the rest of the Caribbean
states also initialled a trade in ser-
vices agreement at this time, the
Bahamas was given a six-month
extension to forge its offer in terms of
to what extent it will open its services
sectors, such as medical, touristic,
financial or construction.

Other CARICOM states have had
the last six months to review the texts
they initialled prior to the official sign-
on date.

The agreement has been criticised
by some who say that the Bahamas,
and other ACP countries, are giving
up too much in return for too little
from Europe, or opportunities — for
example to set up businesses in
Europe — that would be difficult to
take advantage of due to competi-
tiveness issues.

Economy

Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing has down played the
potential negative implications of the
agreement, pointing to the liberality
of the Bahamian economy at present,
the three to 25-year roll-out period
for the agreement’s requirements, and
the relatively small size of imports
coming into the Bahamas from
Europe.

Minister Laing addresses Bahamas Real Estate Association

@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON

GOVERNMENT is continu-
ing its broad consultation on trade
negotiations, and the opportunity
exists for the real estate sector to
determine its strengths and advise
government both on areas that
could be included in future trade
negotiations and on areas that are
sensitive, Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing said.

Mr Laing was addressing the
Bahamas Real Estate’s (BREA)
luncheon on Thursday; May 8, at
the British Colonial Hilton on the
topic, “Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) and the
Impact on the Real Estate Sector
in The Bahamas”.

The EPA is a trade agreement
between the European Commis-
sion and CARIFORUM
(Caribbean Forum of African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
States).

“This is an opportunity for the
sector to determine where its
strengths are and to advise the
government on areas of the real
estate sector which could be
included in future trade negotia-
tions and those areas that are sen-
sitive,” Mr Laing said.

“It has been pointed out that
trade in goods represents a rela-
tively small component of the
Bahamian economy. Importantly
for The Bahamas, the EPA is a
trade agreement that deals with
trade in services and investments,”



“This is an
opportunity for the
sector to determine
where its strengths
are and to advise
the government on
areas of the real
estate sector which
could be included
in future trade
negotiations and
those areas that are
sensitive.”



Zhivargo Laing

“Previous trade agreements
only addressed trade in goods and
do not require beneficiaries like
The Bahamas to do anything
more than ensure that customs
authorities had procedures in
place to verify that the goods
exported to Europe originated in
The Bahamas,” Mr. Laing said.

He said although the EPA is
not a guarantee that there will be
additional investment in any sec-

_tor of the economy, “it provides a

framework for persons seeking to
understand The Bahamas’ invest-
ment regime to readily decipher

which sectors are open for invest-

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openness in these sectors.”

Mr. Laing said that in some
instances, goods exported from
The Bahamas also had to meet
other criteria referred to as sani-
tary requirements to ensure the
exports were treated to prevent
health problems.

“The Bahamas, for the most
part, was able to quietly benefit

’ from trade agreements in the

goods sector without significant
public interest or debate,” he said.

The Bahamas is considered a
major exporter of services and
actively participates in the global
economy with respect to tourism
and financial services.

“The EPA is a new type of
trade agreement for The Bahamas
and the countries of CARIFO-
RUM,” Mr. Laing said. “Howev-
er, this type of agreement is not
new to the developing world. All
around the world countries are
seeking to enter trade agreements
that promote their trading inter-
ests.”

The EPA is an agreement that
has three major parts. The first
section details the rules that gov-

ern trade in goods. The second
part outlines the commitments
with respect to service and invest-
ment and the final section
addresses trade related issues.

Mr. Laing said there are two »

sectors that were not included in
the services schedule for The
Bahamas — telecommunications,
because of the pending privatisa-
tion of the Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company, and the real

“estate sector, because of the “sen-

sitivity” of the sector to foreign
participation. 3

“The Government needs more
time to develop a comprehensive
framework for the development
of this sector in consultation with
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation and other stakeholders,”
he said.

“So for The Bahamas, the real
estate sector is not part of the cur-
rent EPA Services Schedule.”

With respect to the European
Union,. there are no restrictions
on commercial establishment,
which means Bahamian realtors
will be allowed to offer this service
into the EU, Mr. Lairig said.



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located at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas,
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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





Spotlight on



l@ MONIQUE FERNANDER
DOWN YOUR

‘Parking is a
serious issue’



estaurant Owner REP ORTS and PHOTOS:
Monique Fernander has
worked in Nett’s Restaurant and LISA LAWLOR ,
Bar on Deveaux Street off Dowdeswell Street ey oe
for the past two years. . Reporter
Business has noticeably lessened, she said,
because a lot of Bay Street businesses have

been closing down and there is consequently TIM CLARKE

less patronage of her restaurant. oe ,
“The parking is also a serious issue for us Trionune Steff Photographer

workers — tourist patrons as well as locals,” Y

she said, “Without parking there is no business

rotation”. : . . :
As a consequence of the diminishing number THE TRIBUNE is spotlighting the neigh-

of parking spaces, she reports that people park

illegally ae thie end of tie street, making it bourhoods of Nassau to uncover the untold

impossible to see oncoming traffic when turn- i . eae
ng on to Hay Street stories of the characters and personalities
Ms Fernander said there needs to be more who give them their unique flavour. Here is

strategic planning for downtown in order to : : ;
bring business back into the area. the latest in our special Serles..
















@ BRIDGET MORTIMER-SALAKO

Crime is a constant
problem for bakery



ridget Mortimer-Salako has had the Model
Bakery in her family since September 1,
1973.

The bakery moved to its present location on
Dowdeswell Street in order-to attract more business,
in what was at the time a more lucrative spot.

However, since then, crime has been a constant
problem, and the police have had to be called more
than a few times.

“We call for security reasons, especially at closing
time when I feel unsafe leaving the bakery,” she said.
“There are jonesers out there just watching some-
times.”

Another issue that affects Mrs Mortimer-Salako is
the garbage build up on Dowdeswell Street.

The homeless population are attracted to the
garbage cans outside the bakery at night, and spread
refuse.all over the ‘street, she,said.

“Cope bakery“ could therefore ‘benefit considerably
from aicléan up team’ somimg' to-_Dowdeswell, -Mrs
’Mortimer-Salako said.



ll KATELEEN SANDS : “if you are what you Shes you are.... Then have no fear...
Rising murder rate The Ca mera ‘s Here” (Lupe Fiasco)

is cause of concern



n the Dowdeswell Street area, the general con- HIOUSANDS IN MODELING CONTRACTS
sensus is that there aren’t too many crime prob- THREE DAYS OF EDITORIAL SHOOTING

lems — but many opinions about crime. - * COMPLETE HIGH FASHION MAKE-OVERS
- Parking lot attendant Kateleen Sands’ complaint is — ae cee ,
Hite iene miner eater Glas spe cueally as ie peta Sy WUT... ony SIX WOMEN WILT MAKE IT TO THE STAGE OF THE RAINFOREST
the young men. a ee Sih Eee

She believes it is a “contagious issue” because young people THEATER ON OCTO eee a AE
don’t choose to reason out their problems and no one intervenes in =

~ Photo by Mark Humes







disputes anymore. os , : f * MODELS242 FACE OF 242 RULES: NO PURCHLASE NECESS.A TO ENTER OR WIN. Contest is open to alt ‘Bahatiian eitizene mand legal residents

“Life is precious,” she said, “and people need to stop having hot of the Bahamas who are between the ages of 14 to 30 years of nse al the time of entry, Males: 15-30, 6°0"- 62.” Females: 14-23, 5°8 1/2 to 5° 11, 108-130

head and hot temper”. Ibs (height and weight proportional). Contest begins on May 5. 200% and ends September 1, 2008. Mail in entries can be sent to “Models242 Face of 242

Ms Sands noted that business is slowing down in the area, just like Model Search Competition” P.O. Box Nil 17. Nassau. Paharmas and must be postinarked by September 1, 2008. Be sure to include your name, address,
phone number, email address, height, hair and eye color. body measurements. and shoe size. Finalists will be announced Monday, September 15, 2008.

everywhere else in the country.



RET PPE PER SS

Oo) 4 aw RENTER TODAY! BE ONE OF THE TOP SIX!



o to /





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ee
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Ie bans SCM

IPAS












lram D. Lewis & Associates
=» Architects & Project Managerse [—

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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 9

| Rely .

GN-675





mi ELVIS EDGECOMBE
‘We need cleaners like

they have on Bay Street’



Be Edgecombe, a Bahamas Experience Lim-

ousines and Tours driver, has been carrying
tourists between the airport and hotels on Paradise
Island for the past five years.

He drives through Dowdeswell Street regularly and says.a seri-
ous problem is the four-way stop at Christie Street.

Mr Edgecombe explained that drivers often simply refuse to
stop, which sometimes results in very serious accidents.

He said that several dilapidated buildings on the street need
more care and upkeep — and are often further damaged during the
frequent car accidents.

Mr Edgecombe said that over the last few years, Dowdeswell
Street has become extremely dirty.

“We need cleaners like they have on Bay Street. This is still
downtown, you know. Horse and carriages drive through here,
and the tourists have time to notice it, take it in ie make a judg-
ment,” he said.

_ BEJUANITA GRANT
A disturbing, frightening
place after 10.30 p.m.



Jeni Grant has been a Dowdeswell resident for

the last 73 years.

She reminisces about the days when it was a nice res-
idential area with hardly any businesses, and was free of dirty
drains and gutters.

“There is a persistent sick scent around here nowadays,” said Mrs

. Grant. “It takes everyone to keep the area clean. I do my part, but
I don’t know what our people have become — it’s a disgrace”.

She reported that the neighbourhood has definitely gone down-
hill, and nearly all her old neighbours have moved away.

Illegal activities,.at night time in particular, affect the peace of
mind of residents like Mrs Grant severely. She said that after
10.30pm, the street becomes very loud, and is a disturbing, fright-
ening place to live.





@ KARA NOTTAGE
‘A little oasis of security’





kK ara Nottage has been the principal of the Little
Schoolhouse: Early Learning Centre for 10 years

now, and agrees that Dowdeswell Street could definitely be
cleaned-up.

While her pre-school is gated in to protect the children,
she has no choice but to clean-up immediately outside the
school’s gates, and agrees that a public effort to keep the
area clean should be implemented.

“At the same time, it’s a great area for parents who
work, to drop off their children,” she said, responding pos-
itively to questions on any problems in the neighbourhood.
“And we are centrally located. We have our own little
oasis with security!” she added.







SUPREME COURT



15TH MAY, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/NPR/00194

IN THE ESTATE OF LOIS EDNA
GIBSON, late of 28 Panther Top Lane in
the Town of Murphy, in the County of
Cherokee, in the State of North Carolina,
one of the States of the United States of
America. deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by FREDERICA
GERTRUDE McCARTNEY of the Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing
of Certificate of Probate in the above estate
granted to WILLIAM L. RAU the Executor
of the Estate, by the Superior Court Division
in the General Court of Justice, in the Sate
of North Carolina on the 18th day of June,
2004.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00226

Whereas LEROY BELL, of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of. the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the

Real and Personal Estate of ANTHONY |

BELL, late of the Settlement of Behring
Point, Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00227

Whereas JAMES MAXWELL
THOMPSON, SR., of First Terrace, Collin
Avenue, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of HAZEL
ROSANNA HENRIETTA THOMPSON,
late of Farrington Road, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00228

Whereas REGINALD MINNIS, of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters
of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HAROLD MINNIS, late of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00229

Whereas FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB, of
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
DR. PETER MEISSNER, the sole executor
has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate.of JUDITH J.A.
MEISSNER a.k.a. JUDITH JOSEFINE
ANNA MEISSNER, late of Berlin,

Charlottenburg, Wilmersdorf Germany and

of Treasure Cay, Abaco one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

15TH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00231

Whereas JAMIE TERREL TINKER, of
the Western District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Cecil Newry has made.
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of REQUILDA PRATT, late of Faith
Avenue Carmichael Road, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
PAGE 10, . THE TRIBUNE _
WEDNESDAY EVENING MAY 14, 2008 |

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THE TRIBUNE



PA:G-E. 11

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008




INSIDE e International sports news




a

‘The Knights shine!

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

nother season and anoth-
er title for the school that
has dominated the GSS-
: SA Athletics calendar
from start to finish.

The C R Walker Knights added the
seniar boys softball title to their already
impressive résumé with a dominating
game two series-clinching win against the
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins, 14-
1.

As he was all season long, Knights’ ace
pitcher Lorenzo Williams was the dri-
ving force behind the team’s success, as
he allowed just three hits and recorded
seven strikeouts in the win.

Williams told Tribune Sports that the
growth his team has displayed over the
course of the season culminated in a
championship clinching performance.

“We improved nicely since the start of
the season,” he said. “Today we just had
to keep our composure, reduce our errors
and win the close out game.”

The 11th grader said with ‘the cast of
returning starters, expectations for a title
repeat are high, but can be achieved.

“For next year we have to come out
stronger and improve from where we

were this year and come back to win the’

championship,” he said.

The Knights reached their third con-
secutive championship series and with a
dominating performance from Williams
and consistent run support from the line-
up, were able to reverse the trend this
year.

C R Walker raced out to an early 4-0
lead in the first inning and continued to
build upon their lead with each passing
frame.

The Mystic Marlins experienced a myr-
iad of fielding errors which compounded
the frustrations of trying to catch up with
the speed of Williams’ delivery.

The Knights’ Brian Cambridge took

- full advantage when he stretched a bunt
into an in the park home run due to con-
secutive wild throws by the Marlins
infield.

It took the Mystic Marlins lineup three
innings to finally connect with Williams
for their first hit of the game, and scored
their lone run an inning later.

Tia Rolle, head coach of the Knights,
said her team remained largely untested
throughout the course of the year.

“The journey was kind of easy because
they really did not have much competi-

tion all year,” she said. “The only com- -

petition we thought we had was C V
Bethel and when we played them we won
9-2.”

Rolle said the championship win is
especially gratifying for her senior stu-
dents who have fell short in the past.

“This is their third consecutive year
playing for the championship and they
finally won so my 12th grade students
are very happy today,” she said. “Hope-
fully we should repeat as champions next
year with the returning players but for
now it feels good to add another cham-
pionship to C R Walker.”

On the ‘07-08 year, the Knights also
captured the GSSSA senior boys volley-
ball and basketball, senior girls basket-
ball, track and field and Hugh Campbell
titles.

C R Walker senior boys conquer
Dame Doris Johnson Mystic
Marlins 14-1 to win the title



DRIVING FORCE - As he was all season long, Knights’ ace pitcher Lorenzo Williams (shown) was the driving force behind
the team’s success, as he allowed just three hits and recorded seven strikeouts in the win. See more photos on page 13

Myriad of new champions crowned

at ‘Sonny Boy’ boxing tournament

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN honour of one of the legendary
icons of the ring, Champion Amateur
Boxing Club successfully concluded
its sixth show of the year over the
weekend.

A myriad of new champions were
crowned following the finals of the
“Sonny Boy” Rahming Silver Gloves
boxing tourney at Nirvana Beach on
Saturday.

Seventeen-year-old Rashad Saun-
ders took home the tournament’s most
coveted prize, the “Sonny Boy” Rah-
ming floating trophy awarded to the
Most Outstanding Boxer over the two-
day event.

Jerrano Collins recorded a three-

round decision against Keno Pratt and
was awarded the Most Improved Box-
er.
In the 11-12 age group, Aprachio
Davis recorded two wins on the final
day of competition with a pair of
three-round decisions against Rashad
Flowers and Antonio Duncanson.

Flowers rebounded to top Denash
Dames later in the evening, also in a
three-round decision.

The bout awarded “Best Fight” of
the tournament which featured Jer-
maine Bain defeating Cameron John-
son in three rounds.

Other bouts included Devon King
defeating Shawn Anderson and Ken-
roy Lord defeating Kenvado Brown.

Champion Amateur Boxing Club’s
Ray Minus Jr said the tournament was
a resounding success and hopes to see

continued future growth.

“All the fights were outstanding and
I must say that the boxers have been
stepping up the past few weeks to per-
form,” he said. “The boxers went after
those trophies with all they have and
we want to continue to look forward to
this event being a milestone builder
of boxing in this country.”

Minus Jr said the tournament is a
fitting way for the club to pay homage
to a man who has been responsible
for the development of some of the
country’s greatest fighters.

“Sonny Boy Rahming is a legend
and has done a lot for boxing in pro-
ducing a lot of champions and a lot of
great fighters and it is an honour for
CABC to put on an event in his
name,” he said. “It is an event that is
growing leaps and bounds in the com-

munity. We had a lot of fighters per-
form in this tournament over the years,
boxers like (Jermaine) ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey, Meacher Major, Jerry But-
ler, Elkino Saunders, Taureano John-
son and many others.”

Minus Jr said CABC continues to
develop and looks to make further
improvements to the tournament.

“Next year we are looking to estab-
lish champions per category and pre-
sent them with mini-boxing belts and
organise it in a way that boxers can
defend their belts,” he said.

“Next year we are looking at bring-
ing in an international team. It is still
going strong, we are very excited and
we look forward to growing this event
more nationally and eventually inter-
nationally,” Minus Jr told Tribune
Sports.

“ATP ~Doubles

Tim Clarke/T! ribune staff



Knowles,
Bhupathi
are out
of the
second
round



ATP MASTERS

l@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



FOR the second consecu-
tive clay court tournament,
Mark Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi have taken an ear-
ly fall, getting eliminated
from the second round again.

After getting knocked out
of a tourney in Rome last

' year, Knowles and Bhupathi

made an early exit again at
ATP Masters Series in Ham-
burg, Germany, yesterday.

As the number four seeds,
Knowles and Bhupathi were
upset by the American.team
of Mardy Fish and James
Blake.

In a match that lasted just
53 minutes, the Americans
won 6-2, 6-3 over the
Bahamian-Indian combo.

Fish and Blake, who are
ranked over the 100 mark
individually in the Stanford
Race,

advanced ‘to their first ATP
- doubles quarterfinal of the

year together.

For Knowles and Bhu-
pathi, who are ranked at No
3 and 10 individually in the
race, their departure in the
second round raises a lot of
concern about their perfor-
mances after they got off to
such a great start.

The duo, who teamed up
this year after Knowles split
with his long-time partner
Daniel Nestor from Canada
last year, won two titles back-
to-back in Memphis, Ten-
nessee and Miami, Florida.

Suffered

However, Bhupathi suf-
fered a slight injury prior to
playing in Rome and he was
forced to take a week off. It’s
not certain if he’s fully recov-
ered from the injury.

Up to press time Tuesday
night, Tribune Sports was
unable to contact Knowles in
Germany.

Tuesday’s tournament was
supposed to be the final tour-
nament for Knowles and
Bhupathi as they prepare for
the second Grand Slam at the
French Open in Roland Gar-
ros, starting May 25.

Presently, Knowles and
Bhupathi are sitting in third
place as a team in the ATP
Doubles Race with 374
points, just two points behind
former leaders Jonathan
Erlich and Andy Ram, who
are in second with 376.

American identical twin
brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan, who won the last tour-
nament in Rome, have
surged to the front of the
pack with 456 points.

As former number one
world players, Knowles and
Bhupathi have combined to
win 88 titles. They were close.
to winning the first Grand
Slam at the Australian Open
when they knocked off the
Bryans to advance to the
semifinal.

While Knowles has teamed
up with Nestor to win the
Australian Open in 2002 and
the US Open in 2004, the duo
are the defending champions
of the French Open.

So even though they are
scheduled to return to
Roland Garros with differ-
ent partners, Knowles and °
Bhupathi are hoping to
regain the form they had ear-
lier this year to win their first
Grand Slam title together.
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Davydenko defeats Ljubicic,
cruises into the third round

.@ By NESHA STARCEVIC
_ AP Sports Writer



HAMBURG, Germany
(AP) — Nikolay Davydenko
cruised into the third round of
the Hamburg Masters by
defeating Ivan Ljubicic 6-4, 6-
1 Tuesday, and two more play-
ers retired because of injuries.

Also, David Ferrer defeat-
ed Ivo Minar 6-3, 6-3, while
Andreas Seppi downed eight-
seeded Richard Gasquet 6-3,
6-2.

Luis Horna dropped out
with a calf injury while trail-
ing Potito Starace 6-3, 4-2, and
Kristof Vliegen pulled out with
a back injury with Jose Aca-

-suso leading 5-2. Filippo
Volandri retired Monday with
a knee injury.

Davydenko dominated Lju-
bicic after the two players trad-
ed five breaks of serve early
in the match.

“The first match is always
difficult,” said Davydenko,
who had a first-round bye.

The Russian, who is coming
off a third-round loss to'Tom-
my Robredo in Rome, won the
Masters tournament in Miami
last month.

Losing

“Losing to Robredo was dif-

ficult, but the win in Miami has.

made me mentally stronger,”
Davydenko said.

Ljubicic has not beaten
Davydenko in four years.

Robredo rallied Tuesday to
outlast Philipp Kohlschreiber
. 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3. He won his
first match in Hamburg since
capturing the title in 2006.

The 13th-seeded Robredo
was helped by a disputed call
in the second set. Losing the



HAMBURG MASTERS



point would have put Robredo

- down a break but chair umpire

Gerry Armstrong overruled
the linesman, calling the ball
good. A long discussion involv-
ing both players, Armstrong _
and the tournament supervi-
sor followed. The point was
eventually replayed and
Robredo held his serve.

Shut

“You try to shut it out but
you keep thinking about it,”
Kohlschreiber said. “But it
wasn’t what decided the match.
I made some bad decisions in
my shots.”

Robredo broke serve for a
decisive 4-2 lead in the third.
He double-faulted on one
match point, but used the next
to win.

Withdrawals have become a
common theme in European
clay-court tournaments in the
past month.

At the Rome Masters last
week, five players, withdrew.
No semifinal match was com-
pleted.

The second-ranked Rafael
Nadal,.who lost in Rome.in the
second round after getting
treated for a major blister on
his foot, has blamed the crowd-
ed schedule for the series of
retirements.

In another second-round
match, Fernando Verdasco
defeated Michael Llodra 6-2,
6-0.

In first-round action, 11th-
seeded Carlos Moya rallied to
defeat Julien Benneteau 3-6,
6-4, 7-6 (7), and Janko Tip-
sarevic rallied past Andreas
Beck 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.



RUSSIAN tennis player Nikolay Davydenko returns a ball during first round match against Croatian
Ivan Ljubicic at the ATP Masters Series tennis tournament in Hamburg, Germany, on Tuesday.

Davydenko won in two sets 6-4 and 6-1.

)

/AP ©

immer,

Fabian B

in Rome
ROME (AP) — Unseeded

teenager Victoria Azarenka ,

routed Sybille Bammer 6-1,

6-3 Tuesday in the first round

of the Italian Open before

play was delayed because of

rain. ;
Azarenka has showed
strong form in the last two
weeks, when she lost to even-
tual champion Dinara Safina
at the German Open and
posted a runner-up finish at
the Prague Open.

She is ranked a career-high
19th this week, but hag to ask
for a wild card because she
decided late to enter the
tournament.

Azarenka, an 18-year-old
from Belarus who resides in
Scottsdale, Ariz., improved
to 19-9 this year.

The 22nd-ranked Bammer
was granted a seed when
Safina withdrew because of a
back injury.

Also, wild card Roberta
Vinci held off qualifier Kaia
Kenepi 6-4, 4-6, 6-0; Domini-
ka Cibulkova defeated Gisela
Dulko 7-6 (1), 6-4; and Tsve-
tana Pironkova eliminated
Klara Zakopalova 6-4, 6-2 in
a matchup of two qualifiers.

Pending a restart, both
Williams sisters were slated
to play later.

Seventh-seeded Venus
faced Samantha Stosur and
fifth-seeded Serena was up
against Alona Bondarenko in
the clay-court warmup for the

French Open, which begins
May 25.



Sorenstam to retire after season

LPGA GOLFER Annika Sorenstam (inset), of Sweden, throws out the ceremonial first pitch before a baseball game between the
New York Mets and the Washington Nationals Tuesday in New York. Sorenstam announced Tuesday that she is retiring at the
end of the LPGA season.



Frank Franklin II/AP

Hi By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer

ANNIKA Sorenstam will retire
after the season, ending an LPGA
Tour career in which she has won
72 tournaments to date and deliv-
ered a defining moment when she
teed it up against the men on the
PGA Tour.

“I think I’ve achieved more than I -

ever thought I could,” she said dur-
ing a news conference Tuesday at
the Sybase Classic in Clifton, N.J. “I
have given it all, and it’s been fun.”

The 37-year-old Sorenstam has
hinted at retirement the past several
seasons, saying she wanted to
devote more time to her growing
business and to start a family. She is
engaged to Mike McGee, son of
former PGA. Tour player Jerry
McGee.

“This would be very much like
Annika to get on top and then
quit,” said Judy Rankin, a Hall of
Famer and television analyst. |

Sorenstam said her final event
would be the Dubai Ladies Masters
after the LPGA Tour season ends.

“I’m leaving the game on my
terms,” she said.

The decision comes two days
after Sorenstam won the Michelob
Ultra Open at Kingsmill by seven
shots for her third victory of the
season, and first against a field that
included Lorena Ochoa. It was a
sign that Sorenstam had fully recov-
ered from injuries and was poised to
make a strong bid at recapturing
her stature as the best in women’s
golf.

“It’s sad to see the greatest
female golfer of all time step away
from the game,” said Tiger Woods,
who has played practice rounds
with Sorenstam. “But it’s nice to see
Annika did it on her terms. It has
been a pleasure watching Annika
player for all of these years, but
even more an honor to call her a
friend.”

“] just hope to continue this
momentum,” Sorenstam said after
winning. “I’m feeling it. It’s turning
around, and so J can’t wait for the
next month or so to come with big
tournaments, and I’m excited.”

Sorenstam dominated women’s
golf like few others, especially dur-
ing a five-year period when she won
43 times and finished among the top
three nearly 70 percent of the time.
But for all her achievements — the
only woman to shoot 59, 10 majors
and one of six women to complete
the career Grand Slam — she
became most famous for testing
herself against the men.

Sorenstam became the first
woman in 58 years to compete on

the PGA Tour when she played at
the Colonial in 2003. She missed the
cut, but earned worldwide respect
for the way she handled herself
amid massive scrutiny.

She won LPGA Tour player of
the year a record eight times,

’ including five straight seasons until

Ochoa ended the streak in 2006.
Sorenstam was ineffective most of
2007, the first time in 12 years she
failed to win on the LPGA Tour, as
she recovered from, back and neck
injuries.

She won the first founmeal of
the year in Hawaii, picked up a
playoff victory in South Florida
three weeks ago, then continued a
slow rise in the world rankings
toward Ochoa with a dominant vic-
tory in Virginia.

But when asked Sunday if she
would defend her title at Kingsmill,

’ Sorenstam hedged.

“TI hope so,” she said. “I’m going
to continue this year the way I start-

- ed it and at the end of the year. I

always assess it like I have the last
few years. At this point, I feel great
about what I’m doing.”

Sorenstam still faces a large
deficit to reclaim the No. 1 ranking
from Ochoa, although LPGA Tour
players measure themselves more
on winning the money title and the
points-based player of the year

‘award. Those are easily within

reach for Sorenstam with the season
not even halfway over.

Sorenstam’s 72 victories put her
third on the LPGA Tour’s career
list behind Kathy Whitworth (88)
and Mickey Wright (82). She is tied
for fourth in career majors, five
behind record-setter Patty Berg.

But those kind of marks never
appealed to Sorenstam, even when
she was winning at least 10 times
during a season. She often talked
about stopping sooner than people
imagined to pursue other interests,
whether that meant her affinity for
cooking or fitness.

Sorenstam opened a golf acade-
my last year near her home in
Orlando, Fla., also launching her
brand (“Annika”) and a Web site.
Sorenstam plans to marry next
spring.

She is not the first LPGA Tour
star to retire early. Wright, whom
many regard as the best, stopped
playing a full schedule when she
was 34 and won the last of her 82
tournaments at age 37. ’

At the end of the ’07 season,
Sorenstam felt she had arrived at
“the back nine of my career.”

“T’ve done a lot, and I’m satisfied
in a lot of things,” she said. “I’ve
achieved so much more than I ever
thought I could.”
TRIBUNE SPORTS | WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 13
SPORTS

rimary schoolers take
part in annual torch run

4+—









STARTING at 9 am today,
the New Providence Primary
Schools Sports Association’s
27th annual track and field
championships is scheduled
to get underway at the
Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

The championships kicked
off on Saturday when the
torch run was held through
the streets of New Provi-
dence, climaxing at the
Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasi-
um.

Immediately following the
opening ceremonies, the
track and field competition is
expected to begin.

Former participant Philip-
pa Arnett-Willie and Minis-

_ ter of State for Sports, Bryan
Woodside, are expected to
address the opening.

Ceremony

Adso during the ceremony,
the winning team from the
Cheerleading competition
that took place yesterday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um will put on a repeat per-
formance.

Some 11 schools participat-
ed in the Cheerleading com-
petition sponsored by Muck-
A-Mucks.

The championships, spon-
sored by Thompson Trading
through its product, Milo, °
will run until Friday. More
than 50 schools, both private
and public from New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama and
the Family Islands, are
expected to compete.

While there will be no
overall team champion |
crowned, ribbons will be pre- *
sented to the winners of the
various heats in all events.

The top eight finishers will |
advance to the final where
medals will be presented to .
the first three finishers. The
championships are being co-
ABOVE AND TOP RIGHT - Participants in action during the annual torch run...The championships kicked off on Saturday when the torch run was held through the streets of New = ordinated by Frank ‘Pancho’

Providence, climaxing at the Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasium. Rahming.











C R Walker senior boys conquer Dame Doris 5 John



Photos: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

AC R WALKER KNIGHTS player takes a swing...The Knights added the senior boys softball title to their





already impressive résumé with a dominating game two series shing win against the Dame Doris John-

son Mystic Marlins, 14-1. As he was al season lana, Knichtis’ ace pitcher Lorenzo Williams (not
shown) was the driving force behind the leany’: ree hits and recorded sev- ACR een KNIGHTS player (top) slides to base as another player takes
ar } " tha enfthall

, \
PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



cS ; oe BAO
CLEVELAND Cavaliers’ LeBron James (23)
dunks on Boston Celtics’ Kevin Garnett in the
final two minutes of Game 4 of the NBA
basketball Eastern Conference semifinals |.
Monday, May 12, 2008, in Cleveland. The
Cavaliers beat Boston 88-77 to even the
ey shit) OP

(AP Photo: Tony Dejak)








ll By The Associated Press
e Through May.12 a4

SCORING:
ach eiG 2 VEG FT. PTS . AVG. |
Bryant;LAL). 8” 90 80 273. 34.1
McGrady, Hou. 6 .. 62 33 162 27.0
Nowitzki, Dall. 5 43 42 134 26.8
Parker, S.A. 9 91 48 234 26.0
James, Clev. 10 78 84 254 25.4
Paul, N.O. 9 88 48 228 25.3
Iverson,Den. 4 36 23 98 24.5
Bosh, Tor. 5 42 “35 120 =. 24.0
| Stoudemire, Ph. 5 48 19 116 23.2
Anthony, Den. 4 32 24 90. 22.5
Williams, Utah 10 73 42 211 21.1
West, N.O. 9 74 37 186 20.7
Duncan,S.A. 9 75 34 185. 20.6
Hamilton, Det. 10 82 38 205 20.5
Gasol, LAL 8: 63 36 162 20.3
Lewis, Orl. 9 67 28 181 20.1
Garnett, Bos. 11 OL ~ «B7 220 ~~ =20.0
J. Johnson, Atl. 7 47 30 140 20.0
Howard, Orl. 9 68 39 175 19.4
Ginobili, S.A. 9 59 35 169 18.8






FG PERCENTAGE
FG























Gasol, LAL 63

Haywood, Was. 26 44 591
Prince, Det. 73 124 589
Walton, LAL 30 51 588
Howard, Orl. 68 116 586
Kapono, Tor. 31 53 585
Bell; Phoe. 21 37 568
Diaw, Phoe. 35 64 547
Kleiza, Den. . 22 41 537
Smith, Den. 23... 43 535

REBOUNDS

Q







Howard, Orl. 9 56 85 141 15.7
Camby,Den. 4 11 42. 53 13.3
Boozer, Utah 10 33 88 121 12.1
Duncan, S.A..-.9 38 70 108 12.0
Jamison,:Wash. 6 19 53: - 72 12.0
Nowitzki Dall. 5... 10 50 60 12.0
Okur, Utah 10° 29° 89 118 11.8
Odom,LAL 8 22 65 87 10.9
Chandler,,.N:O; 9 36 58 94 10.4

7 22 51 73 10.4

Horford, Atl,
ASSISTS” =




Paul, N.O. :
Williams, Utah 10 96 9.6
James, Clev. 10 82 8.2

Nash, Phoe. 5 39 7.8
Calderon, Tor. 5 35 7.0
Parker, S.A, 9 62 6.9
Bryant, LAL -- 8 55 6.9
McGrady, Hou: 6 © 41 6.8
Kidd, Dall. 5 34 6.8
Ford, Tor. 5 33 6.6

a





@ By The Associated Press



SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, May 14
Cleveland at Boston (8 p.m. EDT). The
’ Cavaliers are attempting to overcome an
0-2 deficit for the second time in two years.

STAR

Monday

— LeBron James, Cavaliers, had 21
points and 13 assists to lead Cleveland to
a 88-77 win over Boston.

HOMESICK

Cleveland beat Boston 88-77 in Game 4
of their Eastern Conference semifinals
Monday night to tie the best-of-seven
series at 2-2. The Celtics dropped to 0-5 on
the road in the postseason, a stunning slip
for a team that went 31-10 on the road
during the regular season. During a short
visit to Ohio, the Celtics lost their momen-
tum in the series but will head home,
where they went 35-6 before the playoffs
started.

ALL-DEFENSIVE TEAM

League MVP Kobe Bryant and Kevin
Garnett were selected to the NBA All-
Defensive Team on Monday, along with
Marcus Camby, Bruce Bowen and Tim
Duncan. The second team is Shane Batti-
er of the Houston Rockets, Chris Paul of
the New Orleans Hornets, Dwight
Howard of the Orlando Magic, Tayshaun
Prince of the Detroit Pistons and Raja
Bell of the Phoenix Suns.

SPEAKING : :

“He can dunk. Especially if you give
him a running start at the basket. It’s prob-
ably going to be a pretty good dunk and
he’s so darn powerful that once he gets up
there, there’s not a lot you can do.

'— Celtics coach Doc Rivers on LeBron
James after Boston fell to the Cavaliers 88-
77 on Monday night. ,

James delivered a devastating dunk over
a defenseless Kevin Garnett in the final
two minutes.

licks introduce D’ Antoni

as their new head coach |

@ By BRIAN MAHONEY
- AP Basketball Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The

New York Knicks introduced —

Mike D’Antoni as their new
coach Tuesday, hoping his
high-scoring brand of basket-
ball will turn around a team
with seven straight losing sea-
sons.

D’Antoni agreed to leave
the Suns for the Knicks on Sat-
urday, taking over a team com-
ing off a 23-59 finish. He
replaces Isiah Thomas, who
was fired last month after
going 56-108 in two seasons.

D’Antoni won at least 54
games each of the last four sea-
sons and earned coach of the
year honors in 2005. He is
known as one of the NBA’s
top offensive minds, running a
system that helped Steve Nash
win two MVP awards and
making the Suns one of the
league’s most exciting teams.

He brings his entertaining
system to a team that seems
ill-suited to run it. The Knicks
aren’t a quick team, with. Eddy
Curry and Zach Randolph up
front and an unclear situation
at point guard, but D’Antoni
vows he will come up with a
scheme that works with this
group.

“I look at the roster and
that’s'the roster I’m going to
win with,” D’Antoni said at a
news conference at Madison
Square Garden.

The 57-year-old D’Antoni
went 253-136 in Phoenix, but
the Suns let him talk to other
clubs about their jobs after los-

ing to San Antonio in the first -

round. .
When Knicks president
Donnie Walsh learned New
York was one of those teams,
he said he was in Phoenix
probably a day later. Walsh
then beat out the Chicago
Bulls with a $24 million, four-
year contract to land D’An-

‘ toni and make him the 24th

coach in franchise history.
“Mike is a proven winner in

this league with a long impres-

sive coaching resume in the

“ NBA and abroad,” Walsh said.

“While Mike’s style in Phoenix
was extremely successful with a
running offensive team, he can
adjust his style to the person-
nel.”

Walsh took over in New



Richard Drew/AP

NEW YORK Knicks new head coach Mike D’Antoni poses outside New York’s Madison Square Garden
after a news conference Tuesday. The Knicks introduced D’Antoni as their new coach on Tuesday, hop-
ing his high-scoring brand of basketball will turn around a team with seven straight losing seasons.

York last month and has said it
won’t be easy to win right away
with a mismatched roster that
is well over the salary cap. Still,
D’Antoni said he’ll give it a
try. “My focus is to win this
coming year,” he said. “I know
we need to win so that’s my
whole focus.”

D’Antoni said he doesn’t
know if he will use his entire
system, which focuses on trying
to take a shot in the first 7 sec-
onds of the shot clock, many of
them 3-pointers. But he still

é

wants to play fast and believes
many of the players on the ros-
ter are capable of it.

“We were 7 seconds or less
and the rules say you have to
be 24 seconds or less,” D’An-
toni said. “So we can adjust it
to anything we want.”

After firing Thomas, Walsh
took his time with his search,
interviewing TV analyst Mark
Jackson, coaches Rick Carlisle
and Avery Johnson, and
Knicks assistant Herb
Williams. Though he intro-

duced his new coach as Mike
“D’ Antonio,” Walsh knew he
had the right man.

“] thought that Mike was the
best guy to choose because I
think he’s been in situations
like we have right now and he
did a good job with those situ-
ations,” Walsh said.

D’Antoni’s career record is
267-172 in parts of six seasons
with Phoenix and Denver. He
also coached Benetton Treviso
to the 2002 Italian League
championship.

t
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 15 —



Pastor among
four charged
with defrauding

the government
FROM page one

Pratt between November 12,
2004 and December 10, 2004
while at Cat Island conspired
to commit fraud. It is further
alleged that on December 10,
2004, the men by means of
fraud obtained $7,900 from the
Bahamas Government. It is
further alleged that Ferguson
and Pratt on March 8, 2005
while at Cat Island conspired
to commit fraud. Court dock-
ets also state that on March 8,
2005 the two men obtained
$2,100 from the Bahamas
Government.

It is alleged that the funds
belonged to the National
Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA) and the
Ministry of Housing.

The men were not required
to plead to the charges as
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
informed them that the Attor-
ney General had issued a fiat
in the matter authorising the
court to proceed by way of
information. Inspector Ercell
Dorsett informed the court
that the prosecution intends
to proceed with a Voluntary
Bill of Indictment, meaning
that the case will go directly
to Supreme Court. .

Pratt’s attorney Roger Min-
nis told the court yesterday
that his client is a pastor who
ministers at Zion Baptist
Church, Cat Island, and has
no criminal history. Attorney
Raphael Moxey, who
appeared for Evans, told the
court that his client was
employed with the Ministry of
Works as a building’s control
officer and had no previous
convictions. Lopez, who was
not represented by an attor-
ney, told the court that he is
employed at the Ministry of
Education as first assistant sec-
retary. Ferguson who was also
not represented by a lawyer
told the court yesterday that
he works as a senior adminis-
trator in Fresh Creek, Andros.

- Pratt, Lopez and Ferguson
were all granted bail in the
- sum of $25,000 with two
sureties. Evans was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000 with
two sureties.

The case was adjourned to
June 30 when the Voluntary

Bill of Indictment is expected 4

to be ready. The. men were
remanded in custody -yester-

day until their suretors were

approved.
FROM page one

LOCAL NEWS

Major FNM shake-up m

FROM page one

“While the FNM did inherit a lot of challenges when they came into
office, there is no reason why some of them (Minister’s) should not be
doing a better job,” one insider said yesterday.

Besides from the lack of performance, another source within the par-
ty suggested that after their “ascension to power,” some Ministers or
Ministers of State have been “very difficult to access.”

“JT have heard lots of complaints of inaccessibility of certain MPs. And
some people feel that some Ministers are very difficult to access. But
these people : should make themselves accessible — especially to their
constituents,” said another party insider.

Friction at the ground level in various FNM constituencies has also
been a cause of concern for the party, sources suggest.

Reportedly, the unrest has reached the point that a number of
chairmen from the various branches have sought a meeting with the
Prime Minister, to insist that he intervene to “smooth things over”

between the MPs and their branches.

FROM page one .

Bonita Rolle said: “Sonia is a very
special friend. She is always loving
and giving to everybody. We did not

‘want her to go through this alone.”

Khodee’s best friend, Keno Sey-
mour, 16, who grew up with Kodee
in Fox Hill was also at the morgue.
He was walking with Khodee to
Cabbage Beach whén Khodee was

stabbed in the heart and abdomen.

just after 4pm on Monday.

Keno said he and Khodee were
walking together to Cabbage beach
along the path next to the RIU hotel
when an older boy, around age 21;
started an argument with Khodee’s
friend.

Keno explained: “He said to him,
‘It’s time to get you now,’ and
Khodee said, ‘It ain’t like that’, and
he jooked him.

“Then he turned around and tried
to run, and they jooked him in the
back.

“The last thing he said to me was,
‘They got me’. He held up his shirt

‘and I saw him drop. He was just

down on the ground and then I just
lost it. We started to fight.”
Keno said there were two knives

Family and friends

used in the fight, but only Khodee
was stabbed. He said Khodee never
carried a weapon.

Keno, a student at Jordan Prince
William, used to play basketball,
video games and listen to rap music
with Khodee, who was like a broth-
er to him. '

He said: “He was very popular,
in the neighbourhood, and in school.
Everyone knew him and he got
along with everyone. He never used
to pick trouble and people liked him
a lot. He is going to be missed,”

Khodee, a student at Temple
Christian School, was a talented
track runner and basketball player
and had plans to attend boarding
school in the Fall.

Keno said: “I still can’t believe it.
Before we went out, Khodee said
we wouldn’t get into any trouble.
And then I saw him go, just like
that.”

Several people were arrested and
taken into police custody for inter-

view after the incident, but the mur-

der suspect has not yet been
detained.

Bishop Simeon Hall

FROM page one

Bishop Hall yesterday said that he “firmly and fiercely beg(ged) to

differ” with the Court of Appeal president.

He said that in his opinion the commehts she was reported to have
made were, “with the greatest respect, frightening and silly.”

“The evil behaviour of some cannot induce us to return to the
dark ages of the 15th century when persons were burnt at the stake or
sent to gas chambers because they exercised personal faith and freedom

of speech.”

He added: “We cannot remediate the many social problems in our

country by engaging in sweeping generalisations and backward think- .

ing. Freedom must be free even when some use it for excess and

wrong.”

Dame Joan was also reported as stating during the speech that the ‘
country has “plunged headlong. into‘a cesspooliof wickedness, and is
calling it righteousness.” She was quoted.as saying that.the Bahamas “is

adrift.”

According to & Bishop, phil “all well meaning and good think-

ing persons in our society agree that ‘we are adrift’...it ought to be clear
that the greatest area of concern has always been leadership.”

He then added: “I personally find it interesting that the vast major-
ity of our leadership have been lawyers.”

The Tribune attempted to reach Dame Joan Sawyer to clarify her
comments yesterday, but was unsuccessful.

Ship fails inspection

special projects Colin Murphy announced that the
NCL ship — freshly renamed the Norwegian Sky,
_after previously carrying the moniker the Pride of
Aloha — will start cruises to the Bahamas on July 14
this year. .

The 2,002 capacity vessel will offer three and
four-day cruises to Nassau, Grand Bahama and
Great Stirrup Cay and transport hundreds of thou-
sands of passengers over the next year.

However, the cruise ship has received some less
than pleasant press in the United States over the past
few months after it emerged that it failed a Centre
for Disease Control ship inspection in December
of 2007.

The ship received 78 points, below the 86 points
required to pass the bi-annual CDC review. USA
Today’s Cruise Log Blog described the inspection
failure as an occurrence that “almost never hap-
pens at a major line.”

The CDC’s impromptu investigation found that,
among other sanitation violations, there were
“numerous live insect larvae” on one of the ship’s
beverage stations, mould on a counter top, numer-
ous pieces of “heavily soiled” equipment on board,
and the whirlpool was incorrectly chlorinated —
resulting in inspectors immediately evacuating the
pool and “netting the unit.”

The cruise line was reported to have responded to
the investigation, taking steps to rectify the short-
comings.

Yesterday, NCL Vice President Colin Murphy,
when asked about the cleanliness concerns, said
that the newly-named ship will be “operated at the
highest standards.”

“We have a reputation for operating extremely
clean cruise ships. In fact we regularly receive the
very highest scores from the American government
which carries out inspections from time to time.”

According to Mr Murphy, the vessel is also about
to undergo six weeks of remodelling and refurbish-
ment in Miami. When upgraded, the ship will be
“the youngest and highest quality ship in the three
and four-day market”, he said.

Tourism minister Neko Grant said that NCL’s
new itinerary “will have a major affect on our cruise
arrivals and positively impact the bottom lines of
those businesses that focus on this sector of the

’ industry” at a time when tourism figures “have mod-

erated.”

Additionally, the inclusion of Grand Bahama as a
destination will be a major boon to its depressed
economy. Mr Grant said that the ship should make
42 trips to that island over the next year, bringing at
least 39,900 passengers.

It will also ensure more regular employment
opportunities for 15 Berry Islanders who work at the
cruise line’s private island, Great Stirrup Cay, as
the resort will now be open year round rather than
just in winter months. ;

FROM page one

: “It is felt that young men in
i Step Street murdered this
? young man because he is from
? a neighbourhood that has been
? warring with them. I heard at
east 17 rounds fired. It was
i like a war had broken out.”

Neil White, 40, was caught

: in the Step Street crossfire. He
? was shot in the right thigh and
: treated at Princess Margaret
: Hospital.

: Chief Superintendent for
i Bahamas Police Central
: Detective Unit Glenn Miller
i Said: “We know the deceased
? is from Fox Hill and this inci-
: dent happened not far from
: where he lived.

“We are putting pieces

together to see whether there
: was any connection between
? the two incidents.”

A 32-year-old man has been

i arrested in connection with the
? shooting after he was linked
: to a car seen in Step Street at
: the time of the incident.

A spokesman for the Dill-

? Davis family said: “We con-
? demn the killing of our loved
? one, Khodee, and we condemn
-} what appeared to be a retal-
jatory shooting.

Gunshots ‘intended
for teenager’s killer’

“We are opposed to mem-
bers of the community in our
neighbourhood taking any
kind of revenge or retaliating
against any resident of Step
Street.

“We believe the police
ought to be allowed to contin-
ue with their investigations
and if any members of the
community have any informa-

tion go to the police or'come
to the immediate family and
we will pass on the informa-
tion. ”

Anyone with information
which could assist police
inquiries should call Bahamas
Police Central Detective Unit
on 322-2561 or call Crimestop-
pers anonymously on 328-
8477.

Amnesty issues ‘Urgent Action Appeat'

FROM page one

United States branch of Amnesty International yesterday.

It tells its recipients that Emmanuel McKenzie and his Bahamian
environmental organization, the Millar’s Creek Preservation Group
(MCPG), “have been targeted by the Bahamian security forces who
have also accused him of illegal activities in an attempt to discredit
him.”

The notice adds that Amnesty believes that the “harassment” of Mr
McKenzie by security forces in April “may be linked to his environ-
mental activism.”

The global human rights group is calling on its members to “send
appeals to arrive as quickly as possible” to Deputy Prime minister
Brent Symonette, Minister of National Security Tommy Eupieiuest
and Police Commissioner Reginald Ferguson.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Troops hike to
quake-buried



inese villages

“=” =

A WOMAN cries as she walks by a line rescuers just before they are going to search for victims after the earth-
quake at Beichuan County in Mianyang of southwest China's Sichuan province.

lm By AUDRA ANG
MIANYANG, China

. Soldiers hiking over landslide-

blocked roads reached the epi- ,

center of China’s devastating
earthquake Tuesday, pulling bod-
ies and a few survivors from col-
lapsed buildings. The death toll
of more than 12,000 is certain to
rise as the buried are found,
according to the Associated Press.

Rescuers worked through a
steady rain-as they searched
wrecked towns across hilly
stretches of Sichuan province that
were stricken by Monday’s mag-
nitude-7.9 quake,. China’s, dead-
liest. in three decades. Tens of
thousands of homeless spent a
second night outdoors, some
sleeping under plastic sheeting,
others bused to a stadium in the
city of Mianyang, on the edge of
the disaster area. -

Street lamps were switched on
in Mianyang on Tuesday night,
but all the buildings were dark
and deserted after the govern-

ment ordered people out of them

for fear of aftershocks. Security
guards were posted at apartment
blocks to keep people out.

The industrial city, of 700,000
people — home to the headquar-
ters of China’s nuclear weapons
industry.— was turned into a
thronging refugee camp, with res-
idents sleeping outdoors.

“T’m cold. I don’t dare to sleep,
and I’m worried a building is
going to fall down on me,” said
Tang Ling, a 20-year-old waitress
wrapped in a borrowed pink
down jacket and camped outside
the Juyuan restaurant with three
co-workers. “What’s happened is
so cruel. In.one minute to have so
many people die is too tragic.”

As night fell, a first wave of
200 troops entered the town of
Wenchuan, near the epicenter,
trudging across ruptured roads
and mudslides, state television
said, Initial reports from soldiers
said one nearby town could
account for only 2,300 survivors
out of 9,000 people, China Cen-
tral Television said.

_. At least 12,012 deaths occurred
.in Sichuan alone while another
"323 died in five other provinces
and the metropolis of Chongqing,
state media reported. That toll
seemed likely to jump sharply as
‘rescue teams reached hard-hit
towns. © |

‘. The devastation and ramped-
‘up rescue-across large, heavily
populated region of farms and
factory towns'strained local gov-
ernments. Food dwindled on the
shelves of the few stores th: t
remained open. Gasoline was
scarce, with long lines outside

some stations and pumps marked |

“empty.” -
Buses carried survivors away

from Beichuan, which was flat-.

tened — a few buildings stand-
ing amid piles of rubble in a nar-
row valley, according to CCTV

video. More than 10,000 people

from there and surrounding areas.

packed Mianyang’s Jiuzhou Gym-

nasium, with empty water bottles, .

boxes of instant noodles and cig-
arette cartons littering the ground.

“T saw rocks and earth rolling
down the hill, and they destroyed
whatever they hit below,” said a
farmer. who only gave his sur-

~ name, Chen, from the village of

Leigu near Beichuan. “There’s
nothing I can do about this. It’s all
in the hands of the government.”

In the provincial capital of
Chengdu, FM-91.4 all-traffic radio
station operated around the clock,
reading text messages sent by sur-
vivors of stricken areas to let rel-
atives know they are alive.

The government’s high-gear
response aimed to reassure Chi-
nese while showing the world it
was capable of handling the dis-
aster and was ready for the Aug.
8-24 Olympics in Beijing.
Although the government said it
welcomed outside aid, officials
said that the assistance would be
confined to money and supplies,
not to foreign personnel.

As Prime Minister Wen Jiabao
crisscrossed the disaster area to

oversee relief efforts, the official -

Xinhua news agency cited the
Defense Ministry as saying that
some 20,000 soldiers and police
arrived in the disaster area, with
30,000 more on the way by plane,
train, truck and on foot.

“We will save the people,”
Wen said through a bullhorn to
survivors in Shifang, where two
chemical plants collapsed and
buried more than 600 people,
according to CCTV. “As long as
the people are there, factories can

be built into even better ones, °

and so can the towns and coun-
thes.” °

The Finance Ministry said it
had allocated $123 million in
quake aid.

At the world famous Wolon
National Nature Reserve, all 86
pandas were reported safe late

Tuesday in the first word since

communications with'the pre-
serve were cut off. A group of 31
British tourists. panda-watching
in,the preserve also returned safe-
ly to Chengdu, the Foreign Min-
istry said, although there was no
word on .12 missing Americans
on a World Wildlife Fund tour. -

Still, prospects for survivors in
the quake zone dwindled. Only
58 people were pulled from
demolished buildings across the
quake area so far, China Seismo-
logical Bureau spokesman Zhang
Hongwei told Xinhua.

Weeping parents held a vigil in '

a steady outside a collapsed
school in the town of Juyuan,
where more than 900 high school
students were initially trapped.
Only one survivor has been
found: a girl pulled free by rescue
team. ;

Bowing to public calls, Beijing
Olympics organizers scaled down

the boisterous ongoing torch
relay, saying Wednesday’s leg in
the southeastern city of Ruijin
will begin with a minute of silence
and more somber ceremonies.
People along the route, which
next month is scheduled to arrive
in quake-hit areas, would be
asked for donations, an organiz-
ing committee spokesman said.
In the areas around Mianyang,
more than 7,300 people died and
another 18,000 were believed
trapped in rubble, most in
Beichuan.’ Amid the:rubble,
CCTV showed the six-story

‘Beichuan Hotel listing, half its

first story collapsed. Medical
teams tried to treat the wounded
in dirt courtyards littered with
broken furniture and concrete. -.
Though Wen and others called
for air drops of emergency sup-_
plies to hard-to-reach areas, rain

impeded efforts for a second day,

and Xinhua said a group of para-
troopers called off a rescue mis-
sion. ‘

Strong aftershocks — one of
magnitude-6, according to Chi-
nese seismologists — hit Cheng-
du, the region’s usually busy com-
mercial center. A KFC outlet ran
out of chicken and cooking oil. -

Expressions of sympathy and
offers of help poured in from
Japan and the European Union.
Russia was sending a plane with
30 tons of relief supplies, the
Interfax news agency said. Chi-
nese President Hu Jintao dis-
cussed the disaster by phone with
President Bush.

The U.S. is offering an initial
$500,000 in relief in anticipation
of an appeal by the International
Red Cross, White House spokes-
woman Dana Perino said.

While welcoming the support,
the Chinese government suggest-
ed that aid would be confined to
supplies and money, not foreign
personnel.

“We welcome funds and sup-
plies. We can’t accommodate per-
sonnel at this point,” Wang
Zhenyao, the Civil Affairs Min-
istry’s top disaster relief official,
told reporters in Beijing.

The Dalai Lama, who has been
vilified by Chinese authorities
who blame him for recent unrest
in Tibet, offered prayers for the
victims. The epicenter skirts the
Tibetan highlands, where some
communities staged anti-govern-
ment protests in March.

Seismologists said the quake
was on a level the tegion sees
once every 50 to 100 years. The
region’s last strong quake was in
1933, when a magnitude 7.5
quake kiiled more than 9,300 peo-

_ ple. Monday’s quake was pow-

ered up the pent-up stress,
experts said. i

“J don’t think this is unheard
of,” said Amy Vaughn of the USS.
Geological Survey. “It’s more an
issue of how long and how much
stress has been built up in this
region.”

Wang Jiaowen/AP Photo ;

DEBRIS of collapsed buildings is seen after the earthquake in Beichuan county in southwest China's Sichuan
province, Tuesday, May 13, 2008. Rescue workers sifted through tangled debris of toppled schools and homes
Tuesday for thousands of victims buried or missing after China's worst earthquake in three decades, where the
deatn toll soared to more than 12,000 people in the hardest-hit province alone.

a


WEDNESDAY,

“MAY

a 2008

: - SECTION B « JLab ncaa hch tt led Munch oh ean

Corporation ‘exhausted’
ability to pay $5.6m bill



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
’ Tribune Business Editor

he Water & Sewerage

Corporation has

“exhausted their [gov-

ernment] subsidy” for the

current 2007-2008 finan-
cial year, the chief executive of its
major water supplier said yesterday,
blaming its cash-strapped position as
the reason his firm is owed $5.6 million
in accounts receivables.

Asked by Wall Street analysts to
explain why that position had accu-
mulated on Consolidated Water’s
books at March 31, 2008, Rick McTag-
gart, the BISX-listed company’s chief
executive, replied: “The Corporation
there in the Bahamas is subsidised by
the Government, and the Budget goes
from June to June.

“It’s our understanding that they’ve
[the Corporation] exhausted their sub-
sidy for this fiscal year, and we’ve been
working with them to ensure they get
- up to date on payments when the new
government: budget is due next
month.”

Bahamas ‘runs the risk’

ROYAL 9 FIDELITY

* But minister questions figure, saying W & S Corporation
will meet ‘all obligations’ and has not run out of money

* Says it has ‘lived up to’ payment plan with Consolidated
Water and ‘made strides’ in reducing accounts receivables

When contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for public utilities, disputed
the figure given by Mr McTaggart.

He said the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration’s..chief financial officer had
informed him “that as of the end of
March, the outstanding invoices to
Consolidated were approximately $3
million”.

Expressing concern that Consoli-
dated Water, which supplies the Water
& Sewerage Corporation with water
from its Blue Hills and Windsor
reverse osmosis plants, was revealing
information on the Corporation’s
financial position (something it is oblig-
ed to do to comply with Securities &
Exchange Commission requirements),

Mr Neymour acknowledged that it had’;

a number of outstanding accounts.
“The Water & Sewerage Corpora-:

tion is a corporation that has strug-)/

gled financially for a number of years,
and is still facing increasing challenges .
throughout the Bahamas,” Mr Ney- |
mour told The Tribune. i
“However, we have an agreement

“with Consolidated Water in terms of

payments and reducing our outstand:
ing payments, which we have lived up,
to.

_ “We have made strides in reducing
the outstanding fees this year. We
intend to meet out obligations to Con-
solidated Water, and the Water &
Sewerage Corporation has been mak-

ing payments to them since March 31. -

“The Government is right now
' preparing an Action Plan for the

Water & Sewerage Corporation, which
we shall address in short order.”

Mr Neymour added that the $100
million bond issue proposed under the
former Christie’ administration, the
proceeds of which would have financed
upgrades to, and the built out of,
Water & Sewerage Corporation infra-
structure, ‘was: “not a priority for the
Government at this particular time”.

In its 10-Q filing with the SEC in -

the US, Consolidated Water said of
the situation: “Included in our consol-
idated balance sheet as. of March 31,

SEE page 6B



on Act reform delays

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER
government
minister yester- i
day said the
likely failure to
place the
amended Secu-
tities Industry
Act on the Par-
liamentary leg- E
islative agenda
before year-end left the
Bahamas “running the risk of
falling short of international
best practices” in the key cap-
ital markets business.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance in the
Christie administration,
described the delays in bring-
ing the revised Act forward as
“unfortunate”, given that the
Bahamas needed “much
strengthened” securities legis-
lation to grow its capital mar-
kets.

Mr Smith, now CFAL’s
chairman, told The Tribune
that the revised Securities
Industry Act - upon which
work was begun when he was
in office - was part of a bigger
picture, in that it was linked to
regulatory consolidation and
other economic and monetary
reforms the Government was
eyeing.

“It would clarify the grey
areas in terms of what the
Commission could or could not
do.” Mr Smith said, “and how
far it could go in terms of infor-

Speak up,



mation exchange with other —

regulators.

“At the same time, it would
have strengthened the plat-
form BISX [the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange] has to operate on
as ittakes on a more futuristic
role. It would also further the
aim of relaxation of exchange
controls.

“Tt [the Act] is part ofa larg-
er picture. We need a much
strengthened secyrities legis-
lation in place in order to pro-
tect capital markets in the
Bahamas. It’s a pity it will not
‘make the legislative agenda
[this year].°’

A press release issued yes-
terday by the Securities Com-
mission, the capital markets
regulator, confirmed Tribune
Business’s exclusive story of
Tuesday, May 13, stating that
the regulations accompanying
the revised Securities Industry
Act would be released to the
private sector in the 2008
fourth. quarter.

Mr Smith yesterday
acknowledged to The Tribune
that the Government and cap-
ital markets regulators had not
moved fast enough bringing
the Securities Industry Act
reforms forward, saying the
legislation had “sort of been
dragging along”.

“It’s been falling too far

behind,” Mr Smith said. “It.

really has to come up to speed

See ACT, 5B

Flemings

are listening.



in the furure of
Grand Bahama.
ro] EAU eS (eln ct

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas _ has
moved to make its products
“more affordable to a wider
cross-section of consumers”,
through leasing deals for: its
digital set-top and video
recorder boxes,_as it, eagerly.
awaits growth opportunities
that may be produced from the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company’s (BTC) privatisa-
tion.

Barry. Williams, Cable

Bahamas’ vice-president of.

finance, said that while the

BISX-listed company’s leasing

programme had “started slow-
ly”, the roll-out of its promo-
tional and marketing campaign
via radio and TV advertise-
ments was helping it to “take
off now”.

The leasing programme is

. Company eagerly awaits opportunities |

| Cable Bahamas makes products ‘more affordable’

that may follow BTC privatisation
* But comes out on losing end of
US interest rate swap agreement

likely to be greeted warmly by

_ Bahamian consumers, espe-

cially residential ones, whose
disposable incomes and house-
hold budgets are likely com-
ing under increasing strain
from rising electricity, gas and
food costs.

Mr Williams said the leasing
programme, started by Cable
Bahamas at the end of March
2008, was designed to make
the digital set-top boxes need-
ed to access its Ocean’s Digital
TV service more accessible to
consumers.

Such boxes would.cost $150
to purchase outright, but Mr

- Williams said Cable Bahamas

was leasing the first box to sub-

-scribers at the rate of $5 per

month. Depending on how

-many boxes subscribers
applied for, Cable Bahamas

would lease a second for $3
per month, and the third for
$2 per month.

“What we’ve basically done ;

is to make it more affordable
to a wider cross-section of con-
sumers,” Mr Williams added.

“One of our goals is to make”

sure a large cross-section of

See CABLE, 3B

Cal he Raja! Fly pension experts ody "

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Cruise line
could give
$22m boost.

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE Government is
expected to receive almost $8
million between July 2008
and December 2009 in cruise,
passenger head tax through. -
the arrival of the Norwegian |
Sky’s weekly calls, starting
later this summer. Bay Street
merchants could experience a
$22 million spending injec-
tion from tourists brought in
by all the cruise line’s vessels

Tourism Minister Neko |
Grant announced that Nor-
wegian Cruise Lines (NCL)
will reflag, and rename, the
former Pride of Aloha and _.
launch the ship as the Norwe:
gian Sky, offering three and,
four- day cruises to the - ‘
Bahamas from Miami start-"
ing on Friday, July 18. I

NCL is also expected to

See CRUISE, 5B

Sua eh]
SIV ES

Drive a Honda Fit ont ra: up to
40 miles per gallon



Royal Fidelity Pension Plan

ee rey Gare on ee ee ea

Perea era

berber egy Gey ee

eevee J

i tes rae

DELLEY


: ‘ Ce - of

_PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



For many, wages are a real ‘living’ issue

“EARLIER this month, as
the debate about the implica-
tions of rising. oil and food
costs was making the rounds
on the various ‘radio talk
shows’, several callers raised
the issue of whether the
avernment would consider
faising the minimum wage.

* Since July 1, 2000, the min-
imum wage for government
employees in the Bahamas
has been established at $4.45
per hour or about $175 per
























| St. Andrew’s in Exuma.

- _- NURSERY TEACHERS.

pe




t ‘Degrees from an

;

tS



application forms

TEACHING VACANCIES

“The Anglican Central Education Authority invites
_ applications from qualified Teachers for positions
‘ | available at St. John’s College, St. Anne’s School
“and Bishop Michael Eldon School in Freeport and

g Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
accredited University or
‘ . College and Teoching Certificate need apply.

i For further details and applications, from, please
contact the Anglican Central Education Authority on
i , Sands Road at telephone (242) 322-3015/6/7.

application
with
documents must be sent by Friday, May 30th, 2008 to
| the Anglican Education Department addressed _to:-

t The Director of Education

\ Anglican Central Education Authority
_ P.O.Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas

week. If my memory serves
me correctly, I believe that
the actual legislated rate is $4
per hour or some $160 per
week.

When asked whether the
Government was considering
raising the minimum wage in
light of escalating prices, the
minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, was quoted
as indicating the negative.

Over the years, I have
found that very few persons

completed
required

and/or
copies of










' poor. That last argument is

actually take time to under-
stand the issues involved in
establishing and maintaining
a minimum wage policy. The
arguments in favour of a min-
imum wage seem just as.
strong as those against it.

Informative

Several years ago, I discov-
ered a March 13, 2007, article
by Lisa Smith, entitled
Exploring the Minimum
Wage, posted on
www.investopedia.com. This
provided an excellent and
extremely well written, easy
to read, discussion, which I
regard as a ‘must read’ on the
topic and reprint below:

“The International Labour
Office in Geneva, Switzer-
land, reports that some 90
per cent of countries around
the world have legislation
supporting a minimum wage.
The minimum wage in coun-
tries that rank within the low-
est 20 per cent of the pay
scale is less than $2 per day, |
or about $57 per month. The
minimum wage in the coun-
tries that represent the high-
est 20 per cent of the pay
scale is. about $40 per day, or
about $1,185 per month.

Despite paying one of the
highest minimum wages in
the world, the minimum wage
is a perpetual hot potato
among politicians in the US.
The last time the minimum
wage was federally increased

“in the US was 1997. Propo-

nents of an increase argue
that the cost of living has
risen more than 25 per cent
since then. Since the mini-
mum wage is not indexed to
inflation, it does not system-
atically increase in propor-
tion to changes in the costs of
living.

Arguments in Favour

Those in favour of increas-
ing the minimum wage argue
that such an increase lifts
people out of poverty, helps
low-income families make
ends meet and narrows the
gap between the rich and

Bintthday and




Spe ncwe wee NA
OA



242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501

Financial Solutions for cr

MORTGAGES » MUTUAL FUNDS » LIFE INSURANCE * HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS » FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS

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| By Larry Gibson



underscored by the exorbi-
tant salaries earned by chief
executives and other corpo-
rate titans, who are also the
same people generally argu-.
ing against an increase in the
minimum wage. The idea of
an increase also has a strong
populist appeal, particularly
in a nation where discussions
about social class - when they
are held at all - are nearly
always framed in terms of the
rich versus the poor.

Arguments Against
On the other side of the

’ discussion is the argument

that increasing the minimum
wage hurts small businesses,
squeezes profit margins,
leads to inflation, encourages
employers to downsize their
staff and increases the cost of
goods to the end consumer.
Interestingly, the arguments
against an increase rarely
focus on the fact that a good
portion of states already
mandate a wage that is higher
than the federal minimum
wage.

By The Numbers

Economically speaking, the
theory of supply and demand
suggests that the imposition
of an artificial value on
wages, which is higher than
the value that would be dic-
tated in a free-market system,
creates an inefficient market
and leads to unemployment.
_ The inefficiency occurs
when there are a greater
number of workers that want
the higher paying jobs than .
there are employers willing
to pay the higher wages. Crit-
ics disagree.

What is generally agreed
upon by all parties is that the
number of individuals relying

on the minimum wage in the ©

US is less than 5 per cent.

However, this statistic is
largely ignored in favor of
citations regarding the num-
ber of people that live in
poverty. Keep in mind that
earning more than the mini-
mum wage does not necessar-
ily mean that one is not living
in poverty. According to esti-
mates from the CIA World
Fact Book, some 13 per cent
of the US population lives in
poverty — that is 37 million
people. — .

To put this in perspective,
the federal poverty level for a
working adult was $9,800 in
2006, according to the US

. Department of Health and

Human Services. At $5.25
per hour, a minimum wage
workers earns $10,920 per
year, which is already greater
than the federally determined
poverty level.

Pay

If the worker's pay jumps
to $7.25, yearly earnings
would move to $15,080 per
year for a 40-hour week.
From a mathematical and
logical perspective, increasing
the minimum wage does not
lift anyone out of poverty
because the prior minimum _
wage already paid more than
the official poverty rate.

The numbers would seem
to put the minimum wage
argument to rest, but only
because of the misaligned
focus on the phrase ‘mini-
mum wage’. When referring
to that phrase, many people
actually seem to be seeking a
living wage, which is general-
ly defined as the amount
required to raise a family on

a single wage-earner’s salary. »

Pegging that number to the
poverty rate for a family of
four moves the bar to $20,000
per year. Looking at the ©
argument from this perspec-
tive, neither the current mini-
mum wage nor the proposed
increased wage will provide a
living wage. Even if an
increase would move the
salary of every worker in the
country to this level, it would
make little difference i in-the

statistical comparison
between the earnings of the
average worker to those of
the highest-paid chief execu-
tives.

No Easy Answers

What is the solution to the
minimum wage/living wage
issue? Statistics can be gath-
ered to support both sides of
the argument. While there
are no easy answers, a good
first step is to frame the

. debate in realistic terms.

Referring to the minimum
wage as a wage designed to
support a family confuses the
issue. Families need a living
wage, not a minimum wage.
With that said, working at
McDonalds or the local gas
station isn't a career. These
are jobs designed to help
entry-level workers join the
workforce, not to support the
(long-term) financial needs of
a family.

On the core issue of mini-
mum wage itself, political
wrangling is unlikely to result
in a real solution. A more
practical solution is to join
the workforce at the low-end
of the wage scale, build your
skills, get an education and
move up the ladder to a bet-
ter-paying job, just as mem-
bers of the workforce have
done for generations.”

Until next week...

_. NB: Larry R. Gibson, a

Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group |
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insur-
ance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do
not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group
International or any of its
subsidiary and/or affiliated
companies. Please direct any
questions or comments to
rigibson@atlantichouse. com.
bs- eee

JOB OPPORTUNITY
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has been established by statute
for the regulation of the telecommunications, electricity and water and
sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

The PUC is seeking a utility regulatory professional with training and
experience, particularly in the field of telecommunications regulation, to
’ fill the position of Executive Director.

The Executive Director is the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission
reporting to the Chairman, and is responsible for the day-to-day
administration of the affairs of the Commission and for ensuring that the
Commission is provided with high quality technical advice and guidance
in the execution of its functions.

The successful candidate will be required to provide leadership and
management direction to the PUC. The candidate will also be a high-
level practitioner with direct experience in.a wide variety of utility
regulatory activities including liberalization(especially with respect to
telecommunications) granting of licences, approval of rates, service quality,
licence.enforcement measures, universal service policies, radio spectrum
management, and international best practices. This post will be offered

on a contract basis.

The successful applicant will have a Master’s Degree or Professional
Certification in Economics, Management, Law or Engineering and is
expected to have had ten (10) years practice as a trained regulator.

The PUC offers a very attractive remuneration and benefits package
‘together with a pleasant working environment. Further information about
the PUC can be obtained from the website: www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:

Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission
' 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Fax No. (242) 323-7288

E-mail: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs

Applications should be received by 16 May, 2008. Only applicants who
have been short-listed will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE



@ By CARA BRENNEN- Caribbean Disaster Emer- for understanding and
BETHEL gency Response Agency, in. responding to potential risk
Tribune Business collaboration with the and crisis situations. These
Reporter Caribbean Tourism Organi- include hotel operators, trav-

sation. el agencies, food and service
TOURISM and disaster The purpose of the project organisations, emergency ser-
management officials yester- is to develop standardised vices and local government
day met to discuss strategic methods for hazard mapping authorities”.

plans to help the industry and risk vulnerability assess- 7

recover in the aftermath of a ments in the region, which Pointed

natural disaster. will aid the regional approach
The national workshop to disaster risk prevention She pointed out that con-

held yesterday is a compo- and response. tributing to the development
nent of the Regional Disaster Geneva Cooper, senior of the plan guarantees full

Risk Management for Sus- director of the Ministry of ownership of the end results.

tainable Tourism in the Tourism and Aviation, said Ms Cooper said the work-

Caribbean project. that being one of the pilot shop’s goal was to develop a
The $1 million initiative is countries in the project plan that will complement

largely sponsored by the places the Bahamas, “in a each country’s existing

Inter-American Develop- position to involve a wide national plan.

ment Bank, which donated cross-section of our own “Tt is crucial that we have

$800,000. It is a three-year tourism stakeholders in the such comprehensive plans in

project involving the development of aframework __ place, and persons with the
CABLE, from 1B Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas __ that it would pursue a cellular
is eagerly awaiting new _ licence.

our customer base can afford telecommunications growth Mr Williams now told The

our products.” opportunities that could be Tribune: “The Government

Cable Bahamas has also ushered in if the Bahamas and the Prime Minister have
applied the leasing programme Telecommunications Compa- indicated that BTC should be
to Digital Video Recorders ny (BTC) is privatised by year- privatised by year-end. We
(DVRs), an expensive piece of end 2008, something Prime would hope that with that
equipment that Mr Williams Minister Hubert Ingraham has would come more liberalisa-
said would cost around $800 committed to. tion of the rest of the telecom-
to purchase. The company has in the past, munications market, and we

DVRs allow consumers to under its original chairman and_—_— would be more than willing to
record their favourite pro- former largest shareholder, be participants in that liberali-
grammes, and come in both Philip Keeping, made no secret _ sation.
Standard and High Definitions. of its desire to expand beyond “We are ready and willing
The former can be leased ata — its core cable TV, Internet and __ to take advantage of that. We
rate of $12.96 per month, the data services base, having said feel the Government is one
latter for $29 per month. in a previous annual report _ that is certainly pro-competi-

, tion and liberalisation.”
The only figure in Cable

Bahamas’ 2008 first quarter
>t ag a Lo A results that went in the wrong
direction was the company’s
5; interest rate expenses, which
_ increased by 45.3 per cent to
$1.108 million from $607,000
the year before.
ef Mr Williams attributed this
7 Te =f to an interest rate swap agree-
ment, which had not worked
Peo Bole a ele itol aig ment. which ha
He explained that Cable
1 6 Bahama Sound Exuma Bahamas aid most of its bor-
rowing in US$, in addition to
having to pay US$ for all its
Call s signals -apart from local pro-
; gramming - and electronics.
* “Our borrowing for capital
327-8026 projects is mostly in USS, so
what we:did a year-and-a-half
or ago was to enter into swap
agreements to mitigate interest
359-31 60 rate risk at the time,” Mr
' Williams said.
Cable Bahamas locked in its
interest rate risk exposure at
6 per cent, only for US interest



Kelly’s Team

Learning & Development
_ Manager

Kelly's is seeking a fully-qualified and experienced professional to become the full-
time Learning and Development Manager for the 350 + employees in Kelly's House
& Home and Kelly's Lumber. The position requires an experienced. and resourceful
communicator able to motivate adults with varying educational backgrounds and
qualifications, and capable of continuing the development and implementation of on-
going in-house learning and development programs, with their attendant testing and
evaluation procedures. Such programs will include, but not necessarily be limited to:

* Orientation courses for all new employees

° Supervisory courses for new and prospective supervisors —

¢ Customer Service courses for all retail employees

* Computer familiarisation courses

* Product-specific knowledge courses for all retail employees
¢ Safety courses for drivers and warehouse/yard personnel

¢ Personal development courses for career advancement

The successful applicant will also be expected to develop and maintain strong links
with other providers of on-going work-related courses in specialised and technical
areas. Previous experience in learning and development or in adult education would
be an asset. ,

This is a management position for an experienced and qualified professional, who is
willing to demonstrate a long-term commitment to Kelly's development and expansion.
Benefits include medical, pension, and profit-sharing plans, with remuneration package
dependant on qualifications and experience.

E-mail letter of application with comprehensive resume to info@kellysbahamas.com
with "Learning and Development Manager" as subject.

No phone calls please

Kelly’s "35.

Nel - partner § 6
Tel: (242) 393.4002 Monday-Friday 9:00am8:00pm
Fax: (3434 3934096 ‘Sai’ dea



WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 3B

ee ee as
Tourism plans its Disaster Response

appropriate expertise and ensure the continuity of their _ tection of the industry,” Ms

authority to be able toimme- __ business:and, by default, pro- | Cooper said.
diately respond should a cri-
sis arise,” Ms Cooper said.

She said this was important
regardless of which govern-
ment or private sector agen-
cies persons belonged to, and ,

that Bahamians see them-
selves as having a direct con-

tribution to make in protect-

ing the tourism industry.
Ms Cooper said the min-

istry needs to involve more a A 2 Un @ .S'

stakeholders in workshops sii Ed : é

and training programmes,

and give practical support in
risk management. -

~ “We must recognize that
risk management is not only
reserved for large resorts, but 8

every small business must
also take active steps to

\

rates to go the other way and :
dip below that figure as the US
Federal Ree we enibarced on Ar awak Homes Ltd and Is no
a series of rate cuts to save the
economy from recession.
Accounting treatments
require Cable Bahamas to
record the accrual of any dif-

Jlonger authorized to conduct
Krone sean hfe at business on behalf of Arawak
interest and the interest it is

actually paying until the swap § Homes or an of it’s affiliates.

agreement ends.

BB Vinca PED) 774. tees
See ey com



@ Frost & Young LLP
© Timnes square
ssew. York, New Yar bi te 64



Sl! ERNST & YOUNG



Report of Independent Auditors

Board of Directors
Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)
New York, New York

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate
Bank (USA) (the “Bank” as of December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the related
consolidated statements of income, stockholder’s equity and cash flows for the years then
ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our
tesponsibility is to-express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the
United States. Those standards: require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain
reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements,
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management,
and evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that
our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion. Ban Pa ge en

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in
all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate Bank
(USA) at December 31, 2007 and 2006, and the consolidated results of its operations and

its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principl
accepted in the United States. Ue ae

; Garnet ¥ pong tir

Mizuho Corporate Bank. (USA)

March 27, 2008

Consolidated Balance Sheets

December 31

(In thousands, except share amounts) ; 2007 2006
Assets .
Cash and due from banks (Note 3) ; $ 28,882
Interest-bearing deposits with banks te . ris
Federal funds sold £9 - 710,000
Securities (Note 4) :
Available-for-sale 270,26
Held-to-maturity sai7 ma
Loans and leases (Notes 5 and 21) 2,502,271 2,294,164
Allowance for credit losses (Note 6) (10,289) (12,209)
Net loans and leases 2,491,982 2,281,955
Accrued interest receivable and other assets 72,432 81,570
Total assets , / $2,897,573 $3,680,863
Liabilities :
Noninterest-bearing deposits $ 101,608 $ 103,238
Interest-bearing deposits (Note 9) 1,348,312 1,546,571 :
Total deposits . 1,449,920 1,649,809
Federal funds purchased ‘ 270,000 904,0

J ’ 104,00
Other borrowings (Note 10) - 66,129 a
Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities 91,915 125,794
Total liabilities :

1,877,964 2,679,634

Stockholder’s equity (Note /4)
Common stock—$100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding




984,742 shares in 2007 and 2006) _ 98,474 98,474
Capital surplus 1,222,036 1,222,036
Accumulated deficit (276,240) (3 19.2 86)
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss)/income 24,661 5
Total stockholder’s equity 1,019,609 1,001,229 4
Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity $2,897,573 $3,680,863.

a eer nena
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
. . ale ay
Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited
Accounts from SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited,

P. O. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau Bahamas.

You Run YOUr BUSINESS Accept cheques easy as credit cards,

We'll Collect the Cheques With the confidence of cash
Take the risk out of accepting Sa

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_ PAGE 4B,
ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited +
(incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)
Balance Sheet
As of December 31, 2007
(Expressed in United States Dollars)
: Notes 2007 2006
$ $
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents il 104,160 | 59,945
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss 3&11 652,132 635,843
Trustee fees receivable, net : , 4 282,946 257,456
' Prepayments and other assets 6 67,751 89,424
Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements 5 254,221 124,715

Total Assets 1,361,210 1,167,383
‘LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Liabilities
Accrued expenses 25,597 25,621.
Accounts payable ' 6 220,573 18,170
Unearmed revenue 38,306 20,962
284,476 64,753
Equity
Share capital: authorized, issued and fully paid
1,000,000 shares of US $1 each 1,000,000 1,000,000
Retained earnings’ * 76,734 102,630
1,076,734 1,102,630

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

1,361,210 1,167,383

Signed as approved on behalf of The Board of Directors:

Director

Date



Director

April 18, 2008

Notes to the Balance Sheet
December 31, 2007

1.

Incorporation, Business Activity and Group Structure

ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited (the “Company” is incorporated under The Companies Act,
1992, and is licensed to carry on trust business in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The
address of its registered office is Providence House, First Floor Eastern Side, East Hill Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas. Its previous registered office was located at the British American Building,
Second Floor, George Street, Nassau, The Bahamas, S

The Company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Amsterdam Trust Corporation (ATC),
Chuchubiweg 17, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles.

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies applied in preparation of this balance sheet are set out below.
These policies have been consistently applied to all years presented, unless otherwise stated.

(a) Basis of presentation

The Company’s balance sheet is prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRS) and under the historical cost convention as modified by the
revaluation of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss.

In the current year, the Company has adopted IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures
and the amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements, which became effective
for fiscal periods beginning on or after January 1, 2007. The impact of the adoption of
IFRS 7 and the changes to IAS 1 Has been to expand the disclosures provided in these
financial statements. regarding the Company’s financial instruments and management of
capital. ,

J
i

The remaining standards and amendments and interpretations to published standards that
became effective for fiscal periods beginning on or after January 1, 2007 were not relevant
to the Company’s operations and accordingly did not impact the Company’s accounting
policies or balance sheet. :

The application of new standards and amendments and interpretations to existing standards
that have been published but are not yet effective are not expected to have a material impact
on the Company’s accounting policies or balance sheet in the period of initial application.

(b) Use of estimates

The preparation of a balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires the use of certain
accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgment in the process
of applying the Company’s accounting policies. Estimates and judgments are continually
evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors including expectations of
future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results
could differ from those estimates. ,

(c) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and at bank, and short-term deposits with
contractual maturities of three months or less from the placement date.

(d) Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

The Company has classified its investments in securities as financial assets at fair value

_ through profit or loss. A financial asset is classified as financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term or if so
designated by management. Management determines the classification of its investments at .
initial recognition.

Regular way purchases and sales of securities are recognized on trade date — the date on
which the Company commits to purchase or sell the asset. ‘Securities are initially recorded
at fair value, and transaction costs are expensed. Securities are derecognized when the rights
to receive cash flows from the investments have expired or when the Company has
transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership.

(e) Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements

Furmiture, equipment and leasehold improvements are stated at historical cost less
accumulated depreciation. Improvements, which extend the useful lives or increase the
value of these assets are capitalized. Upon retirement or other disposition, cost and
accumulated depreciation are relieved from the accounts and any resultant gain or loss is
included in the income statement. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the
following estimated useful lives of the respective assets:

Computers » 3 years
Office equipment 3 years
Fumiture and fixtures 5 years
Leasehold improvements 10 years or term of lease,

whichever is shorter

(f) Provision for impairment of accounts receivable

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

(

A provision for impairment is established if there is objective evidence that the Company will
not be able to collect all amounts due. The provision established is equal to 80% of the
balance outstanding for more than one year and 100% of the balance outstanding for more

than two years.

(g) Investment in subsidiaries

Included in other assets is the Bank’s investment in its three wholly-owned subsidiaries that
are not consolidated, Universal Administrators Limited, Universal Directors Limited and
Universal Shareholders Limited, which are all incorporated under the/International Business
Companies Act, 2000 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The activities of the
subsidiaries are limited to providing nominee services on behalf of the Company’s customers.
The effect of not consolidating these subsidiaries is not material because each subsidiary has a
share capital of $2.

(h) Fiduciary accounts and assets under administration
The Company acts as trustee and in other fiduciary capacities that result in the holding of
assets on behalf of its customers. These assets are excluded from this balance sheet, as they

are not assets of the Company.

Financial Assets at Fair Value through Profit or Loss

$ $

Money market fund ae. Pgh
te bonds 366, ’

a 177,000 174,000

Principal protected minimum return equity linked certificate

Accrued interest on corporate bonds 4,468 4,358

652,132 635,843
During the year, the Company invested $18,058 (2006: $23,042) in the money market fund of

which $4,175 (2006: $3,209) represented the reinvestment of earnings. There were no other
investments or disposals during 2007 (2006: $Nil).

Total financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

The principal protected minimum return equity linked certificate matures on January 6, 2009 at
which time the Company will receive the principal amount of $150,000 plus a distribution equal to
the greater of 9% and an amount based on the percentage change in the S&P 500 Index, subject to a
monthly appreciation cap of 4.5% . :

Trustee Fees Receivable

2007 «2006

$ $

Trustee fees receivable, gross 318,778 322,506
Less: provision for impairment (35,832) (65,050)
Total 282,946 257,456

The movements in the provision for impairment during the year are as follows:

|

2007 2006 |

$ $

|

Balance as of January 1 65,050 63,331 |

Provision charged for the year 32,481 46,773 |

-Receivables written-off (66,383) (48,635) |
Recoveries of bad debt 4,684 3,581

Balance as of December 31 35,832 65,050

Furniture, equipment and leasehold improvements

eas : & Office Leasehold
Computers Fixtures Equipment - Improvements Total
$ $ “$ S$ $

As of December 31, 2007 : : 2
Opening net book amount 47,892 25,264 1,798 49,761 124,715
Disposals “aM - - (11) (18)
Additions 32,182 . 53,909 24,773 85,250 196,114
Depreciation charge (27,712) (19,211) (7,380) (12,287) (66,590)
Closing net book amount 52,355 59,962 19,191 713 1
As of December 31, 2007
Cost 99,191 121,950 29,219 135,000 385,360
Accumulated depreciation 46,83 61,988 10,028 12,28 131,139)
Net book améunt 52,355 59,962 19,191 713 1
As of December 31, 2006 ‘ : :
Opening net book amount 14,553 33,290 4,443 10,785 63,071
Additions 51,817 5,303 - 49,750 106,870
Depreciation charge (18,478) (13,329) (2,645) (10,774) (45,226)
Closing net book amount 47,892 25, 1,798 49,761 715
As of December 31, 2006
Cost 67,016 68,041 4,446 49,761 189,264
Accumulated depreciation (19,124) (42,777) (2,648) - (€A,549)
Net book amount 47,892 25, : 1,798 49,761 715

Disposals are in respect of fully depreciated assets that have been relieved from the books of
account. :

Related Party Balances
Related parties include the parent company and its directors, affiliates and their directors and other

entities over which they exercise significant influence. This balance sheet includes the following
balances with related parties not disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements.

2007 2006
$ $
Assets
Prepayments and other assets 16,301 6,594
Liabilities
Accounts payable 160,928 -
Commitments

On November 16, 2006, the Company entered into a sub-lease for the lease of office space
commencing December 1, 2006. The sub-lease term is for an initial period of five (5) years and
expires on November 30, 2011, with an option to renew for a further five (5) years. Prior to
entering into the sub-lease the Company occupied office space under a lease that expired on July
31, 2006, but was extended to February 28, 2007. :

The future minimum lease payments under the lease are as follows:

2007 2006:

\ $ $

No later than 1 year 128,650 144,088
Later than 1 year and no later than 5 years 385,950 514,601 -

514,600 658,689
Capital Management '
The Company’s objectives when managing capital are:

e To comply with the capital requirements set by the Central Bank of The Bahamas (the Central
Bank);

¢ To safeguard the Company’s ability to continue as a going concem so that it can continue to
provide returns for its shareholders and benefits for other stakeholders; and

e To maintain a strong capital base to support the development of its business.

Capital adequacy and the use of regulatory capital are monitored by the Company’s management,
-employing techniques designed to ensure compliance with guidelines established by the Central
Bank. The required information is filed with the Central Bank on a quarterly basis.
3

wi

_

THE TRIBUNE

10.

The Central Bank requires each entity with a public trust license to maintain a regulatory capital
of at least $1,000,000. The Company has complied with all of the externally imposed capital
requirements to which it is subject.

For capital adequacy purposes, the Company’s eligible capital base comprises its issued and fully
paid ordinary shares and retained earnings.

Risk Management
The Company is exposed to various types of risks in the normal course of business, including

fiduciary, credit, market risk (interest rate and price risks) and liquidity risks. The Company’s
financial performance is dependent on its ability to understand and effectively manage these risks.

du risk

The Company is susceptible to fiduciary risk, which is the risk that the Company may fail in
carrying out certain mandates in accordance with the wishes of its clients. To circumvent this risk,
the Company takes a very conservative approach in its undertakings. High risk instruments are not
considered attractive instrument vehicles and are not invested in unless the Company is specifically
advised to do so by its clients and covered by an indemnity agreement.

Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of the counterparty to perform according to the terms of the
ee Most of the Company’s credit exposure consists of cash, investments and trustee fees
receivable. Credit risk is managed by restricting counterparties to approved, well-established. hi

credit quality financial institutions. " , rate

Market risk

Market tisk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due to
changes in general and specific market conditions. The Company’s exposure to such risks is
concentrated in its financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. Market risk is considered
oe as oe Company principally invests in money market instruments, high grade debt
securities and is guaranteed a retum of capital on its princi tected mini i

linked certificate. ee ant —
Liquidity risk = ‘

The objective of liquidity management is to ensure the availability of sufficient funds to honour all
of the Company’s financial commitments. Management is responsible for ensuring a level of liquid
assets is maintained which could be sold immediately to meet cash requirements for normal
operating purposes.

Dividend

During the year, the Company declared and paid a dividend of $300,830 (2006: $300,000) to ATC,
its parent company.

11. Corresponding Figures

"PRICEWATERHOUsE(GoPERS |

The corresponding figures for cash and cash equivalents and financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss have been re-presented to conform to the presentation adopted for the current year.
In particular, the Company’s investment in the money market fund was previously included
within cash and cash equivalents and has now been reclassified to financial assets at fair value
through profit and loss. :



Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O. Box N-3910 ~
Nassau, Bahamas

Website: www.pwe.com
E-mail: pwcbs@bs.pwc.com
Telephone (242) 302-5300

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT
F wfeestoarent Facsimile (242) 302-5350

To the Shareholders of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited as of
December 31, 2007 and a'summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management's Responsibility for the Balance Sheet

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this balance sheet in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes: designing,
implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of
financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting
and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in

- the circumstances.





Auditors’ Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our audit. We conducted
our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we
comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance
whether the balance sheet is free from material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures
in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or
error. In making those risk assessments, the auditors consider internal control relevant to the entity’s
preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that
are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the
effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of
accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as
well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

We believe that the audit evidence we-have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis
for our audit opinion. .

Opinion

In our opinion, the accompanying balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial
position of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited as of December 31, 2007 for the year then ended in
accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Emphasis of Matter ;

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasise that the accompanying balance sheet does not
comprise a complete set of financial statements in accordance with Inter:ational Financial Reporting
Standards. Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to
obtain a complete understanding of the financial position, performance and changes in financial
position of ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited.

“bacco Keren Lorps :
Chartered Accountants

Nassau, Bahamas
April 18, 2008

th Publish your
CARD OF THANKS or
IN LOVING MEMORY

in OBITUARY SECTION
Every Thursday) —

Call us today

502-2352 or 502-2354





FROM page 1B

increase calls by a number of
its other vessels, including the
Norwegian Sun and the
Majesty.

“Government head tax
projections from the Norwe-
gian Sky are expected to be
$7.9 million over the period
July 2008- December 2009.
Total head tax projections
from all NCL ships visiting
the Bahamas over the next
year-and-a-half is estimated
at $21.4 million,” Mr Grant
said.

“The redeployment of the
Norwegian Sky on a dedicat-
ed Bahamas itinerary repre-
sents a significant commit-
ment by NCL to the
Bahamas, and will have a
major effect on our cruise
arrivals and positively impact
the bottom lines of those
businesses that focus on this
sector of the industry.

Mr Grant added that feed-
back from Bay Street mer-
chants indicated that NCL’s

ACT, from 1B

as other things are happening.”

He added: “I think the
Bahamas has to now always
keep an eye on the interna-
tional regulatory framework.

“Our Act was not quite up
to speed, and to the extent
we’ve got these apparent
weaknesses, we always run the
risk of falling short of best
international practices. We
need modern securities legis-
lation in place to encourage
the activities of BISX, and to
begin the cross-listing of secu-
rities from other countries.”

Kenwood Kerr, chief execu-
tive at Providence Advisors,
an investment advisory firm,
said he was also “disappoint-
ed” that more progress had not
been made with the revised
Securities Industry Act,
although the delays to the
process were “not a surprise
at all”.

“It’s always a plus to have it
there to enhance the regulato-
ry regime,” Mr Kerr said,
pointing out that while the new

Act was unlikely. to-stimulate: :



Nassau Airport

Development Company

NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008, PAGE 5B

passengers spent consider-
ably more than other cruise
line passengers, which will
bode well for the economy.

Gain

He said the Bahamas could
stand to gain $22 million in
passenger spend between the
period July 2008 and Decem-
ber 2009, with the Norwegian
Sky generating almost 50 per
cent of this amount. The
addition of the Norwegian
Sky brings the number of
NCL vessels calling on the
Bahamas, inclusive of the
Pearl, Dawn, Gem, Majesty
and Spirit, to six, and togeth-
er they are expected to con-
tribute a total visitor spend
by passengers of approxi-
mately $39.86 million over
the next year-and-a-half.

Mr Grant explained that

’ the the Norwegian Sky’s itin-

erary will include Nassau and
Great Stirrup Cay twice a
week, which amounts to a
minimum projection of 96



(ii
Cruise line could give $22m boost

calls per year, bringing poten-
tially some 182,400 passen-
gers. The calls to Great Stir-
rup Cay will mean year-
round employment as
opposed to being open for
the winter months alone.

A minimum of 42 calls are
expected to Grand Bahama
over the course of the year,
which should give that island
a much-needed financial
boost. Twenty-one calls will
be made to the island before
the end of 2008, an average
of one per week, delivering at
least 39,900 passengers

Colin Murphy, vice-presi-
dent of special projects for
NCL, said that with the Nor-
wegian Sky the line is going
back to its. roots, as the com-
pany pioneered cruising from
Miami more than 41 years
ago.

He thanked the Bahamas
and the Government for all
of their support, and encour-
aged Bahamians to show
passengers “the very best of
the Bahamas”.



greater securities trading and
market activity in and of itself,
it was likely to provide greater
protection for minority
investor rights.

Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rities Commission’s executive
director, had told this newspa-
per that the Bahamian capital
markets industry was not very
comfortable” in reviewing the
revised Securities Industry Act
without seeing the accompa-
nying regulations.

A major concern voiced by
many in the Bahamian capital

markets was that the regula- .

tions were critically important,
given that provisions omitted
from the first Securities Indus-

try Act —such as trading from |

a broker’s own account and
the short selling prohibition —
were supposed to have been
transferred to the regulations.
If anything, this increased the
void caused by the regulations’
non-release and non-develop-
ment.

The Securities Commission
opted to place the main
requirements and real details
into the regulations and rules it

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can make, leaving the legisla-
tion to set out the general
obligations, so it could better
keep pace with evolving inter-
national best practices and
global standards.

Placing the main details into
the regulations is designed to
enable the Securities Commis-
sion to avoid having to seek
Parliamentary approval every

‘ time any change — however

minor — is needed to the Act,
thus avoiding time-consuming
delays.
Among the main changes
heralded by the reformed
Securities Industry Act are the
registration of industry partic-
ipants by function rather than
title; provisions that ensure
compliance with securities and -
capital markets principals
established by IOSCO, the
international association of
securities regulators; provisions
for information sharing;
enhancement of the Securities
Commission’s regulatory and
investigative powers; simplifi-
cation of the disciplinary
process; and new disclosure
provisions... -

Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design requirement
report; .

Preparing technical specifications and drawings for the IT component of
the Project; ‘

Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and

System commissioning and training.

Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
(AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;

Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and

Adesign quality control program. ,

RFP packages can be picked up between

: May 7th - 23rd, 2008 at:

The Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau Airport Development Company,
Terminal 1, Concourse 2nd Floor,

- PO Box AP-59229°

Nassau, Bahamas



Contact: Ms.Coakley at 377-0209
wa





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

There is an job opportunity in a
general medical practise office
located down town
Anyone interested please call:
322-3347 (office) or
327- 8605(home)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEUNETTE PETIT-BEAU
of CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
May 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GREGORY SMITH
of SOUTH OCEAN GOLF RESIDENCE, P.O. BOX
CB-12951, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any. person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible: for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Are you a Bahamian Artist interested in
displaying your talent in a busy
down town museum and gift store?

If so please call us at (242) 326-0511 and
become a part of a successful business
venture

‘

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIEULA PETIT-BEAU of
CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The.

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

'P-O;Box N- 74 47, Nassau, Bahamas.

BEG

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-LOURDES
MONPREVILLE of FIRE TRAIL ROAD, P.O. BOX
N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the

| facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of

May 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE VIRTA ALTIME of
18621 NW 8TH RD, MIAMI FL., 33169 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 6th day of May 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











THE TRIBUNE





Corporation ‘exhausted’

ability to pay $5.6m bill

FROM page 1B

2008, are approximately $5.6

million in accounts receivable .

due to our Bahamas subsidiary
from the Water & Sewerage
Corporation.

“This receivable balance
exceeds the amounts billed to
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration during the three months
ended March 31, 2008 by
approximately $1.3 million.

“During April 2008, we met
with representatives of the
Bahamas government to

inquire as to the reasons for

the increase in the receivable

balance. We were informed in

this meeting by the Govern-
ment representatives that the
delay in paying our accounts
receivables was due to operat-
ing issues within the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, that



the delay did not reflect any
type of dispute with us with
respect to the amounts owed,
and that the amounts would
ultimately be paid in full.
“Based upon this meeting,
we believe that the accounts
receivable from the WSC are
fully collectible and therefore
have not provided any
allowance for possible non-
payment of these receivables
as of March 31, 2008.”
Elsewhere, Consolidated
Water said revenues generated
by its bulk segment - into
which the two Bahamas-based
reverse osmosis plants fall -
increased by 18 per cent or just
under $1 million to $6.167 mil-
lion for the 2008 first quarter.
Revenues generated by the
Bahamian operations
increased by $657,000 year-
over-year in the three months
to March 31, 2008, but “higher



diesel and maintenance costs”
at the Windsor plant dropped
gross profit margins (or gross
profits as a percentage of sales)
from 26 per cent in 2007 to 17
per cent in 2008. Gross profits
themselves declined from
$1.339 million in 2007 to $1.028
million this time around.

Mr McTaggart admitted to
analysts that the increase in
bulk sales was “more than off-
set by higher maintenance and
operational costs at the Wind-
sor plant”. The repair and
maintenance costs for the 2008
first quarter were some
$271,000 more than that
incurred during the 2007 .com-
parative period.

He added that the Windsor:
plant’s new Bahamian man- |
.agement team were working

to aggressively reduce costs,
with planned improvements to
the plant having been in the
development stage for more
than nine months.

“New wells and other

* improvements we.are making

will resolve this problem once
and for all”, Mr McTaggart
said, adding that increasing
diesel and fuel costs were

- becoming a “more material
' part of our operations”.

Diesel prices had risen by 58
per cent over a 12-month peri-
od, but while Consolidated
Water’s contract with the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion for the Windsor plant
allows it to pass these fuel
increases on to the Corpora-
tion, it could not do so during
the 2008 first quarter because
stipulated efficiency levels had
not been achieved.

“Our contract with the
Water and Sewerage Corpo-
ration for our Windsor plant
provides for the pass through

A multi facetted communications/consultitig ¢ company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer
skills and be able prepare public presentations on behalf of

compani es clients.

A degree in inanketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV’s and reference letters to:

by May 31, 2008.

DA#6282 .
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas

PRESENTS



Thursday, May 15, 2008

To confirm your attendance e-mail:

MR. GODFREY SHERMAN

General Manager,

_ Water and Sewerage Corporation

| Godfrey Sherman, General Manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation is a fully
qualified civil engineer with over fifteen years
experience at the level of senior management.
Mr. Sherman is especially known for his

outstanding implementation strategies in the
area of project management and extensive
operational experience in the water sector
including sewer treatment and disposal. He is

of increases in diesel costs ‘to

the Corporation if the plant is

operating at or better than the -
efficiency specified in the con-

tract,” Consolidated Water

said in its SEC filing.

“In early 2006, we recontig-
ured the Windsor plant.in
order to mitigate membrane
fouling. However, this recon+
figuration resulted insja
decrease in the fuel efficiency
of the Windsor plant and we
have not been able to pass
through all of our diesel costs
to the Water & Sewerage Cor:
poration.

“This inefficiency was exac:
erbated by a 58 per cent riséin

diesel fuel prices over the past

12 months. Consequently;

$207,000 was incurred in diesel’ -

costs during the first three
months of 2008 that could not
be billed to the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation. |

“Weare currently con-
structing new feed water wells
and will replace the reverse
osmosis membranes on two.of
four of our production trains.!
While we anticipate that these)
improvements will allow us to;
reverse the plant reconfigura=
tion and improve the Windsor.
plant’s fuel efficiency by the’

end of the third quarter of
2008, our gross profit for our |
Bahamas operations in the |

interim will continue to be/

adversely affected by its diesel |

costs.

“The repairs and mainte- |
nance costs for our Bahamas |
operations for the 2008 quarter: ,

exceeded those for the 2007
quarter by approximately
$271,000.”

Mr McTaggart said that
while Consolidated Water had

seen “some” similar issues at
its Blue Hills plant, it had been:

able to address these quickly...

and did not foresee any mote. \

The company is still in talks |
with the Government and the |
Water and Sewerage Corpo- |

ration over its now-completed

non-revenue water contract,
which stipulated that it had to

reduce water leaks from the=
Corporation’s distribution sys-
tem by one million gallons per g

day.

ration said the actual date was
July 1, 2007, forcing the com--
pany to “reserve” the $332,000
it believes the latter owes it for
water supplied between those
two dates.

Mr McTaggart said yester-:
day that the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation had hired an
independent consultant to.
review Consolidated Water’s
calculations on the non-rev-!
enue water project, and

While Consolidated Water:
. Said the project was completed
on March 1, 2007, the Corpo-»

pledged to get back to the” “4

company on that.

He added that Consolidat-)|
ed Water currently had no’ ’

plans to redeem the $10 mil- |

lion bond issue that was used:

to finance construction of the!

Blue Hills plant.

GODFREY SHERMAN, General Manager, The Water & Sewerage Corporation
on The Evolving Role Of Water In An Energy Conscious Environment”

BSE’s Monthly Luncheon » East Villa Restaurant - East Bay Street + Time: 12:00 pm - Donation: $25.00
Quentin.knowles@flameless.com or gracesharma05@yahoo.com or jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com

honours. He also attended Harvard University’s
School of Business Administration Program

for Executive Management. He is amember

of several professional bodies including the

also highly accomplished in policy formulation, Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association
finance and union negotiations. Mr. Sherman — and the Bahamas Society of Professional

graduated from Northeastern University, —
Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a Bachelor of
Science Degree in Civil Engineering with

Industry.

Engineers. He has travelled and trained
extensively in the Water and Wastewater


~ JUDGE PARKER

HOW LONG DID IT TAKE

RIAL I ENTOY
YQU TO LEARN TO WALK

TALKING TO YOU---

PROSTHETICS, ME ANYTHING!

[AND NEWSPRINT INTO
_ DOLLARS./ :

a)

TURNING CHAOS

MORNING, DORIS, INTO ORDER.

READY FOR A CRAZY) WITH DOZENS OF









FOR PETE'S SAKE! WHAT KINO
OR.TWISTED LOGIC IS THAT?!
NN]



WHAT'S WITH THE
OLD SWEATSHIRT?









ISWEATSHIRT DOING IN. THE DONATION



WELL,
ti

ANYMORE, SO I Tone tre. é

B\, THOUGHT WE 2A

MAY AS WELL



wee.Blondie.com











{i FOR I SUGGEST WE AND

"| THE SAKE TRASH THIS JUST GIVE
cat oe STUPID, OUTDATED ME MY
“EXPEDIENCY PIGGY BANK OWN CREDIT

CARD

(©2008 by North America Syndicate, Ine. World rights rasarved.

wer kingfeatures.com







PANELL, | GUESS
oat AIS, ANEWERS :
-CHART: AGE-OLD ©

bo: QUEATION... :

sn es



a [ ONT Weire }
* GRAFFITI



Nos rights reserved

. CRYPTIC PUZZLE _

DOWN
9 So free the tied up or incarcerated (9) 1 Ajar containing flowers in the kitchen? (8)
10 Willing to, which is nice (9) - 2 Either give the shivers to or have no
12 The chap doesn't have complete effect on (5,3,4)
B see oes nerve! (6) People move in close: the ne enters (8)
14 Will silver fish be about where there’s Getting the seat does clinch it (6)

Try to win later, locked in battle (8)

tubbish? (7)
15 Don't allow to contain copy writing (9) In sea water, a giant floating ship (10)
Don’t lip-read the word “rumour” (7)

1? Listen to the man and are worried
_ (423) Goes in and talks about teen troubles (10)
11 “Bit of luck,’ you say, “finding a thicket” (5)

= = — =
oo or Ls} ‘|
=
om

CoN DUM HS WwW

2
nm
|

18 Let move about, lean on for support (7)
19 An expert player? Well, that’s an !

Fu NEVER GET MARRIED



Orst. EY URWE RSP ORESS SYHOICATE

Grae 27 en Features Sire

advantage (6)

20 Still drink (4)

23 Advertising, for a doctor, is getting into
trouble (9)

25 The damned birds! (3,6)

26 She's given the apprentice a day off (4)

27 |'m sorry for being mean to the fellow (6)

29 The spendthritt, a law-breaker, involved
the rest in (7)

32 Various Russians caught, having
infiltrated the plant (9)

34 Is reversed, and covered by another
silly girl (9)

35 Bones not broken though having fallen,
perhaps, from an apple tree (7)

36 Is informed by tips right through (6)

_37 Shouts out “W'thout us? Nonsense!” (4)

38 Means first tr give the religious
denominati 1 (9)

39 Said to foligs1e wrapping paper and
Anbar )

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS,

ACROSS: 4, Bishop 7, Frou-trou 8,
16, Lot 17, Sa-ar 19, L-aid 21, J

DOWN: 1, Of-Al 2, W-oven 3, Of-ta 4,
Cool-l.e. 11, Red 12, Nasal 13
At
33, Part

an ~

EASY PUZZLE THURSDAY 31ST JANUARY 2008 BLOCK 4

ACROSS: 4, Grease 7, Retri
Pew 17, Troe 19, Iron Zi,
32, Deed 33, Aside 34, Caress 35, Tarragon 36, Versus
DOWN: 1. Trust 2, Stain 3, Ti
Meter 13, Dredged 15, Fen 1
Vacata 25, Bid 28, Tests 0,



16 The bad thing about having a tot play
with thread (6)

19 When your number is up, drink (3)

- 21 Why the worn rug was thrown out? (4,8)

22 She might be easiest to get a deduction
for (6)

23 Mum or dad could show you one ~ and
did (10)

24 While away, a tin | threw out, containing
runner beans (2,8)

25 It's “The Unfinished Melody’ child (3)

28 Does get upset aver the ex: it’s very sad (8)

29 Was holding the reins loosely but with
vigilance (8)

30 Having the cover broken early is tough (8)

31 How you said “No. It has police backirig” (7)

33 To disprove it, be back in your old
routine (5)

34 Saves, from frost. half the buds (6)

Scales 10, Arena 13, Who-M 14, Lena 15, Yoyo ————_______
lack-knife 23, Talc 24, Me-et 26, Thy 27, Re-a-d
29, Erin 32, Turn 33, Pro-NE 34, Hit-her 35, Over-cast 36, St.-roll

Bushy (Bushey) 5, S-L-am 6, Open-Ed, 9,
. Wo-rkma-n 15, Yak (Kay) 16, Lie 18, AC-crue 20,
e-R 21, Jay 22, Ned 23, Thrift 25, Yin 28, Errol 30, Royal 31, Neath 32, The-O

leve 8. Nestie 10, Slime 13, Dine 14, T
. A . Tone 15, Fret 16,
Meandered 23, Verb 24, Glee 26, Saw 27, Itom 29, Orip

me 4, Genie 5, Erse 6, Sullen 9, Entire 1

5 A , 1, Lot 12.
5, Pod 18, Rabies 20, Reeds 21, Mew 22, Fim 23,
Ridge 31, Penny 32, Dens 33, Acre

w
wo

BE
a

w

a
Lele =
at 3

EASY PUZZLE

:



ACROSS

9 Jewish building (9)

10 Complicated in
design (9)

12. Darts line (4)

13. Perspires (6)

a (7)

15 *neriuun state
(3,6)

17 Large ape (5-4)

18 Mean or miserly
perso:. (?)

19 Fractures (6)

20 Arm orleg (4)

23 Massacre (9)

25 Chess term (9)

26 Dull pain (4)

27 Wax stick (8)

29 Casta spell over (7)

32 Augments (9)

34 Blocks up (9)

35 Sport for women (7)

36 Takes illegally (6)

+ 37 Entreaty (4)

38 Abode or home (9)
39 Take apart (9)

COMICS PAGE



7

Dennis

MOM WANTS ME
TO MAKE MY BED.



JOEY.
THE ONLY WOMAN IN MY LIFE!’

Ss



Good Partnership Defense

West dealer. .
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
AK Q105
v¥874
@AT7
#952
WEST EAST
343 98 -
VK92 5
KI $Q86532
$A Q1074 #KI83
SOUTH :
4762
Â¥AQJ1063
41094
#6
The bidding:
West North East South
i 1¢ 2 & 29
3 3% 4h 4%

Opening lead — ace of clubs.

Good defense is usually a cooper-
ative effort, with both defenders
making use of every inference and

‘scrap of information they have at
their disposal. An excellent example
of two minds operating on the same
wavelength is provided by today’s
deal.

West led the ace of clubs against
four hearts, and East signaled with
the eight. Had West now blindly con-
tinued with a club, declarer would
have had no trouble scoring 11 tricks.

But West reasoned that since East
had supported clubs twice during the
bidding, South would surely ruff the



The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition).
HOW many words of four letters or
more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 21; very good 32; excellent: 42
(or more). Solution tomorrow.







DOWN
1 Atthe very
moment that

(2,4,2)

2 Inastate of anger
(2,3,7)
Albumen (3,5)
Pleasure craft (6)
Diamond, say (8)
Rickety, derelict (10)
Funeral
procession (7)
8 Fair, average (10)
1 Turnaside (5)
16 Sufficient (6)
_19 Drinks counter (3)
21 Incoherent (12)
22 \“chab spike (6)
23. Writing materials
(10)
24 Medical operation
B
i

NOuUDaw

(10)
25 Actor's prompi (3)
28 Calamity (8)

29 Unfounded (8)
30 Kidnapped people
(8) :

31 Returns to
custody (7)

33 Quotes (5)

34 Exaggerate (6)



next club. It would then be a simple
matter for declarer, after losing a
trick to the heart king, to discard
whatever losers he had left on
dummy’s spades.

So at trick two, West shifted to the
king of diamonds! This did not figure
to cost a trick even if South had the .
queen, because declarer’s diamonds
were due-to disappear on dummy’s
spades eventually.

South took the king with the ace
and led a trump to the queen, losing
to the king. West retumed the jack of
diamonds, and it was now East’s tum
to shine.

He reasoned that since West had
ignored the club signal at trick one,
he must have known declarer had no
more clubs. In addition, the unusual
diamond lead from the K-J made it
clear West was interested in obtain-
ing a diamond ruff. So East overtook

_.the jack with the queen and returned

TARGET

a third diamond, and West tumped
with the nine to set the contract one
trick.

East-West’s excellent: defense
notwithstanding, South should have
made his contract anyway. He should
have recognized the danger of an
opposing diarnond ruff and taken one
simple step to prevent it.

Had he ducked West’s king of
diamonds at trick two, he would have
made it impossible for West to reach
his partner’s hand later, and the con-
tract would have been secured.

v a
> 9
Ba bee
Sng Ga
® Hoe g 2 ome
PAE y 5Sdde
gases @ aS
Seong byes e
zs Ou > do-
tO >> be
(OSORNO Le
Feel, poakas
Bae5 og MS fg
Sysseydears
48° Be eheg
gage S Pt =o ge
-2a8e moe
reakSaeeeea
a®°l? woh aggoe
fo we 2 gedrag
Pee Oe a>
Hegpesseeo bs
‘ BSSIHRHSSE SS



Ia
word
| offense _|

means or tactics
in attempting to
score







Jeff Horner v Milos Pavlovic, Isle of
Man 2007. Horner achieved an
unusual record. He had scored two
of the three required results for the
international master title long ago
back in the 1970s, but then his
teaching work restricted his
opportunities. Aged 58 and newly
retired, he scored his third and final
IM normat Isle of Man, and this win
against an established grandmaster
was the highlight. White (to move)
is rook for knight ahead, but Black's
position looks solid and hard to
break down. A tactical sequence did
it. Can you work out the win? A key
factor is the exposed black rook at
b8. For full solution credit, you need
to spot and defeat a sneaky trap by
which Black hoped to turn the
tables.



COME HELP ME, OK?

” END Do ALL THAT WORK ?/?
NO, WERE GOING TO INVENT
A ORAS NS VED THE BED?

CHESS by Leonard Barden



- PAGE 7B -





















© v989 Universal Press Syndicate

8







WONT INVENTING A ROBOT BE
MORE WORK THAN MAKING:





ITS ONLY WORK
F SOMEBODY
WAKES YOU DO
IT.




WEDNESDAY,
MAY 14°
“AQUARIUS -~ Jan 21/Feb 18

You are not scoring well in the love
department, Aquarius. Fawning over
your partner has only been giving

you the reputation of a pushover.
Define what you want, and go for it.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20

Financial success is imminent this
week, Pisces. Just be sure to share
your wealth with someone deserving.
Tt will make it much more rewarding.

ARIES — March 21/April 20
Risk-taking is not on the agenda this
weck, Aries, Walk the straight and
narrow path, and you'll find that
‘things will go much more smoothly.
Expect Scorpio to pose a concer.
TAURUS — April 21/May 21
See that new project through, Taurus.
Don't give up now that things have
just begun. If you’re feeling over-
whelmed. Seek the assistance of a
family member who wants tv help.
GEMINI — May 22/June 21
Your funk is over. and you have
found a new outlook on life. This
week should be a breeze for you,
Gemini, with particularly good news
atriving on Friday.

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Bad news finds you on. Tuesday,
Cancer. While- it may be a blow,
you ll survive the turmoil. Keep your
chin up ---. better things wil] come
your way next'weck.

LEO - July 23/August 23

The world is still offering you
Icssons, but you've tuned out. Get
those cars working again and accept
the things that you: must change
about yourself,

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22
Flirtation gives rise to passion by
Thursday. Virgo. You’re showing off
your wild side and. loving every
minute of it. Those close to you
might become concemed.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23

A friend comes to you with a serious
‘problem, Libra. In your current staie
you are by no means ready to offer
-solid advice. Guide this person to
someone who can help for now.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Your ego has gotten in the’ way
again. Scorpio, but you can redeem
yourself. That charitable act ‘you've
been pondering could be the perfect
way to showcase your sweet side.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Trouble at home escalates by
Wednesday, Sagittarius. You’ve
made a mountain out of a mole-
hill. Change your strategy and you
could find a quick resolution.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
No one is being fooled by your sincer- .
ity act, Capricorn. They’re all on to
your hidden agenda. Don’t try to deny ©
your motives — it will only make
things worse in the end.

LEONARD BARDEN

——
~—e

Chess: 8559: 1 Bxf7 Qxf7 (if Kxf7 2 Qh7+ and 3 Qxg6 '
wins) 2 Rxg5! fxg5 3 Rxg6+! Qxg6 4 Bxe5+ Kf7 5 :

Qf3+! (avoiding the trap 5 Qxg6+? Kxg6 6 Bxb8 d3! :
and the black pawn queens) Kg8 6 Bxb8 and White ‘

eee won a bishop ahead.


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Royal Bank unveils $600k
branch for Spanish Wells

ROYAL Bank of Canada
this week unveiled its new
$600,000 branch for Spanish
Wells, the building three
times bigger than the 1,000
square foot property it origi-
nally opened on the island in
1973.

Planning for the new Span-
ish Wells branch began in
late 2006, with construction
starting in August 2007. Roy-
al Bank began operating
from the branch when it
opened in November last
year, although the official
opening was postponed until
this week.

Nathaniel Beneby, Royal
Bank’s vice-president and
country head, said in a state-
ment: “This year will make a -
century since we began serv-
ing clients in the Bahamas.
We are proud to have been
able to help generations of
Bahamian families meet their
personal.and business bank-
ing needs.

“Our entry into Spanish
Wells in 1961 marked a peri-
od of great expansion for the
bank into the Family Islands.
Spanish Wells was only our
third Family Island branch,
but in the 47 years that we
have spent here we are proud
to have become a fixture in
this community.”





AY

For the stories



TRUST
reat Insight - SHOWN (i-r) are: Keith Wells, manager of corporate real estate for the Bahamas and Caribbean; Kirkwood Tex.Pinder, manager of client care and operations, RBC Royal Bank of Cana-
da, New Providence and Grand Bahama, and former branch manager for Spanish Wells; Joyce Coleby-Riviere, area manager for the Family Islands, RBC Royal Bank of Canada. Cut-
TH Montays ting the ribbon is Irwin Kelly, former branch manager for Spanish Wells; Nathaniel Beneby, vice-president and country head, Bahamas, RpE Royal Bank of Canada; Walter Carey, branch~
Manager, Spanish Wells; and Jason Sawyer, assistant risk manager, Bahamas Regional Office.





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