Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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| > WARMTH

Volume: 104 No.143

ee ‘CLOUDS AND SUN |

The Tribune =

|
e
|

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

we 2
Ae

SEE PAGE 16C ON BACK OF BUSINESS

Paratis Island murder

Teenage boy
from Fox Hill is
stabbed to death

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

A 16-YEAR-OLD Fox Hill
boy has been stabbed to death
on Paradise Island next to two
of the country’s largest tourist
resorts.

Police*had:to fire gun shots

next to Atlantis and-the, RIU_.

Resorts around 4 o’clock yes-
terday afternoon to disburse a
fight between two groups of
young men. At the end of the
melee, Khodee Davis, a student
of Temple Christian, and son
of prominent Fox Hill busi-
nessman Dereck Davis, lay
dead at the entrance to Cab-

bage Beach, next to the RIU.
His mother is Ms Sonia Dill,
also of Fox Hill, and a Customs
officer.

During the altercation

‘ Khodee suffered what appeared

to be a stab wound to the chest.

Crime scene tape blocked off
the roundabout near the beach
access point as family and

tourists. looked on_at the boy , :

who was covered in an orange
blanket.

According to witnesses, the
boy was not involved in the
altercation that led to his mur-
der. It is believed that he might
have been attempting to break

SEE page 10

Bahamas sees 18% drop
in foreign investment

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas saw an eighteen per cent drop in the amount —

of foreign direct investment dollars entering its economy in
2007 compared with a year prior — equivalent to a decline of
$126 million, according to the United Nations.

This information, revealed in a report by the UN’s Econom-
ic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
released last week, comes as the Bahamas was also given a less
impressive ranking i in the region for predicted tourism growth
potential.

The Travel, Leisure and Tourism section of Financial con-
sulting firm KPMG made public its fourth annual regional
banking survey at the Caribbean Hotel Tourism and Investment
conference in Trinidad last week.

SEE page i

a. rues

RIzzZa wit ae /
Ke} ne eS xg @ aimediv ae
ing) :



THE BODY of Khodee me is removed from the scene yesterday.





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é Major/Tribune staff

Felip

Former minister hits back at Neko
Grant over airport screeners remarks



@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia:net



FORMER Transport and Avi-
ation Minister Glenys Hanna-
Martin has declared that state-
ments by Neko Grant, minister
of tourism and aviation, suggest-
ing that Exuma airport screeners
were improperly hired under her
watch represents an act of “polit-
ical cowardice” and were designed
to disguise his “incompetence.”

Mrs Hanna-Martin made the
hard hitting statement in a press

SEE page 11

| Sea Hauler tragedy victims to
receive cheques on Wednesday

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

LONG-SUFFERING victims of the 2003 Sea
Hauler tragedy will be handed their much-antic-
ipated cheques from government on Wednesday,
it has been announced.

A $1 million ex-gratis, or “out of kindness”,
payment will be split between the 29 victims
according to the severity of the injuries that were
sustained by each, said a statement issued by
Minister of Labour and Maritime Affairs, Dion
Foulkes, yesterday.






Get savings es
built right into
your mortgage

The government has determined that of those
29 people, three can be categorised as “deceased
with dependents”, one as “deceased with no
dependants”, one as having undergone amputa-
tion, seven as having suffered compound frac-

tures, and five and 16 having been subject to frac- -

tures and “soft tissue injuries” respectively.
“The Government fully sympathizes with the
victims of the Sea Hauler tragedy,” Mr. Foulkes
said, adding that it “hopes that these payments
will help to relieve their suffering and bring some
comfort to the families of those who died.”

SEE page 11

Multiply your savings!

Man shot by
police after
woman held
at gunpoint

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

ONE man was shot, and anoth-
er was bitten by police dogs, after
officers responded to a house
where a woman was being held at
gunpoint against her will early
yesterday morning.

The dramatic scene played out

~-at-around. 2.15am_ on Rupert

Dean Lane, about three houses
south of Patton Street.

Police responded to a call
reporting that a woman was being
held against her will in the area.
When they arrived at the house, a
man was reportedly holding her
at gunpoint.

At this time, shots were fired at
the officers, according to Chief
Superintendent Glenn Miller,
officer in charge of the Central
Detective Unit.

The officers, who were not
injured in the shoot-out according
to reports, returned fire and hit
one of the men. He was taken

SEE page 11

Ura
insurance
executive shot
TUT

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A well-
known insurance executive
was shot and,robbed over
the weekend during an
armed robbery at his resi-
dence in Fortune Bay.

Colina Imperial CEO
Dashwell Flowers was
accosted by two gunmen as
he pulled into his garage
around 10.45pm on Satur-
day, a senior police official
reported.

Mr Flowers, 43, of Trea-
sure Cove, sustained a seri-
ous gunshot injury to the
shoulder. He was subse-
quently airlifted to New
Providence for treatment,
where he is currently listed

SEE page 11



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



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EVENT PROVIDES TOURISM BOOST FOR COUNTRY

More than 1,000 people
attend regional Rotary
conference in Bahamas

: es ee :
tet at Rt SI AEs





Peter Ramsay/BIS Photo

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham delivers the keynote address at the opening ceremony of Rotary Internation-
al’s Districts 7020 and 6930 Conference at the Atlantis Grand Ballroom, Paradise Island on Thursday, May 8.

lm By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN tourism got a
boost over the weekend as
almost 900 people came to the
Bahamas from Florida and the
Caribbean to take part in a
regional Rotary conference.

The 34th Annual Rotary Dis-
trict 7020 Conference drew
close to a total of 1,100 people,
including Bahamians and
regional Rotarians, to Atlantis
and Breezes between Thursday
and Sunday.

Lindsey Cancino, a past pres-
ident of the East Nassau Rotary
Club and current secrétary for
the 7020 district, described the
event as “hugely successful”
both for Rotary and for the
Bahamas.

With Rotary’s current Dis-
trict Governor for. the 7020

‘region being a Bahamian, Dick
McCombe, Mr Cancino said it is
traditional that the annual con-
ference would take place in the
governor’s home country.

He added that the location of

the conference played a big part
in its popularity. “Atlantis was a
big draw,” Said the past presi-
dent. ~

Combine this with the fact
that Rotary negotiated a deal
with Atlantis for its participants
— with rooms starting at $150 a
night — and the massive influx
of visitors can be put into con-
text.

According to Mr Cancino,
there were around 300 more
registrants for this year’s event
than any other previous confer-
ence for the district.

In addition, the large num-
ber of Rotaracters — younger
Rotarians aged between 18-26

years, who are less likely to —

have funds to spend on trips
abroad than their elder coun-
terparts — was an indication of
the conference’s popularity, he
claimed. The Rotaracters held
their conference at Breezes.
The 7020 district includes the
Bahamas, the Cayman islands,
Haiti, Jamaica, the US Virgin
islands, the British Virgin
islands, St Martin, St Marteen,
St Barthelemy and Anguilla.
Also present were around 100

_ Rotarians from the 6930 district

of southern Florida.

During the four-day meeting,
Rotary business was discussed
and newly elected members
were trained to handle their
new responsibilities.

Hundreds of members also
participated in a massive com-
munity service effort, helping
to landscape the Western
Esplanade on Saturday. —

“That was hugely successful,
we did about 85 per cent of the
work in one day,” said Mr Can-
cino, who added that besides
the work, it was also a chance to
“fellowship, make friends, and
have a bit of fun.”

Raymond Cushnie from
Providenciales described the
conference as “very interest-
ing.” ;

“It’s been good, good speak-
ers, good opportunity to fel-
lowship, make new friends, get
to know what other Rotarians
are doing in the region, build
alliances, (and ) maybe (find
people) to participate in differ-
ent projects in different
regions,” he said.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 3



Oo In brie |

Cashiers
accused of
Stealing over
$60,000

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Following a
month-long police investiga-
tion, five of six cashiers at City
Market were charged in
Freeport Magistrate's Court
for allegedly stealing over
$60,000 in cash.

Appearing before Magis.
trate Andrew Forbes were
Melissa Florence Laing, 26, of
No 1 Ringwood Drive; Leann
Elizabeth Seymour, 29, of Apt
1 Beachway Drive; Ghislene
Vilburn, 26, of No 70 Bayber-
ry Lane; Tina Strapp, 21, of
No 8B King Neptune Drive,
Seahorse Village; and Syman-
tha Pelara Jones, 19, of Hep-
burn Town, Eight Mile Rock.

A sixth cashier, who was off
the island, is expected to face
charges on Tuesday.

The women are accused of
stealing approximately $62,000
between early January and the
latter part of April.

The five defendants plead-
ed not guilty to stealing by rea-
son of employment. They were
represented by lawyers Simeon
Brown, Rufus Allen and K
Brian Hanna.

Magistrate Forbes

adjourned the matters to 8

November 4 for trial. The
women were each released on
$2,000 bail with one surety.

Immigrants
apprehended

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Another
group of illegal immigrants
were apprehended by police
on Abaco this week as they
awaited a boat captain who
had told them he would take
them to the United States.

The men were found when,
according to Chief Superin-

tendent Basil Rahming,, :

police were conducting a
search for four suspected ille-
gal Cuban immigrants in
South Abaco on May 6.

While searching at Sands
Cove area, which is just north
of Sandy-Point, officers went
on to find seven male
Dominican nationals hiding
in thick bushes.

The Dominicans told
police that they were left in
bushes without any food or
water by their boat captain,
who told them that he would
return the following day to
take them to Miami.

Mr Rahming said the men,
who are suspected of enter-
ing the Bahamas illegally,
were arrested and transport-
ed to Marsh Harbour.

They were turned over to
Bahamas Immigration offi-

cials,







Rotarians dig in to help
beautify Western Esplanade

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



HUNDREDS of Rotarians from across the
Caribbean and Florida got their hands dirty and put
their green thumbs to the test over the weekend,
beautifying the Western Esplanade.

With over one thousand Rotarians and Rotaracters
(young Rotarians) from the Bahamas,10 other
regional neighbours and Florida in Nassau for the
34th Annual Rotary District 7020 conference from
Thursday until Sunday, it was the ideal opportunity
for the members to engage in some mass communi-
ty service.

The Western Esplanade on West Bay Street has
been undergoing a major upgrade for the last five
weeks, under the guiding hand of Ed Fields, Kerzn-
er International’s public affairs directer, in conjunc-
tion with Rotary and the government.

Planting

As the hot sun scorched Nassau, Rotarians dug in
helping to complete the planting phase of the project.
New paved parking areas, trees, grass, benches,
garbage cans and beach-cleaning have either already
been completed or were set to be finished by the end
of the weekend.

Kerzner International has coordinated numerous
park beautification projects since 2000, including
Flamingo Gardens and Montagu Foreshore.

Mr Fields said of the project, which he estimated
would cost “several hundreds of thousands of dollars”
by the time it is ready: “I’ve always wanted to do
Western Esplanade. It’s the centrepiece of down-
town...thousands of people use this park. Now it’s
going to be arranged in an organised way.”

This weekend’s work benefitted from the experi- -

ence of the pan-Caribbean volunteers, many of whom
said that they had participated in beautification pro-
jects in their own countries.

Thirty-four-year-old Raymond Cushnie from Prov-
idenciales, Turks and Caicos, who was planting sea
grape trees, told The Tribune: “This,is the kind of
stuff we live for. All different aspects of helping the
community. I’m all for this kind of project.”

Jessie Daubahadour, part of a group of four young

Fashion Advice, Help
and Inspiration



A ROTARIAN prepares the ground for one of the
many sea grape plants that were ready to be placed
along the Esplanade.

rotaracters from St Martin who were raking the
beach, said of the shore clean-up: “It’s a nice project.
We live by tourism and we need to have, all the
Caribbean islands need to have, nice beaches for
the locals and the tourists.”

Meanwhile, Janet Johnson, a Bahamian rotarian
and employee of the Ministry of Tourism said she felt
the updgrade was “long overdue.”

“Tt’s a beautiful spot, right next to the cruise ships,
and obviously it’s somewhere where we would like to
have a showcase so we applaud all the groups that
have come together to put it together,” she said.

Bahamian rotaracter, Sheyna Sawyer, expressed
pride in having had so many people from across
the region cooperating to make the Bahamas better.

When the park is fully completed the Clipper
group, Bank of the Bahamas and the Nassau Palm
Resort will each contribute to the cost of its month-
ly maintenance, which will be done by Enviroscape,
a private landscaping company.



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE-DUPUCH, Kt, 0.8.2. KM, K.C.S5.G,,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Handling young sex offenders

COMMENTATORS on the recent sex scan-
dal in one of our private schools seem more
concerned about the failure of the school to
report the incident to the police than trying to
extricate our society from the sink hole of degra-
dation in which it and our children are now
mired.

The reality is that sexual activity is so preva-
lent in many of the schools that if every infrac-
tion were reported to the police, the force would
crack under the strain.

Several years ago one of our reporters won
the confidence of a small group of female stu-
dents.

She was introduced into a club where the
students talked freely of the sexual activities in
their school.

They talked of hard core sex, the details of
which we could not publish. Lesbianism was
also rampant.

The Tribune ran up the warning flag by pub-
lishing the story leaving out much of the
unsavoury details. Society blinked. Politicians
dismissed it. Instead they accused us of sensa-
tionalising a story to sell newspapers.

Whether an attempt was made behind the
scenes to find out if what we printed was true;
or, having discovered that the facts were even
worse than published, they tried to correct them,
we shall never know.

However, we'do know that nothing has
changed, Society is to blame.

What is going on in the schools today is just a
reflection of a violent, coarse society that has
been dumbed down to accommodate the lowest
denominator in our midst.

It is now time for someone to put on the
brakes.

Instead of calling in the police, the school,

parents and counsellors wrapped their arms
around the young offenders and tried to lead
them back to the moral high ground.

No police cell could mend such moral fences.

Several facts in the story, as told to the press,
were incorrect.

The students were caught in the sexual act
not on camera, but by a teacher who walked up
on them behind a school building during an
after-school function.

The boy is 17, the girl, 14, not 13 as reported.

The girl’s family was insistent that the matter
be taken no further — certainly not beyond
the confines of the school.

Both families, and the school, felt that more
good could be done to rehabilitate the young
offenders without a police presence. And so
the police were not called.

Children rights’ campaigner Clever Dun-

NOTICE

combe believed that the police should have
been called and action taken regardless of the
parents’ status.

“Would the same line be taken if this were
the son of a janitor or maid?” he asked.

The answer is obvious: “No, of course not.”

No janitor or maid’s son, in the same cir-
cumstances, would have made headlines as did
the politician’s son. What these young people in
privileged positions must understand is that “to
whom much is given much is expected.”
Because they have had better opportunities,
they are measured by a more severe yardstick,
and so, more is demanded of them. That is why
they make headlines and the gardener’s son
does not.

And if the maid or gardener’s son were sent
to reform school, it would have been because
they were unmanageable. Also their home envi-
ronment would have probably been such that it

would have been in their best interest to remove

them. But they would have gone quietly, not in
a blare of headlines.

However, in the present situation the two
young people now involved can be better reha-

bilitated at home with parents and counsellors. '

The object of the exercise — whether it be a
politician or a gardener’s son — is to rehabilitate
and heal, not to destroy.

The politician’ s son has not only been humil-

iated by headlines, but he has been stripped of

the high office he held in the school and will :

probably not be allowed to participate in grad-
uation ceremonies.
He is being punished to the fullest.

However, by the hints and whispers behind
the scenes, it has been suggested that because a
politician’s child is involved, the political oppo-
sition is now going to try to humiliate the father.

This would be a big mistake. In their midst
there are few of them whose private lives are
beyond reproach.

It would be a brave man among them who
would dare throw the first stone.

So we suggest that they — and those who are
so brazen in their sexual exploits — try to
reform their own lives and set a better example
for young people.

The young after all are only imitating their

_ macho elders.

And if pa, grandpa, and uncle think it so
smart, why shouldn’t they?

So rather then spewing forth more political
slime, they should go home, examine their own
consciences and mend their own fences.

The older generation must learn that “exam-
ple is the school of mankind” and young people
will learn from no other.

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responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that



PRE-OWNED

We must resist
violation of our
imaginations

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WROTE in one of my first
columns for the Nassau
Guardian that exercising one’s
imagination in this country is
tantamount to heresy. The
imagination is the one place that
governments and churches (and
any other authority for that
matter) cannot control, and
therefore it is seen (and por-
trayed) as wild and dangerous
terrain. We have been trai: 2d
not to question authority, and
not to ‘story’, to tell lies, fic-
tions. We have been trained to
stay out of the mangrove
swamps of our imaginations, to
fear the monsters in the blue
holes, to keep to the shallows
and steer clear of the dark
brown and black patches of
water in our own psyches: all
the better to uphold the truths
already known, the status quo,
in which those with most kinds
of power are thoroughly invest-
ed.

When individuals step out of
line, or cross the line between
status quo and the unknown,
into the dangerous and wild
places of the imagination, we
tell them first they are abomi-
nations; we tell them they are of
the devil. We threaten them
with spiritual warfare, eternal

‘damnation and the like. When

that doesn’t work, when those

individuals do not cower in fear

for their souls, we send in back-
up: the physical forces of domi-
nation, in this case, the Royal
Bahamian Police Force.

The story is that two young

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



poets are being investigated by
the police because of their poet-
ry. When I learned of this, I was
shocked, and outraged. But the
shock was short-lived. I have
heard other stories: a young
woman is dragged naked from
her home by police; a young
woman is raped by a policeman
while in custody. It so happens
that both poets are female. Ina
patriarchy, every act of aggres-
sion against a woman by a male
in authority is calculated to con-
trol, to keep her in a place out-
side her imagination, in the
hopes that she may forget how
to get there. She may forget a
place called ‘imagination’ exists
at all. And without a way to get
to her imagination, there will
be no new ideas, and no agency
with which to live them.

Poet Audre Lorde, a first
generation Caribbean Ameri-
can, wrote once that “poetry is
not a luxury” precisely because
it has the power to give birth to
ideas so that they can be lived.
Poetry names those feelings that
our bodies know but have no
words for. Poetry is necessary
because it can turn feeling into
language and language into
action.

True rebellion does not come
in the form of guns, or physical
force, it comes in the shape of
ideas. Ideas cannot be killed.

And ideas are spawned in the
mangrove swamps of our imag-
inations. Poets, playwrights,
novelists, essayists, filmmakers,
visual artists of all kinds have
the power to spawn ideas. We
have the power to bring down
walls and governments. The
builders of both know this.

If Bahamian poets are under
investigation by police it is
because they are naming some-
thing which powers that be
would prefer remained
unnamed. And that is the
sacred task of poets. And, if the
police are investigating poets
and poetry, it is because they
can: we as a society have agreed
not to question authority, by
and large; not to make consis-
tent and sustained protests
against so many other kinds of
human rights violations; and not
to protect the spawning grounds
of our most delicate and valu-
able resources: physical and psy-
chic wetlands. The intrusion of
police into the poet’s work, into
the poem, is a serious human
rights violation. And it is our
sacred task as human beings
and poets to resist violation of
our bodies, our poems, and our
imaginations, by every means
possible. We have already been
too silent, too accommodating;
if we say nothing, do nothing,
then like frogs in water slowly
boiling, we will not understand
our fate until it is too late.

HELEN KLONARIS
Oakland, CA
May 8, 2008

Barack Obama - a symbol of
national unity and progress

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE present campaigning
of US presidential candidates
has garnered ‘much interest in
both the United States and
abroad. Needless to say, much
of the focus has been on the
race between Democratic
rivals Barack Obama and
Hillary Rodham Clinton.

In The Bahamas, the atten-
tion given to this particular
campaign is due to the
grounds gained and momen-
tum sustained by the Obama
team; in spite of various
bumps and distractions
encountered on the campaign
trail. This endearment is not
only that Barack Obama i a
member of America’s minori-
ty population; it is also his
style of an intelligent orator
as displayed at his support ral-



lies. Our admiration is also the
result of his demonstration of
sincere humility, broadmind-
edness and integrity.

His greatest asset is the
holding fast to a philosophy
that does not contribute to or
bolster America’s racial
divide. This fact has been a
major catalyst to the support
of his campaign that tran-
scends race, class and party.

As someone recently
described him, “....a black can-
didate without the in-your-
face insistent cry of griev-
ances.”

With the last point in mind,
it is obvious that Senator Oba-
ma’s greatest challenge is
bearing the burden and nega-
tive impact stemming from the
inflammatory, offensive, unpa-
triotic remarks of his former
pastor, Rev Dr Jeremiah
Wright. His recent comments
at The National Press Club in
Washington, made it very
clear that he does not care
about the damage he may
have caused, by not recanting
his infamous statements. The
Christian leader showed no
signs of humility or regret.

ideology of God’s kingdom.

As an Ambassador for
Christ, his focus should be
directed toward the salvation
of love as recorded in I John 4
vs 8 of the Holy Bible. In this
21st century, most US citizens
desire to advance and be
healed as a nation of their
oppressive past.

Barack Obama is a man to
be admired as he strives to ful-
fil the dream of Dr Martin
Luther King in uniting the
American people.

He himself is an embodi-
ment of the American Dream.
He is also an example of a
person not being judged by
the colour of their skin, but
by the content of their char-
acter. He has demonstrated
good character by which he
should be judged, and not, by
past association with his for-
mer pastor. It is noteworthy
to have a US presidential can-
didate who holds to the para-
digm of America’s first presi-
dent George Washington who
stated, “We were born to
unite with our fellow men, and
to join in community with the
human race.”

any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization

should not be granted, should send a written and signed As a leader in the Christian

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THE TRIBUNE

PM recalls sacrifice of
Defence Force marines

Peter Ramsay/BIS Photo

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham delivered the keynote address and
unveiled the ceremonial plaque at the 28th Anniversary Commemorative
Service and Dedication of the HMBS Flamingo Memorial Park and Mon-
ument on Saturday.

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham conveyed his thanks on
behalf of the nation to the families of the four Defence Force
marines killed by Cuban fighter planes 28 years ago, at the
unveiling ceremony of a ceremonial plaque, monument and
memorial park in their honour over the weekend.

“I have no doubt that this memorial park and monument
will serve to remind countless future generations of the sac-
rifice made by four courageous colleagues and to highlight the
continued faithful service of the many who serve in this orga-
nization and our nation,” said Mr Ingraham on Saturday at the
Defence Force Base, Coral Harbour.

“It is my hope and expectation that Bahamians from all
walks of life, recalling these sacrifices will be inspired also to
serve our nation as productive, law-abiding and patriotic cit-
izens,” added Mr Ingraham.

On May 10, 1980, after intercepting two Cuban fishing
vessels near the Ragged Island Chain, Able Seaman Fenrick
Sturrup, Marine Seaman Austin Rudolph Smith, Marine Sea-
man David Allison Tucker and Marine Seaman Edward
Arnold Williams were killed when Cuban MIG jets fired
upon and sank HMBS Flamingo.

“T recall the day vividly,” said the prime minister during a
moment of reflection during his remarks. “The news from
Ragged Island revealed that one of our craft had been sunk by
military jets out of the Republic of Cuba. Four marines had
been lost, — the community at Ragged Island and The Bahamas
feared for what might happen next.” _~

“The incident served to unite us as a people and as a
nation. And it served to raise the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force in the esteem of all Bahamians,” said the prime minis-
ter.

Along with celebrating the memory of the four fallen
marines, Mr Ingraham pledged to ensure that the Force is able
to keep up the increased demand for its services across the
country in the years to come.

“I reiterate to you the commitment of the government to
support you in the execution of your national duty,” he said.
“We commit to continue to improve, upgrade and expand
the tools available to you in the performance of your duties.

“In this regard, we are now seeking proposals for the
upgrade and expansion of your fleet to take account of antic-
ipated needs up to 2014.

“The new craft to be acquired will expand and enhance
the capability of the Defence Force.”



LOCAL NEWS
STUDENTS HOPE TO STOP LARGE-SCALE FOOD WASTAGE IN THE BAHAMAS

Mission: Ending hunger

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A group of Bahamian univer-
sity students are on a mission to
make hunger and large-scale food
wastage a thing of the past in the
Bahamas. With growing pledged
support from huge corporate
donors, the group — A Little Help
From My Friends — is set to
make a big impact by putting
food that would otherwise be dis-
carded from major restaurants
and supermarkets into the hands
of under-privileged Bahamians.

The brainchild of Alanna
Rodgers, a 21-year-old Universi-
ty of Miami student, the not-for-
profit organisation is already very
well organised and gaining sup-
port locally and internationally.

They will run the Bahamas’
first “food rescue” programme,
collecting any perishable food
that restaurants and supermar-
kets located in New Providence
cannot sell for one reason or
another, but which is still edible,
and delivering to those who are
hungry.

“Right now we have our
donors set up, we have our recip-
ients set up...We want to be oper-
ational in June on some level,”
Ms Rodgers, also the project's
coordinator, told The Tribune.

. Before that happens a well-
established Canadian food res-
cue project, Second Harvest, will
soon travel to Nassau to help the
all-student team take the final

‘ steps to get the project off the

ground. At present the group has
commitments from Supervalue,
Starbucks, KFC, Burger King,

Quiznos, Johnny Rockets, Jam- .

ba Juice, Lucianos and Antho-
ny's Grill, among others, to make
available any products that they
cannot sell.

A network of volunteers will
be kept busy collecting the food
and delivering it to the immediate
recipients, the Red Cross, Salva-
tion Army, the All Saints Aids
Camp and Urban Renewal, along
with various churches that can
then host meals. The government
is also set to play a part, with min-

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ister of state for legal affairs
Desmond Bannister having met
with the group and agreeing to
introduce to parliament a “Good
Samaritan Law” which will help
ALHFMF attract greater spon-
sorship from corporate donors
who might ordinarily be scared
of the legal issues that might arise
from passing on the food that
they are not serving to their cus-
tomers directly.

Community

According to Ms Rodgers, the
inspiration to found an organisa-
tion like ALHFMF came about
during some time away from her
studies as she transferred colleges
in 2007. Realising her life was
“very one dimensional” at the
time, focusing on her studies and
college tennis, she wanted to do
more. “When I grew up I always
thought of community service as

being a noble pursuit but it was,

one of those things I felt like I
didn't have time for,” said Ms
Rodgers.

The student said she had ini-

o0999 9 8 © ©

Cushions

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 5

tially considered forming a NGO
with an environmental focus, but
quickly came to the conclusion
that it is hard to ask individuals
who have more pressing concerns
like where their next meal is
coming from — to care about
such issues. Ms Rodgers said that
while it is difficult to get hard fig-
ures of how many people are suf-
fering from hunger — the inabil-
ity to access enough food nutri-
ents they need for fully active and
productive lives — going into the
community and talking to people
has given the group an insight
into the extent of the problem.
“We don't have an epidemic
like Africa,” admits Ms Rodgers.
“One statistic that we know is
that 70 per cent of the people who
use emergency food services have
at least one member of their fam-
ily employed, so it's not like
they're sitting on the road beg-
ging, they are working, but maybe
the cheque didn't go far enough
to feed everyone,” she said.
Food shortages in the home
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said Ms Rodgers, particularly





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when it causes a child to go to
school on an empty stomach.

“When children are turning up
at school and they haven't eaten
anything, first of all they can’ t
be active learners. They're going
to be listless, and later on that
listlessness turns into violence,
hostility,” said Ms Rodgers.

With this in mind, one of
ALHFMF’s first objectives will
be to initiate a breakfast pro-
gramme in schools, along with
after-school and weekend snack
provisions aimed at tackling this
chronic concern.

Meanwhile, the group's first big
expense will be the acquisition of
a refrigerated truck to transport
their donated goods, and by the
end of the Summer, a full-time
driver.

They already have some pri-
vate sponsorship, but are looking
for more.

Anyone interested in support-
ing or volunteering with A Little
Help From My Friends is asked
to contact:

alanna.rodgers@gmail.com, or
visit www.helpfrommyfriends.org



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Pe a ee a eee
: _. Illegal immigration

tops list of concerns at
Exuma town meeting

SN

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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& By Llionella Gilbert
Bahamas Information
Services

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
— Illegal immigration topped the
list of concerns of Exuma resi-
dents and Cabinet Ministers
who attended a government
organised town meeting at St.
Andrews Community Centre
last week.

After their arrival the Minis-
ters and other senior govern-
ment and law enforcement offi-
cials got a first hand look at
Haitians squatting in the bushes
of Exuma.

The contingent included
Tourism and Aviation Minister
Neko Grant; Health and Social

‘Development Minister Dr

Hubert Minnis; Lands and Local
Government Minister Sidney
Collie; Works and Transport
Minister Earl Deveaux and
National Security Minister Tom-
my Turnquest.

Mr. Deveaux told residents
attending the town meeting that
what he saw in the bush alarmed
him. ;

He said that although there is
a need for labour in Exuma, the
residents there were “accom-
modating” something that is a
“serious detriment” to them.

“So my admonition to you is
to let us work together to
resolve this very serious prob-
lem,” Mr. Deveaux said.

“The problem I am talking
about is not a Haitian problem,
it is not a Jamaican problem, it is
not a Peruvian problem, it is not
a Cuban problem — the prob-
lem I am talking about is a
Bahamian problem.”

Immigration Minister Turn-

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quest noted that presently
HMBS Yellow Elder is docked
at George Town dock and a
number of the commando
squadron are also on the island.

“They will do what they have
to do to eradicate what is in the
bush,” Mr. Turnquest said, “and
we (the government) will also
do what we have to do to stop
illegals working.”

Responding to concerns
about the small number of
immigration officers in Exuma,
the Minister told residents that
the officers were originally
placed there for border protec-
tion.

“But what Exuma has
become in terms of immigration
has expanded beyond border
protection and has expanded
into the apprehension and repa-
triation exercises like we have in
places like New Providence and
Grand Bahama.”

While the Department is

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looking for a solution, Mr. Turn-
quest said residents must come
forward if they have knowledge
of illegal immigrants working
for individuals or businesses.

He said it follows that some-
one must be hiring the illegal
immigrants otherwise they
would not be in Exuma.

“T want you to know that we
are going to step up our appre-
hension exercises to rid our-
selves of a large number of ille-
gals and we will also begin to
take action against employers.”

Mr. Turnquest spoke directly
to persons who pick up illegal
workers early in the morning to
take them to job sites.

“Please do not do so,” he -
warned. “You are likely to be
surprised and you do not want
that to happen to you; so you
cannot continue to do so.”

“I want to-make The
Bahamas’ position clear in
regard to immigrants,” he said.
“If there is a need for you as a
business to have foreign labour
and the request is reasonable
and the person is not a security
threat to The Bahamas, we are
likely to approve that request.

“But you are not to engage
someone, as an individual or as
a business that you do not have
a work permit for.

“Tt is against the law,” he
said, “for illegal immigrants to
be working here illegally; it is
also illegal for an employer to
hire someone illegally.”

Further the Minister
explained, “If John Joseph has a
work permit to work for Tom-
my Turnquest, Earl Deveaux
cannot take John Joseph to

work for him without permis-

sion. The Department of Immi-
gration is prepared to accept an
application jointly by' Tommy
Turnquest and Earl Deveaux

_for John Joseph if that is what

you want.

“You can apply together but
we do not expect persons to be
hiring illegal immigrants.”

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THE TRIBUNE

| UESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 7





Hillary is showing
her true colours

il

eee

B@ By Sir Ronald
Sanders

I: is unlikely that by the
time this commentary is

read Hillary Clinton would have
conceded victory to Barack
Obama in the race for the US
presidential nomination of the
Democratic Party, even though
she should.

Mrs Clinton is no longer a
credible candidate.

The figures speak for them-
selves: Obama far outstrips her
in the popular vote.

He now leads her by an insur-
mountable 715,000. Obama has
1,840 delegates, Clinton has
1,688. The winner needs 2,025
and there is no way that Mrs
Clinton could overhaul Obama
in the remaining six contests
(five states and Puerto Rico)
which together will yield only
217 delegates, and from support
by the super delegates, only 269
of whom are uncommitted.

Obama needs only 30 per
cent of those votes to make him
the winner; Clinton requires 70
per cent. And, As the Los
Angeles Times editorialised:
“Even if Clinton were to win
every remaining state by a com-
fortable margin, she could not
amass enough delegates before
the convention to pass Obama.”

But, yet, she, is remaining in
the race and, in the process, cre-
’ ating fissures in the Democrat-

ic Party and giving ammunition
to the Republican candidate,
John McCain, to use against
Obama.

Only unremitting ambition
and an overwhelming desire for
power could now be driving
Mrs Clinton.

No greater testimony ,to this
unrelenting resolve could be

* needed than the fact that, while
donors have now abandoned
the financing of her campaign,
she has personally loaned it $6.4
million, added to an earlier sum
of $5 million that she and her
husband, former US President
Bill Clinton, made to it.

Whatever her motivation
now is, she is demonstrating an
almost vicious determination to
stay in the campaign to the end,
even though it will surely dam-
age the Democratic Party’s
struggle against a settled
Republican Party candidate.

In recent television interviews
she has appeared calculating,
even scheming.

When Obama’s views or
statements are put to her for
reaction, she seems intolerant,
bordering on irritated.

She seems to draw on great
reserves of forbearance just to
be civil when Obama’s name is
mentioned.

Yet, except in the minds of
the most die-hard supporters of
Mrs Clinton, there can be no
doubt that Obama has. beaten
her solidly. She can now count
only on the backing of less afflu-
ent and less educated white vot-
ers.

After her very poor showing
in North Carolina, where Oba-
ma won 56 per cent of the vote
to her 42 per cent, and her even
worse showing in Indiana where
she was expected to trounce
him decisively, the right thing
for Mrs Clinton to have done
was to concede graciously.

She didn’t. Instead two days
later, she played the race card.

Not enough attention was
paid by the mainstream media
in the US to the spin she put
on an Associated Press (AP)
exit poll of the North Carolina
and Indiana primaries. Accord-
ing to the poll, Clinton won
about 60 per cent of the white
vote in both states. Mrs Clinton
interpreted that to mean that
“white Americans” are turning
away from Obama.

She is reported to have told a

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reporter for the magazine, USA
Today: “J have a much broader
base to build a winning coali-
tion on.”

What she ignored was the fact
that since March 4 in Ohio,
where she won 65 per cent of
the white vote, her support
among whites has been declin-
ing. In Pennsylvania on April
22, she won 63 per cent of the
white vote, down to 60 per cent
in both North Carolina:and
Indiana on May 6.

She was bold, if economical
with the truth, by saying that
the AP poll “found how Sena-
tor Obama’s support among
hard-working Americans —
white Americans — is weakening
again and how whites in both
states who had not completed
college were supporting me.”

But, it was her last assertion
about the poll that showed Mrs
Clinton’s readiness to use race
to frighten Democrats into
handing her the presidential
nomination. She said: “These
(the whites who had not com-
pleted college) are the people
you have to win - if you’re a
Democrat - in-sufficient num-
bers to actually win the (Presi-
dential) election.”

When, in the past, Mrs Clin-
ton said that Obama was “une-
lectable”, commentators sug-
gested that she meant he was
inexperienced. In the context of
the white voters she claims to
represent, it looks as if she now
means he is also not white.

From the very beginning of
this campaign, when I wrote
two commentaries entitled No
Black in The White House, my
belief had been that race would
be used against Obama being
elected President of the Unit-

~ ed States.

But, I have to admit that
while I fully expected the
Republican campaign to whip
it up unmercifully if Obama
emerged as the Democratic
nominee, I did not expect it to
come from Hillary Clinton.
Certainly not after the almost
blind support that the black
American community gave to

iTunes

anniversary

Hillary Clinton

both she and her husband, not
only in his election as US Pres-
ident but also in the travails that
followed, especially over the
Monica Lewinski affair.

What has also been amazing
about the Clinton campaign is
that it has’ characterised Oba-
ma as having “elitist sensibili-
ties”. This was a turn-up for the
books — an African American
being elitist while the white
American candidate is not. My,
how times have changed.

Given all this, it looks as if
Hillary Clinton will prolong the
campaign for the Democratic
nomination to the bitter end.





A

‘or Dr.



That end will be one of two:
either when Obama gets to the
magic figure of 2,025 delegates,
or when the leadership of the
Democratic Party has enough
gumption to tell Mrs Clinton
that she has caused the candi-
dacy of the Democrats enough
harm, and she should withdraw
so that the Party could focus on

- John McCain.

e Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
Diplomat)





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To be held on T. Tiesilay May, 13th 2008 at 2pm at
NS Ebenezer Methodist Church, Shirley Street, Nassau

4

Dr. Paul Poad, a widely respected physician who practised
medicine in Nassau for almost 50 years, died at his home



in England on January 30th 2008 at the age of 89.

_Friends, colleagues and former patients are warmly invited
to attend a Memorial Service to give thanks for his life and
work, to be held on Tuesday March 13th 2008 at 2 p.m. at

Ebenezer Methodist Church, Shirley Street, Nassau.

iPhones



Dr. Poad was born on 26th November 1918 in Nassau,
where his father, the late Reverend Frank E. Poad was
Minister at Ebenezer Methodist Church. His mother was
the late Mrs. Olive G Poad (nee Higgs) of Harbour Island.
A younger brother Basil Poad was bern in

Harbour Island in 1922.

Dr. Poad was educated in India and trained as a doctor in
London. After qualifying in the early years of World War
II, he joined the Royal Navy as a Surgeon Lieutenant and
served in HMS Forrester and HMS Renown, including
_ action on North Atlantic and Russian convoys.

_ In 1947 Dr. Poad returned to the Bahamas and
established his office in Nassau. As a physician and
general surgeon he served the local community for almost
half a century. He retired in 1996. He will be remembered
not only as a doctor but as a sailor and yachtsman.

He was a member of the Royal Nassau Sailing Club, the
Bahamas Historical Society, the Humane Society and the
Bahamas Medical Association.

Dr. Poad is survived by his two sons Richard and Bill,
both resident in England, and by his daughter Ann. He is
_also survived by his grandchildren Clare, Sara, Jonathan
and Georgina, his great-grandchildren Alice, Lucy and
Sebastian. In accordance with his last wishes, his ashes.
will be scattered in the waters of the Bahamas.

Donations in memory of Dr. Poad may be made to BASRA
(Bahamas Air Sea Rescue), P.O.Box SS6247, Nassau.
No flowers please.

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THE TRIBUNE






<« & ~

Fraternities and sororities
compete in the ‘Stepping
on the Shores’ competition

ACTION from the weekend step event that took place at
Arawak Cay.

Fraternities and sororities from the US and the Bahamas were’
in competition.

Hundreds watched as the California Deltas (top) took top hon-
ours in the women’s sorority group, while the Unknown Sigmas
(above) won in the male fraternity group.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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HE WILL FOREVER LIVE IN OUR HEARTS &
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WE MISS YOU DADDY.

FOREVER LOVING YOU, YOUR WIFE,
CHILDREN, AND
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TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008



LOCAL NEWS ‘

FROM page one

The survey, which intends
to assess investment trends in
the region, lists Jamaica,
Anguilla and St Lucia, trailed
by the Dominican Republic,
the Bahamas and Turks and
Caicos, as the Caribbean
countries which leading banks
in the region felt have the
greatest tourism growth
potential for 2008.

The Bahamas had previ-
ously topped the list in 2007,
with 50 per cent of respon-
dents stating that they
believed this country would
see the most expansion that
year.

Bahamas sees 18% drop
in foreign investment

This year, Jamaica was sin-
gled out for its ability to
attract European travellers, its
diversified economy, good air-
lift and low-cost carriers.
European tourists are said to
make longer visits and spend
more than visitors from else-
where.

KPMG’s prediction may be
considered less significant in

light of this year’s ECLAC
teport, which says that the
amount of investment coming
into the Bahamas in fact fell
from $706 in 2006 to $580 mil-
lion in 2007.

Its 18 per cent decline was
more than the investment
drop in Trinidad and Tobago
and Belize combined, but the
data also shows that it was

more than the annual average
for the 2002 -
$463 million.

The weakening happened
at a time when the Caribbean
as a whole was experiencing
a decline in investment, while
Latin America saw an
unprecedented boom.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar told The
Tribune that, while he had
some reservations about the
accuracy of the data obtained
by the ECLAC, noting that
the amount of FDI the report
said was coming into the
Bahamas in both 2006 and
2007 was smaller than he
would have expected
given the projects underway,
the fall-off is to be
expected.

“I think that you will con-

2007 period of

tinue to see a decrease in the
amount of foreign investment
primarily because our num-
bers are probably skewed by
the significant amount of
investment made by Kerzner
international,” he said.

“It will be trending down
because there’s no major sig-
nificant investment particu-
larly in our hotel sector on the
horizon,” he added.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance, also
questioned the figures pro-
vided in the ECLAC report
based on the amount of devel-
opment underway in the spec-
ified periods, but concluded
that the data provides a good
“approximate”
the Bahamas’ status.

He said that the difficulty

indication of

THE TRIBUNE 22%



international agencies have in ,3
accessing “timely and com- |
prehensive” data on the
Bahamas could have caused, ,
the Bahamas’ “position to be}
understated.” aie

However, he said that this,. j\,,
did not mean that the overall. :_
picture Was not “of any use.”* '§
He added that traditionally lit-
tle resources have been made
available to the Department )°"!
of Statistics to undertake
research,

“That position was changed ~
about three years ago and
hopefully, going forward there’ ~
should be improvements,” he
added.

The Tribune attempted to. 5.,;
reach minister of state for. ,,,/.
finance Zhivargo Laing but... j):5
was unsuccessful. fas

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FROM page one

up a fight between two groups of boys when he
was stabbed and killed.

The police officers who arrived at the scene
and fired the warning shots, reportedly appre-
hended several young men from the fight, who
were made to lie in the road near the hotel before
being taken into custody.

Davis’ body fell just in the middle of the path-
way leading to the beach with his right hand
clutched over his heart and his head turned to the
east.

Assistant Superintendent Joseph Feaste, officer
in charge at Paradise Island and Potter’s Cay,
confirmed that police have several people in cus-

tody for questioning at this time related to the,

incident, but-he was unable to comment further
on who these persons are.

People who knew Davis said he was on his way
to boarding school abroad, but instead, he too has
now been consumed by the brutality of an increas-
ingly violent Nassau.

Several tourists stood around the crime scene

A BALANCING ACT

“Buyers’ market.” “Sellers’ market.”
What does it all mean when you find
yourself ready to buy or sell a proper-
ty?

The basic concept behind a “buyers”
market” is that there are more proper-
ties for sale than there are buyers qual-
ified to make a purchase. This creates
increased competition among the sell-
ers for those fewer purchasers, and can
put the buyers in the “driver’s seat”
when it comes to negotiation.

It logically follows that a “sellers’
market” happens when there are more
prospective buyers than there are properties for
sale. Now it is the buyers who must compete against
each other for available properties, often to the
benefit of those who are selling.

The Bahamas has enjoyed a sellers’ market for the

last few years. This is largely due to the fact that

the





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Paradise Island murder.

curious about what happened, while others
attempted to battle through the yellow tape to
quickly get to their hotels, as dozens of armed offi- |
cers, some with automatic weapons, blocked off
the area. ~ oH
The violence did not stop here, however. As lag
police attempted to secure this scene, many of
them had to speed off to the other entrance to |
Cabbage Beach near the Paradise Island laun- ~
dry as another fight had broken out there. Cy
At the same time, a call could be heard on
police radios for assistance at Goodman’s Bay 3
as a disturbance was occurring there among.
beach-goers.
It is unclear if the brawl at the laundry was! '0

. related to the one that had left Davis dead. Mr! !!17

Feaste, when asked about this incident, said he’: '
had no information that he could report.
Davis’ body lay near the hotel for nearly three’ ! rid
hours yesterday, until shortly after 7pm when it»! |
was taken away in a hearse. (til

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THE TRIBUNE



Man shot by police

FROM page one

into custody and detained at Princess Margaret Hospital.
Police dogs also had to be used to subdue the other, male, said

Mr Miller.

Two men are currently in police custody assisting with the inves-
tigation, Mr Miller confirmed. One of the men is said to be 18 years

old, and the other 17.

FROM page one

in stable condition at Doctors
Hospital.

Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming said police were
alerted to the crime scene
after receiving a call from a
neighbour who reported that
Mr Flowers had been robbed
and shot at his residence.

EMS personnel and a num-
ber of uniformed and plain-
clothes officers were dis-
patched to the scene in For-
tune Point in response to the
call.

On their arrival, officers
saw Mr Flowers bleeding and
suffering from a gunshot
wound to his left shoulder.

Mr Flowers told the offi-
cers that he arrived home
around 10.43pm and parked
his car inside the garage.

He said as he got out of his

Shot and robbed

appeared out of nowhere
and demanded money from
him.

Chief Supt Rahming said
that during a struggle with the
gunmen, Flowers received the
gun shot wound to the left
shoulder. He was then robbed
of a Motorola cellular phone
and an undetermined amount
of cash by the assailants.

Mr Flowers was taken to
the Rand Memorial Hospital
where he received emergency
medical treatment. However,
it was determined that due to
his injuries, he should be sent
to New Providence. He was
later airlifted around 6am on
Sunday to Doctors Hospital
in Nassau.

Chief Supt Rahming said
the Central Detective Unit

vehicle, two dark males armed

officers have launched an
with handguns suddenly

investigation into the incident.

Sea Hauler victims
FROM page one

The statement also noted that in addition to this offering, all
of the Sea Hauler victim’s “past and future medical expenses”
will be “paid by government at any government health facility.”

Those affected have been asked to come to the Ministry of
Labour and Maritime Affairs, located in the Post office building,
East Hill Street, to collect their money on May 14.

They are advised that each will have to provide proof of iden-
tity such as a passport, voter’s card or driver’s licence.

“Payments to the estate of deceased persons can be collected
by the legally appointed representatives or trustees,” added
the statement.

News that the government would soon be making the payment
was greeted by Sea Hauler victims last week with gratitude and
satisfaction.

Twenty-five people were injured and four people died during
the night time collison between the Sea Hauler and United Star
boats in August 2003.

The Sea Hauler was loaded with sleeping passengers and on
its way to the Cat Island regatta when the incident took place.

The FNM government maintains that none of its agencies
were in any way responsible for the accident, but stated last year
that it would intervene out of a “sense of fair play.”

The Sea Hauler victims’ fight for compensation, which now
continues against the owners of the boats involved, began short-
ly after the tragic crash, continuing throughout the PLP’s tenure
and well into the first year of the current government’s term in
office.

The Ingraham administration previously suggested that while
it was keen to help the victims from before the time it entered
office, the process was set back when it was met by a demand for
$12 million, which it was “not prepared to countenance,” short-
ly after its election victory.

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CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE OF

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Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
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from Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
19th May, 2008, 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation”
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

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Port Everglades to Nassau twice a week
from anywhere in the world

FROM page one

release over the weekend, in
response to Mr Grant’s remarks
recently in Exuma.

“It was with a degree of great
disbelief that I listened to the
comments of the minister of
tourism and aviation, Hon Neko
Grant at a recent town meeting in
Exuma, purportedly in response
to a question by an airport screen-
er as to why the salaries of air-
port screeners in Exuma had not
been paid by the Bahamas gov-
ernment,” she said.

These workers whose salaries
have recently been stopped,
explained the former minister,
were hired during her watch as
minister under delegated author-
ity, at which time, recommenda-
tions were made to have the offi-
cers appointed on a permanent
basis.

“They were so appointed, in
the first instance, to ensure the
deadline implemented by the
International Civil Aviation
Organization as to 100 per cent
screening at all international air-
ports was met in the Bahamas,”
she said. “I am advised that
despite that recommendation
being made more than two years
ago, these persons have yet to be
regularized.”

The appointment of the
screeners, as is the case with all
public servants, said Mrs Hanna-
Martin, is done under the super-
vision and advice of the Depart-
ment of Public Service in accor-
dance with the provisions of gen-
eral orders and the rules of the
Public Service.

“To claim that people were
brought into the public service
and paid from the public treasury
for more than two years ‘improp-
erly’ is obscene,” said Mrs Hanna-
Martin.

“The minister’s performance
in Exuma was an act of political
cowardice designed to disguise
his incompetence in the perfor-
mance of his duties in two critical
areas of national development,
tourism and aviation. He should
know by now that the Bahamian
people will not be satisfied with
excuses and scapegoating and
expect duly appointed ministers

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to carry out their duties without
ducking and diving.”

A source close to the issue.
who did not wish to be named.
told The Tribune yesterday that
of the 15 to 16 screeners in Exu-
ma. the pay issue is a problem
particularly with seven to 10 of
the screeners.

The emplovees are irregularly
paid, said the source. At month’s
end when salaries are due. the
workers are paid sometimes two
or three days after they should
be: or in some cases, the delays
stretch to a week or longer.

The current delay that has
caused upset among staff, the
source said, occurred when
screeners Were not paid for two
weeks after they should have
been. They finally received this
money last Friday, said the
source.

“This is very, very difficult for
people who have bills to pay.”
The Tribune was told. “The prob-
lem is made worse with the high
cost of living and the high gas
prices.”

Along with the irregular pay-
ments, some screeners in Exuma
are reportedly owed as much as
10 months of overtime, the source
said. And, the problem of owed
overtime reportedly extends
beyond Exuma to other screeners
in islands such as Long Island.

Mrs Hanna-Martin called on
Mr Grant to explain to the
screeners why, after he has been
in office for more that a year,
these persons have not yet been
regularized; and further, why they
are not now being paid.

“These people should have,
by now, been regularized by the
Bahamas government and they
ought to be paid,” she said. “I call
on Minister Grant to forthwith
apologize to the Exuma airport
screeners, to the people of Exuma
and Bahamians generally for his
lack of forthrightness.”

When contacted yesterday Mr
Grant said that he had not yet
read Mrs Hanna-Martin’s com-
ments. But upon doing so, he said
that he intends to respond on the
issue.

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ee eed
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Prestigious apartment complex at Cable Beach
is seeking the services of a “hands on” Resident
Manager. The successful applicant will possess
a proven track record, showing supervisory
ability and communication skills at all levels.







Areas of knowledge and proficiency will
include familiarity with electrical, plumbing
and pumping systems. Experience of general
office equipment and procedures, stock control
and working with a small staff is highly
desirable. Salary is negotiable. Persons with
children need not apply. This position is
open to Bahamians or those with Bahamian
status only. Replies C.V., recent photograph
and references should be forwarded to:












The President,
P.O. Box N-4903
Nassau, Bahamas



_. See

e a

THE TRIBUNE

The Westin supports the Grand
Bahama Heritage Foundation

Public invited to view sculptures of first settlers of Freetown

THE Grand Bahama Heritage
Foundation in conjunction with
the Westin Hotel at Our Lucaya
has invited the public to view the
Sacred Women, a sculptural rep-
resentation of the first settlers of
Freetown, by Bahamian artist
Antonius Roberts.

This collection of 12 statuesque
women, carved from indigenous
Bahamian trees, will be on dis-
play in the lobby of the Manor
House until they are moved into
their new home at The Heritage
Museum and Gallery.

That location will be
announced later this year.

Representative of The Her-
itage’s vision, “to use art as a win-
dow into our past”, the use of
indigenous trees and the repre-
sentation of the freed slaves from

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Freetown, connect the present

‘with the past. Through this medi-

um of sculpture, Mr Roberts has
created the opportunity to dis-
cuss the difficult topic of slavery
and its connection to Grand
Bahama. “Through sculptures,
paintings, mixed and new media
and performances, it (art) offers a
society much needed reliquary
objects, mediums and rituals that

allow a people the possibility of —

conscious recognition and regen-
eration,” said Erica James, Direc-
tor of the National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas, during the Her-
itage’s sponsored show, “Free-
dom Call.”

Mr Roberts says of Sacred
Women, “My sculptures are
inspired by an ancestral urge to
conserve that which we destroy
or discard in the name of
progress.

It is my intent through this
process, to-present conceptual
proposals, which suggest issues
of identity and respect for
nature.”

The new Heritage Museum
and Gallery will bring artists and
historians together to create exhi-
bitions reflecting the historical
and cultural aspects of Grand
Bahama.

Artists in Residence pro-
grammes, workshops and film will
contribute to the exhibits.

f . SF A N |
%\ < \ = Ne we



HOTO: Chantal Bethel

P



LAURIE TUCHEL, co-chair of the Grand Bahama Heritage Foundation,
stands next to the life size Sacred Women sculptures with the artist,
sculptor, Antonius Roberts in the Manor House lobby of The Westin
ee the carvings will remain until the Heritage Museum is com-
pleted.



RELIGIOUS and community leaders paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna on Wednesday,





BIS PHOTO: Raymond A Behtel



May 7, at Government House. Seated from left are Dean Wells, Bishop Simeon Hall, Governor General Han-
na, Debbie Bartlett, and Member of Parliament Picewell Forbes. Standing from left are Jerome Gomez, Ron-
nie Armbrister, Pastor Lyall Bethel, Rhinehart Pearson and Pastor Geoffrey Wood.





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Diabetic Association monthly meeting

THE Bahamas Diabetic Association will hold its monthly meet-
ing starting at 2.30pm at the Nurses Training Centre in Grosvenor
Close off Shirley Street on Saturday, May 17. The guest speaker is
Dr. Graham Cates.

Members and interested persons of the public are invited to
attend. Light refreshments will be served following the meeting.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award. If so,
call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.















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~= THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 13

Law
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P.O. Box SS-6366, Nassau, Bahamas P.O. Box SS-6355, Nassau, Bahamas P.O. Box SS-6366, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone (242) 323-3973 or 325-3976 Phone (242) 326-8543 of 326-5464 Phone (242) 323-3973 or 325-3976
_ Fax (242) 322-3937 Fax (242) 326-5461 Fax (242) 322-3937
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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Sanpin Motors Ltd.
Your

Pre-Owned

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BREATHTAKING ocean
views, ultra-luxurious accom-
modations and hospitable world
class service awaited members
of Atlantis’ Priority Club as
they recently toured hotel mag-
nate Sol Kerzner’s 600-room all-
suite resort, The Cove Atlantis
along with Dolphin Cay at
Atlantis. The all-suite resort,
which recently celebrated its
first year anniversary, is a major
component of Kerzner Interna-
tional’s over $1 billion Phase III
Development.

Leading the familiarisation
tour was Karen Cargill, Nation-
al Sales Manager at Kerzner
International, who heads the
Priority Club. Following the
tour the group, which included
representatives from Credit
Suisse, RMF Investment Man-
agement Branch and Agrolimen
South America, were hosted to
a lunch at Mosaic at The Cove
as well as presented with gifts
for their outstanding contribu-
tions during the first quarter of
2008.

_ The Priority Club is a corpo-
rate service club, administered
by Kerzner International’s Sales
and Marketing Department.
Club members receive points
for booking rooms and food
and beverage events with
Atlantis, The Cove Atlantis and
One&Only Ocean Club. The
points can be redeemed for
accommodations along with
food and beverage privileges at
‘any of Kerzner’s Bahamian
properties.
“ “Any opportunity which we
have to showcase Atlantis along
~with any of Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Paradise Island based
propertiesis indeed an honour,”
Ms Cargill commented. “Our







rear of Pre-ov

Ppa pertennesrdenrwostonavedh



EDUCATION Minister Carl Bethel
greets R M Bailey Senior High
School students at the school’s
Career’s Fest Day, entitled “Career



8.. Representatives from various

Tees O68 at
_ Fax:325-0883







sd Pete RE aw
businesses attended to provide stu-
dents with employment informa-
tion.

“If you are what you say you are se Then have no fear...

The Camera’s Here” (Lupe Fecal

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OUSANDS IN MODELING CONTRA
THREE DAYS OF EDITORIAL SHOO'
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Ibs (height and weight proportional)... Contest begins on May 5, 2008 and ends September 1, 2008. Mail in entries can be sent to ‘““Models2-
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es Extravaganza,”.on Thursday,- May; :

government agencies, ‘hotels and °



Atlantis’ Priority Club members
tour Kerzner’s 600-room all-
suite resort, The Cove Atlantis



"PHOTO: Tim Aylen

KERZNER INTERNATIONAL’S National Sales Manager, Karen Cargill pic-
tured at centre recently hosted members of the resort’s Priority Club to a

familiarisation tour and special recognition luncheon at The Cove. Pictured —

from left to right are Tanya Stubbs, Kerzner International’s Sales Admin-
istrator, Denise Knowles, RMF Investment Management Branch, Karen,
Catherine Wallas of Credit Suisse and Cindy Rolle of Agrolimen South

America.

Priority Club members have
played a significant role in part-
nering with us over the years,
in allowing their corporate
clients to enjoy and experience
Atlantis along with Kerzner’s
Paradise Island based resorts,
and this familiarisation tour and
special luncheon is just our way
of saying a special thank you to
our club members.”

RMF Investment Manage-

ment Branch has been a long-

standing member of Atlantis’
Priority Club. Speaking on
behalf of the company, Denise
Knowles said the company
enjoys being a member of
Atlantis’ Priority Club because
the resort’s employees always
go above and beyond their
expectations to ensure that their
special customers feel at home.

Minister greets Bailey students



“They are always helpful. They
know when our people (clients)
are coming as well as they make

it a point to know their

names...It’s just wonderful.”

Catherine Wallas of Credit
Suisse Nassau Branch said that
her company has been a mem-
ber of Atlantis’ Priority Club
for over four years. “They (The
Priority Club) have always been
very helpful when we had guests
staying here. It was so nice to
see the rooms and the dol-
phins...It is very beautiful over
here,” she said.

Echoing similar comments
was Cindy Rolle of Agrolimen
South America. “...It was
something I hadn’t imagined,
the atmosphere, the experience
at Dolphin Cay and...the rooms
are very lovely,” she agreed.

TENDER NO. 664/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for
CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE OF
ENGINES AND SURROUNDING AREAS
Blue Hills Power Station

Nassau, Bahamas.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
from Mrs. Deimeta Seymour
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be délivered on or before
19th May, 2008, 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Envelopes must be marked:
Tender No. 664/08
Engine Cleaning & Maintenance
of Surrounding Areas
Blue Hills Power Station
Nassau, Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such part of
any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.



A the



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 15

Banktofil he Bahan

deiner Nationa

ay








Fase Se Se i =




4

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE









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TUESDAY,

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Securities Industry
Act ‘unlikely’ to make
Parliament by year-end

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE reformed Securities
Industry Act 2008 is unlikely to
reach Parliament’s legislative
agenda before year-end, The
Tribune has learnt, the Securi-
ties Commission’s executive
director admitting that the pri-
vate sector was “not very com-
fortable” in reviewing the Act
without the accompanying reg-
ulations.

While declining to comment
on whether the revised Act,
which would regulate the
Bahamian capital markets,
would reach the Cabinet and
Parliamentary legislative agen-
das this year, Hillary Deveaux
said the regulations were likely
to be released for industry con-
sultation between the third
quarter end and 2008 year-end.

Mr Deveaux, though, con-
firmed that the Bahamian capi-
tal markets industry was “not
very comfortable” in reviewing
the revised Securities Industry
Act without seeing the accom-
panying regulations.

The Act was released for

* Private sector
‘uncomfortable’
reviewing law without
accompanying regulations
* Consultation extended,
with regulations
set for release between
‘end-Q3 and end-Q4’
industry consultation at the end
of January 2008, without the
regulations. The plan was to

draft the regulations in ‘parallel’
with the Act’s review, leading

. some to argue that the Govern-

ment and Securities Commis-
sion were looking for the indus-
try to draft the regulations for
them.

While the Act sets out the
legal parameters and frame-
work for oversight, it is the
accompanying regulations that

give it enforcement teeth. With--
out the latter, the Act cannot :

be implemented and brought

SEE page 12B

Corporation needs ‘at least’
$200m to hit long-term targets

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Water and Sewerage
Corporation will need at least
$200 million to achieve its long-
term objectives and targets, its
general manager revealed,
adding that with inflation, this
figure could reach as high as
$765 million.

Godfrey Sherman told per-
sons attending a College of the
Bahamas (COB) water seminar
that the Corporation spent
about $50 million a year, but
only collected about $40 mil-
lion in revenues, thus making it
heavily reliant on government
subsidies to bridge that $10 mil-
lion-plus deficit.

Mr Sherman said the $200
million investment needed by
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration would increase to $300
million if left for another five
years, and could ultimately

: s
Ri

Figure could rise to
$300m after five years,
maybe up to $765m,
due to inflation

extend to about $765 million
due to inflation and inaction.

“The longer you take, the
more it will cost,” Mr Sherman
said, acknowledging that the
Government needed to pass
further legislation to help the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
achieve its objectives.

“If we are going to play the
same game at least let’s be on
the same playing field,” Mr
Sherman added. He said that
like every Bahamian resident
and business, rising costs have
affected the Corporation as
well, particularly given that con-
sumer bills do not necessarily
reflect the cost of water services.

SEE page 4B

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MAY 13,



ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



Hutchison ready for
Port ‘due diligence’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

utchison Whampoa is “ready
to commence its due dili-
gence” on the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and its affiliates, having signed an
agreement to acquire the late Edward St

- George estate’s stake in their holding com-
pany, court documents have revealed.
’ An affidavit filed last week on behalf .

of Robert Lotmore, Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) managing director, recounted

Sir Albert threat to ‘throw in towel’
and leave over chairman impasse

versation he had with Chris Gray, the
Freeport Container Port (FCP) chief exec-
utive who has been acting as the Bahamas-

based ‘point man’ for Hutchison Wham- -

poa in its attempt to acquire the GBPA.

“On April 29, 2008, I spoke’by tele-:,
phone with Chris Gray, the chief executive —
of Freeport Container Port, one of the: ©
’ Hutchison companies, during which con-

versation he said that Hutchison has an
agreement to acquire the shares of the St .
George estate in Intercontinental Diver-
sified Corporation,” Mr Lotmore alleged.
The latter company, known as IDC, is
the immediate pulding company that owns

“SEE page 12B



an alleged April 29, 2008, telephone con-

‘Fantastic’ venture a midis

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

‘A WASTE recycling joint
venture is “fantastic” for New
Providence and represents “a
more progressive way of plan-
ning and executing”, a senior
executive from one of its
shareholders told The Tribune.

T. Rhys Duggan, New Proy-
idence Development Compa-
ny’s president and chief exec-
utive, said Green Systems,
which is located just south of
the Airport Industrial Park,
was producing compost, top
soil and mulch from green
waste and pallets brought to

its facility from-throughout——
. western.New, Providence. :
Describing the tipping fees

for businesses and residents as

“reasonable” to encourage
them to use the facility, Mr

Duggan told The Tribune: “I

think it’s fantastic for the

island. We collect the green:

waste and put it through the
mulcher to become compost,
or mixing it with soil to
become top soil.

“We don’t make any money,
out of it yet, but it’s a fantastic ,
thing to do. It’s a more pro--

gressive way of doing things,
planning and executing.”
Green Systems also pro-
duces mulch from the waste
pallets sourced from the
Tonique Williams-Darling

Highway landfill and, else-
where across New Providence.
,, Apart from New Providence

Development’ Company,
which provided the land for

‘progressive way of planning’

the venture, the ores dares
holders include BISX-listed
Bahamas Waste, which has a

19 pet cent stake; Ginny McK-.
inney’s Waste Not; and Robin.

‘Myers of Caribbean Land-

-.scaping.

Given. that
Waste’s 19 per cent stake was
initially valued at $100,574,

according to the company’s

2007 annual report, it appears
that Green Systems was start-
ed with initial shareholder cap-
ital of just over $502,000.
Bahamas Waste said its
share of Green Systems’ prof-
its was just over $5,295 for the
year ended December 31,

=DOOF, neatn “Tdicating that — i

SEE page 8B.

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BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY












PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





On



BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
; SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
@ By Royal Fidelity Capital Freeport Concrete Compa- at $0.014, an increase of 0.08 per cent to $72.9 million, com- AML $1.95 $- 200 17.47%
Markets ny (FCC) was this week's mar- _ per cent from $0.013. pared to $56 million in the BBL $0.90 $- 0 5.88%
ket loser, with 2,500 of its Total assets and liabilities 2007 first quarter. BOB $9.61 $- 0 0.00 %
TRADING momentum shares trading, declining by stood at $238 million and $204 Offering Notice: _ BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00 %
increased slightly in the $0.05 to end the week atanew __ million respectively, compared ROYAL Fidelity Bahamas BSL $14.60 $- 0 0.00 %
Bahamian stock market last 52-week low of $0.45. to $224 million and $191 mil- International Investment | BWL $3.50 $- , 0 -4.37 %
week, with investors trading in lion at year-end 2007. Fund - Equities Sub Fund is _ CAB $14.00 - $+0.20 3,000 16.18%
eight out of the 19 listed COMPANY NEWS ¢ CABLE Bahamas (CAB) currently open for subscrip- —CBL $7.08 $-0.02 40,090 16.01%
stocks. A total of 55,170 Earnings Releases: released its unaudited finan- tion until May 15, 2008. | CHL $2.87 $- 2,280 ~8.89%
shares changed hands, an ¢ FIDELITY Bank cial results for the quarter The fund provides investors CIB $13.24 $- 0 -9.32%
increase of 116.8 per cent (Bahamas) (FBB) released its ending March 31, 2008. with access to the best-per- _CWCB $4.29 $-0.37 0 -14.80%
compared to last week's trad- —_ un-audited financial results for Net income increased by forming international markets, DHS $3.00 $- 0 27.66%
ing volume of 25,448 shares. the quarter ending March 31, 10.9 per cent to $5.5 million, and the ability to diversify | FAM $8.00 $- 0 11.11%
Cable Bahamas (CAB) led 2008. FBB reported net compared to $4.9 million in one's portfolio by investing _ FBB $2.39 $- 0- -9.81%
the advance for a second con- income of $390,000, an the 2007 first quarter. Net Bahamian dollars in interna- | FCC $0.45 $-0.05 2,500 -41.56%
secutive week, with 3,000 increase of 26.3 per cent com- income per ordinary share tional equity securities with- FCL $5.45 $+0.13 5,500 5.21%
shares trading, climbing by pared to $309,000 for the same _ stood at $0.28, up 12 per cent out paying any investment | FIN $12.50 $- 1,000 -3.47%
$0.20 or 1.4 per cent to end period in 2007. from $0.25 for the 2007 first premium. ICD $6.79 $- 0 “6.34%
the week at a new 52-week For the three months ending —_ quarter. Offering Notice - JSJ $12.30 $- 600 11.82%
high of $14. March 31, 2008, interest CAB reported revenues . Continued PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
Commonwealth Bank income rose by 47 per cent to $20 million, an increase of $1.9 FOCOL Holdings (FCL
(CBL) led the volume for $4 million , onitared to $2.7 million or 10.6 per cent from announced it will be extending DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES: ea |
another week with 40,090 million forthe same periodin $18.1 millionin 2007. Operat- _ the deadline on its private ¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has declared a dividend of $0.03 _
shares trading, decreasing by 2007. ing income of $7.2 million placement offering to cover per share, payable on May 13, 2008, to all shareholders of |
$0.02 to end the week at $7.08. Net interest income climbed by $947,000 or 15.12 the next six months. The pre- record date April 30, 2008. ee |
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) fol- increased by 9.5 per cent to per cent, from $6.2 million in ferred shares will be paying a ¢ Bahamas Waste (BWL) announced it will be holding its _
lowed with 5,500 shares, $1.8 million, compared to $1.7 2007. dividend rate of prime + 1.75 Annual General Meeting on May 22, 2008, at 6pm at the
climbing by $0.13 to close at million in the 2007 first quar- Retained earnings at the per cent, payable semi-annual- = National Tennis Centre, Nassau, Bahamas. |

$5.45.



ter. Earnings per share stood

end of the period rose by 29.8

on new
annuities
during the
month of May!

ly.





The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 901.89 (-5.27%) YTD



Public Utilities Commission

JOB OPPORTUNITY

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has been established by statute
for the regulation of the telecommunications, electricity and water and
sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

\

The PUC is seeking a utility regulatory professional with training and
experience, particularly in the field of telecommunications regulation, to
fill the position of Executive Director.

The Executive Director is the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission
reporting to the Chairman, and is responsible for the day-to-day
administration of the affairs of the Commission and for ensuring that the
Commission is provided with high quality technical advice and guidance
in the execution of its functions. .

The successful candidate will be required to provide leadership and ‘
management direction to the PUC. The candidate will also be a high-
level practitioner with direct experience in a wide variety of utility
regulatory activities including liberalization(especially with respect to
telecommunications) granting of licences, approval of rates, service quality,
licence enforcement measures, universal service policies, radio spectrum
management, and international best practices. This post will be offered

on a contract basis.

The successful applicant will have a Master’s Degree or Professional
Certification in Economics, Management, Law or Engineering and is
expected to have had ten (10) years practice as a trained regulator.

The PUC offers a very attractive remuneration and benefits package
together with a pleasant working environment. Further information about
the PUC can be obtained from the website: www. PUCBahamas.gov.bs

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3095 Abaco 242-367-6501 : . ; ie soe
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission

4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Fax No. (242) 323-7288
E-mail: PUC@puchahamas.gov.bs

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 3B





Bank worker’s prosecution To ativertise, call 302-2371

over alleged $130k theft
was ‘severely hampered’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE prosecution of a former
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional executive for allegedly
stealing $130,000 from the bank
was “severely hampered” by
errors made by the presiding
magistrate, the Court of Appeal
finding that there was a “prima
facie case” against the accused.

Saying that its comments had
to be brief because it was remit-
ting the case against Terry Mur-
ray to another magistrate, the
Court of Appeal said in its judg-
ment that the original magis-
trate to hear the case, Marilyn
Meeres, who was now a
Supreme Court deputy regis-
trar, effectively “restricted” the
evidence placed before the
court by the prosecution.

The Court of Appeal judg-’

ment, delivered by Justice Hart-
man Longley, and with which
Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer and Justice
Ganpatsingh agreed, recalled
that Murray, in his employment
at Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national, had been accused of
14 counts of stealing totaling
$130,000.

This sum was allegedly
“made up of 13 or 14 drafts
issued without payment at his
[Murray’s] order, either to him-
self or his siblings. It was alleged
that [Murray] had confessed to
the theft, which he claimed: to
have committed out of frustra-
tion”.

At the original trial before

then-Magistrate Meeres, two
prosecution witnesses were
called to give evidence. The first
was the Bank of the Bahamas
International customer service
representative who allegedly
prepared the bank drafts in
question.

However, the judgment noted
she “could not recall the spe-
cific details of all the drafts that
she had prepared for or on
behalf of [Murray], but she gave
evidence that she had made a
record of each transaction,
which she entered in the daily
logs of the bank, and had either
signed or initialed each entry”.

The Court of Appeal judg-
ment said the witness told the
court she could identify the log
entries from her signature, but
then-Magistrate Meeres refused
permission for her to refresh
her memory about the drafts
she had prepared.

As a result, the customer ser-
vice representative said she
could only recall one draft for
$9,500, which was the subject
of one charge and entered into
evidence after she identified it.

The Court of Appeal found
there was “no justifiable rea-
son” for not allowing the wit-
ness to refresh her memory, as
the application for her to do so
from the bank’s entry logs was

“properly grounded” and
allowed under two sections of
the Evidence Act.

The second witness, the
Court of Appeal judgment
recorded, was Bank of the
Bahamas International’s inter-

nal auditor, who was called to
provide the findings of his inves-
tigation into the alleged
$130,000 theft.

“However, for reasons not
quite apparent from the record,
the learned Magistrate refused
to permit the witness to give
evidence of the entirety of his
investigation and findings, and
limited him to the one draft
which the customer service rep-
resentative was able to identify,
and for which he said he could
find no record of a payment,”
the Court of Appeal found.

“It is difficult to understand
why. the internal auditor’s evi-
dence was so restricted by the
magistrate. All evidence which
is logically relevant is legally
admissible unless excluded by
one of the exclusionary rules.
No basis for the exclusion of his
evidence was put before us, and
none appears on the record.

“It therefore transpired that
because of the aforementioned
material errors, the prosecution
was severely hampered in the
presentation of its case, so that
at its close it conceded that
there was evidence relating to
only one charge.”

As a result, Murray’s attor-
ney, Murrio Ducille, submitted
that there was no case for his
client to answer. Ultimately,
then-Magistrate Meeres ruled
that the prosecution had to
prove its case beyond reason-
able doubt and had not done
so, discharging Murray.

This, the Court of Appeal
said, was “clearly an error”, as

TREASURY MANAGEMENT
INTERNAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Bahamian Subsidiary of International Company seeks an Internal Control
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Responsibilities

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accordance with the company standards.

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* Supervise the accounting function; prepare monthly accounts statements

and reports to the General Manager.

* Implement control for day-to-day investment operations.

* Monitoring of various investments limits (notional, counterparty, VaR, stop
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* Design and implement cash flows model and estimates.

* Support for the General Manager in the analysis of investments and |
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* Substitute for the General Manager as required.
* Manage special projects as required.
* Support internal and external auditors during their periodic reviews.

Profile



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* Strong expertise in internal control (implementation of COSO model) and
audit, CIA certification preferred.
+ 5+ years international experience in risk management/audit in a treasury
and investment environment, including risk measurement (VaR, stress test)
and valuation of financial instruments.
* Knowledge of treasury and investments processes, from and accounting
and control standpoint.
* French written and spoken (required), Spanish written and spoken

(desirable).

+ International experience in financial services auditing at management level.
* Excellent experience with banks and or private company.
* Strong financial, analytical and methodical skills.

Benefits

Competitive salary commensurate with banks and or private company.

Medical insurance and pension scheme.

Apply in confidence to:

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P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, The Bahamas

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the prosecution needed to pro-
vide only a prima facie case
against Murray at that stage in
the trial.

“We would say there is evi-
dence which is capable of
amounting to a prima facie case,
particularly in view of the fact
that [Murray] had allegedly con-
fessed to stealing some $130,000
from the bank,” the Court of
Appeal found.

“That, together with the fact
that funds from the draft iden-
tified by the customer service
representative, amounting to
some $9,500, were deposited to
the account of [Murray] at FIN-
CO, and no record for payment
of that draft could be found at
the bank, it was on the evidence
open to the court to find a pri-
ma facie case on the one
remaining charge.”

TST

For the stories

Ta UTE
rR
TT EES





Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

NOTICE OF
_ ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
CALL AS PER THE CO-OPERATIVE
-ACT 2005 SECTION 22

The 23" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 24", 2008

at
9:00 am
at MN ARSE S
Holy Trinity Activities Centre
Trinity Way >
Stapledon Gardens



Refreshments will be provided



BIMINI B

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North
end of North Bimini, Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on
over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for
anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the
most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd.
owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

CAREER OUONUNIET

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a eaoaat individual

for the following SELES)

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

This individual will be responsible to plan, direct, and ‘erie the ©
provision of accurate, timely, and objective financial data. from





which informed management decisions can be made. Recommend

remedial action when and where necessary. Safeguard owner assets

_ by creating and mainiaining sound internal control systems. Hire the

most professional, service-oriented, dedicated highly skilled, trained

staff available. Participate in total hotel management asa member of
the hotel’s Executive Committee.

FERRY CAPTAIN

This individual will be responsible to transport associates to and from the -
Bimini Bay in a safe and efficient manner, following the stipulated ferry
schedule. Maintaining vessel's log book and the smooth operation of
the vessel, i.e., servicing, cleaning and reporting any incidents.
A/B Captain's License required

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation.
For full consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of

their resumé to the attention of

MANAGER OF HUMAN RESOURCES

at gbullard@biminibayresort.com
or fax to (242) 347.2312



Perry ee Re eae aed
with the confidence of cash

pam Sh Ad
3238-15653

2A Dewagard Piaza Madeira Street





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



)
l

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER NATHANIEL SMITH Late of High
Tree Estates, Carmichael Road in the Southern District of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

DECEASED

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having a claim against the above Estate
are required to send such clatms duly certified in writting to the undersigned on
or before the 28th May A.D., 2008 after which date the Executor of the Estate
will proceed to distribute the assets having regard to only those claims of which
he had notice.

Williams & Williams
Chambers

33 Pinedale Street
PO. Box N-7421
Nassau, Bahamas



¥ ‘
NAD
Nosseu Alper

~ REQUEST

FOR PROPOSALS

NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -
EXPANSION PROJECT

Request for proposal D-107 IT consultant- design & construction administration
‘services.

NAD is seeking IT design and construction administration services from
qualified IT Consultants for the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of work
includes: : ;

“Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design requirement
report;
Preparing technical specifications and drawings for the IT component of
the Project; :
Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and
System commissioning and training.

.. Qualifications: :
e Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
~ (AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;
Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and
Adesign quality control program.



MR. GODFREY SHERMAN
General Manager,

Water and Sewerage Corporation
Godfrey Sherman, General Manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation is a fully
qualified civil engineer with over fifteen years

Mr. Sherman is especially known for his





experience at the level of senior management.

Corporation needs ‘at least’
$200m to hit long-term targets

FROM page 1B

“On some Family Islands, we
are giving water away,” Mr
Sherman said.

He explained that the burden
of water costs will still have to
be absorbed by the Govern-
ment (by extension, the
Bahamian taxpayer) or, if the
Corporation is privatised, this
burden will be passed to the
consumer until measures are
implemented to decrease water
production cost.

Mr Sherman said that in the
past few months, the Corpora-
tion has done quite a bit to
increase its reliance on reverse
osmosis plants, completed

repairs and upgrades to infra-
structure and increased Family
island projects. However, sub-
stantial losses from non- rev-
enue water continued to plague
the company.

Discussion

Also joining Mr Sherman on
the panel discussion, which was
a part of Water

Week, were Philip Weech,
director of the BEST Commis-
sion, Richard Cant, a consul-
tant at the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation, Eric Carey,
executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust, and
Eleanor Philips, the director of
the Nature Conservancy.



Mr Weech said that given
concerns over rising sea levels,
flooding and natural disasters,
the Government needed to
make provisions for this in its
design of the water table and
septic tanks.

Dr Cant and Mr Carey
addressed the need for proper
sanitary practices and protec-
tion of the environment, while
Ms Philips urged the Govern-
ment and the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation to protect
the water tables.

The Water Week Panel Dis-
cussion, The Current State of
Water in the Bahamas, was
held at the Choices Dinning
Room at the School of Hospi-
tality last Thursday.

=) sage |

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& Take it Home:

REGISTER BY
MAY 23, 2008





Please Contact:

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LIC Let






Note: Exam is NOT included.

Candice Albury

Office Assistant/Training Coordinator

Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.

Email: Candice@lignumtech.com
Ph: 393-2164 Fax: 394-4971





PRESENTS

outstanding implementation strategies in the
area of project management and extensive
operational experience in the water sector
including sewer treatment and disposal. He is
also highly accomplished in policy formulation,
finance and union negotiations. Mr. Sherman
graduated from Northeastern University,
Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a Bachelor of

Science Degree in Civil Engineerir

Industry.




GODFREY SHERMAN, General Manager, The Water & Sewerage Corporation
on The Evolving Role Of Water In An Energy Conscious Environment”

Thursday, May 15, 2008

BSE's Monthly Luncheon « East Villa Restaurant « East Bay Street - Time: 12:00 pm - Donation: $25.00

To confirm your attendance e-mail:
Quentin.knowles@flameless.com or gracesharma05@yahoo.com or jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com

honours. He also attended Harvard University’s
School of Business Administration Program

for Executive Management. He isa member

of several professional bodies including the
Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association
and the Bahamas Society of Professional
Engineers. He has travelled and trained
extensively in the Water and Wastewater



THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 5B



ETT TS A 077

Bah amas comp any ea CES ca —
in US equipment :
firm partnership

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

A BAHAMAS-based truck-
ing company has partnered with
a US construction equipment
supplier to enhance its compet-
itive advantage ahead of an
expected increase in construc-
tion work in this nation.

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales’
partnership with Case Con-
struction Equipment is a move
that will, according to
spokesman Sean Bain, enable
the Bahamian firm to expand
its services because it will now



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

have the tools and equipment
needed to handle larger con-
struction jobs.

Mr Bain explained that
Bahamas Mack Truck Sales was
previously unable to bid for a
lot of construction-related jobs
because it lacked the necessary
heavy equipment.

The tie-up with Case Con-
struction boded well for the
Bahamas considering the diver-
sity and complexity of proposed
construction projects, he told
Tribune Business.

Robert Lynch, the company’s
general manager, said he was
excited about the partnership
and the expanded service the













Exuma Lots
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Call
327-8026

ed i
359-3160

v e101)

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Nassau to The Bight
@ 11:30am
Friday, June 6
Nassau to Arthurs Town
@11:30am
Saturday, June 7
The Bight to Nassau
@12:25pm
Sunday, June 8
The Bight to Nassau
@12:35pm

company will be able to offer
its clients.

Release

In its press release, Bahamas
Mack Truck Sales said that even
though the construction
machinery market in the
Bahamas may be small in com-
parison to other nations, Case
feels that the brand will be suc-
cessful, given its products, low
operating costs and ease of
maintenance, as well as the sales
support Bahamas Mack has
enjoyed for the past 13 years.

Bahamas Mack was estab-
lished in the early 1970s, and
the company has just under 30
employees.

Case was formed in Novem-
ber 1999 through the merger of
Case Corporation and New
Holland N.V., which builds and
markets several. of the world's
leading brands of construction
and agricultural equipment, and
is among the world's largest
equipment financing companies.

Currently, more than 50
products carry the Case brand,
in a lineup that ranges from
compact trenchers and skid
steers to high-power excavators
and wheel loaders. Case con-
struction equipment is available
for sale, lease or rental in more
than 150 countries through a
comprehensive network of deal-
er/distributor outlets around the
globe.

There is an job opportunity ina
general medical practise office
located down town
Anyone interested please call:
CPPEE VAC) (e-) Ke)

327- 8605(home)

GYMNASTICS TRAININ G CLINI Cc
hosted by
THE GYMNASTICS FEDERA TION
of THE BAHAMAS

featuring
2 Internationally Recognized
Coaches from the USA

Open to the Public for Interested
Students ages 6 and over

Monday, May 19 thru Wednesday, May 21

Please call 364-8423 or 356-7722
for further information



RS eR ae TL



BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

www.bahamasengineers.org

NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON
on
Thursday, May 15, 2008

Topic:.

“WATER WEEK: THE EVOLVING ROLE OF
WATER IN AN ENERGY CONSCIOUS
ENVIRONMENT”

GUEST SPEAKER:

Eng. Godgrey Sherman
General Manager
The Water & Sewerage Corporation

Place: East Villa Restaurant
East Bay Street
TIME: 12:00p.m.
Donation: $25.00 per person

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR ATTENDANCE BY E-MAIL
gracesharma05@ yahoo.com
. or
jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com
or
quentin.knowles@flameless.com

No. 12 Sixth Terrace, Centreville.
4200 sq.ft. Suitable for
Retail/Wholesale, Club, Warehouse,
Doctors office. High traffic area.
Roll down shutters.

Metal roof. Loading door.

Call for pricing.

T/F: 242-326-3029
See photos at:
www.keygroupproperties.com





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Store hours are: Monday - Friday 10am - 6pm



Pi
t



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE











WO

Ww

WEY

N \\
Wn N





Ow



Cc

WWE

WWW

‘I.get a better sense of what
is happening in The Bahamas
rom reading the Tribune.

Where other daily

7



newspapers fall short, the



[ribune delivers. Pin:

confident knowing The

e

Iribune looks out for my

interests. The Tribune is





my newspaper.



THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 7B



S Embassy now planning
alternative energy forum

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE United States Embassy is
looking to organize an alternative
energy conference in Nassau in July
2008, a senior official told Tribune
Business.

Dan O’Connor, the Embassy’s
political and economic chief, said
that after a Business Development
Conference scheduled for the end of
May, it was looking to work with
the Organisation of American
States (OAS) on an alternative
energy conference to be held in the
Bahamas.

Under the current plan, the OAS

would organize one day of the con-
ference, and the US Embassy in
Nassau the other day.

“We're still working on plans for
an alternative energy conference in
July,” Mr O’Connor said, adding
that it would involve presentations
by outside experts on all areas of
alternative power sources — financ-
ing, technology and private-public
partnerships.

Expertise

“We’re looking to help bring |
expertise to the Bahamas,” Mr
O’Connor said. “The Bahamas has
to make the decision on where to

move with its energy sector, but the
US certainly realizes the difficulties
countries in the region are having
with the high cost of energy.”

The timing of such a conference is
judicious, given the drag on the
pocket books of all Bahamian
households and businesses pro-
duced by record global oil prices,
which recently passed $126 per bar-
rel.

The effects are felt by all
Bahamas-based residents and busi-
nesses in terms of higher Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) bills
and increased gas prices at the
pump. With BEC seemingly doing
its oil buying three to four months

JOB OFFERINGS

in advance of when the fuel is used,
the current oil prices are only likely
to feed into an increased fuel sur-
charge on the electricity bill during
the summer months — when electric-
ity demand and use is at its highest.

Bills

Current bills are only reflecting
the $100 per barrel price of around
Christmas time, so if people think
BEC bills.are bad now, they ain’t
seen nothing yet! Other businesses
especially impacted by fuel price
increases are airlines, ferries, taxis,
jitneys and all others involved in the
transportation industry.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



SALES CAREER}

A multi fyoetted communications/consulting company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer §
skills and be able prepare public Bie any on behalf of &
companies clients. a.

A leading retailer is seeking the services of:

Financial Accountant & Human Resource a

Requirements:
General:

Candidates must be competent, honest, efficient, of high integrity, proficient in electronic data
entry and possess good oral & written communication skills.

Specific:

Financial Accountant must possess a valid certificate from the A.I.C.P.A. or equivalent
professional body, a university degree in accounting, bus. admin., or finance, and at least 3
years experience performing the functions of a financial accountant. Must have demonstrated
good leadership, supervisory, accounting and financial statements preparation skills in former

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
engagements.

Human Resource (HR) Manager must possess a university degree in business administration, #4 Persons interested should submit CV’s.and reference letters to:
and at least 3 years experience performing the functions of an HR Manager. Responsible for - ass ,
effective, daily management of the human resource function including planning, recruitment,
compensation and benefit administration, policy gevelopment and implementation, employee

relations and training and development.

DA#6282
~ P.O. Box N-3207

. Nassau, Bahamas
by May 31, 2008.

Salary and benefits commensurate with level of certification, education, experience and skills.

Only Bahamians need apply

Send resume to: seekingtalentedbahamians@gmail.com

as L

‘soca.

And enjoy a relaxing weekend getaway

Summer is hee..gtin “beach! shape at the Squash Clu!

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offers 3 Intemational Sized Courts
(Rental Equipment always available)

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Unlimited meals and beverages 24/7
Champagne upon arrival
Preferred V.1.P. dinner reservations in our specialty
restaurants: Garden of Eden and Pastafari
Live Bahamian Entertainment, featuring Funky D and other
Bahamian Artist
e Enjoy our Karaoke Moments
Package includes 3 days/2 nights

Members at the Squash Club can enjoy the large
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night — double occupancy, single occupancy at $145.00 per night.

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P.O. BOX SS19661 or

Email: jobsinthelab@gmail.com

GS

Teaching Vacancy
‘Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for
the following positions for the 2008 - 2009 School Year.

-Math - (Gr. 7-12) PART-TIME

-Music - (Gr. 7-12) PART-TIME
-Cosmetologist (Gr. 10-12) - PART TIME
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9) FULL TIME

Applicants must;

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who
is willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian School
Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or
University in the area of specialization.
Have a valid Teachers Certificate or
Diploma. tet ek
Have at least two years experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills. ;
Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the
BJC/BGCSE levels. _

Be willing to participate in the high school’s:

,, eXtra curricular programmes. ;.__

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photographed and
three reference to:

1

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application is
May 16th 2008



Monday, June 9
6:00am
8:30am

12:30pm

We have « seat jut for you!
For more information, call your Travel Agent o
Bahamasair
242-377-5505
. Family sland Toll Free
1-242-300-8359

United States Toll Free
1-800-222-4262











PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



BSS Le eS Re CELTS ESS > ee ea I an
‘Fantastic’ venture

a ‘more progressive
way of planning’

FROM page 1B

total profits were around
$21,000. The BISX-listed com-
pany’s annual accounts indicate
that the profits remained within
Green Systems as retained
earnings.

Ventures such as Green Sys-
tems represent a much-needed
start for the Bahamas when it
comes to waste recycling, alter-
native energy sources and con-
servation and planning, with the
private sector needing to take
the lead.

When it conies to planning,
New Providence Development
Company, which is the second
largest landowner and develop-
er on New Providence behind

the Governmient, looks to
impose specific requirements
and covenants on every devel-
opment project it sells land to.

Mr Duggan told The Tribune:
“Tf we’ré selling bulk land to a
developer, we usually require
and dictate things like the per-
centage of open space, set back,
public amenities, lot size and
the formation of a Property
Owners Association (PoA).
That ensures the communities
are kept up.

“We also dictate architecture,
style, height [of buildings]. We
like to get in what percentage of
housing is multi-family, single-
family, duplex and triplex.”

He added that New Provi-
dence Development Company

LEGAL NOTICE >

NOTICE

PRIORY LANE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

a) The above Company is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000.

b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on the
9th day of May, 2008, when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Anthony B.’
Dupuch of Kings Court, 3rd Floor, Bay Street, Nassau,

Bahamas.

'

Dated this 9th day of May, A.D. 2008.

Anthony B. Dupuch
Liquidator

Noe:
homes



MR, RODRICK WOOD

is no longer employed with
Arawak Homes Ltd and is no
longer authorized to conduct

business on behalf of Arawak

Homes or any of it’s affiliates.






Abaco Markets

J. S. Johnson




Bahamas Supermarkets



Eeiss8s rova. dFwe.ity

11.50 Bahamas Property Fund

9.05 Bank of Bahamas 9.61
0.85 Benchmark 0.90
2.70 Bahamas Waste 3.50
1.30 Fidelity Bank 2.39
10.42 Cable Bahamas 14.00
2.10 Colina Holdings 2.87
4.75 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.00
3.60 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.31
2.20 Doctor’s Hospital 3.00
5.94 Famguard 8.00
12.49 Finco 12.50
13.24 FirstCaribbean 13.24
5.05 Focol (S) 5.45
0.45 Freeport Concrete 0.45

ICD Utilities

often went beyond the Govern-
ment’s stipulations; such as
requiring developers to allocate
10 per cent of land within their
projects to open green space,
rather then 5 per cent.

“I don’t think anything we’re
proposing out here is going to
conflict with the Government’s
vision,” Mr Duggan told The
Tribune.

“I think our ultimate goal is
to.grow in a smart and con-
trolled way that doesn’t com-
promise the rest of our hold-
ings out here. I think our strat-
egy is to really make sure the
infrastructure is in place, and
then develop carefully and
deliberately.”

Apart from Green Systems,
New Providence Development
Company’s plans for western
New Providence include creat-
ing a new retail “Town Centre’
opposite the entrance to the
Charlotteville subdivision,

something that might require
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre to
be ‘moved’. The site would then

be redeveloped.

Apart from renewal of its
water franchise and $15 million
investment in a wastewater
treatment plant to serve western
New Providence, Mr Duggan
said the company was also aim-
ing to develop a 75-acre light

industrial park, the Rock Plant |

Road Industrial Park, just south
of the existing Airport Indus-
trial Park.

In this way, western New
Providence’s development den-
sity will be phased and become
more spacious the further west
persons go. From heavy indus-
try at the Airport Industrial
Park, it will go to light industry
with the new park, then to retail
at the ‘Town Centre’ out to the
more residential areas at Old
Fort Bay, Lyford Cay and
Albany.

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that EVANS SERAPHIN of
FOWLER STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
.the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of May 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SHERRILL PAULETTE
WHYLEY of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to SHERRILL PAULETTE GLINTON. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of the publication of this notice.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

LORDLY LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LORDLY LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions.of Section 137(4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 30th April, 2008 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Ltd. of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,

1211 Geneva 70 ©

Dated this 13th day of May, A.D. 2008

Credit Suisse Trust Ltd. - Geneva
Liquidator

=







CFA L”

11.80
9.61 0.00
0.90 0.00
3.50 0.00
2.39 0.00
14.00 0.00
2.87 0.00
7.08 0.08 30,090
4.29 -0.02
3.00 0.00
8.00 0.00
12.50 0.00
13.24 , 0.00
5.45 0.00
0.45 0.00

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES











i
























13.4

























8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 __RND Holdings : z < . vy A yyy, 0: 00%
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 - 2 6.16%
0.55 0.40 Holdi ae 0.45 0.55 pwnd ya ot
ey g J Wa ee YI

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low ie NAV YTD% Last 12 Mont

1.3081 1.2443 Colina Bond Fund 1.308126°°°* 1.25% 5.61%

3.0008 2.6629 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.996573°"°** -0.14% 13.11%

1.3875 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.387505°°* 0.90% 3.87%

3.7969 3.2018 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.6960°°°°" -2.66% 16.13%

12.1010 11.5519 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.1010°° 140% 5.72%

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00°*

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00°*

1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00°*

10.5000 9.6346 __ Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.8832°*""* -5.87% _ 227%

ee ae d Market Terms Yj




+ 28 February 2008
+ - 31 December 2007

+** 41 April 2008

sre" 231 March 2008

****. 30 April 2008

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks





52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks





Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months








P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

KS 1) - 3-for-1 Stock Spkt - Effective Date 7/11/2007 . ; eae eee eS aT EOe
Â¥O TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-662-7010 | FIDELITY 242-358-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-40







ee”

seas



THE TRIBUNE



Just 12-15
per cent
of realtors
using MLS
listing
system

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE long-waited Multiple
Listing System (MLS) for
Bahamian realtors is fully
operational, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
former president telling
members that it now has 24
participating companies, 169
' active exclusive listings and
12 pending listings.

Larry Roberts encouraged
BREA members who had
already not done so to sign
on to the system, which he
called the future of the indus-
try. ; ;

“That was as of a few days
ago,” he Said’reférring to the
amount of listings. “I know
that there are more that have
come in. As you can see, with
89 participating members we
have just over 12-15 per cent

of our members participating.

You need to get on board.”
Future

“This is the future. This is
the way that business is going
to be done. You need to get
in now and familarise your-
self with the system.”

Mr Roberts told persons
who are using the MLS sys-
tem to ensure that they log
on and use it every day to
take advantage of all “the
bells and whistles that are

there”, such as e-mail alerts
of listings based on selected
criteria-or “hot” listings.

Multi-listing is an informa-
tion sharing tool used by real-
tors to provide access to a
wider array of available prod-
ucts.

It allows Bahamian realtors
a number of options for real
estate searches, setting para-
meters for real estate search-
es and enabling them to find
specific homes with the
details their clients want.

Access

They now have access to
the homes that other realtors
are listing, so rather than.
going to individual compa-'

“nies they ‘can view the infor-

mation from one place.

In addition, the MLS sys-
tem can be tailored to suit
specific needs through vari-
ous options, such as the abili-
ty to attach floor plans, prices
and to create marketing
products for homes and open
houses.

The system would also ben-
efit smaller companies, as it .
would allow them access to
properties they would not -
have, and highlight their own
properties - something which
their limited budgets may not
allow. The system is one way
to increase the standards and
professionalism of the indus-
try, placing every one on an
even field.



GN-675



SUPREME COURT

15TH MAY, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/NPR/00194

IN THE ESTATE OF LOIS EDNA
GIBSON, late of 28 Panther Top Lane in
the Town of Murphy, in the County of
Cherokee, in the State of North Carolina,
one of the States of the United States of
America. deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the

Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by FREDERICA

- GERTRUDE McCARTNEY of the Eastern

District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney

. in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing
~ of Certificate of Probate in-the above estate

granted to WILLIAM L. RAU the Executor
of the Estate, by the Superior Court Division
in the General Court of Justice, in the Sate
of North Carolina on the 18th day of June,
2004. |

Desiree Robinson =

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00226

Whereas LEROY BELL, of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ANTHONY
BELL, late of the Settlement of Behring
Point, Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00227

Whereas JAMES MAXWELL
THOMPSON, SR., of First Terrace, Collin
Avenue, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of HAZEL
ROSANNA HENRIETTA THOMPSON,
late of Farrington Road, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 9B.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00228

Whereas REGINALD MINNIS, of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters
of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HAROLD MINNIS, late of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00229
Whereas FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB, of

Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

“| Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
| DR. PETER MEISSNER, the sole executor

has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate of JUDITH J.A.
MEISSNER a.k.a. JUDITH JOSEFINE
ANNA MEISSNER, late of Berlin,
Charlottenburg, Wilmersdorf Germany and
of Treasure Cay, Abaco one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
| THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/0023 1

Whereas JAMIE TERREL TINKER, of
the Western District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Cecil Newry has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of REQUILDA PRATT, late of Faith
Avenue Carmichael Road, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE













Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

— . x

2g.

XK



ENT

NASSAU CAMPUS COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AND RELATED EVENTS

EVENT | Date: (The f “davadwatinstdacatacde ¥deemsnte VNEUE

Nurses Pinning Ceremony Monday, May 19, 2008, 7:00 p.m. eee Bahamas Faith Ministries
Honours Convocation’ Tuesday, more 20, ane: E 00. oe | Bahamas Faith Ministries
Graduation Rehearsal * Bahamas Faith Ministries

Baccalaureate Service St. Francis Roman Catholic Church





2 Graduates Awards Breakfast Wyndham Resort & Casino



“Bohamas Faith Ministries



ommencement Ceremony






. os esident's Reception - Bahamas Faith Ministies

NORTHERN B












Graduates’ Retr ol. _ Saiurday, April 26, 2008, | 2:0( L ee Gril Bahama Reef Boulevard
Peele ao cae HAsorey Een ACU NcHAUY . Eo Mundon Drive
Graduation Searle Wedr : | _ ‘Northern Campus oe
elect service a : a A mele) | ee o “Church of God Temple, Peach Tree Stree!
Graduates’ eet ane 5 3 : Commencement eer) : oe oe : Convention Center, Our Lucaya

Mase | UP

Pri au

Acapemic STANDING BACCALAUREATE ASSOCIATE Date / Time
Seniors 91 of more 46 or more Saturday, May 10, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Juniors 61-90 31-45 . Sunday, May 11, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11; 59 p.m.
Sophomores 31 - 60 16 - 30 Monday, May 12, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Freshmen 0 - 30 0-15 Tuesday, May 13, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Ail (Online Regisrtration Only) Gee 0 Wednesday, May 14, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Ail (Online and Records Dept.) weemmeeee manne Thursday, May 15, 2008, 9:00 a.m, - 4:00 p.m.

All (Online and Records Dept.) weemeeeee eee Friday, May 16, 2008, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.











THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs Er rcATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

STAFF VACANCY

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Assistant Professor — History (Northern Bahamas Campus)



Candidate should have a Ph.D. in History Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching;
however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in History Education
plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in Education.
Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching history courses, assist with supervision of student-
teachers and assist with curriculum development of history education courses/programmes.

Assistant Professor — Religious Education (New Providence Campus)

Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Religious Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching;
however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in Religious Education
plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in Education.
Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching religion courses, assist with supervision of student-
teachers and assist with curriculum development of religious education courses/programmes.

Assistant Professor - Mathematics (New Providence Campus)

Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education with a minimum of 3 years of school
teaching; however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in Mathematics
Education plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in
Education. Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching mathematics courses, assist with
supervision of student-teachers and assist with curriculum development of mathematics education
courses/programmes.

Assistant Professor — Physical Education (New Providence Campus)

Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Physical Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching;
however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in Physical Education
plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in Education.

Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching physical education courses, assist with supervision
of student-teachers and assist with curriculum development of physical education courses/programmes.

In ALL cases, preference will be given to candidates with strong academic backgrounds, teaching
and research experience.

Salary Scale: - .

$39,460 - $61,960

$42,160 - $69,160

Master’s Degree -
Doctorate Degree -
Interested candidates should submit the following information for consideration:

é The College/University of The Bahamas Employment Application,
G A Comprehensive Resume

G Official transcripts

é Three work references

All information should be addressed to:
The Director, Human Resource
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912

Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas

Facsimile: (242) 302-4539
E-mail: hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Web Site: www.cob.edu.bs

The application deadline is Friday May 16 2008.
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022008

| COURSE PSEC | COURDE fe ee Pe Nd
[NO. TNO. | DESCRIPTION, = TIME | DAY START | DUR | FEE |
ene) lg eo a

bs cist tacee ttl
BUSINESS
CUST900

Po

Se AS PSS RPE TS EE!
-3Vam- :

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SER. W/S 4:30pm $170



2-Ma
15-Me




01
BUSI900 01







BUSI901 01








COMPUTERS









COMEROT ae



COMP902 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II



9:30pm Thurs 13-May | 9 wks $550
6:00pm-
COMP941 QUICKBOOKS 9:00pm Tues 13-May | 6 wks
: 6:00pm-
COMP953 PC UPGRADE & REPAIR 8:00pm Mon/Wed 14-May | 9 wks
9:30am-
COMP960 e MICROSOFT POWERPOINT soon |. sl nuay.. sepia aaa $170
9:30am-
COMP930 WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP 4:30pm da hogees |
[eas cere eee ee Meier It a creo |e eM hos eet tae

|cosmeTovogy | |

; 6:00pm-
MAKE UP APPLICATIONS 9:00pm

COSM802 19-May | 8 wks




testi ock echo ta
FLOR800 04 FLORAL DESIGN | 9:00pm
on [or [nomnonsenn [Se —

FLOR801 FLORAL DESIGN I 9:00pm Tues

or lanenoncecnmnce [Ser —

DEC0801 01 INTERIOR DECORATING II 9:00pm

1

6:00pm
_DECO800 0 INTERIOR DECORATING | 9:00pm
ANIMAL CARE

DECORATING

HE

14- 9

Tues

































ae
6:00pm-
ANIM800 | DOG GROOMING 9:00pm Tues
ENG900. | OT | EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS | 9:00 fre | 00
HEALTH AND
FITNESS
6:00pm- .
MASG900 101 _| MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |_| 9:00pm Thurs
MASG901 101 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS Ii_ | 9:00pm i
i 9:30am- i
BWAX900 01 | BODY WAXING W/S 4:30pm Tues i
DANCE Seren eee i
7-00pm-
DANC9O0O BAHAMIAN DRUMMING & DANCING oper Tue 13-May | 10 wks | $275
DANCS901 BALLROOM DANCING 8:30pm | Wed owks | $275



DANC902 ; ay |
lee ee
MANAGEMENT __ Pecado, alle 2h em |






| 6:00pm- i

| 9:00pm
6:00pm-
9:00pm i

6:00pm-
8:00pm

ENQUIRIES: Contact the Coordinator at Tet: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0083 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email acurty@cob edu: bs



i BASIC FREEHAND CUTTING |

t:

DRAPERY MAKING |

wesoweeeuneruteonsonseeweeveswecneccteevaeefeeennessevsseore-|naterseverereecusecsneeeaseneeeuunseqnesnueeseenseestecsessneewenenmeeane

JEWELRY MAKING

n
z
&
:

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.



peopra sea Tt





THE TRIBUNE

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES.

THIS MONTHS TOPIC:
Total Joint Replacement

LECTURE DATE
Thursday, May 15th, 2008 @ 6pm

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues
affecting society today.

SPEAKER:
Dr. Dane Bowe
Orthopedic Surgeon



DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health Far Life



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Â¥ Available in 11 column print capacity and 8 different currency imprint locations

For more information contact:

Bahamas Cheque Services Ltd.
Telephone: 242-677-8720



TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 11B



PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Hutchison ready for
Port ‘due diligence’

FROM page 1B

the shares of the GBPA and its
Port Group Ltd affiliate. Mr
Lotmore further recalled of his
conversation with Mr Gray:
“He further indicated the par-
ties had signed a Heads of
Agreement, and that Hutchison
was ready to commence its due
diligence.”

No dollar figure was provided
for the deal, which some have
suggested is likely to be around
$125 million.

Mr Lotmore’s affidavit was
filed last week by attorneys for
Seashells Investments, the vehi-
cle through which Sir Jack Hay-
ward’s family trust owns a 50
per cent IDC stake.

He and Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) are involved
because it provides two corpo-
rate directors for Seashells
Investments, Montague East
Ltd and Sterling East Ltd, plus
former Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) chairman
Ian Fair. Another Seashells
Investments director is John
Hemmingway.

It is unlikely that Hutchison

Whampoa will begin due dili-
gence on the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, plus move to close
its purchase of the St George
estate stake, as long as the own-
ership dispute between it and
the Hayward side drags on via a
court-based litigation battle.

While the ownership dispute
creates uncertainty for any
GBPA buyer, given that the
Hayward side has appealed the
Supreme Court’s ruling that the
St George estate owns a 50 per
cent GBPA and Port Group
Ltd stake, this may not matter
as much to Hutchison Wham-
poa.

Securities Industry.
Act ‘unlikely’ to make
Parliament by year-end

FROM page 1B

into law, and this was one issue
that gave the securities indus-
try cause for.concern.

Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune: “The industry felt some-
what uncomfortable in dealing
with the Act without the regu-
lations. For that reason we are
going to extend the consulta-
tion period with the Act, and
allow it to remain outstanding
until the regulations are devel-
oped.

“Then we’ll give the industry
and the public time to review
the Act and the regulations.”

The Securities Commission
said it was due to publish immi-
nently a public notice setting
out these details, consultation
on the Securities Industry Act
having been previously sched-
uled to end on April 30, 2008.

When asked when the regu-
lations were likely to be
released, Mr Deveaux told The
Tribune: “I can’t give you any
timeline for that. It could be
anywhere from the end of the
third quarter to the end of the
fourth quarter.”

The industry’s misgivings
over how the Securities Industry
Act has been handled, and the
absence of the regulations,
come as no surprise, this news-
paper having warned of such
concerns in an article on Feb-
ruary 4, 2008.

A major concern voiced by
many in the Bahamian capital
markets was that the regulations
were critically important, given
that provisions omitted from
the first Securities Industry Act
— such as trading from a bro-
ker’s own account and the short
selling prohibition — were sup-
posed to have been transferred
to the regulations. If anything,
this increased the void caused
by the regulations’ non-release
and non-development.

The Securities Commission
opted to place the main require-
ments and real details into the
regulations and rules it can
make, leaving the legislation to
set out the general obligations,
so it could better keep pace with
evolving international best prac-
tices and global standards.

Placing the main details into
the regulations is designed to
enable the Securities Commis-

sion to avoid having to seek

Kel

Parliamentary approval every

time any change — however
minor — is needed to the Act,
thus avoiding time-consuming
delays. :

The Bahamian capital mar-
kets are likely to be'unim-
pressed that such a major, and
much-needed, piece of legisla-
tion is likely to be further
delayed in making its way into
the Parliamentary pipeline.

The Securities Industry Act
is arguably the top financial law
in need-of urgent reform, for-
mer minister of state for
finance, James Smith, having
described it as “woefully inade-
quate” during his time in office.

The Act has long been seen
as ‘lacking teeth’ when it comes
to the regulatory and enforce-
ment powers provided to the
Securities Commission. Other
weaknesses identified include
the absence of a Takeover Code
to regulate the acquisition of
majority stakes in Bahamian
public companies, protection
and safeguards for minority
shareholder rights, and the
absence of power to compel
Bahamian companies to make
timely disclosures on material
events or changes.

‘s Team

Learning & Development

Manager

Kelly's is seeking a fully-qualified and experienced professional to become the full-
time Learning and Development Manager for the 350 + employees in Kelly's House
& Home and Kelly's Lumber. The position requires an experienced and resourceful
communicator able to motivate adults with varying educational backgrounds and
qualifications, and capable of continuing the development and implementation of on-
going in-house learning and development programs, with their attendant testing and
evaluation procedures. Such programs will include, but not necessarily be limited to:

* Orientation courses for all new employees
* Supervisory courses for new and prospective supervisors
* Customer Service courses for all retail employees

* Computer familiarisation courses
* Product-specific knowledge courses for all retail employees
* Safety courses for drivers and warehouse/yard personnel

* Personal development courses for career advancement

The successful applicant will also be expected to develop and maintain strong links
with other providers of on-going work-related courses in specialised and technical
areas. Previous experience in learning and development or in adult education would

be an asset.

This is a management position for an experienced and qualified professional, who is
willing to demonstrate a long-term commitment to Kelly’s development and expansion.
Benefits include medical, pension, and profit-sharing plans, with remuneration package
dependant on qualifications and experience.

E-mail letter of application with comprehensive resume to info@kellysbahamas.com
with "Learning and Development Manager’ as subject.

No phone calls please

Kelly’s

Mail at Marathon

Tel: (343) 393-4002

Fax: (242) 393-4096

Sunday

Monday-Friday 9:00am8:
9:00am-9-00pm
dosed

Houseg
Home

:OOpm

This is because the Hong
Kong-based conglomerate
already owns a 50 per cent stake
in the key Freeport infrastruc-
ture and economic assets. Given
that Port Group Ltd is its 50
per cent partner in these assets,
which include the Grand

’ Bahama Development Compa-

ny (Devco), Freeport Harbour
Company and Grand Bahama
Airport Company, acquiring it
will give Hutchison Whampoa
majority ownership and control
regardless of whether the St
George interest is 25 per cent or
50 per cent.

Apart from these assets,
Hutchison Whampoa already
has majority ownership of the
Freeport Container Port, and
management control at the
Sea/Air Business Centre.

This economic dominance is

already causing concern among

some observers, who feel that if
Hutchison Whampoa succeeds

in acquiring the St George:

GBPA and Port Group Ltd
stake, Freeport will become a
company town - controlled
solely by one entity.

Others, though, disagree,
arguing that if it had control
Hutchison Whampoa would be
likely to invest heavily in fur-

ther developing Freeport,

adding to the $1 billion in equi-
ty it has already pumped in.

To sweeten the pill with gov-
ernment, the company is
thought likely to offer to hand
back the quasi-governmental,
development and regulatory
obligations now bound-up with
the GBPA.

If the St George estate were
to successfully conclude a trans-
action with Hutchison Wham-
poa, it would effectively squeeze
the Hayward family, leaving
them as equal partners in the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd -
but minority partners in
Freeport’s main economic and



Florida

AANA AAA AAA

OTNMen

OE A

productive assets.

Such a deal could effectively
also end attempts by British
banker Roddie Fleming to
acquire the Hayward family’s
GBPA stake for $100 million,
having made clear he wants to
purchase all IDC’s share capital
or he will walk away, sources
have said.

Meanwhile, Justice Neville
Adderley last week moved to
resolve the impasse created by
his Order that the St George
and Hayward sides agree on an,
independent chairman for the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
who would have a ‘casting vote’
to decide matters where both
sides were split.

With the two parties unable
to agree on an. independent
chairman, Justice Adderley
ordered that both sides’ respec-
tive nominees — Erik Chris-
tiansen for the St George estate,
Felix Stubbs for the Haywards —
be elected to the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd Boards. It will
now be up to those Boards to
elect a chairman from among
themselves.

This now means the GBPA
will finally have a functioning
Board, as it previously only had
five rather than the minimum
six prescribed by its Articles of
Association. It also means that
there will be no conflict
between Justice Adderley’s ini-
tial ruling for an ‘independent
chairman with a casting vote’
and the GBPA’s Articles of
Association.

Court documents filed over
the chairman situation indicate
just how frustrated senior
GBPA management and staff
were becoming over the inabil-
ity to elect such a person.

In an April 14, 2008, letter to
Sir Jack Hayward and Lady
Henrietta St George, Sir Albert
Miller, the GBPA’s chief exec-
utive, described electing an

16 Weeks U.S.A. Accredited
| in Collaboration with ‘
Medical Training Institute

independent chairman as “a
tremendous challenge”.

Sir Albert said he first
believed that his suggestion of
Mr Christiansen for the role was
acceptable to both sides, but
then heard that Sir Jack’s attor-
neys and others had subse-
quently switched to Mr Stubbs.
The latter, Sir Albert said, was
“not acceptable” for the post,
and he had told Sir Jack why.

Alternatively, Sir Albert said
other independent chairman
candidates were former finance
minister and Central Bank gov-
ernor, Sir William Allen, and
two other former Central Bank
chiefs, James Smith and T. B.
Donaldson.

Sir Albert said: “I find myself
becoming more and more pres-
sured and frustrated, as there
are many matters which need
to be decided by the Board. I
have virtually wasted a whole
month doing very little other
than holding things together.

“If [cannot get some relief, I
myself might have to throw in
the towel and leave things to
those who vigorously supported
the receivers over the past 15
months, and then I know what
would happen to your compa-
nies.”

The St George estate object-
ed to Mr Stubbs chiefly because
he sits on the Board of Direc-
tors for Freeport Concrete, the
company whose largest share-
holder is ousted GBPA chair-
man Hannes Babak. Mr Babak
has been a particular target of
the estate.

This week, Justice Anita
Allen will determine whether
to lift the stay preventing the
Hayward trust from selling its
GBPA stake to the Flemings,
while Friday will see Mr Babak
attempt to have the injunction
preventing him from having a
role on the GBPA Board or
management lifted.





Ambulance

ALLL

g ,



ride times



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 13B



4

@ By DR BASIL SANDS

Lv diseases refer to the dis-

eases or conditions that inter-
fere with any of the liver’s normal func-
tions.

The liver is a large organ located in
the most forward part of the abdomen,
resting against the muscular portion
(the diaphragm) between the abdomen
and chest cavities. The liver is essential
for life and performs over 100 impor-
tant functions, such as detoxifying poi-
sons and drugs, metabolizing fats, stor-
ing carbohydrates, manufacturing bile,
plasma proteins and other substances,
and assisting in blood clotting. The liv-

:“er is essentially an organic filter that

“removes waste and detoxifies drugs and
“'poison, and acts as a factory that man-
!“ufactures and processes nutrients and
“enzymes.

Food in the intestine is absorbed into
the blood which then ferries specific
zicomponents to the liver. There, sugars
and fats are processed, amino acids are

produced and certain vitamins and min-
perals are stored. The liver also manu-
;factures hormones, important blood

,clotting enzymes, and a substance called

bile that allows fat to be absorbed.

;,, Other substances, such as drugs that
.jare carried by the blood, are metabo-
dized or altered by the liver into other
forms. Foreign materials, including
.,viruses, bacteria and poisons, are fil-

"tered out in an effort to protect the rest

“of the body from damage. It is for this

“reason that an animal’s liver is exposed

“to diseases and injury more than any

other part of the body.

©! Other conditions affecting liver func-

‘tion include birth defects, parasites and

cancer. Liver disease is serious and

i often life threatening to your pet.

«| Liver disease is often difficult to
_odetect until the illness becomes severe

};because there is an over abundance of

«liver tissue and the liver can partially

, regenerate itself. The signs of liver dis-



eases vary
with the
degree and
location of
damage.
However
whatever
their caus-
es, the signs
are remark-
ably simi-
lar.

Com-
monly, liv-
er diseases
result in
anorexia
(lack of
appetite), vomiting, diarrhea, weight
loss and lethargy. When bile backs up in
the circulation it can turn light coloured
areas of the animal’s body pale yellow
or tea-coloured, this is called jaundice
and is most easily seen in the white of
the eyes, gums or inner surface of the
ear flap.

Increased pressure of the veins that
drain the liver may result in ascites,
which is an accumulation of fluid in the
abdomen. The animal’s abdomen will
appear swollen or bloated. Hemor-
rhages are another sign of advanced
liver disease, with bleeding into the
stomach, intestines and urinary tract.

Various blood tests are necessary to
discover the extent and nature of liver
damage. In many cases, surgical
removal of a small piece of liver tissue
(liver biopsy) is the only way to diag-
nose the type of liver disease.

Treatment depends on the specific
causes of the disease. Some types of
liver diseases can only be treated in the
hospital, while others are treated on an
out-patient basis. Some liver diseases
can be cured, while in others the goal of
treatment is to control the disease.

Chronic hepatitis is the most com-
mon liver disease in dogs. Feline hepat-
ic lipidosis, also called fatty liver dis-
ease, is the most common liver disease

oe

GARDENING/HEALTH

The danger of liver diseases

in cats. Overweight cats are at highest
risk for this condition, and the definitive
sign is when an obese cat suddenly stops
eating. For reasons not completely
understood, fat is moved into the liver
and becomes trapped, resulting in com-
promised liver functions.

Chronic hepatitis cases are idiopath-
ic, which means that no definitive cause
can be determined. When a cause can
be determined, it is often due to anoth-
er generalized disease such as cancer,
kidney disease or an infection such as
leptospirosis.

Treatment consists primarily of sup-
portive care, (like IV fluids, antibiotics
etc). Prognosis depends on the cause,
but usually is not to good. About 30
per cent of animals suffering from
hepatitis will die within one week of
diagnosis, despite treatment.

A congenital defect may result in a
portosystemic shunt, which is an abnor-
mal connection of a vein into the liver
that should normally close off shortly
after the newborn is born. Surgical cor-
rection is the treatment of choice for
some types of shunts.

A diet with non-meat protein places
less strain on the liver and gives it a
chance to heal.

However, it is best to follow your
vet’s advice since he or she is most
familiar with your dog’s diagnoses, clin-
ical condition and dietary needs.

There is no way to prevent conge-
nial liver problems, or to anticipate
some immune or bacterial conditions
that affect the liver.

However, in cats you can reduce the
risk of feline hepatic lipodosis by keep-
ing your cat slim.

Also, protecting your pets from poi-
sons will help prevent toxicity induced
liver damage.

e Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at
the Central Animal Hospital. Questions
or comments should be directed to pot-
cake59@hotmail.com. Dr Sands can also
be contacted at 325-1288





aaa aa ae a SS ae
Will exfoliation help

the health of my skin?

lm By SARAH SIMPSON

| he fastest answer is yes - exfolia-
tion will help the health of your
skin!

Skin exfoliation improves the quality
and tone of skin by assisting in the
removal of dead skin cells from the sur-
face - human skin produces about one
million skin cells per minute, which
equates to over five billion skin cells per
day. As our skin cells renew, old surface
cells harden and lose moisture, and even-
tually detach from the skin to allow for
new cells to come through. This process is
called desquamation.

Desquamation also eliminates dam-
aged and contaminated cells that carry
pollutants and micro-organisms from the
environment. These dead skin cells don't
always effectively fall from our skin,
meaning they can dry and dull the skin
surface, causing clogging and congestion.

Through professional and at-home
exfoliation, these dulling skin cells are
effectively removed, and newer cells are
revealed for a fresher, healthier appear-
ance.

own.

Acneic skin: Acneic skin produces five
times more dead skin cells than other
skin conditions, meaning proper exfolia-
tion can have great benefits for acneic
skin. Hydroxy acids, in general, will be
effective as they help the dead cells
detach, preventing dead skin cells from
clogging the follicle and contributing to
acne. Avoid physical exfoliants/scrubs,
which can worsen inflammation.

Sarah Simpson



especially effective on prematurely-aging
- and mature skin, as it stimulates cell
renewal faster than the body can on its



difficult, caus-
ing a build up
that results in
dull, thick skin
with less tone.
On average,
cell renewal
takes from 28-
35 days in mid-
life, and up to
90 days in
maturity.

Exfoliation is



Hyperpigmentation: Hyperpigmenta-
tion is an increase in colour caused by ©
either an increase in melanocytes or from
a substance that adds colour by forming
deposits in the skin. Exfoliation helps
shed these pigmented cells more quickly,
and also helps remove the dead skin cells
so ingredients can more effectively pene-
trate hyperpigmentation at its source.

Dry, dehydrated skin: A lack of mois-
ture in the skin leads to gaps in the cellu-
lar barrier. As a result, skin is left feeling
tight and stretched, and many tend to
over moisturize, which sticks the older
skin cells down, leading to a dull, uneven
skin tone. Through exfoliation, drying
skin cells are effectively removed, and
moisturizing and hydrating ingredients
can penetrate deeper into the skin to help
ease dry and dehydrated skin conditions.

This information was taken from

www.dermalogica.com

Aging skin: When we are young, our
cells renew roughly every 12-19 days. But
as we get older, this process slows down as
the “glue” that holds our cells together
becomes denser. The natural sloughing
of older cells from the skin becomes more

¢ Sarah Simpson is a skin care therapist
at the Dermal Clinic located at One Sandy-
port Plaza (the same building as Ballys
Gym). For more information visit her
website at www.dermal-clinic.com or call
her at 327.6788

How this invisible disease robbed me of my independence

,, FROM page 14

“ous pain.
4) “I can no longer hold down a
‘gob. As a matter of fact, when my
employer found out that I had
'\ FMS they treated me as if I was a
‘prize horse with a broken leg, and
I was put out to pasture. When I
«was able to work, I gave them
100 per cent, but now I doubt
‘they know if I am alive or dead.
Most of my so called friends/co-
«workers abandoned me. Sadly, I
; was plagued by their hurtful com-
ments, and assumptions from
those around me; as well as com-
pletely frustrated with insurance
| companies and doctors dismiss-
| ing fibromyalgia as a figment of
} the imagination.
| “At some point, I felt they
| were sick and tired
| of hearing the truth of me
telling them that I don't feel like
| doing much of anything and that
| I was too painful,” she said. “I
| would like to believe they just
| had no idea how to help. You

FROM page 14

Sau.



me.”

According to Ms Harvey, an upcoming event
that she is working with is a fund raising cam-

affect my mouth I will find a way to fight

and use all resources available to me. I have
always been a fighter for my rights and I am not of
going to let FMS win over me,” Ms Harvey said.

The week of May 12 has been dedicated to
International Awareness of the disease, and in
order to shed light on this growing health threat,
Ms Harvey hopes to start a support group in Nas-

“I have gotten some guidance from Michele
Rassin, vice president at Doctors Hospital; Dr
Christine Chin, especially Dr Philip Huyler, who
has been extremely supportive and patient with

know that cliché about knowing
who your friends are when trou-
ble comes - well I found out.”

While co-workers, associates,
the insurance companies and
even doctors may have failed her
at times, Ms Harvey said that her
three wonderful children have
been her rock.

“My son, Mancini, took his
time to remodel

my bathroom and installed a.

whirlpool to help my body relax
(Her body responds well to the
manipulation of the hot/cold’ ther-
apy). My daughter, Dandria gives
me a lot of spiritual support and
she has taken over where I have
left off. She dances as if no one is
watching in a lot of workshop

performances for BFM. When
I watch her, I just imagine that
she is me in my mind. My daugh-
ter,

‘Yoshina is a registered nurse.
She makes sure no doctors do me
any additional harm. She is also
exploring research for me. And
to top it off I have a few nurses in
my family such as Rosemae Bain

and Paulette Claridge, who are
always willing to lend a helping
hand,” she said. ‘

Asked about the circumstances
that led to her diagnosis, Ms Har-
vey said that it was as a result of
tests that came when she experi-
enced a near fall at work.

“I screamed from the pain as it
swept through my entire body. I
went into a brain fog, dizziness,
whip lash, facial pain, sciatica
(radiating pain. down my thighs
and legs). My head ached, the
paininmyneck .

and shoulders was overwhelm-
ing. My spinal cord and spinal
nerve function was affected. I was
unable to walk for months.

“At first I was misdiagnosed. I
was told that I had MS, lupus and
some other disease, but after tak-
ing

multiple. tests - a Cat scan,
brain scan, X-rays; MRI's and
spinal injections, they were ruled
out. I went through a thorough
workup after seeing over 65 dif-
ferent specialists in the United
States,” she said.

The fight against fibromyalgia

‘This is my contribution’, so now I need to get

assistance on how:to make this idea a reality.
Also Rose Richardson and Dellarece Edgecombe

Tyreflex Star Motors, and Dandria Scott of
BFM have already raised an undisclosed amount
to assist with this cause.

“It is my hope to get as much assistance possi-
ble to make this happen so that chronically ill

people can have an emergency fund to draw on

during times of financial hardship. I know how
hard it is. I had to use all my savings to get my
mind and my body to cooperate with my spirit. I
would like to spare others the same experience

and offer any type of advocacy that I possibly

Harvey said.

paign, mostly through the National Fibromyalgia

Association and The Body Shop At Home.
Toward this end, she has already received the

generous support of a number of friends.
“When I mentioned the fundraising to one of

my friends, he immediately gave $100 and said,

The spine’s foundation

‘By SUSAN DONALD DC



Is the case of low back
problems, doctors often
confine a spinal examination to
the area of complaint and direct
correction to the localized prob-
lem. In many cases this pro-
duces satisfactory results. Some
, times, however, the improve-
ment may not last; the reason is
that the spine’s foundation was
) not examined

| The spine sits on a founda-
‘tion formed by the pelvis and
‘legs. This foundation must be
| balanced and working normally
or it will create strain through-
out your spine. If the cause of
your spinal pain is an imbalance
in the foundation, the spinal
pain will return until the foun-
dation is balanced.

An example of this principle
is a house sitting on a crooked,
shifting foundation. As the
foundation shifts, the walls of
the house distort, the plaster
ks the doers don't fit. A

149
(

come to



carpenter can come in and
patch the cracks in the wall and
trim the doors and everything
looks and functions well. But
only temporarily. If the foun-
dation is not corrected, it won't
be long before the walls again
crack and the doors don't fit.
The same example applies to
the spine. The pelvis, which is
the spine’s foundation, is made
up of three bones, the two larg-

bones that form the hips, an:

can so that they will not suffer as I had to,” Ms

Persons interested in finding out more
about fibromyalgia or making a donation are wel-
contact
392.3149/468.0524/941.355.2766 or they can e-mail:
vgodet@msn.com.

Ms Harvey at



ing them is called the sacrum.
This structural circle is called
the pelvic girdle.

When a torsion or misalign-
ment occurs in the structural
foundation, it causes strain
throughout the body especial-
ly above the pelvic girdle. In
addition to spinal involvement
an adaptive torsion of the shoul-
der girdle may take place that
can cause shoulder, arm and
hand symptoms. Here again we
find the integration within the
body: the shoulder problem will
not respond adequately until
the pelvic torsion or misalign-
ments are corrected.

As a chiropractor I check the
foundation in every case I get.
The whole spine is examined,
not just a part. This is the reason
chiropractic is so successful at
relieving so many people’s pain
when nothing else has.

* Susan Donald is a doctor of

chiropractic at the Life Chiro-

nractic Centre. For more infor-
Vorea fall 393-2774

Y

As she struggles to find a way
to fight her disease, Ms Harvey
said that some days she is unable
to get

out of bed, however, when her
pain level goes lower she is able
to utilize that time to do research
and fight a system that appears
to not be working for people with
disabilities.

“But first, I truly talk to God.
For the first time in my life I have
learned how to pray and use my
mind for positive thinking, then I
deal with my body ‘

to show me how to deal with

every day living, especially con-
tact with the outside world and
the insurance companies,” she
said.

Looking to the future, Ms Har-
vey said that she is focusing on
the positive and not the negative.

“TI have faith in God, now I
need courage to overcome my
fears. As Mark Twain said,
‘Courage is resistance to fear,
mastery of fear - not absence of
fear.’ Before I had this unfore-
seen condition I had ‘plans of
retiring’ in Exuma and living my

life in a nice bed’ and breakfast,



hosting tea parties, spa events,
fashion shows and seeing the
world.

But now I am hoping that I can

. still move to Exuma and turn that

B&B into a wellness spa/clinic to
help people who suffer from
FMS/CFS.”

: Persons who interested in
finding out more about fibromyal-
gia are welcome to call Ms Harvey
at 392.3149/468.0524/941.355.2766
or they can e-mail:
vgodet@msn.com.

7 oF I NET aT ee



PAGE 14B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

©
=
cE
=
Bex
a
©
aia
-



eee hs ¥ aka

@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX

Tribune Features Editor

ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net



ERED Be

uddenly struck with a devastat-
ing illness or disease, most peo-
ple begin to mark their lives in

terms of “before the diagnosis”
and “after the diagnosis”. Every-
thing seems relative to that moment and, for better
or worse, that is how they come to define the events

of their lives.

For 52-year-old Vincanna Godet Harvey, who was
diagnosed with fibromyalgia (FMS) on July 17, 2001,
her “before diagnosis”, includes being a very strong,
active, independent, goal-oriented, career-driven

woman.

“Between my careers as a
claims adjuster, working part-time
in permanent cosmetics and as an
independent consultant for The
Beauty Shop, I was extremely
busy in the world of fashion. I
held fashion shows and tea parties
with celebrities such as Angela
Bassett and her mother, Betty
Bassett and her family.

“T was very much involved in
my church and community, espe-
cially the ballet. I love fashion,
but dancing was my passion; fur-
thermore, I still found the time
to care for my family,” she said.

According to Ms Harvey, one
of the hardest challenges she has
experienced since being diag-
nosed with fibromyalgia, is giv-
ing up her independence, and the
development of strained rela-
tionships with her husband, chil-
dren, family and friends.

“My illness is so complex and it
has so many symptoms that vary
from day to day even hour to
hour, and in intensity of pain. To
anyone who greets me, on the
outside I look healthy, and the
same is probably true to anyone
reading this right now because I
am articulating it. People often
have difficulty understanding how
I can look fine to them, despite
the seriousness of my condition,”
she said

Because of these misconcep-
tions, people often jump to the
disheartening conclusion that Ms
Harvey is actually quite healthy
and perhaps is just faking it for
attention.

“J don't believe they under-
stand the constant
pain I am going through. I am liv-
ing with a disease you can not
see; it really consumes my entire
being and makes me feel like I
am absolutely worthless, espe-
cially when I just lay there and
cry from all over body pain and
the only thing that seems to work,
although not so well sometimes, is
my mind. Some days it's to the
point that I would not leave the

house because it is hard enough
just getting through one day.
Needless to say, getting to church
or to a social gathering is very
difficult.”

Described as a chronic condi-
tion characterized by widespread
pain in muscles, ligaments and
tendons, individuals diagnosed
with fibromyalgia also experience
fatigue and multiple tender points
(places on their body where slight
pressure causes pain).

More common in women than
in men, fibromyalgia was previ-
ously known by other names such
as fibrositis, chronic muscle pain
syndrome, psychogenic rheuma-
tism and tension myalgias.

The variations of FMS, as the
disease is also known, are as com-
plex as the nervous system itself.

According to Ms Harvey, FMS
is the result of fibrous deposits in
her muscles that cause pain.

“Nerve roots carry impulses
from my brain to my body, most
of which tell the muscles to work
on command. But in my case,
because the nerves fire without
legitimate cause, the muscles con-
tract when they are supposed to
be at rest. After years of contrac-
tions the muscles form scar tis-
sue, resulting from the constant
buildup of waste products from
the metabolic process and the
lack of blood flow in the con-
tracted muscles. And thus we
have the name for fibromyalgia -
fibros indicates scar-tissue-type
deposits, 71yo means muscle, and
algia means pain,” she said.

Perhaps even more devastat-
ing than the disease itself, is the
feeling that some family mem-
bers and friends have become
worn out with her.

“I am even tired of me,” Ms
Harvey admits. “The frustration
that I endure affects everyone
that I'am around because they
can not take away the continu-

SEE page 13



The fight

AGAINST —

Fibromyalgia

MH By YOLANDA «
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features
Editor

s part of her own

treatment, and for
the sake of others afflicted
with the same disease, Ms
Harvey is now working hard
to raise money and aware-
ness to assist in the research
and the development of
proper treatments for
fibromyalgia.

“Help me, help others.
It’s about caring by sharing,
and I want to encourage
others to join our fund rais-
ing campaign and to make a
donation. Donate your time;
set up a wellness practice,
join The Body Shop’s fund
raising campaign,” she said.

Currently, her main pri-
orities are in line with the
US-based National
Fibromyalgia Association,
whose awareness issues are:

o Increased funding
research aimed at determin-
ing the mechanisms causing
fibromyalgia, new treatment
options, and access to com-
prehensive healthcare

and treatment options;

oO Recognition of
fibromyalgia as a legitimate
chronic pain condition
deserving of the similar pre-
ventive measures and treat-
ment protocol

developed for other
chronic conditions, such as
diabetes;

o Increased education
of healthcare professionals
in medical school

o Required continuing
medical education for
licensed providers.

“Our organisations have
come across many other
organisations and websites
that are attempting to raise
funds and awareness, and
that are very good about
getting the word out. We
send out newsletters to
those who do not have a
computer and/or are home

bound/bed ridden. I par-
ticipate via e-mail most of
the time. At any rate. as
long as this disease does not

SEE page 13







THE TRIBUNE












_ People often
have difficulty —
understanding ©
how I can look
fine to them,
despite the
seriousness of
my condition

a.

Vincanna
_ Godet Harvey







Yify
tht Villa "tl lt tl” “, “ttn “ld “tts “ta.

Sister, Sister

Breast Cancer Support Group





The Tribune

Vly Vie. Wy Venpyon!





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 15B



aaa a Ae eS ee ee a
~ Rotarians from around the

globe gather in the Bahamas

Demystifying
Black/African-
Bahamian
skincare

CONTRARY to popular
belief, black skin has certain
needs specific to its genetic
make up. However, the basic
steps in skincare, such as
cleaning, toning, treating,
moisturizing and sun protec-
tion are still necessary.

Black or dark skin tends to
have varying pigmentation
and undertones even on one
individual. Black skin has a
problem with hyper-pigmenta-
tion and scaring, and special
care is needed to avoid these
situations and repair already
damaged skin. It is therefore
important to know your skin
type and problem areas if any.

Sun protection

Despite having more
‘melanin than Caucasian skin,
people of colour still need to
practice sun protection. Also,
people of African descent and
other dark-skinned races can
and do get skin cancer. It is.a
common belief that the
melanin in dark skin protects
it from skin cancer. The truth
is, melanin only offers a cer-
tain amount of protection.
What is true is that with black
skin, sun damage is less obvi-
ous, which means that the use
of sunscreen is necessary. Sun-
screen of SPF 15 is recom-
mended.

Cleaning

Cleaning of the skin is also
important; the face should not
be scrubbed to hard while
washing. Black skin is delicate
and excessive cleaning and
harslrhandling will result in
bruising and microscopic
tears.

Again, the colour of the
skin hides the damage so the
bruising is normally not
noticed. Also, darker skin
tones tend to look gray if too
dry, therefore over-washing
should be avoided. It is best
not to use soap for cleaning
the face or skin since they
tend to be drying. If you have
oily skin a purifying cleanser is
a good choice.

Exfoliation, while necessary
especially for those over 20 or
with acne, should be done
cautiously. It is recommended
that Bahamians of colour use
clay-based exfoliants. Also,
because black skin tends to
have large pores, toning is
essential to help keep the
pores healthy. This helps pre-
vent black heads and other
skin problems.

Moisturizing

Some dermatologists dis-
agree that everyone needs to
moisturize, especially those
with oily skin. Oily skin is a
condition that affects a large
segment of the country’s black
population. If your skin is dry
however, you do need to
moisturize.

Apart from the obvious rea-
sons to keep your skin hydrat-
ed, black people tend to have
eczema. This skin condition,
while not curable, can be con-
trolled by keeping the skin or
other affected areas well mois-
turized.

For black skin it is best to
‘use creams instead of lotions
for moisturizing as the skin
absorbs creams more effec-
tively.

Allin all, skin is skin, but
black skin is normally abused
because of the misconception
that it is tougher than lighter
skin

MORE than 1,000 Rotarians from
eleven countries and four territories
descended on the Bahamas last week
to participate in the Rotary District
7020 and District 6930 Conference,
held at Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island.

With a global emphasis on water,
health and hunger, literacy and the
family, and with a special focus on
youth and Rotary’s public image,
members of the service organisation
used last week’s conference as an
opportunity to share in fellowship
and experiences, while discussing
projects, community needs and how
the network of Rotarians in the dis-
trict can be more effective in making
life better for the needy.

Success

Operating under the Rotary 2008
theme, “Rotary Shares”, Dick
McCombe, district governor, said the
organisation’s efforts in creating sus-
tainable communities that have
access to clean food and water,
health care and literary initiatives
have been met with much success.

“These areas have resulted in more
sustainable quality water projects,
health initiatives covering all aspects
of health for all ages, and literacy
programmes for young and old alike
just to name a few,” he said.

Mr McCombe noted further that
their theme, “Rotary Shares”, best
describes the special common thread
that binds all Rotarians — their per-
sonal commitment to share their
time, their talents, their treasure and



“Rotary’s magical
contribution to the
needy in the world
begins with every
Rotarians’ desire
to help others.
Without the
individual
Rotarians in the
clubs throughout
the world, Rotary
would not exist,
and the needy
would suffer even
more than they do
today.



Dick McCombe,
district governor

their empathy, as they provide ser-
vice above self to the communities
of the world.

In the final analysis however, for
the organisation to continue to do
the good in the world that they have
begun, Mr McCombe said, Rotari-
ans must continue to grow Rotary in

_~achieved

the world. “We must share Rotary
with others and share our accom-
plishments.”

It is the Rotarian’s compassion and
ability to open their hearts to those in
need, he said, combined with their
commitment to share their time, tal-
ent and treasures with those who are
less fortunate, that makes the Rotary
organisation so magical.

Magic

“It reminds me of the magic one
can see in the eyes of a person receiv-
ing their first wheelchair and for the
first time, they can get around on
their own. It’s like the magic of the
smile of a young child when you give
them their first book. It’s like the
magic of happy faces when you bring
a water well to a community. This is
the magic that causes ordinary Rotar-
ians to do the extraordinary things

they do,” he said. .
“Rotary’s magical contribution to

the needy in the world begins with
every Rotarians’ desire to help oth-
ers. Without the individual Rotarians
in the clubs throughout the world,
Rotary would not exist, and the
needy would suffer even more than
they do today. We are proud of the
accomplishments Rotarians have
in the world,” Mr
McCombe said. “But more than any-
thing we must be proud of the part
Rotarians have played in making the
world a better place for those who
have the least.”

A worldwide organisation of more
than 1.2 million business, profes-

sional and community leaders, there
are over 32,000 Rotary clubs in more
than 200 countries and geographical
areas.

Members of Rotary clubs provide
humanitarian service, encourage high
ethical standards in all vocations, and
help build goodwill and peace in the
world.

Clubs are non-political, non-reli-
gious, and open to all cultures, races,
and creeds. As signified by the mot-
to “Service Above Self”, Rotary’s
main objective is service - in the com-
munity, in the workplace, and
throughout the world. The object of
Rotary is to encourage and foster
the ideal of service as a basis of wor-
thy enterprise and, in particular, to
encourage and foster:

e The development of acquain-
tance as an opportunity for service;

e High ethical standards in busi-
ness and professions, the recognition
of the worthiness of all useful occu-
pations, and the dignifying of each
Rotarian's occupation as an oppor-

‘tunity to serve society;

e The application of the ideal of
service in each Rotarian's personal,
business, and community life;

e The advancement of interna-
tional understanding, goodwill and
peace through a world fellowship of
business and professional persons
united in the ideal of service.

e For more information on Rotary
and becoming a member of this ser-
vice organisation check out www.dis-
trict7020blog. blogspot.com or e-mail
richardmccombe@gmail.com

Your success: Are you

contributing or complaining?
| life
coaching -
A new
perspective

@ By MICHELLE M MILLER,
cc

Success requires consistent
gratitude for what's going right,
rather than constantly grumbling
about what's going wrong.

Michelle M Miller

IN times of dissatisfaction it's
probably natural to grumble
about those things that appear
to hinder success; this is espe-
cially true if you are already a
chronic complainer.

The disadvantage of con-
stantly complaining is that in
the long run you build a skewed
outlook of life which impedes
any positive step towards your
success. Left unchecked, this
dead-end attitude will create a
serious wall of resentment.

Like a hamster wheel, the

‘more you spin the wheel of

complaining, the more situa-

‘tions you will find to complain

about. The truth of the matter
is, as long as you live on this
beautiful planet there will be
times when things don't go
according to plan; that's the way
life goes.

At every junction, you, how-
ever, have the incredible power
to choose how you deal with
life’s challenges. Knowledge is

by Michelle M
Miller, CC



the key; most people are com-
plainers primarily because they
are unaware of the importance

of contrast
blends the colours of life’s expe-
riences.

Nothing really exists without

an opposing substance or idea
to which it can be compared.
For example, you are able to
identify joy by virtue of the fact
that it can be compared to pain;
having something to compare
it with is what makes it what it
is.
I know that this may seem a
little over the top - but more
simply put - the concept of 'up'
exists only because it can be
compared to 'down'; one can-
not exist without the other.
Contrast is an important ele-
ment and its awareness brings
clarity to your experiences.

With this knowledge, you
learn to accept that we are all
exposed to life's 'ups' and
‘downs' and we need not take
our situations so seriously.

COMPLAINING
DEPLETES ENERGY

Rest assured that the habit of
complaining is laced with nega-
tive energy. Ever notice how
being around a complainer
drains your energy? It's as if
everything's sapped out of you
just by listening to their insis-
tent ramblings about how 'bad'
things are.

and .how it.

The bigger question is -
where does this overwhelming
pessimism come from?

‘You may be surprised to find
out that the bulk of negative
energy shouldered by many
people comes from so called
‘reliable’ sources of information
(media); print, television, radio,
Internet etc.

Seems many media houses
serve only to readily. remind the
public of what's 'wrong' with
the world. The relentless serving
of negative information will
eventually impact the human
psyche. You must, therefore,
decide in advance how you will
ensure the sanctity of your own
mind.

Moreover, the media's affect

on the human psyche is not a |

farfetched theory; in the movie
Hotel Rwanda, which was
based on a true story, research
suggests that it was propaganda
carried via ‘hate radio' that
incited ordinary people into the
eventual extermination cam-
paign.

Limit your intake of negative
information and gently shift
from complaining to contribut-
ing. This will allow you to dis-
cover the vast beauty and won-
der in this magical world.
Despite the daily negative
reports, this is a magnificently

created universe.

FINAL THOUGHT

Wayne Dyer says - Change
the way you look at things and
the things you look at will
change; a powerful statement
that encourages a shift in your
focus.

Whether you believe it or not,
your outer world is by and large
created by the perception of
your inner world; how you see
life is exactly how life shows in
your experiences. -

_ Shifting your mind towards
contributing means accepting
that the glass of life is always
half full; knowing that contrast
provides the stimulation that
keeps you intrigued and excited.

Remember. - success is a
process and every sunrise is
another opportunity for you to
move forward.

Consistently contribute; get
up and make it happen.

© Questions/Comments are
welcome

Website: www.keep-moving-
forward.com

E-mail:
coach4ward@yahoo.com or
write to

PO Box CB-13060
Nassau, Bahamas

° carefair.com

FROM woman front

ed to the young however. For Diana*, who will be 70
on her next birthday, the truth of one of her friend-
ships was painfully realised just a few years ago.

“In 2006 I had an incredibly difficult experience
in my local church where the very people responsi-
ble for shepherding our congregation were trying to
humiliate and sideline me. During this time, my
friend - we had been friends for many years, she
never forgot my birthday or the birthdays of my
children, my children were friends with her chil-
dren, I thought we were friends - but when this dif-
ficulty came my way - and it was a very public expe-
rience - she never approached me to see how I was
doing, for us to talk about it or to tell me that she
was praying for me. She just backed away and
allowed me to go through this trial alone,” Diana
said.

“I don’t know whether she didn?t know what to
say or how to handle it or even if she agreed with
what was happening to me. In a way, she was like
Peter - some friends don’t want to be identified
with you when you are in trouble - but a real friend
will stick close to your side and offer that support
that you need to make it through the difficult times.”

Even with this painful experience, Diana recog-
nises that female friends are important to have and
that everybody needs an outlet.

“Sometimes we say Jesus is all we need, but you
need people in your life who will give you an encour-
aging word, who will guide you along. You have
your family, your husband, your children, but you
need your friends. Even with Jesus, in that circle of
twelve disciples, he had three who were closest to
him = Peter, James and John. You don’t need a
bunch of friends, but you need your friends who
you could confide in, and when you speak to them
you don’t hear it again; someone who will pray for

:

Girlfriends

you, who you could lean on,” she said

ALL GOOD THINGS MUST
COME TO AN END

In a way, the end of a friendship is even worse
than breaking up with a boyfriend.

“J invest more in my relationships with girls than
matter what. Most times you are more real with
they disappear.

“You always call your friends when something
happens to you, but who do you call when you can’t

get in touch with your friends?” she said.
When asked how to end a friendship without all of

relationship without there being bad feelings.

way to do that,” she said.

* Names have been changed

FROM woman front

able keep feelings of romance at bay when

i they become emotionally close to a member of
; the opposite sex.

Outside of her cousins and extended friends

: of the family, Diana said she never had any
: male friends growing up. “It was always easier
: for me to make friends with women,” she said.

According to Ms Ward male/female friend-

> ag: ships are very similar to female/female friend-
guys,” Shante said, “and I expect them to be there no : ships, although she admits that romance can

girls; you're not worrying about how you look or sometimes get in the way of the man/woman

anything like that, so it’s more devastating when : dynamic.

“T think that many women would say that it

is easier to be friends with a man because they
: don’t feel they have to compete on any level -
; then again there are many people that say men

: : and women can’t be friends. But what
the emotional upheaval, Ms Ward made the point :

that it might not be possible to end an authentic type of relationship or they can’t have that

“Sometimes there is a gradual process where type of reiationship themselves. And it does
someone spends less and less time with the other ; Complicate things if one person in the rela-
person - may be they’re moving in different circles- ; tionship is married or has a boyfriend,” she
but it is always difficult when one person gets left :

behind and the other moves on. There’s no easy :

I say is that either they haven’t seen that

said.

In Anna’s case, while she has ac - . of sup-

a ; i portive female friends, the majority of her
ve seen where young women have friends and : frjends are males. “They are the best ones to
one gets engaged and the other ones feel left out. ? have. You're not a threat to them they’re not
They’re still trying to be friends, but something has : : - ti ses
cote betweeit them: It’s a process that unfortu- : Dey usnally ies loyal, contidenual ene
nately happens and it’s a part of life. And then | ly, it’s a whole different perspective. The only
sometimes we break for a time and come back ; thing with the men though, once they accept
together in different circumstances,” Ms Ward said. :

: the friendship then everything will be fine,”
: she said.

that there will be no dating or compromising of

Friendships.

CROSSING THE AGE DIVIDE

As women get older, Ms Ward said, they
become more confident in themselves, know
more about what they want, and their friend-
ships tend to reflect their changing attitudes
about life. “If someone is going through a
divorce, for example, they want more divorced
friends or single friends — our friendships
change from that perspective,” she said.

But although sharing similar experiences
serves as a bonding agent with friends of the
same age — sometimes it is the differences in
our lives — even our ages - that brings women
together.

As a senior citizen, Diana feels that an old
person can have young or younger friends.
Referring to the difficult time she went through
in 2006, Diana said that she was going to church
one night when she suddenly felt overwhelmed
by all that was going on.

“J thought to myself, I don’t want to go into
this church, I don’t want to see these people,
and just then one of my younger friends - she
could have been my daughter - came over and
told me how over the years I had encouraged
her and now she thought it was her turn to
encourage me. She put her arm around me
and said all would be well and that she was
praying for me. I was able to walk in church
feeling like I could face the world,” she said

; “S





HE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

MAY



13:5

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pete itery they come

GIRLFRIENDS

THE POWER aAanp THE ANGUISH
OF THE FEMALE RELATIONSHIP

m@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features Editor
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net

THE beauty of female friendship —
it’s the one human relationship where
two people, two equals, bond over shared
intimacies, struggles, moments of embar-
rassment, triumphs and achievement,
remaining true to one another, faithful
and loyal. The relationship can be sea-
sonal or lifelong — but when it is right, in
either phase, it is, arguably, among the
most satisfying emotional experience a
woman can have.

For twenty-something Shante*, her
female friendships are some of the most
important relationships in her life. “They
are almost like a surrogate family. If you
don’t have a husband or a steady
boyfriend or kids, you spend most of
your time with them. Your girlfriends
are like your family,” she said.

But while the strength of female
friendship is easily recognised, there
sometimes seems to bea darker, more
edgy side to this type of relationship.

Still in that sometimes awkward stage
where girls make that transition into
womanhood - seeing themselves as such
for the first time - Shante has discov-
ered that, especially when it comes to
male affections, her closest girlfriends
have sometimes served as her greatest
rivals.

“When you spend a lot of time with a
certain group of people, there’s a dynam-
ic that’s set up where it could either be a
positive thing or a negative thing. One
thing I notice in my friendships is that
there seems to be a level of competition.
If you are hanging out with your single
friends — when it comes to getting atten-
tion from males you want to be the one
that he sees or talks to first,” she said.

While some might argue that this is
the typical group mindset that most
young women experience, Angela Ward,
a psychotherapist at the Renascence
Institute International, questions whether
these women really are friends.

“They are not real friends. When I
think about a friend, not an acquaintance
or somebody on the job who is in com-
petition with you, but someone you have
a relationship with as opposed to some-
one you are working alongside or com-
peting with for someone or something,
that [competition] is not what I see,” she
said.

For Anna*, who is in her thirty’s, her
female friendships are very important
and crucial in helping her develop into
the woman God created her to be.
“Women are insightful; outspoken, affec-
tionate, affirming and confidential,” she
said.

Back in high school, where the power
of the female friendship first truly
emerges, her relationships evolved
around music, and she gravitated toward
the girls who could really dance and
could put on makeup, “because I could-
n't,” she admits.

“As I became a young woman, the

determining factor [for my friendships]
was honesty and self awareness and def-
initely someone I could laugh with or
talk about God with. My friendships went
from hanging out and talking fool to
more adult concerns - life changing/pos-
itive themes. There were less frequent
get-togethers, but more depth and qual-
ity conversations. The secret to my suc-
cessful relationships with women is find-
ing that secure balance between being
an individual and knowing and accepting
who they are,” she said.

The truth of our friendships

W hile everyone knows that
trust is an important

component of any friendship —
Ms Ward notes that a true
friendship cannot exist with-
out it - what other charac-
teristic constitute a friend-
ship?

According to Ms
Ward - friends:

e Share quality time
together

¢ Have similar
interests in activities

e Feel the support
of one another

e Share similar
values

e Have asense ©
that the other per-
son has “got your
back”

e Allow you to
feel that you can be
yourself. You don?t
have to put on a face
or a show for them

While spending
time together doing
activities that you
both enjoy is a
foundational
aspect of any
friendship, this
relationship become ‘
most important when
one party seeks and i
receives the support of
the other.

“T think the time I
most relied on my
friends is when I
had issues I felt
I couldn’t turn
to my fami-
ly with
because I
felt they
would be
disap-
pointed,”
Shante
said.







“Whether it is work-related or about a
boyfriend, it’s good when you have
friends who don’t judge you, who just

listen instead of jumping down your

throat.

“You need someone who understands
that everyone messes up. And sometimes
family members could be a bit more sup-
portive, but they say ‘oh, you shouldn?t
have done that’. I know they want the
best for you, but your friends are your
age and they are going through the same
thing as you, so they know how you feel,”
she said.

Issues of support and feeling that your
friend has “got your back” are not limit-

SEE page 15



















































in all shapes and sizes

@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features Editor
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net



A: DIVERSE as the women of the Bahamas are, so to are the
reasons for the friendships that are formed between them.

According to Angela Ward, a psychotherapist at the Renascence Insti-
tute International in SandyPort for the past five years, women form
friendships for different reasons and with different types of people,
because their needs cannot be met by one person.

“It’s hard to find everything in one person, and women who expect to
find everything in their husbands or boyfriends will be disappointed.
We may have a friend we can laugh with, have a friend we can talk to con-
fidentially; someone that teaches us about being a women - who is good
with hair, interior decorating, with cooking. Sometimes friends bond as a
result of having children, and they become part of our support system,
sometimes friendships result from activities that we do,” said Ms Ward.

“Nowadays it’s kind of rare to have friends from childhood. Sometimes
we outgrow those friendships depending on what stage we are at in our
lives. Remaining close friends with someone over the course of a lifetime
is rare and very special - it could be like sisters,” she said.

According to Ms Ward, women generally have a greater ability to
bond than men do and it’s because we try to find commonalities with one
another and work with that. Our relationships are not necessarily about
competing, but finding a common bond — and that’s why she
believes women should be heading the peace process.

VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE

B ut what about other types of female friend-
ships — like those with a man or someone

much older or younger — are they possible, and what
makes them important?
For. many Bahamian women, Shante included, while
they have a few relatively close male friends, their
core base remains the women in their lives.
“T have one or two male friends that I talk
about my feelings with, but sometimes you
just need another girl, another woman to
talk to. We are used to talking about
our feelings, but with guys if you
tell them a problem, they imme-
diately feel they have to find a
solution for it — your female
friends just listen. They
know that you might not
need a solution, just
someone to listen to. It’s
cathartic — you just
need to let it out.”
When dealing with
male/female friend-
ships, it is perhaps
the age of the
individual that
determines
whether this
type of relation-
ship is possible.
While younger
generations of
Bahamian
women are more
easily able to see
the men in their
’ lives as friends —
Le aaa ett i with no hint of inti-
he a macy or sexual] ten-
sion existing in the
relationship, older
Bahamians may not be

SEE page 15












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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 17



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Mid-Atlantic storm
cuts power and
prompts evacuations

@ WASHINGTON

HEAVY rain drenched the
mid-Atlantic region Monday,
knocking out power to tens of
thousands of customers, flooding
roads and chasing people out of
their homes, gccording to Asso-
ciated Press.

Up to 5 inches of rain fell
across the region from Sunday
afternoon into Monday, with
another half-inch possible in
some areas.

“(It’s) possibly the worst
flooding that I’ve seen since
Hurricane Isabel in ’03,” said
Steven Marshall, director of the
Department of Emergency Ser-
vices,in Somerset County, Md.

Strong wind and saturated soil’

brought down trees and cut pow-
er to homes and businesses
throughout the region.

Numerous roads were closed
because of high water and fire-
fighters reported calls from
stranded motorists and some
boaters who had to be rescued.

A sinkhole up to 30 feet wide
and 10 feet deep led to the evac-
uation of three homes in Camp
Springs, said Mark Brady, a
Prince George’s County fire
department spokesman. The
porch of one home collapsed
into the hole.

Along the Delaware coast,
residents of several communi-
ties in Kent County were evacu-
ated Monday because of flood-
ing. National Guard troop carri-
ers capable of driving through 6

feet of water rescued trapped ..

Iraq: Sadr City

residents. Flood warnings in the
region were extended through
early Tuesday.

About 30 people in Bowers,
Del., fled to a fire station, with
dozens of others seeking refuge
elsewhere, said Willie Trow-
bridge, president of the town’s
fire department.

“We still have some people in
their houses who have refused
to ledve,” he said.

A Coast Guard helicopter
crew rescued two men Monday
morning from a private research
ship that was breaking up and
taking on water about 14 miles
off the coast of Rehoboth Beach,
Del.

Ship

The ship, named after a for-
mer Delaware governor, was
christened in Wilmington just six
weeks ago and was being used
for the study migratory bird
routes by a company trying to
win state approval for an off-
shore wind farm. ~ ‘

Utilities reported 50,000 cus-
tomers without power in Mary-
land, nearly 50,000 in New Jer-
sey, more than 23,000 in
Delaware, 16,000 in Virginia and
4,500 in the District of Columbia.

Power already had been restored.

to many of those customers by
early afternoon.

Farther up the coast, wind and
rain caused average delays of up
to 2 1/2 hours for flights heading
into New York’s three major

cease-fire signed after
weeks of fighting _

m@ BAGHDAD

THE CARPORT of this home

was damaged when a sink hole
formed behind a row of homes in
Camp Springs, Md. on Monday
May 12, 2008 after heavy rains.
At the end of the driveway and
under the carport platform the
land sank approximately

20-30 feet.

airports.

Strong wind also contributed
to a fatal fire Monday morning
in Newark, N.J., fanning flames
of a blaze that killed 4 50-year-
old man, damaged three build-
ings and left 35 people home-
less.

The foul weather prevented
the resumption of a Coast Guard
search for a female passenger
who fell overboard from a cruise
ship northeast of Atlantic City,
N.J., on Sunday night. The Nor-
wegian Dawn was headed for
Bermuda from New York City
when the passenger fell.

Weather service meteorolo-
gist Lee Robertson said the
storm differs from a nor’easter
because it is.a combination of
two weather systems, one from
the Ohio Valley that contributed
to weekend tornadoes and a sec-
ond from just south of the Del-
marva region of Delaware.





























Jacquelyn Martin/AP

IRAQ’S main Shiite political bloc and supporters of firebrand
cleric Muqtada al-Sadr signed a fragile cease-fire in Baghdad’s
Sadr City on Monday, hoping to end seven weeks of fighting that
has left hundreds dead, according to Associated Press.

But the U.S. military has alleged that most Shiite extremists
fighting Iraqi and U.S. forces in the teeming slum have splintered
away from al-Sadr’s Mahdi Army, and that the cleric’s level of
influence on those rogue groups is unclear. Many are thought to be
trained and armed by Iranian forces. Iran denies the allegations.

Al-Sadr’s representatives and the rival United Iraqi Alliance
agreed to institute the four-day cease-fire starting on Sunday, but
talks over the details of the truce were not finished until a day lat-
er.
The deal allows Iraqi forces to take over security in the militia
stronghold of Sadr City on Wednesday.

“The mutual efforts of all have stood against civil war, and
thanks.to God we have left it behind our backs,” proclaimed Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki, a Shiite.

Clashes

The clashes erupted late March when Iraqi forces launched a
crackdown in the southern city of Basra. The Sadrists accused al-
Maliki, a political rival, of trying to sideline them ahead of expect-
ed provincial elections in the fall.

The fighting spread through the south and to the capital, where
Shiite extremists in Sadr City began firing rockets and mortars
toward the heavily fortified Green Zone.

Al-Sadr effectively stopped his militia from fighting in Basra
within days of the crackdown. But clashes escalated in Sadr City,
drawing U.S. attack aircraft and tanks into the fighting.

Al-Sadr recently threatened to launch an all-out war against
U\S.-led forces but ordered his militia to avoid Iraqi casualties. His
movement appears divided over whether to launch a full-scale
fight against Americans or focus on political efforts.



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PAGE 18, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008



THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Putin names
TTT Tamm WTI

ko





Tara Todras-Whitehill/AP

ISRAELI PRIME Minister Enud Olmert, center, and lawmakers Lia Shemtov, left, nt Gideon Sar right, attend a committee nealing at the Knesset, Israel's salient in
Jerusalem, Monday May 12, 2008. According to a new poll, six out of 10 Israelis think Prime Minister Ehud Olmert cannot promote peacemaking with the Palestinians because
of the latest police investigation into his conduct. The same number think Olmert should resign.

Israeli police widen sama
into Olmert donations

@ JERUSALEM

ISRAELI police raided
Jerusalem’s City Hall on
Monday, searching offices
and confiscating documents
‘as part of a widening cor-
ruption inquiry against
Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Olmert is suspected of

illicitly accepting large sums
of cash from a Jewish Amer-
ican donor. Some of the
donations are believed to
have taken place during
Olmert’s 0-year tenure as
mayor of Jerusalem.

Police spokesman Micky
Rosenfeld said the police’s
anti-fraud team. conducted
the raid. He said the seized
documents were connected
to Olmert time as mayor
between 1993 and 2003, but

ne

: Le

Anti-fraud team conduct
raid on Jerusalem’s City Hall

had no further details on
their contents.

The investigation has cast
a shadow over Israel’s 60th
anniversary celebrations and
embarrassed the prime min-

‘ister at a time when he

should be enjoying the lime-
light. President Bush arrives
this week to take part in the
national celebrations.
Olmert’s legal troubles
have also raised doubts
about his ability to reach a
peace deal with the Pales-
tinians. With U.S. backing,
Olmert and Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas

have set a year-end target
for a peace agreement
meant to end six decades of
conflict. During his visit,
Bush is expected to take
stock of the talks and push
for more progress.

The scandal has set off
speculation that Olmert may
not be able to remain in
office long enough to com-
plete the negotiations.
Olmert, who denies wrong-
doing, has said he would
resign if he is indicted, and
even if he hangs on to pow-
er, he may not be strong
enough politically to win

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support for a peace deal.

A poll Monday said six of
10 Israelis think Olmert is
not capable of promoting
peace with the Palestinians
because of the investigation.
Sixty percent of those polled
also said they don’t believe
Olmert’s claim that he did-
n’t funnel money into his
own pocket. The survey had

a margin of error of 4.5 per- .

centage points.

The poll was the first since
police disclosed last week
that they are investigating
suspicions that Olmert illic-
itly took envelopes stuffed

- with hundreds of thousands

of dollars in cash from Mor-
ris Talansky. Police were
questioning the Long Island,
N.Y., businessman Monday.

An Israeli police official
said investigators are look-
ing into many allegations
against Olmert, including
possible money laundering,
accepting bribes and cam-
paign finance violations. The
official, who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because

the investigation is contin-
uing, said the case is looking
ata 12-year period.

The Justice Ministry has
been deliberately vague on
what laws the Israeli leader
might have broken because
the probe — expected to
take months — is at an ear-
ly stage, a ministry official
said.

Since becoming prime
minister, Olmert has been a
suspect in several corruption
affairs involving real estate
deals and questionable polit-
ical appointments. He has
been questioned several
times in the past by police
but has never been charged.
Some of the investigations
remain pending.

In an interview broadcast
Sunday on Channel 10 TV,
Talansky denied trying to
bribe Olmert.

“T never thought in any
way that the money that I
gave him for the purpose of
his becoming mayor or elec-
tioneering was in any way
illegal or wrong,” he said.

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF



SECURITY SERVICES

for

POWER STATIONS &
OUTLYING LOCATIONS

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders from eligible bidders for the

: 4 provision of Security Services for the Mall-
4 at-Marathon, Main Post Office Depot and
Clifton Pier, Soldier Road & Blue Hills
' Power Stations for the Corporation.

Bidders are required to coliect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by
contacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Phone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
26th May, 2008, 3:00 p.m. and addressed

as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 666/08
Security Services for

Mail at Marathon,

Main Post Office Depot,
Clifton Pier, Soldier Road &
Biue Hills Power Stations

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject the whole or such part of any
Tender the Corporation deems necessary.



PIS ETT
the Kremlin

mm MOSCOW



PRIME Minister
Vladimir Putin wasted no
time in naming his new Cab-
inet on Monday, bringing in
loyalists trom the Kremlin
in what was seen as an effort
to shift the center of power
to his new place of work,
according to Associated
Press.

He also left several
prominent ministers
untouched, including For-
eign Minister Sergey
Lavrov, Defense Minister
Anatoly Serdyukov and
Finance Minister Alexei
Kudrin.

Putin announced the 24
positions, eight of them
new, at a Cabinet meeting
in the government head-
quarters, the ministers
already seated according to
their new appointments.

President Dmitry
Medvedev, Putin’s hand-
picked successor who was
inaugurated last week,
quickly approved the
appointments, which includ-
ed the demotion of a former
rival. Putin named the
hawkish Sergei Ivanov, once
seen as a top candidate to
succeed him as president, as
one of his deputy prime
ministers, a step down from
his previous position as first
deputy premier.

Bolstering the economy
was one of the priorities list-
ed by Putin when he pre-
sented himself as prime
minister-designate to the
parliament last week.

His move from the Krem-
lin to the Cabinet residence
up the Moscow River allows
him to remain a hugely
influential figure in the
country’s politics and many
observers have speculated
he will overshadow
Medvedev.

“Medvedev has a very
narrow set of choices and
opportunities,” said political
analyst Dmitry Oreshkin. —
“He will accept the condi-
tions Putin imposes on him
and will not take steps that
would spoil his image as
(Putin’s) successor.”

Putin was shown describ-
ing the structure of the new
Cabinet in footage which
dominated news broadcasts
throughout the day. He
looked and sounded presi-
dential when he discussed
the changes with Medvedev
in televised remarks.

“It was enough to see
how Putin talked to
Medvedev to understand
who is the boss,” commen-
tator Anton Orekh said on
Ekho Moskvy radio. “Putin
was the main hero Mon-
day.”

Medvedev received signif-
icantly less air time Mon-
day.

In another sign of his
authority, Putin angrily
scolded reporters dictating
details of the reshuffle to
their offices: “If you contin-
ue chatting so loud, we
won't invite you any more.”

Putin increased the num-
ber of prime ministerial
deputies to seven, compared
to the five for his predeces-
sor, Viktor Zubkov.

Zubkov was named a first
deputy prime minister. He
was put in charge of agricul-
ture, forestry and the fishing
industry, in addition to cus-
toms and tariffs.

- The other first deputy
premier is Igor Shuvalov, a
top policy aide in Putin’s
Kremlin who gained promi-
nence as an important fig-
ure when Russia hosted the
Group of Eight summit in
2006. Shuvalov will oversee
foreign economic policy and
negotiate Russia’s member-
ship in the World Trade
Organization.

Igor Sechin, the former
deputy chief of presidential
staff, will oversee industrial
development programs.
Sechin, who is widely seen
as a leader of a powerful
Kremlin clan of “siloviki,”
or veterans of Russian secu-
| rity services, will apparently
remain chairman of the
| state-controlled oil compa-
ny Rosneft.

Oreshkin said most of the
promotions were given to
colorless officials who are
little known by the public.
“There was no, populism, in
the new appointments,” he
said. “The role of public
opinion is so low that
whomever is appointed will
be accepted.”













THE TRIBUNE

I UESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 19



NTERNATIONA

| L NEWS

Death toll in China
earthquake is up
to nearly 9,000

@ CHONGQING, China

ONE of the worst earth-
quakes in decades struck cen-
tral China on Monday, killing
nearly 9,000 people, trapping
about 900 students under the
rubble of their school and caus-
ing a toxic chemical leak, state
media reported, according to
Associated Press.

The 7.8-magnitude earth-
quake devastated a hilly region
of small cities and towns. The
official Xinhua News Agency
said 8,533 people died in
Sichuan province and more
than 200 others were killed in
three other provinces and the
mega-city of Chongqing.

Xinhua said 80 percent of the
buildings had collapsed in
Sichuan province’s Beichuan
county after the quake, raising
fears the overall death toll could
increase sharply.

State media said a chemical
plant in Shifang city had
cratered, burying hundreds of
people and spilling more than
80 tons of toxic liquid ammo-
nia from the site.

The earthquake sent thou-
sands of people rushing out of
buildings and into the streets
hundreds of miles away in Bei-

jing and Shanghai. The temblor -

was felt as far away as Vietnam
and Thailand.

It posed a challenge to a gov-
ernment already grappling with
discontent over high inflation
and a widespread uprising
among Tibetans in western Chi-
na while trying to prepare for
the Beijing Olympics this
August.

The. quake hit about 60 miles
northwest of Chengdu — a city
of 3.75 million — in the middle
of the afternoon when class-
rooms and office towers were
full. There were several smaller
aftershocks, the U.S. Geological
Survey said on its Web site.

About 1,200 pandas — 80
percent of the surviving wild
population in China — live in
several mountainous areas of
Sichuan. :

The earthquake hit one of the
last homes of the giant panda
at the Wolong Nature Reserve
and panda breeding center, in
Wenchuan county, which
remained out of contact, Xin-
hua said.

The Wolong PandaCam, a
live online video feed showing
the activities of the pandas at
the nature reserve, stopped
showing footage of the animals
late Sunday night.

The earthquake, China’s
deadliest since 1976, occurred
in an area with numerous fault
lines that have triggered
destructive temblors before. A
magnitude 7.5 earthquake in
Diexi, Sichuan that hit on
August 25, 1933 killed more
than 9,300 people.

Xinhua said 50 bodies had



RESCUERS SEARCH for victims in the debris of a hospital after the



earthquake in Dujiangyan, in southwest China's Sichuan province Mon-
day, May 12, 2008. A massive earthquake toppled buildings across a
wide area of central China on Monday, killing more than 8,533 people,
trapping hundreds of students under the rubble of schools.and causing
a.toxic chemical leak in one of the worst quakes in decades. ;

‘been pulled from the debris of

the school building in Juyuan
town but did not say if the chil-
dren were alive. Students also
were buried under five other
toppled schools in Deyang city,
Xinhua reported.

Its reporters saw buried
teenagers struggling to break
loose from underneath the rub-
ble of the three-story building in
Juyuan “while others were cry-
ing out for help:” Two girls
were quoted by Xinhua as say-
ing they escaped because they
had “run faster than others.”

Photos showed heavy cranes
trying to remove rubble from
the ruined school. Other photos
posted on the Internet and
found on the Chinese search
engine Baidu showed arms and
a torso sticking out of the rub-
ble of the school as dozens of
people worked to free them,
using their hands to move con-
crete slabs.

Calls into the city did not go
through as panicked residents
quickly overloaded the tele-
phone system and the quake
also affected power networks.

Although it was difficult to

MATE Ce Peel te

telephone Chengdu, an Israeli

student, Ronen Medzini, sent a
text message to The Associated

Press saying there were power
and water outages there.

“Traffic jams, no running -

water, power outs, everyone sit-
ting in the streets, patients evac-
uated from hospitals sitting out-
side and waiting,” he said.

The road to Wenchuan from
Chendu was cut off by land-
slides, state media said, slowing
the rescue efforts.

Though news trickled out in
the first hours after the quake,
the government and its media
quickly mobilized, with nearly
8,000 soldiers and police sént
to the area. China Central Tele-
vision ran non-stop coverage,
with phone reports from
reporters and a few isolated
camera shots from the scene.

Disasters always pose a test to
the communist government,
whose mandate in part rests on
providing relief to those in need.
In recent years, the government
has improved emergency plan-
ning and rapid response training
for the military.

_ The earthquake also rattled

PEOPLE TAKE care of patients
outside a hospital after it was
evacuated following an earth-
quake in Chengdu, in southwest
China's Sichuan province Mon-
day, May 12, 2008. A massive
earthquake toppled buildings
across a wide area of central Chi-
na on Monday, killing more than
8,533 people, trapping hundreds
of students under the rubble of
schools and causing a toxic
chemical leak in one of the worst
quakes in decades.

buildings in Beijing, some 930
miles to the north, less than
three months before the Chi-
nese capital was expected to be
full of hundreds of thousands

of foreign visitors for the Sum-

mer Olympics.

Li Jiulin, a top engineer on

the 91,000-seat National Stadi-
um — known as the Bird’s Nest
and the jewel of the Olympics
— was conducting an inspec-
tion at the venue when the
quake occurred. He told
reporters the building was
designed to withstand a 8.0
uake.

“The Olympic venues. were
not affected by the earth-
quake,” said Sun Weide, a
spokesman for the Beijing orga-
nizing committee.

Skyscrapers swayed in Shang-
hai and in the Taiwanese capital
of Taipei, 100 miles off the
southeastern Chinese coast.
There were no immediate
reports of injuries or damage.

The quake was felt as far.

away as the Vietnamese capi-
tal of Hanoi, where some peo-
ple hurried out of swaying office
buildings and into the streets
downtown. A building in the
Thai capital of Bangkok also
was evacuated after the quake
was felt there.

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake
is considered a major event,
capable of causing widespread
damage and injuries in popu-
lated areas.



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-BIG POND COMPLEX

JUMBEY VILLAGE & HUYLER STREET
PARKING LOTS

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
Security Services for its Administration Building,
Big Pond Complex and Jumbey Village & Huyler
"Street Parking Lots for the Corporation.

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads by
contacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Phone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 26th
May, 2008, 3:00 p.m, and addressed as follows:

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Marked: Tender No. 667/08
Security Services for
Administration Building, Big Pond

Jumbey Village & Huyler Street Parking
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or

reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary.




Color China Photo/AP




for





and
















+

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager






Nassau, Bahamas






Complex and



Lots





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PAGE 20, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008



Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority
To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277)

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration Building,
Prince George Wharf on Thursday the 29" May,2008 3:00pm for the purpose of
granting Licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277)

Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do $0 at least six
(6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing to the
Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting. .

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written -
‘notification from the, New Providence Port Authoxity. "os .

The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licences as specified below: -

GOVERNMENT NOTICE |

Ministry Of Maritime Affairs And Labour
Port Department



THE TRIBUNE





NEW MASTER’S LICENCE — NEW PROVIDENCE
LICENCE # ' NAME . CLASS
NB/13/08 Bastian Stephen L. B
P.O. Box N-3733
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/14/08 Sands Dino D. B
P.O.:Box NP- 3733
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/15/08 Smith Kelly J. B
P.O. Box EE- 16986
, Nassau, Bahamas
NB/16/08 Wells Cleveland T A
P.O. Box n-9665
Nassau, Bahamas
NEW MASTER’S LICENCE -FAMILY ISLAND
LICENCE # NAME - ; CLASS
NB/02/08 Cartwright Graeme A
Hoopers Bay, Exuma
NEW BOAT LICENCE- FAMILY ISLAND
REG # APPLICATION BOAT CLASS PASS USE
NAME
NB/01/08 Little Exuma “Marlin” A 0 ' Barge
Enterprises: 200ft
P.O. Box F-60448 Steel Hull
Freeport, Grand
Bahama :
NB/02/08 Little Exuma ‘Vega Big A 0 Tug
Enterprise Dolphin”
P.O. Box F-60448 105ft
Freeport,GrandBahama Steel Hull
NEW COMMERC RE TIONAL W R
OPERATORS LICENCE NEW PROVIDEN
LICENCE # NAME CLASS
NB/81/08 Hanna Rodney E. D
: General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/84/08 James Renaldo M D
General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas
SFER OF BOAT -F. Y ISL
REG NO. PREVIOUS NEW CLASS PASS USE
OWNER OWNER
NP: 6817 Island Time Sports Exuma Blue A 49 Charter
. Fishing Ltd Boat .
PO. Box SS-19812 Charters Ltd
Hopper’s Bay Hopper’s
Exuma Bay Exuma

RENEWAL OF CO NAL
ACT
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT CLASS’ PASS USE
NAME
NP B 3(CB) Vonies Watersports “Time Out” D 10 Rental
P.O. Box SB-50762 12ft
Nassau, Bahamas Banana Boat
RENEWAL OF C L
JET NEW - :
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT CLASS PASS USE
NAME
NP: 503 SAN = Smith Vernal “No Name” D 2 Rental
P.O. Box CB-13796 On
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski
RENE T LI W
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT CLASS PASS’ USE
NAME
NP: 04 Barefoot Sailing “Riding BB 30 Charter
Cruises High”
P.O, Box SS-5219 53ft *
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass
NP: 2788 Barefoot Sailing “Wind B 20 Charter
Cruises _., Dancer”
P.O. Box SS-5219 4ift
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass
NP: 5076 Munroe Prince “Lady p” A 0 Mail Boat
P.O. Box SS-40483 98 ft
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 6298 Marine Tankers “Ocean * A 10 Oil Tanker
Services Trader”
P.O. Box SS-6130 171 {4
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 6621 Maury Peter “Reel B 8 Charter
‘Nassau, Bahamas Motion”
48ft
Fibreglass
NP: 6754 Pirates Well “M/V -Lady A 85 Mail Boat
Investments Co. Rosalind II” ;
P.O. Box N-7461 185ft
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 6743 Pirates Well “M/V Lady A 85 Mail Boat
Investments Co Rosalind”
P.O. Box N-7461 150ft
Nassau, Bahamas Stee) Bull
NP: 6236 Pirates Well “M/V Trans A 40 Mail Boat
investments Co. Cargo Il”
P.O. Box N-7461 226ft
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 3198 Paradise Dive “Sea Star” B 25 Charter
Charters 37ft
P.O. Box N-3198 Fibreglass
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 6738 Smith Paul “Chaser” B 8 Charter
Nassau, Bahamas 38ft
Fibreglass
NP: 6823. Smith Paul “Strike Zone” B 8 Charter
Nassau, Bahamas 39ft
Defender
NP: 6638 Smith Paul “Hunter” _ B 10 Charter
Nassau, Bahamas 42ft
Hatteras
NP: 6323 William Yelverton “Mary Ann B 73 Ferry Boat —
P.O. Box CR-54939 II”
Nassau, Bahamas 46ft
Fibreglass
RENEWAL OF TER’S — FAMI
LICENCE# NAME CLASS
7204 Darville James G. A
Berry Island, Bahamas
8293 David Rex E. A
P.O. Box AB-20687
Murphy Town, Abaco
7380 Gunn Stephen F. A
Freeport, Grand Bahama
6404 Higgs Harvey W. A

Spanish Wells, Eleuthera



15)



iy!

6132

7491 |
8281
7919
7364

6725

7292

LICENCE #

6877

1495

8177

7815

8142

8267

6813



Munroe Prince A

Staniel Creek, Andros

“MinnisNigeIF. == =A
P.O. Box F-44257
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Knowles Adam M.A. A
Freeport, Grand Bahamas

Smith Kyle L. A
P.O. Box F-43216
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Ward Kent A
P.O. Box F-41478
Freeport, Grand Bahama |

Waton Harry B A.

Spanish Wells, Eleuthera

Zaritzky Barry A
General Delivery
Gregory Town, Eleuthera

suBtL

GN-674_

samen meerey

RENEWAL OF MASTER’S — NEW PROVIDENCE

NAME

Adderley Farron - A
P.O. Box SB-50104
Nassau, Bahamas

Clarke Franklyn A
General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas

Clarke Lawson A
P.O, Box N-1397
Nassau, Bahamas

Dames Ethan R. A
P.O. Box EE-17380
Nassau, Bahamas

Flowers Christopher A
P.O. Box CR-5562
Nassau, Bahamas

Knowles Kevin N.
P.O. Box GT-2494
Nassau, Bahamas

Moss Keith
P.O. Box CR-56592
Nassau, Bahamas

Sweeting Christopher R.
P.O. Box N-1029
Nassau, Bahamas

Varga Randolph 1.
P.O. Box SS-5219
Nassau, Bahamas

Signed: Captain Anthony Allens
PORT CONTROLLER

CLASS

_ fellow Islamists, ideological

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 21



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Sudan briefly
detains Islamist
for alleged

rebel

KHARTOUM, Sudan

SUDAN briefly detained its
leading fundamentalist Islamic
ideologue on Monday, accusing
him of aiding a Darfur rebel
attack on the capital but then
releasing him without charge,
according to his party and state
media, according to Associated
Press.

Hassan Turabi was arrested
after dawn at his home in Khar-
toum and at least 10 other mem-
bers of his Popular Congress
Party members were detained
in a government sweep across
the city, said Awadh Ba Bakr, a
relative and close aide to Tura-
bi. Bakr says al-Turabi was
questioned by security and
released without charges about
15 hours later.

Turabi is believed to wield
influence with Khalil Ibrahim,
the leader of the Justice and
Equality Movement, whose
fighters launched an unprece-
dented attack Saturday near
Khartoum, hundreds of miles
from their bases in the country’s -
far west.

The attack was the closest
Darfur rebels have ever come
to the seat of Sudan’s govern-
ment, which they accuse of mar-
ginalizing ethnic African minori-
ties and worsening the area’s
humanitarian crisis.

Sudan’s official news agency
quoted unidentified government
officials as saying that rebels
already in custody implicated
Turabi and other party mem-
bers as part of a “conspiracy.”
Interrogations were underway; it’,
said.

Turabi, who has a doctorate
from the Sorbonne, is one of the
founders of Islamist politics in
Sudan and provided the ideo-
logical basis for President Omar
al-Bashir’s coup and the cre-
ation of an Islamic state in 1989.

Both he and Ibrahim were
once part of the regime, and as

allies.

Ibrahim, however, denounced
the Sudanese government-in
1999 for its Arab bias against

ferences.

HOLE & 1H ta fe Kil Wrtet



During the early 1990s, Sudan

links

Amr Nabil, File/AP

IN THIS Dec.10, 2000, file photo, Hassan Turabi, the leader of the
Sudanese opposition Popular Congress Party is seen waving for his
supporters during a conference in Khartoum, Sudan. Turabi was arrest-
ed at his house in the early hours of Monday, May 12, 2008, according
to his party, apparently because of his links to Darfur rebels who
attacked close to the capital this week.

move that helped make Sudan a
pariah state.
Turabi fell out with al-Bashir

ethnic Africans and resigned
from the government and even-
tually taking up arms.

Ibrahim maintained he and
Turabi, an ethnic Arab with a
Darfuri wife, still had their dif-

was accused of sheltering Islam-
ic militant groups; Osama bin
Laden made his home here until
the government threw him out
in 1996. Turabi backed Saddam
Hussein in the first Gulf War, a

in 1999 and has since been in
and out of prison on various
charges, and under house arrest.
He was never sentenced, and
remains influential. ;

Sharif’s party to quit
Pakistan Cabinet

m@ ISLAMABAD, Pakistan

‘FORMER Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif
pulled his party from the Cabinet on Mon-
day, raising doubts over the new govern-
ment’s stability and Pakistan’s transition to
democracy after eight years of military rule,
according to Associated Press.

The ruling coalition that came to power
after February elections — dealing a crush-
ing defeat to allies of President Pervez
Musharraf — could now flounder. Its two
key partners cannot agree over how to
restore senior judges removed by the former
military strongman late last year.

Sharif said his group would still support
the government led by the party of Asif Ali
Zardari on an “issue by issue” basis, but
also indicated he would join protests by
lawyers lobbying for the restoration of the
judges — which risks intensifying the stand-
off between the parties.

A permanent split in the coalition would
boost Musharraf, a longtime ally in the U.S.-
led war on terror, who has taken a back
seat since the new civilian government took
power in late March.

The failure of the new civilian adminis-
tration could reinforce perceptions that only
the army is capable of running the volatile
Islamic country.

Political analyst Hasan-Askari Rizvi said
that unless the two parties could find a quick
solution to the judges issue “they will drift in
the opposite direction.” '

“That could be the beginning of instabil-
ity in Pakistan and a major setback for the
prospects of democracy in Pakistan,” he
said.

Sharif said ministers from his party would
meet with Prime Minister Yousuf Raza

Gilani on Tuesday and hand in their resig-
nations. He said he was “very pained” at
the decision.

“We will sit together ... We are not going
to sit on the opposition benches for the time
being,” Sharif told a news conference. “We
will not take any step which will benefit
Musharraf’s dictatorship.”

Separately, the 53-nation Commonwealth
comprised mainly of Britain and its former
colonies cited Pakistan’s progress in restor-
ing democracy in lifting the country’s sus-
pension from the group, imposed after
Musharraf’s imposition of emergency rule in
November.

Coalition

The wrangling within the coalition over
the judges is an unwelcome diversion for a
government facing myriad problems, includ-
ing Islamic militancy — which claimed the
life of Zardari’s wife Benazir Bhutto in
December — and a worsening economy.

Zardari and Sharif announced an agree-
ment on reinstating the dozens of judges
that were axed by Musharraf to forestall a
Supreme Court ruling on his eligibility for
office. But they have since disagreed on the
mechanics, and weekend negotiations in
London — the latest in several rounds of
talks — did not produce a deal.

Zardari’s party said it still wanted to
restore the judges but the parties needed
resolve how to best do it “without affecting
the present judges” — a reference to those
appointed during Musharraf’s emergency.

Spokesman Farhatullah Babar said it
would not fill the Cabinet vacancies left by
Sharif’s party and would try to resolve the
issue “amicably.”



PAGE 22, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 / THE TRIBUNE
COMICS PAGE

















ARE YOUR MALADJUSTED
ANTISOCIAL TENDENCIES
THE PRODUC OF YOUR

BERSERK PITUITARY GLAND?








BY THE WAY, I'M GLAD

YOU AND LU ANN





I'LL SEE YOU TOMORROW
NIGHT AT THE OPENING,













i, GEN | “AFTER ENNIS KINDA GROWS ON YOU
A SS} .» LIKE MOLP..OR MILDEW.”
a)
4












THAT WAS CLOSE!
1 WAS NEARLY
UPSTAGED BY MY
OWN YANKEE POT

THAT GOES FOR yOu,
TOO, GORGEOUS!












‘Famous Hand










West dealer. played very quickly. ‘| TU ESDAY,
North-South vulnerable. West led the king of hearts,
NORTH ducked by South, and continued with | M AY 1 3
@A8 the jack, won by Rubens with the — -+
: 9765 ace. He promptly played the jack of AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
= #AK 1042 diamonds aa Soe ree took the Your finances continue to be aj sub-
#983 queen and remanence: : ‘ject of angst. You’re making the sit-
T EAST Rubens thereupon showed his : 2 ' Ree |
ayoe #10652 hand and claimed the rest of the ya Hons Saat is. ane
OT : ¥KQI92 ¥33 tricks on a double squeeze! The only the “numbers again and you lt fn
; ; * 86° #Q53 * explanation he offered was that he that you are in good shape. |
MARVIN J. "hy 42 \ #Q 1075 assumed East had four or more PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
eee ote ROR Ay 72 ee SEIS Se a ae Balage wre Belay ay A Am eben SD. gk ; RSOULH bite Sa CAN ae pelt That special someone who got away
: : . : ouble s : Sauget ile : >
cae THATE UNVING VA fb AG es His well-versed opponents conceded is back in the picture. Don’t blow
: : ven things a second time around — make
IN A GATED #397 ; the claim, and the hand was not ¢ 1
io Re - : AKG . played out! your plans now for the right moment.
COMMUNITY I = he The bidding: They realized that Rubens would ARIES — March 21/April! 20

West North East South — win the club with the king and cash

is WwW sday;
24 Pass Pass 2NT the A-K-Q of spades and A-K-10 of Tempers flare up on Wednesday

Aries, -and you’re smack-dab in the



Pass 3 NT - diamonds to produce this ending: : a Pe Feel
: re 5 North middle. ‘Iry to extinguish those feel-
Opening lead . as he ? 7, ings of anger. Be the bigger person,
This deal occurred during the +4 and end the argumentearly, |

playoff to determine which team #9 TAURUS - April 21/May 21

wouls paar ‘ vate ete in vO. tS st It will probably be a dull week for
ns . it was 3 i t

a Fas ato deal of the 160-, &J4— #Q 10 you, Taurus, as everything momen-
board match, but it demonstrated that” South tous is scheduled for the weeks to
at least one of the players, Jeff 7 come. Enjoy the quiet time by catch-

_ ee Ringpontores.com Rubens, was already functioning on #A 6 si ap ing up on some rest and relaxation.

Vata ee res . - ! all cylinders.’ The lead of the diamond four / GEMINI — May 22/June/21

3 South and reached. would first squeeze East out of a 4 HAR ty «

‘NO N'SEQUITUR : : ete rqncaete : ine pene a shown. Ordinarily, club, on which South would discard Your dual personality comes into full

play at work. You're playing both sides
- Gf'a tricky situation late in the week. If
either party catches you, there’s bound to
» be trouble. Rethink your strategy.

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Your amiability could have you
taken advantage of on Tuesday.
Being friendly is one thing, being
gullible is another. Keep your eyes
wide open to avoid the trap. '

’ LEO — July 23/August 23

* You expected good news this, week,
Leo, but it’s not going according to
plan.. Rest assured that. it should
arrive shortly, so keep a positive atti-
tude toward the situation. |

‘VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22
A troublesome housemate is causing
all types of turmoil in your Usually
organized life. You’re at your wit’s
end with the situation. It may pe best
to sever all tics. :

. LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve reached a roadblock in your
career path, Libra. If you can’t
decide what steps to take, consult a
close confidant for some advice.
Expect things to change next)week.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

~. You have your eye on someone. who
isn’t your current partner. If; you’re
single, go for the adventure. If
you’re married, it’s not worth the
risk of discovery.

-‘ SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21

You have much planning in store

Rubens plays his cards ina deliberate a spade, and then squeeze West out
tempo, even though he is actually of a club to put an end to the pro-
one of the fastest thinkers in the ceedings. Rubens’ claim at trick four
game. But on the present occasion he _ was simply a timesaver!







DUNE IT
DONN. RNY

FURTRER |!

oy
— Sige ra -
RIE Al= "
uses ’
SOW TUR. COM mn :
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WHILE YOURE : Cc Dalen
THERE, YOU VONT | | mae
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OrSt, BY UWIVER SAL PRESS SYRPKPTE

>



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Fach
must contain the centre letter
and phere Gace at least one
-letter word.
TODAY'S TARGET TS:
Good 25; very good 38;
excellent 49 (or more).
Solution tomorrow:

tram trauma TRAUMATIC ~ j

trim uric

amir amrita aria arum
atrium attar aura carat cart
cram curt marc mart raita
tarmac tart tiara tract trait

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION



|

bb





CRYPTIC PUZZLE














; DOWN | for the weeks to come, Sagittarius.
AcROss a BERG eda rs 5 i] There are parties galore, and
Good man, but is an arch : eee Ss (5) 3 \ you'll be at the center of every cel-
one better? (6) fj 2 Fabricated like a white-topped eal Wor i ebration. Enjoy the rush. |
Four, once more, can ponstitute cooker (5) aes CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
omamentation (8) 3 Aking of some fame, known for his | closing | Home life has been putting a damper
Na : Dyke (4) a ee on your ‘usually adventurous spirit.
imbs on a swimmer's back? (6) aids Laan casiptwrlren Cena This week stays at status quo. Don’t
Where fighting can leave one a near Meee final step of a fight the quiet, embrace it; things are
wreck? (5) way, we hear?) (5) real estate bound to bounce back shortly,
Which perech may be a doctor a 5 Left Uncle out of the violence! (4) ee ae Peyeyeteye
Maidenhead (4) 6 — Started to be frank with the Editor (6)
Fiver scale ite tic 9 His unskilled labour is acceptable, eal
ae yen oe Oy) . _ thatis, out East (6) 33
Aspen TN tage hace | ae CHESS by Leonard Barden
nf 7 eee ets) 12 About the nose Alan's broken (5) real
a org round a sand bar (4) 13 Now up around the mark, perhaps, as
Deposited as financial an artisan (7) ia Mark Ferguson v Michael Yeo, Isle
sae Chetan) Ra see alto Testa cf
orm of cutter a sailor would ; :
Tear ud Nave 2 16 Take the rest as pure fiction (3) must have been feeling quietly
), 18 _ Increase due to interest in an electric ACROSS fi satisfied when he reached today's
Powder used in dental care (4) shock cure! (6) 4 — Lubricant (6) i Faith (5) position as Black against an
Join me when the cabaret's 20 Trying to get a wicked fate to come 7 oF are & 2 Blemish (5) ~~ international master opponent.
finished (4) right? (5) 8 — Snuggle (6) Z 3 Occasion (4) Several pieces have already been
Your worthy side a 10 Mud (5) ‘ 4 Magic exchanged, and now Black is
oe (3) e oe sound of a bird (3) 13 Eat (4) b spirit (5) looking forward to hoovering off a
. Scan a letter in red (4) 22 He's up in his den (3) Ww ae as 4 - 4 5 Gaelic (4) ; pair of rooks and the remaining
She's presumably Irish (4) 23 Perennial caution with cash (6) _I 5 Wom, bs a : mee, knights, after which he can open
Go and change direction (4) —25 Inmany instances, the Scots one (3) N 16 = Church ; Tl Auction sala soi bur therfore iy
Lying the professionaLway (5) 28 — Flynnin one of his finer roles? (5) =) "7 aeons item (3) tactical trick hidden in the position
Strike the woman this way (6) 30 Real tennis was so princely! (5) oO. (4) z nec which IM Ferguson had spotted a
Gloomy about the actors 31 Welsh thane, possibly (5) > 19 Metal(4) 15 Swamp (3) -_.. __ few moves earlier before steering
employed? (8) : 32 The love of a boy (4) g 21 Wandered (9) 16 Seed-case (3) the game into the diagram against
Walk on the street with a certain gait (6) 33 A dramatic bit of work (4) wu 2 Type of 18 Disease (6) his unsuspecting opponent. How
word (4) 20 Rushes (5) did White force a rapid
24 Merriment (4) 2 Cat's cry (3) resignation? LEONARD BARDEN
26 Noticed (3) 2 Type of ag he
27 Thing (4) wood (3) 4 :
23 Weed (4) ; 2 Empty (6) gia k cape ss
32 Action (4) 25 Offer (3)
; - = 33 Stage 28 Examines (5
Yesterday's cryptic solutions | Yesterday’s easy solutions whispe a
5 c
ACROSS: 1, Hum-bug 7, Eighteen (18) 8, MA-MA 10, Boozer | ACROSS: 1, Evolve 7, Decanter 8, Pole 10,Chosen11,Facade «| '—i(iti3 Stroke 5 _ . ae Chess: 8558: 1 Nxd6 Rxe6 2 dxe6 Qxd6 3 Qf3! wins
11, Little 14, K-ew 16, Noses 17, Le-er 19, Fi-n-er 21, C-aged | 14, Peg 16, Voted 17, Then 19, Metal 21, Melon 22, Motor 23, 35 Herb (3) en with the double threat of 4 Qxa8+ winning the rook
22, A-RR-a-Y 23, Ran-k 26, Lisle 28, Ted 29, Ostler 30, Brew 26, Began 28, Fee 29, Ironic 30, Forage 31, Oral 32, 36 Against (6) : es a - or 4 Rdi pinning and winning the queen.
Re-gent 31, Ear-N 32, Lumbered 33, Sat-|-re Customer 33, Trench pa te 33 Unit of land (4)

DOWN: 1, Her-bal 2, Blazer 3, Gear 4, Chained 5, Heats 6, DOWN: 1, Elicit 2, Loosen 3, Eden 4, Caravan 5, Stoat 6,

Knees 8, M-OK-e 9, Me-W 12, To-R 13, Lenin 15, Cigar 18, Greed 8, Pope 9, Leg 12, Col 13, Delve 15, Below 18, Haver :

Elvis 19, F-ar 20, Ney 21, Creeper 22, A-L-L 23, Re-gret 24, 19, Met 20, Tor 21, Monitor 22, Man 23, Berate 24, Real 25, : hes

Aden 25, Kettle 26, Lolly 27, St.-amp 28, Tea 30, Reds Wrench 26, Birch 27, Goose 28, For 30, Fort

a FT I TS SY, VS IT

a



-, THE TRIBUNE











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: TUESDAY EVENING MAY 13, 2008
| 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30.



NETWORK CHANNELS

Florida Roadtrip |Nova “A Walk to Beautifu Three | Frontline “Storm Over Everest’ A fierce storm traps three climbing teams

-|@ WPBT Carriage rides; [Ethiopian women with childbirth in- {high on the slopes of Mount Everest. (N) 1 (CC) (DVS)

Equitheatre. juries. (N) (CC) (DVS)

The Insider (N) |NCIS “About Face’ A killer targets Shark “One Hit Wonder’ Sebastian |Criminal Minds “Limelight” A seif-
4 (CC) Jimmy Palmer. (N) © (CC) tries to determine who murdered an |storage unit reveals evidence of a
aspiring singer. (N) (CC) serial killer. © (CC)

Access Holly- |MostOutra- © (Most Outra- {Law & Order: Special Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
wood (CC) us Moments |geous Moments | The life of a ke eat ness Wounded, Lake takes a hostage
Ay A (CC) 4 (CC) goes terribly wrong. (CC) and goes on the run. (N)

Deco Drive American Idol The top three fina |(:02) Hell’s Kitchen Contestants |News (N) (CC)

ists perform three songs. (Live) “ |take a blindfold taste-test challenge.

cc} (N) © (PA) (CC) |

Jeopardy! “Col- |Accordingto [According to |Dancing With the Stars Elimina- Se Women’s Murder Club “Never
lege Champi- Jim Dana hypno- |Jim Game night. tion. (Live) (CC) e| pee Finale) Lindsay risks
onship” (N) (CC) |tizes Andy. (N) 0 (CC) her life. (N) (CC)

CABLE CHANNELS
00) (SI: Miami |The First 48 A man is found dead |The First 48 “Double Time” Investi- Gene Simmons |Gene Simmons |
One of Our behind a church. (CC) gating two homicides in Miami. (CC) |Family Jewels |Family Jewels |

Own’ 1 (CC) “Nail Me” (CC) —|(N) (CC) |

(0 BBC World |BBC News |World Business |BBC News |Women onthe |News |
levis America |(Latenight). Report (Latenight). Front Line War |
. in the Congo. |

College Hill: At- | * x NEXT FRIDAY (2000, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Justin Pierce. |College Hill: At- Iron Ring (N) |
lainta (CC) A young man lives with kin who won the lottery. (CC) lanta{N) (CC) |(CC) |

NHL Hockey Eastern Conference Final Game 3 -- Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Fly- |CBC News: The National (N) 0
es, From the Wachovia Center in Philadelphia. (Live) (CC) (CC) |






(:00) Kudlow & |Fast Money Deal or No Deal Contestants get a |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch |
‘Company (CC) chance to win money. (cc) |
{00} Poe CNN Election Center Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)

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(CC)
Scrubs Jordan's |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Futurama Ro- South Park Cart-|Carlos Mencia: No Strings At-
friends come to |With Jon Stew- |port (CC) bots in love. 1 |man exacts re- tached The comic shares his take |
town. 1 (CC) fart (CC) (CC) venge. (CC) — jonAmerican diversity. (CC)
Wizards of Wa- | MODEL BEHAVIOR (2000, Comedy-Drama) Mag- (A) That's So (i) That's So. |Life With Derek
verly Place Alex |gie Lawson. A shy teen swaps identities with aglam- |Raven (CC) |Raven “Where's |*Driving Lessons*
alters time. orous young model. 1 (CC) the Smoke” A (CC) ,
This Old House |Sweat Equity /Sweat Eau Desperate Land-|Desperate Land-|Rock Solid “Fire |Rock Solid Out-
0 (CC) “Decked scapes (N) _ {stapes Pit & Gril?” door kitchen.
Beckmann ‘ |ZDF Reportage |Journal: Tages- |Global 3000 — {Journal: In Euromaxx

thema Depth

The Daily 10 (N) |Going Postal: 15 Most Shocking Acts of Violence Disturbing acts of vi-|Keeping Up-Kar- Keeping Up-Kar-
; dashians dashians



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TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 23

Let Charlie the ny
Bahamian Puppet and aay
his sidekick Derek put ay —

es

s
SS

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the

MctHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of May 9008,

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

?m lovin’ it

LL

ei Ade a aa

ovie Gift Certificates
imake great gifts!z



PAGE 24, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Seeking help for pets
after volcano eruption

A MEMBER of an animal welfare group poses with a dog during a demonstration in front of La Moneda
presidential palace in Santiago, Monday, May 12, 2008. Members of the group met Chilean officials to

ask for help for the hundreds of household pets left behind in the wake of the Chaiten volcano eruption
in southern Chile.



Sh
SOURDOUGH

HOMESTYLE

* Sausage andiEgg
« Melted American Cheese







#

Special Donation to the School for Exceptional Students at the GIES 25S ee 24 | F
Exuma Foundation’s Campus at Hoopers al Sade ao th adam : a







Full Text




| > WARMTH

Volume: 104 No.143

ee ‘CLOUDS AND SUN |

The Tribune =

|
e
|

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

we 2
Ae

SEE PAGE 16C ON BACK OF BUSINESS

Paratis Island murder

Teenage boy
from Fox Hill is
stabbed to death

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

A 16-YEAR-OLD Fox Hill
boy has been stabbed to death
on Paradise Island next to two
of the country’s largest tourist
resorts.

Police*had:to fire gun shots

next to Atlantis and-the, RIU_.

Resorts around 4 o’clock yes-
terday afternoon to disburse a
fight between two groups of
young men. At the end of the
melee, Khodee Davis, a student
of Temple Christian, and son
of prominent Fox Hill busi-
nessman Dereck Davis, lay
dead at the entrance to Cab-

bage Beach, next to the RIU.
His mother is Ms Sonia Dill,
also of Fox Hill, and a Customs
officer.

During the altercation

‘ Khodee suffered what appeared

to be a stab wound to the chest.

Crime scene tape blocked off
the roundabout near the beach
access point as family and

tourists. looked on_at the boy , :

who was covered in an orange
blanket.

According to witnesses, the
boy was not involved in the
altercation that led to his mur-
der. It is believed that he might
have been attempting to break

SEE page 10

Bahamas sees 18% drop
in foreign investment

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas saw an eighteen per cent drop in the amount —

of foreign direct investment dollars entering its economy in
2007 compared with a year prior — equivalent to a decline of
$126 million, according to the United Nations.

This information, revealed in a report by the UN’s Econom-
ic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)
released last week, comes as the Bahamas was also given a less
impressive ranking i in the region for predicted tourism growth
potential.

The Travel, Leisure and Tourism section of Financial con-
sulting firm KPMG made public its fourth annual regional
banking survey at the Caribbean Hotel Tourism and Investment
conference in Trinidad last week.

SEE page i

a. rues

RIzzZa wit ae /
Ke} ne eS xg @ aimediv ae
ing) :



THE BODY of Khodee me is removed from the scene yesterday.





(2 storey yellow building
=upstairs Signature Styles).

PRICE — 75¢

SUG CSG EEE)

UA TT es

SEE SPORTS FRONT PAGE



é Major/Tribune staff

Felip

Former minister hits back at Neko
Grant over airport screeners remarks



@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia:net



FORMER Transport and Avi-
ation Minister Glenys Hanna-
Martin has declared that state-
ments by Neko Grant, minister
of tourism and aviation, suggest-
ing that Exuma airport screeners
were improperly hired under her
watch represents an act of “polit-
ical cowardice” and were designed
to disguise his “incompetence.”

Mrs Hanna-Martin made the
hard hitting statement in a press

SEE page 11

| Sea Hauler tragedy victims to
receive cheques on Wednesday

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

LONG-SUFFERING victims of the 2003 Sea
Hauler tragedy will be handed their much-antic-
ipated cheques from government on Wednesday,
it has been announced.

A $1 million ex-gratis, or “out of kindness”,
payment will be split between the 29 victims
according to the severity of the injuries that were
sustained by each, said a statement issued by
Minister of Labour and Maritime Affairs, Dion
Foulkes, yesterday.






Get savings es
built right into
your mortgage

The government has determined that of those
29 people, three can be categorised as “deceased
with dependents”, one as “deceased with no
dependants”, one as having undergone amputa-
tion, seven as having suffered compound frac-

tures, and five and 16 having been subject to frac- -

tures and “soft tissue injuries” respectively.
“The Government fully sympathizes with the
victims of the Sea Hauler tragedy,” Mr. Foulkes
said, adding that it “hopes that these payments
will help to relieve their suffering and bring some
comfort to the families of those who died.”

SEE page 11

Multiply your savings!

Man shot by
police after
woman held
at gunpoint

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

ONE man was shot, and anoth-
er was bitten by police dogs, after
officers responded to a house
where a woman was being held at
gunpoint against her will early
yesterday morning.

The dramatic scene played out

~-at-around. 2.15am_ on Rupert

Dean Lane, about three houses
south of Patton Street.

Police responded to a call
reporting that a woman was being
held against her will in the area.
When they arrived at the house, a
man was reportedly holding her
at gunpoint.

At this time, shots were fired at
the officers, according to Chief
Superintendent Glenn Miller,
officer in charge of the Central
Detective Unit.

The officers, who were not
injured in the shoot-out according
to reports, returned fire and hit
one of the men. He was taken

SEE page 11

Ura
insurance
executive shot
TUT

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A well-
known insurance executive
was shot and,robbed over
the weekend during an
armed robbery at his resi-
dence in Fortune Bay.

Colina Imperial CEO
Dashwell Flowers was
accosted by two gunmen as
he pulled into his garage
around 10.45pm on Satur-
day, a senior police official
reported.

Mr Flowers, 43, of Trea-
sure Cove, sustained a seri-
ous gunshot injury to the
shoulder. He was subse-
quently airlifted to New
Providence for treatment,
where he is currently listed

SEE page 11



act e at
VioneyBack
tela ds Fos 0)






PEE a EEO

Hassau: t 356.7764
Freeport: t 252 6676
Marsh Harbour: t 367.3735

= FIDELITY




tore than a Bank
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ae Ag fi).

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A Subsidiary of Sanpin Motors Ltd.

EVENT PROVIDES TOURISM BOOST FOR COUNTRY

More than 1,000 people
attend regional Rotary
conference in Bahamas

: es ee :
tet at Rt SI AEs





Peter Ramsay/BIS Photo

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham delivers the keynote address at the opening ceremony of Rotary Internation-
al’s Districts 7020 and 6930 Conference at the Atlantis Grand Ballroom, Paradise Island on Thursday, May 8.

lm By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN tourism got a
boost over the weekend as
almost 900 people came to the
Bahamas from Florida and the
Caribbean to take part in a
regional Rotary conference.

The 34th Annual Rotary Dis-
trict 7020 Conference drew
close to a total of 1,100 people,
including Bahamians and
regional Rotarians, to Atlantis
and Breezes between Thursday
and Sunday.

Lindsey Cancino, a past pres-
ident of the East Nassau Rotary
Club and current secrétary for
the 7020 district, described the
event as “hugely successful”
both for Rotary and for the
Bahamas.

With Rotary’s current Dis-
trict Governor for. the 7020

‘region being a Bahamian, Dick
McCombe, Mr Cancino said it is
traditional that the annual con-
ference would take place in the
governor’s home country.

He added that the location of

the conference played a big part
in its popularity. “Atlantis was a
big draw,” Said the past presi-
dent. ~

Combine this with the fact
that Rotary negotiated a deal
with Atlantis for its participants
— with rooms starting at $150 a
night — and the massive influx
of visitors can be put into con-
text.

According to Mr Cancino,
there were around 300 more
registrants for this year’s event
than any other previous confer-
ence for the district.

In addition, the large num-
ber of Rotaracters — younger
Rotarians aged between 18-26

years, who are less likely to —

have funds to spend on trips
abroad than their elder coun-
terparts — was an indication of
the conference’s popularity, he
claimed. The Rotaracters held
their conference at Breezes.
The 7020 district includes the
Bahamas, the Cayman islands,
Haiti, Jamaica, the US Virgin
islands, the British Virgin
islands, St Martin, St Marteen,
St Barthelemy and Anguilla.
Also present were around 100

_ Rotarians from the 6930 district

of southern Florida.

During the four-day meeting,
Rotary business was discussed
and newly elected members
were trained to handle their
new responsibilities.

Hundreds of members also
participated in a massive com-
munity service effort, helping
to landscape the Western
Esplanade on Saturday. —

“That was hugely successful,
we did about 85 per cent of the
work in one day,” said Mr Can-
cino, who added that besides
the work, it was also a chance to
“fellowship, make friends, and
have a bit of fun.”

Raymond Cushnie from
Providenciales described the
conference as “very interest-
ing.” ;

“It’s been good, good speak-
ers, good opportunity to fel-
lowship, make new friends, get
to know what other Rotarians
are doing in the region, build
alliances, (and ) maybe (find
people) to participate in differ-
ent projects in different
regions,” he said.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 3



Oo In brie |

Cashiers
accused of
Stealing over
$60,000

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Following a
month-long police investiga-
tion, five of six cashiers at City
Market were charged in
Freeport Magistrate's Court
for allegedly stealing over
$60,000 in cash.

Appearing before Magis.
trate Andrew Forbes were
Melissa Florence Laing, 26, of
No 1 Ringwood Drive; Leann
Elizabeth Seymour, 29, of Apt
1 Beachway Drive; Ghislene
Vilburn, 26, of No 70 Bayber-
ry Lane; Tina Strapp, 21, of
No 8B King Neptune Drive,
Seahorse Village; and Syman-
tha Pelara Jones, 19, of Hep-
burn Town, Eight Mile Rock.

A sixth cashier, who was off
the island, is expected to face
charges on Tuesday.

The women are accused of
stealing approximately $62,000
between early January and the
latter part of April.

The five defendants plead-
ed not guilty to stealing by rea-
son of employment. They were
represented by lawyers Simeon
Brown, Rufus Allen and K
Brian Hanna.

Magistrate Forbes

adjourned the matters to 8

November 4 for trial. The
women were each released on
$2,000 bail with one surety.

Immigrants
apprehended

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Another
group of illegal immigrants
were apprehended by police
on Abaco this week as they
awaited a boat captain who
had told them he would take
them to the United States.

The men were found when,
according to Chief Superin-

tendent Basil Rahming,, :

police were conducting a
search for four suspected ille-
gal Cuban immigrants in
South Abaco on May 6.

While searching at Sands
Cove area, which is just north
of Sandy-Point, officers went
on to find seven male
Dominican nationals hiding
in thick bushes.

The Dominicans told
police that they were left in
bushes without any food or
water by their boat captain,
who told them that he would
return the following day to
take them to Miami.

Mr Rahming said the men,
who are suspected of enter-
ing the Bahamas illegally,
were arrested and transport-
ed to Marsh Harbour.

They were turned over to
Bahamas Immigration offi-

cials,







Rotarians dig in to help
beautify Western Esplanade

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



HUNDREDS of Rotarians from across the
Caribbean and Florida got their hands dirty and put
their green thumbs to the test over the weekend,
beautifying the Western Esplanade.

With over one thousand Rotarians and Rotaracters
(young Rotarians) from the Bahamas,10 other
regional neighbours and Florida in Nassau for the
34th Annual Rotary District 7020 conference from
Thursday until Sunday, it was the ideal opportunity
for the members to engage in some mass communi-
ty service.

The Western Esplanade on West Bay Street has
been undergoing a major upgrade for the last five
weeks, under the guiding hand of Ed Fields, Kerzn-
er International’s public affairs directer, in conjunc-
tion with Rotary and the government.

Planting

As the hot sun scorched Nassau, Rotarians dug in
helping to complete the planting phase of the project.
New paved parking areas, trees, grass, benches,
garbage cans and beach-cleaning have either already
been completed or were set to be finished by the end
of the weekend.

Kerzner International has coordinated numerous
park beautification projects since 2000, including
Flamingo Gardens and Montagu Foreshore.

Mr Fields said of the project, which he estimated
would cost “several hundreds of thousands of dollars”
by the time it is ready: “I’ve always wanted to do
Western Esplanade. It’s the centrepiece of down-
town...thousands of people use this park. Now it’s
going to be arranged in an organised way.”

This weekend’s work benefitted from the experi- -

ence of the pan-Caribbean volunteers, many of whom
said that they had participated in beautification pro-
jects in their own countries.

Thirty-four-year-old Raymond Cushnie from Prov-
idenciales, Turks and Caicos, who was planting sea
grape trees, told The Tribune: “This,is the kind of
stuff we live for. All different aspects of helping the
community. I’m all for this kind of project.”

Jessie Daubahadour, part of a group of four young

Fashion Advice, Help
and Inspiration



A ROTARIAN prepares the ground for one of the
many sea grape plants that were ready to be placed
along the Esplanade.

rotaracters from St Martin who were raking the
beach, said of the shore clean-up: “It’s a nice project.
We live by tourism and we need to have, all the
Caribbean islands need to have, nice beaches for
the locals and the tourists.”

Meanwhile, Janet Johnson, a Bahamian rotarian
and employee of the Ministry of Tourism said she felt
the updgrade was “long overdue.”

“Tt’s a beautiful spot, right next to the cruise ships,
and obviously it’s somewhere where we would like to
have a showcase so we applaud all the groups that
have come together to put it together,” she said.

Bahamian rotaracter, Sheyna Sawyer, expressed
pride in having had so many people from across
the region cooperating to make the Bahamas better.

When the park is fully completed the Clipper
group, Bank of the Bahamas and the Nassau Palm
Resort will each contribute to the cost of its month-
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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE-DUPUCH, Kt, 0.8.2. KM, K.C.S5.G,,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Handling young sex offenders

COMMENTATORS on the recent sex scan-
dal in one of our private schools seem more
concerned about the failure of the school to
report the incident to the police than trying to
extricate our society from the sink hole of degra-
dation in which it and our children are now
mired.

The reality is that sexual activity is so preva-
lent in many of the schools that if every infrac-
tion were reported to the police, the force would
crack under the strain.

Several years ago one of our reporters won
the confidence of a small group of female stu-
dents.

She was introduced into a club where the
students talked freely of the sexual activities in
their school.

They talked of hard core sex, the details of
which we could not publish. Lesbianism was
also rampant.

The Tribune ran up the warning flag by pub-
lishing the story leaving out much of the
unsavoury details. Society blinked. Politicians
dismissed it. Instead they accused us of sensa-
tionalising a story to sell newspapers.

Whether an attempt was made behind the
scenes to find out if what we printed was true;
or, having discovered that the facts were even
worse than published, they tried to correct them,
we shall never know.

However, we'do know that nothing has
changed, Society is to blame.

What is going on in the schools today is just a
reflection of a violent, coarse society that has
been dumbed down to accommodate the lowest
denominator in our midst.

It is now time for someone to put on the
brakes.

Instead of calling in the police, the school,

parents and counsellors wrapped their arms
around the young offenders and tried to lead
them back to the moral high ground.

No police cell could mend such moral fences.

Several facts in the story, as told to the press,
were incorrect.

The students were caught in the sexual act
not on camera, but by a teacher who walked up
on them behind a school building during an
after-school function.

The boy is 17, the girl, 14, not 13 as reported.

The girl’s family was insistent that the matter
be taken no further — certainly not beyond
the confines of the school.

Both families, and the school, felt that more
good could be done to rehabilitate the young
offenders without a police presence. And so
the police were not called.

Children rights’ campaigner Clever Dun-

NOTICE

combe believed that the police should have
been called and action taken regardless of the
parents’ status.

“Would the same line be taken if this were
the son of a janitor or maid?” he asked.

The answer is obvious: “No, of course not.”

No janitor or maid’s son, in the same cir-
cumstances, would have made headlines as did
the politician’s son. What these young people in
privileged positions must understand is that “to
whom much is given much is expected.”
Because they have had better opportunities,
they are measured by a more severe yardstick,
and so, more is demanded of them. That is why
they make headlines and the gardener’s son
does not.

And if the maid or gardener’s son were sent
to reform school, it would have been because
they were unmanageable. Also their home envi-
ronment would have probably been such that it

would have been in their best interest to remove

them. But they would have gone quietly, not in
a blare of headlines.

However, in the present situation the two
young people now involved can be better reha-

bilitated at home with parents and counsellors. '

The object of the exercise — whether it be a
politician or a gardener’s son — is to rehabilitate
and heal, not to destroy.

The politician’ s son has not only been humil-

iated by headlines, but he has been stripped of

the high office he held in the school and will :

probably not be allowed to participate in grad-
uation ceremonies.
He is being punished to the fullest.

However, by the hints and whispers behind
the scenes, it has been suggested that because a
politician’s child is involved, the political oppo-
sition is now going to try to humiliate the father.

This would be a big mistake. In their midst
there are few of them whose private lives are
beyond reproach.

It would be a brave man among them who
would dare throw the first stone.

So we suggest that they — and those who are
so brazen in their sexual exploits — try to
reform their own lives and set a better example
for young people.

The young after all are only imitating their

_ macho elders.

And if pa, grandpa, and uncle think it so
smart, why shouldn’t they?

So rather then spewing forth more political
slime, they should go home, examine their own
consciences and mend their own fences.

The older generation must learn that “exam-
ple is the school of mankind” and young people
will learn from no other.

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NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH DATIS OF MARSH
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responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that



PRE-OWNED

We must resist
violation of our
imaginations

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WROTE in one of my first
columns for the Nassau
Guardian that exercising one’s
imagination in this country is
tantamount to heresy. The
imagination is the one place that
governments and churches (and
any other authority for that
matter) cannot control, and
therefore it is seen (and por-
trayed) as wild and dangerous
terrain. We have been trai: 2d
not to question authority, and
not to ‘story’, to tell lies, fic-
tions. We have been trained to
stay out of the mangrove
swamps of our imaginations, to
fear the monsters in the blue
holes, to keep to the shallows
and steer clear of the dark
brown and black patches of
water in our own psyches: all
the better to uphold the truths
already known, the status quo,
in which those with most kinds
of power are thoroughly invest-
ed.

When individuals step out of
line, or cross the line between
status quo and the unknown,
into the dangerous and wild
places of the imagination, we
tell them first they are abomi-
nations; we tell them they are of
the devil. We threaten them
with spiritual warfare, eternal

‘damnation and the like. When

that doesn’t work, when those

individuals do not cower in fear

for their souls, we send in back-
up: the physical forces of domi-
nation, in this case, the Royal
Bahamian Police Force.

The story is that two young

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



poets are being investigated by
the police because of their poet-
ry. When I learned of this, I was
shocked, and outraged. But the
shock was short-lived. I have
heard other stories: a young
woman is dragged naked from
her home by police; a young
woman is raped by a policeman
while in custody. It so happens
that both poets are female. Ina
patriarchy, every act of aggres-
sion against a woman by a male
in authority is calculated to con-
trol, to keep her in a place out-
side her imagination, in the
hopes that she may forget how
to get there. She may forget a
place called ‘imagination’ exists
at all. And without a way to get
to her imagination, there will
be no new ideas, and no agency
with which to live them.

Poet Audre Lorde, a first
generation Caribbean Ameri-
can, wrote once that “poetry is
not a luxury” precisely because
it has the power to give birth to
ideas so that they can be lived.
Poetry names those feelings that
our bodies know but have no
words for. Poetry is necessary
because it can turn feeling into
language and language into
action.

True rebellion does not come
in the form of guns, or physical
force, it comes in the shape of
ideas. Ideas cannot be killed.

And ideas are spawned in the
mangrove swamps of our imag-
inations. Poets, playwrights,
novelists, essayists, filmmakers,
visual artists of all kinds have
the power to spawn ideas. We
have the power to bring down
walls and governments. The
builders of both know this.

If Bahamian poets are under
investigation by police it is
because they are naming some-
thing which powers that be
would prefer remained
unnamed. And that is the
sacred task of poets. And, if the
police are investigating poets
and poetry, it is because they
can: we as a society have agreed
not to question authority, by
and large; not to make consis-
tent and sustained protests
against so many other kinds of
human rights violations; and not
to protect the spawning grounds
of our most delicate and valu-
able resources: physical and psy-
chic wetlands. The intrusion of
police into the poet’s work, into
the poem, is a serious human
rights violation. And it is our
sacred task as human beings
and poets to resist violation of
our bodies, our poems, and our
imaginations, by every means
possible. We have already been
too silent, too accommodating;
if we say nothing, do nothing,
then like frogs in water slowly
boiling, we will not understand
our fate until it is too late.

HELEN KLONARIS
Oakland, CA
May 8, 2008

Barack Obama - a symbol of
national unity and progress

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE present campaigning
of US presidential candidates
has garnered ‘much interest in
both the United States and
abroad. Needless to say, much
of the focus has been on the
race between Democratic
rivals Barack Obama and
Hillary Rodham Clinton.

In The Bahamas, the atten-
tion given to this particular
campaign is due to the
grounds gained and momen-
tum sustained by the Obama
team; in spite of various
bumps and distractions
encountered on the campaign
trail. This endearment is not
only that Barack Obama i a
member of America’s minori-
ty population; it is also his
style of an intelligent orator
as displayed at his support ral-



lies. Our admiration is also the
result of his demonstration of
sincere humility, broadmind-
edness and integrity.

His greatest asset is the
holding fast to a philosophy
that does not contribute to or
bolster America’s racial
divide. This fact has been a
major catalyst to the support
of his campaign that tran-
scends race, class and party.

As someone recently
described him, “....a black can-
didate without the in-your-
face insistent cry of griev-
ances.”

With the last point in mind,
it is obvious that Senator Oba-
ma’s greatest challenge is
bearing the burden and nega-
tive impact stemming from the
inflammatory, offensive, unpa-
triotic remarks of his former
pastor, Rev Dr Jeremiah
Wright. His recent comments
at The National Press Club in
Washington, made it very
clear that he does not care
about the damage he may
have caused, by not recanting
his infamous statements. The
Christian leader showed no
signs of humility or regret.

ideology of God’s kingdom.

As an Ambassador for
Christ, his focus should be
directed toward the salvation
of love as recorded in I John 4
vs 8 of the Holy Bible. In this
21st century, most US citizens
desire to advance and be
healed as a nation of their
oppressive past.

Barack Obama is a man to
be admired as he strives to ful-
fil the dream of Dr Martin
Luther King in uniting the
American people.

He himself is an embodi-
ment of the American Dream.
He is also an example of a
person not being judged by
the colour of their skin, but
by the content of their char-
acter. He has demonstrated
good character by which he
should be judged, and not, by
past association with his for-
mer pastor. It is noteworthy
to have a US presidential can-
didate who holds to the para-
digm of America’s first presi-
dent George Washington who
stated, “We were born to
unite with our fellow men, and
to join in community with the
human race.”

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PM recalls sacrifice of
Defence Force marines

Peter Ramsay/BIS Photo

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham delivered the keynote address and
unveiled the ceremonial plaque at the 28th Anniversary Commemorative
Service and Dedication of the HMBS Flamingo Memorial Park and Mon-
ument on Saturday.

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham conveyed his thanks on
behalf of the nation to the families of the four Defence Force
marines killed by Cuban fighter planes 28 years ago, at the
unveiling ceremony of a ceremonial plaque, monument and
memorial park in their honour over the weekend.

“I have no doubt that this memorial park and monument
will serve to remind countless future generations of the sac-
rifice made by four courageous colleagues and to highlight the
continued faithful service of the many who serve in this orga-
nization and our nation,” said Mr Ingraham on Saturday at the
Defence Force Base, Coral Harbour.

“It is my hope and expectation that Bahamians from all
walks of life, recalling these sacrifices will be inspired also to
serve our nation as productive, law-abiding and patriotic cit-
izens,” added Mr Ingraham.

On May 10, 1980, after intercepting two Cuban fishing
vessels near the Ragged Island Chain, Able Seaman Fenrick
Sturrup, Marine Seaman Austin Rudolph Smith, Marine Sea-
man David Allison Tucker and Marine Seaman Edward
Arnold Williams were killed when Cuban MIG jets fired
upon and sank HMBS Flamingo.

“T recall the day vividly,” said the prime minister during a
moment of reflection during his remarks. “The news from
Ragged Island revealed that one of our craft had been sunk by
military jets out of the Republic of Cuba. Four marines had
been lost, — the community at Ragged Island and The Bahamas
feared for what might happen next.” _~

“The incident served to unite us as a people and as a
nation. And it served to raise the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force in the esteem of all Bahamians,” said the prime minis-
ter.

Along with celebrating the memory of the four fallen
marines, Mr Ingraham pledged to ensure that the Force is able
to keep up the increased demand for its services across the
country in the years to come.

“I reiterate to you the commitment of the government to
support you in the execution of your national duty,” he said.
“We commit to continue to improve, upgrade and expand
the tools available to you in the performance of your duties.

“In this regard, we are now seeking proposals for the
upgrade and expansion of your fleet to take account of antic-
ipated needs up to 2014.

“The new craft to be acquired will expand and enhance
the capability of the Defence Force.”



LOCAL NEWS
STUDENTS HOPE TO STOP LARGE-SCALE FOOD WASTAGE IN THE BAHAMAS

Mission: Ending hunger

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A group of Bahamian univer-
sity students are on a mission to
make hunger and large-scale food
wastage a thing of the past in the
Bahamas. With growing pledged
support from huge corporate
donors, the group — A Little Help
From My Friends — is set to
make a big impact by putting
food that would otherwise be dis-
carded from major restaurants
and supermarkets into the hands
of under-privileged Bahamians.

The brainchild of Alanna
Rodgers, a 21-year-old Universi-
ty of Miami student, the not-for-
profit organisation is already very
well organised and gaining sup-
port locally and internationally.

They will run the Bahamas’
first “food rescue” programme,
collecting any perishable food
that restaurants and supermar-
kets located in New Providence
cannot sell for one reason or
another, but which is still edible,
and delivering to those who are
hungry.

“Right now we have our
donors set up, we have our recip-
ients set up...We want to be oper-
ational in June on some level,”
Ms Rodgers, also the project's
coordinator, told The Tribune.

. Before that happens a well-
established Canadian food res-
cue project, Second Harvest, will
soon travel to Nassau to help the
all-student team take the final

‘ steps to get the project off the

ground. At present the group has
commitments from Supervalue,
Starbucks, KFC, Burger King,

Quiznos, Johnny Rockets, Jam- .

ba Juice, Lucianos and Antho-
ny's Grill, among others, to make
available any products that they
cannot sell.

A network of volunteers will
be kept busy collecting the food
and delivering it to the immediate
recipients, the Red Cross, Salva-
tion Army, the All Saints Aids
Camp and Urban Renewal, along
with various churches that can
then host meals. The government
is also set to play a part, with min-

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ister of state for legal affairs
Desmond Bannister having met
with the group and agreeing to
introduce to parliament a “Good
Samaritan Law” which will help
ALHFMF attract greater spon-
sorship from corporate donors
who might ordinarily be scared
of the legal issues that might arise
from passing on the food that
they are not serving to their cus-
tomers directly.

Community

According to Ms Rodgers, the
inspiration to found an organisa-
tion like ALHFMF came about
during some time away from her
studies as she transferred colleges
in 2007. Realising her life was
“very one dimensional” at the
time, focusing on her studies and
college tennis, she wanted to do
more. “When I grew up I always
thought of community service as

being a noble pursuit but it was,

one of those things I felt like I
didn't have time for,” said Ms
Rodgers.

The student said she had ini-

o0999 9 8 © ©

Cushions

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 5

tially considered forming a NGO
with an environmental focus, but
quickly came to the conclusion
that it is hard to ask individuals
who have more pressing concerns
like where their next meal is
coming from — to care about
such issues. Ms Rodgers said that
while it is difficult to get hard fig-
ures of how many people are suf-
fering from hunger — the inabil-
ity to access enough food nutri-
ents they need for fully active and
productive lives — going into the
community and talking to people
has given the group an insight
into the extent of the problem.
“We don't have an epidemic
like Africa,” admits Ms Rodgers.
“One statistic that we know is
that 70 per cent of the people who
use emergency food services have
at least one member of their fam-
ily employed, so it's not like
they're sitting on the road beg-
ging, they are working, but maybe
the cheque didn't go far enough
to feed everyone,” she said.
Food shortages in the home
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said Ms Rodgers, particularly





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when it causes a child to go to
school on an empty stomach.

“When children are turning up
at school and they haven't eaten
anything, first of all they can’ t
be active learners. They're going
to be listless, and later on that
listlessness turns into violence,
hostility,” said Ms Rodgers.

With this in mind, one of
ALHFMF’s first objectives will
be to initiate a breakfast pro-
gramme in schools, along with
after-school and weekend snack
provisions aimed at tackling this
chronic concern.

Meanwhile, the group's first big
expense will be the acquisition of
a refrigerated truck to transport
their donated goods, and by the
end of the Summer, a full-time
driver.

They already have some pri-
vate sponsorship, but are looking
for more.

Anyone interested in support-
ing or volunteering with A Little
Help From My Friends is asked
to contact:

alanna.rodgers@gmail.com, or
visit www.helpfrommyfriends.org



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THE TRIBUNE



Pe a ee a eee
: _. Illegal immigration

tops list of concerns at
Exuma town meeting

SN

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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& By Llionella Gilbert
Bahamas Information
Services

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
— Illegal immigration topped the
list of concerns of Exuma resi-
dents and Cabinet Ministers
who attended a government
organised town meeting at St.
Andrews Community Centre
last week.

After their arrival the Minis-
ters and other senior govern-
ment and law enforcement offi-
cials got a first hand look at
Haitians squatting in the bushes
of Exuma.

The contingent included
Tourism and Aviation Minister
Neko Grant; Health and Social

‘Development Minister Dr

Hubert Minnis; Lands and Local
Government Minister Sidney
Collie; Works and Transport
Minister Earl Deveaux and
National Security Minister Tom-
my Turnquest.

Mr. Deveaux told residents
attending the town meeting that
what he saw in the bush alarmed
him. ;

He said that although there is
a need for labour in Exuma, the
residents there were “accom-
modating” something that is a
“serious detriment” to them.

“So my admonition to you is
to let us work together to
resolve this very serious prob-
lem,” Mr. Deveaux said.

“The problem I am talking
about is not a Haitian problem,
it is not a Jamaican problem, it is
not a Peruvian problem, it is not
a Cuban problem — the prob-
lem I am talking about is a
Bahamian problem.”

Immigration Minister Turn-

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mmy Turnquest

quest noted that presently
HMBS Yellow Elder is docked
at George Town dock and a
number of the commando
squadron are also on the island.

“They will do what they have
to do to eradicate what is in the
bush,” Mr. Turnquest said, “and
we (the government) will also
do what we have to do to stop
illegals working.”

Responding to concerns
about the small number of
immigration officers in Exuma,
the Minister told residents that
the officers were originally
placed there for border protec-
tion.

“But what Exuma has
become in terms of immigration
has expanded beyond border
protection and has expanded
into the apprehension and repa-
triation exercises like we have in
places like New Providence and
Grand Bahama.”

While the Department is

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looking for a solution, Mr. Turn-
quest said residents must come
forward if they have knowledge
of illegal immigrants working
for individuals or businesses.

He said it follows that some-
one must be hiring the illegal
immigrants otherwise they
would not be in Exuma.

“T want you to know that we
are going to step up our appre-
hension exercises to rid our-
selves of a large number of ille-
gals and we will also begin to
take action against employers.”

Mr. Turnquest spoke directly
to persons who pick up illegal
workers early in the morning to
take them to job sites.

“Please do not do so,” he -
warned. “You are likely to be
surprised and you do not want
that to happen to you; so you
cannot continue to do so.”

“I want to-make The
Bahamas’ position clear in
regard to immigrants,” he said.
“If there is a need for you as a
business to have foreign labour
and the request is reasonable
and the person is not a security
threat to The Bahamas, we are
likely to approve that request.

“But you are not to engage
someone, as an individual or as
a business that you do not have
a work permit for.

“Tt is against the law,” he
said, “for illegal immigrants to
be working here illegally; it is
also illegal for an employer to
hire someone illegally.”

Further the Minister
explained, “If John Joseph has a
work permit to work for Tom-
my Turnquest, Earl Deveaux
cannot take John Joseph to

work for him without permis-

sion. The Department of Immi-
gration is prepared to accept an
application jointly by' Tommy
Turnquest and Earl Deveaux

_for John Joseph if that is what

you want.

“You can apply together but
we do not expect persons to be
hiring illegal immigrants.”

~World Blood Donor Day

14th June 2008

Theme - “Giving Blood Regularly”

Ministry of Health and Social Development

Essay Competition

Topic: “Give Blood Regularl

-AnQO

Grand Prize: $200 - Plaqu e+ Publication of

Rules for submission:

Gm. Vp pp
ay 200
yf UnypyYyyy,

1. Essay Length: No more more than 1000 words.

2. Submit Essay as a Microsoft Word file (.doc) attachment to
whbddessay@hotmail.com

3.In the Subject line of the email.type “First Name Last Name
WBDD Essay Competition”

4. In the body of the e-mail, type your full name, telephone
number, school and grade

5. Essays can be submitted directly to the Ministry of Health
(National Blood Programme Office, Meeting St.)

For more information please
contact 502-4871.


THE TRIBUNE

| UESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 7





Hillary is showing
her true colours

il

eee

B@ By Sir Ronald
Sanders

I: is unlikely that by the
time this commentary is

read Hillary Clinton would have
conceded victory to Barack
Obama in the race for the US
presidential nomination of the
Democratic Party, even though
she should.

Mrs Clinton is no longer a
credible candidate.

The figures speak for them-
selves: Obama far outstrips her
in the popular vote.

He now leads her by an insur-
mountable 715,000. Obama has
1,840 delegates, Clinton has
1,688. The winner needs 2,025
and there is no way that Mrs
Clinton could overhaul Obama
in the remaining six contests
(five states and Puerto Rico)
which together will yield only
217 delegates, and from support
by the super delegates, only 269
of whom are uncommitted.

Obama needs only 30 per
cent of those votes to make him
the winner; Clinton requires 70
per cent. And, As the Los
Angeles Times editorialised:
“Even if Clinton were to win
every remaining state by a com-
fortable margin, she could not
amass enough delegates before
the convention to pass Obama.”

But, yet, she, is remaining in
the race and, in the process, cre-
’ ating fissures in the Democrat-

ic Party and giving ammunition
to the Republican candidate,
John McCain, to use against
Obama.

Only unremitting ambition
and an overwhelming desire for
power could now be driving
Mrs Clinton.

No greater testimony ,to this
unrelenting resolve could be

* needed than the fact that, while
donors have now abandoned
the financing of her campaign,
she has personally loaned it $6.4
million, added to an earlier sum
of $5 million that she and her
husband, former US President
Bill Clinton, made to it.

Whatever her motivation
now is, she is demonstrating an
almost vicious determination to
stay in the campaign to the end,
even though it will surely dam-
age the Democratic Party’s
struggle against a settled
Republican Party candidate.

In recent television interviews
she has appeared calculating,
even scheming.

When Obama’s views or
statements are put to her for
reaction, she seems intolerant,
bordering on irritated.

She seems to draw on great
reserves of forbearance just to
be civil when Obama’s name is
mentioned.

Yet, except in the minds of
the most die-hard supporters of
Mrs Clinton, there can be no
doubt that Obama has. beaten
her solidly. She can now count
only on the backing of less afflu-
ent and less educated white vot-
ers.

After her very poor showing
in North Carolina, where Oba-
ma won 56 per cent of the vote
to her 42 per cent, and her even
worse showing in Indiana where
she was expected to trounce
him decisively, the right thing
for Mrs Clinton to have done
was to concede graciously.

She didn’t. Instead two days
later, she played the race card.

Not enough attention was
paid by the mainstream media
in the US to the spin she put
on an Associated Press (AP)
exit poll of the North Carolina
and Indiana primaries. Accord-
ing to the poll, Clinton won
about 60 per cent of the white
vote in both states. Mrs Clinton
interpreted that to mean that
“white Americans” are turning
away from Obama.

She is reported to have told a

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reporter for the magazine, USA
Today: “J have a much broader
base to build a winning coali-
tion on.”

What she ignored was the fact
that since March 4 in Ohio,
where she won 65 per cent of
the white vote, her support
among whites has been declin-
ing. In Pennsylvania on April
22, she won 63 per cent of the
white vote, down to 60 per cent
in both North Carolina:and
Indiana on May 6.

She was bold, if economical
with the truth, by saying that
the AP poll “found how Sena-
tor Obama’s support among
hard-working Americans —
white Americans — is weakening
again and how whites in both
states who had not completed
college were supporting me.”

But, it was her last assertion
about the poll that showed Mrs
Clinton’s readiness to use race
to frighten Democrats into
handing her the presidential
nomination. She said: “These
(the whites who had not com-
pleted college) are the people
you have to win - if you’re a
Democrat - in-sufficient num-
bers to actually win the (Presi-
dential) election.”

When, in the past, Mrs Clin-
ton said that Obama was “une-
lectable”, commentators sug-
gested that she meant he was
inexperienced. In the context of
the white voters she claims to
represent, it looks as if she now
means he is also not white.

From the very beginning of
this campaign, when I wrote
two commentaries entitled No
Black in The White House, my
belief had been that race would
be used against Obama being
elected President of the Unit-

~ ed States.

But, I have to admit that
while I fully expected the
Republican campaign to whip
it up unmercifully if Obama
emerged as the Democratic
nominee, I did not expect it to
come from Hillary Clinton.
Certainly not after the almost
blind support that the black
American community gave to

iTunes

anniversary

Hillary Clinton

both she and her husband, not
only in his election as US Pres-
ident but also in the travails that
followed, especially over the
Monica Lewinski affair.

What has also been amazing
about the Clinton campaign is
that it has’ characterised Oba-
ma as having “elitist sensibili-
ties”. This was a turn-up for the
books — an African American
being elitist while the white
American candidate is not. My,
how times have changed.

Given all this, it looks as if
Hillary Clinton will prolong the
campaign for the Democratic
nomination to the bitter end.





A

‘or Dr.



That end will be one of two:
either when Obama gets to the
magic figure of 2,025 delegates,
or when the leadership of the
Democratic Party has enough
gumption to tell Mrs Clinton
that she has caused the candi-
dacy of the Democrats enough
harm, and she should withdraw
so that the Party could focus on

- John McCain.

e Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
Diplomat)





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To be held on T. Tiesilay May, 13th 2008 at 2pm at
NS Ebenezer Methodist Church, Shirley Street, Nassau

4

Dr. Paul Poad, a widely respected physician who practised
medicine in Nassau for almost 50 years, died at his home



in England on January 30th 2008 at the age of 89.

_Friends, colleagues and former patients are warmly invited
to attend a Memorial Service to give thanks for his life and
work, to be held on Tuesday March 13th 2008 at 2 p.m. at

Ebenezer Methodist Church, Shirley Street, Nassau.

iPhones



Dr. Poad was born on 26th November 1918 in Nassau,
where his father, the late Reverend Frank E. Poad was
Minister at Ebenezer Methodist Church. His mother was
the late Mrs. Olive G Poad (nee Higgs) of Harbour Island.
A younger brother Basil Poad was bern in

Harbour Island in 1922.

Dr. Poad was educated in India and trained as a doctor in
London. After qualifying in the early years of World War
II, he joined the Royal Navy as a Surgeon Lieutenant and
served in HMS Forrester and HMS Renown, including
_ action on North Atlantic and Russian convoys.

_ In 1947 Dr. Poad returned to the Bahamas and
established his office in Nassau. As a physician and
general surgeon he served the local community for almost
half a century. He retired in 1996. He will be remembered
not only as a doctor but as a sailor and yachtsman.

He was a member of the Royal Nassau Sailing Club, the
Bahamas Historical Society, the Humane Society and the
Bahamas Medical Association.

Dr. Poad is survived by his two sons Richard and Bill,
both resident in England, and by his daughter Ann. He is
_also survived by his grandchildren Clare, Sara, Jonathan
and Georgina, his great-grandchildren Alice, Lucy and
Sebastian. In accordance with his last wishes, his ashes.
will be scattered in the waters of the Bahamas.

Donations in memory of Dr. Poad may be made to BASRA
(Bahamas Air Sea Rescue), P.O.Box SS6247, Nassau.
No flowers please.

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<« & ~

Fraternities and sororities
compete in the ‘Stepping
on the Shores’ competition

ACTION from the weekend step event that took place at
Arawak Cay.

Fraternities and sororities from the US and the Bahamas were’
in competition.

Hundreds watched as the California Deltas (top) took top hon-
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(above) won in the male fraternity group.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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ARNOLD “CHIC” AGEEB
AUGUST 10TH 1933 - MAY 13TH 2006

HE WILL FOREVER LIVE IN OUR HEARTS &
MIND.
WE MISS YOU DADDY.

FOREVER LOVING YOU, YOUR WIFE,
CHILDREN, AND
GRANDCHILDREN



TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS



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LOCAL NEWS ‘

FROM page one

The survey, which intends
to assess investment trends in
the region, lists Jamaica,
Anguilla and St Lucia, trailed
by the Dominican Republic,
the Bahamas and Turks and
Caicos, as the Caribbean
countries which leading banks
in the region felt have the
greatest tourism growth
potential for 2008.

The Bahamas had previ-
ously topped the list in 2007,
with 50 per cent of respon-
dents stating that they
believed this country would
see the most expansion that
year.

Bahamas sees 18% drop
in foreign investment

This year, Jamaica was sin-
gled out for its ability to
attract European travellers, its
diversified economy, good air-
lift and low-cost carriers.
European tourists are said to
make longer visits and spend
more than visitors from else-
where.

KPMG’s prediction may be
considered less significant in

light of this year’s ECLAC
teport, which says that the
amount of investment coming
into the Bahamas in fact fell
from $706 in 2006 to $580 mil-
lion in 2007.

Its 18 per cent decline was
more than the investment
drop in Trinidad and Tobago
and Belize combined, but the
data also shows that it was

more than the annual average
for the 2002 -
$463 million.

The weakening happened
at a time when the Caribbean
as a whole was experiencing
a decline in investment, while
Latin America saw an
unprecedented boom.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar told The
Tribune that, while he had
some reservations about the
accuracy of the data obtained
by the ECLAC, noting that
the amount of FDI the report
said was coming into the
Bahamas in both 2006 and
2007 was smaller than he
would have expected
given the projects underway,
the fall-off is to be
expected.

“I think that you will con-

2007 period of

tinue to see a decrease in the
amount of foreign investment
primarily because our num-
bers are probably skewed by
the significant amount of
investment made by Kerzner
international,” he said.

“It will be trending down
because there’s no major sig-
nificant investment particu-
larly in our hotel sector on the
horizon,” he added.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance, also
questioned the figures pro-
vided in the ECLAC report
based on the amount of devel-
opment underway in the spec-
ified periods, but concluded
that the data provides a good
“approximate”
the Bahamas’ status.

He said that the difficulty

indication of

THE TRIBUNE 22%



international agencies have in ,3
accessing “timely and com- |
prehensive” data on the
Bahamas could have caused, ,
the Bahamas’ “position to be}
understated.” aie

However, he said that this,. j\,,
did not mean that the overall. :_
picture Was not “of any use.”* '§
He added that traditionally lit-
tle resources have been made
available to the Department )°"!
of Statistics to undertake
research,

“That position was changed ~
about three years ago and
hopefully, going forward there’ ~
should be improvements,” he
added.

The Tribune attempted to. 5.,;
reach minister of state for. ,,,/.
finance Zhivargo Laing but... j):5
was unsuccessful. fas

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FROM page one

up a fight between two groups of boys when he
was stabbed and killed.

The police officers who arrived at the scene
and fired the warning shots, reportedly appre-
hended several young men from the fight, who
were made to lie in the road near the hotel before
being taken into custody.

Davis’ body fell just in the middle of the path-
way leading to the beach with his right hand
clutched over his heart and his head turned to the
east.

Assistant Superintendent Joseph Feaste, officer
in charge at Paradise Island and Potter’s Cay,
confirmed that police have several people in cus-

tody for questioning at this time related to the,

incident, but-he was unable to comment further
on who these persons are.

People who knew Davis said he was on his way
to boarding school abroad, but instead, he too has
now been consumed by the brutality of an increas-
ingly violent Nassau.

Several tourists stood around the crime scene

A BALANCING ACT

“Buyers’ market.” “Sellers’ market.”
What does it all mean when you find
yourself ready to buy or sell a proper-
ty?

The basic concept behind a “buyers”
market” is that there are more proper-
ties for sale than there are buyers qual-
ified to make a purchase. This creates
increased competition among the sell-
ers for those fewer purchasers, and can
put the buyers in the “driver’s seat”
when it comes to negotiation.

It logically follows that a “sellers’
market” happens when there are more
prospective buyers than there are properties for
sale. Now it is the buyers who must compete against
each other for available properties, often to the
benefit of those who are selling.

The Bahamas has enjoyed a sellers’ market for the

last few years. This is largely due to the fact that

the





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Paradise Island murder.

curious about what happened, while others
attempted to battle through the yellow tape to
quickly get to their hotels, as dozens of armed offi- |
cers, some with automatic weapons, blocked off
the area. ~ oH
The violence did not stop here, however. As lag
police attempted to secure this scene, many of
them had to speed off to the other entrance to |
Cabbage Beach near the Paradise Island laun- ~
dry as another fight had broken out there. Cy
At the same time, a call could be heard on
police radios for assistance at Goodman’s Bay 3
as a disturbance was occurring there among.
beach-goers.
It is unclear if the brawl at the laundry was! '0

. related to the one that had left Davis dead. Mr! !!17

Feaste, when asked about this incident, said he’: '
had no information that he could report.
Davis’ body lay near the hotel for nearly three’ ! rid
hours yesterday, until shortly after 7pm when it»! |
was taken away in a hearse. (til

ee

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THE TRIBUNE



Man shot by police

FROM page one

into custody and detained at Princess Margaret Hospital.
Police dogs also had to be used to subdue the other, male, said

Mr Miller.

Two men are currently in police custody assisting with the inves-
tigation, Mr Miller confirmed. One of the men is said to be 18 years

old, and the other 17.

FROM page one

in stable condition at Doctors
Hospital.

Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming said police were
alerted to the crime scene
after receiving a call from a
neighbour who reported that
Mr Flowers had been robbed
and shot at his residence.

EMS personnel and a num-
ber of uniformed and plain-
clothes officers were dis-
patched to the scene in For-
tune Point in response to the
call.

On their arrival, officers
saw Mr Flowers bleeding and
suffering from a gunshot
wound to his left shoulder.

Mr Flowers told the offi-
cers that he arrived home
around 10.43pm and parked
his car inside the garage.

He said as he got out of his

Shot and robbed

appeared out of nowhere
and demanded money from
him.

Chief Supt Rahming said
that during a struggle with the
gunmen, Flowers received the
gun shot wound to the left
shoulder. He was then robbed
of a Motorola cellular phone
and an undetermined amount
of cash by the assailants.

Mr Flowers was taken to
the Rand Memorial Hospital
where he received emergency
medical treatment. However,
it was determined that due to
his injuries, he should be sent
to New Providence. He was
later airlifted around 6am on
Sunday to Doctors Hospital
in Nassau.

Chief Supt Rahming said
the Central Detective Unit

vehicle, two dark males armed

officers have launched an
with handguns suddenly

investigation into the incident.

Sea Hauler victims
FROM page one

The statement also noted that in addition to this offering, all
of the Sea Hauler victim’s “past and future medical expenses”
will be “paid by government at any government health facility.”

Those affected have been asked to come to the Ministry of
Labour and Maritime Affairs, located in the Post office building,
East Hill Street, to collect their money on May 14.

They are advised that each will have to provide proof of iden-
tity such as a passport, voter’s card or driver’s licence.

“Payments to the estate of deceased persons can be collected
by the legally appointed representatives or trustees,” added
the statement.

News that the government would soon be making the payment
was greeted by Sea Hauler victims last week with gratitude and
satisfaction.

Twenty-five people were injured and four people died during
the night time collison between the Sea Hauler and United Star
boats in August 2003.

The Sea Hauler was loaded with sleeping passengers and on
its way to the Cat Island regatta when the incident took place.

The FNM government maintains that none of its agencies
were in any way responsible for the accident, but stated last year
that it would intervene out of a “sense of fair play.”

The Sea Hauler victims’ fight for compensation, which now
continues against the owners of the boats involved, began short-
ly after the tragic crash, continuing throughout the PLP’s tenure
and well into the first year of the current government’s term in
office.

The Ingraham administration previously suggested that while
it was keen to help the victims from before the time it entered
office, the process was set back when it was met by a demand for
$12 million, which it was “not prepared to countenance,” short-
ly after its election victory.

TENDER NO. 665/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for :
CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE OF

ENGINES AND SURROUNDING AREAS

Clifton Pier Power Station
Nassau, Bahamas

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
from Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
19th May, 2008, 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation”
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Envelopes must be marked:
Tender No. 665/08 :
Engine Cleaning & Maintenance
of Surrounding Areas
Blue Hills Power Station
Nassau, Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such part of
any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary







Port Everglades to Nassau twice a week
from anywhere in the world

FROM page one

release over the weekend, in
response to Mr Grant’s remarks
recently in Exuma.

“It was with a degree of great
disbelief that I listened to the
comments of the minister of
tourism and aviation, Hon Neko
Grant at a recent town meeting in
Exuma, purportedly in response
to a question by an airport screen-
er as to why the salaries of air-
port screeners in Exuma had not
been paid by the Bahamas gov-
ernment,” she said.

These workers whose salaries
have recently been stopped,
explained the former minister,
were hired during her watch as
minister under delegated author-
ity, at which time, recommenda-
tions were made to have the offi-
cers appointed on a permanent
basis.

“They were so appointed, in
the first instance, to ensure the
deadline implemented by the
International Civil Aviation
Organization as to 100 per cent
screening at all international air-
ports was met in the Bahamas,”
she said. “I am advised that
despite that recommendation
being made more than two years
ago, these persons have yet to be
regularized.”

The appointment of the
screeners, as is the case with all
public servants, said Mrs Hanna-
Martin, is done under the super-
vision and advice of the Depart-
ment of Public Service in accor-
dance with the provisions of gen-
eral orders and the rules of the
Public Service.

“To claim that people were
brought into the public service
and paid from the public treasury
for more than two years ‘improp-
erly’ is obscene,” said Mrs Hanna-
Martin.

“The minister’s performance
in Exuma was an act of political
cowardice designed to disguise
his incompetence in the perfor-
mance of his duties in two critical
areas of national development,
tourism and aviation. He should
know by now that the Bahamian
people will not be satisfied with
excuses and scapegoating and
expect duly appointed ministers

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to carry out their duties without
ducking and diving.”

A source close to the issue.
who did not wish to be named.
told The Tribune yesterday that
of the 15 to 16 screeners in Exu-
ma. the pay issue is a problem
particularly with seven to 10 of
the screeners.

The emplovees are irregularly
paid, said the source. At month’s
end when salaries are due. the
workers are paid sometimes two
or three days after they should
be: or in some cases, the delays
stretch to a week or longer.

The current delay that has
caused upset among staff, the
source said, occurred when
screeners Were not paid for two
weeks after they should have
been. They finally received this
money last Friday, said the
source.

“This is very, very difficult for
people who have bills to pay.”
The Tribune was told. “The prob-
lem is made worse with the high
cost of living and the high gas
prices.”

Along with the irregular pay-
ments, some screeners in Exuma
are reportedly owed as much as
10 months of overtime, the source
said. And, the problem of owed
overtime reportedly extends
beyond Exuma to other screeners
in islands such as Long Island.

Mrs Hanna-Martin called on
Mr Grant to explain to the
screeners why, after he has been
in office for more that a year,
these persons have not yet been
regularized; and further, why they
are not now being paid.

“These people should have,
by now, been regularized by the
Bahamas government and they
ought to be paid,” she said. “I call
on Minister Grant to forthwith
apologize to the Exuma airport
screeners, to the people of Exuma
and Bahamians generally for his
lack of forthrightness.”

When contacted yesterday Mr
Grant said that he had not yet
read Mrs Hanna-Martin’s com-
ments. But upon doing so, he said
that he intends to respond on the
issue.

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Areas of knowledge and proficiency will
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THE TRIBUNE

The Westin supports the Grand
Bahama Heritage Foundation

Public invited to view sculptures of first settlers of Freetown

THE Grand Bahama Heritage
Foundation in conjunction with
the Westin Hotel at Our Lucaya
has invited the public to view the
Sacred Women, a sculptural rep-
resentation of the first settlers of
Freetown, by Bahamian artist
Antonius Roberts.

This collection of 12 statuesque
women, carved from indigenous
Bahamian trees, will be on dis-
play in the lobby of the Manor
House until they are moved into
their new home at The Heritage
Museum and Gallery.

That location will be
announced later this year.

Representative of The Her-
itage’s vision, “to use art as a win-
dow into our past”, the use of
indigenous trees and the repre-
sentation of the freed slaves from

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Freetown, connect the present

‘with the past. Through this medi-

um of sculpture, Mr Roberts has
created the opportunity to dis-
cuss the difficult topic of slavery
and its connection to Grand
Bahama. “Through sculptures,
paintings, mixed and new media
and performances, it (art) offers a
society much needed reliquary
objects, mediums and rituals that

allow a people the possibility of —

conscious recognition and regen-
eration,” said Erica James, Direc-
tor of the National Art Gallery
of the Bahamas, during the Her-
itage’s sponsored show, “Free-
dom Call.”

Mr Roberts says of Sacred
Women, “My sculptures are
inspired by an ancestral urge to
conserve that which we destroy
or discard in the name of
progress.

It is my intent through this
process, to-present conceptual
proposals, which suggest issues
of identity and respect for
nature.”

The new Heritage Museum
and Gallery will bring artists and
historians together to create exhi-
bitions reflecting the historical
and cultural aspects of Grand
Bahama.

Artists in Residence pro-
grammes, workshops and film will
contribute to the exhibits.

f . SF A N |
%\ < \ = Ne we



HOTO: Chantal Bethel

P



LAURIE TUCHEL, co-chair of the Grand Bahama Heritage Foundation,
stands next to the life size Sacred Women sculptures with the artist,
sculptor, Antonius Roberts in the Manor House lobby of The Westin
ee the carvings will remain until the Heritage Museum is com-
pleted.



RELIGIOUS and community leaders paid a courtesy call on Governor General Arthur Hanna on Wednesday,





BIS PHOTO: Raymond A Behtel



May 7, at Government House. Seated from left are Dean Wells, Bishop Simeon Hall, Governor General Han-
na, Debbie Bartlett, and Member of Parliament Picewell Forbes. Standing from left are Jerome Gomez, Ron-
nie Armbrister, Pastor Lyall Bethel, Rhinehart Pearson and Pastor Geoffrey Wood.





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Diabetic Association monthly meeting

THE Bahamas Diabetic Association will hold its monthly meet-
ing starting at 2.30pm at the Nurses Training Centre in Grosvenor
Close off Shirley Street on Saturday, May 17. The guest speaker is
Dr. Graham Cates.

Members and interested persons of the public are invited to
attend. Light refreshments will be served following the meeting.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award. If so,
call us on 322-1986 and share
your story.















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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



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BREATHTAKING ocean
views, ultra-luxurious accom-
modations and hospitable world
class service awaited members
of Atlantis’ Priority Club as
they recently toured hotel mag-
nate Sol Kerzner’s 600-room all-
suite resort, The Cove Atlantis
along with Dolphin Cay at
Atlantis. The all-suite resort,
which recently celebrated its
first year anniversary, is a major
component of Kerzner Interna-
tional’s over $1 billion Phase III
Development.

Leading the familiarisation
tour was Karen Cargill, Nation-
al Sales Manager at Kerzner
International, who heads the
Priority Club. Following the
tour the group, which included
representatives from Credit
Suisse, RMF Investment Man-
agement Branch and Agrolimen
South America, were hosted to
a lunch at Mosaic at The Cove
as well as presented with gifts
for their outstanding contribu-
tions during the first quarter of
2008.

_ The Priority Club is a corpo-
rate service club, administered
by Kerzner International’s Sales
and Marketing Department.
Club members receive points
for booking rooms and food
and beverage events with
Atlantis, The Cove Atlantis and
One&Only Ocean Club. The
points can be redeemed for
accommodations along with
food and beverage privileges at
‘any of Kerzner’s Bahamian
properties.
“ “Any opportunity which we
have to showcase Atlantis along
~with any of Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Paradise Island based
propertiesis indeed an honour,”
Ms Cargill commented. “Our







rear of Pre-ov

Ppa pertennesrdenrwostonavedh



EDUCATION Minister Carl Bethel
greets R M Bailey Senior High
School students at the school’s
Career’s Fest Day, entitled “Career



8.. Representatives from various

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_ Fax:325-0883







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tour Kerzner’s 600-room all-
suite resort, The Cove Atlantis



"PHOTO: Tim Aylen

KERZNER INTERNATIONAL’S National Sales Manager, Karen Cargill pic-
tured at centre recently hosted members of the resort’s Priority Club to a

familiarisation tour and special recognition luncheon at The Cove. Pictured —

from left to right are Tanya Stubbs, Kerzner International’s Sales Admin-
istrator, Denise Knowles, RMF Investment Management Branch, Karen,
Catherine Wallas of Credit Suisse and Cindy Rolle of Agrolimen South

America.

Priority Club members have
played a significant role in part-
nering with us over the years,
in allowing their corporate
clients to enjoy and experience
Atlantis along with Kerzner’s
Paradise Island based resorts,
and this familiarisation tour and
special luncheon is just our way
of saying a special thank you to
our club members.”

RMF Investment Manage-

ment Branch has been a long-

standing member of Atlantis’
Priority Club. Speaking on
behalf of the company, Denise
Knowles said the company
enjoys being a member of
Atlantis’ Priority Club because
the resort’s employees always
go above and beyond their
expectations to ensure that their
special customers feel at home.

Minister greets Bailey students



“They are always helpful. They
know when our people (clients)
are coming as well as they make

it a point to know their

names...It’s just wonderful.”

Catherine Wallas of Credit
Suisse Nassau Branch said that
her company has been a mem-
ber of Atlantis’ Priority Club
for over four years. “They (The
Priority Club) have always been
very helpful when we had guests
staying here. It was so nice to
see the rooms and the dol-
phins...It is very beautiful over
here,” she said.

Echoing similar comments
was Cindy Rolle of Agrolimen
South America. “...It was
something I hadn’t imagined,
the atmosphere, the experience
at Dolphin Cay and...the rooms
are very lovely,” she agreed.

TENDER NO. 664/08

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for
CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE OF
ENGINES AND SURROUNDING AREAS
Blue Hills Power Station

Nassau, Bahamas.

Bidders are required to collect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
from Mrs. Deimeta Seymour
Telephone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be délivered on or before
19th May, 2008, 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Envelopes must be marked:
Tender No. 664/08
Engine Cleaning & Maintenance
of Surrounding Areas
Blue Hills Power Station
Nassau, Bahamas

The Corporation reserves the right to
accept or reject the whole or such part of
any Tender the Corporation
deems necessary.



A the
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 15

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE









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SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Securities Industry
Act ‘unlikely’ to make
Parliament by year-end

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE reformed Securities
Industry Act 2008 is unlikely to
reach Parliament’s legislative
agenda before year-end, The
Tribune has learnt, the Securi-
ties Commission’s executive
director admitting that the pri-
vate sector was “not very com-
fortable” in reviewing the Act
without the accompanying reg-
ulations.

While declining to comment
on whether the revised Act,
which would regulate the
Bahamian capital markets,
would reach the Cabinet and
Parliamentary legislative agen-
das this year, Hillary Deveaux
said the regulations were likely
to be released for industry con-
sultation between the third
quarter end and 2008 year-end.

Mr Deveaux, though, con-
firmed that the Bahamian capi-
tal markets industry was “not
very comfortable” in reviewing
the revised Securities Industry
Act without seeing the accom-
panying regulations.

The Act was released for

* Private sector
‘uncomfortable’
reviewing law without
accompanying regulations
* Consultation extended,
with regulations
set for release between
‘end-Q3 and end-Q4’
industry consultation at the end
of January 2008, without the
regulations. The plan was to

draft the regulations in ‘parallel’
with the Act’s review, leading

. some to argue that the Govern-

ment and Securities Commis-
sion were looking for the indus-
try to draft the regulations for
them.

While the Act sets out the
legal parameters and frame-
work for oversight, it is the
accompanying regulations that

give it enforcement teeth. With--
out the latter, the Act cannot :

be implemented and brought

SEE page 12B

Corporation needs ‘at least’
$200m to hit long-term targets

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Water and Sewerage
Corporation will need at least
$200 million to achieve its long-
term objectives and targets, its
general manager revealed,
adding that with inflation, this
figure could reach as high as
$765 million.

Godfrey Sherman told per-
sons attending a College of the
Bahamas (COB) water seminar
that the Corporation spent
about $50 million a year, but
only collected about $40 mil-
lion in revenues, thus making it
heavily reliant on government
subsidies to bridge that $10 mil-
lion-plus deficit.

Mr Sherman said the $200
million investment needed by
the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration would increase to $300
million if left for another five
years, and could ultimately

: s
Ri

Figure could rise to
$300m after five years,
maybe up to $765m,
due to inflation

extend to about $765 million
due to inflation and inaction.

“The longer you take, the
more it will cost,” Mr Sherman
said, acknowledging that the
Government needed to pass
further legislation to help the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
achieve its objectives.

“If we are going to play the
same game at least let’s be on
the same playing field,” Mr
Sherman added. He said that
like every Bahamian resident
and business, rising costs have
affected the Corporation as
well, particularly given that con-
sumer bills do not necessarily
reflect the cost of water services.

SEE page 4B

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Port ‘due diligence’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

utchison Whampoa is “ready
to commence its due dili-
gence” on the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and its affiliates, having signed an
agreement to acquire the late Edward St

- George estate’s stake in their holding com-
pany, court documents have revealed.
’ An affidavit filed last week on behalf .

of Robert Lotmore, Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) managing director, recounted

Sir Albert threat to ‘throw in towel’
and leave over chairman impasse

versation he had with Chris Gray, the
Freeport Container Port (FCP) chief exec-
utive who has been acting as the Bahamas-

based ‘point man’ for Hutchison Wham- -

poa in its attempt to acquire the GBPA.

“On April 29, 2008, I spoke’by tele-:,
phone with Chris Gray, the chief executive —
of Freeport Container Port, one of the: ©
’ Hutchison companies, during which con-

versation he said that Hutchison has an
agreement to acquire the shares of the St .
George estate in Intercontinental Diver-
sified Corporation,” Mr Lotmore alleged.
The latter company, known as IDC, is
the immediate pulding company that owns

“SEE page 12B



an alleged April 29, 2008, telephone con-

‘Fantastic’ venture a midis

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

‘A WASTE recycling joint
venture is “fantastic” for New
Providence and represents “a
more progressive way of plan-
ning and executing”, a senior
executive from one of its
shareholders told The Tribune.

T. Rhys Duggan, New Proy-
idence Development Compa-
ny’s president and chief exec-
utive, said Green Systems,
which is located just south of
the Airport Industrial Park,
was producing compost, top
soil and mulch from green
waste and pallets brought to

its facility from-throughout——
. western.New, Providence. :
Describing the tipping fees

for businesses and residents as

“reasonable” to encourage
them to use the facility, Mr

Duggan told The Tribune: “I

think it’s fantastic for the

island. We collect the green:

waste and put it through the
mulcher to become compost,
or mixing it with soil to
become top soil.

“We don’t make any money,
out of it yet, but it’s a fantastic ,
thing to do. It’s a more pro--

gressive way of doing things,
planning and executing.”
Green Systems also pro-
duces mulch from the waste
pallets sourced from the
Tonique Williams-Darling

Highway landfill and, else-
where across New Providence.
,, Apart from New Providence

Development’ Company,
which provided the land for

‘progressive way of planning’

the venture, the ores dares
holders include BISX-listed
Bahamas Waste, which has a

19 pet cent stake; Ginny McK-.
inney’s Waste Not; and Robin.

‘Myers of Caribbean Land-

-.scaping.

Given. that
Waste’s 19 per cent stake was
initially valued at $100,574,

according to the company’s

2007 annual report, it appears
that Green Systems was start-
ed with initial shareholder cap-
ital of just over $502,000.
Bahamas Waste said its
share of Green Systems’ prof-
its was just over $5,295 for the
year ended December 31,

=DOOF, neatn “Tdicating that — i

SEE page 8B.

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





On



BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
; SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
@ By Royal Fidelity Capital Freeport Concrete Compa- at $0.014, an increase of 0.08 per cent to $72.9 million, com- AML $1.95 $- 200 17.47%
Markets ny (FCC) was this week's mar- _ per cent from $0.013. pared to $56 million in the BBL $0.90 $- 0 5.88%
ket loser, with 2,500 of its Total assets and liabilities 2007 first quarter. BOB $9.61 $- 0 0.00 %
TRADING momentum shares trading, declining by stood at $238 million and $204 Offering Notice: _ BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00 %
increased slightly in the $0.05 to end the week atanew __ million respectively, compared ROYAL Fidelity Bahamas BSL $14.60 $- 0 0.00 %
Bahamian stock market last 52-week low of $0.45. to $224 million and $191 mil- International Investment | BWL $3.50 $- , 0 -4.37 %
week, with investors trading in lion at year-end 2007. Fund - Equities Sub Fund is _ CAB $14.00 - $+0.20 3,000 16.18%
eight out of the 19 listed COMPANY NEWS ¢ CABLE Bahamas (CAB) currently open for subscrip- —CBL $7.08 $-0.02 40,090 16.01%
stocks. A total of 55,170 Earnings Releases: released its unaudited finan- tion until May 15, 2008. | CHL $2.87 $- 2,280 ~8.89%
shares changed hands, an ¢ FIDELITY Bank cial results for the quarter The fund provides investors CIB $13.24 $- 0 -9.32%
increase of 116.8 per cent (Bahamas) (FBB) released its ending March 31, 2008. with access to the best-per- _CWCB $4.29 $-0.37 0 -14.80%
compared to last week's trad- —_ un-audited financial results for Net income increased by forming international markets, DHS $3.00 $- 0 27.66%
ing volume of 25,448 shares. the quarter ending March 31, 10.9 per cent to $5.5 million, and the ability to diversify | FAM $8.00 $- 0 11.11%
Cable Bahamas (CAB) led 2008. FBB reported net compared to $4.9 million in one's portfolio by investing _ FBB $2.39 $- 0- -9.81%
the advance for a second con- income of $390,000, an the 2007 first quarter. Net Bahamian dollars in interna- | FCC $0.45 $-0.05 2,500 -41.56%
secutive week, with 3,000 increase of 26.3 per cent com- income per ordinary share tional equity securities with- FCL $5.45 $+0.13 5,500 5.21%
shares trading, climbing by pared to $309,000 for the same _ stood at $0.28, up 12 per cent out paying any investment | FIN $12.50 $- 1,000 -3.47%
$0.20 or 1.4 per cent to end period in 2007. from $0.25 for the 2007 first premium. ICD $6.79 $- 0 “6.34%
the week at a new 52-week For the three months ending —_ quarter. Offering Notice - JSJ $12.30 $- 600 11.82%
high of $14. March 31, 2008, interest CAB reported revenues . Continued PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
Commonwealth Bank income rose by 47 per cent to $20 million, an increase of $1.9 FOCOL Holdings (FCL
(CBL) led the volume for $4 million , onitared to $2.7 million or 10.6 per cent from announced it will be extending DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES: ea |
another week with 40,090 million forthe same periodin $18.1 millionin 2007. Operat- _ the deadline on its private ¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) has declared a dividend of $0.03 _
shares trading, decreasing by 2007. ing income of $7.2 million placement offering to cover per share, payable on May 13, 2008, to all shareholders of |
$0.02 to end the week at $7.08. Net interest income climbed by $947,000 or 15.12 the next six months. The pre- record date April 30, 2008. ee |
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) fol- increased by 9.5 per cent to per cent, from $6.2 million in ferred shares will be paying a ¢ Bahamas Waste (BWL) announced it will be holding its _
lowed with 5,500 shares, $1.8 million, compared to $1.7 2007. dividend rate of prime + 1.75 Annual General Meeting on May 22, 2008, at 6pm at the
climbing by $0.13 to close at million in the 2007 first quar- Retained earnings at the per cent, payable semi-annual- = National Tennis Centre, Nassau, Bahamas. |

$5.45.



ter. Earnings per share stood

end of the period rose by 29.8

on new
annuities
during the
month of May!

ly.





The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 901.89 (-5.27%) YTD



Public Utilities Commission

JOB OPPORTUNITY

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) has been established by statute
for the regulation of the telecommunications, electricity and water and
sewerage sectors in The Bahamas.

\

The PUC is seeking a utility regulatory professional with training and
experience, particularly in the field of telecommunications regulation, to
fill the position of Executive Director.

The Executive Director is the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission
reporting to the Chairman, and is responsible for the day-to-day
administration of the affairs of the Commission and for ensuring that the
Commission is provided with high quality technical advice and guidance
in the execution of its functions. .

The successful candidate will be required to provide leadership and ‘
management direction to the PUC. The candidate will also be a high-
level practitioner with direct experience in a wide variety of utility
regulatory activities including liberalization(especially with respect to
telecommunications) granting of licences, approval of rates, service quality,
licence enforcement measures, universal service policies, radio spectrum
management, and international best practices. This post will be offered

on a contract basis.

The successful applicant will have a Master’s Degree or Professional
Certification in Economics, Management, Law or Engineering and is
expected to have had ten (10) years practice as a trained regulator.

The PUC offers a very attractive remuneration and benefits package
together with a pleasant working environment. Further information about
the PUC can be obtained from the website: www. PUCBahamas.gov.bs

Interested applicants may deliver resumes to:

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3095 Abaco 242-367-6501 : . ; ie soe
Executive Director, Public Utilities Commission

4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue
Fax No. (242) 323-7288
E-mail: PUC@puchahamas.gov.bs

FiN AN CEA

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 3B





Bank worker’s prosecution To ativertise, call 302-2371

over alleged $130k theft
was ‘severely hampered’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE prosecution of a former
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional executive for allegedly
stealing $130,000 from the bank
was “severely hampered” by
errors made by the presiding
magistrate, the Court of Appeal
finding that there was a “prima
facie case” against the accused.

Saying that its comments had
to be brief because it was remit-
ting the case against Terry Mur-
ray to another magistrate, the
Court of Appeal said in its judg-
ment that the original magis-
trate to hear the case, Marilyn
Meeres, who was now a
Supreme Court deputy regis-
trar, effectively “restricted” the
evidence placed before the
court by the prosecution.

The Court of Appeal judg-’

ment, delivered by Justice Hart-
man Longley, and with which
Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer and Justice
Ganpatsingh agreed, recalled
that Murray, in his employment
at Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national, had been accused of
14 counts of stealing totaling
$130,000.

This sum was allegedly
“made up of 13 or 14 drafts
issued without payment at his
[Murray’s] order, either to him-
self or his siblings. It was alleged
that [Murray] had confessed to
the theft, which he claimed: to
have committed out of frustra-
tion”.

At the original trial before

then-Magistrate Meeres, two
prosecution witnesses were
called to give evidence. The first
was the Bank of the Bahamas
International customer service
representative who allegedly
prepared the bank drafts in
question.

However, the judgment noted
she “could not recall the spe-
cific details of all the drafts that
she had prepared for or on
behalf of [Murray], but she gave
evidence that she had made a
record of each transaction,
which she entered in the daily
logs of the bank, and had either
signed or initialed each entry”.

The Court of Appeal judg-
ment said the witness told the
court she could identify the log
entries from her signature, but
then-Magistrate Meeres refused
permission for her to refresh
her memory about the drafts
she had prepared.

As a result, the customer ser-
vice representative said she
could only recall one draft for
$9,500, which was the subject
of one charge and entered into
evidence after she identified it.

The Court of Appeal found
there was “no justifiable rea-
son” for not allowing the wit-
ness to refresh her memory, as
the application for her to do so
from the bank’s entry logs was

“properly grounded” and
allowed under two sections of
the Evidence Act.

The second witness, the
Court of Appeal judgment
recorded, was Bank of the
Bahamas International’s inter-

nal auditor, who was called to
provide the findings of his inves-
tigation into the alleged
$130,000 theft.

“However, for reasons not
quite apparent from the record,
the learned Magistrate refused
to permit the witness to give
evidence of the entirety of his
investigation and findings, and
limited him to the one draft
which the customer service rep-
resentative was able to identify,
and for which he said he could
find no record of a payment,”
the Court of Appeal found.

“It is difficult to understand
why. the internal auditor’s evi-
dence was so restricted by the
magistrate. All evidence which
is logically relevant is legally
admissible unless excluded by
one of the exclusionary rules.
No basis for the exclusion of his
evidence was put before us, and
none appears on the record.

“It therefore transpired that
because of the aforementioned
material errors, the prosecution
was severely hampered in the
presentation of its case, so that
at its close it conceded that
there was evidence relating to
only one charge.”

As a result, Murray’s attor-
ney, Murrio Ducille, submitted
that there was no case for his
client to answer. Ultimately,
then-Magistrate Meeres ruled
that the prosecution had to
prove its case beyond reason-
able doubt and had not done
so, discharging Murray.

This, the Court of Appeal
said, was “clearly an error”, as

TREASURY MANAGEMENT
INTERNAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING MANAGER

Bahamian Subsidiary of International Company seeks an Internal Control
and Accounting Manager for its Treasury Investment Operations based in

Nassau.

Responsibilities

* Design and implement internal control and accounting procedures, in
accordance with the company standards.

- Assess and monitor business risks and controls continuously.

* Supervise the accounting function; prepare monthly accounts statements

and reports to the General Manager.

* Implement control for day-to-day investment operations.

* Monitoring of various investments limits (notional, counterparty, VaR, stop
loss, etc.) in accordance with investment policy.
* Design and implement cash flows model and estimates.

* Support for the General Manager in the analysis of investments and |
performance measurement.

* Evaluate the risk in investments vehicles (international and emerging

markets)

* Substitute for the General Manager as required.
* Manage special projects as required.
* Support internal and external auditors during their periodic reviews.

Profile



¢ Degree in business administration, accounting or similar.
* Strong expertise in internal control (implementation of COSO model) and
audit, CIA certification preferred.
+ 5+ years international experience in risk management/audit in a treasury
and investment environment, including risk measurement (VaR, stress test)
and valuation of financial instruments.
* Knowledge of treasury and investments processes, from and accounting
and control standpoint.
* French written and spoken (required), Spanish written and spoken

(desirable).

+ International experience in financial services auditing at management level.
* Excellent experience with banks and or private company.
* Strong financial, analytical and methodical skills.

Benefits

Competitive salary commensurate with banks and or private company.

Medical insurance and pension scheme.

Apply in confidence to:

Treasury Vacancy
P.O. Box N-4875
Nassau, The Bahamas

Deadline for Application 30th May, 2008.

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the prosecution needed to pro-
vide only a prima facie case
against Murray at that stage in
the trial.

“We would say there is evi-
dence which is capable of
amounting to a prima facie case,
particularly in view of the fact
that [Murray] had allegedly con-
fessed to stealing some $130,000
from the bank,” the Court of
Appeal found.

“That, together with the fact
that funds from the draft iden-
tified by the customer service
representative, amounting to
some $9,500, were deposited to
the account of [Murray] at FIN-
CO, and no record for payment
of that draft could be found at
the bank, it was on the evidence
open to the court to find a pri-
ma facie case on the one
remaining charge.”

TST

For the stories

Ta UTE
rR
TT EES





Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd

NOTICE OF
_ ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND
CALL AS PER THE CO-OPERATIVE
-ACT 2005 SECTION 22

The 23" Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Ltd will
be held on

Saturday, May 24", 2008

at
9:00 am
at MN ARSE S
Holy Trinity Activities Centre
Trinity Way >
Stapledon Gardens



Refreshments will be provided



BIMINI B

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North
end of North Bimini, Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on
over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for
anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the
most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd.
owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

CAREER OUONUNIET

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a eaoaat individual

for the following SELES)

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

This individual will be responsible to plan, direct, and ‘erie the ©
provision of accurate, timely, and objective financial data. from





which informed management decisions can be made. Recommend

remedial action when and where necessary. Safeguard owner assets

_ by creating and mainiaining sound internal control systems. Hire the

most professional, service-oriented, dedicated highly skilled, trained

staff available. Participate in total hotel management asa member of
the hotel’s Executive Committee.

FERRY CAPTAIN

This individual will be responsible to transport associates to and from the -
Bimini Bay in a safe and efficient manner, following the stipulated ferry
schedule. Maintaining vessel's log book and the smooth operation of
the vessel, i.e., servicing, cleaning and reporting any incidents.
A/B Captain's License required

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation.
For full consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of

their resumé to the attention of

MANAGER OF HUMAN RESOURCES

at gbullard@biminibayresort.com
or fax to (242) 347.2312



Perry ee Re eae aed
with the confidence of cash

pam Sh Ad
3238-15653

2A Dewagard Piaza Madeira Street


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



)
l

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER NATHANIEL SMITH Late of High
Tree Estates, Carmichael Road in the Southern District of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

DECEASED

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having a claim against the above Estate
are required to send such clatms duly certified in writting to the undersigned on
or before the 28th May A.D., 2008 after which date the Executor of the Estate
will proceed to distribute the assets having regard to only those claims of which
he had notice.

Williams & Williams
Chambers

33 Pinedale Street
PO. Box N-7421
Nassau, Bahamas



¥ ‘
NAD
Nosseu Alper

~ REQUEST

FOR PROPOSALS

NASSAU AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LPIA -
EXPANSION PROJECT

Request for proposal D-107 IT consultant- design & construction administration
‘services.

NAD is seeking IT design and construction administration services from
qualified IT Consultants for the LPIA Expansion Project. The scope of work
includes: : ;

“Meeting with all stakeholders and preparing a design requirement
report;
Preparing technical specifications and drawings for the IT component of
the Project; :
Providing administrative and inspection services during construction;
and
System commissioning and training.

.. Qualifications: :
e Consultant should be familiar with Airport Operations Database Systems
~ (AODB) and the integration of security systems, FIDS / BIDS, baggage
control and monitoring, fire and alarm, access control, CCTV and
building systems monitoring;
Good communication, reporting and tracking procedures; and
Adesign quality control program.



MR. GODFREY SHERMAN
General Manager,

Water and Sewerage Corporation
Godfrey Sherman, General Manager of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation is a fully
qualified civil engineer with over fifteen years

Mr. Sherman is especially known for his





experience at the level of senior management.

Corporation needs ‘at least’
$200m to hit long-term targets

FROM page 1B

“On some Family Islands, we
are giving water away,” Mr
Sherman said.

He explained that the burden
of water costs will still have to
be absorbed by the Govern-
ment (by extension, the
Bahamian taxpayer) or, if the
Corporation is privatised, this
burden will be passed to the
consumer until measures are
implemented to decrease water
production cost.

Mr Sherman said that in the
past few months, the Corpora-
tion has done quite a bit to
increase its reliance on reverse
osmosis plants, completed

repairs and upgrades to infra-
structure and increased Family
island projects. However, sub-
stantial losses from non- rev-
enue water continued to plague
the company.

Discussion

Also joining Mr Sherman on
the panel discussion, which was
a part of Water

Week, were Philip Weech,
director of the BEST Commis-
sion, Richard Cant, a consul-
tant at the Water and Sewer-
age Corporation, Eric Carey,
executive director of the
Bahamas National Trust, and
Eleanor Philips, the director of
the Nature Conservancy.



Mr Weech said that given
concerns over rising sea levels,
flooding and natural disasters,
the Government needed to
make provisions for this in its
design of the water table and
septic tanks.

Dr Cant and Mr Carey
addressed the need for proper
sanitary practices and protec-
tion of the environment, while
Ms Philips urged the Govern-
ment and the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation to protect
the water tables.

The Water Week Panel Dis-
cussion, The Current State of
Water in the Bahamas, was
held at the Choices Dinning
Room at the School of Hospi-
tality last Thursday.

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& Take it Home:

REGISTER BY
MAY 23, 2008





Please Contact:

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Note: Exam is NOT included.

Candice Albury

Office Assistant/Training Coordinator

Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.

Email: Candice@lignumtech.com
Ph: 393-2164 Fax: 394-4971





PRESENTS

outstanding implementation strategies in the
area of project management and extensive
operational experience in the water sector
including sewer treatment and disposal. He is
also highly accomplished in policy formulation,
finance and union negotiations. Mr. Sherman
graduated from Northeastern University,
Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a Bachelor of

Science Degree in Civil Engineerir

Industry.




GODFREY SHERMAN, General Manager, The Water & Sewerage Corporation
on The Evolving Role Of Water In An Energy Conscious Environment”

Thursday, May 15, 2008

BSE's Monthly Luncheon « East Villa Restaurant « East Bay Street - Time: 12:00 pm - Donation: $25.00

To confirm your attendance e-mail:
Quentin.knowles@flameless.com or gracesharma05@yahoo.com or jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com

honours. He also attended Harvard University’s
School of Business Administration Program

for Executive Management. He isa member

of several professional bodies including the
Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association
and the Bahamas Society of Professional
Engineers. He has travelled and trained
extensively in the Water and Wastewater
THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 5B



ETT TS A 077

Bah amas comp any ea CES ca —
in US equipment :
firm partnership

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

A BAHAMAS-based truck-
ing company has partnered with
a US construction equipment
supplier to enhance its compet-
itive advantage ahead of an
expected increase in construc-
tion work in this nation.

Bahamas Mack Truck Sales’
partnership with Case Con-
struction Equipment is a move
that will, according to
spokesman Sean Bain, enable
the Bahamian firm to expand
its services because it will now



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

have the tools and equipment
needed to handle larger con-
struction jobs.

Mr Bain explained that
Bahamas Mack Truck Sales was
previously unable to bid for a
lot of construction-related jobs
because it lacked the necessary
heavy equipment.

The tie-up with Case Con-
struction boded well for the
Bahamas considering the diver-
sity and complexity of proposed
construction projects, he told
Tribune Business.

Robert Lynch, the company’s
general manager, said he was
excited about the partnership
and the expanded service the













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company will be able to offer
its clients.

Release

In its press release, Bahamas
Mack Truck Sales said that even
though the construction
machinery market in the
Bahamas may be small in com-
parison to other nations, Case
feels that the brand will be suc-
cessful, given its products, low
operating costs and ease of
maintenance, as well as the sales
support Bahamas Mack has
enjoyed for the past 13 years.

Bahamas Mack was estab-
lished in the early 1970s, and
the company has just under 30
employees.

Case was formed in Novem-
ber 1999 through the merger of
Case Corporation and New
Holland N.V., which builds and
markets several. of the world's
leading brands of construction
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is among the world's largest
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Currently, more than 50
products carry the Case brand,
in a lineup that ranges from
compact trenchers and skid
steers to high-power excavators
and wheel loaders. Case con-
struction equipment is available
for sale, lease or rental in more
than 150 countries through a
comprehensive network of deal-
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globe.

There is an job opportunity ina
general medical practise office
located down town
Anyone interested please call:
CPPEE VAC) (e-) Ke)

327- 8605(home)

GYMNASTICS TRAININ G CLINI Cc
hosted by
THE GYMNASTICS FEDERA TION
of THE BAHAMAS

featuring
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Coaches from the USA

Open to the Public for Interested
Students ages 6 and over

Monday, May 19 thru Wednesday, May 21

Please call 364-8423 or 356-7722
for further information



RS eR ae TL



BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

www.bahamasengineers.org

NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON
on
Thursday, May 15, 2008

Topic:.

“WATER WEEK: THE EVOLVING ROLE OF
WATER IN AN ENERGY CONSCIOUS
ENVIRONMENT”

GUEST SPEAKER:

Eng. Godgrey Sherman
General Manager
The Water & Sewerage Corporation

Place: East Villa Restaurant
East Bay Street
TIME: 12:00p.m.
Donation: $25.00 per person

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR ATTENDANCE BY E-MAIL
gracesharma05@ yahoo.com
. or
jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com
or
quentin.knowles@flameless.com

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4200 sq.ft. Suitable for
Retail/Wholesale, Club, Warehouse,
Doctors office. High traffic area.
Roll down shutters.

Metal roof. Loading door.

Call for pricing.

T/F: 242-326-3029
See photos at:
www.keygroupproperties.com





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Store hours are: Monday - Friday 10am - 6pm



Pi
t
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE











WO

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Wn N





Ow



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WWE

WWW

‘I.get a better sense of what
is happening in The Bahamas
rom reading the Tribune.

Where other daily

7



newspapers fall short, the



[ribune delivers. Pin:

confident knowing The

e

Iribune looks out for my

interests. The Tribune is





my newspaper.
THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 7B



S Embassy now planning
alternative energy forum

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE United States Embassy is
looking to organize an alternative
energy conference in Nassau in July
2008, a senior official told Tribune
Business.

Dan O’Connor, the Embassy’s
political and economic chief, said
that after a Business Development
Conference scheduled for the end of
May, it was looking to work with
the Organisation of American
States (OAS) on an alternative
energy conference to be held in the
Bahamas.

Under the current plan, the OAS

would organize one day of the con-
ference, and the US Embassy in
Nassau the other day.

“We're still working on plans for
an alternative energy conference in
July,” Mr O’Connor said, adding
that it would involve presentations
by outside experts on all areas of
alternative power sources — financ-
ing, technology and private-public
partnerships.

Expertise

“We’re looking to help bring |
expertise to the Bahamas,” Mr
O’Connor said. “The Bahamas has
to make the decision on where to

move with its energy sector, but the
US certainly realizes the difficulties
countries in the region are having
with the high cost of energy.”

The timing of such a conference is
judicious, given the drag on the
pocket books of all Bahamian
households and businesses pro-
duced by record global oil prices,
which recently passed $126 per bar-
rel.

The effects are felt by all
Bahamas-based residents and busi-
nesses in terms of higher Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC) bills
and increased gas prices at the
pump. With BEC seemingly doing
its oil buying three to four months

JOB OFFERINGS

in advance of when the fuel is used,
the current oil prices are only likely
to feed into an increased fuel sur-
charge on the electricity bill during
the summer months — when electric-
ity demand and use is at its highest.

Bills

Current bills are only reflecting
the $100 per barrel price of around
Christmas time, so if people think
BEC bills.are bad now, they ain’t
seen nothing yet! Other businesses
especially impacted by fuel price
increases are airlines, ferries, taxis,
jitneys and all others involved in the
transportation industry.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



SALES CAREER}

A multi fyoetted communications/consulting company that is
currently undergoing market expansion wishes to employ
experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer §
skills and be able prepare public Bie any on behalf of &
companies clients. a.

A leading retailer is seeking the services of:

Financial Accountant & Human Resource a

Requirements:
General:

Candidates must be competent, honest, efficient, of high integrity, proficient in electronic data
entry and possess good oral & written communication skills.

Specific:

Financial Accountant must possess a valid certificate from the A.I.C.P.A. or equivalent
professional body, a university degree in accounting, bus. admin., or finance, and at least 3
years experience performing the functions of a financial accountant. Must have demonstrated
good leadership, supervisory, accounting and financial statements preparation skills in former

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.
engagements.

Human Resource (HR) Manager must possess a university degree in business administration, #4 Persons interested should submit CV’s.and reference letters to:
and at least 3 years experience performing the functions of an HR Manager. Responsible for - ass ,
effective, daily management of the human resource function including planning, recruitment,
compensation and benefit administration, policy gevelopment and implementation, employee

relations and training and development.

DA#6282
~ P.O. Box N-3207

. Nassau, Bahamas
by May 31, 2008.

Salary and benefits commensurate with level of certification, education, experience and skills.

Only Bahamians need apply

Send resume to: seekingtalentedbahamians@gmail.com

as L

‘soca.

And enjoy a relaxing weekend getaway

Summer is hee..gtin “beach! shape at the Squash Clu!

The Newly Renovated Squash Club on Village Rd
offers 3 Intemational Sized Courts
(Rental Equipment always available)

at Superclubs Breezes Bahamas.

Deluxe Room accommodations
Unlimited meals and beverages 24/7
Champagne upon arrival
Preferred V.1.P. dinner reservations in our specialty
restaurants: Garden of Eden and Pastafari
Live Bahamian Entertainment, featuring Funky D and other
Bahamian Artist
e Enjoy our Karaoke Moments
Package includes 3 days/2 nights

Members at the Squash Club can enjoy the large
Entertainment Lounge and Full Bar, along with
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Sunday 11am-Unti

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P: 242.394.5042 F:242.394.5046

oy . ate aes
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To reserved your super-special getaway call our
Reservation Specialist 327-5356 ext 6312




WE Ea

Medical Technologist (ASCP/AMT) &
Medical Assistant



Positive attitude and a Team player



* Must be able to work independently
¢ Must be able to modify work schedule
to meet laboratory needs

Phlebotomy skills -










P.O. BOX SS19661 or

Email: jobsinthelab@gmail.com

GS

Teaching Vacancy
‘Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian teachers for
the following positions for the 2008 - 2009 School Year.

-Math - (Gr. 7-12) PART-TIME

-Music - (Gr. 7-12) PART-TIME
-Cosmetologist (Gr. 10-12) - PART TIME
-Social Studies (Gr. 7-9) FULL TIME

Applicants must;

A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who
is willing to subscribe to the Statement of
Faith of Temple Christian School
Have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education or
higher from a recognized College or
University in the area of specialization.
Have a valid Teachers Certificate or
Diploma. tet ek
Have at least two years experience in the
relevant subject area with excellent
communication skills. ;
Applicants must have the ability to prepare
students for all examinations to the
BJC/BGCSE levels. _

Be willing to participate in the high school’s:

,, eXtra curricular programmes. ;.__

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum vitae, recent coloured photographed and
three reference to:

1

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for application is
May 16th 2008



Monday, June 9
6:00am
8:30am

12:30pm

We have « seat jut for you!
For more information, call your Travel Agent o
Bahamasair
242-377-5505
. Family sland Toll Free
1-242-300-8359

United States Toll Free
1-800-222-4262











PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



BSS Le eS Re CELTS ESS > ee ea I an
‘Fantastic’ venture

a ‘more progressive
way of planning’

FROM page 1B

total profits were around
$21,000. The BISX-listed com-
pany’s annual accounts indicate
that the profits remained within
Green Systems as retained
earnings.

Ventures such as Green Sys-
tems represent a much-needed
start for the Bahamas when it
comes to waste recycling, alter-
native energy sources and con-
servation and planning, with the
private sector needing to take
the lead.

When it conies to planning,
New Providence Development
Company, which is the second
largest landowner and develop-
er on New Providence behind

the Governmient, looks to
impose specific requirements
and covenants on every devel-
opment project it sells land to.

Mr Duggan told The Tribune:
“Tf we’ré selling bulk land to a
developer, we usually require
and dictate things like the per-
centage of open space, set back,
public amenities, lot size and
the formation of a Property
Owners Association (PoA).
That ensures the communities
are kept up.

“We also dictate architecture,
style, height [of buildings]. We
like to get in what percentage of
housing is multi-family, single-
family, duplex and triplex.”

He added that New Provi-
dence Development Company

LEGAL NOTICE >

NOTICE

PRIORY LANE INVESTMENTS LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

a) The above Company is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000.

b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on the
9th day of May, 2008, when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Anthony B.’
Dupuch of Kings Court, 3rd Floor, Bay Street, Nassau,

Bahamas.

'

Dated this 9th day of May, A.D. 2008.

Anthony B. Dupuch
Liquidator

Noe:
homes



MR, RODRICK WOOD

is no longer employed with
Arawak Homes Ltd and is no
longer authorized to conduct

business on behalf of Arawak

Homes or any of it’s affiliates.






Abaco Markets

J. S. Johnson




Bahamas Supermarkets



Eeiss8s rova. dFwe.ity

11.50 Bahamas Property Fund

9.05 Bank of Bahamas 9.61
0.85 Benchmark 0.90
2.70 Bahamas Waste 3.50
1.30 Fidelity Bank 2.39
10.42 Cable Bahamas 14.00
2.10 Colina Holdings 2.87
4.75 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.00
3.60 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.31
2.20 Doctor’s Hospital 3.00
5.94 Famguard 8.00
12.49 Finco 12.50
13.24 FirstCaribbean 13.24
5.05 Focol (S) 5.45
0.45 Freeport Concrete 0.45

ICD Utilities

often went beyond the Govern-
ment’s stipulations; such as
requiring developers to allocate
10 per cent of land within their
projects to open green space,
rather then 5 per cent.

“I don’t think anything we’re
proposing out here is going to
conflict with the Government’s
vision,” Mr Duggan told The
Tribune.

“I think our ultimate goal is
to.grow in a smart and con-
trolled way that doesn’t com-
promise the rest of our hold-
ings out here. I think our strat-
egy is to really make sure the
infrastructure is in place, and
then develop carefully and
deliberately.”

Apart from Green Systems,
New Providence Development
Company’s plans for western
New Providence include creat-
ing a new retail “Town Centre’
opposite the entrance to the
Charlotteville subdivision,

something that might require
Lyford Cay Shopping Centre to
be ‘moved’. The site would then

be redeveloped.

Apart from renewal of its
water franchise and $15 million
investment in a wastewater
treatment plant to serve western
New Providence, Mr Duggan
said the company was also aim-
ing to develop a 75-acre light

industrial park, the Rock Plant |

Road Industrial Park, just south
of the existing Airport Indus-
trial Park.

In this way, western New
Providence’s development den-
sity will be phased and become
more spacious the further west
persons go. From heavy indus-
try at the Airport Industrial
Park, it will go to light industry
with the new park, then to retail
at the ‘Town Centre’ out to the
more residential areas at Old
Fort Bay, Lyford Cay and
Albany.

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that EVANS SERAPHIN of
FOWLER STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
.the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 13th day of May 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SHERRILL PAULETTE
WHYLEY of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to SHERRILL PAULETTE GLINTON. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of the publication of this notice.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

LORDLY LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LORDLY LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions.of Section 137(4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 30th April, 2008 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse
Trust Ltd. of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,

1211 Geneva 70 ©

Dated this 13th day of May, A.D. 2008

Credit Suisse Trust Ltd. - Geneva
Liquidator

=







CFA L”

11.80
9.61 0.00
0.90 0.00
3.50 0.00
2.39 0.00
14.00 0.00
2.87 0.00
7.08 0.08 30,090
4.29 -0.02
3.00 0.00
8.00 0.00
12.50 0.00
13.24 , 0.00
5.45 0.00
0.45 0.00

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES











i
























13.4

























8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 __RND Holdings : z < . vy A yyy, 0: 00%
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 - 2 6.16%
0.55 0.40 Holdi ae 0.45 0.55 pwnd ya ot
ey g J Wa ee YI

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low ie NAV YTD% Last 12 Mont

1.3081 1.2443 Colina Bond Fund 1.308126°°°* 1.25% 5.61%

3.0008 2.6629 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.996573°"°** -0.14% 13.11%

1.3875 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.387505°°* 0.90% 3.87%

3.7969 3.2018 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.6960°°°°" -2.66% 16.13%

12.1010 11.5519 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.1010°° 140% 5.72%

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00°*

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00°*

1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00°*

10.5000 9.6346 __ Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.8832°*""* -5.87% _ 227%

ee ae d Market Terms Yj




+ 28 February 2008
+ - 31 December 2007

+** 41 April 2008

sre" 231 March 2008

****. 30 April 2008

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks





52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks





Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months








P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

KS 1) - 3-for-1 Stock Spkt - Effective Date 7/11/2007 . ; eae eee eS aT EOe
Â¥O TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-662-7010 | FIDELITY 242-358-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-40







ee”

seas
THE TRIBUNE



Just 12-15
per cent
of realtors
using MLS
listing
system

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE long-waited Multiple
Listing System (MLS) for
Bahamian realtors is fully
operational, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
former president telling
members that it now has 24
participating companies, 169
' active exclusive listings and
12 pending listings.

Larry Roberts encouraged
BREA members who had
already not done so to sign
on to the system, which he
called the future of the indus-
try. ; ;

“That was as of a few days
ago,” he Said’reférring to the
amount of listings. “I know
that there are more that have
come in. As you can see, with
89 participating members we
have just over 12-15 per cent

of our members participating.

You need to get on board.”
Future

“This is the future. This is
the way that business is going
to be done. You need to get
in now and familarise your-
self with the system.”

Mr Roberts told persons
who are using the MLS sys-
tem to ensure that they log
on and use it every day to
take advantage of all “the
bells and whistles that are

there”, such as e-mail alerts
of listings based on selected
criteria-or “hot” listings.

Multi-listing is an informa-
tion sharing tool used by real-
tors to provide access to a
wider array of available prod-
ucts.

It allows Bahamian realtors
a number of options for real
estate searches, setting para-
meters for real estate search-
es and enabling them to find
specific homes with the
details their clients want.

Access

They now have access to
the homes that other realtors
are listing, so rather than.
going to individual compa-'

“nies they ‘can view the infor-

mation from one place.

In addition, the MLS sys-
tem can be tailored to suit
specific needs through vari-
ous options, such as the abili-
ty to attach floor plans, prices
and to create marketing
products for homes and open
houses.

The system would also ben-
efit smaller companies, as it .
would allow them access to
properties they would not -
have, and highlight their own
properties - something which
their limited budgets may not
allow. The system is one way
to increase the standards and
professionalism of the indus-
try, placing every one on an
even field.



GN-675



SUPREME COURT

15TH MAY, 2008

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/NPR/00194

IN THE ESTATE OF LOIS EDNA
GIBSON, late of 28 Panther Top Lane in
the Town of Murphy, in the County of
Cherokee, in the State of North Carolina,
one of the States of the United States of
America. deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the

Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by FREDERICA

- GERTRUDE McCARTNEY of the Eastern

District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney

. in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing
~ of Certificate of Probate in-the above estate

granted to WILLIAM L. RAU the Executor
of the Estate, by the Superior Court Division
in the General Court of Justice, in the Sate
of North Carolina on the 18th day of June,
2004. |

Desiree Robinson =

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00226

Whereas LEROY BELL, of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ANTHONY
BELL, late of the Settlement of Behring
Point, Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00227

Whereas JAMES MAXWELL
THOMPSON, SR., of First Terrace, Collin
Avenue, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas, for letters of administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of HAZEL
ROSANNA HENRIETTA THOMPSON,
late of Farrington Road, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 9B.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00228

Whereas REGINALD MINNIS, of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters
of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HAROLD MINNIS, late of
Clarence Town, Long Island, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00229
Whereas FREDERIK F. GOTTLIEB, of

Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

“| Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
| DR. PETER MEISSNER, the sole executor

has made application to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate of JUDITH J.A.
MEISSNER a.k.a. JUDITH JOSEFINE
ANNA MEISSNER, late of Berlin,
Charlottenburg, Wilmersdorf Germany and
of Treasure Cay, Abaco one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
| THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

ISTH MAY, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/0023 1

Whereas JAMIE TERREL TINKER, of
the Western District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Cecil Newry has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the will annexed of the Real and Personal
Estate of REQUILDA PRATT, late of Faith
Avenue Carmichael Road, Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the
expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE













Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

— . x

2g.

XK



ENT

NASSAU CAMPUS COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AND RELATED EVENTS

EVENT | Date: (The f “davadwatinstdacatacde ¥deemsnte VNEUE

Nurses Pinning Ceremony Monday, May 19, 2008, 7:00 p.m. eee Bahamas Faith Ministries
Honours Convocation’ Tuesday, more 20, ane: E 00. oe | Bahamas Faith Ministries
Graduation Rehearsal * Bahamas Faith Ministries

Baccalaureate Service St. Francis Roman Catholic Church





2 Graduates Awards Breakfast Wyndham Resort & Casino



“Bohamas Faith Ministries



ommencement Ceremony






. os esident's Reception - Bahamas Faith Ministies

NORTHERN B












Graduates’ Retr ol. _ Saiurday, April 26, 2008, | 2:0( L ee Gril Bahama Reef Boulevard
Peele ao cae HAsorey Een ACU NcHAUY . Eo Mundon Drive
Graduation Searle Wedr : | _ ‘Northern Campus oe
elect service a : a A mele) | ee o “Church of God Temple, Peach Tree Stree!
Graduates’ eet ane 5 3 : Commencement eer) : oe oe : Convention Center, Our Lucaya

Mase | UP

Pri au

Acapemic STANDING BACCALAUREATE ASSOCIATE Date / Time
Seniors 91 of more 46 or more Saturday, May 10, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Juniors 61-90 31-45 . Sunday, May 11, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11; 59 p.m.
Sophomores 31 - 60 16 - 30 Monday, May 12, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Freshmen 0 - 30 0-15 Tuesday, May 13, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Ail (Online Regisrtration Only) Gee 0 Wednesday, May 14, 2008, 12:01 a.m. - 11: 59 p.m.
Ail (Online and Records Dept.) weemmeeee manne Thursday, May 15, 2008, 9:00 a.m, - 4:00 p.m.

All (Online and Records Dept.) weemeeeee eee Friday, May 16, 2008, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.








THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs Er rcATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

STAFF VACANCY

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Assistant Professor — History (Northern Bahamas Campus)



Candidate should have a Ph.D. in History Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching;
however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in History Education
plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in Education.
Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching history courses, assist with supervision of student-
teachers and assist with curriculum development of history education courses/programmes.

Assistant Professor — Religious Education (New Providence Campus)

Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Religious Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching;
however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in Religious Education
plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in Education.
Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching religion courses, assist with supervision of student-
teachers and assist with curriculum development of religious education courses/programmes.

Assistant Professor - Mathematics (New Providence Campus)

Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education with a minimum of 3 years of school
teaching; however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in Mathematics
Education plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in
Education. Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching mathematics courses, assist with
supervision of student-teachers and assist with curriculum development of mathematics education
courses/programmes.

Assistant Professor — Physical Education (New Providence Campus)

Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Physical Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching;
however, consideration will also be given for persons with a Master’s Degree in Physical Education
plus 5 years of teaching experience along with a Teacher’s Certification or Diploma in Education.

Candidates will be expected to assist with teaching physical education courses, assist with supervision
of student-teachers and assist with curriculum development of physical education courses/programmes.

In ALL cases, preference will be given to candidates with strong academic backgrounds, teaching
and research experience.

Salary Scale: - .

$39,460 - $61,960

$42,160 - $69,160

Master’s Degree -
Doctorate Degree -
Interested candidates should submit the following information for consideration:

é The College/University of The Bahamas Employment Application,
G A Comprehensive Resume

G Official transcripts

é Three work references

All information should be addressed to:
The Director, Human Resource
The College of The Bahamas
P. O. Box N-4912

Nassau, N. P., The Bahamas

Facsimile: (242) 302-4539
E-mail: hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Web Site: www.cob.edu.bs

The application deadline is Friday May 16 2008.
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - SUMMER SEMESTER 022008

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MASG900 101 _| MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |_| 9:00pm Thurs
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ENQUIRIES: Contact the Coordinator at Tet: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0083 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or email acurty@cob edu: bs



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THE TRIBUNE

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES.

THIS MONTHS TOPIC:
Total Joint Replacement

LECTURE DATE
Thursday, May 15th, 2008 @ 6pm

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues
affecting society today.

SPEAKER:
Dr. Dane Bowe
Orthopedic Surgeon



DOCTORS HOSPITAL

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TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 11B
PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Hutchison ready for
Port ‘due diligence’

FROM page 1B

the shares of the GBPA and its
Port Group Ltd affiliate. Mr
Lotmore further recalled of his
conversation with Mr Gray:
“He further indicated the par-
ties had signed a Heads of
Agreement, and that Hutchison
was ready to commence its due
diligence.”

No dollar figure was provided
for the deal, which some have
suggested is likely to be around
$125 million.

Mr Lotmore’s affidavit was
filed last week by attorneys for
Seashells Investments, the vehi-
cle through which Sir Jack Hay-
ward’s family trust owns a 50
per cent IDC stake.

He and Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) are involved
because it provides two corpo-
rate directors for Seashells
Investments, Montague East
Ltd and Sterling East Ltd, plus
former Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) chairman
Ian Fair. Another Seashells
Investments director is John
Hemmingway.

It is unlikely that Hutchison

Whampoa will begin due dili-
gence on the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, plus move to close
its purchase of the St George
estate stake, as long as the own-
ership dispute between it and
the Hayward side drags on via a
court-based litigation battle.

While the ownership dispute
creates uncertainty for any
GBPA buyer, given that the
Hayward side has appealed the
Supreme Court’s ruling that the
St George estate owns a 50 per
cent GBPA and Port Group
Ltd stake, this may not matter
as much to Hutchison Wham-
poa.

Securities Industry.
Act ‘unlikely’ to make
Parliament by year-end

FROM page 1B

into law, and this was one issue
that gave the securities indus-
try cause for.concern.

Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune: “The industry felt some-
what uncomfortable in dealing
with the Act without the regu-
lations. For that reason we are
going to extend the consulta-
tion period with the Act, and
allow it to remain outstanding
until the regulations are devel-
oped.

“Then we’ll give the industry
and the public time to review
the Act and the regulations.”

The Securities Commission
said it was due to publish immi-
nently a public notice setting
out these details, consultation
on the Securities Industry Act
having been previously sched-
uled to end on April 30, 2008.

When asked when the regu-
lations were likely to be
released, Mr Deveaux told The
Tribune: “I can’t give you any
timeline for that. It could be
anywhere from the end of the
third quarter to the end of the
fourth quarter.”

The industry’s misgivings
over how the Securities Industry
Act has been handled, and the
absence of the regulations,
come as no surprise, this news-
paper having warned of such
concerns in an article on Feb-
ruary 4, 2008.

A major concern voiced by
many in the Bahamian capital
markets was that the regulations
were critically important, given
that provisions omitted from
the first Securities Industry Act
— such as trading from a bro-
ker’s own account and the short
selling prohibition — were sup-
posed to have been transferred
to the regulations. If anything,
this increased the void caused
by the regulations’ non-release
and non-development.

The Securities Commission
opted to place the main require-
ments and real details into the
regulations and rules it can
make, leaving the legislation to
set out the general obligations,
so it could better keep pace with
evolving international best prac-
tices and global standards.

Placing the main details into
the regulations is designed to
enable the Securities Commis-

sion to avoid having to seek

Kel

Parliamentary approval every

time any change — however
minor — is needed to the Act,
thus avoiding time-consuming
delays. :

The Bahamian capital mar-
kets are likely to be'unim-
pressed that such a major, and
much-needed, piece of legisla-
tion is likely to be further
delayed in making its way into
the Parliamentary pipeline.

The Securities Industry Act
is arguably the top financial law
in need-of urgent reform, for-
mer minister of state for
finance, James Smith, having
described it as “woefully inade-
quate” during his time in office.

The Act has long been seen
as ‘lacking teeth’ when it comes
to the regulatory and enforce-
ment powers provided to the
Securities Commission. Other
weaknesses identified include
the absence of a Takeover Code
to regulate the acquisition of
majority stakes in Bahamian
public companies, protection
and safeguards for minority
shareholder rights, and the
absence of power to compel
Bahamian companies to make
timely disclosures on material
events or changes.

‘s Team

Learning & Development

Manager

Kelly's is seeking a fully-qualified and experienced professional to become the full-
time Learning and Development Manager for the 350 + employees in Kelly's House
& Home and Kelly's Lumber. The position requires an experienced and resourceful
communicator able to motivate adults with varying educational backgrounds and
qualifications, and capable of continuing the development and implementation of on-
going in-house learning and development programs, with their attendant testing and
evaluation procedures. Such programs will include, but not necessarily be limited to:

* Orientation courses for all new employees
* Supervisory courses for new and prospective supervisors
* Customer Service courses for all retail employees

* Computer familiarisation courses
* Product-specific knowledge courses for all retail employees
* Safety courses for drivers and warehouse/yard personnel

* Personal development courses for career advancement

The successful applicant will also be expected to develop and maintain strong links
with other providers of on-going work-related courses in specialised and technical
areas. Previous experience in learning and development or in adult education would

be an asset.

This is a management position for an experienced and qualified professional, who is
willing to demonstrate a long-term commitment to Kelly’s development and expansion.
Benefits include medical, pension, and profit-sharing plans, with remuneration package
dependant on qualifications and experience.

E-mail letter of application with comprehensive resume to info@kellysbahamas.com
with "Learning and Development Manager’ as subject.

No phone calls please

Kelly’s

Mail at Marathon

Tel: (343) 393-4002

Fax: (242) 393-4096

Sunday

Monday-Friday 9:00am8:
9:00am-9-00pm
dosed

Houseg
Home

:OOpm

This is because the Hong
Kong-based conglomerate
already owns a 50 per cent stake
in the key Freeport infrastruc-
ture and economic assets. Given
that Port Group Ltd is its 50
per cent partner in these assets,
which include the Grand

’ Bahama Development Compa-

ny (Devco), Freeport Harbour
Company and Grand Bahama
Airport Company, acquiring it
will give Hutchison Whampoa
majority ownership and control
regardless of whether the St
George interest is 25 per cent or
50 per cent.

Apart from these assets,
Hutchison Whampoa already
has majority ownership of the
Freeport Container Port, and
management control at the
Sea/Air Business Centre.

This economic dominance is

already causing concern among

some observers, who feel that if
Hutchison Whampoa succeeds

in acquiring the St George:

GBPA and Port Group Ltd
stake, Freeport will become a
company town - controlled
solely by one entity.

Others, though, disagree,
arguing that if it had control
Hutchison Whampoa would be
likely to invest heavily in fur-

ther developing Freeport,

adding to the $1 billion in equi-
ty it has already pumped in.

To sweeten the pill with gov-
ernment, the company is
thought likely to offer to hand
back the quasi-governmental,
development and regulatory
obligations now bound-up with
the GBPA.

If the St George estate were
to successfully conclude a trans-
action with Hutchison Wham-
poa, it would effectively squeeze
the Hayward family, leaving
them as equal partners in the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd -
but minority partners in
Freeport’s main economic and



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productive assets.

Such a deal could effectively
also end attempts by British
banker Roddie Fleming to
acquire the Hayward family’s
GBPA stake for $100 million,
having made clear he wants to
purchase all IDC’s share capital
or he will walk away, sources
have said.

Meanwhile, Justice Neville
Adderley last week moved to
resolve the impasse created by
his Order that the St George
and Hayward sides agree on an,
independent chairman for the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
who would have a ‘casting vote’
to decide matters where both
sides were split.

With the two parties unable
to agree on an. independent
chairman, Justice Adderley
ordered that both sides’ respec-
tive nominees — Erik Chris-
tiansen for the St George estate,
Felix Stubbs for the Haywards —
be elected to the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd Boards. It will
now be up to those Boards to
elect a chairman from among
themselves.

This now means the GBPA
will finally have a functioning
Board, as it previously only had
five rather than the minimum
six prescribed by its Articles of
Association. It also means that
there will be no conflict
between Justice Adderley’s ini-
tial ruling for an ‘independent
chairman with a casting vote’
and the GBPA’s Articles of
Association.

Court documents filed over
the chairman situation indicate
just how frustrated senior
GBPA management and staff
were becoming over the inabil-
ity to elect such a person.

In an April 14, 2008, letter to
Sir Jack Hayward and Lady
Henrietta St George, Sir Albert
Miller, the GBPA’s chief exec-
utive, described electing an

16 Weeks U.S.A. Accredited
| in Collaboration with ‘
Medical Training Institute

independent chairman as “a
tremendous challenge”.

Sir Albert said he first
believed that his suggestion of
Mr Christiansen for the role was
acceptable to both sides, but
then heard that Sir Jack’s attor-
neys and others had subse-
quently switched to Mr Stubbs.
The latter, Sir Albert said, was
“not acceptable” for the post,
and he had told Sir Jack why.

Alternatively, Sir Albert said
other independent chairman
candidates were former finance
minister and Central Bank gov-
ernor, Sir William Allen, and
two other former Central Bank
chiefs, James Smith and T. B.
Donaldson.

Sir Albert said: “I find myself
becoming more and more pres-
sured and frustrated, as there
are many matters which need
to be decided by the Board. I
have virtually wasted a whole
month doing very little other
than holding things together.

“If [cannot get some relief, I
myself might have to throw in
the towel and leave things to
those who vigorously supported
the receivers over the past 15
months, and then I know what
would happen to your compa-
nies.”

The St George estate object-
ed to Mr Stubbs chiefly because
he sits on the Board of Direc-
tors for Freeport Concrete, the
company whose largest share-
holder is ousted GBPA chair-
man Hannes Babak. Mr Babak
has been a particular target of
the estate.

This week, Justice Anita
Allen will determine whether
to lift the stay preventing the
Hayward trust from selling its
GBPA stake to the Flemings,
while Friday will see Mr Babak
attempt to have the injunction
preventing him from having a
role on the GBPA Board or
management lifted.





Ambulance

ALLL

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ride times
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 13B



4

@ By DR BASIL SANDS

Lv diseases refer to the dis-

eases or conditions that inter-
fere with any of the liver’s normal func-
tions.

The liver is a large organ located in
the most forward part of the abdomen,
resting against the muscular portion
(the diaphragm) between the abdomen
and chest cavities. The liver is essential
for life and performs over 100 impor-
tant functions, such as detoxifying poi-
sons and drugs, metabolizing fats, stor-
ing carbohydrates, manufacturing bile,
plasma proteins and other substances,
and assisting in blood clotting. The liv-

:“er is essentially an organic filter that

“removes waste and detoxifies drugs and
“'poison, and acts as a factory that man-
!“ufactures and processes nutrients and
“enzymes.

Food in the intestine is absorbed into
the blood which then ferries specific
zicomponents to the liver. There, sugars
and fats are processed, amino acids are

produced and certain vitamins and min-
perals are stored. The liver also manu-
;factures hormones, important blood

,clotting enzymes, and a substance called

bile that allows fat to be absorbed.

;,, Other substances, such as drugs that
.jare carried by the blood, are metabo-
dized or altered by the liver into other
forms. Foreign materials, including
.,viruses, bacteria and poisons, are fil-

"tered out in an effort to protect the rest

“of the body from damage. It is for this

“reason that an animal’s liver is exposed

“to diseases and injury more than any

other part of the body.

©! Other conditions affecting liver func-

‘tion include birth defects, parasites and

cancer. Liver disease is serious and

i often life threatening to your pet.

«| Liver disease is often difficult to
_odetect until the illness becomes severe

};because there is an over abundance of

«liver tissue and the liver can partially

, regenerate itself. The signs of liver dis-



eases vary
with the
degree and
location of
damage.
However
whatever
their caus-
es, the signs
are remark-
ably simi-
lar.

Com-
monly, liv-
er diseases
result in
anorexia
(lack of
appetite), vomiting, diarrhea, weight
loss and lethargy. When bile backs up in
the circulation it can turn light coloured
areas of the animal’s body pale yellow
or tea-coloured, this is called jaundice
and is most easily seen in the white of
the eyes, gums or inner surface of the
ear flap.

Increased pressure of the veins that
drain the liver may result in ascites,
which is an accumulation of fluid in the
abdomen. The animal’s abdomen will
appear swollen or bloated. Hemor-
rhages are another sign of advanced
liver disease, with bleeding into the
stomach, intestines and urinary tract.

Various blood tests are necessary to
discover the extent and nature of liver
damage. In many cases, surgical
removal of a small piece of liver tissue
(liver biopsy) is the only way to diag-
nose the type of liver disease.

Treatment depends on the specific
causes of the disease. Some types of
liver diseases can only be treated in the
hospital, while others are treated on an
out-patient basis. Some liver diseases
can be cured, while in others the goal of
treatment is to control the disease.

Chronic hepatitis is the most com-
mon liver disease in dogs. Feline hepat-
ic lipidosis, also called fatty liver dis-
ease, is the most common liver disease

oe

GARDENING/HEALTH

The danger of liver diseases

in cats. Overweight cats are at highest
risk for this condition, and the definitive
sign is when an obese cat suddenly stops
eating. For reasons not completely
understood, fat is moved into the liver
and becomes trapped, resulting in com-
promised liver functions.

Chronic hepatitis cases are idiopath-
ic, which means that no definitive cause
can be determined. When a cause can
be determined, it is often due to anoth-
er generalized disease such as cancer,
kidney disease or an infection such as
leptospirosis.

Treatment consists primarily of sup-
portive care, (like IV fluids, antibiotics
etc). Prognosis depends on the cause,
but usually is not to good. About 30
per cent of animals suffering from
hepatitis will die within one week of
diagnosis, despite treatment.

A congenital defect may result in a
portosystemic shunt, which is an abnor-
mal connection of a vein into the liver
that should normally close off shortly
after the newborn is born. Surgical cor-
rection is the treatment of choice for
some types of shunts.

A diet with non-meat protein places
less strain on the liver and gives it a
chance to heal.

However, it is best to follow your
vet’s advice since he or she is most
familiar with your dog’s diagnoses, clin-
ical condition and dietary needs.

There is no way to prevent conge-
nial liver problems, or to anticipate
some immune or bacterial conditions
that affect the liver.

However, in cats you can reduce the
risk of feline hepatic lipodosis by keep-
ing your cat slim.

Also, protecting your pets from poi-
sons will help prevent toxicity induced
liver damage.

e Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at
the Central Animal Hospital. Questions
or comments should be directed to pot-
cake59@hotmail.com. Dr Sands can also
be contacted at 325-1288





aaa aa ae a SS ae
Will exfoliation help

the health of my skin?

lm By SARAH SIMPSON

| he fastest answer is yes - exfolia-
tion will help the health of your
skin!

Skin exfoliation improves the quality
and tone of skin by assisting in the
removal of dead skin cells from the sur-
face - human skin produces about one
million skin cells per minute, which
equates to over five billion skin cells per
day. As our skin cells renew, old surface
cells harden and lose moisture, and even-
tually detach from the skin to allow for
new cells to come through. This process is
called desquamation.

Desquamation also eliminates dam-
aged and contaminated cells that carry
pollutants and micro-organisms from the
environment. These dead skin cells don't
always effectively fall from our skin,
meaning they can dry and dull the skin
surface, causing clogging and congestion.

Through professional and at-home
exfoliation, these dulling skin cells are
effectively removed, and newer cells are
revealed for a fresher, healthier appear-
ance.

own.

Acneic skin: Acneic skin produces five
times more dead skin cells than other
skin conditions, meaning proper exfolia-
tion can have great benefits for acneic
skin. Hydroxy acids, in general, will be
effective as they help the dead cells
detach, preventing dead skin cells from
clogging the follicle and contributing to
acne. Avoid physical exfoliants/scrubs,
which can worsen inflammation.

Sarah Simpson



especially effective on prematurely-aging
- and mature skin, as it stimulates cell
renewal faster than the body can on its



difficult, caus-
ing a build up
that results in
dull, thick skin
with less tone.
On average,
cell renewal
takes from 28-
35 days in mid-
life, and up to
90 days in
maturity.

Exfoliation is



Hyperpigmentation: Hyperpigmenta-
tion is an increase in colour caused by ©
either an increase in melanocytes or from
a substance that adds colour by forming
deposits in the skin. Exfoliation helps
shed these pigmented cells more quickly,
and also helps remove the dead skin cells
so ingredients can more effectively pene-
trate hyperpigmentation at its source.

Dry, dehydrated skin: A lack of mois-
ture in the skin leads to gaps in the cellu-
lar barrier. As a result, skin is left feeling
tight and stretched, and many tend to
over moisturize, which sticks the older
skin cells down, leading to a dull, uneven
skin tone. Through exfoliation, drying
skin cells are effectively removed, and
moisturizing and hydrating ingredients
can penetrate deeper into the skin to help
ease dry and dehydrated skin conditions.

This information was taken from

www.dermalogica.com

Aging skin: When we are young, our
cells renew roughly every 12-19 days. But
as we get older, this process slows down as
the “glue” that holds our cells together
becomes denser. The natural sloughing
of older cells from the skin becomes more

¢ Sarah Simpson is a skin care therapist
at the Dermal Clinic located at One Sandy-
port Plaza (the same building as Ballys
Gym). For more information visit her
website at www.dermal-clinic.com or call
her at 327.6788

How this invisible disease robbed me of my independence

,, FROM page 14

“ous pain.
4) “I can no longer hold down a
‘gob. As a matter of fact, when my
employer found out that I had
'\ FMS they treated me as if I was a
‘prize horse with a broken leg, and
I was put out to pasture. When I
«was able to work, I gave them
100 per cent, but now I doubt
‘they know if I am alive or dead.
Most of my so called friends/co-
«workers abandoned me. Sadly, I
; was plagued by their hurtful com-
ments, and assumptions from
those around me; as well as com-
pletely frustrated with insurance
| companies and doctors dismiss-
| ing fibromyalgia as a figment of
} the imagination.
| “At some point, I felt they
| were sick and tired
| of hearing the truth of me
telling them that I don't feel like
| doing much of anything and that
| I was too painful,” she said. “I
| would like to believe they just
| had no idea how to help. You

FROM page 14

Sau.



me.”

According to Ms Harvey, an upcoming event
that she is working with is a fund raising cam-

affect my mouth I will find a way to fight

and use all resources available to me. I have
always been a fighter for my rights and I am not of
going to let FMS win over me,” Ms Harvey said.

The week of May 12 has been dedicated to
International Awareness of the disease, and in
order to shed light on this growing health threat,
Ms Harvey hopes to start a support group in Nas-

“I have gotten some guidance from Michele
Rassin, vice president at Doctors Hospital; Dr
Christine Chin, especially Dr Philip Huyler, who
has been extremely supportive and patient with

know that cliché about knowing
who your friends are when trou-
ble comes - well I found out.”

While co-workers, associates,
the insurance companies and
even doctors may have failed her
at times, Ms Harvey said that her
three wonderful children have
been her rock.

“My son, Mancini, took his
time to remodel

my bathroom and installed a.

whirlpool to help my body relax
(Her body responds well to the
manipulation of the hot/cold’ ther-
apy). My daughter, Dandria gives
me a lot of spiritual support and
she has taken over where I have
left off. She dances as if no one is
watching in a lot of workshop

performances for BFM. When
I watch her, I just imagine that
she is me in my mind. My daugh-
ter,

‘Yoshina is a registered nurse.
She makes sure no doctors do me
any additional harm. She is also
exploring research for me. And
to top it off I have a few nurses in
my family such as Rosemae Bain

and Paulette Claridge, who are
always willing to lend a helping
hand,” she said. ‘

Asked about the circumstances
that led to her diagnosis, Ms Har-
vey said that it was as a result of
tests that came when she experi-
enced a near fall at work.

“I screamed from the pain as it
swept through my entire body. I
went into a brain fog, dizziness,
whip lash, facial pain, sciatica
(radiating pain. down my thighs
and legs). My head ached, the
paininmyneck .

and shoulders was overwhelm-
ing. My spinal cord and spinal
nerve function was affected. I was
unable to walk for months.

“At first I was misdiagnosed. I
was told that I had MS, lupus and
some other disease, but after tak-
ing

multiple. tests - a Cat scan,
brain scan, X-rays; MRI's and
spinal injections, they were ruled
out. I went through a thorough
workup after seeing over 65 dif-
ferent specialists in the United
States,” she said.

The fight against fibromyalgia

‘This is my contribution’, so now I need to get

assistance on how:to make this idea a reality.
Also Rose Richardson and Dellarece Edgecombe

Tyreflex Star Motors, and Dandria Scott of
BFM have already raised an undisclosed amount
to assist with this cause.

“It is my hope to get as much assistance possi-
ble to make this happen so that chronically ill

people can have an emergency fund to draw on

during times of financial hardship. I know how
hard it is. I had to use all my savings to get my
mind and my body to cooperate with my spirit. I
would like to spare others the same experience

and offer any type of advocacy that I possibly

Harvey said.

paign, mostly through the National Fibromyalgia

Association and The Body Shop At Home.
Toward this end, she has already received the

generous support of a number of friends.
“When I mentioned the fundraising to one of

my friends, he immediately gave $100 and said,

The spine’s foundation

‘By SUSAN DONALD DC



Is the case of low back
problems, doctors often
confine a spinal examination to
the area of complaint and direct
correction to the localized prob-
lem. In many cases this pro-
duces satisfactory results. Some
, times, however, the improve-
ment may not last; the reason is
that the spine’s foundation was
) not examined

| The spine sits on a founda-
‘tion formed by the pelvis and
‘legs. This foundation must be
| balanced and working normally
or it will create strain through-
out your spine. If the cause of
your spinal pain is an imbalance
in the foundation, the spinal
pain will return until the foun-
dation is balanced.

An example of this principle
is a house sitting on a crooked,
shifting foundation. As the
foundation shifts, the walls of
the house distort, the plaster
ks the doers don't fit. A

149
(

come to



carpenter can come in and
patch the cracks in the wall and
trim the doors and everything
looks and functions well. But
only temporarily. If the foun-
dation is not corrected, it won't
be long before the walls again
crack and the doors don't fit.
The same example applies to
the spine. The pelvis, which is
the spine’s foundation, is made
up of three bones, the two larg-

bones that form the hips, an:

can so that they will not suffer as I had to,” Ms

Persons interested in finding out more
about fibromyalgia or making a donation are wel-
contact
392.3149/468.0524/941.355.2766 or they can e-mail:
vgodet@msn.com.

Ms Harvey at



ing them is called the sacrum.
This structural circle is called
the pelvic girdle.

When a torsion or misalign-
ment occurs in the structural
foundation, it causes strain
throughout the body especial-
ly above the pelvic girdle. In
addition to spinal involvement
an adaptive torsion of the shoul-
der girdle may take place that
can cause shoulder, arm and
hand symptoms. Here again we
find the integration within the
body: the shoulder problem will
not respond adequately until
the pelvic torsion or misalign-
ments are corrected.

As a chiropractor I check the
foundation in every case I get.
The whole spine is examined,
not just a part. This is the reason
chiropractic is so successful at
relieving so many people’s pain
when nothing else has.

* Susan Donald is a doctor of

chiropractic at the Life Chiro-

nractic Centre. For more infor-
Vorea fall 393-2774

Y

As she struggles to find a way
to fight her disease, Ms Harvey
said that some days she is unable
to get

out of bed, however, when her
pain level goes lower she is able
to utilize that time to do research
and fight a system that appears
to not be working for people with
disabilities.

“But first, I truly talk to God.
For the first time in my life I have
learned how to pray and use my
mind for positive thinking, then I
deal with my body ‘

to show me how to deal with

every day living, especially con-
tact with the outside world and
the insurance companies,” she
said.

Looking to the future, Ms Har-
vey said that she is focusing on
the positive and not the negative.

“TI have faith in God, now I
need courage to overcome my
fears. As Mark Twain said,
‘Courage is resistance to fear,
mastery of fear - not absence of
fear.’ Before I had this unfore-
seen condition I had ‘plans of
retiring’ in Exuma and living my

life in a nice bed’ and breakfast,



hosting tea parties, spa events,
fashion shows and seeing the
world.

But now I am hoping that I can

. still move to Exuma and turn that

B&B into a wellness spa/clinic to
help people who suffer from
FMS/CFS.”

: Persons who interested in
finding out more about fibromyal-
gia are welcome to call Ms Harvey
at 392.3149/468.0524/941.355.2766
or they can e-mail:
vgodet@msn.com.

7 oF I NET aT ee
PAGE 14B, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008

©
=
cE
=
Bex
a
©
aia
-



eee hs ¥ aka

@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX

Tribune Features Editor

ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net



ERED Be

uddenly struck with a devastat-
ing illness or disease, most peo-
ple begin to mark their lives in

terms of “before the diagnosis”
and “after the diagnosis”. Every-
thing seems relative to that moment and, for better
or worse, that is how they come to define the events

of their lives.

For 52-year-old Vincanna Godet Harvey, who was
diagnosed with fibromyalgia (FMS) on July 17, 2001,
her “before diagnosis”, includes being a very strong,
active, independent, goal-oriented, career-driven

woman.

“Between my careers as a
claims adjuster, working part-time
in permanent cosmetics and as an
independent consultant for The
Beauty Shop, I was extremely
busy in the world of fashion. I
held fashion shows and tea parties
with celebrities such as Angela
Bassett and her mother, Betty
Bassett and her family.

“T was very much involved in
my church and community, espe-
cially the ballet. I love fashion,
but dancing was my passion; fur-
thermore, I still found the time
to care for my family,” she said.

According to Ms Harvey, one
of the hardest challenges she has
experienced since being diag-
nosed with fibromyalgia, is giv-
ing up her independence, and the
development of strained rela-
tionships with her husband, chil-
dren, family and friends.

“My illness is so complex and it
has so many symptoms that vary
from day to day even hour to
hour, and in intensity of pain. To
anyone who greets me, on the
outside I look healthy, and the
same is probably true to anyone
reading this right now because I
am articulating it. People often
have difficulty understanding how
I can look fine to them, despite
the seriousness of my condition,”
she said

Because of these misconcep-
tions, people often jump to the
disheartening conclusion that Ms
Harvey is actually quite healthy
and perhaps is just faking it for
attention.

“J don't believe they under-
stand the constant
pain I am going through. I am liv-
ing with a disease you can not
see; it really consumes my entire
being and makes me feel like I
am absolutely worthless, espe-
cially when I just lay there and
cry from all over body pain and
the only thing that seems to work,
although not so well sometimes, is
my mind. Some days it's to the
point that I would not leave the

house because it is hard enough
just getting through one day.
Needless to say, getting to church
or to a social gathering is very
difficult.”

Described as a chronic condi-
tion characterized by widespread
pain in muscles, ligaments and
tendons, individuals diagnosed
with fibromyalgia also experience
fatigue and multiple tender points
(places on their body where slight
pressure causes pain).

More common in women than
in men, fibromyalgia was previ-
ously known by other names such
as fibrositis, chronic muscle pain
syndrome, psychogenic rheuma-
tism and tension myalgias.

The variations of FMS, as the
disease is also known, are as com-
plex as the nervous system itself.

According to Ms Harvey, FMS
is the result of fibrous deposits in
her muscles that cause pain.

“Nerve roots carry impulses
from my brain to my body, most
of which tell the muscles to work
on command. But in my case,
because the nerves fire without
legitimate cause, the muscles con-
tract when they are supposed to
be at rest. After years of contrac-
tions the muscles form scar tis-
sue, resulting from the constant
buildup of waste products from
the metabolic process and the
lack of blood flow in the con-
tracted muscles. And thus we
have the name for fibromyalgia -
fibros indicates scar-tissue-type
deposits, 71yo means muscle, and
algia means pain,” she said.

Perhaps even more devastat-
ing than the disease itself, is the
feeling that some family mem-
bers and friends have become
worn out with her.

“I am even tired of me,” Ms
Harvey admits. “The frustration
that I endure affects everyone
that I'am around because they
can not take away the continu-

SEE page 13



The fight

AGAINST —

Fibromyalgia

MH By YOLANDA «
DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features
Editor

s part of her own

treatment, and for
the sake of others afflicted
with the same disease, Ms
Harvey is now working hard
to raise money and aware-
ness to assist in the research
and the development of
proper treatments for
fibromyalgia.

“Help me, help others.
It’s about caring by sharing,
and I want to encourage
others to join our fund rais-
ing campaign and to make a
donation. Donate your time;
set up a wellness practice,
join The Body Shop’s fund
raising campaign,” she said.

Currently, her main pri-
orities are in line with the
US-based National
Fibromyalgia Association,
whose awareness issues are:

o Increased funding
research aimed at determin-
ing the mechanisms causing
fibromyalgia, new treatment
options, and access to com-
prehensive healthcare

and treatment options;

oO Recognition of
fibromyalgia as a legitimate
chronic pain condition
deserving of the similar pre-
ventive measures and treat-
ment protocol

developed for other
chronic conditions, such as
diabetes;

o Increased education
of healthcare professionals
in medical school

o Required continuing
medical education for
licensed providers.

“Our organisations have
come across many other
organisations and websites
that are attempting to raise
funds and awareness, and
that are very good about
getting the word out. We
send out newsletters to
those who do not have a
computer and/or are home

bound/bed ridden. I par-
ticipate via e-mail most of
the time. At any rate. as
long as this disease does not

SEE page 13







THE TRIBUNE












_ People often
have difficulty —
understanding ©
how I can look
fine to them,
despite the
seriousness of
my condition

a.

Vincanna
_ Godet Harvey







Yify
tht Villa "tl lt tl” “, “ttn “ld “tts “ta.

Sister, Sister

Breast Cancer Support Group





The Tribune

Vly Vie. Wy Venpyon!


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 15B



aaa a Ae eS ee ee a
~ Rotarians from around the

globe gather in the Bahamas

Demystifying
Black/African-
Bahamian
skincare

CONTRARY to popular
belief, black skin has certain
needs specific to its genetic
make up. However, the basic
steps in skincare, such as
cleaning, toning, treating,
moisturizing and sun protec-
tion are still necessary.

Black or dark skin tends to
have varying pigmentation
and undertones even on one
individual. Black skin has a
problem with hyper-pigmenta-
tion and scaring, and special
care is needed to avoid these
situations and repair already
damaged skin. It is therefore
important to know your skin
type and problem areas if any.

Sun protection

Despite having more
‘melanin than Caucasian skin,
people of colour still need to
practice sun protection. Also,
people of African descent and
other dark-skinned races can
and do get skin cancer. It is.a
common belief that the
melanin in dark skin protects
it from skin cancer. The truth
is, melanin only offers a cer-
tain amount of protection.
What is true is that with black
skin, sun damage is less obvi-
ous, which means that the use
of sunscreen is necessary. Sun-
screen of SPF 15 is recom-
mended.

Cleaning

Cleaning of the skin is also
important; the face should not
be scrubbed to hard while
washing. Black skin is delicate
and excessive cleaning and
harslrhandling will result in
bruising and microscopic
tears.

Again, the colour of the
skin hides the damage so the
bruising is normally not
noticed. Also, darker skin
tones tend to look gray if too
dry, therefore over-washing
should be avoided. It is best
not to use soap for cleaning
the face or skin since they
tend to be drying. If you have
oily skin a purifying cleanser is
a good choice.

Exfoliation, while necessary
especially for those over 20 or
with acne, should be done
cautiously. It is recommended
that Bahamians of colour use
clay-based exfoliants. Also,
because black skin tends to
have large pores, toning is
essential to help keep the
pores healthy. This helps pre-
vent black heads and other
skin problems.

Moisturizing

Some dermatologists dis-
agree that everyone needs to
moisturize, especially those
with oily skin. Oily skin is a
condition that affects a large
segment of the country’s black
population. If your skin is dry
however, you do need to
moisturize.

Apart from the obvious rea-
sons to keep your skin hydrat-
ed, black people tend to have
eczema. This skin condition,
while not curable, can be con-
trolled by keeping the skin or
other affected areas well mois-
turized.

For black skin it is best to
‘use creams instead of lotions
for moisturizing as the skin
absorbs creams more effec-
tively.

Allin all, skin is skin, but
black skin is normally abused
because of the misconception
that it is tougher than lighter
skin

MORE than 1,000 Rotarians from
eleven countries and four territories
descended on the Bahamas last week
to participate in the Rotary District
7020 and District 6930 Conference,
held at Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island.

With a global emphasis on water,
health and hunger, literacy and the
family, and with a special focus on
youth and Rotary’s public image,
members of the service organisation
used last week’s conference as an
opportunity to share in fellowship
and experiences, while discussing
projects, community needs and how
the network of Rotarians in the dis-
trict can be more effective in making
life better for the needy.

Success

Operating under the Rotary 2008
theme, “Rotary Shares”, Dick
McCombe, district governor, said the
organisation’s efforts in creating sus-
tainable communities that have
access to clean food and water,
health care and literary initiatives
have been met with much success.

“These areas have resulted in more
sustainable quality water projects,
health initiatives covering all aspects
of health for all ages, and literacy
programmes for young and old alike
just to name a few,” he said.

Mr McCombe noted further that
their theme, “Rotary Shares”, best
describes the special common thread
that binds all Rotarians — their per-
sonal commitment to share their
time, their talents, their treasure and



“Rotary’s magical
contribution to the
needy in the world
begins with every
Rotarians’ desire
to help others.
Without the
individual
Rotarians in the
clubs throughout
the world, Rotary
would not exist,
and the needy
would suffer even
more than they do
today.



Dick McCombe,
district governor

their empathy, as they provide ser-
vice above self to the communities
of the world.

In the final analysis however, for
the organisation to continue to do
the good in the world that they have
begun, Mr McCombe said, Rotari-
ans must continue to grow Rotary in

_~achieved

the world. “We must share Rotary
with others and share our accom-
plishments.”

It is the Rotarian’s compassion and
ability to open their hearts to those in
need, he said, combined with their
commitment to share their time, tal-
ent and treasures with those who are
less fortunate, that makes the Rotary
organisation so magical.

Magic

“It reminds me of the magic one
can see in the eyes of a person receiv-
ing their first wheelchair and for the
first time, they can get around on
their own. It’s like the magic of the
smile of a young child when you give
them their first book. It’s like the
magic of happy faces when you bring
a water well to a community. This is
the magic that causes ordinary Rotar-
ians to do the extraordinary things

they do,” he said. .
“Rotary’s magical contribution to

the needy in the world begins with
every Rotarians’ desire to help oth-
ers. Without the individual Rotarians
in the clubs throughout the world,
Rotary would not exist, and the
needy would suffer even more than
they do today. We are proud of the
accomplishments Rotarians have
in the world,” Mr
McCombe said. “But more than any-
thing we must be proud of the part
Rotarians have played in making the
world a better place for those who
have the least.”

A worldwide organisation of more
than 1.2 million business, profes-

sional and community leaders, there
are over 32,000 Rotary clubs in more
than 200 countries and geographical
areas.

Members of Rotary clubs provide
humanitarian service, encourage high
ethical standards in all vocations, and
help build goodwill and peace in the
world.

Clubs are non-political, non-reli-
gious, and open to all cultures, races,
and creeds. As signified by the mot-
to “Service Above Self”, Rotary’s
main objective is service - in the com-
munity, in the workplace, and
throughout the world. The object of
Rotary is to encourage and foster
the ideal of service as a basis of wor-
thy enterprise and, in particular, to
encourage and foster:

e The development of acquain-
tance as an opportunity for service;

e High ethical standards in busi-
ness and professions, the recognition
of the worthiness of all useful occu-
pations, and the dignifying of each
Rotarian's occupation as an oppor-

‘tunity to serve society;

e The application of the ideal of
service in each Rotarian's personal,
business, and community life;

e The advancement of interna-
tional understanding, goodwill and
peace through a world fellowship of
business and professional persons
united in the ideal of service.

e For more information on Rotary
and becoming a member of this ser-
vice organisation check out www.dis-
trict7020blog. blogspot.com or e-mail
richardmccombe@gmail.com

Your success: Are you

contributing or complaining?
| life
coaching -
A new
perspective

@ By MICHELLE M MILLER,
cc

Success requires consistent
gratitude for what's going right,
rather than constantly grumbling
about what's going wrong.

Michelle M Miller

IN times of dissatisfaction it's
probably natural to grumble
about those things that appear
to hinder success; this is espe-
cially true if you are already a
chronic complainer.

The disadvantage of con-
stantly complaining is that in
the long run you build a skewed
outlook of life which impedes
any positive step towards your
success. Left unchecked, this
dead-end attitude will create a
serious wall of resentment.

Like a hamster wheel, the

‘more you spin the wheel of

complaining, the more situa-

‘tions you will find to complain

about. The truth of the matter
is, as long as you live on this
beautiful planet there will be
times when things don't go
according to plan; that's the way
life goes.

At every junction, you, how-
ever, have the incredible power
to choose how you deal with
life’s challenges. Knowledge is

by Michelle M
Miller, CC



the key; most people are com-
plainers primarily because they
are unaware of the importance

of contrast
blends the colours of life’s expe-
riences.

Nothing really exists without

an opposing substance or idea
to which it can be compared.
For example, you are able to
identify joy by virtue of the fact
that it can be compared to pain;
having something to compare
it with is what makes it what it
is.
I know that this may seem a
little over the top - but more
simply put - the concept of 'up'
exists only because it can be
compared to 'down'; one can-
not exist without the other.
Contrast is an important ele-
ment and its awareness brings
clarity to your experiences.

With this knowledge, you
learn to accept that we are all
exposed to life's 'ups' and
‘downs' and we need not take
our situations so seriously.

COMPLAINING
DEPLETES ENERGY

Rest assured that the habit of
complaining is laced with nega-
tive energy. Ever notice how
being around a complainer
drains your energy? It's as if
everything's sapped out of you
just by listening to their insis-
tent ramblings about how 'bad'
things are.

and .how it.

The bigger question is -
where does this overwhelming
pessimism come from?

‘You may be surprised to find
out that the bulk of negative
energy shouldered by many
people comes from so called
‘reliable’ sources of information
(media); print, television, radio,
Internet etc.

Seems many media houses
serve only to readily. remind the
public of what's 'wrong' with
the world. The relentless serving
of negative information will
eventually impact the human
psyche. You must, therefore,
decide in advance how you will
ensure the sanctity of your own
mind.

Moreover, the media's affect

on the human psyche is not a |

farfetched theory; in the movie
Hotel Rwanda, which was
based on a true story, research
suggests that it was propaganda
carried via ‘hate radio' that
incited ordinary people into the
eventual extermination cam-
paign.

Limit your intake of negative
information and gently shift
from complaining to contribut-
ing. This will allow you to dis-
cover the vast beauty and won-
der in this magical world.
Despite the daily negative
reports, this is a magnificently

created universe.

FINAL THOUGHT

Wayne Dyer says - Change
the way you look at things and
the things you look at will
change; a powerful statement
that encourages a shift in your
focus.

Whether you believe it or not,
your outer world is by and large
created by the perception of
your inner world; how you see
life is exactly how life shows in
your experiences. -

_ Shifting your mind towards
contributing means accepting
that the glass of life is always
half full; knowing that contrast
provides the stimulation that
keeps you intrigued and excited.

Remember. - success is a
process and every sunrise is
another opportunity for you to
move forward.

Consistently contribute; get
up and make it happen.

© Questions/Comments are
welcome

Website: www.keep-moving-
forward.com

E-mail:
coach4ward@yahoo.com or
write to

PO Box CB-13060
Nassau, Bahamas

° carefair.com

FROM woman front

ed to the young however. For Diana*, who will be 70
on her next birthday, the truth of one of her friend-
ships was painfully realised just a few years ago.

“In 2006 I had an incredibly difficult experience
in my local church where the very people responsi-
ble for shepherding our congregation were trying to
humiliate and sideline me. During this time, my
friend - we had been friends for many years, she
never forgot my birthday or the birthdays of my
children, my children were friends with her chil-
dren, I thought we were friends - but when this dif-
ficulty came my way - and it was a very public expe-
rience - she never approached me to see how I was
doing, for us to talk about it or to tell me that she
was praying for me. She just backed away and
allowed me to go through this trial alone,” Diana
said.

“I don’t know whether she didn?t know what to
say or how to handle it or even if she agreed with
what was happening to me. In a way, she was like
Peter - some friends don’t want to be identified
with you when you are in trouble - but a real friend
will stick close to your side and offer that support
that you need to make it through the difficult times.”

Even with this painful experience, Diana recog-
nises that female friends are important to have and
that everybody needs an outlet.

“Sometimes we say Jesus is all we need, but you
need people in your life who will give you an encour-
aging word, who will guide you along. You have
your family, your husband, your children, but you
need your friends. Even with Jesus, in that circle of
twelve disciples, he had three who were closest to
him = Peter, James and John. You don’t need a
bunch of friends, but you need your friends who
you could confide in, and when you speak to them
you don’t hear it again; someone who will pray for

:

Girlfriends

you, who you could lean on,” she said

ALL GOOD THINGS MUST
COME TO AN END

In a way, the end of a friendship is even worse
than breaking up with a boyfriend.

“J invest more in my relationships with girls than
matter what. Most times you are more real with
they disappear.

“You always call your friends when something
happens to you, but who do you call when you can’t

get in touch with your friends?” she said.
When asked how to end a friendship without all of

relationship without there being bad feelings.

way to do that,” she said.

* Names have been changed

FROM woman front

able keep feelings of romance at bay when

i they become emotionally close to a member of
; the opposite sex.

Outside of her cousins and extended friends

: of the family, Diana said she never had any
: male friends growing up. “It was always easier
: for me to make friends with women,” she said.

According to Ms Ward male/female friend-

> ag: ships are very similar to female/female friend-
guys,” Shante said, “and I expect them to be there no : ships, although she admits that romance can

girls; you're not worrying about how you look or sometimes get in the way of the man/woman

anything like that, so it’s more devastating when : dynamic.

“T think that many women would say that it

is easier to be friends with a man because they
: don’t feel they have to compete on any level -
; then again there are many people that say men

: : and women can’t be friends. But what
the emotional upheaval, Ms Ward made the point :

that it might not be possible to end an authentic type of relationship or they can’t have that

“Sometimes there is a gradual process where type of reiationship themselves. And it does
someone spends less and less time with the other ; Complicate things if one person in the rela-
person - may be they’re moving in different circles- ; tionship is married or has a boyfriend,” she
but it is always difficult when one person gets left :

behind and the other moves on. There’s no easy :

I say is that either they haven’t seen that

said.

In Anna’s case, while she has ac - . of sup-

a ; i portive female friends, the majority of her
ve seen where young women have friends and : frjends are males. “They are the best ones to
one gets engaged and the other ones feel left out. ? have. You're not a threat to them they’re not
They’re still trying to be friends, but something has : : - ti ses
cote betweeit them: It’s a process that unfortu- : Dey usnally ies loyal, contidenual ene
nately happens and it’s a part of life. And then | ly, it’s a whole different perspective. The only
sometimes we break for a time and come back ; thing with the men though, once they accept
together in different circumstances,” Ms Ward said. :

: the friendship then everything will be fine,”
: she said.

that there will be no dating or compromising of

Friendships.

CROSSING THE AGE DIVIDE

As women get older, Ms Ward said, they
become more confident in themselves, know
more about what they want, and their friend-
ships tend to reflect their changing attitudes
about life. “If someone is going through a
divorce, for example, they want more divorced
friends or single friends — our friendships
change from that perspective,” she said.

But although sharing similar experiences
serves as a bonding agent with friends of the
same age — sometimes it is the differences in
our lives — even our ages - that brings women
together.

As a senior citizen, Diana feels that an old
person can have young or younger friends.
Referring to the difficult time she went through
in 2006, Diana said that she was going to church
one night when she suddenly felt overwhelmed
by all that was going on.

“J thought to myself, I don’t want to go into
this church, I don’t want to see these people,
and just then one of my younger friends - she
could have been my daughter - came over and
told me how over the years I had encouraged
her and now she thought it was her turn to
encourage me. She put her arm around me
and said all would be well and that she was
praying for me. I was able to walk in church
feeling like I could face the world,” she said

; “S


HE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

MAY



13:5

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pete itery they come

GIRLFRIENDS

THE POWER aAanp THE ANGUISH
OF THE FEMALE RELATIONSHIP

m@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features Editor
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net

THE beauty of female friendship —
it’s the one human relationship where
two people, two equals, bond over shared
intimacies, struggles, moments of embar-
rassment, triumphs and achievement,
remaining true to one another, faithful
and loyal. The relationship can be sea-
sonal or lifelong — but when it is right, in
either phase, it is, arguably, among the
most satisfying emotional experience a
woman can have.

For twenty-something Shante*, her
female friendships are some of the most
important relationships in her life. “They
are almost like a surrogate family. If you
don’t have a husband or a steady
boyfriend or kids, you spend most of
your time with them. Your girlfriends
are like your family,” she said.

But while the strength of female
friendship is easily recognised, there
sometimes seems to bea darker, more
edgy side to this type of relationship.

Still in that sometimes awkward stage
where girls make that transition into
womanhood - seeing themselves as such
for the first time - Shante has discov-
ered that, especially when it comes to
male affections, her closest girlfriends
have sometimes served as her greatest
rivals.

“When you spend a lot of time with a
certain group of people, there’s a dynam-
ic that’s set up where it could either be a
positive thing or a negative thing. One
thing I notice in my friendships is that
there seems to be a level of competition.
If you are hanging out with your single
friends — when it comes to getting atten-
tion from males you want to be the one
that he sees or talks to first,” she said.

While some might argue that this is
the typical group mindset that most
young women experience, Angela Ward,
a psychotherapist at the Renascence
Institute International, questions whether
these women really are friends.

“They are not real friends. When I
think about a friend, not an acquaintance
or somebody on the job who is in com-
petition with you, but someone you have
a relationship with as opposed to some-
one you are working alongside or com-
peting with for someone or something,
that [competition] is not what I see,” she
said.

For Anna*, who is in her thirty’s, her
female friendships are very important
and crucial in helping her develop into
the woman God created her to be.
“Women are insightful; outspoken, affec-
tionate, affirming and confidential,” she
said.

Back in high school, where the power
of the female friendship first truly
emerges, her relationships evolved
around music, and she gravitated toward
the girls who could really dance and
could put on makeup, “because I could-
n't,” she admits.

“As I became a young woman, the

determining factor [for my friendships]
was honesty and self awareness and def-
initely someone I could laugh with or
talk about God with. My friendships went
from hanging out and talking fool to
more adult concerns - life changing/pos-
itive themes. There were less frequent
get-togethers, but more depth and qual-
ity conversations. The secret to my suc-
cessful relationships with women is find-
ing that secure balance between being
an individual and knowing and accepting
who they are,” she said.

The truth of our friendships

W hile everyone knows that
trust is an important

component of any friendship —
Ms Ward notes that a true
friendship cannot exist with-
out it - what other charac-
teristic constitute a friend-
ship?

According to Ms
Ward - friends:

e Share quality time
together

¢ Have similar
interests in activities

e Feel the support
of one another

e Share similar
values

e Have asense ©
that the other per-
son has “got your
back”

e Allow you to
feel that you can be
yourself. You don?t
have to put on a face
or a show for them

While spending
time together doing
activities that you
both enjoy is a
foundational
aspect of any
friendship, this
relationship become ‘
most important when
one party seeks and i
receives the support of
the other.

“T think the time I
most relied on my
friends is when I
had issues I felt
I couldn’t turn
to my fami-
ly with
because I
felt they
would be
disap-
pointed,”
Shante
said.







“Whether it is work-related or about a
boyfriend, it’s good when you have
friends who don’t judge you, who just

listen instead of jumping down your

throat.

“You need someone who understands
that everyone messes up. And sometimes
family members could be a bit more sup-
portive, but they say ‘oh, you shouldn?t
have done that’. I know they want the
best for you, but your friends are your
age and they are going through the same
thing as you, so they know how you feel,”
she said.

Issues of support and feeling that your
friend has “got your back” are not limit-

SEE page 15



















































in all shapes and sizes

@ By YOLANDA DELEVEAUX
Tribune Features Editor
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net



A: DIVERSE as the women of the Bahamas are, so to are the
reasons for the friendships that are formed between them.

According to Angela Ward, a psychotherapist at the Renascence Insti-
tute International in SandyPort for the past five years, women form
friendships for different reasons and with different types of people,
because their needs cannot be met by one person.

“It’s hard to find everything in one person, and women who expect to
find everything in their husbands or boyfriends will be disappointed.
We may have a friend we can laugh with, have a friend we can talk to con-
fidentially; someone that teaches us about being a women - who is good
with hair, interior decorating, with cooking. Sometimes friends bond as a
result of having children, and they become part of our support system,
sometimes friendships result from activities that we do,” said Ms Ward.

“Nowadays it’s kind of rare to have friends from childhood. Sometimes
we outgrow those friendships depending on what stage we are at in our
lives. Remaining close friends with someone over the course of a lifetime
is rare and very special - it could be like sisters,” she said.

According to Ms Ward, women generally have a greater ability to
bond than men do and it’s because we try to find commonalities with one
another and work with that. Our relationships are not necessarily about
competing, but finding a common bond — and that’s why she
believes women should be heading the peace process.

VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE

B ut what about other types of female friend-
ships — like those with a man or someone

much older or younger — are they possible, and what
makes them important?
For. many Bahamian women, Shante included, while
they have a few relatively close male friends, their
core base remains the women in their lives.
“T have one or two male friends that I talk
about my feelings with, but sometimes you
just need another girl, another woman to
talk to. We are used to talking about
our feelings, but with guys if you
tell them a problem, they imme-
diately feel they have to find a
solution for it — your female
friends just listen. They
know that you might not
need a solution, just
someone to listen to. It’s
cathartic — you just
need to let it out.”
When dealing with
male/female friend-
ships, it is perhaps
the age of the
individual that
determines
whether this
type of relation-
ship is possible.
While younger
generations of
Bahamian
women are more
easily able to see
the men in their
’ lives as friends —
Le aaa ett i with no hint of inti-
he a macy or sexual] ten-
sion existing in the
relationship, older
Bahamians may not be

SEE page 15












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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 17



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Mid-Atlantic storm
cuts power and
prompts evacuations

@ WASHINGTON

HEAVY rain drenched the
mid-Atlantic region Monday,
knocking out power to tens of
thousands of customers, flooding
roads and chasing people out of
their homes, gccording to Asso-
ciated Press.

Up to 5 inches of rain fell
across the region from Sunday
afternoon into Monday, with
another half-inch possible in
some areas.

“(It’s) possibly the worst
flooding that I’ve seen since
Hurricane Isabel in ’03,” said
Steven Marshall, director of the
Department of Emergency Ser-
vices,in Somerset County, Md.

Strong wind and saturated soil’

brought down trees and cut pow-
er to homes and businesses
throughout the region.

Numerous roads were closed
because of high water and fire-
fighters reported calls from
stranded motorists and some
boaters who had to be rescued.

A sinkhole up to 30 feet wide
and 10 feet deep led to the evac-
uation of three homes in Camp
Springs, said Mark Brady, a
Prince George’s County fire
department spokesman. The
porch of one home collapsed
into the hole.

Along the Delaware coast,
residents of several communi-
ties in Kent County were evacu-
ated Monday because of flood-
ing. National Guard troop carri-
ers capable of driving through 6

feet of water rescued trapped ..

Iraq: Sadr City

residents. Flood warnings in the
region were extended through
early Tuesday.

About 30 people in Bowers,
Del., fled to a fire station, with
dozens of others seeking refuge
elsewhere, said Willie Trow-
bridge, president of the town’s
fire department.

“We still have some people in
their houses who have refused
to ledve,” he said.

A Coast Guard helicopter
crew rescued two men Monday
morning from a private research
ship that was breaking up and
taking on water about 14 miles
off the coast of Rehoboth Beach,
Del.

Ship

The ship, named after a for-
mer Delaware governor, was
christened in Wilmington just six
weeks ago and was being used
for the study migratory bird
routes by a company trying to
win state approval for an off-
shore wind farm. ~ ‘

Utilities reported 50,000 cus-
tomers without power in Mary-
land, nearly 50,000 in New Jer-
sey, more than 23,000 in
Delaware, 16,000 in Virginia and
4,500 in the District of Columbia.

Power already had been restored.

to many of those customers by
early afternoon.

Farther up the coast, wind and
rain caused average delays of up
to 2 1/2 hours for flights heading
into New York’s three major

cease-fire signed after
weeks of fighting _

m@ BAGHDAD

THE CARPORT of this home

was damaged when a sink hole
formed behind a row of homes in
Camp Springs, Md. on Monday
May 12, 2008 after heavy rains.
At the end of the driveway and
under the carport platform the
land sank approximately

20-30 feet.

airports.

Strong wind also contributed
to a fatal fire Monday morning
in Newark, N.J., fanning flames
of a blaze that killed 4 50-year-
old man, damaged three build-
ings and left 35 people home-
less.

The foul weather prevented
the resumption of a Coast Guard
search for a female passenger
who fell overboard from a cruise
ship northeast of Atlantic City,
N.J., on Sunday night. The Nor-
wegian Dawn was headed for
Bermuda from New York City
when the passenger fell.

Weather service meteorolo-
gist Lee Robertson said the
storm differs from a nor’easter
because it is.a combination of
two weather systems, one from
the Ohio Valley that contributed
to weekend tornadoes and a sec-
ond from just south of the Del-
marva region of Delaware.





























Jacquelyn Martin/AP

IRAQ’S main Shiite political bloc and supporters of firebrand
cleric Muqtada al-Sadr signed a fragile cease-fire in Baghdad’s
Sadr City on Monday, hoping to end seven weeks of fighting that
has left hundreds dead, according to Associated Press.

But the U.S. military has alleged that most Shiite extremists
fighting Iraqi and U.S. forces in the teeming slum have splintered
away from al-Sadr’s Mahdi Army, and that the cleric’s level of
influence on those rogue groups is unclear. Many are thought to be
trained and armed by Iranian forces. Iran denies the allegations.

Al-Sadr’s representatives and the rival United Iraqi Alliance
agreed to institute the four-day cease-fire starting on Sunday, but
talks over the details of the truce were not finished until a day lat-
er.
The deal allows Iraqi forces to take over security in the militia
stronghold of Sadr City on Wednesday.

“The mutual efforts of all have stood against civil war, and
thanks.to God we have left it behind our backs,” proclaimed Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki, a Shiite.

Clashes

The clashes erupted late March when Iraqi forces launched a
crackdown in the southern city of Basra. The Sadrists accused al-
Maliki, a political rival, of trying to sideline them ahead of expect-
ed provincial elections in the fall.

The fighting spread through the south and to the capital, where
Shiite extremists in Sadr City began firing rockets and mortars
toward the heavily fortified Green Zone.

Al-Sadr effectively stopped his militia from fighting in Basra
within days of the crackdown. But clashes escalated in Sadr City,
drawing U.S. attack aircraft and tanks into the fighting.

Al-Sadr recently threatened to launch an all-out war against
U\S.-led forces but ordered his militia to avoid Iraqi casualties. His
movement appears divided over whether to launch a full-scale
fight against Americans or focus on political efforts.



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PAGE 18, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008



THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Putin names
TTT Tamm WTI

ko





Tara Todras-Whitehill/AP

ISRAELI PRIME Minister Enud Olmert, center, and lawmakers Lia Shemtov, left, nt Gideon Sar right, attend a committee nealing at the Knesset, Israel's salient in
Jerusalem, Monday May 12, 2008. According to a new poll, six out of 10 Israelis think Prime Minister Ehud Olmert cannot promote peacemaking with the Palestinians because
of the latest police investigation into his conduct. The same number think Olmert should resign.

Israeli police widen sama
into Olmert donations

@ JERUSALEM

ISRAELI police raided
Jerusalem’s City Hall on
Monday, searching offices
and confiscating documents
‘as part of a widening cor-
ruption inquiry against
Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Olmert is suspected of

illicitly accepting large sums
of cash from a Jewish Amer-
ican donor. Some of the
donations are believed to
have taken place during
Olmert’s 0-year tenure as
mayor of Jerusalem.

Police spokesman Micky
Rosenfeld said the police’s
anti-fraud team. conducted
the raid. He said the seized
documents were connected
to Olmert time as mayor
between 1993 and 2003, but

ne

: Le

Anti-fraud team conduct
raid on Jerusalem’s City Hall

had no further details on
their contents.

The investigation has cast
a shadow over Israel’s 60th
anniversary celebrations and
embarrassed the prime min-

‘ister at a time when he

should be enjoying the lime-
light. President Bush arrives
this week to take part in the
national celebrations.
Olmert’s legal troubles
have also raised doubts
about his ability to reach a
peace deal with the Pales-
tinians. With U.S. backing,
Olmert and Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas

have set a year-end target
for a peace agreement
meant to end six decades of
conflict. During his visit,
Bush is expected to take
stock of the talks and push
for more progress.

The scandal has set off
speculation that Olmert may
not be able to remain in
office long enough to com-
plete the negotiations.
Olmert, who denies wrong-
doing, has said he would
resign if he is indicted, and
even if he hangs on to pow-
er, he may not be strong
enough politically to win

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support for a peace deal.

A poll Monday said six of
10 Israelis think Olmert is
not capable of promoting
peace with the Palestinians
because of the investigation.
Sixty percent of those polled
also said they don’t believe
Olmert’s claim that he did-
n’t funnel money into his
own pocket. The survey had

a margin of error of 4.5 per- .

centage points.

The poll was the first since
police disclosed last week
that they are investigating
suspicions that Olmert illic-
itly took envelopes stuffed

- with hundreds of thousands

of dollars in cash from Mor-
ris Talansky. Police were
questioning the Long Island,
N.Y., businessman Monday.

An Israeli police official
said investigators are look-
ing into many allegations
against Olmert, including
possible money laundering,
accepting bribes and cam-
paign finance violations. The
official, who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because

the investigation is contin-
uing, said the case is looking
ata 12-year period.

The Justice Ministry has
been deliberately vague on
what laws the Israeli leader
might have broken because
the probe — expected to
take months — is at an ear-
ly stage, a ministry official
said.

Since becoming prime
minister, Olmert has been a
suspect in several corruption
affairs involving real estate
deals and questionable polit-
ical appointments. He has
been questioned several
times in the past by police
but has never been charged.
Some of the investigations
remain pending.

In an interview broadcast
Sunday on Channel 10 TV,
Talansky denied trying to
bribe Olmert.

“T never thought in any
way that the money that I
gave him for the purpose of
his becoming mayor or elec-
tioneering was in any way
illegal or wrong,” he said.

TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF



SECURITY SERVICES

for

POWER STATIONS &
OUTLYING LOCATIONS

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders from eligible bidders for the

: 4 provision of Security Services for the Mall-
4 at-Marathon, Main Post Office Depot and
Clifton Pier, Soldier Road & Blue Hills
' Power Stations for the Corporation.

Bidders are required to coliect packages
from the Corporation's Administration
Office, Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by
contacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Phone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before
26th May, 2008, 3:00 p.m. and addressed

as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 666/08
Security Services for

Mail at Marathon,

Main Post Office Depot,
Clifton Pier, Soldier Road &
Biue Hills Power Stations

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject the whole or such part of any
Tender the Corporation deems necessary.



PIS ETT
the Kremlin

mm MOSCOW



PRIME Minister
Vladimir Putin wasted no
time in naming his new Cab-
inet on Monday, bringing in
loyalists trom the Kremlin
in what was seen as an effort
to shift the center of power
to his new place of work,
according to Associated
Press.

He also left several
prominent ministers
untouched, including For-
eign Minister Sergey
Lavrov, Defense Minister
Anatoly Serdyukov and
Finance Minister Alexei
Kudrin.

Putin announced the 24
positions, eight of them
new, at a Cabinet meeting
in the government head-
quarters, the ministers
already seated according to
their new appointments.

President Dmitry
Medvedev, Putin’s hand-
picked successor who was
inaugurated last week,
quickly approved the
appointments, which includ-
ed the demotion of a former
rival. Putin named the
hawkish Sergei Ivanov, once
seen as a top candidate to
succeed him as president, as
one of his deputy prime
ministers, a step down from
his previous position as first
deputy premier.

Bolstering the economy
was one of the priorities list-
ed by Putin when he pre-
sented himself as prime
minister-designate to the
parliament last week.

His move from the Krem-
lin to the Cabinet residence
up the Moscow River allows
him to remain a hugely
influential figure in the
country’s politics and many
observers have speculated
he will overshadow
Medvedev.

“Medvedev has a very
narrow set of choices and
opportunities,” said political
analyst Dmitry Oreshkin. —
“He will accept the condi-
tions Putin imposes on him
and will not take steps that
would spoil his image as
(Putin’s) successor.”

Putin was shown describ-
ing the structure of the new
Cabinet in footage which
dominated news broadcasts
throughout the day. He
looked and sounded presi-
dential when he discussed
the changes with Medvedev
in televised remarks.

“It was enough to see
how Putin talked to
Medvedev to understand
who is the boss,” commen-
tator Anton Orekh said on
Ekho Moskvy radio. “Putin
was the main hero Mon-
day.”

Medvedev received signif-
icantly less air time Mon-
day.

In another sign of his
authority, Putin angrily
scolded reporters dictating
details of the reshuffle to
their offices: “If you contin-
ue chatting so loud, we
won't invite you any more.”

Putin increased the num-
ber of prime ministerial
deputies to seven, compared
to the five for his predeces-
sor, Viktor Zubkov.

Zubkov was named a first
deputy prime minister. He
was put in charge of agricul-
ture, forestry and the fishing
industry, in addition to cus-
toms and tariffs.

- The other first deputy
premier is Igor Shuvalov, a
top policy aide in Putin’s
Kremlin who gained promi-
nence as an important fig-
ure when Russia hosted the
Group of Eight summit in
2006. Shuvalov will oversee
foreign economic policy and
negotiate Russia’s member-
ship in the World Trade
Organization.

Igor Sechin, the former
deputy chief of presidential
staff, will oversee industrial
development programs.
Sechin, who is widely seen
as a leader of a powerful
Kremlin clan of “siloviki,”
or veterans of Russian secu-
| rity services, will apparently
remain chairman of the
| state-controlled oil compa-
ny Rosneft.

Oreshkin said most of the
promotions were given to
colorless officials who are
little known by the public.
“There was no, populism, in
the new appointments,” he
said. “The role of public
opinion is so low that
whomever is appointed will
be accepted.”










THE TRIBUNE

I UESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 19



NTERNATIONA

| L NEWS

Death toll in China
earthquake is up
to nearly 9,000

@ CHONGQING, China

ONE of the worst earth-
quakes in decades struck cen-
tral China on Monday, killing
nearly 9,000 people, trapping
about 900 students under the
rubble of their school and caus-
ing a toxic chemical leak, state
media reported, according to
Associated Press.

The 7.8-magnitude earth-
quake devastated a hilly region
of small cities and towns. The
official Xinhua News Agency
said 8,533 people died in
Sichuan province and more
than 200 others were killed in
three other provinces and the
mega-city of Chongqing.

Xinhua said 80 percent of the
buildings had collapsed in
Sichuan province’s Beichuan
county after the quake, raising
fears the overall death toll could
increase sharply.

State media said a chemical
plant in Shifang city had
cratered, burying hundreds of
people and spilling more than
80 tons of toxic liquid ammo-
nia from the site.

The earthquake sent thou-
sands of people rushing out of
buildings and into the streets
hundreds of miles away in Bei-

jing and Shanghai. The temblor -

was felt as far away as Vietnam
and Thailand.

It posed a challenge to a gov-
ernment already grappling with
discontent over high inflation
and a widespread uprising
among Tibetans in western Chi-
na while trying to prepare for
the Beijing Olympics this
August.

The. quake hit about 60 miles
northwest of Chengdu — a city
of 3.75 million — in the middle
of the afternoon when class-
rooms and office towers were
full. There were several smaller
aftershocks, the U.S. Geological
Survey said on its Web site.

About 1,200 pandas — 80
percent of the surviving wild
population in China — live in
several mountainous areas of
Sichuan. :

The earthquake hit one of the
last homes of the giant panda
at the Wolong Nature Reserve
and panda breeding center, in
Wenchuan county, which
remained out of contact, Xin-
hua said.

The Wolong PandaCam, a
live online video feed showing
the activities of the pandas at
the nature reserve, stopped
showing footage of the animals
late Sunday night.

The earthquake, China’s
deadliest since 1976, occurred
in an area with numerous fault
lines that have triggered
destructive temblors before. A
magnitude 7.5 earthquake in
Diexi, Sichuan that hit on
August 25, 1933 killed more
than 9,300 people.

Xinhua said 50 bodies had



RESCUERS SEARCH for victims in the debris of a hospital after the



earthquake in Dujiangyan, in southwest China's Sichuan province Mon-
day, May 12, 2008. A massive earthquake toppled buildings across a
wide area of central China on Monday, killing more than 8,533 people,
trapping hundreds of students under the rubble of schools.and causing
a.toxic chemical leak in one of the worst quakes in decades. ;

‘been pulled from the debris of

the school building in Juyuan
town but did not say if the chil-
dren were alive. Students also
were buried under five other
toppled schools in Deyang city,
Xinhua reported.

Its reporters saw buried
teenagers struggling to break
loose from underneath the rub-
ble of the three-story building in
Juyuan “while others were cry-
ing out for help:” Two girls
were quoted by Xinhua as say-
ing they escaped because they
had “run faster than others.”

Photos showed heavy cranes
trying to remove rubble from
the ruined school. Other photos
posted on the Internet and
found on the Chinese search
engine Baidu showed arms and
a torso sticking out of the rub-
ble of the school as dozens of
people worked to free them,
using their hands to move con-
crete slabs.

Calls into the city did not go
through as panicked residents
quickly overloaded the tele-
phone system and the quake
also affected power networks.

Although it was difficult to

MATE Ce Peel te

telephone Chengdu, an Israeli

student, Ronen Medzini, sent a
text message to The Associated

Press saying there were power
and water outages there.

“Traffic jams, no running -

water, power outs, everyone sit-
ting in the streets, patients evac-
uated from hospitals sitting out-
side and waiting,” he said.

The road to Wenchuan from
Chendu was cut off by land-
slides, state media said, slowing
the rescue efforts.

Though news trickled out in
the first hours after the quake,
the government and its media
quickly mobilized, with nearly
8,000 soldiers and police sént
to the area. China Central Tele-
vision ran non-stop coverage,
with phone reports from
reporters and a few isolated
camera shots from the scene.

Disasters always pose a test to
the communist government,
whose mandate in part rests on
providing relief to those in need.
In recent years, the government
has improved emergency plan-
ning and rapid response training
for the military.

_ The earthquake also rattled

PEOPLE TAKE care of patients
outside a hospital after it was
evacuated following an earth-
quake in Chengdu, in southwest
China's Sichuan province Mon-
day, May 12, 2008. A massive
earthquake toppled buildings
across a wide area of central Chi-
na on Monday, killing more than
8,533 people, trapping hundreds
of students under the rubble of
schools and causing a toxic
chemical leak in one of the worst
quakes in decades.

buildings in Beijing, some 930
miles to the north, less than
three months before the Chi-
nese capital was expected to be
full of hundreds of thousands

of foreign visitors for the Sum-

mer Olympics.

Li Jiulin, a top engineer on

the 91,000-seat National Stadi-
um — known as the Bird’s Nest
and the jewel of the Olympics
— was conducting an inspec-
tion at the venue when the
quake occurred. He told
reporters the building was
designed to withstand a 8.0
uake.

“The Olympic venues. were
not affected by the earth-
quake,” said Sun Weide, a
spokesman for the Beijing orga-
nizing committee.

Skyscrapers swayed in Shang-
hai and in the Taiwanese capital
of Taipei, 100 miles off the
southeastern Chinese coast.
There were no immediate
reports of injuries or damage.

The quake was felt as far.

away as the Vietnamese capi-
tal of Hanoi, where some peo-
ple hurried out of swaying office
buildings and into the streets
downtown. A building in the
Thai capital of Bangkok also
was evacuated after the quake
was felt there.

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake
is considered a major event,
capable of causing widespread
damage and injuries in popu-
lated areas.



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TENDER FOR THE PROVISION OF
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ADMINISTRATON BUILDING,
-BIG POND COMPLEX

JUMBEY VILLAGE & HUYLER STREET
PARKING LOTS

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites
Tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of
Security Services for its Administration Building,
Big Pond Complex and Jumbey Village & Huyler
"Street Parking Lots for the Corporation.

Bidders are required to collect packages from
the Corporation’s Administration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads by
contacting Mrs. Delmeta Seymour,
Phone No. 302-1158.

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 26th
May, 2008, 3:00 p.m, and addressed as follows:

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

Marked: Tender No. 667/08
Security Services for
Administration Building, Big Pond

Jumbey Village & Huyler Street Parking
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or

reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary.




Color China Photo/AP




for





and
















+

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager






Nassau, Bahamas






Complex and



Lots





mas

SGV

SN

SSL Wy Ww > virpy,],17_yz3qas. 0000 °° 7. qqp»»w AEA)» EeEwn»

BW

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\


PAGE 20, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008



Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority
To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration
Act Chapter (277)

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands will be held at the Port Administration Building,
Prince George Wharf on Thursday the 29" May,2008 3:00pm for the purpose of
granting Licences under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277)

Any person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do $0 at least six
(6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing to the
Board and to the applicant.

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written
authorization at the meeting. .

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written -
‘notification from the, New Providence Port Authoxity. "os .

The under mentioned persons have applied for grant of licences as specified below: -

GOVERNMENT NOTICE |

Ministry Of Maritime Affairs And Labour
Port Department



THE TRIBUNE





NEW MASTER’S LICENCE — NEW PROVIDENCE
LICENCE # ' NAME . CLASS
NB/13/08 Bastian Stephen L. B
P.O. Box N-3733
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/14/08 Sands Dino D. B
P.O.:Box NP- 3733
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/15/08 Smith Kelly J. B
P.O. Box EE- 16986
, Nassau, Bahamas
NB/16/08 Wells Cleveland T A
P.O. Box n-9665
Nassau, Bahamas
NEW MASTER’S LICENCE -FAMILY ISLAND
LICENCE # NAME - ; CLASS
NB/02/08 Cartwright Graeme A
Hoopers Bay, Exuma
NEW BOAT LICENCE- FAMILY ISLAND
REG # APPLICATION BOAT CLASS PASS USE
NAME
NB/01/08 Little Exuma “Marlin” A 0 ' Barge
Enterprises: 200ft
P.O. Box F-60448 Steel Hull
Freeport, Grand
Bahama :
NB/02/08 Little Exuma ‘Vega Big A 0 Tug
Enterprise Dolphin”
P.O. Box F-60448 105ft
Freeport,GrandBahama Steel Hull
NEW COMMERC RE TIONAL W R
OPERATORS LICENCE NEW PROVIDEN
LICENCE # NAME CLASS
NB/81/08 Hanna Rodney E. D
: General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas
NB/84/08 James Renaldo M D
General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas
SFER OF BOAT -F. Y ISL
REG NO. PREVIOUS NEW CLASS PASS USE
OWNER OWNER
NP: 6817 Island Time Sports Exuma Blue A 49 Charter
. Fishing Ltd Boat .
PO. Box SS-19812 Charters Ltd
Hopper’s Bay Hopper’s
Exuma Bay Exuma

RENEWAL OF CO NAL
ACT
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT CLASS’ PASS USE
NAME
NP B 3(CB) Vonies Watersports “Time Out” D 10 Rental
P.O. Box SB-50762 12ft
Nassau, Bahamas Banana Boat
RENEWAL OF C L
JET NEW - :
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT CLASS PASS USE
NAME
NP: 503 SAN = Smith Vernal “No Name” D 2 Rental
P.O. Box CB-13796 On
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski
RENE T LI W
REG NO APPLICATION BOAT CLASS PASS’ USE
NAME
NP: 04 Barefoot Sailing “Riding BB 30 Charter
Cruises High”
P.O, Box SS-5219 53ft *
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass
NP: 2788 Barefoot Sailing “Wind B 20 Charter
Cruises _., Dancer”
P.O. Box SS-5219 4ift
Nassau, Bahamas Fibreglass
NP: 5076 Munroe Prince “Lady p” A 0 Mail Boat
P.O. Box SS-40483 98 ft
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 6298 Marine Tankers “Ocean * A 10 Oil Tanker
Services Trader”
P.O. Box SS-6130 171 {4
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 6621 Maury Peter “Reel B 8 Charter
‘Nassau, Bahamas Motion”
48ft
Fibreglass
NP: 6754 Pirates Well “M/V -Lady A 85 Mail Boat
Investments Co. Rosalind II” ;
P.O. Box N-7461 185ft
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 6743 Pirates Well “M/V Lady A 85 Mail Boat
Investments Co Rosalind”
P.O. Box N-7461 150ft
Nassau, Bahamas Stee) Bull
NP: 6236 Pirates Well “M/V Trans A 40 Mail Boat
investments Co. Cargo Il”
P.O. Box N-7461 226ft
Nassau, Bahamas Steel Hull
NP: 3198 Paradise Dive “Sea Star” B 25 Charter
Charters 37ft
P.O. Box N-3198 Fibreglass
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 6738 Smith Paul “Chaser” B 8 Charter
Nassau, Bahamas 38ft
Fibreglass
NP: 6823. Smith Paul “Strike Zone” B 8 Charter
Nassau, Bahamas 39ft
Defender
NP: 6638 Smith Paul “Hunter” _ B 10 Charter
Nassau, Bahamas 42ft
Hatteras
NP: 6323 William Yelverton “Mary Ann B 73 Ferry Boat —
P.O. Box CR-54939 II”
Nassau, Bahamas 46ft
Fibreglass
RENEWAL OF TER’S — FAMI
LICENCE# NAME CLASS
7204 Darville James G. A
Berry Island, Bahamas
8293 David Rex E. A
P.O. Box AB-20687
Murphy Town, Abaco
7380 Gunn Stephen F. A
Freeport, Grand Bahama
6404 Higgs Harvey W. A

Spanish Wells, Eleuthera
15)



iy!

6132

7491 |
8281
7919
7364

6725

7292

LICENCE #

6877

1495

8177

7815

8142

8267

6813



Munroe Prince A

Staniel Creek, Andros

“MinnisNigeIF. == =A
P.O. Box F-44257
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Knowles Adam M.A. A
Freeport, Grand Bahamas

Smith Kyle L. A
P.O. Box F-43216
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Ward Kent A
P.O. Box F-41478
Freeport, Grand Bahama |

Waton Harry B A.

Spanish Wells, Eleuthera

Zaritzky Barry A
General Delivery
Gregory Town, Eleuthera

suBtL

GN-674_

samen meerey

RENEWAL OF MASTER’S — NEW PROVIDENCE

NAME

Adderley Farron - A
P.O. Box SB-50104
Nassau, Bahamas

Clarke Franklyn A
General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas

Clarke Lawson A
P.O, Box N-1397
Nassau, Bahamas

Dames Ethan R. A
P.O. Box EE-17380
Nassau, Bahamas

Flowers Christopher A
P.O. Box CR-5562
Nassau, Bahamas

Knowles Kevin N.
P.O. Box GT-2494
Nassau, Bahamas

Moss Keith
P.O. Box CR-56592
Nassau, Bahamas

Sweeting Christopher R.
P.O. Box N-1029
Nassau, Bahamas

Varga Randolph 1.
P.O. Box SS-5219
Nassau, Bahamas

Signed: Captain Anthony Allens
PORT CONTROLLER

CLASS

_ fellow Islamists, ideological

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 21



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Sudan briefly
detains Islamist
for alleged

rebel

KHARTOUM, Sudan

SUDAN briefly detained its
leading fundamentalist Islamic
ideologue on Monday, accusing
him of aiding a Darfur rebel
attack on the capital but then
releasing him without charge,
according to his party and state
media, according to Associated
Press.

Hassan Turabi was arrested
after dawn at his home in Khar-
toum and at least 10 other mem-
bers of his Popular Congress
Party members were detained
in a government sweep across
the city, said Awadh Ba Bakr, a
relative and close aide to Tura-
bi. Bakr says al-Turabi was
questioned by security and
released without charges about
15 hours later.

Turabi is believed to wield
influence with Khalil Ibrahim,
the leader of the Justice and
Equality Movement, whose
fighters launched an unprece-
dented attack Saturday near
Khartoum, hundreds of miles
from their bases in the country’s -
far west.

The attack was the closest
Darfur rebels have ever come
to the seat of Sudan’s govern-
ment, which they accuse of mar-
ginalizing ethnic African minori-
ties and worsening the area’s
humanitarian crisis.

Sudan’s official news agency
quoted unidentified government
officials as saying that rebels
already in custody implicated
Turabi and other party mem-
bers as part of a “conspiracy.”
Interrogations were underway; it’,
said.

Turabi, who has a doctorate
from the Sorbonne, is one of the
founders of Islamist politics in
Sudan and provided the ideo-
logical basis for President Omar
al-Bashir’s coup and the cre-
ation of an Islamic state in 1989.

Both he and Ibrahim were
once part of the regime, and as

allies.

Ibrahim, however, denounced
the Sudanese government-in
1999 for its Arab bias against

ferences.

HOLE & 1H ta fe Kil Wrtet



During the early 1990s, Sudan

links

Amr Nabil, File/AP

IN THIS Dec.10, 2000, file photo, Hassan Turabi, the leader of the
Sudanese opposition Popular Congress Party is seen waving for his
supporters during a conference in Khartoum, Sudan. Turabi was arrest-
ed at his house in the early hours of Monday, May 12, 2008, according
to his party, apparently because of his links to Darfur rebels who
attacked close to the capital this week.

move that helped make Sudan a
pariah state.
Turabi fell out with al-Bashir

ethnic Africans and resigned
from the government and even-
tually taking up arms.

Ibrahim maintained he and
Turabi, an ethnic Arab with a
Darfuri wife, still had their dif-

was accused of sheltering Islam-
ic militant groups; Osama bin
Laden made his home here until
the government threw him out
in 1996. Turabi backed Saddam
Hussein in the first Gulf War, a

in 1999 and has since been in
and out of prison on various
charges, and under house arrest.
He was never sentenced, and
remains influential. ;

Sharif’s party to quit
Pakistan Cabinet

m@ ISLAMABAD, Pakistan

‘FORMER Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif
pulled his party from the Cabinet on Mon-
day, raising doubts over the new govern-
ment’s stability and Pakistan’s transition to
democracy after eight years of military rule,
according to Associated Press.

The ruling coalition that came to power
after February elections — dealing a crush-
ing defeat to allies of President Pervez
Musharraf — could now flounder. Its two
key partners cannot agree over how to
restore senior judges removed by the former
military strongman late last year.

Sharif said his group would still support
the government led by the party of Asif Ali
Zardari on an “issue by issue” basis, but
also indicated he would join protests by
lawyers lobbying for the restoration of the
judges — which risks intensifying the stand-
off between the parties.

A permanent split in the coalition would
boost Musharraf, a longtime ally in the U.S.-
led war on terror, who has taken a back
seat since the new civilian government took
power in late March.

The failure of the new civilian adminis-
tration could reinforce perceptions that only
the army is capable of running the volatile
Islamic country.

Political analyst Hasan-Askari Rizvi said
that unless the two parties could find a quick
solution to the judges issue “they will drift in
the opposite direction.” '

“That could be the beginning of instabil-
ity in Pakistan and a major setback for the
prospects of democracy in Pakistan,” he
said.

Sharif said ministers from his party would
meet with Prime Minister Yousuf Raza

Gilani on Tuesday and hand in their resig-
nations. He said he was “very pained” at
the decision.

“We will sit together ... We are not going
to sit on the opposition benches for the time
being,” Sharif told a news conference. “We
will not take any step which will benefit
Musharraf’s dictatorship.”

Separately, the 53-nation Commonwealth
comprised mainly of Britain and its former
colonies cited Pakistan’s progress in restor-
ing democracy in lifting the country’s sus-
pension from the group, imposed after
Musharraf’s imposition of emergency rule in
November.

Coalition

The wrangling within the coalition over
the judges is an unwelcome diversion for a
government facing myriad problems, includ-
ing Islamic militancy — which claimed the
life of Zardari’s wife Benazir Bhutto in
December — and a worsening economy.

Zardari and Sharif announced an agree-
ment on reinstating the dozens of judges
that were axed by Musharraf to forestall a
Supreme Court ruling on his eligibility for
office. But they have since disagreed on the
mechanics, and weekend negotiations in
London — the latest in several rounds of
talks — did not produce a deal.

Zardari’s party said it still wanted to
restore the judges but the parties needed
resolve how to best do it “without affecting
the present judges” — a reference to those
appointed during Musharraf’s emergency.

Spokesman Farhatullah Babar said it
would not fill the Cabinet vacancies left by
Sharif’s party and would try to resolve the
issue “amicably.”
PAGE 22, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 / THE TRIBUNE
COMICS PAGE

















ARE YOUR MALADJUSTED
ANTISOCIAL TENDENCIES
THE PRODUC OF YOUR

BERSERK PITUITARY GLAND?








BY THE WAY, I'M GLAD

YOU AND LU ANN





I'LL SEE YOU TOMORROW
NIGHT AT THE OPENING,













i, GEN | “AFTER ENNIS KINDA GROWS ON YOU
A SS} .» LIKE MOLP..OR MILDEW.”
a)
4












THAT WAS CLOSE!
1 WAS NEARLY
UPSTAGED BY MY
OWN YANKEE POT

THAT GOES FOR yOu,
TOO, GORGEOUS!












‘Famous Hand










West dealer. played very quickly. ‘| TU ESDAY,
North-South vulnerable. West led the king of hearts,
NORTH ducked by South, and continued with | M AY 1 3
@A8 the jack, won by Rubens with the — -+
: 9765 ace. He promptly played the jack of AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
= #AK 1042 diamonds aa Soe ree took the Your finances continue to be aj sub-
#983 queen and remanence: : ‘ject of angst. You’re making the sit-
T EAST Rubens thereupon showed his : 2 ' Ree |
ayoe #10652 hand and claimed the rest of the ya Hons Saat is. ane
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; ; * 86° #Q53 * explanation he offered was that he that you are in good shape. |
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is WwW sday;
24 Pass Pass 2NT the A-K-Q of spades and A-K-10 of Tempers flare up on Wednesday

Aries, -and you’re smack-dab in the



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board match, but it demonstrated that” South tous is scheduled for the weeks to
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Vata ee res . - ! all cylinders.’ The lead of the diamond four / GEMINI — May 22/June/21

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‘NO N'SEQUITUR : : ete rqncaete : ine pene a shown. Ordinarily, club, on which South would discard Your dual personality comes into full

play at work. You're playing both sides
- Gf'a tricky situation late in the week. If
either party catches you, there’s bound to
» be trouble. Rethink your strategy.

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Your amiability could have you
taken advantage of on Tuesday.
Being friendly is one thing, being
gullible is another. Keep your eyes
wide open to avoid the trap. '

’ LEO — July 23/August 23

* You expected good news this, week,
Leo, but it’s not going according to
plan.. Rest assured that. it should
arrive shortly, so keep a positive atti-
tude toward the situation. |

‘VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22
A troublesome housemate is causing
all types of turmoil in your Usually
organized life. You’re at your wit’s
end with the situation. It may pe best
to sever all tics. :

. LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23
You’ve reached a roadblock in your
career path, Libra. If you can’t
decide what steps to take, consult a
close confidant for some advice.
Expect things to change next)week.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

~. You have your eye on someone. who
isn’t your current partner. If; you’re
single, go for the adventure. If
you’re married, it’s not worth the
risk of discovery.

-‘ SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21

You have much planning in store

Rubens plays his cards ina deliberate a spade, and then squeeze West out
tempo, even though he is actually of a club to put an end to the pro-
one of the fastest thinkers in the ceedings. Rubens’ claim at trick four
game. But on the present occasion he _ was simply a timesaver!







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HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Fach
must contain the centre letter
and phere Gace at least one
-letter word.
TODAY'S TARGET TS:
Good 25; very good 38;
excellent 49 (or more).
Solution tomorrow:

tram trauma TRAUMATIC ~ j

trim uric

amir amrita aria arum
atrium attar aura carat cart
cram curt marc mart raita
tarmac tart tiara tract trait

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION



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CRYPTIC PUZZLE














; DOWN | for the weeks to come, Sagittarius.
AcROss a BERG eda rs 5 i] There are parties galore, and
Good man, but is an arch : eee Ss (5) 3 \ you'll be at the center of every cel-
one better? (6) fj 2 Fabricated like a white-topped eal Wor i ebration. Enjoy the rush. |
Four, once more, can ponstitute cooker (5) aes CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
omamentation (8) 3 Aking of some fame, known for his | closing | Home life has been putting a damper
Na : Dyke (4) a ee on your ‘usually adventurous spirit.
imbs on a swimmer's back? (6) aids Laan casiptwrlren Cena This week stays at status quo. Don’t
Where fighting can leave one a near Meee final step of a fight the quiet, embrace it; things are
wreck? (5) way, we hear?) (5) real estate bound to bounce back shortly,
Which perech may be a doctor a 5 Left Uncle out of the violence! (4) ee ae Peyeyeteye
Maidenhead (4) 6 — Started to be frank with the Editor (6)
Fiver scale ite tic 9 His unskilled labour is acceptable, eal
ae yen oe Oy) . _ thatis, out East (6) 33
Aspen TN tage hace | ae CHESS by Leonard Barden
nf 7 eee ets) 12 About the nose Alan's broken (5) real
a org round a sand bar (4) 13 Now up around the mark, perhaps, as
Deposited as financial an artisan (7) ia Mark Ferguson v Michael Yeo, Isle
sae Chetan) Ra see alto Testa cf
orm of cutter a sailor would ; :
Tear ud Nave 2 16 Take the rest as pure fiction (3) must have been feeling quietly
), 18 _ Increase due to interest in an electric ACROSS fi satisfied when he reached today's
Powder used in dental care (4) shock cure! (6) 4 — Lubricant (6) i Faith (5) position as Black against an
Join me when the cabaret's 20 Trying to get a wicked fate to come 7 oF are & 2 Blemish (5) ~~ international master opponent.
finished (4) right? (5) 8 — Snuggle (6) Z 3 Occasion (4) Several pieces have already been
Your worthy side a 10 Mud (5) ‘ 4 Magic exchanged, and now Black is
oe (3) e oe sound of a bird (3) 13 Eat (4) b spirit (5) looking forward to hoovering off a
. Scan a letter in red (4) 22 He's up in his den (3) Ww ae as 4 - 4 5 Gaelic (4) ; pair of rooks and the remaining
She's presumably Irish (4) 23 Perennial caution with cash (6) _I 5 Wom, bs a : mee, knights, after which he can open
Go and change direction (4) —25 Inmany instances, the Scots one (3) N 16 = Church ; Tl Auction sala soi bur therfore iy
Lying the professionaLway (5) 28 — Flynnin one of his finer roles? (5) =) "7 aeons item (3) tactical trick hidden in the position
Strike the woman this way (6) 30 Real tennis was so princely! (5) oO. (4) z nec which IM Ferguson had spotted a
Gloomy about the actors 31 Welsh thane, possibly (5) > 19 Metal(4) 15 Swamp (3) -_.. __ few moves earlier before steering
employed? (8) : 32 The love of a boy (4) g 21 Wandered (9) 16 Seed-case (3) the game into the diagram against
Walk on the street with a certain gait (6) 33 A dramatic bit of work (4) wu 2 Type of 18 Disease (6) his unsuspecting opponent. How
word (4) 20 Rushes (5) did White force a rapid
24 Merriment (4) 2 Cat's cry (3) resignation? LEONARD BARDEN
26 Noticed (3) 2 Type of ag he
27 Thing (4) wood (3) 4 :
23 Weed (4) ; 2 Empty (6) gia k cape ss
32 Action (4) 25 Offer (3)
; - = 33 Stage 28 Examines (5
Yesterday's cryptic solutions | Yesterday’s easy solutions whispe a
5 c
ACROSS: 1, Hum-bug 7, Eighteen (18) 8, MA-MA 10, Boozer | ACROSS: 1, Evolve 7, Decanter 8, Pole 10,Chosen11,Facade «| '—i(iti3 Stroke 5 _ . ae Chess: 8558: 1 Nxd6 Rxe6 2 dxe6 Qxd6 3 Qf3! wins
11, Little 14, K-ew 16, Noses 17, Le-er 19, Fi-n-er 21, C-aged | 14, Peg 16, Voted 17, Then 19, Metal 21, Melon 22, Motor 23, 35 Herb (3) en with the double threat of 4 Qxa8+ winning the rook
22, A-RR-a-Y 23, Ran-k 26, Lisle 28, Ted 29, Ostler 30, Brew 26, Began 28, Fee 29, Ironic 30, Forage 31, Oral 32, 36 Against (6) : es a - or 4 Rdi pinning and winning the queen.
Re-gent 31, Ear-N 32, Lumbered 33, Sat-|-re Customer 33, Trench pa te 33 Unit of land (4)

DOWN: 1, Her-bal 2, Blazer 3, Gear 4, Chained 5, Heats 6, DOWN: 1, Elicit 2, Loosen 3, Eden 4, Caravan 5, Stoat 6,

Knees 8, M-OK-e 9, Me-W 12, To-R 13, Lenin 15, Cigar 18, Greed 8, Pope 9, Leg 12, Col 13, Delve 15, Below 18, Haver :

Elvis 19, F-ar 20, Ney 21, Creeper 22, A-L-L 23, Re-gret 24, 19, Met 20, Tor 21, Monitor 22, Man 23, Berate 24, Real 25, : hes

Aden 25, Kettle 26, Lolly 27, St.-amp 28, Tea 30, Reds Wrench 26, Birch 27, Goose 28, For 30, Fort

a FT I TS SY, VS IT

a
-, THE TRIBUNE











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NETWORK CHANNELS

Florida Roadtrip |Nova “A Walk to Beautifu Three | Frontline “Storm Over Everest’ A fierce storm traps three climbing teams

-|@ WPBT Carriage rides; [Ethiopian women with childbirth in- {high on the slopes of Mount Everest. (N) 1 (CC) (DVS)

Equitheatre. juries. (N) (CC) (DVS)

The Insider (N) |NCIS “About Face’ A killer targets Shark “One Hit Wonder’ Sebastian |Criminal Minds “Limelight” A seif-
4 (CC) Jimmy Palmer. (N) © (CC) tries to determine who murdered an |storage unit reveals evidence of a
aspiring singer. (N) (CC) serial killer. © (CC)

Access Holly- |MostOutra- © (Most Outra- {Law & Order: Special Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
wood (CC) us Moments |geous Moments | The life of a ke eat ness Wounded, Lake takes a hostage
Ay A (CC) 4 (CC) goes terribly wrong. (CC) and goes on the run. (N)

Deco Drive American Idol The top three fina |(:02) Hell’s Kitchen Contestants |News (N) (CC)

ists perform three songs. (Live) “ |take a blindfold taste-test challenge.

cc} (N) © (PA) (CC) |

Jeopardy! “Col- |Accordingto [According to |Dancing With the Stars Elimina- Se Women’s Murder Club “Never
lege Champi- Jim Dana hypno- |Jim Game night. tion. (Live) (CC) e| pee Finale) Lindsay risks
onship” (N) (CC) |tizes Andy. (N) 0 (CC) her life. (N) (CC)

CABLE CHANNELS
00) (SI: Miami |The First 48 A man is found dead |The First 48 “Double Time” Investi- Gene Simmons |Gene Simmons |
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Own’ 1 (CC) “Nail Me” (CC) —|(N) (CC) |

(0 BBC World |BBC News |World Business |BBC News |Women onthe |News |
levis America |(Latenight). Report (Latenight). Front Line War |
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College Hill: At- | * x NEXT FRIDAY (2000, Comedy) Ice Cube, Mike Epps, Justin Pierce. |College Hill: At- Iron Ring (N) |
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NHL Hockey Eastern Conference Final Game 3 -- Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Fly- |CBC News: The National (N) 0
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(:00) Kudlow & |Fast Money Deal or No Deal Contestants get a |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch |
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{00} Poe CNN Election Center Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)

onight



(CC)
Scrubs Jordan's |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Futurama Ro- South Park Cart-|Carlos Mencia: No Strings At-
friends come to |With Jon Stew- |port (CC) bots in love. 1 |man exacts re- tached The comic shares his take |
town. 1 (CC) fart (CC) (CC) venge. (CC) — jonAmerican diversity. (CC)
Wizards of Wa- | MODEL BEHAVIOR (2000, Comedy-Drama) Mag- (A) That's So (i) That's So. |Life With Derek
verly Place Alex |gie Lawson. A shy teen swaps identities with aglam- |Raven (CC) |Raven “Where's |*Driving Lessons*
alters time. orous young model. 1 (CC) the Smoke” A (CC) ,
This Old House |Sweat Equity /Sweat Eau Desperate Land-|Desperate Land-|Rock Solid “Fire |Rock Solid Out-
0 (CC) “Decked scapes (N) _ {stapes Pit & Gril?” door kitchen.
Beckmann ‘ |ZDF Reportage |Journal: Tages- |Global 3000 — {Journal: In Euromaxx

thema Depth

The Daily 10 (N) |Going Postal: 15 Most Shocking Acts of Violence Disturbing acts of vi-|Keeping Up-Kar- Keeping Up-Kar-
; dashians dashians



olence.
(:00) E:60 (N) — |2007 World Series of Poker Main |2007 World Series of Poker Main |Baseball Tonight (Live) (CC)
event, from Las Vegas. (CC) event, from Las Vegas. (CC) ss | - ;
ATP Tennis Masters Series Hamburg -- Early Rounds. |Poker Hip Hop Hold'Em. (Taped) {Poker Irish Championship. (Taped)
From Hamburg, Germany. (CC)
Daily Mass: Our {Mother Angelica Live Classic ~ |Religious Cata- |The Holy Rosary/Threshold of Hope
Lady Episodes logue
(tn) Cardio © |Shimmy Chest |Shimmy Basic |Namaste Yoga |Namaste Yoga |Body Challenge (CC)
last M (CC) Egyptian step. — jLegs. (CC) “Sun-Moon’
Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
Shepard Smith Susteren (CC)

circles. (CC)
(0) MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at Cincinnati Reds. From Great American Ball Park in {Inside the Mar- |The FSN Final
lins Score (Live)











incinnati, (Subject to Blackout) (Live) ‘

Playing Lessons|The Approach fe ee Big Break: Ka’anapali Big Break: Ka'anapali (N)
ive ;
Lingo (CC) ' |Who Wants to Be a Millionaire © |Family Feud |Family Feud © /Russian Whammy (CC)

(CC) (CC) (CC) Roulette (CC)

(00) Attack of {X-Play (N) Ninja Warrior Unbeatable —_‘| Attack of the Show! “World War 2
he Show! (N) Banzuke Airplane Laser Tag.”

(00) Walker, —_ |Walker, Texas Ranger Walker gets |DANIEL’S DAUGHTER (2008, Drama) Laura Leighton, Sebastian

exas Ranger “6 |called in to break up a sophisticated shenes: Brandon Firla. A woman returns home to bury the father who
Hours” cc} burglary ring. © (CC) abandoned her. (CC)

Buy Me Selling a/Designer Guys {Design Inc, “The |Colin & Justin's Home Heist “Clut-|Green Force | Take It Outside
townhouse. % {Acouple looks to |Carlu’ (CC) ter Nutter’ Ready for a fresh start. “Dog Playground”| (CC)

(CC) upgrade. N (CC) (NA ;

Victory Joyce Meyer: {Christ in Inspiration To- |Life Today With |This Is Your Day/The Gospel:

Everyday Life |Prophecy day James Robison |(CC) Truth (CC)










Reba Reba plays Wy Wifeand According to |Family Guy Family Guy © Two anda Half |Two and a Half
Cupid for her ex- |Kids ‘WhatDo |Jim Jim makes a |Homicidal and —|(CC) Men © (CC) —|Men Jake's
husband. You Know?” ( {neighbor cry. — drunk. © (CC) school principal.
Still Standing + /Reba Cheyenne |Reba Reba's ex- |HOMELESS TO HARVARD: THE LIZ MURRAY STORY (2003, Drama)
Lauren takes ad- |dooms the foot- |husbandbe- | Thora Birch, Kelly Lynch, Michael Riley. The homeless daughter of drug
vantage. (CC) ball team. (CC) comes jealous.

addicts tums her life around. (CC)

te Hardball |Countdown With Keith Olber- | Verdict With Dan Abrams Countdown With Keith Olber-
CC mann mann

Zoey 101 “Jet X” |SpongeBob {Drake &Josh |Home Improve- |Home Improve- |George Lopez rei Lopez
a kee) SquarePants 1 |"Sheep Thrills” |ment (CC) jment M (CC) | (CC), 0 (CC)

(:00) Bones (N) {NCIS “About Face” A killer targets |House House struggles to regain |News (N) ‘|News

(PA) (CC) |uimmy Palmer. (N) © (CC) his memory after a bus crash. (N) _|(CC)

Pass Time Countdown to All-Star Spot- Wind Tunnel Special Edition (Live)/Unique Whips

All-Star (N) light (N)
Behind the Joyce Meyer: /John Hagee To- |Bill Gaither (CC) |Praise the Lord (CC)
-|Scenes (CC) Enfo ing Every: |day (CC)
day Life (CC) ;

Everybody Family Guy “Hell |Family Guy Pe- |Family Guy Meg |Family Guy Pe- |The Office The Office Jim
Loves Raymond |Comes to Qua- |tergoesona |cannotfinda —|ter acts like © {Michael demands|and Michael's
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etectives “Van- Se A i a vanishes with {crime victim receives a letter asking |“Death on the Nile” Tragedy. (CC)
ished’ millions of dollars. forgiveness. (CC) ;

(:00) Law & Or- |NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal -- Teams TBA. (Live) (CC) NBA Basketball:
der “Marathon” Conf. Semi.

1 (CC) (DVS) ' c

Camp Lazio |My Gym Part- |Home for Imagi- |Johnny Test © |Johnny Test © |Courage the — |Grim Adven-

ner’s a Monkey |nary Friends —|(CC) (CC) Cowardly Dog |tures

Cops “Atlanta” /Cops Cops ( (CC) {Most Daring A gunman storms a __|Inside American |Inside American
0 (CC) “Seattle/Tacoma” loan office. Jail (N) Jail

(*t) Toute une |Pékin express “Krasnoiarsk’ Les eae doivent re- |Fourchette et {Solo parent

istoire joindre la ville de Krasnoiarsk. (Partie 5 de 12) sac a dos

(00) Abrams & |Epic Conditions |Weather Ven- | Weather: Evening Edition (CC)

ettes tures Py
(ot) YoAmoa_ /Al Diablo con Los Guapos Fuego enla Sangre Hermanos {Aqui y Ahora El benefactor de mas
uan Querendon buscan venganza. de 40 extranjeros ilegal.

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orate Awoman is found |cas, Patrick Dempsey. A New York fashion designer has a secret in the South. (CC)

dead in Central Park. 0

Young Rich, Britney's Secret Childhood Profile |Sex: The Revolution Sexual re- | Sex: The Revolution Liberated
Out of Control of singer Britney Spears, 1 pression in the 1950s. (CC) sexuality in the 1960s. (N) (CC)

NHL Hockey Eastern Conference Final Game 3 - emp! Penguins at Philadelphia Fly- |Hockey Central |TapouT (CC)
ers. From the Wachovia Center in Philadelphia. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) 0 (Live)

Bed America’s |Funniest Pets & |Funniest Pets & |Funniest Pets & |Funniest Pets & |WGN News at Nine (N) © (CC) 4
unniest Home |People Funny People Funny People Funny | People Funny |
Videos â„¢ (CC) |blooper videos. blooper videos. [blooper videos. {blooper videos, |
|
|















Family Guy Bay and the Geek (Season Fi- |Reaper ‘The Leak” Sam tums ina |CW11 News at Ten With Kaity |,
Homicidal and —_|nale) The remaining teams partici- |soul who somehow keeps returning |Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
drunk. (CC) |pate in a pop quiz 1 M (CC) _ |to earth. (N) O (CC) |

Jeopardy! “Col- |Dr. Phil The doctor counsels a drug |News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) |Frasier Frasier |Frasier Niles co- |
lege Champi- addict. (N) 1 (CC) has a midlife cri- |hosts on Frasier’s|
onship” (N) (CC) sis. 1 (CC) —|show.

PREMIUM CHANNELS

ad REAL * & EVAN ALMIGHTY (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell, |(:45) & &% THE ASTRONAUT FARMER (2007, Dra-
ports With — |Morgan Freeman. God commands a dee elected Me Billy Bob Thorton. A space-obsessed rancher
Bryant Gumbel jcongressman to build an ark. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) builds a rocket in his bam. 1 ‘PG’ (CC)

6:30) * %% HAVANA (1990, Romance) Robert Red- |The Sopranos “Stage 5° Johnny | x» WAIST DEEP (2006, Action)
ord, Lena Olin, Alan Arkin. A gambler begins a risky |Sack copes with more bad news. | Tyrese Gibson. A man’s son is in-
affair with a Cuban revolutionary. © ‘R’ (CC) side his hijacked car. 1 ‘R’ (CC}

(6:45) Coma Four head-injury pa- | x % » HOW TO EAT FRIED WORMS (2006) Thomas |REAL Sports With Bryant Gumue!
tients at JFK Medical Center ete New at a school, a boy takes a challenge |
emerge from comas. (1 (CC) to eat 10 worms. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) |

(5) & &: CONFETTI (2006, Comedy-Drama) Martin | * * * THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA oe ore Meryl Streep, Anne

reeman. Three couples enter a competition for most |Hathaway, Adrian Grenier. A recent college graduate lands a job at a

original wedding. 1 ‘R’ (CC) fashion magazine. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)

a) % % THE |(:15) &% THE REAPING (2007, Horror) Hilary Swank, David Morrissey, | *% LICENSE TO WED (2007, Ro-
REAK-UP dris Elba. A former Christian missionary debunks religious phenomena. |mance-Comedy) Robin Williams. 1

(2006) ‘PG-13' | 0 ‘R' (CC) ‘PG-13' (CC)

(6:50) % * x RANSOM (1996, Suspense) Mel Gib- | * x * TRANSFORMERS (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson,

son, Rene Russo, Gary Sinise. A wealthy executive _ |Josh Duhamel. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. (\ ‘PG-13' (CC)

tums the tables on his son's abductor. (1 'R' (CC)

(30) * He — |(:15) & * & ROCKY BALBOA (2006, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Burt |The Tudors (iTV) Cromwell reports
HE TRUMAN | Young, Antonio Tarver. iTV. Rocky, now retired, fights the world heavy- jon his findings about the Roman
SHOW (1998) {weight champion. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) Catholic Church. 1 (CC)

Me *&% |e LUCKY NUMBER SLEVIN (2006, Crime Drama) Josh Hartnett, |BACK IN THE DAY (2004) Ja Rule.
UDGE DREDD |Morgan Freeman, Ben Kingsley. A man lands amid a war between black |An old friend lures a young man ‘
(1995) ‘R’ (CC) and Jewish crime lords. 1 ‘R’ (CC) back to a life of crime. 'R’















TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008, PAGE 23

Let Charlie the ny
Bahamian Puppet and aay
his sidekick Derek put ay —

es

s
SS

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the

MctHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of May 9008,

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

?m lovin’ it

LL

ei Ade a aa

ovie Gift Certificates
imake great gifts!z
PAGE 24, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Seeking help for pets
after volcano eruption

A MEMBER of an animal welfare group poses with a dog during a demonstration in front of La Moneda
presidential palace in Santiago, Monday, May 12, 2008. Members of the group met Chilean officials to

ask for help for the hundreds of household pets left behind in the wake of the Chaiten volcano eruption
in southern Chile.



Sh
SOURDOUGH

HOMESTYLE

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Special Donation to the School for Exceptional Students at the GIES 25S ee 24 | F
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