Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Body with head
injuries found
wrapped in blanket

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE badly decomposed
body of a Cat Island man was
found wrapped in a blanket
under a tree in Bennett’s Har-
bour yesterday. He had suffered
head injuries.

Arville Smith, 43, has become
the twelfth murder victim in the
Bahamas this year, on an island
unused to violent crime.

Inspector Philip Rolle, offi-
cer in charge at Cat island, con-
firmed to The Tribune late last
night that police are treating the
death as a homicide.

Smith was found under a tree
in his back yard at his residence
at around 7.30am, police report.
The discovery was made by his

nephew, George Williams, dur-
ing a visit to the house where
Smith lived alone.

Blunt force trauma was visi-
ble to Smith’s head, Insp Rolle
confirmed, with the victim’s
teeth having been smashed
in.

Last evening, Insp Rolle said
that police were following
“some leads” in relation to
Smith’s death, but no one was in
custody at that time.

Last year, excluding Grand
Bahama, there were only four
murders in the Family Islands.
The police crime report for 2007
indicates that all of these cases
were solved.

A team of detectives has also
been sent to Cat Island from
New Providence to assist with
the investigation.

Polish men attacked and
robbed in Grand Bahama

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Two Polish men, returning home in the Lucaya
area early Sunday morning, were attacked and robbed by two men who
used a car to knock down one of them, and chased and struck the oth-

er one in the head.

Chief Superintendent Basil Rahming said Police have launched an
island-wide search for two robbers involved in the bold attack on the
two employees of the Grand Bahama Shipyard.

Jaroslaw Waszcyk, 42, and Andrzei Tomaszewski, 34, told police that

they were walking on Kings Road

back to their condominium shortly after midnight early Sunday
when they were accosted and robbed by two men.
Mr Waszcyk reported that he fell on the tarmac when he was hit

from behind by a red two-door car.

SEE page 13




































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@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION Leader Perry
Christie has called for urgent
action and cooperation among
regional partners against the
upsurge in‘crime across the
Caribbean.

The topic of crime was one
of the issues addressed by Mr
Christie while he was a guest
speaker at a dinner on Friday
evening organized by the
Rotary Club, in Georgetown,
Guyana.

The event, held at the Le
Meridien Pegasus Hotel, was
in observance of World Under-
standing Month, which is cele-
brated in February each year
by Rotarians.

During his remarks, Mr
Christie referred to the recent
Economist article on the rate
of violence in the Caribbean,
which brought negative pub-
licity to both the Bahamas,
Guyana and the wider region.
The article, written in a publi-
cation which has an annual

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The Tribune

ANY 'TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

MRS MARY PROFILO was presented with the |
Sir Victor Sassoon Heart Foundation Golden Award at the |
44th Annual Heart Ball held at the Atlantis Resort on |
Paradise Island on Saturday.



Perry Christie

readership of more than 62 }
million, named the Caribbean :

as a world leader in violent
crime,

“In a recent debate in our
Parliament in the }
Bahamas, I referred to the i
same magazine article, which :
‘described the worsening crime :

own

situation in the Caribbean,

including mentions of both The }
Bahamas and Guyana,” he :
said. “We know the issues. We :

SEE page 13









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Rien

Sr

* No commitment fees )
’ Flexible payment terms with
up to 10 years to repay!

* SEE PAGE SEVEN |

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Driver dies
after crashing
into utility pole

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net + :
— | party chairmanship
POLICE are investigating |
\ : @ By BRENT DEAN
an empty stretch of road in Aba- :

how a man, travelling alone on

co, crashed into a utility pole,

breaking it in half and killing ;

himself.

51 year-old Michael Baillou’s :
body had to be extricated from ;
the mangled wreckage of his :
maroon coloured Chevy Lumina ;

by using the “jaws of life”,

time after it had occurred.”

It is believed the deadly inci- ceeecive Lie cl baat
dent occurred as Mr Baillou was; eg ee
travelling at a high speed ON | tremendously.”
what police described as “a ; :
deserted stretch” of the S C Boo- : values of the Progressive Liberal
tle highway at around 11.20pm :

on Friday. His vehicle is thought : instilled in her all of her life. I

to have veered off the eastern : believe that possibly, no one but
side of the road a short distance ;

ahead of the Treasure Cay pri- :

SEE page 13

RN

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Minister diowaplays
the impact of the
proposed Economic
Partnership Agreement

! Mi By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE impact of the proposed

i Economic Partnership Agree-
: ment between the Bahamas and
; Other African Caribbean and
: Pacific nations and the Euro-
: pean Union was downplayed
: yesterday by minister of state
: for finance, Zhivargo Laing.

“We are a free trade society

i so people need to get used to
i the idea that the Bahamas is not
; in a situation where it is run-
? ning boldly into unchartered
: areas when it comes to trade (if
i it signs the EPA),”

: told a local radio talk show.

Mr Laing

Last week, attorney and PLP

i hopeful Paul Moss cailed on the
: government to “resist” signing
? onto the EPA, which calls for
i the liberalisation of trade
; between the EU and African,
: Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
: countries, declaring that by
: doing so it would “wreck the
; Bahamian economy.”

Yesterday, asked whether the

i Bahamas government was in
} agreement with statements
: made by Jamaican officials to
; the effect that the EPA would

SEE page 13

Former PLP MP
says Hanna-Martin
best candidate for

Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

ENGLERSTON MP Glenys
Hanna-Martin is the best candi-
date for the chairmanship of the
PLP, according to former party
MP George Smith.

While a guest on Love 97’s

reported police, adding that the : Sunday talkshow Jones & Com-

emergency services were only }
notified of the crash “quite some :

pany yesterday, Mr Smith said
“that Glenys Hanna-Martin will
be elected without any difficul-
ties as the chairperson of the Pro-
And
that...will benefit the party
“Glenys understands the core

Party,” said Mr Smith. “It’s been

Pindling equalled Arthur Hanna
in understanding what the PLP

SEE page 13

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——p—



PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE |)





CARL W. BETHEL (front
row, centre) is pictured
with representatives
from his Ministry, RBC
Royal Bank of Canada,
the Lyford Cay Founda-
tions, and past Lyford
Cay scholarship recipi-
ents who are employed
by RBC. Pictured imme-
diately behind Minister
Bethel is Dr. Nicolette
Bethel, Director of Cul-
ture, who was one of the
first Lyford Cay Founda-
tion scholars.





















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FROM LEFT: Carl W. Bethel, Minister of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture, Manuel J. Cutillas, Chairman)”
of Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc. and Ross McDonald, RBC Royal Bank of Canada's Head of Caribbean Banking, -
announce the donation of four academic scholarships by RBC to the Lyford Cay Foundations. an

RBC pledges |
LCF Academic -
Scholarship —
Programme

RBC Royal Bank of
Canada has_ pledged
$100,000, payable over 2008

and 2009, to the Lyford :Cay.

Foundation’s Academic
Scholarship Programme.

The financial institution
has also committed to mak-
ing a further gift of $100,000
in 2010-2011, provided that
a number of criteria are
met, including the scholar-
ship recipients maintaining
a certain level of perfor-
mance.

RBC's donation will make
it possible for four qualify-
ing Bahamians graduating
from high school this year
to pursue an undergraduate
degree of their choice at
approved institutions in
Canada. The scholarships

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“I wish to thank the Lyford Cay ‘,,.
Foundation, the Canadian Lyford)‘

Cay Foundation, the Royal Bank
of Canada particularly for this
wonderful partnership that is
geared towards the building of
our youth and our nation.”

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Education Minister Carl Bethel ballw

are worth CAD$12,500 per
annum each,

"I wish to thank the
Lyford Cay Foundation, the
Canadian Lyford Cay Foun-
dation, the Royal Bank of
Canada particularly for this
wonderful partnership that
is geared towards the build-
ing of our youth and our
nation," said Education
Minister Carl W. Bethel,
during the official presen-
tation of the award recently.

"The commitment of all
of these entities to excel-
lence has not gone unno-
ticed."

Manuel J. Cutillas, Chair-
man of Lyford Cay Founda-
tion, Inc., described RBC's
donation as "a most wel-
come gift."

Supporter

"I would like to express
our sincere and deep grati-
tude to the Royal Bank of
Canada for its tremendous
generosity," said Mr. Cutil-
las. "RBC has been an
important supporter of the
Lyford Cay Foundation
over many years, and this
grant is a further demon-
stration of its ongoing com-
mitment to education, and
the country."

"We are proud and privi-
leged to be able to make
this contribution, and confi-
dent that these scholars will
be excellent ambassadors
for The Bahamas and return
home one day to have a
positive impact on the fur-
ther development of our
community," said Ross
McDonald, RBC's Head of
Caribbean Banking.

Nathaniel Beneby, Vice
President and Country
Head at RBC, thanked the
Lyford Cay Foundations for
their work in the fields of
education and philanthropy.

"RBC applauds the level
of support the Lyford Cay
Foundations have given to
the Bahamian community

I
20]
over the years. We are sijqi
pleased to again partner pses
with them to provide access sin 5
to higher education for 34 lo
Bahamian students." ebay
The gift is being made as 08%
part of RBC's 100th! bn
anniversary celebrations. In es
January, the financial insti- ae
tution also donated $1 mil- °)
lion to The College of The ....4
Bahamas (COB), the single jj, ,;
largest corporate donation 5; 4,
the college has received to jajy3!
date. BENG

ie?

Ee
lied

The money will go.
towards the creation of MM&
COB's Bahamas Business jj &
Centre.

RBC Royal Bank of «i
Canada was a pioneer in toy
bringing full-service bank- oy
ing to The Bahamas, and w»!!
today employs more than .{\"
700 Bahamians at its 24 1)!
branches throughout New
Providence and the Family *
Islands. 38

The Lyford Cay Founda- °°
tions are the country's
largest private educational
and philanthropic organisa-
tions, having awarded more,
than $14 million in under- ,.,,
graduate, graduate and 4
technical: scholarships to ;
Bahamians studying over- jie!
seas and at The College of . agw
The Bahamas.

The deadline for Lyford ¢ vit
Cay Foundation academic viii
scholarship applications is !\
March 31, 2008. Ino

Applicants must be 2.
Bahamian citizens and
pledge to return to The
Bahamas upon completion |
of their studies.

Detailed information and —
application forms are avail-
able at www.lyfordcayfoun-
dation.org. Forms may also
be obtained from high
school guidance counsellors,
The College of The §
Bahamas Financial Aid ;
Office, and the Lyford Cay |
Foundation office. ,

Money

J



—_



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 3



© In brief

Thousands of
teachers stage
protest march
in US Caribbean
territory

@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

Thousands of Puerto Rican
teachers marched to the gates of
the governor’s mansion Sunday,
threatening to go on strike for
higher salaries and better work-
ing conditions if long-stalled
bargaining talks are not
resumed, according to the Asso-
ciate Press. The two sides will
sit down again Monday to try
to resolve the two-year impasse.
But union leaders representing
the majority of Puerto Rico’s
42,000 public school teachers
plan a Tuesday news confer-
ence to announce a strike date if
no agreement is reached.

“We hope to send a firm mes- '

sage to Gov. Anibal Acevedo
Vila so that the agreement is
signed,” Teachers Federation
President Rafael Feliciano said
among a throng of marchers.
The island’s department of
education and the union have
agreed to 26 articles of a pro-

posed collective-bargaining’

agreement, but 20 others
remain unsigned, including 16
salary-related clauses.

The looming strike has divid-
ed the union’s roughly 32,000
members as some urge restraint,
saying the group’s first strike
since 1993 should be a last
resort. Strikers could be fired
under a local law that forbids
disruption of the public educa-

tion system. The starting salary °

for a teacher in the U.S. terri-
tory is US$19,200 (euro13,084)
a year — about a third less than
the average public school
teacher salary on the U.S. main-
land.

Broatdcasters in
crackdown on
radio payofts

@ KINGSTON, Jamaica

Jamaica’s broadcasting chief
said new regulations will hin-
der rac.. stations from taking
bribes from local music compa-
uies oF artists to play songs, a
pervasive problem in the
Caribbean country.

Hopeton Dunn, chairman of
the island’s broadcasting com-
mission, said program coordi-
nators must now provide
detailed playlists to government
inspectors to prevent the bribes
called payola, a contraction of
“pay” and “Victrola,” the old
wind-up record player.

“These regulations will help
to encourage the sector to
increase the monitoring, man-
agement and documentation as
a measure against this question
of payola,” Dunn said in a Sat-
urday statement. “It is impact-
ing on the broadcasting industry

and has done so for a very long

time.”

In addition, Dunn said he will
recommend introducing finan-
cial sanctions under the island’s
Broadcasting Commission Act
to discourage improperly sold
or traded air time. The island’s
legislature will take up that pro-
posal in coming weeks.

Four released
Cuban dissidents
arrive in Spain

& MADRID, Spain

Four dissidents released after
spending years in a Cuban
prison for their political beliefs
flew into exile in Spain yester-
day. Pedro Pablo Alvarez
Ramos, Omar Pernet Hernan-
dez, Jose Gabriel Ramon Castil-
lo and Alejandro Gonzalez
Raga landed in Madrid accom-
panied by 13 relatives and
friends and drove to a down-
town hotel, where they spoke
about their ordeal to journal-
ists.

Alvarez said Cuban authori-
ties gave him a choice — exile
or jail. “It was a very difficult
decision. To leave so many
brothers and colleagues behind
was a heartrending experience,”
Alvarez said. Alvarez, 60, said if
he had been younger he would
have probably opted to stay in
jail as a protest, but with his
health failing he felt he had lit-
tle choice but to leave Cuba.

Spain’s Air Force had sent a
plane to transport the four
Cubans to an air force base in
Madrid, a Foreign Ministry
spokesman said on condition of
anonymity.

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Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

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822-2157



Laing confident
Urban Renewal

ww

Programme will
prove effective

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE newly relaunched
Urban Renewal programme
will bring the “facilities, the
means and the programmes” of
central government down to
blighted urban communities to
an extent never seen before,
State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing said yesterday.

Speaking on the radio show,
Real Talk Live, Mr Laing said
that the FNM government’s
decision to “relaunch” the pro-
gramme, first implemented
under the Christie government,
was taken because the pro-
gramme as it stood was not con-
tributing to the “physical, social
and economic transformation”
of urban communities.

Mr Laing said that while he
did not doubt “what the former
administration attempted to do”
by creating Urban Renewal “in
terms of reaching out to com-
munities” he believed it failed in
some regards, lacking “struc-
ture” and “the proper focus of
urban renewal.” By relaunch-
ing the initiative, he suggested,
the aims of a “pure definition”
of urban renewal can be
achieved.

“Urban Renewal begins with
this recommendation that there
are areas of a society that have
blight, they are urban...but it
begins with them being blight-
ed, meaning that physically,
economically, socially they have
deteriorated.

“So the idea behind urban
renewal is to go into those areas
and through economic empow-
erment and investment you
actually regenerate the area and
you move into the area with
programmes that actually assist
with empowering socially the
people in that area,” he said.

He said that urban renewal

_is “not a clean up campaign, it’s

not a hand-out campaign, it’s
not a campaign for providing
simply opportunities to walk
about in an area — it is meant
to transform the area, physical-
ly, socially and economically
(and) that has not been the case
to date.”

The urban renewal pro-
gramme became the subject of
intense post-election contro-
versy in May and the months
that followed, when the PLP
accused the FNM of “stopping”
the programme. However min-
ister with responsibility for the
programme, Kenneth Russell,
denied this was the case, but did
admit that changes would be
made — in particular to the role
of police officers in the initia-
tive.

Mr Laing said yesterday that
the public can now expect to
see an effort to ensure that
those living in blighted social
conditions are more aware of
and able to access the opportu-
nities that are available to them.

“Many in these communities

End Tabi
Cushions

e
e
e
@
e
@
e
e
e

Blighted communities to
receive help ‘as never
before’, says Minister

Zhivargo Laing



that we live in don’t have a clue
about the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank and what it could
offer, Venture Capital Fund,
the various guaranteed loan
schemes. The idea now is to
cause those centres to pull those
programmes from that remote
distance down to these commu-
nities so that people now can
be furnished with empowering
information and contacts, appli-
cations — right there in their
communities,” he said.

Last week, Mr Russell said
that the four main objectives of

the new programme are to
increase safety, wealth, inde-
pendence and create a “sense
of responsibility” within com-
munities. He noted that each of
the nine urban renewal centres
has now been appointed man-
agers. Urban Renewal centres
were previously headed by
police officers. Former prime
minister Perry Christie, howev-
er, blasted the FNM’s decision
to relaunch the programme in
the manner in which it did as a
“bloody disgrace.”

“The fact that these gentle-

men and ladies (the govern-
ment) are coming back and say-
ing they are relaunching it, is
one of the shameful develop-
ments in this country because
it ought not to have been
stopped. And in saying that I
concede that they could have

- come in, kept it going:with the

leadership it had and then
decide to tweak it. But to stop
it, and change it, and bring now
what they’re going to bring in, is
a bloody disgrace.”

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



ee a

re

HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

Pie

of Abaco, The Bahamas, well loved educator, community
leader and retired District Education Officer died at
Doctors Hospital, Nassau on Thursday, 14th February,

2008.

He is survived by his wife, Sylvia and son, Gregory.

A Memorial Service in Abaco will be announced at a

later date.

Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.



<-





“So the idea behind urban
renewal is to go into those areas
and through economic
empowerment and investment you

actually regenerate the area ...”



Zhivargo Laing

Editorial/Letters see
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE








The Tribune Limited .

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
, Nassau Fax: - (°42) 328-2398
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Get YEAST back on track

IN THE House of Assembly on Wednes-
day Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in sup-
porting an Opposition motion for a select com-
mittee to investigate the social conditions con-
tributing to crime and to make recommenda-
tions for improvement, suggested that govern-
ment make the money it now pays to operate
the YEAST youth programme available to the
Catholic Church, the founders of YEAST.

YEAST was a programme started by the
Church nine years ago to try to rehabilitate
troubled young men, ages 16 to 19.

The Church had started the pilot programme
in 1999. It was known as the Character and
Leadership Development Camp and was held at
Camp Symonette in James Cistern, Eleuthera.
The camp grew and had many successes. The
FNM government contributed financially to it,
but left it up to the Church to administer it.
However, when the PLP became the govern-
ment it invited the Church to join its youth pro-
gramme with that of government in return for
which government would pay for the whole
programme. Of course, with such an agreement,
political interference entered the picture, and
YEAST, as we know it today, was born.

“When we were last in government,” said Mr
Ingraham, “much as the government tradition-
ally has lent assistance to youth programmes
in the community; we lent both financial and
other support to the YEAST programme.

“Members opposite also when in govern-
ment, lent support to the programme. It was
unfortunate in my view that government sup-
port eventually resulted in the programme being
moved to Andros where 65 young boys are
enrolled in the programme now,

~Government’s financial support of the pro-
gramme has grown to some $871,000 annually,
more than $13,000 a year per boy,” Mr Ingra-
ham told the House. “I am forced to question
whether that $871,000 might not have assisted a
greater number of young boys if instead of
bringing YEAST into the government sector,
the money had not simply been made available
to the Catholic Church to continue and expand
its programme.”

This seems a sensible suggestion. Already
there are too many overlapping programmes
in the community all trying to deal with the
same at risk group of young Bahamians. If some
of these similar organisations would get togeth-
er and pool their resources they could probably
do more good in assisting this country’s troubled
youth than they are now doing as separate units.

‘Mr Ingraham said that the “objectives of

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the (YEAST) programme are supposed to be to
interrupt the continuing cycle of incompetence,
violence, aimlessness, deficiency and despair
among adolescent males, ages 12 to 19 — to
restore their dignity and value by teaching them
marketable skills, improving their self esteem
and self image — and to help them develop
positive attitudes so that they would become
self-reliant, productive and useful citizens in
their community.”

However, he said, no matter how desirable
the programme might be, the truth of the mat-
ter is that government cannot continue to pay
$13,000 for each boy. “There has to be other
means by which we can do this,” he said.

YEAST, before being taken over by the
PLP government, was established at the camp
donated by the late Sir Roland Symonette in his
native Eleuthera. ;

It had started out as a two-week programme
in 1999. By 2003 it had grown into a nine-week
programme with the goal of expanding to 12
weeks. In 2002 and 2003 the FNM contributed
$20,000 each year to the programme. When the
PLP became the government, it contributed
$10,000 in 2002. The following year it paid for 20
boys to go through the camp’s training, and by
2004 had invited the Church to become a part of
the PLP government’s youth programme. In
return government undertook to underwrite
the cost of the whole programme. The Church
agreed, but soon found that government had
taken over the programme. It was moved to
Andros and housed on the old BARTAD
grounds. The PLP MP for North Andros pushed
for his supporters to be employed. And at
every opportunity the PLP government took
credit for the whole programme, never giving
the founders of YEAST any credit for its con-
cept, design or their continuing efforts to make
the camp the success it had now become.

Today YEAST is the second largest employ-
er to government in:Andros. Half of the
$871,000 of government’s contribution goes to
pay the salaries of 27 Androsians. Said someone
close to the programme: If YEAST were to
leave Andros it would be a loss to the commu-
nity of about $600,000 annually in goods and ser-
vices.

But wherever YEAST is located, it should be
out of the hands of government so that it can do
the work for which its members are best trained.
Government should continue to make its con-
tribution to a programme, which, in the last
nine years, has made a positive difference in
the lives of many young men.
















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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I USED to be proud to be a
Bahamian! I was proud to hear
visitors say that we were lucky
to live in a paradise. I was proud
of the drive and willingness of
Bahamians to work hard, to
grow in strengths and better
themselves in an air of friendli-
ness and determination.

Today - I am not always
proud to be a Bahamian. I
shudder at the way I see people
treating each other.

What happened to us? We
came so far in the eyes of the
world over the years. People
looked at our island nation and
envied us and praised our suc-
cesses.

Now we have those same
people watching our failures
and going to other shores. We
did not raise ourselves to our
enviable heights alone.

When we were big enough,
we asked for help and help
came.

It came largely in the form of
foreigners. They came to share
our shores and our dreams and
to help us advance as a nation.
They brought with them the
willingness to invest in us, to
trust us, and to teach and train
us in the world of technology
and hospitality that we had not
accomplished on our own.

We wanted them here — we
invited them here — we enticed
them here.

Today, while we kick and
scream because they are making
money and raising their fami-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net






lies here, they continue to train
us and promote us to higher
positions of responsibilities and
to increase our salaries.

They provide our police with
bullet proof vests and cars, build
playgrounds for our children,
provide them with scholarships,
and give money to our chari-
ties.

Hotel chains are given enor-
mous incentives to come and
build here. No matter though
how many Bahamians succeed
in the hotel business and climb
the proverbial ladder, the hotel
owners need to guard and pro-
tect their investment and they
rightly do this by keeping some
of their key (foreign) executives
in place.

Why should we expect any
less from any other company
that comes here, improves our
way of life and gives so much to
us?

If it’s a foreign company then
foreigners need to be involved.
It’s that simple! If a person
doesn’t perform for them as
they should, they replace
him/her. It’s that simple! We
ourselves would do no less. Do
we want to give up the advances
we have now and make it so
uninviting for the foreigners
that they pack up and leave?
Wake up people! They won’t
leave their companies
behind...and even if they did...

.who would run them as effi-
ciently? They’ take their mon-
ey and go. Why would they
leave it all behind? It appears
that we look at these foreign-
ers with disdain.

These people pay for permits
to be here legitimately, yet we
turn a blind eye to the illegal
ones who come and use our
schools and health care free of
charge, who do not or will not
speak our language and who
introduce the life of crime and
drugs to so many of our youth.
What does this say about us as a
people?

Who of you reading this can
in all honesty doubt the truth
of it?

Just ask yourself why we are
paying the Canadians all this
money to build and run our new
airport? Why are we all fighting
a losing battle with BaTelCo
because our ??TDSM?? cell
phones fail us in certain areas of
this little island?

What happens when BaTel-
Co offers only the GSM phones
which work less frequently than
the TDSM phones? Why are
we paying such exorbitant

- prices for gas and electricity? I

know it is not because a for-
eigner is running the show.

We need the foreigners and
their commodities and exper-
tise.

I long for the day I can once
again be proud to be a Bahami-
an!

SMST
Nassau,
January, 2008.

We should all play a part in
tackling the crime wave

Editor, The Tribune.

Bishop Hall allegedly blames
PLP and FNM for the Bahamas’
crime wave.

The Nassau Guardian’s front
page, lead story of Saturday,
February 9, 2008 suggests that
Bishop Simeon Hall, the newly
appointed Chairman of the

&

§2-6122

<<

Crime Council Advisory Com-
mittee, blasted both the PLP
and FNM governments for
"allowing the crime rate to
increase so rapidly since the
country gained its Independence
in 1973".

He is also quoted as saying
that ..."successive governments
have done little more than just
placate the face of the voting
public until the next election."

Well Rev Hall might be cor-
rect, because I know of instances
where employers have been
called by politicians asking that
the company not press charges
against an employee that had
been caught stealing, for exam-
ple.

However, there have been
numerous allegations of employ-
ers having received calls from
ministers of religion with similar
requests. In addition to this, I
have had calls from reverends

in my capacity as a manager ask-
ing us not to press charges or
terminate employees for wrong-
doing. So we can't simply lay
the blame at the feet of our
politicians, no matter how
tempting that might be.

For far too long our society
has “cloaked” criminals or have
been prepared to allow fellow
employees to steal and get away
with it, as some of us don't want
to be thought of as being a
“pimp.”

We all play a part, and if we
decide we will “pimp” on
wrong-doers and the Police
enforce what are perceived as
petty laws (traffic violations, lit-
tering, etc), I believe we will
begin to see a turnaround.

One thing for sure. It can't
hurt.

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com

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All interested applicants should fax a copy of their resume to
361-1469 or email recruitmentbahamas @ gmail.com. Closing
Date for application is February 20, 2008.







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS.

Eight weekend arrests



Shuttle, station —
astronauts say

teary farewell 2

in space

MCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

THE crews of the space shut-
tle and station said a teary :
farewell, then sealed the hatches :
between them Sunday after ;
more than a week of working ;
tirelessly together to build a big- :
ger and better scientific outpost }
in orbit, according to Associated }

Press.

Atlantis was scheduled to
undock early Monday, its load :
considerably lighter than when it :

arrived Feb. 9 with Europe’s pre-
miere space laboratory, Colum-
bus.

Astronaut Daniel Tani was
especially emotional as he left
the international space station,

his home for the past four :

months.

Before floating into Atlantis }
for his long-overdue ride home, }
Tani paid tribute.to his mother, :
Rose, who was killed in a car :
accident while he was in space — :
“my inspiration” — and his wife, :
Jane, who “had the hard work :

while I was having fun.”

“T can’t wait to get back to her }

and my two little girls,” he said.

He also saluted his two female ;
commanders, the space station’s }
Peggy Whitson and Pamela Mel- :
roy, who delivered him to the :
orbiting complex back in Octo- :

ber.

“If we were toasting, if we }
were in Russia, this would be :
the third toast,” Tani said, “the :
toast for the women in our :

lives.”

Tani recalled how he floated’ ;
last week through the space sta- :
tion shooting high-definition :
video, with his nine colleagues :
busy at work from one end of }
the orbiting complex to the oth- :
er and even outside. He said it :
reminded him of “those movies :
they used to show you about 25 :
years ago about how we're going :



to live in space.”

“It was almost like a promo-
tional video, and it was phe-
nomenal,” he said.

Just before the seven shuttle :
crewmen departed, Whitson :
said; “All right, you guys, it’s, :
been great having you here,” :
The astronauts hugged one }

another and wiped away tears.

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in separate incidents

BH By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EIGHT people were arrested
this weekend and one sent to
hospital in separate incidents
involving a stolen boat, an imi-
tation firearm, ammunition, ille-
gal drugs and an early-morning
residential fire.

First taken into custody were

two Berkeley Street, Ridgeland
Park residents, ages 19 and 24.
They were picked up on Friday
at around 9.30pm after police
officers attached to the Mobile
Division discovered an imitation
.Jmm handgun in a pouch in a
silver Nissan Altima, which
police had initially targeted
because it had a blown headlight.

Police suspicion of the car’s
occupants was raised when an

odour, believed to be marijuana
smoke, was detected coming
from the vehicle. ;

Shortly before these arrests,
police had received a report of
the theft of a stolen 44-foot white
boat with three outboard 250
horsepower engines from Nas-
sau Sailing Club.

At around 4 o’clock Saturday
morning, officers from Elizabeth
Estates police station reported

Film based on Jack London novel

to begin work in the Bahamas

PRINCIPAL photography
for the film “Der Seewolf”
(The Sea Wolf) will commence
in mid-March at The Bahamas
Film Studios.

Based on Jack London’s
1904 novel of the same name,
the film stars Thomas
Kretschmann, who appeared
in Peter Jackson’s “King
Kong” and the soon-to be-
released motion picture,
“Transsiberian,” among other
film credits.

“This is an exciting time in
Grand Bahama,” says
Bahamas Film Commissioner
Craig Woods. “Beyond the
immediate benefit of provid-
ing additional training oppor-
tunities and jobs, the tourism
product will be promoted as
well. When this film airs in
Europe, and viewers see the
natural beauty here in The

Bahamas, the result is always positive for our

tourism endeavours.”

Hofmann & Voges Entertainment GmBH,
based in Germany, will produce the film for release
in the European market in late 2008. Anett Grun-
beck, the film’s production manager scouted several
international locations and says The Bahamas is

ideal for this project.

“We are looking forward to filming here in
Grand Bahama,” Grunbeck says. “The island is
very beautiful and everyone has been helpful. The
Studio facilities are working well for our film and we
are very pleased with the service being provided.
We are happy to be working with The Bahamas
Film Commission. Craig Woods and his staff have

THOMAS KRETSCHMANN will star in
“Der Seewolf” (The Sea Wolf) - (AP)

X





been very supportive.”

Boosting the local econo-
my, this project will employ
dozens of Bahamians and pro-
vide eight internships for those
aspiring to film industry
careers.

The production is also book-
ing approximately 3,000 room
nights with local hotels, includ-
ing Pelican Bay Resort, which
according to the studio’s local
manager, Diana McGonigal, is
a film-friendly destination.

“Many local businesses and
individuals will benefit directly
from this production,” McGo-
nigal says, emphasizing those
additional purchases of goods
and services from local busi-
nesses will have a far-reaching
affect on the economy.

“The production will also
hire background extras for the
film, providing excellent

opportunities for those who wish to gain acting

experience” she adds. “There is so much talent in

Grand Bahama and we are thrilled to showcase
our island in this film.” '

On Saturday, February 23, at 3 p.m., The
Bahamas Film Studios will host an open casting
call for 38 men and five women background extras

at UNEXSO’s poolside café at Port Lucaya. Apphi-

not required.

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cants should be at least 18 years old, provide a pho-
to ID, and dress in form-fitting clothing. Preferred
applicants are those who are strong swimmers with
sailing experience; fluency in German is desired, but

The Bahamas Film Studios at Gold Rock Creek,
Grand Bahama.





noticing three men acting suspi-
ciously on a boat fitting that
description in the Blue Water
Cay area of Fox Hill Road south.

On seeing the police, the men
fled, with one escaping. Two oth-
ers, however — a 26-year-old
Podoleo Street resident and a
25-year-old resident of Joan’s
Heights West — were not so suc-
cessful. They were taken into
custody.

Searching the vessel police dis-
covered eight 55 gallon contain-
ers filled with gasoline, along
with a stash of food and some
clothing. The third individual is
still being sought in connection
with this incident.

Meanwhile, at around 9
o’clock that morning, police took
four individuals into custody —
three women, ages 55, 22 and 21

years, and a 19-year-old youth..
Their detention came after policc
executed a search warrant on «
Chippingham home. Officers dis-
covered two plastic bags of mar-
ijuana in a washing machine and
five live rounds of .357mim
ammunition concealed inside a
mattress.

Later, shortly after midnight, a
man was wakened by a fire as he
slept in a house off Bacardi
Road.

By the time officers arrived on
the scene the fire had been extin-
guished, but the upper portion
of the man’s body had been
burned. He was taken to hospi-
tal. There was only minor dam-
age to one of the building's
rooms.

Police investigations into all
of these matters continue.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





LEARNING THE RULES: Participants in the fun run and walk wise up
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 7
a c,.,.,
BT Weve VATA

THE 44th HEART BALL




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THE TRIBUNE





Obama has captured

minds of ma

ll By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a business execu-
tive and former Caribbean Diplo-
mat)

Is THE years that I have
been writing a widely pub-
lished weekly commentary, I have
never received as many responses
as I did to my commentary last
week on Barack Obama’s quest
for the White House.

I concluded in that commen-
tary that, despite his vision and
the wide appeal of his message,
he would not succeed in occupying
The White House, because, in the
end, the fact that he is what the
Americans call “an African Amer-
ican” would cause a majority of
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torate who actually vote, to vote
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many whites will reject; it is not
his part whiteness that they will
celebrate.

Having said all that, I am
bound to reveal that, if the more
than a hundred responses I have
had are a straw poll, Obama will
not only win the Democratic Par-
ty nomination, but he will romp
home with the Presidency.

Whether it is wishful thinking
or an indication of gale force winds
of change blowing through Amer-
ica, I do not know. What I do
know is that Obama has captured
the minds of many in the US who

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are fed-up with the war-mongering
bullying stance of the George W
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appear to be equally jaded with
the slick but flawed aura of the
Clintons. Obama is a welcome
oasis in a desert of distrust.

Here is a voice from Illinois:

“The United States needs this
man, We need him to unite a
divided nation and a divided
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that we have lost under this sorry
administration. We need him to
show us that,we can have strength

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without the need to continuously
flex our muscle.”

On the matter of race, there
are some who believe that part of
the reason for Obama’s success in
the primaries so far is precisely
because he is “part white”.

Here is a white man in Florida:

“No one will admit it, but I
believe Obama's mixed racial
background has caused many
whites to vote for him, they see
him as acceptable”.

And a mixed race person from
America, now living in the
Caribbean, adds:

“Tam convinced because of my
own experiences and acceptance
in parts of Pennsylvania, where
the closest whites came to seeing a
black man was on television, that
white Americans are more likely
to accept and vote for a qualified
person of mixed ancestry than for
a full blooded black American for
President.”

A professor from Wayne Uni-
versity in the US summed up the
race aspect of this campaign in the
following way:

“If only the media could have
championed the reality that Oba-
ma is as white as he is black, what
a statement that would make for
progress of race relations in the
US and to the world? Overtly per-
petuating the notion that 'purity' is
reserved for a single race does
more damage to any ‘gains' we
have made towards equality... my
latent wish is that America would
seize the moment and make a
statement to the world that it real-
ly does accept its citizens regard-
less of colour or ethnic combina-
tions.”

What all this seems to empha-
sise is that race and colour remain
deeply motivating factors in
American society, and especially,
with regard to the person to whom
will be entrusted enormous power
over ordinary people and over
nations.

So, if this is so widely known
and felt, there should be no
assumption that the race card will
not be played as subtly and care-
fully as the Republican Party dares
when the contest reaches the
home stretch and the finishing line
draws near.

Indeed, there are keen Wash-
ington observers who firmly
believe that Obama’s phenome-





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ny in US

nal success in raising huge cam-
paign funds is part of a dastardly
Republican scheme to make him
the Democratic Party’s nominee
for the Presidency on the basis
that, ultimately, the majority of
the white electorate will fall back
on an atavistic racial prejudice
when they cast their vote.

, One of them contends: “My
gut instincts for some time have
told me that somewhere in the DC
area Karl Rove has a dirty tricks
boiler room getting Republicans to
give to Obama financial help to
defeat Hillary, relying on the racist
attitudes nationally to reject Oba-
ma over any of the clowns in the
original GOP presidential candi-
date line-up.”

Note should be taken that,
despite Obama’s remarkable suc-
cess, he is unlikely to gain the
2,025 delegates needed to secure
the nomination outright. But nei-
ther will Clinton.

The so-called 796 “super dele-
gates” — members of congress,
governors, former presidents and
office holders — may well decide
who wins, and so far Clinton has
more committed votes.

Assuming he wins, however,
many of those who responded to
my commentary last week — and
these are people who fervently
support Obama and desperately
want him to triumph ~ are fearful
that his song will be abruptly end-
ed, and his vision dimmed in the
same way that Martin Luther King
Jr was silenced and John F
Kennedy stopped.

In championing his quest for
The White House, many of his
black supporters want to assert
their own legitimacy as true equals
in a society that has squashed
them underfoot; others pray that
he can remould America into that
society of liberty, generosity and
fraternity that has always been
more imagined than real.

A heavy burden of hope has
been placed on the shoulders of
Barack Obama.

He will need divine help not
only to stride into The White
House, but also to satisfy the great
expectations now reposed in him —
if he occupies it.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com















































THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Zhivargo Laing
donates computers
to three school

ll By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Marco City MP Zhivargo
Laing presented computers to three schools
last week. The donation, which totalled
more than $25,000, is to assist in
establishing computer labs at schools in his
constituency.

A total of 15 computers and three lap tops
were presented to the Freeport Primary, Mau-
rice Moore Primary and Jack Hayward High
schools on Thursday.

Each school received five computers and
one lap top for administration.

Mr Laing, Minister of State for Finance, said
government made a $100,000 provision in the
budget this year for every constituency. He
said the constituency decided to use one quar-
ter of those funds to purchase computers for
the schools.

Excited

He said that education is high on their agen-.

da. “J am excited about Marco City’s future and
what we can do in education to motivate, to
inspire and to encourage our kids. It’s just an
open opportunity that I’m looking forward to
take advantage of,” said Mr Laing.

Mr Laing said that he was very proud that his
constituency headquarters had invested in the
children’s education. ;

Benjamin Stubbs, principal of Jack Hayward
High, was grateful for the donation of/com-
puters. He said the donation by Mr Laing
brings the computer count at the school to
nine.

“This generous gift will help to establish a
computer programme which we have been
attempting to start over the last two years,”
he said.

Maurice Moore Primary School principal
Victoria Wright said the donation is a blessing
and thanked Mr Laing.

Mrs Wright said that school’s PTA has also





started a computer drive in conjunction with
school’s patron Maurice Moore, former
Bahamian Ambassador.

Sheila Scavella, principal at Freeport Pri-
mary, said the computers will significantly ben-
efit students at the school. She said the dona-
tion of a computer is the best gift that chil-
dren could ever receive because it helps them
to learn.





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Employee from
Old Bahama Bay
participates in
off-shore training

WEST END, Grand Bahama
— Deidre Rahming, sales and
marketing coordinator at Old
Bahama Bay by Ginn sur Mer,
participated in a weeklong
familiarisation trip at Ginn
Reunion Resort in Orlando,
Florida.

Ms Rahming met and worked
alongside the communications
staff at Ginn Resorts’ head-
quarters in Celebration, Florida
and also spent time observing
and interacting with Ginn
Reunion Resort staff members
in sales, reservations, public
relations and marketing.

She also received an exten-
sive tour of the 2,300-acre Ginn
Reunion Resort and experi-
enced the resort’s luxury accom-
modations firsthand.

Opportunities for offshore
training will be available for
other Old Bahama Bay employ-
ees as the development in West
End, Grand Bahama, progress-



OFFSHORE TRAINING: Deidre
Rahming, sales and marketing
coordinator at Old Bahama Bay
es. by Ginn sur Mer, visits the

Reunion Grande at Ginn
Reunion Resort in Orlando,
Florida.

“Ginn Resorts is firmly com-
mitted to the training and edu-
cation of its staff,” said Bob
Van Bergen, vice president and
general manager at Ginn sur
Mer. “This is only the begin-
ning of what we see as an ongo-
ing training programme as we
provide Bahamians with the
tools needed for long-term
careers in the hospitality indus-
try.”

Ginn Reunion Resort, in
Orlando, was selected as an off-
shore training property because
of its similarities to the Ginn
sur Mer project underway in
West End. Ginn Reunion
Resort is a luxury golf resort
featuring varied accommoda-
tions, including single- and mul-
ti-family homes, condominiums
and townhomes.

Amenities include three Sig-
nature golf courses, the ANNI-
KA Academy, tennis facilities, a
boutique spa, a water park and
state-of-the-art meeting space.
The centrepiece of the commu-
nity is Reunion Grande, a luxu-
ry high-rise with 82 one-and

two-bedroom suites and fine
dining restaurants.

“The entire experience was
phenomenal,” Rahming said.
“It gave me a glimpse into the
company’s standards and the
daily workings of a massive
resort. I was able to see what’s
to come for us here in The
Bahamas.”

Ginn sur Mer is a 2,000-acre
resort community on West End,
Grand Bahama that will con-
tain more than 4,400 condo-
minium and hotel units and
nearly 2,000 single-family resi-
dential homesites. Luxury
amenities include Signature golf
courses designed by Jack Nick-
laus and Arnold Palmer, club-
houses, two marinas, a private
airport, a Monte Carlo-style
casino, water and swim pavil-
ions, a spa and beach club. The
$4.9 billion resort community
will serve as a flagship devel-
opment for Ginn Resorts.







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PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

‘LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



g . |

ww

Sy LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
rvices

MINISTER of State for

You

ith and Sports Byran Wood-
ide olticnally opened the Col-



Phone:322-1

(ea



OPE ine Dae ar a



d

es

ne ei

i ar



lege of the Bahamas Wellness
Centre, a modern multipurpose
facility on the campus in Oakes

Field, during a ceremony Fri-.

day.
The centre will also serve to
facilitate a national health data-

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base for the Ministry of Health
and Social Development in its
thrust towards a healthy nation.

“This augurs well for the Col-
lege as it moves towards a Uni-
versity of The Bahamas, as well
as towards promoting its ath-

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letic programme,” Mr Wood-
side said.

He credited Minister of
Health and Social Development
Dr Hubert Minnis with leading
the way in respect to wellness
and the general health of the
population.

“Given his position in chal-
lenging our nation to bea
' healthy nation, I too believe
that the health of the nation is
the wealth of the nation,” Mr
Woodside said.

He said the establishment of
the wellness centre would serve
COB for a number of reasons.
Firstly, it will be “a wonderful
facility” for the instruction of
physical education and training
for those who are studying to
become physical education
teachers.

“This facility will also serve
the general student population
and faculty at the College of the
Bahamas. | believe that.is
important because students and
faculty will have a place on cam-
pus to which they can come and
exercise and generally improve
their wellness,” Mr Woodside
said.

The College envisioned the ;

facility close to 10 years ago.
The facility emerged from a
10x10 sized room to a 4,000 sq ft
structure built at an estimated
cost of $1 million. It houses
administrative offices, a
weightlifting area, storage and
equipment room, male and
female locker rooms, an area
for aerobics classes, yoga,
palates, martial arts, dance
classes, physical education class-
es, counselling and monthly ses-
sions on a variety of health mat-
ters.

Two weeks ago, a health-risk
assessment exercise was per-

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MINISTER OF State for Youth and Sports Byran Woodside and Col-

lege of the Bahamas president Janyne Hodder cut the ribbon to offi-

eal ee the Wellness Centre on the campus on Friday February
5; ;

formed on over 300 individuals
connected to the College. The
information is to be used in the
establishment of a national
health database for the Ministry
of Health and Social Develop-
ment.

Bradley Cooper is Assistant
Director of Athletics for Well-

ness at the centre. Student ©

workers have undergone 16
hours of training to serve as fit-

STUDENTS QUALIFIED in physical fitness put on a demonstration aia de opening ceremonies of the
Wellness Centre at the College of the Bahamas on Friday, February 15, 2008.

ness instructors, under the
direction of Arlene McPhee.
They also will be trained in
CPR and First Aid techniques.

COB President Janyne Hod-
der said of the College that on
matters important to the quali-
ty of life of the nation, “we want
to be a leader.” She also
referred to the facility as anoth-
er step in moving towards uni-
versity status.






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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 11

wellness centre







STUDENTS
qualified in
physical fit-
ness put ona
demonstration
during the
opening cere-
monies of the
Wellness Cen-
tre at the Col-
lege of the
Bahamas on
Friday, Febru-
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Civilian employees
praised for role in
crime fighting efforts

m@ By MATT MAURA
Bahamas

Information Services

THE Royal Bahamas
Police Force is taking “deci-
sive action with notable suc-
cesses” in countering crime
and criminality in the
Bahamas, with a meaning-

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National Security Minister
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day.

Addressing the first Civil-
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Turnquest said that despite

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the current crime trends
affecting the nation, there is
no doubt that the Force has
taken up the challenge of
the existing and emerging
manifestations that crime
and criminality are present-
ing.

Mr Turnquest said it is a
viewpoint generally held,
not just here in The
Bahamas, but in countries
around the world, that civil-
ian employees are increas-
ingly becoming an important
element in law enforcement.

“Tt is an important source
of encouragement for me, as
it should be to us all, that
the Royal Bahamas Police

’ Force is taking decisive

action, with notable suc-
cesses, in countering crime
and criminality in our
country,” Mr Turnquest
said.

“When you, the civilian
staff, undertake profession-
al and other functions for
which trained Police Offi-
cers need not be engaged,
you make it possible for
those officers to return to
the essential duties of law
enforcement,” Mr Turn-
quest added.

Mr Turnquest said it has
been 30 years since civilian
employees have helped to
“underpin” the law enforce-
ment work of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force. He
said that during this period,
a transformation has taken
place in the services the
civilian employees give the
Force.

From the mid-1990s, Govy-
ernment, as a matter of pol-
icy, has sought to strategi-
cally place civilian employ-
ees in certain positions that
would allow Police Officers



Patrick Hanna/BIS

MINISTER OF National Security sonny Tarauies! (ett), listens attentively dri the opening ceremo-
ny of the first Royal Bahamas Police Force Civilian Staff Day Away which was held under the theme:

“Fostering A Spirit of Unity and Excellence in the Workplace.” Mr Turnquest was joined by Acting Com-
missioner of Police Reginald Ferguson (centre) and Acting Deputy Commmlssonel of Police Christopher

McCoy.

to perform tasks for which
they have been trained, he
added.

“We have moved from the
early days when civilian staff
work was limited to clerical
and custodial duties,” Mr
Turnquest said.

“Today, the 250 civilian
employees of the Force are
engaged in many duties
ranging from accounting,
where they are responsible
for managing revenue and
expenditure, to registry per-
sonnel who manage the
intake, circulation and filing
of the Force’s correspon-
dence.

“Additionally, Human
Resource Managers organ-
ise and administer person-
nel matters relating to the
Force’s 3,000 officers
while other civilian employ-
ees assist the Force in
areas, including crime data
input.”

The Minister of National
Security said the myriad of
contributions do not stop
there, as civilian employees
are making “essential con-
tributions” in critical areas

todo

such the Central Detective
Unit (CDU), Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEU), Criminal
Records Office (CRO) and
in the many Stations which
serve the various Bahamian
communities.

Civilian employees, Min-
ister Turnquest said, are also
now making “important
contributions” in other spe-
cialised areas of the
Force such as the Forensic

.Science Unit which has

been identified for further
expansion of civilian
employees.

“An important factor con-
tributing to the work of the
Police Force and extending
its reach and strength
throughout The Bahamas is
the presence of the Force in
Grand Bahama and in our
various Family Islands,” Mr
Turnquest said.

“Civilian employees are
contributing to that success
in islands such as Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Andros,
Cat Island, Eleuthera and
Long Island,” Mr Turnquest

_added.

Minister Turnquest told

the employees that they, like
Police Officers, must be in
the business of making the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force the best it can be,
adding that to do so requires
continued excellence in
the execution of their
duties.

He said it further requires
camaraderie and cohesion,
productivity and the further
development of their skills
and other attributes for ser-
vice to the Force.

“We know that for the
most part, civilian employ-
ees of the Police Force are
Public Officers and as such,
are not part of the Police
Force, but are part of the
Public Service (but) as you
know, the Government and
people of The Bahamas are
the main beneficiaries of uni-
ty and excellence in service
in the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and as such, I com-
mend you, on their behalf,
for the work you have done
to date and encourage you
to continue to do your best
always,” Mr Turnquest
said.






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Wendy Craigg, Governor, The Central Bank of The Bahamas

Gregory Moss, President, Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce

Carey Leonard, General Counsel, Grand Bahama Port Authority

Mike Murphy, Founding Director, Harcourt Group

Chris Gray, Chief Executive, Freeport Container Port,

Freeport Harbour Company and Grand Bahama Airport Company

Jaime Vargas, Vice President Operations, South Riding Point Holdings Ltd

Robert Millard, Director. International Business Development, Global Fulfillment Services.
Jerry Butler, Caribbean Executive Director, Inter-American Development Bank
Antonius Roberts, Artist & Sculptor

L Roscoe Dames Il, Founder & President, lvory Global Promotions

Vincent Vanderpool Wallace, Secretary General, Caribbean Tourism Organization















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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS

Minister downplays impact of EPA

Driver dies
FROM page one

mary school before hitting the
pole and bringing it down.
Police did not report what
time they eventually arrived
on the scene.

Authorities believe that the
51 year old was killed instant-
ly and suggested that “exces-
sive speed” was a “major con-
tributing factor” in Mr Bail-
lou’s accident, and subse-
quent death. He is Abaco’s
first traffic fatality for the year
and the Bahamas’ third.

His death follows that of
two Eleuthera residents who
were passengers in a vehicle
that was involved in a colli-
sion with another car on that
island last week. Raymond
Bethel, 15, died on the scene,
while 23-year-old O’Neal
Roach died later in the hos-
pital.

Men attacked

FROM page one

He said a black man then
got out of the vehicle with a
baseball bat in his hand and
robbed him of an undeter-
mined amount of cash and a
set of keys that were in his
jacket pocket.

Mr Tomaszewski tried to
flee, but was chased by
another black man who
struck him in the head with -
an object, causing a small
wound. However, nothing
was taken from him as he
was able to get away.

Police arrived and
searched the area for the
suspects, but were unable to
locate them.

This robbery and assault,
comes after a teen was
stabbed on Grand Bahama
either late Friday night, or
early Saturday morning.

The victim, identified as
15-year-old Dentrel Farring-
ton, is detained in the Rand
Memorial Hospital in stable
condition, after receiving
multiple stab wounds about
the body.

According to reports,
police received a call at
about 11.49pm on Friday
from an anonymous person
who reported that a stabbing
had. occurred at the. Bowling
Alley at Britannia Boule-
vard.

When officers arrived at
the location, the scene was
quiet and no one had any
knowledge of a stabbing
having taken place there.

However, Mr Rahming
said police received a call
from the Rand’s duty nurse
supervisor around 2.10am on

Saturday to report that a
15-year-old boy had been
brought to the hospital with
stab wounds to the upper
back, chest and abdomen.

Police were unable at the
time to interview Farrington
because he was under seda-
tion and resting after being
treated for his injuries by
doctors.

Mr Rahming said that
police do not know how the
teen ended up at the hospi-
tal.

Police are currently inves-
tigation both incidents.

FROM page one

be a “good idea” for the region,

Mr Laing said: “We have to be,

to this extent,” before going on
to outline how the World Trade
Organisation now requires its
member countries — among
them many EU and ACP states
— to end any non-reciprocal
trade arrangements such as
that which the Bahamas has
enjoyed with the EU for many
years.

However, Mr Laing explained
that with the Bahamas’ biggest
trading partners being the Unit-
ed States, Canada and Japan
respectively, this country’s trade
relationship with the European
Union is “very small”, before
further claiming that the
Bahamas is already one of the
“freest trading societies in the
world.”

Under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) negoti-
ated with the EU by CARI-
COM negotiators, the Bahamas
and other ACP nations would
have to allow many EU goods
and services the same duty-free
access that Bahamian goods
have into their market.

This means that up to 82.7 per
cent of the Bahamas’ EU goods
tariff lines will have to be opened
up to import duty elimination
within 15 years of signing the
agreement, while 75 per cent of
the service industries would be
opened up to competition from

EU companies, Mr Laing has
previously indicated.

Yesterday, the minister
stressed that goods from the EU
represent in total around 30 per
cent of the goods imported into
this country. Therefore it is only
this percentage of all imports
into the Bahamas that will be
exempted from customs duty if
the agreement is signed into exis-
tence, not all goods from “all the
other countries with which we
now trade.”

This would thus allow the
Bahamas to continue to create
revenue by customs duty levied
on products coming from its oth-
er main trading partners, while
ensuring that the country con-
tinues to enjoy the duty-free
access for its major imports —
lobsters, Bacardi products and
Polymers products — into
Europe.

The EPA as it stands also calls
for liberalisation of services, such
as finance and tourism, allowing
European companies to enter
the Bahamian market to com-
pete with Bahamian entities.

Mr Laing stated, however,
that these services are already
“internationally traded areas” in
the Bahamas, adding: “‘No one is
stopping a European company
from setting up a hotel in the
Bahamas once they’ve got their
necessary approvals (and) in
banking we have European
banks here already — so we’re
not talking about opening up an
area of the economy where there

Police release
descriptions of
men wanted
for questioning

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



GRAND Bahama police have released the descriptions of four
men — all to be considered armed and extremely dangerous — who
are wanted for questioning in relation to a series of crimes.

Wanted for questioning in connection with a burglary are Robert
Angelo Holbert, also known as “Bobby”, Marco Marcian Montey

Missick, alias “Marco Polo”,
Pratt, alias “Dee”.

and 24-year-old Darshiel George

Robert Holbert, 36, described as five foot eleven inches tall of
slim build, was born in Nassau and weighs 175 pounds. He worked
as a fisherman, and can be distinguished by a partially-amputated
right ring finger. His last known place of residence was 86A
Tamarind Street, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Pratt, born in Freeport, has brown eyes and a medium brown
complexion. He is five foot seven inches tall, and has a slim build.
His occupation is listed as “painter.” Pratt’s last known address was
138 Inagua Place, Hawksbill, Grand Bahama.

Missick is a 36-year-old fisherman who is five feet eleven inch-
es tall with short hair and a dark brown complexion. His last
known address was 179 Bimini Place, Hawksbill, Grand Bahama.

Also wanted is Luigi Dowsdewell Lockhart, who is being sought
in connection with an incident in which the victim suffered griev-
ous bodily harm. His last known addresses were: 169 Bimini Place,
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama and 27 Tenuich Street Nassau. Lock-

hart, 32, was born in Grand Bahama and is of a dark brown com- .

plexion with dreadlocks. He is five foot eight inches tall and weighs
150 pounds, with no listed occupation.

Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of these
individuals is asked to contact the Grand Bahama police at 350-

3138, 350-3106, 373-1112 and 911.

Sanpin Motors Ltd.

Nissan Sunnys
starting @
$4,995.00

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has not been to date much inter-
national trade.”

He claimed that the liberality
of our economy can be deter-
mined by looking at how few
products Bahamians are restrict-
ed from importing or exporting.

“Your trade (with the
Bahamas) is restricted only to
the extent that (the Bahamas
has) these customs duties which
other people see as a hindrance

to free trade generally but (the
Bahamian government) use(s)
it as a revenue raising measure,
and that is one of the reasons
why they would say your market
isn’t free,” he said.

The minister went on to claim
that this trade liberalism has
already made the country one
of “the most prosperous devel-
oping countries in the world.”

He maintained that while

there are areas of the economy
retained for Bahamian invest-
_ment only, such as wholesale and
retail trade, and ground trans-
portation, outsiders can “largely
invest in any area” already, not
withstanding the EPA.
However, attorney Mr Moss
claimed last week that the
Bahamian economy must devel-
op further before it can be
“opened up as proposed.”

Former PLP MP says Hanna-Martin best cantitiate

think is needed. And I can only speculate that of
the other individuals whose names I have read
about, I don’t think they will pOmpe ts effectively

FROM page one

was all about.”

The Englerston MP, said Mr Smith, is from
“the same rock in terms of belief, in terms of con-

viction” as her father.

“I don’t know any daughter who is more like
her father, like Glenys is like Arthur Hanna,” he

said.

Mrs Hanna-Martin is regarded by party insiders
as the clear favourite to capture the post from
out-going party Chairman Raynard Rigby.

Though rumours have circulated about the entry
of many potential candidates into the race, thus far
only Elcott Coleby, and party newcomer Omar
Archer are also seeking the post. However, nei-
ther of these opponents, according Mr Smith, will
pose a serious threat to her candidacy.

“T’ve seen her in the islands, I’ve seen her inter-
“She does it with
that same level of humility and purpose that I

Christie calls for urgent regional action

acting with people,” he said.


















FROM page one

know the recent stories. What
matters is that the stories and
the fact of crime itself is dam-
aging to our countries and to
the region.”

Mr Christie told the audi-
ence that to combat this prob-
lem, his government during its
tenure in office, put in place
both a Youth and Urban
Renewal Programme, intend-
ed “to use the police force and
the social services together to
intervene in the lives of young
people and in families and
communities before the deci-
sions are made to turn to
crime.”

He also told the audience
that currently in the Bahamas,

against her.”

"Former Mt Moriah MP Keod Smith aanenneed

last week that he will not be running for the PLP

a bipartisan effort has been
launched in the House of
Assembly through the forma-
tion of a select committee to
investigate issues related to
crime. However, said Mr
Christie, “none of this can or
will work unless there is an
understanding and a commit-
ment from. the people of our
countries to work together.”

“There is in my view no
other way to address the long
term problems associated with.
crime, a social and economic
phenomenon, that we must
understand and solve, if our
societies are to further develop
and not be overwhelmed by
drugs, guns and social dys-
function,” he said.

Violent crime increaseditâ„¢* *

the Bahamas by 38 per.cént=



7



he-saide. SE AREA

chairmanship, after declaring several weeks ago
that he was exploring the idea.

There has also been some conflict between Mr
Rigby as chairman, and Party Leader Perry
Christie over the direction of the convention.

Mr Rigby reportedly was of the view that the
event should focus on what went wrong in the
last election in order to determine what needs to
be done for the PLP to regain government in as
short a time as possible. This strict focus, howev-
er, was not what was desired by the Christie camp,
insiders indicate.

Mr Rigby consequently walked away from par- .
ticipation in the organization of the convention,
which is now being chaired by Mr Christie.































last year, including a record 79
recorded murders.

In concluding his address,
the former prime minister
focused on the responsibility
of leaders in this region to
show the way in moving
towards a sense of coilective
responsibility in addressing
these vexing social problems.

“In conclusion, I say that
we must recognize the one
undeniable fact that those of
us who have the honour and
the privilege to govern, in its
broadest sense, those of us in
Government and in Opposi-
tion must shoulder our extra-
ordinary obligation to bring
our constituents to accept that
we must all — all of us — work
together to secure our future,”







PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







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POWERING THE BAHAMAS FOR GENERATIONS!



Finance Minister affirms the
importance of nation’s youth



YOUTH FORUM: Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing is pictured as he listens in on discussions at the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports
and Culture’s Youth Forum in Freeport Friday. Pictured standing from left are Mrs Janet Russell, Assistant Director of Youth; Minister Laing; and

Young make up
largest portion of the

Bahamas population,

Laing tells forum



oe

Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



Ruth Evangeline Delancy, 80
of 8th Terrace, West Court,
Centerville and formerly of
Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera will
be held on Thursday at 11:00
a.m. at East Street Gospel
Chapel, East Street North.
Pastor Tom Roberts assisted
by other ministers of the
Gospel will officiate.
Interment will be made in

Lakeview Memorial Gardens
J.EK. Drive.



Left to mourn but cherish her
life, her husband of 59 years, William Lloyd, her six children,
Cislyn Evangeline Simmons, William Percy, Philip Lloyd,
Peter Alfred, Craig Gilbert and Deitra Ann Delancy; daughter-
in-law, Phillipa Delancy, son-in-law Arnold Simmons;
grandchildren, Vaughn and Vashti Simmons, Adrian, Kelly
and Lesa Delancy, Dana Chacon, Bryan and Bristol Delancy;
grandson-in-law Michael Chacon Sr.; great-grandson,
Michael Chacon Jr. Brothers: Dr. William (Al) McCartney
and Arnold McCartney; sisters, [vis Carey, Dorothy Moncur,
Angela Wallace; brothers-in-law, Archie Carey and Charles
Wallace; sisters-in-law, Eileen and Mary McCartney, Dorothy
and Remona Delaney; aunt, Jane Miller and family; nephews,
William (Billy), Dr. Barrett (Barry), Lennox and Keith
McCartney, D. Augustus Moncur, Carville Wallace, Garvin
and Mark McCartney; nieces, Tamara McCartney-Cargill,
Dale Carey-McHardy, Shawn Carey-Turnquest, Kim Carey-
Gibson, Alexandra, Amanda and Anita Moncur, Dr. Charlene
Wallace-Ferguson, Kayla Wallace-Hilton, Tonya McCartney-
Tynes, the families of the late Joseph and John Delaney,
Leroy Delancy, Lawrena Wilson and Caroline Rolle; the
families of the late Timothy McCartney, Irvin (Sonny)
McCartney, Ruth Morris, Beatrice Knowles, Evelyn Carey,
Leon McCartney, the families of the late Fred Allen, Eris
Allen, William Allen, Albertha Ferguson, Alice Bethel, Ruth
Carey, Marion Knowles Ingraham of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera,
Naomi Christie, Mary Darling and a host of other relatives
and friends including, Hon. Perry G. Christie, Hon. Tommy
Turnquest, Hon. Bran McCartney, Dr. Edward Allen, Dr.
David Allen, John Rolle, Hartman Rolle, Williemae Toote,
Vernita Cleare, Maudline Forbes, Carolyn Moss, Anna Marie
Ferguson, Erma Bowe, Annamae Delancy, Sybilene
Cumberbatch, Georgina Delancy, Hollis Sherman and family,
the Butcherettes, Jeanette Anderson, Pearlene Williams,
Sandra Elliott, Eleanor Elliott and family, the Saint Johns
Native Baptist Church family, the East Street Gospel Chapel
family, the Believers’ Gospel Chapel Family, Gayle
Duncombe and family, Dr. James and Janet Shearer, Hesketh
and Dawn Johnson, Pastor Roderick Rolle, Nora Dorsett,
the Centerville 8th Terrace West Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau St. on Wednesday from 10:00 a.m.
to 6:00 p.m. and on Thursday at the church from 10:00 a.m.
until service time.





Vandyke Hepburn/BIS Photo

@ By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information Services

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama - State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing affirmed Friday that it is sensible to take into full
account the views and suggestions of the nation’s youth since
young people make up the largest portion of the Bahamian popu-
lation.

Mr Laing’s comments came as he addressed the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Education’s Youth Forum held at the Worker’s
House Auditorium. The aim of the Forum is to collect ideas and
suggestion on the Ministry’s proposed national youth policy.

Friday’s Youth Forum brought together some 40 young per-
sons from organisations and schools on Grand Bahama and saw
groups focusing on areas such as education, employment, crime,
abuse, government and more.

Mr Laing told the gathering that he was happy to be attending the ~~

forum because so much of his development started with the Min-
istry of Youth, which recruited him in youth work and allowed him
to represent the country at youth meetings around the world.

He recalled during his early days being involved in a similar
forum which back then had focused on the proposed National
Youth Service and how the young people of the nation rejected the
idea.

“And so I want you to know that because they rejected that
National Youth Service then, there was not a National Youth Ser-
vice of the order that was being proposed, introduced in The
Bahamas since. And I say that to tell you that your input can
make a difference as to
what the Government
does or what the Gov-
ernment does not do,”
he told the gathering.

Minister Laing said
the young persons
attending the Forum had
very clear ideas of the
issues they were dis-
cussing and he assured
them that the recom- °
mendations would be
considered in respect of
the national youth policy
that they will formally
adopt in The Bahamas.

The Commonwealth
Youth Association, he
noted, has been leading a
charge for some fifteen
years to cause countries
to adopt a formal
National Youth Policy.

“Government in
adopting that policy will
determine in advance
how it wants to respond
to the development of
young people; how it
wants to respond to the :
issues that confront young people, whether that issue relates to
employment, to crime or to education or social development,” he
stated. “When you consider the share size of the youth population
in this country there is no group of people in The Bahamas who
have the numbers you have if you are under 25 years old.”

He told that nearly 54 per cent of the nation’s population is
under 25 years of age, and that whether one is talking business,
church, education or the general society, no one group has the
share numbers young people have in the country.

“When we look at the things that are influencing the social
development, the social dynamics of The Bahamas you are having
a bigger say in all of that than any other population set,” Minister
Laing said.

Spearheaded by the Department of Youth, a similar Youth
Forum was scheduled for Mt Zion Baptist Church in Eight Mile
Rock on Saturday. The Ministry of Youth also co-ordinated a
town meeting for all youth, sporting and cultural leaders, school
principal, teachers, parents, guardians, social partners and the
community beginning Saturday at the Universal Household of
Faith Church in Hawksbill.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

oo SRPMS! FORESEES



“When we look
at the things that
are influencing
the social devel-
opment, the social
dynamics of The
Bahamas you are
having a bigger
say in all of that
than any other
population set.”



Zhivargo Laing
















THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 15



KENYA

Amid lull in violence, Kenyans seek safety of ethnic numbers

@ By MATTHEW
ROSENBERG
NAIVASHA, Kenya

As the bus slows for a police
checkpoint, hawkers rush up
pushing cars of corn, sodas and
fried treats toward the open win-
dows.

The journey is long, the pas-
sengers hungry and thirsty. But
nobody's buying. Instead they
hurriedly jam the windows shut.
They are of the Luo tribe, and
this is Kikuyu territory.

“We are among our enemies. It
can be dangerous to be eating
these foods,” says Daniel Ochieng
Adongo. “There could be poi-
soning.”

With the violence sparked by a
deeply flawed election tapering
off, a quieter tragedy is unfold-
ing in Kenya. The tribes that lived

together peacefully for decades .

are peeling off in search of safety
in ethnic numbers. A bus ride
with 68 fleeing Luos provides a
ground’s-eye view of a migration
that could permanently fracture
the country’s ethnic map. More
than 1,000 people died and some

THE BAHAMAS

600,000 were forced from their
homes in the strife that followed
the December election in which
President Mwai Kibaki, a Kikuyu,
was declared the victor over Raila
Odinga, a Luo, even though most
local and foreign observers said it
was rigged. The fear and enmity
sown by the violence is evident
during much of the 10-hour bus
ride with the refugees. They are
fleeing their homes in Nairobi,
the capital in the Kikuyu-domi-
. nated central highlands, for west-
ern Kenya, their Luo heartland.

“It is like we are living in two
countries,” Adongo says as the
bus pulls away from the police
checkpoint. “We are leaving their
country for our country.”

The first half of the trip
requires an escort of soldiers in
jeeps and trucks because it passes
through Kikuyu areas such as
Naivasha, a town that in better
days attracted hordes of tourists
eager to see lions, wildebeest and
other animals. Angelina Jolie
even filmed part of her Tomb
Raider franchise amid the arching
rock formations in a nearby
national park,

But that was then. Last week,
members of a feared Kikuyu gang
called Mungiki were setting up
roadblocks in town, looking for
Luos and members of other eth-
nic groups that supported Odinga.

Most of the bus passengers
were living in Thika, a relatively
prosperous town on Nairobi’s
edge. Adongo, a rangy, impas-
sive-looking man of 35, was a
mechanic who managed send a
little money home to poor rela-
tives in western Kenya every
week.

In the election, Adongo, like
most Luos, supported Odinga.
When Kibaki was declared the
winner, years of resentment
against the Kikuyu’s domination
of the country exploded. Luos
and other tribes tied to the oppo-
sition chased Kikuyus from west-
ern Kenya, burning their homes,
looting their shops and killing
many. Kikuyus were fast to
extract revenge on Luos in their
midst. In a predominantly Luo
part of Thika, a mob showed up
and told the residents to leave or
dic. So Adongo and a few thou-
sand others took what they could

Farewell to Lawrence Whitfield Major



Peter Ramsay/BIS

PRIME MINISTER Hubert arias (right) and Minister of National Security and Immigration iam Turn-
quest are pictured among those attending the funeral service for former Assistant Commissioner of Police
Lawrence Whitfield Major at Bethel Baptist Church, Meeting Street, on Friday, February 15. Mr Major also
served as former Commander of the Marine Division of the Defence Force and former Superintendent of Pris-

ons.

ee







carry and fled to a camp on
Nairobi’s outskirts, many leaving
homes they had grown up in.

That was about a month ago.
With the roads now clear, a
church group is giving Luos free
bus rides to western Kenya.

Once luxury coaches, the buses
are ragged from years of grinding
down Kenya’s rutted roads. The
seats sag, windows are cracked,
wooden planks cover holes in the
floor and the air brakes wheeze
asthmatically. Luos pile in with
bundles of clothes, boxes of trin-
kets and pictures tied with string,
and sacks of flour and rice.

Some will stay with relatives
out west, others will have
nowhere to shelter.

The convoy joins its army
escort on the road out of Nairobi
as it starts its 150-mile journey in
the verdant highlands where
sheep.and goats graze next to veg-
etable plots. Soon, the bus

descends to the dusty savannah
of the Rift Valley, passing occa-
sional herds of zebra. |

Along the way, it overtakes
run-down cargo trucks crammed
with other fleeing Luos and their



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furniture, clothes, goats, chick-
ens. The passengers stare in
silence when driving by burned
out homes, which they assume
belonged to Luos.

Hours later, as the bus barrels
past tea plantations, safely out of
Kikuyu territory and now in hills
“dominated by ethnic groups
aligned with the opposition, they
pass more burned-out homes.
This time they presume the
charred wrecks belonged to
Kikuyus, and they start chatter-
ing. “We are glad,” says Christina
Odhiambo, a 39-year-old who
used to clean houses in Nairobi.
“It is what they deserve.”

Soon enough, tea bushes give
way to fields of sugar cane — they
have reached the Luo heartland
on the shores of Lake Victoria.
Driving into Kisumu, the region’s
main town, people shout, “we’ve
arrived, we’ve arrived.” Passersby
cheer them on. Even the sight of
the muddy transit camp on the
grounds of a half-built church
doesn’t get them down. They
stumble out expectantly, glanc-
ing at the long tents and tarps
strung from unfinished cin-









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nae DISCOUNT willl Loe 1 Ot
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ft{s) DPersnise

derblock walls. A few line up for
a meal of boiled beans and veg-
etables. The rest look for a place
to bed down for the night.

Church workers at the camp
say 9,000 people have passed
through in 10 days. Most are
quickly shipped out to villages
where they have relatives, even
distant ones. Adongo is going to.
relatives outside Kisumu who’,’
have been putting up his wife and’
three children for the past month.’
He used his last money to send
them west, and he needs work...
“My relatives are poor. They will.
need help feeding us.”

For Odhiambo, who has little.
family in western Kenya, the
future is less certain. Her 19-year-’
old son left Nairobi 11 days ago»
and is staying with a friend in:
Kisumu. Maybe she can stay,
there, she says, while she looks;
for something permanent. ora

- As for work, “there are houses*
to clean. There are dirty house
everywhere.” But having grown...
up in Nairobi, she speaks little,”

Luo, and worries: “Will they trust?
me?”





TTT ee are rears



Our ALREADY | |
Regular

‘ Discounted Prices
| Excludes All Sale

Items) —











——





PAGE 16, MONDAY, one 18, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

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The Management of UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. & )
' | UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. is proud to announce its |

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| Ian Atkins Roberto Schott
BANK BANK

| DIRECTOR |



| Jose Aguilar-Millan Dwayne Davis Zelpha Davis Steve Davis ‘ Turi Dias a
BANK _ BANK TRUST BANE | BANK
, fess Nae ’



AAD igs,



Lovina Penne rman Claudia Rolle Pierre-Alain Torti
BANK BANK BANK

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR





IY PO
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Yi a iain cart mall tye mini



Luiz Barros Felecia Boyle-Bazard Eduardo Barros Aldo Mazzella Gustavo Pontes
BANK BANK _ BANK © _ BANK BANK

We acknowledge those employees who celebrated
Service Anniversaries in 2007



5 YEARS
35 YEARS 18 YEARS Marsha Adderley a
Bathsheba Cleare Ed Zaleschuck Dena Andr ews i
Daniel Brandenberger Jobn Benjamin a
25 YEARS Tanya Braynen ie
Elvira Lowe 10 YEARS Tanya Clare a
Joachim Koebele Linda Mackey
20 YEARS Andreas Rentschler Lanier Daniels
Cheryl Rolle Shavonne Davis
Germaine Simmons-Dean x
. Gale ae ak _ Shevette Edwards f
Bruno Salgado Kenderlyn Minnis Khalifa Evans
BANK TRUST Lynn Kelly

Tina Marshall











_ broker/dealer’s liquidatio

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamas-
based . bro-
ker/dealer has
gone into. liq-

uidation after .

incurring an estimated $20 mil-
lion loss from certain trading

activities, The Tribune can.

reveal, an episode that also
prompted a Securities Com-
mission inquiry

This all ultimately resulted
in Caledonia Corporate Man-
agement Group’s sharehold-
ers voting by resolution on

MONDAY

“FEBRUARY

18,

2008

SEC ek ds. a Hints sols Liste ae net |

--$20m rading loss prompts

Colinalmperial.



Confidence For Life



* Caledonia liquidator confirms that process to become court-supervised

* Securities Commission: ‘We acted in best interests of investors’

* Caledonia executives said they approached regulator on voluntary liquidation

February 12, 2008, to place the

business into voluntary liqui-
dation, a notice in Friday’s Tri-
bune Business section
announced.

Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas) accountant and
partner, Anthony Kikivarakis,
has been appointed as liquida-

BISX ‘expects’ four

‘more funds listings

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange (BISX)
is hoping to have four more
investment fund listings on the
= exchange shortly, with its chief

executive telling The Tribune _

‘that the exchange hopes to
“roll out” the listing and trad-
ing of public companies’ sec-
ondary securities issues next
month.

On the investment funds
side, Keith Davies said: “I have
gotten interest from three,
potentially four, more mutual
funds for listing on BISX.
These are active inquiries,
seeking information for time-
lines for listings.

“They’re more than just
inquiries, They’ve completed
-draft applications. We have a

steady stream of interest. Our |

[listing] numbers keep on
creeping up, and we expect to
have these four.”

BISX had some 18 invest-
ment fund listings at year-end
2007, finishing the year in style

Exchange hoping to
‘roll-out’ market for
listed firms’ secondary
issues next month







NGTLUMM BN (erS)

by adding the Fidelity

Bahamas International Invest-'

SEE page 4B

‘sa le It His all
tages of of modern living

: ; ‘commer lots starting at



zee ao





tor, and he confirmed to this
newspaper that he and his
attorneys would soon be apply-
ing to the Supreme Court for
an order that would place
Caledonia’s liquidation under
the court’s supervision.
Although the precise nature
of the particular investments

and strategy that ultimately led
to Caledonia’s $20 million
trading loss is unclear, sources
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business that it was a
high risk/high return pro-
gramme that involved short-
selling of securities and heavy
leverage (debt).

Caledonia executives, in
answers to questions e-mailed
to them by Tribune Business,
said they met with the Securi-
ties Commission on January
22, 2008, to propose that they

SEE page 8B

Fiscal deficit grows 67.5
per cent to $78.4m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE fiscal deficit for the
first five months of the Gov-
ernment’s 2007-2008 fiscal year
rose by 67.5 per cent to $78.4

’ million, with one leading pri-

vatisation advocate saying it

“ey > . ’ .
“just can’t-continue” pumping-«-

subsidies into the public cor-
porations to cover multi-mil-

i, Nassau





rrr .

Don't copy. Lead.

Life and Health Insurance

THE DAVIS FAMILY

“ Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

Multi-million dollar corporation subsidies ‘just
can’t continue’ or Bahamas will be bankrupted

lion dollar losses.

Rick Lowe, a member of the
Nassau Institute economic
think-tank, responding to Tri-

-bune Business’s.reports last ,

week on the $19.8 million and
$13 million subsidies given to

Exuma



*Abaco

Mortgage Lending

the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration and Airport Authority
respectively for their 2006 and

2007 financial vente, said that if

SEE page OB

Freeport



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One family with many needs. For

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Tourismtoday
The celebrated, television show that everybody
talks about, continues this season on

Monday, February 18, 2008
FEATURING:
Q Making It In Tourism With Ms. Gina Smith,

_ THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange
(BISX) has been talking with
a Canadian counterpart over
whether its “venture
exchange model” could be
used in this nation, the
exchange’s chief executive
acknowledging that its “expo-
nential growth” had been
impacted by the absence of
any Bahamian initial public
offerings (IPOs) since 2001.
Keith Davies said that

Keith Davies





BISX in talks on ‘venture

Still awaiting word on

rity out there, and the onus
rests with the exchange to
expand the market in differ-
ent ways.

“The first step is to get
these secondary offerings [by
companies whose primary
offerings are already listed by
BISX] on, and approach dif-
ferent ways to expand the
market.”

Mr Davies added that he
had been speaking with his
exchange counterpart in:
Canada on “the expansion of
their venture exchange model
in the Bahamas. How that

while no IPOs may have tak- could be deployed in the
at Da Culture Place en place since Freeport Con- tal from the private place- Bahamas”.
crete, BISX had been work- ment/private equity/venture Acknowledging that a

Q Visitor's Voice With Raquel Horton
Q New Authenticaily Bahamian Kiosks At LPIA
QO) The Impact Of Public Transportation On

the Tourism Industry

ing to attract and develop
new forms of business,
including assessing how it
could serve Bahamian com-
panies who were raising capi-

Be sure to tune in to another brand new,
informative episode of the show
every Monday at 8:30 pm
Mas and Saturday at 10:00 am on ZNS TV.

capital route.

“Our market continues to
grow in other ways,” Mr
Davies told The Tribune.
“IPOs are not the only secu-

| (a! |
TR te ee aes

4 bed, 3 bath, central air,security
screens & bars, furnished,
alarm, swiping pool large yard,

Phone. 423-9866.



stock exchange’s success was
based on its ability to attract
new listings, Mr Davies said
“that from that perspective,
yes, our ability to grow expo-
nentially has been affected by
the lack of IPOs coming to
list on the exchange”.

Yet given the level of pri-
vate capital raising by
Bahamas-based companies in
recent years, Mr Davies said
BISX needed to see how it

- could meet their needs, espe-

cially those firms that did not
want to go public but desired
to be part of a formalized,
regulated market prior to
potentially doing so.

“If you need money, you
come to the market,” Mr
Davies said. “A lot of compa-
nies have been able to obtain
private placements from
institutions and well-off indi-
viduals. Those funds are ade-
quate for them to do what
they need to do at the

“What has to happen as an
exchange is that there’s no
reason why we cannot serve
those persons seeking private
equity as well.”

The BISX chief executive
added that he had not given
up on the IPO market either,
pointing out that the Bahami-
an capital markets enjoyed a

2

SEE next page ba

Generali Worldwide appoints a new
Business Development Manager

Generali Worldwide is pleased to announce the
appointment. of Tanya A. Woodside, who will
manage the business development for’ our,
Bahamas Healthcare Portfolio. Tanya will be
based at our Bahamas office and_ will
concentrate on ensuring continued support for
our brokers and clients in the Islands of The
Bahamas, while also beginning to promote
Generali Worldwide’s products and services
throughout the wider Caribbean.

Tanya has over 15 year’s experience in employee benefits, healthcare
and related industries. Most recently, she worked with J.S. Johnson in
Nassau as Employee Benefits Consultant / Manager. Her experience ©
spans both local and international markets and she has represented a ©
variety of blue chip companies, including AON Consulting. :

Tanya also ha§ extensive, first-hand experience of working as a broker
with Benefits Design & Financial Services in Houston, Texas and she is
also Charter Treasurer for The Bahamas Insurance Brokers’ Association
(BIAA), providing her with a detailed and intimate understanding of the
needs, expectations and challenges of brokers in an ever increasingly
competitive marketplace. Tanya is also a Board Member of both Rotary
Nassau Sunrise and The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce.

Generali Worldwide is delighted to welcome Tanya on board and believe
that her extensive and varied experience will be both an asset to
Generali Worldwide and the business community in The Bahamas and
wider Caribbean.

Congratulations to Ms. Audrey Dorsette
Wionr ofthe Bish Anercan “Ear Bin Customer
Joyeciaion Cangolga tor ana,

(Lo Fe) Wenchal Srnitin, Aesiatant Vioe President ~ Salee
& Developrrvent, Jaret lenin, Staff Manager, Audrey
Doreetie, Vininer, |. Cheoter Cooper, Predict & CEC,

*“

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com \ itis
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601 ‘ ime Can

AN CELA

eam vib a

AWWA, ES By haat!





THE TRIBUNE



PRM El
exchange’ with Canada peer

government debt market

FROM page 2

‘boom’ in companies going
public in the late 1990s and
2000. While the last few years
had been fallow, he argued
that IPO activity was cyclical
and would come round again,
especially when Bahamian
firms needed to raise large
amounts of capital to com-
pete with international rivals
in a free trade environment.
Meanwhile, Mr Davies said
BISX had developed plans
for the listing, trading and
settlement of all government
debt securities - including
government-registered stock
and Treasury Bills — once the
Government gave the formal
go-ahead for this to begin.
Adding that the exchange
now awaited the Governmen-
t’s decision to give the go-
ahead, Mr Davies said:
“We've been working for a
year putting in place plans for
the eventual listing, trading
and settlement of govern-
- ment securities across the

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
328-8157



Fourth Terrace Diagnostic Centre: 9am—5S pm
Imaging At Grosveror 24 Hours, Call After 8pm

exchange....... It’s a matter
of being told to proceed. The
groundwork has been laid.
We ate ready, willing and
able to implement a phased
project plan.

“That element of our busi-
ness is in a waiting stage until
we are told otherwise. We
have been getting on with
other things.”

BISX had implemented the
required systems already, he
said, and had plans to add
additional staff and educate
all government debt market
participants — investors,
banks, broker/dealers and the
Central Bank — on how the
new set-up would work.

While some work still
needed to be done in specific
areas, Mr Davies said that
until the Government gave
the formal go-ahead, it did

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

”

“not make operational sense
for the exchange to “ramp-
up” for business it still did
not know it would get
because this would add
unnecessary costs with return
prospects uncertain.

He added that he was not
criticizing the Government,
or making any judgments or
casting aspersions in relation
to the listing of government
debt on the exchange, but
simply stating a fact as to the
current situation.

“We are very practical in
our approach, having been
operating BISX and the local
market for eight years. Peo-
ple can point to the success of
the smooth market opera-
tions, despite some of the dif-
ficulties the exchange has
been through,” Mr Davies
said.

“Climb high and

reach the

mountain top.
‘When you reach,

look down and
help others to do

the same.



IMAGING

AT GROSVENOR
CT & Ultrasound Services



Pregnancy
Ovarian Disease
Prostate
Uterine Disease
Abdominal Disease
Breast Ultrasound

HOURS

pte
325-1036



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 3B



THIS MONTHS TOPIC:
Heart Health

LECTURE DATE

Thursday, February 21st, 2008 @ 6pm
Doctors Hospital Conference room

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating



SPEAKER: | series of the most relevant health issues
Dr. Conville Brown affecting society today.
Cardiologist



~. To ensure available seating

Phone: 302-4603

pDOCT ORS HOSPITAL

. Health Fut Life.

SIU Rae



HAPPY TOURS DECLARES
A $50,000.00 DIVIDEND



Left to Right -Robert Outten, Trustee Director; John G. Rolle, Trustee/Director; Bruce
Rolle, Vice President; Mr Albert Brown, President; Jeffrey Murphy, Director; Basil Major,
Director; Roscoe Weech, Secretary/ Director and Leon Griffin, BTCU President: Director.
Missing are Mr. T.C. Brown, Treasury/Director and Mr. Philip Watkins, Trustee: Director.

The Directors of Happy Tours Ltd. have declared a dividend
of $50,000.00 payable to all shareholders of record on the
31st January, 2008. This Dividend represents the first dividend
payable by the company since its operations began many years ago.
The resolution was passed by the Directors on the 3 1st January, 2008

All shareholders are hereby notified that a dividend is now
payable at $2.50 per share. All shareholders are asked to confirm
their shares with the registrar of the company or the secretary by
29th February, 2008.

Registrar

Concorida Corporate Services
Hepburn House

Shirley Street

Tel: 322-8814

Secretary

Mr. Roscoe Weech

145 Nassau Street
Company Head Quarters
Tel: 323-5818

Person who are unable to locate their share certificates are asked to
check with the Registrar or the Company’s Secretary for confirmation of
their share holdings.



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



ae ee
PO TCT Te a

BISX ‘expects’ four

Fund, and the CFAL High — exchange’s ability to list their
Grade Bond Fund. secondary securities issues,

Meanwhile, Mr Davies said such as preference shares and
ment Fund Class N-Series, the — there had been a “great deal
CFAL Global Bond Fund, the of interest” from existing
CFAL Global High Equity BISX-listed equities in the

eam ES eT TLC
just call 322-1986 today!

FROM page 1B



SEE next page

x.
pl

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking
bids for Construction services from suitably qualified local
Bahamian contractors to carry out the development of 9,
500 square feet of office space at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Qualified contractors must:-
-Demonstrate an ability to obtain $1,000,000.00 liability
insurance
-Provide evidence that all Government tax payments are
current
-Provide at least three references from owners of
projects in excess of $50,000.00 .

Bid packages can be obtained from the offices of NAD on
Tuesday 19th — Friday 22nd between the hours of 9am and
5pm. .

A site visit has been arranged for 9am on Monday,
February 25th. Contractors wishing to participate are
asked to notify NAD of their intention no later than 5pm on
Friday, February 22nd at telephone number 702-1000.

The Deadline for submission of bids is 4:00pm on February
29th. Bid packages should be delivered to the NAD offices
no later than 4:00pm February 29th. All packages received
after this time will be returned unopened.

NAD reserves the right to reject any or all bids.



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES,
THE BAHAMAS

SCHOOL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND RESEARCH

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the posts of:

LECTURER/ SENIOR LECTURER IN SURGERY

Candidates should be a medical graduate from a recognized and accredited

University, with a qualification in Surgery, and significant clinical experience at
the highest levels in their surgical specialty, well thought of by peers and in current
clinical practice. He/she must be a good team player with strong leadership skills
as well as professional and interpersonal skills, undergraduate and postgraduate

training and research experience, record of excellence in surgical experience,

teaching, research and publications.

The successful applicant will be required to:
¢ Lead in and coordinate the teaching of surgery to undergraduates and
postgraduates (for the MB BS and DM surgery);
¢ Lead and mentor research in surgical disciplines; .
¢ Participate in the surgical services of the Princess Margaret Hospital
(a 600-bed public and teaching hospital.

LECTURER/ SENIOR LECTURER IN EPIDEMIOLOGY,
RESEARCH UNIT

Candidates should have training at the masters or doctoral level in epidemiology. It
is highly desirable for the candidate to have interest and competence in teaching at
the undergraduate level in community health and family medicine, and overseeing
the research component of all postgraduate programmes. Experience in the design
and conduct of epidemiological projects including demonstrated ability to attract
research grants would be an asset.

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to the development of
the programme in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially cardiovascular
disease risk while establishing collaborative projects with other researchers and
units within the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and the wider UWI research

community.

The successful applicants will be expected to assume duties June 1, 2008.

Application letter along with curriculum vitae giving full particulars of qualifications,
experience, nationality, names and address of three referees and copies of degrees
should be sent by electronic mail to: hrmd.sed@uwimona.edu.jm or to the Human
Resource Officer, Staffing & Placement, Human Resource Management Division,
The University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7. In order to expedite the selection
process, applicants are advised to as‘: their referees to send reports under confidential
cover to the above address without waiting to be contacted. The final date for receipt of

applications is February 29, 2008.



Public Hospitals Authority
Advertisement

Two (2) Vacancy For
Emergency Vehicle Driver
Marsh Harbour Abaco

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the |
post Emergency Services Technician (EST) III], Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-\

A minimum of five (5) subjects at the B.J.C. level or equivalent
including English Language OR pass the NREMT practical exam
and the BLS (Basic Life Support) with two (2) years relevant
experience.

Must also obtain licensure and registration from the Health Pro-
fessions Council.

DUTIES:

The Emergency Services Technician III is responsible for provid-
ing basic life support to ill or injured persons including:

* Taking current and past history relevant to event

* Maintaining the airway.

* Manually ventilating a patient.

* Splintering or otherwise immobilizing the body or parts of the
body

* Protecting the confidentiality and dignity of the patient.

* Recording all pertinent information.

WORKING CONDITIONS

Must be able to lift patients, equipments, materials weighing 150.
Ibs.

Letters of Application, resume and three (3) references should
be submitted, no later than 22nd February, 2008 to Human Re-
sources Director, Public Hospitals Authority, PLO. Box N-8200 or
3rd Terrace Centerville (West).





LY NTN

STH ANNUAL

FUNG WALK

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2008

EARLY REGISTRATION APPLICATIONS CAN BE DROPPED OFF AT THE SUBWAY
HARBOUR BAY AND PRINCE CHARLES RESTAURANTS FROM FEBRUARY 18 TO 22.






NAME:



AGE: GENDER: Male Female




ADDRESS:



TELEPHONE




T-SHIRT SIZE: Small Medium large X-Large 2X-Large



Please check anuropriate category:
















WALKER





Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician.

| assume all risks associated with the SUBWAY Fun Run Walk including, but not limited to falls,
* contact with other participants, the effect of weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold,
and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions of the road, all such risks being known and appreci-
ated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing the facts and in consideration of accepting
my application, |, for myself and anyone entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release
SUBWAY and all sponsors, their representatives and successors, from all claims and liabilities
of any kind arising out of my participation in the SUBWAY Fun Run Walk even though that
liability may arise out of negligence or carelessness on the part of the persons named in this
waiver. | am aware that the registration fee is non-refundable. | am also aware that the course
will open to traffic and that headphones, jogging strollers, bikes, in-line skaters, and similar
ms and animals accompanying entrants are not permitted on the course

RACE STARTS AT 7AM

LATE REGISTRATION STARTS AT GAM

REGISTRATION FEE: $12
WESTERN ESPLANADE TO

GOODMAN'S BAY & BACK

Thompson
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88c¥-See WO 9080-22E TIVO NOLLYWHOANI SHOW 4O4

REMUINE fs .-
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SAVING
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is Rin you? DOCTORS HOSPUTAL,







THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 5B





more funds listings

FROM page 4

bonds.

The Securities Commission
earlier this year gave BISX
permission to list these issues
and instruments, which should
help to broaden and deepen
the Bahamian capital markets
in terms of investor interest
and options.

Mr Davies, though, told The
Tribune that BISX had not
‘gone live’ with the secondary
issues listings facility straight
away because “we want to do a
few things in-house”.

He because these secondary
issues were typically debt
instruments, as opposed to
ordinary shares and equities,
broker/dealers used a “differ-
ent part of the trading system”
when conducting and moni-
toring transactions.

While equities traded on
price, the BISX chief execu-
tive explained that debt instru-
ments were traded on a per-
centage of their face value, so
the exchange’s trading system
—and the way it and its screens
interacted with broker/dealers
— had been reconfigured to
deal with this.

“IT would hope that by the
end of the month we will have
gone through a period of
releasing the operational steps
to our members. We have
been doing behind-the-scenes
testing in our testing environ-
ment” using real-time date,
“Mr Davies said, “so we can
roll-out with it early next
month.”

The BISX chief executive
said the company was “trying
to make our system a one-stop
shop through our broker/deal-
er members”, which are pri-
marily Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets and CFAL.

The exchange, he explained,
was planning to roll-out its
Observer work stations, which
are configured to track the
market, in addition to its
BISXnet service. This allows
registered users to mine
BISX’s trading information.

“This will become a key fea-
ture of our website, as the
back-end will be tied directly
into the trading information
from the trading engine,” Mr
Davies said.

He added that BISX was
also planning to “release at
some stage” information and

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

data it had compiled to show
every shareholder and investor
in a publicly-listed company in
the Bahamas, an exercise
designed to reveal the breadth,
depth and diversity of share-
holding in the Bahamas. It is

also intended to show how the
future well-being of many
Bahamians, especially those
preparing for and looking for-
ward to retirement, is tied to
the performance of listed com-
pany stocks.

TENDER SECURITY SERVICES

The Clinton Heritage Authority invites proposals
from suitably qualified Companies for the provi-
sion of security services at the Clifton Heritage

National Park.

Interested companies can collect a specification
document from the Authority’s office in the Collin’s
House Complex, with entrance on Collins Avenue,
between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm Mon-

day through Friday.

Tenders must be sealed in an envelope marked
“TENDER FOR SECURITY SERVICES” and
delivered for the attention of:

Dr. Keith Tinker
Secretary
The Clifton Heritage Authority
P.O. Box EE 15082
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: 325-1505

- Bids should reach the Authority's office by
5:00 p.m. on 22 February, 2008.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend
a bid opening on Tuesday, 26 February, 2008 at
10:00 a.m. at the Administrative Office, Collins

Avenue.

The Clifton Heritage Authority reserves the right to

reject any or all tenders.



BAHA MAR

NASSAU, BAMAMAS

Career Opportunity

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. seeks to hire a
Landscape Superintendent

The successful applicant should possess the following qualifications:

¢ Ability to read and revise landscape plans.

¢ Ability to operate a backhoe, excavator, grader, and a
front-loader.

Knowledge of proper installation of all commercial irrigation
systems.

¢ Experience in the planting or installation of palms, trees,
shrubs and sod.

¢ Extensive knowledge of transplanting palms and trees.

* Ability to supervise and give direction to construction
personnel.

* Knowledge of golf course landscaping and maintenance.
* Computer experience in landscaping design is a necessity.

Exceptional communication skills, leadership qualities, self discipline
and the initiative to grow and learn are also essential.

Please forward curriculum vitae with salary requirements via
e-mail to the Human Resources Manager at hr@bahamar.com or fax to:
(242) 677-9100 no later than February 27, 2008. All responses will be
held in the strictest confidence.



Esso Standard Oil, S.A., Ltd. is looking for Talented
Candidates who seek Exceptional Career Development —

ROLE STATEMENT:

Responsible for the execution of special projects or assignments in different Busiess, areas in order
to obtain Training and exposure to our company’s processes and values for a ‘period of 12 months,
having the possibility at the end of the program 2 becoming part of the organizatic ne

POSSIBLE RESPONSIBILITIES:

_% Monitor and perform business data analysis ~

* Short term assignments in Operations, Staff Functions, Sales or + Convenience Retail
_%& Develop projects, business plans, results and strategies -

* Assist with logistics and implementation of category programs - :

NECESSARY SKILLS:

* Bachelor degree in Business Administration, Engineering, Marketing or Related Fields
* 3-4 Years of experience in areas of study

* Great Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills

* Strong Decision Making, Problem Solving , Computer & Analyticei Skills

* Has Commitment to High Standards

* With Drive, Perseverance & Initiating Action

If you are interested in participating in this program, please send your resume by email to:
' recruitmentbahamas@yahoo.com



“The Tribune keeps me
informed. The Tribune
is my Newspaper.”

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN

The Tribune

Purchase The Tribune
from your local store
or street vendor.

My Viwe. My (lewgoqot/





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008



THE TRIBUNE



THE RECEPTIONIST AS AN AMBASSADOR



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LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CAPRI INVESTMENT SERVICES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), the
Dissolution of CAPRI INVESTMENT SERVICES INC. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 17th Day of July, 2007.



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Markets

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian stock market, with
105,291 shares changing hands.
Ten of the 19 listed companies
traded during the week, with
there being five advancers, three
decliners, and two issuers remain-
ing unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Freeport Oil Holdings Com-
pany (FCL) with 44,100 shares
changing hands, accounting for
42 per cent of total shares traded.
With the activity, FCL saw a $0.03
increase in its share price, clos-
ing the week out at $5.15.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) had another active
week, with 35,600 shares changing
hands, raising by $0.01 to close
the week at $2.46. Leading the
rally was FamGuard Corporation
(FAM), with its share price
increasing by $0.29, on volume of
1,400 shares, to close the week
out at a new 52-week high of
$7.79.

The loss leader for the week’

was JS Johnson & Company
(JSJ), which declined by $0.20,
on a volume of 5,000 shares, to
close the week out at $12.30.

The FINDEX increased by
0.44 points or 0.05 per cent, week-
over-week, to close at 929.66.
Year-to-date the FINDEX is
down by 2.35 per cent.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no earnings releas-
es from any of the listed compa-
nies during the week.

INVESTOR CORNER

Last week we looked at two
different types of mutual funds,
namely open-end versus closed-
end funds. This week we will
continue the discussion on invest-
ment funds by exploring differ-
ent investment strategies of
investment funds.

A mutual fund could have sev-
eral types of investment strate-
gies that define the type of mutu-
al fund it is, namely equity fund,
bond fund, money market fund,
fund of funds, and hedge funds.

An equity fund, which invests
mainly in stock investments, is
probably the most common type
of mutual fund and is usually
open-ended. Often, such funds
focus investments on particular
strategies and certain types of
issuers, such as emerging mar-
kets, large cap companies, etc.

A bond fund invests in bonds
and other debt securities. Like
the equity fund, the bond fund
can also focus on certain types of
issuers - government bonds, cor-
porate bonds or junk bonds.

A money-market fund invests
in short-term debt instruments,
and seeks to limit an investor's
exposure to credit, market and
liquidity risks. Such funds tend
to invest in the highest rated debt
instruments, such as commercial
paper, treasury bills or other
short-term highly rated bonds. In
next week's commentary we will
explore the features of fund of
funds and hedge funds. We will
also discuss the exchange-traded
fund (ETF) as an investment
vehicle.

citi

Treasury Head

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Regional Treasury team,
responsible for developing and implementing strategies for
liability products.

currency

the position is

Key

responsibilities include marketing and quoting rates for corporate

We invite outstanding
individuals, wanting to build a
career in Corporate Banking, to
be part of our dynamic global
team. You will interact with
colleagues from around the
Caribbean region and across the
organization globally, providing
treasury management to our
local team. In addition to a great
career, we offer a competitive
salary and benefits package.

related _ financial,

foreign exchange contracts, money market instruments and
derivative products and projecting liquidity'and rate trends. The
role is also focused on risk management through monitoring
liquidity and foreign exposure, ensuring compliance with legal,
regulatory, and internal policy requirements, and, managing ratios
and reserves. Additional responsibilities include overseeing all
regulatory and management performance
reporting, and, supervising and training support staff.

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Accounting or Finance, and, a minimum of 5 years Treasury
experience with a major commercial and/or investment bank; a

Chartered Accountant or CFA designation preferred. Excellent

Interested candidates should
forward a copy of their resume
by February 22, 2008 to: Human
Resources, P.O. Box N-1576;
Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax:
(242) 302-8779 OR Email:

janice.gibson@citi.com

required.

marketing/sales, analytical,

Challenge

communication, and _ interpersonal
skills, combined with a results orientation and an ability to build
relationships, will round out the ideal candidate. Some travel is

yourself to a career like no other

Bish

Pricing Information As Of: .



= ) FIDELITY

Previous Close Today's Close

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
‘Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol (S)

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND H

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

5 A
X Listed Mutual Funds

Last 1 2 Months



Yield %










BISX
SYMBOL







AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE































19, 2008.





















































NOTICE








CLOSING CHANGE

PRICE

$1.73
$0.99
$9.61
$11.80
$14.60
$3.66
$12.70
$7.82
$3.14
$13.99
$4.48
$2.46
$7.79
$2.60
$0.74
$5.15
$13.00
$7.25
$12.30
$10.00



DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

¢ BBL has declared a special dividend of $0.02 per share,
with $0.01 already paid on December 31, 2007, and $0.01
being payable on March 31, 2007, to all shareholders *
record date December 21, 2007.

¢ CBL has declared a special dividend of $0.06 per share,
payable on April 30, 2008, to all shareholders of record date
April 15, 2008.

¢ FAM has declared a dividend of $0.06 per share, payable on
February 25, 2008, to all shareholders of record date February |

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Tides Act, 1959

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising 250 acres forming a portion of the Henry Armbrister
Grant E.79A situate approximately 2 miles Northwest of the
Arthur's Town Airport on the Island of Cat Island one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.



IN THE MATTER of the Petition of

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 929.66






YTD (2.35%)



VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

$0.01 7,591 4.22%
$0.09 5,000 16.47%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 5.39%
$- 200 -7.24%
$- 0 -0.32%
$-0.01 1,000 4.18%
$-0.16 -11.11%
$0.01 35,600 4.68%
$0.29 1,400 8.19%
$- 0 -1.89%
$-0.03 1,400 -3.90%
$0.03 44,100 -0.58%
Se 4,000 0.39%
$- 0 0.00%
$-0.20 5,000 11.82%
i: 0 0.00%







2007





CLE/qui/01438




AND








AND







CAMPERDOWN HOLDINGS LIMITED

THE PETITION OF CAMPERDOWN: HOLDINGS LIMITED. in

“ALL THAT “pleas parcel
approximately two (2) miles Northwest of Arthur's Town
Airport on the Island of Cat Island in. the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in the vicinity of that tract of land known
as Camperdown and more fully described as follows:
Commencing at a point at the High Water Mark thence
SOUTHWARDLY to Dickies Road and land originally granted
to Robert Stubbs (recorded in Book E at page 255) and running
thereon Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-seven and Twenty-
one Hundredths (1,937.21) feet and SOUTHEASTWARDLY
by land originally granted to Emma Culmer, Thomas Butler,
James Thurston,
and running thereon a total distance of Forty Six Hundred
and Nineteen and Ninety-six Hundredths (4,619.96) feet
and SOUTHWESTWARDLY by
to the aforesaid Charles Hepburn and George Dean and
running thereon a total distance of Twenty Three Hundred
and Nine and Eighty-nine Hundredths (2,309.89) feet and
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by land originally granted to Jupiter
‘and Jacob Thurston and running thereon Ten Hundred and
Ninety-eight and Thirty Hundredths (1,098.30) feet and
NORTHEASTWARDLY by a tract of land originally known as
“Camperdown” and originally granted to Henry Armbrister and
running thereon Thirty. Eight Hundred and Sixty-two and Sixty-
five Hundredths (3,862.65) feet NORTHWESTWARDLY by the
High Water Mark and running thereon a total distance of Seventy
Three Hundred and Twenty-five and Eighty-five Hundredths
(7,325.85) feet back to the point of commencement.”

Camperdown Holdings Limited claim to be the owner of the
unincumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said
land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas; and

3. The Commissioner's/ Administrator's Office at New Bight
and Arthur's Town, Cat Island, Bahamas.

is hereby given
dower or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall
expiration of Thirty (3
these presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on
the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in

the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final

NOTICE





respectof:. ,, isha)

or tract of land located

John Strachan and Charles -Hepburn

land originally granted




e

Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following places:








that any person having
on or before the

0) days after the final publication of






























1.3001 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.300059** ublication of these pre i ar to such claim

3.0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.999402**" 19.97% P presents will operate as b ,

1.3798 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.379777°"*""

3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.7442 1.40% 27.72%

11.9880 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9880*** 0.46% 5.53%

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00 LOCKHART & MUNROE

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00

1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund ie Chambers
: 9.6628




Fidelity International Investment Fund

#35 Buen Retiro Road











i 8: Ad 1 VV 2.37% 1 2007 84.47%





ISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY Off Shirley Street
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity Nassau, Bah amas
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price ** . 31 December 2007



Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
*** 31 January 2008

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week A tto rneys for th e Petiti oner






Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths ** 2 January 2008
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV-NetAsset Value ne - 8 February 2008
DIV $ - Divic 2er Share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(3) - 4-for-1 Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

ck Split - Effective Date 7/1 172007

WTO NRADE CALL) CRAL 24@-$00-7010 7 PIDELITY 240-966-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION GALL (242) 904-2808



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18; 2008,

PAGE 7B



PE 1a
Banks still competing

heavily over deposits

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BRINGING major foreign
direct investment (FDI) and
infrastructure projects to
fruition will be key to the
Bahamian economy’s perfor-
mance in 2008, a leading
investment adviser told The
Tribune. ,

He questioned, though,
whether the level of excess liq-
uid assets in the commercial
banking system had fully
recovered from 2006.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said
that while the Central Bank of
the Bahamas economic report
for December 2007 showed

‘excess liquid assets had
increased by $145.4 million to
close the year at almost $155
million, commercial banks had
recently been competing heav-
ily for.deposits controlled by
his company in its capacity as
an investment manager.

“Two weeks ago, we had
banks crawling all over us for
liquidity, offering us attractive
deposit rates, more attractive
than normal,” Mr Kerr said.
Banks offer high deposits rates
typically when they are having
difficulty attracting money,
forcing them to make the rate
of return more attractive.

Commenting on the Central
Bank’s outlook for 2008, Mr
Kerr described it as “a very

neutral kind of a position. It’s
not too hot and not too cold

without going into details”.

The Central Bank had said:
“The economic prospects con-
tinue to be, on balance, posi-
tive, despite persistently high
oil prices and the continuing
risks of a prolonged slowdown
in the United States economy,
and its potentially negative
impact on both domestic
tourism and real estate mar-
kets in the medium term.”

Mr Kerr, though, said the
main issue was to get projects
such as Baha Mar’s $2.4 bil-
lion Cable Beach redevelop-
ment; the $1.4 billion Albany
Golf & Beach Resort; $867
million South Ocean project;
and the $1 billion Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island, going, along with
the $400 million redevelop-
ment of Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) and
the $130 million-plus New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project (NPRIP).

“A lot of people are going
to be employed,” said Mr Kerr,
when asked about the impact.

When it came to rising ener-
gy costs and global oil prices,
he added that a likely “thresh-
old” for New Providence resi-
dents would come when the
price of auto gasoline went
past $5 per gallon.

Due to weaknesses in the
public transport system, par-
ticularly its unreliability and
safety, Mr Kerr suggested that
Bahamians were increasingly
going to have to consider car
pooling.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

MARINA INVESTMENTS INC.

Registration Number: 35,974 B

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby: given'that’in accordance with'Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of
2000) the Dissolution of MARINA INVESTMENTS INC.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was 18

January 2008.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas is the Liquidator of MARINA

INVESTMENTS INC.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd.

Liquidator

i

NOTRE mir NGS PVD

.(Peripheral Vascular Disease)

Do you have any of the
following symptoms:

Leg pain when you walk or exercise
Cold feet or legs .

i] Leg pain that goes away when you rest
J] Numbness and tingling in your legs

2) Ulcers or sores that won't heal

You may have PVD (peripheral
vascular disease). Early
treatment of PVD may prevent
heart attack and stroke. Dr.
Delton Farquharson, M.B.B.S.,
ER.C.S.C., General and Vascular
Surgeon, will be conducting a
FREE PVD screening, Thursday,
February 21st, at the Doctors
Hospital Sessional Clinic, by
appointment only.



Dr. Delton Farquharson
Vascular Surgeon

legshart ce

when you walk or exercise?

lana as

SCREENING & CONSULTATION

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Thursday, February 21st
Time: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

# DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Mealth bar Life



PwectLic NoTiceE

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSE ARCHITECTS

Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliament 1994

Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2009.

NAME
Rodney W. Braynen, F.1.B.A.
B. Arch.

John W. Darville, R.L.B.A.
Dip. Arch., I.B.A

Amos J. Ferguson, F.I.B.A.,
A.P.A. B. Arch., M. Arch.

Anthony J. Jervis, FI.B.A.
B.E.D., B. Arch., M. Arch.

Alvan K. Rolle, I.B.A.
B. Arch. Tech.

Douglas R.A. Smith R.L.B.A.
FI.B.A., Dip. Arch. BSc. MSc.

Gordon C, Major
B. Arch. Tech.

Arthur Colebrook, I.B.A.

Jonathan A. Adderley
LB.A., B.E.D., Dip. Arch.
M.A.,, P.U.G.

Michael C, Alexiou, I.B.A.
B. Arch.

Reginald W. Armbrister
B.Arch.

Neil Behagg, I.B.A.
R.1.B.A. Dip. Arch.

Gaetano . Bonamy
B. Arch.

Trevor Bridgewater
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Victor R. Cartwright
B. Arch.

Ashward G. Ferguson

Winston G. Jones
R.I.B.A., Dip. Arch.
Dip. Urban Design
Kenneth V. Lam
R.I.B.A., M.B.A.

Iram Lewis
B. Arch.

John L. McKenzie
B. Arch.

Clinton W. Pearce
B. Arch.

Andrew O. Stirling, A.A.
R.LB.A., B. Arch.

W. Kevin Sweeting, I.B.A.
B. Art8 Arch. B; Arch.

Benjamin M. Albury
B. Arch.

Frederick D. Albury

B. Arch.

Andre W. Braynen, I.B.A.
B. Arts Arch, Sc., B. Arch.

Sean A. Farrington
B. Sc. Arch. B. Arch.

Michael Foster
B. Sc., B. Arch.

Henry A. Hepburn, R.1.B.A
I.B.A. A.LA. B. Arch.,
M. Arch., M.U.P.

Sean R. Mathews
Dip. Arch.

Charles J. Moss
B. Sc. Arch.

Alicia C-A. Oxley
B. Arch. M. Arch.

David S. White
R.I.B.A., R.A.LC.

Douglas A. Minns, I.B.A.

P. Barry Vanderpool, I.B.A.
B. Sc., M. Urban Design

R. John Paine, R.A.T.A.
B. Arch.

D. Monty Knowles
B. Arch.

Jackson L. Burnside III, I.B.A.
R.1LB.A., M. Arch,

Larry Forbes
B. Arch,

P. Curtis Malone

Jason P. Lorandos, I.B.A.
B. Arch., M. Arch.

David K., Griffiths
Dip. Arch.

Donald A. Dean

P. O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street — Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act 1994, empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons qualified to practice as Professional Architects
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless
he is the holder of a valid licence.” Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offense and is liable on summary conviction to a fine, imprisonment
or both. Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional

ADDRESS

Phone No (242) 393-1874
P. O. Box N-1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P.O. Box N-4556
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-0079
P. O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-2628
P. O. Box N 7273
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-8141
P.O. Box N 7401
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P. O. Box N 4556
Nassau, Bahamas

P. O. Box 3745
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-4061
P. O. Box N 3745
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8893
P. O. Box N 9585
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-7383
P.O. Box N 672
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 395-1148
P. O. Box EE 16704
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8109
P. O. Box CB 11187
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-2496
P. O. Box AB-20676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 394-0014
P. O. Box N 8244
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1896
P. O. Box N 4383
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-7334
P.O. Box N 8156
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-1520
P. O. Box SS 5377
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P. O. Box SS 5730
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 361-4972
P.O. Box CR 56998
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8415
P.O. B ox N 3356
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1463
P. O. Box EE 17989
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7982
P. O. Box SS 5399
Nassau; Bahamas >

Phone (242) 394-8150
P.O. Box!N 3211
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-3552
P.O. Box N 1731
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5916
P. O. Box N-1677

Phone (242) 393-1874
P.O. Box N1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 465-3738
P. O. Box N 7627
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-3385
P.O. Box N 1190
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-9389
P. O. Box 7248
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P.O. Box SS 19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-5204
P. O. Box F 41247
Freeport,, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-3251
P. O. Box CB 11836
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1547
P.O. Box N 1013
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-4736
P. O. Box N 7936
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-7723
P. O. Box 3729
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2945
P.O. Box CB 11499
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2646
P.O. Box SS 19095
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-1886
P.O. Box N 1207
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2021
P.O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8045
P.O. Box CB 12835
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-4372
P.O. Box CB 11275
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 559-7200
P. O. Box F 40257
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F 41609
Freeport, Grand Bahama



LICENCE #

001

002

003

005

006

007

008

009

010

Ol

012

013

014

O1S

016

O18

019

020

021

023

024

031

032

033

038

044

046

049

050

052

O55

056

LPNS

Bruce LaFleur
A.P.A., A.LA.

B. Sc. Envin. Des., M. Arch.

Michael J. Moss, I.B.A.
Garth W. Sawyer

Neville Bosfield
B. Arch.

Wesley G. R. Thompson
Leo D. Ferguson

Timothy H. Neill, R.LB.A.
I.B.A., Dip. Arch.

John W. McCardy
B. Arch.

Alberto G. Suighi, I.B.A.
Phd. Arch.

Tyrone Burrows
B. Arch.

Dwight M. Thompson
1.B.A., B. Arch.

Jennifer A. Saunders
B. Arch.

Livingston Forbes
B. Arch.

Hiram H. Lockhart
Pier Baldacci
Lawrence Chisholm

Bruce M. Stewart
1.B.A., A.LA., B. Arch.

Michael A. Diggiss
LB.A., B. Arch.

Thomas M. Dean
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Dirk K. Saunders
B. Arch.

Godwin Cargill

Robert Whittingham

* Stephen}, Bain >

B. Arch.

Jeremiah Moxey
B. Arch.

C. Bernardo Deleveaux

Lawrence c. Smith

Harold S. Johnson

Mark W. Henderson, I.B.A.
R.1.B.A., B. Se., B. Arch.

Kevin R. Bryce
B. Se. Arch. Arch. Eng.

Mark A. Smith
B. Arch., MLA

Copeland Moxey
B. Arch.

Carlos J. Hepburn
B. Arch., I.B.A.

Tariq J. O'Brien, R.I.B.A.
B. A. Dip., Arch. Dip.
Uban Design

Mark M. Braithwaite
B. Arts, B. Arch,

Stefan P. Russell
B. Arch., IL.B.A.

Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson
LB.A., B.E.D.S.

Kesna M. Hunt
B. Arch.

lan Brent Creary
B. Arch,

Carlan A. Johnson
B. Arts. Arch Sc.
B. Arch.

Dezon A. Curry

B. Arch., M. Arch.

Jechelle T. Rolle
Bs. Arch, Studies

Wilfred B. Dorsett, 1.B.A.
B. Se. Tech, ‘

PY) Tat)

Phone (242) 328-7240
P. O. Box FH 14435
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-5913
P. O. Box N 7091
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 464-1798
P. O. Box Ex 29276
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-1900
P.O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 557-3718
P. O. Box N 8472
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-5566
P.O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-5415
P. O. Box AB 20006
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 332-2987
P. O. Box EL-25078
Governor’s Harbour
Eleuthera

Phone (242) 327-2335
P. O. Box CB 13177
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 382-0611
P. O. Box N 9876
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3220
P. O., Box CB 13826
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-1411
P. O. Box CB 12364
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9738
P. O. Box N 4230
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7789
P. O. Box CB 13452
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-4764
P. O. Box N 4674
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-6261
P. O. Box N 9025
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-8800
P.O. Box N 366
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8916
P. O. Box CB 11388
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1170
P. O. Box N540
Nassau, Bahamas

Pone (242) 557-2308
P. O. Box CR-54122
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-0218
P. O. Box EE-16270
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-6591
P. O. Box CB-13846
Nassau, Bahamas

i. Bihuine @42):356-6029. >
P.O Bos N00)

Nagdal Bahdirias

Phone (242) 341-4846
P. O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5103
P. O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 427-1565
P.O. Box N1412
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 364-4694
P. O. Box N 9420
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3274
P. O. Box CB 12436
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P. O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-0486
P. O. Box SS 6888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone:(242) 457-2107
P. O. Box CB-12689
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-5166
P. O. Box CR-54090
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P.O. Box 9116
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-7259
P. O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-4982
P. O. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 362-6306
P. O. Box N 402
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-1886
P. O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9080
P.O. Box N 9926
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1541
P.O. Box 29151
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-2767
P.O. Box SB-50045
Nassau, Bahamas



Phone (242) 324-5529
P.O. Box N 842
Nassau, Bahamas

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994

Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional Architectural Technicians” until 31 January
ys pel ) I )

2009.

ADDRESS

Phone (242) 326-8141

Leo A. Miller

P. O. Box 6583
Nassau, Bahamas

Henry A. Delancy

Phone (242) 334-0458

Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera

Michael A. Jones Phone (242)

P.O. Box N 3049
Nassau, Bahamas

Laurin L. Knowles

Phone (242) 337-0025

Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas.

Ryan A, Archer

Phone (242) 367-2001
P.O. Box 579

Marsh Harbour, Abaco

C. Jenkin Williams

Phone (242) 352-2500

P.O. Box F 44107
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Raa)

TO06

TOL

TOLLS

‘1026

Solomon J. Smith

Coralyn T. Adderley

Jermaine Evans

Trevor Butterfield

Brent Key

PY) th

Phone (242) 361-6517
P.O. Box N 10888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-1247
P.O. Box GT-2315
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 646-3801
P.O. Box F 60283
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-7154
P.O. Box F 44042
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 367-4143
P.O. Box AB-20702
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

~~

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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008



$20m trading loss prompts broker/ dealer’s liquidation





NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of MERIH HAINES
late of No. 85, Devonshire Street,
Westward Villas, Western District,

Island of New Providence in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the undersigned on or before the 7th March,
2008 after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make
full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers

Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street

P.O. Box N-4014

Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executors



The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, Abaco, is looking to fill the
following positions in its Development Department. This is an
eight (8) year project.

| Project Manager - Construction

*- Minimum 10 years experience in construction management

e Proficient in reading and understanding construction plans

e Proficient in creating and monitoring of construction
schedules

° Assist with development of forecasting and working
budgets

° Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel

° Keen understanding of maintaining aggressive schedules

within planned budgets

¢ Needs good communication, logistical and organizational
skill

ES =e

FROM page 1B

place the company into volun-
tary liquidation. They added
that the regulator approved
this action on February 6, 2008.

However, sources close to
the Securities Commission's
viewpoint said the regulator
approved the voluntary liqui-
dation only on two conditions
— that it appointed and
approved the liquidator, and
that the process would ulti-

mately become court super-

vised.

In addition, The Tribune
understands that once notified
of Caledonia’s situation and
the $20 million trading loss, the
Securities Commission began a

review process that assessed
the company’s internal con-
trols, procedures and risk man-
agement systems.

Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rilies Commission’s executive
director, told ‘Phe Tribune:
“Once the Commission had
knowledge of what was going
on, we acted in the best inter-
ests of the investors in Cale-
donia and its clients.”

He declined to comment
further. However, sources told
this newspaper that the Secu-
rities Commission had consid-
ered going to court itself to
have a receiver appointed for
Caledonia, only to find that it
had no power to do so in the
existing Securities Industry Act
legislation. This resulted in the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAKE VASTHI INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

the dissolution of LAKE VAS'THI INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

West, Centreville,

into voluntary liquidation and Mr. 4

Nassau,

,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)



Notice

Notice is hereby given that on 12 February
2008, by resloution of its Members, Caledonia

Corporate Management Group Limited went

Anthony S.

Kikivarakis of Deloitte & Touche, 2nd Terrace

The Bahamas,

was appointed as the Company’s Liquidator.

Sig ned
Mr. Anthony S

S. Kikivarakis

agreement on the vountaey
liquidation.

Mr Kikivarakis, the liquida-
tor, told The Tribune: “It is a
voluntary liquidation with the
Securities Commission’s sup-
port. It will become a court
supervised one. It always
makes sense to do that in what
may be regarded as con-
tentious liquidations. The reg-
ulators wanted it to be court-
supervised as well.”

Pointing

Pointing out that since Cale-
donia had only been placed
into voluntary liquidation on
February 12, 2008, and that he
had only been at the compa-
ny’s offices for two days when
he spoke to Tribune Business,
Mr Kikivarakis said he would
“oo to the court in short order”
to obtain permission for the
process to be court-supervised.

Adding that he was dealing
with Caledonia clients and any
other interested parties who
had concerns over the liquida-
tion, Mr Kikivarakis said:
“We’re in there fresh, we’re in
there new. I’m getting my feet
wet.”

He is now beginning the
process of interviewing Cale-
donia executives and staff, and
going through the company’s
records, in a bid to ascertain a
irue picture of its condition.

Matthew McNeilly, Caledo-
nia’s chairman, who is cur-
rently travelling to the United
Kingdom, said in reply to The
Tribune’s e-mailed questions
that the liquidation of any
financial services company
would have to be court-super-
vised to ensure the liquidator
was adequately protected by
law.

He wrote: “Caledonia
arranged a meeting with the
Commission on January 22,
2008. The purpose of that
meeting was to propose to the
Commission that Caledonia
move the company into volun-

THE TRIBUNE

tary liquidation.

“The Commission then
reviewed the matter before, on
February 6, 2008, approving,
that Caledonia enter into vol-:
untary liquidation, As a result, ;
Deloitte and Touche have,
been appointed in a court-
supervised voluntary liquida-;
tion.

“T would ask you to note.
that any voluntary liquidation ;
involving a financial services ,
company would be court-.
supervised. This is the only,
way the liquidator can be pro-,
tected throughout the ae
tion process.’

“Mr McNeilly added that.
because Caledonia was now;
under the control of Mr Kiki-

varakis and Deloitte & Touche’

(Bahamas), he could not make.
any comment on the company ,
or the events that had led to,
its voluntary liquidation.

Referring this newspaper to,
the liquidator, Mr McNeilly,
said “any detail on the amount.
involved” — referring to the,
trading loss —- must come from ;
Mr Kikivarakis.

He added, though, that,
there was no truth to rumours-
that Caledonia was attempting .
to reincorporate under a dif
ferent name.

Mr McNeilly, who came to,
the Bahamas in 1996 as gen-,
eral manager of Royal Bank,
of Scotland (Nassau), found-.
ed Caledonia Corporate Man- ,
agement Group in January,
1999, according to the compa-
ny’s website.

The firm expanded on June
1, 2005, when it merged with
Robert Dunkley’s Atlantic,
Asset Management. :

Apart from Mr McNeilly,
other key Caledonia executives -
included former Leadenhall,
Bank & Trust managing direc-
tor, William Jennings, who also ,
served as its managing director, |
and ex-Deltec and Leopold
Joseph banker, Keith Kelty,,
who served as Peon
manager.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCO FRANCOIS of 1250
2ND STREET, APT#201, SARASOTA, FLA 34236, UNITED

‘STATES OF AMERICA, is applying to the Minister resposible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 11TH day of FEBRUARY, 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ Will work closely with larger GC on high-end product
" 3 P se é I 7 Si S . 1

Minimum 5 years of construction site management
experience

Good working knowledge of timber and masonry
construction methods

Working knowledge of construction materials

Proficient in reading and understanding construction plans
Proficient in fielding and resolving daily on-site queries
from contractors

Proficient in performing material take-offs

Proficient in creating construction schedules

Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel

Needs good communication, logistical and organizational |
skills

Quantity Surveyor/Estimator

° Minimum 5 years experience as a QS/Construction
Estimator

* Proficient in reading and understanding of construction
plans

* Proficient in material take-offs and creating Bills of
Quantities

° Proficient in developing forecasting and working budgets

* Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel

° Need good communication and organizational skills

Liquidator
P.O. Box N-7526
Nassau, Bahamas

HIGGS & JOHNSON
242-302-4800 H Co

unsel & Attorneys-at-Law

&



invites applications for attorneys for our Abaco Office. |

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Applicants must have a minimum of 3-5 years |
experience in Litigation and Real Estate &
Development, demonstrate an ability to work].
independently and possess a thorough working |
knowledge and technical competence in the areas
mentioned. (Applicants with experience in only
one of the mentioned areas may also apply).

ISMENA CO. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
Successful applicants can look forward to
competitive remuneration and benefits.

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

the dissolution of ISMENA CO. LID. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution las been issued and : .
. . Apply in confidence to:
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
Vacancy
P. O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
or via email at: gbastian@higgsjohnson.com

Project Scheduler +
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
e Minimum 5 years experience as a Project Scheduler (Liquidator)
Proficient in reading and understanding of construction
plans
Proficient with Sure-Track scheduler program
Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel ——

Need good communication and organizational skills



Legal Notice Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

Procurement Officer
NOTICE




* Minimum 5 years experience as a Procurement Officer
Detailed understanding of freight and shipping logistics
Proficient with ordering and tracking of construction
materials
Good working knowledge of construction materials
Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel
Need good communication and organizational skills

PINK PEARL VALLEY INC.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the haiicatic hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 10th day of
January 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,

P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

International Business Companies Act 2000 of BLUE
Warehouse Clerk MANAGEMENT COMPANY LID. ts in dissolution

* Good understanding of construction materials The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 30th January

¢ Good understanding of warehouse procedures 2008. David ‘Pham of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ptd., Build:
° Proficient with Microsoft Excel ing 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 ts the Liquidator of BLUE
MANAGEMENT COMPANY LGD. At persons having clams

against the above-named company are required to send therr address and

Resume should be sent to Nick Sims,
nd Mareh 2008

Development Department,
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay,
P.O. Box AB-20571, Marsh Harbour, Abaco

paruculars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 2

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



e-mail to construction@theabacoclub.com ra fore et, :

OTigusbaer
e



-—-



THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

such trends continued all
Bahamians would end up pay-
ing — literally, in the form of
ever-higher taxes.
Meanwhile, the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ report
on monthly economic devel-
opments for December 2007,
indicated that the Govern-

ment’s finances for the period

June-November 2007 moved
further into the red compared
to the prior year, the deficit’s
size increasing from $46.8 mil-
lion to $78.4 million.

This is the amount by which
total government spending
exceeds total government
earnings (revenue). The data
released by the Central Bank
for the period showed that rev-
enues were slightly down on
the prior year 2006-2007 per-
formance, while recurrent
spending on fixed costs such
as public service salaries, emol-
uments and rents had
increased.

Total revenues collected in
the five months to November
2007 were down by just 2.28
per cent, standing at $510.2
million compared to $522 mil-
lion the previous year.
Import/customs duties, the
main component of govern-
ment revenues, stood at $215.3
million, a 7.67 per cent increase
upon the previous year’s $199.9
million.

The figures appear to back
up previous assertions by
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, that while
government revenues were
generally keeping pace with
2006-2007 figures, they were
below the 2007-2008 projec-
tions outlined in the Budget.
That, of course, may lead to
debate on whether those rev-
enue projections were too opti-

BAHA MAR

mistic.

On the other side, the Gov-
ernment’s recurrent spending
increased by 3.47 per cent to
$515.1 million, compared to
the previous year’s $497.8 mil-
lion for the first five months,
with the difference in capital
spending between the two
Budget years negligible.

Factor

One factor that increasing-
ly acts as a drag on the Gov-
ernment’s finances is the need
for it to financially support
(some would say bail out)
numerous public corporations
such as Bahamasair, Water &
Sewerage, the Airport Author-
ity, Hotel Corporation, BAIC
and others.

Given that all these subsidy
recipients are also notorious
for delivering poor service,
many Bahamians have openly
questioned why the existence
of some of these entities need

to be prolonged, including Mr -

Lowe.

Urging the Government to
privatise entities such as Water
& Sewerage and Bahamasair,
thus ending their reliance on
taxpayer subsidies, Mr Lowe
told The Tribune that the Gov-
ernment could not financially

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008 , PAGE 9B

eee eens nS a
Fiscal deficit grows 67.5 per cent

support these entities on one
hand without taking with the
other from the Bahamian tax-
payer.

“Tt just can’t continue; it just
can’t,” Mr Lowe said. “Gov-
ernment has got to find a way
to permanently resolve this sit-
uation, or otherwise it will
bankrupt the country. Why
can’t others get these subsi-
dies? Don’t just restrict it to
these government agencies
that don’t seem interested in
providing service.......

“It’s not in the interests of
the average Bahamian for this
to continue, because it’s the
average Bahamian that will
pay for it through higher taxes.
Sooner or later, we’re going to
have to pay the piper.

“I’m not interested in being
like Jamaica, Barbados and
countries that have a worse
GDP to debt ratio than the
Bahamas. You don’t bench-
mark against the worst exam-
ples; you benchmark against
the best examples.”

An almost-$20 million
bailout by the Bahamian tax-
payer helped the Water &

Sewerage Corporation turn
what would have been a $19
million loss into a small six-fig-
ure profit for 2006, with its cur-
rent liabilities exceeding cur-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVNER PETITFOR of 1250
2ND STREET, APT#201, SARASOTA, FLA 34236, UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA,

is applying to the Minister resposible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18TH day of FEBRUARY, 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P-O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. seeks to hire a

Project/Construction Manager

The Project/Construction Manager is responsible for planning, organizing, supervising
and coordinating the work of consultants, contractors and sub-trades as required
for ‘various projects. They must ensure that the projects meet design, budget,
schedule and quality requirements.

The successful applicant will be responsible for:

e Ensuring the trade contractors are carrying out their work in accordance with
the Contract, including approved method statements and other approved
documents relating to Health & Safety, environmental issues and quality.
Facilitating the work of the contractors, so far as possible, by ensuring the
necessary logistic arrangements are set up and operating

MUST SELL _
VACANT PROPERTY

Lot #14721 comprising 10,000 sq.ft. in area with
83 frontage on Zinnia Road and 120 feet on,
Eastward Drive in Bahama Sound of Exuma Ocean

rent assets by more than $50 Addition West, Exuma Bahamas

million.

This compared to a $3.108
million loss the previous year,
a performance aided by anoth-
er $15.5 million government
subsidy, which covered what
would have otherwise been an
$18.608 million loss.

Meanwhile, the Airport
Authority produced a $43.638
million loss for the Govern-
ment and Bahamian taxpayer
in the first seven years since it
was created, an average of
more than $6 million per year,
with a $13 million subsidy
required to cover its fiscal 2007
losses.

It sustained a $19.569 mil-
lion loss in 2007 before the
Government rode to the res-
cue with a more than $13 mil-
lion subsidy.

The property is undeveloped and is
located 1 mile south of Emerald Bay
and The Four Seasons Resort.

For conditions of the sale and any other
information, please contact:
Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit at:
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608,
Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit
offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management - Collection
Unit, PO. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

Serious enquiries only





Public Hospitals Authority
Advertisement




Two (2) Vacancy For
Emergency Vehicle Driver
Marsh Harbour Abaco



Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the
post Emergency Services Technician (EST) Ill, Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, Public Hospitals Authority.







Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-\

A minimum of five (5) subjects at the B.J.C. level or equivalent
including English Language OR pass the NREMT practical exam
and the BLS (Basic Life Support) with two (2) years relevant ©

experience.









Must also obtain licensure and registration from the Health Pro-
fessions Council.

DUTIES:














_ The Emergency Services Technician III is responsible for provid-
ing basic life support to ill or injured persons including:
* Taking current and past history relevant to event
* Maintaining the airway.
- Manually ventilating a patient.
- Splintering or otherwise immobilizing the body or parts of the
body
* Protecting the confidentiality and dignity of the patient.
* Recording all pertinent information.

WORKING CONDITIONS

Must be able to lift patients, equipments, materials weighing 150
Ibs.

Letters of Application, resume and three (3) references should
be submitted, no later than 22nd February, 2008 to Human Re-
sources Director, Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N-8200 or
3rd Terrace Centerville (West).




& s
v ¥
N, ¥

4 v
Lay ce

Sheraton
Grand Bahama Island

OUR LUCAYA

THE WESTIN

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
~ OUR LUCAYA














Interfacing between contractors

Recording the progress of work and valuation

Carrying out inspections with the contractor to verify that work is in accordance
with the approved standards. Escort other parties, (Local Authority, Consultants,
Clients etc) as requested, to participate in inspections.

Conducting or participating in site meetings as requested and proce written
records.

Creating and executing project work plans and revises as appropriate to meet
changing needs and requirement.

Identifying resources needed and assigns individual responsibilities
Managing day-to-day operational aspects of a project and scope
Minimizing exposure to risk

Managing project budget

Analyzing project cost

Resort RESORT

e

EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY et as
Assistant Financial eee

)

The successful candidate will support. the Director of Finance in the |
achievement of the division's goals and the maintenance of adequate {
internal controls over all areas of-hotel operations. Provide leadership. |
and coordination of all accounting and financial functions of the
company as designated by Director of finance. Establish, gl e-1se) clea

and Ss all secounting records clu financial statements.

Qualifications include:

Extensive knowledge of the general construction industry and the sub trades
Extensive knowledge of construction legal issues including contracts, liens,
labor standards, retainage and other related topics

Ability to perform project management duties for construction projects up to
$150,000,000 effectively and efficiently including but not limited to Budgeting,
Scheduling, QA, Submittals, etc

Ability to identify, troubleshoot and resolve problems on projects before they
become major issues.

Ability to handle multiple tasks at the same time while nyantanine attention
to detail

Ability to work in stressful situations

Ability to juggle departmental resources to.meet deadlines

Ability to read and interpret financial reports

Ability to consistently prepare accurate cost estimates

Ability to successfully negotiate with owner’s, architects, engineers,
subcontractors and suppliers

Ensure Design and Budget is compatible.

Development of assigned Bid Packages.

Excellent written and verbal communication skills

Mitigates team conflict and communication problems

Motivates team to work together in the most efficient manner

Candidate ale possess the following Haat requirements:
Excellent organization and enaietia Sao well as strong
interpersonal, problem solving and customer service skills.
Basic computational and budgetary analysis capabilities. required.
Knowledgeable in rohan] ele lg aber GMa eae Microsoft A
SAP and Delphi. :
Minimum of five years experience in a senior level
finance/accounting position.in the hotel industry.

A Bachelor’s Dearee in egeuiniti: fo) g Cibo field is Say

he

We offer exceptional pay and benefits.
UCM el Ce ML Micelau-lae(-te Mela melg
oN fo CAL La ay) ae A
ourlucayajobs@starwoodhotels.com

Dem Mucins mule
Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya Resort
P.O. Box F-42500
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Please forward your curriculum vitae with salary requirements via e-mail to the

Human Resources Manager at hr@bahamar.com
or fax to (242) 677-9100 no later than February 21, 2008.

All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.





THE TRIBUNE

Credit growth
falls 4.1 per cent
uring 2007

PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008



RTM USAW nA oe LU) an 7

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TAIRA INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company.
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 18th day of
February 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,

P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SLOWING housing and
consumer demand saw the rate
of Bahamian dollar credit
growth in 2007 drop by 4.1 per
cent to 10.5 per cent or $626
million, allowing banking sys-
tem liquidity and the nation’s
foreign currency reserves to
recover somewhat from 2006.

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas report on monthly
economic and financial devel-
opments for December 2007
found that consumer credit for
the full year moderated by
$21.2 million to $215.4 million,
while the pace of mortgage
lending lessened by $33.9 mil-
lion to $300 million.

As a result, private sector
credit growth only expanded
at a 10.2 per cent rate for 2007,
compared to 15.6 per cent the
year earlier, a rate that many
economists and those in the
Central Bank and the Gov-
ernment are likely to have con-
sidered unsustainable.

For the year, the Central
Bank found that excess liquid
assets in the Bahamian bank-
ing system — the assets that are
available to the clearing banks
for onward lending purposes
— increased by $145.4 million to
close the year at almost $155
million, compared to a $103
million contraction the previ-
ous year amid the 2006 credit
boom. ,

The external. reserves
remained flat when it came to

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Housing and consumer demand slow, aS
Central Bank adopts ‘neutral’ 2008 outlook
despite 2007 tourist arrival declines

year-to-year comparisons,
standing at just under $455 mil-
lion, an increase of only $2.9
million on the 2006 year-end
total.

Meanwhile, the Central
Bank adopted a ‘neutral’ pos-
ture when it came to the
Bahamas’ economic outlook
for 2008.

It said: “The economic
prospects continue to be, on
balance, positive, despite per-
sistently high oil prices and the
continuing risks of a prolonged
slowdown in the US economy,
and its potentially negative
impact on both domestic
tourism and real estate mar-
kets in the medium term.”

The Central Bank said
December 2007 had again seen
a “slowing in the pace of eco-
nomic activity”, as weakness
in the tourism and construc-
tion sectors more than offset
the seasonal expansion of con-
sumer demand for the Christ-
mas season.

For the first 11 months of
2007, the Central Bank said
total visitor arrivals to the
Bahamas fell by 3.8 per cent
or 0.18 million to 4.14 million,
with air and sea arrivals down
by 1.7 per cent and 4.8 per cent
respectively.

Total visitor arrivals to New
Providence were down by 1.3

Furniture and household
operations saw a 5.26 per cent
price increase over 2007; recre-
ation and entertainment ser-
vices a 3.78 per cent rise; trans-
port and communications 3.72
per cent; food and beverages
3.69 per cent; and medical and
healthcare 3.01 per cent.

For December 2007, the |
Central Bank said proceeds
from the Government’s short-
term US$20 million credit facil-
ity boosted external reserves,
while there was some liquidity
tightening and firming in both
private sector and government
credit.

ye |

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Limited Edition

Employment Opportunity

The Clifton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of an individual to fill the position of
Managing Director in accordance with Section 15 of the Clifton Heritage Authority Act
~ 2004.

The individual would be required to provide executive leadership, supervision and
direction to units of the Clifton Heritage Authority’s offices and the Heritage Park,
while ensuring, the research and promotion of its historical, cultural and natural
resources.

Duties and Responsibilities:

° Responsible for the implementation of policies, programs and goals and objectives for
the efficient management of the Clifton Heritage Authority.

° Ensures the development and implementation of a strategic plan for the management
of the Clifton Heritage Park ensuring that accepted operating standards and
practices are employed.

° Coordinate and supervise all activities related to safety issues, best environmental
practices, and all matters related to the preservation of historic structures and
conservation of natural resources at the park.

° Serve ad Principal Advisor to the Clifton Heritage Authority Board on matters and
issues relative to the maintenance and upkeep of the park.

° Oversee and coordinate all public and private use of facilities and recreational spaces
at the Clifton Heritage Park and establish user fees.

Liaise with other government, non-government, regional and international agencies to

explore opportunities to promote the sustainable development and management of

the Clifton Heritage Park.

Direct and.coordinate the employment of staff, develop and implement operating

policies, standards and procedures to ensure performance and maintain a stable

working environment.

Conduct periodic assessments of facilities and infrastructure and recommend
"improvements or repairs as necessary.

Prepare and submit a monthly report to the Board of Directors on the operations of

the Authority.

Liase with the Marketing and Public Relations officer to produce material for the

promotion of the Clifton Heritage Park.

P fication:
° Aminimum of a graduate degree in Administration or a related discipline, and/or 10
years experience in an administrative discipline.

Applications are available at the Authority’s Office Collins Avenue and should be
submitted along with resume by 25 February, 2008.

Telephone contact 325-1505.



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per cent; off 6.8 per cent for
Grand Bahama; and down 7.4
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Consumer inflation for 2007
rose to 2.5 per cent, compared
to 1.8 per cent in 2006, again
‘indicating that Bahamian
~ households, especially those in
the lower and middle classes,
are beginning to feel an
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The Education Loan Authority is a quasi government corporation established
under the Eduacation Loan Authority Act 2002, charged with the responsibility of
raising monies for the Education Loan Guarantee scheme established under the
Education Guarantee Fund Act 2001

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of
Financial Officer in the Educaion Loan Authority ona three (3) years contractual basis.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPEREINCE:-
¢ Bachelor’s Degree in Business,(with a major in accounting);
* At least five (5) years job experience in accounting;
¢ Knowledge and ablility to apply accounting;

ESSENTIAL DUTIES, RESPONSIBILITIES AND SKILL INCLUDES:-

¢ Review and analyze financial reports provided by our agent and
affiliated committee:

¢ provide overall direction for accounting, budget and cash feces

¢ Prepare and post journal entries

* Reconcile accounts, prepare Income Statement and balance Sheet;

¢ Coordinate the annual external audit;

¢ Any other job that may be assigned from time to time by the Board
or the Chief Administrative Officer;

The Salary range for the post is $30,900 x 700 - $37,600 per annum

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter, resume and documentary
evidence of qualifications and three (3) references to:

Educational Loan Authority

P.O.Box SS-19039
Nassau, Bahamas
No telephone calls will be accepted



“THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

MONDAY, MONDAY 18, 2006 , PAGE 118
" @N-647



- OFFICE OF THE
PRIME MINISTER

NOTICE OF INVESTIGATION

TAKE NOTICE that pursuant to Section 4 of the Acquisition of Land Act,

_ Chapter 252 Statute Laws of The Bahamas 2000, it appears to the Minister

Responsible for the Acquisition and Disposition of Lands, that the Land

_ described In the Schedule hereto Is likely to be needed for the public purpose

of construction of a Public School, other public buildings and for uses related

thereto.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Minister and his servants or

workmen may either generally or specially authorise any person to do all or

any of the following things, namely:-

se PAY

(b)
(c)

(9)

{e)

if

(g)

A copy of the Plan of the said land may be inspected commencing on
the 8th day of February A.D., 2008 at the Department of Lands and Surveys

situate at Bay and Armstrong Streets between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30

Enter upon and survey and take levels of the said land or any
part thereof; |
Dig or bore into the sub-soil of the said land;

Do all acts necessary to ascertain whether the sald land Is
adapted for the public purpose outlined;

Set out the boundarles of the said land proposed to be taken and

the intended line of work (if any) proposed to be made thereon;

Mark such levels, boundaries and line by placing marks and
cutting trenches on the sald land;

For the purpose of carrying out the foregoing {if necessary) cut
down clear any standing crop, fence, tree or bush;

Do all such other acts as may be Incidental to or necessary for

any of the purposes aforesaid.

p.m. on Monday through Friday.

DATED this 7 day of February A.D., 2008

Hubert A. Ingraham
MINISTER RESPONSIBLE FOR

THE ACQUISITION AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS

SCHEDULE

AREA= 2.76 ACRES

All that certain lot piece or parcel of land containing by admeasurement Two and
Seventy-Six Hundredreths (2.76) acres situate between Queens Highway and King’s _
Highway immediately north of Coopers Court in the Northern Limits of Alice Town,
on the island of North Bimini in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Abutting and
Bounding towards the East on King’s Highway towards the South on Coopers
Court, towards the West on Queen’s Highway towards the North on Allotment
Number 28 or however else the same may abut and bound which said lot, piece or
parcel of land is more particularly delineated and shown coloured pink on the

diagram attached.





COMPILED PLAN
SHOWNE

A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING AN AREA 2,76 ACRES
Syuate



BETWEEN QUEEN'S HIGHWAY AND KINGS HIGHWAY
AT THE WUNCTION OF COOPER'S COURT
WW THE NORTHERN UMITS OF ALICE TOWN
NORTH BIMIN) - BAHAMAS

PREPARED AT THE BRSTANCE OF IME SURVEYOR OONERAL







SCALE: 1 INCH = 100 FEET JANUARY, 2008





PAGE 12B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



:

Service professions have just four
months over EPA feedback

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN professionals
in industries such as architec-
ture, engineering, accounting
and computer services now
‘have just four months to sub-
mit feedback to the Govern-
_ ment as it crafts its services
- offer for the Economic Part-
- nership Agreement (EPA)

‘with the European Union
(EU), in which this nation
- Must ultimately liberalise up
to 75 per cent of its services
industries.

The above-mentioned pro- '

fessions are among the most
_ &fitical as they are the indus-
. tries that Caribbean countries
. have agreed to liberalise under
. the EPA; meaning that many
‘nations have agreed to open
them to some of what are
termed the ‘four modes of sup-

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ply’.

These four nodes are the
cross-border supply of services
where, for example, a Euro-
pean firm in the UK provides
a service to a Crribbean-based
firm; consum dtion abroad,
where a service consumer in
the Caribbean travels to the
EU to obtain 1 service; com-
mercial prese ice, where an
EU or Caribbein services sup-
plier establishes a physical
presence in th: other region;
and the prese.ce of natural
persons, where EU or
Caribbean persons enter the
other region to supply a ser-

Offer

Thé Bahamas was given six
months to craft a services offer
after the EPA treaty was ini-
tialed by its neg otiators in mid-

December 2007, meaning that
it has until mid-June to. sub-
mit an offer detailing the
industries it will liberalise,
how, and when.

By making an offer, the
Bahamas will be able to total-
ly ‘reserve’ or exclude up to
25 per cent of its services econ-
omy from the EPA’s liberal-
ization process. It will also be
able to open others up in a
phased liberalisation process
over five, 10, 15, 20 and 25-
year periods.

But if it does not submit an
offer, the Bahamas will be
unable to protect its own eco-
nomic interests. It will then be
left with a choice of not signing
on to the EPA or signing on to
the offer agreed by CARIFO-
RUM, which may not protect
all this nation’s key industries.

Documents produced by the
CARICOM Regional Negoti-

ating Machines (CRNM)
reveal that among the main
sectors CARIFORUM has
agreed to liberalise are
accounting; architecture; engi-
neering; computer and relat-
ed services; research and
development; management
consulting; services related to
manufacturing; telecommuni-
cations services; courier ser-
vices; environmental services;
hospital services; tourism and
travel-related services; enter-
tainment services; and mar-
itime transport.

Sectors

According to the CRNM,
the main sectors chosen by
CARIFORUM countries for
liberalization were “those that
have positive development
aspects, and in which member
states are seeking investment

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or new technologies, as well
as sectors that are important to
create economic opportunities
in outsourcing contracts from
European firms”.

CARIFORUM’s main focus
was on liberalizing cross-bor-
der trade and investment, the
group having kept a tight grip
on temporary entry for EU
professionals, limiting this to
contract service suppliers and
independent professionals.

“The CARIFORUM sched-
ule of commitments on trade
in services and on investment
does not include'the Bahamas
and Haiti, which will make
such submissions in the first
half of 2008 for incorporation
in the overall CARIFORUM
schedules within six months of
signature of the agreement,”
a CRNM briefing paper said,
on how professional services
would be treated under the
EPA.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, previously
told The Tribune that the
Government was hoping to
begin consultations with the
private sector on the EPA this
month. The Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce has already
begun meeting with, and brief-
ing, different groups and
industries on the EPA, seeking
any particular concerns they
may have with the agreemen-
t’s provisions.

The CRNM said “all CAR-
IFORUM states” had liberal-
ized some professional services
under the EPA in at least one
of the four supply modes.
While most countries had
avoided making commitments
on legal services, something
that will no doubt please the
Bahamas Bar Association and
its members, the CRNM
pointed out that for sectors
where CARIFORUM had
made commitments on per-

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mitting EU firms to establish a
commercial presence, there
were “automatic commit-
ments” allowing such firms to
bring in ‘key personnel’ and
‘graduate trainees’.

This, of course, implies that
if the Bahamas signs on to the
CARIFORUM offer - with or
without its own services offer —
it will have to modify its Immi-
gration regime to some extent.

Some three years after the
EPA comes into effect, both
the CARIFORUM and EU
are to start meetings on Mutu-
al Recognition Agreements
(MRAs) and the acceptance
of each side’s methods for

‘ accrediting professional stan-

dards.

“With respect to the tempo-
rary movement of profession-
als, disciplines on accounting,
architecture, engineering and
tourism are noted as a priority
for dialogue between the rele-
vant professional bodies in the
Caribbean and Europe, with
a view to signing MRAs no
later than three years after
entry into force of the agree-
ment,” the CRNM said.

Regional

Again hinting at the closer
regional integration the EPA
will produce for the
Caribbean, something that
may spark fears the Bahamas
is being led into a CARICOM
Single Market & Economy
(CSME)-type arrangement,
the CRNM added:

‘““A common regime for pro-
fessional services would cre-
ate a seamless CARICOM
professional services market,
and enable easier negotiations
with external professional bod-
ies of Mutual Recognition
Agreements no later that

could apply equally to all _

member states.”



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Body with head
injuries found
wrapped in blanket

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

THE badly decomposed
body of a Cat Island man was
found wrapped in a blanket
under a tree in Bennett’s Har-
bour yesterday. He had suffered
head injuries.

Arville Smith, 43, has become
the twelfth murder victim in the
Bahamas this year, on an island
unused to violent crime.

Inspector Philip Rolle, offi-
cer in charge at Cat island, con-
firmed to The Tribune late last
night that police are treating the
death as a homicide.

Smith was found under a tree
in his back yard at his residence
at around 7.30am, police report.
The discovery was made by his

nephew, George Williams, dur-
ing a visit to the house where
Smith lived alone.

Blunt force trauma was visi-
ble to Smith’s head, Insp Rolle
confirmed, with the victim’s
teeth having been smashed
in.

Last evening, Insp Rolle said
that police were following
“some leads” in relation to
Smith’s death, but no one was in
custody at that time.

Last year, excluding Grand
Bahama, there were only four
murders in the Family Islands.
The police crime report for 2007
indicates that all of these cases
were solved.

A team of detectives has also
been sent to Cat Island from
New Providence to assist with
the investigation.

Polish men attacked and
robbed in Grand Bahama

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Two Polish men, returning home in the Lucaya
area early Sunday morning, were attacked and robbed by two men who
used a car to knock down one of them, and chased and struck the oth-

er one in the head.

Chief Superintendent Basil Rahming said Police have launched an
island-wide search for two robbers involved in the bold attack on the
two employees of the Grand Bahama Shipyard.

Jaroslaw Waszcyk, 42, and Andrzei Tomaszewski, 34, told police that

they were walking on Kings Road

back to their condominium shortly after midnight early Sunday
when they were accosted and robbed by two men.
Mr Waszcyk reported that he fell on the tarmac when he was hit

from behind by a red two-door car.

SEE page 13




































As





@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION Leader Perry
Christie has called for urgent
action and cooperation among
regional partners against the
upsurge in‘crime across the
Caribbean.

The topic of crime was one
of the issues addressed by Mr
Christie while he was a guest
speaker at a dinner on Friday
evening organized by the
Rotary Club, in Georgetown,
Guyana.

The event, held at the Le
Meridien Pegasus Hotel, was
in observance of World Under-
standing Month, which is cele-
brated in February each year
by Rotarians.

During his remarks, Mr
Christie referred to the recent
Economist article on the rate
of violence in the Caribbean,
which brought negative pub-
licity to both the Bahamas,
Guyana and the wider region.
The article, written in a publi-
cation which has an annual

10 a“ eo
Bree
BEAU
REA
AURA






q
March 2008)
le erin Th

The Tribune

ANY 'TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1

MRS MARY PROFILO was presented with the |
Sir Victor Sassoon Heart Foundation Golden Award at the |
44th Annual Heart Ball held at the Atlantis Resort on |
Paradise Island on Saturday.



Perry Christie

readership of more than 62 }
million, named the Caribbean :

as a world leader in violent
crime,

“In a recent debate in our
Parliament in the }
Bahamas, I referred to the i
same magazine article, which :
‘described the worsening crime :

own

situation in the Caribbean,

including mentions of both The }
Bahamas and Guyana,” he :
said. “We know the issues. We :

SEE page 13









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Driver dies
after crashing
into utility pole

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net + :
— | party chairmanship
POLICE are investigating |
\ : @ By BRENT DEAN
an empty stretch of road in Aba- :

how a man, travelling alone on

co, crashed into a utility pole,

breaking it in half and killing ;

himself.

51 year-old Michael Baillou’s :
body had to be extricated from ;
the mangled wreckage of his :
maroon coloured Chevy Lumina ;

by using the “jaws of life”,

time after it had occurred.”

It is believed the deadly inci- ceeecive Lie cl baat
dent occurred as Mr Baillou was; eg ee
travelling at a high speed ON | tremendously.”
what police described as “a ; :
deserted stretch” of the S C Boo- : values of the Progressive Liberal
tle highway at around 11.20pm :

on Friday. His vehicle is thought : instilled in her all of her life. I

to have veered off the eastern : believe that possibly, no one but
side of the road a short distance ;

ahead of the Treasure Cay pri- :

SEE page 13

RN

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Minister diowaplays
the impact of the
proposed Economic
Partnership Agreement

! Mi By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE impact of the proposed

i Economic Partnership Agree-
: ment between the Bahamas and
; Other African Caribbean and
: Pacific nations and the Euro-
: pean Union was downplayed
: yesterday by minister of state
: for finance, Zhivargo Laing.

“We are a free trade society

i so people need to get used to
i the idea that the Bahamas is not
; in a situation where it is run-
? ning boldly into unchartered
: areas when it comes to trade (if
i it signs the EPA),”

: told a local radio talk show.

Mr Laing

Last week, attorney and PLP

i hopeful Paul Moss cailed on the
: government to “resist” signing
? onto the EPA, which calls for
i the liberalisation of trade
; between the EU and African,
: Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
: countries, declaring that by
: doing so it would “wreck the
; Bahamian economy.”

Yesterday, asked whether the

i Bahamas government was in
} agreement with statements
: made by Jamaican officials to
; the effect that the EPA would

SEE page 13

Former PLP MP
says Hanna-Martin
best candidate for

Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

ENGLERSTON MP Glenys
Hanna-Martin is the best candi-
date for the chairmanship of the
PLP, according to former party
MP George Smith.

While a guest on Love 97’s

reported police, adding that the : Sunday talkshow Jones & Com-

emergency services were only }
notified of the crash “quite some :

pany yesterday, Mr Smith said
“that Glenys Hanna-Martin will
be elected without any difficul-
ties as the chairperson of the Pro-
And
that...will benefit the party
“Glenys understands the core

Party,” said Mr Smith. “It’s been

Pindling equalled Arthur Hanna
in understanding what the PLP

SEE page 13

cl on iii

bie
rié ail



——p—
PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE |)





CARL W. BETHEL (front
row, centre) is pictured
with representatives
from his Ministry, RBC
Royal Bank of Canada,
the Lyford Cay Founda-
tions, and past Lyford
Cay scholarship recipi-
ents who are employed
by RBC. Pictured imme-
diately behind Minister
Bethel is Dr. Nicolette
Bethel, Director of Cul-
ture, who was one of the
first Lyford Cay Founda-
tion scholars.





















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FROM LEFT: Carl W. Bethel, Minister of Education, Youth, Sports and Culture, Manuel J. Cutillas, Chairman)”
of Lyford Cay Foundation, Inc. and Ross McDonald, RBC Royal Bank of Canada's Head of Caribbean Banking, -
announce the donation of four academic scholarships by RBC to the Lyford Cay Foundations. an

RBC pledges |
LCF Academic -
Scholarship —
Programme

RBC Royal Bank of
Canada has_ pledged
$100,000, payable over 2008

and 2009, to the Lyford :Cay.

Foundation’s Academic
Scholarship Programme.

The financial institution
has also committed to mak-
ing a further gift of $100,000
in 2010-2011, provided that
a number of criteria are
met, including the scholar-
ship recipients maintaining
a certain level of perfor-
mance.

RBC's donation will make
it possible for four qualify-
ing Bahamians graduating
from high school this year
to pursue an undergraduate
degree of their choice at
approved institutions in
Canada. The scholarships

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“I wish to thank the Lyford Cay ‘,,.
Foundation, the Canadian Lyford)‘

Cay Foundation, the Royal Bank
of Canada particularly for this
wonderful partnership that is
geared towards the building of
our youth and our nation.”

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Education Minister Carl Bethel ballw

are worth CAD$12,500 per
annum each,

"I wish to thank the
Lyford Cay Foundation, the
Canadian Lyford Cay Foun-
dation, the Royal Bank of
Canada particularly for this
wonderful partnership that
is geared towards the build-
ing of our youth and our
nation," said Education
Minister Carl W. Bethel,
during the official presen-
tation of the award recently.

"The commitment of all
of these entities to excel-
lence has not gone unno-
ticed."

Manuel J. Cutillas, Chair-
man of Lyford Cay Founda-
tion, Inc., described RBC's
donation as "a most wel-
come gift."

Supporter

"I would like to express
our sincere and deep grati-
tude to the Royal Bank of
Canada for its tremendous
generosity," said Mr. Cutil-
las. "RBC has been an
important supporter of the
Lyford Cay Foundation
over many years, and this
grant is a further demon-
stration of its ongoing com-
mitment to education, and
the country."

"We are proud and privi-
leged to be able to make
this contribution, and confi-
dent that these scholars will
be excellent ambassadors
for The Bahamas and return
home one day to have a
positive impact on the fur-
ther development of our
community," said Ross
McDonald, RBC's Head of
Caribbean Banking.

Nathaniel Beneby, Vice
President and Country
Head at RBC, thanked the
Lyford Cay Foundations for
their work in the fields of
education and philanthropy.

"RBC applauds the level
of support the Lyford Cay
Foundations have given to
the Bahamian community

I
20]
over the years. We are sijqi
pleased to again partner pses
with them to provide access sin 5
to higher education for 34 lo
Bahamian students." ebay
The gift is being made as 08%
part of RBC's 100th! bn
anniversary celebrations. In es
January, the financial insti- ae
tution also donated $1 mil- °)
lion to The College of The ....4
Bahamas (COB), the single jj, ,;
largest corporate donation 5; 4,
the college has received to jajy3!
date. BENG

ie?

Ee
lied

The money will go.
towards the creation of MM&
COB's Bahamas Business jj &
Centre.

RBC Royal Bank of «i
Canada was a pioneer in toy
bringing full-service bank- oy
ing to The Bahamas, and w»!!
today employs more than .{\"
700 Bahamians at its 24 1)!
branches throughout New
Providence and the Family *
Islands. 38

The Lyford Cay Founda- °°
tions are the country's
largest private educational
and philanthropic organisa-
tions, having awarded more,
than $14 million in under- ,.,,
graduate, graduate and 4
technical: scholarships to ;
Bahamians studying over- jie!
seas and at The College of . agw
The Bahamas.

The deadline for Lyford ¢ vit
Cay Foundation academic viii
scholarship applications is !\
March 31, 2008. Ino

Applicants must be 2.
Bahamian citizens and
pledge to return to The
Bahamas upon completion |
of their studies.

Detailed information and —
application forms are avail-
able at www.lyfordcayfoun-
dation.org. Forms may also
be obtained from high
school guidance counsellors,
The College of The §
Bahamas Financial Aid ;
Office, and the Lyford Cay |
Foundation office. ,

Money

J



—_
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 3



© In brief

Thousands of
teachers stage
protest march
in US Caribbean
territory

@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

Thousands of Puerto Rican
teachers marched to the gates of
the governor’s mansion Sunday,
threatening to go on strike for
higher salaries and better work-
ing conditions if long-stalled
bargaining talks are not
resumed, according to the Asso-
ciate Press. The two sides will
sit down again Monday to try
to resolve the two-year impasse.
But union leaders representing
the majority of Puerto Rico’s
42,000 public school teachers
plan a Tuesday news confer-
ence to announce a strike date if
no agreement is reached.

“We hope to send a firm mes- '

sage to Gov. Anibal Acevedo
Vila so that the agreement is
signed,” Teachers Federation
President Rafael Feliciano said
among a throng of marchers.
The island’s department of
education and the union have
agreed to 26 articles of a pro-

posed collective-bargaining’

agreement, but 20 others
remain unsigned, including 16
salary-related clauses.

The looming strike has divid-
ed the union’s roughly 32,000
members as some urge restraint,
saying the group’s first strike
since 1993 should be a last
resort. Strikers could be fired
under a local law that forbids
disruption of the public educa-

tion system. The starting salary °

for a teacher in the U.S. terri-
tory is US$19,200 (euro13,084)
a year — about a third less than
the average public school
teacher salary on the U.S. main-
land.

Broatdcasters in
crackdown on
radio payofts

@ KINGSTON, Jamaica

Jamaica’s broadcasting chief
said new regulations will hin-
der rac.. stations from taking
bribes from local music compa-
uies oF artists to play songs, a
pervasive problem in the
Caribbean country.

Hopeton Dunn, chairman of
the island’s broadcasting com-
mission, said program coordi-
nators must now provide
detailed playlists to government
inspectors to prevent the bribes
called payola, a contraction of
“pay” and “Victrola,” the old
wind-up record player.

“These regulations will help
to encourage the sector to
increase the monitoring, man-
agement and documentation as
a measure against this question
of payola,” Dunn said in a Sat-
urday statement. “It is impact-
ing on the broadcasting industry

and has done so for a very long

time.”

In addition, Dunn said he will
recommend introducing finan-
cial sanctions under the island’s
Broadcasting Commission Act
to discourage improperly sold
or traded air time. The island’s
legislature will take up that pro-
posal in coming weeks.

Four released
Cuban dissidents
arrive in Spain

& MADRID, Spain

Four dissidents released after
spending years in a Cuban
prison for their political beliefs
flew into exile in Spain yester-
day. Pedro Pablo Alvarez
Ramos, Omar Pernet Hernan-
dez, Jose Gabriel Ramon Castil-
lo and Alejandro Gonzalez
Raga landed in Madrid accom-
panied by 13 relatives and
friends and drove to a down-
town hotel, where they spoke
about their ordeal to journal-
ists.

Alvarez said Cuban authori-
ties gave him a choice — exile
or jail. “It was a very difficult
decision. To leave so many
brothers and colleagues behind
was a heartrending experience,”
Alvarez said. Alvarez, 60, said if
he had been younger he would
have probably opted to stay in
jail as a protest, but with his
health failing he felt he had lit-
tle choice but to leave Cuba.

Spain’s Air Force had sent a
plane to transport the four
Cubans to an air force base in
Madrid, a Foreign Ministry
spokesman said on condition of
anonymity.

0) ee Me VS 11 (of
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

CCIE ey
822-2157



Laing confident
Urban Renewal

ww

Programme will
prove effective

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE newly relaunched
Urban Renewal programme
will bring the “facilities, the
means and the programmes” of
central government down to
blighted urban communities to
an extent never seen before,
State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing said yesterday.

Speaking on the radio show,
Real Talk Live, Mr Laing said
that the FNM government’s
decision to “relaunch” the pro-
gramme, first implemented
under the Christie government,
was taken because the pro-
gramme as it stood was not con-
tributing to the “physical, social
and economic transformation”
of urban communities.

Mr Laing said that while he
did not doubt “what the former
administration attempted to do”
by creating Urban Renewal “in
terms of reaching out to com-
munities” he believed it failed in
some regards, lacking “struc-
ture” and “the proper focus of
urban renewal.” By relaunch-
ing the initiative, he suggested,
the aims of a “pure definition”
of urban renewal can be
achieved.

“Urban Renewal begins with
this recommendation that there
are areas of a society that have
blight, they are urban...but it
begins with them being blight-
ed, meaning that physically,
economically, socially they have
deteriorated.

“So the idea behind urban
renewal is to go into those areas
and through economic empow-
erment and investment you
actually regenerate the area and
you move into the area with
programmes that actually assist
with empowering socially the
people in that area,” he said.

He said that urban renewal

_is “not a clean up campaign, it’s

not a hand-out campaign, it’s
not a campaign for providing
simply opportunities to walk
about in an area — it is meant
to transform the area, physical-
ly, socially and economically
(and) that has not been the case
to date.”

The urban renewal pro-
gramme became the subject of
intense post-election contro-
versy in May and the months
that followed, when the PLP
accused the FNM of “stopping”
the programme. However min-
ister with responsibility for the
programme, Kenneth Russell,
denied this was the case, but did
admit that changes would be
made — in particular to the role
of police officers in the initia-
tive.

Mr Laing said yesterday that
the public can now expect to
see an effort to ensure that
those living in blighted social
conditions are more aware of
and able to access the opportu-
nities that are available to them.

“Many in these communities

End Tabi
Cushions

e
e
e
@
e
@
e
e
e

Blighted communities to
receive help ‘as never
before’, says Minister

Zhivargo Laing



that we live in don’t have a clue
about the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank and what it could
offer, Venture Capital Fund,
the various guaranteed loan
schemes. The idea now is to
cause those centres to pull those
programmes from that remote
distance down to these commu-
nities so that people now can
be furnished with empowering
information and contacts, appli-
cations — right there in their
communities,” he said.

Last week, Mr Russell said
that the four main objectives of

the new programme are to
increase safety, wealth, inde-
pendence and create a “sense
of responsibility” within com-
munities. He noted that each of
the nine urban renewal centres
has now been appointed man-
agers. Urban Renewal centres
were previously headed by
police officers. Former prime
minister Perry Christie, howev-
er, blasted the FNM’s decision
to relaunch the programme in
the manner in which it did as a
“bloody disgrace.”

“The fact that these gentle-

men and ladies (the govern-
ment) are coming back and say-
ing they are relaunching it, is
one of the shameful develop-
ments in this country because
it ought not to have been
stopped. And in saying that I
concede that they could have

- come in, kept it going:with the

leadership it had and then
decide to tweak it. But to stop
it, and change it, and bring now
what they’re going to bring in, is
a bloody disgrace.”

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



ee a

re

HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

Pie

of Abaco, The Bahamas, well loved educator, community
leader and retired District Education Officer died at
Doctors Hospital, Nassau on Thursday, 14th February,

2008.

He is survived by his wife, Sylvia and son, Gregory.

A Memorial Service in Abaco will be announced at a

later date.

Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, The Bahamas.



<-





“So the idea behind urban
renewal is to go into those areas
and through economic
empowerment and investment you

actually regenerate the area ...”



Zhivargo Laing

Editorial/Letters see
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE








The Tribune Limited .

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
, Nassau Fax: - (°42) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Get YEAST back on track

IN THE House of Assembly on Wednes-
day Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in sup-
porting an Opposition motion for a select com-
mittee to investigate the social conditions con-
tributing to crime and to make recommenda-
tions for improvement, suggested that govern-
ment make the money it now pays to operate
the YEAST youth programme available to the
Catholic Church, the founders of YEAST.

YEAST was a programme started by the
Church nine years ago to try to rehabilitate
troubled young men, ages 16 to 19.

The Church had started the pilot programme
in 1999. It was known as the Character and
Leadership Development Camp and was held at
Camp Symonette in James Cistern, Eleuthera.
The camp grew and had many successes. The
FNM government contributed financially to it,
but left it up to the Church to administer it.
However, when the PLP became the govern-
ment it invited the Church to join its youth pro-
gramme with that of government in return for
which government would pay for the whole
programme. Of course, with such an agreement,
political interference entered the picture, and
YEAST, as we know it today, was born.

“When we were last in government,” said Mr
Ingraham, “much as the government tradition-
ally has lent assistance to youth programmes
in the community; we lent both financial and
other support to the YEAST programme.

“Members opposite also when in govern-
ment, lent support to the programme. It was
unfortunate in my view that government sup-
port eventually resulted in the programme being
moved to Andros where 65 young boys are
enrolled in the programme now,

~Government’s financial support of the pro-
gramme has grown to some $871,000 annually,
more than $13,000 a year per boy,” Mr Ingra-
ham told the House. “I am forced to question
whether that $871,000 might not have assisted a
greater number of young boys if instead of
bringing YEAST into the government sector,
the money had not simply been made available
to the Catholic Church to continue and expand
its programme.”

This seems a sensible suggestion. Already
there are too many overlapping programmes
in the community all trying to deal with the
same at risk group of young Bahamians. If some
of these similar organisations would get togeth-
er and pool their resources they could probably
do more good in assisting this country’s troubled
youth than they are now doing as separate units.

‘Mr Ingraham said that the “objectives of

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the (YEAST) programme are supposed to be to
interrupt the continuing cycle of incompetence,
violence, aimlessness, deficiency and despair
among adolescent males, ages 12 to 19 — to
restore their dignity and value by teaching them
marketable skills, improving their self esteem
and self image — and to help them develop
positive attitudes so that they would become
self-reliant, productive and useful citizens in
their community.”

However, he said, no matter how desirable
the programme might be, the truth of the mat-
ter is that government cannot continue to pay
$13,000 for each boy. “There has to be other
means by which we can do this,” he said.

YEAST, before being taken over by the
PLP government, was established at the camp
donated by the late Sir Roland Symonette in his
native Eleuthera. ;

It had started out as a two-week programme
in 1999. By 2003 it had grown into a nine-week
programme with the goal of expanding to 12
weeks. In 2002 and 2003 the FNM contributed
$20,000 each year to the programme. When the
PLP became the government, it contributed
$10,000 in 2002. The following year it paid for 20
boys to go through the camp’s training, and by
2004 had invited the Church to become a part of
the PLP government’s youth programme. In
return government undertook to underwrite
the cost of the whole programme. The Church
agreed, but soon found that government had
taken over the programme. It was moved to
Andros and housed on the old BARTAD
grounds. The PLP MP for North Andros pushed
for his supporters to be employed. And at
every opportunity the PLP government took
credit for the whole programme, never giving
the founders of YEAST any credit for its con-
cept, design or their continuing efforts to make
the camp the success it had now become.

Today YEAST is the second largest employ-
er to government in:Andros. Half of the
$871,000 of government’s contribution goes to
pay the salaries of 27 Androsians. Said someone
close to the programme: If YEAST were to
leave Andros it would be a loss to the commu-
nity of about $600,000 annually in goods and ser-
vices.

But wherever YEAST is located, it should be
out of the hands of government so that it can do
the work for which its members are best trained.
Government should continue to make its con-
tribution to a programme, which, in the last
nine years, has made a positive difference in
the lives of many young men.
















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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I USED to be proud to be a
Bahamian! I was proud to hear
visitors say that we were lucky
to live in a paradise. I was proud
of the drive and willingness of
Bahamians to work hard, to
grow in strengths and better
themselves in an air of friendli-
ness and determination.

Today - I am not always
proud to be a Bahamian. I
shudder at the way I see people
treating each other.

What happened to us? We
came so far in the eyes of the
world over the years. People
looked at our island nation and
envied us and praised our suc-
cesses.

Now we have those same
people watching our failures
and going to other shores. We
did not raise ourselves to our
enviable heights alone.

When we were big enough,
we asked for help and help
came.

It came largely in the form of
foreigners. They came to share
our shores and our dreams and
to help us advance as a nation.
They brought with them the
willingness to invest in us, to
trust us, and to teach and train
us in the world of technology
and hospitality that we had not
accomplished on our own.

We wanted them here — we
invited them here — we enticed
them here.

Today, while we kick and
scream because they are making
money and raising their fami-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net






lies here, they continue to train
us and promote us to higher
positions of responsibilities and
to increase our salaries.

They provide our police with
bullet proof vests and cars, build
playgrounds for our children,
provide them with scholarships,
and give money to our chari-
ties.

Hotel chains are given enor-
mous incentives to come and
build here. No matter though
how many Bahamians succeed
in the hotel business and climb
the proverbial ladder, the hotel
owners need to guard and pro-
tect their investment and they
rightly do this by keeping some
of their key (foreign) executives
in place.

Why should we expect any
less from any other company
that comes here, improves our
way of life and gives so much to
us?

If it’s a foreign company then
foreigners need to be involved.
It’s that simple! If a person
doesn’t perform for them as
they should, they replace
him/her. It’s that simple! We
ourselves would do no less. Do
we want to give up the advances
we have now and make it so
uninviting for the foreigners
that they pack up and leave?
Wake up people! They won’t
leave their companies
behind...and even if they did...

.who would run them as effi-
ciently? They’ take their mon-
ey and go. Why would they
leave it all behind? It appears
that we look at these foreign-
ers with disdain.

These people pay for permits
to be here legitimately, yet we
turn a blind eye to the illegal
ones who come and use our
schools and health care free of
charge, who do not or will not
speak our language and who
introduce the life of crime and
drugs to so many of our youth.
What does this say about us as a
people?

Who of you reading this can
in all honesty doubt the truth
of it?

Just ask yourself why we are
paying the Canadians all this
money to build and run our new
airport? Why are we all fighting
a losing battle with BaTelCo
because our ??TDSM?? cell
phones fail us in certain areas of
this little island?

What happens when BaTel-
Co offers only the GSM phones
which work less frequently than
the TDSM phones? Why are
we paying such exorbitant

- prices for gas and electricity? I

know it is not because a for-
eigner is running the show.

We need the foreigners and
their commodities and exper-
tise.

I long for the day I can once
again be proud to be a Bahami-
an!

SMST
Nassau,
January, 2008.

We should all play a part in
tackling the crime wave

Editor, The Tribune.

Bishop Hall allegedly blames
PLP and FNM for the Bahamas’
crime wave.

The Nassau Guardian’s front
page, lead story of Saturday,
February 9, 2008 suggests that
Bishop Simeon Hall, the newly
appointed Chairman of the

&

§2-6122

<<

Crime Council Advisory Com-
mittee, blasted both the PLP
and FNM governments for
"allowing the crime rate to
increase so rapidly since the
country gained its Independence
in 1973".

He is also quoted as saying
that ..."successive governments
have done little more than just
placate the face of the voting
public until the next election."

Well Rev Hall might be cor-
rect, because I know of instances
where employers have been
called by politicians asking that
the company not press charges
against an employee that had
been caught stealing, for exam-
ple.

However, there have been
numerous allegations of employ-
ers having received calls from
ministers of religion with similar
requests. In addition to this, I
have had calls from reverends

in my capacity as a manager ask-
ing us not to press charges or
terminate employees for wrong-
doing. So we can't simply lay
the blame at the feet of our
politicians, no matter how
tempting that might be.

For far too long our society
has “cloaked” criminals or have
been prepared to allow fellow
employees to steal and get away
with it, as some of us don't want
to be thought of as being a
“pimp.”

We all play a part, and if we
decide we will “pimp” on
wrong-doers and the Police
enforce what are perceived as
petty laws (traffic violations, lit-
tering, etc), I believe we will
begin to see a turnaround.

One thing for sure. It can't
hurt.

RICK LOWE
www.weblogbahamas.com

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS.

Eight weekend arrests



Shuttle, station —
astronauts say

teary farewell 2

in space

MCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

THE crews of the space shut-
tle and station said a teary :
farewell, then sealed the hatches :
between them Sunday after ;
more than a week of working ;
tirelessly together to build a big- :
ger and better scientific outpost }
in orbit, according to Associated }

Press.

Atlantis was scheduled to
undock early Monday, its load :
considerably lighter than when it :

arrived Feb. 9 with Europe’s pre-
miere space laboratory, Colum-
bus.

Astronaut Daniel Tani was
especially emotional as he left
the international space station,

his home for the past four :

months.

Before floating into Atlantis }
for his long-overdue ride home, }
Tani paid tribute.to his mother, :
Rose, who was killed in a car :
accident while he was in space — :
“my inspiration” — and his wife, :
Jane, who “had the hard work :

while I was having fun.”

“T can’t wait to get back to her }

and my two little girls,” he said.

He also saluted his two female ;
commanders, the space station’s }
Peggy Whitson and Pamela Mel- :
roy, who delivered him to the :
orbiting complex back in Octo- :

ber.

“If we were toasting, if we }
were in Russia, this would be :
the third toast,” Tani said, “the :
toast for the women in our :

lives.”

Tani recalled how he floated’ ;
last week through the space sta- :
tion shooting high-definition :
video, with his nine colleagues :
busy at work from one end of }
the orbiting complex to the oth- :
er and even outside. He said it :
reminded him of “those movies :
they used to show you about 25 :
years ago about how we're going :



to live in space.”

“It was almost like a promo-
tional video, and it was phe-
nomenal,” he said.

Just before the seven shuttle :
crewmen departed, Whitson :
said; “All right, you guys, it’s, :
been great having you here,” :
The astronauts hugged one }

another and wiped away tears.

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in separate incidents

BH By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

EIGHT people were arrested
this weekend and one sent to
hospital in separate incidents
involving a stolen boat, an imi-
tation firearm, ammunition, ille-
gal drugs and an early-morning
residential fire.

First taken into custody were

two Berkeley Street, Ridgeland
Park residents, ages 19 and 24.
They were picked up on Friday
at around 9.30pm after police
officers attached to the Mobile
Division discovered an imitation
.Jmm handgun in a pouch in a
silver Nissan Altima, which
police had initially targeted
because it had a blown headlight.

Police suspicion of the car’s
occupants was raised when an

odour, believed to be marijuana
smoke, was detected coming
from the vehicle. ;

Shortly before these arrests,
police had received a report of
the theft of a stolen 44-foot white
boat with three outboard 250
horsepower engines from Nas-
sau Sailing Club.

At around 4 o’clock Saturday
morning, officers from Elizabeth
Estates police station reported

Film based on Jack London novel

to begin work in the Bahamas

PRINCIPAL photography
for the film “Der Seewolf”
(The Sea Wolf) will commence
in mid-March at The Bahamas
Film Studios.

Based on Jack London’s
1904 novel of the same name,
the film stars Thomas
Kretschmann, who appeared
in Peter Jackson’s “King
Kong” and the soon-to be-
released motion picture,
“Transsiberian,” among other
film credits.

“This is an exciting time in
Grand Bahama,” says
Bahamas Film Commissioner
Craig Woods. “Beyond the
immediate benefit of provid-
ing additional training oppor-
tunities and jobs, the tourism
product will be promoted as
well. When this film airs in
Europe, and viewers see the
natural beauty here in The

Bahamas, the result is always positive for our

tourism endeavours.”

Hofmann & Voges Entertainment GmBH,
based in Germany, will produce the film for release
in the European market in late 2008. Anett Grun-
beck, the film’s production manager scouted several
international locations and says The Bahamas is

ideal for this project.

“We are looking forward to filming here in
Grand Bahama,” Grunbeck says. “The island is
very beautiful and everyone has been helpful. The
Studio facilities are working well for our film and we
are very pleased with the service being provided.
We are happy to be working with The Bahamas
Film Commission. Craig Woods and his staff have

THOMAS KRETSCHMANN will star in
“Der Seewolf” (The Sea Wolf) - (AP)

X





been very supportive.”

Boosting the local econo-
my, this project will employ
dozens of Bahamians and pro-
vide eight internships for those
aspiring to film industry
careers.

The production is also book-
ing approximately 3,000 room
nights with local hotels, includ-
ing Pelican Bay Resort, which
according to the studio’s local
manager, Diana McGonigal, is
a film-friendly destination.

“Many local businesses and
individuals will benefit directly
from this production,” McGo-
nigal says, emphasizing those
additional purchases of goods
and services from local busi-
nesses will have a far-reaching
affect on the economy.

“The production will also
hire background extras for the
film, providing excellent

opportunities for those who wish to gain acting

experience” she adds. “There is so much talent in

Grand Bahama and we are thrilled to showcase
our island in this film.” '

On Saturday, February 23, at 3 p.m., The
Bahamas Film Studios will host an open casting
call for 38 men and five women background extras

at UNEXSO’s poolside café at Port Lucaya. Apphi-

not required.

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cants should be at least 18 years old, provide a pho-
to ID, and dress in form-fitting clothing. Preferred
applicants are those who are strong swimmers with
sailing experience; fluency in German is desired, but

The Bahamas Film Studios at Gold Rock Creek,
Grand Bahama.





noticing three men acting suspi-
ciously on a boat fitting that
description in the Blue Water
Cay area of Fox Hill Road south.

On seeing the police, the men
fled, with one escaping. Two oth-
ers, however — a 26-year-old
Podoleo Street resident and a
25-year-old resident of Joan’s
Heights West — were not so suc-
cessful. They were taken into
custody.

Searching the vessel police dis-
covered eight 55 gallon contain-
ers filled with gasoline, along
with a stash of food and some
clothing. The third individual is
still being sought in connection
with this incident.

Meanwhile, at around 9
o’clock that morning, police took
four individuals into custody —
three women, ages 55, 22 and 21

years, and a 19-year-old youth..
Their detention came after policc
executed a search warrant on «
Chippingham home. Officers dis-
covered two plastic bags of mar-
ijuana in a washing machine and
five live rounds of .357mim
ammunition concealed inside a
mattress.

Later, shortly after midnight, a
man was wakened by a fire as he
slept in a house off Bacardi
Road.

By the time officers arrived on
the scene the fire had been extin-
guished, but the upper portion
of the man’s body had been
burned. He was taken to hospi-
tal. There was only minor dam-
age to one of the building's
rooms.

Police investigations into all
of these matters continue.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





LEARNING THE RULES: Participants in the fun run and walk wise up
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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 7
a c,.,.,
BT Weve VATA

THE 44th HEART BALL




» AUCTION STATIONS: Items wait to be auctioned off to raise funds for the
Heart Foundation.



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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Obama has captured

minds of ma

ll By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a business execu-
tive and former Caribbean Diplo-
mat)

Is THE years that I have
been writing a widely pub-
lished weekly commentary, I have
never received as many responses
as I did to my commentary last
week on Barack Obama’s quest
for the White House.

I concluded in that commen-
tary that, despite his vision and
the wide appeal of his message,
he would not succeed in occupying
The White House, because, in the
end, the fact that he is what the
Americans call “an African Amer-
ican” would cause a majority of
that small portion of the US elec-
torate who actually vote, to vote
against him. For, in the American
society it is his part blackness that

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many whites will reject; it is not
his part whiteness that they will
celebrate.

Having said all that, I am
bound to reveal that, if the more
than a hundred responses I have
had are a straw poll, Obama will
not only win the Democratic Par-
ty nomination, but he will romp
home with the Presidency.

Whether it is wishful thinking
or an indication of gale force winds
of change blowing through Amer-
ica, I do not know. What I do
know is that Obama has captured
the minds of many in the US who

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are fed-up with the war-mongering
bullying stance of the George W
Bush regime and, by close associ-
ation, the Republican Party. They
appear to be equally jaded with
the slick but flawed aura of the
Clintons. Obama is a welcome
oasis in a desert of distrust.

Here is a voice from Illinois:

“The United States needs this
man, We need him to unite a
divided nation and a divided
world. We need him for us to
believe that this country can rise
and be great again. We need him
to lead us in regaining the respect



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without the need to continuously
flex our muscle.”

On the matter of race, there
are some who believe that part of
the reason for Obama’s success in
the primaries so far is precisely
because he is “part white”.

Here is a white man in Florida:

“No one will admit it, but I
believe Obama's mixed racial
background has caused many
whites to vote for him, they see
him as acceptable”.

And a mixed race person from
America, now living in the
Caribbean, adds:

“Tam convinced because of my
own experiences and acceptance
in parts of Pennsylvania, where
the closest whites came to seeing a
black man was on television, that
white Americans are more likely
to accept and vote for a qualified
person of mixed ancestry than for
a full blooded black American for
President.”

A professor from Wayne Uni-
versity in the US summed up the
race aspect of this campaign in the
following way:

“If only the media could have
championed the reality that Oba-
ma is as white as he is black, what
a statement that would make for
progress of race relations in the
US and to the world? Overtly per-
petuating the notion that 'purity' is
reserved for a single race does
more damage to any ‘gains' we
have made towards equality... my
latent wish is that America would
seize the moment and make a
statement to the world that it real-
ly does accept its citizens regard-
less of colour or ethnic combina-
tions.”

What all this seems to empha-
sise is that race and colour remain
deeply motivating factors in
American society, and especially,
with regard to the person to whom
will be entrusted enormous power
over ordinary people and over
nations.

So, if this is so widely known
and felt, there should be no
assumption that the race card will
not be played as subtly and care-
fully as the Republican Party dares
when the contest reaches the
home stretch and the finishing line
draws near.

Indeed, there are keen Wash-
ington observers who firmly
believe that Obama’s phenome-





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ny in US

nal success in raising huge cam-
paign funds is part of a dastardly
Republican scheme to make him
the Democratic Party’s nominee
for the Presidency on the basis
that, ultimately, the majority of
the white electorate will fall back
on an atavistic racial prejudice
when they cast their vote.

, One of them contends: “My
gut instincts for some time have
told me that somewhere in the DC
area Karl Rove has a dirty tricks
boiler room getting Republicans to
give to Obama financial help to
defeat Hillary, relying on the racist
attitudes nationally to reject Oba-
ma over any of the clowns in the
original GOP presidential candi-
date line-up.”

Note should be taken that,
despite Obama’s remarkable suc-
cess, he is unlikely to gain the
2,025 delegates needed to secure
the nomination outright. But nei-
ther will Clinton.

The so-called 796 “super dele-
gates” — members of congress,
governors, former presidents and
office holders — may well decide
who wins, and so far Clinton has
more committed votes.

Assuming he wins, however,
many of those who responded to
my commentary last week — and
these are people who fervently
support Obama and desperately
want him to triumph ~ are fearful
that his song will be abruptly end-
ed, and his vision dimmed in the
same way that Martin Luther King
Jr was silenced and John F
Kennedy stopped.

In championing his quest for
The White House, many of his
black supporters want to assert
their own legitimacy as true equals
in a society that has squashed
them underfoot; others pray that
he can remould America into that
society of liberty, generosity and
fraternity that has always been
more imagined than real.

A heavy burden of hope has
been placed on the shoulders of
Barack Obama.

He will need divine help not
only to stride into The White
House, but also to satisfy the great
expectations now reposed in him —
if he occupies it.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com












































THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

Zhivargo Laing
donates computers
to three school

ll By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Marco City MP Zhivargo
Laing presented computers to three schools
last week. The donation, which totalled
more than $25,000, is to assist in
establishing computer labs at schools in his
constituency.

A total of 15 computers and three lap tops
were presented to the Freeport Primary, Mau-
rice Moore Primary and Jack Hayward High
schools on Thursday.

Each school received five computers and
one lap top for administration.

Mr Laing, Minister of State for Finance, said
government made a $100,000 provision in the
budget this year for every constituency. He
said the constituency decided to use one quar-
ter of those funds to purchase computers for
the schools.

Excited

He said that education is high on their agen-.

da. “J am excited about Marco City’s future and
what we can do in education to motivate, to
inspire and to encourage our kids. It’s just an
open opportunity that I’m looking forward to
take advantage of,” said Mr Laing.

Mr Laing said that he was very proud that his
constituency headquarters had invested in the
children’s education. ;

Benjamin Stubbs, principal of Jack Hayward
High, was grateful for the donation of/com-
puters. He said the donation by Mr Laing
brings the computer count at the school to
nine.

“This generous gift will help to establish a
computer programme which we have been
attempting to start over the last two years,”
he said.

Maurice Moore Primary School principal
Victoria Wright said the donation is a blessing
and thanked Mr Laing.

Mrs Wright said that school’s PTA has also





started a computer drive in conjunction with
school’s patron Maurice Moore, former
Bahamian Ambassador.

Sheila Scavella, principal at Freeport Pri-
mary, said the computers will significantly ben-
efit students at the school. She said the dona-
tion of a computer is the best gift that chil-
dren could ever receive because it helps them
to learn.





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Employee from
Old Bahama Bay
participates in
off-shore training

WEST END, Grand Bahama
— Deidre Rahming, sales and
marketing coordinator at Old
Bahama Bay by Ginn sur Mer,
participated in a weeklong
familiarisation trip at Ginn
Reunion Resort in Orlando,
Florida.

Ms Rahming met and worked
alongside the communications
staff at Ginn Resorts’ head-
quarters in Celebration, Florida
and also spent time observing
and interacting with Ginn
Reunion Resort staff members
in sales, reservations, public
relations and marketing.

She also received an exten-
sive tour of the 2,300-acre Ginn
Reunion Resort and experi-
enced the resort’s luxury accom-
modations firsthand.

Opportunities for offshore
training will be available for
other Old Bahama Bay employ-
ees as the development in West
End, Grand Bahama, progress-



OFFSHORE TRAINING: Deidre
Rahming, sales and marketing
coordinator at Old Bahama Bay
es. by Ginn sur Mer, visits the

Reunion Grande at Ginn
Reunion Resort in Orlando,
Florida.

“Ginn Resorts is firmly com-
mitted to the training and edu-
cation of its staff,” said Bob
Van Bergen, vice president and
general manager at Ginn sur
Mer. “This is only the begin-
ning of what we see as an ongo-
ing training programme as we
provide Bahamians with the
tools needed for long-term
careers in the hospitality indus-
try.”

Ginn Reunion Resort, in
Orlando, was selected as an off-
shore training property because
of its similarities to the Ginn
sur Mer project underway in
West End. Ginn Reunion
Resort is a luxury golf resort
featuring varied accommoda-
tions, including single- and mul-
ti-family homes, condominiums
and townhomes.

Amenities include three Sig-
nature golf courses, the ANNI-
KA Academy, tennis facilities, a
boutique spa, a water park and
state-of-the-art meeting space.
The centrepiece of the commu-
nity is Reunion Grande, a luxu-
ry high-rise with 82 one-and

two-bedroom suites and fine
dining restaurants.

“The entire experience was
phenomenal,” Rahming said.
“It gave me a glimpse into the
company’s standards and the
daily workings of a massive
resort. I was able to see what’s
to come for us here in The
Bahamas.”

Ginn sur Mer is a 2,000-acre
resort community on West End,
Grand Bahama that will con-
tain more than 4,400 condo-
minium and hotel units and
nearly 2,000 single-family resi-
dential homesites. Luxury
amenities include Signature golf
courses designed by Jack Nick-
laus and Arnold Palmer, club-
houses, two marinas, a private
airport, a Monte Carlo-style
casino, water and swim pavil-
ions, a spa and beach club. The
$4.9 billion resort community
will serve as a flagship devel-
opment for Ginn Resorts.







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PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

‘LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



g . |

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Sy LINDSAY THOMPSON
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(ea



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lege of the Bahamas Wellness
Centre, a modern multipurpose
facility on the campus in Oakes

Field, during a ceremony Fri-.

day.
The centre will also serve to
facilitate a national health data-

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base for the Ministry of Health
and Social Development in its
thrust towards a healthy nation.

“This augurs well for the Col-
lege as it moves towards a Uni-
versity of The Bahamas, as well
as towards promoting its ath-

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letic programme,” Mr Wood-
side said.

He credited Minister of
Health and Social Development
Dr Hubert Minnis with leading
the way in respect to wellness
and the general health of the
population.

“Given his position in chal-
lenging our nation to bea
' healthy nation, I too believe
that the health of the nation is
the wealth of the nation,” Mr
Woodside said.

He said the establishment of
the wellness centre would serve
COB for a number of reasons.
Firstly, it will be “a wonderful
facility” for the instruction of
physical education and training
for those who are studying to
become physical education
teachers.

“This facility will also serve
the general student population
and faculty at the College of the
Bahamas. | believe that.is
important because students and
faculty will have a place on cam-
pus to which they can come and
exercise and generally improve
their wellness,” Mr Woodside
said.

The College envisioned the ;

facility close to 10 years ago.
The facility emerged from a
10x10 sized room to a 4,000 sq ft
structure built at an estimated
cost of $1 million. It houses
administrative offices, a
weightlifting area, storage and
equipment room, male and
female locker rooms, an area
for aerobics classes, yoga,
palates, martial arts, dance
classes, physical education class-
es, counselling and monthly ses-
sions on a variety of health mat-
ters.

Two weeks ago, a health-risk
assessment exercise was per-

pt BY DESIGN

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COB opens new multi-purpose





MINISTER OF State for Youth and Sports Byran Woodside and Col-

lege of the Bahamas president Janyne Hodder cut the ribbon to offi-

eal ee the Wellness Centre on the campus on Friday February
5; ;

formed on over 300 individuals
connected to the College. The
information is to be used in the
establishment of a national
health database for the Ministry
of Health and Social Develop-
ment.

Bradley Cooper is Assistant
Director of Athletics for Well-

ness at the centre. Student ©

workers have undergone 16
hours of training to serve as fit-

STUDENTS QUALIFIED in physical fitness put on a demonstration aia de opening ceremonies of the
Wellness Centre at the College of the Bahamas on Friday, February 15, 2008.

ness instructors, under the
direction of Arlene McPhee.
They also will be trained in
CPR and First Aid techniques.

COB President Janyne Hod-
der said of the College that on
matters important to the quali-
ty of life of the nation, “we want
to be a leader.” She also
referred to the facility as anoth-
er step in moving towards uni-
versity status.






Tornado destroys
four homes in
‘| Escambia; no
injuries reported

@ MOLINO, Fla.

FOUR homes were destroyed when a tornado touched down
Sunday in Escambia County, the National Weather Service
reported, according to Associated Press.

Several other homes were damaged, but no injuries were
immediately reported, the Escambia County Department of

Public Safety said.

A shelter was set up at a church in Molino for residents who

needed Red Cross assistance.

A line of strong storms was moving through the Panhandle on

Sunday afternoon.

The National Weather Service has issued a tornado watch for
the following Florida counties: Bay, Calhoun, Escambia,
Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa, Walton and Washington.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 11

wellness centre







STUDENTS
qualified in
physical fit-
ness put ona
demonstration
during the
opening cere-
monies of the
Wellness Cen-
tre at the Col-
lege of the
Bahamas on
Friday, Febru-
ary 15, 2008.























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MINISTER OF State for Youth and Sports Byran Woodside tries the new sp
the Bahamas Wellness Centre during its opening ceremony on Friday.

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Civilian employees
praised for role in
crime fighting efforts

m@ By MATT MAURA
Bahamas

Information Services

THE Royal Bahamas
Police Force is taking “deci-
sive action with notable suc-
cesses” in countering crime
and criminality in the
Bahamas, with a meaning-

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ful part of that success
attributable to the excellent
job its civilian staff is per-
forming in a supporting role,
National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest said Fri-
day.

Addressing the first Civil-
ian Staff Day Away, Mr
Turnquest said that despite

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the current crime trends
affecting the nation, there is
no doubt that the Force has
taken up the challenge of
the existing and emerging
manifestations that crime
and criminality are present-
ing.

Mr Turnquest said it is a
viewpoint generally held,
not just here in The
Bahamas, but in countries
around the world, that civil-
ian employees are increas-
ingly becoming an important
element in law enforcement.

“Tt is an important source
of encouragement for me, as
it should be to us all, that
the Royal Bahamas Police

’ Force is taking decisive

action, with notable suc-
cesses, in countering crime
and criminality in our
country,” Mr Turnquest
said.

“When you, the civilian
staff, undertake profession-
al and other functions for
which trained Police Offi-
cers need not be engaged,
you make it possible for
those officers to return to
the essential duties of law
enforcement,” Mr Turn-
quest added.

Mr Turnquest said it has
been 30 years since civilian
employees have helped to
“underpin” the law enforce-
ment work of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force. He
said that during this period,
a transformation has taken
place in the services the
civilian employees give the
Force.

From the mid-1990s, Govy-
ernment, as a matter of pol-
icy, has sought to strategi-
cally place civilian employ-
ees in certain positions that
would allow Police Officers



Patrick Hanna/BIS

MINISTER OF National Security sonny Tarauies! (ett), listens attentively dri the opening ceremo-
ny of the first Royal Bahamas Police Force Civilian Staff Day Away which was held under the theme:

“Fostering A Spirit of Unity and Excellence in the Workplace.” Mr Turnquest was joined by Acting Com-
missioner of Police Reginald Ferguson (centre) and Acting Deputy Commmlssonel of Police Christopher

McCoy.

to perform tasks for which
they have been trained, he
added.

“We have moved from the
early days when civilian staff
work was limited to clerical
and custodial duties,” Mr
Turnquest said.

“Today, the 250 civilian
employees of the Force are
engaged in many duties
ranging from accounting,
where they are responsible
for managing revenue and
expenditure, to registry per-
sonnel who manage the
intake, circulation and filing
of the Force’s correspon-
dence.

“Additionally, Human
Resource Managers organ-
ise and administer person-
nel matters relating to the
Force’s 3,000 officers
while other civilian employ-
ees assist the Force in
areas, including crime data
input.”

The Minister of National
Security said the myriad of
contributions do not stop
there, as civilian employees
are making “essential con-
tributions” in critical areas

todo

such the Central Detective
Unit (CDU), Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEU), Criminal
Records Office (CRO) and
in the many Stations which
serve the various Bahamian
communities.

Civilian employees, Min-
ister Turnquest said, are also
now making “important
contributions” in other spe-
cialised areas of the
Force such as the Forensic

.Science Unit which has

been identified for further
expansion of civilian
employees.

“An important factor con-
tributing to the work of the
Police Force and extending
its reach and strength
throughout The Bahamas is
the presence of the Force in
Grand Bahama and in our
various Family Islands,” Mr
Turnquest said.

“Civilian employees are
contributing to that success
in islands such as Grand
Bahama, Abaco, Andros,
Cat Island, Eleuthera and
Long Island,” Mr Turnquest

_added.

Minister Turnquest told

the employees that they, like
Police Officers, must be in
the business of making the
Royal Bahamas Police
Force the best it can be,
adding that to do so requires
continued excellence in
the execution of their
duties.

He said it further requires
camaraderie and cohesion,
productivity and the further
development of their skills
and other attributes for ser-
vice to the Force.

“We know that for the
most part, civilian employ-
ees of the Police Force are
Public Officers and as such,
are not part of the Police
Force, but are part of the
Public Service (but) as you
know, the Government and
people of The Bahamas are
the main beneficiaries of uni-
ty and excellence in service
in the Royal Bahamas Police
Force and as such, I com-
mend you, on their behalf,
for the work you have done
to date and encourage you
to continue to do your best
always,” Mr Turnquest
said.






February Ya ; 2008 | Westin Sheraton at Our Lucaya

8:45 am

«

10th Annual
Grand Bahama

Speakers Include :

Hon Neko C Grant I, Minister of Tourism & Aviation

Wendy Craigg, Governor, The Central Bank of The Bahamas

Gregory Moss, President, Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce

Carey Leonard, General Counsel, Grand Bahama Port Authority

Mike Murphy, Founding Director, Harcourt Group

Chris Gray, Chief Executive, Freeport Container Port,

Freeport Harbour Company and Grand Bahama Airport Company

Jaime Vargas, Vice President Operations, South Riding Point Holdings Ltd

Robert Millard, Director. International Business Development, Global Fulfillment Services.
Jerry Butler, Caribbean Executive Director, Inter-American Development Bank
Antonius Roberts, Artist & Sculptor

L Roscoe Dames Il, Founder & President, lvory Global Promotions

Vincent Vanderpool Wallace, Secretary General, Caribbean Tourism Organization















Business
Wutlook

Under the theme

Investment and Innovation:

Strategies for Grand Bahama’s Turnaround

Distinguished local anid international authorities will answer these key questions:

Is Grand Bahama's economy finally poised to take off?

What will this require and when can the business community expect a turnaround?




® Bank of The Bahamas B' British
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THE TRIBUNE



San ON) Linited
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS

Minister downplays impact of EPA

Driver dies
FROM page one

mary school before hitting the
pole and bringing it down.
Police did not report what
time they eventually arrived
on the scene.

Authorities believe that the
51 year old was killed instant-
ly and suggested that “exces-
sive speed” was a “major con-
tributing factor” in Mr Bail-
lou’s accident, and subse-
quent death. He is Abaco’s
first traffic fatality for the year
and the Bahamas’ third.

His death follows that of
two Eleuthera residents who
were passengers in a vehicle
that was involved in a colli-
sion with another car on that
island last week. Raymond
Bethel, 15, died on the scene,
while 23-year-old O’Neal
Roach died later in the hos-
pital.

Men attacked

FROM page one

He said a black man then
got out of the vehicle with a
baseball bat in his hand and
robbed him of an undeter-
mined amount of cash and a
set of keys that were in his
jacket pocket.

Mr Tomaszewski tried to
flee, but was chased by
another black man who
struck him in the head with -
an object, causing a small
wound. However, nothing
was taken from him as he
was able to get away.

Police arrived and
searched the area for the
suspects, but were unable to
locate them.

This robbery and assault,
comes after a teen was
stabbed on Grand Bahama
either late Friday night, or
early Saturday morning.

The victim, identified as
15-year-old Dentrel Farring-
ton, is detained in the Rand
Memorial Hospital in stable
condition, after receiving
multiple stab wounds about
the body.

According to reports,
police received a call at
about 11.49pm on Friday
from an anonymous person
who reported that a stabbing
had. occurred at the. Bowling
Alley at Britannia Boule-
vard.

When officers arrived at
the location, the scene was
quiet and no one had any
knowledge of a stabbing
having taken place there.

However, Mr Rahming
said police received a call
from the Rand’s duty nurse
supervisor around 2.10am on

Saturday to report that a
15-year-old boy had been
brought to the hospital with
stab wounds to the upper
back, chest and abdomen.

Police were unable at the
time to interview Farrington
because he was under seda-
tion and resting after being
treated for his injuries by
doctors.

Mr Rahming said that
police do not know how the
teen ended up at the hospi-
tal.

Police are currently inves-
tigation both incidents.

FROM page one

be a “good idea” for the region,

Mr Laing said: “We have to be,

to this extent,” before going on
to outline how the World Trade
Organisation now requires its
member countries — among
them many EU and ACP states
— to end any non-reciprocal
trade arrangements such as
that which the Bahamas has
enjoyed with the EU for many
years.

However, Mr Laing explained
that with the Bahamas’ biggest
trading partners being the Unit-
ed States, Canada and Japan
respectively, this country’s trade
relationship with the European
Union is “very small”, before
further claiming that the
Bahamas is already one of the
“freest trading societies in the
world.”

Under the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement (EPA) negoti-
ated with the EU by CARI-
COM negotiators, the Bahamas
and other ACP nations would
have to allow many EU goods
and services the same duty-free
access that Bahamian goods
have into their market.

This means that up to 82.7 per
cent of the Bahamas’ EU goods
tariff lines will have to be opened
up to import duty elimination
within 15 years of signing the
agreement, while 75 per cent of
the service industries would be
opened up to competition from

EU companies, Mr Laing has
previously indicated.

Yesterday, the minister
stressed that goods from the EU
represent in total around 30 per
cent of the goods imported into
this country. Therefore it is only
this percentage of all imports
into the Bahamas that will be
exempted from customs duty if
the agreement is signed into exis-
tence, not all goods from “all the
other countries with which we
now trade.”

This would thus allow the
Bahamas to continue to create
revenue by customs duty levied
on products coming from its oth-
er main trading partners, while
ensuring that the country con-
tinues to enjoy the duty-free
access for its major imports —
lobsters, Bacardi products and
Polymers products — into
Europe.

The EPA as it stands also calls
for liberalisation of services, such
as finance and tourism, allowing
European companies to enter
the Bahamian market to com-
pete with Bahamian entities.

Mr Laing stated, however,
that these services are already
“internationally traded areas” in
the Bahamas, adding: “‘No one is
stopping a European company
from setting up a hotel in the
Bahamas once they’ve got their
necessary approvals (and) in
banking we have European
banks here already — so we’re
not talking about opening up an
area of the economy where there

Police release
descriptions of
men wanted
for questioning

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



GRAND Bahama police have released the descriptions of four
men — all to be considered armed and extremely dangerous — who
are wanted for questioning in relation to a series of crimes.

Wanted for questioning in connection with a burglary are Robert
Angelo Holbert, also known as “Bobby”, Marco Marcian Montey

Missick, alias “Marco Polo”,
Pratt, alias “Dee”.

and 24-year-old Darshiel George

Robert Holbert, 36, described as five foot eleven inches tall of
slim build, was born in Nassau and weighs 175 pounds. He worked
as a fisherman, and can be distinguished by a partially-amputated
right ring finger. His last known place of residence was 86A
Tamarind Street, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Pratt, born in Freeport, has brown eyes and a medium brown
complexion. He is five foot seven inches tall, and has a slim build.
His occupation is listed as “painter.” Pratt’s last known address was
138 Inagua Place, Hawksbill, Grand Bahama.

Missick is a 36-year-old fisherman who is five feet eleven inch-
es tall with short hair and a dark brown complexion. His last
known address was 179 Bimini Place, Hawksbill, Grand Bahama.

Also wanted is Luigi Dowsdewell Lockhart, who is being sought
in connection with an incident in which the victim suffered griev-
ous bodily harm. His last known addresses were: 169 Bimini Place,
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama and 27 Tenuich Street Nassau. Lock-

hart, 32, was born in Grand Bahama and is of a dark brown com- .

plexion with dreadlocks. He is five foot eight inches tall and weighs
150 pounds, with no listed occupation.

Anyone with information concerning the whereabouts of these
individuals is asked to contact the Grand Bahama police at 350-

3138, 350-3106, 373-1112 and 911.

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has not been to date much inter-
national trade.”

He claimed that the liberality
of our economy can be deter-
mined by looking at how few
products Bahamians are restrict-
ed from importing or exporting.

“Your trade (with the
Bahamas) is restricted only to
the extent that (the Bahamas
has) these customs duties which
other people see as a hindrance

to free trade generally but (the
Bahamian government) use(s)
it as a revenue raising measure,
and that is one of the reasons
why they would say your market
isn’t free,” he said.

The minister went on to claim
that this trade liberalism has
already made the country one
of “the most prosperous devel-
oping countries in the world.”

He maintained that while

there are areas of the economy
retained for Bahamian invest-
_ment only, such as wholesale and
retail trade, and ground trans-
portation, outsiders can “largely
invest in any area” already, not
withstanding the EPA.
However, attorney Mr Moss
claimed last week that the
Bahamian economy must devel-
op further before it can be
“opened up as proposed.”

Former PLP MP says Hanna-Martin best cantitiate

think is needed. And I can only speculate that of
the other individuals whose names I have read
about, I don’t think they will pOmpe ts effectively

FROM page one

was all about.”

The Englerston MP, said Mr Smith, is from
“the same rock in terms of belief, in terms of con-

viction” as her father.

“I don’t know any daughter who is more like
her father, like Glenys is like Arthur Hanna,” he

said.

Mrs Hanna-Martin is regarded by party insiders
as the clear favourite to capture the post from
out-going party Chairman Raynard Rigby.

Though rumours have circulated about the entry
of many potential candidates into the race, thus far
only Elcott Coleby, and party newcomer Omar
Archer are also seeking the post. However, nei-
ther of these opponents, according Mr Smith, will
pose a serious threat to her candidacy.

“T’ve seen her in the islands, I’ve seen her inter-
“She does it with
that same level of humility and purpose that I

Christie calls for urgent regional action

acting with people,” he said.


















FROM page one

know the recent stories. What
matters is that the stories and
the fact of crime itself is dam-
aging to our countries and to
the region.”

Mr Christie told the audi-
ence that to combat this prob-
lem, his government during its
tenure in office, put in place
both a Youth and Urban
Renewal Programme, intend-
ed “to use the police force and
the social services together to
intervene in the lives of young
people and in families and
communities before the deci-
sions are made to turn to
crime.”

He also told the audience
that currently in the Bahamas,

against her.”

"Former Mt Moriah MP Keod Smith aanenneed

last week that he will not be running for the PLP

a bipartisan effort has been
launched in the House of
Assembly through the forma-
tion of a select committee to
investigate issues related to
crime. However, said Mr
Christie, “none of this can or
will work unless there is an
understanding and a commit-
ment from. the people of our
countries to work together.”

“There is in my view no
other way to address the long
term problems associated with.
crime, a social and economic
phenomenon, that we must
understand and solve, if our
societies are to further develop
and not be overwhelmed by
drugs, guns and social dys-
function,” he said.

Violent crime increaseditâ„¢* *

the Bahamas by 38 per.cént=



7



he-saide. SE AREA

chairmanship, after declaring several weeks ago
that he was exploring the idea.

There has also been some conflict between Mr
Rigby as chairman, and Party Leader Perry
Christie over the direction of the convention.

Mr Rigby reportedly was of the view that the
event should focus on what went wrong in the
last election in order to determine what needs to
be done for the PLP to regain government in as
short a time as possible. This strict focus, howev-
er, was not what was desired by the Christie camp,
insiders indicate.

Mr Rigby consequently walked away from par- .
ticipation in the organization of the convention,
which is now being chaired by Mr Christie.































last year, including a record 79
recorded murders.

In concluding his address,
the former prime minister
focused on the responsibility
of leaders in this region to
show the way in moving
towards a sense of coilective
responsibility in addressing
these vexing social problems.

“In conclusion, I say that
we must recognize the one
undeniable fact that those of
us who have the honour and
the privilege to govern, in its
broadest sense, those of us in
Government and in Opposi-
tion must shoulder our extra-
ordinary obligation to bring
our constituents to accept that
we must all — all of us — work
together to secure our future,”




PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







C'ECTRICITY _

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POWERING THE BAHAMAS FOR GENERATIONS!



Finance Minister affirms the
importance of nation’s youth



YOUTH FORUM: Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing is pictured as he listens in on discussions at the Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports
and Culture’s Youth Forum in Freeport Friday. Pictured standing from left are Mrs Janet Russell, Assistant Director of Youth; Minister Laing; and

Young make up
largest portion of the

Bahamas population,

Laing tells forum



oe

Bethel Brothers Morticians
Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



Ruth Evangeline Delancy, 80
of 8th Terrace, West Court,
Centerville and formerly of
Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera will
be held on Thursday at 11:00
a.m. at East Street Gospel
Chapel, East Street North.
Pastor Tom Roberts assisted
by other ministers of the
Gospel will officiate.
Interment will be made in

Lakeview Memorial Gardens
J.EK. Drive.



Left to mourn but cherish her
life, her husband of 59 years, William Lloyd, her six children,
Cislyn Evangeline Simmons, William Percy, Philip Lloyd,
Peter Alfred, Craig Gilbert and Deitra Ann Delancy; daughter-
in-law, Phillipa Delancy, son-in-law Arnold Simmons;
grandchildren, Vaughn and Vashti Simmons, Adrian, Kelly
and Lesa Delancy, Dana Chacon, Bryan and Bristol Delancy;
grandson-in-law Michael Chacon Sr.; great-grandson,
Michael Chacon Jr. Brothers: Dr. William (Al) McCartney
and Arnold McCartney; sisters, [vis Carey, Dorothy Moncur,
Angela Wallace; brothers-in-law, Archie Carey and Charles
Wallace; sisters-in-law, Eileen and Mary McCartney, Dorothy
and Remona Delaney; aunt, Jane Miller and family; nephews,
William (Billy), Dr. Barrett (Barry), Lennox and Keith
McCartney, D. Augustus Moncur, Carville Wallace, Garvin
and Mark McCartney; nieces, Tamara McCartney-Cargill,
Dale Carey-McHardy, Shawn Carey-Turnquest, Kim Carey-
Gibson, Alexandra, Amanda and Anita Moncur, Dr. Charlene
Wallace-Ferguson, Kayla Wallace-Hilton, Tonya McCartney-
Tynes, the families of the late Joseph and John Delaney,
Leroy Delancy, Lawrena Wilson and Caroline Rolle; the
families of the late Timothy McCartney, Irvin (Sonny)
McCartney, Ruth Morris, Beatrice Knowles, Evelyn Carey,
Leon McCartney, the families of the late Fred Allen, Eris
Allen, William Allen, Albertha Ferguson, Alice Bethel, Ruth
Carey, Marion Knowles Ingraham of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera,
Naomi Christie, Mary Darling and a host of other relatives
and friends including, Hon. Perry G. Christie, Hon. Tommy
Turnquest, Hon. Bran McCartney, Dr. Edward Allen, Dr.
David Allen, John Rolle, Hartman Rolle, Williemae Toote,
Vernita Cleare, Maudline Forbes, Carolyn Moss, Anna Marie
Ferguson, Erma Bowe, Annamae Delancy, Sybilene
Cumberbatch, Georgina Delancy, Hollis Sherman and family,
the Butcherettes, Jeanette Anderson, Pearlene Williams,
Sandra Elliott, Eleanor Elliott and family, the Saint Johns
Native Baptist Church family, the East Street Gospel Chapel
family, the Believers’ Gospel Chapel Family, Gayle
Duncombe and family, Dr. James and Janet Shearer, Hesketh
and Dawn Johnson, Pastor Roderick Rolle, Nora Dorsett,
the Centerville 8th Terrace West Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau St. on Wednesday from 10:00 a.m.
to 6:00 p.m. and on Thursday at the church from 10:00 a.m.
until service time.





Vandyke Hepburn/BIS Photo

@ By SIMON LEWIS
Bahamas Information Services

FREEPORT, Grand Bahama - State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing affirmed Friday that it is sensible to take into full
account the views and suggestions of the nation’s youth since
young people make up the largest portion of the Bahamian popu-
lation.

Mr Laing’s comments came as he addressed the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Education’s Youth Forum held at the Worker’s
House Auditorium. The aim of the Forum is to collect ideas and
suggestion on the Ministry’s proposed national youth policy.

Friday’s Youth Forum brought together some 40 young per-
sons from organisations and schools on Grand Bahama and saw
groups focusing on areas such as education, employment, crime,
abuse, government and more.

Mr Laing told the gathering that he was happy to be attending the ~~

forum because so much of his development started with the Min-
istry of Youth, which recruited him in youth work and allowed him
to represent the country at youth meetings around the world.

He recalled during his early days being involved in a similar
forum which back then had focused on the proposed National
Youth Service and how the young people of the nation rejected the
idea.

“And so I want you to know that because they rejected that
National Youth Service then, there was not a National Youth Ser-
vice of the order that was being proposed, introduced in The
Bahamas since. And I say that to tell you that your input can
make a difference as to
what the Government
does or what the Gov-
ernment does not do,”
he told the gathering.

Minister Laing said
the young persons
attending the Forum had
very clear ideas of the
issues they were dis-
cussing and he assured
them that the recom- °
mendations would be
considered in respect of
the national youth policy
that they will formally
adopt in The Bahamas.

The Commonwealth
Youth Association, he
noted, has been leading a
charge for some fifteen
years to cause countries
to adopt a formal
National Youth Policy.

“Government in
adopting that policy will
determine in advance
how it wants to respond
to the development of
young people; how it
wants to respond to the :
issues that confront young people, whether that issue relates to
employment, to crime or to education or social development,” he
stated. “When you consider the share size of the youth population
in this country there is no group of people in The Bahamas who
have the numbers you have if you are under 25 years old.”

He told that nearly 54 per cent of the nation’s population is
under 25 years of age, and that whether one is talking business,
church, education or the general society, no one group has the
share numbers young people have in the country.

“When we look at the things that are influencing the social
development, the social dynamics of The Bahamas you are having
a bigger say in all of that than any other population set,” Minister
Laing said.

Spearheaded by the Department of Youth, a similar Youth
Forum was scheduled for Mt Zion Baptist Church in Eight Mile
Rock on Saturday. The Ministry of Youth also co-ordinated a
town meeting for all youth, sporting and cultural leaders, school
principal, teachers, parents, guardians, social partners and the
community beginning Saturday at the Universal Household of
Faith Church in Hawksbill.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

oo SRPMS! FORESEES



“When we look
at the things that
are influencing
the social devel-
opment, the social
dynamics of The
Bahamas you are
having a bigger
say in all of that
than any other
population set.”



Zhivargo Laing













THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 15



KENYA

Amid lull in violence, Kenyans seek safety of ethnic numbers

@ By MATTHEW
ROSENBERG
NAIVASHA, Kenya

As the bus slows for a police
checkpoint, hawkers rush up
pushing cars of corn, sodas and
fried treats toward the open win-
dows.

The journey is long, the pas-
sengers hungry and thirsty. But
nobody's buying. Instead they
hurriedly jam the windows shut.
They are of the Luo tribe, and
this is Kikuyu territory.

“We are among our enemies. It
can be dangerous to be eating
these foods,” says Daniel Ochieng
Adongo. “There could be poi-
soning.”

With the violence sparked by a
deeply flawed election tapering
off, a quieter tragedy is unfold-
ing in Kenya. The tribes that lived

together peacefully for decades .

are peeling off in search of safety
in ethnic numbers. A bus ride
with 68 fleeing Luos provides a
ground’s-eye view of a migration
that could permanently fracture
the country’s ethnic map. More
than 1,000 people died and some

THE BAHAMAS

600,000 were forced from their
homes in the strife that followed
the December election in which
President Mwai Kibaki, a Kikuyu,
was declared the victor over Raila
Odinga, a Luo, even though most
local and foreign observers said it
was rigged. The fear and enmity
sown by the violence is evident
during much of the 10-hour bus
ride with the refugees. They are
fleeing their homes in Nairobi,
the capital in the Kikuyu-domi-
. nated central highlands, for west-
ern Kenya, their Luo heartland.

“It is like we are living in two
countries,” Adongo says as the
bus pulls away from the police
checkpoint. “We are leaving their
country for our country.”

The first half of the trip
requires an escort of soldiers in
jeeps and trucks because it passes
through Kikuyu areas such as
Naivasha, a town that in better
days attracted hordes of tourists
eager to see lions, wildebeest and
other animals. Angelina Jolie
even filmed part of her Tomb
Raider franchise amid the arching
rock formations in a nearby
national park,

But that was then. Last week,
members of a feared Kikuyu gang
called Mungiki were setting up
roadblocks in town, looking for
Luos and members of other eth-
nic groups that supported Odinga.

Most of the bus passengers
were living in Thika, a relatively
prosperous town on Nairobi’s
edge. Adongo, a rangy, impas-
sive-looking man of 35, was a
mechanic who managed send a
little money home to poor rela-
tives in western Kenya every
week.

In the election, Adongo, like
most Luos, supported Odinga.
When Kibaki was declared the
winner, years of resentment
against the Kikuyu’s domination
of the country exploded. Luos
and other tribes tied to the oppo-
sition chased Kikuyus from west-
ern Kenya, burning their homes,
looting their shops and killing
many. Kikuyus were fast to
extract revenge on Luos in their
midst. In a predominantly Luo
part of Thika, a mob showed up
and told the residents to leave or
dic. So Adongo and a few thou-
sand others took what they could

Farewell to Lawrence Whitfield Major



Peter Ramsay/BIS

PRIME MINISTER Hubert arias (right) and Minister of National Security and Immigration iam Turn-
quest are pictured among those attending the funeral service for former Assistant Commissioner of Police
Lawrence Whitfield Major at Bethel Baptist Church, Meeting Street, on Friday, February 15. Mr Major also
served as former Commander of the Marine Division of the Defence Force and former Superintendent of Pris-

ons.

ee







carry and fled to a camp on
Nairobi’s outskirts, many leaving
homes they had grown up in.

That was about a month ago.
With the roads now clear, a
church group is giving Luos free
bus rides to western Kenya.

Once luxury coaches, the buses
are ragged from years of grinding
down Kenya’s rutted roads. The
seats sag, windows are cracked,
wooden planks cover holes in the
floor and the air brakes wheeze
asthmatically. Luos pile in with
bundles of clothes, boxes of trin-
kets and pictures tied with string,
and sacks of flour and rice.

Some will stay with relatives
out west, others will have
nowhere to shelter.

The convoy joins its army
escort on the road out of Nairobi
as it starts its 150-mile journey in
the verdant highlands where
sheep.and goats graze next to veg-
etable plots. Soon, the bus

descends to the dusty savannah
of the Rift Valley, passing occa-
sional herds of zebra. |

Along the way, it overtakes
run-down cargo trucks crammed
with other fleeing Luos and their



Sormmy for dine
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WE “a ae ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS | :



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furniture, clothes, goats, chick-
ens. The passengers stare in
silence when driving by burned
out homes, which they assume
belonged to Luos.

Hours later, as the bus barrels
past tea plantations, safely out of
Kikuyu territory and now in hills
“dominated by ethnic groups
aligned with the opposition, they
pass more burned-out homes.
This time they presume the
charred wrecks belonged to
Kikuyus, and they start chatter-
ing. “We are glad,” says Christina
Odhiambo, a 39-year-old who
used to clean houses in Nairobi.
“It is what they deserve.”

Soon enough, tea bushes give
way to fields of sugar cane — they
have reached the Luo heartland
on the shores of Lake Victoria.
Driving into Kisumu, the region’s
main town, people shout, “we’ve
arrived, we’ve arrived.” Passersby
cheer them on. Even the sight of
the muddy transit camp on the
grounds of a half-built church
doesn’t get them down. They
stumble out expectantly, glanc-
ing at the long tents and tarps
strung from unfinished cin-









On Everything in the Store
‘10% | On CER lances)

NUN E IST
nae DISCOUNT willl Loe 1 Ot
Monday Meardh 3rd for



Montrose Avenue

Gust North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co) eT

Phone:

‘ os © 325-2040 » 323-7756 « 326-7494



\

ib 4h at Sam.



ft{s) DPersnise

derblock walls. A few line up for
a meal of boiled beans and veg-
etables. The rest look for a place
to bed down for the night.

Church workers at the camp
say 9,000 people have passed
through in 10 days. Most are
quickly shipped out to villages
where they have relatives, even
distant ones. Adongo is going to.
relatives outside Kisumu who’,’
have been putting up his wife and’
three children for the past month.’
He used his last money to send
them west, and he needs work...
“My relatives are poor. They will.
need help feeding us.”

For Odhiambo, who has little.
family in western Kenya, the
future is less certain. Her 19-year-’
old son left Nairobi 11 days ago»
and is staying with a friend in:
Kisumu. Maybe she can stay,
there, she says, while she looks;
for something permanent. ora

- As for work, “there are houses*
to clean. There are dirty house
everywhere.” But having grown...
up in Nairobi, she speaks little,”

Luo, and worries: “Will they trust?
me?”





TTT ee are rears



Our ALREADY | |
Regular

‘ Discounted Prices
| Excludes All Sale

Items) —











——


PAGE 16, MONDAY, one 18, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Se oc SS A ak

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Bivtepan® ant vee tem:

The Management of UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. & )
' | UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. is proud to announce its |

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ihe nent MLR a AL GML a at I ep ALD sine LRAED etre Ag tick ke Hs eci tige c 2 z



| Ian Atkins Roberto Schott
BANK BANK

| DIRECTOR |



| Jose Aguilar-Millan Dwayne Davis Zelpha Davis Steve Davis ‘ Turi Dias a
BANK _ BANK TRUST BANE | BANK
, fess Nae ’



AAD igs,



Lovina Penne rman Claudia Rolle Pierre-Alain Torti
BANK BANK BANK

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR





IY PO
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Yi a iain cart mall tye mini



Luiz Barros Felecia Boyle-Bazard Eduardo Barros Aldo Mazzella Gustavo Pontes
BANK BANK _ BANK © _ BANK BANK

We acknowledge those employees who celebrated
Service Anniversaries in 2007



5 YEARS
35 YEARS 18 YEARS Marsha Adderley a
Bathsheba Cleare Ed Zaleschuck Dena Andr ews i
Daniel Brandenberger Jobn Benjamin a
25 YEARS Tanya Braynen ie
Elvira Lowe 10 YEARS Tanya Clare a
Joachim Koebele Linda Mackey
20 YEARS Andreas Rentschler Lanier Daniels
Cheryl Rolle Shavonne Davis
Germaine Simmons-Dean x
. Gale ae ak _ Shevette Edwards f
Bruno Salgado Kenderlyn Minnis Khalifa Evans
BANK TRUST Lynn Kelly

Tina Marshall








_ broker/dealer’s liquidatio

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Bahamas-
based . bro-
ker/dealer has
gone into. liq-

uidation after .

incurring an estimated $20 mil-
lion loss from certain trading

activities, The Tribune can.

reveal, an episode that also
prompted a Securities Com-
mission inquiry

This all ultimately resulted
in Caledonia Corporate Man-
agement Group’s sharehold-
ers voting by resolution on

MONDAY

“FEBRUARY

18,

2008

SEC ek ds. a Hints sols Liste ae net |

--$20m rading loss prompts

Colinalmperial.



Confidence For Life



* Caledonia liquidator confirms that process to become court-supervised

* Securities Commission: ‘We acted in best interests of investors’

* Caledonia executives said they approached regulator on voluntary liquidation

February 12, 2008, to place the

business into voluntary liqui-
dation, a notice in Friday’s Tri-
bune Business section
announced.

Deloitte & Touche
(Bahamas) accountant and
partner, Anthony Kikivarakis,
has been appointed as liquida-

BISX ‘expects’ four

‘more funds listings

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange (BISX)
is hoping to have four more
investment fund listings on the
= exchange shortly, with its chief

executive telling The Tribune _

‘that the exchange hopes to
“roll out” the listing and trad-
ing of public companies’ sec-
ondary securities issues next
month.

On the investment funds
side, Keith Davies said: “I have
gotten interest from three,
potentially four, more mutual
funds for listing on BISX.
These are active inquiries,
seeking information for time-
lines for listings.

“They’re more than just
inquiries, They’ve completed
-draft applications. We have a

steady stream of interest. Our |

[listing] numbers keep on
creeping up, and we expect to
have these four.”

BISX had some 18 invest-
ment fund listings at year-end
2007, finishing the year in style

Exchange hoping to
‘roll-out’ market for
listed firms’ secondary
issues next month







NGTLUMM BN (erS)

by adding the Fidelity

Bahamas International Invest-'

SEE page 4B

‘sa le It His all
tages of of modern living

: ; ‘commer lots starting at



zee ao





tor, and he confirmed to this
newspaper that he and his
attorneys would soon be apply-
ing to the Supreme Court for
an order that would place
Caledonia’s liquidation under
the court’s supervision.
Although the precise nature
of the particular investments

and strategy that ultimately led
to Caledonia’s $20 million
trading loss is unclear, sources
familiar with the situation told
Tribune Business that it was a
high risk/high return pro-
gramme that involved short-
selling of securities and heavy
leverage (debt).

Caledonia executives, in
answers to questions e-mailed
to them by Tribune Business,
said they met with the Securi-
ties Commission on January
22, 2008, to propose that they

SEE page 8B

Fiscal deficit grows 67.5
per cent to $78.4m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE fiscal deficit for the
first five months of the Gov-
ernment’s 2007-2008 fiscal year
rose by 67.5 per cent to $78.4

’ million, with one leading pri-

vatisation advocate saying it

“ey > . ’ .
“just can’t-continue” pumping-«-

subsidies into the public cor-
porations to cover multi-mil-

i, Nassau





rrr .

Don't copy. Lead.

Life and Health Insurance

THE DAVIS FAMILY

“ Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

Multi-million dollar corporation subsidies ‘just
can’t continue’ or Bahamas will be bankrupted

lion dollar losses.

Rick Lowe, a member of the
Nassau Institute economic
think-tank, responding to Tri-

-bune Business’s.reports last ,

week on the $19.8 million and
$13 million subsidies given to

Exuma



*Abaco

Mortgage Lending

the Water & Sewerage Corpo-
ration and Airport Authority
respectively for their 2006 and

2007 financial vente, said that if

SEE page OB

Freeport



Retirement Planning

One family with many needs. For

THESE PRICES ARE HATENDIR 18 BF STL
AS A GRE DY FOR Cetimerien
CECH WITH YER FARES] Gas S110)






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a solid financial foundation and
customized advice, their choice is

Colinalmperial.





Wwww.micronet,}

Micronet

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Providing Technology That Wor!
56 Madeira St. - Palmdale

242) 328-3040 ° Fax (242) 328-304.
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Tourismtoday
The celebrated, television show that everybody
talks about, continues this season on

Monday, February 18, 2008
FEATURING:
Q Making It In Tourism With Ms. Gina Smith,

_ THE Bahamas Internation-
al Securities Exchange
(BISX) has been talking with
a Canadian counterpart over
whether its “venture
exchange model” could be
used in this nation, the
exchange’s chief executive
acknowledging that its “expo-
nential growth” had been
impacted by the absence of
any Bahamian initial public
offerings (IPOs) since 2001.
Keith Davies said that

Keith Davies





BISX in talks on ‘venture

Still awaiting word on

rity out there, and the onus
rests with the exchange to
expand the market in differ-
ent ways.

“The first step is to get
these secondary offerings [by
companies whose primary
offerings are already listed by
BISX] on, and approach dif-
ferent ways to expand the
market.”

Mr Davies added that he
had been speaking with his
exchange counterpart in:
Canada on “the expansion of
their venture exchange model
in the Bahamas. How that

while no IPOs may have tak- could be deployed in the
at Da Culture Place en place since Freeport Con- tal from the private place- Bahamas”.
crete, BISX had been work- ment/private equity/venture Acknowledging that a

Q Visitor's Voice With Raquel Horton
Q New Authenticaily Bahamian Kiosks At LPIA
QO) The Impact Of Public Transportation On

the Tourism Industry

ing to attract and develop
new forms of business,
including assessing how it
could serve Bahamian com-
panies who were raising capi-

Be sure to tune in to another brand new,
informative episode of the show
every Monday at 8:30 pm
Mas and Saturday at 10:00 am on ZNS TV.

capital route.

“Our market continues to
grow in other ways,” Mr
Davies told The Tribune.
“IPOs are not the only secu-

| (a! |
TR te ee aes

4 bed, 3 bath, central air,security
screens & bars, furnished,
alarm, swiping pool large yard,

Phone. 423-9866.



stock exchange’s success was
based on its ability to attract
new listings, Mr Davies said
“that from that perspective,
yes, our ability to grow expo-
nentially has been affected by
the lack of IPOs coming to
list on the exchange”.

Yet given the level of pri-
vate capital raising by
Bahamas-based companies in
recent years, Mr Davies said
BISX needed to see how it

- could meet their needs, espe-

cially those firms that did not
want to go public but desired
to be part of a formalized,
regulated market prior to
potentially doing so.

“If you need money, you
come to the market,” Mr
Davies said. “A lot of compa-
nies have been able to obtain
private placements from
institutions and well-off indi-
viduals. Those funds are ade-
quate for them to do what
they need to do at the

“What has to happen as an
exchange is that there’s no
reason why we cannot serve
those persons seeking private
equity as well.”

The BISX chief executive
added that he had not given
up on the IPO market either,
pointing out that the Bahami-
an capital markets enjoyed a

2

SEE next page ba

Generali Worldwide appoints a new
Business Development Manager

Generali Worldwide is pleased to announce the
appointment. of Tanya A. Woodside, who will
manage the business development for’ our,
Bahamas Healthcare Portfolio. Tanya will be
based at our Bahamas office and_ will
concentrate on ensuring continued support for
our brokers and clients in the Islands of The
Bahamas, while also beginning to promote
Generali Worldwide’s products and services
throughout the wider Caribbean.

Tanya has over 15 year’s experience in employee benefits, healthcare
and related industries. Most recently, she worked with J.S. Johnson in
Nassau as Employee Benefits Consultant / Manager. Her experience ©
spans both local and international markets and she has represented a ©
variety of blue chip companies, including AON Consulting. :

Tanya also ha§ extensive, first-hand experience of working as a broker
with Benefits Design & Financial Services in Houston, Texas and she is
also Charter Treasurer for The Bahamas Insurance Brokers’ Association
(BIAA), providing her with a detailed and intimate understanding of the
needs, expectations and challenges of brokers in an ever increasingly
competitive marketplace. Tanya is also a Board Member of both Rotary
Nassau Sunrise and The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce.

Generali Worldwide is delighted to welcome Tanya on board and believe
that her extensive and varied experience will be both an asset to
Generali Worldwide and the business community in The Bahamas and
wider Caribbean.

Congratulations to Ms. Audrey Dorsette
Wionr ofthe Bish Anercan “Ear Bin Customer
Joyeciaion Cangolga tor ana,

(Lo Fe) Wenchal Srnitin, Aesiatant Vioe President ~ Salee
& Developrrvent, Jaret lenin, Staff Manager, Audrey
Doreetie, Vininer, |. Cheoter Cooper, Predict & CEC,

*“

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com \ itis
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-5601 ‘ ime Can

AN CELA

eam vib a

AWWA, ES By haat!


THE TRIBUNE



PRM El
exchange’ with Canada peer

government debt market

FROM page 2

‘boom’ in companies going
public in the late 1990s and
2000. While the last few years
had been fallow, he argued
that IPO activity was cyclical
and would come round again,
especially when Bahamian
firms needed to raise large
amounts of capital to com-
pete with international rivals
in a free trade environment.
Meanwhile, Mr Davies said
BISX had developed plans
for the listing, trading and
settlement of all government
debt securities - including
government-registered stock
and Treasury Bills — once the
Government gave the formal
go-ahead for this to begin.
Adding that the exchange
now awaited the Governmen-
t’s decision to give the go-
ahead, Mr Davies said:
“We've been working for a
year putting in place plans for
the eventual listing, trading
and settlement of govern-
- ment securities across the

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
328-8157



Fourth Terrace Diagnostic Centre: 9am—5S pm
Imaging At Grosveror 24 Hours, Call After 8pm

exchange....... It’s a matter
of being told to proceed. The
groundwork has been laid.
We ate ready, willing and
able to implement a phased
project plan.

“That element of our busi-
ness is in a waiting stage until
we are told otherwise. We
have been getting on with
other things.”

BISX had implemented the
required systems already, he
said, and had plans to add
additional staff and educate
all government debt market
participants — investors,
banks, broker/dealers and the
Central Bank — on how the
new set-up would work.

While some work still
needed to be done in specific
areas, Mr Davies said that
until the Government gave
the formal go-ahead, it did

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

”

“not make operational sense
for the exchange to “ramp-
up” for business it still did
not know it would get
because this would add
unnecessary costs with return
prospects uncertain.

He added that he was not
criticizing the Government,
or making any judgments or
casting aspersions in relation
to the listing of government
debt on the exchange, but
simply stating a fact as to the
current situation.

“We are very practical in
our approach, having been
operating BISX and the local
market for eight years. Peo-
ple can point to the success of
the smooth market opera-
tions, despite some of the dif-
ficulties the exchange has
been through,” Mr Davies
said.

“Climb high and

reach the

mountain top.
‘When you reach,

look down and
help others to do

the same.



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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 3B



THIS MONTHS TOPIC:
Heart Health

LECTURE DATE

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SIU Rae



HAPPY TOURS DECLARES
A $50,000.00 DIVIDEND



Left to Right -Robert Outten, Trustee Director; John G. Rolle, Trustee/Director; Bruce
Rolle, Vice President; Mr Albert Brown, President; Jeffrey Murphy, Director; Basil Major,
Director; Roscoe Weech, Secretary/ Director and Leon Griffin, BTCU President: Director.
Missing are Mr. T.C. Brown, Treasury/Director and Mr. Philip Watkins, Trustee: Director.

The Directors of Happy Tours Ltd. have declared a dividend
of $50,000.00 payable to all shareholders of record on the
31st January, 2008. This Dividend represents the first dividend
payable by the company since its operations began many years ago.
The resolution was passed by the Directors on the 3 1st January, 2008

All shareholders are hereby notified that a dividend is now
payable at $2.50 per share. All shareholders are asked to confirm
their shares with the registrar of the company or the secretary by
29th February, 2008.

Registrar

Concorida Corporate Services
Hepburn House

Shirley Street

Tel: 322-8814

Secretary

Mr. Roscoe Weech

145 Nassau Street
Company Head Quarters
Tel: 323-5818

Person who are unable to locate their share certificates are asked to
check with the Registrar or the Company’s Secretary for confirmation of
their share holdings.
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



ae ee
PO TCT Te a

BISX ‘expects’ four

Fund, and the CFAL High — exchange’s ability to list their
Grade Bond Fund. secondary securities issues,

Meanwhile, Mr Davies said such as preference shares and
ment Fund Class N-Series, the — there had been a “great deal
CFAL Global Bond Fund, the of interest” from existing
CFAL Global High Equity BISX-listed equities in the

eam ES eT TLC
just call 322-1986 today!

FROM page 1B



SEE next page

x.
pl

Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking
bids for Construction services from suitably qualified local
Bahamian contractors to carry out the development of 9,
500 square feet of office space at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport.

Qualified contractors must:-
-Demonstrate an ability to obtain $1,000,000.00 liability
insurance
-Provide evidence that all Government tax payments are
current
-Provide at least three references from owners of
projects in excess of $50,000.00 .

Bid packages can be obtained from the offices of NAD on
Tuesday 19th — Friday 22nd between the hours of 9am and
5pm. .

A site visit has been arranged for 9am on Monday,
February 25th. Contractors wishing to participate are
asked to notify NAD of their intention no later than 5pm on
Friday, February 22nd at telephone number 702-1000.

The Deadline for submission of bids is 4:00pm on February
29th. Bid packages should be delivered to the NAD offices
no later than 4:00pm February 29th. All packages received
after this time will be returned unopened.

NAD reserves the right to reject any or all bids.



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES,
THE BAHAMAS

SCHOOL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE AND RESEARCH

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the posts of:

LECTURER/ SENIOR LECTURER IN SURGERY

Candidates should be a medical graduate from a recognized and accredited

University, with a qualification in Surgery, and significant clinical experience at
the highest levels in their surgical specialty, well thought of by peers and in current
clinical practice. He/she must be a good team player with strong leadership skills
as well as professional and interpersonal skills, undergraduate and postgraduate

training and research experience, record of excellence in surgical experience,

teaching, research and publications.

The successful applicant will be required to:
¢ Lead in and coordinate the teaching of surgery to undergraduates and
postgraduates (for the MB BS and DM surgery);
¢ Lead and mentor research in surgical disciplines; .
¢ Participate in the surgical services of the Princess Margaret Hospital
(a 600-bed public and teaching hospital.

LECTURER/ SENIOR LECTURER IN EPIDEMIOLOGY,
RESEARCH UNIT

Candidates should have training at the masters or doctoral level in epidemiology. It
is highly desirable for the candidate to have interest and competence in teaching at
the undergraduate level in community health and family medicine, and overseeing
the research component of all postgraduate programmes. Experience in the design
and conduct of epidemiological projects including demonstrated ability to attract
research grants would be an asset.

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to the development of
the programme in chronic non-communicable diseases, especially cardiovascular
disease risk while establishing collaborative projects with other researchers and
units within the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and the wider UWI research

community.

The successful applicants will be expected to assume duties June 1, 2008.

Application letter along with curriculum vitae giving full particulars of qualifications,
experience, nationality, names and address of three referees and copies of degrees
should be sent by electronic mail to: hrmd.sed@uwimona.edu.jm or to the Human
Resource Officer, Staffing & Placement, Human Resource Management Division,
The University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7. In order to expedite the selection
process, applicants are advised to as‘: their referees to send reports under confidential
cover to the above address without waiting to be contacted. The final date for receipt of

applications is February 29, 2008.



Public Hospitals Authority
Advertisement

Two (2) Vacancy For
Emergency Vehicle Driver
Marsh Harbour Abaco

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the |
post Emergency Services Technician (EST) III], Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-\

A minimum of five (5) subjects at the B.J.C. level or equivalent
including English Language OR pass the NREMT practical exam
and the BLS (Basic Life Support) with two (2) years relevant
experience.

Must also obtain licensure and registration from the Health Pro-
fessions Council.

DUTIES:

The Emergency Services Technician III is responsible for provid-
ing basic life support to ill or injured persons including:

* Taking current and past history relevant to event

* Maintaining the airway.

* Manually ventilating a patient.

* Splintering or otherwise immobilizing the body or parts of the
body

* Protecting the confidentiality and dignity of the patient.

* Recording all pertinent information.

WORKING CONDITIONS

Must be able to lift patients, equipments, materials weighing 150.
Ibs.

Letters of Application, resume and three (3) references should
be submitted, no later than 22nd February, 2008 to Human Re-
sources Director, Public Hospitals Authority, PLO. Box N-8200 or
3rd Terrace Centerville (West).





LY NTN

STH ANNUAL

FUNG WALK

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2008

EARLY REGISTRATION APPLICATIONS CAN BE DROPPED OFF AT THE SUBWAY
HARBOUR BAY AND PRINCE CHARLES RESTAURANTS FROM FEBRUARY 18 TO 22.






NAME:



AGE: GENDER: Male Female




ADDRESS:



TELEPHONE




T-SHIRT SIZE: Small Medium large X-Large 2X-Large



Please check anuropriate category:
















WALKER





Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician.

| assume all risks associated with the SUBWAY Fun Run Walk including, but not limited to falls,
* contact with other participants, the effect of weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold,
and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions of the road, all such risks being known and appreci-
ated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing the facts and in consideration of accepting
my application, |, for myself and anyone entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release
SUBWAY and all sponsors, their representatives and successors, from all claims and liabilities
of any kind arising out of my participation in the SUBWAY Fun Run Walk even though that
liability may arise out of negligence or carelessness on the part of the persons named in this
waiver. | am aware that the registration fee is non-refundable. | am also aware that the course
will open to traffic and that headphones, jogging strollers, bikes, in-line skaters, and similar
ms and animals accompanying entrants are not permitted on the course

RACE STARTS AT 7AM

LATE REGISTRATION STARTS AT GAM

REGISTRATION FEE: $12
WESTERN ESPLANADE TO

GOODMAN'S BAY & BACK

Thompson
y trading Company, Lad,






88c¥-See WO 9080-22E TIVO NOLLYWHOANI SHOW 4O4

REMUINE fs .-
Marin Ve
SERBS
NES, the striders
URI IA

SAVING
Uvss






is Rin you? DOCTORS HOSPUTAL,




THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008, PAGE 5B





more funds listings

FROM page 4

bonds.

The Securities Commission
earlier this year gave BISX
permission to list these issues
and instruments, which should
help to broaden and deepen
the Bahamian capital markets
in terms of investor interest
and options.

Mr Davies, though, told The
Tribune that BISX had not
‘gone live’ with the secondary
issues listings facility straight
away because “we want to do a
few things in-house”.

He because these secondary
issues were typically debt
instruments, as opposed to
ordinary shares and equities,
broker/dealers used a “differ-
ent part of the trading system”
when conducting and moni-
toring transactions.

While equities traded on
price, the BISX chief execu-
tive explained that debt instru-
ments were traded on a per-
centage of their face value, so
the exchange’s trading system
—and the way it and its screens
interacted with broker/dealers
— had been reconfigured to
deal with this.

“IT would hope that by the
end of the month we will have
gone through a period of
releasing the operational steps
to our members. We have
been doing behind-the-scenes
testing in our testing environ-
ment” using real-time date,
“Mr Davies said, “so we can
roll-out with it early next
month.”

The BISX chief executive
said the company was “trying
to make our system a one-stop
shop through our broker/deal-
er members”, which are pri-
marily Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets and CFAL.

The exchange, he explained,
was planning to roll-out its
Observer work stations, which
are configured to track the
market, in addition to its
BISXnet service. This allows
registered users to mine
BISX’s trading information.

“This will become a key fea-
ture of our website, as the
back-end will be tied directly
into the trading information
from the trading engine,” Mr
Davies said.

He added that BISX was
also planning to “release at
some stage” information and

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

data it had compiled to show
every shareholder and investor
in a publicly-listed company in
the Bahamas, an exercise
designed to reveal the breadth,
depth and diversity of share-
holding in the Bahamas. It is

also intended to show how the
future well-being of many
Bahamians, especially those
preparing for and looking for-
ward to retirement, is tied to
the performance of listed com-
pany stocks.

TENDER SECURITY SERVICES

The Clinton Heritage Authority invites proposals
from suitably qualified Companies for the provi-
sion of security services at the Clifton Heritage

National Park.

Interested companies can collect a specification
document from the Authority’s office in the Collin’s
House Complex, with entrance on Collins Avenue,
between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm Mon-

day through Friday.

Tenders must be sealed in an envelope marked
“TENDER FOR SECURITY SERVICES” and
delivered for the attention of:

Dr. Keith Tinker
Secretary
The Clifton Heritage Authority
P.O. Box EE 15082
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: 325-1505

- Bids should reach the Authority's office by
5:00 p.m. on 22 February, 2008.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend
a bid opening on Tuesday, 26 February, 2008 at
10:00 a.m. at the Administrative Office, Collins

Avenue.

The Clifton Heritage Authority reserves the right to

reject any or all tenders.



BAHA MAR

NASSAU, BAMAMAS

Career Opportunity

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. seeks to hire a
Landscape Superintendent

The successful applicant should possess the following qualifications:

¢ Ability to read and revise landscape plans.

¢ Ability to operate a backhoe, excavator, grader, and a
front-loader.

Knowledge of proper installation of all commercial irrigation
systems.

¢ Experience in the planting or installation of palms, trees,
shrubs and sod.

¢ Extensive knowledge of transplanting palms and trees.

* Ability to supervise and give direction to construction
personnel.

* Knowledge of golf course landscaping and maintenance.
* Computer experience in landscaping design is a necessity.

Exceptional communication skills, leadership qualities, self discipline
and the initiative to grow and learn are also essential.

Please forward curriculum vitae with salary requirements via
e-mail to the Human Resources Manager at hr@bahamar.com or fax to:
(242) 677-9100 no later than February 27, 2008. All responses will be
held in the strictest confidence.



Esso Standard Oil, S.A., Ltd. is looking for Talented
Candidates who seek Exceptional Career Development —

ROLE STATEMENT:

Responsible for the execution of special projects or assignments in different Busiess, areas in order
to obtain Training and exposure to our company’s processes and values for a ‘period of 12 months,
having the possibility at the end of the program 2 becoming part of the organizatic ne

POSSIBLE RESPONSIBILITIES:

_% Monitor and perform business data analysis ~

* Short term assignments in Operations, Staff Functions, Sales or + Convenience Retail
_%& Develop projects, business plans, results and strategies -

* Assist with logistics and implementation of category programs - :

NECESSARY SKILLS:

* Bachelor degree in Business Administration, Engineering, Marketing or Related Fields
* 3-4 Years of experience in areas of study

* Great Interpersonal Effectiveness & Communication Skills

* Strong Decision Making, Problem Solving , Computer & Analyticei Skills

* Has Commitment to High Standards

* With Drive, Perseverance & Initiating Action

If you are interested in participating in this program, please send your resume by email to:
' recruitmentbahamas@yahoo.com



“The Tribune keeps me
informed. The Tribune
is my Newspaper.”

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN

The Tribune

Purchase The Tribune
from your local store
or street vendor.

My Viwe. My (lewgoqot/


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008



THE TRIBUNE



THE RECEPTIONIST AS AN AMBASSADOR



The Receptionist as an Ambassador â„¢ is a
people—oriented program that develops
your receptionist's abilities to consistently
deliver quality services when she/he is
handling internal & external customers.
One-on —One & Group Sessions Available!

Log on: www. markturnquestconsulting.com





MARK A TURNQUEST & COLTD

(242) 326-6748 / (242) 427-3640

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CAPRI INVESTMENT SERVICES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), the
Dissolution of CAPRI INVESTMENT SERVICES INC. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was the 17th Day of July, 2007.



Join Citibank, N.A.
Nassau, Bahamas, a
branch of Citi, the
largest financial
institution in the
world.







managing _local/foreign

SA



@ By Royal Fidelity Capital

Markets

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian stock market, with
105,291 shares changing hands.
Ten of the 19 listed companies
traded during the week, with
there being five advancers, three
decliners, and two issuers remain-
ing unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Freeport Oil Holdings Com-
pany (FCL) with 44,100 shares
changing hands, accounting for
42 per cent of total shares traded.
With the activity, FCL saw a $0.03
increase in its share price, clos-
ing the week out at $5.15.

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) had another active
week, with 35,600 shares changing
hands, raising by $0.01 to close
the week at $2.46. Leading the
rally was FamGuard Corporation
(FAM), with its share price
increasing by $0.29, on volume of
1,400 shares, to close the week
out at a new 52-week high of
$7.79.

The loss leader for the week’

was JS Johnson & Company
(JSJ), which declined by $0.20,
on a volume of 5,000 shares, to
close the week out at $12.30.

The FINDEX increased by
0.44 points or 0.05 per cent, week-
over-week, to close at 929.66.
Year-to-date the FINDEX is
down by 2.35 per cent.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no earnings releas-
es from any of the listed compa-
nies during the week.

INVESTOR CORNER

Last week we looked at two
different types of mutual funds,
namely open-end versus closed-
end funds. This week we will
continue the discussion on invest-
ment funds by exploring differ-
ent investment strategies of
investment funds.

A mutual fund could have sev-
eral types of investment strate-
gies that define the type of mutu-
al fund it is, namely equity fund,
bond fund, money market fund,
fund of funds, and hedge funds.

An equity fund, which invests
mainly in stock investments, is
probably the most common type
of mutual fund and is usually
open-ended. Often, such funds
focus investments on particular
strategies and certain types of
issuers, such as emerging mar-
kets, large cap companies, etc.

A bond fund invests in bonds
and other debt securities. Like
the equity fund, the bond fund
can also focus on certain types of
issuers - government bonds, cor-
porate bonds or junk bonds.

A money-market fund invests
in short-term debt instruments,
and seeks to limit an investor's
exposure to credit, market and
liquidity risks. Such funds tend
to invest in the highest rated debt
instruments, such as commercial
paper, treasury bills or other
short-term highly rated bonds. In
next week's commentary we will
explore the features of fund of
funds and hedge funds. We will
also discuss the exchange-traded
fund (ETF) as an investment
vehicle.

citi

Treasury Head

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Regional Treasury team,
responsible for developing and implementing strategies for
liability products.

currency

the position is

Key

responsibilities include marketing and quoting rates for corporate

We invite outstanding
individuals, wanting to build a
career in Corporate Banking, to
be part of our dynamic global
team. You will interact with
colleagues from around the
Caribbean region and across the
organization globally, providing
treasury management to our
local team. In addition to a great
career, we offer a competitive
salary and benefits package.

related _ financial,

foreign exchange contracts, money market instruments and
derivative products and projecting liquidity'and rate trends. The
role is also focused on risk management through monitoring
liquidity and foreign exposure, ensuring compliance with legal,
regulatory, and internal policy requirements, and, managing ratios
and reserves. Additional responsibilities include overseeing all
regulatory and management performance
reporting, and, supervising and training support staff.

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Accounting or Finance, and, a minimum of 5 years Treasury
experience with a major commercial and/or investment bank; a

Chartered Accountant or CFA designation preferred. Excellent

Interested candidates should
forward a copy of their resume
by February 22, 2008 to: Human
Resources, P.O. Box N-1576;
Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax:
(242) 302-8779 OR Email:

janice.gibson@citi.com

required.

marketing/sales, analytical,

Challenge

communication, and _ interpersonal
skills, combined with a results orientation and an ability to build
relationships, will round out the ideal candidate. Some travel is

yourself to a career like no other

Bish

Pricing Information As Of: .



= ) FIDELITY

Previous Close Today's Close

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
‘Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol (S)

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND H

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

5 A
X Listed Mutual Funds

Last 1 2 Months



Yield %










BISX
SYMBOL







AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE































19, 2008.





















































NOTICE








CLOSING CHANGE

PRICE

$1.73
$0.99
$9.61
$11.80
$14.60
$3.66
$12.70
$7.82
$3.14
$13.99
$4.48
$2.46
$7.79
$2.60
$0.74
$5.15
$13.00
$7.25
$12.30
$10.00



DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

¢ BBL has declared a special dividend of $0.02 per share,
with $0.01 already paid on December 31, 2007, and $0.01
being payable on March 31, 2007, to all shareholders *
record date December 21, 2007.

¢ CBL has declared a special dividend of $0.06 per share,
payable on April 30, 2008, to all shareholders of record date
April 15, 2008.

¢ FAM has declared a dividend of $0.06 per share, payable on
February 25, 2008, to all shareholders of record date February |

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Tides Act, 1959

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
comprising 250 acres forming a portion of the Henry Armbrister
Grant E.79A situate approximately 2 miles Northwest of the
Arthur's Town Airport on the Island of Cat Island one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.



IN THE MATTER of the Petition of

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 929.66






YTD (2.35%)



VOLUME YTD PRICE
CHANGE

$0.01 7,591 4.22%
$0.09 5,000 16.47%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 0.00%
$- 0 5.39%
$- 200 -7.24%
$- 0 -0.32%
$-0.01 1,000 4.18%
$-0.16 -11.11%
$0.01 35,600 4.68%
$0.29 1,400 8.19%
$- 0 -1.89%
$-0.03 1,400 -3.90%
$0.03 44,100 -0.58%
Se 4,000 0.39%
$- 0 0.00%
$-0.20 5,000 11.82%
i: 0 0.00%







2007





CLE/qui/01438




AND








AND







CAMPERDOWN HOLDINGS LIMITED

THE PETITION OF CAMPERDOWN: HOLDINGS LIMITED. in

“ALL THAT “pleas parcel
approximately two (2) miles Northwest of Arthur's Town
Airport on the Island of Cat Island in. the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas in the vicinity of that tract of land known
as Camperdown and more fully described as follows:
Commencing at a point at the High Water Mark thence
SOUTHWARDLY to Dickies Road and land originally granted
to Robert Stubbs (recorded in Book E at page 255) and running
thereon Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-seven and Twenty-
one Hundredths (1,937.21) feet and SOUTHEASTWARDLY
by land originally granted to Emma Culmer, Thomas Butler,
James Thurston,
and running thereon a total distance of Forty Six Hundred
and Nineteen and Ninety-six Hundredths (4,619.96) feet
and SOUTHWESTWARDLY by
to the aforesaid Charles Hepburn and George Dean and
running thereon a total distance of Twenty Three Hundred
and Nine and Eighty-nine Hundredths (2,309.89) feet and
SOUTHEASTWARDLY by land originally granted to Jupiter
‘and Jacob Thurston and running thereon Ten Hundred and
Ninety-eight and Thirty Hundredths (1,098.30) feet and
NORTHEASTWARDLY by a tract of land originally known as
“Camperdown” and originally granted to Henry Armbrister and
running thereon Thirty. Eight Hundred and Sixty-two and Sixty-
five Hundredths (3,862.65) feet NORTHWESTWARDLY by the
High Water Mark and running thereon a total distance of Seventy
Three Hundred and Twenty-five and Eighty-five Hundredths
(7,325.85) feet back to the point of commencement.”

Camperdown Holdings Limited claim to be the owner of the
unincumbered fee simple estate in possession of the said
land and has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section Three (3) of
the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro
Road, off Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas; and

3. The Commissioner's/ Administrator's Office at New Bight
and Arthur's Town, Cat Island, Bahamas.

is hereby given
dower or right to dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim
not recognized in the Petition shall
expiration of Thirty (3
these presents, file in the Supreme Court and serve on
the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his claim in

the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his
Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final

NOTICE





respectof:. ,, isha)

or tract of land located

John Strachan and Charles -Hepburn

land originally granted




e

Copies of the Petition and the Plan of the said land may be
inspected during normal office hours in the following places:








that any person having
on or before the

0) days after the final publication of






























1.3001 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.300059** ublication of these pre i ar to such claim

3.0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.999402**" 19.97% P presents will operate as b ,

1.3798 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.379777°"*""

3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.7442 1.40% 27.72%

11.9880 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9880*** 0.46% 5.53%

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00 LOCKHART & MUNROE

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.00

1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund ie Chambers
: 9.6628




Fidelity International Investment Fund

#35 Buen Retiro Road











i 8: Ad 1 VV 2.37% 1 2007 84.47%





ISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY Off Shirley Street
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity Nassau, Bah amas
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price ** . 31 December 2007



Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
*** 31 January 2008

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week A tto rneys for th e Petiti oner






Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths ** 2 January 2008
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV-NetAsset Value ne - 8 February 2008
DIV $ - Divic 2er Share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(3) - 4-for-1 Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

ck Split - Effective Date 7/1 172007

WTO NRADE CALL) CRAL 24@-$00-7010 7 PIDELITY 240-966-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION GALL (242) 904-2808
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18; 2008,

PAGE 7B



PE 1a
Banks still competing

heavily over deposits

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BRINGING major foreign
direct investment (FDI) and
infrastructure projects to
fruition will be key to the
Bahamian economy’s perfor-
mance in 2008, a leading
investment adviser told The
Tribune. ,

He questioned, though,
whether the level of excess liq-
uid assets in the commercial
banking system had fully
recovered from 2006.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, said
that while the Central Bank of
the Bahamas economic report
for December 2007 showed

‘excess liquid assets had
increased by $145.4 million to
close the year at almost $155
million, commercial banks had
recently been competing heav-
ily for.deposits controlled by
his company in its capacity as
an investment manager.

“Two weeks ago, we had
banks crawling all over us for
liquidity, offering us attractive
deposit rates, more attractive
than normal,” Mr Kerr said.
Banks offer high deposits rates
typically when they are having
difficulty attracting money,
forcing them to make the rate
of return more attractive.

Commenting on the Central
Bank’s outlook for 2008, Mr
Kerr described it as “a very

neutral kind of a position. It’s
not too hot and not too cold

without going into details”.

The Central Bank had said:
“The economic prospects con-
tinue to be, on balance, posi-
tive, despite persistently high
oil prices and the continuing
risks of a prolonged slowdown
in the United States economy,
and its potentially negative
impact on both domestic
tourism and real estate mar-
kets in the medium term.”

Mr Kerr, though, said the
main issue was to get projects
such as Baha Mar’s $2.4 bil-
lion Cable Beach redevelop-
ment; the $1.4 billion Albany
Golf & Beach Resort; $867
million South Ocean project;
and the $1 billion Ritz-Carlton
Rose Island, going, along with
the $400 million redevelop-
ment of Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) and
the $130 million-plus New
Providence Road Improve-
ment Project (NPRIP).

“A lot of people are going
to be employed,” said Mr Kerr,
when asked about the impact.

When it came to rising ener-
gy costs and global oil prices,
he added that a likely “thresh-
old” for New Providence resi-
dents would come when the
price of auto gasoline went
past $5 per gallon.

Due to weaknesses in the
public transport system, par-
ticularly its unreliability and
safety, Mr Kerr suggested that
Bahamians were increasingly
going to have to consider car
pooling.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

MARINA INVESTMENTS INC.

Registration Number: 35,974 B

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby: given'that’in accordance with'Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of
2000) the Dissolution of MARINA INVESTMENTS INC.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was 18

January 2008.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas is the Liquidator of MARINA

INVESTMENTS INC.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd.

Liquidator

i

NOTRE mir NGS PVD

.(Peripheral Vascular Disease)

Do you have any of the
following symptoms:

Leg pain when you walk or exercise
Cold feet or legs .

i] Leg pain that goes away when you rest
J] Numbness and tingling in your legs

2) Ulcers or sores that won't heal

You may have PVD (peripheral
vascular disease). Early
treatment of PVD may prevent
heart attack and stroke. Dr.
Delton Farquharson, M.B.B.S.,
ER.C.S.C., General and Vascular
Surgeon, will be conducting a
FREE PVD screening, Thursday,
February 21st, at the Doctors
Hospital Sessional Clinic, by
appointment only.



Dr. Delton Farquharson
Vascular Surgeon

legshart ce

when you walk or exercise?

lana as

SCREENING & CONSULTATION

By Appointment Only

Call: 302-4684

Date: Thursday, February 21st
Time: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

# DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Mealth bar Life



PwectLic NoTiceE

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSE ARCHITECTS

Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliament 1994

Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2009.

NAME
Rodney W. Braynen, F.1.B.A.
B. Arch.

John W. Darville, R.L.B.A.
Dip. Arch., I.B.A

Amos J. Ferguson, F.I.B.A.,
A.P.A. B. Arch., M. Arch.

Anthony J. Jervis, FI.B.A.
B.E.D., B. Arch., M. Arch.

Alvan K. Rolle, I.B.A.
B. Arch. Tech.

Douglas R.A. Smith R.L.B.A.
FI.B.A., Dip. Arch. BSc. MSc.

Gordon C, Major
B. Arch. Tech.

Arthur Colebrook, I.B.A.

Jonathan A. Adderley
LB.A., B.E.D., Dip. Arch.
M.A.,, P.U.G.

Michael C, Alexiou, I.B.A.
B. Arch.

Reginald W. Armbrister
B.Arch.

Neil Behagg, I.B.A.
R.1.B.A. Dip. Arch.

Gaetano . Bonamy
B. Arch.

Trevor Bridgewater
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Victor R. Cartwright
B. Arch.

Ashward G. Ferguson

Winston G. Jones
R.I.B.A., Dip. Arch.
Dip. Urban Design
Kenneth V. Lam
R.I.B.A., M.B.A.

Iram Lewis
B. Arch.

John L. McKenzie
B. Arch.

Clinton W. Pearce
B. Arch.

Andrew O. Stirling, A.A.
R.LB.A., B. Arch.

W. Kevin Sweeting, I.B.A.
B. Art8 Arch. B; Arch.

Benjamin M. Albury
B. Arch.

Frederick D. Albury

B. Arch.

Andre W. Braynen, I.B.A.
B. Arts Arch, Sc., B. Arch.

Sean A. Farrington
B. Sc. Arch. B. Arch.

Michael Foster
B. Sc., B. Arch.

Henry A. Hepburn, R.1.B.A
I.B.A. A.LA. B. Arch.,
M. Arch., M.U.P.

Sean R. Mathews
Dip. Arch.

Charles J. Moss
B. Sc. Arch.

Alicia C-A. Oxley
B. Arch. M. Arch.

David S. White
R.I.B.A., R.A.LC.

Douglas A. Minns, I.B.A.

P. Barry Vanderpool, I.B.A.
B. Sc., M. Urban Design

R. John Paine, R.A.T.A.
B. Arch.

D. Monty Knowles
B. Arch.

Jackson L. Burnside III, I.B.A.
R.1LB.A., M. Arch,

Larry Forbes
B. Arch,

P. Curtis Malone

Jason P. Lorandos, I.B.A.
B. Arch., M. Arch.

David K., Griffiths
Dip. Arch.

Donald A. Dean

P. O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street — Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act 1994, empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons qualified to practice as Professional Architects
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless
he is the holder of a valid licence.” Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offense and is liable on summary conviction to a fine, imprisonment
or both. Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional

ADDRESS

Phone No (242) 393-1874
P. O. Box N-1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P.O. Box N-4556
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-0079
P. O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-2628
P. O. Box N 7273
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-8141
P.O. Box N 7401
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-2600
P. O. Box N 4556
Nassau, Bahamas

P. O. Box 3745
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-4061
P. O. Box N 3745
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8893
P. O. Box N 9585
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-7383
P.O. Box N 672
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 395-1148
P. O. Box EE 16704
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8109
P. O. Box CB 11187
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-2496
P. O. Box AB-20676
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 394-0014
P. O. Box N 8244
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1896
P. O. Box N 4383
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-7334
P.O. Box N 8156
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-1520
P. O. Box SS 5377
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P. O. Box SS 5730
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 361-4972
P.O. Box CR 56998
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-8415
P.O. B ox N 3356
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1463
P. O. Box EE 17989
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7982
P. O. Box SS 5399
Nassau; Bahamas >

Phone (242) 394-8150
P.O. Box!N 3211
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-3552
P.O. Box N 1731
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5916
P. O. Box N-1677

Phone (242) 393-1874
P.O. Box N1423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 465-3738
P. O. Box N 7627
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-3385
P.O. Box N 1190
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-9389
P. O. Box 7248
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P.O. Box SS 19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-5204
P. O. Box F 41247
Freeport,, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-3251
P. O. Box CB 11836
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1547
P.O. Box N 1013
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-4736
P. O. Box N 7936
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-7723
P. O. Box 3729
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2945
P.O. Box CB 11499
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2646
P.O. Box SS 19095
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-1886
P.O. Box N 1207
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-2021
P.O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8045
P.O. Box CB 12835
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 393-4372
P.O. Box CB 11275
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 559-7200
P. O. Box F 40257
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F 41609
Freeport, Grand Bahama



LICENCE #

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LPNS

Bruce LaFleur
A.P.A., A.LA.

B. Sc. Envin. Des., M. Arch.

Michael J. Moss, I.B.A.
Garth W. Sawyer

Neville Bosfield
B. Arch.

Wesley G. R. Thompson
Leo D. Ferguson

Timothy H. Neill, R.LB.A.
I.B.A., Dip. Arch.

John W. McCardy
B. Arch.

Alberto G. Suighi, I.B.A.
Phd. Arch.

Tyrone Burrows
B. Arch.

Dwight M. Thompson
1.B.A., B. Arch.

Jennifer A. Saunders
B. Arch.

Livingston Forbes
B. Arch.

Hiram H. Lockhart
Pier Baldacci
Lawrence Chisholm

Bruce M. Stewart
1.B.A., A.LA., B. Arch.

Michael A. Diggiss
LB.A., B. Arch.

Thomas M. Dean
B. Arch., M. Arch.

Dirk K. Saunders
B. Arch.

Godwin Cargill

Robert Whittingham

* Stephen}, Bain >

B. Arch.

Jeremiah Moxey
B. Arch.

C. Bernardo Deleveaux

Lawrence c. Smith

Harold S. Johnson

Mark W. Henderson, I.B.A.
R.1.B.A., B. Se., B. Arch.

Kevin R. Bryce
B. Se. Arch. Arch. Eng.

Mark A. Smith
B. Arch., MLA

Copeland Moxey
B. Arch.

Carlos J. Hepburn
B. Arch., I.B.A.

Tariq J. O'Brien, R.I.B.A.
B. A. Dip., Arch. Dip.
Uban Design

Mark M. Braithwaite
B. Arts, B. Arch,

Stefan P. Russell
B. Arch., IL.B.A.

Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson
LB.A., B.E.D.S.

Kesna M. Hunt
B. Arch.

lan Brent Creary
B. Arch,

Carlan A. Johnson
B. Arts. Arch Sc.
B. Arch.

Dezon A. Curry

B. Arch., M. Arch.

Jechelle T. Rolle
Bs. Arch, Studies

Wilfred B. Dorsett, 1.B.A.
B. Se. Tech, ‘

PY) Tat)

Phone (242) 328-7240
P. O. Box FH 14435
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-5913
P. O. Box N 7091
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 464-1798
P. O. Box Ex 29276
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-1900
P.O. Box SS 6351
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 557-3718
P. O. Box N 8472
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-5566
P.O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 367-5415
P. O. Box AB 20006
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

Phone (242) 332-2987
P. O. Box EL-25078
Governor’s Harbour
Eleuthera

Phone (242) 327-2335
P. O. Box CB 13177
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 382-0611
P. O. Box N 9876
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3220
P. O., Box CB 13826
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-1411
P. O. Box CB 12364
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9738
P. O. Box N 4230
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-7789
P. O. Box CB 13452
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-4764
P. O. Box N 4674
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-6261
P. O. Box N 9025
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-8800
P.O. Box N 366
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-8916
P. O. Box CB 11388
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 324-1170
P. O. Box N540
Nassau, Bahamas

Pone (242) 557-2308
P. O. Box CR-54122
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-0218
P. O. Box EE-16270
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 322-6591
P. O. Box CB-13846
Nassau, Bahamas

i. Bihuine @42):356-6029. >
P.O Bos N00)

Nagdal Bahdirias

Phone (242) 341-4846
P. O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 325-5103
P. O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 427-1565
P.O. Box N1412
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 364-4694
P. O. Box N 9420
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-3274
P. O. Box CB 12436
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-4538
P. O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 323-0486
P. O. Box SS 6888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone:(242) 457-2107
P. O. Box CB-12689
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 394-5166
P. O. Box CR-54090
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 326-2114
P.O. Box 9116
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 327-7259
P. O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-4982
P. O. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 362-6306
P. O. Box N 402
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 352-4835
P. O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 394-1886
P. O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 356-9080
P.O. Box N 9926
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 424-1541
P.O. Box 29151
Exuma, Bahamas

Phone (242) 328-2767
P.O. Box SB-50045
Nassau, Bahamas



Phone (242) 324-5529
P.O. Box N 842
Nassau, Bahamas

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994

Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional Architectural Technicians” until 31 January
ys pel ) I )

2009.

ADDRESS

Phone (242) 326-8141

Leo A. Miller

P. O. Box 6583
Nassau, Bahamas

Henry A. Delancy

Phone (242) 334-0458

Wemyss Bight, Eleuthera

Michael A. Jones Phone (242)

P.O. Box N 3049
Nassau, Bahamas

Laurin L. Knowles

Phone (242) 337-0025

Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas.

Ryan A, Archer

Phone (242) 367-2001
P.O. Box 579

Marsh Harbour, Abaco

C. Jenkin Williams

Phone (242) 352-2500

P.O. Box F 44107
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Raa)

TO06

TOL

TOLLS

‘1026

Solomon J. Smith

Coralyn T. Adderley

Jermaine Evans

Trevor Butterfield

Brent Key

PY) th

Phone (242) 361-6517
P.O. Box N 10888
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 341-1247
P.O. Box GT-2315
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone (242) 646-3801
P.O. Box F 60283
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 352-7154
P.O. Box F 44042
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Phone (242) 367-4143
P.O. Box AB-20702
Marsh Harbour, Abaco

~~

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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008



$20m trading loss prompts broker/ dealer’s liquidation





NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of MERIH HAINES
late of No. 85, Devonshire Street,
Westward Villas, Western District,

Island of New Providence in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
any claim or demand against the above Estate are
required to send the same duly certified in writing
to the undersigned on or before the 7th March,
2008 after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims
of which they shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make
full settlement on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers

Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street

P.O. Box N-4014

Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Executors



The Abaco Club on Winding Bay, Abaco, is looking to fill the
following positions in its Development Department. This is an
eight (8) year project.

| Project Manager - Construction

*- Minimum 10 years experience in construction management

e Proficient in reading and understanding construction plans

e Proficient in creating and monitoring of construction
schedules

° Assist with development of forecasting and working
budgets

° Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel

° Keen understanding of maintaining aggressive schedules

within planned budgets

¢ Needs good communication, logistical and organizational
skill

ES =e

FROM page 1B

place the company into volun-
tary liquidation. They added
that the regulator approved
this action on February 6, 2008.

However, sources close to
the Securities Commission's
viewpoint said the regulator
approved the voluntary liqui-
dation only on two conditions
— that it appointed and
approved the liquidator, and
that the process would ulti-

mately become court super-

vised.

In addition, The Tribune
understands that once notified
of Caledonia’s situation and
the $20 million trading loss, the
Securities Commission began a

review process that assessed
the company’s internal con-
trols, procedures and risk man-
agement systems.

Hillary Deveaux, the Secu-
rilies Commission’s executive
director, told ‘Phe Tribune:
“Once the Commission had
knowledge of what was going
on, we acted in the best inter-
ests of the investors in Cale-
donia and its clients.”

He declined to comment
further. However, sources told
this newspaper that the Secu-
rities Commission had consid-
ered going to court itself to
have a receiver appointed for
Caledonia, only to find that it
had no power to do so in the
existing Securities Industry Act
legislation. This resulted in the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LAKE VASTHI INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

the dissolution of LAKE VAS'THI INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

West, Centreville,

into voluntary liquidation and Mr. 4

Nassau,

,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)



Notice

Notice is hereby given that on 12 February
2008, by resloution of its Members, Caledonia

Corporate Management Group Limited went

Anthony S.

Kikivarakis of Deloitte & Touche, 2nd Terrace

The Bahamas,

was appointed as the Company’s Liquidator.

Sig ned
Mr. Anthony S

S. Kikivarakis

agreement on the vountaey
liquidation.

Mr Kikivarakis, the liquida-
tor, told The Tribune: “It is a
voluntary liquidation with the
Securities Commission’s sup-
port. It will become a court
supervised one. It always
makes sense to do that in what
may be regarded as con-
tentious liquidations. The reg-
ulators wanted it to be court-
supervised as well.”

Pointing

Pointing out that since Cale-
donia had only been placed
into voluntary liquidation on
February 12, 2008, and that he
had only been at the compa-
ny’s offices for two days when
he spoke to Tribune Business,
Mr Kikivarakis said he would
“oo to the court in short order”
to obtain permission for the
process to be court-supervised.

Adding that he was dealing
with Caledonia clients and any
other interested parties who
had concerns over the liquida-
tion, Mr Kikivarakis said:
“We’re in there fresh, we’re in
there new. I’m getting my feet
wet.”

He is now beginning the
process of interviewing Cale-
donia executives and staff, and
going through the company’s
records, in a bid to ascertain a
irue picture of its condition.

Matthew McNeilly, Caledo-
nia’s chairman, who is cur-
rently travelling to the United
Kingdom, said in reply to The
Tribune’s e-mailed questions
that the liquidation of any
financial services company
would have to be court-super-
vised to ensure the liquidator
was adequately protected by
law.

He wrote: “Caledonia
arranged a meeting with the
Commission on January 22,
2008. The purpose of that
meeting was to propose to the
Commission that Caledonia
move the company into volun-

THE TRIBUNE

tary liquidation.

“The Commission then
reviewed the matter before, on
February 6, 2008, approving,
that Caledonia enter into vol-:
untary liquidation, As a result, ;
Deloitte and Touche have,
been appointed in a court-
supervised voluntary liquida-;
tion.

“T would ask you to note.
that any voluntary liquidation ;
involving a financial services ,
company would be court-.
supervised. This is the only,
way the liquidator can be pro-,
tected throughout the ae
tion process.’

“Mr McNeilly added that.
because Caledonia was now;
under the control of Mr Kiki-

varakis and Deloitte & Touche’

(Bahamas), he could not make.
any comment on the company ,
or the events that had led to,
its voluntary liquidation.

Referring this newspaper to,
the liquidator, Mr McNeilly,
said “any detail on the amount.
involved” — referring to the,
trading loss —- must come from ;
Mr Kikivarakis.

He added, though, that,
there was no truth to rumours-
that Caledonia was attempting .
to reincorporate under a dif
ferent name.

Mr McNeilly, who came to,
the Bahamas in 1996 as gen-,
eral manager of Royal Bank,
of Scotland (Nassau), found-.
ed Caledonia Corporate Man- ,
agement Group in January,
1999, according to the compa-
ny’s website.

The firm expanded on June
1, 2005, when it merged with
Robert Dunkley’s Atlantic,
Asset Management. :

Apart from Mr McNeilly,
other key Caledonia executives -
included former Leadenhall,
Bank & Trust managing direc-
tor, William Jennings, who also ,
served as its managing director, |
and ex-Deltec and Leopold
Joseph banker, Keith Kelty,,
who served as Peon
manager.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCO FRANCOIS of 1250
2ND STREET, APT#201, SARASOTA, FLA 34236, UNITED

‘STATES OF AMERICA, is applying to the Minister resposible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 11TH day of FEBRUARY, 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ Will work closely with larger GC on high-end product
" 3 P se é I 7 Si S . 1

Minimum 5 years of construction site management
experience

Good working knowledge of timber and masonry
construction methods

Working knowledge of construction materials

Proficient in reading and understanding construction plans
Proficient in fielding and resolving daily on-site queries
from contractors

Proficient in performing material take-offs

Proficient in creating construction schedules

Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel

Needs good communication, logistical and organizational |
skills

Quantity Surveyor/Estimator

° Minimum 5 years experience as a QS/Construction
Estimator

* Proficient in reading and understanding of construction
plans

* Proficient in material take-offs and creating Bills of
Quantities

° Proficient in developing forecasting and working budgets

* Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel

° Need good communication and organizational skills

Liquidator
P.O. Box N-7526
Nassau, Bahamas

HIGGS & JOHNSON
242-302-4800 H Co

unsel & Attorneys-at-Law

&



invites applications for attorneys for our Abaco Office. |

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Applicants must have a minimum of 3-5 years |
experience in Litigation and Real Estate &
Development, demonstrate an ability to work].
independently and possess a thorough working |
knowledge and technical competence in the areas
mentioned. (Applicants with experience in only
one of the mentioned areas may also apply).

ISMENA CO. LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
Successful applicants can look forward to
competitive remuneration and benefits.

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

the dissolution of ISMENA CO. LID. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution las been issued and : .
. . Apply in confidence to:
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
Vacancy
P. O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
or via email at: gbastian@higgsjohnson.com

Project Scheduler +
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
e Minimum 5 years experience as a Project Scheduler (Liquidator)
Proficient in reading and understanding of construction
plans
Proficient with Sure-Track scheduler program
Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel ——

Need good communication and organizational skills



Legal Notice Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

Procurement Officer
NOTICE




* Minimum 5 years experience as a Procurement Officer
Detailed understanding of freight and shipping logistics
Proficient with ordering and tracking of construction
materials
Good working knowledge of construction materials
Proficient with Microsoft Word and Excel
Need good communication and organizational skills

PINK PEARL VALLEY INC.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the haiicatic hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 10th day of
January 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,

P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

International Business Companies Act 2000 of BLUE
Warehouse Clerk MANAGEMENT COMPANY LID. ts in dissolution

* Good understanding of construction materials The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 30th January

¢ Good understanding of warehouse procedures 2008. David ‘Pham of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ptd., Build:
° Proficient with Microsoft Excel ing 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 ts the Liquidator of BLUE
MANAGEMENT COMPANY LGD. At persons having clams

against the above-named company are required to send therr address and

Resume should be sent to Nick Sims,
nd Mareh 2008

Development Department,
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay,
P.O. Box AB-20571, Marsh Harbour, Abaco

paruculars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 2

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



e-mail to construction@theabacoclub.com ra fore et, :

OTigusbaer
e



-—-
THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

such trends continued all
Bahamians would end up pay-
ing — literally, in the form of
ever-higher taxes.
Meanwhile, the Central
Bank of the Bahamas’ report
on monthly economic devel-
opments for December 2007,
indicated that the Govern-

ment’s finances for the period

June-November 2007 moved
further into the red compared
to the prior year, the deficit’s
size increasing from $46.8 mil-
lion to $78.4 million.

This is the amount by which
total government spending
exceeds total government
earnings (revenue). The data
released by the Central Bank
for the period showed that rev-
enues were slightly down on
the prior year 2006-2007 per-
formance, while recurrent
spending on fixed costs such
as public service salaries, emol-
uments and rents had
increased.

Total revenues collected in
the five months to November
2007 were down by just 2.28
per cent, standing at $510.2
million compared to $522 mil-
lion the previous year.
Import/customs duties, the
main component of govern-
ment revenues, stood at $215.3
million, a 7.67 per cent increase
upon the previous year’s $199.9
million.

The figures appear to back
up previous assertions by
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, that while
government revenues were
generally keeping pace with
2006-2007 figures, they were
below the 2007-2008 projec-
tions outlined in the Budget.
That, of course, may lead to
debate on whether those rev-
enue projections were too opti-

BAHA MAR

mistic.

On the other side, the Gov-
ernment’s recurrent spending
increased by 3.47 per cent to
$515.1 million, compared to
the previous year’s $497.8 mil-
lion for the first five months,
with the difference in capital
spending between the two
Budget years negligible.

Factor

One factor that increasing-
ly acts as a drag on the Gov-
ernment’s finances is the need
for it to financially support
(some would say bail out)
numerous public corporations
such as Bahamasair, Water &
Sewerage, the Airport Author-
ity, Hotel Corporation, BAIC
and others.

Given that all these subsidy
recipients are also notorious
for delivering poor service,
many Bahamians have openly
questioned why the existence
of some of these entities need

to be prolonged, including Mr -

Lowe.

Urging the Government to
privatise entities such as Water
& Sewerage and Bahamasair,
thus ending their reliance on
taxpayer subsidies, Mr Lowe
told The Tribune that the Gov-
ernment could not financially

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008 , PAGE 9B

eee eens nS a
Fiscal deficit grows 67.5 per cent

support these entities on one
hand without taking with the
other from the Bahamian tax-
payer.

“Tt just can’t continue; it just
can’t,” Mr Lowe said. “Gov-
ernment has got to find a way
to permanently resolve this sit-
uation, or otherwise it will
bankrupt the country. Why
can’t others get these subsi-
dies? Don’t just restrict it to
these government agencies
that don’t seem interested in
providing service.......

“It’s not in the interests of
the average Bahamian for this
to continue, because it’s the
average Bahamian that will
pay for it through higher taxes.
Sooner or later, we’re going to
have to pay the piper.

“I’m not interested in being
like Jamaica, Barbados and
countries that have a worse
GDP to debt ratio than the
Bahamas. You don’t bench-
mark against the worst exam-
ples; you benchmark against
the best examples.”

An almost-$20 million
bailout by the Bahamian tax-
payer helped the Water &

Sewerage Corporation turn
what would have been a $19
million loss into a small six-fig-
ure profit for 2006, with its cur-
rent liabilities exceeding cur-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVNER PETITFOR of 1250
2ND STREET, APT#201, SARASOTA, FLA 34236, UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA,

is applying to the Minister resposible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18TH day of FEBRUARY, 2008 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P-O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd. seeks to hire a

Project/Construction Manager

The Project/Construction Manager is responsible for planning, organizing, supervising
and coordinating the work of consultants, contractors and sub-trades as required
for ‘various projects. They must ensure that the projects meet design, budget,
schedule and quality requirements.

The successful applicant will be responsible for:

e Ensuring the trade contractors are carrying out their work in accordance with
the Contract, including approved method statements and other approved
documents relating to Health & Safety, environmental issues and quality.
Facilitating the work of the contractors, so far as possible, by ensuring the
necessary logistic arrangements are set up and operating

MUST SELL _
VACANT PROPERTY

Lot #14721 comprising 10,000 sq.ft. in area with
83 frontage on Zinnia Road and 120 feet on,
Eastward Drive in Bahama Sound of Exuma Ocean

rent assets by more than $50 Addition West, Exuma Bahamas

million.

This compared to a $3.108
million loss the previous year,
a performance aided by anoth-
er $15.5 million government
subsidy, which covered what
would have otherwise been an
$18.608 million loss.

Meanwhile, the Airport
Authority produced a $43.638
million loss for the Govern-
ment and Bahamian taxpayer
in the first seven years since it
was created, an average of
more than $6 million per year,
with a $13 million subsidy
required to cover its fiscal 2007
losses.

It sustained a $19.569 mil-
lion loss in 2007 before the
Government rode to the res-
cue with a more than $13 mil-
lion subsidy.

The property is undeveloped and is
located 1 mile south of Emerald Bay
and The Four Seasons Resort.

For conditions of the sale and any other
information, please contact:
Credit Risk Management — Collection Unit at:
Phone: 356-1685 or 356-1608,
Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit
offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management - Collection
Unit, PO. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas

Serious enquiries only





Public Hospitals Authority
Advertisement




Two (2) Vacancy For
Emergency Vehicle Driver
Marsh Harbour Abaco



Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the
post Emergency Services Technician (EST) Ill, Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, Public Hospitals Authority.







Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-\

A minimum of five (5) subjects at the B.J.C. level or equivalent
including English Language OR pass the NREMT practical exam
and the BLS (Basic Life Support) with two (2) years relevant ©

experience.









Must also obtain licensure and registration from the Health Pro-
fessions Council.

DUTIES:














_ The Emergency Services Technician III is responsible for provid-
ing basic life support to ill or injured persons including:
* Taking current and past history relevant to event
* Maintaining the airway.
- Manually ventilating a patient.
- Splintering or otherwise immobilizing the body or parts of the
body
* Protecting the confidentiality and dignity of the patient.
* Recording all pertinent information.

WORKING CONDITIONS

Must be able to lift patients, equipments, materials weighing 150
Ibs.

Letters of Application, resume and three (3) references should
be submitted, no later than 22nd February, 2008 to Human Re-
sources Director, Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N-8200 or
3rd Terrace Centerville (West).




& s
v ¥
N, ¥

4 v
Lay ce

Sheraton
Grand Bahama Island

OUR LUCAYA

THE WESTIN

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
~ OUR LUCAYA














Interfacing between contractors

Recording the progress of work and valuation

Carrying out inspections with the contractor to verify that work is in accordance
with the approved standards. Escort other parties, (Local Authority, Consultants,
Clients etc) as requested, to participate in inspections.

Conducting or participating in site meetings as requested and proce written
records.

Creating and executing project work plans and revises as appropriate to meet
changing needs and requirement.

Identifying resources needed and assigns individual responsibilities
Managing day-to-day operational aspects of a project and scope
Minimizing exposure to risk

Managing project budget

Analyzing project cost

Resort RESORT

e

EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY et as
Assistant Financial eee

)

The successful candidate will support. the Director of Finance in the |
achievement of the division's goals and the maintenance of adequate {
internal controls over all areas of-hotel operations. Provide leadership. |
and coordination of all accounting and financial functions of the
company as designated by Director of finance. Establish, gl e-1se) clea

and Ss all secounting records clu financial statements.

Qualifications include:

Extensive knowledge of the general construction industry and the sub trades
Extensive knowledge of construction legal issues including contracts, liens,
labor standards, retainage and other related topics

Ability to perform project management duties for construction projects up to
$150,000,000 effectively and efficiently including but not limited to Budgeting,
Scheduling, QA, Submittals, etc

Ability to identify, troubleshoot and resolve problems on projects before they
become major issues.

Ability to handle multiple tasks at the same time while nyantanine attention
to detail

Ability to work in stressful situations

Ability to juggle departmental resources to.meet deadlines

Ability to read and interpret financial reports

Ability to consistently prepare accurate cost estimates

Ability to successfully negotiate with owner’s, architects, engineers,
subcontractors and suppliers

Ensure Design and Budget is compatible.

Development of assigned Bid Packages.

Excellent written and verbal communication skills

Mitigates team conflict and communication problems

Motivates team to work together in the most efficient manner

Candidate ale possess the following Haat requirements:
Excellent organization and enaietia Sao well as strong
interpersonal, problem solving and customer service skills.
Basic computational and budgetary analysis capabilities. required.
Knowledgeable in rohan] ele lg aber GMa eae Microsoft A
SAP and Delphi. :
Minimum of five years experience in a senior level
finance/accounting position.in the hotel industry.

A Bachelor’s Dearee in egeuiniti: fo) g Cibo field is Say

he

We offer exceptional pay and benefits.
UCM el Ce ML Micelau-lae(-te Mela melg
oN fo CAL La ay) ae A
ourlucayajobs@starwoodhotels.com

Dem Mucins mule
Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya Resort
P.O. Box F-42500
Freeport, Grand Bahama

Please forward your curriculum vitae with salary requirements via e-mail to the

Human Resources Manager at hr@bahamar.com
or fax to (242) 677-9100 no later than February 21, 2008.

All responses will be held in the strictest confidence.


THE TRIBUNE

Credit growth
falls 4.1 per cent
uring 2007

PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008



RTM USAW nA oe LU) an 7

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TAIRA INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company.
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 18th day of
February 2008. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,

P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SLOWING housing and
consumer demand saw the rate
of Bahamian dollar credit
growth in 2007 drop by 4.1 per
cent to 10.5 per cent or $626
million, allowing banking sys-
tem liquidity and the nation’s
foreign currency reserves to
recover somewhat from 2006.

The Central Bank of the
Bahamas report on monthly
economic and financial devel-
opments for December 2007
found that consumer credit for
the full year moderated by
$21.2 million to $215.4 million,
while the pace of mortgage
lending lessened by $33.9 mil-
lion to $300 million.

As a result, private sector
credit growth only expanded
at a 10.2 per cent rate for 2007,
compared to 15.6 per cent the
year earlier, a rate that many
economists and those in the
Central Bank and the Gov-
ernment are likely to have con-
sidered unsustainable.

For the year, the Central
Bank found that excess liquid
assets in the Bahamian bank-
ing system — the assets that are
available to the clearing banks
for onward lending purposes
— increased by $145.4 million to
close the year at almost $155
million, compared to a $103
million contraction the previ-
ous year amid the 2006 credit
boom. ,

The external. reserves
remained flat when it came to

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Kelly's Team
Security Officers

Kelly’s is seeking mature, reliable, honest
and hardworking individuals to fill the
position of Security Officer.

Prospective, candidates must be available to

work evening shifts. Past security experience

would be an asset. This position is ideal for
retired police or prison officers.

We offer a great group of people to work with,
excellent pay, benefits and working conditions.

Interested persons may collect an application
form from the Customer Service counter at
Kelly's Home Centre, Mall at Marathon.

No phone calls please

Houseg

Tel: (242) 393-4002
Home

Fax: (242) 393-4096

‘s



Housing and consumer demand slow, aS
Central Bank adopts ‘neutral’ 2008 outlook
despite 2007 tourist arrival declines

year-to-year comparisons,
standing at just under $455 mil-
lion, an increase of only $2.9
million on the 2006 year-end
total.

Meanwhile, the Central
Bank adopted a ‘neutral’ pos-
ture when it came to the
Bahamas’ economic outlook
for 2008.

It said: “The economic
prospects continue to be, on
balance, positive, despite per-
sistently high oil prices and the
continuing risks of a prolonged
slowdown in the US economy,
and its potentially negative
impact on both domestic
tourism and real estate mar-
kets in the medium term.”

The Central Bank said
December 2007 had again seen
a “slowing in the pace of eco-
nomic activity”, as weakness
in the tourism and construc-
tion sectors more than offset
the seasonal expansion of con-
sumer demand for the Christ-
mas season.

For the first 11 months of
2007, the Central Bank said
total visitor arrivals to the
Bahamas fell by 3.8 per cent
or 0.18 million to 4.14 million,
with air and sea arrivals down
by 1.7 per cent and 4.8 per cent
respectively.

Total visitor arrivals to New
Providence were down by 1.3

Furniture and household
operations saw a 5.26 per cent
price increase over 2007; recre-
ation and entertainment ser-
vices a 3.78 per cent rise; trans-
port and communications 3.72
per cent; food and beverages
3.69 per cent; and medical and
healthcare 3.01 per cent.

For December 2007, the |
Central Bank said proceeds
from the Government’s short-
term US$20 million credit facil-
ity boosted external reserves,
while there was some liquidity
tightening and firming in both
private sector and government
credit.

ye |

2006 Mercedes Benz CLS 500

Limited Edition

Employment Opportunity

The Clifton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of an individual to fill the position of
Managing Director in accordance with Section 15 of the Clifton Heritage Authority Act
~ 2004.

The individual would be required to provide executive leadership, supervision and
direction to units of the Clifton Heritage Authority’s offices and the Heritage Park,
while ensuring, the research and promotion of its historical, cultural and natural
resources.

Duties and Responsibilities:

° Responsible for the implementation of policies, programs and goals and objectives for
the efficient management of the Clifton Heritage Authority.

° Ensures the development and implementation of a strategic plan for the management
of the Clifton Heritage Park ensuring that accepted operating standards and
practices are employed.

° Coordinate and supervise all activities related to safety issues, best environmental
practices, and all matters related to the preservation of historic structures and
conservation of natural resources at the park.

° Serve ad Principal Advisor to the Clifton Heritage Authority Board on matters and
issues relative to the maintenance and upkeep of the park.

° Oversee and coordinate all public and private use of facilities and recreational spaces
at the Clifton Heritage Park and establish user fees.

Liaise with other government, non-government, regional and international agencies to

explore opportunities to promote the sustainable development and management of

the Clifton Heritage Park.

Direct and.coordinate the employment of staff, develop and implement operating

policies, standards and procedures to ensure performance and maintain a stable

working environment.

Conduct periodic assessments of facilities and infrastructure and recommend
"improvements or repairs as necessary.

Prepare and submit a monthly report to the Board of Directors on the operations of

the Authority.

Liase with the Marketing and Public Relations officer to produce material for the

promotion of the Clifton Heritage Park.

P fication:
° Aminimum of a graduate degree in Administration or a related discipline, and/or 10
years experience in an administrative discipline.

Applications are available at the Authority’s Office Collins Avenue and should be
submitted along with resume by 25 February, 2008.

Telephone contact 325-1505.



Fully Loaded; only 7000 miles .
driven in Lyford Cay
JustLike New!

$110,000

ran executive!!!

per cent; off 6.8 per cent for
Grand Bahama; and down 7.4
per cent in the Family Islands.
Consumer inflation for 2007
rose to 2.5 per cent, compared
to 1.8 per cent in 2006, again
‘indicating that Bahamian
~ households, especially those in
the lower and middle classes,
are beginning to feel an
increasing squeeze from a ris-
ing cost of living that is being
driven by global energy prices.

| VACANCY FOR -

FINANCIAL OFFICER

EDUCATION LOAN AUTHORITY

asking:
0

great deal

CONTACT: 702-2015





The Education Loan Authority is a quasi government corporation established
under the Eduacation Loan Authority Act 2002, charged with the responsibility of
raising monies for the Education Loan Guarantee scheme established under the
Education Guarantee Fund Act 2001

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of
Financial Officer in the Educaion Loan Authority ona three (3) years contractual basis.

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPEREINCE:-
¢ Bachelor’s Degree in Business,(with a major in accounting);
* At least five (5) years job experience in accounting;
¢ Knowledge and ablility to apply accounting;

ESSENTIAL DUTIES, RESPONSIBILITIES AND SKILL INCLUDES:-

¢ Review and analyze financial reports provided by our agent and
affiliated committee:

¢ provide overall direction for accounting, budget and cash feces

¢ Prepare and post journal entries

* Reconcile accounts, prepare Income Statement and balance Sheet;

¢ Coordinate the annual external audit;

¢ Any other job that may be assigned from time to time by the Board
or the Chief Administrative Officer;

The Salary range for the post is $30,900 x 700 - $37,600 per annum

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter, resume and documentary
evidence of qualifications and three (3) references to:

Educational Loan Authority

P.O.Box SS-19039
Nassau, Bahamas
No telephone calls will be accepted
“THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

MONDAY, MONDAY 18, 2006 , PAGE 118
" @N-647



- OFFICE OF THE
PRIME MINISTER

NOTICE OF INVESTIGATION

TAKE NOTICE that pursuant to Section 4 of the Acquisition of Land Act,

_ Chapter 252 Statute Laws of The Bahamas 2000, it appears to the Minister

Responsible for the Acquisition and Disposition of Lands, that the Land

_ described In the Schedule hereto Is likely to be needed for the public purpose

of construction of a Public School, other public buildings and for uses related

thereto.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Minister and his servants or

workmen may either generally or specially authorise any person to do all or

any of the following things, namely:-

se PAY

(b)
(c)

(9)

{e)

if

(g)

A copy of the Plan of the said land may be inspected commencing on
the 8th day of February A.D., 2008 at the Department of Lands and Surveys

situate at Bay and Armstrong Streets between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30

Enter upon and survey and take levels of the said land or any
part thereof; |
Dig or bore into the sub-soil of the said land;

Do all acts necessary to ascertain whether the sald land Is
adapted for the public purpose outlined;

Set out the boundarles of the said land proposed to be taken and

the intended line of work (if any) proposed to be made thereon;

Mark such levels, boundaries and line by placing marks and
cutting trenches on the sald land;

For the purpose of carrying out the foregoing {if necessary) cut
down clear any standing crop, fence, tree or bush;

Do all such other acts as may be Incidental to or necessary for

any of the purposes aforesaid.

p.m. on Monday through Friday.

DATED this 7 day of February A.D., 2008

Hubert A. Ingraham
MINISTER RESPONSIBLE FOR

THE ACQUISITION AND DISPOSITION OF LANDS

SCHEDULE

AREA= 2.76 ACRES

All that certain lot piece or parcel of land containing by admeasurement Two and
Seventy-Six Hundredreths (2.76) acres situate between Queens Highway and King’s _
Highway immediately north of Coopers Court in the Northern Limits of Alice Town,
on the island of North Bimini in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Abutting and
Bounding towards the East on King’s Highway towards the South on Coopers
Court, towards the West on Queen’s Highway towards the North on Allotment
Number 28 or however else the same may abut and bound which said lot, piece or
parcel of land is more particularly delineated and shown coloured pink on the

diagram attached.





COMPILED PLAN
SHOWNE

A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING AN AREA 2,76 ACRES
Syuate



BETWEEN QUEEN'S HIGHWAY AND KINGS HIGHWAY
AT THE WUNCTION OF COOPER'S COURT
WW THE NORTHERN UMITS OF ALICE TOWN
NORTH BIMIN) - BAHAMAS

PREPARED AT THE BRSTANCE OF IME SURVEYOR OONERAL







SCALE: 1 INCH = 100 FEET JANUARY, 2008


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



:

Service professions have just four
months over EPA feedback

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN professionals
in industries such as architec-
ture, engineering, accounting
and computer services now
‘have just four months to sub-
mit feedback to the Govern-
_ ment as it crafts its services
- offer for the Economic Part-
- nership Agreement (EPA)

‘with the European Union
(EU), in which this nation
- Must ultimately liberalise up
to 75 per cent of its services
industries.

The above-mentioned pro- '

fessions are among the most
_ &fitical as they are the indus-
. tries that Caribbean countries
. have agreed to liberalise under
. the EPA; meaning that many
‘nations have agreed to open
them to some of what are
termed the ‘four modes of sup-

Open a new account today
and get a chance to win up to

—|$20, hh

twery $100 you de p poe yets you
win in the mor nthly 2 |

t

4 wed



ply’.

These four nodes are the
cross-border supply of services
where, for example, a Euro-
pean firm in the UK provides
a service to a Crribbean-based
firm; consum dtion abroad,
where a service consumer in
the Caribbean travels to the
EU to obtain 1 service; com-
mercial prese ice, where an
EU or Caribbein services sup-
plier establishes a physical
presence in th: other region;
and the prese.ce of natural
persons, where EU or
Caribbean persons enter the
other region to supply a ser-

Offer

Thé Bahamas was given six
months to craft a services offer
after the EPA treaty was ini-
tialed by its neg otiators in mid-

December 2007, meaning that
it has until mid-June to. sub-
mit an offer detailing the
industries it will liberalise,
how, and when.

By making an offer, the
Bahamas will be able to total-
ly ‘reserve’ or exclude up to
25 per cent of its services econ-
omy from the EPA’s liberal-
ization process. It will also be
able to open others up in a
phased liberalisation process
over five, 10, 15, 20 and 25-
year periods.

But if it does not submit an
offer, the Bahamas will be
unable to protect its own eco-
nomic interests. It will then be
left with a choice of not signing
on to the EPA or signing on to
the offer agreed by CARIFO-
RUM, which may not protect
all this nation’s key industries.

Documents produced by the
CARICOM Regional Negoti-

ating Machines (CRNM)
reveal that among the main
sectors CARIFORUM has
agreed to liberalise are
accounting; architecture; engi-
neering; computer and relat-
ed services; research and
development; management
consulting; services related to
manufacturing; telecommuni-
cations services; courier ser-
vices; environmental services;
hospital services; tourism and
travel-related services; enter-
tainment services; and mar-
itime transport.

Sectors

According to the CRNM,
the main sectors chosen by
CARIFORUM countries for
liberalization were “those that
have positive development
aspects, and in which member
states are seeking investment

STH ANNUAL

FUN( WALK

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 23, 2008
SEE REGISTRATION FORM INSIDE

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 327-0806 OR 225-4288

}

» i rye 'y
if , , a ¥
7 it I | wid ec

Rat 4) |



For more information visit any branch of FirstCaribbean International Bank.

Or call:

New Providence - 502-6800/01
Family Islands - 1-242-300-2255

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or new technologies, as well
as sectors that are important to
create economic opportunities
in outsourcing contracts from
European firms”.

CARIFORUM’s main focus
was on liberalizing cross-bor-
der trade and investment, the
group having kept a tight grip
on temporary entry for EU
professionals, limiting this to
contract service suppliers and
independent professionals.

“The CARIFORUM sched-
ule of commitments on trade
in services and on investment
does not include'the Bahamas
and Haiti, which will make
such submissions in the first
half of 2008 for incorporation
in the overall CARIFORUM
schedules within six months of
signature of the agreement,”
a CRNM briefing paper said,
on how professional services
would be treated under the
EPA.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, previously
told The Tribune that the
Government was hoping to
begin consultations with the
private sector on the EPA this
month. The Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce has already
begun meeting with, and brief-
ing, different groups and
industries on the EPA, seeking
any particular concerns they
may have with the agreemen-
t’s provisions.

The CRNM said “all CAR-
IFORUM states” had liberal-
ized some professional services
under the EPA in at least one
of the four supply modes.
While most countries had
avoided making commitments
on legal services, something
that will no doubt please the
Bahamas Bar Association and
its members, the CRNM
pointed out that for sectors
where CARIFORUM had
made commitments on per-

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mitting EU firms to establish a
commercial presence, there
were “automatic commit-
ments” allowing such firms to
bring in ‘key personnel’ and
‘graduate trainees’.

This, of course, implies that
if the Bahamas signs on to the
CARIFORUM offer - with or
without its own services offer —
it will have to modify its Immi-
gration regime to some extent.

Some three years after the
EPA comes into effect, both
the CARIFORUM and EU
are to start meetings on Mutu-
al Recognition Agreements
(MRAs) and the acceptance
of each side’s methods for

‘ accrediting professional stan-

dards.

“With respect to the tempo-
rary movement of profession-
als, disciplines on accounting,
architecture, engineering and
tourism are noted as a priority
for dialogue between the rele-
vant professional bodies in the
Caribbean and Europe, with
a view to signing MRAs no
later than three years after
entry into force of the agree-
ment,” the CRNM said.

Regional

Again hinting at the closer
regional integration the EPA
will produce for the
Caribbean, something that
may spark fears the Bahamas
is being led into a CARICOM
Single Market & Economy
(CSME)-type arrangement,
the CRNM added:

‘““A common regime for pro-
fessional services would cre-
ate a seamless CARICOM
professional services market,
and enable easier negotiations
with external professional bod-
ies of Mutual Recognition
Agreements no later that

could apply equally to all _

member states.”



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INTERNATIONAL BANK
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