Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 104.No.67







Local government

set for Nassau?

UU a

Masked raidiets.
tie-up millionaire’s
wife and sons

THE family of a French mar-
keting mogul was held at gun-
point, tied up and robbed when
two masked men invaded their
luxury home at Old Fort Bay,
The Tribune has learned.

The wife and sons of French
multi-millionaire Fabrice Ker-
hervé were terrorised during
‘the armed home invasion out
West, which was not reported to
the media by police.

When The Tribune inquired
about the incident yesterday,
police remained tight-lipped on
particulars of case.

When asked about the mat-

- ter, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna

said the robbery occurred short-
ly after 10pm on Wednesday.

Mr Kerhervé’s wife Beatrice
was at home, along with two of
her sons, when the armed rob-
bers invaded the residence and
held them at gunpoint.

The family was tied up, a
source confirmed, before the

-men rummaged through the. .

house for cash and valuables.
The gunmen took an undis-

closed amount of cash as well as’

jewellery and other personal
-items.

One of the sons *vag untied

during the ordeal and led down
to the dock where the family
vessel was located so that he
couid untie the boat. He was
then taken back into the home
where he was retied and left
with his mother and brother,
before the robbers made their
getaway in the family’s 25-foot
Boston Whaler.

Mr Hanna said police found

the stolen vessel on Thursday .

morning not far from Old Fort
Bay, but he did not want to
identify the victims, as he
claimed that he did not want to



POLICE have identified
the country’s latest murder
victim as Corey Whyms, 23,
of Theodora Lane, off
Tonique Williams Darling
Highway.

Whyms - the country’s
10th homicide victim of
2008 - was standing with a
group of men on the western
side of Adderley Street after
8pm Thursday night when a
small dark car pulled up and
stopped near the group.

There was an argument
between the car’s occupant
and Whyms who, after being
shot, ran to the eastern side
of the street where he col-
lapsed and died. Investiga-
tions are continuing.



' “expose anyone.”

However, high-ranking police
officials have confirmed to The
Tribune that the Kerhervé fam-
ily were the victims.

Mr Kerhervé was not at.
home during the robbery and
his wife and children were
unharmed during the ordeal,
police report.

Mr Kerhervé is president of
KGC Networks, a marketing
system based in 33 countries,
according to the company’s
website.

This armed home invasion of
a wealthy French family comes
weeks after insurance executive
Franklin Nesbitt was kidnapped

from his Love Beach home — a:

short distance from the Ker-
hervés’ property.

On that occasion, Mr Nesbitt
was taken to his Collins Avenue

General Brokers office by two

masked men. They tried to
force him to open the company
safe, but were unsuccessful.
During the ordeal, Mr Nesbitt
was gun-butted and tied up
before the kidnappers left him
at his office. |

A former resident of the Old
Fort community, who wished to
remain anonymous, told The
Tribune yesterday that numer-
ous armed home invasions have

-occurred’in the area over r the

last few months.

A 64-year-old woman was
tied up and robbed in the Old
Fort area in January when she
returned home. She was forced
in her home by two men, tied
up and robbed. Her car was
stolen in the incident.

Another armed home inva-
sion occurred across from the
Nesbitt residence, the source
said, around the same time the
insurance boss was kidnapped
in January.

In this instance, he said, an
entire family was tied up, and
one of the women in the house

was struck by the robbers
‘because she was making “too

much noise.” |

Another prominent business-
man, said the source, was held
up in his driveway in Old Fort
last year, and robbed of his
Rolex watch. |

One Old Fort resident The
Tribune is aware of is now
about to sell his home after an
armed home invasion last year.

Burglary — overnight break-
ins — increased by a shocking
43 per cent last year in the
Bahamas compared to 2006.

Police have been unable to
solve the bulk of these crimes.
The 2007 crime statistics reveal
an abysmal 10 per cent police
detection rate.for burglaries.

Their detection rate for
housebreaking and shopbreak-
ing were even lower as the,num-
bers stood at six and eight per
cent in 2007 for these crimes
respectively. No-one has been
arrested by police thus far for
the Kerhervé robbery.

The Tribune

ANY TIME...ANY PLA¢



BAHAMAS EDITION:

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008



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“No contract renewal’ ree



ord Cay Club’s top man

a By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

- By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The contract of controversial expat Lyford Cay
Club managing director Didier Picquot will not be
renewed when it expires i in March, The Tribune

has learned.

Secretary-general of the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU) Leo
Douglas confirmed yesterday that the union had
“received assurances” to this effect.

said.

Mr Picquot has. been a focus of frustration and

anger from the union since taking the job. Many
staff have complained about Mr Picquot’s alleged-
ly “disrespectful” and excessively harsh attitude

towards them.

The union claims he has huinhipaiea the organ-
isation in its efforts to serve members, and is par-

However, he.said union members at the club -

about 180 of them - continue to call with com-
plainis about the manager. “They’re still very

upset and wondering why it is taking so long,” he



Anna Nicole Smith’s former
partner Howard K Stern has
marked the anniversary of her
desih by creating a charity in
he" name.

_ !l donations through Feb-
ru. .y, 2008, will assist a chari-
ty in the Bahamas for under-
privileged and at-risk youths
that Anna 2 oe wanted to
heip.

Reyond that, the charity will
benefit charitable causes that
‘Apna Nicole supported dur-

Charity is created in
Anna Nicole’s name

ing her life: children, the elder-
ly, and the treatment and cure

_of AIDS.

Lawyer Stern released a
statement yesterday, one year
to the day after Smith was
found dead in her Florida
hotel room after overdosing
on drugs.

He is appealing for dona-
tions to the Anna Nicole and
Daniel Wayne Smith Charita-
ble Foundation, which also
remembers the star’s son, who



ticularly disturbed about his alleged involvement
in a decision to have “dogs set on” union execu-
tives on the club’s property in November when
they arrived for what they maintain was a sched-
uled meeting.

Meanwhile, earlier this month Commonwealth
Bank chairman T. Baswell Donaldson also com-
plained of Mr Picquot’s behaviour when he was
allegedly “embarrassed” by the manager during

SEE page 8







died aged 20 in September,
2006.

Stern writes: “Today is
extremely difficult for those of
us who were close to Anna
Nicole. In memory of Anna
Nicole and her son Daniel, we
have created the Anna Nicole
and Daniel Wayne Smith
Charitable Foundation.”

He adds: “Hopefully, it will
grow, help more people each
year, and eventually be headed
by her daughter Dannielynn.”














pas any
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up all mane

yea Oi da

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24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



Sehiaes
sought to
sue over

court

delays”

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

. LOCAL businessmen and
lawyers are exploring legal
avenues to sue the government
for failing to bring cases of seri-
ous offences before the courts
within a reasonable time.

One businessman, Lynden
Nairn, speaking on the GEMS
105.2 talk show The Way For-
ward yesterday, even went so
far as to pledge resources
towards retaining lawyers who

_ are willing to fight for this cause.

Mr Nairn said the Attorney
General’s Office, and the gov-
ernment on the whole; should
be held accountable whenever a
serious crime is committed by
someone who was out on bail
for a previous crime because his
original case was nat heard
within the time prescribed by
law.

“The entire population
should sue the government of
the Bahamas because their inac-
tion has led to a heightened
sense of fear and increased the
expenditure to protect ourselves
from those released on bail,”
he said.

Mr Nairn said he would argue
that the Attorney General’s ©
Office and the government have
“knowingly, repeatedly and
negligently aided and abetted
in rendering ineffectual the Bail
Act, which was passed by the
people’s parliament for their
protection.”

Also speaking as a guest on
the talk show yesterday, lawyer
and social activist Paul Moss
said he believes that legally
there are avenues to sue the
government for accountability.

“T believe there is a premise
that can be looked at in our
courts to bring an action against
the persons who are in charge,”
he said.

Mr Moss, one of the PLP’s
hopefuls for the St Cecelia seat
in 2012, said it is not good
enough to hold governing par-
ties accountable at the voting
polls every five years.

“A life is lost and someone
must be accountable,” he said.

Businessman Mr Nairn said
that, in his view, “democracies
ought not to work only around
polls every five years.”

“When persons are not
accountable we have a fractured
democracy. When there is a
absence of transparency as
exists today, and has existed for-
ever in this country, we have a
fractured democracy,” he said.

Mr Moss said that with 80-
plus murders in 2007 and
already 10 murders in the new 4

SEE page 8





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

Local government’
expansion to Nassau
under consideration

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said that
the government is giving con-
sideration to expanding local
government to Nassau.

Mr Ingraham was speaking
at the sponsorship luncheon on
Fyiday held at the Our Lucaya
Resort to announce that the
Bahamas will be hosting the
Commonwealth Local Govern-
ment Conference in 2009.

The conference - which is to
be held on Grand Bahama - is a
major international event which
is being held for the first time in
the Caribbean region.

In his short keynote address,
Mr Ingraham welcomed con-
ference secretary general Carl
Wright to the Bahamas. He not-
ed that the local government
conference has special signifi-
cance to the Bahamas.

“Elected local government

MAIN SECTION
Local. NEWS fot OOO) 6, Y 8 10 11 12
Editorial/Letters. .......:ececee

SPORTS SECTION
Sports oe 2,3,4,5



long and we come to a place
(Freeport) where local govern-
ment has been practiced largely
through the private sector in the
last 50-plus years, and in more
recent times through ourselves.

“We hope that, in the time,
the Port Authority will finish

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Weather... SR

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKEND EDITION 8 PAGES



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has not been with us for very

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham (pictured right, centre) meets with
officials of the Commonwealth Local Government Forum (seated left) at
he Office of the Prime Minister, Freeport on Friday. Following the
meeting, Prime Minister Ingraham and officials took part in the official

launch of the CLGF Conference slated for Freeport in May 2009. The
launch was held at the Great Harbour Cay Room, Westin at Our Luc

its fight so they will be able to
restructure their private sector
to even have more public sector
participation.”

“It should come at a time
when we are giving considera-
tion to expanding local govern-
ment to the capital city. We are
a very centralised form of gov-
ernment in the Bahamas and
we would like to delegate and
pass on responsibilities of many
things to communities,” said Mr
Ingraham.

The conference will attract
600 high-level politicians and
practitioners from 52 countries,
and is expected to bring a sig-
nificant economic boost to
Grand Bahama.

During his address, the prime
minister admitted that jobs are
scarce in Grand Bahama.

He said: “I shant speak long,
I know jobs are not plentiful in
Freeport and those of you who







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Mr Ingraham said to the visi-
tors present: “I wish to welcome
you to the Bahamas. It is our
honour and responsibility to
host this important conference —
this has special significance to us
in the Bahamas.

“Many members of the Com-
monwealth have a lot of expe-
rience in local government and
we hope to access talent and
expertise from yourselves .. .
and begin discussions about
expanding, strengthening, and
deepening local government
and so the government is hon-
oured that you are here,” said



AML ddl WELLE

Mr Ingraham.

Robert Montague, Minister
of State for Local Government
in Jamaica, said the conference
is not only very important for
the Bahamas, but also for the
Caribbean.

“Tt is the first time this con-
ference is being held in the
region. We want to show the

THE TRIBUNE



eo Minister Hubert Ingraham addresses the conference.

rest of the world that the
Caribbean is a world-class cen-
tre for important international
events.

“In May, 2009, the eyes of the
local government world will be
on the Bahamas - two billion
people will be watching you. I
say to you captains of industry,
you will have persons right here

. to look at your products, so



get your products out,” he said.

Mr Montague said it is impor-
tant for local government in the
region to show that democracy
is thriving. He encouraged the
private sector to support the
upcoming conference.

Sidney Collie, Minister of
Lands and Local Government,

said government is looking for-
ward to hosting the conference
in the Bahamas.

He said it will give the coun-
try the opportunity to showcase
its best to a very large contin-
gent of delegates from 52 coun-
tries and two billion people
from around the world.

The Commonwealth Local
Government Conference is held

every two years. The previous
conference was held in New
Zealand.

A significant number of peo-
ple from the Caribbean, as well
as persons from Asia, Africa,
Europe, and the Pacific will be
attending the conference in the
Bahamas.

Elbow Cay subdivision
protests ‘dying

PROTESTS over a new sub-
division development at Hope
Town, Abaco, appear to be
dying down, locals said yester-
day.

Two groups protested over
US lawyer Mark Mason’s plan
to build 52 homes on 15 acres at
Elbow Cay.

“But it seems the whole thing
will be going ahead,” a source
told The Tribune.

Mr Mason, from the Caroli-
nas, bought the land from long-
term resident Robert Maltarp, a
Canadian.

He wants to build small,

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Bahamian-style houses on the
picturesque island, one of the
gems of the Bahamas.

“All the work is being done
by local contractors,” said the
source. “Work has already
started on the roads and it looks
like Mr Mason’s troubles are
over.”

ONE of Marsh Harbour’s
vest-known restaurants has
been sold.

Wally’s Restaurant, launched
by Mr Wally Sinith in the 1960s,
has been run in recent years by
his daughter, Maureen.

Now she has sold it to an
unknown buyer who reportedly
plans to appoint a manager to
run the operation.

MINISTER of Local Govy-
ernment Sidney Collie will be
in Abaco on February 18 to

down’

hear town planning appeals.

On the agenda is a contro-
versial condo project near the
ferry dock in Marsh Harbour.

Locals have protested that
the three-block development is
out-of-scale on its waterfront
site.

They also complained that
the three-storey units broke
height restrictions.

A Nassau attorney is behind
the development.

ABACO?’s annual Junkanoo
parade takes place on Febru-
ary 21 with at least three senior
government figures in atten-
dance.

Tourism Minister Neko
Grant, Education Minister Carl
Bethel and Minister of State for
Culture Charles Maynard will
be at the event, to be held in
Marsh Harbour.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 3



ee a Orn ee a
More than 400 migrants

caught in Bahamas waters

US Coast Guard
‘extremely busy in the
Windward passage in
the last three weeks’

HE U S Coast Guard
has reported that it
intercepted more
than 400 suspected illegal
immigrants in Bahamian
waters in the last three weeks.

A 210-foot Coast Guard
ship assigned to patrol the
windward passage and the
southern Bahamas region
intercepted a 30-foot Haitian
sailing sloop 25 miles south-
east of Acklins Island on
Thursday.

Although only 15 Haitian
nationals were initially visible
on the weather decks of the
sloop when sighted by Coast
Guard aircraft patrolling in
the region, the U S Coast
Guard confirmed there were
actually 73 Haitian nationals
onboard.

Each of the 73 migrants
were safely transferred to the
Coast Guard ship and will be
directly repatriated to Haiti
within the next few days, the
Coast Guard said.

The U S Embassy said in a
statement yesterday that
Coast Guard ships and aircraft
have been “extremely busy in
the windward passage within
the last three weeks assisting

in the protection of the shores
of the Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Islands.”

Since 18 January the Coast
Guard interdicted four over-
loaded sailing sloops from
departure points in Haiti
attempting to land in the
Bahamas and the United
States.

Other recent Haitian sloop
intercepts made by the U S
Coast Guard in the windward
passage include:

e Saturday, February 2 — the
Coast Guard intercepted a 40-
foot Haitian sloop 30 miles
southwest of Great Inagua
with 131 Haitian nationals
onboard.

All 131 were transferred to
the U S Coast Guard ship and
repatriated directly back to
Port Au Prince on Tuesday,
February 5.

¢ Monday, January 21 — the
Coast Guard intercepted a 40-
foot Haitian sloop just south
of Santo Domingo Key with
163 Haitian nationals
onboard. All were safely
transferred to the Coast
Guard cutter and the empty
sloop was then sunk, report-
edly because it was a hazard to

passage.

AN

ERNE



maritime navigation. All
‘migrants in this case were
repatriated to Port-au-Prince
by the cutter.

e Friday, January 18 — the
Coast Guard intercepted a
northbound, 40-foot Haitian
sloop 11 miles southeast of
Great Inagua with 80 Haitian
nationals onboard. All 80
migrants were safely trans-
ferred to the Coast Guard ship
and repatriated to Port-au-
Prince within a few days.

In total since mid-January,
the Coast Guard has inter-
cepted a total of 447 Haitian
migrants who were directly
repatriated back to Haiti.

Such direct repatriations by
the U S Coast Guard — in lieu
of transfer and detention in
the Bahamas — have saved the
government of the Bahamas
an estimated $97,000 in repa-
triation costs, said the U S
Embassy in a statement.

To supplement the maritime |
efforts of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, the U S Coast
Guard maintains at least one
multi-mission ship in the wind-
ward passage and southern
Bahamas region year round.

As part of the U S and

‘Bahamas Comprehensive

Maritime Agreement, U S
Coast Guard ships patrol with
a trained member of the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force
who assists in all maritime law
enforcement matters in
Bahamian territorial waters.

U S Coast Guard aircraft
also assist in these efforts
through daily flights covering
vast portions of the Bahamian
maritime region.

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An Acklins man: has
alleged that his livelihood is
suffering because of inaction
and ineptitude on the part of
local government officials on
the island.

He claims they gave him
the wrong plans for a local
public works project.

The man is calling on his
island’s representative,
MICAL MP Alfred Gray, to
right the situation.

Clinton Rolle told The Tri-
bune yesterday that he was
awarded the contract to build

January of last year. .

Local government, he
claimed, later acknowledged
after he had almost completed
the work that they had not
provided him with the correct
plans for the project.

“It was the wrong size,” he
‘said.

He then calculated that he
would require an extra $8,000
to $10,000 to complete the job
required.

Mr Rolle said that in Feb-
ruary, 2007, he wrote to the
Local Council Board, as well
as to Chief Councillor Raw-
ston Cox and Mr Gray, point-
ing out the mistake and
requesting the additional
money.

Receiving no response, he
was forced to stop work on
the court in early March,



Acklins resident



a public basketball court in-







when it was around 75 to 80
per cent finished, because of
lack of funds.

Mr Rolle said he has yet to
hear from Mr ‘Cox or Mr
Gray in relation to the matter
and while he is uncertain, he
believes that “politics” may
be involved.

Meanwhile, the court sat
untouched until yesterday,
said Mr Rolle, when he saw
another set of workmen on
the site.

“They never gave me a let-
ter of termination or anything
but I see other people work-
ing on the job,” he said.

Mr Rolle said he has been
unable to pay his bills, includ-
ing some workmen, because
of the money shortage.

“Even if they don’t give me
the money to complete the
job I would like to pay the
persons that I owe,” he
added.

His frustration was height-
ened because, he alleges, oth-
er people awarded contracts
for works on the island,
including docks and other
recreational facilities, were
paid in full by local govern-
ment officials despite no work
yet having been done on
those projects.

Messages left for Alfred
Gray and Mr Cox seeking
comment were not returned
up to press time.





























peers Moss targets St Cecilia

contract woes hit

nomination for the PLP

Says Cynthia Pratt
has indicated she
will not run in 2012

= By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEY and social
activist Paul Moss has
announced that he wants the
nod from the Progressive Lib-
eral Party to run as its candi-
date in the St Cecilia con-
stituency in the next general
election.

The current MP, deputy
leader of the PLP Cynthia Pratt,
has reportedly indicated that
she will not run in the 2012
election, Mr Moss told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Mrs Pratt is recouping at
home from a bout of tendonitis
to her upper left hip and has
opted to possibly avoid the
House of Assembly when it
next sits in order to properly
heal the problem.

On Wednesday, Mrs Pratt
tried to visit the House for the
duration of its sitting. However,
a continual sharp pain from the
tendonitis forced her to return
home.

“Pm not where I want to be
yet, but I’m better than I was. I

At the time, Mrs Pratt said
she would not be making any
decisions about her future as
deputy leader, other than she
intends to continue to serve the
people of St Cecilia to the best
of her ability.

“Tm going to still serve my
people. I gave them my word
that I will serve them, and I am
going to do that. As I said, I will
discuss my future at the con-
vention when I make my speech
to the nation. But in terms of
serving, I will serve my people.
I have given my word, and I
have to live by my word,” she
said.

While admitting that he has
not received the go-ahead to
run in the area as yet from par-
ty leader Perry Christie, Mr
Moss said ‘he is one of those
who have been working the
area for some time, and he will
continue to work it.

“I believe I will be success-
ful. No doubt the party needs
the kind of things that persons
like me can deliver. That is lead-
ership, experience, and wisdom
to assist in the growth of this
country,” Mr Moss said.

Commenting on his ties to St

‘Yhe Matl-at-Marathon

don’t know if I will go in next — Cecilia, Mr Moss said hie grew - The Mat
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

week, but maybe the following
week hopefully I will be in top
shape to get back to the helm,”

up in the area, and still enjoyed
the support of many young peo-
ple in the community.

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 8TH, 2008 __

ROSCOE JENKINS NEW | 1:00



been accepted for an MA
course in publishing at the Uni-
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Ms Marquis, 21, graduated
last year with a BA(Hons)
degree in history from the Uni-
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Canada, and is now working in

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

Solutions for

the ‘House’
on Justice

f

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hopr.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Needed: tobacco non-proliferation treaties

WACO, Texas — The United States
should work with the United Nations to
pass tobacco nonproliferation treaties.

The World Health Organization esti-
mates tobacco use will kill 1 billion people
in the 21st century unless governments
aggressively curb the spread and use of

. tobacco. Responsible governments felt

that it was imperative to pursue treaties to
stop the spread of arms and nuclear
weapons for the sake of humanity. They
should make an effort to vanquish tobacco
products for the same reason.

The WHO Report on the Global Tobac-
co Epidemic, 2008, according to The Asso-
ciated Press, urges all nations to dramati-
cally increase efforts to prevent young peo-
ple from beginning to smoke, help smokers
quit and protect nonsmokers from expo-
sure to secondhand smoke.

Many people are willing to accept hun-
dreds of thousands of needless deaths
annually when it comes to the use of tobac-
co but deeply mourn only a fraction of
those deaths caused by military action.

Though government studies estimate
that 500,000 Americans die every year

from tobacco-related diseases, Congress.

refuses to give the Food and Drug Admin-
istration the power to regulate tobacco
products.

In a 16-month period, more Americans
are killed by tobacco than all the com-
bined battle deaths that occurred during
the Civil War, World War I, World War II
and the Korean War, as well as the wars in
Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq. The total
battle deaths of those wars come to
642,447.

How many of those'battle deaths could
have been prevented remains a subject of
debate since wars often must be fought to
preserve independence and freedom.

There is no debate, however, on the
number of tobacco-related deaths that can
be prevented — all of them.

A major obstacle in establishing an inter-
national effort to reduce tobacco deaths
was spelled out in the WHO report. Gov-
ernments around the world collect more
than $200 billion in tobacco taxes every
year. Out of all those revenues, the report

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said less than one fifth of 1 per cent of
that revenue is spent on tobacco control.

That should come as no surprise to
Americans who have seen their politicians
go out of their way to avoid placing
restraints on the tobacco companies that
pump campaign donations into campaign
coffers.

In 1965, cigarette packages manufac-
tured in the United States were required to
carry.a warning label that said: “Cigarette
smoking may be hazardous to your
health.”

In 1970, the warning labels were changed
to say: “The surgeon general has deter-
mined that cigarette smoking is danger-
ous to your health.”

These warning labels were a boon to
American tobacco companies. The labels
were used to prevail over lawsuits attempt-
ing to recover damages for the death and
maiming caused by cigarette smoking.

Their customers were warned, argued
the tobacco companies, and they chose to
ignore the warnings.

Despite the lack of assistance from the
nation’s capital, lawsuits started going
against the tobacco industry. Cities, states
and business leaders successfully pushed
for laws, ordinances and rules that curbed
smoking.

In 2006, a federal judge ruled that tobac-
co companies have violated civil racke-
teering laws by conspiring for decades to
deceive the public about the dangers of
their product.

A Harvard study early this year con-
cluded that cigarette makers have for years
deliberately increased nicotine levels in
cigarettes to make them more addictive.

Congress still refuses to give the FDA
power to regulate tobacco products that
ar. increasingly being marketed in foreign
countries.

Unless the United States works with the
United Nations to control the spread and
use of tobacco products worldwide, it
appears likely that tobacco will kill 1 billion
people by 2100.

(This article was written by Rowland
Nethaway of the Waco Tribune-Herald —
Cox News Service). .








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EDITOR, The Tribune.

COMPLAINT after com-
plaint has overwhelmed our
media concerning crime, pover-
ty, illegal immigration and var-
ious other social ills. The cry for
a cure comes from all quarters
of this beautiful nation and
many persons have expressed
sound commentaries on these
topics.

As to the negative portions
of these commentaries, this
writer refuses to partake. Fur-
thermore, one notices that the
quality of discourses tend to
weaken when negative com-
mentaries are not accompanied
by solutions. Therefore, in this
two-tiered commentary, con-
cerning our present state of
affairs, one hopes that solutions
can be found.

The Justice System: Firstly, it
should be clarified that this term
is being used loosely here to
encompass all those agencies
and establishments that deal
with the courts, be they public
or private entities, be they pros-
ecution or defence.

Citizens, and rightly so, are
concerned with the rise in
crime, the perceived lack of
punishment of wrongdoers,
speedy recourse to civil reme-
dies and the access to justice
generally. However, it is very
disconcerting to see that due to
the political polarisation of this
country, the most astute, even
the most venerable, have not
stepped forward and offered
solutions to solving these vexing
problems.

Additionally, we know that
it may be rather difficult for par-
ty loyalists to believe but most
of the disintegration in values
that we see in most of our insti-
tutions actually began with the
disintegration in the values of
the men and women that ‘we’
have placed in Parliament. This
‘hate’ mentality displayed in
Parliament is astounding. I have
yet to see party colleagues scold
one of their own for displaying
unprofessional behaviour
towards an opposing member
of the House. Agreeably this is
a broad position to take but
unfortunately, the conduct dis-
played in Parliament is now tan-
tamount to tribalis u.

Sadly, we the citizens of this

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net




country have followed our lead-
ers down this path of character
assassination through ‘name-
blaming’ and destruction. This is
unfortunate because we the
electorate have revered our
politicians so much that we have
inadvertently transferred all
power to them. Equally unfor-
tunate is the fact that we have
become comfortable being lord-
ed over by them. This is evident
in the way we applaud when
our respective party spend their
first 18 months in office head-
hunting while neglecting to fix
the problems at hand.

In taking precaution, the fol-
lowing statements are expressed
solely to highlight the powers
of Parliament. Firstly, Parlia-
ment is directly responsible for
amending all statutes in this
country. Never be fooled, it is
not a judge’s responsibility to
change law nor is it the former
administration’s job. This blame
game has been going on for so
long by Parliamentarians, that
they have successfully been able
to move the public’s focus off
their inability to formulate pro-
gressive policies and legislation.

Further, if the public has
problems with alleged criminals
being let out on bail, then check
with Parliament, they have to
amend the Act, not the court. If
criminal trials are not progress-
ing fast enough through the sys-
tem, then go to Parliament, they
are the ones who set the budget
for the Attorney General’s
Office. Parliament is the one
that set judge’s remuneration
packages. They are the ones
that allocate funding for the
building of courtrooms. If there
is alleged abuse by the police,
then see Parliament, they have
no interest in introducing a
Police and Criminal Evidence
Act (PACE) to govern police
conduct, interviews, investiga-
tions and length of time in cus-
tody but see them anyway. As
for civil remedies, it is the same
thing and the list goes on.

Justice House: the second
part of this commentary con-

THE TRIBUNE

cerns a building structure of the
previous mentioned name. The
suggested location of this build-
ing is the southern end of the
property (a paid parking lot)
located on Shirley Street oppo-
site the Sandringham House
building. The northern end of
that very same property can be
used for parking.

This seven-storey structure
will house all of the Supreme
Courts, an International Arbi-
tration Centre (to be fully
developed in another letter),
the Supreme Court Registry, all
Registrars Chambers, stenog-
rapher’s offices, libraries and
small conference rooms for pri-
vate counsel.

Additionally, there should be
two media rooms, with copiers,
fax, internet access, vending
machines, telephones and video
links to each court for the news
reporters. Clearly, media hous-
es will pay an annual subscrip-
tion to use these rooms and ID
and ‘swipe’ cards would be
mandatory.

Just south of this property is
the old nurses training centre,
located on Sands Lane, which is
the road leading to the Princess
Margaret Hospital. This build-
ing can be converted into a
police station with holding cells
for all persons with matters
before the court. On the eastern
boundary of this property, an
access road, from Shirley Street
to Sands Lane, should be built
for the use of Judges and Reg-
istrars only.

There are so many other
aspects to this vision, however,
this is just an overview of an
idea that if executed correctly,
can bring tangible, practical and
aesthetic solutions to our coun-
try’s self-esteem and interna-
tional image.

Again a.,dream placed on
paper for the world to see. Who
will dare stand in Parliament
today and say that this coun-
try’s duty of care towards our
fellowman has all but disap-
peared; who will stand and say.
that the country cannot survive
another decade of doing busi-
ness as usual.

DWAYNE J HANNA
Nassau,
January 31, 2008.

ress will
overnance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I can't speak for the rest of
the country, but personally I'm
thoroughly fed up with the
unending vitriolic exchange
between the government and
opposition. To add insult to
injury, the main focus of The
Tribune's editorial and Mon-
day’s column these days seems
to be purely on scorching Mr.
Christie and his followers.

I'm not excusing or exoner-
ating the PLP or the Christie
government of their poor gov-
ernance and their many political
debacles of the last five years,
however the present govern-
ment has done very little during
their first nine months in office
other than to pontificate on and
gloat over the already well doc-
umented failures of their pre-
decessors.

The Tribune possesses for-
midable literary talent and it is

a shame to see it wasted on
chastising only the opposition
when the présent administra-
tion should also have their feet
held to the fire for their lack of
affirmative action in dealing
with our country's many press-

- ing issues. By and large, all we

have had to date from them is
lip service; they are far from
perfection and must be made
aware that people who live in
glass houses shouldn't throw
stones.

It's time to put an end to the
blame game, stop fighting like
little boys over a bag of mar-
bles, and get on with what you
were elected to do, GOVERN!

In closing, I might add that
an objective and unbiased press
would help considerably in
pointing the way forward.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
January 31, 2008.

Port must go

EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE allow me space in
your newspaper to express my
views on the move of the Nas-
sau port from Bay Street to
Clifton Pier. In my opinion, this
would be a move in the right
direction. Bay Street is a promi-
nent tourist area, and I feel that
the existing port not only cre-
ates congestion and pollution,
but is also a complete eyesore.
This move would also give
access to prime sea front prop-
erty that can be used to further
enhance our tourism product.
Consideration needs to be

given to the inevitable growth
over the coming years. The
group contracted to research
this project stated that Bay
Street will not be able to accom-
modate the volume over the
next 30 years. This, however, ts
an issue that our government
needs to pay close attention to,
It is just a matter of proper
planning, because this move is
both technically and economi-
cally feasible.

SAM-ME
Nassau,
February 5, 2008.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS 7



m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

“IT vex at how reckless these
no-good jitney drivers are!
My car gone in the shop last
week and so I had to catch
the number 15 home, and I
been in fear of my life every
night. I lost count of how
many times one
crazy bus driver
run the red light,
turned corners
like a fire was
behind him or
speed like he
ain’ get no
sense.

“Not to men-
tion the damage
to my eardrums
with that loud
music they have
to blast. How do
these people get
drivers licenses?
Traffic on the
road is a mess
but trust me as soon as my
car get fix I ain’ stepping my
pinkey toe on another jitney.”

— Maxine S, Robinson
Road

“[T vex because I almost
break my car right up on one
big pot hole on Shirley Street.
And on Sunday I saw a three
car accident on that road just
cuz someone fall in that pot
hole.

“Every month someone’s
birthday comes up and they
have to go and renew their
car’s licence and insurance.
We paying the government
thousands of dollars every
month to drive on these
messed up roads what
breakin’ up people car. I
don’t think that’s fair — you
mise’well just walk where you
gat to go.”



Why you Vex?





— Frank R, Marathon

“You know why I vex?
Because | don’t think our
government is setting a good
example for Bahamian chil-
dren. When a member of par-
liament is trying to give a
speech in the House of
Assembly, persons elected
into office carry on like they
in a fishmarket throwin’
insults and jeers
at one another,
giving no
respect to the
lady or gentle-
man who is
speaking.

“Then they
tell the children
in schools to be
polite, quiet and
respectful of
others. How
they expect
young people to
take them seri-
ous when you
could turn on
the TV and see
them acting
worse than lil’ chirren?”

— Darren W, Sea Breeze.







“IT vex about how they have
that road, Tonique Williams
Darling Highway, set up. If
there is a lil’ fender bender
or a car breaks down on that
highway, traffic is be backed
up for miles. Ain’t no space to
push a car on the side, traffic
is be jammed right up, and its
dangerous at night because it
can cause even more acci-
dents.

“They need to rethink how
they have that road planned
out.

And when you think they
ga’ fix that red light by Bar
20 corner? That light never
workin’. Man, they need to
do better than that,”

— Cedric S, Carmichael





; Road
MP concerned

at high level of
road accidents

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The high
number of injuries caused by
traffic accidents should be a
matter of great concern,
according to Grand Bahama
MP Kwasi Thompson.

“One need only visit the
accident and emergency cen-
tres of our medical institutions,
or visit the hospital wards —
especially the orthopaedic
ward,” said Mr Thompson.

He was speaking at the
opening the first Road Traffic
Youth Symposium on Thurs-
day.

“I wish to remind. you that
of the 11 (traffic) fatalities for
2007, one of those persons was
a six-year-old pedestrian, a stu-
dent,” he said. “There have
also been many injuries to chil-
dren as a result of traffic acci-
dents.”

Mr Thompson said the gov-
ernment is committed to
ensuring that the message of
road safety awareness is
ingrained in the next genera-
tion.

He noted that the problem
is an international one, as sta-
tistics provided by the World
Health Organisation indicate
that 40 children die every hour
around the world as a result
of traffic accidents.

Addressing the high school
students in attendance, Mr
Thompson told them that chil-
dren and young adults are the
most vulnerable groups among
road users.

In an effort to reduce the
number road accidents on the
island, the Grand Bahama
Road Safety Committee and
the Road Traffic Department
held its first annual Youth
Symposium at the Foster B
Pestaina Hall.

The symposium sought to
target future drivers by engag-
ing them in productive discus-
sions regarding road safety and
encouraging them to exchange

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RET
PHONE: 322-2157



ideas for road safety strategies
that would appeal to young
people.

Stephanie Rahming, Assis-
tant Comptroller of Road
Traffic, said the symposium is
designed to educate students
about the consequences of
irresponsible road use. “Your
entire course can be altered as
a result of a serious accident,”
she warned.

Mr Thompson said he
believes that the support of
corporate businesses, schools,
parents, and community
organisations, can create a cul-
ture of responsibility.

“Responsible driving can
save lives and reduce the
occurrence of road accidents,”
he said.

“We cannot take it for
granted that all will be well
when we are on the road.
Complacency can lead to dis-
aster and tragedy. By being
more mindful of our road con-
duct, we will help keep our
roads safe.

“I am pleased that the
organisers have planned a fun
and effective way of inculcat-
ing road safety awareness in
our students.

At the symposium students
were given information on the
types of insurance policies
available ‘to teenage drivers
and factors that contribute to
accidents.

Students also heard from a
crash survivor and were given
information about the road
traffic legislation currently in
place. ,

Mr Thompson said the sym-
posium is a step in the right
direction and that he hopes
the experience will make a dif-
ference in the lives of students
and reduce number of deaths
and injuries on the streets.

‘““As we continue to educate
our children on road safety,
we as drivers must also play
our part. I urge all motorists to
exercise patience and caution
on the roads, as our young
ones may be less aware of the
potential hazards around,” he
said.

He commended the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Traffic
Division and members of the
Grand Bahama Road Safety
Committee for their commit-
ment to road safety.

COPS COR H LOH Lee Ee EE EE D OEE EEE DELETED ODED OED ESEESODOTESEEO LESSEE EEE DES TED SESE EO SESE SED EO SESE EEE E EEE SOEE OEE EOS EEE EES ES SEED ESO SESO OOOO O ESO OS OEE EOE EEEEE SEES ESE ESOT SO ES SEED OES OEE O EEE E EEE ESOS EEO E EEE EE EeeEeeS



Teacher-pupil sex not
common in Bahamas

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

COMPLAINTS of female
teachers having sexual rela-
tionships with male students is
uncommon in the Bahamas, a
senior ministry official told The
Tribune yesterday.

On Thursday, Elma Gar-
raway, permanent secretary in
the Ministry of Education,
Youth, and Sports, confirmed
to The Tribune that there is an
ongoing investigation at her
ministry into allegations of a
sexual relationship between a
female teacher and a male stu-

dent at a public school.
When asked yesterday about
the prevalence of these types of

complaints, she said that in the _

past, the few they have received ”
involved male teachers and
female students. Mrs Garraway
emphasised however that there~
have not been many of these
complaints.

“This is extraordinary,” she
said.

Mrs Garraway did not com-
ment on whether this particu-
lar allegation will or will not be
referred to police when asked
by The Tribune.

Instead, she said yesterday
that it was “under investiga-
tion”.

Governor-General

thanks the Dutch



By Lindsay Thompson

THE government has
acknowledged the Netherlands
for its leading role in supporting
international agreements which
seek to curb the proliferation
of weapons of mass destruction.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna made this statement as
he accepted letters of credence
from Christiaan Mark Johan
Kroner, non-resident ambas-
sador of the Kingdom of the

Netherlands to the Bahamas, at .

a ceremony at Government
House on Thursday.

The Bahamas has approved,
in principle, the ratification of
the Chemical Weapons Con-
vention, a United Nations treaty
that bans the development, pro-
duction, stockpiling, transfer
and use of chemical weapons,
and stipulates their timely
destruction.

“The Bahamas has also
attached highest priority to the
adherence to such agreements,
and its signing of the Chemical
Weapons Convention on
March, 2, 1994, underlines its
historic commitment to non-
proliferation,” the governor
general said.

He told Ambassador Kroner.
“Your political and security
experience, and acknowledg-
ment of the extended friend-
ship between our two countries,
make you a valuable partner for
the challenges of today.”

He also noted that the
Netherlands’ support for a suc-
cessful completion to the waiv-
er negotiations for the Schen-
gen Visa would be of ‘special
importance” to the Bahamas.

The Antilles and Aruba form
an integral part of the Kingdom
of the Netherlands, and like the
Bahamas, are built on tourism
and financial services, the gov-
ernor general said. “The
Bahamas would like to embrace
opportunities to fortify our rela-
tions in these areas.”

He noted that both countries
share a fundamental belief in
democratic values, internation-
al co-operation, and upholding
and advancing the rule of inter-
national law. — ,

“In this regard, the Bahamas
looks forward to the continued
partnering with the Kingdom
of the Netherlands in promoting
the common goals of peace,
goodwill, sovereign equality and
security,” the governor general
said.

He told the ambassador that
the Bahamas intends to use his
appointment to further the
long-standing friendship
between the two countries, giv-
en the Netherlands’ member-
ship in the Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) and the
European Union.

“We, therefore, count on the
Kingdom of the Netherlands to
ensure the OECD’s regulations
on financial services are fair,
just and equitable for all,”’ the
governor general said. “It is also
our hope that the Netherlands
will play an important role in
ensuring that European Union
investment in the Bahamas is
sustained, indeed increased, and
the transfer of advanced man-
agement skills and new tech-
nologies emphasised.”

Ambassador Kroner said the
Bahamas has enjoyed friendly
ties with the Netherlands since
the Dutch first sailed Caribbean
waters.

He said the ties between the
countries are not confined to
economic matters, and asked
for the Bahamas’ support as his
country seeks a seat on the
United Nations Human Rights
Council.

“The promotion and respect
of human rights is one of the
main priorities in our foreign
policy.

“Your support in this regard
is needed and truly appreciat-
ed,” he said.

Armed robbers
‘exposed’ during
officer’s pursuit

ST. THOMAS, US Virgin
Islands (AP) — A police officer
who chased armed robbery sus-
pects clad only in his underwear
won praise yesterday for not
letting a little exposure get in
the way of his job.

Officer Dariel Chinnery
jumped, barely clothed, into his
cruiser this week and chased
two men suspected of a violent
armed robbery in St. Thomas.

Chinnery, a veteran officer,
went “a little above the call of
duty”, said Police Chief Rod-
ney Querrard, whose depart-

In brief

Body found

in South
Ocean area

A man’s body was found in
the South Ocean area of New
Providence late last night.

Little information was ayail-
able at press time, but Chief
Superintendent Hulan Hanna
said the matter is considered a
case of sudden death, and foul
play is not suspected by the
police.

ment has struggled to contain
arise in violent crime in the US
Caribbean island territory.

On Tuesday night, a man
frantically banged on Chin-
nery’s door, saying he had been
shot in the arm by two men who
demanded all his money, police
said.

Chinnery grabbed his gun as
the suspects drove away. After
a short car chase, the men aban-
doned their car and escaped on
foot. Chinnery is well-known
for issuing traffic tickets and
using the loudspeaker on his
patrol car to order people to
move illegally parked cars.

Cecccecceceseceseereseeecceesoce
e °
°

&
G)
<=

For the sto- :
ries behind :
the news,

read Insight :

Corer sesccccceoceseccccce

weceeescees

Peer ecevecccncvesesececsece
oe

When asked if her ministry
has a.timetable for concluding
the investigation, the perma-
nent secretary said:

“Well, we would hope that
we can have it all investigated
and concluded as soon as possi-
ble. We would wish to have it
done as soon as possible.”

When The Tribune contacted
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel he did not wish to com-
ment on the active investigation
beyond what was already said
by his ministry through the per-
manent secretary. ”

The Tribune has learned that
the female teacher in question is
32 years old, the male student is
16 years old, and school in ques-

tion is in inner city New Provi-
dence.

Reports have also indicated
that the teacher has been
removed from her post at the
school.

In the U S, the case of Mary
Kay Letourneau made interna-
tional headlines years ago, after
she was convicted of statutory
rape of Vili Fualaau.

He was a six grade student in
her class when she had sex with

¢him.

She was 34 and he was 13
when the relationship began.

After her release from prison,
she and Mr Fualaau eventually
married and they have two chil-
dren.





Mark Johan Kroner, non-resident ambassador of the Kingdom of the

Netherlands



SU
SHAUL |

A financial institution seeks an Accountant.
Candidates must have at least 3 years experience
in accounting in the financial industry with sound
knowledge of but not limited to:

Formulating budgets

Managing Accounts Receivables and

Payables

Preparation of monthly and annual

financial reports and statements

Preparation of bank reconciliations and

various general ledger accounts to the sub

ledgers

Co-ordinate the annual audit with external

auditors and preparation of the necessary

schedules

Preparing reports for the regulators

Must be a team player
Must possess people skills and be prepared

to interact with members
Minimum qualifications: AA in

Accounting

Please forward resume before
February 18, 2008 to P.O. Box N-7544



Taettee pee ee

temupe

1



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Artist broadens ‘Stop
the Violence’ campaign

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A local artist and concerned
resident of Freeport is taking his “stop the vio-
lence” message to the wider community by
launching a public awareness ad campaign against
crime with the help of sponsors on Grand
Bahama.

Paul Joseph, an artist whose painting entitled,
“Stop the Violence”, was featured in local and
national newspapers, said there has been positive
feedback from many persons in Freeport and
Nassau who saw the painting and read the article.

As a result of the “overwhelming” support he
has received, Mr Joseph has decided to run an ad

Eight Mile Rock ©
Town Committee
now fully staffed

Chere FT Ye | Peace Wesleyan Church
PETC Meee m eee eed le

North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:4)a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Revival Services
February 13-17, 2008
Speaker: Rev. Steve Bell

from Bradenton Free Methodist Church, Florida

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE




















orinieaindsams P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
wmummea Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
guamea CHURCH SERVICES .

Mm SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2008

q Z FIRST SUNDAY BEFORE LENT

11:00AM

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM

Rev. Mark Carey







Bernard Road

11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss



Zion Boulevard
10:00AM
7:00PM

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM

7:00PM

Rey. Charles Sweeting
No Service





Rev. Charles New
Rev. Charles New





Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

8:00AM

9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs

(i 11:00AM Rey. William Higgs/HC

RADIO PROGRAMMES




‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: _Rev. James D. Neilly

Your Host: Mr. Janice J. Knowles

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH, 2008.

7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.

& Church School

Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)



THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road

Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street

‘METHODIST MOMENTS?’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.

FR A A AR A A A A A A EE AR Ee AC A ee AC A He A AR A RAR AOR AR AR AC eR ER ee ACR A

The Nassau Regional Women’s Fellowship will be
holding their Anniversary Service and Installation
Service for New Officers on Sunday, February 10,
2008 at 3:00 p.m. at Trinity Methodist Church.

Rev. Charles Sweeting/Sis. Marilyn Tinker

Rev. Carla Culmer/Usher Board Anniversary

Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Christian Education



of his painting in newspapers in hopes of getting
through to criminals and alerting the public about
the seriousness of the crime problem.

He feels that every Bahamian citizen must do
his or her part to reduce.crime in the country. The
ad started running in The Freeport News last
week, he said.

“Crime has become a national disease that is
destroying the well-being of our country, where
we have recorded nine murders already in New
Providence in January,” he said.

Mr Joseph thinks that his initiative will make a
difference in the Freeport community.

He has also distributed posters of his painting,
which are displayed at some businesses on the
island.

The painting shows a peaceful Bahamian land-

scape marred by a tragic bloody crime scene,
highlighted by crime scene tape.

The chalk outline of a victim interrupted by
blood flowing from the head represents those
who have lost their lives to violent crime.

The Bahamian flag is flown at half mast as a
tribute to officers who fell in the line of duty,
and as a symbol of a nation in mourning.

A gun and a cutlass signify the weapons of
choice for criminals.

An empty rum bottle and a‘ numbers” receipt
signify the national pastimes, Mr Joseph said,
while a skull and crossbones symbolises death.

A Bible at the base of a coconut tree is open to
Proverbs 14:34 — “Righteousness exalts a nation,
but sin is a reproach to any people.”

Violence in 2007 when a close friend received
the devastating news that his missing son’s body
had been discovered.

He said that businesses are supporting his ini-
tiative and have donated funds to help with the ad
campaign.

Mr Joseph said that successive Bahamian gov-
ernments have promised to implement compre-
hensive plans to reduce crime, but he believes
capital punishment must become a part of the
long term solution.

He said that the Bahamian people are entitled
to live in a safe and civilised society.

“Like a pebble striking a still pond, the rip-
pling effect of crime touches everyone. Let us
unite to remove the blight of crime from our

Mr Joseph was first inspired to paint Stop the — land,”





ders.



















Adult Education



CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS » Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2008.
11:30 a.m.Speaker:

PASTOR DEXTER DUVALIER

of Christ Community Church
6:00 p.m. EVENING SERVICE |

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
» Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)





OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning Worship Service
Sunday School tor all ages ...
Worship S@IVICE oor 11.00am.
Spanish Service...
Evening Worship Service

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching

Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club} 4-14 yrs,

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

_ Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

PAS en Ce UMC RSC
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O, Box: N-1566
Email Cu ols VOR CM VCH HC Ret]



ee

VTS for MNES ee Bahama District, Rufus Johnson, is pictured delivering the oath of office to three ne Eight Mie 3
Rock East Town Committee members on Tuesday. From left are: Administrator Johnson, Darron Grant, Vandyke Hepburn and Roscoe Saun-

EIGHT MILE ROCK,
Grand Bahama - For the first
time in almost two and a half
years, the Eight Mile Rock
East township has its full com-
plement of local government
representatives.

Minister for Lands and
Local Government Sidney
Collie has appointed Vandyke
Hepburn, Darron Grant and
Roscoe Saunders to fill the
vacant spots on the nine-mem-
ber town committee.

The posts were left vacant
last year, requiring the minister
responsible to appoint persons
to fill these posts.

The three men live in the
Eight Mile Rock East area and
were sworn into office by the
administrator for west Grand
Bahama Rufus Johnson dur-
ing a brief ceremony at the
Administrator’s Office in Eight
Mile Rock on Tuesday after-
noon.

Mr Hepburn is a veteran
photographer attached to
Bahamas Information Services
in Freeport.

Mr Grant currently serves as
the project manager for the








aa
XS 4
ttimefor




(Sunday School: 10am
/Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2













8.30 am,
9.45 a.m.

he said.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURC
' SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

FUNDAMENTA
EVANGELISTIC

~ PastomH. Mills

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are’
(Pastor: H. Mills « Phone: 393-0563 « 6

SIMON LEWIS/BIS

Ginn Group and is a civil engi-
neer.

Mr Saunders is well known
in the west Grand Bahama dis-
trict. He is a construction engi-
neer who worked at the Min-
istry of Works for several
years.

The Eight Mile Rock East
Town Committee members
are:

e Chairman Percy Charlton

e Deputy chairman Rosney
Cooper

e Calvis Bartlett

e Harold Curry

e James Vega

e Joylean Rolle

e Mr Hepburn

e Mr Grant

e Mr Saunders

In swearing in the three new
members, Mr Johnson asked
that they be honest, fair and
sincere in carrying out their
duties and that they use their
term in office to help in build-
ing the township.

Local government elections
throughout the country are
expected before July 1, 2008.
Members are elected for a
three year term.



945 am,

8.00 a.m.
6.30 p.m.

Place:

Center
(Next door to CIBC)





© LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Wor orship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

The Madeira Shopping

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs









THE TRIBUNE





LE Ta tT

THE race is on for the crown-
ing of the 40th Miss Bahamas
Universe.

The winner will represent the
country at the Miss Universe
Pageant to be held in Vietnam
this July.

“There are some 16 beauti-
ful young ladies in the line-up
with eager anticipation of secur-
ing one of the three top spots
which will afford them the
opportunity of representing the
Bahamas internationally,” said
the organisers in a statement.
“However the most coveted is
that of the Miss Bahamas Uni-
verse title.”

Also competing are 15 young
and talented teenagers, who are
vying for the title of Miss Teen
Universal Bahamas.

This years' Miss Teen Uni-
versal Bahamas winner will be
afforded the opportunity of rep-
resenting the Bahamas in Bar-
bados, Africa, Europe and
Venezuela — as did the outgoing
- Miss Teen Universal Bahamas,
Jessica Thompkins. The dual
pageant is set for March 16.

According to the organisers,
the ladies have all participated
in a number of preparatory
workshops and seminars, the
first several of which was hosted



by platinum hotel sponsor
Superclubs Breezes.

The annual swimsuit compe-
tition will be held this week on
Eleuthera, sponsored by the
Bahamas Fast Ferries and
Valentines Resorts.

This week the organisers are
introducing eight of the contes-
tants to the public — four from
the Miss category and four from
the Teen category:

MISS BAHAMAS
UNIVERSE

JAMIE MORRIS, 20 years

old, is a bio-chemistry major at
the Omega College and the
College of the Bahamas. She
aspires to be a cardiac surgeon.
She stands at five feet nine inch-
es tall and represents the Berry

- Islands. Jamie enjoys cooking,

networking, reading and the
social arts. She feels her biggest
accomplishment is speaking in
the House of Assembly as a
youth parliamentarian.

‘ KAZHERAE ROLLE, 18
years old, is an aspiring com-
puter analyst and a sophomore
at the College of the Bahamas.
Standing at five feet, 10 inches

. tall, Kasherae loves sports, and

US scholar in
spying claim

By DAN KEANE
Associated Press Writer

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — An
American scholar said Friday
’ that an official at the U.S.
Embassy asked him to keep
tabs on Venezuelan and Cuban
workers in Bolivia. Washington
said that any such request
would be an error and against
U.S. policy.

“I was shocked,” Fulbright
scholar Alex van Schaick told
The Associated Press. “I mean,
this man’s asking me to spy for
the U.S. government.” Van
Schaick is one cf six Fulbright
scholars doing research in the
countty.

The U.S. Embassy in La Paz
issued a statement Friday saying
that “some routine information
sessions about security given to
certain American citizens
included incorrect information.
As soon as this was brought to
our attention, appropriate mea-
sures were taken to assure that
these errors would not be
repeated.”

U.S. State Department
spokesman Gonzalo Gallegos
said in Washington that any
such request would have been a
mistake.

“Worldwide, we adhere to a

strict understanding with the
Peace Corps that their volun-
teers are not permitted to act
in any sort of intelligence capac-
ity,” Gallegos said.

“If anyone suggested that any
members of either group pro-
vide information outside the
scope of their work or positions,
it was an error and is not U.S.
government policy.”

LOCAL NEWS

Contestants aim t

SHACOYA MITCHELL —



lists her all-time favourite ath-
lete as Debbie Ferguson. She is
sponsored by Lickety Split Ltd.

SACHA SCOTT, 19 years
old, is a double major student at
the University of Miami and an
advocate for the Bahamas’ nat-
ural resources. Standing at five
feet, five inches tall, she said
her most unusual job was acting
as an assistant to Anna Nicole-
Smith when the actress arrived
in the Bahamas. Representing
the island of Abaco, she is spon-
sored by Nautilus and Prime
Bahamas.

SHARIE DELVA is a six
foot, one inch tall, statuesque
beauty and super model. She is













39
Nl

Grace and Peace
Masia’ ONS

Wed, Feb. | ie 2008, 7:00 pm
Thurs, Feb. 14, 2008, 7:00 pm

Fri, Feb. 15, 2008, 7:00 pm

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2008
11:00 am & 6:00 pm

Rev. Steve Bell, oe |

Oye e, jl ah, o
Twynam Heights, Adjacent to Super Winton

SHS a

MARISSA PRATT

Miss Grand Bahama Universe
2008.

At 21 years old, she lists the
most unusual thing she has ever
done as dancing in the rain. She
is sponsored by Nyguard Cay
and aspires to own and operate
a luxury clothing and accessory
boutique.

MISS TEEN BAHAMAS

BRITTANY JOHNSON is
16 years old and well travelled.
A student at C V Bethel Senior
High, this photogenic beauty
aspires to become a dermatolo-
gist. :

SHACOYA MITCHELL is
a 15 year old honour student at



Youth Service:



eeeN een
coer



WANTED



_ Awell established Media Company is looking for a hard working male
‘to work as a Pressroom Assistant. Qualified applicants should be able

Interested persons should sent resume to:

c/o DA 04149
P.O. Box N-3207
Fax: 328-2398

email: pbrown @tribunemedia.net

:
| |
| |
| |
| |
| to work night’s between the hours of 8pm to 5am, and be prepared to |
| submit job references and a clean police record.
| |
| |
| |
| |
L. -



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 7

i anak

YULANDA FORBES



D W Davis High who excels at
academics and has a number of
choices for scholarships. She has
her eyes set on becoming a
gynecologist.

MARISSA PRATT is a role

model student at R M Bailey’

Senior High. This 16 year old
enjoys being a teenager. Look-
ing to the future, she hopes to
attend the College of the

Bahamas and become a pedia-
trician.

YULANDA FORBES says
she feels at home on the run-
way. This 16-year-old student
of the OSC School of Model-
ing and dance aspires to become
a certified public accountant.
She is sponsored by Virgo Car
Rental and Outback Steak
House:



THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS 2&8
CONFERENCE

OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE

CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE

ET LES AMERIQUES
NJ ASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)

“Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas”
SIXTH LORD’S DAY BEFORE THE |
RESURRECTION, FEBURARY 10, 2008.
METHODIST SCHOOLS



COLLECT: Almighty Father, whose Son Jesus fasted forty

days in the wilderness and was tempted as we are, yet without
sin: give us grace to discipline ourselves in obedience to your
Spirit; and as you know our weakness, so may we know your
power to save; through Jesus Christ your son our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m, Rev. Edward J. Sykes
11:00 a.m. Bro. Andrew Hunter
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
(Holy Communion)
Sis. Patrice Strachan
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte ,
6:30 p.m. Class Leaders 5-7
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 am. Sis. Annette Poitier
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
9:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
6:30 p.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (healing & wellness)
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
8:00 a.m, Women
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE
5:30 p.m. Fridays Children’s Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Monastery Park Fellowship

10:00 a.m.

(Quackoo Street)

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift
Shop and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: — All Methodists of
the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to

prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to the upsurge
in violence. The fast begins weekly after the evening meal

on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim
unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS Lat 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.



PAGE 8, SAIURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Calling all customers



We’ Y hj is

’ Bethel Brothers Morticians
i Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026





A State-recognised
funeral service for former
Public Administrator
JACQUELYN
MONICA MURRAY,

62

of # 26 Hillview Drive,
Winton Heights will be
held on Monday
February 11th, 2008 at
llam at Christ Church

Cathedral, George Street.
Archdeacon J. Ranfurly Brown assisted by Rev 'd.
Fr. Bernard Been, Canon Basil Tynes, Rev'd. Angela
Palacious and Rev 'd. Fr. Mervyn Johnson will
officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

She is survived by her husband; Frederick Murray;

two daughters; LaVette Johnson and Yael Walcott;
one son; Krishna Murray; grandchildren; Alyssa
Brockington, Seth Walcott and Sebastian Walcott;
son-in-law; Jeffrey Walcott; daughter-in-law; Inia
Murray; sisters; Judith Theophilus, Edith Outten,
Marina Hagan, Marguerita Major and Robynn Robert;
brother, Eneas Theophilus; step-children, Brian
Hamilton, Dwight, Duane and Douglas Murray;
nieces, Tamika, Monique, Michelle, Makayla, Sonia,
Enea, Inga, Bridgette, Renee, Annette, Pamela, Tanya,
Vivian, Andrea, Bernadette, Nakeira, Lisa and Kia;
nephews; Juan, Jamal, Keith, Don, Yvon, Kent,
Dereck, Don, Julius, Julian, D'Arcy, Omar, Valashi,
Ron, Warren, N'Kimba, N'Kumba, N'Shaka, Dominic,

Frederick, Rudolph, Dereck, Terry, Andrew and.

Ryan; sisters-in-law, Maureen Pustam, Emeline
Murray, Maxine Murray, Inez Johnson, Mary
Lightbourne and Ludelle Theophilus; brothers-in-
law, Willam Outten, Larry Hagan, Bertram Murray,
Samuel Johnson and Claude Robert and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, Nassau Street on Saturday from 10am
to 6pm. There will be no viewing at the Cathedral.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

tee TATA TTT I TATA LETT AL TILIA ITIL ISIS IIL IL ESET ELST TEL TTT TTT eT Tee eee eee

Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company president Leon
Williams speaks at the open-
ing of the company’s new
Cyber World Branch on Bay
Street.





(242) 32

Venezuela hits at
Judicial terrorism’

By FABIOLA SANCHEZ
Associated Press Writer

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuela’s
top oil official accused Exxon Mobil Corp. of
“judicial terrorism” on Friday, but said court
orders won by the oil major do not amount to
confiscation of $12 billion (8.3 billion euros) in
assets.

Exxon Mobil has gone after the assets of state -

oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela SA, in U.S.,
British and Dutch courts as it challenges the
nationalization of a multibillion dollar (euro) oil
project by President Hugo Chavez’s government.

A British court last month issued an injunc-
tion “freezing” as much as $12 billion (8.3 bil-
lion euros) in assets.

But Oil Minister Rafael Ramirez said: “They
don’t have any asset frozen. They only have
frozen $300 million” in cash through a U.S. court
in New York. As for the case in Britain, PDVSA
doesn’t have “any assets in that jurisdiction that
even come close to those sums” of $12 billion
(8.3 billion euros), Ramirez said.

Ramirez called it a “transitory measure” while
the state company, known as PDVSA, presents its
case in New York and London. Exxon Mobil is
also taking its dispute to international arbitra-
tion, which Venezuela has agreed to.

But Ramirez, who is PDVSA’s president, said
Exxon Mobil “hasn’t respected the terms of the
arbitration” and said Exxon Mobil’s claims in
the Venezuela nationalization dispute “don’t
even come close to half the sum of $12 billion
claimed by them.”

Exxon Mobil spokeswoman Margaret Ross
said the company had no comment on Ramirez’s
statements. Ramirez said the court cases “don’t
have any affect on our cash flow, don’t affect our
operational situation at all.”

Ramirez said Exxon Mobil sued in New York,
London and the Netherlands to dispute the terms
under Chavez’s nationalization last year of four
heavy oil projects in the Orinoco River basin,
one of the world’s richest oil deposits.

“We don’t have any decision by any court that’s
definitive,” Ramirez said. “We have a preventa-
tive measure in a court in New York that we

have a right to respond to, and we are going to.”

He accused the Irving, Texas-based oil major of
employing “judicial terrorism” and trying to gen-
erate “financial nervousness” around PDVSA.

According to documents filed last month in
the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, Exxon
Mobil has secured an “order of attachment” on
about $300 million (207 million euros) in cash
held by PDVSA. A hearing to confirm the order
is scheduled in New York for Feb. 13.

In a Jan. 24 “freezing injunction” by a British
High Court, the court said that “until the return
date or further order from the court,” PDVSA
“must not remove from England or Wales any of
its assets which are in England or Wales up to the
value of $12 billion (8.3 billion euros).”

The court also said that if PDVSA disobeys
the order, it could be held in contempt of court
and be fined or have assets seized.

The credit rating agency Fitch Ratings said the
British court order would “have a minimum
impact on the company’s day-to-day operations,
as well as its near-term credit quality and financial
flexibility.” The agency noted that most of
PDVSA’s assets are located in Venezuela and
the United States, where the company has refiner-
ies.

But Fitch Ratings also noted that the outcome
of the arbitration process with Exxon Mobil
remains uncertain and that “a negative outcome
of the arbitration could pressure the credit profile
of PDVSA.”

Other major oil companies including U.S.-
based Chevron Corp., France’s Total, Britain’s BP
PLC, and Norway’s StatoilHydro ASA have
negotiated deals with Venezuela to continue on as
minority partners in the Orinoco oil project.

ConocoPhillips and Exxon Mobil, however,
balked at the tougher terms and have been in
compensation talks with PDVSA.

Ramirez said Venezuelan officials have had
“very important meetings” with ConocoPhillips
Chairman Jim Mulva and have made progress
toward an agreement. “I think we’re on a path to
achieving it,” Ramirez said.

As for the dispute with Exxon Mobil, Ramirez
said “we’re going to value fairly what would be its
compensation, or not if that be the case.”

Hotel union ‘receives

assurances’

on change

events.

FROM page one

a visit to the club with friends.
He told The Bahama Jour-
nal that he had written a letter
of complaint to the communi-
ty’s chairman and board mem-
bers. “I didn’t find him very
respectful at all or very cus-
tomer friendly. I think the
quicker he gets out of The
Bahamas the better,”’ he said.
In December, minister Dion
Foulkes confirmed that the
Department of Labour had
launched an investigation “into

# The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

has a

new telephone number

(242) 677-1441

Our fax number remains:
(242) 328-2938

Our old telephone number
2-1441 is no longer

in service

The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.
Madeira Street, Palmdale
new telephone number

(242) 677-1441

the veracity of complaints”
made by the union and some
employees at the club.

This action came after the
high-profile “‘dog incident” and
the subsequent filing of an offi-
cial complaint by the union
against Mr Picquot.

Lyford Cay Property Own-
ers’ Association chairman
Christopher Hampton Davis
said the dogs were brought out
when one of the union execu-
tives, secretary Leo Douglas,
breached their security. Mr
Douglas denied this version of














Yesterday, Mr Foulkes would
not comment directly on an
insider’s claim that Mr Picquot’s
contract would not be renewed.

“I have personally been
involved with the dispute and I
have spoken to both the hotel
union and also to the Lyford
Cay Club and I am confident
that we will come up with a res-
olution to the dispute that is
acceptable to both parties,” he
said.

The minister said his role as
an “honest arbitrator” requires

that he “talk to both sides with

a certain degree of confiden-
tiality.”

A call to Mr Picquot for com-
ment was turned down, as his
assistant reiterated the club’s
policy of not commenting on
press reports.

Mr Douglas said the union’s
disgruntlement with Mr Pic-
quot, who has been at the club
for around two years, has noth-
ing to do with his expat status.

“If you cannot work along
with the organisation, it goes
for Bahamians, too,” said Mr
Douglas, referring to the -
union’s calls for the boss’s
removal. The union executive
claimed that employees and
union never experienced any
similar problems with Mr Pic-
quot’s predecessor, Paul
Thompson.

He affirmed that, should a
change of command not occur
in March, the union is set to
take further action in the form
of demonstrations.

Attorneys
explore
suing the
govenment
on court
case delays
FROM page one .

year, he does put much stock
in the police’s comments that
many homicide victims were
involved in criminal activities
themselves.

“As if that excused the mur-
der — it does not. It is irrelevant,
you must get on with the job,”
he said.

Mr Moss said it is now imper-
ative that all those accused of
murder are brought before the
courts and stand trial as soon
as possible.



THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 9















Cn SDays Yone SSy

World champion
: ‘fishing in the sun’

THIS week, In Days Gone By looks back to 1985 and sailing exploits of Donald Martinborough, three
time world Sunfish champion.

ANTI-CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A week of Sunfish sailing ended with celebration, a
night of dining, dancing and awards giving at the Yacht Club. Mr Martinborough won trophies for five
races in which he placed in the top three. He later became the first Sunfish sailor ever to win the Worlds
three times. ; :

At the announcement of the Sunfish World Championships race, scheduled for October 14 to 22 at
Montagu Bay. Left to right Fred Hazelwood, director of John Bull and Michael Jeruis of the Ministry
of Tourism, holding the Rolex Submariner watch to be awarded to the winner; John Dunkley, com-
mittee chairman of the race; Donnie Martinborough. :

Donald Martinborough shows off the trophy that he received after winning the World Championships
‘of Sunfish Sailing in Riccione Italy. This was the second time Martinborough won the prestigious cham-
pionship, having won it in 1983 in Colombia. .

Donnie Martinborough presented his father Mike with the Rolex watch he received during the pre-
sentation of awards at the Nassau Yacht Club.

PT NL gee

Wo ceases





10am-3pm

Everything Must GO!!!

These prices are unbelievable!

WING |
sat





PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS:

Major Bahamas law firm t




in
@

celebrates 60th birthda
Y :

HIGGS and Johnson has — law firm ranked for “corporate — vate wealth management are all Higes and Johnson was
been a cornerstone of the advisory for private banking — key factors in the economic evo- formed by well-known Bahami-
Bahamian legal profession for clients in the Caribbean.” lution of the Bahamas and have — an attorney Godfrey Higgs and
more than half a century. Last The firm believes its success been the areas where we former registrar-general
week, the law firm celebrated comes as a result of maintaining — applied our energy to promote — Mervyn Johnson.
its history and achievements in high standards. the development of the financial For the first 10 years, the pair
style with a 60th anniversary Managing partner John © services sector and the legal held chambers on the second
celebration at its new East Bay — Delaney said, “Higgs and John- —_ profession,” he said. floor of the House of Myers on

Street offices, son has held to its ideals and The firm attributes much of | the corner of Bay Street and
Over the years, Higgs and reputation despite dramatic — its success to the “high stan- — Victoria Avenue, specialising in
fohnson has gained a reputa- changes in our culture and dards and unwavering princi- — property and commercial law.
tion of being one of the best financial system over the last 60 = ples” of its longest serving The office was then moved to
firms in the Caribbean. They — years. We willno doubt contin- — senior partner, Sir Geoffrey | Sandringham House on Shirley
are currently ranked asa Tier1 ue to hold in high regard our Johnstone. Street.
firm by the independent global commitment to maintaining “With success comes a Today, Higgs and Johnson
legal directory “Chambers and close working relationships with — responsibility to the community. — has expanded to four offices
Partners Global Guide and _ our clients and to delivering Higgs and Johnson has throughout the Bahamas with

IFLR 1000”. quality legal services. embraced this responsibility by = more than 35 lawyers practis-
In 2008, for the second con- “The firm’s expansion over being a part of a number of — ing much more than real prop-

secutive year, Higgs and John- the latter half of the 20th cen- — charitable initiatives,” said the — erty and commercial law.

son was ranked first in “inheri- — tury and its continued success __ firm ina statement. “Higgs and Their repertoire includes liti-

tance and succession planning — now into the 21st have truly par- — Johnson is the only private sec- gation, private client and wealth
in the Caribbean” by. alleled the growth of the — tor partner in the Ministry of | management, real estate and
Euromoney Magazine’s private Bahamas. Godfrey Higgs’ rep- .Education’s Teacher of the — development, commercial trans-
banking survey. utation as an attorney even Year programme and the firm actions, securities, financial ser-

They were also the highest before the firm’s inception provides a cash prize that — vices law and regulation, insol-
ranked Bahamian law firm for allowed him to attract the high- rewards educators who exem- — vency, company formation and

tax guidance and services inthe — est calibre of clients. plify excellence in education — management, maritime/shipping
region and-the only Bahamian “Real estate, banking and pri- — and leadership development.” and intellectual property.

THE Managing partner John Delaney with Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta Butler Turner

iHE H&J managing partner John Delaney (left) and senior partner Phillip Dunkley (second from left) introduce guests to'the family of tirm
founders Godfrey Higgs and Mervyn Johnson. Pictured with Messrs Delaney and Dunkley are Andrew and Chris Higgs (grandsons of Mr. Higgs),
Judy Higgs(daughter-in-law), Peter Higgs (former partner and son), Diane Sturm (daughter of Mervyn Johnson), Joyce:and Geotf Higgs (daugh-
er-in-law and son). er



te





Pricing !nformation As Of:
Friday, 8 February 2008
BISX LISTED & TRADE D SE URITIES - VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 2,012.44 / CHG 0.08 / CHG 0.00 / YTD -$4.31/ YTD % «2.63
52we-Hi 52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.72 0.75 Abaco Markets 1.72 : V2: 0.00 3,000 0.157 0.000 11.0 0.00%
11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 A1.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.68 8.03 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.612 0.260 15.7
0.90 0.80 Benchmark 0.90 0.90 0.00 0.188 0.030 4.8
3.74 1.85 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12
23:00; 1.25 Fidelity Bank . 2.60 2.60 0,00 0.058 0.040 44.8
12.70 10.00 Cable Bahamas 12.70 12.70 0.00 1.030 0.240 12.3
3.15. 2.00 Colina Holdings 3.14 3.14 0.00 0.031 0.040 VO
































3.50 4.45 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.82 7.82 0.00 . 0.428 0.260 18.3 3.3
7.22 4.52 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.60 4.63 0.03 0.129 O.O52 35.7

2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.44 2.45 0.01 3,200 0.316 0.020 7.8 Be
7.50 5.70 Famguard 7.50 7.50 0,00 0.713 O.280 10.5 3.72
13,01 12.30 Finco 13.00 13.00 0,00 0.829 O.570 15,7

14.75 14.00 FirstCaribbean 14.00 14.00 0.00 0.914 0.470 Wo c

6.10 5.12 Focol (S) 5.12 5.12 0.00 0.363 O40 14d 2.73%]
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.035 0.000 22.0 0.00%)
8.00 7.20 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
#12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.50 12.50 0.00 1.059 0.610 11.8 4.88%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities



























S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ Yield
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
; Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%) \
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.128 13.4 7.71% q
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings - 0.45 0.55 0.45 0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00% N
BISX Listed Mutual Funds ‘ N
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA_Â¥V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % y
41.2920 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.291985"* ~ N
3.0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.999402"** 19.97% N
1.3789 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.378862" \
3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.7969** 27.72% 27.72%
11.9333 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9333** 5.53% 5.53%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00**
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100,00**
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00°*
10.5000 10.5000 _ Fidelity International Investment Fund 10,607"**
Â¥ FINDEX: CLOSE 929.15 / YTD -2,40% / 2007 34.47%
| BISK ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS — YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV WEY
J 52H 1M Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid § - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
»2wk Low - I st closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ ~ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 1 February 2008 NS
Provious Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price “41 December 2007 ‘
Today's Clase - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. ~ Trading volume of the prior wook 741 January 2008
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 niths 2 danuary 2008
|| Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value \ N \
DIV §% - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful \ ANS “ we \\\
Ae So ete acai tis Oe Oey saminge FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 é \ ‘ \ WS * a. 5 w
(1) -3or-1 Stock Spit - Effective Date 7/11/2007 NAV aa Abaco; Michael Fields, Citibank; Stephen
nf O TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL. (242) 394-2503 Melvin ee partner

d



THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 11
LOCAL NEWS |





“H&J partner Dr Earl Cash; Lucethy Smith, UBS (Ba
Hudson Carey, Coldwell Banker/Lightbourne Realty

Daphne-Delaney, Tradelnvest Asset Management, Vaughn Delaney, Bank of the Bahamas, Paul McWeeny, Ministry of Education Teacher. of the Year (
Bank of the Bahamas, Wendy Warren, BESP Daphne Wilkinson Ret :

VACANCY NOTICE.

ASSISTANT PLANT OPERATORS
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

Vacancies exist in the Clifton Pier Power Station, Energy Supply Division for
Assistant Plant Operators.











































Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

e Assists with monitoring all operational parameters and plants at the power
station including fuel tanks, engines, auxiliaries and control panels. This
involves checking and maintaining lube-oil and water levels, temperature
readings etc

¢ Records accurate operating data for all plant in the station to ensure the safe,
efficient and continuous functioning of the power station

¢ Assists with operating all plants (¢.g., engines, exhaust gas boilers) This
involves assisting with starting up, synchronizing and shutting down available
plant

* Cleans engines, gas and steam turbines by disassembling and replacing fluids.
and assists with the change over and cleaning of coolers and filters

* Cleans work area and maintains good housekeeping throughout the generating
units. This involves maintaining all operating plant so that they are safe or yi
hazard free (free of grease, dirt and grime) and includes sludge disposal.
May be required to perform touch-up painting during engine shut down

¢ Assists with troubleshooting problems on back-start and starting diesel
engines, turbine units and generators

¢ Assists operations and maintenance lead staff with engine maintenance
(associated auxiliary and ancillary equipment)

BEL =

CI PETA

Job requirements include:

Applicants should be high school graduates with a minimum of six (6) months
experience or equivalent. However, additional related industrial certificates and/or
a College of The Bahamas Pre-iechnology diploma and/or applicants with at least
five (5) BJCs including Mathematics and English Language are acceptable. Basic
knowledge of mechanical and electrical schematics and the ability to operate tools,
measuring devices and use chemicals appropriately are required

PAT

The post is a SHIFT ROTA job; therefore successful persons will be required to
work shift. ;
Interested person should apply by completing an Application Form, attaching a h
resume and contact information for three professional references to the attention
of the {|
Manager-Human Resources & Training, '
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hall & ‘Pucker Road, ,

P.O. Box N-7509

Nassau, Bahamas
on or before: Monday, February 18, 2008,



Zs

ener nt pent aa Dene with Minister of National Security nn atari

|
SSeS AE Tae

i

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Full Text
TIED OE Lat PE op “FEE alata
7
j ,



a

4,

pr

Volume: 104.No.67







Local government

set for Nassau?

UU a

Masked raidiets.
tie-up millionaire’s
wife and sons

THE family of a French mar-
keting mogul was held at gun-
point, tied up and robbed when
two masked men invaded their
luxury home at Old Fort Bay,
The Tribune has learned.

The wife and sons of French
multi-millionaire Fabrice Ker-
hervé were terrorised during
‘the armed home invasion out
West, which was not reported to
the media by police.

When The Tribune inquired
about the incident yesterday,
police remained tight-lipped on
particulars of case.

When asked about the mat-

- ter, Chief Supt Hulan Hanna

said the robbery occurred short-
ly after 10pm on Wednesday.

Mr Kerhervé’s wife Beatrice
was at home, along with two of
her sons, when the armed rob-
bers invaded the residence and
held them at gunpoint.

The family was tied up, a
source confirmed, before the

-men rummaged through the. .

house for cash and valuables.
The gunmen took an undis-

closed amount of cash as well as’

jewellery and other personal
-items.

One of the sons *vag untied

during the ordeal and led down
to the dock where the family
vessel was located so that he
couid untie the boat. He was
then taken back into the home
where he was retied and left
with his mother and brother,
before the robbers made their
getaway in the family’s 25-foot
Boston Whaler.

Mr Hanna said police found

the stolen vessel on Thursday .

morning not far from Old Fort
Bay, but he did not want to
identify the victims, as he
claimed that he did not want to



POLICE have identified
the country’s latest murder
victim as Corey Whyms, 23,
of Theodora Lane, off
Tonique Williams Darling
Highway.

Whyms - the country’s
10th homicide victim of
2008 - was standing with a
group of men on the western
side of Adderley Street after
8pm Thursday night when a
small dark car pulled up and
stopped near the group.

There was an argument
between the car’s occupant
and Whyms who, after being
shot, ran to the eastern side
of the street where he col-
lapsed and died. Investiga-
tions are continuing.



' “expose anyone.”

However, high-ranking police
officials have confirmed to The
Tribune that the Kerhervé fam-
ily were the victims.

Mr Kerhervé was not at.
home during the robbery and
his wife and children were
unharmed during the ordeal,
police report.

Mr Kerhervé is president of
KGC Networks, a marketing
system based in 33 countries,
according to the company’s
website.

This armed home invasion of
a wealthy French family comes
weeks after insurance executive
Franklin Nesbitt was kidnapped

from his Love Beach home — a:

short distance from the Ker-
hervés’ property.

On that occasion, Mr Nesbitt
was taken to his Collins Avenue

General Brokers office by two

masked men. They tried to
force him to open the company
safe, but were unsuccessful.
During the ordeal, Mr Nesbitt
was gun-butted and tied up
before the kidnappers left him
at his office. |

A former resident of the Old
Fort community, who wished to
remain anonymous, told The
Tribune yesterday that numer-
ous armed home invasions have

-occurred’in the area over r the

last few months.

A 64-year-old woman was
tied up and robbed in the Old
Fort area in January when she
returned home. She was forced
in her home by two men, tied
up and robbed. Her car was
stolen in the incident.

Another armed home inva-
sion occurred across from the
Nesbitt residence, the source
said, around the same time the
insurance boss was kidnapped
in January.

In this instance, he said, an
entire family was tied up, and
one of the women in the house

was struck by the robbers
‘because she was making “too

much noise.” |

Another prominent business-
man, said the source, was held
up in his driveway in Old Fort
last year, and robbed of his
Rolex watch. |

One Old Fort resident The
Tribune is aware of is now
about to sell his home after an
armed home invasion last year.

Burglary — overnight break-
ins — increased by a shocking
43 per cent last year in the
Bahamas compared to 2006.

Police have been unable to
solve the bulk of these crimes.
The 2007 crime statistics reveal
an abysmal 10 per cent police
detection rate.for burglaries.

Their detection rate for
housebreaking and shopbreak-
ing were even lower as the,num-
bers stood at six and eight per
cent in 2007 for these crimes
respectively. No-one has been
arrested by police thus far for
the Kerhervé robbery.

The Tribune

ANY TIME...ANY PLA¢



BAHAMAS EDITION:

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008



a

GUESTS BYU ance ai BIC s new Cyber World meen on Bay Street browse check out the many lone

on display.



“No contract renewal’ ree



ord Cay Club’s top man

a By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

- By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

The contract of controversial expat Lyford Cay
Club managing director Didier Picquot will not be
renewed when it expires i in March, The Tribune

has learned.

Secretary-general of the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union (BHCAWU) Leo
Douglas confirmed yesterday that the union had
“received assurances” to this effect.

said.

Mr Picquot has. been a focus of frustration and

anger from the union since taking the job. Many
staff have complained about Mr Picquot’s alleged-
ly “disrespectful” and excessively harsh attitude

towards them.

The union claims he has huinhipaiea the organ-
isation in its efforts to serve members, and is par-

However, he.said union members at the club -

about 180 of them - continue to call with com-
plainis about the manager. “They’re still very

upset and wondering why it is taking so long,” he



Anna Nicole Smith’s former
partner Howard K Stern has
marked the anniversary of her
desih by creating a charity in
he" name.

_ !l donations through Feb-
ru. .y, 2008, will assist a chari-
ty in the Bahamas for under-
privileged and at-risk youths
that Anna 2 oe wanted to
heip.

Reyond that, the charity will
benefit charitable causes that
‘Apna Nicole supported dur-

Charity is created in
Anna Nicole’s name

ing her life: children, the elder-
ly, and the treatment and cure

_of AIDS.

Lawyer Stern released a
statement yesterday, one year
to the day after Smith was
found dead in her Florida
hotel room after overdosing
on drugs.

He is appealing for dona-
tions to the Anna Nicole and
Daniel Wayne Smith Charita-
ble Foundation, which also
remembers the star’s son, who



ticularly disturbed about his alleged involvement
in a decision to have “dogs set on” union execu-
tives on the club’s property in November when
they arrived for what they maintain was a sched-
uled meeting.

Meanwhile, earlier this month Commonwealth
Bank chairman T. Baswell Donaldson also com-
plained of Mr Picquot’s behaviour when he was
allegedly “embarrassed” by the manager during

SEE page 8







died aged 20 in September,
2006.

Stern writes: “Today is
extremely difficult for those of
us who were close to Anna
Nicole. In memory of Anna
Nicole and her son Daniel, we
have created the Anna Nicole
and Daniel Wayne Smith
Charitable Foundation.”

He adds: “Hopefully, it will
grow, help more people each
year, and eventually be headed
by her daughter Dannielynn.”














pas any
KU
up all mane

yea Oi da

eke nga

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



Sehiaes
sought to
sue over

court

delays”

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

. LOCAL businessmen and
lawyers are exploring legal
avenues to sue the government
for failing to bring cases of seri-
ous offences before the courts
within a reasonable time.

One businessman, Lynden
Nairn, speaking on the GEMS
105.2 talk show The Way For-
ward yesterday, even went so
far as to pledge resources
towards retaining lawyers who

_ are willing to fight for this cause.

Mr Nairn said the Attorney
General’s Office, and the gov-
ernment on the whole; should
be held accountable whenever a
serious crime is committed by
someone who was out on bail
for a previous crime because his
original case was nat heard
within the time prescribed by
law.

“The entire population
should sue the government of
the Bahamas because their inac-
tion has led to a heightened
sense of fear and increased the
expenditure to protect ourselves
from those released on bail,”
he said.

Mr Nairn said he would argue
that the Attorney General’s ©
Office and the government have
“knowingly, repeatedly and
negligently aided and abetted
in rendering ineffectual the Bail
Act, which was passed by the
people’s parliament for their
protection.”

Also speaking as a guest on
the talk show yesterday, lawyer
and social activist Paul Moss
said he believes that legally
there are avenues to sue the
government for accountability.

“T believe there is a premise
that can be looked at in our
courts to bring an action against
the persons who are in charge,”
he said.

Mr Moss, one of the PLP’s
hopefuls for the St Cecelia seat
in 2012, said it is not good
enough to hold governing par-
ties accountable at the voting
polls every five years.

“A life is lost and someone
must be accountable,” he said.

Businessman Mr Nairn said
that, in his view, “democracies
ought not to work only around
polls every five years.”

“When persons are not
accountable we have a fractured
democracy. When there is a
absence of transparency as
exists today, and has existed for-
ever in this country, we have a
fractured democracy,” he said.

Mr Moss said that with 80-
plus murders in 2007 and
already 10 murders in the new 4

SEE page 8


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

Local government’
expansion to Nassau
under consideration

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said that
the government is giving con-
sideration to expanding local
government to Nassau.

Mr Ingraham was speaking
at the sponsorship luncheon on
Fyiday held at the Our Lucaya
Resort to announce that the
Bahamas will be hosting the
Commonwealth Local Govern-
ment Conference in 2009.

The conference - which is to
be held on Grand Bahama - is a
major international event which
is being held for the first time in
the Caribbean region.

In his short keynote address,
Mr Ingraham welcomed con-
ference secretary general Carl
Wright to the Bahamas. He not-
ed that the local government
conference has special signifi-
cance to the Bahamas.

“Elected local government

MAIN SECTION
Local. NEWS fot OOO) 6, Y 8 10 11 12
Editorial/Letters. .......:ececee

SPORTS SECTION
Sports oe 2,3,4,5



long and we come to a place
(Freeport) where local govern-
ment has been practiced largely
through the private sector in the
last 50-plus years, and in more
recent times through ourselves.

“We hope that, in the time,
the Port Authority will finish

\

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Weather... SR

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKEND EDITION 8 PAGES



-



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has not been with us for very

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham (pictured right, centre) meets with
officials of the Commonwealth Local Government Forum (seated left) at
he Office of the Prime Minister, Freeport on Friday. Following the
meeting, Prime Minister Ingraham and officials took part in the official

launch of the CLGF Conference slated for Freeport in May 2009. The
launch was held at the Great Harbour Cay Room, Westin at Our Luc

its fight so they will be able to
restructure their private sector
to even have more public sector
participation.”

“It should come at a time
when we are giving considera-
tion to expanding local govern-
ment to the capital city. We are
a very centralised form of gov-
ernment in the Bahamas and
we would like to delegate and
pass on responsibilities of many
things to communities,” said Mr
Ingraham.

The conference will attract
600 high-level politicians and
practitioners from 52 countries,
and is expected to bring a sig-
nificant economic boost to
Grand Bahama.

During his address, the prime
minister admitted that jobs are
scarce in Grand Bahama.

He said: “I shant speak long,
I know jobs are not plentiful in
Freeport and those of you who







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Mr Ingraham said to the visi-
tors present: “I wish to welcome
you to the Bahamas. It is our
honour and responsibility to
host this important conference —
this has special significance to us
in the Bahamas.

“Many members of the Com-
monwealth have a lot of expe-
rience in local government and
we hope to access talent and
expertise from yourselves .. .
and begin discussions about
expanding, strengthening, and
deepening local government
and so the government is hon-
oured that you are here,” said



AML ddl WELLE

Mr Ingraham.

Robert Montague, Minister
of State for Local Government
in Jamaica, said the conference
is not only very important for
the Bahamas, but also for the
Caribbean.

“Tt is the first time this con-
ference is being held in the
region. We want to show the

THE TRIBUNE



eo Minister Hubert Ingraham addresses the conference.

rest of the world that the
Caribbean is a world-class cen-
tre for important international
events.

“In May, 2009, the eyes of the
local government world will be
on the Bahamas - two billion
people will be watching you. I
say to you captains of industry,
you will have persons right here

. to look at your products, so



get your products out,” he said.

Mr Montague said it is impor-
tant for local government in the
region to show that democracy
is thriving. He encouraged the
private sector to support the
upcoming conference.

Sidney Collie, Minister of
Lands and Local Government,

said government is looking for-
ward to hosting the conference
in the Bahamas.

He said it will give the coun-
try the opportunity to showcase
its best to a very large contin-
gent of delegates from 52 coun-
tries and two billion people
from around the world.

The Commonwealth Local
Government Conference is held

every two years. The previous
conference was held in New
Zealand.

A significant number of peo-
ple from the Caribbean, as well
as persons from Asia, Africa,
Europe, and the Pacific will be
attending the conference in the
Bahamas.

Elbow Cay subdivision
protests ‘dying

PROTESTS over a new sub-
division development at Hope
Town, Abaco, appear to be
dying down, locals said yester-
day.

Two groups protested over
US lawyer Mark Mason’s plan
to build 52 homes on 15 acres at
Elbow Cay.

“But it seems the whole thing
will be going ahead,” a source
told The Tribune.

Mr Mason, from the Caroli-
nas, bought the land from long-
term resident Robert Maltarp, a
Canadian.

He wants to build small,

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Bahamian-style houses on the
picturesque island, one of the
gems of the Bahamas.

“All the work is being done
by local contractors,” said the
source. “Work has already
started on the roads and it looks
like Mr Mason’s troubles are
over.”

ONE of Marsh Harbour’s
vest-known restaurants has
been sold.

Wally’s Restaurant, launched
by Mr Wally Sinith in the 1960s,
has been run in recent years by
his daughter, Maureen.

Now she has sold it to an
unknown buyer who reportedly
plans to appoint a manager to
run the operation.

MINISTER of Local Govy-
ernment Sidney Collie will be
in Abaco on February 18 to

down’

hear town planning appeals.

On the agenda is a contro-
versial condo project near the
ferry dock in Marsh Harbour.

Locals have protested that
the three-block development is
out-of-scale on its waterfront
site.

They also complained that
the three-storey units broke
height restrictions.

A Nassau attorney is behind
the development.

ABACO?’s annual Junkanoo
parade takes place on Febru-
ary 21 with at least three senior
government figures in atten-
dance.

Tourism Minister Neko
Grant, Education Minister Carl
Bethel and Minister of State for
Culture Charles Maynard will
be at the event, to be held in
Marsh Harbour.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 3



ee a Orn ee a
More than 400 migrants

caught in Bahamas waters

US Coast Guard
‘extremely busy in the
Windward passage in
the last three weeks’

HE U S Coast Guard
has reported that it
intercepted more
than 400 suspected illegal
immigrants in Bahamian
waters in the last three weeks.

A 210-foot Coast Guard
ship assigned to patrol the
windward passage and the
southern Bahamas region
intercepted a 30-foot Haitian
sailing sloop 25 miles south-
east of Acklins Island on
Thursday.

Although only 15 Haitian
nationals were initially visible
on the weather decks of the
sloop when sighted by Coast
Guard aircraft patrolling in
the region, the U S Coast
Guard confirmed there were
actually 73 Haitian nationals
onboard.

Each of the 73 migrants
were safely transferred to the
Coast Guard ship and will be
directly repatriated to Haiti
within the next few days, the
Coast Guard said.

The U S Embassy said in a
statement yesterday that
Coast Guard ships and aircraft
have been “extremely busy in
the windward passage within
the last three weeks assisting

in the protection of the shores
of the Bahamas and the Turks
and Caicos Islands.”

Since 18 January the Coast
Guard interdicted four over-
loaded sailing sloops from
departure points in Haiti
attempting to land in the
Bahamas and the United
States.

Other recent Haitian sloop
intercepts made by the U S
Coast Guard in the windward
passage include:

e Saturday, February 2 — the
Coast Guard intercepted a 40-
foot Haitian sloop 30 miles
southwest of Great Inagua
with 131 Haitian nationals
onboard.

All 131 were transferred to
the U S Coast Guard ship and
repatriated directly back to
Port Au Prince on Tuesday,
February 5.

¢ Monday, January 21 — the
Coast Guard intercepted a 40-
foot Haitian sloop just south
of Santo Domingo Key with
163 Haitian nationals
onboard. All were safely
transferred to the Coast
Guard cutter and the empty
sloop was then sunk, report-
edly because it was a hazard to

passage.

AN

ERNE



maritime navigation. All
‘migrants in this case were
repatriated to Port-au-Prince
by the cutter.

e Friday, January 18 — the
Coast Guard intercepted a
northbound, 40-foot Haitian
sloop 11 miles southeast of
Great Inagua with 80 Haitian
nationals onboard. All 80
migrants were safely trans-
ferred to the Coast Guard ship
and repatriated to Port-au-
Prince within a few days.

In total since mid-January,
the Coast Guard has inter-
cepted a total of 447 Haitian
migrants who were directly
repatriated back to Haiti.

Such direct repatriations by
the U S Coast Guard — in lieu
of transfer and detention in
the Bahamas — have saved the
government of the Bahamas
an estimated $97,000 in repa-
triation costs, said the U S
Embassy in a statement.

To supplement the maritime |
efforts of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, the U S Coast
Guard maintains at least one
multi-mission ship in the wind-
ward passage and southern
Bahamas region year round.

As part of the U S and

‘Bahamas Comprehensive

Maritime Agreement, U S
Coast Guard ships patrol with
a trained member of the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force
who assists in all maritime law
enforcement matters in
Bahamian territorial waters.

U S Coast Guard aircraft
also assist in these efforts
through daily flights covering
vast portions of the Bahamian
maritime region.

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An Acklins man: has
alleged that his livelihood is
suffering because of inaction
and ineptitude on the part of
local government officials on
the island.

He claims they gave him
the wrong plans for a local
public works project.

The man is calling on his
island’s representative,
MICAL MP Alfred Gray, to
right the situation.

Clinton Rolle told The Tri-
bune yesterday that he was
awarded the contract to build

January of last year. .

Local government, he
claimed, later acknowledged
after he had almost completed
the work that they had not
provided him with the correct
plans for the project.

“It was the wrong size,” he
‘said.

He then calculated that he
would require an extra $8,000
to $10,000 to complete the job
required.

Mr Rolle said that in Feb-
ruary, 2007, he wrote to the
Local Council Board, as well
as to Chief Councillor Raw-
ston Cox and Mr Gray, point-
ing out the mistake and
requesting the additional
money.

Receiving no response, he
was forced to stop work on
the court in early March,



Acklins resident



a public basketball court in-







when it was around 75 to 80
per cent finished, because of
lack of funds.

Mr Rolle said he has yet to
hear from Mr ‘Cox or Mr
Gray in relation to the matter
and while he is uncertain, he
believes that “politics” may
be involved.

Meanwhile, the court sat
untouched until yesterday,
said Mr Rolle, when he saw
another set of workmen on
the site.

“They never gave me a let-
ter of termination or anything
but I see other people work-
ing on the job,” he said.

Mr Rolle said he has been
unable to pay his bills, includ-
ing some workmen, because
of the money shortage.

“Even if they don’t give me
the money to complete the
job I would like to pay the
persons that I owe,” he
added.

His frustration was height-
ened because, he alleges, oth-
er people awarded contracts
for works on the island,
including docks and other
recreational facilities, were
paid in full by local govern-
ment officials despite no work
yet having been done on
those projects.

Messages left for Alfred
Gray and Mr Cox seeking
comment were not returned
up to press time.





























peers Moss targets St Cecilia

contract woes hit

nomination for the PLP

Says Cynthia Pratt
has indicated she
will not run in 2012

= By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEY and social
activist Paul Moss has
announced that he wants the
nod from the Progressive Lib-
eral Party to run as its candi-
date in the St Cecilia con-
stituency in the next general
election.

The current MP, deputy
leader of the PLP Cynthia Pratt,
has reportedly indicated that
she will not run in the 2012
election, Mr Moss told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Mrs Pratt is recouping at
home from a bout of tendonitis
to her upper left hip and has
opted to possibly avoid the
House of Assembly when it
next sits in order to properly
heal the problem.

On Wednesday, Mrs Pratt
tried to visit the House for the
duration of its sitting. However,
a continual sharp pain from the
tendonitis forced her to return
home.

“Pm not where I want to be
yet, but I’m better than I was. I

At the time, Mrs Pratt said
she would not be making any
decisions about her future as
deputy leader, other than she
intends to continue to serve the
people of St Cecilia to the best
of her ability.

“Tm going to still serve my
people. I gave them my word
that I will serve them, and I am
going to do that. As I said, I will
discuss my future at the con-
vention when I make my speech
to the nation. But in terms of
serving, I will serve my people.
I have given my word, and I
have to live by my word,” she
said.

While admitting that he has
not received the go-ahead to
run in the area as yet from par-
ty leader Perry Christie, Mr
Moss said ‘he is one of those
who have been working the
area for some time, and he will
continue to work it.

“I believe I will be success-
ful. No doubt the party needs
the kind of things that persons
like me can deliver. That is lead-
ership, experience, and wisdom
to assist in the growth of this
country,” Mr Moss said.

Commenting on his ties to St

‘Yhe Matl-at-Marathon

don’t know if I will go in next — Cecilia, Mr Moss said hie grew - The Mat
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

week, but maybe the following
week hopefully I will be in top
shape to get back to the helm,”

up in the area, and still enjoyed
the support of many young peo-
ple in the community.

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 8TH, 2008 __

ROSCOE JENKINS NEW | 1:00



been accepted for an MA
course in publishing at the Uni-
versity of Sydney, Australia.
Ms Marquis, 21, graduated
last year with a BA(Hons)
degree in history from the Uni-
versity of Western Ontario,
Canada, and is now working in

Crisis
Centre
hotline
p ro b | e€ m Australia.

Her brother, John Jr., who

THE Crisis Centre’s hotline ajgo attended Queen’s College,
eee is temporarily out of jg studying history at the Uni-
order. ersity of Sydney.

Emergencies should be oC e ae
referred to police until further * THE Cabinet Office has

notice. announced that Daylight Sav-

ing Time will begin at 2am on

: Sunday, March 9 and will con-

* FORMER Queen’s College tinue until 2am on Sunday,
student Annabella Marquishas — \jgyember 2.

she said.

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FIRST SUNDAY


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

Solutions for

the ‘House’
on Justice

f

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hopr.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Needed: tobacco non-proliferation treaties

WACO, Texas — The United States
should work with the United Nations to
pass tobacco nonproliferation treaties.

The World Health Organization esti-
mates tobacco use will kill 1 billion people
in the 21st century unless governments
aggressively curb the spread and use of

. tobacco. Responsible governments felt

that it was imperative to pursue treaties to
stop the spread of arms and nuclear
weapons for the sake of humanity. They
should make an effort to vanquish tobacco
products for the same reason.

The WHO Report on the Global Tobac-
co Epidemic, 2008, according to The Asso-
ciated Press, urges all nations to dramati-
cally increase efforts to prevent young peo-
ple from beginning to smoke, help smokers
quit and protect nonsmokers from expo-
sure to secondhand smoke.

Many people are willing to accept hun-
dreds of thousands of needless deaths
annually when it comes to the use of tobac-
co but deeply mourn only a fraction of
those deaths caused by military action.

Though government studies estimate
that 500,000 Americans die every year

from tobacco-related diseases, Congress.

refuses to give the Food and Drug Admin-
istration the power to regulate tobacco
products.

In a 16-month period, more Americans
are killed by tobacco than all the com-
bined battle deaths that occurred during
the Civil War, World War I, World War II
and the Korean War, as well as the wars in
Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq. The total
battle deaths of those wars come to
642,447.

How many of those'battle deaths could
have been prevented remains a subject of
debate since wars often must be fought to
preserve independence and freedom.

There is no debate, however, on the
number of tobacco-related deaths that can
be prevented — all of them.

A major obstacle in establishing an inter-
national effort to reduce tobacco deaths
was spelled out in the WHO report. Gov-
ernments around the world collect more
than $200 billion in tobacco taxes every
year. Out of all those revenues, the report

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said less than one fifth of 1 per cent of
that revenue is spent on tobacco control.

That should come as no surprise to
Americans who have seen their politicians
go out of their way to avoid placing
restraints on the tobacco companies that
pump campaign donations into campaign
coffers.

In 1965, cigarette packages manufac-
tured in the United States were required to
carry.a warning label that said: “Cigarette
smoking may be hazardous to your
health.”

In 1970, the warning labels were changed
to say: “The surgeon general has deter-
mined that cigarette smoking is danger-
ous to your health.”

These warning labels were a boon to
American tobacco companies. The labels
were used to prevail over lawsuits attempt-
ing to recover damages for the death and
maiming caused by cigarette smoking.

Their customers were warned, argued
the tobacco companies, and they chose to
ignore the warnings.

Despite the lack of assistance from the
nation’s capital, lawsuits started going
against the tobacco industry. Cities, states
and business leaders successfully pushed
for laws, ordinances and rules that curbed
smoking.

In 2006, a federal judge ruled that tobac-
co companies have violated civil racke-
teering laws by conspiring for decades to
deceive the public about the dangers of
their product.

A Harvard study early this year con-
cluded that cigarette makers have for years
deliberately increased nicotine levels in
cigarettes to make them more addictive.

Congress still refuses to give the FDA
power to regulate tobacco products that
ar. increasingly being marketed in foreign
countries.

Unless the United States works with the
United Nations to control the spread and
use of tobacco products worldwide, it
appears likely that tobacco will kill 1 billion
people by 2100.

(This article was written by Rowland
Nethaway of the Waco Tribune-Herald —
Cox News Service). .








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EDITOR, The Tribune.

COMPLAINT after com-
plaint has overwhelmed our
media concerning crime, pover-
ty, illegal immigration and var-
ious other social ills. The cry for
a cure comes from all quarters
of this beautiful nation and
many persons have expressed
sound commentaries on these
topics.

As to the negative portions
of these commentaries, this
writer refuses to partake. Fur-
thermore, one notices that the
quality of discourses tend to
weaken when negative com-
mentaries are not accompanied
by solutions. Therefore, in this
two-tiered commentary, con-
cerning our present state of
affairs, one hopes that solutions
can be found.

The Justice System: Firstly, it
should be clarified that this term
is being used loosely here to
encompass all those agencies
and establishments that deal
with the courts, be they public
or private entities, be they pros-
ecution or defence.

Citizens, and rightly so, are
concerned with the rise in
crime, the perceived lack of
punishment of wrongdoers,
speedy recourse to civil reme-
dies and the access to justice
generally. However, it is very
disconcerting to see that due to
the political polarisation of this
country, the most astute, even
the most venerable, have not
stepped forward and offered
solutions to solving these vexing
problems.

Additionally, we know that
it may be rather difficult for par-
ty loyalists to believe but most
of the disintegration in values
that we see in most of our insti-
tutions actually began with the
disintegration in the values of
the men and women that ‘we’
have placed in Parliament. This
‘hate’ mentality displayed in
Parliament is astounding. I have
yet to see party colleagues scold
one of their own for displaying
unprofessional behaviour
towards an opposing member
of the House. Agreeably this is
a broad position to take but
unfortunately, the conduct dis-
played in Parliament is now tan-
tamount to tribalis u.

Sadly, we the citizens of this

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net




country have followed our lead-
ers down this path of character
assassination through ‘name-
blaming’ and destruction. This is
unfortunate because we the
electorate have revered our
politicians so much that we have
inadvertently transferred all
power to them. Equally unfor-
tunate is the fact that we have
become comfortable being lord-
ed over by them. This is evident
in the way we applaud when
our respective party spend their
first 18 months in office head-
hunting while neglecting to fix
the problems at hand.

In taking precaution, the fol-
lowing statements are expressed
solely to highlight the powers
of Parliament. Firstly, Parlia-
ment is directly responsible for
amending all statutes in this
country. Never be fooled, it is
not a judge’s responsibility to
change law nor is it the former
administration’s job. This blame
game has been going on for so
long by Parliamentarians, that
they have successfully been able
to move the public’s focus off
their inability to formulate pro-
gressive policies and legislation.

Further, if the public has
problems with alleged criminals
being let out on bail, then check
with Parliament, they have to
amend the Act, not the court. If
criminal trials are not progress-
ing fast enough through the sys-
tem, then go to Parliament, they
are the ones who set the budget
for the Attorney General’s
Office. Parliament is the one
that set judge’s remuneration
packages. They are the ones
that allocate funding for the
building of courtrooms. If there
is alleged abuse by the police,
then see Parliament, they have
no interest in introducing a
Police and Criminal Evidence
Act (PACE) to govern police
conduct, interviews, investiga-
tions and length of time in cus-
tody but see them anyway. As
for civil remedies, it is the same
thing and the list goes on.

Justice House: the second
part of this commentary con-

THE TRIBUNE

cerns a building structure of the
previous mentioned name. The
suggested location of this build-
ing is the southern end of the
property (a paid parking lot)
located on Shirley Street oppo-
site the Sandringham House
building. The northern end of
that very same property can be
used for parking.

This seven-storey structure
will house all of the Supreme
Courts, an International Arbi-
tration Centre (to be fully
developed in another letter),
the Supreme Court Registry, all
Registrars Chambers, stenog-
rapher’s offices, libraries and
small conference rooms for pri-
vate counsel.

Additionally, there should be
two media rooms, with copiers,
fax, internet access, vending
machines, telephones and video
links to each court for the news
reporters. Clearly, media hous-
es will pay an annual subscrip-
tion to use these rooms and ID
and ‘swipe’ cards would be
mandatory.

Just south of this property is
the old nurses training centre,
located on Sands Lane, which is
the road leading to the Princess
Margaret Hospital. This build-
ing can be converted into a
police station with holding cells
for all persons with matters
before the court. On the eastern
boundary of this property, an
access road, from Shirley Street
to Sands Lane, should be built
for the use of Judges and Reg-
istrars only.

There are so many other
aspects to this vision, however,
this is just an overview of an
idea that if executed correctly,
can bring tangible, practical and
aesthetic solutions to our coun-
try’s self-esteem and interna-
tional image.

Again a.,dream placed on
paper for the world to see. Who
will dare stand in Parliament
today and say that this coun-
try’s duty of care towards our
fellowman has all but disap-
peared; who will stand and say.
that the country cannot survive
another decade of doing busi-
ness as usual.

DWAYNE J HANNA
Nassau,
January 31, 2008.

ress will
overnance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I can't speak for the rest of
the country, but personally I'm
thoroughly fed up with the
unending vitriolic exchange
between the government and
opposition. To add insult to
injury, the main focus of The
Tribune's editorial and Mon-
day’s column these days seems
to be purely on scorching Mr.
Christie and his followers.

I'm not excusing or exoner-
ating the PLP or the Christie
government of their poor gov-
ernance and their many political
debacles of the last five years,
however the present govern-
ment has done very little during
their first nine months in office
other than to pontificate on and
gloat over the already well doc-
umented failures of their pre-
decessors.

The Tribune possesses for-
midable literary talent and it is

a shame to see it wasted on
chastising only the opposition
when the présent administra-
tion should also have their feet
held to the fire for their lack of
affirmative action in dealing
with our country's many press-

- ing issues. By and large, all we

have had to date from them is
lip service; they are far from
perfection and must be made
aware that people who live in
glass houses shouldn't throw
stones.

It's time to put an end to the
blame game, stop fighting like
little boys over a bag of mar-
bles, and get on with what you
were elected to do, GOVERN!

In closing, I might add that
an objective and unbiased press
would help considerably in
pointing the way forward.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
January 31, 2008.

Port must go

EDITOR, The Tribune.
PLEASE allow me space in
your newspaper to express my
views on the move of the Nas-
sau port from Bay Street to
Clifton Pier. In my opinion, this
would be a move in the right
direction. Bay Street is a promi-
nent tourist area, and I feel that
the existing port not only cre-
ates congestion and pollution,
but is also a complete eyesore.
This move would also give
access to prime sea front prop-
erty that can be used to further
enhance our tourism product.
Consideration needs to be

given to the inevitable growth
over the coming years. The
group contracted to research
this project stated that Bay
Street will not be able to accom-
modate the volume over the
next 30 years. This, however, ts
an issue that our government
needs to pay close attention to,
It is just a matter of proper
planning, because this move is
both technically and economi-
cally feasible.

SAM-ME
Nassau,
February 5, 2008.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS 7



m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

“IT vex at how reckless these
no-good jitney drivers are!
My car gone in the shop last
week and so I had to catch
the number 15 home, and I
been in fear of my life every
night. I lost count of how
many times one
crazy bus driver
run the red light,
turned corners
like a fire was
behind him or
speed like he
ain’ get no
sense.

“Not to men-
tion the damage
to my eardrums
with that loud
music they have
to blast. How do
these people get
drivers licenses?
Traffic on the
road is a mess
but trust me as soon as my
car get fix I ain’ stepping my
pinkey toe on another jitney.”

— Maxine S, Robinson
Road

“[T vex because I almost
break my car right up on one
big pot hole on Shirley Street.
And on Sunday I saw a three
car accident on that road just
cuz someone fall in that pot
hole.

“Every month someone’s
birthday comes up and they
have to go and renew their
car’s licence and insurance.
We paying the government
thousands of dollars every
month to drive on these
messed up roads what
breakin’ up people car. I
don’t think that’s fair — you
mise’well just walk where you
gat to go.”



Why you Vex?





— Frank R, Marathon

“You know why I vex?
Because | don’t think our
government is setting a good
example for Bahamian chil-
dren. When a member of par-
liament is trying to give a
speech in the House of
Assembly, persons elected
into office carry on like they
in a fishmarket throwin’
insults and jeers
at one another,
giving no
respect to the
lady or gentle-
man who is
speaking.

“Then they
tell the children
in schools to be
polite, quiet and
respectful of
others. How
they expect
young people to
take them seri-
ous when you
could turn on
the TV and see
them acting
worse than lil’ chirren?”

— Darren W, Sea Breeze.







“IT vex about how they have
that road, Tonique Williams
Darling Highway, set up. If
there is a lil’ fender bender
or a car breaks down on that
highway, traffic is be backed
up for miles. Ain’t no space to
push a car on the side, traffic
is be jammed right up, and its
dangerous at night because it
can cause even more acci-
dents.

“They need to rethink how
they have that road planned
out.

And when you think they
ga’ fix that red light by Bar
20 corner? That light never
workin’. Man, they need to
do better than that,”

— Cedric S, Carmichael





; Road
MP concerned

at high level of
road accidents

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The high
number of injuries caused by
traffic accidents should be a
matter of great concern,
according to Grand Bahama
MP Kwasi Thompson.

“One need only visit the
accident and emergency cen-
tres of our medical institutions,
or visit the hospital wards —
especially the orthopaedic
ward,” said Mr Thompson.

He was speaking at the
opening the first Road Traffic
Youth Symposium on Thurs-
day.

“I wish to remind. you that
of the 11 (traffic) fatalities for
2007, one of those persons was
a six-year-old pedestrian, a stu-
dent,” he said. “There have
also been many injuries to chil-
dren as a result of traffic acci-
dents.”

Mr Thompson said the gov-
ernment is committed to
ensuring that the message of
road safety awareness is
ingrained in the next genera-
tion.

He noted that the problem
is an international one, as sta-
tistics provided by the World
Health Organisation indicate
that 40 children die every hour
around the world as a result
of traffic accidents.

Addressing the high school
students in attendance, Mr
Thompson told them that chil-
dren and young adults are the
most vulnerable groups among
road users.

In an effort to reduce the
number road accidents on the
island, the Grand Bahama
Road Safety Committee and
the Road Traffic Department
held its first annual Youth
Symposium at the Foster B
Pestaina Hall.

The symposium sought to
target future drivers by engag-
ing them in productive discus-
sions regarding road safety and
encouraging them to exchange

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

RET
PHONE: 322-2157



ideas for road safety strategies
that would appeal to young
people.

Stephanie Rahming, Assis-
tant Comptroller of Road
Traffic, said the symposium is
designed to educate students
about the consequences of
irresponsible road use. “Your
entire course can be altered as
a result of a serious accident,”
she warned.

Mr Thompson said he
believes that the support of
corporate businesses, schools,
parents, and community
organisations, can create a cul-
ture of responsibility.

“Responsible driving can
save lives and reduce the
occurrence of road accidents,”
he said.

“We cannot take it for
granted that all will be well
when we are on the road.
Complacency can lead to dis-
aster and tragedy. By being
more mindful of our road con-
duct, we will help keep our
roads safe.

“I am pleased that the
organisers have planned a fun
and effective way of inculcat-
ing road safety awareness in
our students.

At the symposium students
were given information on the
types of insurance policies
available ‘to teenage drivers
and factors that contribute to
accidents.

Students also heard from a
crash survivor and were given
information about the road
traffic legislation currently in
place. ,

Mr Thompson said the sym-
posium is a step in the right
direction and that he hopes
the experience will make a dif-
ference in the lives of students
and reduce number of deaths
and injuries on the streets.

‘““As we continue to educate
our children on road safety,
we as drivers must also play
our part. I urge all motorists to
exercise patience and caution
on the roads, as our young
ones may be less aware of the
potential hazards around,” he
said.

He commended the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Traffic
Division and members of the
Grand Bahama Road Safety
Committee for their commit-
ment to road safety.

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Teacher-pupil sex not
common in Bahamas

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

COMPLAINTS of female
teachers having sexual rela-
tionships with male students is
uncommon in the Bahamas, a
senior ministry official told The
Tribune yesterday.

On Thursday, Elma Gar-
raway, permanent secretary in
the Ministry of Education,
Youth, and Sports, confirmed
to The Tribune that there is an
ongoing investigation at her
ministry into allegations of a
sexual relationship between a
female teacher and a male stu-

dent at a public school.
When asked yesterday about
the prevalence of these types of

complaints, she said that in the _

past, the few they have received ”
involved male teachers and
female students. Mrs Garraway
emphasised however that there~
have not been many of these
complaints.

“This is extraordinary,” she
said.

Mrs Garraway did not com-
ment on whether this particu-
lar allegation will or will not be
referred to police when asked
by The Tribune.

Instead, she said yesterday
that it was “under investiga-
tion”.

Governor-General

thanks the Dutch



By Lindsay Thompson

THE government has
acknowledged the Netherlands
for its leading role in supporting
international agreements which
seek to curb the proliferation
of weapons of mass destruction.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna made this statement as
he accepted letters of credence
from Christiaan Mark Johan
Kroner, non-resident ambas-
sador of the Kingdom of the

Netherlands to the Bahamas, at .

a ceremony at Government
House on Thursday.

The Bahamas has approved,
in principle, the ratification of
the Chemical Weapons Con-
vention, a United Nations treaty
that bans the development, pro-
duction, stockpiling, transfer
and use of chemical weapons,
and stipulates their timely
destruction.

“The Bahamas has also
attached highest priority to the
adherence to such agreements,
and its signing of the Chemical
Weapons Convention on
March, 2, 1994, underlines its
historic commitment to non-
proliferation,” the governor
general said.

He told Ambassador Kroner.
“Your political and security
experience, and acknowledg-
ment of the extended friend-
ship between our two countries,
make you a valuable partner for
the challenges of today.”

He also noted that the
Netherlands’ support for a suc-
cessful completion to the waiv-
er negotiations for the Schen-
gen Visa would be of ‘special
importance” to the Bahamas.

The Antilles and Aruba form
an integral part of the Kingdom
of the Netherlands, and like the
Bahamas, are built on tourism
and financial services, the gov-
ernor general said. “The
Bahamas would like to embrace
opportunities to fortify our rela-
tions in these areas.”

He noted that both countries
share a fundamental belief in
democratic values, internation-
al co-operation, and upholding
and advancing the rule of inter-
national law. — ,

“In this regard, the Bahamas
looks forward to the continued
partnering with the Kingdom
of the Netherlands in promoting
the common goals of peace,
goodwill, sovereign equality and
security,” the governor general
said.

He told the ambassador that
the Bahamas intends to use his
appointment to further the
long-standing friendship
between the two countries, giv-
en the Netherlands’ member-
ship in the Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) and the
European Union.

“We, therefore, count on the
Kingdom of the Netherlands to
ensure the OECD’s regulations
on financial services are fair,
just and equitable for all,”’ the
governor general said. “It is also
our hope that the Netherlands
will play an important role in
ensuring that European Union
investment in the Bahamas is
sustained, indeed increased, and
the transfer of advanced man-
agement skills and new tech-
nologies emphasised.”

Ambassador Kroner said the
Bahamas has enjoyed friendly
ties with the Netherlands since
the Dutch first sailed Caribbean
waters.

He said the ties between the
countries are not confined to
economic matters, and asked
for the Bahamas’ support as his
country seeks a seat on the
United Nations Human Rights
Council.

“The promotion and respect
of human rights is one of the
main priorities in our foreign
policy.

“Your support in this regard
is needed and truly appreciat-
ed,” he said.

Armed robbers
‘exposed’ during
officer’s pursuit

ST. THOMAS, US Virgin
Islands (AP) — A police officer
who chased armed robbery sus-
pects clad only in his underwear
won praise yesterday for not
letting a little exposure get in
the way of his job.

Officer Dariel Chinnery
jumped, barely clothed, into his
cruiser this week and chased
two men suspected of a violent
armed robbery in St. Thomas.

Chinnery, a veteran officer,
went “a little above the call of
duty”, said Police Chief Rod-
ney Querrard, whose depart-

In brief

Body found

in South
Ocean area

A man’s body was found in
the South Ocean area of New
Providence late last night.

Little information was ayail-
able at press time, but Chief
Superintendent Hulan Hanna
said the matter is considered a
case of sudden death, and foul
play is not suspected by the
police.

ment has struggled to contain
arise in violent crime in the US
Caribbean island territory.

On Tuesday night, a man
frantically banged on Chin-
nery’s door, saying he had been
shot in the arm by two men who
demanded all his money, police
said.

Chinnery grabbed his gun as
the suspects drove away. After
a short car chase, the men aban-
doned their car and escaped on
foot. Chinnery is well-known
for issuing traffic tickets and
using the loudspeaker on his
patrol car to order people to
move illegally parked cars.

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When asked if her ministry
has a.timetable for concluding
the investigation, the perma-
nent secretary said:

“Well, we would hope that
we can have it all investigated
and concluded as soon as possi-
ble. We would wish to have it
done as soon as possible.”

When The Tribune contacted
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel he did not wish to com-
ment on the active investigation
beyond what was already said
by his ministry through the per-
manent secretary. ”

The Tribune has learned that
the female teacher in question is
32 years old, the male student is
16 years old, and school in ques-

tion is in inner city New Provi-
dence.

Reports have also indicated
that the teacher has been
removed from her post at the
school.

In the U S, the case of Mary
Kay Letourneau made interna-
tional headlines years ago, after
she was convicted of statutory
rape of Vili Fualaau.

He was a six grade student in
her class when she had sex with

¢him.

She was 34 and he was 13
when the relationship began.

After her release from prison,
she and Mr Fualaau eventually
married and they have two chil-
dren.





Mark Johan Kroner, non-resident ambassador of the Kingdom of the

Netherlands



SU
SHAUL |

A financial institution seeks an Accountant.
Candidates must have at least 3 years experience
in accounting in the financial industry with sound
knowledge of but not limited to:

Formulating budgets

Managing Accounts Receivables and

Payables

Preparation of monthly and annual

financial reports and statements

Preparation of bank reconciliations and

various general ledger accounts to the sub

ledgers

Co-ordinate the annual audit with external

auditors and preparation of the necessary

schedules

Preparing reports for the regulators

Must be a team player
Must possess people skills and be prepared

to interact with members
Minimum qualifications: AA in

Accounting

Please forward resume before
February 18, 2008 to P.O. Box N-7544



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1
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Artist broadens ‘Stop
the Violence’ campaign

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A local artist and concerned
resident of Freeport is taking his “stop the vio-
lence” message to the wider community by
launching a public awareness ad campaign against
crime with the help of sponsors on Grand
Bahama.

Paul Joseph, an artist whose painting entitled,
“Stop the Violence”, was featured in local and
national newspapers, said there has been positive
feedback from many persons in Freeport and
Nassau who saw the painting and read the article.

As a result of the “overwhelming” support he
has received, Mr Joseph has decided to run an ad

Eight Mile Rock ©
Town Committee
now fully staffed

Chere FT Ye | Peace Wesleyan Church
PETC Meee m eee eed le

North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED

Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:4)a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Revival Services
February 13-17, 2008
Speaker: Rev. Steve Bell

from Bradenton Free Methodist Church, Florida

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE




















orinieaindsams P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
wmummea Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
guamea CHURCH SERVICES .

Mm SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2008

q Z FIRST SUNDAY BEFORE LENT

11:00AM

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM

Rev. Mark Carey







Bernard Road

11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss



Zion Boulevard
10:00AM
7:00PM

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM

7:00PM

Rey. Charles Sweeting
No Service





Rev. Charles New
Rev. Charles New





Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly

8:00AM

9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs

(i 11:00AM Rey. William Higgs/HC

RADIO PROGRAMMES




‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: _Rev. James D. Neilly

Your Host: Mr. Janice J. Knowles

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH, 2008.

7:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.

& Church School

Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)



THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road

Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
Connections - Rev. Philip Stubbs

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street

‘METHODIST MOMENTS?’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.

FR A A AR A A A A A A EE AR Ee AC A ee AC A He A AR A RAR AOR AR AR AC eR ER ee ACR A

The Nassau Regional Women’s Fellowship will be
holding their Anniversary Service and Installation
Service for New Officers on Sunday, February 10,
2008 at 3:00 p.m. at Trinity Methodist Church.

Rev. Charles Sweeting/Sis. Marilyn Tinker

Rev. Carla Culmer/Usher Board Anniversary

Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Christian Education



of his painting in newspapers in hopes of getting
through to criminals and alerting the public about
the seriousness of the crime problem.

He feels that every Bahamian citizen must do
his or her part to reduce.crime in the country. The
ad started running in The Freeport News last
week, he said.

“Crime has become a national disease that is
destroying the well-being of our country, where
we have recorded nine murders already in New
Providence in January,” he said.

Mr Joseph thinks that his initiative will make a
difference in the Freeport community.

He has also distributed posters of his painting,
which are displayed at some businesses on the
island.

The painting shows a peaceful Bahamian land-

scape marred by a tragic bloody crime scene,
highlighted by crime scene tape.

The chalk outline of a victim interrupted by
blood flowing from the head represents those
who have lost their lives to violent crime.

The Bahamian flag is flown at half mast as a
tribute to officers who fell in the line of duty,
and as a symbol of a nation in mourning.

A gun and a cutlass signify the weapons of
choice for criminals.

An empty rum bottle and a‘ numbers” receipt
signify the national pastimes, Mr Joseph said,
while a skull and crossbones symbolises death.

A Bible at the base of a coconut tree is open to
Proverbs 14:34 — “Righteousness exalts a nation,
but sin is a reproach to any people.”

Violence in 2007 when a close friend received
the devastating news that his missing son’s body
had been discovered.

He said that businesses are supporting his ini-
tiative and have donated funds to help with the ad
campaign.

Mr Joseph said that successive Bahamian gov-
ernments have promised to implement compre-
hensive plans to reduce crime, but he believes
capital punishment must become a part of the
long term solution.

He said that the Bahamian people are entitled
to live in a safe and civilised society.

“Like a pebble striking a still pond, the rip-
pling effect of crime touches everyone. Let us
unite to remove the blight of crime from our

Mr Joseph was first inspired to paint Stop the — land,”





ders.



















Adult Education



CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS » Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2008.
11:30 a.m.Speaker:

PASTOR DEXTER DUVALIER

of Christ Community Church
6:00 p.m. EVENING SERVICE |

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. * Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
» Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. * Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)





OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY

SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning Worship Service
Sunday School tor all ages ...
Worship S@IVICE oor 11.00am.
Spanish Service...
Evening Worship Service

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching

Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionettes (Girls Club} 4-14 yrs,

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

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Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O, Box: N-1566
Email Cu ols VOR CM VCH HC Ret]



ee

VTS for MNES ee Bahama District, Rufus Johnson, is pictured delivering the oath of office to three ne Eight Mie 3
Rock East Town Committee members on Tuesday. From left are: Administrator Johnson, Darron Grant, Vandyke Hepburn and Roscoe Saun-

EIGHT MILE ROCK,
Grand Bahama - For the first
time in almost two and a half
years, the Eight Mile Rock
East township has its full com-
plement of local government
representatives.

Minister for Lands and
Local Government Sidney
Collie has appointed Vandyke
Hepburn, Darron Grant and
Roscoe Saunders to fill the
vacant spots on the nine-mem-
ber town committee.

The posts were left vacant
last year, requiring the minister
responsible to appoint persons
to fill these posts.

The three men live in the
Eight Mile Rock East area and
were sworn into office by the
administrator for west Grand
Bahama Rufus Johnson dur-
ing a brief ceremony at the
Administrator’s Office in Eight
Mile Rock on Tuesday after-
noon.

Mr Hepburn is a veteran
photographer attached to
Bahamas Information Services
in Freeport.

Mr Grant currently serves as
the project manager for the








aa
XS 4
ttimefor




(Sunday School: 10am
/Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2













8.30 am,
9.45 a.m.

he said.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURC
' SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

FUNDAMENTA
EVANGELISTIC

~ PastomH. Mills

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are’
(Pastor: H. Mills « Phone: 393-0563 « 6

SIMON LEWIS/BIS

Ginn Group and is a civil engi-
neer.

Mr Saunders is well known
in the west Grand Bahama dis-
trict. He is a construction engi-
neer who worked at the Min-
istry of Works for several
years.

The Eight Mile Rock East
Town Committee members
are:

e Chairman Percy Charlton

e Deputy chairman Rosney
Cooper

e Calvis Bartlett

e Harold Curry

e James Vega

e Joylean Rolle

e Mr Hepburn

e Mr Grant

e Mr Saunders

In swearing in the three new
members, Mr Johnson asked
that they be honest, fair and
sincere in carrying out their
duties and that they use their
term in office to help in build-
ing the township.

Local government elections
throughout the country are
expected before July 1, 2008.
Members are elected for a
three year term.



945 am,

8.00 a.m.
6.30 p.m.

Place:

Center
(Next door to CIBC)





© LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Wor orship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

The Madeira Shopping

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs






THE TRIBUNE





LE Ta tT

THE race is on for the crown-
ing of the 40th Miss Bahamas
Universe.

The winner will represent the
country at the Miss Universe
Pageant to be held in Vietnam
this July.

“There are some 16 beauti-
ful young ladies in the line-up
with eager anticipation of secur-
ing one of the three top spots
which will afford them the
opportunity of representing the
Bahamas internationally,” said
the organisers in a statement.
“However the most coveted is
that of the Miss Bahamas Uni-
verse title.”

Also competing are 15 young
and talented teenagers, who are
vying for the title of Miss Teen
Universal Bahamas.

This years' Miss Teen Uni-
versal Bahamas winner will be
afforded the opportunity of rep-
resenting the Bahamas in Bar-
bados, Africa, Europe and
Venezuela — as did the outgoing
- Miss Teen Universal Bahamas,
Jessica Thompkins. The dual
pageant is set for March 16.

According to the organisers,
the ladies have all participated
in a number of preparatory
workshops and seminars, the
first several of which was hosted



by platinum hotel sponsor
Superclubs Breezes.

The annual swimsuit compe-
tition will be held this week on
Eleuthera, sponsored by the
Bahamas Fast Ferries and
Valentines Resorts.

This week the organisers are
introducing eight of the contes-
tants to the public — four from
the Miss category and four from
the Teen category:

MISS BAHAMAS
UNIVERSE

JAMIE MORRIS, 20 years

old, is a bio-chemistry major at
the Omega College and the
College of the Bahamas. She
aspires to be a cardiac surgeon.
She stands at five feet nine inch-
es tall and represents the Berry

- Islands. Jamie enjoys cooking,

networking, reading and the
social arts. She feels her biggest
accomplishment is speaking in
the House of Assembly as a
youth parliamentarian.

‘ KAZHERAE ROLLE, 18
years old, is an aspiring com-
puter analyst and a sophomore
at the College of the Bahamas.
Standing at five feet, 10 inches

. tall, Kasherae loves sports, and

US scholar in
spying claim

By DAN KEANE
Associated Press Writer

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — An
American scholar said Friday
’ that an official at the U.S.
Embassy asked him to keep
tabs on Venezuelan and Cuban
workers in Bolivia. Washington
said that any such request
would be an error and against
U.S. policy.

“I was shocked,” Fulbright
scholar Alex van Schaick told
The Associated Press. “I mean,
this man’s asking me to spy for
the U.S. government.” Van
Schaick is one cf six Fulbright
scholars doing research in the
countty.

The U.S. Embassy in La Paz
issued a statement Friday saying
that “some routine information
sessions about security given to
certain American citizens
included incorrect information.
As soon as this was brought to
our attention, appropriate mea-
sures were taken to assure that
these errors would not be
repeated.”

U.S. State Department
spokesman Gonzalo Gallegos
said in Washington that any
such request would have been a
mistake.

“Worldwide, we adhere to a

strict understanding with the
Peace Corps that their volun-
teers are not permitted to act
in any sort of intelligence capac-
ity,” Gallegos said.

“If anyone suggested that any
members of either group pro-
vide information outside the
scope of their work or positions,
it was an error and is not U.S.
government policy.”

LOCAL NEWS

Contestants aim t

SHACOYA MITCHELL —



lists her all-time favourite ath-
lete as Debbie Ferguson. She is
sponsored by Lickety Split Ltd.

SACHA SCOTT, 19 years
old, is a double major student at
the University of Miami and an
advocate for the Bahamas’ nat-
ural resources. Standing at five
feet, five inches tall, she said
her most unusual job was acting
as an assistant to Anna Nicole-
Smith when the actress arrived
in the Bahamas. Representing
the island of Abaco, she is spon-
sored by Nautilus and Prime
Bahamas.

SHARIE DELVA is a six
foot, one inch tall, statuesque
beauty and super model. She is













39
Nl

Grace and Peace
Masia’ ONS

Wed, Feb. | ie 2008, 7:00 pm
Thurs, Feb. 14, 2008, 7:00 pm

Fri, Feb. 15, 2008, 7:00 pm

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2008
11:00 am & 6:00 pm

Rev. Steve Bell, oe |

Oye e, jl ah, o
Twynam Heights, Adjacent to Super Winton

SHS a

MARISSA PRATT

Miss Grand Bahama Universe
2008.

At 21 years old, she lists the
most unusual thing she has ever
done as dancing in the rain. She
is sponsored by Nyguard Cay
and aspires to own and operate
a luxury clothing and accessory
boutique.

MISS TEEN BAHAMAS

BRITTANY JOHNSON is
16 years old and well travelled.
A student at C V Bethel Senior
High, this photogenic beauty
aspires to become a dermatolo-
gist. :

SHACOYA MITCHELL is
a 15 year old honour student at



Youth Service:



eeeN een
coer



WANTED



_ Awell established Media Company is looking for a hard working male
‘to work as a Pressroom Assistant. Qualified applicants should be able

Interested persons should sent resume to:

c/o DA 04149
P.O. Box N-3207
Fax: 328-2398

email: pbrown @tribunemedia.net

:
| |
| |
| |
| |
| to work night’s between the hours of 8pm to 5am, and be prepared to |
| submit job references and a clean police record.
| |
| |
| |
| |
L. -



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 7

i anak

YULANDA FORBES



D W Davis High who excels at
academics and has a number of
choices for scholarships. She has
her eyes set on becoming a
gynecologist.

MARISSA PRATT is a role

model student at R M Bailey’

Senior High. This 16 year old
enjoys being a teenager. Look-
ing to the future, she hopes to
attend the College of the

Bahamas and become a pedia-
trician.

YULANDA FORBES says
she feels at home on the run-
way. This 16-year-old student
of the OSC School of Model-
ing and dance aspires to become
a certified public accountant.
She is sponsored by Virgo Car
Rental and Outback Steak
House:



THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS 2&8
CONFERENCE

OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE

CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE

ET LES AMERIQUES
NJ ASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)

“Celebrating 225 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas”
SIXTH LORD’S DAY BEFORE THE |
RESURRECTION, FEBURARY 10, 2008.
METHODIST SCHOOLS



COLLECT: Almighty Father, whose Son Jesus fasted forty

days in the wilderness and was tempted as we are, yet without
sin: give us grace to discipline ourselves in obedience to your
Spirit; and as you know our weakness, so may we know your
power to save; through Jesus Christ your son our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m, Rev. Edward J. Sykes
11:00 a.m. Bro. Andrew Hunter
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
(Holy Communion)
Sis. Patrice Strachan
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte ,
6:30 p.m. Class Leaders 5-7
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 am. Sis. Annette Poitier
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
9:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
6:30 p.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (healing & wellness)
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
8:00 a.m, Women
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE
5:30 p.m. Fridays Children’s Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Monastery Park Fellowship

10:00 a.m.

(Quackoo Street)

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift
Shop and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: — All Methodists of
the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to

prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to the upsurge
in violence. The fast begins weekly after the evening meal

on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday. This we proclaim
unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS Lat 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.
PAGE 8, SAIURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Calling all customers



We’ Y hj is

’ Bethel Brothers Morticians
i Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026





A State-recognised
funeral service for former
Public Administrator
JACQUELYN
MONICA MURRAY,

62

of # 26 Hillview Drive,
Winton Heights will be
held on Monday
February 11th, 2008 at
llam at Christ Church

Cathedral, George Street.
Archdeacon J. Ranfurly Brown assisted by Rev 'd.
Fr. Bernard Been, Canon Basil Tynes, Rev'd. Angela
Palacious and Rev 'd. Fr. Mervyn Johnson will
officiate. Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

She is survived by her husband; Frederick Murray;

two daughters; LaVette Johnson and Yael Walcott;
one son; Krishna Murray; grandchildren; Alyssa
Brockington, Seth Walcott and Sebastian Walcott;
son-in-law; Jeffrey Walcott; daughter-in-law; Inia
Murray; sisters; Judith Theophilus, Edith Outten,
Marina Hagan, Marguerita Major and Robynn Robert;
brother, Eneas Theophilus; step-children, Brian
Hamilton, Dwight, Duane and Douglas Murray;
nieces, Tamika, Monique, Michelle, Makayla, Sonia,
Enea, Inga, Bridgette, Renee, Annette, Pamela, Tanya,
Vivian, Andrea, Bernadette, Nakeira, Lisa and Kia;
nephews; Juan, Jamal, Keith, Don, Yvon, Kent,
Dereck, Don, Julius, Julian, D'Arcy, Omar, Valashi,
Ron, Warren, N'Kimba, N'Kumba, N'Shaka, Dominic,

Frederick, Rudolph, Dereck, Terry, Andrew and.

Ryan; sisters-in-law, Maureen Pustam, Emeline
Murray, Maxine Murray, Inez Johnson, Mary
Lightbourne and Ludelle Theophilus; brothers-in-
law, Willam Outten, Larry Hagan, Bertram Murray,
Samuel Johnson and Claude Robert and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, Nassau Street on Saturday from 10am
to 6pm. There will be no viewing at the Cathedral.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

tee TATA TTT I TATA LETT AL TILIA ITIL ISIS IIL IL ESET ELST TEL TTT TTT eT Tee eee eee

Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company president Leon
Williams speaks at the open-
ing of the company’s new
Cyber World Branch on Bay
Street.





(242) 32

Venezuela hits at
Judicial terrorism’

By FABIOLA SANCHEZ
Associated Press Writer

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuela’s
top oil official accused Exxon Mobil Corp. of
“judicial terrorism” on Friday, but said court
orders won by the oil major do not amount to
confiscation of $12 billion (8.3 billion euros) in
assets.

Exxon Mobil has gone after the assets of state -

oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela SA, in U.S.,
British and Dutch courts as it challenges the
nationalization of a multibillion dollar (euro) oil
project by President Hugo Chavez’s government.

A British court last month issued an injunc-
tion “freezing” as much as $12 billion (8.3 bil-
lion euros) in assets.

But Oil Minister Rafael Ramirez said: “They
don’t have any asset frozen. They only have
frozen $300 million” in cash through a U.S. court
in New York. As for the case in Britain, PDVSA
doesn’t have “any assets in that jurisdiction that
even come close to those sums” of $12 billion
(8.3 billion euros), Ramirez said.

Ramirez called it a “transitory measure” while
the state company, known as PDVSA, presents its
case in New York and London. Exxon Mobil is
also taking its dispute to international arbitra-
tion, which Venezuela has agreed to.

But Ramirez, who is PDVSA’s president, said
Exxon Mobil “hasn’t respected the terms of the
arbitration” and said Exxon Mobil’s claims in
the Venezuela nationalization dispute “don’t
even come close to half the sum of $12 billion
claimed by them.”

Exxon Mobil spokeswoman Margaret Ross
said the company had no comment on Ramirez’s
statements. Ramirez said the court cases “don’t
have any affect on our cash flow, don’t affect our
operational situation at all.”

Ramirez said Exxon Mobil sued in New York,
London and the Netherlands to dispute the terms
under Chavez’s nationalization last year of four
heavy oil projects in the Orinoco River basin,
one of the world’s richest oil deposits.

“We don’t have any decision by any court that’s
definitive,” Ramirez said. “We have a preventa-
tive measure in a court in New York that we

have a right to respond to, and we are going to.”

He accused the Irving, Texas-based oil major of
employing “judicial terrorism” and trying to gen-
erate “financial nervousness” around PDVSA.

According to documents filed last month in
the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, Exxon
Mobil has secured an “order of attachment” on
about $300 million (207 million euros) in cash
held by PDVSA. A hearing to confirm the order
is scheduled in New York for Feb. 13.

In a Jan. 24 “freezing injunction” by a British
High Court, the court said that “until the return
date or further order from the court,” PDVSA
“must not remove from England or Wales any of
its assets which are in England or Wales up to the
value of $12 billion (8.3 billion euros).”

The court also said that if PDVSA disobeys
the order, it could be held in contempt of court
and be fined or have assets seized.

The credit rating agency Fitch Ratings said the
British court order would “have a minimum
impact on the company’s day-to-day operations,
as well as its near-term credit quality and financial
flexibility.” The agency noted that most of
PDVSA’s assets are located in Venezuela and
the United States, where the company has refiner-
ies.

But Fitch Ratings also noted that the outcome
of the arbitration process with Exxon Mobil
remains uncertain and that “a negative outcome
of the arbitration could pressure the credit profile
of PDVSA.”

Other major oil companies including U.S.-
based Chevron Corp., France’s Total, Britain’s BP
PLC, and Norway’s StatoilHydro ASA have
negotiated deals with Venezuela to continue on as
minority partners in the Orinoco oil project.

ConocoPhillips and Exxon Mobil, however,
balked at the tougher terms and have been in
compensation talks with PDVSA.

Ramirez said Venezuelan officials have had
“very important meetings” with ConocoPhillips
Chairman Jim Mulva and have made progress
toward an agreement. “I think we’re on a path to
achieving it,” Ramirez said.

As for the dispute with Exxon Mobil, Ramirez
said “we’re going to value fairly what would be its
compensation, or not if that be the case.”

Hotel union ‘receives

assurances’

on change

events.

FROM page one

a visit to the club with friends.
He told The Bahama Jour-
nal that he had written a letter
of complaint to the communi-
ty’s chairman and board mem-
bers. “I didn’t find him very
respectful at all or very cus-
tomer friendly. I think the
quicker he gets out of The
Bahamas the better,”’ he said.
In December, minister Dion
Foulkes confirmed that the
Department of Labour had
launched an investigation “into

# The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

has a

new telephone number

(242) 677-1441

Our fax number remains:
(242) 328-2938

Our old telephone number
2-1441 is no longer

in service

The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.
Madeira Street, Palmdale
new telephone number

(242) 677-1441

the veracity of complaints”
made by the union and some
employees at the club.

This action came after the
high-profile “‘dog incident” and
the subsequent filing of an offi-
cial complaint by the union
against Mr Picquot.

Lyford Cay Property Own-
ers’ Association chairman
Christopher Hampton Davis
said the dogs were brought out
when one of the union execu-
tives, secretary Leo Douglas,
breached their security. Mr
Douglas denied this version of














Yesterday, Mr Foulkes would
not comment directly on an
insider’s claim that Mr Picquot’s
contract would not be renewed.

“I have personally been
involved with the dispute and I
have spoken to both the hotel
union and also to the Lyford
Cay Club and I am confident
that we will come up with a res-
olution to the dispute that is
acceptable to both parties,” he
said.

The minister said his role as
an “honest arbitrator” requires

that he “talk to both sides with

a certain degree of confiden-
tiality.”

A call to Mr Picquot for com-
ment was turned down, as his
assistant reiterated the club’s
policy of not commenting on
press reports.

Mr Douglas said the union’s
disgruntlement with Mr Pic-
quot, who has been at the club
for around two years, has noth-
ing to do with his expat status.

“If you cannot work along
with the organisation, it goes
for Bahamians, too,” said Mr
Douglas, referring to the -
union’s calls for the boss’s
removal. The union executive
claimed that employees and
union never experienced any
similar problems with Mr Pic-
quot’s predecessor, Paul
Thompson.

He affirmed that, should a
change of command not occur
in March, the union is set to
take further action in the form
of demonstrations.

Attorneys
explore
suing the
govenment
on court
case delays
FROM page one .

year, he does put much stock
in the police’s comments that
many homicide victims were
involved in criminal activities
themselves.

“As if that excused the mur-
der — it does not. It is irrelevant,
you must get on with the job,”
he said.

Mr Moss said it is now imper-
ative that all those accused of
murder are brought before the
courts and stand trial as soon
as possible.
THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 9















Cn SDays Yone SSy

World champion
: ‘fishing in the sun’

THIS week, In Days Gone By looks back to 1985 and sailing exploits of Donald Martinborough, three
time world Sunfish champion.

ANTI-CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A week of Sunfish sailing ended with celebration, a
night of dining, dancing and awards giving at the Yacht Club. Mr Martinborough won trophies for five
races in which he placed in the top three. He later became the first Sunfish sailor ever to win the Worlds
three times. ; :

At the announcement of the Sunfish World Championships race, scheduled for October 14 to 22 at
Montagu Bay. Left to right Fred Hazelwood, director of John Bull and Michael Jeruis of the Ministry
of Tourism, holding the Rolex Submariner watch to be awarded to the winner; John Dunkley, com-
mittee chairman of the race; Donnie Martinborough. :

Donald Martinborough shows off the trophy that he received after winning the World Championships
‘of Sunfish Sailing in Riccione Italy. This was the second time Martinborough won the prestigious cham-
pionship, having won it in 1983 in Colombia. .

Donnie Martinborough presented his father Mike with the Rolex watch he received during the pre-
sentation of awards at the Nassau Yacht Club.

PT NL gee

Wo ceases





10am-3pm

Everything Must GO!!!

These prices are unbelievable!

WING |
sat


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS:

Major Bahamas law firm t




in
@

celebrates 60th birthda
Y :

HIGGS and Johnson has — law firm ranked for “corporate — vate wealth management are all Higes and Johnson was
been a cornerstone of the advisory for private banking — key factors in the economic evo- formed by well-known Bahami-
Bahamian legal profession for clients in the Caribbean.” lution of the Bahamas and have — an attorney Godfrey Higgs and
more than half a century. Last The firm believes its success been the areas where we former registrar-general
week, the law firm celebrated comes as a result of maintaining — applied our energy to promote — Mervyn Johnson.
its history and achievements in high standards. the development of the financial For the first 10 years, the pair
style with a 60th anniversary Managing partner John © services sector and the legal held chambers on the second
celebration at its new East Bay — Delaney said, “Higgs and John- —_ profession,” he said. floor of the House of Myers on

Street offices, son has held to its ideals and The firm attributes much of | the corner of Bay Street and
Over the years, Higgs and reputation despite dramatic — its success to the “high stan- — Victoria Avenue, specialising in
fohnson has gained a reputa- changes in our culture and dards and unwavering princi- — property and commercial law.
tion of being one of the best financial system over the last 60 = ples” of its longest serving The office was then moved to
firms in the Caribbean. They — years. We willno doubt contin- — senior partner, Sir Geoffrey | Sandringham House on Shirley
are currently ranked asa Tier1 ue to hold in high regard our Johnstone. Street.
firm by the independent global commitment to maintaining “With success comes a Today, Higgs and Johnson
legal directory “Chambers and close working relationships with — responsibility to the community. — has expanded to four offices
Partners Global Guide and _ our clients and to delivering Higgs and Johnson has throughout the Bahamas with

IFLR 1000”. quality legal services. embraced this responsibility by = more than 35 lawyers practis-
In 2008, for the second con- “The firm’s expansion over being a part of a number of — ing much more than real prop-

secutive year, Higgs and John- the latter half of the 20th cen- — charitable initiatives,” said the — erty and commercial law.

son was ranked first in “inheri- — tury and its continued success __ firm ina statement. “Higgs and Their repertoire includes liti-

tance and succession planning — now into the 21st have truly par- — Johnson is the only private sec- gation, private client and wealth
in the Caribbean” by. alleled the growth of the — tor partner in the Ministry of | management, real estate and
Euromoney Magazine’s private Bahamas. Godfrey Higgs’ rep- .Education’s Teacher of the — development, commercial trans-
banking survey. utation as an attorney even Year programme and the firm actions, securities, financial ser-

They were also the highest before the firm’s inception provides a cash prize that — vices law and regulation, insol-
ranked Bahamian law firm for allowed him to attract the high- rewards educators who exem- — vency, company formation and

tax guidance and services inthe — est calibre of clients. plify excellence in education — management, maritime/shipping
region and-the only Bahamian “Real estate, banking and pri- — and leadership development.” and intellectual property.

THE Managing partner John Delaney with Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta Butler Turner

iHE H&J managing partner John Delaney (left) and senior partner Phillip Dunkley (second from left) introduce guests to'the family of tirm
founders Godfrey Higgs and Mervyn Johnson. Pictured with Messrs Delaney and Dunkley are Andrew and Chris Higgs (grandsons of Mr. Higgs),
Judy Higgs(daughter-in-law), Peter Higgs (former partner and son), Diane Sturm (daughter of Mervyn Johnson), Joyce:and Geotf Higgs (daugh-
er-in-law and son). er



te





Pricing !nformation As Of:
Friday, 8 February 2008
BISX LISTED & TRADE D SE URITIES - VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 2,012.44 / CHG 0.08 / CHG 0.00 / YTD -$4.31/ YTD % «2.63
52we-Hi 52wk-Low Securit Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.72 0.75 Abaco Markets 1.72 : V2: 0.00 3,000 0.157 0.000 11.0 0.00%
11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.80 A1.80 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.9 3.39%
9.68 8.03 Bank of Bahamas 9.61 9.61 0.00 0.612 0.260 15.7
0.90 0.80 Benchmark 0.90 0.90 0.00 0.188 0.030 4.8
3.74 1.85 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12
23:00; 1.25 Fidelity Bank . 2.60 2.60 0,00 0.058 0.040 44.8
12.70 10.00 Cable Bahamas 12.70 12.70 0.00 1.030 0.240 12.3
3.15. 2.00 Colina Holdings 3.14 3.14 0.00 0.031 0.040 VO
































3.50 4.45 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.82 7.82 0.00 . 0.428 0.260 18.3 3.3
7.22 4.52 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.60 4.63 0.03 0.129 O.O52 35.7

2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.44 2.45 0.01 3,200 0.316 0.020 7.8 Be
7.50 5.70 Famguard 7.50 7.50 0,00 0.713 O.280 10.5 3.72
13,01 12.30 Finco 13.00 13.00 0,00 0.829 O.570 15,7

14.75 14.00 FirstCaribbean 14.00 14.00 0.00 0.914 0.470 Wo c

6.10 5.12 Focol (S) 5.12 5.12 0.00 0.363 O40 14d 2.73%]
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.77 0.77 0.00 0.035 0.000 22.0 0.00%)
8.00 7.20 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
#12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 12.50 12.50 0.00 1.059 0.610 11.8 4.88%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities



























S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ Yield
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.35 -0.023 0.000 N/M 0.00%
; Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%) \
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.128 13.4 7.71% q
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings - 0.45 0.55 0.45 0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00% N
BISX Listed Mutual Funds ‘ N
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA_Â¥V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % y
41.2920 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.291985"* ~ N
3.0008 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.999402"** 19.97% N
1.3789 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.378862" \
3.7969 3.0569 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.7969** 27.72% 27.72%
11.9333 11.3545 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.9333** 5.53% 5.53%
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.00**
100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100,00**
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.00°*
10.5000 10.5000 _ Fidelity International Investment Fund 10,607"**
Â¥ FINDEX: CLOSE 929.15 / YTD -2,40% / 2007 34.47%
| BISK ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS — YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV WEY
J 52H 1M Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid § - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
»2wk Low - I st closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ ~ Selling price of Colina and fidelity 1 February 2008 NS
Provious Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price “41 December 2007 ‘
Today's Clase - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. ~ Trading volume of the prior wook 741 January 2008
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 niths 2 danuary 2008
|| Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value \ N \
DIV §% - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful \ ANS “ we \\\
Ae So ete acai tis Oe Oey saminge FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 é \ ‘ \ WS * a. 5 w
(1) -3or-1 Stock Spit - Effective Date 7/11/2007 NAV aa Abaco; Michael Fields, Citibank; Stephen
nf O TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL. (242) 394-2503 Melvin ee partner

d
THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2008, PAGE 11
LOCAL NEWS |





“H&J partner Dr Earl Cash; Lucethy Smith, UBS (Ba
Hudson Carey, Coldwell Banker/Lightbourne Realty

Daphne-Delaney, Tradelnvest Asset Management, Vaughn Delaney, Bank of the Bahamas, Paul McWeeny, Ministry of Education Teacher. of the Year (
Bank of the Bahamas, Wendy Warren, BESP Daphne Wilkinson Ret :

VACANCY NOTICE.

ASSISTANT PLANT OPERATORS
CLIFTON PIER POWER STATION

Vacancies exist in the Clifton Pier Power Station, Energy Supply Division for
Assistant Plant Operators.











































Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

e Assists with monitoring all operational parameters and plants at the power
station including fuel tanks, engines, auxiliaries and control panels. This
involves checking and maintaining lube-oil and water levels, temperature
readings etc

¢ Records accurate operating data for all plant in the station to ensure the safe,
efficient and continuous functioning of the power station

¢ Assists with operating all plants (¢.g., engines, exhaust gas boilers) This
involves assisting with starting up, synchronizing and shutting down available
plant

* Cleans engines, gas and steam turbines by disassembling and replacing fluids.
and assists with the change over and cleaning of coolers and filters

* Cleans work area and maintains good housekeeping throughout the generating
units. This involves maintaining all operating plant so that they are safe or yi
hazard free (free of grease, dirt and grime) and includes sludge disposal.
May be required to perform touch-up painting during engine shut down

¢ Assists with troubleshooting problems on back-start and starting diesel
engines, turbine units and generators

¢ Assists operations and maintenance lead staff with engine maintenance
(associated auxiliary and ancillary equipment)

BEL =

CI PETA

Job requirements include:

Applicants should be high school graduates with a minimum of six (6) months
experience or equivalent. However, additional related industrial certificates and/or
a College of The Bahamas Pre-iechnology diploma and/or applicants with at least
five (5) BJCs including Mathematics and English Language are acceptable. Basic
knowledge of mechanical and electrical schematics and the ability to operate tools,
measuring devices and use chemicals appropriately are required

PAT

The post is a SHIFT ROTA job; therefore successful persons will be required to
work shift. ;
Interested person should apply by completing an Application Form, attaching a h
resume and contact information for three professional references to the attention
of the {|
Manager-Human Resources & Training, '
Bahamas Electricity Corporation,
Blue Hall & ‘Pucker Road, ,

P.O. Box N-7509

Nassau, Bahamas
on or before: Monday, February 18, 2008,



Zs

ener nt pent aa Dene with Minister of National Security nn atari

|
SSeS AE Tae

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