Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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MecDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays

PRICE — 75¢

Donald Thomas

struggles to shake off rust

- ATHLETICS: FRONT OF SPORTS





Major ZNS shake-up

Evette Stuart
removed from
executive post;
Anthony Foster
retires as GM

& By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

bdean@tribunemedia.net

A MAJOR shake-up is
occurring at the top of the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas, as Evette Stuart
has been removed from her
executive post, and reports indi-
cate that Anthony Foster, the
general manager, has retired.

Sources within ZNS informed
The Tribune of the changes yes-
terday with one insider alleging
political victimisation regarding
Ms Stuart’s removal. Sources
indicated that Ms Stuart’s last
day on the job was Thursday,
before she was either made
redundant, or her contract was
bought out by the BCB. The
Tribune was unable to confirm
which was the case as officials

‘within the BCB were tight-
lipped on her removal.

Ms Stuart, who has a Ph.D.

in Communications, is a veteran
broadcaster and former ZNS
TV anchor. She was the former
senior deputy general manager
at the BCB, before the most
recent round of shuffling of the
leadership at the BCB, and
within ZNS.

After the addition to ZNS of
Jerome Sawyer, vice-president
of news and current affairs, Jes-
sica Robertson, news director,
and Kayleaser Moss, as execu-
tive vice-president, it is report-
ed that Ms Stuart was reas-
signed from the senior deputy
GM post, to the lesser status of
vice-president.

“Her professional record
stands,” said an insider at the
BCB who did not wish to be
named. “She is one of the best
researchers there is and a seri-
ous asset to ZNS, but they

SEE page six

COB accused of.

ignoring safety
of students



By Xan-Xi Bethel





STUDENTS at the College of the Bahamas say they are dis-
gruntled as the Fall 2007 semester was riddled with reports of
rape, theft and assault and they still see little change in the level of

security to reverse this trend.

They call the introduction of two businesses

Starbucks Coffee



and Sbarros restaurant — the college’s “Achilles’ heel” as they
have opened the campus to the public.

According to some of the students, three of last semester’s rob-
beries took place within a week.

These robberies are believed to have involved some young men
from areas near the college with students being accosted on cam-
pus, usually in the evening.

The students reported being robbed of money and cell-phones.
In one incident, a girl was stabbed in her hand as the perpetrators
attempted to wrestle her cell phone from her. ,

“Security is never around when these robberies happen. COB is
not taking an interest in the safety of the students,” one angry
student claimed.

Two women reported being raped and others reported being ver-
bally and physically harassed on campus by males who were not stu-
dents of the college. In another report from last semester that
made headlines, a male shot his girlfriend on COB’s campus.

One girl claimed that COB’s security officers are not interested
in the safety of the students. She said that an incident occurred and
they could not find any security guards in.any of the security
booths. She also said that the thieves were able to escape by cutting
through the main COB campus without being stopped by any-
one.

It is now 2008 and students report that they have not seen a

SEE page six



Eulamae dressed in her ‘Sunday best’

AT PEACE: Eulamae Johnson, 78, displayed at the Rock of Ages Funeral Home yesterday, was laid out of coffin dressed in her ‘Sunday best’. Ms



Brent Dean/T ribune staff



Johnson appeared to be merely resting in a couch, rather than in a funeral home, yesterday. Following Harl Taylor, she is the second out of cof-
fin display in recent times in the Bahamas.

Second Bahamian laid out of coffin after death

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

Eulamae Johnson, 78, has
become the second Bahamian
to be, laid out of coffin after
death, in a setting that gave the
impression she was taking an
afternoon rest, rather than being
displayed in a funeral home.

Friends and family were pre-
sent when The Tribune visited
the Rock of Ages Funeral Home
on Wulff Rd yesterday after-
noon.

One visiting relative said of

the deceased — who seemed to

NATIONAL TOURISM WEEK CELEBRATIONS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

be taking a rest on her couch —
that she thought Ms Johnson
looked “nice” in the setting,
which was intended to ease the

grief of the moment, according:

to Dorcas Cox, licensed funeral
director at Rock of Ages.

It was intended, she said “to
portray things to the family that
would make them more com-
fortable.”

“That would be their last
memory picture, to see their
loved one,” said Mrs Cox, who
has been in her profession for
20 years. “They wouldn't be cry-
ing, because nobody came cry-
ing today.”



Mrs Cox, who is a graduate
of Gupton-Jones College of
Funeral Services, said that once
trained in the restorative arts, a
funeral director can lay out bod-
ies in “anyway” once the request
is made before embalming
begins. .

“The family did not suggest
that. I suggested it to the fami-
ly,” explained Mrs Cox. “I asked
them, I said, ‘your mum is a very
special person to me and I think
I would like to do something,
you know, meaningful, that I
think you all will be very pleased
with’. And so, they said ‘go for
it’. And they trusted me.”

Harl Taylor was the first per-
son in recent Bahamian history
to be laid out of coffin in an
elaborate setting that gave the
appearance he was alive and at
work in his office.

Ted Sweeting, mortician at
Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary
and Crematorium, was respon-
sible for Mr Taylor’s display,
which drew hundreds — if not
thousands — of spectators, after
The Tribune published a front
page picture of the unique dis-
play. This second such display

SEE page six

We will restore
Nassau, says PM

THE government of the
Bahamas in partnership with
the private sector, will restore
the city of Nassau, starting with
the harbour, the waterfront,
Woodes Rogers wharf, and
many of its public buildings,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said.

* Speaking at the National
Tourism Week celebrations at
the Wyndham Resort, Mr
Ingraham said the city of Nas-
sau too often is considered by
observers as being “congested,

shabby and run-down”. Many
distinctive shops on Bay Street,
he said, less than a decade ago,
have become shadows of them-
selves. .

“We will take care to main-
tain the essential characteristics
of our capital city and preserve
its heart,” Mr Ingraham
promised.

Starting in this process, the
prime minister said government
will beautify the city, make ii

SEE page six



\\\ UA WN Ee
oa



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

SHOWTIME FOR FOXY





International dog show set for March

Foxy, owned by Tonya Gay, is the first dog to
enter the Bahamas Kennel Club's 27th Interna-
tional Dog Show and Obedience Trials.

The show will be held on Saturday March 15
‘and Sunday March 16.

Foxy is entered in the Open Obedience; eate-
gory‘and the special class for spayed and neutered
donjaatitich w will be held on both days ‘thisvy “year.

- Botanical Gardens. ‘



Organisers said entry forms can be picked up at
Fox Hill Nursery on Bernard Road, or at any vet
office. Entries close February 28.

There will be free handling classes on Sunday,
March 2 and Sunday March 9 at 3pm in the
‘The classes are highly rec-
gmmended for anyone thinking of entering their
“deg,” said one organiser.



FEBRUARY 2nd, 2008

12 Noon - UNTIL

8

Candy Land
Pastry
Ice Cream

‘ Hot Dogs
‘Hoop-La
‘Pony Ride
Punch Board
* Bingo
* Bouncing Castle
‘ Music
Food & Drinks
‘ Books, etc.



Bahamas partners
with OAS, UNESCO to”
host regional school
violence workshop

m By ERIC ROSE



REPRESENTATIVES of
at least 10 countries are slated
to attend the Caribbean
Regional Workshop on
Reduction of School Violence.

The event is being organ-
ised by the Ministry of Edu-
cation, the Organisation of
American States (OAS) and
the United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO).

It will be held on February 6
to 8 at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach.

According to Permanent
Secretary at the Ministry of
Education Elma Garraway,
the principal objective of the
event is to exchange and
analyse policies and strategies
designed to promote a “cul-
ture of peace” within the
school community as well as
to equip educators to deal
with related issues systemati-
cally and effectively.

“In the Bahamas and in the
entire Caribbean school vio-
lence is an emerging source of
educational and social con-
cern,” Mrs Garraway said. “In
recent times, the use of vio-
lence on the part of and
against many of our students,
particularly in the secondary
school level, has surfaced as a
source of increasing concern
among education profession-
als, government officials, par-
ents and the general public.

“This workshop represents
an attempt to analyse the cur-
rent situation regarding vio-
lence in schools in the
Caribbean region, with a view
to proposing policies that will
lead to its reduction, if not its
elimination,” she added.

Minister of Education,
Youth, Sports and Culture
Carl Bethel will officially open
the workshop, with the
keynote address to be deliv-
ered by director of the Inter-
national Observatory on
School Violence at the Uni-
versity of Bordeaux IJ, France,
Professor Eric Debarbieux.

Other presenters will
include local and internation-
al speakers from Europe,
Latin America and the
Caribbean...

Topics to be addressed at
the workshop include: conflict
resolution, responsible citi-

Representatives of at least ten

countries are slated to attend





“There is a
need to
examine the
root cause,
determine
strategies for
the rejection
of violence as
well as for
providing
alternatives to
violent behav-
iour ...”

Juliet Mallet
Phillip

zenship and democratic living,
effective parenting and alter-
native forms of discipline.

Acting director of education
Lionel Sands said ZNS would
broadcast the workshop’s
opening ceremony live on
February 6, at 9am.

He said it is expected that
students, teachers, school
administrators, parents and
the general public will tune in
to the proceedings to share in
the dialogue, particularly the
presentations by Minister
Bethel’s and Professor Debar-
bieux.

Guidelines

“After the broadcast, the
Department of Education is
requesting that administrators,
teachers and students engage
in discussion on the topic,
using a set of guidelines that
the department will issue,” Mr
Sands said. “This will assist us
in better understanding fac-
tors contributing to school vio-
lence and enable us to make
informed decisions, as we seek
to remediate this troubling
phenomenon.”



Mr Sands said that on the
same day, the department will
host a public forum at the CR
Walker Senior High School at
8pm, in an attempt to further
involve the Bahamian public
in this important conversation.

“We are happy that the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas has agreed to
partner with us in this venture
by providing a live transmis-
sion of the event,” he added.
“We would also like to
encourage the Bahamian pub-
lic to share in this exercise by
expressing their views, offer-
ing possible solutions.”

Chair of the Bahamas
National Commission for
UNESCO Theresa Moxey-
Ingraham said it is clear that
only through concerted col-
lective action can stakehold-
ers begin to find solutions to
the school violence problem.

“We are indeed happy to be
a part of a regional effort to
address this issue, which has
surfaced throughout the
Caribbean region, and is a
matter of deep concern,” she
noted.

“We look forward to col-
laborating with representa-
tives from participating coun-
tries, through the exchange of
experiences and best prac-
tices.” .

Director of the OAS
Bahamas Office Ms Juliet
Mallet Phillip said the organi-
sation looks forward to a pro-
ductive session next week,
with input from regional and
international participants.

“There is a need to examine
the root cause, determine
strategies for the rejection of
violence, as well as for pro-
viding alternatives to violent
behaviour and fostering inno-
vative and positive forms of
youth participation and active
citizenship.”

Mrs Garraway said, “It is
expected that a manual ‘of best
practices and policies will be
produced as a result of the
workshop and that participat-
ing countries will implement
projects geared towards over-
coming the growing challenge,
of violence in schools.”

Praise for retired Police officers



@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the last acts of the
late president of the Retired
Police Officers Association was
to extend his congratulations to
the retired officers awarded for
their historical contribution to
the recently published ‘Story of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force’.

Before his death two weeks:

ago, Errington Rahming, 67,
extended praise to the following
recipients:

e Dustan Babb, retired super-
intendent of police

AG ovals
: Weather... :

e Bernard K Bonamy, retired
commissioner of police and sec-
retary of Gaming Board

e Reginald Dumont, retired
chief inspector of police

° Kemuel Hepburn, retired
assistant commissioner. of police

e Cardinal Hutchinson,
retired chief inspector of police
and consultant for the RPA

e Keith Mason, retired
deputy commissioner of police

e Sir Albert Miller, retired
senior deputy commissioner of
police

e Myrtle Mott-Jones, woman
superintendent of police

e Howard Smith, retired
assistant Commissioner of
Police



e Vernon Wilkinson, retired
chief inspector of police

e Patrice Williams McPhee,
assistant director of the

Bahamas Department of

Archives

The officers received the
awards at the launch for the
book in October, 2007 at the
RBPF headquarters.

In addition to extending con-
gratulations to the award recip-
ients, the association also
reminded its members and their
widows that they can still
receive a 10 per cent discount
on the book at participating
agencies.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
ME
PHONE: 822-2157



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 3



© In brief

Police search
for Frederick
Antonio over
reports of theft,
house breaking



POLICE are searching for
Frederick Antonio who is
wanted in connection with
reports of house breaking and
stealing.

Antonio, a 50-year-old resi-
dent of Hanna Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, is considered armed
and dangerous and should be
approached with caution,
police said.

He is described as being of
medium brown complexion
and having brown eyes.

He is of slim built and
weighs about 145 pounds. He
stands at five feet, 11 inches
tall.

Anyone with information
concerning Antonio was asked
to contact the Police in Grand
Bahama at 350-3138, 350-
3106, 373-1112 or 911. °

Police find
loaded handgun
during routine
vehicle search —

ONE more illegal firearm
is off the street today after
police conducted a routine
search of a vehicle in the East
Street area yesterday.

According to a statement
released by Assistant Super-
intendent of Police Walter
Evans, officers from the
Mobile Division were on rou-
tine patrol in Windsor Lane
off East Street shortly before
lam on Friday.

They saw a 1998 Kia Avella
with several occupants, who
were reportedly acting suspi-
ciously.

When police stopped the
car, one person fled the scene,
ASP Evans said.

Officers then conducted a
search of the vehicle and
found a loaded .38 handgun.

As a result of the incident,
two men from South Beach —
a 23-year-old and a 36-year-
old — along with a 25-year-old
female resident of Windsor
Lane have been taken into
police custody for question-
ing.



CONDUCT OF SOME POLITICIANS CALLED INTO QUESTION

Former PLP govt helped create a
climate of crime — FNM youth wing

m By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE youth wing of the FNM has
attacked the former PLP government,
saying it helped foster an atmosphere

-of lawlessness which contributed to

the escalating crime wave that has
engulfed the nation.

The Torch Bearers Association said
in a statement that as crime does not
wear any political colours, no “sensible
Bahamians” would place the blame
on any political group.

“Crime has affected us all. There-
fore we must put aside party differ-
ences and agree to search deep within
us for a solution. We must stare our-
selves in the mirror and call it as we see
it. Our inability to exercise discipline at
the most crucial times contributes
greatly to, sometimes, an unfortunate
conclusion.”

However, the statement also said:
“Since we dare to be honest, we must
admit that the behavior of some politi-



“The Bahamian youth need to know if
there could be a direct association
between the high wave in crime and
the much touted PLP second chance

programme.”



cians and others in positions of author-
ity and trust, in our recent past and
even further back, may have con-
tributed to the callous attitude toward
law and order. While we are feverish-
ly clamouring for a solution, we could
help our quest by finding the cause.”

The statement charged that: “The
Bahamian youth need to know if there
could be a direct association between
the high wave in crime‘and the much
touted PLP second chance pro-
gramme, where hardened criminals
were released on the streets, just for
the PLP to appear to be humane.”

It said that if PLP leader Perry

Hawn Foundation presents
self-awareness programme to PM

bers Judy Willis and Liz Edlic.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







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THE HAWN FOUNDATION, a California based group focused on
“mindfulness training” in educational, healthcare and community-
based settings gave a presentation on its programme to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Friday Feb-
ruary 1, 2008. Lionel Sands, Acting Director of Education was also pre-
sent at the morning presentation. Founded in 2003 by actress Goldie
Hawn, the Foundation’s programmes are designed to enhance students’
self awareness; focused attention, problem solving abilities, self-reg-
ulation, stress reduction and pro-social behaviors, according to its offi-
cial website. Pictured from left are Foundation member Alexa Model,
founder Goldie Hawn, Prime Minister Ingraham and Foundation mem-



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Christie “could deviate from his usual
laid back posture, he may be able to
admit that he erred, being too
overzealous at the expense of terrifying

_the general public.”

The association went on to say that
the results of research conducted by its
members highlighted the corruption
that was exposed in the Commission of
Inquiry of 1984.

“We read of a leader in the name
of the late Sir Lynden Pindling who, as
it were, had far more money in his
account than he could honestly give
an account for. He was not prosecuted.
He did not even have the decency to

IN THE NAME OF THE KING





FIRST SUNDAY
BUCKET LIST



Peter Ramsay/BIS

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the true values of a community.










The Mall-at-Marathon :
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resign. The shameless PLP behaved
as if it was okay.

“We also discovered the nefarious
drug trade that rocked the PLP, where
many of its members were knee deep
in the activities. There was no law for
the PLP then, and it seems that there is
no law for them now. The seeds that
were planted then have now grown
into huge ‘oak like’ trees,” the group
said.

The Torch Bearers Association said
that its members are “seriously con-
cerned” about the rising crime wave as
every life is precious and as such, one
lost is one “too many”.

“The Bahamas has'been experienc-
ing the high level of murders, emanat-
ing mostly from domestic problems
and also because the lifestyle that peo-
ple have chosen resulted in death. The
fact of the matter is that the majority of
the murders in recent times are the
result of drugs and other illegal related
activities. The sad part is that we are
now experiencing the sins of the
fathers,” the statement said.




















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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTER TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR EAB DUPUCH, Kt,. O.BLE., K:M,.K.CS.G,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
- Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

The McCain transition for Tuesday

JOHN McCain is exhausted. He hasn’t had a
full-night’s sleep in forever. It took him 10 hours
to get to California because of flight trouble. He
underperformed in the debate on Wednesday

night, as his staff understands. He took some |

shots at Mitt Romney that were gratuitous con-
sidering the circumstances, as he privately
acknowledges.

But somehow in the midst of all this frenzy,
McCain has to transition from being an under-
dog to being a front-runner. He has to transition
from being an insurgent to being the leader of a
broad centre-right coalition. He has to transition
from being a primary season scrambler to offer-
ing a broader vision of how to unify the country.

By the end of next week, McCain could be
the de facto leader of the Republican Party.
The McCain staff is acutely aware of the respon-
sibility this entails, and what it will take to oper-
ate at the next level.

First, the tone of the campaign will have to
change. In 2000, McCain was a joyful warrior.
He was the guy rollicking through rallies waving
a light saber and launching playful verbal
assaults on the Bush empire. He was the guy fill-
ing his speeches with New Frontier rhetoric
and glimpses of hopeful vistas. “I believe we
are an unfinished nation,” he used to say.

’ But the Obama campaign feels more like
McCain in 2000 than the current McCain cam-
paign does.

Barack Obama outshines McCain right now
as the hopeful warrior. Obama is the one insis-
tently calling on audiences to serve a cause
greater than self-interest.

He’s the one transcending partisanship and
telling young people that politics can be the
means to a meaningful, purpose-driven life.

McCain seems to be burdened by the emo-
tional cost of the war in Iraq, by the gravity of
young people dying. But FDR was a happy
wartime campaigner and to compete with the
Democrats in the fall, McCain will have to
reconnect with the spirit of this moment.

The country, the uber-pollster Peter Hart
notes, is not in a mood for irritation and anger.
It’s thirsty for uplift, progress and hope.

Second, McCain will have to clarify his vision
for the future. He talks about the struggle with
Islamic extremists as the transcendent foreign
policy challenge of our time.

But there’s a transcendent domestic chal-
lenge as well. America is segmenting.

The country is dividing along the lines of
education, income, religion, lifestyle and giv-
ing way to cynicism and mistrust. Government
is distanced from the people and growing more
corrupt.

In the past, McCain has said that repairing

MANAGING EDITOR
WANTED

THE TRIBUNE seeks a Managing Editor to add a new
chapter to this newspaper's continuing success story.

Candidates will need to be seasoned journalists of
the highest calibre with relevant professional
qualifications and a proven track record in newspaper

management.

Superior editing skills, excellent command of the
English language, sound judgment and outstanding
writing ability are essential requirements for this
demanding position. You will also need to be totally
conversant with the Apple-Quark Xpress computer
editing system, with relevant page make-up expertise.

If you think you qualify, please send a covering letter
and resume, together with work samples, to The
Publisher, The Tribune, PO Box N-3207, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Please include references from past employers and
a short statement saying why you qualify for this post.

An attractive salary package, paid vacation and
company medical insurance scheme are on offer to

the successful candidate

No Phone Calls Please
Our benefits include paid vacation
& medical insurance.

The Tribune

Nassauand Bahama Islands’ Leadjgg Newspaper



these divisions constitutes “a new patriotic chal-
lenge for a new century.” He has hinted at a phi-
losophy that amounts to an American version of
One Nation Conservatism. It emphasizes
reforming federal institutions, calling on young
people to perform national service, promoting
economic competitiveness and enhancing social
mobility. It is a mixture of Theodore Roosevelt
and Ronald Reagan. This governing philoso-
phy has lurked in the background this year, but
McCain will have to make it explicit to move a
nation.

Finally, McCain is going to have to beef up his
domestic policy offerings.

He has some excellent ideas, like his plan to
control health care costs, which he doesn’t
explain well. But he has not yet focused suffi-
ciently on the group that is always the key to
Republican success or failure — the suburban
working class.

Picture a suburban townhouse community
filled with families making $40,000 to $60,000 a
year.

Maybe there’s a single mother in one unit
who hates her job but needs the benefits. Maybe
there are immigrant parents with associate
degrees watching their son drop out of school in
another.

The definition of being middle class has
changed, as many have noticed. It used to be a
destination.

Now it’s an uncertain Sinie It s a struggle
just to stay there.

Any candidate who can’t talk specifically to
these concerns is doomed.

If McCain does well on Super Tuesday, he
will have pulled off one of the greatest come-
back stories in modern political history. He will
owe his victory to his character, his honesty
and his tenacity.

But already, he is being judged by different
standards. Republicans are wondering how he
would compete against Hillary Clinton (whom
they moderately fear) and Obama (whom they
fear a great deal).

To unify the party, McCain will have to
respect different parts of the coalition. But more
importantly, he will also have to excite Repub-
licans with the possibility of a GOP victory.

He will have to mine his own past and bring
forward the ideals and causes that lurk there,
and present them as a coherent package.

He’ll have to show that winning the nomina-
tion of a dispirited Republican Party is one
thing; winning the presidency and uniting a
nation is another.

(This article was written by David Brooks of
the New York Times News Service- c.2008).



Zion Hill Church of God



The Tribune wants to
are making news in

Ccall us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Share your news

hear from people who

their neighbourhoods.

AIDS case
should stir
conscience

of nation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS WE consider the precious
blood that Our Lord and Sav-
iour Jesus Christ shed for us all,
let us take a moment to reflect
on a few thoughts which were
written in 2004 but never sub-
mitted concerning the death
two years earlier of a well
known public figure. This gen-
tleman of whom I am speaking
is Mr Philip Ingraham, AIDS
activist.

This letter was written a num-
ber of years ago, but it is now
being submitted to your read-
ership because it is even more
relevant today and perhaps it
will be useful in snapping us as
a nation into reality. It is my
heartfelt prayer that it will serve
to awaken the conscience of our
nation as we seek to live pleas-
ing to Almighty God.

Mr Ingraham was just one of
the many tragic cases which was
brought to the forefront of
national attention.

His case was one of abject
need based on his unfortunate
contraction of the AIDS virus.
His resulting wretched poverty
and pitiful pleas for help tested
the moral fiber of our society
in every area.

However, the area, which
stood out most emphatically,
was our level of compassion for
our fallen fellowman. As we
know Mr Ingraham died with-
out realising (by his own testi-
mony) the mercy from his fel-
lowman for which he was so
earnestly, diligently and des-
perately searching. Yes, he
looked to God — but he expect-
ed that God would use US if
we let Him.

Meanness is very disturbing
because it bears the unpleasant
fruit of violence. It is the direct
opposite of “brotherly kind-
ness.” Withholding good from
someone when it is in the pow-




AMS

letters@tribunemedia.net



er of your hands to help anoth-
er person when they are in need
contributes to an atmosphere,
which will eventually translate
itself into a manifestation of vio-
lence in one form or the other.
That is, if the person’s hope is
not fully grounded in the mercy
of Almighty God to intervene
miraculously on his or her
behalf.

Jesus Christ’s teachings clear-
ly demonstrates the higher pow-
er of mercy, love, forgiveness,
compassion, faith, patience, etc
to heal lives and restore broken
relationships.

Are we in the Bahamas going
to allow our nation to be
labeled mean, callous, compas-
sionless and cold? God will
judge nations and where will we
stand? Meanness is disguised in
many forms: A lack of patience
is actually a mean spirit. Rude-
ness and insults are particularly
mean and violent. Evil speaking
against another’s character and
gossip is disgusting and mean.
Pride and prejudice is distaste-
ful, hateful and mean. Pride was
Satan’s sin. He was kicked out
of heaven for his evil pride. We
need not glory in our privileged
position in life if we are legalis-
tic-and mean and cannot hear
the cry of those in need.

We must ask ourselves, what
are we sowing each day by our
attitude? What is our answer to
God when the question is
asked: “Where is your broth-
er?” Do we even know where
our brother or sister is? What is
his or her condition? Where is
our friend? Can you hear the
cry of your neighbour, your sis-
ter, brother and friend? Can
you feel the pain? Can you per-

ceive the prayer and desperate
hope for some mercy?

Where is generosity in your
giving? Can you make a differ-
ence in someone’s life without
sounding a trumpet before you?
The scriptures say: “Blessed are
the merciful, for they shall
obtain mercy.”

In studying the Golden Rule:
“Do unto others as you would
have them do unto you,” I not-
ed that the little, insignificant,
overlooked word “as” means
“equally.” “Equally” means “on
the same level.” In God’s eyes
He sees all humans as equal to
each other. A tremendous
amount of sanity will return to

~ us as a nation if we recognise

that we are, in God’s eyes, on
the exact same level as the next
man and treat each other as
such — our equal (not above
neither beneath us — but as our
equal). Yes, of course we give
honour to those to whom it is
due — but we are talking about
the equality and dignity of all
men to which each human being
is entitled.

God’s richest blessings upon
those who have no need for
such a reminder because of your
chosen lifestyle of reverential
fear of God.

May the Bahamas once again
be known for its kindness and
love towards each other and all
those in need. Yes, we do show
much love and friendship to the
tourist and that is excellent, but
what about our own and every-
one else?

A RENEE FORBES
Nassau,
January 25, 2008.

I call on armed Bahamians
to put down their weapons

Revival

BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES

‘Revival

Bishop Gloria Redd
February 3rd - February 8th - 1 Week Revival - Bishop Peter Balle

Galilee Holiness Missionary Church of God

Windsor Lane

February 10th - February 15th-1 Week Revival - Bishop Ferguson

Market Street & White Road

February 17th - February 29th -

_ 2 Week Revival - Pastor Dwayne Saunders —
Jesus Christ of the Heart Deliverance Ministry
Market St, & Palm Tree Ave,

MAY GOD RICHLY BLESS YOu,









EDITOR, The Tribune.

A “GUN” is defined as a common name given to an object
that fires high-velocity projectiles. For too long we have expe-
rienced the problem of guns on the streets which was and are still
diminishing too many innocent lives.

For this New Year the Bahamas has already recorded five
murders in three weeks of January. It will then be a matter of
fact that if murders continue on this same road, they will defi-
nitely surpass last year’s murder count. As we all know many of
last year’s murders were done by guns and apparently it applies
to this year’s latest murders also. I definitely give the Police force
credit for their continued effort in trying to ban all firearms from

off the streets.

The question that many are asking is that how are there so

many guns on the streets?

Are they being smuggle into the country and bought by
Bahamians? Whatever way they are coming into the country this
really has to stop now, because too many innocent lives are being

taken away so suddenly.

For example the C R Walker student who was gunned down
two weeks ago on Frederick Street whilst waiting for a jitney to
go home. It was a very sad situation for the boy’s family and con-

cerned citizens of the Bahamas.

On the other hand, the country recorded its fifth homicide for
2008 after a 39-year-old father of four was gunned down in his
home in Joan’s Heights sub-division, during the early morning

hours on Tuesday.

Police have identified the latest victim as Marvin Seymour, a
resident of Joan’s Heights west. Around 5am Seymour was at
home with his four children when it is reported three men,
burst through the front door and fired shots.

The victim was hit many times about the body. This homicide
concerns the police force because it was done in front of chil-
dren. These children will now need to be counseled and are now

growing up without a father.

As Bahamian citizens we too can help ban guns off the streets
by reporting to police if we spot or know any one who has a gun

in their possession.

By doing this we can save lives. As a concerned Bahamian cit-
izen I call on everyone to put down the guns and stop the vio-
lence. Let’s make a commitment to attain less violence and

more peace,

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau
January 23, 2008.



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 5



Police
probe
discovery
of human
remains
on Abaco

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT — Human
skeletal remains were discov-
ered earlier this week on the
island of Abaco, where
intense investigations are cur-
rently underway by detec-
tives from Grand Bahama.

According to police
reports, a passerby and his
dog discovered the remains
along a track road in the
Spring City settlement on
Monday.

Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said that a resident of Spring
City reported the incident to
the Marsh Harbour Police.

The resident told officers
that while walking along the
track road, his dog ventured
into bushes and began run-
ning around in circles and
whining.

He went to see what had
excited the dog and discov-
ered what appeared to be
human skeletal remains lying
on the ground.

Police officers were accom-
panied to the location by the
resident and a doctor.

The remains, which
appeared to have been in that
location for a considerable
period of time, were identi-
fied by the doctor as those of
a human.

After processing the scene,
the remains were transported
to the morgue at Marsh Har-
bour.

Supt Rahming said police
have launched an intense
investigation into the matter.



LOCAL NEWS

Fifty four-year-old man
accused of having sex
with 12-year-old girl

A 54-year-old Quarry Mission Road
man accused of having sex with a 12-
year-old girl was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

According to court dockets, it is
alleged that some time during Novem-
ber 2007, Carlton Turnquest commit-
ted the offence.

Turnquest, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank Lane, was not
required to enter a plea to the unlaw-
ful sex charge.

He was granted bail in the sum of

$15,000. The case was adjourned to
February 4 and transferred to court
one in Bank Lane.



MAGISTRATE’S COURT

e A 27-year-old man accused of
indecently assaulting a 13-year-old girl
was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

According to court dockets, it is
alleged that Elkeno Kelly of Melrose
Avenue committed the offence on
Monday, November 12.

Kelly, who was arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel, pleaded
not guilty to the charge.

Kelly was granted bail in the sum
of $8,000.

The case was adjourned to February
4 and transferred to court one in Bank
Lane.

e A 33-year-old man was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court on Thursday on
fraud charges.

Court dockets alleged that on Mon-
day, November 7, 2007, Marvin Mack-
ey of Florida Court was found in pos-
session of a forged Royal Bank of
Canada cheque in the amount of
$1,800.

Court dockets further alleged that
on the same day, Mackey uttered the
forged cheque and obtained from the
Royal Bank of Canada’s Madeira
Street Branch, cash in the amount of

$1,800.

Court dockets also alleged that on
that day, Mackey was found in pos-
session of a forged Royal Bank of
Canada cheque in the amount of
$1,500.

It is further alleged that on the same
day Mackey obtained from the Royal
Bank of Canada on John F Kennedy
Drive, cash in the amount of $1,500.

Mackey, who appeared before Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel at court eight in
Bank Lane, pleaded not guilty to the
charges.

He was granted bail in the sum of
$7,500 and the matter was adjourned
to September 10.

Honour and integrity have kept leading law firm
throughout 60-year history, says senior partner

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



THE fundamental principles
of honour and integrity are
what have kept Higgs and
Johnson a leading law firm
throughout its 60-year history,
senior partner Philip Dunkley
said at an anniversary service
Thursday.

Changes in technology and
the growth of a global market
have changed the face of the
firm’s business, but in spite of
these changes the firm holds
fast to the core principles upon
which it was founded, he said.

“When I joined Higgs &
Johnson.in 1974 the number of
lawyers in the firm totaled five.
Today there are 35. The fax
was unheard of and there were
no computers, blackberries, cell



AteiTa Deen

Higgs and Johnson holds anniversary service

phones voice mail or e-mail.

“Then, the world was large
and round and the Bahamas
was an island in the stream.
Today the world is small and
flat in which the Bahamas is
an integral part,” said Mr
Dunkley at ceremony, held at
the firm’s offices on East Bay
Street.

He said that despite the
advancements in technology
on which today’s lawyer is
increasingly reliant, it is to the
continued effort “to adhere to
the principles upon which this
firm was founded, namely the
principles of honour and
integrity ... that we truly owe
our success”.

Managing partner John
Delaney said that while many
relics of the 1940s have come
and gone, Higgs & Johnson
maintains its presence by
evolving and re-inventing itself
to fit the times.

He too noted the importance
of honour and integrity,
instilled in the firm by its
founding fathers,

“We are grateful for the core
values instilled by our founders
and the legal prowess of suc-
cessive partners and leaders —
chief amongst them Sir Geof-
frey Johnstone — that have
established the firm,as a
Bahamian institution.

“The firm’s core tenets of

honour and integrity have
served our clients well over the
years. We are humbled by the
high recognition accorded this
firm by the financial services
industry, business persons and
others locally and internation-
ally”.

Among those in attendance
were relations of Godfrey Hig-
gs and Mervin Johnson, the
firms founders, and retired
Supreme Court Justice Jeanne
Thompson.

Higgs & Johnson was estab-
lished January 2, 1948.

Today it is one of the largest
full-service corporate_and com-
mercial law firms.,,in the
Bahamas.

‘I vex at how brazen criminals are these days...’

lm By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net -



“I vex at how low society has
sunk these days. Last week I
was passing Dowdeswell Street
after work and lo and behold I
spotted a grown man stripped
half naked in a parking lot with
his bits exposed for all the
world to see.

“For him to do something
like that, in broad daylight, def-
initely means he is a danger to
himself and possibly to some-
one else. That area already
populated with jonsers and
miscreants, now we have to
deal with half naked men with
their privates exposed as a pos-
sible threat too? I think the
police need to make a habit of
patrolling that area and move
those vagrants to another place
where they won’t harm them-
selves or others.”

— JT, Danottage Estates

TST



Why You Vex?



















Dye
Lye

=



“I vex because there seems
no end to New Providence's
traffic problem. There needs
to be some relief for those
coming from the east heading
into work and vice versa. If
that requires less cars on the
road or widening of roads
something needs to happen
before one day I strip down to
my underwear and walk down
Bernard Raod with a base ball
bat,”

— Sandra Williams

“You know why I vex?
Broke people like me can’t
survive in Nassau. You know
it’s wrong when you puttin’ $50
gas in ya’ car a week and it

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don’t last! And it ain’ even ya’
car! I tired of giving my old
lady gas money and | don’t
even go nowhere. I tryin’ hard
to make my lil’ paycheck
stretch but tings tough man,
tings tough,”

— Marvin F,

Elizabeth Estates

“I vex at how brazen crimi-
nals are these days. I know the
police say its drug dealers and
petty criminals settling old

scores but I think it is outra-
geous that young men and
women have complete disre-
gard for the laws society has

_in place.

“It all goes back to the
breakdown of family structure
in The Bahamas and how slack
and hostile Bahamians are
though. We are really paying
the price for our deeds and
reaping the seeds we have
sown.”

— Evelyn R

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ZNS shake-up

FROM page one

made her redundant.”
The source claimed that her removal is a “political act.”
“From what I understand, it is complete victimisation,” the
source claimed.
Larry Smith, a member of the board of the BCB, confirmed

that Mr Foster has retired as he had reached the retirement age of

60 years. Mr Smith said he is not certain if Mr Foster has yet left the
helm of the BCB, as there is a possibility that some sort of exten-
sion may be offered to him.

Mr Smith, however, did not comment on Ms Stuart’s status, and
referred The Tribune to Michael Moss, who has reportedly taken
over the chairmanship of the BCB from Barry Malcolm, or to Mr
Foster.

Mr Moss did not return a call placed to him by The Tribune, and
a secretary at Mr Foster’s office said that he was not in office yes-
terday.

Senator Kay Forbes-Smith, parliamentary secretary in the office
of the prime minister, who has responsibility for ZNS, was off the
island when The Tribune made attempts to reach her to discuss
these changes.

Another ZNS insider, however, who also did not wish to be

named, provided a different view of Ms Stuart’s removal. The

source expressed delight over the change.

He questioned her political neutrality, and suggested that some
of the staff at the BCB may have had some issues with her leader-
ship.

Second Bahamian laid

out of coffin after death
_ FROM page one

may indicate that a trend is emerging in the Bahamas funeral
industry.

Mrs Johnson, a Bamboo Town resident who is formerly from
Snug Corner, Acklins, will be buried this morning at 10am at the
Church of God of Prophecy, East Street.

«9 LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future
Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center
(Next door to CIBC) Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

| ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
eens P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
wamemmm Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
mame CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 03, 2008
a 8 SUNDAY BEFORE LENT

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rey. Mark Carey/HC

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Zion Boulevard

10:00AM Mrs. Kenris Carey/HC
7:00PM Rey. Charles Sweeting

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM Rey. Charles New/HC
7:00PM Rey. Charles New

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rey. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections - Rey. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rey. Philip Stubbs/HC

{ TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
i y 11:00AM Rey. William Higgs/HC

RADIO PROGRAMMES

‘RENEWAL’ vi Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Mr. Janice J. Knowles
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.

Your Host: Mr. Janice J. Knowles
AR oe oe ee oe oe oe oe ae oe ae oe ae 6 6 a a oe aK a 2 2 2 oe 2 26 2g 2 2 2 2 2 9 2 2 9 kk ge ie oe a aK aK KK

The Nassau Regional Women’s Fellowship will be holding their
Anniversary Service and Installation Service for New Officers on
Sunday, February 10, 2008 at 3:00 p.m. at Trinity Methodist Church.





Grant's Con Wesley Methodist Church
_ Balllou Hill Ra & Chapel Street) RO.Box GB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD, 2008.

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis Ktherine Rose
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Usher Board Anniversary(HC)
7:00 p.m.






Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Board of Music,



Ministry
“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)



College of the
Bahamas accused
of ignoring the
safety of students

FROM page one

change in the level of security on campus. “You would think that
they’d do something after all those rapes and robberies last year.”

The College of the Bahamas is accused of being more interested
in trivial matters rather than dealing with real issues on campus.
Many of the students and teachers have criticized the introduction
of Starbucks Coffee and Sbarro Restaurant on the main campus.
Some say that the introduction of these businesses on campus has
increased the crime on campus and made the campus vulnerable to
attack.

These businesses are open to the public, thus opening the door
for anyone to have access to the campus. Outsiders are mixing
with students.

“These two businesses are the real Achilles heel for COB,”
said a student. The college has been under fire for a long time, fac-
ing harsh criticism over a number of controversial issues. Now, staff
and students are angry over what they regard as COB’s serious lack
of focus. They are accusing the school of placing emphasis on mat-
ters that have nothing to do with the advancement of education in
the school. COB’s purported aim for university status has been
called “nonsense” and “pure propaganda.” Instead of focusing on
upgrading the quality of education, they have been accused of
putting priority on upgrading the quality of food available on cam-
pus.

Prior to the introduction of these establishments, all students were
supposed to possess a personal identification card and show this ID
at the various entry points to the campus. Now, since there are
restaurants located on the main campus, everybody has the right to
enter the campus. COB’s grounds are basically “public property.”
A student noted, “The only thing that ID is good for is to get into
the library now.”

The Tribune tried to get a statement from the college’s Office of
Communications about these complaints, but so far the College has
not replied.

OVERSEAS NEWS

Student denies involvement
in Holloway disappearance

@ THE HAGUE, Netherlands

Dutch student Joran van der Sloot denied yesterday that he had any-
thing to do with Natalee Holloway’s disappearance, saying he lied
when he told someone privately he was involved, according to the
Associated Press.

The statement came hours after Aruban prosecutors announced
they were reopening their investigation into the disappearance of the
Alabama teenager after seeing secretly taped material from a Dutch
journalist. Van der Sloot was interviewed by the respected Dutch
television show “Pauw & Witteman” following reports that crime
reporter Peter R. De Vries had captured him making statements about
the case, “It is true I told someone. Everybody will see it Sunday,” Van
der Sloot said, referring to De Vries’ planned television show. De
Vries claims to have solved the mystery of Holloway’s May 2005 dis-
appearance with the help of an undercover investigation.

Van der Sloot spoke to the late night current affairs show by tele-
phone. His voice was recognizable from an earlier appearance on the
show, which has closely followed the Holloway case. Holloway, 18, of
Mountain Brook, Alabama, was last seen in public leaving a bar with
Van der Sloot and two Surinamese brothers — Deepak and Satish
Kalpoe — hours before she was due to board a flight home from a
school trip to Aruba. No trace of her has ever been found. The three
were re-arrested in November, but released within weeks for lack of evi-
dence. Prosecutors then dismissed their case against them.

1










ESE

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY



SUNDAY SERVICES
Moming Worship Service ....... 8.30 am.
Sunday School for allages .. 9.45a.m,
Adult Eduction wcities 9.45 am.
Worshla S@rviC@ cise 17.00 a.m.
SPANISN SEINVICE cress 8.00 am.
Evening Worship Service ......., 6.30 pm.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs,
Missionettes (Girls Club] 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
» Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS |

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

PTS UM Ceram acl i(s
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O, Box: N=1566

~ TEMPLE TIME



Email: evlemple@bateinet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org

|| “Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”

PM pledges to
restore Nassau

FROM page one

greener, and greatly improve its appearance and ambiance.

“We will complete the stalled and abandoned construction of the
Nassau Street Magistrate’s Court House and the Registrar Gen-
eral’s offices on Market Street. And we will construct a new
Supreme Court. As well, a number of government buildings have
sat condemned in the city of Nassau for a number of years.

“We will restore or demolish the Adderley Building on Bay
Street and the Rodney Bain Building on Shirley and Parliament.
Complementary to works to improve the Harbour we will contin-
ue the upgrade of Woodes Rogers Wharf and extend it eastward to
at least Victoria Avenue if not Armstrong Street. This will provide
an alternative east to west throughway relieving traffic on Bay
Street in the city centre.

“We will also complete the paving of roads and junctions in our
city centre, including the
replacement of the
asphalt road with cobble
stones extending eastward
from Rawson Square to
the Hilton British Colo-
nial Hotel setting the
stage for the introduction
of pedestrian only sec-
tions along Bay Street,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham said there
also will be repairs and
upgrades to the old cus-
toms warehouses on the
Prince George Dock,
transforming them into an
authentic Bahamian
Crafts Market.

“We will demolish the
old customs building on
Arawak Cay. This will
enhance the entrance to



“In Grand
Bahama and the
Family Islands we
have an opportu-
nity to respond to
the traveller’s-
need for diversity

and our country’s
compelling
mandate to utilize
its more precious
our city centre, remove resource...”
much of the grime; help

reduce congestion and remove the sense of decline. We will also
expand the Potter’s Cay dock.

“Associated with improved town planning, will be a systematic
programme to identify, label and clear all public beach access in
New Providence. And I said there are many, some you don’t know,
and you will hear a lot of noise when it happens.

“In Grand Bahama and the Family Islands we have an oppor-
tunity to respond to the traveller’s need for diversity and our coun-
try’s compelling mandate to utilize its most precious resource in a
sustainable manner for the benefit of our citizens.”

While not eschewing all large-scale development in the Family
Islands, Mr Ingraham said that the Bahamas must guard against the
urbanization of small, intimate settlements that are better suited to
the development of high-end, environmentally-conscious and cul--
turally attuned resorts that offer a relaxed, paced experience.

“It is to be remembered that over the centuries the people of the
Bahamas have endured a myriad of experiences, many the result of
developments in the United States of America, for example, the
years of slavery and emancipation, Prohibition and the American
War of Independence. As a result, we are home to many artifacts,
ruins and monuments tied not only to our own experiences but to
the history of our largest tourist market to the north.

“Heritage and cultural tourism allow the visitor to experience the
essence of who we are while ensuring that we play to our greatest
resource — our people. Our planned programme to restore heritage
sites, sponsor cultural festivals and increase support for linkages with
our main industry will ensure the further growth in diversity of our
tourist product,” he said. Identifying, restoring, and stabilizing
these heritage sites will ensure that they serve as permanent attrac-
tions for residents and visitors for years to come, Mr Ingraham said.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD, 2008

11:30 am Speaker:
Pastor Dexter Duxalier
Christ Community Church
5:00 pm
United Communion & Thanksgiving

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. « Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 am.
« Gomrounity Outreach: 41550 a.m. + Event Service: 7:00 p.m.

. @ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m.
*« Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)



Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL ||
Preaching 11am &7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

PastonH. Mills |
\
i
\

Pastor: H. Mills «© Phone: 393-0563 * Box N- 8622 |



Grace and Peace
me an Church

Wed, Feb. 13, sae 7:00 pm
Thurs, Feb. 14, 2008, 7:00 pm

Youth Service:
Fri, Feb. 15, 2008, 7:00 pm
Sunday, Feb. 17, 2008
11:00 am & 6:00 p
Rev. Steve mes USA r














THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 7



LOOKING BACK AT

The Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts







































THIS week, In Days
Gone By looks back at
some moments in the his-
tory of the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts.

1 - February 28, 1989 -
Gentle persuader Carlson
(Anthony Delaney, right)
offers to shoot old Candy's
(Sammy Bethel) dog. “I'll put
old devil out of his misery,”
he promises in ‘Of Mice and
Men’, performed at the Dun-
das nightly until March 4.

2 - February 28, 1989 —
George (David Jonathan Bur-
rows) comforts his. friend
Lennie (Garvin David Collins)
with thoughts of a house of
their own, where they can

“live off the fat of the land,”
during a scene from Of Mice
and Men

3 - January 29, 1989 —
Constant badgering between
two oldsters Nat (Mik Ban-
croft) and Midge (Winston
Saunders), gives the audience
comic relief during the rather
slow-paced first act of “l am
not Rappaport”. Here Midge
(right) tells Nat that “its your
type that gives old a bad
name.”

4 - Greg Lampkin in “I.
Nehemiah Remember When
» > Chapter II”. '












a THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS CONFERENCE .
So! OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE CARIBBRAN AND THE AMERICAS
L’KGLISK METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE RT LES AMBRIQUES

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue

P.O, Box BE-163%, Nassau, Bahamas, Tdephone: 325-6432: Fa 328-284:

thodesmethod(@batdnet bs














METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD, TO REFORM THE
NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father Jahn Wedey)
“Celebrating 228 years of continuous Methodist witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
SEVENTH LORD'S DAY BEFORE THE RESURRECTION, TRANSFIGURATION
FEBURARY 3, 2008,








COLLECT: Almighty Father, whose Sen was reveded in mgesty before he suffered death upon the -
USS: give us grace te pervave his glory, that we may be strengthened to suffer with him and be changed
into his likeness, from glory to glory; who is dive and reigns with you inthe unity ofthe Holy Spin,

one God, now and for ever,








WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malealm Rd East)



















S00 am, Rey. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion}
£3) p.m, Rev, Edward 1. Sykes Healing & Wellness
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose Ave near Wulff Rd)
700 am. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)
10:00 am. Six Pabtee Stuchan
11:80 am Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly! AMEN (Holy Communion)
G rac Ee a Nn d Peac e 630 pam, Class Leaders 14
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox Hill)
We S | eya Nn G h U rc h L100 am. Rev, Leonard O, Roberts Jt. (Holy Communion)
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza}
e Pr Bw ALA Po 9.00. am, Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)
YY HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Fad)
Vy & 7.00 am. Rey, Edwand J. Sykes
OS ,
dam, ois, Cola Gardiner
Wed, Feb. 13, 2008, 7:00 pm METHODIST CHURCH cena pig
S00 am. Rev. Emily A. Damentte
Thurs, Feb. 14, 2008, 7:00 pm CRON DES-MISSIONS sUDeRscare (Quackvo Stret)
A eee, gt ates' S30 pm, Frdays Children’s Club
Youth Service: ve . Sunday Providenee Beacons’ Rhodes Women Alive






Fri, Feb. 15, 2008, 7:00 pm

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2008
11:00 am & 6:00 pm

Rev. Steve Bell, USA



METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thnft Shop and other Min sries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St, Oakes Fidd) Reception to Primary
PRACK AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: - All Methodists of the Conferenceare urged to pray and to
fast for Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to theupsurgein violence, The fast
begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday and endsat noon on Kriday, Thisweprocaim
unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lond’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m. “Great Hymns of Inspiration” - On the Lord's Day, Radto
810 at 5:30 p.m, “Family Vibes” ZNS1, Tuesday, 7:30 pans “To God be the Glory” ZNS |, Tuesday,
74S pun.








ge ra a ~
ee SES Se

peo Se ; we PPR eS

a rs a






eed Nop ad ot Nal as








Twynam Heights, Adjacent to Super Value, Winton

\ t

4 ) et

é



PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Digging deep

for the needy

Bahamians
and visitors
donate a
record sum

to Salvation.

Army Kettle
Drive

Bahamians.and visitors
reached into their pockets to
help the less fortunate like
never before this year, donat-
ing a record $104,243 to the
annual Salvation Army Ket-
tle Drive, it was revealed this
week.

This announcement was °

made during a luncheon host-
ed by board members of the
Salvation Army to thank
those who helped.

“If you could capture what
the Salvation Army is or does
in one word, it would be ‘oth-
ers’,” said divisional comman-
der Major Lester Ferguson as
he addressed the 40 persons
at the awards ceremony.

“It is the help of others, all
of you, that allows us to per-
form our duties, which is the
basis of the army’s sole exis-
tence.”

For the three weeks leading
up to Christmas, members of
civic clubs including Pilot
Clubs, Delta Sigma Theta,
Kiwanis Clubs, Rotary Clubs,
Kappa Alpha Psi, the Zonta
Club of Nassau, the Calvary
Men’s Fellowship, Omar Tem-
ple Lodge, Alpha Phi Alpha



RECOGNISED: Former Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson is pre-

sented with a certificate of appreciation. Major Lester Ferguson is pictured

far left.

and businesses including
Price WaterhouseCoopers and
Marsha Thompson gave up
weekends to stand in front of
food stores and malls using
the sound of the signature red
bells to convince passers-by
to help make someone else’s
holiday a little brighter.

“We are pleased to
announce that we raised a
record-breaking $104,243.16
which has gone a long way in
touching the lives of over
6,800 persons during the holi-
days,” said Major Ferguson.

The funds helped provide
1,650 special meals, 1,597 food
parcels, 1,352 toys for children
and 2,282 care packs.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
raised $3,727.55 — the largest
amount of all the service
organisations — and for their
efforts, were presented the
Bell Ringers Award.

This year’s collection was
nearly 25 per cent higher than
last year’s — and that set a new
record.

Former governor general
Sir Orville Turnquest official-
ly launched the kettle drive in

a ceremony that included
music by the Royal Bahamas
Palice Force Band in late
November.

Certificates of appreciation
were awarded to other service
and non-service organisations
that participated, including the
Pilot Clubs, Delta Sigma
Theta, Kiwanis Clubs, Rotary
Clubs, PriceWaterhouseC-
oopers, Kappa Alpha Psi,
Zonta Club of Nassau, Cal-
vary Men’s Fellowship, Mar-
sha Thompson, Omar Temple
Lodge and Alpha Phi Alpha.

Another individual receiv-
ing a special award was for-
mer commissioner of police
and Salvation Army board
member Paul Farquharson,
who was recognised for his
contributions and diligent ser-
vice during his tenure on the
board. “My life has been
enriched,” Mr Farquharson
said, “having been given the
opportunity to be a part of this
community conscious group.
I owe you a depth of gratitude
as ingratitude is a sin. I thank
you so much.”

FREEPORT CONTAINER PORT LIMITED

Is pleased to offera CAREER OPPORTUNITY to a qualified candidate

In the position of:



IF I WERE MINISTER OF TOURISM ...



eter Ramsay/BIS

P

CIVIL ENGINEER



JONNAJAH BOODLE, a student of the St Francis De Sales School in Marsh Harbour, Abaco met Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Cable Beach on Thursday. The youngster deliv-
ered a stirring presentation entitled “If | Were Minister of Tourism’ at the National Tourism Week Confer-
ence held at the Wyndham Resort in Nassau. Pictured is Prime Minister Ingraham, Jonnajah Boodle and

Candidate must possess the following minimum qualifications and experience
and perform the essential functions of the job-including but not limited to:

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of Five
(5) years’ experience in civil and marine engineering.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

eeport Container Port Limited
Supervision of All Civil Engineering projects including: Phase V
development, Phase 1 repairs, establishment of additional Stacking Area,
construction of an Amenities Building, preparation for additional Reefer
Capacity and all property maintenance an repairs for Freeport Container
Port.

reeport Harbour Company Limited
Supervision of repairs to quay walls; entrance and breakwaters,
consultation on new Cruise Facility, Bahama Rock Mining Program and
all property maintenance and repairs for Freeport Harbour Company.

rand Bahama Airport Company include:
Construction of a new Fuel Farm, construction of an extension to the
Domestic terminal and all property maintenance and repairs for Grand
Bahama Airport Company

Eighteen months on the job training will be provided before assuming full
responsibility for the position.

Candidates are required to forward Resume to:

The Human Resource Director
Freeport Container Port Limited
P.O.Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
or send email to: Ads@fcp.com.bs



St Francis De Sales teacher Jonna Boodle.


“The Three Little Pigs” is a
familiar children’s favourite, and
on Wednesday Grade IP stu-
dents at Woodcock Primary
School delighted in U S Ambas-

sador Ned Siegel’s reading of

this classic.

This was the first reading by
Ambassador Siegel since he
“officially” took over the reading,
programme from former
Ambassador John Rood on Jan-
uary 23. Ambassador Siegel has
pledged that he and Mrs Siegel
will continue the reading initia-

CW
SW



US Ambassador Ned Siegel reads
at Woodcock Primary School



tive both in New Providence and
in the Family Islands.

Now into its third year, the
programme involves U §
Embassy volunteers reading to
students at Woodcock Primary
School for 30 minutes each
weck. The school staff has said
that as a result of the pro-

gramme, students’ enthusiasm
for reading has increased signif-
icantly.

Embassy volunteers said they
value the programme as a way to
give something back to the local
community and to help build a
better future for the youth of the
Bahamas.



THE TRIBUNE



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 9

RO a Se arr ea ae
Hundreds of students flock
to Tourism Careers Fair

HUNDREDS of enthusias-
tic students gathered at the
Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasi-
um to attend the Ministry of
Tourism’s third annual Tourism
Careers Fair and Developers
Expo.

The two-day fair, which
began on January 29, is being
held as part of the week of
activities for National Tourism
Week, with the Ministry of
Tourism hosting students from
various high schools and pri-
mary schools in Nassau and the
Family Islands.

’ Held under the theme “A
new beginning”, the fair aimed
to create an interactive forum —
especially geared towards 6th,
9th and 12th graders — to pro-
vide intellectual and visual
stimulation through creative
booth displays and enthusias-
tic and enlightening speakers.

Cable Beach Resorts was
well represented at the fair,
showcasing many of its depart-
ments.

According to diréctor of
community relations Leah
Davis, Cable Beach Resorts
and Baha Mar tried to show
the students everything the
company has to offer.

“Baha Mar recognises that
the success of the project (the
redevelopment of Cable
Beach) is based on the quality
of the team — that is, its
employees.

“Our involvement in today’s
activities is critical to exposing
students to careers available
with the company; we wanted
to showcase not only one or
two, but highlight the many
avenues that their careers in
tourism can take,” Ms Davis
said.

Representing the culinary
arm of Cable Beach Resorts,
executive chef Edwin Johnson
decided to put a spin on their
participation in the fair.

“We are featuring our female
chefs today; we want the stu-
dents to see more women in
the work place,” he said.

Chef Johnson said there is a
high demand for skilled culi-
nary personnel in the Bahamas,
but COB is not producing
enough of these persons.

He said that is why his team
decided that it was important to
be a part of the fair, as it pre-
sented an opportunity to
inform students of the fact that
there are many career oppor-
tunities in the culinary arts and
when the Cable Beach project
is complete, many qualified
persons will be needed.

The students seemed to truly
enjoy being treated to samples
of food prepared by Cable
“Beach Resorts chefs and stu-
“dent chefs from the College of
“the Bahamas’ School of Hos-
‘pitality.

The Crystal Palace Casino
was also represented at the fair.
‘Supervisor of the casino, Phill-
isha Rogers, said her team was

THE Crystal Palace Casino was also represented at the fair. Supervisor Phillisha Rogers (not shown), said her
team was trying to help students appreciate the many opportunities that exist in the industry.

CSS

HUNDREDS of enthusiastic students gathered at the Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasium to attend the Ministry
- of Tourism’s s third annual Tourism Careers Fair and Developers Expo.

trying to help students appre-

ciate the many opportunities.

that exist in the casino industry.

She pointed out that it is
important that students today
know they need more than just
skills to function well in the
hospitality industry — they also
need a positive attitude.

The fair featured participants
such as Atlantis, Atlantis
Marine Aquarium Operations,
the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort, Wyndham Nassau and
Crystal Palace Casino, the
Department of Fisheries, Min-
istry of Education, Sports
Youth and Culture, College of
the Bahamas, the Lyford Cay
Foundation, the Canadian
Lyford Cay Foundation, Min-
istry of Tourism, Authentically
Bahamian, National Museum
of the Bahamas, and the
Department of Marine





Resources in the Ministry of
Agriculture, Marine Resource
and Local Government and
BTC.

Leah Davis expressed her
enthusiasm about Baha Mar
and Cable Beach Resorts being
part of this “very important
event” in the activities for
National Tourism Week, and
said that Baha Mar will contin-
ue to co-operate with the rele-
vant stakeholders to improve
the Bahamas’ tourism product.

“Baha Mar is very excited to
be here, the education of our
most precious resource, our
human resource, has always
been a priority for us. We hope
to continue our partnership
with the Ministries of Educa-
tion and Tourism to achieve
the common goal of improving
the Bahamas’ Tourism prod-
uct” Ms Davis said





THE STUDENTS seemed to truly enjoy being treated to samples of food prepared by Cable Beach Resorts chefs
and student chefs from the College of the Bahamas’ School of Hospitality.

Two-day event
being held as part

Week of activities

Opportunity inside the classroom.
Opportunity outside the classroom.
Opportunity in life.

Please join us for an admissions presentation:

Monday, February 4, 2008 at 6:00pm
British Colonial Hilton

R.S.V.P. Rosamund Roberts at (242) 394-1665

@ TRINITY

COLLEGE SCHOOL

A Piss high school for students aged 13-18
located in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada

905-885-3209 admissions@tes.on.ca



ROTARY INTERNATIONAL,
DISTRICT 7020

APPLICANTS WANTED
FOR GROUP STUDY EXCHANGE
TO ARIZONA, USA

Group Study Exchange is a Rotary Foundation sponsored program, the
purpose of which is to promote international understanding and goodwill
through person-to-person contact. The GSE teams are made up of 5 persons,
the leader of which is an experienced Rotarian.

District 7020, which includes The Bahamas, is pairing with Rotary 5490
District in Arizona, which includes Phoenix, London Bridge and The Grand
Canyon for a four-week visit during May & June (specific dates to be
determined). While abroad, team members have the opportunity to meet
their counterparts in their respective vocations, tour various businesses and
attractions and give presentations to Rotary Clubs and others about their
home country and sponsoring Rotary District.

The Rotary Foundation provides round trip airfare and local Rotarians in
the host District (i.e. Arizona) provide lodging, meals and transportation.
Team members pay for personal and incidental expenses only. All other
costs are covered by Rotary.

Individuals interested in applying for the four team member spaces should
be employed full time for at least two years in a recognized business or
profession and between the ages of 25 and 40 years. Applicants must be
citizens of The Bahamas and make themselves available for personal
interviews. Applications must be submitted by February 5 through one of
the Nassau Rotary Clubs or by contacting one of the following committee
members, who can also provide additional information:

Tel/fax: 393-1892
325-9663
424-3778

e-mail: forde@batelnet.bs
e-mail: pdrollins@batelnet.bs
e-mail: bridgetterolle@yahoo.com

Murray Forde
Patrick Rollins Tel:
Dr. Bridgette Rolle Tel:



of National Tourism

“www. tcs.on. ca |



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008



HE Ragged Islands may

be the last hidden trea-

sures in the Bahamas —

but a new study has
begun to uncover their secrets.

These isolated islands are sparsely
populated and located in the far south-
ern region of the Bahamas. Because
of their remoteness, it is very difficult to
travel to or maneuver around the
islands.

As a result, there has been insuffi-
cient scientific surveying done to iden-
tify the ecological features of the area.

To help establish a baseline of sci-
entific information, the Bahamas
National Trust along with the Nature
Conservancy’s Northern Caribbean
Programme and the Shedd Aquarium
located in Chicago, Illinois supported a
diverse team of researchers on a 12-
day expedition to conduct a rapid eco-
logical assessment throughout the
Ragged Islands.

Information gathered during this
expedition included a list of marine
(Figure 1) and terrestrial habitat (Fig-
ure 2) and species types, significant fea-
tures and GPS co-ordinates of the
islands.

Researchers travelled to Ragged
Island aboard the R/V Coral Reef IT, a
vessel which allowed them to stay in
close proximity to most of the islands
and conduct broad taxonomic surveys
of the organisms that are found there.
In addition, smaller boats were used
to travel between each island.

In addition to gathering ecological
data, researchers visited Duncan Town,
the primary settlement of the Ragged
Island, where they spoke with school
principal Robert Boodram, Mrs
Boodram, a teacher, and students from
the Ragged Island All Age School.

The students were invited to tour
the R/V Coral Reef II and viewed with
great excitement both the plant and
animals collected as well as underwater
photos that were taken throughout the
expedition.

Many of the students had consider-
able knowledge of the various types of
fish and marine habitats found in the
area because of their interaction with
the environment and local knowledge
passed on to them by parents and oth-
er relatives.

Researchers also took the opportu-
nity to discuss with students the impor-
tance of their land and sea resources
with the hope of increasing both their
appreciation of the natural treasures
of the Ragged Islands and their under-
standing of why these resources need to
be preserved for future generations.

Pricing Information As Of:

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier os Esta'



Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

gs

Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund



BISX ALL SHA\

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Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
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P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

ffective Date 7/11/2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



A rapid ecological assessment has been made of the Ragged
Islands, a group of isolated islands in the far southern region of the
Bahamas a...




. SS \\ SS
oo
Coes

Previous Close Today's Close Daily Vol

3 0.2 YTD.

‘he-Counter Securities — RRS
Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol.
15.60
6.25
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Colitia Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 43.00 41.00
15.60 "14.00
cep pep OPP org eon 0:48
BISX Listed Mutual Funds SN
YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
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_.11.9333** 5.53% 5.53%

SEX: CLOSE 946.87 /YTD -0.68% / 2007 34.47%
MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidality
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidolity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter prica
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior wook

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

#2-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION GALL (242





IN

\
SS

0.82%
3.76%
4.38%

.

\\\

PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss

MUD/SANDFLAT surround-
ed by black (Avicennia ger-
minans) and white (Lagun-
cularia racemosa) man-
groves with coppice shrub-
land directly behind the
mangroves. It has been
noted that this area sup-
ports the highly threatened
{species of Piping Plovers

‘ (Charadrius melodus).





0.000

Yield %

NAV ISEY.

18 January 2008
**. 31 Decamber 2007



courtesy of Sharrah Moss

NOTICE





NOTICE is hereby given that GUILBOT JEAN-PIERRE OF
REEVES STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-1671, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send

a written and Signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 26TH day of JANUARY, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

aw



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 11

THE TRIBUNE

HIDDEN TREASURES :



WHO WERE THE
RESEARCHERS?



The researchers that participated in the expedition included:






e Ethan Freid: terrestrial botany (lead researcher)
e Sharrah Moss: dive safety officer, former Bahamas
National Trust Parks outreach officer

° Felicity Burrows: TNC northern Caribbean programme,
marine diversity and ecology

e LaKeshia Anderson: Bahamas Department of Marine
Resources, marine diversity and ecology

e Apollo Butler: Bahamas National Trust park warden

¢ Caroline Stahala: ornithology.

e Alan Bolten: sea turtles, Archie Carr Centre for Sea
Turtle Research, University of Florida

e Heather Masonjones: marine diversity and ecology

e Lynn Kimsey: entomology

e Abel Valdivia: National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, marine diversity and ecology

e Robert Van Valkenburg: Shedd Aquarium representa-
tive, marine diversity and ecology

e Jim Robinett: Shedd Aquarium representative, marine
diversity and ecology





















PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss

CUBAN CAVE SHRIMP (BARBOURIA CUBENSIS), an endangered species found in anchialine cave and cenotes in Cuba, Bermuda and in
Bahamian islands such as Exuma, Abaco, San Salvador and Long Island.



PHOTO COURTESY OF Lakeshia Anderson



Ltn itp a inane”

COMMIS MILAM AMAL Dh I Maire

hil



PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss
PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss

DR ETHAN FREID is showing students how to identify various types
of plants. .

We don’t like counting it so..
shop till ya drop!

wit yy,
wu,

&%Y
Cul

* Except on red tagged and net items

Kelly's "3c:

Mall at Marathon

Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Le cA a rere ae
eet . A ; Fax: (242) 393.4096 www.kellysbahamas.com





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING
SUPPLIES is now CBS BAHAMAS





Y OMMON-

WEALTH

Building

Supplies

has been rebranded and
is now CBS Bahamas.

The company said it
wanted to ensure that the
invite for the launch
event would set the stage
for a spectacular evening, —
so they consulted with
‘their partners in design,
the AdWorks Advertis-
ing team, who came. up
with a unique invitation
concept.

One week prior to the
launch, CBS Bahamas
vendors and clients.
received an intriguing
invite, wrapped around a —
miniature level. Be

No mention was made

“of what was to be PICTURED are Brent Burrows (CBS GM) with Larry Treco (CGT Contractors) & Jose San- JENNIFER (CBS BAHAMAS Marketing Manager) and Ed Crimm (KAWNEER) are all smiles in this
unveiled. The inyite tiago (PGT). picture.
merely showed the date,
time and place of the —
event and the new CBS
Bahamas logo.
“The invites created
: such a buzz, over 80
excited CBS Bahamas |
vendors and clients_
turned up at Luciano’s _
for the unveiling of their
new look,” said the com- ©
pany in a statement.

“Commonwealth
Building Supplies has
always been a progressive
company that imple-—
ments the latest innova-
tions te ensure they stay —
ahead of the curve. After —
35 years of supplying and
installing top-of-the-line
architectural building
products throughout the

‘ Bahamas, they’ve decid-
ed to rebrand. This bold -
move has taken the : — ————

Bahamian Building BRUCE STEWART (Bruce Stewart Architects), Gingi Damianos (Damianos Realty) & Kate Tsavousis-Bates PETER ENNS & D ATTFIELD (LUCAYAN HOLDINGS) with Danny Martinbor-

- Industry by surprise and (adWorks Senior Partner) ough (Bahamas Realty)
excited vendors and
clients alike,” it said.

Upon entry guests
received CBS Bahamas
gift bags, filled with
branded items and the
new CBS Bahamas
brochure.

The brochure features
all the window, door,
countertop, flooring and
ceiling tile i ~ they car-





ry: te
It also features special-
ty products like motor- -
- ized gates and railings,
which can be custom- _
_ made to almost any spec- _
: ification, along with their _
wide range of hurricane
protection product ‘the
company said, __
_ Premier architects,
contractors and realtors

d and mingled with io
nea gle JOHN TRECO (CBS Pres) & Brent Burrows (ces GM) with Melanie Roach (Ministry Of JOHN MICHAEL CLARKE (Veritas Consultants), is pictured with Tony Jervis (Architect) and

representatives from
Kawucer (architectural _ Works) Wayne Treco (CGI Contractors).

_ aluminum building prod- _
ucts), USG. (acoustica Le
ceiling tiles), PGT
(impact resistant win-

_ dows and doors), and
HURD (wood windows
and doors).

Brent Burrows, general i
manager of CBS.
Bahamas and John Tre-
co, president of CBS

Bahamas, unveiled their
new logo, new ad cam-
paign, and new website,

‘International vendors,

_ especially, were wowed,”

_ said the statement, “Den-
nis Shur (HURD repre-
sentative) in particular, Z scint. ii
remarked that it was one | SITTING around the table are @ Nancy Treco with Bethany & Derek Francis (Master JOHN TRECO (CBs President) with Tony Lind & Assoblite (CNG Construction find plenty to taugft
the best rebranding Technicians GM) about.
launches he’s ever seen.”

STOREWIDE


















JENNIFER (CBS BAHAMAS), Jackson Burnside (Architect), Jose Santiago (PGT), John Treco (CBS BAHAMAS : - , i Sane eae
pres) & Jana Indi Johnson (AdWords Ad Exec) Cee vendors with John Treco (CBS President) &

f {

ae cates

Bernard Ris Mackey $t- Thompson Blvd





Full Text




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BAHAMAS EDITION

ATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

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raise VE BE

SA TODAY —



alte taba

MecDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays

PRICE — 75¢

Donald Thomas

struggles to shake off rust

- ATHLETICS: FRONT OF SPORTS





Major ZNS shake-up

Evette Stuart
removed from
executive post;
Anthony Foster
retires as GM

& By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter

bdean@tribunemedia.net

A MAJOR shake-up is
occurring at the top of the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas, as Evette Stuart
has been removed from her
executive post, and reports indi-
cate that Anthony Foster, the
general manager, has retired.

Sources within ZNS informed
The Tribune of the changes yes-
terday with one insider alleging
political victimisation regarding
Ms Stuart’s removal. Sources
indicated that Ms Stuart’s last
day on the job was Thursday,
before she was either made
redundant, or her contract was
bought out by the BCB. The
Tribune was unable to confirm
which was the case as officials

‘within the BCB were tight-
lipped on her removal.

Ms Stuart, who has a Ph.D.

in Communications, is a veteran
broadcaster and former ZNS
TV anchor. She was the former
senior deputy general manager
at the BCB, before the most
recent round of shuffling of the
leadership at the BCB, and
within ZNS.

After the addition to ZNS of
Jerome Sawyer, vice-president
of news and current affairs, Jes-
sica Robertson, news director,
and Kayleaser Moss, as execu-
tive vice-president, it is report-
ed that Ms Stuart was reas-
signed from the senior deputy
GM post, to the lesser status of
vice-president.

“Her professional record
stands,” said an insider at the
BCB who did not wish to be
named. “She is one of the best
researchers there is and a seri-
ous asset to ZNS, but they

SEE page six

COB accused of.

ignoring safety
of students



By Xan-Xi Bethel





STUDENTS at the College of the Bahamas say they are dis-
gruntled as the Fall 2007 semester was riddled with reports of
rape, theft and assault and they still see little change in the level of

security to reverse this trend.

They call the introduction of two businesses

Starbucks Coffee



and Sbarros restaurant — the college’s “Achilles’ heel” as they
have opened the campus to the public.

According to some of the students, three of last semester’s rob-
beries took place within a week.

These robberies are believed to have involved some young men
from areas near the college with students being accosted on cam-
pus, usually in the evening.

The students reported being robbed of money and cell-phones.
In one incident, a girl was stabbed in her hand as the perpetrators
attempted to wrestle her cell phone from her. ,

“Security is never around when these robberies happen. COB is
not taking an interest in the safety of the students,” one angry
student claimed.

Two women reported being raped and others reported being ver-
bally and physically harassed on campus by males who were not stu-
dents of the college. In another report from last semester that
made headlines, a male shot his girlfriend on COB’s campus.

One girl claimed that COB’s security officers are not interested
in the safety of the students. She said that an incident occurred and
they could not find any security guards in.any of the security
booths. She also said that the thieves were able to escape by cutting
through the main COB campus without being stopped by any-
one.

It is now 2008 and students report that they have not seen a

SEE page six



Eulamae dressed in her ‘Sunday best’

AT PEACE: Eulamae Johnson, 78, displayed at the Rock of Ages Funeral Home yesterday, was laid out of coffin dressed in her ‘Sunday best’. Ms



Brent Dean/T ribune staff



Johnson appeared to be merely resting in a couch, rather than in a funeral home, yesterday. Following Harl Taylor, she is the second out of cof-
fin display in recent times in the Bahamas.

Second Bahamian laid out of coffin after death

@ By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

Eulamae Johnson, 78, has
become the second Bahamian
to be, laid out of coffin after
death, in a setting that gave the
impression she was taking an
afternoon rest, rather than being
displayed in a funeral home.

Friends and family were pre-
sent when The Tribune visited
the Rock of Ages Funeral Home
on Wulff Rd yesterday after-
noon.

One visiting relative said of

the deceased — who seemed to

NATIONAL TOURISM WEEK CELEBRATIONS

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

be taking a rest on her couch —
that she thought Ms Johnson
looked “nice” in the setting,
which was intended to ease the

grief of the moment, according:

to Dorcas Cox, licensed funeral
director at Rock of Ages.

It was intended, she said “to
portray things to the family that
would make them more com-
fortable.”

“That would be their last
memory picture, to see their
loved one,” said Mrs Cox, who
has been in her profession for
20 years. “They wouldn't be cry-
ing, because nobody came cry-
ing today.”



Mrs Cox, who is a graduate
of Gupton-Jones College of
Funeral Services, said that once
trained in the restorative arts, a
funeral director can lay out bod-
ies in “anyway” once the request
is made before embalming
begins. .

“The family did not suggest
that. I suggested it to the fami-
ly,” explained Mrs Cox. “I asked
them, I said, ‘your mum is a very
special person to me and I think
I would like to do something,
you know, meaningful, that I
think you all will be very pleased
with’. And so, they said ‘go for
it’. And they trusted me.”

Harl Taylor was the first per-
son in recent Bahamian history
to be laid out of coffin in an
elaborate setting that gave the
appearance he was alive and at
work in his office.

Ted Sweeting, mortician at
Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary
and Crematorium, was respon-
sible for Mr Taylor’s display,
which drew hundreds — if not
thousands — of spectators, after
The Tribune published a front
page picture of the unique dis-
play. This second such display

SEE page six

We will restore
Nassau, says PM

THE government of the
Bahamas in partnership with
the private sector, will restore
the city of Nassau, starting with
the harbour, the waterfront,
Woodes Rogers wharf, and
many of its public buildings,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said.

* Speaking at the National
Tourism Week celebrations at
the Wyndham Resort, Mr
Ingraham said the city of Nas-
sau too often is considered by
observers as being “congested,

shabby and run-down”. Many
distinctive shops on Bay Street,
he said, less than a decade ago,
have become shadows of them-
selves. .

“We will take care to main-
tain the essential characteristics
of our capital city and preserve
its heart,” Mr Ingraham
promised.

Starting in this process, the
prime minister said government
will beautify the city, make ii

SEE page six



\\\ UA WN Ee
oa
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

SHOWTIME FOR FOXY





International dog show set for March

Foxy, owned by Tonya Gay, is the first dog to
enter the Bahamas Kennel Club's 27th Interna-
tional Dog Show and Obedience Trials.

The show will be held on Saturday March 15
‘and Sunday March 16.

Foxy is entered in the Open Obedience; eate-
gory‘and the special class for spayed and neutered
donjaatitich w will be held on both days ‘thisvy “year.

- Botanical Gardens. ‘



Organisers said entry forms can be picked up at
Fox Hill Nursery on Bernard Road, or at any vet
office. Entries close February 28.

There will be free handling classes on Sunday,
March 2 and Sunday March 9 at 3pm in the
‘The classes are highly rec-
gmmended for anyone thinking of entering their
“deg,” said one organiser.



FEBRUARY 2nd, 2008

12 Noon - UNTIL

8

Candy Land
Pastry
Ice Cream

‘ Hot Dogs
‘Hoop-La
‘Pony Ride
Punch Board
* Bingo
* Bouncing Castle
‘ Music
Food & Drinks
‘ Books, etc.



Bahamas partners
with OAS, UNESCO to”
host regional school
violence workshop

m By ERIC ROSE



REPRESENTATIVES of
at least 10 countries are slated
to attend the Caribbean
Regional Workshop on
Reduction of School Violence.

The event is being organ-
ised by the Ministry of Edu-
cation, the Organisation of
American States (OAS) and
the United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO).

It will be held on February 6
to 8 at SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach.

According to Permanent
Secretary at the Ministry of
Education Elma Garraway,
the principal objective of the
event is to exchange and
analyse policies and strategies
designed to promote a “cul-
ture of peace” within the
school community as well as
to equip educators to deal
with related issues systemati-
cally and effectively.

“In the Bahamas and in the
entire Caribbean school vio-
lence is an emerging source of
educational and social con-
cern,” Mrs Garraway said. “In
recent times, the use of vio-
lence on the part of and
against many of our students,
particularly in the secondary
school level, has surfaced as a
source of increasing concern
among education profession-
als, government officials, par-
ents and the general public.

“This workshop represents
an attempt to analyse the cur-
rent situation regarding vio-
lence in schools in the
Caribbean region, with a view
to proposing policies that will
lead to its reduction, if not its
elimination,” she added.

Minister of Education,
Youth, Sports and Culture
Carl Bethel will officially open
the workshop, with the
keynote address to be deliv-
ered by director of the Inter-
national Observatory on
School Violence at the Uni-
versity of Bordeaux IJ, France,
Professor Eric Debarbieux.

Other presenters will
include local and internation-
al speakers from Europe,
Latin America and the
Caribbean...

Topics to be addressed at
the workshop include: conflict
resolution, responsible citi-

Representatives of at least ten

countries are slated to attend





“There is a
need to
examine the
root cause,
determine
strategies for
the rejection
of violence as
well as for
providing
alternatives to
violent behav-
iour ...”

Juliet Mallet
Phillip

zenship and democratic living,
effective parenting and alter-
native forms of discipline.

Acting director of education
Lionel Sands said ZNS would
broadcast the workshop’s
opening ceremony live on
February 6, at 9am.

He said it is expected that
students, teachers, school
administrators, parents and
the general public will tune in
to the proceedings to share in
the dialogue, particularly the
presentations by Minister
Bethel’s and Professor Debar-
bieux.

Guidelines

“After the broadcast, the
Department of Education is
requesting that administrators,
teachers and students engage
in discussion on the topic,
using a set of guidelines that
the department will issue,” Mr
Sands said. “This will assist us
in better understanding fac-
tors contributing to school vio-
lence and enable us to make
informed decisions, as we seek
to remediate this troubling
phenomenon.”



Mr Sands said that on the
same day, the department will
host a public forum at the CR
Walker Senior High School at
8pm, in an attempt to further
involve the Bahamian public
in this important conversation.

“We are happy that the
Broadcasting Corporation of
the Bahamas has agreed to
partner with us in this venture
by providing a live transmis-
sion of the event,” he added.
“We would also like to
encourage the Bahamian pub-
lic to share in this exercise by
expressing their views, offer-
ing possible solutions.”

Chair of the Bahamas
National Commission for
UNESCO Theresa Moxey-
Ingraham said it is clear that
only through concerted col-
lective action can stakehold-
ers begin to find solutions to
the school violence problem.

“We are indeed happy to be
a part of a regional effort to
address this issue, which has
surfaced throughout the
Caribbean region, and is a
matter of deep concern,” she
noted.

“We look forward to col-
laborating with representa-
tives from participating coun-
tries, through the exchange of
experiences and best prac-
tices.” .

Director of the OAS
Bahamas Office Ms Juliet
Mallet Phillip said the organi-
sation looks forward to a pro-
ductive session next week,
with input from regional and
international participants.

“There is a need to examine
the root cause, determine
strategies for the rejection of
violence, as well as for pro-
viding alternatives to violent
behaviour and fostering inno-
vative and positive forms of
youth participation and active
citizenship.”

Mrs Garraway said, “It is
expected that a manual ‘of best
practices and policies will be
produced as a result of the
workshop and that participat-
ing countries will implement
projects geared towards over-
coming the growing challenge,
of violence in schools.”

Praise for retired Police officers



@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the last acts of the
late president of the Retired
Police Officers Association was
to extend his congratulations to
the retired officers awarded for
their historical contribution to
the recently published ‘Story of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force’.

Before his death two weeks:

ago, Errington Rahming, 67,
extended praise to the following
recipients:

e Dustan Babb, retired super-
intendent of police

AG ovals
: Weather... :

e Bernard K Bonamy, retired
commissioner of police and sec-
retary of Gaming Board

e Reginald Dumont, retired
chief inspector of police

° Kemuel Hepburn, retired
assistant commissioner. of police

e Cardinal Hutchinson,
retired chief inspector of police
and consultant for the RPA

e Keith Mason, retired
deputy commissioner of police

e Sir Albert Miller, retired
senior deputy commissioner of
police

e Myrtle Mott-Jones, woman
superintendent of police

e Howard Smith, retired
assistant Commissioner of
Police



e Vernon Wilkinson, retired
chief inspector of police

e Patrice Williams McPhee,
assistant director of the

Bahamas Department of

Archives

The officers received the
awards at the launch for the
book in October, 2007 at the
RBPF headquarters.

In addition to extending con-
gratulations to the award recip-
ients, the association also
reminded its members and their
widows that they can still
receive a 10 per cent discount
on the book at participating
agencies.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
ME
PHONE: 822-2157
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 3



© In brief

Police search
for Frederick
Antonio over
reports of theft,
house breaking



POLICE are searching for
Frederick Antonio who is
wanted in connection with
reports of house breaking and
stealing.

Antonio, a 50-year-old resi-
dent of Hanna Hill, Eight Mile
Rock, is considered armed
and dangerous and should be
approached with caution,
police said.

He is described as being of
medium brown complexion
and having brown eyes.

He is of slim built and
weighs about 145 pounds. He
stands at five feet, 11 inches
tall.

Anyone with information
concerning Antonio was asked
to contact the Police in Grand
Bahama at 350-3138, 350-
3106, 373-1112 or 911. °

Police find
loaded handgun
during routine
vehicle search —

ONE more illegal firearm
is off the street today after
police conducted a routine
search of a vehicle in the East
Street area yesterday.

According to a statement
released by Assistant Super-
intendent of Police Walter
Evans, officers from the
Mobile Division were on rou-
tine patrol in Windsor Lane
off East Street shortly before
lam on Friday.

They saw a 1998 Kia Avella
with several occupants, who
were reportedly acting suspi-
ciously.

When police stopped the
car, one person fled the scene,
ASP Evans said.

Officers then conducted a
search of the vehicle and
found a loaded .38 handgun.

As a result of the incident,
two men from South Beach —
a 23-year-old and a 36-year-
old — along with a 25-year-old
female resident of Windsor
Lane have been taken into
police custody for question-
ing.



CONDUCT OF SOME POLITICIANS CALLED INTO QUESTION

Former PLP govt helped create a
climate of crime — FNM youth wing

m By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE youth wing of the FNM has
attacked the former PLP government,
saying it helped foster an atmosphere

-of lawlessness which contributed to

the escalating crime wave that has
engulfed the nation.

The Torch Bearers Association said
in a statement that as crime does not
wear any political colours, no “sensible
Bahamians” would place the blame
on any political group.

“Crime has affected us all. There-
fore we must put aside party differ-
ences and agree to search deep within
us for a solution. We must stare our-
selves in the mirror and call it as we see
it. Our inability to exercise discipline at
the most crucial times contributes
greatly to, sometimes, an unfortunate
conclusion.”

However, the statement also said:
“Since we dare to be honest, we must
admit that the behavior of some politi-



“The Bahamian youth need to know if
there could be a direct association
between the high wave in crime and
the much touted PLP second chance

programme.”



cians and others in positions of author-
ity and trust, in our recent past and
even further back, may have con-
tributed to the callous attitude toward
law and order. While we are feverish-
ly clamouring for a solution, we could
help our quest by finding the cause.”

The statement charged that: “The
Bahamian youth need to know if there
could be a direct association between
the high wave in crime‘and the much
touted PLP second chance pro-
gramme, where hardened criminals
were released on the streets, just for
the PLP to appear to be humane.”

It said that if PLP leader Perry

Hawn Foundation presents
self-awareness programme to PM

bers Judy Willis and Liz Edlic.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







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THE HAWN FOUNDATION, a California based group focused on
“mindfulness training” in educational, healthcare and community-
based settings gave a presentation on its programme to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Friday Feb-
ruary 1, 2008. Lionel Sands, Acting Director of Education was also pre-
sent at the morning presentation. Founded in 2003 by actress Goldie
Hawn, the Foundation’s programmes are designed to enhance students’
self awareness; focused attention, problem solving abilities, self-reg-
ulation, stress reduction and pro-social behaviors, according to its offi-
cial website. Pictured from left are Foundation member Alexa Model,
founder Goldie Hawn, Prime Minister Ingraham and Foundation mem-



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Christie “could deviate from his usual
laid back posture, he may be able to
admit that he erred, being too
overzealous at the expense of terrifying

_the general public.”

The association went on to say that
the results of research conducted by its
members highlighted the corruption
that was exposed in the Commission of
Inquiry of 1984.

“We read of a leader in the name
of the late Sir Lynden Pindling who, as
it were, had far more money in his
account than he could honestly give
an account for. He was not prosecuted.
He did not even have the decency to

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resign. The shameless PLP behaved
as if it was okay.

“We also discovered the nefarious
drug trade that rocked the PLP, where
many of its members were knee deep
in the activities. There was no law for
the PLP then, and it seems that there is
no law for them now. The seeds that
were planted then have now grown
into huge ‘oak like’ trees,” the group
said.

The Torch Bearers Association said
that its members are “seriously con-
cerned” about the rising crime wave as
every life is precious and as such, one
lost is one “too many”.

“The Bahamas has'been experienc-
ing the high level of murders, emanat-
ing mostly from domestic problems
and also because the lifestyle that peo-
ple have chosen resulted in death. The
fact of the matter is that the majority of
the murders in recent times are the
result of drugs and other illegal related
activities. The sad part is that we are
now experiencing the sins of the
fathers,” the statement said.




















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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTER TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR EAB DUPUCH, Kt,. O.BLE., K:M,.K.CS.G,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
- Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

The McCain transition for Tuesday

JOHN McCain is exhausted. He hasn’t had a
full-night’s sleep in forever. It took him 10 hours
to get to California because of flight trouble. He
underperformed in the debate on Wednesday

night, as his staff understands. He took some |

shots at Mitt Romney that were gratuitous con-
sidering the circumstances, as he privately
acknowledges.

But somehow in the midst of all this frenzy,
McCain has to transition from being an under-
dog to being a front-runner. He has to transition
from being an insurgent to being the leader of a
broad centre-right coalition. He has to transition
from being a primary season scrambler to offer-
ing a broader vision of how to unify the country.

By the end of next week, McCain could be
the de facto leader of the Republican Party.
The McCain staff is acutely aware of the respon-
sibility this entails, and what it will take to oper-
ate at the next level.

First, the tone of the campaign will have to
change. In 2000, McCain was a joyful warrior.
He was the guy rollicking through rallies waving
a light saber and launching playful verbal
assaults on the Bush empire. He was the guy fill-
ing his speeches with New Frontier rhetoric
and glimpses of hopeful vistas. “I believe we
are an unfinished nation,” he used to say.

’ But the Obama campaign feels more like
McCain in 2000 than the current McCain cam-
paign does.

Barack Obama outshines McCain right now
as the hopeful warrior. Obama is the one insis-
tently calling on audiences to serve a cause
greater than self-interest.

He’s the one transcending partisanship and
telling young people that politics can be the
means to a meaningful, purpose-driven life.

McCain seems to be burdened by the emo-
tional cost of the war in Iraq, by the gravity of
young people dying. But FDR was a happy
wartime campaigner and to compete with the
Democrats in the fall, McCain will have to
reconnect with the spirit of this moment.

The country, the uber-pollster Peter Hart
notes, is not in a mood for irritation and anger.
It’s thirsty for uplift, progress and hope.

Second, McCain will have to clarify his vision
for the future. He talks about the struggle with
Islamic extremists as the transcendent foreign
policy challenge of our time.

But there’s a transcendent domestic chal-
lenge as well. America is segmenting.

The country is dividing along the lines of
education, income, religion, lifestyle and giv-
ing way to cynicism and mistrust. Government
is distanced from the people and growing more
corrupt.

In the past, McCain has said that repairing

MANAGING EDITOR
WANTED

THE TRIBUNE seeks a Managing Editor to add a new
chapter to this newspaper's continuing success story.

Candidates will need to be seasoned journalists of
the highest calibre with relevant professional
qualifications and a proven track record in newspaper

management.

Superior editing skills, excellent command of the
English language, sound judgment and outstanding
writing ability are essential requirements for this
demanding position. You will also need to be totally
conversant with the Apple-Quark Xpress computer
editing system, with relevant page make-up expertise.

If you think you qualify, please send a covering letter
and resume, together with work samples, to The
Publisher, The Tribune, PO Box N-3207, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Please include references from past employers and
a short statement saying why you qualify for this post.

An attractive salary package, paid vacation and
company medical insurance scheme are on offer to

the successful candidate

No Phone Calls Please
Our benefits include paid vacation
& medical insurance.

The Tribune

Nassauand Bahama Islands’ Leadjgg Newspaper



these divisions constitutes “a new patriotic chal-
lenge for a new century.” He has hinted at a phi-
losophy that amounts to an American version of
One Nation Conservatism. It emphasizes
reforming federal institutions, calling on young
people to perform national service, promoting
economic competitiveness and enhancing social
mobility. It is a mixture of Theodore Roosevelt
and Ronald Reagan. This governing philoso-
phy has lurked in the background this year, but
McCain will have to make it explicit to move a
nation.

Finally, McCain is going to have to beef up his
domestic policy offerings.

He has some excellent ideas, like his plan to
control health care costs, which he doesn’t
explain well. But he has not yet focused suffi-
ciently on the group that is always the key to
Republican success or failure — the suburban
working class.

Picture a suburban townhouse community
filled with families making $40,000 to $60,000 a
year.

Maybe there’s a single mother in one unit
who hates her job but needs the benefits. Maybe
there are immigrant parents with associate
degrees watching their son drop out of school in
another.

The definition of being middle class has
changed, as many have noticed. It used to be a
destination.

Now it’s an uncertain Sinie It s a struggle
just to stay there.

Any candidate who can’t talk specifically to
these concerns is doomed.

If McCain does well on Super Tuesday, he
will have pulled off one of the greatest come-
back stories in modern political history. He will
owe his victory to his character, his honesty
and his tenacity.

But already, he is being judged by different
standards. Republicans are wondering how he
would compete against Hillary Clinton (whom
they moderately fear) and Obama (whom they
fear a great deal).

To unify the party, McCain will have to
respect different parts of the coalition. But more
importantly, he will also have to excite Repub-
licans with the possibility of a GOP victory.

He will have to mine his own past and bring
forward the ideals and causes that lurk there,
and present them as a coherent package.

He’ll have to show that winning the nomina-
tion of a dispirited Republican Party is one
thing; winning the presidency and uniting a
nation is another.

(This article was written by David Brooks of
the New York Times News Service- c.2008).



Zion Hill Church of God



The Tribune wants to
are making news in

Ccall us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Share your news

hear from people who

their neighbourhoods.

AIDS case
should stir
conscience

of nation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AS WE consider the precious
blood that Our Lord and Sav-
iour Jesus Christ shed for us all,
let us take a moment to reflect
on a few thoughts which were
written in 2004 but never sub-
mitted concerning the death
two years earlier of a well
known public figure. This gen-
tleman of whom I am speaking
is Mr Philip Ingraham, AIDS
activist.

This letter was written a num-
ber of years ago, but it is now
being submitted to your read-
ership because it is even more
relevant today and perhaps it
will be useful in snapping us as
a nation into reality. It is my
heartfelt prayer that it will serve
to awaken the conscience of our
nation as we seek to live pleas-
ing to Almighty God.

Mr Ingraham was just one of
the many tragic cases which was
brought to the forefront of
national attention.

His case was one of abject
need based on his unfortunate
contraction of the AIDS virus.
His resulting wretched poverty
and pitiful pleas for help tested
the moral fiber of our society
in every area.

However, the area, which
stood out most emphatically,
was our level of compassion for
our fallen fellowman. As we
know Mr Ingraham died with-
out realising (by his own testi-
mony) the mercy from his fel-
lowman for which he was so
earnestly, diligently and des-
perately searching. Yes, he
looked to God — but he expect-
ed that God would use US if
we let Him.

Meanness is very disturbing
because it bears the unpleasant
fruit of violence. It is the direct
opposite of “brotherly kind-
ness.” Withholding good from
someone when it is in the pow-




AMS

letters@tribunemedia.net



er of your hands to help anoth-
er person when they are in need
contributes to an atmosphere,
which will eventually translate
itself into a manifestation of vio-
lence in one form or the other.
That is, if the person’s hope is
not fully grounded in the mercy
of Almighty God to intervene
miraculously on his or her
behalf.

Jesus Christ’s teachings clear-
ly demonstrates the higher pow-
er of mercy, love, forgiveness,
compassion, faith, patience, etc
to heal lives and restore broken
relationships.

Are we in the Bahamas going
to allow our nation to be
labeled mean, callous, compas-
sionless and cold? God will
judge nations and where will we
stand? Meanness is disguised in
many forms: A lack of patience
is actually a mean spirit. Rude-
ness and insults are particularly
mean and violent. Evil speaking
against another’s character and
gossip is disgusting and mean.
Pride and prejudice is distaste-
ful, hateful and mean. Pride was
Satan’s sin. He was kicked out
of heaven for his evil pride. We
need not glory in our privileged
position in life if we are legalis-
tic-and mean and cannot hear
the cry of those in need.

We must ask ourselves, what
are we sowing each day by our
attitude? What is our answer to
God when the question is
asked: “Where is your broth-
er?” Do we even know where
our brother or sister is? What is
his or her condition? Where is
our friend? Can you hear the
cry of your neighbour, your sis-
ter, brother and friend? Can
you feel the pain? Can you per-

ceive the prayer and desperate
hope for some mercy?

Where is generosity in your
giving? Can you make a differ-
ence in someone’s life without
sounding a trumpet before you?
The scriptures say: “Blessed are
the merciful, for they shall
obtain mercy.”

In studying the Golden Rule:
“Do unto others as you would
have them do unto you,” I not-
ed that the little, insignificant,
overlooked word “as” means
“equally.” “Equally” means “on
the same level.” In God’s eyes
He sees all humans as equal to
each other. A tremendous
amount of sanity will return to

~ us as a nation if we recognise

that we are, in God’s eyes, on
the exact same level as the next
man and treat each other as
such — our equal (not above
neither beneath us — but as our
equal). Yes, of course we give
honour to those to whom it is
due — but we are talking about
the equality and dignity of all
men to which each human being
is entitled.

God’s richest blessings upon
those who have no need for
such a reminder because of your
chosen lifestyle of reverential
fear of God.

May the Bahamas once again
be known for its kindness and
love towards each other and all
those in need. Yes, we do show
much love and friendship to the
tourist and that is excellent, but
what about our own and every-
one else?

A RENEE FORBES
Nassau,
January 25, 2008.

I call on armed Bahamians
to put down their weapons

Revival

BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES

‘Revival

Bishop Gloria Redd
February 3rd - February 8th - 1 Week Revival - Bishop Peter Balle

Galilee Holiness Missionary Church of God

Windsor Lane

February 10th - February 15th-1 Week Revival - Bishop Ferguson

Market Street & White Road

February 17th - February 29th -

_ 2 Week Revival - Pastor Dwayne Saunders —
Jesus Christ of the Heart Deliverance Ministry
Market St, & Palm Tree Ave,

MAY GOD RICHLY BLESS YOu,









EDITOR, The Tribune.

A “GUN” is defined as a common name given to an object
that fires high-velocity projectiles. For too long we have expe-
rienced the problem of guns on the streets which was and are still
diminishing too many innocent lives.

For this New Year the Bahamas has already recorded five
murders in three weeks of January. It will then be a matter of
fact that if murders continue on this same road, they will defi-
nitely surpass last year’s murder count. As we all know many of
last year’s murders were done by guns and apparently it applies
to this year’s latest murders also. I definitely give the Police force
credit for their continued effort in trying to ban all firearms from

off the streets.

The question that many are asking is that how are there so

many guns on the streets?

Are they being smuggle into the country and bought by
Bahamians? Whatever way they are coming into the country this
really has to stop now, because too many innocent lives are being

taken away so suddenly.

For example the C R Walker student who was gunned down
two weeks ago on Frederick Street whilst waiting for a jitney to
go home. It was a very sad situation for the boy’s family and con-

cerned citizens of the Bahamas.

On the other hand, the country recorded its fifth homicide for
2008 after a 39-year-old father of four was gunned down in his
home in Joan’s Heights sub-division, during the early morning

hours on Tuesday.

Police have identified the latest victim as Marvin Seymour, a
resident of Joan’s Heights west. Around 5am Seymour was at
home with his four children when it is reported three men,
burst through the front door and fired shots.

The victim was hit many times about the body. This homicide
concerns the police force because it was done in front of chil-
dren. These children will now need to be counseled and are now

growing up without a father.

As Bahamian citizens we too can help ban guns off the streets
by reporting to police if we spot or know any one who has a gun

in their possession.

By doing this we can save lives. As a concerned Bahamian cit-
izen I call on everyone to put down the guns and stop the vio-
lence. Let’s make a commitment to attain less violence and

more peace,

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau
January 23, 2008.
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 5



Police
probe
discovery
of human
remains
on Abaco

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT — Human
skeletal remains were discov-
ered earlier this week on the
island of Abaco, where
intense investigations are cur-
rently underway by detec-
tives from Grand Bahama.

According to police
reports, a passerby and his
dog discovered the remains
along a track road in the
Spring City settlement on
Monday.

Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said that a resident of Spring
City reported the incident to
the Marsh Harbour Police.

The resident told officers
that while walking along the
track road, his dog ventured
into bushes and began run-
ning around in circles and
whining.

He went to see what had
excited the dog and discov-
ered what appeared to be
human skeletal remains lying
on the ground.

Police officers were accom-
panied to the location by the
resident and a doctor.

The remains, which
appeared to have been in that
location for a considerable
period of time, were identi-
fied by the doctor as those of
a human.

After processing the scene,
the remains were transported
to the morgue at Marsh Har-
bour.

Supt Rahming said police
have launched an intense
investigation into the matter.



LOCAL NEWS

Fifty four-year-old man
accused of having sex
with 12-year-old girl

A 54-year-old Quarry Mission Road
man accused of having sex with a 12-
year-old girl was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

According to court dockets, it is
alleged that some time during Novem-
ber 2007, Carlton Turnquest commit-
ted the offence.

Turnquest, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank Lane, was not
required to enter a plea to the unlaw-
ful sex charge.

He was granted bail in the sum of

$15,000. The case was adjourned to
February 4 and transferred to court
one in Bank Lane.



MAGISTRATE’S COURT

e A 27-year-old man accused of
indecently assaulting a 13-year-old girl
was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

According to court dockets, it is
alleged that Elkeno Kelly of Melrose
Avenue committed the offence on
Monday, November 12.

Kelly, who was arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel, pleaded
not guilty to the charge.

Kelly was granted bail in the sum
of $8,000.

The case was adjourned to February
4 and transferred to court one in Bank
Lane.

e A 33-year-old man was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court on Thursday on
fraud charges.

Court dockets alleged that on Mon-
day, November 7, 2007, Marvin Mack-
ey of Florida Court was found in pos-
session of a forged Royal Bank of
Canada cheque in the amount of
$1,800.

Court dockets further alleged that
on the same day, Mackey uttered the
forged cheque and obtained from the
Royal Bank of Canada’s Madeira
Street Branch, cash in the amount of

$1,800.

Court dockets also alleged that on
that day, Mackey was found in pos-
session of a forged Royal Bank of
Canada cheque in the amount of
$1,500.

It is further alleged that on the same
day Mackey obtained from the Royal
Bank of Canada on John F Kennedy
Drive, cash in the amount of $1,500.

Mackey, who appeared before Mag-
istrate Carolita Bethel at court eight in
Bank Lane, pleaded not guilty to the
charges.

He was granted bail in the sum of
$7,500 and the matter was adjourned
to September 10.

Honour and integrity have kept leading law firm
throughout 60-year history, says senior partner

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



THE fundamental principles
of honour and integrity are
what have kept Higgs and
Johnson a leading law firm
throughout its 60-year history,
senior partner Philip Dunkley
said at an anniversary service
Thursday.

Changes in technology and
the growth of a global market
have changed the face of the
firm’s business, but in spite of
these changes the firm holds
fast to the core principles upon
which it was founded, he said.

“When I joined Higgs &
Johnson.in 1974 the number of
lawyers in the firm totaled five.
Today there are 35. The fax
was unheard of and there were
no computers, blackberries, cell



AteiTa Deen

Higgs and Johnson holds anniversary service

phones voice mail or e-mail.

“Then, the world was large
and round and the Bahamas
was an island in the stream.
Today the world is small and
flat in which the Bahamas is
an integral part,” said Mr
Dunkley at ceremony, held at
the firm’s offices on East Bay
Street.

He said that despite the
advancements in technology
on which today’s lawyer is
increasingly reliant, it is to the
continued effort “to adhere to
the principles upon which this
firm was founded, namely the
principles of honour and
integrity ... that we truly owe
our success”.

Managing partner John
Delaney said that while many
relics of the 1940s have come
and gone, Higgs & Johnson
maintains its presence by
evolving and re-inventing itself
to fit the times.

He too noted the importance
of honour and integrity,
instilled in the firm by its
founding fathers,

“We are grateful for the core
values instilled by our founders
and the legal prowess of suc-
cessive partners and leaders —
chief amongst them Sir Geof-
frey Johnstone — that have
established the firm,as a
Bahamian institution.

“The firm’s core tenets of

honour and integrity have
served our clients well over the
years. We are humbled by the
high recognition accorded this
firm by the financial services
industry, business persons and
others locally and internation-
ally”.

Among those in attendance
were relations of Godfrey Hig-
gs and Mervin Johnson, the
firms founders, and retired
Supreme Court Justice Jeanne
Thompson.

Higgs & Johnson was estab-
lished January 2, 1948.

Today it is one of the largest
full-service corporate_and com-
mercial law firms.,,in the
Bahamas.

‘I vex at how brazen criminals are these days...’

lm By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net -



“I vex at how low society has
sunk these days. Last week I
was passing Dowdeswell Street
after work and lo and behold I
spotted a grown man stripped
half naked in a parking lot with
his bits exposed for all the
world to see.

“For him to do something
like that, in broad daylight, def-
initely means he is a danger to
himself and possibly to some-
one else. That area already
populated with jonsers and
miscreants, now we have to
deal with half naked men with
their privates exposed as a pos-
sible threat too? I think the
police need to make a habit of
patrolling that area and move
those vagrants to another place
where they won’t harm them-
selves or others.”

— JT, Danottage Estates

TST



Why You Vex?



















Dye
Lye

=



“I vex because there seems
no end to New Providence's
traffic problem. There needs
to be some relief for those
coming from the east heading
into work and vice versa. If
that requires less cars on the
road or widening of roads
something needs to happen
before one day I strip down to
my underwear and walk down
Bernard Raod with a base ball
bat,”

— Sandra Williams

“You know why I vex?
Broke people like me can’t
survive in Nassau. You know
it’s wrong when you puttin’ $50
gas in ya’ car a week and it

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don’t last! And it ain’ even ya’
car! I tired of giving my old
lady gas money and | don’t
even go nowhere. I tryin’ hard
to make my lil’ paycheck
stretch but tings tough man,
tings tough,”

— Marvin F,

Elizabeth Estates

“I vex at how brazen crimi-
nals are these days. I know the
police say its drug dealers and
petty criminals settling old

scores but I think it is outra-
geous that young men and
women have complete disre-
gard for the laws society has

_in place.

“It all goes back to the
breakdown of family structure
in The Bahamas and how slack
and hostile Bahamians are
though. We are really paying
the price for our deeds and
reaping the seeds we have
sown.”

— Evelyn R

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PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ZNS shake-up

FROM page one

made her redundant.”
The source claimed that her removal is a “political act.”
“From what I understand, it is complete victimisation,” the
source claimed.
Larry Smith, a member of the board of the BCB, confirmed

that Mr Foster has retired as he had reached the retirement age of

60 years. Mr Smith said he is not certain if Mr Foster has yet left the
helm of the BCB, as there is a possibility that some sort of exten-
sion may be offered to him.

Mr Smith, however, did not comment on Ms Stuart’s status, and
referred The Tribune to Michael Moss, who has reportedly taken
over the chairmanship of the BCB from Barry Malcolm, or to Mr
Foster.

Mr Moss did not return a call placed to him by The Tribune, and
a secretary at Mr Foster’s office said that he was not in office yes-
terday.

Senator Kay Forbes-Smith, parliamentary secretary in the office
of the prime minister, who has responsibility for ZNS, was off the
island when The Tribune made attempts to reach her to discuss
these changes.

Another ZNS insider, however, who also did not wish to be

named, provided a different view of Ms Stuart’s removal. The

source expressed delight over the change.

He questioned her political neutrality, and suggested that some
of the staff at the BCB may have had some issues with her leader-
ship.

Second Bahamian laid

out of coffin after death
_ FROM page one

may indicate that a trend is emerging in the Bahamas funeral
industry.

Mrs Johnson, a Bamboo Town resident who is formerly from
Snug Corner, Acklins, will be buried this morning at 10am at the
Church of God of Prophecy, East Street.

«9 LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future
Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:
The Madeira Shopping
Center
(Next door to CIBC) Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

| ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
eens P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
wamemmm Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
mame CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 03, 2008
a 8 SUNDAY BEFORE LENT

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rey. Mark Carey/HC

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Zion Boulevard

10:00AM Mrs. Kenris Carey/HC
7:00PM Rey. Charles Sweeting

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

East Shirley Street

11:00AM Rey. Charles New/HC
7:00PM Rey. Charles New

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rey. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections - Rey. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rey. Philip Stubbs/HC

{ TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
i y 11:00AM Rey. William Higgs/HC

RADIO PROGRAMMES

‘RENEWAL’ vi Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Mr. Janice J. Knowles
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.

Your Host: Mr. Janice J. Knowles
AR oe oe ee oe oe oe oe ae oe ae oe ae 6 6 a a oe aK a 2 2 2 oe 2 26 2g 2 2 2 2 2 9 2 2 9 kk ge ie oe a aK aK KK

The Nassau Regional Women’s Fellowship will be holding their
Anniversary Service and Installation Service for New Officers on
Sunday, February 10, 2008 at 3:00 p.m. at Trinity Methodist Church.





Grant's Con Wesley Methodist Church
_ Balllou Hill Ra & Chapel Street) RO.Box GB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD, 2008.

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis Ktherine Rose
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Usher Board Anniversary(HC)
7:00 p.m.






Sis. Nathalie Thompson/Board of Music,



Ministry
“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)



College of the
Bahamas accused
of ignoring the
safety of students

FROM page one

change in the level of security on campus. “You would think that
they’d do something after all those rapes and robberies last year.”

The College of the Bahamas is accused of being more interested
in trivial matters rather than dealing with real issues on campus.
Many of the students and teachers have criticized the introduction
of Starbucks Coffee and Sbarro Restaurant on the main campus.
Some say that the introduction of these businesses on campus has
increased the crime on campus and made the campus vulnerable to
attack.

These businesses are open to the public, thus opening the door
for anyone to have access to the campus. Outsiders are mixing
with students.

“These two businesses are the real Achilles heel for COB,”
said a student. The college has been under fire for a long time, fac-
ing harsh criticism over a number of controversial issues. Now, staff
and students are angry over what they regard as COB’s serious lack
of focus. They are accusing the school of placing emphasis on mat-
ters that have nothing to do with the advancement of education in
the school. COB’s purported aim for university status has been
called “nonsense” and “pure propaganda.” Instead of focusing on
upgrading the quality of education, they have been accused of
putting priority on upgrading the quality of food available on cam-
pus.

Prior to the introduction of these establishments, all students were
supposed to possess a personal identification card and show this ID
at the various entry points to the campus. Now, since there are
restaurants located on the main campus, everybody has the right to
enter the campus. COB’s grounds are basically “public property.”
A student noted, “The only thing that ID is good for is to get into
the library now.”

The Tribune tried to get a statement from the college’s Office of
Communications about these complaints, but so far the College has
not replied.

OVERSEAS NEWS

Student denies involvement
in Holloway disappearance

@ THE HAGUE, Netherlands

Dutch student Joran van der Sloot denied yesterday that he had any-
thing to do with Natalee Holloway’s disappearance, saying he lied
when he told someone privately he was involved, according to the
Associated Press.

The statement came hours after Aruban prosecutors announced
they were reopening their investigation into the disappearance of the
Alabama teenager after seeing secretly taped material from a Dutch
journalist. Van der Sloot was interviewed by the respected Dutch
television show “Pauw & Witteman” following reports that crime
reporter Peter R. De Vries had captured him making statements about
the case, “It is true I told someone. Everybody will see it Sunday,” Van
der Sloot said, referring to De Vries’ planned television show. De
Vries claims to have solved the mystery of Holloway’s May 2005 dis-
appearance with the help of an undercover investigation.

Van der Sloot spoke to the late night current affairs show by tele-
phone. His voice was recognizable from an earlier appearance on the
show, which has closely followed the Holloway case. Holloway, 18, of
Mountain Brook, Alabama, was last seen in public leaving a bar with
Van der Sloot and two Surinamese brothers — Deepak and Satish
Kalpoe — hours before she was due to board a flight home from a
school trip to Aruba. No trace of her has ever been found. The three
were re-arrested in November, but released within weeks for lack of evi-
dence. Prosecutors then dismissed their case against them.

1










ESE

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY



SUNDAY SERVICES
Moming Worship Service ....... 8.30 am.
Sunday School for allages .. 9.45a.m,
Adult Eduction wcities 9.45 am.
Worshla S@rviC@ cise 17.00 a.m.
SPANISN SEINVICE cress 8.00 am.
Evening Worship Service ......., 6.30 pm.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs,
Missionettes (Girls Club] 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
» Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS |

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

PTS UM Ceram acl i(s
Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.O, Box: N=1566

~ TEMPLE TIME



Email: evlemple@bateinet.bs Web: www.evangelistictemple.org

|| “Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”

PM pledges to
restore Nassau

FROM page one

greener, and greatly improve its appearance and ambiance.

“We will complete the stalled and abandoned construction of the
Nassau Street Magistrate’s Court House and the Registrar Gen-
eral’s offices on Market Street. And we will construct a new
Supreme Court. As well, a number of government buildings have
sat condemned in the city of Nassau for a number of years.

“We will restore or demolish the Adderley Building on Bay
Street and the Rodney Bain Building on Shirley and Parliament.
Complementary to works to improve the Harbour we will contin-
ue the upgrade of Woodes Rogers Wharf and extend it eastward to
at least Victoria Avenue if not Armstrong Street. This will provide
an alternative east to west throughway relieving traffic on Bay
Street in the city centre.

“We will also complete the paving of roads and junctions in our
city centre, including the
replacement of the
asphalt road with cobble
stones extending eastward
from Rawson Square to
the Hilton British Colo-
nial Hotel setting the
stage for the introduction
of pedestrian only sec-
tions along Bay Street,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham said there
also will be repairs and
upgrades to the old cus-
toms warehouses on the
Prince George Dock,
transforming them into an
authentic Bahamian
Crafts Market.

“We will demolish the
old customs building on
Arawak Cay. This will
enhance the entrance to



“In Grand
Bahama and the
Family Islands we
have an opportu-
nity to respond to
the traveller’s-
need for diversity

and our country’s
compelling
mandate to utilize
its more precious
our city centre, remove resource...”
much of the grime; help

reduce congestion and remove the sense of decline. We will also
expand the Potter’s Cay dock.

“Associated with improved town planning, will be a systematic
programme to identify, label and clear all public beach access in
New Providence. And I said there are many, some you don’t know,
and you will hear a lot of noise when it happens.

“In Grand Bahama and the Family Islands we have an oppor-
tunity to respond to the traveller’s need for diversity and our coun-
try’s compelling mandate to utilize its most precious resource in a
sustainable manner for the benefit of our citizens.”

While not eschewing all large-scale development in the Family
Islands, Mr Ingraham said that the Bahamas must guard against the
urbanization of small, intimate settlements that are better suited to
the development of high-end, environmentally-conscious and cul--
turally attuned resorts that offer a relaxed, paced experience.

“It is to be remembered that over the centuries the people of the
Bahamas have endured a myriad of experiences, many the result of
developments in the United States of America, for example, the
years of slavery and emancipation, Prohibition and the American
War of Independence. As a result, we are home to many artifacts,
ruins and monuments tied not only to our own experiences but to
the history of our largest tourist market to the north.

“Heritage and cultural tourism allow the visitor to experience the
essence of who we are while ensuring that we play to our greatest
resource — our people. Our planned programme to restore heritage
sites, sponsor cultural festivals and increase support for linkages with
our main industry will ensure the further growth in diversity of our
tourist product,” he said. Identifying, restoring, and stabilizing
these heritage sites will ensure that they serve as permanent attrac-
tions for residents and visitors for years to come, Mr Ingraham said.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD, 2008

11:30 am Speaker:
Pastor Dexter Duxalier
Christ Community Church
5:00 pm
United Communion & Thanksgiving

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. « Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 am.
« Gomrounity Outreach: 41550 a.m. + Event Service: 7:00 p.m.

. @ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m.
*« Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)



Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL ||
Preaching 11am &7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

PastonH. Mills |
\
i
\

Pastor: H. Mills «© Phone: 393-0563 * Box N- 8622 |



Grace and Peace
me an Church

Wed, Feb. 13, sae 7:00 pm
Thurs, Feb. 14, 2008, 7:00 pm

Youth Service:
Fri, Feb. 15, 2008, 7:00 pm
Sunday, Feb. 17, 2008
11:00 am & 6:00 p
Rev. Steve mes USA r











THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 7



LOOKING BACK AT

The Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts







































THIS week, In Days
Gone By looks back at
some moments in the his-
tory of the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts.

1 - February 28, 1989 -
Gentle persuader Carlson
(Anthony Delaney, right)
offers to shoot old Candy's
(Sammy Bethel) dog. “I'll put
old devil out of his misery,”
he promises in ‘Of Mice and
Men’, performed at the Dun-
das nightly until March 4.

2 - February 28, 1989 —
George (David Jonathan Bur-
rows) comforts his. friend
Lennie (Garvin David Collins)
with thoughts of a house of
their own, where they can

“live off the fat of the land,”
during a scene from Of Mice
and Men

3 - January 29, 1989 —
Constant badgering between
two oldsters Nat (Mik Ban-
croft) and Midge (Winston
Saunders), gives the audience
comic relief during the rather
slow-paced first act of “l am
not Rappaport”. Here Midge
(right) tells Nat that “its your
type that gives old a bad
name.”

4 - Greg Lampkin in “I.
Nehemiah Remember When
» > Chapter II”. '












a THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS CONFERENCE .
So! OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE CARIBBRAN AND THE AMERICAS
L’KGLISK METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE RT LES AMBRIQUES

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue

P.O, Box BE-163%, Nassau, Bahamas, Tdephone: 325-6432: Fa 328-284:

thodesmethod(@batdnet bs














METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD, TO REFORM THE
NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS
THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father Jahn Wedey)
“Celebrating 228 years of continuous Methodist witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
SEVENTH LORD'S DAY BEFORE THE RESURRECTION, TRANSFIGURATION
FEBURARY 3, 2008,








COLLECT: Almighty Father, whose Sen was reveded in mgesty before he suffered death upon the -
USS: give us grace te pervave his glory, that we may be strengthened to suffer with him and be changed
into his likeness, from glory to glory; who is dive and reigns with you inthe unity ofthe Holy Spin,

one God, now and for ever,








WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malealm Rd East)



















S00 am, Rey. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion}
£3) p.m, Rev, Edward 1. Sykes Healing & Wellness
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose Ave near Wulff Rd)
700 am. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)
10:00 am. Six Pabtee Stuchan
11:80 am Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly! AMEN (Holy Communion)
G rac Ee a Nn d Peac e 630 pam, Class Leaders 14
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox Hill)
We S | eya Nn G h U rc h L100 am. Rev, Leonard O, Roberts Jt. (Holy Communion)
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza}
e Pr Bw ALA Po 9.00. am, Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)
YY HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Fad)
Vy & 7.00 am. Rey, Edwand J. Sykes
OS ,
dam, ois, Cola Gardiner
Wed, Feb. 13, 2008, 7:00 pm METHODIST CHURCH cena pig
S00 am. Rev. Emily A. Damentte
Thurs, Feb. 14, 2008, 7:00 pm CRON DES-MISSIONS sUDeRscare (Quackvo Stret)
A eee, gt ates' S30 pm, Frdays Children’s Club
Youth Service: ve . Sunday Providenee Beacons’ Rhodes Women Alive






Fri, Feb. 15, 2008, 7:00 pm

Sunday, Feb. 17, 2008
11:00 am & 6:00 pm

Rev. Steve Bell, USA



METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thnft Shop and other Min sries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St, Oakes Fidd) Reception to Primary
PRACK AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN: - All Methodists of the Conferenceare urged to pray and to
fast for Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases and for an end to theupsurgein violence, The fast
begins weekly after the evening meal on Thursday and endsat noon on Kriday, Thisweprocaim
unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lond’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m. “Great Hymns of Inspiration” - On the Lord's Day, Radto
810 at 5:30 p.m, “Family Vibes” ZNS1, Tuesday, 7:30 pans “To God be the Glory” ZNS |, Tuesday,
74S pun.








ge ra a ~
ee SES Se

peo Se ; we PPR eS

a rs a






eed Nop ad ot Nal as








Twynam Heights, Adjacent to Super Value, Winton

\ t

4 ) et

é
PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Digging deep

for the needy

Bahamians
and visitors
donate a
record sum

to Salvation.

Army Kettle
Drive

Bahamians.and visitors
reached into their pockets to
help the less fortunate like
never before this year, donat-
ing a record $104,243 to the
annual Salvation Army Ket-
tle Drive, it was revealed this
week.

This announcement was °

made during a luncheon host-
ed by board members of the
Salvation Army to thank
those who helped.

“If you could capture what
the Salvation Army is or does
in one word, it would be ‘oth-
ers’,” said divisional comman-
der Major Lester Ferguson as
he addressed the 40 persons
at the awards ceremony.

“It is the help of others, all
of you, that allows us to per-
form our duties, which is the
basis of the army’s sole exis-
tence.”

For the three weeks leading
up to Christmas, members of
civic clubs including Pilot
Clubs, Delta Sigma Theta,
Kiwanis Clubs, Rotary Clubs,
Kappa Alpha Psi, the Zonta
Club of Nassau, the Calvary
Men’s Fellowship, Omar Tem-
ple Lodge, Alpha Phi Alpha



RECOGNISED: Former Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson is pre-

sented with a certificate of appreciation. Major Lester Ferguson is pictured

far left.

and businesses including
Price WaterhouseCoopers and
Marsha Thompson gave up
weekends to stand in front of
food stores and malls using
the sound of the signature red
bells to convince passers-by
to help make someone else’s
holiday a little brighter.

“We are pleased to
announce that we raised a
record-breaking $104,243.16
which has gone a long way in
touching the lives of over
6,800 persons during the holi-
days,” said Major Ferguson.

The funds helped provide
1,650 special meals, 1,597 food
parcels, 1,352 toys for children
and 2,282 care packs.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
raised $3,727.55 — the largest
amount of all the service
organisations — and for their
efforts, were presented the
Bell Ringers Award.

This year’s collection was
nearly 25 per cent higher than
last year’s — and that set a new
record.

Former governor general
Sir Orville Turnquest official-
ly launched the kettle drive in

a ceremony that included
music by the Royal Bahamas
Palice Force Band in late
November.

Certificates of appreciation
were awarded to other service
and non-service organisations
that participated, including the
Pilot Clubs, Delta Sigma
Theta, Kiwanis Clubs, Rotary
Clubs, PriceWaterhouseC-
oopers, Kappa Alpha Psi,
Zonta Club of Nassau, Cal-
vary Men’s Fellowship, Mar-
sha Thompson, Omar Temple
Lodge and Alpha Phi Alpha.

Another individual receiv-
ing a special award was for-
mer commissioner of police
and Salvation Army board
member Paul Farquharson,
who was recognised for his
contributions and diligent ser-
vice during his tenure on the
board. “My life has been
enriched,” Mr Farquharson
said, “having been given the
opportunity to be a part of this
community conscious group.
I owe you a depth of gratitude
as ingratitude is a sin. I thank
you so much.”

FREEPORT CONTAINER PORT LIMITED

Is pleased to offera CAREER OPPORTUNITY to a qualified candidate

In the position of:



IF I WERE MINISTER OF TOURISM ...



eter Ramsay/BIS

P

CIVIL ENGINEER



JONNAJAH BOODLE, a student of the St Francis De Sales School in Marsh Harbour, Abaco met Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at the Office of the Prime Minister on Cable Beach on Thursday. The youngster deliv-
ered a stirring presentation entitled “If | Were Minister of Tourism’ at the National Tourism Week Confer-
ence held at the Wyndham Resort in Nassau. Pictured is Prime Minister Ingraham, Jonnajah Boodle and

Candidate must possess the following minimum qualifications and experience
and perform the essential functions of the job-including but not limited to:

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of Five
(5) years’ experience in civil and marine engineering.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

eeport Container Port Limited
Supervision of All Civil Engineering projects including: Phase V
development, Phase 1 repairs, establishment of additional Stacking Area,
construction of an Amenities Building, preparation for additional Reefer
Capacity and all property maintenance an repairs for Freeport Container
Port.

reeport Harbour Company Limited
Supervision of repairs to quay walls; entrance and breakwaters,
consultation on new Cruise Facility, Bahama Rock Mining Program and
all property maintenance and repairs for Freeport Harbour Company.

rand Bahama Airport Company include:
Construction of a new Fuel Farm, construction of an extension to the
Domestic terminal and all property maintenance and repairs for Grand
Bahama Airport Company

Eighteen months on the job training will be provided before assuming full
responsibility for the position.

Candidates are required to forward Resume to:

The Human Resource Director
Freeport Container Port Limited
P.O.Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
or send email to: Ads@fcp.com.bs



St Francis De Sales teacher Jonna Boodle.


“The Three Little Pigs” is a
familiar children’s favourite, and
on Wednesday Grade IP stu-
dents at Woodcock Primary
School delighted in U S Ambas-

sador Ned Siegel’s reading of

this classic.

This was the first reading by
Ambassador Siegel since he
“officially” took over the reading,
programme from former
Ambassador John Rood on Jan-
uary 23. Ambassador Siegel has
pledged that he and Mrs Siegel
will continue the reading initia-

CW
SW



US Ambassador Ned Siegel reads
at Woodcock Primary School



tive both in New Providence and
in the Family Islands.

Now into its third year, the
programme involves U §
Embassy volunteers reading to
students at Woodcock Primary
School for 30 minutes each
weck. The school staff has said
that as a result of the pro-

gramme, students’ enthusiasm
for reading has increased signif-
icantly.

Embassy volunteers said they
value the programme as a way to
give something back to the local
community and to help build a
better future for the youth of the
Bahamas.
THE TRIBUNE



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 9

RO a Se arr ea ae
Hundreds of students flock
to Tourism Careers Fair

HUNDREDS of enthusias-
tic students gathered at the
Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasi-
um to attend the Ministry of
Tourism’s third annual Tourism
Careers Fair and Developers
Expo.

The two-day fair, which
began on January 29, is being
held as part of the week of
activities for National Tourism
Week, with the Ministry of
Tourism hosting students from
various high schools and pri-
mary schools in Nassau and the
Family Islands.

’ Held under the theme “A
new beginning”, the fair aimed
to create an interactive forum —
especially geared towards 6th,
9th and 12th graders — to pro-
vide intellectual and visual
stimulation through creative
booth displays and enthusias-
tic and enlightening speakers.

Cable Beach Resorts was
well represented at the fair,
showcasing many of its depart-
ments.

According to diréctor of
community relations Leah
Davis, Cable Beach Resorts
and Baha Mar tried to show
the students everything the
company has to offer.

“Baha Mar recognises that
the success of the project (the
redevelopment of Cable
Beach) is based on the quality
of the team — that is, its
employees.

“Our involvement in today’s
activities is critical to exposing
students to careers available
with the company; we wanted
to showcase not only one or
two, but highlight the many
avenues that their careers in
tourism can take,” Ms Davis
said.

Representing the culinary
arm of Cable Beach Resorts,
executive chef Edwin Johnson
decided to put a spin on their
participation in the fair.

“We are featuring our female
chefs today; we want the stu-
dents to see more women in
the work place,” he said.

Chef Johnson said there is a
high demand for skilled culi-
nary personnel in the Bahamas,
but COB is not producing
enough of these persons.

He said that is why his team
decided that it was important to
be a part of the fair, as it pre-
sented an opportunity to
inform students of the fact that
there are many career oppor-
tunities in the culinary arts and
when the Cable Beach project
is complete, many qualified
persons will be needed.

The students seemed to truly
enjoy being treated to samples
of food prepared by Cable
“Beach Resorts chefs and stu-
“dent chefs from the College of
“the Bahamas’ School of Hos-
‘pitality.

The Crystal Palace Casino
was also represented at the fair.
‘Supervisor of the casino, Phill-
isha Rogers, said her team was

THE Crystal Palace Casino was also represented at the fair. Supervisor Phillisha Rogers (not shown), said her
team was trying to help students appreciate the many opportunities that exist in the industry.

CSS

HUNDREDS of enthusiastic students gathered at the Kendal G L Isaacs Gymnasium to attend the Ministry
- of Tourism’s s third annual Tourism Careers Fair and Developers Expo.

trying to help students appre-

ciate the many opportunities.

that exist in the casino industry.

She pointed out that it is
important that students today
know they need more than just
skills to function well in the
hospitality industry — they also
need a positive attitude.

The fair featured participants
such as Atlantis, Atlantis
Marine Aquarium Operations,
the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort, Wyndham Nassau and
Crystal Palace Casino, the
Department of Fisheries, Min-
istry of Education, Sports
Youth and Culture, College of
the Bahamas, the Lyford Cay
Foundation, the Canadian
Lyford Cay Foundation, Min-
istry of Tourism, Authentically
Bahamian, National Museum
of the Bahamas, and the
Department of Marine





Resources in the Ministry of
Agriculture, Marine Resource
and Local Government and
BTC.

Leah Davis expressed her
enthusiasm about Baha Mar
and Cable Beach Resorts being
part of this “very important
event” in the activities for
National Tourism Week, and
said that Baha Mar will contin-
ue to co-operate with the rele-
vant stakeholders to improve
the Bahamas’ tourism product.

“Baha Mar is very excited to
be here, the education of our
most precious resource, our
human resource, has always
been a priority for us. We hope
to continue our partnership
with the Ministries of Educa-
tion and Tourism to achieve
the common goal of improving
the Bahamas’ Tourism prod-
uct” Ms Davis said





THE STUDENTS seemed to truly enjoy being treated to samples of food prepared by Cable Beach Resorts chefs
and student chefs from the College of the Bahamas’ School of Hospitality.

Two-day event
being held as part

Week of activities

Opportunity inside the classroom.
Opportunity outside the classroom.
Opportunity in life.

Please join us for an admissions presentation:

Monday, February 4, 2008 at 6:00pm
British Colonial Hilton

R.S.V.P. Rosamund Roberts at (242) 394-1665

@ TRINITY

COLLEGE SCHOOL

A Piss high school for students aged 13-18
located in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada

905-885-3209 admissions@tes.on.ca



ROTARY INTERNATIONAL,
DISTRICT 7020

APPLICANTS WANTED
FOR GROUP STUDY EXCHANGE
TO ARIZONA, USA

Group Study Exchange is a Rotary Foundation sponsored program, the
purpose of which is to promote international understanding and goodwill
through person-to-person contact. The GSE teams are made up of 5 persons,
the leader of which is an experienced Rotarian.

District 7020, which includes The Bahamas, is pairing with Rotary 5490
District in Arizona, which includes Phoenix, London Bridge and The Grand
Canyon for a four-week visit during May & June (specific dates to be
determined). While abroad, team members have the opportunity to meet
their counterparts in their respective vocations, tour various businesses and
attractions and give presentations to Rotary Clubs and others about their
home country and sponsoring Rotary District.

The Rotary Foundation provides round trip airfare and local Rotarians in
the host District (i.e. Arizona) provide lodging, meals and transportation.
Team members pay for personal and incidental expenses only. All other
costs are covered by Rotary.

Individuals interested in applying for the four team member spaces should
be employed full time for at least two years in a recognized business or
profession and between the ages of 25 and 40 years. Applicants must be
citizens of The Bahamas and make themselves available for personal
interviews. Applications must be submitted by February 5 through one of
the Nassau Rotary Clubs or by contacting one of the following committee
members, who can also provide additional information:

Tel/fax: 393-1892
325-9663
424-3778

e-mail: forde@batelnet.bs
e-mail: pdrollins@batelnet.bs
e-mail: bridgetterolle@yahoo.com

Murray Forde
Patrick Rollins Tel:
Dr. Bridgette Rolle Tel:



of National Tourism

“www. tcs.on. ca |
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008



HE Ragged Islands may

be the last hidden trea-

sures in the Bahamas —

but a new study has
begun to uncover their secrets.

These isolated islands are sparsely
populated and located in the far south-
ern region of the Bahamas. Because
of their remoteness, it is very difficult to
travel to or maneuver around the
islands.

As a result, there has been insuffi-
cient scientific surveying done to iden-
tify the ecological features of the area.

To help establish a baseline of sci-
entific information, the Bahamas
National Trust along with the Nature
Conservancy’s Northern Caribbean
Programme and the Shedd Aquarium
located in Chicago, Illinois supported a
diverse team of researchers on a 12-
day expedition to conduct a rapid eco-
logical assessment throughout the
Ragged Islands.

Information gathered during this
expedition included a list of marine
(Figure 1) and terrestrial habitat (Fig-
ure 2) and species types, significant fea-
tures and GPS co-ordinates of the
islands.

Researchers travelled to Ragged
Island aboard the R/V Coral Reef IT, a
vessel which allowed them to stay in
close proximity to most of the islands
and conduct broad taxonomic surveys
of the organisms that are found there.
In addition, smaller boats were used
to travel between each island.

In addition to gathering ecological
data, researchers visited Duncan Town,
the primary settlement of the Ragged
Island, where they spoke with school
principal Robert Boodram, Mrs
Boodram, a teacher, and students from
the Ragged Island All Age School.

The students were invited to tour
the R/V Coral Reef II and viewed with
great excitement both the plant and
animals collected as well as underwater
photos that were taken throughout the
expedition.

Many of the students had consider-
able knowledge of the various types of
fish and marine habitats found in the
area because of their interaction with
the environment and local knowledge
passed on to them by parents and oth-
er relatives.

Researchers also took the opportu-
nity to discuss with students the impor-
tance of their land and sea resources
with the hope of increasing both their
appreciation of the natural treasures
of the Ragged Islands and their under-
standing of why these resources need to
be preserved for future generations.

Pricing Information As Of:

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier os Esta'



Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

gs

Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund



BISX ALL SHA\

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV. $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

ffective Date 7/11/2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



A rapid ecological assessment has been made of the Ragged
Islands, a group of isolated islands in the far southern region of the
Bahamas a...




. SS \\ SS
oo
Coes

Previous Close Today's Close Daily Vol

3 0.2 YTD.

‘he-Counter Securities — RRS
Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol.
15.60
6.25
).3 0.40 :
Colitia Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 43.00 41.00
15.60 "14.00
cep pep OPP org eon 0:48
BISX Listed Mutual Funds SN
YTD% Last 12 Months Div $
7.291985""
3.00076**
1.376507"
3.7969** 27.72% 27.72%

_.11.9333** 5.53% 5.53%

SEX: CLOSE 946.87 /YTD -0.68% / 2007 34.47%
MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidality
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidolity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter prica
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior wook

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

#2-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION GALL (242





IN

\
SS

0.82%
3.76%
4.38%

.

\\\

PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss

MUD/SANDFLAT surround-
ed by black (Avicennia ger-
minans) and white (Lagun-
cularia racemosa) man-
groves with coppice shrub-
land directly behind the
mangroves. It has been
noted that this area sup-
ports the highly threatened
{species of Piping Plovers

‘ (Charadrius melodus).





0.000

Yield %

NAV ISEY.

18 January 2008
**. 31 Decamber 2007



courtesy of Sharrah Moss

NOTICE





NOTICE is hereby given that GUILBOT JEAN-PIERRE OF
REEVES STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-1671, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send

a written and Signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 26TH day of JANUARY, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

aw
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008, PAGE 11

THE TRIBUNE

HIDDEN TREASURES :



WHO WERE THE
RESEARCHERS?



The researchers that participated in the expedition included:






e Ethan Freid: terrestrial botany (lead researcher)
e Sharrah Moss: dive safety officer, former Bahamas
National Trust Parks outreach officer

° Felicity Burrows: TNC northern Caribbean programme,
marine diversity and ecology

e LaKeshia Anderson: Bahamas Department of Marine
Resources, marine diversity and ecology

e Apollo Butler: Bahamas National Trust park warden

¢ Caroline Stahala: ornithology.

e Alan Bolten: sea turtles, Archie Carr Centre for Sea
Turtle Research, University of Florida

e Heather Masonjones: marine diversity and ecology

e Lynn Kimsey: entomology

e Abel Valdivia: National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, marine diversity and ecology

e Robert Van Valkenburg: Shedd Aquarium representa-
tive, marine diversity and ecology

e Jim Robinett: Shedd Aquarium representative, marine
diversity and ecology





















PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss

CUBAN CAVE SHRIMP (BARBOURIA CUBENSIS), an endangered species found in anchialine cave and cenotes in Cuba, Bermuda and in
Bahamian islands such as Exuma, Abaco, San Salvador and Long Island.



PHOTO COURTESY OF Lakeshia Anderson



Ltn itp a inane”

COMMIS MILAM AMAL Dh I Maire

hil



PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss
PHOTO COURTESY OF Sharrah Moss

DR ETHAN FREID is showing students how to identify various types
of plants. .

We don’t like counting it so..
shop till ya drop!

wit yy,
wu,

&%Y
Cul

* Except on red tagged and net items

Kelly's "3c:

Mall at Marathon

Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Le cA a rere ae
eet . A ; Fax: (242) 393.4096 www.kellysbahamas.com


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2008 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

COMMONWEALTH BUILDING
SUPPLIES is now CBS BAHAMAS





Y OMMON-

WEALTH

Building

Supplies

has been rebranded and
is now CBS Bahamas.

The company said it
wanted to ensure that the
invite for the launch
event would set the stage
for a spectacular evening, —
so they consulted with
‘their partners in design,
the AdWorks Advertis-
ing team, who came. up
with a unique invitation
concept.

One week prior to the
launch, CBS Bahamas
vendors and clients.
received an intriguing
invite, wrapped around a —
miniature level. Be

No mention was made

“of what was to be PICTURED are Brent Burrows (CBS GM) with Larry Treco (CGT Contractors) & Jose San- JENNIFER (CBS BAHAMAS Marketing Manager) and Ed Crimm (KAWNEER) are all smiles in this
unveiled. The inyite tiago (PGT). picture.
merely showed the date,
time and place of the —
event and the new CBS
Bahamas logo.
“The invites created
: such a buzz, over 80
excited CBS Bahamas |
vendors and clients_
turned up at Luciano’s _
for the unveiling of their
new look,” said the com- ©
pany in a statement.

“Commonwealth
Building Supplies has
always been a progressive
company that imple-—
ments the latest innova-
tions te ensure they stay —
ahead of the curve. After —
35 years of supplying and
installing top-of-the-line
architectural building
products throughout the

‘ Bahamas, they’ve decid-
ed to rebrand. This bold -
move has taken the : — ————

Bahamian Building BRUCE STEWART (Bruce Stewart Architects), Gingi Damianos (Damianos Realty) & Kate Tsavousis-Bates PETER ENNS & D ATTFIELD (LUCAYAN HOLDINGS) with Danny Martinbor-

- Industry by surprise and (adWorks Senior Partner) ough (Bahamas Realty)
excited vendors and
clients alike,” it said.

Upon entry guests
received CBS Bahamas
gift bags, filled with
branded items and the
new CBS Bahamas
brochure.

The brochure features
all the window, door,
countertop, flooring and
ceiling tile i ~ they car-





ry: te
It also features special-
ty products like motor- -
- ized gates and railings,
which can be custom- _
_ made to almost any spec- _
: ification, along with their _
wide range of hurricane
protection product ‘the
company said, __
_ Premier architects,
contractors and realtors

d and mingled with io
nea gle JOHN TRECO (CBS Pres) & Brent Burrows (ces GM) with Melanie Roach (Ministry Of JOHN MICHAEL CLARKE (Veritas Consultants), is pictured with Tony Jervis (Architect) and

representatives from
Kawucer (architectural _ Works) Wayne Treco (CGI Contractors).

_ aluminum building prod- _
ucts), USG. (acoustica Le
ceiling tiles), PGT
(impact resistant win-

_ dows and doors), and
HURD (wood windows
and doors).

Brent Burrows, general i
manager of CBS.
Bahamas and John Tre-
co, president of CBS

Bahamas, unveiled their
new logo, new ad cam-
paign, and new website,

‘International vendors,

_ especially, were wowed,”

_ said the statement, “Den-
nis Shur (HURD repre-
sentative) in particular, Z scint. ii
remarked that it was one | SITTING around the table are @ Nancy Treco with Bethany & Derek Francis (Master JOHN TRECO (CBs President) with Tony Lind & Assoblite (CNG Construction find plenty to taugft
the best rebranding Technicians GM) about.
launches he’s ever seen.”

STOREWIDE


















JENNIFER (CBS BAHAMAS), Jackson Burnside (Architect), Jose Santiago (PGT), John Treco (CBS BAHAMAS : - , i Sane eae
pres) & Jana Indi Johnson (AdWords Ad Exec) Cee vendors with John Treco (CBS President) &

f {

ae cates

Bernard Ris Mackey $t- Thompson Blvd





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