Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
sem Lhe Ir

Che Miami Herald





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Volume: 103 No.6





PRE URS
PST Tg

Sa a isn scent)

Man airlifted to N assau

after being beaten
‘almost to death’

lm By JOHN MARQUIS
and PAUL TURNQUEST

‘TENSION was mounting on
a Bahamian island last night
after a man was beaten “almost
to death” by up to 15 Defence
Force officers following an inci-
dent in a bar.

The people of Inagua were
in “a state of rage” after 27-
year-old Morton’ Salt marine
worker Dexter Wilson was air-
lifted to Nassau for emergency

treatment following what-locals~

described as a. “barbaric beat-
ing” in the early: hours of yes-
terday morning. -

One Defence Force officer
also had to receive treatment
for stab wounds following the
altercation, it-was claimed.

Defence Force Commodore
Clifford Scavella told The Tri-
bune yesterday that officers

from the Defence Force, along.

with police, will be flying down

- to Thagua “first thing in the

morning” to investigate the
matter.

Last night, a large group of
Inaguans - estimated at between
80 and 100 - gathered outside
the Defence Force base on the
island shouting threats to offi-
cers inside.

A source said: “They have
locked the gates. The people
have told them not to set foot in
Mathew Town.”

Out-of-control ' officers

‘Teportedly fired handguns into

the air when neighbours -
aroused by loud noises. in the
night - tried to intervene in yes-
terday’s beating incident.
When a semi-conscious Mr
Wilson, with two gaping head

wounds, was rushed to the local

clinic, one officer is said to have
told the duty doctor: “Let him
die.”

As Mr Wilson fought for his

life at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital last night, Inaguans warned
that Defence Force officers on
the island were in grave danger
because of the public mood.

One islander said: “The peo-
ple are so angry that there could
be a riot. The police and
Defence Force would be well-
advised: to: send-in\ reinforce
ments. Things could get ugly
here.”

Trouble flared at around
3.30am when Mr Wilson began
chatting to a female Defence
Force officer at the bar of
Supers nightclub in Mathew
Town. He was said to be

“developing a rapport” with :

her.

A male officer took excep-

tion to the conversation and,
when Mr Wilson asked why he
should object, in light of the fact
that officers chatted.to Inaguan
women, slapped him round the
face.
What happened next left
locals gasping with astonish-
ment as “around 15 officers”

set about Mr Wilson, kicking ©

and beating him.

At one point, the victim man-
aged to break clear andi flee,
but the officers chased him
along the street, finally catch-
ing up with him outside the
home of Mr Diverne Ingraham.

There was ‘so much commo-

tion that Mr Ingraham emerged -

from his hduse to see what was

SEE page 14

+ Giftware

ee trike

* Stationery

+ Home Decer |
* Saby items



at the scene.

Chief Justice

defends Justice

Lyons’ ‘right |
to speak out’

CHIEF Justice Sir Burton
Hall defended Justice John :

Maynard-Gibson, and the :
“independence” of the judicia- :

ry.

on the matter. He maintained

his initial stance throughout his ; versity Hospital last Thursday :

interview with Wendell Jones following a brief illness. He was : _.
: 2 : will go up, or coverage will be
: severely limited.
The surgeon’s comments :

: came ina statement to The Tri- ; the “pitfalls” of the health plan.

on Jones and Co, to not com- }

ment on Justice Lyons’ “con-
troversial” ruling.

improper for a judge, any judge, :

to comment publicly on what
another judge has-said,” Sir
Burton began, “And I certainly

SEE page five



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

However, that would be as :
far as the chief justice would go :



“Guiding light’

Winston Saunders _
_be ruinous to.

THE Bahamas has lost a }
“guiding light in the develop- :
ment and protection of its cul- ;
: ture” with the death of Winston :
Lyons’ right yesterday to speak :
out as he did in response to the :
Attorney General, Allyson :

dies at age of 65

Christie said yesterday, hon- i
? ouring the cultural icon who :
died over the weekend:

Mr Saunders,



65.

i He took ill while on an offi-
Hn : cial visit to Jamaica to assist in :
“The near insistent comments ; the planning of the 200th :

for the Chief Justice to say : anniversary of the abolition of

something is because I have : the slave trade in the former ;

always been of the view that itis ! British Empire.
Mr Saunders had a stroke. ; _ | ratte
! He hada pacemaker implanted ; Mitted to the concept of a ;
! some 10 years ago and thus had | national health insurance plan
! some problems for some time. | ostensibly to help the poor and:

do not propose to do it on this ;

SEE page 10

AN OFF -DUTY sallee officer was killed in a siptorbike accident on Friday none S on Skyline Drive off Goodman’s
- Bay. The officer was with a colleague (nfo s was marveling on a separate bike) when he lost control and hit a tree. He died

plan could

the economy

A LEADING Nassau sur-
Saunders, Prime Minister Perry | 8°00 has hit out at the govern- ;
: ment’s national-health insur- :

ance plan, saying it has the i president of the Bahamas -
: Employer's Confederation, the
: : _ } government has never been suc-
Dr C Dean Tseretopoulos ; cessful in running a public entity
: in the past —and he sees no indi-

: potential to be “ruinous” to the

co-chairman | Bahamas economy.

:_ of the National Commission on :
Culture, died in Kingston,
: Jamaica, on Saturday evening : . ested a ;
: after being admitted to the Unk ; its obligations with the pro-
: : posed budget.

: claims that if the plan becomes

: law, it will not be able to fulfil : cation that that will change.

: bune alleging that the plan had :

: siderations.

uninsured.

ee page 10

Quiznos Su

EAT UP

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

"Surgeon: NHI |










Employers’
Confederation
resent warns

over NHI scheme

a By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter
ACCORDING to:Brian Nutt,

Mr Nutt said that historically

: government was a "bad manag-
As a result, either taxation :
: porations, and that employers and
: the general public have not been

er" when it came to running cor-

properly consulted about all of

Mr Nutt told The Tribune that

: been hijacked by political con- : the federation had requested that
t 7 : they be involved in the creation
He said: “The PLP is com- : °° review of the National Health
: Insurance Act, but that their pleas
: were never heard by the govern-

? ment.

He asked: "How are we sup-

: posed to make a proper decision

SEE page 10

» Palmdale * Cakes Field

» Paradise Island
* Feedanvh Street

* Regent Centre (Freeport)

Major Credit Cards ere :







PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006























Hannes Babak was being reas-

signed to the north eastern cor-.

ner office, which was previous-
ly occupied by Sir Jack.

A spokesman at the Port
Authority stated that “at no
time was Eady Henrietta or any

and no attempt was made to put
Lady Henrietta or any of her
guests out of the building.
“The reallocation of execu-
tive office space at the GBPA is
internal: The GBPA, and cer-
tainly members of the Grand

THE TRIBUNE



media show.

“We shall remain focused and
continue to work in the best
interest of our staff, licensees,
and the advancement of the
quality of life of Grand Bahama
residents.”

The Ministry of Tourism In Cooperation with -
The Bahamas Hotel Association Presents

12TH ANNUAL

Me)
: LOCAL NEWS set
Lady Henrietta and —
ONE DAY'S awyert ‘physically :
or Er ace Ma i. JEY VELER RY remo 4 ed from office 1%
SKUs Was NOW TEM ‘sktF Was NOW .
STERUNGSLVER ‘KT GOLD eat ord li By DENISE MAYCOCK .
16° Omega Necklace 221084 $4.00 $17.00 Solid Box Link Cham 26033 «$400 $360 Tribune Freeport Reporter a
18” Multi Strand Necklace 73002 $ 140.0 S$ 3600 White GoldSingaporeChain 211684 $= 8000 $32.00 oe
16” Sake Chain 2) $$ M00 «$ BO WhieGoldSiakeChin «= BOD «$1800 SBD | | FREBPORT one ne
LBP Necker A SNA SGN) Brace wi Charms 21254 $1600 8 65.00 . remove” lawyer Fred Smith and oy
7 Multi Heart Bracelet 33588 $5000 $2106 P Rolo Bracelet 24788 = § 12500 $31.00 Lady Henrietta St George from 3
8" ID Bracelet 27S «$$ «(120.00 $49.00 Hoop Earrings Io $9000 $36.00 the Grand Bahama Port
5 Fay re ma $00) 2500 Dag Erin gd § GH) $A | according to reports reaching
7 Byzantine Bracclet 20KS $M «$19.00 Dinmont Cur Heap Barings 21080 $8000 $33.00 The Tribune.
Starfish Pendant Ss =§ «1999 8 BOD Sea Shell Chan rao $M S400 gon Suh is Tepresentite
seit ’ ii RE t R
Hoop Earrings: 231665 $ 20 § £00 acs enrietta in a awsul
ae & ee 1 tel aaah gies citar te ging Sir Jack Hayward’s 4
Dangle Heart Earrings m3 $ 8 $16 14KT SEMIPRECIOUS GEMSTONES claim to 75 per cent ownership 4
t oe of the Grand Bahama Port re
PEARLS. foto iial BH § OS ann Authority and Port Group Ltd.
ree ~ ee MH YAW OS : h t f the lat
Toggle Poa Meikle, WD § WR A bi Bho Tope Bary ‘1378 = § 10000 § —A.O0: Baward St Georse arenes
‘M)'Fresh Water Pearl Necklace 228666 «$4 § 16200. umatst Cross Pendant ‘som? tony $4000 also seeking removal of Hannes oa
weeds Ba SOSH teem tw $a | Babak he Forts chairmen, 3
Pear Peet th Chain nes § OH 8 i Multi Stone Heait Pendant’ «= 238602 $2000 $8100 George’s death, it was general ay
mpd § 40.00 8 a Oe EME «SOKO «8-80 knowledge that Sir Jack and Mr sys
21926 S$ 800 § 4 St George had equal shares in .
es = the GBPA and PGL i
REN Boe: » 75% OFF ALL WATCHES While at the Port Authority m
NEWIVS VANES Lancaster Ladies Watehy me = -§ JM § yesterday, Mr Smith claims that ,
DiamoadRing «27328 «$ UNOS SLND Lancaster Sikes Stel Watch. 200807 §. 40000 S| bot Deen e Set ate id
Supie @DinaondRig NT$ TANG. $800 LamaserQueto ah 2168 $4810 S from an office in the Port by “
Tanzanite & Diamond Pendant 30310 $§ 13500 § 0) Jukes hurgensen Ladies Watch = 26091 $8008 several police officers. g
Tole Gs Pedat S$ BOYS BLOM Nec Lal Wa 2 FO Sete ewe are being
¥sivad Danita “aint. agen 8 ORK cee mivieg. men © + DSF: une, : “We are bei ‘
Ruby, Pendant . BM 8 ee 8 a ae tee th 7 Smo. 3 13 police officers. We are-trying to ‘,
R 206 J $ a0 70500 $4100 remain in the office. We are not 4
: 5 a a : ieani going to be moved.” act
ue ree eee ae Ce ape It is believed that effort any
$150) $1000 StoLadeTweTe'inh 6s § Th $110 | matrereweretacy Hemmer
$i $ M00 Renney Cote Bescelet Watch. INS $6800. SOD ta from her husband’s third os
e 3 $ 230 Kona coon a RB § MOO $ 3600 floor office at the Port. 4
According to an inter-office _ ; _ -
memo issued by Sir Jack, he Mi GREG Moss, Babak and Sir Jack’s attorney, speaks to
had advised that the south-east-. Superintendent Russelll ,
ern corner executive office pre- ey
viously occupied by Mr St : 5
George is to be occupied by of her guests, which included Bahama community, are not +
himself. Mr Fred Smith, prevented from surprised by today’s overly ~ *
He further advised that Mr entering the GBPA’s building exaggerated and dramatic =



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THE FRIBUNE



Tony Blair
expresses
sorrow over
slave trade

@ LONDON

PRIME Minister Tony Blair
will express “deep sorrow” for
Britain’s role in the trans-
Atlantic slave trade — but
won’t deliver a full apology
demanded by some activists,
according to a published report,
according to Associated Press.

Blair was to make a “historic
statement” before Parliament
on Monday, The Observer
newspaper said Sunday.

He will say that the trade,
which was outlawed in Britain
two centuries ago, would now
be considered “a crime against
humanity.”

“T believe the bicentenary
offers us a chance not just to
say how profoundly shameful
the slave trade was — how we
condemn its existence utterly

and praise those who fought for

its abolition — but also to
express our deep sorrow that it
could ever have happened and
rejoice at the better times we
live in today,” Blair was to say
in his.speech.

The comments will also
appear in the black community
newspaper New Nation.

Government ministers are
expected to release details next
week of Britain’s plans to mark
the March 25, 2007 bicentenary
of the Slave Trade Act, which
banned British participation in
the Atlantic slave trade.

Though Britain abolished
slavery in that year, it did not
emancipate slaves in its over-
seas territories until 1833.

Nottage
to attend
NHI plan
meeting

SENATOR Dr Bernard Not-
‘tage will speak on national
health insurance at a town
meeting to be held at 7 o’clock
toniight at Gerald Cash Prima-
ry School, Flamingo Gardens.

Trinidad
venues get

World Cup
approval

@ TRINIDAD
Port-of Spain

THE Queen’s Park Oval and
the Sir Frank Worrell playing
field have received initial clear-
ance as match venues in
Trinidad for the upcoming
cricket World Cup, the tourna-
ment’s managing director said,
according to Associated Press.

“Several members of the
inspection team were surprised
at quality of the pitch and the
outfield at the Sir Frank Wor-
rell, a ground that is not known
on the international cricket cir-
cuit,” Chris Dehring told
reporters Saturday after the 26-
member International Cricket
Council venue inspection team
visited the grounds in St.
Augustine.

Dehring praised the senthitye
old Queen’s Park Oval, but the
pace of reconstruction on some
grandstands “is not exactly what
we would have liked to see.”

-Dehring said he continues to
have concerns about a few
grounds but declined to name
them. Stadiums in the nine
Caribbean countries hosting

-» matches will havea final inspec-

tion at year’s end.

“If there are venues that are
not ready we shall not be afraid
to make the hard decisions with
additional games being played
at those venues which are
ready,” he said.

The World Cup runs from
March 13-April 28. It’s the first
time the event, which is expect-
ed to draw 100,000 fans, will be
held in the Caribbean.

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LOCAL NEWS

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 3





answer's on bag of money

By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Movement
yesterday charged that the Bahami-
an people are still waiting for the
Minister of Financial Services and
Investments Vincent Peet to come
clean about the source of a half-
filled bag of US $100 bills stored in
his bedroom closet in 2003.

“Nobody believes his tall story
about changing money into foreign
currency and saving it up in a bag in
a closet in his bedroom,” a release on
the party’s website reads. “Even peo-
ple in the remotest parts of the
Bahamas look for the nearest bank to
put their hard-earned, honest money.

ena the man who Prime

Minister Perry Christie appointed
to be Minister responsible for
Financial Services is aware of the
banking and financial services avail-
able to him in the capital city of
Nassau, so he doesn’t have to stash
his money in a bag in a closet in his
bedroom.

“Mr Peet should come again, and
come clean. He should stop insult-
ing the intelligence of the Bahamian
people and trying to intimidate
those asking questions about his
bizarre behaviour in this matter,”
the party said.

The FNM reminded Mr Peet that,
as a minister of the government, his
financial affairs are a matter of pub-
lic interest - by law.

“From whom and how he gets his

money is not a private affair, it is
information that the people of the
Bahamas are entitled to. Some PLP
leaders act as if they are above and
beyond the law and in so doing they
have devalued our system of gov-
ernment and destroyed the public’s
faith in the integrity of the conduct
of public affairs.

“The FNM will restore public con-
fidence in our laws and conventions,
especially the ones governing the
conduct of elected representatives
of the people; and we will review
and strengthen those laws wherever
necessary,” the release read.





















i VINCENT Peet has come
under close scrutiny since details
of the money were revealed

Opposition warns government >
not to rush through NHI scheme

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie and his colleagues will
be making a big mistake if they
believe that “ramming through
their half-baked National
Health Insurance scheme” can
be used as a smokescreen in
the election to cover up their
“Jong list of scandals, broken
promises and incompetent gov-
ernance,” the FNM said in a
statement yesterday.

The opposition accused the
government of taking their
“usual position in trying to vil-
ify those Bahamians who have
genuine concerns about what is
being proposed and attribut-
ing ulterior motives to them.”

These include, the FNM
said, Bahamian doctors who
are on the frontline delivering
health services to the Bahami-
an people as well as trade
union leaders whose job is to
look after the interests of thou-
sands of Bahamian workers.

“It is particularly galling to

an doctors of being motivated
by greed as these are the very
ones who work in the system,
serving the Bahamian people
every day of the week and who
give generously of their ser-
vice to indigent Bahamians,”
the FNM said.

The PLP government, the
opposition pointed out, came
to office loudly trumpeting
their intention to consult with
the Bahamian people on mat-
ters of importance.

“They have used the consul-
tation thing as an excuse for
not doing many things that
they should have done. Now,
in a matter of the greatest
importance to the nation - .a
matter that cries out for thor-
ough consultation - they want
to rush it through in the vain
hope that it will distract the
attention of the Bahamian
people from their many mis-
deeds and from the many
unanswered questions about

The FNM called on Prime
Minister Perry Christie and his
colleagues to take another look
- and to listen - before they go
any further with this plan.

“Perhaps the Prime Minis-
ter and his Ministers need to
be reminded about what con-
sultation means and does not
mean. Consultation does not
mean just telling people what
you are going to do anyway.

“It means providing all the
consultation partners with
comprehensive information on
the subject so they can make
intelligent judgments about it
and recommend adjustments.
It means listening and respond-
ing to the ideas put forward by
the consultation partners,” the
party said.

Clearly, the FNM said, the
PLP government had failed to
do this and that is why those
who will be called upon to
work the system and those
who will be affected in one





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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

_EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR”

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 325-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1- (242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Health insurance is

THE PLP government is frightened silly
about that little word. “tax.” Prime Minister
Christie, anxious to leave a brilliant legacy
behind him, doesn’t want it ever to be said
that that legacy was a tax on the Bahamian
people.

But if the mandatory “contributions” pro+
posed to underwrite government’s soon-to-
be-introduced National Health Insurance
scheme is not a tax, then what is it?

How would Health Minister Dr Nottage

define that three letter word — “tax’’?

When a “contribution” from one’s income
is mandatory, then it becomes a tax on that
income.

Therefore, if a “contribution” becomes.a
tax when it is ceases to be voluntary, then
— as day follows night — a mandatory con-
tribution to the National Health Insurance
plan is a tax.

Dr Nottage, although he avoids the word,
by describing the. basis on which this “con-
tribution” is to be collected, confirms its tax
nature. In his description he also assiduously
avoids using the word “income” — to him it
is rather a person’s “earnings” from which a
“contribution” is to be collected. But as we all
know an accumulation of earnings translates
into income.

Says Dr Nottage: “All employees earning .

will pay 2.65 per cent of their monthly earn-
ings up to a maximum of $5,000.” Now trans-
late that into: “All employees earning will
pay 2.65 per cent of their monthly income
up to a maximum of $5,000.” In other words,
a tax on income — therefore, income tax.

“People who work for themselves will pay
5.3 per cent of their earnings,” said the good
doctor. For the word “earnings” again sub-
stitute the word “income” and you'll get the
drift of where this government is headed.

But then came the Freudian slip. As pen-
sioners no longer earn, Dr Nottage was forced
to use the word “income.’

“Pensioners who have a substantial income
will be asked to pay 2.65 per cent” — again
government puts a mandatory tax on income
for those it assumes can pay. Of course, those,
“with low income, who cannot afford it will be
covered by a contribution from the govern-
ment. They will not have to pay 4 copper!”
Dr Nottage promised.

It would make for a more honest debate if
instead of playing hide-and-seek around the
mulberry bush with the words “contribution”
and “tax”, government would acknowledge

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‘income tax’

that Bahamians are being taxed for their
health care.

In his address to the nation last Tuesday,
Dr Nottage made his “from the cradle to the
grave” promise — socialism in the raw.

Said he: “Persons who reach retirement
age or have to retire early for other reasons
and who now experience difficulties in getting
or meeting premium obligations for private
health insurance will not have to worry. With
NHI, they will still be protected! It is this
lifelong protection, offered by NHI, from the
cradle to the grave that will provide a signif-
icant measure of reassurance that one will
not be marginalized or pauperized by health
bills during the long years of retirement.”

The fact that the National Insurance Board
(NIB) is to administer this fund, is enough to
send an old age pensioner to an early grave.
Our readers must recall the alarming notice
that Doctors Hospital was forced to give
patients recently. It told those with National
Insurance health claims that their claims
would not be honoured by the hospital
because the National Insurance Board had
not paid Doctors Hospital.

That notice shook NIB into action. The
next announcement from Doctors Hospital
was that NIB had made “substantial pay-
ments” towards the outstanding receivable
balance it owed the hospital.

Doctors Hospital explained its reasons for
writing to employers and patients about the
outstanding NIB debt.

"The purpose of the notices,” said the hos- -

pital, “were merely to alert those persons
that the discussions regarding claims were
ongoing, and that the patients who received
care might be directly responsible for pay-
ment of bills if a-timely settlement was not
reached.”

NIB is yet to.get its own house in order. Its
administrative costs are far too high.

Bahamians would be wise to take govern- .

ment’s outlandish promises with a grain of

‘salt.
One day they might wake up and discover, .

as everyone is now predicting, that because
government has miscalculated the true cost of
the National Health Insurance scheme,
instead of a smooth march from the cradle to
the grave, government might stumble over its
debts and drop you along the way.

Like NIB contributors you might wake
up to find that you are being threatened with
having to pay your own health bills.



_grandchildr é n

What’s the rush
with NHI plan?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LADIES and gentlemen, let us
stop to think for a moment about
the double-talking hypocrisy of some
of our politicians. We are told that
doctors do not support National
Health Insurance (NHI) because of
their own self interest and greed,
and that the only persons who will
suffer if NHI is not passed are the
poor, struggling, vulnerable Bahami-
ans whose interests are ignored,
while those in the upper-income-
earning brackets (doctors included)
remain callously unsympathetic to
their hardship and suffering. Shame
on those who seek to cast suspicion
and contempt on our country’s entire
body of physicians, by cautivning
Bahamians to suspiciously question
their motives for opposing the gov-
ernment’s hasty attempt to enact
NHI legislation.

Check the record, not once has

the Medical Association of The

Bahamas objected to the govern-
ment's desire to significantly improve
our country’s public health system.
They have consistently offered cate-
gorical support for any effort that
will advance the quality and avail-
ability of health care for the Bahami-
an people. Let me make this very
important disclaimer: I am an ortho-
dontist, not a physician, and den-
tistry is not a part of NHL. In voicing
my concern therefore, I cannot be
accused by detractors of promoting
,my own self interest, at the expense
of the welfare of the Bahamian peo-
ple.

Bahamian physicians are not the
gang of unethical and unscrupulous
hoarders that certain mischievous
political public relations operatives
and politicians would have you
believe them to be. Ironically, these
same public relations operatives and
politicians, or more appropriately,
“spin doctors”, are trying to turn this
debate into a rich versus poor issue.
The problem is that they aren’t will-
ing to engage in any debate, but
would rather ‘ram this critically
flawed proposal down the throats of
the Bahamian people in the usual
paternalistic fashion that has char-
acterised. politics in our country since
the days of the UBP government.
Why can’t our government treat
Bahamians with more respect than
to assume that the voices of dissent
aren’t as smart as they are, and
should instead be vilified as special
interest lobbyists, only seeking to
protect their own self interests?

Curiously, these same “spin doc-
tors” have decided that it is not in the
people’s best interests to have a cam-
paign finance reform bill enacted, to

disclose and limit political campaign -

contributions for the protection of
the Bahamian people and our
democracy, from hidden vested
interests that provide political
favours to the rich and privileged,
whether Bahamian or foreign, at the
expense of the poor and not-so-well
connected. Why aren’t these same
socially conscious individuals aggres-
sively pursuing such legislation that
would create a truly transparent
political environment to keep our
country’s politicians honest? They
won’t tell you the answer to that
question, because it doesn’t favour
them to do so. How ironic, they
champion the cause of the poor man
— when it suits their purposes — but
won’t cry for justice on behalf of the
poor man when it interferes with
their own self interests. And they
unashamedly cry that doctors, in call-
ing for further consultation in craft-
ing a well conceived and structured
plan, are motivated by their own

‘Morris “Rudy” Campbell.

La has been 2 year but it feels more like a
"lifetime. Dear missed by | his wife, children,
family and friends.

SAMUS

enero ao aloel- kare








greedy self interests. Say what?!
Shame on these duplicitous politi-
cal propagandists and hypocrites! As
the song goes: “I say it’s politricks
time again! It’s politricks. time
again!”

Tam not a FNM or PLP, I am an
Independent Bahamian who loves
this Bahamaland and its people. I
am an objective thinker, and I sepa-
rate politics from national interest.
Despite what negatives are hurled
at the feet of Sir Lynden, it can nev-
er be denied that early in his tenure,
he championed the noble cause of
uplifting the masses through educa-
tional empowerment. Educational
empowerment facilitates what
democracy holds so dearly, the con-
cept of self determination. Some of
our politicians are threatened by this
concept, as it frees the people from
the clutches of political subjugation
and reliance. The Bahamian people
don’t owe politicians anything. Politi-
cians owe the people gratitude for
endowing them with the opportuni-
ty to work on their béhalf. Political
paternalism is one of the greatest
threats to the advancement and evo-
lution of our Bahamas , and it is very
evident in the manner in which NHI
is being politicised today. Why
should Bahamians feel beholden and
dependent on government to decide
what is best for us, without due dili-
gence and proper consultation on
the part of government? The Anna
Nicole Smith disaster shows us how
devastating a lack of due diligence
and consultation can’be. We have a
sick, narcissistic, gold digger using
our beloved Bahamas and her own
personal tragedy to rake in unde-
served legal damages and tabloid
earnings, without regard for how her
shenanigans impacts upon the wel-
fare of our people and our country.
We must not allow Ms Smith and
those like her, to make our country a
cesspool for those who hold it in con-
tempt, distracting us from the real
issues requiring our full attention.

NHI is far too important for the
Ministry of Health to treat it with
the same kind of inattention to detail
exhibited by our country’s Ministry
of Immigration. This is not a fight
between the rich and poor, as some
would have us believe. Any sensi-
ble Bahamian surely realises that
any society that ignores the interests
and the well being of the poor, will
reap from the seeds of social destruc-
tion: Every Bahamian deserves
access to good quality health care.
No organisation or group opposed to
the existing NHI proposal has denied
this. The crux of the concern about
NHI has centred on the gimmick-
ery and false advertising that has
promised NHI will provide all of the
medical coverage that Bahamians
will need, at very little cost, when
countries like Canada and Great
Britain which have tried such
socialised health care plans, have
found them to be chronically over-
subscribed and underfunded, per-
petually placing financial burden on
their governments and their tax-pay-
ing citizenry. Their governments con-
tinue to pump more and more bil-
lions of tax dollars into these health
plans, while the tax payers complain
about receiving less and less benefits
due to bureaucratic waste and inef-
ficiency. What makes us believe that
The Bahamas’ experience with the
exact same system as Canada and

the UK will be any different? The
voices of protest are NOT objecting
to creating a better health care sys-
tem for the protection of all Bahami-*
ans. They have been VOICES OF
REASON trying to urge the gov-.
ernment to create a NHI [ plan that is.
properly defined and structured, with
a management team independent of
the government, since government,
managed corporations have been
synonymous with waste, inefficiency.
and mismanagement.

Again, think for a moment. The’
Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC);
the government’s health insurance'
advisory committee, proposes that
the cost to provide medical treat-
ment to Bahamians in 2007 will be
$108 million less than what it cost
to treat Bahamians in 2003. Why,
then, have ‘successive ministers of
health lamented that our country’s
public health system has become too.
expensive for the government to
finance without. additional monies,
when their own advisory committee
has reported that health care costs
under NHI will drastically decrease.
Bear in mind that we are told this
plan will provide all that our present
public health system does not, and
that 20 per cent more people will
utilise the public system during the
first three years of NHI than present,
ly do, but we are expected to believe.
that it will cost the government $108.
million less. Who do we believe, the
ministers or the committee? Wait,
it gets better. The $235 million price
tag will remain unchanged during
each of these first three years, despite

_ this 20 per cent increase in utilisation.

That means $235 million in
2007; $235 million in 2008; and $235
million in 2009. The costs don’t
change?! Sounds strange doesn’t it?
We don’t need a mathematician to
figure out that increased utilisation of
services will mean increased costs to
supply those needs. Could it be that
government intends to deny Bahami-
ans access to needed medical ser-
vices in an effort to contain costs?
Even if math usually hurts your
head, it is elementary to see that thé -
proposed NHI numbers just don’t
add up. No, this.is not a fight
between the rich and the poor, this is
a fight to get this thing right! If we
don’t get it right, guess who will pay
the price of grossly underestimatin’
the costs of NHI: every singlé
Bahamian; rich and poor; young and
old; this generation and those yet
unborn. '

The government is extreme
unsure of what the true. costs of
will be. There has been insufficient
research done to accurately deter-
mine the true costs of this plan. Evi
dence of this fact is that earlier this
year Bahamians were told that pens
sioners would pay $1 per day fox
their health coverage under NHI
One big problem though, they
realised that pensioners, many of
whom only receive $200 per month
from National Insurance, would bg
paying just as much as employed
Bahamians making $1200 per month,
The NHI steering committee realiseti
that a gross oversight had been
made, which forced them to také
another look at the NHI proposal,
because their contribution formula
was fundamentally flawed, would
neither be equitable nor fair in sh
ing costs, and would in fact be hurt:
ing the very same people the al
was designed to help. Now we are
being told by the minister of health
that “pensioners who experience
(financial) difficulties will not have to
pay a copper.” Why does it seem as

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THE TRIBUNE




Chief Justice
defends Justice
Lyons’ ‘right
to speak out’

FROM page one

show.

“That is why I would have
alerted you when you invited
me Mr Jones that I would prob-
ably be here to disappoint your
listeners,” he said.

Mr Jones continued to probe
Sir Burton to no avail. The chief
justice maintained his decorum,
and avoided Mr Jones’ attempts
to re-word questions surround-
ing Justice Lyons rulings and
the controversy between the
justice and the attorney general.

Justice Lyons has ruled that
the judiciary of the Bahamas
was not independent because
the government had failed to
cause the appointment of a
Judicial Review Commission on
two occasions to review the
salaries of judges.

' He has also taken offence to
a scathing attack levied at him
by Mrs Maynard-Gibson in the
House of Assembly where she
asserted that the Justice had
“misled” the Bahamian people.
', The matter is now before the
Court of Appeal, and Justice
Lyons has stated that if the judg-

ment of the court proved that

he had, in fact, misled the public,
he would resign from his post.

- Similarly, he said, if the ruling
showed that he did not mislead
the Bahamian public, then the
Attorney General should resign.

When asked by Mr Jones if
Justice Lyons was correct in
questioning the independence
of the judiciary, Sir Burton said

that he would not say if he

agreed with Justice Lyons or
not - but did agree that the

statement was one that Justice .

Lyons was entitled to make.

“That is an argument in which,
in this broad ongoing work of
dialogue, he is entitled to make.
I am not going to say whether I
agree with him or not. But it is
an argument that he is entitled to
make,” Sir Burton said.

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"Lawyer: Lyons
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@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Justice John Lyons’
rulings and government’s
handling of the matter will
not embarrass the Bahamas
when the Privy Council sits
in New Providence in Decem-
ber, according to lawyer
Damian Gomez.

“No, it just depends on how
the matter is handled. I don’t
think one has much to do
with the other at this point.

“If the government digs in
its heels, it was bound to
reach the Privy Council in any
event. Even if they were sit-
ting in England, they would
have still heard about it.”

The Privy Council is to sit
for the first time ever outside of
the UK when members arrive
in the Bahamas next month.

Mr Gomez said the Court
of Appeal is currently under-
going renovation to accom-
modate this historical event.

He said this is a great hon-
our and will become the “sin-
gle most important legal
event in Bahamas.”

“And if we can get them to
stay here, that is to sit on a
regular basis and hear appeals
from the rest of those coun-
tries that still use them as the
highest court of appeal in the
region, we would have scored
a major coup.

“It will promote the off-
shore financial services sector
in a way we just couldn’t do it
otherwise,” Mr Gomez said.

The Privy Council will be
hearing matters that have
been listed with the Court of
Appeal.

Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer in July,
2004, was the first Bahamian
woman to be appointed a
Privy Councillor to.the Queen.

The Privy Council is a

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council of personal advisers
to the Queen, and its judicial
committee is the Bahamas’
highest court.

Dame Sawyer’s appoint-
ment is for life.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie was appointed as a
Privy Councillor earlier in
2004.

Earlier this year, Lord Scott
of Foscote of the Privy Coun-

cil visited Freeport, Grand

Bahama.

Addressing the judiciary at
a special luncheon in Janu-
ary, he spoke about the
increasing complexities of
courts, granting damages or.
monetary awards.

Lord Hope of Craighead of
the Privy Council attended
the opening of the legal year
on January 6 in Nassau.

He announced that in the
near future the new Supreme
Court for the United King-
dom will absorb the jurisdic-
tion of the Privy Council.

The Constitutional Reform
Bill will abolish the office of
Supreme Chancellor and cre-
ate a new Supreme Court for
the UK. Ate







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PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Downtown redevelopment of
Nassau is too narrowly focused

Hier so. often,
somebody in govern-
ment, perhaps prompted by
somebody at ZNS (or vice ver-
sa) takes the opportunity to
remind the public of the pend-
ing release of the EDAW
report on the regeneration of
downtown Nassau. Apart from
reminding us that the report

would, in any normal society,
have been public from the very
outset, such snippets of infor-
mation actually tell us very lit-
tle in the way of concrete plans
or timetables.

While government has been
amply and deservedly com-
-mended for involving a wide
cross section of the local busi-

-ness community in the consul-

Decorate

tative process, the same age-old
pattern of needless secrecy has
been followed as regards the
general public. Everyone knows
someone who has seen the
much-rumoured disc contain-
ing the recommendations, but,
to date, nothing tangible is
available to the interested pub-
lic.

Nevertheless, one of the

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PERSPECTIVES

ANDREW ALLEN

things that seem clear is that,
like most of its predecessors,
the EDAW plan suffers from a
problem of definition. Once
again, a plan to redevelop
downtown Nassau has com-



. Once again, a
plan.to redevelop
downtown
Nassau has
commenced on
the false premise
that ‘downtown’
is restricted toa
narrow coastal
strip. It excludes
even the

central areas
immediately
adjacent to
Government
House.

aS ee eee ee

menced on the false premise
that ‘downtown’ is restricted to
a narrow coastal strip. It
excludes even the central areas
immediately adjacent to Goy-
ernment House.

his is no fault of the

consultants themselves.
Rather, it is because, in com-
missioning the study, govern-
ment has once again failed to

appreciate that half of ‘down-
town’ is located in an area



poignant given the.emphasis
being placed by the present gov-
ernment on Urban Renewal.
What better means of begin-












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ning a genuine renewal of the
entire inner city than integrating
bordering areas into the Busi-
ness Improvement District
(BID) proposed in the EDAW
plan?

Most notably, the area

extending from behind West
Hill Street and Gregory Arch
to St. Agnes Church encom-
passes a block that includes
Government House and Gar-
dens and one of the finest and
most historic Churches in The
Bahamas. This area has
already has almost all of the

ingredients required for inte-

gration into the better-kept
and more prestigious parts of
the city.

TEAR DOWN THAT
WALL

Meee the single
worst legacy of colo-

nial urban design in The
Bahamas is that monstrous
pink wall that surrounds Gov-
ernment House, denying the
public a view of the largest and
most attractive public gardens
in Central Nassau.

One wonders whether any-

one in government, or perhaps’

any of the seven post-Indepen-
dence occupants of the house
itself, has ever spared a thought
as to what purpose the wall
serves, or, more importantly,
what kind of psychological
message it sends to Bahami-
ans. .

It is clear what message it was
initially intended to send: the
same message as the Norman
Castles that once ruled over
Saxon serfs in England. Put sim-

‘ply, those behind or outside the

wall are behind the back of the
town, which faces and encom-
passes the district between the
ridge and the sea. In both cases,
it is a powerful psychological
signal that was not lost on the
builders.

And it damages a lot more

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SUNSET MEADOWS SUBDIVISION

than just psychology. THe
opportunity, for instance, to sus-
tain a once-thriving over-the-
hill entertainment scene has
probably now been lost forever
as middle-class Bahamians have
migrated from such areas and
inadequate investment, security-

‘and facilities have prevented

their replacement by tourist
patronage.

he historic condition-

ing of Bahamians to
regard anything behind the
ridge not as a part of the city,
but as a parasitic settlement,
much as the favelas that mush-
room among the hills around
Latin American cities, has dis-
couraged government from
undertaking any genuine
‘urban’ renewal, but encouraged
patchy residential renewal
efforts.

Since low-cost residential
usage is by definition a misuse
of this urban space, the long:
term effects of most efforts over
the years has been to delay

actual urban regeneration,



Maybe the
single worst
legacy of colonial
urban design in °
The Bahamas is .
that monstrous |
pink wall that
surrounds
Government
House, denying -
the public a view,
of the largest and
most attractive ;
public gardens in =
Central Nassau. .

%



tather than promote it. i
A sensible move in the right
direction would be to replace

.the wall around government

house with a black gate, which
would give a full vista from
Blue Hill Road to Market

: Street, encompassing the Gov-

ernment House gardens «s well
as Gregory Arch. The ¢atire
area would be ins! vistly

enhanced. ° . é ler
' At present, the obtrusive,
offensive wall stands as a
reminder that, a generation
after independence, Bahamians
have done little to address the
deep, inherited defects in Nas-
sau’s urban design. f









INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE

CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET,
OR CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT
ANY OR ALL OFFERS.





«THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 7

Never a Caribbean airline?

e
6
‘

if By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat).

YEAR ago in a com-
. mentary entitled
, ‘Time to Ground National Air-
lines”, I observed that: “The
“national airline option has not
worked for the CARICOM
area. And, if it continues to be
’ pursued, air traffic into and out
of the region will pass to carriers
of other countries with little if
any regard for CARICOM’s
development goals.”
“ On November 21st this year,
“Caribbean Airlines — the pro-
posed successor company to
BWIA, the Trinidad and Toba-
g0 state-owned airline —
‘announced that it was entering
a “partnership” with British
‘Airways from March next year.
Under this “partnership”,
,Caribbean Airlines will give
up BWIA’s current lucrative
slots at London’s Heathrow
Airport in return for code
‘sharing with BA from Gatwick
“Airport — a considerable dis-
tance from London. BA will
“clearly be the senior partner
in this proposed relationship
gontrolling the inventory and
pricing.

‘My observation in November
last year echoed the views of
several regional airline experts,
and reflected the conclusion of
the 1992 West Indian Commis-
sion which stated in its report,
“Time for Action”, that a single
CARICOM airline, in some
form, was vitally necessary and
the national airline option

should be abandoned.

he calls for a regional

airline came against the
background of severe financial
losses by all the national air-
lines, and even the privately
owned, Caribbean Star, which
was competing with LIAT in
the Eastern and Southern

Caribbean.
~ At the time, three govern-
ment-owned airlines that serve
multi-destinations within the
«region, were all -undergoing
major restructuring exercis-
es. This followed a decade dur-
‘ing which they collectively
‘incurred losses in excess US$1.5
‘billion funded by taxpayers’
money. These airlines were:
‘ Air Jamaica, BWIA and LIAT,
‘though it should be mentioned
that Bahamasair, the national
airline of the Bahamas, and
Cayman Airlines were also
doing poorly.



» These nation-
al airlines will
not long
sutvive unless
governments
‘continue to
‘pour money
into them. The
‘case for
grounding
them remains
solid.

.



» The restructurings of the
‘Three airlines are expensive and
‘are being funded by
taxpayers. US$400 million was
spent on restructuring Air
‘Jamaica, the Jamaica state-
owned airline. Yet, last year,
she airline lost another US$136
million which will have to be
picked up by the govern-
fment. This questions the value
of its restructuring.

In the case of BWIA, the
‘lrinidad and Tobago state-
sowned airline, the government
‘was backing the airline’s bor-
yowings and other transactions
ovith guarantees. Finally, this
year, the government decided
‘to close down BWIA and pump
US$250 million into a succes-
sor company, Caribbean Air-
dines.

aribbean Airlines is
essentially BWIA with
ll the old union contracts
gone. This means some of the
employees will be severed and
“others offered new relationships
{with the new entity.

2 With regard to LIAT, the
restructuring figure bandied
‘about last year was US$50 mil-
lion. At that time, continued

Pw Te oe

competition with Caribbean
Star was still envisaged.

In all this discussion about
restructuring and financing, the
notion of a single Caribbean air-
line was hardly discussed even
though, in 1995, the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation (CTO)
commissioned a report which
identified huge savings that
could be achieved through co-
operation and different levels
of integration of national air-
lines

The annual savings were suf-
ficient to offset the annual loss-
es that these airlines typically
sustained.

The CTO-commissioned
study was ignored.

In 2005, the Caribbean Hotel

Association (CHA) examined
the issue again and in clear,
unequivocal terns concluded
that a regional airline was the
only way forward.
_ It issued a White Paper to
form the basis for a discussion
between the three airlines and
their government owners and
called for the creation of a
regional airline.

Again, the White Paper was
ignored.

Then, on November 21st this
year, the new Caribbean Air-
lines announced the formation
of its “partnership” with British
Airways, starting from March
next year.




WORLD VI

hat is remarkable
about this
announcement is that a
Caribbean airline can find the
means to partner with a foreign
airline but there is no sign that
the airlines of the Caribbean
can partner with each other.

Caribbean Airlines, for
instance, has already made sug-
gested plans to establish its own
Dash-8 subsidiary to feed its
bigger airlines at hubs in
Trinidad, Barbados and
Antigua. This means that it will
still compete with LIAT and
Caribbean Star or the airline
that emerges from a current
negotiation between these two
ailing airlines to create a single
airline.

It took years of losing money,
through competition with each
other, before the shareholders
of LIAT and Caribbean Star
finally decided to stop their
joint haemorrhaging.

In the meantime, Air Jamaica
stands mightily aloof from the



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

developments surrounding the
other nationally owned air-
lines. It will continue as the
national airline of Jamaica and
the Jamaican.taxpayers will foot
the bill of US$536 million that
might otherwise be spent on
health or education. It will also
continue to compete with



BWIA/Caribbean Airlines out
of New York into the Eastern
Caribbean causing both airlines
to lose money.

What is more, according to
the Ministry of Finance, Air
Jamaica will be using “older
model planes” in an effort to
save US$25 million. Although,
who will be happy over the use
of “older model planes”, is any-
body’s guess.

But, the problems of

Caribbean airlines have not -

changed since a year ago.

They still face high costs as a
consequence of their separate
operations. They continue to
forego the benefits of
economies of scale that could
have applied to a single airline
or even to the merged opera-
tion of some of their activities
such as offices at airports,
check-in counters, telecommu-
nication circuits, and the pur-
chase of jet fuel.

BWIA and Air Jamaica still
carry fewer passengers into and
out of the region than their for-
eign competitors. For instance,
American Airlines carries far
more people between Miami
and Port-of-Spain than BWIA.
The national Caribbean airlines
are outdone by the foreign car-
riers with greater resources.

These national airlines will
not long survive unless govern-
ments continue to pour money



}

into them. The case for ground-
ing them remains solid.

Trinidad and Tobago may
have Caribbean Airlines from
January and for a time, but it
seems that the CARICOM
region will never have a
Caribbean airline.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





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Constituency





ENM is ‘playing
politics with NHI’

li By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE opposition is, playing
politics with an issue that ought
not to be divided along political
lines, PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby said yesterday, speaking
about the FNM’s critical
remarks on the National Health
Insurance scheme.

“Anyone following the debate
on the National Health Insur-
ance scheme would appreciate
that it is a noble objective from
any government who wants to
take care of its people. It’s not
just for PLPs, it’s for all Bahami-
ans,” Mr Rigby said. ,

Mr Rigby added his voice
again to the ongoing debate on
the National Health Insurance
scheme yesterday, calling into
Love 97 during Mike Smith’s
talk show.

id members of the
opposition were appearing on
television and radio shows try-



{





ing to ‘politify’ this issue that
requires no politics.

“There is no way-a responsi-
ble person from the major
Opposition in our country to say
we are playing politics with an
issue that ought not to be divid-
ed on political lines.

“We have a country, and we
ought to mould our country and
make sure that it is the best coun-
try that we can have. (To do that
we have to) look after those peo-
ple that we know are being left
out of the social network.”

He noted that several groups
in the Bahamas could not afford
private insurance, including the
old, and persons of low to aver-
age income.

Last week Prime Minister
Perry Christie tabled a Bill for
the establishment of the Nation-
al Insurance Scheme in the
House of Assembly. ;

According to:Mr Rigby, the
Bill is intended to move to the



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Senate by December and be
completed by the end of the year.
Some observers believe that
the bill was being rushed and
not enough time was being
allowed for public input and
consultation. However, Mr Rig-
by said by tabling the Bill in
parliament the second phase of:
consultation will continue.

’ He anticipates that, when the
bill is being tabled, regulations
will be put before parliament
“which will set out bringing the
necessary prerequisites in the
positions of how the actual
scheme will work.” :

“But the consultation will con-
tinue even during the passing of
the bill,” he said. “This is not the
end of the process. The public
always has an input. The process
of consultation and fine-tuning
will not end,” Mr Rigby said.

During the course of debate,
the Bill could be amended, he
added.



y

>



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 9











FNM candidate hosts steak-out

FREE National Movement candidate Reece Chipman for the St. Thomas More constituency host-
ed a Thanksgiving steak-out and basketball jamboree at the weekend. Teams from throughout the com-
munity competed for trophies at Betty Cole Park. Reece and her campaign team gathered some 100
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‘Guiding light’
Saunders dies at age of 65

“In his generation and
beyond, Mr Saunders’ name
was synonymous with culture
in The Bahamas. Though an
attorney by profession, Mr
Saunders shared his consider-

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a nation and its people? And
Winston Saunders led the way
in helping to develop, catalogue
and promote it all. The range of
Winston’s work in the interest
of Bahamian culture was truly
outstanding and amazing,” the
prime minister said.

A consummate intellectual,
Mr Saunders always asserted
that culture in The Bahamas
was more than Junkanoo alone.

The former chairman of the
Quincentennial Commission,
which organised celebrations
for the 500th anniversary of
Columbus landing in San Sal-
vador, Mr Saunders was also
the founder of the National
Youth Choir, the National
Dance Company and’ the
National Children’s Choir. He
was also founder of the modern
Dundas Centre for the Per-
forming Arts.

“In recognition of his talent,
leadership and ability to serve
the national interest in culture,
I was pleased to name Winston
to head the National Commis-
sion on Culture. The passing of
Winston Saunders is a deep
personal loss and a tremendous
loss for The Bahamas. His lead-
ership will be missed. ~

“T offer my own condolences
to his family and the lasting
thanks of a grateful nation. This
is a sad day for The Bahamas.
It is a loss that cannot be filled,”
Mr Christie said. ;

Mr Saunders was a cultural
icon in The Bahamas and was
known for his stellar contribu-
tion to the arts generally, but
specifically as a pianist, singer

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and church organist.

He was also a playwright
(You Can Take a Horse To
Water), a director and a leader
of culture in the area of public
policy.

Mr Saunders once served as
chairman of the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts and
put the Dundas on its present
modern footing. _

Professionally, he was an
attorney and served as a mag-
istrate in the Bahamas, creating
the Coroners Court.

As chairman of the commis-
sion appointed by Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to advise
the government on cultural pol-
icy, he was the organiser for
the national Independence Day

_celebrations and helped to

develop legislation for parlia-
ment on national honours and a
national heroes day.

Paul Mirchell Salon
far Women & Men





|
THE TRIBUNE






Employers’
Confederation
FROM page one

on .the plan when we have not
been consulted or provided with
any information in respect to a
detailed report of the costs and
components involved in imple-
menting the plan?"

The president also expressed
concern about recommended
improvements that have not been
made to the National Insurance
Board before the national health
plan comes into effect.

"The government,” he said,
“was not successful in their han-
dling of Water and Sewerage,
BEC, or the Batelco, so J don’t
see them being successful in man-
aging this corporation."

The Bahamas Employer’s
Confederation is a member of the
National Coalition for Healthcare
Reform.

The coalition, which is made
up of various medical groups,
trade unions.and employer asso-
ciations claims that it is a “part-
nership of Bahamian citizens rep-
resenting all sectors of society
who are committed to improving
health care services that truly
incorporate the elements of the
right of choice and equal access to
health care services for all resi-
dents in the Bahamas.”

The coalition is one of the
major opponents of the proposed
national health insurance plan,
claiming that the plan is “rushed”
by government, and that more
consultation is requied before
implementation.

Health Minister Dr Bernard
Nottage claimed Wednesday
night in his address to the nation
that there were many persons in
the country who were in “dire
need” of medical insurance.

The health minister said: “We
must convince those Bahamians
who have much to share just a
little with those who have little.”

Mr Nutt said that the coalition
and the employers federation did
not oppose the principle of med-
ical insurance for all citizens, but
he claimed that government was
intent on making the proposed .
health plan sound like a “won-
derful thing.”

But, he said: “There are just
too many pitfalls that are being
glossed over.”

Surgeon
FROM page one. 2

“Tt is a lofty, goal;.and one

‘that I would certainly support if

the plan were feasible and sus-
tainable.. ~ a
“Unfortunately, the plan has
been hijackéd by political con-
siderations. The projected bud-

get is a gross under-estimate for
the services they propose to
cover.








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“The revenue generation by’
income contribution constitutes
an income tax by any reason-
able definition.”

Dr Tseretopoulos, pointing
out that actuarial data on the

colors
We export to alll RECIEVE A 10% DISCOUNT proposed plan had not been
3 : m public, ci ritain’s
islands. ie sates National Health Service bud-

get as a guide to likely true
costs.

With a 2006/7 budget alloca-
tion of £135 billion for a popu- -
lation of 60 million, it works out
at roughly £2,000 or $4,000 per
person. : 4

Translated into Bahamas
terms, based on a 300,000 pop-
ulation, the cost would be $1.2
billion, far exceeding the gov-
ernment’s projected $235 mil- °
lion.

“Our health care costs in the
Bahamas are equivalent to
those in the southern United
States and far exceed the cost of
care in the United Kingdom.

“In addition, our administra-
tive costs will certainly ,be much
higher than those in the UK,
particularly if the NIB is used as
a benchmark. It would be fair to
assume our per capita costs
would exceed the UK rate fur-
ther diminishing the validity of
the government’s estimates.”

Dr Tseretopoulos said though
it was possible the services
offered might be scaled down,
“at this point the government
is guaranteeing comprehensive
health coverage which based on
these projections is not realis-
tic.” i

He added: “I can only sur-
mise that the proposal is being
pushed forward for purely polit-
ical considerations, and that the
government is offering a pie in
the sky to try and gain an
advantage prior to the upcom-
ing election.

“If this proposal becomes
law, it is a certainty that it will
be unable to fulfil its obligations
with the proposed budget, and
that the level of taxation will
either increase or the coverage
will be severely limited.”

He said the act had the
potential to be ruinous to the
economy “and there must be
further reasonable discussion
with all interested parties and
health experts prior to its imple-
mentation.”



eT

THE TRIBUNE




Craft graduates to
have a ‘captive

market at

The 51 Berry Islanders who
graduated with honours from
the BAIC straw and shell craft
course have a “captive market”
awaiting them at nearby Coco
Cay, where hundreds of thou-
sands of cruise tourists vacation
every year, they were told.

A memo has already gone
out from the management of

Coco Cay (Royal Caribbean _

International and Celebrity
Cruises) that come the new year
more Bahamian-made sou-
venirs must be sold there.
During ceremonies last week-
end at St Bartholomew by the
Sea Church, Bullocks Harbour,
the graduates, who included stu-
dents from the R N Gomez All
Age School there, heard from
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Minister, Vincent Peet,
MP for the Berry Islands and
North Andros, the guest speak-
er

Coco Cay sent a letter to ven-
dors that, come next year, they
were reducing the sale of non-

Bahamian souvenirs offered to

tourists there.

Though vendors complained
such a move would cut into
their livelihoods, Mr Peet said
the concept “was a good one.”

“Clearly tourists come to the
Bahamas to experience the
Bahamas and things Bahami-
an,” said-Mr Peet. “They come
to experience our culture and
that which makes us who we
are. :

“The government is encour-
aging developers and owners
‘like Coco Cay and others to use
more Bahamian-made products.

“So if they are saying they
want to do it, you and I will
have to find the formula to
make that happen.”

Courses

The Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) course in shell and
straw craft, he said, is one of
the methods to:make that hap-
pen. More than 500 persons
throughout the islands have
taken the BAIC courses’ this
year. = hse
“You in Great Harbour Cay
are much more fortunate than
those who graduated‘in Andros
because you have a captive mar-
ket,” said Mr Peet. “You have
Coco Cay, (and) you have Big
Sturrup Cay...

“Depending on how hard you
want to work-and-how good






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oco Cay







Berry Islands graduate Katielee Butler shows Financial Services
and Investments Minister Vincent Peet Bahamian-made Christ-
mas decorations.

your product is, the sky is the
limit, literally.”

The Berry Islands trainers.
were April Fox-Martin in shell
craft and Eldena Miller in straw

~ craft...

Thirteen students from R N
Gomez All Age School, Bul-
locks Harbour, also took the
course. |

“With the development that
is happening in our country
nowadays it is important that
our students get an early start,”
said principal Cleveland Ram-
say

exhibits on display you can see
that the future is bright in shell
and straw craft. :

“We are committed at the R
N Gomez All-Age School to
become artisans and business
owners to provide authentically
Bahamian made products to
meet the market.”

Rhondi Treco, assistant site
manager at Coco Cay, said she

was “very impressed” by the ..-..

quality of produets- made during
the BAIC course.

“This is exactly what we were
talking about,” ‘she said. “It is
just what we are looking for.
This makes me very happy. I
can see we are headed in the
right direction.

“I have had many guests
comment that they don’t want
to purchase anything that they
can get elsewhere,” said Ms
Treco. “And these are items, I
am sure, people will pay for and
this is what they are looking for.

“There is a big demand for-
native products that are authen-
tic and one of a kind and I see a

ENGLAND

“And when you look at the |

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

lot of that here. I am very
pleased. This is better than what
I expected.”






- MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 11



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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE

Junkanoo back in.

Bahama after eight years

® By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The tradi-
tional early morning Boxing
Day Junkanoo Parade with a
“much modernised approach”
will return to the streets of West
End, Grand Bahama, on
December 26, after an almost
eight year hiatus.

West End MP Obie Wilch-
combe said the return of the
junkanoo parade “is a major
move towards bringing back the
glory days to West End.”

During a press conference at
the Prime Minister’s Office in
Freeport, Mr Wilchcombe
announced that Ginn Corpora-
tion executives John Davies and
John Gray had agreed to be the
corporate sponsors for the
junkanoo parade and competi-
tion.

“It is my privilege to
announce formally that plans
are well underway for the stag-

- ing of the first Junkanoo Festi-

vals in West End after a hiatus

\

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i JUNKANOO will be back in Grand Bahama for oxing Day

of almost eight years,” said Mr
Wilchcombe, who is also Min-
ister of Tourism.

Jeff Albury, chairman of the
West End Junkanoo Commit-
tee, said the parade will start at
2am on December 26. He said

SHOPPING PLAZA

the Superstar Rockers, The
Swingers, The West End Con-
querors, The Arawak Invaders,
and the Fun Time Gikos, a new
group, will participate in the
parade.

Mr Wilchcombe said that the

HARBOUR BAY

PHONE: 394-7040

committee -+had been working
for several weeks...and are
putting into West End some
features that don’t even exist
on Bay Street in Nassau.

“We are revolutionising this |
junkanoo parade by introduc-
ing new concepts, and we cer-
tainly hope that those who will
make it to West End will see
some new things happening in
junkanoo, and a much mod-
ernised approach to how the
parade is presented,” he said.

He said junkanoo in West
End was started many years ago
with men like West End resi-
dent Senator Austin Grant, who
is now deceased, and “who
thought it was an opportunity
to celebrate the culture and the
creative attributes of the
Bahamian people and bring
excitement into Grand Bahama,
and West End in particular, dur-
ing Boxing Day.

“In fact, they wanted West
End to be'recognised as the”
place where the true Christmas
celebrations begin on Grand
Bahama.

“And so, we are staging
junkanoo again with the won-
derful assistance of Ginn, who is
coming in as a major corporate
sponsor this year. We will cer-
tainly invite others to be a part
of it.”

Mr Wilchcombe commended
Ginn for demonstrating its cor-
porate citizenship by agreeing
to become involved in the stag-
ing of what will be perhaps the
best junkanoo celebration held
in West End.

John Davies said Ginn is
happy to be a part of the
rebirth of the traditional cele-
bration in West End. He added

’ that the fact that Ginn is work-

ing in West End makes it even
better and provides more cor-
porate purpose for what the
corporation was doing in West
End.

“We sincerely hope that this
first event will be the first of
many and will grow and become
very successful in the years to
come,” he said.



election, Chavez said amid the

.



ried Castro and his armed band

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS







B THE Heads of Department of various government agencies came fogetlier recently for lunch for
the new Commodore of the Defence Force Clifford ‘Butch’ Scavella at Police Headquarters. From
left: Deputy Commissioner of Police John Rolle, Director of Airport Security Erold Farquharson,
Head of Road Traffic Department Jack Thompson, Head of Lmmigration Vernon Burrows, Com-
modore Scavella, Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson, Controller of Customs John Rolle,
Deputy Head of Her Majesty’s Prison Fox Hill Charles Rolle, Head of Passport
Department Jordan Ritchie and Commander Delong Bonner of the US Embassy.

iene, Franklyn G Ferguson)

Chavez pledges to dedicate
victory to Cuba's Castro

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

VENEZUELAN President
Hugo Chavez told a "red tide"
of hundreds of thousands of
supporters on Sunday that he
will dedicate his expected re-
election victory to the ailing
leader of communist Cuba,
Fidel Castro, according to Asso-
‘ciated Press.

Chavez, a close ally of Cas-
tro, noted that the December 3
vote will be held the same
weekend as Cuba's 50th’
anniversary celebration of the
landing of the yacht that car-

to Cuba to launch their guerril-
la war.

"This victory on December 3

.. we're going to dedicate it to.
the 50 years since the arrival of
the revolutionary boat Granma
led by Fidel Castro to the coast
of Cuba," Chavez said to
cheers. "Fidel, applause from
Venezuela! Long live Cuba!
Long live revolutionary Cuba!"

Chavez considers the Cuban
leader a mentor, but has often
said that the socialism he seeks
for Venezuela does not aim to
copy Cuba's system. His critics,
including leading opposition
candidate Manuel Rosales, have
accused Chavez of trying to
bring Venezuela to Cuba-style
authoritarianism.

Peering through a pair of
binoculars down a major
avenue packed with supporters .
wearing the color of his party,
Chavez admired what he called
the "red tide."

"Our goal is not to win" the

thunder of fireworks. "We must
outdo our previous triumphs.
We are going to win in a way
that is overwhelming, crushing."

Sunday's rally, the largest in
support of Chavez since cam-
paigning began in August,
appeared to number in the hun-
dreds of thousands and Chavez
claimed millions. There were
no official estimates by police
or other agencies.

Journalists on the scene said
it appeared somewhat smaller:
than an opposition rally a day
earlier that flooded) a major
highway in one of the largest
anti-Chavez demonstrations in
years.

Chavez welcomed interna-
tional election observers from
the European Union, Organi-
zation of American States, the
Carter Center and other bod-
ies.

"You will be witnesses to
another of the great victories of
the Bolivarian people," said
Chavez, invoking the legacy of
South American independence
hero Simon Bolivar.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Lightbourne

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

















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FROM page one

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Saturday 7:00am - 3:00pm_'_

Company, the officers
dropped a rock on Mr
Wilson’s back, then picked
it up and dropped it on him
a second time.

In addition, they kicked
and beat him about the
body and head until Mr
Wilson was reduced to a
semi-conscious state, “drift-
ing in and out of conscious-
ness and suffering flash-
backs.”

As Mr Ingraham
approached the officers,
four of them drew handguns
and fired three shots into
the air, said Mr Moultrie.
One reportedly said they

would have to kill Mr Ingra- -

ham because he had seen
what happened.

When Mr Ingraham and
his neighbour, Mr Wilfred
Major, eventually managed
to drag Mr Wilson clear and
rush him to the local clinic,
an officer allegedly told the
duty doctor: “Let him die.”

Commodore Scavella said
that he could not predict
what repercussions would
follow if all reports of the
altercation proved true.
Until that time he said they
would have to allow a prop-
er investigation to take
place.

“One is not able to pre-
empt what one might do or
what will happen. Now one
has to let the course of the
investigation play out and
to see where we are before
one can make any predic-
tions along that line,” he
said.

The incident -has left
Inagua in a state of shock.
Yesterday, officers at the
island’s Defence Force base,
and on board the visiting
Defence Force vessel Yel-
low Elder, were lying low as
tension mounted.

Mr Moultrie said: “Had

those men not come out of |

their homes when they did,
these officers would have
killed this poor fellow. |
_“Mr Wilson is known as a
nice guy. He is not a trou-

-ble-maker and was doing

nothing wrong when. these
officers set about him.
“This is a barbaric act.
The police have not made
any arrests so far, but they
are investigating and the
people will expect results.”
The local physician, a Dr
Kapuno, was so concerned
about the condition of Mr
Wilson’s head that he
ordered an emergency flight

‘to Nassau. It left Inagua at

9am yesterday.

Mr Moultrie told ‘The Tri-
bune: “Mr Wilson was
sedated before the flight.
His cousin Shane accompa- _
nied him on the plane.

THE TRIBUNE

Man is airlifted
to Nassau after
being beaten
‘almost to death’

There were two gaping
holes in his head, front and
back, where he had been
beaten with rocks.

“These officers attacked
him like an animal. They
stomped on him. At one
point, they dropped a rock

“on the back of his head.

They were kicking and beat-

ing him when Diverne. came

out of his house.

“Then the officers pulled |

weapons and told him to get
away. One officer said he
(Mr Ingraham) had seen it
and so. they should get rid
of him.

“Then Mr Wilfred Major
came out. The officers did-
n’t want anyone to give Mr
Wilson attention. Mr Ingra-
ham and Mr Major finally

‘got him and carried him to

the clinic.”

Mr Moultrie said Mr
Wilson’s injuries were “life
threatening” and the feel-
ings locally were that he
would have a struggle to
survive. -

“Dexter is a hard-work-
ing fellow who keeps him-
self out of problems. He is
not the sort of guy who goes
looking for trouble.

“What these officers did
. to him was inhumane. These

neighbours saved Dexter’s
life. Right now the people
are uneasy. I think there
could be.trouble.”

. The incident brought back
bitter memories. for

Inaguans. In 1984 a'riot
broke out in Mathew Town
after a police officer ‘gun-
butted an. elderly man.’'Dur- ~



Last” night,

tension was evident follow-
ing the attack on Mr Wil-
son,.a single man who was
born in Nassau of Inaguan
parents.

“These. people are sup-
posed to be here to uphold
the law,” said a resident,
“Instead they engaged in
this completely uncalled-for
act. The people are very
upset.

“At the moment, the base
is quiet, all the officers
appear to be confined to

base. But one officer is on-

the deck of the Yellow
Elder heavily armed. They
obviously feel that some-
thing unpleasant could hap-
pen.” :

e LATE NEWS: The Yel-
low Elder was said last
night to have left Inagua. “I
presume it’s bound for Nas-
sau,” said a source. “They
obviously didn’t want to be
here tonight.” ~

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 15



Tribune colleagues Cara.
and Marcquel tie the knot








F ROM page four

though this plan has not been giv-
en proper consideration as to
what it will teally cost, and who
will and won't have to pay for it?
Could it be that our leaders just
really do not know? Perhaps the
minister of foreign affairs sums
up this uncertainty best, when he
suggested on Wednesday’s More
94FM talk show that government

will work out the details AFTER ©

NHI is passed into law.

Stop for a moment, and let’s
consider a scenario that incorpo-
rates Mr Mitchel’s cavalier atti-
tude toward the implementation
of NHI. 5

Doctor: “Mr Johnson, you
need brain surgery.”

- long pause -

Mr Johnson: “Who will per-
form the procedure, Doctor?”

. Doctor: “T will.” ;

Mr Johnson: “Have you per-
formed brain surgery before,
Doctor?”

Doctor: “No, Mr Johnson, but
I'll work it out once I see what
I’m working with.”

Mr Johnson: “Doc, ya head
jam eh?!” :

NHI must be properly planned
to succeed, lest it is doomed to
failure. Instead of getting into a
really big jam, why can’t we give
further evaluation to a plan that
many well-meaning experts have
cautioned has not been given due
diligence. Bahamians deserve and
expect a health insurance plan
prepared with the. care of a seven
course meal, definitely not with
the haste of some slam bam.

Minister Nottage, please,
what’s the rush?

S ANDRE ROLLINS, DMD
Nassau,
November 24, 2006.






Wehave all your c
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*

TRIBUNE staff members Marcquel Bethel and Cara Brennen. «:
were married at the weekend in a service at the Church of the
Epiphany on Prince Charles Drive.

The newlyweds then enjoyed their wedding reception at the
British Colonial Hilton. Ed



(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

On Roving Memory








DALERI € ANTOINETTE
CAREY OUTION

"March 18, 1953 - November 27, 2004






‘For rione of ud fives io himself alone and
none of us dies to himself alone.
If we live, we live to the Lord;
and if we die, we die to the Lord. So whether
we live or die, we belong to the Lord.
Romans 14:7-8



Children: Julian, Caitlin and Chaka Outten
Parents: James T. Carey and Sheila Carey Pessoa
Siblings: Patricia Carey Collins, Barbara Carey

_ Burrows, Paulette Carey Jacobs, Dr Earla

Carey-Baines, Sheila (Shelly) Carey
and Thomas (Tommy) Carey



















PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

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.-.°, Maynard Lifetime Achieve- |

vo ee |

VERNON Gregory “Boy”
Wilkinson leads a distinguished

~\". group of tourism workers who

-\+ will be honoured at the 11th

annual Cacique Awards on Jan-
uary 26, 2007. . :

Mr Wilkinson, manager and
consultant at Luciano’s of
Chicago, was named as the
recipient of one of the coveted
Cacique Awards — the Clement

ment Award: pe
Dr Davidson Hepburn, chair-
man of the Blue Ribbon Panel
that decides on winners of the
awards, described Mr Wilkin-

son as “an accomplished yet

humble man.” :

He pointed out that Mr
Wilkinson started out in the ser-
vice industry in 1958, parking
cars at The Bahamian Club,
West Bay Street.

In 1967, Mr Wilkinson

became a bartender at Café
Martinique, Paradise Island. He
worked his way up to manager
of the restaurant.

The rich and famous, includ-
ing Sir Sidney Poitier, Merv
Griffin and Sean Connery,
sought him out, and recom-

” mended his service to their

friends, Dr Hepburn said.
Eventually, Mr Wilkinson
became manager and consul-

*. tant at Luciano’s of Chicago,

where he continues to train
workers in the service industry.
“The industry has been very
fortunate to have him at the

forefront for 45 years,” Dr Hep-

burn said.

Dr Hepburn also pointed out
that the Ministry of Tourism
enlisted nomination scouting
teams to find deserving candi-
dates for the Cacique through-
out the Bahamas.

As a result, he said, finalists
for the 11th annual Cacique

“-i7.°- Awards came from eight islands

- New Providence, Crooked



Nominations
~ awards are announced |

island since it was affected by
hurricanes Jeanne, Frances and



Island, Eleuthera, Harbour
Island, Bimini, Exuma, Abaco,
and Grand Bahama.

In addition, Dr Hepburn
pointed out a marked increase

_ in nominations from Grand
Bahama. He said this was noted

after there had been a sharp
drop in nominations from that

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

I am vex because the PLP
government is sliding them-
selves right out of power by fail-
ing to control BEC with their
outrageous fuel surcharge. The
people will suffer this Christ-
mas because of this rise in elec-
tricity. Not only is light bill up,
food costs go up also. There will
be no bonuses, no extra hiring,
gift giving cuts; because of more
expenses people could get laid
off from work. ‘Boo’ to the PLP
government, get a government
with more concern for the peo-
ple, and better management
skills! a

Christmas Blues

I am vex because I recently
visited a school in the west and
I was kept waiting by the prin-
cipal for over an hour. During
my wait I observed that she was
very rude, grouchy and disre-
spectful to a worker. She need
to learn how to be a principal
from her counterpart across the
street. The government need to
choose good leaders in these
schools.

Tired of bad leaders



Wilma in recent years.

The winners of these awards
and the winner of the Hotelier
of the Year will be announced
at the Cacique Awards cere-
mony on January 26, Mr Bethell
said..



































I am really vex because
every week I spend about $20
on a GSM phone card. Month-
ly that adds up to $80, and
sometimes I spend more than
that. Yet the minister respon-
sible for that company has the
audacity to compare the ser-
vice with foreign companies.
When I was a student in the
States I paid $50 monthly for
hundreds of minutes plus I got
to make calls free during the

nights and weekends. It’s
ridiculous to compare BTC’s
cellphone services to Verizon
or any other big cellphone
company in the States. The
system is not that good and I
doubt it will get any better
unless some serious competi-
tion comes along.
L Cartwright

I.am vex because every time
the electricity goes off, the street

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 7















































light goes off, making traffic
build up. We need to have gen-
erators in place when this hap-
pens so that the flow of traffic
can run smoothly. Someone
nearly hit my car off the road
the other day because the light
was not working. My heart
nearly stopped when I almost
got hit. This is a serious problem
and needs to be addressed right
away!
Lights out

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oe



~—"PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

Sandals staff give a
Thanksgiving treat

eLY

EMPLOYEES from Sandals
observed Thanksgiving Day
with the residents of the Solider
Road Senior Citizen’s Home
and the Marathon community



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
‘area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PRISE

og fate Gomes

SEI,

fans; lights, i
Proper use a
save 3 bler of

° Redpce ns dattings| to lowe

Share your news

at Holy Family Community
Centre.

The resort’s chefs prepared a
delicious meal of turkey, ham,
stuffing, vegetable rice, cole













* Where possibly replace old, ineffi

HEATERS

'° Repair leaks in hot water heaters

° Take shorter showers or use.
* install a timer on hot water

WASHERS & DRYERS

« Machines settings should be ¢or

» Resist the urge to frequently open
VERY INEFFICIENT!

eater



nsistent wil

slaw, swect potato and assorted
cakes and pies.

General manager Stephen
Ziadie told the seniors that it
was a joy for everyone to come
out and spend some quality
time together. “You have con-
tributed so much and at this
stage in your life we want to
thank you.”

- He said while the gesture was
a small one, it was rewarding to
not only the employees but also
himself. “With your age, wis-
dom and knowledge, it is from
you that we can learn.”

_ As the employees served
food to the more than forty
seniors, they also conversed,
laughed and shared stories of
past and present. Also in atten-
dance was MP for Marathon,

ls during winter months
efrigerators

NAME

less water in baths.

eae or.

* Use adequate loads in washing machines and dryers

AIR CONDITIONING

° Set the temperature no lower than 78? F
> Consider using automatic settings

* Use a ceiling fan in conjunction with the air conditioner
o Use a proper size air conditioner for the room space

e Ensure the filters are cleaned regularly
° Seal all leaks or gaps in windows and doors







ti tit athena



Ron Pinder.

In leaving encouraging words
with the seniors, Mr Ziadie said
“spending this time with you -



@ GENERAL manager Stephen Ziadie (right) is pictured helping to serve

as being able to share with oth-
ers.” Food was also provided.
for the residents at Golden
Aged Retirement Home.

. has also made us more thankful
for what we have and demon-
strates to us that no matter what
we have, it is not as important

CONGRATULATIONS TO
usan L. Roker

OCTOBER WINNER OF SCOTIABANK'S

“WIN $550 ON OUR 50™”
ANNIVERSARY CONTEST

from our Scotiabank, Paradise Island Branch



Paradise Island Branch Winner? from L-R: Karen Williams, Assistant Manager
Personal Banking; “Win $550" Winner. - SrHeees Susan L. Roker; Rachel Knowles,
Paradise tsland Branch Manager

| THE MORE YOU USE YOUR CARD,
THE MORE CHANCES YOU HAVE TO WIN!
CELEBRATION ENDS OCTOBER 31, 2006.



Said Ala abaes t D seen
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Hingeiges MB Oe ve se

rene eS hanes teeta, air me
ee
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yess
Beka tah






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‘THe I RIBUINE WIUINVAT, INUVEIVIDLN 21, Huu, ere

a
Fr kolo VEN Ae





li THE North Andros High Drum Line performed during Thanksgiving ceremony at the North @ FINANCIAL Services and Investments Minister Vincent Peet addressed students of the North
Andros High School on Thursday Andros High School during Thanksgiving ceremony on Thursday.
(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

Training facility set for North Andros

A BAHAMAS Technical
‘> ‘and’ Vocational Institute
(BTVI) facility is set for the
campus of the North Andros
High School, Financial Services
and Investments Minister Vin-

*.* "cent Peet has confirmed.

‘,° *. Addressing students during
Thanksgiving ceremonies on
Thursday, Mr Peet, MP for
North Andros and the Berry

-Islands, said three new class-
rooms and a cafeteria will open
for North Andros High early
next year.

“This school will make histo-
ry by becoming the first to have
on its campus its own BTVI

. facility for a high school,” said
Mr Peet.

The BTVI technical work-

_ shop is under construction and
.’.’ .will be staffed by teachers.

“By the time those of you

who are so inclined would have

finished grade 12,” he said, “you

would leave here not only as a

‘-. , student but as a qualified certi-
-" fied'student with a trade.”

Dignitaries attending Thanks-
, giving included senior radmini S-
: ‘trafor Dr Huntley Christie,
assistant district superintendent
Clyde Bowleg, and Linda Wal-
lace of the Department of





Social Services. Guest speaker
was pastor Mark Ewen, Minis-
ter in Pastoral Charge, Lowe
Sound Seventh Day Adventist
Church.

He commended North
Andros High for having “some
of the best qualified and com-
mitted teachers anywhere in the
Bahamas.”

To principal Locksley Forbes,
he said: “Although you have
been here for a short time you
have shown exceptional lead-
ership already. Your leadership
is what will-take this school to
the next level.”

Mr Peet also announced con-
struction of a new airport termi-
nal for North Andros to be built
“in the next several months.”

“Foreign investors are com-
ing to the Bahamas more than
anywhere else,” he said,
“because they see how good it is
in the Bahamas and they want
to be a part of what’s happening
in the Bahamas.

“As young Bahamians you
need to understand that you are
special, You have opportunities

“that will-make you even more

special, that will preparevyou
for the future,” Mr Peet told
the students.











@ MINISTER of Financial Services and Investments Vincent
Peet, MP for North Andros and the Berry Islands, and others
look at the Thanksgiving gifts. Pictured from left are Pastor



Mark Ewen, Linda Wallace of the Social Services Department,
Mr Peet, principal Locksley Forbes, senior administrator Dr
Huntley Christie, and assistant district superintendent Clyde
Bowleg.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 21



: OCALNEWS _, Us



Governor-General shows spirit of giving
GOVERNOR-GENERAL Arthur Hanna showed the spirit of giving on Saturday during the Sal-

vation Army’s Annual Launching of the 2006 Christmas Kettle Drive ceremony at Rawson Square.
Also pictured is Salvation Army board chairman Mrs Judy Munroe.





Bear necessities
for needy kids

ALAKSA Aces goalie Derek
Gustafson skates through a sea of
stuffed animals that were hurled onto
the ice by fans in Bakersfield, Calif.,
Saturday, Nov. 25, 2006. The flying
fur was part of the annual Teddy Bear
Toss, at a hockey game between the
Aces and the Bakersfield Condors.
The toys are collected and distributed
to needy children in Kern County.












(AP Photo/The Bakersfield
Californian, Brian Drake)







st 22, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE




















Down Syndrome
Association hosts
‘Buddy Walk’

THE Down Syndrome
Association recently held its
community awareness walk —
or ‘Buddy Walk’.

The event started at
Queen’s College and went
on to Fort Montagu before
returning to the college.

Over 300 took part includ-
ing Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his wife
Bernadette.

The walk ended with a fun
day for all.

Model FRT 8BSEW





| The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are

making news in their

) neighbourhoods. Perhaps

i you are raising funds for a

| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

area or have won an

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I If so, call us on 322-1986

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-!-). THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 23















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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 27
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

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THE TRIBUNE





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PAGE 28, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006




MISTANBUL, Turkey

TENS of thousands of pro-
testers chanted "No to the
pope!" and waved anti- Vatican
banners Sunday ina defiant dis-
play of the pro-Islamic anger
that could await the pontulf on
his first papal trip to a mostly
Muslim nation, according to
Associated Press.

About 25,000 people filled a
square in a working-class district
of Istanbul at a rally organized
by an Islamist political party
whose leaders have denounced
the pope's remarks in September
that Jinked violence and Islam.

"The pope is not wanted
here," said Kubra Yigitoglu, a
20-year-old protester in a head
scarf, ankle-length coat and cow-
boy boots who called Turkey
"an Islamic republic."

The demonstration highlight-
ed the deep strains in Turkey
ahead of the pope's four-day vis-
it beginning Tuesday.

‘Turkish officials hope to use
the visit to promote their ambi-
tions of joining the European
Union and to showcase its secu-
lar political system. But pro-
Islamic groups — which have
been gaining strength for years -
perceive Benedict as a symbol
of Western intolerance and
injustices against Muslims.

The pope plans to first meet
with political and Muslim reli-
gious leaders in the capital,
Ankara, including Turkey's pres-
ident and the Islamic cleric who
oversees Turkey's religious
affairs. Turkey's prime minister,
Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is sched-
uled to attend a NATO meet-
ing in Latvia during the papal
visit, but could briefly greet the
pontiff at the airport.

Benedict later heads to Istan-
bul — the ancient Christian capi-
tal Constantinople — to be host-
ed by the spiritual leader of the
world's Orthodox Christians,
Ecumenical Patriarch
Bartholomew I. The pope
strongly backs. efforts. to close

Available from Commercial News P



the nearly 1,000-year divide
between the Vatican and the
Orthodox churches.

The pope also is expected to
continue the Vatican's efforts to
heal rifts with Muslims. The Vat-
ican has expressed regret for
offending Muslims and sorrow
for the violent backlash to his
comments — which the Vatican
said. were an attempt to show
the incompatibility between faith

. and violence.

At the. Vatican on Sunday:

Benedict ae his | ae

INTERNATIONAL NEWS —

ousands protest in Turkey
st the pope’s upcoming visit.

Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content

- ship" for Turks and their leaders.
The Vatican spokesman also
confirmed that the pope would
visit Istanbul's famous 17th-cen-
tury Blue Mosque as “a sign of
respect" to Muslims.

The mosque, a major tourist

‘attraction and prominent land-

mark on Istanbul's skyline, faces -

the Haghia Sophia, a former
Byzantine church that was con-
verted to a mosque following the
fall of the city to Muslim armies

in 1453. It is anow a museum. **

* But Benedict may also use his
time in Turkey as a forum to

os

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demand that Islamic nations

offer greater rights and protec-
tion to Christian minorities, such
as the remnants of the once-
thriving Greek Orthodox com-
munity in Istanbul.

Turkey's foreign minister,
Abdullah Gul, said Benedict's
visit could help "remove some
misunderstandings" between
Christians and Muslims.

"The messages the pope gives
here will, of course, be very

segrortant, ".Gul said at a news

nference..
But the protesters sent aloud

message that the pope is not wel-
come.until he offers a full apol-
ogy for his remarks, in which he
quoted a Byzantine emperor
who characterized some of
Muhammad's teachings as "evil
and inhuman," particularly "his
command to spread by the
sword the faith."

"The pope was disrespectful
to us and he needs to apologize,"
said one banner at the rally,
which is in the heart of Istan-

_ bul's conservative districts and

is often the site of pro-Islam
gatherings. More than 4,000

WIE T

Improving

THE TRIBUNE





roviders

police — including riot squads —

ringed the protest as police heli- -

copters buzzed overhead.
Seafetin Tuleg, 70, wrapped
himself in the red flag of the

. Felicity Party which organized . -

the demonstration. He said Mus-
lims revered the Jewish and
Christian prophets but did not
receive the same respect for their
own.

Muhammad, but the pope does-
n't love Muhammad and Islam,"
he said.

Officially, Turkey is a rigidly
secular republic, though around
99 percent of its population i is
Muslim.

In 2004 '— before becoming *!

pope — the then-Cardinal Joseph | -

Ratzinger cast doubt on whether
Turkey has a place among EU
nations.

"Turkey has always repre-
sented a different continent, in
permanent contrast to Europe,"
he was quoted by the French
magazine Le
saying.

On Sunday, Turkey's state-
run Anatolia news agency quot-
ed the Vatican spokesman, Fed-
erico Lombardi, as saying that
the Vatican was not against
Turkish membership in the EU.
The Vatican city, states is: not an
EU member...

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. THE TRIBUNE
an . i INTERNATIONAL NEWS





2 Arctic scientists
| look for clues to

Available from Commercial News Providers

. . . . > . can and Canadian scientists at ratios in clouds may be very doing it in one hundred years,"
is - = A the Eureka Weather Station in important in controlling the he said. ; ?
a - the northern Canadian territory Arctic surface temperatures and There's a point where ani-
“a — ° - . of Nunavut, like the Inuit who pow it melts," she said. mals can't change fast enough, .
od - are seeing their native habitat In Nunavut, the melting is there's a point where plants :
a —- thaw, are beyond questioning keenly felt. "In the old days, we can't change fast enough, so 3
We the existence of climate change. sed ito have 10 months of win- they'll either compete it out or ©
ee "If we compare the debate tey- now it's six," said Simon 89 €Xtinct."
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ogt

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Copyrighted Material

Syndica





ted Content





climate change

@ EUREKA,
Nunavut Territory

SCIENTISTS are peering
into the clouds near the top of
the world, trying to solve a mys-
tery and learn something new
about global warming, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

. The mystery is the droplets
of water in the clouds. With the
North Pole just 685 miles (1,100
kilometers) away, they should
be frozen, yet more of them are
liquid than anyone expected.

So the scientists working out
of a converted blue cargo con-
tainer are trying to determine
whether the clouds are one of
the causes — or effects — of
Earth's warming atmosphere.

"Much to our surprise, we
found that Arctic clouds have
got lots of super-cooled liquid
water in them. Liquid water has
even been detected in clouds at
temperatures as low as minus
30 degrees Celsius. (minus 22
F)," said Taneil Uttal, chief of
the Clouds and Arctic Research
Group at the Earth Systems
Research Laboratory of the
U.S. National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).

Atmosphere

"If a cloud is composed of liq-
uid water droplets in the Arctic,
instead of ice crystals, then that
changes how they will interact
with the earth's surface and the
atmosphere to reflect, absorb
and transmit radiation," said
Uttal.

"It's a new science, driven by
the fact that everybody doing
climate predictions says that
clouds are perhaps the single
greatest unknown factor in
understanding global warming."

With NASA reporting that
2005 was the warmest year on
record worldwide, the debate
over global warming marches
on, but not here. The Ameri-

over the theory of evolution
with the debate over the theory
of global warming — global

-warming's a whole lot more cer-

tain at the moment," said Jim

Drummond, a University of '

Toronto physics professor and
chief investigator for the Cana-
dian Network for the Detection
of Atmospheric Change.

"By and large," he said, "we
are not now arguing about
whether global warming is
going to happen; the argument
has turned to: How big is it
going to be?"

_ Uttal, Drummond and other
American and Canadian scien-
tists recently visited Eureka, an
outpost established jointly by
Canada and the United States
in 1947 and now equipped with
instruments that sound like sci-
fi inventions — the ozone spec-
trophotometer, for instance, or
the tropospheric lidar. (A lidar,
an amalgamation of "light" and
"radar," uses laser light to
detect atmospheric particles.)

_ The new technology helps to
better understand the impact of
clouds on Earth's surface tem-
perature. The clouds being stud-
ied here range from six miles
high to almost touching the
ground.

"For a couple of decades we
have known that super-cooled
liquid water droplets could exist
in clouds," Uttal said. "But the

' prevalence of it in Arctic clouds

was not really known until these.
specialized sensors starting
operating in the Arctic about
eight years ago."

"The really exciting thing,"
she said, will be the ability to
track an:aerosol layer or an

Asian dust cloud from their .

source and measure their effect
on a cloud.

Uttal noted that water clouds
are more likely to warm the
Arctic atmosphere than ice
clouds, since the liquid clouds
retain more heat radiated by
the Earth's surface. "This
means that the ice-to-water

Awa, an Inuit leader and
deputy minister for the envi-
ronment of Nunavut who was
on the trip to Eureka. “Every
year we're getting winter later
and later."

For these 155,000 people of

’ Canada, Greenland, Russia and

the United States, it means less
time to hunt caribou, walrus
and polar bear. Studies show
that average winter tempera-
tures have increased as much
as 7 degrees in the Arctic over
the last 50 years. The per-
mafrost — ground that is contin-
ually frozen for at least two
years — is thawing, imperiling
polar bears and forcing other
animals to migrate farther
north.

Walrus

The walrus have moved far-
ther away, said Awa. "So you're
taking more time out, away on

the land hunting." Meanwhile,.

families back home are forced
to eat store-bought food that is
costlier and less healthy.

"The majority of the world's
population hasn't really felt the
global warming," said Awa.
"But right now.in. the Arctic
and in Nunavut, we're really
worried because it's already
affecting us. We are a ther-
mometer of the world for what
could happen." :

Russ Schnell, director of |
. Observatory and Global Net-

work Operations for NOAA,
notes that climate change is
cyclical — that the planet's veg-

etation, over millions of years,

sucks in and spits out carbon
dioxide.

" All the carbon dioxide in the
coal and oil was once in the air.
The plants took it and it went
into the oceans or into the
ground — and now we're taking
it back out," says Schnell.

"The cycle is the same today,
only you're taking something
that took 100,000 years and









PAGE 30, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006



COMICS PAGE

~*t
le 4
‘ = ~s“ Tw
r) -_s

. Synd

‘opyrighted Material

icated Content were



THE TRIBUNE

Available from Commercial News Providers

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Pass 5¢ 4

Opening lead — ten of hearts.

You can’t see the adverse. hands
when you’re declarer, but as the play
proceeds, it often becomes possible
to visualize them perfectly, enabling
you to achieve the best possible
result.

Here is a simple case that shows
how it’s done. South becomes
declarer at five diamonds after East
opens one heart, and West leads the
heart ten. East wins with the jack and
' continues with the ace.

7 “Séuth ruffs high, enters dummy
with a trump and leads a low spade to



Teeget
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 14; very good 21; excellent
28 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.

AcROss
Live and travel atound the:

* @ast and south (6)
Generous accommodation for
Americe.-convicts (3,5)
Hardly rare? (6)

That obsequious

character Heep? (5)
Stray sheep that's got out ”
of the ring (4)
’ Metal boxes used by Latin
scholars (4)

Plaintive cries from the
old stables (4)

We had to tie the knot (3)
‘Tis out East we have
certain connections (4)
Usually wooden

spare part (4)

Crimes can bring

sore grief (9)

Finished being cheated (4)
The girl left the idiot! (4)

A bit of supper for each (3)
Be inclined to cheat

at bagatelle (4)

A sound back, possibly (4)
Have they meant much

for centuries? (4)

Many persons can

do her wrong (5)

Heaven, | guess (6)

One of those doing bird imitations
with conviction? (8)
Superlatively modern (6)

Making ready to take a seaman

away (5)

‘Once mora the middleman takes the
» profit (5) ” :

Naturally it comes to light (4):

To use more seéd could

be-worse (5)

To shut the.door angrily can be

grand (4) °

One taking a short cut to

Immingham? (6)

A cordial that makes you hiss? (6)

Only part of the perimeter? (3)

Villa in Glastonbury? (5)

Flogs repeatedly (7)

A Home Guard girl (3)

Existed as an article between two

points (3)

Some girls’ school of historic general

fame (6)

Basil contributes to this saucy Italian

production (5) ’

Because of insufficien}, force? (3) ’ pina

Deserter from the regiment, a traop. 8 Religious house (6)

leader (3) 10. Cold dish (5)

Little chap with passion and lust (6) 13 Nobleman (4)

A stick in the production line (3) 14 Layer (4)

It's clumsy to lose heart and spill a 2 Gn ‘3
pint (5)

17 Bridge (4) Fire-raising (5)
Less of an ape than you might 19 Gemstone (4) Boarding ar (7)
ct, perhaps (5 21 Kitchen implement Tibetan ox (3
Foen nana ) | 16 Uncooked (3
Be eros ere ved Long hair (4) Summary (6)
stare (5)
It upsets me for while (4)

Jot (4) Fruit (5)
As eaten in the mess? (4)

—
=

iy)

nN
wo



IN

ACROSS Middle (5)
Weighing device (5)
Second-hand (4)
Drive (5)
Reasonable (4)
Human (6)
Account (6)

Help (3)

EASY PUZZLE

Atmosphere (3) Vehicle (3)
Boast (4 Farm animal (3)
a Tiny (6
Ship's company (4) iny (6) :
Feline (4) For every (3)
Ration (5) Flowers (5)
Coercion (6) Scope (5)
Expanded (8) Feeble (5)

Against (6) ana

23
24
26
27
28
32
33
34
35
36

Yesterday's cryptic solutions

ACROSS: 1, Animus 7, Linguist 8, To-f-u 10, Loiter 11,
Office 14, ‘Me-n 16, L-one-R 17, She'd 19, Ju-lie 21,
Tu-Ll-p 22, Bugle 23, Beef(- -cake) 26, Wi-ser 28, P- OM
29, In-tent 30, Jammed 31, Elba 32, Trainers 33, Throne
DOWN: 1, Angles 2, Mooted 3, Slur 4, Egg flip 5, Fit in 6,
Steer 8, Time 9, Fen 12, Fo-E 13, C-e-ase 15, Bully 18,
H-OP. in 19, Jug 20, Lie 21, Turing 22, Be-e 23, Bomber

Yesterday's easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Miffed 7, Enclosed 8, Tern 10, Amulet 11,
Appear 14, Bed 16, Padre 17, Star 19, Repel 21, Caber
22, Pagan 23, Foal 26, Strip 28, Rim 29, Chip in 30,
Finale 31, Odin 32, Predator 33, Deeper

DOWN: 1, Morass 2, Feeler 3, Dent 4, Clipper 5, Asked 6,
Adore 8, Tuba 9, Red 12, Pal 13, Aroma 15, Kebab 18,

a0 a “MA 25, Fiddle 26, Wi-D-th 27, Steam 28, Pal (lap) | Tooth 19, Rag 20, Pen 21, Capital 22, Pip 23, Finite 24,
lest

Oman 25, Lieder 26, Scope 27, River 28, Rid 30, Ford

TRL REE EET TP eee ET TE ee od eae ner



Detective Work Works Well

the queen. As expected, the finesse
succeeds, and declarer then cashes

his three remaining trumps to pro- -

duce this position:
: North
437
v9
$Q82
West East
$98 @K 10
31063 ¥KQ
; &95
South ;
@A3
hAKT4

Declarer may hope the clubs are
divided 3-3, but he knows that even
if they’re not he is still sure of the
contract. No lie of the cards can
defeat him.:

He cashes the A-K of clubs and
plays.a club to dummy’s queen. East
shows out on the third club and is
forced to discard the heart queen in
order to guard the spade king.

To this point, East has shown up
‘with precisely five hearts, three dia-
monds and two clubs. East therefore
started with exactly three spades and
so is now known to hold the K-x of
spades and king of hearts.

Accordingly, South leads

dummy’s nine of hearts and discards
his chub loser on it. East wins, but.is.
compelled to return a. spade, allow-
ing declarer to win the last two tricks
with the ace and jack of spades.

TARGET



TURBULENT turn turtle tutu

rebut rent. runt tent tern true
untrue utter

pelt bent blunt blunter blurt
brunt brute bunt burnt butler
butt butte butter lent lute
tube tuber tubule tune tuner

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

food prepared by
blending or
straining



Joanna Dvorakowska v Thomas
Bryn, Midnight Sun Open,

. Norway 2006. The amateur
playing the black pieces in.
today’s puzzle is two pawns up,
and has just set a trap for his
woman grandmaster opponent.
tf White (to move) grabs the
rook by 1 Qxa8 then Bb7 traps
the queen. White may still be
winning then, but Dvorakowska 3
found a much better idea. In
fact, though White's point-
scoring play looks spectacular!

any self-respecting expert would a

consider it routine. How did the
game end? If Sunday chess
appeals to you, there are two
open-to all festivals happening
this weekend. Anyone from
expert to novice is welcome at
Pinner (details from Graham



Yu.




MONDAY, |
NOVEMBER 27

ARIES —- Mar 21/Apr 20°:

You must take your cash flow ‘more’.

seriously, ‘Aries. You haven't been -
paying much attention to it in the last -
few months. You'll find that your
resources can deplete quickly.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Something that happened in the past

4

has bothered you lately. That situation: . .

must now be forgotten so that you can’

get on with. your life. The only thing. *

_that matters is now.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
The planets indicate that if you will
do a good deed for someone, you
‘will be rewarded suitably at some
point in the future. Naturally, you, «
would do it even without reward.

CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22
You will gain. something this week
that you’re not entitled to, Cancer.

Think hard about giving it back. You’. °

will-receive your just desserts when, +

‘the time is right.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

Don’t .flatter coworkers. Rather, .
sHow them that you’re willing to put
in the hard work needed to get!
through tough. projects...ahead.
They’ll appreciate it more. ‘

VIRGO — Aug.24/Sept: 22, :
Be friendly this week, Virgo, but also. ~
be on your guard. for: those Who are

looking .to..take advantage’ of your
generosity. Youll ‘be. oe hors
these people actually are.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23 «

You'll smooth out a difficult gitaa-
tion with your partner this week,
Libra. Mending fences is something °
you often find to be a chore.: Just

| think of the end result.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22.
You have to learn that you cati't”
always be right in every situation.
Learn to compromise with others to
get things done efficiently as-a team. It
will help build stronger relationships...”

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec:21| :

It is important to avoid stressful: situ-
ations in the days. to come,
Sagittarius. You are prone to’ blow-

ing things out of proportion. Stay .-

calm and ride the wave.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20° -

You’re in a creative
Capricorn, so put it to good , use.
Redecorate or focus on that * “pro-
ject” you’ve cast aside. Entice. oth:
,ers to get in on the action.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb' 18
Don’t let the negative comments of
others rub off on you this week, :
Aquarius. As usual, you have your °
head in the clouds and you don’t
want to come down from that high.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 -

It’s time to make an important deci-
sion, Pisces. The answer is to try-
|something different rather than stay
jing on a Steady course.

CO
nN
>
oo

i i
FY
a
e

a

Snow at 020 7736 5693) and
Richmond (Richard James at 020
8898 0362).

LEONARD BARDEN

>
Chess solution 8248: 1 Ne7+ Nxe7 2 Bxh7+ Kh8 3
Bg6+ Kg8 4 Rh8+ Kxh8 5 QhS+ Kg86 Qh7

mate.
Mensa quiz: Deportation. **

One possible word ladder solution is: JEST, pest,

post, pose, poke, woke, JOKE.



TORRE ATES EL TY ITT TN

mood,’ ."



















shoe epeee Sace.



wn Meetings
Start Time: 6:30pm Nightly

Wed Nevernt Harbour
Great Abaco Beach Resort (The en) Host: Darold Miller

eve
Ubi eat raesstan ie

Thu, November 9tt
SC Bootle High School, Cooper’ sTown Host ory Forbes
















Tue. Novernber ith; Exarma
Anglican Church Sea Ctr, George oye Host: Darold Miller

Wed. Nover mber and:
Workers House, Governor's Harbour Host: Picewell Forbes
Wed. Noverr

| monmnouse use et Club, Andros Town Host Darold Miller





Thu, ‘Novern
Mirion rer c

Fri December 151: Lorie tulad
Oasis, McKanns Host: D Darold Miller






FREE FOOD!
PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS

—_

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 31



#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts, Palmdale
(Next to City Market Food Store)
Nassau, Bahamas
Email: sales@dsipc.com

Ph: 242-328-0048
ECHROLOGY Fax: 242-328-0049

COMPANY LIMITED

SMALL PRICES!

-Under the Distinguished Patronage of
Mrs. Bernadette Christie

The Bahamas Humane Society

Proudly Presents

An Exhibition of the Art of

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December 1-3, 2006 December 4 - 6, 2006

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Flamingo Gay Room * Lounge
9 a.m. to midnight 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
Official Opening Dec. 1 @ 4:00 p.m. FREE to the public
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December 7 - 31, 2006 at Arts Studio Gallery

An Arts Studio Bahamas Production

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Call: 242-323-5138 or E-mail: bhsadoptions@coralwave.com









os) PAGE 32, MONDAY, NOVE


































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PAGE 34, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

:




















on interview with a 20 year veteran





non-conventional way is key,

nterview with a 20 year veteran











Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY.
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. WHAT HAS BEEN
YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE DIFFERENT CULTURES
AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE
PAST 20 YEARS? WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE
EXPERIENCE?

A. The days when GM- Mr. Veersteg used to have staff General
Meetings at South Ocean because in those days we did not have
a meeting facility! Our GMs always did what was necessary to
make our lives comfortable, they still do today.

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT Bly DETAIL
YOUR JOURNEY.
A. [Industrial Mechanic] My career path journey at CBL has
been challenging as an Industrial Mechanic, and now Mechanic

. Supervisor; throughout the years, I decided to try my best to deal
with and overcome those challenges, by keeping my head to the
ground and moving.

Q. WHat HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?
A. Over the years, I have enjoyed the challenges that come
along win ann and the opportunity to work for a Pepe.

Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE;
WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20
YEARS AGO?

A. Being a recent graduate of the College of The Bahamas in the
engineering field, I was looking for a challenging career working
in the industrial environment. I must admit that the choices were
limited to B.E.C., the hotel industry or light manufacturing. Then
an opportunity presented itself to learn something new; they were
building a brewery and looking for technical personnel. This was
what I was looking at as an avenue to break away from the status
quo, to step into new industry as far as The Bahamas was
concerned. And as the saying goes “the rest is history."

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?

A. The question for me can be answered very simply; it is the
constant change in technology which leads to the change and
upgrade of equipment. I find the training, installing and repairing
these new equipments challenging and rewarding.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO
YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO
GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?

A. For me this answer has to be yes. I joined CBL as a Jr.
Electrician and today 1 am the Engineering Manager This is quite
an opportunity to grow.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. WHAT HAS BEEN

‘YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE DIFFERENT CULTURES

AND PERSON TIES THAT HAVE BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE

PAST 20 YEARS? ‘Wear HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERI- .

ENCE?
A. My experience is you have to be flexible not ridged. Open
minded and willing to see things i ina different or should I say

<

THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?

- of different cultures and personalities.

beotession

v



THE TRIBUNE

. Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?

A. What I have enjoyed was the opportunity to travel from
Atlanta, California, Holland, Indiana, St. Lucia and Vietnam. The
main purpose for these trips was for training; however, it gave me
the opportunity to experience different cultures which most
certainly was an enjoyable experience. ,

Q. WovuLp you RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH BREWERY TO UP
AND COMING HIGH POTENTIALS FOR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY?
Wuat 1s CBL’s stRONGEST SELLING POINT FROM YOUR PERSPEC-
TIVE?

A. Yes I would. CBL is the type of company that if you are willing,
dedicated and have a level of flexibility, you can experience great
opportunities.

Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN THE YEARS
THAT LIE AHEAD?

A. I envision the company being run entirely by Bahamians,
maintaining world class brewing standards. In addition to taking its
products not only to a few U.S. states, but to all and to all the
islands in the Caribbean.

Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR COLLEAGUES THAT
WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL EXPERIENCE?

A. Like life, you get out what you put in; 15% in 15% out, 80% i in,

80% out, need I say more.

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN?
A. Life is never perfect and of course if I had the opportunity to do
it again I would change a few things...but then again perhaps not.
OK, it was not all perfect but the imperfection is what has made my
experience unique, I wouldn't change anything, and I eee do it) vy
all over again.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,

Q. We ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO COME AND JOIN
A. The new technology that was going to bea part of the Brewery and the opportunity to see with people

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A: My motivation year after yee has been the challengiis projects, new machinery and a love for oe

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE AFFORDED THE
OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?
A. Yes because I have had the opportunity to travel abroad for training and also receive training on the job.




ry to make our lives -

Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN THE .
YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD?
A. Being the only Brewery in the Babamas at this time, I think
Commonwealth Brewery will experience some competition in

_ the years that lie ahead. Competition is the name of the game
today, and competitors are rising up.

Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR COLLEAGUES
THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL EXPERIENCE?
A. To further enhance my colleagues experience, I would

advise them to really have a love for his/her job; get facts in



AGAIN?
A. Yes I would because my experience has been and continues

to be a good one.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,

FORTITUDE, FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE ATTITUDE IN
20 YEARS AT CBL.

KEEP REACHING FOR THE STARS! JOB WELL son
oe) Wout YoU RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH Brewery Ue . a

order to execute a task rather than relying on assumptions and
to always be to work on time. —

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL OVER





















THE TRIBUNE | MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 35

wD;
3

Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO

COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?
A. The new technology that the Brewery was bringing to The Bahamas. . je












Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. The mindset of improving myself along with the technological changes of better equipment.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE
AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?

A. Yes. The training to enhance my mechanical and welding skills in greet to perform at a
professional standard.



Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH
MANY MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS.









z WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE fs
5 DIFFERENT CULTURES AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE st
~ BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS? WHAT HAS ba —
® BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERIENCE? Q. WHERE DO.YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN . ‘
e A. In general, my experience has been good in interact- THE YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD? yi
c ing with the different cultural personalities. My most A. Diversifying its product line to include soft drinks e
® favorable experience was being afforded the opportunity COMP lementing Vitamalt and Vitamalt Plus. Ha
; S to train at the G.T.I Welding Plant in The Netherlands. ( : + iz
on) Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR :
; Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT CBL? COLLEAGUES THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR ;
» DETAIL YOUR JOURNEY. CBL EXPERIENCE? ae
ao A. Semi-skilled Welder to Welder; Mechanical. Bister A. To appreciate the now CBL experience; embrace the vs
: = Pipe Fitter, Fabricator, Certified Tig Welding, Stainless challenges that promote growth; develop a positive nee
- 3 Steel Specialist, J.C.C Representative and now Union mental attitude toward your work; whatever your et ;
. Seas Shop Stowapd: hands find to do, do it as unto the ees .
> Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS? Q. Hinpstcur BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ea ih : y iis
of “A. The opportunities to grow to your fullest potential. OVER AGAIN? gf :
: = The challenges of new [Engineering] projects. My Bee A. se I would. o
pS & colleagues and the bee that CBL L offers. t ‘

ConeRatuLarions ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE, :
ORT. TUD FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE.







Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO
COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?

A. My dear departed father put me in his place here and I try my best to walk in his
footsteps and learn different things from CBL ree











Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. My motivation year after year was interacting with new team members and managers.
It was a joy meeting different people and learning different things.







Q. CoMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE
AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?

A. Yes, my time was well spent with the company. I learned and grew very strong within
my department.
















\ Id be tp leam and
WMiyacioe pu c em anc



advantage of everything



Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN
MANY MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. THE YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD?
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE At [Malachi Reckley] envision this company in the

DIFFERENT CULTURES. AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE BEEN years that lie ahead with even more success.








REPRESENTED OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS? WHAT. HAS BEEN









: YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERIENCE? Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR .
A. My most favorable anberienee was learning we are all | COLLEAGUES THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL ;
different people and we came to learn and respect each ° ‘EXPERIENCE?
others cultures and personalities. ; A. My advice would be to learn and take advantage of 2
: . ee everything that you can learn and achieve at CBL. Hard rie
- Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT CBL? work here pays off in the end for you and your family. a2
: DETAIL YOUR JOURNEY. “i
A. I have always wanted to become an Engineer and I Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL *,
hope to become Chief Engineer one day at CBL. Iam _ OVER AGAINP * af
presently and have been a line technician. - A. Yes I would and I wouldn’t change anything because =



it was a blessing being here.

Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?










es A. Over the years I enjoyed the seminars, the events and CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE, 3
: the hard work. I enjoy meeting new members of staff ana I FORTITUDE, FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE ATTITUDE hs
enjoy working here at CBL for 20 years. IN 20 YEARS AT CBL.

KEEP REACHING FOR THE STARS! JOB WELL DONE.



oe

i, | Hh



PAGE 36. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE | f





MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 27, 2006

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business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

BU

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

Tribun









Insurance Lid,





- Bank to

double
capital to

$100m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



BANK of the Bahamas
International’s shareholders
will be asked to approve the

_ creation of five new preference

share classes at its December
22, 2006, annual general meet-
ing (AGM), doubling share
capital to $100 million from its
current $50 million.

The move, likely designed
to bolster the bank’s capital
base and enable it to take on
further anticipated growth in
its loan book, aims to create
preference share classes D to
H.

Each of the five new classes.
will consist of 10,000 shares,
all bearing a par value of
$1,000, if shareholders
approve. Given that between
them, the Government and
National Insurance Board
(NIB) own almost 52 per cent
of the bank’s ordinary shares,
the preference share classes’
creation is likely to be
approved.

The AGM resolution follows
a fiscal year in which Bank of
the Bahamas International
twice strengthened its capital

a SEE page 11B _

Babak denies contempt claim.

~ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) chairman
Hannes Babak has alleged that
“all necessary steps” have been
taken by himself and the other
defendants to comply with a
November 2 order by Justice
John Lyons relating to the pro-
duction of documents. This is
despite attempts by the late
Edward St George’s estate to
have him committed to prison
for alleged contempt of court.

In the latest developments
surrounding the extremely bit-
ter and public fight between
the St George family and Sir

National Health sums
‘just don’t add up’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he cost of services

under the Gov-

ernment’s pro-

posed National

- Health Insurance

(NHI) plan “just doesn’t add
up”, the Bahamas Dental
Association’s president has
warned, questioning how this
can be pegged at $235 million
for three consecutive years
when the administration’s
experts are themselves pre-
dicting a 20 per cent increase in

Bank Clearing House targets June

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Clearing Banks Association
(CBA) is hoping to have the first phase
of an Automated Clearing House
(ACH) in place “no later than June
2007”, its chairman told The Tribune,
with the software supplier selected

before Christmas.

Paul McWeeney, who is also Bank
of the Bahamas International’s man-
-aging director, said the ACH Working...

Jack Hayward, their former
business partner, over his claim
that he owns 75 per cent of
GBPA and its affiliate, Port
Group Ltd, the estate applied
to the courts on November 14
for an order committing Mr
Babak to Fox Hill Prison for

-alleged contempt of court.

The GBPA chair. again
appears to have become a par-
ticular target for the St George
estate, which has accused both

him and Sir Jack of acting ina —

manner that is against their
interests.
The contempt allegation

SEE page 5B

Employers urged to help

combat domestic violence

’ @ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN employers are
reluctant to deal with domestic
violence impacting their

‘ employees due to uncertainty
over their role and a desire to .

respect worker privacy, a senior
police officer said.

Assistant Superintendent
Elaine Sands told a crime pre-
vention seminar organised by
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce: “Uncertainty of their
precise roles or desire to respect
employees’ privacy makes
employers hesitant to deal with
it.” ~

She added that domestic vio-
lence “affects us directly and
indirectly”, and its victims fre-
quently suffered from low

Shopbreaking up 11%

morale and low productivity in
the workplace, impacting their
employer’s profitability.

“Domestic violence does not
stay at home. It ends up in the
workplace,” Assistant Superin-
tendent Sands said.

She described a double mur-
der and suicide that took place
at a work site on Soldier Road
in 2002 as an example of how
domestic violence could result
in extreme tragedy.

Explaining that domestic vio-
lence negatively impacted work-
er health and safety, and
“undermined” company pro-

SEE page 7B

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

# 56 Maderia Street. * Palmdale

P.O.Box $S-6270, Nassau, N.P. Bahamas

242.328.3040
fax: 242.328.3043

www .micronet.bs —

* computers

copiers. 4

Dentists head says u-turn over pensioner contributions shows
‘Government extremely unsure of what true costs will be’

use of the health system.

Charging that “the Govern-
ment is extremely unsure of
what the true costs of NHI will
be”, Dr Andre Rollins said the
NHI project implementation
team had forecast that under

NHI, the cost of providing:
medical treatment to all

Bahamians in 2007 will be $108



million less than the $343 mil-
lion its cost in 2001.- when they
had the option of purchasing
private health insurance.

In a hard-hitting commen-
tary, Dr Rollins argued: “Bear
in mind that we are told this
plan will provide all that our
present. public health system

does not, and that 20 per cent:



Group and CBA had narrowed the list
of potential software suppliers down
to four, who were now visiting the.
Bahamas to give presentations on their
products and be interviewed.
One of the contenders is believed to

be Montran, sources told The Tribune. -
Mr McWeeney said once the Working

more people will utilise the
public system during the first

three years of NHI than

presently do, but we are
expected to believe that it will
cost the government $108 mil-
lion less. Who do we believe,
the ministers or the commit-
tee?”

Picking up on the. NHI

1

implementation team’s $235
million price tag, and the fact
that no actuarial review of the
scheme’s costs, viability and
sustainability will be carried |
out for thrée years, Dr Rollins
said the Government was

| SEE page 6B

ny! |
07 date
Four companies compete for software
contract, with selection due in December

Group and CBA had assessed the pre-
sentations, the winning vendor would
be selected next month “before we
have a break for the holidays”.

“We have one or two presentations

. SEE page 12B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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it can also be a great investment that appreciates over time. Start saving automatically with
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be Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and contro! of The Bank of Noya Scotia. +Conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.

\



@ By Fidelity Capital
Markets 00

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian market as almost
93,000 shares changed hands.
The market saw 14 out of its 19
listed stocks trade, of which
three advanced, four declined
and seven remained
unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Colina Holdings (CHL)
with 43,400 shares changing
hands and accounting for 47
per cent of the total shares
traded.

The big sdvanee for the
week was First Caribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB), up $0.14 or 1 per cent to
end the week at its new 52-
week high of $14.14.

On the down side for a
fourth consecutive week was
Abaco Markets (AML), drop-
ping another $0.15 or 17.24 per
cent to close the week at $0.72.

The FINDEX gained 3.57
points for the week, to close
at 729.32.

COMPANY NEWS

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) -

FOR the 2007 first quarter,
BOB posted net income of
$2.9 million, representing an

increase of $478,000 or 19.5 per

cent over the same period last









FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR



Commodities








Crude Oil
Gold






DJIA
S&P500
NASDAQ





'

oe .
_ i



International Markets







International Stock Market Indexes:


















The ‘Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 729.32 YTD 32.20%
CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

ir

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.72 $-0.15 2000 -1.37%
BAB $1.21 $- 250 10.00%
‘BBL $0.80 $- 0 14.29%
BOB $7.88 $- 13359 12.57%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 5.77%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 14.51%
BWL $1.65 $-- 300 30.95%
CAB $9.85 $-0.07 3200 3.14%
CBL. $12.29 $0.04 5467 | 34.91%
CHL $1.90 $0.05 43400 15.85%
CIB $14.14 $0.14 1000 29.96%
CWCB $4.81 $-0.41 1500 . -7.85%
DHS - $2.65 $- 2500 22.12%
FAM _ $5.54 $- 0 -8.43%
FCC $1.00 $- 0 -13.04%
FCL $11.65 $- 11000 15.92%
FIN $12.00 $- 1500 10.09%
ICD __ $8.00 $-0.05 3750 -19.60%
JSJ $8.70 $-. 3700 -3.87%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%











DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

¢ Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a special div-
idend of $0.08 per share, payable on November 30, 2006, to all
shareholders of record date November 15, 2006.

e CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR,
payable on February 7, Ou, to all shareholders of record date
December 31, 2006.

e FOCOL has declared a special dividend of $0.06 per
share payable on December 12, 2006, to all sharelie lets of
record date November 30, 2006.

year when net income stood at
$2.4 million.

Interest income increased by
$2.1 millon or 26.3 per cent to



est expense rose by $1.1 mil-
. lion or 35.6 per cent to total
$4.2 million. Net interest

Weekly % Change





1.1354 -1.14

1.9315 1.99 income was $5.9 million ver-

1.3094 2.10 sus $4.9 million in the 2006 first
‘ Se quarter.

Provisions for loan losses fell
by $286,000 year-over-year to
$342,000, while operating
expenses grew by $868,000 or
‘21 per cent to total $4.9 mil-
lion. Earnings per share stood
‘ at $0.19 versus $0.20 in 2005.

The decrease in EPS was
due to an additional 3.6 mil-.
lion ordinary shares being
added to the bank's capital
from its rights issue. BOB also
issued $14.7 million in prefer-
ence shares to the investing
public this year. The bank's
shareholders equity stood at

+. $90 million as at September 30,
2006, representing an increase
of 101 per cent year-over-year
and a capital ratio of 16 per
cent versus 9 per cent in 2005.

In related news, BOB man-
agement has announced the
opening of its Private Banking
arm, which is geared towards
providing enhanced customer
service, coupled with a full
scale array of banking prod-
ucts and services.



Weekly % Change



$59.24 6.15
$629.00 1.13



Weekly

12,280.17 -0.51
1,400.95 -0.02
2,460.26 0. 59
15,734.60

% Change



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Pm lovin’ it



total $10.1 million, while inter-_

a















THE TRIBUNE



iio tne Lo a eee
Business has ‘major
worry’ on Clause 14

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE business community’s
“major concern” with the pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance Bill remains Clause 14,
which the National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform
believes “leaves a lot of ques-
tions unanswered” and could
even be interpreted as pre-
venting companies from drop-
ping private group health
insurance for their employees.

Winston Rolle, a consultant
to the Coalition and former
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president, said from a
“business perspective, there
are a couple of scenarios” that
could play out relating to
Clause 14, depending on how it
was interpreted.

The Coalition’s members are
understood to have met for a
strategy session at the week-
end, which included analysing
the Bill. Yet one business
source told The Tribune that
one meaning of Clause 14 was
that “you are not permitted to
drop your group health insur-
ance”.

_ The source added: “There
are lots and. lots of inequities,
but the one huge concern is
this Clause 14, and how it can
control private contracts, which
is what they appear to be
doing.”

If companies were forced to
maintain the group health
insurance plans they have for
staff now, along with paying
NHI contributions - set cur-
rently at 5.3 per cent of a
salaried worker’s monthly
wage, split 50/50 between

worker and employer - the .

impact on many firms, partic-
ularly small and medium-sized
ones, could be devastating.
The Tribune had previously
spoken to two companies, one
a law firm and the other an
insurance company, who both

said they spent more than
$200,000 per annum on pro-
viding private group health
insurance for their employees.

If such firms were to pay for
NH1 as well, without dropping
their private plans, their oper-
ating costs will go through the
roof, possibly resulting in wage
reductions and redundancies.

Mr Rolle told The Tribune
yesterday: “The major concern
is Clause 14, which leaves a lot
of questions to be answered,
especially as it relates to com-
panies and people who have
private insurance. When NHI
comes in, how are they going
to be affected? All that is what
needs to be properly clarified.”

A further concern with
Clause 14 is that by allowing
employers to modify their pri-
vate group health insurance
plans, this means that compa-
nies will in turn have to alter
their contracts with employ-
ees, which might stipulate that
the firm provides them with
private health insurance anda
certain level of benefits.

“Companies may be paying
full insurance for their staff
now, but that Clause gives the
minister the right to modify
employee agreements,” Mr
Rolle said.

“It’s the kind of question
that needs to be answered.
Why is that necessary, if cur-
rent legislation in the labour
laws governs the relationship
between employer and
employee?”

Clause 14 (1) of the NHI Bill
says that despite any agree-
ment a Bahamian employer
may have in place regarding
the provision of group health
insurance for his workers with
a trade union representing
them, or in their contracts of
employment, “every employ-
er is entitled to modify..... the
rate of contributions payable”
under this scheme, to elimi-

nate any duplication and

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“overlap” of benéfits with the
proposed NHI scheme.

Apart from the fact.that this
seems to allow employers to
arbitrarily tear up any con-
tracts and agreements made
over the provision of private
health insurance for their staff,
the following clause, 14 (2), of
the Bill stipulates that “no
employer shall make any mod-
ification [to their private group
coverage] without obtaining
the prior written approval of
the Minister”. To obtain this
approval, all relevant informa-
tion and materials, including a
copy of the group health plan,
has to be sent to the Minister.

This has left business execu-
tives fearing that the Bahamas
is heading down the route of a

nanny state’, where the Govy-
ernment always determines
whatever is best for people and
seeks to regulate everything,
stifling the private sector.

Meanwhile, Mr Rolle told
The Tribune that the Govern-
ment had provided the Coali-
tion with some of the informa-
tion it had been seeking.

“We did receive on Friday
some of the documents
requested from the Ministry,
but it still doesn’t provide us
with sufficient information that
we can do the type of analysis
we’d like,” he explained.

The Coalition is especially
keen to see the actuarial stud-
ies and full report upon which
the Government has based its
$235 million cost of services
estimate for NHI. These
formed the foundation for the
eight-page summary that con-
tains all the estimates, but the
full report has never been pub-
lished.

Mr Rolle said the Govern-
ment had committed to send-
ing them more information this

week, with this newspaper

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

| and share your story.



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Save Guana Cay Reef

Association has argued that
Acting Justice Norris Carroll
was wrong to find that Wendall
Major, the National Economic
Council (NEC) secretary, had
the power to enter into the
Heads of Agreement for the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
& Ocean Club, arguing that a

BUSINESS

number of rights given to the
developers were not Cabinet’s
to confer.

That is one of the nine
grounds listed in the Associa-
tion’s appeal of the Supreme
Court ruling that permitted Dis-
covery Land Company to pro-
ceed with its Baker’s Bay pro-
ject, and which rejected all its
applications for relief, dismiss-
ing the case entirely.

Apart from the grounds

The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked to
visit the MEDICAL DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance
Board located in the Board’s Jumbey Village Complex on Baillou
Hill Road. For further information, you may contact the Department
at telephone number 502-1745:

NAME

BONABY, J acqueline
BROWN, Cedric
BURROWS, Maryann
CLARE, Alphonso
GIBBS, Maxwell
GLINTON, Theresa V.
GOMEZ, Juan Carlos

-ADDRESS

Jamaica Avenue

Kenilworth Street

. Somerset Way

South Beach
- Bernard Road

East Street South
Ivanhoe Road .

involving Mr Major, the Asso-
ciation is also alleging that the
Judge was wrong to conclude
that entering into the Heads of
Agreement was not irrational
or unreasonable, and that the
agreement “did not constitute
a fettering of the discretion of
the Cabinet”.

Acting Justice Carroll con-
cluded that Mr Major was act-
ing as an agent of the Cabinet,
and that the Heads of Agree-
ment was in principle only and
just an expression of policy.




Nine grounds cited
in Guana Cay appeal

Yet as one of the grounds of
its appeal, the Association is
arguing that a number of rights
given to the developers were
not in Cabinet’s powers to give,
falling under the local District
Council, the Treasurer, and the
Minister for Crown Lands, plus
legislation such as Town Plan-
ning, the Business Licence Act
and Hotels Encouragement
Act.

In addition, the Association is
arguing that the Supreme Court
failed to consider the environ-

FOR S ae

Beautifully landscaped and situated on the canal
with a breathtaking view, is a3 bed, two bath home.
It has an additional bedroom and bath in the garage
for a live in maid. Other amenities include 100 foot

concrete dock; 28k generator with an automatic
transfer switch; a 250 gallon water tank; automatic

gate; laundry facilities and more.... A must see!!!!
Asking $495,000 gross furnished .

Call 356-3189 and ask for Carolyn.



Marine Helpers and

e

THE TRIBUNE;

4
Th

mental impact from the Bak?
er’s Bay project, plus its impact
on Guana Cay residents and
whether it fitted in with gov?
ernment aims on these issues.’ *
The Association further
alleged that the Heads of
Agreement was not an agree-
ment in principle, as the Judge
had ruled, but gave important
rights to the developers and prey
vented: both local and centrab
government from considering
whether or not to grant the rel;
evant permits. ’

Another ground of the appeal
relates to the Association’s con-
tention that proper consultation
on the Baker’s Bay project did
not take place.

yf

CLAUSE, from 3B.

Th

understanding that most of
what was provided was already

in the public domain.

The former Chamber presi-
dent said the Bill “did not have
a significant amount of sub
stance”, except to frequently
refer to the National Insurancé
Act. Ms

The NHI plan is seen by,
some as nothing more than afr
income tax and tax on labour?
which will reduce take home
pay and disposable income for
workers. Among the likely out
comes of NHI, employers have
said, is a reduction in real
wages, increases in the costs of
goods and services, and busi-
ness cost cuts, including job

aes Persons Wanted

Harbourside Marine is looking for marine } HR ie
economy’s competitiveness. ~

helpers. Must have mechanical knowledge and There are also concerns thaf
; : the $235 million cost placed dn
strong work ethics. NHI by the Government’s pro™
ject implementation team are
far too low, and combined with
the likely problems in admin-
istering the plan through the
National Insurance Board! |
(NIB), this will mean the,
scheme is not financially viable:
or sustainable in the long-term.
It is likely that. contribution!
rates will have to be increased,,
acting as a further burden on!
disposable income, the busi-
ness community and the
Bahamian economy. i
{

MACKEY, Keyno
MAJOR, Dorothy
NAIRN, Anthony
PINDER, Deborah
STRACHAN, Herbert
WILSON, Timothy L.

losses. All would further raisé
the costs of doing business in
the Bahamas, and reduce the

Nassau Village
Elizabeth Estates
Market Street
Blue Hill Road
Faith Avenue
Sunset Park
Please fax resumes to: 394-7659



Harbourside Marine is looking for sales
person with knowledge of generators, golf
cars and the marine industry.

Must be self driven.

Please fax resume to: 394-7659



'

Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Ltd.




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a compliance and/or risk management function, and be conversant
with local and international laws and regulations.










Responsibilities will include:

Maintain a comprehensive understanding of local laws and
regulations regarding the financial services industry
Develop and maintain policies and procedures in accordance
with local laws and regulations

Establish effective monitoring and reporting programs for
policies and procedures ;
Ensure proper documentation is collected and accurately
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Provide recommendations for improvements to risk
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Only persons being interviewed for this position will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 5B



abak denies contempt claim

FROM page 1B

centres on paragraph three of

the Order issued by Justice
Lyons on November 3, before
he recused himself from hear-
ing all cases as a result of his
ruling on judicial indepen-
dence.

| The order instructs that
copies of all correspondence
and e-mails between Mr Babak
and his fellow defendant, Sir
Jack, and between the pair of
them and GBPA, Port Group
Ltd and Fiduciary Manage-

ment Services Ltd - the com-.

pany that holds the 50 per cent
of GBPA and Port Group’s
parent that is currently being
disputed - be handed to the St
George estate’s attorney, Fred
Smith of Callender’s & Co, in
preparation for a hearing on
November 20 that never hap-
pened.

In addition, ‘the order gave
Mr Smith access to all e-mail
records and allowed him to
enter the GBPA to obtain
these, provided they were not
attorney/client privileged. Doc-
uments in this category did not
have to be disclosed.

The estate is claiming that
the defendants had “failed
and/or refused to comply”, but
Mr Babak denied this in an
affidavit. filed with the
Supreme Court on November
20.

, Mr Babak confirmed details
in an affidavit submitted by
Caroline St George, daughter
of the late Edward St George’s
first wife, that his attorney,
Gregory Moss, had submitted
to Justice Lyons a November
3, 2006, letter from him con-
firming that the documents and
access will be provided.

‘Mr Babak alleged that he
had given instructions, as
GBPA and Port Group Ltd
chair, to Ian Barry, chief finan-
cial officer of both entities, to
comply, and the latter had con-
firmed that this had been done
or all necessary steps taken.

-In addition, Mr Babak said
be was, apealing for himself,

err
Ee 8,

Hi, my name is

GBPA, Port Group Ltd and
Sir Jack and his entities that
all steps had been taken to pre-
serve the necessary papers and
documents.

Alleged

However, Mr Babak alleged
that GBPA and Port Group
Ltd had been delayed in com-
plying after Mr Smith objected
to Mr Moss’s involvement in
printing and delivering records
to the estate because he did
not represent GBPA and Port
Group Ltd.

The GBPA chair said this
had caused the delay, as both
companies had been forced to



required

Agent of the Mon ts :

British _
6

ACCOUNTS CLERK

Needed for Private Christian School

Accounting Degree or solid
accounting background

Must be a mature, reliable
and honest team player
Must be computer literate

Must have excellent
people skills

Please fax resume & cover letter.

Fax# 325-3260.

hire Thomas Evans QC to
review documents and see
whether they were subject to
attorney/client privilege, a
process still ongoing.

Mr Babak also promised
that no materials had been
destroyed or removed from the
GBPA, and that no electronic
records would be tampered
with, having promised Mr
Smith that a computer techni-
cian of his choice would be
allowed in to verify no e-mail
records would be deleted.

Yet as at November 14, Car-
oline St George had alleged
that no papers or documents
had been received from Mr
Babak, Sir Jack and his entities

























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Freepart 242-392-7288 Exuma 242-438-3635

despite repeated requests to
do so.

Nor had any documents
been received from Mr Evans
on behalf of Port Group Ltd
and GBPA.

Distributed by Lowe’s Wholesale, Soldier Rd.

Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that KATHIA FELIMA OF EAST
BROUGHAM STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and_ Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why. registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.





¢ 393-7111.» Fax: 393-0440

ACREAGE FOR SALE

The Property is located off Fox Hil Road in the vicinity of Prince Charles Drive,
The parcel is a parallelogram in shape, is on a level awe and contains 16. 32

acres.

All that piece, parcel, or lot of land being lots #841 & 82 being bounded onthe
north by Springfield Read running thereon One Thousand One Hundred and
Eighteen and Sixteen Hundredths (1,448.16) feet, on the east by lot number 83
running thereon five hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (687.80)
~feet, on the south by land running thereon nine hundred and seventy-seven
and fen hundredths (977.10) feet, and one the west by lot number 52 running
thereon five hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (587.80) feet.

PLOT PLAN

The property is for sale by owner. No agents. Asking price is One Million Five
Hundred Thousand (B$1,500,000.00) dollars net. The right is reserved to

any and or all offers. All offers to be submitted | in writing by December 31%,
006 to:-

Acreage for sale
clo P. 0. Box N-8097
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE \



JoB VACANCY

QUEEN’S COLLEGE

Has an immediate vacancy for an Accounts Clerk

The major duties of the Clerk will include:

e Ordering of books and related teaching supplies
and materials for all sections of the school
Receiving/Checking/Distribution of books and
supplies to the relevant sections of the school
Preparation of payment for local and international
suppliers
Maintaining accurate relevant accounting files

The successful candidate will:

demonstrate effective communication and
interpersonal skills

be able to work with minimum supervision

be a multi-tasker, in this very busy office

be able to work on weekends and holidays if -
necessary

The starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications
and experience. We offer a competitive benefits package,

including gratuity, pension, health insurance, discount on

children’s tuition.

Queen’s College was established in Nassau in 1890 by
The Methodist Church and is a member of The International
Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges and
Universities (IAMSCU).

Resumes, covering letters and application forms can be
returned to:

The Office of The Principal
‘Queen’s College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas

or emailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com

more information can be obtained at our award

winning website www.qchenceforth.com.
BAHAMIANS ONLY NEED APPLY



WE’RE MOVING

Royal Bank of Canada Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited is
pleased to announce that on
December 4, 2006 it will be
changing its place of business to

Royal Bank

of Canada
Trust Company
is on the move

Bayside Executive Park

Floor 2, Building #3

Blake Road and West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 702 5900
Fax (242) 327 7382

The postal address for the
company will remain

PO Box N-3024

Nassau, NP, Bahamas

Royal Bank
of Canada’

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

Dias mark of Royal Bank
The Lion & Globe sy:nbol and RB

GLOBAL PRIVATE BANKING



National Health sums

‘just don’t add up’

FROM page 1B

assuming that the cost of ser-
vices would remain unchanged
despite a 20 per cent rise in
usage.

He questioned whether, if
NHI’s costs dramatically
exceeded the Government’s
$235 million projection, med-
ical services and benefits avail-
able to NHI members would
be cut to contain these costs.

“The costs don’t change?
Sounds strange doesn’t it? We

-don’t need a mathematician to

figure out that increased utili-
sation of services will mean
increased costs to supply those
needs,” Dr Rollins argued.

“Could it be that govern-
ment intends to deny Bahami-
ans access to needed medical
services in.an effort to contain
costs? Even if maths usually
hurts'your head, it is elemen-
tary to see that the proposed
NHI numbers just don’t add
up.

“No, this is not a fight
between the rich and the poor,
this is a fight to get this thing
right. If we don’t get it right,
guess who will pay the price of
grossly underestimating the
costs of NHI: every single
Bahamian; rich and poor;
young and old; this generation

’ and those yet unborn.”

Head

The BDA head emphasised
that he was neither pro-FNM
not pro-PLP, saying he could
not be accused of having a
vested interest, as dentistry was
one of the benefits excluded
from NHI. _

And Dr Rollins added: “The
Government is extremely
unsure of what the true costs of
NHI will be. There has been
insufficient research done to
accurately determine the true

* costs of this plan:”

Dr Rollins said the Govern-

’ $1 per day proposal: “

ment’s uncertainty over the
plan’s true costs came from the
fact that it had suddenly
altered the proposed contribu-
tion rates for pensioners.
Initially, the Government
and its project implementation
team had said all pensioners
would pay $1 per day for cov-
erage under NHI. Yet in his
address to the nation last week,
Dr Bernard Nottage, minister
of health and national insur-
ance, revealed that pensioners
with a “substantial income”
would pay 2.65 per cent of this

_ to NHI, with those on a lesser

income not having to “pay a
copper”.

*Dr Rollins said of the initial
One big
problem, though. They realised
that pensioners, many of whom
only receive $200 per month
from National Insurance,
would be.paying just as much
as employed Bahamians mak-
ing $1200 per month.

“The NHI steering commit-

tee realised that a gross over- |

sight had been made, which
forced them to take another
look at the NHI proposal,
because their contribution for-
mula was fundamentally
flawed, would neither be equi-
table nor fair in sharing costs,
and would in fact be hurting
the very same people the plan
was designed to help.

“Now we are being told by
the minister of health that
‘pensioners who experience
(financial) difficulties will not
have to.pay. a copper’. Why
does it seem as though this
plan has not been given proper
consideration as to what it will
really cost, and who will and
won't have to pay for it? Could
it be that our leaders just real-
ly do not know?”

Dr Rollins and the BDA
have frequently voiced con-
cerns about the inaccuracy in
estimating healthcare costs in
the Bahamas, arguing that
poor récord keeping in the
public health institutions has

increased “the prospect for
gross inaccuracies in the NHI
cost estimates”.

They pointed out that the
Government’s own Blue Rib-
bon Commission, in its 2004
report on NHI, noted that

financial data had been diffi-

cult to obtain, “and has forced
management in the public
health system to employ guess
work when making. critical
decisions”.

As a result, the BDA ques-
tioned whether NHI’s cost-esti-
mates could be accepted as
reliable.

Addition

In addition, Dr Rollins also"

pointed to the 1995 contract
signed between the Govern-
ment and Physicians Alliance
Management (PAML) - a 10-
year partnership under which
the Public Hospitals:Authority
would provide the premises,
utilities and human resources,
and PAML provide the private
health care services, with the
profits split 50/50.

Yet the BDA said .that in
2003, the Government suffered
a $553,903 loss from this part-
nership, which the Blue Rib-
bon Commission said did not
generate enough revenue to
cover costs. —

The BDA said: “When one
compares the return on invest-
ment ratio in this equity part-
nership, one realises that of the
$3.189 million invested by the
Government in 2003, the
$553,903 loss represents an
approximate 17 per shortfall.

“We cannothelp but extrap-
olate how a similar 17 per cent
miscalculation for the costs

implementing the proposed

NHI would impact its potential
real cost. A 17 per cent deficit
would equate to an underesti-
mation of some $41 million,
meaning that Bahamas could
be asked very quickly to pay
an additional $328" per ‘year in
contributions.” ;

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) and
Galanis & Company

CPD Seminar:
Taxation - A Global
Comparison

British Colonial Hilton Hotel
#1 Bay Steet, Nassau

Wednesday 29 November 2006
3:00am - 1:00pm
Registration staris af 8.30 a.m.

US$150

3 CPD units



Galanis
& Company

The seminar will be conducted by Chas Roy-Chowdhury,
Head of Taxation at ACCA. He has a degree in Applied Economics
and is a fellow of ACCA. He warked in public practice from 1980
until 1991 when he joined ACCA Technical Department.
He has made presentations on key international tax issues to

_ the European Parliament and International conference venues
as well as lectured for ACCA extensively on Anti Money Laundering,
IFRS and other programmes,on ACCA courses and
for lis tax exams in China .

To book or for information, please contact John Bain at Galanis & Co:
328-4540; Fax: 328-4377 or the ACCA Caribbean Office, Email:
_ info@wi.accaglobal.com / www.accaglobal.com

BAHAMAS HOT MIX

Asphalt Products Manufacturer
Civil Engineering Contractor

Now Hiring For Abaco Projects
NB: Personnel To Be Hired In Abaco

Nassau Office

Airport Industrial Park
Po Box Cb 10990
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 377-6351
Fax: (242) 377-2193

Dump Truck Drivers
‘Excavator Operators
Dozer Operators
General Labourers

Abaco Office

Airport Roundabout

P.O. Box AB-20184

Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 367-3956

Fax: (242) 367-3959



\

'
\



>

-. THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBEH 2/, Zuuo, rAuc sD



Employers urged to help
combat domestic violence

FROM page 1B

ductivity, Assistant Superinten-
| dent Sands said: “It’s important
“that top managers know how to
‘ deal with workers affected by
‘ domestic violence.”
~ To help combat domestic vio-
‘' lence, Assistant Superintendent
~ Sands urged employers to
establish policies and proce-
dures that would allow work-
*. ers, in confidence, to disclose if
-'they were suffering from
‘s domestic violence, and to
ensure that advance warnings
and pictures of alleged perpe-
trators were passed to the com-
pany’s security guards.
She-also encouraged employ-
', ers to sponsor workshops on
1 domestic violence, and to estab-
, lish employee assistance pro-
‘, grammes.
«Meanwhile, Superintendent
, Keith Bell said that for the first
10 months of 2006 to October
,. end, shopbreaking incidents had
_+ risen by 11 per cent compared.
, to the same period in 2005,
‘implying that crimes against

business property, such as
break-ins, were on the rise.
However, while six business-
men and employees had been
murdered in 2005 as a result of

attempted armed robberies at _

their place of work, this had fall-
en to just two for the first 10
months of 2006.
With cash the favourite targe
for armed robbers, accounting
for 63 per cent of what was
stolen in all 2005 armed rob-
beries, Superintendent Bell
warned businesses to be care-
ful when handling; transporting
or depositing large sums of cash.
“It raises the very real ques-
tion as to whether it is an inside
job, with people monitoring
you,” he said. “You make your-

. self more vulnerable to atten-

tion when you accumulate large
sums of cash.”
Superintendent Bell urged
Bahamian businesses to ensure
they maintained all surveillance
and anti-crime technology,
revealing that in several cases
where the police had attempted
to investigate robberies, the

LONG-TERM BENEFIT CHEQUES

Closed Circuit Television
(CCTV) system in stores did
not have film in to record the
perpetrators.

“Some are not doing their job
by checking the film is in the
camera,” Superintendent Bell
said. “You can have the best,
but if you do not have checks
and balances on a daily basis,
it defeats the purpose.”

He added that the installa-
tion of a CCTV system in down-
town Nassau, a prime tourist
destination, was “a work in
progress”, the police and Nas-
sau Tourism and Development
Board (NTDB) had visited oth-
er countries such as Ottawa to
see how such systems worked.

Chief Superintendent Hulan
Hanna told the seminar that
while there were civil liberties
concerns about CCTV use,
“their usefulness is far more
overwhelming than the down-
side”.

He added that the police
were also looking at holding
special seminars on crime pre-

vention for street vendors, an .

The names of persons with outstanding Long-Term Benefit cheques are listed
below. These persons are kindly asked to collect their cheque(s) from the
Pensions Department of the WULFF ROAD LOCAL OFFICE.

For further information, you may contact the Department at telpehone number

356-2070:

NAME
BAZARD, Lucito
BROWN, Violet
DARVILLE, Elizabeth
EDWARDS, Cardinal
GOODMAN, Marjorie
JOHNSON, Anthony
JOHNSON, Shanara.
KNOWLES, Herbert

' MARTIN, Geoffrey
MILLER, Albert
MILLER, Sandra
SANDS, Sherie

WILLIAMSON, Dwight

Oe

we

ro a

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ADDRESS
Regency Park
Kemp Road
Dorsette Street
Golden Gates
Nassau Village
Bruce Avenue :
Miami Street
Durham Street
Claire Street
Sea Hawk Drive
Wilson Tract

- Sisal Street
Lincoln Boulevard









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expanding sector of the
Bahamian economy.
Superintendent Bell said the
switch from traditional paper
to computers, situated in web
shops and web cafes, had made

it much harder for the police to
combat Numbers Houses, espe-
cially given that the computer
servers were situated in foreign
companies.

The police were also assessing

how to improve the quality of
service delivered by private
security companies, as “more

. and more, it is becoming obvi-

ous we need to improve quali-
ty”.

ey (Cololle wen
Management Career
Oyen aan

Exclusive property requires a General Manager to coordinate and
oversee the day to day functioning of the homeowners’

association including:

Management of staff and sub-contractors
Property maintenance, including building
and landscaping Administration

Successful candidate must possess proven managerial skills and
knowledge of construction industry practices.

Excellent salary and benefits package commensurate

with experience.

Please fax resumes to (242) 362-4107

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shopping and keep the
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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

Ce ee

Rik BE EE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

_ GREAT PROGRESS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
GREAT PROGRESS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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Act Now!!! | Act Now!!!

Call Today: 325-6461 ext 256

Email: shavarinvestment@coralwave.com

Upperlevel Town Center Mall




































OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME
MINISTER AND MINISTRY OF
NATIONAL SECURITY

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR SECURITY SERVICE
STRAW MARKET
BAY STREET

1) The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister
invites Tenders from security companies to supply
security services fot the Downtown Straw Market fora
-period of twelve months (1 year) with effect from Ist
January 2007. Hours for security coverage of the
Market are from 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.

2) Interested persons or companies may collect tender
specifications from the Office of the Deputy Prime
Minister and Ministry of National Security, 3rd Floor -
Churchill Building, Bay Street between the hours of
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday
beginning Monday, 20 th November 2006.

| 3) Tenders are to be in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Security, Straw Market” and delivered to
the attention of:

The Permanent Secretary
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister &
Ministry of National Security
P.O. Box N-3217
Churchill Building
Nassau, Bahamas

4) All Tenders must received by 4:00 p.m. Friday, 8th
2006, accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current
business licence.

5) The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister reserves
the right to accept or reject any or all Tender(s).



lip-offs lead to $1.3bn in fraud

: Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers

ee

Seta eh att
behind the news,
read Insight Mondays





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMOND CHARLES OF
MILTON STREET, P.O. BOX CB-13015, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











Legal Notice

NOTICE

KAIZER INTERNATIONAL LTD.
—o—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
KAIZER INTERNATIONAL LID.
’ has been completed; a Certificate of
» Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

“NOTICE

SYGEN TECHNOLOGY LTD.

- Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
. 2000, the dissolution of
SYGEN TECHNOLOGY LID.
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MYCENE HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance wi... Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
MYCENE HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







Resort & Spa

- “~~ Recruiting

Passionate, Personable and Honest

Individuals have a least 3 years experience in the
Hospitality Industry to fill the following
positions:

Executive Chef
Food and Beverage Manager
Boutique Manager
Room Division Manager
Spa Manager
Spa Therapist
Entertainment Coordinator
- Concierge
Receptionist ©...
Maitre D 4
Bartenders —
Waiters
Housekeeping
Bellman

All applications are appreciated but only qualified
individuals will be considered. Applications must
be received before December 4, 2006. Our email

address is stephmresort@ yahoo.com or you can
mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ENTERPRISING ENTERPRISES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
ENTERPRISING ENTERPRISES LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ASHTON LYD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that inaccordance with Section 138 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000

ASHTON LTD., is in dissolution, as of November 23, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box !777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Exclusive Boutique |



wo re tle BR A oR ea a RET aa ae a OR

Le ASS te HR a

Ce i i EE A ie lb a i RS BE Re a RR Sea a MB

ee a a ett

Bien ie eae aoe



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 9B

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



Ministry Of Transport and Aviation

Road Traffic Department

NOTICE

Results of The Franchise Renewal Sitting of the Road Traffic Authority Board held at
‘ Worker’s House, Tonique Williams-Darling Highway on Thursday, 26" October, 2006 at

. NAME

DESCRIPTION
OF FRANCHISE

NUMBER = STATUS

SELF DRIVE SCOOTERS



10:00 am. : : wet oy
10. Ursula Coakley SD Scooters 90 NO ATTENDANCE
, Faithia Investment Ltd.
The under-mentioned persons or their representatives were in attendance:- Nassau Bahamas
NAME DESCRIPTION NUMBER = STATUS 11. Julia Turnquest SD Scooters 30 = INATTENDANCE
OF FRANCHISE J & S Scooters
Nassau Bahamas
PRIVATE SCHEDULE SERVICE (SCHOOL BUS
12. Robert Allen SD Scooters 4 ‘NO ATTENDANCE

_ 1. Forbes Bus Service
General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas

Strachan’s Bus Service
P.O. Box N-10389
Nassau Bahamas

Private School Bus

Private School Bus

Private School Bus

2 IN ATTENDANCE

2 IN ATTENDANCE

Nassau Bahamas

13. Brenton Rolle
Nassau Bahamas

14. William Simms
Sunshine Scooter
Nassau Bahamas

SD Scooters

SD Scooters

3 NO ATTENDANCE

15 NO ATTENDANCE

3. Leroy Bowe 9 INATTENDANCE 15. Judy Smith SD Scooters 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Bowe’s Transportation Two A’s Scooter Rental
P.O. Box N515 Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas
‘ SELF DRIVE CARS
4. Lilymae Mcdonald Private School Bus 2 NO ATTENDANCE
Mackado Bus Service 1. Franklyn Ferguson SD Cars 20 IN ATTENDANCE
P.O. Box N 9371 P.O. Box SB 51923 : :
Sea Breeze Estate
5. Antonio Edwards Private School Bus 4 NO ATTENDANCE :
P.O. Box N8898 2. Collingwood Armbrister SD Cars - 15. NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas P.O.Box CB 1 1007. : t
Nassau Bahamas
6. On Time Fabulous Transportation Private School Bus 2 NO ATTENDANCE er :
Nassau Bahamas ; 3. Airport Rent A Car SD Cars 113 IN ATTENDANCE
; Bahamas Rent A Car SD Cars 25
7. Craig Wilmore Private School Bus 4 NO ATTENDANCE Hillview Holdings Ltd é SD Cars 30
Three kings Nassau U Drive It Service SD Cars 4
P.O. Box N7264 P.O..Box 1615
8. Anthony Weech Private School Bus 1 NO ATTENDANCE 4. Matthew Ferguson SD Cars 18 IN ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas . Millenium Car Rental : .
P.O. Box CB 12109
9. Samuel Woodside Private School Bus . 5 IN ATTENDANCE 5. Stephen Heastie: SD Cars 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Classical Transportation Heastie Rent a Car
‘Nassau Bahamas P.O. Box N 110
: : 6. Sanco Car Rental SD Cars 24 . INATTENDANCE
10. Mark Moss 2 wi ag wu « Private School Bus 3 IN ATTENDANCE P.O Box EE 15073
nae ae Servige elie Nassau Bahamas
.O. OX Rig Ce RS ROY UGA rem &
Nassau Bahamas: 7. Ricardo Hamilton SD Cars 10. =NOATTENDANCE
K &G Enterpris
11. Dorrington Poitier Private School Bus 1. INATTENDANCE P.O. Box Grae
Nassau Bahamas aa
; gees. 8. Taddeus Thompson SD Cars 35 NO ATTENDANCE
12. Harrison Moxey I Private School Bus 1 IN ATTENDANCE Teglo Rentals
Hieon Fu Serie’ P.O. Box CB-13694
Nassau Bahamas
\ red 9. Sidney Mckenzie SD Cars 80 IN ATTENDANCE
13. Glen Rolle Private School Bus 1 ; NO ATTENDANCE P.O.Box N1603
Hillside Bus Service Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas
. 10 Wille Moss SD Cars 6 NO ATTENDANCE
14, Jefferey Myers Private School Bus 2 IN ATTENDANCE P.O. Box SS 19451
Jasmine Transit Nassau Bahamas ‘
Nassau Bahamas
‘ x d 11. M &M Virgo Car Rental SD Cars 168 INATTENDANCE
15. Linda C. Carey Private School Bus 1 IN ATTENDANCE P.O. Box N1702
Nassau Bahamas _ Nassau Bahamas
16. Three Kings Private School Bus 2 - NO ATTENDANCE 12. Pemmie Sutherland SD Cars 5 NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas : P.O. Box 1962
: Nassau Bahamas
17. Norman Dean Private School Bus 3 NO ATTENDANCE
Three N’s Bus Service 13. A & G Car Rental SD Cars 20 = INATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas Nassau Bahamas
18 Wenzel Miller Private School Bus ey IN ATTENDANCE 14. Samuel Knowles SD Cars 35 NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas A 1 Car Rental
+ : : ‘ Nassau Bahamas
19. Carla Bastian Private School Bus 2 IN ATTENDANCE :
P.O. Box N 1779 15, Asa Bethel SD Cars 25 © NOATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas AJ Rent A Car
Nassau Bahamas
SELF DRIVE SCOOTERS 16. Ace Rent A Car SD Cars 3 NO ATTENDANCE
_ - -Nassau Bahamas
1. Bowe Car Investment SD Scooters 50 IN ATTENDANCE
P.O. Box AP 59217 17. Adderley Car Rental SD Cars 9 NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas Nassau Bahamas
2. M&M Virgo Car Rental SD Scooters 50 INATTENDANCE i8. Jamal Davis SD Cars 13. IN ATTENDANCE
P.O. Box N1702 Adrana’s Car Rental
Nassau Bahamas Nassau Bahamas
3. Sheaderon Thompson SD Scooter 15. INATTENDANCE 19. Adventure Jeep Rental SD Cars 3 NO ATTENDANCE
Alpha Scooter Rental Nassau Bahamas
P.O. Box CR 54870
20. George Kerr SD Cars 20 NO ATTENDANCE
4. Allan Forbes SD Scooters 16 NO ATTENDANCE All (M) Auto
All Season Cycle Rental Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas
21. Auto To Go Rental’ SD Cars 3 NO ATTENDANCE
5. Cedric Cadet SD Scooters 22 NO ATTENDANCE Nassau Bahamas
BNB Scooter Rental
Nassau Bahamas 22. Brian & Paulette Higgs SD Cars 20 IN ATTENDANCE
; BPB Auto Sales & Rental
6. William Simms SD Scooter 9 NO ATTENDANCE De eevreranee
Brown Brothers ;
Nassau Bahamas 23. Destiny Car Rentals SD Cars 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Gary Cox
7. Colan Knowles SD Scooters 4B NO ATTENDANCE P.O. Box SS-6273
Nassau Bahamas iNassau, Bahamas
8. William Curtis SD Scooters 5 NO ATTENDANCE 24. ee eee SD Cars 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Curtis Scooter Rental aa
NascapBalamas Nassau Bahamas
Diane lelest Wisedside SD Scooters 2 a EN ANGE 25. West Bay Rent A Car SD Cars | 12 NO ATTENDANCE
DK Rental P.O. Box CB 11111
Nassnu Baharins Nassau Bahamas
\ ;
' } \



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

NAME

DESCRIPTION

OF FRANCHISE

SELF DRIVE CARS

26 Danco Rentals
P.O. Box N 1081
Nassau Bahamas

SD Cars

PRIVATE CHARTER

1. Joseph Forbes
General Delivery
Nassau Bahamas

2. Leon Rahming
Kenwood Street
Nassau Bahamas

3. Charles Storr
C&S Private Charter
P.O. Box N-1476

4. Larry Bastian
Sun Fun
P.O. Box N-448

5. Prince Livingston
P.O. Box N-8970
Nassau Bahamas

6. Hugo Barry
William Street
Nassau Bahamas

7. Michael Symonette
P.O. Box N4846
Nassau Bahamas

8. Sonia Bowe-Adderley
P.O. Box SS5454, ©
Nassau Bahamas

9. Errington Hanna
P.O. Box SS5646
Nassau Bahamas

‘10. Stephen O. Symonette
Nassau Bahamas .

~ 11. Richard Thompson
P.O. Box SS2000
Nassau Bahamas

12. Evangelist Mcphee
P.O Box N7999
Nassau Bahamas

13 Richard Moss
Leisure Travel & Tour
P.O. Box SS19057
Nassau Bahamas

. 13 Colin Bowe
Bowtie Tours
P.O. Box N8246
Nassau Bahamas

14. Bahamas Taxi Cab Union
P.O. Box N 1077
Nassau Bahamas

15. Emerald Gréen Sightseeing Ltd.

P.O. Box N-1077
Nassau Bahamas

16. Majestic Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau Bahamas

17. Howard Johnson Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau Bahamas

18. Dan Knowles Tour Ltd
P.O. Box N1081
Nassau Bahamas -

19. Prince Livingston
Nassau Bahamas

20. Kenneth Johnson
Nassau Bahamas

1. Alexander Burrows
Burrows Transportation
P.O. Box N-3477

N

David Strachan
Strachans Bus Service
P.O. Box N10389

3. Sherwon Williams
Gleniston Gardens
P.O. Box GT-2212

4. Stafford Nairn
Golden Gates #2
P.O. Box SS-6737

5. Forbes Bus Service
. General Delivery
Kool Acres

6. Harrison Moxey
Nassau Bahamas

_ Frankie Bus Service
P.O. Box SB 51923
Sea Breeze

~

8. Anthony Newbold
P.O. Box N 439
Nassau Bahamas

9. Sherwin Brown
Al’s Bus Service
P.O. Box N-9231

10, Elkin Davis
P.O. Box FH14516
Nassau Bahamas

10. Louis Major
P.O. Box SS-6567
Nassau Bahamas

11 Allan Russell
A and R Bus Service |
P.O. Box FH 14277

12 Sealy Bus Service
Rickey Sealy
P.O. Box CR56729

Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter
Private Citas.

. Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

ITNE

Jitney
‘Jitney
Jitney

Jitney

' Jitney

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney

Jitney

NUMBER STATUS
6 TN ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
2 NG oe
1 NO ATTENDANCE
3 NO ATTENDANCE
5 NO STENDANEE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
11 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
2 = NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANS
2 ‘IN ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
41 INATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
19 —_ INATTENDANCE
15 IN ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
5 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE
8 IN ATTENDANCE
7 3 IN ATTENDANCE. |
5 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE
1 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
1 IN er
2 IN ATTENDANCE
8 . IN ATTENDANCE
6 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE

13. Glinton’s Bus Service
Benjamin A Glinton
P. O. Box N126

14. Shirley Clarke
Clarke’s Bus Service
P.O. Box. N3913

15. Dianne Evans
Gerald Bartlett Estate
General Delivery

16. Tyrone Swaby
P.O. Box SS-6951
Nassau Bahamas

17. Cleveland Stuart
Clevelin Company Ltd
P.O. Box SS 6030

18. Deans Transportation
P.O Box N 3456
Nassau Bahamas

19. Thomas Lightbourne
P.O. Box SB50788
Nassau Bahamas

20. Hilton Mcintosh
P.O. Box N7386
Nassau Bahamas

21. Alvin’s Bus Service
P.O. Box N7656
Nassau Bahamas

22. Patricia Lightbourne-Dole
P.O. Box GT2897
‘Nassau Bahamas.

23. Harold Adderley
P.O Box SB 50953
Nassau Bahamas

24 Alvin Burrows
P.O. Box N3477
Nassau Bahamas

25. Browns Bus Service
General Delivery
Nassau Bahamas

26 Sean Galanos
Petrina’s Bus
P.O. Box N EE15030

27 Sonnie Taylor
P.O Box CR55275
Nassau Bahamas

28 Isaiah Nathan
P.O. Box CR55275
Nassau Bahamas

29 Richard Moss
D.J Transportation
P.O. Box $S19057
Nassau Bahamas

30. Lawrence Thurston
Thurston Bus Service
P.O. Box 56174
Nassau Bahamas

31 Cedrick Smith ;
Desario’s Bus Service
P.O. Box EE17067
Nassau Bahamas

32. Samuel Woodside
Classical Transportation
Nassau Bahamas

33. Audley Turnquest
A.J. Transportation
General Delivery -
Nassau Bahamas

34. Arron Woodside
Aaron’s Bus Service
P.O. Box SB 50441
Nassau Bahamas

35. Adrian Fox
Adrian’s Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

36. Alicia Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

37. Shervin Brown
Al’s Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

38. Arthur Archer
Archer Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

39. George Forbes
Aries Co. Train Express
Nassau Bahamas

40. Barry Ferguson
BB Transit
Nassau Bahamas

41. Leslie Rolle
B.L.L. Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

42. Basil Woodside
Bahamas Jitney Service
Nassau Bahamas

43. Bridgette Barrett
P.O. Box FH 14294
Nassau Bahamas

44. James Lewis
Big Lou Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

45. Lambert Rahming
Convenient City Transit
Nassau Bahamas

46. Patricia Deveaux
Courtesy Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

DESCRIPTION

OF FRANCHISE

JITNEY

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
_ Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney

Jitney _

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney

Jitney

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

NUMBER STATUS

1 IN ATTENDANCE

1 IN ATTENDANCE
1 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE

14 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE

1‘ NO ATTENDANCE

5 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO acrENDENCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1 IN ATTENDANCE

2 NO ATTENDANCE

2 NO ATTENDANCE
5 IN ATTENDANCE .
1 IN ATTENDANCE

3 Ne APPEARANCE |

17 IN ATTENDANCE

2. NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
1 IN es
2 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1° NOATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE

16 NO ATTENDANCE

2 NO ATTENDANCE



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DME NREE Mo

SR Ta TR I SR RE ae RR

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47. Teresa Knowles
Davis Bus Line
Nassau Bahamas

48. Wayde Forbes
Nassau Bahamas

49. Derek Davis
Davis Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

50. Robert Bethel
Daytolla’s Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

51. Erick Ferguson
E & B Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

52. Alexander Walkes
P.O. Box N35
Nassau Bahamas

53. Clarence Ferguson
P.O. Box 9117
Nassau Bahamas

54 Ivan Bowe
IB Transportation
P.O. Box N9117
Nassau Bahamas

55 Arlington King
Q K Bus Service
‘Nassau Bahamas

56. Hercules Rolie
Herks Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

57. Nassau City Transit
P.O. Box SS6982
Nassau Bahamas

58 Franklyn P Rolle
' Eestacy Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

. 59, Henry Sears

Rahad Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

60. Avan Wilson -
A.W. Transportation
Nassau Bahamas

61. ‘Lavon A. Harris
Quality Transit
P.O. Box N3913

62. Samuel Woodside
Classical Transportation
Nassau Bahamas

63; Clatance Moss Jr.
Tuff Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

64. Roy Deal
Nassau Bahamas

'- 65. Vernon Deal

Nassau Bahamas

66. Arthur Deal
Nassau Bahamas

: 67. Ferlin Henfield

Touch of Class
Nassau Bahamas

68. John Thurston
Comfort Auto
Nassau Bahamas

69 Minerva Edwards
Four Star Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

Sonia Bowe — Adderely
Island Escape Tours
P.O: Box SS-5454 ©

2. Errington Hanna

P.O. Box SS5646
Nassau Bahamas

3. Harry Tinker
P.O. Box N1503
Nassau Bahamas

4. Terry Delancy he
P.O. Box N 1702
Nassau Bahamas

5. Leisure Travel & Tours
P.O. Box 19057
Nassau Bahamas

6. Bowtie Tours
P.O Box N 8246
Nassau Bahamas

7. Happy Tours Ltd.
. P.O. Box N-1077
Nassau Bahamas

8. Island Sun Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau Bahamas

9. Majestic Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau, Bahamas -

10. Siri 2000 LTD
P.O. Box CB12396
Nassau Bahamas

11. Dan Knowles
P.O. Box N1081
Nassau Bahamas

12. Howard Johnson
Nassau Bahamas

13. Steven Symonette
Nassau Bahamas

14. Bahamas Experience
Nassau Bahamas

DESCRIPTION

OF FRANCHISE

JITNEY
Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney ©
Jitney

Jitney

Jitney-~’
Jitney
Jitney
~ Jitney
Jitney.....
Jitney
Jitney
‘Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney

J itney

TOUR CAR

Tour Car

Tour Car

Tour Car —

Tour Car

Tour Car...

Tour Car
Tour Car
Tour Car

Tour Car

Tour Car
Tour Car

Jour Car
Tour Car

Tour Car

THE TRIBUNE
NUMBER STATUS
3 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
17 IN ATTENDANCE
5 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
FROM page 1B
1 NO ATTENDANCE rigs’ ‘ : gk
base, first with a $25 million
- rights issue, and therra- $15 mil-
lion preference share issue.
3 NO ATTEND Both were oversubscribed.
a Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national saw its loan book and
advances to customers increase
2 IN by more than $100 million. to
Meee $452.69 million in the year to
June 30, 2006, with the bank
attributing its mortgage cam-.
eee» ff pag as the reason it captured
“Eee : 25 per cent of all mortgages
4 ap PLNPENGe issued by Bahamian commer-
cial banks that year.
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
1 _national said in its 2006 annual
TN ALTENDANCE report that the rate of growth
“jn its loan book rose to 28.45
per cent in fiscal 2006, com-
pared to 17.74 per cent the pre-
1 NO ATTENDANCE vious year.
It added that despite enjoy-
ing “phenomenal growth”, the
-bank’s asset quality rose from
4 IN ATTENDANCE 3.44 per cent to 2.44 per cent in
‘2006, described as “the best
__ level for the last 10-years”:~-~--
ae a aS are Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
1 . INATTENDANCE national reaffirmed it remained
committed to its long-time core
lending niches, mortgages and
1 IN ATTENDANCE
ee”) TNE en
Life; Ss RUATTENDANCE For the stories
behind the news,
2 : cere Ce Mele [a1 4
on Mondays
1

12

\o

15

=i IN) ATTENDANCE





MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 11B

commercial and industrial

loans.

Al Jarrett, its chairman, said
that at year-end, mortgages
accounted for 81 per cent of
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional’s 2006 loan book growth,
with commercial loans taking
up 10 per cent and consumer
loans 9 per cent. At 2006 year-
end, mortgages took up 52.24
per cent of all the bank’s loans.

The bank added: “The
growth in the loan portfolio,

ances in the industry, present-
ed certain challenges for the’
bank in 2006.”

It said that it used funds
from capital sources to allevi-
ate this, with total deposits ris-
ing by 15.82 per cent or just
over $60 million.

In his message to sharehold-.

_ers, Paul McWeeney, Bank of

the Bahamas International’s
managing director, confirmed
that credit growth throughout
‘the commercial banking indus-
try had impacted system liq-
uidity, and this had “influenced

_-higher-deposit rates a8 Well”.

He’ added that the bank’s
Board had approved plans to
open two new branches - one
in Cat Island, the other for
southwestern New Providence.

Mr McWeeney said the.
bank’s efficiency ratio had
improved from 65.82 per cent
to 58.07 per cent in 2006, show-
ing Bank of the Bahamas
International had contained
non-interest expenses and
overall costs despite its growth.

Interest expenses rose by
20.78 per cent in fiscal 2006,

with the “imbalances” in com- _

mercial banking liquidity and
“withholding of funds by
investors, in anticipation of cer-
tain major private and public
offerings”, putting pressure on
deposit rates.












IN ATTENDANCE qonad’} ateyin’. (ba ( gaitoaiiig te WOOO) Hasina Ete
: : GN-44t |
IN ATTENADANCE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS Leg
: NOTICE :
-IN ATTENDANCE -- Sane oP eee
_. THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
a ee (CHAPTER 326) ey “
IN ATTENDANCE —_ oT 2
It is Hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement 3
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products should #
be declared "APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purposes of that Act. =
IN ATTENDANCE Ee oe ; ; 4
INATTENDANCE |
No Attendance
IN ATTENDANCE
It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 Of the Industries Encouragement e
Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about to consider whether the manufacturer i
IN ATTENDANCE specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an is
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER" in relation to the products specified in the i
third column. ee ea ee re &
MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS fon
FACTORY PREMISES bs
IN ATTENDANCE | . E
| Western Hardware & Airport industrial Park Metal Stud &
Lumber New Providence Track Forming
The Bahamas
IN ATTENDANCE
EE eNe Any interested person having any objection to these deciarations should 3
give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of n
the Ministry of Financial Services.and investments, before,” 29" November, ea
AN ATEENSA RE 2006, by letter addressed to :- ;
THE PERMANENT SECRETARY 7
THE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES & INVESTMENTS a
IN ATTENDANCE P.O. Box N-7770 .
NASSAU, N. P., a
THE BAHAMAS %
IN TTENDANCE <
Signed: me
IN ATTENDANCE .
rte Sa Ns SHEILA CAREY
PERMANENT SECRETARY vs
Rear nARee MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS "
IN ATTENDANCE 5


















Bank to double
capital to $100m

Meanwhile, Bank -of- the
Bahamas International’s capi-
tal to asset ratio stood at 13.72
per cent at 2006 year-end, com-
pared to 9.79 per cent the pre-
vious year, something the bank
said was “substantially above
the 5 per cent standard estab-.
lished by the Central Bank of
the Bahamas”.

When it came to risk-adjust-
ed capital, for Tier 1 and total
capital ratios, at June 30, 2006,
these stood at 20.18 per cent

_ together with liquidity-imbal——and 24.26 per cent respectively,”

well above the minimums of 4

per cent and 8 per cent.
During fiscal 2006, Bank of

the Bahamas International said

’ its loan book growth helped to

fuel a 29:59 per cent increase in
interest income to $ 35.295 mil-
lion from $27.239 million.

Net interest income, which
is interest income minus inter-
est expense, rose by $5.761 mil-
lion or 35.57 per cent.,

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national added that the loan
portfolio growth forced it: to

increase its net provision for. -

“Joan losses, that provision now

standing at 1.42 per cent ofall
loans - some $2.692 million -
and: advances compared to 1
per cent a year earlier. ;
Non-interest income, Bank
of the Bahamas International
added, would be a key focus
in its efforts to increase prof-
itability, having grown this'by
almost 27 per cent in fiscal
2006, due largely to fees con-
nected with its mortgage peort-
folio. »
The bank added that non-
interest expenses rose by 17:31

_per. cent, “largely due to ihe

opening of new branches, the
development costs involved in
the introduction of new prod-
ucts, and increased marketing
and competitive positioning of
the bank”.

















PAGE 128, VONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006




RAT A AI TI

~ NOTICE

4 AMERICAN DEVELOPMEN BANK (IDB)
WiNG WLLL BE SOLD BY TENDER:
2004 Ford Windstar

esponsibic for payment of customs duty and
y tad. Lis velucle may be inspected during the normal
2 hours, Monday through Friday upon request through
ve of the Administrative Officer, IDB House, East Bay
Nassau, Sealed offers marked “Bid for Automobile”
lel be sent to:

Waser WH %

The Administrative Officer
P.O. Box N-3743
Nassau, Bahamas

Yemen

:s will be accepted until noon on December 8th, 2006. This
car will be sold “as is”. The right is reseved to reject any or all

offers

race






BUSINESS

Bank Clearing House targets June ‘07 date

FROM page 1B

. to be made to the ACH work-

ing group,” Mr McWeeney
added. The working group will
then submit its recommenda-
tions to kim, and he will put it
before the CBA and Central
Bank of the Bahamas for rati-
fication.

Mr McWeeney said he
planned to bring it before the
CBA at its last meeting this
year, which will be held dur-
ing either the second or third
week in December.

“We expect to move swiftly
to the implementation phase,
and we are optimistic we will
have the first phase completed
in a maximum of six months,”
the CBA chairman told The

Tribune.

“It should be no later than’
June, and then we’ll look at
adding on the bells and whis-
tles after that.”

The ACH will “transform”
the Bahamian economy’s pay-
ments systems and the manner
in which thousands of daily
business transactions are con-

ducted.
Phase

Mr McWeeney said the first
phase would provide for the
automatic clearing of cheques,
direct credits and direct debits,
accommodating the bulk of
these transactions.

He added: “It'll bring finali-
ty, help improve the integrity
of transactions and the turn-






New ColorStay®.

_ Full coverage that feels so comfortable,
you won't believe you're wearing makeup.



lakeup

around time. It will cut the
clearing period from four days
to two days and one day.

“Tt allows transactions to
flow much more efficiently.”

Mr McWeeney said previ-
ously that the ACH would
“help to improve the integrity
of the [banking] system”, with
persons able to know the full
value of goods involved in a
transaction “almost immedi-
ately”.

And it was also set to
“improve the cash flow of the
whole society, with money
turned over much quicker”.

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-
actions, where cheques drawn
on one bank but due to be
deposited at another have to
be taken by armoured car to
a central location where they
are settled by representatives
of the various institutions.

Apart.from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will even-
tually allow direct debits and
credits from accounts, debit
cards and a shared Automatic
Teller Machine (ATM) net-
work.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time
persons spent in line waiting
to cash and deposit pay
cheques, as they could be
deposited to their account.

Bahamian consumers would
also be able to use direct deb-

THE TRIBUNE



its from their bank accounts to
pay bills such as cable televi-
sion and electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one
back office system for the
entire Bahamas. It may also
help develop SWITCH prod-
ucts, where Bahamians could
use their cash cards at any
bank's ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the
opening up a whole range of
electronic banking services in
the Bahamas, including its use
in the online purchase of gov-
ernment goods and services.

Bahamian business owners
last week renewed their plea
fer the commercial banks to
introduce debit cards, some-
thing they feel would reduce
consumers’ reliance on cash -

. the favourite target of armed

robbers. .
Chain —

Dionisio D’Aguilar, who
runs the Superwash laundro-
mat chain and is a member of
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s crime prevention
committee, said his business
had immense problems in
reducing its attractiveness for
potential armed robbers due

. to the fact that 100 per cent-of .

its customer transactions
involved cash.

Mr D’ Aguilar told a Cham-
ber-organised seminar on
crime prevention: “They [con-
sumers] have no choice but to
use cash, so it’s very challeng-
ing.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

EQUITY SIDE

2006/CLE/QUI
No. 00662

IN THE MATTER of all those pieces parcels or lots .
of land being Lot Numbers 584 and 585 situate in
Golden Gates Estates Section II Subdivision in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence,

The Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
(Chapter 393 statute law of the Bahamas,revised...
edition 2001).

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Petition of
RICHARDSON HARVEY THURSTON

NOTICE

RICHARDS HARVEY THURSTON, The Petitioner
claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession of
the pieces parcels or lots of land hereinbefore described
and have made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3:
of the Quieting Titles Act to have the title to the said
pieces parcels or lots of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the Act.

small offshore company situated on
Shirley Street, close to downtown
looking for compatible company to’
__ sub-lease office space to.

Copies of a diagram or plan showing the position
boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the said
pieces parcels or lots of land may be inspected during
normal working hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Bitco
Building, East Street in the City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Davis & Co.,
‘ured : British Colonial Hilton, Centre of Commerce,
aie oi ee tere —— . a : = 4th Floor Suite 400, #1 Bay Street, Nassau,
| New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorneys

for the Petitioner i






















Abaco Markets

16.25 Bahamas Property Fund f 11.00 6.8 3.45%

6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.88 9.9 4.19%

0.0 B ch kK 4 0.80 3.0 2.50%! 1 1

Doe) gee ee sone wee ea as NOTICE is hereby given that any person or persons
1.10 Fidelity Bank 4.21 6.4 4.13% having a right of Dower or an adverse claim or any

9.05 Cable Bah é 9.92 14.9 2.44%) : : % aS $ 5 .

ia, ealina Holdings 1.85 41.3 0.00% claim not recognized in the Petition shall within thirty

3,00 Commonwealth Bank —- 12.29 12.3 5.39%) i i

eae) Soenesie canes GBRe ah gee nae (30) days after the appearance of the Notice herein

210 Doctor's Hospital 2.65 9.0 0.00% file in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City

4.35 Far ard 5.54 %o . sa:

ae tee asice ae ee of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or the

10.00 FirstCaribbean 14.14 15.1 3.93% j i imi ib

Pee he ie fe) ies undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed

0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 N/M 0.00% form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

8.00 ICD Utilities A 8.00 15.1 3.35%

8.65 J. S. Johnson

Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement
of claim within thirty (30) days of the date herein will













AAO ROTEL SSMS te ESTA
= yO .

__52wk-Low, Symbol _ Last Price Weekly Vol.
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 14.00 1.923 1.320 8.1 9.04% 1
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 10.00 0.000 0.640 =NM 7.85% operate as a bar to such claim.



0.20 RND Holdings



Dated this 16th day of November, A.D. 2006




28.00 ABDAB










| 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

0.60 i

| DAVIS & CO.

5 -t 52wk-low Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $

a4 1 1.2626 Colina Money Market Fund 1.314929* siete Chambers 4

is GO17 2.5197 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.00177** British Colonial Hilton
2.2754 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.482888"*

Ie A823
W203? 1.1406

Centre of Commerce
4th Floor Suite 400
#1 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

5 INDE > NAV KEY.
S2wk Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
8 Soday's Close - Current + ay's weighted price for daily volume
ngeinclo 1g price from day to day
mber 0” otal shares traded today
a are paid in the tact 19? rsonths



Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

* - 17 November 2006

** - 31 October 2006

Attorneys for the Petitioners

*** - 31 October 2006
N/M - Not Meaningful




been.

ye tM





TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 13B





@ INDIA'S Anil Kumble appeals unsuccessfully for the lbw against South Africa's Mark Boucher during their third one-day international in Cape Town, South Africa, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2006.

t

(AP Photo/Str)

South Africa beats India by 106

runs in third o

CRICKET
CAPE TOWN,
South Africa
Associated Press

SOUTH Africa's fast bowlers
dismissed India for 168 on Sun-
day to win the third one-day
international by 106 runs.

The victory marked a
remarkable turnaround for
South Africa which earlier
recovered from 0-2 — and then
76-6 — to make 274-7 in 50 overs
with a world record ODI eighth
wicket partnership. Justin
Kemp hit an undefeated 100.

South Africa now leads the
five-match series 2-0.

"We missed some opportu-
nities after we had them at 76-
6," India coach Greg Chappell
said. "There is not much posi-
tive to take out of the game
from that point on."

South African captain

‘ Graeme Smith said India suf-
fered from a lack of confidence.

"T don't know how they can

’ deal with it, but Ido know that

we have been bowling really
‘well, and backing it up with
some great fielding," Smith
said.

Shaun Pollock precipitated
India's collapse with an opening
spell of 3-17 off seven overs at
the Newlands Stadium. He fin-
ished with 4-25 in nine overs.

Pollock had Virender
Sehwag caught by Andrew Hall
at third man for a duck in the
opening over of the innings and

,he then dismissed Sachin Ten-
dulkar, caught by Loots
Bosman at square leg for two.

When Pollock bowled
Mohammad Kaif for 10 in the
ninth over, India at 17-3 looked
unlikely to be able to chase
down South Africa's target.

Kemp's 100 had rescued
South Africa which lost two
wickets for no runs in the first
over.

"T didn't think of the 100
while I was batting," Kemp
said. "I was only thinking of
getting the team as many (runs)
on the board as possible. But
when I got to 99, I did think I
had got pretty close."

Kemp reached his maiden
century in one-dayers off 89
balls, and hit six fours and sey-
en sixes as he and Hall shared a
world record eighth-wicket
partnership of 138 runs. That
surpassed the 119 runs by Aus-

Atalia's Paul Reiffel and‘Shane

Warne against South Africa in
Port Elizabeth in 1994,

Hall finished on 56 not out
off 47 balls, with seven fours.

Smith won the toss and elect-
ed to bat at the Newlands Sta-
dium, but he was the first to
depart when bowled by Zaheer
Khan off the second ball of the
match.

Khan also removed Jacques
Kallis for a duck in the same
first over, leaving Herschelle
Gibbs and Bosman battling to
stabilize the innings.

But these two departed just
10 balls apart - Bosman caught
by Tendulkar off Khan for 6,
and Gibbs caught by Moham-
mad Kaif for 35 off Irfan
Pathan.

Mark. Boucher was run out
in a mix-up with A.B. de Vil-
liers for 4, and that brought
Kemp to the crease.

Kemp took his time to get
going, and survived the loss of
De Villiers for 29, and the run-
out of Pollock for 33.

Hall was a willing rebuilder
with Kemp, and the pair grad-
ually got the upper hand over
the Indian bowlers. Khan's ini-
tial spell of seven overs cost
him nine runs, with three wick-
ets, but he finished with 3-42
as he conceded 31 off his last
three overs.

Harbhajan Singh (0-63 off 10

overs) and Ajit Agarkar (1-71
off nine) were severely pun-
ished. |

After India's early collapse,
captain Rahul Dravid held the
innings together with 63.

Dinesh Karthik helped him
at first but found the extra pace
and lift of Makhaya Ntini diffi-
cult and edged a sharp chance
to Smith to depart for 14.

Mahendra Singh Dhoni
raised Indian hopes of a recov-
ery with a brisk 55 off 48 balls
including four sixes. He was
caught on the square leg
boundary by Bosman off Kallis.

Two good catches by Smith
saw Pathan dismissed for 1 off
Kallis and Harbhajan Singh for
10 off Hall.

Pollock completed his four-
wicket hall when he was
hooked by Dravid and caught
by Hall for 63.

Hall finished with 3-45 and
Kallis took 2-29.

"We have too many players
out of form," Chappell said.

The fourth one-dayer is in

Port Elizabeth on Wednesday.

PRY}







-day international





@ INDIA'S Mahundra Dhoni hits a six during the third one-day cricket international in Cape Town, South Africa, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2006.
(AP Photo)



PAGE 14B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS
Se eee eee Ee



HB THE JETS and
the Stingrays battle it
out over the weekend
in a pre-season game.
The Jets ran out 19-0
winners.














I'm a winner with The

I'm Andrew Berlanda, winner of game
tickets, a one day car and airfare for
two, to the Dolphins vs. Minn. Vikings
game. You can be a winner too, fill out
the Dolphins vs Jaguars entry form in
the Sports section, and become eligible
to win! : : |

READ

Se.

VERYPAY The Tribune:
My Voice. My Honzpaper!









tea 6 a

EET

CONGRATULATIONS to Andrew Berlanda, WINNER of the Dolphins and Vikings drawing

ERS

(Photos:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



-Road Runners
‘must continue ©
to provide hope



for our athletes’

@ By BRENT. STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

NEWLY elected Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tions” Council Member Basil Ney-
mour said that, while we are faced
with so much’'crime in our coun-
try, he knows there is still hope
for our young people.

“You have decided to that you
want your children to be some-
thing good,” said Neymour, who
as he addressed the Road Run-
ners Track and Field Club’s 7th
annual awards & presentation
banquet on Saturday night.

The Grand Bahamian busi-
nessman told the audience at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort & Casi-
no that you would never know
what is in store for youngsters in
the future.

He said it’s important that the
Road Runners continue to pro-
vide that hope for their athletes, as
they have done in Grand Bahama
with relay silver medalist Andrae
Williams and Jr. CAC medalist
Michael Mattieu.

And he thanked Road Run-

ners’ president/head coach Dexter

Bodie for training our young peo-
ple.

Turning his attention to the ath-
letes, Neymour told them that
they should take the advice that

they get from their parents

because they only want the best
for them.

Also addressing the audience
was businessman Harrison Petty
who said there are times because
of the hustle and bustle of life that
parents sometimes forget their
responsibilities to their children.

“The parents here tonight obvi-
ously have not forgotten their
responsibilities,” Petty charged.
“They take their responsibilities
very, very serious.



“You have them in a very
organised track club. This track.
club has discipline and this track
club have given them the thrill of
victory. That is what these tro-
phies are all about.”

The owner of the Colony Club
Resort & Suites said he was so
proud of what the club stands for
that he honoured his pledge to
provide a $5,000 scholarship grant
to Galilee Academy and he’s been
pleased with the follow-up of

-those athletes who are now a part

of the programme.

Both Neymour and Petty were
presented with awards by Bodie
and the Road Runners for their
support of their track and field
programme, both locally and
internationally.

During the night, athletes were
also presented with awards in the
Dominique Higgins, Dianna
Thompson and Athlete of the
Year categories in addition to the

President’s list, most outstanding ~

athletes and most improved.
Three athletes took home the
Dominique Higgins Award, pre-

sented to,athletes who excel both.

in athletics and academics.

Those recipients were Maverick
Bowleg, Abiah Missick and Jen-
ero Knowles.

Knowles, a 10-year-old student
of Carmichael Primary who spe-
cialises in the 200 and 400, said
he was “shocked” because he did-
n’t envision getting it.

Missick, a eight-year-old Faith
Temple student, said he was “very
proud”. to get the award. It was
just one of the 11 he carted home
from his performance in the 100
and 200.

And Bowleg, an 11-year-old
Temple Christian 100 and 400
runner, said he was very “sur-
prised” when his name was called
for the award. He thought Ray-

cseIOnntp nnn onrney cenTo=n Toon nea aeaaachanasadieanne rasmneannneonene diesen ananashressnachasneatonasan ansenthennenshesnaeneanead

Address. _

ford Rigby would have beaten

hinrdut- a
Higgins, who is now studying

at Stariford University in Califor-

nia where he is preparing for med-
ical school, was represented by
his parents. :

His father, David Higgins, said
it’s a honour to continue to sup-
port the club, which gave so much
to the success of his son. He con-
gratulated the club for the manner
in which they continue to hold the
awards banquet.

While the boys dominatéd in
the highest award presented, a
number of girls shared in all of
the other categories.

Winning 11 awards in the girls’
category was Edvania Missick, a
13-year-old Faith Temple student,
who runs the 400.

“I was very pleased with all of
the awards I got this year,” she
stressed. “Next year, I hope to
win the most outstanding athlete
award.”

Other winners of the Dianna
Thompson award were Brason
Rolle, Antwan Hoyte, Stephon
Taylor, Jenero Knowles,
Antonique Butler, Faythe Miller,
Pollyann Bethel, Lotiona Bowleg
and Britanni Rolle.

@ THE winners of the Athlete
of the Year awards were:

Under-9 girl - Angel Butler; U-
9 boy - Branson Rolle;

U-11 girl - Faythe Miller; U-11
boy - Jenero Knowles;

U-13 girl - Carlisa Gray; U-13
boy - Maverick Bowleg and Ray-
ford Rigby;

U-15 girl - Pollyann Bethel and
Rashanda Dean;

U-15 boy - Drew Kerr and
Patrick Bodie;

U-17 girl - Charlene Innocent;

U-17 boy - Shawn Lockhart and
Trevino Thompson and

U-20 girl - Rashanda Davis.

The Tribune The Minmi Herald

Fill out coupon and drop off at The Tribune

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F/C F/C F/C F/C ;
Albuquerque 55/12. -36/2° pe 53/11 33/0. pe —- Indianapolis
Anchorage 20/-6 12/-11 sn —-.24/-4 12/-11 sf Jacksonville
Atlanta “65/18 50/10 s- — 6719-542 pe —_ Kansas City ISLAN
Atlantic City 62/16 41/5 s 58/14 44/6 pc Las sey re
‘Baltimore: 64/17 37/2. -s 60/15. 43/6 pc ‘ib Low:67°F/19°C
Boston 62/16 42/5 pc 44/6 39/3 c .
Buffalo = 64/12 40/46 ¢ 55/12. 44/6 c-
Charleston, SC 70/21 53/11 c 75/23 56/13 pc
Chicago 66/13 46/7 sho 57/3: 48/8 sh
Cleveland 58/14 43/6 pe 56/13 47/8 ¢ Minneapo is.
Dallas. 75/23 6216 c- 76/24 GI/16- pc Nashville
Denver 52/11 23/-5 pe 39/3 10/-12 c New Orleans
‘Detroit 88/12 43/6. ¢. 59/1 c : ve 26.
Honolulu 84/28 72/22 ¢ 84/28 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 70/21 55/12 70/21 46/7 Tucson 68/20 66/18 41/5 c
Houston 77/25. 66/18 pce 77/25.-65/18 sh Orlando. ss =: 80/26: 60/15 = s- 82/27. 62/16 © Washington, DC 64/17 62/16 46/7 pc







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| :
|
Several hours of Clear. Breezy with several Breezy with some Partly sunny, windy
sunshine. | hours of sun. sun. : and humid.
/ i High: 83° High: 84° i ‘High: 85°.
High: 80° : Low: 72° Low: 74° - Low: 74°
AccuWeather RealFeel: am AcclWeather RealFeel i Sian ierludearlnccl PY eed unvelateell ace AccuWeather RealFeel
Ceoer |'C eer | °C e2-73°F | *[ 86-75°F | [86-76 F Cis

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature.



~ Hligh:79°F/26°C
Low:64°F/18°C

ELEUTHERA
Hiab" Fiza ¢

KEY WEST
High: 80° F/27°C
Low: 70° F/21°C



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



High: 86° F/30°'
Low:72° F/22°C



Tuesday
High = Low Ww

Tuesday















Sunshine and.some
clouds,

ne 84°

'P96-60°F

, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday



Normal year to date a eae 49.10”

AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2006?

%







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ABACO HIQh 22.2 hiis Sindee anaes BI F/27°C
LOW ......ssscceseceseesecetosseseesrererereersrsreneees OF” F/19° CG
Normal high ..........sscesescesssessssessesseses BO" F/27° C
Normal lOW .......ssssssssssescsssssecsstesseeerse 09° F/20° C
Last year’s NIGH ........ccsecsssccrssesesseceeee O17 F/27° C
Last year’s IOW ......eccssessersesssseessseesee D9” F/15? ©
Precipitation
As of 1 p.m: yesterday 0... .ssieseereressereee 0.00”
Year t0 date .........escssessscsssecsssssetseceesessereseess 46,41”

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The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.









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Sunrise ......6:35 a.m. Moonrise . . . 12:16 p.m.
Sunset.......5:20 p.m.- Moonset. ... 11:49 p.m.



GREATINAGUA —
High: 85° F/29° C

- High:83°F/28°C ss
Low: 71° F/22°C










Amsterd

Vienna

Winnipeg

storms, f-



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‘00 38/3 F

Q/-12 7/-13 ¢

rain, Sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace

NASSAU Today:

221-5 9/-12 sn
Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-



WINDS

NE at 10-20 Knots
NE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet
NE at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet
NE at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet
NNE at 12-25 Knots

NE at 12-25 Knots

WAVES
2-4 Feet



Flurries
Snow

MURRICANE IN

Wk (240) S32-2062



i)

VISIBILITY
5-7 Miles
5-7 Miles

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

80° F
79°F



5-7 Miles
5-7 Miles

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Sc

3 Miami
¢ 81/70

Fronts
Cold ===

Warm Min MMenie
Stationary Menga®

RANCE

We (240) 6-20







WATER TEMPS.









PLT







*

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com





BASKETBALL:
PRIMARY CATHOLIC
CHAMPIONSHIP

ALTHOUGH they will
be making their debut into
the best-of-three champi-
onship series, coach Como
Ferguson said he’s con-
vinced that the St. Cecilia’s
Strikers will win the
Catholic Diocesan Primary
School basketball title.

The pennant-winning
Strikers will travel to Loy-
ola Hall today where they
will play game one of the
series at 3:15 pm against the
St. Thomas More Sparks,
who have been to the big
dance quite a few times and
won the title under coach
Leo Delaney.

Ferguson has even pre-
dicted that they will
“sweep” the Sparks
because they’ve beaten
them during the regular
season.

Game two will be played
on Wednesday at the same
place and time.

@ TENNIS:
GATORADE SR
NATIONALS

THE Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association’s
Gatorade Senior National
Tennis Tournament will
continue at the Gym Ten-
nis Club today at 3pm.

The tournament got
started on Saturday and
will run through Saturday,
December 9.

It feature players who are

35 years and older. They -
will play in singles, doubles
and mixed doubles.

lf TENNIS:
KNOWLES
CELEBRITY



’ PLANS are well under-
way for the hosting of the
sixth Mark Knowles
Celebrity Tournament at
Atlantis. The event is
scheduled for the weekend
of December 8-9. —

A number of players,
including Knowles’ touring
doubles partner Daniel -
Nestor from Canada, along
with Fred Stolle, Jim Couri-
er, Nicole Vaidisova, Jamea
Jackson, Scott Davis, Rick
Leach, Mark Merklein and
Ryan Sweeting, will be in
attendance.

OLYMPICS:
BOCA AGM/
ELECTIONS

THE Bahamas Olympic
Association will go to the
polls on Thursday night to
select its new slate of offi-
cers.

The elections will be held
during the annual general
meeting at the Nassau
Yacht Club.

. Incumbent Arlington
Butler will be running for
his eighth consecutive term
as president. Nominations
are expected to come from
the floor, but interested
persons should have been a
former executive or cur-
rently serving as an execu-
tive of one of the affiliated
federations.













FORMER Bahamas Associa-
tion of athletic Associations’
president Desmond Bannister
said it’s important for athletes
to have dreams, but it’s even
better when they believe that
they can, and do, achieve them.

Speaking at the Road Run-











































































DW Davis.

Hl NESLY LUCIEW, quarterback |
for the Stingrays (No 12), in action
against the John Bull Jets. The Jets

won 19-0 in this pre-season match at

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

urged 10
Ollow their dreams —

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

Former BAAA president speaks at annual awards 5

ners Track and Field Club’s 7th
annual Awards and Presentation
Banquet on Saturday night, at
the Wyndham

Nassau Resort & Casino, Ban-
nister congratulated the club for
keeping the memories of their







founder, the late Dianne

Thompson, alive.

“Dianne Thompson was the
ultimate dreamer. She was a lady
who never participated in track
and field. She didn’t even come
from the Bahamas,” said Ban-

nister of the American, who died

_ recently in the United States.

“J want to encourage you to
continue to share her dream.”

At that point, Bannister called
up Rayford C. Rigby, who said
in the souvenir booklet that his












folqceecyey- Eo) E)

football
action



dream i to “break the world’.
record 400 metres held by -

Michael Johnson and to obtain
our national record for the 400
and also help the ‘next genera-
tion in track and field and for
them to have confidence in
themselves.”

Speaking on the awards’

theme: “Dreamers, Believers,

Achievers, Soaring to Higher:
Heights,” Bannister said that the:
11-year-old student of Bahamas’
Academy can be compared to
Joseph in the Bible, who was the
ultimate dreamer at the age of
17. '
Bannister encouraged all of

the athletes to think like Rigby:-

with their own dreams.

“Tf you become a dreamer,
you can turn your dreams into
achievements,” he charged. “I’m
looking forward to when you
‘break that record. I want to be in
the stadium when you break
Michael Johnson record.”

Coming closer to home, Ban-
nister said 20 years ago if they
had heard a young girl named
Debbie Ferguson (now McKen-

zie). say that she was going. to”.

have a pocket full of medals,,
they would not have believed
her. But now she has them and a
book has also been written
about her achievement.

He also drew the illustration
of Ferguson-McKenzie and her
Golden Girls teammates, who
won an Olympic gold together
in the women’s 4 x 100 metre
relay.

And he reminded the Road
Runners that they even have a
former member of their club in
Avard Moncur, who fulfilled a
dream of becoming the first
Bahamian male champion in the
400 at the World Champi-
onships.

As dreamers, Bannister fur-
ther encouraged the athletes that
they can only achieve them if

they follow five steps: 1) focus”

on a single goal; 2) concentrate
on continuous improvement
every year; 3) forget the past; 4)

focus on the future and 5) every.

year you improve, you have. to
sacrifice a little more.
If they can accomplish those

feats, Bannister said the Road

Runners athletes. will definitely
soar like eagles to higher
heights.

Also during his address, Ban-
nister lauded Road Runners’

president/head coach Dexter.

Bodie and his officers for being
the only track club in the
Bahamas that put on such an
elegant event.

He even brought their, atten- -

tion of the fact that the club has
not just developed the physical
side of the athletes, but they
have shown the’social and even
the spiritual side of well-round-
ed individuals.

The Road Runners presented

two tables full of trophies and .
plaques to just about very mem-.'

ber of their club for their ath-
letic and academic achievements
this past year.

Bodie said this is just the tip of
the iceberg because next year,
they intend to take the awards
banquet even higher as they
introduce a “Grammy” style pre-
sentation.





Full Text


sem Lhe Ir

Che Miami Herald





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Volume: 103 No.6





PRE URS
PST Tg

Sa a isn scent)

Man airlifted to N assau

after being beaten
‘almost to death’

lm By JOHN MARQUIS
and PAUL TURNQUEST

‘TENSION was mounting on
a Bahamian island last night
after a man was beaten “almost
to death” by up to 15 Defence
Force officers following an inci-
dent in a bar.

The people of Inagua were
in “a state of rage” after 27-
year-old Morton’ Salt marine
worker Dexter Wilson was air-
lifted to Nassau for emergency

treatment following what-locals~

described as a. “barbaric beat-
ing” in the early: hours of yes-
terday morning. -

One Defence Force officer
also had to receive treatment
for stab wounds following the
altercation, it-was claimed.

Defence Force Commodore
Clifford Scavella told The Tri-
bune yesterday that officers

from the Defence Force, along.

with police, will be flying down

- to Thagua “first thing in the

morning” to investigate the
matter.

Last night, a large group of
Inaguans - estimated at between
80 and 100 - gathered outside
the Defence Force base on the
island shouting threats to offi-
cers inside.

A source said: “They have
locked the gates. The people
have told them not to set foot in
Mathew Town.”

Out-of-control ' officers

‘Teportedly fired handguns into

the air when neighbours -
aroused by loud noises. in the
night - tried to intervene in yes-
terday’s beating incident.
When a semi-conscious Mr
Wilson, with two gaping head

wounds, was rushed to the local

clinic, one officer is said to have
told the duty doctor: “Let him
die.”

As Mr Wilson fought for his

life at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital last night, Inaguans warned
that Defence Force officers on
the island were in grave danger
because of the public mood.

One islander said: “The peo-
ple are so angry that there could
be a riot. The police and
Defence Force would be well-
advised: to: send-in\ reinforce
ments. Things could get ugly
here.”

Trouble flared at around
3.30am when Mr Wilson began
chatting to a female Defence
Force officer at the bar of
Supers nightclub in Mathew
Town. He was said to be

“developing a rapport” with :

her.

A male officer took excep-

tion to the conversation and,
when Mr Wilson asked why he
should object, in light of the fact
that officers chatted.to Inaguan
women, slapped him round the
face.
What happened next left
locals gasping with astonish-
ment as “around 15 officers”

set about Mr Wilson, kicking ©

and beating him.

At one point, the victim man-
aged to break clear andi flee,
but the officers chased him
along the street, finally catch-
ing up with him outside the
home of Mr Diverne Ingraham.

There was ‘so much commo-

tion that Mr Ingraham emerged -

from his hduse to see what was

SEE page 14

+ Giftware

ee trike

* Stationery

+ Home Decer |
* Saby items



at the scene.

Chief Justice

defends Justice

Lyons’ ‘right |
to speak out’

CHIEF Justice Sir Burton
Hall defended Justice John :

Maynard-Gibson, and the :
“independence” of the judicia- :

ry.

on the matter. He maintained

his initial stance throughout his ; versity Hospital last Thursday :

interview with Wendell Jones following a brief illness. He was : _.
: 2 : will go up, or coverage will be
: severely limited.
The surgeon’s comments :

: came ina statement to The Tri- ; the “pitfalls” of the health plan.

on Jones and Co, to not com- }

ment on Justice Lyons’ “con-
troversial” ruling.

improper for a judge, any judge, :

to comment publicly on what
another judge has-said,” Sir
Burton began, “And I certainly

SEE page five



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

However, that would be as :
far as the chief justice would go :



“Guiding light’

Winston Saunders _
_be ruinous to.

THE Bahamas has lost a }
“guiding light in the develop- :
ment and protection of its cul- ;
: ture” with the death of Winston :
Lyons’ right yesterday to speak :
out as he did in response to the :
Attorney General, Allyson :

dies at age of 65

Christie said yesterday, hon- i
? ouring the cultural icon who :
died over the weekend:

Mr Saunders,



65.

i He took ill while on an offi-
Hn : cial visit to Jamaica to assist in :
“The near insistent comments ; the planning of the 200th :

for the Chief Justice to say : anniversary of the abolition of

something is because I have : the slave trade in the former ;

always been of the view that itis ! British Empire.
Mr Saunders had a stroke. ; _ | ratte
! He hada pacemaker implanted ; Mitted to the concept of a ;
! some 10 years ago and thus had | national health insurance plan
! some problems for some time. | ostensibly to help the poor and:

do not propose to do it on this ;

SEE page 10

AN OFF -DUTY sallee officer was killed in a siptorbike accident on Friday none S on Skyline Drive off Goodman’s
- Bay. The officer was with a colleague (nfo s was marveling on a separate bike) when he lost control and hit a tree. He died

plan could

the economy

A LEADING Nassau sur-
Saunders, Prime Minister Perry | 8°00 has hit out at the govern- ;
: ment’s national-health insur- :

ance plan, saying it has the i president of the Bahamas -
: Employer's Confederation, the
: : _ } government has never been suc-
Dr C Dean Tseretopoulos ; cessful in running a public entity
: in the past —and he sees no indi-

: potential to be “ruinous” to the

co-chairman | Bahamas economy.

:_ of the National Commission on :
Culture, died in Kingston,
: Jamaica, on Saturday evening : . ested a ;
: after being admitted to the Unk ; its obligations with the pro-
: : posed budget.

: claims that if the plan becomes

: law, it will not be able to fulfil : cation that that will change.

: bune alleging that the plan had :

: siderations.

uninsured.

ee page 10

Quiznos Su

EAT UP

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

"Surgeon: NHI |










Employers’
Confederation
resent warns

over NHI scheme

a By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter
ACCORDING to:Brian Nutt,

Mr Nutt said that historically

: government was a "bad manag-
As a result, either taxation :
: porations, and that employers and
: the general public have not been

er" when it came to running cor-

properly consulted about all of

Mr Nutt told The Tribune that

: been hijacked by political con- : the federation had requested that
t 7 : they be involved in the creation
He said: “The PLP is com- : °° review of the National Health
: Insurance Act, but that their pleas
: were never heard by the govern-

? ment.

He asked: "How are we sup-

: posed to make a proper decision

SEE page 10

» Palmdale * Cakes Field

» Paradise Island
* Feedanvh Street

* Regent Centre (Freeport)

Major Credit Cards ere :




PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006























Hannes Babak was being reas-

signed to the north eastern cor-.

ner office, which was previous-
ly occupied by Sir Jack.

A spokesman at the Port
Authority stated that “at no
time was Eady Henrietta or any

and no attempt was made to put
Lady Henrietta or any of her
guests out of the building.
“The reallocation of execu-
tive office space at the GBPA is
internal: The GBPA, and cer-
tainly members of the Grand

THE TRIBUNE



media show.

“We shall remain focused and
continue to work in the best
interest of our staff, licensees,
and the advancement of the
quality of life of Grand Bahama
residents.”

The Ministry of Tourism In Cooperation with -
The Bahamas Hotel Association Presents

12TH ANNUAL

Me)
: LOCAL NEWS set
Lady Henrietta and —
ONE DAY'S awyert ‘physically :
or Er ace Ma i. JEY VELER RY remo 4 ed from office 1%
SKUs Was NOW TEM ‘sktF Was NOW .
STERUNGSLVER ‘KT GOLD eat ord li By DENISE MAYCOCK .
16° Omega Necklace 221084 $4.00 $17.00 Solid Box Link Cham 26033 «$400 $360 Tribune Freeport Reporter a
18” Multi Strand Necklace 73002 $ 140.0 S$ 3600 White GoldSingaporeChain 211684 $= 8000 $32.00 oe
16” Sake Chain 2) $$ M00 «$ BO WhieGoldSiakeChin «= BOD «$1800 SBD | | FREBPORT one ne
LBP Necker A SNA SGN) Brace wi Charms 21254 $1600 8 65.00 . remove” lawyer Fred Smith and oy
7 Multi Heart Bracelet 33588 $5000 $2106 P Rolo Bracelet 24788 = § 12500 $31.00 Lady Henrietta St George from 3
8" ID Bracelet 27S «$$ «(120.00 $49.00 Hoop Earrings Io $9000 $36.00 the Grand Bahama Port
5 Fay re ma $00) 2500 Dag Erin gd § GH) $A | according to reports reaching
7 Byzantine Bracclet 20KS $M «$19.00 Dinmont Cur Heap Barings 21080 $8000 $33.00 The Tribune.
Starfish Pendant Ss =§ «1999 8 BOD Sea Shell Chan rao $M S400 gon Suh is Tepresentite
seit ’ ii RE t R
Hoop Earrings: 231665 $ 20 § £00 acs enrietta in a awsul
ae & ee 1 tel aaah gies citar te ging Sir Jack Hayward’s 4
Dangle Heart Earrings m3 $ 8 $16 14KT SEMIPRECIOUS GEMSTONES claim to 75 per cent ownership 4
t oe of the Grand Bahama Port re
PEARLS. foto iial BH § OS ann Authority and Port Group Ltd.
ree ~ ee MH YAW OS : h t f the lat
Toggle Poa Meikle, WD § WR A bi Bho Tope Bary ‘1378 = § 10000 § —A.O0: Baward St Georse arenes
‘M)'Fresh Water Pearl Necklace 228666 «$4 § 16200. umatst Cross Pendant ‘som? tony $4000 also seeking removal of Hannes oa
weeds Ba SOSH teem tw $a | Babak he Forts chairmen, 3
Pear Peet th Chain nes § OH 8 i Multi Stone Heait Pendant’ «= 238602 $2000 $8100 George’s death, it was general ay
mpd § 40.00 8 a Oe EME «SOKO «8-80 knowledge that Sir Jack and Mr sys
21926 S$ 800 § 4 St George had equal shares in .
es = the GBPA and PGL i
REN Boe: » 75% OFF ALL WATCHES While at the Port Authority m
NEWIVS VANES Lancaster Ladies Watehy me = -§ JM § yesterday, Mr Smith claims that ,
DiamoadRing «27328 «$ UNOS SLND Lancaster Sikes Stel Watch. 200807 §. 40000 S| bot Deen e Set ate id
Supie @DinaondRig NT$ TANG. $800 LamaserQueto ah 2168 $4810 S from an office in the Port by “
Tanzanite & Diamond Pendant 30310 $§ 13500 § 0) Jukes hurgensen Ladies Watch = 26091 $8008 several police officers. g
Tole Gs Pedat S$ BOYS BLOM Nec Lal Wa 2 FO Sete ewe are being
¥sivad Danita “aint. agen 8 ORK cee mivieg. men © + DSF: une, : “We are bei ‘
Ruby, Pendant . BM 8 ee 8 a ae tee th 7 Smo. 3 13 police officers. We are-trying to ‘,
R 206 J $ a0 70500 $4100 remain in the office. We are not 4
: 5 a a : ieani going to be moved.” act
ue ree eee ae Ce ape It is believed that effort any
$150) $1000 StoLadeTweTe'inh 6s § Th $110 | matrereweretacy Hemmer
$i $ M00 Renney Cote Bescelet Watch. INS $6800. SOD ta from her husband’s third os
e 3 $ 230 Kona coon a RB § MOO $ 3600 floor office at the Port. 4
According to an inter-office _ ; _ -
memo issued by Sir Jack, he Mi GREG Moss, Babak and Sir Jack’s attorney, speaks to
had advised that the south-east-. Superintendent Russelll ,
ern corner executive office pre- ey
viously occupied by Mr St : 5
George is to be occupied by of her guests, which included Bahama community, are not +
himself. Mr Fred Smith, prevented from surprised by today’s overly ~ *
He further advised that Mr entering the GBPA’s building exaggerated and dramatic =



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Tony Blair
expresses
sorrow over
slave trade

@ LONDON

PRIME Minister Tony Blair
will express “deep sorrow” for
Britain’s role in the trans-
Atlantic slave trade — but
won’t deliver a full apology
demanded by some activists,
according to a published report,
according to Associated Press.

Blair was to make a “historic
statement” before Parliament
on Monday, The Observer
newspaper said Sunday.

He will say that the trade,
which was outlawed in Britain
two centuries ago, would now
be considered “a crime against
humanity.”

“T believe the bicentenary
offers us a chance not just to
say how profoundly shameful
the slave trade was — how we
condemn its existence utterly

and praise those who fought for

its abolition — but also to
express our deep sorrow that it
could ever have happened and
rejoice at the better times we
live in today,” Blair was to say
in his.speech.

The comments will also
appear in the black community
newspaper New Nation.

Government ministers are
expected to release details next
week of Britain’s plans to mark
the March 25, 2007 bicentenary
of the Slave Trade Act, which
banned British participation in
the Atlantic slave trade.

Though Britain abolished
slavery in that year, it did not
emancipate slaves in its over-
seas territories until 1833.

Nottage
to attend
NHI plan
meeting

SENATOR Dr Bernard Not-
‘tage will speak on national
health insurance at a town
meeting to be held at 7 o’clock
toniight at Gerald Cash Prima-
ry School, Flamingo Gardens.

Trinidad
venues get

World Cup
approval

@ TRINIDAD
Port-of Spain

THE Queen’s Park Oval and
the Sir Frank Worrell playing
field have received initial clear-
ance as match venues in
Trinidad for the upcoming
cricket World Cup, the tourna-
ment’s managing director said,
according to Associated Press.

“Several members of the
inspection team were surprised
at quality of the pitch and the
outfield at the Sir Frank Wor-
rell, a ground that is not known
on the international cricket cir-
cuit,” Chris Dehring told
reporters Saturday after the 26-
member International Cricket
Council venue inspection team
visited the grounds in St.
Augustine.

Dehring praised the senthitye
old Queen’s Park Oval, but the
pace of reconstruction on some
grandstands “is not exactly what
we would have liked to see.”

-Dehring said he continues to
have concerns about a few
grounds but declined to name
them. Stadiums in the nine
Caribbean countries hosting

-» matches will havea final inspec-

tion at year’s end.

“If there are venues that are
not ready we shall not be afraid
to make the hard decisions with
additional games being played
at those venues which are
ready,” he said.

The World Cup runs from
March 13-April 28. It’s the first
time the event, which is expect-
ed to draw 100,000 fans, will be
held in the Caribbean.

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 3





answer's on bag of money

By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Free National Movement
yesterday charged that the Bahami-
an people are still waiting for the
Minister of Financial Services and
Investments Vincent Peet to come
clean about the source of a half-
filled bag of US $100 bills stored in
his bedroom closet in 2003.

“Nobody believes his tall story
about changing money into foreign
currency and saving it up in a bag in
a closet in his bedroom,” a release on
the party’s website reads. “Even peo-
ple in the remotest parts of the
Bahamas look for the nearest bank to
put their hard-earned, honest money.

ena the man who Prime

Minister Perry Christie appointed
to be Minister responsible for
Financial Services is aware of the
banking and financial services avail-
able to him in the capital city of
Nassau, so he doesn’t have to stash
his money in a bag in a closet in his
bedroom.

“Mr Peet should come again, and
come clean. He should stop insult-
ing the intelligence of the Bahamian
people and trying to intimidate
those asking questions about his
bizarre behaviour in this matter,”
the party said.

The FNM reminded Mr Peet that,
as a minister of the government, his
financial affairs are a matter of pub-
lic interest - by law.

“From whom and how he gets his

money is not a private affair, it is
information that the people of the
Bahamas are entitled to. Some PLP
leaders act as if they are above and
beyond the law and in so doing they
have devalued our system of gov-
ernment and destroyed the public’s
faith in the integrity of the conduct
of public affairs.

“The FNM will restore public con-
fidence in our laws and conventions,
especially the ones governing the
conduct of elected representatives
of the people; and we will review
and strengthen those laws wherever
necessary,” the release read.





















i VINCENT Peet has come
under close scrutiny since details
of the money were revealed

Opposition warns government >
not to rush through NHI scheme

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie and his colleagues will
be making a big mistake if they
believe that “ramming through
their half-baked National
Health Insurance scheme” can
be used as a smokescreen in
the election to cover up their
“Jong list of scandals, broken
promises and incompetent gov-
ernance,” the FNM said in a
statement yesterday.

The opposition accused the
government of taking their
“usual position in trying to vil-
ify those Bahamians who have
genuine concerns about what is
being proposed and attribut-
ing ulterior motives to them.”

These include, the FNM
said, Bahamian doctors who
are on the frontline delivering
health services to the Bahami-
an people as well as trade
union leaders whose job is to
look after the interests of thou-
sands of Bahamian workers.

“It is particularly galling to

an doctors of being motivated
by greed as these are the very
ones who work in the system,
serving the Bahamian people
every day of the week and who
give generously of their ser-
vice to indigent Bahamians,”
the FNM said.

The PLP government, the
opposition pointed out, came
to office loudly trumpeting
their intention to consult with
the Bahamian people on mat-
ters of importance.

“They have used the consul-
tation thing as an excuse for
not doing many things that
they should have done. Now,
in a matter of the greatest
importance to the nation - .a
matter that cries out for thor-
ough consultation - they want
to rush it through in the vain
hope that it will distract the
attention of the Bahamian
people from their many mis-
deeds and from the many
unanswered questions about

The FNM called on Prime
Minister Perry Christie and his
colleagues to take another look
- and to listen - before they go
any further with this plan.

“Perhaps the Prime Minis-
ter and his Ministers need to
be reminded about what con-
sultation means and does not
mean. Consultation does not
mean just telling people what
you are going to do anyway.

“It means providing all the
consultation partners with
comprehensive information on
the subject so they can make
intelligent judgments about it
and recommend adjustments.
It means listening and respond-
ing to the ideas put forward by
the consultation partners,” the
party said.

Clearly, the FNM said, the
PLP government had failed to
do this and that is why those
who will be called upon to
work the system and those
who will be affected in one





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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

_EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR”

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 325-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Health insurance is

THE PLP government is frightened silly
about that little word. “tax.” Prime Minister
Christie, anxious to leave a brilliant legacy
behind him, doesn’t want it ever to be said
that that legacy was a tax on the Bahamian
people.

But if the mandatory “contributions” pro+
posed to underwrite government’s soon-to-
be-introduced National Health Insurance
scheme is not a tax, then what is it?

How would Health Minister Dr Nottage

define that three letter word — “tax’’?

When a “contribution” from one’s income
is mandatory, then it becomes a tax on that
income.

Therefore, if a “contribution” becomes.a
tax when it is ceases to be voluntary, then
— as day follows night — a mandatory con-
tribution to the National Health Insurance
plan is a tax.

Dr Nottage, although he avoids the word,
by describing the. basis on which this “con-
tribution” is to be collected, confirms its tax
nature. In his description he also assiduously
avoids using the word “income” — to him it
is rather a person’s “earnings” from which a
“contribution” is to be collected. But as we all
know an accumulation of earnings translates
into income.

Says Dr Nottage: “All employees earning .

will pay 2.65 per cent of their monthly earn-
ings up to a maximum of $5,000.” Now trans-
late that into: “All employees earning will
pay 2.65 per cent of their monthly income
up to a maximum of $5,000.” In other words,
a tax on income — therefore, income tax.

“People who work for themselves will pay
5.3 per cent of their earnings,” said the good
doctor. For the word “earnings” again sub-
stitute the word “income” and you'll get the
drift of where this government is headed.

But then came the Freudian slip. As pen-
sioners no longer earn, Dr Nottage was forced
to use the word “income.’

“Pensioners who have a substantial income
will be asked to pay 2.65 per cent” — again
government puts a mandatory tax on income
for those it assumes can pay. Of course, those,
“with low income, who cannot afford it will be
covered by a contribution from the govern-
ment. They will not have to pay 4 copper!”
Dr Nottage promised.

It would make for a more honest debate if
instead of playing hide-and-seek around the
mulberry bush with the words “contribution”
and “tax”, government would acknowledge

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‘income tax’

that Bahamians are being taxed for their
health care.

In his address to the nation last Tuesday,
Dr Nottage made his “from the cradle to the
grave” promise — socialism in the raw.

Said he: “Persons who reach retirement
age or have to retire early for other reasons
and who now experience difficulties in getting
or meeting premium obligations for private
health insurance will not have to worry. With
NHI, they will still be protected! It is this
lifelong protection, offered by NHI, from the
cradle to the grave that will provide a signif-
icant measure of reassurance that one will
not be marginalized or pauperized by health
bills during the long years of retirement.”

The fact that the National Insurance Board
(NIB) is to administer this fund, is enough to
send an old age pensioner to an early grave.
Our readers must recall the alarming notice
that Doctors Hospital was forced to give
patients recently. It told those with National
Insurance health claims that their claims
would not be honoured by the hospital
because the National Insurance Board had
not paid Doctors Hospital.

That notice shook NIB into action. The
next announcement from Doctors Hospital
was that NIB had made “substantial pay-
ments” towards the outstanding receivable
balance it owed the hospital.

Doctors Hospital explained its reasons for
writing to employers and patients about the
outstanding NIB debt.

"The purpose of the notices,” said the hos- -

pital, “were merely to alert those persons
that the discussions regarding claims were
ongoing, and that the patients who received
care might be directly responsible for pay-
ment of bills if a-timely settlement was not
reached.”

NIB is yet to.get its own house in order. Its
administrative costs are far too high.

Bahamians would be wise to take govern- .

ment’s outlandish promises with a grain of

‘salt.
One day they might wake up and discover, .

as everyone is now predicting, that because
government has miscalculated the true cost of
the National Health Insurance scheme,
instead of a smooth march from the cradle to
the grave, government might stumble over its
debts and drop you along the way.

Like NIB contributors you might wake
up to find that you are being threatened with
having to pay your own health bills.



_grandchildr é n

What’s the rush
with NHI plan?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LADIES and gentlemen, let us
stop to think for a moment about
the double-talking hypocrisy of some
of our politicians. We are told that
doctors do not support National
Health Insurance (NHI) because of
their own self interest and greed,
and that the only persons who will
suffer if NHI is not passed are the
poor, struggling, vulnerable Bahami-
ans whose interests are ignored,
while those in the upper-income-
earning brackets (doctors included)
remain callously unsympathetic to
their hardship and suffering. Shame
on those who seek to cast suspicion
and contempt on our country’s entire
body of physicians, by cautivning
Bahamians to suspiciously question
their motives for opposing the gov-
ernment’s hasty attempt to enact
NHI legislation.

Check the record, not once has

the Medical Association of The

Bahamas objected to the govern-
ment's desire to significantly improve
our country’s public health system.
They have consistently offered cate-
gorical support for any effort that
will advance the quality and avail-
ability of health care for the Bahami-
an people. Let me make this very
important disclaimer: I am an ortho-
dontist, not a physician, and den-
tistry is not a part of NHL. In voicing
my concern therefore, I cannot be
accused by detractors of promoting
,my own self interest, at the expense
of the welfare of the Bahamian peo-
ple.

Bahamian physicians are not the
gang of unethical and unscrupulous
hoarders that certain mischievous
political public relations operatives
and politicians would have you
believe them to be. Ironically, these
same public relations operatives and
politicians, or more appropriately,
“spin doctors”, are trying to turn this
debate into a rich versus poor issue.
The problem is that they aren’t will-
ing to engage in any debate, but
would rather ‘ram this critically
flawed proposal down the throats of
the Bahamian people in the usual
paternalistic fashion that has char-
acterised. politics in our country since
the days of the UBP government.
Why can’t our government treat
Bahamians with more respect than
to assume that the voices of dissent
aren’t as smart as they are, and
should instead be vilified as special
interest lobbyists, only seeking to
protect their own self interests?

Curiously, these same “spin doc-
tors” have decided that it is not in the
people’s best interests to have a cam-
paign finance reform bill enacted, to

disclose and limit political campaign -

contributions for the protection of
the Bahamian people and our
democracy, from hidden vested
interests that provide political
favours to the rich and privileged,
whether Bahamian or foreign, at the
expense of the poor and not-so-well
connected. Why aren’t these same
socially conscious individuals aggres-
sively pursuing such legislation that
would create a truly transparent
political environment to keep our
country’s politicians honest? They
won’t tell you the answer to that
question, because it doesn’t favour
them to do so. How ironic, they
champion the cause of the poor man
— when it suits their purposes — but
won’t cry for justice on behalf of the
poor man when it interferes with
their own self interests. And they
unashamedly cry that doctors, in call-
ing for further consultation in craft-
ing a well conceived and structured
plan, are motivated by their own

‘Morris “Rudy” Campbell.

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greedy self interests. Say what?!
Shame on these duplicitous politi-
cal propagandists and hypocrites! As
the song goes: “I say it’s politricks
time again! It’s politricks. time
again!”

Tam not a FNM or PLP, I am an
Independent Bahamian who loves
this Bahamaland and its people. I
am an objective thinker, and I sepa-
rate politics from national interest.
Despite what negatives are hurled
at the feet of Sir Lynden, it can nev-
er be denied that early in his tenure,
he championed the noble cause of
uplifting the masses through educa-
tional empowerment. Educational
empowerment facilitates what
democracy holds so dearly, the con-
cept of self determination. Some of
our politicians are threatened by this
concept, as it frees the people from
the clutches of political subjugation
and reliance. The Bahamian people
don’t owe politicians anything. Politi-
cians owe the people gratitude for
endowing them with the opportuni-
ty to work on their béhalf. Political
paternalism is one of the greatest
threats to the advancement and evo-
lution of our Bahamas , and it is very
evident in the manner in which NHI
is being politicised today. Why
should Bahamians feel beholden and
dependent on government to decide
what is best for us, without due dili-
gence and proper consultation on
the part of government? The Anna
Nicole Smith disaster shows us how
devastating a lack of due diligence
and consultation can’be. We have a
sick, narcissistic, gold digger using
our beloved Bahamas and her own
personal tragedy to rake in unde-
served legal damages and tabloid
earnings, without regard for how her
shenanigans impacts upon the wel-
fare of our people and our country.
We must not allow Ms Smith and
those like her, to make our country a
cesspool for those who hold it in con-
tempt, distracting us from the real
issues requiring our full attention.

NHI is far too important for the
Ministry of Health to treat it with
the same kind of inattention to detail
exhibited by our country’s Ministry
of Immigration. This is not a fight
between the rich and poor, as some
would have us believe. Any sensi-
ble Bahamian surely realises that
any society that ignores the interests
and the well being of the poor, will
reap from the seeds of social destruc-
tion: Every Bahamian deserves
access to good quality health care.
No organisation or group opposed to
the existing NHI proposal has denied
this. The crux of the concern about
NHI has centred on the gimmick-
ery and false advertising that has
promised NHI will provide all of the
medical coverage that Bahamians
will need, at very little cost, when
countries like Canada and Great
Britain which have tried such
socialised health care plans, have
found them to be chronically over-
subscribed and underfunded, per-
petually placing financial burden on
their governments and their tax-pay-
ing citizenry. Their governments con-
tinue to pump more and more bil-
lions of tax dollars into these health
plans, while the tax payers complain
about receiving less and less benefits
due to bureaucratic waste and inef-
ficiency. What makes us believe that
The Bahamas’ experience with the
exact same system as Canada and

the UK will be any different? The
voices of protest are NOT objecting
to creating a better health care sys-
tem for the protection of all Bahami-*
ans. They have been VOICES OF
REASON trying to urge the gov-.
ernment to create a NHI [ plan that is.
properly defined and structured, with
a management team independent of
the government, since government,
managed corporations have been
synonymous with waste, inefficiency.
and mismanagement.

Again, think for a moment. The’
Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC);
the government’s health insurance'
advisory committee, proposes that
the cost to provide medical treat-
ment to Bahamians in 2007 will be
$108 million less than what it cost
to treat Bahamians in 2003. Why,
then, have ‘successive ministers of
health lamented that our country’s
public health system has become too.
expensive for the government to
finance without. additional monies,
when their own advisory committee
has reported that health care costs
under NHI will drastically decrease.
Bear in mind that we are told this
plan will provide all that our present
public health system does not, and
that 20 per cent more people will
utilise the public system during the
first three years of NHI than present,
ly do, but we are expected to believe.
that it will cost the government $108.
million less. Who do we believe, the
ministers or the committee? Wait,
it gets better. The $235 million price
tag will remain unchanged during
each of these first three years, despite

_ this 20 per cent increase in utilisation.

That means $235 million in
2007; $235 million in 2008; and $235
million in 2009. The costs don’t
change?! Sounds strange doesn’t it?
We don’t need a mathematician to
figure out that increased utilisation of
services will mean increased costs to
supply those needs. Could it be that
government intends to deny Bahami-
ans access to needed medical ser-
vices in an effort to contain costs?
Even if math usually hurts your
head, it is elementary to see that thé -
proposed NHI numbers just don’t
add up. No, this.is not a fight
between the rich and the poor, this is
a fight to get this thing right! If we
don’t get it right, guess who will pay
the price of grossly underestimatin’
the costs of NHI: every singlé
Bahamian; rich and poor; young and
old; this generation and those yet
unborn. '

The government is extreme
unsure of what the true. costs of
will be. There has been insufficient
research done to accurately deter-
mine the true costs of this plan. Evi
dence of this fact is that earlier this
year Bahamians were told that pens
sioners would pay $1 per day fox
their health coverage under NHI
One big problem though, they
realised that pensioners, many of
whom only receive $200 per month
from National Insurance, would bg
paying just as much as employed
Bahamians making $1200 per month,
The NHI steering committee realiseti
that a gross oversight had been
made, which forced them to také
another look at the NHI proposal,
because their contribution formula
was fundamentally flawed, would
neither be equitable nor fair in sh
ing costs, and would in fact be hurt:
ing the very same people the al
was designed to help. Now we are
being told by the minister of health
that “pensioners who experience
(financial) difficulties will not have to
pay a copper.” Why does it seem as

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THE TRIBUNE




Chief Justice
defends Justice
Lyons’ ‘right
to speak out’

FROM page one

show.

“That is why I would have
alerted you when you invited
me Mr Jones that I would prob-
ably be here to disappoint your
listeners,” he said.

Mr Jones continued to probe
Sir Burton to no avail. The chief
justice maintained his decorum,
and avoided Mr Jones’ attempts
to re-word questions surround-
ing Justice Lyons rulings and
the controversy between the
justice and the attorney general.

Justice Lyons has ruled that
the judiciary of the Bahamas
was not independent because
the government had failed to
cause the appointment of a
Judicial Review Commission on
two occasions to review the
salaries of judges.

' He has also taken offence to
a scathing attack levied at him
by Mrs Maynard-Gibson in the
House of Assembly where she
asserted that the Justice had
“misled” the Bahamian people.
', The matter is now before the
Court of Appeal, and Justice
Lyons has stated that if the judg-

ment of the court proved that

he had, in fact, misled the public,
he would resign from his post.

- Similarly, he said, if the ruling
showed that he did not mislead
the Bahamian public, then the
Attorney General should resign.

When asked by Mr Jones if
Justice Lyons was correct in
questioning the independence
of the judiciary, Sir Burton said

that he would not say if he

agreed with Justice Lyons or
not - but did agree that the

statement was one that Justice .

Lyons was entitled to make.

“That is an argument in which,
in this broad ongoing work of
dialogue, he is entitled to make.
I am not going to say whether I
agree with him or not. But it is
an argument that he is entitled to
make,” Sir Burton said.

Wi ee
ASS

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PHONE: 322-2157









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"Lawyer: Lyons
matter will not

embarrass us

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Justice John Lyons’
rulings and government’s
handling of the matter will
not embarrass the Bahamas
when the Privy Council sits
in New Providence in Decem-
ber, according to lawyer
Damian Gomez.

“No, it just depends on how
the matter is handled. I don’t
think one has much to do
with the other at this point.

“If the government digs in
its heels, it was bound to
reach the Privy Council in any
event. Even if they were sit-
ting in England, they would
have still heard about it.”

The Privy Council is to sit
for the first time ever outside of
the UK when members arrive
in the Bahamas next month.

Mr Gomez said the Court
of Appeal is currently under-
going renovation to accom-
modate this historical event.

He said this is a great hon-
our and will become the “sin-
gle most important legal
event in Bahamas.”

“And if we can get them to
stay here, that is to sit on a
regular basis and hear appeals
from the rest of those coun-
tries that still use them as the
highest court of appeal in the
region, we would have scored
a major coup.

“It will promote the off-
shore financial services sector
in a way we just couldn’t do it
otherwise,” Mr Gomez said.

The Privy Council will be
hearing matters that have
been listed with the Court of
Appeal.

Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer in July,
2004, was the first Bahamian
woman to be appointed a
Privy Councillor to.the Queen.

The Privy Council is a

- Sanpin Motors
~ Pre-Owned Dept. —
Thompson Blvd.
325-0881/2

S.UVs

@ DAMIEN Gomez

council of personal advisers
to the Queen, and its judicial
committee is the Bahamas’
highest court.

Dame Sawyer’s appoint-
ment is for life.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie was appointed as a
Privy Councillor earlier in
2004.

Earlier this year, Lord Scott
of Foscote of the Privy Coun-

cil visited Freeport, Grand

Bahama.

Addressing the judiciary at
a special luncheon in Janu-
ary, he spoke about the
increasing complexities of
courts, granting damages or.
monetary awards.

Lord Hope of Craighead of
the Privy Council attended
the opening of the legal year
on January 6 in Nassau.

He announced that in the
near future the new Supreme
Court for the United King-
dom will absorb the jurisdic-
tion of the Privy Council.

The Constitutional Reform
Bill will abolish the office of
Supreme Chancellor and cre-
ate a new Supreme Court for
the UK. Ate







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PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Downtown redevelopment of
Nassau is too narrowly focused

Hier so. often,
somebody in govern-
ment, perhaps prompted by
somebody at ZNS (or vice ver-
sa) takes the opportunity to
remind the public of the pend-
ing release of the EDAW
report on the regeneration of
downtown Nassau. Apart from
reminding us that the report

would, in any normal society,
have been public from the very
outset, such snippets of infor-
mation actually tell us very lit-
tle in the way of concrete plans
or timetables.

While government has been
amply and deservedly com-
-mended for involving a wide
cross section of the local busi-

-ness community in the consul-

Decorate

tative process, the same age-old
pattern of needless secrecy has
been followed as regards the
general public. Everyone knows
someone who has seen the
much-rumoured disc contain-
ing the recommendations, but,
to date, nothing tangible is
available to the interested pub-
lic.

Nevertheless, one of the

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PERSPECTIVES

ANDREW ALLEN

things that seem clear is that,
like most of its predecessors,
the EDAW plan suffers from a
problem of definition. Once
again, a plan to redevelop
downtown Nassau has com-



. Once again, a
plan.to redevelop
downtown
Nassau has
commenced on
the false premise
that ‘downtown’
is restricted toa
narrow coastal
strip. It excludes
even the

central areas
immediately
adjacent to
Government
House.

aS ee eee ee

menced on the false premise
that ‘downtown’ is restricted to
a narrow coastal strip. It
excludes even the central areas
immediately adjacent to Goy-
ernment House.

his is no fault of the

consultants themselves.
Rather, it is because, in com-
missioning the study, govern-
ment has once again failed to

appreciate that half of ‘down-
town’ is located in an area



poignant given the.emphasis
being placed by the present gov-
ernment on Urban Renewal.
What better means of begin-












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ning a genuine renewal of the
entire inner city than integrating
bordering areas into the Busi-
ness Improvement District
(BID) proposed in the EDAW
plan?

Most notably, the area

extending from behind West
Hill Street and Gregory Arch
to St. Agnes Church encom-
passes a block that includes
Government House and Gar-
dens and one of the finest and
most historic Churches in The
Bahamas. This area has
already has almost all of the

ingredients required for inte-

gration into the better-kept
and more prestigious parts of
the city.

TEAR DOWN THAT
WALL

Meee the single
worst legacy of colo-

nial urban design in The
Bahamas is that monstrous
pink wall that surrounds Gov-
ernment House, denying the
public a view of the largest and
most attractive public gardens
in Central Nassau.

One wonders whether any-

one in government, or perhaps’

any of the seven post-Indepen-
dence occupants of the house
itself, has ever spared a thought
as to what purpose the wall
serves, or, more importantly,
what kind of psychological
message it sends to Bahami-
ans. .

It is clear what message it was
initially intended to send: the
same message as the Norman
Castles that once ruled over
Saxon serfs in England. Put sim-

‘ply, those behind or outside the

wall are behind the back of the
town, which faces and encom-
passes the district between the
ridge and the sea. In both cases,
it is a powerful psychological
signal that was not lost on the
builders.

And it damages a lot more

i @

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SUNSET MEADOWS SUBDIVISION

than just psychology. THe
opportunity, for instance, to sus-
tain a once-thriving over-the-
hill entertainment scene has
probably now been lost forever
as middle-class Bahamians have
migrated from such areas and
inadequate investment, security-

‘and facilities have prevented

their replacement by tourist
patronage.

he historic condition-

ing of Bahamians to
regard anything behind the
ridge not as a part of the city,
but as a parasitic settlement,
much as the favelas that mush-
room among the hills around
Latin American cities, has dis-
couraged government from
undertaking any genuine
‘urban’ renewal, but encouraged
patchy residential renewal
efforts.

Since low-cost residential
usage is by definition a misuse
of this urban space, the long:
term effects of most efforts over
the years has been to delay

actual urban regeneration,



Maybe the
single worst
legacy of colonial
urban design in °
The Bahamas is .
that monstrous |
pink wall that
surrounds
Government
House, denying -
the public a view,
of the largest and
most attractive ;
public gardens in =
Central Nassau. .

%



tather than promote it. i
A sensible move in the right
direction would be to replace

.the wall around government

house with a black gate, which
would give a full vista from
Blue Hill Road to Market

: Street, encompassing the Gov-

ernment House gardens «s well
as Gregory Arch. The ¢atire
area would be ins! vistly

enhanced. ° . é ler
' At present, the obtrusive,
offensive wall stands as a
reminder that, a generation
after independence, Bahamians
have done little to address the
deep, inherited defects in Nas-
sau’s urban design. f









INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE

CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET,
OR CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT
ANY OR ALL OFFERS.


«THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 7

Never a Caribbean airline?

e
6
‘

if By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat).

YEAR ago in a com-
. mentary entitled
, ‘Time to Ground National Air-
lines”, I observed that: “The
“national airline option has not
worked for the CARICOM
area. And, if it continues to be
’ pursued, air traffic into and out
of the region will pass to carriers
of other countries with little if
any regard for CARICOM’s
development goals.”
“ On November 21st this year,
“Caribbean Airlines — the pro-
posed successor company to
BWIA, the Trinidad and Toba-
g0 state-owned airline —
‘announced that it was entering
a “partnership” with British
‘Airways from March next year.
Under this “partnership”,
,Caribbean Airlines will give
up BWIA’s current lucrative
slots at London’s Heathrow
Airport in return for code
‘sharing with BA from Gatwick
“Airport — a considerable dis-
tance from London. BA will
“clearly be the senior partner
in this proposed relationship
gontrolling the inventory and
pricing.

‘My observation in November
last year echoed the views of
several regional airline experts,
and reflected the conclusion of
the 1992 West Indian Commis-
sion which stated in its report,
“Time for Action”, that a single
CARICOM airline, in some
form, was vitally necessary and
the national airline option

should be abandoned.

he calls for a regional

airline came against the
background of severe financial
losses by all the national air-
lines, and even the privately
owned, Caribbean Star, which
was competing with LIAT in
the Eastern and Southern

Caribbean.
~ At the time, three govern-
ment-owned airlines that serve
multi-destinations within the
«region, were all -undergoing
major restructuring exercis-
es. This followed a decade dur-
‘ing which they collectively
‘incurred losses in excess US$1.5
‘billion funded by taxpayers’
money. These airlines were:
‘ Air Jamaica, BWIA and LIAT,
‘though it should be mentioned
that Bahamasair, the national
airline of the Bahamas, and
Cayman Airlines were also
doing poorly.



» These nation-
al airlines will
not long
sutvive unless
governments
‘continue to
‘pour money
into them. The
‘case for
grounding
them remains
solid.

.



» The restructurings of the
‘Three airlines are expensive and
‘are being funded by
taxpayers. US$400 million was
spent on restructuring Air
‘Jamaica, the Jamaica state-
owned airline. Yet, last year,
she airline lost another US$136
million which will have to be
picked up by the govern-
fment. This questions the value
of its restructuring.

In the case of BWIA, the
‘lrinidad and Tobago state-
sowned airline, the government
‘was backing the airline’s bor-
yowings and other transactions
ovith guarantees. Finally, this
year, the government decided
‘to close down BWIA and pump
US$250 million into a succes-
sor company, Caribbean Air-
dines.

aribbean Airlines is
essentially BWIA with
ll the old union contracts
gone. This means some of the
employees will be severed and
“others offered new relationships
{with the new entity.

2 With regard to LIAT, the
restructuring figure bandied
‘about last year was US$50 mil-
lion. At that time, continued

Pw Te oe

competition with Caribbean
Star was still envisaged.

In all this discussion about
restructuring and financing, the
notion of a single Caribbean air-
line was hardly discussed even
though, in 1995, the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation (CTO)
commissioned a report which
identified huge savings that
could be achieved through co-
operation and different levels
of integration of national air-
lines

The annual savings were suf-
ficient to offset the annual loss-
es that these airlines typically
sustained.

The CTO-commissioned
study was ignored.

In 2005, the Caribbean Hotel

Association (CHA) examined
the issue again and in clear,
unequivocal terns concluded
that a regional airline was the
only way forward.
_ It issued a White Paper to
form the basis for a discussion
between the three airlines and
their government owners and
called for the creation of a
regional airline.

Again, the White Paper was
ignored.

Then, on November 21st this
year, the new Caribbean Air-
lines announced the formation
of its “partnership” with British
Airways, starting from March
next year.




WORLD VI

hat is remarkable
about this
announcement is that a
Caribbean airline can find the
means to partner with a foreign
airline but there is no sign that
the airlines of the Caribbean
can partner with each other.

Caribbean Airlines, for
instance, has already made sug-
gested plans to establish its own
Dash-8 subsidiary to feed its
bigger airlines at hubs in
Trinidad, Barbados and
Antigua. This means that it will
still compete with LIAT and
Caribbean Star or the airline
that emerges from a current
negotiation between these two
ailing airlines to create a single
airline.

It took years of losing money,
through competition with each
other, before the shareholders
of LIAT and Caribbean Star
finally decided to stop their
joint haemorrhaging.

In the meantime, Air Jamaica
stands mightily aloof from the



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

developments surrounding the
other nationally owned air-
lines. It will continue as the
national airline of Jamaica and
the Jamaican.taxpayers will foot
the bill of US$536 million that
might otherwise be spent on
health or education. It will also
continue to compete with



BWIA/Caribbean Airlines out
of New York into the Eastern
Caribbean causing both airlines
to lose money.

What is more, according to
the Ministry of Finance, Air
Jamaica will be using “older
model planes” in an effort to
save US$25 million. Although,
who will be happy over the use
of “older model planes”, is any-
body’s guess.

But, the problems of

Caribbean airlines have not -

changed since a year ago.

They still face high costs as a
consequence of their separate
operations. They continue to
forego the benefits of
economies of scale that could
have applied to a single airline
or even to the merged opera-
tion of some of their activities
such as offices at airports,
check-in counters, telecommu-
nication circuits, and the pur-
chase of jet fuel.

BWIA and Air Jamaica still
carry fewer passengers into and
out of the region than their for-
eign competitors. For instance,
American Airlines carries far
more people between Miami
and Port-of-Spain than BWIA.
The national Caribbean airlines
are outdone by the foreign car-
riers with greater resources.

These national airlines will
not long survive unless govern-
ments continue to pour money



}

into them. The case for ground-
ing them remains solid.

Trinidad and Tobago may
have Caribbean Airlines from
January and for a time, but it
seems that the CARICOM
region will never have a
Caribbean airline.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





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Steak-out and Basketball Jamboree at the Betty Cole Park, hosted by the FNM St. Thomas More
Constituency





ENM is ‘playing
politics with NHI’

li By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE opposition is, playing
politics with an issue that ought
not to be divided along political
lines, PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby said yesterday, speaking
about the FNM’s critical
remarks on the National Health
Insurance scheme.

“Anyone following the debate
on the National Health Insur-
ance scheme would appreciate
that it is a noble objective from
any government who wants to
take care of its people. It’s not
just for PLPs, it’s for all Bahami-
ans,” Mr Rigby said. ,

Mr Rigby added his voice
again to the ongoing debate on
the National Health Insurance
scheme yesterday, calling into
Love 97 during Mike Smith’s
talk show.

id members of the
opposition were appearing on
television and radio shows try-



{





ing to ‘politify’ this issue that
requires no politics.

“There is no way-a responsi-
ble person from the major
Opposition in our country to say
we are playing politics with an
issue that ought not to be divid-
ed on political lines.

“We have a country, and we
ought to mould our country and
make sure that it is the best coun-
try that we can have. (To do that
we have to) look after those peo-
ple that we know are being left
out of the social network.”

He noted that several groups
in the Bahamas could not afford
private insurance, including the
old, and persons of low to aver-
age income.

Last week Prime Minister
Perry Christie tabled a Bill for
the establishment of the Nation-
al Insurance Scheme in the
House of Assembly. ;

According to:Mr Rigby, the
Bill is intended to move to the



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Senate by December and be
completed by the end of the year.
Some observers believe that
the bill was being rushed and
not enough time was being
allowed for public input and
consultation. However, Mr Rig-
by said by tabling the Bill in
parliament the second phase of:
consultation will continue.

’ He anticipates that, when the
bill is being tabled, regulations
will be put before parliament
“which will set out bringing the
necessary prerequisites in the
positions of how the actual
scheme will work.” :

“But the consultation will con-
tinue even during the passing of
the bill,” he said. “This is not the
end of the process. The public
always has an input. The process
of consultation and fine-tuning
will not end,” Mr Rigby said.

During the course of debate,
the Bill could be amended, he
added.



y

>
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 9











FNM candidate hosts steak-out

FREE National Movement candidate Reece Chipman for the St. Thomas More constituency host-
ed a Thanksgiving steak-out and basketball jamboree at the weekend. Teams from throughout the com-
munity competed for trophies at Betty Cole Park. Reece and her campaign team gathered some 100
food containers that were distributed throughout the St. Thomas More constituency to persons 1n need.







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‘Guiding light’
Saunders dies at age of 65

“In his generation and
beyond, Mr Saunders’ name
was synonymous with culture
in The Bahamas. Though an
attorney by profession, Mr
Saunders shared his consider-

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able gifts as a playwright and
cultural mentor with the coun-
try for which he will always be
remembered. ‘
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LOCAL NEWS



Winston

a nation and its people? And
Winston Saunders led the way
in helping to develop, catalogue
and promote it all. The range of
Winston’s work in the interest
of Bahamian culture was truly
outstanding and amazing,” the
prime minister said.

A consummate intellectual,
Mr Saunders always asserted
that culture in The Bahamas
was more than Junkanoo alone.

The former chairman of the
Quincentennial Commission,
which organised celebrations
for the 500th anniversary of
Columbus landing in San Sal-
vador, Mr Saunders was also
the founder of the National
Youth Choir, the National
Dance Company and’ the
National Children’s Choir. He
was also founder of the modern
Dundas Centre for the Per-
forming Arts.

“In recognition of his talent,
leadership and ability to serve
the national interest in culture,
I was pleased to name Winston
to head the National Commis-
sion on Culture. The passing of
Winston Saunders is a deep
personal loss and a tremendous
loss for The Bahamas. His lead-
ership will be missed. ~

“T offer my own condolences
to his family and the lasting
thanks of a grateful nation. This
is a sad day for The Bahamas.
It is a loss that cannot be filled,”
Mr Christie said. ;

Mr Saunders was a cultural
icon in The Bahamas and was
known for his stellar contribu-
tion to the arts generally, but
specifically as a pianist, singer

Look Great for the Holidays!

320-1090 -



# WINSTON SAUNDERS

and church organist.

He was also a playwright
(You Can Take a Horse To
Water), a director and a leader
of culture in the area of public
policy.

Mr Saunders once served as
chairman of the Dundas Centre
for the Performing Arts and
put the Dundas on its present
modern footing. _

Professionally, he was an
attorney and served as a mag-
istrate in the Bahamas, creating
the Coroners Court.

As chairman of the commis-
sion appointed by Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to advise
the government on cultural pol-
icy, he was the organiser for
the national Independence Day

_celebrations and helped to

develop legislation for parlia-
ment on national honours and a
national heroes day.

Paul Mirchell Salon
far Women & Men





|
THE TRIBUNE






Employers’
Confederation
FROM page one

on .the plan when we have not
been consulted or provided with
any information in respect to a
detailed report of the costs and
components involved in imple-
menting the plan?"

The president also expressed
concern about recommended
improvements that have not been
made to the National Insurance
Board before the national health
plan comes into effect.

"The government,” he said,
“was not successful in their han-
dling of Water and Sewerage,
BEC, or the Batelco, so J don’t
see them being successful in man-
aging this corporation."

The Bahamas Employer’s
Confederation is a member of the
National Coalition for Healthcare
Reform.

The coalition, which is made
up of various medical groups,
trade unions.and employer asso-
ciations claims that it is a “part-
nership of Bahamian citizens rep-
resenting all sectors of society
who are committed to improving
health care services that truly
incorporate the elements of the
right of choice and equal access to
health care services for all resi-
dents in the Bahamas.”

The coalition is one of the
major opponents of the proposed
national health insurance plan,
claiming that the plan is “rushed”
by government, and that more
consultation is requied before
implementation.

Health Minister Dr Bernard
Nottage claimed Wednesday
night in his address to the nation
that there were many persons in
the country who were in “dire
need” of medical insurance.

The health minister said: “We
must convince those Bahamians
who have much to share just a
little with those who have little.”

Mr Nutt said that the coalition
and the employers federation did
not oppose the principle of med-
ical insurance for all citizens, but
he claimed that government was
intent on making the proposed .
health plan sound like a “won-
derful thing.”

But, he said: “There are just
too many pitfalls that are being
glossed over.”

Surgeon
FROM page one. 2

“Tt is a lofty, goal;.and one

‘that I would certainly support if

the plan were feasible and sus-
tainable.. ~ a
“Unfortunately, the plan has
been hijackéd by political con-
siderations. The projected bud-

get is a gross under-estimate for
the services they propose to
cover.








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“The revenue generation by’
income contribution constitutes
an income tax by any reason-
able definition.”

Dr Tseretopoulos, pointing
out that actuarial data on the

colors
We export to alll RECIEVE A 10% DISCOUNT proposed plan had not been
3 : m public, ci ritain’s
islands. ie sates National Health Service bud-

get as a guide to likely true
costs.

With a 2006/7 budget alloca-
tion of £135 billion for a popu- -
lation of 60 million, it works out
at roughly £2,000 or $4,000 per
person. : 4

Translated into Bahamas
terms, based on a 300,000 pop-
ulation, the cost would be $1.2
billion, far exceeding the gov-
ernment’s projected $235 mil- °
lion.

“Our health care costs in the
Bahamas are equivalent to
those in the southern United
States and far exceed the cost of
care in the United Kingdom.

“In addition, our administra-
tive costs will certainly ,be much
higher than those in the UK,
particularly if the NIB is used as
a benchmark. It would be fair to
assume our per capita costs
would exceed the UK rate fur-
ther diminishing the validity of
the government’s estimates.”

Dr Tseretopoulos said though
it was possible the services
offered might be scaled down,
“at this point the government
is guaranteeing comprehensive
health coverage which based on
these projections is not realis-
tic.” i

He added: “I can only sur-
mise that the proposal is being
pushed forward for purely polit-
ical considerations, and that the
government is offering a pie in
the sky to try and gain an
advantage prior to the upcom-
ing election.

“If this proposal becomes
law, it is a certainty that it will
be unable to fulfil its obligations
with the proposed budget, and
that the level of taxation will
either increase or the coverage
will be severely limited.”

He said the act had the
potential to be ruinous to the
economy “and there must be
further reasonable discussion
with all interested parties and
health experts prior to its imple-
mentation.”
eT

THE TRIBUNE




Craft graduates to
have a ‘captive

market at

The 51 Berry Islanders who
graduated with honours from
the BAIC straw and shell craft
course have a “captive market”
awaiting them at nearby Coco
Cay, where hundreds of thou-
sands of cruise tourists vacation
every year, they were told.

A memo has already gone
out from the management of

Coco Cay (Royal Caribbean _

International and Celebrity
Cruises) that come the new year
more Bahamian-made sou-
venirs must be sold there.
During ceremonies last week-
end at St Bartholomew by the
Sea Church, Bullocks Harbour,
the graduates, who included stu-
dents from the R N Gomez All
Age School there, heard from
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Minister, Vincent Peet,
MP for the Berry Islands and
North Andros, the guest speak-
er

Coco Cay sent a letter to ven-
dors that, come next year, they
were reducing the sale of non-

Bahamian souvenirs offered to

tourists there.

Though vendors complained
such a move would cut into
their livelihoods, Mr Peet said
the concept “was a good one.”

“Clearly tourists come to the
Bahamas to experience the
Bahamas and things Bahami-
an,” said-Mr Peet. “They come
to experience our culture and
that which makes us who we
are. :

“The government is encour-
aging developers and owners
‘like Coco Cay and others to use
more Bahamian-made products.

“So if they are saying they
want to do it, you and I will
have to find the formula to
make that happen.”

Courses

The Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) course in shell and
straw craft, he said, is one of
the methods to:make that hap-
pen. More than 500 persons
throughout the islands have
taken the BAIC courses’ this
year. = hse
“You in Great Harbour Cay
are much more fortunate than
those who graduated‘in Andros
because you have a captive mar-
ket,” said Mr Peet. “You have
Coco Cay, (and) you have Big
Sturrup Cay...

“Depending on how hard you
want to work-and-how good






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oco Cay







Berry Islands graduate Katielee Butler shows Financial Services
and Investments Minister Vincent Peet Bahamian-made Christ-
mas decorations.

your product is, the sky is the
limit, literally.”

The Berry Islands trainers.
were April Fox-Martin in shell
craft and Eldena Miller in straw

~ craft...

Thirteen students from R N
Gomez All Age School, Bul-
locks Harbour, also took the
course. |

“With the development that
is happening in our country
nowadays it is important that
our students get an early start,”
said principal Cleveland Ram-
say

exhibits on display you can see
that the future is bright in shell
and straw craft. :

“We are committed at the R
N Gomez All-Age School to
become artisans and business
owners to provide authentically
Bahamian made products to
meet the market.”

Rhondi Treco, assistant site
manager at Coco Cay, said she

was “very impressed” by the ..-..

quality of produets- made during
the BAIC course.

“This is exactly what we were
talking about,” ‘she said. “It is
just what we are looking for.
This makes me very happy. I
can see we are headed in the
right direction.

“I have had many guests
comment that they don’t want
to purchase anything that they
can get elsewhere,” said Ms
Treco. “And these are items, I
am sure, people will pay for and
this is what they are looking for.

“There is a big demand for-
native products that are authen-
tic and one of a kind and I see a

ENGLAND

“And when you look at the |

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

lot of that here. I am very
pleased. This is better than what
I expected.”






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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE

Junkanoo back in.

Bahama after eight years

® By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The tradi-
tional early morning Boxing
Day Junkanoo Parade with a
“much modernised approach”
will return to the streets of West
End, Grand Bahama, on
December 26, after an almost
eight year hiatus.

West End MP Obie Wilch-
combe said the return of the
junkanoo parade “is a major
move towards bringing back the
glory days to West End.”

During a press conference at
the Prime Minister’s Office in
Freeport, Mr Wilchcombe
announced that Ginn Corpora-
tion executives John Davies and
John Gray had agreed to be the
corporate sponsors for the
junkanoo parade and competi-
tion.

“It is my privilege to
announce formally that plans
are well underway for the stag-

- ing of the first Junkanoo Festi-

vals in West End after a hiatus

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i JUNKANOO will be back in Grand Bahama for oxing Day

of almost eight years,” said Mr
Wilchcombe, who is also Min-
ister of Tourism.

Jeff Albury, chairman of the
West End Junkanoo Commit-
tee, said the parade will start at
2am on December 26. He said

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the Superstar Rockers, The
Swingers, The West End Con-
querors, The Arawak Invaders,
and the Fun Time Gikos, a new
group, will participate in the
parade.

Mr Wilchcombe said that the

HARBOUR BAY

PHONE: 394-7040

committee -+had been working
for several weeks...and are
putting into West End some
features that don’t even exist
on Bay Street in Nassau.

“We are revolutionising this |
junkanoo parade by introduc-
ing new concepts, and we cer-
tainly hope that those who will
make it to West End will see
some new things happening in
junkanoo, and a much mod-
ernised approach to how the
parade is presented,” he said.

He said junkanoo in West
End was started many years ago
with men like West End resi-
dent Senator Austin Grant, who
is now deceased, and “who
thought it was an opportunity
to celebrate the culture and the
creative attributes of the
Bahamian people and bring
excitement into Grand Bahama,
and West End in particular, dur-
ing Boxing Day.

“In fact, they wanted West
End to be'recognised as the”
place where the true Christmas
celebrations begin on Grand
Bahama.

“And so, we are staging
junkanoo again with the won-
derful assistance of Ginn, who is
coming in as a major corporate
sponsor this year. We will cer-
tainly invite others to be a part
of it.”

Mr Wilchcombe commended
Ginn for demonstrating its cor-
porate citizenship by agreeing
to become involved in the stag-
ing of what will be perhaps the
best junkanoo celebration held
in West End.

John Davies said Ginn is
happy to be a part of the
rebirth of the traditional cele-
bration in West End. He added

’ that the fact that Ginn is work-

ing in West End makes it even
better and provides more cor-
porate purpose for what the
corporation was doing in West
End.

“We sincerely hope that this
first event will be the first of
many and will grow and become
very successful in the years to
come,” he said.
election, Chavez said amid the

.



ried Castro and his armed band

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 13

LOCAL NEWS







B THE Heads of Department of various government agencies came fogetlier recently for lunch for
the new Commodore of the Defence Force Clifford ‘Butch’ Scavella at Police Headquarters. From
left: Deputy Commissioner of Police John Rolle, Director of Airport Security Erold Farquharson,
Head of Road Traffic Department Jack Thompson, Head of Lmmigration Vernon Burrows, Com-
modore Scavella, Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson, Controller of Customs John Rolle,
Deputy Head of Her Majesty’s Prison Fox Hill Charles Rolle, Head of Passport
Department Jordan Ritchie and Commander Delong Bonner of the US Embassy.

iene, Franklyn G Ferguson)

Chavez pledges to dedicate
victory to Cuba's Castro

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

VENEZUELAN President
Hugo Chavez told a "red tide"
of hundreds of thousands of
supporters on Sunday that he
will dedicate his expected re-
election victory to the ailing
leader of communist Cuba,
Fidel Castro, according to Asso-
‘ciated Press.

Chavez, a close ally of Cas-
tro, noted that the December 3
vote will be held the same
weekend as Cuba's 50th’
anniversary celebration of the
landing of the yacht that car-

to Cuba to launch their guerril-
la war.

"This victory on December 3

.. we're going to dedicate it to.
the 50 years since the arrival of
the revolutionary boat Granma
led by Fidel Castro to the coast
of Cuba," Chavez said to
cheers. "Fidel, applause from
Venezuela! Long live Cuba!
Long live revolutionary Cuba!"

Chavez considers the Cuban
leader a mentor, but has often
said that the socialism he seeks
for Venezuela does not aim to
copy Cuba's system. His critics,
including leading opposition
candidate Manuel Rosales, have
accused Chavez of trying to
bring Venezuela to Cuba-style
authoritarianism.

Peering through a pair of
binoculars down a major
avenue packed with supporters .
wearing the color of his party,
Chavez admired what he called
the "red tide."

"Our goal is not to win" the

thunder of fireworks. "We must
outdo our previous triumphs.
We are going to win in a way
that is overwhelming, crushing."

Sunday's rally, the largest in
support of Chavez since cam-
paigning began in August,
appeared to number in the hun-
dreds of thousands and Chavez
claimed millions. There were
no official estimates by police
or other agencies.

Journalists on the scene said
it appeared somewhat smaller:
than an opposition rally a day
earlier that flooded) a major
highway in one of the largest
anti-Chavez demonstrations in
years.

Chavez welcomed interna-
tional election observers from
the European Union, Organi-
zation of American States, the
Carter Center and other bod-
ies.

"You will be witnesses to
another of the great victories of
the Bolivarian people," said
Chavez, invoking the legacy of
South American independence
hero Simon Bolivar.

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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FROM page one

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Saturday 7:00am - 3:00pm_'_

Company, the officers
dropped a rock on Mr
Wilson’s back, then picked
it up and dropped it on him
a second time.

In addition, they kicked
and beat him about the
body and head until Mr
Wilson was reduced to a
semi-conscious state, “drift-
ing in and out of conscious-
ness and suffering flash-
backs.”

As Mr Ingraham
approached the officers,
four of them drew handguns
and fired three shots into
the air, said Mr Moultrie.
One reportedly said they

would have to kill Mr Ingra- -

ham because he had seen
what happened.

When Mr Ingraham and
his neighbour, Mr Wilfred
Major, eventually managed
to drag Mr Wilson clear and
rush him to the local clinic,
an officer allegedly told the
duty doctor: “Let him die.”

Commodore Scavella said
that he could not predict
what repercussions would
follow if all reports of the
altercation proved true.
Until that time he said they
would have to allow a prop-
er investigation to take
place.

“One is not able to pre-
empt what one might do or
what will happen. Now one
has to let the course of the
investigation play out and
to see where we are before
one can make any predic-
tions along that line,” he
said.

The incident -has left
Inagua in a state of shock.
Yesterday, officers at the
island’s Defence Force base,
and on board the visiting
Defence Force vessel Yel-
low Elder, were lying low as
tension mounted.

Mr Moultrie said: “Had

those men not come out of |

their homes when they did,
these officers would have
killed this poor fellow. |
_“Mr Wilson is known as a
nice guy. He is not a trou-

-ble-maker and was doing

nothing wrong when. these
officers set about him.
“This is a barbaric act.
The police have not made
any arrests so far, but they
are investigating and the
people will expect results.”
The local physician, a Dr
Kapuno, was so concerned
about the condition of Mr
Wilson’s head that he
ordered an emergency flight

‘to Nassau. It left Inagua at

9am yesterday.

Mr Moultrie told ‘The Tri-
bune: “Mr Wilson was
sedated before the flight.
His cousin Shane accompa- _
nied him on the plane.

THE TRIBUNE

Man is airlifted
to Nassau after
being beaten
‘almost to death’

There were two gaping
holes in his head, front and
back, where he had been
beaten with rocks.

“These officers attacked
him like an animal. They
stomped on him. At one
point, they dropped a rock

“on the back of his head.

They were kicking and beat-

ing him when Diverne. came

out of his house.

“Then the officers pulled |

weapons and told him to get
away. One officer said he
(Mr Ingraham) had seen it
and so. they should get rid
of him.

“Then Mr Wilfred Major
came out. The officers did-
n’t want anyone to give Mr
Wilson attention. Mr Ingra-
ham and Mr Major finally

‘got him and carried him to

the clinic.”

Mr Moultrie said Mr
Wilson’s injuries were “life
threatening” and the feel-
ings locally were that he
would have a struggle to
survive. -

“Dexter is a hard-work-
ing fellow who keeps him-
self out of problems. He is
not the sort of guy who goes
looking for trouble.

“What these officers did
. to him was inhumane. These

neighbours saved Dexter’s
life. Right now the people
are uneasy. I think there
could be.trouble.”

. The incident brought back
bitter memories. for

Inaguans. In 1984 a'riot
broke out in Mathew Town
after a police officer ‘gun-
butted an. elderly man.’'Dur- ~



Last” night,

tension was evident follow-
ing the attack on Mr Wil-
son,.a single man who was
born in Nassau of Inaguan
parents.

“These. people are sup-
posed to be here to uphold
the law,” said a resident,
“Instead they engaged in
this completely uncalled-for
act. The people are very
upset.

“At the moment, the base
is quiet, all the officers
appear to be confined to

base. But one officer is on-

the deck of the Yellow
Elder heavily armed. They
obviously feel that some-
thing unpleasant could hap-
pen.” :

e LATE NEWS: The Yel-
low Elder was said last
night to have left Inagua. “I
presume it’s bound for Nas-
sau,” said a source. “They
obviously didn’t want to be
here tonight.” ~

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 15



Tribune colleagues Cara.
and Marcquel tie the knot








F ROM page four

though this plan has not been giv-
en proper consideration as to
what it will teally cost, and who
will and won't have to pay for it?
Could it be that our leaders just
really do not know? Perhaps the
minister of foreign affairs sums
up this uncertainty best, when he
suggested on Wednesday’s More
94FM talk show that government

will work out the details AFTER ©

NHI is passed into law.

Stop for a moment, and let’s
consider a scenario that incorpo-
rates Mr Mitchel’s cavalier atti-
tude toward the implementation
of NHI. 5

Doctor: “Mr Johnson, you
need brain surgery.”

- long pause -

Mr Johnson: “Who will per-
form the procedure, Doctor?”

. Doctor: “T will.” ;

Mr Johnson: “Have you per-
formed brain surgery before,
Doctor?”

Doctor: “No, Mr Johnson, but
I'll work it out once I see what
I’m working with.”

Mr Johnson: “Doc, ya head
jam eh?!” :

NHI must be properly planned
to succeed, lest it is doomed to
failure. Instead of getting into a
really big jam, why can’t we give
further evaluation to a plan that
many well-meaning experts have
cautioned has not been given due
diligence. Bahamians deserve and
expect a health insurance plan
prepared with the. care of a seven
course meal, definitely not with
the haste of some slam bam.

Minister Nottage, please,
what’s the rush?

S ANDRE ROLLINS, DMD
Nassau,
November 24, 2006.






Wehave all your c
nassau 394221 3 marshharhour abaco 242:3672271

paintpleecoralwave.com



*

TRIBUNE staff members Marcquel Bethel and Cara Brennen. «:
were married at the weekend in a service at the Church of the
Epiphany on Prince Charles Drive.

The newlyweds then enjoyed their wedding reception at the
British Colonial Hilton. Ed



(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

On Roving Memory








DALERI € ANTOINETTE
CAREY OUTION

"March 18, 1953 - November 27, 2004






‘For rione of ud fives io himself alone and
none of us dies to himself alone.
If we live, we live to the Lord;
and if we die, we die to the Lord. So whether
we live or die, we belong to the Lord.
Romans 14:7-8



Children: Julian, Caitlin and Chaka Outten
Parents: James T. Carey and Sheila Carey Pessoa
Siblings: Patricia Carey Collins, Barbara Carey

_ Burrows, Paulette Carey Jacobs, Dr Earla

Carey-Baines, Sheila (Shelly) Carey
and Thomas (Tommy) Carey
















PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

Butler & Sands:
Company Limited





Caves Village, Shirley Street, Independence Highway, Cable Beach Roundabout,
Harbour Bay, Lyford Cay

RAND BAHAMA 3

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PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. 3

fe






.-.°, Maynard Lifetime Achieve- |

vo ee |

VERNON Gregory “Boy”
Wilkinson leads a distinguished

~\". group of tourism workers who

-\+ will be honoured at the 11th

annual Cacique Awards on Jan-
uary 26, 2007. . :

Mr Wilkinson, manager and
consultant at Luciano’s of
Chicago, was named as the
recipient of one of the coveted
Cacique Awards — the Clement

ment Award: pe
Dr Davidson Hepburn, chair-
man of the Blue Ribbon Panel
that decides on winners of the
awards, described Mr Wilkin-

son as “an accomplished yet

humble man.” :

He pointed out that Mr
Wilkinson started out in the ser-
vice industry in 1958, parking
cars at The Bahamian Club,
West Bay Street.

In 1967, Mr Wilkinson

became a bartender at Café
Martinique, Paradise Island. He
worked his way up to manager
of the restaurant.

The rich and famous, includ-
ing Sir Sidney Poitier, Merv
Griffin and Sean Connery,
sought him out, and recom-

” mended his service to their

friends, Dr Hepburn said.
Eventually, Mr Wilkinson
became manager and consul-

*. tant at Luciano’s of Chicago,

where he continues to train
workers in the service industry.
“The industry has been very
fortunate to have him at the

forefront for 45 years,” Dr Hep-

burn said.

Dr Hepburn also pointed out
that the Ministry of Tourism
enlisted nomination scouting
teams to find deserving candi-
dates for the Cacique through-
out the Bahamas.

As a result, he said, finalists
for the 11th annual Cacique

“-i7.°- Awards came from eight islands

- New Providence, Crooked



Nominations
~ awards are announced |

island since it was affected by
hurricanes Jeanne, Frances and



Island, Eleuthera, Harbour
Island, Bimini, Exuma, Abaco,
and Grand Bahama.

In addition, Dr Hepburn
pointed out a marked increase

_ in nominations from Grand
Bahama. He said this was noted

after there had been a sharp
drop in nominations from that

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

I am vex because the PLP
government is sliding them-
selves right out of power by fail-
ing to control BEC with their
outrageous fuel surcharge. The
people will suffer this Christ-
mas because of this rise in elec-
tricity. Not only is light bill up,
food costs go up also. There will
be no bonuses, no extra hiring,
gift giving cuts; because of more
expenses people could get laid
off from work. ‘Boo’ to the PLP
government, get a government
with more concern for the peo-
ple, and better management
skills! a

Christmas Blues

I am vex because I recently
visited a school in the west and
I was kept waiting by the prin-
cipal for over an hour. During
my wait I observed that she was
very rude, grouchy and disre-
spectful to a worker. She need
to learn how to be a principal
from her counterpart across the
street. The government need to
choose good leaders in these
schools.

Tired of bad leaders



Wilma in recent years.

The winners of these awards
and the winner of the Hotelier
of the Year will be announced
at the Cacique Awards cere-
mony on January 26, Mr Bethell
said..



































I am really vex because
every week I spend about $20
on a GSM phone card. Month-
ly that adds up to $80, and
sometimes I spend more than
that. Yet the minister respon-
sible for that company has the
audacity to compare the ser-
vice with foreign companies.
When I was a student in the
States I paid $50 monthly for
hundreds of minutes plus I got
to make calls free during the

nights and weekends. It’s
ridiculous to compare BTC’s
cellphone services to Verizon
or any other big cellphone
company in the States. The
system is not that good and I
doubt it will get any better
unless some serious competi-
tion comes along.
L Cartwright

I.am vex because every time
the electricity goes off, the street

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 7















































light goes off, making traffic
build up. We need to have gen-
erators in place when this hap-
pens so that the flow of traffic
can run smoothly. Someone
nearly hit my car off the road
the other day because the light
was not working. My heart
nearly stopped when I almost
got hit. This is a serious problem
and needs to be addressed right
away!
Lights out

OR CALL TOLL FREE IN NASSAU
AND FREEPORT ON 380-8015.

ONLY OPEN TO CONSUMERS ABOVE
THE LEGAL DRINKING AGE.
PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY.

oe
~—"PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

Sandals staff give a
Thanksgiving treat

eLY

EMPLOYEES from Sandals
observed Thanksgiving Day
with the residents of the Solider
Road Senior Citizen’s Home
and the Marathon community



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
‘area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

PRISE

og fate Gomes

SEI,

fans; lights, i
Proper use a
save 3 bler of

° Redpce ns dattings| to lowe

Share your news

at Holy Family Community
Centre.

The resort’s chefs prepared a
delicious meal of turkey, ham,
stuffing, vegetable rice, cole













* Where possibly replace old, ineffi

HEATERS

'° Repair leaks in hot water heaters

° Take shorter showers or use.
* install a timer on hot water

WASHERS & DRYERS

« Machines settings should be ¢or

» Resist the urge to frequently open
VERY INEFFICIENT!

eater



nsistent wil

slaw, swect potato and assorted
cakes and pies.

General manager Stephen
Ziadie told the seniors that it
was a joy for everyone to come
out and spend some quality
time together. “You have con-
tributed so much and at this
stage in your life we want to
thank you.”

- He said while the gesture was
a small one, it was rewarding to
not only the employees but also
himself. “With your age, wis-
dom and knowledge, it is from
you that we can learn.”

_ As the employees served
food to the more than forty
seniors, they also conversed,
laughed and shared stories of
past and present. Also in atten-
dance was MP for Marathon,

ls during winter months
efrigerators

NAME

less water in baths.

eae or.

* Use adequate loads in washing machines and dryers

AIR CONDITIONING

° Set the temperature no lower than 78? F
> Consider using automatic settings

* Use a ceiling fan in conjunction with the air conditioner
o Use a proper size air conditioner for the room space

e Ensure the filters are cleaned regularly
° Seal all leaks or gaps in windows and doors







ti tit athena



Ron Pinder.

In leaving encouraging words
with the seniors, Mr Ziadie said
“spending this time with you -



@ GENERAL manager Stephen Ziadie (right) is pictured helping to serve

as being able to share with oth-
ers.” Food was also provided.
for the residents at Golden
Aged Retirement Home.

. has also made us more thankful
for what we have and demon-
strates to us that no matter what
we have, it is not as important

CONGRATULATIONS TO
usan L. Roker

OCTOBER WINNER OF SCOTIABANK'S

“WIN $550 ON OUR 50™”
ANNIVERSARY CONTEST

from our Scotiabank, Paradise Island Branch



Paradise Island Branch Winner? from L-R: Karen Williams, Assistant Manager
Personal Banking; “Win $550" Winner. - SrHeees Susan L. Roker; Rachel Knowles,
Paradise tsland Branch Manager

| THE MORE YOU USE YOUR CARD,
THE MORE CHANCES YOU HAVE TO WIN!
CELEBRATION ENDS OCTOBER 31, 2006.



Said Ala abaes t D seen
ay Stak Pa) Blakes se
Hingeiges MB Oe ve se

rene eS hanes teeta, air me
ee
eo tiee

yess
Beka tah






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Fo) 8. O56: 6 gS



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‘THe I RIBUINE WIUINVAT, INUVEIVIDLN 21, Huu, ere

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Fr kolo VEN Ae





li THE North Andros High Drum Line performed during Thanksgiving ceremony at the North @ FINANCIAL Services and Investments Minister Vincent Peet addressed students of the North
Andros High School on Thursday Andros High School during Thanksgiving ceremony on Thursday.
(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

Training facility set for North Andros

A BAHAMAS Technical
‘> ‘and’ Vocational Institute
(BTVI) facility is set for the
campus of the North Andros
High School, Financial Services
and Investments Minister Vin-

*.* "cent Peet has confirmed.

‘,° *. Addressing students during
Thanksgiving ceremonies on
Thursday, Mr Peet, MP for
North Andros and the Berry

-Islands, said three new class-
rooms and a cafeteria will open
for North Andros High early
next year.

“This school will make histo-
ry by becoming the first to have
on its campus its own BTVI

. facility for a high school,” said
Mr Peet.

The BTVI technical work-

_ shop is under construction and
.’.’ .will be staffed by teachers.

“By the time those of you

who are so inclined would have

finished grade 12,” he said, “you

would leave here not only as a

‘-. , student but as a qualified certi-
-" fied'student with a trade.”

Dignitaries attending Thanks-
, giving included senior radmini S-
: ‘trafor Dr Huntley Christie,
assistant district superintendent
Clyde Bowleg, and Linda Wal-
lace of the Department of





Social Services. Guest speaker
was pastor Mark Ewen, Minis-
ter in Pastoral Charge, Lowe
Sound Seventh Day Adventist
Church.

He commended North
Andros High for having “some
of the best qualified and com-
mitted teachers anywhere in the
Bahamas.”

To principal Locksley Forbes,
he said: “Although you have
been here for a short time you
have shown exceptional lead-
ership already. Your leadership
is what will-take this school to
the next level.”

Mr Peet also announced con-
struction of a new airport termi-
nal for North Andros to be built
“in the next several months.”

“Foreign investors are com-
ing to the Bahamas more than
anywhere else,” he said,
“because they see how good it is
in the Bahamas and they want
to be a part of what’s happening
in the Bahamas.

“As young Bahamians you
need to understand that you are
special, You have opportunities

“that will-make you even more

special, that will preparevyou
for the future,” Mr Peet told
the students.











@ MINISTER of Financial Services and Investments Vincent
Peet, MP for North Andros and the Berry Islands, and others
look at the Thanksgiving gifts. Pictured from left are Pastor



Mark Ewen, Linda Wallace of the Social Services Department,
Mr Peet, principal Locksley Forbes, senior administrator Dr
Huntley Christie, and assistant district superintendent Clyde
Bowleg.

(cos
ee)

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 21



: OCALNEWS _, Us



Governor-General shows spirit of giving
GOVERNOR-GENERAL Arthur Hanna showed the spirit of giving on Saturday during the Sal-

vation Army’s Annual Launching of the 2006 Christmas Kettle Drive ceremony at Rawson Square.
Also pictured is Salvation Army board chairman Mrs Judy Munroe.





Bear necessities
for needy kids

ALAKSA Aces goalie Derek
Gustafson skates through a sea of
stuffed animals that were hurled onto
the ice by fans in Bakersfield, Calif.,
Saturday, Nov. 25, 2006. The flying
fur was part of the annual Teddy Bear
Toss, at a hockey game between the
Aces and the Bakersfield Condors.
The toys are collected and distributed
to needy children in Kern County.












(AP Photo/The Bakersfield
Californian, Brian Drake)




st 22, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE




















Down Syndrome
Association hosts
‘Buddy Walk’

THE Down Syndrome
Association recently held its
community awareness walk —
or ‘Buddy Walk’.

The event started at
Queen’s College and went
on to Fort Montagu before
returning to the college.

Over 300 took part includ-
ing Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his wife
Bernadette.

The walk ended with a fun
day for all.

Model FRT 8BSEW





| The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are

making news in their

) neighbourhoods. Perhaps

i you are raising funds for a

| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

area or have won an

H award,

I If so, call us on 322-1986

id share your story.






18.2 Cube Feet

a We















_ SEEKS TO FILL POSITION N INMEDIAT TELY

| Candidate must possess the following characteristics: excellent
! communication skills-verbal and written, able to work in a fast paced}
environment, self-motivated, well organized

JOB REQUIREMENTS

1° Knowledge of POS systems, ACCPAC, Microsoft Word and Excel |]. :

1° Excellent verbal and written skills Te :
= ) FIDELITY

e Must be able to work in a deadline- oriented business with
DOCUMENT IMAGING SPECIALIST

Profile:
Possess High School Diploma

minimum supervision

: Salary negotiable based on experience.
| Please fax resumes to: 394-8573

XCITING, GROWING, DYNAMIC.
COMPANY SEEKS CUSTOMER SERVICE




Related experience is preferred but not required

REPRESENTATIVE

Responsibilities Include:

Coordinating the daily process of scanning documents

Manage and maintain high volume scanners



Prepping, scanning, indexing and verifying documents



Adhering to deadlines assigned by management



Critical Competencies:




Z Strong computer proficiency

- Ability to work effectively with minimum supervision and
as part of a team




- Strong communication skills (verbal & written) and
Organizational skills





Send resume no later than November 30th, 2006 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Street
P.O, Box N-4853
Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com




































4 x
.

si :
aos



-!-). THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 23















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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 27
INTERNATIONAL NEWS

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Z Copyrighted Material ‘
_ vt Syndicated Content Content

Available from Commercial New News Providers |—

aie

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: > -* —. : °
. ~~"

A swinging time
at monkey festival |

THE TRIBUNE





—


































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Or 2 SD © BP @W PM GH DB MW GT GH E Ch LD CM Ch EP C2 Gs EP Th Lp OD I GD GD GR Cd GI GR Gd GB GA Cid GG CB Bi Cs GP GD GS CB EB

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PAGE 28, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006




MISTANBUL, Turkey

TENS of thousands of pro-
testers chanted "No to the
pope!" and waved anti- Vatican
banners Sunday ina defiant dis-
play of the pro-Islamic anger
that could await the pontulf on
his first papal trip to a mostly
Muslim nation, according to
Associated Press.

About 25,000 people filled a
square in a working-class district
of Istanbul at a rally organized
by an Islamist political party
whose leaders have denounced
the pope's remarks in September
that Jinked violence and Islam.

"The pope is not wanted
here," said Kubra Yigitoglu, a
20-year-old protester in a head
scarf, ankle-length coat and cow-
boy boots who called Turkey
"an Islamic republic."

The demonstration highlight-
ed the deep strains in Turkey
ahead of the pope's four-day vis-
it beginning Tuesday.

‘Turkish officials hope to use
the visit to promote their ambi-
tions of joining the European
Union and to showcase its secu-
lar political system. But pro-
Islamic groups — which have
been gaining strength for years -
perceive Benedict as a symbol
of Western intolerance and
injustices against Muslims.

The pope plans to first meet
with political and Muslim reli-
gious leaders in the capital,
Ankara, including Turkey's pres-
ident and the Islamic cleric who
oversees Turkey's religious
affairs. Turkey's prime minister,
Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is sched-
uled to attend a NATO meet-
ing in Latvia during the papal
visit, but could briefly greet the
pontiff at the airport.

Benedict later heads to Istan-
bul — the ancient Christian capi-
tal Constantinople — to be host-
ed by the spiritual leader of the
world's Orthodox Christians,
Ecumenical Patriarch
Bartholomew I. The pope
strongly backs. efforts. to close

Available from Commercial News P



the nearly 1,000-year divide
between the Vatican and the
Orthodox churches.

The pope also is expected to
continue the Vatican's efforts to
heal rifts with Muslims. The Vat-
ican has expressed regret for
offending Muslims and sorrow
for the violent backlash to his
comments — which the Vatican
said. were an attempt to show
the incompatibility between faith

. and violence.

At the. Vatican on Sunday:

Benedict ae his | ae

INTERNATIONAL NEWS —

ousands protest in Turkey
st the pope’s upcoming visit.

Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content

- ship" for Turks and their leaders.
The Vatican spokesman also
confirmed that the pope would
visit Istanbul's famous 17th-cen-
tury Blue Mosque as “a sign of
respect" to Muslims.

The mosque, a major tourist

‘attraction and prominent land-

mark on Istanbul's skyline, faces -

the Haghia Sophia, a former
Byzantine church that was con-
verted to a mosque following the
fall of the city to Muslim armies

in 1453. It is anow a museum. **

* But Benedict may also use his
time in Turkey as a forum to

os

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demand that Islamic nations

offer greater rights and protec-
tion to Christian minorities, such
as the remnants of the once-
thriving Greek Orthodox com-
munity in Istanbul.

Turkey's foreign minister,
Abdullah Gul, said Benedict's
visit could help "remove some
misunderstandings" between
Christians and Muslims.

"The messages the pope gives
here will, of course, be very

segrortant, ".Gul said at a news

nference..
But the protesters sent aloud

message that the pope is not wel-
come.until he offers a full apol-
ogy for his remarks, in which he
quoted a Byzantine emperor
who characterized some of
Muhammad's teachings as "evil
and inhuman," particularly "his
command to spread by the
sword the faith."

"The pope was disrespectful
to us and he needs to apologize,"
said one banner at the rally,
which is in the heart of Istan-

_ bul's conservative districts and

is often the site of pro-Islam
gatherings. More than 4,000

WIE T

Improving

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roviders

police — including riot squads —

ringed the protest as police heli- -

copters buzzed overhead.
Seafetin Tuleg, 70, wrapped
himself in the red flag of the

. Felicity Party which organized . -

the demonstration. He said Mus-
lims revered the Jewish and
Christian prophets but did not
receive the same respect for their
own.

Muhammad, but the pope does-
n't love Muhammad and Islam,"
he said.

Officially, Turkey is a rigidly
secular republic, though around
99 percent of its population i is
Muslim.

In 2004 '— before becoming *!

pope — the then-Cardinal Joseph | -

Ratzinger cast doubt on whether
Turkey has a place among EU
nations.

"Turkey has always repre-
sented a different continent, in
permanent contrast to Europe,"
he was quoted by the French
magazine Le
saying.

On Sunday, Turkey's state-
run Anatolia news agency quot-
ed the Vatican spokesman, Fed-
erico Lombardi, as saying that
the Vatican was not against
Turkish membership in the EU.
The Vatican city, states is: not an
EU member...

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. THE TRIBUNE
an . i INTERNATIONAL NEWS





2 Arctic scientists
| look for clues to

Available from Commercial News Providers

. . . . > . can and Canadian scientists at ratios in clouds may be very doing it in one hundred years,"
is - = A the Eureka Weather Station in important in controlling the he said. ; ?
a - the northern Canadian territory Arctic surface temperatures and There's a point where ani-
“a — ° - . of Nunavut, like the Inuit who pow it melts," she said. mals can't change fast enough, .
od - are seeing their native habitat In Nunavut, the melting is there's a point where plants :
a —- thaw, are beyond questioning keenly felt. "In the old days, we can't change fast enough, so 3
We the existence of climate change. sed ito have 10 months of win- they'll either compete it out or ©
ee "If we compare the debate tey- now it's six," said Simon 89 €Xtinct."
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% ‘Promotion runs from October 9th thu December 9th, 2006.
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a purchase for Grand Prize" eligibility, Grand Prize drawn on
ee December 9th, 2006, See in-store for further details.
‘°
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Lene, i

3



Copyrighted Material

Syndica





ted Content





climate change

@ EUREKA,
Nunavut Territory

SCIENTISTS are peering
into the clouds near the top of
the world, trying to solve a mys-
tery and learn something new
about global warming, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

. The mystery is the droplets
of water in the clouds. With the
North Pole just 685 miles (1,100
kilometers) away, they should
be frozen, yet more of them are
liquid than anyone expected.

So the scientists working out
of a converted blue cargo con-
tainer are trying to determine
whether the clouds are one of
the causes — or effects — of
Earth's warming atmosphere.

"Much to our surprise, we
found that Arctic clouds have
got lots of super-cooled liquid
water in them. Liquid water has
even been detected in clouds at
temperatures as low as minus
30 degrees Celsius. (minus 22
F)," said Taneil Uttal, chief of
the Clouds and Arctic Research
Group at the Earth Systems
Research Laboratory of the
U.S. National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).

Atmosphere

"If a cloud is composed of liq-
uid water droplets in the Arctic,
instead of ice crystals, then that
changes how they will interact
with the earth's surface and the
atmosphere to reflect, absorb
and transmit radiation," said
Uttal.

"It's a new science, driven by
the fact that everybody doing
climate predictions says that
clouds are perhaps the single
greatest unknown factor in
understanding global warming."

With NASA reporting that
2005 was the warmest year on
record worldwide, the debate
over global warming marches
on, but not here. The Ameri-

over the theory of evolution
with the debate over the theory
of global warming — global

-warming's a whole lot more cer-

tain at the moment," said Jim

Drummond, a University of '

Toronto physics professor and
chief investigator for the Cana-
dian Network for the Detection
of Atmospheric Change.

"By and large," he said, "we
are not now arguing about
whether global warming is
going to happen; the argument
has turned to: How big is it
going to be?"

_ Uttal, Drummond and other
American and Canadian scien-
tists recently visited Eureka, an
outpost established jointly by
Canada and the United States
in 1947 and now equipped with
instruments that sound like sci-
fi inventions — the ozone spec-
trophotometer, for instance, or
the tropospheric lidar. (A lidar,
an amalgamation of "light" and
"radar," uses laser light to
detect atmospheric particles.)

_ The new technology helps to
better understand the impact of
clouds on Earth's surface tem-
perature. The clouds being stud-
ied here range from six miles
high to almost touching the
ground.

"For a couple of decades we
have known that super-cooled
liquid water droplets could exist
in clouds," Uttal said. "But the

' prevalence of it in Arctic clouds

was not really known until these.
specialized sensors starting
operating in the Arctic about
eight years ago."

"The really exciting thing,"
she said, will be the ability to
track an:aerosol layer or an

Asian dust cloud from their .

source and measure their effect
on a cloud.

Uttal noted that water clouds
are more likely to warm the
Arctic atmosphere than ice
clouds, since the liquid clouds
retain more heat radiated by
the Earth's surface. "This
means that the ice-to-water

Awa, an Inuit leader and
deputy minister for the envi-
ronment of Nunavut who was
on the trip to Eureka. “Every
year we're getting winter later
and later."

For these 155,000 people of

’ Canada, Greenland, Russia and

the United States, it means less
time to hunt caribou, walrus
and polar bear. Studies show
that average winter tempera-
tures have increased as much
as 7 degrees in the Arctic over
the last 50 years. The per-
mafrost — ground that is contin-
ually frozen for at least two
years — is thawing, imperiling
polar bears and forcing other
animals to migrate farther
north.

Walrus

The walrus have moved far-
ther away, said Awa. "So you're
taking more time out, away on

the land hunting." Meanwhile,.

families back home are forced
to eat store-bought food that is
costlier and less healthy.

"The majority of the world's
population hasn't really felt the
global warming," said Awa.
"But right now.in. the Arctic
and in Nunavut, we're really
worried because it's already
affecting us. We are a ther-
mometer of the world for what
could happen." :

Russ Schnell, director of |
. Observatory and Global Net-

work Operations for NOAA,
notes that climate change is
cyclical — that the planet's veg-

etation, over millions of years,

sucks in and spits out carbon
dioxide.

" All the carbon dioxide in the
coal and oil was once in the air.
The plants took it and it went
into the oceans or into the
ground — and now we're taking
it back out," says Schnell.

"The cycle is the same today,
only you're taking something
that took 100,000 years and






PAGE 30, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006



COMICS PAGE

~*t
le 4
‘ = ~s“ Tw
r) -_s

. Synd

‘opyrighted Material

icated Content were



THE TRIBUNE

Available from Commercial News Providers

~

POP

East dealer.
» Both sides seen
NO
: - . : . 4375
” - 997643
Q9
$Q82
WEST EAST
9864 @K 102
Â¥102 VAKQI8
0742 853
--- 31063 95
SOUTH
@AQ3
: 5
@AKI106
&AKT74
The bidding:
ast South West | North
1% Dble Pass 1¢
’ Pass 3¢ Pass. 44
Pass 5¢ 4

Opening lead — ten of hearts.

You can’t see the adverse. hands
when you’re declarer, but as the play
proceeds, it often becomes possible
to visualize them perfectly, enabling
you to achieve the best possible
result.

Here is a simple case that shows
how it’s done. South becomes
declarer at five diamonds after East
opens one heart, and West leads the
heart ten. East wins with the jack and
' continues with the ace.

7 “Séuth ruffs high, enters dummy
with a trump and leads a low spade to



Teeget
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)



HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may
be used once only. Each must
contain the centre letter and
there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 14; very good 21; excellent
28 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.

AcROss
Live and travel atound the:

* @ast and south (6)
Generous accommodation for
Americe.-convicts (3,5)
Hardly rare? (6)

That obsequious

character Heep? (5)
Stray sheep that's got out ”
of the ring (4)
’ Metal boxes used by Latin
scholars (4)

Plaintive cries from the
old stables (4)

We had to tie the knot (3)
‘Tis out East we have
certain connections (4)
Usually wooden

spare part (4)

Crimes can bring

sore grief (9)

Finished being cheated (4)
The girl left the idiot! (4)

A bit of supper for each (3)
Be inclined to cheat

at bagatelle (4)

A sound back, possibly (4)
Have they meant much

for centuries? (4)

Many persons can

do her wrong (5)

Heaven, | guess (6)

One of those doing bird imitations
with conviction? (8)
Superlatively modern (6)

Making ready to take a seaman

away (5)

‘Once mora the middleman takes the
» profit (5) ” :

Naturally it comes to light (4):

To use more seéd could

be-worse (5)

To shut the.door angrily can be

grand (4) °

One taking a short cut to

Immingham? (6)

A cordial that makes you hiss? (6)

Only part of the perimeter? (3)

Villa in Glastonbury? (5)

Flogs repeatedly (7)

A Home Guard girl (3)

Existed as an article between two

points (3)

Some girls’ school of historic general

fame (6)

Basil contributes to this saucy Italian

production (5) ’

Because of insufficien}, force? (3) ’ pina

Deserter from the regiment, a traop. 8 Religious house (6)

leader (3) 10. Cold dish (5)

Little chap with passion and lust (6) 13 Nobleman (4)

A stick in the production line (3) 14 Layer (4)

It's clumsy to lose heart and spill a 2 Gn ‘3
pint (5)

17 Bridge (4) Fire-raising (5)
Less of an ape than you might 19 Gemstone (4) Boarding ar (7)
ct, perhaps (5 21 Kitchen implement Tibetan ox (3
Foen nana ) | 16 Uncooked (3
Be eros ere ved Long hair (4) Summary (6)
stare (5)
It upsets me for while (4)

Jot (4) Fruit (5)
As eaten in the mess? (4)

—
=

iy)

nN
wo



IN

ACROSS Middle (5)
Weighing device (5)
Second-hand (4)
Drive (5)
Reasonable (4)
Human (6)
Account (6)

Help (3)

EASY PUZZLE

Atmosphere (3) Vehicle (3)
Boast (4 Farm animal (3)
a Tiny (6
Ship's company (4) iny (6) :
Feline (4) For every (3)
Ration (5) Flowers (5)
Coercion (6) Scope (5)
Expanded (8) Feeble (5)

Against (6) ana

23
24
26
27
28
32
33
34
35
36

Yesterday's cryptic solutions

ACROSS: 1, Animus 7, Linguist 8, To-f-u 10, Loiter 11,
Office 14, ‘Me-n 16, L-one-R 17, She'd 19, Ju-lie 21,
Tu-Ll-p 22, Bugle 23, Beef(- -cake) 26, Wi-ser 28, P- OM
29, In-tent 30, Jammed 31, Elba 32, Trainers 33, Throne
DOWN: 1, Angles 2, Mooted 3, Slur 4, Egg flip 5, Fit in 6,
Steer 8, Time 9, Fen 12, Fo-E 13, C-e-ase 15, Bully 18,
H-OP. in 19, Jug 20, Lie 21, Turing 22, Be-e 23, Bomber

Yesterday's easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Miffed 7, Enclosed 8, Tern 10, Amulet 11,
Appear 14, Bed 16, Padre 17, Star 19, Repel 21, Caber
22, Pagan 23, Foal 26, Strip 28, Rim 29, Chip in 30,
Finale 31, Odin 32, Predator 33, Deeper

DOWN: 1, Morass 2, Feeler 3, Dent 4, Clipper 5, Asked 6,
Adore 8, Tuba 9, Red 12, Pal 13, Aroma 15, Kebab 18,

a0 a “MA 25, Fiddle 26, Wi-D-th 27, Steam 28, Pal (lap) | Tooth 19, Rag 20, Pen 21, Capital 22, Pip 23, Finite 24,
lest

Oman 25, Lieder 26, Scope 27, River 28, Rid 30, Ford

TRL REE EET TP eee ET TE ee od eae ner



Detective Work Works Well

the queen. As expected, the finesse
succeeds, and declarer then cashes

his three remaining trumps to pro- -

duce this position:
: North
437
v9
$Q82
West East
$98 @K 10
31063 ¥KQ
; &95
South ;
@A3
hAKT4

Declarer may hope the clubs are
divided 3-3, but he knows that even
if they’re not he is still sure of the
contract. No lie of the cards can
defeat him.:

He cashes the A-K of clubs and
plays.a club to dummy’s queen. East
shows out on the third club and is
forced to discard the heart queen in
order to guard the spade king.

To this point, East has shown up
‘with precisely five hearts, three dia-
monds and two clubs. East therefore
started with exactly three spades and
so is now known to hold the K-x of
spades and king of hearts.

Accordingly, South leads

dummy’s nine of hearts and discards
his chub loser on it. East wins, but.is.
compelled to return a. spade, allow-
ing declarer to win the last two tricks
with the ace and jack of spades.

TARGET



TURBULENT turn turtle tutu

rebut rent. runt tent tern true
untrue utter

pelt bent blunt blunter blurt
brunt brute bunt burnt butler
butt butte butter lent lute
tube tuber tubule tune tuner

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

food prepared by
blending or
straining



Joanna Dvorakowska v Thomas
Bryn, Midnight Sun Open,

. Norway 2006. The amateur
playing the black pieces in.
today’s puzzle is two pawns up,
and has just set a trap for his
woman grandmaster opponent.
tf White (to move) grabs the
rook by 1 Qxa8 then Bb7 traps
the queen. White may still be
winning then, but Dvorakowska 3
found a much better idea. In
fact, though White's point-
scoring play looks spectacular!

any self-respecting expert would a

consider it routine. How did the
game end? If Sunday chess
appeals to you, there are two
open-to all festivals happening
this weekend. Anyone from
expert to novice is welcome at
Pinner (details from Graham



Yu.




MONDAY, |
NOVEMBER 27

ARIES —- Mar 21/Apr 20°:

You must take your cash flow ‘more’.

seriously, ‘Aries. You haven't been -
paying much attention to it in the last -
few months. You'll find that your
resources can deplete quickly.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Something that happened in the past

4

has bothered you lately. That situation: . .

must now be forgotten so that you can’

get on with. your life. The only thing. *

_that matters is now.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
The planets indicate that if you will
do a good deed for someone, you
‘will be rewarded suitably at some
point in the future. Naturally, you, «
would do it even without reward.

CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22
You will gain. something this week
that you’re not entitled to, Cancer.

Think hard about giving it back. You’. °

will-receive your just desserts when, +

‘the time is right.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

Don’t .flatter coworkers. Rather, .
sHow them that you’re willing to put
in the hard work needed to get!
through tough. projects...ahead.
They’ll appreciate it more. ‘

VIRGO — Aug.24/Sept: 22, :
Be friendly this week, Virgo, but also. ~
be on your guard. for: those Who are

looking .to..take advantage’ of your
generosity. Youll ‘be. oe hors
these people actually are.

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23 «

You'll smooth out a difficult gitaa-
tion with your partner this week,
Libra. Mending fences is something °
you often find to be a chore.: Just

| think of the end result.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22.
You have to learn that you cati't”
always be right in every situation.
Learn to compromise with others to
get things done efficiently as-a team. It
will help build stronger relationships...”

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec:21| :

It is important to avoid stressful: situ-
ations in the days. to come,
Sagittarius. You are prone to’ blow-

ing things out of proportion. Stay .-

calm and ride the wave.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20° -

You’re in a creative
Capricorn, so put it to good , use.
Redecorate or focus on that * “pro-
ject” you’ve cast aside. Entice. oth:
,ers to get in on the action.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb' 18
Don’t let the negative comments of
others rub off on you this week, :
Aquarius. As usual, you have your °
head in the clouds and you don’t
want to come down from that high.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 -

It’s time to make an important deci-
sion, Pisces. The answer is to try-
|something different rather than stay
jing on a Steady course.

CO
nN
>
oo

i i
FY
a
e

a

Snow at 020 7736 5693) and
Richmond (Richard James at 020
8898 0362).

LEONARD BARDEN

>
Chess solution 8248: 1 Ne7+ Nxe7 2 Bxh7+ Kh8 3
Bg6+ Kg8 4 Rh8+ Kxh8 5 QhS+ Kg86 Qh7

mate.
Mensa quiz: Deportation. **

One possible word ladder solution is: JEST, pest,

post, pose, poke, woke, JOKE.



TORRE ATES EL TY ITT TN

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os) PAGE 32, MONDAY, NOVE


































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PAGE 34, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

:




















on interview with a 20 year veteran





non-conventional way is key,

nterview with a 20 year veteran











Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY.
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. WHAT HAS BEEN
YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE DIFFERENT CULTURES
AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE
PAST 20 YEARS? WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE
EXPERIENCE?

A. The days when GM- Mr. Veersteg used to have staff General
Meetings at South Ocean because in those days we did not have
a meeting facility! Our GMs always did what was necessary to
make our lives comfortable, they still do today.

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT Bly DETAIL
YOUR JOURNEY.
A. [Industrial Mechanic] My career path journey at CBL has
been challenging as an Industrial Mechanic, and now Mechanic

. Supervisor; throughout the years, I decided to try my best to deal
with and overcome those challenges, by keeping my head to the
ground and moving.

Q. WHat HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?
A. Over the years, I have enjoyed the challenges that come
along win ann and the opportunity to work for a Pepe.

Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE;
WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20
YEARS AGO?

A. Being a recent graduate of the College of The Bahamas in the
engineering field, I was looking for a challenging career working
in the industrial environment. I must admit that the choices were
limited to B.E.C., the hotel industry or light manufacturing. Then
an opportunity presented itself to learn something new; they were
building a brewery and looking for technical personnel. This was
what I was looking at as an avenue to break away from the status
quo, to step into new industry as far as The Bahamas was
concerned. And as the saying goes “the rest is history."

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?

A. The question for me can be answered very simply; it is the
constant change in technology which leads to the change and
upgrade of equipment. I find the training, installing and repairing
these new equipments challenging and rewarding.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO
YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO
GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?

A. For me this answer has to be yes. I joined CBL as a Jr.
Electrician and today 1 am the Engineering Manager This is quite
an opportunity to grow.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH MANY
MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. WHAT HAS BEEN

‘YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE DIFFERENT CULTURES

AND PERSON TIES THAT HAVE BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE

PAST 20 YEARS? ‘Wear HAS BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERI- .

ENCE?
A. My experience is you have to be flexible not ridged. Open
minded and willing to see things i ina different or should I say

<

THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?

- of different cultures and personalities.

beotession

v



THE TRIBUNE

. Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?

A. What I have enjoyed was the opportunity to travel from
Atlanta, California, Holland, Indiana, St. Lucia and Vietnam. The
main purpose for these trips was for training; however, it gave me
the opportunity to experience different cultures which most
certainly was an enjoyable experience. ,

Q. WovuLp you RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH BREWERY TO UP
AND COMING HIGH POTENTIALS FOR EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY?
Wuat 1s CBL’s stRONGEST SELLING POINT FROM YOUR PERSPEC-
TIVE?

A. Yes I would. CBL is the type of company that if you are willing,
dedicated and have a level of flexibility, you can experience great
opportunities.

Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN THE YEARS
THAT LIE AHEAD?

A. I envision the company being run entirely by Bahamians,
maintaining world class brewing standards. In addition to taking its
products not only to a few U.S. states, but to all and to all the
islands in the Caribbean.

Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR COLLEAGUES THAT
WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL EXPERIENCE?

A. Like life, you get out what you put in; 15% in 15% out, 80% i in,

80% out, need I say more.

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN?
A. Life is never perfect and of course if I had the opportunity to do
it again I would change a few things...but then again perhaps not.
OK, it was not all perfect but the imperfection is what has made my
experience unique, I wouldn't change anything, and I eee do it) vy
all over again.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,

Q. We ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO COME AND JOIN
A. The new technology that was going to bea part of the Brewery and the opportunity to see with people

Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A: My motivation year after yee has been the challengiis projects, new machinery and a love for oe

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE AFFORDED THE
OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?
A. Yes because I have had the opportunity to travel abroad for training and also receive training on the job.




ry to make our lives -

Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN THE .
YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD?
A. Being the only Brewery in the Babamas at this time, I think
Commonwealth Brewery will experience some competition in

_ the years that lie ahead. Competition is the name of the game
today, and competitors are rising up.

Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR COLLEAGUES
THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL EXPERIENCE?
A. To further enhance my colleagues experience, I would

advise them to really have a love for his/her job; get facts in



AGAIN?
A. Yes I would because my experience has been and continues

to be a good one.

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE,

FORTITUDE, FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE ATTITUDE IN
20 YEARS AT CBL.

KEEP REACHING FOR THE STARS! JOB WELL son
oe) Wout YoU RECOMMEND COMMONWEALTH Brewery Ue . a

order to execute a task rather than relying on assumptions and
to always be to work on time. —

Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL OVER


















THE TRIBUNE | MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 35

wD;
3

Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO

COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?
A. The new technology that the Brewery was bringing to The Bahamas. . je












Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. The mindset of improving myself along with the technological changes of better equipment.

Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE
AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?

A. Yes. The training to enhance my mechanical and welding skills in greet to perform at a
professional standard.



Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH
MANY MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS.









z WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE fs
5 DIFFERENT CULTURES AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE st
~ BEEN REPRESENTED OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS? WHAT HAS ba —
® BEEN YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERIENCE? Q. WHERE DO.YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN . ‘
e A. In general, my experience has been good in interact- THE YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD? yi
c ing with the different cultural personalities. My most A. Diversifying its product line to include soft drinks e
® favorable experience was being afforded the opportunity COMP lementing Vitamalt and Vitamalt Plus. Ha
; S to train at the G.T.I Welding Plant in The Netherlands. ( : + iz
on) Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR :
; Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT CBL? COLLEAGUES THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR ;
» DETAIL YOUR JOURNEY. CBL EXPERIENCE? ae
ao A. Semi-skilled Welder to Welder; Mechanical. Bister A. To appreciate the now CBL experience; embrace the vs
: = Pipe Fitter, Fabricator, Certified Tig Welding, Stainless challenges that promote growth; develop a positive nee
- 3 Steel Specialist, J.C.C Representative and now Union mental attitude toward your work; whatever your et ;
. Seas Shop Stowapd: hands find to do, do it as unto the ees .
> Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS? Q. Hinpstcur BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ea ih : y iis
of “A. The opportunities to grow to your fullest potential. OVER AGAIN? gf :
: = The challenges of new [Engineering] projects. My Bee A. se I would. o
pS & colleagues and the bee that CBL L offers. t ‘

ConeRatuLarions ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE, :
ORT. TUD FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE.







Q. WE ARE CELEBRATING WITH YOU TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE; WHAT MOTIVATED YOU TO
COME AND JOIN THE CBL TEAM 20 YEARS AGO?

A. My dear departed father put me in his place here and I try my best to walk in his
footsteps and learn different things from CBL ree











Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MOTIVATION YEAR AFTER YEAR?
A. My motivation year after year was interacting with new team members and managers.
It was a joy meeting different people and learning different things.







Q. CoMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GROWN OVER THE YEARS, DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU WERE
AFFORDED THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW WITH THE COMPANY? IF YES, IN WHICH WAYS?

A. Yes, my time was well spent with the company. I learned and grew very strong within
my department.
















\ Id be tp leam and
WMiyacioe pu c em anc



advantage of everything



Q. COMMONWEALTH BREWERY HAS GONE THROUGH Q. WHERE DO YOU ENVISION THE COMPANY GOING IN
MANY MANAGEMENT TEAM CHANGES OVER THE YEARS. THE YEARS THAT LIE AHEAD?
WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE IN DEALING WITH THE At [Malachi Reckley] envision this company in the

DIFFERENT CULTURES. AND PERSONALITIES THAT HAVE BEEN years that lie ahead with even more success.








REPRESENTED OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS? WHAT. HAS BEEN









: YOUR MOST FAVORABLE EXPERIENCE? Q. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO YOUR .
A. My most favorable anberienee was learning we are all | COLLEAGUES THAT WOULD FURTHER ENHANCE THEIR CBL ;
different people and we came to learn and respect each ° ‘EXPERIENCE?
others cultures and personalities. ; A. My advice would be to learn and take advantage of 2
: . ee everything that you can learn and achieve at CBL. Hard rie
- Q. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CAREER PATH WHILE AT CBL? work here pays off in the end for you and your family. a2
: DETAIL YOUR JOURNEY. “i
A. I have always wanted to become an Engineer and I Q. HINDSIGHT BEING 20/20, WOULD YOU DO IT ALL *,
hope to become Chief Engineer one day at CBL. Iam _ OVER AGAINP * af
presently and have been a line technician. - A. Yes I would and I wouldn’t change anything because =



it was a blessing being here.

Q. WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST OVER THE YEARS?










es A. Over the years I enjoyed the seminars, the events and CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR PERSEVERANCE, 3
: the hard work. I enjoy meeting new members of staff ana I FORTITUDE, FORTHRIGHTNESS AND A POSITIVE ATTITUDE hs
enjoy working here at CBL for 20 years. IN 20 YEARS AT CBL.

KEEP REACHING FOR THE STARS! JOB WELL DONE.



oe

i, | Hh
PAGE 36. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE | f





MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 27, 2006

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business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

BU

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

Tribun









Insurance Lid,





- Bank to

double
capital to

$100m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



BANK of the Bahamas
International’s shareholders
will be asked to approve the

_ creation of five new preference

share classes at its December
22, 2006, annual general meet-
ing (AGM), doubling share
capital to $100 million from its
current $50 million.

The move, likely designed
to bolster the bank’s capital
base and enable it to take on
further anticipated growth in
its loan book, aims to create
preference share classes D to
H.

Each of the five new classes.
will consist of 10,000 shares,
all bearing a par value of
$1,000, if shareholders
approve. Given that between
them, the Government and
National Insurance Board
(NIB) own almost 52 per cent
of the bank’s ordinary shares,
the preference share classes’
creation is likely to be
approved.

The AGM resolution follows
a fiscal year in which Bank of
the Bahamas International
twice strengthened its capital

a SEE page 11B _

Babak denies contempt claim.

~ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) chairman
Hannes Babak has alleged that
“all necessary steps” have been
taken by himself and the other
defendants to comply with a
November 2 order by Justice
John Lyons relating to the pro-
duction of documents. This is
despite attempts by the late
Edward St George’s estate to
have him committed to prison
for alleged contempt of court.

In the latest developments
surrounding the extremely bit-
ter and public fight between
the St George family and Sir

National Health sums
‘just don’t add up’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he cost of services

under the Gov-

ernment’s pro-

posed National

- Health Insurance

(NHI) plan “just doesn’t add
up”, the Bahamas Dental
Association’s president has
warned, questioning how this
can be pegged at $235 million
for three consecutive years
when the administration’s
experts are themselves pre-
dicting a 20 per cent increase in

Bank Clearing House targets June

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Clearing Banks Association
(CBA) is hoping to have the first phase
of an Automated Clearing House
(ACH) in place “no later than June
2007”, its chairman told The Tribune,
with the software supplier selected

before Christmas.

Paul McWeeney, who is also Bank
of the Bahamas International’s man-
-aging director, said the ACH Working...

Jack Hayward, their former
business partner, over his claim
that he owns 75 per cent of
GBPA and its affiliate, Port
Group Ltd, the estate applied
to the courts on November 14
for an order committing Mr
Babak to Fox Hill Prison for

-alleged contempt of court.

The GBPA chair. again
appears to have become a par-
ticular target for the St George
estate, which has accused both

him and Sir Jack of acting ina —

manner that is against their
interests.
The contempt allegation

SEE page 5B

Employers urged to help

combat domestic violence

’ @ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN employers are
reluctant to deal with domestic
violence impacting their

‘ employees due to uncertainty
over their role and a desire to .

respect worker privacy, a senior
police officer said.

Assistant Superintendent
Elaine Sands told a crime pre-
vention seminar organised by
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce: “Uncertainty of their
precise roles or desire to respect
employees’ privacy makes
employers hesitant to deal with
it.” ~

She added that domestic vio-
lence “affects us directly and
indirectly”, and its victims fre-
quently suffered from low

Shopbreaking up 11%

morale and low productivity in
the workplace, impacting their
employer’s profitability.

“Domestic violence does not
stay at home. It ends up in the
workplace,” Assistant Superin-
tendent Sands said.

She described a double mur-
der and suicide that took place
at a work site on Soldier Road
in 2002 as an example of how
domestic violence could result
in extreme tragedy.

Explaining that domestic vio-
lence negatively impacted work-
er health and safety, and
“undermined” company pro-

SEE page 7B

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

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P.O.Box $S-6270, Nassau, N.P. Bahamas

242.328.3040
fax: 242.328.3043

www .micronet.bs —

* computers

copiers. 4

Dentists head says u-turn over pensioner contributions shows
‘Government extremely unsure of what true costs will be’

use of the health system.

Charging that “the Govern-
ment is extremely unsure of
what the true costs of NHI will
be”, Dr Andre Rollins said the
NHI project implementation
team had forecast that under

NHI, the cost of providing:
medical treatment to all

Bahamians in 2007 will be $108



million less than the $343 mil-
lion its cost in 2001.- when they
had the option of purchasing
private health insurance.

In a hard-hitting commen-
tary, Dr Rollins argued: “Bear
in mind that we are told this
plan will provide all that our
present. public health system

does not, and that 20 per cent:



Group and CBA had narrowed the list
of potential software suppliers down
to four, who were now visiting the.
Bahamas to give presentations on their
products and be interviewed.
One of the contenders is believed to

be Montran, sources told The Tribune. -
Mr McWeeney said once the Working

more people will utilise the
public system during the first

three years of NHI than

presently do, but we are
expected to believe that it will
cost the government $108 mil-
lion less. Who do we believe,
the ministers or the commit-
tee?”

Picking up on the. NHI

1

implementation team’s $235
million price tag, and the fact
that no actuarial review of the
scheme’s costs, viability and
sustainability will be carried |
out for thrée years, Dr Rollins
said the Government was

| SEE page 6B

ny! |
07 date
Four companies compete for software
contract, with selection due in December

Group and CBA had assessed the pre-
sentations, the winning vendor would
be selected next month “before we
have a break for the holidays”.

“We have one or two presentations

. SEE page 12B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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@ By Fidelity Capital
Markets 00

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian market as almost
93,000 shares changed hands.
The market saw 14 out of its 19
listed stocks trade, of which
three advanced, four declined
and seven remained
unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Colina Holdings (CHL)
with 43,400 shares changing
hands and accounting for 47
per cent of the total shares
traded.

The big sdvanee for the
week was First Caribbean
International Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB), up $0.14 or 1 per cent to
end the week at its new 52-
week high of $14.14.

On the down side for a
fourth consecutive week was
Abaco Markets (AML), drop-
ping another $0.15 or 17.24 per
cent to close the week at $0.72.

The FINDEX gained 3.57
points for the week, to close
at 729.32.

COMPANY NEWS

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) -

FOR the 2007 first quarter,
BOB posted net income of
$2.9 million, representing an

increase of $478,000 or 19.5 per

cent over the same period last









FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR



Commodities








Crude Oil
Gold






DJIA
S&P500
NASDAQ





'

oe .
_ i



International Markets







International Stock Market Indexes:


















The ‘Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 729.32 YTD 32.20%
CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

ir

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $0.72 $-0.15 2000 -1.37%
BAB $1.21 $- 250 10.00%
‘BBL $0.80 $- 0 14.29%
BOB $7.88 $- 13359 12.57%
BPF $11.00 $- 0 5.77%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 14.51%
BWL $1.65 $-- 300 30.95%
CAB $9.85 $-0.07 3200 3.14%
CBL. $12.29 $0.04 5467 | 34.91%
CHL $1.90 $0.05 43400 15.85%
CIB $14.14 $0.14 1000 29.96%
CWCB $4.81 $-0.41 1500 . -7.85%
DHS - $2.65 $- 2500 22.12%
FAM _ $5.54 $- 0 -8.43%
FCC $1.00 $- 0 -13.04%
FCL $11.65 $- 11000 15.92%
FIN $12.00 $- 1500 10.09%
ICD __ $8.00 $-0.05 3750 -19.60%
JSJ $8.70 $-. 3700 -3.87%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%











DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

¢ Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a special div-
idend of $0.08 per share, payable on November 30, 2006, to all
shareholders of record date November 15, 2006.

e CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR,
payable on February 7, Ou, to all shareholders of record date
December 31, 2006.

e FOCOL has declared a special dividend of $0.06 per
share payable on December 12, 2006, to all sharelie lets of
record date November 30, 2006.

year when net income stood at
$2.4 million.

Interest income increased by
$2.1 millon or 26.3 per cent to



est expense rose by $1.1 mil-
. lion or 35.6 per cent to total
$4.2 million. Net interest

Weekly % Change





1.1354 -1.14

1.9315 1.99 income was $5.9 million ver-

1.3094 2.10 sus $4.9 million in the 2006 first
‘ Se quarter.

Provisions for loan losses fell
by $286,000 year-over-year to
$342,000, while operating
expenses grew by $868,000 or
‘21 per cent to total $4.9 mil-
lion. Earnings per share stood
‘ at $0.19 versus $0.20 in 2005.

The decrease in EPS was
due to an additional 3.6 mil-.
lion ordinary shares being
added to the bank's capital
from its rights issue. BOB also
issued $14.7 million in prefer-
ence shares to the investing
public this year. The bank's
shareholders equity stood at

+. $90 million as at September 30,
2006, representing an increase
of 101 per cent year-over-year
and a capital ratio of 16 per
cent versus 9 per cent in 2005.

In related news, BOB man-
agement has announced the
opening of its Private Banking
arm, which is geared towards
providing enhanced customer
service, coupled with a full
scale array of banking prod-
ucts and services.



Weekly % Change



$59.24 6.15
$629.00 1.13



Weekly

12,280.17 -0.51
1,400.95 -0.02
2,460.26 0. 59
15,734.60

% Change



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Pm lovin’ it



total $10.1 million, while inter-_

a












THE TRIBUNE



iio tne Lo a eee
Business has ‘major
worry’ on Clause 14

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE business community’s
“major concern” with the pro-
posed National Health Insur-
ance Bill remains Clause 14,
which the National Coalition
for Healthcare Reform
believes “leaves a lot of ques-
tions unanswered” and could
even be interpreted as pre-
venting companies from drop-
ping private group health
insurance for their employees.

Winston Rolle, a consultant
to the Coalition and former
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president, said from a
“business perspective, there
are a couple of scenarios” that
could play out relating to
Clause 14, depending on how it
was interpreted.

The Coalition’s members are
understood to have met for a
strategy session at the week-
end, which included analysing
the Bill. Yet one business
source told The Tribune that
one meaning of Clause 14 was
that “you are not permitted to
drop your group health insur-
ance”.

_ The source added: “There
are lots and. lots of inequities,
but the one huge concern is
this Clause 14, and how it can
control private contracts, which
is what they appear to be
doing.”

If companies were forced to
maintain the group health
insurance plans they have for
staff now, along with paying
NHI contributions - set cur-
rently at 5.3 per cent of a
salaried worker’s monthly
wage, split 50/50 between

worker and employer - the .

impact on many firms, partic-
ularly small and medium-sized
ones, could be devastating.
The Tribune had previously
spoken to two companies, one
a law firm and the other an
insurance company, who both

said they spent more than
$200,000 per annum on pro-
viding private group health
insurance for their employees.

If such firms were to pay for
NH1 as well, without dropping
their private plans, their oper-
ating costs will go through the
roof, possibly resulting in wage
reductions and redundancies.

Mr Rolle told The Tribune
yesterday: “The major concern
is Clause 14, which leaves a lot
of questions to be answered,
especially as it relates to com-
panies and people who have
private insurance. When NHI
comes in, how are they going
to be affected? All that is what
needs to be properly clarified.”

A further concern with
Clause 14 is that by allowing
employers to modify their pri-
vate group health insurance
plans, this means that compa-
nies will in turn have to alter
their contracts with employ-
ees, which might stipulate that
the firm provides them with
private health insurance anda
certain level of benefits.

“Companies may be paying
full insurance for their staff
now, but that Clause gives the
minister the right to modify
employee agreements,” Mr
Rolle said.

“It’s the kind of question
that needs to be answered.
Why is that necessary, if cur-
rent legislation in the labour
laws governs the relationship
between employer and
employee?”

Clause 14 (1) of the NHI Bill
says that despite any agree-
ment a Bahamian employer
may have in place regarding
the provision of group health
insurance for his workers with
a trade union representing
them, or in their contracts of
employment, “every employ-
er is entitled to modify..... the
rate of contributions payable”
under this scheme, to elimi-

nate any duplication and

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“overlap” of benéfits with the
proposed NHI scheme.

Apart from the fact.that this
seems to allow employers to
arbitrarily tear up any con-
tracts and agreements made
over the provision of private
health insurance for their staff,
the following clause, 14 (2), of
the Bill stipulates that “no
employer shall make any mod-
ification [to their private group
coverage] without obtaining
the prior written approval of
the Minister”. To obtain this
approval, all relevant informa-
tion and materials, including a
copy of the group health plan,
has to be sent to the Minister.

This has left business execu-
tives fearing that the Bahamas
is heading down the route of a

nanny state’, where the Govy-
ernment always determines
whatever is best for people and
seeks to regulate everything,
stifling the private sector.

Meanwhile, Mr Rolle told
The Tribune that the Govern-
ment had provided the Coali-
tion with some of the informa-
tion it had been seeking.

“We did receive on Friday
some of the documents
requested from the Ministry,
but it still doesn’t provide us
with sufficient information that
we can do the type of analysis
we’d like,” he explained.

The Coalition is especially
keen to see the actuarial stud-
ies and full report upon which
the Government has based its
$235 million cost of services
estimate for NHI. These
formed the foundation for the
eight-page summary that con-
tains all the estimates, but the
full report has never been pub-
lished.

Mr Rolle said the Govern-
ment had committed to send-
ing them more information this

week, with this newspaper

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

| and share your story.



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Save Guana Cay Reef

Association has argued that
Acting Justice Norris Carroll
was wrong to find that Wendall
Major, the National Economic
Council (NEC) secretary, had
the power to enter into the
Heads of Agreement for the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
& Ocean Club, arguing that a

BUSINESS

number of rights given to the
developers were not Cabinet’s
to confer.

That is one of the nine
grounds listed in the Associa-
tion’s appeal of the Supreme
Court ruling that permitted Dis-
covery Land Company to pro-
ceed with its Baker’s Bay pro-
ject, and which rejected all its
applications for relief, dismiss-
ing the case entirely.

Apart from the grounds

The following persons or their nearest relatives are kindly asked to
visit the MEDICAL DEPARTMENT of the National Insurance
Board located in the Board’s Jumbey Village Complex on Baillou
Hill Road. For further information, you may contact the Department
at telephone number 502-1745:

NAME

BONABY, J acqueline
BROWN, Cedric
BURROWS, Maryann
CLARE, Alphonso
GIBBS, Maxwell
GLINTON, Theresa V.
GOMEZ, Juan Carlos

-ADDRESS

Jamaica Avenue

Kenilworth Street

. Somerset Way

South Beach
- Bernard Road

East Street South
Ivanhoe Road .

involving Mr Major, the Asso-
ciation is also alleging that the
Judge was wrong to conclude
that entering into the Heads of
Agreement was not irrational
or unreasonable, and that the
agreement “did not constitute
a fettering of the discretion of
the Cabinet”.

Acting Justice Carroll con-
cluded that Mr Major was act-
ing as an agent of the Cabinet,
and that the Heads of Agree-
ment was in principle only and
just an expression of policy.




Nine grounds cited
in Guana Cay appeal

Yet as one of the grounds of
its appeal, the Association is
arguing that a number of rights
given to the developers were
not in Cabinet’s powers to give,
falling under the local District
Council, the Treasurer, and the
Minister for Crown Lands, plus
legislation such as Town Plan-
ning, the Business Licence Act
and Hotels Encouragement
Act.

In addition, the Association is
arguing that the Supreme Court
failed to consider the environ-

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Marine Helpers and

e

THE TRIBUNE;

4
Th

mental impact from the Bak?
er’s Bay project, plus its impact
on Guana Cay residents and
whether it fitted in with gov?
ernment aims on these issues.’ *
The Association further
alleged that the Heads of
Agreement was not an agree-
ment in principle, as the Judge
had ruled, but gave important
rights to the developers and prey
vented: both local and centrab
government from considering
whether or not to grant the rel;
evant permits. ’

Another ground of the appeal
relates to the Association’s con-
tention that proper consultation
on the Baker’s Bay project did
not take place.

yf

CLAUSE, from 3B.

Th

understanding that most of
what was provided was already

in the public domain.

The former Chamber presi-
dent said the Bill “did not have
a significant amount of sub
stance”, except to frequently
refer to the National Insurancé
Act. Ms

The NHI plan is seen by,
some as nothing more than afr
income tax and tax on labour?
which will reduce take home
pay and disposable income for
workers. Among the likely out
comes of NHI, employers have
said, is a reduction in real
wages, increases in the costs of
goods and services, and busi-
ness cost cuts, including job

aes Persons Wanted

Harbourside Marine is looking for marine } HR ie
economy’s competitiveness. ~

helpers. Must have mechanical knowledge and There are also concerns thaf
; : the $235 million cost placed dn
strong work ethics. NHI by the Government’s pro™
ject implementation team are
far too low, and combined with
the likely problems in admin-
istering the plan through the
National Insurance Board! |
(NIB), this will mean the,
scheme is not financially viable:
or sustainable in the long-term.
It is likely that. contribution!
rates will have to be increased,,
acting as a further burden on!
disposable income, the busi-
ness community and the
Bahamian economy. i
{

MACKEY, Keyno
MAJOR, Dorothy
NAIRN, Anthony
PINDER, Deborah
STRACHAN, Herbert
WILSON, Timothy L.

losses. All would further raisé
the costs of doing business in
the Bahamas, and reduce the

Nassau Village
Elizabeth Estates
Market Street
Blue Hill Road
Faith Avenue
Sunset Park
Please fax resumes to: 394-7659



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person with knowledge of generators, golf
cars and the marine industry.

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Please fax resume to: 394-7659



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 5B



abak denies contempt claim

FROM page 1B

centres on paragraph three of

the Order issued by Justice
Lyons on November 3, before
he recused himself from hear-
ing all cases as a result of his
ruling on judicial indepen-
dence.

| The order instructs that
copies of all correspondence
and e-mails between Mr Babak
and his fellow defendant, Sir
Jack, and between the pair of
them and GBPA, Port Group
Ltd and Fiduciary Manage-

ment Services Ltd - the com-.

pany that holds the 50 per cent
of GBPA and Port Group’s
parent that is currently being
disputed - be handed to the St
George estate’s attorney, Fred
Smith of Callender’s & Co, in
preparation for a hearing on
November 20 that never hap-
pened.

In addition, ‘the order gave
Mr Smith access to all e-mail
records and allowed him to
enter the GBPA to obtain
these, provided they were not
attorney/client privileged. Doc-
uments in this category did not
have to be disclosed.

The estate is claiming that
the defendants had “failed
and/or refused to comply”, but
Mr Babak denied this in an
affidavit. filed with the
Supreme Court on November
20.

, Mr Babak confirmed details
in an affidavit submitted by
Caroline St George, daughter
of the late Edward St George’s
first wife, that his attorney,
Gregory Moss, had submitted
to Justice Lyons a November
3, 2006, letter from him con-
firming that the documents and
access will be provided.

‘Mr Babak alleged that he
had given instructions, as
GBPA and Port Group Ltd
chair, to Ian Barry, chief finan-
cial officer of both entities, to
comply, and the latter had con-
firmed that this had been done
or all necessary steps taken.

-In addition, Mr Babak said
be was, apealing for himself,

err
Ee 8,

Hi, my name is

GBPA, Port Group Ltd and
Sir Jack and his entities that
all steps had been taken to pre-
serve the necessary papers and
documents.

Alleged

However, Mr Babak alleged
that GBPA and Port Group
Ltd had been delayed in com-
plying after Mr Smith objected
to Mr Moss’s involvement in
printing and delivering records
to the estate because he did
not represent GBPA and Port
Group Ltd.

The GBPA chair said this
had caused the delay, as both
companies had been forced to



required

Agent of the Mon ts :

British _
6

ACCOUNTS CLERK

Needed for Private Christian School

Accounting Degree or solid
accounting background

Must be a mature, reliable
and honest team player
Must be computer literate

Must have excellent
people skills

Please fax resume & cover letter.

Fax# 325-3260.

hire Thomas Evans QC to
review documents and see
whether they were subject to
attorney/client privilege, a
process still ongoing.

Mr Babak also promised
that no materials had been
destroyed or removed from the
GBPA, and that no electronic
records would be tampered
with, having promised Mr
Smith that a computer techni-
cian of his choice would be
allowed in to verify no e-mail
records would be deleted.

Yet as at November 14, Car-
oline St George had alleged
that no papers or documents
had been received from Mr
Babak, Sir Jack and his entities

























Give me a call today at our Garmichael Rd. Branch

I
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Freepart 242-392-7288 Exuma 242-438-3635

despite repeated requests to
do so.

Nor had any documents
been received from Mr Evans
on behalf of Port Group Ltd
and GBPA.

Distributed by Lowe’s Wholesale, Soldier Rd.

Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that KATHIA FELIMA OF EAST
BROUGHAM STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and_ Citizenship,

for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why. registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20TH day of NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.





¢ 393-7111.» Fax: 393-0440

ACREAGE FOR SALE

The Property is located off Fox Hil Road in the vicinity of Prince Charles Drive,
The parcel is a parallelogram in shape, is on a level awe and contains 16. 32

acres.

All that piece, parcel, or lot of land being lots #841 & 82 being bounded onthe
north by Springfield Read running thereon One Thousand One Hundred and
Eighteen and Sixteen Hundredths (1,448.16) feet, on the east by lot number 83
running thereon five hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (687.80)
~feet, on the south by land running thereon nine hundred and seventy-seven
and fen hundredths (977.10) feet, and one the west by lot number 52 running
thereon five hundred and eighty-seven and eighty hundredths (587.80) feet.

PLOT PLAN

The property is for sale by owner. No agents. Asking price is One Million Five
Hundred Thousand (B$1,500,000.00) dollars net. The right is reserved to

any and or all offers. All offers to be submitted | in writing by December 31%,
006 to:-

Acreage for sale
clo P. 0. Box N-8097
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE \



JoB VACANCY

QUEEN’S COLLEGE

Has an immediate vacancy for an Accounts Clerk

The major duties of the Clerk will include:

e Ordering of books and related teaching supplies
and materials for all sections of the school
Receiving/Checking/Distribution of books and
supplies to the relevant sections of the school
Preparation of payment for local and international
suppliers
Maintaining accurate relevant accounting files

The successful candidate will:

demonstrate effective communication and
interpersonal skills

be able to work with minimum supervision

be a multi-tasker, in this very busy office

be able to work on weekends and holidays if -
necessary

The starting salary will be commensurate with qualifications
and experience. We offer a competitive benefits package,

including gratuity, pension, health insurance, discount on

children’s tuition.

Queen’s College was established in Nassau in 1890 by
The Methodist Church and is a member of The International
Association of Methodist Schools, Colleges and
Universities (IAMSCU).

Resumes, covering letters and application forms can be
returned to:

The Office of The Principal
‘Queen’s College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas

or emailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com

more information can be obtained at our award

winning website www.qchenceforth.com.
BAHAMIANS ONLY NEED APPLY



WE’RE MOVING

Royal Bank of Canada Trust
Company (Bahamas) Limited is
pleased to announce that on
December 4, 2006 it will be
changing its place of business to

Royal Bank

of Canada
Trust Company
is on the move

Bayside Executive Park

Floor 2, Building #3

Blake Road and West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 702 5900
Fax (242) 327 7382

The postal address for the
company will remain

PO Box N-3024

Nassau, NP, Bahamas

Royal Bank
of Canada’

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

Dias mark of Royal Bank
The Lion & Globe sy:nbol and RB

GLOBAL PRIVATE BANKING



National Health sums

‘just don’t add up’

FROM page 1B

assuming that the cost of ser-
vices would remain unchanged
despite a 20 per cent rise in
usage.

He questioned whether, if
NHI’s costs dramatically
exceeded the Government’s
$235 million projection, med-
ical services and benefits avail-
able to NHI members would
be cut to contain these costs.

“The costs don’t change?
Sounds strange doesn’t it? We

-don’t need a mathematician to

figure out that increased utili-
sation of services will mean
increased costs to supply those
needs,” Dr Rollins argued.

“Could it be that govern-
ment intends to deny Bahami-
ans access to needed medical
services in.an effort to contain
costs? Even if maths usually
hurts'your head, it is elemen-
tary to see that the proposed
NHI numbers just don’t add
up.

“No, this is not a fight
between the rich and the poor,
this is a fight to get this thing
right. If we don’t get it right,
guess who will pay the price of
grossly underestimating the
costs of NHI: every single
Bahamian; rich and poor;
young and old; this generation

’ and those yet unborn.”

Head

The BDA head emphasised
that he was neither pro-FNM
not pro-PLP, saying he could
not be accused of having a
vested interest, as dentistry was
one of the benefits excluded
from NHI. _

And Dr Rollins added: “The
Government is extremely
unsure of what the true costs of
NHI will be. There has been
insufficient research done to
accurately determine the true

* costs of this plan:”

Dr Rollins said the Govern-

’ $1 per day proposal: “

ment’s uncertainty over the
plan’s true costs came from the
fact that it had suddenly
altered the proposed contribu-
tion rates for pensioners.
Initially, the Government
and its project implementation
team had said all pensioners
would pay $1 per day for cov-
erage under NHI. Yet in his
address to the nation last week,
Dr Bernard Nottage, minister
of health and national insur-
ance, revealed that pensioners
with a “substantial income”
would pay 2.65 per cent of this

_ to NHI, with those on a lesser

income not having to “pay a
copper”.

*Dr Rollins said of the initial
One big
problem, though. They realised
that pensioners, many of whom
only receive $200 per month
from National Insurance,
would be.paying just as much
as employed Bahamians mak-
ing $1200 per month.

“The NHI steering commit-

tee realised that a gross over- |

sight had been made, which
forced them to take another
look at the NHI proposal,
because their contribution for-
mula was fundamentally
flawed, would neither be equi-
table nor fair in sharing costs,
and would in fact be hurting
the very same people the plan
was designed to help.

“Now we are being told by
the minister of health that
‘pensioners who experience
(financial) difficulties will not
have to.pay. a copper’. Why
does it seem as though this
plan has not been given proper
consideration as to what it will
really cost, and who will and
won't have to pay for it? Could
it be that our leaders just real-
ly do not know?”

Dr Rollins and the BDA
have frequently voiced con-
cerns about the inaccuracy in
estimating healthcare costs in
the Bahamas, arguing that
poor récord keeping in the
public health institutions has

increased “the prospect for
gross inaccuracies in the NHI
cost estimates”.

They pointed out that the
Government’s own Blue Rib-
bon Commission, in its 2004
report on NHI, noted that

financial data had been diffi-

cult to obtain, “and has forced
management in the public
health system to employ guess
work when making. critical
decisions”.

As a result, the BDA ques-
tioned whether NHI’s cost-esti-
mates could be accepted as
reliable.

Addition

In addition, Dr Rollins also"

pointed to the 1995 contract
signed between the Govern-
ment and Physicians Alliance
Management (PAML) - a 10-
year partnership under which
the Public Hospitals:Authority
would provide the premises,
utilities and human resources,
and PAML provide the private
health care services, with the
profits split 50/50.

Yet the BDA said .that in
2003, the Government suffered
a $553,903 loss from this part-
nership, which the Blue Rib-
bon Commission said did not
generate enough revenue to
cover costs. —

The BDA said: “When one
compares the return on invest-
ment ratio in this equity part-
nership, one realises that of the
$3.189 million invested by the
Government in 2003, the
$553,903 loss represents an
approximate 17 per shortfall.

“We cannothelp but extrap-
olate how a similar 17 per cent
miscalculation for the costs

implementing the proposed

NHI would impact its potential
real cost. A 17 per cent deficit
would equate to an underesti-
mation of some $41 million,
meaning that Bahamas could
be asked very quickly to pay
an additional $328" per ‘year in
contributions.” ;

ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) and
Galanis & Company

CPD Seminar:
Taxation - A Global
Comparison

British Colonial Hilton Hotel
#1 Bay Steet, Nassau

Wednesday 29 November 2006
3:00am - 1:00pm
Registration staris af 8.30 a.m.

US$150

3 CPD units



Galanis
& Company

The seminar will be conducted by Chas Roy-Chowdhury,
Head of Taxation at ACCA. He has a degree in Applied Economics
and is a fellow of ACCA. He warked in public practice from 1980
until 1991 when he joined ACCA Technical Department.
He has made presentations on key international tax issues to

_ the European Parliament and International conference venues
as well as lectured for ACCA extensively on Anti Money Laundering,
IFRS and other programmes,on ACCA courses and
for lis tax exams in China .

To book or for information, please contact John Bain at Galanis & Co:
328-4540; Fax: 328-4377 or the ACCA Caribbean Office, Email:
_ info@wi.accaglobal.com / www.accaglobal.com

BAHAMAS HOT MIX

Asphalt Products Manufacturer
Civil Engineering Contractor

Now Hiring For Abaco Projects
NB: Personnel To Be Hired In Abaco

Nassau Office

Airport Industrial Park
Po Box Cb 10990
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 377-6351
Fax: (242) 377-2193

Dump Truck Drivers
‘Excavator Operators
Dozer Operators
General Labourers

Abaco Office

Airport Roundabout

P.O. Box AB-20184

Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 367-3956

Fax: (242) 367-3959



\

'
\
>

-. THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBEH 2/, Zuuo, rAuc sD



Employers urged to help
combat domestic violence

FROM page 1B

ductivity, Assistant Superinten-
| dent Sands said: “It’s important
“that top managers know how to
‘ deal with workers affected by
‘ domestic violence.”
~ To help combat domestic vio-
‘' lence, Assistant Superintendent
~ Sands urged employers to
establish policies and proce-
dures that would allow work-
*. ers, in confidence, to disclose if
-'they were suffering from
‘s domestic violence, and to
ensure that advance warnings
and pictures of alleged perpe-
trators were passed to the com-
pany’s security guards.
She-also encouraged employ-
', ers to sponsor workshops on
1 domestic violence, and to estab-
, lish employee assistance pro-
‘, grammes.
«Meanwhile, Superintendent
, Keith Bell said that for the first
10 months of 2006 to October
,. end, shopbreaking incidents had
_+ risen by 11 per cent compared.
, to the same period in 2005,
‘implying that crimes against

business property, such as
break-ins, were on the rise.
However, while six business-
men and employees had been
murdered in 2005 as a result of

attempted armed robberies at _

their place of work, this had fall-
en to just two for the first 10
months of 2006.
With cash the favourite targe
for armed robbers, accounting
for 63 per cent of what was
stolen in all 2005 armed rob-
beries, Superintendent Bell
warned businesses to be care-
ful when handling; transporting
or depositing large sums of cash.
“It raises the very real ques-
tion as to whether it is an inside
job, with people monitoring
you,” he said. “You make your-

. self more vulnerable to atten-

tion when you accumulate large
sums of cash.”
Superintendent Bell urged
Bahamian businesses to ensure
they maintained all surveillance
and anti-crime technology,
revealing that in several cases
where the police had attempted
to investigate robberies, the

LONG-TERM BENEFIT CHEQUES

Closed Circuit Television
(CCTV) system in stores did
not have film in to record the
perpetrators.

“Some are not doing their job
by checking the film is in the
camera,” Superintendent Bell
said. “You can have the best,
but if you do not have checks
and balances on a daily basis,
it defeats the purpose.”

He added that the installa-
tion of a CCTV system in down-
town Nassau, a prime tourist
destination, was “a work in
progress”, the police and Nas-
sau Tourism and Development
Board (NTDB) had visited oth-
er countries such as Ottawa to
see how such systems worked.

Chief Superintendent Hulan
Hanna told the seminar that
while there were civil liberties
concerns about CCTV use,
“their usefulness is far more
overwhelming than the down-
side”.

He added that the police
were also looking at holding
special seminars on crime pre-

vention for street vendors, an .

The names of persons with outstanding Long-Term Benefit cheques are listed
below. These persons are kindly asked to collect their cheque(s) from the
Pensions Department of the WULFF ROAD LOCAL OFFICE.

For further information, you may contact the Department at telpehone number

356-2070:

NAME
BAZARD, Lucito
BROWN, Violet
DARVILLE, Elizabeth
EDWARDS, Cardinal
GOODMAN, Marjorie
JOHNSON, Anthony
JOHNSON, Shanara.
KNOWLES, Herbert

' MARTIN, Geoffrey
MILLER, Albert
MILLER, Sandra
SANDS, Sherie

WILLIAMSON, Dwight

Oe

we

ro a

ERE AAR Te




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ADDRESS
Regency Park
Kemp Road
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Golden Gates
Nassau Village
Bruce Avenue :
Miami Street
Durham Street
Claire Street
Sea Hawk Drive
Wilson Tract

- Sisal Street
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Soldier Road * 393



expanding sector of the
Bahamian economy.
Superintendent Bell said the
switch from traditional paper
to computers, situated in web
shops and web cafes, had made

it much harder for the police to
combat Numbers Houses, espe-
cially given that the computer
servers were situated in foreign
companies.

The police were also assessing

how to improve the quality of
service delivered by private
security companies, as “more

. and more, it is becoming obvi-

ous we need to improve quali-
ty”.

ey (Cololle wen
Management Career
Oyen aan

Exclusive property requires a General Manager to coordinate and
oversee the day to day functioning of the homeowners’

association including:

Management of staff and sub-contractors
Property maintenance, including building
and landscaping Administration

Successful candidate must possess proven managerial skills and
knowledge of construction industry practices.

Excellent salary and benefits package commensurate

with experience.

Please fax resumes to (242) 362-4107

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shopping and keep the
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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

Ce ee

Rik BE EE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

_ GREAT PROGRESS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
GREAT PROGRESS LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



SHAVAR INVESTMENT

MORTGAGE BROKERS
~ Products and Services

~ Get Cash Now!

¢ Interest rates as low as 7.5% on
home equity loans
| © Pay off your credit card bills
¢ Renovate your home for
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¢ Save up to $50,000 on your
home mortgage.

| Refinance Today!!!
CONSOLIDATE | LANDOWNERS

| Get out of debt -Are you paying on land?
: -Bring all your payments -Do you owna piece or
under one roof. property

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ed, ; age into your home, duplex
| Relieve Financial Stress o GUE

- lor triplex
Act Now!!! | Act Now!!!

Call Today: 325-6461 ext 256

Email: shavarinvestment@coralwave.com

Upperlevel Town Center Mall




































OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY PRIME
MINISTER AND MINISTRY OF
NATIONAL SECURITY

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR SECURITY SERVICE
STRAW MARKET
BAY STREET

1) The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister
invites Tenders from security companies to supply
security services fot the Downtown Straw Market fora
-period of twelve months (1 year) with effect from Ist
January 2007. Hours for security coverage of the
Market are from 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.

2) Interested persons or companies may collect tender
specifications from the Office of the Deputy Prime
Minister and Ministry of National Security, 3rd Floor -
Churchill Building, Bay Street between the hours of
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday
beginning Monday, 20 th November 2006.

| 3) Tenders are to be in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Security, Straw Market” and delivered to
the attention of:

The Permanent Secretary
Office of the Deputy Prime Minister &
Ministry of National Security
P.O. Box N-3217
Churchill Building
Nassau, Bahamas

4) All Tenders must received by 4:00 p.m. Friday, 8th
2006, accompanied by an endorsed copy of a current
business licence.

5) The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister reserves
the right to accept or reject any or all Tender(s).



lip-offs lead to $1.3bn in fraud

: Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers

ee

Seta eh att
behind the news,
read Insight Mondays





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMOND CHARLES OF
MILTON STREET, P.O. BOX CB-13015, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of
NOVEMBER, 2006 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











Legal Notice

NOTICE

KAIZER INTERNATIONAL LTD.
—o—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
KAIZER INTERNATIONAL LID.
’ has been completed; a Certificate of
» Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

“NOTICE

SYGEN TECHNOLOGY LTD.

- Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
. 2000, the dissolution of
SYGEN TECHNOLOGY LID.
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

MYCENE HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance wi... Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
MYCENE HOLDINGS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







Resort & Spa

- “~~ Recruiting

Passionate, Personable and Honest

Individuals have a least 3 years experience in the
Hospitality Industry to fill the following
positions:

Executive Chef
Food and Beverage Manager
Boutique Manager
Room Division Manager
Spa Manager
Spa Therapist
Entertainment Coordinator
- Concierge
Receptionist ©...
Maitre D 4
Bartenders —
Waiters
Housekeeping
Bellman

All applications are appreciated but only qualified
individuals will be considered. Applications must
be received before December 4, 2006. Our email

address is stephmresort@ yahoo.com or you can
mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ENTERPRISING ENTERPRISES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of
ENTERPRISING ENTERPRISES LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ASHTON LYD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that inaccordance with Section 138 (4)

of the International Business Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000

ASHTON LTD., is in dissolution, as of November 23, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box !777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Exclusive Boutique |



wo re tle BR A oR ea a RET aa ae a OR

Le ASS te HR a

Ce i i EE A ie lb a i RS BE Re a RR Sea a MB

ee a a ett

Bien ie eae aoe
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 9B

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



Ministry Of Transport and Aviation

Road Traffic Department

NOTICE

Results of The Franchise Renewal Sitting of the Road Traffic Authority Board held at
‘ Worker’s House, Tonique Williams-Darling Highway on Thursday, 26" October, 2006 at

. NAME

DESCRIPTION
OF FRANCHISE

NUMBER = STATUS

SELF DRIVE SCOOTERS



10:00 am. : : wet oy
10. Ursula Coakley SD Scooters 90 NO ATTENDANCE
, Faithia Investment Ltd.
The under-mentioned persons or their representatives were in attendance:- Nassau Bahamas
NAME DESCRIPTION NUMBER = STATUS 11. Julia Turnquest SD Scooters 30 = INATTENDANCE
OF FRANCHISE J & S Scooters
Nassau Bahamas
PRIVATE SCHEDULE SERVICE (SCHOOL BUS
12. Robert Allen SD Scooters 4 ‘NO ATTENDANCE

_ 1. Forbes Bus Service
General Delivery
Nassau, Bahamas

Strachan’s Bus Service
P.O. Box N-10389
Nassau Bahamas

Private School Bus

Private School Bus

Private School Bus

2 IN ATTENDANCE

2 IN ATTENDANCE

Nassau Bahamas

13. Brenton Rolle
Nassau Bahamas

14. William Simms
Sunshine Scooter
Nassau Bahamas

SD Scooters

SD Scooters

3 NO ATTENDANCE

15 NO ATTENDANCE

3. Leroy Bowe 9 INATTENDANCE 15. Judy Smith SD Scooters 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Bowe’s Transportation Two A’s Scooter Rental
P.O. Box N515 Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas
‘ SELF DRIVE CARS
4. Lilymae Mcdonald Private School Bus 2 NO ATTENDANCE
Mackado Bus Service 1. Franklyn Ferguson SD Cars 20 IN ATTENDANCE
P.O. Box N 9371 P.O. Box SB 51923 : :
Sea Breeze Estate
5. Antonio Edwards Private School Bus 4 NO ATTENDANCE :
P.O. Box N8898 2. Collingwood Armbrister SD Cars - 15. NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas P.O.Box CB 1 1007. : t
Nassau Bahamas
6. On Time Fabulous Transportation Private School Bus 2 NO ATTENDANCE er :
Nassau Bahamas ; 3. Airport Rent A Car SD Cars 113 IN ATTENDANCE
; Bahamas Rent A Car SD Cars 25
7. Craig Wilmore Private School Bus 4 NO ATTENDANCE Hillview Holdings Ltd é SD Cars 30
Three kings Nassau U Drive It Service SD Cars 4
P.O. Box N7264 P.O..Box 1615
8. Anthony Weech Private School Bus 1 NO ATTENDANCE 4. Matthew Ferguson SD Cars 18 IN ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas . Millenium Car Rental : .
P.O. Box CB 12109
9. Samuel Woodside Private School Bus . 5 IN ATTENDANCE 5. Stephen Heastie: SD Cars 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Classical Transportation Heastie Rent a Car
‘Nassau Bahamas P.O. Box N 110
: : 6. Sanco Car Rental SD Cars 24 . INATTENDANCE
10. Mark Moss 2 wi ag wu « Private School Bus 3 IN ATTENDANCE P.O Box EE 15073
nae ae Servige elie Nassau Bahamas
.O. OX Rig Ce RS ROY UGA rem &
Nassau Bahamas: 7. Ricardo Hamilton SD Cars 10. =NOATTENDANCE
K &G Enterpris
11. Dorrington Poitier Private School Bus 1. INATTENDANCE P.O. Box Grae
Nassau Bahamas aa
; gees. 8. Taddeus Thompson SD Cars 35 NO ATTENDANCE
12. Harrison Moxey I Private School Bus 1 IN ATTENDANCE Teglo Rentals
Hieon Fu Serie’ P.O. Box CB-13694
Nassau Bahamas
\ red 9. Sidney Mckenzie SD Cars 80 IN ATTENDANCE
13. Glen Rolle Private School Bus 1 ; NO ATTENDANCE P.O.Box N1603
Hillside Bus Service Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas
. 10 Wille Moss SD Cars 6 NO ATTENDANCE
14, Jefferey Myers Private School Bus 2 IN ATTENDANCE P.O. Box SS 19451
Jasmine Transit Nassau Bahamas ‘
Nassau Bahamas
‘ x d 11. M &M Virgo Car Rental SD Cars 168 INATTENDANCE
15. Linda C. Carey Private School Bus 1 IN ATTENDANCE P.O. Box N1702
Nassau Bahamas _ Nassau Bahamas
16. Three Kings Private School Bus 2 - NO ATTENDANCE 12. Pemmie Sutherland SD Cars 5 NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas : P.O. Box 1962
: Nassau Bahamas
17. Norman Dean Private School Bus 3 NO ATTENDANCE
Three N’s Bus Service 13. A & G Car Rental SD Cars 20 = INATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas Nassau Bahamas
18 Wenzel Miller Private School Bus ey IN ATTENDANCE 14. Samuel Knowles SD Cars 35 NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas A 1 Car Rental
+ : : ‘ Nassau Bahamas
19. Carla Bastian Private School Bus 2 IN ATTENDANCE :
P.O. Box N 1779 15, Asa Bethel SD Cars 25 © NOATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas AJ Rent A Car
Nassau Bahamas
SELF DRIVE SCOOTERS 16. Ace Rent A Car SD Cars 3 NO ATTENDANCE
_ - -Nassau Bahamas
1. Bowe Car Investment SD Scooters 50 IN ATTENDANCE
P.O. Box AP 59217 17. Adderley Car Rental SD Cars 9 NO ATTENDANCE
Nassau Bahamas Nassau Bahamas
2. M&M Virgo Car Rental SD Scooters 50 INATTENDANCE i8. Jamal Davis SD Cars 13. IN ATTENDANCE
P.O. Box N1702 Adrana’s Car Rental
Nassau Bahamas Nassau Bahamas
3. Sheaderon Thompson SD Scooter 15. INATTENDANCE 19. Adventure Jeep Rental SD Cars 3 NO ATTENDANCE
Alpha Scooter Rental Nassau Bahamas
P.O. Box CR 54870
20. George Kerr SD Cars 20 NO ATTENDANCE
4. Allan Forbes SD Scooters 16 NO ATTENDANCE All (M) Auto
All Season Cycle Rental Nassau Bahamas
Nassau Bahamas
21. Auto To Go Rental’ SD Cars 3 NO ATTENDANCE
5. Cedric Cadet SD Scooters 22 NO ATTENDANCE Nassau Bahamas
BNB Scooter Rental
Nassau Bahamas 22. Brian & Paulette Higgs SD Cars 20 IN ATTENDANCE
; BPB Auto Sales & Rental
6. William Simms SD Scooter 9 NO ATTENDANCE De eevreranee
Brown Brothers ;
Nassau Bahamas 23. Destiny Car Rentals SD Cars 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Gary Cox
7. Colan Knowles SD Scooters 4B NO ATTENDANCE P.O. Box SS-6273
Nassau Bahamas iNassau, Bahamas
8. William Curtis SD Scooters 5 NO ATTENDANCE 24. ee eee SD Cars 10 NO ATTENDANCE
Curtis Scooter Rental aa
NascapBalamas Nassau Bahamas
Diane lelest Wisedside SD Scooters 2 a EN ANGE 25. West Bay Rent A Car SD Cars | 12 NO ATTENDANCE
DK Rental P.O. Box CB 11111
Nassnu Baharins Nassau Bahamas
\ ;
' } \
PAGE 10B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

NAME

DESCRIPTION

OF FRANCHISE

SELF DRIVE CARS

26 Danco Rentals
P.O. Box N 1081
Nassau Bahamas

SD Cars

PRIVATE CHARTER

1. Joseph Forbes
General Delivery
Nassau Bahamas

2. Leon Rahming
Kenwood Street
Nassau Bahamas

3. Charles Storr
C&S Private Charter
P.O. Box N-1476

4. Larry Bastian
Sun Fun
P.O. Box N-448

5. Prince Livingston
P.O. Box N-8970
Nassau Bahamas

6. Hugo Barry
William Street
Nassau Bahamas

7. Michael Symonette
P.O. Box N4846
Nassau Bahamas

8. Sonia Bowe-Adderley
P.O. Box SS5454, ©
Nassau Bahamas

9. Errington Hanna
P.O. Box SS5646
Nassau Bahamas

‘10. Stephen O. Symonette
Nassau Bahamas .

~ 11. Richard Thompson
P.O. Box SS2000
Nassau Bahamas

12. Evangelist Mcphee
P.O Box N7999
Nassau Bahamas

13 Richard Moss
Leisure Travel & Tour
P.O. Box SS19057
Nassau Bahamas

. 13 Colin Bowe
Bowtie Tours
P.O. Box N8246
Nassau Bahamas

14. Bahamas Taxi Cab Union
P.O. Box N 1077
Nassau Bahamas

15. Emerald Gréen Sightseeing Ltd.

P.O. Box N-1077
Nassau Bahamas

16. Majestic Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau Bahamas

17. Howard Johnson Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau Bahamas

18. Dan Knowles Tour Ltd
P.O. Box N1081
Nassau Bahamas -

19. Prince Livingston
Nassau Bahamas

20. Kenneth Johnson
Nassau Bahamas

1. Alexander Burrows
Burrows Transportation
P.O. Box N-3477

N

David Strachan
Strachans Bus Service
P.O. Box N10389

3. Sherwon Williams
Gleniston Gardens
P.O. Box GT-2212

4. Stafford Nairn
Golden Gates #2
P.O. Box SS-6737

5. Forbes Bus Service
. General Delivery
Kool Acres

6. Harrison Moxey
Nassau Bahamas

_ Frankie Bus Service
P.O. Box SB 51923
Sea Breeze

~

8. Anthony Newbold
P.O. Box N 439
Nassau Bahamas

9. Sherwin Brown
Al’s Bus Service
P.O. Box N-9231

10, Elkin Davis
P.O. Box FH14516
Nassau Bahamas

10. Louis Major
P.O. Box SS-6567
Nassau Bahamas

11 Allan Russell
A and R Bus Service |
P.O. Box FH 14277

12 Sealy Bus Service
Rickey Sealy
P.O. Box CR56729

Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter
Private Citas.

. Private Charter
Private Charter
Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

Private Charter

ITNE

Jitney
‘Jitney
Jitney

Jitney

' Jitney

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney

Jitney

NUMBER STATUS
6 TN ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
2 NG oe
1 NO ATTENDANCE
3 NO ATTENDANCE
5 NO STENDANEE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
11 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
2 = NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANS
2 ‘IN ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
41 INATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
19 —_ INATTENDANCE
15 IN ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
5 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE
8 IN ATTENDANCE
7 3 IN ATTENDANCE. |
5 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE
1 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
1 IN er
2 IN ATTENDANCE
8 . IN ATTENDANCE
6 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE

13. Glinton’s Bus Service
Benjamin A Glinton
P. O. Box N126

14. Shirley Clarke
Clarke’s Bus Service
P.O. Box. N3913

15. Dianne Evans
Gerald Bartlett Estate
General Delivery

16. Tyrone Swaby
P.O. Box SS-6951
Nassau Bahamas

17. Cleveland Stuart
Clevelin Company Ltd
P.O. Box SS 6030

18. Deans Transportation
P.O Box N 3456
Nassau Bahamas

19. Thomas Lightbourne
P.O. Box SB50788
Nassau Bahamas

20. Hilton Mcintosh
P.O. Box N7386
Nassau Bahamas

21. Alvin’s Bus Service
P.O. Box N7656
Nassau Bahamas

22. Patricia Lightbourne-Dole
P.O. Box GT2897
‘Nassau Bahamas.

23. Harold Adderley
P.O Box SB 50953
Nassau Bahamas

24 Alvin Burrows
P.O. Box N3477
Nassau Bahamas

25. Browns Bus Service
General Delivery
Nassau Bahamas

26 Sean Galanos
Petrina’s Bus
P.O. Box N EE15030

27 Sonnie Taylor
P.O Box CR55275
Nassau Bahamas

28 Isaiah Nathan
P.O. Box CR55275
Nassau Bahamas

29 Richard Moss
D.J Transportation
P.O. Box $S19057
Nassau Bahamas

30. Lawrence Thurston
Thurston Bus Service
P.O. Box 56174
Nassau Bahamas

31 Cedrick Smith ;
Desario’s Bus Service
P.O. Box EE17067
Nassau Bahamas

32. Samuel Woodside
Classical Transportation
Nassau Bahamas

33. Audley Turnquest
A.J. Transportation
General Delivery -
Nassau Bahamas

34. Arron Woodside
Aaron’s Bus Service
P.O. Box SB 50441
Nassau Bahamas

35. Adrian Fox
Adrian’s Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

36. Alicia Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

37. Shervin Brown
Al’s Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

38. Arthur Archer
Archer Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

39. George Forbes
Aries Co. Train Express
Nassau Bahamas

40. Barry Ferguson
BB Transit
Nassau Bahamas

41. Leslie Rolle
B.L.L. Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

42. Basil Woodside
Bahamas Jitney Service
Nassau Bahamas

43. Bridgette Barrett
P.O. Box FH 14294
Nassau Bahamas

44. James Lewis
Big Lou Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

45. Lambert Rahming
Convenient City Transit
Nassau Bahamas

46. Patricia Deveaux
Courtesy Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

DESCRIPTION

OF FRANCHISE

JITNEY

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
_ Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney

Jitney _

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney
Jitney

Jitney

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

NUMBER STATUS

1 IN ATTENDANCE

1 IN ATTENDANCE
1 IN ATTENDANCE
3 IN ATTENDANCE

14 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE

1‘ NO ATTENDANCE

5 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO acrENDENCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1 IN ATTENDANCE

2 NO ATTENDANCE

2 NO ATTENDANCE
5 IN ATTENDANCE .
1 IN ATTENDANCE

3 Ne APPEARANCE |

17 IN ATTENDANCE

2. NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
1 IN es
2 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
1° NOATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
7 IN ATTENDANCE
1 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE

16 NO ATTENDANCE

2 NO ATTENDANCE
crew Et

SE Oe TL

a

RTE TORE EE og

ae re

en

28 BOR

EP SE SES Oe

EPL PR ee eR

DME NREE Mo

SR Ta TR I SR RE ae RR

Ty EE SR ERI TER SOR TR RGR A ET TTS RSET hag TT IER Nog

FR OR RT

Pan ad

PRR SMT EL

Oe we we OE RS ar



47. Teresa Knowles
Davis Bus Line
Nassau Bahamas

48. Wayde Forbes
Nassau Bahamas

49. Derek Davis
Davis Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

50. Robert Bethel
Daytolla’s Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

51. Erick Ferguson
E & B Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

52. Alexander Walkes
P.O. Box N35
Nassau Bahamas

53. Clarence Ferguson
P.O. Box 9117
Nassau Bahamas

54 Ivan Bowe
IB Transportation
P.O. Box N9117
Nassau Bahamas

55 Arlington King
Q K Bus Service
‘Nassau Bahamas

56. Hercules Rolie
Herks Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

57. Nassau City Transit
P.O. Box SS6982
Nassau Bahamas

58 Franklyn P Rolle
' Eestacy Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

. 59, Henry Sears

Rahad Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

60. Avan Wilson -
A.W. Transportation
Nassau Bahamas

61. ‘Lavon A. Harris
Quality Transit
P.O. Box N3913

62. Samuel Woodside
Classical Transportation
Nassau Bahamas

63; Clatance Moss Jr.
Tuff Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

64. Roy Deal
Nassau Bahamas

'- 65. Vernon Deal

Nassau Bahamas

66. Arthur Deal
Nassau Bahamas

: 67. Ferlin Henfield

Touch of Class
Nassau Bahamas

68. John Thurston
Comfort Auto
Nassau Bahamas

69 Minerva Edwards
Four Star Bus Service
Nassau Bahamas

Sonia Bowe — Adderely
Island Escape Tours
P.O: Box SS-5454 ©

2. Errington Hanna

P.O. Box SS5646
Nassau Bahamas

3. Harry Tinker
P.O. Box N1503
Nassau Bahamas

4. Terry Delancy he
P.O. Box N 1702
Nassau Bahamas

5. Leisure Travel & Tours
P.O. Box 19057
Nassau Bahamas

6. Bowtie Tours
P.O Box N 8246
Nassau Bahamas

7. Happy Tours Ltd.
. P.O. Box N-1077
Nassau Bahamas

8. Island Sun Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau Bahamas

9. Majestic Tours Ltd
P.O. Box N-1401
Nassau, Bahamas -

10. Siri 2000 LTD
P.O. Box CB12396
Nassau Bahamas

11. Dan Knowles
P.O. Box N1081
Nassau Bahamas

12. Howard Johnson
Nassau Bahamas

13. Steven Symonette
Nassau Bahamas

14. Bahamas Experience
Nassau Bahamas

DESCRIPTION

OF FRANCHISE

JITNEY
Jitney

Jitney

Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney ©
Jitney

Jitney

Jitney-~’
Jitney
Jitney
~ Jitney
Jitney.....
Jitney
Jitney
‘Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney
Jitney

Jitney
Jitney

J itney

TOUR CAR

Tour Car

Tour Car

Tour Car —

Tour Car

Tour Car...

Tour Car
Tour Car
Tour Car

Tour Car

Tour Car
Tour Car

Jour Car
Tour Car

Tour Car

THE TRIBUNE
NUMBER STATUS
3 IN ATTENDANCE
2 IN ATTENDANCE
17 IN ATTENDANCE
5 NO ATTENDANCE
2 NO ATTENDANCE
FROM page 1B
1 NO ATTENDANCE rigs’ ‘ : gk
base, first with a $25 million
- rights issue, and therra- $15 mil-
lion preference share issue.
3 NO ATTEND Both were oversubscribed.
a Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national saw its loan book and
advances to customers increase
2 IN by more than $100 million. to
Meee $452.69 million in the year to
June 30, 2006, with the bank
attributing its mortgage cam-.
eee» ff pag as the reason it captured
“Eee : 25 per cent of all mortgages
4 ap PLNPENGe issued by Bahamian commer-
cial banks that year.
Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
1 _national said in its 2006 annual
TN ALTENDANCE report that the rate of growth
“jn its loan book rose to 28.45
per cent in fiscal 2006, com-
pared to 17.74 per cent the pre-
1 NO ATTENDANCE vious year.
It added that despite enjoy-
ing “phenomenal growth”, the
-bank’s asset quality rose from
4 IN ATTENDANCE 3.44 per cent to 2.44 per cent in
‘2006, described as “the best
__ level for the last 10-years”:~-~--
ae a aS are Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
1 . INATTENDANCE national reaffirmed it remained
committed to its long-time core
lending niches, mortgages and
1 IN ATTENDANCE
ee”) TNE en
Life; Ss RUATTENDANCE For the stories
behind the news,
2 : cere Ce Mele [a1 4
on Mondays
1

12

\o

15

=i IN) ATTENDANCE





MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 11B

commercial and industrial

loans.

Al Jarrett, its chairman, said
that at year-end, mortgages
accounted for 81 per cent of
Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
tional’s 2006 loan book growth,
with commercial loans taking
up 10 per cent and consumer
loans 9 per cent. At 2006 year-
end, mortgages took up 52.24
per cent of all the bank’s loans.

The bank added: “The
growth in the loan portfolio,

ances in the industry, present-
ed certain challenges for the’
bank in 2006.”

It said that it used funds
from capital sources to allevi-
ate this, with total deposits ris-
ing by 15.82 per cent or just
over $60 million.

In his message to sharehold-.

_ers, Paul McWeeney, Bank of

the Bahamas International’s
managing director, confirmed
that credit growth throughout
‘the commercial banking indus-
try had impacted system liq-
uidity, and this had “influenced

_-higher-deposit rates a8 Well”.

He’ added that the bank’s
Board had approved plans to
open two new branches - one
in Cat Island, the other for
southwestern New Providence.

Mr McWeeney said the.
bank’s efficiency ratio had
improved from 65.82 per cent
to 58.07 per cent in 2006, show-
ing Bank of the Bahamas
International had contained
non-interest expenses and
overall costs despite its growth.

Interest expenses rose by
20.78 per cent in fiscal 2006,

with the “imbalances” in com- _

mercial banking liquidity and
“withholding of funds by
investors, in anticipation of cer-
tain major private and public
offerings”, putting pressure on
deposit rates.












IN ATTENDANCE qonad’} ateyin’. (ba ( gaitoaiiig te WOOO) Hasina Ete
: : GN-44t |
IN ATTENADANCE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS Leg
: NOTICE :
-IN ATTENDANCE -- Sane oP eee
_. THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
a ee (CHAPTER 326) ey “
IN ATTENDANCE —_ oT 2
It is Hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement 3
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products should #
be declared "APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purposes of that Act. =
IN ATTENDANCE Ee oe ; ; 4
INATTENDANCE |
No Attendance
IN ATTENDANCE
It is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 Of the Industries Encouragement e
Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about to consider whether the manufacturer i
IN ATTENDANCE specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an is
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER" in relation to the products specified in the i
third column. ee ea ee re &
MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF PRODUCTS fon
FACTORY PREMISES bs
IN ATTENDANCE | . E
| Western Hardware & Airport industrial Park Metal Stud &
Lumber New Providence Track Forming
The Bahamas
IN ATTENDANCE
EE eNe Any interested person having any objection to these deciarations should 3
give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of n
the Ministry of Financial Services.and investments, before,” 29" November, ea
AN ATEENSA RE 2006, by letter addressed to :- ;
THE PERMANENT SECRETARY 7
THE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES & INVESTMENTS a
IN ATTENDANCE P.O. Box N-7770 .
NASSAU, N. P., a
THE BAHAMAS %
IN TTENDANCE <
Signed: me
IN ATTENDANCE .
rte Sa Ns SHEILA CAREY
PERMANENT SECRETARY vs
Rear nARee MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND INVESTMENTS "
IN ATTENDANCE 5


















Bank to double
capital to $100m

Meanwhile, Bank -of- the
Bahamas International’s capi-
tal to asset ratio stood at 13.72
per cent at 2006 year-end, com-
pared to 9.79 per cent the pre-
vious year, something the bank
said was “substantially above
the 5 per cent standard estab-.
lished by the Central Bank of
the Bahamas”.

When it came to risk-adjust-
ed capital, for Tier 1 and total
capital ratios, at June 30, 2006,
these stood at 20.18 per cent

_ together with liquidity-imbal——and 24.26 per cent respectively,”

well above the minimums of 4

per cent and 8 per cent.
During fiscal 2006, Bank of

the Bahamas International said

’ its loan book growth helped to

fuel a 29:59 per cent increase in
interest income to $ 35.295 mil-
lion from $27.239 million.

Net interest income, which
is interest income minus inter-
est expense, rose by $5.761 mil-
lion or 35.57 per cent.,

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national added that the loan
portfolio growth forced it: to

increase its net provision for. -

“Joan losses, that provision now

standing at 1.42 per cent ofall
loans - some $2.692 million -
and: advances compared to 1
per cent a year earlier. ;
Non-interest income, Bank
of the Bahamas International
added, would be a key focus
in its efforts to increase prof-
itability, having grown this'by
almost 27 per cent in fiscal
2006, due largely to fees con-
nected with its mortgage peort-
folio. »
The bank added that non-
interest expenses rose by 17:31

_per. cent, “largely due to ihe

opening of new branches, the
development costs involved in
the introduction of new prod-
ucts, and increased marketing
and competitive positioning of
the bank”.














PAGE 128, VONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006




RAT A AI TI

~ NOTICE

4 AMERICAN DEVELOPMEN BANK (IDB)
WiNG WLLL BE SOLD BY TENDER:
2004 Ford Windstar

esponsibic for payment of customs duty and
y tad. Lis velucle may be inspected during the normal
2 hours, Monday through Friday upon request through
ve of the Administrative Officer, IDB House, East Bay
Nassau, Sealed offers marked “Bid for Automobile”
lel be sent to:

Waser WH %

The Administrative Officer
P.O. Box N-3743
Nassau, Bahamas

Yemen

:s will be accepted until noon on December 8th, 2006. This
car will be sold “as is”. The right is reseved to reject any or all

offers

race






BUSINESS

Bank Clearing House targets June ‘07 date

FROM page 1B

. to be made to the ACH work-

ing group,” Mr McWeeney
added. The working group will
then submit its recommenda-
tions to kim, and he will put it
before the CBA and Central
Bank of the Bahamas for rati-
fication.

Mr McWeeney said he
planned to bring it before the
CBA at its last meeting this
year, which will be held dur-
ing either the second or third
week in December.

“We expect to move swiftly
to the implementation phase,
and we are optimistic we will
have the first phase completed
in a maximum of six months,”
the CBA chairman told The

Tribune.

“It should be no later than’
June, and then we’ll look at
adding on the bells and whis-
tles after that.”

The ACH will “transform”
the Bahamian economy’s pay-
ments systems and the manner
in which thousands of daily
business transactions are con-

ducted.
Phase

Mr McWeeney said the first
phase would provide for the
automatic clearing of cheques,
direct credits and direct debits,
accommodating the bulk of
these transactions.

He added: “It'll bring finali-
ty, help improve the integrity
of transactions and the turn-






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lakeup

around time. It will cut the
clearing period from four days
to two days and one day.

“Tt allows transactions to
flow much more efficiently.”

Mr McWeeney said previ-
ously that the ACH would
“help to improve the integrity
of the [banking] system”, with
persons able to know the full
value of goods involved in a
transaction “almost immedi-
ately”.

And it was also set to
“improve the cash flow of the
whole society, with money
turned over much quicker”.

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-
actions, where cheques drawn
on one bank but due to be
deposited at another have to
be taken by armoured car to
a central location where they
are settled by representatives
of the various institutions.

Apart.from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will even-
tually allow direct debits and
credits from accounts, debit
cards and a shared Automatic
Teller Machine (ATM) net-
work.

The latter would allow
Bahamians to use their cash
cards at any bank branch. It
would also reduce the time
persons spent in line waiting
to cash and deposit pay
cheques, as they could be
deposited to their account.

Bahamian consumers would
also be able to use direct deb-

THE TRIBUNE



its from their bank accounts to
pay bills such as cable televi-
sion and electricity.

The ACH could ultimately
lead to the creation of just one
back office system for the
entire Bahamas. It may also
help develop SWITCH prod-
ucts, where Bahamians could
use their cash cards at any
bank's ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH will be the
opening up a whole range of
electronic banking services in
the Bahamas, including its use
in the online purchase of gov-
ernment goods and services.

Bahamian business owners
last week renewed their plea
fer the commercial banks to
introduce debit cards, some-
thing they feel would reduce
consumers’ reliance on cash -

. the favourite target of armed

robbers. .
Chain —

Dionisio D’Aguilar, who
runs the Superwash laundro-
mat chain and is a member of
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s crime prevention
committee, said his business
had immense problems in
reducing its attractiveness for
potential armed robbers due

. to the fact that 100 per cent-of .

its customer transactions
involved cash.

Mr D’ Aguilar told a Cham-
ber-organised seminar on
crime prevention: “They [con-
sumers] have no choice but to
use cash, so it’s very challeng-
ing.”

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

EQUITY SIDE

2006/CLE/QUI
No. 00662

IN THE MATTER of all those pieces parcels or lots .
of land being Lot Numbers 584 and 585 situate in
Golden Gates Estates Section II Subdivision in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence,

The Bahamas.

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
(Chapter 393 statute law of the Bahamas,revised...
edition 2001).

AND

IN THE MATTER of The Petition of
RICHARDSON HARVEY THURSTON

NOTICE

RICHARDS HARVEY THURSTON, The Petitioner
claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession of
the pieces parcels or lots of land hereinbefore described
and have made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3:
of the Quieting Titles Act to have the title to the said
pieces parcels or lots of land investigated and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in
a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the Act.

small offshore company situated on
Shirley Street, close to downtown
looking for compatible company to’
__ sub-lease office space to.

Copies of a diagram or plan showing the position
boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the said
pieces parcels or lots of land may be inspected during
normal working hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Bitco
Building, East Street in the City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Davis & Co.,
‘ured : British Colonial Hilton, Centre of Commerce,
aie oi ee tere —— . a : = 4th Floor Suite 400, #1 Bay Street, Nassau,
| New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorneys

for the Petitioner i






















Abaco Markets

16.25 Bahamas Property Fund f 11.00 6.8 3.45%

6.90 Bank of Bahamas 7.88 9.9 4.19%

0.0 B ch kK 4 0.80 3.0 2.50%! 1 1

Doe) gee ee sone wee ea as NOTICE is hereby given that any person or persons
1.10 Fidelity Bank 4.21 6.4 4.13% having a right of Dower or an adverse claim or any

9.05 Cable Bah é 9.92 14.9 2.44%) : : % aS $ 5 .

ia, ealina Holdings 1.85 41.3 0.00% claim not recognized in the Petition shall within thirty

3,00 Commonwealth Bank —- 12.29 12.3 5.39%) i i

eae) Soenesie canes GBRe ah gee nae (30) days after the appearance of the Notice herein

210 Doctor's Hospital 2.65 9.0 0.00% file in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City

4.35 Far ard 5.54 %o . sa:

ae tee asice ae ee of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or the

10.00 FirstCaribbean 14.14 15.1 3.93% j i imi ib

Pee he ie fe) ies undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed

0.95 Freeport Concrete 1.00 N/M 0.00% form, verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

8.00 ICD Utilities A 8.00 15.1 3.35%

8.65 J. S. Johnson

Failure of any such person to file and serve a statement
of claim within thirty (30) days of the date herein will













AAO ROTEL SSMS te ESTA
= yO .

__52wk-Low, Symbol _ Last Price Weekly Vol.
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 14.00 1.923 1.320 8.1 9.04% 1
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 10.00 0.000 0.640 =NM 7.85% operate as a bar to such claim.



0.20 RND Holdings



Dated this 16th day of November, A.D. 2006




28.00 ABDAB










| 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

0.60 i

| DAVIS & CO.

5 -t 52wk-low Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $

a4 1 1.2626 Colina Money Market Fund 1.314929* siete Chambers 4

is GO17 2.5197 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.00177** British Colonial Hilton
2.2754 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.482888"*

Ie A823
W203? 1.1406

Centre of Commerce
4th Floor Suite 400
#1 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

5 INDE > NAV KEY.
S2wk Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
8 Soday's Close - Current + ay's weighted price for daily volume
ngeinclo 1g price from day to day
mber 0” otal shares traded today
a are paid in the tact 19? rsonths



Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

* - 17 November 2006

** - 31 October 2006

Attorneys for the Petitioners

*** - 31 October 2006
N/M - Not Meaningful




been.

ye tM


TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006, PAGE 13B





@ INDIA'S Anil Kumble appeals unsuccessfully for the lbw against South Africa's Mark Boucher during their third one-day international in Cape Town, South Africa, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2006.

t

(AP Photo/Str)

South Africa beats India by 106

runs in third o

CRICKET
CAPE TOWN,
South Africa
Associated Press

SOUTH Africa's fast bowlers
dismissed India for 168 on Sun-
day to win the third one-day
international by 106 runs.

The victory marked a
remarkable turnaround for
South Africa which earlier
recovered from 0-2 — and then
76-6 — to make 274-7 in 50 overs
with a world record ODI eighth
wicket partnership. Justin
Kemp hit an undefeated 100.

South Africa now leads the
five-match series 2-0.

"We missed some opportu-
nities after we had them at 76-
6," India coach Greg Chappell
said. "There is not much posi-
tive to take out of the game
from that point on."

South African captain

‘ Graeme Smith said India suf-
fered from a lack of confidence.

"T don't know how they can

’ deal with it, but Ido know that

we have been bowling really
‘well, and backing it up with
some great fielding," Smith
said.

Shaun Pollock precipitated
India's collapse with an opening
spell of 3-17 off seven overs at
the Newlands Stadium. He fin-
ished with 4-25 in nine overs.

Pollock had Virender
Sehwag caught by Andrew Hall
at third man for a duck in the
opening over of the innings and

,he then dismissed Sachin Ten-
dulkar, caught by Loots
Bosman at square leg for two.

When Pollock bowled
Mohammad Kaif for 10 in the
ninth over, India at 17-3 looked
unlikely to be able to chase
down South Africa's target.

Kemp's 100 had rescued
South Africa which lost two
wickets for no runs in the first
over.

"T didn't think of the 100
while I was batting," Kemp
said. "I was only thinking of
getting the team as many (runs)
on the board as possible. But
when I got to 99, I did think I
had got pretty close."

Kemp reached his maiden
century in one-dayers off 89
balls, and hit six fours and sey-
en sixes as he and Hall shared a
world record eighth-wicket
partnership of 138 runs. That
surpassed the 119 runs by Aus-

Atalia's Paul Reiffel and‘Shane

Warne against South Africa in
Port Elizabeth in 1994,

Hall finished on 56 not out
off 47 balls, with seven fours.

Smith won the toss and elect-
ed to bat at the Newlands Sta-
dium, but he was the first to
depart when bowled by Zaheer
Khan off the second ball of the
match.

Khan also removed Jacques
Kallis for a duck in the same
first over, leaving Herschelle
Gibbs and Bosman battling to
stabilize the innings.

But these two departed just
10 balls apart - Bosman caught
by Tendulkar off Khan for 6,
and Gibbs caught by Moham-
mad Kaif for 35 off Irfan
Pathan.

Mark. Boucher was run out
in a mix-up with A.B. de Vil-
liers for 4, and that brought
Kemp to the crease.

Kemp took his time to get
going, and survived the loss of
De Villiers for 29, and the run-
out of Pollock for 33.

Hall was a willing rebuilder
with Kemp, and the pair grad-
ually got the upper hand over
the Indian bowlers. Khan's ini-
tial spell of seven overs cost
him nine runs, with three wick-
ets, but he finished with 3-42
as he conceded 31 off his last
three overs.

Harbhajan Singh (0-63 off 10

overs) and Ajit Agarkar (1-71
off nine) were severely pun-
ished. |

After India's early collapse,
captain Rahul Dravid held the
innings together with 63.

Dinesh Karthik helped him
at first but found the extra pace
and lift of Makhaya Ntini diffi-
cult and edged a sharp chance
to Smith to depart for 14.

Mahendra Singh Dhoni
raised Indian hopes of a recov-
ery with a brisk 55 off 48 balls
including four sixes. He was
caught on the square leg
boundary by Bosman off Kallis.

Two good catches by Smith
saw Pathan dismissed for 1 off
Kallis and Harbhajan Singh for
10 off Hall.

Pollock completed his four-
wicket hall when he was
hooked by Dravid and caught
by Hall for 63.

Hall finished with 3-45 and
Kallis took 2-29.

"We have too many players
out of form," Chappell said.

The fourth one-dayer is in

Port Elizabeth on Wednesday.

PRY}







-day international





@ INDIA'S Mahundra Dhoni hits a six during the third one-day cricket international in Cape Town, South Africa, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2006.
(AP Photo)
PAGE 14B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS
Se eee eee Ee



HB THE JETS and
the Stingrays battle it
out over the weekend
in a pre-season game.
The Jets ran out 19-0
winners.














I'm a winner with The

I'm Andrew Berlanda, winner of game
tickets, a one day car and airfare for
two, to the Dolphins vs. Minn. Vikings
game. You can be a winner too, fill out
the Dolphins vs Jaguars entry form in
the Sports section, and become eligible
to win! : : |

READ

Se.

VERYPAY The Tribune:
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tea 6 a

EET

CONGRATULATIONS to Andrew Berlanda, WINNER of the Dolphins and Vikings drawing

ERS

(Photos:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



-Road Runners
‘must continue ©
to provide hope



for our athletes’

@ By BRENT. STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

NEWLY elected Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tions” Council Member Basil Ney-
mour said that, while we are faced
with so much’'crime in our coun-
try, he knows there is still hope
for our young people.

“You have decided to that you
want your children to be some-
thing good,” said Neymour, who
as he addressed the Road Run-
ners Track and Field Club’s 7th
annual awards & presentation
banquet on Saturday night.

The Grand Bahamian busi-
nessman told the audience at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort & Casi-
no that you would never know
what is in store for youngsters in
the future.

He said it’s important that the
Road Runners continue to pro-
vide that hope for their athletes, as
they have done in Grand Bahama
with relay silver medalist Andrae
Williams and Jr. CAC medalist
Michael Mattieu.

And he thanked Road Run-

ners’ president/head coach Dexter

Bodie for training our young peo-
ple.

Turning his attention to the ath-
letes, Neymour told them that
they should take the advice that

they get from their parents

because they only want the best
for them.

Also addressing the audience
was businessman Harrison Petty
who said there are times because
of the hustle and bustle of life that
parents sometimes forget their
responsibilities to their children.

“The parents here tonight obvi-
ously have not forgotten their
responsibilities,” Petty charged.
“They take their responsibilities
very, very serious.



“You have them in a very
organised track club. This track.
club has discipline and this track
club have given them the thrill of
victory. That is what these tro-
phies are all about.”

The owner of the Colony Club
Resort & Suites said he was so
proud of what the club stands for
that he honoured his pledge to
provide a $5,000 scholarship grant
to Galilee Academy and he’s been
pleased with the follow-up of

-those athletes who are now a part

of the programme.

Both Neymour and Petty were
presented with awards by Bodie
and the Road Runners for their
support of their track and field
programme, both locally and
internationally.

During the night, athletes were
also presented with awards in the
Dominique Higgins, Dianna
Thompson and Athlete of the
Year categories in addition to the

President’s list, most outstanding ~

athletes and most improved.
Three athletes took home the
Dominique Higgins Award, pre-

sented to,athletes who excel both.

in athletics and academics.

Those recipients were Maverick
Bowleg, Abiah Missick and Jen-
ero Knowles.

Knowles, a 10-year-old student
of Carmichael Primary who spe-
cialises in the 200 and 400, said
he was “shocked” because he did-
n’t envision getting it.

Missick, a eight-year-old Faith
Temple student, said he was “very
proud”. to get the award. It was
just one of the 11 he carted home
from his performance in the 100
and 200.

And Bowleg, an 11-year-old
Temple Christian 100 and 400
runner, said he was very “sur-
prised” when his name was called
for the award. He thought Ray-

cseIOnntp nnn onrney cenTo=n Toon nea aeaaachanasadieanne rasmneannneonene diesen ananashressnachasneatonasan ansenthennenshesnaeneanead

Address. _

ford Rigby would have beaten

hinrdut- a
Higgins, who is now studying

at Stariford University in Califor-

nia where he is preparing for med-
ical school, was represented by
his parents. :

His father, David Higgins, said
it’s a honour to continue to sup-
port the club, which gave so much
to the success of his son. He con-
gratulated the club for the manner
in which they continue to hold the
awards banquet.

While the boys dominatéd in
the highest award presented, a
number of girls shared in all of
the other categories.

Winning 11 awards in the girls’
category was Edvania Missick, a
13-year-old Faith Temple student,
who runs the 400.

“I was very pleased with all of
the awards I got this year,” she
stressed. “Next year, I hope to
win the most outstanding athlete
award.”

Other winners of the Dianna
Thompson award were Brason
Rolle, Antwan Hoyte, Stephon
Taylor, Jenero Knowles,
Antonique Butler, Faythe Miller,
Pollyann Bethel, Lotiona Bowleg
and Britanni Rolle.

@ THE winners of the Athlete
of the Year awards were:

Under-9 girl - Angel Butler; U-
9 boy - Branson Rolle;

U-11 girl - Faythe Miller; U-11
boy - Jenero Knowles;

U-13 girl - Carlisa Gray; U-13
boy - Maverick Bowleg and Ray-
ford Rigby;

U-15 girl - Pollyann Bethel and
Rashanda Dean;

U-15 boy - Drew Kerr and
Patrick Bodie;

U-17 girl - Charlene Innocent;

U-17 boy - Shawn Lockhart and
Trevino Thompson and

U-20 girl - Rashanda Davis.

The Tribune The Minmi Herald

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F/C F/C F/C F/C ;
Albuquerque 55/12. -36/2° pe 53/11 33/0. pe —- Indianapolis
Anchorage 20/-6 12/-11 sn —-.24/-4 12/-11 sf Jacksonville
Atlanta “65/18 50/10 s- — 6719-542 pe —_ Kansas City ISLAN
Atlantic City 62/16 41/5 s 58/14 44/6 pc Las sey re
‘Baltimore: 64/17 37/2. -s 60/15. 43/6 pc ‘ib Low:67°F/19°C
Boston 62/16 42/5 pc 44/6 39/3 c .
Buffalo = 64/12 40/46 ¢ 55/12. 44/6 c-
Charleston, SC 70/21 53/11 c 75/23 56/13 pc
Chicago 66/13 46/7 sho 57/3: 48/8 sh
Cleveland 58/14 43/6 pe 56/13 47/8 ¢ Minneapo is.
Dallas. 75/23 6216 c- 76/24 GI/16- pc Nashville
Denver 52/11 23/-5 pe 39/3 10/-12 c New Orleans
‘Detroit 88/12 43/6. ¢. 59/1 c : ve 26.
Honolulu 84/28 72/22 ¢ 84/28 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 70/21 55/12 70/21 46/7 Tucson 68/20 66/18 41/5 c
Houston 77/25. 66/18 pce 77/25.-65/18 sh Orlando. ss =: 80/26: 60/15 = s- 82/27. 62/16 © Washington, DC 64/17 62/16 46/7 pc







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i
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| :
|
Several hours of Clear. Breezy with several Breezy with some Partly sunny, windy
sunshine. | hours of sun. sun. : and humid.
/ i High: 83° High: 84° i ‘High: 85°.
High: 80° : Low: 72° Low: 74° - Low: 74°
AccuWeather RealFeel: am AcclWeather RealFeel i Sian ierludearlnccl PY eed unvelateell ace AccuWeather RealFeel
Ceoer |'C eer | °C e2-73°F | *[ 86-75°F | [86-76 F Cis

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature.



~ Hligh:79°F/26°C
Low:64°F/18°C

ELEUTHERA
Hiab" Fiza ¢

KEY WEST
High: 80° F/27°C
Low: 70° F/21°C



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



High: 86° F/30°'
Low:72° F/22°C



Tuesday
High = Low Ww

Tuesday















Sunshine and.some
clouds,

ne 84°

'P96-60°F

, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday



Normal year to date a eae 49.10”

AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2006?

%







E ee
ABACO HIQh 22.2 hiis Sindee anaes BI F/27°C
LOW ......ssscceseceseesecetosseseesrererereersrsreneees OF” F/19° CG
Normal high ..........sscesescesssessssessesseses BO" F/27° C
Normal lOW .......ssssssssssescsssssecsstesseeerse 09° F/20° C
Last year’s NIGH ........ccsecsssccrssesesseceeee O17 F/27° C
Last year’s IOW ......eccssessersesssseessseesee D9” F/15? ©
Precipitation
As of 1 p.m: yesterday 0... .ssieseereressereee 0.00”
Year t0 date .........escssessscsssecsssssetseceesessereseess 46,41”

1

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.









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won ee Ear
Sunrise ......6:35 a.m. Moonrise . . . 12:16 p.m.
Sunset.......5:20 p.m.- Moonset. ... 11:49 p.m.



GREATINAGUA —
High: 85° F/29° C

- High:83°F/28°C ss
Low: 71° F/22°C










Amsterd

Vienna

Winnipeg

storms, f-



am

‘00 38/3 F

Q/-12 7/-13 ¢

rain, Sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace

NASSAU Today:

221-5 9/-12 sn
Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-



WINDS

NE at 10-20 Knots
NE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet
NE at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet
NE at 12-25 Knots 4-6 Feet
NNE at 12-25 Knots

NE at 12-25 Knots

WAVES
2-4 Feet



Flurries
Snow

MURRICANE IN

Wk (240) S32-2062



i)

VISIBILITY
5-7 Miles
5-7 Miles

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

80° F
79°F



5-7 Miles
5-7 Miles

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Sc

3 Miami
¢ 81/70

Fronts
Cold ===

Warm Min MMenie
Stationary Menga®

RANCE

We (240) 6-20







WATER TEMPS.









PLT




*

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com





BASKETBALL:
PRIMARY CATHOLIC
CHAMPIONSHIP

ALTHOUGH they will
be making their debut into
the best-of-three champi-
onship series, coach Como
Ferguson said he’s con-
vinced that the St. Cecilia’s
Strikers will win the
Catholic Diocesan Primary
School basketball title.

The pennant-winning
Strikers will travel to Loy-
ola Hall today where they
will play game one of the
series at 3:15 pm against the
St. Thomas More Sparks,
who have been to the big
dance quite a few times and
won the title under coach
Leo Delaney.

Ferguson has even pre-
dicted that they will
“sweep” the Sparks
because they’ve beaten
them during the regular
season.

Game two will be played
on Wednesday at the same
place and time.

@ TENNIS:
GATORADE SR
NATIONALS

THE Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association’s
Gatorade Senior National
Tennis Tournament will
continue at the Gym Ten-
nis Club today at 3pm.

The tournament got
started on Saturday and
will run through Saturday,
December 9.

It feature players who are

35 years and older. They -
will play in singles, doubles
and mixed doubles.

lf TENNIS:
KNOWLES
CELEBRITY



’ PLANS are well under-
way for the hosting of the
sixth Mark Knowles
Celebrity Tournament at
Atlantis. The event is
scheduled for the weekend
of December 8-9. —

A number of players,
including Knowles’ touring
doubles partner Daniel -
Nestor from Canada, along
with Fred Stolle, Jim Couri-
er, Nicole Vaidisova, Jamea
Jackson, Scott Davis, Rick
Leach, Mark Merklein and
Ryan Sweeting, will be in
attendance.

OLYMPICS:
BOCA AGM/
ELECTIONS

THE Bahamas Olympic
Association will go to the
polls on Thursday night to
select its new slate of offi-
cers.

The elections will be held
during the annual general
meeting at the Nassau
Yacht Club.

. Incumbent Arlington
Butler will be running for
his eighth consecutive term
as president. Nominations
are expected to come from
the floor, but interested
persons should have been a
former executive or cur-
rently serving as an execu-
tive of one of the affiliated
federations.













FORMER Bahamas Associa-
tion of athletic Associations’
president Desmond Bannister
said it’s important for athletes
to have dreams, but it’s even
better when they believe that
they can, and do, achieve them.

Speaking at the Road Run-











































































DW Davis.

Hl NESLY LUCIEW, quarterback |
for the Stingrays (No 12), in action
against the John Bull Jets. The Jets

won 19-0 in this pre-season match at

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

urged 10
Ollow their dreams —

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

Former BAAA president speaks at annual awards 5

ners Track and Field Club’s 7th
annual Awards and Presentation
Banquet on Saturday night, at
the Wyndham

Nassau Resort & Casino, Ban-
nister congratulated the club for
keeping the memories of their







founder, the late Dianne

Thompson, alive.

“Dianne Thompson was the
ultimate dreamer. She was a lady
who never participated in track
and field. She didn’t even come
from the Bahamas,” said Ban-

nister of the American, who died

_ recently in the United States.

“J want to encourage you to
continue to share her dream.”

At that point, Bannister called
up Rayford C. Rigby, who said
in the souvenir booklet that his












folqceecyey- Eo) E)

football
action



dream i to “break the world’.
record 400 metres held by -

Michael Johnson and to obtain
our national record for the 400
and also help the ‘next genera-
tion in track and field and for
them to have confidence in
themselves.”

Speaking on the awards’

theme: “Dreamers, Believers,

Achievers, Soaring to Higher:
Heights,” Bannister said that the:
11-year-old student of Bahamas’
Academy can be compared to
Joseph in the Bible, who was the
ultimate dreamer at the age of
17. '
Bannister encouraged all of

the athletes to think like Rigby:-

with their own dreams.

“Tf you become a dreamer,
you can turn your dreams into
achievements,” he charged. “I’m
looking forward to when you
‘break that record. I want to be in
the stadium when you break
Michael Johnson record.”

Coming closer to home, Ban-
nister said 20 years ago if they
had heard a young girl named
Debbie Ferguson (now McKen-

zie). say that she was going. to”.

have a pocket full of medals,,
they would not have believed
her. But now she has them and a
book has also been written
about her achievement.

He also drew the illustration
of Ferguson-McKenzie and her
Golden Girls teammates, who
won an Olympic gold together
in the women’s 4 x 100 metre
relay.

And he reminded the Road
Runners that they even have a
former member of their club in
Avard Moncur, who fulfilled a
dream of becoming the first
Bahamian male champion in the
400 at the World Champi-
onships.

As dreamers, Bannister fur-
ther encouraged the athletes that
they can only achieve them if

they follow five steps: 1) focus”

on a single goal; 2) concentrate
on continuous improvement
every year; 3) forget the past; 4)

focus on the future and 5) every.

year you improve, you have. to
sacrifice a little more.
If they can accomplish those

feats, Bannister said the Road

Runners athletes. will definitely
soar like eagles to higher
heights.

Also during his address, Ban-
nister lauded Road Runners’

president/head coach Dexter.

Bodie and his officers for being
the only track club in the
Bahamas that put on such an
elegant event.

He even brought their, atten- -

tion of the fact that the club has
not just developed the physical
side of the athletes, but they
have shown the’social and even
the spiritual side of well-round-
ed individuals.

The Road Runners presented

two tables full of trophies and .
plaques to just about very mem-.'

ber of their club for their ath-
letic and academic achievements
this past year.

Bodie said this is just the tip of
the iceberg because next year,
they intend to take the awards
banquet even higher as they
introduce a “Grammy” style pre-
sentation.





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