Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 102 No.243







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The Bahamas was
_ ‘extremely fast to
‘recover’ after attacks

a By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

».*.°. THE September 11 attacks

~ have proven the resilience of
the Bahamas’ tourism indus-
tiy. , Soya

» Looking back on the attacks.
on New York City’s World.

Trade Centre, which claimed
_ the lives of 2,749 victims,

seniordirector of .communi-..

cations with the Ministry of
Tourism Basil Smith said that
“for years now people have
said that the Bahamas is too

dependent on tourism, that we.

should branch out, but (Sep-

_-.-témber 11) showed that our ©

‘tourism industry .is: more
resilient than ever predicted.”

In an interview with The
. Tribune yesterday, Mr Smith
*+recalled that five years ago the

* Bahamas’ tourism industry —

was in danger of being com-
pletely wiped out.

With all flights out of the
United: States grounded and

thousands of tourists having
cancelled their vacations, cir-
cumstances for the Bahamas
were dire, he said. .

Mr Smith said it is hardly

possible to understand today -

what kind of acute uncertain-
ty existed for the country’s

_ tourism industry following the

worst terrorism act on US soil.

However, he said, the
Bahamas was extremely fast
to recover.

“It took us maybe three
months to, recover. And most
important of all we were able
to retain our pre-clearance

- privileges,” Mr Smith said.

Nevertheless, he said, the
September 11 attacks have:
forever changed the experi-
ence of travel.

When asked if the country’ s
tourism industry could survive
another major terrorism
attack on the US, Mr Smith
said that we can “only hope
that nothing like this ever hap-
pens again.”

- Tree is planted to
commemorate attacks

& By ALISON LOWE

ON THE fifth anniversary of September 11, 2001, a young
poinciana tree ‘has been planted to commemorate the attacks — and
symbolise the "depth and endurance of the values" underpinning
the relationship between the US and the Bahamas. :

US ambassador John Rood, Prime Minister Perry Christie and

_ Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell were among a group in attendance _

at. the ambassador's residence to commemorate the tragedy —

SEE page 11

























Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006







PRICE — 75¢



@ A TREE planting ceremony was held at the US Ambassailor’ s residence yesterday, for the fifth anniversary of the attacks of Sep-
tember 11, 2001 and to honour the memory of the victims of those attacks. Shown from left: Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Ser-

vice Fred Mitchell, Prime Minister Perry Christie, US Ambassador John Rood au Governor Genera Arthur Hanna.
(Onan Bridgewater! Tribune staff)

Concerns raised
over construction
work on
Paradise Island

§ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PARADISE Island home-
owners are raising concerns
that construction work on
the island is negatively
impacting the environment

‘and killing marine life.

Residents on the island are
claiming that styrofoam used
at the construction site of
Atlantis’ new 600-room all
suite hotel is not being
secured properly and has
been seen floating along Par-
adise Island’s shoreline and
washing up on the beaches.

Speaking with The Tri-

SEE page nine

i

Raising consciousness of ‘Cuban Five’
‘should not be seen as anti-American’

@ By ALISON LOWE

IN THE light of the com-
memoration of the anniversary

of the September 11th attacks in

New York the relevance of
working to raise public aware-
ness of the need for the release
of the "Cuban.Five" in Miami is
more profound, according to
two founding members of the
group "Bahamian Friends of the
Cuban Five".

They added that, in agitating
to raise consciousness of the
case of the five men — known
as "heroes" in their native Cuba
— Bahamians should not be
suspected, or accused of being
anti-American.

These were statements made
in an interview with The Tri-

bune on Friday. Alexander |

Morley — co-chair of the group
— and Felix Bethel, political
science lecturer at the College

Protects While at

‘of the Bahamas, Said they were

concerned about some percep-
tions that had been surfacing in
New Providence indicating that
the group's interest in the
release of the five may be a cov-
er — and publicity tool — for
simple anti-Americanism.

The men believe it would be
timely and useful to consider
the issue of the Cuban Five in
the context of the 9/11 com-
memorations that took place
yesterday. -

"The climate is that there i isa
war on terrorism — we have to
define what this means for us,”
said co-chair Mr Morley.

"What is this war all about,
who are they looking for — we
have to define that for our-
selves, and within this issue, that
of the five Cuban nationals
imprisoned in the US who had

SEE page 12

ere

Police not ruling

out any possibility
in death of son of
Anna Nicole Smith

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE confirm that they
ate not ruling out any possi-
bility in the recent unex-
plained death of 20-year-old
Daniel Smith, son of former
1993 Playboy Playmate of the
Year Anna Nicole Smith.

Ms Smith, who was regis-
tered and checked in at Doc-
tors Hospital under a false
name had delivered her baby
girl on Thursday by a last-
minute caesarean. Her son,
Daniel, reportedly had just
arrived in the country on Sat-.
urday and visited with his

SEE page nine.



Available in a variety of flavours a

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Ross Carner: A

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_ audience was “more concerned



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

Bahamians need to hear more
from PM on Freeport affairs

RIME Minister Perry

Christie has at last tried to
say something reassuring about the
state of affairs in the nation’s second
city after a dramatic upheaval
months ago. But it was a spur of the
moment statement that was obvi-
ously not well-considered.

In Freeport for a groundbreak-
ing ceremony, the Prime Minister
apparently discovered what the
whole Bahamas has known now for
months.

According to a report in The Tri-
bune, Mr Christie could see that his

about corporate governance and
possible conflicts in the administra-
tion of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority”.

“As Prime Minister,” said the
Prime Minister, “it gives me an
opportunity to tell you that you
must not forget I am Prime Minister
of The Bahamas ...” Okay!

The Prime Minister continued:

. that I have the responsibility of
ensuring consistent governance in
the context of what offends public
policy, and that my government will
not hesitate to ensure that all' acts
are taken consistent with that man-
date to ensure that what we do in |
our country is consistent with good
corporate governance and does not
offend public policy.”

His audience certainly had not
forgotten that Mr Christie is Prime
Minister. They may have been won-
dering whether after four and a half
years that fact has fully dawned on him,
or whether he had forgotten and was
just reminding himself that he does
indeed occupy the highest executive
position in the land.

And they must have resisted a strong
urge to laugh out loud when he talked
about not hesitating, et cetera, et cetera.

hen those three qualified
\ Bahamians at the top of the -

‘Grand Bahama Port Authority were

suddenly cut down, it was clearthat the -
corporate purge had nothing to do with
personalities nor qualifications, nor with
bei







there had been over-staffing at that lev-
el it must have been only by one since

.two of the three were immediately

replaced.
It was more fundamental than that. It
was obvious that it had to do with the

July:
“There can be no doubt that the late

np top-heavy as.was later suggest,.....

The Bahamians were qualified, and if’ “Bahamas' Gover



direction and governance of the nation’s
second city after the death of Edward St
George, one of the principal share-
holders in the Port.

The appointment of expatriate ‘

licenseé Hannes Babak to succeed for-
mer Central Bank Governor Julian

Francis as chairman only encouraged.
_ that suspicion. This point and a few

more were made a this column back in

Edward St George, with all his foibles,
had a vision for Freeport and was keen-
ly aware of the lasting contribution it

can make to the overall progress and:
development of the-whole country. :
sibility-of-The—:
t to make sure —

“It is the resp





that, while the shareholders are able to

“make money, the short- and long-term

interests of the Bahamian people are

not sacrificed together with Mr. St.
George’s vision. .
’ “There is a balance to be eee here .



His audience certainly had not
forgotten that Mr Christie is Prime
Minister. They may have been.
wondering whether after four and a
half years that fact has fully dawned

on him,

‘





| TE old’ s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

_ SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: ee 1731 OR 322-3875

Port Authority.



Mr Christie and his colleagues ina
matter of months will have to face the
Bahamian people again in a general |
election. This should help them to
focus their minds so they can deal
effectively with at least one serious
matter before they face the judgment

of the electorate.



and it could very well be that this is at
the heart of the struggle at the Port -
_ Authority.”

ll of this should have been

crystal clear to Mr Christie
from the outset. The public, espe-
cially the residents of Freeport and
Grand Bahama, would have been
relieved to hear at that stage that the
government was not hesitating to pro-
tect good corporate governance and
public policy in the Port.

- But they heard nothing like that
even when there was an.outcry from
people the government has no rea-
son to mistrust. What the public did
hear.were disturbing comments from
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe,

who happens to represent Bimini and
the West End district of Grand Bahama.
According to Mr Wilchcombe, it had-

~ nothing to do with the government since

the Port Authority was a private com-
pany owned by shareholders, and no-

. one could tell them whom to hire and

whom to fire and how to run their busi-
ness: He only hoped that they would
have a plan that would be good for the
country!

- Mr Wilchcombe also volunteered that
when challenged he had a problem com- :
ing up with the name of.a single.

Bahamian living in Grand Bahama who

was qualified to sit on the board of the




soe

This is a ‘minister,inathe same gov-
ernment that prattles: t Bahamian--
isation and raids the homes of poor
legal immigrant workers in the dark of
night in an effort.to trick the Bahamian
people into believing that they have
their interests at heart.

Never mind that these are jobs that
Bahamians do not want in the first
place. But when it comes to Bahami-

ans who are eminently qualified for top

positions being replaced by expatriates,
they are simply not interested. °

Since Mr Wilchcombe uttered those
foolish words he has been repeatedly
reminded that the Port Authority is a
special creature with special arrange-
ments with the government of The.

' Bahamas and with special powers over

a large sector of the Bahamian society.

So who runs the Authority and what
their philosophy is must be of immedi-
ate concern to the Government of The _
Bahamas..

Furthermore, the aovetumient has a
responsibility not only to chase down
poor immigrant workers. but to. make

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE




sure that Bahamians who qualify for »

high-end jobs are being fairly treated

even by other entities which do not have
the. same power and influence over
Bahamian affairs.

‘he Bahamas needs. qualified
expatriates in many fields to
help develop the country, but it is irri-
tating to Bahamians that there are some
who need not be. here but who are
allowed to stay year after year and to
engage in pursuits for which they have
no permission, simply because they
know how to ingratiate themselves with
the right people.

Mr Christie and his colleagues in a
matter of months will have to face the
Bahamian people again in a general
election. This should help them to focus
their minds so they can deal effectively
with at least one serious matter before
they face the judgment of the electorate.

But despite Mr Christie’s words, it is
not likely that this government will take
the bull by the horns and do something
to secure the interests of the Bahamian
people in Freeport.

The Prime Minister can make all the
pronouncements he likes about good
corporate governance and public policy,
but talk alone will not accomplish any-
thing.

Nobody is going to say that the Prime
Minister wants this so that is what

~should be done. He has to act. The
shareholders — including those who have

inherited from Mr St George — can be
counted on to fight tooth and nail over
what they perceive to be their awn
interests. Ve .

he Bahamian people have a

right to expect their. govern-
ment to protect their rights in Freeport.
They need to hear something more
definitive from the Prime Minister than
the comments he made when he dis’
covered that a particular audience was
less interested ina groundbreaking cer-
emony and more concerned about “cor-
porate governance and possible con-
flicts in the administration of the Grand

.Bahama Port Authority”.

They need to hear what he and his
government are doing about it.

‘ sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www.bahamapundit.typepad.com



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for.a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.









THE TRIBUNE



$250,000
of marijuana
seized in
operation

FREEPORT - Bahamian and

US Drug authorities thwarted
a major drug smuggling opera-
tion between Abaco and Grand
Bahama - seizing 48 bales of
marijuana with an estimated
street value of $250,000.

Superintendent of Police

Basil Rahming reported that
around 2,500 pounds of: mari-
juana were confiscated and
flown to New Providence on
Thursday of last week.

“No one was arrested in con-
nection with the seizure.

According to police reports,
sometime around 11pm on

Thursday officials received |

information that a drug smug- |

gling operation was underway
in waters between Abaco and
Grand ‘Bahama, involving a go-
fast vessel alleged to be trans-
porting a large quantity of dan-
gerous drugs.

“. Agents from the Bahamas
Drug Enforcement Unit, US
Drug Enforcement Agency,
OPBAT and US Customs and
Border Control proceeded to
the area.

‘A high-endurance tracking

aircraft spotted the vessel,
which had
mechanical difficulties and was
headed back towards Sandy
Point, Abaco.

Supt Rahming said a heli-
copter was dispatched to the
location, where . officers
retrieved 46 bales of marijuana

éncountered.

from the beach. He said the two .

speedboats that were in the area
when the helicopter arrived fled
heading north.

After transporting the drugs
to New Providence, officers

returned: to the Sandy Point”

area on Friday where they -

retrieved two additional mari-.'

juana bales from bushes near
the beach.

Mr Rahming said efforts are
underway to identify and appre-
hend persons involved in the
smuggling operation.

Abaco duo
to perform
at British.
Colonial

AN Abaco singer who calls
himself. “the most:versatile
entertainer in the Bahamas” is
appearing at the British Coio-

nial-Hilton for the next two

weeks.

Stone McEwan and Thunder
- bass player Wesley Cornish, a
fellow Abaconian - claim to
produc€ as much sound as five
or Six musicians.

And their unique musical 1 mix

certainly enjoyed a warm recep-
tion when they got their Nas-
sau posting off to a good start
over the weekend at the hotel’s
Palm Court lounge.

“The last time I was at the
BC was 2001,” said Stone, who
is usually to be seen performing
at Snappers in Marsh Harbour.
“It’s good to be back.”

Stone and Wesley can be
seen and heard on Wednesday,
Thursday and Sunday from 8pm
to midnight and Friday and Sat-
urday from apm to lam.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 822-2157





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 3





New posts in

-effect at

College of
the Bahamas

SEVERAL new top-level
appointments at the College of
the Bahamas came into effect
yesterday.

The new management struc-
ture, which includes a redefini-
tion of the goals of each posi-
tion, has been designed to guide
the college to university status.

“We are committed to high
standards of teaching, scholar-
ship and research and aim to
prepare students to participate
fully in the social, cultural, polit-
ical, economic and spiritual life
of their communities,” said col-
lege president Janyne Hodder
in a speech last month.

The revised positions and
goals for the next year are:

e President’s Office - Janyne
Hodder

Support governance by offer-
ing high-quality, evidence-based
policy options, oversee college-
to-university planning, develop
institutional benchmarks and
indicators on matters key to uni-
versity status and reputation,
lead and support senior col-
_ leagues, build a development
office and increase alumni sup-
port and engagement, define
and adopt best practices in uni-
versity information technology
and build institutional capaci-
ty, engage the community, build
support for the college.

e Executive Vice President

‘of Academic Affairs — Dr

Rhonda Chipman-Johnson
Ensure that students have
access to the courses they need,
analyse the rate of graduation
and time to completion, estab-
lish goals appropriate to uni-
versity status, develop quality

-assurance policy options, focus

on outcomes rather than input,
plan and support faculty recruit-
ment and development, stabilise

_ existing programmes and iden-

’ tify innovations that will serve

national needs. ‘

° Vice president of research,
graduate programmes and inter-
national relations - Dr Linda
Davis ©

Ensure that students have
access to the courses they need,
analyse the rate of graduation

and time to completion, estab-

lish goals appropriate to uni-
versity status, develop quality
assurance policy options, focus
on outcomes rather-than input,

plan and support faculty recruit-

ment and development, stabilise
existing programmes and iden-
tify innovations that will serve
national needs.

e Vice president of outreach —
“Dr Pandora Johnson -

Review continuing education
and propose organisation of ser-
vices by clientele, expand fami-
ly island programming and
develop a distance education
plan, contribute to meeting
national education challenges,
expand community partnerships
using a variety of models includ-
ing new institutes, build part-

“nerships with government agen-

cies; employer and employee
groups, civil society and others,
market the college as ‘the
place’ to go to develop made-to-
measure solutions to national
training needs at the college lev-
el.

_ Vice president of Student

” Affairs — Colyn Major

Expand current student life
programmes, build new resi-
dence and create a full resident
life programme, build athletics,
expand student aid with the help
of the president’s office, recruit
registrar, resolve system issues
with training and support of MIS,

compete successfully with N A —

universities for excellent stu-
dents, work with VP of research
and international reJations to cre-

. ate student exchanges.

Vice president of finance and
administration —- Denton Brown

Establish best in class finan-
cial management practices and
complete all outstanding audits,
create purchasing office to sup-
port good financial manage-
ment of resources, oversee the
performance of for-profit oper-
ations, plan and complete con-
struction projects in the north-
-ern Bahamas — including the
‘library and cafeteria, create a
master plan for Gladstone Road
residence, build client-centered
culture of service across port-
folio and maximise training
opportunities.

Vice president of human
. Tesources and communications
— Patricia Glinton-Meicholas

Develop and implement a
communications plan in support

~. of the 2006-2007 goals, re-struc-

ture human resources with a
focus on the ‘client’, adopt a
comprehensive professional
development and training plan,
ensure respect of collective
agreements.

mia. oe a
o In brief’ | Adelaide and Yellow Elder

students go back to school

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

AFTER a week was added
to their summer break, due to

unfinished repairs, Adelaide.

Primary and Yellow Elder Pri-
mary School students returned
to their classrooms yesterday

i as most work was completed

over the weekend.

Both schools officially
opened yesterday to full hous-
es and students and teachers

were excited to get back to

school, administrators report-
ed.

Besides minor repairs still to
be finished “School is going
great!” David Dean, principal

- of Adelaide Primary, said yes-

terday after making his rounds.

Following a week of missing
school, some parents were con-
cerned that the students’ cur-
riculum would be adversely
affected but, according to Mr
Dean, the teachers are pre-
pared to tackle the challenges
ahead.

Mrs Catherine McPhee,
principal of Yellow Elder, said
‘her teachers were at school all
last week getting classrooms
ready for the start yesterday
while Mr Dean said his teach-
ers are working diligently to
make up the week of lost work.

Mrs McPhee, who was work-

ing out of a temporary admin-
istration facility as the present

-one is still being worked on,

said she is happy with the

repairs so far. Following the.

school’s structural makeover,
the principal hoped the Min-
istry of Education would main-
tain it.

Mr Dean said if he had to”

give the school a grade to
repairs done, it would be a ‘B’
‘because there are still minor
repairs that need to be fin-
ished, he explained.

While Mrs McPhee said it

“would not be fair for her to

grade something that is not fin-
ished, she expects to be able





Black Village residents

still living in fear in —
_ build-up to funeral of
‘murdered gang member

PEOPLE in Black Village
are still living “in panic and
fear” during the countdown to
Saturday’s funeral of mur-
dered gang member Hosea
Lightbourne, 23 — said to be a
founder of the Bain Town
Gundogs.

Despite extra police mobile
and foot patrols in the area,
residents believe there could
be reprisals for Lightbourne’s
death ten days ago. He was
shot several times while walk-
ing a few yards from his home
in Rupert Dean Lane.

Yesterday, Black Village
residents said they felt unsafe
in the run-up to Lightbourne’s
funeral, when police are
expected to lay on massive
security round the church.

“Yes, it’s true to say we are
living in panic and fear,” said
one source. “Officers are going
from door to door offering
reassurance, but that doesn’t
stop people being afraid.”

Lightbourne is thought to
have been killed as a reprisal
for an earlier shooting inci-
dent. Now residents fear a tit-
for-tat battle between youths
from Bain Town and Black
Village.

Since Lightbourne’s death
there have been three sepa-
rate shooting incidents in
Black eee All involved

random gunfire near people’s
homes, but no-one was hurt.

People. in Black. Village
claim certain residents have
already been pinpointed as
possible targets. And a Bain
Town resident stated on tele-
vision last’ week that there
should be “a life for a life.”

A source said: “We have
had officers from the urban
renewal programme walking
through parts of Bain Town
and Black Village trying to
dampen down the situation.

“There is no doubt the police
are going to be out in force for
the funeral service. There will
be very tight security.

_ “Threats are still being
made and certain people are
being mentioned as possible
targets. There are wild boys
out there who we have heard
about through what you might
call intelligence. We are all
hoping things will calm down
after the funeral.”

Last week, the Rev CB
Moss, whose church is in Bain
Town, said no-one in his com-
munity was seeking revenge

_ for the killing of Mr Light-

bourne. He called for calm and
said people should renounce
violence.

A man has been arrested
and charged in connection
with the Hee killing.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays



yp

to give thé school an “A’ after
repairs are completed.

CR Walker Senior High also
reopened yesterday after being
closed for repairs on Wednes-
day. Students reported that the
school was much cleaner.

Adelaide and Yellow Elder
Primary Schools are expected
to continue without further hin-
drance. Meanwhile, work will
continue on both schools during
the afternoons and on the week-
ends.

OPEN
ri, edi A WEEK FOR aoe aa tba delle

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-Security’s Desk located in the Administrative Building on John F. Kennedy
Drive, between the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.

Packages could also be collected from the security’s desk BTC - Settlers Way,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Friday, September 15th, 2006.
Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR
INSURANCE” and should be delivered to the attention of the “Acting
President and CEO, Mr. Leon, Williams.”

In Grand Bahama, packages could also be dropped off at the security located
at Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

' EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE (=) ce).

THE TRIBUNE _





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

_ Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
‘Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 Sic
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398 :
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608





MANY Spanish Wells residents are
upset that a decision by the Ministry of
Education has been smothered in racial
overtones and directed against them.

Apparently, on a recent radio talk show
it was stated that children from the set-
tlement of Blackwood on North Eleuther-
a’s mainland were no longer welcome at
the Spanish Wells. All-Age School. As'a
result they: were to be sent to the public
school at the Bluff. One school is a ferry
ride away, the other is only a short bus
drive down the road from Blackwood.

Where the racial innuendo comes in is
that the children not only happen to be
black, but they are also Haitian. The Span-
ish Wells school is perceived to be a “white
school.”

It was also claimed that Education Min- -

ister Alfred Sears made the statement that
it was against government policy to ferry
children across the water to school. This
statement, if true, suggested that no chil-
dren from ‘Blackwood, as from the opening
of this school year, could now attend the
Spanish. Wells school — because the only
way to get to that school would be across
the water and by ferry.

The suggestion here was that black chil-
dren were being ostracised by the white’



parents of Spanish Wells.”

Nothing could be further from the truth,

said Spanish Wells’ Chief. Councillor Abn-
er Pinder.
Mr Pinder said he heard the rumour

about 10 days ago when he got a. phone -

call from a local taxi driver known as “Fine
' Thread.” The cab driver had been told
that it was Mr Pinder who had been the
instigator in having the Blackwood chil-

dren transferred from-Spanish Wells to —

the school at the Bluff. Mr Pinder said
that that was the first time he had heard
the suggestion.

The rumour implied that all Blackwood

children had been removed from the

school. This, said Mr Pinder, is not true.
It is true that the primary students, the

five and six year olds, have been sent to

the mainland school, which is a bus ride.
-‘away from their homes. However, the high

school students from Blackwood are still
being ferried to Spanish Wells. And the

Haitian students from Russell Island are °

still crossing the bridge to go to school in
Spanish Wells..



Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Racist school move is denied



Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham
said that it was FNM policy that primary
school children should not be transported
to school by ferry. It was not true to say —
if in fact Minister Sears did say it — that
no students were to go by ferry to school.
Mr Ingraham pointed out that as general
policy governments do not even like bus-.
ing small children, and that is why the
building of neighbourhood schools is
encouraged. Therefore, the rule that chil-
dren should not be transported to school
across the water, applied ‘only to the pri-
mary grades.

Obviously, even this rule was being bro:
ken in the case of the Blackwood children



















as, until the last school term, they arrived.

at Spanish Wells by boat. They are now

remaining on the mainland, and going to |

school in the Bluff, This decision, said Mr
Pinder, was made by the Ministry of Edu-
cation and had nothing to do with him.

The truth of the matter is, said Mr Pin-
der, that the Spanish Wells government
school, which can accommodate about 250
students from primary grades through to
the twelfth grade, is overcrowded.

“We now have more students than the ©

school can hold,” he said. “We need at
$t:three to four more classrooms.”

eWe didi’ t stop them coming,” said Mr
Pinder. “The Ministry of Education



_ Stopped. them. And it is true that the rule

is that primary students are not to be fer-
ried across the water, but high school stu-

dents can, and still are being ferried to |

our school.”
Mr Pinder said he was totally against
this. decision being made a racial issue.

“Ninety-nine per cent of Bahamians know

that I am not racial,” he said.

The whole country should know by now »

that Mr Pinder is not a racist. After all it
was he, who, on learning of Immigration’s

night raid. in Spanish Wells that resulted in ~

the removal of a large number of Haitian
residents to the Detention Centre in Nas-
sau, followed them there. Not only did he

_ insist on Immigration releasing them, but

he put them up in a hotel overnight and
returned them to their Eleuthera homes
the next day.

He went so far as threatening to sue

‘government for the arrest without cause.of

Haitians who were legal residents of-his-

community.





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Concern

over transfer

of students

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE ARE pleading for assis-
tance from the media to raise
various extremely important
concerns in regards to a vexing

‘situation we are now facing at

The North Eleuthera Primary
School in. The Bluff,
Eleuthera. The Ministry of
Education and Bahamas Gov-

ernment has made a décision: ,

to transfer approximately 55;
60 Haitian primary students
from the Blackwood commu-
nity to our school .beginning
next Monday.. »

These students previously
attended the Spanish Wells
All Age School, as the major-
ity of their parents have work
permits allowing them to work
there. Listed below are sever-

_ al reasons why this will nega-

tively impact our school and
the education of our children,

1) Firstly, the North
Eleuthera Primary School is
already very, very full. The

average size class being 30 stu-

dents, some even higher at 35.
However, the Spanish Wells
All Age School, including
these Haitians students, has
an average class size of 20-25,
except in grade one. So why
send these students to a school
that is already overcrowded.
We would protest this deci-
sion even if this move involved
Chinese, American, even
Bahamian students. The
school ground in Bluff is so
very tiny there is no space for
the present population to
move around and play at
lunch,.much less adding 55

“mote todtiif the: government:

wants tosend these children to
our school, then they must
build more classrooms, bath-
rooms and add infrastructure
and teachers for these stu-
dents first, then send the stu-

‘dents.
2) In addition, the Heoale

of Spanish Wells want to
employ these Haitian nation-

als and apply for work per-

mits for them, therefore, their
high rate of child birth and its
overburdening results must
also be theirs to deal with. If

- they don’t want the kids, don’t

get permits for parents.

3) Thirdly, we want to know
why it is that the parents of
the North Eleuthera Primary

that the Ministry of Education
and the government have
completely disregarded our
feelings on the matter. This




.were not consulted. It appears. '

Dae M US

letters@tribunemedia.net



decision seems to have been
covered up until the last
minute which was last week
in the hopes that we parents
would just let it slide, no way!

4) In addition there are only
two functional toilets at the
NEPS for the girls and two for
the boys. Please tell me how
such poor infrastructure could

accommodate another 55 stu- °

dents.

5) Fifthly, the School in
Bluff has one janitress for our
already 220 students. What a
shame that the entire last
school year, local government
and, central government per-
mitted this gross injustice! No
other janitress has been hired
since the second janitress
retired in 2005. Why is this?
The school in Spanish Wells
has three janitresses for a
smaller school population.

6) Another shameful mat-
ter is the shabby condition of
the North Eleuthera Primary
School. A bathroom door was
off the hinges since January,
2006. That’s right, no door on
the bathroom that students
must use every day. Many
classroom doors are falling off
and destroyed. The school has
not been painted for the past
six years, it looks disgraceful.
Again, why are we being
neglected like this? Major

‘repairs have been done at

most of the schools on this

' island in the past several years,

except NEPS. :

7) North Eleuthera Primary
School is the largest primary
school on this island, serving
the settlements of Current,
Lower Bogue, Bluff and
Upper Bogue. When all these

schools were combined about

seven years ago, we were

promised many things by the |

then Director of Education..
But many of these things have
not happened. For example,

we were promised computer

for the students and spe-
cialised teachers for Art,
Music and the sort, none of
this came 'to reality.

From what we understand,
they want to send us some
trailers to house some of these
students. No, no, no! You
mean leave the classrooms in
Spanish Wells. to have 12 stu-
dents to put them in trailers
at NEPS! This is ridiculous!
Is this a political move? We
all know that the people of
Spanish Wells never wanted
these kids in their school, but
they must deal with the prob-
lem they helped to create, not
shove it onto us.

We will demonstrate and
protest and do whatever it
takes to step this!

PARENTS OF NEPS
Eleuthera,
one 31, 2006.

N egativism used in

a constructive way

EDITOR, The Tribune.

\

YOU need the negative.as well as the positive in this life.
Take for an example, a car battery. If the negative cable is
slack, no matter how charged the battery, the starter will not
get the current necessary to turn the engine.

Negativism used in a constructive way, can help you get
your ‘engine’ started (each day). Then you can shift into for-
ward géar, and move on ahead. Yes! You are going some-

place.
Do you know where to?

How do you know when you are nearing the peak of your
‘maturity?
Whenever you honestly feel happy for another’s achieve-
ment, rather than feel uncontrolled — envious.
Whenever you can accept criticism in a quiet, impartial,

humble way.:

Accept the fact that you are guilty, if found to be so. Don’t
waste time seeking to be even (pride). It is vain. We pass this

way only once. Move on.

Negativism because of jealously? Shrug it! Shun it. There is
a way seemeth right unto a man, but the end of that way. is

death.

Negative vibes created asa result of some action/inaction :

on your behalf?

Study it. Correct it. Be thankful for it. Be not afraid to
chastise your friend. Iron sharpens iron. Strive to be a better »
person today. Strive to be healthier person. Take care of your

body.

TOMMY THOMPSON
Crooked Island,
August 24, 2006. ’

‘QUALITY INSIDE
AND OUT








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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 5



SAE] | mL PTT | PE PE
Ils for
an audience on Abaco



Police
retrieve
‘firearm
from yard

FREEPORT - A loaded
firearm was taken off the
streets by police after an
Eight MileRock resident dis-
covered it on Friday.

Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming reported that officers
at the EMR Police Station
received an anonymous call
on Thursday from someone
who reported finding a .32
revolver along with 10 live
rounds of .32 ammunition in
a yard. The firearm was
handed over to Officers at the
Central Detective Unit.

Mr Rahming commended}

the caller for his effort and
encouraged other persons to
make the community safer
by doing likewise.

Florence
churns
past
Bermuda

@ BERMUDA
Hamiiton

HURRICANE Florence
blew out windows, peeled
away the roofs of at least three
houses and knocked out pow-
er to thousands in Bermuda
on Monday, according to
Associated Press.

The lashing winds and sea
water surge that threatened
the islands were reducing in
intensity by late afternoon.

As the hurricane continued

-. .to.chug past Bermuda, it was |
causing dangerous surf and_:

strong rip currents along the
entire eastern seaboard of the
United States and the Cana-
~. dian Maritimes, and various
islands in the Bahamas.

eae LAWN Soa

TUESDAY,

'SEPTEMBER 12!

‘| 6:00 Community page

.411:00 Immediate Response (Live) |

.7+fnoon — ZNS News Update
“| Immediate Response (Cont'd)
Island Life Destinations
* N-Contrast
Bullwinkle & His Friends
The Fun Farm
Durone Hepburn
Ernest Leonard-The Word
Dennis The Menace
Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
The Envy Life
Andiamo
Tourism Today
' News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
In His Own Words:
Hon. Arthur.D. Hanna
Island Lifestyles
Remembering The Contract
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 icekoiclal(=m tg =a

Paella to make Et real aon ic yan
(programme. tate, :



is being





Hi BUSINESSMAN Doug Evans has called for both Prime Minister Perry Christie (left) and Opposition leader Hubert Ingraham
(right) to come to Abaco to sort out the island’s problems

TOP government and oppo-
sition politicians should go to
Abaco and hear first-hand the
complaints which have led to
talk of secession, it was claimed
last night.

Businessman Doug Evans

said he would like to invite

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham to Abaco to thrash
out the island’s problems.

As he spoke, yet more power
cuts were plaguing the island.
affecting residents and tourists
as summer temperatures
soared. He said Abaco’s poor
returns from its contributions
to the national treasury were
no longer acceptable.

“We have grown to the point

where we have outstripped the
infrastructure. Central govern-
ment must catch up with the
growth, otherwise the growth is
going to flatten out,” he said.

British TV station film documentary
about Harry Oakes murder case

“T would like to invite Mr
Christie and Mr Ingraham to sit
down with a group of Abaco-
nians so that we can talk about
what Abaco needs.”

Although talk of a possible
secession movement is not con-
sidered serious at this stage, Mr
Evans is among those who feel
a groundswell of opinion is
moving in that direction.

He said, however, it was more
a reflection of Abaconians’
growing frustration than a dec-
laration of intent.

“J want this talk of secession
to be something that is going to
move Abaco forward. I would
like the prime minister and Mr
Ingraham to address that rather
than us having just more talk
and promises.”

Apart from BEC’s deficiencies,

Abaconians are concerned about
road maintenance, the state of
the island dump and, most specif-

ically, the security and safety
issues at Marsh Harbour airport.

There have been announce-
ments four times since 2002 that

the airport is going to be

improved.

Mr Evans said: “I hope it
doesn’t take loss of life for
something to be done. The air-
port has serious security and
safety issues that need to be
dealt with.”

He said American property
owners on Abaco had raised a

petition and sent it to US .

ambassador John Rood alerting
him to the airport’s problems.
This, in turn, had led toa FAA
report.which, he said, had never
been made public. “T would like
to see a copy of that FAA report.
It led to someone coming down
here and signing a contract.

“T would like to know before ©

I let my family fly on a plane.
The runway is in a terrible con-

dition. Planes are still back-taxi-
ing which, in itself, is inefficient
and dangerous.”

Yesterday, Abaco was abuzz
with secession talk after The
Tribune’s INSIGHT article
‘Rumblings of Rebellion” hit
the island.

Another businessman, Mr
Dale Hill, said response to the

article had been largely posi- °

tive, though he felt talk of seces-
sion was at this stage more a

‘means of prompting govern-



ment action.
“It is a matter of getting what
we deserve. Everyone is agteed
that something must be done. I
have not heard any nggative
comments about the article. We
do expect more than we are get-
ting from central government.
“It’s like running a company.

“You just can’t keep taking money

away and putting it elsewhere.
You need to put something back.”

A BRITISH film unit has been in :

Nassau over the last few days prepar-
ing a TV documentary about the Sir
Harry Oakes murder-mystery.

An hour-long programme will be
broadcast by the UK’s Channel Four
during November.

Those interviewed for the docu-
mentary included lawyer Mr Paul
Adderley, whose father A F Adder-
ley was part of the prosecution team
in the trial of Count Alfred de
Marigny, the only man formally

_accused of the murder. Count de

Marigny was acquitted and then
deported after the trial in 1943.
Also interviewed was Mr Peter
Christie, nephew of the late Sir
Harold Christie, who remains the
chief suspect in spite of friends’ insis-

tence that he was “too timid” to be
involved. Sir Harold at one point
became so exasperated: by accusa-
tions levelled against ‘him that he

threatened legal action over the

“inferential calumny” surrounding
him.

Bahamian historian Dr Gail Saun-
ders was also interviewed for back-
ground information about wartime
Nassau.

And journalist John Magenuis:

* managing editor of The Tribune, out-

lined his own views of the case, as
described in his book, Blood and
Fire, which was published last Christ-
mas.

Mr Marquis explained in an inter-
view with director Matthew Wort-

man why he thought the Duke of

Windsor, then Governor of the
Bahamas, was involved in a cover-up
after the killing.

The programme will be.part of a _
series on the Royal family commis- .

sioned by Channel Four for peak
autumn, viewing. It is expected to be
watche: ‘by millions.

Sir Harry Oakes, a Canadian mul-
ti-millionaire who settled in Nassau
during the 1930s, was murdered at
his seafront home, Westbourne, on’
the night of July 7-8, 1943.

It was such a major story at the
time that it knocked the war itself
off front pages around the world.

Criminologists have’ since
described the case as the greatest
murder mystery of the twentieth cen-

tury.

JOHN Marquis

secession
talks are
‘not about
race’ says
campaigner

TALK of secession on Abaco
is nothing to do with race or pol-
itics, it was stressed yesterday.

“This is for the benefit of all
Abaconians,” said businessman
Doug Evans.

A Radio Abaco debate last
week rekindled bitter racial
feelings that were evident
around the time of indepen-
dence in 1973.

After local campaigner Mrs
Yvonne Key - a white Bahami-
an — appeared on the pro-
gramme, callers began claiming
the secession talk was racially
inspired.

However, Mr Evans and fel-
low businessman Mr Dale Hill
stressed that race and politics
had nothing to do with it.

The issues being raised were
for the benefit of all Abaconi-

“ans, they said.

Mr Evans added: “This is not
a black and white matter. This is
an Abaconian issue. People
need to realise that this is our

~ money being spent and we want

more of it to stay here.”
Mr Hill said: “This is not

- racial. It is not political. It is

that we are asking for more
money back. They need to
realise that more needs to come
back here.”

When Abaco “rebels” sought
to distance themselves from the
Bahamas independence move-
ment 33 years ago, and opted
to remain a British Crown
colony, some blacks claimed it
was a means of prolonging
white rule on the island.

The secessionist cause fizzled
out when it became clear there
was no support for it from the
British parliament.







YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

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New Billing System



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The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC)
wishes to inform our valued customers and the general public
that BTC has implemented a new billing system. Therefore,
the public is advised that all accounts in arrears thirty-one days
or more will be liable for disconnection effective September
30th, 2006.

BTC encourages customers to keep their accounts current,
_ payments on all accounts can be made at any BTC CTO location,
via BTC’s website www.btcbahamas.com , and at all of the
following bank branches: Bank of The Bahamas, Royal Bank,
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COT ERENT OI TE TA NNT NTE

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Sh eee ees ES

sas EPS

ass ae See



PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



lll ae eee
Sentencing of Cordell -

Consulate for
Bahamas opened |
in Georgia, US

THE opening of a Bahami-
an consulate in Atlanta, Geor-
gia is a reflection of the close
ties between the two commu-
nities, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell said.

Mr Mitchell said he is sure
the new Honorary Consul
Micheal Munroe Young will
represent the Bahamas well.

“I take this opportunity to
underline the close, fraternal
relations which the Bahamas
has with the United States and
in particular with the Atlanta
community,” he said.

Mr Mitchell noted that there

is a steady exchange of persons ,

between the two communities,

with Atlanta Braves legend.

Hank Aaron ‘and his wife Billie
being among the regular visi-
tors to the Bahamas.

“This has been long in com-

PROSPECTUS

ing,” Mr Mitchell said. “It seems
though like only yesterday as I
returned to this side of the
world after a 15-hour journey
from South Africa to Atlanta
for a dinner meeting with (for-
mer Bahamian Ambassador to
the US Andrew Young) at his
home. It was a wonderful gath-
ering. That was in 2003.

“It was at that time that
Ambassador Young first moot-
ed the idea of an honorary con-
sul for the Bahamas in Atlanta
and he introduced me to Mike
‘Young, a Bahamian by descent
and his beautiful wife.”

He said the ambassador
explained that Mr Young would
be an excellent choice for the
post.

Mr Mitchell continued:

“We are a small country and
so from the point of view of

resources, it is always pleasing
that our sons and daughters
abroad are willing to help hold
up the flag overseas. Mike, hav-
ing served for so many years in
Atlanta in Delta Airlines khows
the business community well
here and is well connected in
this community and in this state.

“His responsibilities will
include not just holding up the
flag but being a general point
of interface between the
Bahamas and this community
at an official level, fielding ques-
tions and complaints, the prob-
lems of students, and those who
serve in prison and generally
keeping us abreast of how the
mutual interests of the Bahamas
and this community can be
enhanced. I have no doubt that
he will be successful,” Mr
Mitchell said.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

eS REGISTERED STOCK 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025 AND 2026
ISSUE OF B$100,000, 000.00

Issued Sade The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of

ASsemoly, 21st June, 2006.

Applications will be received = The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 11th September, 2006
and will close at 3:00pm on 20th September, 2006. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m..on 21st September,

2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 22nd September, 2006.

- If the total subseriotions exceed the sum of B$100,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible afier allotment. No interest will be

Farrington adjourned ..

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE sentencing hearing of convicted mur-
derer Cordell Farrington was adjourned to
Monday after his attorney informed the court
that she needed a few more days to prepare a
defence.

Yesterday, Farrington’s ; lawyer Romona Far-
quharson noted that although the prosecution
had indicated that it would be seeking the death
penalty against Farrington, she had not yet
received a formal notice of this.

She also informed the court that she only
received submissions from the prosecution on
September 5 and needed a few more days to
prepare a response.

Prosecutors noted that they were ready to
proceed with their submissions yesterday.

Acting Chief Justice Anita Allen said that a
social report was still outstanding. The judge
adjourned the hearing to September 18.

Farrington was convicted nearly a month
ago of the murder of 22-year-old Jamal Robins.
He was charged with the murder in Grand
Bahama in October 2003. .

He is also charged with the murders af four
Grand Bahama boys. No court date has yet

een set for that trial.
}, During the month-long trial into Robins’
murder, jurors heard testimony from more than
i30 witnesses, including two psychiatrists. Far-
rington also gave an unsworn statement from
the prisoner’s dock.

After the verdict was delivered, prosecutors
indicated that they would be seeking the death
penalty.

In March of this year the Privy Council in
London ruled that the mandatory death penal-
ty in the Bahamas is unconstitutional and that



@ CORDELL Farrington

the appropriate sentence should be left to the

‘ discretion of the trial judge.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025 AND 2026

The Registrar
c/o The Central Bank of The Batiatinad
P. O. Box N-4868

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:__

Stoo

a
+
?

Nassau, Bahamas

The date of this Prospectus is 11th September, 2006 Si

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$100,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity ‘dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2026. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue

; price are given below :-

paid on amounts so refunded.



I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:. -

Insert below the amount applied for

Issue in Units of B5100
Rate Of Interest ae son

; , t “
5/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2021 —_10,000,000.00 400.00 eee meee poe arid ee ee ee ae ee
3/16% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2022. 10,000,000.00 100.00 ee oh Wee Rama Bikames Recistared Stobk at BS.
7/132% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2023 20,000,000.00 100.00 aa, 9 Alc Baia Rite Bakuinad Recitercl Stock 2004 Be
1/4% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2024 15,000,000.00 100.00 aise ie iano Re Saha res Re cictcted Sf 3088 Be
9/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2025 20,000,000.00 100.00 ae a ihe eke ee Batatics Regained Stack-2036 se
5/16% Above Prime Rate ~ 25,000,000.00. 100.00 oe oe aa

Bahamas Registered Stock 2026
‘ 100,000,000.00

4 t -
and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us. : se



The Stock shall be repaid on 2nd September, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

in payment for the Stock applied for:

INTEREST I/We enclose B$

The Stock will bear interest from 22nd September, 2006, at the rate shown.against the name of the Stock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
" the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is'fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 22nd March, 2007 and thereafter on 22nd September and 22nd March in every year until

In the event of the full'amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, V/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:



the Stock ierepag: ek : : ' % . Bahamas Registered Stock BS

‘ ‘\% Bahamas Registered Stock : BS
p t \ % Bahamas Registered Stock BS

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND sa. Balisias Besitcied sleek BS
ee k % ° Bahamas Registered Stock BS

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged.upon and payable out of the % ae al cee ae

Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of'The Bahamas. . :
: SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS



I RAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.
The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas). BANKS PRAEGS SHOULD Be MEADE PAYABLE TO THE CENT f
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 amon Lith
September, 2006 and will close at 3:00 pm ‘on 20th September, 2006. Allocations will
commence at 9:30 a.m: on 21st September, 2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 22nd d
September, 2006. All envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled “Application.
For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks”.

Issue of Stock

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature‘ Bat) \



Name in Full , (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)

Units The Stock will be'in units of B$100.00.

Applications Applications n must be for B$100. 00 ora multiple of that sum.



Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices, in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (gslbers ugh Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the i
following banks: i ’ P.O. Box : sat

Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )



’ Bank of The Bahamas International
First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited :
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
Commonwealth Bank Limited
. Royal Bank Of Canada
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally peed American Bank( 1993) ;
Limited) : ‘2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should

8. Citibank, N.A. be given below.)



‘Telephone Nos.(H) __- (W)

SP Ne

'

PUBLIC DEBT Ordinary Signatures



Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2006 show the Public Debt of The

« Bahamas to be BS2,823,456,000.* Names in Full



GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE







f : And/OR
The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
; : Address ae
FY2004/2005p** FY2005/2006p** FY2006/2007p**
BS BS BS :
Approved Budget Approved Budget Telephone Nos.(H). (W) see %
1,039,376,000 1,132,774,000 1,338,971,000

Revenue
. I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding





Repayment of Public Debt) 1,053,095,000 1,145,691 ,000 " 1,269,560,000
; \ : Bank Name
Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances Bank Branch
to public corporations) - 90,374,000 132,901,000 162,356,000

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts. : ,Account Number :

* — The Pubtic Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent lability svhich as at June
30, 2005 totalled B$505,687,000.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 7









‘to primary
school

PARTNERS of the commer-
cial law firm Higgs and John-
son, last week made a donation
to underprivileged children at
a local primary school

The firm said that the dona-
tion deepened a commitment
to education that has led the
firm to donate thousands of dol-
Jars to outstanding teachers
over the past ten years, as a cor-
porate sponsor of the national
H&J Excellence in Teaching
Award.

This most recent donation
included reading books, dictio-
naries and other school supplies
for the 42 pupils of Claridge Pri-
mary School, who currently rely
on the school’s. student assis-
tance programme.

The firm also made a cash
contribution to the school that
provided the children with the
individual Mathematics and
Comprehension workbooks
that would give them the oppor-
tunity to practise new skills and
improve their grasp of relev ant
subject material.

“Nature offers the perfect
illustration-of.how a small
investment, of water and sun-
light can transform a simple
seed into a resplendent flower,”
Said H&J partner John K F
, Delaney. * ‘Our goal is to invest
in these students by providing
*the instruments necessary to
‘help them to develop into pro-
ductive members of society and,
later, to transform society with
‘their ideas, attitudes and

-' achievements.”
School principal Angela Rus-
, sell said the donation was one
, that would have a significant
‘impact. “Some deserving stu-
dents will now have the tools:
-‘, «to excel in their lessons,” she
“+ ssaid: “We are indeed thankful
"for such a gracious donation.”
' H & J began its association
‘with Claridge Primary this past

- April following the presenta-

- tion of its annual cash award to
the Teacher of the Year — third-
grade Claridge teacher Tamika
Cartwright.

e 2 € eC Te

oe a ee

LOCAL NEWS:

Machine to test for HIV/AIDS



donated to Ministry of Health

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

THE treatment. of
HIV/AIDS in the Bahamas
received a significant boost
yesterday when a machine
that will enable doctors to
diagnose patients was offi-
cially presented to the Min-
istry of Health yesterday.

Sponsored by the Lyford
Cay and Clinton Founda-
tions, the CD4 Count
Machine or the Beckman
Coulter Epic XL will save
local medical officials both
time and money as diagnostic
testing can now be done
locally.’

Dr Perry Gomez, Director
of National HIV/AIDS Pro-
gramme described the gift as a
“dream come true.”

“With this equipment now
in Nassau, we will no longer
have to courier-blood samples
ona weekly basis to a labora-
tory in Canada to assess white
blood cell count which tells
us the level to which a patien-
t’s immune system has been
corapromised and thus, what
the correct treatment ‘is. We

. will be able to diagnose and

determine the best method of
treatment right here in Nas-
sau,” Dr Gomez said in.a

press release.



Hi DR Ismae Whyms, acti

New equipment will make diagnosis possible
without sending samples to Canada

For 15 years blood samples
were sent to Canada for test-
ing, now, results can be ready
in two days or jess as opposed
to the two weeks it took. to
get to and from Canada.

“It’s a little machine, but
it’s going to do big things in
our country,” Health Minis-
ter Dr Bernard Nottage said.

Young people are the prin-
cipal victims of this virus. This
robs us of their productivity,
so everything that we can do
to prevent, care for and treat
this disease is important, he
said.

“We want to proyide the
greatest degree of cate that
we can. And I can say this to
you without the fear of con-
tradiction — this machine will.
allow us to do so.’ To improve
the quality of care that we can
give and to improve the qual-
ity of our lives.

This disease that used to be
a deadly disease and used to .
be difficult to control is begin-
ning to yield to science and
commitment and dedication



g lab director at Princess Miar-

garet Hospital’s HIV reference lab, explaining to members of

_ the press about their new CD4 machine

by a lot of people, he said.

Mr Manuel Cutillas, Chair-
man of Lyford Cay Foundation,
said foundation members were
happy to assist the government
of the Bahamas.

“We too have joined the fight

“against AIDS. It is our respon-

sibility to do our part'in ensur-
ing that we are winning this

fight and with an estimated
7,000 Bahamians infected with
HIV/AIDS this is a fight we
cannot afford to lose.”

The CD4 machine is an
important addition to the HIV
AIDS laboratory that will

_ “keep the Bahamas in the fore-
. front in the fight against ATDS,”
Mr Cutillas said. —

YOUR CONNECTIO

PUBLIC NOTICE

GSM UPGRADE

Dr Ismae Whyms, Acting lab
director, explained that CD4
are cells in the body that are
responsible for fighting infec-
tion and protects the body from
foreign particles like the flu and
cold.

The machine will be in HIV
Reference Lab until a “state-
of-the-art” laboratory and
resource centre, now under con-

struction, is finished.

“This lab will be the first of its
kind (in the Bahamas) when it’s
completed to handle truly dan-
gerous infectious viruses,” Dr.
Gomez said.

[TO THE WORLD

|| In its continuing effort to improve its telecommunications |

|| services, The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd.

|| (BTC) wishes to inform the public and its valued customers 1]
| that we will be performing an equipment upgrade on .

1 September 7th, 2006 and concluding September 22nd. As a

| results, some subscribers may experience 2 brief dis ruption I
|| in GSM Cellular Services.. |

BTC apologizes for the inconvenience causec

I aid: assures

| the public that every effort will be made to. me this
|} disruption of GSM Cellular Service to a minimum.







OLN (an) Survivor: |Survivor: Palau “The Best and Survivor: Palau “Jellyfish 'n Chips” |Survivor: Palau “Sumo at Sea” 0
alau © (CC) {Worst Reward Ever’ © (CC) A (CC) CC)
h

PAGE 8 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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2 ani Bullock. FBI agent Gracie Hart clashes with her superiors when she 43 (2005, Action) Ethan Hawke,



ies CRY |Costas NOW 1 (CC)




jumps in to save two kidnapped friends in Las Vegas. ‘PG-13' Laurence Fishburne. 1 'R’ (CC)

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deadly extraterrestrials. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) O'R (CC) : i

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(1s) t %% DE-LOVELY (2004, Musical) Kevin Kline, Ashley Judd, % 4% CAPTURING THE FRIEDMANS (2003)










TMC






lonathan Qe Broadway composer Cole Porter marries a socialite. |Amold Friedman. Premiere. A man and his son. stand

‘PG-13' (CC trial for sex crimes against minors. © ‘NR’ (CC)

THE TRIBUNE

One Piece - One Price

MULTI-PURPOSE















Small space? Le
Limited budget?
We've got the solution. ae
Our armoire’s and trundle
beds are the perfect
space-saver. Buy a single piece
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THE TRIBUNE





































LOCAL NEWS

Concerns raised 0

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 9





construction work

FROM page one

bune yesterday, an eyewit-
ness - who resides and
works on Paradise Island —
said that over the weekend
styrofoam washed up and
covered the beaches close
to Atlantis, all along the
shore to the old Club Med
property, and almost to the
lighthouse.

One witness said he saw
dead fish washed up on the
beach.

Upon examining the fish
more closely, the eyewit-
ness said, styrofoam could
be found in their gills.

“So maybe that’s what
they died of,” another wit-
ness speculated.

Homeowners, who have

found the dead, washed-up
fish, have reportedly
thrown them back into the

water to prevent the smell

of the rotting fish from
spreading.

The eyewitnesses also
said that this weekend was
not the first time they had
seen this kind of styrofoam
floating in the waters off
Paradise Island.

“This has been happen-
ing for months now, you
constantly see styrofoam
floating in the water,” a
witness said.

Environmentally con-
cerned residents of Par-
adise Island are now ask-
ing Atlantis to: secure their
building materials better in
future.

When contacted by The
Tribune yesterday, vice-
president of Kerzner Inter-
national with responsibility
for public relations Ed
Fields said that he had:no
information regarding



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
‘good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have wonan ,
award.

If so, call us on 322. 1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

these claims and would
have to look into the mat-
ter.

Up until press time last
night, The Tribune
received no further
response from Mr Fields.















i RESIDENTS on the island are claiming that styrofoam used
at the construction site of Atlantis’ new 600-room all suite hotel is
not being secured properly and has been seen floating along Par-
adise Island’s shoreline and washing up on the beaches.

(Photo: Felipé Major Tribune staff)

- Police not ruling

out any possibility
in death of son of
‘Anna Nicole Smith |



FROM page one

mother that afternoon at the
hospital where. he eventually
stayed overnight.

However, on Sunday morn-
ing he was found dead, sitting
“upright” in a chair in his
mother’s hospital room. It is
believed that the baby girl was
not in the room, but in anoth-
er section of the hospital.

According to Reginald Fer- .
superintendent of

guson,
police, there were no physical
signs of trauma anywhere on
Daniel’s body, and there was
no sign of a struggle anywhere
in the room. Daniel’s body is
currently being held at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
where an autopsy is being per-
formed to find a cause of
death:

In the meantime, however,
speculation of a probable
cause of death has been over-
whelming, with a number of
persons alluding to the prob-
ability of a drug overdose.

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However, Mr Ferguson said
that while they can not rule
out any possibility at this time,

it would be premature of them!

to lend too much focus to one

.. avenue before they had at

least a preliminary report
from the pathologist.

“It would not. be wise for
the police to try and come toa
conclusion before we have a
proper investigation,” Mr Fer-
guson said.

“So for that reason we are
trying to investigate the mat-
ter, and part and parcel of the
investigation is the role that
the pathologist has to
play.

“While we cannot deter-
mine from what.we see on the
body at this time —— while we

can not come to any conclu- .

sion, that is not conclusive in
the absence of the pathologist
report. And so we have gol to
wait for the pathologist to
assist in determining what
might be the cause of death,”
he said.




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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Join The Tribune Atel
The College of The Bahamas’
Partnership for Literacy in



Featuring: Ian Strachan & Patti Glinton-Meicholas
Hear the featured authors share their lifelong
appreciation of reading and the role it has
played in shaping their lives.

Chapter One Bookstore
The College of The Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard
Friday 15th of September 2006 6.30pm




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College of The Bahamasam
i About The Tribune's Newspaper
in Education Literacy Programme .

The Tribune's Newspaper in Education Literacy Programme
eee is an initiative to increase awareness of the need and impor-

tance of literacy, and the role it plays in developing construc- |

tive citizens.
3's A component of this programme is story serialisation.
We publish stories which are educational, interesting and
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. I



Sa a
Bahamas presents

Canadian with award:

THE Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism presented a Canadian
travel industry professional with
the William H Baxter Lifetime
Achievement Award at a cere-
mony in Toronto.

John D McKenna, one of the
key architects in the establish-
ment and growth of the travel
insurance industry in Canada,
has been recognised for his con-
tributions to the Canadian
tourism industry by being

‘named the second recipient of

this prestigious award.
Established by the Bahamas

Ministry of Tourism in recog-

nition of the late William ‘Bill’

Baxter’s contributions to the |

tourism industry in Canada, the
award ceremony was held
before an audience of top Cana-
dian and Bahamian travel and
tourism professionals and
media.

Vernice Walkine, director
general of Tourism, was on
hand to present the award to
Mr McKenna along with Edith

Baxter, editor-in-chief of Baxter .

Publications.
“Mr McKenna’s contribu-

tions to the Canadian travel

industry certainly make him a

most worthy first recipient of .

the William H Baxter Lifetime
Achievement Award,” said Ms
Walkine. “The Bahamas is hon-
oured to name him as this year’s
winner of the Award.”

An annual event beginning
in 2005, the award was estab-
lished by the Bahamas to serve
as a lasting reminder of Mr Bax-
ter’s contributions to the
tourism industry in Canada as
well as his fondness and sup-

‘port for the Bahamas and its

several destinations.

In determining the winner,
members of the Award’s selec-
tion panel considered individ-
uals who:

* improved professional stan-
dards in the industry;

e demonstrated successful
innovations and entrepreneurial

initiative;

e enhanced the industry’s

standing with the general public. |

Sy



communications in the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism; Vernice
Walkine, director general of the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism;
John McKenna, award recipient; Paul Strachan, national:
director of the Bahamas Tourist Office in Canada.

The selection panel, made up

' -of top Canadian travel industry

professionals, determined
that John McKenna’s success
in building Voyageur Travel
Insurance, now RBC Travel
Insurance, into one of the most
trusted brand names in the
travel industry, along with his
example of public service and
commitment to the travel
industry throughout his career,
made him a petted choice as













from people who are

| making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for.a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322. 1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

- the second recipient of the.

award.

ro

‘
lof
@ LEFT to right: Ambrose Morris, pitblic relations manager for 2.
the Bahamas Tourist Office in Canada; Basil Smith director of

In addition to his position as’ ;

vice chairman of RBC Travel

Insurance, Mr McKenna served ,

as a chairman for numerous
boards and has been an active

' member of many: travel industry -
both

related associations,
nationally and internationally,
the board of directors of both
Voyageur Insurance and RBC
Travel Insurance Company.

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‘We thank all applicants, however only those
selected for an interview will be contacted.







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 11



Big foo ey

BEL eet

ofa
Br oa
Sore es
ry

i | : a.
= MEMBERS of Bahamian government along with US

Perry Christie, US Ambassador John Rood and Govern

a US Ambassador John Rood noted in his speech that “with the help of like-minded nations such
as the Bahamas’’, the US has made progress by removing sanctuaries for terrorists ;

CBREED

=

TORN

_

Rosy,

Ambassador John Rood unveili
plaque with the engraving “In remembrance of the victims of September 11, 2001”. Shown from
left: Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Service Fred Mitchell, Prime Minister of the Bahamas
or General of the Bahamas Arthur Hanna.

(Photos: Onan Bridgewater/Tribune staff)




ng a



@ MARINES standing at attention, b

attacks of September 11.

FROM page one

and celebrate the relationship
between our two nations.

The ambassador recalled the
setting and scale of the tragedy
in an address at the tree planti-
ng ceremony. .

“For the victims,.as forall of
us, that tragic day began like so

many others. In New York and -

Washington it was one of those
clear, cool and dry early fall
days that are so enjoyed on the

east coast after along hot sum- .

mer. That outward tranquility
was quickly shattered when at
8.46am the first of two planes

slammed into the World Trade

Centre in New York City.”

Citizens of more than 90
countries were among the
almost 3000 victims of the
attacks in New York, Washing-
ton, DC, and rural Pennsylva-
nia. :

"The Bahamas, along with
our other friends and allies,
immediately pledged solidarity
with us, and we were comforted
as a nation as our friends and
allies rallied around us".

It is the partnership between
nations with the same "cher-
ished" values and principles —

‘a’ symbol. of

of -democracy, human rights,
and freedom of expression. —.
that is fundamental to the fight
against terrorism, according to

' Ambassador Rood.

Long term success in the

fight against terrorism will be

won "less by. tactical victories
than by advancing freedom and
human dignity. and promoting
the spread of democracy", said
the Ambassador.

A poinciana tree was chosen
to be planted at the gathering as
"strength, -

endurance, hope and beauty".

"As it takes root in the rich
soil here it will stand strong dur-
ing the many storms that pass



earing flags in honour of the victims and fallen heroes of the

-over it. It will have a long life, so



that many years after we have
moved on.those who follow in
our steps can stand here and
recall the sacrifices made for
ourfreedoms. ——- :

"Its deep roots symbolise to
me the depth and endurance of
the values that underpin the
United States friendship with
The Bahamas".

Mr Rood said he believed



- the tree would act as an appro-

priate symbol of "our hope for
the future and our desire to
build a world of peace, free of
terrorism, where liberty, democ- ©
racy, and respect for human dig-
nity are universally honoured".

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THE Bahamas will be among Latin American
and Caribbean nations bringing proposals to this
week’s Non Aligned Movement Summit on the
fight against poverty and in favour of human
health, based on unity and solidarity principles.

Representatives of 24 nations of the region
will meet from today in Havana, with delegates
the world over, to exchange initiatives directed to
resize the group so that it acts more efficiently.

Immersed in new concepts of integration and
democracy, this geographic area points to a dif-
ferent and brighter future of co-operation in ener-
gy, health and education.

Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Republica

Poverty and Middle East

conflict top agenda for

Non-Aligned Movement
summit in Cuba

PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

efoy- Vi T=

Baharian 10 dale part in n-Aligned Su Summit —

Dominicana, Ecuador, Peru, Antigua and Bar-
buda, Dominica, Panama and Venezuela are part

of the forum founded in Belgrade, then capital of
Yugoslavia, in September, 1961.

After that entered Bahamas, Barbados, Belize,
Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras,
Jamaica, Nicaragua, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, St. Lucia, Suriname and Trinidad
and Tobago. It is expected that Haiti and St Kitts
and Nevis will also apply for membership, with
which all the Caribbean will be part of that group
of nations, 116 in total.

Among the challenges facing the summit are
co-operation agreements and the approval of

documents to strengthen. the NAM role in the
solution of global problems.

Advancing toward multilateralism “in opposi-
tion to the unipolar scheme ‘led by the United
States through force and blackmail” is one of the
objectives of the meeting. ;

Cuba, which is to receive the presidency of
the group for a three-year term, has among its
goals to aid in the solution of some of the prob-
lems faced by underdeveloped countries and
the co-ordination of efforts in.the political scene
in order to Be common stands and joint
actions.

The movement set itself the goal of discarding

THE TRIBUNE

. the sensation of having lost relevance as an inter-

national force which for many meant the end of
confrontation between the two blocs that gave it
a reason to exist.

In recent statements regarding the 14th NAM
Summit Conference, vice foreign minister Abclar-
do Moreno of Cuba insisted the group had not
lost its validity, despite the end of the Cold War
(1947-1990) and warned about the complex and
contradictory international arena.

Official statistics register over 1.2 bitlion poor,
2.4 billion without sanitary facilities, 1.6 bilhon
with no electricity and 771 million illiterates, of
which 39 million live in Latin America.



Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content

@ HAVANA .
POVERTY, health care and

‘ the Middle East conflict top’ the

agenda for the weeklong sum-

mit of the global Non-Aligned -

Movement in Cuba that began
Monday and will culminate with
the meeting of 50 heads of state,

‘ancluding anti-American lead-

ers Iranian President Mahmoud
Ahniadinejad and Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez, accord-
ingto Associated Press. .
Cuba takes over the chair-
manship this week from
Malaysia, which hosted the last
summit three years ago, and the
communist government’s for-
eign minister opened the event

Monday with a forceful call for.

smaller, developing countries
to band together to resist the
intervention and aggressions of
more powerful nations in this
“unjust world".

“Today we can affirm ... that
the movement is more neces-
sary than ever,” said Felipe
Perez Roque.

“We need the united force of
118 nations,” he added, refer-
ring to the current members

plus Haiti and St Kitts and:

Nevis, expected to join the
movement this week.
The movement, which
includes about two-thirds of the
world’s nations, was developed
during thie Cold Waras a Third
World alternative to the United
States and Soviet Union. Diplo-
mats say it has lost.direction in
recent year but expect the



1 UNIDENTIFIED members of delegations of the Non-Aligned

Movement gather during a preparation meeting in Havana
yesterday. Officials of developing nations from around the globe
are expected to gather in Havana for the 14th Non-Aligned

Summit by week’s end.

Cuban leadership to deepen the
bond between member nations
that share similar social and
economic struggles.

“JHiteracy, lack of access to
_ decent health care and energy

conservation are high on Cuba’s
agenda, along with a group

statement calling for the lifting -

of the decades-old US trade
embargo against the island.
Tran’s delegation will seek sup-
port for its efforts to become a
nuclear power. Leaders from

‘Pakistan and India will meet as

part of their peace process.
-Organisers will work ona

final declaration that rejects all _

terrorism against civilian pop-
ulations, including “state ter-
rorism” in a statement that will

chastise Israel and the United

States for invasions in Lebanon
and Iraq.

And many nations want to
send a sharp message to the
developed world that wealthy
countries need to do more to
share the finite resources and
respect the rights of all coun-
tries to determine their own
governments and economic sys-
tems. |

Formed in 1961, the move-
ment has survived long after the
Soviet Union’s collapse. Today,

many of the members are unit-
ed in a shared distaste for US
foreign policy. Leaders like
Ahmadinejad and Chavez; who
atrive later in the week, are
expected to use: the summit to
blast the “imperialist” world
view of US President George
W Bush.

But other eeunties attend--

ing say they are not interested
in “battering the United States.
Nations like India and South
Africa are improving relations
with the US and are not willing
to point fingers at the Bush
administration.

The member nations include
most of Africa, the Middle East,

Asia and Latin America. China °

is attending as an observer
nation, an opportunity the Unit-
ed States passed up.

The attendance of one of
Bush’s top foes, the ailing
Cuban President Fidel Castro, is
still up ‘in the air. The 80-year-
old leader announced July 31

he was stepping-down from |

power — for the first time in 47
years — to recover from intesti-
nal surgery. He has made no
public appearances since,
though the government released
two videos it filmed of visits
with Chavez in Havana. »
‘Defense Minister Raul Castro
is Cuba’s acting president and
will head the island’s delegation
in the elder Castro’s absence.
Fidel Castro said he would
be able to recéive some visiting
dignitaries, but the government
statement gave the sense that





those meetings. would be small
and private.

Cuban organisers said they
would urge the United Nations

leadership. to.strengthen its loy-

alty to developing nations. UN
Secretary-General Kofi Annan
will attend as an observer, and
was expected to meet person-
‘ally with Fidel Castro. Many of

. the global leaders will contin-

ue on to New York for the UN
General Assembly session, and
some plan to meet Bush in
Washington.

Among other well-known
leaders attending are Presidents:
Pervez Musharraf of Pakistan,
Bashar Assad of Syria and.
Thabo Mbeki of South Africa,

Available from Commercial News Providers

aswell as Prime Ministers Man-
mohan Singh of India and
Thaksin ' Shinawatra of Thai-

‘Jand.

Musharraf said he will meet
with Singh on the sidelines as
part of an ongoing peace
process. between Pakistan and

. India. The two countries share a.

history of hostile relations,
mainly because. of their com-

_peting claims on the border ©

region of Kashmir.

Arco Progresista, one of

Cuba’s dissident groups, noting
that protecting human rights is a
priority of the movement, urged
the government to expand tree-
dom of expression and allow

_ multiparty elections in Cuba. ~

Bahamian group presses for renewed focus on the ‘Cuban Five’

FROM page one

been hunting down terrorists —
this was their job, they were just
looking for information — they
weren't using weapons."

Key to the work of ‘the
"Friends" is highlighting exact-
ly what it is the five men were
purported to be doing in Miami
shortly before the point of their
arrest. It is said that they were
in Miami in response to terror-
ist attacks that had been threat-
ening and causing destruction
within Cuba since the start of
the Cuban revolution — all of
which are reported to have been
orchestrated by Cuban émigrés
living in Miami, bent on ridding
Cuba of Castro and reclaiming
their properties and other assets
lost during the revolution.

Having investigated and
uncovered information about
planned terrorist activities, the
Cubans handed information over
to the US authorities. It was at
this point that the US authori-
ties arrested, and ultimately sen-
tenced the Cuban "investiga-
tors," it was claimed. They are
currently serving four’ life sen-
tences, and 75 years in jail.

Ultimately, the two say that
any negative perceptions that
have apparently developed in
some quarters around the
group's endeavours to raise pub-
lic awareness — and around the
situation of the men themselves
— are asymptom of the "rarefi-
cation" of, or treating as beyond
question, American "war on ter-
ror" ideology. This has become a
barrier to communication about
injustice, according to Mr Bethel.

The "deep mystification" of
American objectives has led to
it becoming an ideological con-
struct which people "worship,"
he said. In the process, a "for-
us-or-against us” framework of
thought has effected people's

ability to discern what is con-

structive criticism from simple
anti-Americanism.

‘Explaining his position, Mr.

Morley said: "To say that you

are anti-American is to make it ,

seem like I have problems with
everything they do. No —

America has produced a lot of
things in the world: Technolog- ©

ical advancements, and in terms
of: what it universally has

brought to the world, and I

agree with these things. All I'm |

saying is that we have our own
vibe too," said Morley.
Drawing on this point, Mr
Bethel said: "It can be split
down the middle: You can be
opposed to a specific US policy,
but not opposed to the US."
Within the Bahamian Friends

of the ‘Cuban Five, the "over-

all interest" is in the ' "guestion
of justice — in the same way as
we-are for them we are for oth-

er’ people who are suffering ©
indignity or injustice,"

and are
being denied the right to

achieve these constitutional .

aspirations, he added.
Detracting further from those

elements who claim anti-Amer- -
icanism within the group, Mr

Bethel said: "We need the pub-
lic to understand that we are
‘friends’ insofar as those men
who are now locked up in the
US. are being deprived of fun-
damental rights as regards visits
by their family. We are friends
of the Cuban five to the extent
that we are for freedom and
dignity and justice.

Mr Bethel added that both

. Village ree

Ce 2 atta il

ae ° Lk Cara)

Amnesty International, "the vast
majority" of the members of the

UN, and a significant number of |

British MPs favour the release of

the men — along with well pop- °

ulated American contingents of
the "Free the Five" campaign.

The group has recently ©
launched an online blog to

make public their writings and
other media.

* Harold Road.
Hah North

« Cable Beac



A



oma

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

SECTION



°

i business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

mM Wite Tribune



sana

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‘Is financial sector ‘ready to
pay price’ on new markets? |

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

eo ae, he’ Bahamian
Tae financial services
: industry must
- decide whether it
; is “ready to pay
the price” of venting into the
emerging markets of Asia and
- Eastern Europe in the search

~.°-for new clients, the Bahamas

Financial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chief executive said.
, Addressing the legal clinic.
held at the weekend by the
Halsbury. Chambers law firm,
Wendy Warren said that while
the Bahamas would not neglect
the traditional sources of its
high net worth clients, North
America and Europe, it was
now Starting to pursue new
opportunities in Asia and the
Far East, plus eastern Europe.
But she added that the
Bahamas “has to make a deter-

mination, before we step into
this brave new world, are we
ready to pay the price or ser-
vicing these markets?”.

Ms Warren pointed out that
when the Bahamas was nor-
mally asleep, clients in India
would be awake, and vice ver-
sa. In addition, the Bahamian
financial services industry
would also have to drop any
preconceptions it may have
about clients from areas, such
as Russia.

Ms Warren said that despite
the external regulatory chal-
lenges facing the Bahamian
financial services industry,
these could be overcome with
the correct preparation.

And while the competition
for the Bahamas had become
more intense, she added: “The
business is. going to continue to
‘grow. Latin America and North
America represent huge oppor-
tunities for us, right on.our



_ |. WENDY WARREN

doorstep.”
Ms Warren pointed out that
foreign real estate buyers and

’ purchasers of second homes in

the Bahamas remained anoth-

er target market for the indus-
try, as their presence here held
out the prospect of establish-
ing a financial’ relationship with
these clients.
“Fundamentally, without
financial services we would see

a significant impact on tourism.

and the second home industry.
The three pillars of our econo-

my work in tandem,” Ms War-.

ren said.

She added that salary levels
in the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry were above aver-
age compared to the wider

Bahamian economy, standing

at an: average of $41,000 and

$66,000 for the sector’s. domes-

tic and international segments
respectively. This compared to
an average $20,000 per capita

for the economy as a whole. |”

Ms Warren said that to fur-
ther develop the industry, the
BFSB was looking at a'techni-
cal co-operation project with

Sansbury resigns from Baha Mar

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter

MICHAEL Sansbury has resigned as
Baha Mar’s executive vice-president of
resort operations, The Tribune has learnt.

Yesterday, Robert Sands, executive
vice-president of administration and pub-
lic affairs at the Cable Beach resort,, con-
. firmed that Mr Sansbury had tendered his
registration.

Mr Sansbury was part of the Baha Mar

.development team when it bought ‘the

- Cable Beach property from Phil Ruffin for’

“about $150 million in April, 2005. At that
time, he was executive vice-president of
the company.

Before joining Baha Mar Development,

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Mr Sansbury ran three Universal Orlando
resorts since inception and previously. ran

the 3,000-room Mirage resort in Las Vegas. |

Mr Sands had little to say.on the resig-
nation, only confirming that it had hap-
pened, but not indicating how this would
affect the company as it continues its trans-
formation of the Cable Beach strip into
its $2 billion vision. Mr Sands did add that
~ the company has yet to fill the position.

The Tribune was unable to reach Mr
Sansbury for comment yesterday.

Mr Sands also told The Tribune that
work is progressing very well on the first
physical change to the property - the $80
million renovation of the Radisson Hotel.
The work is being done by locally-based

Osprey Developers, who were awarded a



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substantial contract to do the work.
While that work ‘continues, Mr Sands

_ noted that a number of additional planned’
initiatives are also moving forward. They

are the building of the re-routed: West:

Bay Street as well as the reconstruction’

of several buildings:presently located epee
site the Cable Beach resorts.
.. The buildings will be reconstructed on

the western portion of the Radisson on

the opposite side of the road. This will

make way for the creation of Baha Mar’s.

new casino hotel and'convention centre.
Mr Sands said the resort is waiting for a
combination of several things to be com-
pleted before they can initiate that
process. But he said it was expected this
would’be done in short order.

BBN MIS ee AY *

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HOME EQUITY LOANS

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ISLAND

the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), and estab-
lishing the Bahamas as a finan-

cial. services brand to make it.“

compelling option”.

“We've got to remain rele-
vant..We can’t let the industry
get ahead of us,” Ms Warren
said. “What we really need to
do as country is be sure we're.

_ looking at trends and have the

capability to respond-to these
trends. Our challenge is to
ensure we’re never left behind
the herd.”
. The growing number of high
net worth individuals was set
to provide further opportuni-
ties for the Bahamas, Ms War-
ren added.
Some 8.7 million individuals

- across the world had'$1 million

or more in financial assets, and.
collectively these people owned
$33.3 trillion, an amount set to
grow to $44.6 trillion by the
end of this‘decade.

And many of the so-called
‘Baby Boomers’ generation in
the US were set to transfer
wealth, estimated to total $41
trillion;,to their children.

‘Many of these people had

“ingly

generated their wealth through
their own entrepreneurial
endeavours, and Ms Warren
said the Bahamian industry’s
clients were becoming increas-
-sophisticated and
demanding, looking for ever-
higher service standards.

As a result, service was
becoming more important to
these clients than confidential-
ity, the old factor that had gov-

- effied client-decisions.

“If you can’t add value, the
benefits of long-standing rela-
tionships will no longer be as
important,” Ms Warren said.

~ “Clients will be demanding:

on us. They won’t just be happy
with a story, they'll be evaluat-
ing our performance.”

She’ added that the financial
services industry was happy
about the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company’s (BTC)
launch of BlackBerry products
in the Bahamas, as this would
allow their clients to use their
own Blackberries in this nation.

The industry is also hoping
that Private Trust Company
legislation is introduced by
year-end.



:

Union will

mâ„¢ By CARA BRENNEN
- Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Bahamas Mainte-
nance and Allied Workers
Union will represent 500

‘non-managerial: workers at
the Sandals Bahamian
Resort and Spa, Trade
Union Congress president
Obie Ferguson claimed,
although the resort has said
it had no commient on the
matter.

According to Mr Fergu-
son, the union, which was
started some three to four
years ago, will be in a posi-

| tion to represent all inclusive

workers at Sandals and

Breezes.

He said the union is an
affiliate of the TUC and that
they are looking forward to -



represent

{
|
}
|

500 non- -managerial |
workers at Sandals |

sitting down with the hotel |
to make an industrial agree- |

‘ment. {

In fact, he said he expects
the union to obtain a Cer-
tificate of Determination |
declaring it the bargaining
agent for the workers within
-a week or so. |

Director of Labour Har- |
court Brown explained yes- |
terday that the union has

which means it has fulfilled
the paperwork listed to be a
union registered on the |
department’s trade union ||
listing. |
However, he said the
department is still in the
process of completing recog-
nition of the union, a neces-

|
been granted registration, |
|
|

_SEE page 5B

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eee



PAGE 2b, |UESDAY, SEPIEMBER 12, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



‘Making home owner |

dreams beco

LAST Friday’s edition of the
London Daily Mail carried a
short article about a new trend
in mortgage financing, which
they call group mortgages in
the UK. Instead of making a
traditional mortgage loan to a
husband/wife team,
instance, in the UK a group of
individuals can come together
to obtain mortgage financing.

Housing crisis

There is a global housing cri-
sis in the making in most devel-
oped economies around the

ribune

for’



Financial
Focus

world, and the challenge is to
make affordable housing avail-



able to the upcoming genera-

tion.
In the Bahamas, the cost of

-housing is exploding almost

Ce Ne eS

daily. I was taken aback some
months ago when the then

fF oncler insurance



&

Crawford Bahamas Ltd:

Orry J. Sands & Co. Ltd. -
RoyalStar Assurance Ltd.

Summit Insurance Co. Ltd.

Minister of Housing said.
recent government-sponsored

‘low-cost’ houses sold for’
around $143,000, which is:

about 9 times our per capita
income of about $16,500. ©
This was a most sobering
wake-up call, as my immedi-
ate thought was: “How could

my children ever afford to own:

a home?” This prompted me
to start looking at home prices
and land prices, which quickly
confirmed that we are not
exempt from the housing crisis
here in the Bahamas.



Avoid»

the Risk of |
‘Under-insurance

isin for less than the peplacenent value of |
your property may result in any claim payment made
under your policy being reduced in proportion to the
aroun’
VO Mae” ertain ‘that the sum insured on your policy
accurately reflects your property's replacement cost.

if you have any questions about this or any other
aspects of your insurance coverage, we encourage
- you fo contact your insurance representative.

A, Scott Fitzgerald Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.
Algoma Adjusters (Bahamas) Ltd. _

Bahamas First General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Bahamas Motor Assessment & Claims Ltd.

Carib Insurance Agency Ltd.

Colina General Insurance Agency Ltd.

General Brokers & Agents Ltd.

Insurance Company of the Bahamas Ltd.

Insurance Management (Bahamas) Ltd.

J.S. Johnson & Company, Ltd. _

K. A. P. Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd.

Moseley Burnside Insurance Agency Ltd.

Nassau Underwriters Cole iby Insurance Agency Ltd. .

1

Security & General Insurance Co: Ltd.
Star General Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd.

Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Lid.










Group mortgages
In the UK, the average cost
of a home is £179,000 — seven

times greater than the average

salary of £25,570.

Group mortgages, therefore,

have been targeted at cash-
strapped first-time buyers, who

could be friends, relatives or:

even strangers. According to
the article: “Mortgages which
let up to four friends buy a

home together are becoming °

more popular as [house] prices
continue to rise.’
“Britain’s biggest bank,

HSBC, has seen a 50 per cent |
rise in the numbers of people ©
applying for a ‘group mort-, :

gage’ since January. At pre-

sent, young homebuyers typi-'

cally ‘borrow just over. three

times their salary. With a |
group mortgage, four friends,

could club together to take out,
a mortgage of £300,000 with’.

some lenders. This would be
more than enough money. to

buy the aver gee two- bedroom

house.”

In the Bahamas; Iam: told
that some agencies have been
granting loans for ‘low-cost’



Senior A

e reali

-homes to extended family
units, guaranteed by the wages.

of a working parent and one
or more working children.
Also, some institutions have
been capitalising the closing
costs, such as stamp tax, legal
fees and the like. Without such
approaches, home ownership

would simply be an unattain-.

able dream. .

' Caution
~ However, while group ores

“gages (or extended- -family

mortgages as granted in the
Bahamas), seem to be a “quick
fix? to a very vexing problem,
lenders need to think about

what would happen if one per-.
sor lost their job, fell out with

‘his. frierids, decides to get mar-
ried or had to move to another
island or country? While this

may be a creative short-term -
solution to the population’s’ .
‘ immediate housing needs, it

certainly is not a long term
solution.

Potential social implications
The lack of affordable hous-
ing has many social implica-

lanager, Trust &

Fiduciary Services Department

sG Hambros, part of the SG Private Banking, isa private bank providing
- a comprehensive wealth management service with offices in the UK,
. Guernsey, Jersey Gibraltar and The Bahamas.

SG Hambros is currently looking to reeruit a Senior Manager, Trust &
' Fiduciary Services Department. The individual will be required to:

. ‘visit on a ragular basis significant
clients whose business with the Bank
is important clients enough that
it warrants direct client contact in
‘a meating :

® work with taam colleagues to ensure
that there is a high quality of

“Félation iship: Management pravided io,

sofa trust ais fidui RS |

i ces team |.

w dey elon new clint reldbobthing from
a particular target markating region or
country for the bank

® develop new business from existing
and new olients, ensure maintenance
and profitability of existing client
relationships — all towards achieving
income and sales goals for the taam



that will he set by Senior Management. ~

# develop a detailed knowledge and. —
understanding of client estate planning
and financial needs and provide
advica to existing clients and
prospective clients on the

Bank's products and services, liaising

_in providing more detailed product

- recommendations. In particutar, work
closely and co-operativaly with,
Private Bankers to introduce
specialized investment products and
services in accordance with the
clients needs

@ ensure that the Bank js properly
compensated for services rendered’ ”
to clients. :

SG Hamteas Bark & Thus Gahamasi Limited is

The rola will entail supervisory and
training function and ensuring thai
policies-and procedures are being |
followed with the department.

_ You'shoutd ideally have:

ma Bachelor’s Dagree in Banking &
_ Finance, and have ai least 7-10

a Years’, experience in, Tustand..
". Fiduciary Services:

wa superior numeric, wriling and
communication skills

ma superior knowledge ‘of trusts, trust

law, companies and company law

mihe abllity to read and understand —y
financial statements, vatuations and
related forms of financial reporting

ma management and sales experience
and proven ability to work with others ©
in a multi-faceted financial
services organization.

Tha position offers an attractive salary

and henefits package.

Applications should be submitted to the

. following address, to arrive on or before
with product spacialisis as,appropriaie

15 Saptember 2006

Manager, Human Resources

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) |
Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas.

awww.sghambras.com

. fisoreed under the Banke & Yrast Co ingenieg Roguintion Act

aah eleoM tla d 83

i

SOCIETE CENERALE GROUP

Lenneth Fl. Brozozog

Occupation: Business Executive
Age: 70.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: Oct 1995
Number of Years as Sur- US2TOO’

vivor: | 0

PROSTATE CANCER
EDUCATION & SUPPORT

observes Prostate Cancer Awareness Month





tions for the country moving
forward. First, it would suggest

that children may simply have ~
_ to live at home longer (and ©

hopefully save towards a down

" payment).

~The offset to this is that par-
ents may be required to spend

“more than anticipated in sup-,

porting their children when
they should be organising their
finances for retirement. Sec-

_ ond, if our returning university
graduates and professionals

feel they are squeezed out of
the affordable housing market,
they will simply stay abroad.
Finally, this article really has
not.addressed the plight of the

- lower income masses, where ~
the situation.is most dire. The

family structure for the major-
ity of our citizens is broken,

our school system is ‘on aver- _
.age’ producing D+ graduates,

and wages are not keeping
pace with affordable housing.

eos ore
woe 8

We have a growing generation .°_-:

of ‘angry youth’ who feel
squeezed out, and totally alien

to the economic prosperity.that .

the. Bahamas boasts of.
Together, these facts will lead
to future problem if we do not
give them the consideration
they deserve today.

The Bahamas is unique in
that.it‘-has vast reserves of
‘Crown Lands’, which i in recent
times has commanded the
attention of international
developers. However, we must

‘. ensure that some of this is

strategically made available’at
reasonable prices for low, mid-
dle and upper middle class
Bahamian housing projects.
Last November, I wrote in

this column: “Now that we are’
-in the ‘manifesto drafting’

mode, I challenge all political
parties to clearly articulate
their. land policy should. they.
become elected. Home own-
ership must remain an achiev-

-able objective for all Bahami-

ans.” This remains true today.

Conclusion
_ We need to continuously

find ways to ‘qualify’ Bahami-'

ans for mortgage financing,
while at the same time ensur-

ing that affordable land

remains available. Other

aa

Caribbean countries have suc- -!

cessfully addressed this issue *
“with appropriate policies.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a

‘Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,

Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group .
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of

_ Security & General Insurance

Company in the Bahamas.
The views expressed are

- those of the author and do not

necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



eee
oe at



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 3B



Technical support
‘main weakness’
on start-up help

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE lack of technical and
institutional support has been
“one of the main weaknesses”
behind the failures of so many
Bahamian entrepreneurs and
start-ups, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s executive
director said.

Philip Simon said the
Bahamian economy was “dri-
ven by small businesses”, point-
ing out that 75 per cent of the
Chamber’s membership had ou
employees or less.
. While the problems of access

to capital funding for Bahami-
an entrepreneurs had “been
around for years”, Mr Simon
said the situation was “getting

better”. .
Fund

This was due.to the $2 mil-

lion Bahamas Venture Capital.
Fund, administered by Gomez «

Partners & Co, into which the
Government was likely to con-
tribute another $1 million soon.

Scotiabank and Common-

wealth Bank had established.

their own $10 million loan facil-
ity for small Bahamian busi-
nesses, and Mr Simon said the
renewed interest in small busi-

ness financing: was “as a result

of demand evident over the last
several years”.

He added that this had also
been driven by the increase in

foreign direct investment and .
spin-off opportunities for

@ Bank of The Bahamas

A rowing and dynamic Bahamian institution”







Bahamian start-ups, warning:

. “The large companies cannot

do it alone.”

Mr Simon, though, warned
that under-capitalised compa-
nies were likely to experience
increasing stress, becoming
ever-more reliant on cash flow
to cover payroll and operating
costs.

He related an “urgent and
dire situation” he had dealt
with recently involving a
Bahamian business that did

“not have the cash to meet the

payroll”.

He added that the company
had been in business for two
years, with all returns being
invested back ifto it.

“The business had tremen-
dous potential, but it was in a

bind. The business was heavily
leveraged, and in a position
where he had no choice but to
sell it,” Mr Simon said.

Financing

Bahamian businesses, he
added, would receive the
financing if they had a good
concept, business plan and
management, Mr Simon said.

He advised companies that ~

if they could, they should hire
an accountant to do the finan-

‘ cial books, as often “‘the finan-

cial are always not properly
done” when it came to assess-
ing business plans.

Another source of fiance
Mr Simon said, was investment
clubs. These clubs pooled the









GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.

Is seeking qualified and experienced applicants to join its
‘Title Search Department

Attractive salary and benefits to the successful applicant.
Please. address resume and cover letter to:

The Managing Partner
P.O. Box N-272

_ Nassau, Bahamas
Facsimile (242) 323-0012 or email
info @gtclaw.com

No Telephone calls will be accepted “

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
COLLECTIONS OFFICER - EXUMA BRANCH

Core responsibilities:

© Manage delinquent loan portfolio for the branch.

© Conduct credit risk assessments. :
_ Coordinate repossession activities.

) Make field calls as necessary. :

4 Conduct research and prepare report:

Liaise with attorneys on legal issues relative to delinquent

accounts.

¢

Knowledge. Skills and Abilities:

) Associates Deere in velevalt area. (e. g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance).

( Certificate in Credit and Collections

© Knowledge of laws governing contracts and properties.

4 Working knowledge of appraisals and land value

4 Excellent oral and written communications skills.

) Three years banking experience. _ a

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than September 22nd 2006

to:

__ The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International

P.O.Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas

x

resources of individual mem-
bers, and he himself was a
member in one. that had invest-
ed in real estate, small business
development and two restau-

rants at the Atlantis Marina

Village.
Mr Simon said he knew of

two women-only investment _

clubs that invested only in busi-
nesses run by women entre-
preneurs.



NOTICE is hereby given that JOCELYN JASON JEUDI, of
GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA, BAHAMAS is applying to ‘the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 5th day of September, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N- 7147,
Exuma, Bahamas. :



Notice









| The Government of The Bahamas is seeking Armored i!

Car Services to service some of its revenue collection

sites. Interested firms may collect bid specifications
from: ati



OFFSHORE BANK is logins for:

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitefield Centre
West Bay Street a Ms
‘P.O.Box N-3017 ss
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for submission of bids is:

October 6th, 2006.

Resident Banker

MBA degree or equivalent 15 years minimum experience in banking and trust business. -
Fluent in Spanish, read and written. Extensive knowledge of Argentine Financial and Tax
systems, as well as a detailed knowledge of banking laws and regulations in the Bahamas.
Experience of reporting to the Central bank, and capability in the areas of compliance and.
AML are prerequisities. Duties will include It supervision, Oe of RPG and OS

400; data base adminsitration, SQL 400 will be needed.

Pursant to Section 4(2) (i) of The. Financial Intelligence Unit Act, 2000s
hereby advise the public and financial institutions to be aware that there : are

Applicatings should be mailed to:

Offshore Bank
P.O.Box N4779

Nassau, NP



+

e S a
oF “if
=h



several fraudulent schemes being perpetrated via the Internet.

"Please note that it has come to our attention that persons have:had
their personal information, bank account details and or funds misappro-
priated from their bank accounts after providing their personal details/
information to person or Be unknown to them over the Internet.

i We hereby WARN the public not to disclose any con banking
information to unknown individuals and or entities especially in situations
where the person or entity makes the following representations:

I, Request to provide banking information in exchange fora
promise to share a proportion of an inheritance/monies currently

- being held within a dormant account, which has not been claimed
bythe next of kin as the ce who died tragically left ne heir;

ae Payment for s services, which: have not-been rendered, with a

promise that a portion of the money will be paid out upon -
submission of bank account information. we ae

3. Request for assistence in transferring to you a foreigner a | portion
of substantial sums of monies, as the claimants state that they can
-not keep the money as their respective laws forbid ownership of the

same.

4. Claims from unknown persons or entities alleging that your
name was selected in a lottery, for which you are aware your name
' was not submited. Stipulations are imposed, such as in order to
retrieve the prize a registration fee is payable and banking .
information is required.

In the event that you are in receipt of correspondence relating to any of the
aforementioned fraudulent schemes, we advise that extreme caution be

exercised.

Signed:

Mr. Anthony M. Johnson

DIRECTOR
Fincancial Intelligence Unit
3RD Floor
Norfolk House
Frederick Street
P.O.Box SB-50086
Nasssu, The Bahamas





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



ee
‘Metals prices head down with crude
oil, possible Iran breakthrough

NEW YORK (Dow

LEGAL NOTICE

hoe

- INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000

(No. 45 of 2000) .

ALU TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)

of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of
ALU TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed, a Certificated of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the.
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was 31st
day of August, 2006

p B. Foster oa
For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

“NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000



(No. 45 of 2000)

CHROME TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the Intemmstonal Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution —
(CHROME TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed, a Certificated of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was
: 31st day of August, 2006

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

ae LEGAL NOTICE

Jones/AP) — Lower pricéé for

crude oil and commodities in

general sent gold and other pre- |

cious metals sharply lower yes-
terday, with the moves acceler-
ating when chart-based selling
was triggered, analysts said.
Silver was especially hard hit
after that metal had outper-
formed gold at times over the
summer but has now fallen back
below a key uptrend line. A

couple of the contacts cited:

momentum-based selling of
metals after prices also fell late
last week, with funds said to be
among those liquidating long
positions.

‘December gold settled down
$20 at $597.30 a troy ounce on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

“The main factor has been
the recent weakness in the
crude-oil market,” said Dan
Vaught, futures analyst with
A.G. Edwards.

Currency-market activity
lately has also put some weight
on gold, said Vaught. Although
the euro was up slightly for the
day as of gold’s close, it had

nevertheless fallen from rough-

ly $1.2875 early last week to a
low Monday of $1.2650. Euro
weakness and dollar strength
tends to undermine metals such
as gold.

Vaught added, “I suspect the
precious metals also suffered to
some extent from reports this
weekend that Iran might have
said something about being will-
ing to suspend its nuclear pro-
gram for a couple of months.”

December silver settled down
$1.055 to $11.24 an ounce. The
contract fell as far as $11.20, its

_ lowest level since July 26.

Most-active December cop-
per settled down 15.05 cents:at
$3.4175 per pound. The contract
traded to.a low of $3.3850 per
pound — its lowest: level since
August 31.

Front-month September .cop-
per settled 14.40 cents lower at
$3.4340 per pound.

October platinum settled
down $28.90 to $1,200.60 an
ounce. October platinum tum-
bled as far as $1,186 overnight,
its weakest level since June.

December palladium settled
down $17.55 to $316.05 an

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NIDOCA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

; Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)~



LEGAL NOTICE

ounce. December palladium

bottomed at $313 overnight, but ©

held just above Friday’s rough-
ly six-week low of $312.50.
New York crude oil futures
fell to a five-month closing low
Monday, dipping below $65 a
barrel as Iran hinted it could
temporarily stop its nuclear pro-
gram and the Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries
agreed to hold oil output steady.
The front-month October
light, sweet crude contract
closed down 71 cents at $65.54 a
barrel, it’s lowest close since

March 28. The contract fell as’

low as $64.85 a barrel before
settling down 64 cents at $65.61
a barrel.

October unleaded gasoline

settled down 1.45 cents to’

$1.5946 a gallon. October heat-

ing oil settled down 3.78 cents at -

$1.8054 a gallon.

October natural gas settled
down 0.5 cents at $5.670 per
million British thermal units.

On the New York Board of
Trade, Arabica coffee futures
for December settled 2.40 cents
lower at $1.0375 a pound.

December cocoa settled
down $2 at $1,478 per metric
ton.

Futures on raw sugar in for-

eign ports for October settled
down 0.48 cent at 11.41 cents a
pound.

On the Chicago Board of
Trade, September corn settled
down 3 cents to $2.2875 per
bushel. September soybeans set-

tled down 5 cents at $5.32 per.

bushel.

December wheat settled
down 2.50 cents to $4.13 per
bushel.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
« (No.45 OF 2000)

SUNBURY INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of SUNBURY INVESTMENTS LIMITED has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck of the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was 30th day of August, 2006.

Ms. Alrena Moxey °
. Liquidator



"Leal Notice

8 NOTICE...
CYDNEY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000 .
‘(No. 45 of 2000)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
company is in dissolution, which commenced.en.
the 8th day of September 2006. The Liquidator 3": >
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, =

HILLFIELD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
Bahamas.

ORE TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in abootdance with Section138 (8)
of the Intemational Business Companies Act, No. he of 2000,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,

the Dissolution of
ORE TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed; a Certificated of Dissolution has Beet
issued-and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was
31st day of August, 2006

the Dissolution
‘HILLFIELD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed, a Certificated of Dissolution has been
-issued and the Company has. therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was
31st day of August, 2006

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

: a B, Foster
For; Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

Position Available:
Assistant Financial Controller

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator



| ‘Colin

_ Financial EEeR is Ltd.

Eligible Candidate must posses:




Alaina ean



Pricing Information As Of:
Monday, 11 September 200 6



° Bachelors of Business Administrative
Degree with main concentration in
Accounting.





Previous Close Today's Close
Abaco Markets ; : : A : 0.00
Bahamas Property Fund | : -50 > : 2 0.00
Bank of Bahamas i : ; 0.00°

Daily Vol.

Benchmark 7 : ; 0.00
Bahamas Waste ’ : 51° 0.00'
Fidelity Bank j : i : . 0.00
Cable Bahamas i 3 0.00
Colina Holdings ~ é 3 0.00
Commonwealth Bank . , : 0.13
Consolidated Water BDRs - : -0.20
Doctor's Hospital j 3 0.00
Famguard i : Fi 0.00
Finco 41. , 0.00
FirstCaribbean Z 5 7 0.06 .
Focol : i 0.00

+ Freeport Concrete a 3 b 0.00
ICD Utilities ; 65, : . 0.00
J. S. Johnson x 5 0.00
Kerzner International BDRs : 0.00 SUSPENDED
Premier Real Estate

Ato5 ee experience in the a
related field. . ..

Excellent oral, written and
organizational skills.

6 © ae wt

Must be team player.

Experience with supervising 10 or é
more people. |

Last Price Weekly Vol.

12.25 Bahamas Supe rkets 5s

10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) Excellent benefits and remuneration

ackage.

28.00 ABDAB P 8

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings a

Interested persons should submit resume to:

Last 12 Months Yield %

1.2508 Colina Money Market Fund 1.306371*
2.4403 © Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9513***
2.2560

Colina MS! Preferred Fund
i d

The Financial Controller
P.O.Box CB 13049
Nassau, Bahamas

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not E Meeninet

* 01 September 2006
- Trading volume of the prior week - 31 August 2006

** -31 August 2006





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 5B



Stocks post
modest ad

eee Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers | «=:

Union will represent 500 non-
: managerial workers at Sandals.

‘ance
as oil prices fall

FROM page 1B

sary step as it allows the union

- permission to actually repre- _
'. sent its members.

“So we are currently going
through that process,” he
explained.

-Mr Brown said that, while.

the union might choose to
cater specifically to all inclu-

dealing with all ‘ncluanve work-
ers. In the case of Sandals, par-
ticularly, he said employees

have fought long and hard for _

union representation.
“They are entitled to rea-
sonable returns on their

labour. It cannot be wrong for .

anyone to say to the workers of
Sandals that they. have not
struggled to get what they

wait

However, the hotel said it
had no comment on the mat-
ter. Mr Ferguson also put
Breezes employees on notice
that they are only “a few steps
down the road.” The Tribune
was unable to reach the other
all-inclusive resorts - Super-
Clubs Breezes or RIU - for

comment.

sive resorts, that distinction will -
.. not be used in the departmen-
"- ’s registration of the union.
._-... He explained that, rather
‘than looking at the. place of
employment, the Department
of Labour looks at the type of
_...work being done by the
~. ‘employer.
: “A waiter would be.a waiter.’
_ regardless of where he works,”
he explained.
_ At a press conference
recently, Mr Ferguson said that
this is the second time in the
country’s history that a union is

Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that STANDLEY ST. NATUS, of.
FAITH GARDEN, P. 0. CR 56991 is applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
-naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any .

person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts. within twenty-eight days from the
12th day of September, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Gitenship: P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. ;

COOK

A major Caribbean resort seeks to hire a qualified Cook

The Successful applicant will be responsible for preparing food items,
based on standardized recipes, for the Restaurant, Room Service,
‘Employee Cafeteria and Banquet, while maintaining the highest standards
to prouduce an appealing appetizing product. This successful canididate
is also responsible for ensuring the cleanliness, sanitation and safety in the
kitchen and work areas while minimizing waste and maximizing
cost/production ratio.

The successful candidate must have experience in culinary arts, a
high school diploma or equivalent and/or experience in a hotel or
related field preferred.

All interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume
with salary requirement to:

The Human Resources Manager, Box
c/o The Tribune, Nassau, Bahamas,

on or Before September 29, 2006

All resumes will be held in the strictest of confidence.



Lay WANTED }

Live in Nanny/Housekeeper
Family of Four including two children-one 2 years old
and one 6 months old
Must have background in child care
and managing household
Bahamians only need apply
Write: Housekeeper, P. O. Box 7000, Nassau








Sssisti nt to

SG Hambros, part of the SG Private Banking, is a private bank ans
providing a comprehensive wealth management service with ‘et.
offices in the UK, Guernsey, Jersey Gibraltar and The Bahamas. ; gees

$G Hambros is currently looking to recruit an Assistant to
Executive Management. Your main responsibilities will be to:

* @ at least 5-7 years’ experience in
the related field

@ the capacity to learn quickly and
‘in an independent manner

@ excellent written skills

@ excellent cornmunications |
skills (experience in making
presentations)

m advanced Excel skills including
formulae, with check boxes,
buttons, drill down etc

Wa keen sense of business
awareness.

® schedule meetings,
appointments arid travel
arrangements

®@ organize and maintain an
appropriate and accurate filing -
system

@ produce a variety of written
communication;

@ conduct research for special

B coordinate and follow-up on
actions and deadlines for
‘projects sponsored by
Executive Management

li attend meetings with
Executive Management with
the view to draft minutes and
action plan

@ perform-as requested ad hoc
analysis or research and
prepare synthesis to facilitate
decision making process by
_ Executive Management.

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package,

Applications should be submitted
to the following address, to arrive
on or before 15 September 2006

Managér, Human Resources
- SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

You should ideally have: PO Box N7789
Nassau

Ma Bachelor's Degree in Business Bahamas
Administration or the Certified
Professional Secretary

‘designate (CPS) www.sghambros.com

SG Hambros Bank & Trusl @ahamas} Limited is
licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Requiation Act.

isc
gah iccm steal dish

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP



: MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND
INVESTMENTS

. NOTICE
THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
"(CHAPTER 326)

it is hereby notified pursuant to Section Ssien of the Industries Encouragement -
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products should
be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purposes of that Act.

Marble, Granite, Limestone, Shellstone |
& Slates

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Five of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about fo consider whether the manufacturer
specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER” in relation to the ploducts oe in the
third column,

Prince Charles Drive _
New Providence
The Bahamas

Any interested person having any objection to these declarations should

give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of
the Ministry of Financial Services and Investments, before, 19" day of
September, 2006, by letter addressed to :-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY ats
THE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES & INVESTMENTS
P.O, Box N-7770
NASSAU, N. P.,
THE BAHAMAS

. SHEILA CAREY
PERMANENT SECRETARY



‘
eo

ne

’
ts

”

‘

e 4

’

S19PIAOld SMAN [EIAWWOD WO ajqeyleAy

PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





}U9}U04) payeoipuAs
[eHoyey oe

secgeedonsessdsisdoaveassveeseevasssecderedhasessendedovesescabeccssedeasbsavevccevaaneus aeons sccenecedseceneddbougdeseodseengoecaashdercaacbarnyyeadescadsedssesavetedcsistoncesesces:

one believing in you,’

Galilee College aunches preparatory
programme for student/athletes

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

GALILEE College has
spread its wings to include a
preparatory programme for
student/athletes who are look-
ing for another altexnative to
going to the United States or
Canada.

The nationally recognised

institution, which is registered

with the Ministry of Education,
approved by the Department
of Public Personnel and mem-
ber of both the Association of
Tertiary Institutions in the
Bahamas and the National
Christian Counselors Associa-
tion, has agreed to reach out
to student/athlétes who need
good, quality education.
According to its president,
Dr. Willis Johnson, although
they are a small institution,
they have had some powerful
results so. far and they know
that the programme will con-

‘tinue to grow with the inclu-

sion of the student/athletes.

His wife, Evette Johnson, the
executive director,
aim is no just to provide a
forum for the athletes to excel,
but to ensure that they are
properly equipped to enter the
international colleges and uni-
versities.

“We. are quite aware that
there are so many athletes who
have had dreams and had them
dashed because the opportuni-
ty to get a higher learning of
education did not present itself
because of some shortcoming
in your SAT results or some-
* she not-
ed.

By providing the student/ith-
letes with this opportunity,
Johnson said all of these short-
falls could bé abbreviated so
that they can excel when they

» step into the larger enViron-

ment overseas:
With a.large-arrangement of
classes, ranging from business,

accounting, banking, computer, °

said their’

' possible

@ REVEALING plans for Galilee College’s preparatory PO uranTnE are, from left to right: Mike
Sands, BAA A’s president; Yvette Johnson, Galilee’s director; Dr. Willis Johnson, Galilee’s pres-
ident; Harrison Petty, president of the Bahamas Scholarship F oundation for Student Athletes and
. Rupert Gardiner, Athletic Director at Galilee. ~

human resource management,
office administration and sports
management and law to travel
and tourism, she said the stu-
dent/athletes will be equipped
for the task ahead of them.
“We have also established
articulation agreement with
other colleges and universities
in the United States where
when we reach the stage that
we can no longer accommodate
you, you can go to the larger

‘schools and all of your credits
-. would be accepted,” she stated.

“We believe in miracles and
we know that they all begin at

Galilee. So whatever it- takes .

that is legal and moral, we will

do to cause ourstudents to gain

the dreams that they so eager-
ly desire. We are here to cause
the dreams to come though and
cause the impossible to become
and that’s called a mir-
acle.”
Galilee College has just
recently been accepted as the

first non- American school to.

be accepted as member of the

National Christian College,

Athletic Association.

Newly appointed Athletic
Director Rupert Gardiner said
his aim in joining the staff at

5-dloor Suzuki Swift 1.5-litre fuel injected engine

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24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY:



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were welcomed, into the





NCCAA, which is a part of fies:
NCAA.

“A lot of athletes, when hes
hear about Christian schools,
they don’t want to go,” he
reflécted. “We are hooked up
in so many bad things that we

tian schools.

schools that we can be a part of
because they have over 300
schools involved and they par-
ticipate in ‘a number of sports
including basketball and track
and field and they guarantee
_us that we will be a part of their .
nationals and we can get into
meets like the Penn Relays.”
Gardiner said: the
studeni/athletes have made the

Galilee College was to make
sure that the student/athletes
have another avenue to pre-
pare themselves for college.
“We decided to put together
this prep college so that the
athletes can comé here, know
what it’s like to come to col-
lege, get your credits and when
you leave here, you could be
better ‘equipped when you go

to college,”

he insisted:

. “IT talked to a lot of athletes
who are here, who want to be a
part of this programme and we
have athletes who will be com-

/ing down from the Turks &

Cacaos to be a part of this pro-
gramme. I know we have ath-

_ letes who will do well here.”

Last week at the regional
necting, Gardiner said they

right choice in choosing Galilee. -
College to get their collegiate.
preparation.

Harrison Petty, the. president
of the Bahamas Scholarship
Foundation for Student Ath-
letes, commended Galilee Col-

lege for providing such an-(-"

*

don’t want to go to these Chris . '

“But these are very nice |

affordable preparatory college’.
experience for our student/ath-,

letes.

Basketball camp ‘wil he hack next year

ia BASKETBALL



OVER the summer holiday, Xavier’s Lower
School athletic director Nelson ‘Mandelia “Joseph
hosted a basketball camp for students in grades 2-
6.
It is the second time that Joseph has put on the

camp. He ‘indicated that it was held to provide
those students with an GEOL MALLY to learn the
game.

“When [ was growing up in Eleuthera, [really
didn’t have anyone to assist me with my game,”
said Joseph, who has represented the Bahamas on
the national team as a shooting guard.

“About three or four of us got. together and
went jogging and basically worked on our game

ourselves. { just thought that I would take the.

time out every year to help young’kids prepare

“themselves and that is by tearning the basic fun-
* damentals of the game.’
Assisting Joseph was Bahamas men’s national.

team eéach Charles ‘Chuck’ Mackey, who noted

Mackey has pledged to assist J oseph in the
future with the camp.

One of the parents, Philip Davis, whose son is
trying oui for Xavier s icam, invited Sam Mitcheli
to also assist the camp.

Mitchell, the head coach of the NBA’s Toion-

‘to Raptors basketball teani, spoke with the

campers, encouraging them to “always listen
attentively to what your coach teaches you and to
keep on dreaming.”

Mitchell also: told the campers that although
there are only 400'players that currently play-in
the NBA, “you can be in that number as he was
with the Indiana Pacers and then later with the
Minnesota ° ‘Yimber wolves, assinne Kevin Gar-
nett.”

Mitchell joined Gerald Wilkins, who visited
the camp earlier, in advising the powers that be
that if a gymnasiuni was built on the school
campus, it wouid improve the skill level of the
players.

In closing. Mitchell said he enjoyed himself so
much that he intends to be back again next year

that he was very excited about the opportunity of |
. being a part of the camp. :

to assist the Capers: sey



makes debut for



Park University

â„¢@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ROMONA Nicholls made
her debut for Park University
on Saturday when she com-
peted in the Central Missouri
State cross country race.

The Jordan Prince William
graduate, who earned an ath-
letic scholarship through the

-assistance ‘of the Bahamas

Scholarship Foundation for
Student Athletes, was 59th
out of 135 competitors.



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
f neighbourhoods. Perhaps
| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TR NORA 1h LOR NEVE ETH OIE BRE TY TALS

4

She clocked 16 minutes and :

36.28 seconds in the women’s
2.5 mile race. '

The winning time was
14:01.71 by Kristin
Anderson, who competed
unattached.

Nicholls was one of nine
athletes the BSFSA have
assisted in getiing into col-
lege in August. Two more
athletes are heading oft in
January.

Already gone with Nicholis
are Leneice Rolle and Dean-

‘dra Rolle, both at Missouri
‘State University; Lacquito

Thompson at Missouri Val-
ley College: Jamal Moss at
Hinds Community College
and Keneisha Miller, La’Sean
Pickstock, Rashad Dean and
Lavardo Sands, all at Dick-
inson State.

In January, BSFSA presi-
dent Harrison Petty said they
will be sending off Jameson
Strachan and Jamai Forbes
to-join the list of Bahamians
at Dickinson State.

For the past 6-7 years, Pet-
ty said he along with Donna
Nicholls and Grafton Ifill fH
have been trying to secure

scholarships for deserving

Bahamian athletes.

This year, he said they have
sent off nine athletes and are
looking forward to the next
two going in January. He said
they are also appealing to stu-
dent/athletes who wish to
secure a scholarship next year
to submit their entry to the

BAAA’s office at the Colony
Club.

Strachan said i s working
to secure some more funding,
but he’s also doing his off-
season training so that when
he goes to Dickinson State

“and I have to compete, my ,

ivack season won't be a done, -*-

tall as it was last year.
“Y’m hoping to go there and
run my personal best im the
#400 and come back and tep-
resent my country to the, best
of my ability.”

Forbes said he is also Work- :

ing as he tries to train for tie
upcoming season, nobiny ‘iat
he wants to be ready to just
step into Lhe programme and °
compete next year. ;

Petty said while there aie
scholarships available fos the
student/athietes, he advised
them to get a start some-
where such as Galilee Col-
lege before they transfer to
. the US colleges and universi-
ties. j

Additionally, the BSFSA
donated a total of $5,000/in
an educational improvement
grant to the Road Runners
Track and Field Club.

“That’s the club that we
find to be exceptional,” Petty
revealed.

In accepting the grant,
Roadrunners head coach
Dexter Bodie said they are
preparing now to meet with
their student/athletes and par-
“ents to decide how they will
distribute the grant.

)

~



TRIBUNE SPORTS |



FIFA wants Fidane and
_ Materazzi to make peace

—— a



_—S>-_

SE

Copyrighted Material
RoddickSyndicated Content spots in
Available from Gomumartial News | uy Sig
CHES LUp LU,

= Jia apuva vie



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 7B.



Wty ate

6 be



SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

|
onag
: +5
i “76
3 ahs
. ; Pan
+ r

Vixens win
Opener in
four sets

i VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON |
Junior Sports Reporter

IT WAS back to business as
usual on Sunday evening for the
Scottsdale Vixens women’s vol-
leyball club.

The defending champions in the

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006



New Providence Volleyball Asso- -

ciation (NPVA) proved to the Da
Basement’s women that their title
win last year was no fluke.

Vixens took the NPVA wom-
en’s seasons opener over the Da
Basement in four sets, 25-18, 26-28,
25-23 and 25-20.

The team never looked back in
the first set, after jumping to an
early. lead off of service aces by
veteran Jackie Conyers.

Conyers, served the ball deep
into left corner of the Da Base-
ment court to go up 9-5.

The strong hits by Krystel Rolle
and Tamasiane Poitier helped
keep the service of Conyers alive.

Rolle and Poitier, were towers
when put up against the Da Base-
ment front court hitters. But the

. Da Basement would get Melinda

Bastian involved in the offence.

Setting Bastian on strong side
proved affective and she ripped
one past Rolle and Poitier for the
break.

“Tt was all mental errors for the
team,” said Vixens’ head coach
Joseph Smith. --

“Even though we are the |.

defending champions there are still

some things we need to work out.”
This team hasn’t played together.

since the championship game last
year, that is a. long lay-off.

“But judging by the perfor-
mance I don’t think that there is to
much we have to work on. There
will be some minor things as we
try to plug in some offence, but
not too much we need to be con-
cerned about.”

Bastian and Edricka McPhee
were just two of the additions to
the Da Basement team that made
a huge difference in the second
set.

The younger more athletic play-
ers added to the firing squad,
including Maragert Albury,
Natasha Armbrister.

Vixens’ offence and defence
started to crumble when the Da

Basement team joined their firing -

power.

It was the combo. of Albury,
Bastian and McPhee that tied up
things, forcing Smith to return to a
starting line-up.

“Dropping the second set was
due to simple mental errors,” said
Smith, who described the opening
game, especially the second set, as
a “try-out” match for his club.

a

“You can’t judge a team just |

because they lost the second set,

‘the team made a lot: of mental

errors and it cost them.

. “The team we played they will
hit the ball on you hard at times, so
you have to be prepared to play

defence: I always preach defence -

to the team..In the second set they

got to lazy, instead of playing for
the hard hits they were in for the

soft taps.
“Keep in mind that the team
will give you some soft taps, but

they have added. a few players «|

who can really attack the
ball.”

According to Smith, the team’s
performance should not be judged
based on their level of play on Sun-

, day, and the chemistry will come

together by the season’s half:.
Play action will continue today
with the Lady Technicians taking

on the First Caribbean Bank Dig- | '

gers.



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS







a BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

WHO can forget sitting in sold’

out gyms to witness the fierce
match-ups between rivals the
Kentucky Colonels and the Becks
Cougars?

Phil Smith tapendary Basketball Classic '

Just the mention of the names
of these two basketball clubs
brings a smile on the faces of for-
mer players, and some of the
country’s fanatics as they remi-

nisce on the great games played.

Now, that match-up will take
place again in the 1st annual Phil
Smith Legendary Basketball Clas-
sic.

Smith, the voice behind sports
in the Bahamas for many years,

Knowles and Nestor set to
compete for Masters Cup



Syndicated Content





‘TENNIS |
By BRENT STUBBS
Sehior Sports Reporter



‘ title next month..

Kevin Ullyett.
four titles this year.

ment in Delray Beach, Florida.

THEY didn’t win any of the Grand Slam titles this
year, but Mark Knowles and his Canadian partner
Daniel Nestor will have a chance to compete for a major

The duo will go in as the jauuiber four seeds at the
Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai in Shanghai, China from
November 12-19 at the Qi Zhong Stadium.

They will play behind the top seeded team of Amer-
ican twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan; No.2 Jonas
Bjorkman and Max Mirnyi and No.3 Paul Hanley and

Now in their 12th year as a team, Knowles and Nestor
have compiled a 36-14 record and have won.a total of

After their disappointment at the Australian Open to
begin the year, they won their first title at a tourna- -




Available from Commercial News Providers

# MARK KNOWLES and Daniel Nestor (AP FILE Photo)

Rome.

ify so early.”

finale.

They made the final in Marseilles and Dubai before

they clinched their first ATP Masters Series in Indian
Wells and then they followed that with back-to-back
victories in Barcelona and at the ATP Masters Series in

“It is very exciting to be back at the Tennis Masters’
Cup,” said Nestor. “This is a title that has eluded us the
' past few years so it has definitely been a focus of ours.
We've had a great year and it’s ‘great to be able to qual-

Knowles was unavailable for comments.
Knowles and Nestor, who advanced to the Tennis
Masters Cup semifinals in 2003 and 2004, will be making
' their fourth consecutive team appearance in the circuit

They currently hold a 101-point lead over their near-

~ est rivals in the Stanford ATP Doubles Race, the No. 5
team of Fabrice Santoro and Nenad Zimonijic.

In their last tournament at the US Open, which they

won in 2002, Knowles and Nestor lost in the third round.

They were the No.3 seeded team.



—_—

‘



























will be honoured ‘for his contri-
butions to the discipline of bas-
ketball in a Cougars-Colonels bat-

tle. The tournament is also a~

token of appreciation by players
and sports fans to Smith for his
contribution to the development
of sports in the-country.

The annual classic,’ which. will
assist with Smith’s medical fund-
ing will be held on Saturday Octo-
ber 28th at the Sir Kendal Isaacs

“gymnasium. The basketball game
is just one of the main events

being featured in the week of |

activities.

Members of both the Kentucky

Colonels and the Becks Cougars,
thought it only fitting to honour
Smith, who is.said to be one of

the country’ s'top players in ne

1960’s-70’s.

Persons like Fred ‘Papa’ Smith,
Eddie Ford, Peter ‘Superstar’
Gilcud, Halson- Moultrie, and
Peter Brown, who played in one
of the ball clubs, voiced their grat-
itude and support to Smith, who
has been one of the leading names
in the Bahamas, yesterday at a
press conference.

According to Moultrie, who has
been a part of both the Colonels
and the Cougars, “Smith should
be viewed as an icon, who has
made significant contributions to
the development of basketball and
sports in the country.”

As Moultrie reflected on the:
intense training both clubs under- -
went in order to excel, he noted ~

that the success in the club
brought a growth in their players.

He added: “It was difficult for
persons to come from the Family
Islands to play in teams like these,
but I was one who was able to
benefit from both clubs.

“T am pleased to know that such

a high level of basketball existed.

in. the country, and to know that I
was a part of it.

“You can always tell when the
Cougars were going to play the
Colonels. You can see both teams

-working out harder than, before,

wanting to have bragging rights.

“There was a level of commit-
ment by the players, something
you don’t see very often these
days. That kind of rivalry and par-
ticipation has been lost in the

‘Bahamas, so hopefully by the end

of the tournament, those in the
gym.can learn from the guys who
played in the past.”

Before the classic’s feature
match tip-off, persons such as
Bucky Nesbitt, John Martin, Den-
zel ‘Inch’ Swain and Charles ‘Soft-
ly’ Rubins will take on the team of
Dercky ‘DJ’ Johnson, Pat McKen-
zie, Gordon Musgove and Sharon
Storr in a friendly game.



ai



Full Text


I STORM

Volume: 102 No.243







Pm fovir’ it. |

S7F |
15 |



The Tribune







ls financial sector
Be OB
on new markets?
yaaa bee (a aii Ltt

The Bahamas was
_ ‘extremely fast to
‘recover’ after attacks

a By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

».*.°. THE September 11 attacks

~ have proven the resilience of
the Bahamas’ tourism indus-
tiy. , Soya

» Looking back on the attacks.
on New York City’s World.

Trade Centre, which claimed
_ the lives of 2,749 victims,

seniordirector of .communi-..

cations with the Ministry of
Tourism Basil Smith said that
“for years now people have
said that the Bahamas is too

dependent on tourism, that we.

should branch out, but (Sep-

_-.-témber 11) showed that our ©

‘tourism industry .is: more
resilient than ever predicted.”

In an interview with The
. Tribune yesterday, Mr Smith
*+recalled that five years ago the

* Bahamas’ tourism industry —

was in danger of being com-
pletely wiped out.

With all flights out of the
United: States grounded and

thousands of tourists having
cancelled their vacations, cir-
cumstances for the Bahamas
were dire, he said. .

Mr Smith said it is hardly

possible to understand today -

what kind of acute uncertain-
ty existed for the country’s

_ tourism industry following the

worst terrorism act on US soil.

However, he said, the
Bahamas was extremely fast
to recover.

“It took us maybe three
months to, recover. And most
important of all we were able
to retain our pre-clearance

- privileges,” Mr Smith said.

Nevertheless, he said, the
September 11 attacks have:
forever changed the experi-
ence of travel.

When asked if the country’ s
tourism industry could survive
another major terrorism
attack on the US, Mr Smith
said that we can “only hope
that nothing like this ever hap-
pens again.”

- Tree is planted to
commemorate attacks

& By ALISON LOWE

ON THE fifth anniversary of September 11, 2001, a young
poinciana tree ‘has been planted to commemorate the attacks — and
symbolise the "depth and endurance of the values" underpinning
the relationship between the US and the Bahamas. :

US ambassador John Rood, Prime Minister Perry Christie and

_ Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell were among a group in attendance _

at. the ambassador's residence to commemorate the tragedy —

SEE page 11

























Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006







PRICE — 75¢



@ A TREE planting ceremony was held at the US Ambassailor’ s residence yesterday, for the fifth anniversary of the attacks of Sep-
tember 11, 2001 and to honour the memory of the victims of those attacks. Shown from left: Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Ser-

vice Fred Mitchell, Prime Minister Perry Christie, US Ambassador John Rood au Governor Genera Arthur Hanna.
(Onan Bridgewater! Tribune staff)

Concerns raised
over construction
work on
Paradise Island

§ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PARADISE Island home-
owners are raising concerns
that construction work on
the island is negatively
impacting the environment

‘and killing marine life.

Residents on the island are
claiming that styrofoam used
at the construction site of
Atlantis’ new 600-room all
suite hotel is not being
secured properly and has
been seen floating along Par-
adise Island’s shoreline and
washing up on the beaches.

Speaking with The Tri-

SEE page nine

i

Raising consciousness of ‘Cuban Five’
‘should not be seen as anti-American’

@ By ALISON LOWE

IN THE light of the com-
memoration of the anniversary

of the September 11th attacks in

New York the relevance of
working to raise public aware-
ness of the need for the release
of the "Cuban.Five" in Miami is
more profound, according to
two founding members of the
group "Bahamian Friends of the
Cuban Five".

They added that, in agitating
to raise consciousness of the
case of the five men — known
as "heroes" in their native Cuba
— Bahamians should not be
suspected, or accused of being
anti-American.

These were statements made
in an interview with The Tri-

bune on Friday. Alexander |

Morley — co-chair of the group
— and Felix Bethel, political
science lecturer at the College

Protects While at

‘of the Bahamas, Said they were

concerned about some percep-
tions that had been surfacing in
New Providence indicating that
the group's interest in the
release of the five may be a cov-
er — and publicity tool — for
simple anti-Americanism.

The men believe it would be
timely and useful to consider
the issue of the Cuban Five in
the context of the 9/11 com-
memorations that took place
yesterday. -

"The climate is that there i isa
war on terrorism — we have to
define what this means for us,”
said co-chair Mr Morley.

"What is this war all about,
who are they looking for — we
have to define that for our-
selves, and within this issue, that
of the five Cuban nationals
imprisoned in the US who had

SEE page 12

ere

Police not ruling

out any possibility
in death of son of
Anna Nicole Smith

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE confirm that they
ate not ruling out any possi-
bility in the recent unex-
plained death of 20-year-old
Daniel Smith, son of former
1993 Playboy Playmate of the
Year Anna Nicole Smith.

Ms Smith, who was regis-
tered and checked in at Doc-
tors Hospital under a false
name had delivered her baby
girl on Thursday by a last-
minute caesarean. Her son,
Daniel, reportedly had just
arrived in the country on Sat-.
urday and visited with his

SEE page nine.



Available in a variety of flavours a

Central /

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Ross Carner: A

Store,

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Distributed by Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, 394-1759 ; os


_ audience was “more concerned



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

Bahamians need to hear more
from PM on Freeport affairs

RIME Minister Perry

Christie has at last tried to
say something reassuring about the
state of affairs in the nation’s second
city after a dramatic upheaval
months ago. But it was a spur of the
moment statement that was obvi-
ously not well-considered.

In Freeport for a groundbreak-
ing ceremony, the Prime Minister
apparently discovered what the
whole Bahamas has known now for
months.

According to a report in The Tri-
bune, Mr Christie could see that his

about corporate governance and
possible conflicts in the administra-
tion of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority”.

“As Prime Minister,” said the
Prime Minister, “it gives me an
opportunity to tell you that you
must not forget I am Prime Minister
of The Bahamas ...” Okay!

The Prime Minister continued:

. that I have the responsibility of
ensuring consistent governance in
the context of what offends public
policy, and that my government will
not hesitate to ensure that all' acts
are taken consistent with that man-
date to ensure that what we do in |
our country is consistent with good
corporate governance and does not
offend public policy.”

His audience certainly had not
forgotten that Mr Christie is Prime
Minister. They may have been won-
dering whether after four and a half
years that fact has fully dawned on him,
or whether he had forgotten and was
just reminding himself that he does
indeed occupy the highest executive
position in the land.

And they must have resisted a strong
urge to laugh out loud when he talked
about not hesitating, et cetera, et cetera.

hen those three qualified
\ Bahamians at the top of the -

‘Grand Bahama Port Authority were

suddenly cut down, it was clearthat the -
corporate purge had nothing to do with
personalities nor qualifications, nor with
bei







there had been over-staffing at that lev-
el it must have been only by one since

.two of the three were immediately

replaced.
It was more fundamental than that. It
was obvious that it had to do with the

July:
“There can be no doubt that the late

np top-heavy as.was later suggest,.....

The Bahamians were qualified, and if’ “Bahamas' Gover



direction and governance of the nation’s
second city after the death of Edward St
George, one of the principal share-
holders in the Port.

The appointment of expatriate ‘

licenseé Hannes Babak to succeed for-
mer Central Bank Governor Julian

Francis as chairman only encouraged.
_ that suspicion. This point and a few

more were made a this column back in

Edward St George, with all his foibles,
had a vision for Freeport and was keen-
ly aware of the lasting contribution it

can make to the overall progress and:
development of the-whole country. :
sibility-of-The—:
t to make sure —

“It is the resp





that, while the shareholders are able to

“make money, the short- and long-term

interests of the Bahamian people are

not sacrificed together with Mr. St.
George’s vision. .
’ “There is a balance to be eee here .



His audience certainly had not
forgotten that Mr Christie is Prime
Minister. They may have been.
wondering whether after four and a
half years that fact has fully dawned

on him,

‘





| TE old’ s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

_ SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: ee 1731 OR 322-3875

Port Authority.



Mr Christie and his colleagues ina
matter of months will have to face the
Bahamian people again in a general |
election. This should help them to
focus their minds so they can deal
effectively with at least one serious
matter before they face the judgment

of the electorate.



and it could very well be that this is at
the heart of the struggle at the Port -
_ Authority.”

ll of this should have been

crystal clear to Mr Christie
from the outset. The public, espe-
cially the residents of Freeport and
Grand Bahama, would have been
relieved to hear at that stage that the
government was not hesitating to pro-
tect good corporate governance and
public policy in the Port.

- But they heard nothing like that
even when there was an.outcry from
people the government has no rea-
son to mistrust. What the public did
hear.were disturbing comments from
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe,

who happens to represent Bimini and
the West End district of Grand Bahama.
According to Mr Wilchcombe, it had-

~ nothing to do with the government since

the Port Authority was a private com-
pany owned by shareholders, and no-

. one could tell them whom to hire and

whom to fire and how to run their busi-
ness: He only hoped that they would
have a plan that would be good for the
country!

- Mr Wilchcombe also volunteered that
when challenged he had a problem com- :
ing up with the name of.a single.

Bahamian living in Grand Bahama who

was qualified to sit on the board of the




soe

This is a ‘minister,inathe same gov-
ernment that prattles: t Bahamian--
isation and raids the homes of poor
legal immigrant workers in the dark of
night in an effort.to trick the Bahamian
people into believing that they have
their interests at heart.

Never mind that these are jobs that
Bahamians do not want in the first
place. But when it comes to Bahami-

ans who are eminently qualified for top

positions being replaced by expatriates,
they are simply not interested. °

Since Mr Wilchcombe uttered those
foolish words he has been repeatedly
reminded that the Port Authority is a
special creature with special arrange-
ments with the government of The.

' Bahamas and with special powers over

a large sector of the Bahamian society.

So who runs the Authority and what
their philosophy is must be of immedi-
ate concern to the Government of The _
Bahamas..

Furthermore, the aovetumient has a
responsibility not only to chase down
poor immigrant workers. but to. make

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE




sure that Bahamians who qualify for »

high-end jobs are being fairly treated

even by other entities which do not have
the. same power and influence over
Bahamian affairs.

‘he Bahamas needs. qualified
expatriates in many fields to
help develop the country, but it is irri-
tating to Bahamians that there are some
who need not be. here but who are
allowed to stay year after year and to
engage in pursuits for which they have
no permission, simply because they
know how to ingratiate themselves with
the right people.

Mr Christie and his colleagues in a
matter of months will have to face the
Bahamian people again in a general
election. This should help them to focus
their minds so they can deal effectively
with at least one serious matter before
they face the judgment of the electorate.

But despite Mr Christie’s words, it is
not likely that this government will take
the bull by the horns and do something
to secure the interests of the Bahamian
people in Freeport.

The Prime Minister can make all the
pronouncements he likes about good
corporate governance and public policy,
but talk alone will not accomplish any-
thing.

Nobody is going to say that the Prime
Minister wants this so that is what

~should be done. He has to act. The
shareholders — including those who have

inherited from Mr St George — can be
counted on to fight tooth and nail over
what they perceive to be their awn
interests. Ve .

he Bahamian people have a

right to expect their. govern-
ment to protect their rights in Freeport.
They need to hear something more
definitive from the Prime Minister than
the comments he made when he dis’
covered that a particular audience was
less interested ina groundbreaking cer-
emony and more concerned about “cor-
porate governance and possible con-
flicts in the administration of the Grand

.Bahama Port Authority”.

They need to hear what he and his
government are doing about it.

‘ sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www.bahamapundit.typepad.com



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for.a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.









THE TRIBUNE



$250,000
of marijuana
seized in
operation

FREEPORT - Bahamian and

US Drug authorities thwarted
a major drug smuggling opera-
tion between Abaco and Grand
Bahama - seizing 48 bales of
marijuana with an estimated
street value of $250,000.

Superintendent of Police

Basil Rahming reported that
around 2,500 pounds of: mari-
juana were confiscated and
flown to New Providence on
Thursday of last week.

“No one was arrested in con-
nection with the seizure.

According to police reports,
sometime around 11pm on

Thursday officials received |

information that a drug smug- |

gling operation was underway
in waters between Abaco and
Grand ‘Bahama, involving a go-
fast vessel alleged to be trans-
porting a large quantity of dan-
gerous drugs.

“. Agents from the Bahamas
Drug Enforcement Unit, US
Drug Enforcement Agency,
OPBAT and US Customs and
Border Control proceeded to
the area.

‘A high-endurance tracking

aircraft spotted the vessel,
which had
mechanical difficulties and was
headed back towards Sandy
Point, Abaco.

Supt Rahming said a heli-
copter was dispatched to the
location, where . officers
retrieved 46 bales of marijuana

éncountered.

from the beach. He said the two .

speedboats that were in the area
when the helicopter arrived fled
heading north.

After transporting the drugs
to New Providence, officers

returned: to the Sandy Point”

area on Friday where they -

retrieved two additional mari-.'

juana bales from bushes near
the beach.

Mr Rahming said efforts are
underway to identify and appre-
hend persons involved in the
smuggling operation.

Abaco duo
to perform
at British.
Colonial

AN Abaco singer who calls
himself. “the most:versatile
entertainer in the Bahamas” is
appearing at the British Coio-

nial-Hilton for the next two

weeks.

Stone McEwan and Thunder
- bass player Wesley Cornish, a
fellow Abaconian - claim to
produc€ as much sound as five
or Six musicians.

And their unique musical 1 mix

certainly enjoyed a warm recep-
tion when they got their Nas-
sau posting off to a good start
over the weekend at the hotel’s
Palm Court lounge.

“The last time I was at the
BC was 2001,” said Stone, who
is usually to be seen performing
at Snappers in Marsh Harbour.
“It’s good to be back.”

Stone and Wesley can be
seen and heard on Wednesday,
Thursday and Sunday from 8pm
to midnight and Friday and Sat-
urday from apm to lam.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 822-2157


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 3





New posts in

-effect at

College of
the Bahamas

SEVERAL new top-level
appointments at the College of
the Bahamas came into effect
yesterday.

The new management struc-
ture, which includes a redefini-
tion of the goals of each posi-
tion, has been designed to guide
the college to university status.

“We are committed to high
standards of teaching, scholar-
ship and research and aim to
prepare students to participate
fully in the social, cultural, polit-
ical, economic and spiritual life
of their communities,” said col-
lege president Janyne Hodder
in a speech last month.

The revised positions and
goals for the next year are:

e President’s Office - Janyne
Hodder

Support governance by offer-
ing high-quality, evidence-based
policy options, oversee college-
to-university planning, develop
institutional benchmarks and
indicators on matters key to uni-
versity status and reputation,
lead and support senior col-
_ leagues, build a development
office and increase alumni sup-
port and engagement, define
and adopt best practices in uni-
versity information technology
and build institutional capaci-
ty, engage the community, build
support for the college.

e Executive Vice President

‘of Academic Affairs — Dr

Rhonda Chipman-Johnson
Ensure that students have
access to the courses they need,
analyse the rate of graduation
and time to completion, estab-
lish goals appropriate to uni-
versity status, develop quality

-assurance policy options, focus

on outcomes rather than input,
plan and support faculty recruit-
ment and development, stabilise

_ existing programmes and iden-

’ tify innovations that will serve

national needs. ‘

° Vice president of research,
graduate programmes and inter-
national relations - Dr Linda
Davis ©

Ensure that students have
access to the courses they need,
analyse the rate of graduation

and time to completion, estab-

lish goals appropriate to uni-
versity status, develop quality
assurance policy options, focus
on outcomes rather-than input,

plan and support faculty recruit-

ment and development, stabilise
existing programmes and iden-
tify innovations that will serve
national needs.

e Vice president of outreach —
“Dr Pandora Johnson -

Review continuing education
and propose organisation of ser-
vices by clientele, expand fami-
ly island programming and
develop a distance education
plan, contribute to meeting
national education challenges,
expand community partnerships
using a variety of models includ-
ing new institutes, build part-

“nerships with government agen-

cies; employer and employee
groups, civil society and others,
market the college as ‘the
place’ to go to develop made-to-
measure solutions to national
training needs at the college lev-
el.

_ Vice president of Student

” Affairs — Colyn Major

Expand current student life
programmes, build new resi-
dence and create a full resident
life programme, build athletics,
expand student aid with the help
of the president’s office, recruit
registrar, resolve system issues
with training and support of MIS,

compete successfully with N A —

universities for excellent stu-
dents, work with VP of research
and international reJations to cre-

. ate student exchanges.

Vice president of finance and
administration —- Denton Brown

Establish best in class finan-
cial management practices and
complete all outstanding audits,
create purchasing office to sup-
port good financial manage-
ment of resources, oversee the
performance of for-profit oper-
ations, plan and complete con-
struction projects in the north-
-ern Bahamas — including the
‘library and cafeteria, create a
master plan for Gladstone Road
residence, build client-centered
culture of service across port-
folio and maximise training
opportunities.

Vice president of human
. Tesources and communications
— Patricia Glinton-Meicholas

Develop and implement a
communications plan in support

~. of the 2006-2007 goals, re-struc-

ture human resources with a
focus on the ‘client’, adopt a
comprehensive professional
development and training plan,
ensure respect of collective
agreements.

mia. oe a
o In brief’ | Adelaide and Yellow Elder

students go back to school

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

AFTER a week was added
to their summer break, due to

unfinished repairs, Adelaide.

Primary and Yellow Elder Pri-
mary School students returned
to their classrooms yesterday

i as most work was completed

over the weekend.

Both schools officially
opened yesterday to full hous-
es and students and teachers

were excited to get back to

school, administrators report-
ed.

Besides minor repairs still to
be finished “School is going
great!” David Dean, principal

- of Adelaide Primary, said yes-

terday after making his rounds.

Following a week of missing
school, some parents were con-
cerned that the students’ cur-
riculum would be adversely
affected but, according to Mr
Dean, the teachers are pre-
pared to tackle the challenges
ahead.

Mrs Catherine McPhee,
principal of Yellow Elder, said
‘her teachers were at school all
last week getting classrooms
ready for the start yesterday
while Mr Dean said his teach-
ers are working diligently to
make up the week of lost work.

Mrs McPhee, who was work-

ing out of a temporary admin-
istration facility as the present

-one is still being worked on,

said she is happy with the

repairs so far. Following the.

school’s structural makeover,
the principal hoped the Min-
istry of Education would main-
tain it.

Mr Dean said if he had to”

give the school a grade to
repairs done, it would be a ‘B’
‘because there are still minor
repairs that need to be fin-
ished, he explained.

While Mrs McPhee said it

“would not be fair for her to

grade something that is not fin-
ished, she expects to be able





Black Village residents

still living in fear in —
_ build-up to funeral of
‘murdered gang member

PEOPLE in Black Village
are still living “in panic and
fear” during the countdown to
Saturday’s funeral of mur-
dered gang member Hosea
Lightbourne, 23 — said to be a
founder of the Bain Town
Gundogs.

Despite extra police mobile
and foot patrols in the area,
residents believe there could
be reprisals for Lightbourne’s
death ten days ago. He was
shot several times while walk-
ing a few yards from his home
in Rupert Dean Lane.

Yesterday, Black Village
residents said they felt unsafe
in the run-up to Lightbourne’s
funeral, when police are
expected to lay on massive
security round the church.

“Yes, it’s true to say we are
living in panic and fear,” said
one source. “Officers are going
from door to door offering
reassurance, but that doesn’t
stop people being afraid.”

Lightbourne is thought to
have been killed as a reprisal
for an earlier shooting inci-
dent. Now residents fear a tit-
for-tat battle between youths
from Bain Town and Black
Village.

Since Lightbourne’s death
there have been three sepa-
rate shooting incidents in
Black eee All involved

random gunfire near people’s
homes, but no-one was hurt.

People. in Black. Village
claim certain residents have
already been pinpointed as
possible targets. And a Bain
Town resident stated on tele-
vision last’ week that there
should be “a life for a life.”

A source said: “We have
had officers from the urban
renewal programme walking
through parts of Bain Town
and Black Village trying to
dampen down the situation.

“There is no doubt the police
are going to be out in force for
the funeral service. There will
be very tight security.

_ “Threats are still being
made and certain people are
being mentioned as possible
targets. There are wild boys
out there who we have heard
about through what you might
call intelligence. We are all
hoping things will calm down
after the funeral.”

Last week, the Rev CB
Moss, whose church is in Bain
Town, said no-one in his com-
munity was seeking revenge

_ for the killing of Mr Light-

bourne. He called for calm and
said people should renounce
violence.

A man has been arrested
and charged in connection
with the Hee killing.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays



yp

to give thé school an “A’ after
repairs are completed.

CR Walker Senior High also
reopened yesterday after being
closed for repairs on Wednes-
day. Students reported that the
school was much cleaner.

Adelaide and Yellow Elder
Primary Schools are expected
to continue without further hin-
drance. Meanwhile, work will
continue on both schools during
the afternoons and on the week-
ends.

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Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender Specification from the
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Drive, between the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday.

Packages could also be collected from the security’s desk BTC - Settlers Way,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Friday, September 15th, 2006.
Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER FOR MOTOR
INSURANCE” and should be delivered to the attention of the “Acting
President and CEO, Mr. Leon, Williams.”

In Grand Bahama, packages could also be dropped off at the security located
at Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

' EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE (=) ce).

THE TRIBUNE _





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI





Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

_ Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
‘Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 Sic
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398 :
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608





MANY Spanish Wells residents are
upset that a decision by the Ministry of
Education has been smothered in racial
overtones and directed against them.

Apparently, on a recent radio talk show
it was stated that children from the set-
tlement of Blackwood on North Eleuther-
a’s mainland were no longer welcome at
the Spanish Wells. All-Age School. As'a
result they: were to be sent to the public
school at the Bluff. One school is a ferry
ride away, the other is only a short bus
drive down the road from Blackwood.

Where the racial innuendo comes in is
that the children not only happen to be
black, but they are also Haitian. The Span-
ish Wells school is perceived to be a “white
school.”

It was also claimed that Education Min- -

ister Alfred Sears made the statement that
it was against government policy to ferry
children across the water to school. This
statement, if true, suggested that no chil-
dren from ‘Blackwood, as from the opening
of this school year, could now attend the
Spanish. Wells school — because the only
way to get to that school would be across
the water and by ferry.

The suggestion here was that black chil-
dren were being ostracised by the white’



parents of Spanish Wells.”

Nothing could be further from the truth,

said Spanish Wells’ Chief. Councillor Abn-
er Pinder.
Mr Pinder said he heard the rumour

about 10 days ago when he got a. phone -

call from a local taxi driver known as “Fine
' Thread.” The cab driver had been told
that it was Mr Pinder who had been the
instigator in having the Blackwood chil-

dren transferred from-Spanish Wells to —

the school at the Bluff. Mr Pinder said
that that was the first time he had heard
the suggestion.

The rumour implied that all Blackwood

children had been removed from the

school. This, said Mr Pinder, is not true.
It is true that the primary students, the

five and six year olds, have been sent to

the mainland school, which is a bus ride.
-‘away from their homes. However, the high

school students from Blackwood are still
being ferried to Spanish Wells. And the

Haitian students from Russell Island are °

still crossing the bridge to go to school in
Spanish Wells..



Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Racist school move is denied



Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham
said that it was FNM policy that primary
school children should not be transported
to school by ferry. It was not true to say —
if in fact Minister Sears did say it — that
no students were to go by ferry to school.
Mr Ingraham pointed out that as general
policy governments do not even like bus-.
ing small children, and that is why the
building of neighbourhood schools is
encouraged. Therefore, the rule that chil-
dren should not be transported to school
across the water, applied ‘only to the pri-
mary grades.

Obviously, even this rule was being bro:
ken in the case of the Blackwood children



















as, until the last school term, they arrived.

at Spanish Wells by boat. They are now

remaining on the mainland, and going to |

school in the Bluff, This decision, said Mr
Pinder, was made by the Ministry of Edu-
cation and had nothing to do with him.

The truth of the matter is, said Mr Pin-
der, that the Spanish Wells government
school, which can accommodate about 250
students from primary grades through to
the twelfth grade, is overcrowded.

“We now have more students than the ©

school can hold,” he said. “We need at
$t:three to four more classrooms.”

eWe didi’ t stop them coming,” said Mr
Pinder. “The Ministry of Education



_ Stopped. them. And it is true that the rule

is that primary students are not to be fer-
ried across the water, but high school stu-

dents can, and still are being ferried to |

our school.”
Mr Pinder said he was totally against
this. decision being made a racial issue.

“Ninety-nine per cent of Bahamians know

that I am not racial,” he said.

The whole country should know by now »

that Mr Pinder is not a racist. After all it
was he, who, on learning of Immigration’s

night raid. in Spanish Wells that resulted in ~

the removal of a large number of Haitian
residents to the Detention Centre in Nas-
sau, followed them there. Not only did he

_ insist on Immigration releasing them, but

he put them up in a hotel overnight and
returned them to their Eleuthera homes
the next day.

He went so far as threatening to sue

‘government for the arrest without cause.of

Haitians who were legal residents of-his-

community.





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Concern

over transfer

of students

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE ARE pleading for assis-
tance from the media to raise
various extremely important
concerns in regards to a vexing

‘situation we are now facing at

The North Eleuthera Primary
School in. The Bluff,
Eleuthera. The Ministry of
Education and Bahamas Gov-

ernment has made a décision: ,

to transfer approximately 55;
60 Haitian primary students
from the Blackwood commu-
nity to our school .beginning
next Monday.. »

These students previously
attended the Spanish Wells
All Age School, as the major-
ity of their parents have work
permits allowing them to work
there. Listed below are sever-

_ al reasons why this will nega-

tively impact our school and
the education of our children,

1) Firstly, the North
Eleuthera Primary School is
already very, very full. The

average size class being 30 stu-

dents, some even higher at 35.
However, the Spanish Wells
All Age School, including
these Haitians students, has
an average class size of 20-25,
except in grade one. So why
send these students to a school
that is already overcrowded.
We would protest this deci-
sion even if this move involved
Chinese, American, even
Bahamian students. The
school ground in Bluff is so
very tiny there is no space for
the present population to
move around and play at
lunch,.much less adding 55

“mote todtiif the: government:

wants tosend these children to
our school, then they must
build more classrooms, bath-
rooms and add infrastructure
and teachers for these stu-
dents first, then send the stu-

‘dents.
2) In addition, the Heoale

of Spanish Wells want to
employ these Haitian nation-

als and apply for work per-

mits for them, therefore, their
high rate of child birth and its
overburdening results must
also be theirs to deal with. If

- they don’t want the kids, don’t

get permits for parents.

3) Thirdly, we want to know
why it is that the parents of
the North Eleuthera Primary

that the Ministry of Education
and the government have
completely disregarded our
feelings on the matter. This




.were not consulted. It appears. '

Dae M US

letters@tribunemedia.net



decision seems to have been
covered up until the last
minute which was last week
in the hopes that we parents
would just let it slide, no way!

4) In addition there are only
two functional toilets at the
NEPS for the girls and two for
the boys. Please tell me how
such poor infrastructure could

accommodate another 55 stu- °

dents.

5) Fifthly, the School in
Bluff has one janitress for our
already 220 students. What a
shame that the entire last
school year, local government
and, central government per-
mitted this gross injustice! No
other janitress has been hired
since the second janitress
retired in 2005. Why is this?
The school in Spanish Wells
has three janitresses for a
smaller school population.

6) Another shameful mat-
ter is the shabby condition of
the North Eleuthera Primary
School. A bathroom door was
off the hinges since January,
2006. That’s right, no door on
the bathroom that students
must use every day. Many
classroom doors are falling off
and destroyed. The school has
not been painted for the past
six years, it looks disgraceful.
Again, why are we being
neglected like this? Major

‘repairs have been done at

most of the schools on this

' island in the past several years,

except NEPS. :

7) North Eleuthera Primary
School is the largest primary
school on this island, serving
the settlements of Current,
Lower Bogue, Bluff and
Upper Bogue. When all these

schools were combined about

seven years ago, we were

promised many things by the |

then Director of Education..
But many of these things have
not happened. For example,

we were promised computer

for the students and spe-
cialised teachers for Art,
Music and the sort, none of
this came 'to reality.

From what we understand,
they want to send us some
trailers to house some of these
students. No, no, no! You
mean leave the classrooms in
Spanish Wells. to have 12 stu-
dents to put them in trailers
at NEPS! This is ridiculous!
Is this a political move? We
all know that the people of
Spanish Wells never wanted
these kids in their school, but
they must deal with the prob-
lem they helped to create, not
shove it onto us.

We will demonstrate and
protest and do whatever it
takes to step this!

PARENTS OF NEPS
Eleuthera,
one 31, 2006.

N egativism used in

a constructive way

EDITOR, The Tribune.

\

YOU need the negative.as well as the positive in this life.
Take for an example, a car battery. If the negative cable is
slack, no matter how charged the battery, the starter will not
get the current necessary to turn the engine.

Negativism used in a constructive way, can help you get
your ‘engine’ started (each day). Then you can shift into for-
ward géar, and move on ahead. Yes! You are going some-

place.
Do you know where to?

How do you know when you are nearing the peak of your
‘maturity?
Whenever you honestly feel happy for another’s achieve-
ment, rather than feel uncontrolled — envious.
Whenever you can accept criticism in a quiet, impartial,

humble way.:

Accept the fact that you are guilty, if found to be so. Don’t
waste time seeking to be even (pride). It is vain. We pass this

way only once. Move on.

Negativism because of jealously? Shrug it! Shun it. There is
a way seemeth right unto a man, but the end of that way. is

death.

Negative vibes created asa result of some action/inaction :

on your behalf?

Study it. Correct it. Be thankful for it. Be not afraid to
chastise your friend. Iron sharpens iron. Strive to be a better »
person today. Strive to be healthier person. Take care of your

body.

TOMMY THOMPSON
Crooked Island,
August 24, 2006. ’

‘QUALITY INSIDE
AND OUT








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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 5



SAE] | mL PTT | PE PE
Ils for
an audience on Abaco



Police
retrieve
‘firearm
from yard

FREEPORT - A loaded
firearm was taken off the
streets by police after an
Eight MileRock resident dis-
covered it on Friday.

Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming reported that officers
at the EMR Police Station
received an anonymous call
on Thursday from someone
who reported finding a .32
revolver along with 10 live
rounds of .32 ammunition in
a yard. The firearm was
handed over to Officers at the
Central Detective Unit.

Mr Rahming commended}

the caller for his effort and
encouraged other persons to
make the community safer
by doing likewise.

Florence
churns
past
Bermuda

@ BERMUDA
Hamiiton

HURRICANE Florence
blew out windows, peeled
away the roofs of at least three
houses and knocked out pow-
er to thousands in Bermuda
on Monday, according to
Associated Press.

The lashing winds and sea
water surge that threatened
the islands were reducing in
intensity by late afternoon.

As the hurricane continued

-. .to.chug past Bermuda, it was |
causing dangerous surf and_:

strong rip currents along the
entire eastern seaboard of the
United States and the Cana-
~. dian Maritimes, and various
islands in the Bahamas.

eae LAWN Soa

TUESDAY,

'SEPTEMBER 12!

‘| 6:00 Community page

.411:00 Immediate Response (Live) |

.7+fnoon — ZNS News Update
“| Immediate Response (Cont'd)
Island Life Destinations
* N-Contrast
Bullwinkle & His Friends
The Fun Farm
Durone Hepburn
Ernest Leonard-The Word
Dennis The Menace
Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
The Envy Life
Andiamo
Tourism Today
' News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
In His Own Words:
Hon. Arthur.D. Hanna
Island Lifestyles
Remembering The Contract
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 icekoiclal(=m tg =a

Paella to make Et real aon ic yan
(programme. tate, :



is being





Hi BUSINESSMAN Doug Evans has called for both Prime Minister Perry Christie (left) and Opposition leader Hubert Ingraham
(right) to come to Abaco to sort out the island’s problems

TOP government and oppo-
sition politicians should go to
Abaco and hear first-hand the
complaints which have led to
talk of secession, it was claimed
last night.

Businessman Doug Evans

said he would like to invite

Prime Minister Perry Christie
and Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham to Abaco to thrash
out the island’s problems.

As he spoke, yet more power
cuts were plaguing the island.
affecting residents and tourists
as summer temperatures
soared. He said Abaco’s poor
returns from its contributions
to the national treasury were
no longer acceptable.

“We have grown to the point

where we have outstripped the
infrastructure. Central govern-
ment must catch up with the
growth, otherwise the growth is
going to flatten out,” he said.

British TV station film documentary
about Harry Oakes murder case

“T would like to invite Mr
Christie and Mr Ingraham to sit
down with a group of Abaco-
nians so that we can talk about
what Abaco needs.”

Although talk of a possible
secession movement is not con-
sidered serious at this stage, Mr
Evans is among those who feel
a groundswell of opinion is
moving in that direction.

He said, however, it was more
a reflection of Abaconians’
growing frustration than a dec-
laration of intent.

“J want this talk of secession
to be something that is going to
move Abaco forward. I would
like the prime minister and Mr
Ingraham to address that rather
than us having just more talk
and promises.”

Apart from BEC’s deficiencies,

Abaconians are concerned about
road maintenance, the state of
the island dump and, most specif-

ically, the security and safety
issues at Marsh Harbour airport.

There have been announce-
ments four times since 2002 that

the airport is going to be

improved.

Mr Evans said: “I hope it
doesn’t take loss of life for
something to be done. The air-
port has serious security and
safety issues that need to be
dealt with.”

He said American property
owners on Abaco had raised a

petition and sent it to US .

ambassador John Rood alerting
him to the airport’s problems.
This, in turn, had led toa FAA
report.which, he said, had never
been made public. “T would like
to see a copy of that FAA report.
It led to someone coming down
here and signing a contract.

“T would like to know before ©

I let my family fly on a plane.
The runway is in a terrible con-

dition. Planes are still back-taxi-
ing which, in itself, is inefficient
and dangerous.”

Yesterday, Abaco was abuzz
with secession talk after The
Tribune’s INSIGHT article
‘Rumblings of Rebellion” hit
the island.

Another businessman, Mr
Dale Hill, said response to the

article had been largely posi- °

tive, though he felt talk of seces-
sion was at this stage more a

‘means of prompting govern-



ment action.
“It is a matter of getting what
we deserve. Everyone is agteed
that something must be done. I
have not heard any nggative
comments about the article. We
do expect more than we are get-
ting from central government.
“It’s like running a company.

“You just can’t keep taking money

away and putting it elsewhere.
You need to put something back.”

A BRITISH film unit has been in :

Nassau over the last few days prepar-
ing a TV documentary about the Sir
Harry Oakes murder-mystery.

An hour-long programme will be
broadcast by the UK’s Channel Four
during November.

Those interviewed for the docu-
mentary included lawyer Mr Paul
Adderley, whose father A F Adder-
ley was part of the prosecution team
in the trial of Count Alfred de
Marigny, the only man formally

_accused of the murder. Count de

Marigny was acquitted and then
deported after the trial in 1943.
Also interviewed was Mr Peter
Christie, nephew of the late Sir
Harold Christie, who remains the
chief suspect in spite of friends’ insis-

tence that he was “too timid” to be
involved. Sir Harold at one point
became so exasperated: by accusa-
tions levelled against ‘him that he

threatened legal action over the

“inferential calumny” surrounding
him.

Bahamian historian Dr Gail Saun-
ders was also interviewed for back-
ground information about wartime
Nassau.

And journalist John Magenuis:

* managing editor of The Tribune, out-

lined his own views of the case, as
described in his book, Blood and
Fire, which was published last Christ-
mas.

Mr Marquis explained in an inter-
view with director Matthew Wort-

man why he thought the Duke of

Windsor, then Governor of the
Bahamas, was involved in a cover-up
after the killing.

The programme will be.part of a _
series on the Royal family commis- .

sioned by Channel Four for peak
autumn, viewing. It is expected to be
watche: ‘by millions.

Sir Harry Oakes, a Canadian mul-
ti-millionaire who settled in Nassau
during the 1930s, was murdered at
his seafront home, Westbourne, on’
the night of July 7-8, 1943.

It was such a major story at the
time that it knocked the war itself
off front pages around the world.

Criminologists have’ since
described the case as the greatest
murder mystery of the twentieth cen-

tury.

JOHN Marquis

secession
talks are
‘not about
race’ says
campaigner

TALK of secession on Abaco
is nothing to do with race or pol-
itics, it was stressed yesterday.

“This is for the benefit of all
Abaconians,” said businessman
Doug Evans.

A Radio Abaco debate last
week rekindled bitter racial
feelings that were evident
around the time of indepen-
dence in 1973.

After local campaigner Mrs
Yvonne Key - a white Bahami-
an — appeared on the pro-
gramme, callers began claiming
the secession talk was racially
inspired.

However, Mr Evans and fel-
low businessman Mr Dale Hill
stressed that race and politics
had nothing to do with it.

The issues being raised were
for the benefit of all Abaconi-

“ans, they said.

Mr Evans added: “This is not
a black and white matter. This is
an Abaconian issue. People
need to realise that this is our

~ money being spent and we want

more of it to stay here.”
Mr Hill said: “This is not

- racial. It is not political. It is

that we are asking for more
money back. They need to
realise that more needs to come
back here.”

When Abaco “rebels” sought
to distance themselves from the
Bahamas independence move-
ment 33 years ago, and opted
to remain a British Crown
colony, some blacks claimed it
was a means of prolonging
white rule on the island.

The secessionist cause fizzled
out when it became clear there
was no support for it from the
British parliament.







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wishes to inform our valued customers and the general public
that BTC has implemented a new billing system. Therefore,
the public is advised that all accounts in arrears thirty-one days
or more will be liable for disconnection effective September
30th, 2006.

BTC encourages customers to keep their accounts current,
_ payments on all accounts can be made at any BTC CTO location,
via BTC’s website www.btcbahamas.com , and at all of the
following bank branches: Bank of The Bahamas, Royal Bank,
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sas EPS

ass ae See
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



lll ae eee
Sentencing of Cordell -

Consulate for
Bahamas opened |
in Georgia, US

THE opening of a Bahami-
an consulate in Atlanta, Geor-
gia is a reflection of the close
ties between the two commu-
nities, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell said.

Mr Mitchell said he is sure
the new Honorary Consul
Micheal Munroe Young will
represent the Bahamas well.

“I take this opportunity to
underline the close, fraternal
relations which the Bahamas
has with the United States and
in particular with the Atlanta
community,” he said.

Mr Mitchell noted that there

is a steady exchange of persons ,

between the two communities,

with Atlanta Braves legend.

Hank Aaron ‘and his wife Billie
being among the regular visi-
tors to the Bahamas.

“This has been long in com-

PROSPECTUS

ing,” Mr Mitchell said. “It seems
though like only yesterday as I
returned to this side of the
world after a 15-hour journey
from South Africa to Atlanta
for a dinner meeting with (for-
mer Bahamian Ambassador to
the US Andrew Young) at his
home. It was a wonderful gath-
ering. That was in 2003.

“It was at that time that
Ambassador Young first moot-
ed the idea of an honorary con-
sul for the Bahamas in Atlanta
and he introduced me to Mike
‘Young, a Bahamian by descent
and his beautiful wife.”

He said the ambassador
explained that Mr Young would
be an excellent choice for the
post.

Mr Mitchell continued:

“We are a small country and
so from the point of view of

resources, it is always pleasing
that our sons and daughters
abroad are willing to help hold
up the flag overseas. Mike, hav-
ing served for so many years in
Atlanta in Delta Airlines khows
the business community well
here and is well connected in
this community and in this state.

“His responsibilities will
include not just holding up the
flag but being a general point
of interface between the
Bahamas and this community
at an official level, fielding ques-
tions and complaints, the prob-
lems of students, and those who
serve in prison and generally
keeping us abreast of how the
mutual interests of the Bahamas
and this community can be
enhanced. I have no doubt that
he will be successful,” Mr
Mitchell said.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

eS REGISTERED STOCK 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025 AND 2026
ISSUE OF B$100,000, 000.00

Issued Sade The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of

ASsemoly, 21st June, 2006.

Applications will be received = The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 11th September, 2006
and will close at 3:00pm on 20th September, 2006. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m..on 21st September,

2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 22nd September, 2006.

- If the total subseriotions exceed the sum of B$100,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible afier allotment. No interest will be

Farrington adjourned ..

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE sentencing hearing of convicted mur-
derer Cordell Farrington was adjourned to
Monday after his attorney informed the court
that she needed a few more days to prepare a
defence.

Yesterday, Farrington’s ; lawyer Romona Far-
quharson noted that although the prosecution
had indicated that it would be seeking the death
penalty against Farrington, she had not yet
received a formal notice of this.

She also informed the court that she only
received submissions from the prosecution on
September 5 and needed a few more days to
prepare a response.

Prosecutors noted that they were ready to
proceed with their submissions yesterday.

Acting Chief Justice Anita Allen said that a
social report was still outstanding. The judge
adjourned the hearing to September 18.

Farrington was convicted nearly a month
ago of the murder of 22-year-old Jamal Robins.
He was charged with the murder in Grand
Bahama in October 2003. .

He is also charged with the murders af four
Grand Bahama boys. No court date has yet

een set for that trial.
}, During the month-long trial into Robins’
murder, jurors heard testimony from more than
i30 witnesses, including two psychiatrists. Far-
rington also gave an unsworn statement from
the prisoner’s dock.

After the verdict was delivered, prosecutors
indicated that they would be seeking the death
penalty.

In March of this year the Privy Council in
London ruled that the mandatory death penal-
ty in the Bahamas is unconstitutional and that



@ CORDELL Farrington

the appropriate sentence should be left to the

‘ discretion of the trial judge.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025 AND 2026

The Registrar
c/o The Central Bank of The Batiatinad
P. O. Box N-4868

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No
ALLOTMENT No.

DATE:__

Stoo

a
+
?

Nassau, Bahamas

The date of this Prospectus is 11th September, 2006 Si

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$100,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity ‘dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2021 and the latest in 2026. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue

; price are given below :-

paid on amounts so refunded.



I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:. -

Insert below the amount applied for

Issue in Units of B5100
Rate Of Interest ae son

; , t “
5/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2021 —_10,000,000.00 400.00 eee meee poe arid ee ee ee ae ee
3/16% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2022. 10,000,000.00 100.00 ee oh Wee Rama Bikames Recistared Stobk at BS.
7/132% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2023 20,000,000.00 100.00 aa, 9 Alc Baia Rite Bakuinad Recitercl Stock 2004 Be
1/4% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2024 15,000,000.00 100.00 aise ie iano Re Saha res Re cictcted Sf 3088 Be
9/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2025 20,000,000.00 100.00 ae a ihe eke ee Batatics Regained Stack-2036 se
5/16% Above Prime Rate ~ 25,000,000.00. 100.00 oe oe aa

Bahamas Registered Stock 2026
‘ 100,000,000.00

4 t -
and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us. : se



The Stock shall be repaid on 2nd September, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

in payment for the Stock applied for:

INTEREST I/We enclose B$

The Stock will bear interest from 22nd September, 2006, at the rate shown.against the name of the Stock as
the percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by
" the Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is'fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 22nd March, 2007 and thereafter on 22nd September and 22nd March in every year until

In the event of the full'amount of Stock(s) applied for above is/are not allotted to
me/us, V/we request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the following Stock:



the Stock ierepag: ek : : ' % . Bahamas Registered Stock BS

‘ ‘\% Bahamas Registered Stock : BS
p t \ % Bahamas Registered Stock BS

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND sa. Balisias Besitcied sleek BS
ee k % ° Bahamas Registered Stock BS

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged.upon and payable out of the % ae al cee ae

Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of'The Bahamas. . :
: SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS



I RAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS.
The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas). BANKS PRAEGS SHOULD Be MEADE PAYABLE TO THE CENT f
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 amon Lith
September, 2006 and will close at 3:00 pm ‘on 20th September, 2006. Allocations will
commence at 9:30 a.m: on 21st September, 2006 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 22nd d
September, 2006. All envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled “Application.
For Bahamas Government Registered Stocks”.

Issue of Stock

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature‘ Bat) \



Name in Full , (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.)

Units The Stock will be'in units of B$100.00.

Applications Applications n must be for B$100. 00 ora multiple of that sum.



Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices, in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (gslbers ugh Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the i
following banks: i ’ P.O. Box : sat

Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )



’ Bank of The Bahamas International
First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited :
Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
Commonwealth Bank Limited
. Royal Bank Of Canada
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally peed American Bank( 1993) ;
Limited) : ‘2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should

8. Citibank, N.A. be given below.)



‘Telephone Nos.(H) __- (W)

SP Ne

'

PUBLIC DEBT Ordinary Signatures



Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at June 30, 2006 show the Public Debt of The

« Bahamas to be BS2,823,456,000.* Names in Full



GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE







f : And/OR
The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
; : Address ae
FY2004/2005p** FY2005/2006p** FY2006/2007p**
BS BS BS :
Approved Budget Approved Budget Telephone Nos.(H). (W) see %
1,039,376,000 1,132,774,000 1,338,971,000

Revenue
. I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding





Repayment of Public Debt) 1,053,095,000 1,145,691 ,000 " 1,269,560,000
; \ : Bank Name
Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances Bank Branch
to public corporations) - 90,374,000 132,901,000 162,356,000

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts. : ,Account Number :

* — The Pubtic Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent lability svhich as at June
30, 2005 totalled B$505,687,000.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 7









‘to primary
school

PARTNERS of the commer-
cial law firm Higgs and John-
son, last week made a donation
to underprivileged children at
a local primary school

The firm said that the dona-
tion deepened a commitment
to education that has led the
firm to donate thousands of dol-
Jars to outstanding teachers
over the past ten years, as a cor-
porate sponsor of the national
H&J Excellence in Teaching
Award.

This most recent donation
included reading books, dictio-
naries and other school supplies
for the 42 pupils of Claridge Pri-
mary School, who currently rely
on the school’s. student assis-
tance programme.

The firm also made a cash
contribution to the school that
provided the children with the
individual Mathematics and
Comprehension workbooks
that would give them the oppor-
tunity to practise new skills and
improve their grasp of relev ant
subject material.

“Nature offers the perfect
illustration-of.how a small
investment, of water and sun-
light can transform a simple
seed into a resplendent flower,”
Said H&J partner John K F
, Delaney. * ‘Our goal is to invest
in these students by providing
*the instruments necessary to
‘help them to develop into pro-
ductive members of society and,
later, to transform society with
‘their ideas, attitudes and

-' achievements.”
School principal Angela Rus-
, sell said the donation was one
, that would have a significant
‘impact. “Some deserving stu-
dents will now have the tools:
-‘, «to excel in their lessons,” she
“+ ssaid: “We are indeed thankful
"for such a gracious donation.”
' H & J began its association
‘with Claridge Primary this past

- April following the presenta-

- tion of its annual cash award to
the Teacher of the Year — third-
grade Claridge teacher Tamika
Cartwright.

e 2 € eC Te

oe a ee

LOCAL NEWS:

Machine to test for HIV/AIDS



donated to Ministry of Health

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

THE treatment. of
HIV/AIDS in the Bahamas
received a significant boost
yesterday when a machine
that will enable doctors to
diagnose patients was offi-
cially presented to the Min-
istry of Health yesterday.

Sponsored by the Lyford
Cay and Clinton Founda-
tions, the CD4 Count
Machine or the Beckman
Coulter Epic XL will save
local medical officials both
time and money as diagnostic
testing can now be done
locally.’

Dr Perry Gomez, Director
of National HIV/AIDS Pro-
gramme described the gift as a
“dream come true.”

“With this equipment now
in Nassau, we will no longer
have to courier-blood samples
ona weekly basis to a labora-
tory in Canada to assess white
blood cell count which tells
us the level to which a patien-
t’s immune system has been
corapromised and thus, what
the correct treatment ‘is. We

. will be able to diagnose and

determine the best method of
treatment right here in Nas-
sau,” Dr Gomez said in.a

press release.



Hi DR Ismae Whyms, acti

New equipment will make diagnosis possible
without sending samples to Canada

For 15 years blood samples
were sent to Canada for test-
ing, now, results can be ready
in two days or jess as opposed
to the two weeks it took. to
get to and from Canada.

“It’s a little machine, but
it’s going to do big things in
our country,” Health Minis-
ter Dr Bernard Nottage said.

Young people are the prin-
cipal victims of this virus. This
robs us of their productivity,
so everything that we can do
to prevent, care for and treat
this disease is important, he
said.

“We want to proyide the
greatest degree of cate that
we can. And I can say this to
you without the fear of con-
tradiction — this machine will.
allow us to do so.’ To improve
the quality of care that we can
give and to improve the qual-
ity of our lives.

This disease that used to be
a deadly disease and used to .
be difficult to control is begin-
ning to yield to science and
commitment and dedication



g lab director at Princess Miar-

garet Hospital’s HIV reference lab, explaining to members of

_ the press about their new CD4 machine

by a lot of people, he said.

Mr Manuel Cutillas, Chair-
man of Lyford Cay Foundation,
said foundation members were
happy to assist the government
of the Bahamas.

“We too have joined the fight

“against AIDS. It is our respon-

sibility to do our part'in ensur-
ing that we are winning this

fight and with an estimated
7,000 Bahamians infected with
HIV/AIDS this is a fight we
cannot afford to lose.”

The CD4 machine is an
important addition to the HIV
AIDS laboratory that will

_ “keep the Bahamas in the fore-
. front in the fight against ATDS,”
Mr Cutillas said. —

YOUR CONNECTIO

PUBLIC NOTICE

GSM UPGRADE

Dr Ismae Whyms, Acting lab
director, explained that CD4
are cells in the body that are
responsible for fighting infec-
tion and protects the body from
foreign particles like the flu and
cold.

The machine will be in HIV
Reference Lab until a “state-
of-the-art” laboratory and
resource centre, now under con-

struction, is finished.

“This lab will be the first of its
kind (in the Bahamas) when it’s
completed to handle truly dan-
gerous infectious viruses,” Dr.
Gomez said.

[TO THE WORLD

|| In its continuing effort to improve its telecommunications |

|| services, The Bahamas Telecommunication Company Ltd.

|| (BTC) wishes to inform the public and its valued customers 1]
| that we will be performing an equipment upgrade on .

1 September 7th, 2006 and concluding September 22nd. As a

| results, some subscribers may experience 2 brief dis ruption I
|| in GSM Cellular Services.. |

BTC apologizes for the inconvenience causec

I aid: assures

| the public that every effort will be made to. me this
|} disruption of GSM Cellular Service to a minimum.




OLN (an) Survivor: |Survivor: Palau “The Best and Survivor: Palau “Jellyfish 'n Chips” |Survivor: Palau “Sumo at Sea” 0
alau © (CC) {Worst Reward Ever’ © (CC) A (CC) CC)
h

PAGE 8 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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eoni, Paz Nee A housekeeper works for a chef and his neurotic wife. jlian Morris. A lying game has deadly consequences for
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licolas Cage, Sam Rockwell. A con man bonds with Stiller, Dustin Hoffman. Future in-laws clash in Florida. ‘PG-13' (CC)
his daughter and plans a swindle. ‘PG-13' (CC)

fer te IN | MISS CONGENIALITY 2: ARMED AND FABULOUS (2005) Sandra| * & x ASSAULT ON PRECINCT
2 ani Bullock. FBI agent Gracie Hart clashes with her superiors when she 43 (2005, Action) Ethan Hawke,



ies CRY |Costas NOW 1 (CC)




jumps in to save two kidnapped friends in Las Vegas. ‘PG-13' Laurence Fishburne. 1 'R’ (CC)

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tion) Sanaa Lathan. Antarctic explorers encounter Courteney Cox. A psychopath stalks the teens of a sleepy California town.
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LOCAL NEWS

Concerns raised 0

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 9





construction work

FROM page one

bune yesterday, an eyewit-
ness - who resides and
works on Paradise Island —
said that over the weekend
styrofoam washed up and
covered the beaches close
to Atlantis, all along the
shore to the old Club Med
property, and almost to the
lighthouse.

One witness said he saw
dead fish washed up on the
beach.

Upon examining the fish
more closely, the eyewit-
ness said, styrofoam could
be found in their gills.

“So maybe that’s what
they died of,” another wit-
ness speculated.

Homeowners, who have

found the dead, washed-up
fish, have reportedly
thrown them back into the

water to prevent the smell

of the rotting fish from
spreading.

The eyewitnesses also
said that this weekend was
not the first time they had
seen this kind of styrofoam
floating in the waters off
Paradise Island.

“This has been happen-
ing for months now, you
constantly see styrofoam
floating in the water,” a
witness said.

Environmentally con-
cerned residents of Par-
adise Island are now ask-
ing Atlantis to: secure their
building materials better in
future.

When contacted by The
Tribune yesterday, vice-
president of Kerzner Inter-
national with responsibility
for public relations Ed
Fields said that he had:no
information regarding



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
‘good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have wonan ,
award.

If so, call us on 322. 1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

these claims and would
have to look into the mat-
ter.

Up until press time last
night, The Tribune
received no further
response from Mr Fields.















i RESIDENTS on the island are claiming that styrofoam used
at the construction site of Atlantis’ new 600-room all suite hotel is
not being secured properly and has been seen floating along Par-
adise Island’s shoreline and washing up on the beaches.

(Photo: Felipé Major Tribune staff)

- Police not ruling

out any possibility
in death of son of
‘Anna Nicole Smith |



FROM page one

mother that afternoon at the
hospital where. he eventually
stayed overnight.

However, on Sunday morn-
ing he was found dead, sitting
“upright” in a chair in his
mother’s hospital room. It is
believed that the baby girl was
not in the room, but in anoth-
er section of the hospital.

According to Reginald Fer- .
superintendent of

guson,
police, there were no physical
signs of trauma anywhere on
Daniel’s body, and there was
no sign of a struggle anywhere
in the room. Daniel’s body is
currently being held at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
where an autopsy is being per-
formed to find a cause of
death:

In the meantime, however,
speculation of a probable
cause of death has been over-
whelming, with a number of
persons alluding to the prob-
ability of a drug overdose.

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However, Mr Ferguson said
that while they can not rule
out any possibility at this time,

it would be premature of them!

to lend too much focus to one

.. avenue before they had at

least a preliminary report
from the pathologist.

“It would not. be wise for
the police to try and come toa
conclusion before we have a
proper investigation,” Mr Fer-
guson said.

“So for that reason we are
trying to investigate the mat-
ter, and part and parcel of the
investigation is the role that
the pathologist has to
play.

“While we cannot deter-
mine from what.we see on the
body at this time —— while we

can not come to any conclu- .

sion, that is not conclusive in
the absence of the pathologist
report. And so we have gol to
wait for the pathologist to
assist in determining what
might be the cause of death,”
he said.




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AWARENESS MONTH - SEPTEMBER 2006


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Join The Tribune Atel
The College of The Bahamas’
Partnership for Literacy in



Featuring: Ian Strachan & Patti Glinton-Meicholas
Hear the featured authors share their lifelong
appreciation of reading and the role it has
played in shaping their lives.

Chapter One Bookstore
The College of The Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard
Friday 15th of September 2006 6.30pm




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College of The Bahamasam
i About The Tribune's Newspaper
in Education Literacy Programme .

The Tribune's Newspaper in Education Literacy Programme
eee is an initiative to increase awareness of the need and impor-

tance of literacy, and the role it plays in developing construc- |

tive citizens.
3's A component of this programme is story serialisation.
We publish stories which are educational, interesting and
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Sa a
Bahamas presents

Canadian with award:

THE Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism presented a Canadian
travel industry professional with
the William H Baxter Lifetime
Achievement Award at a cere-
mony in Toronto.

John D McKenna, one of the
key architects in the establish-
ment and growth of the travel
insurance industry in Canada,
has been recognised for his con-
tributions to the Canadian
tourism industry by being

‘named the second recipient of

this prestigious award.
Established by the Bahamas

Ministry of Tourism in recog-

nition of the late William ‘Bill’

Baxter’s contributions to the |

tourism industry in Canada, the
award ceremony was held
before an audience of top Cana-
dian and Bahamian travel and
tourism professionals and
media.

Vernice Walkine, director
general of Tourism, was on
hand to present the award to
Mr McKenna along with Edith

Baxter, editor-in-chief of Baxter .

Publications.
“Mr McKenna’s contribu-

tions to the Canadian travel

industry certainly make him a

most worthy first recipient of .

the William H Baxter Lifetime
Achievement Award,” said Ms
Walkine. “The Bahamas is hon-
oured to name him as this year’s
winner of the Award.”

An annual event beginning
in 2005, the award was estab-
lished by the Bahamas to serve
as a lasting reminder of Mr Bax-
ter’s contributions to the
tourism industry in Canada as
well as his fondness and sup-

‘port for the Bahamas and its

several destinations.

In determining the winner,
members of the Award’s selec-
tion panel considered individ-
uals who:

* improved professional stan-
dards in the industry;

e demonstrated successful
innovations and entrepreneurial

initiative;

e enhanced the industry’s

standing with the general public. |

Sy



communications in the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism; Vernice
Walkine, director general of the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism;
John McKenna, award recipient; Paul Strachan, national:
director of the Bahamas Tourist Office in Canada.

The selection panel, made up

' -of top Canadian travel industry

professionals, determined
that John McKenna’s success
in building Voyageur Travel
Insurance, now RBC Travel
Insurance, into one of the most
trusted brand names in the
travel industry, along with his
example of public service and
commitment to the travel
industry throughout his career,
made him a petted choice as













from people who are

| making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for.a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322. 1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

- the second recipient of the.

award.

ro

‘
lof
@ LEFT to right: Ambrose Morris, pitblic relations manager for 2.
the Bahamas Tourist Office in Canada; Basil Smith director of

In addition to his position as’ ;

vice chairman of RBC Travel

Insurance, Mr McKenna served ,

as a chairman for numerous
boards and has been an active

' member of many: travel industry -
both

related associations,
nationally and internationally,
the board of directors of both
Voyageur Insurance and RBC
Travel Insurance Company.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 11



Big foo ey

BEL eet

ofa
Br oa
Sore es
ry

i | : a.
= MEMBERS of Bahamian government along with US

Perry Christie, US Ambassador John Rood and Govern

a US Ambassador John Rood noted in his speech that “with the help of like-minded nations such
as the Bahamas’’, the US has made progress by removing sanctuaries for terrorists ;

CBREED

=

TORN

_

Rosy,

Ambassador John Rood unveili
plaque with the engraving “In remembrance of the victims of September 11, 2001”. Shown from
left: Minister of Foreign Affairs and Public Service Fred Mitchell, Prime Minister of the Bahamas
or General of the Bahamas Arthur Hanna.

(Photos: Onan Bridgewater/Tribune staff)




ng a



@ MARINES standing at attention, b

attacks of September 11.

FROM page one

and celebrate the relationship
between our two nations.

The ambassador recalled the
setting and scale of the tragedy
in an address at the tree planti-
ng ceremony. .

“For the victims,.as forall of
us, that tragic day began like so

many others. In New York and -

Washington it was one of those
clear, cool and dry early fall
days that are so enjoyed on the

east coast after along hot sum- .

mer. That outward tranquility
was quickly shattered when at
8.46am the first of two planes

slammed into the World Trade

Centre in New York City.”

Citizens of more than 90
countries were among the
almost 3000 victims of the
attacks in New York, Washing-
ton, DC, and rural Pennsylva-
nia. :

"The Bahamas, along with
our other friends and allies,
immediately pledged solidarity
with us, and we were comforted
as a nation as our friends and
allies rallied around us".

It is the partnership between
nations with the same "cher-
ished" values and principles —

‘a’ symbol. of

of -democracy, human rights,
and freedom of expression. —.
that is fundamental to the fight
against terrorism, according to

' Ambassador Rood.

Long term success in the

fight against terrorism will be

won "less by. tactical victories
than by advancing freedom and
human dignity. and promoting
the spread of democracy", said
the Ambassador.

A poinciana tree was chosen
to be planted at the gathering as
"strength, -

endurance, hope and beauty".

"As it takes root in the rich
soil here it will stand strong dur-
ing the many storms that pass



earing flags in honour of the victims and fallen heroes of the

-over it. It will have a long life, so



that many years after we have
moved on.those who follow in
our steps can stand here and
recall the sacrifices made for
ourfreedoms. ——- :

"Its deep roots symbolise to
me the depth and endurance of
the values that underpin the
United States friendship with
The Bahamas".

Mr Rood said he believed



- the tree would act as an appro-

priate symbol of "our hope for
the future and our desire to
build a world of peace, free of
terrorism, where liberty, democ- ©
racy, and respect for human dig-
nity are universally honoured".

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THE Bahamas will be among Latin American
and Caribbean nations bringing proposals to this
week’s Non Aligned Movement Summit on the
fight against poverty and in favour of human
health, based on unity and solidarity principles.

Representatives of 24 nations of the region
will meet from today in Havana, with delegates
the world over, to exchange initiatives directed to
resize the group so that it acts more efficiently.

Immersed in new concepts of integration and
democracy, this geographic area points to a dif-
ferent and brighter future of co-operation in ener-
gy, health and education.

Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Republica

Poverty and Middle East

conflict top agenda for

Non-Aligned Movement
summit in Cuba

PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

efoy- Vi T=

Baharian 10 dale part in n-Aligned Su Summit —

Dominicana, Ecuador, Peru, Antigua and Bar-
buda, Dominica, Panama and Venezuela are part

of the forum founded in Belgrade, then capital of
Yugoslavia, in September, 1961.

After that entered Bahamas, Barbados, Belize,
Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras,
Jamaica, Nicaragua, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, St. Lucia, Suriname and Trinidad
and Tobago. It is expected that Haiti and St Kitts
and Nevis will also apply for membership, with
which all the Caribbean will be part of that group
of nations, 116 in total.

Among the challenges facing the summit are
co-operation agreements and the approval of

documents to strengthen. the NAM role in the
solution of global problems.

Advancing toward multilateralism “in opposi-
tion to the unipolar scheme ‘led by the United
States through force and blackmail” is one of the
objectives of the meeting. ;

Cuba, which is to receive the presidency of
the group for a three-year term, has among its
goals to aid in the solution of some of the prob-
lems faced by underdeveloped countries and
the co-ordination of efforts in.the political scene
in order to Be common stands and joint
actions.

The movement set itself the goal of discarding

THE TRIBUNE

. the sensation of having lost relevance as an inter-

national force which for many meant the end of
confrontation between the two blocs that gave it
a reason to exist.

In recent statements regarding the 14th NAM
Summit Conference, vice foreign minister Abclar-
do Moreno of Cuba insisted the group had not
lost its validity, despite the end of the Cold War
(1947-1990) and warned about the complex and
contradictory international arena.

Official statistics register over 1.2 bitlion poor,
2.4 billion without sanitary facilities, 1.6 bilhon
with no electricity and 771 million illiterates, of
which 39 million live in Latin America.



Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content

@ HAVANA .
POVERTY, health care and

‘ the Middle East conflict top’ the

agenda for the weeklong sum-

mit of the global Non-Aligned -

Movement in Cuba that began
Monday and will culminate with
the meeting of 50 heads of state,

‘ancluding anti-American lead-

ers Iranian President Mahmoud
Ahniadinejad and Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez, accord-
ingto Associated Press. .
Cuba takes over the chair-
manship this week from
Malaysia, which hosted the last
summit three years ago, and the
communist government’s for-
eign minister opened the event

Monday with a forceful call for.

smaller, developing countries
to band together to resist the
intervention and aggressions of
more powerful nations in this
“unjust world".

“Today we can affirm ... that
the movement is more neces-
sary than ever,” said Felipe
Perez Roque.

“We need the united force of
118 nations,” he added, refer-
ring to the current members

plus Haiti and St Kitts and:

Nevis, expected to join the
movement this week.
The movement, which
includes about two-thirds of the
world’s nations, was developed
during thie Cold Waras a Third
World alternative to the United
States and Soviet Union. Diplo-
mats say it has lost.direction in
recent year but expect the



1 UNIDENTIFIED members of delegations of the Non-Aligned

Movement gather during a preparation meeting in Havana
yesterday. Officials of developing nations from around the globe
are expected to gather in Havana for the 14th Non-Aligned

Summit by week’s end.

Cuban leadership to deepen the
bond between member nations
that share similar social and
economic struggles.

“JHiteracy, lack of access to
_ decent health care and energy

conservation are high on Cuba’s
agenda, along with a group

statement calling for the lifting -

of the decades-old US trade
embargo against the island.
Tran’s delegation will seek sup-
port for its efforts to become a
nuclear power. Leaders from

‘Pakistan and India will meet as

part of their peace process.
-Organisers will work ona

final declaration that rejects all _

terrorism against civilian pop-
ulations, including “state ter-
rorism” in a statement that will

chastise Israel and the United

States for invasions in Lebanon
and Iraq.

And many nations want to
send a sharp message to the
developed world that wealthy
countries need to do more to
share the finite resources and
respect the rights of all coun-
tries to determine their own
governments and economic sys-
tems. |

Formed in 1961, the move-
ment has survived long after the
Soviet Union’s collapse. Today,

many of the members are unit-
ed in a shared distaste for US
foreign policy. Leaders like
Ahmadinejad and Chavez; who
atrive later in the week, are
expected to use: the summit to
blast the “imperialist” world
view of US President George
W Bush.

But other eeunties attend--

ing say they are not interested
in “battering the United States.
Nations like India and South
Africa are improving relations
with the US and are not willing
to point fingers at the Bush
administration.

The member nations include
most of Africa, the Middle East,

Asia and Latin America. China °

is attending as an observer
nation, an opportunity the Unit-
ed States passed up.

The attendance of one of
Bush’s top foes, the ailing
Cuban President Fidel Castro, is
still up ‘in the air. The 80-year-
old leader announced July 31

he was stepping-down from |

power — for the first time in 47
years — to recover from intesti-
nal surgery. He has made no
public appearances since,
though the government released
two videos it filmed of visits
with Chavez in Havana. »
‘Defense Minister Raul Castro
is Cuba’s acting president and
will head the island’s delegation
in the elder Castro’s absence.
Fidel Castro said he would
be able to recéive some visiting
dignitaries, but the government
statement gave the sense that





those meetings. would be small
and private.

Cuban organisers said they
would urge the United Nations

leadership. to.strengthen its loy-

alty to developing nations. UN
Secretary-General Kofi Annan
will attend as an observer, and
was expected to meet person-
‘ally with Fidel Castro. Many of

. the global leaders will contin-

ue on to New York for the UN
General Assembly session, and
some plan to meet Bush in
Washington.

Among other well-known
leaders attending are Presidents:
Pervez Musharraf of Pakistan,
Bashar Assad of Syria and.
Thabo Mbeki of South Africa,

Available from Commercial News Providers

aswell as Prime Ministers Man-
mohan Singh of India and
Thaksin ' Shinawatra of Thai-

‘Jand.

Musharraf said he will meet
with Singh on the sidelines as
part of an ongoing peace
process. between Pakistan and

. India. The two countries share a.

history of hostile relations,
mainly because. of their com-

_peting claims on the border ©

region of Kashmir.

Arco Progresista, one of

Cuba’s dissident groups, noting
that protecting human rights is a
priority of the movement, urged
the government to expand tree-
dom of expression and allow

_ multiparty elections in Cuba. ~

Bahamian group presses for renewed focus on the ‘Cuban Five’

FROM page one

been hunting down terrorists —
this was their job, they were just
looking for information — they
weren't using weapons."

Key to the work of ‘the
"Friends" is highlighting exact-
ly what it is the five men were
purported to be doing in Miami
shortly before the point of their
arrest. It is said that they were
in Miami in response to terror-
ist attacks that had been threat-
ening and causing destruction
within Cuba since the start of
the Cuban revolution — all of
which are reported to have been
orchestrated by Cuban émigrés
living in Miami, bent on ridding
Cuba of Castro and reclaiming
their properties and other assets
lost during the revolution.

Having investigated and
uncovered information about
planned terrorist activities, the
Cubans handed information over
to the US authorities. It was at
this point that the US authori-
ties arrested, and ultimately sen-
tenced the Cuban "investiga-
tors," it was claimed. They are
currently serving four’ life sen-
tences, and 75 years in jail.

Ultimately, the two say that
any negative perceptions that
have apparently developed in
some quarters around the
group's endeavours to raise pub-
lic awareness — and around the
situation of the men themselves
— are asymptom of the "rarefi-
cation" of, or treating as beyond
question, American "war on ter-
ror" ideology. This has become a
barrier to communication about
injustice, according to Mr Bethel.

The "deep mystification" of
American objectives has led to
it becoming an ideological con-
struct which people "worship,"
he said. In the process, a "for-
us-or-against us” framework of
thought has effected people's

ability to discern what is con-

structive criticism from simple
anti-Americanism.

‘Explaining his position, Mr.

Morley said: "To say that you

are anti-American is to make it ,

seem like I have problems with
everything they do. No —

America has produced a lot of
things in the world: Technolog- ©

ical advancements, and in terms
of: what it universally has

brought to the world, and I

agree with these things. All I'm |

saying is that we have our own
vibe too," said Morley.
Drawing on this point, Mr
Bethel said: "It can be split
down the middle: You can be
opposed to a specific US policy,
but not opposed to the US."
Within the Bahamian Friends

of the ‘Cuban Five, the "over-

all interest" is in the ' "guestion
of justice — in the same way as
we-are for them we are for oth-

er’ people who are suffering ©
indignity or injustice,"

and are
being denied the right to

achieve these constitutional .

aspirations, he added.
Detracting further from those

elements who claim anti-Amer- -
icanism within the group, Mr

Bethel said: "We need the pub-
lic to understand that we are
‘friends’ insofar as those men
who are now locked up in the
US. are being deprived of fun-
damental rights as regards visits
by their family. We are friends
of the Cuban five to the extent
that we are for freedom and
dignity and justice.

Mr Bethel added that both

. Village ree

Ce 2 atta il

ae ° Lk Cara)

Amnesty International, "the vast
majority" of the members of the

UN, and a significant number of |

British MPs favour the release of

the men — along with well pop- °

ulated American contingents of
the "Free the Five" campaign.

The group has recently ©
launched an online blog to

make public their writings and
other media.

* Harold Road.
Hah North

« Cable Beac



A
oma

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

SECTION



°

i business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

mM Wite Tribune



sana

- HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH





Tel: (242) 356-7764




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NASSAU OFFICE

FREEPORT OFFICE



‘Is financial sector ‘ready to
pay price’ on new markets? |

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

eo ae, he’ Bahamian
Tae financial services
: industry must
- decide whether it
; is “ready to pay
the price” of venting into the
emerging markets of Asia and
- Eastern Europe in the search

~.°-for new clients, the Bahamas

Financial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chief executive said.
, Addressing the legal clinic.
held at the weekend by the
Halsbury. Chambers law firm,
Wendy Warren said that while
the Bahamas would not neglect
the traditional sources of its
high net worth clients, North
America and Europe, it was
now Starting to pursue new
opportunities in Asia and the
Far East, plus eastern Europe.
But she added that the
Bahamas “has to make a deter-

mination, before we step into
this brave new world, are we
ready to pay the price or ser-
vicing these markets?”.

Ms Warren pointed out that
when the Bahamas was nor-
mally asleep, clients in India
would be awake, and vice ver-
sa. In addition, the Bahamian
financial services industry
would also have to drop any
preconceptions it may have
about clients from areas, such
as Russia.

Ms Warren said that despite
the external regulatory chal-
lenges facing the Bahamian
financial services industry,
these could be overcome with
the correct preparation.

And while the competition
for the Bahamas had become
more intense, she added: “The
business is. going to continue to
‘grow. Latin America and North
America represent huge oppor-
tunities for us, right on.our



_ |. WENDY WARREN

doorstep.”
Ms Warren pointed out that
foreign real estate buyers and

’ purchasers of second homes in

the Bahamas remained anoth-

er target market for the indus-
try, as their presence here held
out the prospect of establish-
ing a financial’ relationship with
these clients.
“Fundamentally, without
financial services we would see

a significant impact on tourism.

and the second home industry.
The three pillars of our econo-

my work in tandem,” Ms War-.

ren said.

She added that salary levels
in the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry were above aver-
age compared to the wider

Bahamian economy, standing

at an: average of $41,000 and

$66,000 for the sector’s. domes-

tic and international segments
respectively. This compared to
an average $20,000 per capita

for the economy as a whole. |”

Ms Warren said that to fur-
ther develop the industry, the
BFSB was looking at a'techni-
cal co-operation project with

Sansbury resigns from Baha Mar

By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter

MICHAEL Sansbury has resigned as
Baha Mar’s executive vice-president of
resort operations, The Tribune has learnt.

Yesterday, Robert Sands, executive
vice-president of administration and pub-
lic affairs at the Cable Beach resort,, con-
. firmed that Mr Sansbury had tendered his
registration.

Mr Sansbury was part of the Baha Mar

.development team when it bought ‘the

- Cable Beach property from Phil Ruffin for’

“about $150 million in April, 2005. At that
time, he was executive vice-president of
the company.

Before joining Baha Mar Development,

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Mr Sansbury ran three Universal Orlando
resorts since inception and previously. ran

the 3,000-room Mirage resort in Las Vegas. |

Mr Sands had little to say.on the resig-
nation, only confirming that it had hap-
pened, but not indicating how this would
affect the company as it continues its trans-
formation of the Cable Beach strip into
its $2 billion vision. Mr Sands did add that
~ the company has yet to fill the position.

The Tribune was unable to reach Mr
Sansbury for comment yesterday.

Mr Sands also told The Tribune that
work is progressing very well on the first
physical change to the property - the $80
million renovation of the Radisson Hotel.
The work is being done by locally-based

Osprey Developers, who were awarded a



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substantial contract to do the work.
While that work ‘continues, Mr Sands

_ noted that a number of additional planned’
initiatives are also moving forward. They

are the building of the re-routed: West:

Bay Street as well as the reconstruction’

of several buildings:presently located epee
site the Cable Beach resorts.
.. The buildings will be reconstructed on

the western portion of the Radisson on

the opposite side of the road. This will

make way for the creation of Baha Mar’s.

new casino hotel and'convention centre.
Mr Sands said the resort is waiting for a
combination of several things to be com-
pleted before they can initiate that
process. But he said it was expected this
would’be done in short order.

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the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), and estab-
lishing the Bahamas as a finan-

cial. services brand to make it.“

compelling option”.

“We've got to remain rele-
vant..We can’t let the industry
get ahead of us,” Ms Warren
said. “What we really need to
do as country is be sure we're.

_ looking at trends and have the

capability to respond-to these
trends. Our challenge is to
ensure we’re never left behind
the herd.”
. The growing number of high
net worth individuals was set
to provide further opportuni-
ties for the Bahamas, Ms War-
ren added.
Some 8.7 million individuals

- across the world had'$1 million

or more in financial assets, and.
collectively these people owned
$33.3 trillion, an amount set to
grow to $44.6 trillion by the
end of this‘decade.

And many of the so-called
‘Baby Boomers’ generation in
the US were set to transfer
wealth, estimated to total $41
trillion;,to their children.

‘Many of these people had

“ingly

generated their wealth through
their own entrepreneurial
endeavours, and Ms Warren
said the Bahamian industry’s
clients were becoming increas-
-sophisticated and
demanding, looking for ever-
higher service standards.

As a result, service was
becoming more important to
these clients than confidential-
ity, the old factor that had gov-

- effied client-decisions.

“If you can’t add value, the
benefits of long-standing rela-
tionships will no longer be as
important,” Ms Warren said.

~ “Clients will be demanding:

on us. They won’t just be happy
with a story, they'll be evaluat-
ing our performance.”

She’ added that the financial
services industry was happy
about the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company’s (BTC)
launch of BlackBerry products
in the Bahamas, as this would
allow their clients to use their
own Blackberries in this nation.

The industry is also hoping
that Private Trust Company
legislation is introduced by
year-end.



:

Union will

mâ„¢ By CARA BRENNEN
- Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Bahamas Mainte-
nance and Allied Workers
Union will represent 500

‘non-managerial: workers at
the Sandals Bahamian
Resort and Spa, Trade
Union Congress president
Obie Ferguson claimed,
although the resort has said
it had no commient on the
matter.

According to Mr Fergu-
son, the union, which was
started some three to four
years ago, will be in a posi-

| tion to represent all inclusive

workers at Sandals and

Breezes.

He said the union is an
affiliate of the TUC and that
they are looking forward to -



represent

{
|
}
|

500 non- -managerial |
workers at Sandals |

sitting down with the hotel |
to make an industrial agree- |

‘ment. {

In fact, he said he expects
the union to obtain a Cer-
tificate of Determination |
declaring it the bargaining
agent for the workers within
-a week or so. |

Director of Labour Har- |
court Brown explained yes- |
terday that the union has

which means it has fulfilled
the paperwork listed to be a
union registered on the |
department’s trade union ||
listing. |
However, he said the
department is still in the
process of completing recog-
nition of the union, a neces-

|
been granted registration, |
|
|

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+
*



eee
PAGE 2b, |UESDAY, SEPIEMBER 12, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



‘Making home owner |

dreams beco

LAST Friday’s edition of the
London Daily Mail carried a
short article about a new trend
in mortgage financing, which
they call group mortgages in
the UK. Instead of making a
traditional mortgage loan to a
husband/wife team,
instance, in the UK a group of
individuals can come together
to obtain mortgage financing.

Housing crisis

There is a global housing cri-
sis in the making in most devel-
oped economies around the

ribune

for’



Financial
Focus

world, and the challenge is to
make affordable housing avail-



able to the upcoming genera-

tion.
In the Bahamas, the cost of

-housing is exploding almost

Ce Ne eS

daily. I was taken aback some
months ago when the then

fF oncler insurance



&

Crawford Bahamas Ltd:

Orry J. Sands & Co. Ltd. -
RoyalStar Assurance Ltd.

Summit Insurance Co. Ltd.

Minister of Housing said.
recent government-sponsored

‘low-cost’ houses sold for’
around $143,000, which is:

about 9 times our per capita
income of about $16,500. ©
This was a most sobering
wake-up call, as my immedi-
ate thought was: “How could

my children ever afford to own:

a home?” This prompted me
to start looking at home prices
and land prices, which quickly
confirmed that we are not
exempt from the housing crisis
here in the Bahamas.



Avoid»

the Risk of |
‘Under-insurance

isin for less than the peplacenent value of |
your property may result in any claim payment made
under your policy being reduced in proportion to the
aroun’
VO Mae” ertain ‘that the sum insured on your policy
accurately reflects your property's replacement cost.

if you have any questions about this or any other
aspects of your insurance coverage, we encourage
- you fo contact your insurance representative.

A, Scott Fitzgerald Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.
Algoma Adjusters (Bahamas) Ltd. _

Bahamas First General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Bahamas Motor Assessment & Claims Ltd.

Carib Insurance Agency Ltd.

Colina General Insurance Agency Ltd.

General Brokers & Agents Ltd.

Insurance Company of the Bahamas Ltd.

Insurance Management (Bahamas) Ltd.

J.S. Johnson & Company, Ltd. _

K. A. P. Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd.

Moseley Burnside Insurance Agency Ltd.

Nassau Underwriters Cole iby Insurance Agency Ltd. .

1

Security & General Insurance Co: Ltd.
Star General Insurance Agents & Brokers Ltd.

Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Lid.










Group mortgages
In the UK, the average cost
of a home is £179,000 — seven

times greater than the average

salary of £25,570.

Group mortgages, therefore,

have been targeted at cash-
strapped first-time buyers, who

could be friends, relatives or:

even strangers. According to
the article: “Mortgages which
let up to four friends buy a

home together are becoming °

more popular as [house] prices
continue to rise.’
“Britain’s biggest bank,

HSBC, has seen a 50 per cent |
rise in the numbers of people ©
applying for a ‘group mort-, :

gage’ since January. At pre-

sent, young homebuyers typi-'

cally ‘borrow just over. three

times their salary. With a |
group mortgage, four friends,

could club together to take out,
a mortgage of £300,000 with’.

some lenders. This would be
more than enough money. to

buy the aver gee two- bedroom

house.”

In the Bahamas; Iam: told
that some agencies have been
granting loans for ‘low-cost’



Senior A

e reali

-homes to extended family
units, guaranteed by the wages.

of a working parent and one
or more working children.
Also, some institutions have
been capitalising the closing
costs, such as stamp tax, legal
fees and the like. Without such
approaches, home ownership

would simply be an unattain-.

able dream. .

' Caution
~ However, while group ores

“gages (or extended- -family

mortgages as granted in the
Bahamas), seem to be a “quick
fix? to a very vexing problem,
lenders need to think about

what would happen if one per-.
sor lost their job, fell out with

‘his. frierids, decides to get mar-
ried or had to move to another
island or country? While this

may be a creative short-term -
solution to the population’s’ .
‘ immediate housing needs, it

certainly is not a long term
solution.

Potential social implications
The lack of affordable hous-
ing has many social implica-

lanager, Trust &

Fiduciary Services Department

sG Hambros, part of the SG Private Banking, isa private bank providing
- a comprehensive wealth management service with offices in the UK,
. Guernsey, Jersey Gibraltar and The Bahamas.

SG Hambros is currently looking to reeruit a Senior Manager, Trust &
' Fiduciary Services Department. The individual will be required to:

. ‘visit on a ragular basis significant
clients whose business with the Bank
is important clients enough that
it warrants direct client contact in
‘a meating :

® work with taam colleagues to ensure
that there is a high quality of

“Félation iship: Management pravided io,

sofa trust ais fidui RS |

i ces team |.

w dey elon new clint reldbobthing from
a particular target markating region or
country for the bank

® develop new business from existing
and new olients, ensure maintenance
and profitability of existing client
relationships — all towards achieving
income and sales goals for the taam



that will he set by Senior Management. ~

# develop a detailed knowledge and. —
understanding of client estate planning
and financial needs and provide
advica to existing clients and
prospective clients on the

Bank's products and services, liaising

_in providing more detailed product

- recommendations. In particutar, work
closely and co-operativaly with,
Private Bankers to introduce
specialized investment products and
services in accordance with the
clients needs

@ ensure that the Bank js properly
compensated for services rendered’ ”
to clients. :

SG Hamteas Bark & Thus Gahamasi Limited is

The rola will entail supervisory and
training function and ensuring thai
policies-and procedures are being |
followed with the department.

_ You'shoutd ideally have:

ma Bachelor’s Dagree in Banking &
_ Finance, and have ai least 7-10

a Years’, experience in, Tustand..
". Fiduciary Services:

wa superior numeric, wriling and
communication skills

ma superior knowledge ‘of trusts, trust

law, companies and company law

mihe abllity to read and understand —y
financial statements, vatuations and
related forms of financial reporting

ma management and sales experience
and proven ability to work with others ©
in a multi-faceted financial
services organization.

Tha position offers an attractive salary

and henefits package.

Applications should be submitted to the

. following address, to arrive on or before
with product spacialisis as,appropriaie

15 Saptember 2006

Manager, Human Resources

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) |
Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas.

awww.sghambras.com

. fisoreed under the Banke & Yrast Co ingenieg Roguintion Act

aah eleoM tla d 83

i

SOCIETE CENERALE GROUP

Lenneth Fl. Brozozog

Occupation: Business Executive
Age: 70.

Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: Oct 1995
Number of Years as Sur- US2TOO’

vivor: | 0

PROSTATE CANCER
EDUCATION & SUPPORT

observes Prostate Cancer Awareness Month





tions for the country moving
forward. First, it would suggest

that children may simply have ~
_ to live at home longer (and ©

hopefully save towards a down

" payment).

~The offset to this is that par-
ents may be required to spend

“more than anticipated in sup-,

porting their children when
they should be organising their
finances for retirement. Sec-

_ ond, if our returning university
graduates and professionals

feel they are squeezed out of
the affordable housing market,
they will simply stay abroad.
Finally, this article really has
not.addressed the plight of the

- lower income masses, where ~
the situation.is most dire. The

family structure for the major-
ity of our citizens is broken,

our school system is ‘on aver- _
.age’ producing D+ graduates,

and wages are not keeping
pace with affordable housing.

eos ore
woe 8

We have a growing generation .°_-:

of ‘angry youth’ who feel
squeezed out, and totally alien

to the economic prosperity.that .

the. Bahamas boasts of.
Together, these facts will lead
to future problem if we do not
give them the consideration
they deserve today.

The Bahamas is unique in
that.it‘-has vast reserves of
‘Crown Lands’, which i in recent
times has commanded the
attention of international
developers. However, we must

‘. ensure that some of this is

strategically made available’at
reasonable prices for low, mid-
dle and upper middle class
Bahamian housing projects.
Last November, I wrote in

this column: “Now that we are’
-in the ‘manifesto drafting’

mode, I challenge all political
parties to clearly articulate
their. land policy should. they.
become elected. Home own-
ership must remain an achiev-

-able objective for all Bahami-

ans.” This remains true today.

Conclusion
_ We need to continuously

find ways to ‘qualify’ Bahami-'

ans for mortgage financing,
while at the same time ensur-

ing that affordable land

remains available. Other

aa

Caribbean countries have suc- -!

cessfully addressed this issue *
“with appropriate policies.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a

‘Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,

Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group .
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of

_ Security & General Insurance

Company in the Bahamas.
The views expressed are

- those of the author and do not

necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



eee
oe at
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 3B



Technical support
‘main weakness’
on start-up help

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE lack of technical and
institutional support has been
“one of the main weaknesses”
behind the failures of so many
Bahamian entrepreneurs and
start-ups, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce’s executive
director said.

Philip Simon said the
Bahamian economy was “dri-
ven by small businesses”, point-
ing out that 75 per cent of the
Chamber’s membership had ou
employees or less.
. While the problems of access

to capital funding for Bahami-
an entrepreneurs had “been
around for years”, Mr Simon
said the situation was “getting

better”. .
Fund

This was due.to the $2 mil-

lion Bahamas Venture Capital.
Fund, administered by Gomez «

Partners & Co, into which the
Government was likely to con-
tribute another $1 million soon.

Scotiabank and Common-

wealth Bank had established.

their own $10 million loan facil-
ity for small Bahamian busi-
nesses, and Mr Simon said the
renewed interest in small busi-

ness financing: was “as a result

of demand evident over the last
several years”.

He added that this had also
been driven by the increase in

foreign direct investment and .
spin-off opportunities for

@ Bank of The Bahamas

A rowing and dynamic Bahamian institution”







Bahamian start-ups, warning:

. “The large companies cannot

do it alone.”

Mr Simon, though, warned
that under-capitalised compa-
nies were likely to experience
increasing stress, becoming
ever-more reliant on cash flow
to cover payroll and operating
costs.

He related an “urgent and
dire situation” he had dealt
with recently involving a
Bahamian business that did

“not have the cash to meet the

payroll”.

He added that the company
had been in business for two
years, with all returns being
invested back ifto it.

“The business had tremen-
dous potential, but it was in a

bind. The business was heavily
leveraged, and in a position
where he had no choice but to
sell it,” Mr Simon said.

Financing

Bahamian businesses, he
added, would receive the
financing if they had a good
concept, business plan and
management, Mr Simon said.

He advised companies that ~

if they could, they should hire
an accountant to do the finan-

‘ cial books, as often “‘the finan-

cial are always not properly
done” when it came to assess-
ing business plans.

Another source of fiance
Mr Simon said, was investment
clubs. These clubs pooled the









GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.

Is seeking qualified and experienced applicants to join its
‘Title Search Department

Attractive salary and benefits to the successful applicant.
Please. address resume and cover letter to:

The Managing Partner
P.O. Box N-272

_ Nassau, Bahamas
Facsimile (242) 323-0012 or email
info @gtclaw.com

No Telephone calls will be accepted “

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
COLLECTIONS OFFICER - EXUMA BRANCH

Core responsibilities:

© Manage delinquent loan portfolio for the branch.

© Conduct credit risk assessments. :
_ Coordinate repossession activities.

) Make field calls as necessary. :

4 Conduct research and prepare report:

Liaise with attorneys on legal issues relative to delinquent

accounts.

¢

Knowledge. Skills and Abilities:

) Associates Deere in velevalt area. (e. g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance).

( Certificate in Credit and Collections

© Knowledge of laws governing contracts and properties.

4 Working knowledge of appraisals and land value

4 Excellent oral and written communications skills.

) Three years banking experience. _ a

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than September 22nd 2006

to:

__ The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International

P.O.Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas

x

resources of individual mem-
bers, and he himself was a
member in one. that had invest-
ed in real estate, small business
development and two restau-

rants at the Atlantis Marina

Village.
Mr Simon said he knew of

two women-only investment _

clubs that invested only in busi-
nesses run by women entre-
preneurs.



NOTICE is hereby given that JOCELYN JASON JEUDI, of
GEORGE TOWN, EXUMA, BAHAMAS is applying to ‘the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 5th day of September, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N- 7147,
Exuma, Bahamas. :



Notice









| The Government of The Bahamas is seeking Armored i!

Car Services to service some of its revenue collection

sites. Interested firms may collect bid specifications
from: ati



OFFSHORE BANK is logins for:

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitefield Centre
West Bay Street a Ms
‘P.O.Box N-3017 ss
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for submission of bids is:

October 6th, 2006.

Resident Banker

MBA degree or equivalent 15 years minimum experience in banking and trust business. -
Fluent in Spanish, read and written. Extensive knowledge of Argentine Financial and Tax
systems, as well as a detailed knowledge of banking laws and regulations in the Bahamas.
Experience of reporting to the Central bank, and capability in the areas of compliance and.
AML are prerequisities. Duties will include It supervision, Oe of RPG and OS

400; data base adminsitration, SQL 400 will be needed.

Pursant to Section 4(2) (i) of The. Financial Intelligence Unit Act, 2000s
hereby advise the public and financial institutions to be aware that there : are

Applicatings should be mailed to:

Offshore Bank
P.O.Box N4779

Nassau, NP



+

e S a
oF “if
=h



several fraudulent schemes being perpetrated via the Internet.

"Please note that it has come to our attention that persons have:had
their personal information, bank account details and or funds misappro-
priated from their bank accounts after providing their personal details/
information to person or Be unknown to them over the Internet.

i We hereby WARN the public not to disclose any con banking
information to unknown individuals and or entities especially in situations
where the person or entity makes the following representations:

I, Request to provide banking information in exchange fora
promise to share a proportion of an inheritance/monies currently

- being held within a dormant account, which has not been claimed
bythe next of kin as the ce who died tragically left ne heir;

ae Payment for s services, which: have not-been rendered, with a

promise that a portion of the money will be paid out upon -
submission of bank account information. we ae

3. Request for assistence in transferring to you a foreigner a | portion
of substantial sums of monies, as the claimants state that they can
-not keep the money as their respective laws forbid ownership of the

same.

4. Claims from unknown persons or entities alleging that your
name was selected in a lottery, for which you are aware your name
' was not submited. Stipulations are imposed, such as in order to
retrieve the prize a registration fee is payable and banking .
information is required.

In the event that you are in receipt of correspondence relating to any of the
aforementioned fraudulent schemes, we advise that extreme caution be

exercised.

Signed:

Mr. Anthony M. Johnson

DIRECTOR
Fincancial Intelligence Unit
3RD Floor
Norfolk House
Frederick Street
P.O.Box SB-50086
Nasssu, The Bahamas


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



ee
‘Metals prices head down with crude
oil, possible Iran breakthrough

NEW YORK (Dow

LEGAL NOTICE

hoe

- INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000

(No. 45 of 2000) .

ALU TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)

of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of
ALU TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed, a Certificated of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the.
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was 31st
day of August, 2006

p B. Foster oa
For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator



LEGAL NOTICE

“NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000



(No. 45 of 2000)

CHROME TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the Intemmstonal Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
the Dissolution —
(CHROME TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed, a Certificated of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was
: 31st day of August, 2006

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

ae LEGAL NOTICE

Jones/AP) — Lower pricéé for

crude oil and commodities in

general sent gold and other pre- |

cious metals sharply lower yes-
terday, with the moves acceler-
ating when chart-based selling
was triggered, analysts said.
Silver was especially hard hit
after that metal had outper-
formed gold at times over the
summer but has now fallen back
below a key uptrend line. A

couple of the contacts cited:

momentum-based selling of
metals after prices also fell late
last week, with funds said to be
among those liquidating long
positions.

‘December gold settled down
$20 at $597.30 a troy ounce on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

“The main factor has been
the recent weakness in the
crude-oil market,” said Dan
Vaught, futures analyst with
A.G. Edwards.

Currency-market activity
lately has also put some weight
on gold, said Vaught. Although
the euro was up slightly for the
day as of gold’s close, it had

nevertheless fallen from rough-

ly $1.2875 early last week to a
low Monday of $1.2650. Euro
weakness and dollar strength
tends to undermine metals such
as gold.

Vaught added, “I suspect the
precious metals also suffered to
some extent from reports this
weekend that Iran might have
said something about being will-
ing to suspend its nuclear pro-
gram for a couple of months.”

December silver settled down
$1.055 to $11.24 an ounce. The
contract fell as far as $11.20, its

_ lowest level since July 26.

Most-active December cop-
per settled down 15.05 cents:at
$3.4175 per pound. The contract
traded to.a low of $3.3850 per
pound — its lowest: level since
August 31.

Front-month September .cop-
per settled 14.40 cents lower at
$3.4340 per pound.

October platinum settled
down $28.90 to $1,200.60 an
ounce. October platinum tum-
bled as far as $1,186 overnight,
its weakest level since June.

December palladium settled
down $17.55 to $316.05 an

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NIDOCA LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 8th day of September 2006. The Liquidator is

Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

; Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)~



LEGAL NOTICE

ounce. December palladium

bottomed at $313 overnight, but ©

held just above Friday’s rough-
ly six-week low of $312.50.
New York crude oil futures
fell to a five-month closing low
Monday, dipping below $65 a
barrel as Iran hinted it could
temporarily stop its nuclear pro-
gram and the Organization of
Petroleum Exporting Countries
agreed to hold oil output steady.
The front-month October
light, sweet crude contract
closed down 71 cents at $65.54 a
barrel, it’s lowest close since

March 28. The contract fell as’

low as $64.85 a barrel before
settling down 64 cents at $65.61
a barrel.

October unleaded gasoline

settled down 1.45 cents to’

$1.5946 a gallon. October heat-

ing oil settled down 3.78 cents at -

$1.8054 a gallon.

October natural gas settled
down 0.5 cents at $5.670 per
million British thermal units.

On the New York Board of
Trade, Arabica coffee futures
for December settled 2.40 cents
lower at $1.0375 a pound.

December cocoa settled
down $2 at $1,478 per metric
ton.

Futures on raw sugar in for-

eign ports for October settled
down 0.48 cent at 11.41 cents a
pound.

On the Chicago Board of
Trade, September corn settled
down 3 cents to $2.2875 per
bushel. September soybeans set-

tled down 5 cents at $5.32 per.

bushel.

December wheat settled
down 2.50 cents to $4.13 per
bushel.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
« (No.45 OF 2000)

SUNBURY INVESTMENTS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000, the
Dissolution of SUNBURY INVESTMENTS LIMITED has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck of the Register. The date
of completion of the dissolution was 30th day of August, 2006.

Ms. Alrena Moxey °
. Liquidator



"Leal Notice

8 NOTICE...
CYDNEY LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000 .
‘(No. 45 of 2000)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
company is in dissolution, which commenced.en.
the 8th day of September 2006. The Liquidator 3": >
Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, =

HILLFIELD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
Bahamas.

ORE TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in abootdance with Section138 (8)
of the Intemational Business Companies Act, No. he of 2000,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,

the Dissolution of
ORE TRADE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed; a Certificated of Dissolution has Beet
issued-and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was
31st day of August, 2006

the Dissolution
‘HILLFIELD INTERNATIONAL LIMITED,
has been completed, a Certificated of Dissolution has been
-issued and the Company has. therefore been struck off the
Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was
31st day of August, 2006

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

: a B, Foster
For; Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

Position Available:
Assistant Financial Controller

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator



| ‘Colin

_ Financial EEeR is Ltd.

Eligible Candidate must posses:




Alaina ean



Pricing Information As Of:
Monday, 11 September 200 6



° Bachelors of Business Administrative
Degree with main concentration in
Accounting.





Previous Close Today's Close
Abaco Markets ; : : A : 0.00
Bahamas Property Fund | : -50 > : 2 0.00
Bank of Bahamas i : ; 0.00°

Daily Vol.

Benchmark 7 : ; 0.00
Bahamas Waste ’ : 51° 0.00'
Fidelity Bank j : i : . 0.00
Cable Bahamas i 3 0.00
Colina Holdings ~ é 3 0.00
Commonwealth Bank . , : 0.13
Consolidated Water BDRs - : -0.20
Doctor's Hospital j 3 0.00
Famguard i : Fi 0.00
Finco 41. , 0.00
FirstCaribbean Z 5 7 0.06 .
Focol : i 0.00

+ Freeport Concrete a 3 b 0.00
ICD Utilities ; 65, : . 0.00
J. S. Johnson x 5 0.00
Kerzner International BDRs : 0.00 SUSPENDED
Premier Real Estate

Ato5 ee experience in the a
related field. . ..

Excellent oral, written and
organizational skills.

6 © ae wt

Must be team player.

Experience with supervising 10 or é
more people. |

Last Price Weekly Vol.

12.25 Bahamas Supe rkets 5s

10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) Excellent benefits and remuneration

ackage.

28.00 ABDAB P 8

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings a

Interested persons should submit resume to:

Last 12 Months Yield %

1.2508 Colina Money Market Fund 1.306371*
2.4403 © Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9513***
2.2560

Colina MS! Preferred Fund
i d

The Financial Controller
P.O.Box CB 13049
Nassau, Bahamas

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not E Meeninet

* 01 September 2006
- Trading volume of the prior week - 31 August 2006

** -31 August 2006


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 5B



Stocks post
modest ad

eee Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers | «=:

Union will represent 500 non-
: managerial workers at Sandals.

‘ance
as oil prices fall

FROM page 1B

sary step as it allows the union

- permission to actually repre- _
'. sent its members.

“So we are currently going
through that process,” he
explained.

-Mr Brown said that, while.

the union might choose to
cater specifically to all inclu-

dealing with all ‘ncluanve work-
ers. In the case of Sandals, par-
ticularly, he said employees

have fought long and hard for _

union representation.
“They are entitled to rea-
sonable returns on their

labour. It cannot be wrong for .

anyone to say to the workers of
Sandals that they. have not
struggled to get what they

wait

However, the hotel said it
had no comment on the mat-
ter. Mr Ferguson also put
Breezes employees on notice
that they are only “a few steps
down the road.” The Tribune
was unable to reach the other
all-inclusive resorts - Super-
Clubs Breezes or RIU - for

comment.

sive resorts, that distinction will -
.. not be used in the departmen-
"- ’s registration of the union.
._-... He explained that, rather
‘than looking at the. place of
employment, the Department
of Labour looks at the type of
_...work being done by the
~. ‘employer.
: “A waiter would be.a waiter.’
_ regardless of where he works,”
he explained.
_ At a press conference
recently, Mr Ferguson said that
this is the second time in the
country’s history that a union is

Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that STANDLEY ST. NATUS, of.
FAITH GARDEN, P. 0. CR 56991 is applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
-naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any .

person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts. within twenty-eight days from the
12th day of September, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Gitenship: P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. ;

COOK

A major Caribbean resort seeks to hire a qualified Cook

The Successful applicant will be responsible for preparing food items,
based on standardized recipes, for the Restaurant, Room Service,
‘Employee Cafeteria and Banquet, while maintaining the highest standards
to prouduce an appealing appetizing product. This successful canididate
is also responsible for ensuring the cleanliness, sanitation and safety in the
kitchen and work areas while minimizing waste and maximizing
cost/production ratio.

The successful candidate must have experience in culinary arts, a
high school diploma or equivalent and/or experience in a hotel or
related field preferred.

All interested applicants should forward a copy of their resume
with salary requirement to:

The Human Resources Manager, Box
c/o The Tribune, Nassau, Bahamas,

on or Before September 29, 2006

All resumes will be held in the strictest of confidence.



Lay WANTED }

Live in Nanny/Housekeeper
Family of Four including two children-one 2 years old
and one 6 months old
Must have background in child care
and managing household
Bahamians only need apply
Write: Housekeeper, P. O. Box 7000, Nassau








Sssisti nt to

SG Hambros, part of the SG Private Banking, is a private bank ans
providing a comprehensive wealth management service with ‘et.
offices in the UK, Guernsey, Jersey Gibraltar and The Bahamas. ; gees

$G Hambros is currently looking to recruit an Assistant to
Executive Management. Your main responsibilities will be to:

* @ at least 5-7 years’ experience in
the related field

@ the capacity to learn quickly and
‘in an independent manner

@ excellent written skills

@ excellent cornmunications |
skills (experience in making
presentations)

m advanced Excel skills including
formulae, with check boxes,
buttons, drill down etc

Wa keen sense of business
awareness.

® schedule meetings,
appointments arid travel
arrangements

®@ organize and maintain an
appropriate and accurate filing -
system

@ produce a variety of written
communication;

@ conduct research for special

B coordinate and follow-up on
actions and deadlines for
‘projects sponsored by
Executive Management

li attend meetings with
Executive Management with
the view to draft minutes and
action plan

@ perform-as requested ad hoc
analysis or research and
prepare synthesis to facilitate
decision making process by
_ Executive Management.

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package,

Applications should be submitted
to the following address, to arrive
on or before 15 September 2006

Managér, Human Resources
- SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

You should ideally have: PO Box N7789
Nassau

Ma Bachelor's Degree in Business Bahamas
Administration or the Certified
Professional Secretary

‘designate (CPS) www.sghambros.com

SG Hambros Bank & Trusl @ahamas} Limited is
licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Requiation Act.

isc
gah iccm steal dish

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP



: MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES AND
INVESTMENTS

. NOTICE
THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
"(CHAPTER 326)

it is hereby notified pursuant to Section Ssien of the Industries Encouragement -
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products should
be declared “APPROVED PRODUCTS" for the purposes of that Act.

Marble, Granite, Limestone, Shellstone |
& Slates

It is hereby notified pursuant to Section Five of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 326, that the Minister is about fo consider whether the manufacturer
specified in the first column of the table below should be declared an
"APPROVED MANUFACTURER” in relation to the ploducts oe in the
third column,

Prince Charles Drive _
New Providence
The Bahamas

Any interested person having any objection to these declarations should

give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the Office of
the Ministry of Financial Services and Investments, before, 19" day of
September, 2006, by letter addressed to :-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY ats
THE MINISTRY OF FINANCIAL SERVICES & INVESTMENTS
P.O, Box N-7770
NASSAU, N. P.,
THE BAHAMAS

. SHEILA CAREY
PERMANENT SECRETARY
‘
eo

ne

’
ts

”

‘

e 4

’

S19PIAOld SMAN [EIAWWOD WO ajqeyleAy

PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





}U9}U04) payeoipuAs
[eHoyey oe

secgeedonsessdsisdoaveassveeseevasssecderedhasessendedovesescabeccssedeasbsavevccevaaneus aeons sccenecedseceneddbougdeseodseengoecaashdercaacbarnyyeadescadsedssesavetedcsistoncesesces:

one believing in you,’

Galilee College aunches preparatory
programme for student/athletes

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

GALILEE College has
spread its wings to include a
preparatory programme for
student/athletes who are look-
ing for another altexnative to
going to the United States or
Canada.

The nationally recognised

institution, which is registered

with the Ministry of Education,
approved by the Department
of Public Personnel and mem-
ber of both the Association of
Tertiary Institutions in the
Bahamas and the National
Christian Counselors Associa-
tion, has agreed to reach out
to student/athlétes who need
good, quality education.
According to its president,
Dr. Willis Johnson, although
they are a small institution,
they have had some powerful
results so. far and they know
that the programme will con-

‘tinue to grow with the inclu-

sion of the student/athletes.

His wife, Evette Johnson, the
executive director,
aim is no just to provide a
forum for the athletes to excel,
but to ensure that they are
properly equipped to enter the
international colleges and uni-
versities.

“We. are quite aware that
there are so many athletes who
have had dreams and had them
dashed because the opportuni-
ty to get a higher learning of
education did not present itself
because of some shortcoming
in your SAT results or some-
* she not-
ed.

By providing the student/ith-
letes with this opportunity,
Johnson said all of these short-
falls could bé abbreviated so
that they can excel when they

» step into the larger enViron-

ment overseas:
With a.large-arrangement of
classes, ranging from business,

accounting, banking, computer, °

said their’

' possible

@ REVEALING plans for Galilee College’s preparatory PO uranTnE are, from left to right: Mike
Sands, BAA A’s president; Yvette Johnson, Galilee’s director; Dr. Willis Johnson, Galilee’s pres-
ident; Harrison Petty, president of the Bahamas Scholarship F oundation for Student Athletes and
. Rupert Gardiner, Athletic Director at Galilee. ~

human resource management,
office administration and sports
management and law to travel
and tourism, she said the stu-
dent/athletes will be equipped
for the task ahead of them.
“We have also established
articulation agreement with
other colleges and universities
in the United States where
when we reach the stage that
we can no longer accommodate
you, you can go to the larger

‘schools and all of your credits
-. would be accepted,” she stated.

“We believe in miracles and
we know that they all begin at

Galilee. So whatever it- takes .

that is legal and moral, we will

do to cause ourstudents to gain

the dreams that they so eager-
ly desire. We are here to cause
the dreams to come though and
cause the impossible to become
and that’s called a mir-
acle.”
Galilee College has just
recently been accepted as the

first non- American school to.

be accepted as member of the

National Christian College,

Athletic Association.

Newly appointed Athletic
Director Rupert Gardiner said
his aim in joining the staff at

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QUALITY:



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were welcomed, into the





NCCAA, which is a part of fies:
NCAA.

“A lot of athletes, when hes
hear about Christian schools,
they don’t want to go,” he
reflécted. “We are hooked up
in so many bad things that we

tian schools.

schools that we can be a part of
because they have over 300
schools involved and they par-
ticipate in ‘a number of sports
including basketball and track
and field and they guarantee
_us that we will be a part of their .
nationals and we can get into
meets like the Penn Relays.”
Gardiner said: the
studeni/athletes have made the

Galilee College was to make
sure that the student/athletes
have another avenue to pre-
pare themselves for college.
“We decided to put together
this prep college so that the
athletes can comé here, know
what it’s like to come to col-
lege, get your credits and when
you leave here, you could be
better ‘equipped when you go

to college,”

he insisted:

. “IT talked to a lot of athletes
who are here, who want to be a
part of this programme and we
have athletes who will be com-

/ing down from the Turks &

Cacaos to be a part of this pro-
gramme. I know we have ath-

_ letes who will do well here.”

Last week at the regional
necting, Gardiner said they

right choice in choosing Galilee. -
College to get their collegiate.
preparation.

Harrison Petty, the. president
of the Bahamas Scholarship
Foundation for Student Ath-
letes, commended Galilee Col-

lege for providing such an-(-"

*

don’t want to go to these Chris . '

“But these are very nice |

affordable preparatory college’.
experience for our student/ath-,

letes.

Basketball camp ‘wil he hack next year

ia BASKETBALL



OVER the summer holiday, Xavier’s Lower
School athletic director Nelson ‘Mandelia “Joseph
hosted a basketball camp for students in grades 2-
6.
It is the second time that Joseph has put on the

camp. He ‘indicated that it was held to provide
those students with an GEOL MALLY to learn the
game.

“When [ was growing up in Eleuthera, [really
didn’t have anyone to assist me with my game,”
said Joseph, who has represented the Bahamas on
the national team as a shooting guard.

“About three or four of us got. together and
went jogging and basically worked on our game

ourselves. { just thought that I would take the.

time out every year to help young’kids prepare

“themselves and that is by tearning the basic fun-
* damentals of the game.’
Assisting Joseph was Bahamas men’s national.

team eéach Charles ‘Chuck’ Mackey, who noted

Mackey has pledged to assist J oseph in the
future with the camp.

One of the parents, Philip Davis, whose son is
trying oui for Xavier s icam, invited Sam Mitcheli
to also assist the camp.

Mitchell, the head coach of the NBA’s Toion-

‘to Raptors basketball teani, spoke with the

campers, encouraging them to “always listen
attentively to what your coach teaches you and to
keep on dreaming.”

Mitchell also: told the campers that although
there are only 400'players that currently play-in
the NBA, “you can be in that number as he was
with the Indiana Pacers and then later with the
Minnesota ° ‘Yimber wolves, assinne Kevin Gar-
nett.”

Mitchell joined Gerald Wilkins, who visited
the camp earlier, in advising the powers that be
that if a gymnasiuni was built on the school
campus, it wouid improve the skill level of the
players.

In closing. Mitchell said he enjoyed himself so
much that he intends to be back again next year

that he was very excited about the opportunity of |
. being a part of the camp. :

to assist the Capers: sey



makes debut for



Park University

â„¢@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ROMONA Nicholls made
her debut for Park University
on Saturday when she com-
peted in the Central Missouri
State cross country race.

The Jordan Prince William
graduate, who earned an ath-
letic scholarship through the

-assistance ‘of the Bahamas

Scholarship Foundation for
Student Athletes, was 59th
out of 135 competitors.



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
f neighbourhoods. Perhaps
| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

TR NORA 1h LOR NEVE ETH OIE BRE TY TALS

4

She clocked 16 minutes and :

36.28 seconds in the women’s
2.5 mile race. '

The winning time was
14:01.71 by Kristin
Anderson, who competed
unattached.

Nicholls was one of nine
athletes the BSFSA have
assisted in getiing into col-
lege in August. Two more
athletes are heading oft in
January.

Already gone with Nicholis
are Leneice Rolle and Dean-

‘dra Rolle, both at Missouri
‘State University; Lacquito

Thompson at Missouri Val-
ley College: Jamal Moss at
Hinds Community College
and Keneisha Miller, La’Sean
Pickstock, Rashad Dean and
Lavardo Sands, all at Dick-
inson State.

In January, BSFSA presi-
dent Harrison Petty said they
will be sending off Jameson
Strachan and Jamai Forbes
to-join the list of Bahamians
at Dickinson State.

For the past 6-7 years, Pet-
ty said he along with Donna
Nicholls and Grafton Ifill fH
have been trying to secure

scholarships for deserving

Bahamian athletes.

This year, he said they have
sent off nine athletes and are
looking forward to the next
two going in January. He said
they are also appealing to stu-
dent/athletes who wish to
secure a scholarship next year
to submit their entry to the

BAAA’s office at the Colony
Club.

Strachan said i s working
to secure some more funding,
but he’s also doing his off-
season training so that when
he goes to Dickinson State

“and I have to compete, my ,

ivack season won't be a done, -*-

tall as it was last year.
“Y’m hoping to go there and
run my personal best im the
#400 and come back and tep-
resent my country to the, best
of my ability.”

Forbes said he is also Work- :

ing as he tries to train for tie
upcoming season, nobiny ‘iat
he wants to be ready to just
step into Lhe programme and °
compete next year. ;

Petty said while there aie
scholarships available fos the
student/athietes, he advised
them to get a start some-
where such as Galilee Col-
lege before they transfer to
. the US colleges and universi-
ties. j

Additionally, the BSFSA
donated a total of $5,000/in
an educational improvement
grant to the Road Runners
Track and Field Club.

“That’s the club that we
find to be exceptional,” Petty
revealed.

In accepting the grant,
Roadrunners head coach
Dexter Bodie said they are
preparing now to meet with
their student/athletes and par-
“ents to decide how they will
distribute the grant.

)

~
TRIBUNE SPORTS |



FIFA wants Fidane and
_ Materazzi to make peace

—— a



_—S>-_

SE

Copyrighted Material
RoddickSyndicated Content spots in
Available from Gomumartial News | uy Sig
CHES LUp LU,

= Jia apuva vie



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006, PAGE 7B.
Wty ate

6 be



SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

|
onag
: +5
i “76
3 ahs
. ; Pan
+ r

Vixens win
Opener in
four sets

i VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON |
Junior Sports Reporter

IT WAS back to business as
usual on Sunday evening for the
Scottsdale Vixens women’s vol-
leyball club.

The defending champions in the

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2006



New Providence Volleyball Asso- -

ciation (NPVA) proved to the Da
Basement’s women that their title
win last year was no fluke.

Vixens took the NPVA wom-
en’s seasons opener over the Da
Basement in four sets, 25-18, 26-28,
25-23 and 25-20.

The team never looked back in
the first set, after jumping to an
early. lead off of service aces by
veteran Jackie Conyers.

Conyers, served the ball deep
into left corner of the Da Base-
ment court to go up 9-5.

The strong hits by Krystel Rolle
and Tamasiane Poitier helped
keep the service of Conyers alive.

Rolle and Poitier, were towers
when put up against the Da Base-
ment front court hitters. But the

. Da Basement would get Melinda

Bastian involved in the offence.

Setting Bastian on strong side
proved affective and she ripped
one past Rolle and Poitier for the
break.

“Tt was all mental errors for the
team,” said Vixens’ head coach
Joseph Smith. --

“Even though we are the |.

defending champions there are still

some things we need to work out.”
This team hasn’t played together.

since the championship game last
year, that is a. long lay-off.

“But judging by the perfor-
mance I don’t think that there is to
much we have to work on. There
will be some minor things as we
try to plug in some offence, but
not too much we need to be con-
cerned about.”

Bastian and Edricka McPhee
were just two of the additions to
the Da Basement team that made
a huge difference in the second
set.

The younger more athletic play-
ers added to the firing squad,
including Maragert Albury,
Natasha Armbrister.

Vixens’ offence and defence
started to crumble when the Da

Basement team joined their firing -

power.

It was the combo. of Albury,
Bastian and McPhee that tied up
things, forcing Smith to return to a
starting line-up.

“Dropping the second set was
due to simple mental errors,” said
Smith, who described the opening
game, especially the second set, as
a “try-out” match for his club.

a

“You can’t judge a team just |

because they lost the second set,

‘the team made a lot: of mental

errors and it cost them.

. “The team we played they will
hit the ball on you hard at times, so
you have to be prepared to play

defence: I always preach defence -

to the team..In the second set they

got to lazy, instead of playing for
the hard hits they were in for the

soft taps.
“Keep in mind that the team
will give you some soft taps, but

they have added. a few players «|

who can really attack the
ball.”

According to Smith, the team’s
performance should not be judged
based on their level of play on Sun-

, day, and the chemistry will come

together by the season’s half:.
Play action will continue today
with the Lady Technicians taking

on the First Caribbean Bank Dig- | '

gers.



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS







a BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

WHO can forget sitting in sold’

out gyms to witness the fierce
match-ups between rivals the
Kentucky Colonels and the Becks
Cougars?

Phil Smith tapendary Basketball Classic '

Just the mention of the names
of these two basketball clubs
brings a smile on the faces of for-
mer players, and some of the
country’s fanatics as they remi-

nisce on the great games played.

Now, that match-up will take
place again in the 1st annual Phil
Smith Legendary Basketball Clas-
sic.

Smith, the voice behind sports
in the Bahamas for many years,

Knowles and Nestor set to
compete for Masters Cup



Syndicated Content





‘TENNIS |
By BRENT STUBBS
Sehior Sports Reporter



‘ title next month..

Kevin Ullyett.
four titles this year.

ment in Delray Beach, Florida.

THEY didn’t win any of the Grand Slam titles this
year, but Mark Knowles and his Canadian partner
Daniel Nestor will have a chance to compete for a major

The duo will go in as the jauuiber four seeds at the
Tennis Masters Cup Shanghai in Shanghai, China from
November 12-19 at the Qi Zhong Stadium.

They will play behind the top seeded team of Amer-
ican twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan; No.2 Jonas
Bjorkman and Max Mirnyi and No.3 Paul Hanley and

Now in their 12th year as a team, Knowles and Nestor
have compiled a 36-14 record and have won.a total of

After their disappointment at the Australian Open to
begin the year, they won their first title at a tourna- -




Available from Commercial News Providers

# MARK KNOWLES and Daniel Nestor (AP FILE Photo)

Rome.

ify so early.”

finale.

They made the final in Marseilles and Dubai before

they clinched their first ATP Masters Series in Indian
Wells and then they followed that with back-to-back
victories in Barcelona and at the ATP Masters Series in

“It is very exciting to be back at the Tennis Masters’
Cup,” said Nestor. “This is a title that has eluded us the
' past few years so it has definitely been a focus of ours.
We've had a great year and it’s ‘great to be able to qual-

Knowles was unavailable for comments.
Knowles and Nestor, who advanced to the Tennis
Masters Cup semifinals in 2003 and 2004, will be making
' their fourth consecutive team appearance in the circuit

They currently hold a 101-point lead over their near-

~ est rivals in the Stanford ATP Doubles Race, the No. 5
team of Fabrice Santoro and Nenad Zimonijic.

In their last tournament at the US Open, which they

won in 2002, Knowles and Nestor lost in the third round.

They were the No.3 seeded team.



—_—

‘



























will be honoured ‘for his contri-
butions to the discipline of bas-
ketball in a Cougars-Colonels bat-

tle. The tournament is also a~

token of appreciation by players
and sports fans to Smith for his
contribution to the development
of sports in the-country.

The annual classic,’ which. will
assist with Smith’s medical fund-
ing will be held on Saturday Octo-
ber 28th at the Sir Kendal Isaacs

“gymnasium. The basketball game
is just one of the main events

being featured in the week of |

activities.

Members of both the Kentucky

Colonels and the Becks Cougars,
thought it only fitting to honour
Smith, who is.said to be one of

the country’ s'top players in ne

1960’s-70’s.

Persons like Fred ‘Papa’ Smith,
Eddie Ford, Peter ‘Superstar’
Gilcud, Halson- Moultrie, and
Peter Brown, who played in one
of the ball clubs, voiced their grat-
itude and support to Smith, who
has been one of the leading names
in the Bahamas, yesterday at a
press conference.

According to Moultrie, who has
been a part of both the Colonels
and the Cougars, “Smith should
be viewed as an icon, who has
made significant contributions to
the development of basketball and
sports in the country.”

As Moultrie reflected on the:
intense training both clubs under- -
went in order to excel, he noted ~

that the success in the club
brought a growth in their players.

He added: “It was difficult for
persons to come from the Family
Islands to play in teams like these,
but I was one who was able to
benefit from both clubs.

“T am pleased to know that such

a high level of basketball existed.

in. the country, and to know that I
was a part of it.

“You can always tell when the
Cougars were going to play the
Colonels. You can see both teams

-working out harder than, before,

wanting to have bragging rights.

“There was a level of commit-
ment by the players, something
you don’t see very often these
days. That kind of rivalry and par-
ticipation has been lost in the

‘Bahamas, so hopefully by the end

of the tournament, those in the
gym.can learn from the guys who
played in the past.”

Before the classic’s feature
match tip-off, persons such as
Bucky Nesbitt, John Martin, Den-
zel ‘Inch’ Swain and Charles ‘Soft-
ly’ Rubins will take on the team of
Dercky ‘DJ’ Johnson, Pat McKen-
zie, Gordon Musgove and Sharon
Storr in a friendly game.



ai