Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 102 No.215



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EESEBURUER ym iovin' It, |





Govt considers.

fixed time limits

~ Woman in hospital
following shooting

H By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

FOREIGNERS with work
permits will in future be expect-
ed to train Bahamian replace-
ments by the time their permits
expire, the government said yes-

_terday.

Work permits with fixed time
limits are part of a proposal by
the Ministry. of Immigration,

, -abour and ‘Training to monitor -

compliance with the govern-
ment’s Bahamianisation policy.

“The government is review-
ing its work permit policy to
determine the prudence of lim-
iting the period of time that one

individual may hold a work per-
mit,” said a press release.

It said the ministry “will
implement a procedure
designed to monitor compliance

- of companies with the govern-

ment’s Bahamianisation poli-
CY ey
Should a work permit ‘be
approved because there are no,
or not enough, Bahamians
available, then the employer
must identify a Bahamian to
train to fill the vacancy by the
end of the term of the work per-
mit, it added. *

“The Bahamianisation poli-

SEE page 15.

A’YOUNG woman was shot on Tuesday morning in front of her

home off Melrose Avenue.

Melissa Taylor, in her early twenties, was outside her house on.

“Hampton Road at about 4am when a man took out a handgun and shot
her in the head, according to press liaison officer Inspector Walter

Evans. i

Ms Taylor — who neighbours claim is related to one of Prime Minister.

__ Perry Christie’s bodyguards — was admitted to the intensive care unit
‘at Doctors Hospital where she'is listed in serious condition.

Inspector Evans told The Tribune that the last report. he received on

Tuesday morning was that the victim was undergoing surgery.
No one has been arrested as a result of the incident. “When officers

_» established.”
No information was available at Doctors Hospital about Ms Taylor’s

condition. —- .

At the scene of the shooting yesterday, shocked friends and relatives

_ reached the scene the assailant fled,” Inspector Evans said. “No suspects
~. have been brought forward and a motive of this incident has not been

refused to comment on what had happened.
Neighbour Lauren Brown said: “Last night, around four in the

morning I héard three gun shots and then I saw two or four guys run-

ning down Hampton Road.”

Another resident said that after the gunshots she saw a car driving
down the road “that looked as if it was going to turn over.”

































he Hiami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006



se Ue EE i

VANDALS have damaged the art site known as ‘Sacred Space’ located at Clifton.
Graffiti has been scrawled on the exhibition, with the head being pulled off one of the
| | pieces. Artist Antonius Roberts, who created the figures from dead casuarina stumps,
has been notified. of the damage. * SEE PAGE SIX







patients knowingly
spreading disease

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

crash, filming postponed

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
Tribune Staff Writer





FILMING of Pirates of the Caribbean II, has
been postponed until January of next year due to
a car accident that has left a producer. of the mul-
ti-million dollar blockbuster movie seriously
injured, Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
confirmed in the House of Assembly yesterday.

The matter was brought.up by member of par-
liament for High Rock, Kenneth Russell.

Mr Wilchcombe later told The Tribune that
he was informed of the accident “about a month
ago.”

“We had wanted the completion of Pirates of
the Caribbean III to continue as was expected, but
just as with Pirates of the Caribbean II, there
were circumstances that had caused a delay,” Mr
Wilchcombe explained. “This one is on hiatus

SEE page 15



THERE have been rumours that some
HIV/AIDS patients in the Bahamas are know-
ingly spreading the disease.

The Tribune has received reports that persons
who have contacted HIV/AIDS are declining to
warn their sexual partners on purpose — and
that some are even attempting “to the best of
their ability” to infect others.

Claiming that some officials are fully aware of
what is going on but are doing nothing about it,
two members of the public have complained
that sufficient information is not being released
about the problem.

Speaking in response to the allegations,

SEE page 10



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Pirates movie producer in : Rumours of HIV/AIDS





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August 8-

All teachers wil receive ‘|

all purchases made (
with proper
ID is required

Civil Aviation
director denies
emergency: -
Chalk’s meeting

_ i By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

REFUTING claims that
Chalk’s management was
engaged in an emergency meet-
ing in Nassau to relaunch their .
airline, director of Civil Avia-
tion Cyril Saunders yesterday
said that the hands of Bahamian
authorities are tied in the mat-
ter.

“No such (emergency) meet-
ing took place. All it was, was
that Chalk’s principles met with
Civil Aviation in a routine pre-
application meeting,” he said.

Mr Saunders explained that

_every airline wishing to fly

routes into the Bahamas must
take part in such pre-applica-
tion meetings. ;

The civil aviation director ©

_ pointed out, however, that in

the case of Chalk’s the Bahamas
cannot approve the airline
resuming its operations into the
country until United States
authorities give the required go-

~ ahead. |

SEE page 14

Damaged
cable affects
phone lines

li By KRYSTEL ROLLE

TELEPHONE lines in south
central Bahamas were severe-
ly disrupted yesterday as a dam-
aged cable prevented persons
in the Golden Gates area from
making outgoing calls or receiv-
ing incoming calls.

The breakdown was caused
by damage to BTC’s fiber optic
line, creating major, disruption
in land lines with the prefix 341
and 361. Land line customers
with these prefixes were unable
to make calls outside of their
prefix or numbers not begin-
ning with either 361 or 341.

In case of emergencies BTC
advised persons needing to con-
tact the police to use the fol-
lowing numbers: 361-0480, 361-
0482, 361-0483, and 361-0484.

BTC is working assiduously
to fix the damaged cable and

SEE page 15



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

A quarter of stud





‘accurate to the Bahamas but Dr

NEWS

ents have

m@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A QUARTER of high school
students admitted to having
smoked in a World Health
Organisation study ~ making it
a top health concern for the
Bahamas.

Minister of Health Senator
Bernard Nottage said he is very
concerned at the high number
of young persons that smoke,
and that the number of popular
songs which promote smoking
make young persons regard it
as a harmless practice.

The WHO study was con-
ducted in all the high schools in
New Providence and some of
the Family Islands.

At an exhibition entitled
‘Towards a Smoke-Free
Bahamas’, the Minister revealed
several troubling statistics.

According to, the results, 15
per cent of the 1,746 students
who took part in the survey said
they currently use tobacco. Six-
ty-seven per cent of those said
they want to stop but could not,
and half of the interviewed stu-
dents said they were. exposed
to smoking in their homes. ©

“In other words they inher-
ited it -- in a manner of speak-
ing,” Dr Nottage said.

Tobacco is a major cause of .
death globall, with tobacco-
related illnesses killing about
one in ten adults worldwide.
Those figures are not exactly





THE Northwest Bahamas
should see an improvement in
the weather starting soon — as a

‘tropical wave moves out of the

area.
Chief Meteorologist Basil
Dean said yesterday that the

_wave that was over the north-

west Bahamas is expected to
head west and move out of the
area by early today.

. Areas of New Providence
experienced heavy showers and

THE TRIBUNE



oe



@ SMOKING is becoming an increasing concern for the

Ministry of Health

Nottage said the figures are not
very far off the mark.

“If you look at the Bahamas
some of the most common caus-
es of death is cardiovascular dis-
ease, lung cancer, and cancer of
the mouth and tongue -- all of
them contribute to the statis-
tics,” he said.

Smoking and second-hand
smoke leads to a variety of
health problems including lung
cancer and heart disease. In fact
in some cases second-hand
smoke can be more deadly to
persons than first hand smoke,
the minister said.

The minister said that work
has already been started to draft

thunderstorms on Monday

evening as the system moved _

through the northwest
Bahamas.

According to Mr Dean, the
Bahamas Meteorological
Department is monitoring a sec-
ond tropical wave which was
located near the Western
Antilles yesterday afternoon.

He explained that the wave
could become a depression
within the next day or two,
reaching maximum wind speeds
of 35 miles per hour.

(AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

legislation to create smoke-free
environments. Also public edu-
cational programmes are being

improved to teach children
about the adverse effects that,
smoking can have on persons

and the’ environment.

Dr Nottage said he is also
working towards making work-
ing environments safer — par-
ticularly places like casinos.

“The environment that casino
workers have to work in is not
healthy.”

He reported that trade union
workers have already come to
them complaining of smoke-
related health problems that
workers are experiencing.

sing through- but
depression may be felt at weekend

lm By KRISTINA MCNEIL

Even if the wave does not:
mature into a depression, the .

Bahamas may still feel the
effects this weekend with skies
not clearing up until Monday,
Mr Dean said.

The Met Department is also
monitoring a third low pressure
system located southwest of the

. Azores Islands off the coast of

West Africa.

On Tuesday, its location was .

given as 750 miles off the coast

and Mr Dean said it remained '

relatively stationary overnight.

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_
“



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 3





In brief —

Three men
arrested
after firearm
discovered

THREE men were arrested
in connection with the confis-
cation of a firearm on Tuesday
night.

The gun was reportedly dis-
covered when drug enforce-
ment officers became suspicious
of two vehicles parked outside
the Super Value on Baillou Hill
Road.

- ‘According to press liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans,
when the officers approached, a
young man in one of the cars
pulled the gun from his waist
and threw it on the ground.

Upon detaining all three indi-
viduals — ages 26, 27, and 33 —
the officers conducted a search
and found that the gun was a .38
revolver with four live bullets.

Police investigations into the
matter continue.

Preval visits
lawless slum
in bid.to curb
violence

a HAITI
: -. Port-au- Prince

PRESIDENT Rene Preval on
Wednesday assured residents in
one of Haiti’s roughest neigh-
borhoods that the government is
determined to stem rampant
gang violence in the capital’s
densely populated slums,
according to Associated Press.

Flanked by UN troops in

"jeeps and light-armored vehi-
cles, Preval toured the Cite Mil-
itaire slum where five gang
members were killed Tuesday
in a gunfight with peacekeep-
ers, UN officials said. Journal-
ists were not allowed on the
half-hour visit because of safety
concerns, the UN said.

In Preval’s first visit to the
troubled neighborhood since his

February election, he addressed

_a crowed and pledged peace,

jobs and gang disarmament,
according to residents. ~

. Ketly Kazmine, a 23-year-old
market vendor, said: “I am hun-
gry and I can’t sell anymore

because of the shootings,” Kaz- -

ime said near an intersection
where UN pracckeepers stood
watch.

Gunfire between warring
gangs has raged in parts of Port-
au-Prince in recent days. Much
of the shooting has been in Cite
Militaire, which borders the
capital’s business district.





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LOCAL NEW

“Minister pledges crackdown



on ‘indiscriminate squatting’

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports, and Housing Neville
Wisdom said that he cannot sit
back and allow “indiscriminate
squatting” on Crown Land to
go on.

During yesterday’ s sitting of
the House of Assembly, Mr
Wisdom again expressed the
need for squatters at the Fire
Trail subdivision site to either
purchase the property on
which they live, or leave.

“When my ministry took up
the challenge of sub-develop-
ment and the construction at
Fire trail, we found out that
there were 230 squatters resid-
ing in that area.

“Following the issuance of
vacancy notices Mr Speaker,
215 left. And yesterday we had
one family return to Long
Island, so that is 216 that have
left,” he. said.

Mr Wisdom.also gave an
update on the progress of the
subdivision to his parliamen-
tary colleagues, and recount-

ed an interesting encounter he.

had with one of the squatters —
an illegal immigrant.

“He told me that God gave
him that land. Bahamian land,
and he is here illegally. The

a NEVILLE Wisdom

tractor that was on the land
went through specifically to
remove some abandoned
shacks. Those shacks were all
occupied by illegal immigrants,
and when given notice, they
left. No Bahamian has been
moved from that section at
Fire Trail,” he said.

Mr Wisdom mentioned that
he had met, both at the site
and at his ministry, with the
squatters who were being

~ impacted.

“Rach case was examined



and as a result the following
offers were made. In some
instances the offers that were
made to squatters were to pur-
chase the land on which they
were squatting with an appro-
priate payment schedule
agreed to.

Offers

“Secondly Mr Speaker, there’

were two disabled persons who
were squatting in shacks that
had no lights, no water, and no
proper sewage system. They
were given the option of occu-
pying government subsidised
rental units.

“In other words, we offered
to take them from that unsan-
itary, unclean, and certainly
unsafe condition — and with the

assistance of government sub- _

sidy because they are disabled,
(put them) in a facility that has
running water, lights, and
which had proper sewage,” he
said.

Mr Wisdom also explained
that a small portion of land was
given to the Rastafarian com-
munity for their “religious
facility”.

“T’d like to give notice today
as the minister responsible to
address as quickly as I can the

Hospital p

harmacy still closed

after promised reopening

CROWDS of customers

" were again gathered around

the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital pharmacy yesterday
morning — which was closed
for the second day in a row
despite assurances that it
would be open on time.

When this first happened .
on Tuesday, a staff member
said that the pharmacy would
be open at 8am the next day.

However The Tribune was
told yesterday by hospital
senior assistant administra-
tor Jessica Cartwright-Rolle
that such late starts will hap-
pen again - “but not all the
time”,

Angry pharmacy cus-

i tomers waiting to have pre-

scriptions filled called it a
ridiculous situation.
“Something has to be
done, if they are going to be
late they should announce it












UR R LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm) '











on television, radio, or in the
papers the public needs to be
informed,” said one. “It is a
waste of time to come here and
wait from my arrival, which is at
6am to find that I have to wait
until 10am."

A pharmacy manager, -who
wished to remain anonymous,
refused to release any informa-
tion to the press.

However another adminis-
trator later said that the delayed
opening was due to the fact that
the staff had to hold a meeting.

It was explained to The Tri-
bune.on Tuesday that the phar-
macy is supposed to open from
8am to 12.30pm, then from
1.30pm to 3.30pm every day.

But if the pharmacy does not

open until 10am.— as was the

case yesterday — the usual
crowd of customers only have
two and a half hours to be
served, before they face having
to wait until 2pm.

One said that even trying to
be served under the circum-
stances is “a waste of time”.





FENDI BOUTIQUE.

_ Is looking for a Sales Associate
‘at least 25 years old
honest, mature, responsible and flexible

cashing and computer experience an asset

outgoing personality:
Send resume to

According to Mrs Cartwright-
Rolle, “being in a business like
this there is need for commu-
nication between the employer

and employees, and this com-- -

munication takes place during
our meeting. .
“We try our best to schedule

our meetings in.a way that it ©

will not inconvenience the pub-
lic, which is why it is held in the
mornings so that when their
meeting is done, they can go
straight through trying their best
to serve everyone.

“About announcing (closures
and delays) on television, radio,
or newspaper — it will be
brought forward as a sugges-
tion, but their are no promises
as to if it will actually happen.”

eT cya
erase acy

mA
PHONE: 322-2157







challenge of providing afford-
able housing for Bahamians —
Bahamians who want to do it
the right way; Bahamians who
have applied and who qualify
for affordable housing.

“And we cannot allow this
indiscriminate squatting on pub-
lic land to go by and we just say

in the interest of compassion
‘let it go’. I want to give notice
now to those persons who are
continuing to squat on govern- —
ment land reserved for housing,
that this minister will be taking
the necessary steps to ensure
the continued development of
our housing project,” he said.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

\

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDI

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387



Minister makes statement on Tribune

LABOUR and Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson, speaking in the House of Assembly
yesterday afternoon, told members that in deal-
ing with work permits, he had invited more than
100 companies, including The Tribune, to give
him information about their training pro-
srammes for Bahamians. The Tribune was the
only company that did not do so, he said.
“Some of:them wrote detailed reports to
show me their training programme,” he said.
Some even came to him with their powerpoint
presentation.

But not The Tribune.

“Now what I found even more amazing,” he
continued, “is that in The Tribune editorial they
saying when the FNM came to power, a minister
in the FNM asked them the same thing, and
they went to the FNM minister and they made
their presentation. So now, why don’t they do
the same thing with me? One company out of all
of those companies, Mr Speaker,.decide they
would now...” He did’not finish the sentence. .

What we presume he was trying to say was
that more than 100 companies were invited to
see him, or send him information on their train-
ing programmes. Only The Tribune remained
silent.

This is not true. We were never informed
that the Minister or anyone at Immigration
wanted a meeting with us. It was only by acci-
dent that The Tribune discovered that the Min-
ister had instructed a Labour Department offi-
cial to visit The Tribune. We are still waiting
for that inspector to set up an appointment to
come to our offices.

Mr Gibson said he was surprised that we
would go to see‘an. FNM Minister, but would not
go to see him. We can’t ‘understand his surprise.
It is all very simple. We went to see the FNM

' minister — in fact we saw two FNM Labour

ministers — because the minister wrote a letter
inviting us to see him. We did not go to see Mr
Gibson, because we were not invited. In fact
we had no idea that he even wanted to see us
until-he made his statement in the House yes-
terday. :

And it was only by reading The Nassau
Guardian of July 31 that we learned that Tribune
Managing Editor John Marquis’ work permit °
had been deferred until Immigration could

“ensure what efforts have been made to Bahami-
anize the position.”

Later the same day we received Immigra- |
tion’s letter, dated July 18, which informed us of
that fact. ;

Mr Gibson also told the House that his deci-
sion had nothing to do with Mr Marquis. We
question this. The reason we question it is
because we submitted two applications for work
permits on the same day. One of them was for
the renewal of Mr Marquis’. permit. It was only
Mr Marquis’ permit that was held up. The oth-
er editor was granted his. Therefore, “as night
follows day”, it is only Mr Marquis’ position
that this government is interested in. It is the

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘02 H-I 12-SEATER VAN
‘00 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI BALENO

only position that The Tribune has to justify.
On January 24 The Tribune submitted two

applications to the Labour Department for a

Notice of Vacancy permit, which was needed

’ to accompany the Immigration application for

the renewal of the work permits of two editors
— one of them John Marquis. Six weeks later we
telephoned the department to find out when
the Labour forms would be ready. We were told

to send our messenger to collect them in an

hour’s time — that was March 8.

On arrival our messenger was told to return
the next day — they were not yet ready. The
next day, the messenger telephoned us from the
Labour Department to tell us that there was_.a

problem. He put us on to a staff member who .

confirmed there was indeed a problem, but she
couldn’t tell us. She put a more senior staff
member on the phone. Even she could not tell us
until she had conferred with the director.

Eventually the lady called back, She said .

“the Minister” had a problem with the applica-
tion. He wanted a Labour Department officer to
interview our two editors and the two persons
who were training for their positions. She said
they would come to our offices to do this. There

’ was an exchange of letters, and as we were leav-

ing the island that week it was left. that we would
phone the director on our return to arrange a
meeting. Although we telephoned on our return
we had a great deal of difficulty reaching the
director.

There was then an exchange of e-mails.

The last e-mail from the director said that he
had to leave to attend an international confer-
ence in Geneva and would be in touch with us on
his return, We have heard no more from the

’ Labour Department. When we telephoned the

department last week, we were told that the
director was on vacation and would not be back
in office before September. And that is where
the matter remained until the arrival of the July
18 letter from Immigration — the first and only
communication that we have had since our appli-
cation on March 8 for the renewal of permits for

two editors. On May 1 one of those permits was ©
’ renewed. Nothing was said about Mr Marquis’

permit.

On July 31 we received Immigration’s July 18
letter telling us that Mr Marquis’ permit was
deferred “to ensure what efforts have been made
to Bahamianize the position.”

Until Mr Gibson’s statement on, the floor of
the House yesterday, we still assumed that this

. was to be done by the Labour Be partient

inspector.

The letter also asked that we “submit a staff
list indicating names, nationality and positions
held”. A letter with all the information request-
ed.was hand delivered to the Immigration
Department, and also.to Mr Gibson’s office on

‘Tuesday of this week.

Now if Mr Gibson wants us to meet him in hig
office, we have no objection. He only has to say

so.

THE TRIBUNE





training under
the tutelage of
John Marquis

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I AM most grateful for the
training and guidance I have
received under Mr Marquis’
tutelage. I have always told
Mr Marquis and several oth-
ers that he has been a literary
mentor, a literary giant of
sorts, to me.

Mr Marquis, with news edi-
tor Paco Nunez, mentored me
as a reporter and believed in
my ability to properly research
and report to our true mas-
ters-— the people!

In 2005, as a 20-year-old
cub reporter Mr
Marquis endorsed the idea of
my having a column to bring a
youthful voice to everyday

affairs in our country and :

indeed across the world. This
was even more groundbreak-
ing, as his vision allowed me to
become the youngest colum-
nist in the Bahamas. Mr Mar-






aA BPeS

letters@tribunemedia.net

quis demonstrated a belief in
me by taking such a gam-
ble. In my mind's eye, he went
above and beyond in assisting
with my development as a
writer and as a concerned, dis-
cerning Bahamian citizen.

I am sickened by the notion
that a few politicians, who've
also threatened me, would
resort to machiavellian tactics
to deport him from the coun-
try. I have been threatened
with being disciplined and/or
fired in my professional capac-
ity and he has been threatened
with deportation. Isn’t that
something?! The pérsons that

‘lambast this government the

hardest are the ones being
subjected to bully tactics!

Now at age 22, Mr Marquis *
continues to show an interest
in my development as a leader
among my countrymen.
Speaking to Mr Marquis on
an almost weekly basis has led

‘to my maturity as a person

and a citizen in a democratic
country. I assure Bahamians
that the worst thing imagin-
able would be for this govern-
ment to become too obsessed
with power, and attempt to
abuse journalists and those
espousing the principles of
democracy, particularly free
speech.

Mr Marquis, thank you for
being: a mentor and for:
demonstrating an undeniable
belief in my progression.

ADRIAN GIBSON
Tribune Columnist
August 8,

Nassau, Bahamas.

An invisible wall that —
is difficult to climb

- EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT IS a well established belief that educa-

tion was not available to the Bahamian masses

until the Progressive Liberal Party was given
the mandate to govern our beautiful Bahamas
in 1967! If that is true, then under which gov-
ernment was Sir Lynden Pindling educated?
Which government educated A F Adderley,
Sir Gerald Cash, Dr Doris Johnson, Sir Randol

Fawkes, Hon. A D Hanna, Dr Elwood Don- -

aldson, Hon Paul L Adderley, Mr G J Tynes,
Mr H A Verance, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Mr T
Baswell Donaldson, and, oh, yes, Mr Carlton
Francis? I can go on, and on, but I will leave it
there.

-There is no doubt, that some vast educa-
tional advances were made under the Progres-
sive Liberal Party government, but to say that
the former, who had the mandate to govern,
did nothing to educate the masses, would be
untrue.

I believe it would be safe to say that they
educated the group who took over from them,
Tam sure that was not their intention, but that
is a fact of life. I hate injustice where it is, I am
not going to deprive anyone, and I do not want
anyone to deprive me of anything.

If we go back to BC 19th Dynasty, Egypt, we
would see Moses being educated in the House
of Pharaoh, after Moses’ altercation with the
Royal Household and made his exit, or Exodus,



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it would not be true to say that he was educat-
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saying that Hippocrates is the father of medi-
cine, when they know from history that:
Imhotep of ancient Egypt was the real father of
medicine. He lived from about 2300 BC, and
gave that knowledge to Greece and Rome.
Hippocrates appeared on the scene 2000 years
after Imhotep who was also Prime Minister to
King Zozer; he was a multi-genius and fore-
most architect of his time.

One would dilute himself if he were to say
there were no barriers under the old system,
there were some then, and there are some now.
The oligarchies.erected a high wall, but it was —
visible, what we have now is an invisible wall
that is difficult to climb because you don’t
know where it is, unless you know somebody
who knows somebody who has a name, which
is very taxing to someone who does not want to
comprise his dignity. There is.a story to be
told, but who would tell it, if we would not tell
it ourselves? It must be told if we want history .
to be kind to us, because history has a way to-
expose those who deprive others of their right-
ful place in history.

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August, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 5





In brief

Flight from
Venezuela
redirected
to Bahamas

A FLIGHT from Venezuela
was redirected to the Bahamas
after being denied entry into
the US because some passen-
gers reportedly had “irregular”
documentation.

The news website www.elu-
niversal.com quoted a Lan
Chile Airlines statement as say-
ing that a group of passengers
aboard flight 568 from
Venezuela to Miami on July 4
was prohibited from entering
the US and landed in the
Bahamas to refuel before
immediately returning to
Venezuela.

Said the report: “Lan Chile
general manager Juan Manuel
Pérez explained that 11 trav-
ellers boarded the airplane in
Maiquetia bearing irregular
documentation — the.reason
why US authorities denied the
flight authorisation to land.

“Following September 11
attacks on New York, the US
has reinforced security mea-
sures and demands the list of
passengers traveling to the
country to be sent by e-mail. In

-’ that way, the relevant US

authorities detected the irreg-
ularities and prohibit the land-
ing of the flight in Miami.

The report said that Mr Pérez
would not confirm whether the
passengers with irregular doc-
umentation were Cubans as
other passengers had claimed.

The director of the Venezue-
lan Civil Aviation Institute
Francisco Paz Freita said inves-
tigations on this case continue
and that investigators are await-
ing a report from Lan Chile.









ay ARR isa:
Fertilizer, Fungicide,

Pest Control

Pec
“30215



@ BY MARK HUMES

SUPERINTENDENT of
Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming
has commended the govern-
ment’s efforts to begin the
process of equipping officers
with protective gear — calling
the move unprecedented.

Dr Rahming’s comments
came after a Tribune article on
Wednesday in which Corporal
Clive Rolle, president of the
Bahamas Prison Officer’s
Association, criticised the gov-
ernment for not delivering all
of the protective gear that it
had promised to officers.

“This year, Her Majesty’s
Prison will celebrate its 270th
anniversary, and ever since
there was a prison in the
Bahamas, officers have been
in some degree of danger by

virtue of where they work. This

is the first time that protective
gear has been bought, although
the danger has always been
there,” Dr Rahming said.
“The efforts of the govern-
ment to begin the process of
equipping officers with protec-
tive gear, I do not see how the
efforts can be anything other
than commendable,” he said.
Noting that the need for pro-
tective gear is mostly specific to
the maximum security area,
the central intake facility and
to a certain extent the remand
centre, Dr Rahming said that

“there have been genuine

attempts by the government to
ameliorate many of the long-
standing negative conditions.
. In addition to the 40 vests
which have already been pro-
vided to the facility, Dr Rah-
ming said he was awaiting
another donation of vests from

Prison superintendent praises _

Efforts to equip prison
guards ‘commendable’

government despite delay



a corporate citizen.

“The administration is very
busy, almost 24 hours a day,
working towards improving the
conditions at HMP for both
inmates and staff,” said Dr
Rahming. “Where there are
deficiencies and weaknesses,
we acknowledge them and we
are working hastily to remedi-
ate them.”

In an open letter to the edi-
tor.of The Tribune earlier this
week, BPOA president Mr
Rolle claimed to have sought
out Deputy Prime Minister and

Minister of National Security

Cynthia Pratt for assistance in

Rigby refuses to respond
to criticism of party

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

PLP chairman Raynard Rig-
by has refused to respond to
the opposition’s claim that his
party fell into political ruin and
lost its creative savvy after
their first, 25-year tenure.

In a statement released on
Sunday, the FNM accused the
old PLP of abandoning its
roots, selling out the country
and destroying the good name
of the Bahamas.

The statement said that the
new PLP government is so
busy protecting its image from
scandals, that it does not have
the time to govern.

According to the FNM, by
the end of the first PLP stint in
office, “the country’s infra-
structure was run down, the
nation’s finances were in
shambles, foreign investment
had almost dried up, and many

Bronze, Gold,Blue

_Phone:325-3336

pie OAL) RRL AI YIN A Latah SY





Hl RAYNARD Rigby

of our family of islands were
being treated like relatives we
had turned our backs on.”
“By 1992, after 25 years of
tule, a once progressive polit-
ical force was spending most of
its time victimising opponents,
cutting sweetheart deals, sell-

Co

Black, White,
Green, Silver

ing out the country to various
shady interests and ruining the
country’s good name,” it said.

After reading the statement,
Mr Rigby said he would not
respond to the claims.

As the next general election
approaches, the FNM claims
that after five years in opposi-
tion, it has put together a
“dynamic group the Bahamian
people can be proud of.”

“We have also been doing

tremendous amount of plan-

ning and developing exciting
new plans to take the
Bahamas even further than we
did the last time we were in
office. This is what a responsi-
ble political party does when it
is in opposition: get ready to
govern again.”

Attempts to contact Prime ..

Minister Perry Christie for
comment on the FNM state-
ment proved fruitless.



ren.

obtaining more vests and
equipment so that officers
could feel protected .

Without an answer coming
from Mrs Pratt or officials at
National Security, Mr Rolle
said: “We want to work and
remain loyal to our job, our
institution, and our country,
but its gets more difficult every
day we have to wait on the
tools necessary to carry out our
duties in an effective manner
and in a clean and safe envi-
ronment.

“The prison officers are tired
of being at the bottom of the
totem pole.”

§e

~



/ noon
y 12:05

4:30 Carmen San Diego

F 11:00

GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

Les ata

THURSDAY,
AUGUST 10TH

5:30 AM Community Page

11:00 Immediate Response (Live)
ZNS News Update Hl
Immediate Response (Cont'd) j
1:00 Legends: Rolly Gray
1:30 N-Contrast

2:00 Bullwinkle & His Friends
2:30 The Fun Farm

3:00 Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Tiangello Hill

4:00 - Dennis The Menace















4:58 ZNS News Update

5:00: The Envy Life

5:30 .. Andiamo

6:00 ThisWeek in The Bahamas |

6:30 News Night 13

7:00° ' The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 _ Da’ Native Show

8:30 Bahamian Spirit: Hon. Italia
Johnson

9:30 The Envy Life

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 — Immediate Resonse

1:30am Community Page 1540AM |

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the |
right to make last minute —
programme changes!























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LOCAL NEWS

Vandals
‘Sacred Spac









VANDALS have scrawled graffiti on wood-
en female figures at the Sacred Space art site at
Clifton.

Last night, one art-lover declared herself
“disgusted” at the desecration.

“Almost all the sculptures have been van-
dalised and the head has been ripped off one of
them,” she said.

Artist Antonius Roberts, who created the
figures from dead casuarina stumps, has been
notified of the damage.

Mr Roberts, who is currently in China, is

awaiting public reaction to the vandalism
before deciding what to do about it.
_ The Sacred Space sculptures - depicting slave
women looking back towards Africa - have
been hailed as one of the most haunting pieces
of art in the Bahamas.

Mr Roberts sculpted the forms last year and
another, artist, Tyrone Ferguson,
provided bells to hang in the trees round the
site. y

Foreign visitors have been so impressed by
the forms that Mr Roberts has been asked to
reproduce them else-
where. There is now a
Sacred Space in Ger-
many.

On one figure, the
words ‘Tree killer’
and ‘Peter C was
here’ appear close to
a drawing of a skull.

Under-



THE
Sacred Space
art site which

is located
at Clifton.



| Bakers Da

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB |



VACAN

THE TRIBUNE

efa






neath are the words: “The trees were already
dead. The art saves their history and presence.
Love it! M M” - apparently written by a well-
meaning art-lover who merely worsened the
damage.

Vulgar additions have been made to other
sculptures on the site.

Collection

Sacred Space, which stands close to Clifton
Oil Depot, was to have been the beginning of
a collection of artwork in the area.

Artists hoped it would become an ‘art park’
with tourist appeal.

With slave cottages of the old Whylly plan-
tation standing nearby, it was hoped the
African theme could have been developed.

_A visitor to the site said:
“It’s a great pity that peo-
ple can’t leave things like
this alone. Apart from
gang signs, Nassau is
remarkably free of graffi-
ti, but there always seems
to be one sad case who
ruins

f













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Define the design elements associated with landscape and hardscape deiails
* Prepare design guidelines and administrative procedures for development
Sub-consultant identification and contract negotiation

Coordinate the preparation of marketing and public relations materia!

Analyze comparable projects within the region with respect to product size,
finish, amenities and cost in order fo fully understand the impact of the
proposed master plan from a pricing, sales and marketing perspective
Coordinate the efforts associated with developing a marina marketing strategy
Oversee ihe on-going improvements fo ensure compliance with the overall

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° Coordinate efforts between sales, design and construction teams, including
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Artists
needed to
contribute
to calendar

LOCAL artists are being
offered the chance to show their
work in a popular corporate cal-
endar.

Fidelity (Bahamas) Ltd is
hoping to feature Bahamian
scenes and wants to hear from
artists interested in submitting
work.

The calendar will be available
not only in the Bahamas, but

-also Turks and Caicos and the

Cayman Islands.

Interested artists should con-
tact Selina J Roberts at 356-
7764 (ext 3126) or e-mail seli-
na.roberts@fidelitybahamas.co
m

Education
on agenda
at special

meeting

EDUCATION and its role in
the modern Bahamas will be

“among topics for discussion at a

special meeting tonight.
Speakers will also ask if

- Bahamians are ready to com-

pete globally and whether edu-
cation teaches Bahamians who
they are.

The event, organised by
Youth Gr oundings, will be held
at Me’Ting, in the plaza next to
the British Colonial Hilton

(8pm).
Closing
ceremony

for camp
today

THE closing out ceremony
of the Yamacraw Summer
Camp is scheduled to be held
today at the Vision of Hope
Church of God on Yamacraw
Hill.

The camp was sponsored by |

the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing.

Minister of Social Services
and Community Development
Melanie Griffin will be in atten-
dance and will give brief
remarks.

The ceremony, begins at
10am.

I n brief

LOCAL NEWS

Murder accused’s sister denies



IMUHSVAY, AUUUS!

1U, 2UU0, FAUL /

that he was abused as a child

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A SISTER of accused mur-
derer Cordell Farrington, his
former girlfriend and the man
claiming to be his lover all tes-
tified in the Supreme Court.
yesterday.

Farrington is on trial for the
2002 murder of Jamaal Rob-
bins in Grand Bahama.

Detective Corporal Raquel
Lightbourne, Farrington’s old-
er sister, described her broth-
er as a humble, nice person
who never got into a fight or
argument.

She said that growing up,
Cordell sought to have a good
relationship with their father,
but that the efforts were not
returned.

Corporal Lightbourne also
told the court that through-
out his life, Cordell would say
that he hated their mother or
did not like her very much.

She said that on Sunday,
October 26, 2003 at about
7.45am she received a call from
her brother, who told her he
was at Central Police Station.

Corporal Lightbourne said
that when she asked him why,
her brother said he was not
“locked up” but needed her
to come to the station,
although he did not say why.

She said that she responded
“OK”, but want back to sleep
because she thought that he
had been detained.

She told the court that
about an hour or two later,
she received a call from Cor-
poral Pinder who was at the
Central Police Station, and as
a result, cleaned up and imme-
diately went to the station
where she met her brother in
one of the interview rooms.

The witness said that while
she was alone with her broth-
er, he admitted to killing
Jamaal Robbins, someone he
had met at Sandilands Reha-
bilitation Centre between
2000 and 2001.

She told the court that she
had to leave the room there-
after, because she was no
longer able to act in a profes-
sional manner.

During cross-examination
by Farrington’s lawyer
Romona Farquharson, officer
Lightbourne denied the sug-
gestion that their mother had
been verbally and emotional-
ly abusive to them when they
were children.

-Ms Farquharson also sug-














@ CORDELL Farrington
(right) is accused of
murdering Jamaal Robbins,
who he met at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre

gested that their mother, who
was referred to as “Dot,” used
to beat Farrington repeatedly
when he was a child. .

Corporal Lightbourne
denied this, noting that all the
children were beaten for
wrongdoing.

She claimed that on one
occasion, Farrington ran away

. to the home of grandmother,

Alfreda Brennen’s house.
Corporal Lightbourne said
that following this, she too

' would seek refuge at her

grandmother’s house when
she knew she was going to be
disciplined.

Ms Farquharson further
suggested that as punishment,
their mother would make
Officer Lightbourne and the
accused stand in.the yard,
even if it was raining, while
the accused wore her panties
and she his underwear.

Corporal Lightbourne stat-
ed that to her recollection this
occurred once, when she and
Farrington were between the
ages of two and three.

She further denied the sug-
gestion that this punishment
took place 10 times at least.

It was further suggested
that their mother drank a
great deal, however Officer
Lightbourne told the court
that this was not so.

Ms Farquharson also sug-
gested that that Officer Light-
bourne had sexually abused
Farrington when he was a
child. This the officer emphat-
ically denied.

She also denied that during
the two times she visited

Cordell at the prison, she told





him not to reveal the sexual
abuse nor the abuse from his
mother.

The officer added that she
never visited her brother alone.

The witness also denied that
she showed a lack of concern
by going back to sleep after her
brother called her. Corporal
Lightbourne explained that she
told family members that they
were never to call her if they
were in trouble with the law.

Oterrio Floyd, the man who
claimed that he and Farrington
were lovers, was recalled to the
stand yesterday.

He told the court that Far-
rington became very violent
with him on two occasions.

Floyd explained that the first
was in May 2002 after “Elkin and
Joseph” moved out of the apart-
ment they shared with himself
and Farrington on Mallory Lane.

He said Farrington became
angry with him when he asked
about a bank card which the
accused had lost, and that the
accused picked up a fan and

2007 tek SPORT TRAC

threw it at him.

Floyd told the court that on
the second occasion, which was
in July, Farrington pinned him
to a wall by placing his hand
around his neck. Floyd said he
started to cry and begged the
accused to stop. This occurred a
week before Jamaal Robbins’
death, he said.

During cross-examination,
Floyd admitted that he was nev-
er charged in relation to Rob-
bins’ death.

He said that the accused knew
when he left the Mallory Lane
apartment, and told the court
that he bought a ticket on a mail
boat and left Freeport and his

family behind.

Ms Farquharson suggested
that during the three days fol-
lowing Robbins’ death, Floyd
and the accused left the apart-
ment on numerous occasions.
Mr Floyd denied this.

Girlfriend

Katsia Dean Parker, Farring-

ton’s former girlfriend with whom
he had a child, was recalled to
the witness stand yesterday. °

She told the court that when
she first met Farrington, he was
employed at Dolly Madison in
Freeport.

In October 2003, when he
moved with the witness to her

‘mother’s home at Poinciana

Drive Freeport, Farrington
worked as a security officer with
Candid Security Firm, she said.
She told the court that the first
time she saw the box, which was
later discovered to contain some
of Jamaal Robbins' bones, was
at their apartment at King Nep-
tune Drive, Sea horse Village.
She told the court that the

box which Farrington later gave ©

police was in a room he called

. his art room.

The witness said her rela-
tionship with the accused ended
in October 2003 and that she
moved back to her mother’s
home at Poinciana Drive.

She said Farrington gave her
the box along with a few other
things to keep for him.



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Detective Sergeant Presley
Rolle told the court yesterday
that on Monday October 27, 2003
he interviewed the accused in the
presence of Detective Inspector
Anthony Ferguson and Detec-
tive Constable 2399 Munroe,
who videotaped the interview
with the consent of the accused.

The officer said that before
the interview, he told Farring-
ton that he was suspected of the
murder of Jamaal Robbins and:
cautioned him.

He said Farrington relayed a
story to him, and upon comple-
tion of the video interview, he
asked Farrington if he would
be willing to give a written state-

“ment.

According to Sergeant Rolle,
Farrington said “yes” and
declined to have a lawyer or fam-
ily member present. Farrington
signed the statement, he said.

- The officer said that on Tues-
day, October 28, 2003 at
9.20am, he and a team of offi-
cers travelled with the accused
to the Grand Bahama Highway
where the accused directed then
to one unpaved road, then to
another, before indicating a tree
stump that he used a as a mark-
er for where he had placed
Jamaal Robbins' body.

Officer Rolle said the accused
stated that on occasion he
would return to the area and
pick the meat off the bones so
that they would not smell,
because he would take the
bones away with him.

The officer told the court that
four pieces of bone, a pair of
blue pants, a colourful “Tom-
my” shirt and one sneaker were
found in the area.

The officer said the party
went to Mallory Lane where the
accused pointed out apartment
three and gave him certain
information pertaining to it.

From there, the officers were
directed to Queens Cove and

to a track road where the

accused pointed out a green
inflatable mattress.

The officer said Farrington
stated that he disposed of the iron
tod which he used to kill Jamaal
Robbins in a nearby canal.

2006 FORD FUSION





PART OF YOUR LIFE





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



The ten most influential
people in the Bahamas

STRAIGHT UP TALK

INFLUENCE is the currency
of social order. Without it no
group, including the state, can
continue to exist. Recently, this
writer gave thought to the ten



most influential people in our
country. The result was the list
that follows.

10) Bishop Neil C Ellis. This

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firebrand preacher’s charisma
and grassroots messages com-
mand the attention of his large
immediate following and a
much larger audience of peo-
ple throughout The Bahamas.
Often controversial, to say that
least, few people don’t listen
when Bishop Ellis speaks. The
role he played in coining the
phrase and crafting the mes-
sage that captured that mood
of most voters in the 2002 gen-
eral election and the governing
party’s continuing dependence
on his tacit endorsement solid-
ifies his place as one of the most
influential persons in The
Bahamas.

9) Dr Myles Munroe. Dr
Munroe is the second of three
reverend gentlemen who will
make our list. As president of
Bahamas Faith Ministries Inter-
national, one of the most
sought after motivational
speakers in the world and an
internationally acclaimed best-
selling author, Dr Munroe is
highly regarded for his lucid
thoughts on realising human
potential, pursuing purpose and
developing leaders. His credi-
bility, both at home and
abroad, earns him respect from
leaders and followers alike. Dr
Munroe is one of the few peo-
ple in The Bahamas who can
influence the thinking of
Bahamians by the sheer force
of the wisdom of his words, sep-
arate and apart from any
charisma that he has. Though
he seldom does so, when he is
compelled to speak on any
national issue, the masses of
our people take note and this is
why he belongs on this list.

8) Wendy Craig, Governor
of the Central Bank. The mon-
etary policy of The Bahamas is
quite static compared to that
of other economies where cen-

tral banks tend to make daily

interventions in the market.
However, domestic credit is.a
critical component of the eco-



Zits

nomic life of The Bahamas. Its
restraint or release plays a crit-
ical role in the economic buoy-
ancy of the country and with it
the fortunes of Bahamians. The

fact that the governor of the |

Central Bank holds sway in
determinations about how
much domestic credit is extend-
ed to our population gives that
position great influence and
Governor Craig on this list.

7) Ivan Johnson, Editor of
The Punch. The Punch may be
a tabloid but many Bahamians
treat its content as gospel. It is
widely read and by some peo-
ple who might not admit that
they do so. The Punch’s stories
might not be all accurate but it

is hardly ever all inaccurate and —

often presents the smoke long
before other media have seen
the fire. Lots of people believe
what they read in The Punch
and this shapes their percep-
tions of things. This is why Ivan
Johnson belongs on this list.

6) Bishop Drexel Gomez.
Though his position as arch-
bishop of the Anglican Church
in The Bahamas gives him great
influence, Bishop Gomez has
by his conduct over many years

prior to holding that office.

established a level of moral
authority that.is nationally
acclaimed. :‘This fact was
launched during the 1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry when he
issued his shocking minority
report and was further cement-
ed during his forceful and suc-
cessful objections to the process
of the 2002 referendum. Bishop

‘Gomez’s genuine interest in the

moral posture of leaders of this
nation, his fight against corrup-
tion in public office and his

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advocacy for better education
have made him a potent force
in our nation. Whenever he
speaks to national issues he
does so with a level of scholar-
ship unseen in most of our
modern pulpiteers and with a
relevance that cannot be
ignored. It is for this reason that
he has such great influence in
our society.

5) Eileen Dupuch Carron,
Publisher/Editor of The Tri-
bune. Eileen Carron, like her
father, the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch, has come to wield her

. pen with a potency that com-

mands attention, especially the
attention of those who hold
public office. Her commentary
on national issues, public policy
or public personalities carry
weight in our society. Indeed,
though they may not admit it,
politicians who come under her
critical review can react to it
like a snake to turpentine. This
is because she writes with the
force of facts, history, clarity,
conviction and purpose. She
also writes to an audience that
includes the professional class
in the country, a group that are
not easily swayed by the shal-
low politics of charisma and
who value the content of infor-
mation. Politicians know this
and they read The Tribune’s
editorial as a matter of daily
routine. They know that the
respect The Tribune has as a
mainstream daily makes it a
much looked to source of infor-
mation and readers of the daily
make Mrs Carron’s column a
principal part of their reading.
Mrs ‘Carron can, with her col-
umn bring, much scrutiny to
bear on government policies
and actions. Indeed, that scruti-

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ny serves as a powerful check
on the execution of power in

our small but dynamic democ- °

racy. That is why she has made
this list.

4) The American Ambas- =

sador to The Bahamas. The

Bahamas needs America. This ‘
s : ,
is a fact; at times an uncom- ,

fortable fact but a fact nonethe-

less. The influence of America |
on our economy, culture and -
politics is second to none in the |
world. The fortunes that flow

to The Bahamas from America

are tied to its positive relation-
ship, which depends on the per-
ceptions of its ambassador here.

Positive reports maintain posi- ‘

tive flows while negative
reports threaten those flows.

’ Pre-clearance; travel advisories,

drug interdiction support, offi- ,

cial aid, travel visas, regional

defence and trade are all issues |

that can be impacted by the US
ambassador’s reporting and
that can ultimately influence
the lives of the masses of peo-

ple in our nation. While most .
US. ambassadors tend to be -

non-intrusive when it comes to

national affairs, in keeping with |

diplomatic protocol, they can
directly or indirectly impact
domestic issues in a big way.

3) Sol Kerzner. So] Kerzn- .

er’s stake and role in the
Bahamian economy has now
taken on mythical proportions.
Kerzner International is now
the single largest private
employer in The Bahamas and
is second only to the govern-
ment overall. No enterprise has
invested more money in our
economy in so short a period
of time’as Kerzner Interna-
tional and no enterprise’s ongo-
ing economic contribution has a
broader impact on the welfare
of the masses of our popula-
tion. Remove Atlantis from the
tourism plant of The Bahamas
and the result will be a Bahami-
an tourism sector becomes only.
a shadow of itself. By his vision
and his actions, Sol Kerzner
wields great influence in our
nation. If you doubt this, ask
any prime minister of ‘The

Bahamas, past or present.

2) The Right Hon Hubert A

Ingraham. He is highly regard- .

ed by friend and foe alike. No-
one. ignores him. No-one is apa-
thetic towards him. Over a life-
time of political involvement,
Hubert Ingraham has estab-
lished himself as the most
potent political force in our

nation today. Indeed, only the

late Sir Lynden Pindling has
been a more formidable politi-

cal personality. When Hubert .

Ingraham speaks people listen,
lots of people. While the rul-
ing party might pretend other-
wise, it knows both in theory
and in fact that Hubert Ingra-
ham is the greatest threat to
gaining a second term. That is
why the prospect of his return
was met by government mem-
bers with all manner of postur-
ing to discourage it and that’ is
why the reality of his return has
prompted a rigorous campaign
to discredit him, a campaign
being sponsored by a strange
array of bedfellows. Politics is
the ‘most potent secular force
in our country and Hubert
Ingraham, more than any single
individual, can influence how
it turns.

1) Prime Minister The Right
Hon Perry Christie. Though in
his own person The Right Hon
Perry Christie has great influ-
ence in The Bahamas, he sits
atop of this list largely because
he holds the office of prime
minister, which is the most
powerful office in our land. The
Prime Minister of The
Bahamas, as the chairman of
the executive and the first lord
of the treasury, can turn the
economic, social and political
fortunes of the entire popula-
tion. His decisions can literally
make or break our state. Some
have and continue to question
the seemingly unbridled scope
of the prime minister’s powers
but no-one denies them. Any
holder of the office of prime
minister, given our present
political organisation, must be
the number one person on any
list of the most influential peo-
ple in The Bahamas.

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK

Influence is fluid. It can be

earned over a lifetime and.

destroyed ina day.



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 9



my Royoy Vi Se

In brief Grand Bahama is





Volvo hunt
drawing to
a close

THE Pirates of the

‘_Caribbean-inspired Volvo Inter-

national Treasure Hunt will
draw to a close today — as con-
testants race to uncover the cov-
eted grand prize buried some-
where in the Bahamas.

Seven finalists have now
arrived on an undisclosed
island, where they will begin the
final stages of their search for
the buried Pirates of the

’ Caribbean-themed Volvo XC90

V8 SUV.

Said the organisers: “Over
the past four weeks, contestants
worldwide have been frantical-
ly deciphering clues, similar to
the format of reality TV shows
Survivor and The Amazing
Race, with the hope of having a
chance to uncover a buried,
one-of-a-kind Volvo XC90 V8
valued at $82,000.

“The luxury SUV features a
variety of elements inspired by
Disney’s Pirates of the
Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest,
including menacing graphics
from the film, black leather
seats and custom painted 20-
inch wheels.”

On Tuesday the contestants
took part in a day-long hunt for
the prize at the Abaco Club at

- Winding Bay.

‘

i Today, the winner and results
of the final hunt are to be
released to the public

On Friday, August 25 a series
of “webisodes” documenting

’ the hunt will premier online at

www.volvocars.us/thehunt _

Thousands of online partici-
pants were narrowed down to
seven contestants from around
the world.

The finalists are:

e Jenny Buckalew, 35, New-
nan, Ga.

e David Hutz, 30, Herndon, ©

Va. :

e James Hutz, 57, Carefree,
Ariz.

e Karl Lloyd, 33, Surrey, Eng-
land :

e Susanne Kalintsch, 44,
Trieben, Austria

e Akihiro Horibe, 36, Yoko-

hama, Kanagawa, Japan
° Jose Luis Dominguez Mon-
ge, 31, Valladolid, Spain



Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama public is being urged
to participate in a two-day
genetic sampling exercise that
will assist in the establishment
of a DNA database in th
Bahamas. -

The exercise is being con-
ducted by officers of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force’s
forensic science section.

“The bottom line of this
whole exercise is to bring the
Bahamas in line with other
leading developed countries
in the world — particularly the
US, Canada, Great Britain
and France,” said Chief
Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming yesterday.

Mr Rahming stressed that
DNA evidence is extremely
significant in modern criminal
procedures. He urged resi-
dents on Grand Bahama to
assist the police by participat-
ing in the exercise.

A similar exercise was con-
ducted in New Providence and
there are plans to conduct
additional exercises, particu-
larly in more populated
islands like Eleuthera and
Long Island.

Forensic Detectives 30
Shanell Sands, 2557 Sheria
King and 2857 Shemeiko
Arthur of New Providence
will conduct the exercise on
Thursday at Winn-Dixie
Supermarket in downtown
Freeport and on Friday at
Winn-Dixie in Eight Mile
Rock, between the hours of
9am and 5pm.

Ms Sands said that partici-
pants will be anonymous and
are only required to submit to
a mouth swab, which takes
about five minutes.

“We will ask you simple
questions, such as where your
parents were born, where your

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urged to take part
in DNA exercise

‘Ml By DENISE MAYCOCK

grandparents and you were
born, but not your names,”
she explained.

Even though a minimum of
400 participants is required,
Ms Sands said it is very impor-
tant that they get as many
samples as possible to get a
proper representation of the
Bahamian population.

Ms Sands said the samples
will be used to establish a
DNA unit in the police labo-
ratory for statistical data pur-
poses only, and will not be
cross-referenced with DNA
profiles in criminal matters or
missing persons cases.

She explained the samples
will be used to determine how
rare or how common a DNA
profile is in the Bahamian
population.

“If you have ever been a
victim of a crime, the turn-
around time it takes for a'case
to be resolved can be quite
lengthy.

“And this one aspect, espe-
cially for DNA analysis work,
is due to the fact that we are
sending off samples, but what
we are trying to do is have
analysis done at home, which
is cost-effective and the turn-

‘around time is enhanced and

we can get cases resolved
much faster,” she said.
Mr Rahming said the intro-

‘duction of DNA evidence in a

case eliminates almost all
doubt about the guilt or inno-
cence of an accused person.

He said it will ensure that
innocent persons are not con-
victed of crimes and also that
a guilty person doesn’t walk
away free.

“I would feel that the
Bahamian public would really
want the Bahamas Police
Force to be on the cutting
edge of development in the

- 21st century

“That is the objective of this
exercise and why: team from



ree,



Forensic Lab are here with us,”
Mr Rahming said.

Exercises will be held in
Eleuthera in September and in
Long Island in October.



H PROCESSING a DNA sample
(Phote/AP archive)

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

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@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 65 Dominican

fishermen detained in Bahami- .

an waters are expected to be
released sometime this week,
according to an Associated
Press report.

The men were originally held
in connection with poaching-
related charges in July.

They were arrested by the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
near the Cay Sal bank, which is
located in the southwestern
Bahamas.

According to the report, the
owner of the boat on which the
men were detained said he was
informed by Bahamian author-
ities through his lawyers that
the fishermen would be
released this week.

Speaking to The Tribune yes-
terday, Department of Fisheries

CG ue







& THE ship (right) which was discovered off Cay Sal Bank.
RBDF officers were called in to bring Dominican fisherman to
Nassau, where they were turned over to Immigration.

director Michael Brennen said
that the matter was concluded
in court about three weeks ago.

“The captain was fined and

the vessel was ordered to be
confiscated by the magistrate,”
he said.

The Dominican detainees

THE TRIBUNE






were the crew of the boat
Barlovento.

’ The boat’s owner, Angel Sev-
erino, told the AP that he trav-
elled to the Bahamas in an
effort to get the crew released,
but was told that this would be
impossible until the judicial

" process has taken its course.

He said he has now been
informed by Bahamian author-
ities that his crew will arrive in

‘Puerto Plata or Santo Domingo

by air in the few next days.

Many such boats have been
seized in the Bahamas over the
years and boat owners have
received stiff fines following
such arrests, according to the
report.

In some cases the crews have
also been jailed for months or
even years.

At the time of the arrest,
about 20,000 pounds of fish
were reportedly confiscated.

FROM page one

Wellington Adderley, office’

administrator at the Bahamas
AIDS Foundation, said the
issue “is of great concern to the
Bahamas.”

“You are aware that even
though we expect persons with
the virus to do the right thing,
the world isn’t perfect. Not
everyone who has the virus
will feel it necessary to warn
their partners,” he said.





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Iff Road _

HIV/AIDS

Mr Adderley explained that
if a person knowingly spreads
the virus or infects someone
else, they are legally liable and
can be charged.

He referred to a criminal
case in the United States
where a man was convicted
under an Iowa law that makes
it a crime for a person who

- knows he or she is HIV-posi-

tive to “engage in intimate
contact with another person,”
or to intentionally expose a

“person to a bodily fluid of
another person in a manner

that could result in the trans- .

mission of the human
immuno-deficiency virus.”

Mr Adderley made it clear
that such behaviour is against
the law in the Bahamas as
well.

The man in the US is cur-
rently serving a 50-year prison
sentence.

“The HIV centre has always
stressed the need to inform
our partner,” he said. “But in
another sense, there is the con-
fidentiality law. Persons do not
necessarily tell the persons
they are involved with that
they have the disease. And

ited yo
ot wn :

rumours

that is because of the stigma
attached to it.

“As this situation is a prob-
lem, it is up to both persons
who are involved in the sexual

relationship to take the

responsibility of protecting
themselves. You can’t expect
someone else to do it for you.
As the saying goes, if you leave
your door open you will get
robbed. And that saying
applies to this.”

According to a Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre con-
sulting psychiatrist, there is no
evidence that persons who act
in such a way have a mental
problem.

Admitting that they have
heard rumours of such activi-
ties, as well as rumours that
infected persons are sticking
people with contaminated nee-
dies, the consultant said that

as far as they know there is no -

evidence to support such
claims.

One consultant said that “if
persons are aware of what they
are doing and that it is wrong,
it is simply spiteful,” however
he sees “no real reason to call
it a mental problem.”

Rose Mae Bain, director of
the HIV/AIDS Centre, said
that these allegations have
been circulating from as far
back as 1985, however, no one
has provided any information
about persons who are
allegedly committing the
crime.

According to Mrs Bain,
“HIV is spread by about 95

. per, cent of the time’ through

”

unprotected sex,” and as a
result “we, the HIV/AIDS
centre, promote safe sex and
abstinence.”

-“Tf you are having sex you
need to communicate with
your partner and be faithful
to one monogynous
partner.

“We say to the public that if
they are going to engage in
sexual activity it is up to you to
protect yourself,” she said.

“We have slogans every-
where that promote safe sex.
We also believe that if every
Bahamian makes it their mis-
sion not to get the virus they
will get tested and ensure that
their partners get tested.

“However, if the public does
have any information of such
actiyjties, they are to report it,
as it is a criminal offence.”

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THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian culture appears
on banks of the Hudson

NEW YORK will get a taste of
the Bahamas next month when a
special culture day is held on the
banks of the Hudson River.

The event, organised by the
Bahamian American Cultural
Society, will take place on Sun-
day, September 3, at Pier 63,
23rd Street, directly behind Bas-
ketball City.

Starting at noon, the event
will feature Bahamian food,
folklore, dance and music with a
Junkanoo rush-out adding to
the fun.

Entertainment will be pro-
vided by the Cat Island Down
Home Dancers, the Cat island
Folklore Dancers, The Gospel
Rushers, Bo-Hog and the Root-
ers Rake n’ Scrape Band and
the Bahamian-American Calyp-
so Band.

A society spokesman said:
“People come from all over the
Atlantic states and the islands to
enjoy both the unique expres-
sions of Bahamian culture and

CATERING













THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 11

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





Ambassador praised for tenure in US

@ By GABRIELLE
MISIEWICZ

JOSHUA Sears was praised
for having represented the
Bahamas with “dignity and dis-
tinction” by Henry Illes, Henry
Illes, chairman of the perma-
nent council of the Organisa-
tion of American States.

Last month, Mr Sears
resigned his post as ambassador
to the United States and per-
manent representative to the
OAS at a regular meeting of

B FORMER
US President

United States
President Bill
Clinton meets
with The
Bahamas’ US
Ambassador
Joshua Sears.
















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the council, where members
had a chance to bid him
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Dr Izben Williams, the
ambassador for St Kitts and
Nevis, called Ambassador Sears
a “mature diplomat and an
experienced administrator,”
praising his awareness of the
needs and interests of the
Bahamas as well as the needs
and expectations of the mem-
ber states.

Members of the council

expressed their gratitude for the.
ambassador’s leadership and

various contributions.

These include his serving as
vice-chair of the Permanent
Council and chair and vice-chair
of the Committee on Adminis-
trative and Budgetary Issues.

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Hf Archbishop Pietro Sambi, Apostolic Nuncio, and Ambassador
Joshua Sears, at a.reception to celebrate the first anniversary of
the election of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI

da acknowledged that chairing
the committee was a difficult

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or promotion. All net items excluded.

and very important task, which
Mr Sears carried out with
“enthusiasm and dedication.”

Ambassador Sears also
served as chair of the working
group to make recommenda-
tions on the OAS Special Mis-
sion for Strengthening Democ-
racy in Haiti.

The ambassador held these
posts while he was representa-
tive to the OAS and Ambas-
sador to the United States — a
fact which the representative
for Canada felt was notewor-
thy.

The members of the council
wished the ambassador good
luck in his future endeavours.

Share
your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
-making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
areaorhave wonan |, ,
award.

If so, call‘us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST10, 2006, PAGE 13



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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

Chalk’s crash injury reports released

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOR the first time since the fatal
crash of Chalk’s Ocean Airways in
December 2005, reports detailing the
fatal injuries of the 20 victims were
released to the Bahamas media.

Having completed their review of
ihe plane crash, which claimed the lives
of 11 Biminifes and one long-time res-
ident, the National Transportation

_Safery Board (NTSB) in the US
released their detailed report of the
cause of the accident and the nature of

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the injuries which led to the deaths of
all the passengers.

The NTSB reported that the cap-
tain, a 37-year-old woman, suffered a
fractured skull, multiple fractures of
the base of the skull, facial fractures, as
well as evisceration of the brain and
lacerations and abrasions of the face.

She further sustained lacerations to
the heart and traumatic amputation of
the right arm.

The second person in the cockpit,
the flight’s 34-year-old first officer, suf-
fered partial decapitation, a shattered
rib cage and sternum, a severed spinal

“LOCAL NEWS.

cord, and a shattered pelvis.

The first officer also experienced the
traumatic amputation of his right arm
above the elbow, and of his left leg
above the knee.

All 18 passengers, including three
infants, suffered similar fatal injuries.

Most sustained lacerations and abra-
sions to the face, fractured ribs, lacer-
ations and ruptures to bladder, liver
and lungs.

Several also suffered shattered and ©

fractured skulls, as well as amputated
limbs.
The NTSB reported that a year pri-

or to sittte crash, the seaplane — a Grum-
man Mallard G73T — had several
repairs to the wing that separated just
after takeoff.

Interviews

The board’s investigators also report-
ed that interviews with Chalk’s employ-
ees had revealed that some of the air-
line’s pilots had complained to man-
agement about the poor maintenance
on the aircraft.

According international news

THE TRIBUNE



sources, the families of the Bahami-
ans killed in the crash could split a ten-
tative $51 million settlement.

The fatal flight departed from Miami
Seaplane Base and took off from the
shipping channel at 2.39pm on Decem-
ber 19, 2005.

The Chalk’s Ocean Airways flight
101 crashed into a shipping channel
adjacent to the Port of Miami shortly
after takeoff.

Witness and video recordings
indicated fire on the right wing and
showed the wing separating prior to
impact.







FROM page one

PARACEL AO SAT RTE





a INVESTIGATORS look over the-recovered wreckage of a Chalk's Ocean Airways plane ona pares anchored at the crash scene
off the shore off Miami Beach, Pia, Wednestey Dec. 21, 2005.

(AP FILE Photo)

Civil Aviation director
- denies emergency
Chalk’s meeting

=< Investigators later identi-

“That’s the law. They first
have to get the correct
authority from the United
States Department of Trans-
portation. So there was no

‘emergency, Chalk’s is simply

following all the necessary
steps,” he said.

Should the airline pass the
fitness review which is cur-
rently being held by the US
Transportation Department

to determine its ability to con-_
-duct business as a commuter

service, Chalk’s would have

to reapply to Civil Aviation.
“After they’ve gotten the

authority from the US, then

application they would have
to re-submit,” he said.

Mr Saunders said he did
not wish to speculate on the
possible outcome of Chalk’s
eventual application at this
time.

On December 19, 2005,
Chalk’s Ocean Airways Flight
101 from Watson Island to
Bimini crashed off the coast
of Miami Beach, Florida.

Twenty people, 18 passen-
gers and two pilots —-includ-
ing 11 Biminites — were killed
in the fatal crash.

he, Sweeting's

fied cracks in the main sup-
port beam connecting the
wing to the fuselage.

Chalk’s was the longest. — -
continuously operating aif-"

line in the world, having start-
ed operations in 1917 and
regular scheduled flights to
the Bahamas in February
1919. .

The. Chalk’s Ocean
Airways fleet consisted
of four Grumman G-73

Turbo Mallard aircraft, fol- ‘

lowing the December 2005
crash.

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THE TRIBUNE









Work
ermit

policy
FROM page one

cy was introduced during the
early 1970s and this administra-
tion, like previous administra-
tions, has guarded and imple-
mented the tenets of that poli-
cy,” the ministry said.

Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson said the fashioning of
the country’s work permit pol-
icy in this manner would be
following a model already
used by other countries in the
region, such as Bermuda and
the
Cayman Islands, which have
economies like the Bahamas.

“Once you are on 4 work
permit for, let’s say, five years,
you would have to spend a
number of years outside of the
country and then you can
come back again.

“That’s not to say we would
not be issuing work permits
for those positions, it just
means that a company would
have to bring in another per-
son to do that job,” he said.

Since being appointed Min-
ister of Immigration, Mr Gib-
son said he has met with
dozens of businesses, most of
‘which have provided him with
their company’s training poli-
cy.

The Bahamianisation policy
dictates that if a Bahamian is
qualified for a job vacancy for
which a work permit is being
sought, and all other things ©
are equal, then that Bahamian
will get the job rather than a
non-Bahamian.

However, the ministry
pointed out that there are one
or two exceptions to the poli-
cy. For example, work permits
are approved for owners’ rep-
resentatives.

“This administration is tak-
ing all the steps that are neces-
sary to ensure that Bahamians
are trained and equipped as

the Bahamas strives to remain -

competitive and keep pace
with the demands of employ-
ers of the 21st century,” the
ministry said.



BING 1850
tei Meet FUR:

far



















































FROM page one

and we are told it will continue
in January once the director is
fine agairt.

“But he was apparently
injured very seriously in that
accident and he will be out
of commission and unavail-
able for several months. So
we are hoping that as soon
as he is better, Disney will
be back in the Bahamas and
continue.”

In the meantime, Mr
Wilchcombe said, negotia-
tions are presently taking
place with another film com-
pany.

“So. you are going to see
more and more business in
the making of a movie in the
amount of $100 million and
that is what our people are
discussing now with one of
the film companies,” Mr
Wilchcombe said.

Ron Ricardo



introduces its

“I think that it speaks to
the fact that we are a viable
destination for films. We
have the natural environ-
ment. We now have a tank
(a massive filming open
water enclosure) in Grand
Bahama and I think that is
what is attracting more busi-
ness.

“It allows for controlled
filming. There are only three
in the world.”

Mr Wilchcombe explained
that the unexpected delay
has minimally impacted
Grand Bahamians who
enjoyed spin-off.employ-
ment.

“It wasn’t work that was
scheduled, but there is
always an impact in the
economy. We did not have
these in our thought

: SE

Filming postponed |





process,” Mr Wilchcombe
reiterated.

“The intention was to
shoot Pirates of the
Caribbean and start anoth-
er, but the difficulty has
been that the director of the
movie was involved in this
serious car accident and —

these are situations that we’

did not have in our thought
process.”

But while work has stalled
on the third sequence, Dead-
man’s Chest continues to
score at the box office.

Filmed in Grand Bahama
and Exuma, the movie has
made history by breaking a
Hollywood record — as the
first film to ever gross more

than $100 million in two days |

and $132 million on its week-
end release.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 15

Damaged cable
FROM page one

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_ Additionally BTC announced that GSM and TDMA cus-
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difficulty making and/or receiving calls.

According to a release, every effort is being made to rectify the
problem. “Once again BTC apologises for any inconvenience
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Guana Cay developers face
$440,000 per week losses

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

iscovery Land Com-
pany was last night
facing the possibility
of losing $440,000 per

~-"-Council upheld the injunction stop-
_- “ping all new work at its $175 million
Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club
development, with the project’s oppo-
-.-nents claiming the decision was a
-" “gecognition and validation” of their
- Tight to due process.
The developers, through their sub-
sidiary Passerine at Abaco Holdings,
yesterday acknowledged that the
‘Privy Council “did not accede” to its
application to set aside the July 27,
2006, injunction obtained by the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association.
The injunction prevents Discovery
Land Company from carrying out

. week after the Privy ~

Discovery Land Company fails in attempt to overturn ‘stop work’ .
injunction; pins hopes on Supreme Court judgement this month |

“certain works” on the project until
Supreme Court Acting Justice Norris
Carroll delivers his verdict on the sub-
stantive issues raised by. the Associa-
tion’s case, or until the Privy Council
hears the latter’s application for spe-
cial leave to appeal the Court 6f
Appeal decision this October.

Not surprisingly, the developers are
hoping Acting Justice Carroll delivers
his verdict before October.

Ina short staternent yesterday, Dis-
covery Land Company said an affi-
davit swérn by the-Association’s attor-
ney, Frederick Smith, said that on

August 8, he had been told by Acting
Justice Carroll’s clerk that the judge-
ment-was imminent. |

Mr Smith had been told “that Mr
Justice Carroll anticipated that he
would be delivering a judgement dur-
ing the third week of August 2006”.
__ However, in an affidavit sworn by
Joey Arenson, a Discovery Land
Company partner and attorney for
yesterday’s case, said: “I understand

from our Bahamian attorneys that

informal intimations from the Judge’s
chambers about its delivery have
proved to be false dawns.”

Meanwhile, an ecstatic Mr Smith

_ said: “We won. The injunction stays in

place and the Privy Council ordered
them to pay our costs.

“The injunction stays in place until
either the Supreme Court gives its
ruling, or the special leave to appeal is
heard in October.

“This vindicates their [the Associa-
tion’s] complaint throughout: that
they have been blocked out of the

process. It’s a recognition and vali- ©

dation of their rights to due process.”
Mr Smith added: “The people of
Guana Cay are absolutely thrilled

that the Privy Council, the highest
court in the land, has recognised the
tremendous public importance of this
case, and is giving them the opportu-
nity to have their day in court.”

The partner in Callenders & Co
said the legal action was stimulated by
what the people of Guana Cay per-
ceived as being “denied due process”,
and.an opportunity to be heard.

“We are absolutely delighted that
the Privy Council has seen fit to main-

SEE page 6B

- RoyalStar retains Blue Hills plant ‘at full capacity’

MByNEILHARTNELL == Bahamian operations

‘excellent rating

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor.

BAHAMIAN general insur-
er RoyalStar Assurance yes-
terday saw its financial strength

“partially offset” the positive -

“ compariy’s rating.

attributes surrounding the

But, to RoyalStar’s credit,
A. .M. Best added: “The level
of catastrophe risk is mitigated

Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water
last night said its Blue Hills

reverse osmosis plant was pro-

ducing at full capacity of 7.2
million. gallons per day, and

was now awaiting confirmation

drive Consolidated

Water’s bulk water
sales up by 50%,
as firm waits for

rating of A- (Excellent) reaf- _ by the company’s efficient rein- tf the Water & S : . ;
firmed by the leading global surance programme, which ae Leal on thal it oa eee confirmation it has
insurance rating agency, large- protects capital from both fre- Sea ee Bee
ly due to its capitalisation and quency and severity of events.” ng conbtactnal requite met government
“strong” reinsurance network. The rating agency also noted uN aes ‘| :

Describing RoyalStar Assur- that the Caribbean insurance Announcing that the ;com requirements

ance’s rating as stable, A. M. -
Best said: “The rating reflects
RoyalStar’s solid capitalisation,
generally favourable operating
results and well-established
“presence in the Caribbean
market. J
_ “These attributed are sup-
ported by the management’s
- commitment to effective con-
trol systems, a strong reinsur-
ance programme and knowl-
edge of local markets.”
A. M. Best said RoyalStar’s
exposure to hurricane activity
in the Caribbean, given its
presence in the Bahamas, Cay-
man Islands and Turks &
Caicos, and the increasing fre-
‘quency and severity of storms,

@ By CARA BRENNEN

.. Tribune Business Reporter

THE National Health Insurance (NHI) plan is designed to
work alongside private insurers and should not take away from °
their profits, Dr Stanley Lalta, its project manager, said.

_-_-. Although admitting that implementing the plan will require a.
.". *. reduction in employees’ take home pay to cover the cost of their
NHI contributions, Dr Lalta said the minimum payments were far
less than the burdensome medical bills some Bahamians would

face without significant insurance coverage.
fay: Dr Lalta was responding to some of the “surprising” findings
*.*.°. of areport on the Government’s planned NHI scheme, which was
~.. prepared for the Nassau Institute economic think-tank by
Nadeem Esmail, the director of health system performance stud-

ies for the Canada-based Fraser Institute.

Mr Esmail had concluded that implementation of the NHI

- plan as proposed would result in lower wages and benefits for

staff, and impose restrictions on the labour market.

In addition, he argued that the NHI would also “create a sub-
standard health care programme whose costs far exceeded what
was necessary to deliver the level of quality/access that would be
provided to residents of the Bahamas”.

However, Dr Lalta said he found those comments surprising

_. because the NHI has always been intended to work alongside pri-

vate insurers.

“Everything we have proposed has supported a choice of
provider. There are no restrictions,” he said, saying that the

NHI has tried to be very clear
on that.
“We want them to stay in busi-

i,
/

- the premium RoyalStar is able

market was becoming increas-
ingly competitive, with indige-
nous insurers, challenging’ the
established companies for mar-
ket share. :
RoyalStar generated a .
$3.119 million profit in the 12
months to December 31, 2005,
despite suffering “another year
of underwriting losses from
property insurance” as a result
of what it described as the -
“incorrect pricing” of premi-
ums in the Bahamian market.
Effectively, this means that

to charge is not covering its

SEE page 8B

' SEE page 8B

(FILE photo)

a eS



@ JEFFREY PARKER, chairman of Consolidated Water

pany’s Bahamian operations

helped drive its bulk water
"sales SO per cent higher in the
- 2006 second quarter, Rick

McTaggart, Consolidated
Water’s president and chief
executive, said the Blue Hills
plant had added $300,000 to

4)

e'll clear yOu
US cheque

its sales during that period. |
He added that:the compa-
ny, whose Bahamian Deposi-

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

BUSINESS

Ensuring likelihood of
IT problems is ‘remote’

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manage its customers’ IT environments round
the clock. Remote monitoring and management
delivers proactive management and perior:
mance at predetermined costs.

There are many benefits of remote monitor-
ing and management services to customers. The
primary benefits are a reduction in downtime,
improved overall network performance through
real-time problem monitoring, and reporting
and automated asset inventory management.

Reduced Downtime
- Most downtime occurs because IT staff are
busy or out of office, and are unable to keep a
close eye.on their network. The automatic alert-
ing capability inherent in most monitoring tools
allows technical staff to be alerted to problems
before they become critjcal.

For example, if your primary server is about to
run out of disk space, your IT team will be alert-
ed and can respond. before the problem becomes
critical. In addition, remote monitoring by your
IT provider allows a second pair of eyes to
watch your network to identify and resolve

issues. Again, this significantly reduces down-

time.

agement of our clients’ networks. as

Improved Network Performance Remote monitoring and management has ., | :

It is an IT person’s dream to have anetwork greatly raised the value of our service level *,

that performs with minimal effort. Real-time agreements, and has allowed Providence to offer “ 4
proactive monitoring and management signifi-. a lower cost to our cients. ‘ i
cantly enhances overall network performance, ad
which naturally improves security and reliabil- Re ‘
ity. With remote monitoring, IT people now About the author: 3
have the ability to manage networks without : fl
being confined to the office. Your IT team will Georgette Robinson works for Providence i

also know what issues are affecting your net-
work before you are even aware there is a

problem.
If we look at a basic e- -mail scenario where no



THE TRIBUNE





Making
IT Work

by Georgette Robinson

Providence Technology Group"

one in the office can receive e-mail, it could be
several things. It could be your Internet Ser-
vice Provider (ISP), it could be the mail server,
the switch or router. Remote monitoring and
management allows all possible points of failure
to be immediately identified or narrowed down.
Once the problem is identified, the time to res-
olution is much quicker, thus increasing net-
work uptime and employee productivity.

Asset Inventory Management
Another benefit of remote monitoring and

management worth noting 'is the sea of infor- .

mation that monitoring tools provide.

A detailed asset inventory of all up-to-date
hardware, software and patch information of
all servers and workstations are available. No
more searching for the make and model of your
network devices. No more searching for the

~ amount of servers and workstations across your

network. Information on your network is now
visible from a central console, and can be prop-
erly managed and dissected for reporting pur-
poses.

Providence Technology Group has, over the
past year, incorporated a new way of managing
our client’s networks. We have adopted inter-
national IT standards by deploying remote mon-
itoring and management tools in our environ-
ment to enable us to provide proactive man-

Technology Group, one of the leading IT firms
in the Bahamas. Providence Technology Group
specialises in Networking Solutions, Consulting
and Advisory Services and Software Solutions.

Public Utilities Commission

JOB OPPORTUNITY FOR A PROFESSIONAL
Chief Accountant

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is seeking to employ a
seasoned and competent Chief Accountant to be responsible for its
accounting and financial control systems and policies in accordance
with recognised accounting standards. The successful candidate will be
a professional with drive, initiative, excellent interpersonal skills and a
range of management, supervisory and accounting

experiences.

Principal Duties: The duties of the post will include











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establishing and implementing accounting and financial control policies
and procedures; ensuring the proper maintenance of the internal
accounting systems and records for external auditing; ensuring the
maintenance of the general ledger and the bank reconciliation
statements; and overall responsibility for accounts payables, receivables

and revenue collection.-:



Qualifications and experience: CPA or equivalent; member of
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants; experience in
computerized management and financial management systems; proven
skills and abilities in financial and management accounting, and billing eee
and collections systems are essential; 10 years relevant experience in :
accounting and financial matters.

::
i
h
t
it

Scotiabank's ‘Forgive & Fares Mortgage Campaign

To celebrate our 50th year in The Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving

away $50,000 in prizes. The PUC offers a very attractive and competitive salary and :

benefits package and opportunities for further training and development
are excellent. Starting sory will be commensurate with
relevant mAPOHeHCe, ; “4

Hewacesonietit as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign extended to October 13 2006

Interested applicants may deliver or fax resumes to: Executive
Director, Public Utilities Commission, Agape House, 4th Terrace East,
Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas; Fax No. (242) 323-7288.
Applications should be received by 15 August, 2006. .

Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to ‘Forgive & Forget’

6g piel tel sfol a) Gl

AEE TS

Life. Money. Balance both:

* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia, Trademarks used under authorization and contol of The Bank of Nova Scotia,





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 3B





Governm«s:

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter "

THE Government is reviewing its
work permit policy to determine
whether to limit the timeframe an
individual may hold a work permit
for.

The Ministry of Immigration,
Labour and Training announced that
it will implement a procedure
designed to monitor compliance with

the Government’s Bahamisation pol-
icy.
Ministry ©

According to the ministry, the
Bahamianisation policy was intro-
duced during the early 1970s. It reit-
erated the policy that if a Bahamian
and a person requiring a work per-

mit applied for a job, all things being
equal the Bahamian should get the

SSS



position.

‘It also noted that there were limit-
ed exceptions to the rule, for example
in the case of a business owner’s rep-
resentatives.

The Ministry maintained that if a
work permit was approved ‘because
a Bahamian was not qualified, the
employer must identify Bahamians
to train to fill the vacancy by the en
of the work permit’s term.

The enforcement of a timeframe

v

- for work permits is a move endorsed

by Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
president, Tanya Wright.

Stressed

Mrs Wright said she had often
stressed the importance of immigrant

labour, noting it was essential to the -

development of the Bahamas and
should not be feared.
However, she said this must be cou-

nt reviews
work permit durations



pled with a policy geared towards
empowering the transfer of skills.

“I would endorse limiting work per-
mits to a reasonable timeframe to
allow for training for a particular
skill,” she said. However, she added
that.a realistic timeframe must be
established in each case.

Mrs Wright said that therefore, dif-
ferent companies and businesses
would require a different length o!
time for different professions.

. ae 1 Z 42.25 Bahamas Supermarkets












Legal Notice

- NOTICE

_ IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1992



AND



moe dienekuceae econ |”

(BAHAMAS) BANK & TRUST LIMITED

tion, BTC is also working to repair a break In Voluntary Liquidation

in its Golden Gates fibre optic line, which
affected telephone numbers beginning
with 361 and 341.

_ Services

rience difficulties when using their cell
phones due to technical difficulties.
“Customers may experience a brief dis-
ruption in service or some difficulty when
_ making and or receiving phone calls,”
BTCsaid. >
“Technicians are working arduously to
rectify the problem. BTC apologises for
any inconvenience caused, and asks the
public’s patience during this time.”
In addition to cellular service disrup-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN PIERRE BIRBAL OF P.O. Box F-
43201, #13 SHERWOOD DRIVE, LUCAYA, GRAND BAHAMA,
.BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and, that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day
of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS Telecommunications ,
Company (BTC) technicians are working
_ t6 repair phone lines that disrupted pre-
-’ paid cellular phone services. and certain
area codes throughout the island.

Statement

'. In a statement yesterday, BTC apolo-
gised to its TDMA (Quickcell) and GSM
(Rockit) customers, saying they may expe-

_ By resolution of the members of the above-named Company dated the
2nd day of August, A.D., 2006 it was; :

RESOLVED that Banco Atlantico (Bahamas) Bank & Trust Limited - |
by voluntarily wound up and that Maria M. Férére of FT Consultant
Ltd. Nassau, Bahamas be appointed Liquidator for the purpose of the
winding up. |



“Persons in Golden Gates who need to.
call emergency services should dial 361-
0480, 361-0482, 361-0483 and 361-0484,”
the company said.



Dated this 2nd day of August, A.D., 2006.

Maria M. Férére
Liquidator












































The Tribune wants to hear “+

from people who are making ae
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds

| for a good cause, campaigning:

| for improvements in the area
or have -won an award.

Tf so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.









COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

.

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00286

Common Law & Equity Division




ea Lito cetacean tara peed au tad em one

a nayiletasle SET Reaves sh nietea aaa asia 8

&

IN THE MATTER OF The Quicting Tides Act, 1959 (Chapter 393)



Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that SHINELLE CHARLES,
FINLAYSON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
| the Minister tesponsible ‘fof Nationality and: Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/ |
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 10th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice be
NOTICE is hereby given that ANITE RENA, DEANS LANE #6,
_,. | NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
'|-for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
| acitizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows ahy
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARGOT ROBIN FOUNTAIN
OF P.O. BOX CB-11724, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 10TH day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing by admeasurement Eighteen thousand Four hundred
and Eighty-four (18,484) Acres situate North of Blackwood Vil-
lage on the Island of Abaco one the Island of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas. —

ER areas

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of PATRICK ROBERTS
NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of PATRICK ROBERTS of the Settlement of Dun-

das Town in the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.









NOTICE is hereby given that AMOS GARRY SEIDE, 18970
| NW 27TH AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33056, U. S. A.
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
| Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
| Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty- -
eight days from the 10th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau; Bahamas.











ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing by
admeasurements Eighteen thousand Four hundred and
Eighty-four (18,484) Acres situate North of Blackwood
Village on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
* of the said piece parcel or tract of land and have made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
under Section Three (3) of the Quieting of Titles.

>

wu Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.



le UO. eed

: : Act 1959 to have his title to the said piece parcel or tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in ac-
cordance with provisions of the said Act. Copies of the filed Plan
may be inspected. during normal working hours at:

qPricing Information As Of:
i 9A t 200 6



Previous Close Today's Close Change,
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street North, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

(b) Rolle and Co., Chambers, Anth-Mar House, 84
Minnie Street, Nassau, The Bahamas

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or rights to
dower or an adverse claim or claims not recognized in the Petition
shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days of the last pub-
lication file a notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau in
the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed
form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of his her claim on or
before the Thirty (30) days after the last publication will operate
as a bar to such claim.

ice Weekly Vol EPS $
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

DATED the 14th day of July, A.D. 2006.

Colina Money Market Fund 1.300892*
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9038*** ’
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.441484** ROLLE & CO.
Colina Bond Fund Chambers ,
Nd 35
NAV KEY Anth-Mar House,
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 5 “
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *- 28 July 2006 84 Minnie Street,

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

i Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
# Today's Close - Current:day’s weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
i ivid £12 th i

Nassau, The Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

** - 30 June 2006

*** . 30 June 2006



30 June 2006







PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

SACO nt RUC Cree
read Insight on Mondays

np AS_NATURE

@nautilus

Ne bd
"SED With ba TRACE MINC®

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Bottled water company invites applicants for;
Truck Drivers, Sales People, and Receptionist

The potential candidates must meet the following criteria:

* A minimum but not limited to a High School Diploma,
along with working experience in a simiiar position

° Excellent communication skills
Must be a team player, motivated & well groomed

Successful applicants can look forward to
competitive re-numeration and benefits,

Willing to work flexible hours

Applicants must be 25 yrs or older and possess
a clean police record &’a valid drivers license.

Please note that we are located in
the western district near the airport.

All interested persons are asked to call .
377-0444 thru 0446 or submit resumes to
jobs@Nautilash20.com prior to August 11, 2006,

Only successful applicants will be contacted.

oe payee ange ei mete od yene pee an oy RENE



BUSINESS

Bahamians attend
OAS private forum





THE Chamber of Commerce’s second vice-president, Khaalis Rolle (far left), and Kerzner International’s senior vice-president,

J. Barrie Farrington (far right), are shown with other executives at the Organisation of American States Private Sector Forum in the

Dominican Republic.

TWO Bahamian business executives
attended the Organisation of American
States (OAS) Private Sector Forum in the
Dominican Republic, with one involved in
a panel discussion on the parts. trans-
parency and the rule of law played in
assisting investments.

The Chamber of Commerce’s second
vice-president, Khaalis Rolle, and Kerzn-
er International’s senior vice-president, J.
Barrie Farrington, attended the three-day
event that discussed issues such as edu-
cation and skills training;and information

SRR LO ySeRe

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

PRESS RELEASE

and communication technology infra-
structure.

Mr Farrington participated on the pan-
el addressing the role of transparency and
the rule of law for investments. |

Relationship

Mr Farrington used the open relation-
ship between Kerzner International.and
the Bahamian government to. demonstrate
an effective functioning model within the
Western Hemisphere as the basis for his



“GB POWER COMPANY RESPONDS TO CEW UNION”

presentation,

Additionally, significant emphasis was
placed on the ‘Irish Model’, which pro- ©
vided infrastructural and educational
transformation in that country that began
during the 1960s.

e The third Private Sector Forum was
held during the 33rd annual OAS general
assembly, under the theme: Inter-Ameri-
can Public-Private Partnership for Com-'
petitiveness.and Job Creation in the Knowl-
edge Society.

Last week, Mr. Keith Knowles, President of the Commonwealth Electrical Workers (CEW) Union that represents about 135 of the ue. employees of Grand Bahama Power Company, in a natiérally
Belevised press conference accused GBPC Management of.not negotiating in-good faith with the CEW union.

Wanagement of GBPC believes that the public needs. to know the facts concerning our ongoing industrial agreement negotiations with the cCEW Union.

e First, the negotiation process which commenced over a year ago was initially stalled by CEW Union after their leaders walked way froin the negotiation table. After several weeks, CEW Union

returned to the table and negotiations resumed.

s 5% salary increase in the 2nd Year;
* 5% salary increase in-the 3rd Year;
* 5% in the 4th Year.

e The CEW Union’s new propos will cost the GBPC approximately $2,500, 000.

© The CEW Unions wage increase demand is in addition to their 25% electricity bill discount and other henanies enjoyed by them, such as part- payment of the tuition costs and a uniform and book

allowance for each child.

4

© The Public must know that GBPC is fully committed to negotiating a new industrial agreement with CEW gion, but we cannot lose sight of the fact that electricity rates of its customers were
increased earlier this year and that our customers are being required to ey substantially increased fuel surcharge each month. due to rising price of fuel. Also, GBPC cannot lose sight of the piSeent

state of Grand Bahama’s economy.

© Further, GBPC also cannot ignore the fact that CEW Union wage increase demand, will create further upward pressure on the existing electricity rates for its customers.

° On Jurie 24, 2006, the GBPC’s latest offer containing a package of proposed terms was delivered to CEW Union negotiating team, GBPC’s offer included:

* 12% lump sum payment in the Ist Year
* 5% in the 2nd Year
* 3% in the 3rd Year
* 5% in the 4th Year

e This offer would cost GBPC about $1,500,000

¢ However, in a press statement aired on national television on July 24 and before responding to GBPC’s offer CEW Union chose to make allegations of negotiating in bad faith.

e It was not until July 27,2006, more than one month after GBPC’S offer, and after its press statement, that the CEW Union responded to the Company by submitting a new proposal which contains

demands for wage increases as follows:

* $6,000 lump sum payment in the Ist Year; a payment which represents 25% of the average annual salary of CEW employees;

* Retroactive pay

*5% salary increase in the 2nd Year:
*5% salary increase in the 3rd Year:
*5% in the 4th Year

e

© The CEW Union’s wages increase demand. is in addition to their 25% electricity bill discount and other benefits enjoyed by them, such as part Payment of the tuition costs and a uniform and book
allowance for each child. .

© The public must know that GBPC is fully committed to negotiating a new industrial agreement with CEW Union, but we cannot lose sight of the fact that electricity rates of its customers were
increased earlier this year and that our customers are being required to pay substantially increased fuel surcharge each month due to rising price of fuel. Also, GBPC cannot lose sight of the Piesent
state of Grand Bahama’s economy.

e Further, GBPC also cannot ignore the fact that CEW Union wage increase demand will create further upward pressure on the existing electricity rates for its customers.

e Although employees within CEW Union and. other GBPC employees enjoy a 25% discount on their electricity bills, Management of GBPC believes that fair and proper consideration must be given to
the potential impact of the demand for wage increases on other GBPC customers presently living and working in Grand Bahama who do not get a discount are required to pay 100% of their electricity
bills every month --at some point in the negotiations, we hope that this will be appreciated by CEW Union leaders and negotiating team. ;

© We believe it is unfair to the hard working residents of the Island of Grand Bahama for CEW Union to state that the public needs to prepare itself because “a storm is brewing” in the CEW Union,
when the record reflects that both sides are active negotiations for a new industrial agreement. We ask the CEW Union to use its energy towards completing these negotiations in a reasonable and
professional manner instead of creating added stress in an already fragile economy.

© GBPC appreciates the work and commitment of its dedicated employees and.is fully prepared to continue negotiations in good health for a new industrial agreement.





THE TRIBUNE es | THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 5B

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Fishing conte St Offshore bank is looking for a Compliance

and Risk Management Officer

@ ®@ ®
to D QO ost Bimini Small financial institution is looking for a Compliance and
Risk Management Officer to join its select team of professionals.

The appropriate candidate will have several years experience

within a compliance and/or risk management function, and

@
to U r 1 Sm p ro du ct be conversant with local and international laws and regulations.

Responsibilities will include:

Maintain a comprehensive understanding of local laws

. BIMINI will this weekend

tice ther Seth, Annual Native and regulations regarding the financial services industry

: Fishing Tournament, bringing

|* serious anglers and numerous

, fishing boats to the island’s

| marinas.

Norma Wilkinson, senior.

»” manager of the Bimini Tourist

'. Office, said in a statement:

‘ “This fishing tournament has
. become a treasure trove of his-
Astor about the island of North
», Bimini.

; re “Some of the adventures of
.” our anglers have etched eternal
* memories in the minds of the

* people of Bimini, and have

". become a part of the oral his-

,» tory of this wonderful island.”

s Native

* The Bimini Native Fishing

. Tournament was started in
_-\~ 1950 by the Bimini Progressive
“is Sporting Club. ‘

') The aim then had been to

*: create fellowship among both:

f settlers and visitors to the
, island.

This year, the tournament

- will run from August 6-11.

*, Over the years, it has grown
from a minor 12-boat affair to
the current event that sees
hundreds of boats docking in
the marinas.

Ms Wilkinson said fishing
‘ tournaments such as the annu-

i al Native Fishing Tournament c/o The Tribune

"are very important-to the - — — —______ PO. Box N-3207
Bahamas because of the niche ‘S NORMA Wilkinson, senior manager : Nassain.B ahaiiias

: 9

Develop and maintain policies and procedures in
accordance with local laws and ecewaHons

Establish effective monitoring and reporting programs
for policies and procedures

Ensure proper documentation i is collected and accurately
recorded

Carry out regular and ad hoc reviews of activities
Develop, monitor and report on key risk indicators

Provide recommendations for improvements to risk
management process .

- Report to Executive Management and Board of Directors

Minimum qualification: LLB, ACIB, CPA, BACO or similar
designation i is preferred.

Salary will be commensurate with experience. Bahamians or
persons with Bahamian residency status only need apply.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume
to:



market opportunities they cre- of the Bimini Tourist Office
° ate within the overall tourism

offering. : een ¥ 2h, : joey vege
“It exemplifies what we have _ islands of the Bahamas present _ within one. There is something Only persons being intervie wed for this position will be.

‘ been saying all along: The a multiplicity of destinations for everyone,” she added. contacted.



Ministry of ences & The Environment —
| Department of Environmental Health Services
| : | | Invitation. for the Tenders for the supply of Vehicles
| Are you looking for job security witha | | 0) ! Cra Ta)
| reputable company? Then we're the (3) Double Cab Pick-Up Truck(s)
if company for you! i] es Ae

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the above
assortment of vehicles for the Department of Environmental Health

WE ARE NOW HIRING! Leo

: Position Available: Laboratory Technician | Interested parties may obtain specification from the office of:
: | Requirements: Associates Degree in a science related field | Tne Peparamen Pete Roa Health Services
. or | | P.O. Box $S-19048

-e : ae Nassau, N.P.
: _ prior laboratory experience he Weharae

Job Responsibilities to include but not limited to: — | Telephone: (242) 322-8037 / (242) 322-8048
| Daily Microbial Testing J | Telefax: (242) 322-8118 / (242) 322-8120

4

1 * Complying with quality control standards 7 | Between the hours of 9:00am - 5:00pm Monday - Friday
| ¢ Verifying Materials . .

e Taste Testing

Re BET FL

Tenders are to be.submitted in sealed envelope(s) marked “Tenders
for the supply of Vehicles to The Department of Environmental Health
Services” and sent to:

wos
ee wow dd

| Applicants should be highly motivated, and able to
| perform and adapt to changing environments. Salary | The Tender Board

| | c/o The Financial Secretary
| commensurate with experience. Please apply in writing, Ministry of Finance ;
: — onor before Friday, August 25th, 2006 to: P.O. Box N-3017

| Nassau, The Bahamas

TheHuman Resources Manager | All tenders must reach the Tenders Board no later than 4:00pm on
B c/o Coca Cola- | Monday, August 28th, 2006. All tenders must be submitted in triplicate.
f ; Tenders will be opened at 10:00am, on Tuesday, 29th August, 2006,
P.O. Box N-1123 2 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance and Planning.
| Nassau, Bahamas | The Government reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.





PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

Bahamian hotelier helps



shelter group from storm.

A FORMER Bahamas-
based hotelier provided shelter
for a 25-strong group that

included nine Bahamians when
Tropical Storm Chris threat-

ened their camp in the US Vir-

ACCOUNTING & SMALL BUSINESS
CONSULTING SERVICES

*Accounting records in bad shape?

*Need financial statements for the bank?

*Need a bussiness plan and financial proposal prepared?
¢Need business licence prepared/certified?

CALL US WE CAN HELP
eBusiness Start-Up Assistance/Consultations
Compliance Commission Examinations
*Construction & Contract Accounting
*Small Business Customized Accounting Packages
¢Computerized-quickbooks-Setup-Training
eInventory Planning + Control Handbook $25
eSample Business Plans (New/Existing Businesses)

. Business Seminars - Registration $35
(Materials and Refreshments)
eStarting and Managing a business - October 21-10 AM
eInventory Planning + Control - October 21 - 2 PM

TEL: 325-7313 OR 322-6000 Fax: 323-3700

WTI e OOo
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Small Business Consultants



gin Islands.

Ex-Bahamian hotelier
Glyine Delancey operates
three hotels for Fairfield
Resorts.on the island of St
Thomas, and provided shelter
for the group after it evacuated
its St John camp.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
executive vice-president, who
was part of the nine-strong

Bahamian contingent, recalled
the role Mr Delancey played
with the BHA when he was
general manager for the Port
Lucaya Resort and Yacht Club

and served as the organisa-

tion’s vice-president repre-
senting Grand Bahama.

Mr Comito said: “Glyine
was always a dedicated and
willing volunteer, committed
to helping make a difference. I

gave him a call. Told him of
our dilemma and immediately
he put me at ease, saying he
would take care of things. All
he wanted to. know is what
time would our ferry boat
arrive that evening, and how
many people were with us.”
The 25-strong group were
accommodated at Fairfield
Resorts, and those from the
Bahamas and Trinidad &

THE TRIBUNE :

: :
Tobago spent a second night
there after the storm caused *”
the cancellation of their flights. "4

“It was indeed special for us."
to receive Bahamian hospital- ©
ity in the Virgin Islands. We ~
are most appreciative to‘
Glyine and his staff at Fairfield »’ ,
Resorts for making us feel so a
welcome and easing our bur-
den during a moment of need,” ”
said Mr Comito.

Guana Cay developers face $440, 000 per week losses : :

FROM page 1B

tain the status quo. It is absolutely fun-

damental to our case that the physical .

environment, the marine and terrestrial
environment, are preserved until all issues
are dealt with by the court system,” Mr
Smith said.

He again argued that if Discovery Land
Company had been allowed to continue

_ work, the issues and subject matter being

litigated in court could be rendered nuga-
tory, meaning that changes to the Guana
Cay environment would render the action
irrelevant.

‘In his affidavit, Mr Arenson had alleged
that it would cost the developers $440,000
per week if the injunction was upheld.

He alleged that the firm may lose $1.75
million a month, resulting from fixed costs
related to operating expenses, staff costs,
equipment and dredgers, if the injunction
was upheld.

Arguing that “the majority of these costs
would remain if the injunction were not
discharged”, Mr Arenson said its contin-

uation would also result in Discovery Land
Company losing potential real estate sales
and employees, and harm the firm’s rep-
utation.

He added: “Every time the develop-

‘ment is interrupted, its attractiveness as an

investment is materially prejudiced. These
losses are extremely difficult, if not impos-
sible, to quantify.”

But the Association argued that the
costs Discovery Land Company would
incur as a result of the injunction’s con-
tinuation were minor.

They alleged: “Even if the development |

were lawfully permitted to proceed, it is
submitted that in the context of a planned
$500 million, 10-year development, the
costs arising from delay would be rela-
tively modest.

Further, it is clear from the (wholly
unparticularised) schedule of losses exhib-
ited with Mr Arenson’s first affidavit.........
that at least some of these costs would
not in any event be incurred were the
injunction continued (for example, the

$65,000 sales expenses).

““Tt is submitted that the public interest
factors in the present case all point one
way: the proposed:development is not an
infrastructure project of national impor-

tance to the Bahamas; the potential nega- jy

tive impact on the public interest if the
development is permitted to continue: is
potentially highly significant.”

It is unclear what impact. the ongoing %
battle over Guana Cay, and the stop-start ,*
nature of the work performed by the;
developers to date, will have on wider «

‘investor perceptions of the Bahanias as a

place:to do business in.

While it is likely to encourage investors
from the perspective that it shows the
Bahamas is a state where the Rule of Law
reigns, and everyone has a right to due
legal process through the courts, it could ~
also have negative consequences.

In particular, it could alarm investors

to know that any Heads of Agreement.
. they sign with the Government could be

subject to legal challenge, and held up in
court battles, costing them time and mon-

ey.

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear. It is currently based in.
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty retailers in the U.S. and Europe
in addition to a manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand. Bloch International is in
the process of setting up operations in The Bahamas and is seeking a

AGRE + WH

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

JOB SUMMARY:

Organizes and directs all aspects of the accounting and financial control function of the Bahamas Branch and
reports operational results. Maintain accounting systems that ensure the proper accounting and recording of the
Branch’s resources, Provide management with relevant and reliable financial data necessary for budgetary and
financial decisions, Oversee the operation and management of the Accounting Department activities and staff.

_ Reports to the Chief Operating Officer in The Bahamas and to the Chief Financial Officer in Australia.
SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

Supervises and trains the general accounting staff.

Regularly reviews entries to the general ledger to assure accuracy and compliance with established
accounting’ principals and procedures

Assists the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) in the preparation of the annual budgets and forecasts.
Responsible for compliance with all Bahamian fiscal regulatory requirements.

Plans and implements changes in the Branch’s accounting system, where necessary, and with approval
from the Chief Financial Officer (Australia),

Recommends changes in financial policies and procedures, as necessary, Write policies and prboedtes
and ensure they are being adhered to,

Monitors established internal controls to assure proper compliance,
Recruits and evaluates personnel under own supervision.

Keeps the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) informed of the Branch’s performance.

_ Assures protection of assets of the business through internal control and ensuring proper insurance

coverage.

Maintain a regular review of income and expenditure to ensure that cash flow is adequate to meet future
business needs, “if
Prepares and makes recommendations fused on financial siya of operations.

Keeps abreast of current trends, practices, and developments in the profession. Makes recommendations
for implementation of new practices and procedures.

Performs and/or oversees all aspects of Human Resources functions,

Coordinates and supervises.IT function with outside: company providing service.

Oversee global Inventory management and logistics functions.

»

Assume other special activities and responsibilities as required.
~ EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, plus five (5) to seven (7) years experience in all aspects of Accounting, ideally

gained through increasingly responsible positions within Finance, two years of which must be as a department

manager or supervisor. Candidate with a professional accounting qualification and public accounting experience
- at the Manager/Supervisor level is highly desirable.

Experience in a wholesale distribution environment is also highly desirable but not mandatory.

COMPENSATION

The position offers a competitive salary plus incentive bonus based on performance and pension,
insurance and other benefits.

Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

‘East Hill Street
P.O. Box N3910 .
Nassau, Bahamas
pwcbs@bs.pwe.com

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear. It is currently based in
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty retailers in the U,S.. and Europe
in addition toa manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand. Bloch Enteenatonst is in
the process of ee up upesautae in The Bahamas and is seeking a: . te

P eyry eye

Senior Operations Manager |

~ Position Sunamary:

The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring that business objectives. are met effectively and

efficiently and in a timely manner. The ideal candidate will also be required to assist in maintaining the smooth,

turning of the Bloch International business at new corporate headquarters to be established in the Bahamas, An
innovative and energetic profile is necessary to manage the operations of this growing and dynamic business.

Reports to the Senior Vice President in The Bahamas.
Duties and Responsibilities

Develop a communication process to ensure Managers.and Staff are kept well informed

Ensure proper planning and evaluation of business. strategies so that worldwide operations can. meet

profit goals,

Co-ordinate marketing plans and strategies dn conjunction with the senior ‘management staff of Bloch
International and approval of range plans for each division and each distributor in order that sales
targets can-be met,

Assist the Senior Vice President to. monitor and maintain worldwide operation key performance
indicators (KPI's).

Required Skalls/Experience:

The successful candidate for this position will be a self-motivated individual, possess excéllent leadership
skills, be a team player, and be able to demonstrate flexibility to respond to a host of different challenges,
He/she must be accustomed to working on multiple-tasks without continual supervision. This: individual
must be persuasive and tenacious in their relationships while maintaining professional standards of conduct

. and strong customer focus. The ability to manage multiple projects, change priorities: when needed and be
pro-active will be essential. Ultimately the successful candidate will be able to work: on his/her own
initiative and impact positively on the business on a daily basis.

An extensive marketing background with an.in-depth knowledge of brand development
A solid, broad understanding of finance (including product costing and pricing)
Experience in distribution / licensing arrangements as business development in Europe, Asia and South
America forms part of the business plan. International.
An understanding of product development and the product development life cycle from concept through to
market

¢ A good understanding of systems (both computer and procedures)

‘,
Competencies:

Ownership of the role

’ Excellent financial knowledge mixed with excellent commercial knowledge to ensure excellent margin
protection
The ability to understand a different market and apply classical marketing strategies to the
aforementioned new market
Exceptional communication skills
Rois to work with both vertical and flat bones structures

Compensation:

This is a senior position and the compensation package is designed accordingly. Compensation comprises a
base salary (low six figures) plus an incentive bonus based on performance and attainment of worldwide goals.

Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O. Box N3910
Nassau, Bahamas
pwebs@bs.pwe.com



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 7B





Blue Hills plant ‘at full capacity’

FROM page 1B

tory Receipts (BDRs) are listed on
the Bahamas International Securities
Exchange (BISX), had finished a suc-
cessful seven-day performance test of
its Blue Hills plant on July 25.
- Mr McTaggart said: “In our bulk
water business segment, sales rose 50
per cent from last year's second quar-
ter due to the temporary expansion of
- our Windsor Plant and, to a lesser
extent, approximately $300,000 in
sales that were billable in accordance
with the interim delivery phase of the
Blue Hills contract.

Report

“I am pleased to report that the
Blue Hills Plant was fully commis-

sioned in mid-July, and is producing .

an additional 7.2 million US gallons of
potable water each day for the
Bahamian market.

“We successfully completed a 7-
day performance test of the Blue Hills
Plant on July 25, 2006, and are await-
ing confirmation by our customer that
the plant is meeting all contractual
requirements.”

Expanded

- Mr McTaggart said the expanded

Windsor Plant, whose capacity was -

increased until Blue Hills came fully
on line, will remain active until mid-

- August, when some of the equipment

will be moved to another market.

Consolidated Water said its
Bahamian reverse osmosis plant oper-
ations also boosted second quarter
gross profit margins in its bulk water
business.

Mr McTaggart said this reflected
“operational efficiencies associated
with the temporary Windsor Plant
Expansion project” and in the Cay-
man Islands.

He added: “Additional operational

efficiencies were also achieved
through the resolution of a.mem-
brane-fouling problem that hindered
2005 operations at the Windsor
Plant."

To help finance the Blue Hills plant
construction, Consolidated Water
issued $15.8 million in secured bonds,
bearing a coupon of 5.95 per cent, to
non-US investors on August 4.

David Sasnett, its chief financial
officer, said: “The net proceeds of
approximately $15 million from these
bonds will be applied to various cap-
ital expansion projects, including the
Blue Hills plant in the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas, and the
expansion of the North Sound Plant
on Grand Cayman, and to reduce our
bank line of credit."

Months

For the three months to June 30,
2006, Consolidated Water’s net
income rose by 70 per cent to $2.522

million or $0.20 per diluted share,
compared to $1.481 million. or $0.12
per diluted share the year before.

Revenues

Total revenues rose by 47 per cent
to $9.6 million, compared to $6.6 mil-
lion in the 2005 second quarter.

Bulk water sales were up to $4.3
million, compared to $2.9 million the
year before. Bulk water gross mar-
gins increased to 28 per cent, com-
pared to 19 per cent the year before.

For the first six months of its fiscal
2006, Consolidated Water’s net
income was up 96 per cent at $5.6
million or $0.44 per diluted share,
compared to $2.855 million or $0.24
per diluted share.

Total revenues were ahead by 50
per cent at $18.9 million, coniparca to
$12.6 million.

«.“We are-currently in discussions.

involving potential new water pro-
jects in.a number of countries where

naturally occurring water supplies are
scarce. While the ‘sales cycles' for
such new projects are often longer
than we would like, we remain confi-
dent in the growth opportunities that
will be presented to Consolidated
over the next several years," said Mr
McTaggart. .

Increase

“The 43 per cent increase in sec-
ond quarter retail sales primarily
reflected increased demand for
potable water in Grand Cayman, par-
ticularly in our Seven Mile Beach ser-
vice area, where tourist-related activ-
ities have recovered from prior-year
levels that were negatively impacted
by Hurricane Ivan.

“Also, the opening of a major new "
hotel and golf course project (the Ritz
Carlton) and a number of new con-
dominiums along Seven Mile Beach
have increased demand for water in
the area.”







Seeking Candidates for



To advertise in The Tritune - the #1 newspaper

‘in circulation, just call 822-1986 today!













the Position of
Office Assistant

The desired candidate will be responsible for :-

Overseeing to general office duties.
Must be motivated, honest and
confidential.

Must be customer oriented.

Possess excellent organizational ange
administrative skills: °° ~

Must have excellent computer skills.
Assume any additional duties and
responsibilities as directed. -

The successful candidate must possess a high school
certificate.

Qualified candidates are invited to apply i in writing:
‘with a complete resume to :-

The Manager
DA12141T
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



HALSBURY
CHAMBERS:

Counsel and Attorneys-at-law
Notaries Public

Is seeking an ambitious

‘COMMERCIAL/CORPORATE

_ ATTORNEY
For its Nassau Office

Candidates with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the
~ ability to work independently on various
commercial/corporate transactions.

AND A

COMMERCIAL/LITIGATION

ATTORNEY
For its Exuma Office

Candidates.must have at least five (5) years
experience and must have the skills and the
ability to work independently on varied
commercial/litigation matters.

Attractive salary and benefits are available to
the applicants with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE MANAGING PARTNER
‘P O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
Email: info@halsburylawchambers.com

* Electricity

* Kitchen and
Bathroom Supplies * Use of Law Library

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
PERFECT FOR ATTORNEY:

Rent includes the following:

* Cleaning

* Security

* Parking

* Use of two
conference rooms

* Water
* Generator
* Receptionist

To arrange viewing please call: 394-5145

2004 CLE/QUI/00593

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
~ IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land containing 37.473 acres sjtuate on Queen’s Highway
in the vicinity of Great Oyster Pond and approximately
2.7 miles Southwardly of Governor’ s Harbour, Eleuthera,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
_ AND
IN MATTER of the Petition of OWEN BETHEL

Notice is hereby given that Owen Bethel is applying to the
_ Supreme Court to have this title to the following investi-
gated under Section 3 of The Quieting Title Act, and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court in ac-
cordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land containing 37.473
acres situate-on Queen’s Highway in the vicinity of Great
Oyster Pond and approximately 2.7 miles Southwardly of

: » Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the ~~

Commonwealth of The Bahamas.”

Copies of the plans may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in
the City of the Nassau, N. P., Bahamas: or

2. The Chambers of Sears & Co., No. 10 Market Street, in
the City of Nassau, aforesaid.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a Statement of
his, her or its Claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit and other related requirements to be filed and
served therewith by the 5th day of October, 2006. Failure
of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his, her
or its Claim by the 5th day of October, 2006 will operate
as a bar to such Claim.

SEARS & CO.

Attorney for the Petitioner

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No, 46 of 2000)
VANORMIX LIMITED
IBC No 130327B
In nm Volwalary Piquidation

NOTICE i is hereby dive that in accourdance with Section 131 (2)

| (a) of the International Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000,

Vanormix Limited is in Dissolution.

Any person having a claim against Vanormix Limited is required
on or before the 30th August 2006 to send their name, address and
particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company,
or In default thereof they may be excluded from the beneift of any
distribution made before such claim is approved.

Sovereign (Bahamas) Lirhited, of Ansbacher House, 2nd Floor,
Shirley Street & East Sts. North, P.O. Box N-4244, Nassau,

‘Bahamas, is the Liquidator of Vanormix Limited.

CLE/QUI/013 17 2005
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side

NOTICE '
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

The Petition of PHILIP ANDREW ALBURY SR.,, PHILIP

ANDREW JR. AND CELIA ALBURY of the Settlement of

Marsh Harbour, in the Island of Abaco, on of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 7.739 acres
‘being a portion of Grant B-88 granted to john Sweeting and
situate in the Town of Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco

one of the Islands of the Cormmonwealth of the Bahamas which .

said piece, parcel or lot of land is bounded on the EAST by the
Sea of Abaco and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty

Five and Sixty-two Hundredths (125.62) feet and on the EAST
SOUTH by the Sea of Abaco and running thereon Seventy-

two and Nineteen Hundredths (72.19) feet and SOUTHWEST .
by land now or formerly the property of the Estates of the late

Howard Sweeting and running One Thousand and Sixty-three

_.. and Forty Hundredths (1.763.40) feet on the WEST by land
‘now or formerly the property of the Estate of Milton Kenneth

Sweeting and running thereon One Hundred and Seventy-eight
Hundredths (178.68) feet and on the NORTHWEST by land

-now or formerly of Audrey Roberts and running thereon One

thousand Seven Hundred and Three and Forty-eight
Hundredths (1,703.48) feet.

The Petitioners, PHILIP ANDREW ALBURY JR. AND
CELIA ALBURY, claim to be the owners in a fee simple
estate in possession of the pieces parcels or lots of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioners have made
application to. the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas under S.3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have
their title to the said land and investigated and under the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared, by a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at:-

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, Second Floor,
Ansbacher Building, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of HOPE STRACHAN & CO., Equity
House, Mount Royal Avenue North, (Hawkins Hill), Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
said Petition shall on or before the 23rd November, 2006 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or undersigned a
Statement of Claim in the prescribed form verified be an
Affidavit to be filled therewith. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of Claim on or before the 23rd
November, 2006 will operate as a bar to such claim.

HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers, ;
Equity House,
Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins Hill,
Nassau,Bahamas





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



ational Health chief: take
home pay will decrease

FROM page 1B

coverage through that scheme,
and still allow them to use a
private insurer for additional

ance companies.
Dr Lalta said the NHI plan

ness,” he said of private insur- will allow persons to have basic

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coverage.

He added that as far as NHI
contribution rates were con-
cerned, employees will most
likely have to take a reduction
in take home pay to cover the
cost of mandatory payments.

However, Dr Lalta said
some businesses may choose
to offset that by giving employ-
ees a small salary increase that
could assist them in their pay-
ments.

Dr Lalta said this would be
where logic comes in, as it was
better to make small payments

than to not have insurance.and .

face massive medical bills.

. He compared the NHI con-
tribution to pension payments,
noting that many workers still
have a job-related pension
fund, but may ’still have a per-
sonal pension fund.

In addition, Dr Lalta said
the cost of health care - and

subsequently health care insur-
'. ance - will increase regardless

of whether the Government

implements NHI.

“Costs are linked to two
things - the general costs of
importing poods and the pat-

terns of usage - so if more per-
sons are using the services and
there is greater demand, then
there will be more costs,” he
said.

He added that the NHI team
was working on a public
response to the entire study
conducted by Mr Esmail.

In his study, Mr Esmail said
the NHI plan was effectively
an income tax in disguise.

He added that although the
NHI proposed that contribu-
tions, supposed to be set at 5.3
per cent of a salaried worker's
monthly income, were-to be
split evenly between employer
and employee, this would not
lessen the burden on employ:
ees.

“The Blue Ribbon Commis-
sion's proposal that employers
share in the cost of employee

health premiums results in an

unnecessary restriction on the
marketplace, and the cost will

‘still ultimately be paid by

employees through lower
wages and/or benefits," Mr
Esmail said.

“This total value is deter-

mined by the firm according. .

to the value of the employee's
output. Unless the value of an
employee rises post NHI
implementation, the NHI pre-
mium must ultimately be fac-
tored into total income
through a reduction in other
forms of income.

“In the short term, until
employers can adjust their

‘wage structure to account for

the new costs, the effect of the
tax will be an increase in
employer costs."

Although this would be a
temporary event, Mr Esmail
said that until employee wages
were adjusted over the long-
term, NHI contributions "will

‘squeeze personal income",

meaning that the scheme's
implementation will impose a
cost on individual Bahamians
and the economy.

"A premium cost levied on
the employer will ultimately
be paid by the employees

through lower take-home.

wages," Mr Esmail said. "Thus, - °
it makes most sense to simply ~
require that individuals fund
the entire premium them-
selves.”

4

+.

RoyalStar retains

FROM page 1B

reinsurance costs, agent and broker commis-
sions, and operating expenses. The company
said in its 2005 annual report that this trend
had continued into 2006.

The strength of RoyalStar’s capital base and

reinsurance programme is best seen from the
level of claims submitted by policyholders, par-
ticularly in 2004. During that year, Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne struck the Bahamas, while
Hurricane Ivan devastated the Cayman Islands
- both nations being RoyalStar’s primary mar-
ket.

Franklyn Wilson, RoyalStar’s chairman, said

_that since the company was purchased from

‘excellent’ rating

UK-based Royal & Sun Alliance in 2002, it had
suffered losses before reinsurance of more than
$240 million due to hurricanes.

Yet over that period, Mr Wilson had pointed
out that RoyalStar had generated profits of .
$8.442 million. —

. In the Bahamas, general insurers need to pur-
chase a huge amount of reinsurance from the
global reinsurance industry, which suffered mas-
sive losses as a result of Katrina, Rita and |
Wilma-related payouts in the US.

Reinsurance is required to the relatively small
capital bases of Bahamian general insurers, with -
RoyalStar and its chief competitor, Bahamas
First, both having capital of around $20 mil-
lion.

a

“Credit Suisse Nassau Branch -
is presently considering applications fora

ASSISTANT mae CONTROLLER

Credit Suisse is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go

beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our

clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and professional

portfolio management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without
~ compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

‘TEMPORARY POSITION UNTIL MARCH 2007.

The postion is open fo candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Main Main tasks:

° * Assisting in ensuring that the Branch’s books and records are-accurately recorded on a timely

-basis

~* Preparing all Branch, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting deadlines
* Assisting in the preparing of reports for Senior management in London and New York
° Assisting in ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated
* Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting i issues and projects

Requirements:
¢ CPA or equivalent qualification

« Aminimum of 1-2 years’ post qualification experience, investment banking apes
preferred (maybe gained through audit profession)

* Knowledge of US GAAP would be an asset
Personal Qualities:

¢ Acommitmentto service excellence

» Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

Good organizational and interpersonal skills
Ability to work independently
Good IT skills

Benefits provided include:
° Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need
not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS AUGUST 15, 2006

yw

CREDIT SUISSE





He

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS : . THURSDAY, AUGUST10, 2006, PAGE 9B

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MUST SELL eexxizzx

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT, DUNDAS TOWN ROCK SOUND, ELEUTHERA

_ ABACO All that piece parcel or lot of land in the vicinity of the Rock Sound Club
All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. being a portion of on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of The Commonwealth of
the Dundas Town Crown allotment this land is rectangular in shape with The Bahamas. Lot comprising of about 32,808 sq. ft, this site encompasses
dimensions of 80 ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a 1 asingle storey concrete block building. This building has been abandoned
concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. This house is an for quite some time now and is in.very poor condition. This structure is
approximate 30 year ald single farnily, residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, also in a low lying area. This area is also in a low lying area. This area is
1-bathroom, living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly. good overgrown with ‘buses, with all utilities and services available.
condition for its age with a projected future life of about 25 to 30 more — A

; ae ; ppraisal: $61,555.00
g years. The land rises above road level, to, a'helght In excess of This property is situated in the vicinity of the Rock Sound Club on the
approximately 15ft above sea level, with no likelihood of flooding i in an island of Eléuthers.

hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped. 5 s

Appraisal: $90,000.00

This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is 8 adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white trimmed teal green.

BRAKEN BURY ROAD, BLUE HILL ESTATES
(Lot No. 15 Block 11)



|








All that lot of land having an area of 14,520 sq. ft., being lot no. 15 block 11 of the Subdivision known as and asagneied at Blue Hill Estates, the said subdivision
situated in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas. The property is comprised of a 20 yr old single family residence consisting of approximately 1,234 sq. ft.,
of enclused living space with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living, utility, dining rooms and a Kkitchen. The land is on a grad and level; however the site appears to be
sufficently elivated to dissalow the possibility of flooding duri9ng annual heavy-rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including,
driveway, walkway’ and low shrubs, Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing.

Appraisal: $174, 592. 00



Traveling west on the service road of the Tonique Williams Highway, turn left at the corner just before Original Patties, drive straight over the hill to the end of the corner, The subject house i is the last house at the top of
the hill peinted white trimmed green.





LOT #7 EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(Eleuthera) ©

All that lot of land and improversonts having a an area of 11,200 sq. ft. being #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera elon Eleuthera one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. This property is comprised an incomplete two storey single family structure consisting of approximately
2,255.92 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen and tv room.



fee | 7 : Appraisal: $1 32,968.00





LOT 29 GOVERNMENT SUBDIVISION

Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Alll that lot of land having an area of 15, 950 sq. ft. being lot No. 29 of the subdivision known and designated as the Government Subdivision, the said
subdivision situated in the southern side of the town of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a block structure 32x34
plus an addition of wood partially completed being 29x5 the house is an approximate 25 yrs old single family residence comprising of two bedrooms,
one bathroom, living and dining rooms, and kitchen. The house is structurally sound with the exception of the woodwork. The land rises above road
level, to a height of approximately 15 ft and is 30 plus ft above sea level.

AERP TR NE RIE CS GANA TAT RATT UTR,» He ATR, i SN, Appraisal: $1 30,000.00

This property is located in the Government Subdivision in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and is painted blue trimmed white.

(Lot No. 42, Lower Bogue)
ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 42, comprising of about 11,570 sq.
ft., this site encompasses a 25 year old single story home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (one incomplete), front room, dining, kitchen and
basement area. Total living area is approximately 1,703.66 sq. ft. and basement area about 144 sq. ft. This home i is in good condition. The land is flat
and on a hill, and is clear of all debis. Area is complete with all goods, utilities and services available.



Appraisal: $108,934.00

This property is situated on the northern side of the road leading to the public cemetery and BpProrimately 66 ft westerly from the main Eleuthera
Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue. ; :





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue)
‘ ONE ee _ ELEUTHERA .

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising. of about 34,210 sq.
ft., this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen and
‘laundry room, with a total living area of approximately.2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft. of
approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638. 00

1 This property i is situated on the western side of Blumere Highway in the séttlement of Lower Bogue.





Investment Opportunity - Must Sell
JOHNSON’S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION

All those piece, parcel or lot of land and improvements having an area of approximately 4,500 sq. ft. Being Lots 12E and 13W situated in the Johnson’s
Harbour View Estates Subdivision on Harbour Island, North Eleuthera, Bahamas. This site encompasses a single storey apartment block that is
approximately 4 years old and consist of a'living area of approximately 1,555.36 sq. ft. Each apartment contains 2-bedrooms, 1-full bathroom, front
room/dining in one, and kitchen. These apartments are fully furnished. The kitchen and bathrooms are complete with cabinets. There is a wooden
storage to the rear wood landing, and a wood decking to the back door entrance. This building is in good condition. The property is partially landscaped
with crab grass, and fiascos trees. All Utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $196,348.00.

This said pieces, parcels or lot of land and improvements i is situated in Johnson’ 's Harbour View Estates subdivision, on Harbour Island, Eleuthera one
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.





Lot No. 25 Orchard Close Sea Breeze

Nassau

All that lot of land having an aproximate area of 5,000 sq. ft. more or less being lot 1 of the subdivision Orchard Close,situated at the southeastern
corner of Sea Breeze Lane and the roadway of Orchard Close about half mile west of Fox Hill Road, in the eastern District of New Providence, Bahamas.
This property encompasses a 16 year old single storey house with an attached 1-bedroom apartment is the principal improvement. The quality of
construction is average and maintenance is fair, so the effective age of the building is 8 years, besides the apartment. The house is comprised of 3-
bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, livingroom dining room, kitchen a utility area and a covered area that is being used for the preparation of Catered meals, also
attached to the house is an open back patio, with concrete block railing and climate control is provided in the house by ducted central air-conditioning.
The lot is completely enclosed, by chain link fencing i in part and by concrete pork walls and metal gate in part. The grounds are fairly maintained, with
minimal landscaping in place.



Appraisal: $183, 430.00

Travel south on Bay Lily Drive turn right onto Sea Breeze Lane. Go to the 5th corner right, subject property: is ist left painted white trimmed white.

VACANT PROPERTIES

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal ieusaenant Ltd., this is a single family zoning
and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation
is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: ¥1, 275.00






__ For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502- a email philip. rol Ue com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com

fee



—







. tral
‘. Caribbean Games.







HARRISON Petty should

be commended for the role.

he's playing in athletics.
tie’s not an official mem-
ber of the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associa-
tions’ executive board, but
he has gone above and
beyond the call of duty
assisting the local athletes.
Wis latest contribution
came on Friday night at his
Colony Club Resort when
he honoured sprinter Der-

- rick Atkins for lowering the
*.men’s national 100 metre

record for the second time
before he went on to win a
silver medal at the XX Cen-
American and

It wasn’t an Olympic
Games or World Champi-
onships, but Atkins’ feat

_ will go down as one of the

highlights of the year and
Petty made sure that it did-
n’t go un-noticed.

It’s small things like these
that make our athletes feel
appreciative after their
accomplishments. In Atkins’
case, it was a feat that
deserved to be recognised.

Back in July, Atkins:

broke a 25-year-old record
that was set by Rudy Levar-
ity in a time of 10.18 before
Rendward Wells matched

“PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

STUBBS



OPINION





the time in the 1990s.

Atkins lowered the mark
to 10.14. But his time of
10.08 was what is now listed

in the BAAA’s record ©

book.

Petty has been a contrib-
utor to Atkins long before
he strutted down the



SPORTS

straight away and into the
national spotlight. So it was
only fitting that he joined
in his success.

But Petty, on the whole,
has supported so many of
our track stars and the

~BAAA itself. A couple

years ago, he was honoured
by the BAAA as the Man
of the Year.

He’s definitely one of
those unsung heroes who
need to be saluted.



LET'S TIP OUR
HATS TO WILLIAMS
AS WELL

WHEN Sherman ‘the
Tank’ Williams (above)
went to Las Vegas, Nevada,

he had one thing on his
mind, coming out with both
of his NBA: and WBC
FEDECaribe titles around
his waist.

In one of his most impres-
sive performances, Williams
put American Josh Gutcher

‘out of his misery 70 seconds

into the first round with a
technical knockout.

Now the Grand Bahamian
native, fighting out of the
Silver Hawk Promotions in
Florida, said he’s still look-
ing forward to the possible
showdown with ‘Iron’ Mike
Tyson.

‘Williams said he feels he
has the potential to not just
stand in the ring, but go toe-
to-toe and. head-to-head

_ with the former undisputed

world champion.

Obviously, a fight of that
nature won’t be a title bout,
but Williams feels it will
definitely put in the right
direction for a shot at one
of the many crowns that
Tyson held in the past.

It would be good to see
how Williams would match
up against a top ranked
fighter.

In time, that will come
too.

Williams said he’ just.

needs the opportunity.

larrison Petty goes above °
and beyond the call of duty =

HOORAY FOR BARR

IT was two years since
Freeman ‘the Natural’ Barr
was in the ring, but in his
return, it looked as if ‘he
didn’t. miss a beat, even
moving up in weight class
from super middleweight to
light heavyweight.

.The native from Andros,
who is still fighting out of

the SJC Boxing Club in Fort . 4

Myers, needed just two
rounds to shake off the ring
rust before he went-to
work against veteran Amer-
ican journeyman Terry Ack-
er.

- Barr, 32, was so aggres-
sive throughout the ring
that Acker, at the end of the
first two.rounds, didn’t even
know what corner he was
supposed to go to.

Like Williams, Barr will
only prove how good he
really is if he can get a shot
at a credible top ranked
fighter.

His manager/trainer Steve
Canton assured the public
that his chance will
come.

He said they just wanted
to get Barr back into the
ring after sitting out witha;
series of injuries.

He’s definitely back.

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Narrow defeat for Bahamas shock troops |

TRIBUNE SPORTS

- another

i BASEBALL

Sy RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

‘THE smallest nation at the third

World University Baseball Champi-

onships continues to make the biggest
impact on the field.

Fresh off an historic 2-1 win over
Cuba, the hosts and tournament
favourites, the Bahamas followed up
with a close three run loss against
baseball - powerhouse,
Nicaragua.

The Bahamas fell 3-0 to a talented
Nicaraguan squad before approxi-
mately 500 spectators at Santiago

Mederos Stadium in Havana, Cuba.

Going the distance for the Pahamas,
Greg Burrows Jr. was the les:ug pitch-
er, while Nicaragua's Aric! Francisco
Sulduria got the win in'seven and one-
third innings.

Kenny Espinoza picked up the save.

Team Bahamas turned in another
stellar pitching and defensive perfor-
mance, but was unable to score enough
runs to pull off yet another upset.

The Bahamas fell to a 1-1 record and
now sits in second place in Group A

_ behind Japan and tied with Cuba.

Teddy Sweeting, Secretary General
of the Bahamas Baseball Federation,
said the team played well but suffered

eS

an apparent emotional letdown after .
_ the major victory against Cuba.

"It was tough to bounce back from
beating what many people consider the
best country ini the world," he said,
"We did not come out with the inten-
sity that was needed to come into this
game and perform well enough to get
the win, and that was our biggest down-
fall. We lost a bit of our edge and inten-
sity now we have to try and get that
back against Japan tomorrow."

Sweeting said the team suffered a
defensive lapse during the fifth inning,
which ultimately led to the loss.

"It was just a tough loss all around,
we had a rough stretch during the fifth

inning where we gave up three runs,
the only runs we gave up for the whole
game," he said. "We did not capitalise
on a few key situations, there were
instances where we had runners on
base but we just could not bring them
home."

He said the team is optimistic after
the loss and looks to build on the pos-
itive aspects of their play so far.

“The team remains in good spirits,"
he said, "We had two excellent pitching
performances, thus far and our defence
has been great, so we are right where
we want to be."

The team's next game will be against
division leaders Japan today at 2.00pm.





C lubs fighting for a leeia in
Champions League € group =
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Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from’Commercial News Providers





THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com







MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

RTL TES DRE LLL ELE LLNS LET LET BT






LAD RR aL ND ESSER AY

‘Musgrove still confident

-flespite defeat in opener

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas got off to a
slow start in the FIBA Amer-
icas U20 Championships for
Women, dropping their open-
ing game by 25 points.

The team tipped off things
in the qualifying tournament
against host country Mexico,
and when the final buzzer
sounded, the Bahamas walked
off with their first loss, 68-43.

Despite the defeat, head

coach Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove is .

still confident that the team
will be able to end the tour-
nament in one of the top three
spots.

Miserove declared that the
score does not reflect the lev-:

el of play by the players or the
degree of execution.

He said that the team piit
forth a great effort, even
though they didn’t play as well
they are capable. |

“We didn’t play as well as I




vailable from Commercial News Providers

~~



“The

girls should be in

tip-top shape after the practice

session this morning. I am

confident that this team will be
able to play more competitive
games, they just needed to

make that transition.”

Head coach Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove

anticipated the girls to play,”

said Musgrove.
“We played pretty well in

‘the opening minutes of the
game, but fatigue set in pretty

fast as the time went by.
“The girls still haven’t got-

ten used to the air up here yet

and that was a big problem

_ for us. Unlike home, where I
noticed the girls playing hard .

for like three and a half. quar-
ters.

“They weren’t able to adjust
to the weather and climate
and it showed.”

Even though the team had
trouble adjusting and playing
a full game, Musgrove
revealed.to The Tribune that
the intense work-out sessions
they’ve done early Wednes-

oe heme ee ~

_—
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——_— ES





day morning should assist in
their progress.
The Bahamas was expected

to play Brazil yesverday at

4pm.

He added: “The girls should
be in tip-top shape after the
practice session this morning.
I am confident that this team

will be able to play more com-—

petitive games, they just need-

_ed to make that transition.”

Even though the team is
capable of playing competi-

tively with the other teams at -

the tournament, Musgrove

still believes that the team:

needed a little more prepara-
tion before travelling.

But, despite what the team .

is lacking in height, Musgrove
is hoping that their athletic
ability and speed will com-
pensate.

“We are on the top of our

game, but in order to be

.sharper we needed to play

against some other teams, not
against ourselves.

He said: “We are probably .

Anow les and Nestor



the shortest team in the tour-
nament. The height of what
we call our big players is the
height of some of the guards
from the other countries. But
this will not deter us, we will
make up in speed and ee
ability.

“This team could have been
even further if they had gotten
a tournament or two in, pus
we didn’t.

“They are used to playing
against themselves.

“As a result the team plays

at a slower pace and when.

they need to turn up the heat

on teams they are unable to’

do so. But I hope we can cor-
rect all of this before the tour-
nament ends.”

Top scorers in the game for
the Bahamas were Robyn
Swaby with 15 points, five

rebounds; Philica Kelly, six

points, one rebound; Taronya
Wildgoose, six points, two
rebounds and Derlene Fergu-
son, five: points” and five
rebounds.










Coach waits

WOmleesan

on Kelly

@ BASKETBALL
. By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter






-HEAD coach of the
Bahamas junior women’s
national basketball team
is playing a waiting game
as the jury has not yet

delivered a verdict on the
protest launched by the
coaching staff in the case
of Philica Kelly.

Kelly, one of the start-
ing guards for the

. Bahamas junior women’s
national basketball team,
was ejected in the fourth

-quarter-of their first
game in the FIBA
Americas U20 Champi- ~
onships for Women on
Tuesday.

~The team was down by
12 points in the fourth
when Kelly was ejected.
After her dismissal, the
Mexican squad went on ©
a 10-2 run, winning the
game by 25 points.

Kelly, along with one
of the Mexican players,
was ejected by the refer-
‘ees in the fourth quarter
after displaying
‘unsportsmanlike con-

duct.’

Head coach Musgrove
said: “It was just a small
matter, they were both
shoving on each other,
probably trying to create
space, but we are rectify-
ing that.

“We are appealing the
ejection, we don’t know
what will happen until
we get to the game
tonight.

“We are appealing the
ejection because the
rules state that if a play-
er is ejected, they have
to be warned on the first
encounter. Now if she is
disqualified again then
she will have to sit out a
game.”

The appeal was sent to
the panel of appeals and
the technical commis-
sioner, which consists of
four representatives
from different countries.

The Bahamas was
scheduled to play Brazil

at 4pm yesterday

evening. Musgrove
revealed that Kelly will
suit-up:




























































Full Text


4
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| 2% PARTLY



SUNNY

Volume: 102 No.215



O3F |
79F |



m Lhe Tribune

EESEBURUER ym iovin' It, |





Govt considers.

fixed time limits

~ Woman in hospital
following shooting

H By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

FOREIGNERS with work
permits will in future be expect-
ed to train Bahamian replace-
ments by the time their permits
expire, the government said yes-

_terday.

Work permits with fixed time
limits are part of a proposal by
the Ministry. of Immigration,

, -abour and ‘Training to monitor -

compliance with the govern-
ment’s Bahamianisation policy.

“The government is review-
ing its work permit policy to
determine the prudence of lim-
iting the period of time that one

individual may hold a work per-
mit,” said a press release.

It said the ministry “will
implement a procedure
designed to monitor compliance

- of companies with the govern-

ment’s Bahamianisation poli-
CY ey
Should a work permit ‘be
approved because there are no,
or not enough, Bahamians
available, then the employer
must identify a Bahamian to
train to fill the vacancy by the
end of the term of the work per-
mit, it added. *

“The Bahamianisation poli-

SEE page 15.

A’YOUNG woman was shot on Tuesday morning in front of her

home off Melrose Avenue.

Melissa Taylor, in her early twenties, was outside her house on.

“Hampton Road at about 4am when a man took out a handgun and shot
her in the head, according to press liaison officer Inspector Walter

Evans. i

Ms Taylor — who neighbours claim is related to one of Prime Minister.

__ Perry Christie’s bodyguards — was admitted to the intensive care unit
‘at Doctors Hospital where she'is listed in serious condition.

Inspector Evans told The Tribune that the last report. he received on

Tuesday morning was that the victim was undergoing surgery.
No one has been arrested as a result of the incident. “When officers

_» established.”
No information was available at Doctors Hospital about Ms Taylor’s

condition. —- .

At the scene of the shooting yesterday, shocked friends and relatives

_ reached the scene the assailant fled,” Inspector Evans said. “No suspects
~. have been brought forward and a motive of this incident has not been

refused to comment on what had happened.
Neighbour Lauren Brown said: “Last night, around four in the

morning I héard three gun shots and then I saw two or four guys run-

ning down Hampton Road.”

Another resident said that after the gunshots she saw a car driving
down the road “that looked as if it was going to turn over.”

































he Hiami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006



se Ue EE i

VANDALS have damaged the art site known as ‘Sacred Space’ located at Clifton.
Graffiti has been scrawled on the exhibition, with the head being pulled off one of the
| | pieces. Artist Antonius Roberts, who created the figures from dead casuarina stumps,
has been notified. of the damage. * SEE PAGE SIX







patients knowingly
spreading disease

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

crash, filming postponed

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE
Tribune Staff Writer





FILMING of Pirates of the Caribbean II, has
been postponed until January of next year due to
a car accident that has left a producer. of the mul-
ti-million dollar blockbuster movie seriously
injured, Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
confirmed in the House of Assembly yesterday.

The matter was brought.up by member of par-
liament for High Rock, Kenneth Russell.

Mr Wilchcombe later told The Tribune that
he was informed of the accident “about a month
ago.”

“We had wanted the completion of Pirates of
the Caribbean III to continue as was expected, but
just as with Pirates of the Caribbean II, there
were circumstances that had caused a delay,” Mr
Wilchcombe explained. “This one is on hiatus

SEE page 15



THERE have been rumours that some
HIV/AIDS patients in the Bahamas are know-
ingly spreading the disease.

The Tribune has received reports that persons
who have contacted HIV/AIDS are declining to
warn their sexual partners on purpose — and
that some are even attempting “to the best of
their ability” to infect others.

Claiming that some officials are fully aware of
what is going on but are doing nothing about it,
two members of the public have complained
that sufficient information is not being released
about the problem.

Speaking in response to the allegations,

SEE page 10



Breakfast at Subway...
A Delicious Morning Ritual




ADELICIOUS WAY
TO START YOUR DAY?

Pirates movie producer in : Rumours of HIV/AIDS





iy

August 8-

All teachers wil receive ‘|

all purchases made (
with proper
ID is required

Civil Aviation
director denies
emergency: -
Chalk’s meeting

_ i By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

REFUTING claims that
Chalk’s management was
engaged in an emergency meet-
ing in Nassau to relaunch their .
airline, director of Civil Avia-
tion Cyril Saunders yesterday
said that the hands of Bahamian
authorities are tied in the mat-
ter.

“No such (emergency) meet-
ing took place. All it was, was
that Chalk’s principles met with
Civil Aviation in a routine pre-
application meeting,” he said.

Mr Saunders explained that

_every airline wishing to fly

routes into the Bahamas must
take part in such pre-applica-
tion meetings. ;

The civil aviation director ©

_ pointed out, however, that in

the case of Chalk’s the Bahamas
cannot approve the airline
resuming its operations into the
country until United States
authorities give the required go-

~ ahead. |

SEE page 14

Damaged
cable affects
phone lines

li By KRYSTEL ROLLE

TELEPHONE lines in south
central Bahamas were severe-
ly disrupted yesterday as a dam-
aged cable prevented persons
in the Golden Gates area from
making outgoing calls or receiv-
ing incoming calls.

The breakdown was caused
by damage to BTC’s fiber optic
line, creating major, disruption
in land lines with the prefix 341
and 361. Land line customers
with these prefixes were unable
to make calls outside of their
prefix or numbers not begin-
ning with either 361 or 341.

In case of emergencies BTC
advised persons needing to con-
tact the police to use the fol-
lowing numbers: 361-0480, 361-
0482, 361-0483, and 361-0484.

BTC is working assiduously
to fix the damaged cable and

SEE page 15
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

A quarter of stud





‘accurate to the Bahamas but Dr

NEWS

ents have

m@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A QUARTER of high school
students admitted to having
smoked in a World Health
Organisation study ~ making it
a top health concern for the
Bahamas.

Minister of Health Senator
Bernard Nottage said he is very
concerned at the high number
of young persons that smoke,
and that the number of popular
songs which promote smoking
make young persons regard it
as a harmless practice.

The WHO study was con-
ducted in all the high schools in
New Providence and some of
the Family Islands.

At an exhibition entitled
‘Towards a Smoke-Free
Bahamas’, the Minister revealed
several troubling statistics.

According to, the results, 15
per cent of the 1,746 students
who took part in the survey said
they currently use tobacco. Six-
ty-seven per cent of those said
they want to stop but could not,
and half of the interviewed stu-
dents said they were. exposed
to smoking in their homes. ©

“In other words they inher-
ited it -- in a manner of speak-
ing,” Dr Nottage said.

Tobacco is a major cause of .
death globall, with tobacco-
related illnesses killing about
one in ten adults worldwide.
Those figures are not exactly





THE Northwest Bahamas
should see an improvement in
the weather starting soon — as a

‘tropical wave moves out of the

area.
Chief Meteorologist Basil
Dean said yesterday that the

_wave that was over the north-

west Bahamas is expected to
head west and move out of the
area by early today.

. Areas of New Providence
experienced heavy showers and

THE TRIBUNE



oe



@ SMOKING is becoming an increasing concern for the

Ministry of Health

Nottage said the figures are not
very far off the mark.

“If you look at the Bahamas
some of the most common caus-
es of death is cardiovascular dis-
ease, lung cancer, and cancer of
the mouth and tongue -- all of
them contribute to the statis-
tics,” he said.

Smoking and second-hand
smoke leads to a variety of
health problems including lung
cancer and heart disease. In fact
in some cases second-hand
smoke can be more deadly to
persons than first hand smoke,
the minister said.

The minister said that work
has already been started to draft

thunderstorms on Monday

evening as the system moved _

through the northwest
Bahamas.

According to Mr Dean, the
Bahamas Meteorological
Department is monitoring a sec-
ond tropical wave which was
located near the Western
Antilles yesterday afternoon.

He explained that the wave
could become a depression
within the next day or two,
reaching maximum wind speeds
of 35 miles per hour.

(AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

legislation to create smoke-free
environments. Also public edu-
cational programmes are being

improved to teach children
about the adverse effects that,
smoking can have on persons

and the’ environment.

Dr Nottage said he is also
working towards making work-
ing environments safer — par-
ticularly places like casinos.

“The environment that casino
workers have to work in is not
healthy.”

He reported that trade union
workers have already come to
them complaining of smoke-
related health problems that
workers are experiencing.

sing through- but
depression may be felt at weekend

lm By KRISTINA MCNEIL

Even if the wave does not:
mature into a depression, the .

Bahamas may still feel the
effects this weekend with skies
not clearing up until Monday,
Mr Dean said.

The Met Department is also
monitoring a third low pressure
system located southwest of the

. Azores Islands off the coast of

West Africa.

On Tuesday, its location was .

given as 750 miles off the coast

and Mr Dean said it remained '

relatively stationary overnight.

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°
*
_
“
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 3





In brief —

Three men
arrested
after firearm
discovered

THREE men were arrested
in connection with the confis-
cation of a firearm on Tuesday
night.

The gun was reportedly dis-
covered when drug enforce-
ment officers became suspicious
of two vehicles parked outside
the Super Value on Baillou Hill
Road.

- ‘According to press liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans,
when the officers approached, a
young man in one of the cars
pulled the gun from his waist
and threw it on the ground.

Upon detaining all three indi-
viduals — ages 26, 27, and 33 —
the officers conducted a search
and found that the gun was a .38
revolver with four live bullets.

Police investigations into the
matter continue.

Preval visits
lawless slum
in bid.to curb
violence

a HAITI
: -. Port-au- Prince

PRESIDENT Rene Preval on
Wednesday assured residents in
one of Haiti’s roughest neigh-
borhoods that the government is
determined to stem rampant
gang violence in the capital’s
densely populated slums,
according to Associated Press.

Flanked by UN troops in

"jeeps and light-armored vehi-
cles, Preval toured the Cite Mil-
itaire slum where five gang
members were killed Tuesday
in a gunfight with peacekeep-
ers, UN officials said. Journal-
ists were not allowed on the
half-hour visit because of safety
concerns, the UN said.

In Preval’s first visit to the
troubled neighborhood since his

February election, he addressed

_a crowed and pledged peace,

jobs and gang disarmament,
according to residents. ~

. Ketly Kazmine, a 23-year-old
market vendor, said: “I am hun-
gry and I can’t sell anymore

because of the shootings,” Kaz- -

ime said near an intersection
where UN pracckeepers stood
watch.

Gunfire between warring
gangs has raged in parts of Port-
au-Prince in recent days. Much
of the shooting has been in Cite
Militaire, which borders the
capital’s business district.





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LOCAL NEW

“Minister pledges crackdown



on ‘indiscriminate squatting’

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports, and Housing Neville
Wisdom said that he cannot sit
back and allow “indiscriminate
squatting” on Crown Land to
go on.

During yesterday’ s sitting of
the House of Assembly, Mr
Wisdom again expressed the
need for squatters at the Fire
Trail subdivision site to either
purchase the property on
which they live, or leave.

“When my ministry took up
the challenge of sub-develop-
ment and the construction at
Fire trail, we found out that
there were 230 squatters resid-
ing in that area.

“Following the issuance of
vacancy notices Mr Speaker,
215 left. And yesterday we had
one family return to Long
Island, so that is 216 that have
left,” he. said.

Mr Wisdom.also gave an
update on the progress of the
subdivision to his parliamen-
tary colleagues, and recount-

ed an interesting encounter he.

had with one of the squatters —
an illegal immigrant.

“He told me that God gave
him that land. Bahamian land,
and he is here illegally. The

a NEVILLE Wisdom

tractor that was on the land
went through specifically to
remove some abandoned
shacks. Those shacks were all
occupied by illegal immigrants,
and when given notice, they
left. No Bahamian has been
moved from that section at
Fire Trail,” he said.

Mr Wisdom mentioned that
he had met, both at the site
and at his ministry, with the
squatters who were being

~ impacted.

“Rach case was examined



and as a result the following
offers were made. In some
instances the offers that were
made to squatters were to pur-
chase the land on which they
were squatting with an appro-
priate payment schedule
agreed to.

Offers

“Secondly Mr Speaker, there’

were two disabled persons who
were squatting in shacks that
had no lights, no water, and no
proper sewage system. They
were given the option of occu-
pying government subsidised
rental units.

“In other words, we offered
to take them from that unsan-
itary, unclean, and certainly
unsafe condition — and with the

assistance of government sub- _

sidy because they are disabled,
(put them) in a facility that has
running water, lights, and
which had proper sewage,” he
said.

Mr Wisdom also explained
that a small portion of land was
given to the Rastafarian com-
munity for their “religious
facility”.

“T’d like to give notice today
as the minister responsible to
address as quickly as I can the

Hospital p

harmacy still closed

after promised reopening

CROWDS of customers

" were again gathered around

the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital pharmacy yesterday
morning — which was closed
for the second day in a row
despite assurances that it
would be open on time.

When this first happened .
on Tuesday, a staff member
said that the pharmacy would
be open at 8am the next day.

However The Tribune was
told yesterday by hospital
senior assistant administra-
tor Jessica Cartwright-Rolle
that such late starts will hap-
pen again - “but not all the
time”,

Angry pharmacy cus-

i tomers waiting to have pre-

scriptions filled called it a
ridiculous situation.
“Something has to be
done, if they are going to be
late they should announce it












UR R LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm) '











on television, radio, or in the
papers the public needs to be
informed,” said one. “It is a
waste of time to come here and
wait from my arrival, which is at
6am to find that I have to wait
until 10am."

A pharmacy manager, -who
wished to remain anonymous,
refused to release any informa-
tion to the press.

However another adminis-
trator later said that the delayed
opening was due to the fact that
the staff had to hold a meeting.

It was explained to The Tri-
bune.on Tuesday that the phar-
macy is supposed to open from
8am to 12.30pm, then from
1.30pm to 3.30pm every day.

But if the pharmacy does not

open until 10am.— as was the

case yesterday — the usual
crowd of customers only have
two and a half hours to be
served, before they face having
to wait until 2pm.

One said that even trying to
be served under the circum-
stances is “a waste of time”.





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According to Mrs Cartwright-
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nication between the employer

and employees, and this com-- -

munication takes place during
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“We try our best to schedule

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will not inconvenience the pub-
lic, which is why it is held in the
mornings so that when their
meeting is done, they can go
straight through trying their best
to serve everyone.

“About announcing (closures
and delays) on television, radio,
or newspaper — it will be
brought forward as a sugges-
tion, but their are no promises
as to if it will actually happen.”

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PHONE: 322-2157







challenge of providing afford-
able housing for Bahamians —
Bahamians who want to do it
the right way; Bahamians who
have applied and who qualify
for affordable housing.

“And we cannot allow this
indiscriminate squatting on pub-
lic land to go by and we just say

in the interest of compassion
‘let it go’. I want to give notice
now to those persons who are
continuing to squat on govern- —
ment land reserved for housing,
that this minister will be taking
the necessary steps to ensure
the continued development of
our housing project,” he said.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

\

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDI

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387



Minister makes statement on Tribune

LABOUR and Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson, speaking in the House of Assembly
yesterday afternoon, told members that in deal-
ing with work permits, he had invited more than
100 companies, including The Tribune, to give
him information about their training pro-
srammes for Bahamians. The Tribune was the
only company that did not do so, he said.
“Some of:them wrote detailed reports to
show me their training programme,” he said.
Some even came to him with their powerpoint
presentation.

But not The Tribune.

“Now what I found even more amazing,” he
continued, “is that in The Tribune editorial they
saying when the FNM came to power, a minister
in the FNM asked them the same thing, and
they went to the FNM minister and they made
their presentation. So now, why don’t they do
the same thing with me? One company out of all
of those companies, Mr Speaker,.decide they
would now...” He did’not finish the sentence. .

What we presume he was trying to say was
that more than 100 companies were invited to
see him, or send him information on their train-
ing programmes. Only The Tribune remained
silent.

This is not true. We were never informed
that the Minister or anyone at Immigration
wanted a meeting with us. It was only by acci-
dent that The Tribune discovered that the Min-
ister had instructed a Labour Department offi-
cial to visit The Tribune. We are still waiting
for that inspector to set up an appointment to
come to our offices.

Mr Gibson said he was surprised that we
would go to see‘an. FNM Minister, but would not
go to see him. We can’t ‘understand his surprise.
It is all very simple. We went to see the FNM

' minister — in fact we saw two FNM Labour

ministers — because the minister wrote a letter
inviting us to see him. We did not go to see Mr
Gibson, because we were not invited. In fact
we had no idea that he even wanted to see us
until-he made his statement in the House yes-
terday. :

And it was only by reading The Nassau
Guardian of July 31 that we learned that Tribune
Managing Editor John Marquis’ work permit °
had been deferred until Immigration could

“ensure what efforts have been made to Bahami-
anize the position.”

Later the same day we received Immigra- |
tion’s letter, dated July 18, which informed us of
that fact. ;

Mr Gibson also told the House that his deci-
sion had nothing to do with Mr Marquis. We
question this. The reason we question it is
because we submitted two applications for work
permits on the same day. One of them was for
the renewal of Mr Marquis’. permit. It was only
Mr Marquis’ permit that was held up. The oth-
er editor was granted his. Therefore, “as night
follows day”, it is only Mr Marquis’ position
that this government is interested in. It is the

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
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‘02 H-I 12-SEATER VAN
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‘03 SUZUKI BALENO

only position that The Tribune has to justify.
On January 24 The Tribune submitted two

applications to the Labour Department for a

Notice of Vacancy permit, which was needed

’ to accompany the Immigration application for

the renewal of the work permits of two editors
— one of them John Marquis. Six weeks later we
telephoned the department to find out when
the Labour forms would be ready. We were told

to send our messenger to collect them in an

hour’s time — that was March 8.

On arrival our messenger was told to return
the next day — they were not yet ready. The
next day, the messenger telephoned us from the
Labour Department to tell us that there was_.a

problem. He put us on to a staff member who .

confirmed there was indeed a problem, but she
couldn’t tell us. She put a more senior staff
member on the phone. Even she could not tell us
until she had conferred with the director.

Eventually the lady called back, She said .

“the Minister” had a problem with the applica-
tion. He wanted a Labour Department officer to
interview our two editors and the two persons
who were training for their positions. She said
they would come to our offices to do this. There

’ was an exchange of letters, and as we were leav-

ing the island that week it was left. that we would
phone the director on our return to arrange a
meeting. Although we telephoned on our return
we had a great deal of difficulty reaching the
director.

There was then an exchange of e-mails.

The last e-mail from the director said that he
had to leave to attend an international confer-
ence in Geneva and would be in touch with us on
his return, We have heard no more from the

’ Labour Department. When we telephoned the

department last week, we were told that the
director was on vacation and would not be back
in office before September. And that is where
the matter remained until the arrival of the July
18 letter from Immigration — the first and only
communication that we have had since our appli-
cation on March 8 for the renewal of permits for

two editors. On May 1 one of those permits was ©
’ renewed. Nothing was said about Mr Marquis’

permit.

On July 31 we received Immigration’s July 18
letter telling us that Mr Marquis’ permit was
deferred “to ensure what efforts have been made
to Bahamianize the position.”

Until Mr Gibson’s statement on, the floor of
the House yesterday, we still assumed that this

. was to be done by the Labour Be partient

inspector.

The letter also asked that we “submit a staff
list indicating names, nationality and positions
held”. A letter with all the information request-
ed.was hand delivered to the Immigration
Department, and also.to Mr Gibson’s office on

‘Tuesday of this week.

Now if Mr Gibson wants us to meet him in hig
office, we have no objection. He only has to say

so.

THE TRIBUNE





training under
the tutelage of
John Marquis

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I AM most grateful for the
training and guidance I have
received under Mr Marquis’
tutelage. I have always told
Mr Marquis and several oth-
ers that he has been a literary
mentor, a literary giant of
sorts, to me.

Mr Marquis, with news edi-
tor Paco Nunez, mentored me
as a reporter and believed in
my ability to properly research
and report to our true mas-
ters-— the people!

In 2005, as a 20-year-old
cub reporter Mr
Marquis endorsed the idea of
my having a column to bring a
youthful voice to everyday

affairs in our country and :

indeed across the world. This
was even more groundbreak-
ing, as his vision allowed me to
become the youngest colum-
nist in the Bahamas. Mr Mar-






aA BPeS

letters@tribunemedia.net

quis demonstrated a belief in
me by taking such a gam-
ble. In my mind's eye, he went
above and beyond in assisting
with my development as a
writer and as a concerned, dis-
cerning Bahamian citizen.

I am sickened by the notion
that a few politicians, who've
also threatened me, would
resort to machiavellian tactics
to deport him from the coun-
try. I have been threatened
with being disciplined and/or
fired in my professional capac-
ity and he has been threatened
with deportation. Isn’t that
something?! The pérsons that

‘lambast this government the

hardest are the ones being
subjected to bully tactics!

Now at age 22, Mr Marquis *
continues to show an interest
in my development as a leader
among my countrymen.
Speaking to Mr Marquis on
an almost weekly basis has led

‘to my maturity as a person

and a citizen in a democratic
country. I assure Bahamians
that the worst thing imagin-
able would be for this govern-
ment to become too obsessed
with power, and attempt to
abuse journalists and those
espousing the principles of
democracy, particularly free
speech.

Mr Marquis, thank you for
being: a mentor and for:
demonstrating an undeniable
belief in my progression.

ADRIAN GIBSON
Tribune Columnist
August 8,

Nassau, Bahamas.

An invisible wall that —
is difficult to climb

- EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT IS a well established belief that educa-

tion was not available to the Bahamian masses

until the Progressive Liberal Party was given
the mandate to govern our beautiful Bahamas
in 1967! If that is true, then under which gov-
ernment was Sir Lynden Pindling educated?
Which government educated A F Adderley,
Sir Gerald Cash, Dr Doris Johnson, Sir Randol

Fawkes, Hon. A D Hanna, Dr Elwood Don- -

aldson, Hon Paul L Adderley, Mr G J Tynes,
Mr H A Verance, Sir Arthur Foulkes, Mr T
Baswell Donaldson, and, oh, yes, Mr Carlton
Francis? I can go on, and on, but I will leave it
there.

-There is no doubt, that some vast educa-
tional advances were made under the Progres-
sive Liberal Party government, but to say that
the former, who had the mandate to govern,
did nothing to educate the masses, would be
untrue.

I believe it would be safe to say that they
educated the group who took over from them,
Tam sure that was not their intention, but that
is a fact of life. I hate injustice where it is, I am
not going to deprive anyone, and I do not want
anyone to deprive me of anything.

If we go back to BC 19th Dynasty, Egypt, we
would see Moses being educated in the House
of Pharaoh, after Moses’ altercation with the
Royal Household and made his exit, or Exodus,



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it would not be true to say that he was educat-
ed in the wilderness. That would be like Europe
saying that Hippocrates is the father of medi-
cine, when they know from history that:
Imhotep of ancient Egypt was the real father of
medicine. He lived from about 2300 BC, and
gave that knowledge to Greece and Rome.
Hippocrates appeared on the scene 2000 years
after Imhotep who was also Prime Minister to
King Zozer; he was a multi-genius and fore-
most architect of his time.

One would dilute himself if he were to say
there were no barriers under the old system,
there were some then, and there are some now.
The oligarchies.erected a high wall, but it was —
visible, what we have now is an invisible wall
that is difficult to climb because you don’t
know where it is, unless you know somebody
who knows somebody who has a name, which
is very taxing to someone who does not want to
comprise his dignity. There is.a story to be
told, but who would tell it, if we would not tell
it ourselves? It must be told if we want history .
to be kind to us, because history has a way to-
expose those who deprive others of their right-
ful place in history.

PRINCE G SMITH
Washington, DC,
Freeport, GB,
August, 2006.

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 5





In brief

Flight from
Venezuela
redirected
to Bahamas

A FLIGHT from Venezuela
was redirected to the Bahamas
after being denied entry into
the US because some passen-
gers reportedly had “irregular”
documentation.

The news website www.elu-
niversal.com quoted a Lan
Chile Airlines statement as say-
ing that a group of passengers
aboard flight 568 from
Venezuela to Miami on July 4
was prohibited from entering
the US and landed in the
Bahamas to refuel before
immediately returning to
Venezuela.

Said the report: “Lan Chile
general manager Juan Manuel
Pérez explained that 11 trav-
ellers boarded the airplane in
Maiquetia bearing irregular
documentation — the.reason
why US authorities denied the
flight authorisation to land.

“Following September 11
attacks on New York, the US
has reinforced security mea-
sures and demands the list of
passengers traveling to the
country to be sent by e-mail. In

-’ that way, the relevant US

authorities detected the irreg-
ularities and prohibit the land-
ing of the flight in Miami.

The report said that Mr Pérez
would not confirm whether the
passengers with irregular doc-
umentation were Cubans as
other passengers had claimed.

The director of the Venezue-
lan Civil Aviation Institute
Francisco Paz Freita said inves-
tigations on this case continue
and that investigators are await-
ing a report from Lan Chile.









ay ARR isa:
Fertilizer, Fungicide,

Pest Control

Pec
“30215



@ BY MARK HUMES

SUPERINTENDENT of
Prisons Dr Elliston Rahming
has commended the govern-
ment’s efforts to begin the
process of equipping officers
with protective gear — calling
the move unprecedented.

Dr Rahming’s comments
came after a Tribune article on
Wednesday in which Corporal
Clive Rolle, president of the
Bahamas Prison Officer’s
Association, criticised the gov-
ernment for not delivering all
of the protective gear that it
had promised to officers.

“This year, Her Majesty’s
Prison will celebrate its 270th
anniversary, and ever since
there was a prison in the
Bahamas, officers have been
in some degree of danger by

virtue of where they work. This

is the first time that protective
gear has been bought, although
the danger has always been
there,” Dr Rahming said.
“The efforts of the govern-
ment to begin the process of
equipping officers with protec-
tive gear, I do not see how the
efforts can be anything other
than commendable,” he said.
Noting that the need for pro-
tective gear is mostly specific to
the maximum security area,
the central intake facility and
to a certain extent the remand
centre, Dr Rahming said that

“there have been genuine

attempts by the government to
ameliorate many of the long-
standing negative conditions.
. In addition to the 40 vests
which have already been pro-
vided to the facility, Dr Rah-
ming said he was awaiting
another donation of vests from

Prison superintendent praises _

Efforts to equip prison
guards ‘commendable’

government despite delay



a corporate citizen.

“The administration is very
busy, almost 24 hours a day,
working towards improving the
conditions at HMP for both
inmates and staff,” said Dr
Rahming. “Where there are
deficiencies and weaknesses,
we acknowledge them and we
are working hastily to remedi-
ate them.”

In an open letter to the edi-
tor.of The Tribune earlier this
week, BPOA president Mr
Rolle claimed to have sought
out Deputy Prime Minister and

Minister of National Security

Cynthia Pratt for assistance in

Rigby refuses to respond
to criticism of party

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

PLP chairman Raynard Rig-
by has refused to respond to
the opposition’s claim that his
party fell into political ruin and
lost its creative savvy after
their first, 25-year tenure.

In a statement released on
Sunday, the FNM accused the
old PLP of abandoning its
roots, selling out the country
and destroying the good name
of the Bahamas.

The statement said that the
new PLP government is so
busy protecting its image from
scandals, that it does not have
the time to govern.

According to the FNM, by
the end of the first PLP stint in
office, “the country’s infra-
structure was run down, the
nation’s finances were in
shambles, foreign investment
had almost dried up, and many

Bronze, Gold,Blue

_Phone:325-3336

pie OAL) RRL AI YIN A Latah SY





Hl RAYNARD Rigby

of our family of islands were
being treated like relatives we
had turned our backs on.”
“By 1992, after 25 years of
tule, a once progressive polit-
ical force was spending most of
its time victimising opponents,
cutting sweetheart deals, sell-

Co

Black, White,
Green, Silver

ing out the country to various
shady interests and ruining the
country’s good name,” it said.

After reading the statement,
Mr Rigby said he would not
respond to the claims.

As the next general election
approaches, the FNM claims
that after five years in opposi-
tion, it has put together a
“dynamic group the Bahamian
people can be proud of.”

“We have also been doing

tremendous amount of plan-

ning and developing exciting
new plans to take the
Bahamas even further than we
did the last time we were in
office. This is what a responsi-
ble political party does when it
is in opposition: get ready to
govern again.”

Attempts to contact Prime ..

Minister Perry Christie for
comment on the FNM state-
ment proved fruitless.



ren.

obtaining more vests and
equipment so that officers
could feel protected .

Without an answer coming
from Mrs Pratt or officials at
National Security, Mr Rolle
said: “We want to work and
remain loyal to our job, our
institution, and our country,
but its gets more difficult every
day we have to wait on the
tools necessary to carry out our
duties in an effective manner
and in a clean and safe envi-
ronment.

“The prison officers are tired
of being at the bottom of the
totem pole.”

§e

~



/ noon
y 12:05

4:30 Carmen San Diego

F 11:00

GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre
Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

Les ata

THURSDAY,
AUGUST 10TH

5:30 AM Community Page

11:00 Immediate Response (Live)
ZNS News Update Hl
Immediate Response (Cont'd) j
1:00 Legends: Rolly Gray
1:30 N-Contrast

2:00 Bullwinkle & His Friends
2:30 The Fun Farm

3:00 Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Tiangello Hill

4:00 - Dennis The Menace















4:58 ZNS News Update

5:00: The Envy Life

5:30 .. Andiamo

6:00 ThisWeek in The Bahamas |

6:30 News Night 13

7:00° ' The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 _ Da’ Native Show

8:30 Bahamian Spirit: Hon. Italia
Johnson

9:30 The Envy Life

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 — Immediate Resonse

1:30am Community Page 1540AM |

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the |
right to make last minute —
programme changes!























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LOCAL NEWS

Vandals
‘Sacred Spac









VANDALS have scrawled graffiti on wood-
en female figures at the Sacred Space art site at
Clifton.

Last night, one art-lover declared herself
“disgusted” at the desecration.

“Almost all the sculptures have been van-
dalised and the head has been ripped off one of
them,” she said.

Artist Antonius Roberts, who created the
figures from dead casuarina stumps, has been
notified of the damage.

Mr Roberts, who is currently in China, is

awaiting public reaction to the vandalism
before deciding what to do about it.
_ The Sacred Space sculptures - depicting slave
women looking back towards Africa - have
been hailed as one of the most haunting pieces
of art in the Bahamas.

Mr Roberts sculpted the forms last year and
another, artist, Tyrone Ferguson,
provided bells to hang in the trees round the
site. y

Foreign visitors have been so impressed by
the forms that Mr Roberts has been asked to
reproduce them else-
where. There is now a
Sacred Space in Ger-
many.

On one figure, the
words ‘Tree killer’
and ‘Peter C was
here’ appear close to
a drawing of a skull.

Under-



THE
Sacred Space
art site which

is located
at Clifton.



| Bakers Da

GOLF & OCEAN CLUB |



VACAN

THE TRIBUNE

efa






neath are the words: “The trees were already
dead. The art saves their history and presence.
Love it! M M” - apparently written by a well-
meaning art-lover who merely worsened the
damage.

Vulgar additions have been made to other
sculptures on the site.

Collection

Sacred Space, which stands close to Clifton
Oil Depot, was to have been the beginning of
a collection of artwork in the area.

Artists hoped it would become an ‘art park’
with tourist appeal.

With slave cottages of the old Whylly plan-
tation standing nearby, it was hoped the
African theme could have been developed.

_A visitor to the site said:
“It’s a great pity that peo-
ple can’t leave things like
this alone. Apart from
gang signs, Nassau is
remarkably free of graffi-
ti, but there always seems
to be one sad case who
ruins

f













things
for
every-
one
else.”



Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean Club invites applications from s



ESSENTIAL FUNCTION:

implement all aspects of developmeni,

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Masier planning
e Architectural design

aspects of the project

with respect to fhe project
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Sub-consultant coordination

vision

development

construction documents
* Lead design review committee

ensure product quality

inspections and field directives

team and general contractors

agencies





M
















master planned communities
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projects with marine components

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qualified individuals for the position of

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Plans, direcis and coordinates all design activities of designated projecis ic
ensure that the goals and objectives of the development are accomplishe:
the prescribed timeframe and funding parameters. Manage all design projec
personally or through subordinate supervisors, consultants and contractors.
with development partners and sales and marketing staff fo define design anc

¢ Develop the programme, schematic design, and architectural characier for all
Define the design elements associated with landscape and hardscape deiails
* Prepare design guidelines and administrative procedures for development
Sub-consultant identification and contract negotiation

Coordinate the preparation of marketing and public relations materia!

Analyze comparable projects within the region with respect to product size,
finish, amenities and cost in order fo fully understand the impact of the
proposed master plan from a pricing, sales and marketing perspective
Coordinate the efforts associated with developing a marina marketing strategy
Oversee ihe on-going improvements fo ensure compliance with the overall

* Implement the strategy for permitting, construction, and administering the

° Coordinate efforts between sales, design and construction teams, including
buyer presentations, design specialization and management of revisions to

e Manage and direct developmeni of construction documents by caonsulfanis
° Review submittals, samples, mock-ups, owner approvals and shop drawings to

Provide quality control of design and construction activities through field
Establish good working relationships with governmental inspectors, the design

Coordinate project activities with activities of government regulatory or other

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P.0. Box AB-20766
Front Street, Marsh Harbour, ABACO
Tel: 1-242-367-0612
Email: dshipman@discoverylandco.com




































tural



jdinag






Phd tb ater









Artists
needed to
contribute
to calendar

LOCAL artists are being
offered the chance to show their
work in a popular corporate cal-
endar.

Fidelity (Bahamas) Ltd is
hoping to feature Bahamian
scenes and wants to hear from
artists interested in submitting
work.

The calendar will be available
not only in the Bahamas, but

-also Turks and Caicos and the

Cayman Islands.

Interested artists should con-
tact Selina J Roberts at 356-
7764 (ext 3126) or e-mail seli-
na.roberts@fidelitybahamas.co
m

Education
on agenda
at special

meeting

EDUCATION and its role in
the modern Bahamas will be

“among topics for discussion at a

special meeting tonight.
Speakers will also ask if

- Bahamians are ready to com-

pete globally and whether edu-
cation teaches Bahamians who
they are.

The event, organised by
Youth Gr oundings, will be held
at Me’Ting, in the plaza next to
the British Colonial Hilton

(8pm).
Closing
ceremony

for camp
today

THE closing out ceremony
of the Yamacraw Summer
Camp is scheduled to be held
today at the Vision of Hope
Church of God on Yamacraw
Hill.

The camp was sponsored by |

the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing.

Minister of Social Services
and Community Development
Melanie Griffin will be in atten-
dance and will give brief
remarks.

The ceremony, begins at
10am.

I n brief

LOCAL NEWS

Murder accused’s sister denies



IMUHSVAY, AUUUS!

1U, 2UU0, FAUL /

that he was abused as a child

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A SISTER of accused mur-
derer Cordell Farrington, his
former girlfriend and the man
claiming to be his lover all tes-
tified in the Supreme Court.
yesterday.

Farrington is on trial for the
2002 murder of Jamaal Rob-
bins in Grand Bahama.

Detective Corporal Raquel
Lightbourne, Farrington’s old-
er sister, described her broth-
er as a humble, nice person
who never got into a fight or
argument.

She said that growing up,
Cordell sought to have a good
relationship with their father,
but that the efforts were not
returned.

Corporal Lightbourne also
told the court that through-
out his life, Cordell would say
that he hated their mother or
did not like her very much.

She said that on Sunday,
October 26, 2003 at about
7.45am she received a call from
her brother, who told her he
was at Central Police Station.

Corporal Lightbourne said
that when she asked him why,
her brother said he was not
“locked up” but needed her
to come to the station,
although he did not say why.

She said that she responded
“OK”, but want back to sleep
because she thought that he
had been detained.

She told the court that
about an hour or two later,
she received a call from Cor-
poral Pinder who was at the
Central Police Station, and as
a result, cleaned up and imme-
diately went to the station
where she met her brother in
one of the interview rooms.

The witness said that while
she was alone with her broth-
er, he admitted to killing
Jamaal Robbins, someone he
had met at Sandilands Reha-
bilitation Centre between
2000 and 2001.

She told the court that she
had to leave the room there-
after, because she was no
longer able to act in a profes-
sional manner.

During cross-examination
by Farrington’s lawyer
Romona Farquharson, officer
Lightbourne denied the sug-
gestion that their mother had
been verbally and emotional-
ly abusive to them when they
were children.

-Ms Farquharson also sug-














@ CORDELL Farrington
(right) is accused of
murdering Jamaal Robbins,
who he met at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre

gested that their mother, who
was referred to as “Dot,” used
to beat Farrington repeatedly
when he was a child. .

Corporal Lightbourne
denied this, noting that all the
children were beaten for
wrongdoing.

She claimed that on one
occasion, Farrington ran away

. to the home of grandmother,

Alfreda Brennen’s house.
Corporal Lightbourne said
that following this, she too

' would seek refuge at her

grandmother’s house when
she knew she was going to be
disciplined.

Ms Farquharson further
suggested that as punishment,
their mother would make
Officer Lightbourne and the
accused stand in.the yard,
even if it was raining, while
the accused wore her panties
and she his underwear.

Corporal Lightbourne stat-
ed that to her recollection this
occurred once, when she and
Farrington were between the
ages of two and three.

She further denied the sug-
gestion that this punishment
took place 10 times at least.

It was further suggested
that their mother drank a
great deal, however Officer
Lightbourne told the court
that this was not so.

Ms Farquharson also sug-
gested that that Officer Light-
bourne had sexually abused
Farrington when he was a
child. This the officer emphat-
ically denied.

She also denied that during
the two times she visited

Cordell at the prison, she told





him not to reveal the sexual
abuse nor the abuse from his
mother.

The officer added that she
never visited her brother alone.

The witness also denied that
she showed a lack of concern
by going back to sleep after her
brother called her. Corporal
Lightbourne explained that she
told family members that they
were never to call her if they
were in trouble with the law.

Oterrio Floyd, the man who
claimed that he and Farrington
were lovers, was recalled to the
stand yesterday.

He told the court that Far-
rington became very violent
with him on two occasions.

Floyd explained that the first
was in May 2002 after “Elkin and
Joseph” moved out of the apart-
ment they shared with himself
and Farrington on Mallory Lane.

He said Farrington became
angry with him when he asked
about a bank card which the
accused had lost, and that the
accused picked up a fan and

2007 tek SPORT TRAC

threw it at him.

Floyd told the court that on
the second occasion, which was
in July, Farrington pinned him
to a wall by placing his hand
around his neck. Floyd said he
started to cry and begged the
accused to stop. This occurred a
week before Jamaal Robbins’
death, he said.

During cross-examination,
Floyd admitted that he was nev-
er charged in relation to Rob-
bins’ death.

He said that the accused knew
when he left the Mallory Lane
apartment, and told the court
that he bought a ticket on a mail
boat and left Freeport and his

family behind.

Ms Farquharson suggested
that during the three days fol-
lowing Robbins’ death, Floyd
and the accused left the apart-
ment on numerous occasions.
Mr Floyd denied this.

Girlfriend

Katsia Dean Parker, Farring-

ton’s former girlfriend with whom
he had a child, was recalled to
the witness stand yesterday. °

She told the court that when
she first met Farrington, he was
employed at Dolly Madison in
Freeport.

In October 2003, when he
moved with the witness to her

‘mother’s home at Poinciana

Drive Freeport, Farrington
worked as a security officer with
Candid Security Firm, she said.
She told the court that the first
time she saw the box, which was
later discovered to contain some
of Jamaal Robbins' bones, was
at their apartment at King Nep-
tune Drive, Sea horse Village.
She told the court that the

box which Farrington later gave ©

police was in a room he called

. his art room.

The witness said her rela-
tionship with the accused ended
in October 2003 and that she
moved back to her mother’s
home at Poinciana Drive.

She said Farrington gave her
the box along with a few other
things to keep for him.



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Detective Sergeant Presley
Rolle told the court yesterday
that on Monday October 27, 2003
he interviewed the accused in the
presence of Detective Inspector
Anthony Ferguson and Detec-
tive Constable 2399 Munroe,
who videotaped the interview
with the consent of the accused.

The officer said that before
the interview, he told Farring-
ton that he was suspected of the
murder of Jamaal Robbins and:
cautioned him.

He said Farrington relayed a
story to him, and upon comple-
tion of the video interview, he
asked Farrington if he would
be willing to give a written state-

“ment.

According to Sergeant Rolle,
Farrington said “yes” and
declined to have a lawyer or fam-
ily member present. Farrington
signed the statement, he said.

- The officer said that on Tues-
day, October 28, 2003 at
9.20am, he and a team of offi-
cers travelled with the accused
to the Grand Bahama Highway
where the accused directed then
to one unpaved road, then to
another, before indicating a tree
stump that he used a as a mark-
er for where he had placed
Jamaal Robbins' body.

Officer Rolle said the accused
stated that on occasion he
would return to the area and
pick the meat off the bones so
that they would not smell,
because he would take the
bones away with him.

The officer told the court that
four pieces of bone, a pair of
blue pants, a colourful “Tom-
my” shirt and one sneaker were
found in the area.

The officer said the party
went to Mallory Lane where the
accused pointed out apartment
three and gave him certain
information pertaining to it.

From there, the officers were
directed to Queens Cove and

to a track road where the

accused pointed out a green
inflatable mattress.

The officer said Farrington
stated that he disposed of the iron
tod which he used to kill Jamaal
Robbins in a nearby canal.

2006 FORD FUSION





PART OF YOUR LIFE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



The ten most influential
people in the Bahamas

STRAIGHT UP TALK

INFLUENCE is the currency
of social order. Without it no
group, including the state, can
continue to exist. Recently, this
writer gave thought to the ten



most influential people in our
country. The result was the list
that follows.

10) Bishop Neil C Ellis. This

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firebrand preacher’s charisma
and grassroots messages com-
mand the attention of his large
immediate following and a
much larger audience of peo-
ple throughout The Bahamas.
Often controversial, to say that
least, few people don’t listen
when Bishop Ellis speaks. The
role he played in coining the
phrase and crafting the mes-
sage that captured that mood
of most voters in the 2002 gen-
eral election and the governing
party’s continuing dependence
on his tacit endorsement solid-
ifies his place as one of the most
influential persons in The
Bahamas.

9) Dr Myles Munroe. Dr
Munroe is the second of three
reverend gentlemen who will
make our list. As president of
Bahamas Faith Ministries Inter-
national, one of the most
sought after motivational
speakers in the world and an
internationally acclaimed best-
selling author, Dr Munroe is
highly regarded for his lucid
thoughts on realising human
potential, pursuing purpose and
developing leaders. His credi-
bility, both at home and
abroad, earns him respect from
leaders and followers alike. Dr
Munroe is one of the few peo-
ple in The Bahamas who can
influence the thinking of
Bahamians by the sheer force
of the wisdom of his words, sep-
arate and apart from any
charisma that he has. Though
he seldom does so, when he is
compelled to speak on any
national issue, the masses of
our people take note and this is
why he belongs on this list.

8) Wendy Craig, Governor
of the Central Bank. The mon-
etary policy of The Bahamas is
quite static compared to that
of other economies where cen-

tral banks tend to make daily

interventions in the market.
However, domestic credit is.a
critical component of the eco-



Zits

nomic life of The Bahamas. Its
restraint or release plays a crit-
ical role in the economic buoy-
ancy of the country and with it
the fortunes of Bahamians. The

fact that the governor of the |

Central Bank holds sway in
determinations about how
much domestic credit is extend-
ed to our population gives that
position great influence and
Governor Craig on this list.

7) Ivan Johnson, Editor of
The Punch. The Punch may be
a tabloid but many Bahamians
treat its content as gospel. It is
widely read and by some peo-
ple who might not admit that
they do so. The Punch’s stories
might not be all accurate but it

is hardly ever all inaccurate and —

often presents the smoke long
before other media have seen
the fire. Lots of people believe
what they read in The Punch
and this shapes their percep-
tions of things. This is why Ivan
Johnson belongs on this list.

6) Bishop Drexel Gomez.
Though his position as arch-
bishop of the Anglican Church
in The Bahamas gives him great
influence, Bishop Gomez has
by his conduct over many years

prior to holding that office.

established a level of moral
authority that.is nationally
acclaimed. :‘This fact was
launched during the 1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry when he
issued his shocking minority
report and was further cement-
ed during his forceful and suc-
cessful objections to the process
of the 2002 referendum. Bishop

‘Gomez’s genuine interest in the

moral posture of leaders of this
nation, his fight against corrup-
tion in public office and his

Su zuki Liana
is what you need

VARGO



NG

LA

advocacy for better education
have made him a potent force
in our nation. Whenever he
speaks to national issues he
does so with a level of scholar-
ship unseen in most of our
modern pulpiteers and with a
relevance that cannot be
ignored. It is for this reason that
he has such great influence in
our society.

5) Eileen Dupuch Carron,
Publisher/Editor of The Tri-
bune. Eileen Carron, like her
father, the late Sir Etienne
Dupuch, has come to wield her

. pen with a potency that com-

mands attention, especially the
attention of those who hold
public office. Her commentary
on national issues, public policy
or public personalities carry
weight in our society. Indeed,
though they may not admit it,
politicians who come under her
critical review can react to it
like a snake to turpentine. This
is because she writes with the
force of facts, history, clarity,
conviction and purpose. She
also writes to an audience that
includes the professional class
in the country, a group that are
not easily swayed by the shal-
low politics of charisma and
who value the content of infor-
mation. Politicians know this
and they read The Tribune’s
editorial as a matter of daily
routine. They know that the
respect The Tribune has as a
mainstream daily makes it a
much looked to source of infor-
mation and readers of the daily
make Mrs Carron’s column a
principal part of their reading.
Mrs ‘Carron can, with her col-
umn bring, much scrutiny to
bear on government policies
and actions. Indeed, that scruti-

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ny serves as a powerful check
on the execution of power in

our small but dynamic democ- °

racy. That is why she has made
this list.

4) The American Ambas- =

sador to The Bahamas. The

Bahamas needs America. This ‘
s : ,
is a fact; at times an uncom- ,

fortable fact but a fact nonethe-

less. The influence of America |
on our economy, culture and -
politics is second to none in the |
world. The fortunes that flow

to The Bahamas from America

are tied to its positive relation-
ship, which depends on the per-
ceptions of its ambassador here.

Positive reports maintain posi- ‘

tive flows while negative
reports threaten those flows.

’ Pre-clearance; travel advisories,

drug interdiction support, offi- ,

cial aid, travel visas, regional

defence and trade are all issues |

that can be impacted by the US
ambassador’s reporting and
that can ultimately influence
the lives of the masses of peo-

ple in our nation. While most .
US. ambassadors tend to be -

non-intrusive when it comes to

national affairs, in keeping with |

diplomatic protocol, they can
directly or indirectly impact
domestic issues in a big way.

3) Sol Kerzner. So] Kerzn- .

er’s stake and role in the
Bahamian economy has now
taken on mythical proportions.
Kerzner International is now
the single largest private
employer in The Bahamas and
is second only to the govern-
ment overall. No enterprise has
invested more money in our
economy in so short a period
of time’as Kerzner Interna-
tional and no enterprise’s ongo-
ing economic contribution has a
broader impact on the welfare
of the masses of our popula-
tion. Remove Atlantis from the
tourism plant of The Bahamas
and the result will be a Bahami-
an tourism sector becomes only.
a shadow of itself. By his vision
and his actions, Sol Kerzner
wields great influence in our
nation. If you doubt this, ask
any prime minister of ‘The

Bahamas, past or present.

2) The Right Hon Hubert A

Ingraham. He is highly regard- .

ed by friend and foe alike. No-
one. ignores him. No-one is apa-
thetic towards him. Over a life-
time of political involvement,
Hubert Ingraham has estab-
lished himself as the most
potent political force in our

nation today. Indeed, only the

late Sir Lynden Pindling has
been a more formidable politi-

cal personality. When Hubert .

Ingraham speaks people listen,
lots of people. While the rul-
ing party might pretend other-
wise, it knows both in theory
and in fact that Hubert Ingra-
ham is the greatest threat to
gaining a second term. That is
why the prospect of his return
was met by government mem-
bers with all manner of postur-
ing to discourage it and that’ is
why the reality of his return has
prompted a rigorous campaign
to discredit him, a campaign
being sponsored by a strange
array of bedfellows. Politics is
the ‘most potent secular force
in our country and Hubert
Ingraham, more than any single
individual, can influence how
it turns.

1) Prime Minister The Right
Hon Perry Christie. Though in
his own person The Right Hon
Perry Christie has great influ-
ence in The Bahamas, he sits
atop of this list largely because
he holds the office of prime
minister, which is the most
powerful office in our land. The
Prime Minister of The
Bahamas, as the chairman of
the executive and the first lord
of the treasury, can turn the
economic, social and political
fortunes of the entire popula-
tion. His decisions can literally
make or break our state. Some
have and continue to question
the seemingly unbridled scope
of the prime minister’s powers
but no-one denies them. Any
holder of the office of prime
minister, given our present
political organisation, must be
the number one person on any
list of the most influential peo-
ple in The Bahamas.

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK

Influence is fluid. It can be

earned over a lifetime and.

destroyed ina day.
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 9



my Royoy Vi Se

In brief Grand Bahama is





Volvo hunt
drawing to
a close

THE Pirates of the

‘_Caribbean-inspired Volvo Inter-

national Treasure Hunt will
draw to a close today — as con-
testants race to uncover the cov-
eted grand prize buried some-
where in the Bahamas.

Seven finalists have now
arrived on an undisclosed
island, where they will begin the
final stages of their search for
the buried Pirates of the

’ Caribbean-themed Volvo XC90

V8 SUV.

Said the organisers: “Over
the past four weeks, contestants
worldwide have been frantical-
ly deciphering clues, similar to
the format of reality TV shows
Survivor and The Amazing
Race, with the hope of having a
chance to uncover a buried,
one-of-a-kind Volvo XC90 V8
valued at $82,000.

“The luxury SUV features a
variety of elements inspired by
Disney’s Pirates of the
Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest,
including menacing graphics
from the film, black leather
seats and custom painted 20-
inch wheels.”

On Tuesday the contestants
took part in a day-long hunt for
the prize at the Abaco Club at

- Winding Bay.

‘

i Today, the winner and results
of the final hunt are to be
released to the public

On Friday, August 25 a series
of “webisodes” documenting

’ the hunt will premier online at

www.volvocars.us/thehunt _

Thousands of online partici-
pants were narrowed down to
seven contestants from around
the world.

The finalists are:

e Jenny Buckalew, 35, New-
nan, Ga.

e David Hutz, 30, Herndon, ©

Va. :

e James Hutz, 57, Carefree,
Ariz.

e Karl Lloyd, 33, Surrey, Eng-
land :

e Susanne Kalintsch, 44,
Trieben, Austria

e Akihiro Horibe, 36, Yoko-

hama, Kanagawa, Japan
° Jose Luis Dominguez Mon-
ge, 31, Valladolid, Spain



Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama public is being urged
to participate in a two-day
genetic sampling exercise that
will assist in the establishment
of a DNA database in th
Bahamas. -

The exercise is being con-
ducted by officers of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force’s
forensic science section.

“The bottom line of this
whole exercise is to bring the
Bahamas in line with other
leading developed countries
in the world — particularly the
US, Canada, Great Britain
and France,” said Chief
Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming yesterday.

Mr Rahming stressed that
DNA evidence is extremely
significant in modern criminal
procedures. He urged resi-
dents on Grand Bahama to
assist the police by participat-
ing in the exercise.

A similar exercise was con-
ducted in New Providence and
there are plans to conduct
additional exercises, particu-
larly in more populated
islands like Eleuthera and
Long Island.

Forensic Detectives 30
Shanell Sands, 2557 Sheria
King and 2857 Shemeiko
Arthur of New Providence
will conduct the exercise on
Thursday at Winn-Dixie
Supermarket in downtown
Freeport and on Friday at
Winn-Dixie in Eight Mile
Rock, between the hours of
9am and 5pm.

Ms Sands said that partici-
pants will be anonymous and
are only required to submit to
a mouth swab, which takes
about five minutes.

“We will ask you simple
questions, such as where your
parents were born, where your

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urged to take part
in DNA exercise

‘Ml By DENISE MAYCOCK

grandparents and you were
born, but not your names,”
she explained.

Even though a minimum of
400 participants is required,
Ms Sands said it is very impor-
tant that they get as many
samples as possible to get a
proper representation of the
Bahamian population.

Ms Sands said the samples
will be used to establish a
DNA unit in the police labo-
ratory for statistical data pur-
poses only, and will not be
cross-referenced with DNA
profiles in criminal matters or
missing persons cases.

She explained the samples
will be used to determine how
rare or how common a DNA
profile is in the Bahamian
population.

“If you have ever been a
victim of a crime, the turn-
around time it takes for a'case
to be resolved can be quite
lengthy.

“And this one aspect, espe-
cially for DNA analysis work,
is due to the fact that we are
sending off samples, but what
we are trying to do is have
analysis done at home, which
is cost-effective and the turn-

‘around time is enhanced and

we can get cases resolved
much faster,” she said.
Mr Rahming said the intro-

‘duction of DNA evidence in a

case eliminates almost all
doubt about the guilt or inno-
cence of an accused person.

He said it will ensure that
innocent persons are not con-
victed of crimes and also that
a guilty person doesn’t walk
away free.

“I would feel that the
Bahamian public would really
want the Bahamas Police
Force to be on the cutting
edge of development in the

- 21st century

“That is the objective of this
exercise and why: team from



ree,



Forensic Lab are here with us,”
Mr Rahming said.

Exercises will be held in
Eleuthera in September and in
Long Island in October.



H PROCESSING a DNA sample
(Phote/AP archive)

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@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 65 Dominican

fishermen detained in Bahami- .

an waters are expected to be
released sometime this week,
according to an Associated
Press report.

The men were originally held
in connection with poaching-
related charges in July.

They were arrested by the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force
near the Cay Sal bank, which is
located in the southwestern
Bahamas.

According to the report, the
owner of the boat on which the
men were detained said he was
informed by Bahamian author-
ities through his lawyers that
the fishermen would be
released this week.

Speaking to The Tribune yes-
terday, Department of Fisheries

CG ue







& THE ship (right) which was discovered off Cay Sal Bank.
RBDF officers were called in to bring Dominican fisherman to
Nassau, where they were turned over to Immigration.

director Michael Brennen said
that the matter was concluded
in court about three weeks ago.

“The captain was fined and

the vessel was ordered to be
confiscated by the magistrate,”
he said.

The Dominican detainees

THE TRIBUNE






were the crew of the boat
Barlovento.

’ The boat’s owner, Angel Sev-
erino, told the AP that he trav-
elled to the Bahamas in an
effort to get the crew released,
but was told that this would be
impossible until the judicial

" process has taken its course.

He said he has now been
informed by Bahamian author-
ities that his crew will arrive in

‘Puerto Plata or Santo Domingo

by air in the few next days.

Many such boats have been
seized in the Bahamas over the
years and boat owners have
received stiff fines following
such arrests, according to the
report.

In some cases the crews have
also been jailed for months or
even years.

At the time of the arrest,
about 20,000 pounds of fish
were reportedly confiscated.

FROM page one

Wellington Adderley, office’

administrator at the Bahamas
AIDS Foundation, said the
issue “is of great concern to the
Bahamas.”

“You are aware that even
though we expect persons with
the virus to do the right thing,
the world isn’t perfect. Not
everyone who has the virus
will feel it necessary to warn
their partners,” he said.





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HIV/AIDS

Mr Adderley explained that
if a person knowingly spreads
the virus or infects someone
else, they are legally liable and
can be charged.

He referred to a criminal
case in the United States
where a man was convicted
under an Iowa law that makes
it a crime for a person who

- knows he or she is HIV-posi-

tive to “engage in intimate
contact with another person,”
or to intentionally expose a

“person to a bodily fluid of
another person in a manner

that could result in the trans- .

mission of the human
immuno-deficiency virus.”

Mr Adderley made it clear
that such behaviour is against
the law in the Bahamas as
well.

The man in the US is cur-
rently serving a 50-year prison
sentence.

“The HIV centre has always
stressed the need to inform
our partner,” he said. “But in
another sense, there is the con-
fidentiality law. Persons do not
necessarily tell the persons
they are involved with that
they have the disease. And

ited yo
ot wn :

rumours

that is because of the stigma
attached to it.

“As this situation is a prob-
lem, it is up to both persons
who are involved in the sexual

relationship to take the

responsibility of protecting
themselves. You can’t expect
someone else to do it for you.
As the saying goes, if you leave
your door open you will get
robbed. And that saying
applies to this.”

According to a Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre con-
sulting psychiatrist, there is no
evidence that persons who act
in such a way have a mental
problem.

Admitting that they have
heard rumours of such activi-
ties, as well as rumours that
infected persons are sticking
people with contaminated nee-
dies, the consultant said that

as far as they know there is no -

evidence to support such
claims.

One consultant said that “if
persons are aware of what they
are doing and that it is wrong,
it is simply spiteful,” however
he sees “no real reason to call
it a mental problem.”

Rose Mae Bain, director of
the HIV/AIDS Centre, said
that these allegations have
been circulating from as far
back as 1985, however, no one
has provided any information
about persons who are
allegedly committing the
crime.

According to Mrs Bain,
“HIV is spread by about 95

. per, cent of the time’ through

”

unprotected sex,” and as a
result “we, the HIV/AIDS
centre, promote safe sex and
abstinence.”

-“Tf you are having sex you
need to communicate with
your partner and be faithful
to one monogynous
partner.

“We say to the public that if
they are going to engage in
sexual activity it is up to you to
protect yourself,” she said.

“We have slogans every-
where that promote safe sex.
We also believe that if every
Bahamian makes it their mis-
sion not to get the virus they
will get tested and ensure that
their partners get tested.

“However, if the public does
have any information of such
actiyjties, they are to report it,
as it is a criminal offence.”

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THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian culture appears
on banks of the Hudson

NEW YORK will get a taste of
the Bahamas next month when a
special culture day is held on the
banks of the Hudson River.

The event, organised by the
Bahamian American Cultural
Society, will take place on Sun-
day, September 3, at Pier 63,
23rd Street, directly behind Bas-
ketball City.

Starting at noon, the event
will feature Bahamian food,
folklore, dance and music with a
Junkanoo rush-out adding to
the fun.

Entertainment will be pro-
vided by the Cat Island Down
Home Dancers, the Cat island
Folklore Dancers, The Gospel
Rushers, Bo-Hog and the Root-
ers Rake n’ Scrape Band and
the Bahamian-American Calyp-
so Band.

A society spokesman said:
“People come from all over the
Atlantic states and the islands to
enjoy both the unique expres-
sions of Bahamian culture and

CATERING













THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 11

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THE TRIBUNE





Ambassador praised for tenure in US

@ By GABRIELLE
MISIEWICZ

JOSHUA Sears was praised
for having represented the
Bahamas with “dignity and dis-
tinction” by Henry Illes, Henry
Illes, chairman of the perma-
nent council of the Organisa-
tion of American States.

Last month, Mr Sears
resigned his post as ambassador
to the United States and per-
manent representative to the
OAS at a regular meeting of

B FORMER
US President

United States
President Bill
Clinton meets
with The
Bahamas’ US
Ambassador
Joshua Sears.
















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the council, where members
had a chance to bid him
farewell.

Dr Izben Williams, the
ambassador for St Kitts and
Nevis, called Ambassador Sears
a “mature diplomat and an
experienced administrator,”
praising his awareness of the
needs and interests of the
Bahamas as well as the needs
and expectations of the mem-
ber states.

Members of the council

expressed their gratitude for the.
ambassador’s leadership and

various contributions.

These include his serving as
vice-chair of the Permanent
Council and chair and vice-chair
of the Committee on Adminis-
trative and Budgetary Issues.

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Hf Archbishop Pietro Sambi, Apostolic Nuncio, and Ambassador
Joshua Sears, at a.reception to celebrate the first anniversary of
the election of His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI

da acknowledged that chairing
the committee was a difficult

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or promotion. All net items excluded.

and very important task, which
Mr Sears carried out with
“enthusiasm and dedication.”

Ambassador Sears also
served as chair of the working
group to make recommenda-
tions on the OAS Special Mis-
sion for Strengthening Democ-
racy in Haiti.

The ambassador held these
posts while he was representa-
tive to the OAS and Ambas-
sador to the United States — a
fact which the representative
for Canada felt was notewor-
thy.

The members of the council
wished the ambassador good
luck in his future endeavours.

Share
your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
-making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
areaorhave wonan |, ,
award.

If so, call‘us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST10, 2006, PAGE 13



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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

Chalk’s crash injury reports released

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOR the first time since the fatal
crash of Chalk’s Ocean Airways in
December 2005, reports detailing the
fatal injuries of the 20 victims were
released to the Bahamas media.

Having completed their review of
ihe plane crash, which claimed the lives
of 11 Biminifes and one long-time res-
ident, the National Transportation

_Safery Board (NTSB) in the US
released their detailed report of the
cause of the accident and the nature of

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the injuries which led to the deaths of
all the passengers.

The NTSB reported that the cap-
tain, a 37-year-old woman, suffered a
fractured skull, multiple fractures of
the base of the skull, facial fractures, as
well as evisceration of the brain and
lacerations and abrasions of the face.

She further sustained lacerations to
the heart and traumatic amputation of
the right arm.

The second person in the cockpit,
the flight’s 34-year-old first officer, suf-
fered partial decapitation, a shattered
rib cage and sternum, a severed spinal

“LOCAL NEWS.

cord, and a shattered pelvis.

The first officer also experienced the
traumatic amputation of his right arm
above the elbow, and of his left leg
above the knee.

All 18 passengers, including three
infants, suffered similar fatal injuries.

Most sustained lacerations and abra-
sions to the face, fractured ribs, lacer-
ations and ruptures to bladder, liver
and lungs.

Several also suffered shattered and ©

fractured skulls, as well as amputated
limbs.
The NTSB reported that a year pri-

or to sittte crash, the seaplane — a Grum-
man Mallard G73T — had several
repairs to the wing that separated just
after takeoff.

Interviews

The board’s investigators also report-
ed that interviews with Chalk’s employ-
ees had revealed that some of the air-
line’s pilots had complained to man-
agement about the poor maintenance
on the aircraft.

According international news

THE TRIBUNE



sources, the families of the Bahami-
ans killed in the crash could split a ten-
tative $51 million settlement.

The fatal flight departed from Miami
Seaplane Base and took off from the
shipping channel at 2.39pm on Decem-
ber 19, 2005.

The Chalk’s Ocean Airways flight
101 crashed into a shipping channel
adjacent to the Port of Miami shortly
after takeoff.

Witness and video recordings
indicated fire on the right wing and
showed the wing separating prior to
impact.







FROM page one

PARACEL AO SAT RTE





a INVESTIGATORS look over the-recovered wreckage of a Chalk's Ocean Airways plane ona pares anchored at the crash scene
off the shore off Miami Beach, Pia, Wednestey Dec. 21, 2005.

(AP FILE Photo)

Civil Aviation director
- denies emergency
Chalk’s meeting

=< Investigators later identi-

“That’s the law. They first
have to get the correct
authority from the United
States Department of Trans-
portation. So there was no

‘emergency, Chalk’s is simply

following all the necessary
steps,” he said.

Should the airline pass the
fitness review which is cur-
rently being held by the US
Transportation Department

to determine its ability to con-_
-duct business as a commuter

service, Chalk’s would have

to reapply to Civil Aviation.
“After they’ve gotten the

authority from the US, then

application they would have
to re-submit,” he said.

Mr Saunders said he did
not wish to speculate on the
possible outcome of Chalk’s
eventual application at this
time.

On December 19, 2005,
Chalk’s Ocean Airways Flight
101 from Watson Island to
Bimini crashed off the coast
of Miami Beach, Florida.

Twenty people, 18 passen-
gers and two pilots —-includ-
ing 11 Biminites — were killed
in the fatal crash.

he, Sweeting's

fied cracks in the main sup-
port beam connecting the
wing to the fuselage.

Chalk’s was the longest. — -
continuously operating aif-"

line in the world, having start-
ed operations in 1917 and
regular scheduled flights to
the Bahamas in February
1919. .

The. Chalk’s Ocean
Airways fleet consisted
of four Grumman G-73

Turbo Mallard aircraft, fol- ‘

lowing the December 2005
crash.

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THE TRIBUNE









Work
ermit

policy
FROM page one

cy was introduced during the
early 1970s and this administra-
tion, like previous administra-
tions, has guarded and imple-
mented the tenets of that poli-
cy,” the ministry said.

Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson said the fashioning of
the country’s work permit pol-
icy in this manner would be
following a model already
used by other countries in the
region, such as Bermuda and
the
Cayman Islands, which have
economies like the Bahamas.

“Once you are on 4 work
permit for, let’s say, five years,
you would have to spend a
number of years outside of the
country and then you can
come back again.

“That’s not to say we would
not be issuing work permits
for those positions, it just
means that a company would
have to bring in another per-
son to do that job,” he said.

Since being appointed Min-
ister of Immigration, Mr Gib-
son said he has met with
dozens of businesses, most of
‘which have provided him with
their company’s training poli-
cy.

The Bahamianisation policy
dictates that if a Bahamian is
qualified for a job vacancy for
which a work permit is being
sought, and all other things ©
are equal, then that Bahamian
will get the job rather than a
non-Bahamian.

However, the ministry
pointed out that there are one
or two exceptions to the poli-
cy. For example, work permits
are approved for owners’ rep-
resentatives.

“This administration is tak-
ing all the steps that are neces-
sary to ensure that Bahamians
are trained and equipped as

the Bahamas strives to remain -

competitive and keep pace
with the demands of employ-
ers of the 21st century,” the
ministry said.



BING 1850
tei Meet FUR:

far



















































FROM page one

and we are told it will continue
in January once the director is
fine agairt.

“But he was apparently
injured very seriously in that
accident and he will be out
of commission and unavail-
able for several months. So
we are hoping that as soon
as he is better, Disney will
be back in the Bahamas and
continue.”

In the meantime, Mr
Wilchcombe said, negotia-
tions are presently taking
place with another film com-
pany.

“So. you are going to see
more and more business in
the making of a movie in the
amount of $100 million and
that is what our people are
discussing now with one of
the film companies,” Mr
Wilchcombe said.

Ron Ricardo



introduces its

“I think that it speaks to
the fact that we are a viable
destination for films. We
have the natural environ-
ment. We now have a tank
(a massive filming open
water enclosure) in Grand
Bahama and I think that is
what is attracting more busi-
ness.

“It allows for controlled
filming. There are only three
in the world.”

Mr Wilchcombe explained
that the unexpected delay
has minimally impacted
Grand Bahamians who
enjoyed spin-off.employ-
ment.

“It wasn’t work that was
scheduled, but there is
always an impact in the
economy. We did not have
these in our thought

: SE

Filming postponed |





process,” Mr Wilchcombe
reiterated.

“The intention was to
shoot Pirates of the
Caribbean and start anoth-
er, but the difficulty has
been that the director of the
movie was involved in this
serious car accident and —

these are situations that we’

did not have in our thought
process.”

But while work has stalled
on the third sequence, Dead-
man’s Chest continues to
score at the box office.

Filmed in Grand Bahama
and Exuma, the movie has
made history by breaking a
Hollywood record — as the
first film to ever gross more

than $100 million in two days |

and $132 million on its week-
end release.

rae 7 SS
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3

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 15

Damaged cable
FROM page one

apologizes for any inconvenience caused during this time, said
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_ Additionally BTC announced that GSM and TDMA cus-
tomers will experience brief disruptions in service or have some
difficulty making and/or receiving calls.

According to a release, every effort is being made to rectify the
problem. “Once again BTC apologises for any inconvenience
caused and asks the public to have patience.”



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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006 7 ' THE TRIBUNE

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business@tribunemedia.net

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006





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Guana Cay developers face
$440,000 per week losses

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

iscovery Land Com-
pany was last night
facing the possibility
of losing $440,000 per

~-"-Council upheld the injunction stop-
_- “ping all new work at its $175 million
Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club
development, with the project’s oppo-
-.-nents claiming the decision was a
-" “gecognition and validation” of their
- Tight to due process.
The developers, through their sub-
sidiary Passerine at Abaco Holdings,
yesterday acknowledged that the
‘Privy Council “did not accede” to its
application to set aside the July 27,
2006, injunction obtained by the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association.
The injunction prevents Discovery
Land Company from carrying out

. week after the Privy ~

Discovery Land Company fails in attempt to overturn ‘stop work’ .
injunction; pins hopes on Supreme Court judgement this month |

“certain works” on the project until
Supreme Court Acting Justice Norris
Carroll delivers his verdict on the sub-
stantive issues raised by. the Associa-
tion’s case, or until the Privy Council
hears the latter’s application for spe-
cial leave to appeal the Court 6f
Appeal decision this October.

Not surprisingly, the developers are
hoping Acting Justice Carroll delivers
his verdict before October.

Ina short staternent yesterday, Dis-
covery Land Company said an affi-
davit swérn by the-Association’s attor-
ney, Frederick Smith, said that on

August 8, he had been told by Acting
Justice Carroll’s clerk that the judge-
ment-was imminent. |

Mr Smith had been told “that Mr
Justice Carroll anticipated that he
would be delivering a judgement dur-
ing the third week of August 2006”.
__ However, in an affidavit sworn by
Joey Arenson, a Discovery Land
Company partner and attorney for
yesterday’s case, said: “I understand

from our Bahamian attorneys that

informal intimations from the Judge’s
chambers about its delivery have
proved to be false dawns.”

Meanwhile, an ecstatic Mr Smith

_ said: “We won. The injunction stays in

place and the Privy Council ordered
them to pay our costs.

“The injunction stays in place until
either the Supreme Court gives its
ruling, or the special leave to appeal is
heard in October.

“This vindicates their [the Associa-
tion’s] complaint throughout: that
they have been blocked out of the

process. It’s a recognition and vali- ©

dation of their rights to due process.”
Mr Smith added: “The people of
Guana Cay are absolutely thrilled

that the Privy Council, the highest
court in the land, has recognised the
tremendous public importance of this
case, and is giving them the opportu-
nity to have their day in court.”

The partner in Callenders & Co
said the legal action was stimulated by
what the people of Guana Cay per-
ceived as being “denied due process”,
and.an opportunity to be heard.

“We are absolutely delighted that
the Privy Council has seen fit to main-

SEE page 6B

- RoyalStar retains Blue Hills plant ‘at full capacity’

MByNEILHARTNELL == Bahamian operations

‘excellent rating

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor.

BAHAMIAN general insur-
er RoyalStar Assurance yes-
terday saw its financial strength

“partially offset” the positive -

“ compariy’s rating.

attributes surrounding the

But, to RoyalStar’s credit,
A. .M. Best added: “The level
of catastrophe risk is mitigated

Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water
last night said its Blue Hills

reverse osmosis plant was pro-

ducing at full capacity of 7.2
million. gallons per day, and

was now awaiting confirmation

drive Consolidated

Water’s bulk water
sales up by 50%,
as firm waits for

rating of A- (Excellent) reaf- _ by the company’s efficient rein- tf the Water & S : . ;
firmed by the leading global surance programme, which ae Leal on thal it oa eee confirmation it has
insurance rating agency, large- protects capital from both fre- Sea ee Bee
ly due to its capitalisation and quency and severity of events.” ng conbtactnal requite met government
“strong” reinsurance network. The rating agency also noted uN aes ‘| :

Describing RoyalStar Assur- that the Caribbean insurance Announcing that the ;com requirements

ance’s rating as stable, A. M. -
Best said: “The rating reflects
RoyalStar’s solid capitalisation,
generally favourable operating
results and well-established
“presence in the Caribbean
market. J
_ “These attributed are sup-
ported by the management’s
- commitment to effective con-
trol systems, a strong reinsur-
ance programme and knowl-
edge of local markets.”
A. M. Best said RoyalStar’s
exposure to hurricane activity
in the Caribbean, given its
presence in the Bahamas, Cay-
man Islands and Turks &
Caicos, and the increasing fre-
‘quency and severity of storms,

@ By CARA BRENNEN

.. Tribune Business Reporter

THE National Health Insurance (NHI) plan is designed to
work alongside private insurers and should not take away from °
their profits, Dr Stanley Lalta, its project manager, said.

_-_-. Although admitting that implementing the plan will require a.
.". *. reduction in employees’ take home pay to cover the cost of their
NHI contributions, Dr Lalta said the minimum payments were far
less than the burdensome medical bills some Bahamians would

face without significant insurance coverage.
fay: Dr Lalta was responding to some of the “surprising” findings
*.*.°. of areport on the Government’s planned NHI scheme, which was
~.. prepared for the Nassau Institute economic think-tank by
Nadeem Esmail, the director of health system performance stud-

ies for the Canada-based Fraser Institute.

Mr Esmail had concluded that implementation of the NHI

- plan as proposed would result in lower wages and benefits for

staff, and impose restrictions on the labour market.

In addition, he argued that the NHI would also “create a sub-
standard health care programme whose costs far exceeded what
was necessary to deliver the level of quality/access that would be
provided to residents of the Bahamas”.

However, Dr Lalta said he found those comments surprising

_. because the NHI has always been intended to work alongside pri-

vate insurers.

“Everything we have proposed has supported a choice of
provider. There are no restrictions,” he said, saying that the

NHI has tried to be very clear
on that.
“We want them to stay in busi-

i,
/

- the premium RoyalStar is able

market was becoming increas-
ingly competitive, with indige-
nous insurers, challenging’ the
established companies for mar-
ket share. :
RoyalStar generated a .
$3.119 million profit in the 12
months to December 31, 2005,
despite suffering “another year
of underwriting losses from
property insurance” as a result
of what it described as the -
“incorrect pricing” of premi-
ums in the Bahamian market.
Effectively, this means that

to charge is not covering its

SEE page 8B

' SEE page 8B

(FILE photo)

a eS



@ JEFFREY PARKER, chairman of Consolidated Water

pany’s Bahamian operations

helped drive its bulk water
"sales SO per cent higher in the
- 2006 second quarter, Rick

McTaggart, Consolidated
Water’s president and chief
executive, said the Blue Hills
plant had added $300,000 to

4)

e'll clear yOu
US cheque

its sales during that period. |
He added that:the compa-
ny, whose Bahamian Deposi-

SEE page 7B

Our

inasnao!

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

BUSINESS

Ensuring likelihood of
IT problems is ‘remote’

To < ativertise in 7he Tribune - the #1 newspaper

in circulation, just call 322-1986 CENT

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ONE of the key determinants of a compa-
ny’s success is the performance, availability and
security of their IT infrastructure. Customers

‘and partners are demanding that your IT infra-

structure is “always on”, and it is essential in a

‘productive environment for your key staff to

have access to information “anywhere and any
time”.

This demand has forced IT providers to
improve their services so they can deliver an
“always on” infrastructure, while keeping the
cost of delivering the services to a minimum.
One way that IT providers have been able to
solve this challenge is by implementing remote
monitoring and management services.

Remote monitoring and management greatly
helps IT providers with this challenge, because
it enables the IT provider to cost-effectively
manage its customers’ IT environments round
the clock. Remote monitoring and management
delivers proactive management and perior:
mance at predetermined costs.

There are many benefits of remote monitor-
ing and management services to customers. The
primary benefits are a reduction in downtime,
improved overall network performance through
real-time problem monitoring, and reporting
and automated asset inventory management.

Reduced Downtime
- Most downtime occurs because IT staff are
busy or out of office, and are unable to keep a
close eye.on their network. The automatic alert-
ing capability inherent in most monitoring tools
allows technical staff to be alerted to problems
before they become critjcal.

For example, if your primary server is about to
run out of disk space, your IT team will be alert-
ed and can respond. before the problem becomes
critical. In addition, remote monitoring by your
IT provider allows a second pair of eyes to
watch your network to identify and resolve

issues. Again, this significantly reduces down-

time.

agement of our clients’ networks. as

Improved Network Performance Remote monitoring and management has ., | :

It is an IT person’s dream to have anetwork greatly raised the value of our service level *,

that performs with minimal effort. Real-time agreements, and has allowed Providence to offer “ 4
proactive monitoring and management signifi-. a lower cost to our cients. ‘ i
cantly enhances overall network performance, ad
which naturally improves security and reliabil- Re ‘
ity. With remote monitoring, IT people now About the author: 3
have the ability to manage networks without : fl
being confined to the office. Your IT team will Georgette Robinson works for Providence i

also know what issues are affecting your net-
work before you are even aware there is a

problem.
If we look at a basic e- -mail scenario where no



THE TRIBUNE





Making
IT Work

by Georgette Robinson

Providence Technology Group"

one in the office can receive e-mail, it could be
several things. It could be your Internet Ser-
vice Provider (ISP), it could be the mail server,
the switch or router. Remote monitoring and
management allows all possible points of failure
to be immediately identified or narrowed down.
Once the problem is identified, the time to res-
olution is much quicker, thus increasing net-
work uptime and employee productivity.

Asset Inventory Management
Another benefit of remote monitoring and

management worth noting 'is the sea of infor- .

mation that monitoring tools provide.

A detailed asset inventory of all up-to-date
hardware, software and patch information of
all servers and workstations are available. No
more searching for the make and model of your
network devices. No more searching for the

~ amount of servers and workstations across your

network. Information on your network is now
visible from a central console, and can be prop-
erly managed and dissected for reporting pur-
poses.

Providence Technology Group has, over the
past year, incorporated a new way of managing
our client’s networks. We have adopted inter-
national IT standards by deploying remote mon-
itoring and management tools in our environ-
ment to enable us to provide proactive man-

Technology Group, one of the leading IT firms
in the Bahamas. Providence Technology Group
specialises in Networking Solutions, Consulting
and Advisory Services and Software Solutions.

Public Utilities Commission

JOB OPPORTUNITY FOR A PROFESSIONAL
Chief Accountant

The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is seeking to employ a
seasoned and competent Chief Accountant to be responsible for its
accounting and financial control systems and policies in accordance
with recognised accounting standards. The successful candidate will be
a professional with drive, initiative, excellent interpersonal skills and a
range of management, supervisory and accounting

experiences.

Principal Duties: The duties of the post will include











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establishing and implementing accounting and financial control policies
and procedures; ensuring the proper maintenance of the internal
accounting systems and records for external auditing; ensuring the
maintenance of the general ledger and the bank reconciliation
statements; and overall responsibility for accounts payables, receivables

and revenue collection.-:



Qualifications and experience: CPA or equivalent; member of
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants; experience in
computerized management and financial management systems; proven
skills and abilities in financial and management accounting, and billing eee
and collections systems are essential; 10 years relevant experience in :
accounting and financial matters.

::
i
h
t
it

Scotiabank's ‘Forgive & Fares Mortgage Campaign

To celebrate our 50th year in The Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving

away $50,000 in prizes. The PUC offers a very attractive and competitive salary and :

benefits package and opportunities for further training and development
are excellent. Starting sory will be commensurate with
relevant mAPOHeHCe, ; “4

Hewacesonietit as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)
Campaign extended to October 13 2006

Interested applicants may deliver or fax resumes to: Executive
Director, Public Utilities Commission, Agape House, 4th Terrace East,
Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas; Fax No. (242) 323-7288.
Applications should be received by 15 August, 2006. .

Call or visit us today and let Scotiabank help you to ‘Forgive & Forget’

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Life. Money. Balance both:

* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia, Trademarks used under authorization and contol of The Bank of Nova Scotia,


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 3B





Governm«s:

i By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter "

THE Government is reviewing its
work permit policy to determine
whether to limit the timeframe an
individual may hold a work permit
for.

The Ministry of Immigration,
Labour and Training announced that
it will implement a procedure
designed to monitor compliance with

the Government’s Bahamisation pol-
icy.
Ministry ©

According to the ministry, the
Bahamianisation policy was intro-
duced during the early 1970s. It reit-
erated the policy that if a Bahamian
and a person requiring a work per-

mit applied for a job, all things being
equal the Bahamian should get the

SSS



position.

‘It also noted that there were limit-
ed exceptions to the rule, for example
in the case of a business owner’s rep-
resentatives.

The Ministry maintained that if a
work permit was approved ‘because
a Bahamian was not qualified, the
employer must identify Bahamians
to train to fill the vacancy by the en
of the work permit’s term.

The enforcement of a timeframe

v

- for work permits is a move endorsed

by Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
president, Tanya Wright.

Stressed

Mrs Wright said she had often
stressed the importance of immigrant

labour, noting it was essential to the -

development of the Bahamas and
should not be feared.
However, she said this must be cou-

nt reviews
work permit durations



pled with a policy geared towards
empowering the transfer of skills.

“I would endorse limiting work per-
mits to a reasonable timeframe to
allow for training for a particular
skill,” she said. However, she added
that.a realistic timeframe must be
established in each case.

Mrs Wright said that therefore, dif-
ferent companies and businesses
would require a different length o!
time for different professions.

. ae 1 Z 42.25 Bahamas Supermarkets












Legal Notice

- NOTICE

_ IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT 1992



AND



moe dienekuceae econ |”

(BAHAMAS) BANK & TRUST LIMITED

tion, BTC is also working to repair a break In Voluntary Liquidation

in its Golden Gates fibre optic line, which
affected telephone numbers beginning
with 361 and 341.

_ Services

rience difficulties when using their cell
phones due to technical difficulties.
“Customers may experience a brief dis-
ruption in service or some difficulty when
_ making and or receiving phone calls,”
BTCsaid. >
“Technicians are working arduously to
rectify the problem. BTC apologises for
any inconvenience caused, and asks the
public’s patience during this time.”
In addition to cellular service disrup-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN PIERRE BIRBAL OF P.O. Box F-
43201, #13 SHERWOOD DRIVE, LUCAYA, GRAND BAHAMA,
.BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and, that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 10TH day
of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

BAHAMAS Telecommunications ,
Company (BTC) technicians are working
_ t6 repair phone lines that disrupted pre-
-’ paid cellular phone services. and certain
area codes throughout the island.

Statement

'. In a statement yesterday, BTC apolo-
gised to its TDMA (Quickcell) and GSM
(Rockit) customers, saying they may expe-

_ By resolution of the members of the above-named Company dated the
2nd day of August, A.D., 2006 it was; :

RESOLVED that Banco Atlantico (Bahamas) Bank & Trust Limited - |
by voluntarily wound up and that Maria M. Férére of FT Consultant
Ltd. Nassau, Bahamas be appointed Liquidator for the purpose of the
winding up. |



“Persons in Golden Gates who need to.
call emergency services should dial 361-
0480, 361-0482, 361-0483 and 361-0484,”
the company said.



Dated this 2nd day of August, A.D., 2006.

Maria M. Férére
Liquidator












































The Tribune wants to hear “+

from people who are making ae
news in their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising funds

| for a good cause, campaigning:

| for improvements in the area
or have -won an award.

Tf so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.









COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

.

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/00286

Common Law & Equity Division




ea Lito cetacean tara peed au tad em one

a nayiletasle SET Reaves sh nietea aaa asia 8

&

IN THE MATTER OF The Quicting Tides Act, 1959 (Chapter 393)



Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that SHINELLE CHARLES,
FINLAYSON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
| the Minister tesponsible ‘fof Nationality and: Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/ |
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 10th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice be
NOTICE is hereby given that ANITE RENA, DEANS LANE #6,
_,. | NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
'|-for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
| acitizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows ahy
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARGOT ROBIN FOUNTAIN
OF P.O. BOX CB-11724, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 10TH day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing by admeasurement Eighteen thousand Four hundred
and Eighty-four (18,484) Acres situate North of Blackwood Vil-
lage on the Island of Abaco one the Island of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas. —

ER areas

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of PATRICK ROBERTS
NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of PATRICK ROBERTS of the Settlement of Dun-

das Town in the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.









NOTICE is hereby given that AMOS GARRY SEIDE, 18970
| NW 27TH AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA 33056, U. S. A.
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
| Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
| Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty- -
eight days from the 10th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau; Bahamas.











ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing by
admeasurements Eighteen thousand Four hundred and
Eighty-four (18,484) Acres situate North of Blackwood
Village on the Island of Abaco one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Petitioner in this matter claims to be the owner in fee simple
* of the said piece parcel or tract of land and have made application
to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
under Section Three (3) of the Quieting of Titles.

>

wu Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.



le UO. eed

: : Act 1959 to have his title to the said piece parcel or tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in ac-
cordance with provisions of the said Act. Copies of the filed Plan
may be inspected. during normal working hours at:

qPricing Information As Of:
i 9A t 200 6



Previous Close Today's Close Change,
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street North, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

(b) Rolle and Co., Chambers, Anth-Mar House, 84
Minnie Street, Nassau, The Bahamas

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or rights to
dower or an adverse claim or claims not recognized in the Petition
shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days of the last pub-
lication file a notice in the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau in
the Island of New Providence aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner
or the undersigned a statement of his or her claim in the prescribed
form verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any
such person to file and serve a statement of his her claim on or
before the Thirty (30) days after the last publication will operate
as a bar to such claim.

ice Weekly Vol EPS $
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

DATED the 14th day of July, A.D. 2006.

Colina Money Market Fund 1.300892*
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9038*** ’
Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.441484** ROLLE & CO.
Colina Bond Fund Chambers ,
Nd 35
NAV KEY Anth-Mar House,
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 5 “
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *- 28 July 2006 84 Minnie Street,

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

i Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
# Today's Close - Current:day’s weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
i ivid £12 th i

Nassau, The Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

** - 30 June 2006

*** . 30 June 2006



30 June 2006




PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

SACO nt RUC Cree
read Insight on Mondays

np AS_NATURE

@nautilus

Ne bd
"SED With ba TRACE MINC®

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Bottled water company invites applicants for;
Truck Drivers, Sales People, and Receptionist

The potential candidates must meet the following criteria:

* A minimum but not limited to a High School Diploma,
along with working experience in a simiiar position

° Excellent communication skills
Must be a team player, motivated & well groomed

Successful applicants can look forward to
competitive re-numeration and benefits,

Willing to work flexible hours

Applicants must be 25 yrs or older and possess
a clean police record &’a valid drivers license.

Please note that we are located in
the western district near the airport.

All interested persons are asked to call .
377-0444 thru 0446 or submit resumes to
jobs@Nautilash20.com prior to August 11, 2006,

Only successful applicants will be contacted.

oe payee ange ei mete od yene pee an oy RENE



BUSINESS

Bahamians attend
OAS private forum





THE Chamber of Commerce’s second vice-president, Khaalis Rolle (far left), and Kerzner International’s senior vice-president,

J. Barrie Farrington (far right), are shown with other executives at the Organisation of American States Private Sector Forum in the

Dominican Republic.

TWO Bahamian business executives
attended the Organisation of American
States (OAS) Private Sector Forum in the
Dominican Republic, with one involved in
a panel discussion on the parts. trans-
parency and the rule of law played in
assisting investments.

The Chamber of Commerce’s second
vice-president, Khaalis Rolle, and Kerzn-
er International’s senior vice-president, J.
Barrie Farrington, attended the three-day
event that discussed issues such as edu-
cation and skills training;and information

SRR LO ySeRe

GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY

PRESS RELEASE

and communication technology infra-
structure.

Mr Farrington participated on the pan-
el addressing the role of transparency and
the rule of law for investments. |

Relationship

Mr Farrington used the open relation-
ship between Kerzner International.and
the Bahamian government to. demonstrate
an effective functioning model within the
Western Hemisphere as the basis for his



“GB POWER COMPANY RESPONDS TO CEW UNION”

presentation,

Additionally, significant emphasis was
placed on the ‘Irish Model’, which pro- ©
vided infrastructural and educational
transformation in that country that began
during the 1960s.

e The third Private Sector Forum was
held during the 33rd annual OAS general
assembly, under the theme: Inter-Ameri-
can Public-Private Partnership for Com-'
petitiveness.and Job Creation in the Knowl-
edge Society.

Last week, Mr. Keith Knowles, President of the Commonwealth Electrical Workers (CEW) Union that represents about 135 of the ue. employees of Grand Bahama Power Company, in a natiérally
Belevised press conference accused GBPC Management of.not negotiating in-good faith with the CEW union.

Wanagement of GBPC believes that the public needs. to know the facts concerning our ongoing industrial agreement negotiations with the cCEW Union.

e First, the negotiation process which commenced over a year ago was initially stalled by CEW Union after their leaders walked way froin the negotiation table. After several weeks, CEW Union

returned to the table and negotiations resumed.

s 5% salary increase in the 2nd Year;
* 5% salary increase in-the 3rd Year;
* 5% in the 4th Year.

e The CEW Union’s new propos will cost the GBPC approximately $2,500, 000.

© The CEW Unions wage increase demand is in addition to their 25% electricity bill discount and other henanies enjoyed by them, such as part- payment of the tuition costs and a uniform and book

allowance for each child.

4

© The Public must know that GBPC is fully committed to negotiating a new industrial agreement with CEW gion, but we cannot lose sight of the fact that electricity rates of its customers were
increased earlier this year and that our customers are being required to ey substantially increased fuel surcharge each month. due to rising price of fuel. Also, GBPC cannot lose sight of the piSeent

state of Grand Bahama’s economy.

© Further, GBPC also cannot ignore the fact that CEW Union wage increase demand, will create further upward pressure on the existing electricity rates for its customers.

° On Jurie 24, 2006, the GBPC’s latest offer containing a package of proposed terms was delivered to CEW Union negotiating team, GBPC’s offer included:

* 12% lump sum payment in the Ist Year
* 5% in the 2nd Year
* 3% in the 3rd Year
* 5% in the 4th Year

e This offer would cost GBPC about $1,500,000

¢ However, in a press statement aired on national television on July 24 and before responding to GBPC’s offer CEW Union chose to make allegations of negotiating in bad faith.

e It was not until July 27,2006, more than one month after GBPC’S offer, and after its press statement, that the CEW Union responded to the Company by submitting a new proposal which contains

demands for wage increases as follows:

* $6,000 lump sum payment in the Ist Year; a payment which represents 25% of the average annual salary of CEW employees;

* Retroactive pay

*5% salary increase in the 2nd Year:
*5% salary increase in the 3rd Year:
*5% in the 4th Year

e

© The CEW Union’s wages increase demand. is in addition to their 25% electricity bill discount and other benefits enjoyed by them, such as part Payment of the tuition costs and a uniform and book
allowance for each child. .

© The public must know that GBPC is fully committed to negotiating a new industrial agreement with CEW Union, but we cannot lose sight of the fact that electricity rates of its customers were
increased earlier this year and that our customers are being required to pay substantially increased fuel surcharge each month due to rising price of fuel. Also, GBPC cannot lose sight of the Piesent
state of Grand Bahama’s economy.

e Further, GBPC also cannot ignore the fact that CEW Union wage increase demand will create further upward pressure on the existing electricity rates for its customers.

e Although employees within CEW Union and. other GBPC employees enjoy a 25% discount on their electricity bills, Management of GBPC believes that fair and proper consideration must be given to
the potential impact of the demand for wage increases on other GBPC customers presently living and working in Grand Bahama who do not get a discount are required to pay 100% of their electricity
bills every month --at some point in the negotiations, we hope that this will be appreciated by CEW Union leaders and negotiating team. ;

© We believe it is unfair to the hard working residents of the Island of Grand Bahama for CEW Union to state that the public needs to prepare itself because “a storm is brewing” in the CEW Union,
when the record reflects that both sides are active negotiations for a new industrial agreement. We ask the CEW Union to use its energy towards completing these negotiations in a reasonable and
professional manner instead of creating added stress in an already fragile economy.

© GBPC appreciates the work and commitment of its dedicated employees and.is fully prepared to continue negotiations in good health for a new industrial agreement.


THE TRIBUNE es | THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 5B

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Fishing conte St Offshore bank is looking for a Compliance

and Risk Management Officer

@ ®@ ®
to D QO ost Bimini Small financial institution is looking for a Compliance and
Risk Management Officer to join its select team of professionals.

The appropriate candidate will have several years experience

within a compliance and/or risk management function, and

@
to U r 1 Sm p ro du ct be conversant with local and international laws and regulations.

Responsibilities will include:

Maintain a comprehensive understanding of local laws

. BIMINI will this weekend

tice ther Seth, Annual Native and regulations regarding the financial services industry

: Fishing Tournament, bringing

|* serious anglers and numerous

, fishing boats to the island’s

| marinas.

Norma Wilkinson, senior.

»” manager of the Bimini Tourist

'. Office, said in a statement:

‘ “This fishing tournament has
. become a treasure trove of his-
Astor about the island of North
», Bimini.

; re “Some of the adventures of
.” our anglers have etched eternal
* memories in the minds of the

* people of Bimini, and have

". become a part of the oral his-

,» tory of this wonderful island.”

s Native

* The Bimini Native Fishing

. Tournament was started in
_-\~ 1950 by the Bimini Progressive
“is Sporting Club. ‘

') The aim then had been to

*: create fellowship among both:

f settlers and visitors to the
, island.

This year, the tournament

- will run from August 6-11.

*, Over the years, it has grown
from a minor 12-boat affair to
the current event that sees
hundreds of boats docking in
the marinas.

Ms Wilkinson said fishing
‘ tournaments such as the annu-

i al Native Fishing Tournament c/o The Tribune

"are very important-to the - — — —______ PO. Box N-3207
Bahamas because of the niche ‘S NORMA Wilkinson, senior manager : Nassain.B ahaiiias

: 9

Develop and maintain policies and procedures in
accordance with local laws and ecewaHons

Establish effective monitoring and reporting programs
for policies and procedures

Ensure proper documentation i is collected and accurately
recorded

Carry out regular and ad hoc reviews of activities
Develop, monitor and report on key risk indicators

Provide recommendations for improvements to risk
management process .

- Report to Executive Management and Board of Directors

Minimum qualification: LLB, ACIB, CPA, BACO or similar
designation i is preferred.

Salary will be commensurate with experience. Bahamians or
persons with Bahamian residency status only need apply.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume
to:



market opportunities they cre- of the Bimini Tourist Office
° ate within the overall tourism

offering. : een ¥ 2h, : joey vege
“It exemplifies what we have _ islands of the Bahamas present _ within one. There is something Only persons being intervie wed for this position will be.

‘ been saying all along: The a multiplicity of destinations for everyone,” she added. contacted.



Ministry of ences & The Environment —
| Department of Environmental Health Services
| : | | Invitation. for the Tenders for the supply of Vehicles
| Are you looking for job security witha | | 0) ! Cra Ta)
| reputable company? Then we're the (3) Double Cab Pick-Up Truck(s)
if company for you! i] es Ae

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the above
assortment of vehicles for the Department of Environmental Health

WE ARE NOW HIRING! Leo

: Position Available: Laboratory Technician | Interested parties may obtain specification from the office of:
: | Requirements: Associates Degree in a science related field | Tne Peparamen Pete Roa Health Services
. or | | P.O. Box $S-19048

-e : ae Nassau, N.P.
: _ prior laboratory experience he Weharae

Job Responsibilities to include but not limited to: — | Telephone: (242) 322-8037 / (242) 322-8048
| Daily Microbial Testing J | Telefax: (242) 322-8118 / (242) 322-8120

4

1 * Complying with quality control standards 7 | Between the hours of 9:00am - 5:00pm Monday - Friday
| ¢ Verifying Materials . .

e Taste Testing

Re BET FL

Tenders are to be.submitted in sealed envelope(s) marked “Tenders
for the supply of Vehicles to The Department of Environmental Health
Services” and sent to:

wos
ee wow dd

| Applicants should be highly motivated, and able to
| perform and adapt to changing environments. Salary | The Tender Board

| | c/o The Financial Secretary
| commensurate with experience. Please apply in writing, Ministry of Finance ;
: — onor before Friday, August 25th, 2006 to: P.O. Box N-3017

| Nassau, The Bahamas

TheHuman Resources Manager | All tenders must reach the Tenders Board no later than 4:00pm on
B c/o Coca Cola- | Monday, August 28th, 2006. All tenders must be submitted in triplicate.
f ; Tenders will be opened at 10:00am, on Tuesday, 29th August, 2006,
P.O. Box N-1123 2 at the office of the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance and Planning.
| Nassau, Bahamas | The Government reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

Bahamian hotelier helps



shelter group from storm.

A FORMER Bahamas-
based hotelier provided shelter
for a 25-strong group that

included nine Bahamians when
Tropical Storm Chris threat-

ened their camp in the US Vir-

ACCOUNTING & SMALL BUSINESS
CONSULTING SERVICES

*Accounting records in bad shape?

*Need financial statements for the bank?

*Need a bussiness plan and financial proposal prepared?
¢Need business licence prepared/certified?

CALL US WE CAN HELP
eBusiness Start-Up Assistance/Consultations
Compliance Commission Examinations
*Construction & Contract Accounting
*Small Business Customized Accounting Packages
¢Computerized-quickbooks-Setup-Training
eInventory Planning + Control Handbook $25
eSample Business Plans (New/Existing Businesses)

. Business Seminars - Registration $35
(Materials and Refreshments)
eStarting and Managing a business - October 21-10 AM
eInventory Planning + Control - October 21 - 2 PM

TEL: 325-7313 OR 322-6000 Fax: 323-3700

WTI e OOo
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Small Business Consultants



gin Islands.

Ex-Bahamian hotelier
Glyine Delancey operates
three hotels for Fairfield
Resorts.on the island of St
Thomas, and provided shelter
for the group after it evacuated
its St John camp.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
executive vice-president, who
was part of the nine-strong

Bahamian contingent, recalled
the role Mr Delancey played
with the BHA when he was
general manager for the Port
Lucaya Resort and Yacht Club

and served as the organisa-

tion’s vice-president repre-
senting Grand Bahama.

Mr Comito said: “Glyine
was always a dedicated and
willing volunteer, committed
to helping make a difference. I

gave him a call. Told him of
our dilemma and immediately
he put me at ease, saying he
would take care of things. All
he wanted to. know is what
time would our ferry boat
arrive that evening, and how
many people were with us.”
The 25-strong group were
accommodated at Fairfield
Resorts, and those from the
Bahamas and Trinidad &

THE TRIBUNE :

: :
Tobago spent a second night
there after the storm caused *”
the cancellation of their flights. "4

“It was indeed special for us."
to receive Bahamian hospital- ©
ity in the Virgin Islands. We ~
are most appreciative to‘
Glyine and his staff at Fairfield »’ ,
Resorts for making us feel so a
welcome and easing our bur-
den during a moment of need,” ”
said Mr Comito.

Guana Cay developers face $440, 000 per week losses : :

FROM page 1B

tain the status quo. It is absolutely fun-

damental to our case that the physical .

environment, the marine and terrestrial
environment, are preserved until all issues
are dealt with by the court system,” Mr
Smith said.

He again argued that if Discovery Land
Company had been allowed to continue

_ work, the issues and subject matter being

litigated in court could be rendered nuga-
tory, meaning that changes to the Guana
Cay environment would render the action
irrelevant.

‘In his affidavit, Mr Arenson had alleged
that it would cost the developers $440,000
per week if the injunction was upheld.

He alleged that the firm may lose $1.75
million a month, resulting from fixed costs
related to operating expenses, staff costs,
equipment and dredgers, if the injunction
was upheld.

Arguing that “the majority of these costs
would remain if the injunction were not
discharged”, Mr Arenson said its contin-

uation would also result in Discovery Land
Company losing potential real estate sales
and employees, and harm the firm’s rep-
utation.

He added: “Every time the develop-

‘ment is interrupted, its attractiveness as an

investment is materially prejudiced. These
losses are extremely difficult, if not impos-
sible, to quantify.”

But the Association argued that the
costs Discovery Land Company would
incur as a result of the injunction’s con-
tinuation were minor.

They alleged: “Even if the development |

were lawfully permitted to proceed, it is
submitted that in the context of a planned
$500 million, 10-year development, the
costs arising from delay would be rela-
tively modest.

Further, it is clear from the (wholly
unparticularised) schedule of losses exhib-
ited with Mr Arenson’s first affidavit.........
that at least some of these costs would
not in any event be incurred were the
injunction continued (for example, the

$65,000 sales expenses).

““Tt is submitted that the public interest
factors in the present case all point one
way: the proposed:development is not an
infrastructure project of national impor-

tance to the Bahamas; the potential nega- jy

tive impact on the public interest if the
development is permitted to continue: is
potentially highly significant.”

It is unclear what impact. the ongoing %
battle over Guana Cay, and the stop-start ,*
nature of the work performed by the;
developers to date, will have on wider «

‘investor perceptions of the Bahanias as a

place:to do business in.

While it is likely to encourage investors
from the perspective that it shows the
Bahamas is a state where the Rule of Law
reigns, and everyone has a right to due
legal process through the courts, it could ~
also have negative consequences.

In particular, it could alarm investors

to know that any Heads of Agreement.
. they sign with the Government could be

subject to legal challenge, and held up in
court battles, costing them time and mon-

ey.

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear. It is currently based in.
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty retailers in the U.S. and Europe
in addition to a manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand. Bloch International is in
the process of setting up operations in The Bahamas and is seeking a

AGRE + WH

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

JOB SUMMARY:

Organizes and directs all aspects of the accounting and financial control function of the Bahamas Branch and
reports operational results. Maintain accounting systems that ensure the proper accounting and recording of the
Branch’s resources, Provide management with relevant and reliable financial data necessary for budgetary and
financial decisions, Oversee the operation and management of the Accounting Department activities and staff.

_ Reports to the Chief Operating Officer in The Bahamas and to the Chief Financial Officer in Australia.
SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

Supervises and trains the general accounting staff.

Regularly reviews entries to the general ledger to assure accuracy and compliance with established
accounting’ principals and procedures

Assists the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) in the preparation of the annual budgets and forecasts.
Responsible for compliance with all Bahamian fiscal regulatory requirements.

Plans and implements changes in the Branch’s accounting system, where necessary, and with approval
from the Chief Financial Officer (Australia),

Recommends changes in financial policies and procedures, as necessary, Write policies and prboedtes
and ensure they are being adhered to,

Monitors established internal controls to assure proper compliance,
Recruits and evaluates personnel under own supervision.

Keeps the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) informed of the Branch’s performance.

_ Assures protection of assets of the business through internal control and ensuring proper insurance

coverage.

Maintain a regular review of income and expenditure to ensure that cash flow is adequate to meet future
business needs, “if
Prepares and makes recommendations fused on financial siya of operations.

Keeps abreast of current trends, practices, and developments in the profession. Makes recommendations
for implementation of new practices and procedures.

Performs and/or oversees all aspects of Human Resources functions,

Coordinates and supervises.IT function with outside: company providing service.

Oversee global Inventory management and logistics functions.

»

Assume other special activities and responsibilities as required.
~ EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, plus five (5) to seven (7) years experience in all aspects of Accounting, ideally

gained through increasingly responsible positions within Finance, two years of which must be as a department

manager or supervisor. Candidate with a professional accounting qualification and public accounting experience
- at the Manager/Supervisor level is highly desirable.

Experience in a wholesale distribution environment is also highly desirable but not mandatory.

COMPENSATION

The position offers a competitive salary plus incentive bonus based on performance and pension,
insurance and other benefits.

Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

‘East Hill Street
P.O. Box N3910 .
Nassau, Bahamas
pwcbs@bs.pwe.com

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear. It is currently based in
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty retailers in the U,S.. and Europe
in addition toa manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand. Bloch Enteenatonst is in
the process of ee up upesautae in The Bahamas and is seeking a: . te

P eyry eye

Senior Operations Manager |

~ Position Sunamary:

The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring that business objectives. are met effectively and

efficiently and in a timely manner. The ideal candidate will also be required to assist in maintaining the smooth,

turning of the Bloch International business at new corporate headquarters to be established in the Bahamas, An
innovative and energetic profile is necessary to manage the operations of this growing and dynamic business.

Reports to the Senior Vice President in The Bahamas.
Duties and Responsibilities

Develop a communication process to ensure Managers.and Staff are kept well informed

Ensure proper planning and evaluation of business. strategies so that worldwide operations can. meet

profit goals,

Co-ordinate marketing plans and strategies dn conjunction with the senior ‘management staff of Bloch
International and approval of range plans for each division and each distributor in order that sales
targets can-be met,

Assist the Senior Vice President to. monitor and maintain worldwide operation key performance
indicators (KPI's).

Required Skalls/Experience:

The successful candidate for this position will be a self-motivated individual, possess excéllent leadership
skills, be a team player, and be able to demonstrate flexibility to respond to a host of different challenges,
He/she must be accustomed to working on multiple-tasks without continual supervision. This: individual
must be persuasive and tenacious in their relationships while maintaining professional standards of conduct

. and strong customer focus. The ability to manage multiple projects, change priorities: when needed and be
pro-active will be essential. Ultimately the successful candidate will be able to work: on his/her own
initiative and impact positively on the business on a daily basis.

An extensive marketing background with an.in-depth knowledge of brand development
A solid, broad understanding of finance (including product costing and pricing)
Experience in distribution / licensing arrangements as business development in Europe, Asia and South
America forms part of the business plan. International.
An understanding of product development and the product development life cycle from concept through to
market

¢ A good understanding of systems (both computer and procedures)

‘,
Competencies:

Ownership of the role

’ Excellent financial knowledge mixed with excellent commercial knowledge to ensure excellent margin
protection
The ability to understand a different market and apply classical marketing strategies to the
aforementioned new market
Exceptional communication skills
Rois to work with both vertical and flat bones structures

Compensation:

This is a senior position and the compensation package is designed accordingly. Compensation comprises a
base salary (low six figures) plus an incentive bonus based on performance and attainment of worldwide goals.

Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O. Box N3910
Nassau, Bahamas
pwebs@bs.pwe.com



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006, PAGE 7B





Blue Hills plant ‘at full capacity’

FROM page 1B

tory Receipts (BDRs) are listed on
the Bahamas International Securities
Exchange (BISX), had finished a suc-
cessful seven-day performance test of
its Blue Hills plant on July 25.
- Mr McTaggart said: “In our bulk
water business segment, sales rose 50
per cent from last year's second quar-
ter due to the temporary expansion of
- our Windsor Plant and, to a lesser
extent, approximately $300,000 in
sales that were billable in accordance
with the interim delivery phase of the
Blue Hills contract.

Report

“I am pleased to report that the
Blue Hills Plant was fully commis-

sioned in mid-July, and is producing .

an additional 7.2 million US gallons of
potable water each day for the
Bahamian market.

“We successfully completed a 7-
day performance test of the Blue Hills
Plant on July 25, 2006, and are await-
ing confirmation by our customer that
the plant is meeting all contractual
requirements.”

Expanded

- Mr McTaggart said the expanded

Windsor Plant, whose capacity was -

increased until Blue Hills came fully
on line, will remain active until mid-

- August, when some of the equipment

will be moved to another market.

Consolidated Water said its
Bahamian reverse osmosis plant oper-
ations also boosted second quarter
gross profit margins in its bulk water
business.

Mr McTaggart said this reflected
“operational efficiencies associated
with the temporary Windsor Plant
Expansion project” and in the Cay-
man Islands.

He added: “Additional operational

efficiencies were also achieved
through the resolution of a.mem-
brane-fouling problem that hindered
2005 operations at the Windsor
Plant."

To help finance the Blue Hills plant
construction, Consolidated Water
issued $15.8 million in secured bonds,
bearing a coupon of 5.95 per cent, to
non-US investors on August 4.

David Sasnett, its chief financial
officer, said: “The net proceeds of
approximately $15 million from these
bonds will be applied to various cap-
ital expansion projects, including the
Blue Hills plant in the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas, and the
expansion of the North Sound Plant
on Grand Cayman, and to reduce our
bank line of credit."

Months

For the three months to June 30,
2006, Consolidated Water’s net
income rose by 70 per cent to $2.522

million or $0.20 per diluted share,
compared to $1.481 million. or $0.12
per diluted share the year before.

Revenues

Total revenues rose by 47 per cent
to $9.6 million, compared to $6.6 mil-
lion in the 2005 second quarter.

Bulk water sales were up to $4.3
million, compared to $2.9 million the
year before. Bulk water gross mar-
gins increased to 28 per cent, com-
pared to 19 per cent the year before.

For the first six months of its fiscal
2006, Consolidated Water’s net
income was up 96 per cent at $5.6
million or $0.44 per diluted share,
compared to $2.855 million or $0.24
per diluted share.

Total revenues were ahead by 50
per cent at $18.9 million, coniparca to
$12.6 million.

«.“We are-currently in discussions.

involving potential new water pro-
jects in.a number of countries where

naturally occurring water supplies are
scarce. While the ‘sales cycles' for
such new projects are often longer
than we would like, we remain confi-
dent in the growth opportunities that
will be presented to Consolidated
over the next several years," said Mr
McTaggart. .

Increase

“The 43 per cent increase in sec-
ond quarter retail sales primarily
reflected increased demand for
potable water in Grand Cayman, par-
ticularly in our Seven Mile Beach ser-
vice area, where tourist-related activ-
ities have recovered from prior-year
levels that were negatively impacted
by Hurricane Ivan.

“Also, the opening of a major new "
hotel and golf course project (the Ritz
Carlton) and a number of new con-
dominiums along Seven Mile Beach
have increased demand for water in
the area.”







Seeking Candidates for



To advertise in The Tritune - the #1 newspaper

‘in circulation, just call 822-1986 today!













the Position of
Office Assistant

The desired candidate will be responsible for :-

Overseeing to general office duties.
Must be motivated, honest and
confidential.

Must be customer oriented.

Possess excellent organizational ange
administrative skills: °° ~

Must have excellent computer skills.
Assume any additional duties and
responsibilities as directed. -

The successful candidate must possess a high school
certificate.

Qualified candidates are invited to apply i in writing:
‘with a complete resume to :-

The Manager
DA12141T
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas



HALSBURY
CHAMBERS:

Counsel and Attorneys-at-law
Notaries Public

Is seeking an ambitious

‘COMMERCIAL/CORPORATE

_ ATTORNEY
For its Nassau Office

Candidates with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the
~ ability to work independently on various
commercial/corporate transactions.

AND A

COMMERCIAL/LITIGATION

ATTORNEY
For its Exuma Office

Candidates.must have at least five (5) years
experience and must have the skills and the
ability to work independently on varied
commercial/litigation matters.

Attractive salary and benefits are available to
the applicants with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE MANAGING PARTNER
‘P O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
Email: info@halsburylawchambers.com

* Electricity

* Kitchen and
Bathroom Supplies * Use of Law Library

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
PERFECT FOR ATTORNEY:

Rent includes the following:

* Cleaning

* Security

* Parking

* Use of two
conference rooms

* Water
* Generator
* Receptionist

To arrange viewing please call: 394-5145

2004 CLE/QUI/00593

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
~ IN THE SUPREME COURT

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land containing 37.473 acres sjtuate on Queen’s Highway
in the vicinity of Great Oyster Pond and approximately
2.7 miles Southwardly of Governor’ s Harbour, Eleuthera,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
_ AND
IN MATTER of the Petition of OWEN BETHEL

Notice is hereby given that Owen Bethel is applying to the
_ Supreme Court to have this title to the following investi-
gated under Section 3 of The Quieting Title Act, and the
nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the said Court in ac-
cordance with the provisions of the said Act.

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land containing 37.473
acres situate-on Queen’s Highway in the vicinity of Great
Oyster Pond and approximately 2.7 miles Southwardly of

: » Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the ~~

Commonwealth of The Bahamas.”

Copies of the plans may be inspected during normal
office hours at the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street North in
the City of the Nassau, N. P., Bahamas: or

2. The Chambers of Sears & Co., No. 10 Market Street, in
the City of Nassau, aforesaid.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said
Certificate of Title is required to file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or its Attorney a Statement of
his, her or its Claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit and other related requirements to be filed and
served therewith by the 5th day of October, 2006. Failure
of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his, her
or its Claim by the 5th day of October, 2006 will operate
as a bar to such Claim.

SEARS & CO.

Attorney for the Petitioner

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No, 46 of 2000)
VANORMIX LIMITED
IBC No 130327B
In nm Volwalary Piquidation

NOTICE i is hereby dive that in accourdance with Section 131 (2)

| (a) of the International Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000,

Vanormix Limited is in Dissolution.

Any person having a claim against Vanormix Limited is required
on or before the 30th August 2006 to send their name, address and
particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company,
or In default thereof they may be excluded from the beneift of any
distribution made before such claim is approved.

Sovereign (Bahamas) Lirhited, of Ansbacher House, 2nd Floor,
Shirley Street & East Sts. North, P.O. Box N-4244, Nassau,

‘Bahamas, is the Liquidator of Vanormix Limited.

CLE/QUI/013 17 2005
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side

NOTICE '
THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

The Petition of PHILIP ANDREW ALBURY SR.,, PHILIP

ANDREW JR. AND CELIA ALBURY of the Settlement of

Marsh Harbour, in the Island of Abaco, on of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising 7.739 acres
‘being a portion of Grant B-88 granted to john Sweeting and
situate in the Town of Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco

one of the Islands of the Cormmonwealth of the Bahamas which .

said piece, parcel or lot of land is bounded on the EAST by the
Sea of Abaco and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty

Five and Sixty-two Hundredths (125.62) feet and on the EAST
SOUTH by the Sea of Abaco and running thereon Seventy-

two and Nineteen Hundredths (72.19) feet and SOUTHWEST .
by land now or formerly the property of the Estates of the late

Howard Sweeting and running One Thousand and Sixty-three

_.. and Forty Hundredths (1.763.40) feet on the WEST by land
‘now or formerly the property of the Estate of Milton Kenneth

Sweeting and running thereon One Hundred and Seventy-eight
Hundredths (178.68) feet and on the NORTHWEST by land

-now or formerly of Audrey Roberts and running thereon One

thousand Seven Hundred and Three and Forty-eight
Hundredths (1,703.48) feet.

The Petitioners, PHILIP ANDREW ALBURY JR. AND
CELIA ALBURY, claim to be the owners in a fee simple
estate in possession of the pieces parcels or lots of land
hereinbefore described and the Petitioners have made
application to. the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas under S.3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959, to have
their title to the said land and investigated and under the nature
and extent thereof determined and declared, by a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act.

Copies of the plan may be inspected during
normal office hours at:-

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, Second Floor,
Ansbacher Building, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of HOPE STRACHAN & CO., Equity
House, Mount Royal Avenue North, (Hawkins Hill), Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the
said Petition shall on or before the 23rd November, 2006 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or undersigned a
Statement of Claim in the prescribed form verified be an
Affidavit to be filled therewith. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of Claim on or before the 23rd
November, 2006 will operate as a bar to such claim.

HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers, ;
Equity House,
Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins Hill,
Nassau,Bahamas


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



ational Health chief: take
home pay will decrease

FROM page 1B

coverage through that scheme,
and still allow them to use a
private insurer for additional

ance companies.
Dr Lalta said the NHI plan

ness,” he said of private insur- will allow persons to have basic

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coverage.

He added that as far as NHI
contribution rates were con-
cerned, employees will most
likely have to take a reduction
in take home pay to cover the
cost of mandatory payments.

However, Dr Lalta said
some businesses may choose
to offset that by giving employ-
ees a small salary increase that
could assist them in their pay-
ments.

Dr Lalta said this would be
where logic comes in, as it was
better to make small payments

than to not have insurance.and .

face massive medical bills.

. He compared the NHI con-
tribution to pension payments,
noting that many workers still
have a job-related pension
fund, but may ’still have a per-
sonal pension fund.

In addition, Dr Lalta said
the cost of health care - and

subsequently health care insur-
'. ance - will increase regardless

of whether the Government

implements NHI.

“Costs are linked to two
things - the general costs of
importing poods and the pat-

terns of usage - so if more per-
sons are using the services and
there is greater demand, then
there will be more costs,” he
said.

He added that the NHI team
was working on a public
response to the entire study
conducted by Mr Esmail.

In his study, Mr Esmail said
the NHI plan was effectively
an income tax in disguise.

He added that although the
NHI proposed that contribu-
tions, supposed to be set at 5.3
per cent of a salaried worker's
monthly income, were-to be
split evenly between employer
and employee, this would not
lessen the burden on employ:
ees.

“The Blue Ribbon Commis-
sion's proposal that employers
share in the cost of employee

health premiums results in an

unnecessary restriction on the
marketplace, and the cost will

‘still ultimately be paid by

employees through lower
wages and/or benefits," Mr
Esmail said.

“This total value is deter-

mined by the firm according. .

to the value of the employee's
output. Unless the value of an
employee rises post NHI
implementation, the NHI pre-
mium must ultimately be fac-
tored into total income
through a reduction in other
forms of income.

“In the short term, until
employers can adjust their

‘wage structure to account for

the new costs, the effect of the
tax will be an increase in
employer costs."

Although this would be a
temporary event, Mr Esmail
said that until employee wages
were adjusted over the long-
term, NHI contributions "will

‘squeeze personal income",

meaning that the scheme's
implementation will impose a
cost on individual Bahamians
and the economy.

"A premium cost levied on
the employer will ultimately
be paid by the employees

through lower take-home.

wages," Mr Esmail said. "Thus, - °
it makes most sense to simply ~
require that individuals fund
the entire premium them-
selves.”

4

+.

RoyalStar retains

FROM page 1B

reinsurance costs, agent and broker commis-
sions, and operating expenses. The company
said in its 2005 annual report that this trend
had continued into 2006.

The strength of RoyalStar’s capital base and

reinsurance programme is best seen from the
level of claims submitted by policyholders, par-
ticularly in 2004. During that year, Hurricanes
Frances and Jeanne struck the Bahamas, while
Hurricane Ivan devastated the Cayman Islands
- both nations being RoyalStar’s primary mar-
ket.

Franklyn Wilson, RoyalStar’s chairman, said

_that since the company was purchased from

‘excellent’ rating

UK-based Royal & Sun Alliance in 2002, it had
suffered losses before reinsurance of more than
$240 million due to hurricanes.

Yet over that period, Mr Wilson had pointed
out that RoyalStar had generated profits of .
$8.442 million. —

. In the Bahamas, general insurers need to pur-
chase a huge amount of reinsurance from the
global reinsurance industry, which suffered mas-
sive losses as a result of Katrina, Rita and |
Wilma-related payouts in the US.

Reinsurance is required to the relatively small
capital bases of Bahamian general insurers, with -
RoyalStar and its chief competitor, Bahamas
First, both having capital of around $20 mil-
lion.

a

“Credit Suisse Nassau Branch -
is presently considering applications fora

ASSISTANT mae CONTROLLER

Credit Suisse is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go

beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our

clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and professional

portfolio management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without
~ compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

‘TEMPORARY POSITION UNTIL MARCH 2007.

The postion is open fo candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Main Main tasks:

° * Assisting in ensuring that the Branch’s books and records are-accurately recorded on a timely

-basis

~* Preparing all Branch, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting deadlines
* Assisting in the preparing of reports for Senior management in London and New York
° Assisting in ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated
* Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting i issues and projects

Requirements:
¢ CPA or equivalent qualification

« Aminimum of 1-2 years’ post qualification experience, investment banking apes
preferred (maybe gained through audit profession)

* Knowledge of US GAAP would be an asset
Personal Qualities:

¢ Acommitmentto service excellence

» Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision

Good organizational and interpersonal skills
Ability to work independently
Good IT skills

Benefits provided include:
° Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need
not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS AUGUST 15, 2006

yw

CREDIT SUISSE


He

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS : . THURSDAY, AUGUST10, 2006, PAGE 9B

ee he ee
MUST SELL eexxizzx

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT, DUNDAS TOWN ROCK SOUND, ELEUTHERA

_ ABACO All that piece parcel or lot of land in the vicinity of the Rock Sound Club
All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. being a portion of on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of The Commonwealth of
the Dundas Town Crown allotment this land is rectangular in shape with The Bahamas. Lot comprising of about 32,808 sq. ft, this site encompasses
dimensions of 80 ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a 1 asingle storey concrete block building. This building has been abandoned
concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. This house is an for quite some time now and is in.very poor condition. This structure is
approximate 30 year ald single farnily, residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, also in a low lying area. This area is also in a low lying area. This area is
1-bathroom, living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly. good overgrown with ‘buses, with all utilities and services available.
condition for its age with a projected future life of about 25 to 30 more — A

; ae ; ppraisal: $61,555.00
g years. The land rises above road level, to, a'helght In excess of This property is situated in the vicinity of the Rock Sound Club on the
approximately 15ft above sea level, with no likelihood of flooding i in an island of Eléuthers.

hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped. 5 s

Appraisal: $90,000.00

This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is 8 adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white trimmed teal green.

BRAKEN BURY ROAD, BLUE HILL ESTATES
(Lot No. 15 Block 11)



|








All that lot of land having an area of 14,520 sq. ft., being lot no. 15 block 11 of the Subdivision known as and asagneied at Blue Hill Estates, the said subdivision
situated in the western district of New Providence, Bahamas. The property is comprised of a 20 yr old single family residence consisting of approximately 1,234 sq. ft.,
of enclused living space with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living, utility, dining rooms and a Kkitchen. The land is on a grad and level; however the site appears to be
sufficently elivated to dissalow the possibility of flooding duri9ng annual heavy-rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, with improvements including,
driveway, walkway’ and low shrubs, Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing.

Appraisal: $174, 592. 00



Traveling west on the service road of the Tonique Williams Highway, turn left at the corner just before Original Patties, drive straight over the hill to the end of the corner, The subject house i is the last house at the top of
the hill peinted white trimmed green.





LOT #7 EARLY SETTLERS DRIVE
(Eleuthera) ©

All that lot of land and improversonts having a an area of 11,200 sq. ft. being #7 Early Settlers Drive, North Eleuthera elon Eleuthera one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. This property is comprised an incomplete two storey single family structure consisting of approximately
2,255.92 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen and tv room.



fee | 7 : Appraisal: $1 32,968.00





LOT 29 GOVERNMENT SUBDIVISION

Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Alll that lot of land having an area of 15, 950 sq. ft. being lot No. 29 of the subdivision known and designated as the Government Subdivision, the said
subdivision situated in the southern side of the town of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a block structure 32x34
plus an addition of wood partially completed being 29x5 the house is an approximate 25 yrs old single family residence comprising of two bedrooms,
one bathroom, living and dining rooms, and kitchen. The house is structurally sound with the exception of the woodwork. The land rises above road
level, to a height of approximately 15 ft and is 30 plus ft above sea level.

AERP TR NE RIE CS GANA TAT RATT UTR,» He ATR, i SN, Appraisal: $1 30,000.00

This property is located in the Government Subdivision in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and is painted blue trimmed white.

(Lot No. 42, Lower Bogue)
ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 42, comprising of about 11,570 sq.
ft., this site encompasses a 25 year old single story home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (one incomplete), front room, dining, kitchen and
basement area. Total living area is approximately 1,703.66 sq. ft. and basement area about 144 sq. ft. This home i is in good condition. The land is flat
and on a hill, and is clear of all debis. Area is complete with all goods, utilities and services available.



Appraisal: $108,934.00

This property is situated on the northern side of the road leading to the public cemetery and BpProrimately 66 ft westerly from the main Eleuthera
Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue. ; :





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue)
‘ ONE ee _ ELEUTHERA .

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising. of about 34,210 sq.
ft., this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen and
‘laundry room, with a total living area of approximately.2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft. of
approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638. 00

1 This property i is situated on the western side of Blumere Highway in the séttlement of Lower Bogue.





Investment Opportunity - Must Sell
JOHNSON’S HARBOUR VIEW ESTATES SUBDIVISION

All those piece, parcel or lot of land and improvements having an area of approximately 4,500 sq. ft. Being Lots 12E and 13W situated in the Johnson’s
Harbour View Estates Subdivision on Harbour Island, North Eleuthera, Bahamas. This site encompasses a single storey apartment block that is
approximately 4 years old and consist of a'living area of approximately 1,555.36 sq. ft. Each apartment contains 2-bedrooms, 1-full bathroom, front
room/dining in one, and kitchen. These apartments are fully furnished. The kitchen and bathrooms are complete with cabinets. There is a wooden
storage to the rear wood landing, and a wood decking to the back door entrance. This building is in good condition. The property is partially landscaped
with crab grass, and fiascos trees. All Utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $196,348.00.

This said pieces, parcels or lot of land and improvements i is situated in Johnson’ 's Harbour View Estates subdivision, on Harbour Island, Eleuthera one
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.





Lot No. 25 Orchard Close Sea Breeze

Nassau

All that lot of land having an aproximate area of 5,000 sq. ft. more or less being lot 1 of the subdivision Orchard Close,situated at the southeastern
corner of Sea Breeze Lane and the roadway of Orchard Close about half mile west of Fox Hill Road, in the eastern District of New Providence, Bahamas.
This property encompasses a 16 year old single storey house with an attached 1-bedroom apartment is the principal improvement. The quality of
construction is average and maintenance is fair, so the effective age of the building is 8 years, besides the apartment. The house is comprised of 3-
bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, livingroom dining room, kitchen a utility area and a covered area that is being used for the preparation of Catered meals, also
attached to the house is an open back patio, with concrete block railing and climate control is provided in the house by ducted central air-conditioning.
The lot is completely enclosed, by chain link fencing i in part and by concrete pork walls and metal gate in part. The grounds are fairly maintained, with
minimal landscaping in place.



Appraisal: $183, 430.00

Travel south on Bay Lily Drive turn right onto Sea Breeze Lane. Go to the 5th corner right, subject property: is ist left painted white trimmed white.

VACANT PROPERTIES

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal ieusaenant Ltd., this is a single family zoning
and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation
is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: ¥1, 275.00






__ For conditions of sale and other information contact
Philip White @ 502- a email philip. rol Ue com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 email harry.collie@scotiabank.com

fee



—




. tral
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HARRISON Petty should

be commended for the role.

he's playing in athletics.
tie’s not an official mem-
ber of the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Athletic Associa-
tions’ executive board, but
he has gone above and
beyond the call of duty
assisting the local athletes.
Wis latest contribution
came on Friday night at his
Colony Club Resort when
he honoured sprinter Der-

- rick Atkins for lowering the
*.men’s national 100 metre

record for the second time
before he went on to win a
silver medal at the XX Cen-
American and

It wasn’t an Olympic
Games or World Champi-
onships, but Atkins’ feat

_ will go down as one of the

highlights of the year and
Petty made sure that it did-
n’t go un-noticed.

It’s small things like these
that make our athletes feel
appreciative after their
accomplishments. In Atkins’
case, it was a feat that
deserved to be recognised.

Back in July, Atkins:

broke a 25-year-old record
that was set by Rudy Levar-
ity in a time of 10.18 before
Rendward Wells matched

“PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

STUBBS



OPINION





the time in the 1990s.

Atkins lowered the mark
to 10.14. But his time of
10.08 was what is now listed

in the BAAA’s record ©

book.

Petty has been a contrib-
utor to Atkins long before
he strutted down the



SPORTS

straight away and into the
national spotlight. So it was
only fitting that he joined
in his success.

But Petty, on the whole,
has supported so many of
our track stars and the

~BAAA itself. A couple

years ago, he was honoured
by the BAAA as the Man
of the Year.

He’s definitely one of
those unsung heroes who
need to be saluted.



LET'S TIP OUR
HATS TO WILLIAMS
AS WELL

WHEN Sherman ‘the
Tank’ Williams (above)
went to Las Vegas, Nevada,

he had one thing on his
mind, coming out with both
of his NBA: and WBC
FEDECaribe titles around
his waist.

In one of his most impres-
sive performances, Williams
put American Josh Gutcher

‘out of his misery 70 seconds

into the first round with a
technical knockout.

Now the Grand Bahamian
native, fighting out of the
Silver Hawk Promotions in
Florida, said he’s still look-
ing forward to the possible
showdown with ‘Iron’ Mike
Tyson.

‘Williams said he feels he
has the potential to not just
stand in the ring, but go toe-
to-toe and. head-to-head

_ with the former undisputed

world champion.

Obviously, a fight of that
nature won’t be a title bout,
but Williams feels it will
definitely put in the right
direction for a shot at one
of the many crowns that
Tyson held in the past.

It would be good to see
how Williams would match
up against a top ranked
fighter.

In time, that will come
too.

Williams said he’ just.

needs the opportunity.

larrison Petty goes above °
and beyond the call of duty =

HOORAY FOR BARR

IT was two years since
Freeman ‘the Natural’ Barr
was in the ring, but in his
return, it looked as if ‘he
didn’t. miss a beat, even
moving up in weight class
from super middleweight to
light heavyweight.

.The native from Andros,
who is still fighting out of

the SJC Boxing Club in Fort . 4

Myers, needed just two
rounds to shake off the ring
rust before he went-to
work against veteran Amer-
ican journeyman Terry Ack-
er.

- Barr, 32, was so aggres-
sive throughout the ring
that Acker, at the end of the
first two.rounds, didn’t even
know what corner he was
supposed to go to.

Like Williams, Barr will
only prove how good he
really is if he can get a shot
at a credible top ranked
fighter.

His manager/trainer Steve
Canton assured the public
that his chance will
come.

He said they just wanted
to get Barr back into the
ring after sitting out witha;
series of injuries.

He’s definitely back.

ciine |

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Narrow defeat for Bahamas shock troops |

TRIBUNE SPORTS

- another

i BASEBALL

Sy RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

‘THE smallest nation at the third

World University Baseball Champi-

onships continues to make the biggest
impact on the field.

Fresh off an historic 2-1 win over
Cuba, the hosts and tournament
favourites, the Bahamas followed up
with a close three run loss against
baseball - powerhouse,
Nicaragua.

The Bahamas fell 3-0 to a talented
Nicaraguan squad before approxi-
mately 500 spectators at Santiago

Mederos Stadium in Havana, Cuba.

Going the distance for the Pahamas,
Greg Burrows Jr. was the les:ug pitch-
er, while Nicaragua's Aric! Francisco
Sulduria got the win in'seven and one-
third innings.

Kenny Espinoza picked up the save.

Team Bahamas turned in another
stellar pitching and defensive perfor-
mance, but was unable to score enough
runs to pull off yet another upset.

The Bahamas fell to a 1-1 record and
now sits in second place in Group A

_ behind Japan and tied with Cuba.

Teddy Sweeting, Secretary General
of the Bahamas Baseball Federation,
said the team played well but suffered

eS

an apparent emotional letdown after .
_ the major victory against Cuba.

"It was tough to bounce back from
beating what many people consider the
best country ini the world," he said,
"We did not come out with the inten-
sity that was needed to come into this
game and perform well enough to get
the win, and that was our biggest down-
fall. We lost a bit of our edge and inten-
sity now we have to try and get that
back against Japan tomorrow."

Sweeting said the team suffered a
defensive lapse during the fifth inning,
which ultimately led to the loss.

"It was just a tough loss all around,
we had a rough stretch during the fifth

inning where we gave up three runs,
the only runs we gave up for the whole
game," he said. "We did not capitalise
on a few key situations, there were
instances where we had runners on
base but we just could not bring them
home."

He said the team is optimistic after
the loss and looks to build on the pos-
itive aspects of their play so far.

“The team remains in good spirits,"
he said, "We had two excellent pitching
performances, thus far and our defence
has been great, so we are right where
we want to be."

The team's next game will be against
division leaders Japan today at 2.00pm.


C lubs fighting for a leeia in
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006

SECTION



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MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

RTL TES DRE LLL ELE LLNS LET LET BT






LAD RR aL ND ESSER AY

‘Musgrove still confident

-flespite defeat in opener

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas got off to a
slow start in the FIBA Amer-
icas U20 Championships for
Women, dropping their open-
ing game by 25 points.

The team tipped off things
in the qualifying tournament
against host country Mexico,
and when the final buzzer
sounded, the Bahamas walked
off with their first loss, 68-43.

Despite the defeat, head

coach Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove is .

still confident that the team
will be able to end the tour-
nament in one of the top three
spots.

Miserove declared that the
score does not reflect the lev-:

el of play by the players or the
degree of execution.

He said that the team piit
forth a great effort, even
though they didn’t play as well
they are capable. |

“We didn’t play as well as I




vailable from Commercial News Providers

~~



“The

girls should be in

tip-top shape after the practice

session this morning. I am

confident that this team will be
able to play more competitive
games, they just needed to

make that transition.”

Head coach Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove

anticipated the girls to play,”

said Musgrove.
“We played pretty well in

‘the opening minutes of the
game, but fatigue set in pretty

fast as the time went by.
“The girls still haven’t got-

ten used to the air up here yet

and that was a big problem

_ for us. Unlike home, where I
noticed the girls playing hard .

for like three and a half. quar-
ters.

“They weren’t able to adjust
to the weather and climate
and it showed.”

Even though the team had
trouble adjusting and playing
a full game, Musgrove
revealed.to The Tribune that
the intense work-out sessions
they’ve done early Wednes-

oe heme ee ~

_—
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——_— ES





day morning should assist in
their progress.
The Bahamas was expected

to play Brazil yesverday at

4pm.

He added: “The girls should
be in tip-top shape after the
practice session this morning.
I am confident that this team

will be able to play more com-—

petitive games, they just need-

_ed to make that transition.”

Even though the team is
capable of playing competi-

tively with the other teams at -

the tournament, Musgrove

still believes that the team:

needed a little more prepara-
tion before travelling.

But, despite what the team .

is lacking in height, Musgrove
is hoping that their athletic
ability and speed will com-
pensate.

“We are on the top of our

game, but in order to be

.sharper we needed to play

against some other teams, not
against ourselves.

He said: “We are probably .

Anow les and Nestor



the shortest team in the tour-
nament. The height of what
we call our big players is the
height of some of the guards
from the other countries. But
this will not deter us, we will
make up in speed and ee
ability.

“This team could have been
even further if they had gotten
a tournament or two in, pus
we didn’t.

“They are used to playing
against themselves.

“As a result the team plays

at a slower pace and when.

they need to turn up the heat

on teams they are unable to’

do so. But I hope we can cor-
rect all of this before the tour-
nament ends.”

Top scorers in the game for
the Bahamas were Robyn
Swaby with 15 points, five

rebounds; Philica Kelly, six

points, one rebound; Taronya
Wildgoose, six points, two
rebounds and Derlene Fergu-
son, five: points” and five
rebounds.










Coach waits

WOmleesan

on Kelly

@ BASKETBALL
. By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter






-HEAD coach of the
Bahamas junior women’s
national basketball team
is playing a waiting game
as the jury has not yet

delivered a verdict on the
protest launched by the
coaching staff in the case
of Philica Kelly.

Kelly, one of the start-
ing guards for the

. Bahamas junior women’s
national basketball team,
was ejected in the fourth

-quarter-of their first
game in the FIBA
Americas U20 Champi- ~
onships for Women on
Tuesday.

~The team was down by
12 points in the fourth
when Kelly was ejected.
After her dismissal, the
Mexican squad went on ©
a 10-2 run, winning the
game by 25 points.

Kelly, along with one
of the Mexican players,
was ejected by the refer-
‘ees in the fourth quarter
after displaying
‘unsportsmanlike con-

duct.’

Head coach Musgrove
said: “It was just a small
matter, they were both
shoving on each other,
probably trying to create
space, but we are rectify-
ing that.

“We are appealing the
ejection, we don’t know
what will happen until
we get to the game
tonight.

“We are appealing the
ejection because the
rules state that if a play-
er is ejected, they have
to be warned on the first
encounter. Now if she is
disqualified again then
she will have to sit out a
game.”

The appeal was sent to
the panel of appeals and
the technical commis-
sioner, which consists of
four representatives
from different countries.

The Bahamas was
scheduled to play Brazil

at 4pm yesterday

evening. Musgrove
revealed that Kelly will
suit-up: