Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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AND SUN

The Tribune









The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 102 No.211



UST

March 22 touted —
as most likely date

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter res
THE laté Sir Lynden Pin-

dling’s birthday — March 22 —i

being touted as the most likely —

date “for the next general elec-
tion.

_ Political insiders are claiming
that Prime Minister Perry
Christie has decided Sir loyn-
den’s birthday ts the ideal date
to cail the elections, but has yet
to officially inform his Cabinet.

According to - Tribune

sources, this would be in keep-
ing with the party’s current
strategy of “draping themselves
in the legacy of Sir Lynden”
strategy which was said, to be
one of the major reasons they
were catapulted to victory in
2002.
- However, there are some
observers who are:sceptical that
Mr Christie would have let out
the date of the election six
months ahead of time, but they
did conclude that March was
not totally out of the re ealm of
possibility.

Many Jalso agreed that cur-
rently, the PLP appears to have
taken as part of its election
strategy the a about”
of Sir Lynden’s legacy.

While not commenting on the
speculation on the election date,
Felix Bethel, a former govern-
ment and politics lecturer at the
College of the Bahamas, said
that Sir Lynden’s legacy is a real
asset to the party and is no
doubt:being used in some form
for the next general election.

“Sir Lynden’s death in



“August 26, 2000 catapulted the
Progressive Liberal

Party to

power. There’s no doubt about
that, that event was a singular
event in the history of the coun-.
try as important to the mind of
the black Bahamian as signifi-
cant as January 10, 1967. The
death of this man who became
patriarch, chief,” Mr Bethel
said.

There were other things that
occurred leading up to the 2002
election that diminished the
popularity of the FNM, includ-
ing the referendum and the near
implosion of the banking sec-
tor, but according to Mr Bethel
the singular event that got
things rolling for the PLP was
Sir Lynden’s death.

“This is the year 2006 going
into 2007 the Pindling card is

being played. We saw it being .

played in the naming of the air-

port, a massive event that shows

you that the legacy of Sir Lyn-

‘den is real and therefore politi-

cally potent. I suspect that there
will be some honour or other
for Lady Pindling which will
secure in the mind of the people
the place of this man and
woman and that family.

“Tt is a family with a large
legacy, a large name so the par-
ty that secures itself in that. and

- owns that legacy gains that sup-

port. But will it get support
from people who are removed
in time from that legacy? That
remains to be seen,” Mr Bethel
said. vy

Nevertheless, Mr Bethel said
the upcoming election will be
the last time the country would

have to deal with the direct ©

legacy of Sir Lynden Pindling.
SEE page 12







or



RIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

Mitchell ‘had no influence’ on
renaming of Fox Hill Festival

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

CONTRARY to earlier
reports, Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell had no influence on
the renaming of the Fox Hill
Festival to the George Mackey
Fox Hill Festival, according to
Charles Johnson, the commit-
tee’s chairman.

Sources informed The Tri-
bune Wednesday that they sus-
pected Mr Mitchell was using
Mr Mackey’s name and
extending invitations to leaders
from several Caribbean
nations to politicise the Eman-
cipation day events.

However, Mr Johnson said

the decision to name this year’s
festivities after George Mack-
ey was completely that of the
committee.

“The Honourable Fred

‘Mitchell was not involved in

this decision — this was the
decision of the committee,
after obtaining permission
from the Mackey family to do
so,” he said.

“Not one Foxhillian ever
came to me and said ‘hey ya'll
gat this thing all politics’.”

Despite what the public has
been hearing, Mr Johnson said,
the name Fox Hill Day will not
be changed, but he explained
that the addition of George

Mackey’s name to the event is
a posthumous honour for this
year’s festival only.

“We are doing this for his
commitment to the communi-
ty,” he said.

“You have to honotrs your
people — this George Mackey
festival'is only for this year, in
his honour.”

The sources also claimed
that Mr Mitchell had planned
to use Caribbean dignitaries to
gain favour in CARICOM as a
contingency measure, in case
he lost his Fox Hill seat in the
next election.

SEE page 11





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Rising medical

costs ‘due to lack of

regulatory board’

lm By MARK HUMES

THE escalating cost of med-
ical care and health insurance
is being driven by the fact that
there is no regulatory board to
monitor the pricing practices of
medical doctors’ in the
Bahamas; The Tribune has
learned.

. According to a source, this
‘has led many leading insurance
companies to hire in-house doc-

to contain cost against, what
some consider to be,-unscrupu-
lous price gouging.

After receiving information
that many local insurance agen-
cies were employing medical
practitioners, doctors and nurs-
es, The Tribune began an inves-
tigation into this practice as it
related to the high rate of insur-
ance and medical care.

“The doctor is on a retainer
.to try and speak to his col-
leagues to keep the cost down,”
said one insurance official. “The

‘cahoots’ with doctors. What

SEE page 12

Man guilty of
the murder
of tourists

# By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A Supreme
Court jury on Thursday found
Frederick Francis guilty of the
brutal murders of Austrians
Barbara von Perfall and Bern-
hard Bolzano, who were shot
to death while on vacation in
Bimini in July last year.

After nearly four hours of
deliberating, a jury of six men
and six women returned at
3.30pm with their verdicts, find-
ing Francis guilty on all four
counts against him.

Justice Stephen Isaacs, at the
end of his summation, handed
the case to the jury around
noon.

On counts one and two — the
murders of Mr Bolanzo and Ms
von Perfall — the jury returned
a unanimous guilty verdict.

SEE page 11




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IAeE IRIBUINE



Sea Hauler collision victims |

still awaiting compensation

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

Tribune Staff Reporter

SURVIVORS ofthe tragic
Sea Hauler accident are still
pleading for financial retribu-
tion — almost three years after
the boat collision claimed the
lives of four persons and injured
25 others.

Cedric Hart, a father of seven
who narrowly survived the 2003
accident, says he is suffering
silently.

He told The Tribune yester-
day that in addition to his own
injuries, he is struggling with
the burden of medical bills for
his son, whose kidney is failing.

Mr Hart sustained major
spinal injuries, fell into a coma
and spent two years in hospital
following the accident.

“My spine was messed up by
the crane crash and my son
needs kidneys because of the
incident,” Mr Hart explained.

“T can’t sit up for too long, so
I just need to try and continue
to see if I can get up. I have
chronic pain 24 hours a day.
The left side of my body is still
immobile and this is the side
where I got the blow.”

In a letter to The Tribune, a



BA BAHAMAS Defence Force vessel Srila around the MV
United Star and the MV Sea Hauler after the two vessels collid-
ed on Saturday, August 2, 2003 in waters off the southwest coast

of Eleuthera i in the Bahamas

concerned person called on
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, “‘to release the
money from the United Star
that was (reportedly) paid out
three months after the collision
on August 2, 2003.

“Can the Central Bank please
authorise the release of these
funds? And further, when is
Mrs Glenys Hanna-Martin
going to pay the Sea Hauler vic-
tims?” the letter asked.

It said that Mrs Hanna-Mar-

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tin, Minister of Transport and
Aviation, promised last year
that the payments would be in
this year’s budget.

It was during the Emancipa-
tion weekend of 2003 that the
Sea Hauler mail boat, over-
loaded with passengers on their
way to the Cat Island Regatta,
collided with the United Star
freight vessel near Highbourn
Cay, Exuma, and Wemyss Bight
Eleuthera.

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Smith Ellis, Brenda Smith
Leslie, Livingston Seymour
‘and Lynden Riley died in the
collision.

_ The victims say they believe
other issues are taking prece-
dence, and that government
is leaving them to suffer.

Mr Hart explained that
National Insurance is paying
“a little something, so is Social
Services,” but the assistance
is insufficient.

“Right now we are not get-
ting any kind of answers from
the government about the
case,” Mr Hart explained. “I
went to other people to reach
out to see how long it is going
to be before we get some kind
of assistance because it is not
only me one is out here suf-
fering from that accident.”

Ina letter dated July 4, 2005

to the National Insurance’

Board, Dr Winston Phillips,
consultant surgeon at the
Department of Orthopaedics,
wrote: “Mr Hart sustained
injury to his lower back. “He

continues to have lower pain. .

in the back despite treatment
with physiotherapy, muscle
relaxation and analgesics

(medication capable of reliev- |

ing pain). He is still undergo-

ing treatment and is unable... -
to work for a period of one..

year.”
Mr Hart told The Tribune

that he is not looking for
hand-outs. He said since leav-
ing the hospital he has sought
employment, but has not yet
been hired.

However, he explained that
before the accident he had
worked for six years as a secu-
rity officer at the Mall at

‘ Marathon.

“My spine is out of place. I
am still doing the therapy, but
it is not (working) as fast as
they wanted it to. But I am
still trying to make life easier
for my family,” Mr Hart said.

His children range in age
from two months to 13 years.
He blames the accident for
his son’s kidney failure.

“My wife was on the vessel
and witnessed the accident
and went into labour after she -

. saw me pinned down under

the crane,” he-explained

‘The twin boys, Devon and -

Deshon, who are three years-
old, were born prematurely.
Deshon, he said, is in need of
a kidney.

“My mother has him going
to the US right now to take
blood samples to sign up for a
kidney.

The Tribune made numer-
ous unsuccessful attempts to
contact Minister of Transport

.and Aviation Glenys Hanna- |

Martin and Attorney General
Allyson Maynard. -Gibson. _

Miller under fire
for ‘insufficient’
consultation on
crawfish season

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

’ QUESTIONING the efféc-
tiveness of shortening the

crawfish season, FNM North .

Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith
drew attention to the damage
that such a decision would
have on the. local fishing

industry, and criticised Agri- -

culture and Marine Resources
Minister Leslie Miller for not
consulting enough on the mat-
ter. .



-, B ALVIN Smith |

Mr Smith said he was sure |

‘that the public was relieved
to know that as the next gen-

eral election drew near, that

neither Mr Miller, nor the =:

PLP government. would be

around for the next. crawfish ‘
‘season. 3°,

“Before even considering
‘to move ahead with this pro-

posal, the minister should

. have produced the empirical

data for:the past four, six or
10 years to justify this deci-
sion to shorten the season.

Data such as total number of .

pounds taken, total number

of FDC licences issued and

renewed.

“The total number ofskiffs
used assuming that'the major-
ity of FDC licences were
issued for larger vessels.
Hooka permits issued and
renewed, and the total dollar
value exported. The minister
should have also consulted
and discussed his proposal to

‘shorten the season with the

Fisheries Advisory Commit-
tee before prematurely arriv-
ing at this decision and mak-
ing a public statement on the
matter,” he said.

season for Bahamians, but :.

leaving it wide open for inter-

‘national poachers from Flori--
‘da, the Dominican Republic,
Honduras and other coun-
‘tries...
.. “These fishermen care
- nothing about the future or!

that of the industry, so the

- eradication of species or per-,
“manent damage to our reefs .

or fishing grounds do not mat-

. ter. Unfortunately, there are

Mr Smith explained that if

the government followed
through with its plan to short-
en the crawfish season by two
months, it will be closing the
most productive part of the

also some Bahamian ‘fisher-
men who are contributing to
the damage inflicted on the
industry through, fishing dur-
ing the closed season, har-
vesting of undersized crawfish
and using chemicals under
reefs and condo’s, literally
killing every living marine
species from premature to

mature.

“Clearly the minister should
have addressed these very
serious concerns before arbi-
trarily deciding to reduce the
crawfish season by two
months, which in fact will
‘amount to four months in the
event of a hurricane or tropi-
cal storm. An example may
unfortunately be on its way, as
Tropical Storm Chris has its
eyes on some of the prime
fishing grounds in the
Bahamas,” he said.





























@ In brief

Man injured
in leg with
shotgun
during fight

A MAN is in hospital after
sustaining a gunshot wound to
his right leg following an early
morning altercation.

According to police liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans,
the 37-year-old man was in his
home’on Augusta Street early
this morning when another man
came to visit him.

The two men had a conver-
sation which led to an argu-
ment, Mr Evans said.

As a result, the visiting man
allegedly shot the man in his
leg.

The victim was taken to hos-
pital, where he is presently in
stable condition.

Investigations continue.

17 Cubans
land in
reserve off
Puerto Rico

#@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

SEVENTEEN Cuban
migrants landed in a mostly
uninhabited nature preserve off
Puerto Rico’s west coast early.
Thursday, authorities said,
according to Associated Press.

The migrants — 12 men, five
women — were in good health,
according to the natural
resources department. The
migrants said two boats
dropped ‘them off in Mona.
Island, a rugged nature preserve
located between the Domini-
can Republic and Puerto Rico.

Though Mona Island has
become a popular new routé for
Cubans headed to the United
States — about 600 people have
made the journey by boat from
the Dominican Republic to the
preserve — Thursday’s group
appeared to among the first to
arrive since Cuban leader Fidél
Castro underwent intestinal
surgery on Monday. |

Once they reach U.S. territo-
ry, Cubans are generally
allowed to stay in the United »
States, though they are returned
to their country if they are
caught at sea.

16 hurt and
one killed
in hotel

‘collapse.

"= JAMAICA
Kingston

FIREFIGHTERS searched
for, bodies amid the rubble
Thursday after the partial col-
lapse of a huge resort under
construction in northern
Jamaica killed one worker and
injured 16, police said, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

-The collapse Wednesday
evening was the latest mishap
to hit the Bahia Principe, a
planned 1,918-room hotel in
Runaway Bay i in what is expect-
ed to be Jamaica’s largest resort.

Firefighters searched for bod-
ies or additional survivors, but it
wasn’t clear whether any work-
ers were missing. Police said
eight of the injured have been
released from the hospital.

Engineers will inspect the
damage to determine when
work on the US$200 million
project can resume, said George
Ho Sang, head of public works
in St. Ann Parish.

Grupo Pinero, the Spanish
company developing the resort,
would not comment until the
investigation was complete.

On May 3, a floor collapse at
the project injured three work-

ers.





THETRIBUNE







Cuba sends
me;sage of
continuity
to reople

B CUB/
Havaa

CUBS communist govern-
ment ser a clear message to its
people ‘hursday: Nothing 1s
going tochange, according to
Associatd Press.

“The rvolution will contin-
ue” was te mantra chanted on
state-ru television and dis-
played irgovernment newspa-
pers thre days after Fidel Cas-
tro temprarily ceded power to
his youner brother Raul while
recoveriz from surgery.

The acng president was still
nowhere‘o be seen. Nor was
the eldercastro, who turns 80
on Aug. 1. Yet the news media
— all arerun by the state —
lined up Gbans to express con-
fidence bth in Fidel Castro’s
ability torecover quickly and
in Raul Cstro’s competence to
govern inhe meantime.

“Certai of your rapid recov-
ery, alwas toward victory!” a
graduatin class of Interior Min-
istry cades chanted in a collec-
tive grecing to Fidel Castro, .
publishe on the front page of
the Connunist youth newspa-
per Juvetud Rebelde.

“Ever Cuban trusts Raul,
and evey one of our leaders,”
an unnmed woman said on
state telvision’s midday broad-
cast. “Ve are certain that the
revolutin will continue.”

Awayrom government cam-
eras, hwever, some Cubans
expressvariness of life without
Fidel Cstro in charge.

“I,:a least, am worried,
becaus without him we are
nothig,” gardener Rafael
Reyessaid. “We hope that he
will reover and leave (the hos-
pital) soon.”












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FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006 PAGE 3

BEC still investigating outages as



customer complaints continue

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

INVESTIGATIONS into
the cause of Wednesday’s
blackout are ongoing — as com-
plaints and claims of damaged
electrical equipment continue
to come in.

BEC is reportedly still trying
to determine the cause of the

power outage and general "|

-manager Kevin Basden said
the corporation is looking into
a number of possibilities.

Mr Basden said he did not
want to speculate, adding only
that the matter is still under
investigation.

“TI don't have the final
reports yet. I hope to have
something by tomorrow but
there are a number of things
that have to be looked into,”
he said.

The problems began for the





i KEVIN Basden

electrical corporation shortly

after 3pm when a vehicle
crashed into an electricity pole
cutting power to between 30
and 40 per cent of the island.
As BEC worked to fix the
problem, calls began flooding



‘into The Tribune claiming that

power had been lost across the
island.

Mr Basden also called, and
explained that an island-wide
outage had indeed taken place
— but that BEC was not sure
what caused it.

Meanwhile, members of the
public say that — as is often the
case in power outages — co
puters, appliances and othes
items of electrical equipment
were damaged.

Dionne Godet, sales man-
ager of 100 Jamz and Joy FM,
said the hard drive of both his
home computer and his work
computer have been affected,

“Much to my displeasure,
I've got two computers that
were fried yesterday. I can't
get what I need to get done
today because I don't have a
computer,” he said.



Ingraham: no need to
rewrite our history

GIVING his contribution to
the on the National Heroes
and National Honours Acts,
leader of the opposition
Hubert Ingraham said that the
FNM did not conclude either
of the bills when they were first
brought to parliament in 2001
— because they wished to have
a national consensus on such
important legislation.

Addressing the House of
Assembly during parliament’s
evening session on Wednesday,
Mr Ingraham explained that the
2001 bills intended to bring
about four primary things: a sys-
tem to govern, determine and
declare national heroes, the
establishment of a Heroes Day,
the awarding of national hon-
ours, and the creation of a
national heroes park — a provi-
sion he suggested be included in
the bills now before parliament.

_ Inaneffort to foster a better
understanding of the nature of
the Queen’s Honours, which
are currently awarded to out-
standing Bahamians, Mr Ingra-

portant for maintaining



Former PMP defends Queen’s
honours as Bahamian honours



ham said that although some
people object to their colonial
roots, the Queen’s Honours
are in fact Bahamian national
honours. _

He explained that such hon-
ours are conferred based on
recommendations given by the
prime minister via a letter he
issues through the secretary of
the cabinet.

As such, he said, the awards
are essentially Bahamian hon-
ours given through the Queen
of England — who, he empha-
sised; is still the queen of the
Bahamas, whether some like
that fact or not.

“We are not interested in.

becoming consumed by a
desire to re-write history,
regardless to whether we are
happy or unhappy about what
transpired in the past.

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ll HUBERT Ingraham

“And so we do not wish to
become distracted by whose
statue is in the public square or
at Government House — that’s
a part of. history of Bahamas.
We are, however, interested in
creating a heroes park to hon-
our Bahamian: heroes,” “Mr
Ingraham said.

Comgesp ine”
* CME
4 ‘e











Mr Godet was at a funeral on
Wednesday when the first out-
age occurred and was dismayed
upon returning to find that his
computer was damaged and
could not be used.

Mr Godet said he plans to
contact BEC for reimburse-
ment.

When asked what the corpo-
ration does when presented
with such situations, Mr Bas-
den said: “We investigate each










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and every claim on its own mer-
it. We would have to take into
consideration what was the
cause of the outage, et cetera.

“There may be instances
where the corporation may
make an award and there may
be instances where the corpo-
ration may reject the claims.

“Tt all depends of the circum-
stances surrounding the outage
and how valid the claim is,”
Basden said.






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~ PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

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4.- Authority chairman, Mr Hannes Babak, an




The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH,*Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

: TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

‘ Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387



Not for govt. to make business decision |

ONLY A FOOL, or a person with very
deep pockets, would employ a foreigner to
operate his business if he could find a
Bahamian to perform equally as well. And
only business owners — not some civil ser-
vant — can decide if there is in fact a Bahami-

_ an to meet the needs of their business.

‘The expense, including immigration fees, to
bring a foreigner to the Bahamas is prohibi-
tive. No businessman is going to spend mon-
ey. overseas unnecessarily if he can employ
locally. And so when an application is sub-
mitted to Immigration for a work permit to
fill an essential position in a business, it must
mean that the businessperson is desperate,
cannot find the right Bahamian and is now
trying to appoint the right foreigner.

However, government’s myopic, view is
that businesses are employing foreigners,

'- because they prefer foreigners. This is prob-
ably an inferiority complex suffered by many .

politicians, but it is not the way a busi-
nessperson thinks. He doesn’t spend his
money on non-essentials.

For.a government that has gone out of its

ot: ~. way to woo foreign investment, the attitude of

. persons like Senator Philip Galanis is eco-
nomically suicidal.

About three weeks ago the senator urged

government to .adhere to its Bahamianisa-

._ tion policy and investigate the work permit of

. recently appointed Grand Bahama Port

Austrian.
To which Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe very sensibly replied: . ,
“Lady Henrietta St George and Jack Hay-
ward are the private owners, and they are
appointing someone to represent their inter-

|. _ est. To what extent do we influence that? It is

still their personal subjective interest, and
we cannot force upon them a Bahamian or
anyone.”

Quite right, Mr Wilchcombe: To what
extent can a government influence:an owner’s
decision when it comes to whom he entrusts
his business without driving out investors?

And how can this government tell a private
employer that he has to justify a foreign staff
member when recently, on naming 'the Lyn-
den Pindling Airport, it announced that for-
eighers were going to manage its airport?
The irony of it was that-the announcement
- was made by no less a person than the daugh-
ter of the governor general, who, when a
PLP immigration minister, ruthlessly vic-

“Bahamianisation policy”, because we

timised The Tribune with the so-called .

refused to bow before his “Chief’s” PLP altar.
We are not criticising the decision to put.

98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA —
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the airport under foreign management. In
the past Bahamians have failed and so have

_ foreigners.

This new team has the potential of success
only if government is smart enough not to
interfere. And if the Vancouver company is
wise it will have that commitment written in
stone, especially if it wants smooth flying at
that much-troubled airport.

Government apparently believes it can
silence the pen of John Marquis, our manag-
ing editor, for whom we have not as yet found
a Bahamian replacement, by holding up a
work permit that is now six months overdue.

Technologically, these politicians are still
thinking in the stone age. Mr Marquis does
not have to sit behind a desk at The Tribune
to continue to write for this newspaper.

_ Often we have sat behind our desk in Mia-
mi and done our daily work for The Tribune
in Nassau. It doesn’t matter whether we are
here or there, the same work is done with
the greatest of ease — and all deadlines met.

When the FNM first came to power one of
its Immigration Ministers wanted to be
brought up to date on The Tribune’s training

_ programmes. We were invited to meet with
him to explain what we were doing.

At the meeting we took the various sec-
tions of The Tribune — main news, business,
features, arts, etc. As we spread them across
the table, The International Miami Herald
was included. “Oh, you can eliminate that,”
the Minister said, pointing to The Herald.

“Oh, no you can’t,” we replied. “That’s the
whole key to our operation.” ;

After our experience with the victimising
Pindling government, we have been plotting

‘ and planning as to how to get out from under
dictatorial governments that want to cripple
a newspaper that it can’t control as it does the
Bahamas Broadcasting Corporation. Daily
we have been practising with The Miami Her-
ald. The Herald is prepared in Miami by its
own editors and sent over the network to
our press in Nassau.

We now know that we don’t need any edi-
tors in Nassau. They can all be located over-

. seas — beyond the reach of an over sensitive.
immigration minister and his political cronies.

Of course, when we do it, it will make
international headlines.

And, so, Minister Shane Gibson, the ball is
now ir your court. Quite frankly we don’t
care what you, and your buddies, do. Only do
it quickly. ;

We have prepared so many reports on
The Tribune’s training programmes for Immi-
gration that all Mr Gibson has to do is open
the file.



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

| Changing rules
make running a



farm impossible

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE. allow me the
opportunity to clarify our posi-
tion as it relates to your July
27th article “Government hin-
dering farming”.

We have received several
calls expressing support but
unfortunately none from the
relevant Departments that we
would have hoped. Possibly
there is no interest in repairing
the problems that exist within
the system of farmer/govern-
ment relationship, but we
hope this is not the case.

Goodfellow Farms cur-
rently employs six Haitians
and eight Bahamians. The
combined salary and benefits

for the Bahamians employed

is close to a quarter of a mil-
lion dollars. The field labour is
all done by Haitians but all
managed by Bahamians —
Mr. Roger Rolle, C. Eneas
and Ms. McKay, a really super
team. The balance of the
Bahamians are employed in
the packaging/order desk/food
production and bottling/can-
ning. These are all good jobs,

clean jobs, jobs that are well

paid middle and upper level.
My problem is that my per-






LETTERS

mit applications are taking a
year and then being turned
down. First of all that is too
long and secondly if my appli-
cations and renewals are
rejected then there will be no
Haitian labour and therefore
no field production, therefore
no need to employ this great
team of Bahamians.

Seems simple but I have
been to every Ministry and
relevant department with no
successful results. We are not
here to embarrass the Gov-
ernment or point fingers but
why have a National Agricul-
tural Policy that does not
work?

Our Mission Statement: To
improve the quality of pro-

duce, food and life in The

Bahamas.

There is no need for me to
detail the facts about Bahami-
ans not wanting to field
labour, and it’s understand-
able that we.all want our chil-
dren to be better off than we
are and not worse off..We
believe Bahamians should be

Se, ae | tbat at the Farm. Here ithe
letters@triounemedia.net

given the best positions fothe
best wages and we do.exatly

~

deal: for every permitwe
receive we will employ anth-
er Bahamian on our team:
Our job is to be a heahy
alternative food source; ithe

‘ules that we work under Eep

changing then running a irm |
becomes impossible.

Our farm is a model othe ~
marriage between agricuure ©
and tourism. /

Our internship prograime
with the College has not een .
a success but it will be athe
nature of the programmeand
agriculture find a comion
ground. ae

Thanks you for the opor-
tunity to express my two chts
worth.

Karin.and Ian Goodfelloy
Roger Rolle
Cleveland Eneas

Yolanda McKay

Anthony Claridge

Cally Papageorge

Jennifer Wilson

Marva Johnson

Mauren Rolle
Plus six student workers ar
Field production team.



EDITOR, The Tribune.



SENATOR Philip Galanis called this morn-
ing (Wednesday, August 2, 2006) to say that I
misrepresented his position regarding the Mar-
quis work permit issue in a recent letter to the

editor.

Here is what he said via e-mail:

"There is absolutely nothing in either release
to support any suggestion whatsoever, that I
asked for Marquis’ work permit to be revoked.
I repeat as I did during our telecon this a.m.
when asked by Mr. Mark Humes at The Tri- |
bune to comment on Mr. Marquis’ work permit
being revoked, I flatly indicated that I did not

Ga an vi

p





cussed with him over the telephone, I did na
misrepresent him intentionally and obviously

Freeport.

agree with that. I would appreciate it if you

would please correct this as prominently as you
‘misrepresented’ my position."

‘ [have re-read his releases and would like to
thank him for the clarification. And, as dis-

289 Market St. South ° P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Feed your faith and doubt
will starve to death.”

SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798
' Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

The following persons are asked to contact
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My concern

_ confused his Hannes Babak comments with the
Marquis issue.

I apologised to him for this oversight over
the phone and do so now publicly.

In our conversation Senator Galanis did mt
deny his recommendation for revoking tle
work permit of Hannes Babak, the newly
appointed Chairman of the Port Authority in

for individual freedom and the
rule of law has not changed, and will not when
politicians use their offices to punish individu-
als they don't like.

RICK LOWE

August 3, 2006.



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THE TRIBUNE ©



0 In brief

first trip ©
to Haiti

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

UN Secretary-General
Kofi Annan, making his first
trip to Haiti, was embraced
by President Rene Preval
upon his arrival at the airport
Thursday and quickly went
into private meetings with
Haitian and UN officials, who
are trying to bring peace and
stability to the impoverished
Caribbean nation, according
to Associated Press.

Annan later met with two

. Brazilian peacekeepers who
were wounded by gang gun-
fire in July. An 8,800-strong
force of UN troops and inter-
national police provides the
only real security in a country
plagued with well-armed
gangs and a local police force
that Annan has said is “inad-
equately trained” and “infil-
trated by criminal elements.”

The peacekeepers were dis-
patched to Haiti to help

_«, restore order amid the chaos

-_~. following the 2004 revolt that

“ toppled President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide.

Annan was later scheduled
to tour a Haitian police acad-

emy.

_ Ina report to the U.N.

‘ Security Council, Annan
called for elite police tactical
teams and advisers to bolster
the U.N. force to help counter
a renewed surge in kidnap-
pings and gang violence.

Haiti experienced relative:
calm after Preval’s February
election victory but since
May, dozens of foreigners
and Haitians have been kid-
napped and gang fighting has
forced hundreds of people to
flee their homes in the capital,
Port-au-Prince.

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Act.

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

TROPICAL Storm Chris
looked likely to weaken into a
tropical depression rather than
the originally predicted hurri-
cane yesterday after losing
much of its strength in the east-
ern Caribbean

Senior deputy director of
meteorology Trevor Basden

said the next alert should be ~

one announcing a tropical
depression — although he
warned that the storm could
possibly gain strength again.

Today, winds had been |

expected to reach up to 74 miles
an hour but Mr Basden said:
“Maximum sustained winds
have decreased significantly
over night (Wednesday) and is
now near 40 miles per hour.”
If the depression does pass
over the south end of the
Bahamas, the islands are like-
ly to only experience some
wind and rain damage. How-
ever, Mr Basden warned that

aaah Stave ulcnce Orme ca aces ended aeuadaccdahebaaBados cdacgdavsagomedioasandedsadaNeduobene dcaaseesaseeessesaasasecsdiagdecedenenseeess esse rieslets




. LOCAL NEWS

Tropical Stor

sk

i

icy Management Agen





SHOWN (from left): Trevor Basden, senior deputy director of

the Department of Meteorology, interim director of NEMA

- Bahamians still need to con-

tinue to take precautions.
“Those islands can experience
up to two inches in rain, and
there is a possibility of flood-
ing.”

On Wednesday local meteo-
rologists issued a hurricane
watch for the south-east

Former Bahamasair boss

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Bahamasair man-
aging director Paul Major has
been appointed the new con-
sultant to the Domestic Invest-
ment Board.

He is charged with the task
of bringing more Bahamians
into the economic mainstream.

Financial Services and Invest-
ments Basil Albury said yester-
day that Mr Major will play a
significant role in creating new

legislation, such as the proposed —

Tourism Attraction Incentive

Addressing members of the
board and the press at the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, Mr Albury
explained that that this new
Tourism Act will offer Bahami-
ans what the Hotel Encourage-
ment Act has traditionally
offered foreign investors.

Such an act, he added, would
offer Bahamians incentives to
invest more in their own coun-
try, and help them to benefit
more from the spin-off effects of
the growing tourism industry.

Giving an example of the

advantages of the Act, Mr
Albury said that in the sports
fishing industry, Bahamians
who so far have only been
employees, can bring their own
sports boats into the country

free of duty and ultimately:

‘become self-employed.

Mr Major said that it is very
important that Bahamians learn
to “think big.”

“I’ve been making a pitch in
the political arena that we’ve
got to get away from thinking
small business,” he said.

He pointed out that ‘small
business’ in Bahamian vernac-
ular is an investment of
“$50,000, $100,000, maybe a
quarter million dollars.”

In the United States, Mr
Major said, the small businesses
start at the $5 million mark.

Mr Major said that it is
impossible for Bahamians to
not only compete with only for-
eign investors, but also with
established local investors,

unless there is access to capital .

“by those who have been
deprived of it for so long”.
“And there’s no shortage of
ideas, we all know stories of
Bahamians who have come up

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Carl Smith and ,Hubert Bain logistic officer for NEMA

Bahamas which included Ack-
lins, Inagua, Mayaguana, Long
Island,, Ragged Island and
Crooked Island. The storm was
expected to pass over the
Bahamas this morning but it has
already lost most of its power,
Basden said.

Although the storm is dimin-

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 5

m Chris weakens

ishing, if it continues on it cur-
rent projected path and main-
tains its strength it will be just
outside of Andros on Sunday.

Locals worried that Tropical
Storm Chris would disrupt the
activities planned for this week-
end on several Family Islands,
including the Cat Island and
Acklins annual regatta and
Grand Bahama’s “Feel the
Rush.”

However, National Emer-
gency Management Agency
(NEMA) director Carl Smith
said that those islands towards
the central part of the Bahamas
should not be duly affected but
should still remain on guard.

“The message NEMA is
sending is: You ought to con-
tinue to take necessary action
in terms of securing your prop-
erty and getting emergency sup-
plies.

“You can expect, as we,

approach the height of the
active hurricane season which
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September, that these tropical
storms will come very fre-
quently. It’s important for the
public not to let their guards
down.”

Lieutenant Commander
Hebert Bain, logistics officer for
NEMA, cautioned fisherman,
particularly those in the south-
east Bahamas.

“Head to safe harbour,” he
advised. “It’s easier to lose a
day of fishing than to lose a ves-
sel or become a possible search
and rescue victim, or casualty
situation.”

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7:00 The Bahamas: A Natural Beauty
8:00 Remembering The Contract
9:00 Hanging In The Balance
10:00 The National Art Gallery of The |.
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10:30 The Launch of Power 104.5FM
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1:30 A Special Report
2:00 ~ Bullwinkle & His Friends
2:30 The Fun Farm:
3:00 International Fellowship of
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3:30 Paul Morton
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4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update -
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7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Da’ Down Home Show
9:00 The Envy Life
9:30 3 D’ Funk Studio
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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>IPATION DAY






A 2208 the world,
religion has evolved

into a robust, multi-billion dol-
lar industry that is tragically
prostituted to promote the self-
serving interests of many disin-
genuous, so-called religious
men and charlatans.

In the Bahamas, while the
religious beliefs of some are
principled and genuine, reli-

cally motivated enterprise
which has emerged as the

industry, occupied in many
instances by “tiefing”, money-
grubbing, self-appointed
churchmen.

Among discerning Bahami-
ans, the consensus is that,
unlike starting conventional
businesses, the use of a church
as a business platform is one of
the easiest undertakings, as any

rent a building or pitch a tent
and rant and rave about who
should be “saved”, while cir-
culating a collection plate.

With churches springing up
on every street corner, some
only a stone’s throw away from
the other, it appears religion
is rapidly replacing drugs as a
simple means to wealth, as any
so-called ‘churchman’ can
hoodwink some poor fool to
follow him.

I pity those, needy, gullible
congregants who cannot afford
to pay their rent but can fatten
the coffers of a pastor in the
name of the “Lord” every
weekend.

And, why are so many
gigantic, multi-million dollar
church buildings being con-
structed? From South Beach
to Carmichael, these under-
takings have been outlandish,
because while money is being
invested in these buildings, the
poor and disenchanted are still
homeless, roaming the streets
and begging for assistance.

‘Shouldn’t this money be
invested in the true church —
the people — rather than over-
sized buildings that most like-
ly sprung up to compete with
another next door?

Profile:

VICE PRESIDENT - MONEY TRANSFER SERVICES

gion is fast becoming a polliti-.

Bahamas’ “real” third largest.

petty crook can thump a Bible,

Religion has become big
business in the Bahamas



ADRIAN

Doesn’t the Bible instruct
the church (people) that above
all else, to be your brother’s
keeper?

On a small island like New
Providence, where most of the
enormous churches are situat-
ed, who is going to fill the
‘pews? Rather than construct-
ing self-aggrandising sanctuar-
ies, “church leaders” should be
focusing on getting people to
attend churches, as church
attendance in the Bahamas



Since the Bible’
said Jesus had
12 apostles, I am

baffled by the

notion that
anyone can just
add themselves

to the count



and around the world has fall-
en to an all-time low.
Almost daily, I am per-
plexed by the number of Apos-
tles, Reverend Doctors, Presi-
dents, and other titles, many
self-given, that P’ve heard asso-
ciated with churchmen.
Bahamians must be aware
that anyone can go online, pay
a few dollars and become Rev-
erend Doctor this and that!
And, since the Bible said Jesus
had 12 apostles, I am baffled
by the notion that anyone can

_just add themselves to the

count.

Why are items such as.

books, snacks and CDs sold in
church? I have read the story
of Jesus entering the temple,



YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

‘upon entering office, appoint-







GIBSON






angrily tossing over sales
stands and whipping the peo-
ple for making money out of
God’s name.

Here, Jesus wanted to
ensure that his Father’s place
remained Holy. Therefore,
have I read the same Bible as
these pastors?

Newly-instated Jamaican
PM Portia Simpson-Miller, .











ed pastors to head government
commissions and boards,
blending an explosive cocktail
- religion and politics.

I am diametrically opposed
to this trend, which is gripping
the Bahamas, most recently
with the inept Bahamas Chris-
tian Council mandating to gov-
ernment what adults could and
could not view at local cine-
mas (Brokeback Mountain). ,

The BCC is one of the most.
politically linked, bungling
organisations in the Bahamas.
It appears to be comprised of
some religious zealots intent
on dictating to the populace,
thereby trampling over the
democratic rights of Bahami- ’
ans to choose. On what author-
ity does the ‘vocal when con-
venient’ BCC think they can
dictate to.300,000 people?

It must be apparent that .
religion has become a business
venture when a small country
such as the Bahamas is home
to 4,000 churches.

And, since Jesus either rode
a donkey or walked, why is it
that today’s churchmen must
be chauffeured or drive flam-
boyant Jaguars and Mercedes
vehicles? Why do certain pas-
tors, with relatively, poor con-
gregants, have Lear jets? I am
sure. that the reason isn’t
because they want to get clos-
er to God!

ajbahama@hotmail.com

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A minimum of 10 years experience in an extremely active and
dynamic operational environment;

A minimum of 5 years experience in international money trans-
fer business;

Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills;
Excellent marketing and communications skills;

A strong team leader with experience in managing businesses
and staff across multi-national locations;

Proven experience in managing the roll-out of a large number
of new outlets across multi-national locations;

Proven ability to innovate and develop new products and
services;

Willingness and ability to travel frequently around the Carib-
bean

The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses

Resumes should be received no later than August 9th, 2006.

The Human Resource Director

Fidelity

51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853

Nassau
f: 328.1108

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com





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THE TRIBUNE

xamining pros

and cons of LNG

m By REUBEN SHEARER

THE government is remain-
ing silent on the progress of
LNG negotiations with the
AES Corporation — despite
assurances that the deal may be
approved soon.

As the public awaits the out-
come of the talks, The Tribune
looks at the possible “ ‘pros” and

“cons” of LNG in the Bahamas. |

AES is proposing to construct
a terminal to receive ocean-
going tankers carrying liquefied
natural gas. At the terminal, the
LNG will be regasified and
transported through an under-
water pipeline to service the
South Florida community.

Last year Bill Bardelmeier, a
retired consultant on LNG,
admitted that the resource
posed dangers and that whoev-
er dismissed this fact was risking

a “Bhopal attitude” — an allu-
sion to the December 1984 acci-
dent in Bhopal, Central India
where 2,000 people died and
300,000 were injured when poi-
sonous vapor was emitted from
the Union Carbide pesticide
plant.

He suggested that LNG
“should not be simply rejected,
but managed with a high degree
of professionalism under vigilant
security at sites with low popula-
tions where it won’t conflict with

long term land-use plans.”

Mr Bardelmeier, who believes

’ that risks are manageable, said

Bahamians should not allow
LNG to become a divisive issue.

However Tim Riley, an
American consumer protection
attorney, claimed that govern-
ment authorities and LNG
advocates are using “sleight of
hand” in their dealings with the
Bahamian public.

After reviewing a study ir ini-
tially prepared for the US Pen-
tagon by Brittle Power, Riley
described the possible “cata-
strophic” effect of even a small
spill by an LNG tanker.

“About nine per cent of such

va tanker load:of LNG will prob-*'

ably, if spilled onto water, be

so cold that it will be denser
than air,” he said. “It will there-
fore flow in a cloud or plume
along the surface until it reach-
es an ignition source.”

Riley added that LNG haz-
ard models are extremely com-
plex and inherently uncertain
because they rely on “calcula-
tions and input @ assumptions
about which fair-minded ana-
lysts may legitimately disagree.”

He said that after the Septem-
ber 11 attacks, one of the first
orders that came out of the White
House was to stop any LNG
tanker approaching the US coast.

According to Mr Riley,
Richard Clark, former co-ordi-
nator of US National Security,
said that the administration
knew that if one of those
tankers got into Boston Har-
bour, it could wipe out the
entire downtown area.

Riley added that LNG most-
ly consists of methane — which,
according to his sources, is more
flammable and explosive than
unleaded gasoline or jet fuel.

Local environmentalists are

not only concerned about acci-
dents, but also the effect that
the laying of the pipeline to
Florida will have on the seabed
and coral reef systems.

They are also worried about
the temperature of the water sur-
rounding Ocean Cay, a man-
made island near Bimini where
AES plans to build the terminal.
Environmentalists claim that the
regasification process will have
the side effect of cooling the sur-
rounding ocean — which will
destroy reefs and kill sea life.

The government maintains
that no one has ever died
because of LNG, and that the
deal will not be approved unless
environmental standards are
met. z

Agriculture and Fisheries

Minister Leslie Miller, the gov-

ernment spokesman on LNG,

has said that the regasification

method that will be used by
_ AES will for the most part
. employ air rather than; water.
“My Miller has also enumer-

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 7






@ AN impression of hat
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Cay will look like |

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

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~ EMAIL! YDELEVEAUX@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
PLEASE PUT “OUT THERE” IN THE SUBJECT LINE

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MONDAY



&@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
‘public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the

third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-

pital conference room.











MAIN EVENT

hi












@ THEATRE

The Sweetheart’s Club - a nev Bahamian play:
Written and directed by Nickeva Eve, The Sweet-
heart’s Club will be performed at Worker’s
House, August 10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available
from the Kennedy Medical Center (by Galleria
Cinemas, JFK Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop
and Gallery (Soldier Road, East of Abundant Life
Road).

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm
& 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fri-
days @ 6pm to 7pm New Providence Community
Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to 8pm.









® CIVIC CLUBS @ CIVIC CLUBS Pes
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British â„¢ Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas est
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 Bar every Wednes- Baptist Community College Rm Ald, Jean St. Metal
meets Monday 6pm.@ Wyndham Nassau Resort, dav spm.8 F Ha ff HEALTH fie Ayes
Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets Se ee eta? : . ae ne Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Pees
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at appetizers and numerous drink specials. sit i Says Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Cen- he
y Free public health lectures featuring distin-
7pm: Fee pune nea iiuectires teaturiiis Cisne tre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info oe
@ ENTERTAINMENT guished physicians are bed at Dortors vonnGl call 325.1947 after 4pm. MIE 2
‘ : ; every third Thursday of the month at6pminthe : py
enoye oe : ce oe ee anes The 56th Annual Bimini Native Fishing Tourna-.. . acters Hospital Cte a ea Free oe
in the B ai Root arn Briti he lonial "ment, sponsored by the Bahamas Ministry of screenings between 5pm & 6pm. For more infor- SATURDAY a4
Hilt < Hot at ne ra PPS xR ore Tourism begins August 6 and runs through August . mation call 302-4603. / os
oayet 11. On Wednesday, August 9, come enjoy fishing, . an
dominoes, volleyball, the Softly Basketball Gamp, i mothe @ THEATRE pat
TUESDAY Miss and Little Miss Bimini Native pageant and a’ - Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the The Sweetheart’s Club - a new Bahamian play:
special cocktail party at Bimini Big-Game. Call. _ public of its meeting times and places: The Nas- Written and directed by Nickeva Eve, The Sweet-
242.347.3529 for more information sau Group, ee sur Thursday. ee heart’s Club will be performed at Worker’s
5 : ; ‘ 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays -- — House, August 10-12 @ 8pm: Tickets are available
7 Pees NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAU The first Inagua Salty Festival will take place @ — 7:30pm to 8:30pm Peon ie ee dy Me dice! Center (by Galleria
Dathee To Inagua, yan 3-7, Sponsors by Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are pein held Cinemas, JFK Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop vow
‘ : i the Inagua Development \ssociation, ere W e 6:3: m Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics ea- Soldier Road, East of Abundant Life. oe
a foe ee nas Te eee a variety of entertainment and activities as well as an sate location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor Raa ( :
, . male patron i exhibit by the Morton Salt Company, a Junkanoo — approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every, tenth feinale patron is rush out, arts and crafts, rakeand scrape, Donkey _for more info. : .
allowed into the club absolutely free and is given derby, gospel concert tea party, children’s corner,? . ati ai
a complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tuesday cooking contest, and live entertainment featuring
nights also include the Carlo. Rossi's Hot Body Avvy and other Bahamian entertainers. | -REACH - Resources & Education for Autism Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the Z
Competition. Hosted by Daddi Renzi and music and related Challenges meets from:7pm — 9pm public of ts tneetine times and places The Nase 5
provided by Dies tom tO) lan Moe ie the second Thursday of each month in the sau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings -
Devito Bodie provides scrumptious appetizers. @ HEALTH cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill TOgia tot aa ie Me
, ee at Road. — “g
@ HEALTH. Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third a
. NE inf h public of its meeting times and places: New Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and Decem-
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the Providence Community Centre: Wednesday - @ CIVIC CLUBS ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Shirley Street. 3
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, sec- Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes _
Epmule-0pi te'9: 30pm. a ond and third Thursday at the Ministry of are offered every third Saturday of the month | oe
; @ CIVIC CLUBS Health & Environment building on Meeting from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital eee
The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at _.... Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is wel- Community Training Representative at 302.4732 es
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at — 7). Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta come to attend. , soperimors information and learn to save d life ei etet
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets x ea
Call 323.4482 for more info. 6:30pm every third Wednesday atthe Bahamas. - . TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
ws ie . National Pride Building. - . Clubs Breezes. ohh:
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held : 1 ; : 4 : : - CIVIC CLUBS
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea- TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm- International Association of Administrative Pro-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor 8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West High- _ fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register way. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th ‘Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, 1, tinted to offers citing cline for juniors
formore into: Wednesday of each month at : - Sweeting Cable Beach, 6pm. Mt ‘Between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held i
: Senior High School, Oakes Field.’ whey set ey ee every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
VIO CLUBS : : The recently established National Insurance ele >aienta iutecestedinqepisterie thelr chil-
International Training in Communication, |". ~ Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets dren should contact organisers at
Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm — Escence Club 43173 holds its bi-monthly meet-..__ -every. fourth Thursday in the month, in the jarcycling@gmail.com
Oe Sucetue Sealer seo! | Pane ho ings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday ofeach'. .. .. National Insurance Board’s (NIB) training .
cole peruse ae ne pee ¥ ae Cousteau - inonth at Doctor's Hospital Conference - ., room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm. All
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in , oor pias ty
Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Room. os retirees ae welcome eee oa SUNDAY
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus _ ae ees or
at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Ter- ects the second and fourth Wednesday of the: - FRIDAY & PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS pas
race, Centreville. month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary. & RESTAURANTS
Alplia Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega @ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAU- Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
chapter meets every second sueeday 6 epe. S THURSDAY | RANTS . features special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha a
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau ; and the Caribbean Express - every Sun day from yee
Resort, Cable Beach. - Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks ~ 6:30pm to 9:30pm.
oy a @ ENTERTAINMENT off every Friday night with Happy Hour... spe- i
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second cial drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and
Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, Py. 56th Annual Bimini Native Fishing Tourna- — Nassau’s first European Night Restaurant - mg HEALTH
4th floor meeting room.’ ment continues, Thursday, August 10. Activities | Qpen Friday night till Saturday morning Sam,
: sa , include 39th Annual Glenda’s Road Race, Julian: \: serving hot food/and take out - music, drinks Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Brown Fun/Run/W: alk, fishing and Softly.Basketball — and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the per- public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Camp. Call 242.347.3529 for more information. fect place to spend your night out till the morn- sau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / Pat
Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info. ing. : > 8:30pm to 9:30pm. : Ne
: @ THEATRE ay,
@ THE ARTS ‘ : 5 / ae
The Sweetheart’s Club - a new Hohe Play: . @ ENTERTAINMENT ’
Written and directed by Nickeva Eve,-The Sweet~ 0) ess ee es 6 & peal i
WEDNESDAY - heart’s Club will be performed at Worker’s EL ey The Seth Annual pumitl napye eee he Sa ee Ae paw ta? hte 1
House, August 10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available ment, FINAL DAY - Friday, August, 11. Activities . «54,
from the Keithedy Medical Center (by Galleria include fishing, Softly Basketball Camp, Gala Ball at id al yonest vi ga ee er i Not
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS » Cinemas, JFK Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop the Bimini Breeze, under the patronage of Minister ear ih vileleveaux® : a
& RESTAURANTS ~ and Gallery (Soldier Road, East of Abundant Life of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe. Call 242.347.3529 - or e-mail: y i

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports

Road).



for more information.



Please Drink



tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

Responsibly





THE TRIBUNE



In brief

a eeeeeeeeeeeees, ev

Cheaper
eléctricity
demanded
in Dominica

Bn DOMINICA

Roseau

MORE than a dozen people
demonstrated Wednesday out-
side utHity offices in the capi-
tal of Roseau to demand lower
electrieity costs on the cash-
strapped Caribbean island,
according to Associated Press.

The protesters, who dubbed
themsélves “Consumers
Against High Utility Rates,”
marched to the main office of
the Dominica Electricity Ser-
vices, the tiny island’s sole pow-
er provider.

The protest comes about a
month,after Prime Minister
Roosevelt Skerrit accused the
utility, also known as Domlec,
of not caring about island con-
sumers ‘and announced that he
had created a committee to
advise the government on how
to lowet electricity costs.

Joel Huggins, general man-
ager of the power company, of
which Florida-based WRB
Enterprises holds a 72 per cent
stake,-Ras said the utility was
trying te lower its surcharge but
was being held hostage by sky-
rocketing fuel costs.

Domincan
residents
injured in
protests

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

RESIDENTS of a northern
Dominican town angered over
power blackouts and removal
of sand for use in tourist beach-
es burned tyres and confront-
ed police on Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.

Several people were injured
in the protests in Rio San Juan,
about 267 miles north of Santo
Domingo, police said. As many
as 18 people may have been
injured, the television news sta-
tion CDN reported. No further
details were immediately avail-
able. —~













Nellie
Louise
Bain Rose

88 years a resident of
Peter Street, East and
formerly: of Anderson
Hill, Acklins, will be held
11:00a.m., Saturday, 5th
August, 2006 at The



Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Brat 3:7 ee asa) ae

Kingdom Hall of
Jehovah’s Witnesses, Quakoo Street. Officiating will
be Brother Eric Bullard. Interment will be in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Still no response |

LOCAL NEWS

on medical board.

m By KAHMILE REID __

THE Ministry of Health is
remaining tight-lipped on the
claim that it has failed to table
a mandatory report on the
finances of a medical board.

After more than a week of
pursuing the official position
on reports that is has never
submitted the financial records
of the Hospital and Healthcare
Facilities Licensing Board
(HHFLB) to parliament —
despite being required to by
law — The Tribune is still
unable to get a response.

Numerous efforts to reach
Minister of Health Dr Bernard
Nottage and his Permanent
Secretary Elma Garraway
proved futile.

Earlier this week, Mrs Gar-
raway promised to issue a
response, but had failed to do
so.
Yesterday, her secretary
called to say Mrs Garraway
would contract The Tribune,
however, she did not call.up to
press time. ae ;

Three voice messages have
been left.on Dr Nottage’s per-
sonal voice mail and numerous
messages left with his secretary
over the last week.

According to unofficial cal-

Wisdom:

m@ By REUBEN SHEARER ©

MINISTER of Housing
Neville Wisdom said he is not
prepared to be distracted from
providing affordable housing
to Bahamians by worrying
about the housing needs of ille-
gal immigrants.

Mr Wisdom was referring to
the land dispute which erupted
between squatters and the Min-
istry of Housing over a prop-
erty government has reserved

for developing the second...

phase of a new Fire Trail Road
housing subdivision:

Many of these squatters,
according to Mr Wisdom, are
people he has come into con-








Hi THERE has been no
response from the Minister of
Health Bernard Nottage or
his officials

culations, the HHFLB may
have collected over $9 million
since 1998 when it was created.

The Act governing the
HHELB states that a “the min-
ister shall cause a copy of every
such report to be laid on tables
of both Houses of Parliament”.

This report should be sub-
mitted “no later than June 30
‘in any year.”

However when The Tribune
interviewed Jerome Gomez,
chairman of the HHFLB, in
late July, he said they will be

tact with in the past. -

He gave an example of an
illegal Haitian man who was
notified by the ministry that he
must relocate.

Mr Wisdom said the man
responded by telling him the
land had been given to him by
God, and that he was not pre-
pared to move.

The minister said he replied:
“You as an illegal immigrant

- do not have the right to pre-

vent me from allowing Bahami-
ans to access homes through a
government supported ‘pro-

gramme.”
Mr Wisdom said he then

asked for a tractor to knock
down the house which was in

preparing the report shortly.

The board is the body in
charge of regulating private
hospitals and healthcare facili-
ties, which are required to pay
a basic fee of $500. If they pro-
vide diagnostic services they
are required to pay an addi-
tional $500.

Provided that a facility has
a pharmacy that also-serves the

* public, an additional $200 is to

be paid, and a $10 fee has to be
paid for every bed in the facil-
ity.

"One hospital, therefore,
depending on its size, could pay
‘up to $5,000 in licensing fees.

Clinics pay a basic fee of
$400, and another $400 if a
diagnostic facility is in place.
Therefore, a clinic could pay
as much $1,000 to $3,000 in
licensing fees.

Mr Gomez told The Tribune
that no facility has ever been
denied a licence and, accord-.
ing to the Act, there are three
conditions that a facility must
meet to receive a licence — one
of which is “upon payment of
prescribed fee”.

Therefore, the board should
have collected around $9 mil-
lion in licensing fees over the

eight years it has been in exis-
tence.



b

the immediate way of con-
struction plans.



KEMP(SIFUNERALIHOMEILIMITED

220PalmdalelAvenue,!Palmdale —
Nassau,IN.P.,JThelBahamas

Goins iecnao waning

MARY JEAN CAREY

740 off Woodland
Road,0 Nassau,] The
Bahamas,l will be
heldi atl Ebenezer
Methodist] Church,
EastiShirleylStreets,
NassaullontThursday,
10thDAugust,12006lat
5:00pm.

Reverendl Milton




= NEVEEEE SV edon vse “that the. Bahamas is a country






























Cherished memories are held by her one son: Harold
Rose of Ohio; one adopted son: Norman Cleare of
N assau, Bahamas; one brother: Leon Bain; one sister-
in-law: Irene Bain; one adopted sister: Ruthiemae
Black; one daughter-in-law: Barbara Rose; four °
grandchildren: Angela, Denise, Erica and Harold Jr.;
five great grandchildren: Whitney, Devin, Aaren,
Anthony and Arianna; nine nephews including: Bert,
Phillip, Joseph Beneby of West Palm Beach Florida
and Bernard Beneby of Nassau Bahamas; James Bain
. of Connecticut, Ellis Bain of Nassau and Arthur Bain
Jr.; four nieces including: Annette ‘““Nelliemae” Kodra;
ten grand nephews including: Gary Black; fifteen grand
nieces-including: Ferlesa Cleare, Valarie Burrows,
Lakeisha and Kayla Thompson and Genevieve Thomas;
twenty-two great grand nephews including: John
Hutcheson; thirteen great grand nieces including:
Tyisha and Ebony Cleare and Carlisa Miller; two great-
great grandnephews, one great-great grandniece

numerous other relatives and friends including: J ean
and Barbie Beneby of West Palm Beach Florida,
Carolyn and Beverly Beneby of Nassau Bahamas,
Harrington Beneby of Miami Florida, The Bastian
Family of Atlanta Georgia, Veronica Ferguson, Corette
Cosbert of Virginia Florida, The Nottage, Ferguson,
Moss, Darling, Bain and Symonette Families, Ronald
Miller and Family, Mr. Newton Williamson and Family
and the Central Congregation Family. ,

Relatives and Friends may pay their res

pects at Ced
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street
on Friday from 12noon to 6:00p.m., and at the church
on Saturday from 9:30a.m until service time.



Lightbournel and

Pastorl Martin

Loyleylwilllofficiatelandlintermentwilllbe
inl Ebenezerl Methodist] Cemetery, East
ShirleylStreet,INassau.

Mrs.0Careyllwaslpredeceasedibylherlhusband,
William Charles Careylandlislsurvivedlby
herllson,JDavidiCharlesICarey ;Idaughter-in-

-law,lAuralEstellellCareyJGrandson,JMichael

CharlesiCarey;granddaughter,JAshleylJean
Carey;[sisters-in-law,iBessThompson Lottie
Lowel andl Darlenell Careyl off Bradenton
Florida; brother-in-law, Nevillel "Butch"

Carey,andImanylnieceslandinephewslother
relativeslland{IfriendsliniTheBahamasland
the Unitedi States andd special thanksi to

caregivers,JFaylMillerJBridgetJArmbrister |

andiCleopatralArmbristeri.

Insteadofiiflowersithelfamilylrequestithat
donationsibellsentitofthe1B ahamas] Humane
Society,UP.O.0BoxiIN-242 [Nassau,linJmemory
offMrs.0MarylJeanICarey



—

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 9

i JEROME Gomez, chairman of the HHFLB

mitted reports to the minister.
The HHFLB jis among a
group of advisory, technical
and administrative support
units of the Ministry of Health.
Its main functions include:
to issue licences for the use of
buildings as hospitals or health-
care facilities; to regulate and
inspect healthcare facilities; to
_ initiate investigations into any
matter affecting the manage-
ment, diagnosis or treatment
of a person within the hospi-
tal or healthcare facility
licensed under the Act, and to
appoint qualified persons to be .
certainty.that both he and the inspectors for ‘the purpose of
previous board chairman sub- the Act.

However, the Minister of
Health — neither under the
FNM nor the PLP — has ever
tabled a report.

‘When asked about the
accounts, Mr Gomez said they
are “not public information”.

He said the only way for the
public to be privy to such infor-
mation is after the report is
tabled in the Cabinet and
House of Assembly by the
Minister of Health. ..

Though Mr Gomez said he is
uncertain as to whether the
reports were tabled in parlia-
ment, he said he could say with

of an increasing demand for
reasonable housing,” he said.
According to Mr Wisdom, if
government can proceed with
the development, more than
120 Bahamian families will
have a house for Christmas.
“Right now we have 553
homes listed in my inventory,
with over 5,000 requests of peo-

Since then, the immigrant
has been referred to the Min-
istry of Immigration, which is
reportedly dealing with the sit-
uation.

Mr Wisdom said that it is not
his responsibility to find hous-
ing for illegal nationals, as he
says there are other agencies
in the country to provide that

kind of support. ple who are qualified for them,
' “Byen if I tried to offer legal © which means that we cannot

assistance to illegal immigrants _give priority to the illegal immi-
- I would be breaking the law,” — grant.

“The government of the.
_. Bahamas refuses to give away
“property to just anyone,” he
“ said: “Once you.start doing that™
you have to provide the same
assistance for everybody else.”

hesaid. }
“We don’t want it to be said



without Compassion — but
there’s something called the
rule of law and also the reality

6. , \ e ; e e
and Crematorium Limited
FREEPORT z
$ 11A East Corel Roath Freeport, G.B., Bahamas .

0, Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005










HELEN ©
REMILDA
TURNQUEST-
BAIN

58 of #139 Fawcett Lane, Freeport,
Grand Bahama and formerly of Long
Island will be held on Saturday,
August 5, 2006 at 10:00 am at First
Baptist Church, Columbus Drive,
Freeport. Officiating will be Rev. Dr.
George L. Cumberbatch, assisted
by Rev. Derrick Russell. Interment
will follow in The Grand Bahama
Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.





























































Precious memory will forever linger in the hearts of her Stepmother: Mazel
_ Turnquest of Deadman’s Cay, Long Island; mother-in-law, Laura Telefar Bain
of New Providence; adopted daughters, Dellareese Hall (Nicky) of
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos.and Cherelle Newbold of Freeport, Grand
Bahama; adopted sons, Aaron Newbold and Valance Smith Jr. of Freeport,
Grand Bahama; sisters, Sandra Turnquest, Shirley Turnquest-Horton, Rochelle
Turnquest of New Providence and Eddrin Turnquest of Freeport, Grand
Bahama; brothers, Franklyn Turnquest Sr. of Mader Town, Grand Bahama,
Nicholas Turnquest Sr. of New Providence, Theophilus Turnquest Sr. of
Chicago, Illinois and Kevin Turnquest Sr. of New Providence; aunts, Myrtle
Turnquest-McHardy of Lower Deadman’s Cay, Long Island and Patricia
Turnquest of Deadman’s Cay, Long Island; uncles, Samuel Minnis of New
Providence, Fred (Bill) Minnis of Windsor, North Carolina and Kirkland
McHardy of Lower Deadman’s Cay, Long Island; nieces, Latisha Horton-
Curtis, Sonia, Tonia and Vandrea, Horton, Alicia Curry, Nickia Turnquest,
Tatyana Turnquest, Semaj Bunch, Patrice Nimmo, Laverne Williams- McKinney,
Deserea Taylor, Andrea Beharrie, Edris Lundy, Lisa Karageorgroy, Crystal,
Shavonne, Marvette and Marrissa Bain, Vernell Williams and Tavanna Bain;
nephews, Franklyn Turnquest Jr., Primo Rolle, Ashley and Quinley Horton,
Lorran Charlton, Nicholas Turnquest Jr., Theophilus Turnquest Jr. and Kevin
Turnquest uJr., Jerome Keith Williams, Allison, Edison Jr., Don, Keith and
Shawn Bain, Kenneth Taylor, Lynden Hall, Stephari Lundy, Clayton Beharre,
Albert McKinney and Renardo Karageorgroy; cousins, Reginald, Charles,
Edwin, Oscar Hunt, Francis Clarke, Eleanor Crawford-McKinney, Alice
Mackey-Dixon, Mildred Mackey, Thalia Mackey-Hogge, Florence Parish,
Loretta Mackey-Pieze, MaryAnn Mackey-Moore, Inez Mackey-Brabson,
Pricilla Mackey-Minnis, Franklyn, Henry and Daniel Mackey, Betty Adderley,
Andrew McPhee, Grace Bassett-Johnson, Miriam Minnis-Maniguait, Elsworth,
Monzell Turnquest, Marcia, Margaret, Thomas, Janet, Mark, Yvette Turnquest,
Janet Adderley and Tammy McPhee-Miller; sisters-in-law, Marilyn, Evelyn
and Chasity Turnquest, Erma Williams, Lerlene Carey, Monica Allen and
Jennifer Bain; brothers-in-law, William Horton, George Williams, Larry Allen,
Roderick Carey, Eddison Bain Sr., Harrison Bain and Herman Murray Bain;
godchildren, Lindsay (Dawn) Adderley and ine Hall; special friends, Lynn
Austin, Arimintha Newbold, Glen Newbold Sr., Glen Newbold Jr., Gabriella
(Gaye) Adderley, Petral Russell, Beryl Poitier, Loggie Brown, Rev. Harry.and
Mrs. Rosalind Clarke, Rose Marie Collins, Catherine Taylor-Scavella, Linda
Taylor, Merylene Baptiste, Diane Ferguson, Jackie Richardson, Jeff and
Glenda Wildgoose, Chris and Cleo Newbold, Van Bethel, Zelita Ferguson,
Willamae Ferguson, Two Big Guys Landscaping, the community of Deadman’s

Cay, Long Island, Ken Rolle, Troy Hanna, the Staff of the Rand Memorial
Hospital, especially Intensive Care Unit, Doctors and Nurses, Rev Dr and
Mrs. Cumberbatch and the First Baptist family, Community of Fawcett Lane,
Member of the Church of God, Hawksbill, Ann Percentie, M.P., Department
of Public Health Staff especially Administration, Accounts and Supplies Unit,
Nassau, Staff of Charles Place, Nassau, St. Ambrose Anglican Church,
Nassau, Zion East and Shirley Street, especially the Prayer Band and a host
of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.









Viewing will be held in the “Perpetual Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the Church on Saturday from
8:30am until service time.







PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE







Out-Island Doctor

The Tribune meesmesssenesee:

ership



The Tribune’s
_ Summer
Reading Series

EXTRACT TEN
Hurricane at Shroud Cay

(Cottman has sailed the Green Cross to the Exumas to
continue expanding his practice but, to his dismay,
finds himself in the direct path of a hurricane. He
seeks refuge from the storm in a creek at Shroud Cay.)

AT 11 A.M. the United States Weather Bureau issued
the reassuring report that the storm had shifted to the
northwest and The Bahamas were thought to be out of
danger. The tide was still high, so with a sigh of relief I
took up my anchors and came back to the mouth of the
creek. But outside the creek the sea was a white rage
and there was a hard wind blowing. So I decided to stay
where I was until things calmed down a bit.

Now I do not want to pick a quarrel with the ‘hurri-

cane warning service. It does the best job it humanly »

can. But predicting the future of a hurricane is not a job
for human beings. A hurricane’s course is as erratic
and unpredictable as that of a baby just learning to
walk: a gigantic, monstrous infant that toddles a few
steps in one direction, tearing up trees and knocking
over houses instead of breaking bric-a-brac, then paus-
ing, rocking back and forth in the same spot, staggering
to one side to casually destroy a town, before plunging
forward in a wild, falling gallop.

And, sure enough, the next hurricane advisory
informed me that the monstrous infant had once more
toddled off in a new direction. Now the centre of the
storm was due to strike the Exuma Cays some time
that same night with winds of 100 miles per hour or
more. , ,

It was out of the question to remain where I was,
and equally out of the question to get back to the
anchorage I had prematurely left because the tide was
too low and it was already getting dark. I remembered
a sandbar a short way from the mouth of the creek so I
decided to head into the creek as far as the sandbar. I
pulled my throttle wide open, the inrushing tide added

speed, the Green Cross struck the sandbar, slid well up ~

on it and stuck firmly. an

I threw my 40 pound grapnel into mangroves to star-
board and dropped my big anchor and followed it over
the side. The water in the deepest part of the creek was
up to my chest and running so swiftly it almost swept me
off my feet but I struggled across to the bank on the port
side, dropped the anchor among the mangroves and tied
the loose end of the hawser to some roots.

The darkness was complete now and I could not see
my hand before my face. I followed the anchor back to
the Green Cross, climbed aboard and found the flash-
light.

The first thing the beam showed me was that my two
lines to starboard had gone slack while those to port
were taut. To avoid problems I was going to have put all
four moorings on the port side. Once more I went over
the rail. Now the water was up to my chin but I got
ashore, took up both lines and brought them back

aboard.
With the tide rising quickly, I figured she must be -

afloat by now so I started the engine, intending to
move her to the other side of the creek before putting
the grapnel over again. But when I threw in the clutch,
she did not budge. She should have been surging for-
ward with the tide but she was steady as Gibraltar.
There must be some obstruction I thought, so I went
over board. The Green Cross was floating but the line

WRITTEN BY EVANS WCW COTTMAN
LINE DRAWINGS BY Guy FLEMING

from the dinghy had become tangled in a cluster of
mangroves and was holding us back. However, when I
tried to free it, I found it was too taut and I realized it
would have to be untied from the Green Cross.

Up to this point, I am fairly sure I had been acting
rationally and logically. From this point on is another
matter. Perhaps it was fatigue dulling my wits, but I
pulled myself back along the line to the Green Cross.
Hanging there, my arms and elbows on the deck, I
started to untie the dinghy’s line. I turned off the flash-
light to save the batteries and felt the knot in the line
loosen: I heaved a premature sigh of relief for the sail-
boat, freed from the bond that held her to thé dinghy
and the mangroves, leapt forward on the rushing tide

‘and threw me unceremoniously into the creek.

When I came up, the Green Cross was gone. A com-
bination of the darkness and a deluge of hurricane dri-
ven rain meant I could see nothing. I could feel the tide
rushing around me, sweeping me up the creek as I
tried to swim in the direction of the.Green Cross. Des-





perately, under water as much as above, I swam.
Strangely, I was not actually afraid. Instead I felt a
kind of intoxicated excitement that was by no means

. unpleasant. I was conscious of battling against the °

storm and, even at that moment, sure I was going to win.

Blind and approaching exhaustion, I reached out my
hand from the surging waters of the creek. I touched
something. Something solid. It was the Green Cross.

‘Blindly I had come as straight to her as if I had been

drawn by a magnet. My feet touched bottom and I
stood there and tied the dinghy’s line to the ringbolt
before I wearily clambered aboard.

( Continued every Friday
and Wednesday until August 18th) »

Text copyright © 1998 Gayle Cottman

Excerpt prepared by Marjorie Downie and Gordon
Mills of

The College of The Bahamas











THE TRIBUNE

@ By GABRIELLE
MISIEWICZ

BEC does not benefit “one
cent” from the fuel surcharge

- added to electricity bills accord-

ing to Minister of Energy and
Environment Dr Marcus

' Bethel.

Dr Bethel issued a statement

' yesterday explaining that the

fluctuating surcharge is calcu-
lated on a monthly basis, based
on the ever-changing and

. volatile cost of oil.

“The minister was refuting
reports in the local media that
claimed the corporation uses,
the surcharge to engage in
“profiteering”.

He said there is “no aspect
whatsoever of the fuel sur-

~ charge that benefits BEC.”

I!

_ Man guilty of the
murder of tourists

to assist Mr Shurland in his request for

Festival

“. FROM page one

However, Mr Johnson said
he had heard nothing about
these dignitaries, but. pointed

_out that many foreign digni-

taries had been guests at past
Fox Hill Festivals.

“T know throughout the years
we have had the Chinese
Ambassador, the Haitian
Ambassador — the Chinese
puppet show opened up the fes-
tival one year,” he said.

The sources also claimed that
the Ministry of Tourism was
brought in to sponsor the Festi-
val in order to brand it a gov-
ernment endorsed event, but
according to Eric Wilmott, Sr, a
foundér and administrator of
the Fox Hill Festival, the Min-
istry of Tourism is sponsoring
only one part of the event.

“It’s very discouraging to
read this nonsense,” he said. -

The festival started in 1988
and, according to Mr Johnson,
every five years Emancipation
Day and Fox Hill Day are cele-
brated back to back. The pur-
pose of the Fox Hill Festival
was to bridge the two days.

“The name Fox Hill Day is
still-with us and-Fox Hill Day
will be observed next Tuesday
— I would like to stress that
Fox Hill Day is the closing day
of the Festival,” he said.

Grand |
Bahama

_Junkanoo

&

Xe
a

*. the.Ginn Corporation. °

2
&
e

tn 4 +

p «
2

event will
go ahead

__ALL systems are go for
the Feel the Rush
Junkanoo parade in Grand
Bahama this weekend.

The event will take place
on Sunday, August 6th at
6.30pm in Downtown
Freeport.

Public relations director

‘for the parade Peter:

Adderley said that despite
some fears earlier in the
week over the weather, the
forecast now appears
favourable.
Saxons, Valley Boys,
One Family and the Grand
Bahama All-Stars will
compete for a $90,000
purse at the event which is
sponsored by the Grand

‘a Bahama Port Authority,

cod
.
a

the Ministry of Tourism,
Grand Bahama Power and

Dr Bethel said that in the
long run, BEC actually loses
money, because it pays 10 per
cent in stamp tax and seven per
cent in duty on fuel, rather than
passing on this cost to the cus-
tomer. .

Minister Bethel stressed that
“every entity” is negatively
affected by the rising cost of
oil.

He explained that fuel is
becoming more expensive
because of turmoil in the oil-
producing states of the Middle

East and that “unparalleled |

growth in the demand for petro-
Jeum products” is a contributing
factor.

| Dr Bethel said BEC held a
press conference on July 19 at
the Ministry of Energy and
Environment, at which “clear

BEC does not benefit from
fuel surcharge, says Bethel

recommendations” were given
to consumers on what they
could to do reduce energy usage
and therefore lower the cost of

_ their electricity bills.

The minister pointed out that
BEC’s annual report has been
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly and is public record. This
means that anyone who wishes
to can see “undeniable proof”
that the company is not profi-
teering, he said. —

Dr Bethel added that not

only has the corporation.

always been forthcoming with
information requested by gov-
ernment, it has also given
“countless interviews” specifi-
cally on the fuel surcharge
issue to both print and broad-
cast media, °

lishes a monthly surcharge

notice in the newspapers — —

something it began doing since
2005.

Dr Bethel said he would like
the public to know ‘that
although BEC is faced with a’
situation beyond its control, the
corporation has taken steps to
“continually upgrade the effi-
ciency of its machinery.”

He said that the company’s
newest generator runs entirely
on the waste heat of the other
generators, and therefore
requires no petroleum products
to power it.

Dr Bethel explained that

“upgrading machinery is of the

utmost importance. il al
It allows the corporation to

save fuel and therefore lower

the surcharge, he explained. .








FROM page one

On counts three and four, the jury returned

a 10-2 guilty verdict in the rape of Ms von

Perfall, and the armed robbery of Mr
Bolzano. ;

Francis, 23, showed no emotion. He
remained as composed “at the end as he did

throughout the entire trial, which opened last.

Tuesday.

The: nude bodies of Ms von Perfall, a 32
year-old Austrian duchess, and Mr Bolzano,
34, were found at the Bimini Blue Water
Resort on July 23, 2005. :

‘According to evidence given in court, both
had been shot at close range with a 12-gauge
shotgun that was recovered by police from
Francis’s home in Porgy Bay, Bimini.

After the verdicts were read in court, Justice
Isaacs told Francis that he was obligated to
have a sentence hearing on the two murder
counts.

He deferred the sentencing for counts three

and four until the sentencing hearing, which
was tentatively set for September 18.
Prosecutor Sandra Dee Gardiner informed
the court that the Crown.intends to seek the
death penalty for the murders.
Mr Shurland informed the court of his

intention to seek a social probation report and.

asked the court’s assistance in a psychiatric
evaluation of Francis before his sentencing.
Justice Isaacs said that the court would try

of the

psychiatric evaluation and assessment of his

‘client.

Prosecutor Gardiner said that a psychiatric
evaluation usually takes between four and six
weeks. He noted that.a probation report
should be completed as well by that time.

Justice Isaacs thanked jurors for their pat-.
- ticipation in the trial and discharged them ‘of

their duties. 4

“It wasn’t a long trial, but you had some .

serious issues to deliberate on.” Without

them, he said, they would not be able to have

trials. :

When asked to comment on the verdicts. :

handed down, Ms Gardiner said she believed

the jury verdict reflected the evidence pre- '

sented by the prosecution.
“The jury represents the consciousness of

this community and we are satisfied that they.

gave the right verdict.

“It was a case in which they had 'to consid-
er the liberty-of the accused and murder is a
very serious crime. As you know, when it
comes to murder one could get up to the death
penalty.

“And the fact that they took a long time —
three or four hours to reach their verdict,

shows that they took their time as the matter is
_a serious one,” she said. |

Defence lawyer Carlson Shurland was not
available for comment after the verdict.

Francis’ case is the last in the Grand Bahama
court’s criminal session.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 11

i MARCUS Bethel

CABINET WORKSHOP
MANAGER NEEDED

(FOR NEW STATE OF THE ART PRODUCTION LINE
CABINET FACTORY IN NASSAU)











Qualifications:

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} ro) dee ot ale cap,










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A Shell Licensee



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006






Ambassador Sears addresses OAS Permanent Council



Nee:

@ WASHINGTON DC - The general assembly in session. Bahamas Ambassador to the US

Joshua Sears chaired the budgetary committee

(Photo: Franklyn G. Ferguson)















@ AMBASSADOR Joshua
Sears receives a plaque from
Ambassador Henry Illes,
chairman of the OAS Per-
manent Council. Ambas-
sador Sears is stepping down
from the position

@ BELOW: Following
Ambassador Sears’ address
to the OAS Permanent

' Council, he received a
standing ovation from the
council’s members

(Photos: Franklyn
G Ferguson)









LOCAL NEWS



AISA TET ame =




FROM page one

they are trying to do is work with the doctors to
contain costs. It is really the doctors who are dri-
ving up the costs.” ,

The official continued by pointing out that
there was no regulatory board for doctors, and
even though there was a medical association in
place, the medical association could nut really
tell doctors what they could charge fe~ their ser-
vices.

“They have a fee schedule that t’ :y should be
following, but the doctors do not iollow the fee
schedule put out by the medical association,” the
official claimed. “The health ¢ ~- - ost is driven by
the doctors and the hosritiis. if tne doctor’s fees
were driven back down, then obviously the insur-
ance rates would also be driven down.”

In explaining how the scheme works, the offi-
cial, hypothetically, used the cost and procedures
involved in having abdominal surgery.

“If the cost of having abdominal surgery is
$2500, that cost should include the doctor cutting
you open, going inside, doing an exploration of
the abdomen to see what is going on, finding
what is going wrong, fixing it, closing you up,
hospital follow-ups, and him visiting you on the
ward.

“When they send the forms in, if you pay a 20
per cent co-pay, they reflect what you paid, then
they break down the charges, and it should have
been $2,500.

“But they are going to charge $2,500 just for the
surgery, then they will charge an additional, say,
$600 for cutting you, which he shouldn’t do
because all of that should have been in the orig-
inal $2,500. Additionally, he is going to charge you:
another, say, $1,500 to do the exploration, which
should not be broken down.

“So, when it’s all said and done, a surgery
which should have cost $2,500 now comes to
about $5-$6,000, and this is how they make their
money. What the doctor did was to unbundle it to
make sure he gets what he wanted — the maxi-
mum,” the official said.

The official likened what doctors do to going to
a mechanic for an oil change and having the

‘mechanical charge you for everything from open-

ing the hood of the car to doing the oil change.
However, in paying, the official said insurance
companies “bundle” all of the unbundled ser-
vices back into one, and they pay 80 per cent of
what it should cost, so the doctor will get 80 per
cent of the $2,500.
“The doctor takes the balance of what he

charged, and, say that the insurance company .

did not pay all of the patient’s bill, they balance
bill the patient because they are not going to
lose,” the official claimed. :

The official said that patients are not legally
obligated to pay the balance, but with doctors
knowing this, they are asking patients for more
than the required 20 per cent up front.

“If the patient does not pay it,” said the official,
“the doctor will not touch him or her, and usual-
ly tells the patient that is how their fee schedule is,
and if he or she wants to use their services, that is
what they must pay.”

This practice, said the official, occurs with most
doctors outside of an insurance company’s net-

work.
“Inside the network,” said the official, “the
doctors give them a list of fee schedules and they







Medical costs

THE TRIBUNE









have already tacked on their fees to it, but the
Insurance companies work with them to see how
they can cut back.” iy

The official said that in many instances, insur-
ance companies give doctors within their net-
work incentives to cut back on their fees, incen-
tives which include a quick turn around on claims
submitted by these doctors.

“Many of these doctors have a lot of competi-
tion, and they are waiting for that insurance mon-
ey to run their offices. The insurance cheque
pays their bills and pays for them to live elaborate
lives,” the insurance official said yesterday.

Because. the Bahamas Medical Association has
no set standard of fees applicable to the Bahamas,
what The Tribune has discovered is that doctors
set their rates according to a physician’s fee and
coding guide that is used to set medical costs in
the United States.

The problem with this practice, the official
pointed out, is that codes and fees vary from
state to state, and whatever fee these doctors are
using, they are charging the insurance compa-’
nies on the higher end.

While a few insurance officials contacted have
said that some of the claims were a bit exagger-
ated, they do agree that others were true.

March 22 touted
FROM page one

“Going into the next election it would reai-
ly be Pindling verses Pindling. Perry Christie
and his former law partner Mr Ingraham is

one aspect of the Pindling legacy against one. *.~
aspect of the Pindling legacy,” he said. ae

However, Mr Bethel said he does not
believe that the PLP will lose the next elec-
tion.

“J don’t believe (Ingraham) has to this:
point made a compelling case for his return as

leader of the country. He was able to make a ©

case for being leader of the FNM because
the men who would be leader of the FNM
were so massively mediocre.

“Mr Ingraham is now remaking:‘the FNM.
The question for him is does he have the time
to do it? I-don’t believe he has sufficient time
If I was told that he was preparing the
groundworks for the year 2012 I would say he
is off to an excellent start,” Mr Bethel said.

The various scandals that have followed
‘the PLP through this administration, he said,
will not factor in the decisions the electorate
will make in the next general election. .

“The history shows you that in 1987 when

the PLP was wallowing in scandal and .cor-_

ruption the PLP won. The Bahamas is not a
place where sandal, unfortunately, brings
down anyone. You have to mix scandal with
hard times. That is the brew, scandal and
hard times. But if you have scandal and mon-
ey, the Bahamian who has moved from pira-
cy to all sorts of plundering as. part of his
psyche will say let the good times roll,” Mr
Bethel said.





All

qusiomer
PAINT
RECORDS
were
saved!

*

.

or



oe

’ CARICOM, for this nation to.

-Bahamian-only incentives
under development




SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







WTO breakdown Ro ) al Oasis bi d der

‘undermines’ CSME

membership case presents t Oo

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE collapse of the latest
round in global trade talks has
undermined the Government’s
main rationale for joining tshe
Caribbean Single Market &
Economy (CSME), a Bahamian
free trade campaigner said yes-
terday.

Paul Moss, head of Bahamian
Agitating for a Referendum on
Free Trade, said the collapse of
the World Trade Organisation’s
(WTO) Doha round of trade
talks had given the Bahamas
breathing space, and extra time
to get its own house in order
-before it contemplated signing
-on to any trade agreements.

‘Mr Moss said events at the
WTO had undermined the main
economic and trade arguments
advanced in a position paper by
A. Leonard Archer, the

-.Bahamas) Ambassador. to

-- In addition, the ee said the Government was still in the
process of. hiring persons for the Standards Bureau.

join the CSME..

In his paper, Mr Archer
argued that membership in the
CSME -would eeneiien the

i
b
'



Consumer Commission
members now selected

& By CARA BRENNEN

Tribune Business Reporter

- LOCAL Governinent and Consumer iis minister, V Alfred
Gray, said yesterday he plans to announce members of the Con-
sumer Protection Commission in a few weeks, before they. begin

their work next month.

Mr Gray told The Tribune that the chairman and members of that
Commission have all been appointed and should start to work in
their official capacity on September 1, helping to implement the
Consumer Protection Act and deal with customer complaints
against businesses and the products they sell.

Once this occurs, Mr Gray said the commission can begin to
hear complaints filed by consumers. He explained that the major-
ity of these complaints have to do with perceived high prices at
Bahamian grocery stores on bread basket items, high gas prices and

“rent control.

He said that the Commission was comprised of citzens from var-
ied backgrounds, including agriculture and business. Before appoint-
ing the chairman, he said the ministry looked for a person with a

legal background,

“We looked for a person who understands consumer rights and
- would know how to proceed, because they will be hearing com-

plaints,” Mr Gray said.

@ By CARA BRENNEN

Tribune Business:
Reporter

ADDITIONAL incentives
for the sole benefit of Bahami-
an investors need to be created,
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments’ director
of investments said yesterday.

Basil Albury said: “You
know that in our National
Investment Policy, there are

specific areas reserved for |

.

Bahamas’ negotiating: position
when it engaged in talks to

accede to full membership in

the WTO.

Mr Archer had argued that
by being part of the CSME or
CARICOM bloc, whose nations
were already members of the
WTO, the Bahamas would be
treated no less favourably than
those countries’ whose per capi-
ta incomes were much less.

As a result, Mr Archer said
the Bahamas would not be
treated as having the third high-
est per capita income in the
Western Hemisphere, and
would get the same benefits and
preferences as other CARI-

_COM nations whose economies

were much weaker. As a result,
the terms of the Bahamas’
WTO entry would be more
tavourable.
However, Mr Moss said yes-
terday that the collapse of the
“WTO talks meant “it doesn’t
make sense for the Bahamas to
be part of the CSME”, and had

SEE page 4B

@ abinet ministers

and Grand

Bahama Port

Authority

(GBPA) execu-

tives were yesterday given a

presentation by the group that

has emerged as’the lead con-

tender to acquire the Royal

Oasis resort, with an agree-

ment for the property’s sale
“fairly close” to conclusion. .

Sources. told The Tribune

that a Florida-led group has .

emerged as the front-runner
to acquire the Royal Oasis
from Lehman Brothers, the

_ New York-based investment

bank whose private equity arm
is the resort’s de facto owner as
the result of a mortgage and
debenture it holds on the prop-
erty.

The identities of investors in
the Florida-led group, named
as one of two interested parties
last month by Prime Minister
Perry Christie, have not been
revealed.

The other bidder left in the

Port Authority executives ated fheeting



with Florida-led group emerging as
front runner to acquire resort

Royal Oasis hunt was Har-
court Developments, the Irish-
based property developer that

already has interests in Grand

Bahama through. its Suffolk

_ Court project.

However, it is understood
that the Florida-led group has

moved ahead of Harcourt to °
“emerge as front-runner in the

Royal. Oasis talks, which are
being held with Lehman
Brothers and the Government.

It is unclear whether ,an
agreement for the Royal Oasis
sale has.been reached in prin-
ciple, as some sources suggest-
ed yesterday, although the
high-level meeting indicates

.that a solution to the almost







two- -year saga is close and that
an official announcement
could soon be forthcoming.

“They’re fairly close. Some- .

thing might be about top
break,” one source told The
Tribune.

The Prime Minister on J uly
18 said the main question that
had to be resolved was

whether one of the bidders -

likely to be the Florida-led one,
which offered thé higher price

of around $42 million - was

willing to put up a non-refund-

able deposit to show Lehman

Brothers its offer was serious.

Sources have told The Tri-
bune that the Florida-led group
has been in talks with the Las

‘clarity’



-@ WENDY WARREN_

. Act.

a. @ By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor

was told yesterday.

LEGISLATIVE amendments
mâ„¢ tabled in the House of Assembly will

s, provide greater “clarity” to high net
worth individuals over the structuring
and regulation of Bahamas-domiciled ~
private trust companies, The Tribune. .

Prime Minister Perry Christie last
week tabled amendments to the Banks »
and Trust Companies Regulation Act
and the Central Bank of the Bahamas .
Act that. will facilitate the creation of.
private trust companies under those
‘existing pieces of legislation, rather

than through a standalone bill. |

Wendy Warren, the Bahamas Finan-

cial Services Board’s (BFSB) chief

executive and executive director, yes-

_terday said the main advantage from
the amendments was that they would |
bring clarity to how private trust com-.

panies domiciled in the Bahamas could
be formed, structured and regulated.

She added that. the BFSB, during
marketing trips and discussions with
clients and foreign institutions, had
“found significant interest in private

‘trust companies” as a wealth manage-
ment and estate planning tool for high

net, worth individuals.

“We certainly | are: vey pleased to

see the legislation tabled,” Ms War-
ren said. “It’s been a very fruitful exer-"
cise, in particular working with the
Central Bank over the last two years.”

The Bahamian financial services
industry, including the BFSB and
Association of International Banks
and Trusts (AIBT) had worked close-
ly with the Central Bank and other
regulators in the drafting of the leg-
islative amendments.

Describing the amendments, which
are now awaiting their second read-
ing, as creating “a very-clear, stream-

s SEE page 6B ,



Vegas-based New York, New
York hotel/casino about
becoming the operating part-

‘ner for the Royal Oasis if its

bid is successful. The company
is a subsidiary of MGM
Mirage. ‘
Jethro Miller, of Nottaze!
Miller & Co, is understood to
be the-attorney representing

- the Florida-led group.

Harcourt is represented by
Kirk Antoni of Cafferta & Co.
It wasepreviously part of.a
three-member group that Aa
included Westgate Resorts, the ae
world’s third largest timeshare
group, and Planet Hollywood.

The Tribune was first alerted
to yesterday’s emergency Cab-
inet meeting when it spotted
Hannes Babak, the Port
Authority’s chairman, and Sir: /
Albert Miller, its chief exécu-

_ tive, walking across Rawson

Square to a waiting car after
leaving the Cabinet Office. .
Parked right behind them was
Prime Minister Christie’s car.
- Any: announcement that a.
deal has been concluded for
the Royal Oasis, and the buy-



er’s name revealed, islikelyto won

be greeted with a sigh ofrelief . -°-
by allon Grand Bahama. — .
- The resort’s closure in 2004,
following Hurricane Frances
and Jeanne, put about 1,200
hotel staff out of work, cutting
Grand Bahama’s room inven-
tory by one third and increased
unemployment onthe island
to over 11 per cent.

SEE page 5B



Bahamians. We need to create
incentives that would apply only
to Bahamians.”

He said that currently, there
was a proposal fora Tourism
Attraction Incentive or Encour- ”
agement Act ,which would
serve as companion legislation
to the Hotels Encouragement

Mr Albury explained this”

SEE page 4B

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~

. PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Know your customer is

not just key in banking

THE first step in putting
together your marketing strat-
egy is to find out who your cus-
tomer is. If you don’t know

who your customer is, and
what their needs are, how will
you know what they want? It
never ceases to amaze me how

The Embassy of the United States in Nassau, The Bahamas
has launched via the internet, a solicitation to require op-
eration and management of: Local Guard Services for the
U.S. Embassy Nassau, and the Frederal Inspection Station
'(FIS) Pre-Clearance Unit, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
Bahamas. The contractor shall furnish mangerial, admin-
istrative and direct labor personal to accomplish all work
as required in this contact. The estimated number of hours
for guards is 153,833 per year. Performance is for a one
(1) year base period and four (4) one-year periods. Major
duties and responsibilities are to perform accesss control |
to limit entry only to authorized personnel or visitors, the
operation of walk-through metal detectors, hand-held de-
tectors and special monitoring devices.
All responsible sources may submit an offer, which shall
be considered. The government has issued the solicitation
on the FEDBIZOPPS site at www.fedbizopps.gov This
requirement will be issued only via the internet. No hard
(paper) copies will be mailed. Once on the FEDBIZOPPS
website, Click on “Vendors” button under browse
agencies, choose “STATE”, scroll down to “Western
Hemisphere Posts”, double click on “locations”. You
will locate all. documents related to this solicitation under
American Embassy Nassau, The Bahamas. Questions can
be addressed to Karen Wiebelhaus, Contracting Officer by
phone: (242) 322-1181 ext. 4415, or by FAX (242)
328-7838 or at wiebelhauskk @state.gov



many businesses fail to know
their customer and, by exten-
sion, their market.

Remember, marketing is
about getting more people to
buy more of your product at
the most advantageous price
to you. By finding out more
about your customers, you will
be in a better position to make
them happy. After all, happy
customers feel you value them,
that you will help them solve
their problems and meet their
needs,

There are three things you
need to know about your cus-
tomers.

First, where do they live? Do
they live near you, or do they
‘have to come to you from
afar? At the most basic level,
research of the geography, or
area where your customers live
and work, often will give you
valuable information about
whether a region, city or neigh-
bourhood area is suitable for
your product. |

For example, if you sell
water-skis, you may consider
marketing to communities that
live near the sea or lakes. Geo-
graphical research will provide
this information for you.

Second, what does your cus-
tomer look like? What age,
race or gender are they? What
income do they have and what
level of education have they
achieved? Are they generally
low income, middle class or
upper class? This area is
known as demographics and
can yield useful information.

For example, it is tradition-
ally thought that African-
Americans spend more on
clothes, shoes and personal
care products, tend to be more
brand loyal and prefer to shop

_ locally than other groups, Lati-

nos tend to prefer quality prod-
ucts to generic products, and






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In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Programme of the 2
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Centre, Stapledon Gardens from Monday July 31 through Friday, August, 11 2006.
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to'3:00 p.m. as follows:

NEW STUDENTS (CF el time recipients)


















tend to patronise Latino busi-
nesses, The mature population
is considered to spend more
on recreational, healthcare and
personal care products.

So, knowing more about the
make- -up of your local popu-
lation will help you in creating
the right promotions to appeal
to the segment you are target-
ing. For example, if you lived
in India and are selling curry
sauces, you may want to avoid
areas where elderly Indian
people live, as they tradition-
ally make their own sauces.
You should concentrate
instead on the middle classes
that buy “ease of use” and con-
venience products.

Be aware, there is also a pur-
chasing life cycle you need to
understand. A young, divorced
single mother with children will
have much different needs and
desires than a soon-to-be-
retired member. There is plen-
ty of information on the Inter-
net on all these segments, so
you would be well advised to
start studying this area.

Also, be aware that every _

customer goes through a buy-
ing cycle. It starts off with them
becoming aware of your prod-
uct. This is why a lot of mar-
keting is targeted at making
customers aware of the exis-
tence of products and services.
This is because, if they are
aware, eventually they might
evaluate the product to see
whether it will meet their
needs, And if it meets their
needs, they may trial the prod-
uct or service it. If they really
like it, they may become your
regular customers, At that
stage, your marketing should
be aimed to get that group to
buy more of your product,
more times, and at-a higher
price.

: The third thing you need to











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find out about your customers
is their motivation for buying
things. What influences their

' buying decisions? How often

and when do they buy? Are
they buying because they like
to try things out first? Are they
buying because they actually
need it? Or, are they buying
because it gives them social
status? Again, there is a lot of
research out there that'can give
you the answers to these ques-
tions.

So, you can see that “know-
ing” your customer is a lot
more than just knowing where
they live and what their demo-
graphic make up is. You also

_ need to know their buying and

behavioural preferences, which
takes you into the realm of
psychology.

Luckily, all this information
can be readily acquired
through research. I will be
dealing in more detail with the
research process in a future
column. However, there are
generally two ways in which
you can research your cus-
tomer.

The first involves getting the
information from your cus-
tomers direct. You collect the

‘data, analyse it and draw your

own conclusions from it. You
can use direct methods, such
as surveys at the till, telephone
interviews, e-mail interviews,

focus groups or street inter-.

views. You can start with your
own staff, particularly your
sales people, customer service
people, and those who already
use your product, and get their

= Soca

ern oe

#3600.96010.,

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Sale

feedback.

Make sure you read between
the lines, though. Customers
are known to tell you what
they want you to hear, or what
they think they should say, so
they can make themselves look
better in your eyes,

The second method of
research involves you acquiring
information about customers
from other sources such as
trade organisations, polling
organisations, newspaper and
magazine reports. This
research can be much more
sophisticated, dealing with the
psychological preferences of
customers, their aspirations,
buying patterns, level of
sophistication and perceived
needs. .

Marketing is an important
area for your business. The
first step in successful market-
ing is to try to get to know your
customers. Without this valu-
able information, it will be
more. difficult for you to struc-
ture your product, price, posi-
tioning, promotion and deliv-
ery.

So, in order to avoid the trap
of antipreneurship, make sure
you spend sufficient time on
researching this area as it could
pay large dividends for your

- future business success.

‘NB: Adapted from his

_ upcoming book, Antipreneur-

ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He
is chief operating officer of
www.ezpzemail.com, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be
contacted at .markalex-'
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved







Day

Monday, July 31st, 2006
Tuesday, August Ist, 2006
Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006
Thursday, August 3rd, 2006.
Friday, August 4th, 2006

Surnames beginning with

A-C















RETURNING STU

Surnames beginning with




Friday, August 4th 2006.
Tuesday, August 8th, 2006 _
Wednesday, August 9th, 2006
Thursday, August 10th, 2006
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THE TRIBUNE




FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 3B

Major as a

consultant to the DIB

m@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business

Reporter

FORMER Bahamasair gen-
eral manager, Paul Major, has
been appointed as a consultant
to the Domestic Investment
Board.

Mr Major, who is also head-
ing up the Government side of
the task force relocating ship-
ping facilities from downtown

Bay Street to a new port in

southwestern New Providence,
is to serve in an advisory capac-
ity as the Board tries to ensure
more Bahamians can become
investors in their own country.

Making the announcement
on behalf of Financial Services
and Investments Minister, Vin-
cent Peet, Director of Invest-

ment, Basil Albury, said Mr —

Major’s banking background
and managerial experience in a
number of areas would stand
him in good stead. He was pre-
viously managing director at
Citibank (Bahamas).

“As a businessmen himself,
he knows the difficulties and
the challenges and the great
pleasures of small business
-Operations,” Mr Albury said
of Mr Major. i

“He has been there and he is
stil there, and so he is the sort
of person who we feel can help
us achieve the overall mission
of the Domestic Investment
Board - to empower Bahami-
ans to enable them to fully par-
ticipate in the economic devel-
opment and success of the
Bahamian economy.”

Mr Albury said foreign
investments provide a huge
opportunity for Bahamians to
form spin -off entrepreneurial
businesses.

Mr Major will have the task
of advising the ministry as to

how Bahamians can get
involved in these opportuni-
ties, Mr Albury explained.
The Board will likely oper-
ate in an advisory capacity
rather than a statutory one.
“We want to make the
process of doing business in
this country by Bahamas as
easy as possible. We’ve always
talked about putting out the
red carpet for foreign direct
investors - we will continue to

do that - but we want to be

sure that carpet is just as plush
for Bahamians who want to
invest in their country,” Mr
Albury added.

Mr Major said that over the
course of ‘his career, he has
done a number of things to

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help improve small business
in the Bahamas. He added that

small business in the Bahamian.

context was $50,000, $100,000,
and companies with sales up
to $250,000.

In the United States, Mr
Major pointed out that small
business started at $5 million.
Five to $10 million was small
business, $10 to $50 is medi-
um business and over $50 mil-
lion is large business.

“So our very definition con-
strains us in the way we think,

-and there is no way we can

compete, not only with foreign

interests but established

Bahamian interests, unless
there is access to capital by
those of us who have been





interested in working for any-
body any more, but rather
‘being able to capitalise on the
economic boom in a direct and
timely fashion”.

Mr Major said there was.a
lot of economic growth in the
Bahamas, but “the only ques-
tion is how does it get to the
poor Bahamian who is not







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deprived of it for so long,” Mr
Major said.

“We all know stories of
Bahamians who have come up
with great ideas, and who have
had them taken away from
because they did not have the ,
funding to do it. They end up
being eitheras miniscule share-
holders or kicked out while the
business goes on to survive.”

Signed |
Pat Strachan!

t
i ti

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial institution with a
presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million customers worldwide. is seeking candidates
for the position of Area Manager GWS ‘Technology.

FUNCT IONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION |

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore trust companies servic-

ing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel
Islands, New Jersey and Singapore. Products tarset wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.
The Technology Department supports all locations and local applications of the business. ooo u..

jac eis OTT



OVERVIEW OF ROLE 4 :
The requirements and responsibilities for all aspects of the Area Manager Role include (but are
not limited fo) the following:



i 5 4
- Lead or facilitate decisions affecting long-range organizational goals and strategic planning. i
"- Manage large-scale strategic/critical projects or applications, or global projects or |
applications. , |
- Manage multiple project managers or projects leaders.
- Develop strategies to reduce costs, manage risk, and enhance revenues or services.
- Follow Citigroup Private Bank “people practices”, including long and short-term career
development for employees, mobility process, and diversity.

ROLE DESCRIPTION

Client Management

- Build relationships: manage/partner with multiple senior level clients.

- Set strategic technology direction (6-24 mou.h horizon)

- Participate in initial meetings with clients; delegate projects to Projects Managers.

\



Risk Management ;
- Manage audit reviews; execute corrective actions plans. i
- Implement and monitor compensating controls for risks.
- Execute crisis management action plan. .

- Responsible for application of corporate. information security policies.

Resource Management _

- Financial budget management.

- Staffing Plan (employee, consultant, temp).

- Expense Control.

- Human Capital Development.

- Training, mobility, diversity, communication.
- Manage the technology infrastructure (hardware and software)

Administration ;

- Routine Audit/Citigroup Technology Standard policies..

- Support Legal and Compliance initiatives.

- Ensure all dedicated resources meet legal and compliance standards.

- Monitor overall project management tracking. using the firm’s standard tools.
= Communicate, monitor and enforce all technology policies and procedures.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

- Strong management skills.

> Strong oral and written communication skills.

- Interfacing with the business, internal and external vendors.

< Influencing and leadership skills. “

- MS Office Oracle, SQL. VB (historic programming experience with language and web
applications), ‘
Crystal Reports; Imaging technologies, financial systems, 4Series application.

- Project Management and Reporting.

- Minimum Bachelor's degree required with at least 4 years experience as a Senior
Technology Manager ina similar role

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to;



Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P. O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

-mail: sat

Deadline for application is August 5, 2006.





eh Poa

PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006





FROM page 1B

could be particularly beneficial
to persons in the entertainment
arena, which has “died through
our eyes”.

ahamian-

“Tf an Act like this would
enable entrepreneurs to bring
in the materials that are needed
for something like this, this
opens wide that particular

industry,” he added.
Another example, he said

_ Was sports fishing, as the work-

ers on the boats would be able
to bring in these vessels duty



eg

NOTICE OF VACANCY

A vacancy exists for a Bahamian at The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited in the Building and Developement Services Department.

Vacancy: Director of Building and Developement Services

The position reports directly to Management.

Qualifications/Pre-requisites:

Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of fifteen (15) years experience with
substantial knowledge in the construction industry w.r.t. building services, substantial familiarity
with building codes, substantial knowledge in urban engineering and substantial experience
in management of projects.Legal mindedness,computer literacy, the ability to communicate
effectively and speak publicly and a character of integrity are essential.

Responsibilities:

Managing the day to day operations of the Building and Development Services Department
with respect to Building and Planning Code matters, contracts administration of capital projects,
implementation of Management’s physical planning of subdivisions and overseeing the
functions of the City Management Department.

Resumés with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
On or before August 10, 2006

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear, It is currently based in
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty-retailers in the U.S. and Europe
in addition to a manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand. Bloch International is in
the process of setting up operations in The Bahamas and is seeking a

Senior Operations Manager

Position Summary:

The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring that business objectives are met effectively and
efficiently and in a timely manner, The ideal candidate will also be required to assist in maintaining the smooth
running of the Bloch International business at new corporate headquarters to be established in the Bahamas. An
innovative and energetic profile is necessary to manage the operations of this growing and dynamic business.

- Reports to the Senior Vice President in The Bahamas.

Duties and Responsibilities

Develop a communication process to ensure Managers and Staff are kept well informed —

Ensure proper planning and evaluation of business strategies so that worldwide operations can. meet
profit goals, y

Co-ordinate marketing plans and strategies in conjunction with the senior management staff of Bloch

International and approval of range plans for each division and each distributor in order that sales _

targets can be met, '
Assist the Senior Vice President to monitor and maintain worldwide operation key performance
indicators (KPI’s). :

Required Skills/Experience:

The successful candidate for this position will be a self-motivated individual, possess excellent leadership
skills, be a team player, and be able to demonstrate flexibility to respond to a host of different challenges.
He/she must be accustomed to working on multiple tasks without continual ‘supervision. This individual
must be persuasive and tenacious in their relationships while maintaining professional standards of conduct
and strong customer focus. The ability to manage multiple projects, change priorities when needed and be
pro-active. will be essential, Ultimately the successful candidate. will be. able to work on his/her own
initiative and impact positively on the business on a daily basis.

An extensive marketing background with an in-depth knowledge of brand development
A solid, broad understanding of finance (including product costing and pricing)
Experience in distribution / licensing arrangements as business development in Europe, Asia and South
America forms part of the business plan. International:
An understanding of product development and the product development life cycle from:concept through to
market
° A good utiderstanding of systems (both computer and procedures)

Competencies:

Ownership of the role
Excellent financial knowledge mixed with excellent commercial knowledge to ensure excellent margin

protection

The ability to understand a different market and apply classical marketing strategies to the
aforementioned new-market

Exceptional communication skills oe

Ability to work with both vertical and flat business structures .

Compensation:

This is a senior position and the compensation package is designed accordingly. Compensation comprises a

base salary (low six figures) plus an incentive bonus based on performance and attainment of worldwide goals.
Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O. Box N3910
Nassau, Bahamas
pwcbs@bs.pwe.com



free.

“All of these areas are areas
reserved for Bahamians, and
this is how, in conjunction with
tourism, we can move ahead.
This is creating whole new
ground opening up many
opportunities for Bahamians,”
Mr Albury said.

He emphasised that not only
will businesses involved direct-
ly with the tourism industry
benefit, but food stores, gas sta-
tions and other retailers, too.

Mr Albury said Bahamians
will have to learn to take advan-
tage of this “trickle down”
effect.

He added that the initiative to
encourage Bahamians investors
by offering them special con-
cessions was a timely oné.

“The idea now is to have
Bahamians begin to think big. If
you look at the hotel industry,

only incentives under development

there are small guest houses.”
Mr Albury said. ;

The investments director said
that while the Domestic Invest-
ment Board will continue to
support these smaller ventures,
Bahamians need to make an
effort to expand their way of
thinking.

He pointed to the Cotton Bay
resort in South Eleuthera,
which is being developed by
Franklyn Wilson and Tommy
Sands Jr.

“One of the amazing things
to me was to see the dominant
Bahamian profile there, not
only in terms of ownership but
all of the subcontractors and
workers that were there,” he
said.

Mr Albury noted that of the
102 employees, about 98 or 99
of them were Bahamians.

“Here is an example of a

. Bahamian who is thinking big

about investment in this coun-
try, and I think it will be a suc-
cessful venture,” he said.

Mr Albury assured the Board
members that the Government
has an appreciation for the
major difficulties faced by
Bahamians aiming to become
investors in their own country.

“That major difficulty has
been access to funding,” he said.

Mr Albury said all sugges-
tions, considerations and pro-
posals pertaining to the
Bahamian investor have been

compiled in a Cabinet paper.

with respect for the future struc-
ture of the Board. ,
He added that he was confi-

dent the Board will serve in an -

advisory capacity in an effort to
eliminate another level of
bureaucracy for Bahamians
entrepreneurs.

OO ———————

WTO, from1B

“sidelined” the arguments
advanced by Mr Archer.
' However, it is not the WTO -

- itself that has collapsed, but just

the current round of trade.talks, —
which were focusing mainly on
agriculturé and industrial tar-
iffs and other barriers to free
trade.

The areas involved in the cur-
rent round were relatively
peripheral to the Bahamas, giv-
en that it does not have large
industrial or agriculture sectors, .
but if these talks had concluded
successfully the WTO would
have moved on to other indus-
tries.

These were likely to have
included services and invest-
ments, included under the
WTO’s General Agreement on
Services (GATS). The WTO
quietly dropped its Multilateral
Agreement on Investment
(MAT), although this was
brought back through the rich
nations club, the OECD.

Mr Moss yesterday told The
Tribune that the WTO talks col-
lapse had given this nation time
to look inwards, review its
investment and commercial
laws and policies, and see which
were compliant with. the WTO
and which were not.






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He added that the Bahamas.

should also withdraw its appli-
cation for WTO membership
that was submitted under the
former FNM administration,

saying it needed to be reviewed .

to ensure this nation received
the best benefits possible from
joining. .

“This is an opportunity we
need to take to develop core
industries that make sense to
the WTO,” Mr Moss said.
“We’ve been in tourism and
financial services for some time
now, and need to refine those,
and pick up on agriculture and
really develop that.”

He added that with modern
technology and farming meth-
ods the Bahamas could estab-
lish itself as a niche player ‘in
world agriculture, emphasising
that he was worried about the
country’s ability to feed itself.

“We believe now is the right
time for the Bahamas to con-
sider its tax regime,” Mr Moss
said. “This is not because of the
WTO, it is right and proper to
consider these things.”

Pointing out that the OECD
had dropped ‘ring fencing’ as a
criteria for including the
Bahamas on its so-called ‘tax
haven blacklist’, Mr Moss advo-
cated an income tax to replace
the current system of import
duties.

He said an income tax was’



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ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

While
inventory lasts

nd inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
d emergency roadside assistance.

needed because the Govern-
ment was not earning enough
revenue from the current sys-
tem to meet its civil service pay-
roll obligations, let alone public
infrastructure works.

Mr Moss said the import duty
system “prohibited” Bahami-
ans from getting into business
because they had to pay taxes to
import products and materials
they needed to start up.

He added that it was also

wrong for companies 'consid- |: _-
ered non-resident for exchange -’

control purposes, such as for-
eign-owned bank and trust com-
panies, to be exempt from pay-
ing taxes unlike their Bahami-
an-owned counterparts.



roe

Mr Moss said of the WTO: *-~

application: “It’s a perfect.

opportunity for the Bahamas to
withdraw its application. That

application was misguided by.

the former administration, and

to look at it again.
“Resubmit this if they feel
and the Bahamian people feel it

_is the way to go, but on’ terms

that benefit the Bahamas.”
No WTO committee has

" itis time for this administration ree:

been formed to analyse the .

Bahamas’ memorandum of -

trade that was submitted as part
of its membership application,
and no talks have begun with
countries that have an interest
in trading with the Bahamas.

ED

HYUNDAI














auto
Sales

LIMITED ©

















THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 5B



Royal Oasis bidder

presents to G

FROM page 1B

The effects of more than
1,000 workers losing their jobs

have been felt by the entire _

Grand Bahama economy, with
the resort’s closure hitting the
International Bazaar especial-
ly hard, since the majority of its
customers were Royal Oasis
guests.

Finding a solution for the
Royal Oasis has not been easy,
and has pre-occupied the Gov-
ernment in relation to its pri-
mary objectives for Grand
Bahama. .

It is unclear whether the
resort can be opened before
the upcoming general election,
as the administration will be

“hoping for, even if a deal is
concluded today.

Construction companies that
assessed the Royal Oasis on
behalf of other prospective bid-
ders suggested it would take

- at least nine months to get the
property ready for re-opening
at best.

Negotiations over the Royal

Oasis were given. an added
complexity due to the fact that
they.were three-way, involv-
ing the Government, Lehman
Brothers and potential buyers.

It is likely that the priorities
of Lehman Brothers and the
Government did not coincide,
as the Prime Minister hinted
at on July 18. The private equi-
ty fund will want to realise the
highest price possible for the
resort, while the Government
will want the buyer to be the
one best suited to take the
resort forward for the long-
term.

In essence, the Government
will want the buyer to have the
resort model best suited for
the Royal Oasis and Freeport,
a good track record and the
financing in place to execute

properly.

Currently, the casino is the °

Royal Oasis’s biggest asset, but
the fact it has no beachfront
property means that it is most

suited to being a convention.

destination.

Among the most pressing
issues needing to be resolved
are the $22 million debts owed

abinet

by Driftwood (Freeport), the
holding company for the Roy-
al Oasis, when it closed the
resort in September 2004.

In January 2005, the resort
owed the Government $13 mil-

lion in casino taxes, and owed ©

$2.7 million to the Port
Authority and its affiliates, $2.5
million to the National Insur-

‘ance Board (NIB), and

$550,000 to Grand Bahama-
based suppliers.

In addition, the two hotel
pension funds, owed $4.1 mil-

‘ jion by the Royal Oasis, have

obtained a court order requir-
ing the contributions debt
owed to them to be repaid in
the event of a sale.

Discussions between the
Government, Lehman Broth-
ers and a buyer are likely to
focus on how much of, these
debts will be written-off, how
much will be repaid and who
will be responsible. for financ-
ing this.

Lehman Brothers has
already agreed to repay the $5
million that the Government
paid to former Royal Oasis
workers as severance pay.

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JONES & CO





Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-21838/9

N/T ara Tel Am Tel Us VOT cA mn AON CC COL TR ae UTA ATO) Eat

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear. It is currently based in
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty retailers in the U.S. and Europe
in addition to a manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand, Bloch International is in
the process of setting up operations in The Bahamas and is seeking a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

JOB SUMMARY:

Organizes and directs all aspects of the accounting and financial control fimction of the Bahamas Branch and
teports operational results, Maintain accounting systems that ensure the proper accounting and recording of the
Branch’s resources, Provide management with relevant and reliable financial data necessary for budgetary and
‘financial decisions. Oversee the operation and management of the Accounting Department activities and staff





Reports to the Chief Operating Officer in The Bahamas and to the Chief Financial Officer in Australi.
















SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

© Supervises and trains the general accounting staff.
e Regularly reviews entries to the general ledger to assure accuracy and compliance with established
" accounting principals and procedures ° :
: Assists the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) in the preparation of the annual budgets and forecasts.
¢ Responsible for compliance with all Bahamian fiscal regulatory requirements.
@ Plans and implements changes in the Branch’s accounting system, where necessary; and with approval
_ fromthe Chief Financial Officer (Australia), 4
® Recommends changes in financial policies and procedures, as necessary. Write policies and procedures
and ensure'they are being adhered to. )
Monitors established internal controls to assure proper compliance.
Recruits and evaluates personnel under own supervision.
Keeps the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) informed of the Branch’s performance.
Assures protection of assets of the business through internal. control and ensuring proper insurance
coverage,
e Maintain a regular review of income and expenditure to-ensure that cash flow is adequate to meet future
busiriess needs. .
¢ Prepares and makes recommendations based on financial analysis of operations.
e Keeps abreast of cutrent trends, practices, and developments in the profession. Makes recorimendations
for implementation of new practices and procedures.
_ © Performs and/or oversees all aspects of Human Resources functions.
¢ Coordinates and supervises IT function with outside company providing service.
¢ Oversee global Inventory management and logistics functions.



fay

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian.
Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in the Bahamas, we are seeking candidates with
anewly acquired degree in Engineering. The
candidate should be a graduate with a Bachelors
Degree in Mechanical/Electrical Engineering
and should be a professional who thrives on
the challenge of developing outstanding
customer relations and service excellence.

M&E Limited



Assume other special activities and responsibilities as required.

Having both academic and practical back or ou: nd EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

in mechanical/electrical concepts is an asset
but not mandatory. The successful candidate
will be afforded the opportunity to be trained
by Certified Caterpillar Technicians/Engineers.

Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, plus five (5) to seven (7) years experience in all aspects of Accounting, ideally
gained through increasingly responsible positions within Finance, two years of which must be as a department
manager or supervisor. Candidate with a professional accounting qualification and public accounting experience
at the Manager/Supervisor level is highly desirable.

“Experience ina wholesale distribution environment is also highly desirable but not mandatory.

COMPENSATION

The position offers a competitive salary plus incentive bonus based on performance and pension
insurance and other benefits.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M&E Limited, P.O. Box N-3238,

Nassau Bahamas, Attention President & COO,
or email me@me-ltd.com.

Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O, Box N3910
Nassau, Bahamas
pwcbs@bs.pwe.com

Only persons being interviewed for this
positions will be contacted.

?.



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHONY CANILLO
LOON, 10B, HAMPSHIRE COURT, FREEPORT,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 4th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, GRAND BAHAMA, _Bahamas.























Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that MOHAMMED TALAT
MAHBOOB ALI SHARIFF, P.O.BOX F 44317 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for.
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
ier evionallty and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Freeport,
ahamas.



Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that ZAMRAD SULTANA SHARIFF,
-P.O.BOX F 44317, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
(or aera and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Freeport,
ahamas.

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-law
Notaries Public



Is seeking an ambitious
COMMERCIAL/CORPORATE

ATTORNEY |
For its Nassau Office

Candidates with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the
ability to work independently on various
commercial/corporate transactions.

AND A |

~COMMERCIAL/LITIGATION
ATTORNEY

For its Exuma Office

Candidates must have at least five (5) years
experience and must have the skills and the
ability to work independently on varied
commercial/litigation matters.

Attractive salary and benefits are available to
the applicants with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE MANAGING PARTNER °
P. O. Box. N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or ©
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
Email: info@halsburylawchambers.com







BIS

Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 1 August 200 6





Abaco Markets

‘Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

1.2983 1.2414 Colina Money Market Fund 1.298262"
2.9038 2.4169 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9038***
2.3915 2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480**

wei






Colin




BISX ALL 9 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
divided by the last 12 month earnings






‘Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of.Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS$-A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value



Private trust
amendments
to give ‘clarity’

FROM page 1C

lined and attractive way to ser-

vice high net worth individu-
als”, Ms Warren said: “The
legislation should introduce
clarity.

“We look forward to being
able to introduce an important
structure to the market that
fits with the existing regulatory

- regime.”

Currently

Ms Warren said there were
currently two ways to estab-
lish private trust companies in
the Bahamas, including apply-
ing to the Central Bank of the
Bahamas for a restricted trust
licence.

The new legislation will
enhance the process for estab-

nmensu
experience.






Jahn B. Foster
For: Continental Liquidators, Inc,
Liquidator

Send resumé, qualifications and 3 references
to “Employment” P.O. Box N-7507, Nassau.

| NOTICE 3

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation
yi

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), RIPOLL CORPORATION, is in dissolution.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and
can be contacted at 60 Market Square, PR O. Box 1906, Belize

' City, Belize. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses.
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
September 4, 2006.

ZSlaiaeune

lishing and regulating private
trust companies, with the
Bahamas seeking to tap into
market demand for this prod-
uct.

- Companies

Ms Warren said the private
trust companies would also
link in to other products creat-
ed by legislative changes over
the past three years, including
special purpose trusts.

“The private trust company
is really geared to the high end
of the market. It’s an exciting
time,” Ms Warren said.

_ Private trust companies are
incorporated to act as the
trustee for a single or related
group of trusts, and are often
exempt from the licensing
requirements of institutional
trustees, such'as banks and
















NAV KEY.
*-14 July 2006
** 31 May 2006

*** - 30 June 2006

trust companies.

They are increasingly popu-
lar with clients from civil law
jurisdictions and those wanting
to create a family office.

Private trust companies |

allow settlors to have more
control over the assets held in
trust, greater control over
income and spending relating
to the trust, and they are more
familiar with the business
affairs of the settlor and bene-
ficiaries.

They provide confidentiality
and are seen as being more
cost-effective in some cases
that institutional trustees.

Many rival jurisdictions have
private trust company legisla-
tion, and without similar laws
the Bahamas could lose poten-
tial clients.

Clients.

Private trust companies
often encourage clients to fol-
low their assets and'domicile in

the jurisdiction where these are
located, meaning that the
Bahamian legislation could
facilitate an increase in the
number of high net worth indi-
viduals relocating to this coun-
try. : :

Offices

A rise in the number of fam-
ily offices in the Bahamas will
generate further economic
spin-offs; including greater
spending in the Bahamian
economy by the settlor and
their, families, and real estate
and construction activity.

Ultimately, a high net worth
family’s relocation and family
office creation could lead to
more investment in the home
country. A prime example of
this is Dikran and Sarkis Izmir- ,°

lian, the major investors and - |<"

shareholders in the $2 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment
by their company, Baha Mar
Development Company.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLIFFIN PETI-PHARD OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 4TH day of AUGUST,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. :













Notice
NOTICE .is hereby given .that BENNY LORFILS,
GENERAL DILVERY, MARSH HARBOUR , BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and. that any person who knows .any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of
AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship; RO.Box N- 7147, ABACO, Bahamas.



SG Hambros, part of SG Private Banking, is a private bank
providing a comprehensive wealth management service with
offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, Gibraltar and

The Bahamas.

SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Business Analyst.
Your main responsibilities will be to:

#@ undertake Business Analysis
and Application support roles
as assigned by Management

@ review existing procedures and
propose innovative
improvements to bring
processes to Group standard
and increase reliability and
efficiency

®@ participate in local and Group
projects as directed

You should ideally have:

â„¢@ a Bachelor's Degree in
Programming

@ at least 5-7 years’ experience _
in Information Technology

@ the capacity to learn quickly
and in an independent manner

@ a broad knowledge of banking
procedures and processes

@ excellent written skills
(experience in writing business
reviews, procedures, user
guides)

“SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) ;
licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies

§G Hambros

SG

Private Banking

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP

_@ excellent communications
skills (experience in making
presentations and training):

B a good knowledge of Olympic
Banking Software (developed
by Eri Bancaire)

@ the ability to write queries
(SQL)

®@ advanced Excel skills including
formulae, complex form
creation, with check boxes,
buttons, drill down etc

B® akeen sense of Business
awareness

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted
to the following address, by close
of business on 8 August 2006.

The Human Resources Manager
SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas

Limited is
Regulation Act.

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
gasiicatis




4



BS BASES AON 8







FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 7B







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS ————
— oo dae a eae AUGUST 4, 2006

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PAGE 8B,FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





COMICS PAGE



"Copyrighted Materia
ow ‘Syndicated Content
a" -s

Available from Commercial

News ‘Providers

.-—
———







































-—«
. Step-b y-Step Reasoning
North dealer. tions, you must start by assuming
East-West ane that the contract can be defeated. The:
NORT next step is to count the number of
: ’ * ” ~ : 10 ie : tricks declarer is sure to make. A FRI DAY,
7 KQ quick survey reveals that there are
= ia) ‘ @AKQ103 eight of them in dummy consisting AUGUST 4, 2006
~- ee HA2 of five diamonds, a club and two ;
° ~ WEST EAST hearts whether you take the heart ace | ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
7 = i = ~— - #A83.- @KI92 now or later. You have R&R on the brain, but you
fo Be ll 7108643 VAS This, in turn, leads you to con- ‘ff have to buckle down and get through
095 362 clude that if declarer has the ace of | another grueling week at work,
#376 #10954 spades, he cannot be defeated. You } Aries. There will be reward enough
—- 2 SOUTH "therefore credit partner with the ace. | for a job well done.
Q65 Once you’ve reached this point, it TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 -
- ¥972 becomes much easier to answer the It may feel like everyone is out to get
-_ 0874 questions posed above. you this week, Taurus. But it is all just
+ » KQ83 First, you must win the heart at | your imagination. Just focus on the
The bidding: trick one, because if declarer has the | task at hand and these next few days
: North East . South West K-Q of clubs, he can score a heart, | 4% going to sail by.
1¢ Pass .1NT Pass _ five diamonds and three clubs before | GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21
Ps 3.NT your side regains the lead. Second, | Wishing for a change in your - -
. 4 Opening lead — four of hearts. you should not retum a heart-for the | finances will. get you. nowhere,
- : A defender should assume, as a — same reason. Gemini. You have to put a plan in
7 Ss matter of course, that the contract... Third, since partner needs to have [action to make the changes you
°@ a ' he’s defending against can be the spade ace for the contract to be | desire. Leo can help with the task.
e = = . defeated. If he does not cultivate this defeated, you must shift to a spade. | CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22
- o Xe / attitude as a regular habit, many But you cannot lead just any spade. } Focus on family for the next. few
opportunities to defeat opposing con- If you return a low spade and South | days, Cancer. Afterward, you'll have
tracts will pass him by. has Q-x-x, as in the actual deal, he some time to devote to yourself.
_* eo” @& _ Let’s say you’re East on this deal can make the-contract by playing low There are big changes on the horizon,
and partner leads the heart four from his hand. so enjoy the downtime now.
against three notrump. Should you To cater to this possibility, you | LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23
take the ace or withhold it? If you do must return the spade jack to trap | Hold your head high when you pre-
ite take the ace, is it better to return a South’s queen. Regardless of how J sent a proposal to your supervisor,

Leo. Your ideas have merit and they
should be taken seriously. Surprises
are in store on Thursday.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22
Make the most of the time spent with
your $pouse or romantic partner,
Virgo. The hours will become fleeting
when a work project springs up unex-
pectedly midweek.

declarer chooses to proceed, he can-
not stop you from collecting four
spade tricks, and the contract is
defeated.

heart, or should you shift to another
suit? If you do shift, should it be to a
spade or a club?

To find the answers to these ques-



The



—< ; ° = Target LIBRA = Sept 23/Oct 23
a, Werden ea You’ll have trouble focusing on any-
the main 2 sae ge thing this week, Libra. No matter
oe body of egkree, how hard you try to devote your’
1 Chambers E z eHHes attention to one task, you’ll end up.
21st aa oe § ge8 working on multiple projects.
-- Century z pA Boke a
— (1999 E g BF gle Rather than going on the defensive
° edition) SAEESSES with a coworker, Scorpio, sit down
3 Bra g ei Bok and talk to the person about what’s
HOW many words of four letters “no Boa” bother ttn :
or more can you make from the 5 wok os B8eg othering you. It may or may not -
letters shown here? In making a: 328 Bd 8 2 SE work, but at least you’ll have tried.
word, each letter may be use: eo - =
once only. Each must contain the HOS oP 8 ae SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
centre letter and there must be at we as a4 ogk Now is not the time to make.a major
~ fears one nine-letter word. No BSSseeans life decision because your head is

just not into it, Sagittarius. Put off
heavy thinking for another few days
and skate through this week.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
No matter how hard you try,
Capricorn, you can’t get everyone to
like you — just accept it. Instead of
trying to win everyone over, spend
your energy on the friends you have.



pars TARGET :
Good 23; very good 35; excellent
45 (or more). Solution’ tomorrow.



+





























new





Actos rere AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
3° Get over being ratty (5) 1 Find the amount a child will getout word There is trouble brewing at home,
8 — Forher, pleasure’s only half nice (5) of bed for? (3,2) but you won’t be able to Ee ea
r i 2 Wildly throw a scare about — what’s up unless you confront those
Cees ane) | you live wih, Dont clam up and
11 Youandme (3) ‘ race (7) ; . a avoid confrontation.
12 Shoot, inthe garden for falstying ee cr PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
coins? (5) 5 Rain can be spectacular al the end that grows It’ll take a lot of effort to get through
13. The mere resutt of frostis - of winter! (6) beyond the the week, Pisces, because things will
only fair (7) 6 — Acunning snare is not so daft! (5) gumline a struggle for you. Relief comes
7 Something written with diplomacy when virgo enters the picture.

15 Possibly new companion, a git! (5)

18 For whom sailoring is 2 about a religious leader? (5)

9 Theayes have it (3)




























i ?
biotateg? (3) 5 Ganare cite plea ra _CHESS by Leonard Barden
19 Scold for being along time in church (7) aN
= ae : mae ee 14 Has he the heart of a giant? (3)
ician capable of treas : ‘
22° Agrowing source of hot air (4) 16+ feolnemeste d Cemicaion Sergey Rublevsky v Alexey
growing 17 Eatin hotels, as in the country (5) Shirov, Russia Cup 2006. Some

23 Was re the stuf 19 He wrote music and started a book Lpeleprrpeae S dek. of

wasn't woven (4) ona sculptor (7) : mood, full of brilliant ideas
24 Wherein swimmers are taught? (7) and tactics one day, then
26 Foracelebrity, a drop of Scotch ao becuase stumbling into oversights and

; nmeey py ACROSS DOWN blunders the next. Former

Serves bs a sifientr (6) 21 Amovingstaircan sound quite 3 Resided (5). 1 Proportion (5) Latvian Shirov, who now
ae) The German rade (3) musical! (5) ‘ ce ‘6 ; Aaa ”) represents Spain, has his share
31 Mum goes to town \oaeth som pootionti @) . ao room (8) of off oe oe Geance ea

with him (5) : ‘ 12 Wik (5) 5 Accounts positio

Whe: ni ake ee uu 13 Bounded (7) : book (6) can sacrifice pawns and pieces
ee oe ra troubled by ducks (6) ad 15 Magic spirit (5) 6 Large shrubs (5) freely if the result is to leave .

shelter from the wind (4,3) 25 Unctuous circle at a film centre (3) N 18 Tree (3) 7 Hard (5) your opponent's king fatally
34 Notmuch of an article to 27 Fortransport, take the Central Line to > aon 9. Male cal G) exposed. White's pawn guard

smile about (5) - Acton Central! (5) a. 22 Carrying salver (4) a Bnd) (7) is flimsy and justafew moves om described Shirov's play as
35 Tom's little boat (3) 28 legitimate punch (5) a a rt a) 46 African country (5) ee Sige - “awesome”. Can you spot the
26 Actively moving around in Leith (5) 30. Buryin the heart of Battersea (5) 37 Measure many a wild tree (5) 32 Mimicry makes her weep (4) tu - reared 6) attendant (4,3) live internet audience, one
38 One the bride might drag to 33 = Obtain inner 32. Indistinclly (7) 20 eat peer! (5) :

the altar? (5). satisfaction (3) 34 Donated (5) Be ScnMrTh i)

gee 3) 3 ae |

h Art LL
Yesterday's cryptic solutions | Yesterday's easy solutions 7 Gant 3 27 Artist's stand (5) 2
ACROSS: 9, | tu 10, He-as-one-d 12, Know (no) | ACROSS: 9, Retallate 10, One-sided 12, Norm 13, Adverp 38 Answer (5) 28 Feline (5)
3, Pag-oc-a 4, iver 15, Deter-gent 17, Have words 14, Immense 15, Therefore 17, Endangers 1 ie Ente 2 20, 30 Change (5)
18, No d-oubt 20, MO-dish 21, Vice 24, H-and--cap 26, $l 21, Loan 24, Pinafore 26, Casualt 32 Calf’s meat (4) PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
Nota 26, Fi 9 (wrung) 28, Seared 3 , Trifles 34, Sogn Zt Demands dod, Reco, 33 Listening organ (3)

oem Dot a oi sens oe “UIM [eUAyEL Ase Ue LIM TUXY PX 9

Ga-theri-ng Telling 39, Sticks 40, Bott Dossier 39, Roster 40, Odds 41, Vendetla

41, heeone 42, Great Dane 42, Shi

DOWN: 1, Kicked in 2, i faome beoer i, | DOWN: 1, Brunette, Stare Starve 3, Handsome 4, Delete 5,
B-reath-ed 6, Paid a vi Sombrero 6, Behind 7, Diamond 8, Seance 11,
Crosses 16, Ro-un-ds 19, brew 20, MaP (rev! Frleaie ot

23, Spring 25 . Cutting out 26, Nod (rev ZF Fr G-ate 30,
Register 3%, Thick-set 32, S-ne-athed ned (rev)
35, Tale- snes Do-in-gs 37, re

appxd PPO GJ! aM UaANd Zp ap SUM +2EY ZIM Sl
-paubisau ayn pur {+940 ZO p +TEU EE (HEU TE
yeasty) BEY yaxe 7 iPGXN'T *L9TB ORMIOS SEHD





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IRIBUNE SPUOHIS



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for Tour de New Peavidence

@ CYCLING
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

IN THE world of cycling,
summer is usually synony-
mous with the Tour de
France. But for local cyclists,
the Tour de New Providence
now takes centre stage.

The New Providence
Cycling Association, in con-

junction with Musgrove Inc,

will host the landmark event
as a part of the Bertram Cow-
boy Musgrove Cycling Tour.

Scheduled for August 19th
and 20th, the two day race will
cover three stages at various
locations throughout the cap-
ital.

The race features a number
of divisions including, Seniors,
Juniors, and Masters in order
to engage the full range of
cyclists throughout the coun-
try.

Within the various divisions, :

cyclists are broken down into
categories based on experi-
ence and abilities

Cyclists can look forward to





rom

a

being rewarded with a myriad
of cash prizes, trophies, and
gift certificates.

The Tour de New Provi-
dence is gearing to be the pre-

. Miere cycling event of the year

and will feature the top
ranked cyclists throughout the
country.

‘ @ Saturday, August 19th

(Seniors Male/

Female - Masters Male)

Stage I: at 8am Cyclists will
cover 65 miles starting/finish-
ing at the Coral Harbor
Roundabout Race site for this
event.

& (Junior Girls 17yrs Under,
Junior Boys/Girls 14yrs
under & Open Women II)
Stage I: Saturday 19th

August 8am start/finish at

Coral Harbor Roundabout,

distance 24 miles. Route starts

at Coral Harbor Roundabout,
travels along inner field air-

port road to the first round-
‘about, turns around and heads

back to'‘Coral Harbour at the
start/finish line. The cyclists

Co

merc

will complete this route three
times before the finish.

& (Junior Boys 17yrs &
Under)

Stage I: Cover one ‘lap of .

Coral Harbor, Carmichael
Road, Lyford Cay, Clifton
Pier, South Ocean, back to
Coral Harbour, up to first
roundabout again and back to
Coral Harbour for the finish.

i (Senior Male I, 11, III /

Masters/ Women I)

Stage I: 8am start. Covers
65 miles start/finish Coral Har-
bour Roundabout, the cyclists
will head from Coral Harbour,
Carmichael Road, onto Glad-
stone Road, left onto JFK Dri-
ve, along JFK Drive to Old
Fort Bay, Lyford Cay, Clifton
Pier, South Ocean, Back to
Coral Harbour. The cyclists
will continue onto inner field
airport road, pass both round-
about at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport, left
onto JFK Drive, to Old Fort

Bay, Lyford Cay, Clifton Pier,

South Ocean, Coral Harbour,

this route will be covered
twice by the cyclists.

@ Sunday, August 20th
(Senior Male/Female -
Masters Male)

Stage II: 8:30 am. Cyclists
will cover seven laps of the
South Ocean Racing Course
which is five miles for one lap.

(All of the Cyclists will com-
pete in this stage)

Stage III::-1lam at Coral

Harbour roundabout, the
place of the time trial course.
Cyclists will cover the. eight
mile Individual Time Trial
with the fastest/ leader of the
tour going first in that order.

@ (Junior Girls 17yrs Under,
Junior Boys/Girls 14yrs.

under & Open Women ID) |

Stage II: 8:30am. South
Ocean race site, leave inner
field South road /blvd turn left
on to the road that leads
passed Jaws Beach to Clifton
Pier, passed South Ocean
Resort, taking the first left
turn after the resort; coming

&

‘back to the start/finish line.

The cyclists will cover two laps
of this course.

Stage III: 11:30am back at
the Coral Harbor Round-
about, for the eight mile
Individual Time Trial which
will conclude the stages
for the Tour De New Provi-
dence.

Ml (Senior Male I, U1, WI /

Masters/ Women I)

Stage II: 8:30am start/finish
at South Ocean five mile
road course covering seven
laps.

Stage III: 11:30am. Back to
the Coral Harbour site, eight
miles individual Time Trial,
Coral Harbour roundabout to
the airport, first roundabout
and back.’

i (Junior Boys 17yrs &

Under)

Stage II: 8:30 am. South
Ocean route will cover three
laps of the short course route

Stage III: 11:30 am: Coral
Harbor eight mile Individual
Time Trial Course’ .

> -_

,





cial News Providers







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i.cuveuwn
makes 4

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Real Madrid

Regatta events get ready to set sail

@ SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE excitement is still brewing
over the two Regattas which will be
held this holiday weekend.

The hosting of both the Cat Island
and the Acklins Regattas were forcing
sailors and fans to make a choice, but

as the August Monday weekend

"quickly approaches, the excitement
is ‘sending waves through the two
islands.’

Although the two Regattas will not
be as crowded as others held this year,
the camaraderie between the large
sailing community will still be on
show.

The majority of the skippers haven’t
revealed which one they will attend,
but government officials are hoping

that the 24 sloops that graced the Har-
bour of Morgan’s Bluff in July can
split for the two events. F
Skipper Eleazor Johnson expresse
his disappointment with the arrange-
ment in an earlier interview with The
Tribune, but did confirm that he will
make his decision and participate in
d faith.
Booth the Cat Island and the Acklins
Regatta are small festivals, with lim-

ike Seere

ited races in the A-C classes.

Some boats expected to partake are
the Red Hot Thunderbird, Red
Stripe, Lady Eunice, the Campari
Lady Nathalie, Ants Nest and
Anscbacher.

Competition is expected to start
today in both Regattas. Boats sailing
in the A class will have a five mile
course mapped out with three miles
for both the B and C class.



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FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



@ TRACK AND FIELD
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

IN LIGHT of the recent
mandate handed down by
Bahamas Olympic Association
surround athlete participation,
the Bahamas Amateur Athletic
Association has fully endorsed
the decision and has issued a
warning of its own to its ath-
letes.

A series of absences by the
country’s upper echelon of track
and field athletes has forced the
Bahamas Olympic Association
‘to take action regarding partic-
ipation at international meets.

Sir Arlington Butler, head of
the Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, said that the executive
committee has laid down the
gauntlet and will take a more
direct approach towards elite
national team athletes.

Butler has said athletes who

qualify to represent the coun-
try at the 2007 Pan American
Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
and opt not to compete will suf-
fer dire consequences and
become ineligible to represent
the country at the 2008 Olympic
Games in Beijing, China.

Travel

While the BAAA’s is respon-
sible for recommending nation-
al-team members for competi-
tion, the BOA has the final
word and ratifies the team
members prior to travel.

The national team represent-

ing the country at last week’s
Central American and
Caribbean Games was missing
many Bahamian household
names within athletics. i

Many top-tier Bahamian ath-~

letes, including Olympic 400m



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Williams Darling and Olympic

such an instance is unlikely to
4x400m Bronze Medallist Chris

occur again.



“You all must come to appreciate
that the people of the Bahamas
throughout the Ministry of Youth,
Sports, and Housing provides the
vast majority of you with a
subvention in order to assist you
with your training and ultimately
to represent the Bahamas,”



BAAA president Mike Sands

Brown, did not compete at the
CAC Games.

However, with the new more
ardent stance taken by the

Gold .Medallist Tonique-

BOA regarding the matter,

@ JUSTIN GATLIN and Floyd Landis have both denied any wrong doing.
(AP FILE ee

Officials send strong message in
rea i mE Un VAN

By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter





WITH two high profile case on the interna-
tional scene being investigated by the World
Anti Doping Agency (WADA), track and field
officials in the Bahamas are sending a strong
message to their athletes.

In an interview with The Tribune yesterday,
President of the Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Association (BAAA) Mike Sands said,
“The association takes the doping policy imple-
mented by WADA seriously, cautioning all pro-
fessional athletes to take extra careful steps to
ensure that they are not treating a symptom
with one of the banned substances listed by the
WADA.”

Sands said: “Athletes of such high caliber, be
it track and field, baseball, or cycling, the sport
doesn’t matter, find themselves under such doubt
with respect. to their performance. They all work
extremely hard to get to the next level.

“What I think is unfortunate is the money
incentive that has now crept into the sport. It has
created a win at any cost attitude by the profes-
sional athletes. commend WADA for making
every effort for trying to clean up the sport, but
there will still be that one person who will try to
stay a step ahead of the game, which might cost
them.”

The Bahamas has had several athletes sus-
pended by WADA - Renward Wells, being one
of them.

The former co-national record holder in the
100m received a two year suspension several

we"

years ago, bringing his career to an end as a

result.

National record holder in the triple jump Lee-
yan Sands still has case being viewed by the
IAAF.

Sands has already met with the tribunal board
and is awaiting their decision on the matter.

In March of this year, traces of methamphet-
amine were allegedly found in Sands and, as a
result, his season has come to an end, until he
receives word from the IAAF.

Sands added: “We preach to all of our athletes
the importance of staying clean. We currently
have in the junior levels doctors working close-
ly with some of the athletes.

“What a lot of persons don’t know is that
there are some medicines out there you can get
from over the counter that also have some of the
banned substances listed by WADA in them.

“So the only thing left for us to do is make
sure that the athletes are aware of the situation
at hand.”

Recent high profile cases brought to the
WADA concern Justin Gatlin, the Olympic and
World Champion, and Tour de France winner
Floyd Landis. Gatlin is‘also the co-world record
holder in the 100m with Asafa Powell.

A few weeks ago Gatlin admitted to ‘testing
positive for testosterone or its precursors. The
random testing took place on April 22nd, at the
Kansas Relays. If Gatlin is found guilty, he will
be facing a lifetime ban from the IAAF, the
governing body for the sport. Landis is also
being accused with testosterone violation. Both
athletes deny any wrong doing.

With their new, more rigid
position towards participation,
only in. the cases of extreme cir-
cumstances, such as injuries, will

exemption from competition be -

allowed.

While athletes may choose
not to compete at meets of less-
er prestige or “non-paying”

meets, the BOA has forced the’

issue and has made participa-
tion in these events necessary
if the athletes wish to compete






at the Olympic Games.

In an statement released by
BAAA’s president Mike Sands,
he re-iterated the BOA’s senti-
ments and fully supported their
decision regulate the participa-
tion of elite athletes. ©

“IT would be remiss if I did
not express my disappointment
in the amount of no shows for
the CAC Games, particularly
in view of the ‘feeble excuses’
that were given,” he said. ©

Sands said the athletes must -

have a greater appreciation for
the support they receive from
the Bahamas, mouelanty: or
otherwise..

“You all must come to appre-

ciate that the peoplé of the
Bahamas throughout the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports, and
Housing provides the vast
majority of you with a subven-
tion in order to assist you with
your training and ultimately to
represent the Bahamas,” he
said, “therefore public senti-
ments will not be in your favour
when you choose not to repre-
sent your country.”

In regards to athletes on sub-
vention and choosing not to
represent the country at inter-
national events, Sands said the



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BAAA’ s does not condone

such actions and deemed them
as “unacceptable.”

“Whilst I do appreciate that
most of you have chosen track
and field as your profession for
the time being, you must also
be reminded of your national
obligation if you are receiving
the people’s money,” he said.

Sands said the decision for
athletes to travel lies solely with

the BOA, thus, athletes should *.* ~ {

approach 2007 accordingly if
they plan to compete in the
Olympics.

Schedule

“The BOA is ‘ultimately.
responsible’ for entering teams
in the Olympic, Common-
wealth, CAC and Pan Am
Games,” he said, “Therefore
you should plan your next sea-
son’s schedule taking into
account the BOA’s position‘and
be guided accordingly.”

He said the need for sucha
statement to be released by the
BOA was timely and it had
become apparent that it was a
message more athletes needed
to become aware of.



Full Text


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im lovin’ it. |

HIGH _
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AND SUN

The Tribune









The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 102 No.211



UST

March 22 touted —
as most likely date

By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter res
THE laté Sir Lynden Pin-

dling’s birthday — March 22 —i

being touted as the most likely —

date “for the next general elec-
tion.

_ Political insiders are claiming
that Prime Minister Perry
Christie has decided Sir loyn-
den’s birthday ts the ideal date
to cail the elections, but has yet
to officially inform his Cabinet.

According to - Tribune

sources, this would be in keep-
ing with the party’s current
strategy of “draping themselves
in the legacy of Sir Lynden”
strategy which was said, to be
one of the major reasons they
were catapulted to victory in
2002.
- However, there are some
observers who are:sceptical that
Mr Christie would have let out
the date of the election six
months ahead of time, but they
did conclude that March was
not totally out of the re ealm of
possibility.

Many Jalso agreed that cur-
rently, the PLP appears to have
taken as part of its election
strategy the a about”
of Sir Lynden’s legacy.

While not commenting on the
speculation on the election date,
Felix Bethel, a former govern-
ment and politics lecturer at the
College of the Bahamas, said
that Sir Lynden’s legacy is a real
asset to the party and is no
doubt:being used in some form
for the next general election.

“Sir Lynden’s death in



“August 26, 2000 catapulted the
Progressive Liberal

Party to

power. There’s no doubt about
that, that event was a singular
event in the history of the coun-.
try as important to the mind of
the black Bahamian as signifi-
cant as January 10, 1967. The
death of this man who became
patriarch, chief,” Mr Bethel
said.

There were other things that
occurred leading up to the 2002
election that diminished the
popularity of the FNM, includ-
ing the referendum and the near
implosion of the banking sec-
tor, but according to Mr Bethel
the singular event that got
things rolling for the PLP was
Sir Lynden’s death.

“This is the year 2006 going
into 2007 the Pindling card is

being played. We saw it being .

played in the naming of the air-

port, a massive event that shows

you that the legacy of Sir Lyn-

‘den is real and therefore politi-

cally potent. I suspect that there
will be some honour or other
for Lady Pindling which will
secure in the mind of the people
the place of this man and
woman and that family.

“Tt is a family with a large
legacy, a large name so the par-
ty that secures itself in that. and

- owns that legacy gains that sup-

port. But will it get support
from people who are removed
in time from that legacy? That
remains to be seen,” Mr Bethel
said. vy

Nevertheless, Mr Bethel said
the upcoming election will be
the last time the country would

have to deal with the direct ©

legacy of Sir Lynden Pindling.
SEE page 12







or



RIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

Mitchell ‘had no influence’ on
renaming of Fox Hill Festival

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

CONTRARY to earlier
reports, Fox Hill MP Fred
Mitchell had no influence on
the renaming of the Fox Hill
Festival to the George Mackey
Fox Hill Festival, according to
Charles Johnson, the commit-
tee’s chairman.

Sources informed The Tri-
bune Wednesday that they sus-
pected Mr Mitchell was using
Mr Mackey’s name and
extending invitations to leaders
from several Caribbean
nations to politicise the Eman-
cipation day events.

However, Mr Johnson said

the decision to name this year’s
festivities after George Mack-
ey was completely that of the
committee.

“The Honourable Fred

‘Mitchell was not involved in

this decision — this was the
decision of the committee,
after obtaining permission
from the Mackey family to do
so,” he said.

“Not one Foxhillian ever
came to me and said ‘hey ya'll
gat this thing all politics’.”

Despite what the public has
been hearing, Mr Johnson said,
the name Fox Hill Day will not
be changed, but he explained
that the addition of George

Mackey’s name to the event is
a posthumous honour for this
year’s festival only.

“We are doing this for his
commitment to the communi-
ty,” he said.

“You have to honotrs your
people — this George Mackey
festival'is only for this year, in
his honour.”

The sources also claimed
that Mr Mitchell had planned
to use Caribbean dignitaries to
gain favour in CARICOM as a
contingency measure, in case
he lost his Fox Hill seat in the
next election.

SEE page 11





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Rising medical

costs ‘due to lack of

regulatory board’

lm By MARK HUMES

THE escalating cost of med-
ical care and health insurance
is being driven by the fact that
there is no regulatory board to
monitor the pricing practices of
medical doctors’ in the
Bahamas; The Tribune has
learned.

. According to a source, this
‘has led many leading insurance
companies to hire in-house doc-

to contain cost against, what
some consider to be,-unscrupu-
lous price gouging.

After receiving information
that many local insurance agen-
cies were employing medical
practitioners, doctors and nurs-
es, The Tribune began an inves-
tigation into this practice as it
related to the high rate of insur-
ance and medical care.

“The doctor is on a retainer
.to try and speak to his col-
leagues to keep the cost down,”
said one insurance official. “The

‘cahoots’ with doctors. What

SEE page 12

Man guilty of
the murder
of tourists

# By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A Supreme
Court jury on Thursday found
Frederick Francis guilty of the
brutal murders of Austrians
Barbara von Perfall and Bern-
hard Bolzano, who were shot
to death while on vacation in
Bimini in July last year.

After nearly four hours of
deliberating, a jury of six men
and six women returned at
3.30pm with their verdicts, find-
ing Francis guilty on all four
counts against him.

Justice Stephen Isaacs, at the
end of his summation, handed
the case to the jury around
noon.

On counts one and two — the
murders of Mr Bolanzo and Ms
von Perfall — the jury returned
a unanimous guilty verdict.

SEE page 11




— ’
Aditi







tors and nurses as consultants .

insurance companies are not in.
rAGE 2, FHIVAY, AUGUS! 4, ZUU6 ©

IAeE IRIBUINE



Sea Hauler collision victims |

still awaiting compensation

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

Tribune Staff Reporter

SURVIVORS ofthe tragic
Sea Hauler accident are still
pleading for financial retribu-
tion — almost three years after
the boat collision claimed the
lives of four persons and injured
25 others.

Cedric Hart, a father of seven
who narrowly survived the 2003
accident, says he is suffering
silently.

He told The Tribune yester-
day that in addition to his own
injuries, he is struggling with
the burden of medical bills for
his son, whose kidney is failing.

Mr Hart sustained major
spinal injuries, fell into a coma
and spent two years in hospital
following the accident.

“My spine was messed up by
the crane crash and my son
needs kidneys because of the
incident,” Mr Hart explained.

“T can’t sit up for too long, so
I just need to try and continue
to see if I can get up. I have
chronic pain 24 hours a day.
The left side of my body is still
immobile and this is the side
where I got the blow.”

In a letter to The Tribune, a



BA BAHAMAS Defence Force vessel Srila around the MV
United Star and the MV Sea Hauler after the two vessels collid-
ed on Saturday, August 2, 2003 in waters off the southwest coast

of Eleuthera i in the Bahamas

concerned person called on
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, “‘to release the
money from the United Star
that was (reportedly) paid out
three months after the collision
on August 2, 2003.

“Can the Central Bank please
authorise the release of these
funds? And further, when is
Mrs Glenys Hanna-Martin
going to pay the Sea Hauler vic-
tims?” the letter asked.

It said that Mrs Hanna-Mar-

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tin, Minister of Transport and
Aviation, promised last year
that the payments would be in
this year’s budget.

It was during the Emancipa-
tion weekend of 2003 that the
Sea Hauler mail boat, over-
loaded with passengers on their
way to the Cat Island Regatta,
collided with the United Star
freight vessel near Highbourn
Cay, Exuma, and Wemyss Bight
Eleuthera.

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Smith Ellis, Brenda Smith
Leslie, Livingston Seymour
‘and Lynden Riley died in the
collision.

_ The victims say they believe
other issues are taking prece-
dence, and that government
is leaving them to suffer.

Mr Hart explained that
National Insurance is paying
“a little something, so is Social
Services,” but the assistance
is insufficient.

“Right now we are not get-
ting any kind of answers from
the government about the
case,” Mr Hart explained. “I
went to other people to reach
out to see how long it is going
to be before we get some kind
of assistance because it is not
only me one is out here suf-
fering from that accident.”

Ina letter dated July 4, 2005

to the National Insurance’

Board, Dr Winston Phillips,
consultant surgeon at the
Department of Orthopaedics,
wrote: “Mr Hart sustained
injury to his lower back. “He

continues to have lower pain. .

in the back despite treatment
with physiotherapy, muscle
relaxation and analgesics

(medication capable of reliev- |

ing pain). He is still undergo-

ing treatment and is unable... -
to work for a period of one..

year.”
Mr Hart told The Tribune

that he is not looking for
hand-outs. He said since leav-
ing the hospital he has sought
employment, but has not yet
been hired.

However, he explained that
before the accident he had
worked for six years as a secu-
rity officer at the Mall at

‘ Marathon.

“My spine is out of place. I
am still doing the therapy, but
it is not (working) as fast as
they wanted it to. But I am
still trying to make life easier
for my family,” Mr Hart said.

His children range in age
from two months to 13 years.
He blames the accident for
his son’s kidney failure.

“My wife was on the vessel
and witnessed the accident
and went into labour after she -

. saw me pinned down under

the crane,” he-explained

‘The twin boys, Devon and -

Deshon, who are three years-
old, were born prematurely.
Deshon, he said, is in need of
a kidney.

“My mother has him going
to the US right now to take
blood samples to sign up for a
kidney.

The Tribune made numer-
ous unsuccessful attempts to
contact Minister of Transport

.and Aviation Glenys Hanna- |

Martin and Attorney General
Allyson Maynard. -Gibson. _

Miller under fire
for ‘insufficient’
consultation on
crawfish season

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

’ QUESTIONING the efféc-
tiveness of shortening the

crawfish season, FNM North .

Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith
drew attention to the damage
that such a decision would
have on the. local fishing

industry, and criticised Agri- -

culture and Marine Resources
Minister Leslie Miller for not
consulting enough on the mat-
ter. .



-, B ALVIN Smith |

Mr Smith said he was sure |

‘that the public was relieved
to know that as the next gen-

eral election drew near, that

neither Mr Miller, nor the =:

PLP government. would be

around for the next. crawfish ‘
‘season. 3°,

“Before even considering
‘to move ahead with this pro-

posal, the minister should

. have produced the empirical

data for:the past four, six or
10 years to justify this deci-
sion to shorten the season.

Data such as total number of .

pounds taken, total number

of FDC licences issued and

renewed.

“The total number ofskiffs
used assuming that'the major-
ity of FDC licences were
issued for larger vessels.
Hooka permits issued and
renewed, and the total dollar
value exported. The minister
should have also consulted
and discussed his proposal to

‘shorten the season with the

Fisheries Advisory Commit-
tee before prematurely arriv-
ing at this decision and mak-
ing a public statement on the
matter,” he said.

season for Bahamians, but :.

leaving it wide open for inter-

‘national poachers from Flori--
‘da, the Dominican Republic,
Honduras and other coun-
‘tries...
.. “These fishermen care
- nothing about the future or!

that of the industry, so the

- eradication of species or per-,
“manent damage to our reefs .

or fishing grounds do not mat-

. ter. Unfortunately, there are

Mr Smith explained that if

the government followed
through with its plan to short-
en the crawfish season by two
months, it will be closing the
most productive part of the

also some Bahamian ‘fisher-
men who are contributing to
the damage inflicted on the
industry through, fishing dur-
ing the closed season, har-
vesting of undersized crawfish
and using chemicals under
reefs and condo’s, literally
killing every living marine
species from premature to

mature.

“Clearly the minister should
have addressed these very
serious concerns before arbi-
trarily deciding to reduce the
crawfish season by two
months, which in fact will
‘amount to four months in the
event of a hurricane or tropi-
cal storm. An example may
unfortunately be on its way, as
Tropical Storm Chris has its
eyes on some of the prime
fishing grounds in the
Bahamas,” he said.





























@ In brief

Man injured
in leg with
shotgun
during fight

A MAN is in hospital after
sustaining a gunshot wound to
his right leg following an early
morning altercation.

According to police liaison
officer Inspector Walter Evans,
the 37-year-old man was in his
home’on Augusta Street early
this morning when another man
came to visit him.

The two men had a conver-
sation which led to an argu-
ment, Mr Evans said.

As a result, the visiting man
allegedly shot the man in his
leg.

The victim was taken to hos-
pital, where he is presently in
stable condition.

Investigations continue.

17 Cubans
land in
reserve off
Puerto Rico

#@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

SEVENTEEN Cuban
migrants landed in a mostly
uninhabited nature preserve off
Puerto Rico’s west coast early.
Thursday, authorities said,
according to Associated Press.

The migrants — 12 men, five
women — were in good health,
according to the natural
resources department. The
migrants said two boats
dropped ‘them off in Mona.
Island, a rugged nature preserve
located between the Domini-
can Republic and Puerto Rico.

Though Mona Island has
become a popular new routé for
Cubans headed to the United
States — about 600 people have
made the journey by boat from
the Dominican Republic to the
preserve — Thursday’s group
appeared to among the first to
arrive since Cuban leader Fidél
Castro underwent intestinal
surgery on Monday. |

Once they reach U.S. territo-
ry, Cubans are generally
allowed to stay in the United »
States, though they are returned
to their country if they are
caught at sea.

16 hurt and
one killed
in hotel

‘collapse.

"= JAMAICA
Kingston

FIREFIGHTERS searched
for, bodies amid the rubble
Thursday after the partial col-
lapse of a huge resort under
construction in northern
Jamaica killed one worker and
injured 16, police said, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

-The collapse Wednesday
evening was the latest mishap
to hit the Bahia Principe, a
planned 1,918-room hotel in
Runaway Bay i in what is expect-
ed to be Jamaica’s largest resort.

Firefighters searched for bod-
ies or additional survivors, but it
wasn’t clear whether any work-
ers were missing. Police said
eight of the injured have been
released from the hospital.

Engineers will inspect the
damage to determine when
work on the US$200 million
project can resume, said George
Ho Sang, head of public works
in St. Ann Parish.

Grupo Pinero, the Spanish
company developing the resort,
would not comment until the
investigation was complete.

On May 3, a floor collapse at
the project injured three work-

ers.


THETRIBUNE







Cuba sends
me;sage of
continuity
to reople

B CUB/
Havaa

CUBS communist govern-
ment ser a clear message to its
people ‘hursday: Nothing 1s
going tochange, according to
Associatd Press.

“The rvolution will contin-
ue” was te mantra chanted on
state-ru television and dis-
played irgovernment newspa-
pers thre days after Fidel Cas-
tro temprarily ceded power to
his youner brother Raul while
recoveriz from surgery.

The acng president was still
nowhere‘o be seen. Nor was
the eldercastro, who turns 80
on Aug. 1. Yet the news media
— all arerun by the state —
lined up Gbans to express con-
fidence bth in Fidel Castro’s
ability torecover quickly and
in Raul Cstro’s competence to
govern inhe meantime.

“Certai of your rapid recov-
ery, alwas toward victory!” a
graduatin class of Interior Min-
istry cades chanted in a collec-
tive grecing to Fidel Castro, .
publishe on the front page of
the Connunist youth newspa-
per Juvetud Rebelde.

“Ever Cuban trusts Raul,
and evey one of our leaders,”
an unnmed woman said on
state telvision’s midday broad-
cast. “Ve are certain that the
revolutin will continue.”

Awayrom government cam-
eras, hwever, some Cubans
expressvariness of life without
Fidel Cstro in charge.

“I,:a least, am worried,
becaus without him we are
nothig,” gardener Rafael
Reyessaid. “We hope that he
will reover and leave (the hos-
pital) soon.”












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FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006 PAGE 3

BEC still investigating outages as



customer complaints continue

m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

INVESTIGATIONS into
the cause of Wednesday’s
blackout are ongoing — as com-
plaints and claims of damaged
electrical equipment continue
to come in.

BEC is reportedly still trying
to determine the cause of the

power outage and general "|

-manager Kevin Basden said
the corporation is looking into
a number of possibilities.

Mr Basden said he did not
want to speculate, adding only
that the matter is still under
investigation.

“TI don't have the final
reports yet. I hope to have
something by tomorrow but
there are a number of things
that have to be looked into,”
he said.

The problems began for the





i KEVIN Basden

electrical corporation shortly

after 3pm when a vehicle
crashed into an electricity pole
cutting power to between 30
and 40 per cent of the island.
As BEC worked to fix the
problem, calls began flooding



‘into The Tribune claiming that

power had been lost across the
island.

Mr Basden also called, and
explained that an island-wide
outage had indeed taken place
— but that BEC was not sure
what caused it.

Meanwhile, members of the
public say that — as is often the
case in power outages — co
puters, appliances and othes
items of electrical equipment
were damaged.

Dionne Godet, sales man-
ager of 100 Jamz and Joy FM,
said the hard drive of both his
home computer and his work
computer have been affected,

“Much to my displeasure,
I've got two computers that
were fried yesterday. I can't
get what I need to get done
today because I don't have a
computer,” he said.



Ingraham: no need to
rewrite our history

GIVING his contribution to
the on the National Heroes
and National Honours Acts,
leader of the opposition
Hubert Ingraham said that the
FNM did not conclude either
of the bills when they were first
brought to parliament in 2001
— because they wished to have
a national consensus on such
important legislation.

Addressing the House of
Assembly during parliament’s
evening session on Wednesday,
Mr Ingraham explained that the
2001 bills intended to bring
about four primary things: a sys-
tem to govern, determine and
declare national heroes, the
establishment of a Heroes Day,
the awarding of national hon-
ours, and the creation of a
national heroes park — a provi-
sion he suggested be included in
the bills now before parliament.

_ Inaneffort to foster a better
understanding of the nature of
the Queen’s Honours, which
are currently awarded to out-
standing Bahamians, Mr Ingra-

portant for maintaining



Former PMP defends Queen’s
honours as Bahamian honours



ham said that although some
people object to their colonial
roots, the Queen’s Honours
are in fact Bahamian national
honours. _

He explained that such hon-
ours are conferred based on
recommendations given by the
prime minister via a letter he
issues through the secretary of
the cabinet.

As such, he said, the awards
are essentially Bahamian hon-
ours given through the Queen
of England — who, he empha-
sised; is still the queen of the
Bahamas, whether some like
that fact or not.

“We are not interested in.

becoming consumed by a
desire to re-write history,
regardless to whether we are
happy or unhappy about what
transpired in the past.

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ll HUBERT Ingraham

“And so we do not wish to
become distracted by whose
statue is in the public square or
at Government House — that’s
a part of. history of Bahamas.
We are, however, interested in
creating a heroes park to hon-
our Bahamian: heroes,” “Mr
Ingraham said.

Comgesp ine”
* CME
4 ‘e











Mr Godet was at a funeral on
Wednesday when the first out-
age occurred and was dismayed
upon returning to find that his
computer was damaged and
could not be used.

Mr Godet said he plans to
contact BEC for reimburse-
ment.

When asked what the corpo-
ration does when presented
with such situations, Mr Bas-
den said: “We investigate each










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and every claim on its own mer-
it. We would have to take into
consideration what was the
cause of the outage, et cetera.

“There may be instances
where the corporation may
make an award and there may
be instances where the corpo-
ration may reject the claims.

“Tt all depends of the circum-
stances surrounding the outage
and how valid the claim is,”
Basden said.






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L
~ PAGE 4, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

IHe inmipuine



{ -

!

}

|
:










|
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|
|
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|
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{
|
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4.- Authority chairman, Mr Hannes Babak, an




The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH,*Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

: TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

‘ Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387



Not for govt. to make business decision |

ONLY A FOOL, or a person with very
deep pockets, would employ a foreigner to
operate his business if he could find a
Bahamian to perform equally as well. And
only business owners — not some civil ser-
vant — can decide if there is in fact a Bahami-

_ an to meet the needs of their business.

‘The expense, including immigration fees, to
bring a foreigner to the Bahamas is prohibi-
tive. No businessman is going to spend mon-
ey. overseas unnecessarily if he can employ
locally. And so when an application is sub-
mitted to Immigration for a work permit to
fill an essential position in a business, it must
mean that the businessperson is desperate,
cannot find the right Bahamian and is now
trying to appoint the right foreigner.

However, government’s myopic, view is
that businesses are employing foreigners,

'- because they prefer foreigners. This is prob-
ably an inferiority complex suffered by many .

politicians, but it is not the way a busi-
nessperson thinks. He doesn’t spend his
money on non-essentials.

For.a government that has gone out of its

ot: ~. way to woo foreign investment, the attitude of

. persons like Senator Philip Galanis is eco-
nomically suicidal.

About three weeks ago the senator urged

government to .adhere to its Bahamianisa-

._ tion policy and investigate the work permit of

. recently appointed Grand Bahama Port

Austrian.
To which Tourism Minister Obie Wilch-
combe very sensibly replied: . ,
“Lady Henrietta St George and Jack Hay-
ward are the private owners, and they are
appointing someone to represent their inter-

|. _ est. To what extent do we influence that? It is

still their personal subjective interest, and
we cannot force upon them a Bahamian or
anyone.”

Quite right, Mr Wilchcombe: To what
extent can a government influence:an owner’s
decision when it comes to whom he entrusts
his business without driving out investors?

And how can this government tell a private
employer that he has to justify a foreign staff
member when recently, on naming 'the Lyn-
den Pindling Airport, it announced that for-
eighers were going to manage its airport?
The irony of it was that-the announcement
- was made by no less a person than the daugh-
ter of the governor general, who, when a
PLP immigration minister, ruthlessly vic-

“Bahamianisation policy”, because we

timised The Tribune with the so-called .

refused to bow before his “Chief’s” PLP altar.
We are not criticising the decision to put.

98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA —
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘02 H-I 12-SEATER VAN

the airport under foreign management. In
the past Bahamians have failed and so have

_ foreigners.

This new team has the potential of success
only if government is smart enough not to
interfere. And if the Vancouver company is
wise it will have that commitment written in
stone, especially if it wants smooth flying at
that much-troubled airport.

Government apparently believes it can
silence the pen of John Marquis, our manag-
ing editor, for whom we have not as yet found
a Bahamian replacement, by holding up a
work permit that is now six months overdue.

Technologically, these politicians are still
thinking in the stone age. Mr Marquis does
not have to sit behind a desk at The Tribune
to continue to write for this newspaper.

_ Often we have sat behind our desk in Mia-
mi and done our daily work for The Tribune
in Nassau. It doesn’t matter whether we are
here or there, the same work is done with
the greatest of ease — and all deadlines met.

When the FNM first came to power one of
its Immigration Ministers wanted to be
brought up to date on The Tribune’s training

_ programmes. We were invited to meet with
him to explain what we were doing.

At the meeting we took the various sec-
tions of The Tribune — main news, business,
features, arts, etc. As we spread them across
the table, The International Miami Herald
was included. “Oh, you can eliminate that,”
the Minister said, pointing to The Herald.

“Oh, no you can’t,” we replied. “That’s the
whole key to our operation.” ;

After our experience with the victimising
Pindling government, we have been plotting

‘ and planning as to how to get out from under
dictatorial governments that want to cripple
a newspaper that it can’t control as it does the
Bahamas Broadcasting Corporation. Daily
we have been practising with The Miami Her-
ald. The Herald is prepared in Miami by its
own editors and sent over the network to
our press in Nassau.

We now know that we don’t need any edi-
tors in Nassau. They can all be located over-

. seas — beyond the reach of an over sensitive.
immigration minister and his political cronies.

Of course, when we do it, it will make
international headlines.

And, so, Minister Shane Gibson, the ball is
now ir your court. Quite frankly we don’t
care what you, and your buddies, do. Only do
it quickly. ;

We have prepared so many reports on
The Tribune’s training programmes for Immi-
gration that all Mr Gibson has to do is open
the file.



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

| Changing rules
make running a



farm impossible

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE. allow me the
opportunity to clarify our posi-
tion as it relates to your July
27th article “Government hin-
dering farming”.

We have received several
calls expressing support but
unfortunately none from the
relevant Departments that we
would have hoped. Possibly
there is no interest in repairing
the problems that exist within
the system of farmer/govern-
ment relationship, but we
hope this is not the case.

Goodfellow Farms cur-
rently employs six Haitians
and eight Bahamians. The
combined salary and benefits

for the Bahamians employed

is close to a quarter of a mil-
lion dollars. The field labour is
all done by Haitians but all
managed by Bahamians —
Mr. Roger Rolle, C. Eneas
and Ms. McKay, a really super
team. The balance of the
Bahamians are employed in
the packaging/order desk/food
production and bottling/can-
ning. These are all good jobs,

clean jobs, jobs that are well

paid middle and upper level.
My problem is that my per-






LETTERS

mit applications are taking a
year and then being turned
down. First of all that is too
long and secondly if my appli-
cations and renewals are
rejected then there will be no
Haitian labour and therefore
no field production, therefore
no need to employ this great
team of Bahamians.

Seems simple but I have
been to every Ministry and
relevant department with no
successful results. We are not
here to embarrass the Gov-
ernment or point fingers but
why have a National Agricul-
tural Policy that does not
work?

Our Mission Statement: To
improve the quality of pro-

duce, food and life in The

Bahamas.

There is no need for me to
detail the facts about Bahami-
ans not wanting to field
labour, and it’s understand-
able that we.all want our chil-
dren to be better off than we
are and not worse off..We
believe Bahamians should be

Se, ae | tbat at the Farm. Here ithe
letters@triounemedia.net

given the best positions fothe
best wages and we do.exatly

~

deal: for every permitwe
receive we will employ anth-
er Bahamian on our team:
Our job is to be a heahy
alternative food source; ithe

‘ules that we work under Eep

changing then running a irm |
becomes impossible.

Our farm is a model othe ~
marriage between agricuure ©
and tourism. /

Our internship prograime
with the College has not een .
a success but it will be athe
nature of the programmeand
agriculture find a comion
ground. ae

Thanks you for the opor-
tunity to express my two chts
worth.

Karin.and Ian Goodfelloy
Roger Rolle
Cleveland Eneas

Yolanda McKay

Anthony Claridge

Cally Papageorge

Jennifer Wilson

Marva Johnson

Mauren Rolle
Plus six student workers ar
Field production team.



EDITOR, The Tribune.



SENATOR Philip Galanis called this morn-
ing (Wednesday, August 2, 2006) to say that I
misrepresented his position regarding the Mar-
quis work permit issue in a recent letter to the

editor.

Here is what he said via e-mail:

"There is absolutely nothing in either release
to support any suggestion whatsoever, that I
asked for Marquis’ work permit to be revoked.
I repeat as I did during our telecon this a.m.
when asked by Mr. Mark Humes at The Tri- |
bune to comment on Mr. Marquis’ work permit
being revoked, I flatly indicated that I did not

Ga an vi

p





cussed with him over the telephone, I did na
misrepresent him intentionally and obviously

Freeport.

agree with that. I would appreciate it if you

would please correct this as prominently as you
‘misrepresented’ my position."

‘ [have re-read his releases and would like to
thank him for the clarification. And, as dis-

289 Market St. South ° P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Feed your faith and doubt
will starve to death.”

SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798
' Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

The following persons are asked to contact
CARIBBEAN WAREHOUSE &

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My concern

_ confused his Hannes Babak comments with the
Marquis issue.

I apologised to him for this oversight over
the phone and do so now publicly.

In our conversation Senator Galanis did mt
deny his recommendation for revoking tle
work permit of Hannes Babak, the newly
appointed Chairman of the Port Authority in

for individual freedom and the
rule of law has not changed, and will not when
politicians use their offices to punish individu-
als they don't like.

RICK LOWE

August 3, 2006.



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0 In brief

first trip ©
to Haiti

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

UN Secretary-General
Kofi Annan, making his first
trip to Haiti, was embraced
by President Rene Preval
upon his arrival at the airport
Thursday and quickly went
into private meetings with
Haitian and UN officials, who
are trying to bring peace and
stability to the impoverished
Caribbean nation, according
to Associated Press.

Annan later met with two

. Brazilian peacekeepers who
were wounded by gang gun-
fire in July. An 8,800-strong
force of UN troops and inter-
national police provides the
only real security in a country
plagued with well-armed
gangs and a local police force
that Annan has said is “inad-
equately trained” and “infil-
trated by criminal elements.”

The peacekeepers were dis-
patched to Haiti to help

_«, restore order amid the chaos

-_~. following the 2004 revolt that

“ toppled President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide.

Annan was later scheduled
to tour a Haitian police acad-

emy.

_ Ina report to the U.N.

‘ Security Council, Annan
called for elite police tactical
teams and advisers to bolster
the U.N. force to help counter
a renewed surge in kidnap-
pings and gang violence.

Haiti experienced relative:
calm after Preval’s February
election victory but since
May, dozens of foreigners
and Haitians have been kid-
napped and gang fighting has
forced hundreds of people to
flee their homes in the capital,
Port-au-Prince.

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m By KRYSTEL ROLLE _

TROPICAL Storm Chris
looked likely to weaken into a
tropical depression rather than
the originally predicted hurri-
cane yesterday after losing
much of its strength in the east-
ern Caribbean

Senior deputy director of
meteorology Trevor Basden

said the next alert should be ~

one announcing a tropical
depression — although he
warned that the storm could
possibly gain strength again.

Today, winds had been |

expected to reach up to 74 miles
an hour but Mr Basden said:
“Maximum sustained winds
have decreased significantly
over night (Wednesday) and is
now near 40 miles per hour.”
If the depression does pass
over the south end of the
Bahamas, the islands are like-
ly to only experience some
wind and rain damage. How-
ever, Mr Basden warned that

aaah Stave ulcnce Orme ca aces ended aeuadaccdahebaaBados cdacgdavsagomedioasandedsadaNeduobene dcaaseesaseeessesaasasecsdiagdecedenenseeess esse rieslets




. LOCAL NEWS

Tropical Stor

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SHOWN (from left): Trevor Basden, senior deputy director of

the Department of Meteorology, interim director of NEMA

- Bahamians still need to con-

tinue to take precautions.
“Those islands can experience
up to two inches in rain, and
there is a possibility of flood-
ing.”

On Wednesday local meteo-
rologists issued a hurricane
watch for the south-east

Former Bahamasair boss

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Bahamasair man-
aging director Paul Major has
been appointed the new con-
sultant to the Domestic Invest-
ment Board.

He is charged with the task
of bringing more Bahamians
into the economic mainstream.

Financial Services and Invest-
ments Basil Albury said yester-
day that Mr Major will play a
significant role in creating new

legislation, such as the proposed —

Tourism Attraction Incentive

Addressing members of the
board and the press at the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, Mr Albury
explained that that this new
Tourism Act will offer Bahami-
ans what the Hotel Encourage-
ment Act has traditionally
offered foreign investors.

Such an act, he added, would
offer Bahamians incentives to
invest more in their own coun-
try, and help them to benefit
more from the spin-off effects of
the growing tourism industry.

Giving an example of the

advantages of the Act, Mr
Albury said that in the sports
fishing industry, Bahamians
who so far have only been
employees, can bring their own
sports boats into the country

free of duty and ultimately:

‘become self-employed.

Mr Major said that it is very
important that Bahamians learn
to “think big.”

“I’ve been making a pitch in
the political arena that we’ve
got to get away from thinking
small business,” he said.

He pointed out that ‘small
business’ in Bahamian vernac-
ular is an investment of
“$50,000, $100,000, maybe a
quarter million dollars.”

In the United States, Mr
Major said, the small businesses
start at the $5 million mark.

Mr Major said that it is
impossible for Bahamians to
not only compete with only for-
eign investors, but also with
established local investors,

unless there is access to capital .

“by those who have been
deprived of it for so long”.
“And there’s no shortage of
ideas, we all know stories of
Bahamians who have come up

5 New Restaurants,
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All in the heart
of paradise.

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Carl Smith and ,Hubert Bain logistic officer for NEMA

Bahamas which included Ack-
lins, Inagua, Mayaguana, Long
Island,, Ragged Island and
Crooked Island. The storm was
expected to pass over the
Bahamas this morning but it has
already lost most of its power,
Basden said.

Although the storm is dimin-

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 5

m Chris weakens

ishing, if it continues on it cur-
rent projected path and main-
tains its strength it will be just
outside of Andros on Sunday.

Locals worried that Tropical
Storm Chris would disrupt the
activities planned for this week-
end on several Family Islands,
including the Cat Island and
Acklins annual regatta and
Grand Bahama’s “Feel the
Rush.”

However, National Emer-
gency Management Agency
(NEMA) director Carl Smith
said that those islands towards
the central part of the Bahamas
should not be duly affected but
should still remain on guard.

“The message NEMA is
sending is: You ought to con-
tinue to take necessary action
in terms of securing your prop-
erty and getting emergency sup-
plies.

“You can expect, as we,

approach the height of the
active hurricane season which
runs from mid-August to mid

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September, that these tropical
storms will come very fre-
quently. It’s important for the
public not to let their guards
down.”

Lieutenant Commander
Hebert Bain, logistics officer for
NEMA, cautioned fisherman,
particularly those in the south-
east Bahamas.

“Head to safe harbour,” he
advised. “It’s easier to lose a
day of fishing than to lose a ves-
sel or become a possible search
and rescue victim, or casualty
situation.”

TRE















































augusT ern :
6:30AM Bahamas @ Sunrise
7:00 The Bahamas: A Natural Beauty
8:00 Remembering The Contract
9:00 Hanging In The Balance
10:00 The National Art Gallery of The |.
Bahamas i
10:30 The Launch of Power 104.5FM
Radio - Freeport
1:30 A Special Report
2:00 ~ Bullwinkle & His Friends
2:30 The Fun Farm:
3:00 International Fellowship of
Christian & Jews
3:30 Paul Morton
4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update -
5:00 The Envy Life
5:30 ’ Andiamo
6:00 Caribbean Passport
' 6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Da’ Down Home Show
9:00 The Envy Life
9:30 3 D’ Funk Studio
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 - -- News Night13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 - . The Launch of Power 104.5FM
Radio - Freeport ;
1:30 Community Page 1540 am
AUGUST 8
6:30am . Community Page.1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
f 10:00 Underdog
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Tennessee Tuxedo
noon 41
12:30 Aqua Kids
4:00 E. Clement Bethel National Arts
Festival
3:30 33rd Independence Beat Retreat
5:00 - Cricket World
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6:00 Ballroom Boxingp





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LEA EG a aT
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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>IPATION DAY






A 2208 the world,
religion has evolved

into a robust, multi-billion dol-
lar industry that is tragically
prostituted to promote the self-
serving interests of many disin-
genuous, so-called religious
men and charlatans.

In the Bahamas, while the
religious beliefs of some are
principled and genuine, reli-

cally motivated enterprise
which has emerged as the

industry, occupied in many
instances by “tiefing”, money-
grubbing, self-appointed
churchmen.

Among discerning Bahami-
ans, the consensus is that,
unlike starting conventional
businesses, the use of a church
as a business platform is one of
the easiest undertakings, as any

rent a building or pitch a tent
and rant and rave about who
should be “saved”, while cir-
culating a collection plate.

With churches springing up
on every street corner, some
only a stone’s throw away from
the other, it appears religion
is rapidly replacing drugs as a
simple means to wealth, as any
so-called ‘churchman’ can
hoodwink some poor fool to
follow him.

I pity those, needy, gullible
congregants who cannot afford
to pay their rent but can fatten
the coffers of a pastor in the
name of the “Lord” every
weekend.

And, why are so many
gigantic, multi-million dollar
church buildings being con-
structed? From South Beach
to Carmichael, these under-
takings have been outlandish,
because while money is being
invested in these buildings, the
poor and disenchanted are still
homeless, roaming the streets
and begging for assistance.

‘Shouldn’t this money be
invested in the true church —
the people — rather than over-
sized buildings that most like-
ly sprung up to compete with
another next door?

Profile:

VICE PRESIDENT - MONEY TRANSFER SERVICES

gion is fast becoming a polliti-.

Bahamas’ “real” third largest.

petty crook can thump a Bible,

Religion has become big
business in the Bahamas



ADRIAN

Doesn’t the Bible instruct
the church (people) that above
all else, to be your brother’s
keeper?

On a small island like New
Providence, where most of the
enormous churches are situat-
ed, who is going to fill the
‘pews? Rather than construct-
ing self-aggrandising sanctuar-
ies, “church leaders” should be
focusing on getting people to
attend churches, as church
attendance in the Bahamas



Since the Bible’
said Jesus had
12 apostles, I am

baffled by the

notion that
anyone can just
add themselves

to the count



and around the world has fall-
en to an all-time low.
Almost daily, I am per-
plexed by the number of Apos-
tles, Reverend Doctors, Presi-
dents, and other titles, many
self-given, that P’ve heard asso-
ciated with churchmen.
Bahamians must be aware
that anyone can go online, pay
a few dollars and become Rev-
erend Doctor this and that!
And, since the Bible said Jesus
had 12 apostles, I am baffled
by the notion that anyone can

_just add themselves to the

count.

Why are items such as.

books, snacks and CDs sold in
church? I have read the story
of Jesus entering the temple,



YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

‘upon entering office, appoint-







GIBSON






angrily tossing over sales
stands and whipping the peo-
ple for making money out of
God’s name.

Here, Jesus wanted to
ensure that his Father’s place
remained Holy. Therefore,
have I read the same Bible as
these pastors?

Newly-instated Jamaican
PM Portia Simpson-Miller, .











ed pastors to head government
commissions and boards,
blending an explosive cocktail
- religion and politics.

I am diametrically opposed
to this trend, which is gripping
the Bahamas, most recently
with the inept Bahamas Chris-
tian Council mandating to gov-
ernment what adults could and
could not view at local cine-
mas (Brokeback Mountain). ,

The BCC is one of the most.
politically linked, bungling
organisations in the Bahamas.
It appears to be comprised of
some religious zealots intent
on dictating to the populace,
thereby trampling over the
democratic rights of Bahami- ’
ans to choose. On what author-
ity does the ‘vocal when con-
venient’ BCC think they can
dictate to.300,000 people?

It must be apparent that .
religion has become a business
venture when a small country
such as the Bahamas is home
to 4,000 churches.

And, since Jesus either rode
a donkey or walked, why is it
that today’s churchmen must
be chauffeured or drive flam-
boyant Jaguars and Mercedes
vehicles? Why do certain pas-
tors, with relatively, poor con-
gregants, have Lear jets? I am
sure. that the reason isn’t
because they want to get clos-
er to God!

ajbahama@hotmail.com

t

\




































FIDELITY

Position Available

Vice President
Money Transfer Services.

Knowledge and Skills:

Responsible for the development and management of Fidelity’s
money transfer and associated businesses in The Bahamas,
the Cayman Islands and the Turks & Caicos Islands.

Based in The Bahamas, but expected to actively oversee the
WUFS business in Fidelity’s operations in the Cayman Islands,
the Turks & Caicos Islands and any other locations where
Fidelity may establish operations.

As a senior manager occasionally assist with other areas of
Fidelity’s business.and have responsibilties that may be
expanded to incorporate other areas.

a

Bachelors or equivalent degree in marketing or communica-
tions;

A minimum of 10 years experience in an extremely active and
dynamic operational environment;

A minimum of 5 years experience in international money trans-
fer business;

Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills;
Excellent marketing and communications skills;

A strong team leader with experience in managing businesses
and staff across multi-national locations;

Proven experience in managing the roll-out of a large number
of new outlets across multi-national locations;

Proven ability to innovate and develop new products and
services;

Willingness and ability to travel frequently around the Carib-
bean

The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses

Resumes should be received no later than August 9th, 2006.

The Human Resource Director

Fidelity

51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853

Nassau
f: 328.1108

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


oO me

4 oy
se « es ower 4 6 8 & @ eo

oe

eR OFT me & we

2 8 wl





THE TRIBUNE

xamining pros

and cons of LNG

m By REUBEN SHEARER

THE government is remain-
ing silent on the progress of
LNG negotiations with the
AES Corporation — despite
assurances that the deal may be
approved soon.

As the public awaits the out-
come of the talks, The Tribune
looks at the possible “ ‘pros” and

“cons” of LNG in the Bahamas. |

AES is proposing to construct
a terminal to receive ocean-
going tankers carrying liquefied
natural gas. At the terminal, the
LNG will be regasified and
transported through an under-
water pipeline to service the
South Florida community.

Last year Bill Bardelmeier, a
retired consultant on LNG,
admitted that the resource
posed dangers and that whoev-
er dismissed this fact was risking

a “Bhopal attitude” — an allu-
sion to the December 1984 acci-
dent in Bhopal, Central India
where 2,000 people died and
300,000 were injured when poi-
sonous vapor was emitted from
the Union Carbide pesticide
plant.

He suggested that LNG
“should not be simply rejected,
but managed with a high degree
of professionalism under vigilant
security at sites with low popula-
tions where it won’t conflict with

long term land-use plans.”

Mr Bardelmeier, who believes

’ that risks are manageable, said

Bahamians should not allow
LNG to become a divisive issue.

However Tim Riley, an
American consumer protection
attorney, claimed that govern-
ment authorities and LNG
advocates are using “sleight of
hand” in their dealings with the
Bahamian public.

After reviewing a study ir ini-
tially prepared for the US Pen-
tagon by Brittle Power, Riley
described the possible “cata-
strophic” effect of even a small
spill by an LNG tanker.

“About nine per cent of such

va tanker load:of LNG will prob-*'

ably, if spilled onto water, be

so cold that it will be denser
than air,” he said. “It will there-
fore flow in a cloud or plume
along the surface until it reach-
es an ignition source.”

Riley added that LNG haz-
ard models are extremely com-
plex and inherently uncertain
because they rely on “calcula-
tions and input @ assumptions
about which fair-minded ana-
lysts may legitimately disagree.”

He said that after the Septem-
ber 11 attacks, one of the first
orders that came out of the White
House was to stop any LNG
tanker approaching the US coast.

According to Mr Riley,
Richard Clark, former co-ordi-
nator of US National Security,
said that the administration
knew that if one of those
tankers got into Boston Har-
bour, it could wipe out the
entire downtown area.

Riley added that LNG most-
ly consists of methane — which,
according to his sources, is more
flammable and explosive than
unleaded gasoline or jet fuel.

Local environmentalists are

not only concerned about acci-
dents, but also the effect that
the laying of the pipeline to
Florida will have on the seabed
and coral reef systems.

They are also worried about
the temperature of the water sur-
rounding Ocean Cay, a man-
made island near Bimini where
AES plans to build the terminal.
Environmentalists claim that the
regasification process will have
the side effect of cooling the sur-
rounding ocean — which will
destroy reefs and kill sea life.

The government maintains
that no one has ever died
because of LNG, and that the
deal will not be approved unless
environmental standards are
met. z

Agriculture and Fisheries

Minister Leslie Miller, the gov-

ernment spokesman on LNG,

has said that the regasification

method that will be used by
_ AES will for the most part
. employ air rather than; water.
“My Miller has also enumer-

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 7






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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

iy + +
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woe
ar er)
A & a





~ EMAIL! YDELEVEAUX@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
PLEASE PUT “OUT THERE” IN THE SUBJECT LINE

eeceeseene PPC ene ereeneeeervooeasconesenevecvecneoeaneonsesoncesenesscnessoeaeeeeeneneereens.



Oo At

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MONDAY



&@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
‘public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the

third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hos-

pital conference room.











MAIN EVENT

hi












@ THEATRE

The Sweetheart’s Club - a nev Bahamian play:
Written and directed by Nickeva Eve, The Sweet-
heart’s Club will be performed at Worker’s
House, August 10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available
from the Kennedy Medical Center (by Galleria
Cinemas, JFK Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop
and Gallery (Soldier Road, East of Abundant Life
Road).

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm
& 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fri-
days @ 6pm to 7pm New Providence Community
Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to 8pm.









® CIVIC CLUBS @ CIVIC CLUBS Pes
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British â„¢ Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas est
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 Bar every Wednes- Baptist Community College Rm Ald, Jean St. Metal
meets Monday 6pm.@ Wyndham Nassau Resort, dav spm.8 F Ha ff HEALTH fie Ayes
Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets Se ee eta? : . ae ne Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Pees
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at appetizers and numerous drink specials. sit i Says Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Cen- he
y Free public health lectures featuring distin-
7pm: Fee pune nea iiuectires teaturiiis Cisne tre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info oe
@ ENTERTAINMENT guished physicians are bed at Dortors vonnGl call 325.1947 after 4pm. MIE 2
‘ : ; every third Thursday of the month at6pminthe : py
enoye oe : ce oe ee anes The 56th Annual Bimini Native Fishing Tourna-.. . acters Hospital Cte a ea Free oe
in the B ai Root arn Briti he lonial "ment, sponsored by the Bahamas Ministry of screenings between 5pm & 6pm. For more infor- SATURDAY a4
Hilt < Hot at ne ra PPS xR ore Tourism begins August 6 and runs through August . mation call 302-4603. / os
oayet 11. On Wednesday, August 9, come enjoy fishing, . an
dominoes, volleyball, the Softly Basketball Gamp, i mothe @ THEATRE pat
TUESDAY Miss and Little Miss Bimini Native pageant and a’ - Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the The Sweetheart’s Club - a new Bahamian play:
special cocktail party at Bimini Big-Game. Call. _ public of its meeting times and places: The Nas- Written and directed by Nickeva Eve, The Sweet-
242.347.3529 for more information sau Group, ee sur Thursday. ee heart’s Club will be performed at Worker’s
5 : ; ‘ 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays -- — House, August 10-12 @ 8pm: Tickets are available
7 Pees NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAU The first Inagua Salty Festival will take place @ — 7:30pm to 8:30pm Peon ie ee dy Me dice! Center (by Galleria
Dathee To Inagua, yan 3-7, Sponsors by Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are pein held Cinemas, JFK Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop vow
‘ : i the Inagua Development \ssociation, ere W e 6:3: m Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics ea- Soldier Road, East of Abundant Life. oe
a foe ee nas Te eee a variety of entertainment and activities as well as an sate location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor Raa ( :
, . male patron i exhibit by the Morton Salt Company, a Junkanoo — approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every, tenth feinale patron is rush out, arts and crafts, rakeand scrape, Donkey _for more info. : .
allowed into the club absolutely free and is given derby, gospel concert tea party, children’s corner,? . ati ai
a complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tuesday cooking contest, and live entertainment featuring
nights also include the Carlo. Rossi's Hot Body Avvy and other Bahamian entertainers. | -REACH - Resources & Education for Autism Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the Z
Competition. Hosted by Daddi Renzi and music and related Challenges meets from:7pm — 9pm public of ts tneetine times and places The Nase 5
provided by Dies tom tO) lan Moe ie the second Thursday of each month in the sau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings -
Devito Bodie provides scrumptious appetizers. @ HEALTH cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill TOgia tot aa ie Me
, ee at Road. — “g
@ HEALTH. Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third a
. NE inf h public of its meeting times and places: New Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and Decem-
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the Providence Community Centre: Wednesday - @ CIVIC CLUBS ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas- 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Shirley Street. 3
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, sec- Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes _
Epmule-0pi te'9: 30pm. a ond and third Thursday at the Ministry of are offered every third Saturday of the month | oe
; @ CIVIC CLUBS Health & Environment building on Meeting from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital eee
The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at _.... Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is wel- Community Training Representative at 302.4732 es
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at — 7). Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta come to attend. , soperimors information and learn to save d life ei etet
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets x ea
Call 323.4482 for more info. 6:30pm every third Wednesday atthe Bahamas. - . TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
ws ie . National Pride Building. - . Clubs Breezes. ohh:
Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held : 1 ; : 4 : : - CIVIC CLUBS
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea- TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm- International Association of Administrative Pro-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor 8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West High- _ fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register way. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th ‘Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes, 1, tinted to offers citing cline for juniors
formore into: Wednesday of each month at : - Sweeting Cable Beach, 6pm. Mt ‘Between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held i
: Senior High School, Oakes Field.’ whey set ey ee every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
VIO CLUBS : : The recently established National Insurance ele >aienta iutecestedinqepisterie thelr chil-
International Training in Communication, |". ~ Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets dren should contact organisers at
Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm — Escence Club 43173 holds its bi-monthly meet-..__ -every. fourth Thursday in the month, in the jarcycling@gmail.com
Oe Sucetue Sealer seo! | Pane ho ings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday ofeach'. .. .. National Insurance Board’s (NIB) training .
cole peruse ae ne pee ¥ ae Cousteau - inonth at Doctor's Hospital Conference - ., room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm. All
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in , oor pias ty
Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Room. os retirees ae welcome eee oa SUNDAY
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus _ ae ees or
at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Ter- ects the second and fourth Wednesday of the: - FRIDAY & PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS pas
race, Centreville. month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary. & RESTAURANTS
Alplia Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega @ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS & RESTAU- Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
chapter meets every second sueeday 6 epe. S THURSDAY | RANTS . features special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha a
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau ; and the Caribbean Express - every Sun day from yee
Resort, Cable Beach. - Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks ~ 6:30pm to 9:30pm.
oy a @ ENTERTAINMENT off every Friday night with Happy Hour... spe- i
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second cial drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and
Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, Py. 56th Annual Bimini Native Fishing Tourna- — Nassau’s first European Night Restaurant - mg HEALTH
4th floor meeting room.’ ment continues, Thursday, August 10. Activities | Qpen Friday night till Saturday morning Sam,
: sa , include 39th Annual Glenda’s Road Race, Julian: \: serving hot food/and take out - music, drinks Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Brown Fun/Run/W: alk, fishing and Softly.Basketball — and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the per- public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Camp. Call 242.347.3529 for more information. fect place to spend your night out till the morn- sau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / Pat
Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info. ing. : > 8:30pm to 9:30pm. : Ne
: @ THEATRE ay,
@ THE ARTS ‘ : 5 / ae
The Sweetheart’s Club - a new Hohe Play: . @ ENTERTAINMENT ’
Written and directed by Nickeva Eve,-The Sweet~ 0) ess ee es 6 & peal i
WEDNESDAY - heart’s Club will be performed at Worker’s EL ey The Seth Annual pumitl napye eee he Sa ee Ae paw ta? hte 1
House, August 10-12 @ 8pm. Tickets are available ment, FINAL DAY - Friday, August, 11. Activities . «54,
from the Keithedy Medical Center (by Galleria include fishing, Softly Basketball Camp, Gala Ball at id al yonest vi ga ee er i Not
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS » Cinemas, JFK Plaza) and Woodside Photoshop the Bimini Breeze, under the patronage of Minister ear ih vileleveaux® : a
& RESTAURANTS ~ and Gallery (Soldier Road, East of Abundant Life of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe. Call 242.347.3529 - or e-mail: y i

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports

Road).



for more information.



Please Drink



tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

Responsibly


THE TRIBUNE



In brief

a eeeeeeeeeeeees, ev

Cheaper
eléctricity
demanded
in Dominica

Bn DOMINICA

Roseau

MORE than a dozen people
demonstrated Wednesday out-
side utHity offices in the capi-
tal of Roseau to demand lower
electrieity costs on the cash-
strapped Caribbean island,
according to Associated Press.

The protesters, who dubbed
themsélves “Consumers
Against High Utility Rates,”
marched to the main office of
the Dominica Electricity Ser-
vices, the tiny island’s sole pow-
er provider.

The protest comes about a
month,after Prime Minister
Roosevelt Skerrit accused the
utility, also known as Domlec,
of not caring about island con-
sumers ‘and announced that he
had created a committee to
advise the government on how
to lowet electricity costs.

Joel Huggins, general man-
ager of the power company, of
which Florida-based WRB
Enterprises holds a 72 per cent
stake,-Ras said the utility was
trying te lower its surcharge but
was being held hostage by sky-
rocketing fuel costs.

Domincan
residents
injured in
protests

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

RESIDENTS of a northern
Dominican town angered over
power blackouts and removal
of sand for use in tourist beach-
es burned tyres and confront-
ed police on Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.

Several people were injured
in the protests in Rio San Juan,
about 267 miles north of Santo
Domingo, police said. As many
as 18 people may have been
injured, the television news sta-
tion CDN reported. No further
details were immediately avail-
able. —~













Nellie
Louise
Bain Rose

88 years a resident of
Peter Street, East and
formerly: of Anderson
Hill, Acklins, will be held
11:00a.m., Saturday, 5th
August, 2006 at The



Cedar Crest Funeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Brat 3:7 ee asa) ae

Kingdom Hall of
Jehovah’s Witnesses, Quakoo Street. Officiating will
be Brother Eric Bullard. Interment will be in Woodlawn
Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Still no response |

LOCAL NEWS

on medical board.

m By KAHMILE REID __

THE Ministry of Health is
remaining tight-lipped on the
claim that it has failed to table
a mandatory report on the
finances of a medical board.

After more than a week of
pursuing the official position
on reports that is has never
submitted the financial records
of the Hospital and Healthcare
Facilities Licensing Board
(HHFLB) to parliament —
despite being required to by
law — The Tribune is still
unable to get a response.

Numerous efforts to reach
Minister of Health Dr Bernard
Nottage and his Permanent
Secretary Elma Garraway
proved futile.

Earlier this week, Mrs Gar-
raway promised to issue a
response, but had failed to do
so.
Yesterday, her secretary
called to say Mrs Garraway
would contract The Tribune,
however, she did not call.up to
press time. ae ;

Three voice messages have
been left.on Dr Nottage’s per-
sonal voice mail and numerous
messages left with his secretary
over the last week.

According to unofficial cal-

Wisdom:

m@ By REUBEN SHEARER ©

MINISTER of Housing
Neville Wisdom said he is not
prepared to be distracted from
providing affordable housing
to Bahamians by worrying
about the housing needs of ille-
gal immigrants.

Mr Wisdom was referring to
the land dispute which erupted
between squatters and the Min-
istry of Housing over a prop-
erty government has reserved

for developing the second...

phase of a new Fire Trail Road
housing subdivision:

Many of these squatters,
according to Mr Wisdom, are
people he has come into con-








Hi THERE has been no
response from the Minister of
Health Bernard Nottage or
his officials

culations, the HHFLB may
have collected over $9 million
since 1998 when it was created.

The Act governing the
HHELB states that a “the min-
ister shall cause a copy of every
such report to be laid on tables
of both Houses of Parliament”.

This report should be sub-
mitted “no later than June 30
‘in any year.”

However when The Tribune
interviewed Jerome Gomez,
chairman of the HHFLB, in
late July, he said they will be

tact with in the past. -

He gave an example of an
illegal Haitian man who was
notified by the ministry that he
must relocate.

Mr Wisdom said the man
responded by telling him the
land had been given to him by
God, and that he was not pre-
pared to move.

The minister said he replied:
“You as an illegal immigrant

- do not have the right to pre-

vent me from allowing Bahami-
ans to access homes through a
government supported ‘pro-

gramme.”
Mr Wisdom said he then

asked for a tractor to knock
down the house which was in

preparing the report shortly.

The board is the body in
charge of regulating private
hospitals and healthcare facili-
ties, which are required to pay
a basic fee of $500. If they pro-
vide diagnostic services they
are required to pay an addi-
tional $500.

Provided that a facility has
a pharmacy that also-serves the

* public, an additional $200 is to

be paid, and a $10 fee has to be
paid for every bed in the facil-
ity.

"One hospital, therefore,
depending on its size, could pay
‘up to $5,000 in licensing fees.

Clinics pay a basic fee of
$400, and another $400 if a
diagnostic facility is in place.
Therefore, a clinic could pay
as much $1,000 to $3,000 in
licensing fees.

Mr Gomez told The Tribune
that no facility has ever been
denied a licence and, accord-.
ing to the Act, there are three
conditions that a facility must
meet to receive a licence — one
of which is “upon payment of
prescribed fee”.

Therefore, the board should
have collected around $9 mil-
lion in licensing fees over the

eight years it has been in exis-
tence.



b

the immediate way of con-
struction plans.



KEMP(SIFUNERALIHOMEILIMITED

220PalmdalelAvenue,!Palmdale —
Nassau,IN.P.,JThelBahamas

Goins iecnao waning

MARY JEAN CAREY

740 off Woodland
Road,0 Nassau,] The
Bahamas,l will be
heldi atl Ebenezer
Methodist] Church,
EastiShirleylStreets,
NassaullontThursday,
10thDAugust,12006lat
5:00pm.

Reverendl Milton




= NEVEEEE SV edon vse “that the. Bahamas is a country






























Cherished memories are held by her one son: Harold
Rose of Ohio; one adopted son: Norman Cleare of
N assau, Bahamas; one brother: Leon Bain; one sister-
in-law: Irene Bain; one adopted sister: Ruthiemae
Black; one daughter-in-law: Barbara Rose; four °
grandchildren: Angela, Denise, Erica and Harold Jr.;
five great grandchildren: Whitney, Devin, Aaren,
Anthony and Arianna; nine nephews including: Bert,
Phillip, Joseph Beneby of West Palm Beach Florida
and Bernard Beneby of Nassau Bahamas; James Bain
. of Connecticut, Ellis Bain of Nassau and Arthur Bain
Jr.; four nieces including: Annette ‘““Nelliemae” Kodra;
ten grand nephews including: Gary Black; fifteen grand
nieces-including: Ferlesa Cleare, Valarie Burrows,
Lakeisha and Kayla Thompson and Genevieve Thomas;
twenty-two great grand nephews including: John
Hutcheson; thirteen great grand nieces including:
Tyisha and Ebony Cleare and Carlisa Miller; two great-
great grandnephews, one great-great grandniece

numerous other relatives and friends including: J ean
and Barbie Beneby of West Palm Beach Florida,
Carolyn and Beverly Beneby of Nassau Bahamas,
Harrington Beneby of Miami Florida, The Bastian
Family of Atlanta Georgia, Veronica Ferguson, Corette
Cosbert of Virginia Florida, The Nottage, Ferguson,
Moss, Darling, Bain and Symonette Families, Ronald
Miller and Family, Mr. Newton Williamson and Family
and the Central Congregation Family. ,

Relatives and Friends may pay their res

pects at Ced
Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First Street
on Friday from 12noon to 6:00p.m., and at the church
on Saturday from 9:30a.m until service time.



Lightbournel and

Pastorl Martin

Loyleylwilllofficiatelandlintermentwilllbe
inl Ebenezerl Methodist] Cemetery, East
ShirleylStreet,INassau.

Mrs.0Careyllwaslpredeceasedibylherlhusband,
William Charles Careylandlislsurvivedlby
herllson,JDavidiCharlesICarey ;Idaughter-in-

-law,lAuralEstellellCareyJGrandson,JMichael

CharlesiCarey;granddaughter,JAshleylJean
Carey;[sisters-in-law,iBessThompson Lottie
Lowel andl Darlenell Careyl off Bradenton
Florida; brother-in-law, Nevillel "Butch"

Carey,andImanylnieceslandinephewslother
relativeslland{IfriendsliniTheBahamasland
the Unitedi States andd special thanksi to

caregivers,JFaylMillerJBridgetJArmbrister |

andiCleopatralArmbristeri.

Insteadofiiflowersithelfamilylrequestithat
donationsibellsentitofthe1B ahamas] Humane
Society,UP.O.0BoxiIN-242 [Nassau,linJmemory
offMrs.0MarylJeanICarey



—

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 9

i JEROME Gomez, chairman of the HHFLB

mitted reports to the minister.
The HHFLB jis among a
group of advisory, technical
and administrative support
units of the Ministry of Health.
Its main functions include:
to issue licences for the use of
buildings as hospitals or health-
care facilities; to regulate and
inspect healthcare facilities; to
_ initiate investigations into any
matter affecting the manage-
ment, diagnosis or treatment
of a person within the hospi-
tal or healthcare facility
licensed under the Act, and to
appoint qualified persons to be .
certainty.that both he and the inspectors for ‘the purpose of
previous board chairman sub- the Act.

However, the Minister of
Health — neither under the
FNM nor the PLP — has ever
tabled a report.

‘When asked about the
accounts, Mr Gomez said they
are “not public information”.

He said the only way for the
public to be privy to such infor-
mation is after the report is
tabled in the Cabinet and
House of Assembly by the
Minister of Health. ..

Though Mr Gomez said he is
uncertain as to whether the
reports were tabled in parlia-
ment, he said he could say with

of an increasing demand for
reasonable housing,” he said.
According to Mr Wisdom, if
government can proceed with
the development, more than
120 Bahamian families will
have a house for Christmas.
“Right now we have 553
homes listed in my inventory,
with over 5,000 requests of peo-

Since then, the immigrant
has been referred to the Min-
istry of Immigration, which is
reportedly dealing with the sit-
uation.

Mr Wisdom said that it is not
his responsibility to find hous-
ing for illegal nationals, as he
says there are other agencies
in the country to provide that

kind of support. ple who are qualified for them,
' “Byen if I tried to offer legal © which means that we cannot

assistance to illegal immigrants _give priority to the illegal immi-
- I would be breaking the law,” — grant.

“The government of the.
_. Bahamas refuses to give away
“property to just anyone,” he
“ said: “Once you.start doing that™
you have to provide the same
assistance for everybody else.”

hesaid. }
“We don’t want it to be said



without Compassion — but
there’s something called the
rule of law and also the reality

6. , \ e ; e e
and Crematorium Limited
FREEPORT z
$ 11A East Corel Roath Freeport, G.B., Bahamas .

0, Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005










HELEN ©
REMILDA
TURNQUEST-
BAIN

58 of #139 Fawcett Lane, Freeport,
Grand Bahama and formerly of Long
Island will be held on Saturday,
August 5, 2006 at 10:00 am at First
Baptist Church, Columbus Drive,
Freeport. Officiating will be Rev. Dr.
George L. Cumberbatch, assisted
by Rev. Derrick Russell. Interment
will follow in The Grand Bahama
Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.





























































Precious memory will forever linger in the hearts of her Stepmother: Mazel
_ Turnquest of Deadman’s Cay, Long Island; mother-in-law, Laura Telefar Bain
of New Providence; adopted daughters, Dellareese Hall (Nicky) of
Providenciales, Turks and Caicos.and Cherelle Newbold of Freeport, Grand
Bahama; adopted sons, Aaron Newbold and Valance Smith Jr. of Freeport,
Grand Bahama; sisters, Sandra Turnquest, Shirley Turnquest-Horton, Rochelle
Turnquest of New Providence and Eddrin Turnquest of Freeport, Grand
Bahama; brothers, Franklyn Turnquest Sr. of Mader Town, Grand Bahama,
Nicholas Turnquest Sr. of New Providence, Theophilus Turnquest Sr. of
Chicago, Illinois and Kevin Turnquest Sr. of New Providence; aunts, Myrtle
Turnquest-McHardy of Lower Deadman’s Cay, Long Island and Patricia
Turnquest of Deadman’s Cay, Long Island; uncles, Samuel Minnis of New
Providence, Fred (Bill) Minnis of Windsor, North Carolina and Kirkland
McHardy of Lower Deadman’s Cay, Long Island; nieces, Latisha Horton-
Curtis, Sonia, Tonia and Vandrea, Horton, Alicia Curry, Nickia Turnquest,
Tatyana Turnquest, Semaj Bunch, Patrice Nimmo, Laverne Williams- McKinney,
Deserea Taylor, Andrea Beharrie, Edris Lundy, Lisa Karageorgroy, Crystal,
Shavonne, Marvette and Marrissa Bain, Vernell Williams and Tavanna Bain;
nephews, Franklyn Turnquest Jr., Primo Rolle, Ashley and Quinley Horton,
Lorran Charlton, Nicholas Turnquest Jr., Theophilus Turnquest Jr. and Kevin
Turnquest uJr., Jerome Keith Williams, Allison, Edison Jr., Don, Keith and
Shawn Bain, Kenneth Taylor, Lynden Hall, Stephari Lundy, Clayton Beharre,
Albert McKinney and Renardo Karageorgroy; cousins, Reginald, Charles,
Edwin, Oscar Hunt, Francis Clarke, Eleanor Crawford-McKinney, Alice
Mackey-Dixon, Mildred Mackey, Thalia Mackey-Hogge, Florence Parish,
Loretta Mackey-Pieze, MaryAnn Mackey-Moore, Inez Mackey-Brabson,
Pricilla Mackey-Minnis, Franklyn, Henry and Daniel Mackey, Betty Adderley,
Andrew McPhee, Grace Bassett-Johnson, Miriam Minnis-Maniguait, Elsworth,
Monzell Turnquest, Marcia, Margaret, Thomas, Janet, Mark, Yvette Turnquest,
Janet Adderley and Tammy McPhee-Miller; sisters-in-law, Marilyn, Evelyn
and Chasity Turnquest, Erma Williams, Lerlene Carey, Monica Allen and
Jennifer Bain; brothers-in-law, William Horton, George Williams, Larry Allen,
Roderick Carey, Eddison Bain Sr., Harrison Bain and Herman Murray Bain;
godchildren, Lindsay (Dawn) Adderley and ine Hall; special friends, Lynn
Austin, Arimintha Newbold, Glen Newbold Sr., Glen Newbold Jr., Gabriella
(Gaye) Adderley, Petral Russell, Beryl Poitier, Loggie Brown, Rev. Harry.and
Mrs. Rosalind Clarke, Rose Marie Collins, Catherine Taylor-Scavella, Linda
Taylor, Merylene Baptiste, Diane Ferguson, Jackie Richardson, Jeff and
Glenda Wildgoose, Chris and Cleo Newbold, Van Bethel, Zelita Ferguson,
Willamae Ferguson, Two Big Guys Landscaping, the community of Deadman’s

Cay, Long Island, Ken Rolle, Troy Hanna, the Staff of the Rand Memorial
Hospital, especially Intensive Care Unit, Doctors and Nurses, Rev Dr and
Mrs. Cumberbatch and the First Baptist family, Community of Fawcett Lane,
Member of the Church of God, Hawksbill, Ann Percentie, M.P., Department
of Public Health Staff especially Administration, Accounts and Supplies Unit,
Nassau, Staff of Charles Place, Nassau, St. Ambrose Anglican Church,
Nassau, Zion East and Shirley Street, especially the Prayer Band and a host
of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.









Viewing will be held in the “Perpetual Suite” of Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Friday from 10:00am to 6:00pm and at the Church on Saturday from
8:30am until service time.




PAGE 10, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE







Out-Island Doctor

The Tribune meesmesssenesee:

ership



The Tribune’s
_ Summer
Reading Series

EXTRACT TEN
Hurricane at Shroud Cay

(Cottman has sailed the Green Cross to the Exumas to
continue expanding his practice but, to his dismay,
finds himself in the direct path of a hurricane. He
seeks refuge from the storm in a creek at Shroud Cay.)

AT 11 A.M. the United States Weather Bureau issued
the reassuring report that the storm had shifted to the
northwest and The Bahamas were thought to be out of
danger. The tide was still high, so with a sigh of relief I
took up my anchors and came back to the mouth of the
creek. But outside the creek the sea was a white rage
and there was a hard wind blowing. So I decided to stay
where I was until things calmed down a bit.

Now I do not want to pick a quarrel with the ‘hurri-

cane warning service. It does the best job it humanly »

can. But predicting the future of a hurricane is not a job
for human beings. A hurricane’s course is as erratic
and unpredictable as that of a baby just learning to
walk: a gigantic, monstrous infant that toddles a few
steps in one direction, tearing up trees and knocking
over houses instead of breaking bric-a-brac, then paus-
ing, rocking back and forth in the same spot, staggering
to one side to casually destroy a town, before plunging
forward in a wild, falling gallop.

And, sure enough, the next hurricane advisory
informed me that the monstrous infant had once more
toddled off in a new direction. Now the centre of the
storm was due to strike the Exuma Cays some time
that same night with winds of 100 miles per hour or
more. , ,

It was out of the question to remain where I was,
and equally out of the question to get back to the
anchorage I had prematurely left because the tide was
too low and it was already getting dark. I remembered
a sandbar a short way from the mouth of the creek so I
decided to head into the creek as far as the sandbar. I
pulled my throttle wide open, the inrushing tide added

speed, the Green Cross struck the sandbar, slid well up ~

on it and stuck firmly. an

I threw my 40 pound grapnel into mangroves to star-
board and dropped my big anchor and followed it over
the side. The water in the deepest part of the creek was
up to my chest and running so swiftly it almost swept me
off my feet but I struggled across to the bank on the port
side, dropped the anchor among the mangroves and tied
the loose end of the hawser to some roots.

The darkness was complete now and I could not see
my hand before my face. I followed the anchor back to
the Green Cross, climbed aboard and found the flash-
light.

The first thing the beam showed me was that my two
lines to starboard had gone slack while those to port
were taut. To avoid problems I was going to have put all
four moorings on the port side. Once more I went over
the rail. Now the water was up to my chin but I got
ashore, took up both lines and brought them back

aboard.
With the tide rising quickly, I figured she must be -

afloat by now so I started the engine, intending to
move her to the other side of the creek before putting
the grapnel over again. But when I threw in the clutch,
she did not budge. She should have been surging for-
ward with the tide but she was steady as Gibraltar.
There must be some obstruction I thought, so I went
over board. The Green Cross was floating but the line

WRITTEN BY EVANS WCW COTTMAN
LINE DRAWINGS BY Guy FLEMING

from the dinghy had become tangled in a cluster of
mangroves and was holding us back. However, when I
tried to free it, I found it was too taut and I realized it
would have to be untied from the Green Cross.

Up to this point, I am fairly sure I had been acting
rationally and logically. From this point on is another
matter. Perhaps it was fatigue dulling my wits, but I
pulled myself back along the line to the Green Cross.
Hanging there, my arms and elbows on the deck, I
started to untie the dinghy’s line. I turned off the flash-
light to save the batteries and felt the knot in the line
loosen: I heaved a premature sigh of relief for the sail-
boat, freed from the bond that held her to thé dinghy
and the mangroves, leapt forward on the rushing tide

‘and threw me unceremoniously into the creek.

When I came up, the Green Cross was gone. A com-
bination of the darkness and a deluge of hurricane dri-
ven rain meant I could see nothing. I could feel the tide
rushing around me, sweeping me up the creek as I
tried to swim in the direction of the.Green Cross. Des-





perately, under water as much as above, I swam.
Strangely, I was not actually afraid. Instead I felt a
kind of intoxicated excitement that was by no means

. unpleasant. I was conscious of battling against the °

storm and, even at that moment, sure I was going to win.

Blind and approaching exhaustion, I reached out my
hand from the surging waters of the creek. I touched
something. Something solid. It was the Green Cross.

‘Blindly I had come as straight to her as if I had been

drawn by a magnet. My feet touched bottom and I
stood there and tied the dinghy’s line to the ringbolt
before I wearily clambered aboard.

( Continued every Friday
and Wednesday until August 18th) »

Text copyright © 1998 Gayle Cottman

Excerpt prepared by Marjorie Downie and Gordon
Mills of

The College of The Bahamas








THE TRIBUNE

@ By GABRIELLE
MISIEWICZ

BEC does not benefit “one
cent” from the fuel surcharge

- added to electricity bills accord-

ing to Minister of Energy and
Environment Dr Marcus

' Bethel.

Dr Bethel issued a statement

' yesterday explaining that the

fluctuating surcharge is calcu-
lated on a monthly basis, based
on the ever-changing and

. volatile cost of oil.

“The minister was refuting
reports in the local media that
claimed the corporation uses,
the surcharge to engage in
“profiteering”.

He said there is “no aspect
whatsoever of the fuel sur-

~ charge that benefits BEC.”

I!

_ Man guilty of the
murder of tourists

to assist Mr Shurland in his request for

Festival

“. FROM page one

However, Mr Johnson said
he had heard nothing about
these dignitaries, but. pointed

_out that many foreign digni-

taries had been guests at past
Fox Hill Festivals.

“T know throughout the years
we have had the Chinese
Ambassador, the Haitian
Ambassador — the Chinese
puppet show opened up the fes-
tival one year,” he said.

The sources also claimed that
the Ministry of Tourism was
brought in to sponsor the Festi-
val in order to brand it a gov-
ernment endorsed event, but
according to Eric Wilmott, Sr, a
foundér and administrator of
the Fox Hill Festival, the Min-
istry of Tourism is sponsoring
only one part of the event.

“It’s very discouraging to
read this nonsense,” he said. -

The festival started in 1988
and, according to Mr Johnson,
every five years Emancipation
Day and Fox Hill Day are cele-
brated back to back. The pur-
pose of the Fox Hill Festival
was to bridge the two days.

“The name Fox Hill Day is
still-with us and-Fox Hill Day
will be observed next Tuesday
— I would like to stress that
Fox Hill Day is the closing day
of the Festival,” he said.

Grand |
Bahama

_Junkanoo

&

Xe
a

*. the.Ginn Corporation. °

2
&
e

tn 4 +

p «
2

event will
go ahead

__ALL systems are go for
the Feel the Rush
Junkanoo parade in Grand
Bahama this weekend.

The event will take place
on Sunday, August 6th at
6.30pm in Downtown
Freeport.

Public relations director

‘for the parade Peter:

Adderley said that despite
some fears earlier in the
week over the weather, the
forecast now appears
favourable.
Saxons, Valley Boys,
One Family and the Grand
Bahama All-Stars will
compete for a $90,000
purse at the event which is
sponsored by the Grand

‘a Bahama Port Authority,

cod
.
a

the Ministry of Tourism,
Grand Bahama Power and

Dr Bethel said that in the
long run, BEC actually loses
money, because it pays 10 per
cent in stamp tax and seven per
cent in duty on fuel, rather than
passing on this cost to the cus-
tomer. .

Minister Bethel stressed that
“every entity” is negatively
affected by the rising cost of
oil.

He explained that fuel is
becoming more expensive
because of turmoil in the oil-
producing states of the Middle

East and that “unparalleled |

growth in the demand for petro-
Jeum products” is a contributing
factor.

| Dr Bethel said BEC held a
press conference on July 19 at
the Ministry of Energy and
Environment, at which “clear

BEC does not benefit from
fuel surcharge, says Bethel

recommendations” were given
to consumers on what they
could to do reduce energy usage
and therefore lower the cost of

_ their electricity bills.

The minister pointed out that
BEC’s annual report has been
tabled in the House of Assem-
bly and is public record. This
means that anyone who wishes
to can see “undeniable proof”
that the company is not profi-
teering, he said. —

Dr Bethel added that not

only has the corporation.

always been forthcoming with
information requested by gov-
ernment, it has also given
“countless interviews” specifi-
cally on the fuel surcharge
issue to both print and broad-
cast media, °

lishes a monthly surcharge

notice in the newspapers — —

something it began doing since
2005.

Dr Bethel said he would like
the public to know ‘that
although BEC is faced with a’
situation beyond its control, the
corporation has taken steps to
“continually upgrade the effi-
ciency of its machinery.”

He said that the company’s
newest generator runs entirely
on the waste heat of the other
generators, and therefore
requires no petroleum products
to power it.

Dr Bethel explained that

“upgrading machinery is of the

utmost importance. il al
It allows the corporation to

save fuel and therefore lower

the surcharge, he explained. .








FROM page one

On counts three and four, the jury returned

a 10-2 guilty verdict in the rape of Ms von

Perfall, and the armed robbery of Mr
Bolzano. ;

Francis, 23, showed no emotion. He
remained as composed “at the end as he did

throughout the entire trial, which opened last.

Tuesday.

The: nude bodies of Ms von Perfall, a 32
year-old Austrian duchess, and Mr Bolzano,
34, were found at the Bimini Blue Water
Resort on July 23, 2005. :

‘According to evidence given in court, both
had been shot at close range with a 12-gauge
shotgun that was recovered by police from
Francis’s home in Porgy Bay, Bimini.

After the verdicts were read in court, Justice
Isaacs told Francis that he was obligated to
have a sentence hearing on the two murder
counts.

He deferred the sentencing for counts three

and four until the sentencing hearing, which
was tentatively set for September 18.
Prosecutor Sandra Dee Gardiner informed
the court that the Crown.intends to seek the
death penalty for the murders.
Mr Shurland informed the court of his

intention to seek a social probation report and.

asked the court’s assistance in a psychiatric
evaluation of Francis before his sentencing.
Justice Isaacs said that the court would try

of the

psychiatric evaluation and assessment of his

‘client.

Prosecutor Gardiner said that a psychiatric
evaluation usually takes between four and six
weeks. He noted that.a probation report
should be completed as well by that time.

Justice Isaacs thanked jurors for their pat-.
- ticipation in the trial and discharged them ‘of

their duties. 4

“It wasn’t a long trial, but you had some .

serious issues to deliberate on.” Without

them, he said, they would not be able to have

trials. :

When asked to comment on the verdicts. :

handed down, Ms Gardiner said she believed

the jury verdict reflected the evidence pre- '

sented by the prosecution.
“The jury represents the consciousness of

this community and we are satisfied that they.

gave the right verdict.

“It was a case in which they had 'to consid-
er the liberty-of the accused and murder is a
very serious crime. As you know, when it
comes to murder one could get up to the death
penalty.

“And the fact that they took a long time —
three or four hours to reach their verdict,

shows that they took their time as the matter is
_a serious one,” she said. |

Defence lawyer Carlson Shurland was not
available for comment after the verdict.

Francis’ case is the last in the Grand Bahama
court’s criminal session.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 11

i MARCUS Bethel

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006






Ambassador Sears addresses OAS Permanent Council



Nee:

@ WASHINGTON DC - The general assembly in session. Bahamas Ambassador to the US

Joshua Sears chaired the budgetary committee

(Photo: Franklyn G. Ferguson)















@ AMBASSADOR Joshua
Sears receives a plaque from
Ambassador Henry Illes,
chairman of the OAS Per-
manent Council. Ambas-
sador Sears is stepping down
from the position

@ BELOW: Following
Ambassador Sears’ address
to the OAS Permanent

' Council, he received a
standing ovation from the
council’s members

(Photos: Franklyn
G Ferguson)









LOCAL NEWS



AISA TET ame =




FROM page one

they are trying to do is work with the doctors to
contain costs. It is really the doctors who are dri-
ving up the costs.” ,

The official continued by pointing out that
there was no regulatory board for doctors, and
even though there was a medical association in
place, the medical association could nut really
tell doctors what they could charge fe~ their ser-
vices.

“They have a fee schedule that t’ :y should be
following, but the doctors do not iollow the fee
schedule put out by the medical association,” the
official claimed. “The health ¢ ~- - ost is driven by
the doctors and the hosritiis. if tne doctor’s fees
were driven back down, then obviously the insur-
ance rates would also be driven down.”

In explaining how the scheme works, the offi-
cial, hypothetically, used the cost and procedures
involved in having abdominal surgery.

“If the cost of having abdominal surgery is
$2500, that cost should include the doctor cutting
you open, going inside, doing an exploration of
the abdomen to see what is going on, finding
what is going wrong, fixing it, closing you up,
hospital follow-ups, and him visiting you on the
ward.

“When they send the forms in, if you pay a 20
per cent co-pay, they reflect what you paid, then
they break down the charges, and it should have
been $2,500.

“But they are going to charge $2,500 just for the
surgery, then they will charge an additional, say,
$600 for cutting you, which he shouldn’t do
because all of that should have been in the orig-
inal $2,500. Additionally, he is going to charge you:
another, say, $1,500 to do the exploration, which
should not be broken down.

“So, when it’s all said and done, a surgery
which should have cost $2,500 now comes to
about $5-$6,000, and this is how they make their
money. What the doctor did was to unbundle it to
make sure he gets what he wanted — the maxi-
mum,” the official said.

The official likened what doctors do to going to
a mechanic for an oil change and having the

‘mechanical charge you for everything from open-

ing the hood of the car to doing the oil change.
However, in paying, the official said insurance
companies “bundle” all of the unbundled ser-
vices back into one, and they pay 80 per cent of
what it should cost, so the doctor will get 80 per
cent of the $2,500.
“The doctor takes the balance of what he

charged, and, say that the insurance company .

did not pay all of the patient’s bill, they balance
bill the patient because they are not going to
lose,” the official claimed. :

The official said that patients are not legally
obligated to pay the balance, but with doctors
knowing this, they are asking patients for more
than the required 20 per cent up front.

“If the patient does not pay it,” said the official,
“the doctor will not touch him or her, and usual-
ly tells the patient that is how their fee schedule is,
and if he or she wants to use their services, that is
what they must pay.”

This practice, said the official, occurs with most
doctors outside of an insurance company’s net-

work.
“Inside the network,” said the official, “the
doctors give them a list of fee schedules and they







Medical costs

THE TRIBUNE









have already tacked on their fees to it, but the
Insurance companies work with them to see how
they can cut back.” iy

The official said that in many instances, insur-
ance companies give doctors within their net-
work incentives to cut back on their fees, incen-
tives which include a quick turn around on claims
submitted by these doctors.

“Many of these doctors have a lot of competi-
tion, and they are waiting for that insurance mon-
ey to run their offices. The insurance cheque
pays their bills and pays for them to live elaborate
lives,” the insurance official said yesterday.

Because. the Bahamas Medical Association has
no set standard of fees applicable to the Bahamas,
what The Tribune has discovered is that doctors
set their rates according to a physician’s fee and
coding guide that is used to set medical costs in
the United States.

The problem with this practice, the official
pointed out, is that codes and fees vary from
state to state, and whatever fee these doctors are
using, they are charging the insurance compa-’
nies on the higher end.

While a few insurance officials contacted have
said that some of the claims were a bit exagger-
ated, they do agree that others were true.

March 22 touted
FROM page one

“Going into the next election it would reai-
ly be Pindling verses Pindling. Perry Christie
and his former law partner Mr Ingraham is

one aspect of the Pindling legacy against one. *.~
aspect of the Pindling legacy,” he said. ae

However, Mr Bethel said he does not
believe that the PLP will lose the next elec-
tion.

“J don’t believe (Ingraham) has to this:
point made a compelling case for his return as

leader of the country. He was able to make a ©

case for being leader of the FNM because
the men who would be leader of the FNM
were so massively mediocre.

“Mr Ingraham is now remaking:‘the FNM.
The question for him is does he have the time
to do it? I-don’t believe he has sufficient time
If I was told that he was preparing the
groundworks for the year 2012 I would say he
is off to an excellent start,” Mr Bethel said.

The various scandals that have followed
‘the PLP through this administration, he said,
will not factor in the decisions the electorate
will make in the next general election. .

“The history shows you that in 1987 when

the PLP was wallowing in scandal and .cor-_

ruption the PLP won. The Bahamas is not a
place where sandal, unfortunately, brings
down anyone. You have to mix scandal with
hard times. That is the brew, scandal and
hard times. But if you have scandal and mon-
ey, the Bahamian who has moved from pira-
cy to all sorts of plundering as. part of his
psyche will say let the good times roll,” Mr
Bethel said.





All

qusiomer
PAINT
RECORDS
were
saved!

*

.

or
oe

’ CARICOM, for this nation to.

-Bahamian-only incentives
under development




SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







WTO breakdown Ro ) al Oasis bi d der

‘undermines’ CSME

membership case presents t Oo

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE collapse of the latest
round in global trade talks has
undermined the Government’s
main rationale for joining tshe
Caribbean Single Market &
Economy (CSME), a Bahamian
free trade campaigner said yes-
terday.

Paul Moss, head of Bahamian
Agitating for a Referendum on
Free Trade, said the collapse of
the World Trade Organisation’s
(WTO) Doha round of trade
talks had given the Bahamas
breathing space, and extra time
to get its own house in order
-before it contemplated signing
-on to any trade agreements.

‘Mr Moss said events at the
WTO had undermined the main
economic and trade arguments
advanced in a position paper by
A. Leonard Archer, the

-.Bahamas) Ambassador. to

-- In addition, the ee said the Government was still in the
process of. hiring persons for the Standards Bureau.

join the CSME..

In his paper, Mr Archer
argued that membership in the
CSME -would eeneiien the

i
b
'



Consumer Commission
members now selected

& By CARA BRENNEN

Tribune Business Reporter

- LOCAL Governinent and Consumer iis minister, V Alfred
Gray, said yesterday he plans to announce members of the Con-
sumer Protection Commission in a few weeks, before they. begin

their work next month.

Mr Gray told The Tribune that the chairman and members of that
Commission have all been appointed and should start to work in
their official capacity on September 1, helping to implement the
Consumer Protection Act and deal with customer complaints
against businesses and the products they sell.

Once this occurs, Mr Gray said the commission can begin to
hear complaints filed by consumers. He explained that the major-
ity of these complaints have to do with perceived high prices at
Bahamian grocery stores on bread basket items, high gas prices and

“rent control.

He said that the Commission was comprised of citzens from var-
ied backgrounds, including agriculture and business. Before appoint-
ing the chairman, he said the ministry looked for a person with a

legal background,

“We looked for a person who understands consumer rights and
- would know how to proceed, because they will be hearing com-

plaints,” Mr Gray said.

@ By CARA BRENNEN

Tribune Business:
Reporter

ADDITIONAL incentives
for the sole benefit of Bahami-
an investors need to be created,
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments’ director
of investments said yesterday.

Basil Albury said: “You
know that in our National
Investment Policy, there are

specific areas reserved for |

.

Bahamas’ negotiating: position
when it engaged in talks to

accede to full membership in

the WTO.

Mr Archer had argued that
by being part of the CSME or
CARICOM bloc, whose nations
were already members of the
WTO, the Bahamas would be
treated no less favourably than
those countries’ whose per capi-
ta incomes were much less.

As a result, Mr Archer said
the Bahamas would not be
treated as having the third high-
est per capita income in the
Western Hemisphere, and
would get the same benefits and
preferences as other CARI-

_COM nations whose economies

were much weaker. As a result,
the terms of the Bahamas’
WTO entry would be more
tavourable.
However, Mr Moss said yes-
terday that the collapse of the
“WTO talks meant “it doesn’t
make sense for the Bahamas to
be part of the CSME”, and had

SEE page 4B

@ abinet ministers

and Grand

Bahama Port

Authority

(GBPA) execu-

tives were yesterday given a

presentation by the group that

has emerged as’the lead con-

tender to acquire the Royal

Oasis resort, with an agree-

ment for the property’s sale
“fairly close” to conclusion. .

Sources. told The Tribune

that a Florida-led group has .

emerged as the front-runner
to acquire the Royal Oasis
from Lehman Brothers, the

_ New York-based investment

bank whose private equity arm
is the resort’s de facto owner as
the result of a mortgage and
debenture it holds on the prop-
erty.

The identities of investors in
the Florida-led group, named
as one of two interested parties
last month by Prime Minister
Perry Christie, have not been
revealed.

The other bidder left in the

Port Authority executives ated fheeting



with Florida-led group emerging as
front runner to acquire resort

Royal Oasis hunt was Har-
court Developments, the Irish-
based property developer that

already has interests in Grand

Bahama through. its Suffolk

_ Court project.

However, it is understood
that the Florida-led group has

moved ahead of Harcourt to °
“emerge as front-runner in the

Royal. Oasis talks, which are
being held with Lehman
Brothers and the Government.

It is unclear whether ,an
agreement for the Royal Oasis
sale has.been reached in prin-
ciple, as some sources suggest-
ed yesterday, although the
high-level meeting indicates

.that a solution to the almost







two- -year saga is close and that
an official announcement
could soon be forthcoming.

“They’re fairly close. Some- .

thing might be about top
break,” one source told The
Tribune.

The Prime Minister on J uly
18 said the main question that
had to be resolved was

whether one of the bidders -

likely to be the Florida-led one,
which offered thé higher price

of around $42 million - was

willing to put up a non-refund-

able deposit to show Lehman

Brothers its offer was serious.

Sources have told The Tri-
bune that the Florida-led group
has been in talks with the Las

‘clarity’



-@ WENDY WARREN_

. Act.

a. @ By NEIL HARTNELL
i Tribune Business Editor

was told yesterday.

LEGISLATIVE amendments
mâ„¢ tabled in the House of Assembly will

s, provide greater “clarity” to high net
worth individuals over the structuring
and regulation of Bahamas-domiciled ~
private trust companies, The Tribune. .

Prime Minister Perry Christie last
week tabled amendments to the Banks »
and Trust Companies Regulation Act
and the Central Bank of the Bahamas .
Act that. will facilitate the creation of.
private trust companies under those
‘existing pieces of legislation, rather

than through a standalone bill. |

Wendy Warren, the Bahamas Finan-

cial Services Board’s (BFSB) chief

executive and executive director, yes-

_terday said the main advantage from
the amendments was that they would |
bring clarity to how private trust com-.

panies domiciled in the Bahamas could
be formed, structured and regulated.

She added that. the BFSB, during
marketing trips and discussions with
clients and foreign institutions, had
“found significant interest in private

‘trust companies” as a wealth manage-
ment and estate planning tool for high

net, worth individuals.

“We certainly | are: vey pleased to

see the legislation tabled,” Ms War-
ren said. “It’s been a very fruitful exer-"
cise, in particular working with the
Central Bank over the last two years.”

The Bahamian financial services
industry, including the BFSB and
Association of International Banks
and Trusts (AIBT) had worked close-
ly with the Central Bank and other
regulators in the drafting of the leg-
islative amendments.

Describing the amendments, which
are now awaiting their second read-
ing, as creating “a very-clear, stream-

s SEE page 6B ,



Vegas-based New York, New
York hotel/casino about
becoming the operating part-

‘ner for the Royal Oasis if its

bid is successful. The company
is a subsidiary of MGM
Mirage. ‘
Jethro Miller, of Nottaze!
Miller & Co, is understood to
be the-attorney representing

- the Florida-led group.

Harcourt is represented by
Kirk Antoni of Cafferta & Co.
It wasepreviously part of.a
three-member group that Aa
included Westgate Resorts, the ae
world’s third largest timeshare
group, and Planet Hollywood.

The Tribune was first alerted
to yesterday’s emergency Cab-
inet meeting when it spotted
Hannes Babak, the Port
Authority’s chairman, and Sir: /
Albert Miller, its chief exécu-

_ tive, walking across Rawson

Square to a waiting car after
leaving the Cabinet Office. .
Parked right behind them was
Prime Minister Christie’s car.
- Any: announcement that a.
deal has been concluded for
the Royal Oasis, and the buy-



er’s name revealed, islikelyto won

be greeted with a sigh ofrelief . -°-
by allon Grand Bahama. — .
- The resort’s closure in 2004,
following Hurricane Frances
and Jeanne, put about 1,200
hotel staff out of work, cutting
Grand Bahama’s room inven-
tory by one third and increased
unemployment onthe island
to over 11 per cent.

SEE page 5B



Bahamians. We need to create
incentives that would apply only
to Bahamians.”

He said that currently, there
was a proposal fora Tourism
Attraction Incentive or Encour- ”
agement Act ,which would
serve as companion legislation
to the Hotels Encouragement

Mr Albury explained this”

SEE page 4B

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~

. PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Know your customer is

not just key in banking

THE first step in putting
together your marketing strat-
egy is to find out who your cus-
tomer is. If you don’t know

who your customer is, and
what their needs are, how will
you know what they want? It
never ceases to amaze me how

The Embassy of the United States in Nassau, The Bahamas
has launched via the internet, a solicitation to require op-
eration and management of: Local Guard Services for the
U.S. Embassy Nassau, and the Frederal Inspection Station
'(FIS) Pre-Clearance Unit, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
Bahamas. The contractor shall furnish mangerial, admin-
istrative and direct labor personal to accomplish all work
as required in this contact. The estimated number of hours
for guards is 153,833 per year. Performance is for a one
(1) year base period and four (4) one-year periods. Major
duties and responsibilities are to perform accesss control |
to limit entry only to authorized personnel or visitors, the
operation of walk-through metal detectors, hand-held de-
tectors and special monitoring devices.
All responsible sources may submit an offer, which shall
be considered. The government has issued the solicitation
on the FEDBIZOPPS site at www.fedbizopps.gov This
requirement will be issued only via the internet. No hard
(paper) copies will be mailed. Once on the FEDBIZOPPS
website, Click on “Vendors” button under browse
agencies, choose “STATE”, scroll down to “Western
Hemisphere Posts”, double click on “locations”. You
will locate all. documents related to this solicitation under
American Embassy Nassau, The Bahamas. Questions can
be addressed to Karen Wiebelhaus, Contracting Officer by
phone: (242) 322-1181 ext. 4415, or by FAX (242)
328-7838 or at wiebelhauskk @state.gov



many businesses fail to know
their customer and, by exten-
sion, their market.

Remember, marketing is
about getting more people to
buy more of your product at
the most advantageous price
to you. By finding out more
about your customers, you will
be in a better position to make
them happy. After all, happy
customers feel you value them,
that you will help them solve
their problems and meet their
needs,

There are three things you
need to know about your cus-
tomers.

First, where do they live? Do
they live near you, or do they
‘have to come to you from
afar? At the most basic level,
research of the geography, or
area where your customers live
and work, often will give you
valuable information about
whether a region, city or neigh-
bourhood area is suitable for
your product. |

For example, if you sell
water-skis, you may consider
marketing to communities that
live near the sea or lakes. Geo-
graphical research will provide
this information for you.

Second, what does your cus-
tomer look like? What age,
race or gender are they? What
income do they have and what
level of education have they
achieved? Are they generally
low income, middle class or
upper class? This area is
known as demographics and
can yield useful information.

For example, it is tradition-
ally thought that African-
Americans spend more on
clothes, shoes and personal
care products, tend to be more
brand loyal and prefer to shop

_ locally than other groups, Lati-

nos tend to prefer quality prod-
ucts to generic products, and






Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Programme of the 2
Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Department, Bank of The Baha-
mas International Limited is pleased to advise that the cheque disbursement for
| ALL students in the Loan Programme will take place at the Holy Trinity Activities
Centre, Stapledon Gardens from Monday July 31 through Friday, August, 11 2006.
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to'3:00 p.m. as follows:

NEW STUDENTS (CF el time recipients)


















tend to patronise Latino busi-
nesses, The mature population
is considered to spend more
on recreational, healthcare and
personal care products.

So, knowing more about the
make- -up of your local popu-
lation will help you in creating
the right promotions to appeal
to the segment you are target-
ing. For example, if you lived
in India and are selling curry
sauces, you may want to avoid
areas where elderly Indian
people live, as they tradition-
ally make their own sauces.
You should concentrate
instead on the middle classes
that buy “ease of use” and con-
venience products.

Be aware, there is also a pur-
chasing life cycle you need to
understand. A young, divorced
single mother with children will
have much different needs and
desires than a soon-to-be-
retired member. There is plen-
ty of information on the Inter-
net on all these segments, so
you would be well advised to
start studying this area.

Also, be aware that every _

customer goes through a buy-
ing cycle. It starts off with them
becoming aware of your prod-
uct. This is why a lot of mar-
keting is targeted at making
customers aware of the exis-
tence of products and services.
This is because, if they are
aware, eventually they might
evaluate the product to see
whether it will meet their
needs, And if it meets their
needs, they may trial the prod-
uct or service it. If they really
like it, they may become your
regular customers, At that
stage, your marketing should
be aimed to get that group to
buy more of your product,
more times, and at-a higher
price.

: The third thing you need to











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find out about your customers
is their motivation for buying
things. What influences their

' buying decisions? How often

and when do they buy? Are
they buying because they like
to try things out first? Are they
buying because they actually
need it? Or, are they buying
because it gives them social
status? Again, there is a lot of
research out there that'can give
you the answers to these ques-
tions.

So, you can see that “know-
ing” your customer is a lot
more than just knowing where
they live and what their demo-
graphic make up is. You also

_ need to know their buying and

behavioural preferences, which
takes you into the realm of
psychology.

Luckily, all this information
can be readily acquired
through research. I will be
dealing in more detail with the
research process in a future
column. However, there are
generally two ways in which
you can research your cus-
tomer.

The first involves getting the
information from your cus-
tomers direct. You collect the

‘data, analyse it and draw your

own conclusions from it. You
can use direct methods, such
as surveys at the till, telephone
interviews, e-mail interviews,

focus groups or street inter-.

views. You can start with your
own staff, particularly your
sales people, customer service
people, and those who already
use your product, and get their

= Soca

ern oe

#3600.96010.,

Back-To -Schoo!

Sale

feedback.

Make sure you read between
the lines, though. Customers
are known to tell you what
they want you to hear, or what
they think they should say, so
they can make themselves look
better in your eyes,

The second method of
research involves you acquiring
information about customers
from other sources such as
trade organisations, polling
organisations, newspaper and
magazine reports. This
research can be much more
sophisticated, dealing with the
psychological preferences of
customers, their aspirations,
buying patterns, level of
sophistication and perceived
needs. .

Marketing is an important
area for your business. The
first step in successful market-
ing is to try to get to know your
customers. Without this valu-
able information, it will be
more. difficult for you to struc-
ture your product, price, posi-
tioning, promotion and deliv-
ery.

So, in order to avoid the trap
of antipreneurship, make sure
you spend sufficient time on
researching this area as it could
pay large dividends for your

- future business success.

‘NB: Adapted from his

_ upcoming book, Antipreneur-

ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in
London and the Bahamas. He
is chief operating officer of
www.ezpzemail.com, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be
contacted at .markalex-'
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved







Day

Monday, July 31st, 2006
Tuesday, August Ist, 2006
Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006
Thursday, August 3rd, 2006.
Friday, August 4th, 2006

Surnames beginning with

A-C















RETURNING STU

Surnames beginning with




Friday, August 4th 2006.
Tuesday, August 8th, 2006 _
Wednesday, August 9th, 2006
Thursday, August 10th, 2006
Friday, August 11th, 2006











TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
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THE TRIBUNE




FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 3B

Major as a

consultant to the DIB

m@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business

Reporter

FORMER Bahamasair gen-
eral manager, Paul Major, has
been appointed as a consultant
to the Domestic Investment
Board.

Mr Major, who is also head-
ing up the Government side of
the task force relocating ship-
ping facilities from downtown

Bay Street to a new port in

southwestern New Providence,
is to serve in an advisory capac-
ity as the Board tries to ensure
more Bahamians can become
investors in their own country.

Making the announcement
on behalf of Financial Services
and Investments Minister, Vin-
cent Peet, Director of Invest-

ment, Basil Albury, said Mr —

Major’s banking background
and managerial experience in a
number of areas would stand
him in good stead. He was pre-
viously managing director at
Citibank (Bahamas).

“As a businessmen himself,
he knows the difficulties and
the challenges and the great
pleasures of small business
-Operations,” Mr Albury said
of Mr Major. i

“He has been there and he is
stil there, and so he is the sort
of person who we feel can help
us achieve the overall mission
of the Domestic Investment
Board - to empower Bahami-
ans to enable them to fully par-
ticipate in the economic devel-
opment and success of the
Bahamian economy.”

Mr Albury said foreign
investments provide a huge
opportunity for Bahamians to
form spin -off entrepreneurial
businesses.

Mr Major will have the task
of advising the ministry as to

how Bahamians can get
involved in these opportuni-
ties, Mr Albury explained.
The Board will likely oper-
ate in an advisory capacity
rather than a statutory one.
“We want to make the
process of doing business in
this country by Bahamas as
easy as possible. We’ve always
talked about putting out the
red carpet for foreign direct
investors - we will continue to

do that - but we want to be

sure that carpet is just as plush
for Bahamians who want to
invest in their country,” Mr
Albury added.

Mr Major said that over the
course of ‘his career, he has
done a number of things to

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help improve small business
in the Bahamas. He added that

small business in the Bahamian.

context was $50,000, $100,000,
and companies with sales up
to $250,000.

In the United States, Mr
Major pointed out that small
business started at $5 million.
Five to $10 million was small
business, $10 to $50 is medi-
um business and over $50 mil-
lion is large business.

“So our very definition con-
strains us in the way we think,

-and there is no way we can

compete, not only with foreign

interests but established

Bahamian interests, unless
there is access to capital by
those of us who have been





interested in working for any-
body any more, but rather
‘being able to capitalise on the
economic boom in a direct and
timely fashion”.

Mr Major said there was.a
lot of economic growth in the
Bahamas, but “the only ques-
tion is how does it get to the
poor Bahamian who is not







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2006 to remove your
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deprived of it for so long,” Mr
Major said.

“We all know stories of
Bahamians who have come up
with great ideas, and who have
had them taken away from
because they did not have the ,
funding to do it. They end up
being eitheras miniscule share-
holders or kicked out while the
business goes on to survive.”

Signed |
Pat Strachan!

t
i ti

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial institution with a
presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million customers worldwide. is seeking candidates
for the position of Area Manager GWS ‘Technology.

FUNCT IONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION |

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore trust companies servic-

ing non U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey Channel
Islands, New Jersey and Singapore. Products tarset wealth preservation around fiduciary structure.
The Technology Department supports all locations and local applications of the business. ooo u..

jac eis OTT



OVERVIEW OF ROLE 4 :
The requirements and responsibilities for all aspects of the Area Manager Role include (but are
not limited fo) the following:



i 5 4
- Lead or facilitate decisions affecting long-range organizational goals and strategic planning. i
"- Manage large-scale strategic/critical projects or applications, or global projects or |
applications. , |
- Manage multiple project managers or projects leaders.
- Develop strategies to reduce costs, manage risk, and enhance revenues or services.
- Follow Citigroup Private Bank “people practices”, including long and short-term career
development for employees, mobility process, and diversity.

ROLE DESCRIPTION

Client Management

- Build relationships: manage/partner with multiple senior level clients.

- Set strategic technology direction (6-24 mou.h horizon)

- Participate in initial meetings with clients; delegate projects to Projects Managers.

\



Risk Management ;
- Manage audit reviews; execute corrective actions plans. i
- Implement and monitor compensating controls for risks.
- Execute crisis management action plan. .

- Responsible for application of corporate. information security policies.

Resource Management _

- Financial budget management.

- Staffing Plan (employee, consultant, temp).

- Expense Control.

- Human Capital Development.

- Training, mobility, diversity, communication.
- Manage the technology infrastructure (hardware and software)

Administration ;

- Routine Audit/Citigroup Technology Standard policies..

- Support Legal and Compliance initiatives.

- Ensure all dedicated resources meet legal and compliance standards.

- Monitor overall project management tracking. using the firm’s standard tools.
= Communicate, monitor and enforce all technology policies and procedures.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

- Strong management skills.

> Strong oral and written communication skills.

- Interfacing with the business, internal and external vendors.

< Influencing and leadership skills. “

- MS Office Oracle, SQL. VB (historic programming experience with language and web
applications), ‘
Crystal Reports; Imaging technologies, financial systems, 4Series application.

- Project Management and Reporting.

- Minimum Bachelor's degree required with at least 4 years experience as a Senior
Technology Manager ina similar role

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume to;



Technology Unit Head
GWS/Bahamas Technology
Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited
P. O. Box N-1576,
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8732 OR

-mail: sat

Deadline for application is August 5, 2006.


eh Poa

PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006





FROM page 1B

could be particularly beneficial
to persons in the entertainment
arena, which has “died through
our eyes”.

ahamian-

“Tf an Act like this would
enable entrepreneurs to bring
in the materials that are needed
for something like this, this
opens wide that particular

industry,” he added.
Another example, he said

_ Was sports fishing, as the work-

ers on the boats would be able
to bring in these vessels duty



eg

NOTICE OF VACANCY

A vacancy exists for a Bahamian at The Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Limited in the Building and Developement Services Department.

Vacancy: Director of Building and Developement Services

The position reports directly to Management.

Qualifications/Pre-requisites:

Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering with a minimum of fifteen (15) years experience with
substantial knowledge in the construction industry w.r.t. building services, substantial familiarity
with building codes, substantial knowledge in urban engineering and substantial experience
in management of projects.Legal mindedness,computer literacy, the ability to communicate
effectively and speak publicly and a character of integrity are essential.

Responsibilities:

Managing the day to day operations of the Building and Development Services Department
with respect to Building and Planning Code matters, contracts administration of capital projects,
implementation of Management’s physical planning of subdivisions and overseeing the
functions of the City Management Department.

Resumés with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas
On or before August 10, 2006

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear, It is currently based in
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty-retailers in the U.S. and Europe
in addition to a manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand. Bloch International is in
the process of setting up operations in The Bahamas and is seeking a

Senior Operations Manager

Position Summary:

The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring that business objectives are met effectively and
efficiently and in a timely manner, The ideal candidate will also be required to assist in maintaining the smooth
running of the Bloch International business at new corporate headquarters to be established in the Bahamas. An
innovative and energetic profile is necessary to manage the operations of this growing and dynamic business.

- Reports to the Senior Vice President in The Bahamas.

Duties and Responsibilities

Develop a communication process to ensure Managers and Staff are kept well informed —

Ensure proper planning and evaluation of business strategies so that worldwide operations can. meet
profit goals, y

Co-ordinate marketing plans and strategies in conjunction with the senior management staff of Bloch

International and approval of range plans for each division and each distributor in order that sales _

targets can be met, '
Assist the Senior Vice President to monitor and maintain worldwide operation key performance
indicators (KPI’s). :

Required Skills/Experience:

The successful candidate for this position will be a self-motivated individual, possess excellent leadership
skills, be a team player, and be able to demonstrate flexibility to respond to a host of different challenges.
He/she must be accustomed to working on multiple tasks without continual ‘supervision. This individual
must be persuasive and tenacious in their relationships while maintaining professional standards of conduct
and strong customer focus. The ability to manage multiple projects, change priorities when needed and be
pro-active. will be essential, Ultimately the successful candidate. will be. able to work on his/her own
initiative and impact positively on the business on a daily basis.

An extensive marketing background with an in-depth knowledge of brand development
A solid, broad understanding of finance (including product costing and pricing)
Experience in distribution / licensing arrangements as business development in Europe, Asia and South
America forms part of the business plan. International:
An understanding of product development and the product development life cycle from:concept through to
market
° A good utiderstanding of systems (both computer and procedures)

Competencies:

Ownership of the role
Excellent financial knowledge mixed with excellent commercial knowledge to ensure excellent margin

protection

The ability to understand a different market and apply classical marketing strategies to the
aforementioned new-market

Exceptional communication skills oe

Ability to work with both vertical and flat business structures .

Compensation:

This is a senior position and the compensation package is designed accordingly. Compensation comprises a

base salary (low six figures) plus an incentive bonus based on performance and attainment of worldwide goals.
Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O. Box N3910
Nassau, Bahamas
pwcbs@bs.pwe.com



free.

“All of these areas are areas
reserved for Bahamians, and
this is how, in conjunction with
tourism, we can move ahead.
This is creating whole new
ground opening up many
opportunities for Bahamians,”
Mr Albury said.

He emphasised that not only
will businesses involved direct-
ly with the tourism industry
benefit, but food stores, gas sta-
tions and other retailers, too.

Mr Albury said Bahamians
will have to learn to take advan-
tage of this “trickle down”
effect.

He added that the initiative to
encourage Bahamians investors
by offering them special con-
cessions was a timely oné.

“The idea now is to have
Bahamians begin to think big. If
you look at the hotel industry,

only incentives under development

there are small guest houses.”
Mr Albury said. ;

The investments director said
that while the Domestic Invest-
ment Board will continue to
support these smaller ventures,
Bahamians need to make an
effort to expand their way of
thinking.

He pointed to the Cotton Bay
resort in South Eleuthera,
which is being developed by
Franklyn Wilson and Tommy
Sands Jr.

“One of the amazing things
to me was to see the dominant
Bahamian profile there, not
only in terms of ownership but
all of the subcontractors and
workers that were there,” he
said.

Mr Albury noted that of the
102 employees, about 98 or 99
of them were Bahamians.

“Here is an example of a

. Bahamian who is thinking big

about investment in this coun-
try, and I think it will be a suc-
cessful venture,” he said.

Mr Albury assured the Board
members that the Government
has an appreciation for the
major difficulties faced by
Bahamians aiming to become
investors in their own country.

“That major difficulty has
been access to funding,” he said.

Mr Albury said all sugges-
tions, considerations and pro-
posals pertaining to the
Bahamian investor have been

compiled in a Cabinet paper.

with respect for the future struc-
ture of the Board. ,
He added that he was confi-

dent the Board will serve in an -

advisory capacity in an effort to
eliminate another level of
bureaucracy for Bahamians
entrepreneurs.

OO ———————

WTO, from1B

“sidelined” the arguments
advanced by Mr Archer.
' However, it is not the WTO -

- itself that has collapsed, but just

the current round of trade.talks, —
which were focusing mainly on
agriculturé and industrial tar-
iffs and other barriers to free
trade.

The areas involved in the cur-
rent round were relatively
peripheral to the Bahamas, giv-
en that it does not have large
industrial or agriculture sectors, .
but if these talks had concluded
successfully the WTO would
have moved on to other indus-
tries.

These were likely to have
included services and invest-
ments, included under the
WTO’s General Agreement on
Services (GATS). The WTO
quietly dropped its Multilateral
Agreement on Investment
(MAT), although this was
brought back through the rich
nations club, the OECD.

Mr Moss yesterday told The
Tribune that the WTO talks col-
lapse had given this nation time
to look inwards, review its
investment and commercial
laws and policies, and see which
were compliant with. the WTO
and which were not.






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He added that the Bahamas.

should also withdraw its appli-
cation for WTO membership
that was submitted under the
former FNM administration,

saying it needed to be reviewed .

to ensure this nation received
the best benefits possible from
joining. .

“This is an opportunity we
need to take to develop core
industries that make sense to
the WTO,” Mr Moss said.
“We’ve been in tourism and
financial services for some time
now, and need to refine those,
and pick up on agriculture and
really develop that.”

He added that with modern
technology and farming meth-
ods the Bahamas could estab-
lish itself as a niche player ‘in
world agriculture, emphasising
that he was worried about the
country’s ability to feed itself.

“We believe now is the right
time for the Bahamas to con-
sider its tax regime,” Mr Moss
said. “This is not because of the
WTO, it is right and proper to
consider these things.”

Pointing out that the OECD
had dropped ‘ring fencing’ as a
criteria for including the
Bahamas on its so-called ‘tax
haven blacklist’, Mr Moss advo-
cated an income tax to replace
the current system of import
duties.

He said an income tax was’



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ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

While
inventory lasts

nd inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
d emergency roadside assistance.

needed because the Govern-
ment was not earning enough
revenue from the current sys-
tem to meet its civil service pay-
roll obligations, let alone public
infrastructure works.

Mr Moss said the import duty
system “prohibited” Bahami-
ans from getting into business
because they had to pay taxes to
import products and materials
they needed to start up.

He added that it was also

wrong for companies 'consid- |: _-
ered non-resident for exchange -’

control purposes, such as for-
eign-owned bank and trust com-
panies, to be exempt from pay-
ing taxes unlike their Bahami-
an-owned counterparts.



roe

Mr Moss said of the WTO: *-~

application: “It’s a perfect.

opportunity for the Bahamas to
withdraw its application. That

application was misguided by.

the former administration, and

to look at it again.
“Resubmit this if they feel
and the Bahamian people feel it

_is the way to go, but on’ terms

that benefit the Bahamas.”
No WTO committee has

" itis time for this administration ree:

been formed to analyse the .

Bahamas’ memorandum of -

trade that was submitted as part
of its membership application,
and no talks have begun with
countries that have an interest
in trading with the Bahamas.

ED

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 5B



Royal Oasis bidder

presents to G

FROM page 1B

The effects of more than
1,000 workers losing their jobs

have been felt by the entire _

Grand Bahama economy, with
the resort’s closure hitting the
International Bazaar especial-
ly hard, since the majority of its
customers were Royal Oasis
guests.

Finding a solution for the
Royal Oasis has not been easy,
and has pre-occupied the Gov-
ernment in relation to its pri-
mary objectives for Grand
Bahama. .

It is unclear whether the
resort can be opened before
the upcoming general election,
as the administration will be

“hoping for, even if a deal is
concluded today.

Construction companies that
assessed the Royal Oasis on
behalf of other prospective bid-
ders suggested it would take

- at least nine months to get the
property ready for re-opening
at best.

Negotiations over the Royal

Oasis were given. an added
complexity due to the fact that
they.were three-way, involv-
ing the Government, Lehman
Brothers and potential buyers.

It is likely that the priorities
of Lehman Brothers and the
Government did not coincide,
as the Prime Minister hinted
at on July 18. The private equi-
ty fund will want to realise the
highest price possible for the
resort, while the Government
will want the buyer to be the
one best suited to take the
resort forward for the long-
term.

In essence, the Government
will want the buyer to have the
resort model best suited for
the Royal Oasis and Freeport,
a good track record and the
financing in place to execute

properly.

Currently, the casino is the °

Royal Oasis’s biggest asset, but
the fact it has no beachfront
property means that it is most

suited to being a convention.

destination.

Among the most pressing
issues needing to be resolved
are the $22 million debts owed

abinet

by Driftwood (Freeport), the
holding company for the Roy-
al Oasis, when it closed the
resort in September 2004.

In January 2005, the resort
owed the Government $13 mil-

lion in casino taxes, and owed ©

$2.7 million to the Port
Authority and its affiliates, $2.5
million to the National Insur-

‘ance Board (NIB), and

$550,000 to Grand Bahama-
based suppliers.

In addition, the two hotel
pension funds, owed $4.1 mil-

‘ jion by the Royal Oasis, have

obtained a court order requir-
ing the contributions debt
owed to them to be repaid in
the event of a sale.

Discussions between the
Government, Lehman Broth-
ers and a buyer are likely to
focus on how much of, these
debts will be written-off, how
much will be repaid and who
will be responsible. for financ-
ing this.

Lehman Brothers has
already agreed to repay the $5
million that the Government
paid to former Royal Oasis
workers as severance pay.

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Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
322-21838/9

N/T ara Tel Am Tel Us VOT cA mn AON CC COL TR ae UTA ATO) Eat

Bloch International is the leading provider of specialty dancewear. It is currently based in
Sydney, Australia with sales and distribution to specialty retailers in the U.S. and Europe
in addition to a manufacturing operation in Bangkok, Thailand, Bloch International is in
the process of setting up operations in The Bahamas and is seeking a

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

JOB SUMMARY:

Organizes and directs all aspects of the accounting and financial control fimction of the Bahamas Branch and
teports operational results, Maintain accounting systems that ensure the proper accounting and recording of the
Branch’s resources, Provide management with relevant and reliable financial data necessary for budgetary and
‘financial decisions. Oversee the operation and management of the Accounting Department activities and staff





Reports to the Chief Operating Officer in The Bahamas and to the Chief Financial Officer in Australi.
















SPECIFIC RESPONSIBILITIES:

© Supervises and trains the general accounting staff.
e Regularly reviews entries to the general ledger to assure accuracy and compliance with established
" accounting principals and procedures ° :
: Assists the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) in the preparation of the annual budgets and forecasts.
¢ Responsible for compliance with all Bahamian fiscal regulatory requirements.
@ Plans and implements changes in the Branch’s accounting system, where necessary; and with approval
_ fromthe Chief Financial Officer (Australia), 4
® Recommends changes in financial policies and procedures, as necessary. Write policies and procedures
and ensure'they are being adhered to. )
Monitors established internal controls to assure proper compliance.
Recruits and evaluates personnel under own supervision.
Keeps the Chief Financial Officer (Australia) informed of the Branch’s performance.
Assures protection of assets of the business through internal. control and ensuring proper insurance
coverage,
e Maintain a regular review of income and expenditure to-ensure that cash flow is adequate to meet future
busiriess needs. .
¢ Prepares and makes recommendations based on financial analysis of operations.
e Keeps abreast of cutrent trends, practices, and developments in the profession. Makes recorimendations
for implementation of new practices and procedures.
_ © Performs and/or oversees all aspects of Human Resources functions.
¢ Coordinates and supervises IT function with outside company providing service.
¢ Oversee global Inventory management and logistics functions.



fay

As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian.
Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in the Bahamas, we are seeking candidates with
anewly acquired degree in Engineering. The
candidate should be a graduate with a Bachelors
Degree in Mechanical/Electrical Engineering
and should be a professional who thrives on
the challenge of developing outstanding
customer relations and service excellence.

M&E Limited



Assume other special activities and responsibilities as required.

Having both academic and practical back or ou: nd EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:

in mechanical/electrical concepts is an asset
but not mandatory. The successful candidate
will be afforded the opportunity to be trained
by Certified Caterpillar Technicians/Engineers.

Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, plus five (5) to seven (7) years experience in all aspects of Accounting, ideally
gained through increasingly responsible positions within Finance, two years of which must be as a department
manager or supervisor. Candidate with a professional accounting qualification and public accounting experience
at the Manager/Supervisor level is highly desirable.

“Experience ina wholesale distribution environment is also highly desirable but not mandatory.

COMPENSATION

The position offers a competitive salary plus incentive bonus based on performance and pension
insurance and other benefits.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M&E Limited, P.O. Box N-3238,

Nassau Bahamas, Attention President & COO,
or email me@me-ltd.com.

Interested candidates should submit their resume by 11 August 2006 to:

Senior Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Providence House

East Hill Street

P.O, Box N3910
Nassau, Bahamas
pwcbs@bs.pwe.com

Only persons being interviewed for this
positions will be contacted.

?.
PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHONY CANILLO
LOON, 10B, HAMPSHIRE COURT, FREEPORT,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 4th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, GRAND BAHAMA, _Bahamas.























Notice

NOTICE is hereby given that MOHAMMED TALAT
MAHBOOB ALI SHARIFF, P.O.BOX F 44317 is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for.
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
ier evionallty and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Freeport,
ahamas.



Notice
NOTICE is hereby given that ZAMRAD SULTANA SHARIFF,
-P.O.BOX F 44317, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 4th day of AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible
(or aera and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Freeport,
ahamas.

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-law
Notaries Public



Is seeking an ambitious
COMMERCIAL/CORPORATE

ATTORNEY |
For its Nassau Office

Candidates with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the
ability to work independently on various
commercial/corporate transactions.

AND A |

~COMMERCIAL/LITIGATION
ATTORNEY

For its Exuma Office

Candidates must have at least five (5) years
experience and must have the skills and the
ability to work independently on varied
commercial/litigation matters.

Attractive salary and benefits are available to
the applicants with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE MANAGING PARTNER °
P. O. Box. N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or ©
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
Email: info@halsburylawchambers.com







BIS

Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 1 August 200 6





Abaco Markets

‘Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

1.2983 1.2414 Colina Money Market Fund 1.298262"
2.9038 2.4169 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9038***
2.3915 2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480**

wei






Colin




BISX ALL 9 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
divided by the last 12 month earnings






‘Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of.Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS$-A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value



Private trust
amendments
to give ‘clarity’

FROM page 1C

lined and attractive way to ser-

vice high net worth individu-
als”, Ms Warren said: “The
legislation should introduce
clarity.

“We look forward to being
able to introduce an important
structure to the market that
fits with the existing regulatory

- regime.”

Currently

Ms Warren said there were
currently two ways to estab-
lish private trust companies in
the Bahamas, including apply-
ing to the Central Bank of the
Bahamas for a restricted trust
licence.

The new legislation will
enhance the process for estab-

nmensu
experience.






Jahn B. Foster
For: Continental Liquidators, Inc,
Liquidator

Send resumé, qualifications and 3 references
to “Employment” P.O. Box N-7507, Nassau.

| NOTICE 3

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation
yi

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), RIPOLL CORPORATION, is in dissolution.
CONTINENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and
can be contacted at 60 Market Square, PR O. Box 1906, Belize

' City, Belize. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses.
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before
September 4, 2006.

ZSlaiaeune

lishing and regulating private
trust companies, with the
Bahamas seeking to tap into
market demand for this prod-
uct.

- Companies

Ms Warren said the private
trust companies would also
link in to other products creat-
ed by legislative changes over
the past three years, including
special purpose trusts.

“The private trust company
is really geared to the high end
of the market. It’s an exciting
time,” Ms Warren said.

_ Private trust companies are
incorporated to act as the
trustee for a single or related
group of trusts, and are often
exempt from the licensing
requirements of institutional
trustees, such'as banks and
















NAV KEY.
*-14 July 2006
** 31 May 2006

*** - 30 June 2006

trust companies.

They are increasingly popu-
lar with clients from civil law
jurisdictions and those wanting
to create a family office.

Private trust companies |

allow settlors to have more
control over the assets held in
trust, greater control over
income and spending relating
to the trust, and they are more
familiar with the business
affairs of the settlor and bene-
ficiaries.

They provide confidentiality
and are seen as being more
cost-effective in some cases
that institutional trustees.

Many rival jurisdictions have
private trust company legisla-
tion, and without similar laws
the Bahamas could lose poten-
tial clients.

Clients.

Private trust companies
often encourage clients to fol-
low their assets and'domicile in

the jurisdiction where these are
located, meaning that the
Bahamian legislation could
facilitate an increase in the
number of high net worth indi-
viduals relocating to this coun-
try. : :

Offices

A rise in the number of fam-
ily offices in the Bahamas will
generate further economic
spin-offs; including greater
spending in the Bahamian
economy by the settlor and
their, families, and real estate
and construction activity.

Ultimately, a high net worth
family’s relocation and family
office creation could lead to
more investment in the home
country. A prime example of
this is Dikran and Sarkis Izmir- ,°

lian, the major investors and - |<"

shareholders in the $2 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment
by their company, Baha Mar
Development Company.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLIFFIN PETI-PHARD OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 4TH day of AUGUST,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. :













Notice
NOTICE .is hereby given .that BENNY LORFILS,
GENERAL DILVERY, MARSH HARBOUR , BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and. that any person who knows .any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4th day of
AUGUST, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship; RO.Box N- 7147, ABACO, Bahamas.



SG Hambros, part of SG Private Banking, is a private bank
providing a comprehensive wealth management service with
offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, Gibraltar and

The Bahamas.

SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Business Analyst.
Your main responsibilities will be to:

#@ undertake Business Analysis
and Application support roles
as assigned by Management

@ review existing procedures and
propose innovative
improvements to bring
processes to Group standard
and increase reliability and
efficiency

®@ participate in local and Group
projects as directed

You should ideally have:

â„¢@ a Bachelor's Degree in
Programming

@ at least 5-7 years’ experience _
in Information Technology

@ the capacity to learn quickly
and in an independent manner

@ a broad knowledge of banking
procedures and processes

@ excellent written skills
(experience in writing business
reviews, procedures, user
guides)

“SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) ;
licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies

§G Hambros

SG

Private Banking

SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP

_@ excellent communications
skills (experience in making
presentations and training):

B a good knowledge of Olympic
Banking Software (developed
by Eri Bancaire)

@ the ability to write queries
(SQL)

®@ advanced Excel skills including
formulae, complex form
creation, with check boxes,
buttons, drill down etc

B® akeen sense of Business
awareness

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted
to the following address, by close
of business on 8 August 2006.

The Human Resources Manager
SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas

Limited is
Regulation Act.

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
gasiicatis




4



BS BASES AON 8




FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006, PAGE 7B







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS ————
— oo dae a eae AUGUST 4, 2006

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PAGE 8B,FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS





COMICS PAGE



"Copyrighted Materia
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Available from Commercial

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-—«
. Step-b y-Step Reasoning
North dealer. tions, you must start by assuming
East-West ane that the contract can be defeated. The:
NORT next step is to count the number of
: ’ * ” ~ : 10 ie : tricks declarer is sure to make. A FRI DAY,
7 KQ quick survey reveals that there are
= ia) ‘ @AKQ103 eight of them in dummy consisting AUGUST 4, 2006
~- ee HA2 of five diamonds, a club and two ;
° ~ WEST EAST hearts whether you take the heart ace | ARIES — Mar 21/Apr 20
7 = i = ~— - #A83.- @KI92 now or later. You have R&R on the brain, but you
fo Be ll 7108643 VAS This, in turn, leads you to con- ‘ff have to buckle down and get through
095 362 clude that if declarer has the ace of | another grueling week at work,
#376 #10954 spades, he cannot be defeated. You } Aries. There will be reward enough
—- 2 SOUTH "therefore credit partner with the ace. | for a job well done.
Q65 Once you’ve reached this point, it TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 -
- ¥972 becomes much easier to answer the It may feel like everyone is out to get
-_ 0874 questions posed above. you this week, Taurus. But it is all just
+ » KQ83 First, you must win the heart at | your imagination. Just focus on the
The bidding: trick one, because if declarer has the | task at hand and these next few days
: North East . South West K-Q of clubs, he can score a heart, | 4% going to sail by.
1¢ Pass .1NT Pass _ five diamonds and three clubs before | GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21
Ps 3.NT your side regains the lead. Second, | Wishing for a change in your - -
. 4 Opening lead — four of hearts. you should not retum a heart-for the | finances will. get you. nowhere,
- : A defender should assume, as a — same reason. Gemini. You have to put a plan in
7 Ss matter of course, that the contract... Third, since partner needs to have [action to make the changes you
°@ a ' he’s defending against can be the spade ace for the contract to be | desire. Leo can help with the task.
e = = . defeated. If he does not cultivate this defeated, you must shift to a spade. | CANCER — Jun 22/Jul 22
- o Xe / attitude as a regular habit, many But you cannot lead just any spade. } Focus on family for the next. few
opportunities to defeat opposing con- If you return a low spade and South | days, Cancer. Afterward, you'll have
tracts will pass him by. has Q-x-x, as in the actual deal, he some time to devote to yourself.
_* eo” @& _ Let’s say you’re East on this deal can make the-contract by playing low There are big changes on the horizon,
and partner leads the heart four from his hand. so enjoy the downtime now.
against three notrump. Should you To cater to this possibility, you | LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23
take the ace or withhold it? If you do must return the spade jack to trap | Hold your head high when you pre-
ite take the ace, is it better to return a South’s queen. Regardless of how J sent a proposal to your supervisor,

Leo. Your ideas have merit and they
should be taken seriously. Surprises
are in store on Thursday.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22
Make the most of the time spent with
your $pouse or romantic partner,
Virgo. The hours will become fleeting
when a work project springs up unex-
pectedly midweek.

declarer chooses to proceed, he can-
not stop you from collecting four
spade tricks, and the contract is
defeated.

heart, or should you shift to another
suit? If you do shift, should it be to a
spade or a club?

To find the answers to these ques-



The



—< ; ° = Target LIBRA = Sept 23/Oct 23
a, Werden ea You’ll have trouble focusing on any-
the main 2 sae ge thing this week, Libra. No matter
oe body of egkree, how hard you try to devote your’
1 Chambers E z eHHes attention to one task, you’ll end up.
21st aa oe § ge8 working on multiple projects.
-- Century z pA Boke a
— (1999 E g BF gle Rather than going on the defensive
° edition) SAEESSES with a coworker, Scorpio, sit down
3 Bra g ei Bok and talk to the person about what’s
HOW many words of four letters “no Boa” bother ttn :
or more can you make from the 5 wok os B8eg othering you. It may or may not -
letters shown here? In making a: 328 Bd 8 2 SE work, but at least you’ll have tried.
word, each letter may be use: eo - =
once only. Each must contain the HOS oP 8 ae SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
centre letter and there must be at we as a4 ogk Now is not the time to make.a major
~ fears one nine-letter word. No BSSseeans life decision because your head is

just not into it, Sagittarius. Put off
heavy thinking for another few days
and skate through this week.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
No matter how hard you try,
Capricorn, you can’t get everyone to
like you — just accept it. Instead of
trying to win everyone over, spend
your energy on the friends you have.



pars TARGET :
Good 23; very good 35; excellent
45 (or more). Solution’ tomorrow.



+





























new





Actos rere AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
3° Get over being ratty (5) 1 Find the amount a child will getout word There is trouble brewing at home,
8 — Forher, pleasure’s only half nice (5) of bed for? (3,2) but you won’t be able to Ee ea
r i 2 Wildly throw a scare about — what’s up unless you confront those
Cees ane) | you live wih, Dont clam up and
11 Youandme (3) ‘ race (7) ; . a avoid confrontation.
12 Shoot, inthe garden for falstying ee cr PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
coins? (5) 5 Rain can be spectacular al the end that grows It’ll take a lot of effort to get through
13. The mere resutt of frostis - of winter! (6) beyond the the week, Pisces, because things will
only fair (7) 6 — Acunning snare is not so daft! (5) gumline a struggle for you. Relief comes
7 Something written with diplomacy when virgo enters the picture.

15 Possibly new companion, a git! (5)

18 For whom sailoring is 2 about a religious leader? (5)

9 Theayes have it (3)




























i ?
biotateg? (3) 5 Ganare cite plea ra _CHESS by Leonard Barden
19 Scold for being along time in church (7) aN
= ae : mae ee 14 Has he the heart of a giant? (3)
ician capable of treas : ‘
22° Agrowing source of hot air (4) 16+ feolnemeste d Cemicaion Sergey Rublevsky v Alexey
growing 17 Eatin hotels, as in the country (5) Shirov, Russia Cup 2006. Some

23 Was re the stuf 19 He wrote music and started a book Lpeleprrpeae S dek. of

wasn't woven (4) ona sculptor (7) : mood, full of brilliant ideas
24 Wherein swimmers are taught? (7) and tactics one day, then
26 Foracelebrity, a drop of Scotch ao becuase stumbling into oversights and

; nmeey py ACROSS DOWN blunders the next. Former

Serves bs a sifientr (6) 21 Amovingstaircan sound quite 3 Resided (5). 1 Proportion (5) Latvian Shirov, who now
ae) The German rade (3) musical! (5) ‘ ce ‘6 ; Aaa ”) represents Spain, has his share
31 Mum goes to town \oaeth som pootionti @) . ao room (8) of off oe oe Geance ea

with him (5) : ‘ 12 Wik (5) 5 Accounts positio

Whe: ni ake ee uu 13 Bounded (7) : book (6) can sacrifice pawns and pieces
ee oe ra troubled by ducks (6) ad 15 Magic spirit (5) 6 Large shrubs (5) freely if the result is to leave .

shelter from the wind (4,3) 25 Unctuous circle at a film centre (3) N 18 Tree (3) 7 Hard (5) your opponent's king fatally
34 Notmuch of an article to 27 Fortransport, take the Central Line to > aon 9. Male cal G) exposed. White's pawn guard

smile about (5) - Acton Central! (5) a. 22 Carrying salver (4) a Bnd) (7) is flimsy and justafew moves om described Shirov's play as
35 Tom's little boat (3) 28 legitimate punch (5) a a rt a) 46 African country (5) ee Sige - “awesome”. Can you spot the
26 Actively moving around in Leith (5) 30. Buryin the heart of Battersea (5) 37 Measure many a wild tree (5) 32 Mimicry makes her weep (4) tu - reared 6) attendant (4,3) live internet audience, one
38 One the bride might drag to 33 = Obtain inner 32. Indistinclly (7) 20 eat peer! (5) :

the altar? (5). satisfaction (3) 34 Donated (5) Be ScnMrTh i)

gee 3) 3 ae |

h Art LL
Yesterday's cryptic solutions | Yesterday's easy solutions 7 Gant 3 27 Artist's stand (5) 2
ACROSS: 9, | tu 10, He-as-one-d 12, Know (no) | ACROSS: 9, Retallate 10, One-sided 12, Norm 13, Adverp 38 Answer (5) 28 Feline (5)
3, Pag-oc-a 4, iver 15, Deter-gent 17, Have words 14, Immense 15, Therefore 17, Endangers 1 ie Ente 2 20, 30 Change (5)
18, No d-oubt 20, MO-dish 21, Vice 24, H-and--cap 26, $l 21, Loan 24, Pinafore 26, Casualt 32 Calf’s meat (4) PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
Nota 26, Fi 9 (wrung) 28, Seared 3 , Trifles 34, Sogn Zt Demands dod, Reco, 33 Listening organ (3)

oem Dot a oi sens oe “UIM [eUAyEL Ase Ue LIM TUXY PX 9

Ga-theri-ng Telling 39, Sticks 40, Bott Dossier 39, Roster 40, Odds 41, Vendetla

41, heeone 42, Great Dane 42, Shi

DOWN: 1, Kicked in 2, i faome beoer i, | DOWN: 1, Brunette, Stare Starve 3, Handsome 4, Delete 5,
B-reath-ed 6, Paid a vi Sombrero 6, Behind 7, Diamond 8, Seance 11,
Crosses 16, Ro-un-ds 19, brew 20, MaP (rev! Frleaie ot

23, Spring 25 . Cutting out 26, Nod (rev ZF Fr G-ate 30,
Register 3%, Thick-set 32, S-ne-athed ned (rev)
35, Tale- snes Do-in-gs 37, re

appxd PPO GJ! aM UaANd Zp ap SUM +2EY ZIM Sl
-paubisau ayn pur {+940 ZO p +TEU EE (HEU TE
yeasty) BEY yaxe 7 iPGXN'T *L9TB ORMIOS SEHD


¢ onfident England s om 3 t0 .
wrap up series in third test





Copyrighted | Material
Syndicated Content
-wAGE 10B, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

foi

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for Tour de New Peavidence

@ CYCLING
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

IN THE world of cycling,
summer is usually synony-
mous with the Tour de
France. But for local cyclists,
the Tour de New Providence
now takes centre stage.

The New Providence
Cycling Association, in con-

junction with Musgrove Inc,

will host the landmark event
as a part of the Bertram Cow-
boy Musgrove Cycling Tour.

Scheduled for August 19th
and 20th, the two day race will
cover three stages at various
locations throughout the cap-
ital.

The race features a number
of divisions including, Seniors,
Juniors, and Masters in order
to engage the full range of
cyclists throughout the coun-
try.

Within the various divisions, :

cyclists are broken down into
categories based on experi-
ence and abilities

Cyclists can look forward to





rom

a

being rewarded with a myriad
of cash prizes, trophies, and
gift certificates.

The Tour de New Provi-
dence is gearing to be the pre-

. Miere cycling event of the year

and will feature the top
ranked cyclists throughout the
country.

‘ @ Saturday, August 19th

(Seniors Male/

Female - Masters Male)

Stage I: at 8am Cyclists will
cover 65 miles starting/finish-
ing at the Coral Harbor
Roundabout Race site for this
event.

& (Junior Girls 17yrs Under,
Junior Boys/Girls 14yrs
under & Open Women II)
Stage I: Saturday 19th

August 8am start/finish at

Coral Harbor Roundabout,

distance 24 miles. Route starts

at Coral Harbor Roundabout,
travels along inner field air-

port road to the first round-
‘about, turns around and heads

back to'‘Coral Harbour at the
start/finish line. The cyclists

Co

merc

will complete this route three
times before the finish.

& (Junior Boys 17yrs &
Under)

Stage I: Cover one ‘lap of .

Coral Harbor, Carmichael
Road, Lyford Cay, Clifton
Pier, South Ocean, back to
Coral Harbour, up to first
roundabout again and back to
Coral Harbour for the finish.

i (Senior Male I, 11, III /

Masters/ Women I)

Stage I: 8am start. Covers
65 miles start/finish Coral Har-
bour Roundabout, the cyclists
will head from Coral Harbour,
Carmichael Road, onto Glad-
stone Road, left onto JFK Dri-
ve, along JFK Drive to Old
Fort Bay, Lyford Cay, Clifton
Pier, South Ocean, Back to
Coral Harbour. The cyclists
will continue onto inner field
airport road, pass both round-
about at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport, left
onto JFK Drive, to Old Fort

Bay, Lyford Cay, Clifton Pier,

South Ocean, Coral Harbour,

this route will be covered
twice by the cyclists.

@ Sunday, August 20th
(Senior Male/Female -
Masters Male)

Stage II: 8:30 am. Cyclists
will cover seven laps of the
South Ocean Racing Course
which is five miles for one lap.

(All of the Cyclists will com-
pete in this stage)

Stage III::-1lam at Coral

Harbour roundabout, the
place of the time trial course.
Cyclists will cover the. eight
mile Individual Time Trial
with the fastest/ leader of the
tour going first in that order.

@ (Junior Girls 17yrs Under,
Junior Boys/Girls 14yrs.

under & Open Women ID) |

Stage II: 8:30am. South
Ocean race site, leave inner
field South road /blvd turn left
on to the road that leads
passed Jaws Beach to Clifton
Pier, passed South Ocean
Resort, taking the first left
turn after the resort; coming

&

‘back to the start/finish line.

The cyclists will cover two laps
of this course.

Stage III: 11:30am back at
the Coral Harbor Round-
about, for the eight mile
Individual Time Trial which
will conclude the stages
for the Tour De New Provi-
dence.

Ml (Senior Male I, U1, WI /

Masters/ Women I)

Stage II: 8:30am start/finish
at South Ocean five mile
road course covering seven
laps.

Stage III: 11:30am. Back to
the Coral Harbour site, eight
miles individual Time Trial,
Coral Harbour roundabout to
the airport, first roundabout
and back.’

i (Junior Boys 17yrs &

Under)

Stage II: 8:30 am. South
Ocean route will cover three
laps of the short course route

Stage III: 11:30 am: Coral
Harbor eight mile Individual
Time Trial Course’ .

> -_

,





cial News Providers







.

i.cuveuwn
makes 4

> splash how
Real Madrid

Regatta events get ready to set sail

@ SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE excitement is still brewing
over the two Regattas which will be
held this holiday weekend.

The hosting of both the Cat Island
and the Acklins Regattas were forcing
sailors and fans to make a choice, but

as the August Monday weekend

"quickly approaches, the excitement
is ‘sending waves through the two
islands.’

Although the two Regattas will not
be as crowded as others held this year,
the camaraderie between the large
sailing community will still be on
show.

The majority of the skippers haven’t
revealed which one they will attend,
but government officials are hoping

that the 24 sloops that graced the Har-
bour of Morgan’s Bluff in July can
split for the two events. F
Skipper Eleazor Johnson expresse
his disappointment with the arrange-
ment in an earlier interview with The
Tribune, but did confirm that he will
make his decision and participate in
d faith.
Booth the Cat Island and the Acklins
Regatta are small festivals, with lim-

ike Seere

ited races in the A-C classes.

Some boats expected to partake are
the Red Hot Thunderbird, Red
Stripe, Lady Eunice, the Campari
Lady Nathalie, Ants Nest and
Anscbacher.

Competition is expected to start
today in both Regattas. Boats sailing
in the A class will have a five mile
course mapped out with three miles
for both the B and C class.
BY OT



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(242) 332-2860 | Tb (242 36-2304

(350350 | (0) 307-0





Avaveble
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Rose



FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



@ TRACK AND FIELD
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

IN LIGHT of the recent
mandate handed down by
Bahamas Olympic Association
surround athlete participation,
the Bahamas Amateur Athletic
Association has fully endorsed
the decision and has issued a
warning of its own to its ath-
letes.

A series of absences by the
country’s upper echelon of track
and field athletes has forced the
Bahamas Olympic Association
‘to take action regarding partic-
ipation at international meets.

Sir Arlington Butler, head of
the Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, said that the executive
committee has laid down the
gauntlet and will take a more
direct approach towards elite
national team athletes.

Butler has said athletes who

qualify to represent the coun-
try at the 2007 Pan American
Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
and opt not to compete will suf-
fer dire consequences and
become ineligible to represent
the country at the 2008 Olympic
Games in Beijing, China.

Travel

While the BAAA’s is respon-
sible for recommending nation-
al-team members for competi-
tion, the BOA has the final
word and ratifies the team
members prior to travel.

The national team represent-

ing the country at last week’s
Central American and
Caribbean Games was missing
many Bahamian household
names within athletics. i

Many top-tier Bahamian ath-~

letes, including Olympic 400m



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Williams Darling and Olympic

such an instance is unlikely to
4x400m Bronze Medallist Chris

occur again.



“You all must come to appreciate
that the people of the Bahamas
throughout the Ministry of Youth,
Sports, and Housing provides the
vast majority of you with a
subvention in order to assist you
with your training and ultimately
to represent the Bahamas,”



BAAA president Mike Sands

Brown, did not compete at the
CAC Games.

However, with the new more
ardent stance taken by the

Gold .Medallist Tonique-

BOA regarding the matter,

@ JUSTIN GATLIN and Floyd Landis have both denied any wrong doing.
(AP FILE ee

Officials send strong message in
rea i mE Un VAN

By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter





WITH two high profile case on the interna-
tional scene being investigated by the World
Anti Doping Agency (WADA), track and field
officials in the Bahamas are sending a strong
message to their athletes.

In an interview with The Tribune yesterday,
President of the Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Association (BAAA) Mike Sands said,
“The association takes the doping policy imple-
mented by WADA seriously, cautioning all pro-
fessional athletes to take extra careful steps to
ensure that they are not treating a symptom
with one of the banned substances listed by the
WADA.”

Sands said: “Athletes of such high caliber, be
it track and field, baseball, or cycling, the sport
doesn’t matter, find themselves under such doubt
with respect. to their performance. They all work
extremely hard to get to the next level.

“What I think is unfortunate is the money
incentive that has now crept into the sport. It has
created a win at any cost attitude by the profes-
sional athletes. commend WADA for making
every effort for trying to clean up the sport, but
there will still be that one person who will try to
stay a step ahead of the game, which might cost
them.”

The Bahamas has had several athletes sus-
pended by WADA - Renward Wells, being one
of them.

The former co-national record holder in the
100m received a two year suspension several

we"

years ago, bringing his career to an end as a

result.

National record holder in the triple jump Lee-
yan Sands still has case being viewed by the
IAAF.

Sands has already met with the tribunal board
and is awaiting their decision on the matter.

In March of this year, traces of methamphet-
amine were allegedly found in Sands and, as a
result, his season has come to an end, until he
receives word from the IAAF.

Sands added: “We preach to all of our athletes
the importance of staying clean. We currently
have in the junior levels doctors working close-
ly with some of the athletes.

“What a lot of persons don’t know is that
there are some medicines out there you can get
from over the counter that also have some of the
banned substances listed by WADA in them.

“So the only thing left for us to do is make
sure that the athletes are aware of the situation
at hand.”

Recent high profile cases brought to the
WADA concern Justin Gatlin, the Olympic and
World Champion, and Tour de France winner
Floyd Landis. Gatlin is‘also the co-world record
holder in the 100m with Asafa Powell.

A few weeks ago Gatlin admitted to ‘testing
positive for testosterone or its precursors. The
random testing took place on April 22nd, at the
Kansas Relays. If Gatlin is found guilty, he will
be facing a lifetime ban from the IAAF, the
governing body for the sport. Landis is also
being accused with testosterone violation. Both
athletes deny any wrong doing.

With their new, more rigid
position towards participation,
only in. the cases of extreme cir-
cumstances, such as injuries, will

exemption from competition be -

allowed.

While athletes may choose
not to compete at meets of less-
er prestige or “non-paying”

meets, the BOA has forced the’

issue and has made participa-
tion in these events necessary
if the athletes wish to compete






at the Olympic Games.

In an statement released by
BAAA’s president Mike Sands,
he re-iterated the BOA’s senti-
ments and fully supported their
decision regulate the participa-
tion of elite athletes. ©

“IT would be remiss if I did
not express my disappointment
in the amount of no shows for
the CAC Games, particularly
in view of the ‘feeble excuses’
that were given,” he said. ©

Sands said the athletes must -

have a greater appreciation for
the support they receive from
the Bahamas, mouelanty: or
otherwise..

“You all must come to appre-

ciate that the peoplé of the
Bahamas throughout the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports, and
Housing provides the vast
majority of you with a subven-
tion in order to assist you with
your training and ultimately to
represent the Bahamas,” he
said, “therefore public senti-
ments will not be in your favour
when you choose not to repre-
sent your country.”

In regards to athletes on sub-
vention and choosing not to
represent the country at inter-
national events, Sands said the



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BAAA’ s does not condone

such actions and deemed them
as “unacceptable.”

“Whilst I do appreciate that
most of you have chosen track
and field as your profession for
the time being, you must also
be reminded of your national
obligation if you are receiving
the people’s money,” he said.

Sands said the decision for
athletes to travel lies solely with

the BOA, thus, athletes should *.* ~ {

approach 2007 accordingly if
they plan to compete in the
Olympics.

Schedule

“The BOA is ‘ultimately.
responsible’ for entering teams
in the Olympic, Common-
wealth, CAC and Pan Am
Games,” he said, “Therefore
you should plan your next sea-
son’s schedule taking into
account the BOA’s position‘and
be guided accordingly.”

He said the need for sucha
statement to be released by the
BOA was timely and it had
become apparent that it was a
message more athletes needed
to become aware of.