Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 102 No.201



tet anneal ls



Committal order made
on Samuel Knowles’
extradition ‘must stand’

& By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE second and final appeal
of Samuel “Ninety” Knowles
has been dismissed by the Privy
Council.

_ In its judgmen:, the council
stated that the committal order
made on Knowles’ extradition
request must stand.

However, the judges
acknowledged that there is an
outstanding Habeas Corpus
- application by Knowles.

* This'was to have been heard
in the Bahamas Supreme Court

“on May 12-13, 2005, but Justice ©

Hugh Small adjourned the hear-
ing to await the Privy Council’s
judgment.on Knowles’ appeal
’. ‘against that decision.

.« While the Council said that
‘the application has not been the:
subject of argument or decision,
it declined to make any obser-
vation about it.

The US government sought
‘Knowles’ extradition from the
‘Bahamas to stand trial on drug
charges in Florida.

As a result it has made two
extradition requests, which have
led to a number of proceedings
in the Bahamian courts, culmi-
nating in the two appeals to the
‘Privy Council.

The first extradition request .

was made as a result of a feder-
al grand jury, which, on Decem-
ber 8, 2000, indicted Knowles
and others on counts of con-
spiracy to possess cocaine and
marijuana-with intent to dis-

tribute and conspiracy to import

the same drugs into ae United
States.



An order was made for the
release of Knowles in Febru-
ary, 2002, which prompted the
US to make a second extradi-
tion request, for which the same
magistrate, Carolita Bethel,
issued a provisional warrant on
February 6, 2002.

This was founded on an
indictment preferred by a fed-
eral grand jury on May 25, 2000.
It charged Knowles and others
with counts of conspiracy to

smuggle cocaine into the United .

States between June, 1995, and
1997.

The Council pointed out that
the second extradition request
differed from the first in two
respects: it was founded on an
earlier grand jury indictment,
and it related to an earlier peri-
od of time. It also charged dif-

_ ferent conspirators and depend-

ed on different evidence.
_ Knowles’ lawyers resisted this
extradition on the grounds that
the second extradition request
was an abuse of the process of
the court, that the US had not
made proper disclosure and that
the evidence was insufficient to
support the charges.

Bahamian courts rejected
these arguments on December
16, 2002. On the abuse point,
the court:was of the opinion
that a magistrate had no juris-
diction to stay or dismiss extra-
dition proceedings on grounds
of abuse, but also said that the
magistrate would not on the
facts exercise such a jurisdiction
even if she had it

In December, 2002, Knowles’

SEE page nine



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



PRICE —75¢



@ A WORKMAN cuts up the old boat which has eee left at Long Wharf yesterday. This fislowrs a Tribune article last

week in which beach users complained that the barge was a potential health hazard.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Miller: WTO
concessions
‘insulting’

li By CHESTER ROBARDS

WHILE the US and Euro-
pean Union are at odds as to
who is to blame for the failure
of the recent World Trade
Organization negotiations,
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Leslie
Miller contended again yester-
day that the concessions offered

by the WTO were “insulting”.’

Speaking to The Tribune, Mr
Miller reaffirmed his position
against the WTO’s plan to cut
farming subsidies.

According to a British Broad-
cast Corporation (BBC) Inter-
net article, Senior Trade Ana-
lyst Dr Claire Melamed said

SEE page nine

al





Investigation into spate of
bomb threats at airport

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE are anxious to
track down culprits behind a
spate of bomb threats at Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport.

With three threats in less
than ten days, officers have
now launched a serious inves-
tigation. The latest threat
came yesterday at the customs
warehouse on John F
Kennedy Drive.

Acting general manager of
the Airport Authority Joseph
Reckley said he and his col-
leagues.are not taking the sit-
uation lightly.

“The Royal Bahamas Police
Force in conjunction with
BTC (Bahamas Telecommu-

nications Company) are work-
ing together at this time in an
attempt to trace the calls,” he
said.

“We are looking to press
charges against the culprits, as
this is a criminal offence.”

The threat, reported to the
Airport Authority at about
2.12pm yesterday, did not
affect flight services, accord-
ing to Mr Reckley, as the
warehouse is about a mile
away from the airport.

Yesterday The Tribune
received reports that flights
were being made to circle the
airport, causing delays. But
Mr Reckley denied this was
linked to the bomb threats.

“As far as I know, we have

SEE page 11

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tel: 242-394-1789 © fax: 242-394-1859 « email: hwabahamas@coraiwave,com
In Freeport: tel: 242-351-2201 ¢ tex: 242-351-2215,









Police officers
give testimony
in murder trial
@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

SEVERAL police officers
from Freeport were called to
the witness stand yesterday to
give testimony and submit evi-
dence into the Cordell Farring-
ton trial for the murder of 22-
year-old Jamaal Robins.

Detective Constable Lavar-
do Sherman, a crime scene
investigator attached to the
Criminal Records office in
Freeport, told the court yester-
day of how on the morning of
Tuesday, October 28, 2003, he,
with a team of officers, accom-
panied by the accused Cordell
Farrington, travelled to a loca-
tion about 3.2 miles west of the
water tower on the Grand
Bahama highway. From there,

SEE page 11





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



media in a democracy. As a certain
television commercial used to say, it
has always been thus.

At certain times, such as election sea-
son or when there is a particularly hot
issue or when a government or individ-
ual politician gets into hot water, the
tension is likely to mount.

Bahamians are already looking to the
next general election, there are a lot of
hot issues and the government of the
day is in hot water — at least in the eyes
of its critics and opponents. So it is not
surprising that tensions between some
politicians and the media should height-
en.

All politicians are pleased when the
media gives coverage to the good things
they do or say. But some tend to get
quite agitated when the media gives
them short shrift, and the more sensitive
ones get downright apoplectic when the
media dares to point out their mistakes.

It can be discouraging when a par-
liamentarian makes what he thinks is.a
brilliant contribution to a particular
debate and gets only a few lines.- or no
lines at all - in the press. He is more
likely to think that the press is out to get
him rather than that his contribution
might not have been as interesting as he
thought.

It is not that the people responsible
for the media get it right all the time.
_ They have a big job to do; they are
human, and they often make mistakes
for one reason or another.

| he media have a number of

functions to perform in a
democratic society. A prime function
is to give the people accurate informa-
tion about what is happening in their
community and the world.

The more important that information
is, the more depth, context and inter-
pretation it should be given by respon-
sible media outlets, especially the press;

and this should be done as objectively as __

possible.

Context can include recalling and
eomparing what a politician says today
with what he said yesterday about a
particular matter, especially if it appears
to be a. contradiction. :

Obviously, there are endless possi-
bilities for:mistakes-and sometimes
important stories can be missed alto-
gether or misinterpreted because of the
lack of good judgment, insight or expe-
rience. Sensible politicians will find that
most reporters, and certainly editors,
will not take offence if this is pointed



out to them.
Another function of the media is to

lead public debate and to act as a forum

for the development and exposition of
public opinion. I believe it is better

. when these two functions are kept sep-

arate so that the public can easily tell
the difference between information and
opinion. This is what most reputable
mainstream newspapers practise.

But sometimes opinion can be news.
The media can be justified in seeking
and reporting as news the opinion of
qualified persons or even the general
public in certain cases; for example, a
controversial ruling by the Speaker of
the House of Assembly would almost
demand it.

Hee: I believe it tends to
erode.confidence.and.arouse..

suspicion when journalists frequently
drag opinion into their reportage, espe-
cially when those opinions are contro-
versial and attributed to unnamed
sources. It is certainly wrong to allow
personal attacks from behind the veil of



What is totally out of line... is for
governments and individual _
politicians to attempt intimidation
and threaten sanctions against any
section of the media they happen to
have a disagreement with. :










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anonymity.

It is in the forum of conflicting opinion
and debate that the relationship between
politicians and the media tends to get
really messy. Politicians, like everybody
else, have a perfect right to respond vig-
orously to media criticisms, and respon-
sible editors will feel duty-bound to
accommodate them.

What is totally out of line, however, is
for governments and individual politi-
cians to attempt intimidation and threat-
en sanctions against any section of the
media they happen to have a disagree-
ment with.

It is not only out of line, it is fool-
hardy because the fraternity of journal-
ists is likely to put. aside its own differ-
ences, close ranks and make life diffi-
cult for so foolish a government or politi-
cian.

Freedom of the press - which is really
an extension of the freedom of citizens
to exchange information and express
opinions without fear — is an indispens-
able ingredient of our democracy.

Any attack on that freedom is likely to

- be viewed as an attack on democracy

itself and is likely to raise the ire not
only of locals but of the international
community as well.

ee

he press has an inescapable

responsibility to protect mem-
bers of the public from libel, and it is
also in its own interest to do so since

the law provides aggrieved persons with
remedy in the event of failure. In some

. cases.that. remedy can be ruinous to the’:

offender. 4

That is why lecturers in journalism go
to great pains to make sure that their
students understand the laws relating to
libel before turning them loose on the

- public. It is also why responsible news-

paper editors pay particular attention
to this aspect of their duty to the public
and to the institutions they control.
The law also provides remedy for
members of the public in the case of

slander. This has become a serious chal- -

lenge for those who control the elec-
tronic media, especially hosts of radio
talk shows which have become so popu-
lar with Bahamians in recent years.

It used to be said by some outsiders
that Bahamians did not have a public
opinion culture. That was not true, of
course. That perception developed
because so few Bahamians chose, as we
used to say, to put pen to paper.

_ More Bahamians are writing today
but the truth is that we have always had

MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY - SATURDAY:

BILLY'S DREAM

STILL ALIVE



Some advice for politicians |
and media as election nears |

HERE is bound to be tension
between politicians and the’



All politicians are pleased when the
media gives coverage to the good
things they do or say. But some
tend to get quite agitated when the
media gives them short shrift, and
the more sensitive ones get
downright apoplectic



a strong oral tradition which manifested
itself in. great oratory in debates on mat-
ters local and international. These exer-
cises took place in barrooms, clubs, bar-
ber shops, under silk cotton trees or
wherever there was some shade.

his tradition was brilliantly cap-
tured by the late Eugene
Dupuch in his Smokey Joe Says broad-
casts over ZNS back in the 1940s.
Smokey, his relatives in the Babbie
family and his friends would debate in
colourful Bahamian vernacular, laced
with humorous pretensions to high Eng-

‘lish, what Pop Simlet (Sir Roland :
Symonette) was up to in the House of ;

Assembly as well as what Missa Hess
(Nazi leader Rudolf Hess) was about
when he parachuted into Britain in the
middle of World War IT.
According to Smokey’s narrative,
when Hess pompously announced that
he was “born and bred in Germany”,

his British captors responded: “Well, j

yuh only johnny cake over here!”

So it was not surprising that, with the
emancipation of radio by the FNM Gov-
ernment, Bahamians took to the air-
waves with much relish. That was a
good thing for our democracy, but as
with most good things there are those
who would spoil it.

There are the chronic callers who have
an opinion on everything, the propa-
gandists who deliberately or ignorantly
spread misinformation, and the slan-
derers who seek to ruin the reputation of

‘others.

Ave of these present a serious
challenge to the talk show
hosts, but it is a challenge they must
take seriously and deal with responsi-

bly. On some future occasion, the dam-

age done to a person’s character may }

not, with all the goodwill in the world, be
written off with an apology.
' There are technical precautions that
the radio stations can and should take
and the talk show hosts should be aware
that they place themselves and their pro-
prietors at grave risk by exposing them-
selves and the public to these malicious
slanderers.
They ought to know, too, that a court

may be even more annoyed at them if :

they put their victims to the trouble of

_ having to get affidavits because the tape

recorder was not-working.

www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
- Sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.















- ed opinion, ordered.the district



THE TRIBUNE

et

°. In brief »
Judge bars‘
removal of . +.
Cuban book |
from schools ‘

@ MIAMI



A FEDERAL judge on Mon- ,.,"
day temporarily barred the Mia- .;,
mi-Dade County School Dis- . ;
trict from removing a children’s «,,
book on Cuba from school »
libraries and, in a strongly word- _.
to replace any books it had
removed by the end of the day, *”
according to Associated Press. “”

In the 89-page preliminary “@
injunction, US District Judge |,
Alan Gold ruled in favor of the *”
American Civil Liberties Union °\’
of Florida, which is seeking to '”
keep the book, Vamos a Cuba
(“A Visit to Cuba”), in schools. '«
Gold’s decision would keep the i. |
book on the shelves until the :4
case goes to trial. di

Last month, the Miami-Dade +1
school board voted to remove
the book from its elementary 1s
schools after a parent.com- »5
plained its depiction of life in 5

?- the communist nation was mis-

leading and offensive because .;3,
it paints an overly rosy picture ;.,
of life in the country. The board ,
then expanded that order to all
24 books in the series on chil- _.
dren living around the globe.
The Miami-Dade Student.»
Government Association and ::
the ACLU said the board’s «’
decision violated students’ con-.,,.
stitutional right of access to .*
information under the First
Amendment. ae
Vamos a Cuba is by Alta °
Schreier. es:

Coffee
growers to =:
be paid after .
hurricane ~

mg JAMAICA
Kingston a

= ao &

THE Jamaican government »

will give coffee growers pay-
ments they had sought to help —
them recover from a hurricane ;,
that devastated their farms in j,
September 2004, the agriculture », ~
minister said Sunday, accord- .
ing to Associated Press.

The government will pay 7.

_ Jamaican$100 million (US$1.64 ®

million) on July 28 to more than
8,000 coffee farmers whose {|

- farms were devastated by Hur-




ricane Ivan, said Agriculture %
Minister Roger Clarke.
Farmers had paid insurance
on their land through the gov-._-
ernment-run Coffee Industry}
Board to Dyoll Insurance Com- |
pany, which had filed for bank-
ruptcy and was placed in liqui-
dation in early 2005. In June, a }
judge ruled that Dyoll should :
pay the farmers Jamaican$3.1 °
million (US$51,000) in com- ,;
pensation, but that payment was -
delayed after the company ;
appealed the decision.
The farmers, who sell their ;
beans to the Coffee Industry |
Board, said the government had !
e€

neem age

cilia

to expedite at least part of the |
payment.

Ivan caused Jamaican$18 mil- ‘;
lion (US$295,100,) damage to ©
the coffée industry, which |
earns Jamaican $45 million :
(US$737,700) a year, according |
to the agriculture ministry.

Most of the damage was done ;
to properties in the famous cof- j
fee-growing Blue Mountain ;
region. 4 |

asp



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 3



ee LTT aN
‘Ingraham recommends deputy
to Constituencies Commission



In brief |



Man is
arrested
following
murder

A SUSPECT has been arrest-
ed in connection with the mur-
der of the 30-year-old man
found stabbed to death in his
home over the weekend.

According to Assistant Com-
missioner of Police Reginald
Ferguson, the suspect, who was
arrested on Saturday, is now
assisting police with the investi-
gation of the murder.

The victim has been identi-
fied by police as Andrew Far-
quharson of Malcolm Road. Mr
Farquharson died at the scene.

Speaking to The Tribune on
Sunday, Chief Superintendent
Marvin Dames said the police
are in the advanced stages of
their investigation and may
have established a motive.

The incident, which occurred
around 9.50am on Saturday,
could have been the result of a
domestic dispute, police said.

According to Mr Dames,
there is a good chance the
police may have this matter
"wrapped up soon."

Police still
unsure of

cause of |
rectory fire

POLICE are still not certain

what caused the fire which
extensively damaged. the
Catholic rectory of Holy Fami-
ly early on Friday.

Father David Cooper was
rescued by fire fighters, around
3.30am after they reportedly
received a call of a structural
blaze.

Chief Superintendent of
Police Marvin Dames said:
“Investigation continues and we
are. making very good
progress.”

The massive fire damaged
only the priest’s home, located
directly behind the parish
church off Robinson Road.

FOR cL i eM | Baad
9 ok, tilizer; ITE a

est Control’
De aT Eis
322-2157





THE Free National Move-
ment has announced the rec-
ommendation of deputy leader
Brent Symonette to the Con-
stituencies Commission.

Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham said he expects to
inform Govenor General
Arthur Hanna of his selection
today.

“My colleagues and I wel-.

come the recent announce-
ment in connection with the
appointment of the Con-
stituencies Commission,” Mr
Ingraham said in a statement
issued yesterday. :

“Mr Symonette is an expe-
rienced parliamentarian with
a thorough knowledge of the
whole Bahamas and I am con-
fident he will effectively rep-
resent the opposition and the
people of the Bahamas in our
efforts to achieve a fair and
equitable adjustment of elec-




@ BRENT Symonette

a

toral boundaries,” he said.
Mr Ingraham explained that
the constitution provides for
the appointment of a commis-
sion to review the number and
boundaries of electoral con-
stituencies into which the
country is divided at intervals
of not more than five years.

On the commission will be
the speaker of the House of
Assembly, who will act as
chairman; a justice of the
Supreme Court, who will act
as deputy chairman; two MPs
appointed by the governor
general on the advice of the
prime minister, and one MP
appointed by the governor
general in accordance with the
advice of the leader of the
opposition.

“This is an extremely impor-
tant exercise in a process
which is designed to give the
people of the Bahamas the
opportunity to express their
will at the polls by selecting
those persons who will repre-
sent them ‘in parliament and
form the next government of
the Bahamas,” said Mr Ingra-
ham.

The statement continued:
“The opposition will co-oper-
ate fully in all efforts directed
towards achieving the consti-
tutional requirement that the
number of voters in each con-
stituency shall, as far as is rea-
sonably practicable, be the
same.in each constituency.” :

“The opposition will also
support any reasonable rec-
ommendations having regard

- Patties respond to election rumours

@ By KAHMILE REID

RUMORS that the general
election might be called as ear-
ly as October remain uncon-
firmed — but all contenders say
they would be prepared if this
were in fact the case.

It has been suggested by
several sources that Prime
Minister Perry Christie is con-
sidering calling the election
either in October of this year
or in March 2007.

Chairman of the governing
Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) Raynard Rigby did not
confirm or deny the rumour.

He said the party’s machin-
ery is in full gear, irrespective
of when the election is called.

“All the constituency branch-
es are equipped and ready and
we are in full mode,” he said.

As a government, Mr Rigby
said he believes that the PLP
has been steadfast in keeping
its promises.

“We have proven that we
have the ability to move the
country in a positive direction
for the Bahamian people.”

Mr Rigby asserted that -

based on its record and the

i work it has done, the PLP will

remain in affice.

Desmond Bannister, chair-
man of the official opposition
party Free National Move-
ment (FNM), said he has not
heard the rumour of a possible

_ 2006 election, but said his par-

ty also has everything in place.

Mr Bannister said of the
present government that: “the
people of the Bahamas want

_ to see their backs — and when-

ever they call elections, we are
ready.”

He said that when one looks
objectively at the issues affect-

ing Bahamians, it is highly .

unlikely for the PLP to win
the next election.

“The indecisiveness of the
prime minister, unemploy-
ment level going up and stay-
ing over 10 per cent — they
have lost their currency, they
don’t have any advantages,”
Mr Bannister said.

Bahamas Democratic
Movement (BDM) president
Cassius Stuart thinks it is near
impossible for the government
to call an election as early as
October.

However, he said that no
matter what, his team will be
prepared.

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The BDM, he said, is in the
process of ratifying candidates
and is aiming to contest 40 con-
stituencies. “In a few weeks we
will be announcing our candi-
dates,” he said.

Mr Stuart said the Bahamian
people need an alternative to
the PLP and the FNM and that
is what the BDM is providing.

Informed sources also noted
that calling an election as early
as October may have serious
implications on the voter turn-
out — as only 68,111 Bahamians
are currently registered to vote.

In the 2002 general elections
144,758 Bahamians were regis-
tered to vote, however only
130,536 actually voted.

@ Bank of The

to other provisions of the con-
stitution relating to geographi-
cal and other considerations.
“TI take this opportunity once
again to urge all qualified citi-
zens to register to vote as soon

1

as possible. This will greatly
assist the commission in deter- °
mining boundary changes and
will ensure the right to vote in
case of an early election,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



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Friday, August 4th, 2006

RETURNING STUDENTS

Surnames beginning with .

Day

Friday, August 4th 2006
Tuesday, August 8th, 2006
Wednesday, August 9th, 2006
Thursday, August 10th, 2006
Friday, August 11th, 2006

TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE

STAPLEDON GARDENS

> Returning Students: Students AND Guarantors should be present and MUST

bring relevant identification, (valid Passport and National Insurance Card).

© New Students: Students AND Guarantors should be present and MUST bring

relevant identification (valid Passort, National Insurance Card, Current job
letter and copy of Utility Bill).

> Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation have been
completed and ALL loan accounts are current!

NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!










PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 °.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398



Just who is ‘double dipping’?

THERE has been much confusion over the
Prime Minister’s Pension Act and what the
late Sir Lynden Pindling should have been
paid after he was defeated as prime minister,
but continued to serve in parliament as oppo-
sition leader.

There was no prime minister’s pension bill
when the PLP. government was voted from
office in August, 1992. After his government’s
defeat Sir Lynden expressed the wish to retire.
Mr Ingraham, as the new prime minister,
realised that a pension bill would have to be in
place to accommodate this wish. As we have
already said in this column, Mr Ingraham, Mr

‘Perry Christie and Sir Lynden sat down and
discussed the matter, considered the various
Caribbean pension plans for prime ministers
and arrived at a formula that all three agreed.

However, the Bill did not say when the
pension was to take effect, nor did it provide
for a situation where a former prime minister,
although retired from that post, would cross
the floor of the House and occupy the oppo-
sition bench. When these unforeseen conflicts
arose in various other Caribbean islands, a
simple amendment rectified the situation,
making it possible for the former prime min-
ister to either opt for an MP’s salary or take
his pension, but not to receive both.

The Barbados Act, for example, says that if
a prime minister returns to the House as a
legislator and receives a salary as such, his
pension is not to be paid. However, “where the
quantum of Prime Minister’s pension exceeds
the quantum” of the legislator’s salary “the
pension is payable onlyto'the extent of such
excess.” In other words, if he accepts the prime
minister’s pension, he can’t have, the.parlia-
mentary salary...

In their discussions it was clear that Sir
Lynden understood that the payment of the
pension was to start on his retirement from
politics. The only evidence to indicate this was
a note written by Mr Ingraham and left on
the file stating that it was agreed that the pen-
sion payment could only start on his retire-
ment.

Sir Lynden served from August 1992 to
April 1997, drawing an opposition leader’s
salary of $50,000 per year. He did not receive
his pension until his retirement. Neither Sir
Lynden, nor Mr Christie, seemed to have a
problem with this arrangement.

As Mr Ingraham says today: “Sir Lynden
understood clearly that his pension was not
due until he retired.” Mr Ingraham said that

during Sir Lynden’s lifetime he had many dis- -

cussions with both Sir Lynden and Mr Christie
and neither ever brought up the question of
the pension. Sir Lynden obviously did, not

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expect payment while he was an active legis-
lator. Nor did he question why, on his retire-
ment in 1997, his pension had not been made
retroactive to 1992 when he ceased to be prime
minister. Mr Ingraham says that was because
Sir Lynden understood the agreement.
However, the question arose again when
the FNM was defeated at the polls and Mr
Ingraham, having served almost 10 years as
prime minister, was convinced by his con-
stituents to continue as their representative
in the House. At that time Mr Ingraham opt-
ed to take his pension. He asked that the law
be amended, as was done in other Caribbean
islands, to accommodate this wish and to bar
him from being paid his parliamentary salary.
“Clearly,” he told the House, “since I am

already in receipt of the salary payable to a_

Member of Parliament as a pension, I should
not now also receive this sum again. To do so
would be ‘double dipping.’” For three years
this salary was not paid to him, until Fred
Mitchell made the mistake on a public plat-
form of accusing him of receiving it and of
“double dipping.”

The Christie government did not amend -

the law. 4
As we said in this column yesterday, when
government discovered that in fact Mr Ingra-
ham was not “double dipping”, they ordered
the Treasury to transfer a lump sum to his
account for the missing years, thus forcing
him to appear to be “double dipping”. Mr
Ingraham has not touched the money. He says
that every attempt he has made to return it to
the Public: Treasury has been thwarted.
However, in June, 2003, Prime -Minister
Christie told the House that. in an:effort to
correct an “unlawful, illegitimate decision”
and remedy “a great historical misfortune”, his
government had decided to pay Lady Pindling
a lump sum of $500,000 as the pension that was
not paid Sir’ Lynden for the five years that he
served as opposition leader. Was the opposi-
tion’s salary, which had already been paid Sir
Lynden for his service, deducted from the

pension that she was to receive, or did gov- .-

ernment “double dip” when it made the
$500,000 payment — in other words was the
parliamentary salary paid twice? Is this why
the PLP are so anxious to force Mr Ingraham
to “double dip”?

_.Mr Christie has never said what the $500,000
included. Now that certain government mem-
bers have made this matter an issue, we think
Bahamians are entitled to know how this
$500,000 was calculated and whether it also
included the opposition leader’s salary, which
‘Sir Lynden had already been paid during his
lifetime.






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THE TRIBUNE



The starting

ate of ZNS

Document - The Tribune, Sep- -

. EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN YOUR June 1, 2006 edi-
tion of The Tribune, Dr Juli-
ette Storr calls into question the
time honoured custom of the
Broadcasting Corporation of
The Bahamas celebrating May
26, 1936, as the official starting
date of broadcasting by Radio
Station ZNS “in the face of
insurmountable archival evi-
dence” that ZNS Radio began
broadcasting on May 11, 1937,
according to her research.

Indeed, there are archival
documents which confirm the
formal opening of the broad-
casting studio on May 11, 1937,
the eve of the Coronation of
His Royal Majesty King George
VI. The formal opening of the
Colony’s radio station was
billed a8 a highlight of the cele-
bration and the inaugural
address was made by the
Administrator the Hon James
H Jarret. But that was not the

_ beginning of broadcasting by

the station, referred to at the

time as “Government Broad-

casting Station - VP7NF

(renamed ZNS in 1937), which’

was already up and running.
This is confirmed by reports in
The Tribune, The Nassau
Guardian, ‘and in the Depart-
ment of Archives booklet -
“Highlights in The History of
Communication in The
Bahamas 1784-1956”.

On April 21st, this year, Her
Majesty Queen Elizabeth IT cel-
ebrated her 80th birthday; but
the official birthday will be
observed oh June 17th. So it is
with ZNS. It had its beginning
and those who pioneered it,
insist that it was on May 26,
1936. It had a formal opening,
May 11, 1937, both dates worthy
of celebration; but the found-
ing fathers who created it firm-
ly fixed May 26, 1936, the soft
opening, as its starting date, and
this anniversary has been faith-
fully observed, not as a myth,
but an historical fact, with good
reason.

- Also, on July 4th, 1977 —
starting of TV-13,) on-air test-
ing; July 10th; 1977 — official
start; October 20, 1977 — for-
mal opening by the Queen.

The accounts of some of
those pioneers are themselves

“archival evidence”, which can-.

not be ignored or taken lightly,
and following are what some of
these gentlemen of the highest
integrity had to say regarding
this subject:

Mr Kenneth R Ingraham, the
first Bahamian Director of The
Telecommunications depart-
ment, in a letter to the Colonial
Secretary, the Hon F.A Evans,
dated July 6, 1948, writes: “We
started broadcasting in a very
humble way in 1936 with a
transmitting power of 1/4 Kw.
The studio was situated in a lit-
tle building on Shirley Street,
not far from Victoria Avenue.









RA











auto =.
sales
LIMITED






LETTERS
ANCESCAUlo gical el conc

We were “on the air” two hours
each day, and 90 per cent of the
programmes were of the
“canned” variety. His Excel-
lency, Sir Bede Clifford was

. very interested in broadcasting

and a committee, under the
Chairmanship of the Hon J H
Jarrett (then Colonial Secre-
tary) was appointed. I was a
member of the Telecommuni-
cations staff at the time, and
had worked on the engineering
side and served as technical
adviser to the committee.
(Bahamas National Archives,
Document #229 - Colonial
Records).

The Hon. William’ Hart
Sweeting, was Chairman of the

' Board of The Bahamas Radio

and television Commission from
1957 to 2962. He was also the
Receiver General and treasurer
of The Bahamas and ended his
distinguished career as Chief
Secretary and Deputy Gover-
nor.

Delivering the keynote
address at the formal opening of
ZNS’ present radio studios in
Centreville on August 31, 1959,
Mr Sweeting said: “There were
no regular broadcasting in The
Bahamas before 1936, although
occasional broadcasts were
made over a Telegraph Depart-
ment transmitter. In that year,
at the instigation of the Colonial
Secretary and the Assistant
Superintendent of Telegraph,

’ Mr L J Hughes, a service was

commenced in what was the
“Snappy Hat Shop” on Shirley
Street, where Sir Victor Sas-
soon’s offices are now located.
It was a tiny building divided
into two rooms, the operator
and control panel being in the
front room and the studio in the
back. The station operated on a
frequency of 640 Kes four hours
daily, from 6.00 to 10.00pm,
with a power of 500 watts.

The station was operated on a
volunteer basis by The Tele-

' graph Department staff with a

panel of volunteer announcers
of which I was one and it pro-

‘vided an interesting cross sec-

tion of all the problems which
beset broadcasting”. (Archival

Mail ‘is not being: ‘«
delivered on time’ :

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT HAS become increasingly obvious over the past few years that ‘

tember 1st, 1959).

Also in that edition of The ‘ds

Tribune, (September 1st, 1959)
is an account of the beginning of
broadcasting. In the Editorial -

TIR
list

‘it

titled: “ZNS - Calling”, Sir Eti- (7°

enne Dupuch, who once served

on the Broadcasting Advisory 2).

Committee writes: “The Station
was. opened on May 26,
1936...etc, etc.” Hans
‘Writing on his tenure at ZNS,
Mr Kenneth P Brown, the sta-
tion’s first

1937, and General Manager
recalls: “When I started as the
station’s first salaried announc-

professional
announcer, hired in January ‘

er, ZNS was on the air for only fi

one hour each evening. The sta-

tion had been started on an =
experimental basis about 18 ©
months earlier with the volun- ;

teer services of public spirited
individuals acting as announc-
ers.

Programme organisation was
haphazard. Some evenings: am
told, the volunteers arrived but
no one knew what was to be
broadcast.” (“Heritage - 70
years of Broadcasting” - p161).

Mr H R (Rusty) Bethel - the
father of Bahamian Broadcast-
ing, delighted in telling the ZNS
Story, which he knew better
than most. Addressing the
Rotary Club of Lucaya,
Freeport, on October 24th, 1989
- he said: “The station went on
the air on that eventful day -
May 26, 1936. Before it was
assigned its own frequency in
May 1936, broadcasts to the
Out Islands were made,on The
Telecommunications Depart-
ment frequency that was used
by ships at sea. The infant sta-
tion went on the air for the first
time on May 26, 1936, to be

exact at 6.30pm; with a power of

500 watts.”

No myth, but historic data on .

the development and the begin-

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ning of ZNS Radio, and its net- *

work of stations:

ANTHONY FOSTER
General Manager, '

The Broadcasting
‘Corporation of the
Bahamas. ae F
Harcbour “Rusty” Bethel
Drive, ae
Nassau,

July 17, 2006.

within the civil service, slack is back, and nowhere is this malaise
more evident than at that dreary cavern on East Hill Street, the Post *"!
Office. Simply put, the mail is not-being delivered on time. This is °‘ t
particularly aggravating where utility bills, bank statements and tho
credit card bills are concerned, for while not being models in many ’.

when disconnecting your supply and levying reconnection fees, me ;

and interest charges to your account. For example, I received yes-
terday my electricity bill for May post marked May 18, 2006, and

this is not an isolated incident.

I would be obliged if the Postmaster General would comment on
the shambles he presides over, as any enquiries directed to the rank **
and file are either totally ignored or greeted with surly indifference.

Winston Churchill could very well have been speaking of Bahami- *?°
an civil servants when he remarked, “No longer servants, no longer gry

civil”.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
July 19, 2006.

ESTABLISHED LAW FIRM

seeks to employ:

1. Legal Secretary

Qualifications:

5 years experience in
conveyancing, knowledge
of litigation desirable.

2. Entry Level Secretary

Qualifications:

minimum of 3 BGCSE’S, including
English and Mathematics

Salary commensurate with qualifications and

abilities.

Please send resume and references to:
LawOffice_Mail@yahoo.com



mie WO oT

SES SEE RET neh NO eR NE
Clee eee eer Le are ee i

63°
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awa a a,





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 5





In brief —

Teen, faces
charge

of raping
46-year-old

A 14-YEAR-OLD boy was
arraigned in court yesterday and
charged in connection with the
rape of a 46-year-old woman.

The teen, who appeared in
Juvenile Court, is charged with
raping the woman on Friday,
July 21, as well as forcibly
detaining the woman with the
intent to have intercourse with
her.

The accused was ordered to
attend the Sandilands Rehabil-
itation Centre for 30 days,
where he will undergo psychi-
atric evaluation.

He will return to court on
November 2.

Man faces
charge of
unlawful sex
with woman

A 34-YEAR-OLD man
appeared in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday and was charged with

having unlawful sex with a
woman suffering from a men-
tal disorder.

It is alleged that on June.22,
Marvin Gibson had unlawful
intercourse with the 23-year-old
woman.

Gibson, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers yesterday, was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

The case adjourned to Octo-
ber 23 when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

Families of
‘Guantanamo
prisoners .
launch appeal
LONDON

FAMILIES of two long-term
British residents held at the US
military prison at Guantanamo
Bay launched a legal appeal

Monday agdinst.the British gov-

ernment’s refusal to:press Wash-
ington for the men’s release,
according to Associated Press.
The court was told that
Britain refuses to ask for the
detainees’ return because it can-
not guarantee that they will be
placed under tight security mea-
sures that the US is demanding.
. In May, the High Courtiruled
that the government did not
have to act on behalf of Jamil

'-.-el-Banna, from Jordan, and

Libyan national Omar
Deghayes, because they do not
have British citizenship.

Prime Minister Tony Blair’s
government pressed successfully
for the release of nine British
nationals at Guantanamo. None
has been charged with any
offence since returning to the UK.

The pair, both who were
granted refugee status in
Britain, is alleged to have been
associated with al- Qaida
through London- based radical
Muslim cleric Abu Qatada.

The British government has
asked the United States to
return al-Rawi. Negotiations are
continuing.

Rite ae).
Parnes cy

aA
a aera

REE EET
TUESDAY,
JULY 25TH

6:00 Bahamas @ sunrise
‘9:00 Central American and

























Caribbean Games
11:00 Immediate Response (Live)
noon News Update
12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
1:00 Island Life Destinations

1:30 Gillette World Sports

2:00 Central American and
Caribbean

4:00 Island Hopping

4:58 ZNS News Update

5:00 Legends: Whence We Came

6:00 The National Art Gallery of

. The Bahamas

6:30 News Night 13

} 7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Kerzner Today

8:15 Good News Bahamas

8:30 Island Lifestyles

1 9:00 Da’ Down Home Show

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Central American and
Caribbean Games

Community Page

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
“+ right to make last minute
programme changes!







Minister o

f finance defends

lack of emergency auditing

m@ BY MARK HUMES

The Minister of State for
Finance Mr James Smith has
come to the defence of the
National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency, saying public
donations to the disaster relief
agency were used for their
intended purpose.

Last week, the Prime Minis-
ter presented an unaudited
financial statement of the
Bahamas National Disaster
Relief and Recovery Fund to
the House of Assembly.

It was revealed in the state-
ment that auditors were
unable to reconcile or deter-
mine. the disposition of sever-
al accounts.

As a result, the management
of funds at the agency were
called into question.

However, Mr Smith went on
record to reassure the public
that monies donated to the
national disaster agency were
not mismanaged. He pointed
to the report’s statement of
activities for the year ending
August 31, 2005 which shows
that, of the $20,501,969 in
expenses incurred by the gov-
ernment, public contribution
to the amount was $6,332,728.

In pointing this out, the min-

ister said: “whatever the public
gave, more than that went to
the recovery effort. The gov-
ernment is the one who would
have taken the full brunt of
paying for the repairs.”

Even though the report
clearly states that it lacks “cer-
tain information” which could
affect the accuracy of the fund’s
financial position, Mr Smith
went on to say that it does not
highlight what some may con-
sider poor management at the
agency.

“The management of a
national disaster has to do with
the response to the disaster,
rather than accounting for it,”
said Mr Smith. And even
though the report notes that
many of the accounts have not
been reconciled, Mr Smith said
that this is a reflection of a
national disaster taking place
and the response to a national
disaster.

“The emphasis has always
been on trying to provide assis-

‘tance and comfort to those
affected by it. The least of peo-
ple’s concerns at that time
would have been doing the
accounting.

“You are working under
emergency conditions,” said
Mr Smith. “In one instance,

i JAMES Smith

they were giving out supplies,
and they ran out of receipts, so
the person who was doing it
got creative and started to
make up his own receipts. Of
course, this would have no
numbering sequence, and from



an auditors stand point . . . this
is where an accounting system
cannot respond to an emer-
gency. So, you can expect this
to happen.

“You may have a proper
accounting system set up, but if
you run out of your source
materials like invoices, and if
people are now lined up out-
side coming to get supplies to
repair their homes, you don’t
stop giving. them the supplies

_because you do not have the

invoices, so you have to con-
tinue giving them.”

Structure

Mr Smith went on to explain
that the NEMA office, up to
that point, had not always been

_ officially structured. He said

that it was just a group of peo-
ple who were brought together
administratively to deal with a
hurricane.

“TI think they started the rec-
onciliation operation immedi-
ately after the storm, before
the accounting system was set

up,” Mr Smith continued. “So .

people were being dispatched
in these areas to assist with the
reconstruction exercise long
before the accounting system

could be set up.”

In the report that was pre-
sented by the prime minister
last week, it was revealed that
vouchers for material purchas-
es had been issued without
copies, control numbers, and
in some cases, dollar values. As
a result, outstanding commit-
ments could not be deter-
mined.

Additionally, as comprehen-
sive statements had not been
provided to the accounting
agency, the accounts payable
have not been reconciled, leav-
ing balances possibly under-
stated.

The report also noted that
the financial statement may not
properly reflect the activities
and balances:of restricted
funds, as management did not
separate restricted funds into
separate bank accounts.

Almost a year and a half
after a complete account of all
financial transactions were
promised, Mr Smith addressed
the issue of the problematic
accounting records by saying:
“the nature of a NEMA organ-
isation, reconstruction after a
hurricane, does not lend itself
to a traditional audit... what
we can only give is an account-
ing report.”

Vendors’ concern that cruise lines’

not bringing custom to mainland

â„¢ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SHOP owners and vendors
in the Bay Street area are con-
cerned that cruise lines are no
longer bringing business to the
mainland.

The number of cruise ships
travelling to Nassau and
Freeport has declined in
recent years and some mer-
chants have attributed the loss
to cruise lines opting to visit
private islands instead.

One shop owner said he
fears that these islands have
now become the premier des-
tinations for several aoe
sive ships.

As a result, he said, it is only
the “down market” ships —
whose passengers tend to
spend much less — that still
come in to port.

Last year, during the hurri-
cane season, an “up market”

i cruise ship that usually travels

to a private island was forced
to dock in Nassau instead.
Store owners and vendors
reported a significant increase
in sales and revenue com-.
pared to the ships that call on
a regular basis.

Various cruise lines includ-
ing the Norwegian Dawn,

DEPART. NASSAU

DEPART HATCHET BAY ELEUTHERA 12:00AM



Uwe ie
AY FEST
IN
ELEUTHERA

VEHICLE PASSENGER FERRY SCHEDULE
(Air-conditioned Passenger Cabin )

FRIDAY AUGUST 4th, 2006
ARRIVE HATCHET BAY ELEUTHERA 5:45PM

MIDNIGHT
MONDAY AUGUST 7th, 2006

Princess Cruises and Royal
Caribbean have purchased
private islands from the

Bahamas government and

placed their own shops on
them.

However, shop owners in
Nassau believe it should be
mandatory for cruise ships to
make additional stops to the
mainland.

According to officials from
the Ministry of Tourism, all
cruise ships that travel to pri-
vately owned islands in the
Bahamas also make addition-
al stops to Nassau and.some-
times Freeport, with the
exception of Princess Cruises
— although sometimes ships.
are forced to dock elsewhere
because of inclement weather
conditions.

According to the Director
of Cruise Development Carla
Stuart, only four islands are
privately owned by cruise
lines; two. of which are in the
Berry Islands, owned by the
Norwegian Dawn and Royal
Caribbean.

The other two are Princess
Cay in Eleuthera, owned by
Princess Cruises, and Cast--
away Cay in Abaco, owned
by Disney’s Wonder.















2:00PM







FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

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APPRAISED VALUE: $397,256

CHIPMAN ESTATES
LOT NO. 10 Unit #8 (Glenwood

Condominiums)

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Bed 1-1/2 Bath

FOX HILL
LOT NO. 4

Townhouse Unit (878 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Yorkshire Road, Cable Beach
APPRAISED VALUE: $122,000

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,072 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Cockbum Street Close (Fox Hill)

APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

SANDILANDS ALLOTMENT

LOT NO. 2

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence

(6,440 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Quarry Road approx. 100 ft. N

of Robert Sandilands Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $189,000

APPRAISED VALUE: $55,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA. MACKEY STREET.
OR CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT
ANY OR ALL OFFERS.





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

LOCAL NEWS



BIC and Bahamas Fast Ferries
strike wireless internet deal

@ By REUBEN SHEARER

BTC has announced a new strategic
partnership with Bahamas Fast Ferries
that will make the internet available on
the high seas.

According to BFF’s marketing man-
ager Khaalis Rolle, BTC will be sup-
plying Wi-Fi capability to make it pos-
sible to access the web while on board
any of the company’s vessels.

BTC’s logo will be displayed on the
outside of the Bohengy — which ser-
vices North Eleuthera, Harbour Island
and Spanish Wells — and on the front of
BFF ticket jackets.

‘In addition to visual advertising, our
company will also provide distribution





B MR Knowles said: “The

fishermen must make a living.”

Communication firm secures
new advertising opportunity



points for all of BTC’s phone cards such
as Hello, Rokit and Quickcell since we
carry sO many passengers who request
to make phone calls,” he said. “This
partnership will give both companies
the opportunity to advertise, market
and develop some strategic pelenon:
ships.”

Mr Rolle said this partnership spree



BA STUART said: “The livelihood
of the people is always more
important.”

partnership, Mr Rolle said that the
returns would be “significant.”

‘When you look at the exposure and
opportunity that we are providing
BaTelCo, you can’t really quantify that
in terms of dollar value,” he said,
“because they’re going to be every-
where we go.

“Even so, if you review the reputa-
tions of both BaTelCo and ourselves,
you will see that an alliance like this is
the manpower of multiple companies,”
he said.

Mr Rolle said that the partnership
would not affect each business’ indi-
viduality, as they will continue to adver-
tise under their individual names and
logos.

ment will be renewed annually, with
further partnerships and marketing
opportunities possible in the future.
He told The Tribune that the part-
nership was proposed by BTC, consid-
ered for about two months and finally
announced last week Monday.
Although he declined to disclose how
much revenue is expected from the



@ DALETTE Moncur said: “Six
months is good enough.”

BH GLENROY Collie said: “Leslie
Miller is right for the choice he
made on this account.”

Should crawfish season be shorter? |

FISHERIES officials have
noticed a “dramatic and alarm-
ing” decrease in crawfish
resources, says Leslie Miller.

Mr Miller, who was recently
appointed minister of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries, announced
last week that the government
has decided to reduce the 2007

open season on crawfish, from ;

give the species a chance to
"regroup and regenerate”.

The Tribune took to the
streets to ask the public for their
thoughts on the ‘shortening of
the crawfish season. .

Most said they strongly sup-
port the decision, but also
expressed concern for the fish-

ermen who would be affected.



the government 'can come up
with a new plan."

Mr Knowles said: "The fish-
ermen must make a living. I
think the problem is really the
foreign fishermen poaching in
our waters. There has been a
decline in the crawfish because
we are allowing others to take
what is ours. We are too pas-



Rotarians’
executive
for the |
year ahead

ROTARIANS of Southeast
Nasau gathered at Sansals on
West Bay Street on Saturday ,*
for the club’s annual*,
changeover. :

Immediate Past President: *
Ken Clowes handed over the,
president's sash to the new pres- «'
ident for 2006/2007 Bruno*
Pletscher. President Bruno *
thanked members for the con- ''
fidence they have shown in him ° ’
by electing him to lead the club-..
for the upcoming year. The.-
President then introduced his~”
board and gave a brief outline .,
of the exciting year ahead.

The new board is: immediate
past president Ken Clowes;
Rodney Eve, director interna-
tional service; David Moncur,
director'fellowship; Timothy -
Ingrahatn, president elect;
Michelle Albury-Spurlock, trea- «
surer; Peter Goudie, director
community service; Leslie Fras-
er, director vocations; Reginald
Saunders, director club Service
IJ; Kathy Smith, secretary;
Roger Kelty, board advisor; Dr
Bridgette ‘Rolle, director club
service I; Gordon Rodland,
director ways and means.

Rotary is a worldwide organ-
isation of business and profes-
sional leaders that provides
humanitarian service and helps
build goodwill in the world.
There are six Rotary clubs in
Nassau and one in Abaco that
belong to District 7020 with
approximately 300 members.-,
There are additional clubs inâ„¢
Freeport, Grand Bahama who
belong to another disirict. The ,
Rotary Club of South East Nas- :
sau meets at East Villa Restau-_
rant every Wednesday at 1pm. »

“Guyana
offical: ’
evidanee of
wrongdoing’

Soe eRe

eight to six months.
He said this is being done to

One person said that the
Department of Fisheries:should

instead construct’a fish farm
and spawn crawfish.

Glenroy Collie said: “Leslie.

Miller is right for the choice he
made on this account. It goes
both ways. I think it will
enhance our economy if we
have more product to offer in
the future and also the change

will always be more important.
Bahamians must now follow
the laws, because. if we don't
we may loose the crawfish in
our waters for good."

A Stuart agreed that "the
livelihood of the people is
always more important” and
said the. Department of Fish-

- eries “should make a fish farm-

sive as a nation — we always
inconvenience ourselves so
other may reap our resources."

In a letter to The Tribune,
Chief Councillor of Spanish
Wells Abner Pinder listed the
root problems endangering the
fishing industry as “foreign
poaching in season and out of

HB GUYANA = ieee
Georgetown vee

GUYANA’S interior minis-'
ter has come to the defence of"

the South American country’s.
deputy police commissioner!

whose US travel visa was: .
revoked, saying Monday that-. -

will impact the local fishermen."
Mr Collie went to say that
fishermen should begin to seek

ing process to ensure that we

‘season, off-season fishing by
Bahamian and undersized

there was no evidence he had’
been involved’in wrongdoing, ’

have crawfish each year.”
She went on to say however

(crawfish) tail.”
He added that keeping the

according to Associated Press.

“other types of fish” to sup-
plement income while craw-
fish is not in season.

that over-fishing will effect

season closed in August will

Henry Greene, who was.”
expected to become police chief
in October, said the US'

Dalette Moncur said: “Six

crawfish resources in any case,
if nothing is done.
"There must be a mid-point

only allow poachers to reap the
benefits during the prime time
of the season when no Bahami-

months is good enough — but

an will be allowed to fish.

commercials clients.

Creating and maintaining appropriate

file records.

Preparing required correspondence
G. e. letters, memos, policy registers,
Ce depit notes etc. ).

_ The ideal ca didate should hold a

3GCSEs (including Math
& English), a High School Diploma and
be in pursuit of a Certificate of Insurance,
Associate/Bachelors Degree or equivalent.

minimum of <

SYSTEMS KNOWLEDGE
Must be computer literate with working
knowledge of Windows, Word and Excel.

CONTACT.

Please send cover letter and resumé by hand

or fax to the following:

The Office Manager,
Star General Insurance
Agents & Brokers Ltd.,
Marathon Road

Fax: 393-8722



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Embassy told him last Thurs-,
day without explanation that his
US travel visa had been:
revoked. He will become act-"
ing chief later this week.

“We have no evidence.
against Greene and therefore
we are asking those who say’
they have the evidence to bring.
it to our attention,” said Interi-
or Minister Gail Teixeira.

Greene, who heads the for-,
mer British colony’s criminal],
investigations unit, was tapped
to replace the country’s retir-
ing police commissioner, Win-
ston Felix.

In April, the US State
Department canceled Greene’s
diplomatic visa for unspecified
reasons. The US Embassy said
Monday that it does not ‘com-
ment on visa matters.

Other Guyanese officials
have had their US visas revoked
in recent years because they
were suspected of links to drug
traffickers — which Greene has
denied.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps '
you are raising funds fora |
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322-1986,
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE





B® BEC has been unable to meet the demand on Harbour Island.

Businesses ‘being |
crippled by cuts’
in Eleuthera

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

DAILY power outages in
North Eleuthera and surround-
ing communities have caused
sévere disruptions to business,
MP Alvin Smith claimed.

According to Mr Smith, the
electrical demand in the area
has become much higher than
BEC’s capacity — and as a
result, there have “very, very
regular” power cuts, especially
over the last week.

Speaking with The Tribune
on Sunday, Mr Smith said for
the last three years, “the
Bahamas Electrical Corpora-
tion (BEC) has been‘quite ehal-
lenged with providing reliable
electricity to Harbour Island.”

After receiving several calls
from his constituents about reg-
ular disruptions of their electri-
cal supply, Mr Smith has
become concerned that BEC
cannot or will not address the
problem.

He raised his concerns in
parliament last month during
the budget debate.

“BEC is quite aware of this
but they will not rectify it. They
are not sure of what they are
going to do to correct it,” he
said. .

_ According to Mr Smith,
BEC had installed two new gen-
erators in: Harbour Island and
two in Hatchet Bay in a attempt
to maintain electricity in the
area - but this has proved futile.

“T think the initial plan was
to provide Harbour Island with
the generation capacity to take
care of itself but that has not
happened, so Hatchet Bay has
been forced to support Harbow



ALVIN Smith

Island. But even with the sup-
port of Hatchet Bay electrical
supplies are still not sufficient.

He said that Harbour Island,
with all the second homes and
hotels, has a demand that BEC
in unable to meet. ;

“I spoke to. the (BEC’s)
management of Eleuthera last
year and they told me that their

plan was to erect a new station »

in North Eleuthera in the area
of Three Island Dock. They
wanted to build a plant there
to take care of Harbour Island
and North Eleuthera,” Mr
Smith explained.

However, when he raised
that issue in parliament, Minis-
ter of Works Bradley Roberts
said that BEC had changed its
plans and was no longer going
to build a plant in North
Eleuthera.

Instead/ he explained, Har-
bour Island’s plant would be
upgraded to give it the capacity
to tale care of Harbour Island

New development
on Current Island

THE government has
announced the construction of a
multi-million dollar upscale
resort on Current Island,
Eleuthera.

The $8 million project will
take on a 65-strong Bahamian
work force during construction
and 25 full-time employees in
“two years.

* “The Current Club Group
has committed to making a
sound eco-touristic investment
in the Bahamas,” said Vincent
Peet, Minister of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments.

‘ The minister and his delega-
tion also toured the Cotton Bay
Estates and Villas, currently
under construction, and the
South Eleuthera Mission, a
community resource centre
tinder renovation.

Over the past three years,
three developments, including
the Governor’s Harbour Resort
and Marina, the $85 million
Windermere Island Develop-
ment Project and the refurbish-
iment of the Cove Hotel in Gre-
gory Town, have affirmed that
developers view Eleuthera as
an exciting destination to invest
in, Minister Peet said.

* He said the Cotton Bay Club,
which i is under construction, is

aa testament to the govern-
ee

ment’s commitment to proac-
tively and diligently facilitate
positive investment in our coun-
try while concurrently adhering
to strict eco-touristic principles.”

The Current Club Group has

committed to developing an

upscale resort/residential com-
munity complete with 34 con-
dominium hotel units and vil-
las, a marina and restaurant,
and upgrading the existing
dock.

The group is to develop two
acres of the property, leaving
the remaining four acres in its
natural state.

The villas will consist of two
and three bedroom units fur-
nished on the inside with tropi-
cal hardwood trim, marble,
stone and mahogany finish.

Bahamian artwork will high-
light the décor of the rooms.
Amenities will include swim-
ming pools, a fitness room, busi-
ness centre and a game room.

It is expected that the devel-
opment will engage the services
of local entrepreneurs to pro-
vide basic necessities to visitors

‘and residents of the resort.

The developers has also com-
mitted to using Bahamian pro-
duce and local art and handi-
crafts.

and North Eleuthera.

_ “J think that’s their reasoning
behind putting those two gen-
erators in Harbour Island but
those two generators cannot
take care of Harbour Island
alone — not to mention North
Eleuthera,” Mr Smith said.

He warned that things will
get worse if nothing is done.

“The summer, basically, has
just begun. More tourists are
coming over, so more electrici-
ty is going to be used because
everyone will be burning air
conditioners in addition to fans.
BEC is going to have a serious
problem.” '

Calls to Kevin Basden. gen-~

eral manager of BEC, were not
returned up to press time.

: TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 7
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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



SOME FNMs in Abaco fear
the choice of former PLP stal-
wart Edison Key as a general
election candidate will split par-
ty support on the island:

“A lot of people don’t like
it,” said an islander yesterday.
“At the very least, it will mean
that some FNMs will choose not
to vote.”

Mr Key was for years best-
known as the PLP’s most
prominent white presence on
Abaco. His decision to quit as a
PLP senator last year shook
Prime Minister Perry Christie.
Now Mr Key is set to replace
FNM incumbent Robert Sweet-

“ing in the fight for the South
Abaco seat.

“Candidate selection is left
to a small elite FNM group
here,” said a resident. “No-one
else gets much of a say. Several
other people were asked if
they’d accept a nomination -
urifortunately, they all turned
it down.”

Mr Key is unpopular in some
quarters because of what some
residents feel were his “victim-
ising tactics” during his PLP
days.

PLP stalwart Gary Sawyer
was seen as his likeliest oppo-
nent at the general election, but
that now appears to be in doubt.
“Gary has been projecting him-
self as the candidate, but we’re
not sure that the PLP wants
him,” said the source.

Meanwhile, Mr Key has pro-
claimed his selection as evi-
dence that democracy is “alive
and well” in South Abaco.

“My political career spans
some 30-odd years in public life

_ as an MP and Senator, com-
bined with seven years as chair-
man of BaTelCo,” he said: ©
‘ “T am also a proven team
player and bring this experience
to the table of the FNM. In
1977, FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham and I began our polit-

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LID

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER

LEER M ATLA sa

ical careers with the PLP. Now
some 30 years later we are on
the same team again - albeit
with another winning party.”

In a letter to the press, Mr
Key urges all party supporters
“to recognise the urgent and
compelling. need for all hands
to be faithfully on deck as the
general election approaches.”

One possible opponent for
ex-PM Hubert Ingraham in
North Abaco is controversial
businessman Cay Mills, who has
told associates that he plans to
run as an, independent.

° AUTHORITIES have cut
off power to a Haitian settle-
ment at the former Bahama
Star citrus farm at Norman Cas-
tle, west of Treasure Cay.

About 200 Haitians - once
farm employees - are living on
the site, most of them evidently
now without work permits or
hopes of a prosperous future.

“It’s pathetic,” an island
source said, “Unlike most
Haitians, they appear to have
become lethargic and hopeless.
since the farm’s closure. It
seems the government got tired

" of providing free electricity and

now it’s been switched off.”

‘ The Haitians are also drawing
water from a well on the land
and “living at a very frugal lev-
el”, according to a source.

Fortunately for some, their
former employers managed an
effective National Insurance
Board scheme, enabling some.
Haitians to draw pensions.

e AN old barge that washed
ashore south of Man 0’ War
Cay during Hurricane Wilma
last year is causing growing
annoyance for Abaconians.

They fear another storm will

‘push the rusting wreck on to

coral reefs, dealing another
major blow to the environment.
WW



e been told it was

Collins Avenue (South of 6th Terrace)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm

Sat 8am - 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 ° Fax: 322-6714

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed

LOCAL NEWS

i EDISON Key

going to be moved, but it’s still
there - an eyesore and a haz-
ard,” said a resident. -

e THE people of Hope
Town, Abaco, believe their
annual boxcar racing event
could catch on in other islands
throughout the Bahamas.

Every November, youngsters
and adults create ingenious
vehicles at minimum cost for
what has become an eagerly
awaited family occasion.

“The boxcars are made out
of all kinds of things,” said
an islander, “Some people
use the remains of old boats,
some use old prams, others

create cars from four wheels

ce DAIHATSU





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tastic time.”

‘oncerns on FNM’s new |

and a piece of wood.

“Any island with a good slope
can organise a boxcar racing
day. It’s a great occasion for
everyone in the family, with
burgers and sodas on the side.

“Apart from straightforward
racing between boxcars, there
are also slalom events, with cars
weaving between traffic cones
as they run downhill.”

It’s also a competitive event
in which heavy people can
excel. “The cars run entirely on
gravity, which means extra
weight could be an advantage,”
said a boxcar enthusiast.

“Whatever, it makes a great

day out and everyone has a fan-



THE TRIBUNE



cata.




@ CORAL reefs are under threat from rising ocean

temperatures

sustainable
tourism drive |

@ By KRISTINA MCNEIL

THE threat of deteriorat-
ing beaches and coastal infra-

structure has led the FNM to.

encourage and support the

development of sustainable

tourism, the party said in a
statement yesterday.

The FNM noted that global
warming and climate change
can lead to rising oceans and
threaten to destroy as much
as 90 per cent of the coral
reefs around the world over
the next 50 years — and ulti-
mately the entire fishing
industry.

The party noted that a new
economic model is needed to
expand the tourism industry
without leaving such a
“destructive footprint.” ;

The consumption of natural
resources increases pollution,
which “weaves itself into our
social systems”.

“It is imperative, there-
fore, that we adopt responsi-
ble planning and manage-
ment to sustain the industry
going forward,” the state-
ment said.

The FNM’s model calls

upon collaboration between

local communities, hoteliers,
industry workers and even
tourists. '

Comparing Bahamian
attractions to others around
the world, the FNM said it
believes that visitors should
contribute to the upkeep of
natural resources through the
implementation of a fee that
would also help locals to
showcase the Family Islands
without “destroying what
makes them attractive in the
first place.”

Charging a fee is just one
way that the FNM plans to
create a balance “between
demands on our resources
today and the need to ensure
that we can meet the needs
and aspirations of future gen-
erations.”

Unlike the present govern-
ment, the statement said, the
FNM believes in long-term
thinking.

The many training pro-
grammes offered by the Inter-
American Development
Bank, the Caribbean Devel-

- opment Bank and others can

serve to promote such a vision
of sustainable tourism, the
party said.

‘@

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tender from eligible bidders for the
provision of a new power station building civil works as captioned above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, B-E.C.
complex, Fresh Creek, Central Andros, Bahamas, by contacting:-

Mr. Kermit Woodside

Manager

B.E.C. - Fresh Creek
Andros, Bahamas

Phone No. (242)-368-2516
Fax No. (242)-368-2226

- Or

In New Providence, by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. (242)-302-1158
Fax No. (242)-323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered at any one of the two sites on or before 11
August 2006 by 3:30 p.m. and addressed as follows:

The General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 614/06

“POWER STATION BUILDING CIVIL WORKS - FRESH
CREEK, CENTRAL ANDROS”



The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.

FNM endorses -

pow:

b

Pa

aie





THE TRIBUNE



Laws website goes live on-line

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Laws On-line
website was officially launched
yesterday.

The website -
laws.bahamas.gov.bs — is the first
of several fast track projects
under the Bahamas Government
Online Initiative (BGOL).

According to Minister of State
for Finance James Smith, “the
BGOL is a comprehensive,
long-term strategy to transform
and modernise government ser-
vices and the business of gov-
ernment using information and
communications technologies.”

The website, he said, “involves

making such information avail-
able via the Internet), the elec-
tronic delivery of government
services, and ultimately re-engi-
neering business processes with-
in and across government to
improve efficiency in govern-
ment administration — adopting
a whole-of-government
approach.”

Selected

According to the website,
users can view the consolidated
laws which are current up to
April, 2002 as well as selected
Acts from 2002 onwards. The
subsidiary legislation section is

are provided for information
purposes only and for users to
have easy access to the Laws of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Nothing in this web-
site should be construed as con-
stituting legal advice,” says an
advisory posted on the website.

According to Attorney Gen-
eral and Minister of Legal
Affairs Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son, the website is “further man-
ifestation of the government’s
commitment to empower citi-
zens, by which we included per-
sons living in the Bahamas, by
making government services
available on-line.”

“Availability of the laws on-
line is critical to knowing your

services and concessions are
available to advance his busi-
ness,” she said.

“I am especially excited about
the difference that this service
will make for students, whether
they be law students or high
school students,” Mrs Maynard-
Gibson added. “Civic responsi-
bility has much greater meaning
and power when the constitu-
tion (our country’s genetic blue-
print) and our laws are readily
available, at our fingertips.”

“I hope that our young people
especially will take the opportu-
nity when surfing the net to surf

_ the site so that they may become

more aware of what our laws
say about who we are and what

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 9



@ MINISTER of Legal Affairs

providing greater access to gov-
ernment information (including

still under construction.
“The contents of this website

rights, obligations and for the
Bahamian businessman, what _ said.

we stand for as a people,” she

Allyson Maynard-Gibson visits the new website
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

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‘Ninety’ appeal dismissed

FROM page one

lawyers applied for a writ of Habeas
Corpus. This application came before
Justice John Lyons in the Supreme
Court on March 7 and May 26, 2003.
The argument before him was directed
primarily to abuse, lapse of time, the
risk of injustice and oppression and
failure to make proper disclosure. The
judge, however, dismissed the appeal.

Knowles then appealed to the Court
of Appeal, which on February 10,
2004, also dismissed the appeal.

His lawyers, in their appeal to the
Privy Council, contended that the pro-
ceedings to extradite him in relation to
the second extradition request were
an abuse of the process of the court.

“The factual foundation of this com-
plaint is that the second extradition
request was based on a grand jury
indictment preferred on a date earlier
than that of the indictment on which
the first request was based, and relat-
ing to earlier events.

“Yet the Government chose to take
no action on this earlier indictment
(the appellant says that the Govern-
ment held it back), only relying on it
when the order of Isaacs J defeated, or
possibly defeated, the attempt to

extradite the appellant under the first

request.

“Thus the appellant was lulled into
the belief that the Government pro-
posed to take no action in relation to
events before November, 1997, for
which he could not have been tried
had he been extradited under the first
request, and he was detained under
the second provisional warrant as the
conditions for his release on bail fol-

lowing the order of Isaacs J were on
the point of being finalised,” the
Council’s ruling read.

Knowles further complains that
Government wrongly charged as two
separate conspiracies what was in
truth, if a conspiracy at all, a single
conspiracy, relating to a single course
of conduct over a period, although
involving different actors at different
stages.

Further proof of abuse, Knowles’

‘ lawyers contended, rested on the fact

that the US government failed to
explain the reasons for acting as it had.

The Court of Appeal, however,
accepted that there may be a single
conspiracy spanning several years with
some conspirators dropping out and
others joining, but saw grounds to jus-
tify the framing of two conspiracies

_and thought that the US government’s
‘decision should be respected.

The Council said that Knowles faces
an uphill task in seeking to dislodge
the conclusion of three courts (magis-
trates, Supreme Court and Court of
Appeal) that the US Government’s
conduct in proceeding on the second
extradition request was not abusive.

The Board further said that it would
be “very slow to intervene in the
absence ofa clear legal misdirection,
and it finds none.’

The Council said it appears ‘that in
June, 2000, after preferment of the
first grand jury indictment, a gentle-
man known as Herbert “Sharkhead”
Hanna was arrested for importing
cocaine into Florida, and that he gave

Government information about the
appellant in August.

“He was the main prosecution wit-
ness on the second indictment. This
may explain why the Government
based its first request on the later
indictment. But it is, within broad lim-
its, for a prosecutor to decide what
charges he will prefer, and how he will
frame his charges. In the absence of
unfairness or oppression, this is not a
matter for the requested state and not
a matter which calls for explanation,”
the Council said.

The Board said since Knowles did

not know of the first grand jury indict-
ment, he was not misled by the Gov-
ernment’s initial decision not to rely
on it and it cannot be said that the US
Government made any implied rep-
resentation to him.

“Tt was, no doubt, a shock for the
appellant to be detained under the
second request as he was on the point
of being released on bail under the
first, but if (as the Court of Appeal
and a majority of the Board held in

Cartwright and another v Superinten- . !

dent of Her Majesty’s Prison and
another, above) the order made by
Isaacs J was one of certiorari, it is not
(as the Board understands) suggest-
ed that there was no jurisdiction to
release the appellant on bail, and the
Government cannot be criticised for
moving quickly to detain the appel-
lant.

“The Board finds no fault in the
Court of Appeal’s decision,” the
Council said.

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Miller: WTO concessions ‘insulting
FROM page one

that “the selfish intransigence of the US and Europe has finally wrecked any
chance of a successful outcome for these (WTO) trade talks which were meant
to help developing countries.”

Mr Miller said, however, that developing countries such as the Bahamas,
would not benefit from the WTO’s plan, which he asserted might in fact
gravely cripple their economies should they officially become a member of ~
the organization.

“It makes no sense for the least developed world to open their economies
to accept all the goods produced by those industrialized countries at the
expense of the small developing countries by having them offer to only assist
the least developed countries in Africa — so we rejected their proposal,”
said Mr Miller:

‘The “Aide for Trade” programme, in which a sum of money would be
divided amongst the countries it is intended to help, would come to $0.05
per person in those countries when the offers are considered. This, he
said, was an insult to members of the African, Caribbean and Pacific
Group (ACP).

“Due to the farm subsidies that the Europeans and the Americans were
giving to their farmers, and the pittance that they put on the table, they said
that they would give special preference to the farmers in Africa with cot-
ton,” said Mr Miller. “That’s all it is, all they wanted to give was cotton and
we felt in our meetings that it was insulting.”

The WTO in light of the failures have decided that no more talks should
be attempted this year, said the BBC article.

It quoted Senator Charles Grassley, chairman of the ‘Senate finance
committee as saying, “I’ve always said that no deal is better than a bad deal,

and a ‘Doha light’ deal would be a bad deal.”

Mr Miller issued a warning to the Bahamas following opening WTO
talks in Hong Kong last year. °

- He said that the benefits to the economy would be miniscule and that
some countries that have become members, in some instances, were forced
to borrow from the International Monetary Fund after having lost tariff rev-
enues.

Minister Miller alerted the public last year that 80 to 90 per cent of the
money needed to run the Bahamas economy comes from import tariffs, and
therefore, the country should take a few years to consider the conse-
quences before j joining.

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PAGE .10, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING JULY 25, 2006

[780 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE.



[ ia a

Police to step up i

_& By ROYANNE
FORBES- DARVILLE

“THE police. are taking the

. initiative in the fight against _

copyright law infringement
according.to Chief Superinten-
dent Marvin Dames.
Government officials have
been slow.in enacting necessary
amendments to the Copyright
Act, but Mr Dames told The
Tribune yesterday that the

police are now in the process
_of launching new initiatives to

crackdown on establishments

and street vendors engaged in

the sale of illegal goods.
Along. with pirated DVDs

and CDs, Mr Dames also point-

ed.to the illegal sale of brand-

“name items like Gucci, Fendi
and Nike. He said that increas- -

ingly, fake versions of these
brands are being marketed on





@ CHIEF Superintendent
Marvin Dames

the streets of New Providence
as the real thing.

“We have confiscated thou-
sands of these items and would
have executed on a number of

= a
‘stores in the downtown area

and seized significant quanti-
ties of (fake designer) items.
“Certainly all of these per-

sons who are selling DVDs
don’t have a license because
they are illegal. So where ever
we find them we are taking
them off the streets and we are
looking at the laws and if it war-
rants prosecution, we prose-
cute,” Mr Dames said.

He said the sale of fake items
is “rampant” in the downtown
area — especially in the straw
market.

“It seems that Bay Street is a
common place to purchase
knock-off items and this cer-
tainly has to change because
many of the so called authentic
products are being replaced by
knock-off products,” Mr
Dames said. “People are begin-
ning to complain and we do
have legislation — and as we
continue to amend and make
legislation stronger we have to
use what we have to make sure

olice officers

give testimony
in murder trial

. today. If.there.was.a problem,

~ today.”

possibility that the threats could

- incidents. had occurred in the

FROM page one.

the officer told the court that Farrington, iio
had' been “cautioned”, directed them. to an
unnamed dirt road on the northern side of the
Grand Bahama highway on which they travelled
approximately 1.2 miles. -

Officer Sherman told the court that Far-
rington then directed them some 128 feet into

bushes. There officers searched an area some.

20 by 20 feet and found the left foot of a blue
and white Nike tennis shoe, a red, black and
‘white short sleeve ‘collared ‘shirt, short blue
pants.and a pair of red, black and white boxer
shorts. Officer Sherman told the court that
-these.items appeared to’ be torn from being
exposed to the elements:for ‘a considerable
_period of time. The officer told the court that
he photographed the area, the articles of cloth-

~ ing. as well as. four suspected pieces of bone
- fragments which were also discovered i in the
area.

Officer Sherman testified that on that same

x date Farrington gave directions to Queen’s
* Cove, which is 225-feet off the main road of

- Queen’s Cove Boulevard to the beach. There
-officer Sherman testified that police were
“directed by the accused to a pile of debris
' where they discovered an inflatable mattress
which was photographed and collected as evi-
dence. The next day he and officer 2322 Fer-
. guson went to the morgue at the Rand Memo-
' rial Hospital where they: handed the bone frag-
ments over to. Dr Raju. It was on Saturday,
November '1, the officer testified, that he
- réceived from officer Reno McPhee four glass
~ tubes containing blood samples from Patricia
-S¢ott and Edward Robins. The jury was then
“shown photographs that-the officer took at the

area off the Grand Bahama highway and

Queen’ § Cove. :
Detective Corporal Bivarda Dames, who is
also attached to the criminal records. office in

Grand Bahama, told the court that on October

28 he and other officers were present at the
Rand Memorial Hospital’s morgue where they

Bomb |

- threats at |

airport |
FROM page one

not experienced any problems

Aur Traffic Services would have
contacted us, but this has not
been done. Therefore, I can say
- that we have had no problems

Last week, a similar situation
arose when police received a
phone call from someone with a
child’s voice alleging there was ©
a bomb at the customs ware-
house. However, the threat was
-unfounded.

Mr- Reckley discounted any

_.bé linked. to terrorists. Similar

past, he said.

' “We have always had situa-
tions such as this occurring,” he
said. “However, they have all
been unfounded. We have yet
to find any type of explosive
device at this facility.”

_ Yesterday’s- threat- was-also
declared unfounded at about
3,18 pm.

- Police were not able to com-
ment on the matter.

observed the examination of skeletal remains.
He told the court that he took a series of pho-
tographs of these remains, 19 in total. At this
point in his testimony, the mother of Jamaal
Robins, Christine Scott, began to cry.’As the

officer directed the j jury through the series of

photographs Ms Scott began to sob. louder and
was escorted from the court room by her hus-
band.

called to the witness stand yesterday. She told
the court that on October 30, 2003 she received
instructions from Officer Merinard and as a
result of this proceeded to the parking lot of the
police Criminal Records office in Freeport

where she saw a grey 1992 Hyundai car. She .

told the court that she photographed the car
which was registered to Suzette Ferguson.
Those photos were submitted into evidence
yesterday,

Suzette Ferguson, another woman police
officer, told the court that in June of 2002 she

had purchased a new car, having sold her old.

one, a grey 1992 Hyundai Scoot, to Cordell
Farrington, who she knew through her room-
mate, Raquel Lightbourne, who is Farring-
ton’s sister.

She told the court that she and the accused
had a pay arrangement for the vehicle where he
would pay $150 down and pay $150 a week
until he paid the full $1,000. She told the court
that Farrington, who had not been consistent
with his payments, had paid only $750 up to the
time he told her that the car was having engine
problems. She told the court that she took the
vehicle back from Farrington and contracted a
mechanic who was supposed to sell the car’s
parts.

. Woman Detective Constable Glemenena
Nixon told the court that she had inspected
the car at the parking lot of the Criminal
Records office in Freeport and had contacted

--a locksmith to open both doors and the back

trunk where she discovered a grey mat with

various car parts as well as tree stems and

leaves on it.

Woman Corporal Christina Pinder was also ?

people understand that this is a

crime that will not be tolerat:

ed. ”

Local law officials have 286
been working very closely with
international franchise owners
to identify shops involved in
the sale of knock-off goods.

Products

“This is a growing concern
for persons from these compa-
nies who have knowledge that
many of their products are
being sold in the Bahamas and
in particular downtown Bay
Street,” Mr Dames said.

The. economic damage

caused to legitimate companies -
_is said to be enormous. Losses
- to US industries alone are esti-

fanaa ate nite

mated at $200 to 250 billion a
year.

The United States Trade
Representative, in its latest
report, called on the Bahamas
government to address defi-
ciencies in an amendment to
the Copyright Act - and
expressed concern that the
amendment had not yet been
enacted.

The report also revealed that
theft of intellectual property
and trade in fakes has grown
to unprecedented levels, threat-
ening innovation and creative
economies around the world.

Last year the Bahamas, along
with Taiwan and Korea, was

. downgraded to a priority on a
_US watch list.

Countries identified as Pri-

‘a

PUBLIC CONSULTATION
Proposed Interconnection Guidelines ©
The Bahamas

illegal goods crackdown

city Foreign Countries on the |
list can be subjected to a Sec- :
tion 30 investigation and face ;
possible trade sanctions. '

Mr Dames said the crack- :
down is necessary for the:
Bahamas to maintain a positive :
image internationally, but:
pointed out that there are some
challenges.

“In terms of trademark ;
infringements and copyright |
laws this is not only new to us, '
but this is a new area for many '
law enforcement agencies glob- :
ally,” Mr Dames explained. :

’ “The effects of these knock-off :

products is significant because it;
is believed that the profit from ;

this industry is being used to!

finance terrorism and other |
illicit activities.”

‘The Public Uisittes Comeriesion (PUG) hereby fies comments Korn hganieoes and offer iheresien

Thegsais ol tie conainaion ae
(zt inion fieersees of the PLC's expe

eigen ol treet armen ation Lid.
‘ eguiated behwesn BIC and Other Linersad Operators of voice i





ses

x principles tobe.
‘sand

fl mite comments tm icenses ant ote rset pares onthe proposed une.

Bo Fea ee ees Senet eee ey ne

Racer Pa Pe ee Os sco Nene

beet tea tann nae

tessan, Bahaeaas.
‘Telephone 242-272-4437
Fax 2OB-223-728B
Eonailt: bho PUCBatemas goubs.



Bee eee ee ee ee eee cece”

P.O. Bos 04502 Foot Tevare. East Coins Avene





25, 2006

PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JULY





July 20, 2006



THE TRIBUNE



YOUR CONNECTION TO.THE WORLD

Vol. 1 - Issue Twenty-Six_

BTC HIP-HOP HOLLA-DAY ROCKS THE MALL!

On July 8, 2006 the Mall at Marathon was
filled with the sounds of youngsters
rapping to the tone of BTC’s second quarter
“Hip Hop Holla’ finals. The second quarter
finals featured a number of talented young
contestants vying for a Motorola Razr.


















DJ Phines provided the music for the
event, and Randy C, 100 Jamz morning
show personality served as emcee for the
popular event. Each “Holla” participant
performed and the crowd went wild as

The competition was fierce as each
contestant rapped about BTC’s SMS text

of the day Oneil McKenzie was the “Biggie
Holla” winner and Tony McPhee was the
1* runner up. Oneil took home a black
Motorola Razr and Tony received a silver
Motorola Razr both courtesy of BTC.

pees,

Members of BTC Marketing Team enjoying the.event
(L-R); Margo Gibson - Public Relations; LaToysa Francis
~ Sr. Marketing Representative Wireless; Janet Brown -’
Sr. Manager Marketing; Public Relations & External

Communications; Cheryl Barry - Product Management
Boardband & Data and Mr, Leon Williams - Acting

President & CEO of BIC.

THE FOLLOWING BCPOU EXECUTIVES
ON THEIR NE Ww APPOINTMENTS.















DENISE WILSON
Serer eres



ROBERT FARQUHARSON
President

ARNOLD BOWLEG
Executive Vice President
COLINWRIGHT-Treasurer
DINO ROLLE - Assistant General Secretary
DEBORAH HALL - Assistant Treasurer
EDLEY SWAIN - Trustee
MARIO CURRY - Trustee
AVERIL CLARKE - Trustee
SEAN BOWE - AVP Grand Bahama & Bimini
BRANDO STEWART - AVP ZNS Northern Bahamas
FREDDIE PINDER - AVP Abaco
WAYNE CLEARE - Andros
DOROTHEA BETHEL - AVP Eleuthera
RANDY SMITH - AVP Exuma & Southeast Bahamas
MONIQUE CORNISH - AVP ZNS New Providence
PRISCA FRANCIS - Chief Shop Steward/BTC
GENELDINE MARRETT - Chief Shop Steward/ZNS





es avdiTHat ‘Gives: Back!




they cheered for their favorite contestant.

messaging feature. However by the end

Apart from the Biggie Holla, the “Kiddie
Holla” featured a number of kids who
“cacked the mic” with their rhymes about .
text messaging. The winner of the “kiddie
holla” was Ashley Brown and she won a 3.2
Mega Pixel Digital Camera courtesy of
Quality Business Center (QBC).

BTC stands firm in its commitment to
promote the youth of The Baharnas and
will continue to assist in showcasing their.
talent. The third quarter of the Hip Hop —
Halla will commence this week on 100 -
Jamz when callers will have to “HOLLA”
about“WHY BTC”


















For Just 7 Oe 4 a Aires
ner four ies Car oe



te’s Gur

"a











~ Financial laws test

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

The Tribune





- $15m issue caps bank’
‘phenomenal’ fiscal ‘06



i PAUL McWeeney holds Bank of the Bahamas International's

Euromoney best bank award

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN attorney yesterday told
The Tribune that the Supreme
Court had yet to hear the sub-
stantive issues in the case he
was bringing to overturn the
Bahamian financial services
regulatory regime, more than
five years after it was first filed.

-Maurice:’ Glinton, who
togethez with fellow attorney
Leandra Esfakis ‘is challenging

Gray: Development Bank

on constitutional grounds the

11 laws enacted in December
2000 in response to the Finan-
cial Action Task Force
(FATF) blacklisting, said. they
were currently going through
the “discovery” process with
the Attorney General’s Office,
which is representing the Gov-
ernment.

_ This process, he added, will
attempt to. ‘settle the record’,
meaning that both sides will
identify the main issues to be

‘must get back on track’

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter

CONSUMER Affairs and
Local Government minister,
V.Alfred Gray, yesterday

_ pleaded with the Bahamas

Development Bank to do
more to empower small
Bahamian businesses.

Minister says BDB
holding up Bahamian
entrepreneurs

Mr Gray used the opening

SEE page 8B

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Nick.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.427.9778

Damianos

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t 242.322.2305

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALEY

f 242.322.2033









@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor -

ank of the

Bahamas Inter-

national’s man-

aging director

yesterday told

The Tribune that it had

enjoyed a “phenomenal” fis-

cal 2006, with its $15 million

preference share issue over-
subscribed within a week.

Paul McWeeney said the

bank’s Board, which saw its

book of business grow by 40

per cent during the first nine

months of the year to June 30,

was now “in the process of

determining who gets what”

from the now-closed prefer-

ence share issue due to the

_ oversubscription.

Describing the preference
share issue as having “sold out
in no time”, Mr McWeeney
said the proceeds would be
used to “really strengthen the

capital base to support the

major growth we’ve achieved
in the last 12 months”.

With the bank’s book of
business having expanded by
40 per cent between June 30,

2005, and March 31, 2006, Mr
McWeeney pointed out that it
had to maintain certain capital
ratios, and the $15 million issue
would ‘ ‘support existing infra-
structure”.

He explained that Bank of
the Bahamas International still
had the ability to issue a fur-
ther $10 million in preference
shares and, without seeking to
pre-empt the issue, the insti-
tution was “more than likely

to recommend” that its share- .

holders vote for the creation
of a new preference share issue
at the next annual general
meeting (AGM).

‘Mr McWeeney said prefer-
ence shares appeared to be

“extremely attractive” to
Bahamian institutional
investors, fitting their long-
term investment profile by pro-
ducing a good, safe return.

The $15 million private
placement was the second suc-
cessful round of financing com-

‘pleted by Bank of the
Bahamas International during -
.2006, its $25 million rights issue

to 4,000 existing ordinary
shareholders also havirig been
oversubscribed.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter- «|

national saw its net income
increase by 36 per cent in the
fiscal 2006 third quarter,
describing the three months to
March 31 as its most successful
period ever.

The bank’s auditors are cur-
rently working on its fiscal
2006 financial statements, the
year having ended on June 30.
Mr McWeeney said Bank of
the Bahamas International was
“optimistic we continued the
growth momentum into the
final quarter of the year.

“We’re pretty excited if
these numbers hold firm,
which we think they will,” Mr
McWeeney said. “This year
has certainly been a phenome-
nal year, for the bank, no two
ways about it.”

Mr McWeeney said the bank
was “hoping towards the end
of this year to be able to hang
the flag” on and open its new
branch in South Florida.

The twin processes of reno-
vating the branch site and
going through the regulatory

SEE page 5B

case endures five-year wait

argued before the courts, and

the documents used.

“We’re presently going
through a process of discovery
with a view to getting some of
the main issues settled before
the court,” Mr Glinton said,
adding that the case on the
merits of their action was still
before the Supreme Court.

Mr Glinton said he had first
filed the action in April 2001,
meaning the courts still had to
hear the substantive issues

“lust got a lot loan...
Pe , tor

more than five years after it .

was initiated.
The courts have heard sev-

‘ eral interlocutory matters

resulting from Mr Glinton and
Ms Esfakis’s action, the Privy
Council ruling yesterday in

favour of Chief Justice Sir Bur-.

ton Hall’s decision to strike out
13 paragraphs from their writ
(see story on Page 3B).

The central thrust of their
case is that the Financial
Transactions Reporting Act,

one of the 11 laws, violates the

constitutional right of attor-

ney/client privilege.
This right provides for all
forms of communication

‘between an attorney and his

clients to be confidential, but
the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act’s. Know Your
Customer (KYC) require-

ments mandate that govern- |

SEE page 5B

HELPING YOU CREAi E AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



ASL EDS UE



CDB official
tells Bahamians
‘bisvest hindrance
is yourself’; BDB
sees $2m loss
| decline and $5m
non-performing
loan improvement

# By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter

- BAHAMIANS are “‘sit- |

opportunities in the agro-
|. food processing and small
| and micro-business sectors,
but are failing to exploit
these, a Caribbean Devel- |.
| opment Bank (CDB) rep- |-°
resentative said yesterday.
The CDB partnered with
the Bahamas Development
; Bank (BDB) and the
Bahamas Cooperative
Leauge to host a three-day
workshop for 37 partici-
pants from seven different
Family Islands. |
| . Yet the CDB’s Kenneth |
Harvey said finding partic-
ipants proved challenging.
“This workshop is cost-
ing the Caribbean Devel-
opment Bank in excess of
| $26,000, which is not includ-
ing the administrative costs.
The bank agreed to spon-
sor ‘( participants, and I |
am going to tell you, it was
| like pulling teeth to get 17

| have the problem in getting
the programme to do what |
it is supposed to,” Mr Har-

| vey said.

‘SEE # Page ihe






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Choose Fidelity

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‘

PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

Rec Cal ay
EMU ce LL
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ANNUAL FUN DAY

Regular Office Hours
will resume on
MONDAY, 31st July, 2006

We regret any inconvenience caused.







BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE

Break down boundaries |

that cause voter apathy ©

LAST week, Prime Minister
Perry Christie announced he
would be moving to create a
Constituencies Commission
(more commonly referred to

as the Boundaries Commis-

sion) to review whether or not
there should be changes in our
electoral boundaries. Histori-
cally, this move has been an
indication that parliamentary
elections are nearing. The cur-
rent parliamentary term will
end in May 2007, which is now
less than 10 months away.

Structure of the Boundaries

’ Commission

Article 68-70 of the Bahamas
Constitution deals with the
Boundaries Commission, its
composition, duties and report-
ing lines.

The Commission consists of
five members, who are: the
Speaker of the House of
Assembly (chairman), a Jus-
tice of the Supreme Court
(deputy chairman), two mem-
bers appointed on the advice
of the Prime Minister, and one
member appointed on the
advice of the Leader of the
Opposition. According to the
Constitution: “Any decision of
the Commission shall require
the concurrence of not less
than three members of the
Commission. And: “The Com-
mission shall in accordance
with the provisions of this Arti-
cle, at intervals of not more
than five years, review the
number and boundaries of the
constituencies into which the
Bahamas is divided and shall
submit to the Governor-Gen-
eral a single report either:

1. Stating that in the opinion
of the Commission, no change
is required, or ,

2. Recommending certain
changes, and the Governor-





General shall cause such report
to be laid before the House of
Assembly forthwith.

Criteria for Constituencies
The Constitution calls for a
minimum of 38 constituencies

and no maximum. When..

reviewing the number and
boundaries of the constituen-
cies, the Commission is
required to:

a. Strive for equality of pop-
ulation

b. Respect natural barriers

c. Give consideration to the
geographical size of a con-
stituency.

d. Give adequate considera-
tion to any other pertinent fac-
tors. i

In an archipelago nation such
as the Bahamas, those goals
are not easily realised. For
instance, we have the
Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked
Island, Acklins and Long Cay
(MICAL) constituency. It is
one of the smallest constituen-
cies in terms of the number of
registered voters, but it proba-
bly covers the largest geo-
graphical area of any district. It
is probably fair to say it is the
costliest district to represent,
because it encompasses five
separate and distinct island
communities. Contrast MICAL
with, say, Pinewood, which coy-
ers a relatively small land area,
but is densely populated and
ranks among the largest dis-
tricts in terms of registered vot-
ers.



History of Electoral Districts

In 1967 there were 38 con-
stituencies, and this total num-
ber remained until the 1982
elections. The 1982 Boundaries
Commission recommended the
addition of five new electoral
districts, bringing the total to
43 constituencies. By the time
the 1987 election came around,
another 6 electoral districts
were created, bringing the total
to 49 constituencies.

In 2002, the number of elec-
toral districts was reduced for
the first time, with the elimi-
nation of nine electoral districts
for a total of 40 constituen-
cies...the number we stand at
today.

Even though the above para-

graphs trace the changes in the |

total number of constituencies,
it does not even begin to
describe the history of changes
in electoral district boundary
lines. The changes in bound-

ary lines have been far more |

dramatic and more often sub-
ject to criticism and claims of
‘gerrymandering’ over the
years.

In theory, boundary lines

' should shift to reflect popula-
tion shifts that occur naturally -

over time. For instance, the
south-west corridor of New
Providence has seen explosive
growth within the past 15
years...just ride the length of
Carmichael and Cow Pen
roads, and you will be amazed
at all the new subdivisions that
now exist. This, then, raises the
obvious question...should we
then make a corresponding
adjustment for the depopula-
tion of urban centres and, if so,
how?

What is most interesting to
note is the fact that as new elec-
toral districts were added, the
incumbent party generally had
lacklustre results in contesting
these newly-created ‘seats’,
while the only example of
reducing the numbers of elec-
toral districts resulted in a dis-
astrous outcome for the incum-
bent party. Notwithstanding
this, it seems as though every
incumbent political party feels
that there are significant advan-
tages to redrawing national

-boundaries, even if the end

result contravenes the spirit of
the constitutional provisions.

Low Voter Registration

What is extremely interest-
ing is the fact that the voter
registration has been very low,
considering that we are less
than 10 months away from a
general election. Up until
Prime Minister Christie’s
announcement last week, only
67,362 out of an estimated
170,000 eligible voters had reg-
istered. This represents a reg-
istration rate of about 40 per
cent.

To get everybody registered,
we would probably have to reg-
ister more than 10,000 persons
per month if everybody were
to register. Is there the infra-
structure in place to deal with
these types of numbers in a
short period of time? In the
absence of reasonable voter
registration numbers, any
attempts to change boundaries
could be ‘shooting in the dark’.
Is it time (as a part of the con-
stitutional review process) that
we revisit exactly how bound-
aries are drawn and who is

‘involved in the process?

Further, what is this apparent
voter apathy telling us? Is it
simply a case of Bahamians
being ‘last minute’ people, or
could it be symptomatic of oth-
er issues? It will not be long
now before the ‘spin doctors’
from both sides of the politi-

cal divide start to provide us

with explanations to the ques-
tions raised and many others.
Until next week...



NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is 2 major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas. |

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of

‘Colonial Group International .

or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



AVAILABLE

Switzerland-based Private Bank is looking
for a
SENIOR INTERNAL CONTROL &
HEAD OFFICE LIAISON OFFICER

- Minimum qualification

° Degree (or equivalent) in business administration,

banking or fiance

° Excellent organizational, management, communication

and interpersonal skills

e At least 10-15 years experience in managing a private

bank

° Thorough knowledge of all aspects of a modern,

dynamic private bank

¢ Well versed in Swiss banking standards and practices.
Knowledge of local regulatory matters; excellent PC

skills

* Willingness to work in a multicultural environment

* Fluency in English, German and French; spoken

Spanish would be an asset.

The position offers a competitive salary and benefits.
Applications must be made in writing, to arrive by 9th
August, 2006. Persons not meeting the above minimum
requirements need to apply. Applications should be mailed
to: Human Resources Officer, P.O. Box SS-6289, Nassau,
Bahamas.



—



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 5B



Stocks rally on acquisitions,

$15m issue caps bank’s

FROM page 1B

processes in the US:and the
Bahamas are ongoing, with Mr
McWeeney saying the latter
was in “the final steps”.

The renovations to the
branch premises, which are on
the ground floor of the Sun-
trust building in Coral Gables,
located at Alhambra Square,
are expected to be completed
in about three to four months,
about the same time as the reg-
‘ ulatory process.

Mr McWeeney pointed out
that to complete the US
approvals process, Bank of the

Bahamas International had to:

“have a physical address.
In addition, Bank of the

Financial
laws test case
endures five-
year wait

FROM page 1B

ment agents inspect an attor-
ney’s client files to ensure he is
complying with the Act and its
’. regulations.

According to Mr Glinton
and Ms Esfakis, these inspec-
tions on behalf of the Compli-
ance Commission and Inspec-
ior of Financial and Corporate
Services Providers “abrogate
the individual’s constitutional
right of confidentiality as we
have understood it in common
law tradition”.

All Compliance Commission
inspections have been stayed,
though, until the courts rule
on-the substantive issues of the
Glinton/Esfakis case.

Mr Glinton yesterday said
the battle over attorney/client
privilege was important for the
well-being of the Bahamian
economy and its investment
climate, as foreign investors
would want the confidence and
certainty that this nation
upheld the rule of law and its
constitution before placing
their money here.

Absent this, investors would
be more inclined to take their
- investments elsewhere

Mr Glinton added: “Legal
professional privilege is at least
representative of one factor as
far as the foreign investor is
concerned. If he’s coming into
this jurisdiction, he must be
able to take confidence that
the rule of law is upheld.”

He pointed out that courts
in the UK and Canada, and
other Commonwealth and
common law countries, had all
handed down rulings in recent
years upholding the principle
of attorney/client privilege in
the face of increasing KYC
demands.

“We have been trying for so
long to get this matter heard,”
Mr Glinton said of his and Ms
Esfakis’s efforts. “You have to
ask yourself why we (in the
Bahamas) have been unable
to progress this matter.”

Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers

Bahamas International is hop-
ing that the tender bidding
process for the contract to con-
struct its new West Bay Street
headquarters, located between
the Nassau Palm Resort .and
Dockendale House, will start
in the first quarter of its new
fiscal year.

Mr McWeeney added that
he was hopeful groundbreak-
ing for the complex could take
place by the middle of fiscal
2007.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-

‘national recently received its

third major international
award in two years, having
been selected by Euromoney
magazine for one of its Award
of Excellence presentations.
In awarding Bank of the
Bahamas International the

Bahamas’ first ever country’s
best bank award, Euromoney
noted that in addition to
growth and investment in tech-
nology, the bank “has-also
worked hard at customer loy-
alty, developing its internet
banking, expanding its ATM
network and expanding its
credit card business via a pre-
paid Visa promotion”.

“This has been a week of
extraordinary honours for
Bank of The Bahamas,” said
Mr McWeeney.

“Being recognised by such
an influential publication as
Euromoney as the country’s
best bank, and completing a
hugely oversubscribed $15 mil-
lion offering within the same
week is a record that anyone in
the financial services industry

FULL-TIME REGISTERED NURSE

WANTED)
FOR GROWING MEDICAL PRACTICE
PEDIATRIC EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
INTERESTED PERSONS PLEASE
SUBMIT RESUMES AND CV TO
P.O. BOX SS-19026

Job Vacancy

Mechanical Coordinator

The Mechanical Coordinator will manage all Maintenance
Management Systems within their scope of responsibility and
also develop and administer Preventative and Predictive |
Maintenance Programs for new and existing systems.

Applicant Must:

Manage and Maintain Mechanical Systems including:
Production Systems, e.g. Reactors, Filters,
Pumps, Tanks, Vessels and Filter/Dryers
Utilities Systems, e.g. Boilers, R.O.
Systems, Cooling Towers, PSA Nitrogen
and Brine & Chilled Water Systems
Environmental Systems, e.g. Bio Basin,
Clarifiers, Incinerator, Scrubbers,
Ventilation Systems, Groundwater
Remediation System.

pupa will also be responsible for:

Ensuring that Maintenance Shop, Offices,
Work Areas and job sites are maintained
safely and that all appropriate permits,
procedures and standards are adhered to.
Maintaining records and documentation as
required on installations, work orders,
alterations, costs training and inspections

Qualifications:

An Associate Degree, in a mechanical discipline,
from an approved institution along with 10 years of
demonstrated EADeIEnce in the industrial maintenance

field

Compensation: Salary and other benefits commensurate
with qualifications and experience.

Please e-mail written applications to:
HYPERLINK "mailto:businessservices@coralwave.com"
businessservices@coralwave.com

or mail to:
Human Resources
Department
P.O. Box F-42430

Freeport,



Bahamas

‘phenomenal’ fiscal ‘06

‘would be immensely proud of,
and J would like to thank our
staff, management, customers
and shareholders who made
these achievements possible.”

Mr McWeeney told The Tri-
bune that the Euromoney
award showed Bank of the
Bahamas International could
“stand head-to-head with any
other management team”, as
it moved to transform itself
from being a ‘bank’ to a
“financial enterprise”.

He added that the bank was
“about to launch a fully-
fledged private banking office”
for its clients, and was focusing
on further enhancing product
delivery and full service quali-

ty.

arnings

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE |
DEVON ENERGY PORT BOUET,
LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 29th day of June, 2006. :

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
DEVON ENERGY PORT BOUET, LTD.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SANTA FE ENERGY RESOURCES |.
(COTE D’IVOIRE) LTY

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is | .
hereby given that the above-named Company has been }:
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
onthe 29th day of June, 2006.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator

0
- SANTA FE ENERGY RESOURCES (COTE D’IVOIRE) LTD.



A LEADING LOCAL COMMERCIAL BANK
HAS A VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

SENIOR MANAGER CORPORATE FINANCE

Core Responsibilities:

-e Responsible for the Bank’s corporate finances including
budgeting, assets and liability management, financial reporting

and accounting

° Review Bank’s financial results and compare to historical and

sector results

* Review and upgrade all Bank financial management operations

¢ Establish credit and collection policies and develop methods for
improving Bank’s financial performance

¢ Accountable to ensure regulatory mandates are followed

¢ Interacts with branches relating to budgeting and other finance

matters.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

« A minimum of five years experience in a banking environment.

* Complete knowledge of accounting, financial analysis, and
budgeting with experience and skills in financial management.

¢ Either Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or Certified Financial
Analyst (CFA) with an MBA.

¢ Strong analytical, administrative, written and oral communication

skills

¢ Working knowledge of treasury management, information; and

risk management.

* Strong leadership skills to design and convey policy and coach

others.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 26" July 2006 to:

c/oThe Tribune

P.O. Box N 3207, DA 11649

Nassau,Bahamas ss



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS»

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

IMPORTANT NOTICE
2006 RECIPIENTS

‘THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME

CHECKS WILL BE DISTRIBUTED BY LAST NAME IN
CONGRATULATE THE FOLLOWING PERSONS -ALPHABETICAL ORDER. LISTEN FOR WHEN YOU
WHO HAVE BEEN AWARDED EDUCATIONAL ARE TO REPORT TO THE DISBURSEMENT CEN-
LOANS FOR 2006. TRE.

THE EDUCATION LOAN COMMITTEE WISHES TO oe
DO NOT TO COME TO THE DISBURSEMENT CEN-
TRE IF YOUR NAME DOES NOT APPEAR ON THE
FOLLOWING LIST.

CHECK DISTRIBUTION EXERCISES WILL BEGIN New students and their co-borrowers are required to ONLY PERSONS WHO COME ON THEIR ASSIGNED
ON JULY 31ST, 2006 TO AUGUST 12TH , 2006 bring a valid Passport, National Insurance Card, anda DATE WILLBE SERVED ~
FROM 9 A.M. TO 3 PM. AT THE FOLLOWING LOCA- job letter with them. In addition to the original docu-
TIONS: ments, new students can reduce their wait time by
bringing two (2) copied sets of these documents.

PLEASE CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCA-
‘TIONAL LOAN DIVISION

at MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOL-
AWARD LETTERS HAVE BEEN MAILED, HOWEVER, OGY IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS

YOU. MAY RECEIVE A COPY FROM THE SCHOLAR-
SHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION, MINISTRY
OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, .
THOMPSON BOULEVARD.

2006 APPROVED

- THE HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE, STAPLE-
TON GARDENS, NEW PROVIDENCE AND

- THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA (Grand Bahama and the Northern

THE EDUCATION LOAN COMMITTEE
Bahamas)

GACH BAMOMG art Yi

TREVOR
JAMES
LYNN
ANASTACIA
ELNORA
CAROLINE
SHEINAY.
PRINCE
ARNETTE
LOUISEA ANNE
AGENES ALENE
TARAN
PHILIPPA
JOYELLE.
GEORGE
OMAR
CALSEY

* SHANDEIKAH
MBOYA

JHOVAR BOBBY
ANGELIQUE
RENAE
RAYMOND
SHANGELIA
HERMIA
ROSAN |
OLIVIA
NICOLE
DION
ADENA
SAMUEL
SOLOMON
TABITHA
VALENCIA
JONATHAN
MERLENE'
MELISSA
NIKITA
NIKITA
ALEXIS
CRAIG

LA’ SHAN
TAMIKA
LATOYA
LAKEIRA
ALEXANDER
ROBERTHA
OLIVIA
TRANEA

JAMAR
ANYA
TINO
EVEANNA
REYNARD

ALBERT
ANTHONY
ADRIANNE
PATRICK WILLIAM
VANESSA

ELENA

YOLANDA

EDSIL

NAOMI

VERONICA

ADDRESS

ALLENS

SOUTH BEACH
IVANHOE ROAD
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS
NASSAU EAST BLVD
NASSAU EAST
OAKES FIELD
NASSAU VILLAGE
GOLDEN GATES #2
TYLER STREET, SOUTH
BREEZY HILL ROAD
BOZINE TOWN
SPRINGFIELD ROAD

" YAMACRAW

CORAL HARBOUR
CARMICHAEL DRIVE
MISTY GARDENS

GOLDEN GATES #2
CHIPPINGHAM

SUNSHINE PARK

YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
FLAMINGO GARDENS
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
SAN SOUCI

YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
CLARIDGEDALE GARDENS *
ABUNDANT LIFE ROAD
WESTWOOD VILLAS
PALMDALE

NASSAU VILLAGE
CARMICHAEL ROAD
PYFROM ADDITION

BLAIR ESTATES

SIXTH STREET

SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
SUNSET PARK

YAMETTO DRIVE
PINEBARRAN

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
SEABREEZE ESTATES
FOX HILL ROAD

NASSAU VILLLAGE
BAYWATER ESTATES
GAMBIER VILLAGE
GOLDEN GATES #2
GOLDEN GATES #2
CORAL HARBOUR
STAPLEDON GARDENS
CARMICHAEL ROAD
FAITH GARDENS
HIGHLAND PARK
CARMICHAEL ROAD
COLONY VILLAGE, EAST
CARMICHAEL ROAD

ST ANDREWS BEACH ESTATES
GIBBS CORNER
CARMICHAEL ROAD
VISTA MARINA

LAURA HILL SUBDIVISION
MONASTERY PARK
STAPLEDON GARDENS
CABLE BEACH

VILLAGE ROAD

BEL AIR ESTATES
TROPICAL GARDENS

SEA BREEZE ESTATES
MILLENNIUM GARDENS
TOWER HEIGTS
PINEWOOD GARDENS
FOX HILL

YAMACRAW HILL ROAD
MARATHON ESTATES
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
STAPLEDON GARDENS
PINEWOOD GARDENS .
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE
PINEWOOD GARDENS
CORAL HEIGHTS EAST
PINEWOOD GARDENS

. CORAL HEIGHTS WEST

WESTWARD VILLAS

GOLDEN GATES

MILLARS HEIGHTS
YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES
OAKES FIELD

GARDEN HILL ESTATES

SURNAME

CURTIS.
DARLING
DARLING
DARLING
DARVILLE
DARVILLE -
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS,
DAVIS
DAVIS
DEAN

DEAN

DEAN
DELEVEAUX
DELEVEAUX
DEMERITTE
DEVEAUX
DEVEAUX
DEWAR
DORSETT
DORSETT
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE II
EDGECOMBE
ELLIS.
EVANS
EVANS-ROLLE
FARQUHARSON
FARQUHARSON-ARTHUR
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FINLAYSON
FITZ-GERALD
FORBES
FOUNTAIN
FOWLER
FOWLER
FRANCIS.
FRANCIS
FRASER
FRASER
FRAZIER
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GILBERT
GLINTON
GOODMAN
GREENSLADE
HALL
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HARDING
HENFIELD
HIGGS
HIGGS
HUMES
HUTCHESON
HUTCHESON
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM-KNOWLES
ISAACS
JACOBS
JACOBS
JAMES
JESUBATHAN
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON

FIRST. NAME

SHAUNDRA
CARLENSEANO
STEVON
SUZLA
LANECIA
O'KEISHA
ALVIN
CAROL
FLOYD
GLENVILLE
RICCARDO
ANTONIO
KENO
MANDI
CHEQUELLE
JASON
EDRICA
ADRIAN
RUVANIA
CASSANDRA
DARIA
FORRESTALL
ERICA
ROSETTA
STEPHEN
KAYWANA
KRYSTA
CAMERON
MALISSA
ANTHONIQUE
ZANIA
BETTY
CANDICE
DERRICK
ELINDERA
SEAN
SHARA
ALEXIS
LATINA
ANTOINE
ADRIAN
CLEMENT
DANNY
JANAE
SIMONE
ASHLEY
GARITH
ANN
DEANDRA
D'SORAJI
JENNA
BRANDON
BRANDO
SILAS
MONIQUE
PETIA

AMY
ANWAR
JAYCHELLE
M'KHEL
RAYMOND
YASMIN
MANDY
INDIRA
ARETHA
MIYOSHI
SHARANDA
ALENA
GABRIELLE
KENCOVIA
SHELLYN
WILDERA
CHERYL
KELE!
DEONDRA
DONTAE’
EMMA
JEREMY
CHARLEASE
CHRISTIAAN
EBONY
JERMAINE
KRISTY
LAKEIHSA

MIDDLE NAME
NIKITA

DEANDO
MICHELLE
CHRYSAN
DESIREE

FRED
CHARLENE
RINALDO
ARLINGTON
ALEXANDER
DeVANO. .
AKEEM
CAHILA
ANTOINDRA
ROOSEVELT
DOMINIQUE
ANTHORN
EVITTA
ELAINE
TYESHA KELSIE
OSCAR ROGER
VANESSA |
IONA
GREGORY
TOVA
VICTORIA KENVA
LAVER
SHARLENE
TAMARA
LESA
ELIZABETH
CHRISTINA
GLENWILL
COREN
GERRARD
LETHIA
NOELLE
TAMARA
PHILIP

LEROY MARCUS
JACOB
GLEN
LATOYA
DENISE
KANDICE
NATALYA
MARGARET
KAVANA LASHANTI
D'LAJA
TERYL
ALWORTH
ANDRONIC
NIGEL
ALYEAN
ALONA

- ALICIA

ADDINGTON
KRIZIA
ASHLEE
FRANCIS
ANN
LYNETTE
ALEXANDIRA
PATRICIA
CARDINA
CAROLYN
VALENTINE
PATRICE

IVY CURLEAN
STEPHANIE
BONITA
MARVA
IRRINGTON
LE'SHAUN
ALONZO
TAMARA
ROHAN
KASIF
BARNARD JAMAAL
FLORENCIA
JOLTON
ANASTACIA
ANASTASIA

ADDRESS

ELZIABETH ESATES
COLLONY VILLAGE
HAROLD ROAD
SHIRLEY STREET
PINERIDGE

CHIPPINGHAM
CHIPPINGHAM
BAHAMA REEF
CARMICHAEL ROAD

- SEA BREEZE ESTATES

HIGHBURY PARK
ELIZABETHE AVENUE
SUNSET RIDGE DRIVE

-SUNSET PARK

SOLDIER ROAD
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS
BAMBOO TOWN
DANNOTTAGE ESTATES
CARMICHEAL ROAD
STAPLEDON GARDENS
HILLSIDE PARK ROAD
SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

~ SOUTHERN HEIGHTS

GLENISTON GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS
BAMBOO TOWN
GARDENS HILL #1
ANNEX OF VENICE BAY
ELIZABETH ESTATES
TWYNAM HEIGHTS
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
NASSAU EAST

CORAL HEIGHTS EAST
SEA BEACH ESTATES
NASSAU EAST

SEVEN HILLS

CABLE BEACH
YAMACRAW SHORES
APPLE STREET

WEST BAY STREET
BAY STREET
YAMACRAW

SILVER GATES
PERPALL TRACT
MT.PLEASANT VILLAGE
GAMBIER HEIGHTS
PINEWOOD GARDENS
MARATHON ESTATES
VICTORIA BLVD
MILLARS HEIGHTS
HUDSON ESTATES
VILLAGE COURTS
GILBERT STREET
FLAMINGO. GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS #1

- MARATHON ESTATES

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
COX SUBDIVISION
OAKES FIELD

GAMBLE HEIGHTS

SEA BREEZE ESTATES
EASTWOOD ESTATES
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS I!

SEA BREEZE DRIVE
BACARD! ROAD, WEST
WINDSOR LANE
RIDGELAND PARK, EAST
TWYNAM AVENUE
SKYLINE LAKES

BLUE HILLS

BAILLOU HILLS ESTATES
MILLARS HEIGHTS

GOLF COURSE BLVD
GOLF COURSE BLVD
FOX HILL

VILLAGE ROAD
MILLINNUM GARDENS
WINTON HEIGHTS
SUNSET PARK
GLENISTON GARDENS
EASTWOOD ESTATES
GOLDEN GATES #2

ee ee





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 78

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

2006 RECIPIENTS

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME

CONTINUED
2006 APPROVED







SURNAME FIRST NAME MIDDLE NAME ADDRESS ISLAND _ SURNAME FIRST NAME MIDDLE NAME ADDRESS ISLAND _
JOHNSON QUANTRIEA " DRISKELL ROLLE AVENUE NP SHERMAN KENSEL OLIVERE DELAPORTE NP
JOHNSON ROBERT CRAIG FRANCIS BLUE HILL ESTATES NP SHERMAN II GLENN ALEXANDER FLAMINGO GARDENS NP
JOHNSON ROBYNN “MECHELLE LOREN GARDENS HILL #1 NP SIMMONS . MICHELLE MCQUAY IONA COWPEN ROAD : NP
JOHNSON SAMANTHA ALEXIS. BAMBOO CREST NP SMITH AMANDA MICHELLE GOLDEN GATES #2 , ; NP
JOHNSON . ty SANIA AKIRA CORAL HARBOUR NP SMITH : ANDRICA f ANGELIQUE EASTWOOD ESTATES NP
JOHNSON TAMEKA ANTURA SUNSET PARK ‘ NP SMITH CALVIN LEHENZA BOLLA ALLEY NP
JONES JANIQUE AYESHA BEL AIR ESTATES NP SMITH DAVINA NATALIA EAST PARK ESTATES "NP
JONES MARIO. | " FRANKLYN GOLDEN GATES NP SMITH DELPHIA SHARON NASSAU VILLAGE NP
KERR . DENRICKA | CARLETTE BLAIR ESTATES NP SMITH IANTHIA SHASHICA ST ANDREWS CIRCLE , EAST NP
KING PATRICE ‘ LORRAINE GLENISTON GARDENS NP SMITH KRISTIE MARIE WINTON MEADOWS NP
KNOWLES . INEASE cia’ CORAL HEIGHTS NP. SMITH LATANYA SHARRELL PINEWOOD GARDENS © NP
KNOWLES JAYDE KEVETTE BOYD SUBD NP SMITH i LAUREL LAVENIA . GOLDEN GATES II ots NP
KNOWLES MELISSA ‘ .LAUREL BELLOT ROAD NP SMITH é . MEIKO KASHANA SOUTH BEACH ESTATES . NP
KNOWLES SHAW HENRY ELDRIDGE GOLDEN ISLES ROAD NP SMITH MILLICENT SELENE FAITH AVENUE NP
LAING TAJAH ELLAMAE CARMICHAEL ROAD NP SMITH NASHANDA MIA BLUE HILLS ESTATES NP
LEO GARNEL HAVEN AVENUE NP SMITH REGINA TONIA COLLEGE GRADENS NP
LEVARITY MATTHAN . JAVAN GARDEN HILL #1 NP SMITH SHANAE KRISTEN : BLUE HILL ESTATES NP
LEWIS ALETHIA DARRELL GARDEN VIEW ESTATES ‘ NP SMITH JR _ ERIC WINDSOR LANE NP
LEWIS CINDY MALLISA COLOMBUS ESTATES NP ji SPENCE GWENDOLYN VERONICA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP
LEWIS LORENZO JOHN STAPLEDON GARDENS NP SPENCE LATIA -— KEUNIKA ‘ BLUE HILL : NP
LEWIS SHAVONTI RUSSELL . GOLDEN GATES NP ST.CYR LEONETTE LEKARA EASTWOOD ESTATES NP
LIGHTBOURNE TREVOR ANDREW FOX HILL NP STEED AARON ALEXANDER ROYAL PALM GARDENS NP
LLOYD HERBERT LEVI SILVER GATES NP STRACHAN * KYLE HARRISON CARMICHAEL ROAD : NP
LLOYD © VALENTINO ELVARDO GLENISTON GARDENS NP STUART RAVONNE r LATOYA VELESTA GARDEN HILLS I! NP
LONGLEY JOETTE CARA SKYLINE DRIVE NP SWEETING CHERICE CAMILLE STAR ESTATES NP
LUND? AGNESSA LAURELLE IMPERIAL PARK NP SWEETING JESSICA LEIGH . GREENWOOD ROAD NP
LUNDY © a9 -~ TIFFANY LEAH SWAZILAND CREST NP SYMONETTE : KARLEN CHRISTOPHER STAPLEDON GARDENS NP
LUNDY II MARTIN ARNOLD IMPERIAL PARK NP TAYLOR KEITRA BIANCA | “CHESAPEAKE “NP
LUNN JASPER JAMES PROVIDENCE AVENUE NP THOMPSON EDWARD * NATHANIEL BALDWIN AVENUE = NP
MACKEY BERRANDO ARLINGTON CHIPPINGHAM ROAD NP THOMPSON LINDA GLORIA COLLIES AVENUE NP :
wo RL MACKEY DANIELLE SIMONE” “NASSAU EAST moe yp | THOMPSON REAH “TAMARA MILLENNIUM GARDENS * NP i
ot MACKEY KERLANO KACHAD FAIRVIEW DRIVE NP THOMPSON YOLANDA TERRA NASSAU VILLAGE wa agarung NP i
oe MACKEY KHALIA JANAE HILLVIEW CLOSE NP THOMPSON III EARL VINCENTE SEA BREEZE ESTATES . NP
MACKEY LAKEISHA SIMONE NASSAU VILLAGE Be NP THURSTON SIMONE THEOLA YAMACRAW ROAD. , . NP
MACKEY JR GLENROY WILLIAM ELIZABETH ESATES NP . TOOTE SHENANDOA LYNDORA BLUE HILLS at NP
MAJOR ANIKO GLADSTONE GARDEN HILL #2 NP TUCKER CARISMA - : ANDEIRA WINDSQR LANE NP.
MAJOR A ANNA FRANCIS REGENCY PARK ; NP TYNES © > (ANTHE ZANOBIA SANDFORD DRIVE NP
MAJOR MEKO EMRIQUE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP VIRGIL ; KHRISNA MONET MILLENIUM GARDENS NP
Ped ea MAJOR MICAH LOUISE CARMICHAEL ROAD NP VIRGILL : ALEXIA ; JERDELL MASON ADDITION NP
es MAJOR NADIA "BIANCA CHIPPINGHAM NP WALKER GHANDI NADIA SIMONE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP
: MAJOR TRACY CHERISE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP WALKINE BERNADETTE MARGURETTA PLANTON STREET NP
MARSHALL VALENTINO MELCHIZEDEK GOLDEN GATES II NP WALLACE ESIS : DELPHINE KENNEDY SUB MAIN ROAD NP
MARSHALL II ALBERT GEORGE VISTA MARINA NP WALLACE : SEBASTIAN EUTON BUTLER CLOSE : NP
MARTIN DAVARD JAVON GARDEN HILL Ii NP WATKINS SYDIRA - ‘ DONNAYA CORAL LAKES. : NP
MAYCOCK KRYSTLE ROY-ANNE EASTWOOD ESTATES ‘ NP WATSON CHRISTAL LAVERNE ANN GOLDENGATES!| NP
MCALPINE KEISHA ANISHKA FAIRWIEW HEIGHTS NP WHITE ANASTACIA THOMASINA CARMICHAEL ROAD NP
MCCARTNEY ANWAR QUINN TREASURE COVE NP WHYLLY DEANGELO KALMAN EASTWOOD ESTATES NP
MCCLAIN ALEXANDRA — KRISTINA MOUNT VERNON E NP » WHYLLY DEANZA KEVIN, EASTWOOD ESTATES ; NP
is MCINTOSH CAROL JUDY ROBINSON ROAD NP WHYMNS MELISSA : MONTEZ EASTWOOD SUBDIVISION NP
2 MCKENZIE ANTONIA AUTELIA BAMBOO TOWN NP WHYMNS SHENIQUE CRYSTAL MILLENNIUM GARDENS NP
, MCKENZIE SHAVONNE CLAUDETTE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP WHYTE FRANCITA — | VICTORIA WINDSOR LANE NP
“MCKINNEY-COX _ ARIELLA LOLITA JULIANA CARMICHAEL ROAD NP WILKINSON ° ADRIAN ANTONIO SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP
MCPHEE . DARIO "ELVIS SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP WILKINSON KAYSHAN LA-DREA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP
MCQUAY . SUENAE ¢ LOUISE TYLER STREET NP WILLIAMS MARNEECE LEANDRAH ' REGENCY PARK NP
' MIDDLETON RICHARD KARLISSON ELIZABETH AVENUE "NP WILLIAMS MARQUES ANTHONY ZENAS CARMICHAEL ROAD NP
> MILLER DESMOND JERMAINE- EASTWOOD ESTATES NP WILLIAMS TAKASHIEII . LEROYSHA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP
MILLER JOY ALEXINE DEANDRA SEABREEZE GROVE + NP WILSON BETTY ELOISE FAITH AVENUE NP
MILLER RUDENA ° REGINA GARDEN HILLS #2 NP WILSON JAMIE O'NEIL SOUTH OCEAN BLVD NP
MILLER SHONIQUE LAURETTE PINEWOOD GARDENS 3 NP woop PRECIOUS MEO'SHIE ‘GOLDEN GATES I! NP
MILLS OMAR DANA ELIZABETH ESTATES NP WRIGHT DEBBIE YVONNE SUNSET PARK i NP
MINNIS INDERA ST ANDREWS ESTATES : No WRIGHT RICHARD : _ QUINTINO WILLIAM TERRACE : NP
MISSICK MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER FOX HILL NP WRING JORDANNA MICHELLE ; GOLDEN GATES | NP
MORTIMER ANTHONIQUE ANTONYA LOUISE FOX HILL NP YOUNG CRISTA ZANDERA GOLDEN GATES STRAIGHT NP
see MORTIMER KIVONNE ; STEPHANNE EASTERN ESTATES , NP ;
es MORTIMER PRINCESS DOMINIQUE PALMETTO VILLAGE NP :
: MOXEY LYNETTE LATEDRA CASSIEA SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP STUBBS YUWONKA ODELL ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES EL EU
MOXEY 1 : BRADLEY KEVIN ; GARDEN HILL #1 NP HUDSON JR DONZALEIGH - DWIGHT MILLERTON LONG
MUNROE ; KAYLE AKEEM EDWARDO _ ELIZABETH ESTATES NP STANFORD EBONY ANDREA ROBYN DUNDAS TOWN : ABACO
MURPHY : RANIQUE : EZELINE PECOLA GOLDEN GATES 1 NP SYMONETTE BRIAN. LEONARD MARSH HARBOUR ABACO
NEELEY RENALDO O'NEAL HAMILTON ADDITION NP JOHNSON ' KEENAN SIMEON : : PALMETTO POINT ELEU
NEWBOLD 7 DAREN . INZELY : NP KELLY F CRYSTAL _ JAUNETTE LOWER BOUGE ELEU
NEWTON CLAUDETTE ALEXIS LAKE CUNNINGHAM { , NP SYMONETTE NAKESHA - MARGARITTA » ROCK SOUND ELEU
NEWTON LOFTON ANDREW TWYNAM HEIGHTS : NP
NEWTON SHEANDRA MICHELLE TWYNAM HEIGHTS ‘ NP
NORVILLE-SMITH ERIC CHARLES NASSAU EAST NP ‘BAIN SASHA FRANISKA ARDEN FOREST GB
PATTON SHAKERIA ANDERIA PALM TREE AVENUE NP BELL KEVIN LEROY FREEPORT GB
PAUL SIMONE SHAMAAL STAPLEDON GARDENS NP BURROWS STEPHON JULIAN FREEPORT ; GB
PAUL-PARADA -OBREQUE CICELYN ALEXANDRIA WEST BAY STREET NP CAREY PAULINA OELCINE . FREEPORT GB
PEARCE" 82 = --RICARDOâ„¢ PAUL SKYLINE LAKES NP COLEBROOK ANDRE PATRICK FREEPORT ea
PHILIPPE KEITH ; a é HAY STREET - NP CULMER ERICA SHANTEL FREEPORT GB
PILGRIM BRENDIA ALEXANDRIA IBIS STREET NP CURRY ' DEKARRA ECHO | YEOMAN WOOD GB
PRATT KENWOOD LOFTHOUSE WEST BAY STREET NP DAVIS STEVEN TORELLO SHERWOOD FOREST GB
PRATT- DUNCANSON JOSEPHINE SARAH YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP DEAN D'ANDRA LATEIYA ROYAL BAHAMIA GB
PYFROM DIANDRA DISHAN SOUTHERN HEIGHTS Nd DEAN D'ANDREA HENRIKA ARDEN FOREST GB
RAHMING AMANDA ‘ CHESTELE BLUE HILL HEIGHTS ( NP DEMERITTE CHRISTINE LUCAYA GB
RAHMING LEON DARRYL NASSAU EAST BLVD NP DEVEAUX ' KRISTOPHER AMOS FREEPORT GB
RAHMING : SHADE ITALIA YAMACRAW SHORES. NP DOUGLAS THEONE ILALIA ATLANTIC DRIVE GB
RAHMING TAMIKA CHANDERA STAPLEDON GARDENS NP FERNANDER MORGAN CORY CRAIG SHERWOOD FOREST + GB
RIGBY JR ; BALDWIN EASTWOOD NP FORBES RENAJ' KELVIN PINE BAY GB
ROBERTS JADE ARNETTE PINEWOOD GARDENS NP GRANT TANYA PATRICIA FREEPORT GB
ROBERTS JANE HELENA MILLIUNM GARDENS . NP . HANNA GABRIEL MIGUEL HAWKSBILL GB
ROBERTS : VASHTI ESTHER STAPLEDON GARDENS NP KNOWLES ASHTON KEITH FREEPORT GB
ROBINSON DIAH CHANDIRA CHAUTE CARMICHAEL ROAD NP | “MACKEY GARVIN DARREN FREEPORT GB
ROLLE CHARLOTTE PAIGE MELAINE os WINTON HEIGHTS. NP MACKEY TARA LATISHA LUCAYA GB
ROLLE DAREN MARCO DAMONE GLENISTON GARDENS NP MADER KARAN FREEPORT GB
ROLLE JANAE MAKERIA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP MAJOR-ADDERLEY SHEWRUAE "LORRAINE PINERIDGE GB
ROLLE ‘ JERMAINE LAVARDO SUNSET PARK NP MAJOR-MITCHELL INDIRA MICHAELLA FREEPORT GB
ROLLE JUSTINA CORINNE MACKEY STREET NP MCKINNEY JOANN ELIZABETH FREEPORT GB
ROLLE KEISHA SANTYA NASSAU VILLAGE NP MEADOWS SHATORI SANOVIA FREEPORT GB
ROLLE LATESHA MARILYN KENNEDY SUBDIVISION NP MICHAEL DAVID FREEPORT GB
ROLLE LERON LEO CARMERON BAILLOU HILL ESTATES NP MITCHELL SHAVON MICHELLE FREEPORT GB
ROLLE LYNELL MARISSA COLLEGE GARDENS NP. NEWTON RASHAD PEREZ FREEPORT GB
ROLLE NIKITA CAROLYN SUNSET PARK NP PEARSON - LEEMAN JAMES HENRY FREEPORT GB
ROLLE PHILLIPA OLIVIA EAST STREET, SOUTH NP POITIER-SHERMAN MONIQUE SHARON HERITAGE GB
ROLLE TERRELL MELICIA KENISE BAILLOU HILL ROAD NP PRATT KRISTIN JOWELLA CARVEL BEACH GB
ROLLE-SHIEL NIKITA CORAL HARBOUR : NP ROBERTS GARY TYRONE PINERIDGE GB
RUSSELL DAVONYA RAVON BACARD! ROAD NP RUTHERFORD DAVINA ALETHEA LUCAYA GB
RUSSELL RAYMOND ASHLEY CORAL LAKES NP SAUNDERS CHIKARA JAMILA BAHAMA TERRACE GB
SANDS CLINTON CHARLES GLENISTON GARDENS NP SAUNDERS LASHANTA , ANQUONETTE SOUTH BAHAMIA GB
SAUNDERS DESMOND SOUTH BEACH NP SMITH LAMARO SHAMON HOLMES ROCK GB
SAUNDERS LATOYA TAMIKA SIMMS RICHARDS COURT NP SMITH RICHANNA BENITA FREEPORT GB
SAUNDERS STEPHAN KIPLING TENEIL. OAKED FIELD NP STUART STEPHANIE PATRICE HAWKINSBILL GB
SEALEY TANISHA JANETTE WINTON MEADOWS NP TELFORT STEVENCY FREEPORT GB
SEYMOUR LATHARIO KRISTOFF ST. VINCENT ROAD NP THOMPSON LAKIA LASHANA SOUTH BAHAMIA | GB
SEYMOUR WAINGER DERICKA SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP WILLIAMS PAIGE VALERIA JONES TOWN GB
SHERMAN GLENDERIA SAMANTHA FLAMINGO GARDENS NP WORRELL KYRIA DYRELL FREEPORT ; GB
ZONICLE VANESSA ANETRA FREEPORT GB



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006










ae Ia

Job Vacancy

Maintenance & Utility
Manager

The Maintenance and Utility Manager will be responsible for
daily overseeing of the Maintenance Department with Operational
responsibility for the Utilities and Environmental Areas.

Applicant must be able to:
Plan, Lead, Execute and Control all
Maintenance, Utilities and Environmental
Process and Systems

Monitor and administer the Emergency
Response Center, Fire Pump House, Ground
Water Remediation System and Site Waste
Collection Systems

Support Site Waste and Energy Minimization
goals by advising of consumption rates and
best practices. Monitor levels and quality of
Site Waste and Storm water collection and
storage systems

Monitor inventory and usage of chemicals
and fuels consumed by Utilities and
Environmental

Serve as the discipline Engineer for Electrical,
Electronic, Mechanical, Piping,
Environmental and Utilities systems.

Qualifications:
A Bachelors Degree in Engineering or Engineering
Technology from an accredited College or University;
along with at least 10 years of demonstrated experience
in the industrial field

Compensation: Salary and other benefits commensurate
with qualifications and experience.

Please e-mail written applications to:
HYPERLINK "mailto:businessservices@coralwave.com"
businessservices@coralwave.com

or mail to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box F-42430
Freeport, Bahamas



CREDIT SUISSE



a= s

THE TRIBUNE.,: »





Bahamians sitting
on ‘agro gold mine’

FROM page 1B

“This programme can give a
lot of assistance, and can give a
lot more assistance over the
years, but there are some pre-
requisites that must be met.

“In order for us to be more
aggressive, and be of greater
use to you, the resident insti-
tutions must do their work.
You must get in there and
aggressively work with the
people on the various islands
to get them to come to the
workshops.”

Mr Harvey said he himself
had to make quite a number
of calls from outside the
Bahamas to ensure attendance
at yesterday’s workshop.

“Your biggest hindrance is
yourself,” he said. “What we
must not overlook is the myri-
ad of opportunities that exist

. right here in the Bahamas.”

Mr Harvey, who has trav-
elled through the region exten-
sively for the CDB, said that if
he wanted to start a business
he would wish to establish it
in the Bahamas.

“You are sitting on a gold
mine,” said Mr Harvey, noting
that there had to be more dri-

ving the Bahamian economy

than tourism and banking.
Mr Harvey highlighted a
number of achievements that
the CDB has completed, host-
ing a number of workshops
on the Family Islands, includ-
ing a two-week workshop on
batik and tie dying in Andros.
Mr Harvey also gave
Bahamians this piece of advice.

Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

JUNIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

(Private Banking)

“If your attitude is that you
will sit back and wait on the
Government of the day to give
you everything, you will not
get far. As a business person
you have to take responsibility
for all aspects of your business
- from planning to execution.”

In the future, Mr Harvey
said that to drive workshop
attendance, notices will be giv-
en to all permanent secretaries
in Bahamian government min-
istries so no one can say they
were unaware of the work-
shop. The CDB will also send
registration forms to former
workshop participants.

“We have never had the
opportunity to say to any insti-
tution in the Bahamas, or any
individual: ‘We have done
enough this year, give us a
chance to come back next
year.’ You have not been using
the programme aggressively,
please use the programme,” he
said.

Mr Harvey added that there
was a myth that to create an
agro-business, it had to be
done on a large scale.

“This workshop is specifi-
cally designed to let you know
from day one that there are
many micro business opportu-
nities that you can start,” he
said. .

K Neville Adderley, chair-
man of the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank, a co-sponsor of the
event, said the bank’s audited
accounts for 2005 showed its
net loss declined by over $2
million, while non-performing
loans decreased by over $5 mil-

lion.

He pointed out that for the
first time in the bank’s history,
the private sector through
British American Insurance
purchased some government-
guaranteed bonds issued by the
bank to obtain funding for
lending to small and medium-
sized business.

“All of the above is good

news for the ongoing avail-
ability of funding by the. bank
to lend to small and medium-
sized businesses, and we are

endeavouring to see to it that |

they can take advantage of that
increased funding,” Mr Adder-
ley said.

He said the BDB was also
seeking to become more rele-
vant and helpful to the small
business community, through
not only diversifying its loan
portfolio but also by establish-
ing a business advisory unit to
offer.free entrepreneurial
training and advice.

Mr Adderley added that he
welcomed the re-emphasis the
co-operative league was
attempting to place on agro-
processing.

“For our part, the develop- .

ment bank’s strategic plan calls
for making available addition-
al loans for viable farming, hor-
ticultural and agro processing

_projects which have seen ‘a

steady decline in our portfolio
over the last seven years, in
line with the trend in the

-region,” Mr Adderley said.

Consumer Affairs Minister
V Alfred Gray noted that the
co-operative sector had a vital

NOTICE

JPM NIPPON NEUTRAL FUND, LTD.
No. 27698 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 30th day of June, 2006. Articles
of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Joint Liquidators are Paul A. Gomez and Patrick E. Smith of
Paje House, Marlborough Streer, P.O.Box N-8285, Nassau, The

Bahamas.



role to play in fostering and

encouraging its membership to: >| +’
invest in new business oppor-, -*.°-

tunities.

“With an asset base of $180
million, the time has come
when leaders must consciously. - .
consider allocating a percent: ~
age of that $180 million dol; . .
lars for investment in various. ~.
agribusiness and agro-food |
processing ventures,” he
added.

Mr Gray said this was'a way
of diversifying the Bahamian |
economy.

Over the next few days, par-
ticipants will learn about agro-
products that can be success-

fully processed at the micro

and small business level, tech-
nical models for food-based
products, start-up and imple-
mentation of business plans,
and have a daily one-on-one
consultation with advisors.

A certificate will be present-
ed at the end of the workshop.

Ges
Development
Bank ‘must

om veceoe
es

FROM page 1B

of a workshop on business
opportunities in agro-food pro- -
cessing to tell BDB chairman,
K Neville Adderley, of his con-
cerns regarding the bank and
its mandate. The BDB was one
of the sponsors of the three-
day workshop.

“One of the problems that I

‘have, and I have had it forthe .

last four years, is that these.-.
banks that are co-sponsoring -
these events are not always as
loan friendly as I would like to .
see them,” said Mr Gray.

“That is not a:criticism. 1 .-
hope they take it in the spirit-.-°-.-
with which it is intended. I..”

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or. before the 24th day of August, 2006 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims

Credit Suisse is one of the world’s premier private banks. It is setting new
standards that go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly

| qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual
| investment counselling and professional portfolio management. Our total

| commitment is always to our clients and we focus without compromise on their
| financial well-being and their personal values.

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Junior Relationship
y Manager, reporting to the Heads of North America/Latin America.

| Duties will i :

Management of accounts and relationships of existin
clients, Le. ' : :
being responsible for the execution of orders, monitoring
of cash positions and portfolios of the assigned client base
Marketing of private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients from Canada and Brazil
Acquisition and development of new offshore clients
Management of accounts/relationships with clients

originating from Canada and Brazil.

Applicants should possess a degree (or equivalent) in

Business Administration

At least five (5) years banking experience including trading,

trade reconciliation, custody business and securities markets
Marketing experience .
‘Strong communication skills in English, French and Portuguese to
facilitatemarketing and relationship management within Canada and
Brazil

Excellent command of the English language

Good computer literacy on PC and host software.

Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills —
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm and a positive attitude

_ Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Applications oniy should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-49
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JULY 31, 2006



to the Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof, they may
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such debts are proved.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2006

PAUL A. GOMEZ and Patrick E. Smith
Liquidator :

geste AN CTE oo
Licensing Assistant

An expanding IT company is seeking a self
motivated candidate with strong
communication skills to assist with Microsoft
| and other licensing sales.























| The successful candidate should have:

* A minimum of 4 years experience
in licensing sales, especially with
Microsoft Open Licensing Program and
McAfee .

¢ Technical sales experience in firewalls, a
focus on Sonic WALL is an advantage
but not required

¢ Certifications in technical sales and
licensing a plus

¢ The ability to assist in advising clients,
including preparing quotations,
proposal and invoicing

¢ Strong analytical skills and an attention

to detail



Remuneration and Benefits will include a
competitive salary, group health and pension.




Resumes should be submitted by Fax
to 356-4189 no later than July 28, 2006.

believe that together we can ,-

do better than we are doing,
and in fact we have to do bet-
ter than we are doing to assist.

those small businessmen and:.

women.” ae
Mr Gray said he found it dif: - °
ficult to understand why the .
BDB had failed to grant more
loans to budding Bahamian
entrepreneurs.

“One of the difficulties I,-7-_
have is that I do not under-.'.’

stand, and I may not be able to
appreciate why the banks, gen-
erally, and specifically the
Bahamas Development Bank,
have not been willing and/or
able to grant loans to small’.
businessmen and women
unless they come up with ‘all
their family history’,” he
added.

Mr Gray said the BDB was
formed for the specific purpose
of assisting the development
of small business in’ the
Bahamas.

“I am frustrated when I hear
of the cries of our people who
want to get into business, but
they don’t have the collateral
which may be required by the
bank, and even with govern-
ment guarantees that bank has
not been willing to assist small
Bahamian business people,”
the minister added.

Mr Gray said something had
to be fundamentally wrong
with that. “J am asking, I am
pleading, I am begging that
that bank does what it needs to
do in order to help people like
you [the workshop partici-
pants] and those who are rep-’
resentatives of you to get your
business at least started.”

Mr Gray said that while it
was easy to come to seminars
and teach people what to do,
often when they went to the
BDB it was a different story.

“That is what bothers me.
know I represent the Bahami-
an people who have been frus-
trated and turned around. It is
just not right when you look
at the purpose for which the
bank was initially formed,” Mr
Gray said.

“We have drifted away from ©
it and I pray that Sir Lynden in
his grave would speak to those °
who manage the bank to get
it back on track.”



~ TRIBUNE SPORTS | TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 11B.





Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content ,
Available from Commercial News F Providers:

|







‘Softball teams’

See woos:

ws Ss

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

CAC efforts
MINT IMs

AEN

@ SOFTBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports

Reporter

\

“THE efforts
being put forth by
the softball teams
participating in the
Central American
and Caribbean
(CAC) Games
should be applaud-
ed,” said president
of the Bahamas

. Olympic Association

(BOA) Arlington
Butler.

Butler’s assess-
ment came yester-
day afternoon, just
hours before the
women’s national
softball team played
their doubleheader
match. The team has
already suffered two
costly losses, need-

| ing to secure the two

wins in the double-
header to stay alive
in the tournament.

Despite all this,
Butler explained
that all “the team’s
have put forth a gal-
lant effort and their
applause by the
Bahamian public
should not be gf%en
based on the results
of the games, but on
the facts.”

He added: “When
you look at the final
scores in the games
you might say that.
the Bahamas didn’t
do anything, or why
did they send these
teams to represent
us at such a high lev-
el tournament know-
ing that they’re not
able to compete?
But you really have
to assess the games,
look at the bigger
picture. a

“The Bahamas is

-the only team from

the English speaking
Caribbean to play in
softball and base- —
ball. Yes we are
small in numbers
and might.can’t pro-
duce sufficient play-
ers needed in case of
backup, but we are
here and they are
putting forth a gal-
lant effort, they are
doing a remarkable
job despite the out-
come.

“We have to
realise that teams
are playing against
teams like Cuba,
who have a stellar
programme in both
softball and base-
ball. This country
produces some of
the world’s top ath-
letes in the sport.
Then there is
Venezuela, Colom-
bia and Mexico, all
these countries have
a supporting pro-
gramme.”

Butler did reveal
that the women’s
softball team’s per-
formance was at a
low in the first two
games and that
improvement should
be seen during the
double header.

The team is
expected to play
Puerto Rico in the
first game and
Dominican in the
second game.

The men’s team
finished up fourth,
losing the bronze
medal to Puerto
Rico on a shortage
of runs.

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS





@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
’ Senior Sports Reporter.













































Burnside used one word to
describe the performance of the
men’s national softball team at
the XX Central American and
Caribbean Games in Cartagena,
Colombia - Impressive.

“I was satisfied with the play

H. use,” said Burnside on the
team’s return home on Sunday
night. “We got great pitching
from Edney (‘the Heat? Bethel)
and little spots from Crestwell
(‘the Bomber’ Pratt), Edmund
(‘Binks’ Bethel) and Brian ‘the
ninja’ Neely.

“Our defence, I can’t speak
about it. It ‘was excellent. We
made a couple of errors, but it
. was a great defensive effort by
the entire team.”

The Bahamas had a golden
opportunity to win a medal,
holding a 1-0 lead up to the sixth
inning against Panama. But
/Panama took advantage of a
costly error in both the sixth and
the extra eighth inning to win 2-

“One error and we could have
easily secured at least the bronze
medal,” Burnside reflected.
But based on what he seen
from the 13-plus-one injured
squad, Burnside said he couldn’t
ask for anything more, consid-
ering the fact that it was a

young team with
more of the
experienced
players opting to
play for the hap-
less baseball team
that went winless.
“The younger ball
players, infielders and

of the 13 players that we had to .



RARER ARE





PRO AA

§ softhall team
‘Impresses manager



“There’s no doubt in my mind

MANAGER Godfrey ‘Gully’ that Edney Bethel is the best



‘

pitcher in the region right now, .
based on his performance at
the CAC Games.”



‘Manager Godfrey ‘Gully’. Burnside :

outfielders, did very well,” Burn-
side noted. “But in the pitching,
after Edney, who? We need to

work on that.”

Despite falling short of win-
ning a medal, Van ‘Lil Joe’
Johnson and Godfrey Burnside
Jr. were named to the All-Tour-
nament team for left and centre

field respectively.

And even though Edney
Bethel produced a sterling per-
formance on the mound, he was
beaten out in the pitching cate-

gory by the Cuban ace.

“There’s no doubt in my mind

. that Edney Bethel is the best
pitcher in the region right now,
based on his performance at the
CAC Games,” Burnside said.
* “As a matter of fact, with him
leading such a young team, they
never expected us to do so well:
“We have the entire CAC
softball executes mesmerised by
the way these young guys
played. I think Edney did a very
good job in working with them.”
Burnside, however, also com-
plimented the other veterans
Edmund Bethel and Crestwell
Pratt, whom he feels have given
all they could to the national
team as players and should now
bow out and move into the

coaching ranks.

COMPETITORS line up on stage as they await the judges’ decision at the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation’s 33rd National Bodybuilding and Fitness Cham:

“They both brought some
maturity to the younger players
by sitting down and talking with

them,” Burnside stated. “We .

younger players. But we have to
commend them for the job
they’ve done.” ;

While the pitching department
comprised of Edney and

was the mainstay catcher.

The infield comprised of Greg
Gardiner, Julian Pratt,
Devaughn Wong, Alec Rolle
and Larry Russell Jr. The out-
fielders were Van Johnson,-God-

and Alcott Forbes.

injured from the first game and
didn’t play the rest of the tour-
nament.

While the team didn’t win a
medal or qualified for the World
Championships, they will have
another opportunity to qualify
at a tournament in Mexico in.
September. :

: Burnside, however, couldn’t
state whether or not he will bea

: bia.



pionships on Saturday night in the Rainforest Theatre. From left are Gena Mackey, Charmaine McNabb, Charmaine McNabb, Siorhan Dean, Joanna Nixon, Fay Rolle, Lizette

McKinney and Dominique Wilkinson. In the background is Cecilee Hilton.

(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)

Gardinder, however, got.

part of the team or if they intend,
to add or change any. of thé.’.
players who travelled to Colom--

need to move on with some. ’.

Edmund Bethel, Crestwell Pratt-
and Brian Neely, Philip Culmer’

frey Burnside Jr, Charles Rolle



Fitness first for women competitors.

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT SEEMS as though more women are
interested in participating in the fitness
competition rather than the bodybuilding
one.

At the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Federation’s 33rd annual National
Bodybuilding and Fitness Championships

in the Rainforest Theater of the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort on Saturday, the
majority of women competitors entered
the fitness aspect.

‘When asked the reason why, the com-
mon trend with the women was the fact
that, while they wanted to compete, their
main concern was keeping their feminin-
ity.
Defending champion Lizzette McKin-

ney, one of the seasoned competitors on
stage, started out in bodybuilding, but
she said she made the switch over to fit-
ness because “it was a lot easier to get
prepared for the show.”

Unlike bodybuilding, where the train-
ing regime is more stringent, McKinney
said she “only had a few weeks to get
ready” after she was encouraged by the
federation to come out.

McKinney, however, was not as trim
as she would have liked to have been.

She went up against newcomer Cecilee
Hilton, who emerged as the new champi-
on in the Body Fitness Tall. Joanna
Nixon, a returning competitor, was third.

Hilton, 28, said she was well prepared
for the show.

| SEE page 10B



Full Text
| HIGH
LOW

cm CLOUDS



7m towin’ it.

SOF
TTF

. Lhe Tribune





She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 102 No.201



tet anneal ls



Committal order made
on Samuel Knowles’
extradition ‘must stand’

& By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE second and final appeal
of Samuel “Ninety” Knowles
has been dismissed by the Privy
Council.

_ In its judgmen:, the council
stated that the committal order
made on Knowles’ extradition
request must stand.

However, the judges
acknowledged that there is an
outstanding Habeas Corpus
- application by Knowles.

* This'was to have been heard
in the Bahamas Supreme Court

“on May 12-13, 2005, but Justice ©

Hugh Small adjourned the hear-
ing to await the Privy Council’s
judgment.on Knowles’ appeal
’. ‘against that decision.

.« While the Council said that
‘the application has not been the:
subject of argument or decision,
it declined to make any obser-
vation about it.

The US government sought
‘Knowles’ extradition from the
‘Bahamas to stand trial on drug
charges in Florida.

As a result it has made two
extradition requests, which have
led to a number of proceedings
in the Bahamian courts, culmi-
nating in the two appeals to the
‘Privy Council.

The first extradition request .

was made as a result of a feder-
al grand jury, which, on Decem-
ber 8, 2000, indicted Knowles
and others on counts of con-
spiracy to possess cocaine and
marijuana-with intent to dis-

tribute and conspiracy to import

the same drugs into ae United
States.



An order was made for the
release of Knowles in Febru-
ary, 2002, which prompted the
US to make a second extradi-
tion request, for which the same
magistrate, Carolita Bethel,
issued a provisional warrant on
February 6, 2002.

This was founded on an
indictment preferred by a fed-
eral grand jury on May 25, 2000.
It charged Knowles and others
with counts of conspiracy to

smuggle cocaine into the United .

States between June, 1995, and
1997.

The Council pointed out that
the second extradition request
differed from the first in two
respects: it was founded on an
earlier grand jury indictment,
and it related to an earlier peri-
od of time. It also charged dif-

_ ferent conspirators and depend-

ed on different evidence.
_ Knowles’ lawyers resisted this
extradition on the grounds that
the second extradition request
was an abuse of the process of
the court, that the US had not
made proper disclosure and that
the evidence was insufficient to
support the charges.

Bahamian courts rejected
these arguments on December
16, 2002. On the abuse point,
the court:was of the opinion
that a magistrate had no juris-
diction to stay or dismiss extra-
dition proceedings on grounds
of abuse, but also said that the
magistrate would not on the
facts exercise such a jurisdiction
even if she had it

In December, 2002, Knowles’

SEE page nine



TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



PRICE —75¢



@ A WORKMAN cuts up the old boat which has eee left at Long Wharf yesterday. This fislowrs a Tribune article last

week in which beach users complained that the barge was a potential health hazard.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Miller: WTO
concessions
‘insulting’

li By CHESTER ROBARDS

WHILE the US and Euro-
pean Union are at odds as to
who is to blame for the failure
of the recent World Trade
Organization negotiations,
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Minister Leslie
Miller contended again yester-
day that the concessions offered

by the WTO were “insulting”.’

Speaking to The Tribune, Mr
Miller reaffirmed his position
against the WTO’s plan to cut
farming subsidies.

According to a British Broad-
cast Corporation (BBC) Inter-
net article, Senior Trade Ana-
lyst Dr Claire Melamed said

SEE page nine

al





Investigation into spate of
bomb threats at airport

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

POLICE are anxious to
track down culprits behind a
spate of bomb threats at Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport.

With three threats in less
than ten days, officers have
now launched a serious inves-
tigation. The latest threat
came yesterday at the customs
warehouse on John F
Kennedy Drive.

Acting general manager of
the Airport Authority Joseph
Reckley said he and his col-
leagues.are not taking the sit-
uation lightly.

“The Royal Bahamas Police
Force in conjunction with
BTC (Bahamas Telecommu-

nications Company) are work-
ing together at this time in an
attempt to trace the calls,” he
said.

“We are looking to press
charges against the culprits, as
this is a criminal offence.”

The threat, reported to the
Airport Authority at about
2.12pm yesterday, did not
affect flight services, accord-
ing to Mr Reckley, as the
warehouse is about a mile
away from the airport.

Yesterday The Tribune
received reports that flights
were being made to circle the
airport, causing delays. But
Mr Reckley denied this was
linked to the bomb threats.

“As far as I know, we have

SEE page 11

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tel: 242-394-1789 © fax: 242-394-1859 « email: hwabahamas@coraiwave,com
In Freeport: tel: 242-351-2201 ¢ tex: 242-351-2215,









Police officers
give testimony
in murder trial
@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

SEVERAL police officers
from Freeport were called to
the witness stand yesterday to
give testimony and submit evi-
dence into the Cordell Farring-
ton trial for the murder of 22-
year-old Jamaal Robins.

Detective Constable Lavar-
do Sherman, a crime scene
investigator attached to the
Criminal Records office in
Freeport, told the court yester-
day of how on the morning of
Tuesday, October 28, 2003, he,
with a team of officers, accom-
panied by the accused Cordell
Farrington, travelled to a loca-
tion about 3.2 miles west of the
water tower on the Grand
Bahama highway. From there,

SEE page 11


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



media in a democracy. As a certain
television commercial used to say, it
has always been thus.

At certain times, such as election sea-
son or when there is a particularly hot
issue or when a government or individ-
ual politician gets into hot water, the
tension is likely to mount.

Bahamians are already looking to the
next general election, there are a lot of
hot issues and the government of the
day is in hot water — at least in the eyes
of its critics and opponents. So it is not
surprising that tensions between some
politicians and the media should height-
en.

All politicians are pleased when the
media gives coverage to the good things
they do or say. But some tend to get
quite agitated when the media gives
them short shrift, and the more sensitive
ones get downright apoplectic when the
media dares to point out their mistakes.

It can be discouraging when a par-
liamentarian makes what he thinks is.a
brilliant contribution to a particular
debate and gets only a few lines.- or no
lines at all - in the press. He is more
likely to think that the press is out to get
him rather than that his contribution
might not have been as interesting as he
thought.

It is not that the people responsible
for the media get it right all the time.
_ They have a big job to do; they are
human, and they often make mistakes
for one reason or another.

| he media have a number of

functions to perform in a
democratic society. A prime function
is to give the people accurate informa-
tion about what is happening in their
community and the world.

The more important that information
is, the more depth, context and inter-
pretation it should be given by respon-
sible media outlets, especially the press;

and this should be done as objectively as __

possible.

Context can include recalling and
eomparing what a politician says today
with what he said yesterday about a
particular matter, especially if it appears
to be a. contradiction. :

Obviously, there are endless possi-
bilities for:mistakes-and sometimes
important stories can be missed alto-
gether or misinterpreted because of the
lack of good judgment, insight or expe-
rience. Sensible politicians will find that
most reporters, and certainly editors,
will not take offence if this is pointed



out to them.
Another function of the media is to

lead public debate and to act as a forum

for the development and exposition of
public opinion. I believe it is better

. when these two functions are kept sep-

arate so that the public can easily tell
the difference between information and
opinion. This is what most reputable
mainstream newspapers practise.

But sometimes opinion can be news.
The media can be justified in seeking
and reporting as news the opinion of
qualified persons or even the general
public in certain cases; for example, a
controversial ruling by the Speaker of
the House of Assembly would almost
demand it.

Hee: I believe it tends to
erode.confidence.and.arouse..

suspicion when journalists frequently
drag opinion into their reportage, espe-
cially when those opinions are contro-
versial and attributed to unnamed
sources. It is certainly wrong to allow
personal attacks from behind the veil of



What is totally out of line... is for
governments and individual _
politicians to attempt intimidation
and threaten sanctions against any
section of the media they happen to
have a disagreement with. :










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anonymity.

It is in the forum of conflicting opinion
and debate that the relationship between
politicians and the media tends to get
really messy. Politicians, like everybody
else, have a perfect right to respond vig-
orously to media criticisms, and respon-
sible editors will feel duty-bound to
accommodate them.

What is totally out of line, however, is
for governments and individual politi-
cians to attempt intimidation and threat-
en sanctions against any section of the
media they happen to have a disagree-
ment with.

It is not only out of line, it is fool-
hardy because the fraternity of journal-
ists is likely to put. aside its own differ-
ences, close ranks and make life diffi-
cult for so foolish a government or politi-
cian.

Freedom of the press - which is really
an extension of the freedom of citizens
to exchange information and express
opinions without fear — is an indispens-
able ingredient of our democracy.

Any attack on that freedom is likely to

- be viewed as an attack on democracy

itself and is likely to raise the ire not
only of locals but of the international
community as well.

ee

he press has an inescapable

responsibility to protect mem-
bers of the public from libel, and it is
also in its own interest to do so since

the law provides aggrieved persons with
remedy in the event of failure. In some

. cases.that. remedy can be ruinous to the’:

offender. 4

That is why lecturers in journalism go
to great pains to make sure that their
students understand the laws relating to
libel before turning them loose on the

- public. It is also why responsible news-

paper editors pay particular attention
to this aspect of their duty to the public
and to the institutions they control.
The law also provides remedy for
members of the public in the case of

slander. This has become a serious chal- -

lenge for those who control the elec-
tronic media, especially hosts of radio
talk shows which have become so popu-
lar with Bahamians in recent years.

It used to be said by some outsiders
that Bahamians did not have a public
opinion culture. That was not true, of
course. That perception developed
because so few Bahamians chose, as we
used to say, to put pen to paper.

_ More Bahamians are writing today
but the truth is that we have always had

MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY - SATURDAY:

BILLY'S DREAM

STILL ALIVE



Some advice for politicians |
and media as election nears |

HERE is bound to be tension
between politicians and the’



All politicians are pleased when the
media gives coverage to the good
things they do or say. But some
tend to get quite agitated when the
media gives them short shrift, and
the more sensitive ones get
downright apoplectic



a strong oral tradition which manifested
itself in. great oratory in debates on mat-
ters local and international. These exer-
cises took place in barrooms, clubs, bar-
ber shops, under silk cotton trees or
wherever there was some shade.

his tradition was brilliantly cap-
tured by the late Eugene
Dupuch in his Smokey Joe Says broad-
casts over ZNS back in the 1940s.
Smokey, his relatives in the Babbie
family and his friends would debate in
colourful Bahamian vernacular, laced
with humorous pretensions to high Eng-

‘lish, what Pop Simlet (Sir Roland :
Symonette) was up to in the House of ;

Assembly as well as what Missa Hess
(Nazi leader Rudolf Hess) was about
when he parachuted into Britain in the
middle of World War IT.
According to Smokey’s narrative,
when Hess pompously announced that
he was “born and bred in Germany”,

his British captors responded: “Well, j

yuh only johnny cake over here!”

So it was not surprising that, with the
emancipation of radio by the FNM Gov-
ernment, Bahamians took to the air-
waves with much relish. That was a
good thing for our democracy, but as
with most good things there are those
who would spoil it.

There are the chronic callers who have
an opinion on everything, the propa-
gandists who deliberately or ignorantly
spread misinformation, and the slan-
derers who seek to ruin the reputation of

‘others.

Ave of these present a serious
challenge to the talk show
hosts, but it is a challenge they must
take seriously and deal with responsi-

bly. On some future occasion, the dam-

age done to a person’s character may }

not, with all the goodwill in the world, be
written off with an apology.
' There are technical precautions that
the radio stations can and should take
and the talk show hosts should be aware
that they place themselves and their pro-
prietors at grave risk by exposing them-
selves and the public to these malicious
slanderers.
They ought to know, too, that a court

may be even more annoyed at them if :

they put their victims to the trouble of

_ having to get affidavits because the tape

recorder was not-working.

www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
- Sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com

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your
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- ed opinion, ordered.the district



THE TRIBUNE

et

°. In brief »
Judge bars‘
removal of . +.
Cuban book |
from schools ‘

@ MIAMI



A FEDERAL judge on Mon- ,.,"
day temporarily barred the Mia- .;,
mi-Dade County School Dis- . ;
trict from removing a children’s «,,
book on Cuba from school »
libraries and, in a strongly word- _.
to replace any books it had
removed by the end of the day, *”
according to Associated Press. “”

In the 89-page preliminary “@
injunction, US District Judge |,
Alan Gold ruled in favor of the *”
American Civil Liberties Union °\’
of Florida, which is seeking to '”
keep the book, Vamos a Cuba
(“A Visit to Cuba”), in schools. '«
Gold’s decision would keep the i. |
book on the shelves until the :4
case goes to trial. di

Last month, the Miami-Dade +1
school board voted to remove
the book from its elementary 1s
schools after a parent.com- »5
plained its depiction of life in 5

?- the communist nation was mis-

leading and offensive because .;3,
it paints an overly rosy picture ;.,
of life in the country. The board ,
then expanded that order to all
24 books in the series on chil- _.
dren living around the globe.
The Miami-Dade Student.»
Government Association and ::
the ACLU said the board’s «’
decision violated students’ con-.,,.
stitutional right of access to .*
information under the First
Amendment. ae
Vamos a Cuba is by Alta °
Schreier. es:

Coffee
growers to =:
be paid after .
hurricane ~

mg JAMAICA
Kingston a

= ao &

THE Jamaican government »

will give coffee growers pay-
ments they had sought to help —
them recover from a hurricane ;,
that devastated their farms in j,
September 2004, the agriculture », ~
minister said Sunday, accord- .
ing to Associated Press.

The government will pay 7.

_ Jamaican$100 million (US$1.64 ®

million) on July 28 to more than
8,000 coffee farmers whose {|

- farms were devastated by Hur-




ricane Ivan, said Agriculture %
Minister Roger Clarke.
Farmers had paid insurance
on their land through the gov-._-
ernment-run Coffee Industry}
Board to Dyoll Insurance Com- |
pany, which had filed for bank-
ruptcy and was placed in liqui-
dation in early 2005. In June, a }
judge ruled that Dyoll should :
pay the farmers Jamaican$3.1 °
million (US$51,000) in com- ,;
pensation, but that payment was -
delayed after the company ;
appealed the decision.
The farmers, who sell their ;
beans to the Coffee Industry |
Board, said the government had !
e€

neem age

cilia

to expedite at least part of the |
payment.

Ivan caused Jamaican$18 mil- ‘;
lion (US$295,100,) damage to ©
the coffée industry, which |
earns Jamaican $45 million :
(US$737,700) a year, according |
to the agriculture ministry.

Most of the damage was done ;
to properties in the famous cof- j
fee-growing Blue Mountain ;
region. 4 |

asp
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 3



ee LTT aN
‘Ingraham recommends deputy
to Constituencies Commission



In brief |



Man is
arrested
following
murder

A SUSPECT has been arrest-
ed in connection with the mur-
der of the 30-year-old man
found stabbed to death in his
home over the weekend.

According to Assistant Com-
missioner of Police Reginald
Ferguson, the suspect, who was
arrested on Saturday, is now
assisting police with the investi-
gation of the murder.

The victim has been identi-
fied by police as Andrew Far-
quharson of Malcolm Road. Mr
Farquharson died at the scene.

Speaking to The Tribune on
Sunday, Chief Superintendent
Marvin Dames said the police
are in the advanced stages of
their investigation and may
have established a motive.

The incident, which occurred
around 9.50am on Saturday,
could have been the result of a
domestic dispute, police said.

According to Mr Dames,
there is a good chance the
police may have this matter
"wrapped up soon."

Police still
unsure of

cause of |
rectory fire

POLICE are still not certain

what caused the fire which
extensively damaged. the
Catholic rectory of Holy Fami-
ly early on Friday.

Father David Cooper was
rescued by fire fighters, around
3.30am after they reportedly
received a call of a structural
blaze.

Chief Superintendent of
Police Marvin Dames said:
“Investigation continues and we
are. making very good
progress.”

The massive fire damaged
only the priest’s home, located
directly behind the parish
church off Robinson Road.

FOR cL i eM | Baad
9 ok, tilizer; ITE a

est Control’
De aT Eis
322-2157





THE Free National Move-
ment has announced the rec-
ommendation of deputy leader
Brent Symonette to the Con-
stituencies Commission.

Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham said he expects to
inform Govenor General
Arthur Hanna of his selection
today.

“My colleagues and I wel-.

come the recent announce-
ment in connection with the
appointment of the Con-
stituencies Commission,” Mr
Ingraham said in a statement
issued yesterday. :

“Mr Symonette is an expe-
rienced parliamentarian with
a thorough knowledge of the
whole Bahamas and I am con-
fident he will effectively rep-
resent the opposition and the
people of the Bahamas in our
efforts to achieve a fair and
equitable adjustment of elec-




@ BRENT Symonette

a

toral boundaries,” he said.
Mr Ingraham explained that
the constitution provides for
the appointment of a commis-
sion to review the number and
boundaries of electoral con-
stituencies into which the
country is divided at intervals
of not more than five years.

On the commission will be
the speaker of the House of
Assembly, who will act as
chairman; a justice of the
Supreme Court, who will act
as deputy chairman; two MPs
appointed by the governor
general on the advice of the
prime minister, and one MP
appointed by the governor
general in accordance with the
advice of the leader of the
opposition.

“This is an extremely impor-
tant exercise in a process
which is designed to give the
people of the Bahamas the
opportunity to express their
will at the polls by selecting
those persons who will repre-
sent them ‘in parliament and
form the next government of
the Bahamas,” said Mr Ingra-
ham.

The statement continued:
“The opposition will co-oper-
ate fully in all efforts directed
towards achieving the consti-
tutional requirement that the
number of voters in each con-
stituency shall, as far as is rea-
sonably practicable, be the
same.in each constituency.” :

“The opposition will also
support any reasonable rec-
ommendations having regard

- Patties respond to election rumours

@ By KAHMILE REID

RUMORS that the general
election might be called as ear-
ly as October remain uncon-
firmed — but all contenders say
they would be prepared if this
were in fact the case.

It has been suggested by
several sources that Prime
Minister Perry Christie is con-
sidering calling the election
either in October of this year
or in March 2007.

Chairman of the governing
Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) Raynard Rigby did not
confirm or deny the rumour.

He said the party’s machin-
ery is in full gear, irrespective
of when the election is called.

“All the constituency branch-
es are equipped and ready and
we are in full mode,” he said.

As a government, Mr Rigby
said he believes that the PLP
has been steadfast in keeping
its promises.

“We have proven that we
have the ability to move the
country in a positive direction
for the Bahamian people.”

Mr Rigby asserted that -

based on its record and the

i work it has done, the PLP will

remain in affice.

Desmond Bannister, chair-
man of the official opposition
party Free National Move-
ment (FNM), said he has not
heard the rumour of a possible

_ 2006 election, but said his par-

ty also has everything in place.

Mr Bannister said of the
present government that: “the
people of the Bahamas want

_ to see their backs — and when-

ever they call elections, we are
ready.”

He said that when one looks
objectively at the issues affect-

ing Bahamians, it is highly .

unlikely for the PLP to win
the next election.

“The indecisiveness of the
prime minister, unemploy-
ment level going up and stay-
ing over 10 per cent — they
have lost their currency, they
don’t have any advantages,”
Mr Bannister said.

Bahamas Democratic
Movement (BDM) president
Cassius Stuart thinks it is near
impossible for the government
to call an election as early as
October.

However, he said that no
matter what, his team will be
prepared.

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The BDM, he said, is in the
process of ratifying candidates
and is aiming to contest 40 con-
stituencies. “In a few weeks we
will be announcing our candi-
dates,” he said.

Mr Stuart said the Bahamian
people need an alternative to
the PLP and the FNM and that
is what the BDM is providing.

Informed sources also noted
that calling an election as early
as October may have serious
implications on the voter turn-
out — as only 68,111 Bahamians
are currently registered to vote.

In the 2002 general elections
144,758 Bahamians were regis-
tered to vote, however only
130,536 actually voted.

@ Bank of The

to other provisions of the con-
stitution relating to geographi-
cal and other considerations.
“TI take this opportunity once
again to urge all qualified citi-
zens to register to vote as soon

1

as possible. This will greatly
assist the commission in deter- °
mining boundary changes and
will ensure the right to vote in
case of an early election,” Mr
Ingraham said.

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953

e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

GOVERNMENT GUARANTEED ADVANCED
EDUCATION LOAN SCHEME

In collaboration with the Educational Guaranteed Fund Loan Programme of the
Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Department, Bank of The Baha-
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ALL students in the Loan Programme will take place at the Holy Trinity Activities
Centre, Stapledon Gardens from Monday July 31 through Friday, August, 11 2006
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. as follows:

NEW STUDENTS (First time recipients)

Surnames beginning with

Monday, July 31st, 2006
Tuesday, August Ist, 2006
Wednesday, August 2nd, 2006
Thursday, August 3rd, 2006
Friday, August 4th, 2006

RETURNING STUDENTS

Surnames beginning with .

Day

Friday, August 4th 2006
Tuesday, August 8th, 2006
Wednesday, August 9th, 2006
Thursday, August 10th, 2006
Friday, August 11th, 2006

TIME: 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
PLACE: HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE

STAPLEDON GARDENS

> Returning Students: Students AND Guarantors should be present and MUST

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© New Students: Students AND Guarantors should be present and MUST bring

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letter and copy of Utility Bill).

> Cheques will not be released until all necessary documentation have been
completed and ALL loan accounts are current!

NO DISBURSEMENTS WILL BE MADE AT THE BANK!







PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 °.
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Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
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Just who is ‘double dipping’?

THERE has been much confusion over the
Prime Minister’s Pension Act and what the
late Sir Lynden Pindling should have been
paid after he was defeated as prime minister,
but continued to serve in parliament as oppo-
sition leader.

There was no prime minister’s pension bill
when the PLP. government was voted from
office in August, 1992. After his government’s
defeat Sir Lynden expressed the wish to retire.
Mr Ingraham, as the new prime minister,
realised that a pension bill would have to be in
place to accommodate this wish. As we have
already said in this column, Mr Ingraham, Mr

‘Perry Christie and Sir Lynden sat down and
discussed the matter, considered the various
Caribbean pension plans for prime ministers
and arrived at a formula that all three agreed.

However, the Bill did not say when the
pension was to take effect, nor did it provide
for a situation where a former prime minister,
although retired from that post, would cross
the floor of the House and occupy the oppo-
sition bench. When these unforeseen conflicts
arose in various other Caribbean islands, a
simple amendment rectified the situation,
making it possible for the former prime min-
ister to either opt for an MP’s salary or take
his pension, but not to receive both.

The Barbados Act, for example, says that if
a prime minister returns to the House as a
legislator and receives a salary as such, his
pension is not to be paid. However, “where the
quantum of Prime Minister’s pension exceeds
the quantum” of the legislator’s salary “the
pension is payable onlyto'the extent of such
excess.” In other words, if he accepts the prime
minister’s pension, he can’t have, the.parlia-
mentary salary...

In their discussions it was clear that Sir
Lynden understood that the payment of the
pension was to start on his retirement from
politics. The only evidence to indicate this was
a note written by Mr Ingraham and left on
the file stating that it was agreed that the pen-
sion payment could only start on his retire-
ment.

Sir Lynden served from August 1992 to
April 1997, drawing an opposition leader’s
salary of $50,000 per year. He did not receive
his pension until his retirement. Neither Sir
Lynden, nor Mr Christie, seemed to have a
problem with this arrangement.

As Mr Ingraham says today: “Sir Lynden
understood clearly that his pension was not
due until he retired.” Mr Ingraham said that

during Sir Lynden’s lifetime he had many dis- -

cussions with both Sir Lynden and Mr Christie
and neither ever brought up the question of
the pension. Sir Lynden obviously did, not

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expect payment while he was an active legis-
lator. Nor did he question why, on his retire-
ment in 1997, his pension had not been made
retroactive to 1992 when he ceased to be prime
minister. Mr Ingraham says that was because
Sir Lynden understood the agreement.
However, the question arose again when
the FNM was defeated at the polls and Mr
Ingraham, having served almost 10 years as
prime minister, was convinced by his con-
stituents to continue as their representative
in the House. At that time Mr Ingraham opt-
ed to take his pension. He asked that the law
be amended, as was done in other Caribbean
islands, to accommodate this wish and to bar
him from being paid his parliamentary salary.
“Clearly,” he told the House, “since I am

already in receipt of the salary payable to a_

Member of Parliament as a pension, I should
not now also receive this sum again. To do so
would be ‘double dipping.’” For three years
this salary was not paid to him, until Fred
Mitchell made the mistake on a public plat-
form of accusing him of receiving it and of
“double dipping.”

The Christie government did not amend -

the law. 4
As we said in this column yesterday, when
government discovered that in fact Mr Ingra-
ham was not “double dipping”, they ordered
the Treasury to transfer a lump sum to his
account for the missing years, thus forcing
him to appear to be “double dipping”. Mr
Ingraham has not touched the money. He says
that every attempt he has made to return it to
the Public: Treasury has been thwarted.
However, in June, 2003, Prime -Minister
Christie told the House that. in an:effort to
correct an “unlawful, illegitimate decision”
and remedy “a great historical misfortune”, his
government had decided to pay Lady Pindling
a lump sum of $500,000 as the pension that was
not paid Sir’ Lynden for the five years that he
served as opposition leader. Was the opposi-
tion’s salary, which had already been paid Sir
Lynden for his service, deducted from the

pension that she was to receive, or did gov- .-

ernment “double dip” when it made the
$500,000 payment — in other words was the
parliamentary salary paid twice? Is this why
the PLP are so anxious to force Mr Ingraham
to “double dip”?

_.Mr Christie has never said what the $500,000
included. Now that certain government mem-
bers have made this matter an issue, we think
Bahamians are entitled to know how this
$500,000 was calculated and whether it also
included the opposition leader’s salary, which
‘Sir Lynden had already been paid during his
lifetime.






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THE TRIBUNE



The starting

ate of ZNS

Document - The Tribune, Sep- -

. EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN YOUR June 1, 2006 edi-
tion of The Tribune, Dr Juli-
ette Storr calls into question the
time honoured custom of the
Broadcasting Corporation of
The Bahamas celebrating May
26, 1936, as the official starting
date of broadcasting by Radio
Station ZNS “in the face of
insurmountable archival evi-
dence” that ZNS Radio began
broadcasting on May 11, 1937,
according to her research.

Indeed, there are archival
documents which confirm the
formal opening of the broad-
casting studio on May 11, 1937,
the eve of the Coronation of
His Royal Majesty King George
VI. The formal opening of the
Colony’s radio station was
billed a8 a highlight of the cele-
bration and the inaugural
address was made by the
Administrator the Hon James
H Jarret. But that was not the

_ beginning of broadcasting by

the station, referred to at the

time as “Government Broad-

casting Station - VP7NF

(renamed ZNS in 1937), which’

was already up and running.
This is confirmed by reports in
The Tribune, The Nassau
Guardian, ‘and in the Depart-
ment of Archives booklet -
“Highlights in The History of
Communication in The
Bahamas 1784-1956”.

On April 21st, this year, Her
Majesty Queen Elizabeth IT cel-
ebrated her 80th birthday; but
the official birthday will be
observed oh June 17th. So it is
with ZNS. It had its beginning
and those who pioneered it,
insist that it was on May 26,
1936. It had a formal opening,
May 11, 1937, both dates worthy
of celebration; but the found-
ing fathers who created it firm-
ly fixed May 26, 1936, the soft
opening, as its starting date, and
this anniversary has been faith-
fully observed, not as a myth,
but an historical fact, with good
reason.

- Also, on July 4th, 1977 —
starting of TV-13,) on-air test-
ing; July 10th; 1977 — official
start; October 20, 1977 — for-
mal opening by the Queen.

The accounts of some of
those pioneers are themselves

“archival evidence”, which can-.

not be ignored or taken lightly,
and following are what some of
these gentlemen of the highest
integrity had to say regarding
this subject:

Mr Kenneth R Ingraham, the
first Bahamian Director of The
Telecommunications depart-
ment, in a letter to the Colonial
Secretary, the Hon F.A Evans,
dated July 6, 1948, writes: “We
started broadcasting in a very
humble way in 1936 with a
transmitting power of 1/4 Kw.
The studio was situated in a lit-
tle building on Shirley Street,
not far from Victoria Avenue.









RA











auto =.
sales
LIMITED






LETTERS
ANCESCAUlo gical el conc

We were “on the air” two hours
each day, and 90 per cent of the
programmes were of the
“canned” variety. His Excel-
lency, Sir Bede Clifford was

. very interested in broadcasting

and a committee, under the
Chairmanship of the Hon J H
Jarrett (then Colonial Secre-
tary) was appointed. I was a
member of the Telecommuni-
cations staff at the time, and
had worked on the engineering
side and served as technical
adviser to the committee.
(Bahamas National Archives,
Document #229 - Colonial
Records).

The Hon. William’ Hart
Sweeting, was Chairman of the

' Board of The Bahamas Radio

and television Commission from
1957 to 2962. He was also the
Receiver General and treasurer
of The Bahamas and ended his
distinguished career as Chief
Secretary and Deputy Gover-
nor.

Delivering the keynote
address at the formal opening of
ZNS’ present radio studios in
Centreville on August 31, 1959,
Mr Sweeting said: “There were
no regular broadcasting in The
Bahamas before 1936, although
occasional broadcasts were
made over a Telegraph Depart-
ment transmitter. In that year,
at the instigation of the Colonial
Secretary and the Assistant
Superintendent of Telegraph,

’ Mr L J Hughes, a service was

commenced in what was the
“Snappy Hat Shop” on Shirley
Street, where Sir Victor Sas-
soon’s offices are now located.
It was a tiny building divided
into two rooms, the operator
and control panel being in the
front room and the studio in the
back. The station operated on a
frequency of 640 Kes four hours
daily, from 6.00 to 10.00pm,
with a power of 500 watts.

The station was operated on a
volunteer basis by The Tele-

' graph Department staff with a

panel of volunteer announcers
of which I was one and it pro-

‘vided an interesting cross sec-

tion of all the problems which
beset broadcasting”. (Archival

Mail ‘is not being: ‘«
delivered on time’ :

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT HAS become increasingly obvious over the past few years that ‘

tember 1st, 1959).

Also in that edition of The ‘ds

Tribune, (September 1st, 1959)
is an account of the beginning of
broadcasting. In the Editorial -

TIR
list

‘it

titled: “ZNS - Calling”, Sir Eti- (7°

enne Dupuch, who once served

on the Broadcasting Advisory 2).

Committee writes: “The Station
was. opened on May 26,
1936...etc, etc.” Hans
‘Writing on his tenure at ZNS,
Mr Kenneth P Brown, the sta-
tion’s first

1937, and General Manager
recalls: “When I started as the
station’s first salaried announc-

professional
announcer, hired in January ‘

er, ZNS was on the air for only fi

one hour each evening. The sta-

tion had been started on an =
experimental basis about 18 ©
months earlier with the volun- ;

teer services of public spirited
individuals acting as announc-
ers.

Programme organisation was
haphazard. Some evenings: am
told, the volunteers arrived but
no one knew what was to be
broadcast.” (“Heritage - 70
years of Broadcasting” - p161).

Mr H R (Rusty) Bethel - the
father of Bahamian Broadcast-
ing, delighted in telling the ZNS
Story, which he knew better
than most. Addressing the
Rotary Club of Lucaya,
Freeport, on October 24th, 1989
- he said: “The station went on
the air on that eventful day -
May 26, 1936. Before it was
assigned its own frequency in
May 1936, broadcasts to the
Out Islands were made,on The
Telecommunications Depart-
ment frequency that was used
by ships at sea. The infant sta-
tion went on the air for the first
time on May 26, 1936, to be

exact at 6.30pm; with a power of

500 watts.”

No myth, but historic data on .

the development and the begin-

Â¥ts"
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gd
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sb
iy \
er
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ft

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fa

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ning of ZNS Radio, and its net- *

work of stations:

ANTHONY FOSTER
General Manager, '

The Broadcasting
‘Corporation of the
Bahamas. ae F
Harcbour “Rusty” Bethel
Drive, ae
Nassau,

July 17, 2006.

within the civil service, slack is back, and nowhere is this malaise
more evident than at that dreary cavern on East Hill Street, the Post *"!
Office. Simply put, the mail is not-being delivered on time. This is °‘ t
particularly aggravating where utility bills, bank statements and tho
credit card bills are concerned, for while not being models in many ’.

when disconnecting your supply and levying reconnection fees, me ;

and interest charges to your account. For example, I received yes-
terday my electricity bill for May post marked May 18, 2006, and

this is not an isolated incident.

I would be obliged if the Postmaster General would comment on
the shambles he presides over, as any enquiries directed to the rank **
and file are either totally ignored or greeted with surly indifference.

Winston Churchill could very well have been speaking of Bahami- *?°
an civil servants when he remarked, “No longer servants, no longer gry

civil”.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
July 19, 2006.

ESTABLISHED LAW FIRM

seeks to employ:

1. Legal Secretary

Qualifications:

5 years experience in
conveyancing, knowledge
of litigation desirable.

2. Entry Level Secretary

Qualifications:

minimum of 3 BGCSE’S, including
English and Mathematics

Salary commensurate with qualifications and

abilities.

Please send resume and references to:
LawOffice_Mail@yahoo.com



mie WO oT

SES SEE RET neh NO eR NE
Clee eee eer Le are ee i

63°
or

-areas, the utility companies and banks are extremely efficient "'3: |

2B

dy
M

iT

[SEEK

oD

er rR

awa a a,


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 5





In brief —

Teen, faces
charge

of raping
46-year-old

A 14-YEAR-OLD boy was
arraigned in court yesterday and
charged in connection with the
rape of a 46-year-old woman.

The teen, who appeared in
Juvenile Court, is charged with
raping the woman on Friday,
July 21, as well as forcibly
detaining the woman with the
intent to have intercourse with
her.

The accused was ordered to
attend the Sandilands Rehabil-
itation Centre for 30 days,
where he will undergo psychi-
atric evaluation.

He will return to court on
November 2.

Man faces
charge of
unlawful sex
with woman

A 34-YEAR-OLD man
appeared in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday and was charged with

having unlawful sex with a
woman suffering from a men-
tal disorder.

It is alleged that on June.22,
Marvin Gibson had unlawful
intercourse with the 23-year-old
woman.

Gibson, who was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers yesterday, was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

The case adjourned to Octo-
ber 23 when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

Families of
‘Guantanamo
prisoners .
launch appeal
LONDON

FAMILIES of two long-term
British residents held at the US
military prison at Guantanamo
Bay launched a legal appeal

Monday agdinst.the British gov-

ernment’s refusal to:press Wash-
ington for the men’s release,
according to Associated Press.
The court was told that
Britain refuses to ask for the
detainees’ return because it can-
not guarantee that they will be
placed under tight security mea-
sures that the US is demanding.
. In May, the High Courtiruled
that the government did not
have to act on behalf of Jamil

'-.-el-Banna, from Jordan, and

Libyan national Omar
Deghayes, because they do not
have British citizenship.

Prime Minister Tony Blair’s
government pressed successfully
for the release of nine British
nationals at Guantanamo. None
has been charged with any
offence since returning to the UK.

The pair, both who were
granted refugee status in
Britain, is alleged to have been
associated with al- Qaida
through London- based radical
Muslim cleric Abu Qatada.

The British government has
asked the United States to
return al-Rawi. Negotiations are
continuing.

Rite ae).
Parnes cy

aA
a aera

REE EET
TUESDAY,
JULY 25TH

6:00 Bahamas @ sunrise
‘9:00 Central American and

























Caribbean Games
11:00 Immediate Response (Live)
noon News Update
12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
1:00 Island Life Destinations

1:30 Gillette World Sports

2:00 Central American and
Caribbean

4:00 Island Hopping

4:58 ZNS News Update

5:00 Legends: Whence We Came

6:00 The National Art Gallery of

. The Bahamas

6:30 News Night 13

} 7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Kerzner Today

8:15 Good News Bahamas

8:30 Island Lifestyles

1 9:00 Da’ Down Home Show

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Central American and
Caribbean Games

Community Page

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
“+ right to make last minute
programme changes!







Minister o

f finance defends

lack of emergency auditing

m@ BY MARK HUMES

The Minister of State for
Finance Mr James Smith has
come to the defence of the
National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency, saying public
donations to the disaster relief
agency were used for their
intended purpose.

Last week, the Prime Minis-
ter presented an unaudited
financial statement of the
Bahamas National Disaster
Relief and Recovery Fund to
the House of Assembly.

It was revealed in the state-
ment that auditors were
unable to reconcile or deter-
mine. the disposition of sever-
al accounts.

As a result, the management
of funds at the agency were
called into question.

However, Mr Smith went on
record to reassure the public
that monies donated to the
national disaster agency were
not mismanaged. He pointed
to the report’s statement of
activities for the year ending
August 31, 2005 which shows
that, of the $20,501,969 in
expenses incurred by the gov-
ernment, public contribution
to the amount was $6,332,728.

In pointing this out, the min-

ister said: “whatever the public
gave, more than that went to
the recovery effort. The gov-
ernment is the one who would
have taken the full brunt of
paying for the repairs.”

Even though the report
clearly states that it lacks “cer-
tain information” which could
affect the accuracy of the fund’s
financial position, Mr Smith
went on to say that it does not
highlight what some may con-
sider poor management at the
agency.

“The management of a
national disaster has to do with
the response to the disaster,
rather than accounting for it,”
said Mr Smith. And even
though the report notes that
many of the accounts have not
been reconciled, Mr Smith said
that this is a reflection of a
national disaster taking place
and the response to a national
disaster.

“The emphasis has always
been on trying to provide assis-

‘tance and comfort to those
affected by it. The least of peo-
ple’s concerns at that time
would have been doing the
accounting.

“You are working under
emergency conditions,” said
Mr Smith. “In one instance,

i JAMES Smith

they were giving out supplies,
and they ran out of receipts, so
the person who was doing it
got creative and started to
make up his own receipts. Of
course, this would have no
numbering sequence, and from



an auditors stand point . . . this
is where an accounting system
cannot respond to an emer-
gency. So, you can expect this
to happen.

“You may have a proper
accounting system set up, but if
you run out of your source
materials like invoices, and if
people are now lined up out-
side coming to get supplies to
repair their homes, you don’t
stop giving. them the supplies

_because you do not have the

invoices, so you have to con-
tinue giving them.”

Structure

Mr Smith went on to explain
that the NEMA office, up to
that point, had not always been

_ officially structured. He said

that it was just a group of peo-
ple who were brought together
administratively to deal with a
hurricane.

“TI think they started the rec-
onciliation operation immedi-
ately after the storm, before
the accounting system was set

up,” Mr Smith continued. “So .

people were being dispatched
in these areas to assist with the
reconstruction exercise long
before the accounting system

could be set up.”

In the report that was pre-
sented by the prime minister
last week, it was revealed that
vouchers for material purchas-
es had been issued without
copies, control numbers, and
in some cases, dollar values. As
a result, outstanding commit-
ments could not be deter-
mined.

Additionally, as comprehen-
sive statements had not been
provided to the accounting
agency, the accounts payable
have not been reconciled, leav-
ing balances possibly under-
stated.

The report also noted that
the financial statement may not
properly reflect the activities
and balances:of restricted
funds, as management did not
separate restricted funds into
separate bank accounts.

Almost a year and a half
after a complete account of all
financial transactions were
promised, Mr Smith addressed
the issue of the problematic
accounting records by saying:
“the nature of a NEMA organ-
isation, reconstruction after a
hurricane, does not lend itself
to a traditional audit... what
we can only give is an account-
ing report.”

Vendors’ concern that cruise lines’

not bringing custom to mainland

â„¢ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SHOP owners and vendors
in the Bay Street area are con-
cerned that cruise lines are no
longer bringing business to the
mainland.

The number of cruise ships
travelling to Nassau and
Freeport has declined in
recent years and some mer-
chants have attributed the loss
to cruise lines opting to visit
private islands instead.

One shop owner said he
fears that these islands have
now become the premier des-
tinations for several aoe
sive ships.

As a result, he said, it is only
the “down market” ships —
whose passengers tend to
spend much less — that still
come in to port.

Last year, during the hurri-
cane season, an “up market”

i cruise ship that usually travels

to a private island was forced
to dock in Nassau instead.
Store owners and vendors
reported a significant increase
in sales and revenue com-.
pared to the ships that call on
a regular basis.

Various cruise lines includ-
ing the Norwegian Dawn,

DEPART. NASSAU

DEPART HATCHET BAY ELEUTHERA 12:00AM



Uwe ie
AY FEST
IN
ELEUTHERA

VEHICLE PASSENGER FERRY SCHEDULE
(Air-conditioned Passenger Cabin )

FRIDAY AUGUST 4th, 2006
ARRIVE HATCHET BAY ELEUTHERA 5:45PM

MIDNIGHT
MONDAY AUGUST 7th, 2006

Princess Cruises and Royal
Caribbean have purchased
private islands from the

Bahamas government and

placed their own shops on
them.

However, shop owners in
Nassau believe it should be
mandatory for cruise ships to
make additional stops to the
mainland.

According to officials from
the Ministry of Tourism, all
cruise ships that travel to pri-
vately owned islands in the
Bahamas also make addition-
al stops to Nassau and.some-
times Freeport, with the
exception of Princess Cruises
— although sometimes ships.
are forced to dock elsewhere
because of inclement weather
conditions.

According to the Director
of Cruise Development Carla
Stuart, only four islands are
privately owned by cruise
lines; two. of which are in the
Berry Islands, owned by the
Norwegian Dawn and Royal
Caribbean.

The other two are Princess
Cay in Eleuthera, owned by
Princess Cruises, and Cast--
away Cay in Abaco, owned
by Disney’s Wonder.















2:00PM







FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

east

CONRAD SWEETING: 477-6162 Sine
TH ISLAND LINK TICKET BOOTH AT EASTERN END
POTTERS CAY DOCK






i CRUISE Ships in Nassau Harbour

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

LISTED PROPERTIES - RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

WINDSOR ESTATES
LOT NO. 37

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence

(6,480 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: South on Windsor Street from
Bernard Road, 4th Lot on the Right
APPRAISED VALUE: $158,000

STAPLEDON. GARDENS
LOT NO. 544

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence

& Apartment (9.600 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: On Gladiator Road, 2nd

Property on the Right



SEA BREEZE ESTATES

LOT NO. 132

PROPERTY SIZE: Two-storey
Residence (10,400 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Golf Course Boulevard
APPRAISED VALUE: $397,256

CHIPMAN ESTATES
LOT NO. 10 Unit #8 (Glenwood

Condominiums)

PROPERTY SIZE: 2 Bed 1-1/2 Bath

FOX HILL
LOT NO. 4

Townhouse Unit (878 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Yorkshire Road, Cable Beach
APPRAISED VALUE: $122,000

PROPERTY SIZE: 5,072 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Cockbum Street Close (Fox Hill)

APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

SANDILANDS ALLOTMENT

LOT NO. 2

PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence

(6,440 sq. ft.)

LOCATION: Quarry Road approx. 100 ft. N

of Robert Sandilands Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $189,000

APPRAISED VALUE: $55,000

INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA. MACKEY STREET.
OR CALL 502-6200 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT
ANY OR ALL OFFERS.


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

LOCAL NEWS



BIC and Bahamas Fast Ferries
strike wireless internet deal

@ By REUBEN SHEARER

BTC has announced a new strategic
partnership with Bahamas Fast Ferries
that will make the internet available on
the high seas.

According to BFF’s marketing man-
ager Khaalis Rolle, BTC will be sup-
plying Wi-Fi capability to make it pos-
sible to access the web while on board
any of the company’s vessels.

BTC’s logo will be displayed on the
outside of the Bohengy — which ser-
vices North Eleuthera, Harbour Island
and Spanish Wells — and on the front of
BFF ticket jackets.

‘In addition to visual advertising, our
company will also provide distribution





B MR Knowles said: “The

fishermen must make a living.”

Communication firm secures
new advertising opportunity



points for all of BTC’s phone cards such
as Hello, Rokit and Quickcell since we
carry sO many passengers who request
to make phone calls,” he said. “This
partnership will give both companies
the opportunity to advertise, market
and develop some strategic pelenon:
ships.”

Mr Rolle said this partnership spree



BA STUART said: “The livelihood
of the people is always more
important.”

partnership, Mr Rolle said that the
returns would be “significant.”

‘When you look at the exposure and
opportunity that we are providing
BaTelCo, you can’t really quantify that
in terms of dollar value,” he said,
“because they’re going to be every-
where we go.

“Even so, if you review the reputa-
tions of both BaTelCo and ourselves,
you will see that an alliance like this is
the manpower of multiple companies,”
he said.

Mr Rolle said that the partnership
would not affect each business’ indi-
viduality, as they will continue to adver-
tise under their individual names and
logos.

ment will be renewed annually, with
further partnerships and marketing
opportunities possible in the future.
He told The Tribune that the part-
nership was proposed by BTC, consid-
ered for about two months and finally
announced last week Monday.
Although he declined to disclose how
much revenue is expected from the



@ DALETTE Moncur said: “Six
months is good enough.”

BH GLENROY Collie said: “Leslie
Miller is right for the choice he
made on this account.”

Should crawfish season be shorter? |

FISHERIES officials have
noticed a “dramatic and alarm-
ing” decrease in crawfish
resources, says Leslie Miller.

Mr Miller, who was recently
appointed minister of Agricul-
ture and Fisheries, announced
last week that the government
has decided to reduce the 2007

open season on crawfish, from ;

give the species a chance to
"regroup and regenerate”.

The Tribune took to the
streets to ask the public for their
thoughts on the ‘shortening of
the crawfish season. .

Most said they strongly sup-
port the decision, but also
expressed concern for the fish-

ermen who would be affected.



the government 'can come up
with a new plan."

Mr Knowles said: "The fish-
ermen must make a living. I
think the problem is really the
foreign fishermen poaching in
our waters. There has been a
decline in the crawfish because
we are allowing others to take
what is ours. We are too pas-



Rotarians’
executive
for the |
year ahead

ROTARIANS of Southeast
Nasau gathered at Sansals on
West Bay Street on Saturday ,*
for the club’s annual*,
changeover. :

Immediate Past President: *
Ken Clowes handed over the,
president's sash to the new pres- «'
ident for 2006/2007 Bruno*
Pletscher. President Bruno *
thanked members for the con- ''
fidence they have shown in him ° ’
by electing him to lead the club-..
for the upcoming year. The.-
President then introduced his~”
board and gave a brief outline .,
of the exciting year ahead.

The new board is: immediate
past president Ken Clowes;
Rodney Eve, director interna-
tional service; David Moncur,
director'fellowship; Timothy -
Ingrahatn, president elect;
Michelle Albury-Spurlock, trea- «
surer; Peter Goudie, director
community service; Leslie Fras-
er, director vocations; Reginald
Saunders, director club Service
IJ; Kathy Smith, secretary;
Roger Kelty, board advisor; Dr
Bridgette ‘Rolle, director club
service I; Gordon Rodland,
director ways and means.

Rotary is a worldwide organ-
isation of business and profes-
sional leaders that provides
humanitarian service and helps
build goodwill in the world.
There are six Rotary clubs in
Nassau and one in Abaco that
belong to District 7020 with
approximately 300 members.-,
There are additional clubs inâ„¢
Freeport, Grand Bahama who
belong to another disirict. The ,
Rotary Club of South East Nas- :
sau meets at East Villa Restau-_
rant every Wednesday at 1pm. »

“Guyana
offical: ’
evidanee of
wrongdoing’

Soe eRe

eight to six months.
He said this is being done to

One person said that the
Department of Fisheries:should

instead construct’a fish farm
and spawn crawfish.

Glenroy Collie said: “Leslie.

Miller is right for the choice he
made on this account. It goes
both ways. I think it will
enhance our economy if we
have more product to offer in
the future and also the change

will always be more important.
Bahamians must now follow
the laws, because. if we don't
we may loose the crawfish in
our waters for good."

A Stuart agreed that "the
livelihood of the people is
always more important” and
said the. Department of Fish-

- eries “should make a fish farm-

sive as a nation — we always
inconvenience ourselves so
other may reap our resources."

In a letter to The Tribune,
Chief Councillor of Spanish
Wells Abner Pinder listed the
root problems endangering the
fishing industry as “foreign
poaching in season and out of

HB GUYANA = ieee
Georgetown vee

GUYANA’S interior minis-'
ter has come to the defence of"

the South American country’s.
deputy police commissioner!

whose US travel visa was: .
revoked, saying Monday that-. -

will impact the local fishermen."
Mr Collie went to say that
fishermen should begin to seek

ing process to ensure that we

‘season, off-season fishing by
Bahamian and undersized

there was no evidence he had’
been involved’in wrongdoing, ’

have crawfish each year.”
She went on to say however

(crawfish) tail.”
He added that keeping the

according to Associated Press.

“other types of fish” to sup-
plement income while craw-
fish is not in season.

that over-fishing will effect

season closed in August will

Henry Greene, who was.”
expected to become police chief
in October, said the US'

Dalette Moncur said: “Six

crawfish resources in any case,
if nothing is done.
"There must be a mid-point

only allow poachers to reap the
benefits during the prime time
of the season when no Bahami-

months is good enough — but

an will be allowed to fish.

commercials clients.

Creating and maintaining appropriate

file records.

Preparing required correspondence
G. e. letters, memos, policy registers,
Ce depit notes etc. ).

_ The ideal ca didate should hold a

3GCSEs (including Math
& English), a High School Diploma and
be in pursuit of a Certificate of Insurance,
Associate/Bachelors Degree or equivalent.

minimum of <

SYSTEMS KNOWLEDGE
Must be computer literate with working
knowledge of Windows, Word and Excel.

CONTACT.

Please send cover letter and resumé by hand

or fax to the following:

The Office Manager,
Star General Insurance
Agents & Brokers Ltd.,
Marathon Road

Fax: 393-8722



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Embassy told him last Thurs-,
day without explanation that his
US travel visa had been:
revoked. He will become act-"
ing chief later this week.

“We have no evidence.
against Greene and therefore
we are asking those who say’
they have the evidence to bring.
it to our attention,” said Interi-
or Minister Gail Teixeira.

Greene, who heads the for-,
mer British colony’s criminal],
investigations unit, was tapped
to replace the country’s retir-
ing police commissioner, Win-
ston Felix.

In April, the US State
Department canceled Greene’s
diplomatic visa for unspecified
reasons. The US Embassy said
Monday that it does not ‘com-
ment on visa matters.

Other Guyanese officials
have had their US visas revoked
in recent years because they
were suspected of links to drug
traffickers — which Greene has
denied.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps '
you are raising funds fora |
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322-1986,
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE





B® BEC has been unable to meet the demand on Harbour Island.

Businesses ‘being |
crippled by cuts’
in Eleuthera

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

DAILY power outages in
North Eleuthera and surround-
ing communities have caused
sévere disruptions to business,
MP Alvin Smith claimed.

According to Mr Smith, the
electrical demand in the area
has become much higher than
BEC’s capacity — and as a
result, there have “very, very
regular” power cuts, especially
over the last week.

Speaking with The Tribune
on Sunday, Mr Smith said for
the last three years, “the
Bahamas Electrical Corpora-
tion (BEC) has been‘quite ehal-
lenged with providing reliable
electricity to Harbour Island.”

After receiving several calls
from his constituents about reg-
ular disruptions of their electri-
cal supply, Mr Smith has
become concerned that BEC
cannot or will not address the
problem.

He raised his concerns in
parliament last month during
the budget debate.

“BEC is quite aware of this
but they will not rectify it. They
are not sure of what they are
going to do to correct it,” he
said. .

_ According to Mr Smith,
BEC had installed two new gen-
erators in: Harbour Island and
two in Hatchet Bay in a attempt
to maintain electricity in the
area - but this has proved futile.

“T think the initial plan was
to provide Harbour Island with
the generation capacity to take
care of itself but that has not
happened, so Hatchet Bay has
been forced to support Harbow



ALVIN Smith

Island. But even with the sup-
port of Hatchet Bay electrical
supplies are still not sufficient.

He said that Harbour Island,
with all the second homes and
hotels, has a demand that BEC
in unable to meet. ;

“I spoke to. the (BEC’s)
management of Eleuthera last
year and they told me that their

plan was to erect a new station »

in North Eleuthera in the area
of Three Island Dock. They
wanted to build a plant there
to take care of Harbour Island
and North Eleuthera,” Mr
Smith explained.

However, when he raised
that issue in parliament, Minis-
ter of Works Bradley Roberts
said that BEC had changed its
plans and was no longer going
to build a plant in North
Eleuthera.

Instead/ he explained, Har-
bour Island’s plant would be
upgraded to give it the capacity
to tale care of Harbour Island

New development
on Current Island

THE government has
announced the construction of a
multi-million dollar upscale
resort on Current Island,
Eleuthera.

The $8 million project will
take on a 65-strong Bahamian
work force during construction
and 25 full-time employees in
“two years.

* “The Current Club Group
has committed to making a
sound eco-touristic investment
in the Bahamas,” said Vincent
Peet, Minister of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments.

‘ The minister and his delega-
tion also toured the Cotton Bay
Estates and Villas, currently
under construction, and the
South Eleuthera Mission, a
community resource centre
tinder renovation.

Over the past three years,
three developments, including
the Governor’s Harbour Resort
and Marina, the $85 million
Windermere Island Develop-
ment Project and the refurbish-
iment of the Cove Hotel in Gre-
gory Town, have affirmed that
developers view Eleuthera as
an exciting destination to invest
in, Minister Peet said.

* He said the Cotton Bay Club,
which i is under construction, is

aa testament to the govern-
ee

ment’s commitment to proac-
tively and diligently facilitate
positive investment in our coun-
try while concurrently adhering
to strict eco-touristic principles.”

The Current Club Group has

committed to developing an

upscale resort/residential com-
munity complete with 34 con-
dominium hotel units and vil-
las, a marina and restaurant,
and upgrading the existing
dock.

The group is to develop two
acres of the property, leaving
the remaining four acres in its
natural state.

The villas will consist of two
and three bedroom units fur-
nished on the inside with tropi-
cal hardwood trim, marble,
stone and mahogany finish.

Bahamian artwork will high-
light the décor of the rooms.
Amenities will include swim-
ming pools, a fitness room, busi-
ness centre and a game room.

It is expected that the devel-
opment will engage the services
of local entrepreneurs to pro-
vide basic necessities to visitors

‘and residents of the resort.

The developers has also com-
mitted to using Bahamian pro-
duce and local art and handi-
crafts.

and North Eleuthera.

_ “J think that’s their reasoning
behind putting those two gen-
erators in Harbour Island but
those two generators cannot
take care of Harbour Island
alone — not to mention North
Eleuthera,” Mr Smith said.

He warned that things will
get worse if nothing is done.

“The summer, basically, has
just begun. More tourists are
coming over, so more electrici-
ty is going to be used because
everyone will be burning air
conditioners in addition to fans.
BEC is going to have a serious
problem.” '

Calls to Kevin Basden. gen-~

eral manager of BEC, were not
returned up to press time.

: TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 7
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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



SOME FNMs in Abaco fear
the choice of former PLP stal-
wart Edison Key as a general
election candidate will split par-
ty support on the island:

“A lot of people don’t like
it,” said an islander yesterday.
“At the very least, it will mean
that some FNMs will choose not
to vote.”

Mr Key was for years best-
known as the PLP’s most
prominent white presence on
Abaco. His decision to quit as a
PLP senator last year shook
Prime Minister Perry Christie.
Now Mr Key is set to replace
FNM incumbent Robert Sweet-

“ing in the fight for the South
Abaco seat.

“Candidate selection is left
to a small elite FNM group
here,” said a resident. “No-one
else gets much of a say. Several
other people were asked if
they’d accept a nomination -
urifortunately, they all turned
it down.”

Mr Key is unpopular in some
quarters because of what some
residents feel were his “victim-
ising tactics” during his PLP
days.

PLP stalwart Gary Sawyer
was seen as his likeliest oppo-
nent at the general election, but
that now appears to be in doubt.
“Gary has been projecting him-
self as the candidate, but we’re
not sure that the PLP wants
him,” said the source.

Meanwhile, Mr Key has pro-
claimed his selection as evi-
dence that democracy is “alive
and well” in South Abaco.

“My political career spans
some 30-odd years in public life

_ as an MP and Senator, com-
bined with seven years as chair-
man of BaTelCo,” he said: ©
‘ “T am also a proven team
player and bring this experience
to the table of the FNM. In
1977, FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham and I began our polit-

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LID

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER

LEER M ATLA sa

ical careers with the PLP. Now
some 30 years later we are on
the same team again - albeit
with another winning party.”

In a letter to the press, Mr
Key urges all party supporters
“to recognise the urgent and
compelling. need for all hands
to be faithfully on deck as the
general election approaches.”

One possible opponent for
ex-PM Hubert Ingraham in
North Abaco is controversial
businessman Cay Mills, who has
told associates that he plans to
run as an, independent.

° AUTHORITIES have cut
off power to a Haitian settle-
ment at the former Bahama
Star citrus farm at Norman Cas-
tle, west of Treasure Cay.

About 200 Haitians - once
farm employees - are living on
the site, most of them evidently
now without work permits or
hopes of a prosperous future.

“It’s pathetic,” an island
source said, “Unlike most
Haitians, they appear to have
become lethargic and hopeless.
since the farm’s closure. It
seems the government got tired

" of providing free electricity and

now it’s been switched off.”

‘ The Haitians are also drawing
water from a well on the land
and “living at a very frugal lev-
el”, according to a source.

Fortunately for some, their
former employers managed an
effective National Insurance
Board scheme, enabling some.
Haitians to draw pensions.

e AN old barge that washed
ashore south of Man 0’ War
Cay during Hurricane Wilma
last year is causing growing
annoyance for Abaconians.

They fear another storm will

‘push the rusting wreck on to

coral reefs, dealing another
major blow to the environment.
WW



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Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm

Sat 8am - 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 ° Fax: 322-6714

E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs
Parts and service guaranteed

LOCAL NEWS

i EDISON Key

going to be moved, but it’s still
there - an eyesore and a haz-
ard,” said a resident. -

e THE people of Hope
Town, Abaco, believe their
annual boxcar racing event
could catch on in other islands
throughout the Bahamas.

Every November, youngsters
and adults create ingenious
vehicles at minimum cost for
what has become an eagerly
awaited family occasion.

“The boxcars are made out
of all kinds of things,” said
an islander, “Some people
use the remains of old boats,
some use old prams, others

create cars from four wheels

ce DAIHATSU





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and a piece of wood.

“Any island with a good slope
can organise a boxcar racing
day. It’s a great occasion for
everyone in the family, with
burgers and sodas on the side.

“Apart from straightforward
racing between boxcars, there
are also slalom events, with cars
weaving between traffic cones
as they run downhill.”

It’s also a competitive event
in which heavy people can
excel. “The cars run entirely on
gravity, which means extra
weight could be an advantage,”
said a boxcar enthusiast.

“Whatever, it makes a great

day out and everyone has a fan-



THE TRIBUNE



cata.




@ CORAL reefs are under threat from rising ocean

temperatures

sustainable
tourism drive |

@ By KRISTINA MCNEIL

THE threat of deteriorat-
ing beaches and coastal infra-

structure has led the FNM to.

encourage and support the

development of sustainable

tourism, the party said in a
statement yesterday.

The FNM noted that global
warming and climate change
can lead to rising oceans and
threaten to destroy as much
as 90 per cent of the coral
reefs around the world over
the next 50 years — and ulti-
mately the entire fishing
industry.

The party noted that a new
economic model is needed to
expand the tourism industry
without leaving such a
“destructive footprint.” ;

The consumption of natural
resources increases pollution,
which “weaves itself into our
social systems”.

“It is imperative, there-
fore, that we adopt responsi-
ble planning and manage-
ment to sustain the industry
going forward,” the state-
ment said.

The FNM’s model calls

upon collaboration between

local communities, hoteliers,
industry workers and even
tourists. '

Comparing Bahamian
attractions to others around
the world, the FNM said it
believes that visitors should
contribute to the upkeep of
natural resources through the
implementation of a fee that
would also help locals to
showcase the Family Islands
without “destroying what
makes them attractive in the
first place.”

Charging a fee is just one
way that the FNM plans to
create a balance “between
demands on our resources
today and the need to ensure
that we can meet the needs
and aspirations of future gen-
erations.”

Unlike the present govern-
ment, the statement said, the
FNM believes in long-term
thinking.

The many training pro-
grammes offered by the Inter-
American Development
Bank, the Caribbean Devel-

- opment Bank and others can

serve to promote such a vision
of sustainable tourism, the
party said.

‘@

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tender from eligible bidders for the
provision of a new power station building civil works as captioned above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, B-E.C.
complex, Fresh Creek, Central Andros, Bahamas, by contacting:-

Mr. Kermit Woodside

Manager

B.E.C. - Fresh Creek
Andros, Bahamas

Phone No. (242)-368-2516
Fax No. (242)-368-2226

- Or

In New Providence, by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. (242)-302-1158
Fax No. (242)-323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered at any one of the two sites on or before 11
August 2006 by 3:30 p.m. and addressed as follows:

The General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender No. 614/06

“POWER STATION BUILDING CIVIL WORKS - FRESH
CREEK, CENTRAL ANDROS”



The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.

FNM endorses -

pow:

b

Pa

aie


THE TRIBUNE



Laws website goes live on-line

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Laws On-line
website was officially launched
yesterday.

The website -
laws.bahamas.gov.bs — is the first
of several fast track projects
under the Bahamas Government
Online Initiative (BGOL).

According to Minister of State
for Finance James Smith, “the
BGOL is a comprehensive,
long-term strategy to transform
and modernise government ser-
vices and the business of gov-
ernment using information and
communications technologies.”

The website, he said, “involves

making such information avail-
able via the Internet), the elec-
tronic delivery of government
services, and ultimately re-engi-
neering business processes with-
in and across government to
improve efficiency in govern-
ment administration — adopting
a whole-of-government
approach.”

Selected

According to the website,
users can view the consolidated
laws which are current up to
April, 2002 as well as selected
Acts from 2002 onwards. The
subsidiary legislation section is

are provided for information
purposes only and for users to
have easy access to the Laws of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Nothing in this web-
site should be construed as con-
stituting legal advice,” says an
advisory posted on the website.

According to Attorney Gen-
eral and Minister of Legal
Affairs Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son, the website is “further man-
ifestation of the government’s
commitment to empower citi-
zens, by which we included per-
sons living in the Bahamas, by
making government services
available on-line.”

“Availability of the laws on-
line is critical to knowing your

services and concessions are
available to advance his busi-
ness,” she said.

“I am especially excited about
the difference that this service
will make for students, whether
they be law students or high
school students,” Mrs Maynard-
Gibson added. “Civic responsi-
bility has much greater meaning
and power when the constitu-
tion (our country’s genetic blue-
print) and our laws are readily
available, at our fingertips.”

“I hope that our young people
especially will take the opportu-
nity when surfing the net to surf

_ the site so that they may become

more aware of what our laws
say about who we are and what

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 9



@ MINISTER of Legal Affairs

providing greater access to gov-
ernment information (including

still under construction.
“The contents of this website

rights, obligations and for the
Bahamian businessman, what _ said.

we stand for as a people,” she

Allyson Maynard-Gibson visits the new website
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

dececccesectuceececasececececccccsssccuscsceusseeecsesscssuscensenececaresecuessceeeececeesecscacceusescceueesesseeessesenssesueneedeaeseseseneeesuecscssanaaegecasessueenessseaseesestaeseeneeesesOaUSDesSeesenesseE es eSssseeeeseeeeeeseaaeeesaeeneeeeeaereecsnacesceneenesenenesesaassssanassennarssssnscsesensusssansnsesaacuoascneacesauescaasenssaassacaavencuasserauescouarensaussccusesscnesereeesseeeeeeee ee eeee eee

‘Ninety’ appeal dismissed

FROM page one

lawyers applied for a writ of Habeas
Corpus. This application came before
Justice John Lyons in the Supreme
Court on March 7 and May 26, 2003.
The argument before him was directed
primarily to abuse, lapse of time, the
risk of injustice and oppression and
failure to make proper disclosure. The
judge, however, dismissed the appeal.

Knowles then appealed to the Court
of Appeal, which on February 10,
2004, also dismissed the appeal.

His lawyers, in their appeal to the
Privy Council, contended that the pro-
ceedings to extradite him in relation to
the second extradition request were
an abuse of the process of the court.

“The factual foundation of this com-
plaint is that the second extradition
request was based on a grand jury
indictment preferred on a date earlier
than that of the indictment on which
the first request was based, and relat-
ing to earlier events.

“Yet the Government chose to take
no action on this earlier indictment
(the appellant says that the Govern-
ment held it back), only relying on it
when the order of Isaacs J defeated, or
possibly defeated, the attempt to

extradite the appellant under the first

request.

“Thus the appellant was lulled into
the belief that the Government pro-
posed to take no action in relation to
events before November, 1997, for
which he could not have been tried
had he been extradited under the first
request, and he was detained under
the second provisional warrant as the
conditions for his release on bail fol-

lowing the order of Isaacs J were on
the point of being finalised,” the
Council’s ruling read.

Knowles further complains that
Government wrongly charged as two
separate conspiracies what was in
truth, if a conspiracy at all, a single
conspiracy, relating to a single course
of conduct over a period, although
involving different actors at different
stages.

Further proof of abuse, Knowles’

‘ lawyers contended, rested on the fact

that the US government failed to
explain the reasons for acting as it had.

The Court of Appeal, however,
accepted that there may be a single
conspiracy spanning several years with
some conspirators dropping out and
others joining, but saw grounds to jus-
tify the framing of two conspiracies

_and thought that the US government’s
‘decision should be respected.

The Council said that Knowles faces
an uphill task in seeking to dislodge
the conclusion of three courts (magis-
trates, Supreme Court and Court of
Appeal) that the US Government’s
conduct in proceeding on the second
extradition request was not abusive.

The Board further said that it would
be “very slow to intervene in the
absence ofa clear legal misdirection,
and it finds none.’

The Council said it appears ‘that in
June, 2000, after preferment of the
first grand jury indictment, a gentle-
man known as Herbert “Sharkhead”
Hanna was arrested for importing
cocaine into Florida, and that he gave

Government information about the
appellant in August.

“He was the main prosecution wit-
ness on the second indictment. This
may explain why the Government
based its first request on the later
indictment. But it is, within broad lim-
its, for a prosecutor to decide what
charges he will prefer, and how he will
frame his charges. In the absence of
unfairness or oppression, this is not a
matter for the requested state and not
a matter which calls for explanation,”
the Council said.

The Board said since Knowles did

not know of the first grand jury indict-
ment, he was not misled by the Gov-
ernment’s initial decision not to rely
on it and it cannot be said that the US
Government made any implied rep-
resentation to him.

“Tt was, no doubt, a shock for the
appellant to be detained under the
second request as he was on the point
of being released on bail under the
first, but if (as the Court of Appeal
and a majority of the Board held in

Cartwright and another v Superinten- . !

dent of Her Majesty’s Prison and
another, above) the order made by
Isaacs J was one of certiorari, it is not
(as the Board understands) suggest-
ed that there was no jurisdiction to
release the appellant on bail, and the
Government cannot be criticised for
moving quickly to detain the appel-
lant.

“The Board finds no fault in the
Court of Appeal’s decision,” the
Council said.

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Miller: WTO concessions ‘insulting
FROM page one

that “the selfish intransigence of the US and Europe has finally wrecked any
chance of a successful outcome for these (WTO) trade talks which were meant
to help developing countries.”

Mr Miller said, however, that developing countries such as the Bahamas,
would not benefit from the WTO’s plan, which he asserted might in fact
gravely cripple their economies should they officially become a member of ~
the organization.

“It makes no sense for the least developed world to open their economies
to accept all the goods produced by those industrialized countries at the
expense of the small developing countries by having them offer to only assist
the least developed countries in Africa — so we rejected their proposal,”
said Mr Miller:

‘The “Aide for Trade” programme, in which a sum of money would be
divided amongst the countries it is intended to help, would come to $0.05
per person in those countries when the offers are considered. This, he
said, was an insult to members of the African, Caribbean and Pacific
Group (ACP).

“Due to the farm subsidies that the Europeans and the Americans were
giving to their farmers, and the pittance that they put on the table, they said
that they would give special preference to the farmers in Africa with cot-
ton,” said Mr Miller. “That’s all it is, all they wanted to give was cotton and
we felt in our meetings that it was insulting.”

The WTO in light of the failures have decided that no more talks should
be attempted this year, said the BBC article.

It quoted Senator Charles Grassley, chairman of the ‘Senate finance
committee as saying, “I’ve always said that no deal is better than a bad deal,

and a ‘Doha light’ deal would be a bad deal.”

Mr Miller issued a warning to the Bahamas following opening WTO
talks in Hong Kong last year. °

- He said that the benefits to the economy would be miniscule and that
some countries that have become members, in some instances, were forced
to borrow from the International Monetary Fund after having lost tariff rev-
enues.

Minister Miller alerted the public last year that 80 to 90 per cent of the
money needed to run the Bahamas economy comes from import tariffs, and
therefore, the country should take a few years to consider the conse-
quences before j joining.

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PAGE .10, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING JULY 25, 2006

[780 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE.



[ ia a

Police to step up i

_& By ROYANNE
FORBES- DARVILLE

“THE police. are taking the

. initiative in the fight against _

copyright law infringement
according.to Chief Superinten-
dent Marvin Dames.
Government officials have
been slow.in enacting necessary
amendments to the Copyright
Act, but Mr Dames told The
Tribune yesterday that the

police are now in the process
_of launching new initiatives to

crackdown on establishments

and street vendors engaged in

the sale of illegal goods.
Along. with pirated DVDs

and CDs, Mr Dames also point-

ed.to the illegal sale of brand-

“name items like Gucci, Fendi
and Nike. He said that increas- -

ingly, fake versions of these
brands are being marketed on





@ CHIEF Superintendent
Marvin Dames

the streets of New Providence
as the real thing.

“We have confiscated thou-
sands of these items and would
have executed on a number of

= a
‘stores in the downtown area

and seized significant quanti-
ties of (fake designer) items.
“Certainly all of these per-

sons who are selling DVDs
don’t have a license because
they are illegal. So where ever
we find them we are taking
them off the streets and we are
looking at the laws and if it war-
rants prosecution, we prose-
cute,” Mr Dames said.

He said the sale of fake items
is “rampant” in the downtown
area — especially in the straw
market.

“It seems that Bay Street is a
common place to purchase
knock-off items and this cer-
tainly has to change because
many of the so called authentic
products are being replaced by
knock-off products,” Mr
Dames said. “People are begin-
ning to complain and we do
have legislation — and as we
continue to amend and make
legislation stronger we have to
use what we have to make sure

olice officers

give testimony
in murder trial

. today. If.there.was.a problem,

~ today.”

possibility that the threats could

- incidents. had occurred in the

FROM page one.

the officer told the court that Farrington, iio
had' been “cautioned”, directed them. to an
unnamed dirt road on the northern side of the
Grand Bahama highway on which they travelled
approximately 1.2 miles. -

Officer Sherman told the court that Far-
rington then directed them some 128 feet into

bushes. There officers searched an area some.

20 by 20 feet and found the left foot of a blue
and white Nike tennis shoe, a red, black and
‘white short sleeve ‘collared ‘shirt, short blue
pants.and a pair of red, black and white boxer
shorts. Officer Sherman told the court that
-these.items appeared to’ be torn from being
exposed to the elements:for ‘a considerable
_period of time. The officer told the court that
he photographed the area, the articles of cloth-

~ ing. as well as. four suspected pieces of bone
- fragments which were also discovered i in the
area.

Officer Sherman testified that on that same

x date Farrington gave directions to Queen’s
* Cove, which is 225-feet off the main road of

- Queen’s Cove Boulevard to the beach. There
-officer Sherman testified that police were
“directed by the accused to a pile of debris
' where they discovered an inflatable mattress
which was photographed and collected as evi-
dence. The next day he and officer 2322 Fer-
. guson went to the morgue at the Rand Memo-
' rial Hospital where they: handed the bone frag-
ments over to. Dr Raju. It was on Saturday,
November '1, the officer testified, that he
- réceived from officer Reno McPhee four glass
~ tubes containing blood samples from Patricia
-S¢ott and Edward Robins. The jury was then
“shown photographs that-the officer took at the

area off the Grand Bahama highway and

Queen’ § Cove. :
Detective Corporal Bivarda Dames, who is
also attached to the criminal records. office in

Grand Bahama, told the court that on October

28 he and other officers were present at the
Rand Memorial Hospital’s morgue where they

Bomb |

- threats at |

airport |
FROM page one

not experienced any problems

Aur Traffic Services would have
contacted us, but this has not
been done. Therefore, I can say
- that we have had no problems

Last week, a similar situation
arose when police received a
phone call from someone with a
child’s voice alleging there was ©
a bomb at the customs ware-
house. However, the threat was
-unfounded.

Mr- Reckley discounted any

_.bé linked. to terrorists. Similar

past, he said.

' “We have always had situa-
tions such as this occurring,” he
said. “However, they have all
been unfounded. We have yet
to find any type of explosive
device at this facility.”

_ Yesterday’s- threat- was-also
declared unfounded at about
3,18 pm.

- Police were not able to com-
ment on the matter.

observed the examination of skeletal remains.
He told the court that he took a series of pho-
tographs of these remains, 19 in total. At this
point in his testimony, the mother of Jamaal
Robins, Christine Scott, began to cry.’As the

officer directed the j jury through the series of

photographs Ms Scott began to sob. louder and
was escorted from the court room by her hus-
band.

called to the witness stand yesterday. She told
the court that on October 30, 2003 she received
instructions from Officer Merinard and as a
result of this proceeded to the parking lot of the
police Criminal Records office in Freeport

where she saw a grey 1992 Hyundai car. She .

told the court that she photographed the car
which was registered to Suzette Ferguson.
Those photos were submitted into evidence
yesterday,

Suzette Ferguson, another woman police
officer, told the court that in June of 2002 she

had purchased a new car, having sold her old.

one, a grey 1992 Hyundai Scoot, to Cordell
Farrington, who she knew through her room-
mate, Raquel Lightbourne, who is Farring-
ton’s sister.

She told the court that she and the accused
had a pay arrangement for the vehicle where he
would pay $150 down and pay $150 a week
until he paid the full $1,000. She told the court
that Farrington, who had not been consistent
with his payments, had paid only $750 up to the
time he told her that the car was having engine
problems. She told the court that she took the
vehicle back from Farrington and contracted a
mechanic who was supposed to sell the car’s
parts.

. Woman Detective Constable Glemenena
Nixon told the court that she had inspected
the car at the parking lot of the Criminal
Records office in Freeport and had contacted

--a locksmith to open both doors and the back

trunk where she discovered a grey mat with

various car parts as well as tree stems and

leaves on it.

Woman Corporal Christina Pinder was also ?

people understand that this is a

crime that will not be tolerat:

ed. ”

Local law officials have 286
been working very closely with
international franchise owners
to identify shops involved in
the sale of knock-off goods.

Products

“This is a growing concern
for persons from these compa-
nies who have knowledge that
many of their products are
being sold in the Bahamas and
in particular downtown Bay
Street,” Mr Dames said.

The. economic damage

caused to legitimate companies -
_is said to be enormous. Losses
- to US industries alone are esti-

fanaa ate nite

mated at $200 to 250 billion a
year.

The United States Trade
Representative, in its latest
report, called on the Bahamas
government to address defi-
ciencies in an amendment to
the Copyright Act - and
expressed concern that the
amendment had not yet been
enacted.

The report also revealed that
theft of intellectual property
and trade in fakes has grown
to unprecedented levels, threat-
ening innovation and creative
economies around the world.

Last year the Bahamas, along
with Taiwan and Korea, was

. downgraded to a priority on a
_US watch list.

Countries identified as Pri-

‘a

PUBLIC CONSULTATION
Proposed Interconnection Guidelines ©
The Bahamas

illegal goods crackdown

city Foreign Countries on the |
list can be subjected to a Sec- :
tion 30 investigation and face ;
possible trade sanctions. '

Mr Dames said the crack- :
down is necessary for the:
Bahamas to maintain a positive :
image internationally, but:
pointed out that there are some
challenges.

“In terms of trademark ;
infringements and copyright |
laws this is not only new to us, '
but this is a new area for many '
law enforcement agencies glob- :
ally,” Mr Dames explained. :

’ “The effects of these knock-off :

products is significant because it;
is believed that the profit from ;

this industry is being used to!

finance terrorism and other |
illicit activities.”

‘The Public Uisittes Comeriesion (PUG) hereby fies comments Korn hganieoes and offer iheresien

Thegsais ol tie conainaion ae
(zt inion fieersees of the PLC's expe

eigen ol treet armen ation Lid.
‘ eguiated behwesn BIC and Other Linersad Operators of voice i





ses

x principles tobe.
‘sand

fl mite comments tm icenses ant ote rset pares onthe proposed une.

Bo Fea ee ees Senet eee ey ne

Racer Pa Pe ee Os sco Nene

beet tea tann nae

tessan, Bahaeaas.
‘Telephone 242-272-4437
Fax 2OB-223-728B
Eonailt: bho PUCBatemas goubs.



Bee eee ee ee ee eee cece”

P.O. Bos 04502 Foot Tevare. East Coins Avene


25, 2006

PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JULY





July 20, 2006



THE TRIBUNE



YOUR CONNECTION TO.THE WORLD

Vol. 1 - Issue Twenty-Six_

BTC HIP-HOP HOLLA-DAY ROCKS THE MALL!

On July 8, 2006 the Mall at Marathon was
filled with the sounds of youngsters
rapping to the tone of BTC’s second quarter
“Hip Hop Holla’ finals. The second quarter
finals featured a number of talented young
contestants vying for a Motorola Razr.


















DJ Phines provided the music for the
event, and Randy C, 100 Jamz morning
show personality served as emcee for the
popular event. Each “Holla” participant
performed and the crowd went wild as

The competition was fierce as each
contestant rapped about BTC’s SMS text

of the day Oneil McKenzie was the “Biggie
Holla” winner and Tony McPhee was the
1* runner up. Oneil took home a black
Motorola Razr and Tony received a silver
Motorola Razr both courtesy of BTC.

pees,

Members of BTC Marketing Team enjoying the.event
(L-R); Margo Gibson - Public Relations; LaToysa Francis
~ Sr. Marketing Representative Wireless; Janet Brown -’
Sr. Manager Marketing; Public Relations & External

Communications; Cheryl Barry - Product Management
Boardband & Data and Mr, Leon Williams - Acting

President & CEO of BIC.

THE FOLLOWING BCPOU EXECUTIVES
ON THEIR NE Ww APPOINTMENTS.















DENISE WILSON
Serer eres



ROBERT FARQUHARSON
President

ARNOLD BOWLEG
Executive Vice President
COLINWRIGHT-Treasurer
DINO ROLLE - Assistant General Secretary
DEBORAH HALL - Assistant Treasurer
EDLEY SWAIN - Trustee
MARIO CURRY - Trustee
AVERIL CLARKE - Trustee
SEAN BOWE - AVP Grand Bahama & Bimini
BRANDO STEWART - AVP ZNS Northern Bahamas
FREDDIE PINDER - AVP Abaco
WAYNE CLEARE - Andros
DOROTHEA BETHEL - AVP Eleuthera
RANDY SMITH - AVP Exuma & Southeast Bahamas
MONIQUE CORNISH - AVP ZNS New Providence
PRISCA FRANCIS - Chief Shop Steward/BTC
GENELDINE MARRETT - Chief Shop Steward/ZNS





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they cheered for their favorite contestant.

messaging feature. However by the end

Apart from the Biggie Holla, the “Kiddie
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text messaging. The winner of the “kiddie
holla” was Ashley Brown and she won a 3.2
Mega Pixel Digital Camera courtesy of
Quality Business Center (QBC).

BTC stands firm in its commitment to
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~ Financial laws test

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

The Tribune





- $15m issue caps bank’
‘phenomenal’ fiscal ‘06



i PAUL McWeeney holds Bank of the Bahamas International's

Euromoney best bank award

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN attorney yesterday told
The Tribune that the Supreme
Court had yet to hear the sub-
stantive issues in the case he
was bringing to overturn the
Bahamian financial services
regulatory regime, more than
five years after it was first filed.

-Maurice:’ Glinton, who
togethez with fellow attorney
Leandra Esfakis ‘is challenging

Gray: Development Bank

on constitutional grounds the

11 laws enacted in December
2000 in response to the Finan-
cial Action Task Force
(FATF) blacklisting, said. they
were currently going through
the “discovery” process with
the Attorney General’s Office,
which is representing the Gov-
ernment.

_ This process, he added, will
attempt to. ‘settle the record’,
meaning that both sides will
identify the main issues to be

‘must get back on track’

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter

CONSUMER Affairs and
Local Government minister,
V.Alfred Gray, yesterday

_ pleaded with the Bahamas

Development Bank to do
more to empower small
Bahamian businesses.

Minister says BDB
holding up Bahamian
entrepreneurs

Mr Gray used the opening

SEE page 8B

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@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor -

ank of the

Bahamas Inter-

national’s man-

aging director

yesterday told

The Tribune that it had

enjoyed a “phenomenal” fis-

cal 2006, with its $15 million

preference share issue over-
subscribed within a week.

Paul McWeeney said the

bank’s Board, which saw its

book of business grow by 40

per cent during the first nine

months of the year to June 30,

was now “in the process of

determining who gets what”

from the now-closed prefer-

ence share issue due to the

_ oversubscription.

Describing the preference
share issue as having “sold out
in no time”, Mr McWeeney
said the proceeds would be
used to “really strengthen the

capital base to support the

major growth we’ve achieved
in the last 12 months”.

With the bank’s book of
business having expanded by
40 per cent between June 30,

2005, and March 31, 2006, Mr
McWeeney pointed out that it
had to maintain certain capital
ratios, and the $15 million issue
would ‘ ‘support existing infra-
structure”.

He explained that Bank of
the Bahamas International still
had the ability to issue a fur-
ther $10 million in preference
shares and, without seeking to
pre-empt the issue, the insti-
tution was “more than likely

to recommend” that its share- .

holders vote for the creation
of a new preference share issue
at the next annual general
meeting (AGM).

‘Mr McWeeney said prefer-
ence shares appeared to be

“extremely attractive” to
Bahamian institutional
investors, fitting their long-
term investment profile by pro-
ducing a good, safe return.

The $15 million private
placement was the second suc-
cessful round of financing com-

‘pleted by Bank of the
Bahamas International during -
.2006, its $25 million rights issue

to 4,000 existing ordinary
shareholders also havirig been
oversubscribed.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter- «|

national saw its net income
increase by 36 per cent in the
fiscal 2006 third quarter,
describing the three months to
March 31 as its most successful
period ever.

The bank’s auditors are cur-
rently working on its fiscal
2006 financial statements, the
year having ended on June 30.
Mr McWeeney said Bank of
the Bahamas International was
“optimistic we continued the
growth momentum into the
final quarter of the year.

“We’re pretty excited if
these numbers hold firm,
which we think they will,” Mr
McWeeney said. “This year
has certainly been a phenome-
nal year, for the bank, no two
ways about it.”

Mr McWeeney said the bank
was “hoping towards the end
of this year to be able to hang
the flag” on and open its new
branch in South Florida.

The twin processes of reno-
vating the branch site and
going through the regulatory

SEE page 5B

case endures five-year wait

argued before the courts, and

the documents used.

“We’re presently going
through a process of discovery
with a view to getting some of
the main issues settled before
the court,” Mr Glinton said,
adding that the case on the
merits of their action was still
before the Supreme Court.

Mr Glinton said he had first
filed the action in April 2001,
meaning the courts still had to
hear the substantive issues

“lust got a lot loan...
Pe , tor

more than five years after it .

was initiated.
The courts have heard sev-

‘ eral interlocutory matters

resulting from Mr Glinton and
Ms Esfakis’s action, the Privy
Council ruling yesterday in

favour of Chief Justice Sir Bur-.

ton Hall’s decision to strike out
13 paragraphs from their writ
(see story on Page 3B).

The central thrust of their
case is that the Financial
Transactions Reporting Act,

one of the 11 laws, violates the

constitutional right of attor-

ney/client privilege.
This right provides for all
forms of communication

‘between an attorney and his

clients to be confidential, but
the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act’s. Know Your
Customer (KYC) require-

ments mandate that govern- |

SEE page 5B

HELPING YOU CREAi E AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



ASL EDS UE



CDB official
tells Bahamians
‘bisvest hindrance
is yourself’; BDB
sees $2m loss
| decline and $5m
non-performing
loan improvement

# By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter

- BAHAMIANS are “‘sit- |

opportunities in the agro-
|. food processing and small
| and micro-business sectors,
but are failing to exploit
these, a Caribbean Devel- |.
| opment Bank (CDB) rep- |-°
resentative said yesterday.
The CDB partnered with
the Bahamas Development
; Bank (BDB) and the
Bahamas Cooperative
Leauge to host a three-day
workshop for 37 partici-
pants from seven different
Family Islands. |
| . Yet the CDB’s Kenneth |
Harvey said finding partic-
ipants proved challenging.
“This workshop is cost-
ing the Caribbean Devel-
opment Bank in excess of
| $26,000, which is not includ-
ing the administrative costs.
The bank agreed to spon-
sor ‘( participants, and I |
am going to tell you, it was
| like pulling teeth to get 17

| have the problem in getting
the programme to do what |
it is supposed to,” Mr Har-

| vey said.

‘SEE # Page ihe






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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

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will resume on
MONDAY, 31st July, 2006

We regret any inconvenience caused.







BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE

Break down boundaries |

that cause voter apathy ©

LAST week, Prime Minister
Perry Christie announced he
would be moving to create a
Constituencies Commission
(more commonly referred to

as the Boundaries Commis-

sion) to review whether or not
there should be changes in our
electoral boundaries. Histori-
cally, this move has been an
indication that parliamentary
elections are nearing. The cur-
rent parliamentary term will
end in May 2007, which is now
less than 10 months away.

Structure of the Boundaries

’ Commission

Article 68-70 of the Bahamas
Constitution deals with the
Boundaries Commission, its
composition, duties and report-
ing lines.

The Commission consists of
five members, who are: the
Speaker of the House of
Assembly (chairman), a Jus-
tice of the Supreme Court
(deputy chairman), two mem-
bers appointed on the advice
of the Prime Minister, and one
member appointed on the
advice of the Leader of the
Opposition. According to the
Constitution: “Any decision of
the Commission shall require
the concurrence of not less
than three members of the
Commission. And: “The Com-
mission shall in accordance
with the provisions of this Arti-
cle, at intervals of not more
than five years, review the
number and boundaries of the
constituencies into which the
Bahamas is divided and shall
submit to the Governor-Gen-
eral a single report either:

1. Stating that in the opinion
of the Commission, no change
is required, or ,

2. Recommending certain
changes, and the Governor-





General shall cause such report
to be laid before the House of
Assembly forthwith.

Criteria for Constituencies
The Constitution calls for a
minimum of 38 constituencies

and no maximum. When..

reviewing the number and
boundaries of the constituen-
cies, the Commission is
required to:

a. Strive for equality of pop-
ulation

b. Respect natural barriers

c. Give consideration to the
geographical size of a con-
stituency.

d. Give adequate considera-
tion to any other pertinent fac-
tors. i

In an archipelago nation such
as the Bahamas, those goals
are not easily realised. For
instance, we have the
Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked
Island, Acklins and Long Cay
(MICAL) constituency. It is
one of the smallest constituen-
cies in terms of the number of
registered voters, but it proba-
bly covers the largest geo-
graphical area of any district. It
is probably fair to say it is the
costliest district to represent,
because it encompasses five
separate and distinct island
communities. Contrast MICAL
with, say, Pinewood, which coy-
ers a relatively small land area,
but is densely populated and
ranks among the largest dis-
tricts in terms of registered vot-
ers.



History of Electoral Districts

In 1967 there were 38 con-
stituencies, and this total num-
ber remained until the 1982
elections. The 1982 Boundaries
Commission recommended the
addition of five new electoral
districts, bringing the total to
43 constituencies. By the time
the 1987 election came around,
another 6 electoral districts
were created, bringing the total
to 49 constituencies.

In 2002, the number of elec-
toral districts was reduced for
the first time, with the elimi-
nation of nine electoral districts
for a total of 40 constituen-
cies...the number we stand at
today.

Even though the above para-

graphs trace the changes in the |

total number of constituencies,
it does not even begin to
describe the history of changes
in electoral district boundary
lines. The changes in bound-

ary lines have been far more |

dramatic and more often sub-
ject to criticism and claims of
‘gerrymandering’ over the
years.

In theory, boundary lines

' should shift to reflect popula-
tion shifts that occur naturally -

over time. For instance, the
south-west corridor of New
Providence has seen explosive
growth within the past 15
years...just ride the length of
Carmichael and Cow Pen
roads, and you will be amazed
at all the new subdivisions that
now exist. This, then, raises the
obvious question...should we
then make a corresponding
adjustment for the depopula-
tion of urban centres and, if so,
how?

What is most interesting to
note is the fact that as new elec-
toral districts were added, the
incumbent party generally had
lacklustre results in contesting
these newly-created ‘seats’,
while the only example of
reducing the numbers of elec-
toral districts resulted in a dis-
astrous outcome for the incum-
bent party. Notwithstanding
this, it seems as though every
incumbent political party feels
that there are significant advan-
tages to redrawing national

-boundaries, even if the end

result contravenes the spirit of
the constitutional provisions.

Low Voter Registration

What is extremely interest-
ing is the fact that the voter
registration has been very low,
considering that we are less
than 10 months away from a
general election. Up until
Prime Minister Christie’s
announcement last week, only
67,362 out of an estimated
170,000 eligible voters had reg-
istered. This represents a reg-
istration rate of about 40 per
cent.

To get everybody registered,
we would probably have to reg-
ister more than 10,000 persons
per month if everybody were
to register. Is there the infra-
structure in place to deal with
these types of numbers in a
short period of time? In the
absence of reasonable voter
registration numbers, any
attempts to change boundaries
could be ‘shooting in the dark’.
Is it time (as a part of the con-
stitutional review process) that
we revisit exactly how bound-
aries are drawn and who is

‘involved in the process?

Further, what is this apparent
voter apathy telling us? Is it
simply a case of Bahamians
being ‘last minute’ people, or
could it be symptomatic of oth-
er issues? It will not be long
now before the ‘spin doctors’
from both sides of the politi-

cal divide start to provide us

with explanations to the ques-
tions raised and many others.
Until next week...



NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is 2 major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas. |

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of

‘Colonial Group International .

or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



AVAILABLE

Switzerland-based Private Bank is looking
for a
SENIOR INTERNAL CONTROL &
HEAD OFFICE LIAISON OFFICER

- Minimum qualification

° Degree (or equivalent) in business administration,

banking or fiance

° Excellent organizational, management, communication

and interpersonal skills

e At least 10-15 years experience in managing a private

bank

° Thorough knowledge of all aspects of a modern,

dynamic private bank

¢ Well versed in Swiss banking standards and practices.
Knowledge of local regulatory matters; excellent PC

skills

* Willingness to work in a multicultural environment

* Fluency in English, German and French; spoken

Spanish would be an asset.

The position offers a competitive salary and benefits.
Applications must be made in writing, to arrive by 9th
August, 2006. Persons not meeting the above minimum
requirements need to apply. Applications should be mailed
to: Human Resources Officer, P.O. Box SS-6289, Nassau,
Bahamas.



—
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 5B



Stocks rally on acquisitions,

$15m issue caps bank’s

FROM page 1B

processes in the US:and the
Bahamas are ongoing, with Mr
McWeeney saying the latter
was in “the final steps”.

The renovations to the
branch premises, which are on
the ground floor of the Sun-
trust building in Coral Gables,
located at Alhambra Square,
are expected to be completed
in about three to four months,
about the same time as the reg-
‘ ulatory process.

Mr McWeeney pointed out
that to complete the US
approvals process, Bank of the

Bahamas International had to:

“have a physical address.
In addition, Bank of the

Financial
laws test case
endures five-
year wait

FROM page 1B

ment agents inspect an attor-
ney’s client files to ensure he is
complying with the Act and its
’. regulations.

According to Mr Glinton
and Ms Esfakis, these inspec-
tions on behalf of the Compli-
ance Commission and Inspec-
ior of Financial and Corporate
Services Providers “abrogate
the individual’s constitutional
right of confidentiality as we
have understood it in common
law tradition”.

All Compliance Commission
inspections have been stayed,
though, until the courts rule
on-the substantive issues of the
Glinton/Esfakis case.

Mr Glinton yesterday said
the battle over attorney/client
privilege was important for the
well-being of the Bahamian
economy and its investment
climate, as foreign investors
would want the confidence and
certainty that this nation
upheld the rule of law and its
constitution before placing
their money here.

Absent this, investors would
be more inclined to take their
- investments elsewhere

Mr Glinton added: “Legal
professional privilege is at least
representative of one factor as
far as the foreign investor is
concerned. If he’s coming into
this jurisdiction, he must be
able to take confidence that
the rule of law is upheld.”

He pointed out that courts
in the UK and Canada, and
other Commonwealth and
common law countries, had all
handed down rulings in recent
years upholding the principle
of attorney/client privilege in
the face of increasing KYC
demands.

“We have been trying for so
long to get this matter heard,”
Mr Glinton said of his and Ms
Esfakis’s efforts. “You have to
ask yourself why we (in the
Bahamas) have been unable
to progress this matter.”

Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers

Bahamas International is hop-
ing that the tender bidding
process for the contract to con-
struct its new West Bay Street
headquarters, located between
the Nassau Palm Resort .and
Dockendale House, will start
in the first quarter of its new
fiscal year.

Mr McWeeney added that
he was hopeful groundbreak-
ing for the complex could take
place by the middle of fiscal
2007.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-

‘national recently received its

third major international
award in two years, having
been selected by Euromoney
magazine for one of its Award
of Excellence presentations.
In awarding Bank of the
Bahamas International the

Bahamas’ first ever country’s
best bank award, Euromoney
noted that in addition to
growth and investment in tech-
nology, the bank “has-also
worked hard at customer loy-
alty, developing its internet
banking, expanding its ATM
network and expanding its
credit card business via a pre-
paid Visa promotion”.

“This has been a week of
extraordinary honours for
Bank of The Bahamas,” said
Mr McWeeney.

“Being recognised by such
an influential publication as
Euromoney as the country’s
best bank, and completing a
hugely oversubscribed $15 mil-
lion offering within the same
week is a record that anyone in
the financial services industry

FULL-TIME REGISTERED NURSE

WANTED)
FOR GROWING MEDICAL PRACTICE
PEDIATRIC EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
INTERESTED PERSONS PLEASE
SUBMIT RESUMES AND CV TO
P.O. BOX SS-19026

Job Vacancy

Mechanical Coordinator

The Mechanical Coordinator will manage all Maintenance
Management Systems within their scope of responsibility and
also develop and administer Preventative and Predictive |
Maintenance Programs for new and existing systems.

Applicant Must:

Manage and Maintain Mechanical Systems including:
Production Systems, e.g. Reactors, Filters,
Pumps, Tanks, Vessels and Filter/Dryers
Utilities Systems, e.g. Boilers, R.O.
Systems, Cooling Towers, PSA Nitrogen
and Brine & Chilled Water Systems
Environmental Systems, e.g. Bio Basin,
Clarifiers, Incinerator, Scrubbers,
Ventilation Systems, Groundwater
Remediation System.

pupa will also be responsible for:

Ensuring that Maintenance Shop, Offices,
Work Areas and job sites are maintained
safely and that all appropriate permits,
procedures and standards are adhered to.
Maintaining records and documentation as
required on installations, work orders,
alterations, costs training and inspections

Qualifications:

An Associate Degree, in a mechanical discipline,
from an approved institution along with 10 years of
demonstrated EADeIEnce in the industrial maintenance

field

Compensation: Salary and other benefits commensurate
with qualifications and experience.

Please e-mail written applications to:
HYPERLINK "mailto:businessservices@coralwave.com"
businessservices@coralwave.com

or mail to:
Human Resources
Department
P.O. Box F-42430

Freeport,



Bahamas

‘phenomenal’ fiscal ‘06

‘would be immensely proud of,
and J would like to thank our
staff, management, customers
and shareholders who made
these achievements possible.”

Mr McWeeney told The Tri-
bune that the Euromoney
award showed Bank of the
Bahamas International could
“stand head-to-head with any
other management team”, as
it moved to transform itself
from being a ‘bank’ to a
“financial enterprise”.

He added that the bank was
“about to launch a fully-
fledged private banking office”
for its clients, and was focusing
on further enhancing product
delivery and full service quali-

ty.

arnings

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE |
DEVON ENERGY PORT BOUET,
LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is
hereby given that the above-named Company has been
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
on the 29th day of June, 2006. :

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator
of
DEVON ENERGY PORT BOUET, LTD.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

SANTA FE ENERGY RESOURCES |.
(COTE D’IVOIRE) LTY

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 notice is | .
hereby given that the above-named Company has been }:
dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant to a
Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar General
onthe 29th day of June, 2006.

Lynden Maycock
Liquidator

0
- SANTA FE ENERGY RESOURCES (COTE D’IVOIRE) LTD.



A LEADING LOCAL COMMERCIAL BANK
HAS A VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:

SENIOR MANAGER CORPORATE FINANCE

Core Responsibilities:

-e Responsible for the Bank’s corporate finances including
budgeting, assets and liability management, financial reporting

and accounting

° Review Bank’s financial results and compare to historical and

sector results

* Review and upgrade all Bank financial management operations

¢ Establish credit and collection policies and develop methods for
improving Bank’s financial performance

¢ Accountable to ensure regulatory mandates are followed

¢ Interacts with branches relating to budgeting and other finance

matters.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

« A minimum of five years experience in a banking environment.

* Complete knowledge of accounting, financial analysis, and
budgeting with experience and skills in financial management.

¢ Either Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or Certified Financial
Analyst (CFA) with an MBA.

¢ Strong analytical, administrative, written and oral communication

skills

¢ Working knowledge of treasury management, information; and

risk management.

* Strong leadership skills to design and convey policy and coach

others.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 26" July 2006 to:

c/oThe Tribune

P.O. Box N 3207, DA 11649

Nassau,Bahamas ss
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS»

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

IMPORTANT NOTICE
2006 RECIPIENTS

‘THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME

CHECKS WILL BE DISTRIBUTED BY LAST NAME IN
CONGRATULATE THE FOLLOWING PERSONS -ALPHABETICAL ORDER. LISTEN FOR WHEN YOU
WHO HAVE BEEN AWARDED EDUCATIONAL ARE TO REPORT TO THE DISBURSEMENT CEN-
LOANS FOR 2006. TRE.

THE EDUCATION LOAN COMMITTEE WISHES TO oe
DO NOT TO COME TO THE DISBURSEMENT CEN-
TRE IF YOUR NAME DOES NOT APPEAR ON THE
FOLLOWING LIST.

CHECK DISTRIBUTION EXERCISES WILL BEGIN New students and their co-borrowers are required to ONLY PERSONS WHO COME ON THEIR ASSIGNED
ON JULY 31ST, 2006 TO AUGUST 12TH , 2006 bring a valid Passport, National Insurance Card, anda DATE WILLBE SERVED ~
FROM 9 A.M. TO 3 PM. AT THE FOLLOWING LOCA- job letter with them. In addition to the original docu-
TIONS: ments, new students can reduce their wait time by
bringing two (2) copied sets of these documents.

PLEASE CONTACT THE SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCA-
‘TIONAL LOAN DIVISION

at MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOL-
AWARD LETTERS HAVE BEEN MAILED, HOWEVER, OGY IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS

YOU. MAY RECEIVE A COPY FROM THE SCHOLAR-
SHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION, MINISTRY
OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, .
THOMPSON BOULEVARD.

2006 APPROVED

- THE HOLY TRINITY ACTIVITIES CENTRE, STAPLE-
TON GARDENS, NEW PROVIDENCE AND

- THE BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA (Grand Bahama and the Northern

THE EDUCATION LOAN COMMITTEE
Bahamas)

GACH BAMOMG art Yi

TREVOR
JAMES
LYNN
ANASTACIA
ELNORA
CAROLINE
SHEINAY.
PRINCE
ARNETTE
LOUISEA ANNE
AGENES ALENE
TARAN
PHILIPPA
JOYELLE.
GEORGE
OMAR
CALSEY

* SHANDEIKAH
MBOYA

JHOVAR BOBBY
ANGELIQUE
RENAE
RAYMOND
SHANGELIA
HERMIA
ROSAN |
OLIVIA
NICOLE
DION
ADENA
SAMUEL
SOLOMON
TABITHA
VALENCIA
JONATHAN
MERLENE'
MELISSA
NIKITA
NIKITA
ALEXIS
CRAIG

LA’ SHAN
TAMIKA
LATOYA
LAKEIRA
ALEXANDER
ROBERTHA
OLIVIA
TRANEA

JAMAR
ANYA
TINO
EVEANNA
REYNARD

ALBERT
ANTHONY
ADRIANNE
PATRICK WILLIAM
VANESSA

ELENA

YOLANDA

EDSIL

NAOMI

VERONICA

ADDRESS

ALLENS

SOUTH BEACH
IVANHOE ROAD
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS
NASSAU EAST BLVD
NASSAU EAST
OAKES FIELD
NASSAU VILLAGE
GOLDEN GATES #2
TYLER STREET, SOUTH
BREEZY HILL ROAD
BOZINE TOWN
SPRINGFIELD ROAD

" YAMACRAW

CORAL HARBOUR
CARMICHAEL DRIVE
MISTY GARDENS

GOLDEN GATES #2
CHIPPINGHAM

SUNSHINE PARK

YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
FLAMINGO GARDENS
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
SAN SOUCI

YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
CLARIDGEDALE GARDENS *
ABUNDANT LIFE ROAD
WESTWOOD VILLAS
PALMDALE

NASSAU VILLAGE
CARMICHAEL ROAD
PYFROM ADDITION

BLAIR ESTATES

SIXTH STREET

SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
SUNSET PARK

YAMETTO DRIVE
PINEBARRAN

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
SEABREEZE ESTATES
FOX HILL ROAD

NASSAU VILLLAGE
BAYWATER ESTATES
GAMBIER VILLAGE
GOLDEN GATES #2
GOLDEN GATES #2
CORAL HARBOUR
STAPLEDON GARDENS
CARMICHAEL ROAD
FAITH GARDENS
HIGHLAND PARK
CARMICHAEL ROAD
COLONY VILLAGE, EAST
CARMICHAEL ROAD

ST ANDREWS BEACH ESTATES
GIBBS CORNER
CARMICHAEL ROAD
VISTA MARINA

LAURA HILL SUBDIVISION
MONASTERY PARK
STAPLEDON GARDENS
CABLE BEACH

VILLAGE ROAD

BEL AIR ESTATES
TROPICAL GARDENS

SEA BREEZE ESTATES
MILLENNIUM GARDENS
TOWER HEIGTS
PINEWOOD GARDENS
FOX HILL

YAMACRAW HILL ROAD
MARATHON ESTATES
SEA BREEZE ESTATES
STAPLEDON GARDENS
PINEWOOD GARDENS .
SOUTH BEACH DRIVE
PINEWOOD GARDENS
CORAL HEIGHTS EAST
PINEWOOD GARDENS

. CORAL HEIGHTS WEST

WESTWARD VILLAS

GOLDEN GATES

MILLARS HEIGHTS
YAMACRAW BEACH ESTATES
OAKES FIELD

GARDEN HILL ESTATES

SURNAME

CURTIS.
DARLING
DARLING
DARLING
DARVILLE
DARVILLE -
DAVIS
DAVIS
DAVIS,
DAVIS
DAVIS
DEAN

DEAN

DEAN
DELEVEAUX
DELEVEAUX
DEMERITTE
DEVEAUX
DEVEAUX
DEWAR
DORSETT
DORSETT
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE
DUNCOMBE II
EDGECOMBE
ELLIS.
EVANS
EVANS-ROLLE
FARQUHARSON
FARQUHARSON-ARTHUR
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FERGUSON
FINLAYSON
FITZ-GERALD
FORBES
FOUNTAIN
FOWLER
FOWLER
FRANCIS.
FRANCIS
FRASER
FRASER
FRAZIER
GIBSON
GIBSON
GIBSON
GILBERT
GLINTON
GOODMAN
GREENSLADE
HALL
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HANNA
HARDING
HENFIELD
HIGGS
HIGGS
HUMES
HUTCHESON
HUTCHESON
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM
INGRAHAM-KNOWLES
ISAACS
JACOBS
JACOBS
JAMES
JESUBATHAN
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON
JOHNSON

FIRST. NAME

SHAUNDRA
CARLENSEANO
STEVON
SUZLA
LANECIA
O'KEISHA
ALVIN
CAROL
FLOYD
GLENVILLE
RICCARDO
ANTONIO
KENO
MANDI
CHEQUELLE
JASON
EDRICA
ADRIAN
RUVANIA
CASSANDRA
DARIA
FORRESTALL
ERICA
ROSETTA
STEPHEN
KAYWANA
KRYSTA
CAMERON
MALISSA
ANTHONIQUE
ZANIA
BETTY
CANDICE
DERRICK
ELINDERA
SEAN
SHARA
ALEXIS
LATINA
ANTOINE
ADRIAN
CLEMENT
DANNY
JANAE
SIMONE
ASHLEY
GARITH
ANN
DEANDRA
D'SORAJI
JENNA
BRANDON
BRANDO
SILAS
MONIQUE
PETIA

AMY
ANWAR
JAYCHELLE
M'KHEL
RAYMOND
YASMIN
MANDY
INDIRA
ARETHA
MIYOSHI
SHARANDA
ALENA
GABRIELLE
KENCOVIA
SHELLYN
WILDERA
CHERYL
KELE!
DEONDRA
DONTAE’
EMMA
JEREMY
CHARLEASE
CHRISTIAAN
EBONY
JERMAINE
KRISTY
LAKEIHSA

MIDDLE NAME
NIKITA

DEANDO
MICHELLE
CHRYSAN
DESIREE

FRED
CHARLENE
RINALDO
ARLINGTON
ALEXANDER
DeVANO. .
AKEEM
CAHILA
ANTOINDRA
ROOSEVELT
DOMINIQUE
ANTHORN
EVITTA
ELAINE
TYESHA KELSIE
OSCAR ROGER
VANESSA |
IONA
GREGORY
TOVA
VICTORIA KENVA
LAVER
SHARLENE
TAMARA
LESA
ELIZABETH
CHRISTINA
GLENWILL
COREN
GERRARD
LETHIA
NOELLE
TAMARA
PHILIP

LEROY MARCUS
JACOB
GLEN
LATOYA
DENISE
KANDICE
NATALYA
MARGARET
KAVANA LASHANTI
D'LAJA
TERYL
ALWORTH
ANDRONIC
NIGEL
ALYEAN
ALONA

- ALICIA

ADDINGTON
KRIZIA
ASHLEE
FRANCIS
ANN
LYNETTE
ALEXANDIRA
PATRICIA
CARDINA
CAROLYN
VALENTINE
PATRICE

IVY CURLEAN
STEPHANIE
BONITA
MARVA
IRRINGTON
LE'SHAUN
ALONZO
TAMARA
ROHAN
KASIF
BARNARD JAMAAL
FLORENCIA
JOLTON
ANASTACIA
ANASTASIA

ADDRESS

ELZIABETH ESATES
COLLONY VILLAGE
HAROLD ROAD
SHIRLEY STREET
PINERIDGE

CHIPPINGHAM
CHIPPINGHAM
BAHAMA REEF
CARMICHAEL ROAD

- SEA BREEZE ESTATES

HIGHBURY PARK
ELIZABETHE AVENUE
SUNSET RIDGE DRIVE

-SUNSET PARK

SOLDIER ROAD
SOUTHERN HEIGHTS
BAMBOO TOWN
DANNOTTAGE ESTATES
CARMICHEAL ROAD
STAPLEDON GARDENS
HILLSIDE PARK ROAD
SOUTH BEACH ESTATES

~ SOUTHERN HEIGHTS

GLENISTON GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS
BAMBOO TOWN
GARDENS HILL #1
ANNEX OF VENICE BAY
ELIZABETH ESTATES
TWYNAM HEIGHTS
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
NASSAU EAST

CORAL HEIGHTS EAST
SEA BEACH ESTATES
NASSAU EAST

SEVEN HILLS

CABLE BEACH
YAMACRAW SHORES
APPLE STREET

WEST BAY STREET
BAY STREET
YAMACRAW

SILVER GATES
PERPALL TRACT
MT.PLEASANT VILLAGE
GAMBIER HEIGHTS
PINEWOOD GARDENS
MARATHON ESTATES
VICTORIA BLVD
MILLARS HEIGHTS
HUDSON ESTATES
VILLAGE COURTS
GILBERT STREET
FLAMINGO. GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS #1

- MARATHON ESTATES

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
COX SUBDIVISION
OAKES FIELD

GAMBLE HEIGHTS

SEA BREEZE ESTATES
EASTWOOD ESTATES
YELLOW ELDER GARDENS
GARDEN HILLS I!

SEA BREEZE DRIVE
BACARD! ROAD, WEST
WINDSOR LANE
RIDGELAND PARK, EAST
TWYNAM AVENUE
SKYLINE LAKES

BLUE HILLS

BAILLOU HILLS ESTATES
MILLARS HEIGHTS

GOLF COURSE BLVD
GOLF COURSE BLVD
FOX HILL

VILLAGE ROAD
MILLINNUM GARDENS
WINTON HEIGHTS
SUNSET PARK
GLENISTON GARDENS
EASTWOOD ESTATES
GOLDEN GATES #2

ee ee


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 78

SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATIONAL LOAN DIVISION
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

2006 RECIPIENTS

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE BAHAMAS
GUARANTEED LOAN FUND PROGRAMME

CONTINUED
2006 APPROVED







SURNAME FIRST NAME MIDDLE NAME ADDRESS ISLAND _ SURNAME FIRST NAME MIDDLE NAME ADDRESS ISLAND _
JOHNSON QUANTRIEA " DRISKELL ROLLE AVENUE NP SHERMAN KENSEL OLIVERE DELAPORTE NP
JOHNSON ROBERT CRAIG FRANCIS BLUE HILL ESTATES NP SHERMAN II GLENN ALEXANDER FLAMINGO GARDENS NP
JOHNSON ROBYNN “MECHELLE LOREN GARDENS HILL #1 NP SIMMONS . MICHELLE MCQUAY IONA COWPEN ROAD : NP
JOHNSON SAMANTHA ALEXIS. BAMBOO CREST NP SMITH AMANDA MICHELLE GOLDEN GATES #2 , ; NP
JOHNSON . ty SANIA AKIRA CORAL HARBOUR NP SMITH : ANDRICA f ANGELIQUE EASTWOOD ESTATES NP
JOHNSON TAMEKA ANTURA SUNSET PARK ‘ NP SMITH CALVIN LEHENZA BOLLA ALLEY NP
JONES JANIQUE AYESHA BEL AIR ESTATES NP SMITH DAVINA NATALIA EAST PARK ESTATES "NP
JONES MARIO. | " FRANKLYN GOLDEN GATES NP SMITH DELPHIA SHARON NASSAU VILLAGE NP
KERR . DENRICKA | CARLETTE BLAIR ESTATES NP SMITH IANTHIA SHASHICA ST ANDREWS CIRCLE , EAST NP
KING PATRICE ‘ LORRAINE GLENISTON GARDENS NP SMITH KRISTIE MARIE WINTON MEADOWS NP
KNOWLES . INEASE cia’ CORAL HEIGHTS NP. SMITH LATANYA SHARRELL PINEWOOD GARDENS © NP
KNOWLES JAYDE KEVETTE BOYD SUBD NP SMITH i LAUREL LAVENIA . GOLDEN GATES II ots NP
KNOWLES MELISSA ‘ .LAUREL BELLOT ROAD NP SMITH é . MEIKO KASHANA SOUTH BEACH ESTATES . NP
KNOWLES SHAW HENRY ELDRIDGE GOLDEN ISLES ROAD NP SMITH MILLICENT SELENE FAITH AVENUE NP
LAING TAJAH ELLAMAE CARMICHAEL ROAD NP SMITH NASHANDA MIA BLUE HILLS ESTATES NP
LEO GARNEL HAVEN AVENUE NP SMITH REGINA TONIA COLLEGE GRADENS NP
LEVARITY MATTHAN . JAVAN GARDEN HILL #1 NP SMITH SHANAE KRISTEN : BLUE HILL ESTATES NP
LEWIS ALETHIA DARRELL GARDEN VIEW ESTATES ‘ NP SMITH JR _ ERIC WINDSOR LANE NP
LEWIS CINDY MALLISA COLOMBUS ESTATES NP ji SPENCE GWENDOLYN VERONICA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP
LEWIS LORENZO JOHN STAPLEDON GARDENS NP SPENCE LATIA -— KEUNIKA ‘ BLUE HILL : NP
LEWIS SHAVONTI RUSSELL . GOLDEN GATES NP ST.CYR LEONETTE LEKARA EASTWOOD ESTATES NP
LIGHTBOURNE TREVOR ANDREW FOX HILL NP STEED AARON ALEXANDER ROYAL PALM GARDENS NP
LLOYD HERBERT LEVI SILVER GATES NP STRACHAN * KYLE HARRISON CARMICHAEL ROAD : NP
LLOYD © VALENTINO ELVARDO GLENISTON GARDENS NP STUART RAVONNE r LATOYA VELESTA GARDEN HILLS I! NP
LONGLEY JOETTE CARA SKYLINE DRIVE NP SWEETING CHERICE CAMILLE STAR ESTATES NP
LUND? AGNESSA LAURELLE IMPERIAL PARK NP SWEETING JESSICA LEIGH . GREENWOOD ROAD NP
LUNDY © a9 -~ TIFFANY LEAH SWAZILAND CREST NP SYMONETTE : KARLEN CHRISTOPHER STAPLEDON GARDENS NP
LUNDY II MARTIN ARNOLD IMPERIAL PARK NP TAYLOR KEITRA BIANCA | “CHESAPEAKE “NP
LUNN JASPER JAMES PROVIDENCE AVENUE NP THOMPSON EDWARD * NATHANIEL BALDWIN AVENUE = NP
MACKEY BERRANDO ARLINGTON CHIPPINGHAM ROAD NP THOMPSON LINDA GLORIA COLLIES AVENUE NP :
wo RL MACKEY DANIELLE SIMONE” “NASSAU EAST moe yp | THOMPSON REAH “TAMARA MILLENNIUM GARDENS * NP i
ot MACKEY KERLANO KACHAD FAIRVIEW DRIVE NP THOMPSON YOLANDA TERRA NASSAU VILLAGE wa agarung NP i
oe MACKEY KHALIA JANAE HILLVIEW CLOSE NP THOMPSON III EARL VINCENTE SEA BREEZE ESTATES . NP
MACKEY LAKEISHA SIMONE NASSAU VILLAGE Be NP THURSTON SIMONE THEOLA YAMACRAW ROAD. , . NP
MACKEY JR GLENROY WILLIAM ELIZABETH ESATES NP . TOOTE SHENANDOA LYNDORA BLUE HILLS at NP
MAJOR ANIKO GLADSTONE GARDEN HILL #2 NP TUCKER CARISMA - : ANDEIRA WINDSQR LANE NP.
MAJOR A ANNA FRANCIS REGENCY PARK ; NP TYNES © > (ANTHE ZANOBIA SANDFORD DRIVE NP
MAJOR MEKO EMRIQUE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP VIRGIL ; KHRISNA MONET MILLENIUM GARDENS NP
Ped ea MAJOR MICAH LOUISE CARMICHAEL ROAD NP VIRGILL : ALEXIA ; JERDELL MASON ADDITION NP
es MAJOR NADIA "BIANCA CHIPPINGHAM NP WALKER GHANDI NADIA SIMONE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP
: MAJOR TRACY CHERISE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP WALKINE BERNADETTE MARGURETTA PLANTON STREET NP
MARSHALL VALENTINO MELCHIZEDEK GOLDEN GATES II NP WALLACE ESIS : DELPHINE KENNEDY SUB MAIN ROAD NP
MARSHALL II ALBERT GEORGE VISTA MARINA NP WALLACE : SEBASTIAN EUTON BUTLER CLOSE : NP
MARTIN DAVARD JAVON GARDEN HILL Ii NP WATKINS SYDIRA - ‘ DONNAYA CORAL LAKES. : NP
MAYCOCK KRYSTLE ROY-ANNE EASTWOOD ESTATES ‘ NP WATSON CHRISTAL LAVERNE ANN GOLDENGATES!| NP
MCALPINE KEISHA ANISHKA FAIRWIEW HEIGHTS NP WHITE ANASTACIA THOMASINA CARMICHAEL ROAD NP
MCCARTNEY ANWAR QUINN TREASURE COVE NP WHYLLY DEANGELO KALMAN EASTWOOD ESTATES NP
MCCLAIN ALEXANDRA — KRISTINA MOUNT VERNON E NP » WHYLLY DEANZA KEVIN, EASTWOOD ESTATES ; NP
is MCINTOSH CAROL JUDY ROBINSON ROAD NP WHYMNS MELISSA : MONTEZ EASTWOOD SUBDIVISION NP
2 MCKENZIE ANTONIA AUTELIA BAMBOO TOWN NP WHYMNS SHENIQUE CRYSTAL MILLENNIUM GARDENS NP
, MCKENZIE SHAVONNE CLAUDETTE YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP WHYTE FRANCITA — | VICTORIA WINDSOR LANE NP
“MCKINNEY-COX _ ARIELLA LOLITA JULIANA CARMICHAEL ROAD NP WILKINSON ° ADRIAN ANTONIO SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP
MCPHEE . DARIO "ELVIS SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP WILKINSON KAYSHAN LA-DREA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP
MCQUAY . SUENAE ¢ LOUISE TYLER STREET NP WILLIAMS MARNEECE LEANDRAH ' REGENCY PARK NP
' MIDDLETON RICHARD KARLISSON ELIZABETH AVENUE "NP WILLIAMS MARQUES ANTHONY ZENAS CARMICHAEL ROAD NP
> MILLER DESMOND JERMAINE- EASTWOOD ESTATES NP WILLIAMS TAKASHIEII . LEROYSHA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP
MILLER JOY ALEXINE DEANDRA SEABREEZE GROVE + NP WILSON BETTY ELOISE FAITH AVENUE NP
MILLER RUDENA ° REGINA GARDEN HILLS #2 NP WILSON JAMIE O'NEIL SOUTH OCEAN BLVD NP
MILLER SHONIQUE LAURETTE PINEWOOD GARDENS 3 NP woop PRECIOUS MEO'SHIE ‘GOLDEN GATES I! NP
MILLS OMAR DANA ELIZABETH ESTATES NP WRIGHT DEBBIE YVONNE SUNSET PARK i NP
MINNIS INDERA ST ANDREWS ESTATES : No WRIGHT RICHARD : _ QUINTINO WILLIAM TERRACE : NP
MISSICK MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER FOX HILL NP WRING JORDANNA MICHELLE ; GOLDEN GATES | NP
MORTIMER ANTHONIQUE ANTONYA LOUISE FOX HILL NP YOUNG CRISTA ZANDERA GOLDEN GATES STRAIGHT NP
see MORTIMER KIVONNE ; STEPHANNE EASTERN ESTATES , NP ;
es MORTIMER PRINCESS DOMINIQUE PALMETTO VILLAGE NP :
: MOXEY LYNETTE LATEDRA CASSIEA SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP STUBBS YUWONKA ODELL ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES EL EU
MOXEY 1 : BRADLEY KEVIN ; GARDEN HILL #1 NP HUDSON JR DONZALEIGH - DWIGHT MILLERTON LONG
MUNROE ; KAYLE AKEEM EDWARDO _ ELIZABETH ESTATES NP STANFORD EBONY ANDREA ROBYN DUNDAS TOWN : ABACO
MURPHY : RANIQUE : EZELINE PECOLA GOLDEN GATES 1 NP SYMONETTE BRIAN. LEONARD MARSH HARBOUR ABACO
NEELEY RENALDO O'NEAL HAMILTON ADDITION NP JOHNSON ' KEENAN SIMEON : : PALMETTO POINT ELEU
NEWBOLD 7 DAREN . INZELY : NP KELLY F CRYSTAL _ JAUNETTE LOWER BOUGE ELEU
NEWTON CLAUDETTE ALEXIS LAKE CUNNINGHAM { , NP SYMONETTE NAKESHA - MARGARITTA » ROCK SOUND ELEU
NEWTON LOFTON ANDREW TWYNAM HEIGHTS : NP
NEWTON SHEANDRA MICHELLE TWYNAM HEIGHTS ‘ NP
NORVILLE-SMITH ERIC CHARLES NASSAU EAST NP ‘BAIN SASHA FRANISKA ARDEN FOREST GB
PATTON SHAKERIA ANDERIA PALM TREE AVENUE NP BELL KEVIN LEROY FREEPORT GB
PAUL SIMONE SHAMAAL STAPLEDON GARDENS NP BURROWS STEPHON JULIAN FREEPORT ; GB
PAUL-PARADA -OBREQUE CICELYN ALEXANDRIA WEST BAY STREET NP CAREY PAULINA OELCINE . FREEPORT GB
PEARCE" 82 = --RICARDOâ„¢ PAUL SKYLINE LAKES NP COLEBROOK ANDRE PATRICK FREEPORT ea
PHILIPPE KEITH ; a é HAY STREET - NP CULMER ERICA SHANTEL FREEPORT GB
PILGRIM BRENDIA ALEXANDRIA IBIS STREET NP CURRY ' DEKARRA ECHO | YEOMAN WOOD GB
PRATT KENWOOD LOFTHOUSE WEST BAY STREET NP DAVIS STEVEN TORELLO SHERWOOD FOREST GB
PRATT- DUNCANSON JOSEPHINE SARAH YELLOW ELDER GARDENS NP DEAN D'ANDRA LATEIYA ROYAL BAHAMIA GB
PYFROM DIANDRA DISHAN SOUTHERN HEIGHTS Nd DEAN D'ANDREA HENRIKA ARDEN FOREST GB
RAHMING AMANDA ‘ CHESTELE BLUE HILL HEIGHTS ( NP DEMERITTE CHRISTINE LUCAYA GB
RAHMING LEON DARRYL NASSAU EAST BLVD NP DEVEAUX ' KRISTOPHER AMOS FREEPORT GB
RAHMING : SHADE ITALIA YAMACRAW SHORES. NP DOUGLAS THEONE ILALIA ATLANTIC DRIVE GB
RAHMING TAMIKA CHANDERA STAPLEDON GARDENS NP FERNANDER MORGAN CORY CRAIG SHERWOOD FOREST + GB
RIGBY JR ; BALDWIN EASTWOOD NP FORBES RENAJ' KELVIN PINE BAY GB
ROBERTS JADE ARNETTE PINEWOOD GARDENS NP GRANT TANYA PATRICIA FREEPORT GB
ROBERTS JANE HELENA MILLIUNM GARDENS . NP . HANNA GABRIEL MIGUEL HAWKSBILL GB
ROBERTS : VASHTI ESTHER STAPLEDON GARDENS NP KNOWLES ASHTON KEITH FREEPORT GB
ROBINSON DIAH CHANDIRA CHAUTE CARMICHAEL ROAD NP | “MACKEY GARVIN DARREN FREEPORT GB
ROLLE CHARLOTTE PAIGE MELAINE os WINTON HEIGHTS. NP MACKEY TARA LATISHA LUCAYA GB
ROLLE DAREN MARCO DAMONE GLENISTON GARDENS NP MADER KARAN FREEPORT GB
ROLLE JANAE MAKERIA PINEWOOD GARDENS NP MAJOR-ADDERLEY SHEWRUAE "LORRAINE PINERIDGE GB
ROLLE ‘ JERMAINE LAVARDO SUNSET PARK NP MAJOR-MITCHELL INDIRA MICHAELLA FREEPORT GB
ROLLE JUSTINA CORINNE MACKEY STREET NP MCKINNEY JOANN ELIZABETH FREEPORT GB
ROLLE KEISHA SANTYA NASSAU VILLAGE NP MEADOWS SHATORI SANOVIA FREEPORT GB
ROLLE LATESHA MARILYN KENNEDY SUBDIVISION NP MICHAEL DAVID FREEPORT GB
ROLLE LERON LEO CARMERON BAILLOU HILL ESTATES NP MITCHELL SHAVON MICHELLE FREEPORT GB
ROLLE LYNELL MARISSA COLLEGE GARDENS NP. NEWTON RASHAD PEREZ FREEPORT GB
ROLLE NIKITA CAROLYN SUNSET PARK NP PEARSON - LEEMAN JAMES HENRY FREEPORT GB
ROLLE PHILLIPA OLIVIA EAST STREET, SOUTH NP POITIER-SHERMAN MONIQUE SHARON HERITAGE GB
ROLLE TERRELL MELICIA KENISE BAILLOU HILL ROAD NP PRATT KRISTIN JOWELLA CARVEL BEACH GB
ROLLE-SHIEL NIKITA CORAL HARBOUR : NP ROBERTS GARY TYRONE PINERIDGE GB
RUSSELL DAVONYA RAVON BACARD! ROAD NP RUTHERFORD DAVINA ALETHEA LUCAYA GB
RUSSELL RAYMOND ASHLEY CORAL LAKES NP SAUNDERS CHIKARA JAMILA BAHAMA TERRACE GB
SANDS CLINTON CHARLES GLENISTON GARDENS NP SAUNDERS LASHANTA , ANQUONETTE SOUTH BAHAMIA GB
SAUNDERS DESMOND SOUTH BEACH NP SMITH LAMARO SHAMON HOLMES ROCK GB
SAUNDERS LATOYA TAMIKA SIMMS RICHARDS COURT NP SMITH RICHANNA BENITA FREEPORT GB
SAUNDERS STEPHAN KIPLING TENEIL. OAKED FIELD NP STUART STEPHANIE PATRICE HAWKINSBILL GB
SEALEY TANISHA JANETTE WINTON MEADOWS NP TELFORT STEVENCY FREEPORT GB
SEYMOUR LATHARIO KRISTOFF ST. VINCENT ROAD NP THOMPSON LAKIA LASHANA SOUTH BAHAMIA | GB
SEYMOUR WAINGER DERICKA SEA BREEZE ESTATES NP WILLIAMS PAIGE VALERIA JONES TOWN GB
SHERMAN GLENDERIA SAMANTHA FLAMINGO GARDENS NP WORRELL KYRIA DYRELL FREEPORT ; GB
ZONICLE VANESSA ANETRA FREEPORT GB
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006










ae Ia

Job Vacancy

Maintenance & Utility
Manager

The Maintenance and Utility Manager will be responsible for
daily overseeing of the Maintenance Department with Operational
responsibility for the Utilities and Environmental Areas.

Applicant must be able to:
Plan, Lead, Execute and Control all
Maintenance, Utilities and Environmental
Process and Systems

Monitor and administer the Emergency
Response Center, Fire Pump House, Ground
Water Remediation System and Site Waste
Collection Systems

Support Site Waste and Energy Minimization
goals by advising of consumption rates and
best practices. Monitor levels and quality of
Site Waste and Storm water collection and
storage systems

Monitor inventory and usage of chemicals
and fuels consumed by Utilities and
Environmental

Serve as the discipline Engineer for Electrical,
Electronic, Mechanical, Piping,
Environmental and Utilities systems.

Qualifications:
A Bachelors Degree in Engineering or Engineering
Technology from an accredited College or University;
along with at least 10 years of demonstrated experience
in the industrial field

Compensation: Salary and other benefits commensurate
with qualifications and experience.

Please e-mail written applications to:
HYPERLINK "mailto:businessservices@coralwave.com"
businessservices@coralwave.com

or mail to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box F-42430
Freeport, Bahamas



CREDIT SUISSE



a= s

THE TRIBUNE.,: »





Bahamians sitting
on ‘agro gold mine’

FROM page 1B

“This programme can give a
lot of assistance, and can give a
lot more assistance over the
years, but there are some pre-
requisites that must be met.

“In order for us to be more
aggressive, and be of greater
use to you, the resident insti-
tutions must do their work.
You must get in there and
aggressively work with the
people on the various islands
to get them to come to the
workshops.”

Mr Harvey said he himself
had to make quite a number
of calls from outside the
Bahamas to ensure attendance
at yesterday’s workshop.

“Your biggest hindrance is
yourself,” he said. “What we
must not overlook is the myri-
ad of opportunities that exist

. right here in the Bahamas.”

Mr Harvey, who has trav-
elled through the region exten-
sively for the CDB, said that if
he wanted to start a business
he would wish to establish it
in the Bahamas.

“You are sitting on a gold
mine,” said Mr Harvey, noting
that there had to be more dri-

ving the Bahamian economy

than tourism and banking.
Mr Harvey highlighted a
number of achievements that
the CDB has completed, host-
ing a number of workshops
on the Family Islands, includ-
ing a two-week workshop on
batik and tie dying in Andros.
Mr Harvey also gave
Bahamians this piece of advice.

Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited

is presently considering applications for a

JUNIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

(Private Banking)

“If your attitude is that you
will sit back and wait on the
Government of the day to give
you everything, you will not
get far. As a business person
you have to take responsibility
for all aspects of your business
- from planning to execution.”

In the future, Mr Harvey
said that to drive workshop
attendance, notices will be giv-
en to all permanent secretaries
in Bahamian government min-
istries so no one can say they
were unaware of the work-
shop. The CDB will also send
registration forms to former
workshop participants.

“We have never had the
opportunity to say to any insti-
tution in the Bahamas, or any
individual: ‘We have done
enough this year, give us a
chance to come back next
year.’ You have not been using
the programme aggressively,
please use the programme,” he
said.

Mr Harvey added that there
was a myth that to create an
agro-business, it had to be
done on a large scale.

“This workshop is specifi-
cally designed to let you know
from day one that there are
many micro business opportu-
nities that you can start,” he
said. .

K Neville Adderley, chair-
man of the Bahamas Develop-
ment Bank, a co-sponsor of the
event, said the bank’s audited
accounts for 2005 showed its
net loss declined by over $2
million, while non-performing
loans decreased by over $5 mil-

lion.

He pointed out that for the
first time in the bank’s history,
the private sector through
British American Insurance
purchased some government-
guaranteed bonds issued by the
bank to obtain funding for
lending to small and medium-
sized business.

“All of the above is good

news for the ongoing avail-
ability of funding by the. bank
to lend to small and medium-
sized businesses, and we are

endeavouring to see to it that |

they can take advantage of that
increased funding,” Mr Adder-
ley said.

He said the BDB was also
seeking to become more rele-
vant and helpful to the small
business community, through
not only diversifying its loan
portfolio but also by establish-
ing a business advisory unit to
offer.free entrepreneurial
training and advice.

Mr Adderley added that he
welcomed the re-emphasis the
co-operative league was
attempting to place on agro-
processing.

“For our part, the develop- .

ment bank’s strategic plan calls
for making available addition-
al loans for viable farming, hor-
ticultural and agro processing

_projects which have seen ‘a

steady decline in our portfolio
over the last seven years, in
line with the trend in the

-region,” Mr Adderley said.

Consumer Affairs Minister
V Alfred Gray noted that the
co-operative sector had a vital

NOTICE

JPM NIPPON NEUTRAL FUND, LTD.
No. 27698 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in
dissolution, commencing on the 30th day of June, 2006. Articles
of Dissolution have been duly registered by the Registrar. The
Joint Liquidators are Paul A. Gomez and Patrick E. Smith of
Paje House, Marlborough Streer, P.O.Box N-8285, Nassau, The

Bahamas.



role to play in fostering and

encouraging its membership to: >| +’
invest in new business oppor-, -*.°-

tunities.

“With an asset base of $180
million, the time has come
when leaders must consciously. - .
consider allocating a percent: ~
age of that $180 million dol; . .
lars for investment in various. ~.
agribusiness and agro-food |
processing ventures,” he
added.

Mr Gray said this was'a way
of diversifying the Bahamian |
economy.

Over the next few days, par-
ticipants will learn about agro-
products that can be success-

fully processed at the micro

and small business level, tech-
nical models for food-based
products, start-up and imple-
mentation of business plans,
and have a daily one-on-one
consultation with advisors.

A certificate will be present-
ed at the end of the workshop.

Ges
Development
Bank ‘must

om veceoe
es

FROM page 1B

of a workshop on business
opportunities in agro-food pro- -
cessing to tell BDB chairman,
K Neville Adderley, of his con-
cerns regarding the bank and
its mandate. The BDB was one
of the sponsors of the three-
day workshop.

“One of the problems that I

‘have, and I have had it forthe .

last four years, is that these.-.
banks that are co-sponsoring -
these events are not always as
loan friendly as I would like to .
see them,” said Mr Gray.

“That is not a:criticism. 1 .-
hope they take it in the spirit-.-°-.-
with which it is intended. I..”

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company
are required on or. before the 24th day of August, 2006 to send
their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims

Credit Suisse is one of the world’s premier private banks. It is setting new
standards that go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly

| qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual
| investment counselling and professional portfolio management. Our total

| commitment is always to our clients and we focus without compromise on their
| financial well-being and their personal values.

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Junior Relationship
y Manager, reporting to the Heads of North America/Latin America.

| Duties will i :

Management of accounts and relationships of existin
clients, Le. ' : :
being responsible for the execution of orders, monitoring
of cash positions and portfolios of the assigned client base
Marketing of private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients from Canada and Brazil
Acquisition and development of new offshore clients
Management of accounts/relationships with clients

originating from Canada and Brazil.

Applicants should possess a degree (or equivalent) in

Business Administration

At least five (5) years banking experience including trading,

trade reconciliation, custody business and securities markets
Marketing experience .
‘Strong communication skills in English, French and Portuguese to
facilitatemarketing and relationship management within Canada and
Brazil

Excellent command of the English language

Good computer literacy on PC and host software.

Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills —
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm and a positive attitude

_ Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Applications oniy should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-49
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JULY 31, 2006



to the Liquidator of the Company or, in default thereof, they may
be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such debts are proved.

Dated this 24th day of July, 2006

PAUL A. GOMEZ and Patrick E. Smith
Liquidator :

geste AN CTE oo
Licensing Assistant

An expanding IT company is seeking a self
motivated candidate with strong
communication skills to assist with Microsoft
| and other licensing sales.























| The successful candidate should have:

* A minimum of 4 years experience
in licensing sales, especially with
Microsoft Open Licensing Program and
McAfee .

¢ Technical sales experience in firewalls, a
focus on Sonic WALL is an advantage
but not required

¢ Certifications in technical sales and
licensing a plus

¢ The ability to assist in advising clients,
including preparing quotations,
proposal and invoicing

¢ Strong analytical skills and an attention

to detail



Remuneration and Benefits will include a
competitive salary, group health and pension.




Resumes should be submitted by Fax
to 356-4189 no later than July 28, 2006.

believe that together we can ,-

do better than we are doing,
and in fact we have to do bet-
ter than we are doing to assist.

those small businessmen and:.

women.” ae
Mr Gray said he found it dif: - °
ficult to understand why the .
BDB had failed to grant more
loans to budding Bahamian
entrepreneurs.

“One of the difficulties I,-7-_
have is that I do not under-.'.’

stand, and I may not be able to
appreciate why the banks, gen-
erally, and specifically the
Bahamas Development Bank,
have not been willing and/or
able to grant loans to small’.
businessmen and women
unless they come up with ‘all
their family history’,” he
added.

Mr Gray said the BDB was
formed for the specific purpose
of assisting the development
of small business in’ the
Bahamas.

“I am frustrated when I hear
of the cries of our people who
want to get into business, but
they don’t have the collateral
which may be required by the
bank, and even with govern-
ment guarantees that bank has
not been willing to assist small
Bahamian business people,”
the minister added.

Mr Gray said something had
to be fundamentally wrong
with that. “J am asking, I am
pleading, I am begging that
that bank does what it needs to
do in order to help people like
you [the workshop partici-
pants] and those who are rep-’
resentatives of you to get your
business at least started.”

Mr Gray said that while it
was easy to come to seminars
and teach people what to do,
often when they went to the
BDB it was a different story.

“That is what bothers me.
know I represent the Bahami-
an people who have been frus-
trated and turned around. It is
just not right when you look
at the purpose for which the
bank was initially formed,” Mr
Gray said.

“We have drifted away from ©
it and I pray that Sir Lynden in
his grave would speak to those °
who manage the bank to get
it back on track.”
~ TRIBUNE SPORTS | TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006, PAGE 11B.





Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content ,
Available from Commercial News F Providers:

|




‘Softball teams’

See woos:

ws Ss

TUESDAY, JULY 25, 2006

SECTION





Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

CAC efforts
MINT IMs

AEN

@ SOFTBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports

Reporter

\

“THE efforts
being put forth by
the softball teams
participating in the
Central American
and Caribbean
(CAC) Games
should be applaud-
ed,” said president
of the Bahamas

. Olympic Association

(BOA) Arlington
Butler.

Butler’s assess-
ment came yester-
day afternoon, just
hours before the
women’s national
softball team played
their doubleheader
match. The team has
already suffered two
costly losses, need-

| ing to secure the two

wins in the double-
header to stay alive
in the tournament.

Despite all this,
Butler explained
that all “the team’s
have put forth a gal-
lant effort and their
applause by the
Bahamian public
should not be gf%en
based on the results
of the games, but on
the facts.”

He added: “When
you look at the final
scores in the games
you might say that.
the Bahamas didn’t
do anything, or why
did they send these
teams to represent
us at such a high lev-
el tournament know-
ing that they’re not
able to compete?
But you really have
to assess the games,
look at the bigger
picture. a

“The Bahamas is

-the only team from

the English speaking
Caribbean to play in
softball and base- —
ball. Yes we are
small in numbers
and might.can’t pro-
duce sufficient play-
ers needed in case of
backup, but we are
here and they are
putting forth a gal-
lant effort, they are
doing a remarkable
job despite the out-
come.

“We have to
realise that teams
are playing against
teams like Cuba,
who have a stellar
programme in both
softball and base-
ball. This country
produces some of
the world’s top ath-
letes in the sport.
Then there is
Venezuela, Colom-
bia and Mexico, all
these countries have
a supporting pro-
gramme.”

Butler did reveal
that the women’s
softball team’s per-
formance was at a
low in the first two
games and that
improvement should
be seen during the
double header.

The team is
expected to play
Puerto Rico in the
first game and
Dominican in the
second game.

The men’s team
finished up fourth,
losing the bronze
medal to Puerto
Rico on a shortage
of runs.

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS





@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
’ Senior Sports Reporter.













































Burnside used one word to
describe the performance of the
men’s national softball team at
the XX Central American and
Caribbean Games in Cartagena,
Colombia - Impressive.

“I was satisfied with the play

H. use,” said Burnside on the
team’s return home on Sunday
night. “We got great pitching
from Edney (‘the Heat? Bethel)
and little spots from Crestwell
(‘the Bomber’ Pratt), Edmund
(‘Binks’ Bethel) and Brian ‘the
ninja’ Neely.

“Our defence, I can’t speak
about it. It ‘was excellent. We
made a couple of errors, but it
. was a great defensive effort by
the entire team.”

The Bahamas had a golden
opportunity to win a medal,
holding a 1-0 lead up to the sixth
inning against Panama. But
/Panama took advantage of a
costly error in both the sixth and
the extra eighth inning to win 2-

“One error and we could have
easily secured at least the bronze
medal,” Burnside reflected.
But based on what he seen
from the 13-plus-one injured
squad, Burnside said he couldn’t
ask for anything more, consid-
ering the fact that it was a

young team with
more of the
experienced
players opting to
play for the hap-
less baseball team
that went winless.
“The younger ball
players, infielders and

of the 13 players that we had to .



RARER ARE





PRO AA

§ softhall team
‘Impresses manager



“There’s no doubt in my mind

MANAGER Godfrey ‘Gully’ that Edney Bethel is the best



‘

pitcher in the region right now, .
based on his performance at
the CAC Games.”



‘Manager Godfrey ‘Gully’. Burnside :

outfielders, did very well,” Burn-
side noted. “But in the pitching,
after Edney, who? We need to

work on that.”

Despite falling short of win-
ning a medal, Van ‘Lil Joe’
Johnson and Godfrey Burnside
Jr. were named to the All-Tour-
nament team for left and centre

field respectively.

And even though Edney
Bethel produced a sterling per-
formance on the mound, he was
beaten out in the pitching cate-

gory by the Cuban ace.

“There’s no doubt in my mind

. that Edney Bethel is the best
pitcher in the region right now,
based on his performance at the
CAC Games,” Burnside said.
* “As a matter of fact, with him
leading such a young team, they
never expected us to do so well:
“We have the entire CAC
softball executes mesmerised by
the way these young guys
played. I think Edney did a very
good job in working with them.”
Burnside, however, also com-
plimented the other veterans
Edmund Bethel and Crestwell
Pratt, whom he feels have given
all they could to the national
team as players and should now
bow out and move into the

coaching ranks.

COMPETITORS line up on stage as they await the judges’ decision at the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation’s 33rd National Bodybuilding and Fitness Cham:

“They both brought some
maturity to the younger players
by sitting down and talking with

them,” Burnside stated. “We .

younger players. But we have to
commend them for the job
they’ve done.” ;

While the pitching department
comprised of Edney and

was the mainstay catcher.

The infield comprised of Greg
Gardiner, Julian Pratt,
Devaughn Wong, Alec Rolle
and Larry Russell Jr. The out-
fielders were Van Johnson,-God-

and Alcott Forbes.

injured from the first game and
didn’t play the rest of the tour-
nament.

While the team didn’t win a
medal or qualified for the World
Championships, they will have
another opportunity to qualify
at a tournament in Mexico in.
September. :

: Burnside, however, couldn’t
state whether or not he will bea

: bia.



pionships on Saturday night in the Rainforest Theatre. From left are Gena Mackey, Charmaine McNabb, Charmaine McNabb, Siorhan Dean, Joanna Nixon, Fay Rolle, Lizette

McKinney and Dominique Wilkinson. In the background is Cecilee Hilton.

(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)

Gardinder, however, got.

part of the team or if they intend,
to add or change any. of thé.’.
players who travelled to Colom--

need to move on with some. ’.

Edmund Bethel, Crestwell Pratt-
and Brian Neely, Philip Culmer’

frey Burnside Jr, Charles Rolle



Fitness first for women competitors.

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT SEEMS as though more women are
interested in participating in the fitness
competition rather than the bodybuilding
one.

At the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fit-
ness Federation’s 33rd annual National
Bodybuilding and Fitness Championships

in the Rainforest Theater of the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort on Saturday, the
majority of women competitors entered
the fitness aspect.

‘When asked the reason why, the com-
mon trend with the women was the fact
that, while they wanted to compete, their
main concern was keeping their feminin-
ity.
Defending champion Lizzette McKin-

ney, one of the seasoned competitors on
stage, started out in bodybuilding, but
she said she made the switch over to fit-
ness because “it was a lot easier to get
prepared for the show.”

Unlike bodybuilding, where the train-
ing regime is more stringent, McKinney
said she “only had a few weeks to get
ready” after she was encouraged by the
federation to come out.

McKinney, however, was not as trim
as she would have liked to have been.

She went up against newcomer Cecilee
Hilton, who emerged as the new champi-
on in the Body Fitness Tall. Joanna
Nixon, a returning competitor, was third.

Hilton, 28, said she was well prepared
for the show.

| SEE page 10B