Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text







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mom | Che SMiami Herald

T-STORM BAHAMAS EDITION

Volume: 102 No.196

Out-Island
Doctor

esa wea a ey hee lh









WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

Prisoner escayes

Inmate ‘walked © ir charged True

off compound’ —

a By KRYSTEL ROLLE

AFTER severe criticism
recently, Her Majesty’s
Prison was again a source
of embarrassment when a
prisoner is reported to have
walked off the compound
yesterday.

The breakout has left .

HMP shaken, touching the
sensitive nerve at the core
of security leaving only two
possible explanations: Inad-
equate security or inmates
receiving inside help.

Yesterday around noon
— after several steps were
taken recently to prevent
escapes — Adlet Cilice, 21,
managed to bypass security
and flee the prison grounds.

According to Assistant
Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson, before his escape
the prisoner was last seen
working around the Chap-
lain’s office on the eastern
side of the compound. It
wasn’t until prison guards
were rounding up the
inmates shortly after 12
noon that officers realised
he was missing.

Sketchy details have come
into, the. Tribune pointing
towards the possibility of
the inmate receiving inside
‘help. A source closely relat-
ed .to HMP reported that
there was a strong possibil-

ity of this being an inside

job.

However, Assistant

Superintendent Sidney
McPhee strongly denied the
claims ne “There is no




HURRIC

truth to that.”

“We questioned the offi-
cers who were supposed to
be watching him, and we are

confident that they were not

involved,” ASP McPhee
said.

This most recent break-
out comes only six months

after the largest and most. |

deadly penitentiary break
in Bahamian history. Earli-
er this year on January 17,
four prisoners managed to
escape from maximum secu-
rity, at HMP leaving two
men dead, one an officer
the other a prisoner, and
two officers injured. The

two men who died during’

the prison break were
prison guard Corporal Deon
Bowles, who was stabbed to
death, and escapee Neil
Brown who was shot and
killed.

Cilice, who is of Haitian
parentage, was admitted to
HMP on November 21, 2003
after being convicted in the
magistrate’s court for pass-
ing and uttering a fraudu-
lent document. Before
escaping he was serving
three years. His scheduled
release date was October
13, 2007.

According to ASP
McPhee. an island-wide
search was launched in both
New Providence and Grand
Bahama, where he last
resided.

Mr McPhee said there was
a strong possibility that Cil-
ice would go back to Grand
Bahama.

anc INSURANCE

& KAREEM ROBERTS (left) and Troy Bodie leaving court yesterday
(Photos: Felipé eel or TTeene staff)

TWO YOUNG men
charged with the stabbing
death of Devon Thompson,
18, were arraigned in magis-
trate’s court yesterday.

Kareem Roberts, 22, and
Troy Bodie Jr, 18; were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez at
Court One Bank Lane yes-
terday on the charge of mur-
der.

Court dockets stated that

on Monday, July 10, the two
men being concerned togeth-
er, intentionally and unlaw-
fully caused the death of
Devon Thompson.

Initial police reports indi-
cated that on the morning of
July 10, Thompson of Mal-
colm Road was walking in
the vicinity of Pipe of Peace
on Bay Street with a group of
friends when.the incident
occurred. Reports further

stated that the assailant who

| Thompson knew, ‘produced

a sharp object and stabbed
him in the neck. Thompson is
reported to have run to Bank
Lane where he collapsed. He
died in hospital just before
6am on Wednesday, July 12.

Kareem Roberts is repre-
sented by lawyer Langton
Hilton and Troy Bodie Jr is

SEE page 11

Child Protection Council ‘remains committed’

‘ feared that a ‘





Slain former
police officer ©
‘had asked for

protection’

@ By KARIN HERIG arte
Tribune Staff Reporter. _-

FEARING for his life, for-

-mer police officer Marcian Scott

requested, but was denied,
police protection before his .
shooting death, a source close to
the murder victim has claimed. '

Speaking with The Tribune.
yesterday, another source said ©
that Mr Scott, 31, who was
gunned down nae month, had
” had been put
out on his life Beanie he was to
have been a witness in a pend-.°
ing murder frial.

The source close to Mr Scott -
confirmed that the deceased |
had feared for his life and —
because of this had written a -
letter asking for police protec- °
tion.
The Tribune received infor-
mation that Mr Scott, in a bid to
ensure his safety, had attempted
to re-enter the police force.

“However, the source yester

day. said that Mr Scott had no:

intentions of rejoining the force, .

but was merely seeking protec!

tion from his former employer.
“T know he sent a letter to .

. SEE page 11

$50,000 reward

for information
leading to the

whereabouts of
businessman

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A $50,000
reward is being offered for
information leading to the
whereabouts of Grand Bahama
businessman Preston Stuart Jr,




















and the programmmes that they have on the
drawing board they are continuing with :
them,” Ms Zonicle said. “I am sure there will ;
be some negative spin-off from this matter. ;
But once (Bishop Randy Fraser) was charged
he tendered his resignation and naturally
there will be some negative spin-offs whether
he is convicted or not.”

Baptist Bishop Earl Randolph Fraser, was
charged in April with having sex with a 17-
year-old girl who he was alleged to have been

SEE page 11

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

who has ‘been missing since Sat- _
urday.

‘According to police, the
reward is being offered by a
group of concerned citizens in
Grand Bahama. :

Mr Stuart; 64, was reported
missing by a close relative short-
ly before 1am on Sunday. :

He was last seen around 1.34°.
pm on Saturday, wearing a blue"
golf shirt with purple and white

SEE page 11

THE Child Protection Council remains as
committed to its mandate as it was before
sex charges were brought against one of its
board members, Director of Social Services
and Community Development, Mellany Zon-
icle said yesterday.

Ms Zonicle told The Tribune that while
some persons may have lost confidence in
the system, council members remain focused.

“The morale of the committee is still high



rest easy knowing
excellent i insurance





Rawr eunnralry



em
=



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

60 Dominicans are suspected of fishing in Bahamaian waters near Cay Sal
Bank aboard the Barlovento, RBDF officers were called in to bring them to

Nassau, where they were turned over to Immigration.

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A GROUP of 60 Dominican
-men suspected of poaching in
Bahamian waters are now in
the custody of the Defence
Force.

The men, who were detained
on Sunday, have been brought
to New Providence by the 19-
member crew of the HMBS
Yellow Elder.

According to Lieutenant Dar-
ren Henfield, the men were
spotted travelling in an 80-foot
gray and white vessel named
Barlovento by the US Coast
Guard near the Cay Sal Bank,

_ which is located in the south-
western part of the Bahamas on
Sunday.

On Monday morning,
Barlovento, its occupants and
fisheries resources alleged to
have been in their possession
were all turned over to
HMBS Yellow Elder to be
transported to New Provi-
dence.

They are expected to face

Ph vill is S

poaching- -related charges
brought by. the Department of

Fisheries.

Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Leslie , who
was present when the boat
arrived in Nassau harbour yes-
terday, said about 20,000
pounds of fish was confiscat-
ed.

Mr Miller expressed his grat-
itude the to the crew of the Yel-
low Elder and the US Coast
Guard for swiftly apprehend-
ing the suspects.

The problem, the minister
explained is that the Bahamas
does not have the man power or

the resources to properly man

our waters.

“It is going to be impera-
tive that the United States
continue to assist us, but'we’re
going to need a little more
help.

“The Bahamas cannot ‘fully
protect it’s 100,000 square miles
of ocean until we get more man-
power.”

pea to the Royal

LOCAL NEWS"

a

Bahamas Defence Force, the
operation was conducted under
the Bi-lateral. Comprehensive
Maritime Agreement between
the Bahamas and the United
States of America.

Under the accord, a Defence
Force marine is assigned to
ship-riding duties abroad the
Coast Guard Cutter Nantuck-
et, and was present the arrests
were made. ~

According to Lieutenant
Henfield, the mutually benefi-
cial maritime arrangement per-
mits Ccast Guard vessels with
Defence Force personnel
onboard to carry out law
enforcement operations within
the territorial waters of the
Bahamas.

i MINISTER of Fisheries
Leslie Miller takes a closer
look-at the 60 men, thought to
be from Dominica, who were
found near Cay Sal Bank and
brought to the capital by the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.



JUNE WINNER OF SCOTIABANK’S
“FORGIVE & FORGET”
MORTGAGE CAMPAIGN



ink, Cable Beach Branch

Cable Brean Wineese A. to Re Bretdia Ghinteain, Assieeane Manager Person
Aoarnledegys Koesiin InetKitrrneey, Brezevedh Iareagets Phyllis Sulllivean, “Rongive & FRonger” Winner ~
ane: and Ramah IMtyycordk, Pervonal Banking Officer

ints $0 EASY TO

“FORGIVE & FORGET”
SOOTIABANK IS GIVING AWAY

$50,000 WN PRIZES!

CALL OR VISIT US TODAN?

“Trek vag Hic St hive basil Ut tha Bewtin, Meader its weed unter au thoradtion and voriud al The Bark stikoue Gest.





@ DOMINICANS are seen offloading their catch after allegedly being caught
fishing in Bahamian waters near Cay Sal Bank

ios Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)

Dominica ship suspected of
‘fishing in Bahamian waters |



Social services concern
for lack of interest
in elderly relavies

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Department of Social
Services is concerned about
the lack of interest by some

persons who have relatives in

senior citizen group homes.

In-an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Marva
Russell-Minns, deputy direc-
tor with the Department of
Social Services with responsi-
bility for senior citizens, said
that the main concern for the
department is that some elder-
ly people feel abandoned or
deserted by their family

“We'know that there are
some relatives right in New
Providence, so the feeling is
they just wanted to get rid of
them. So, for those who don’t
pay any attention to them, we
would say this is your line of
inheritance and legacy,” said
Mrs Russell-Minns.

Another official with the
senior citizens division, who
wished to remain anonymous,
said that there may be situa-
tions where adult children

may not’ want their elderly

parents to live with them,”

especially when it comes to

fathers who did not take.care -

of their children - when they

" were younger.

However, the social services

" official believes that if the

Bahamas calls itself a Christ-
ian nation, parents should be
honoured.

Mrs Russell-Minns advised

family members that rather
than living with regret, they
should visit their senior rela-
tives on a regular bases or to
simply give them a call.

“Those of us in the profes-
sion, in some ways, cannot
relate to what they are saying
simply because if they are
talking about their families
and the histories of their fam-
ilies, family members need to
hear that.

“Even though we sit and we
listen, sometimes it is good for
them to see persons from their
past or in their family,.and to
not let them feel as if they
have been deserted or aban-
doned” she stressed.















THE TRIBUNE



Promotion

on new
BTC Hello
card

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company has
launched a promotion for its
HELLO phone card.

The promotional campaign,
titled 40-40-40, will allow cus-_
tomers to make long distance
calls anywhere, except Europe,
for just 40 cents for the next 40
days...

The promotion coincides with
the 40th anniversary of BTC.

The rates are only available
on BTC HELLO phone cards
which can be purchased at BTC
-or BTC vendors.

BTC also announced a pro-
motion yesterday that will
expand HELLO phone cards
vendors to Arawak Cay. Par-
ticipating vendors at Arawak
Cay will be supplied with ban-
ners, place mats, coasters, nap-
kins and other HELLO para-
phernalia.

Participating vendors include
Bruno’s Seafood, Red Snapper,
Kemp & Sons, Remelda Davis
Kitchen, Foxy’s Fish Fry, Big
10, Tropical Cool, Seafood
Haven, The B-Man, Oh
Andros, Twin Brothers, Can-
dies, Spangle Rock & Ice
Cream Parlour, Sumtin Good
and Belly Full.

India’s AIDS
treatment
credit for
Guyana

@ GUYANA
Georgetown

INDIA will extend a line of
credit to Guyana to help the
South American nation buy
AIDS medicine and purchase
computers to modernize goy-
ernment operations, officials of -

_the two nations said Tuesday,

according to Associated Press.

The agreement came on. the
second day of a visit-by Shashi
Tripathi, a secretary in India’s
external affairs ministry. The
Indian government agreed to

rovide a line of credit of

US25 million under terms that
were expected to be set by the
end of Tripathi’s visit, said
Ronald Gajraj, Guyana’s high
commissioner to India.

Officials may also agree to
other uses for the money
besides purchasing medicines
to treat AIDS and to Pee
computers, Gajraj said.

India has previously provided
a $US25 million line of credit
to help Guyana build a new
15,000-seat stadium for néxt
year’s cricket World Cup.

The two countries have his-

- torically had close ties and

about 43 per cent of Guyana’s
people are descendants of Indi-
ans who came to work in the
sugar plantations when slavery
was abolished in 1838. Guyana,
a former Dutch and British
colony, has a population of |
about 750,000.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
UCM Cr eM EL CL
RY Ady AY |



_



THE TRIBUNE



@ In brief

$50,000
of cocaine
found on
aircraft

POLICE yesterday captured
$50,000 worth of cocaine aboard
an aircraft bound for West Palm
Beach.

At 2.05pm yesterday, officers
conducting a routine search of
aircraft at the Lynden Pindling
Airport discovered the drugs
onboard a Gulf Stream aircraft.

Supt Raymond Gibson, offi-
cer in-charge of the Drug
Enforcement Unit (DEU), told
The Tribune that two kilos of

cocaine were found hidden:

inside a “tote bag”.

Up to press time last night,
police had not yet arrested any-
one in connection with the
drugs and investigations into
the incident were ongoing.

Customers
complain
at cable
service

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

CABLE Bahamas customers
are complaining about what one
referred to as the company’s
“inadequate digital cable ser-
vices”.

Speaking to The Tribune yes-

terday, one person said she is.
“sick and tired” of the problems

she is experiencing with the new
Cable Bahamas digital package.

“When they announced this
service, they made it sound so
great, but its not worth half the
money I am paying,” she said.

Announcing in July 2005 that
that digital cable would be
launched that August in
Eleuthera, and in October in
Grand Bahama Abaco and
New Providence with a line-up
of 275 channels, the company
stated that “all of our digital
cable packages have been
redesigned for maximum value
and choice.” 13

However, according to sev-
eral customers, this is not the
case.

“Some channels get so pixel-
lated you give up on watching
whatever show or movie you
were watching,” said one.

“Often the sound and pic-
tures are completely out of sync
and I have to turn the box off
for about 10 minutes and then
turn it back on to get it in sync.

“Also, there are many times
channels are just not available —
there’s just a blue screen that
says try again later.”

“T want answers,” said anoth-
er customer. “I want them to
explain why the service is so
bad.”

According to a 2005 press
release, director of marketing
and pay-per-view for Cable
Bahamas David Burrows stated
that “Oceans Digital TV will
revolutionise cable television
and entertainment in the
Bahamas.”

“Oceans Digital TV means
hundreds of channels — many
never before seen on cable TV
in the Bahamas,” he said. “It
means new choices. It means a
new standard in quality.

“Oceans Digital TV means
choices. It means new opportu-
nities for Bahamians through
(access to) our own radio sta-
tions (in the Bahamas), and
through Cable 12 — the com-
munity channel.”

When contacted, Cable
Bahamas Officials said they
could not comment.

They requested a written list
of questions, which was provid-
ed, but have not yet replied to
them.

INSIGHT

ea US
stories

oreo mat:

news, read

TTC Lae)
Mondays



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
._Chief Reporter

AS PROPERTY prices in the
Bahamas continue to soar, particularly
in New Providence, there is increasing
concern by some members of the public
that housing will become out of reach
for most middle class Bahamians.

It goes without saying that this also
has serious implications for those of a
lower socio-economic scale. :

Realtor and Montagu MP Brent
Symonette told The Tribune that in the
future the middle class will find it diffi-
cult to find homes.

“But you have to look at the high
level of consumer credit. We borrow
for cars, front room suites and clothes
and education, but we are not borrow-
ing for bricks and mortar,” he said.

He pointed out that the cost of gov-
ernment-provided low cost housing is in
the range of $100,000 which would
require a mortgage payment each
month of approximately $900.

“If your mortgage payment should
be at least one quarter of your salary
that means you have to be earning

$4,000 a month combined income and

not many low cost households are doing

that,” Mr Symonette said.
Also weighing in on the issue, Grand
Bahama lawyer Fred Smith said

‘ because of this fact there is going to be
a greater difference between the,

“haves” and “have nots.”

In addition, he said, he thinks that
because of the number of foreign
investor-sponsored housing develop-
ments throughout the country, there
also will be a chance that this may push
housing prices up further.

“You are going to see many, many
Bahamians gravitate to the lower end of
the economic spectrum because devel-
opments are going to keep wages low
and if the developers can’t find Bahami-
an craftsmen or tradesmen they will
bring them in at half the hourly wage of
Bahamians, so by pushing the type of
development in Harbour Island or
Chub Cay or Guana Cay it is. not an
employment problem you have there
that is keeping Bahamians on the lower
end of the scale.

“IT am concerned for middle class
Bahamians. In Nassau the prices are

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PA





GE3

Are middle-class and poorer
families slowly being priced out
of the Bahamas housing market?

Alarm at rising house cos‘s





i)
extraordinary. How does a young fam- _nowiit is sold for $90,000,” he : .
ily start off in New Providence? Prices In addition, building costs haye gone «
are still very good in Freeport. Acom- up.
parable lot in Freeport on the beach or “So now it can cost $100 4 square
canal is 30 to 40 per cent for what itisin foot where once it cos! 5 quare
Nassau, if that. It is creating problems _ foot,” Mr Symonetic sail
for the middle class,” he said. Nevertheless, both agree | in the
future it will be imore difft: r the
Factors middle class to survive.
“It is “oing to-be a struge! yu mid-
dle class and those of |o ome
While Mr Symonette agrees that prop- social grouping and you are »oing to
erty prices have skyrocketed in recent see the fortunate Bahamians able to-
years due to the encroachment of foreign carve out more of the econams pic and
second home owners, and in some cases_ | make a lot of money anid there is very
by some Bahamians, on islands like little opportunity for the midcle class
Chub Cay and Harbour Island, however, — and poor,” Mr Smith said
this is not the main reason. While Mr Symonette sais inlay
“There are a number of factors that. be impo sslbie.! ee slow ot op the
contribute to the high cost and itisnot widening gap b the < lasses,

only foreigners. The cost of infrastruc-
tural development, for instance, has
gone up.

“When I was doing a development in
the past I could count on-years ago, count
on so many dollars a months infrastruc-
tural development, now that has increased
irrespective of the foreigner. So years
ago where a back lot could cost $11,000

it is possib le to en Ms
ans to get a piece of
“There
ing forth on ways of causing t
pen. Selling BEC to Bahamian
rest of the Bank of the Bal

r, umi-
{ CoC ¢ ple.
t

nies that are

will be avs

com:



be a'sure way to help th idie class’

people and create

avenues ihey!

can create their own weali! oa

Bahamian embassy opened in Cuba

The Bahamian Embassy in
Cuba was opened Monday
evening after months of spec-
ulation.

The picture shows. from left
to right Keod Smith, Ambas-
sador for the Environment,
Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe
Pérez Rozue, Minister of Social
Services Melanie Griffin and
wife of the Bahamian Ambas-
sador, Audry Wright. Shown
at back is Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell, Bahami-
an Ambassador to Cuba Carl-
ton Wright and MP for South
Bastian.



















South Bahamia.

Murder acct
each other for killin

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freepori Reporier

FREEPORT - William
Forbes and Keweemade [sing
both testified before the
Supreme Court on Tuesday —
accusing each other in the

: death of Donahue Ferguson.

ee Forbes and King are on tri-
i al for the 2003 murder of Fer-
guson at Yorkshire Drive,

In his sworn testimony,









well atterided
The embassy is located at
Sth Avenue No 3006 e/30 y 32

Cuba. The Bahamas National

Youth Choir provided enter-



“A reception was held in thé’
ballroom of Hotel National de



tainment.

(Photo: Franklyn G
Ferguson)

Bahamasair signs new industrial
agreement with air workers

m By KRISTINA MCNEIL

TEN months of negotiations
came to an end yesterday as
the Airport, Airline and Allied
Workers Union and Bahama-
sair signed a newly-revised
industrial agreement with
more employee benefits.

Chairman of Bahamasair
Basil Sands. said: “The flight
to today’s signing was. not
always smooth. Indeed, there
was some turbulence encoun-
tered in the past 10 months.”

President of the AAAWU
Nelerine Harding agreed that
long and difficult negotiations
can lead to “frustration and
unrest of the members and
both sides giving up on the
good will at the initial process”
— especially when there are
‘benefits which employees con-
sider “sacred and non-nego-
tiable”.

The union said the biggest

difficulty it faced in the negoti-
aticns was challenging the gov-
ernment’s proposal for lump
sums payments, which employ-
ees deemed unacceptable.

The new industrial agree-
ment allows employees to
receive their three earned
increments from 2004 to 2006
and a four per cent increase
in annual salaries.

An earned increment of
three per cent will be given in
2007 and another in 2008.

Union members will also
enjoy the benefits of depen-
dent coverage, double pay for
overtime on Saturdays and
Sundays and an additional
month’s pay for employees
who have worked while in the
bargaining unit for more than
30 years.

Paternity leave has also

been added as a benefit, along
with a 50 per cent tuition reim-
bursement for associate and

Hs eer

CHE Pea EK
x4)



bachelor degrees obtained at
the College of the Bahamas
and 10 days of paid leave for
two union officers to attend
the annual International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
conference in Geneva.

July 1, 2006 marked the
third year of the five year
agreement between the
AAAWU and Bahamasair.

The agreement with the
AAAWU is only one hurdle
that Bahamasair has overcome.

The company faces ever
increasing fuel and mainte-
nance costs and competition
for the local market with low
cost carriers.

As for the privatisation of
the national flag carrier, Mr
Sands said that consultants
have already submitted a
report and forwarded it to the
government, but the govern-
ment has yet to make a deci-
sion.

Forbes told jurors that it was
King who attacked Ferguson
with a cutlass on February 10,

2003. ;

He said sometime around
8pm he went to the Parker
home to talk to Ferguson
regarding an accusation about
stolen “rims”.

Keweemade King and
Hailon Nottage were with him
at the time, he said.

Forbes said King ran inside
the Parker home with a cut-
lass and followed the victim
into the bedroom. —

Forbes said he ran into the
house behind King to stop the
fight. He said he saw two chil-
dren in the bedroom screaming.

However, King, in his sworn
testimony, told a different ver-
sion of what transpired.

REI See

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and half years id thaal
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friends. He said he met Fer#@
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that they were never ‘riends. @
The trial continues ons
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

- Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

_ TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Mr Galanis & his hidden agenda?

AFTER accusing The Tribune’s English
managing editor of writing articles about the

Bahamas that could frighten off potential,

tourists and investors, and assuring the public
that he was not doing so because he was xeno-
phobic, Mr Philip Galanis was again on the
hunt for foreigners.

Last week he wanted government to inves-

‘}” tigate the appointment of Mr Hannas Babak,

an Austrian businessman, who was recently
appointed chairman of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.

It wasn’t as though Mr Babak was working
illegally, but after several Bahamians of their
own free will had resigned from the Port, Mr
Galanis wanted the PLP government to
uphold its Bahamianization policy and find
out how Mr Babak, a foreigner, got the job.
He wanted government to make certain that
foreigners were not holding jobs that could
be filled by qualified Bahamians.

Mr Galanis said he could not believe there
had been “due process in the selection of the
replacement for Mr Francis.” Mr Julian Fran-
cis, former Governor of the Central Bank,
resigned from the chairmanship of the Port
after a short stint in the post. He was a banker
who had moved into a new business environ-
ment. Only he and the Port, both free agents,
know why he chose not to stay. It is certainly
nothing for any government to investigate.

“Immediately on his (Mr Francis’) retire-
ment, they brought in Babak to replace him,”
said Mr Galanis. “I do not recall there being
any kind of advertisement or job search made
by the Grand Bahama Port Authority to find
a Bahamian to replace him.”

“I would be the first to criticise the gov-

-” ernment if they did not insist on implementing

the Bahamianization policy that was estab-
lished a long time ago, but I am more qualified
than Mr Babak, and nobody asked me to take

it. ” x

‘Of course, Mr Galanis was quick to assure

- the public that he never wanted the job, but

had only made the statement to show that
there were in fact Bahamians with the quali-
fications to fill the post.

How does Mr Galanis know whether he
or any other Bahamian has the qualifications

' that the Port needs at this time in its develop-
ment?

Mr Galanis’ suggestion that government
has the right to enter a man’s private busi-
ness and judge what he needs or does not
need for his staff, is enough to frighten every
investor off this island. This is what the Pin-

|. dling government did, and that is one of the

many government-inflicted reasons that this
economy collapsed. -
Only a business owner knows who and what

he needs in his own business. An applicant
can show a piece of paper with all kinds of
qualifications written down — as the late Sir
Stafford Sands often said “paper will stand
still and let you write anything on it” — yet
that applicant might not be suitable for the
job. Maybe the qualifications the employer is
looking for have nothing to do with degrees,
but more to do with personality, the ability to
attract investors to the Bahamas, to dream

". dreams like the late Edward St George to cre-

ate great projects that will generate employ-
ment. Sometimes it’s just the physical look of
the person that will inspire an employer to
say: “That’s just the man.we want for the job
— he’s got the presence.”

How can Mr Galanis say that he, or anyone
else for that matter, has what the Port Author-
ity is looking for? How can a government that
has no experience in business say who anyone
should or should not employ?

No business person in his right mind is
going to bring in a qualified foreigner, when an
equally qualified Bahamian is available. The
cost factor alone, including the cost of the
work permit, almost makes the hiring of a for-
eigner prohibitive. And if a foreigner is in a top
position.in this country, it means that no
Bahamian of like qualifications is available
for the position. That is not to say that there
are no qualified Bahamians. But it does mean
that there are not enough qualified Bahamians
for all of the specialty jobs now available in this
country. There is even a shortage among

Bahamian artisans — electricians, plumbers, |
and the like. In other words, the Bahamas is

growing faster than its people.

Already government members have warned
that there are not enough critical skills avail-
able among Bahamians and that foreigners
will have to be imported.

Even Labour Minister Shane Gibson has to
think of the economy when he is about his
Haitian purge. Many small businesses could
collapse overnight if good judgment is not
used in the renewal of Haitian work permits.
After all wasn’t it Sir Lynden who told
Bahamians that they would no longer have to
hew wood or carry water? Well, that’s fine, but
ssomeone has to do it. It was this philosophy

that opened the door to the Haitian and his

much needed labour.

Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe had
the good sense to tell Mr Galanis that he was
barking up the wrong tree.

Maybe, Mr Wilchcombe would now turn to
the lead story in the Business Section of
today’s Tribune to discover why Mr Galanis
was so keen to have the Port investigated.
Apparently, Mr Galanis and his group’s offer
to purchase the Port was soundly rejected.



THE TRIBUNE



Bradley Roberts’
_response to
Tribune articles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HAVE noted with expec-
tation The Tribune’s articles,
concerning my trip to North
Abaco, firstly as a headline sto-
ry on July 12, and again on July
13, in a byline response from
Hubert Ingraham and an edi-
torial by the editor.

It appears from the editori-
alizing of the headline story,
laced with more opinion than
fact, that the editor of The Tri-
bune was more stung by my

usual remarks and historical

facts concerning Hubert Ingra-
ham, than Hubert Ingraham
was himself. This only confirms
what the sensible reading public
has always known, that being
the historical fact that the editor
of The Tribune loses whatever
limited sensibilities reposed in
her when those of special inter-
est to The Tribune are held up
to the light of public scrutiny.

I would wish to remind or
inform The Tribune that my
desire to retire after two and a
half years and the request of
the Prime Minister for me to
continue on at the pleasure of

his appointment as a. Cabinet

Minister, is really inconsequen-
tial to the positive progression
of the nation, as opposed to
Hubert Ingraham breaking his
promise to return as a poten-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



tial Prime Minister of the Com- |

monwealth of The Bahamas. If
I were never an MP or Cabinet
Minister again, it wouldn’t be
earth shattering and destruc-
tive; however it would be earth
shattering and destructive if
Hubert Ingraham were to ever
again hold the reigns of power
in The Bahamas. That is the dis-
tinct difference in me being
requested to stay longer than I
had desired and Hubert Ingra-

‘ham returning asa potential

Prime Minister because that is
what he desires.

I would expect that the Edi-
tor of The Tribune will now
continue writing for weeks,
months and maybe even years
about my remarks in North
Abaco over the Independence
weekend, concerning Hubert
Ingraham, for again, obviously
the editor was stung very
painfully by my remarks. How-
ever, I wish to remind The Tri-
bune newspaper, that anything
they may have to say against
me and in defense of Hubert
Ingraham, would ultimately be
held up, by the public, to the
light of truth and the history of

Relations with the US

EDITOR, The Tribune.

,) GEORGE Bush is an idiot! Yes, you read that correctly. George
Bush is an idiot, the US is only concerned about their own self interest
and the neo-cons in America are trying to run the world but they are

turning things upside down.

Now that I have your attention, I have not gone crazy, but these are

~-comments you hear coming from-many quarters in The Bahamas and

region'these days..And they come from our "intelligentsia" no less,
Of course they cover their personal animosity toward the US by sug-
gesting that it is perfectly logical that The Bahamas should have friend-
ly relations with other countries in the region, because after all we need
to look out for our own self interest. Right? :
This observation is unassailable on the surface, but let's look a lit-

tle closer.

1. Where does most of the Foreign Direct Investment into The

Bahamas come from?

2. Where do most of the imports into The Bahamas come from?

3. Where do most of the visitors to The Bahamas come from?

The answer is the United States of America of course.

So the bottom line is that our self interest is in.ensuring we contin-
ue to have excellent relations with the US if we like it or not.

Furthermore, we should have cordial relations with all countries if
possible, but if our own self interest could be affected by our other inter-
national relations — like supporting Cuba or Venezuela with CARI-
COM, etc — we should respectfully stand side by side with the US.

Now if those "intelligentsia" have a better plan they really need to
show it to us. Maybe our CARICOM brothers, the Europeans, the Chi-
nese, the Cubans or the Venezuelans are just waiting "over the bar" to

"help" us as much as the US does.

Yours in Liberty,
RICK LOWE
Nassau,

July 16, 2006





who actually tells the truth,
when it comes to Bradley .
Roberts as compared to The
Tribune and their cohort,
Hubert Ingraham.

Hubert Ingraham forced Sir
Lynden to resign and provided
some benefits, but got his Cab-
inet to sweeten the benefits for
him in providing a personal
assistant at $45,000 yearly and a
maid for the rest of his life.

BRADLEY B. ROBERTS,
MP

Bain and Grants Town,
Minister of Works

and Utilities

Nassau,

July 12, 2006.

(Mr Bradley Roberts flatters
himself. The editor of The Tri-
bune is never stung “very
painfully” by any politician’s
remarks, because she takes nei-
ther the remarks nor the polliti-
cian seriously. Her only concern
is for the Bahamas and its peo-
ple. She tries to make her deci-

~ sions as abjectively as possible,

always keeping in mind that the
country comes first.

(Mr Roberts says that if he
(Bradley Roberts) “were never
an MP or Cabinet Minister
again, it wouldn’t be earth shat-
tering and destructive; however it
would be earth shattering and |
destructive if Hubert Ingraham
were to ever again hold the
reigns of power in The
Bahamas.”

(That, Mr Roberts, is a matter
of opinion. It might surprise Mr
Roberts to: know how many per-
sons — we are told that some
were even among his Cabinet
colleagues — were very con-
cerned when Prime Minister _
Christie was taken. seriously-ill.: =
How many times during that
period didn’t we hear the very
concerned comment: “Oh, dear
God, what if Bradley gets con-
trol!”

(And so there-were many
“thank God” choruses when
Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt stepped into the breach and
carried on until the Prime Min-
ister could get back on his feet.
There was not only great relief
that she had taken over, but that
she had done thejobso well.

(Without her, many Bahami-
ans feared that Mr Roberts,
when it came to succession, was
too near the throne. So, Mr
Roberts should not fool himself
— there are those who also see
him in his cabinet position as a
potential threat. Therefore, Mr

. Roberts’ change of mind was as

important to this country, as was
Mr Ingraham’s.— Ed).



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Man faces
charge of
intent to
rape girl

A 23-year-old man accused
of assaulting a 16-year-old girl
with the intent of raping her
was arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

It is alleged that Mark
Anthony Wilkinson assault-
ed the girl on Saturday June
10. Wilkinson was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers at Court five, Bank
Lane yesterday.

He was not required to :
plead to the charge and was :
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000. The case was
adjourned to September 16.

‘Green’
party gains
support in
Purto Rico

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

AN environmental party
said Tuesday that it has col-
lected nearly three-quarters
of the signatures it needs to
qualify for the next round of
‘Puerto Rican elections in
2008, according to Associated
Press.

Puerto Ricans for Puerto
Rica expects to have all

100,000 required signatures : .

by the end of the year, said
Maximiliano Perez Collazos,
the party secretary.

The PPR, as its known,
would be the fourth party on
the ballot in 2008 — and the
only one that does not define
itself by its position on the ter-
ritory’s relationship to the
United States.

Gambling
crackdown
troubling
in Antigua

t

@ ANTIGUA
St John’s

A US crackdown on online
gambling prompted concern
Tuesday among officials in
Antigua, which has become
an offshore haven for the
industry, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Antiguan Finance Minister
Errol Cort said the Caribbean
nation would closely monitor
the legal action against
BetOnSports PLC and 11
people involved with gam-
bling over the Web.

“This is of major concern
to us,” Cort told reporters
during a break in a govern-
ment economic forum.

The two-island nation of
Antigua and Barbuda has

licensed 30 online gambling i

firms, including BetOnSports,
and has welcomed the indus-
try as a way to diversify its

economy. i

ah

PUG
Rees)
ci lsicys ara ym

Beene anita

WEDNESDAY,
JULY 19

Community Page 1540AM
Bahamas @ Sunrise
Remembering The Contract
Da’ Down Home Show {
Immediate Response

ZNS News Update
Immediate Response (cont'd)
Island Lifestyles

33rd Independence
Ecumenical Service -
Freeport, Grand Bahama
ZNS News Update
Legends: Whence We
Came

Tazmania

A Special Report

News Night 13 - Freeport
Bahamas Tonight

BTC Connection

Jeff Rodgers Basketball
Championship.Game

News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight
Caribbean and Central
American Games - Volleyball
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 '
right to make iast
programme



6:30am
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
noon
12:05
1:00
1:30

4:58

5:00

5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
8:00
8:30

10:30
11:00
11:30







Cuban nationals are still.
waiting to be repatriated

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE 46 Cuban nationals at the
Carmichael Road Detention Center are
still waiting to be repatriated, according
to Immigration officials.

Last week it was reported that the
government was still awaiting. word from
the Castro regime on the matter, and
that according to Minister of Immigra-
tion Shane Gibson, Foreign Affairs offi-
cials are looking into it.

Unlike the two Cuba doctors who
were detained at the center earlier this
year, a third country may not be willing

accept the refugees, because of their

comparative lack of skills, said the min-
ister.

During a communication to the
Bahamas Parliament earlier this month,
Mr Gibson announced the governmen-
t’s intention to initiate discussions for a
new agreement with Cuba for swift
return of Cubans captured in Bahamian
waters.

Over the past two years, Cuban immi-
grants have reportedly been the master-
minds behind numerous escape attempts

from the facility.
The most recent escape occurred last

i CUBANS in captivity at the Detention Centre on Carmichael Road

THE TRIBUNE | g ‘WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 5



month, when five Cubans fled the centre
by cutting through a series of fences.

The men were captured in Jupiter, Flori-
da a few days later.

Since that time, the government has
announced plans to beef-up security at
the centre with additional lightning and
security cameras to be placed at strategic
points to provide full surveillance of
activities at the facility.

The government has also approved
the employment of 20 additional Immi-
gration officers at the centre.

Speaking to The Tribune yesterday,
Immigration officials refused to com-
ment further on the matter, other than to
say that all the detainees are still at the
centre.

“J cannot give other any other infor-
mation on the matter,” said officer Mar-
cian Francis, who is stationed at the cen-
tre. “I can only say that they are all still
here. You'll have to contact someone
else for more information.”

However other Immigration officials,
including the minister himself, were not
available for comment as they were
either away or at meetings.

Numerous attempts were made to con-
tact these officials, but none of the calls
were returned.









@ By REUBEN SHEARER

A NEW beginning for the
children of Fort Charlotte and
Bain and Grants. Town is on the

“horizon — as a contract worth

just under $10 million was
signed for the new T G Glover
Primary School.
The contract comes four
years after the 2002. general
election, when just before the
PLP won office, structural engi-

neérs informed the previous ,

government of disastrous con-
ditions at the school.

T G Glover was later closed
by the PLP, which extended the
Albury Sayles Primary School
and added trailers to accom-
modate students from TG
Glover.

With the 2007 general elec-
tion fast approaching, Minister
of Works Bradley Roberts
explained that the government
will accomplish what it
promised to do during its first
term — construct a new school.

The school’s design, accord-

. ing to Mr Roberts, was planned
two years ago by the Ministry of

Works and Utilities.

‘He said it will be built on
Horse Shoe Drive, Oakes Field,
cover about 80,000 square feet
and will take 18 months to
build.

According to Mr Roberts,

the school will include three.’

pre-school classroom units
with self-contained kitchens
and. restrooms. It will also
feature an enclosed outdoor



Two more schools
and library planned

@ By REUBEN SHEARER

IN the wake of the contract
for the T G Glover Primary
School, Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts announced.
plans for the construction of two
other schools and a library for
COB.

These projects will be carried
out in both Grand Bahama and
New Providence, Mr Roberts
said.

He told the audience at the
contract signing for the T G
Glover project on Monday that
developers in Grand Bahama
will be invited to bid for the
construction of a new junior
high school in the Heritage Sub-
division of Freeport.

Plans for the school, he said,
are similar to the designs for T
G Glover in New Providence.

Referring to the proposed site
in Grand Bahama, Roberts said,
“this state-of-the-art two-storey

_conventional masonry building

will comprise more than 80,000
square feet.”

He said that the site “will
accommodate around 900 to
1,000 students with 25 standard
and special classrooms.”

Roberts added that the
school will also have a multi-
functional gym for sports and
assembly activities. \

“JT am also pleased to
announce that an identical
architectural design building as
the junior high school in
Freeport will be built adjacent
to Faith Gardens Subdivision
in Southwest New Providence,”
he added.

According to Mr Roberts,
contractors for this project will
soon be invited to offer bids on
this project as the building



@ FRANKLYN Wilson

‘process is expected to begin in

September.
College of the Bahamas

‘council chairman Franklyn Wil-. -..
son advised the press'that con- ».

tractors will be invited within
10 days to submit bids on the
construction of the $15 million
Harry Moore Library on the
campus.

This project is expected to’,
commence within three months. °

Mr Roberts said he has
advised Minister of Education
and MP of Fort Charlotte
Alfred Sears, that the value of
the land for his constituents and
those of Bain and Grants Town
will increase significantly as a
result of major Education
investments in these areas.

He said the community lead-
ers of Fort Charlotte must look

. beyond the cost, as the real ben-

efits to follow these projects
cannot be accounted for in “dol-
lars and cents.”

V. M. Lightbourn & Co.

would like the relatives of George Peter

Syime-Phompson or his Personal

Representative to contact their office in
Miitsh Harbour, Abaco at 242-3

0302 or k

ail at:

vimlightbourn@coralwave.com



@ BRADLEY Roberts

playground area.

“Tt will accommodate some

800 students, teachers,and |

school administrators on 6,97
acres of land, consisting of two

physical grade levels,” he said.

The primary school will com-
prise of 24 standard classrooms,
along with one for special edu-
cation. .

A science laboratory,
library, art and music rooms
will also be constructed. Phys-
ical education changing
rooms, for teachers and stu-
dents will also be built.

He said that there will be
non-slip ceramic floor tiles and
defined carpet floor areas inside

‘ the units. The architectural

design also provides for ade-
quate storage of the pre-school-
ers’ lunch boxes and books.
Roberts added that a cov-
ered walkway will be construct-
ed; along with a tuck shop and
lunch, studént assembly, and

administration buildings.
Parking areas for teachers

and the general public will be

provided, designed with securi-

_ ty booths, a boundary wall, rod

iron gates and railings.

According to Mr Roberts, the
E R Hanna Construction Com-
pany, a veteran company with
more than 40 years experience
in the industry, has-been award-
ed the contract to construct the
school.

They will be assisted by sub-
contractors who will meet the
plumbing, electrical and air-con-
ditioning needs of the school.

The contract administration
will be managed by lead design
architect Ashward Ferguson,
assisted by co-design architect
Timothy Johnson. —

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PM Christie encourages a |
high turnout for elections

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

Hi By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Although an election
date has not yet been announced, Prime
Minister Perry Christie is encouraging
Bahamians to begin preparing ,to exer-
cise their right vote.

While on Grand Bahama over the
weekend, Mr Christie said the Bahamas
has distinguished itself as a country by
consistently having a high turnout during
elections.

“I am here to say to you that whenev-
er you see me starting to dance the shuf-
fle, it is time to get registered because
you will have an opportunity to exercise
your God-given democratic right in this
country — the right to vote.

“And so it is for me to encourage you
with this opportunity I have here, not
to neglect preserving that right for your-
selves and being able to do it when you
can do so at your leisure and not have to
do it at the last moment, because you
know there is only so long that I can
shuffle and that should tell you how long
it is going to be,” he said.

The prime minister was speaking on

_ Saturday in East Grand Bahama at the

". re-opening of the New Star Club in

Ke

Bevans Town.
Mr Christie said he believes it is
important for people. to develop real

-relationships that are stronger than the





@ PERRY Christie addresses Grand Bahamians at the reopening of the New Star

Club

divisions that from time to time are
brought about by politics.

“That is why I always speak to a high-
er calling for our people, a more noble
purpose and understanding that if we



(Photo: Denise Maycock)

are going to grow our country, that we
have to do so and grow our own maturi-
ty,” he said.

Mr Christie pledged the government’s
commitment to aggressively address the

basic concerns of residents in East Grand
Bahama, such as access to portable
water, dredging of the channel, access
to cable television, land survey issues,
and completion of road improvements in
East Grand Bahama.

“I am completely assured that this
economy of this island will jump and will
grow, and that you will be enabled to
participate much more meaningfully as
Bahamians in that growing economy.

Since the hurricanes in 2004, Grand
Bahama has seen the loss of 1,600 jobs
with the closure of Royal Oasis due to
extensive hurricane damage. The resort’s
closure has also significantly impacted
the Freeport economy.

Mr Christie commended East End res-

ident Romeo Bridgewater and his fami-

ly for their perseverance and commit-

ment to,rebuilding their business, which — :

was significantly damaged by hurricane.

“We hear so much about the foreign
investors and we hear so much about
the commitment and lack thereof of
Bahamians to investing themselves.

“I have come here this afternoon to
pay tribute to this family for their perse-
verance and for their being able to sym-
bolise the greatness of the spirit of our
country, that no matter how much they
are beaten up with respect to particular-
ly nature and hurricanes, that we have
the intestinal fortitude to lift ourselves
up and to make it happen,” he said.



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How can the Bahamas improve its |

tourism product for visitors?

THE latest statistics on
Caribbean tourism show a rapid
increase in visitors in the region.

Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said the relation-
ship between the Bahamas and
other Caribbean countries is
becoming “more and more
competitive” and emphasised
the importance of the Bahamas
continuing to secure the atten-
tion of tourists through the



“constant modernisation” of

marketing campaigns.

With this in mind, The Tribune
took to the streets yesterday to
ask the public how the Bahamas
can be more competitive.

“Service, we need to have
quality service,” said Shelton
Taylor. “High standards in cus-
tomer service in all areas of the
Bahamas.”

Mr Taylor said “blow-away”
customer service is always the
most important experience for
the guest. “Some of the other
countries in the Caribbean have
lots of history — we can’t com-
pete in that area. The history
that we have, we don’t upkeep.
Its only our service that will set
us apart — the little things like
prompt response and quick

. problem solving. There is a big

difference between being
friendly and providing great ser-
vice,” he said.

Another commentator said:
“We need to recognise our his-
tory and historical sites more.
Like the changing of the guard
at Government House — which
was a tourist attraction: for
years, but has been discontin-
ued. Even in the area of eco-
tourism — we should use what
we have to stay on top.”

“We have God’s favour,” said
Michelle Joseph. “We have
been guided over the years and
have been doing well with
tourism,” she added. “Just keep



God first and we'll do OK.” —
Mr Wilchcombe also stated
that while the Bahamas is among

those countries which signifi-

cantly contribute to the success of
Caribbean tourism, other coun-
tries are quickly catching up. He
went on to say that the Bahamas
still has the edge on most of its
competitors because it offers.a
unique product.

Kirk Hutchins said: “I think
Bahamians need to be more
vigilant in their efforts — be
more friendly and treat the
guest better. Word of mouth is
one of the biggest means of
advertising. When persons
spend lots of money to come
and vacation here, they expect
good service.”

Mr Hutchins added: “What

we have is location — I think its
about 80 to 90 per cent of our

visitors come from the United

States. Also the value of the US
dollar. in the Bahamas; they
don’t have to go through the
hassle of exchanging currency.

Prescott Strachan said: “I
think we need more cultural
things; to focus on our culture

and market it more. I also think,

we need to come up with some-
thing new that the others don’t
have.”

Mr Strachan went on to sug-
gest that the various resorts and
the Ministry of Tourism
improve and expand the array
of activities available to visitors.

Secretary/Typist

Motivated individual, good computer skills orga-
nized and capable of doing detailed work; must be

able to format and produce

reports, charts, graphs and other general correspon- |
dence, must have excellent command of the English
Language both oral and written, outstanding Tele-
phone Skills and Etiquette, be detailed oriented, and
have excellent organizational, and inter-personal

skills.

The successful candidate should have 2 - 3 years sec-
retarial experience, 50 wpm typing and transcription
experience, and proficient in use of Micorsoft Work,
Excell and Quick books skills.

Interested candidates please apply online at:

llehteb@coralwave.com or
Fax: 394-4458





@ SHELTON Taylor said:
“Service, we need to have
quality service.”



@ KIRK Hutchins said: “I
think Bahamians need to be
more vigilant in their efforts.”






SS

@ MICHELLE Joseph said:
“We have God’s favour.”

i PRESCOTT Strachan said:
“T think we need more
cultural things.”





THE TRIBUNE

URP leader:
‘Antichrist
infiltrated
our politics’

m By REUBEN SHEARER

THE Antichrist has infil-
trated the political scene in
the Bahamas, according to
the founder of the newly
formed United Reform Par-
ty.
Prince A Strachan said the
mark of the beast is “every-
where” and urged all
Bahamians to join together
against this threat by voting
for his party in the next gen-
eral election.

Mr Strachan pointed out
that after 33 years of inde-
pendence, the Bahamas is
still in debt and suffering the
effects of illegal immigration.

Blaming the PLP and
FNM governments for not’
teaching Bahamians to save
instead of borrowing, he
insisted that if this trend of
deficit spending continues,
the Bahamian dollar will be
devalued.

"We are spending more
money than we are getting
from the industries, and fish-
eries and banking. Out of
every dollar we earn we are
spending about 90 cents back
to feed, clothe and do other
things that we need in this
country,” he said.

Mr Strachan added that
successive governments have
been competing with each
other to see which one can
attract the most foreign
investment.

He said the URP, howev-
er, will not sell the Bahamian
birthright, because land in the
Bahamas is valuable and
must be protected and pre-
served for future generations.

“We will not engage in that
regard, and will make sensi-
ble, well- planned and well
thought out economic deci-
sions for our people,” he said.
“The average citizen has pat-

’ terned their lives after the

current government, who
continues to waste taxpayers
dollars and squander away.
the future generation’s wel-
fare.” i

According to Mr Strachan,
recent governments have
trained the public to be con-' |
sumers and not entrepre-
neurs.

He promised that his party
will institute responsible gov-
ernment, protect the wealth
of the nation, and ensure
greater economic diversifica-
tion.

On the point of illegal
immigration, Mr Strachan
said: “We must stop focusing
only on Haitians or
Jamaicans but all illegal
immigrants whether they are
white, brown, black or yel-
low... Successive govern-
ments have taken a ‘Band-
Aid’ approach to this matter.

“The PLP has taken

- advantage of the Bahamian

people’s emotions and uses
this as an election ploy. Gov-
ernance is serious business
and must be taken serious-
ly,” he said.

Caribbean
Star adds
planes to
fleet

@ TRINIDAD
Port-of-Spain

CARIBBEAN Star Air-
lines said Tuesday it has
bought a new 50-seat turbo- -
prop plane — the second of
four new aircraft to be put in
service this year, according
to Associated Press.

Caribbean Star put one
turboprop plane into service
in January and will buy two
more later in July, said Skip
Barnette, president and CEO
of Caribbean Star Airlines
and its sister carrier,
Caribbean Sun Airlines.

The airlines now have a
total fleet of 20 planes.

Privately held Caribbean
Star Airlines Ltd. is based in
Antigua and Caribbean Sun
Airlines Inc., is based in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight on
Mondays



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 7

Beginning July 24, and every Monday and
Saturday until September 2, 2006, see The Tribune for

Cam



Severe hurricanes still expected, says meteorologist

B By CHESTER ROBARDS

DON’T be fooled — the quiet start to the
hurricane season doesn’t mean it’s going
to be less of a problem than expected.

Deputy director of the Meteorological
Department Jeffrey Simmons told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the active hurricane
season usually begins at the end of July
into September, with most hurricanes occur-
ring between August and October.

Experts have predicted 17 named storms,
nine hurricanes and five intense hurricanes
with winds exceeding 110 mph this hurri-
cane season.

Storm prediction is not an exact science,
according to Mr Simmons, but he says mete-
orologists are improving on it every day.

“There is good science behind the sea-
sonal predictions. These predictions are
possible because some components of the
ocean/atmosphere system change very slow-

ly and can remain in a similar state for many

months or they may evolve in predictable
ways,” said director of meteorology at
CBS4, Bryan Norcross.

Mr Simmons said that there has been a
one degree increase in water temperature,
which is the driving force behind hurri-
canes, since last year. The water tempera-
ture patterns from the west coast of Africa
to the Gulf of Mexico are used as predictors
of the growth and formation of Atlantic
hurricanes.

He said in order to predict the activity
during a hurricane season wind flow pat-
terns in the atmosphere are also taken into
account, especially wind shear in the upper
atmosphere which is an important factor
in hurricane development.

“Around this time we don’t have much
shearing going on in the atmosphere so
therefore there is a possibility that these
systems can grow,” he said.

“While the weather pattern is quite

- unfavourable right now for tropical devel-

; opment, it’s not indicative of what the

atmosphere might be doing a month from
now. Remember, last year was the oddi-
ty,” said Mr Norcross.

‘We also see patterns in storms at certain

. times in the season. The first part of the

season you see them develop in the western
Atlantic and as we go into the middle part
of the season they develop in the eastern
Atlantic and then later in the season they
start to develop in the Gulf,” said Mr Sim-
mons.

The Caribbean basin as well as the
Bahamas’ Meteorological departments and

_Florida’s National Hurricane Center engage

in meteorological information sharing. He
said this is why the hurricane warning and
prediction within the Atlantic area is an
impeccable entity and is getting better.

“We are prepared for hurricanes and we
bounce back pretty good, but we’ve never
really gotten the true test here in Nassau,”
he said.

The future of the Bahamas: storms t
worsen, seas and temperature to rise

_ 1 By KAHMILE REID

CLIMATE change will have

a serious impact on the
Bahamas over the next century,
according to the predictions of
experts.

hte

The, country is expected to.

experience an Increase in sever-
ity and frequency of storms, a
progressive rise in sea level, and
increased air and sea tempera-
ture by’the year 2100.

By that year, scientists from
the Inter-governmental Panel
on Climate Change (IPCC)
have predicted, global warming
will have led to an increase in
surface temperature of 2.5 to
10.4 degrees Fahrenheit, as a
result of increased concentra-
tion of greenhouse gases in the
atmosphere.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence on climate change on
Monday at Claughton House,
Senator Dr Marcus Bethel,

Minister of Energy and the
Environment, said despite the
fact hat the Bahamas con-
tributes minimally to green-
house gas emission, the coun-
try faces an “overwhelmingly
disproportionate level of risk

from the. impact of increased. °

concentration of these gases.”
According to director of
meteorology Arthur Rolle, the
Bahamas is apart of the 43-
nation Alliance of Small Island
States (AOSIS) which togeth-
er generate less than one per
cent of the world’s emissions.
Dr Bethel pointed out that
because more than 80 per cent
of the surface of the Bahamas is

_ only a metre above sea level,

the inevitable rise in sea level —
caused mostly by larger indus-
trialised countries — has the
potential to damage the vital
tourism industry.

Upon realising this in 1999,
he said, the government took

action and ratified the United

’ Nations Framework Conven-

tion on Climate Change
(UNFCCC) and joined the
international effort to cope with
global warming.

In. fulfillment of obligations
to the UNFCCC, the Bahamas

completed the ‘first National |

Communication on Climate
Change in April 2001.

Assessment

The communication Dr
Bethel said, examined the
national circumstances, provid-
ed a national inventory of
greenhouse gases, presented a
vulnerability assessment, dis-
cussed systematic observations
and capacity for building efforts
and made recommendations.

Dr Bethel announced the
launch of the second National
Communication on Climate



@ STORM intensity and frequency is expected to increase over the next century around the

Bahamas

$405,000 to aid research |
on climate in the Bahamas

@ By KAHMILE REID

TWO international agencies
have donated $405,000 to the
National Communication for
Climate Change in aid of
research in the Bahamas.

Author Rolle, director of
meteorology in the Bahamas,
revealed that the Global Envi-
ronment Facility and the United
Nations Framework Conven-
tion for Climate Change made
the donation while speaking at
the Claughton House on Mon-
day.

The money, he said, should

be spent over a period of three
years.

“We are going to be doing
detailed vulnerability studies
on the sectors, particularly
tourism, agriculture, water,
fisheries. The area of concen-
tration, however will be
tourism.”

Dr Marcus Bethel, Minister
of Energy and the Environ-
ment, who also spoke at the
press conference, reminded the
public that the Bahamas is a
coastal nation and that any dras-
tic change in climate, whether
long-term or short-term may

result in damage to beaches and
resorts — and by extension the
tourism product.

The research that will be
done in the area of tourism is
geared towards finding the vul-
nerabilities of the industry,
research ways in which the
industry can adapt to climate
change and make recommen-
dations to mitigate the effects
of climate change.

Ultimately, the results of the
research will assist government
in formulating policies that will
protect the resources in the
Bahamas, Dr Bethel said.

Change workshop, to be hosted
at Superclubs Breezes on July
18 and 19.

This year, the workshop will
focus on raising awareness on
climate change in the media and
religious organisations.

On the second day of the

‘workshop, presentations will be



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Numbah Man

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O Dillon McKenzie
> Stay With Me
Dog House
Party In Da Backyard

- BLester Adderley

Why Did You Leave Me _.

Let Me See ya Whinin
Come Go With Me

O Ira Storr
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Bad Ways Bad Pay
She Ready

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Festival Time

O Fred Ferguson
Baby I Love

Junkanoo Music Taking Over
Bahamian Music Can’t Get Enough

Newcomer Stars Records
O Spreading Rumors by Sid

1 Ghost move by Avvy



@ THE aftermath of Hurricane Frances in 2004

made by international and local
experts in the field.

The government, Dr Bethel
said, has taken steps under the
UNFCCC to deal with global

‘warming, and has approved and

adopted a national policy on cli-
mate change — which assesses

_ the vulnerability of the Bahamas. ”

“ CaColyn McDonald





This policy examines the
impact of climate on coastal
marine resources and fisheries,
terrestrial biodiversity resources,
agriculture and forestry, human
settlements and human health,
water resources, energy and
transport, tourism, and the.
finance and insurance sectors.

Gal If | Had You.
Rod! c Ya Body





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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006
WEDNESDAY EVENING

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threaten to gas San Francisco. © ‘R (CC) the Gobi desert. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)










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WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 9

‘Norman’s Cay and the colourful

history of a Colombian drug lord

Reerry, a
Bahamian political

weblog posted a claim that Car-
los Lehder — the notorious
Colombian drug lord sentenced
to life imprisonment in Florida
in 1988 — was living comfort-
ably with his wife on Paradise
Island.

How could this be? Well it
turns out that Lehder cut a deal
with the US government in 1992
to help convict former Panama
dictator Manuel Noriega on
drug trafficking and money
laundering charges. Noriega was
part of Lehder's cocaine cartel
in the 1980s.

That much is true, and there
doesn't seem to be any doubt
that Noriega remains in a fed-
eral prison in Miami (although
he is due for release next year).
But some are convinced that
the US government freed
Lehder in the 1990s.

According to the Internet
conspiracy site, Rumour Mill
News, "Lehder is an employ-
ee of the US Treasury while his
wife has told a veteran DEA
agent that Lehder has been sell-
ing drugs to Russia for the
CIA."

And our Bahamian bloggers
demanded to know how Lehder
— the “king of cocaine” —
could get into the country these
days: "Last year and earlier this
year, he was.lunching and par-
tying with Sol Kerzner at
Atlantis."

A spokesman for Kerzner
International said he wouldn't
even consider responding, but
US Embassy sources insisted
‘that Lehder was still safely in
‘prison, although they would not
say exactly where:

"Mr Lehder has not been

released from prison. Mr
Lehder continues to serve the
remainder of his lengthy prison
sentence in US custody, though
‘in deliberate cbscurity. Lehder
‘was not on Paradise Island and
was not partying with Sol
Kerzner." em

These rumours reportedly
drew laughter from representa-
tives of the Drug Enforcement
Administration — the US
agency that made strenuous
efforts during the 1980s to stop
large-scale drug trafficking

through the Bahamas and bring
_Lehder to heel.

he facts are that from
1978 to 1982 Lehder
operated one of the world's
_ biggest cocaine rings from Nor-
man's Cay in the Exumas. One
of Lehder's associates, inter-
viewed in the 1990s on the PBS
news magazine Frontline, put
it this way:
"He operated on the island

from the beginning because he .

had the blessing of the
Bahamian government. They
were funneling tons of mon-
ey... The Bahamian govern-
ment gave Carlos a promise.
We will advise you. You will

get a wink from us, a signal,.

when things are getting too hot
and you need to move out of
there."

Well, things did eventually
get hot — for the Bahamian
government as much as for
Lehder. And _ those activities
forever tarnished the reputa-
tion of Sir Lynden Pindling,
severely damaged our national
psyche and almost brought
down the entire government in
disgrace.

Heavy pressure from the US
led to the appointment of a
Commission of Inquiry in
November 1983. And the fol-
lowing year its 500-page report
published the unpleasant details
of widespread official corrup-
tion and described the enor-
mous social problems the drug
trade had spawned.

The son of a German father
and a Colombian mother,
Lehder started out as a small-
time car thief and pot dealer.
But his notoriety as one of the
founders of the Medellin Cartel,
and his eventual megaloma-
nia, made him a legendary and
feared figure much like Black-
beard — an earlier internation-
al rogue who once had free rein
in the Bahamas.

At the time of his arrest in
1987 Lehder, then 37, was

. reported to be worth more than
. $2 billion. Throughout the ear-
ly 1980s his airstrip at Norman's
Cay was receiving cocaine
flights from Colombia on a dai-
ly if not hourly basis, transfer-
ring the loads to smaller planes
, for distribution throughout the
US.

To begin with he bought as

much property on the island as

he could and then chased off
the remaining residents. Armed
guards patrolled day and night
and former Member of Parlia-
ment Norman Solomon was
once threatened at gunpoint on
the beach.

ehder's social activities -
were also legendary:

"Orgies," his one-time associ-
ate told Frontline. "Five males,
10 females and everybody runs
naked and everybody switch
partners and everybody drinks
and smokes marijuana, and
alcohol, and three days of
Sodom and Gomorrah."

And he was also a Nazi,
dressing in military fatiques and
comparing himself to Hitler.
According to Tamara Inscoe-
Johnson, who has written a
book on Lehder: "He spent
untold hours plotting a politi-
cal career, aiming at the Colom-
bian presidency. As his goals
expanded, so did his fascination
with Nazism; after all, Hitler’s
goal was to take over the world,
and it was the same with
Lehder."

Before Lehder, Norman's
Cay was a popular anchorage
for visiting yachts. It was devel-
oped in the early 1970s as a

small residential community |

witha clubhouse and marina.
But in 1978 a Bahamian com-
pany called International Dutch
Resources began buying up
land there. IDR was set up for
Lehder by a regular trust com-
pany in Nassau, which conve-



The entire
response of our
governmental,
law enforcement
and judicial
systems to what
had become a
clear and
destructive
threat to
Bahamian
society and
sovereignty was
nothing more
than a sham.



niently managed his working:

capital.

According to the New York
Times, Lehder was responsible
for 80 per cent of the Colom-
bian cocaine reaching the Unit-

ARRY SMITH

ed States, mostly through the
Bahamas. And the interest in
his current whereabouts is iron-
ic in view of the recent renam-
ing of Nassau international



A review of
Sir Lynden's
personal
finances by the
Commission of
Inquiry found
that he had
spent eight
times his

reported total

earnings from
1977 to 1984.



Airport after Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, "the father of the
nation".

Ledher's Bahamian empire
collapsed in mid-1983, when
NBC television broke the
news that Bahamian officials
were on the payroll of Colom-
bian drug lords. At first the sto-
ry generated howls of protest

. (and some lawsuits) from top

Bahamian officials, including
the prime minister.

But soon afterwards, they
began singing a different tune.
In 1985, after the Commission
report was published, Deputy
Prime Minister Arthur.Han-
na called on Sir Lynden to
resign and opposition Free
National Movement leader
Kendal Isaacs condemned the
“nation for sale” scandal as
the worst in modern Bahami-
an history.

"The greatest shocks we have
had to suffer in 1984 have been
the twin revelations of epidem-
ic drug use among our people,
and the incredible corruption
in the PLP as a government and
as a party," Sir Kendal said at
the time.

series of hard-hitting

Miami Herald arti-:

cles on "corruption in the
Bahamas", noted that foreign

_investors had channelled mil-





ie

on CNN.



#@ RECOVERING cancer patient Adam Johnson is shown
with Governor General Arthur Hanna during a courtesy
call at Government House on Monday, July 17. Young
Adam is recovering after a historic surgery to have a
cancerous bone removed from his thigh. The surgery
caught the attention of the world’s media and was featured

ert) a em TL




(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)



lions of dollars to the prime
minister or to companies in
which he had a secret interest:
"The money took various
forms - gifts, unorthodox bank

loans, direct payments to Pin-
dling creditors, unusual stock —

deals or generous home mort-
gages."

A review of Sir Lynden's per-
sonal finances by the Commis-
sion of Inquiry found that he
had spent eight times his report-
ed total earnings from 1977 to

‘1984. According to the Inquiry

report: "The prime minister and
Lady Pindling have received at
least $57.3 million in cash.
Explanations for some of these
deposits were given... but could
not be verified."

‘Senior police and defence
force officers were forced to
resign in disgrace. Lawyers were
condemned for bribing public
officials. One top cabinet min-

‘ister was found to be fronting

for the mafia. A magistrate was
fired for collusion. The Com-
mission’s report also conclud-
ed that some parliamentarians
had accepted bribes from traf-
fickers, and cronies were
accused of perjury.
According to the Inquiry

report: "We were alarmed by ,
the extent to which persons in .

the public service have been
corrupted by money derived
from the illegal. drug
trade...We were particularly
concerned to discover that
these corrupting influences
made their presence felt at the
level of permanent secretary
and minister.

"We have also noted with
some concern the contribution
made by...the legal profession



our opinion, the whole nation
must accept responsibility."

A one time Lehder
was put on the stop

list, but that did not prevent
him from entering the coun-
try. The Commission quoted
a 1980 police report that
Lehder and fugitive financier



One of the
world's biggest
criminal
enterprises,
managed by one
of the world's
highest-profile
crooks, was able
to operate with
impunity ona
Bahamian resort
island for years
— while the
government
looked the other
way.



Robert Vesco (who lived in
Nassau at the time) were both
engaged in drug running and
that Lehder visited the Exu-
mas frequently.

To illustrate the degree to
which Lehder controlled Nor-
man's Cay, the report cited an
incident that occurred in July
1982. An aircraft took off from
the cay with two Colombians
on board and dumped leaflets
calling for the expulsion of the
DEA on the Clifford Park Inde-
pendence celebrations. The

to them.

And all of this was in spite of
the serious social, psychologi-
cal and economic ills being cre-
ated by widespread and growing
drug addiction among Bahami-
ans — many of which are still
with us today.

In other words, the entire
response of our governmental,
law enforcement and judicial
systems to what had become a
clear and destructive threat to
Bahamian society and sover-
eignty was nothing more than
a sham.

IN erentetess Pin-
dling's charisma was

such that the PLP were able
to weather the storm and he
went on to win the 1987 elec-
tion — his last and most
pyrrhic victory. But the bot-
tom line was that one of the
world's biggest criminal enter-
prises, managed by one of the
world's highest-profile crooks,
was able to operate with
impunity on a Bahamian resort
island for years — while the
government looked the other
way.

Lehder moved back to
Colombia in 1983 where he was
eventually captured and extra-
dited to the US.

‘He and others were respon-
sible for assassinating Colom-
bia's justice minister in 1984; ©
for the 1985 attack on Colom-
bia's Supreme Court that killed
11 justices and 84 others; for
assassinating two newspaper
editors and 26 other journal-
ists; for shooting the Colom-
bian ambassador to Hungary
in 1987; and. for a long list of
other murders.

We doubt that he would be a
very attractive dinner guest for
Sol Kerzner.

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net Or visit

and the banking industry.,.In _ leaflets-had-dollar bills attached. - www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

eee eee |




AROUND NASSAU




> YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
PLEASE PUT “OUT THERE” IN THE SUBJECT LINE



MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -

' 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month
at 6:30pm at New Providence Community
Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and
free blood sugar, blood pressure and choles-
terol testing is available. For more info call
702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm e Club

612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas- °

sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS



10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been .
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every fenth female patron
is allowed into the club absolutely free and is ©
given a complimentary glass of Carlo’ Rossi.
Tuesday nights also include the Carlo Rossi's
Hot Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi
Renzi and music provided by DJ Ai from 100
Jamz. Master Chef Devito Bodie provides
scrumptious appetizers.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm
to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday‘of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-.
treville. Call 323.4482 for more.info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call: 364.8423 to
register for more info. *

MCIVICCLUBS =

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,

7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Seni#@r School's Din- °

ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek,:-Central Andros » Clu> 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville..

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm

- @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every sec-
ond Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM
Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more
info.

@ THE ARTS

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas
(NAGB) will host three Youth Summer Art





MAIN EVENT

@ KEVIN WILLIAMSON

BS MACAMBLA SMITH



| METELLU IS CHIPMAN

UNDER the theme, “Seduction Surrender”, the final night of Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition

is scheduled for Spm Sund:
medalist, Ato Boldon, Ame

at the Rain Forest Theatre. The show will be hosted by Olympic
xt Top Model (Season Three), Eva Pigford, and Bahamian radio

personality, Krissy Luv. There will also be an after party immediately following the Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Competition to meet the winner of the competition, delegates, the international judges,

and celebrity hosts.

Camps beginning July 11. All camps are held
at NAGB from 10am to 3pm, and will have an
hour for lunch.

Camp One: Environmental Art

Four weeks - Tuesday, July 11 - Friday,
August 4
Description: Students will participate in the
development of the NAGB’s new Sculpture .
Garden adjacent to the Gallery’s grounds.
Facilitator: John Cox

Ages: 12 years and older

Camp Two: Film Making

Three weeks - Tuesday July 11 to Friday, July
31

Description: This camp is an introduction to
the film making craft and allows students to
experience writing, directing, shooting and
editing. ;

Ages: 15 years and older

_ Camp Three: Textile Collage

ane Weeks - Tuesday, July 11 to Friday, July
2

Description: This camp will encompass basic
textile collaging techniques such as fabric
preparing, cutting, pinning, and pressing.
Facilitator: Jan Elliott

Ages: 13 y ears and older

e Interested persons should contact the
Gallery for information 328.5800/1. Space is
limited.

WEDNESDAY
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

, & RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters __
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free

» appetizers and numerous drink specials.

= HEALTH

- Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the

public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday -
7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. ~

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday,
6pm-8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-
West Highway. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd
and 4th Wednesday of each month at CC

Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly
meetings on the Ist and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference

Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights.of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.









' THURSDAY



@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hospi-
tal every third Thursday of the month at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room.
Free screenings between 5pm & 6pm. For
more information call 302-4603. :

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thurs-
days - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to
register or for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each

- month in the

cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill .
Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, sec-
ond and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ |

SuperClubs Breezes.

‘International Association of Administrative |

Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the.
National Insurance Board’s (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm. All
retirees are welcome.

FRIDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS ©
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks
off every Friday night with Happy Hour...
special drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to
9pm and Nassau’s first European Night
Restaurant - Open Friday night till Saturday
morning 5am, serving hot food/and take out -
music, drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe
Europa...the perfect place to spend your night
out till the morning.

'@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will
be held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Fri-
day between June 9 and July 29,from1lto —
10pm.



Please Drink =





@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church - Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Friday
@7pm to 8pm. , =

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For
more info call 325.1947 after 4pm.

SATURDAY
â„¢ THE ARTS
Junkanoo Summer Festival - Heritage and
Cultural Extravaganza - will be held at
Arawak Cay every Saturday between June 9
and July 29 from 2 to 11pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Box Cart Derby
- will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every

Saturday between June 9 and July 29, from2 .

to 6pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the,
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. es ;

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at
302.4732 for more information and learn to
save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be
held every Saturday in an effort to encourage
kids to cycle. Parents interested in registering
their children should contact organisers at jar-
cycling@gmail.com

SUNDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

-Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,

features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - every
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Royal Poinciana
Tea Party - will be held in Government
House Gardens, every Sunday between June
9 and July 29, from 3 to 6pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Old Town Jazz
at Sandyport - will be held at the Olde Town
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 —
July 29 from 4 - 8pm.

= HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune

via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

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s+eaer «



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 11



Haiti’s Voodoo faithful pray for miracles at sacred waterfalls

B HAITI
Saut d’Eau

BEARING offerings of rum
and freshly slaughtered goats,
thousands of Voodoo faithful
bathe in sacred waterfalls, pray-
ing for a better life and an end
to the spiralling violence that
threatens to destabilise Haiti’s
new government.

In an annual ritual that ended
Monday, worshippers from
across the Caribbean nation
arrived by foot, mule and
crammed into the back of pick-
up trucks for the weeklong Saut
d’Eau pilgrimage, according to
Associated Press.

The ritual, among Haitian
Voodoo’s holiest, comes amid a
surge of violence in Haiti’s cap-
ital that UN officials say is an
attempt to destabilise the new
government of President Rene
Preval.

“The gods tell us what to do.
That’s why we’re having so
many problems: because we’re
not listening to the gods,” said
Yolette Jean, a 35-year-old
houngan, or Voodoo priestess,
her head wrapped in a tradi-
tional red satin scarf.

Saut d’Eau’s mystique owes
to a 19th century legend that an
image of the Virgin Mary
appeared in the waterfalls.
Believing the waters hold mag-
ical powers, followers strip to
their underwear and scrub their
bodies with aromatic mint
leaves and soap.

Arms raised to the heavens, -

they ask the gods for help with
fixing broken relationships, cur-

& VOODOO faithfuls sing and dance while they bathe in a waterfall during a yoodoo pilgrimage



where many pilgrims come seeking deliverance from Haiti's suffocating poverty, others for a cure to
sickness and some seeking a better job or a winning lottery ticket in Saut d' Eau, in northern Haiti,
about 40 miles from Port-au-Prince during a annual rite among Haitian Voodoo's holiest, Sunday, July

16, 2006.

ing sickness and even lucky lot-
tery tickets. Some collapse in
convulsions; overcome by emo-
tion — or maybe spirit gods,
called loas in Voodoo. ©
“Water is life, and we come
for that special deliverance,”

Slain former police officer
‘had asked for protection’

FROM page one

the head of police requesting
assistance. We were asking for

protection. Either in the form of,

a police escort or in the form
of a firearm. But he was denied,
turned down,” the source said.

The source said that a lot

of people were very angry

about how the police handled.,.

the situation. .°° * od. *
Chief Supt Marvin Dames,
head of the Central Detec-
tive Unit, yesterday said that
he could not comment on the
issue and referred The Tri-
bune to police headquarters.
Up until press time last
night Assistant Commission-
er of Police, in charge of
crime, Reginald Ferguson,

could not be contacted for |

comment.

Another source said that
there were also widespread
‘rumours that Mr Scott was.
not the first witness in the
pending murder case, to have
been threatened or even
killed. :

Mr Scott was killed in a dri-
ve-by shooting outside his
Pinewood Gardens home on
June 29.

According to
reports, Mr Scott was siiting
in his car at 7am when a
white car pulled up near his
home.

Inmate

‘walks off |
compound’

FROM page one

Cilice was last seen wearing a white T-
shirt and blue prison trousers.

He is reported to be of dark brown
complexion with dark brown eyes, 5’9”
tall, weighing about 139 pounds.

@ THE scene yesterday on Shirley
Street after the escape.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)

police ©

A man got of the car,
approached Mr Scott’s car
and opened fire.

The gunman escaped in his
car and Mr Scott was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

Mr Scott had been a police
officer for six years, serving
as a detective constable in the
Central Detective Unit.

- He left the force in 2000

_ and was employed at Atlantis

as a security officer at the
time of his death.

Mr Dames assured the
public that police are still
investigating every avenue in
this case. He said police have

been “very encouraged” by

steps taken in the investiga-
tion so far.

“Of course there is still a
lot of work to do,” he said.

The Tribune yesterday also
contacted Mr Scott’s former
employer Basil Dean, head
of security at Atlantis, who

remembered the deceased |

very fondly.
“He was a good man, and

good at his job. He was.a

good security guard and I

understand he was a good}

(police) officer. It is really a
shame,” he said.

Mr Dean said that he now
hopes that police will be able
to solve this case soon and
bring those responsible for

Mr Scott’s death, to justice.



said 45-year-old Gerald Louis,
making his third pilgrimage to
Saut d’Eau, only 40 miles north
of Port-au-Prince but a three-
hour journey by car through

. winding and rutted mountain

roads.

FROM page one

stripes, blue trousers and tennis
shoes. He was driving his maroon
coloured Cadillac DeVille, licensed

BV37.

’ Police have conducted an island-
? wide search for Mr Stuart, who has
? not turned up at.his residence or
any of his businesses on Grand

Bahama. —

Chief Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said police are con-
tinuing their investigations into the

(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

Shot in the leg during Haiti’s

political crisis in the early 1990s,

Louis said the waters healed
him and stopped doctors from

-amputating the limb.

“You must be a believer if
you come here,” he said. “This

is where miracles happen.”
Haiti could certainly use a
few. .
The poorest country in the
Americas, Haiti is still reeling
from a February 2004 revolt
that toppled former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide and
pushed an already dying econ-
omy deeper into despair.
After months of calm since

. Preval’s February election vic-

tory, the jittery capital has again
been gripped by violence,
including the slum massacre of
22 civilians this month. UN offi-
cials say militants are waging
violence to stir unrest and a
spark a.return to lawlessness.,

Unable to find work since the
revolt, 55-year-old Josette
Pierre came to the falls seeking
help by praying to Erzulie, god-
dess of love.

“It’s not easy to survive,” said
Pierre, who sells cooking pots in
street markets to support her

family. “Hopefully the spirits.
‘ will hear us and bring change.”

“I’m asking the spirits to take
away my misery and give me a
better life,” said 38-year-old
Guilange Joseph. “There’s no
work, no nothing.”

After bathing, pilgrims toss
their soaked underwear into the
water, a symbolic shedding of
their old self. Candles are
placed around hollowed-out
trees as goats, cows and chick-
ens are sacrificed and offered
to the gods.

Dancing and singing to drum-
ming last into the night and

-sweet Barbancourt rum flows

freely.

FROM page one

Nassau Street.

tures of the accused.

Some tearful family mem

S “FROM page one

A mix of African religions
and Roman Catholicism,
Voodoo is central to Haitian
life and is observed in some

‘form by most of the country’s 8

million people. —-

It evolved in the 17th century
among African slaves, who
were forced by French colonis-
ers to practice Roman Catholi-
cism. Many slaves secretly held
onto their African religions by
using images of Catholic saints
to serve as African spirits.

The religion has been often

wrongly associated with black

magic or sorcery, leaving a lin-
gering stereotype against fol-
lowers. In 2003, Aristide offi-
cially recognised the faith in a
show of support for his impov-
erished supporters.

Saut d’Eau used to attract |
tens of thousands of followers,
but many no longer can afford
the journey as Haiti’s crippled
economy slips further into
decay.

Still, the pilgrimage remains
sacred to many Haitians, espe-
cially to those living overseas.

Jean Butler, a 54-year-old
Haitian living in Spring Valley,
New York, said he’s been com-
ing every year since 1968, when
he first went with his grandpar-
ents.

He said that he made the trip
mostly out of tradition, but
admitted to making an occa-
sional appeal to the gods.

“I’m hoping it will help me
win the Mega,” Butler said,
referring to the New York State.
Lottery. “Maybe the numbers
will come to me in my dreams."

Pair charged with murder

represented by lawyer Ian Cargill. At the arraignment yesterday Mr Cargill informed the
court that he wanted the court's records to reflect that his client — Troy Bodie — had told him
that he had been deprived of food for some three to four days while in police custody. Magis-
trate Gomez noted the claim. The two men were not required to plead to the murder charge and °
have been remanded to jail. The case was adjourned to August 3 and transferred to Court 9,

bers of the accused had to be consoled and Jed away as the men
were taken back to Central Police Station while others shouted at camera men not to take pic-

i matter. puget

“The police department is renew-
ing its plea to anyone with infor-
mation with respect to this matter
to make contact with police
through the following numbers 350-
3107, 350-3082, 350-3085/6 or 911,”
said Mr Rahming.

Family and close business asso-
ciates of Mr Stuart are said to be
very concerned. ;

Mr Stuart, a resident of No 1
Glover Lane, Bahama Terrace, is
the owner of Freeport Taxi Com-
pany, First Atlantic Realty, and
Club Legend on Qiiéens Highway.

‘Several years ago, he bought the
former Silver Sands Hotel, which is
now closed.

Before venturing into: business,

Mr Stuart was a journalist who
came to Grand Bahama from Nas-
sau in the late 60’s to head the Min-
istry of Tourism’s office.

‘He is described by friends as an
avid golfer and former sports star,
who was recently admitted to the
Grand Bahama Sports Hall of
Fame.

OF <
@

counselling, just two weeks after he had
delivered a powerful sermon calling for
Bahamians to partner with law officials to
protect the nation’s children from abuse.

'. “We believe that the children are our pre-
cious gems,” Bishop Fraser said during the
annual Child Protection Month Church Ser-
vice, held at Pilgrim Baptist Church, off
Kemp Road.

“We are encouraging the children of this .

country to speak up if anybody were to do
anything to (them) that makes (them) feel
uncomfortable, but there are also some
adults (who) children may not be able to
trust. So we are encouraging them to find
someone (who) they can trust.” ne

Ms Zonicle explained that the council

~has a number of events planned that span

over the next several months. “
“We are continuing with our usual pro-
grammes and the nexi (programme) to come

up would be the back-to-school rally. At this —

rally children should expect to hear pep talks
from their peers and a remark from the
Minister. We want it to be a fun-filled as
well as an educational event and then there














6mph.

the depression.



. Tropical storm
forms off US coast

METEOROLOGISTS are monitoring the second named
tropical storm of the 2006 hurricane season off the US coast.

At press time last night Tropical Storm Beryl was located
| off the Eastern Coast of North Carolina.

At 5pm yesterday the depression was located
180 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

Tropical Storm Beryl was moving toward the north at

A slow turn towards the north-northwest was expected to
occur late last night or early today. Maximum sustained
winds were at 40mph with 50mph gusts.

Forecasters are predicting a strengthening of the system
with the next few days.

The Bahamas is not expected to be directly impacted by

Child Protection Council. +

will bé tréats at the end,” Ms-Zonicle'said. *
The council is also continuing to partner
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force on
issues related to pornography and the sexu-
al abuse of minors and producing radio mes-

' sages and tips for families on how to be

safe. DAs
“The committee also intends to produce a
television filler,” the director said.
Over the years, the council has been effec-
tive in bringing about awareness to abuse
and enlightening children and others with
the communities.and offering help. ;
The council, she said, is now going to play
an integral role in legislation.
“We are looking at amending the Chil-

-dren’s and Young Persons Act. .

“The Domestic Violence and Sexual
Offences: Act, which says that a young person
under 16 cannot give consent,” Ms Zonicle
said.

“This new legislation is going to be
addressing abuse and making it mandatory to
report abuse and all sexual acts of girls and
boys under age 16.”




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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

THE TRIBUNE














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‘GLOBAL UNITED offers Ayr Sa Shipping SAV





WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



_ The Tribune









| TG

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH



NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Senator’s Port Author



ty

bid ‘soundly rejected’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

enator Philip Gala-

nis was the ‘point

man’ for a group of

Bahamian investors

& who made an offer

to purchase the Grand

Bahama Port Authority

(GBPA), The Tribune can

reveal, but their bid was

“soundly rejected” by its share-
holders.

One source with knowledge
of the issue told The Tribune
yesterday: “Harvey Tynes was
counsel for Mr Galanis, and
Mr Tynes and Mr Galanis met
with the shareholders and dis-
cussed and made an offer to

_ buy the company for hundreds

of millions of dollars. The offer
was soundly rejected.”

It is unclear as to which
group Mr Galanis was repre-
senting, although unconfirmed
reports suggested that one of
the likely investors was Cap-
tain Jackson Ritchie, owner of
Global United.

Captain Ritchie has strong
Freeport connections through
his original company, Tanja
Enterprises, which was formed
in 1991 and has since morphed
into Global United through the
acquisitions of United Ship-
ping of Freeport, Global Cus-
toms Brokers and World
Bound Couriers Ltd, and Sea
Air Aviation Ltc of Nassau.

Global United is currently
attempting to close its purchase
of Discovery Cruise Line. Mr
Galanis is the company’s cor-
porate adviser.

Apart. from the group rep-



@ PHILIP GALANIS

resented by. Mr Galanis, The
Tribune understands that there
is at least one other Bahamian
consortium interested in
acquiring the Port Authority
from its chief shareholders, the
St George and Hayward fami-
lies.

In addition, well-placed
sources have confirmed to this
newspaper that Hannes Babak,
who replaced Julian Francis as
the Port Authority’s chairman,
also previously harboured

plans to put together an

investor group to purchase the
company.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday afternoon, Mr
Babak confirmed he had once
sought to put such a group
together, but had dropped that
plan completely.

“That is not a question any
more. It will not happen,” Mr
Babak said of his previous
plan.

In response to The Tribune’s
questions, Mr Babak con-
firmed that Mr Galanis had
made an offer to acquire the
Port Authority, but that it had

been turned down.
Mr Babak said: “The share-

holders, are not interested in .

selling, and they’re happy with
the management and structure
of the company now.”

Mr Galanis did not return
The Tribune’s calls seeking
comment before last night’ S
press deadline.

However, his involvement
with a Bahamian investor.
group seeking to acquire the
Port Authority sheds some
new light on his recent criti-
cisms of that organisation, and
Mr Babak in particular.

Mr Galanis had previously
called for the Government to
investigate Mr Babak’s
appointment, hinting that it

SEE page 2B

Reinsurance
cost control
Bahamas
First’s
‘challenge’

Insurer turns
$1.622m profit in
2005, compared
to year-before
$2.7m loss

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First’s “great-
est challenge” is to keep its
reinsurance costs “under some
reasonable level of control” in
the face of increasing catastro- _.
phe-related premium rises .

‘ while sustaining profitability,

its chairman has warned.

SEE page 5B.





i SIGNING CEREMONY — From L-R: Fulco Viooland and. Tsunemitsu Tea of Tsuji Heavy Industries celebrate with Per Herlov, Soren
Halsted and Frank G Jensen of Clipper woe Denmark..



Strong interest
in development’s
‘heart and soul’

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter

JUST over a month since its
“soft opening”, the Chub Cay
Club’s marina is fully open for
business with fuel, customs and
immigration all easily accessi-
ble.

The $250 million investment
in the Berry Islands has
received tremendous interest
since the opening on June 15,
with a large number of yachts
anchoring at the property, a
spokesman said yesterday.

“The marina is truly the heart
and soul of Chub Cay, where
sport fishermen and yachtsmen
alike from around the world
have gathered and socialised
for decades,” said Kaye Pear-
son, chairman of Chub Cay
Club Associates the owners and
developers of the island.

Mr Pearson is also chairman
of International Marinas, the
company responsible for
designing, renovating and man-
aging the new marina.

“We’ve taken great care in
preserving the warm and wel-
coming atmosphere, while sig-
nificantly upgrading the quality
and capacity,” Mr Pearson
added.

The marina has state-of-the
art floating concrete docks and
an overall depth of 12 feet. It
can accommodate yachts of
more than 200 feet. There is
also a new 20,000 square foot
two-storey, manor-style club-
house, including a members-

{

6

only club area with trophy
room, dining room and bar on

second level.

A full service dive shop offers |

lessons and trips for snorkelling
and scuba diving, and the full-
service fishing support facilities
are suitable for world-class fish-
ing tournaments, deep sea fish-
ing, bonefishing and reef fish-
ing. Visitors can enjoy Bahami-
an dining at the Harbour
House.

The former 96- -slip marina
was closed a year ago for the
site to undergo major renova-
tions and expansion, including
the dredging of the entire mari-
na and channel to 12 feet at low
tide, and the installation of
state-of-the-art concrete float-
ing docks. More than 100 slips
are now available. When fully
completed, the marina will
include more than 200 slips.

Maura Brassil, Chub Cay's
International's vice-president
of sales and marketing, told The
Tribune in May that developers
were planning a phase 2 expan-
sion of the project that was due
to start latter this year or in ear-
ly 2007.

That phase will include a fur-
ther increase in slips from 110
to 210, along with ‘the con-
struction of townhouses and
preparation of lots. When com-
pleted, the project will feature
138 lots, townhouses and villas.
The developers are also plan-
ning to widen and resurface the
existing runway at Chub Cay
currently 5,000 square feet in
length.

Call for an Offering Memorandum
Nassau -

(Photo courtesy of Clipper Group)

Marisha Maynard 356.7764 ext 3124

Freeport - Jennie Barr 351.3010 ext 330%

*Valivation:

NOUR MA Re ool oy

Clipper’s
order set

Bahamas

‘THE Bahamas-based Clip-
per Group has signed a $300
million order for 12 30,000
deadweight tons, double hull
handy-size bulkcarriers, which
will be registered on this

nation’s shipping regirsty once

constructed.

The ships, which are to be
built by Tsuji Heavy Indus-
tries' new shipyard in Jiangsu,
about 120 miles north of
Shanghai, China, form the
biggest: single ordér ever
placed by the: Clipper:Group.

These vessels are the Trader

300m. a
to boost
registry

design, and when completed -
will bring Clipper Group’s -
total number .of ships. in this
category to 22.

The Trader series was devel-

_oped by Algoship Designers

of Nassau, and the construc-
tion will be supervised by GTR
Campbell Marine Consultants,
another Bahamian company.
The vessels will be ‘registered
in the Bahamas.
Six Trader vessels are being

SEE page 3B

FIDELITY

Beyond Banking

as.at June 30, 2006, Stock prices can po down as well as up. Past perfonmance ts no guarantee of fitute resulis. Read the Citfermg Meinorandum carefully before you invest,
ccount to invest in the Bahamas Property Fund







PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006 THE TRIBUNE ;

BUSINESS













LOCATION:

be allowed to remove such a number of
highly-qualified Bahamians without any
apparent protest from the Government,
the Port Authority seemingly being
immune from such concerns.

Yet Mr Galanis’s remarks are now in
danger of being seen as ‘sour grapes’ due
to his failed bid.

It is still unclear whether the St George
and Hayward families are considering sell-
ing their stake in the Port Authority and
numerous other Freeport-based invest-
ments.

The recent shake-up at the Port Author-
ity, which apart from Mr Francis has also
seen the departures of executive vice-pres-
ident Barry Malcolm and deputy chair-
man Willie Moss, has been interpreted by
some as the main shareholders ‘clearing
the decks’ in preparation for an exit strat-



company acts as the private investment
firm for the St George and Hayward fam-
ilies, and is the holding vehicle for their
stake in the Port Authority and all other
Grand Bahama-based investments.

Port Group Limited holds the families’
stakes in assets such as the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Devco),
Freeport Harbour Company, the Air/Sea
Business Centre, and Grand Bahama Air-
port Company.

In most of those entities, Port Group
holds a 50 per cent stake. The ownership
structure usually takes the form of a joint
venture partnership, often with Hutchi-
son Whampoa holding the remaining equi-
ty.
The Tribune understands that Port
Group Limited is currently involved in a
transaction to sell its interests Port Lucaya

' Marina, and related land, to investor —

ulator, rather than an owner of roduc:
tive’ assets.
If it is put up for sale, several sources

have suggested the best solution for the

Port Authority would be for it to effec-
tively be bought by or placed under the
control of its licencees. This would intro-

duce a high degree of self-regulation into.

the Freeport business community, and
give companies 2 a deeper stake in how the
city is managed.

Vested :

The Be Authority is effectively vested

with quasi-governmental authority, which °

could raise questions about whether any
such entity should be sold.

It also means the Government in Nassau
would take a great deal of interest in its
fate should it be placed on the market.

se f

Ps

Se e yp
a
THE hurricane season is here again. The their visits. Firstly, they would minimise the hardships
experts have predicted an active one. One way of moving towards this objective is | when we are struck by a hurricane.
In recent years, the weather has not been |View to review our building codes. We could ensure Secondly, should the damage from hurri-
_ kind to us here in the Bahamas. Grand Bahama that they take advantage of the latest technolo- | canes become less costly as a result of these J
- has been punished with particular ferocity and "gy and that we build hurricane-resistant build- actions, in time insurance rates should be fe
repeated blows. It has not yet fully recovered. ings. We could also review our planning criteria reduced.
What can we do to protect ourselves in the in order to prevent inappropriate development Thirdly, and and most importanly, lives may .
future? We can't prevent the hurricanes from in particularly vulnerable locations. be saved.
reaching our shores, so we must look at min- These measures would benefit us in anumber Anyway, we have nothing to lose by these a
imising the damage and SalCHne caused by of ways. reviews. a
0
. rt
ie
The Tribun ’ eee : ° et ta, ° 0 he
Tru Senator’s Port Aut ted’
enators rort Authority Did Soun f eyecte ,
. it
ol ta i
FROM page. 1B ther is interested in selling out and exiting these developments could be setting the it
Freeport. scene for the assets owned by Port Group 3
violated the ‘Bahamianisation’ policy to be separated from the licensing and |
because a foreigner had been appointed to Scenes regulatory functions vested in the Port
a job Bahamians were eminently quali- - Authority.
fied for. Behind the scenes, much interest is There would, though, be questions of
Other sources have questioned which focused on the activities of a little-known | what any acquirer was buying, given that
other Bahamas-based enterprises would | company called Port Group Limited. This the Port Authority would just be the reg-

tm
a

£
4

<<



egy.
Preben Olsen. The deal previously So far, the Government has adopted a J
Sources involved Port Lucaya Marketplace and ‘hands-off’ approach to the recent execu- 5
Port Lucaya Resorts, but has since been _ tive shake-up. in Freeport, unwilling to be
Yet sources close to the Hayward: and St. watered. down.. et _ .seen to interfere’ with the provisions of at
"Several Sources have plsbested that all ot

George families have been told.that nei- .

Scotiabank, Thompson Blvd. Branch

DATE:
Saturday, 22 July 2006

TIME:
10:00am — 4:00pm

Bring the Kids!



. the Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

Free Bouncing Castle, Balloons,
Popcorn, Cotton Candy,
and Sno-Cones.

Life. Money. Balance both?

* Hademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotis. Rademarks used under authorization and contral of The Bank of Nove Scotia.





THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 3B

y





Resorts capitalising on.
Pirates of the Caribbean

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business

Reporter

A NUMBER of Bahamian
businesses have capatalised on
the success of Disney's Pirates
of the Caribbean franchise by
launching their own promo-
tions based on the popular
movie.

This ties in with the Ministry
of Tourism's goal to benefit as
much as possible from the suc-
cess of the three Pirates of the
Caribbean films - The Search
for the Curse of the Black
Pearl, Dead Man's Chest ( in
theatres now) and a third
installment yet to be named
that is scheduled for release in
early 2007.

Sequels.

Grand Bahama, where both
sequels were filmed, served as
a pirate haven during the late

{600s and early 1700s, and the
Westin and Sheraton hotels at

Our Lucaya hope the connec-
tion will generate revenues
from persons visiting the
resort.

Launched

They have launched a
Caribbean Pirates Getaway
that includes accommodations,
including resort fee & service
charge; daily breakfast at Willy
Broadleaf's, a pirates-themed
restaurant; a Pirates of the
Caribbean DVD; daily grog
cocktails; a rum-lime juice con-
coction believed to be enjoyed
by pirate; welcome amenities
with a pirates theme and local
pirates delivery.

Earnestine Moxyz Our
Lucaya’s spokeswoman, told
The Tribune yesterdayy that

‘the package is available now:

through December 31, 2006.
Similarly, on New Provi-
dence, the British Colonial
Hilton is also taking advantage
of the fact that the hotel is
located on the site of what

used to be the home of one of
the country's most notorious
pirates, Blackbeard.

“We will be launching our
Pirate’s escape through Sep-
tember,” said Opal Gibson, of
the Hilton’s marketing depart-
ment.

She explained that persons
who reserve the package will
receive, in addition to the stan-
dard room rate, a welcome
glass of grog and amenities for
children in the group, which

will include a hat, pirate-

themed gift basket, colouring
books and tickets to the nearby
Pirates Museum.

Intrigue

To add to the intrigue of
those items, Ms Gibson added
that the Hilton has also part-
nered with Diamonds Interna-
tional to allow guests who
choose the pirates. vacation an
opportunity to.win a treasure
chest filled with jewellery.

“We are offering three

chests, one monthly for the
next three months. In July,
guests will have a chance to
win a chest with his and her
Movado watches; in August,
they can win a choice of tennis
bracelet for women or a cable
bracelet for men; and in Sep-

tember they have a chance to.

win either a tanznite jewellery
set for a woman or a Movado
watch for a man,” Ms Gibson
said.

So far, she said the promo-
tion has generated much inter-
est from potential guests.

The Bahamas has success-
fully tied itself to the franchise
outdoing its business rivals in
the multi-billion business.

Director General of
Tourism, Vernice Walkine,
said that ensuring the two
sequels of Pirates of the
Caribbean are associated with
the Bahamas will go a long
way in diversifying the prod-
uct the country offers to its vis-

‘itors.

‘In addition, Rene Mack,

| Clipper’s $300m order set
to boost Bahamas registry



FROM page 1B

‘built in Cochin, India, where Clipper has
an option for a further two Trader ships.

In addition, Clipper is building another
four Trader vessels at Shanhaiguan Ship-

yard in China.

Earlier this year, Clipper signed a con-

tract for. the construction of four 4,600
deadweight tons Multipurpose vessels to
be built at Ben Kien Shipyard in Northern

Vietnam.

“in China: °°

It entered into a contract for two 32,000
deadweight tons bulkcarriers to be built at
Hakodate, Japan, and a contract for two

300,000 deadweight tons VLCC (very
_large crude carriers) to be built at Jiangnan

The latest Trader order brings the total
number of vessels currently under con-
struction or on order at various shipyards

in China, Vietnam, India, South Korea,

®,

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT

Serves as Human Resources Assistant/Techician responsible for performing the
full range of technical support duties for all employees. The incumbent is
responsible for Embassy’s recruitment program to include Locally Employed —
Staff, Eligible Family Members, American Citizen Resident, Bahamian and Third

Country Nationals.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- A high school diploma

- Three years of experience in the field of Human Resources
Administration or Office Management and Customer Service related work

- Must have a good working knowledge of general office procedures,
Microsoft office suite, and data base management.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must have the ability to identify priorities, meet deadlines in a timely manner
and to work independently with minimum supervision. Must have a good
knowledge of recruitment issues.

~ Must be able to interpret complicated government regulations, assess
prevailing practices and keep up to date on all issues and trends affecting

areas of responsibility.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package

including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

: Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations

Applications forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through

Friday at the security area’of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy: addresses to Human Resources
Office no later than Friday, July 26, 2006



Japan, Turkey, Spain and the Netherlands

to 58 vessels. When delivered, all these.
vessels will be flying the Bahamian flag.

The Clipper Group's fleet is around 240

vessels, of which 107 vessels are owned:

* ‘by the company." ~~ a TERT *

Qualifications:

skills.

minimised

If you are interested:

2006 to:



president of the travel and
lifestyle mark«»ting practice at
the Bahamas n1ain public rela-
tions agency, ‘Weber Shand-
wick said the Bahamas was
way ahead of its competitors
in the region in seeking to eco-

Pirates of the Caribbean - Dead
Man's Chest movie and its
spin-offs.

The Bahamas has also bene-
fited by being including on
international promotion for the
film which is one of the block-

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

- OPERATIONS PROJECTS &

RELATIONSHIP SERVICES

~ MANAGER

¢ Previous experience in a custorner interface role will be an asset.

e Ability to effectively deal/commu’ nicate with individuals at all levels of
the organization as well as, with vendors and consultants.

° Project management experience and! good business analysis methodologies
¢ Good leadership, negotiation skills and well-developed influential skills
sufficient to resolve distinct diifferences or opinion or approach.
-° Aminimum of 3 - 5 years banking operations experience.
General Requirements/Responsibilities:

e Tocarry out business analysis of exisiting policy or practice with particular
- emphasis on improving efficiencies \with the Operations network

e Work with Centre Manager and Senii. or Managers to ensure receipt of
change is implemented against plan and distribution to their areas are

e To manage the expectations of the: respective Lines of Business as
it relates to new initiatives being exp. lored.

Submit your resume private & confidential in 1 WRITING ONLY before June 28,

First Caribbean International Ba nk (Bahamas) Limited

Or email: chaunte.Toote @firstcaribbeai bank.com

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under ccnsideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.

nomically benifit from the _ buster hits of the summer.

INOTICE

NOTICE is herek»y given that MAZEE AETHILDA BRUSCH,
P.O. Box F-40'367, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Beihamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why ré¢agistration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should se?nd a written and signed statement of the
facts within twentyr-eight days from the 19TH day of JULY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O..Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

vl
\

NOTICE is hereby giv en that MARIA SILVA DE MENDEZ,
P.O. Box CB-1126(), CABLE BEACH, SANDYPORT,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, | is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citi. zenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahé amas, and that any person who knows
any reason why regist ration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a! written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eig ht days from the 19TH day of JULY,
2006 to the Minister . responsible for.Nationality and











































NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given th iat NIXON BREUS OF ST VINCENT
ROAD, P.O. Box CR-!34802, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is

Citizenship, foir registratic n/naturalization as a citizen of The.
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalizatidin should not be granted, should
send a written and signé3d statement of the facts within
twenty-eight clays from thie 19TH.s é
Ministerr espaieble far Neiionalify.
N- 7147; Nassiau® Bahamais.



ERNE







FIRSTICARIIBBEAN
NK

INTERINATION.AL BANK



foi

Ms. Chaunte 'I[oote
Administrative Assistant

P.O. Box N-8:329
Nassau, Bahar nas

Citizenship, P.O.Boo: N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. |

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and |_

*

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“ak



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006





Late-day bounce
leaves






Legal Notice

NOTICE
TOBIN LTD.

‘|. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:






(a) TOBIN LTD is in voluntary dissolution under the provisir ons of Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companit:s Act 2000.

* (b) The dissolution of the said company commencec| on 18th July,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted t o and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Asso siated Ltd., Pasea
Estate, Road Town, Tortola, B.V.I.

Dated this 19th day of July, A.D., 2006.

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator




2005
FAM / DIV /No.509

“COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Family Division

BETWEEN
VELTHY LORRENE PE' TTY
; Petitioner
AND
BARRY PETTY
Respondient

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE OF PETITION |

Take notice that an action has been commenced against you
in the Supreme Court, Divorce and Miatrimonial side Action
No. 509 / 2005 in which the Petiticyner has filecl a Petition
on the 21st day of September, 2005 seeking dissolution of
marriage.

And take notice that it has lbeen ordered by The Su-
preme Court that service of the Petition in the said action be
so effected on you by way of advertisement of thie Notice of
the Petition on two (2) separate occasion in two (2) of the
daily newspapers.

And further take notice thiat you must writhin four-
teen (14) days’ from the date that this advertisement is pub-
lished, acknowledge service of said Petition by completing
a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service. which
may be obtained on request from the Attorneys whose name
and address appear below, otherwise the Petition. will be
heard and determined before the: Supreme Co urt without
you.

Dated 18 day of May, A.D. 20 06

BAIN, GOMEZ & CQ.

Chambers

The Rigarno Building

Bay Street & Victoria Avenue North
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner





Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 18 July 200 6



@ By CHRISTOPHER WANG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — A late-
day rally gave stocks a moder-
ate advance yesterday as a sec-
ond day of sharply lower oil
prices calmed investors uncer-
tain about the direction of inter-
est rates.

Better-than-expected earnings
from Coca-Cola Company and
United Technologies Corpora-
tion propped up the Dow Jones
industrials, while mild wholesale

inflation data also lent some sup- .

port to the market. But concerns
about conflict in the Middle East
made investors uneasy about
buying: Stocks spent most of the
session lower before recovering
late in the day.

John Forelli, portfolio manag-
er for Independence Invest-
ments, said traders were bracing
for Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke’s appearance
before Congress Wednesday.

“It’s the first time in a while I
can remember that we were
within three weeks of a Fed
meeting and Fed fund futures
were 50-50,” Forelli said, mean-
ing the market is divided on
whether the central bank will
boost interest rates when it meets
August 8. “Bernanke tomorrow
could be a linchpin for a rally or
continued malaise in the trading
range we’ve seen.”

While a modest rise in core
producer price index helped the
inflation picture, analysts said

the stronger-than-forecast gain
in overall PPI raised the possi-
bility of more rate hikes from
the Fed and also unnerved the
bond market. Downbeat hous-
ing data renewed fears about an
economic slowdown.

The Dow climbed 51.87, or
0.48 per cent, to 10,799.23, after
sinking as much as 63 points ear-
lier.

‘Broader stock indicators also _

recouped early declines. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
gained 2.37, or 0.19 per cent, to
1,236.86, and the Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 5.50, or 0.27
per cent, to 2,043.22.
Advancing issues overtook
decliners by six to five on the
New York Stock Exchange.
Stocks barely budged Monday
amid nervousnous about buying
following sharp losses last week,
Wall Street’s worst in 2006.
However, the rise in overall
PPI had the bond market wor-
ried about inflation weakening
the value of fixed-income invest-

ments. The yield on the 10-year:

Treasury jumped to 5.14 per cent
from 5.07 per cent late Monday.

In economic news, the Labour .

Department said PPI grew 0.5
per cent in June, ahead of esti-
mates for a 0.3 per cent rise.
Core PPI — excluding volatile
energy and food costs —
increased 0.2 per cent to meet
analyst expectations.
Meanwhile, the National
Association of Home Builders
said its index of new home sales

slumped three points to 39 in
July — a 15-year low — citing
pressure from higher lending
costs.

The day’s data reinforced Wall
Street’s anxiety about the econ-
omy. Although recent reports
have provided evidence of slow-
ing economic growth, rising infla-
tion from persistently high oil

prices could prompt the Fed to

keep boosting interest rates —
and potentially trigger an eco-
nomic downturn.

That comes as central banks
worldwide are also lifting rates to
contain inflation, which would
curb global demand and foreign

_investments as money becomes

more expensive to borrow. On
Wednesday, Bernanke’s speech
and the latest reading of the
Labour Department’s consumer
price index. could lead stocks
sharply in either direction.

“TI think the key is going to be
the monetary policy situation,”
said Bill Strazzullo of Bell Curve
Trading. “Not just in the United
States, but all over the world.
We might be close to being done,
but Japan is just getting started.”

Tension in the Middle East

sent crude futures soaring before.

trades locked in profits toward
the end of the session..A barrel
‘of light crude: jumped to $76.55
but fell $1.76 to settle at $73.54
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

Elsewhere, the US dollar fell
against the Japanese yen. Gold
dropped to $630 an ounce.

stocks higher

Dow Coca-Cola said higher
sales and overseas growth helped
its profit gain seven per cent to
beat targets by two cents per
share. Coca-Cola climbed 85
cents to $43.55.

United Tech, also a Dow com-
ponent, said its profit grew 14
per cent as demand for aero-

space products offset weakness .

at its Carrier heating unit. Unit-
ed Tech advanced 92 cents to
$58.88.

Johnson & Johnson weighed
on the Dow, slumping 31 cents to
$60.60 despite a nine per cent
jump in earnings on record sales
and less marketing and overhead
costs.

Merrill Lynch & Company’s
earnings swelled 42 per cent on
solid trading activity despite the
second-quarter downturn in the
markets. Merrill Lynch nonethe-
less slid 77 cents to $67.50.

Japan’s market fell for a fifth
straight session to a one-month
low, with the Nikkei stock aver-

‘age sinking 2.75 per cent amid

worries about the violence in the
Middle East. Britain’s FTSE 100
lost 0.34 per cent, Germany’s

DAX index fell 0.37 per cent and _

France’s CAC-40 was lower by
0.33 per cent.
Preliminary consolidated vol-

ume on the NYSE was 2.58 bil-

lion shares, which led the 2.24

“billion shares that changed hands

Monday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies gained 3.95,
or 0.58 per cent, to 681.64.



FColina

if Financial Advisors Ltd.

SECURITIES INVESTMENT
ADVISORY FIRM

is seeking a senior £ lationship
manager in private banking. The
position requires proven experience
in financial advisory services, asset
management and customer
relationship management.



-The successful Candidate must possess:

-Ten years experience in Swiss Private
Banking

-University education (business or finance)

-Personal contacts to high net worth
individuals

-International working experience —

-Languages: Spanish, German, Italian and
English

Please send resume to P.O. Box AP59223

#466 or to fax no. 327 60 58.

Bahamian or permanent residents only
need apply.












@I 5



Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-Sixth (26th) Annual
General Meeting of The Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit
Union Limited will be held at The British Colonial Hilton

- Hotel, West Bay Street, on Friday July 21, 2006 commencing
at 6:30pm for the following purposes:

¢ To receive the teport of The Board of Directors
* To receive the Audited Accounts for 2005
¢ To elect members of The Board of Directors

¢ To discuss and approve the budget for 2007

All members are urged to attend.

Refreshments will be served!



& Scotiabank

VACANCY

Assistant Manager, Marketing & Product Development

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of an
Assistant Manager, Marketing & Product Development. The
successful candidate should possess the following qualifications:

* Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing & Product Development
(or a related field).











Abaco Markets 0.00 -0.019 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.70 Bahamas Property Fund 12.05 12.05 0.00 4,050 1.612 0.380 7.5 3.15%
6.44 Bank of Bahamas 7.49 7.49 0.00. 4,604 0.738 0.330 10.1 4.41%
0.70 Benchmark 4 0.80 © 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.59 1.59 0.00 0.143 0.000 11.1 0.00%
1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.49 1.49 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.15 9.15 0.00 1,165 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
1.39 Colina Holdings 1.96 1.96 0.00 0.009 0.000 217.8 0.00%
8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.80 10.80 0.00 2,236 0.931 0.600 11:6 5.56%
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs i 4.26 4.22 -0.04 0.115 0.045 37.0 1.06%
2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.50 0.05 4,900 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
4.02 Famguard i 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.49 Finco 11.50 11.50 0.00 1,417 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78%
8.75 FirstCaribbean 12.43 12.43 0.00 0.885 0.550 14.0 4.42%
8.91 Focol 11.15 11.15 0.00 0.885. 0.500 12.6 4.48%)
1.00 Freeport Concrete : 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.532 0.405 17.9 4.26%
8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 : 0.00 0.565 0.560 16.1 6.15%

Kerzner International BDRs 7.96 7.98 0.02 0.160 0.000 49.7 0.00%

Premier Real Estate

4.80%
. 7.85%)

11.00 1.923

0.000








Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25
RND Holdings






BDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets





S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V Last 12 Months

+ 91.2956 1.2402 Colina Money Market Fund 1.295645*
>, .2.9038 2.3810 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9038***
3915 2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480**




Colina Bond Fund 1.17441179""





1.1744



AP Me 246









%
BISX ALL SHARE IND
52wi-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 wake

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

- NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

* - 30 June 2006

** - 31 May 2006

** - 30 June 2006



¢ At least 3 years experience in Marketing & Product

Development.

Exceptional written communication skills.

Excellent interpersonal skills.

Excellent time management and organizational skills.
Comfortable with autonomy and self motivated.
The ability to organize and execute multiple projects with
minimal supervision.
* The ability to work well under pressure and meet deadlines.
* The ability to work flexible hours and travel.
¢ Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point).

Interested persons should submit applications in writing
marked Private and Confidential to:
' Manager, Human Resources,
P.O.Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas

Applications should be received no later than Friday, 21st July, 2006



-=s2f 2s



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 5B

i
Reinsurance cost
control Bahamas

First’s challenge’

FROM page 1B

Writing in the 2005 annual
report for the company’s par-
ent, Bahamas First Holdings,
. Ian Fair said reinsurance costs
had “risen significantly” over
the past five years, due to hur-
ricane-related damage and
associated insurance payouts.

The Bahamas’ proximity to
the Caribbean and the US
meant it was included with
these regions when reinsurers
priced this market for cata-
, strophe reinsurance, and
increasing storm-related claims
in those two areas had a
knock-on effect on this nation.

-Mr Fair wrote: “Access to
sufficient reinsurance for us to
- be sustainable is becoming
rather challenging and
extremely expensive...........

“The biggest challenge we

now face is how to sustain the,

> group’s profitability for all
- stakeholders while keeping our
reinsurance costs under some
reasonable level of control. We
are actively studying this situ-
ation with a view to having

-something to report before the ©

end of 2006.”

- Escalating reinsurance costs
is a problem being faced by all
Bahamian general insurance
carriers in the wake of the busy

’ 2004 and 2005 hurricane sea-

sons, the latter of which was a
record-breaking year both in
terms of named storms - 27 -
and those that reached cate-
gory five strength.

Insured losses in 2005,
reached $83 billion, compared. ..,

to $45 billion the year before,

which was also a record.
Reinsurers account for a

large percentage of the claims

paid out, especially in the

Bahamas, ‘where general insur-
ance carriers have to purchase
large amounts of. reinsurance

due to their relatively small

capital bases.

_ This means that reinsurance
costs are critical to determining
property and casualty premi-

-um levels in the Bahamian -

market, and reinsurers are like-
ly to demand higher premiums
from this nation’s carriers to

both help compensate them for-

previous losses and keep them

interested in this market.

The Bahamian general
insurance market would be
most impacted if there was a
loss of reinsurance capacity,
meaning that reinsurers had
either gone bust or were
unwilling to assume risks in
this nation.

Meanwhile, Patrick Ward,
Bahamas First’s president, said
the company earned $1.622
million in net income for fis-
cal 2005, compared to the pre-
vious year’s $2.705 million loss,
despite incurring 280 claims

with a total loss of just. over.

$10 million due to Hurricane
Wilma.
For the year to December
31, 2005, Bahamas First’s gross
-written premiums increased by
34 per cent to $82.454 million,
compared to $61.752 million
the year before.

The growth was aided, Mr
Ward wrote, by property rate
increases and Bahamas First’s
acquisition of Commonwealth
General’s general insurance
portfolio.

Net written premiums rose
by 28 per cent to $30.482 mil-

lion, compared to $23.789 mil-
lion, while net premiums
earned rose 16 per cent to
$28.423 million.

Hurricane Wilma-related
claims saw Bahamas First suf-

fer an underwriting loss on its
property insurance portfolio,
Mr: Ward ‘reported, even
though gross premiums rose
by 43 per cent.

However, motor and liabili-
ty insurance generated “record
underwriting profits” for the
insurer, with Mr Ward saying:
“The importance of this
account to our bottom line
results cannot be overstated

and we will continue to drive.

this process.”

Bahamas First also suffered
an underwriting loss on its
marine insurance portfolio
despite an 18 per cent increase
in premiums, attributing this
to “higher than normal theft
losses” as well as the impact
from Hurricane Wilma.

Mr Ward added: “The short-’
‘term demand for cash created

by Wilma resulted in a deple-
tion of cash on hand as funds
were used to settle the losses
we incurred in as timely a man-
ner as possible.”

The company’s bank over-
draft increased to $3.494 mil-
lion at 2005 year-end from
$368,261 the year before, as
Bahamas First funded the costs
of meeting Hurricane Wilma
claims.

It added: “A significant
amount of the losses paid
included amounts due from

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the

news, read Insight on Mondays












Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL ANTHONY WELSH, #58
OF ELLIS LIGHT FOOT AVE, P.O. BOX F-569, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA,BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The.Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should.not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama,





CAREER OPPORTUNITY

GRAHAM THOMPSON & CO.

Graham, Thompson & Co. continues to expand and remains at the
cutting edge of complex commercial transactions within the financial
services industrial sectors of The Bahamas.

We are seeking a talented and ambitious

Commercial/Corporate/Securities Lawyer

with a minimum of 5 to 7 years post qualification experience to join

1. our Nassau Office.

Candidates must possess demonstrated skills and the ability to work
independently on varied complex commercial/corporate transactions
|.. within a broad range of business and industries. Previous experience
| with Securities transactions and IPOs as well as secured lending
and structured financing essential.

~ We offer the support of a strong team and friendly working enviroment
and exposure to high caliber clients. You must be a team player, be
able to “think beyond the box” and enjoy the challenges of this fast
growth area. Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
‘candidates with the right aptitude and skill base. a

Applicants should send detailed resumes to:

The Managing Partner

P.O. Box N- 272, Nassau, Bahamas, or
by facsimile (242) 323 0012 or by

email: info@gtclaw.com

No telephone calls will be accepted.

a

e

reinsurers which had not yet

been recovered...”
Bahamas First confirmed

that it paid $1.75 million to

acquire Commonwealth Gen-
eral’s portfolio, the total cost
rising to $2.056 million once
reinsurance costs were
accounted for.

Mr Ward said a further pay-
ment for Commonwealth Gen-
eral’s insurance portfolio had
been made after the 2005 year-
end, “due to the fact that the
total premium transferred to
the group exceeded the origi-
nal target”. .

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps _
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

J] If so, call us on. 322-1986, |



and share yout story.










LEGALINOTICE

NOTICE
GRAZIANAICORP.

Noticellisfherebylgiventthatlinlaccordancel withiSection
137(8)lofithelInternationallBusiness1CompanieslAct,12000,
thelldissolutionloffGRA ZIANAICORP.hasibeenlicompleted;
allCertificateloffDissolutionlhaslbeenlissuedlandithelCompany
hasithereforelbeenlstrucklloffilthelRegister.

ARGOSAICORPJINC.
Liquidator

BANIF International Bank Ltd.

Wholly owned subsidiary of Banif ~—S.G.P.S., SA

Operations Manager

Reporting directly to the General Manager, the successful candidate
must have: or

A minimum of 5 years of international banking experience, having
dealt with Loans, Deposits, Foreign Collections, Swift Systems,
Charge Cards and Payable Through Services, Corporate
Management , Staff training. Strong knowledge of AS400
computer. Microsoft Windows, Word and Excel applications.

Complete command ef Portuguese and English languages is.a
requirement, due to heavy telephone contact with the Group's
Head office, branches and clientele and preparation of reports to
Senior Management.

We offer 2 competitive salary commensurate with qualifications and
experience the applicant brings to the position.

Only Bahamians or holders of Bahamian status need apply in writing
to: ;

The Manager
P.O. Box SS19487
Nassau, NP, The Bahamas

| Bank ok The | Bah 1m<

INTERNATIONAL



“A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR

Core responsibilities:

® — Perform operational and compliance audits in finance, operations
and credit areas of all branches and departments

4 Preparation of audit reports for review by Management and Audit

Committee

@ Review financial data and reports
@ Assist external auditors during year-end audits and any special .

reviews.

® Perform audit reviews and audit testing for any new system

implemented

@ Performa variety of other related duties, such as assisting with
special audit review projects and investigations.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

A minimum of three years experience with an international public

accounting firm.

A Certified Public Accountant, Certified Internal Auditor or
equivalent designation.

Detailed understanding of commercial banking, The Central Bank
of the Bahamas Acts and Regulations, and The Professional
Standards of the Institute of Internal Auditors

Strong accounting and auditing skills to analyze financial

statements

Computer literate — Ability to use Blecnone Working papers,
MS Word and Excel ©

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications, Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 20 July 2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International

P. O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas





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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS

iii a a a ee

NBA stars hold Court time

US national

at Jeff Rodgers camp tv

HB B-.sKETBALL _and being able to give alittle the phenomenon it is now. a OIC
By RENALDO DORSETT input to the youngsters around “This has just grown tremen- Associated Press

Sports Reporter

FOR almost two decades,
the Jeff Rodgers Basketball
Camp has been the preemi-
nent teaching tool for young
Bahamian basketball. players
looking to learn the basics of
the game.

In this the 19th edition of
the camp, Rodgers once again

hosted several NBA celebri- -

ties at the Bahamas Academy
Gym, much to the delight of
over 400 young campers.

Former NBA. veterans
Travis Knight and Felton
Spencer, New Orleans Head
Coach Byron Scott, and NBA
Hall of Famer Calvin Murphy,
spent about two hours working
with the campers through drills
and offering words of encour-
agement.

Knight, the former New
York Knick and Los Angeles
Laker, has been a mainstay of
the camp for almost a decade
and has worked tirelessly
alongside Rodgers to help the
development of the camp.

Knight’s message to the
campers was to use basketball
as a tool to further their devel-
opment and get where they
want to be in life.

Spencer echoed Knight’s
sentiments, telling the campers

the average NBA career lasts |

just over five years, therefore
importance in the classroom
was paramount.

Scott, kept his message short
and simple but it may have
been the most memorable of
the day.

He stressed to campers the
importance of the “three D’s”:
desire, discipline and dedica-
tion.

Murphy, the most animated
of the group, went through a
series of free throw shooting
drills with the campers and

inspired them to become suc-
cess in all aspects of life.

“This is what I do,” he said,
“I look forward to traveling

the world.”

He applauded Rodgers’
efforts over the past 19 years
and expressed his enthusiasm
to help further the develop-
ment of basketball in the
Bahamas.

“Jeff Rodgers has a great
teaching situation down here,”
he said. “Every year he invites
me to come down here and
every year I put it in my sched-
ule and make sure that I come
down.”

The 5’9” former Houston
Rocket has received many
accolades in the game of bas-
ketball, but said to campers
that they should apply the
same dedication to other
aspects of life.

“The 15-20 minutes I get to
spend with these youngsters,
I use it to talk about more than
just basketball, I use basket-
ball for about three minutes,”
he said. “The rest I used to
talk about citizenship and the
responsibilities of being an all

around person is very impor-.

tant to me. We talked about
pride for a bit and J let them
know what it means to me, We
also talked about keeping a
positive individual attitude,
respect, making intelligent
decisions, pursuing a dream
and working on your educa-
tion.”

Murphy did not forget about
his basketball roots however,
going through a number of

-shooting drills with the eager

young campers.

“I wanted to make sure they
knew the proper elements of
free throw shooting, if you
don’t know how to do it, you
can’t make it consistently,” he
said, “Then I went out there
and .demonstrated a little bit

for them, they said I was too .

old so J thought I’d show
them.” ,
Jeff Rodgers, Camp Direc-
tor, said it has been a pleasure
to see the camp grow from its
modest numbers years ago, to

Peers

dously over the past 19 years,”
he said, “It’s almost getting to
the point were we don’t have
enough space to capacitate the
large numbers, but everything
has gone well and this may
have been the most exciting
year we have had thus far.”

He said the appearances of |

the NBA personalities on a
yearly basis is an effective
means of portraying a message

from people the campers may’

be able to relate to.

“Having the NBA celebri-
ties come down is so impor-
tant because we want the
campers to hear the. message
from people that have
achieved a high level of suc-
cess and have excelled in the
game of basketball,” he said,
“They also serve to give these
guys hope,” We want.them-to
know that even though they
may be going through things
in life, the key to success is to
persevere and have determi-
nation to work towards your
goals. in life, whatever they
may be.”

Rodgers plans now to use
the camp as a means to take
even further steps in enhanc-
ing the level of basketball tal-
ent in the country.

“Right now I’m in the
process of creating the Jeff
Rodgers Basketball Acade-
my,” he said, “Ideally we want

to be able to teach basketball .

year round.”
The camp culminates tomor-

row night with its annual “Fun.

Night” at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

The festivities begin at 7pm
as the campers will display
skills learned over the past few
weeks at the camp.

There will also be an exhibi-
tion game featuring the visiting
NBA players.

H TRAVIS KNIGHT in
action for the LA Lakers.
(AP FILE Photo)



Soccer camp
kicks off for

the summer
FROM sports front

camp instructors include:
Matthew Green,.coach of
the U-20’s women's nation-
al team and local Women's
League Champions FC.
Nassau; Larry Minns, expe-
rienced local youth coach
and head coach of local
men's team Bears FC, and
Deron Swaby, men’s
national team player and a
recent graduate of Bradley
University where he
starred on the men’s soccer
team.

Camp is from Monday,
July 24 - Friday, July 28
and features two.sessions a
day. Session one will run
from 10am -1pm and Ses-
sion two from 2pm -5pm.
Application forms for the
camp and information on
yearly after-school pro-
grams canbe foundat- |
www.bahamassocceracade-
my.com. For more infor- ©
mation, call 324-3371.

B GARY WHITE, USSF
A license coach and
Bahamas Senior Mens
Coach and (inset)
GODWIN BUTLER,
Bahamas Soccer Academy
student Godwin Butler at
the 2005 camp.



BRUCE ARENA has a
message for American soc-
cer fans: Be patient.

Arena took over the
struggling New York Red
Bulls on Tuesday, but also
predicted that his former
squad — the U.S. soccer
team — would not win con-’ .
sistently at the World Cup
until 2018.

“Why did I say 2018?
Because I know that it’s not,
going to happen in 2010; '-
2014,” he said at his intro-
ductory news conference.
“We have a long way to go. « :.
To get there, you’ve got to’ ©
know where you are. It’s the:
same thing with this team.” ’-
If I told you, we were going * - °
to compete for the MLS:
Cup right away, if I told you _
we were going to win a
World Cup in 2010 ... who’s’ -
going to believe that? fetes

“We made progress in this'
World Cup. But we do not °
have players of the quality ©
and experience of the teams
in the group that ended up
in the last eight.” ete

Red Bulls fans may also
have to wait. The club is 3-6- .

8 this season — the fewest
wins in the league — and is:
last in the Eastern Confer-
ence with 17 points. Only
Real Salt Lake in the West=—
ern Conference has fewer. °
points.

But Arena is.in familiar
territory. He knows how to
rebuild.

’ Arena took over the U.S.
team in October 1998, short-
ly after the Americans fin-
ished last of 32 teams at the
World Cup. He brought
them to respectability in
2002, taking them to the
quarterfinals. and raising
hopes. that.the U.S. could
field an even better team in
2006.

But those hopes were
dashed at the World Cup
last month, when the U.S.
failed to advance to the sec-
ond round after losses to the
Czech Republic and Ghana
and a draw with eventual
champion Italy. Last week,
Arena and U.S. Soccer
agreed to part ways.

Arena believes a growing
MLS will eventually help
the U.S. compete better at
the World Cup, as well as
getting more Americans to
play in Europe. But after
the U.S. was eliminated,
some thought Arena took a
swipe at MLS because he
said more players should go
abroad. ?

When asked about those
comments and his retura to
MLS, Arena declined to say
much of anything.

“l’m not going to worry,
about the league,” Arena’ ,'
said. “I’m going to worry’
about the Red Bulls. WhenI .-

5
Ke

was technical director of the. -

national team, that was my
job. Now, this is my job.” -:.

Arena said he had a feel- -
ing in January he would not
return as national team
coach. Though he had nq:,°,
interest in MLS, Arena’-’-
started talking to the Red’
Bulls after the U.S. was
eliminated and changed his
mind because he thought
the organization had many, -.-
positives to offer. ver ee

He agreed to a deal about’.*.
two weeks ago, and had it -*-
in place when he spoke to
U.S. Soccer about his future
as national team coach last - >: |
Thursday. It was the first*.-,
time they had spoken since .*_-
the U.S. was sent homé-~.,
from Germany.

“We never got into a con-
versation Thursday that
would lead me to believe: -.
they wanted me back,” Are-*
na said.

The feeling was mutual.
Red Bulls managing director
Marc de Grandpre said they . ° .
had their eye on Arena from~ -
the moment they fired coach‘. ,
Mo Johnston on June 27.
Richie Williams was elevat-
ed to interim coach, and
Arena will take over for him
Aug. 12 when the Red Bulls
play Barcelona at home.

“We made a long list, and
only one name came back
to the surface, that was
Bruce,” de Grandpre
said.

“He was our No. 1 candi-
date, and we got our guy.”



IMNIDUINE OFUNISO

Landis gets back
ellow jersey at
Tour de France

@ CYCLING
L’ALPE D’HUEZ, France
Associated Press

AMERICAN Floyd Landis
reclaimed the Tour de France’s
overall lead Tuesday, taking
back the yellow jersey after an
uphill finish on the famed
L’Alpe d’Huez.

The 15th stage, won by Lux-
émbourg’s Frank Schleck, was
the first of three straight days of
grueling Alpine treks, which are
likely to identify the top con-
tenders to win the first Tour of
the post-Lance Armstrong era.

‘Landis, the Phonak team
leader, finished 1 minute and
10 seconds behind Schleck. He
took an overall lead of 10 sec-
onds. over Spain’s Oscar
Perejro, who had held the yel-

- low jersey and a lead of 1:29
~ over Landis since the 13th stage.

Landis said he’d taken a
“samble” on Saturday by allow-
ing former Phonak teammate
Pereiro to claim the yellow jer-
sey, which brings with it pres-
sure to lead and places an extra
burden on a rider’s teammates.

Landis, a 30-year-old Penn-
sylvania native, had temporari-
ly taken the race lead last
Thursday after the tougher of
two days of climbs in the Pyre-
nees.

The 116-mile stage began in
Gap and also took riders up the
Col d’Izoard and the Col du
Lautaret climbs.

World champion Tom Boo-
nen of Belgium dropped out of
the race after scaling the Col
d’Izoard, which like the 'L’Alpe
d’Huez is so tough that it defies
classification in cycling’s ranking

system. Boonen had.been trail-.

ing Robbie McEwen of Auais-



inbrief

@ STAGE: Racers began
three days in the Alps in
the 15th stage, riding 116
miles from Gap in the
Alpine foothills to the leg-
endary L’Alpe d’Huez.














B WINNER: Team CSC
rider Frank Schleck of
Luxembourg in 4 hours, 52
minutes, 22 seconds. Italy’s
Damiano Cunego, of the
Lampre team, was second
and compatriot Stefano
Garzelli of Liquigas was
third.









@ YELLOW JERSEY:
American Floyd Landis,
the Phonak team leader,
reclaimed the race leader’s
yellow jersey he had lost.to
Spain’s Oscar Pereiro on
Saturday.







@ NEXT STAGE:
Wednesday’s stage scales
the 8,681-foot Col du Gali-
bier — the highest spot on
the Tour — during a 113-
mile ride from Bourg
d’Oisans to La Toussuire.







tralia for the green jersey, given
to the best sprinter.

Schleck, riding for Team
CSC, pulled away from Damian
Cunego of Italy over the last
1.2 miles to win his first Tour
stage. Cunego was 11 seconds
behind in second. Stefano
Garzelli was third, 1:10 back.

Schleck, who won this year’s
Amstel Gold Race, called his
first Tour stage victory a

“dream come true.”

“Tt makes me even more con-

fident than I was before,”
Schleck said. “To win on the
Alpe d’Huez is fantastic. ... I
think I will need some more
time to realize what has hap-
pened to me.”

‘Fans flocked to the final
climb, which contains 21 sharp
bends, waving flags as the
breakaway riders raced to the
finish.

Two years ago, Armstrong
pulled away from the field at
L’Alpe d’Huez in a time trial
under tense conditions. The
Texan was trailed in a car car-
rying a police sniper after he’d
received death threats.

The lack of Armstrong’s
dominant presence has léd to a
far more open race this year.

He was at L’Alpe d’Huez on.

Tuesday and scaled the Alpine
peak in a ride with friends on
Monday.

The three-week race is wide
open this year, after favorites
Ivan Basso — who won the
Giro d’Italia in May — and
1997 Tour champion Jan UII-
rich were among nine riders
kicked out on the eve of the
Tour after being implicated in a
Spanish doping investigation.

i NEW overall leader Floyd
Landis of the USA reacts on
the podium of the 15th stage of
the 93rd Tour de France cycling
race between Gap, southeast-

‘ern France, and L'Alpe d'Huez,

French Alps, Tuesday, July 18,
2006. Frank Schleck of Luxem-

. bourg won the stage. :
(AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

VV LE t MeN,

Oy Oe, 1 Re ou



»Bertha’s Go Go Ribs # City Market
— British American Bank ¢ Gatorade

a: : e The Sports Center ¢ Joy 101.9 FM © Pepsi
Crate he ont oreo doin. aR Rese mili, * Original Patties « J.S. johnson
The Ministry of Youth, Sports, and Housin smo 8 Scatiabonk _¢ Tropical Brokerage ¢ BFS

ll THE pack rides near Montgardin, southeastern France, during the 15th stage of the 93rd Tour de ee Dip
France cycling race between Gap, southeastern France, and L'Alpe d'Huez, French Alps, Tuesday,
July 18, 2006.

(AP Photo/Bas Czerwinski)





WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

BOA president:

Rooyen tin
Meee mDICO Nai

@ BASEBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON —
Junior Sports
Reporter

PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Olympic
Association (BOA)
Arlington Butler said
yesterday that the
men’s baseball team is
“in desperate need of
pitchers.”

The call by Butler
came after the team
suffered their second
consecutive ‘blowout’
loss at the Central
American and
Caribbean games,
being held in Cartange-
‘na, Colombia.

The team played
Mexico on Tuesday and
Colombia on Sunday,
losing the games 15-0
and 10-0, respectively.

Yesterday’s game did
end on a positive note,
despite the final score.
The team were able to
manage five hits,
unlike in their first
game which was a ‘no
hitter’.

Butler revealed that
the team’s improve-
ment in the hitting
department is a good
sign that the guys .
should be able to use in
their feature match
against Dominican
Republic.

Butler said:. “The
team is improving I
must say, at least today
they were able to get
five hits, that’s a vast
improvement to where
they were in their first
game.

Hits

“They were able to
secure these hits but
weren’t able to put
these hits together in
the game. The team is
not experienced and
they lack exposure. It
is not like (Angelo)
Dillette a terrible
pitcher, he is a good
pitcher. He can throw
but he just can’t pitch
too good, he is not
pitching accurately.”

- The inclement weath- |.

er has forced the men’s
softball team to head
to their dugouts once
again, this time in the
second inning, with no
score.

Pitching for the team
in their double header
schedule was Crestwell
Pratt but Edney ‘The
Heat’ Bethel will have
to step in once again in
the second game.

This will be the sec-



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

NBA stars hold
| (el! lg i ou 3 Bi







& SAILING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THREE-time world champi-
on Donnie Martinborough and
the husband and wife team of
Jimmy and Lori Lowe will head
the Bahamas sailing team head-
ing off to the XX Central Amer-
ican and Caribbean Games.

The team will leave town
today and will start competition

in three different classes on

Monday in Cartagena, Colom-
bia.

Martinborough, a Commercial
Property Manager, will be the
lone competitor entered in the
Sunfish Class that he dominat-
ed for so many years.

Jimmy Lowe will skipper one
of the two’ teams with crew mem-
ber Peter Bruce Wassitch in the
Snipe Class and Robert Dunk-
ley will skipper the other team
with crew member Michelle
Hope.

The remainder of the Bahami-

an continent will comprise of

Lori Lowe and Allison Myers
who will compete separately in
the Laser Radial Class.

Peter Christie, who will travel
as the coach, along with chef de
mission John Lawrence, said it’s
a strong team that was selected
by the Bahamas Yachting Asso-
ciation, headed by president Sir
Durward Knowles.

“We expect medals in the
Snipe Class and in the Sunfish
Class,” Christie proclaimed.
“Donnie Martinborough, the
three-time world champion, is
still as strong as he used to be.



@ THE Bahamas sailing team for the CAC games in Cartagena at their cond off party with Sir Durward Knowles, the President of
the Bahamas Yachting Association.

He’s been practising.

“In the Laser Radial Class,
Jimmy Lowe’s wife, Lori, is a
pretty good sailor and Allison
Myers just went to Korea for the
Youth Championships. They are
new to the class, but Lori Lowe

‘

could well be a contender.”
-. While the Bahamas has com-
peted on the international scene,

winning titlés in both the Sun-

fish and Snipe Classes, Lowe and
Myers will be making their maid-
en voyage in the Laser Radial

Class for women.

Although the team are just
heading off today, all of their
boats have already arrived in
Cartagena. They were sent in a
container from Miami, Florida
so that they can be processed by

the organising committee.

“We are looking for medals in
the Sunfish and Snipe Classes,”
Christie projected. “With any
luck, we could expect a medal in
the Laser Radial, depending on
what the competition is like.”

Soccer camp
kicks off for -
the summer.

m SOCCER

PARENTS who want to
improve their children's soccer
skills will get a chance to do so
beginning next Monday at The’
Gary White/Bahamas Soccer ~
Academy's summer camp at
The College of the Bahamas
soccer fields. This is the third’.
installment of the Gary White:
Soccer Camp, which partners
this year with the Bahamas
Soccer Academy (BSA). The
BSA runs year-round training»

for young soccer players.

ond time Edney ‘The
The camp will train young-;

Heat’ Bethel had to
Step in - the first he
delivered for the soft-
ball team in a come
from behind victory on
Monday to close

out the game and

give their second

win — over Puerto Rico,
2-1.

He added: “Softball
is playing remarkably
well, they have not giv-
en up arun in 18
innings. They are play-
ing very well, they just
don’t have the numbers
to be able to shift the
players around to give
them a rest.”

The game against the
Dominican Republic
resumed late in the
evening but the final
score was not available
up until press time.
The second game in the
double header will be
played against
Venezuela.

sters aged 5-15 — whether
they've never kicked a soccer
ball before or are already
playing for their school or a -,-_
local club — in the fundamen--°.-

tals of the fastest growing -*-
sport in the Bahamas. In a safe
and fun-filled environment,
children will receive expert
guidance in the four areas ye
form the game's foundation -°,
technical, tactical, physical
and mental — and learn the dis-
cipline needed to be a success-
ful soccer player at any level: -:
As well as coach White other

a" ee

SEE page 6B i

@ DERON SWABY,
Bahamas senior international
player and a recent graduate
of Bradley University.





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mom | Che SMiami Herald

T-STORM BAHAMAS EDITION

Volume: 102 No.196

Out-Island
Doctor

esa wea a ey hee lh









WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

Prisoner escayes

Inmate ‘walked © ir charged True

off compound’ —

a By KRYSTEL ROLLE

AFTER severe criticism
recently, Her Majesty’s
Prison was again a source
of embarrassment when a
prisoner is reported to have
walked off the compound
yesterday.

The breakout has left .

HMP shaken, touching the
sensitive nerve at the core
of security leaving only two
possible explanations: Inad-
equate security or inmates
receiving inside help.

Yesterday around noon
— after several steps were
taken recently to prevent
escapes — Adlet Cilice, 21,
managed to bypass security
and flee the prison grounds.

According to Assistant
Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson, before his escape
the prisoner was last seen
working around the Chap-
lain’s office on the eastern
side of the compound. It
wasn’t until prison guards
were rounding up the
inmates shortly after 12
noon that officers realised
he was missing.

Sketchy details have come
into, the. Tribune pointing
towards the possibility of
the inmate receiving inside
‘help. A source closely relat-
ed .to HMP reported that
there was a strong possibil-

ity of this being an inside

job.

However, Assistant

Superintendent Sidney
McPhee strongly denied the
claims ne “There is no




HURRIC

truth to that.”

“We questioned the offi-
cers who were supposed to
be watching him, and we are

confident that they were not

involved,” ASP McPhee
said.

This most recent break-
out comes only six months

after the largest and most. |

deadly penitentiary break
in Bahamian history. Earli-
er this year on January 17,
four prisoners managed to
escape from maximum secu-
rity, at HMP leaving two
men dead, one an officer
the other a prisoner, and
two officers injured. The

two men who died during’

the prison break were
prison guard Corporal Deon
Bowles, who was stabbed to
death, and escapee Neil
Brown who was shot and
killed.

Cilice, who is of Haitian
parentage, was admitted to
HMP on November 21, 2003
after being convicted in the
magistrate’s court for pass-
ing and uttering a fraudu-
lent document. Before
escaping he was serving
three years. His scheduled
release date was October
13, 2007.

According to ASP
McPhee. an island-wide
search was launched in both
New Providence and Grand
Bahama, where he last
resided.

Mr McPhee said there was
a strong possibility that Cil-
ice would go back to Grand
Bahama.

anc INSURANCE

& KAREEM ROBERTS (left) and Troy Bodie leaving court yesterday
(Photos: Felipé eel or TTeene staff)

TWO YOUNG men
charged with the stabbing
death of Devon Thompson,
18, were arraigned in magis-
trate’s court yesterday.

Kareem Roberts, 22, and
Troy Bodie Jr, 18; were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez at
Court One Bank Lane yes-
terday on the charge of mur-
der.

Court dockets stated that

on Monday, July 10, the two
men being concerned togeth-
er, intentionally and unlaw-
fully caused the death of
Devon Thompson.

Initial police reports indi-
cated that on the morning of
July 10, Thompson of Mal-
colm Road was walking in
the vicinity of Pipe of Peace
on Bay Street with a group of
friends when.the incident
occurred. Reports further

stated that the assailant who

| Thompson knew, ‘produced

a sharp object and stabbed
him in the neck. Thompson is
reported to have run to Bank
Lane where he collapsed. He
died in hospital just before
6am on Wednesday, July 12.

Kareem Roberts is repre-
sented by lawyer Langton
Hilton and Troy Bodie Jr is

SEE page 11

Child Protection Council ‘remains committed’

‘ feared that a ‘





Slain former
police officer ©
‘had asked for

protection’

@ By KARIN HERIG arte
Tribune Staff Reporter. _-

FEARING for his life, for-

-mer police officer Marcian Scott

requested, but was denied,
police protection before his .
shooting death, a source close to
the murder victim has claimed. '

Speaking with The Tribune.
yesterday, another source said ©
that Mr Scott, 31, who was
gunned down nae month, had
” had been put
out on his life Beanie he was to
have been a witness in a pend-.°
ing murder frial.

The source close to Mr Scott -
confirmed that the deceased |
had feared for his life and —
because of this had written a -
letter asking for police protec- °
tion.
The Tribune received infor-
mation that Mr Scott, in a bid to
ensure his safety, had attempted
to re-enter the police force.

“However, the source yester

day. said that Mr Scott had no:

intentions of rejoining the force, .

but was merely seeking protec!

tion from his former employer.
“T know he sent a letter to .

. SEE page 11

$50,000 reward

for information
leading to the

whereabouts of
businessman

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A $50,000
reward is being offered for
information leading to the
whereabouts of Grand Bahama
businessman Preston Stuart Jr,




















and the programmmes that they have on the
drawing board they are continuing with :
them,” Ms Zonicle said. “I am sure there will ;
be some negative spin-off from this matter. ;
But once (Bishop Randy Fraser) was charged
he tendered his resignation and naturally
there will be some negative spin-offs whether
he is convicted or not.”

Baptist Bishop Earl Randolph Fraser, was
charged in April with having sex with a 17-
year-old girl who he was alleged to have been

SEE page 11

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

who has ‘been missing since Sat- _
urday.

‘According to police, the
reward is being offered by a
group of concerned citizens in
Grand Bahama. :

Mr Stuart; 64, was reported
missing by a close relative short-
ly before 1am on Sunday. :

He was last seen around 1.34°.
pm on Saturday, wearing a blue"
golf shirt with purple and white

SEE page 11

THE Child Protection Council remains as
committed to its mandate as it was before
sex charges were brought against one of its
board members, Director of Social Services
and Community Development, Mellany Zon-
icle said yesterday.

Ms Zonicle told The Tribune that while
some persons may have lost confidence in
the system, council members remain focused.

“The morale of the committee is still high



rest easy knowing
excellent i insurance





Rawr eunnralry



em
=
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

60 Dominicans are suspected of fishing in Bahamaian waters near Cay Sal
Bank aboard the Barlovento, RBDF officers were called in to bring them to

Nassau, where they were turned over to Immigration.

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

A GROUP of 60 Dominican
-men suspected of poaching in
Bahamian waters are now in
the custody of the Defence
Force.

The men, who were detained
on Sunday, have been brought
to New Providence by the 19-
member crew of the HMBS
Yellow Elder.

According to Lieutenant Dar-
ren Henfield, the men were
spotted travelling in an 80-foot
gray and white vessel named
Barlovento by the US Coast
Guard near the Cay Sal Bank,

_ which is located in the south-
western part of the Bahamas on
Sunday.

On Monday morning,
Barlovento, its occupants and
fisheries resources alleged to
have been in their possession
were all turned over to
HMBS Yellow Elder to be
transported to New Provi-
dence.

They are expected to face

Ph vill is S

poaching- -related charges
brought by. the Department of

Fisheries.

Minister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Leslie , who
was present when the boat
arrived in Nassau harbour yes-
terday, said about 20,000
pounds of fish was confiscat-
ed.

Mr Miller expressed his grat-
itude the to the crew of the Yel-
low Elder and the US Coast
Guard for swiftly apprehend-
ing the suspects.

The problem, the minister
explained is that the Bahamas
does not have the man power or

the resources to properly man

our waters.

“It is going to be impera-
tive that the United States
continue to assist us, but'we’re
going to need a little more
help.

“The Bahamas cannot ‘fully
protect it’s 100,000 square miles
of ocean until we get more man-
power.”

pea to the Royal

LOCAL NEWS"

a

Bahamas Defence Force, the
operation was conducted under
the Bi-lateral. Comprehensive
Maritime Agreement between
the Bahamas and the United
States of America.

Under the accord, a Defence
Force marine is assigned to
ship-riding duties abroad the
Coast Guard Cutter Nantuck-
et, and was present the arrests
were made. ~

According to Lieutenant
Henfield, the mutually benefi-
cial maritime arrangement per-
mits Ccast Guard vessels with
Defence Force personnel
onboard to carry out law
enforcement operations within
the territorial waters of the
Bahamas.

i MINISTER of Fisheries
Leslie Miller takes a closer
look-at the 60 men, thought to
be from Dominica, who were
found near Cay Sal Bank and
brought to the capital by the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force.



JUNE WINNER OF SCOTIABANK’S
“FORGIVE & FORGET”
MORTGAGE CAMPAIGN



ink, Cable Beach Branch

Cable Brean Wineese A. to Re Bretdia Ghinteain, Assieeane Manager Person
Aoarnledegys Koesiin InetKitrrneey, Brezevedh Iareagets Phyllis Sulllivean, “Rongive & FRonger” Winner ~
ane: and Ramah IMtyycordk, Pervonal Banking Officer

ints $0 EASY TO

“FORGIVE & FORGET”
SOOTIABANK IS GIVING AWAY

$50,000 WN PRIZES!

CALL OR VISIT US TODAN?

“Trek vag Hic St hive basil Ut tha Bewtin, Meader its weed unter au thoradtion and voriud al The Bark stikoue Gest.





@ DOMINICANS are seen offloading their catch after allegedly being caught
fishing in Bahamian waters near Cay Sal Bank

ios Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)

Dominica ship suspected of
‘fishing in Bahamian waters |



Social services concern
for lack of interest
in elderly relavies

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Department of Social
Services is concerned about
the lack of interest by some

persons who have relatives in

senior citizen group homes.

In-an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Marva
Russell-Minns, deputy direc-
tor with the Department of
Social Services with responsi-
bility for senior citizens, said
that the main concern for the
department is that some elder-
ly people feel abandoned or
deserted by their family

“We'know that there are
some relatives right in New
Providence, so the feeling is
they just wanted to get rid of
them. So, for those who don’t
pay any attention to them, we
would say this is your line of
inheritance and legacy,” said
Mrs Russell-Minns.

Another official with the
senior citizens division, who
wished to remain anonymous,
said that there may be situa-
tions where adult children

may not’ want their elderly

parents to live with them,”

especially when it comes to

fathers who did not take.care -

of their children - when they

" were younger.

However, the social services

" official believes that if the

Bahamas calls itself a Christ-
ian nation, parents should be
honoured.

Mrs Russell-Minns advised

family members that rather
than living with regret, they
should visit their senior rela-
tives on a regular bases or to
simply give them a call.

“Those of us in the profes-
sion, in some ways, cannot
relate to what they are saying
simply because if they are
talking about their families
and the histories of their fam-
ilies, family members need to
hear that.

“Even though we sit and we
listen, sometimes it is good for
them to see persons from their
past or in their family,.and to
not let them feel as if they
have been deserted or aban-
doned” she stressed.















THE TRIBUNE



Promotion

on new
BTC Hello
card

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company has
launched a promotion for its
HELLO phone card.

The promotional campaign,
titled 40-40-40, will allow cus-_
tomers to make long distance
calls anywhere, except Europe,
for just 40 cents for the next 40
days...

The promotion coincides with
the 40th anniversary of BTC.

The rates are only available
on BTC HELLO phone cards
which can be purchased at BTC
-or BTC vendors.

BTC also announced a pro-
motion yesterday that will
expand HELLO phone cards
vendors to Arawak Cay. Par-
ticipating vendors at Arawak
Cay will be supplied with ban-
ners, place mats, coasters, nap-
kins and other HELLO para-
phernalia.

Participating vendors include
Bruno’s Seafood, Red Snapper,
Kemp & Sons, Remelda Davis
Kitchen, Foxy’s Fish Fry, Big
10, Tropical Cool, Seafood
Haven, The B-Man, Oh
Andros, Twin Brothers, Can-
dies, Spangle Rock & Ice
Cream Parlour, Sumtin Good
and Belly Full.

India’s AIDS
treatment
credit for
Guyana

@ GUYANA
Georgetown

INDIA will extend a line of
credit to Guyana to help the
South American nation buy
AIDS medicine and purchase
computers to modernize goy-
ernment operations, officials of -

_the two nations said Tuesday,

according to Associated Press.

The agreement came on. the
second day of a visit-by Shashi
Tripathi, a secretary in India’s
external affairs ministry. The
Indian government agreed to

rovide a line of credit of

US25 million under terms that
were expected to be set by the
end of Tripathi’s visit, said
Ronald Gajraj, Guyana’s high
commissioner to India.

Officials may also agree to
other uses for the money
besides purchasing medicines
to treat AIDS and to Pee
computers, Gajraj said.

India has previously provided
a $US25 million line of credit
to help Guyana build a new
15,000-seat stadium for néxt
year’s cricket World Cup.

The two countries have his-

- torically had close ties and

about 43 per cent of Guyana’s
people are descendants of Indi-
ans who came to work in the
sugar plantations when slavery
was abolished in 1838. Guyana,
a former Dutch and British
colony, has a population of |
about 750,000.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
UCM Cr eM EL CL
RY Ady AY |



_
THE TRIBUNE



@ In brief

$50,000
of cocaine
found on
aircraft

POLICE yesterday captured
$50,000 worth of cocaine aboard
an aircraft bound for West Palm
Beach.

At 2.05pm yesterday, officers
conducting a routine search of
aircraft at the Lynden Pindling
Airport discovered the drugs
onboard a Gulf Stream aircraft.

Supt Raymond Gibson, offi-
cer in-charge of the Drug
Enforcement Unit (DEU), told
The Tribune that two kilos of

cocaine were found hidden:

inside a “tote bag”.

Up to press time last night,
police had not yet arrested any-
one in connection with the
drugs and investigations into
the incident were ongoing.

Customers
complain
at cable
service

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

CABLE Bahamas customers
are complaining about what one
referred to as the company’s
“inadequate digital cable ser-
vices”.

Speaking to The Tribune yes-

terday, one person said she is.
“sick and tired” of the problems

she is experiencing with the new
Cable Bahamas digital package.

“When they announced this
service, they made it sound so
great, but its not worth half the
money I am paying,” she said.

Announcing in July 2005 that
that digital cable would be
launched that August in
Eleuthera, and in October in
Grand Bahama Abaco and
New Providence with a line-up
of 275 channels, the company
stated that “all of our digital
cable packages have been
redesigned for maximum value
and choice.” 13

However, according to sev-
eral customers, this is not the
case.

“Some channels get so pixel-
lated you give up on watching
whatever show or movie you
were watching,” said one.

“Often the sound and pic-
tures are completely out of sync
and I have to turn the box off
for about 10 minutes and then
turn it back on to get it in sync.

“Also, there are many times
channels are just not available —
there’s just a blue screen that
says try again later.”

“T want answers,” said anoth-
er customer. “I want them to
explain why the service is so
bad.”

According to a 2005 press
release, director of marketing
and pay-per-view for Cable
Bahamas David Burrows stated
that “Oceans Digital TV will
revolutionise cable television
and entertainment in the
Bahamas.”

“Oceans Digital TV means
hundreds of channels — many
never before seen on cable TV
in the Bahamas,” he said. “It
means new choices. It means a
new standard in quality.

“Oceans Digital TV means
choices. It means new opportu-
nities for Bahamians through
(access to) our own radio sta-
tions (in the Bahamas), and
through Cable 12 — the com-
munity channel.”

When contacted, Cable
Bahamas Officials said they
could not comment.

They requested a written list
of questions, which was provid-
ed, but have not yet replied to
them.

INSIGHT

ea US
stories

oreo mat:

news, read

TTC Lae)
Mondays



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
._Chief Reporter

AS PROPERTY prices in the
Bahamas continue to soar, particularly
in New Providence, there is increasing
concern by some members of the public
that housing will become out of reach
for most middle class Bahamians.

It goes without saying that this also
has serious implications for those of a
lower socio-economic scale. :

Realtor and Montagu MP Brent
Symonette told The Tribune that in the
future the middle class will find it diffi-
cult to find homes.

“But you have to look at the high
level of consumer credit. We borrow
for cars, front room suites and clothes
and education, but we are not borrow-
ing for bricks and mortar,” he said.

He pointed out that the cost of gov-
ernment-provided low cost housing is in
the range of $100,000 which would
require a mortgage payment each
month of approximately $900.

“If your mortgage payment should
be at least one quarter of your salary
that means you have to be earning

$4,000 a month combined income and

not many low cost households are doing

that,” Mr Symonette said.
Also weighing in on the issue, Grand
Bahama lawyer Fred Smith said

‘ because of this fact there is going to be
a greater difference between the,

“haves” and “have nots.”

In addition, he said, he thinks that
because of the number of foreign
investor-sponsored housing develop-
ments throughout the country, there
also will be a chance that this may push
housing prices up further.

“You are going to see many, many
Bahamians gravitate to the lower end of
the economic spectrum because devel-
opments are going to keep wages low
and if the developers can’t find Bahami-
an craftsmen or tradesmen they will
bring them in at half the hourly wage of
Bahamians, so by pushing the type of
development in Harbour Island or
Chub Cay or Guana Cay it is. not an
employment problem you have there
that is keeping Bahamians on the lower
end of the scale.

“IT am concerned for middle class
Bahamians. In Nassau the prices are

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PA





GE3

Are middle-class and poorer
families slowly being priced out
of the Bahamas housing market?

Alarm at rising house cos‘s





i)
extraordinary. How does a young fam- _nowiit is sold for $90,000,” he : .
ily start off in New Providence? Prices In addition, building costs haye gone «
are still very good in Freeport. Acom- up.
parable lot in Freeport on the beach or “So now it can cost $100 4 square
canal is 30 to 40 per cent for what itisin foot where once it cos! 5 quare
Nassau, if that. It is creating problems _ foot,” Mr Symonetic sail
for the middle class,” he said. Nevertheless, both agree | in the
future it will be imore difft: r the
Factors middle class to survive.
“It is “oing to-be a struge! yu mid-
dle class and those of |o ome
While Mr Symonette agrees that prop- social grouping and you are »oing to
erty prices have skyrocketed in recent see the fortunate Bahamians able to-
years due to the encroachment of foreign carve out more of the econams pic and
second home owners, and in some cases_ | make a lot of money anid there is very
by some Bahamians, on islands like little opportunity for the midcle class
Chub Cay and Harbour Island, however, — and poor,” Mr Smith said
this is not the main reason. While Mr Symonette sais inlay
“There are a number of factors that. be impo sslbie.! ee slow ot op the
contribute to the high cost and itisnot widening gap b the < lasses,

only foreigners. The cost of infrastruc-
tural development, for instance, has
gone up.

“When I was doing a development in
the past I could count on-years ago, count
on so many dollars a months infrastruc-
tural development, now that has increased
irrespective of the foreigner. So years
ago where a back lot could cost $11,000

it is possib le to en Ms
ans to get a piece of
“There
ing forth on ways of causing t
pen. Selling BEC to Bahamian
rest of the Bank of the Bal

r, umi-
{ CoC ¢ ple.
t

nies that are

will be avs

com:



be a'sure way to help th idie class’

people and create

avenues ihey!

can create their own weali! oa

Bahamian embassy opened in Cuba

The Bahamian Embassy in
Cuba was opened Monday
evening after months of spec-
ulation.

The picture shows. from left
to right Keod Smith, Ambas-
sador for the Environment,
Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe
Pérez Rozue, Minister of Social
Services Melanie Griffin and
wife of the Bahamian Ambas-
sador, Audry Wright. Shown
at back is Minister of Foreign
Affairs Fred Mitchell, Bahami-
an Ambassador to Cuba Carl-
ton Wright and MP for South
Bastian.



















South Bahamia.

Murder acct
each other for killin

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freepori Reporier

FREEPORT - William
Forbes and Keweemade [sing
both testified before the
Supreme Court on Tuesday —
accusing each other in the

: death of Donahue Ferguson.

ee Forbes and King are on tri-
i al for the 2003 murder of Fer-
guson at Yorkshire Drive,

In his sworn testimony,









well atterided
The embassy is located at
Sth Avenue No 3006 e/30 y 32

Cuba. The Bahamas National

Youth Choir provided enter-



“A reception was held in thé’
ballroom of Hotel National de



tainment.

(Photo: Franklyn G
Ferguson)

Bahamasair signs new industrial
agreement with air workers

m By KRISTINA MCNEIL

TEN months of negotiations
came to an end yesterday as
the Airport, Airline and Allied
Workers Union and Bahama-
sair signed a newly-revised
industrial agreement with
more employee benefits.

Chairman of Bahamasair
Basil Sands. said: “The flight
to today’s signing was. not
always smooth. Indeed, there
was some turbulence encoun-
tered in the past 10 months.”

President of the AAAWU
Nelerine Harding agreed that
long and difficult negotiations
can lead to “frustration and
unrest of the members and
both sides giving up on the
good will at the initial process”
— especially when there are
‘benefits which employees con-
sider “sacred and non-nego-
tiable”.

The union said the biggest

difficulty it faced in the negoti-
aticns was challenging the gov-
ernment’s proposal for lump
sums payments, which employ-
ees deemed unacceptable.

The new industrial agree-
ment allows employees to
receive their three earned
increments from 2004 to 2006
and a four per cent increase
in annual salaries.

An earned increment of
three per cent will be given in
2007 and another in 2008.

Union members will also
enjoy the benefits of depen-
dent coverage, double pay for
overtime on Saturdays and
Sundays and an additional
month’s pay for employees
who have worked while in the
bargaining unit for more than
30 years.

Paternity leave has also

been added as a benefit, along
with a 50 per cent tuition reim-
bursement for associate and

Hs eer

CHE Pea EK
x4)



bachelor degrees obtained at
the College of the Bahamas
and 10 days of paid leave for
two union officers to attend
the annual International
Labour Organisation (ILO)
conference in Geneva.

July 1, 2006 marked the
third year of the five year
agreement between the
AAAWU and Bahamasair.

The agreement with the
AAAWU is only one hurdle
that Bahamasair has overcome.

The company faces ever
increasing fuel and mainte-
nance costs and competition
for the local market with low
cost carriers.

As for the privatisation of
the national flag carrier, Mr
Sands said that consultants
have already submitted a
report and forwarded it to the
government, but the govern-
ment has yet to make a deci-
sion.

Forbes told jurors that it was
King who attacked Ferguson
with a cutlass on February 10,

2003. ;

He said sometime around
8pm he went to the Parker
home to talk to Ferguson
regarding an accusation about
stolen “rims”.

Keweemade King and
Hailon Nottage were with him
at the time, he said.

Forbes said King ran inside
the Parker home with a cut-
lass and followed the victim
into the bedroom. —

Forbes said he ran into the
house behind King to stop the
fight. He said he saw two chil-
dren in the bedroom screaming.

However, King, in his sworn
testimony, told a different ver-
sion of what transpired.

REI See

Fabuious Shopy vi ng |
at



: oY
Veoh ah a Y ‘Th Cd.
r oi 8B Bg Boilie ‘

6)
c >
iat f VE
f hi
' lot
‘ i
ll ’ rhes!
A
n
Donahue |
came outs:ce { ifiass.
Forbes and Dor Hed *
fighting, he said
Kang-said that ! pulled
out a“hatchet i VI ng it
at Ferguson, whe

¢ at ed
said*

inside the house
Forbes then ran int
behind Ferguson

King said i



house to check « is (rrend



“VAs he bees lor ss ing Oe
trail of blood inside ¢ use
Forbes came. out hed-#
room and they let! Lie
While leaving th ene
King said he picked up thes
cutlass that Donal 5 had hay
his in hand, and tare rth “ula
lass out.of the vel ick furing®
the ride back his he iD Car-,
avel Beach. ’
According to King, he hadg
‘known Forbes for ut three’
and half years id thaal
Forbes and Ferguson wereq
friends. He said he met Fer#@
guson through Po:hes, but
that they were never ‘riends. @
The trial continues ons
Wednesday. é
>

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Nassau’s Premier Store.

For Gifts & Home Décor



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PARLIAMENT STREET
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P.O. Box N-121

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PRE PL SES STS aa

iat
ae
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

- Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

_ TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Mr Galanis & his hidden agenda?

AFTER accusing The Tribune’s English
managing editor of writing articles about the

Bahamas that could frighten off potential,

tourists and investors, and assuring the public
that he was not doing so because he was xeno-
phobic, Mr Philip Galanis was again on the
hunt for foreigners.

Last week he wanted government to inves-

‘}” tigate the appointment of Mr Hannas Babak,

an Austrian businessman, who was recently
appointed chairman of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority.

It wasn’t as though Mr Babak was working
illegally, but after several Bahamians of their
own free will had resigned from the Port, Mr
Galanis wanted the PLP government to
uphold its Bahamianization policy and find
out how Mr Babak, a foreigner, got the job.
He wanted government to make certain that
foreigners were not holding jobs that could
be filled by qualified Bahamians.

Mr Galanis said he could not believe there
had been “due process in the selection of the
replacement for Mr Francis.” Mr Julian Fran-
cis, former Governor of the Central Bank,
resigned from the chairmanship of the Port
after a short stint in the post. He was a banker
who had moved into a new business environ-
ment. Only he and the Port, both free agents,
know why he chose not to stay. It is certainly
nothing for any government to investigate.

“Immediately on his (Mr Francis’) retire-
ment, they brought in Babak to replace him,”
said Mr Galanis. “I do not recall there being
any kind of advertisement or job search made
by the Grand Bahama Port Authority to find
a Bahamian to replace him.”

“I would be the first to criticise the gov-

-” ernment if they did not insist on implementing

the Bahamianization policy that was estab-
lished a long time ago, but I am more qualified
than Mr Babak, and nobody asked me to take

it. ” x

‘Of course, Mr Galanis was quick to assure

- the public that he never wanted the job, but

had only made the statement to show that
there were in fact Bahamians with the quali-
fications to fill the post.

How does Mr Galanis know whether he
or any other Bahamian has the qualifications

' that the Port needs at this time in its develop-
ment?

Mr Galanis’ suggestion that government
has the right to enter a man’s private busi-
ness and judge what he needs or does not
need for his staff, is enough to frighten every
investor off this island. This is what the Pin-

|. dling government did, and that is one of the

many government-inflicted reasons that this
economy collapsed. -
Only a business owner knows who and what

he needs in his own business. An applicant
can show a piece of paper with all kinds of
qualifications written down — as the late Sir
Stafford Sands often said “paper will stand
still and let you write anything on it” — yet
that applicant might not be suitable for the
job. Maybe the qualifications the employer is
looking for have nothing to do with degrees,
but more to do with personality, the ability to
attract investors to the Bahamas, to dream

". dreams like the late Edward St George to cre-

ate great projects that will generate employ-
ment. Sometimes it’s just the physical look of
the person that will inspire an employer to
say: “That’s just the man.we want for the job
— he’s got the presence.”

How can Mr Galanis say that he, or anyone
else for that matter, has what the Port Author-
ity is looking for? How can a government that
has no experience in business say who anyone
should or should not employ?

No business person in his right mind is
going to bring in a qualified foreigner, when an
equally qualified Bahamian is available. The
cost factor alone, including the cost of the
work permit, almost makes the hiring of a for-
eigner prohibitive. And if a foreigner is in a top
position.in this country, it means that no
Bahamian of like qualifications is available
for the position. That is not to say that there
are no qualified Bahamians. But it does mean
that there are not enough qualified Bahamians
for all of the specialty jobs now available in this
country. There is even a shortage among

Bahamian artisans — electricians, plumbers, |
and the like. In other words, the Bahamas is

growing faster than its people.

Already government members have warned
that there are not enough critical skills avail-
able among Bahamians and that foreigners
will have to be imported.

Even Labour Minister Shane Gibson has to
think of the economy when he is about his
Haitian purge. Many small businesses could
collapse overnight if good judgment is not
used in the renewal of Haitian work permits.
After all wasn’t it Sir Lynden who told
Bahamians that they would no longer have to
hew wood or carry water? Well, that’s fine, but
ssomeone has to do it. It was this philosophy

that opened the door to the Haitian and his

much needed labour.

Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe had
the good sense to tell Mr Galanis that he was
barking up the wrong tree.

Maybe, Mr Wilchcombe would now turn to
the lead story in the Business Section of
today’s Tribune to discover why Mr Galanis
was so keen to have the Port investigated.
Apparently, Mr Galanis and his group’s offer
to purchase the Port was soundly rejected.



THE TRIBUNE



Bradley Roberts’
_response to
Tribune articles

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HAVE noted with expec-
tation The Tribune’s articles,
concerning my trip to North
Abaco, firstly as a headline sto-
ry on July 12, and again on July
13, in a byline response from
Hubert Ingraham and an edi-
torial by the editor.

It appears from the editori-
alizing of the headline story,
laced with more opinion than
fact, that the editor of The Tri-
bune was more stung by my

usual remarks and historical

facts concerning Hubert Ingra-
ham, than Hubert Ingraham
was himself. This only confirms
what the sensible reading public
has always known, that being
the historical fact that the editor
of The Tribune loses whatever
limited sensibilities reposed in
her when those of special inter-
est to The Tribune are held up
to the light of public scrutiny.

I would wish to remind or
inform The Tribune that my
desire to retire after two and a
half years and the request of
the Prime Minister for me to
continue on at the pleasure of

his appointment as a. Cabinet

Minister, is really inconsequen-
tial to the positive progression
of the nation, as opposed to
Hubert Ingraham breaking his
promise to return as a poten-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



tial Prime Minister of the Com- |

monwealth of The Bahamas. If
I were never an MP or Cabinet
Minister again, it wouldn’t be
earth shattering and destruc-
tive; however it would be earth
shattering and destructive if
Hubert Ingraham were to ever
again hold the reigns of power
in The Bahamas. That is the dis-
tinct difference in me being
requested to stay longer than I
had desired and Hubert Ingra-

‘ham returning asa potential

Prime Minister because that is
what he desires.

I would expect that the Edi-
tor of The Tribune will now
continue writing for weeks,
months and maybe even years
about my remarks in North
Abaco over the Independence
weekend, concerning Hubert
Ingraham, for again, obviously
the editor was stung very
painfully by my remarks. How-
ever, I wish to remind The Tri-
bune newspaper, that anything
they may have to say against
me and in defense of Hubert
Ingraham, would ultimately be
held up, by the public, to the
light of truth and the history of

Relations with the US

EDITOR, The Tribune.

,) GEORGE Bush is an idiot! Yes, you read that correctly. George
Bush is an idiot, the US is only concerned about their own self interest
and the neo-cons in America are trying to run the world but they are

turning things upside down.

Now that I have your attention, I have not gone crazy, but these are

~-comments you hear coming from-many quarters in The Bahamas and

region'these days..And they come from our "intelligentsia" no less,
Of course they cover their personal animosity toward the US by sug-
gesting that it is perfectly logical that The Bahamas should have friend-
ly relations with other countries in the region, because after all we need
to look out for our own self interest. Right? :
This observation is unassailable on the surface, but let's look a lit-

tle closer.

1. Where does most of the Foreign Direct Investment into The

Bahamas come from?

2. Where do most of the imports into The Bahamas come from?

3. Where do most of the visitors to The Bahamas come from?

The answer is the United States of America of course.

So the bottom line is that our self interest is in.ensuring we contin-
ue to have excellent relations with the US if we like it or not.

Furthermore, we should have cordial relations with all countries if
possible, but if our own self interest could be affected by our other inter-
national relations — like supporting Cuba or Venezuela with CARI-
COM, etc — we should respectfully stand side by side with the US.

Now if those "intelligentsia" have a better plan they really need to
show it to us. Maybe our CARICOM brothers, the Europeans, the Chi-
nese, the Cubans or the Venezuelans are just waiting "over the bar" to

"help" us as much as the US does.

Yours in Liberty,
RICK LOWE
Nassau,

July 16, 2006





who actually tells the truth,
when it comes to Bradley .
Roberts as compared to The
Tribune and their cohort,
Hubert Ingraham.

Hubert Ingraham forced Sir
Lynden to resign and provided
some benefits, but got his Cab-
inet to sweeten the benefits for
him in providing a personal
assistant at $45,000 yearly and a
maid for the rest of his life.

BRADLEY B. ROBERTS,
MP

Bain and Grants Town,
Minister of Works

and Utilities

Nassau,

July 12, 2006.

(Mr Bradley Roberts flatters
himself. The editor of The Tri-
bune is never stung “very
painfully” by any politician’s
remarks, because she takes nei-
ther the remarks nor the polliti-
cian seriously. Her only concern
is for the Bahamas and its peo-
ple. She tries to make her deci-

~ sions as abjectively as possible,

always keeping in mind that the
country comes first.

(Mr Roberts says that if he
(Bradley Roberts) “were never
an MP or Cabinet Minister
again, it wouldn’t be earth shat-
tering and destructive; however it
would be earth shattering and |
destructive if Hubert Ingraham
were to ever again hold the
reigns of power in The
Bahamas.”

(That, Mr Roberts, is a matter
of opinion. It might surprise Mr
Roberts to: know how many per-
sons — we are told that some
were even among his Cabinet
colleagues — were very con-
cerned when Prime Minister _
Christie was taken. seriously-ill.: =
How many times during that
period didn’t we hear the very
concerned comment: “Oh, dear
God, what if Bradley gets con-
trol!”

(And so there-were many
“thank God” choruses when
Deputy Prime Minister Cynthia
Pratt stepped into the breach and
carried on until the Prime Min-
ister could get back on his feet.
There was not only great relief
that she had taken over, but that
she had done thejobso well.

(Without her, many Bahami-
ans feared that Mr Roberts,
when it came to succession, was
too near the throne. So, Mr
Roberts should not fool himself
— there are those who also see
him in his cabinet position as a
potential threat. Therefore, Mr

. Roberts’ change of mind was as

important to this country, as was
Mr Ingraham’s.— Ed).



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Man faces
charge of
intent to
rape girl

A 23-year-old man accused
of assaulting a 16-year-old girl
with the intent of raping her
was arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

It is alleged that Mark
Anthony Wilkinson assault-
ed the girl on Saturday June
10. Wilkinson was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers at Court five, Bank
Lane yesterday.

He was not required to :
plead to the charge and was :
granted bail in the sum of
$10,000. The case was
adjourned to September 16.

‘Green’
party gains
support in
Purto Rico

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

AN environmental party
said Tuesday that it has col-
lected nearly three-quarters
of the signatures it needs to
qualify for the next round of
‘Puerto Rican elections in
2008, according to Associated
Press.

Puerto Ricans for Puerto
Rica expects to have all

100,000 required signatures : .

by the end of the year, said
Maximiliano Perez Collazos,
the party secretary.

The PPR, as its known,
would be the fourth party on
the ballot in 2008 — and the
only one that does not define
itself by its position on the ter-
ritory’s relationship to the
United States.

Gambling
crackdown
troubling
in Antigua

t

@ ANTIGUA
St John’s

A US crackdown on online
gambling prompted concern
Tuesday among officials in
Antigua, which has become
an offshore haven for the
industry, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Antiguan Finance Minister
Errol Cort said the Caribbean
nation would closely monitor
the legal action against
BetOnSports PLC and 11
people involved with gam-
bling over the Web.

“This is of major concern
to us,” Cort told reporters
during a break in a govern-
ment economic forum.

The two-island nation of
Antigua and Barbuda has

licensed 30 online gambling i

firms, including BetOnSports,
and has welcomed the indus-
try as a way to diversify its

economy. i

ah

PUG
Rees)
ci lsicys ara ym

Beene anita

WEDNESDAY,
JULY 19

Community Page 1540AM
Bahamas @ Sunrise
Remembering The Contract
Da’ Down Home Show {
Immediate Response

ZNS News Update
Immediate Response (cont'd)
Island Lifestyles

33rd Independence
Ecumenical Service -
Freeport, Grand Bahama
ZNS News Update
Legends: Whence We
Came

Tazmania

A Special Report

News Night 13 - Freeport
Bahamas Tonight

BTC Connection

Jeff Rodgers Basketball
Championship.Game

News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight
Caribbean and Central
American Games - Volleyball
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 '
right to make iast
programme



6:30am
8:00
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4:58

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5:30
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10:30
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11:30







Cuban nationals are still.
waiting to be repatriated

@ By KARAN MINNIS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE 46 Cuban nationals at the
Carmichael Road Detention Center are
still waiting to be repatriated, according
to Immigration officials.

Last week it was reported that the
government was still awaiting. word from
the Castro regime on the matter, and
that according to Minister of Immigra-
tion Shane Gibson, Foreign Affairs offi-
cials are looking into it.

Unlike the two Cuba doctors who
were detained at the center earlier this
year, a third country may not be willing

accept the refugees, because of their

comparative lack of skills, said the min-
ister.

During a communication to the
Bahamas Parliament earlier this month,
Mr Gibson announced the governmen-
t’s intention to initiate discussions for a
new agreement with Cuba for swift
return of Cubans captured in Bahamian
waters.

Over the past two years, Cuban immi-
grants have reportedly been the master-
minds behind numerous escape attempts

from the facility.
The most recent escape occurred last

i CUBANS in captivity at the Detention Centre on Carmichael Road

THE TRIBUNE | g ‘WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 5



month, when five Cubans fled the centre
by cutting through a series of fences.

The men were captured in Jupiter, Flori-
da a few days later.

Since that time, the government has
announced plans to beef-up security at
the centre with additional lightning and
security cameras to be placed at strategic
points to provide full surveillance of
activities at the facility.

The government has also approved
the employment of 20 additional Immi-
gration officers at the centre.

Speaking to The Tribune yesterday,
Immigration officials refused to com-
ment further on the matter, other than to
say that all the detainees are still at the
centre.

“J cannot give other any other infor-
mation on the matter,” said officer Mar-
cian Francis, who is stationed at the cen-
tre. “I can only say that they are all still
here. You'll have to contact someone
else for more information.”

However other Immigration officials,
including the minister himself, were not
available for comment as they were
either away or at meetings.

Numerous attempts were made to con-
tact these officials, but none of the calls
were returned.









@ By REUBEN SHEARER

A NEW beginning for the
children of Fort Charlotte and
Bain and Grants. Town is on the

“horizon — as a contract worth

just under $10 million was
signed for the new T G Glover
Primary School.
The contract comes four
years after the 2002. general
election, when just before the
PLP won office, structural engi-

neérs informed the previous ,

government of disastrous con-
ditions at the school.

T G Glover was later closed
by the PLP, which extended the
Albury Sayles Primary School
and added trailers to accom-
modate students from TG
Glover.

With the 2007 general elec-
tion fast approaching, Minister
of Works Bradley Roberts
explained that the government
will accomplish what it
promised to do during its first
term — construct a new school.

The school’s design, accord-

. ing to Mr Roberts, was planned
two years ago by the Ministry of

Works and Utilities.

‘He said it will be built on
Horse Shoe Drive, Oakes Field,
cover about 80,000 square feet
and will take 18 months to
build.

According to Mr Roberts,

the school will include three.’

pre-school classroom units
with self-contained kitchens
and. restrooms. It will also
feature an enclosed outdoor



Two more schools
and library planned

@ By REUBEN SHEARER

IN the wake of the contract
for the T G Glover Primary
School, Minister of Works
Bradley Roberts announced.
plans for the construction of two
other schools and a library for
COB.

These projects will be carried
out in both Grand Bahama and
New Providence, Mr Roberts
said.

He told the audience at the
contract signing for the T G
Glover project on Monday that
developers in Grand Bahama
will be invited to bid for the
construction of a new junior
high school in the Heritage Sub-
division of Freeport.

Plans for the school, he said,
are similar to the designs for T
G Glover in New Providence.

Referring to the proposed site
in Grand Bahama, Roberts said,
“this state-of-the-art two-storey

_conventional masonry building

will comprise more than 80,000
square feet.”

He said that the site “will
accommodate around 900 to
1,000 students with 25 standard
and special classrooms.”

Roberts added that the
school will also have a multi-
functional gym for sports and
assembly activities. \

“JT am also pleased to
announce that an identical
architectural design building as
the junior high school in
Freeport will be built adjacent
to Faith Gardens Subdivision
in Southwest New Providence,”
he added.

According to Mr Roberts,
contractors for this project will
soon be invited to offer bids on
this project as the building



@ FRANKLYN Wilson

‘process is expected to begin in

September.
College of the Bahamas

‘council chairman Franklyn Wil-. -..
son advised the press'that con- ».

tractors will be invited within
10 days to submit bids on the
construction of the $15 million
Harry Moore Library on the
campus.

This project is expected to’,
commence within three months. °

Mr Roberts said he has
advised Minister of Education
and MP of Fort Charlotte
Alfred Sears, that the value of
the land for his constituents and
those of Bain and Grants Town
will increase significantly as a
result of major Education
investments in these areas.

He said the community lead-
ers of Fort Charlotte must look

. beyond the cost, as the real ben-

efits to follow these projects
cannot be accounted for in “dol-
lars and cents.”

V. M. Lightbourn & Co.

would like the relatives of George Peter

Syime-Phompson or his Personal

Representative to contact their office in
Miitsh Harbour, Abaco at 242-3

0302 or k

ail at:

vimlightbourn@coralwave.com



@ BRADLEY Roberts

playground area.

“Tt will accommodate some

800 students, teachers,and |

school administrators on 6,97
acres of land, consisting of two

physical grade levels,” he said.

The primary school will com-
prise of 24 standard classrooms,
along with one for special edu-
cation. .

A science laboratory,
library, art and music rooms
will also be constructed. Phys-
ical education changing
rooms, for teachers and stu-
dents will also be built.

He said that there will be
non-slip ceramic floor tiles and
defined carpet floor areas inside

‘ the units. The architectural

design also provides for ade-
quate storage of the pre-school-
ers’ lunch boxes and books.
Roberts added that a cov-
ered walkway will be construct-
ed; along with a tuck shop and
lunch, studént assembly, and

administration buildings.
Parking areas for teachers

and the general public will be

provided, designed with securi-

_ ty booths, a boundary wall, rod

iron gates and railings.

According to Mr Roberts, the
E R Hanna Construction Com-
pany, a veteran company with
more than 40 years experience
in the industry, has-been award-
ed the contract to construct the
school.

They will be assisted by sub-
contractors who will meet the
plumbing, electrical and air-con-
ditioning needs of the school.

The contract administration
will be managed by lead design
architect Ashward Ferguson,
assisted by co-design architect
Timothy Johnson. —

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PM Christie encourages a |
high turnout for elections

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

Hi By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Although an election
date has not yet been announced, Prime
Minister Perry Christie is encouraging
Bahamians to begin preparing ,to exer-
cise their right vote.

While on Grand Bahama over the
weekend, Mr Christie said the Bahamas
has distinguished itself as a country by
consistently having a high turnout during
elections.

“I am here to say to you that whenev-
er you see me starting to dance the shuf-
fle, it is time to get registered because
you will have an opportunity to exercise
your God-given democratic right in this
country — the right to vote.

“And so it is for me to encourage you
with this opportunity I have here, not
to neglect preserving that right for your-
selves and being able to do it when you
can do so at your leisure and not have to
do it at the last moment, because you
know there is only so long that I can
shuffle and that should tell you how long
it is going to be,” he said.

The prime minister was speaking on

_ Saturday in East Grand Bahama at the

". re-opening of the New Star Club in

Ke

Bevans Town.
Mr Christie said he believes it is
important for people. to develop real

-relationships that are stronger than the





@ PERRY Christie addresses Grand Bahamians at the reopening of the New Star

Club

divisions that from time to time are
brought about by politics.

“That is why I always speak to a high-
er calling for our people, a more noble
purpose and understanding that if we



(Photo: Denise Maycock)

are going to grow our country, that we
have to do so and grow our own maturi-
ty,” he said.

Mr Christie pledged the government’s
commitment to aggressively address the

basic concerns of residents in East Grand
Bahama, such as access to portable
water, dredging of the channel, access
to cable television, land survey issues,
and completion of road improvements in
East Grand Bahama.

“I am completely assured that this
economy of this island will jump and will
grow, and that you will be enabled to
participate much more meaningfully as
Bahamians in that growing economy.

Since the hurricanes in 2004, Grand
Bahama has seen the loss of 1,600 jobs
with the closure of Royal Oasis due to
extensive hurricane damage. The resort’s
closure has also significantly impacted
the Freeport economy.

Mr Christie commended East End res-

ident Romeo Bridgewater and his fami-

ly for their perseverance and commit-

ment to,rebuilding their business, which — :

was significantly damaged by hurricane.

“We hear so much about the foreign
investors and we hear so much about
the commitment and lack thereof of
Bahamians to investing themselves.

“I have come here this afternoon to
pay tribute to this family for their perse-
verance and for their being able to sym-
bolise the greatness of the spirit of our
country, that no matter how much they
are beaten up with respect to particular-
ly nature and hurricanes, that we have
the intestinal fortitude to lift ourselves
up and to make it happen,” he said.



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How can the Bahamas improve its |

tourism product for visitors?

THE latest statistics on
Caribbean tourism show a rapid
increase in visitors in the region.

Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe said the relation-
ship between the Bahamas and
other Caribbean countries is
becoming “more and more
competitive” and emphasised
the importance of the Bahamas
continuing to secure the atten-
tion of tourists through the



“constant modernisation” of

marketing campaigns.

With this in mind, The Tribune
took to the streets yesterday to
ask the public how the Bahamas
can be more competitive.

“Service, we need to have
quality service,” said Shelton
Taylor. “High standards in cus-
tomer service in all areas of the
Bahamas.”

Mr Taylor said “blow-away”
customer service is always the
most important experience for
the guest. “Some of the other
countries in the Caribbean have
lots of history — we can’t com-
pete in that area. The history
that we have, we don’t upkeep.
Its only our service that will set
us apart — the little things like
prompt response and quick

. problem solving. There is a big

difference between being
friendly and providing great ser-
vice,” he said.

Another commentator said:
“We need to recognise our his-
tory and historical sites more.
Like the changing of the guard
at Government House — which
was a tourist attraction: for
years, but has been discontin-
ued. Even in the area of eco-
tourism — we should use what
we have to stay on top.”

“We have God’s favour,” said
Michelle Joseph. “We have
been guided over the years and
have been doing well with
tourism,” she added. “Just keep



God first and we'll do OK.” —
Mr Wilchcombe also stated
that while the Bahamas is among

those countries which signifi-

cantly contribute to the success of
Caribbean tourism, other coun-
tries are quickly catching up. He
went on to say that the Bahamas
still has the edge on most of its
competitors because it offers.a
unique product.

Kirk Hutchins said: “I think
Bahamians need to be more
vigilant in their efforts — be
more friendly and treat the
guest better. Word of mouth is
one of the biggest means of
advertising. When persons
spend lots of money to come
and vacation here, they expect
good service.”

Mr Hutchins added: “What

we have is location — I think its
about 80 to 90 per cent of our

visitors come from the United

States. Also the value of the US
dollar. in the Bahamas; they
don’t have to go through the
hassle of exchanging currency.

Prescott Strachan said: “I
think we need more cultural
things; to focus on our culture

and market it more. I also think,

we need to come up with some-
thing new that the others don’t
have.”

Mr Strachan went on to sug-
gest that the various resorts and
the Ministry of Tourism
improve and expand the array
of activities available to visitors.

Secretary/Typist

Motivated individual, good computer skills orga-
nized and capable of doing detailed work; must be

able to format and produce

reports, charts, graphs and other general correspon- |
dence, must have excellent command of the English
Language both oral and written, outstanding Tele-
phone Skills and Etiquette, be detailed oriented, and
have excellent organizational, and inter-personal

skills.

The successful candidate should have 2 - 3 years sec-
retarial experience, 50 wpm typing and transcription
experience, and proficient in use of Micorsoft Work,
Excell and Quick books skills.

Interested candidates please apply online at:

llehteb@coralwave.com or
Fax: 394-4458





@ SHELTON Taylor said:
“Service, we need to have
quality service.”



@ KIRK Hutchins said: “I
think Bahamians need to be
more vigilant in their efforts.”






SS

@ MICHELLE Joseph said:
“We have God’s favour.”

i PRESCOTT Strachan said:
“T think we need more
cultural things.”





THE TRIBUNE

URP leader:
‘Antichrist
infiltrated
our politics’

m By REUBEN SHEARER

THE Antichrist has infil-
trated the political scene in
the Bahamas, according to
the founder of the newly
formed United Reform Par-
ty.
Prince A Strachan said the
mark of the beast is “every-
where” and urged all
Bahamians to join together
against this threat by voting
for his party in the next gen-
eral election.

Mr Strachan pointed out
that after 33 years of inde-
pendence, the Bahamas is
still in debt and suffering the
effects of illegal immigration.

Blaming the PLP and
FNM governments for not’
teaching Bahamians to save
instead of borrowing, he
insisted that if this trend of
deficit spending continues,
the Bahamian dollar will be
devalued.

"We are spending more
money than we are getting
from the industries, and fish-
eries and banking. Out of
every dollar we earn we are
spending about 90 cents back
to feed, clothe and do other
things that we need in this
country,” he said.

Mr Strachan added that
successive governments have
been competing with each
other to see which one can
attract the most foreign
investment.

He said the URP, howev-
er, will not sell the Bahamian
birthright, because land in the
Bahamas is valuable and
must be protected and pre-
served for future generations.

“We will not engage in that
regard, and will make sensi-
ble, well- planned and well
thought out economic deci-
sions for our people,” he said.
“The average citizen has pat-

’ terned their lives after the

current government, who
continues to waste taxpayers
dollars and squander away.
the future generation’s wel-
fare.” i

According to Mr Strachan,
recent governments have
trained the public to be con-' |
sumers and not entrepre-
neurs.

He promised that his party
will institute responsible gov-
ernment, protect the wealth
of the nation, and ensure
greater economic diversifica-
tion.

On the point of illegal
immigration, Mr Strachan
said: “We must stop focusing
only on Haitians or
Jamaicans but all illegal
immigrants whether they are
white, brown, black or yel-
low... Successive govern-
ments have taken a ‘Band-
Aid’ approach to this matter.

“The PLP has taken

- advantage of the Bahamian

people’s emotions and uses
this as an election ploy. Gov-
ernance is serious business
and must be taken serious-
ly,” he said.

Caribbean
Star adds
planes to
fleet

@ TRINIDAD
Port-of-Spain

CARIBBEAN Star Air-
lines said Tuesday it has
bought a new 50-seat turbo- -
prop plane — the second of
four new aircraft to be put in
service this year, according
to Associated Press.

Caribbean Star put one
turboprop plane into service
in January and will buy two
more later in July, said Skip
Barnette, president and CEO
of Caribbean Star Airlines
and its sister carrier,
Caribbean Sun Airlines.

The airlines now have a
total fleet of 20 planes.

Privately held Caribbean
Star Airlines Ltd. is based in
Antigua and Caribbean Sun
Airlines Inc., is based in Fort
Lauderdale, Florida.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight on
Mondays
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 7

Beginning July 24, and every Monday and
Saturday until September 2, 2006, see The Tribune for

Cam



Severe hurricanes still expected, says meteorologist

B By CHESTER ROBARDS

DON’T be fooled — the quiet start to the
hurricane season doesn’t mean it’s going
to be less of a problem than expected.

Deputy director of the Meteorological
Department Jeffrey Simmons told The Tri-
bune yesterday that the active hurricane
season usually begins at the end of July
into September, with most hurricanes occur-
ring between August and October.

Experts have predicted 17 named storms,
nine hurricanes and five intense hurricanes
with winds exceeding 110 mph this hurri-
cane season.

Storm prediction is not an exact science,
according to Mr Simmons, but he says mete-
orologists are improving on it every day.

“There is good science behind the sea-
sonal predictions. These predictions are
possible because some components of the
ocean/atmosphere system change very slow-

ly and can remain in a similar state for many

months or they may evolve in predictable
ways,” said director of meteorology at
CBS4, Bryan Norcross.

Mr Simmons said that there has been a
one degree increase in water temperature,
which is the driving force behind hurri-
canes, since last year. The water tempera-
ture patterns from the west coast of Africa
to the Gulf of Mexico are used as predictors
of the growth and formation of Atlantic
hurricanes.

He said in order to predict the activity
during a hurricane season wind flow pat-
terns in the atmosphere are also taken into
account, especially wind shear in the upper
atmosphere which is an important factor
in hurricane development.

“Around this time we don’t have much
shearing going on in the atmosphere so
therefore there is a possibility that these
systems can grow,” he said.

“While the weather pattern is quite

- unfavourable right now for tropical devel-

; opment, it’s not indicative of what the

atmosphere might be doing a month from
now. Remember, last year was the oddi-
ty,” said Mr Norcross.

‘We also see patterns in storms at certain

. times in the season. The first part of the

season you see them develop in the western
Atlantic and as we go into the middle part
of the season they develop in the eastern
Atlantic and then later in the season they
start to develop in the Gulf,” said Mr Sim-
mons.

The Caribbean basin as well as the
Bahamas’ Meteorological departments and

_Florida’s National Hurricane Center engage

in meteorological information sharing. He
said this is why the hurricane warning and
prediction within the Atlantic area is an
impeccable entity and is getting better.

“We are prepared for hurricanes and we
bounce back pretty good, but we’ve never
really gotten the true test here in Nassau,”
he said.

The future of the Bahamas: storms t
worsen, seas and temperature to rise

_ 1 By KAHMILE REID

CLIMATE change will have

a serious impact on the
Bahamas over the next century,
according to the predictions of
experts.

hte

The, country is expected to.

experience an Increase in sever-
ity and frequency of storms, a
progressive rise in sea level, and
increased air and sea tempera-
ture by’the year 2100.

By that year, scientists from
the Inter-governmental Panel
on Climate Change (IPCC)
have predicted, global warming
will have led to an increase in
surface temperature of 2.5 to
10.4 degrees Fahrenheit, as a
result of increased concentra-
tion of greenhouse gases in the
atmosphere.

Speaking at a press confer-
ence on climate change on
Monday at Claughton House,
Senator Dr Marcus Bethel,

Minister of Energy and the
Environment, said despite the
fact hat the Bahamas con-
tributes minimally to green-
house gas emission, the coun-
try faces an “overwhelmingly
disproportionate level of risk

from the. impact of increased. °

concentration of these gases.”
According to director of
meteorology Arthur Rolle, the
Bahamas is apart of the 43-
nation Alliance of Small Island
States (AOSIS) which togeth-
er generate less than one per
cent of the world’s emissions.
Dr Bethel pointed out that
because more than 80 per cent
of the surface of the Bahamas is

_ only a metre above sea level,

the inevitable rise in sea level —
caused mostly by larger indus-
trialised countries — has the
potential to damage the vital
tourism industry.

Upon realising this in 1999,
he said, the government took

action and ratified the United

’ Nations Framework Conven-

tion on Climate Change
(UNFCCC) and joined the
international effort to cope with
global warming.

In. fulfillment of obligations
to the UNFCCC, the Bahamas

completed the ‘first National |

Communication on Climate
Change in April 2001.

Assessment

The communication Dr
Bethel said, examined the
national circumstances, provid-
ed a national inventory of
greenhouse gases, presented a
vulnerability assessment, dis-
cussed systematic observations
and capacity for building efforts
and made recommendations.

Dr Bethel announced the
launch of the second National
Communication on Climate



@ STORM intensity and frequency is expected to increase over the next century around the

Bahamas

$405,000 to aid research |
on climate in the Bahamas

@ By KAHMILE REID

TWO international agencies
have donated $405,000 to the
National Communication for
Climate Change in aid of
research in the Bahamas.

Author Rolle, director of
meteorology in the Bahamas,
revealed that the Global Envi-
ronment Facility and the United
Nations Framework Conven-
tion for Climate Change made
the donation while speaking at
the Claughton House on Mon-
day.

The money, he said, should

be spent over a period of three
years.

“We are going to be doing
detailed vulnerability studies
on the sectors, particularly
tourism, agriculture, water,
fisheries. The area of concen-
tration, however will be
tourism.”

Dr Marcus Bethel, Minister
of Energy and the Environ-
ment, who also spoke at the
press conference, reminded the
public that the Bahamas is a
coastal nation and that any dras-
tic change in climate, whether
long-term or short-term may

result in damage to beaches and
resorts — and by extension the
tourism product.

The research that will be
done in the area of tourism is
geared towards finding the vul-
nerabilities of the industry,
research ways in which the
industry can adapt to climate
change and make recommen-
dations to mitigate the effects
of climate change.

Ultimately, the results of the
research will assist government
in formulating policies that will
protect the resources in the
Bahamas, Dr Bethel said.

Change workshop, to be hosted
at Superclubs Breezes on July
18 and 19.

This year, the workshop will
focus on raising awareness on
climate change in the media and
religious organisations.

On the second day of the

‘workshop, presentations will be



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Numbah Man

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O Dillon McKenzie
> Stay With Me
Dog House
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- BLester Adderley

Why Did You Leave Me _.

Let Me See ya Whinin
Come Go With Me

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Bad Ways Bad Pay
She Ready

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Festival Time

O Fred Ferguson
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Junkanoo Music Taking Over
Bahamian Music Can’t Get Enough

Newcomer Stars Records
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1 Ghost move by Avvy



@ THE aftermath of Hurricane Frances in 2004

made by international and local
experts in the field.

The government, Dr Bethel
said, has taken steps under the
UNFCCC to deal with global

‘warming, and has approved and

adopted a national policy on cli-
mate change — which assesses

_ the vulnerability of the Bahamas. ”

“ CaColyn McDonald





This policy examines the
impact of climate on coastal
marine resources and fisheries,
terrestrial biodiversity resources,
agriculture and forestry, human
settlements and human health,
water resources, energy and
transport, tourism, and the.
finance and insurance sectors.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006
WEDNESDAY EVENING

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 9

‘Norman’s Cay and the colourful

history of a Colombian drug lord

Reerry, a
Bahamian political

weblog posted a claim that Car-
los Lehder — the notorious
Colombian drug lord sentenced
to life imprisonment in Florida
in 1988 — was living comfort-
ably with his wife on Paradise
Island.

How could this be? Well it
turns out that Lehder cut a deal
with the US government in 1992
to help convict former Panama
dictator Manuel Noriega on
drug trafficking and money
laundering charges. Noriega was
part of Lehder's cocaine cartel
in the 1980s.

That much is true, and there
doesn't seem to be any doubt
that Noriega remains in a fed-
eral prison in Miami (although
he is due for release next year).
But some are convinced that
the US government freed
Lehder in the 1990s.

According to the Internet
conspiracy site, Rumour Mill
News, "Lehder is an employ-
ee of the US Treasury while his
wife has told a veteran DEA
agent that Lehder has been sell-
ing drugs to Russia for the
CIA."

And our Bahamian bloggers
demanded to know how Lehder
— the “king of cocaine” —
could get into the country these
days: "Last year and earlier this
year, he was.lunching and par-
tying with Sol Kerzner at
Atlantis."

A spokesman for Kerzner
International said he wouldn't
even consider responding, but
US Embassy sources insisted
‘that Lehder was still safely in
‘prison, although they would not
say exactly where:

"Mr Lehder has not been

released from prison. Mr
Lehder continues to serve the
remainder of his lengthy prison
sentence in US custody, though
‘in deliberate cbscurity. Lehder
‘was not on Paradise Island and
was not partying with Sol
Kerzner." em

These rumours reportedly
drew laughter from representa-
tives of the Drug Enforcement
Administration — the US
agency that made strenuous
efforts during the 1980s to stop
large-scale drug trafficking

through the Bahamas and bring
_Lehder to heel.

he facts are that from
1978 to 1982 Lehder
operated one of the world's
_ biggest cocaine rings from Nor-
man's Cay in the Exumas. One
of Lehder's associates, inter-
viewed in the 1990s on the PBS
news magazine Frontline, put
it this way:
"He operated on the island

from the beginning because he .

had the blessing of the
Bahamian government. They
were funneling tons of mon-
ey... The Bahamian govern-
ment gave Carlos a promise.
We will advise you. You will

get a wink from us, a signal,.

when things are getting too hot
and you need to move out of
there."

Well, things did eventually
get hot — for the Bahamian
government as much as for
Lehder. And _ those activities
forever tarnished the reputa-
tion of Sir Lynden Pindling,
severely damaged our national
psyche and almost brought
down the entire government in
disgrace.

Heavy pressure from the US
led to the appointment of a
Commission of Inquiry in
November 1983. And the fol-
lowing year its 500-page report
published the unpleasant details
of widespread official corrup-
tion and described the enor-
mous social problems the drug
trade had spawned.

The son of a German father
and a Colombian mother,
Lehder started out as a small-
time car thief and pot dealer.
But his notoriety as one of the
founders of the Medellin Cartel,
and his eventual megaloma-
nia, made him a legendary and
feared figure much like Black-
beard — an earlier internation-
al rogue who once had free rein
in the Bahamas.

At the time of his arrest in
1987 Lehder, then 37, was

. reported to be worth more than
. $2 billion. Throughout the ear-
ly 1980s his airstrip at Norman's
Cay was receiving cocaine
flights from Colombia on a dai-
ly if not hourly basis, transfer-
ring the loads to smaller planes
, for distribution throughout the
US.

To begin with he bought as

much property on the island as

he could and then chased off
the remaining residents. Armed
guards patrolled day and night
and former Member of Parlia-
ment Norman Solomon was
once threatened at gunpoint on
the beach.

ehder's social activities -
were also legendary:

"Orgies," his one-time associ-
ate told Frontline. "Five males,
10 females and everybody runs
naked and everybody switch
partners and everybody drinks
and smokes marijuana, and
alcohol, and three days of
Sodom and Gomorrah."

And he was also a Nazi,
dressing in military fatiques and
comparing himself to Hitler.
According to Tamara Inscoe-
Johnson, who has written a
book on Lehder: "He spent
untold hours plotting a politi-
cal career, aiming at the Colom-
bian presidency. As his goals
expanded, so did his fascination
with Nazism; after all, Hitler’s
goal was to take over the world,
and it was the same with
Lehder."

Before Lehder, Norman's
Cay was a popular anchorage
for visiting yachts. It was devel-
oped in the early 1970s as a

small residential community |

witha clubhouse and marina.
But in 1978 a Bahamian com-
pany called International Dutch
Resources began buying up
land there. IDR was set up for
Lehder by a regular trust com-
pany in Nassau, which conve-



The entire
response of our
governmental,
law enforcement
and judicial
systems to what
had become a
clear and
destructive
threat to
Bahamian
society and
sovereignty was
nothing more
than a sham.



niently managed his working:

capital.

According to the New York
Times, Lehder was responsible
for 80 per cent of the Colom-
bian cocaine reaching the Unit-

ARRY SMITH

ed States, mostly through the
Bahamas. And the interest in
his current whereabouts is iron-
ic in view of the recent renam-
ing of Nassau international



A review of
Sir Lynden's
personal
finances by the
Commission of
Inquiry found
that he had
spent eight
times his

reported total

earnings from
1977 to 1984.



Airport after Sir Lynden Pin-
dling, "the father of the
nation".

Ledher's Bahamian empire
collapsed in mid-1983, when
NBC television broke the
news that Bahamian officials
were on the payroll of Colom-
bian drug lords. At first the sto-
ry generated howls of protest

. (and some lawsuits) from top

Bahamian officials, including
the prime minister.

But soon afterwards, they
began singing a different tune.
In 1985, after the Commission
report was published, Deputy
Prime Minister Arthur.Han-
na called on Sir Lynden to
resign and opposition Free
National Movement leader
Kendal Isaacs condemned the
“nation for sale” scandal as
the worst in modern Bahami-
an history.

"The greatest shocks we have
had to suffer in 1984 have been
the twin revelations of epidem-
ic drug use among our people,
and the incredible corruption
in the PLP as a government and
as a party," Sir Kendal said at
the time.

series of hard-hitting

Miami Herald arti-:

cles on "corruption in the
Bahamas", noted that foreign

_investors had channelled mil-





ie

on CNN.



#@ RECOVERING cancer patient Adam Johnson is shown
with Governor General Arthur Hanna during a courtesy
call at Government House on Monday, July 17. Young
Adam is recovering after a historic surgery to have a
cancerous bone removed from his thigh. The surgery
caught the attention of the world’s media and was featured

ert) a em TL




(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)



lions of dollars to the prime
minister or to companies in
which he had a secret interest:
"The money took various
forms - gifts, unorthodox bank

loans, direct payments to Pin-
dling creditors, unusual stock —

deals or generous home mort-
gages."

A review of Sir Lynden's per-
sonal finances by the Commis-
sion of Inquiry found that he
had spent eight times his report-
ed total earnings from 1977 to

‘1984. According to the Inquiry

report: "The prime minister and
Lady Pindling have received at
least $57.3 million in cash.
Explanations for some of these
deposits were given... but could
not be verified."

‘Senior police and defence
force officers were forced to
resign in disgrace. Lawyers were
condemned for bribing public
officials. One top cabinet min-

‘ister was found to be fronting

for the mafia. A magistrate was
fired for collusion. The Com-
mission’s report also conclud-
ed that some parliamentarians
had accepted bribes from traf-
fickers, and cronies were
accused of perjury.
According to the Inquiry

report: "We were alarmed by ,
the extent to which persons in .

the public service have been
corrupted by money derived
from the illegal. drug
trade...We were particularly
concerned to discover that
these corrupting influences
made their presence felt at the
level of permanent secretary
and minister.

"We have also noted with
some concern the contribution
made by...the legal profession



our opinion, the whole nation
must accept responsibility."

A one time Lehder
was put on the stop

list, but that did not prevent
him from entering the coun-
try. The Commission quoted
a 1980 police report that
Lehder and fugitive financier



One of the
world's biggest
criminal
enterprises,
managed by one
of the world's
highest-profile
crooks, was able
to operate with
impunity ona
Bahamian resort
island for years
— while the
government
looked the other
way.



Robert Vesco (who lived in
Nassau at the time) were both
engaged in drug running and
that Lehder visited the Exu-
mas frequently.

To illustrate the degree to
which Lehder controlled Nor-
man's Cay, the report cited an
incident that occurred in July
1982. An aircraft took off from
the cay with two Colombians
on board and dumped leaflets
calling for the expulsion of the
DEA on the Clifford Park Inde-
pendence celebrations. The

to them.

And all of this was in spite of
the serious social, psychologi-
cal and economic ills being cre-
ated by widespread and growing
drug addiction among Bahami-
ans — many of which are still
with us today.

In other words, the entire
response of our governmental,
law enforcement and judicial
systems to what had become a
clear and destructive threat to
Bahamian society and sover-
eignty was nothing more than
a sham.

IN erentetess Pin-
dling's charisma was

such that the PLP were able
to weather the storm and he
went on to win the 1987 elec-
tion — his last and most
pyrrhic victory. But the bot-
tom line was that one of the
world's biggest criminal enter-
prises, managed by one of the
world's highest-profile crooks,
was able to operate with
impunity on a Bahamian resort
island for years — while the
government looked the other
way.

Lehder moved back to
Colombia in 1983 where he was
eventually captured and extra-
dited to the US.

‘He and others were respon-
sible for assassinating Colom-
bia's justice minister in 1984; ©
for the 1985 attack on Colom-
bia's Supreme Court that killed
11 justices and 84 others; for
assassinating two newspaper
editors and 26 other journal-
ists; for shooting the Colom-
bian ambassador to Hungary
in 1987; and. for a long list of
other murders.

We doubt that he would be a
very attractive dinner guest for
Sol Kerzner.

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net Or visit

and the banking industry.,.In _ leaflets-had-dollar bills attached. - www.bahamapundit.com

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

eee eee |




AROUND NASSAU




> YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
PLEASE PUT “OUT THERE” IN THE SUBJECT LINE



MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -

' 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month
at 6:30pm at New Providence Community
Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is provided and
free blood sugar, blood pressure and choles-
terol testing is available. For more info call
702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm e Club

612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nas- °

sau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets
at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS



10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been .
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every fenth female patron
is allowed into the club absolutely free and is ©
given a complimentary glass of Carlo’ Rossi.
Tuesday nights also include the Carlo Rossi's
Hot Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi
Renzi and music provided by DJ Ai from 100
Jamz. Master Chef Devito Bodie provides
scrumptious appetizers.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm
to 7pm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday‘of each month
at their Headquarters at East Terrace, Cen-.
treville. Call 323.4482 for more.info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call: 364.8423 to
register for more info. *

MCIVICCLUBS =

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday,

7:30pm @ C C Sweeting Seni#@r School's Din- °

ing Room, College Avenue off Moss Road ¢
Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh
Creek,:-Central Andros » Clu> 7178 meets
each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of
the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville..

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm

- @ the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nas-
sau Resort, Cable Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every sec-
ond Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM
Office, 4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more
info.

@ THE ARTS

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas
(NAGB) will host three Youth Summer Art





MAIN EVENT

@ KEVIN WILLIAMSON

BS MACAMBLA SMITH



| METELLU IS CHIPMAN

UNDER the theme, “Seduction Surrender”, the final night of Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition

is scheduled for Spm Sund:
medalist, Ato Boldon, Ame

at the Rain Forest Theatre. The show will be hosted by Olympic
xt Top Model (Season Three), Eva Pigford, and Bahamian radio

personality, Krissy Luv. There will also be an after party immediately following the Mr Caribbean
Bahamas Competition to meet the winner of the competition, delegates, the international judges,

and celebrity hosts.

Camps beginning July 11. All camps are held
at NAGB from 10am to 3pm, and will have an
hour for lunch.

Camp One: Environmental Art

Four weeks - Tuesday, July 11 - Friday,
August 4
Description: Students will participate in the
development of the NAGB’s new Sculpture .
Garden adjacent to the Gallery’s grounds.
Facilitator: John Cox

Ages: 12 years and older

Camp Two: Film Making

Three weeks - Tuesday July 11 to Friday, July
31

Description: This camp is an introduction to
the film making craft and allows students to
experience writing, directing, shooting and
editing. ;

Ages: 15 years and older

_ Camp Three: Textile Collage

ane Weeks - Tuesday, July 11 to Friday, July
2

Description: This camp will encompass basic
textile collaging techniques such as fabric
preparing, cutting, pinning, and pressing.
Facilitator: Jan Elliott

Ages: 13 y ears and older

e Interested persons should contact the
Gallery for information 328.5800/1. Space is
limited.

WEDNESDAY
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

, & RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters __
Sports Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free

» appetizers and numerous drink specials.

= HEALTH

- Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the

public of its meeting times and places: New
Providence Community Centre: Wednesday -
7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. ~

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated
meets 6:30pm every third Wednesday at the
Bahamas National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday,
6pm-8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-
West Highway. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd
and 4th Wednesday of each month at CC

Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly
meetings on the Ist and 3rd Wednesday of
each month at Doctor's Hospital Conference

Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights.of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of
the month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.









' THURSDAY



@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hospi-
tal every third Thursday of the month at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room.
Free screenings between 5pm & 6pm. For
more information call 302-4603. :

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm
to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thurs-
days - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being
held 6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics
Seagrapes location (off Prince Charles Dr).
Doctor approval is required. Call 364.8423 to
register or for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for
Autism and related Challenges meets from
7pm — 9pm the second Thursday of each

- month in the

cafeteria of the BEC building, Blue Hill .
Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, sec-
ond and third Thursday at the Ministry of
Health & Environment building on Meeting
Street commencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is
welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ |

SuperClubs Breezes.

‘International Association of Administrative |

Professionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the
third Thursday of every month @ Superclubs
Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance
Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the.
National Insurance Board’s (NIB) training
room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm. All
retirees are welcome.

FRIDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS ©
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks
off every Friday night with Happy Hour...
special drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to
9pm and Nassau’s first European Night
Restaurant - Open Friday night till Saturday
morning 5am, serving hot food/and take out -
music, drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe
Europa...the perfect place to spend your night
out till the morning.

'@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will
be held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Fri-
day between June 9 and July 29,from1lto —
10pm.



Please Drink =





@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to
7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart
Church - Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Friday
@7pm to 8pm. , =

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every sec-
ond Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For
more info call 325.1947 after 4pm.

SATURDAY
â„¢ THE ARTS
Junkanoo Summer Festival - Heritage and
Cultural Extravaganza - will be held at
Arawak Cay every Saturday between June 9
and July 29 from 2 to 11pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Box Cart Derby
- will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every

Saturday between June 9 and July 29, from2 .

to 6pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the,
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday
mornings - 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street. es ;

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at
302.4732 for more information and learn to
save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be
held every Saturday in an effort to encourage
kids to cycle. Parents interested in registering
their children should contact organisers at jar-
cycling@gmail.com

SUNDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

-Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,

features special entertainment - Gernie,
Tabitha and the Caribbean Express - every
Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Royal Poinciana
Tea Party - will be held in Government
House Gardens, every Sunday between June
9 and July 29, from 3 to 6pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Old Town Jazz
at Sandyport - will be held at the Olde Town
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 —
July 29 from 4 - 8pm.

= HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The
Nassau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune

via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

Responsibly









s+eaer «
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 11



Haiti’s Voodoo faithful pray for miracles at sacred waterfalls

B HAITI
Saut d’Eau

BEARING offerings of rum
and freshly slaughtered goats,
thousands of Voodoo faithful
bathe in sacred waterfalls, pray-
ing for a better life and an end
to the spiralling violence that
threatens to destabilise Haiti’s
new government.

In an annual ritual that ended
Monday, worshippers from
across the Caribbean nation
arrived by foot, mule and
crammed into the back of pick-
up trucks for the weeklong Saut
d’Eau pilgrimage, according to
Associated Press.

The ritual, among Haitian
Voodoo’s holiest, comes amid a
surge of violence in Haiti’s cap-
ital that UN officials say is an
attempt to destabilise the new
government of President Rene
Preval.

“The gods tell us what to do.
That’s why we’re having so
many problems: because we’re
not listening to the gods,” said
Yolette Jean, a 35-year-old
houngan, or Voodoo priestess,
her head wrapped in a tradi-
tional red satin scarf.

Saut d’Eau’s mystique owes
to a 19th century legend that an
image of the Virgin Mary
appeared in the waterfalls.
Believing the waters hold mag-
ical powers, followers strip to
their underwear and scrub their
bodies with aromatic mint
leaves and soap.

Arms raised to the heavens, -

they ask the gods for help with
fixing broken relationships, cur-

& VOODOO faithfuls sing and dance while they bathe in a waterfall during a yoodoo pilgrimage



where many pilgrims come seeking deliverance from Haiti's suffocating poverty, others for a cure to
sickness and some seeking a better job or a winning lottery ticket in Saut d' Eau, in northern Haiti,
about 40 miles from Port-au-Prince during a annual rite among Haitian Voodoo's holiest, Sunday, July

16, 2006.

ing sickness and even lucky lot-
tery tickets. Some collapse in
convulsions; overcome by emo-
tion — or maybe spirit gods,
called loas in Voodoo. ©
“Water is life, and we come
for that special deliverance,”

Slain former police officer
‘had asked for protection’

FROM page one

the head of police requesting
assistance. We were asking for

protection. Either in the form of,

a police escort or in the form
of a firearm. But he was denied,
turned down,” the source said.

The source said that a lot

of people were very angry

about how the police handled.,.

the situation. .°° * od. *
Chief Supt Marvin Dames,
head of the Central Detec-
tive Unit, yesterday said that
he could not comment on the
issue and referred The Tri-
bune to police headquarters.
Up until press time last
night Assistant Commission-
er of Police, in charge of
crime, Reginald Ferguson,

could not be contacted for |

comment.

Another source said that
there were also widespread
‘rumours that Mr Scott was.
not the first witness in the
pending murder case, to have
been threatened or even
killed. :

Mr Scott was killed in a dri-
ve-by shooting outside his
Pinewood Gardens home on
June 29.

According to
reports, Mr Scott was siiting
in his car at 7am when a
white car pulled up near his
home.

Inmate

‘walks off |
compound’

FROM page one

Cilice was last seen wearing a white T-
shirt and blue prison trousers.

He is reported to be of dark brown
complexion with dark brown eyes, 5’9”
tall, weighing about 139 pounds.

@ THE scene yesterday on Shirley
Street after the escape.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/
Tribune staff)

police ©

A man got of the car,
approached Mr Scott’s car
and opened fire.

The gunman escaped in his
car and Mr Scott was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

Mr Scott had been a police
officer for six years, serving
as a detective constable in the
Central Detective Unit.

- He left the force in 2000

_ and was employed at Atlantis

as a security officer at the
time of his death.

Mr Dames assured the
public that police are still
investigating every avenue in
this case. He said police have

been “very encouraged” by

steps taken in the investiga-
tion so far.

“Of course there is still a
lot of work to do,” he said.

The Tribune yesterday also
contacted Mr Scott’s former
employer Basil Dean, head
of security at Atlantis, who

remembered the deceased |

very fondly.
“He was a good man, and

good at his job. He was.a

good security guard and I

understand he was a good}

(police) officer. It is really a
shame,” he said.

Mr Dean said that he now
hopes that police will be able
to solve this case soon and
bring those responsible for

Mr Scott’s death, to justice.



said 45-year-old Gerald Louis,
making his third pilgrimage to
Saut d’Eau, only 40 miles north
of Port-au-Prince but a three-
hour journey by car through

. winding and rutted mountain

roads.

FROM page one

stripes, blue trousers and tennis
shoes. He was driving his maroon
coloured Cadillac DeVille, licensed

BV37.

’ Police have conducted an island-
? wide search for Mr Stuart, who has
? not turned up at.his residence or
any of his businesses on Grand

Bahama. —

Chief Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said police are con-
tinuing their investigations into the

(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

Shot in the leg during Haiti’s

political crisis in the early 1990s,

Louis said the waters healed
him and stopped doctors from

-amputating the limb.

“You must be a believer if
you come here,” he said. “This

is where miracles happen.”
Haiti could certainly use a
few. .
The poorest country in the
Americas, Haiti is still reeling
from a February 2004 revolt
that toppled former President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide and
pushed an already dying econ-
omy deeper into despair.
After months of calm since

. Preval’s February election vic-

tory, the jittery capital has again
been gripped by violence,
including the slum massacre of
22 civilians this month. UN offi-
cials say militants are waging
violence to stir unrest and a
spark a.return to lawlessness.,

Unable to find work since the
revolt, 55-year-old Josette
Pierre came to the falls seeking
help by praying to Erzulie, god-
dess of love.

“It’s not easy to survive,” said
Pierre, who sells cooking pots in
street markets to support her

family. “Hopefully the spirits.
‘ will hear us and bring change.”

“I’m asking the spirits to take
away my misery and give me a
better life,” said 38-year-old
Guilange Joseph. “There’s no
work, no nothing.”

After bathing, pilgrims toss
their soaked underwear into the
water, a symbolic shedding of
their old self. Candles are
placed around hollowed-out
trees as goats, cows and chick-
ens are sacrificed and offered
to the gods.

Dancing and singing to drum-
ming last into the night and

-sweet Barbancourt rum flows

freely.

FROM page one

Nassau Street.

tures of the accused.

Some tearful family mem

S “FROM page one

A mix of African religions
and Roman Catholicism,
Voodoo is central to Haitian
life and is observed in some

‘form by most of the country’s 8

million people. —-

It evolved in the 17th century
among African slaves, who
were forced by French colonis-
ers to practice Roman Catholi-
cism. Many slaves secretly held
onto their African religions by
using images of Catholic saints
to serve as African spirits.

The religion has been often

wrongly associated with black

magic or sorcery, leaving a lin-
gering stereotype against fol-
lowers. In 2003, Aristide offi-
cially recognised the faith in a
show of support for his impov-
erished supporters.

Saut d’Eau used to attract |
tens of thousands of followers,
but many no longer can afford
the journey as Haiti’s crippled
economy slips further into
decay.

Still, the pilgrimage remains
sacred to many Haitians, espe-
cially to those living overseas.

Jean Butler, a 54-year-old
Haitian living in Spring Valley,
New York, said he’s been com-
ing every year since 1968, when
he first went with his grandpar-
ents.

He said that he made the trip
mostly out of tradition, but
admitted to making an occa-
sional appeal to the gods.

“I’m hoping it will help me
win the Mega,” Butler said,
referring to the New York State.
Lottery. “Maybe the numbers
will come to me in my dreams."

Pair charged with murder

represented by lawyer Ian Cargill. At the arraignment yesterday Mr Cargill informed the
court that he wanted the court's records to reflect that his client — Troy Bodie — had told him
that he had been deprived of food for some three to four days while in police custody. Magis-
trate Gomez noted the claim. The two men were not required to plead to the murder charge and °
have been remanded to jail. The case was adjourned to August 3 and transferred to Court 9,

bers of the accused had to be consoled and Jed away as the men
were taken back to Central Police Station while others shouted at camera men not to take pic-

i matter. puget

“The police department is renew-
ing its plea to anyone with infor-
mation with respect to this matter
to make contact with police
through the following numbers 350-
3107, 350-3082, 350-3085/6 or 911,”
said Mr Rahming.

Family and close business asso-
ciates of Mr Stuart are said to be
very concerned. ;

Mr Stuart, a resident of No 1
Glover Lane, Bahama Terrace, is
the owner of Freeport Taxi Com-
pany, First Atlantic Realty, and
Club Legend on Qiiéens Highway.

‘Several years ago, he bought the
former Silver Sands Hotel, which is
now closed.

Before venturing into: business,

Mr Stuart was a journalist who
came to Grand Bahama from Nas-
sau in the late 60’s to head the Min-
istry of Tourism’s office.

‘He is described by friends as an
avid golfer and former sports star,
who was recently admitted to the
Grand Bahama Sports Hall of
Fame.

OF <
@

counselling, just two weeks after he had
delivered a powerful sermon calling for
Bahamians to partner with law officials to
protect the nation’s children from abuse.

'. “We believe that the children are our pre-
cious gems,” Bishop Fraser said during the
annual Child Protection Month Church Ser-
vice, held at Pilgrim Baptist Church, off
Kemp Road.

“We are encouraging the children of this .

country to speak up if anybody were to do
anything to (them) that makes (them) feel
uncomfortable, but there are also some
adults (who) children may not be able to
trust. So we are encouraging them to find
someone (who) they can trust.” ne

Ms Zonicle explained that the council

~has a number of events planned that span

over the next several months. “
“We are continuing with our usual pro-
grammes and the nexi (programme) to come

up would be the back-to-school rally. At this —

rally children should expect to hear pep talks
from their peers and a remark from the
Minister. We want it to be a fun-filled as
well as an educational event and then there














6mph.

the depression.



. Tropical storm
forms off US coast

METEOROLOGISTS are monitoring the second named
tropical storm of the 2006 hurricane season off the US coast.

At press time last night Tropical Storm Beryl was located
| off the Eastern Coast of North Carolina.

At 5pm yesterday the depression was located
180 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

Tropical Storm Beryl was moving toward the north at

A slow turn towards the north-northwest was expected to
occur late last night or early today. Maximum sustained
winds were at 40mph with 50mph gusts.

Forecasters are predicting a strengthening of the system
with the next few days.

The Bahamas is not expected to be directly impacted by

Child Protection Council. +

will bé tréats at the end,” Ms-Zonicle'said. *
The council is also continuing to partner
with the Royal Bahamas Police Force on
issues related to pornography and the sexu-
al abuse of minors and producing radio mes-

' sages and tips for families on how to be

safe. DAs
“The committee also intends to produce a
television filler,” the director said.
Over the years, the council has been effec-
tive in bringing about awareness to abuse
and enlightening children and others with
the communities.and offering help. ;
The council, she said, is now going to play
an integral role in legislation.
“We are looking at amending the Chil-

-dren’s and Young Persons Act. .

“The Domestic Violence and Sexual
Offences: Act, which says that a young person
under 16 cannot give consent,” Ms Zonicle
said.

“This new legislation is going to be
addressing abuse and making it mandatory to
report abuse and all sexual acts of girls and
boys under age 16.”




ep

Limited
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

THE TRIBUNE














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‘GLOBAL UNITED offers Ayr Sa Shipping SAV


WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



_ The Tribune









| TG

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH



NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Senator’s Port Author



ty

bid ‘soundly rejected’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

enator Philip Gala-

nis was the ‘point

man’ for a group of

Bahamian investors

& who made an offer

to purchase the Grand

Bahama Port Authority

(GBPA), The Tribune can

reveal, but their bid was

“soundly rejected” by its share-
holders.

One source with knowledge
of the issue told The Tribune
yesterday: “Harvey Tynes was
counsel for Mr Galanis, and
Mr Tynes and Mr Galanis met
with the shareholders and dis-
cussed and made an offer to

_ buy the company for hundreds

of millions of dollars. The offer
was soundly rejected.”

It is unclear as to which
group Mr Galanis was repre-
senting, although unconfirmed
reports suggested that one of
the likely investors was Cap-
tain Jackson Ritchie, owner of
Global United.

Captain Ritchie has strong
Freeport connections through
his original company, Tanja
Enterprises, which was formed
in 1991 and has since morphed
into Global United through the
acquisitions of United Ship-
ping of Freeport, Global Cus-
toms Brokers and World
Bound Couriers Ltd, and Sea
Air Aviation Ltc of Nassau.

Global United is currently
attempting to close its purchase
of Discovery Cruise Line. Mr
Galanis is the company’s cor-
porate adviser.

Apart. from the group rep-



@ PHILIP GALANIS

resented by. Mr Galanis, The
Tribune understands that there
is at least one other Bahamian
consortium interested in
acquiring the Port Authority
from its chief shareholders, the
St George and Hayward fami-
lies.

In addition, well-placed
sources have confirmed to this
newspaper that Hannes Babak,
who replaced Julian Francis as
the Port Authority’s chairman,
also previously harboured

plans to put together an

investor group to purchase the
company.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday afternoon, Mr
Babak confirmed he had once
sought to put such a group
together, but had dropped that
plan completely.

“That is not a question any
more. It will not happen,” Mr
Babak said of his previous
plan.

In response to The Tribune’s
questions, Mr Babak con-
firmed that Mr Galanis had
made an offer to acquire the
Port Authority, but that it had

been turned down.
Mr Babak said: “The share-

holders, are not interested in .

selling, and they’re happy with
the management and structure
of the company now.”

Mr Galanis did not return
The Tribune’s calls seeking
comment before last night’ S
press deadline.

However, his involvement
with a Bahamian investor.
group seeking to acquire the
Port Authority sheds some
new light on his recent criti-
cisms of that organisation, and
Mr Babak in particular.

Mr Galanis had previously
called for the Government to
investigate Mr Babak’s
appointment, hinting that it

SEE page 2B

Reinsurance
cost control
Bahamas
First’s
‘challenge’

Insurer turns
$1.622m profit in
2005, compared
to year-before
$2.7m loss

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First’s “great-
est challenge” is to keep its
reinsurance costs “under some
reasonable level of control” in
the face of increasing catastro- _.
phe-related premium rises .

‘ while sustaining profitability,

its chairman has warned.

SEE page 5B.





i SIGNING CEREMONY — From L-R: Fulco Viooland and. Tsunemitsu Tea of Tsuji Heavy Industries celebrate with Per Herlov, Soren
Halsted and Frank G Jensen of Clipper woe Denmark..



Strong interest
in development’s
‘heart and soul’

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business
Reporter

JUST over a month since its
“soft opening”, the Chub Cay
Club’s marina is fully open for
business with fuel, customs and
immigration all easily accessi-
ble.

The $250 million investment
in the Berry Islands has
received tremendous interest
since the opening on June 15,
with a large number of yachts
anchoring at the property, a
spokesman said yesterday.

“The marina is truly the heart
and soul of Chub Cay, where
sport fishermen and yachtsmen
alike from around the world
have gathered and socialised
for decades,” said Kaye Pear-
son, chairman of Chub Cay
Club Associates the owners and
developers of the island.

Mr Pearson is also chairman
of International Marinas, the
company responsible for
designing, renovating and man-
aging the new marina.

“We’ve taken great care in
preserving the warm and wel-
coming atmosphere, while sig-
nificantly upgrading the quality
and capacity,” Mr Pearson
added.

The marina has state-of-the
art floating concrete docks and
an overall depth of 12 feet. It
can accommodate yachts of
more than 200 feet. There is
also a new 20,000 square foot
two-storey, manor-style club-
house, including a members-

{

6

only club area with trophy
room, dining room and bar on

second level.

A full service dive shop offers |

lessons and trips for snorkelling
and scuba diving, and the full-
service fishing support facilities
are suitable for world-class fish-
ing tournaments, deep sea fish-
ing, bonefishing and reef fish-
ing. Visitors can enjoy Bahami-
an dining at the Harbour
House.

The former 96- -slip marina
was closed a year ago for the
site to undergo major renova-
tions and expansion, including
the dredging of the entire mari-
na and channel to 12 feet at low
tide, and the installation of
state-of-the-art concrete float-
ing docks. More than 100 slips
are now available. When fully
completed, the marina will
include more than 200 slips.

Maura Brassil, Chub Cay's
International's vice-president
of sales and marketing, told The
Tribune in May that developers
were planning a phase 2 expan-
sion of the project that was due
to start latter this year or in ear-
ly 2007.

That phase will include a fur-
ther increase in slips from 110
to 210, along with ‘the con-
struction of townhouses and
preparation of lots. When com-
pleted, the project will feature
138 lots, townhouses and villas.
The developers are also plan-
ning to widen and resurface the
existing runway at Chub Cay
currently 5,000 square feet in
length.

Call for an Offering Memorandum
Nassau -

(Photo courtesy of Clipper Group)

Marisha Maynard 356.7764 ext 3124

Freeport - Jennie Barr 351.3010 ext 330%

*Valivation:

NOUR MA Re ool oy

Clipper’s
order set

Bahamas

‘THE Bahamas-based Clip-
per Group has signed a $300
million order for 12 30,000
deadweight tons, double hull
handy-size bulkcarriers, which
will be registered on this

nation’s shipping regirsty once

constructed.

The ships, which are to be
built by Tsuji Heavy Indus-
tries' new shipyard in Jiangsu,
about 120 miles north of
Shanghai, China, form the
biggest: single ordér ever
placed by the: Clipper:Group.

These vessels are the Trader

300m. a
to boost
registry

design, and when completed -
will bring Clipper Group’s -
total number .of ships. in this
category to 22.

The Trader series was devel-

_oped by Algoship Designers

of Nassau, and the construc-
tion will be supervised by GTR
Campbell Marine Consultants,
another Bahamian company.
The vessels will be ‘registered
in the Bahamas.
Six Trader vessels are being

SEE page 3B

FIDELITY

Beyond Banking

as.at June 30, 2006, Stock prices can po down as well as up. Past perfonmance ts no guarantee of fitute resulis. Read the Citfermg Meinorandum carefully before you invest,
ccount to invest in the Bahamas Property Fund




PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006 THE TRIBUNE ;

BUSINESS













LOCATION:

be allowed to remove such a number of
highly-qualified Bahamians without any
apparent protest from the Government,
the Port Authority seemingly being
immune from such concerns.

Yet Mr Galanis’s remarks are now in
danger of being seen as ‘sour grapes’ due
to his failed bid.

It is still unclear whether the St George
and Hayward families are considering sell-
ing their stake in the Port Authority and
numerous other Freeport-based invest-
ments.

The recent shake-up at the Port Author-
ity, which apart from Mr Francis has also
seen the departures of executive vice-pres-
ident Barry Malcolm and deputy chair-
man Willie Moss, has been interpreted by
some as the main shareholders ‘clearing
the decks’ in preparation for an exit strat-



company acts as the private investment
firm for the St George and Hayward fam-
ilies, and is the holding vehicle for their
stake in the Port Authority and all other
Grand Bahama-based investments.

Port Group Limited holds the families’
stakes in assets such as the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Devco),
Freeport Harbour Company, the Air/Sea
Business Centre, and Grand Bahama Air-
port Company.

In most of those entities, Port Group
holds a 50 per cent stake. The ownership
structure usually takes the form of a joint
venture partnership, often with Hutchi-
son Whampoa holding the remaining equi-
ty.
The Tribune understands that Port
Group Limited is currently involved in a
transaction to sell its interests Port Lucaya

' Marina, and related land, to investor —

ulator, rather than an owner of roduc:
tive’ assets.
If it is put up for sale, several sources

have suggested the best solution for the

Port Authority would be for it to effec-
tively be bought by or placed under the
control of its licencees. This would intro-

duce a high degree of self-regulation into.

the Freeport business community, and
give companies 2 a deeper stake in how the
city is managed.

Vested :

The Be Authority is effectively vested

with quasi-governmental authority, which °

could raise questions about whether any
such entity should be sold.

It also means the Government in Nassau
would take a great deal of interest in its
fate should it be placed on the market.

se f

Ps

Se e yp
a
THE hurricane season is here again. The their visits. Firstly, they would minimise the hardships
experts have predicted an active one. One way of moving towards this objective is | when we are struck by a hurricane.
In recent years, the weather has not been |View to review our building codes. We could ensure Secondly, should the damage from hurri-
_ kind to us here in the Bahamas. Grand Bahama that they take advantage of the latest technolo- | canes become less costly as a result of these J
- has been punished with particular ferocity and "gy and that we build hurricane-resistant build- actions, in time insurance rates should be fe
repeated blows. It has not yet fully recovered. ings. We could also review our planning criteria reduced.
What can we do to protect ourselves in the in order to prevent inappropriate development Thirdly, and and most importanly, lives may .
future? We can't prevent the hurricanes from in particularly vulnerable locations. be saved.
reaching our shores, so we must look at min- These measures would benefit us in anumber Anyway, we have nothing to lose by these a
imising the damage and SalCHne caused by of ways. reviews. a
0
. rt
ie
The Tribun ’ eee : ° et ta, ° 0 he
Tru Senator’s Port Aut ted’
enators rort Authority Did Soun f eyecte ,
. it
ol ta i
FROM page. 1B ther is interested in selling out and exiting these developments could be setting the it
Freeport. scene for the assets owned by Port Group 3
violated the ‘Bahamianisation’ policy to be separated from the licensing and |
because a foreigner had been appointed to Scenes regulatory functions vested in the Port
a job Bahamians were eminently quali- - Authority.
fied for. Behind the scenes, much interest is There would, though, be questions of
Other sources have questioned which focused on the activities of a little-known | what any acquirer was buying, given that
other Bahamas-based enterprises would | company called Port Group Limited. This the Port Authority would just be the reg-

tm
a

£
4

<<



egy.
Preben Olsen. The deal previously So far, the Government has adopted a J
Sources involved Port Lucaya Marketplace and ‘hands-off’ approach to the recent execu- 5
Port Lucaya Resorts, but has since been _ tive shake-up. in Freeport, unwilling to be
Yet sources close to the Hayward: and St. watered. down.. et _ .seen to interfere’ with the provisions of at
"Several Sources have plsbested that all ot

George families have been told.that nei- .

Scotiabank, Thompson Blvd. Branch

DATE:
Saturday, 22 July 2006

TIME:
10:00am — 4:00pm

Bring the Kids!



. the Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

Free Bouncing Castle, Balloons,
Popcorn, Cotton Candy,
and Sno-Cones.

Life. Money. Balance both?

* Hademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotis. Rademarks used under authorization and contral of The Bank of Nove Scotia.


THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 3B

y





Resorts capitalising on.
Pirates of the Caribbean

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business

Reporter

A NUMBER of Bahamian
businesses have capatalised on
the success of Disney's Pirates
of the Caribbean franchise by
launching their own promo-
tions based on the popular
movie.

This ties in with the Ministry
of Tourism's goal to benefit as
much as possible from the suc-
cess of the three Pirates of the
Caribbean films - The Search
for the Curse of the Black
Pearl, Dead Man's Chest ( in
theatres now) and a third
installment yet to be named
that is scheduled for release in
early 2007.

Sequels.

Grand Bahama, where both
sequels were filmed, served as
a pirate haven during the late

{600s and early 1700s, and the
Westin and Sheraton hotels at

Our Lucaya hope the connec-
tion will generate revenues
from persons visiting the
resort.

Launched

They have launched a
Caribbean Pirates Getaway
that includes accommodations,
including resort fee & service
charge; daily breakfast at Willy
Broadleaf's, a pirates-themed
restaurant; a Pirates of the
Caribbean DVD; daily grog
cocktails; a rum-lime juice con-
coction believed to be enjoyed
by pirate; welcome amenities
with a pirates theme and local
pirates delivery.

Earnestine Moxyz Our
Lucaya’s spokeswoman, told
The Tribune yesterdayy that

‘the package is available now:

through December 31, 2006.
Similarly, on New Provi-
dence, the British Colonial
Hilton is also taking advantage
of the fact that the hotel is
located on the site of what

used to be the home of one of
the country's most notorious
pirates, Blackbeard.

“We will be launching our
Pirate’s escape through Sep-
tember,” said Opal Gibson, of
the Hilton’s marketing depart-
ment.

She explained that persons
who reserve the package will
receive, in addition to the stan-
dard room rate, a welcome
glass of grog and amenities for
children in the group, which

will include a hat, pirate-

themed gift basket, colouring
books and tickets to the nearby
Pirates Museum.

Intrigue

To add to the intrigue of
those items, Ms Gibson added
that the Hilton has also part-
nered with Diamonds Interna-
tional to allow guests who
choose the pirates. vacation an
opportunity to.win a treasure
chest filled with jewellery.

“We are offering three

chests, one monthly for the
next three months. In July,
guests will have a chance to
win a chest with his and her
Movado watches; in August,
they can win a choice of tennis
bracelet for women or a cable
bracelet for men; and in Sep-

tember they have a chance to.

win either a tanznite jewellery
set for a woman or a Movado
watch for a man,” Ms Gibson
said.

So far, she said the promo-
tion has generated much inter-
est from potential guests.

The Bahamas has success-
fully tied itself to the franchise
outdoing its business rivals in
the multi-billion business.

Director General of
Tourism, Vernice Walkine,
said that ensuring the two
sequels of Pirates of the
Caribbean are associated with
the Bahamas will go a long
way in diversifying the prod-
uct the country offers to its vis-

‘itors.

‘In addition, Rene Mack,

| Clipper’s $300m order set
to boost Bahamas registry



FROM page 1B

‘built in Cochin, India, where Clipper has
an option for a further two Trader ships.

In addition, Clipper is building another
four Trader vessels at Shanhaiguan Ship-

yard in China.

Earlier this year, Clipper signed a con-

tract for. the construction of four 4,600
deadweight tons Multipurpose vessels to
be built at Ben Kien Shipyard in Northern

Vietnam.

“in China: °°

It entered into a contract for two 32,000
deadweight tons bulkcarriers to be built at
Hakodate, Japan, and a contract for two

300,000 deadweight tons VLCC (very
_large crude carriers) to be built at Jiangnan

The latest Trader order brings the total
number of vessels currently under con-
struction or on order at various shipyards

in China, Vietnam, India, South Korea,

®,

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following

position:

HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT

Serves as Human Resources Assistant/Techician responsible for performing the
full range of technical support duties for all employees. The incumbent is
responsible for Embassy’s recruitment program to include Locally Employed —
Staff, Eligible Family Members, American Citizen Resident, Bahamian and Third

Country Nationals.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- A high school diploma

- Three years of experience in the field of Human Resources
Administration or Office Management and Customer Service related work

- Must have a good working knowledge of general office procedures,
Microsoft office suite, and data base management.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must have the ability to identify priorities, meet deadlines in a timely manner
and to work independently with minimum supervision. Must have a good
knowledge of recruitment issues.

~ Must be able to interpret complicated government regulations, assess
prevailing practices and keep up to date on all issues and trends affecting

areas of responsibility.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package

including performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life
insurance, pension and opportunities for training and development.

: Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S citizens who are eligible for
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations

Applications forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30p.m. Monday through

Friday at the security area’of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy: addresses to Human Resources
Office no later than Friday, July 26, 2006



Japan, Turkey, Spain and the Netherlands

to 58 vessels. When delivered, all these.
vessels will be flying the Bahamian flag.

The Clipper Group's fleet is around 240

vessels, of which 107 vessels are owned:

* ‘by the company." ~~ a TERT *

Qualifications:

skills.

minimised

If you are interested:

2006 to:



president of the travel and
lifestyle mark«»ting practice at
the Bahamas n1ain public rela-
tions agency, ‘Weber Shand-
wick said the Bahamas was
way ahead of its competitors
in the region in seeking to eco-

Pirates of the Caribbean - Dead
Man's Chest movie and its
spin-offs.

The Bahamas has also bene-
fited by being including on
international promotion for the
film which is one of the block-

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

- OPERATIONS PROJECTS &

RELATIONSHIP SERVICES

~ MANAGER

¢ Previous experience in a custorner interface role will be an asset.

e Ability to effectively deal/commu’ nicate with individuals at all levels of
the organization as well as, with vendors and consultants.

° Project management experience and! good business analysis methodologies
¢ Good leadership, negotiation skills and well-developed influential skills
sufficient to resolve distinct diifferences or opinion or approach.
-° Aminimum of 3 - 5 years banking operations experience.
General Requirements/Responsibilities:

e Tocarry out business analysis of exisiting policy or practice with particular
- emphasis on improving efficiencies \with the Operations network

e Work with Centre Manager and Senii. or Managers to ensure receipt of
change is implemented against plan and distribution to their areas are

e To manage the expectations of the: respective Lines of Business as
it relates to new initiatives being exp. lored.

Submit your resume private & confidential in 1 WRITING ONLY before June 28,

First Caribbean International Ba nk (Bahamas) Limited

Or email: chaunte.Toote @firstcaribbeai bank.com

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under ccnsideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.

nomically benifit from the _ buster hits of the summer.

INOTICE

NOTICE is herek»y given that MAZEE AETHILDA BRUSCH,
P.O. Box F-40'367, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Beihamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why ré¢agistration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should se?nd a written and signed statement of the
facts within twentyr-eight days from the 19TH day of JULY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O..Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

vl
\

NOTICE is hereby giv en that MARIA SILVA DE MENDEZ,
P.O. Box CB-1126(), CABLE BEACH, SANDYPORT,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, | is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citi. zenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahé amas, and that any person who knows
any reason why regist ration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a! written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eig ht days from the 19TH day of JULY,
2006 to the Minister . responsible for.Nationality and











































NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given th iat NIXON BREUS OF ST VINCENT
ROAD, P.O. Box CR-!34802, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is

Citizenship, foir registratic n/naturalization as a citizen of The.
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalizatidin should not be granted, should
send a written and signé3d statement of the facts within
twenty-eight clays from thie 19TH.s é
Ministerr espaieble far Neiionalify.
N- 7147; Nassiau® Bahamais.



ERNE







FIRSTICARIIBBEAN
NK

INTERINATION.AL BANK



foi

Ms. Chaunte 'I[oote
Administrative Assistant

P.O. Box N-8:329
Nassau, Bahar nas

Citizenship, P.O.Boo: N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. |

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and |_

*

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006





Late-day bounce
leaves






Legal Notice

NOTICE
TOBIN LTD.

‘|. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:






(a) TOBIN LTD is in voluntary dissolution under the provisir ons of Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companit:s Act 2000.

* (b) The dissolution of the said company commencec| on 18th July,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted t o and registered
by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Asso siated Ltd., Pasea
Estate, Road Town, Tortola, B.V.I.

Dated this 19th day of July, A.D., 2006.

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator




2005
FAM / DIV /No.509

“COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Family Division

BETWEEN
VELTHY LORRENE PE' TTY
; Petitioner
AND
BARRY PETTY
Respondient

ADVERTISEMENT OF NOTICE OF PETITION |

Take notice that an action has been commenced against you
in the Supreme Court, Divorce and Miatrimonial side Action
No. 509 / 2005 in which the Petiticyner has filecl a Petition
on the 21st day of September, 2005 seeking dissolution of
marriage.

And take notice that it has lbeen ordered by The Su-
preme Court that service of the Petition in the said action be
so effected on you by way of advertisement of thie Notice of
the Petition on two (2) separate occasion in two (2) of the
daily newspapers.

And further take notice thiat you must writhin four-
teen (14) days’ from the date that this advertisement is pub-
lished, acknowledge service of said Petition by completing
a prescribed form of Acknowledgement of Service. which
may be obtained on request from the Attorneys whose name
and address appear below, otherwise the Petition. will be
heard and determined before the: Supreme Co urt without
you.

Dated 18 day of May, A.D. 20 06

BAIN, GOMEZ & CQ.

Chambers

The Rigarno Building

Bay Street & Victoria Avenue North
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner





Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 18 July 200 6



@ By CHRISTOPHER WANG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — A late-
day rally gave stocks a moder-
ate advance yesterday as a sec-
ond day of sharply lower oil
prices calmed investors uncer-
tain about the direction of inter-
est rates.

Better-than-expected earnings
from Coca-Cola Company and
United Technologies Corpora-
tion propped up the Dow Jones
industrials, while mild wholesale

inflation data also lent some sup- .

port to the market. But concerns
about conflict in the Middle East
made investors uneasy about
buying: Stocks spent most of the
session lower before recovering
late in the day.

John Forelli, portfolio manag-
er for Independence Invest-
ments, said traders were bracing
for Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke’s appearance
before Congress Wednesday.

“It’s the first time in a while I
can remember that we were
within three weeks of a Fed
meeting and Fed fund futures
were 50-50,” Forelli said, mean-
ing the market is divided on
whether the central bank will
boost interest rates when it meets
August 8. “Bernanke tomorrow
could be a linchpin for a rally or
continued malaise in the trading
range we’ve seen.”

While a modest rise in core
producer price index helped the
inflation picture, analysts said

the stronger-than-forecast gain
in overall PPI raised the possi-
bility of more rate hikes from
the Fed and also unnerved the
bond market. Downbeat hous-
ing data renewed fears about an
economic slowdown.

The Dow climbed 51.87, or
0.48 per cent, to 10,799.23, after
sinking as much as 63 points ear-
lier.

‘Broader stock indicators also _

recouped early declines. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
gained 2.37, or 0.19 per cent, to
1,236.86, and the Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 5.50, or 0.27
per cent, to 2,043.22.
Advancing issues overtook
decliners by six to five on the
New York Stock Exchange.
Stocks barely budged Monday
amid nervousnous about buying
following sharp losses last week,
Wall Street’s worst in 2006.
However, the rise in overall
PPI had the bond market wor-
ried about inflation weakening
the value of fixed-income invest-

ments. The yield on the 10-year:

Treasury jumped to 5.14 per cent
from 5.07 per cent late Monday.

In economic news, the Labour .

Department said PPI grew 0.5
per cent in June, ahead of esti-
mates for a 0.3 per cent rise.
Core PPI — excluding volatile
energy and food costs —
increased 0.2 per cent to meet
analyst expectations.
Meanwhile, the National
Association of Home Builders
said its index of new home sales

slumped three points to 39 in
July — a 15-year low — citing
pressure from higher lending
costs.

The day’s data reinforced Wall
Street’s anxiety about the econ-
omy. Although recent reports
have provided evidence of slow-
ing economic growth, rising infla-
tion from persistently high oil

prices could prompt the Fed to

keep boosting interest rates —
and potentially trigger an eco-
nomic downturn.

That comes as central banks
worldwide are also lifting rates to
contain inflation, which would
curb global demand and foreign

_investments as money becomes

more expensive to borrow. On
Wednesday, Bernanke’s speech
and the latest reading of the
Labour Department’s consumer
price index. could lead stocks
sharply in either direction.

“TI think the key is going to be
the monetary policy situation,”
said Bill Strazzullo of Bell Curve
Trading. “Not just in the United
States, but all over the world.
We might be close to being done,
but Japan is just getting started.”

Tension in the Middle East

sent crude futures soaring before.

trades locked in profits toward
the end of the session..A barrel
‘of light crude: jumped to $76.55
but fell $1.76 to settle at $73.54
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

Elsewhere, the US dollar fell
against the Japanese yen. Gold
dropped to $630 an ounce.

stocks higher

Dow Coca-Cola said higher
sales and overseas growth helped
its profit gain seven per cent to
beat targets by two cents per
share. Coca-Cola climbed 85
cents to $43.55.

United Tech, also a Dow com-
ponent, said its profit grew 14
per cent as demand for aero-

space products offset weakness .

at its Carrier heating unit. Unit-
ed Tech advanced 92 cents to
$58.88.

Johnson & Johnson weighed
on the Dow, slumping 31 cents to
$60.60 despite a nine per cent
jump in earnings on record sales
and less marketing and overhead
costs.

Merrill Lynch & Company’s
earnings swelled 42 per cent on
solid trading activity despite the
second-quarter downturn in the
markets. Merrill Lynch nonethe-
less slid 77 cents to $67.50.

Japan’s market fell for a fifth
straight session to a one-month
low, with the Nikkei stock aver-

‘age sinking 2.75 per cent amid

worries about the violence in the
Middle East. Britain’s FTSE 100
lost 0.34 per cent, Germany’s

DAX index fell 0.37 per cent and _

France’s CAC-40 was lower by
0.33 per cent.
Preliminary consolidated vol-

ume on the NYSE was 2.58 bil-

lion shares, which led the 2.24

“billion shares that changed hands

Monday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies gained 3.95,
or 0.58 per cent, to 681.64.



FColina

if Financial Advisors Ltd.

SECURITIES INVESTMENT
ADVISORY FIRM

is seeking a senior £ lationship
manager in private banking. The
position requires proven experience
in financial advisory services, asset
management and customer
relationship management.



-The successful Candidate must possess:

-Ten years experience in Swiss Private
Banking

-University education (business or finance)

-Personal contacts to high net worth
individuals

-International working experience —

-Languages: Spanish, German, Italian and
English

Please send resume to P.O. Box AP59223

#466 or to fax no. 327 60 58.

Bahamian or permanent residents only
need apply.












@I 5



Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-Sixth (26th) Annual
General Meeting of The Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit
Union Limited will be held at The British Colonial Hilton

- Hotel, West Bay Street, on Friday July 21, 2006 commencing
at 6:30pm for the following purposes:

¢ To receive the teport of The Board of Directors
* To receive the Audited Accounts for 2005
¢ To elect members of The Board of Directors

¢ To discuss and approve the budget for 2007

All members are urged to attend.

Refreshments will be served!



& Scotiabank

VACANCY

Assistant Manager, Marketing & Product Development

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of an
Assistant Manager, Marketing & Product Development. The
successful candidate should possess the following qualifications:

* Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing & Product Development
(or a related field).











Abaco Markets 0.00 -0.019 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.70 Bahamas Property Fund 12.05 12.05 0.00 4,050 1.612 0.380 7.5 3.15%
6.44 Bank of Bahamas 7.49 7.49 0.00. 4,604 0.738 0.330 10.1 4.41%
0.70 Benchmark 4 0.80 © 0.80 0.00 0.292 0.020 2.7 2.50%
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.59 1.59 0.00 0.143 0.000 11.1 0.00%
1.10 Fidelity Bank 1.49 1.49 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.15 9.15 0.00 1,165 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
1.39 Colina Holdings 1.96 1.96 0.00 0.009 0.000 217.8 0.00%
8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.80 10.80 0.00 2,236 0.931 0.600 11:6 5.56%
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs i 4.26 4.22 -0.04 0.115 0.045 37.0 1.06%
2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.45 2.50 0.05 4,900 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
4.02 Famguard i 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.49 Finco 11.50 11.50 0.00 1,417 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78%
8.75 FirstCaribbean 12.43 12.43 0.00 0.885 0.550 14.0 4.42%
8.91 Focol 11.15 11.15 0.00 0.885. 0.500 12.6 4.48%)
1.00 Freeport Concrete : 1.00 1.00 0.00 -0.162 0.000 N/M 0.00%
9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.532 0.405 17.9 4.26%
8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 9.10 : 0.00 0.565 0.560 16.1 6.15%

Kerzner International BDRs 7.96 7.98 0.02 0.160 0.000 49.7 0.00%

Premier Real Estate

4.80%
. 7.85%)

11.00 1.923

0.000








Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25
RND Holdings






BDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets





S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V Last 12 Months

+ 91.2956 1.2402 Colina Money Market Fund 1.295645*
>, .2.9038 2.3810 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9038***
3915 2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480**




Colina Bond Fund 1.17441179""





1.1744



AP Me 246









%
BISX ALL SHARE IND
52wi-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 wake

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

- NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

* - 30 June 2006

** - 31 May 2006

** - 30 June 2006



¢ At least 3 years experience in Marketing & Product

Development.

Exceptional written communication skills.

Excellent interpersonal skills.

Excellent time management and organizational skills.
Comfortable with autonomy and self motivated.
The ability to organize and execute multiple projects with
minimal supervision.
* The ability to work well under pressure and meet deadlines.
* The ability to work flexible hours and travel.
¢ Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point).

Interested persons should submit applications in writing
marked Private and Confidential to:
' Manager, Human Resources,
P.O.Box N-7518,
Nassau, Bahamas

Applications should be received no later than Friday, 21st July, 2006



-=s2f 2s
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006, PAGE 5B

i
Reinsurance cost
control Bahamas

First’s challenge’

FROM page 1B

Writing in the 2005 annual
report for the company’s par-
ent, Bahamas First Holdings,
. Ian Fair said reinsurance costs
had “risen significantly” over
the past five years, due to hur-
ricane-related damage and
associated insurance payouts.

The Bahamas’ proximity to
the Caribbean and the US
meant it was included with
these regions when reinsurers
priced this market for cata-
, strophe reinsurance, and
increasing storm-related claims
in those two areas had a
knock-on effect on this nation.

-Mr Fair wrote: “Access to
sufficient reinsurance for us to
- be sustainable is becoming
rather challenging and
extremely expensive...........

“The biggest challenge we

now face is how to sustain the,

> group’s profitability for all
- stakeholders while keeping our
reinsurance costs under some
reasonable level of control. We
are actively studying this situ-
ation with a view to having

-something to report before the ©

end of 2006.”

- Escalating reinsurance costs
is a problem being faced by all
Bahamian general insurance
carriers in the wake of the busy

’ 2004 and 2005 hurricane sea-

sons, the latter of which was a
record-breaking year both in
terms of named storms - 27 -
and those that reached cate-
gory five strength.

Insured losses in 2005,
reached $83 billion, compared. ..,

to $45 billion the year before,

which was also a record.
Reinsurers account for a

large percentage of the claims

paid out, especially in the

Bahamas, ‘where general insur-
ance carriers have to purchase
large amounts of. reinsurance

due to their relatively small

capital bases.

_ This means that reinsurance
costs are critical to determining
property and casualty premi-

-um levels in the Bahamian -

market, and reinsurers are like-
ly to demand higher premiums
from this nation’s carriers to

both help compensate them for-

previous losses and keep them

interested in this market.

The Bahamian general
insurance market would be
most impacted if there was a
loss of reinsurance capacity,
meaning that reinsurers had
either gone bust or were
unwilling to assume risks in
this nation.

Meanwhile, Patrick Ward,
Bahamas First’s president, said
the company earned $1.622
million in net income for fis-
cal 2005, compared to the pre-
vious year’s $2.705 million loss,
despite incurring 280 claims

with a total loss of just. over.

$10 million due to Hurricane
Wilma.
For the year to December
31, 2005, Bahamas First’s gross
-written premiums increased by
34 per cent to $82.454 million,
compared to $61.752 million
the year before.

The growth was aided, Mr
Ward wrote, by property rate
increases and Bahamas First’s
acquisition of Commonwealth
General’s general insurance
portfolio.

Net written premiums rose
by 28 per cent to $30.482 mil-

lion, compared to $23.789 mil-
lion, while net premiums
earned rose 16 per cent to
$28.423 million.

Hurricane Wilma-related
claims saw Bahamas First suf-

fer an underwriting loss on its
property insurance portfolio,
Mr: Ward ‘reported, even
though gross premiums rose
by 43 per cent.

However, motor and liabili-
ty insurance generated “record
underwriting profits” for the
insurer, with Mr Ward saying:
“The importance of this
account to our bottom line
results cannot be overstated

and we will continue to drive.

this process.”

Bahamas First also suffered
an underwriting loss on its
marine insurance portfolio
despite an 18 per cent increase
in premiums, attributing this
to “higher than normal theft
losses” as well as the impact
from Hurricane Wilma.

Mr Ward added: “The short-’
‘term demand for cash created

by Wilma resulted in a deple-
tion of cash on hand as funds
were used to settle the losses
we incurred in as timely a man-
ner as possible.”

The company’s bank over-
draft increased to $3.494 mil-
lion at 2005 year-end from
$368,261 the year before, as
Bahamas First funded the costs
of meeting Hurricane Wilma
claims.

It added: “A significant
amount of the losses paid
included amounts due from

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the

news, read Insight on Mondays












Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL ANTHONY WELSH, #58
OF ELLIS LIGHT FOOT AVE, P.O. BOX F-569, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA,BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The.Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should.not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 19TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama,





CAREER OPPORTUNITY

GRAHAM THOMPSON & CO.

Graham, Thompson & Co. continues to expand and remains at the
cutting edge of complex commercial transactions within the financial
services industrial sectors of The Bahamas.

We are seeking a talented and ambitious

Commercial/Corporate/Securities Lawyer

with a minimum of 5 to 7 years post qualification experience to join

1. our Nassau Office.

Candidates must possess demonstrated skills and the ability to work
independently on varied complex commercial/corporate transactions
|.. within a broad range of business and industries. Previous experience
| with Securities transactions and IPOs as well as secured lending
and structured financing essential.

~ We offer the support of a strong team and friendly working enviroment
and exposure to high caliber clients. You must be a team player, be
able to “think beyond the box” and enjoy the challenges of this fast
growth area. Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
‘candidates with the right aptitude and skill base. a

Applicants should send detailed resumes to:

The Managing Partner

P.O. Box N- 272, Nassau, Bahamas, or
by facsimile (242) 323 0012 or by

email: info@gtclaw.com

No telephone calls will be accepted.

a

e

reinsurers which had not yet

been recovered...”
Bahamas First confirmed

that it paid $1.75 million to

acquire Commonwealth Gen-
eral’s portfolio, the total cost
rising to $2.056 million once
reinsurance costs were
accounted for.

Mr Ward said a further pay-
ment for Commonwealth Gen-
eral’s insurance portfolio had
been made after the 2005 year-
end, “due to the fact that the
total premium transferred to
the group exceeded the origi-
nal target”. .

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps _
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

J] If so, call us on. 322-1986, |



and share yout story.










LEGALINOTICE

NOTICE
GRAZIANAICORP.

Noticellisfherebylgiventthatlinlaccordancel withiSection
137(8)lofithelInternationallBusiness1CompanieslAct,12000,
thelldissolutionloffGRA ZIANAICORP.hasibeenlicompleted;
allCertificateloffDissolutionlhaslbeenlissuedlandithelCompany
hasithereforelbeenlstrucklloffilthelRegister.

ARGOSAICORPJINC.
Liquidator

BANIF International Bank Ltd.

Wholly owned subsidiary of Banif ~—S.G.P.S., SA

Operations Manager

Reporting directly to the General Manager, the successful candidate
must have: or

A minimum of 5 years of international banking experience, having
dealt with Loans, Deposits, Foreign Collections, Swift Systems,
Charge Cards and Payable Through Services, Corporate
Management , Staff training. Strong knowledge of AS400
computer. Microsoft Windows, Word and Excel applications.

Complete command ef Portuguese and English languages is.a
requirement, due to heavy telephone contact with the Group's
Head office, branches and clientele and preparation of reports to
Senior Management.

We offer 2 competitive salary commensurate with qualifications and
experience the applicant brings to the position.

Only Bahamians or holders of Bahamian status need apply in writing
to: ;

The Manager
P.O. Box SS19487
Nassau, NP, The Bahamas

| Bank ok The | Bah 1m<

INTERNATIONAL



“A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR

Core responsibilities:

® — Perform operational and compliance audits in finance, operations
and credit areas of all branches and departments

4 Preparation of audit reports for review by Management and Audit

Committee

@ Review financial data and reports
@ Assist external auditors during year-end audits and any special .

reviews.

® Perform audit reviews and audit testing for any new system

implemented

@ Performa variety of other related duties, such as assisting with
special audit review projects and investigations.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

A minimum of three years experience with an international public

accounting firm.

A Certified Public Accountant, Certified Internal Auditor or
equivalent designation.

Detailed understanding of commercial banking, The Central Bank
of the Bahamas Acts and Regulations, and The Professional
Standards of the Institute of Internal Auditors

Strong accounting and auditing skills to analyze financial

statements

Computer literate — Ability to use Blecnone Working papers,
MS Word and Excel ©

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications, Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 20 July 2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International

P. O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas





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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS

iii a a a ee

NBA stars hold Court time

US national

at Jeff Rodgers camp tv

HB B-.sKETBALL _and being able to give alittle the phenomenon it is now. a OIC
By RENALDO DORSETT input to the youngsters around “This has just grown tremen- Associated Press

Sports Reporter

FOR almost two decades,
the Jeff Rodgers Basketball
Camp has been the preemi-
nent teaching tool for young
Bahamian basketball. players
looking to learn the basics of
the game.

In this the 19th edition of
the camp, Rodgers once again

hosted several NBA celebri- -

ties at the Bahamas Academy
Gym, much to the delight of
over 400 young campers.

Former NBA. veterans
Travis Knight and Felton
Spencer, New Orleans Head
Coach Byron Scott, and NBA
Hall of Famer Calvin Murphy,
spent about two hours working
with the campers through drills
and offering words of encour-
agement.

Knight, the former New
York Knick and Los Angeles
Laker, has been a mainstay of
the camp for almost a decade
and has worked tirelessly
alongside Rodgers to help the
development of the camp.

Knight’s message to the
campers was to use basketball
as a tool to further their devel-
opment and get where they
want to be in life.

Spencer echoed Knight’s
sentiments, telling the campers

the average NBA career lasts |

just over five years, therefore
importance in the classroom
was paramount.

Scott, kept his message short
and simple but it may have
been the most memorable of
the day.

He stressed to campers the
importance of the “three D’s”:
desire, discipline and dedica-
tion.

Murphy, the most animated
of the group, went through a
series of free throw shooting
drills with the campers and

inspired them to become suc-
cess in all aspects of life.

“This is what I do,” he said,
“I look forward to traveling

the world.”

He applauded Rodgers’
efforts over the past 19 years
and expressed his enthusiasm
to help further the develop-
ment of basketball in the
Bahamas.

“Jeff Rodgers has a great
teaching situation down here,”
he said. “Every year he invites
me to come down here and
every year I put it in my sched-
ule and make sure that I come
down.”

The 5’9” former Houston
Rocket has received many
accolades in the game of bas-
ketball, but said to campers
that they should apply the
same dedication to other
aspects of life.

“The 15-20 minutes I get to
spend with these youngsters,
I use it to talk about more than
just basketball, I use basket-
ball for about three minutes,”
he said. “The rest I used to
talk about citizenship and the
responsibilities of being an all

around person is very impor-.

tant to me. We talked about
pride for a bit and J let them
know what it means to me, We
also talked about keeping a
positive individual attitude,
respect, making intelligent
decisions, pursuing a dream
and working on your educa-
tion.”

Murphy did not forget about
his basketball roots however,
going through a number of

-shooting drills with the eager

young campers.

“I wanted to make sure they
knew the proper elements of
free throw shooting, if you
don’t know how to do it, you
can’t make it consistently,” he
said, “Then I went out there
and .demonstrated a little bit

for them, they said I was too .

old so J thought I’d show
them.” ,
Jeff Rodgers, Camp Direc-
tor, said it has been a pleasure
to see the camp grow from its
modest numbers years ago, to

Peers

dously over the past 19 years,”
he said, “It’s almost getting to
the point were we don’t have
enough space to capacitate the
large numbers, but everything
has gone well and this may
have been the most exciting
year we have had thus far.”

He said the appearances of |

the NBA personalities on a
yearly basis is an effective
means of portraying a message

from people the campers may’

be able to relate to.

“Having the NBA celebri-
ties come down is so impor-
tant because we want the
campers to hear the. message
from people that have
achieved a high level of suc-
cess and have excelled in the
game of basketball,” he said,
“They also serve to give these
guys hope,” We want.them-to
know that even though they
may be going through things
in life, the key to success is to
persevere and have determi-
nation to work towards your
goals. in life, whatever they
may be.”

Rodgers plans now to use
the camp as a means to take
even further steps in enhanc-
ing the level of basketball tal-
ent in the country.

“Right now I’m in the
process of creating the Jeff
Rodgers Basketball Acade-
my,” he said, “Ideally we want

to be able to teach basketball .

year round.”
The camp culminates tomor-

row night with its annual “Fun.

Night” at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

The festivities begin at 7pm
as the campers will display
skills learned over the past few
weeks at the camp.

There will also be an exhibi-
tion game featuring the visiting
NBA players.

H TRAVIS KNIGHT in
action for the LA Lakers.
(AP FILE Photo)



Soccer camp
kicks off for

the summer
FROM sports front

camp instructors include:
Matthew Green,.coach of
the U-20’s women's nation-
al team and local Women's
League Champions FC.
Nassau; Larry Minns, expe-
rienced local youth coach
and head coach of local
men's team Bears FC, and
Deron Swaby, men’s
national team player and a
recent graduate of Bradley
University where he
starred on the men’s soccer
team.

Camp is from Monday,
July 24 - Friday, July 28
and features two.sessions a
day. Session one will run
from 10am -1pm and Ses-
sion two from 2pm -5pm.
Application forms for the
camp and information on
yearly after-school pro-
grams canbe foundat- |
www.bahamassocceracade-
my.com. For more infor- ©
mation, call 324-3371.

B GARY WHITE, USSF
A license coach and
Bahamas Senior Mens
Coach and (inset)
GODWIN BUTLER,
Bahamas Soccer Academy
student Godwin Butler at
the 2005 camp.



BRUCE ARENA has a
message for American soc-
cer fans: Be patient.

Arena took over the
struggling New York Red
Bulls on Tuesday, but also
predicted that his former
squad — the U.S. soccer
team — would not win con-’ .
sistently at the World Cup
until 2018.

“Why did I say 2018?
Because I know that it’s not,
going to happen in 2010; '-
2014,” he said at his intro-
ductory news conference.
“We have a long way to go. « :.
To get there, you’ve got to’ ©
know where you are. It’s the:
same thing with this team.” ’-
If I told you, we were going * - °
to compete for the MLS:
Cup right away, if I told you _
we were going to win a
World Cup in 2010 ... who’s’ -
going to believe that? fetes

“We made progress in this'
World Cup. But we do not °
have players of the quality ©
and experience of the teams
in the group that ended up
in the last eight.” ete

Red Bulls fans may also
have to wait. The club is 3-6- .

8 this season — the fewest
wins in the league — and is:
last in the Eastern Confer-
ence with 17 points. Only
Real Salt Lake in the West=—
ern Conference has fewer. °
points.

But Arena is.in familiar
territory. He knows how to
rebuild.

’ Arena took over the U.S.
team in October 1998, short-
ly after the Americans fin-
ished last of 32 teams at the
World Cup. He brought
them to respectability in
2002, taking them to the
quarterfinals. and raising
hopes. that.the U.S. could
field an even better team in
2006.

But those hopes were
dashed at the World Cup
last month, when the U.S.
failed to advance to the sec-
ond round after losses to the
Czech Republic and Ghana
and a draw with eventual
champion Italy. Last week,
Arena and U.S. Soccer
agreed to part ways.

Arena believes a growing
MLS will eventually help
the U.S. compete better at
the World Cup, as well as
getting more Americans to
play in Europe. But after
the U.S. was eliminated,
some thought Arena took a
swipe at MLS because he
said more players should go
abroad. ?

When asked about those
comments and his retura to
MLS, Arena declined to say
much of anything.

“l’m not going to worry,
about the league,” Arena’ ,'
said. “I’m going to worry’
about the Red Bulls. WhenI .-

5
Ke

was technical director of the. -

national team, that was my
job. Now, this is my job.” -:.

Arena said he had a feel- -
ing in January he would not
return as national team
coach. Though he had nq:,°,
interest in MLS, Arena’-’-
started talking to the Red’
Bulls after the U.S. was
eliminated and changed his
mind because he thought
the organization had many, -.-
positives to offer. ver ee

He agreed to a deal about’.*.
two weeks ago, and had it -*-
in place when he spoke to
U.S. Soccer about his future
as national team coach last - >: |
Thursday. It was the first*.-,
time they had spoken since .*_-
the U.S. was sent homé-~.,
from Germany.

“We never got into a con-
versation Thursday that
would lead me to believe: -.
they wanted me back,” Are-*
na said.

The feeling was mutual.
Red Bulls managing director
Marc de Grandpre said they . ° .
had their eye on Arena from~ -
the moment they fired coach‘. ,
Mo Johnston on June 27.
Richie Williams was elevat-
ed to interim coach, and
Arena will take over for him
Aug. 12 when the Red Bulls
play Barcelona at home.

“We made a long list, and
only one name came back
to the surface, that was
Bruce,” de Grandpre
said.

“He was our No. 1 candi-
date, and we got our guy.”
IMNIDUINE OFUNISO

Landis gets back
ellow jersey at
Tour de France

@ CYCLING
L’ALPE D’HUEZ, France
Associated Press

AMERICAN Floyd Landis
reclaimed the Tour de France’s
overall lead Tuesday, taking
back the yellow jersey after an
uphill finish on the famed
L’Alpe d’Huez.

The 15th stage, won by Lux-
émbourg’s Frank Schleck, was
the first of three straight days of
grueling Alpine treks, which are
likely to identify the top con-
tenders to win the first Tour of
the post-Lance Armstrong era.

‘Landis, the Phonak team
leader, finished 1 minute and
10 seconds behind Schleck. He
took an overall lead of 10 sec-
onds. over Spain’s Oscar
Perejro, who had held the yel-

- low jersey and a lead of 1:29
~ over Landis since the 13th stage.

Landis said he’d taken a
“samble” on Saturday by allow-
ing former Phonak teammate
Pereiro to claim the yellow jer-
sey, which brings with it pres-
sure to lead and places an extra
burden on a rider’s teammates.

Landis, a 30-year-old Penn-
sylvania native, had temporari-
ly taken the race lead last
Thursday after the tougher of
two days of climbs in the Pyre-
nees.

The 116-mile stage began in
Gap and also took riders up the
Col d’Izoard and the Col du
Lautaret climbs.

World champion Tom Boo-
nen of Belgium dropped out of
the race after scaling the Col
d’Izoard, which like the 'L’Alpe
d’Huez is so tough that it defies
classification in cycling’s ranking

system. Boonen had.been trail-.

ing Robbie McEwen of Auais-



inbrief

@ STAGE: Racers began
three days in the Alps in
the 15th stage, riding 116
miles from Gap in the
Alpine foothills to the leg-
endary L’Alpe d’Huez.














B WINNER: Team CSC
rider Frank Schleck of
Luxembourg in 4 hours, 52
minutes, 22 seconds. Italy’s
Damiano Cunego, of the
Lampre team, was second
and compatriot Stefano
Garzelli of Liquigas was
third.









@ YELLOW JERSEY:
American Floyd Landis,
the Phonak team leader,
reclaimed the race leader’s
yellow jersey he had lost.to
Spain’s Oscar Pereiro on
Saturday.







@ NEXT STAGE:
Wednesday’s stage scales
the 8,681-foot Col du Gali-
bier — the highest spot on
the Tour — during a 113-
mile ride from Bourg
d’Oisans to La Toussuire.







tralia for the green jersey, given
to the best sprinter.

Schleck, riding for Team
CSC, pulled away from Damian
Cunego of Italy over the last
1.2 miles to win his first Tour
stage. Cunego was 11 seconds
behind in second. Stefano
Garzelli was third, 1:10 back.

Schleck, who won this year’s
Amstel Gold Race, called his
first Tour stage victory a

“dream come true.”

“Tt makes me even more con-

fident than I was before,”
Schleck said. “To win on the
Alpe d’Huez is fantastic. ... I
think I will need some more
time to realize what has hap-
pened to me.”

‘Fans flocked to the final
climb, which contains 21 sharp
bends, waving flags as the
breakaway riders raced to the
finish.

Two years ago, Armstrong
pulled away from the field at
L’Alpe d’Huez in a time trial
under tense conditions. The
Texan was trailed in a car car-
rying a police sniper after he’d
received death threats.

The lack of Armstrong’s
dominant presence has léd to a
far more open race this year.

He was at L’Alpe d’Huez on.

Tuesday and scaled the Alpine
peak in a ride with friends on
Monday.

The three-week race is wide
open this year, after favorites
Ivan Basso — who won the
Giro d’Italia in May — and
1997 Tour champion Jan UII-
rich were among nine riders
kicked out on the eve of the
Tour after being implicated in a
Spanish doping investigation.

i NEW overall leader Floyd
Landis of the USA reacts on
the podium of the 15th stage of
the 93rd Tour de France cycling
race between Gap, southeast-

‘ern France, and L'Alpe d'Huez,

French Alps, Tuesday, July 18,
2006. Frank Schleck of Luxem-

. bourg won the stage. :
(AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

VV LE t MeN,

Oy Oe, 1 Re ou



»Bertha’s Go Go Ribs # City Market
— British American Bank ¢ Gatorade

a: : e The Sports Center ¢ Joy 101.9 FM © Pepsi
Crate he ont oreo doin. aR Rese mili, * Original Patties « J.S. johnson
The Ministry of Youth, Sports, and Housin smo 8 Scatiabonk _¢ Tropical Brokerage ¢ BFS

ll THE pack rides near Montgardin, southeastern France, during the 15th stage of the 93rd Tour de ee Dip
France cycling race between Gap, southeastern France, and L'Alpe d'Huez, French Alps, Tuesday,
July 18, 2006.

(AP Photo/Bas Czerwinski)


WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

BOA president:

Rooyen tin
Meee mDICO Nai

@ BASEBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON —
Junior Sports
Reporter

PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Olympic
Association (BOA)
Arlington Butler said
yesterday that the
men’s baseball team is
“in desperate need of
pitchers.”

The call by Butler
came after the team
suffered their second
consecutive ‘blowout’
loss at the Central
American and
Caribbean games,
being held in Cartange-
‘na, Colombia.

The team played
Mexico on Tuesday and
Colombia on Sunday,
losing the games 15-0
and 10-0, respectively.

Yesterday’s game did
end on a positive note,
despite the final score.
The team were able to
manage five hits,
unlike in their first
game which was a ‘no
hitter’.

Butler revealed that
the team’s improve-
ment in the hitting
department is a good
sign that the guys .
should be able to use in
their feature match
against Dominican
Republic.

Butler said:. “The
team is improving I
must say, at least today
they were able to get
five hits, that’s a vast
improvement to where
they were in their first
game.

Hits

“They were able to
secure these hits but
weren’t able to put
these hits together in
the game. The team is
not experienced and
they lack exposure. It
is not like (Angelo)
Dillette a terrible
pitcher, he is a good
pitcher. He can throw
but he just can’t pitch
too good, he is not
pitching accurately.”

- The inclement weath- |.

er has forced the men’s
softball team to head
to their dugouts once
again, this time in the
second inning, with no
score.

Pitching for the team
in their double header
schedule was Crestwell
Pratt but Edney ‘The
Heat’ Bethel will have
to step in once again in
the second game.

This will be the sec-



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

NBA stars hold
| (el! lg i ou 3 Bi







& SAILING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THREE-time world champi-
on Donnie Martinborough and
the husband and wife team of
Jimmy and Lori Lowe will head
the Bahamas sailing team head-
ing off to the XX Central Amer-
ican and Caribbean Games.

The team will leave town
today and will start competition

in three different classes on

Monday in Cartagena, Colom-
bia.

Martinborough, a Commercial
Property Manager, will be the
lone competitor entered in the
Sunfish Class that he dominat-
ed for so many years.

Jimmy Lowe will skipper one
of the two’ teams with crew mem-
ber Peter Bruce Wassitch in the
Snipe Class and Robert Dunk-
ley will skipper the other team
with crew member Michelle
Hope.

The remainder of the Bahami-

an continent will comprise of

Lori Lowe and Allison Myers
who will compete separately in
the Laser Radial Class.

Peter Christie, who will travel
as the coach, along with chef de
mission John Lawrence, said it’s
a strong team that was selected
by the Bahamas Yachting Asso-
ciation, headed by president Sir
Durward Knowles.

“We expect medals in the
Snipe Class and in the Sunfish
Class,” Christie proclaimed.
“Donnie Martinborough, the
three-time world champion, is
still as strong as he used to be.



@ THE Bahamas sailing team for the CAC games in Cartagena at their cond off party with Sir Durward Knowles, the President of
the Bahamas Yachting Association.

He’s been practising.

“In the Laser Radial Class,
Jimmy Lowe’s wife, Lori, is a
pretty good sailor and Allison
Myers just went to Korea for the
Youth Championships. They are
new to the class, but Lori Lowe

‘

could well be a contender.”
-. While the Bahamas has com-
peted on the international scene,

winning titlés in both the Sun-

fish and Snipe Classes, Lowe and
Myers will be making their maid-
en voyage in the Laser Radial

Class for women.

Although the team are just
heading off today, all of their
boats have already arrived in
Cartagena. They were sent in a
container from Miami, Florida
so that they can be processed by

the organising committee.

“We are looking for medals in
the Sunfish and Snipe Classes,”
Christie projected. “With any
luck, we could expect a medal in
the Laser Radial, depending on
what the competition is like.”

Soccer camp
kicks off for -
the summer.

m SOCCER

PARENTS who want to
improve their children's soccer
skills will get a chance to do so
beginning next Monday at The’
Gary White/Bahamas Soccer ~
Academy's summer camp at
The College of the Bahamas
soccer fields. This is the third’.
installment of the Gary White:
Soccer Camp, which partners
this year with the Bahamas
Soccer Academy (BSA). The
BSA runs year-round training»

for young soccer players.

ond time Edney ‘The
The camp will train young-;

Heat’ Bethel had to
Step in - the first he
delivered for the soft-
ball team in a come
from behind victory on
Monday to close

out the game and

give their second

win — over Puerto Rico,
2-1.

He added: “Softball
is playing remarkably
well, they have not giv-
en up arun in 18
innings. They are play-
ing very well, they just
don’t have the numbers
to be able to shift the
players around to give
them a rest.”

The game against the
Dominican Republic
resumed late in the
evening but the final
score was not available
up until press time.
The second game in the
double header will be
played against
Venezuela.

sters aged 5-15 — whether
they've never kicked a soccer
ball before or are already
playing for their school or a -,-_
local club — in the fundamen--°.-

tals of the fastest growing -*-
sport in the Bahamas. In a safe
and fun-filled environment,
children will receive expert
guidance in the four areas ye
form the game's foundation -°,
technical, tactical, physical
and mental — and learn the dis-
cipline needed to be a success-
ful soccer player at any level: -:
As well as coach White other

a" ee

SEE page 6B i

@ DERON SWABY,
Bahamas senior international
player and a recent graduate
of Bradley University.