Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

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Volume: 102 No.187





Sir Lynden Pindiing
is honoured at
two-hour ceremony

i By KAHMILE REID

THE Bahamas government
yesterday honoured Sir Lynden
Pindling by renaming Nassau
International Airport the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port at a ceremony held yester-
day on the airport’s lawn.

The unveiling of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
was an event that attracted gov-
ernment officials, high society
members and other civilians.
The two-hour ceremony, which
was hosted by Charles Carter, a
former minister of foreign
affairs, is one that can be
described as “short and sweet.”
.. The speakers, however, left no
stones unturned in expressing
how significantly Sir Lynden
Pindling transformed and paved
the way for the development of
the modern Bahamas.

With a-variety of perfor-
mances done to honour Sir Pin-
dling, the event was not short

on entertainment. The South
‘Andros High school did a musi-
cal piece, the National Youth
Choir also, sang of the
“Bahamas Experience” and the
combined bands of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
Defence Force also performed
an original song composed in
Sir Pindling’s honour.

Speaking at the ceremony,
Prime Minister Perry Christie,
said it was “perfectly appropri-
ate” that ithe airport be

renamed in Sir Pindling’s hon-
our and it was being done so
with pride and without apology.

Mr Christie referred to the



numerous contributions to the
building of the nation that Sir
Pindling made and deemed the
renaming of. the airport
“absolutely the right thing to
do.”

There is no one more deserv-

ing, he said, of this honour than
“the-father of the nation” and
the pre-eminent builder of the
modern Bahamas.
_ Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin,
speaking at the ceremony, said
that over the next two-years the
airport will be undergoing
tremendous growth, as it is crit-
ical to the existence of the
Bahamian people.

‘Renaming the airport after
Sir Pindling, she said is to thank
him for his vision and his love
which fuelled the collective pas-
sion of the Bahamian people.

This “son of the soil”, accord-

ing to Ms Hanna-Martin, was a
champion of freedom and social
justice and a proponent of
excellence on the part of his
country.
_ She said the ceremony was
meant to honour a native son,
and is an important step toward
historical development of the
Bahamas.

This dynamic facility, she
said, now being named the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-

. port is symbolic of pride and

optimism Bahamians hold as a

people and to future genera-
tions.

Mr Christie ended his speech

by honouring Lady Marguerite

SEE page eight



FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

Airport re





PRICE — 75¢









@ NASSAU International Aigpukt was oficial named after the late Sir Lynde Pindling yesterday
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

‘Pastor calls for stand |
against gay marriage

Ingraham accuses
govt of turning
ceremony into

‘a partisan event’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPPOSITION leader Hubert
Ingraham accused government
of transforming yesterday’s
renaming ceremony of Nassau
International Airport into a par-
tisan event, instead of a nation-
al one.

The ceremony was held
Thursday morning to rename
Nassau International Airport

the Lynden Pindling Interna--

tional Airport in honour of the
first Bahamian prime minister.
However, Mr Ingraham sees the
ceremony as a PLP affair.
“They had a PLP function
today (Thursday) at the
expense of the Bahamian pub-
lic,” he said. “A national event
put on by the government of
the Bahamas is a national event
for all the people of the
Bahamas, it is not a PLP event
and it should be dealt with as a

SEE page 13





CALLING on Bahamians to
take a stand against the “per-
version” of homosexuality,
popular local, pastor Dr Rex

Major is calling on the public to’

demand that the Bahamas does
not convert marriage from its
“true nature”.

The pastor said that increas-

ingly, outside political pressure
is mounting for countries like
the Bahamas to accept the “gay
agenda”,

“We have to work in a UN
setting, we have to work in col-
Jaboration with the EU which
is swinging very heavily in that
direction, and they are a pres-
sure group who wants you ‘to
conform to social norms that
they create, and plus you have
a growing tide of persons in the
Bahamas for whom tolerance is
a Christian word.

“A misunderstanding of
when tolerance is applied and
when it is not applied. You
can’t tolerate what cannot be
tolerated. When you start tol-
erating lies, you are a terrible
society,” Dr Major said.

' Dr Major spoke to The Tri-
bune yesterday about his rally
on July 16 which aims to spark

a ground-swell of support for
the traditional definition of

matriage.

The confrontation between
those who lobby for gay rights
and those with more conserva-
tive views, Dr Major says,

stems from the demand of

homosexual demands for more
rights.
“They’re the problem, r

one is tolerating them. They
.are the ones demanding a piece
of the pie within the context of

realities which are not a part
of the pie at all.

“Do what you like as a per-
son, but to demand that we
convert marriage from its true
nature to suit their perversion,
you just don’t tolerate that. It
will be a parliamentary deci-
sion but it has to come from

the groundswell of the people,”

he said.
The pastor said that the
moment now is open for per-

SEE page 13



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US newspaper
raises concerns
over increased

foreign investment

in the Bahamas

A FLORIDA newspaper has
raised concerns about the social
and environmental repercus-
sions of the increased foreign
investment in the Bahamas.

The Sun Sentinel in an exten-
sive analytical article on recent
and future developments
throughout the Family Islands,
made. the point that although
Bahamians appreciate the eco-
nomic growth these multi-mil-
lion projects bring to the coun-
try, there is some concern that
the Bahamas is being “sold” to
foreigners.

Speaking with the Florida
newspaper, real-estate execu-

; tive Bob Dwors — who has part-

nered with an affiliate of the
Dallas-based Staubach Co to
buy the 480-acre Royal Island —

: said he plans to build a luxury

SEE page eight

eae,









PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Prosecutors visit Freeport

to carry out ‘Swift Justice





wart

ar |




pt

al
ot

Congratulations to this year's winners in Family Guardian‘s
Annual Calendar Photo Contest.

The 14 winning photographs will appear in the company's
2007 Calendar, “A Celebration of Nature.”

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - As part of the
new Swift Justice initiative,
three prosecutors from New
Providence are in Freeport
dealing with a number of legal
matters that are before the
courts.

Prosecutor Vernal Collie said
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson is very serious and
passionate about the new sys-
tem, which is designed to
improve the efficiency of the in
matters courts.

Mr Collie and his colleagues
Neil Brathwaite and Anthony
Delaney, along with Assistant
Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade and other senior
police officials, met with the
media on Thursday.










“if

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Sara Appleton Alexander Paul

dack Hardy Eric Rose

Timothy Higgs (2) _ Roland Rose

Linda Huber Michael Toogood (2)
Ronald Lightbourn (2) Nancy Young

David (McGorrin

amily Guardian congratulates all participants in the annual
to contest who together submitted 350 entries.

ited to collect their entries
porate Centre, East Bay Street.

GUARDIAN |
INSURANCE
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H VERNAL Collie of the Attorney General’s Office |
addresses the media on Thursday at Police Headquarters,

Mr Collie explained that
every second Thursday of the
month all stakeholders includ-
ing the police, the AG’s office,
the prison, and the probation
office meet to discuss the
progress they are making in
the programme.

“As you know, the new AG
is very passionate about what
she calls Swift Justice initia-
tive, where she is attempting
to bring before the courts mat-
ters as soon as possible,

“Shortly after she took
office she took the whole staff
to Andros on a retreat and she
discussed her objective for the

office.

“One of those was the Swift
Justice initiative and in that
regatd we intend to use what
we call the voluntary bill of
indictment, which allows for
matters to be brought before
the Supreme Court rather
than having to go through a

(Photo: Denise Maycock)
14

preliminary inquiry.” |

Mr Collie noted that 'pre-
liminary inquiries can take
anywhere from six months'to a
year-and-a-half.

He pointed out that prelim-
inary inquiries would not be
done away with, instead mat-
ters such as murder and armed
robberies will be identified ‘for
voluntary bill of indictment,
which significantly cuts down
the time it takes to bring mat-
ters before the court.

Mr Collie said the proposed
witness protection programme
is also important, because! it
would ensure that witnesses
are protected at all times. |

“Jn this society, we have
very serious crimes being com-
mitted and before you can suc-
cessfully prosecute an offence,
you must have the witnesses
who will come to court to give
evidence. Without witnesses,
we have no case,” he said. |

ence ea seceeeeeneancensayecuaucenaesceasacoaveceueneousnteeee fer

Cuba says US transition
proposal for island is
plan for regime change

@ CUBA
Havana

A US proposal aimed at
ensuring a transition to. Ameri-
can-style democracy on the
communist-run island after
Fidel Castro is gone is a sinister
plan for regime change, Cuban
officials charged Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.

“This is a true threat of aggres-
sion,” Cuban parliament speak-
er Ricardo Alarcon said, holding
up the new proposal by the US
Commission for Assistance to a
Free Cuba during a state televi-
sion appearance outlining the
plan’s “sinister pretenses.”





















\
,
/

4




Appearing with other offi-
cials and state-media journal-
ists on the evening Round.
Table program, Alarcon said
the proposal mentions other
recommendations that are
contained in a classified report.

“We have the right to
think the worst,” he said of
the classified section. “We
have the right to think about
an attempt to assassinate
Fidel, or a war.” é

The US government has
not officially rolled out the
proposal, which initially was
expected to be released as
early as May.

But a document said to be
an early version of the plan
presented to US President
George W Bush has been
circulating in Washington,
Miami and Havana.

Bush appointed the Com-

.mission for Assistance to a
Free Cuba in late 2003 and
received its first recommen-
dations in May 2004, which
included a strengthening of
US trade, financial and trav-
el restrictions on the island.

Official US policy is to
undermine Cuba’s planned
succession from Castro, who
turns 80 in August, to his 75-
year-old brother, Defense
Minister Raul Castro.

Cuban officials insist that
the country’s communist
political and economic sys-
tems will endure after Fidel
Castro is gone, and Raul
Castro reiterated that stance
in a speech last month.



In brief

Man faces
multiple
counts

of fraud

A 44-YEAR-OLD man
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday was charged with sev-
eral counts of fraud.

John Kemp was charged with
forging a Commonwealth Bank
cheque in the amount of $7,713
on Tuesday May 23.

He was also charged with
uttering the fake cheque, pur-
porting it to be genuine.

Another charge alleged that -

Kemp obtained cash in the
amount of $7,713 from Com-
monwealth Bank on Wulff
Road by means of fraud.

A second group of charges
alleged that on Friday, May 26
Kemp forged a Commonwealth
Bank cheque in the amount of
$12,338. :

Kemp was further charge
with uttering the fake cheque
and obtaining cash from Com-
monwealth Bank on Wulff
Road.

He was arraigned before

Magistrate Susan Sylvester at

Court 11, Nassau Street.
Kemp pleaded not guilty to
all of the charges and was grant-
ed $7,000 bail.
The case was adjourned to
October 5.

Caribbean
official calls
for plan to
aid Haiti

@ ST KITTS
Basseterre

A TOP Caribbean Commu-
nity official called on the
group’s member nations to
quickly devise a plan to help
stabilize Haiti, two days after
the impoverished nation

rejoined the regional group,

according to Associated Press..

Albert Ramdin, assistant sec-
retary-general of the Organiza-
tion of Eastern Caribbean
States, said on Wednesday that
cooperation on resources such
as police will be critical to ease
social problems in Haiti, which
has seen an surge in kidnap-
pings and gang violence in
recent weeks.

“We are living in very chal-
lenging times for Caribbean
economies, but every country
could train some police ... with-
in their own police forces to
strengthen the Haitian national
police,” Ramdin said.

Ramdin called on the 15-
member community, known as
Caricom, to dispatch trade spe-
cialists and medical personnel
to the French-speaking
Caribbean nation, which shares
the island of Hispaniola with
the Dominican Republic. He
also asked newly inaugurated
Haitian President Rene Preval
to recommend how the
Caribbean Community can best
help Haiti.

“It now depends on the pres-
ident to come up with a plan, a
short-term social, economic
reconstruction plan, so we can
concretely indicate how much
money will be needed and how
much can be pledged,” Ramdin
said.









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THE TRIBUNE





22- year-old |
charged
with armed
robbery

A 22-YEAR-OLD Button-
wood Avenue man _ was
arraigned in Magistrates’ Court
yesterday to be charged with
two counts of armed robbery.

Stephen Bullard was charged
with robbing Poece Bodie of
cash in the amount of $120 and
a gold wrist chain valued at
$900.

It is alleged that the incident
took place on Wednesday, May
10 at New Providence, while
Bullard was concerned with
others and armed with a hand-
gun.

He was also charged, being
concerned with others and
armed with a handgun, of rob-
bing Chavon Marret of a cell-
phone valued at $200 on the
same day.

Bullard appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
at Court One on Bank Lane
yesterday.

_ He was not required to enter
a plea to the charges and was
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison.

The case was adjourned to
July 17 and transferred to Court
Five on Bank Lane.

Police
investigate
violent
incidents

POLICE are continuing
investigations into two matters
which occurred in the past 24
hours.

The Esso service station on
Montrose Avenue and Wulff
Road was robbed of an unde-
termined amount cash yester-
day morning. According to
Assistant Commissioner of
Crime Reginal Ferguson, a
female employee was held at
gunpoint while leaving the
establishment to make a cash
deposit. The gunman reported-
ly fled the scene in an unidenti-
fied car.

In addition, a male wate of
Nassau Village was reportedly
stabbed during an altercation
at his home on Jackson Street.
He survived the attack.

Plans to
increase
Canadian
visitors

THE Ministry of Tourism is

moving swiftly to capture the |

emerging Canadian market.

A contingent of senior exec-
utives from the ministry has met
with the ‘Bahamas team’ in
Toronto to:formulate promo-
tional plans with a view to
increasing the number of visi-
tor arrivals from Canada.

Plans were made to increase
the marketing and public rela-
tions efforts of the Bahamas
Tourist Office and their public
relations firm, Punch Commu-
nications.

According to a statement
from the ministry, target areas
include weddings and honey-
moons, boating, fishing, special
events and festivals.

The Bahamas Tourist Office’s
national director for Canada,
Paul Strachan said: “We are lay-
ing the groundwork to increase
awareness of the Bahamas’
tourism options for Canadians.
: Working closely with our public
relations firm Punch Commu-
nications Inc, we are prepared
to saturate the Canadian mar-
ket with the message that the
- Bahamas is much more than
just sun, sand and sea.

“Our research shows that
Canadians are travelling in
greater numbers to participate
in various activities and events
including weddings, sporting
events and festivals — all of
which we provide in the Islands
of the Bahamas. We just have
to let them know that it’s all
here,” he said.

INSIGHT

Dated a iy -Â¥est ola
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



LOCAL NEWS

o In brief | Government



FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 3

‘failing



users in rehabilitation’

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE government is failing
drug abusers struggling to over-
come their addiction by failing
to address problems at the one
facility méant for them in the
Bahamas. °

This is the claim of one vol-
unteer at,the Public Hospital
Authority ‘Community Coun-
selling and'Assessment Centre.
‘Patrick Sands, 56, has com-
plained to The Tribune about
the many problems that riddle
the centre including insuffi-
cient rest rooms, the heat and
the distasteful smells which
sometimes permeate the
building as a result of poor
plumbing. To make matters
worse, a trench, dug almost a
month ago continues to block
the entire entrance into
the building, with no other
work done to repair the hole





lM THE trench outside the entrance

past the first day of digging.

The centre is a facility
designed to help drug abusers
overcome their addiction and
to help persons with a procliv-
ity towards violence eury and

control their anger.

The centre has only one rest
room to accommodate the
employees, volunteers and the
persons seeking help, which
can amount to about 100 per-

Group says Bahamas is
_the new promised land

@ By REUBEN SHEARER

INDEPENDENCE is
always a special time of year
in the Bahamas — but accord-
ing to one group, it repre-
sents a more profound truth
than most realise.

The members of Bahamas
in Prophecy (BIP) hold that
the seminal dates in Bahami-
an history reveal that the
country has been chosen‘by
God as an example for the
world during the “end
times”.

Micklyn Seymour, presi-
dent of BIP, said yesterday
at a press conference that the
spiritual meaning of Bahami-
an independence in relation
to the history of Israel is too
significant to be coinciden-
tal.

He claims the purpose of
his organisation is to show
the correlation between the
nation of Israel’s prophetic
significance in scripture and
the purpose and destiny of
the Bahamas.

“Some people don’t
believe that God works
divinely in the affairs of
nations, but He has unveiled
to BIP to be a people set
aside to be a model for the
nations of the world,” he
said.

Mr Seymour said his
desire to understand the
striking ‘similarity between
passages in the Bible and
important dates for majority
rule and independence — and
his curiosity about who was
really responsible for putting
up the cross at San Salvador
in 1492 — led him to have a
conversation with former
prime minister, the late Sir
Lynden Pindling. -

According to Mr Seymour,
Sir Lynden told him that

since Canada‘and America had
their independence in July, he

- always thought that other coun-

tries in the western hemisphere
should do the same.

Mr Seymour said he then
took Sir Lynden to a Bible and
showed him that the tenth day
of the seventh month is men-
tioned in the scriptures.

According to BIP, the date
of majority rule is identical to
the date when Israel held its
exodus out of Egypt.

The group claims that the
date Israelites celebrated their
move to the promised land is
the exact date of Bahamian

independence.

Mr Seymour said the people
of the Bahamas are uninformed
— but that it is now the time they
become aware of the truth.

“We believe that the Father is
using. this nation as a model and
example in these end times,” he
said. ‘““How we embrace His sto-
ry within our history, depends
on how we watch the signs he
has put there to mark our
nation and identify it with
Israel.”

Mr Seymour said that if
Bahamians recognise this truth,
God will use the Bahamas in
similar ways that he used Israel.

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sons on Fridays when commu-
nity meetings are held.

The CCAC is the only one of
its kind in the Bahamas and
yet the government will not
make proper provisions on this
one facility to improve condi-
tions for clients, Mr Sands
claimed.

Mr Sands, who was a client
of the centre himself 20 years
ago, has a personal interest in
the facility. He volunteers there
three times a week and often
gives speeches at the govern-
ment schools in Nassau about
the importance of drug pre-
vention.

For years the Government

has repeatedly promised to.

move the programme into a
better facility, Mr Sands
claimed, but nothing has been
done for 20 years.

CCAC’s programme was
moved into a building on Mar-

ket Street more than two
decades ago. It used to be
located in Princess Margaret
Hospital's parking lot.

The move was made to pro-
vide better facilities for the
workers and clients, but
according to Mr Sands not
much has changed.

Mr Sands argues that in
order for the government to
put a dent in drug addiction
and violence in the Bahamas,
they must first develop pro-
grammes such as these to help
the people who need to be
helped.

"If you don't have the facili-

ties and the people to work,

then you don't have anything,"
he said.

The Tribune attempted to
contact managing director
Hubert Brown of the Public
Hospital Authority, but he was
not available yesterday.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F- 485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Independence, but no word from PM

THE FINAL SECTION of The Tribune’s
' three-part Independence supplement is
included in today’s edition.

In that supplement the FNM announces a
major initiative which “showcases the kinds of
policies and programmes” it will pursue in its
next term in office. Although, invited to par-
ticipate and although our presses were held to
the last minute to accommodate them, gov-
ernment submitted nothing for publication.

It would be wrong to say that government
declined our invitation to be a part of the
special edition — it’s just that, although they
promised to embrace the opportunity to
showcase their plans and give a projection
for the future, in the end their copy was
absent without explanation.

The only reason we are announcing this
absence — certainly not to embarrass anyone
— but to avoid the inevitable public com-
ments from PLP quarters — “Ya see | told
yinna The Tribune’s an FNM newspaper and
not checking for the PLP!”

Well this is just not true. We are an inde-
pendent newspaper and — although it seems
to give some PLP supporters a strange plea-
sure to believe otherwise and moan about
their martyrdom — our columns are open
equally to Government and Opposition.

This is the first time that The Tribune has
invited the Prime Minister and the Leader of
the Opposition to participate in this popular
section. This edition, which highlights the
major news stories of the past year and pro-

_ jects the future, is published annually to mark
the country’s independence.

It is true that our decision to include the
country’s two political’leaders was a last
minute decision. However, the same time
constraints were put on both men. |

“My chief concern is that our newspaper
will be incorrectly seen as being unduly
biased,” a member of our staff e-mailed us a
few hours ago. “Unfortunately people aren’t
aware of the fact that an invitation.was sent to
both parties, both agreed to send articles,
but only one delivered.” |

Hence this article.

In June a member of our staff telephoned
the Prime Minister’s office to find out the
name of his speech writer. A name was given.

On June 9, a personal letter was hand
delivered to Prime Minister Christie’s office

-and a copy faxed to his speech writer. The
Tribune staff member then called to make
certain that both received the letter. _

As Mr Ingraham has no speech writer,
the same letter was delivered to his secre-
tary. i

_ And this is what the letter said — one to
Mr Christie, the other to Mr Ingraham. Both
letters were identical.

Dear Prime Minister Christie) (Opposi-
tion Leader Hubert Ingraham):

“The Tribune invites you to contribute to




THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK
“When Life Knocks You To
Your Knees, You’re In '
Position To Pray.”

our annual Independence edition. Over the
years, this edition has reviewed life in the
Bahamas for the previous twelve months.
This year however, we are inviting the leader
of both political parties to share their views
on the subject — The’ Bahamas of July 10,
2011. This piece could include the major pol-
icy planks of your party’s platform.

“We trust you accept this opportunity to
communicate to a wide audience of interest-
ed newspaper readers, who are eager to assess
your vision for the country beyond the
upcoming election season.

“Please indicate your acceptance to ‘the
undersigned on or before June 15, 2006. Your
contribution, if you agree to participate,
should be no more than 1,250 words in length,
and is due to us by June 19, 2006.”

When we had no reply from the Prime
Minister’s Office by June 15th our staff mem-
ber called the speech writer, who said that the
Prime Minister would participate.

As the deadline neared our staff member
continued to call to make certain that copy
was coming as space was being held. Even-
tually the FNM delivered its copy on July 4.
The Prime Minister’s Office was called, told
the FNM’s copy was in and that we needed to
at least know what the PM’s topic was going
to be.as we did not want to publish advance
promotion for the FNM, but nothing for the
PLP. No reply. The FNM’s promotion went
in on Thursday. There was nothing for the
PLP.

On Wednesday, the man (referred to ‘as
the speech writer), who the Prime Minister’s
Office told our staff member to deal with,
informed our staff that he would now have to
contact party chairman Raynard Rigby. In
fairness to. Mr Rigby.he was only informed of
our request that morning. In turn Mr Rigby
directed us to Al Dillette of Bahamas Infor-
mation Services. We told these contacts that
our deadline for the last section that we were
still holding for the Prime Minister was 2pm
yesterday. We then extended the deadline
to 3pm, while we slotted another press run in
the place of the Independence section to
make an extended deadline possible.

When 3pm came and went and the
promised calls from the Prime Minister’s
Office never came through — although a cell
phone was being held open for it — we decid-
ed to let the presses roll.

Despite the minions around him, not one
of them seemed able to deliver a statement
from the Prime Minister. It is now 8.25 pm
Thursday as we close this column, and still no
one has received any word from the Prime
Minister’s Office.

We apologise to all of our readers, includ- ©

ing our PLP readers, but this time, despite
The Tribune’s best efforts, we have. failed
to bring them news from their Prime
Minister.





This yeat’s

Budget: too
little, too late?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I SAT in on most of the.
debate on the national bud- ,

get for the year 2006 to 2007,
if my attendance was not
mandated by my job descrip-
tion, I would have found
something better to do with
my time.

Nothing new or dramatic
emerged from almost two
weeks of non-stop drivel;
platitudes and economic
dreams as presented by the
Minister of Finance and his
parliamentary colleagues.

* Even the contributions of the
official opposition were, im

the main, lacked substance
and few of them presented
any viable alternatives to
what was put forward by the
government. What a grave
disservice to the good peo-
ple of The Bahamas.

National Youth Service is
very close to my heart as far
too many of our young and
impressionable young men
are falling and have fallen
through our societal cracks
and holes. Yet, I heard
absolutely nothing about the
expansion or even the con-
tinued funding of the embry-
onic-youth service which was
launched, with great pomp
and ceremony last year by
the Minister of National
Security and the Minister of
Youth. How come?

Not a single new initiative
was announced relative to
agriculture and fisheries. The
current Minister will have no
real time to.seek to integrate
our food production levels
into our local tourism and
residential needs. Our farm-
ers and fishermen are, appar-
ently, on their own, despite
the ever increasing cost of
gasoline; other fuels; seeds;
equipment and other imple-
ments of those occupations.
The results? Seafood items,
such as lobster; conch and
grouper cost more locally
than in Florida.

Our infrastructure is badly
in need of urgent repairs and
upgrades. When will we see

work start on the major roads .

in New Providence? Robin-
son Road; Blue Hill Road
and, of course, East Street

remain a national disgrace.

and an indictment on the
inability of the Minister of
Works, Bradley Roberts, to
perform within his portfolio.
Obviously, Mr Christie must





Bamba

letters@triounemedia.net




have seen the handwriting on
the wall when he reshuffled
Robert’s portfolio.

The budget was also silent
on several ministries insofar
as it relates to improved ser-
vices and the delivery of the
same to the average Bahami-
an. Education is in a mess
and the players within that
department are reputed to be
on bad terms while our chil-
dren are receiving a sub stan-
dard education within sub
standard buildings.

The Attorney General’s
Office is in shambles and
“swift justice” while sound-
ing good is, in my view, a
potential electoral ploy. You
mean to tell me, a trained
lawyer, that not one extradi-
tion case has been completed
by this government in four
long years? In fact what is
the status of many of those
cases? Relative to the ruling
in Pratt vs Morgan, when will
the Constitution be amend-
ed to reflect the views of
ordinary Bahamians on the
burning and vexing question
of capital punishnient?

Housing is also in a mess

.and no one there seems to

know what to do to try to sat-
isfy the housing needs of
thousands’ of ordinary
Bahamians. Single family lots
are drying up in New Provi-
dence. Housing officials need
to consider the possibility of
the rapid development of two
and three storied townhouse
complexes if we are to pro-
vide affordable housing for

as many persons as possible..

This may be an alien concept
to many but, these are the
times which may require
alternative solutions. |
The Ministry of Health. is
broken and in urgent need of
hope and help. Dr Nottage

may bea good man but,.

clearly, he has no new vision
for the provision and delivery
of good and affordable health
care. Senator Marcus Bethel
used to talk about the con-
struction of a new hospital in
New Providence when he
first was appointed. Are
there any drawings on the
board? Was funding provid-
ed for such construction in
the 2006 to 2007 budget? If
so, where is it in the line
items?

Relative to social services,
there is no mention of an
increase in old age pensions
and assistance to the dis-
abled. No new graveyard
construction. No new com-
munal homes for the aged;

young girls. What about our
at risk young men and boys?
Not a single word in four
long years.

It is clear that the upcom-
ing general elections are the
PLP’s to lose. The FNM, so
far, has not received the
bounce which I expected with
the return to the leadership
of the Rt Hon Hubert A
Ingraham MP, PC. It is as if
that party is still waiting for
its change to come. This is so
sad and almost demoralising.

With less than 10 months
to go before the next elec-
tions, one would have expect-
ed that the recent budget
debate would have been used
as a launching platform for
an aggressive and frontal
assault on the lack of perfor-
mance by the Christie admin-

-istration and any one of the

pressing issues which are
crushing the backs of ordi-
nary Bahamians; massive
under employment; teenage
pregnancies; lack of housing;
alleged corruption within the
public service; sexual
exploitation and harassment;
unabated crimes and, of
course, the abysmal lack of
response from our elected
Members .of Parliament.

What did we get instead
from the opposition? Messrs
Wells and Dupuch spent ail
of their time seeking to lam-
baste their former boss. Not a
single word about the needs
of Bamboo Town or Shirlea.
Clearly, those two men have
served their usefulness in the
House of Assembly and it
may be time to put them out
to pasture.

Even the FNM said and
did nothing dramatic or
revealing. So far, I am con-
vinced that the longevity of
the debate may have lulled
them to sleep, as may have
been intended by Mr Christie
and his advisers. I am disap-
pointed and expected far bet-
ter from the collective oppo-
sition. If this was the best that
they could have offered, The

‘Bahamas is in for a rough

ride over the next year or so.
The CDR is gone, appar-
ently. The young feilows in
the BDM are hopelessly out
of their political depth. Few
Bahamians, if any, take them
seriously anyhow. The BNP,
as led by Dexter Johnson, has
some great ideas but that
fringe party is too exclusicn-
ary and may be, in fact, led
by too dogmatic a leader.

. We are, indeed, between a
rock and a hard place. The
one good thing about this
whole exercise, however, is
that Yahweh is still on the

‘throne and His mercies will

endure forever. To God then,
in all things, be the glory.

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se

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 5



Roadworks project due to

be completed ‘in weeks’

In brief





Man denies
charge of
stealing
from house

A 20-YEAR-OLD man was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday, charged with house-
breaking and stealing.

Torrie McPhee was charged
with breaking into the home of
Stafford Turnquest on Toote
Shop Corner.

It is alleged that the incident
took place between Sunday,
July 2 and Monday, July 3.

McPhee was charged with
stealing several items of jewelry
valued at nearly $3,000 and $700
in cash.

He was arraigned before
Magistrate Susan Sylvester at
Court 11, Nassau Street.

McPhee pleaded not guilty to
the housebreaking and stealing
charges.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $3,500.

The case was adjourned to
October 5.

‘Over 300’
political
prisoners in
Cuba held.

m@ CUBA
Havana

MORE than 300 prisoners of

conscience are still held in Cuba.

despite a slight drop in the. num-
ber of such inmates during the
first half of 2006, a veteran
rights group said Wednesday,

according to Associated Press. _

The Cuban Commission on
Human Rights and National
Reconciliation said in a regular

‘ update that it had 316 docu-

mented political prisoners,
down from 333 at the end of
2005. The new count reflects
both new prisoners and people
freed over the past six months.
Commission head Elizardo
Sanchez wrote in the report that
the net drop of 17 inmates was
“statistically irrelevant” and did
not indicate an improvement in
human rights in Cuba.”
“Unless a miracle occurs, the
international community should
prepare itself, at least over the

. short term, to keep receiving
only bad news when it comes ©

to civil, political and economic
rights in Cuba,” the report said.

Cuba’s communist govern-
ment denies holding prisoners
of conscience, characterizing
them as common criminals.

A lesser-known Cuban rights
«soup released its own list of
political prisoners in recent
days, saying it had document-
ed 346 cases.

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6:30
9:00
10:00

10:30
11:30

lm By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

THE much-anticipated $3.3
million road improvement pro-
ject could be wrapped up in a
matter of weeks, project man-
ager Julian Henson said yes-
_terday.

The project stretches from the
Baillou Hill Road round-about
to the intersecting thoroughfare
between Robinson Road and
Independence Drive.

Last October, the Ministry -

of Works awarded the multi-
' million dollar contract to
. Bahamas Hot Mix and Bethel’s
Trucking and Heavy Equip-
ment Services.
Mr Henson told The Tribune
that while there were minor
delays due to inclement weath-

er, major improvements will be
visible by mid-August.

“Ourselves and the govern-
ment are hoping to finish this
job by August 15,” he said.
“We are fairly close, apart from
the weather — the only thing
we can’t control.”

Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts also told The Tribune
that based on reports, the mas-
sive road upgrade appears to
be progressing as planned.

“I am hoping that it is on
schedule, because the last time
I saw a report, about five
weeks ago, it indicated that it is
on schedule,” Mr Roberts said.

The much-anticipated
upgrade began in March, but
has become a bone of con-
tention for many motorists
who have to use the route

during peak traffic hours.
Complaints

Business owners in the area
have also complained that
heavy congestion caused by the
project has led toa significant
decrease in sales.

Mr Henson explained that
his crew is working expedi-

_tiously.

He said two traffic lanes
have been closed and traffic
diverted to begin work on out-
er lanes needing repair.

“If you have not noticed
already, we have changed the
traffic a couple of days ago and
put up signs to reroute to one
lane,” Mr Henson said. “So to
complete work on the other

Bahamian professional | MISSINGDOG.

president of tourism
group in Canada

BAHAMIAN tourism pro-
fessional Ambrose Morris has
been elected president of the
Association of National
Tourist Office Representatives
in Canada.

Mr Morris, public relations
manager in Ministry of Touris-
m’s Toronto office, takes over
the presidency of the ANTOR
Ontario Chapter from Lynn
Ferguson, director of Visit
Britain — the British Govern-
ment Tourist Office.

He was introduced as presi-
dent on Friday, June 23 during
ANTOR’s annual media
awards luncheon at the Royal
Canadian Yacht Club, Toron-
to Island.

“It is remarkable that the
Islands of the Bahamas com-
mands such notoriety on the
world stage. ANTOR Canada
has 53 member-countries and
my being elected president of
this elite body speaks to visi-
bility and respect our country
enjoys in Canada,” Mr Mor-
ris said.

“Along with a few internal
changes to ANTOR’s constitu-
tion, I hope - through my pres-
idency — to lay the framework
that will enable our members
to make effective use of the



@ AMBROSE Morris —

travel media resources avail-
able to us in Canada,” he said.
“This includes solutions for

media relations initiatives, like

planning press trips. Also,
ANTOR will embark on pro-
viding comment and insights
on topical issues affecting the
travel industry — offering full
perspective — as is rarely done. _
We often read and hear com-
ments made by tour operators,
airlines, hoteliers and retail
agents. It is a rare occasion
when tourism officials are
quoted ... until now.”

FLAGS ° FLAGS ° FLAGS

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in

Customer Service

Successful candidate must be mature
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Persons with strong experience and
sound educational background
(BGCSE’S and higher) preferred.

Serious inquiries should
call: 324-1453.



Before his election as presi-
dent, Mr Morris worked with
ANTOR over the past year as
an executive committee mem-
ber and treasurer.

He has also worked on the
Bahamas’ public relations
account with MacPhee Com-
munications in Toronto.

ANTOR is a worldwide
alliance of national tourist
offices (NTO’s) and affiliates
representing almost every trav-
el destination world-wide.

With chapters in most major
cities, the focus is on addressing
the common needs of foreign
tourist organisations as it relates
to information and services.

side should be done fairly
quickly.”

The project includes
improvements to the round-
about at Baillou Hill Road and
the Tonique Williams Darling
Highway, the doubling of the
thoroughfare between the
highway and a new round-
about at the intersection of
Robinson Road and Baillou
Hill Road.

But, as it stands now, access
to the Town Centre Mall From
Baillou Hill Road remains
closed, with only one lane open

’ on the Independence Highway
headed west and the Tonique
Williams Darling Highway
headed east onto the Baillou
Hill Road round-about.

Motorists are forced to
maneuver between traffic

Old Female Chow, spayed and with a shaved coat.
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Last seen on the night of Sunday 25th June.
Lost in the Camperdown - Sans Souci area.
Any information on her whereabouts appreciated.

Reward offered.

Phone 324 7392 or 324 0134

cones that have been strategi-
cally placed to guide them
through the dense work area.

Mr Henson said that by the
time school reopens, there
should be two-lane accessibili-
ty.

“But, in construction there
is always minor details that you
have to deal with that goes on
for a year after that — details
like columns and other minor
things,” he said. “However the
whole objective is to keep peo-
ple happy and complete work
in the shortest possible time.”
' The government has set a
seven-month deadline to effect
the changes and has also

‘ approved a bonus of $166,726,

to be paid to the contractors if
the project is completed within
five months.








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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 _-

THE TRIBUNE



ee NE

Union official’s concern
terminations at Our Lucaya

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - As the Hotel Work-
ers Union leadership remains in limbo,
a union organiser in Freeport has
expressed concerns about some termi-
nations at the Our Lucaya Resort.

Lionel Morley claims the termina-
tion of four workers since the union’s
election on May 26 were not handled
correctly.

He said that even though the indus-
trial agreement between the union
and hotel expired at end of May, the
existing contract is still binding until

a new contract can be negotiated.

The results of the election were dis-
puted between the Rainbow Adminis-
tration led by Pat Bain and the Justice
Team led by Roy Colebrooke.

The matter is presently before the
courts.

According to Mr Morley, the man-
agement of Our Lucaya has stopped
all communication with the union,
which represents about 900 workers at
the resort.

“The union has a recognition agree-
ment, a contract that is binding, and

it represents 900 workers in the bar-
_ gaining unit,” he pointed out.

Mr Morley claims a pregnant work-
er was among the four employees dis-
missed from Our Lucaya.

He said the woman, who worked as
a clerk in the Spa, and several of her
co-workers, had expressed concerns to
management regarding an unsecured
cash drawer.

Dismissed

Mr Morley said nothing was done ©

about the problem, but the woman was
later dismissed for coming up $18 short
in her float from the same cash drawer.

“She had complained that within her
chores she has to walk guest upstairs
leaving her float exposed . . . and noth-
ing was done about it,” he said

Mr Morley said Section 31 of the
industrial agreement which deals with
shortages and overage, instructs man-
agement how to address such matters.

He claimed management failed to
specify the particulars and grounds for
dismissal, indicating only that the
employee was terminated on accumu-
lation.

“The lady was short $18 that accu- -

mulated to a fourth warning slip, and it
is recommended in the agreement that

about

suspension will follow and after inves-
tigation, termination,” he said.

“There other terminations up there,
and the spa department is slackly run
and often employees are the scape-
goat.

“If an employee complains that the
environment is not right, manage-
ment needs to find a different mech-
anism of protecting the money,” he
said. -

The Tribune contacted the resort for
comments concerning the alleged ter-
minations, however resort representa-
tives did not return calls up to press
time.






i





STAR EX

General






Bahamian independence
and the war on terror



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year anniversary of the
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that many such barbaric acts
stem from prejudicial US/
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While there is no excuse for
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for the western world arises
from a foreign policy that places
embargoes on oil; international
sanctions; a heavily biased view
towards Israel regardless of its
occupation and annexation of
Palestinian lands; the presence
of troops in places like Saudi
Arabia; bombing campaigns
that many times kill civilians;
the war in Iraq that morphed
into a “war to bring democracy”

~ after weapons of mass destruc-

tion were not found; the notion
that the US can invade coun-
tries without restraint and
implement “regime change”
and the use of harsh, undiplo-
matic language by leaders and
their representatives (eg US
Ambassador to the UN John
Bolton’s callous language ques-
tioning the need of the UN).

- A University of London

study in 2004 claimed that 100.

thousand innocent Iraqi civil-
ians had died since the US inva-
sion. These events are at the
heart of the Arab crusade
where vengeance and a deep-
seated knack for revenge are
foremost, contrary to American

beliefs that the Arabs simply

want to destroy their “free-
doms, democracy and financial
services.” It may not be that
simple.

D ue to the hostile poli-
cy taken by the US

and its closest ally, Britain,

Charlene Pinder
Corporate Secretary
July 7th, 2006

©2006 CreativeRelations.net




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towards many Muslim coun-
tries, particularly since Septem-
ber 11, 2001 terrorism has seen
an insurgence unlike ever
before — especially by mis-



Why does the
US feel it can
impose its brand

of democracy on

the world,
especially upon
countries that
are hundreds of
years older?

guided, religiously motivated
young men.

Since the horrendous attacks
on London, many people have
questioned whether British PM
Tony Blair’s charge into Iraq
behind George Bush and
against the wishes of the British
people may have heightened
the UK’s prospects of becoming
a target of foreign terrorism.

Even further, the question
has become: Why does the US
feel it-can impose its brand of
democracy on the world, espe-
cially upon countries that are
hundreds of years older?

iE 2005, the Bahamas was
vilified in an article by Jay
Nordlinger of The National
Review, a right wing magazine.
There, the Bahamas was not
only accused of abusing
detainees at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre but also
of having “a very cozy relation-
ship with Castro” and fearing
and submitting to him. Even the
tragic sinking of HMBS Flamin-
go by Cuban warplanes in 1980



was used as political fodder.
My questions to Mr

Nordlinger are: Are you upset -

because you would really want
the Bahamas to submit to the
US? And, why are you med-
dling into the affairs of a sover-
eign country? Although Cuba
has a communist government,
it has a self-sufficient, stable
society that promotes racial
equality, social harmony and
reduced crime, and more
importantly, the Bahamas has
a sovereign right to develop ties
with any country.

With all the good the United
States contributes to the world,



With all the
good the United
States contributes
to the world, at
times it can be a

political, social

and economic
bully.
SS]
at times it can be a political,

.social and economic bully.

Therefore, it is.a breath of fresh
air to see that China is becom-

‘ing a superpower, thereby

bringing a sense of balance to
the US grip on the world.

The US must understand that
countries that “mind their own
business” are usually not the
subject of terrorist attacks and
that hostile, unfair foreign pol-
icy to Middle Eastern countries
accomplishes zilch. Also, to pro-
hibit the display of the coffins of
American soldiers but yet
parade the undignified photos
of dead terrorists such as al-
Zahawari and Saddam Hus-
sein’s sons against Muslim



beliefs shows a double standard
and only cultivates hatred’
among Muslims.

| o brand every fighter
or resister of outside

policies as terrorists is an -

excuse, as Nelson Mandela, for-
merly considered a terrorist,
himself said that “cone man’s ter-
rorist is another man’s freedom
fighter”.

As we celebrate our 33rd year
of independence, we must also
implement ways of protecting
ourselves from terrorist strikes,
particularly as 86 per cent of all
visitors here are Americans.

Terrorism is barbaric, espe- .
cially when innocent civilians
are massacred. However, effec-
tive and fair diplomacy and law .
enforcement can lead to a vast .
reduction to the main angst of
the new millennium. The sight
of the chaos in London last
year, with people running about
with blood and soot about their
bodies is unforgettable and so
today I stand in solidarity with
the people of our former moth-
er country as they observe a
milestone in their history,

_ As we observe our own mile-
stone in history — Hap Inde-
pendence Bahamas!

ajbahama@hotmai:.:.»m

BRAANR |

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Assistant Managers

Qualified applicants should:

e Have suitable experience

« Have a great attitude toward customer service

« Be willing to work weekends & flexible hours.

Interested persons should submit resumé to
Wendy’s Head Office, P.O. Box N-4351
or to kr@aetosbahamas.com.
Deadline for application is July 15, 2006.
No phone calls please. |



Do what tastes right”



Nye

THE TRIBUNE





In brief |

Guyana

‘must do
better on
drug war’

a GUYANA
Georgetown

GUYANA needs to better
battle drug traffickers who
are increasingly using the
South American nation as a
base for smuggling, the out-
going US ambassador said
Thursday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Roland Bullen said Wash-
ington will only invest more in
the fight against drug traf-
fickers if it is convinced
Guyanese officials here are
doing all they can.

“Resources are success dri-
ven and it is demoralizing to
see drug shipments originat-
ing in Guyana seized abroad,
while narco-criminals roam
freely,” Bullen said.

His remarks came less than

a week after US authorities

arrested Guyanese business-
man Shaheed Khan, who has
been indicted in New York
on cocaine smuggling charges,
in Trinidad.
Last year, the US State
Department said Guyana’s
_Tole as an international trans-
shipment point for cocaine
‘bound to the United States
and Europe from South
America had “increased sig-
nificantly” because of its
' political and economic insta-
‘bility and “ineffective” law
enforcement.
The two countries had par-
- ticipated in joint counter-nar-
~ cotics efforts, but the opera-
“tions were compromised by
‘ corruption, the State Depart-
‘ ment said in an annual assess-
“ment of the drug trade.

First case
in court
‘for music.
piracy

| @ ST VINCENT
Kingstown

, A 19-YEAR-OLD man
” charged with pirating music
was the first person to appear
before a judge in this island
chain for allegedly violating a
_ copyright law passed in 2002

“- designed to clamp down on

, bootlegging, officials said
. Wednesday, according to
* Associated Press. -

* Norris Ollivierre, who was
charged with illegally selling a
- local producer’s music, plead-

‘ ed not guilty at a court hear-.

. ing Wednesday — less than a

* week after musicians took to
‘ the streets in the capital of
, Kingstown to protest what
, they said was inaction by

i authorities to enforce the

' anti-piracy law.

. After the protests, Culture

4 Minister Rene Baptiste told

‘ music pirates to stop boot--

‘ , legging and pledged to pros-
* ecute offenders.

* Ollivierre was released on
, US$375bail and was due back
§ in-court on July 17. He could
* face a maximum fine of
, US$18,725 or five years in
‘ prison if convicted.

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 7

Underage drinking: is it z

cause for public concern?

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Hi GESNER Dalmon said: “Its
just the norm, young persons
drink socially all the time.”

FOLLOWING a special
report on the acceptance of
underage drinking in the
Bahamas, The Tribune took
to the streets yesterday to ask
the members of the public
what they think about the
issue.

Chief Superintendent of
Police Hulan Hanna said
underage drinking as “not
something the police see rou-
tinely” and stated that officers
regularly patrol bars in search
of operators who are in vio-
lation of the Liquor Licence
Act.

However Sheandra Newton
said: “There is no awareness
about underage drinking. I
used to buy liquor when I was
15 — its like the norm in the
Bahamas.”

Options

‘Ms Newton went on to say
that young persons need
more positive options for
entertainment on weekends
and should be more educat-
ed about the effects of drink-
ing.

“Its socially excepted, the
problem starts in the homes,”
said Hubert Pinder. “The law

, isn’t really | enforced either,”
he added.

Mr Pinder pointed out that
some parents have alcoholic
beverages in their homes and
allow their children to con-
sume them as well.

“It is socially excepted in
most homes these days — that’s
what they learn from their
parents.”

John Ferguson said: “Laws
are useless if not reinforced
by penalties. This is just like
other laws that have been
implemented, but aren’t
enforced.”

“To prevent anyone under
the legal age from buying an
alcoholic beverage would be
a solution” said one intervie-
wee. “There has to be some

sort of social responsibility ©

from liquor vendors.

“Tt destroys lives — but
everyone is looking to make a
profit,” he added.

Challenge

The Tribune spoke to co-
chairman of the Bahamas
National
William Weeks about the lev-
el of underage drinking in
comparison to drug use by
minors. |

“Its not as big as the use of

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BM SHANTEE Woodside said:
“The laws aren’t enforced.”



a HUBERT Pinder said: “Its
socially accepted, the problem
starts in the homes.”

marijuana by young persons,
but it is still a major issue,”
said Mr Weeks.

“The:challenge-here is that
parents allow their children to
drink. Its mostly because of
our culture and the fact that
alcohol is a legal substance,”
he continued.

Mr Weeks went on to say
that the Bahamas National
Drug Council in association
with Alcoholics Anonymous
will soon be implementing a
new “zero tolerance” policy
on underage drinking.

He says that he feels confi-
dent about the outcome of this
effort.

Assistant liquor store man-
ager Shantee Woodside said:

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@ JOHN Ferguson said: "laws
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by penalties."





@ SHEANDRA Newton said:
“There is no awareness about
underage drinking.”



“With management here, if
you look like you are under-
age, you’re not served unless
you can produce and ID that
says otherwise.

“We don’t serve underage
persons, but I know some bars
do. They’re just looking to
make money and don’t really
care about who’s buying,” she
said.

“Its just the norm, young
persons drink socially all the
time,” said Gesner Dalmon.
“No minors get in any seri-
ous problems because of
drinking, so the issue is never
addressed. There hasn’t even
been any really big discussion
on it, but I think it should be
looked at.”

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006



@ By KAHMILE REID

THE name may _ have
changed — but not the fact that
visitors and Bahamians contin-
ue to be greeted with filthy
restrooms and inadequate infra-
structure, according to frequent
users.

As the government celebrat-
ed the renaming of the airport
after Sir Lynden Pindling: yes-
terday, one taxi driver remind-
ed the public that the name is
the only thing that has changed.

“The only word in the PLP’s

vocabulary is infrastructure,”
he said, “yet the infrastructure
at the airport remains run
down.”

According to the taxi driver,
who wished to remain anony-
mous, the government should
have refurbished the airport,
and implemented the necessary
modern amenities before
renaming it.

To give an example of the
negative impact that the airport
has on visitors, the taxi driver
recounted a incident that hap-
pened a few weeks ago.

LOCAL NEWS

“T picked up some tourists
from the airport and when he
was about to leave one of the
visitors said he wanted to use
the restroom

“1 directed the gentleman to
the restroom, but about a
minute later I saw him walking
back to the taxi, holding his
nose.”

The driver said that when he
went to the restroom lo investi-
gate, he quickly learned what
the problem was — both toilets
were overflowing with faeces.

He said that he immediately

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found a maintenance employ-
ee and told them about the
problem, and asked if it was
possible to get a bucket of water
to flush the toilets.

The taxi driver said the
employee told him that. there
was no water available.

Efforts to contact the airport
authorities for comment on the

The airport: the more names change,
the more things stay the same

tise the restrooms Stapelly
Disappointed

Last month, when the deputy
opposition leader Brent Symon-
ette made his contribution to
the budget debate, he expressed
his disappointment in the fact

THE TRIBUNE



ble, there has been no signifi-
cant change to the parking, or
more importantly to the first or
last impression of our visitors.”

“The PLP so far has failed to
follow the plan left by the FNM
to turn the airport in a modern-
day facility with all amenities,”

Despite the obvious lack of

= = Me

a

matter proved fruitless, howev-
er an employee, who also.
wished to remain anonymous,
confirmed that the airport does
have frequent water problems,
which affect their ability to sani-

that the PLP had been in office
for four years, yet
revitalise the facility have yet
to be implemented.”
According to Mr Symonette,
“the toilets are still in a terri-

t

'

|

he said. 1
1

'

necessary and modern facilities,
- Mr Symonette said, the gov-
ernment constantly tries to |
impress upon the public that -
they have “solved the ills of the |
NIA”. 4

“plans to







@ PRIME Minister Perry Christie joins in the celebrations
as the airport is named after Sir Lynden Pindling.

FROM page one

Pindling by quoting an excerpt from Sir Pin-
dling’s 1997 retirement speech: “It has been
my singular good fortune to have at my side
a princess, whose endearing grace and charm,
made her the toast of four continents and a
lady whose fortitude in the face of the most
daunting adversities, contributed mightily to
my survival and successes in public life.”

Governor General Arthur Hanna in his
speech reminded those attending that the
occasion had nothing to do with politics and
everything to do with history.

He acknowledged that Sir Lynden made
political mistakes, however Mr Hanna said:
“IT know he tried his best.” On this note, he
said, this occasion should not be a time for
division in our country, but a celebration of
a man mightily hailed as the father



(Photo: Mario Duncanson/T ribune staff) |

Airport renamed.

|
of the nation and the “Bahamas’ finest!
son.” ey
He said the Bahamas we see today did not’
happen by chance but by struggle and the.
airport should be a constant reminder, to all,:
of how the modern Bahamas came to be and
the role that Sir Lynden played in making,
the dream of freedom come true.
The ceremony was not attended by mem-'
bers of the Opposition who complained in,
the House of Assembly on Wednesday that:
they had received no invitations for the cer-
emony.
Late Wednesday afternoon an invitation
was delivered to Opposition Leade Hubert,
Ingraham.






US newspaper raises concerns

FROM page one

resort that will take five to eight
years to complete.

“The Bahamas has
become a very hot item. It
just feels like it's coming of
age,” Mr Dwors said.

While developers are
thrilled at the prospects, The
Sun Sentinel said, some
Bahamians are worried
about the consequences of
having such large develop-
ments established on small
islands.

“Natives and others
acknowledge the massive
growth is critical to the
Bahamas' future, but some
are concerned about what it
will do to the environment.
‘ What’s more, they think the

government isn’t properly
policing foreign developers,
allowing them to make mil-
lions while taking advantage
of the nation and its people,”
the Florida newspaper said.

“Some concede the huge
projects are the price of
progress for this nation of
325,000 people. Still.
Bahamians fear there are
looming repercussions,” the
Florida newspaper said.

It named the develop-
ments at Chub Cay, Bimini
Bay and the Ginn project in
Grand Bahama as high-end
resorts

Reginald Munroe, a 45-
year-old clothing store mer-
chant expressed another
common concern in an inter-
view with the Florida news-

paper, that the “tiny nation”
of the Bahamas cannot aa
dle that magnitude of devel-
opment that is currently get-,
ting underway.
“] just want to make sure
(the government) doesn’t
sell out the homeland. Ten
years from now, is there

going to be any waterfront’

property for Bahamians to
live on?” Mr Munroe asked.
Sam Campbell, a Cat
Island native and lawyer in
the Bahamas for more than,
25 years, said the resorts are’
not affordable for the major-
ity of Bahamians. He said he
hopes the scores of farmers,
maids and dishwashers in the
Bahamas will not fee] “mar-
ginalisedâ„¢ by all the Ey,
developments.

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 9





ae tain i sa ep ~ a §

[FRIDAYEVENING JULY 7, 2006 |

|
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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

Jut-Island Docto





The Tribune wsseessseessse2:





| The Tribune’s
Summer |
Reading Series

EXCERPT TWO
“Fools Rush In”

His father and mother having died, Mr.
Cottman dreamed of purchasing land in
The Bahamas and moving there. During a
school summer vacation in 1941, he sets
out with a friend, Reverend Robert Andry,
on a trip to Long Cay..

ob had only six weeks vacation. His

time was running out and he was in
a great hurry to get going. So it was with
vast excitement that he came rushing into
Miss Taylor’s one day with the news that he
had found a boat. She was a twenty-foot
sloop named the Cheerful, just arrived from
Acklins and due to leave for Long Cay the
following Saturday.

Fools rush in, they say, where angels and
wise men fear to tread. It is also said that
the moment a woman’s baby is born she
forgets the pain associated with the labor.
Seasickness and I have a somewhat similar
connection. No matter how seasick I may
have been, when I get on dry land, feeling
fine, and look out at a boat, I think: Would-
n’t it be wonderful to be out there sailing?
So instead of taking one quick look at the
Cheerful and going straight back to Miss
Taylor’s comfortable, land-based house, I
was almost as thrilled as Bob at the idea of
making such a long trip in such a cute little
boat with such an optimistic name....

We bought provisions. In our blissful igno-
‘rance, we bought such things as bread, eggs,
and very ripe fruit....[and] went happily
aboard the Cheerful.

We were trying to go southeast and the
wind was blowing northwest. Bob and I
were no sailors but we were soon familiar
with the resulting routine. “Good full!”
Captain Bain would boom, standing in the
bow. The man at the tiller would draw it
- toward him and the little boat would lean
still more on her side. “Let’s go back!” Cap-
tain Bain would bellow. The helmsman
would push the tiller as far as possible from
him.

The sail would begin to flap; the boom
would slowly swing from one side of the
boat to the center. There it would hang,
apparently undecided. The Cheerful, unde-
cided also, would pause. Then the boom
would move slowly on to the other side.
Everyone would duck. The wind would fill

sailor than I, was complaining of

THE TRIBUNE:



WRITTEN BY EVAN COTTMAN +
LINE DRAWINGS BY GUY FLEMING





the sail again and we would start moving—
if not back to where we had come from,
then very close to it.

This went on all day and all night and all
the next day and the next. Or so I was told.
After the first few hours I ceased to notice.
I was seasick. .

It took six days to reach the south end
of Long Island. By then our bread was
mouldy, our fruit rotten, our eggs bro-
ken. Bob, who proved a far better

hunger. But of all the things I didn’t
want to hear about, food led all the
rest.

_ All this time we had been sailing
over comparatively shallow
water. The great ocean swells
did not come here. Instead

the water was choppy.
There was no _ set
rhythm
toss tty.
and
tish’ ’e
Cheer-
ful sim-
Pook 2%
bucked like

an unbroken
horse. But on
Friday we
moved out into
the . tremen-
dous ocean








ven 10

Crooked Island Passage. Here

the nature of the waves changed.
They no longer slapped at the Cheerful
but came in long, sleek, tremendous moun-
tains. Up the sides of these the little Cheer-
ful rode like a cork, hung suspended on
the crest like a feather, and plunged down
the far side like a shot duck.

My poor stomach, which had been adjust-
ing itself to the choppy water, was caught
totally off guard. As the Cheerful plunged
down the slope of a wave, my stomach
lurched upward.

It passed through my throat into my
mouth, where I tried to stop it with clenched
teeth and open palm. Then as the Cheerful
shot up the next wave my stomach shot
down....

I was lying on my bunk when I heard cap-
tain Bain boom, “Here come a squall.”
Looking up through the open hatchway, I
observed, with only minor interest, that the
sky had gone purple and black. A moment
later, the wind struck with a wild howling
sound.

- The Cheerful seemed to quit riding the
waves and simply to be blown or hurled

from one to the other.

, owe ~ mee

nt, tA, oy See a See,
etm Beer cee:
depths of the “ 3

PSS ee


























nents




2S.

Khe, “Wwe

Sometimes there were tremendous waves ~
towering over us; sometimes looking over ©
the rail was like looking out of an air-
plane....I looked at Captain Bain and real- |
ized, dimly, that he was scared. Bob, sitting
beside me, was obviously scared. ie

In fact, everybody was scared. Except me. *
I just didn’t care.

In The Bahamas, they say there are two |
stages of seasickness: first, you are afraid
you are going to die; and second, you are "|
afraid that you won't. I had reached the °
second stage. :

(Continued every Wednesday
and Friday until August 18th)

Text copyright © 1998 Gayle Cottman
Excerpt prepared by Marjorie Downie
and Gordon Mills of

The College of The Bahamas













THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE i1





LOCAL NEWS



@ STAFFORD Clarke recieves an award for small engine repair



@ MELICIENNE Drovillard receives an award for culinary arts

'
‘
'
'
1

Awards are

handed out
at prison

‘
'
'
‘

i By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

INMATES graduating from
Her Majesty’s Prison Correc-
tional Training Institute were
encouraged to “get rid of the
negatives” and work hard.

They were told that with an
education, they can have a new
beginning.

( On Wednesday, more than

‘60 inmates were presented with

certificates in various disciplines

ranging from basic computer
skills to ceramics.

This year’s graduation exer-
icise was held under the theme:
Knowledge and hard work,
itwo keys to success.’
| The inmates heard a motiva-
itional speech:from Wendall
Jones, CEO of Jones Commu-
‘nications.

He urged the prison gradu-
‘ates to use their education for
‘good, and said that although
ithey may have made bad choic-
ies in the past, with an educa-
‘tion they must not come back to
prison.

“With your education now,
‘you should be a cut above. You
‘must go back into the main-
\stream of society and stand out
‘in the crowd as a person of
excellence and integrity,” said
‘Mr Jones.

He told them that integrity is
‘the foundation upon which a
‘successful life is built.

“You may be in a situation
today where everybody around
you is compromising their
jintegrity or taking the easy way.
‘Dont let that rub off on you.
'Be the one to have an excellent
‘Spirit. Be the one to stand in
‘the crowd in a positive way,”

_asserted Mr Jones.

Two of the graduates were
igiven a chance to reflect on
*their experience as students.

*« Kristy Hamilton said that

-during her 18-month stay at Her

‘Majesty’ s Prison, one of her

“greatest joys was coming to

Slasses.

. Ms Hamilton said she has
‘acquired many skills as a result
wof the course, including how to
*Qwn and operate a small busi-
‘ness, how to prepare herself

“for getting a job, and how to
*refocus her mind if she is
‘tempted to revert to “negative
wactivity”.

*” “These classes not alone
‘changed me, but the teachers
“played an important role in
; what they do best. This was by
‘simply coming to class with a

“Smile on their faces, they

showed me that they cared and

«that it is not just a job.

“My time here as a student
“has not only benefited me edu-
-Cationally, but also mentally and
spiritually,” she said.

Inmate Dennis Cates said

*.

that he found the classes to be
both educational and invigorat-

ing. .










































RUTH
MINERVA
SANDS, 81

of Village Road,
Nassau, The
Bahamas will be
held at Shirley
Heights Gospel
Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue,



4:00 pm.

Thompson.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas —

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Nassau on Tuesday 11th ily 2006 at

Bother Mark Lacey and Brother Tom
‘Roberts will officiate and interment will
be in Ebenezer Methodist Cemetery, East
Shirley Street, Nassau.

Miss Sands was predeceased by her
parents, William Clarence and Daisy
Emmiline Sands, a sister, Sheila Sands;
brothers, Edgar, Kingsley and Bill Sands
and is survived by her sisters, Anniewade
Albury, Isabell and Katherine Sands; |
sisters-in-law, Ann Sands and Ellen Penny;
-nephews, Donald, Jack and Clarence ur.
Sands; nieces, Daisy Roberts, Kim Sands,
Rachel Pinder, Jennie Roberts, Sueleeann
_ Ferguson and Sophia Lowe and many
other grandnephews and grandnieces,
relatives and friends with special thanks
to caregivers, Shirley, Cynthia, Netta, Beryl
and Tony and Doctors Chea and Ada

Relatives and friends may pay their last
respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, on Sunday
9th July, 2006 from 4:00 pm to 5:00pm.

H NORRIS Rolle recieves an award for small engine repair
from Addiemae Farrington



@ KEVIN Newbold receives an award for Microsoft Word at the
graduation at Her Majesty’s Prison



@ JAMES Newbold receives an award for Microsoft Word from
officer Chris Elliott

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

nary arts, small engine repair;
entrepreneurial skills, basic lit-
eracy, numeracy and ceramics.

From January to July the
inmates were educated in.basic¢
computer skills, welding, ‘culi-



































ane

| Butler's Huneral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

_ FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ope RSA

of Salt Pond, Long ind |
will be held on Friday,
July 7", 2006 at 11:00
a.m. at St. George’s
Anglican Church,
Montrose Avenue.
1 Officiating will be Rev’d
Fr. G. “Kingsley Knowles assisted by Rev.
Timothy Eldon and Fr. Ronald Hamilton.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are his Wife;
Wynette; Three (3) Sons; Justin, Julian and
Stark; Mother; Thelma Knowles; Six (6)
Brothers; Philip, Andrew, Paul, Joel, Brian and
Thomas Knowles; Three (3) Sisters; Iris
Amoury, Lucy Bonimy and Barbara Knowles;
Father-in-law; Edgar Burrows; Mother-in-law;
Theresa Burrows; Six (6) Brothers-in-law; Bruce
Amoury, Roger Bonimy, Randy, Brian, Lester
and Rickey Burrows; Three (3) Sisters-in-law;
Charon Knowles, Rosemary Roussos and Stacy
Burrows; numerous nephews and nieces
including; Peter Amoury, Ryan Bonimy, Ezekiel
and Ethan Knowles, Dawn Trotman, Amelia
Amoury, Deyar and Abigail Knowles, Cameron,
Logan and Sidney Burrows, Madyanna and Mya
Roussos, his Aunts, Uncles, Cousins and many
other relatives and friends, especially those of
Salt Pond, Long Island.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’
Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and
| York Streets on Thursday from 1:00 p.m. until
| 5:00 p.m. and on Friday at the Church from 10:00
a.m. until Service time.







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AVAILABLE AT



Enero FEE RTS ASRS ERS ET cl ee a a ten en







PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

MONDAY



HB HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New |
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm .

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas mects the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm e Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach @ Club 3596 meets at the
British Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS .

10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been.
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron ts
allowed into the club absolutely free and is giv-
en a complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tues-
day nights also include the Carlo Rossi's Hot
Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi Renzi and
music provided by DJ Ai from 100 Jamz. Master
Chef Devito Bodie provides scrumptious appe-
tizers.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to
Tpm/8:30pm to 9:30pm. ‘

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters, at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info. ;

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register’
for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm
@ CC Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room,
College Avenue off Moss Road ¢ Club
Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the
Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central .
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm
at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Ter.
race, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable.Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second

Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Hie:

4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton.
Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour — > Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetiz-




\2





~ Alcoholics Anonymous,



Highway.





Ee eT ae ee Ieee eee

EMA
PLEASE PUT




a Peelers dear
ey Rainforest fie gud EES

ers and numerous drink
specials.

& HEALTH

wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and
places: New Providence
Community Centre:
Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm.
The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday - 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.



Les



B CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets
6:30pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas
National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-
8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West

TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th
Wednesday of each month at C.C Sweeting
Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meet-
ings onthe Ist and 3rd Wednesday of each
month at Doctor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the
month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

THURSDAY

Bl HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hospital
every third Thursday of the month at 6pm in the
Doctors Hospital Conference Room. Free
screenings between Spm & 6pm. For more
information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public.of its meeting times.and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics ‘Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
for more info.

REACH ~ Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm
the second Thursday of each month in the cafe-
teria. of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3956 - "Destined for Suc-
cess" will present the theme "Forward, Upward,
Onward, Together". Thursday, July 6 at-the
Ministry of Health & Environment building on
Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, & 30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.

{nternational Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter‘meets the third

ests of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,

Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently astablished National Insurance
Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National {nsurance Board’s (NIB) training
room, Wulf Rodd office complex, at 6pm. All







NS
“SSAUBA

mcememsnser

‘(NNIVERSARY

"The brewery of The Bahamas"

ree erate





retirees are welcome.
FRIDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks
off every. Friday night with Happy Hour... spe-
ciat: drinks, live:music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and
Nassau’s first;European Night Restaurant -
Open Friday night till Saturday morning 5am,
serving hot food/and take out - music, drinks
and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the
perfect place to spend your night out till the
morning.

@ THE ARTS

NEW - DEBRIS is a one night "Art Experiment"
by Blue Curry and fellow artist Heino Schmid
which will run from 8pm until midnight Friday,
July 7. It is being held in the former Juggie's
Video/Electronic Solutions store on Alexander
Street, Palmdale. Not really an art exhibition in
the traditional sense, we will be using the empty
space for pure visual experimentation.

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will be
held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Friday
between June 9 and July 29, from 1 to 10pm.

®@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the’
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm
& 8:30pm. to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fri-
days @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @
7pm to 8pm.

i CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Cen-
tre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info
call 325.1947 after 4pm.



SATURDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

THE BUZZ - The High Tide band is back this
Saturday, July 8. Let Shelley and Ericka's vocals
take you to another level, while Snucky's pumping
bass, Gavin's guitar licks and Monk's drumming
antics keep you moving and grooving with today's
pop, rock, R&B, soca and reggae hits from today
and yesterday.

_ Show starts at 10-ish. The Buzz has the coldest

beers on the island and great specialty drinks to
keep you cool - two doors east of On The Run
East Bay St.



Please Drink







THE TRIBUNE. |

Sun City Entertainment presents Saturday &
Sunday night functions for the alternative
lifestyle crowd (Gay) at Kendal's Auto Garage
on Gladstone road from 11:30pm to 4am. Music
provided by DJ X. Heading south on Gladstone
Road, Kendal’s is located immediately past
Moss Gas station.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Heritage and Cul-
tural Extravaganza - will be held at Arawak Cay
every Saturday between June 9 and July 29 from
2 to 11pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Box Cart Derby -
will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every Satur-
day between June 9 and July 29, from 2 to 6pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the ,
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings -
10am to.llam.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor . -
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at
302.4732 for more information and learn to save
a life today. 5 ‘

& CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling.
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors ,
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
cycle. Parents interested in registering their
children should contact organisers at Jarcy-
cling@gmail.com

New --Free NFL Football Camp hosted by Alex
Smith #81 Tampa Bay Bucaneers, Saturday,

July 8 at St Augustines College 9am-3pm. Sign-
up must be in advance! Contact (242)327-3920.



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha
and the Caribbean Express - every Sunday from
6:30pm.to: 9:30pm.

Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition will be
held July 15 to 23. Under the theme, “Seduction
Surrender”, the final night of competition will
be held on Sunday, July 23 at 8pm in the Rain
Forest Theatre. The show will be hosted by
Olympic medalist, Ato Boldon, America’s Next
Top Model (Season Three), Eva Pigford, and
Bahamian radio personality, Krissy Luv. There
will also be an after party immediately following
the Mr Caribbean Bahamas Competition to
meet the winner of the competition, delegates,
the international judges, and celebrity hosts.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Royal Poinciana
Tea Party - will be held in Government House
Gardens, every Sunday between June 9 and July
29, from 3 to 6pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Old Town Jazz at
Sandyport - will be held at the Olde Town
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 - July

_ 29 from 4 — 8pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune

via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

Responsibly




YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —-(
‘OUT THERE”

[IN THE SUBJECT CINE’

an







THE TRIBUNE



Ingraham
FROM page one

national event.”

Mr Ingraham did not
attend yesterday’s renaming
ceremony, as he only received
an invitation to the event on
Wednesday afternoon. He
pointed out that he thinks the
lateness of the invitation was
partly the result of incompe-
tence on the part of govern-
ment. However, he added, he
does’not know the extent to
which it was deliberate.

This is not'the first time,
Mr Ingraham said, that he
was informed about an event
at such a late date. In Febru-
ary, | said Mr Ingraham, Prime

Minister Perry Christie called _

him;only a day before the
swearing-in ceremonies for
Mr Arthur Hanna as the new
governor general to invite
him'to attend.

“Similar treatment was
afforded to me and my col-
leagues when Dame Ivy
Duniont demitted office and
the’ ‘ceremony they had for
her.'{t was also the case with
Geatge Mackey’s funeral
arrangements, ” he said.

He added that these inci-
dents are not an exhaustive
list, but just examples of what

é happens.

Wath this most recent
delayed invitation, Mr Ingra-
hanr said: “It is a curious real-
ity that none of the other
FNM members of parliament,
nor’ ‘Mr Whitney Bastian (an
Indgpendent) had received
theit (invitations) either. I
confjrmed with Brent Symon-
ettéthis morning (Thursday)
that*he still had not received
his own.

“{, have no reason to
beligve that my MP’S in Aba-
co, Long Island and Grand
Baliama and North Eleuthera
recejved any since yesterday
(Wednesday) morning.”

Yesterday The Tribune
contacted Mr Symonette, the
FNM’s deputy leader, who
said'that up until the House
of Assembly Wednesday he
had‘ not received his invita-
tion, However, Mr Symonette
said that in'the House of
Assembly he was delivered a

handwritten envelope which

had, his name on it and five
invitations which the aviation
minister advised were for
ENM constituents. At that
tinfe, they were also given
invitations for independence:
based celebrations.

Mr Symonette said that an
employee of his received a
pefsonally addressed enve-
lope with an invitation to
attend the ceremony in her
capacity as director of the
Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation. The invitation was
received several days before
the:ceremony.

Mr Ingraham said persons
shauld be invited without
regard to their political affili-
ation in the community.

He said invitations to all
national events should go
especially to persons who
hofd certain offices, such as

MbP’s and the leader of the.

opposition. And they should
be. invited in a timely man-
ner, not the day before the
event and not after they
would have complained about
not being invited. A com-
plajnt was made in the House
of “Assembly on Wednesday
mdrning that no member of
the! Opposition had received
anunvitation to the ceremony.
Mr Whitney Bastian, Inde-
pefdent member for South
Andros, also complained that
he*had not received an invi-
tation although members of
his:constituency had.

Mr Ingraham also touched
onthe issue of consultation
with the renaming of the air-
pott. He said he was not
aware of any consultation that
had taken place in the
Bahamas about changing the
ndme of Nassau Internation-
al-Airport.

Mr Ingraham said it was
announced by Mr Christie at
the PLP’s convention, how-
ever; they did not choose to
haye, a debate in parliament
fox resolution.

At the same time, Mr
Ingraham said that as the rul-
ing party, the government
does have the right to name
public facilities.

‘He stressed: “It is impor-
taht'‘when you are doing these
major changes to develop a
bread consensus in the society
about it and to get general
agréements on it. It is always
better to have consensus over
these things between the
major political entities before
you do it, so you take the pol-
itics. out of it. The reality is
the. PLP’s election campaign

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 13

AG reveals statistics

use of firearms in crimes





@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE practice of loaning or leasing
firearms to commit crimes is wide-
spread in the Bahamas, statistics
reveal.

According to Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, analysis of
2004 records shows that the majority of
violent crimes committed in the
Bahamas were perpetrated with the
use of firearms.

“Ballistic analysis verified that a sin-
gle firearm had links to multiple inci-
dents, for example, armed robberies,
shootings, murders and grievous harm.

“A firearm used in a 2004 murder
was linked to a 2004 attempted armed

robbery and assault,”

Pastor calls for stand
against gay marriage

FROM page one

sons, by virtue of a govern-
mental constitutional review
committee, to settle orice and
for all the nature of marriage
by requiring that the govern-
ment amend the constitution to
state clearly that it is a union
between a man and a woman.

“Bahamians operate in a
very lackadaisical, apathetic
attitude toward anything. And
we have to get people taking
stands and taking positions and
not talking about it in the clubs
and in the ball parks but to say
publicly that this is where we
stand,” Dr Major said.

While Dr Major admitted
that gay Bahamians have not
been coming forward and
demanding recognition and

rights as married couples, he:

said that there are demands
being made which are leaning
towards that.

“All the conversation from
that side is toward that. From

the persons who want to be |

married as same sex, that’s

‘their position, they want the

same rights to marry as men
and women.

“Marriage is not.for a gay
couple, therefore the benefits
of marriage is not for a gay
couple. Adoption is for per-
sons who care for children.

That’s true for single parents,

that’s true with grandparents,
aunties, uncles, but to be
brought into a coupled union
claiming to be a marital union,
same sex persons, and to bring
a child into that, we stand
against that absolutely,” the

pastor said.

Although “sweethearting” is
prevalent in the Bahamas, the
basic concept of marriage is
not threatened as much by
“sweethearting” as it is by
homosexuality, Dr Major said.

“There is no threat, in the
sense of making a perversion
of what marriage is. That’s a
transgression of marriage in
the sense that someone is relat-

she said.

ing to someone, but they are

not challenging the basic con-

cept of marriage,” he said.
While he said sweethearting

should not be condoned, he

felt it could be tolerated to a

point.

“Any person who gives guid-
ance for marital development
includes in that guidance that
multiple relationships within a
family structure are not valid,
proper, or right. We. are not
talking about how to improve
marriage, we are talking about
how to define it,” he said.

Dr Major pointed out that
the Constitutional Reform
Committee determined that

the majority of persons they

spoke to would want an
amendment stating clearly that
marriage is to be recognised as
a union between a man and a
woman.

“Based on that and the
struggle that is going on in the
west where the status of mar-
riage is being shattered by poor
legislation to begin with and
by careless legal manoeuver-
ing, unless we set it straight
and clear we will fall into the
same traps as well,” Dr Major
said.

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

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Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also pointed

out that of 126 suspects arrested for
unlawful sexual intercourse that year,
8 per cent were repeat suspects.

The attorney general, who was
speaking in parliament, said she plans
to introduce a bill for an Act to amend
a number of Acts relating to the crim-
inal law.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that the
Criminal Law Miscellaneous (amend-
ment) Bill 2006, seeks to provide for a

right of a appeal to the Court of

Appeal by the prosecution, an accused

or convicted individual, where bail has .

been granted or refused by the
Supreme Court, or where an applica-
tion by the prosecution to revoke bail
has been denied.

. Presently, the right to appeal to the
Court of Appeal where bail has been
given or denied, does not exist.

m@ ATTORNEY General Allyson Maynard-Gibson

The bill also seeks to provide for
certain existing offenses to be triable
either on indictment or summarily.

Such offences include:

° Purchasing, acquiring or possessing
a gun and using or carrying a gun with-
out a licence

» Purchasing or possessing a firearm
or ammunition without a certificate

© Possessing a firearm or ammuni-
tion during a period for which one is
subject to the supervision of the police,
to be of good behaviour or to be keep-
ing the peace

° Selling, transferring a firearm or
ammunition or repairing, testing or
proving a firearm or ammunition for
any person prohibited from possess-
ing ‘a firearm or ammunition.



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Freeport Harbour Entrance

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For More Information Contact:
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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Americans at Atlantis
celebrate independenc








ATLANTIS truly rocked — evening with a joy ride aboard ve
and so did hundreds of the _ the famous ‘Love Boat’ from sens
resort’s guests who were hosted the Marina at Atlantis to Par- Jee!
to a Dynamite 70s fourth of July | adise Harbour, the featured 16%,






celebration on Tuesday incom- venue for the carnival-like cel-
memoration of America’s inde- _ ebrations.

%
%

i





















pendence. Everything from the games, 3
a IN an Fantasy Island flashback, Atlantis guests Christina and Guests strolled down memo- _ food, and music — which all dat-
Marko Andrioff along with little Alexa pose with Tattoo ry lane as they began the ed back to the 70s — kept on

rolling. Hoop-la, hole-n-one,
hoop shot and many more excit-
ing games were featured.

Special live music was pro-
vided by the Right On Band.
There were special appearances
by Elvis Presley, the king of
rock-n-roll, Tattoo from Fan-
tasy Island, as well as many oth-
er past celebrities from the 70s
era.

Atlantis employees added a
special twist to the celebrations
Cn Mechiabical Roan as they donned afro wigs, bell-

a bottoms and mini skirts.
Alr Conditioner Amanda Felts, Atlantis’ vice
#AGV12 president of guest activities,
along with her team and others
at the resort, worked tirelessly
to ensure that the event was a
success.

Vanessa Eneas, Atlantis’
r 8,000 BTU director of guest activities said,

: “We are thrilled to once again
$3 75 00 host our guests here at Atlantis
#AGVO8 to our July 4 independence cel-






@ ATLANTIS’ guest Ingrid Dominquez from Miami receives ;
lei from Jaimi Hanna of Atlantis’ Imperial Club.























ebrations. This is one of the best
events of the year.
p 12,000 BTU “All of our guests are in such
$437 50 a festive mood and we really : :
re brought it alive this year with wy 4 TL ANTIS’ guests line up for a slice of the independence



our Dynamite 70s theme.”
The celebrations left a last-
ing impression on the resort’s

¢ 14,000 BTU | atiesis.

It marked the third time that

$5 $5.00 Kerry and Michael Rosen from
#AGV14 ees New York celebrated the spe-
cial holiday at Atlantis.

This year’s celebration was
especially memorable for the
couple, who showed their patri-

. otism by wearing t-shirts depict-
Sales & Full Service Department ing the American flag. “It’s
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets, great for my daughter — she is
322-2188/9 six years old and she plays all of
the carnival games, wins little
prizes, and.she just loves it
here,” said Mr Rosen.

The event climaxed_with.an.

impressive fire works display _ ; 1:
which lit up the evening sky. "7 ne utente! Nikolette Fonseca and Mia Tedesco enjoy

#AGV12 cake

















©2006 CreativeRelations.net







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FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 15
THE TRIBUNE OO aac ciieat oe a.





PAGE 16, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 | | THE TRIBUNE



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FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Mm Wit: iv ‘ibune_

ee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street ©





}

Bahamas resort deal

runs into

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

United States-based_

resort developer has

_tun into trouble with

its plans to acquire a

Bahamian island that

features a hotel and marina complex,

although it told The Tribune that the

potential deal “has not completely
fallen apart” yet.

Cay Clubs Resorts & Marinas has

been attempting to acquire Walker’s.

Cay in the Abacos, having announced
this February that.a deal had been
completed in principle with its own-
ers, the New York-based Abplanalp
family.

However, sources told The Tribune

that the acquisition had fallen.’

through, with environmental issues
concerning Walker’s Cay said to be
_the reason.

Frank Rego, Cay Clubs Resorts &

j

difficulties

Purchase of Walker’s Cay off Abaco ‘not completely |
fallen apart’, but environmental concerns pigminent

|
i

Marinas vice- president of operations ©

for the US ¢astern seaboard and the
Caribbean, yesterday acknowledged
~ that the purchase had run into diffi-
_culties when contacted by .The Tri-
bune.

He. said | Tt has: not fallen through
completely, We're still in negotiations
with the owners. It’s still going back
and forth. It’s not aL completely, fallen
apart. ¢

“There’s issues on the island that
we’re trying to resolve.”

When pressed as to the reasons why
the acquisition had run into trouble,
Mr Rego said they related to “envi-
ronmental” concerns with Walker’s

Cay, but he could say no more
because of confidentiality agreements
signed with the owners.

“It’s nothing I can talk about,” he
said. “There is ongoing negotiations.
That is as much as I can tell you at this
time.

“Hopefully, welll have it resolved
soon. But there’s no exact timeline
we can put on it right now.’

Mr Rego had last week told The
Tribune that while Cay Clubs & Mari-
nas was waiting for environmental
studies on Walker’s Cay to be com-
pleted, the closing date for the acqui-
sition had only been delayed.

The 71-room Walker’s Cay Hotel &

we

Marina, which has 62 suicet rooms,
three villas and the three-bedroom
Harbour House, was heavily dam-
aged during Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne in 2004, and has been closed
ever since.

The 100-acre Walker’s Cay, though,
has the advantage of being the north-

ernmost island in the Bahamas, thus -

making it the first stop-off for US
boaters and yachtsmen as they move
down the Abacos chain - a well-
known destination for this market.
This is what Cay Clubs & Marinas
was planning to capitalise on, plus

_Walker’s Cay’s reputation among

boaters as a leading sports fishing des-

tination. Some 80 per cent of the

_ world’s game fishing records are said
. to be held by boats that came out of

Walker’s Cay.
_ The island provides access to both
shallow water and deep water fish-
ing, with boaters in deep water with-
in minutes of leaving.

Apart from the 2,800 foot airstrip,
Walker’s Cay also houses the Conch

‘Pearl and Lobster Trap restaurants, ,-. ;

two bars, the Treasure Chest gift +”
shop, the Sea Below dive shop, fresh-
water and saltwater swimming pools,

SEE page 4B

Bahamas
investors
put $23bn
into US —

Nation plays key role in

supporting US economy —

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS-domiciled
investors and investment vehi-

SEE page 5B.














}
i

lm By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter

occupancies temporarily. However, he said
the Cable Beach Resorts hope to improve
occupancy and rates over last year, taking
the lost rooms into consideration.

The conversion of the Radisson to. Star-
wood’s Sheraton brand is expected to begin



THE Cable Beach Resorts will temporari-
ly lose 330 rooms, which will have an effect on
their summer occupancy and rate levels, when
the first stage of the $80 million Radisson
renovation begins.

Robert Sands, executive vice- resident of



step towards changing the resorts into the
proposed $2 billion Baha Mar eee:

administration and public affairs for Baha _ begins.

Mar Development Company, predicted that

once construction begins on the Radisson 4
Cable Bre) Resort, yey he lose those SEE pase | B

















_ a dream home
Reality Check.

But affording it may be another makter,
Talk to us about our attractive mortgage leans
vatittn Homme: tihatt tuum @reaang inte reality,
Call us ta Nassau at 242 393 1023

ot im Freeport at 242 352 7233

Or log om to wane, Famityguerdian.conm today!

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INSURANCE
COMPANY

within the next month, as the first physical

Radisson work to



Bank’s $24. 1m

private issue

oversubscribed

COMMONWEALTH Bank
yesterday said its completed
$24.1 million preference share
issue was oversubscribed, as it
sought to strengthen its capital

base-to take advantage of new

opportunities.

The bank said in a statement
that the private preference
share issue, which was only

open to select institutional

investors, was completed in a
matter of days.
The issue was priced 3 at

Bahamian prime plus 1.5 per’

cent, and will pay dividends
quarterly.

T. B. Donaldson, Gominon!
wealth Bank’s chairman, said
in a statement: “This offering
represents the first time Com-

-monwealth Bank has gone to

the capital market since its ini-
tial public offering in 2000.

“Since that time, the bank
has grown from $500 million
in total assets to over $900 mil-
lion today. The issue brings the
bank’s capital to over $180 mil-
lion, more than double the cap-
ital at the Bank’s IPO in 2000.
This offering supports future
growth for the bank while
maintaining our prudent lev-
els of capital.”



& T B DONALDSON

Commonwealth Bank asked
shareholders to approve the
creation of a $50 million pref-
erence share issue at its recent
annual general meeting
(AGM).

Mr Donaldson had said the
preference share issue was like-
ly to take the form of “five
tranches of $10 million each”.

Gh aNciNe The Way
is Does Bui:

siness!!







PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

Intensive traini



*

THE TRIBUNE

for



400 tourism workers

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter

AMERICAN Express will
finance an intensive training
course for 400 workers in. the
Bahamas hotel industry, part
of a partnership with the
Bahamian Hotel Association
(BHA), the Caribbean Hotel
Association (CHA) and the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism.

Earle Bethell, the BHA’s

president, said the Association’

was most appreciative that
American Express and the
CHA chose the Bahamas as
one of the countries to benefit
from the programme.

This particular training
course has been offered in 14
countries for the past 23 years,
reaching some 600,000 service
workers. The Bahamas is. the
first English-speaking
Caribbean island to benefit
from the programme.

Mr Bethell said that given
the major tourism development
projects in the Family Islands,
the Bahamian workforce will
have to be expanded with

ounger workers. He said it was

- imperative that these workers

had the necessary and relevant
skills to work in these resorts.
Mr Bethell added that the
programme was consistent with
the BHA’s goals of strengthen-
ing the industry’s human
resource capability, as well as
providing members with activ-
ities to support the industry’s
development and profitability.
Sammy Gardiner, director of
training for the Ministry of

Tourism, said the Ministry was —

pleased that the training will
not just be a one-time thing,
but will include. opportunities
for enforcement and follow-up.
“Customer service is never
outdated,” he said.
Also attending yesterday’s

‘ tourism industry by teaching

- task they do, it should be done

Total Service: The Bahamas is

launch were Patricio Rubalca-
ba, the manager of destination
business for American Express
(AMEX), and Ivette Martinez,
CHA’s membership services
director and the administrator
of the programme.

Mr Rubalcaba said AMEX
sought to ensure that its clients
enjoyed their visits by promot-
ing the destination that, in turn,
maximises what the clients
spend. He said that in the past
there had been a very successful
collaboration between CHA
and his company.

Ms Martinez said the training
programme should elevate the
level of professionalism in the

workers that no matter what

with excellence.
The training programme,

Quality, will be offered in eight
sessions to workers on New
Providence, Grand Bahama
and Abaco between July 24-28.
Four sessions will be held in
Nassau, two in Grand Bahama
and two will take place in Aba-
co.

It will allow service workers
to focus on 10 principles: cus-
tomer needs, teamwork, mul-
ti-directional communication,
being actively ahead of needs,
effective handling of conflicts,
professional commitment,
empathetic thinking, postive
attitude, strong leadership and
‘total service culture.

It is expected that following
the initial pilot session, similar
sessions will be held to reach
more service workers through-

out the country. @ REPRESENTATIVES from American Express,
ment to deliver a series of customer service training workshops to the industry throu
Rubalcaba, American Express senior manager of destination Business for the Caribbean} Earle Bethell, president, Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation; and Ivette Martinez, membership services director an
Sammy Gardiner, senior director for education and training,
Bahamas Hotel Association; and Renee McKinney, chairperson for BHA’

Cable Beach Resorts.

In addition, there will be a
component called, Train the
‘Trainer, which will allow
Bahamians to teach the course.
‘The sessions are expected to be
sold out.

Vacant land, houses, rental propertics:
find whatever you're looking for in
The Tribune's Real Estate Guide.
The Tritume is my newspaper.”

MARIO CAREY
ESTATE AGENT, BAHAMAS REALTY





d project administrator,

the Caribbean Hotel Association and the Bahamas Hotel Association signed an agree-
ghout the Bahamas. Seated from L to R: Patricio

\



@ SHOWN (from left to right) are Marvin Johnson,
da Thompson, Ministry of Tourism,
sales and airport; Don Hunter, general manager airp

ager, Airport Authority.



Caribbean Hotel Association. Standing from right:
Ministry of Tourism; Bridget Murray, workforce development manager,
's Workforce Development Activities and director of training,



turn coordinator officer for Virgin Airways; Lin-
airlift department; Richard Ryan, Virgin Atlantic manager,
ort services, London; and John Nixon, duty man-

Virgin celebrates first

Nassau service birthday —

VIRGIN ATLANTIC AIR-
WAYS has celebrated the one-
year anniversary of its service
between the UK and the
Bahamas with the flight that
operated on June 26, 2006.

The event was marked by a
brief cake cutting celebration
at the former Nassau Interna-
tional Airport, now renamed
as the Sir Lynden Pindling

International Airport.
Islander

The VS 62 - The Islander
was the 52nd flight operated
on Virgin’s weekly service to
London, leaving every Mon-
day at 4.30 pin to Gatwick Air-
port. During the first year of
operation, Virgin boarded

12,366 passengers from the Sir
Lynden Pindling International
Airport.

Richard Ryan, Virgin
Atlantic Airways Manager not-
ed, “Virgin is extremely
pleased with the 100 per cent

_ operation of all flights.and the...

growing market of visitors
from the United Kingdom to
The Bahamas.



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THE TRIBUNE



Minister’s warning over

liberalisation hypocrisy

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

JAMES Smith, minister of
state for finance, said yesterday
it was “difficult” to understand
why the Bahamas and other
developing countries were being
pressured to open up all mar-
kets to foreign firms when
developed countries had previ-
ously protected their industries
from such competition.

‘In his address to the Trade
and Legal Aid Conference
staged by the Eugene Dupuch
Law School, Mr Smith said that
while countries were increas-
ifigly surrendered sovereignty
over economic policymaking to
bodies such as the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), no nation
. had ever experienced sustained
*. economic growth without gov-
ernment protection and subsi-
dies to certain industries.

Among those countries who
‘had protected their “infant

industries” from foreign com-

petition, and used this to mod-
ernise their economy, were the

US, UK, Japan, Germany and

South Korea.

Mr Smith said: “If we were to
accept those arguments, it is dif-
ficult to. comprehend why some
multilateral institutions are pres-
surising:developing countries to
dismantle all state-sponsored
protective mechanisms in order
to advance the cause of inter-
national. trade when they are
well aware that developed coun-
tries had used similar strategies
in their:formative years.’

This is similar to arguments
advanced by groups. such as

. Bahamians Agitating for a Ref-
erendum on Free Trade

(BARE), who have frequently

warned that by signing on to the

WTO and other trade. agree-

ments, ‘the ‘Bahamas could be

forced ‘to open up: previously
protected markets to foreign
competition, squeezing out

Bahamian-owned firms.

Mr Smith yesterday said small
nations such as the Bahamas



Bank of The B

INTERNATIONAL



@ FINANCE MINISTER
JAMES SMITH

were “at a distinct disadvan-
tage” when it came to interna-
tional trade participation.

If these countries sought eco-
nomic growth by widening and
deepening trade relationships,
they “would only be able to do
so by compromising significant
elements of'sovereignty”.

Mr Smith said: “For small
states, there is an inherent con-
flict between economic devel-
opment via international trade
and the preservation of sover-
eignty by the state. The extent
to which that.confiict or tension
could be mitigated is in fact a
measure of the efficacy of the
governing authority..........0....

“If we in the Bahamas were
to enter into any trade agree-
ments based on WTO standards,
we would most certainly have
to reform and restructure cer-
tain areas of our economy.

“In short, national economic

policies and programmes which
used to be designed, developed
and implemented by the sover-
eign state have now, in some
cases, been subordinated to the
policy prescriptions externally
imposed by the multilateral
institutions.”

Mr Smith said the Bahamas
needed to ensure that it would
be at least “no worse off”, if not

better off, by entering an inter-
national trade agreement rather
remaining on the outside.

He pointed out that if the

_ Bahamas became a WTO mem-

ber it would need to replace its
existing tax system, “a major
concession for a sovereign state

to surrender to the WTO .

process - its right to adopt any
tax system it chooses”.

In addition, trade disputes
with other nations and foreign
companies would have to be
resolved by the WTO’s dispute
settlement mechanisms, a
process that may no be common
to the Bahamas.

The Bahamas would need to
adjust its “laws and practices”

to meet the terms of trade

agreements and their rule-based
frameworks, usually based on
non-discriminatory principles
such as Most Favoured Nation
(MEN), National Treatment and
transparency.

Referring to the ‘blacklisting’
of the Bahamas’ financial ser-
vices industry in 2000 by the
Financial Action Task Force

(FATF) in 2000, Mr Smith said .

this was a clear case “of open
tension between the lawful pur-
suits of a small nation state and
the extraterritorial demands of
large developed states”.

He added that the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-Opera-
tion and Development’s
(OECD) ‘harmful tax practices’
project challenged a long-stand-
ing principle of international
law, namely. that a country’s
ability to tax is limited to those
taxes it can enforce without the
help of other states.

Mr Smith said more than 80
per cent of the world’s offshore
financial services were provided
by OECD states, which them-
selves were non-compliant with
the standards and information

éxchange they were trying them- .

selves to enforce.
He questioned why small
countries such as the Bahamas
would be willing to surrender
sovereignty to multilateral insti-



“ A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
CREDIT OFFICER - FREEPORT BRANCH

Â¥

¢ Prepare thorough credit proposals and maintain profitability of assigned

portfolio.

¢ Interview loan applicants and make considered decisions based on
investigations and assigned lending authority.
¢ Act as the “Relationship Manager” for assigned accounts by ensuring
that 11 of the customers needs are satisfied.
¢ Ensure all loans are granted in compliance with the Bank’s lending

policies and guidelines.

¢ Monitior and control loan portfolios to avoid delinquency.
I © Perform constant follow-up on delinquent loan accounts.
| ¢ Ensure loan and security files are completed and properly maintained.
° Constantly i increase lending by marketing the Bank’s products and

services.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

* Associates Degree in relevant area (e.g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance)
¢ Three to five years banking and lending experience

¢ Excellent interpersonal and communication skills

¢ Strong negotiation, and analytical and organizational skills
° Computer literate-Ability to use MS Word and Excel

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later that July 21st 2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118

Na assau, Bahamas





FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 3B




MUS CS UT RUC ale

read Insight on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE ORCHID LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

tutions after experiencing cases
such as the ‘blacklisting’.

Mr Smith said countries chose
this route because they either
saw international trade as the
route to economic growth and
development, or because they
were forced and pressured to
do so by institutions such as the
World Bank, International
Monetary Fund and the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB).

Loan agreements from these
institutions, Mr Smith said, were
sometimes conditioned on coun-
tries liberalising their economies
and markets, allowing the free
flow of capital, and possibly pri-
vatising and cutting public sector

benefits.

Date Stolen: between 11:00 p.m. on May 18, aN and 6:00
a.m. on May 19, 2006 |

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000, BLUE ORCHID |
LTD., is in dissolution as of JULY 5th, 2006. |

International Liquidator Services Inc., situated at
35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, |
Belize is the Liquidator. :













Location of Theft: The Cove, Gregory Town, Eleuthera

Description: 1998 32 ft. White & Blue Intrepid with two
250 hp Yamaha Outboard Engine

Registration#: n/a





Name of Vessels n/a




A reward of $5, 000 i is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.

Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962

Sea 6p ced ORE! RR RCRD... ep erenceeTtes tt Re apy rat

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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE



SS ae eee eee
shes Bahamas resort deal

VENTURES PORTFOLIO

cum. on =| tuUNS into difficulties

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

: : FROM page 1B Bahamian projects.” The island also fitted into the company’s

: PuSuan - section 137 @) : E me International pag Mr Rego added then that his compa- philosophy of sustainable eco-tourism.
Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby given tennis courts and 75 marina slips. The __ ny’s “reciprocal use type of membership” The only facilities currently open on
that the voluntary winding-up and dissolution of the hotel is 50 feet above sea level. would ensure that Walker’s Cay would Walker’s Cay are the Customs and Immi-

Company commenced on the 26th day of June, 2006 and Michael Redd, of Michael Redd & _ receive a consistent, year-round flow of gration post, plus the utilities plant that
: 6G Associates,‘the company that would be _ business once the development was com- supplies nearby Grand Cay with power

that Bernard Schmutz, 12 rue Verdaine, CH - 1206 Geneva responsible for masterplanning the Walk- _ pleted and re-opened. and water.
has been appointed Liquidator. er’s Cay development on Cay Clubs He said Cay Clubs Resorts & Marinas Cay Clubs & Marinas owns and oper-
Resorts & Marinas behalf, said back in _ had selected Walker’s Cay as the site ofits | ates resort and marina properties through-

. February: “Walker’s is definitely one of _ first international expansion due to its out the Florida Keys, Clearwater, Sara- ~
Dated this 26th day of June, 2006 the rare jewels in the Bahamas chain of _ proximity to the US, “ease of doing busi- _ sota and Las Veen It develops water-
islands. This will be one of the truly unique _ ness and ability to develop the project”. _ front style living and communities.

Bernard Schmutz

a Radisson work to close 330 rooms

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



British Colonial Hilton. will still be strong with the seen as the slow period for the
FROM page 1B - Michael Hooper, general _ hotel expected to have an aver- Bahamian hotel industry, the

terday that while bookings for 90 per cent in July and 78 per stronger numbers because it.

ine Another hotel reporting on _ the summer season were slight- cent in August. : _ the time that more families
its summer rates was the _ ly down from last year, they Mr Hooper said that while tended to take their vacations

TRUFFLEY INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD. those numbers were not bad, _. with school out.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) they were below the strong Mr Hooper said the slower

showing the Hilton posted in season was now during Sep-
the first six months of the year. | tember and October, the peri-
se hm, LY : He added that while in the od that is in the thick of hurri-
Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company past the summer season was__cane season.
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 22nd day
of February 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,

P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.








PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is advised that, | DIANDRA SANTANA
SAUNDERS of Sapote Street, Pinewood Gardens, Nassau,
The Bahamas intend to change my name to D’ANDRA
| SANTANA SAUNDERS. If there are any objections to this
change.of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-3746, Nassau,
Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

=) ia

EVERYTHING
in our FAB!
To tiLae) at :
Located in the Lyford Cay Shopping Center.
Sale hours: 10am-4pm
Monday - Saturday

- ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) :





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HACKBERRY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



NOTICE

Paribas Asset Management Ltd
(known as PAM Bahamas in the UK)

Notice is hereby given that the above-names Company
is in dissoluton, which commenced on the 5th day of
July 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box
N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 249(2) of the |
Companies Act, 1992 that a final meeting of the Shareholders of
the above named Company will be held at the offices of KPMG, 5%
Floor Montague Sterling Centre, East Bay Street.on August 8, 2006,
Nassau, Bahamas at 10:00 O'clock in the forenoon for the purpose
of the Joint Liquidators submitting an account showing the manner
in which the winding-up of the Company has been conducted and
the property of the Company disposed of, and to hear any explanation
that may be given by the Joint Liquidators.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. .
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROBERT JOSEPH OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. le

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL EMMANUEL
FORBES OF COOPERS TOWN, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given ttiat SHAELLYS JOSEPH P.O. Box:
N-7060,Oxford Ave off of Market St South, Nassau,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 7TH day of JULY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

y é « : YTD% Last 12 Months

; : a. i Colina Money Market Fund 1.295645"
NOTICE is hereby given that JAHMAL ANWAR KEVIN : Fidelity Bahamas G &|Fund 2.78564 ***
DANIELS, 104 Washington Street, P.O.BOX N-10711, collie Mee teers ete
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible ; a CLOSE 668.19 / YTD 21.08% / 2008"
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price















Dated this 6th day of July, 2006

Mr. Juan M. Lopez Mr. Simon J.S. Townend
Joint Liquidator Joint Liquidator




















mae €olina a)
— Financial Advisors Ltd.





BIS

Pricing‘ Information As Of:

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets ~
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Hc ‘lings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs



Premier Real Estate iat nO schoo 5.85%
Last Price Weekly Vol P/E Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets 1.923 0.720
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 3 - . 0.000 0.640
CNL
-000 4
0.360 8.0












it] - 4 rvi: v. 52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in fast 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows 52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 30 June 2006
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the — o - eater says otra Va daily volume Ny ve alle volume of eee fe Bra gid ** 31 May 2006

az . at ale | ie ange in closing price from da’ oO day 7 company’s reported eam ir share 6 las’ mths

facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of JULY, Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** 30 April 2006
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful ‘
Citizensh i p, P oO Box N = 7 4 47, iN assau : Bah amas P/E - Closing price divided by the lest Z month: eamings re FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 31 May 2006

MORE |





manager, told The Tribune yes- age occupancy level of around — summer now tends to bringin |



THE TRIBUNE

4

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 5B



Lo - eae eee eee

ahamas investors
put $23bn into US

- FROM page 1B

cles held more than $23 billion
worth of US debt and equity
securities as at June 30, with
this national and other
Caribbean financial services
centres accounting for a com-
bined 62 per cent of all such
investment by the entire

-. Americas region.

The US Treasury Depart-
-ment’s report on foreign hold-

ings of US securities as at June
30, 2005, showed that
Bahamas-registered entities
had invested almost $23.5 bil-
lion in short and long-term
equity and debt instruments,
illustrating the important role
this nation and other interna-
tional financial centres play in
the US capital markets.

» As at June 30, 2005, almost

$22 billion in long-term US
securities was held in the
Bahamas, a slight drop on the



previous year’s $23 billion. Out
of that amount, over half -
some $12 billion - was in the
form of common stock or oth-
er equities.

However, Bahamas-based
holdings of long-term debt
securities, such as US Treasury

‘debt and asset-backed securi-

ties issued by other US gov-
ernment departments and cor-
porations, fell from $10 billion
to $9 billion between June 30,
2004, and June 30, 2005.

As for short-term securities,
Bahamas-based investment
vehicles had reduced their
holdings over the same period
from $1.745 billion to $1.517
billion. Most of the short-term
holdings are US Treasury debt.

The size of the role played
by the Bahamas and other
Caribbean nations in the US
capital markets is best illus-
trated by the lead they take in
investment in US-issued secu-
rities for the Americas region.

Investment in US securities
that is channelled through
Caribbean financial centres,
including the Bahamas, has
grown from $341 billion in
March 2000 to $472 billion in
June 2003 and $607 billion at
June 2004, reaching $715 bil-
lion in June 2005.

The total investment in US
securities by the Americas
region at June 30, 2005, was
$1,155 billion.

The US Treasury report
said: “Of these American
region countries, the Bahamas,
Bermuda, the British Virgin
Islands, the Cayman Islands,
Netherlands Antilles and
Panama - referred to collec-
tively as the Caribbean finan-
cial centres - serve as major
financial centres through which
investments of residents from

other countries are channelled...

As a group, these financial cen-
tre countries accounted for
$715 billion, 62 per cent, of all
investment attributed to the
Americas region.”

The role played by
Bahamas-domiciled invest-
ment in the US economy and
capital markets is also possi-
bly this nation’s greatest
defence against further attacks

Date Stolen: between 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May,
2006 and 6:50 a.m. on Friday, May 19, 2006

Location of Theft: San Marino Marina, Paradise Island

Description: 1991 17 ft. White Boston Whaler with 115
hp Yamaha Outboard Engine

Registration#: N 08607

Name of Vessel: “Sea Bee”

A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.

Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962



by the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) and
the Financial Action Task
Force (FATF).

’ Any further destabilisation .

of the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry by initiatives
such as the OECD’s ‘harmful
tax practices’ could damage the
inward investment upon which
large portions of the US econ-
omy thrive.

Yesim Yilmaz, a research
fellow with a leading US-based
opponent of the OECD, the
Centre for Freedom and Pros-
perity, drew on this theme to
explain why low-tax jurisdic-
tions should be left alone, argu-
ing that they contributed to
“the long-term success of the
US economy”.

Data showed that the
Bahamas and other Caribbean

financial centres had helped

channel more than $1.3 trillion
in investment into the US
economy.at March 2006, based
on the liabilities the US bank-
ing system and capital markets
owed to these nations.

Mr Yilmaz said low-tax juris-
dictions placed competitive
pressures on the US to ensure
its federal and state tax sys-
tems were not too onerous,

with these disciplines generat-

ing “more benefits than costs
for America”.

He described the US as the
world’s largest repository of
foreign capital, standing at
some $11 trillion, with some
$7 trillion of this financial
investment. ;

Mr Yilmaz said: “Losing
some or all of this capital to
other tax havens, which would
happen if the US ceased its
favourable tax treatment of
foreigners, would have signifi-
cant. negative impact on the

US growth and employment.”

THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC SER











NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDRE ETIENNE OF DELANCY
STREET OF NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE GUE OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TECHLER ST FORT OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. Sern:













LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TNC HOLDING INC.

NOTICE ‘is hereby given that in accordance with.
Section 137(6) of the International Business
Companies Act of 2000 (No. 45 of 2000) TNC
HOLDINGS INC. is in Dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution. was the Ist day of
May, 2006. CUTELL MILLER, of Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of TNC HOLDING INC.

CUTELL MILLER
Liquidator

NOTICE

TO ALL MEMBERS

OF
E

UNION

Please be advised that as a result of aSPECIAL
CALL GENERAL MEETING held on
Thursday, 22nd June 7:30 p.m. at the Bahamas
Public Services Union (BPSU) meeting hall
situated on East Street South, in New Providence,
a Resolution was passed and resolved for the
“Increase of Union Membership Dues”. The
clear call of the resoulution says:-

“RESOLVED, that the voting members of the
Special Call Meeting instructs and mandates
President, John Pinder and Executive Officers
of the BPSU to increase its Union general
membership dues from Fifteen Dollars ($15.00)
per month to Twenty-five Dollars ($25.00)
effective Ist July”.

All members of the BPSU, are hereby informed
that effective 1st July, 2006 the increase will be
realized and the new reduction rates will be

honoured.





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE






BUSINESS a : oe

Tobacco ruling could lead
to thousandsCopyrighted Materialtits
coe» NOTICE... —™ Syndicated Content

HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted, should send a written Z : i
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MCKENZIE GAY OF MARSH
‘HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Oe
*

+
ee Fa 3 4a

















LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

POBEDA INC.







Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of POBEDA INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.









The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

} neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for-improvements in the
area or have won an












ARGOSA CORP IN( : “1 If so, call us on 322-1986
(Liquidator) -and share your story.



CUSTOMER SERVICES OFFICER

Duties: | Candidate must be able to provide exceptional
customer services including but not limited to:
meeting and communicating with customers; _
accurate and timely processing of customer

- transactions; monitoring of transactions for

cot ait ot eS
Ue oe Pe

A Se ge 8 >. Bae oe cae LF 3

potential money laundering and deputizing for ‘

Department Head whilst the latter is absent on ie

leave. — c *
Requirements: a

3 Bed/ 2 Bath Residence 2,854 sq ft situated on 1.85 acres
Located Queens Highway, Nicholls Town, North Andros.

2 Ooo & w-
CBE eS

¢ BA degree in Business or Finance

“ee +



¢ A minimum of five years Customers Services For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: a
experience within the Financial Services industry The Commercial Credit Collection Unit ‘sy
aConmercial Orientation at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas *:
+ Excellent Communication Skills (Written and verba ee a et ee ames, |
e Excellent Organizational Skills to reach us before July 21° 2006. oe
¢ Excellent Interpersonal Skills oe 3 ae
¢ Computer Literate (MS Office) oe
¢ Working knowledge of Money Laundering and 3 oe
Financial Transaction laws and regulations oO . IC [Ee st



¢ A Team Player

Date Stolen: night of June 12, 2006 and early hours of June
13, 2006

$e 8 ©
See se >



+e © e

Fringe Benefits include:

* eva
4 28%



ogg

Location of Theft: San Marino Marina, Paradise Island




¢ Life and Health coverage |
¢ Pension

Description: 2002 19 ft. White Boston Whaler with 2002
150 hp Yamaha Outboard Engine



Interested persons should submit their Resume along with a
police Certificate and two (2) Character References to:




Registration#: N 09181



Manager Human Resources



Name of Vessel: “Tender To Trixsea”’




HSBC
P.O.Box N-4917 : ( ;
o A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information § :.
Nassau, Bahamas ie told Pith cen i, : qa:
Fax: 502-2566/2577 eading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest an ‘
prosecution of the culprits.
Application Deadline: Friday, 07 July 2006 a

Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962





THE TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 7B



BUSINESS -
ORC ee Me en ea MRS Esp

S t< ~~ ks _ | n d 7 . a Se just call Ta Ue VENTE

higher ahead

ry ay :
( ) c ) hs ad © i t . i MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
. ‘ ‘ THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
| CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)

(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2002

' —_ The public is advised that prices as shown in the schedule for DIESEL
OIL sold by FOCOL will become effective on Friday, July 7, 2006. .

SCHEDULE

Maximum Wholesale Selling | Maximum |
Price Per U.S. Gallon

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HARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY









TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE

STANFORD 20*«20

TUESDAY 11 JULY |

3pm @ St. Maarten vs USVI (Match 1)
7pm @ Bahamas vs Cayman (Match 2)



WEDNESDAY 12 JULY
7pm ¢ BVI vs St. Lucia (Match 3)

FRIDAY 14 JULY
3pm ® Grenada vs Dominica (Match 4)
7pm ® St. Kitts vs Nevis (Match 5)



















Bee coe





TUESDAY 18 JULY

3pm ¢ St. Vincent vs Winner Match 1 (Match 6)
7pm ¢ Barbados vs Anguilla (Match 7)



WEDNESDAY 19 JULY
7pm © Antigua vs Winner Match 3 (Match 8)

FRIDAY 21 JULY

3pm ¢ Guyana vs Montserrat (Match 9)
7pm ¢ Jamaica vs Bermuda (Match 10)





TUESDAY 25 JULY
7pm e Trinidad vs Winner Match 2 (Match 11)

WEDNESDAY 26 JULY

3pm ¢ Winner Match 6 vs Winner Match 4 (Match 12)
7pm e@ Winner Match 8 vs Winner Match 5 (Match 13)

FRIDAY 28 JULY
; 3 3pm e Winner Match 11 vs Winner Match 7 (Match 14)

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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JULY 7,, 2006




se

—_

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; -





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1c Syndicat ed Content a

‘Available from CommerciallNews
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ACROSS
















, Yesterday's cryptic solutions

ACROSS: 1, Co-a-sts 7, Morpheus 8, Hero 10, Sea dog 11,
Grouse 14, Red 16, Taper 17, Dyes 19, Molar 21, Co-L-in
22, Table 23, Be-NT 26, Strip 28, Sag 29,

T-a-ims 30, Jingle 31, Arts 32, Pro-posed 33, Eamed
DOWN: 1, Ca-use-d 2, SWE-Des 3, Smog 4, Sp-art-an 5,
Get-up 6, U-she-r 8, Hare 9, R-od 12, Oar 13, Seven 15,
Jolly 18, Yal-ta 19, Mob 20, Lie 21, Capt.-I-on 22, Tin 23,
Ba-NT-er 24, E-GG-S 25, The Med 26, Steps 27, Ri-p-on
28, Sir 30, Ja-de



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

: DOWN
4 — Colour of father's phone (6) 1 Proclamation not usually cited (5)
7 _ How hogs do me wrong (at 2 — Looks round at exceptional legs (5)
Battersea?) (4,4) 3 Terrible tosh got rid of (4)
8 _Licentiously, a London flower? (6) 4 Borough boy? (5)
10 Fit for expansion, perhaps, in 5 Mark derives nothing from an
Hpoester 6 erent Ha over two
13 In the army, you leam (4) legs (6)
44 A trying game? (4) 9 The two are pertactly matched (6)
45 Have a fing? (4) 11 Border of the British Empirel (3)
2@ You won't find him in Rotherham (3) 12 It won't back you up at
17 It's offen hot in Provence (4) the bar (5)
49 The one in the forefront is 13 The centurion’s lot (7)
conceited (4) 15 shen oe of “stag”:
: a
AE: No end of axtace of ty be 16 fe nae fashion centre really
80 jumpy (9) exists (3) .
23 Regimental animal? (4) 18 The Romans thought him supremely
24 = Anartist's hotheaded and fiery (6)
‘impetuous (4) 20 A female starting nervously, looking
26 Negation of the number at the end pale (6)
of the street (3) 21 An exceptional word? (3)
27 Number of workers possibly cut? (4) = nie eels o'r peck
28 What the villain has to be (4) ing? . 2 -
32 She's of assistance to many (4) 25 Cover with figures (3)
33 Nota nice thing to be when there's a 28 Elevated land good to uw
Pole in the team (5) ride around (5) N
34 Guard against being badly fed on 30 Clear suggestion that twice six is N
purpose (6) over 500! (5) ra
36 Such girs are well behaved only for 31 Be honest with a woman in her >
a while (4,4) fies! (5) wo”
36 Equally certain to give 32 a a a uniform choice i -
confidence (6) 33 Ateam to team up with! (4)

Yesterday’s easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Goblet 7, Opposite 8, Pain 10, Trance
11, Waiter 14, Nee 16, Board 17, Sped 19, Robin
21, Bidet 22, Moped 23, Plea 26, Miser 28, See 29,
Elated 30, Serene 31, Task 32, Ambrosia 33,
Rename

DOWN: 1, Grates 2, Loaned 3, Tone 4, Cohabit 5,
Vista 6, Beard 8, Pane 9, Ice 12, fon 13, Erode
15,Rodeo 18, Peril 19, Rip 20, Bed 21, Boredom

22, Met 23, Person 24, Leek 25, Avenue 26, Medal 27,

Samba 28, Sea 30, Star










-<



ACROSS

4
7
8
10
13
14
15
16
17
19
21
23
24
26
27
29
32
33
34
35
36

Influence (6)
Assailant (8)
Grit (6)
Wrong (5)
Entrance (4)

~ Hollow (4)

Canvas shelter (4)
Afflict (3)

Particle (4)

Shade (4)
Obvious (9)

Layer (4)

Blood (4)

Deceive (3)

Poke (4)

Heavy walk (4)
Amphibian (4)
Weight (5)
Gambol (6)
Bear (8)
Tennis shot (6)

COMICS PAGE

——
= —_

Material

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

<

-

>

roviders





You are South, both sides vulner-
able. The bidding has been:

East South West North
Pass Pass Pass 1¢
Pass 22

What would you bid with each of
the following hands?

14@]29 4 @ AQIS & KI963

2. @ Q95 ¥ J104 % 8 & AK9854

3. #KJ4 ¥ AJ6 3763 & Q85

4.9J7Â¥ AQ962 QI843 & 7

kak

1. Three diamonds. Many of the
hard-and-fast principles that govern
responses to an opening bid do not
apply after a player has passed origi-
nally. Thus, while a two-club
response to one diamond ‘would be
unconditionally forcing without a
previous pass, the same response
would not be forcing here after your
initial pass.

The reason is obvious. The opener
is frequently in a position to judge
that game is virtually impossible
once partner has passed. Usually, it
takes the equivalent of two opening
bids to make a game, so if opener has
minimal values, he might elect to
pass: what would normally be
regarded as a forcing bid by ae
unpassed hand. ...

The recommended jump to thse
diamonds shows good trump support

Bidding Quiz

and values just short of an opening .

bid. It urges but does not command
partner to bid again.
2. Two clubs. There is some temp-

tation to respond three clubs to show |

your near-opening-bid values, but it
is better to proceed slowly in hands
where a trump fit is not yet estab-
lished. Two clubs shows at least 10
points — passed hand or not — and
is therefore a constructive response.
3. Two notrump. Ordinarily, two

" notrump would promise a balanced

hand of 13 to 15 points and be fore-
ing to game, but after an initial pass,
the range is 11 or 12. Opener is thus

free to pass whenever his hand indi-

cates that that would be the right
thing to do.

4. Two hearts. Most hands change
in value as the bidding progresses.
Not many players would regard this
hand as worth an‘ opening bid, but
once partner opens with a diamond,
the hand increases greatly in value
and assumes the stature of an open-
ing bid.

The best way of describing such
values is by a jump-shift, indicating a
strong suit and implying a fit for
opener’s suit. Partner is thus warned
that if he passes two hearts — which
he may do in an extremely rare case

— he is running the risk of losing a,

game in either hearts or diamonds.

TARGET



HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe
permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkjet in inkjet printer).

"TODAY'S TARGET

Good 12; very good 18; excellent 24 (or more).

Solution Monday.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

cent centre cruet cure current cute enter
erect: neuter recent recur RECURRENT rent
‘- return rune teen tenure tern tree truce true

tune tuner turner





























































Cold dish (5)
Blemish (5)
Performs (4)
Gas (5)
Dread (4)
Believe (6)
Cad (6)
Males (3)
Look fixedly (5)
Minor deity (7)
Male cat (3)
Insect (3)
Lethargy (6)
Useless (5)

Metal

fastener (3)
Signal assent (3)
Salad plant (6)
Professor (3)
Bad-tempered (5)
Neighbouring (5)
Dissuade (5)
Work (4)
Casserole (4)





Loek van Wely v Lucas Brunner,
Biel 1997. They call the number—
one Netherlands grandmaster
"King Loek", a reference not only
to his fine play but to his height
of over two metres. For some
reason Dutch GMs have often
been tall. When their team led
by ex-world champion Max
Euwe visited London for an
England v Holland match, you
had the impression you were
facing a squad of high jumpers.
Both Euwe and his successor Jan
Timman reached the
international super-elite, so van
Wely naturally has the same
ambition, but so far the top
30-40 GMs has been his fimit.
Here material is level with
queens, rooks and bishops on an
open board. It took just one turn
for King Loek to force



FRIDAY,

JULY 6
ARIES -— Mar 21/Apr 20

There’s no time like the present to get I

your finances on track. Take a day to |

sit down and go through your check-
book ‘and assess your income and

expenditures. You’ll be glad you did.

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

How much fun you have this week

depends upon your outlook, Taurus. If.

you act glumly, you’re certain to have
a miserable few days. Keep your chin
up instead.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

The next few days will be unevent-
ful, Gemini. Use the time to catch ‘up
on some chores you’ve let slide? If
you were planning a vacation, now’s
the time to devote your attention to it.

CANCER - Juin 22/Jul 22

A health scare ‘leaves you feeling
shaken. Don’t worry, it is nothing
serious, and you'll recover rather
quickly. Aquarius lends support dur-
ing these trying times.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

A fight with a family member is
something unavoidable. You’ve been

you can no longer hold your tongue,
Leo. Don’t worry; it’s justified. . ~

| VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
_] Stop going above and beyond to

please everyone, Virgo. You do.

enough already, and family and.
friends certainly know it. Pamper
‘| yourself for a change. ‘

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23. 2°"

Don’t keep secrets from family *
members. It will only put you in hot
water, Libra. Confide your feelings.

to-a friend in order to get advice on _

how you should proceed.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22.

A quick temper will get you in trou-
ble, Scorpio. Don’t lash out with °
your venom. Rather, think cool and
calmly on the best way’ to handle+
tricky situations.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 2,
A blast from the past has you feel-

.clashing for a long time now, ’and.”

ing shaken, Sagittarius. This per- ,

son knows about all of your skele--
tons in the closet. Keep an eye on’
him and his motives.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan. 20°
Don’t expect all of your plans ‘to’
go off without a hitch this week, ,
Capricorn. Something is bound to go
awry when you least expect it. You’ N
rebound quickly, however.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18
It’s time to get motivated on your fit- -
ness plan, Aquarius. Leo offers’a’
helping hand to get you started.”
Don’t pass up the opportunity ¢ ‘to,
make fitness a team effort. _
PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20,
A scammer is looking to take advan-
tage of you, Pisces. You'll certainly
recognize all of the signs of wrong-”
doing when they present themselves." 1

resignation. What happened? LEONARD BARDEN
PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
“sajew pue 1890 £ 80 +920) 7 SPXY 20 “IEW

992 SPION “SuBtSOy j+ GPa I LTB ORME S52)

4



TRIBUNE SPORTS




Ref who sent |
off Rooney in
charge of final



< : 7 | 7
5 : Copyrighted Material __ a
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‘years of frustration out on Italy

== - -—_— ~
— — ©



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PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 | TRIBUNE SPORTS
SS SS SSS SS SSS SSS




@ TRACK AND FIELD ,
By KELSIE JOHNSON “oy
Junior Sports Reporter: 7. ei ate

WITH a Golden League win already under e
her belt, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie is the only
Bahamian still in the running for the $1, million
jackpot.

This is the third consecutive year a Bahamian
will contend for the title. ue!

Ferguson-McKenzie is leading the way in the. *
IAAF Golden League’s 100m dash with her as
June 2nd victory. ee

The second leg of the six race series will take’ Y
place on Saturday — the Meeting Gaz de France: ' «
Paris Saint-Denis, in Paris, France. The other‘.
meets are set for July 14th, August 18th and n.
25th August, with the last race on September 3rd.

So far, Ferguson-McKenzie has clocked a sea*. *,
son’s best of 11.14 seconds, on Sunday she ran
11.17 seconds in the Athens Super Grand Prix.”

The time by Ferguson-McKenzie landed her in | +
the second spot behind Torri Edwards of the
US. Edwards won in a time of 11.14 seconds." -

Sunday’s race was not a part of the six races, -
for the IAAF Golden League jackpot. eo

Lining up for Saturday’s race will be Me’Lisa’ | -
Barber, Edwards, Marion Jones, Sherone Simp=" *,
son, Lauryn Williams, Kim Gevaert, Marshe:: _
vat Hooker and Fabienne Beret-Martinel. :

Also participating in the meet will be Christine .
Amertil, in the women’s 400m. :

Leading the way for the IAAF Goldén; -*
League jackpot in the 400m is Sanya Richards of: *
the USA.

Richards is also leading the event in the world
rankings with a score of 1400. :

Competing in the 400m will be Svetlana
Pospelova, Shericka Williams, Natalia Antyukh,
Amertil, Richards, Ana Guevara, DeeDee Trot,
ter and Vanya Stambolova.









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FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

CPTI Teeth

for ‘Peace

on da Streets’

@ BASKETBALL
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter _



FOR basketball players, summer
months are by no means a vacation.
Rather it is a season of strict train-
ing regiments and playing in a myri-
ad of tournaments and summer
leagues.

No other summer tournament in
the Bahamas has garnered more
prestige and acclaim than the Nel- °
son Cooper “Peace on da Streets”
Basketball Classic. ;

The 11th Annual edition of the
classic will take place on July 15th
and 22nd at the Kendal Issacs Gym-
nasium, featuring some of the best
local talent throughout the country.

President of Youth Against Vio-
lence Carlos Reid said the tourna-
ment has grown exponentially each
year since its inception and it he
expects the same this year.

“We have some good new teams
coming out, we have.a lot of college
players coming back to compete
and everyone is excited about this
tournament, we believe this is going
to continue to be what it has been in
the past, a venue for young people
to showcase their talent, especially
in the summer months,” he said.
“The whole concept of the tourna-
ment has always been to bring hope
to the hopeless, a lot of our young
people are hopeless, and what we
want to do is to channel their ener-
gy into doing positive things.” .,

In addition to the tournament’s
usual attractions including the
junior division, senior division, slam
dunk contest, three point shoot-out,
and media game, this year’s tourna-
ment will feature a ladies division.

“We are implementing a girls
division which is brand new tous,”
he said. “What we’re trying to do is
to reach out to a lot of our females.
In the past we have always associat-
ed violence with young boys, and
have overlooked the girls, but now
we are seeing more girls emerge in
that lifestyle.

Reid said this year’s tournament
will host a number of collegiate
coaches from the United States
seeking young talent and possibly
creating educational opportunities
for much of the youth with little
exposure.

“We have some college coaches
that will be coming in, hopefully
they getalook atsome ofour .
young people and ideally they may
be able to offer them some scholar-
ships so they can go on to further
their education.” he said. “That
‘would be a major plus for us,
because we have found that many
of our young people have talent,
but they are forced to grow up in
dysfunctional environments, if we
can hope to maybe a small few we
can bring about a perpetual harvest
for the country where these young
people get an opportunity to go off
to school and come back with their
degrees, find good employment and
inspire other young people.”

Last year’s winners in both the
senior and junior divisions, the Real
Deal Shockers and the Sunshine
Auto Ruff Riders will be returning
to action to defend their crowns.

Reid says.plans for future tourna-
ments include hosting teams from
the Family Islands to truly make it a
national event.

Winners in each category will
receive cash prizes and fans will
become involved in the action as a
number of door prizes will be
awarded, including round ‘zip tick-
ets for two from Bahamasair.

HORAN



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



B TENNIS

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE run for Mark Knowles and
Martina Navratilova came to a
screeching halt in the third round
of the mixed doubles at Wimbledon
2006.

But two days after an historic vic-
tory, Knowles and Daniel Nestor
are hoping to continue their impres-
sive run in the men’s doubles today
in London, England.

They’re scheduled to face the top
seeded team of American twin
brothers Bob and Mike Bryan in

_ the semifinals. If they win, they will

advance to their third shot at win-
ning their first Wimbledon Grand
Slam title.

“We’ve had a storied rivalry hav-
ing played numerous times,” said
Knowles, reflecting on the fact that
he and Nestor have beaten the
Bryan brothers in the previous two
meetings they had so far this year.

“We feel pretty good going in.
They are the top team, but we have
to go out there and play well. It just
comes down to execution. It will
come down to who executes on the
day. We just have to go out there
and play inspired tennis.”

Basking

Knowles and Nestor are still bask-
ing in their six-hour, nine-minute
marathon five set victory over the
No.8 seeded team of Todd Perry of
Australia and Simon Aspelin of
Sweden that lasted for two days.

The two teams were tied at 11-11
in the fifth set when the match was
suspended because of darkness. Up
to that point, they had already
played more than four hours.

“It-was a dog fight. More than
physically, it was a tough match
mentally,” Knowles declared. “But
mentally, being out there for so long
on grass, it’s a big difference
between winning and losing. You
just have to be so solid.”

Knowles and Nestor eventually
won 23-21 in the fifth to produce
both the longest men’s doubles
match and the longest match ever
played at Wimbledon.

In their mixed doubles, Knowles
admitted that he and Navratilova,

‘seeded No.8, were simply outplayed,

losing in two straight sets 7-5, 6-1 to
the No.9 team of Andy Ram of
Israel and Vera Zvonareva of Rus-
sia.

Cruised

Up 5-3 in the first set, Knowles
said they couldn’t close it out as
Ram and Zvonareva picked up their
game another level and cruised toa
come-from-behind victory.

But, with the momentum on their

side, Ram and Zvonareva out- |

played Knowles and Navratilova in
every facet of the game in the sec-
ond set to secure the match.

“Tt was an uphill climb, but I
think we just lost to a better team
today,” Knowles pointed out. “I’ve
been playing a lot of tennis over the
last two days, so J think it may have
had an effect.”

Despite the loss, Knowles said he

NN Nk Et HENNA TENM HAMAR MANAHYNHHANNAHHAN HAHA

a

‘was delighted to have been team-

Bring us your Report Card and show us jour

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Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers



































































ing up with the legendary Navratilo-
va, but he said he would have
remembered the experience a lot
more had they advanced further
into the draw.

Nestor teamed up with Elena
Likhovtseva of Russia, but they
were also ousted in the quarter-
final, which according to Knowles, is
good because now they can concen-
trate solely on winning the men’s
doubles title.

“We still like to win, even if it’s
mixed doubles, but we now only
have the men’s doubles, so we don’t
have anything else to play for, but
to go out there and give it 110 per
cent,” Knowles pointed out.

mae eS
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im lovin’ it. |



HIGH
LOW





AND SUN



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TIF |

——s Che Miami Herald





BAHAMAS EDITION



what tastes tight”
NOW OPEN

Seagrapes Shopping Centre,

Prince Charles Drive



Volume: 102 No.187





Sir Lynden Pindiing
is honoured at
two-hour ceremony

i By KAHMILE REID

THE Bahamas government
yesterday honoured Sir Lynden
Pindling by renaming Nassau
International Airport the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port at a ceremony held yester-
day on the airport’s lawn.

The unveiling of the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
was an event that attracted gov-
ernment officials, high society
members and other civilians.
The two-hour ceremony, which
was hosted by Charles Carter, a
former minister of foreign
affairs, is one that can be
described as “short and sweet.”
.. The speakers, however, left no
stones unturned in expressing
how significantly Sir Lynden
Pindling transformed and paved
the way for the development of
the modern Bahamas.

With a-variety of perfor-
mances done to honour Sir Pin-
dling, the event was not short

on entertainment. The South
‘Andros High school did a musi-
cal piece, the National Youth
Choir also, sang of the
“Bahamas Experience” and the
combined bands of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and
Defence Force also performed
an original song composed in
Sir Pindling’s honour.

Speaking at the ceremony,
Prime Minister Perry Christie,
said it was “perfectly appropri-
ate” that ithe airport be

renamed in Sir Pindling’s hon-
our and it was being done so
with pride and without apology.

Mr Christie referred to the



numerous contributions to the
building of the nation that Sir
Pindling made and deemed the
renaming of. the airport
“absolutely the right thing to
do.”

There is no one more deserv-

ing, he said, of this honour than
“the-father of the nation” and
the pre-eminent builder of the
modern Bahamas.
_ Transport and Aviation Min-
ister Glenys Hanna-Martin,
speaking at the ceremony, said
that over the next two-years the
airport will be undergoing
tremendous growth, as it is crit-
ical to the existence of the
Bahamian people.

‘Renaming the airport after
Sir Pindling, she said is to thank
him for his vision and his love
which fuelled the collective pas-
sion of the Bahamian people.

This “son of the soil”, accord-

ing to Ms Hanna-Martin, was a
champion of freedom and social
justice and a proponent of
excellence on the part of his
country.
_ She said the ceremony was
meant to honour a native son,
and is an important step toward
historical development of the
Bahamas.

This dynamic facility, she
said, now being named the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-

. port is symbolic of pride and

optimism Bahamians hold as a

people and to future genera-
tions.

Mr Christie ended his speech

by honouring Lady Marguerite

SEE page eight



FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

Airport re





PRICE — 75¢









@ NASSAU International Aigpukt was oficial named after the late Sir Lynde Pindling yesterday
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

‘Pastor calls for stand |
against gay marriage

Ingraham accuses
govt of turning
ceremony into

‘a partisan event’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPPOSITION leader Hubert
Ingraham accused government
of transforming yesterday’s
renaming ceremony of Nassau
International Airport into a par-
tisan event, instead of a nation-
al one.

The ceremony was held
Thursday morning to rename
Nassau International Airport

the Lynden Pindling Interna--

tional Airport in honour of the
first Bahamian prime minister.
However, Mr Ingraham sees the
ceremony as a PLP affair.
“They had a PLP function
today (Thursday) at the
expense of the Bahamian pub-
lic,” he said. “A national event
put on by the government of
the Bahamas is a national event
for all the people of the
Bahamas, it is not a PLP event
and it should be dealt with as a

SEE page 13





CALLING on Bahamians to
take a stand against the “per-
version” of homosexuality,
popular local, pastor Dr Rex

Major is calling on the public to’

demand that the Bahamas does
not convert marriage from its
“true nature”.

The pastor said that increas-

ingly, outside political pressure
is mounting for countries like
the Bahamas to accept the “gay
agenda”,

“We have to work in a UN
setting, we have to work in col-
Jaboration with the EU which
is swinging very heavily in that
direction, and they are a pres-
sure group who wants you ‘to
conform to social norms that
they create, and plus you have
a growing tide of persons in the
Bahamas for whom tolerance is
a Christian word.

“A misunderstanding of
when tolerance is applied and
when it is not applied. You
can’t tolerate what cannot be
tolerated. When you start tol-
erating lies, you are a terrible
society,” Dr Major said.

' Dr Major spoke to The Tri-
bune yesterday about his rally
on July 16 which aims to spark

a ground-swell of support for
the traditional definition of

matriage.

The confrontation between
those who lobby for gay rights
and those with more conserva-
tive views, Dr Major says,

stems from the demand of

homosexual demands for more
rights.
“They’re the problem, r

one is tolerating them. They
.are the ones demanding a piece
of the pie within the context of

realities which are not a part
of the pie at all.

“Do what you like as a per-
son, but to demand that we
convert marriage from its true
nature to suit their perversion,
you just don’t tolerate that. It
will be a parliamentary deci-
sion but it has to come from

the groundswell of the people,”

he said.
The pastor said that the
moment now is open for per-

SEE page 13



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US newspaper
raises concerns
over increased

foreign investment

in the Bahamas

A FLORIDA newspaper has
raised concerns about the social
and environmental repercus-
sions of the increased foreign
investment in the Bahamas.

The Sun Sentinel in an exten-
sive analytical article on recent
and future developments
throughout the Family Islands,
made. the point that although
Bahamians appreciate the eco-
nomic growth these multi-mil-
lion projects bring to the coun-
try, there is some concern that
the Bahamas is being “sold” to
foreigners.

Speaking with the Florida
newspaper, real-estate execu-

; tive Bob Dwors — who has part-

nered with an affiliate of the
Dallas-based Staubach Co to
buy the 480-acre Royal Island —

: said he plans to build a luxury

SEE page eight

eae,






PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Prosecutors visit Freeport

to carry out ‘Swift Justice





wart

ar |




pt

al
ot

Congratulations to this year's winners in Family Guardian‘s
Annual Calendar Photo Contest.

The 14 winning photographs will appear in the company's
2007 Calendar, “A Celebration of Nature.”

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - As part of the
new Swift Justice initiative,
three prosecutors from New
Providence are in Freeport
dealing with a number of legal
matters that are before the
courts.

Prosecutor Vernal Collie said
Attorney General Allyson May-
nard-Gibson is very serious and
passionate about the new sys-
tem, which is designed to
improve the efficiency of the in
matters courts.

Mr Collie and his colleagues
Neil Brathwaite and Anthony
Delaney, along with Assistant
Commissioner of Police Ellison
Greenslade and other senior
police officials, met with the
media on Thursday.










“if

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Sara Appleton Alexander Paul

dack Hardy Eric Rose

Timothy Higgs (2) _ Roland Rose

Linda Huber Michael Toogood (2)
Ronald Lightbourn (2) Nancy Young

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amily Guardian congratulates all participants in the annual
to contest who together submitted 350 entries.

ited to collect their entries
porate Centre, East Bay Street.

GUARDIAN |
INSURANCE
COMPANY



|



H VERNAL Collie of the Attorney General’s Office |
addresses the media on Thursday at Police Headquarters,

Mr Collie explained that
every second Thursday of the
month all stakeholders includ-
ing the police, the AG’s office,
the prison, and the probation
office meet to discuss the
progress they are making in
the programme.

“As you know, the new AG
is very passionate about what
she calls Swift Justice initia-
tive, where she is attempting
to bring before the courts mat-
ters as soon as possible,

“Shortly after she took
office she took the whole staff
to Andros on a retreat and she
discussed her objective for the

office.

“One of those was the Swift
Justice initiative and in that
regatd we intend to use what
we call the voluntary bill of
indictment, which allows for
matters to be brought before
the Supreme Court rather
than having to go through a

(Photo: Denise Maycock)
14

preliminary inquiry.” |

Mr Collie noted that 'pre-
liminary inquiries can take
anywhere from six months'to a
year-and-a-half.

He pointed out that prelim-
inary inquiries would not be
done away with, instead mat-
ters such as murder and armed
robberies will be identified ‘for
voluntary bill of indictment,
which significantly cuts down
the time it takes to bring mat-
ters before the court.

Mr Collie said the proposed
witness protection programme
is also important, because! it
would ensure that witnesses
are protected at all times. |

“Jn this society, we have
very serious crimes being com-
mitted and before you can suc-
cessfully prosecute an offence,
you must have the witnesses
who will come to court to give
evidence. Without witnesses,
we have no case,” he said. |

ence ea seceeeeeneancensayecuaucenaesceasacoaveceueneousnteeee fer

Cuba says US transition
proposal for island is
plan for regime change

@ CUBA
Havana

A US proposal aimed at
ensuring a transition to. Ameri-
can-style democracy on the
communist-run island after
Fidel Castro is gone is a sinister
plan for regime change, Cuban
officials charged Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.

“This is a true threat of aggres-
sion,” Cuban parliament speak-
er Ricardo Alarcon said, holding
up the new proposal by the US
Commission for Assistance to a
Free Cuba during a state televi-
sion appearance outlining the
plan’s “sinister pretenses.”





















\
,
/

4




Appearing with other offi-
cials and state-media journal-
ists on the evening Round.
Table program, Alarcon said
the proposal mentions other
recommendations that are
contained in a classified report.

“We have the right to
think the worst,” he said of
the classified section. “We
have the right to think about
an attempt to assassinate
Fidel, or a war.” é

The US government has
not officially rolled out the
proposal, which initially was
expected to be released as
early as May.

But a document said to be
an early version of the plan
presented to US President
George W Bush has been
circulating in Washington,
Miami and Havana.

Bush appointed the Com-

.mission for Assistance to a
Free Cuba in late 2003 and
received its first recommen-
dations in May 2004, which
included a strengthening of
US trade, financial and trav-
el restrictions on the island.

Official US policy is to
undermine Cuba’s planned
succession from Castro, who
turns 80 in August, to his 75-
year-old brother, Defense
Minister Raul Castro.

Cuban officials insist that
the country’s communist
political and economic sys-
tems will endure after Fidel
Castro is gone, and Raul
Castro reiterated that stance
in a speech last month.



In brief

Man faces
multiple
counts

of fraud

A 44-YEAR-OLD man
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday was charged with sev-
eral counts of fraud.

John Kemp was charged with
forging a Commonwealth Bank
cheque in the amount of $7,713
on Tuesday May 23.

He was also charged with
uttering the fake cheque, pur-
porting it to be genuine.

Another charge alleged that -

Kemp obtained cash in the
amount of $7,713 from Com-
monwealth Bank on Wulff
Road by means of fraud.

A second group of charges
alleged that on Friday, May 26
Kemp forged a Commonwealth
Bank cheque in the amount of
$12,338. :

Kemp was further charge
with uttering the fake cheque
and obtaining cash from Com-
monwealth Bank on Wulff
Road.

He was arraigned before

Magistrate Susan Sylvester at

Court 11, Nassau Street.
Kemp pleaded not guilty to
all of the charges and was grant-
ed $7,000 bail.
The case was adjourned to
October 5.

Caribbean
official calls
for plan to
aid Haiti

@ ST KITTS
Basseterre

A TOP Caribbean Commu-
nity official called on the
group’s member nations to
quickly devise a plan to help
stabilize Haiti, two days after
the impoverished nation

rejoined the regional group,

according to Associated Press..

Albert Ramdin, assistant sec-
retary-general of the Organiza-
tion of Eastern Caribbean
States, said on Wednesday that
cooperation on resources such
as police will be critical to ease
social problems in Haiti, which
has seen an surge in kidnap-
pings and gang violence in
recent weeks.

“We are living in very chal-
lenging times for Caribbean
economies, but every country
could train some police ... with-
in their own police forces to
strengthen the Haitian national
police,” Ramdin said.

Ramdin called on the 15-
member community, known as
Caricom, to dispatch trade spe-
cialists and medical personnel
to the French-speaking
Caribbean nation, which shares
the island of Hispaniola with
the Dominican Republic. He
also asked newly inaugurated
Haitian President Rene Preval
to recommend how the
Caribbean Community can best
help Haiti.

“It now depends on the pres-
ident to come up with a plan, a
short-term social, economic
reconstruction plan, so we can
concretely indicate how much
money will be needed and how
much can be pledged,” Ramdin
said.









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THE TRIBUNE





22- year-old |
charged
with armed
robbery

A 22-YEAR-OLD Button-
wood Avenue man _ was
arraigned in Magistrates’ Court
yesterday to be charged with
two counts of armed robbery.

Stephen Bullard was charged
with robbing Poece Bodie of
cash in the amount of $120 and
a gold wrist chain valued at
$900.

It is alleged that the incident
took place on Wednesday, May
10 at New Providence, while
Bullard was concerned with
others and armed with a hand-
gun.

He was also charged, being
concerned with others and
armed with a handgun, of rob-
bing Chavon Marret of a cell-
phone valued at $200 on the
same day.

Bullard appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
at Court One on Bank Lane
yesterday.

_ He was not required to enter
a plea to the charges and was
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison.

The case was adjourned to
July 17 and transferred to Court
Five on Bank Lane.

Police
investigate
violent
incidents

POLICE are continuing
investigations into two matters
which occurred in the past 24
hours.

The Esso service station on
Montrose Avenue and Wulff
Road was robbed of an unde-
termined amount cash yester-
day morning. According to
Assistant Commissioner of
Crime Reginal Ferguson, a
female employee was held at
gunpoint while leaving the
establishment to make a cash
deposit. The gunman reported-
ly fled the scene in an unidenti-
fied car.

In addition, a male wate of
Nassau Village was reportedly
stabbed during an altercation
at his home on Jackson Street.
He survived the attack.

Plans to
increase
Canadian
visitors

THE Ministry of Tourism is

moving swiftly to capture the |

emerging Canadian market.

A contingent of senior exec-
utives from the ministry has met
with the ‘Bahamas team’ in
Toronto to:formulate promo-
tional plans with a view to
increasing the number of visi-
tor arrivals from Canada.

Plans were made to increase
the marketing and public rela-
tions efforts of the Bahamas
Tourist Office and their public
relations firm, Punch Commu-
nications.

According to a statement
from the ministry, target areas
include weddings and honey-
moons, boating, fishing, special
events and festivals.

The Bahamas Tourist Office’s
national director for Canada,
Paul Strachan said: “We are lay-
ing the groundwork to increase
awareness of the Bahamas’
tourism options for Canadians.
: Working closely with our public
relations firm Punch Commu-
nications Inc, we are prepared
to saturate the Canadian mar-
ket with the message that the
- Bahamas is much more than
just sun, sand and sea.

“Our research shows that
Canadians are travelling in
greater numbers to participate
in various activities and events
including weddings, sporting
events and festivals — all of
which we provide in the Islands
of the Bahamas. We just have
to let them know that it’s all
here,” he said.

INSIGHT

Dated a iy -Â¥est ola
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



LOCAL NEWS

o In brief | Government



FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 3

‘failing



users in rehabilitation’

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE government is failing
drug abusers struggling to over-
come their addiction by failing
to address problems at the one
facility méant for them in the
Bahamas. °

This is the claim of one vol-
unteer at,the Public Hospital
Authority ‘Community Coun-
selling and'Assessment Centre.
‘Patrick Sands, 56, has com-
plained to The Tribune about
the many problems that riddle
the centre including insuffi-
cient rest rooms, the heat and
the distasteful smells which
sometimes permeate the
building as a result of poor
plumbing. To make matters
worse, a trench, dug almost a
month ago continues to block
the entire entrance into
the building, with no other
work done to repair the hole





lM THE trench outside the entrance

past the first day of digging.

The centre is a facility
designed to help drug abusers
overcome their addiction and
to help persons with a procliv-
ity towards violence eury and

control their anger.

The centre has only one rest
room to accommodate the
employees, volunteers and the
persons seeking help, which
can amount to about 100 per-

Group says Bahamas is
_the new promised land

@ By REUBEN SHEARER

INDEPENDENCE is
always a special time of year
in the Bahamas — but accord-
ing to one group, it repre-
sents a more profound truth
than most realise.

The members of Bahamas
in Prophecy (BIP) hold that
the seminal dates in Bahami-
an history reveal that the
country has been chosen‘by
God as an example for the
world during the “end
times”.

Micklyn Seymour, presi-
dent of BIP, said yesterday
at a press conference that the
spiritual meaning of Bahami-
an independence in relation
to the history of Israel is too
significant to be coinciden-
tal.

He claims the purpose of
his organisation is to show
the correlation between the
nation of Israel’s prophetic
significance in scripture and
the purpose and destiny of
the Bahamas.

“Some people don’t
believe that God works
divinely in the affairs of
nations, but He has unveiled
to BIP to be a people set
aside to be a model for the
nations of the world,” he
said.

Mr Seymour said his
desire to understand the
striking ‘similarity between
passages in the Bible and
important dates for majority
rule and independence — and
his curiosity about who was
really responsible for putting
up the cross at San Salvador
in 1492 — led him to have a
conversation with former
prime minister, the late Sir
Lynden Pindling. -

According to Mr Seymour,
Sir Lynden told him that

since Canada‘and America had
their independence in July, he

- always thought that other coun-

tries in the western hemisphere
should do the same.

Mr Seymour said he then
took Sir Lynden to a Bible and
showed him that the tenth day
of the seventh month is men-
tioned in the scriptures.

According to BIP, the date
of majority rule is identical to
the date when Israel held its
exodus out of Egypt.

The group claims that the
date Israelites celebrated their
move to the promised land is
the exact date of Bahamian

independence.

Mr Seymour said the people
of the Bahamas are uninformed
— but that it is now the time they
become aware of the truth.

“We believe that the Father is
using. this nation as a model and
example in these end times,” he
said. ‘““How we embrace His sto-
ry within our history, depends
on how we watch the signs he
has put there to mark our
nation and identify it with
Israel.”

Mr Seymour said that if
Bahamians recognise this truth,
God will use the Bahamas in
similar ways that he used Israel.

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sons on Fridays when commu-
nity meetings are held.

The CCAC is the only one of
its kind in the Bahamas and
yet the government will not
make proper provisions on this
one facility to improve condi-
tions for clients, Mr Sands
claimed.

Mr Sands, who was a client
of the centre himself 20 years
ago, has a personal interest in
the facility. He volunteers there
three times a week and often
gives speeches at the govern-
ment schools in Nassau about
the importance of drug pre-
vention.

For years the Government

has repeatedly promised to.

move the programme into a
better facility, Mr Sands
claimed, but nothing has been
done for 20 years.

CCAC’s programme was
moved into a building on Mar-

ket Street more than two
decades ago. It used to be
located in Princess Margaret
Hospital's parking lot.

The move was made to pro-
vide better facilities for the
workers and clients, but
according to Mr Sands not
much has changed.

Mr Sands argues that in
order for the government to
put a dent in drug addiction
and violence in the Bahamas,
they must first develop pro-
grammes such as these to help
the people who need to be
helped.

"If you don't have the facili-

ties and the people to work,

then you don't have anything,"
he said.

The Tribune attempted to
contact managing director
Hubert Brown of the Public
Hospital Authority, but he was
not available yesterday.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F- 485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



Independence, but no word from PM

THE FINAL SECTION of The Tribune’s
' three-part Independence supplement is
included in today’s edition.

In that supplement the FNM announces a
major initiative which “showcases the kinds of
policies and programmes” it will pursue in its
next term in office. Although, invited to par-
ticipate and although our presses were held to
the last minute to accommodate them, gov-
ernment submitted nothing for publication.

It would be wrong to say that government
declined our invitation to be a part of the
special edition — it’s just that, although they
promised to embrace the opportunity to
showcase their plans and give a projection
for the future, in the end their copy was
absent without explanation.

The only reason we are announcing this
absence — certainly not to embarrass anyone
— but to avoid the inevitable public com-
ments from PLP quarters — “Ya see | told
yinna The Tribune’s an FNM newspaper and
not checking for the PLP!”

Well this is just not true. We are an inde-
pendent newspaper and — although it seems
to give some PLP supporters a strange plea-
sure to believe otherwise and moan about
their martyrdom — our columns are open
equally to Government and Opposition.

This is the first time that The Tribune has
invited the Prime Minister and the Leader of
the Opposition to participate in this popular
section. This edition, which highlights the
major news stories of the past year and pro-

_ jects the future, is published annually to mark
the country’s independence.

It is true that our decision to include the
country’s two political’leaders was a last
minute decision. However, the same time
constraints were put on both men. |

“My chief concern is that our newspaper
will be incorrectly seen as being unduly
biased,” a member of our staff e-mailed us a
few hours ago. “Unfortunately people aren’t
aware of the fact that an invitation.was sent to
both parties, both agreed to send articles,
but only one delivered.” |

Hence this article.

In June a member of our staff telephoned
the Prime Minister’s office to find out the
name of his speech writer. A name was given.

On June 9, a personal letter was hand
delivered to Prime Minister Christie’s office

-and a copy faxed to his speech writer. The
Tribune staff member then called to make
certain that both received the letter. _

As Mr Ingraham has no speech writer,
the same letter was delivered to his secre-
tary. i

_ And this is what the letter said — one to
Mr Christie, the other to Mr Ingraham. Both
letters were identical.

Dear Prime Minister Christie) (Opposi-
tion Leader Hubert Ingraham):

“The Tribune invites you to contribute to




THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK
“When Life Knocks You To
Your Knees, You’re In '
Position To Pray.”

our annual Independence edition. Over the
years, this edition has reviewed life in the
Bahamas for the previous twelve months.
This year however, we are inviting the leader
of both political parties to share their views
on the subject — The’ Bahamas of July 10,
2011. This piece could include the major pol-
icy planks of your party’s platform.

“We trust you accept this opportunity to
communicate to a wide audience of interest-
ed newspaper readers, who are eager to assess
your vision for the country beyond the
upcoming election season.

“Please indicate your acceptance to ‘the
undersigned on or before June 15, 2006. Your
contribution, if you agree to participate,
should be no more than 1,250 words in length,
and is due to us by June 19, 2006.”

When we had no reply from the Prime
Minister’s Office by June 15th our staff mem-
ber called the speech writer, who said that the
Prime Minister would participate.

As the deadline neared our staff member
continued to call to make certain that copy
was coming as space was being held. Even-
tually the FNM delivered its copy on July 4.
The Prime Minister’s Office was called, told
the FNM’s copy was in and that we needed to
at least know what the PM’s topic was going
to be.as we did not want to publish advance
promotion for the FNM, but nothing for the
PLP. No reply. The FNM’s promotion went
in on Thursday. There was nothing for the
PLP.

On Wednesday, the man (referred to ‘as
the speech writer), who the Prime Minister’s
Office told our staff member to deal with,
informed our staff that he would now have to
contact party chairman Raynard Rigby. In
fairness to. Mr Rigby.he was only informed of
our request that morning. In turn Mr Rigby
directed us to Al Dillette of Bahamas Infor-
mation Services. We told these contacts that
our deadline for the last section that we were
still holding for the Prime Minister was 2pm
yesterday. We then extended the deadline
to 3pm, while we slotted another press run in
the place of the Independence section to
make an extended deadline possible.

When 3pm came and went and the
promised calls from the Prime Minister’s
Office never came through — although a cell
phone was being held open for it — we decid-
ed to let the presses roll.

Despite the minions around him, not one
of them seemed able to deliver a statement
from the Prime Minister. It is now 8.25 pm
Thursday as we close this column, and still no
one has received any word from the Prime
Minister’s Office.

We apologise to all of our readers, includ- ©

ing our PLP readers, but this time, despite
The Tribune’s best efforts, we have. failed
to bring them news from their Prime
Minister.





This yeat’s

Budget: too
little, too late?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I SAT in on most of the.
debate on the national bud- ,

get for the year 2006 to 2007,
if my attendance was not
mandated by my job descrip-
tion, I would have found
something better to do with
my time.

Nothing new or dramatic
emerged from almost two
weeks of non-stop drivel;
platitudes and economic
dreams as presented by the
Minister of Finance and his
parliamentary colleagues.

* Even the contributions of the
official opposition were, im

the main, lacked substance
and few of them presented
any viable alternatives to
what was put forward by the
government. What a grave
disservice to the good peo-
ple of The Bahamas.

National Youth Service is
very close to my heart as far
too many of our young and
impressionable young men
are falling and have fallen
through our societal cracks
and holes. Yet, I heard
absolutely nothing about the
expansion or even the con-
tinued funding of the embry-
onic-youth service which was
launched, with great pomp
and ceremony last year by
the Minister of National
Security and the Minister of
Youth. How come?

Not a single new initiative
was announced relative to
agriculture and fisheries. The
current Minister will have no
real time to.seek to integrate
our food production levels
into our local tourism and
residential needs. Our farm-
ers and fishermen are, appar-
ently, on their own, despite
the ever increasing cost of
gasoline; other fuels; seeds;
equipment and other imple-
ments of those occupations.
The results? Seafood items,
such as lobster; conch and
grouper cost more locally
than in Florida.

Our infrastructure is badly
in need of urgent repairs and
upgrades. When will we see

work start on the major roads .

in New Providence? Robin-
son Road; Blue Hill Road
and, of course, East Street

remain a national disgrace.

and an indictment on the
inability of the Minister of
Works, Bradley Roberts, to
perform within his portfolio.
Obviously, Mr Christie must





Bamba

letters@triounemedia.net




have seen the handwriting on
the wall when he reshuffled
Robert’s portfolio.

The budget was also silent
on several ministries insofar
as it relates to improved ser-
vices and the delivery of the
same to the average Bahami-
an. Education is in a mess
and the players within that
department are reputed to be
on bad terms while our chil-
dren are receiving a sub stan-
dard education within sub
standard buildings.

The Attorney General’s
Office is in shambles and
“swift justice” while sound-
ing good is, in my view, a
potential electoral ploy. You
mean to tell me, a trained
lawyer, that not one extradi-
tion case has been completed
by this government in four
long years? In fact what is
the status of many of those
cases? Relative to the ruling
in Pratt vs Morgan, when will
the Constitution be amend-
ed to reflect the views of
ordinary Bahamians on the
burning and vexing question
of capital punishnient?

Housing is also in a mess

.and no one there seems to

know what to do to try to sat-
isfy the housing needs of
thousands’ of ordinary
Bahamians. Single family lots
are drying up in New Provi-
dence. Housing officials need
to consider the possibility of
the rapid development of two
and three storied townhouse
complexes if we are to pro-
vide affordable housing for

as many persons as possible..

This may be an alien concept
to many but, these are the
times which may require
alternative solutions. |
The Ministry of Health. is
broken and in urgent need of
hope and help. Dr Nottage

may bea good man but,.

clearly, he has no new vision
for the provision and delivery
of good and affordable health
care. Senator Marcus Bethel
used to talk about the con-
struction of a new hospital in
New Providence when he
first was appointed. Are
there any drawings on the
board? Was funding provid-
ed for such construction in
the 2006 to 2007 budget? If
so, where is it in the line
items?

Relative to social services,
there is no mention of an
increase in old age pensions
and assistance to the dis-
abled. No new graveyard
construction. No new com-
munal homes for the aged;

young girls. What about our
at risk young men and boys?
Not a single word in four
long years.

It is clear that the upcom-
ing general elections are the
PLP’s to lose. The FNM, so
far, has not received the
bounce which I expected with
the return to the leadership
of the Rt Hon Hubert A
Ingraham MP, PC. It is as if
that party is still waiting for
its change to come. This is so
sad and almost demoralising.

With less than 10 months
to go before the next elec-
tions, one would have expect-
ed that the recent budget
debate would have been used
as a launching platform for
an aggressive and frontal
assault on the lack of perfor-
mance by the Christie admin-

-istration and any one of the

pressing issues which are
crushing the backs of ordi-
nary Bahamians; massive
under employment; teenage
pregnancies; lack of housing;
alleged corruption within the
public service; sexual
exploitation and harassment;
unabated crimes and, of
course, the abysmal lack of
response from our elected
Members .of Parliament.

What did we get instead
from the opposition? Messrs
Wells and Dupuch spent ail
of their time seeking to lam-
baste their former boss. Not a
single word about the needs
of Bamboo Town or Shirlea.
Clearly, those two men have
served their usefulness in the
House of Assembly and it
may be time to put them out
to pasture.

Even the FNM said and
did nothing dramatic or
revealing. So far, I am con-
vinced that the longevity of
the debate may have lulled
them to sleep, as may have
been intended by Mr Christie
and his advisers. I am disap-
pointed and expected far bet-
ter from the collective oppo-
sition. If this was the best that
they could have offered, The

‘Bahamas is in for a rough

ride over the next year or so.
The CDR is gone, appar-
ently. The young feilows in
the BDM are hopelessly out
of their political depth. Few
Bahamians, if any, take them
seriously anyhow. The BNP,
as led by Dexter Johnson, has
some great ideas but that
fringe party is too exclusicn-
ary and may be, in fact, led
by too dogmatic a leader.

. We are, indeed, between a
rock and a hard place. The
one good thing about this
whole exercise, however, is
that Yahweh is still on the

‘throne and His mercies will

endure forever. To God then,
in all things, be the glory.

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se

THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 5



Roadworks project due to

be completed ‘in weeks’

In brief





Man denies
charge of
stealing
from house

A 20-YEAR-OLD man was
arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday, charged with house-
breaking and stealing.

Torrie McPhee was charged
with breaking into the home of
Stafford Turnquest on Toote
Shop Corner.

It is alleged that the incident
took place between Sunday,
July 2 and Monday, July 3.

McPhee was charged with
stealing several items of jewelry
valued at nearly $3,000 and $700
in cash.

He was arraigned before
Magistrate Susan Sylvester at
Court 11, Nassau Street.

McPhee pleaded not guilty to
the housebreaking and stealing
charges.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $3,500.

The case was adjourned to
October 5.

‘Over 300’
political
prisoners in
Cuba held.

m@ CUBA
Havana

MORE than 300 prisoners of

conscience are still held in Cuba.

despite a slight drop in the. num-
ber of such inmates during the
first half of 2006, a veteran
rights group said Wednesday,

according to Associated Press. _

The Cuban Commission on
Human Rights and National
Reconciliation said in a regular

‘ update that it had 316 docu-

mented political prisoners,
down from 333 at the end of
2005. The new count reflects
both new prisoners and people
freed over the past six months.
Commission head Elizardo
Sanchez wrote in the report that
the net drop of 17 inmates was
“statistically irrelevant” and did
not indicate an improvement in
human rights in Cuba.”
“Unless a miracle occurs, the
international community should
prepare itself, at least over the

. short term, to keep receiving
only bad news when it comes ©

to civil, political and economic
rights in Cuba,” the report said.

Cuba’s communist govern-
ment denies holding prisoners
of conscience, characterizing
them as common criminals.

A lesser-known Cuban rights
«soup released its own list of
political prisoners in recent
days, saying it had document-
ed 346 cases.

Dae ae
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PHONE: 822-2197

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11:00 Immediate Response

12:00 ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response

1:00 A Special Report

1:30 To The Rising Sun with Kayla
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3:00 The Bahamas National Youth

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ZNS News Update

Legends: Whence We Came

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10:00 Caribbean Newsline

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6:30
9:00
10:00

10:30
11:30

lm By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

THE much-anticipated $3.3
million road improvement pro-
ject could be wrapped up in a
matter of weeks, project man-
ager Julian Henson said yes-
_terday.

The project stretches from the
Baillou Hill Road round-about
to the intersecting thoroughfare
between Robinson Road and
Independence Drive.

Last October, the Ministry -

of Works awarded the multi-
' million dollar contract to
. Bahamas Hot Mix and Bethel’s
Trucking and Heavy Equip-
ment Services.
Mr Henson told The Tribune
that while there were minor
delays due to inclement weath-

er, major improvements will be
visible by mid-August.

“Ourselves and the govern-
ment are hoping to finish this
job by August 15,” he said.
“We are fairly close, apart from
the weather — the only thing
we can’t control.”

Minister of Works Bradley
Roberts also told The Tribune
that based on reports, the mas-
sive road upgrade appears to
be progressing as planned.

“I am hoping that it is on
schedule, because the last time
I saw a report, about five
weeks ago, it indicated that it is
on schedule,” Mr Roberts said.

The much-anticipated
upgrade began in March, but
has become a bone of con-
tention for many motorists
who have to use the route

during peak traffic hours.
Complaints

Business owners in the area
have also complained that
heavy congestion caused by the
project has led toa significant
decrease in sales.

Mr Henson explained that
his crew is working expedi-

_tiously.

He said two traffic lanes
have been closed and traffic
diverted to begin work on out-
er lanes needing repair.

“If you have not noticed
already, we have changed the
traffic a couple of days ago and
put up signs to reroute to one
lane,” Mr Henson said. “So to
complete work on the other

Bahamian professional | MISSINGDOG.

president of tourism
group in Canada

BAHAMIAN tourism pro-
fessional Ambrose Morris has
been elected president of the
Association of National
Tourist Office Representatives
in Canada.

Mr Morris, public relations
manager in Ministry of Touris-
m’s Toronto office, takes over
the presidency of the ANTOR
Ontario Chapter from Lynn
Ferguson, director of Visit
Britain — the British Govern-
ment Tourist Office.

He was introduced as presi-
dent on Friday, June 23 during
ANTOR’s annual media
awards luncheon at the Royal
Canadian Yacht Club, Toron-
to Island.

“It is remarkable that the
Islands of the Bahamas com-
mands such notoriety on the
world stage. ANTOR Canada
has 53 member-countries and
my being elected president of
this elite body speaks to visi-
bility and respect our country
enjoys in Canada,” Mr Mor-
ris said.

“Along with a few internal
changes to ANTOR’s constitu-
tion, I hope - through my pres-
idency — to lay the framework
that will enable our members
to make effective use of the



@ AMBROSE Morris —

travel media resources avail-
able to us in Canada,” he said.
“This includes solutions for

media relations initiatives, like

planning press trips. Also,
ANTOR will embark on pro-
viding comment and insights
on topical issues affecting the
travel industry — offering full
perspective — as is rarely done. _
We often read and hear com-
ments made by tour operators,
airlines, hoteliers and retail
agents. It is a rare occasion
when tourism officials are
quoted ... until now.”

FLAGS ° FLAGS ° FLAGS

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in

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Successful candidate must be mature
(25 years or older), hardworking, able
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Persons with strong experience and
sound educational background
(BGCSE’S and higher) preferred.

Serious inquiries should
call: 324-1453.



Before his election as presi-
dent, Mr Morris worked with
ANTOR over the past year as
an executive committee mem-
ber and treasurer.

He has also worked on the
Bahamas’ public relations
account with MacPhee Com-
munications in Toronto.

ANTOR is a worldwide
alliance of national tourist
offices (NTO’s) and affiliates
representing almost every trav-
el destination world-wide.

With chapters in most major
cities, the focus is on addressing
the common needs of foreign
tourist organisations as it relates
to information and services.

side should be done fairly
quickly.”

The project includes
improvements to the round-
about at Baillou Hill Road and
the Tonique Williams Darling
Highway, the doubling of the
thoroughfare between the
highway and a new round-
about at the intersection of
Robinson Road and Baillou
Hill Road.

But, as it stands now, access
to the Town Centre Mall From
Baillou Hill Road remains
closed, with only one lane open

’ on the Independence Highway
headed west and the Tonique
Williams Darling Highway
headed east onto the Baillou
Hill Road round-about.

Motorists are forced to
maneuver between traffic

Old Female Chow, spayed and with a shaved coat.
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Reward offered.

Phone 324 7392 or 324 0134

cones that have been strategi-
cally placed to guide them
through the dense work area.

Mr Henson said that by the
time school reopens, there
should be two-lane accessibili-
ty.

“But, in construction there
is always minor details that you
have to deal with that goes on
for a year after that — details
like columns and other minor
things,” he said. “However the
whole objective is to keep peo-
ple happy and complete work
in the shortest possible time.”
' The government has set a
seven-month deadline to effect
the changes and has also

‘ approved a bonus of $166,726,

to be paid to the contractors if
the project is completed within
five months.








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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 _-

THE TRIBUNE



ee NE

Union official’s concern
terminations at Our Lucaya

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - As the Hotel Work-
ers Union leadership remains in limbo,
a union organiser in Freeport has
expressed concerns about some termi-
nations at the Our Lucaya Resort.

Lionel Morley claims the termina-
tion of four workers since the union’s
election on May 26 were not handled
correctly.

He said that even though the indus-
trial agreement between the union
and hotel expired at end of May, the
existing contract is still binding until

a new contract can be negotiated.

The results of the election were dis-
puted between the Rainbow Adminis-
tration led by Pat Bain and the Justice
Team led by Roy Colebrooke.

The matter is presently before the
courts.

According to Mr Morley, the man-
agement of Our Lucaya has stopped
all communication with the union,
which represents about 900 workers at
the resort.

“The union has a recognition agree-
ment, a contract that is binding, and

it represents 900 workers in the bar-
_ gaining unit,” he pointed out.

Mr Morley claims a pregnant work-
er was among the four employees dis-
missed from Our Lucaya.

He said the woman, who worked as
a clerk in the Spa, and several of her
co-workers, had expressed concerns to
management regarding an unsecured
cash drawer.

Dismissed

Mr Morley said nothing was done ©

about the problem, but the woman was
later dismissed for coming up $18 short
in her float from the same cash drawer.

“She had complained that within her
chores she has to walk guest upstairs
leaving her float exposed . . . and noth-
ing was done about it,” he said

Mr Morley said Section 31 of the
industrial agreement which deals with
shortages and overage, instructs man-
agement how to address such matters.

He claimed management failed to
specify the particulars and grounds for
dismissal, indicating only that the
employee was terminated on accumu-
lation.

“The lady was short $18 that accu- -

mulated to a fourth warning slip, and it
is recommended in the agreement that

about

suspension will follow and after inves-
tigation, termination,” he said.

“There other terminations up there,
and the spa department is slackly run
and often employees are the scape-
goat.

“If an employee complains that the
environment is not right, manage-
ment needs to find a different mech-
anism of protecting the money,” he
said. -

The Tribune contacted the resort for
comments concerning the alleged ter-
minations, however resort representa-
tives did not return calls up to press
time.






i





STAR EX

General






Bahamian independence
and the war on terror



¢











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BANK

NOTICE OF PREFERENCE SHARE ISSUE

Commonwealth Bank Ltd
(BISX: CBL)
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The successful placement of

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' This notice is for record purposes only and is
not a solicitation to purchase securities.

“Leader in Personal Banking Services”

[ova ' Britons
& acknowledge the one
year anniversary of the
appalling terrorist attacks in
London that were dreadful acts
of cowardice that shook the

foundations of British society,

- and indeed the world. With that

said, people are increasingly
coming to the understanding
that many such barbaric acts
stem from prejudicial US/
British foreign policy.

While there is no excuse for
the bombing of innocent civil-
ians on trains, buses, airplanes
and/or in skyscrapers, we must
be cognizant that Arab hatred
for the western world arises
from a foreign policy that places
embargoes on oil; international
sanctions; a heavily biased view
towards Israel regardless of its
occupation and annexation of
Palestinian lands; the presence
of troops in places like Saudi
Arabia; bombing campaigns
that many times kill civilians;
the war in Iraq that morphed
into a “war to bring democracy”

~ after weapons of mass destruc-

tion were not found; the notion
that the US can invade coun-
tries without restraint and
implement “regime change”
and the use of harsh, undiplo-
matic language by leaders and
their representatives (eg US
Ambassador to the UN John
Bolton’s callous language ques-
tioning the need of the UN).

- A University of London

study in 2004 claimed that 100.

thousand innocent Iraqi civil-
ians had died since the US inva-
sion. These events are at the
heart of the Arab crusade
where vengeance and a deep-
seated knack for revenge are
foremost, contrary to American

beliefs that the Arabs simply

want to destroy their “free-
doms, democracy and financial
services.” It may not be that
simple.

D ue to the hostile poli-
cy taken by the US

and its closest ally, Britain,

Charlene Pinder
Corporate Secretary
July 7th, 2006

©2006 CreativeRelations.net




www.combankitd.com

towards many Muslim coun-
tries, particularly since Septem-
ber 11, 2001 terrorism has seen
an insurgence unlike ever
before — especially by mis-



Why does the
US feel it can
impose its brand

of democracy on

the world,
especially upon
countries that
are hundreds of
years older?

guided, religiously motivated
young men.

Since the horrendous attacks
on London, many people have
questioned whether British PM
Tony Blair’s charge into Iraq
behind George Bush and
against the wishes of the British
people may have heightened
the UK’s prospects of becoming
a target of foreign terrorism.

Even further, the question
has become: Why does the US
feel it-can impose its brand of
democracy on the world, espe-
cially upon countries that are
hundreds of years older?

iE 2005, the Bahamas was
vilified in an article by Jay
Nordlinger of The National
Review, a right wing magazine.
There, the Bahamas was not
only accused of abusing
detainees at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre but also
of having “a very cozy relation-
ship with Castro” and fearing
and submitting to him. Even the
tragic sinking of HMBS Flamin-
go by Cuban warplanes in 1980



was used as political fodder.
My questions to Mr

Nordlinger are: Are you upset -

because you would really want
the Bahamas to submit to the
US? And, why are you med-
dling into the affairs of a sover-
eign country? Although Cuba
has a communist government,
it has a self-sufficient, stable
society that promotes racial
equality, social harmony and
reduced crime, and more
importantly, the Bahamas has
a sovereign right to develop ties
with any country.

With all the good the United
States contributes to the world,



With all the
good the United
States contributes
to the world, at
times it can be a

political, social

and economic
bully.
SS]
at times it can be a political,

.social and economic bully.

Therefore, it is.a breath of fresh
air to see that China is becom-

‘ing a superpower, thereby

bringing a sense of balance to
the US grip on the world.

The US must understand that
countries that “mind their own
business” are usually not the
subject of terrorist attacks and
that hostile, unfair foreign pol-
icy to Middle Eastern countries
accomplishes zilch. Also, to pro-
hibit the display of the coffins of
American soldiers but yet
parade the undignified photos
of dead terrorists such as al-
Zahawari and Saddam Hus-
sein’s sons against Muslim



beliefs shows a double standard
and only cultivates hatred’
among Muslims.

| o brand every fighter
or resister of outside

policies as terrorists is an -

excuse, as Nelson Mandela, for-
merly considered a terrorist,
himself said that “cone man’s ter-
rorist is another man’s freedom
fighter”.

As we celebrate our 33rd year
of independence, we must also
implement ways of protecting
ourselves from terrorist strikes,
particularly as 86 per cent of all
visitors here are Americans.

Terrorism is barbaric, espe- .
cially when innocent civilians
are massacred. However, effec-
tive and fair diplomacy and law .
enforcement can lead to a vast .
reduction to the main angst of
the new millennium. The sight
of the chaos in London last
year, with people running about
with blood and soot about their
bodies is unforgettable and so
today I stand in solidarity with
the people of our former moth-
er country as they observe a
milestone in their history,

_ As we observe our own mile-
stone in history — Hap Inde-
pendence Bahamas!

ajbahama@hotmai:.:.»m

BRAANR |

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Assistant Managers

Qualified applicants should:

e Have suitable experience

« Have a great attitude toward customer service

« Be willing to work weekends & flexible hours.

Interested persons should submit resumé to
Wendy’s Head Office, P.O. Box N-4351
or to kr@aetosbahamas.com.
Deadline for application is July 15, 2006.
No phone calls please. |



Do what tastes right”
Nye

THE TRIBUNE





In brief |

Guyana

‘must do
better on
drug war’

a GUYANA
Georgetown

GUYANA needs to better
battle drug traffickers who
are increasingly using the
South American nation as a
base for smuggling, the out-
going US ambassador said
Thursday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Roland Bullen said Wash-
ington will only invest more in
the fight against drug traf-
fickers if it is convinced
Guyanese officials here are
doing all they can.

“Resources are success dri-
ven and it is demoralizing to
see drug shipments originat-
ing in Guyana seized abroad,
while narco-criminals roam
freely,” Bullen said.

His remarks came less than

a week after US authorities

arrested Guyanese business-
man Shaheed Khan, who has
been indicted in New York
on cocaine smuggling charges,
in Trinidad.
Last year, the US State
Department said Guyana’s
_Tole as an international trans-
shipment point for cocaine
‘bound to the United States
and Europe from South
America had “increased sig-
nificantly” because of its
' political and economic insta-
‘bility and “ineffective” law
enforcement.
The two countries had par-
- ticipated in joint counter-nar-
~ cotics efforts, but the opera-
“tions were compromised by
‘ corruption, the State Depart-
‘ ment said in an annual assess-
“ment of the drug trade.

First case
in court
‘for music.
piracy

| @ ST VINCENT
Kingstown

, A 19-YEAR-OLD man
” charged with pirating music
was the first person to appear
before a judge in this island
chain for allegedly violating a
_ copyright law passed in 2002

“- designed to clamp down on

, bootlegging, officials said
. Wednesday, according to
* Associated Press. -

* Norris Ollivierre, who was
charged with illegally selling a
- local producer’s music, plead-

‘ ed not guilty at a court hear-.

. ing Wednesday — less than a

* week after musicians took to
‘ the streets in the capital of
, Kingstown to protest what
, they said was inaction by

i authorities to enforce the

' anti-piracy law.

. After the protests, Culture

4 Minister Rene Baptiste told

‘ music pirates to stop boot--

‘ , legging and pledged to pros-
* ecute offenders.

* Ollivierre was released on
, US$375bail and was due back
§ in-court on July 17. He could
* face a maximum fine of
, US$18,725 or five years in
‘ prison if convicted.

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 7

Underage drinking: is it z

cause for public concern?

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Hi GESNER Dalmon said: “Its
just the norm, young persons
drink socially all the time.”

FOLLOWING a special
report on the acceptance of
underage drinking in the
Bahamas, The Tribune took
to the streets yesterday to ask
the members of the public
what they think about the
issue.

Chief Superintendent of
Police Hulan Hanna said
underage drinking as “not
something the police see rou-
tinely” and stated that officers
regularly patrol bars in search
of operators who are in vio-
lation of the Liquor Licence
Act.

However Sheandra Newton
said: “There is no awareness
about underage drinking. I
used to buy liquor when I was
15 — its like the norm in the
Bahamas.”

Options

‘Ms Newton went on to say
that young persons need
more positive options for
entertainment on weekends
and should be more educat-
ed about the effects of drink-
ing.

“Its socially excepted, the
problem starts in the homes,”
said Hubert Pinder. “The law

, isn’t really | enforced either,”
he added.

Mr Pinder pointed out that
some parents have alcoholic
beverages in their homes and
allow their children to con-
sume them as well.

“It is socially excepted in
most homes these days — that’s
what they learn from their
parents.”

John Ferguson said: “Laws
are useless if not reinforced
by penalties. This is just like
other laws that have been
implemented, but aren’t
enforced.”

“To prevent anyone under
the legal age from buying an
alcoholic beverage would be
a solution” said one intervie-
wee. “There has to be some

sort of social responsibility ©

from liquor vendors.

“Tt destroys lives — but
everyone is looking to make a
profit,” he added.

Challenge

The Tribune spoke to co-
chairman of the Bahamas
National
William Weeks about the lev-
el of underage drinking in
comparison to drug use by
minors. |

“Its not as big as the use of

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BM SHANTEE Woodside said:
“The laws aren’t enforced.”



a HUBERT Pinder said: “Its
socially accepted, the problem
starts in the homes.”

marijuana by young persons,
but it is still a major issue,”
said Mr Weeks.

“The:challenge-here is that
parents allow their children to
drink. Its mostly because of
our culture and the fact that
alcohol is a legal substance,”
he continued.

Mr Weeks went on to say
that the Bahamas National
Drug Council in association
with Alcoholics Anonymous
will soon be implementing a
new “zero tolerance” policy
on underage drinking.

He says that he feels confi-
dent about the outcome of this
effort.

Assistant liquor store man-
ager Shantee Woodside said:

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@ JOHN Ferguson said: "laws
are useless, if not reinforced
by penalties."





@ SHEANDRA Newton said:
“There is no awareness about
underage drinking.”



“With management here, if
you look like you are under-
age, you’re not served unless
you can produce and ID that
says otherwise.

“We don’t serve underage
persons, but I know some bars
do. They’re just looking to
make money and don’t really
care about who’s buying,” she
said.

“Its just the norm, young
persons drink socially all the
time,” said Gesner Dalmon.
“No minors get in any seri-
ous problems because of
drinking, so the issue is never
addressed. There hasn’t even
been any really big discussion
on it, but I think it should be
looked at.”

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006



@ By KAHMILE REID

THE name may _ have
changed — but not the fact that
visitors and Bahamians contin-
ue to be greeted with filthy
restrooms and inadequate infra-
structure, according to frequent
users.

As the government celebrat-
ed the renaming of the airport
after Sir Lynden Pindling: yes-
terday, one taxi driver remind-
ed the public that the name is
the only thing that has changed.

“The only word in the PLP’s

vocabulary is infrastructure,”
he said, “yet the infrastructure
at the airport remains run
down.”

According to the taxi driver,
who wished to remain anony-
mous, the government should
have refurbished the airport,
and implemented the necessary
modern amenities before
renaming it.

To give an example of the
negative impact that the airport
has on visitors, the taxi driver
recounted a incident that hap-
pened a few weeks ago.

LOCAL NEWS

“T picked up some tourists
from the airport and when he
was about to leave one of the
visitors said he wanted to use
the restroom

“1 directed the gentleman to
the restroom, but about a
minute later I saw him walking
back to the taxi, holding his
nose.”

The driver said that when he
went to the restroom lo investi-
gate, he quickly learned what
the problem was — both toilets
were overflowing with faeces.

He said that he immediately

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found a maintenance employ-
ee and told them about the
problem, and asked if it was
possible to get a bucket of water
to flush the toilets.

The taxi driver said the
employee told him that. there
was no water available.

Efforts to contact the airport
authorities for comment on the

The airport: the more names change,
the more things stay the same

tise the restrooms Stapelly
Disappointed

Last month, when the deputy
opposition leader Brent Symon-
ette made his contribution to
the budget debate, he expressed
his disappointment in the fact

THE TRIBUNE



ble, there has been no signifi-
cant change to the parking, or
more importantly to the first or
last impression of our visitors.”

“The PLP so far has failed to
follow the plan left by the FNM
to turn the airport in a modern-
day facility with all amenities,”

Despite the obvious lack of

= = Me

a

matter proved fruitless, howev-
er an employee, who also.
wished to remain anonymous,
confirmed that the airport does
have frequent water problems,
which affect their ability to sani-

that the PLP had been in office
for four years, yet
revitalise the facility have yet
to be implemented.”
According to Mr Symonette,
“the toilets are still in a terri-

t

'

|

he said. 1
1

'

necessary and modern facilities,
- Mr Symonette said, the gov-
ernment constantly tries to |
impress upon the public that -
they have “solved the ills of the |
NIA”. 4

“plans to







@ PRIME Minister Perry Christie joins in the celebrations
as the airport is named after Sir Lynden Pindling.

FROM page one

Pindling by quoting an excerpt from Sir Pin-
dling’s 1997 retirement speech: “It has been
my singular good fortune to have at my side
a princess, whose endearing grace and charm,
made her the toast of four continents and a
lady whose fortitude in the face of the most
daunting adversities, contributed mightily to
my survival and successes in public life.”

Governor General Arthur Hanna in his
speech reminded those attending that the
occasion had nothing to do with politics and
everything to do with history.

He acknowledged that Sir Lynden made
political mistakes, however Mr Hanna said:
“IT know he tried his best.” On this note, he
said, this occasion should not be a time for
division in our country, but a celebration of
a man mightily hailed as the father



(Photo: Mario Duncanson/T ribune staff) |

Airport renamed.

|
of the nation and the “Bahamas’ finest!
son.” ey
He said the Bahamas we see today did not’
happen by chance but by struggle and the.
airport should be a constant reminder, to all,:
of how the modern Bahamas came to be and
the role that Sir Lynden played in making,
the dream of freedom come true.
The ceremony was not attended by mem-'
bers of the Opposition who complained in,
the House of Assembly on Wednesday that:
they had received no invitations for the cer-
emony.
Late Wednesday afternoon an invitation
was delivered to Opposition Leade Hubert,
Ingraham.






US newspaper raises concerns

FROM page one

resort that will take five to eight
years to complete.

“The Bahamas has
become a very hot item. It
just feels like it's coming of
age,” Mr Dwors said.

While developers are
thrilled at the prospects, The
Sun Sentinel said, some
Bahamians are worried
about the consequences of
having such large develop-
ments established on small
islands.

“Natives and others
acknowledge the massive
growth is critical to the
Bahamas' future, but some
are concerned about what it
will do to the environment.
‘ What’s more, they think the

government isn’t properly
policing foreign developers,
allowing them to make mil-
lions while taking advantage
of the nation and its people,”
the Florida newspaper said.

“Some concede the huge
projects are the price of
progress for this nation of
325,000 people. Still.
Bahamians fear there are
looming repercussions,” the
Florida newspaper said.

It named the develop-
ments at Chub Cay, Bimini
Bay and the Ginn project in
Grand Bahama as high-end
resorts

Reginald Munroe, a 45-
year-old clothing store mer-
chant expressed another
common concern in an inter-
view with the Florida news-

paper, that the “tiny nation”
of the Bahamas cannot aa
dle that magnitude of devel-
opment that is currently get-,
ting underway.
“] just want to make sure
(the government) doesn’t
sell out the homeland. Ten
years from now, is there

going to be any waterfront’

property for Bahamians to
live on?” Mr Munroe asked.
Sam Campbell, a Cat
Island native and lawyer in
the Bahamas for more than,
25 years, said the resorts are’
not affordable for the major-
ity of Bahamians. He said he
hopes the scores of farmers,
maids and dishwashers in the
Bahamas will not fee] “mar-
ginalisedâ„¢ by all the Ey,
developments.

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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 9





ae tain i sa ep ~ a §

[FRIDAYEVENING JULY 7, 2006 |

|
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HBO-P ‘OR THE BOYS |Bullock. FBI agent Gracie Hart clashes with her superiors when she Sarah Michelle Gellar, Jason Behr.
(1991) 'R’ (CC) _ |jumps in to save two kidnapped friends in Las Vegas. ‘PG-13' 0 'PG-13' (CC)

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H BO-W usters Celebrity interviews and film clips highlight — |Diesel, Colm Feore, Thandie Newton. A fugitive fights an invading ruler
movie successes and failures. © (CC) and his army. © ‘PG-13' (CC)
(:15) % % & MELINDA AND MELINDA (2004, Come- |Six Feet Under ‘Nobody Sleeps” | x x MONSTER-IN-LAW (2005, Ro-
dy-Drama) Radha Mitchell. Parallel stories reflect _Lisa plans a birthday party for Ruth; |mance-Comedy) Jennifer Lopez. 0
woman's attempt io fix her life. 'PG-13' (CC) Claire has a wild night. 0 ‘PG-13' (CC)

(:45) % % THE RING TWO (2005, Horror) Naomi Watts, Simon Baker, David Dorfman. A | % 2 UNLEASHED (2005) Jet Li.
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chef and his neurotic wife. O ‘PG-13' (CC) die-hard baseball fan. ‘PG-13' (CC)
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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

Jut-Island Docto





The Tribune wsseessseessse2:





| The Tribune’s
Summer |
Reading Series

EXCERPT TWO
“Fools Rush In”

His father and mother having died, Mr.
Cottman dreamed of purchasing land in
The Bahamas and moving there. During a
school summer vacation in 1941, he sets
out with a friend, Reverend Robert Andry,
on a trip to Long Cay..

ob had only six weeks vacation. His

time was running out and he was in
a great hurry to get going. So it was with
vast excitement that he came rushing into
Miss Taylor’s one day with the news that he
had found a boat. She was a twenty-foot
sloop named the Cheerful, just arrived from
Acklins and due to leave for Long Cay the
following Saturday.

Fools rush in, they say, where angels and
wise men fear to tread. It is also said that
the moment a woman’s baby is born she
forgets the pain associated with the labor.
Seasickness and I have a somewhat similar
connection. No matter how seasick I may
have been, when I get on dry land, feeling
fine, and look out at a boat, I think: Would-
n’t it be wonderful to be out there sailing?
So instead of taking one quick look at the
Cheerful and going straight back to Miss
Taylor’s comfortable, land-based house, I
was almost as thrilled as Bob at the idea of
making such a long trip in such a cute little
boat with such an optimistic name....

We bought provisions. In our blissful igno-
‘rance, we bought such things as bread, eggs,
and very ripe fruit....[and] went happily
aboard the Cheerful.

We were trying to go southeast and the
wind was blowing northwest. Bob and I
were no sailors but we were soon familiar
with the resulting routine. “Good full!”
Captain Bain would boom, standing in the
bow. The man at the tiller would draw it
- toward him and the little boat would lean
still more on her side. “Let’s go back!” Cap-
tain Bain would bellow. The helmsman
would push the tiller as far as possible from
him.

The sail would begin to flap; the boom
would slowly swing from one side of the
boat to the center. There it would hang,
apparently undecided. The Cheerful, unde-
cided also, would pause. Then the boom
would move slowly on to the other side.
Everyone would duck. The wind would fill

sailor than I, was complaining of

THE TRIBUNE:



WRITTEN BY EVAN COTTMAN +
LINE DRAWINGS BY GUY FLEMING





the sail again and we would start moving—
if not back to where we had come from,
then very close to it.

This went on all day and all night and all
the next day and the next. Or so I was told.
After the first few hours I ceased to notice.
I was seasick. .

It took six days to reach the south end
of Long Island. By then our bread was
mouldy, our fruit rotten, our eggs bro-
ken. Bob, who proved a far better

hunger. But of all the things I didn’t
want to hear about, food led all the
rest.

_ All this time we had been sailing
over comparatively shallow
water. The great ocean swells
did not come here. Instead

the water was choppy.
There was no _ set
rhythm
toss tty.
and
tish’ ’e
Cheer-
ful sim-
Pook 2%
bucked like

an unbroken
horse. But on
Friday we
moved out into
the . tremen-
dous ocean








ven 10

Crooked Island Passage. Here

the nature of the waves changed.
They no longer slapped at the Cheerful
but came in long, sleek, tremendous moun-
tains. Up the sides of these the little Cheer-
ful rode like a cork, hung suspended on
the crest like a feather, and plunged down
the far side like a shot duck.

My poor stomach, which had been adjust-
ing itself to the choppy water, was caught
totally off guard. As the Cheerful plunged
down the slope of a wave, my stomach
lurched upward.

It passed through my throat into my
mouth, where I tried to stop it with clenched
teeth and open palm. Then as the Cheerful
shot up the next wave my stomach shot
down....

I was lying on my bunk when I heard cap-
tain Bain boom, “Here come a squall.”
Looking up through the open hatchway, I
observed, with only minor interest, that the
sky had gone purple and black. A moment
later, the wind struck with a wild howling
sound.

- The Cheerful seemed to quit riding the
waves and simply to be blown or hurled

from one to the other.

, owe ~ mee

nt, tA, oy See a See,
etm Beer cee:
depths of the “ 3

PSS ee


























nents




2S.

Khe, “Wwe

Sometimes there were tremendous waves ~
towering over us; sometimes looking over ©
the rail was like looking out of an air-
plane....I looked at Captain Bain and real- |
ized, dimly, that he was scared. Bob, sitting
beside me, was obviously scared. ie

In fact, everybody was scared. Except me. *
I just didn’t care.

In The Bahamas, they say there are two |
stages of seasickness: first, you are afraid
you are going to die; and second, you are "|
afraid that you won't. I had reached the °
second stage. :

(Continued every Wednesday
and Friday until August 18th)

Text copyright © 1998 Gayle Cottman
Excerpt prepared by Marjorie Downie
and Gordon Mills of

The College of The Bahamas










THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE i1





LOCAL NEWS



@ STAFFORD Clarke recieves an award for small engine repair



@ MELICIENNE Drovillard receives an award for culinary arts

'
‘
'
'
1

Awards are

handed out
at prison

‘
'
'
‘

i By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

INMATES graduating from
Her Majesty’s Prison Correc-
tional Training Institute were
encouraged to “get rid of the
negatives” and work hard.

They were told that with an
education, they can have a new
beginning.

( On Wednesday, more than

‘60 inmates were presented with

certificates in various disciplines

ranging from basic computer
skills to ceramics.

This year’s graduation exer-
icise was held under the theme:
Knowledge and hard work,
itwo keys to success.’
| The inmates heard a motiva-
itional speech:from Wendall
Jones, CEO of Jones Commu-
‘nications.

He urged the prison gradu-
‘ates to use their education for
‘good, and said that although
ithey may have made bad choic-
ies in the past, with an educa-
‘tion they must not come back to
prison.

“With your education now,
‘you should be a cut above. You
‘must go back into the main-
\stream of society and stand out
‘in the crowd as a person of
excellence and integrity,” said
‘Mr Jones.

He told them that integrity is
‘the foundation upon which a
‘successful life is built.

“You may be in a situation
today where everybody around
you is compromising their
jintegrity or taking the easy way.
‘Dont let that rub off on you.
'Be the one to have an excellent
‘Spirit. Be the one to stand in
‘the crowd in a positive way,”

_asserted Mr Jones.

Two of the graduates were
igiven a chance to reflect on
*their experience as students.

*« Kristy Hamilton said that

-during her 18-month stay at Her

‘Majesty’ s Prison, one of her

“greatest joys was coming to

Slasses.

. Ms Hamilton said she has
‘acquired many skills as a result
wof the course, including how to
*Qwn and operate a small busi-
‘ness, how to prepare herself

“for getting a job, and how to
*refocus her mind if she is
‘tempted to revert to “negative
wactivity”.

*” “These classes not alone
‘changed me, but the teachers
“played an important role in
; what they do best. This was by
‘simply coming to class with a

“Smile on their faces, they

showed me that they cared and

«that it is not just a job.

“My time here as a student
“has not only benefited me edu-
-Cationally, but also mentally and
spiritually,” she said.

Inmate Dennis Cates said

*.

that he found the classes to be
both educational and invigorat-

ing. .










































RUTH
MINERVA
SANDS, 81

of Village Road,
Nassau, The
Bahamas will be
held at Shirley
Heights Gospel
Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue,



4:00 pm.

Thompson.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas —

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Nassau on Tuesday 11th ily 2006 at

Bother Mark Lacey and Brother Tom
‘Roberts will officiate and interment will
be in Ebenezer Methodist Cemetery, East
Shirley Street, Nassau.

Miss Sands was predeceased by her
parents, William Clarence and Daisy
Emmiline Sands, a sister, Sheila Sands;
brothers, Edgar, Kingsley and Bill Sands
and is survived by her sisters, Anniewade
Albury, Isabell and Katherine Sands; |
sisters-in-law, Ann Sands and Ellen Penny;
-nephews, Donald, Jack and Clarence ur.
Sands; nieces, Daisy Roberts, Kim Sands,
Rachel Pinder, Jennie Roberts, Sueleeann
_ Ferguson and Sophia Lowe and many
other grandnephews and grandnieces,
relatives and friends with special thanks
to caregivers, Shirley, Cynthia, Netta, Beryl
and Tony and Doctors Chea and Ada

Relatives and friends may pay their last
respects at Kemp's Funeral Home Limited,
22 Palmdale Avenue, Nassau, on Sunday
9th July, 2006 from 4:00 pm to 5:00pm.

H NORRIS Rolle recieves an award for small engine repair
from Addiemae Farrington



@ KEVIN Newbold receives an award for Microsoft Word at the
graduation at Her Majesty’s Prison



@ JAMES Newbold receives an award for Microsoft Word from
officer Chris Elliott

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

nary arts, small engine repair;
entrepreneurial skills, basic lit-
eracy, numeracy and ceramics.

From January to July the
inmates were educated in.basic¢
computer skills, welding, ‘culi-



































ane

| Butler's Huneral Homes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

_ FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ope RSA

of Salt Pond, Long ind |
will be held on Friday,
July 7", 2006 at 11:00
a.m. at St. George’s
Anglican Church,
Montrose Avenue.
1 Officiating will be Rev’d
Fr. G. “Kingsley Knowles assisted by Rev.
Timothy Eldon and Fr. Ronald Hamilton.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish fond memories are his Wife;
Wynette; Three (3) Sons; Justin, Julian and
Stark; Mother; Thelma Knowles; Six (6)
Brothers; Philip, Andrew, Paul, Joel, Brian and
Thomas Knowles; Three (3) Sisters; Iris
Amoury, Lucy Bonimy and Barbara Knowles;
Father-in-law; Edgar Burrows; Mother-in-law;
Theresa Burrows; Six (6) Brothers-in-law; Bruce
Amoury, Roger Bonimy, Randy, Brian, Lester
and Rickey Burrows; Three (3) Sisters-in-law;
Charon Knowles, Rosemary Roussos and Stacy
Burrows; numerous nephews and nieces
including; Peter Amoury, Ryan Bonimy, Ezekiel
and Ethan Knowles, Dawn Trotman, Amelia
Amoury, Deyar and Abigail Knowles, Cameron,
Logan and Sidney Burrows, Madyanna and Mya
Roussos, his Aunts, Uncles, Cousins and many
other relatives and friends, especially those of
Salt Pond, Long Island.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’
Funeral Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and
| York Streets on Thursday from 1:00 p.m. until
| 5:00 p.m. and on Friday at the Church from 10:00
a.m. until Service time.







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AVAILABLE AT



Enero FEE RTS ASRS ERS ET cl ee a a ten en




PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

MONDAY



HB HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New |
Providence Community Centre: Mondays -
6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to
8:30pm .

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas mects the
third Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors
Hospital conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm e Club
612315 meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach @ Club 3596 meets at the
British Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the
month in the Board Room of the British Colo-
nial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS .

10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been.
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron ts
allowed into the club absolutely free and is giv-
en a complimentary glass of Carlo Rossi. Tues-
day nights also include the Carlo Rossi's Hot
Body Competition. Hosted by Daddi Renzi and
music provided by DJ Ai from 100 Jamz. Master
Chef Devito Bodie provides scrumptious appe-
tizers.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to
Tpm/8:30pm to 9:30pm. ‘

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters, at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info. ;

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register’
for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm
@ CC Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room,
College Avenue off Moss Road ¢ Club
Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the
Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central .
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm
at the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Ter.
race, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable.Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second

Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Hie:

4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton.
Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour — > Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetiz-




\2





~ Alcoholics Anonymous,



Highway.





Ee eT ae ee Ieee eee

EMA
PLEASE PUT




a Peelers dear
ey Rainforest fie gud EES

ers and numerous drink
specials.

& HEALTH

wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and
places: New Providence
Community Centre:
Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm.
The Nassau Group: Rosetta
Street, Wednesday - 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.



Les



B CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets
6:30pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas
National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-
8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West

TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th
Wednesday of each month at C.C Sweeting
Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meet-
ings onthe Ist and 3rd Wednesday of each
month at Doctor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the
month, 8pm @ St Augustine’s Monestary.

THURSDAY

Bl HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distin-
guished physicians are held at Doctors Hospital
every third Thursday of the month at 6pm in the
Doctors Hospital Conference Room. Free
screenings between Spm & 6pm. For more
information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public.of its meeting times.and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics ‘Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
for more info.

REACH ~ Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm
the second Thursday of each month in the cafe-
teria. of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3956 - "Destined for Suc-
cess" will present the theme "Forward, Upward,
Onward, Together". Thursday, July 6 at-the
Ministry of Health & Environment building on
Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend.

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, & 30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.

{nternational Association of Administrative
Professionals, Bahamas Chapter‘meets the third

ests of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,

Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently astablished National Insurance
Baord Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets
every fourth Thursday in the month, in the
National {nsurance Board’s (NIB) training
room, Wulf Rodd office complex, at 6pm. All







NS
“SSAUBA

mcememsnser

‘(NNIVERSARY

"The brewery of The Bahamas"

ree erate





retirees are welcome.
FRIDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks
off every. Friday night with Happy Hour... spe-
ciat: drinks, live:music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and
Nassau’s first;European Night Restaurant -
Open Friday night till Saturday morning 5am,
serving hot food/and take out - music, drinks
and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the
perfect place to spend your night out till the
morning.

@ THE ARTS

NEW - DEBRIS is a one night "Art Experiment"
by Blue Curry and fellow artist Heino Schmid
which will run from 8pm until midnight Friday,
July 7. It is being held in the former Juggie's
Video/Electronic Solutions store on Alexander
Street, Palmdale. Not really an art exhibition in
the traditional sense, we will be using the empty
space for pure visual experimentation.

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will be
held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Friday
between June 9 and July 29, from 1 to 10pm.

®@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the’
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm
& 8:30pm. to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fri-
days @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @
7pm to 8pm.

i CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Cen-
tre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info
call 325.1947 after 4pm.



SATURDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

THE BUZZ - The High Tide band is back this
Saturday, July 8. Let Shelley and Ericka's vocals
take you to another level, while Snucky's pumping
bass, Gavin's guitar licks and Monk's drumming
antics keep you moving and grooving with today's
pop, rock, R&B, soca and reggae hits from today
and yesterday.

_ Show starts at 10-ish. The Buzz has the coldest

beers on the island and great specialty drinks to
keep you cool - two doors east of On The Run
East Bay St.



Please Drink







THE TRIBUNE. |

Sun City Entertainment presents Saturday &
Sunday night functions for the alternative
lifestyle crowd (Gay) at Kendal's Auto Garage
on Gladstone road from 11:30pm to 4am. Music
provided by DJ X. Heading south on Gladstone
Road, Kendal’s is located immediately past
Moss Gas station.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Heritage and Cul-
tural Extravaganza - will be held at Arawak Cay
every Saturday between June 9 and July 29 from
2 to 11pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Box Cart Derby -
will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every Satur-
day between June 9 and July 29, from 2 to 6pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the ,
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings -
10am to.llam.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every
third Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and
December) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor . -
Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes
are offered every third Saturday of the month
from 9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital
Community Training Representative at
302.4732 for more information and learn to save
a life today. 5 ‘

& CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling.
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors ,
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
cycle. Parents interested in registering their
children should contact organisers at Jarcy-
cling@gmail.com

New --Free NFL Football Camp hosted by Alex
Smith #81 Tampa Bay Bucaneers, Saturday,

July 8 at St Augustines College 9am-3pm. Sign-
up must be in advance! Contact (242)327-3920.



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha
and the Caribbean Express - every Sunday from
6:30pm.to: 9:30pm.

Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition will be
held July 15 to 23. Under the theme, “Seduction
Surrender”, the final night of competition will
be held on Sunday, July 23 at 8pm in the Rain
Forest Theatre. The show will be hosted by
Olympic medalist, Ato Boldon, America’s Next
Top Model (Season Three), Eva Pigford, and
Bahamian radio personality, Krissy Luv. There
will also be an after party immediately following
the Mr Caribbean Bahamas Competition to
meet the winner of the competition, delegates,
the international judges, and celebrity hosts.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Royal Poinciana
Tea Party - will be held in Government House
Gardens, every Sunday between June 9 and July
29, from 3 to 6pm.

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Old Town Jazz at
Sandyport - will be held at the Olde Town
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 - July

_ 29 from 4 — 8pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events to
The Tribune

via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@
tribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

Responsibly




YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —-(
‘OUT THERE”

[IN THE SUBJECT CINE’

an




THE TRIBUNE



Ingraham
FROM page one

national event.”

Mr Ingraham did not
attend yesterday’s renaming
ceremony, as he only received
an invitation to the event on
Wednesday afternoon. He
pointed out that he thinks the
lateness of the invitation was
partly the result of incompe-
tence on the part of govern-
ment. However, he added, he
does’not know the extent to
which it was deliberate.

This is not'the first time,
Mr Ingraham said, that he
was informed about an event
at such a late date. In Febru-
ary, | said Mr Ingraham, Prime

Minister Perry Christie called _

him;only a day before the
swearing-in ceremonies for
Mr Arthur Hanna as the new
governor general to invite
him'to attend.

“Similar treatment was
afforded to me and my col-
leagues when Dame Ivy
Duniont demitted office and
the’ ‘ceremony they had for
her.'{t was also the case with
Geatge Mackey’s funeral
arrangements, ” he said.

He added that these inci-
dents are not an exhaustive
list, but just examples of what

é happens.

Wath this most recent
delayed invitation, Mr Ingra-
hanr said: “It is a curious real-
ity that none of the other
FNM members of parliament,
nor’ ‘Mr Whitney Bastian (an
Indgpendent) had received
theit (invitations) either. I
confjrmed with Brent Symon-
ettéthis morning (Thursday)
that*he still had not received
his own.

“{, have no reason to
beligve that my MP’S in Aba-
co, Long Island and Grand
Baliama and North Eleuthera
recejved any since yesterday
(Wednesday) morning.”

Yesterday The Tribune
contacted Mr Symonette, the
FNM’s deputy leader, who
said'that up until the House
of Assembly Wednesday he
had‘ not received his invita-
tion, However, Mr Symonette
said that in'the House of
Assembly he was delivered a

handwritten envelope which

had, his name on it and five
invitations which the aviation
minister advised were for
ENM constituents. At that
tinfe, they were also given
invitations for independence:
based celebrations.

Mr Symonette said that an
employee of his received a
pefsonally addressed enve-
lope with an invitation to
attend the ceremony in her
capacity as director of the
Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation. The invitation was
received several days before
the:ceremony.

Mr Ingraham said persons
shauld be invited without
regard to their political affili-
ation in the community.

He said invitations to all
national events should go
especially to persons who
hofd certain offices, such as

MbP’s and the leader of the.

opposition. And they should
be. invited in a timely man-
ner, not the day before the
event and not after they
would have complained about
not being invited. A com-
plajnt was made in the House
of “Assembly on Wednesday
mdrning that no member of
the! Opposition had received
anunvitation to the ceremony.
Mr Whitney Bastian, Inde-
pefdent member for South
Andros, also complained that
he*had not received an invi-
tation although members of
his:constituency had.

Mr Ingraham also touched
onthe issue of consultation
with the renaming of the air-
pott. He said he was not
aware of any consultation that
had taken place in the
Bahamas about changing the
ndme of Nassau Internation-
al-Airport.

Mr Ingraham said it was
announced by Mr Christie at
the PLP’s convention, how-
ever; they did not choose to
haye, a debate in parliament
fox resolution.

At the same time, Mr
Ingraham said that as the rul-
ing party, the government
does have the right to name
public facilities.

‘He stressed: “It is impor-
taht'‘when you are doing these
major changes to develop a
bread consensus in the society
about it and to get general
agréements on it. It is always
better to have consensus over
these things between the
major political entities before
you do it, so you take the pol-
itics. out of it. The reality is
the. PLP’s election campaign

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 13

AG reveals statistics

use of firearms in crimes





@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE practice of loaning or leasing
firearms to commit crimes is wide-
spread in the Bahamas, statistics
reveal.

According to Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson, analysis of
2004 records shows that the majority of
violent crimes committed in the
Bahamas were perpetrated with the
use of firearms.

“Ballistic analysis verified that a sin-
gle firearm had links to multiple inci-
dents, for example, armed robberies,
shootings, murders and grievous harm.

“A firearm used in a 2004 murder
was linked to a 2004 attempted armed

robbery and assault,”

Pastor calls for stand
against gay marriage

FROM page one

sons, by virtue of a govern-
mental constitutional review
committee, to settle orice and
for all the nature of marriage
by requiring that the govern-
ment amend the constitution to
state clearly that it is a union
between a man and a woman.

“Bahamians operate in a
very lackadaisical, apathetic
attitude toward anything. And
we have to get people taking
stands and taking positions and
not talking about it in the clubs
and in the ball parks but to say
publicly that this is where we
stand,” Dr Major said.

While Dr Major admitted
that gay Bahamians have not
been coming forward and
demanding recognition and

rights as married couples, he:

said that there are demands
being made which are leaning
towards that.

“All the conversation from
that side is toward that. From

the persons who want to be |

married as same sex, that’s

‘their position, they want the

same rights to marry as men
and women.

“Marriage is not.for a gay
couple, therefore the benefits
of marriage is not for a gay
couple. Adoption is for per-
sons who care for children.

That’s true for single parents,

that’s true with grandparents,
aunties, uncles, but to be
brought into a coupled union
claiming to be a marital union,
same sex persons, and to bring
a child into that, we stand
against that absolutely,” the

pastor said.

Although “sweethearting” is
prevalent in the Bahamas, the
basic concept of marriage is
not threatened as much by
“sweethearting” as it is by
homosexuality, Dr Major said.

“There is no threat, in the
sense of making a perversion
of what marriage is. That’s a
transgression of marriage in
the sense that someone is relat-

she said.

ing to someone, but they are

not challenging the basic con-

cept of marriage,” he said.
While he said sweethearting

should not be condoned, he

felt it could be tolerated to a

point.

“Any person who gives guid-
ance for marital development
includes in that guidance that
multiple relationships within a
family structure are not valid,
proper, or right. We. are not
talking about how to improve
marriage, we are talking about
how to define it,” he said.

Dr Major pointed out that
the Constitutional Reform
Committee determined that

the majority of persons they

spoke to would want an
amendment stating clearly that
marriage is to be recognised as
a union between a man and a
woman.

“Based on that and the
struggle that is going on in the
west where the status of mar-
riage is being shattered by poor
legislation to begin with and
by careless legal manoeuver-
ing, unless we set it straight
and clear we will fall into the
same traps as well,” Dr Major
said.

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and make your own deal!

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also pointed

out that of 126 suspects arrested for
unlawful sexual intercourse that year,
8 per cent were repeat suspects.

The attorney general, who was
speaking in parliament, said she plans
to introduce a bill for an Act to amend
a number of Acts relating to the crim-
inal law.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that the
Criminal Law Miscellaneous (amend-
ment) Bill 2006, seeks to provide for a

right of a appeal to the Court of

Appeal by the prosecution, an accused

or convicted individual, where bail has .

been granted or refused by the
Supreme Court, or where an applica-
tion by the prosecution to revoke bail
has been denied.

. Presently, the right to appeal to the
Court of Appeal where bail has been
given or denied, does not exist.

m@ ATTORNEY General Allyson Maynard-Gibson

The bill also seeks to provide for
certain existing offenses to be triable
either on indictment or summarily.

Such offences include:

° Purchasing, acquiring or possessing
a gun and using or carrying a gun with-
out a licence

» Purchasing or possessing a firearm
or ammunition without a certificate

© Possessing a firearm or ammuni-
tion during a period for which one is
subject to the supervision of the police,
to be of good behaviour or to be keep-
ing the peace

° Selling, transferring a firearm or
ammunition or repairing, testing or
proving a firearm or ammunition for
any person prohibited from possess-
ing ‘a firearm or ammunition.



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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Americans at Atlantis
celebrate independenc








ATLANTIS truly rocked — evening with a joy ride aboard ve
and so did hundreds of the _ the famous ‘Love Boat’ from sens
resort’s guests who were hosted the Marina at Atlantis to Par- Jee!
to a Dynamite 70s fourth of July | adise Harbour, the featured 16%,






celebration on Tuesday incom- venue for the carnival-like cel-
memoration of America’s inde- _ ebrations.

%
%

i





















pendence. Everything from the games, 3
a IN an Fantasy Island flashback, Atlantis guests Christina and Guests strolled down memo- _ food, and music — which all dat-
Marko Andrioff along with little Alexa pose with Tattoo ry lane as they began the ed back to the 70s — kept on

rolling. Hoop-la, hole-n-one,
hoop shot and many more excit-
ing games were featured.

Special live music was pro-
vided by the Right On Band.
There were special appearances
by Elvis Presley, the king of
rock-n-roll, Tattoo from Fan-
tasy Island, as well as many oth-
er past celebrities from the 70s
era.

Atlantis employees added a
special twist to the celebrations
Cn Mechiabical Roan as they donned afro wigs, bell-

a bottoms and mini skirts.
Alr Conditioner Amanda Felts, Atlantis’ vice
#AGV12 president of guest activities,
along with her team and others
at the resort, worked tirelessly
to ensure that the event was a
success.

Vanessa Eneas, Atlantis’
r 8,000 BTU director of guest activities said,

: “We are thrilled to once again
$3 75 00 host our guests here at Atlantis
#AGVO8 to our July 4 independence cel-






@ ATLANTIS’ guest Ingrid Dominquez from Miami receives ;
lei from Jaimi Hanna of Atlantis’ Imperial Club.























ebrations. This is one of the best
events of the year.
p 12,000 BTU “All of our guests are in such
$437 50 a festive mood and we really : :
re brought it alive this year with wy 4 TL ANTIS’ guests line up for a slice of the independence



our Dynamite 70s theme.”
The celebrations left a last-
ing impression on the resort’s

¢ 14,000 BTU | atiesis.

It marked the third time that

$5 $5.00 Kerry and Michael Rosen from
#AGV14 ees New York celebrated the spe-
cial holiday at Atlantis.

This year’s celebration was
especially memorable for the
couple, who showed their patri-

. otism by wearing t-shirts depict-
Sales & Full Service Department ing the American flag. “It’s
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets, great for my daughter — she is
322-2188/9 six years old and she plays all of
the carnival games, wins little
prizes, and.she just loves it
here,” said Mr Rosen.

The event climaxed_with.an.

impressive fire works display _ ; 1:
which lit up the evening sky. "7 ne utente! Nikolette Fonseca and Mia Tedesco enjoy

#AGV12 cake

















©2006 CreativeRelations.net







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FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 15
THE TRIBUNE OO aac ciieat oe a.


PAGE 16, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 | | THE TRIBUNE



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FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Mm Wit: iv ‘ibune_

ee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street ©





}

Bahamas resort deal

runs into

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

United States-based_

resort developer has

_tun into trouble with

its plans to acquire a

Bahamian island that

features a hotel and marina complex,

although it told The Tribune that the

potential deal “has not completely
fallen apart” yet.

Cay Clubs Resorts & Marinas has

been attempting to acquire Walker’s.

Cay in the Abacos, having announced
this February that.a deal had been
completed in principle with its own-
ers, the New York-based Abplanalp
family.

However, sources told The Tribune

that the acquisition had fallen.’

through, with environmental issues
concerning Walker’s Cay said to be
_the reason.

Frank Rego, Cay Clubs Resorts &

j

difficulties

Purchase of Walker’s Cay off Abaco ‘not completely |
fallen apart’, but environmental concerns pigminent

|
i

Marinas vice- president of operations ©

for the US ¢astern seaboard and the
Caribbean, yesterday acknowledged
~ that the purchase had run into diffi-
_culties when contacted by .The Tri-
bune.

He. said | Tt has: not fallen through
completely, We're still in negotiations
with the owners. It’s still going back
and forth. It’s not aL completely, fallen
apart. ¢

“There’s issues on the island that
we’re trying to resolve.”

When pressed as to the reasons why
the acquisition had run into trouble,
Mr Rego said they related to “envi-
ronmental” concerns with Walker’s

Cay, but he could say no more
because of confidentiality agreements
signed with the owners.

“It’s nothing I can talk about,” he
said. “There is ongoing negotiations.
That is as much as I can tell you at this
time.

“Hopefully, welll have it resolved
soon. But there’s no exact timeline
we can put on it right now.’

Mr Rego had last week told The
Tribune that while Cay Clubs & Mari-
nas was waiting for environmental
studies on Walker’s Cay to be com-
pleted, the closing date for the acqui-
sition had only been delayed.

The 71-room Walker’s Cay Hotel &

we

Marina, which has 62 suicet rooms,
three villas and the three-bedroom
Harbour House, was heavily dam-
aged during Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne in 2004, and has been closed
ever since.

The 100-acre Walker’s Cay, though,
has the advantage of being the north-

ernmost island in the Bahamas, thus -

making it the first stop-off for US
boaters and yachtsmen as they move
down the Abacos chain - a well-
known destination for this market.
This is what Cay Clubs & Marinas
was planning to capitalise on, plus

_Walker’s Cay’s reputation among

boaters as a leading sports fishing des-

tination. Some 80 per cent of the

_ world’s game fishing records are said
. to be held by boats that came out of

Walker’s Cay.
_ The island provides access to both
shallow water and deep water fish-
ing, with boaters in deep water with-
in minutes of leaving.

Apart from the 2,800 foot airstrip,
Walker’s Cay also houses the Conch

‘Pearl and Lobster Trap restaurants, ,-. ;

two bars, the Treasure Chest gift +”
shop, the Sea Below dive shop, fresh-
water and saltwater swimming pools,

SEE page 4B

Bahamas
investors
put $23bn
into US —

Nation plays key role in

supporting US economy —

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS-domiciled
investors and investment vehi-

SEE page 5B.














}
i

lm By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter

occupancies temporarily. However, he said
the Cable Beach Resorts hope to improve
occupancy and rates over last year, taking
the lost rooms into consideration.

The conversion of the Radisson to. Star-
wood’s Sheraton brand is expected to begin



THE Cable Beach Resorts will temporari-
ly lose 330 rooms, which will have an effect on
their summer occupancy and rate levels, when
the first stage of the $80 million Radisson
renovation begins.

Robert Sands, executive vice- resident of



step towards changing the resorts into the
proposed $2 billion Baha Mar eee:

administration and public affairs for Baha _ begins.

Mar Development Company, predicted that

once construction begins on the Radisson 4
Cable Bre) Resort, yey he lose those SEE pase | B

















_ a dream home
Reality Check.

But affording it may be another makter,
Talk to us about our attractive mortgage leans
vatittn Homme: tihatt tuum @reaang inte reality,
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COMPANY

within the next month, as the first physical

Radisson work to



Bank’s $24. 1m

private issue

oversubscribed

COMMONWEALTH Bank
yesterday said its completed
$24.1 million preference share
issue was oversubscribed, as it
sought to strengthen its capital

base-to take advantage of new

opportunities.

The bank said in a statement
that the private preference
share issue, which was only

open to select institutional

investors, was completed in a
matter of days.
The issue was priced 3 at

Bahamian prime plus 1.5 per’

cent, and will pay dividends
quarterly.

T. B. Donaldson, Gominon!
wealth Bank’s chairman, said
in a statement: “This offering
represents the first time Com-

-monwealth Bank has gone to

the capital market since its ini-
tial public offering in 2000.

“Since that time, the bank
has grown from $500 million
in total assets to over $900 mil-
lion today. The issue brings the
bank’s capital to over $180 mil-
lion, more than double the cap-
ital at the Bank’s IPO in 2000.
This offering supports future
growth for the bank while
maintaining our prudent lev-
els of capital.”



& T B DONALDSON

Commonwealth Bank asked
shareholders to approve the
creation of a $50 million pref-
erence share issue at its recent
annual general meeting
(AGM).

Mr Donaldson had said the
preference share issue was like-
ly to take the form of “five
tranches of $10 million each”.

Gh aNciNe The Way
is Does Bui:

siness!!




PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

Intensive traini



*

THE TRIBUNE

for



400 tourism workers

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Business Reporter

AMERICAN Express will
finance an intensive training
course for 400 workers in. the
Bahamas hotel industry, part
of a partnership with the
Bahamian Hotel Association
(BHA), the Caribbean Hotel
Association (CHA) and the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism.

Earle Bethell, the BHA’s

president, said the Association’

was most appreciative that
American Express and the
CHA chose the Bahamas as
one of the countries to benefit
from the programme.

This particular training
course has been offered in 14
countries for the past 23 years,
reaching some 600,000 service
workers. The Bahamas is. the
first English-speaking
Caribbean island to benefit
from the programme.

Mr Bethell said that given
the major tourism development
projects in the Family Islands,
the Bahamian workforce will
have to be expanded with

ounger workers. He said it was

- imperative that these workers

had the necessary and relevant
skills to work in these resorts.
Mr Bethell added that the
programme was consistent with
the BHA’s goals of strengthen-
ing the industry’s human
resource capability, as well as
providing members with activ-
ities to support the industry’s
development and profitability.
Sammy Gardiner, director of
training for the Ministry of

Tourism, said the Ministry was —

pleased that the training will
not just be a one-time thing,
but will include. opportunities
for enforcement and follow-up.
“Customer service is never
outdated,” he said.
Also attending yesterday’s

‘ tourism industry by teaching

- task they do, it should be done

Total Service: The Bahamas is

launch were Patricio Rubalca-
ba, the manager of destination
business for American Express
(AMEX), and Ivette Martinez,
CHA’s membership services
director and the administrator
of the programme.

Mr Rubalcaba said AMEX
sought to ensure that its clients
enjoyed their visits by promot-
ing the destination that, in turn,
maximises what the clients
spend. He said that in the past
there had been a very successful
collaboration between CHA
and his company.

Ms Martinez said the training
programme should elevate the
level of professionalism in the

workers that no matter what

with excellence.
The training programme,

Quality, will be offered in eight
sessions to workers on New
Providence, Grand Bahama
and Abaco between July 24-28.
Four sessions will be held in
Nassau, two in Grand Bahama
and two will take place in Aba-
co.

It will allow service workers
to focus on 10 principles: cus-
tomer needs, teamwork, mul-
ti-directional communication,
being actively ahead of needs,
effective handling of conflicts,
professional commitment,
empathetic thinking, postive
attitude, strong leadership and
‘total service culture.

It is expected that following
the initial pilot session, similar
sessions will be held to reach
more service workers through-

out the country. @ REPRESENTATIVES from American Express,
ment to deliver a series of customer service training workshops to the industry throu
Rubalcaba, American Express senior manager of destination Business for the Caribbean} Earle Bethell, president, Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation; and Ivette Martinez, membership services director an
Sammy Gardiner, senior director for education and training,
Bahamas Hotel Association; and Renee McKinney, chairperson for BHA’

Cable Beach Resorts.

In addition, there will be a
component called, Train the
‘Trainer, which will allow
Bahamians to teach the course.
‘The sessions are expected to be
sold out.

Vacant land, houses, rental propertics:
find whatever you're looking for in
The Tribune's Real Estate Guide.
The Tritume is my newspaper.”

MARIO CAREY
ESTATE AGENT, BAHAMAS REALTY





d project administrator,

the Caribbean Hotel Association and the Bahamas Hotel Association signed an agree-
ghout the Bahamas. Seated from L to R: Patricio

\



@ SHOWN (from left to right) are Marvin Johnson,
da Thompson, Ministry of Tourism,
sales and airport; Don Hunter, general manager airp

ager, Airport Authority.



Caribbean Hotel Association. Standing from right:
Ministry of Tourism; Bridget Murray, workforce development manager,
's Workforce Development Activities and director of training,



turn coordinator officer for Virgin Airways; Lin-
airlift department; Richard Ryan, Virgin Atlantic manager,
ort services, London; and John Nixon, duty man-

Virgin celebrates first

Nassau service birthday —

VIRGIN ATLANTIC AIR-
WAYS has celebrated the one-
year anniversary of its service
between the UK and the
Bahamas with the flight that
operated on June 26, 2006.

The event was marked by a
brief cake cutting celebration
at the former Nassau Interna-
tional Airport, now renamed
as the Sir Lynden Pindling

International Airport.
Islander

The VS 62 - The Islander
was the 52nd flight operated
on Virgin’s weekly service to
London, leaving every Mon-
day at 4.30 pin to Gatwick Air-
port. During the first year of
operation, Virgin boarded

12,366 passengers from the Sir
Lynden Pindling International
Airport.

Richard Ryan, Virgin
Atlantic Airways Manager not-
ed, “Virgin is extremely
pleased with the 100 per cent

_ operation of all flights.and the...

growing market of visitors
from the United Kingdom to
The Bahamas.



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THE TRIBUNE



Minister’s warning over

liberalisation hypocrisy

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

JAMES Smith, minister of
state for finance, said yesterday
it was “difficult” to understand
why the Bahamas and other
developing countries were being
pressured to open up all mar-
kets to foreign firms when
developed countries had previ-
ously protected their industries
from such competition.

‘In his address to the Trade
and Legal Aid Conference
staged by the Eugene Dupuch
Law School, Mr Smith said that
while countries were increas-
ifigly surrendered sovereignty
over economic policymaking to
bodies such as the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), no nation
. had ever experienced sustained
*. economic growth without gov-
ernment protection and subsi-
dies to certain industries.

Among those countries who
‘had protected their “infant

industries” from foreign com-

petition, and used this to mod-
ernise their economy, were the

US, UK, Japan, Germany and

South Korea.

Mr Smith said: “If we were to
accept those arguments, it is dif-
ficult to. comprehend why some
multilateral institutions are pres-
surising:developing countries to
dismantle all state-sponsored
protective mechanisms in order
to advance the cause of inter-
national. trade when they are
well aware that developed coun-
tries had used similar strategies
in their:formative years.’

This is similar to arguments
advanced by groups. such as

. Bahamians Agitating for a Ref-
erendum on Free Trade

(BARE), who have frequently

warned that by signing on to the

WTO and other trade. agree-

ments, ‘the ‘Bahamas could be

forced ‘to open up: previously
protected markets to foreign
competition, squeezing out

Bahamian-owned firms.

Mr Smith yesterday said small
nations such as the Bahamas



Bank of The B

INTERNATIONAL



@ FINANCE MINISTER
JAMES SMITH

were “at a distinct disadvan-
tage” when it came to interna-
tional trade participation.

If these countries sought eco-
nomic growth by widening and
deepening trade relationships,
they “would only be able to do
so by compromising significant
elements of'sovereignty”.

Mr Smith said: “For small
states, there is an inherent con-
flict between economic devel-
opment via international trade
and the preservation of sover-
eignty by the state. The extent
to which that.confiict or tension
could be mitigated is in fact a
measure of the efficacy of the
governing authority..........0....

“If we in the Bahamas were
to enter into any trade agree-
ments based on WTO standards,
we would most certainly have
to reform and restructure cer-
tain areas of our economy.

“In short, national economic

policies and programmes which
used to be designed, developed
and implemented by the sover-
eign state have now, in some
cases, been subordinated to the
policy prescriptions externally
imposed by the multilateral
institutions.”

Mr Smith said the Bahamas
needed to ensure that it would
be at least “no worse off”, if not

better off, by entering an inter-
national trade agreement rather
remaining on the outside.

He pointed out that if the

_ Bahamas became a WTO mem-

ber it would need to replace its
existing tax system, “a major
concession for a sovereign state

to surrender to the WTO .

process - its right to adopt any
tax system it chooses”.

In addition, trade disputes
with other nations and foreign
companies would have to be
resolved by the WTO’s dispute
settlement mechanisms, a
process that may no be common
to the Bahamas.

The Bahamas would need to
adjust its “laws and practices”

to meet the terms of trade

agreements and their rule-based
frameworks, usually based on
non-discriminatory principles
such as Most Favoured Nation
(MEN), National Treatment and
transparency.

Referring to the ‘blacklisting’
of the Bahamas’ financial ser-
vices industry in 2000 by the
Financial Action Task Force

(FATF) in 2000, Mr Smith said .

this was a clear case “of open
tension between the lawful pur-
suits of a small nation state and
the extraterritorial demands of
large developed states”.

He added that the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-Opera-
tion and Development’s
(OECD) ‘harmful tax practices’
project challenged a long-stand-
ing principle of international
law, namely. that a country’s
ability to tax is limited to those
taxes it can enforce without the
help of other states.

Mr Smith said more than 80
per cent of the world’s offshore
financial services were provided
by OECD states, which them-
selves were non-compliant with
the standards and information

éxchange they were trying them- .

selves to enforce.
He questioned why small
countries such as the Bahamas
would be willing to surrender
sovereignty to multilateral insti-



“ A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
CREDIT OFFICER - FREEPORT BRANCH

Â¥

¢ Prepare thorough credit proposals and maintain profitability of assigned

portfolio.

¢ Interview loan applicants and make considered decisions based on
investigations and assigned lending authority.
¢ Act as the “Relationship Manager” for assigned accounts by ensuring
that 11 of the customers needs are satisfied.
¢ Ensure all loans are granted in compliance with the Bank’s lending

policies and guidelines.

¢ Monitior and control loan portfolios to avoid delinquency.
I © Perform constant follow-up on delinquent loan accounts.
| ¢ Ensure loan and security files are completed and properly maintained.
° Constantly i increase lending by marketing the Bank’s products and

services.

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

* Associates Degree in relevant area (e.g. Accounting/Business
Administration/Finance)
¢ Three to five years banking and lending experience

¢ Excellent interpersonal and communication skills

¢ Strong negotiation, and analytical and organizational skills
° Computer literate-Ability to use MS Word and Excel

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life
insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later that July 21st 2006 to:

The Senior Manager, Human Resources & Training
Bank of The Bahamas International
P.O. Box N-7118

Na assau, Bahamas





FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 3B




MUS CS UT RUC ale

read Insight on Mondays

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE ORCHID LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

tutions after experiencing cases
such as the ‘blacklisting’.

Mr Smith said countries chose
this route because they either
saw international trade as the
route to economic growth and
development, or because they
were forced and pressured to
do so by institutions such as the
World Bank, International
Monetary Fund and the Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB).

Loan agreements from these
institutions, Mr Smith said, were
sometimes conditioned on coun-
tries liberalising their economies
and markets, allowing the free
flow of capital, and possibly pri-
vatising and cutting public sector

benefits.

Date Stolen: between 11:00 p.m. on May 18, aN and 6:00
a.m. on May 19, 2006 |

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act. No. 45 of 2000, BLUE ORCHID |
LTD., is in dissolution as of JULY 5th, 2006. |

International Liquidator Services Inc., situated at
35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, |
Belize is the Liquidator. :













Location of Theft: The Cove, Gregory Town, Eleuthera

Description: 1998 32 ft. White & Blue Intrepid with two
250 hp Yamaha Outboard Engine

Registration#: n/a





Name of Vessels n/a




A reward of $5, 000 i is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.

Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962

Sea 6p ced ORE! RR RCRD... ep erenceeTtes tt Re apy rat

ee Sg
ae Ree nt,

er
=

> PP fe rte tate

Owe WRAL SG eet

ee
a

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Tora POR,

or
tee
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE



SS ae eee eee
shes Bahamas resort deal

VENTURES PORTFOLIO

cum. on =| tuUNS into difficulties

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

: : FROM page 1B Bahamian projects.” The island also fitted into the company’s

: PuSuan - section 137 @) : E me International pag Mr Rego added then that his compa- philosophy of sustainable eco-tourism.
Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is hereby given tennis courts and 75 marina slips. The __ ny’s “reciprocal use type of membership” The only facilities currently open on
that the voluntary winding-up and dissolution of the hotel is 50 feet above sea level. would ensure that Walker’s Cay would Walker’s Cay are the Customs and Immi-

Company commenced on the 26th day of June, 2006 and Michael Redd, of Michael Redd & _ receive a consistent, year-round flow of gration post, plus the utilities plant that
: 6G Associates,‘the company that would be _ business once the development was com- supplies nearby Grand Cay with power

that Bernard Schmutz, 12 rue Verdaine, CH - 1206 Geneva responsible for masterplanning the Walk- _ pleted and re-opened. and water.
has been appointed Liquidator. er’s Cay development on Cay Clubs He said Cay Clubs Resorts & Marinas Cay Clubs & Marinas owns and oper-
Resorts & Marinas behalf, said back in _ had selected Walker’s Cay as the site ofits | ates resort and marina properties through-

. February: “Walker’s is definitely one of _ first international expansion due to its out the Florida Keys, Clearwater, Sara- ~
Dated this 26th day of June, 2006 the rare jewels in the Bahamas chain of _ proximity to the US, “ease of doing busi- _ sota and Las Veen It develops water-
islands. This will be one of the truly unique _ ness and ability to develop the project”. _ front style living and communities.

Bernard Schmutz

a Radisson work to close 330 rooms

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE



British Colonial Hilton. will still be strong with the seen as the slow period for the
FROM page 1B - Michael Hooper, general _ hotel expected to have an aver- Bahamian hotel industry, the

terday that while bookings for 90 per cent in July and 78 per stronger numbers because it.

ine Another hotel reporting on _ the summer season were slight- cent in August. : _ the time that more families
its summer rates was the _ ly down from last year, they Mr Hooper said that while tended to take their vacations

TRUFFLEY INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD. those numbers were not bad, _. with school out.
(In Voluntary Liquidation) they were below the strong Mr Hooper said the slower

showing the Hilton posted in season was now during Sep-
the first six months of the year. | tember and October, the peri-
se hm, LY : He added that while in the od that is in the thick of hurri-
Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company past the summer season was__cane season.
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 22nd day
of February 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,

P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.








PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is advised that, | DIANDRA SANTANA
SAUNDERS of Sapote Street, Pinewood Gardens, Nassau,
The Bahamas intend to change my name to D’ANDRA
| SANTANA SAUNDERS. If there are any objections to this
change.of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-3746, Nassau,
Bahamas, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.

=) ia

EVERYTHING
in our FAB!
To tiLae) at :
Located in the Lyford Cay Shopping Center.
Sale hours: 10am-4pm
Monday - Saturday

- ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) :





LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

HACKBERRY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)



NOTICE

Paribas Asset Management Ltd
(known as PAM Bahamas in the UK)

Notice is hereby given that the above-names Company
is in dissoluton, which commenced on the 5th day of
July 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box
N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 249(2) of the |
Companies Act, 1992 that a final meeting of the Shareholders of
the above named Company will be held at the offices of KPMG, 5%
Floor Montague Sterling Centre, East Bay Street.on August 8, 2006,
Nassau, Bahamas at 10:00 O'clock in the forenoon for the purpose
of the Joint Liquidators submitting an account showing the manner
in which the winding-up of the Company has been conducted and
the property of the Company disposed of, and to hear any explanation
that may be given by the Joint Liquidators.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. .
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROBERT JOSEPH OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. le

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL EMMANUEL
FORBES OF COOPERS TOWN, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given ttiat SHAELLYS JOSEPH P.O. Box:
N-7060,Oxford Ave off of Market St South, Nassau,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 7TH day of JULY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

y é « : YTD% Last 12 Months

; : a. i Colina Money Market Fund 1.295645"
NOTICE is hereby given that JAHMAL ANWAR KEVIN : Fidelity Bahamas G &|Fund 2.78564 ***
DANIELS, 104 Washington Street, P.O.BOX N-10711, collie Mee teers ete
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible ; a CLOSE 668.19 / YTD 21.08% / 2008"
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price















Dated this 6th day of July, 2006

Mr. Juan M. Lopez Mr. Simon J.S. Townend
Joint Liquidator Joint Liquidator




















mae €olina a)
— Financial Advisors Ltd.





BIS

Pricing‘ Information As Of:

52wk-Low
Abaco Markets ~
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Hc ‘lings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs



Premier Real Estate iat nO schoo 5.85%
Last Price Weekly Vol P/E Yield
Bahamas Supermarkets 1.923 0.720
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 3 - . 0.000 0.640
CNL
-000 4
0.360 8.0












it] - 4 rvi: v. 52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in fast 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows 52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 30 June 2006
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the — o - eater says otra Va daily volume Ny ve alle volume of eee fe Bra gid ** 31 May 2006

az . at ale | ie ange in closing price from da’ oO day 7 company’s reported eam ir share 6 las’ mths

facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of JULY, Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** 30 April 2006
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful ‘
Citizensh i p, P oO Box N = 7 4 47, iN assau : Bah amas P/E - Closing price divided by the lest Z month: eamings re FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 31 May 2006

MORE |





manager, told The Tribune yes- age occupancy level of around — summer now tends to bringin |
THE TRIBUNE

4

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 5B



Lo - eae eee eee

ahamas investors
put $23bn into US

- FROM page 1B

cles held more than $23 billion
worth of US debt and equity
securities as at June 30, with
this national and other
Caribbean financial services
centres accounting for a com-
bined 62 per cent of all such
investment by the entire

-. Americas region.

The US Treasury Depart-
-ment’s report on foreign hold-

ings of US securities as at June
30, 2005, showed that
Bahamas-registered entities
had invested almost $23.5 bil-
lion in short and long-term
equity and debt instruments,
illustrating the important role
this nation and other interna-
tional financial centres play in
the US capital markets.

» As at June 30, 2005, almost

$22 billion in long-term US
securities was held in the
Bahamas, a slight drop on the



previous year’s $23 billion. Out
of that amount, over half -
some $12 billion - was in the
form of common stock or oth-
er equities.

However, Bahamas-based
holdings of long-term debt
securities, such as US Treasury

‘debt and asset-backed securi-

ties issued by other US gov-
ernment departments and cor-
porations, fell from $10 billion
to $9 billion between June 30,
2004, and June 30, 2005.

As for short-term securities,
Bahamas-based investment
vehicles had reduced their
holdings over the same period
from $1.745 billion to $1.517
billion. Most of the short-term
holdings are US Treasury debt.

The size of the role played
by the Bahamas and other
Caribbean nations in the US
capital markets is best illus-
trated by the lead they take in
investment in US-issued secu-
rities for the Americas region.

Investment in US securities
that is channelled through
Caribbean financial centres,
including the Bahamas, has
grown from $341 billion in
March 2000 to $472 billion in
June 2003 and $607 billion at
June 2004, reaching $715 bil-
lion in June 2005.

The total investment in US
securities by the Americas
region at June 30, 2005, was
$1,155 billion.

The US Treasury report
said: “Of these American
region countries, the Bahamas,
Bermuda, the British Virgin
Islands, the Cayman Islands,
Netherlands Antilles and
Panama - referred to collec-
tively as the Caribbean finan-
cial centres - serve as major
financial centres through which
investments of residents from

other countries are channelled...

As a group, these financial cen-
tre countries accounted for
$715 billion, 62 per cent, of all
investment attributed to the
Americas region.”

The role played by
Bahamas-domiciled invest-
ment in the US economy and
capital markets is also possi-
bly this nation’s greatest
defence against further attacks

Date Stolen: between 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, 18 May,
2006 and 6:50 a.m. on Friday, May 19, 2006

Location of Theft: San Marino Marina, Paradise Island

Description: 1991 17 ft. White Boston Whaler with 115
hp Yamaha Outboard Engine

Registration#: N 08607

Name of Vessel: “Sea Bee”

A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information
leading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest and
prosecution of the culprits.

Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962



by the Organisation for Eco-
nomic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) and
the Financial Action Task
Force (FATF).

’ Any further destabilisation .

of the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry by initiatives
such as the OECD’s ‘harmful
tax practices’ could damage the
inward investment upon which
large portions of the US econ-
omy thrive.

Yesim Yilmaz, a research
fellow with a leading US-based
opponent of the OECD, the
Centre for Freedom and Pros-
perity, drew on this theme to
explain why low-tax jurisdic-
tions should be left alone, argu-
ing that they contributed to
“the long-term success of the
US economy”.

Data showed that the
Bahamas and other Caribbean

financial centres had helped

channel more than $1.3 trillion
in investment into the US
economy.at March 2006, based
on the liabilities the US bank-
ing system and capital markets
owed to these nations.

Mr Yilmaz said low-tax juris-
dictions placed competitive
pressures on the US to ensure
its federal and state tax sys-
tems were not too onerous,

with these disciplines generat-

ing “more benefits than costs
for America”.

He described the US as the
world’s largest repository of
foreign capital, standing at
some $11 trillion, with some
$7 trillion of this financial
investment. ;

Mr Yilmaz said: “Losing
some or all of this capital to
other tax havens, which would
happen if the US ceased its
favourable tax treatment of
foreigners, would have signifi-
cant. negative impact on the

US growth and employment.”

THE BAHAMAS PUBLIC SER











NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDRE ETIENNE OF DELANCY
STREET OF NASSAU STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONIQUE GUE OF MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TECHLER ST FORT OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. Sern:













LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TNC HOLDING INC.

NOTICE ‘is hereby given that in accordance with.
Section 137(6) of the International Business
Companies Act of 2000 (No. 45 of 2000) TNC
HOLDINGS INC. is in Dissolution. The date of
commencement of dissolution. was the Ist day of
May, 2006. CUTELL MILLER, of Nassau, Bahamas
is the Liquidator of TNC HOLDING INC.

CUTELL MILLER
Liquidator

NOTICE

TO ALL MEMBERS

OF
E

UNION

Please be advised that as a result of aSPECIAL
CALL GENERAL MEETING held on
Thursday, 22nd June 7:30 p.m. at the Bahamas
Public Services Union (BPSU) meeting hall
situated on East Street South, in New Providence,
a Resolution was passed and resolved for the
“Increase of Union Membership Dues”. The
clear call of the resoulution says:-

“RESOLVED, that the voting members of the
Special Call Meeting instructs and mandates
President, John Pinder and Executive Officers
of the BPSU to increase its Union general
membership dues from Fifteen Dollars ($15.00)
per month to Twenty-five Dollars ($25.00)
effective Ist July”.

All members of the BPSU, are hereby informed
that effective 1st July, 2006 the increase will be
realized and the new reduction rates will be

honoured.


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 THE TRIBUNE






BUSINESS a : oe

Tobacco ruling could lead
to thousandsCopyrighted Materialtits
coe» NOTICE... —™ Syndicated Content

HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/

naturalization should not be granted, should send a written Z : i
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MCKENZIE GAY OF MARSH
‘HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 7TH day of JULY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Oe
*

+
ee Fa 3 4a

















LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

POBEDA INC.







Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137(8) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, the dissolution of POBEDA INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.









The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

} neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for-improvements in the
area or have won an












ARGOSA CORP IN( : “1 If so, call us on 322-1986
(Liquidator) -and share your story.



CUSTOMER SERVICES OFFICER

Duties: | Candidate must be able to provide exceptional
customer services including but not limited to:
meeting and communicating with customers; _
accurate and timely processing of customer

- transactions; monitoring of transactions for

cot ait ot eS
Ue oe Pe

A Se ge 8 >. Bae oe cae LF 3

potential money laundering and deputizing for ‘

Department Head whilst the latter is absent on ie

leave. — c *
Requirements: a

3 Bed/ 2 Bath Residence 2,854 sq ft situated on 1.85 acres
Located Queens Highway, Nicholls Town, North Andros.

2 Ooo & w-
CBE eS

¢ BA degree in Business or Finance

“ee +



¢ A minimum of five years Customers Services For conditions of the sale and any other information, please contact: a
experience within the Financial Services industry The Commercial Credit Collection Unit ‘sy
aConmercial Orientation at: 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas *:
+ Excellent Communication Skills (Written and verba ee a et ee ames, |
e Excellent Organizational Skills to reach us before July 21° 2006. oe
¢ Excellent Interpersonal Skills oe 3 ae
¢ Computer Literate (MS Office) oe
¢ Working knowledge of Money Laundering and 3 oe
Financial Transaction laws and regulations oO . IC [Ee st



¢ A Team Player

Date Stolen: night of June 12, 2006 and early hours of June
13, 2006

$e 8 ©
See se >



+e © e

Fringe Benefits include:

* eva
4 28%



ogg

Location of Theft: San Marino Marina, Paradise Island




¢ Life and Health coverage |
¢ Pension

Description: 2002 19 ft. White Boston Whaler with 2002
150 hp Yamaha Outboard Engine



Interested persons should submit their Resume along with a
police Certificate and two (2) Character References to:




Registration#: N 09181



Manager Human Resources



Name of Vessel: “Tender To Trixsea”’




HSBC
P.O.Box N-4917 : ( ;
o A reward of $5,000 is being offered for any information § :.
Nassau, Bahamas ie told Pith cen i, : qa:
Fax: 502-2566/2577 eading to the recovery of the vessel or the arrest an ‘
prosecution of the culprits.
Application Deadline: Friday, 07 July 2006 a

Please call 919, 326-1449 or 328-4962


THE TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006, PAGE 7B



BUSINESS -
ORC ee Me en ea MRS Esp

S t< ~~ ks _ | n d 7 . a Se just call Ta Ue VENTE

higher ahead

ry ay :
( ) c ) hs ad © i t . i MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
. ‘ ‘ THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
| CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)

(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2002

' —_ The public is advised that prices as shown in the schedule for DIESEL
OIL sold by FOCOL will become effective on Friday, July 7, 2006. .

SCHEDULE

Maximum Wholesale Selling | Maximum |
Price Per U.S. Gallon

Copyrighted Material a
Syndicated Content -

$
FREEPORT
FREEPORT OIL}, Diesel Oil

Available from Commercial News Providers }//="="

HARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY









TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE

STANFORD 20*«20

TUESDAY 11 JULY |

3pm @ St. Maarten vs USVI (Match 1)
7pm @ Bahamas vs Cayman (Match 2)



WEDNESDAY 12 JULY
7pm ¢ BVI vs St. Lucia (Match 3)

FRIDAY 14 JULY
3pm ® Grenada vs Dominica (Match 4)
7pm ® St. Kitts vs Nevis (Match 5)



















Bee coe





TUESDAY 18 JULY

3pm ¢ St. Vincent vs Winner Match 1 (Match 6)
7pm ¢ Barbados vs Anguilla (Match 7)



WEDNESDAY 19 JULY
7pm © Antigua vs Winner Match 3 (Match 8)

FRIDAY 21 JULY

3pm ¢ Guyana vs Montserrat (Match 9)
7pm ¢ Jamaica vs Bermuda (Match 10)





TUESDAY 25 JULY
7pm e Trinidad vs Winner Match 2 (Match 11)

WEDNESDAY 26 JULY

3pm ¢ Winner Match 6 vs Winner Match 4 (Match 12)
7pm e@ Winner Match 8 vs Winner Match 5 (Match 13)

FRIDAY 28 JULY
; 3 3pm e Winner Match 11 vs Winner Match 7 (Match 14)

(ella 7pm ¢ Winner Match 10 vs Winner Match 9 (Match 15)
AIRLINES ;

FRIDAY 11 AUGUST (SEMIFINALS)








OFFICIAL AIRLINES OF THE





STANFORD 20420 TOURNAMENT 3pm e Winner Match 12 vs Winner Match 15 (Match 16)
LY 7pm ¢ Winner Match 13 vs Winner Match 14 (Match 17)
[eibbeanftar SUNDAY 13 AUGUST (FINAL)
7pm e Final Match

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Pe SciC MUR acta Rigel ina eta yeti peels a geen I 0i) Crean cen ord, Crepe LVeee ates
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, JULY 7,, 2006




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ACROSS
















, Yesterday's cryptic solutions

ACROSS: 1, Co-a-sts 7, Morpheus 8, Hero 10, Sea dog 11,
Grouse 14, Red 16, Taper 17, Dyes 19, Molar 21, Co-L-in
22, Table 23, Be-NT 26, Strip 28, Sag 29,

T-a-ims 30, Jingle 31, Arts 32, Pro-posed 33, Eamed
DOWN: 1, Ca-use-d 2, SWE-Des 3, Smog 4, Sp-art-an 5,
Get-up 6, U-she-r 8, Hare 9, R-od 12, Oar 13, Seven 15,
Jolly 18, Yal-ta 19, Mob 20, Lie 21, Capt.-I-on 22, Tin 23,
Ba-NT-er 24, E-GG-S 25, The Med 26, Steps 27, Ri-p-on
28, Sir 30, Ja-de



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

: DOWN
4 — Colour of father's phone (6) 1 Proclamation not usually cited (5)
7 _ How hogs do me wrong (at 2 — Looks round at exceptional legs (5)
Battersea?) (4,4) 3 Terrible tosh got rid of (4)
8 _Licentiously, a London flower? (6) 4 Borough boy? (5)
10 Fit for expansion, perhaps, in 5 Mark derives nothing from an
Hpoester 6 erent Ha over two
13 In the army, you leam (4) legs (6)
44 A trying game? (4) 9 The two are pertactly matched (6)
45 Have a fing? (4) 11 Border of the British Empirel (3)
2@ You won't find him in Rotherham (3) 12 It won't back you up at
17 It's offen hot in Provence (4) the bar (5)
49 The one in the forefront is 13 The centurion’s lot (7)
conceited (4) 15 shen oe of “stag”:
: a
AE: No end of axtace of ty be 16 fe nae fashion centre really
80 jumpy (9) exists (3) .
23 Regimental animal? (4) 18 The Romans thought him supremely
24 = Anartist's hotheaded and fiery (6)
‘impetuous (4) 20 A female starting nervously, looking
26 Negation of the number at the end pale (6)
of the street (3) 21 An exceptional word? (3)
27 Number of workers possibly cut? (4) = nie eels o'r peck
28 What the villain has to be (4) ing? . 2 -
32 She's of assistance to many (4) 25 Cover with figures (3)
33 Nota nice thing to be when there's a 28 Elevated land good to uw
Pole in the team (5) ride around (5) N
34 Guard against being badly fed on 30 Clear suggestion that twice six is N
purpose (6) over 500! (5) ra
36 Such girs are well behaved only for 31 Be honest with a woman in her >
a while (4,4) fies! (5) wo”
36 Equally certain to give 32 a a a uniform choice i -
confidence (6) 33 Ateam to team up with! (4)

Yesterday’s easy solutions

ACROSS: 1, Goblet 7, Opposite 8, Pain 10, Trance
11, Waiter 14, Nee 16, Board 17, Sped 19, Robin
21, Bidet 22, Moped 23, Plea 26, Miser 28, See 29,
Elated 30, Serene 31, Task 32, Ambrosia 33,
Rename

DOWN: 1, Grates 2, Loaned 3, Tone 4, Cohabit 5,
Vista 6, Beard 8, Pane 9, Ice 12, fon 13, Erode
15,Rodeo 18, Peril 19, Rip 20, Bed 21, Boredom

22, Met 23, Person 24, Leek 25, Avenue 26, Medal 27,

Samba 28, Sea 30, Star










-<



ACROSS

4
7
8
10
13
14
15
16
17
19
21
23
24
26
27
29
32
33
34
35
36

Influence (6)
Assailant (8)
Grit (6)
Wrong (5)
Entrance (4)

~ Hollow (4)

Canvas shelter (4)
Afflict (3)

Particle (4)

Shade (4)
Obvious (9)

Layer (4)

Blood (4)

Deceive (3)

Poke (4)

Heavy walk (4)
Amphibian (4)
Weight (5)
Gambol (6)
Bear (8)
Tennis shot (6)

COMICS PAGE

——
= —_

Material

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

<

-

>

roviders





You are South, both sides vulner-
able. The bidding has been:

East South West North
Pass Pass Pass 1¢
Pass 22

What would you bid with each of
the following hands?

14@]29 4 @ AQIS & KI963

2. @ Q95 ¥ J104 % 8 & AK9854

3. #KJ4 ¥ AJ6 3763 & Q85

4.9J7Â¥ AQ962 QI843 & 7

kak

1. Three diamonds. Many of the
hard-and-fast principles that govern
responses to an opening bid do not
apply after a player has passed origi-
nally. Thus, while a two-club
response to one diamond ‘would be
unconditionally forcing without a
previous pass, the same response
would not be forcing here after your
initial pass.

The reason is obvious. The opener
is frequently in a position to judge
that game is virtually impossible
once partner has passed. Usually, it
takes the equivalent of two opening
bids to make a game, so if opener has
minimal values, he might elect to
pass: what would normally be
regarded as a forcing bid by ae
unpassed hand. ...

The recommended jump to thse
diamonds shows good trump support

Bidding Quiz

and values just short of an opening .

bid. It urges but does not command
partner to bid again.
2. Two clubs. There is some temp-

tation to respond three clubs to show |

your near-opening-bid values, but it
is better to proceed slowly in hands
where a trump fit is not yet estab-
lished. Two clubs shows at least 10
points — passed hand or not — and
is therefore a constructive response.
3. Two notrump. Ordinarily, two

" notrump would promise a balanced

hand of 13 to 15 points and be fore-
ing to game, but after an initial pass,
the range is 11 or 12. Opener is thus

free to pass whenever his hand indi-

cates that that would be the right
thing to do.

4. Two hearts. Most hands change
in value as the bidding progresses.
Not many players would regard this
hand as worth an‘ opening bid, but
once partner opens with a diamond,
the hand increases greatly in value
and assumes the stature of an open-
ing bid.

The best way of describing such
values is by a jump-shift, indicating a
strong suit and implying a fit for
opener’s suit. Partner is thus warned
that if he passes two hearts — which
he may do in an extremely rare case

— he is running the risk of losing a,

game in either hearts or diamonds.

TARGET



HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe
permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkjet in inkjet printer).

"TODAY'S TARGET

Good 12; very good 18; excellent 24 (or more).

Solution Monday.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

cent centre cruet cure current cute enter
erect: neuter recent recur RECURRENT rent
‘- return rune teen tenure tern tree truce true

tune tuner turner





























































Cold dish (5)
Blemish (5)
Performs (4)
Gas (5)
Dread (4)
Believe (6)
Cad (6)
Males (3)
Look fixedly (5)
Minor deity (7)
Male cat (3)
Insect (3)
Lethargy (6)
Useless (5)

Metal

fastener (3)
Signal assent (3)
Salad plant (6)
Professor (3)
Bad-tempered (5)
Neighbouring (5)
Dissuade (5)
Work (4)
Casserole (4)





Loek van Wely v Lucas Brunner,
Biel 1997. They call the number—
one Netherlands grandmaster
"King Loek", a reference not only
to his fine play but to his height
of over two metres. For some
reason Dutch GMs have often
been tall. When their team led
by ex-world champion Max
Euwe visited London for an
England v Holland match, you
had the impression you were
facing a squad of high jumpers.
Both Euwe and his successor Jan
Timman reached the
international super-elite, so van
Wely naturally has the same
ambition, but so far the top
30-40 GMs has been his fimit.
Here material is level with
queens, rooks and bishops on an
open board. It took just one turn
for King Loek to force



FRIDAY,

JULY 6
ARIES -— Mar 21/Apr 20

There’s no time like the present to get I

your finances on track. Take a day to |

sit down and go through your check-
book ‘and assess your income and

expenditures. You’ll be glad you did.

TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

How much fun you have this week

depends upon your outlook, Taurus. If.

you act glumly, you’re certain to have
a miserable few days. Keep your chin
up instead.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

The next few days will be unevent-
ful, Gemini. Use the time to catch ‘up
on some chores you’ve let slide? If
you were planning a vacation, now’s
the time to devote your attention to it.

CANCER - Juin 22/Jul 22

A health scare ‘leaves you feeling
shaken. Don’t worry, it is nothing
serious, and you'll recover rather
quickly. Aquarius lends support dur-
ing these trying times.

LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23

A fight with a family member is
something unavoidable. You’ve been

you can no longer hold your tongue,
Leo. Don’t worry; it’s justified. . ~

| VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
_] Stop going above and beyond to

please everyone, Virgo. You do.

enough already, and family and.
friends certainly know it. Pamper
‘| yourself for a change. ‘

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23. 2°"

Don’t keep secrets from family *
members. It will only put you in hot
water, Libra. Confide your feelings.

to-a friend in order to get advice on _

how you should proceed.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22.

A quick temper will get you in trou-
ble, Scorpio. Don’t lash out with °
your venom. Rather, think cool and
calmly on the best way’ to handle+
tricky situations.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 2,
A blast from the past has you feel-

.clashing for a long time now, ’and.”

ing shaken, Sagittarius. This per- ,

son knows about all of your skele--
tons in the closet. Keep an eye on’
him and his motives.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan. 20°
Don’t expect all of your plans ‘to’
go off without a hitch this week, ,
Capricorn. Something is bound to go
awry when you least expect it. You’ N
rebound quickly, however.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18
It’s time to get motivated on your fit- -
ness plan, Aquarius. Leo offers’a’
helping hand to get you started.”
Don’t pass up the opportunity ¢ ‘to,
make fitness a team effort. _
PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20,
A scammer is looking to take advan-
tage of you, Pisces. You'll certainly
recognize all of the signs of wrong-”
doing when they present themselves." 1

resignation. What happened? LEONARD BARDEN
PUZZLE SOLUTIONS
“sajew pue 1890 £ 80 +920) 7 SPXY 20 “IEW

992 SPION “SuBtSOy j+ GPa I LTB ORME S52)

4
TRIBUNE SPORTS




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charge of final



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‘years of frustration out on Italy

== - -—_— ~
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PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006 | TRIBUNE SPORTS
SS SS SSS SS SSS SSS




@ TRACK AND FIELD ,
By KELSIE JOHNSON “oy
Junior Sports Reporter: 7. ei ate

WITH a Golden League win already under e
her belt, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie is the only
Bahamian still in the running for the $1, million
jackpot.

This is the third consecutive year a Bahamian
will contend for the title. ue!

Ferguson-McKenzie is leading the way in the. *
IAAF Golden League’s 100m dash with her as
June 2nd victory. ee

The second leg of the six race series will take’ Y
place on Saturday — the Meeting Gaz de France: ' «
Paris Saint-Denis, in Paris, France. The other‘.
meets are set for July 14th, August 18th and n.
25th August, with the last race on September 3rd.

So far, Ferguson-McKenzie has clocked a sea*. *,
son’s best of 11.14 seconds, on Sunday she ran
11.17 seconds in the Athens Super Grand Prix.”

The time by Ferguson-McKenzie landed her in | +
the second spot behind Torri Edwards of the
US. Edwards won in a time of 11.14 seconds." -

Sunday’s race was not a part of the six races, -
for the IAAF Golden League jackpot. eo

Lining up for Saturday’s race will be Me’Lisa’ | -
Barber, Edwards, Marion Jones, Sherone Simp=" *,
son, Lauryn Williams, Kim Gevaert, Marshe:: _
vat Hooker and Fabienne Beret-Martinel. :

Also participating in the meet will be Christine .
Amertil, in the women’s 400m. :

Leading the way for the IAAF Goldén; -*
League jackpot in the 400m is Sanya Richards of: *
the USA.

Richards is also leading the event in the world
rankings with a score of 1400. :

Competing in the 400m will be Svetlana
Pospelova, Shericka Williams, Natalia Antyukh,
Amertil, Richards, Ana Guevara, DeeDee Trot,
ter and Vanya Stambolova.









i DEBBIE FERGUSON-MCKENZIE



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FRIDAY, JULY 7, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

CPTI Teeth

for ‘Peace

on da Streets’

@ BASKETBALL
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter _



FOR basketball players, summer
months are by no means a vacation.
Rather it is a season of strict train-
ing regiments and playing in a myri-
ad of tournaments and summer
leagues.

No other summer tournament in
the Bahamas has garnered more
prestige and acclaim than the Nel- °
son Cooper “Peace on da Streets”
Basketball Classic. ;

The 11th Annual edition of the
classic will take place on July 15th
and 22nd at the Kendal Issacs Gym-
nasium, featuring some of the best
local talent throughout the country.

President of Youth Against Vio-
lence Carlos Reid said the tourna-
ment has grown exponentially each
year since its inception and it he
expects the same this year.

“We have some good new teams
coming out, we have.a lot of college
players coming back to compete
and everyone is excited about this
tournament, we believe this is going
to continue to be what it has been in
the past, a venue for young people
to showcase their talent, especially
in the summer months,” he said.
“The whole concept of the tourna-
ment has always been to bring hope
to the hopeless, a lot of our young
people are hopeless, and what we
want to do is to channel their ener-
gy into doing positive things.” .,

In addition to the tournament’s
usual attractions including the
junior division, senior division, slam
dunk contest, three point shoot-out,
and media game, this year’s tourna-
ment will feature a ladies division.

“We are implementing a girls
division which is brand new tous,”
he said. “What we’re trying to do is
to reach out to a lot of our females.
In the past we have always associat-
ed violence with young boys, and
have overlooked the girls, but now
we are seeing more girls emerge in
that lifestyle.

Reid said this year’s tournament
will host a number of collegiate
coaches from the United States
seeking young talent and possibly
creating educational opportunities
for much of the youth with little
exposure.

“We have some college coaches
that will be coming in, hopefully
they getalook atsome ofour .
young people and ideally they may
be able to offer them some scholar-
ships so they can go on to further
their education.” he said. “That
‘would be a major plus for us,
because we have found that many
of our young people have talent,
but they are forced to grow up in
dysfunctional environments, if we
can hope to maybe a small few we
can bring about a perpetual harvest
for the country where these young
people get an opportunity to go off
to school and come back with their
degrees, find good employment and
inspire other young people.”

Last year’s winners in both the
senior and junior divisions, the Real
Deal Shockers and the Sunshine
Auto Ruff Riders will be returning
to action to defend their crowns.

Reid says.plans for future tourna-
ments include hosting teams from
the Family Islands to truly make it a
national event.

Winners in each category will
receive cash prizes and fans will
become involved in the action as a
number of door prizes will be
awarded, including round ‘zip tick-
ets for two from Bahamasair.

HORAN



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



B TENNIS

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE run for Mark Knowles and
Martina Navratilova came to a
screeching halt in the third round
of the mixed doubles at Wimbledon
2006.

But two days after an historic vic-
tory, Knowles and Daniel Nestor
are hoping to continue their impres-
sive run in the men’s doubles today
in London, England.

They’re scheduled to face the top
seeded team of American twin
brothers Bob and Mike Bryan in

_ the semifinals. If they win, they will

advance to their third shot at win-
ning their first Wimbledon Grand
Slam title.

“We’ve had a storied rivalry hav-
ing played numerous times,” said
Knowles, reflecting on the fact that
he and Nestor have beaten the
Bryan brothers in the previous two
meetings they had so far this year.

“We feel pretty good going in.
They are the top team, but we have
to go out there and play well. It just
comes down to execution. It will
come down to who executes on the
day. We just have to go out there
and play inspired tennis.”

Basking

Knowles and Nestor are still bask-
ing in their six-hour, nine-minute
marathon five set victory over the
No.8 seeded team of Todd Perry of
Australia and Simon Aspelin of
Sweden that lasted for two days.

The two teams were tied at 11-11
in the fifth set when the match was
suspended because of darkness. Up
to that point, they had already
played more than four hours.

“It-was a dog fight. More than
physically, it was a tough match
mentally,” Knowles declared. “But
mentally, being out there for so long
on grass, it’s a big difference
between winning and losing. You
just have to be so solid.”

Knowles and Nestor eventually
won 23-21 in the fifth to produce
both the longest men’s doubles
match and the longest match ever
played at Wimbledon.

In their mixed doubles, Knowles
admitted that he and Navratilova,

‘seeded No.8, were simply outplayed,

losing in two straight sets 7-5, 6-1 to
the No.9 team of Andy Ram of
Israel and Vera Zvonareva of Rus-
sia.

Cruised

Up 5-3 in the first set, Knowles
said they couldn’t close it out as
Ram and Zvonareva picked up their
game another level and cruised toa
come-from-behind victory.

But, with the momentum on their

side, Ram and Zvonareva out- |

played Knowles and Navratilova in
every facet of the game in the sec-
ond set to secure the match.

“Tt was an uphill climb, but I
think we just lost to a better team
today,” Knowles pointed out. “I’ve
been playing a lot of tennis over the
last two days, so J think it may have
had an effect.”

Despite the loss, Knowles said he

NN Nk Et HENNA TENM HAMAR MANAHYNHHANNAHHAN HAHA

a

‘was delighted to have been team-

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Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers



































































ing up with the legendary Navratilo-
va, but he said he would have
remembered the experience a lot
more had they advanced further
into the draw.

Nestor teamed up with Elena
Likhovtseva of Russia, but they
were also ousted in the quarter-
final, which according to Knowles, is
good because now they can concen-
trate solely on winning the men’s
doubles title.

“We still like to win, even if it’s
mixed doubles, but we now only
have the men’s doubles, so we don’t
have anything else to play for, but
to go out there and give it 110 per
cent,” Knowles pointed out.

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