Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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oF ms









& STEAMY

Dr Nottage reveals

children are part of |

‘alarming’ statistic

@ By ROYANNE

FORBES-DARVILLE

‘CHILDREN as young as 10
years old are becoming a part of
the “alarming” statistic of drug
abusers, Health Minister, Sena-

tor Dr Bernard Nottage.

revealed yesterday.

Citing another disturbing
trend, he explained that as with
HIV/AIDS infection, young
females are becoming the
fastest growing number of drug
abusers.

“Bed capacity at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, has
increased due to these drug
related problems,” said the
health minister, who was a
keynote speaker at the official
opening ceremony for the
National Anti-Drug Secretari-
at, (NADS) at the Church
House complex on East Hill
Street, formerly the old Angli-
can administrative building.

The National Anti-Drug Sec-

-retariat seeks to coordinate anti-

drug strategies, efforts and ini-
tiatives in the country, and is
responsible for the develop-
ment, management and opera-

‘tion of the five year ( 2004 -

2009) National Anti-Drug Plan,
(NADP).

The newly formed body will
be responsible for evaluating
the effectiveness of the NADP;
developing, operating and main-
taining national observatory-
statistical information; coordi-

nating drug questionnaires, to .

provide a national report on
drugs and accessing interna-

.tional donors for project sup-

port and institutional building.

The National Anti-Drug sec-
retariat will also partner with
the Heads of Law Enforcement
Agencies (HONLEA) , the
National Drug Advisory Con-
ference (NDAG).. and,other
stakeholders.

Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt, who is responsible
for national security, explained

that it is important for the

Bahamas to continue to wage
an aggressive campaign against
illegal drugs, both the trafficking
and consumption.

“The consumption of mari-
juana is on the increase and
cocaine, though far below the
epidemic level of the 1980s, may

be stabilizing, but is available

for chronic and first time users,”
the Deputy Prime Minister said
during the: commissioning of the
Church House complex.
“That is why we are gathered
here today. The government is

committed to improving our -

drug control administration to
better coordinate activities and
to maximize our resources,” she
said.

Although the establishment
of the secretariat is two years
behind the initial scheduled
date, the Deputy Prime Minister
said the recent seizure of drugs
speaks volumes.

Only two days ago, acting on
information the Drug Enforce-
ment officers made a major
“drug bust” in New Providence.

SEE page 11























“m Lhe Tribune

Pm lovin’ it. | Es

= The Hiami Herald

PARTLY SUNNY |

BAHAMAS EOIrion





UESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006





NOW OPEN:

Seagrapes Shopping enters ae

Prince Charles Drive



@ DEPUTY Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt and Archbishop Goines are Satown around the new National Anti-Drug *

Secretariat t yestereey | at the Church House complex on East Hill Street, formerly the Anglican administrative building.
(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune staff)

Review to determine

Police inspecwe is.
critical after shooting

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

AN OVERNIGHT shooting
in Kemps Bay, Andros has left
Police Inspector Sidney Rolle
in critical, but stable condition.

Police are still looking for
the suspect who is considered
armed and dangerous.

According to Police Inspec-
tor Evans, Mr Rolle was off
duty and at home when a per-
son, who: he did know,
approached him to make a
complaint.

While he was listening to the
complainant, a vehicle pulled
up, a man got out, and opened
fire on Mr Rolle and other
bystanders.

“The police then returned
fire and because of the defen-
sive actions by the police no
other persons were injured,”
said Mr Evans.

Mr Rolle was hit multiple
times and was. airlifted:
to New Providence for treat-
ment.

“Specialized teams of. offi-
cers from New Providence are
on the island of ‘Andros assist-
ing police officers stationed on
that island in search of the sus-
pect who remains at large,”
said Mr Evans.

On behalf of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, Mr
Evans wished Mr Rolle a
speedy recovery.

the future of OPBAT

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE future of the allocation
of funds for the Operation
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos is
set to be decided: this week
after a special review of
the anti-drug smuggling initia-
tive.

Political, economic and pub-
lic relations officer Greg Floyd
at the US Embassy told The
Tribune yesterday that a special

:. team from Washington, DC, is

expected to travel to the
Bahamas later this week to
review OPBAT.

Following this review, the
team will present US govern-
ment officials with a report that

mPURINA|

PRO a | Fae by

will determine the future of the
programme.

“At this time it is not about
the deduction of funds:for
OPBAT, but rather about the
allocation, the distribution, ?
Mr Floyd said.

US Ambassador John Rood
last Friday returned from a
two-week trip from Washing-
ton where he met with senior
government officials to discuss
the US’ continuing commit-
ment to narcotics interdiction
and OPBAT. yo 8S

On his return the oN
sador announced that the talks
had been “fruitful.” *

Mr Floyd said yesterday: that

SEE page 11

While It Nourishes.

Vatay en AVON | ol eee oa oes a

Protects

Available ina variel
Street: Central Animal Hospital, Tenwich Street: Dragan

Store. Bos. Comer, Antoal Clie, Wolff Road

Ryeaaa ia)

le Agencies.

AB Cae







PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

If rules and conventions are
bused, respect will be lost

O-one expects the business of
parliament to be conducted
like a Sunday school. Parliament is
where the laws governing the nation

are made, ne Ee policy is dobat. wooded area shortly after take- we
Fe resaninaes Ob ne peonle's Maney rules — although designed to be flexi- off, authorities said, according se
to Associated Fress. :
SE ra crccet ot ble — cannot be consistently ignored The pilot, Stephen Hodges, 4,
is held accountable for its conduct of 59 of South: Carolina. was the an
Ober. E heady stuff and so it is expect- and abused. only person aboard when the ie
ed that passions should flare up from ae Mee Gees aries
time to time and that members will County Sheriff Ken Mase Cre ig
engage in:sharp exchanges and even cm Sf ae TfTAA
indulge in occasional dramatics to draw fe ; Thee plane eH f
attention to their causes. In some par- ernment had difficulty mustering aquo- | CDR, had gone back to the PLP and desive oF Kevond ss ae {
liaments members driven by personal rum for.each morning and afternoon had ‘been accepted with much fanfare. had fleaa t Ot L wee tte 10ny I
animosities and ideological differences session of the budget debate. Now Mr Christie wanted to showcase al fae i Aa iy ne 1y
have resorted to fisticuffs. fe his latest acquisition by setting a new Bahaiiags ete ‘g naa ee do
’ That has not happened in our House Fcc aby precedent, and he was prepared to Jane landed aa “hee a 1 5
of Assembly in recent memory although ° destroy a parliamentary convention in fe A ace hotsrs ae oe ac a 3e
it was reported that many years ago Sir the process. off Fe nin Nasenia ee ° "an
Etienne Dupuch ‘aiid Walton Young . ahamians have been under- One of the reasons Mr Christie gave Wiiaees a4 dinertod hatha «038
exchanged blows in a committee room. /standably worried about the for wanting Dr Nottage to address the lanettook off ne dark skies
Sir Etienne was a pugilist and it was occurrence'‘of malaria in Exuma but it | House on the malaria affair was that Ee ain: dad enkine wouble an d ot
said that: Mr Young got the worst of was wrong for Prime Minister Perry _ he was a doctor. It was obvious that Dr eos d with or Sie f the
the:exchange. _ Christie'to seize on this to grandstand at | Nottage read his statement, a statement Be set OOeE ae f
- Years later, after an adjournment of the expense of the rules and'long-stand- _ that could have been read by the Prime o dees Wek P Bate Be to Ten- iS
the House, Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield, ‘ing conventions of parliament and to Minister himself or any other Minister aaa ee said Federal Aviation
then in opposition, intervened to stop a attempt to make the opposition look —_ of the Government in the House. Doc- Adeiinisthation sookeswowan a
physical encounter between Sir Lynden’ like the bad guys for refusing to go __ tors do not necessarily read well. Kathleen:Bér ae
Pindling and Sir Rando] Fawkes. Sir along. There were no questions and answers The Natio a Teinseottation. ~ al
Randol was no longer a member at the Mr Christie Knows that it is, and afterwards, no discussion. If there had SAfaty. Boardiand re ee al Aci a
time but had,jeered at Sir Lynden from should continue to be, a rare honour been, it would have made more sense aaa ak deainistration were sone:
his seat in the public gallery. for anyone who is not a member to for members to engage the Bahamian sn investivators te the scene ‘
Our elected chamber is one of the address the House of Assembly in ses- _ and international disease control experts 6 8 i:
most decorous in the world, perhaps ‘sion. That is a privilege reserved for who were sitting in the gallery and who a
because:Gftits small size and its tradition foreign heads of state and government _had done a great service for the country. [= U u rg es ae
of formality. Until 1956 members of and other distinguished persons. Even . - ee

the Houge;(MHAS in those days) met in

the everting-and were attired in tuxedos -.

or-mess jackets.

The guse shifted to morning meet-
ings to avoid the kind of nighttime
demonstiations that accompanied Sir
Etienne? ‘s\ anti-discrimination resolution







espite its very nature and the
adversarial atmosphere in
which most of its business is conducted,
the decorum’ of parliament cannot be

dispensed with altogether, and its rules -’
—.although designed to be flexible — ..

cannot be consistently ignored and





ces en The Island”

»



The decorum of parliament cannot
be dispensed with altogether, and its



so, it must be with the unanimous con-
sent of the members.

Under no circumstances should a
Minister of Government who sits in the
Senate be allowed to address the elect-
ed branch of parliament in session. But

last Week Mr Christie proposed that Dr



* * *

ncidentally, someone should
instruct the reverend ministers of
the gospel who are invited to be chap-
lains to the House that they should




from people who are
making news in their











THE TRIBUNE

Pilot killed
in plane
crash off
Florida

Hi FLORIDA
Fort Pierce —

A PILOT was killed when a
twin-engine plane crashed in a

nations
to oppose
torture





which had provoked a very emotional _ abused. Otherwise the public will lose Bernard Nottage, the Minister of Health remain at the bar during the opening 4.
debate and a confrontation with then __ respect for this foundational institution. . who sits in the Senate, should do.just_ prayers and not walk onto the green m@ AUSTRIA i
Speaker Asa Pritchard. _ That is precisely the direction in _ that. carpet. Vienna ;
Sir Asa was a strict disciplinarian but — which the House has forsome time now The. opposition tightly withheld its Only elected members of parliament, : j 3
not everybody appreciated that. Eti- been headed. What is particularly, wor- consent but,agreed toa compromise in _ and the public officers who serve them, THE European Union, which 2.
enne Dupuch Jr once-depicted him ina _ rying is that it comes at a time when “ which Dr Nottage could address the should go beyond the bar while the has been harshly critical of US
cartoon as a tyrant in the chair cracking slackness seems:to be growing as a ‘House during an adjournment. Even House is in session. prisoner abuse at Iraq’s Abu ~
the whip‘over cowering members. Mr national characteristic and when too that was unnecessary as there were Ghraib prison and the deten-
_ Speaker was not amused. ‘many of our young people no longer many other ways in which this matter gee Se tion center at Guantanamo Bay,” “~
Sir Asa preserved the decorum of the - find’ discipline, good manners and __ could have been handled, including a . Cuba, urged all nations Mon-
House and-most of the time it took only’ respect tobe attractive... _ national broadcast on radio and televi- “sf ; day to sign a global convention a
a slightly inflected “Order!” to.calm. These days, meetings of the: House sion. erhaps after the next election against torture and condemned st
agitated members. During his term as seldom, if ever, start-ontime, and that. Yet, at the appointed time, the Prime the Bahamian people will have the practice for any reason,
Speaker.House meetings started on — too is becoming a bad habit with most Minister still raised the question and _ a better crop of representatives who, if according to Associated Press. be
time and you could set your watch as. organised events in this country. Mem- forced the opposition to state their they are unfamiliar with the ways ‘of “No culture of impunity is
the black. rod'would announce his. «bers of parliament. should be. setting a ‘objection publicly. He-was supported parliament to begin with, will at least acceptable,” the 25-nation bloc é:
entrance into the chamber'at procbely » better example. ~’ in this piece of political chicanery by have the care and competence to edu- warned in a statement coincid- 5
the aupnitta hour. . Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham ‘Tennyson Wells, an experienced par-. cate themselves about the rules and ing with observances of the ni
Ba _, . pointed out in the House last week that liamentarian, who urged members to conventions and to conduct themselves United Nations’ ninth annual 5
eR aM ay aaee m spite. of their huge majority the Gov- -. leave ‘politics out of it! _' accordingly. International Day to Support =|
» Weta Ag ace sibel GS. AMR Sal But Mr Ingraham was protectingthe _ Any panlinientanae worth his salt the Victims of Torture. a
= wl Ve Annee Lai eatesnetey ~ rules of the House. It was Mr Christie welcomes some heckling and interven- The EU resolves to continue 3
STEAM ; a who was politicking. Mr Christie also tion. That can make for good debate. and intensify its own efforts to 5
a pl Bie yest z : manipulated the system when he caused, But constant interruptions and loud SCCULE RE world free from tor- 8
Leet A parliament to be prorogued so that new- _ chatter are unfair to the member speak- Ba ea cat ea Z
! ly-appointed Governor General Arthur ing, not to mention the persistent abuse con-
It was wr ong for Prime Minister Panna could preside over:an opening. aie rules governing ise of order. or ULE ObCiak te lee oe
There was nothing wrong with this For the duration of this parliament, ‘ J c .
Pe erry Christie. -- to grandstand. at the except ‘that the House had not been however, that is likely to continue since a atise ane eee ane :
es a rorogued in four years and it was after four years the Speaker himself we - y ces, 3
expense of the rules and long stand Foubtful that it would have been if a apparently has not grasped the differ- eee grounds of nation- ;
ing: ‘conventions of parliament — Seer ‘general had not been Searor on aempl: intervention and Bush aleaiaitectionvorials 0"
0) ' It was blindingly obvious what Mr have said the US uses legal inter- ¢
1! Christie was up to in the case of Dr : rogation techniques — not tor- in
i xmvekdaer seen -Nottage: The Minister, who until recent- www.bahamapundit.typepad.com ture — to gain information that =)
aa ly had’been holding out as leader of the sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com could head off terror attacks. £
P J.
LL YOUR DECORATING | Share your news| |
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THE TRIBUNE

In brief |

Man faces
charge of
sex with

daughters

A MAN accused of commit-
ting incest with his daughters
was arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday.

It is alleged that the man
committed the offence with his
16-year-old daughter between
April and June of this year.

He was also charged with
having unlawful sex with his 20-
year-old daughter between Jan-
uary and June of this year.

The man was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers at Court Five, Bank
Lane yesterday.

He was not required to enter
a plea to the charges and was
granted $10,000 bail on each
charge.

The matter was adjourned to
* September 27, when a prelimi-
nary inquiry into the matter is
set to begin.

18-year-old
arrested for
firearm

possession

POLICE arrested an 18 year-
old man from North Andros,
for allegedly being in posses-
sion of an illegal firearm.

According to reports, officers
from the internal security divi-
sion were in the Potter’s Cay
area when, acting on a tip, they
searched a box and found a
loaded handgun and 40 live
rounds of ammunition.

Delegates
seeking

‘restraint’ on.

gay bishops

@ OHIO

EPISCOPAL delegates asked
church leaders to “exercise
restraint” when considering
openly gay candidates for bish-
op, a vote that ended days of
painful debate but fell far short
of demands to preserve Anglican
unity by banning gay bishops,
according to Associated Press.

The Wednesday measure
calls on Episcopal prelates to
“exercise restraint. by not con-
senting to the consecration” of
candidates for bishop “whose
manner of life presents a chal-
lenge to the wider church.”
However it is nonbinding and
—in a sign of the deep split over
gay clergy — at least one bishop
_ vowed immediately to ignore it.

Archbishop of Canterbury
Rowan Williams, the spiritual
leader of the global Anglican
Communion, has been trying to
broker a truce between conser-
vative and liberal archbishops
worldwide ever since the Epis-
copal Church shocked tradi-
tionalists by consecrating Bish-
op Gene Robinson of New
Hampshire.

Robinson, who was elected
in 2003, lives with his longtime
male partner. Anglican conser-
vatives — a majority in the 77-

million-member communion — »

hold that the Bible prohibits gay
Sex.

Episcopal delegates did vote
to'affirm the denomination’s
commitment to the Anglican
fellowship; the church is the US
arm of the communion. But a
proposal for.a temporary mora-
torium on gay bishops never hit
the convention floor.

On Tuesday, the House of
Deputies rebuffed a measure
that would have urged dioceses

o “refrain from” choosing bish-
ops in same-gender relationships.
Some saw its language as sending
a slightly tougher signal.

Whether the Episcopal Gen-
eral Convention went. far
enough to preserve Anglican

ties will play out over months, if
not years. World Anglican lead-"

ers meet next in February in
Tanzania.

Many Anglican churches
have already broken ties with
the US church over Robinson’s
elevation. And if overseas lead-
ers dislike the outcome of the
American meeting, it greatly
increases the chances that the
association of 38 national
churches will break apart.

Wednesday’s vote, just hours
before the end of a nine-day

meeting, won praise from

Williams but pleased neither
American conservatives nor
advocates for full inclusion of

gays.

\










@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE face of the Cable
Beach is set to change forever
starting this summer, as mas-
sive road works to transform
West Bay Street are scheduled
to begin within the next few
weeks.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, vice-president of
administration and external
affairs at the Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company Robert
Sands said that the first work to
reroute and, reshape the road
will start in the next two to
three weeks.

However, he emphasised
that traffic on West Bay Street
will not be disrupted during the
construction.

“It will have absolutely no
effect on the traffic,” he said.

As the road works get under-
way, Baha Mar will turn its
attention towards demolishing
the police and fire stations on
West Bay Street and rebuilding
them on alternate sites.

Funeral homes accused of delay ote :
dead body from home for senior citizens |:

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE owner of a local home
for senior citizens yesterday
accused funeral homes of
refusing to collect a dead resi-
dent from the home due to a
lack of funds.

Administrator and owner of
Unity House, Rev Janet
Smith-Butler, told The Tri-
bune yesterday that a 65-year-
old resident of the home died
on Sunday. She said it took
calls to four different funeral
homes, before one came for
the body.

In one instance, Unity
House was told that the owner
and the workers were out of
town taking care of a funeral.



solving

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Democrat-
ic Movement yesterday
claimed that the PLP govern-
ment was not concerned with
settling the Bozine Town res-
idents’ property dispute.

“The residents of Bozine
Town have been suffering for
too many years now, and for
them (to be) ignored in this
way is shameful,” said BDM
deputy leader Omar Smith in
a press release.

“After Justice Jeannie
Thompson ruled on May 11
to dismiss the residents’ apph-
cation to set aside the title
obtained by Landco, via the
Quieting of Titles Act, the
people in Bozine ‘Town now
have a few weeks to either
pay Landco for the property,
or they will be removed from
their land,” he said.

The land dispute between
the people of Bozine Town
and the Harrold Road Land
Development Company
(Landco) first began in late
2004. At that time more than
500 residents received letters
from the law firm of Lock-

- hart and Munroe informing
them that their client Landco
had been given certificates of
title for the land in the Bozine
Town and Knowles Drive

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This is expected to happen
in the next two to three
months.

“We are currently in the
review stage. We are review-
ing the bids by contractors,”
Mr Sands said.

Major demolition work on
the Cable Beach hotels is not
scheduled to begin until sum-
mer 2007.

Mr Sands said that the Nas-
sau Beach Hotel and two tow-
ers of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal-Palace Casi-
no will be the only structures of
the three hotels to be com-
pletely demolished.

“We are not looking at the
implosion of the hotel until
2007. 1 would say that the Nas-
sau Beach has another 12
months at the maximum,” he
said.

In a recent address to the
Bahamas Contractors Associ-
ation, Mr Sands reiterated that
Baha Mar will spend more
than $2 billion in the redevel-
opment and transformation of
Cable Beach.







@ THE owner of Unity
House, Rev Janet
Smith-Butler

M1 asc aee

However, Mrs Butler thinks

that there should have been a

back up.

LOCAL NEWS







i AN artist’s impression of how the Baha Mar development will look

Starting July 1, work costing
more than $205 million will
begin.

Mr Sands said that all work
at:Cable Beach will be done in

“I feel the type of people
that I deal with at the home
— I don’t expect for every-’
body to have that compassion
inside of them,” said Mrs But-
ler.

According to Mrs Butler,
the woman Alma Veronica
Smith (nee Malcolm) is of
Jamaican descent and for four
years had been a resident at
the senior citizens’ home.

From the little Mrs Butler
knew about her, she was mar-
ried to a Bahamian, now
deceased. Also she has a
daughter in Jamaica and a sis-
ter in Fort Lauderdale. .
Mrs Butler would ‘like any °
member of Mrs Smith’s: hus-
band’s family to contact Unity
House at 323-6128.

concerned’ with
ozine Town issue

‘area. Essentially it would dis-

place residents who had lived
on the land for more than 50
years.

“Why.should the people of
Bozine Town have to pay a
second time for their proper-
ties and homes? The residents
of Bozine already have mort-
gages from banks in this coun-
try, based on clear titles,
granted by the same courts,”
said Mr Smith.

“These people have spent
thousands and thousands of
dollars in legal fees trying to
fight for their homes that they
have already paid for. This
cannot be right,” Mr Smith
said.

Mr Smith said that while
Bahamians are being bullied
from their homes, it is the
lack of proper representation
of the area and the country’s
leadership that is.most
appalling in this case.

“This battle for Bozine
Town and Knowles Drive res-
idents to hold on to their
homes has been going on for
too long. There is no way that
Bahamians should be treated
this way in their own country.

He said politicians should
stop playing politics with the
residents of Bozine Town and
Knowles Drive. “These peo-
ple,” he said, “are not asking
for judicial interference, they
















- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)





_of my extended family”,



are asking for justice.”

However, when speaking
with The Tribune yesterday Mr
Miller said he considers the res-
idents of that area to be “a part
and
promised that he would stand
firmly at their side to ensure
that justice is done.

“No one in Bozine Town or
Knowles Town will be dis-
placed,” he assured residents.
“Everything must go through
the legal process and channels,
but the government will do
whatever it takes to ensure that
no one is displaced from their
homes.”

phases so as not to disrupt
hotel operations along the
strip.

According to projections, in
its a year of operations, from

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- PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1 914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1 986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
me Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
- Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Do police need help from outside?

THE CARIBBEAN is now turning to
_ the UK for seasoned police officers to help
_tackle crime that has crept into and under-

so “mined its local forces.

Trinidad, crippled by kidnappings and

: murders — 235 kidnappings and 386 mur-

‘ders last year — will spend £13 million in
. the next three years to brihg in 39 serving
~ and retired British police officers to assist
_ its local force.

Trinidad and Tobago’s National Securi-
ty Minister said that when his country was
first used as a trans-shipment point no one
"paid any attention because the locals were

x not users of the drugs or guns that were

sen ey

as

cer mee

-a we DEA RSS ERASERS HRY RA

‘being shipped through.

However, he said, some of the contra-
band started to remain in the island as part-

~ payment.

“As a result, our law enforcement got
out of alignment .. . It seems for some peo-
ple that crime is paying. Clearly we needed
assistance,” he explained.

As a result of the growing attacks on

visitors to the tourist island of Tobago, the.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office issued
a travel advisory warning that the “inabil-
ity of local authorities to apprehend and
prosecute the perpetrators is a serious con-
cern.”

Jamaica has also turned to London’s
Metropolitan Police for help. According
to the Daily Gleaner, Jamaicans have had
enough.

They have grown disenchanted with their
‘own police force.

“They believe that it had grown corrupt,
inept and repressive, contributing more to
social instability than the prevention or
solution of crime.”

St Lucia and Guyana have also request-
ed British officers. And Barbados has
joined the queue.

It’s now time for the Bahamas to give
this matter serious consideration, before
crime in these islands escalates to ‘the lev-
els of Trinidad, Tobago and Jamaica.

In 1987 Paul Adderley, then attorney
general, told the House of Assembly that in
the interest of the Bahamas and the secu-
rity of its citizens government might have to
recruit non-Bahamian policemen.

He said that prospects for increasing

the needed personnel for the Royal
Bahamas Police Force from among young
Bahamian men and women “are on
November 24, (1987) not very good.”

Despite nation-wide recruitment exer-
cises the manpower was just not there —
they did not qualify.

He said that in one Family Island 23
young men were identified as being poten-
tial members of the force.

However, after medical examinations,
18 were found to be unsuitable. Remem-
bering the year — 1987 — drugs were
probably the problem.

Another island, which at one time was a
fertile source of excellent recruits, said Mr
Adderley, “was described to me by one of
the recruiting officers as a disaster area
and they found none there.” Again it
sounds as though drugs were their down-
fall.

. Today the only change is that. while
young male recruits remain an endangered
species, young women are qualifying. How-
ever, more men are needed, especially in
the Defence Force. _

If the information that Health Minister
Dr Bernard Nottage disclosed at the com-

’- missioning yesterday of the anti-drug sec-

retariat is any indicator, the recruitment
future looks even less promising. Accord-
ing.to the doctor even 10 year olds are now
marijuana users.

Today the police cannot recruit
“squeaky-clean” young men, because dur-
ing their pre-teen and teen years they have
run afoul of the law, either by dabbling in
drugs, loitering, or commiting various
minor offences.

Now that they have grown to adulthood
it is hoped that some of them have left
their misdemeanours behind and will prove
to be upright citizens.

It is understood that the situation is so
dire, that rules are being “slightly” bent in
the name of being practical to try to include
them in the service.

But, if it is true that corruption is endem-
ic to our society, and it is from this society
that these young recruits are being drawn,
then common sense should tell us that they
need a strong, outside influence to help
keep them on the straight and narrow.



THE TRIBUNE

A new kind

of leader |

has emerged.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS past Friday my spirit
was lifted, much higher than it
has been lifted in many moons.
I witnessed the emergence of a
new kind of leader, one who
has blazed the trail in mentoring
our youth not only through edu-
cation but her civic work.

St Anselm’s Catholic Church

in Fox Hill was jam-packed and
came alive with the many well
wishers who came from across
the political divide, the eco-
nomic borders and from every
other walk of life to show their
love, respect and admiration in
a service of thanksgiving for Dr
Jacinta Higgs. Dr Higgs is a lady
with “world class ability” and
who has made significant
achievements. This Bahamas is
the recipient of an outstanding
scholar, civic leader, teacher,
community builder, just to
name a few.

The celebration at St
Anselms was arranged to give
glory and thanks to almighty

’ God for enabling Dr Higgs, a

humble lady, to achieve the

highest academic achievement.

The atmosphere at St Anselms
was so calming, so peaceful; it
would be an understatement to
say the holy spirit presided over
the celebration.
Dr Higgs’ dissertation was
“Colonial education, African
amnesia”, quite appropriate,
especially because the village
where Dr Higgs hails from is
steeped rich in African heritage.
The people of Fox Hill who
helped her with her research
were present to receive the
thanks from Dr Higgs for their
invaluable help. Some of us
seem to forget from whence we
came. Dr Higgs on the other
hand obviously won’t let any
forget where she came from.
The many accolades heaped
on Dr Higgs by Mrs Erma Gar-
raway, Permanent Secretary to

the Ministry of Health, while’

she boasted of having a hand in
the early development of this
rare lady, Dr Higgs. Mrs Gar-
raway elaborated that she
recognised even in the twelfth
grade that Dr Higgs was just
not an ordinary young lady, but
she had already distinguished
herself from her peers. Accord-
ing to Mrs Garraway “she was
articulate, assertive, determined
and self confident”. This was
certainly an indication and the
makings that the young lady
exemplified extreme leadership
qualities.

Her thirst for knowledge and

her willingness to help others
_ and to share, played out in her

untiring work with her students

DSM MU SI RAS

letters@triounemecia.net






and the Girl Guides. Dr Higgs
has been intricately involved in
the Girl Guides. She is present-
ly preparing papers on the his-
tory of Guides in the Bahamas.
This special lady has touched
many lives and is still touching
lives in a most positive way.

The humility displayed by Dr
Higgs shows just how sensitive
she is. This was obvious from
the crescendo, almost in unison,
by the many persons who sang
her praises during the reception
after the thanksgiving service.
I was baffled how a lady such.as
this has gone by practically
unnoticed for so long.

It is time for the whole
Bahamas to know Dr Higgs. In
fact the Bahamas needs to
know Dr Jacinta Higgs. She has
a contribution to make and it

is extremely obvious that she 4 is

willing to make a contribution:

She is no phony. She is highly
respected. Even though she has
achieved, she never left her peg-
ple in Fox Hill. She loves and
brags about Fox Hill, and by all
indications the people of Fox
Hill love her.
Fox Hill, being the wise peo-
ple that they are, will do what-
ever they must to show their
appreciation to a lady that has
literally given her life for Fox
Hill. Fox Hill knows. that she
has their best interest at hear,
She can identify with Fox Hill’
I am certain that the village of
Fox Hill and-the whole |
Bahamas will hear more about
and from Dr Jacinta Higgs very
soon. Fox Hill needs a “real Figx

Hill gal”.
This warms my heart. 4
IVOINE W INGRAHAM:
Nassau, y
June, 2006. i

sbeseecenssenscessceeceeccaeceneesncaeseseneesaseneaenesceeeeang es

a

ee
situation —

EDITOR, The Tribune.

2

CAN someone please explain to me this perplexing situation
which is occurring in The Bahamas.

Why is it that people are focused on the Opposition Party ait
its leader in Parliament who are not currently in power, but fet
the governing party and its leader off “Scot free”.

It seems to me that opposing parties not now in Partianien
should set their sights on the governing party and its policies.

Yet in the newspaper today, the leader of one opposing pat-
ty spent time criticising the Opposition Parliamentary Leader
together with those members who left the CDR, but not on
word against the present government.

Then in the same newspaper it was stated that two Indepep-
dents have allegedly “cut a deal” with the governing party and
in return for criticising the FNM and its leader, the governing
party allegedly will not run candidates in those districts in the .
next election even though they said they would not offer for re-

election.

If true, how is that for keeping one’s word? ' y
There are also others, including one columnist who a s unre-

lenting in criticising the FNM leader during the last «

\ \etion.

However, in these times, there has not been one serious cx:::"ism

written against the PLP Leader.

Can someone explain what is going on and the reason for such

behaviour?

9

Are there some people who are “untouchable” in This

Bahamas?

SHIRLEA VOTER
Nassau,
June, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE

Robberies
believed
to be
connected

POLICE are investigating
two robberies that occurred
within an hour of each other on
Friday evening.

The incidents are thought to
be connected.

af Just after 9pm, two mask gun-
men entered the Super Saver
on Madeira Street, one bran-
dishing a handgun and the oth-
‘er a shotgun.

. They forced an employee to
‘Open the safe and took an
“andisclosed amount of cash
before escaping in a silver Hon-
“da.

/~ About an hour later, D&T
‘Convenience store on Dean and

Nassau Street was robbed by : :

two gunmen.

'' One of the men who entered
‘the facility was armed with
“handgun and the other with a
“shotgun.

“ The employees were also
robbed of an undetermined
amount of cash.

'C The men reportedly fled in a
Silver Honda.

‘Kidnapped —
Canadian
released
by gang

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

A CANADIAN missionary —

kidnapped a week ago has been
released, a colleague said. Sun-
day as U.N. peacekeepers
increased patrols amid an
upsurge of violence in the Hait-
ian capital, according to Asso-
ciated Press. X

Ed Hughes was released late

Saturday on a rural road after

ckidnappers received a ransom
raised by the missionary’s
tfriends and colleagues, said Nel-
yson Ryman, co-director with
Hughes of the Tytoo Gardens
s;erphanage.

“He called me in the morning
_and was extremely disoriented,”
Ryman said from his home in
“Tampa, Florida, “A bit later I
“falked to him again and he said
he plans to return to his chil-

en in the orphanage and plans

LG stay in Haiti.” °
3 Ryman said the ransom was
Yess than US$10,000 but would
“fot specify the amount.

Police and U.N. officials

worked through a Haitian medi-
ator to secure Hughes’ release.
'.6 Hughes, 72, was kidnapped
ss apparently by gang members



pHaiti’s capital of Port-au-Prince
on June 18. They threatened to
ill him unless a US$45,000
ransom was paid and later low-
ered the demand, according to
Ryman. .

Ryman said Hughes told him
he was released during a storm
Saturday night and was put ina
“tap-tap” — pickup trucks used
as collective taxis. Hughes, who
made it back to the capital ear-

a Sunday, was resting at-a-safe
gecation in Port-au- Prince,
Baas said.

























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JUNE 27

00am Community Page/1540 AM
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2:00 The Fun Farm

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4:30 Carmen San Diego

14:58 ZNS News Update

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}

@ By MARK HUMES

THE Director of Catholic
Education and other inde-
pendent school administra-
tors are once again extend-
ing an offer of partnership
to the Ministry of Educa-
tion in its reform efforts —
saying: “we are all con-
cerned about the nation’s
children.”

In an interview Sat The
Tribune yesterday, Catholic
Education’s Claudette Rolle
said that after last year’s
national conference on edu-
cation, the Ministry of Edu-

LOCAL NEWS

But board yet to hear
from ministry officials



cation made a promise to
invite them to be a part of a
committee looking to
address areas of concern in
public education.

However, to date, said the
director, the Catholic Edu-
cation board has not heard
from ministry officials.

“T always thought it would
be a wise move to partner
with Education,” Mrs Rolle
said. “All of us are a part
of this human development
and formation of persons,
so it is most critical for us to
get together and talk about
how we can move education

Ron Pinder: some
‘Potter’ s Cay vendors
are still ineligible
_ for alcohol permit

a By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SOME Potter’s Cay vendors are still ineli-
gible for a permit to legally sell alcohol, Envi-
ronmental Health director Ron Pinder report-
ed yesterday.

After meeting with the vendors on several
occasions to discuss the criteria for such a

licence, Mr Pinder said he realised that many |

vendors find the requirements too harsh.

“A lot of the compliance is ongoing,” Mr
Pinder explained, “so we continue to have
some difficulty with the vendors. Overall it
was not met favourably because a number
of them had to upgrade their stalls.”

“But those persons who have implemented
the necessary recommendations made by the
various government ministries and agencies
are with licenses.

“There are some who still haven’t, and
there are still one or two.persons who are
not in compliance and are selling alcohol ille-
gally — but: we will address that shortly,” he
said.

In order to obtain a licence, Pinder
explained, vendors have to meet several
requirements — including ensuring that all
food is stored and prepared in kitchens that
meet environmental health standards.

Although some vendors are resisting the
changes, others approve of the steps the gov-
ernment is taking to improve Potter’s Cay.

Mr Louis, co-owner of TZ’s Bayou, said

‘there must be some system of rules in place.

He said many of vendors are in favour of
the requirements, because of the number of
persons that take advantage of the present sit-
uation.

“There are some people who come out
here and sell alcohol out of there cars, while
those of us who have licenses to sell food
and conch can’t sell drinks,” he said.

Mr Louis has already applied for a licence
but said that it usually takes about six months
to a year to get one..

Charlie Brown, who has been a vendor for





@ ENVIRONMENTAL Health
director Ron Pinder

over 20 years, already has a licence.

He said it took him about nine months to
get his because of the number of require-
ments he had to meet in order to qualify.

“Fach person in given a list of require-
ments they need to meet in order to get a
licence,” he explained.

Brown admitted the changes he had to
make sét him back financially, but agreed
that in the end, it was a necessary improve-
ment. “Things needed to change,” he said.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 5

Catholic Education director offers |
partnership over education reform

forward in the country.”

With the success that
independent schools have
had over the years, both she
and Queen’s College’s vice-
principal Mrs Shawn Turn-
quest believe that there is a
great deal their systems can
offer the ministry, if they
were asked. ;

“JT think our administra-
tors, teachers, and students
have said that they would
be more than happy to talk
to anybody who is interest-
ed,” said Mrs Turnquest.
“We would be able to shed
alot of light on where to go
in advancing public educa-
tion.”

“Firstly, in just about all
of our private schools,” said
the administrator, “we do
stress that it is a team effort,
as the schools cannot do it
alone. We insist that our
parents get involved, and we
try. to put the proper
emphasis on key areas.”

Parent

However, she said that
while the schools stress the
role of the parent, as they
are the most influential per-
son in the child’s life, in the
end the influence of leader-
ship is most important.

“Tf there doesn’t appear
to be a sincere interest in
what takes place, then the
entire system will suffer,”
said Mrs Turnquest.

“Teachers need to feel

CABINET WORKSHOP



supported. Students need to
feel supported, and parents
need to feel that those who
are in charge care. :

“They need to make sure
that there are adequate sup-
plies, that the schools are
fixed, that books are avail-
able, grounds are main-
tained and pleasant to look
upon. They need to create
an environment that will
invoke pride.

Encourage |

“Additionally,” said: Mrs
Turnquest, “they need to
encourage students on.a
regular basis to make sure
that they are prepared for
school and life after high
school.”

Mrs Rolle, however, feels
that it is not the lack of sin-
cere interest that slows the
public education system
down. In her opinion, much
of it has to do with-bureau-.
cracy.

“IT believe there are ae
tiatives being put forward,
but it is just the time it takes
and the bureaucracy that is
involved in actually expé-
diting the initiatives that js
the challenge — it slows the
system down.”

However, she said: “wie
are always open to having
a dialogue with the Ministry
of Education and whatever
we can do to help education
progress, we are very Open
to that.” -

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





"
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Invites applications for the position of

PHOTO SHOP SITE MANAGER

.|. The successful applicant should satisfy the following minimum requirements:-

iLs >. Have a diploma or degree in Management/Marketing or a related field

i Fade: Have a minimum of 3 years experience in the hotel/hospitality industry in
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we a Have a minimum of 3 years experience in sales/retail

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Be a team player with the ability to manage staff and daily Photo Shop

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Liaising with resort Sales Manager and assisting the resort General Manager

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asset a

@ MINISTER of Ener-
gy and the Environment
Dr Marcus Bethel, along
with Michael Turner,
under secretary, Melony
McKenzie, Director of
Environmental Health
Services, and
representatives from the
BEST Commission
toured Motana Holdings
Limited development
project in Rum Cay last
Wednesday. Jason
Dean, chief financial
officer, leads Mr Bethel
and his team to a
lookout point.

































@ MARCUS Bethel, along
with Michael Turner,

Ms McKenzie and
representatives from the
BEST Commission toured
The Mayaguana Company
LLC. development project
on Wednesday, June 21,
2006. From left, Sergeant
1155 Curtis, Ramadan
McKenzie, operation
manager, Mr Bethel,

Mr Tourner, and Ms
McKenzie view a map of
the island showing areas
to be developed. )



@ FROM left are Ramadan McKenzie, operations manager, Mr
Turner and Mr Bethel

(Photos: BIS/
Raymond A Bethel)

@ From left are
Archie Cartwright,
operations manager;
Mr Bethel; Jason
Dean, chief financial
officer; and Garbriella
Frazer, business
development analyst,
view an artist’s
rendition of the
marina

Tug oaiches light
off Arawak Cay

@ By Gladstone Thurston
Bahamas Information
Services

A PRIVATELY owned 110-
foot steel hull tug boat, The
Carrizal, caught fire at about
3.30am yesterday at Arawak
Cay and sank four miles north
of Paradise Island.

The vessel Sank in 1,000 feet
of water after being towed away
from Arawak Cay by the owner
Edgar Curling. No injuries were
reported.

According to Mr Curling, the
vessel contained 200 gallons of
diesel fuel in its tank when the
fire broke out.

The Fire Department was
called. They battled the fire for
three hours before a decision
was made to tow the vessel
away from the docks to avoid
additional damage to sur-
rounding vessels.

In what was called a con-
trolled burn, the vessel eventu-
ally sank at 9.42am.

Che Ministry of Transport
and Aviation, the lead agency

for oil spills on the seas, was
informed at about 9.15am of a
vessel on fire with the potential
of an oil spill.

The Port Department and
the oil spill response company.
Baychem, were immediately
mobilised and dispatched to
the scene to monitor and pro-
vide assessment on the situa-
tion.

An international oil spill
response company in Ft Laud-
erdale, Clean Caribbean &
Americas, was placed on alert
should their assistance be need-
ed.

Meeting

The Ministry immediately
called an emergency meetiug of
the National Oil Spill Contin-
gency Advisory Committee to
review the.information at hand
and to strategise on a plan of
action with respect to the poten-
tial spill.

The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) which had a

Career Opportunity

A leading Broadcasting Company has ¢
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energetic, motivated, professional fe-
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Applicant must be a team-player and
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presence during the “con-
trolled burn” gathered
debris from the area and
reported a light sheen on
the surface of the.sea as the
vessel went down. It is
believed that the fire may
have burned out most of the
fuel contained on the ves-
sel.

According to the meteo-
rological report, the winds
are from the south-east to
south at six knots per hour
and, given the ebbing tide,
these conditions will allow
for the sheen to move out
to sea, thereby reducing any
threat to the coast line.

The Ministry of Transport
and Aviation along with the
National Oil Spill Advisory
Coninittee have put m place
a strong monitoring pro
gramme to alert the ministry
in the event there may be
trapped oil remaining in the
tanks of the sunken vessel
which may surface.

Aitplanes and vessels in
the area are advised to
report any sightings of oil
or diesel on the waters to
the Ministry of ‘Transport,
the Port Department and
the Civil Aviation Depart
ment,

The RBDE and the Port
Department will also be
monitoring this area over
the next several days.



Three men
arrested
for attack
on couple

@ ST LUCIA
Castries

THREE men have been
arrested in connection with an
attack on a European couple as
they slept on a yacht moored
off the north coast of this
Caribbean island, police said
Monday, according to Associ-
ated Press

The three men, two from St.
Lucia and one from another
unidentified island, were being
held as suspects after being cap-
tured over the weekend, but
had not yet been charged in the
attack, Assistant Police Com:
missioner Hermangild Francis
said,

Authorities said the tourists, a
Dutch man and a French
woman, were attacked on June
18 as they slept on the boat off
Gros Islet on the country’s
“north coast.

Police said the woman was
raped and the man was beaten
unconscious, and the assailants
stole a computer, cameras ans
money.

Other boaters had tivedtened
to boycott the island if the gov-
ernment failed to solve the
crime, officials said.

Jamaica
receives
cement
from Cuba

@ JAMAICA
Kingston

A SHIPMENT of 8,000 tons
of cement from Cuba arrived
in the Jamaican capital on Sun-
day — some two months after
officials expected it would
arrive, according to Associated
Press.

The cement, which will help
ease a shortage that has slowed
construction on the island, will
be issued for local distribution
on Monday, said Commerce
Minister Phillip Paulwell. It was
not clear why the shipment was
delayed.

Paulwell said it is the first of
several shipments expected
from Cuba to ease the cement
shortage.

“This shipment, in addition
to the other imports and pro-
duction from the Caribbean
Cement Company, should sup-
ply the weekly domestic
demand,” Paulwell said.

Jamaica began negotiating
with Cuba to supply cement
after the main local producci,
Caribbean Cement Company
Limited, temporarily suspended
production in March following
claims of substandard product

An internal inquiry later
revealed that the company had
distributed some 551,000 tons
of faulty cement since Novem.
ber, according to Trinidad
Cement Limited, the company’s
major shareholder

INSIGHT
For the stories
behind the

tC gy: Le.
Insight on
Mondays

METHODIST SUMMER
CAMPS 2006

Held at cam Symonette in James’ Cistern,
Eleuthera
July 1-7 for ages 13-17 and July 10-16 for
ages 6-12. This year’s theme is:
Keys To The
Kingdom: Unlocking the Clues to Christ.
Registration $100. for more information
contact Debra Gibson at the BCMC office at
393-3726, visit our website at:
www.angelfire.com/rmb/campsymonette or
send an email to:
methodistsummercamps@hotmail.com





THE TRIBUNE







In brief

Court ruling
may end
Guantanamo
trials

m@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

A FORMER driver for
Osama bin Laden may help
‘decide the fate of dozens of
‘Guantanamo Bay detainees,
and perhaps all of them, as the
‘Supreme Court prepares to rule
on his legal challenge to the first
‘US war crimes trials since
“World War II, according to
Associated Press.

The court, which is expected
‘to rule as early as Monday, ts
‘considering a range of issues in
Salim Ahmed Hamdan’s case,
including whether US President
George W Bush had the author-
ity to order military trials for
men captured in the war or er-
ror and sent to the Navy base at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

‘Bush recently suggested the
ruling will help him determine
‘what should be done with all
‘the prisoners at Guantanamo,
where the US holds about 450
“men on suspicion of links to al-
‘Qaida or the Taliban.

« Amnesty International and

‘the American Civil Liberties

Union said Friday that Bush

‘doesn’t need a court decision

to close the prison, which has

drawn intense international crit-

icism. The case has nothing to

do with the prison itself, they .
said.

“Bush can close Guan-
tanamo, but this (court) deci-
sion can’t,” said Ben Wizner,
an ACLU attorney who moni.
tors Guantanamo. “That’s not a
question before this court.”

The'ruling, however, could
determine whether the govern-
ment can proceed with military
trials for Hamdan anc aine oth-
er detainees who have been
charged with crimes.














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PEST CONTROL .
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DIAIRARASAS AVAL AA

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TICKETS

THE Defence Force and the police
should do everything they can to stay on
the cutting edge of technology, accord-
ing to Captain Raymond Farquharson.

Captain Farquharson, a Defence Force
officer, made this comment after wit-
nessing the uses to which Rhode Island’s
armed services can put their emergency
equipment, during a tour of the state’s
storm disaster management facilities.

“We started sort of shoulder to shoul-
der to them. However, we now seek to
get the additional equipment needed
to upgrade our storm area — which is
something we will do in this budget
year,” said Captain Farquharson.

“T’m sure it will not.take a lot of
funds, since we are pretty effective right

Last Friday, a group of nine Bahami-
an emergency services officials returned
from the tour, which was a follow-up to
the visit of Rhode Island’s emergency
planners to the Bahamas in March.

The exchange programme pairs
American states with Caribbean coun-
tries, and permits two trips a year for
each team to analyse the progress of
the other’s emergency procedures.

“The trip went very well as far as | am
concerned,” said Captain Farquharson,
who claimed that he could only speak of
his own experience, since each mem-
ber of the team went to different loca-
tions, depending on their specialty.

“For example, (police) Commission-
er Paul Farquharson would have been

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 7 4

Defence Force
be at ‘cutting edge’ of technolo

Superintendent Charles Rolle went to
the prison with his people, and I went
with the Coast Guard, since I am with
the Defence Force.

Farquharson said he also travelled to
Rhode Island in November last year.

“A section of Rhode Island’s Nation-
al Guard réturned the favour by coming
back with their general in January, and
then visited us again sometime in March
or May.”

In the most recent trip, Captain Far-
quharson says that he got to see how
Rhode Islanders use their Coast Guard.

“[ toured their operations center and
saw how they carry out search and res-
cue procedures.

“From there, I was taken by one of









they had a change of command: cérd-
mony at another one of the Cont
Guard stations,” he said.

Captain Farquharson said that at. ‘the
end of the trip, the Bahamian delegd-
tion came together to discuss what'the
did, listen to necommendanone apd
take notes.

He ensured the public that the ‘ate:
mation he received will be passed: on
to other Defence Force officers, who
will use it to improve the force’s emet-
gency response capability. eae

“There is no doubt there were a Jot‘of
things that the Bahamian delegation
learned from Rhode Island, and ‘they
also came, here to learn from us. This
was a wonderful exchange experience

AVAILABLE AT:

now,” he added

with the Rhode Island police, Deputy

their officers to a second base, where

for both sides,” he said.

'
abinsUone peddcceasdocdiecpeedan ddan cuSaactucacescubevcaed asscidcssaccedacpeunceadiduencasectavebscvodecevscsaduatiaesledncddcuerduenveseedesghs saqoneeaséscedsesesdesapencig seseyvinessdoanoerngesossiinsisavadsasebar oe ogseoebdadegdecesesasedevensbadasedeasescdacseavsesesdcenancscebdbanbseua se nedeasasuccesdceeessassecsecncacecccenncse ta yeces

,

f

Public give their views on police and crime

ACCORDING to Assis-
tant Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson, the
crime rate so far this year is
more or less the same as it
was in 2005.

This is true except for in a
few key areas such as house
break-ins, which have risen
in New Providence, he said.

However, as police have
admitted before, actual
crime and the fear of crime
can be two very different
things.

With. this in mind, The
Tribune took to the streets
to seé how members of the
public feel about crime,
safety and the performance
of the police.

Most interviewees said
they feel the police are
doing a very good job in
local communities and have
brought a feeling of safety
to their everyday lives.

One the other hand,
many of those interviewed
said there is a need for bet-
ier community/police rela-
tions and some said they are

living in fear because of

crime. -

» “We live in fear constant-
ly: gangs and crime are like
a way of lite these days.”
said one interviewee. "The

The Home Store, Sandyport
La Rose,The British Hilton Hotel - 356-3467



@ LAVETTE McFall said:
“Police officers can alert the
community with tips to help
prevent us from becoming

victims.”

citizens are made to fear the
system and the police; the gov-
ernment is not doing anything
about it,” he said.

Local businesswoman Lavette

McFall said: “The police can

only do their jobs as best as we
assist them. It is our responsi-
bility as a people to band togeth-
er to help the police.”

She went on to say that crime
develops when neighborhoods
turn a blind eye and a deaf ear
to their own problems.

"Police officers can alert the
community with tips to help
prevent us from becoming vic-
tims" she added.

"T feel safe in general, but as”



ES

@S Johnson said: “When
safety is concerned, on a scale
on one to ten its about a seven
for me.”



far as police and community
relations go, I'll have to say that
some of the officers need to be

trained in social skills" said a
local barber. "You go to report
a matter and they make you feel
like the criminal,” he said.
During an interview, Assis-
tant Commissioner Fer guson
said: "Fighting crime is only a
part of it, we also try to main-
tain our communication with

‘the community as well."

327-1132

@ SEAN Johnson said: “I
don’t feel really safe,
considering how many times.
I’ve had break-ins.”

Ferguson said senior officers
are always seeking new ways to
"bridge the gap between com-
munities and the police force."

S Johnson said: “Where safe-
ty is concerned, on a scale of one
to 10, its about a seven for me..”

“A better relationship with
young men in the community is
needed,” he continued. “I think
this would even help older per-
sons to feel safer where they
live.”

“I've felt more comfortable
other places," said Michael
Brown. "Although I respect the
police, I wouldn't rely on them.
The police force needs to be

‘more aware of the areas they





Mi MICHAEL Brown said:
“More planning and
involvement with the :
community is needed so we |:
all can have a sense of safety. ig

‘
'
f

6

work in, more planing, aid
involvement with the commu-
nity is also needed so we all can
have a sense of safety,” he sald:

CEO of TTL Productions,
Sean Johnson said: “Fdon't’.
really feel safe considering how -
many times I've had break-in.”

He continued, "I think crime
is on the rise. The police’ ean't
do anything about it — it has
more to do with social issues:”

Mr Johnson went on to say
that the relationship between
the police force and the com-
munity needs to be strength-
ened if there is to be any hopé
for preventing crime in the
future,” ‘a



Saturday, July Ist
‘The Radisson Ballroom,
Cable Beach Resort

Vanya as pin
Dinner 8:30pin







BN Uy PUY, VUINE C/, CUUYU





«[ TUESDAY EVENING

PT] 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30

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JUNE 27, 206
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Haiti’s pres
needs roads to boost touris

#@ FLORIDA
Miami Beach __ ets
HAITI cannot expect to be
seen as a desirable tourist des-
tination until the necessary
‘ roads are built and political sta-

‘ bility is achieved, Haitian Pres- .

: ident Rene Preval said on Sun-
‘ day at a tourism conference in
‘South Florida, according to
' Associated Press.

The president’s speech at a
Miami Beach hotel capped a
three-day conference where
jocal and Haitian business
investors discussed how tourism
could boost the Caribbean
country’s crippled economy.
Haitian leaders want potential
tourists to envision the coun-
iry’s beautiful landscape, rich
culture and exotic cuisine ~ not
the western hemisphere’s poor-
est nation riddled with violence.

Neighbouring Caribbean
island Cuba had 2.5 million vis-
itors and the Dominican
Republic had 4 million visitors
in 2005, Preval said in a 90-
minute speech that was delayed
néarly three hours. ,

‘Haiti had 112,000 tourists that
same year, he said.

“The first thing everybody is
asking for is roads. How can
-you talk about tourism without
-having the highways that take

‘the tourists to places in a com-
‘tortable way?” Preval said
‘through an interpreter.

Preval said he would rely on

international financial help to









Hi PRESIDENT of Haiti Rene Preval, center, and Haitian
Ambassador to the US Ray Joseph, left, listen as former mayor
of Atlanta Andrew Young talks at the Second Annual Haiti
Tourism Development Summit on Sunday

defray the cost of road build-
ing, though he did not specify
the estimated cost or a timeline
for construction.

Governor Jeb Bush had also
been scheduled to speak at Sun-
day, but did not attend the
event. A spokeswoman said
Bush, who governs a state with
a large Haitian community, sent
a representative to the confer-
ence and is committed to work-
ing with Haiti to improve its sit-
uation.

“We want to help with a
strong Haiti, a healthy Haiti,”
spokeswoman Alia Faraj said.

Serge Philippe Pierre, mar-

(AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

keting director for the Haitian
airline Tortug’ Air, said he was
encouraged by Préval’s vision
to boost tourism. “It is a good
way for Haiti to rebuild the
country,” he said. “It’s a not a
dream, it will become a reality.
The money is there -- we can
find it from the international
community.”

Preval, a 63-year-old cham-
pion of the gor, took power
last month rolemiaee two-year
i :ent installed
ent Jean-
Bertrand Aristide was deposed
amid a February 2004 revolt.

Throughout his speech,







Preval repeated the need for
siability in his country and
begged his countrymen to stop
the violence. Political unrest
was the main reason why Haiti
was not viewed as a safe, desir-
able tourist destination, he said.

“We have other islands in the
Caribbean that have far more
crime than we do, but nobody
talks about them because they
have political stability,” Preval
told about a.packed hotel ball-
room of about 400 diners, most-
ly from South Florida’s Haitian
community. ,

Haiti had been relatively calm
since Preval was elected Feb-
ruary 7, but recent kidnappings
and attacks on police and UN
peacekeepers have raised fears
of a flare
lar to the mayhem following the
2004 revolt that toppled Aris-
tide. An upsurge in gang. vio-
lence has led UN troops to
increase patrols and checkpoints
in Port-au-Prince, the volatile
Haitian capital.

A Canadian missionary kid-
napped from his home north
of Port-au-Prince a week ago
was released on Sunday. ‘Twen-
iy-nine people were kidnapped
in Haiti’s capital last month,
up from 15 in April, according
to the UN peacekeeping mis-
sion.

Haiti also needs to stream-
line the process for investors,
he said. In the Dominican
Republic investors can open a
business in two days, but Haiti’s



Japan fo fight global warming by pumping carhon dioxide underground

TOKYO a

JAPAN hopes to slash green-
house gas emissions and fight
global warming with a revolu-

tionary plan to pump carbon

dioxide into underground stor-
age reservoirs instead of releas-
ing it into the atmosphere, an
official said Monday, according
to Associated Press.

' The proposal aims to bury
200 million tons of carbon diox-
ide a year by 2020, cutting the
country’s emissions by one-
sixth, said Masahiro Nishio, an
official at the Ministry of Econ-

\

Inventory

SALE

JUNE
zoth
through
30th

omy, Trade and Industry. Intro-
duced last month, the plan is
still under study.
Underground storage of car-
bon dioxide underlines the new
urgency felt’ by, industrialized
countries trying to rein in the
effects of global warming. But
capturing carbon dioxide from
factory emissions and pressur-
izing it into liquid form, scien-
tists can inject it into under-
ground aquifers, gas fields or
gaps between rock strata, safe-
ly keeping it out of the air.
Japan has no commercial

underground carbon dioxide

storage operations, Nishio said.

Dowdeswell Street
Telephone: 322-2100



But the proposed project would
dwarf similar operations under
way in Norway, Canada and
Algeria, each of which pump
about 1 million tons a year.

Tackling carbon dioxide is a
top priority for Japan, the
world’s second-largest econo-
my. The country expels 1.3 bil-
lion tons of carbon dioxide a
year, making it one of the
world’s top offenders. despite
being a key driver behind to the
Kyoto Protocol — an interna-
tional agreement to cut global
output. of carbon dioxide by
2012.

‘Underground storage could

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begin as early as 2010, but there

are still many hurdles to over-
come, Masahiro said.

Capturing carbon dioxide and
injecting it underground is pro-
hibitively expensive costing up
to $52 a ton, Nishio said. Under
the new initiative, the ministry
aims to halve that cost. by 2020
under.




















e-up of violence simi- -

political red tape often forces
investors to donate to political
causes before they can open a
business, he said.

Preval also called on US law-
makers to help boost Haiti’s
economy by passing the Hait-
ian Hemispheric Opportunity
Through Partnership Encour-
agement Act, which supporters
say could create as many as
20,000 jobs in the Caribbean
country.

IUESUAY, JUNE 2/, 2000, MALE'S -





Kwame Raoul, an Illinois:
state senator whose parents:

immigrated from Haiti’ to: —

Chicago, said the HOPE.Act,
was “a very limited step” and!
would only create jobs that paid:
less than $2 an hour.
“But even that is a symbolic!
step forward,”
is lobbying to pass the act. “The |
situation of despair (in Haiti) ;
has reached a level to where’
nobody can deny what exists."

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Kerzner official tells students to
‘believe in themselves and soar’

GRADUATES of Queen’s
College Class 2006 were chal-
lenged to “believe in themselves
and soar” by Ed Fields, Kerzner

'- International’s vice president of
retail services and public affairs.

Mr Fields, who is also the
general manager of the Ocean
Club Estates Homeowners
Association, was the guest
speaker at the graduation cere-
mony held in the school’s audi-
torium on Wednesday, June 21.

The former Queen’s College
graduate told the graduating
class of 2006 that “conventional
thinking maintains our standard
of living and maintains mankind,
but it does very little to advance

_ mankind. |

- “Tt is only through thinking
out of the box that we are able
to advance ourselves,” he said.
“Advancement is not only
essential, but it is critical for our
continued survival as human
beings.”

Pointing to the school’s

‘ theme, “Because we believe...
we soar” Fields used the oppor-

. tunity to challenge the 84 grad-
uates to personalise the theme
by thinking: “because I
believe...I soar.”

Decisions |

Fields told the graduates that
they have reached the point in
their lives where they are the
ones making the important deci-
sions that will affect their future.

“Whether you are going off

to college or entering into the

. work place, ‘mommy and daddy’
* will not be there to make deci-

sions for you. What direction
will you choose? Will you.

choose your friend’s choice, will
it be a boyfriend’s or girlfriend’s
choice, or a conventional
choice?” .

In making decisions, Fields .

urged the students to get input
and guidance from mentors and
loved ones and to make smart
décisions based on what they
believe. £2.



“What we are talking about.

here today, is about mature,
thought-out choices that allow



H QUEEN’S College graduates marching into the school’s auditorium for the graduation ceremony.

us. (human beings) to co-exist
with each other.”

Fields told the graduates that
along the way, some bad choic-
es will be made.

“Bad outcomes are not the
end of a situation, they are the
beginning of an opportunity, life
is like a maze — not a dead end.
The thinkers will find their.w;
out. ce

“At the same time




Nei,



2c

yourself from bad choices
is not necessarily a fun chal-
lenge.

“Tt is only when life situations
deal you a bad hand, that you
should use your creativity to win
the game,” he said.

Mr Fields impressed upon the
graduates’ parents the need to
counsel and guide the young
dwits, rather than mold them,
%, Héurged the parents to finda
balance between what they
think is best for their children







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and what their children believe
is best for themselves.

While delivering the school’s
report, Andrea Gibson, princi-
pal of Queen’s College, pointed
out that the school’s students
continue to perform above the
national average on the BGCSE
(Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Education Exam-
nations).

@ PICTURED is Ed Fields, Kerzner International’s vice president of retail services and pub-

“The performance of our stu-
dents from grade seven to 11
confirmed that when we raised
the bar our students are able to
respond,” she said.

Miss Gibson noted that of the
accelerated students who sat the
BGCSE exam in grade 11, three
gained top marks in their
respective subjects — which
included religious education,
history, craft and geography.

Mrs Shawn Turnquest, vice
principal and head of Queen’s
College high school, said that
over the school’s 116 years of
existence it has withstood the
test of time.

She said that as the oldest pri-
vate school in the Bahamas,
Queen’s College has been a
front-runner in producing many
of this country’s outstanding cit-
izens.

“Today our graduates stand
on the bridge that connects this
school’s great past to its glorious
future.

“We welcome you to the cer-
emony that marks the-end of
one stage of an educational
journey and the beginning of
another which, with the right
heart and the right attitude,
promises to be an incredible
one,” said Mrs Turnquest.

Valedictorian Tajh Ferguson
and salutorian Leslie Ann
Sealey, were presented with the
Susan Eliza Young Prize.

- Awards

Since 1925, the four top stu-
dents in each graduating class
have been recognised through
the presentation of the awards
established through legal trusts
in memory of Susan Eliza
Young and the young son of
Rev and Mrs Parkinson.

The award is presented based

- on the students cumulative GPA

from grades 10 to 12.

Kyle Ingraham received the
Principal’s Prize which is award-
ed to the student who displays
the most consistent effort, and
excellence.

Ingraham also received the -

Head Boy Prize.

Jessica Lowe was presented

with the Head Girl Prize.
A number of graduates

received top awards in the Sub- ©

ject Prizes and Special Awards
category. The school also recog-
nised students from grades sev-
en to 11 who made the Princi-
pal’s List for attaining a 3.
grade point average. '



Ses eRe &

OSS eos es

%

v

lic affairs at first left, along with Mrs Shawn Turnquest, vice principal and head of Queen’s Col-- ‘
lege high school and Rev Dr Laverne Lockhart, vice president of the Bahamas Conference of the’

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THE TRIBUNE



THESE two views of Sand Banks shanty
settlement near Treasure Cay, Abaco, show
tightly-packed Haitian shacks right next toa -

‘swamp.



The community on S C Bootle Highway,

highway... -







FROM page one _

Ambassador Rood was able to
come to a “general agreement”

with US government officials
regarding the funding of
OPBAT.

He emphasised that there will
ibe no reduction of the funds



‘Dr N ottage |
reveals that
~ children part
_of ‘alarming’
statistic —
FROM page one

-’ One hundred and five
kilo-grams of cocaine and
33 pounds of marijuana,.:
with an estimated street:
value of over $1.7 million,
were seized.

Police also confiscated a
large quantity of cash and.
an illegal fire arm. Thre¢
months ago the police ;
made a similar raid.



“Two things are: signifi: e

cant about these incidents.

One is that drug trafficking :

continues to be a pressing.
problem in our country





and, secondly, the Bahami- |.
ans are appalled and‘deter-’

mined to keep their com

munities drug free by pro-.".
viding police with the rele--

vant information to’ aie
hend suppliers,” Mrs Prat
said. :
The major goal i is to
‘bring about a drug free
society, the Deputy Prime
Minister said, while refer-
ring to the secretariat as a
“long awaited tool of the
government.
“The plan represents the
government’s policy and’
. Strategy to address the
_ probjJem of drugs. It is an
integrated strategy incor-
porating adequate legisla-
tive framework, and other
‘ controls to address the
movement of chemicals
and precursors. 5
“Money laundering EO
improve our capacity to -
‘wage an effective war on
_ drugs.”

pedvitied to othe Sperone









In the: weeks leading up to
the ambassador’s trip, concerns
were raised that the US might
withdraw. its, Amy ‘helicopters
from the. programme and 'sig-
nificantly reduce its. financial
support.

However, the: ambassador
quickly moved: to. quell: those
fears by’ saying, sthat there was

no talkof removing: ‘the heli- Bes
copters from OPBAT. ”

The Western: Hemisphere

Travel Initiative was also a top-

ic-of discussion during the
‘Washington trip.

Although he could not yet
disclose any details of the



outcome of talks regarding -

the ‘travel initiative, Mr
Floyd said that the’ “news is
good.”

The initiative, which requires
all US citizens, travelling. to.the
Bahamas to have.a valid pass-_

Poth has caused Breat, concern



like Pigeon Pea in Marsh Harbour, is con-
’ sidered a major fire hazard.

The fenced area on the lower right is the
' Treasure Cay cemetery, which borders the

LOCAL NEWS

Fire hazard concerns i



for the countty’s tourism indus-

try.

It was estimated that the
Caribbean could lose billions of
dollars in revenue if the dead-
line for the new initiative. were
to be enforced before US trav-
ellers — the majority of whom
do not possess passports — had
sufficient time to obtain the nec-
essary documents.

The Caribbean region was

“asking for a deadline on par “|

with that set for Mexico and
Canada —aJ anuary, 2008 dead-
line.

» After consideration of the
region’s concerns, the US
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity decided to extend the orig-

‘inal deadline for the Caribbean,

a January, 2006 deadline, to
2007.

Information regarding the
possible additional extension of
the deadline is expected to be
released tomorrow.

An island resident said: “This is another,
potential disaster as a fire here could take 50-
100 houses. There is no fire engine on North
Abaco and the Marsh Harbour engines are.
probably 30. to 40 minutes away.’

”

Abaco residents fear disaster «












































(Photos: Colyn Reese)







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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006



June 27, 2006






THE E TRIBUNE



issue XIV.



The Bahamas Telecommunications Co, Ltd,
BIG, Take Punta Cana by “Storm” during the
22” Annual CANTO Tradeshow & Exhibition.

The event which was held on the beautiful
Caribbean island of Punta Cana in the
Dominican Republic, attracted some 600
members of the Telecommunications
industry in and throughout the Caribbean.
BTC's Acting President & CEO, Leon Williams,
serves on the CANTO Board of Directors as
Chairman and leads a team of 8 Directors on
the road to ensuring the Caribbean remains
at the forefront of technology and the
Telecommunications Industry.

The Caribbean Association of National
Telecommunication Organizations (CANTO)
was founded in 1985 as a non profit
association of telephone companies in the
Caribbean. CANTO’s objective, then and now,
is to establish a forum through which
Caribbean Telecommunication Organizations
may exchange information and expertise in
the telecommunication field.

THEME: PARTNERS IN TRANSITION
During the 4 day conference numerous

issues where addressed including New &

Emerging Technologies, Human Resources,
Finance and Advisory, Marketing,
Communications and Disaster Recovery
Planning. BTC was well represented by a
delegation of 12 who focused on BTC’s new
initiatives as well as the Bahamas Domestic
Submarine Network International (BDSN).
BTC’s exhibition booth as the conference
showcased a map of the BDSNI, HELLO,
Blackberry and several other produces:
offered by BTC.

During Mr. Leon Williams address to the
CANTO members at the opening ceremony
he stated,”When the rate of change for the

p

outside environment is In excess to that of |

the rate of change with in an organization,
the end is near” Mr. Williams focused on a
plan of action that Included New Discoveries
in Technology, Globalization and
Multinational Corporations (many nations
one voice), BTC also sponsored the luncheon
that was held.on the final day of the
conference, during this time Mr, Willams
extended the opportunity for CANTO
participants to learn more about BTC and
rade a brief presentation on BTC and
Nortel’s extended partnership, This
partnership will positively affect Global
System for Mobile Communication (GM5),
and General Packet Radio System (GPRS -
internet access via mobile phone) therefore,
extended the capability of both services
throughout The Bahamas and the Caribbean,
This partnership triples the capacity of the
current wireless network and extends

roaming capability, Next year CANTO will be
held in Barbados and hosted by Cable & —

Wireless and once again BTC will represent
The Bahamas as the leading
telecommunications company, networking
with other on an international level allows
BTC to forge relationships, establish
creditability and remain knowledgeable of
the many new and upcoming products and
services which are offered, BTC Is proud to
be affiliated with CANTO as it represents a
group of companies that are all striving
towards a common goal’partnering together
to create a stronger linkage between the
Caribbean and the technology that is offered
to the residents of the Caribbean.















































meres a ecrenine hee




SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

BU

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Excessive franchises could Bank aims to
‘cause industry's collapse’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor

Ithough jitney

operators earn

a combined

$78,400 in rev-

enue per day,
“the industry would collapse”
if all 790 franchises that have
been issued were used, a gov-
ernment report has conclud-
ed.

A 46-page report on devel-
oping a model to unify New
Providence’s public transport
system found that while the jit-
ney sector’s annual turnover
was around $28.6 million, only
280 jitneys were on the roads
during a typical week day in
April 2005.

. But out of the 790 franchise ;

plates issued, only 258 were
“active” as at March 24, 2005,
meaning that they had paid all
fees and taxes owed to' the
Government:

, This, the report. said, meant.

that 532 or 67.3 per cent of all
jitney franchise plates issued
were: “non-active”, meaning
that they were either ‘dead

plates’ or unpaid and unli-
censed.

The report also revealed that
only 464 of the 790 issued fran-
chise plates had been allocated

approved routes on which to.

operate jitney services, mean-
ing that 326 licence plates did

‘not have a route.

The report starkly exposes
the chaotic nature of New
Providence’s public bus and
transportation system, which
has stemmed from years of
poor planning, neglect and lack
of regulatory enforcement.

It said: “Approximately 100
franchise. holders own their
own buses, equating to approx-
imately 140 jitneys. As at
March 24, 2004, there were
about 532 non-active/unpaid
franchise plates; 258 franchise

plates were paid up.

“Tf all the franchise plates
were to be used, the industry _

would collapse.”

The report added; “‘Irre-
spective of whether the unifi-
cation succeeds as proposed,

it is imperative that the defi-

ciencies in the current licensing
system are fixed and. an effec-

tively and equitable regulatory
system is established and fully
enforced.”

This findings from the latest
report on New Providence’s
public transport system should
not be surprising, since two
previous studies undertaken
under the former FNM admin-
istration had reached the same
conclusions.

Those studies concluded that
the current jitney system “no
longer effectively serves” the
needs of the travelling public
or its owners and operators. It
said:the problems involved
“destructive competition” and
“the indiscriminate granting of
franchises resulting in too
many ill-equipped operators in
the system”.

About 50 per cent.of fran-
chise holders “have neither the
experiencé nor the inclination
to operate a publicly-scheduled
bus service”.

To calculate the sector’s’

earnings, the report based its

average, daily fare collected fig-

ure of between $280-$320 per
jitney on figures supplied by
the Public Transit Association

(PTA) and individual. opera-
tors.

With 280 jitneys on the road,
collecting an average $280 per
day,.the report. calculated. the
industry’s gross daily turnover
at about $78,400. It:also.relied
on a passenger split of 82 per
cent adults, each paying $1,
and 14 per cent children and

4 per cent seniors, the former, |

paying $0.75 and the latter
$0.50.

Breaking down the number
of daily riders, the report esti-
mated that 64,288 were adults;
14,635 children; and 6,272
seniors. ;

Passenger demand for jitney
trips was likely to increase in
line with population and eco-
nomic activity, but the report
said. demand would be “sup-
pressed” unless issues such as
security, safety, comfort and
driver behaviour’. were
addressed.

By tackling these areas, the
report estimated that passen-
ger numbers could “increase

SEE page 5B

Banks cig optimistic’ on ACH by ‘06 end

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
ribune Business Edi or





THE Clearine Banks Association’s
(CBA) chairman yesterday told The Tri-
bune that the organisation was “still opti-
mistic” that the first phase of the Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH) would be in
place by year-end, having received 20
applications from companies interested in
supplying the software to runit.

Paul McWeeney, who is also Bank of
the Bahamas International’s chairman,
said the Request for Proposal (RFP) for
software vendors to submit their applica-

tions expires on June 30.

He added: “We have about up ‘to 20.
vendors participating in the exercise. It’s
_ reached a much broader ee than

before?” |





eos i PAUL MeWEENEY

three.

The Association has been trying to get
the ACH off the ground for some time,
missing its initial target of having it estab-
lished by 2005 after it brought the first
tendering process to an end, unable to
select a vendor to install the system.

In that round, Mr McWeeney said the
CBA had received about seven applica-
tions from software vendors, who were
subsequently reduced to’a final field of

Apart from the software tender, Mr
McWeeney told The Tribune that the
clearing banks would shortly begin the
process of interviewing applicants for the ,
separate role of ACH project manager.

In addition, the CBA was also assessing

SEE page 6B . 3

reduce US$
cheque process
waiting time by
up to 700%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL ee
Tribune usiness Editor ea







‘BANK. of the Bahamas iitemanondl vercaay said: its
introduction of a service that will reduce the time for-cleating ,
US$ cheques to three from 40 days would improve: -Cashy ‘flow
for Bahamian businesses. and enhance their operating. tf:
ciency:

Paul McWeeney, the bank’s managing director, told The Tri.
bune that the new service - slated to reduce the time to-clear
US$ cheques made out to Bahamian businesses and individ-
uals by up to 700 per cent - was a “natural progression””’ of, ‘the
institution’s existing cheque imaging programme. ;

That initiative allows Bank of the Bahamas International
clients to view electronic images of their cheques online.

Under the US$ cheque initiative, once received,,the bank
will scan these cheques to create images of them electronically.

The images, which serve as a substitute cheque but maintain
the same legal integrity as their paper equivalent, will then be
sent electronically by Bank of the Bahamas International to
their US correspondent bank, Bank of America.

The US bank then places the cheque images into the US

- clearing system for payment, eliminating a costly, bureau-

cratic process that required the physical cheque to besént from
the Bahamas to the US for settlement - a process that could
take up to-40 days: :

Apart from the US$ cheque imaging, Mr McWeeney yes-
terday told The Tribune that Bank of the Bahanias Interna- -
tional. was. currently converting its.technology platform toa

“new “core banking solution”

supplied by an Indian compa- .
aed mei” SEE page 6B.

Bahamas told not to ‘relax’

â„¢ By CARA BRENNEN CTO secretary-general
Tribune Business i
Reporter . urges nation to promote
at the Caribbean Hotel ‘att ee ya
Investment Conference _ destination diversity,
are and praises it lead on.
_ MIAMI, Florida — The Woenes
Bahamas cannot afford,to rest Internet marketing

on its tourism laurels even _
though it is a leader in mar- ©

Fidelity rates make saving worthwhile.

mela why Andrea is a Fidelity Smart Saver.

Choose Wisely
Choose Fidelity

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keting itself via the Internet, a

former tourism director-gen-
eral told The Tribune yester-
day, urging this nation to pro-
mote its diversity of island
experiences.

The current Caribbean
Tourism Organisation (CTO)
secretary-general, Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, said that

while the Bahamas was

doing%o “all the right things,
we need to make sure that no
one thinks it is time to relax”.
_ “T think the Bahamas is
already doing all the thing we
talk about in terms of restruc-

turing ourselves,” he said,

pointing out that increeased

WESTWARD VILLAS #3385:

competition in the tourism sec-
tor was making this critical.
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
joined Frank Vanderpost, the
senior vice-president of the |
Americas for Jumierah, Dubai;
Dr Hudson Husbands of
Tourism Global Inc; and: Dr
Ewart F Brown, the Bermuda
Minister of Tourism and
Transport, for the first session
of the three-day Caribbean
Hotel Investment Conference

(CHIC), which is being held

atthe Hyatt Regency in SOR:
town Miami.

SEE page 7B

Immaculate, turn-key 3 bed

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generator and manicured garden with sprinkler system. Garage —
with electric door, large laundry room, electric gates and alarm .
system. New electric shutters to be installed. US$729,000,
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\W Damianos

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t 242.322.2305

Sotheby's

INTERNATIONAL REALTY -

f 242.322.2033





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

Government should release



RSS es



saad eS a



Sees

Ee:

oh

a

‘
‘
‘
‘
a
4
4



LAST November, the Min-

ister of State for Finance,
James Smith, was quoted as
saying: “We have received the
relevant studies and very soon
I hope to go to my colleagues
to get: permission to formally
launch discussions with the
wider. public and stakeholders
to share with them the results
of these studies, and to have
discussions about the way for-
ward.”

‘Almost three years ago I
wrote: and published a four-
part series on Tax Reform, and
at the:end I recommended a
combination of a low income

tax attd a sales tax. It seems’

from ‘all a¢counts that the Gov-
ernment has more or less set-
tled ona Value Added Tax
(VATye ‘as the way forward. My
concérn at the time was that I
thought that a VAT was quite
complicated to understand,
and there was already talk of
exempting too many sectors
from ‘the tax.

Expressed

Also, I expressed a frustra-
tion that there was insufficient
data in the public domain to

enable independent analysis of
the income yield from all taxa-
tion models, being considered.
No doubt, such analysis is
included in the information
that the Minister intends to
release.

Cabinet

Why is it taking Gihinets so
long to approve the relédse of
thesg studies? It is my hope
that Cabinet gives approval to
the Minister of State, in very
short order, to put these stud-
ies in the public domain and
start the process of tax reform
in earnest. I also hope this
process will produce consen-
sus and generate sustained
interest.

However, I personally feel
it is'‘unlikely that tax reform
will be addressed now, given
that there is less than’ 12
months to go before general
elections. Such an important
initiative requires non-partisan
political discussion, and histo-

ry has shown that coming so .

close ‘to elections, the simplest
matter becomes highly politi-
cised, Therefore, it is probably
unrealistic to expect a major

f



discussion for such a funda-_
mental change to get a bal-_

anced hearing in such an envi-
ronment, notwithstanding that
our current system of taxation
‘has taken us as far as it can.

Marathon

Last Thursday, after a
‘marathon late night session,
the 2006-2007 Budget was
passed by.Parliament and now
goes to the Senate this week
for final approval. While I

admit that I missed all the -

debate due to being off-island,
I was able to follow some of
the presentations in online edi-

tions of the press. As far as I...

\

Financial

By eras Gibson

reanennnarsnnannscnnngonnansnnennrseanaegansnnennnpeeaparqnengnaqnre/dPepenesanvonsnennanannnsnnnananannannasnnnns nn

Focus

~ could tell, no one touched the

issue of tax reform, notwith-
standing the fact that our bud-
getary options are constantly
being challenged by our over-
reliance on ‘customs duties’:

Call for a Policy Paper

It is clear from public pro-
nouncements over the past |
four years that the Govern-
ment has decided‘upon a Val-
ue’ Added Tax (VAT):as the
way forward: This. being the
case, it only makes sense that
the Government proceed to
publish a ‘white paper’ on tax
reform.

According to Wikipedia, the
online encyclopedia: “In the



Commonwealth of Nations,
‘white paper’ is an informal
name for a parliamentary
‘paper; in the United Kingdom

these. are issued as ‘Command

‘papers... White ‘papers. are
issued by the Government and
lay out policy, or proposed
action, on a topic of current
concern. Although a white
paper may occasion consulta-

“tion as to the details of new
Jegislation, it does signify a

clear intention on the part of a

government to pass new law.”

Decision

Conversely, if-a’ final deci-
sion: has not been made, then it
would be appropriate. to pub-

lish a ‘green paper’ on the sub-

ject. Green papers, also.known

as consultation documents,

which are issued much more
frequently, are more’ open-end-
ed and may merely propose a

- strategy to be implemented in.
the details of other legislation,.
or set out proposals on which
the ¢



Vvernment wishes to
obtail public views and opin-
ion, :

“Whether it is a white or
ereen pi Det theta is a matter







for the Government of the day.

However, the publication of
such documents would go a
long way in helping the
Bahamas to develop a tradi-
tion of participatory democra-
cy, whereby persons from all

walks of life and all sides of

the political divide can come
together in a non-partisan way
to, help shape policies for the
long-term benefit of the coun-

. try.

-Until'next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions. Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or.any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please’
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

Â¥

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THE TRIBUNE

‘Little sense’





@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN economic think-tank
said “there is little practical sense” for this
nation to sign on to the PetroCaribe ini-
tiative, as it would rapidly increase the
national debt through by it to the world’s

. most unstable commodity - oil prices.

Responding to renewed efforts during ~
the Budget debate to promote the Petro- -

Caribe accord, the Nassau Institute in its
latest commentary called on the Govern-
ment’s Petroleum Usage Review Com-
mittee to release data showing how much
less Bahamian consumers would pay for
petroleum-related products if this nation
signed on to Hugo Chavez’s accord.

Comunittee

While Pierre Dupuch, the MP who sits
on the Committee, and PetroCaribe’s chief
promoter, Leslie Miller, former minister of
trade and industry, both talked up the
accord’s virtues in their Budget speech-
es, the Nassau Institute said gas prices in
Caribbean countries who had signed on to
the scheme had not fallen.

Describing PetroCaribe as a “loans for
oil” scheme, which had been designed by
Venezuelan president, Hugo Chavez, as
way to obtain Caribbean political in his
ongoing war of words with the US, the

think-tank said neither MP had produced .

documents to support their assertions.

The Nassau Institute said: “The current
price of fuel, as high as it is, is no reason
for the Government to indenture the
Bahamas and her citizens to Venezuela, a
country where political and economic free-
doms erode daily under the arbitrary rule
of Hugo Chavez’s ‘flexible authoritarian-
ism’.

“In other words, there is little practical
sense for the Bahamas to increase its inter-
national debt for a consumable product
like oil. The gasoline will be gone and
future generations of Bahamians will owe
Venezuela millions of dollars for-gas they
did not use.”

A draft copy of the PetroCaribe accord
obtained by The Tribune showed how







@ LESLIE MILLER

much Venezuela will subsidise Bahami-
an purchases of oil from PDV Caribe, an
affiliate of its PDVSA state-owned oil
company. It effectively showed that Petro-
Caribe is an oil-for-credit deal, and does
not mean lower gas prices.

Price

_ If the price is above $15 per barrel, the
level of subsidisation will be 5 per cent. For
$20 per barrel it will be 10 per cent; $22
per barrel at-15 per cent; $24 per barrel at

20 per cent; $30 per barrel at 25 per cent;

$40 per barrel at 30 per cent; and for $50
and $100, 40 per cent and 50 per cent
respectively.



Clearing Banks Association

NG OT ICE

The Central Bank of The Buhanias issued Guidelirts, on 1 the’

Prevention & Detection of Money Laundering for Licensees

- (Guidelines) in October 2005. The Guidelines direct figenisees
to complete verification of existing clients by June 30) 2006
in accordance with section 6(6) of the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, 2000.

Failure to verify your facility may negatively impact the normal
operation of your account/facility. Customers are encouraged
to visit their respective Bank (s) to update MuNenaNee
accounts/facilities on or before June 30% 2006.

The following docurhents, in addition to your respective bank’s

verification documentation, are required for updating personal —

accounts.
Official Current Photo for example:
Current Valid Passport;

Driver’s License;
or Voter’s Card

Verification of Address for example:

Voter’s card;

Utility bill;

National Insurance Card ;or
Bank or credit card statement.

In the case of Corporate/Business accounts/facilities please
contact your nearest Bank for verification requirements.

Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada



Mr Miller had touted cost savings for
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) as one of the major benefits to
flow from PetroCaribe. |

“BEC could easily save between $10!

and $15 million a year with this agree-
ment. We have a deal now where BEC

can purchase 60 per cent of their fuel and
get the other 40 per cent on credit. And on
that AO per cent they have 90 days to pay
for it, with only a one per cent interest
rate. And, Venezuela has agreed to also
assist in the shipping of the fuel," he said.

Study

Yet a Nassau Institute study, réleased in
October 2005, showed that the Bahamas
could owe Venezuela $202 million in debt
within five years if BEC was allowed to
buy oil under PetroCaribe.

It said its calculations were based on
the assumption that BEC purchased $100
million of fuel products per year, and that
under PetroCaribe, some $40 million of
this would be financed by Venezuela. The

financing would be over a 25-year period |

at a 1 per cent per annum interest rate.

And based on the fact that the Bahamas
imported $265 million of petroleum-relat-
ed products in 2004 - an amount that
increased sharply in 2005 - the Nassau
Institute said that based on the same
terms, an extra $106 million in loans per
annum would result.

When added to BEC purchases, the
Nassau Institute said this could result in
the Bahamas owing $737.3 million to
Venezuela. Over 25 years, this could
increase the national debt by $3.7 billion,
it added.

The Nassau Institute urged the Petrole-
um Usage Review Committee to state
how much the Bahamas would owe
Venezuela over 25 years if it signed on to
PetroCaribe.

It added: “We spoke with a contact in
Jamaica who indicated that the price of
fuel at the pumps has not dropped in
Jamaica since the implementation of
PetroCaribe, and his country is using the
money for budgetary purposes rather than
lowering the price of fuel at the pumps.”

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 8B: *.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL.-

The Public is hereby advised that |, MATTHEW OWEN |:
BATHOLEMEW ROBERTS, of of SeaBreeze lane, Nassau,

Bahamas, P.O. Box N-8815 intend to change my name to
MATTHEW OWEN BATHOLEMEW SIMMS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box.
N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days afte
the date of publication of this notice. ay



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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE









NEW YORK (Dow
Jones/AP) — Gold and silver
futures ended the session near-
ly flat yesterday at the New
York Mercantile Exchange as
traders await Thursday’s Fed-
eral Reserve meeting on inter-
est rates.

.. The benchmark August gold
“contract settled 30 cents lower
-‘at $587.70 a troy ounce. The

positive territory to reach a ses-
sion high of $589.50 an ounce
for the day session but was
unable to hold onto gains.
“There is not much of a sto-
ry besides waiting on the Fed,”
said Frank Lesh, a futures ana-
lyst with Future Path Trading.
Lesh said gold and silver
came off of lows amid some
short covering but light vol-

i
1

capped the highs.

“We are likely to see that
kind of trade action at least
until Thursday,” said Lesh.

The most-active July silver
contract followed gold’s lead
and settled lower on the day
at $10.24 an ounce, down 4.5
cents.

July platinum settled $14.40
higher at $1,181.30 an ounce.

$10.75 highet at $320.55 an
ounce.

The most-active September
copper contract settled up 8.20
cents at $3.230 per pound.

August crude oil rose 93
cents to $71.80 a barrel.

July gasoline rose 5.12 cents
to $2.1788 a gallon.

July heating oif rose 1.63
cents higher to $1.9789 a gal-
lon.

.-contract moved slightly into ume and range bound trade September palladium settled

July natural gas fell 25.7
cents to settle at $5.969 a mil-
lion British thermal units.

On the New York Board of
Trade, Arabica coffee futures

FIDELITY

has a vacancy for the position of

GROUP AUDIT MANAGER

PROFILE:

Relevant graduate or postgraduate degree and/or professional
qualneaions e.g. ACCA, CPA, CGA, CFA,

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Management of the Internal Audit function within all Fidelity Group
operations (Bahamas, Cayman, Turks & Caicos Islands)

Liaison with Price WaterhouseCoopers to oversee their internal audit
functions

Formalization of the risk management process

Updating and maintaining the policy and procedural manuals

Overseeing the implementation of the disaster recovery plans

Preparation of business-focused recommendations/reports that
provide clear actions to address control weakness.

Ree RAE A A A

CRITICAL SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE:

Good level of bisinges: awareness and an understanding of
Fidelity’s strategic and tactical goals.

Specialist expertise in capital markets, asset management, financial
management, audit and risk management

An awareness of general financial services issues including regula-
tory requirements.

Reasonable knowledge of core banking processes and banking
functions

® Strong communication & PC skills
The person will report directly to the Audit, Risk and Compliance Committee.
The successful candidate will be offered a competitive

compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.

Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:

_ The Human Resource Director

dropped to one and-a-half-year
lows as fund selling pushed the
September contract through
major support and into sell
stops. Spot July managed to
hold above its recent nine-
month low at 94.50 cents a
pound. July ended 0.70 cent
lower at 94.60 cents while Sep-
tember lost 0.65 cent to 95.95

‘cents.

The most active September
cocoa contract settled up $14 at
$1,557 per metric ton, Decem-
ber settled up $14 at $1,592 per
metric ton.

Futurés‘on raw sugar in for-



nd session ‘nearly flat’

eign ports for July settled up
0.31 cent at 15.76 cents a
pound while October gained
0.38 cent to 16.31 cents a
pound.

On the Chicago Board of
Trade, July corn declined 5.25
cents to $2.23 per bushel, and
December fell 6.25 cents to
$2.49 per bushel.

July soybeans ended 11 cents

- lower at $5.6950, and Nov -soy-

beans finished 12 cents lower
at $5.9450 a bushel.
September wheat contract

settled 4.25 cents higher at

$3.8575 per bushel.

Business leaders
attend US-Arab
Economic Forum



a LEAGUE of Arab States Secretary General Amre Moussa (left), Saudi Arabia Minister of State

~

old and silver futures |

oe we

Abdullah Zainal Alireza (centre) and Qatar Second Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of
Energy and Industry Abdullah Bin Hamad Al-Attiyah (right) talk before the start of a session on
US-Arab relations at the US-Arab Economic Forum yesterday in Houston. Leaders from the Mid-
dle East, CEO’s from the oil companies and other business tenders are here to discuss US-Arab rela-
tions during the three-day event.

Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WEINCE JOSEPH ERME OF
BAHAMA AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who. knows. any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.






=) FIDELITY

























52wk-Low













Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
0.59 Abaco Markets 7.59 4.70 O11 3,000. -0.019 0.000 N/M 0.00% a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
8.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.75 11.75 0.00 1.568 0.380 7.5 3.23% eight days from the 28TH day of JUNE , 2006 to the Minister
6.35 Bank of Bahamas 7.23 7.23 0.00 0.738 0.330 9.8 4.56%
BO. oo Beate oa oe 506 Soe! nea aoe ae responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
1.26. Bahamas Waste 1.43 1.43 0.00 10.143 0.060 10.0 4.20% Nassau, Bahamas.
1.05 Fidelity Bank 1.49 1.49 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.21 9.21 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
- 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.90 4.90 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.80 40.80 0.00 4,000 0.931 0.600 11.6 5.56% Legal Notice
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.17 4.98 -0.19 0.115 0.045 1.5 26.47%
2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.45 —- Finco 11.50 11.50 0.00 400 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78% NOTICE
8.60 FirstCaribbean 12.43 12.43 0.00 0.885 ‘ 4.07% :
8.42 Focol 11.07 11.15 0.08 1,100 0.885 4.48%
0.95 Freeport Concrete 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.162 0.00%
9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.526 4.26% GUN P OINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED
8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 0.00 0.565 6.15%
5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.91 0.00 0.160 0.00%
2.036 9



al .
: This is to inform the General Public that all that private throughfare
or roadway known as Gun Point situate northeastwards of the
Settlement of Spanish Wells at the northwestern end of the Island

of North Eleuthera will be closed to the public from 6:00 a.m. on









EPS $ Div $ Yield
1.923
0.000

0.084

Last Price
1 1.00



52wk-Low Symbol Weekly Vol
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

ND Holdi

7.8 4.80%
7.80%

15.00
10.35





28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings

Saturday, 8th July, 2006 to’ 6:00 a.m. to Sunday, 9th July, 2006 to
protect the right of ownership.

1.750 2.57%
















52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA _V YTD% Last12 Months Div $
1.2933 1.2367 Colina Money Market Fund 1.293348*
2.8564 2.3657 + Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.78564 *** 10.44 22.44

2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480** 3.417

Colina Bond Fund 1.164331***"









1.1006





Everette Sands
President

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price



52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
Sawk-| Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
4 Pravious Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

*- 16 June 2006





Tdday's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week **- 31 May 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value i ** - 30 April 2006

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
4 P/E -’Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings




31 March 2006





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 5B



Despite the storms, —
manufactured homes
are still attractive

@ By BRITT KENNERLY
Florida Today

BAREFOOT BAY, Fla.
(AP) — They’re not tradition-
al homes, but don’t’call them
trailers — and don’t expect to
pay trailer prices for them.

Despite the hard hit from

the storms of 2004, when at ©

least 1,000 of Barefoot Bay’s
5,000 single- or double-wide
manufactured homes had to be
replaced or moved, properties
there haven’t been left behind
in the booming real estate mar-
ket of the past two years.

While the market may have
cooled, as it has for all types of
housing countywide, agents say
lots in the largest land-owned
manufactured home commu-
nity still command as much as
$75,000. Many homes are listed
for more than $125,000, and
one recently sold, for around
$169,000.

Though demand was slow to
come back after every home

in Barefoot Bay sustained -

damage in hurricanes Frances

and Jeanne, those who buy -

here now pay tens of thou-
sands more for homes than
they would have two years ago,
along with hurricane-hiked
insurance rates.

Knowing the potential for
serious damage and the inflat-
ed price tag of settling here,
one question seems a natural:
“Why would anyone pay that

price for a manufactured ©

home?”

-The answer is simple, real
estate agents and many long-
time residents say.:People will:
take their chances to have a
comfortable home in a safe,
sunny neighborhood, even if
it’s on a $30,000, 50-by-80-foot
lot surrounded by old homes.

“We’re still probably the
least expensive alternative for
the working man who wants to
retire. You can buy a really
nice home here for $125,000



FROM page 1B

by at least 50 per cent, or pos-
sibly even by. 100 per cent”.

The report estimated that a

10. per cent rise in passenger

_ numbers could increase the jit-

ney industry’s annual revenues,

from the current $28.6 million
- to. $34.2 million. A 20 per cent
_.rise could take turnover to
$37.3 million; 30 per cent to
$40.4 million; a 50 per cent
increase to $46.6 million; and a
100 per cent increase to $69.2
million.
The report pointed out that
obtaining reliable, consistent

“We're still probably the
least expensive alternative
for the working man who

wants to retire. You can buy

a really nice home here

for $125,000 or less.”

— Broker Pat Webb, co Oitae
of Webb Realty in Barefoot Bay



or less,” said broker Pat Webb,
co-owner of Webb Realty in
Barefoot Bay.

“You can buy an older home
here in good repair, but not
updated on decor, from
$69,000 to $80,000-something.
Some homes go for up to

-$100,000 or more if they’re

totally renovated. Average
price is $100,000 to $115,000.”

For quite a while after the
storms, vacant lots were scarce.

“A lot of people were try-
ing to determine if they were
going to rebuild, sell their lot,
what they were going to do,”

Webb said. “Then slowly but

surely, we got more and more,
as they started pressuring peo-
ple to get rid of damaged
homes.”

Hurricanes, however,
changed the red-hot market of
early 2004. Prestorms, “if we
had 10 homes for sale, that was
a lot, and they went fast,” said
Judy Trier, sales associate at

- Barefoot Bay Realty. “It.was.a..

seller’s market.”
The landscape, along with
prices, has “changed drastical-

. ly. | think people got scared,”

Trier said. “It’s really slowed
down. It’ll pass, I think, if we
have a good season this year;
with no traumatic hurricanes.
But the insurance is still all out
of whack.”

financial information on the
jitney industry was often diffi-
cult, due to a reluctance to dis-
close finances by many indus-
try participants.

“It is evident that many
operators do not maintain
accounts of their business
transactions,” the report said:

A more reliable and safer

public transport-system has -

been cited as one way to
reduce the high level of traf-
fic congestion on New Provi-
dence, as it would lower the
incentive for Bahamians and
residents to always travel by,
and purchase cars.

Economic productivity and
efficiency is heavily impacted

NOTICE

Poststorm business also was-
n’t helped by the fact that for a
while, banks withdrew financ-
ing for homes built before
1980.

. “It was difficult for a while,”
Webb said. “Now we can
finance anything in Barefoot
Bay, but there’s.a slig

ence in una
homes. There’s a shor ter term’
on therii and a quarter-percent
higher interest rate.”

So who’s buying, given those
impediments? Old and young,
Webb said, and people with
children. Unlike many retire-
ment-area meccas, Barefoot
Bay isn’t age-restricted.

Most Barefoot Bay residents
come out of the East, “where a
standard home is $225,000,”
Webb said.

“This sounds like a bargain
to them. I tell people, don’t get
in over their heads; to buy
something they can afford.”

Peggy Galeone is one of
those who is sold on Barefoot
Bay and Brevard County.

“T dan’t think I'd ever want
to go back to New Jersey,” she
said.

“This is a good area, with
good housing prices compared
to other places. And one of the
things it has going for it is that
you own your own property.”

One of the only communi-



by the current school run, with
60 per cent of all school pupils
taken to school - and picked
up - by car. More than 90 per
cent of primary school students
are transported in this way.
And the report said: “The
number of vehicles being reg-
istered in New Providence is
increasing unabated. In the last
10 years, the population of
New Providence has increased
by approximately 50,000 peo-

ple, and concurrently, over the.

same period an additional
57,500 new vehicles have been
registered - a growth factor of
115 cars per 100 persons. It is
essential that this trend be
changed.”

Notice is herby given of the loss of Bahamas Government
Registered Stock Certificate as follow:

Interest

Stock Rate

BGRS

0.1562SAPR

Certificate

No.
57-052

Maturity
Date
May 11, 2006

$50,000.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
certificate. If this certificate is found, please cail 393-3691
or write to PO.Box SS-6314, Nassau, Bahamas.



ties of its type in the state,
Barefoot Bay was established
in 1969. Its amenities include
community buildings, a 776-
foot pier on the Indian River,
heated pools and activities’
from tennis to dance. _

Hal Brooks is one of the
diehards. He and Margie, his
wife of 57 years, are avid
square dancers and wouldn’t,
Brooks said, entertain the idea
of moving back to Pennsylva-
nia

The two had $32,000 worth
of damage at their manufac-
tured home in 2004, losing a
carport and root, among other
things. It took 18 months to
get needed repairs.

Still, the two think the pros
outweigh the cons. There are
99 different types of clubs,
Brooks said, and “the food’s
cheaper down here.”

He admits that “the biggest
thing that’s scaring everybody
away is hurricanes.”

“But a lot of that would stop
if they'd stop blowing it up on
TV, in the newspapers and on
the radio,” he said. “Other
than that, we call it paradise.”

It’s a paradise that people
say is appealing to a new breed
of retiree, too.

Some have just retired from
the military; others are leav-
ing teaching and law enforce-
ment jobs with good retire-
ment programs and saying,
“We’re. going to buy here, live
here a year or two while we’re
thinking about starting a sec-
ond career,” Webb said.

There’s yet another type of
resident, real estate experts
say: the kind who.leaves out
of fear after a storm, moves in
with children out of state, and
later starts to miss Florida.

“And then they came back
and said, "I’ve sold my beauti-
ful home and now I can’t get it
back,’ Trier said. “I’ve seen
it. | try and tell people, ’Stick it

399

out. Just wait.”

Profile:

NOTICE is hereby given that VIOLA CHARLES, OF
PINDER’S POINT, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be

granted, should send a written and signed statement of the |

facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

NOTICE



aw
N2o2s

NOTICE is hereby given that CHENET JOSEPH OF EAST |,

ST./ ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX N.P.-8180, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for i
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be.

facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JUNE,

. granted, should send a written and signed statement of the .

2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, |

P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
POBEDA INC.

(In Voluntary Liaigedon!

43

2 +2 oes 9

Notice is hereby. given that the above-named Company:
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 23rd day of June;,.,
2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp,. Inc., RO. Box N- 7757: ;
Nassau, Bahamas. Lt

ARGOSA CORP, INC.
(Liquidator)

WS See

wl

Winding Bav
ABARAT, BARA AS

Has two (BD vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:

SWE Tee e ew

i

e

ae

PCr EY EY
eer our vae es se we wee

-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration anid® +34
marketing. m3
-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory. te?
-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement :
self developed program ra
-Implementation of tour efficieacy and building of strong team values’.
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others
-Strong leadership skills

. «Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimum 5 years inarketing in management of sales, marketing an

administration

-College degree preferred, but not required.

ye ey
eee 544 4 +

Bo
4%
=

te a a eae

&

$3

Please Send Resumes: to:

ieee 8
, PRE e eee ae ew y
i Ae ee Oe ee a

Attn: HR Director

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057

Mash Harbour, Abaco

or

Fax: 242-367-0077

* 4
+e

* Kk 4s

ame

Supa

Position Available

Network Engineer

MCSE or MCP with N+

~ CCNA or higher a distinct advantage
Key Responsibilities:

Day to day operations of a datacentre
Providing support to clients
- Network and System troubleshooting

Knowledge and Skills:

Good Organisational Skills

Polite And Well Presented

Experience with PCs and IP Networking
Must be willing to travel

Salary & Benefits Negotiable

Send resume no later than Friday July 7th, 2006 to:

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f 326.3000



'

eA ae a
SORA Aran eanswuesasteaanreawuaeaeseaani



me

Renee anannne

SS ERGOT I reser

a Ke 8 er ee ee ae Se eS ss

52 baa

see
Pie ae Sp ae ei

AP BR BAT ee



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

LEE TRIBUNE



- ”

ln LegallNotice

NOTICE

+ QOSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC.

So
sos 4

]



In)VoluntarylLiquidation

NN
6 Moe

', (4)0 off thel Internationall Business? Companiesf Act.02000,
' OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC fislinidissolutionlasofiFebruary
18th,02005.

JaimelOrtizlof0Carreral 130No.0 1020-053 JBogota,IColombialis
: theDLiquidator.

FROM page 1B

“We are in the midst of that conversion
right now, and it will enhance the way we
conduct business internally as well as
externally,” Mr McWeeney said.

He added that the conversion was
Kae expected to be completed by the end of
sham this year, and it would provide the plat-
ca form for Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
; LegallNotice . tional to launch new products.
te Tanya Wright, Bank of the Bahamas

Beaas ot International’s senior manager for busi-
ag NOTICE ness development and public relations,
hype, said the bank’s business clients had indi-
eee cated they were “very pleased” with the
abode US$ cheque clearing system.
fs) OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC. ,

In)VoluntarylLiquidation

|
|
NOTICElistherebyl givenlIthatJinlaccordancelwithDSectionl 137
LIQUIDATOR





integrated with the global economy, and
Bahamian companies raised the volume of
business they did with US firms and others
internationally, the ability to reduce the
time to settle US$ transactions will be key
for business efficiency and the economy’s
competitiveness.

Mrs Wright said: “This technology has
the ability to significantly reduce the time
they have to wait for access to their funds.”

She added that Bahamas-based compa-

NOTICEdistherebylgiventhatlinlaccordancelwithlSectionl137
ee ~ (40 off the Internationall Business? Companiesi Act.0 2000,
: * - OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIIN C.fislinidissolutionlaslofiFebruary
Sah 02005.

j ‘sumed Ortizlof0Carreral 130No.01020-053 JBogota,JColombialis
- theDLiquidator.

ae LIQUIDATOR





As the Bahamas became increasingly |

nies, particularly those in the financial ser-

vices industry and professional services, .

such as accountants and lawyers, received
payment in US$ and other currencies
because they were involved in interna-
tional business.

Mrs Wright said these businesses would
be “thrilled at the opportunity of having
more ready access to their cash, improving
the efficiency of running and operating
their businesses”.

- She added: “Time is money. We are in
the business of...... saving them [customers]
time and saving them money.”

Director

Vaughn Delaney, Bank of the Bahamas
International’s deputy managing director
for information technology and human
resources, said the bank’s previous invest-
ments in IT had borne fruit, with the insti-
tution being the first to introduce cheque
imaging in the Caribbean.

He said: “We are able to electronically
settle US dollar cheques in a short period
of time.

“This bank will allow our customers to
receive the value of their US deposit items
in a very short period of time.”

Mr McWeeney said the US$ cheque

oS Bank aims to reduce US$
cheque process waiting
time by up to 700%

imaging and clearance service would
“enhance the ability of Bahamians and —

' businesspersons to more efficiently con-

duct their business enterprises”, enabling
them to receive instant value for transac-

tions conducted with cheques. . ye
’ The Bank of the Bahamas Internation- erik gd
al managing director said the service, ful: |: |||:
ly launched yesterday, would ‘level the +):

playing field’ between the clearance of,
US$ and Bahamian$ cheques.

From a business perspective, Mr
McWeeney said the key was that entre-
preneurs got access to their due funds
instantly, bolstering cash flow and enabling
them to better plan as a result of a three-
day settlement period.
In addition, businesses would no longer
have to wait for 30 to 40 days to learn
with a US$ cheque had been returned or
bounced, with that time now reduced to
three to four days.

A change in US law, created by the Sep-.
tember 11 terror attacks, had aided Bank
of the Bahamas International in its initia-
tive. Those attacks had disrupted the US
payments and settlement system, so’
Cheque 21 was introduced to enable more:
cheques to be handled electronically, mak-.
ing the payments system faster and more,
efficient.

Banks ‘still optimistic’
on ACH by end of year

tees

RS

si



- be taken, by. ‘agmoured car to »:
a central location where they

are settled by representatives
of the various institutions.

»oMr»McWeeney said the
ACH’s implementation sought
to “improve on the efficiency
of clearing Bahamian dollar

‘ LegallNotice

+ ;

; »~ NOTICE. -=. FROM page 1B:

4 ii

‘ QSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC. sa :

: In) VoluntarylLiquidation porte Jeravens and staffing

i | or the ;

4 . “We’re still optimistic we

4 will have the first phase in transactions”.
4 place by the end of the current

a + NOTICElistherebyt givenlthatlinDaccordancelwithl Section 137
4 4 (40 off thel Internationall Businessi Companiesi Act.0 2000,
‘ s OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIIN C. hislinidissolutionlaslofiFebruary
: > 18th, 02005.

o
my

< Jaimel OrtizloflCarrerall 130No.01020-153,0Bogota,IColombiallis
thelLiquidator. ~ :

LIQUIDATOR





Profile:

- Bachelors Degree

Key Responsibilities: .

year,” Mr McWeeney said.
He explained that the
ACH’s.. implementation
involved several phases, the
first one involving the ability to

process cheques, plus direct .
debit and direct. credit trans- —

actions.

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-
actions, where cheques drawn

on one bank but due to be’

deposited at another have to

= ) FIDELITY

Bank Automation Specialist

He added: “We hope to
reduce the time [for clearing
cheques] from the current four
days down to two days.

“It brings finality to the
transaction. It allows business-
es to be appraised of the value
or not good value of transac-
tions, and to be more efficient
in running their businesses.”

To pave the way for the
ACH’s first. phase, Mr
McWeeney said all six mem-
bers of the CBA - Royal Bank
of Canada, Commonwealth

> Banks wbcotiakanke. ria
ay Caribbean International Bank »

( Bahamas), Fidelity Bank

(Bahamas) and the Bank of ©
the Bahamas International -

had committed to the installa-
tion of cheque imaging services
at their institutions.

Currently, only Common-
wealth Bank and the Bahamas
International have live cheque
imaging services.

Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network. The
latter would allow Bahamians
to use their cash cards at any
bank branch. It would also

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILBERT MESIDOR, #11

PINEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister |.

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should.send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



reduce shesimes persons: spent.
in line: waiting-to cash and os
deposit pay cheques, as they:
could be deposited to he
account. x
Bahamian consumers would

also be able to use direct deb-..

its from their bank accounts to
pay bills such as cable televi-:
sion and electricity. '

Mr McWeeney said the
ACH could ultimately lead to
the creation of just one back
office system for the entire
Bahamas.

He added that it would also’
help develop SWITCH prod-
ucts, where Bahamians could
use their cash cards at any
bank’s ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH, would open up |
a whole range of electronic
banking services in the:
Bahamas, would be its use in:
the online purchase of govern:
ment goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-.
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through elec-.
tronic means, the ACH will
provide buyers and sellers with:
more certainty and confidence,
especially when it comes to set- »
tling their transactions.

It will also enhance eco-w - '
nomic and business efficiency” . :
by settling transactions quick-"
er, boosting business cash. °.

a

te

flows.

Assist in implementing the bank’s automation project

PUBLIC NOTICE ;

- FRIDAY CLOSURE OF
ALL NATIONAL INSURANCE OFFICES -

The National Insurance Board wishes to advise
the general public that all of its
departments/offices throughout The Bahamas,
including the Pay Windows at the Post Offices,
will be closed on Friday, June 30, 2006.

Liaise with Service Centres to set up scanning process



Scan days work and documentation from Service Centres
and accounting and operation areas




Knowledge and Skills




Attentive to detail
PC Skills

Some knowledge of bank processes and functions





Ability to process high volumes of work accurately and
~ efficiently



Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

The Board’s New Providence offices will re-open
on Monday at the usual time.







THE TRIBUNE

SUTIN SoS

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 7%.



Multi-billion dollar acquisitions
give Wall Street modest advance

a m By eee J. MARTINEZ.



NEW YORK (AP) — A series of
multi-billion dollar acquisitions gave
Wall Street a modest advance yester-
day although many. investors

‘ remained cautious ahead of the Fed-
eral Reserve’s decision on interest
rates later this week.

Investors were cheered by news
from mining company: ‘Phelps Dodge

Corp. that it will pay. $40. billion: in

cash and stock for rivak





and Falconbridge Ltd.,
billion bid from Dae tom Steel Co.



consumer produ

Activity aN

" Merger-and-aequisit n activity: is
seen as a sign of economic health, as
major companies aren "t expected to
make major deals. if they expecta

maker Arcelor SA-agréed to a $33,

decline in the economy. Yet Wall

* Stréet’s boost from these deals could

be short-lived as investors continue
to fret over just how far the Fed will
raise rates to combat inflation.

“T think the hand-wringing that’s
hampered the market will get out of
the way after the Fed’s meeting
Thursday,” said Chris Johnson, man-
ager of quantitative analysis at Scha-
éffer’s Investment Research in Cincin-
nati. “But clearly, the Fed is still going
to be hawkish on inflation, and that
means the possibility of more hikes

» down the road.”

According to prelimimary caicula-
tions, the Dow rose 56.19, or ee per

“cent, t6 11,045.28.

‘Broader stock ndigators A also made
gains. The Standard & Poor's 300

index was up 6.06, or 0.49 per.cent, at

1,250.56, and the Nasdaq composite
index climbed 12.20, or 0.58 per cent,
to 2,133.67.

- Bonds were little changed after last
week’s record-setting selloff, with the

yield on the 10-year Treasury note '

rising to 5.24 per cent from 5.23 per
cent late Friday. The .dollar fell

against most major currencies, while
gold prices were little changed.

Oil priced moved higher on con-
cerns about a shipping glitch in the

Gulf of Mexico. A barrel of light .

crude settled at $71.80, up 93 cents, on
the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Economic

In a week with little fresh econom-
ic data, investors welcomed the latest
Commerce Department report on
new home sales. Sales fell to an annu-
alized rate of 1.234 million in May,
down from 1.198 million the previ-
ous month but better than the 1.15
tnillion economists expected.

While the Fed likely will dominate
trading later in the week, traders wel-
comed the. chance to buy up stocks
in the mining, steel and healthcare
sectors, Which aside from the M&A
activity there, are seen as defensive
plays for a questionable economy.

“It’s definitely about the M&A
activity today, because other than
that, you’re really not seeing much
else out there moving,” said Brian

Williamson, equity trader at The
Boston Company Asset Management.

Inco surged $5.95, or 10 per cent, to
$64.21 and Falconbridge gained $2.50,
or 5.1 per cent, to $51.80 on Phelps
Dodge’s takeover announcement.
The combined company, to be called
Phelps Dodge Inco, will be the
world’s largest nickel producer and
the world’s largest publicly traded
copper producer. Phelps Dodge tum-
bled $6.72, or 8.1 per cent, to $76.23.

Mittal Steel fell 77 cents to $31.40
after wrapping up a sometimes-acri-
monious acquisition agreement of
Belgium’s Arcelor. However, Arcelor
shareholders must still vote down a
competing offer from Russian ‘steel-
maker OAO Severstal at a share-
holder meéting Friday for the Mittal
deal to be finished.

Pfizer’ climbed 37 cents to $23.01
after it agreed to sell Johnson & John-
son its consumer products unit, which
includes such brand names as Lister-
ine, Nicorette and Sudafed. Johnson
& Johnson fell $1.11 to $60.21.

In earnings news, Walgreen Co.’s
quarterly earnings rose 14 per cent

as newly opened stores generated

increased:sales. Shares of Walgreen,

which beat ‘analysts’ profit forecasts
by two cents per share, added 49 cents

to $44.10.

Homebuilder Lennar Corp. gained.
$1.14 to $45.68 after it announced a 33
per cent jump in second-quarter prof-
it. However, the company reduced its:
full-year earnings forecasts due to an
anticipated slowdown in the housing
market. ©

Issues

Advancing issues outnumbered
decliners by nearly five to three on
the New York Stock Exchange, where:
volume came to 1.35 billion shares,
compared with 1.42 billion traded on’
Friday. The Russell 2000 index’ of
smaller companies rose 8.50, or 1.23: -
per cent, to 698.64, Overseas, Japan’s: -

_ Nikkei stock average rose 0.19 per,

cent. In Europe, Britain’s FTSE 100, :
closed down 0.19 per cent, France’s' -
CAC-40 fell 0.34 per cent for the ses-'

sion, and Germany’s DAX index lost. .
0.27. per cent in late trading. —

the Internet revolution, “the
changes in social valués of trav-
ellers, competition andthe new ”

According =

cent of airline travellers - use
the Internet to make their trav-
el plans: -



Mr Vanderpool: -Wallace told
delegates that it was therefore

. vital that Internet development

played a major role in market

ing Strategy ~ |
“You have to reorganise



your offices in order to reflect.

what is happening in the mnar-
Ket,” he said.

As far as the Bahamas was
concerned, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace noted: “The Bahamas
is one of only two destinations
that have the URL as its name
.com, a very important part of

miaking sure that you are out...
there because people naturally

look for the name of the desti-
nation.com.

_ “The Bahamas and Aruba
are the only ones to have that
because we had the foresight
to make sure you pul yourself



tune with what is happening in

IERPOOL- WALLACE









pehaied are Moe much in







Me the. world.”

he panelists also discussed.
he changing demographics of
érs, notably the trend

~ towards more affluent visitors
and more family-based vaca-



tions. . -
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said

‘the Bahamas had done every-

thing to.reflect those changing

"target audiences.
research, two a ar ‘every: |
three travelers - and 50 per |

What is needed going for-
ward, he said, was for the
Bahamas to continue to mar-
ket itself as a diverse destina-

* tion so that when someone vis-

its one island, they do not feel

- like they have visited the entire

country.

Mt Vanderpool-Wallace said
many of the resort properties,
if used correctly, can become

_ an outpost for different expe-
_ riences.

He said that people most
want to experience the culture
of a destination.

“Once we differentiate from
other countries we can have a
product with a large variety of
accommodations, giving the
customer exactly what they
want,” he said.

“The only thing I think is
very important is making sure
that the experience is differ-
ent. People are island collec-
tors, so one great advantage

_ we have in the Bahamas is that
they can collect the islands, as

ng as théy understand that
you continue to grow your des-
tinations.”

NOTICE is hereby:given that MAXINSOND DECIUS, P.O.

BOX GENERAL DELIV



Nationality and Citizenship, for

ERY, OF HOPE TOWN, ABACO,

ister: responsible for |

registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the

facts within twenty-éi
2006 to the Mini



he 20TH day of JUNE,
tionality and Citizenship,



Eee ee MES Pp

in circulation, just call 322-1986 today!











da 3iim asicr
Bank of Baroda

(A Govt. of India Undertaking)
(incorporated in India) (Head Office : Mandvi, Baroda)

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AS ON 31st MARCH, 2006 To





i ; (000's omitted). 1
31. Arf 2006 @Y «= «31 ARE 2005 a
As on Ason .
SCHEDULE 31" March 2006 31% March 2005
sei AP a : et a Re. ws.
CAPITAL & LIABILITIES. :
Capital = °° qe 9365,52,74 294,52,74
Reserves & Surplus 2 7748,30,88 5556,53,82
Minority Interest 2A 24,61,43 41,76,53 2
Deposits. 3 -98051,01,01--89405,12,13
Borrowings. §048,87,42 1924,83,67
Other Liabilities: & Provisions 5 7446,63,93 __ 6178,15,26
TOTAL ; 116679,97,41 97400,63,15 és
ASSETS.
. Cash. and balances with : f
. Reserve Bank of India 6 3470.96,39 - 2777,10,68
Balances with Banks and . :
Money at Call and Short Notice 7 10471,33,01_ 6839,89,84
investments 8 35645,17,30 38023,34,80
Loans & Advances “9 61483,12,15 44477,15,56
Fixed Assets | 10 974,84,55 905,36,71
Other Assets __ a sits * 4392,79,69 4377,75,56
Goodwill on Consolidation ___241,74,32 : -
TOTAL 5 116679,97,41 97400,63,15
Contingent, Liabilities 12 39346,11,94 36954,03,59
Bills for Collection 6096,95,97 6340,39,06
Significant Accounting Policies 18 :
Notes on Accounts 19 <

The Schedules referred to above form an integral part of the Balance Shee!

Sonoita Profit & Loss Account for the year ended 31st March, 2006)





(0900's, omitted)
31 Arf 2006 #31 TE 2005 a
ware af & fe waa ad & fee
: Year ended Year ended a
SCHEDULE 31" March 2006 31* March 2005 4
u, Rs. @. Rs.
INCOME
Interest Earned zs 13 7358,60,41 6657,63,73
Other Income 14 1302,76,71 1386,31,03
TOTAL 8661,37,12 8043,94,76
EXPENDITURE =
Interest Expended 15 3993,27,58 3564,64,96
Operating Expenses . 16 2520,53,90 2084,53,25
Provisions and Contingencies 1251,44,45 1684,64,78
TOTAL 7765,25,93 7333,82,99
Consolidated Profit before Minority hee PO RNa
Interest and share of earning in 5
Associates 896,11,19 710,11,77
Share of earnings in Associates 17 14,21,57 46,35,47
Consolidated Net Profit for the year
betore deducting Minority interest 910,32,76 756,47,24
Less : Minority Interest 5,63,61 645,31
Consolidated Profit for the year ;
attributable to the group 904,69,15 750,01,93
Balance ‘in Profit and Loss A/c
brought forward — 27,57,45 6.



Amount available for appropriatior: 9 ) ‘
APPROPRIATIONS. ts

Transfér to Statutory Reserve 210,36,27 “177,16.57
Transfer to Revenue & Other Reserves 471,11,14 390,73,65
Proposed Dividend (Including Dividend Tax) 207,67,69 166,95,62
Balance carried over to consolidated

Balance Sheet + 58.27,59 __42,73,54
TOTAL on 847,42,69 | ___777,59.38
Earnings pér Share (Basic & Diluted) in Rs. 29.65 25.57
Significant. Accounting Policies 18 a

Notes on Accounts 19

The Schedules referred to above form an integral part of the Profit & Loss Account

DIRECTORS AUDITORS

Shri Vinod Rai

Shi H. N. Prasad:

Shri TR. Balasubramanian
Smt. Masarrat Shahid

Br. Anil K. Khandelwal
Shaimman & Managing Director
Shit A.C: Manajarr; 25s
Executive Ditector f

ay For S.Venkataram & Co
Shri B. P. Chakrabarti

Chartered Accountants

For T R Chadha & Co.
Chartered Accountants

For Ray

(Accounts & Audit) Chanered Accountants Chanerea Accountants







Place : Mumopai. Tie a eht eas : Shri D. D. Chanchani Shri Nilesh S. Bhimani Snn Rar
Date : 24th May; 2006 * a ah i is Panner Panther Panna



As per oir separate report of even dale attached .

Chartered Accountants

Chanered Accountants

Auditors’ Report_on con nsolidated
financial statements of Bank of Baroda’

The Board of Directors, Bank of Baroda

. We have audited the attached Consolidated Balance Sheet
~ of BANK OF BARODA (the "Bank") as on 31* March 2006

and also the Consolidated Profit and Loss Account for the
year ended on that date as also the Consolidated Cash Flow
Statement for the year ended on that date annexed thereto.
These Financial Statements are the responsibility of the
Bank's managernent and have been prepared by the
management on the basis of separate financial statements
and other finafcial information regarding subsidiaries and
associates.-Qur responsfbillty is to express our opinion on
these Financial Staternents based on our audit.

. Tha Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared by
, the Bank in aecordance with the requirements of Accounting

Standard 21 ~ “Corisolidated Financia! Statements” and
Accounting Standard 23 -- “Accounting for Investment in
Associates in Consolidated Financial Statements”, issued by
the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India andthe guidelines
issued by the Reserve Bank of India (except as otherwise stated)
and on the basis of the separate Audited Financial Statements

of the Bank, its Subsidiaries and Associates incorporated in the’

Consolidated Financial Statements.

- (a) -We have noi audited the Financial Statements of:-

(i) .the 13: Subsidiaries, whose financial statements
reflect total assets of Rs.4179.22 crores as on
31* March 2006 and Total Revenue of Rs.386.61
crores and cash flow amounting to Rs.124.85
crores for the year ended on that date.

(ii) the 9 Associates reflecting Net Profit of Rs.182.32
crores for the year ended 31% March 2006.

(b) We have been provided with the unaudited Financial
Statements as of 31% March 2006 for reckoning
valuation of Investment made by the Bank in UTI Asset
Management Company Private Limited and audited
financial! statrnent as of 31.3.2005 for reckoning
valuation of Investment in UTI Trustee ‘Company
Private Limited, which, for the purpose of the
Consolidated Financial Statements, have been
considered as “Associate”.

(c) | These financial statements and other financial
information have been audited by other auditors whose
reports have been furnished to us and our opinion is
based solely on the reports of other auditors.
Unaudited financial statement of UTI Asset
Management Company Private Limited for the year
ended 31st March 2006 forms the sole basis of its
incorporation in consolidated accounts. -

. We conducted our audit of the Consolidated Financial

Statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Auditing
Standards in India. These standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the
Financial Statements are. prepared, in all material respects, in
accordance with an identified financial reporting framework and
are free of material mis-statements. An audit includes,
examining on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts
and disclosures in the financial statements and audit also
includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by the management as well as
evaluating the overall, financial statement presentation. We
believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

. Attention is drawn to the following notes in Schedule — 19:-

(a) Note No.4 - regarding non-ascertainment of goodwill/
capital reserve on acquisition of shares in subsidiaries
and associates till 31.03.2005 and consequent non-
disclosure of Minority Interest (Schedule 2A) in the
manner so required, and

‘(b) Note No.6 — regarding adjustments arising from

reconciliation/clearance of outstanding items stated
therein.
The consequential effect of the above has not been ascertained.
Earnings per share (Note No. 21) in Schedule 19 are subject
to our observations in paragraphs 3(b) and 5 above.

Based on our audit and on consideration of reports of other
auditors on separate financial statements and on the other
financial information of the components, and to the best of
our information and according to the explanations given to
us and subject to paragraphs 3(b),5 and 6 above, we are of
the opinion that the attached consolidated financial
statements give a true and fair view in conformity with the
accounting principles generally accepted in India:

(i) in the case of the Consolidated Balance Sheet, of the
consolidated state of affairs of the Bank, its Subsidiaries
and interests in its Associates (Bank of Baroda Group)
as on 31% March 2006;

(ii) in the case of the Consolidated Profit & Loss Account, of
the Profit of Bank of Baroda Group on that date, and
(iii) in the case of Consolidated Cash Flow Statement, of the
cash flows for the year covered by the Consolidated

Financial Statements. ‘

& Ray
The interested parties may obtain a

Gerteral Manager 5 ‘
(Corp ACs) Dr. Dharmendra Bhandari Sh yikes ume suis, Sundaraman Stu Ail Kaine complete balance sheet from the bank
Shri R. K. Veiu Shri Manesh P. Mehta . : at its office !ocated at Gold Circle House,
Deputy General Manager For G. Basu & Co. For G. P. Kapadia & Co. For B.C. Jain & Co Essi Day Street, Nassau



yeet Sinan /






































































2AGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006



a INSTRUCTOR Alesandiia ‘Shaq’ Fernander gets the attention of some of the campers she and D’ Asti Delany:
will be working with at the Jeff Rodgers Summer Basketball Camp.

Jeff Rodgers Basketball |
Camp off to a ‘great start’.

@ BASKETBALL
_~ By BRENT STUBBS.

who will be working this

sharing their experiences with
the campers and they will also

Senior Sports Reporter

ALTHOUGH the 19th Jeff
Rodgers Basketball Camp
won't officially open until next
Monday at the Bahamas Acad-
emy Auditorium, the first day
attracted a large number of par-
ticipants.

Organiser Jeff Rodgers said
he’s been impressed with what
he has saw so far and, if the
numbers are any indication, the
month-long camp should live
up to its advanced billing. °

“As you know, we're getting
ready for our 20th year next
year, so we’re really trying to
set the tone at this year’s camp,”
Rodgers stressed. “It’s already
gotten off to a great start.”

_ Organiser impressed with

what he has saw so far

During the first day of the
camp yesterday, the participants
were placed in their respective
age groups where they met their
instructors and had a chance to
meet old and new friends.

“We’re just going through the
basic stuff so each day they will
know exactly what they have to
go through,” Rodgers stated.
“But, we expect for the camp to

. be very exciting this year.

“We normally have 300-400
campers, but this year, we antic-
ipate that those numbers will

increase because of what we
have seen out here so far.”

A number of instructors, who
either came up the ranks in the
camp, or are back home from.
college in the United States, will
be lending their expertise.

There will be at least two

campers assigned to each age
group.

“We have college instructors
and high school instructors,”
Rodgers pointed out. “So we
are looking forward to having a
good time with the instructors

One of those instructors,
D’asti Delancy, is making her

initial appearance, and she’s

excited about her projection for
the campers. °

“T hope.that they-will learn.a
lot of things by the end of the
camp,” said Delancy, who is
working along with Alexandria .
‘Shaq’ Fernander with the 6-7
age group.

“T just want them to be
patient, but at the same time,
have fun with what they do.”

As the camp progresses,
Rodgers said he’s expecting a
number of players from the
National Basketball Associa-
tion (NBA) to come in and par-
ticipate.

The NBA players will be

participate in a charity celebrity
game that will be played at the
end of the camp.at the Kendal

Isaacs Gymnasium.

The campers will be attend-

ing-a‘luncheon at Government:

House and there will be a num-
ber of field trips that they will
be participating in.

At Monday’s opening, Prime -

Minister Perry Christie is sched-
uled to be the keynote speaker.
He will be joined by Minister

of Youth, Sports and Housing .

Neville Wisdom; Attorney Gen-
eral Allyson Maynard-Gibson;
Bahamas Olympic Association
president Arlington Butler;
Tommy Turnquest; Alvin Smith
and members of the Bahamas
Seventh Day Adventists.

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)

D-Squad to teach the fundamentals

= BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

COACHES from the DW Davis
Junior High and the Dame Doris John-
son Secondary High School physical edu-
cation departments have joined forces
to stage the D-Squad Basketball Camp.

“Our vision is to prepare and present
high school basketball athletes for com-
petition by providing them with the fun-
damentals of defence, passing, dribbling
and shooting,” said camp director Har-
court McCoy.

In their effort to provide the student-
athletes for the upcoming school year,
-McCoy said when they get started on

Monday, they will cater to boys and girls.

between the ages of 8-17.

“We hope to raise the level of basket-
ball in the country by starting at the pri-
mary school level,” McCoy stressed.
“Hopefully in the next three years with
the continuation of the camp, we can
affect the change for basketball i in the
country.”

The camp, scheduled for July 3-19
from 9am to 1pm, is being co-sponsored
by Doc’s Pharmacy, legendary basketball
standout Sterling Quant and Brenda
Moore of the Die Hard Games.

Through their sponsorship, each
camper will be presented with a D-Squad
t-shirt, a basketball and trophies that
they will earn for their performances in
various aspects of the game.

At the end of the camp, the players
will also be able to participate in a three-
point shooting and the All-Star Classic.

Joining McCoy as‘instructors at the
camp are Marilyn Toote, Ann Sturrup,
Hector Rolle and Kevon Spence.

“TI think we have put together a group
of coaches who we know can reach the
kids,” McCoy pointed out. “What the
other camps have is a large following,
but we plan to be hands on and in that
way, we can work more with the
campers.”

Interested persons can contact either
the DW Davis or Dame Doris Johnson
High Schools for further information.



li ORGANISERS and sponsors announce plans for the first DW Davis/Dame Doris Johnson D-Squad Summer Basketball Camp
that starts on Monday at the DW Davis Gym. Seated from left are sponsors Delton ‘Doc’ Bain of Doc’s Pharmacy and Bren-
da Moore of Die Hard Games; coach Kevon Spence; organiser Harcourt McCoy; sponsor Sterling Quant and coach Hector Rolle.
Standing in the back are coaches Ann Sturrup and Marilyn Toote.

Registration, however, will be conducted
through Friday.

Although his sister, Ann Sturrup is
heavily involved in the camp, Quant said
he prefers to provide some of the skills
that he acquired over the years as a
player on the local and international
scene.

“T would also like to ask parents who
at this time have not yet registered their
children in a camp to register them in a
camp, preferably this camp so that they

can be involved doing something con-
structive over the summer,” Quant not-
ed.

Delton ‘Doc’ Bain, who came on
board as the major sponsor of the camp,
said he was impressed with the coaching
staff responsible for putting on the event.

“With the coaching staff and the tal-
ented people here, I will always be will-
ing to sponsor this camp in the future,”
he said. “I’m very proud to be involved
with this camp.”

Moore, who adopted the DW Davis
having sponsored their basketball tour-
nament last year, said she’s been pleased
with the support she received, so she
decided to come back and lend her sup-
port.

Toote, a former high school
classmate of Moore, said when
Sturrup first approached her about
the idea of putting on the camp, she
contacted McCoy and the ball got
rolling.

TRIBUNE SPORTS.

Bahamas to
host Volleyball
Championships

FROM page one :

cessfully host the tourna: ~
ment, Wisdom made a
plea to the public to assist '
the federation as they:
attempt to not only revive - '
the sport but to bring.a-
high level of roo RE to
the country.

He added: “So I Wane 162
call on all corporate spon -
sors, I want to call on all of : '
the national federations, I’
have already spoken:to'
some of the presidents, I
want to call on the
Bahamas national sports
advisory council and the - :
persons of good will in the " . se
public and private sectors *
who like sports. Let’s hold: :
hands with the Bahamas °°
Volleyball Federation and <
let’s make this event suc- -
cessful. “yah

“The last time it was ‘
hosted in the Bahamas at
the Kendal G.L Isaac gym
was sold out, Iam particu-’- :
larly pleased that I was --
able to intervene with the:
presidents of the-
Caribbean volleyball fed-::
eration and ensure the par-": ~
ticipation of Jamaica and -*- |
Haiti and in connection: *
with those two countries: '
participating I wanted to. -
ask the person in the’.
Jamaican and the Haitian’ »
communities for their~~-

, 4

_ assistance as we go abotit -

the hosting of this event: o
“The teams from thosé’~*
two countries will require-~--
- some special assistance ~’-
and I know that the local’ :
Haitian community and -
the local Jamaican com: ”
munity will do their best-'-
to ensure that the visit of
their national Haitian and -
Jamaican volleyball teams
are comfortable and suc-
cessfully. I am so pleased:
this morning that we were.

able to come to an:
arrangement with the fed+’~*

eration and that we are'
able to host this event’!
from the 20th to the 28th

G.L. Isaacs gym. [just’:
want to encourage all
Bahamians to give their
support.”

This will be the first time”, *

a

’ of August and the Kendal- ie

in several years since Haiti. ’~

has decided to participate_—
in the tournament and,-

- according to federation’s '~'

vice president Joseph ~~":

Smith, their Phe lvelal: *
will only boost the level a
play and the fan support. -
Although the Bahamas”: '
national teams on both the «
men and women’s sides
haven’t been named as yet; :
Smith revealed that the
process will not be an easy —'
job since more than 45 -‘:
girls have shown up to-":
practices and 25 on the ''"
males side. A Yeo
Smith said: “We are- '
going tomakeacutbythe :
first week in July so we can’
concentrate on the core of °
the team. The teams now ' °
know that the pressure is °

on, they wanted the tour- +>:

nament here and now
they’ve got it. But we are -
looking good, physically: °:
they are ready now all we. me
have to do is get into ne
minds of the players so”
they can be prepared on a -
very high level mentally. :

“The Bahamas has a
good chance of playing in
the gold medal rounds for
both the men and the. ..
women. We were in the
rebuilding stages for the
last few tournaments, but: -
now I am certain the teams. >
are ready. .

“We have persons like}-
Katrina Johnson who did-:+ :
n’t play with us last year*
and on the men’s side we
have two professional
beach volleyball players
who will be coming home
to assist in the effort, those
two guys are ready so we
will have to just plug them :
in.

“We can’t forget the col- :
lege girls, so basically we
have a good core of per-.
sons coming out all it will
take is the cutting.”
At last year’s champi-
onships the Bahamas fin-
ished up fifth in both the
men and women’s division.
Winning best blocker was -
Annastacia Sands; best
passer was Renaldo’:'
Knowles and best server ::
was Prince Wilson.

PUY AA

fre

ts

weer r ere eer-



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Swim team
heads to
Puerto Rico

= SWIMMING

THE Bahamas Swim-
ming. Federation is send-
ing a,.24 member swim
team to the XVI
Caribbean Swimming
Championships 2006 being
hosted by Federacion
Puertorriquea de Natacion
in Salinas, Puerto Rico
from June 26th to June
30th, 2006.

The team is led by
Nikia‘ Deveaux, a
Bahamas Olympian who
will-be competing in sever-
al events including her
specialty, the 50 freestyle,
in the 18 & over age
group.

The.other female swim-
mers include Je'nae Saun-
ders, Bria Deveaux,
Shante Moss, Shalyla
Campbell in the 12 & 12
age group, Kadesha Cul-
mer, Ashley Butler,

* Anthaya Rolle and Ariel
Weech in the 13 & 14 age
group, Arianna Vander-
pool-Wallace, Alicia
Lightbourne, Jenna Chap-
lin and Teisha Light-
bourne in the 15 to 17 age
group and Alana Dillette
in the 18 & over age
group.

The male swimmers
representing the Bahamas
include Mathew Lowe,
Evante Gibson, Devonn
Knowles, Mancer Roberts
and-Delano McIntosh in
the 41 & 12 age group,
John Bradley in the 13 &
14 age group, Vereance
Burrows, Ashton Knowles
and-Je'vaughan Saunders
in the 15 to 17 age group
and Inoa Charlton in the
18 & over age group.

Algernon Cargill, Presi-
dent of the Bahamas
Swimming Federation, is
optimistic about the
results that these hard
working athletes will get in
. this;¢ompetition. cee

“The Bahamas:has sev-
eral swimmers seeded in
the tap three going into
this meet and several up ~
and coming younger swim-
mers who improve every
time,they compete who.
are likely to make the
podium.

This meet is the first of
three events that some of
these swimmers will see
action in over the coming .
four,weeks. CISC is fol-."
lowed’by the Bahamas
National Swimming .
Championships being held
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Center from July
6th to the 9th, 2006 and
then-ten swimmers, pend-
ing ratification from the
Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation, will be competing
for the Bahamas at the
CAC Games in Cartage-
na, Columbia from July
17th, to July 22nd, 2006. ©
This.is an extremely
demanding schedule and
the swimmers are ready
for the challenge."

The Head Coach for
the team is Mark Sowa
and:he will be assisted by
Shawn Neely. Team Man-
ageris Mr. John Bradley,
Chaperone Kathryn Dil-
lette. Team Doctor Bren-
da Desouza and sports.
therapists are Elsa Barrett
and Dorthey Roberts.

‘your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
‘neighbourhoods. Perhaps’
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





Last gasp win for Italy over Australia |

SPORTS



Bahamas’ Carey is
beaten by Bacchus

@ ABOVE: American Nicholas Bacchus delivers this shot =

while eliminating Bahamian Rodney Carey Jr. from the Secu-.
rity & General International Junior Tennis Open on Monday at.
the National Tennis Centre. 7
@ LEFT: Bahamian Rodney Carey Jr tries concentrates on, >
hitting the ball in his match at the Security & General Interna: +
tional Junior Tennis Open on Monday at the National Tennis...
Centre. ES Po ea F EN SHA OEGINS SEED

* SEE SPORTS FRONT“

Bit
10

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staffy me

at



"iar

ORT

wes



L

vhs
POF aSy

m AUSTRALIA'S goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer, centre, fails to make a save against a penalty kick by Italy's Francesco Totti, right, during the last minute of the Aus-.!
tralia vs Italy Round of 16 World Cup soccer match at Fritz Walter Stadium in Kaiserslautern, Germany, Monday, June 26, 2006. Italy won 1-0. ai

oli

(AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)



- TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

SECTION EPO Cele
and swim |

Fax: (242) 328-2398

Oem t ae



BYALNUT IPAM
host Caribbean

olny
Championships

@ VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON and
ANDRE DAVIS



IT’S official, the
Bahamas will host the 11th
annual Caribbean Volley-
ball Championships
(CVC), August 20th-28th,
at Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym-

TENNIS

nasium.
Minister of Youth Sports By BRENT STUBBS
and Housing Neville Wis- Senior Sports Reporter

dom along with the execu-
tive members of the
Bahamas Volleyball Fed-
eration (BVF) confirmed
yesterday that the bi-annu-
al regional tournament,
which originally kicked off
in the Bahamas in 1994,
will be hosted as an initia-
tive to revive the sport in
the Bahamas once again.

The Bahamas had won
the bid to host the games in
2004, but the government
declined the invitation by
the North, Central and
Caribbean Volleyball Con-
federation (NORCECA)
due to the hosting of the
Bahamas Games.

After the Bahamas
Games were postponed to
make way for the con-
struction of the new stadi-
um, both Wisdom and the
executive members decid-
ed to try their hand once
again to hosting the quali-
fying tournament for the
Olympic Games.

Pride

Although this decision :
went down to the 11th.
hour, Wisdom expressed
great pride and joy on
behalf of the government.

Wisdom said: “I am so
pleased to announce this
morning that the govern-
ment of Bahamas has
agreed to assist with the
hosting of the Caribbean
Volleyball Championship.
As you know the Bahamas
is apart of Caricom and a
part of Caricom’s overall
objective is the promotion
of sports, this is also an

‘important part of the
regional development.

“The Bahamas was orig-
inally scheduled to host this
event, however, it was
passed to another country
primarily because we
intended to host the
Bahamas Games. Now that
the Bahamas Games has
been postponed for the
National Sports Facility
development, the federa-
tion approached the gov-
ernment to see if we would
be inclined as to assist
them in the hosting of this
very prestigious and impor-
tant event.

Agreed —

“The country of Barba-
dos J am told had received
the invitation but were
unable to host it. And so
at, the 11th hour, the gov-
ernment was approached
and we agreed to do as best
we could to hold hands



LAST year, Jamaal Adder-
ley made his exit in the quar-
ter-final.

This year, as the top seeded
player, he’s back with a
vengeance and he’s hoping to
go all the way and win the
Security & General Interna-
tional Junior Tennis Open at
the National Tennis Centre.

On Monday, the 17-year-old
Grand Bahamian began his
quest for supremacy for the
Bahamas with an impressive
6-2, 6-2 win over qualifier Juan
Javier Ponce from Ecuador.

“Tt took me a little while to
find my groove, but I did
okay,” said Adderley, who
was surprised when he went
on the court and found out
that he had to face a south-
paw.

Adderley, ranked at num-
ber 211 in the world, played
a steady and solid game as he
landed the big shots to lead
the way for the Bahamian par-
ticipation at the tournament.

“I puess whatever happens,
happens, but there is no pres-
sure on me to perform here,”
said Adderley, who is coming
off a victory and a runner-up
finish at two tournaments he
participated in Barbados and
Trinidad & Tobago respec-
tively.

Adderley didn’t have to put
on too much of a show as
Ponce had his share of diffi-
culties. At times, he was irate
with himself after he couldn’t
return his volleys.

Another strong perfor-

mance for the Bahamas in the

boys’ division came from
Jason Rolle; who easily dis-
posed, of American qualifier
Sam Morris 6-3, 6-1.

“The fellow I played, played

fairly well, but I just tried to
keep the ball in play and
moved him around the court,”

Rolle reflected. “He was not:

very consistent and not very
patient either, so I just kept
the ball in play.”

The 15-year-old student of
Charles W. Saunders High
School said, after losing in the
qualifying round last year, he
vowed to improve on his per-
formance this year.

On the girls’ side, Kerrie
Cartwright produced a 6-3, 6-
1 win over American Bria Hitt
to pave the way for the
Bahamas in that category.

Cartwright, last year’s win-
ner Of the girls 14-and-under
division, took control of the
match in the first set and she
frustrated the shorter Hitt,
who was taken out of her
rhythm in the second set.

“T think I played really good
and I was doing what I was
supposed to do,” Cartwright
stressed. “When I went up 4-3
in the first set, I noticed that

@ ABOVE: Top seed Jamaal
Adderley hits a backhand vol-
ley in the Security & General
International Junior Tennis
Open at the National Tennis

Centre yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)

just a little more consistent in
her stokes and she prevailed

when it counted the most.

e In other, matches played
yesterday, Bahamian Elanqua
Griffin was eliminated with a
6-3, 6-3 loss to American
Sasha Gluck and Rodney

with the Bahamas Volley- h se That i Carey Jr was beaten 6-2, 6-3

ball Federation and see if . hi Ye olaved by Hes tat 4S by American Nicholas Bac-

we could make this event a | W2°0 + Playee Detter. chus.
Although she has moved up

success. We did it a year
ago with swimming and we
are going to do it with vol-
leyball.”

The BVF will host ten
teams in both the men and
women’s division; defend-
ing champions Barbados,
Trinidad and Tobago,
Jamaica, Haiti, Martinique,
US Virgin Islands, Guade-
loupe, Aruba, St Lucia,
Cayman Islands and the

Netherlands Antilles. i Britain 6-0, 6-2; American esterday.
Since it will cost the BVF i oar the American ee Kristie Ahn whitewashed 1 y
more than $200,000 to suc- erself trying to ae 9 1 Manuela Gil of Colombia 6-0, (Photo: Felipe Major/
, aa get ar the hole. 6-0 and Canadian Sara Tribune staff) |
SEE page 8B ile they played some] a7arevic ousted American Sa

the ranks, Cartwright, 13, said
she feels that she has the
potential to play with the old-
er girls and she. unticipates that
she will only get better as the
tournament progresses.
“There’s a lot of competi-
tion around here, but I’m
going to try my hardest to do
my best,” she projected.
After pulling off the first set,
Cartwright was able to put
Hitt in.a hole in the second

long rallies, Cartwright was

e Other boys matches saw
Kieran Warwick of Australia
defeat Patricio Escobar of
Ecuador 2-6, 6-3, 6-3; Ameri-
can William Parker upset
compatriot Davis Taylor 6-2,
6-4 and Patricio Alvardo of
Ecuador knocked off Panav
Jha of the Cayman Islands 6-2,
6-1.

e On the girls’ side, Yoshimi
Kawasaki of Japan eliminat-
ed Gabriella Phillips of Great





|) @ SOUTHPAW Juan
| Javier Ponce returns a
| shot to Bahamian top

seed Jamaal Adderley









o straight set win





Full Text






oF ms









& STEAMY

Dr Nottage reveals

children are part of |

‘alarming’ statistic

@ By ROYANNE

FORBES-DARVILLE

‘CHILDREN as young as 10
years old are becoming a part of
the “alarming” statistic of drug
abusers, Health Minister, Sena-

tor Dr Bernard Nottage.

revealed yesterday.

Citing another disturbing
trend, he explained that as with
HIV/AIDS infection, young
females are becoming the
fastest growing number of drug
abusers.

“Bed capacity at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, has
increased due to these drug
related problems,” said the
health minister, who was a
keynote speaker at the official
opening ceremony for the
National Anti-Drug Secretari-
at, (NADS) at the Church
House complex on East Hill
Street, formerly the old Angli-
can administrative building.

The National Anti-Drug Sec-

-retariat seeks to coordinate anti-

drug strategies, efforts and ini-
tiatives in the country, and is
responsible for the develop-
ment, management and opera-

‘tion of the five year ( 2004 -

2009) National Anti-Drug Plan,
(NADP).

The newly formed body will
be responsible for evaluating
the effectiveness of the NADP;
developing, operating and main-
taining national observatory-
statistical information; coordi-

nating drug questionnaires, to .

provide a national report on
drugs and accessing interna-

.tional donors for project sup-

port and institutional building.

The National Anti-Drug sec-
retariat will also partner with
the Heads of Law Enforcement
Agencies (HONLEA) , the
National Drug Advisory Con-
ference (NDAG).. and,other
stakeholders.

Deputy Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt, who is responsible
for national security, explained

that it is important for the

Bahamas to continue to wage
an aggressive campaign against
illegal drugs, both the trafficking
and consumption.

“The consumption of mari-
juana is on the increase and
cocaine, though far below the
epidemic level of the 1980s, may

be stabilizing, but is available

for chronic and first time users,”
the Deputy Prime Minister said
during the: commissioning of the
Church House complex.
“That is why we are gathered
here today. The government is

committed to improving our -

drug control administration to
better coordinate activities and
to maximize our resources,” she
said.

Although the establishment
of the secretariat is two years
behind the initial scheduled
date, the Deputy Prime Minister
said the recent seizure of drugs
speaks volumes.

Only two days ago, acting on
information the Drug Enforce-
ment officers made a major
“drug bust” in New Providence.

SEE page 11























“m Lhe Tribune

Pm lovin’ it. | Es

= The Hiami Herald

PARTLY SUNNY |

BAHAMAS EOIrion





UESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006





NOW OPEN:

Seagrapes Shopping enters ae

Prince Charles Drive



@ DEPUTY Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt and Archbishop Goines are Satown around the new National Anti-Drug *

Secretariat t yestereey | at the Church House complex on East Hill Street, formerly the Anglican administrative building.
(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune staff)

Review to determine

Police inspecwe is.
critical after shooting

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

AN OVERNIGHT shooting
in Kemps Bay, Andros has left
Police Inspector Sidney Rolle
in critical, but stable condition.

Police are still looking for
the suspect who is considered
armed and dangerous.

According to Police Inspec-
tor Evans, Mr Rolle was off
duty and at home when a per-
son, who: he did know,
approached him to make a
complaint.

While he was listening to the
complainant, a vehicle pulled
up, a man got out, and opened
fire on Mr Rolle and other
bystanders.

“The police then returned
fire and because of the defen-
sive actions by the police no
other persons were injured,”
said Mr Evans.

Mr Rolle was hit multiple
times and was. airlifted:
to New Providence for treat-
ment.

“Specialized teams of. offi-
cers from New Providence are
on the island of ‘Andros assist-
ing police officers stationed on
that island in search of the sus-
pect who remains at large,”
said Mr Evans.

On behalf of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, Mr
Evans wished Mr Rolle a
speedy recovery.

the future of OPBAT

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE future of the allocation
of funds for the Operation
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos is
set to be decided: this week
after a special review of
the anti-drug smuggling initia-
tive.

Political, economic and pub-
lic relations officer Greg Floyd
at the US Embassy told The
Tribune yesterday that a special

:. team from Washington, DC, is

expected to travel to the
Bahamas later this week to
review OPBAT.

Following this review, the
team will present US govern-
ment officials with a report that

mPURINA|

PRO a | Fae by

will determine the future of the
programme.

“At this time it is not about
the deduction of funds:for
OPBAT, but rather about the
allocation, the distribution, ?
Mr Floyd said.

US Ambassador John Rood
last Friday returned from a
two-week trip from Washing-
ton where he met with senior
government officials to discuss
the US’ continuing commit-
ment to narcotics interdiction
and OPBAT. yo 8S

On his return the oN
sador announced that the talks
had been “fruitful.” *

Mr Floyd said yesterday: that

SEE page 11

While It Nourishes.

Vatay en AVON | ol eee oa oes a

Protects

Available ina variel
Street: Central Animal Hospital, Tenwich Street: Dragan

Store. Bos. Comer, Antoal Clie, Wolff Road

Ryeaaa ia)

le Agencies.

AB Cae




PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

If rules and conventions are
bused, respect will be lost

O-one expects the business of
parliament to be conducted
like a Sunday school. Parliament is
where the laws governing the nation

are made, ne Ee policy is dobat. wooded area shortly after take- we
Fe resaninaes Ob ne peonle's Maney rules — although designed to be flexi- off, authorities said, according se
to Associated Fress. :
SE ra crccet ot ble — cannot be consistently ignored The pilot, Stephen Hodges, 4,
is held accountable for its conduct of 59 of South: Carolina. was the an
Ober. E heady stuff and so it is expect- and abused. only person aboard when the ie
ed that passions should flare up from ae Mee Gees aries
time to time and that members will County Sheriff Ken Mase Cre ig
engage in:sharp exchanges and even cm Sf ae TfTAA
indulge in occasional dramatics to draw fe ; Thee plane eH f
attention to their causes. In some par- ernment had difficulty mustering aquo- | CDR, had gone back to the PLP and desive oF Kevond ss ae {
liaments members driven by personal rum for.each morning and afternoon had ‘been accepted with much fanfare. had fleaa t Ot L wee tte 10ny I
animosities and ideological differences session of the budget debate. Now Mr Christie wanted to showcase al fae i Aa iy ne 1y
have resorted to fisticuffs. fe his latest acquisition by setting a new Bahaiiags ete ‘g naa ee do
’ That has not happened in our House Fcc aby precedent, and he was prepared to Jane landed aa “hee a 1 5
of Assembly in recent memory although ° destroy a parliamentary convention in fe A ace hotsrs ae oe ac a 3e
it was reported that many years ago Sir the process. off Fe nin Nasenia ee ° "an
Etienne Dupuch ‘aiid Walton Young . ahamians have been under- One of the reasons Mr Christie gave Wiiaees a4 dinertod hatha «038
exchanged blows in a committee room. /standably worried about the for wanting Dr Nottage to address the lanettook off ne dark skies
Sir Etienne was a pugilist and it was occurrence'‘of malaria in Exuma but it | House on the malaria affair was that Ee ain: dad enkine wouble an d ot
said that: Mr Young got the worst of was wrong for Prime Minister Perry _ he was a doctor. It was obvious that Dr eos d with or Sie f the
the:exchange. _ Christie'to seize on this to grandstand at | Nottage read his statement, a statement Be set OOeE ae f
- Years later, after an adjournment of the expense of the rules and'long-stand- _ that could have been read by the Prime o dees Wek P Bate Be to Ten- iS
the House, Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield, ‘ing conventions of parliament and to Minister himself or any other Minister aaa ee said Federal Aviation
then in opposition, intervened to stop a attempt to make the opposition look —_ of the Government in the House. Doc- Adeiinisthation sookeswowan a
physical encounter between Sir Lynden’ like the bad guys for refusing to go __ tors do not necessarily read well. Kathleen:Bér ae
Pindling and Sir Rando] Fawkes. Sir along. There were no questions and answers The Natio a Teinseottation. ~ al
Randol was no longer a member at the Mr Christie Knows that it is, and afterwards, no discussion. If there had SAfaty. Boardiand re ee al Aci a
time but had,jeered at Sir Lynden from should continue to be, a rare honour been, it would have made more sense aaa ak deainistration were sone:
his seat in the public gallery. for anyone who is not a member to for members to engage the Bahamian sn investivators te the scene ‘
Our elected chamber is one of the address the House of Assembly in ses- _ and international disease control experts 6 8 i:
most decorous in the world, perhaps ‘sion. That is a privilege reserved for who were sitting in the gallery and who a
because:Gftits small size and its tradition foreign heads of state and government _had done a great service for the country. [= U u rg es ae
of formality. Until 1956 members of and other distinguished persons. Even . - ee

the Houge;(MHAS in those days) met in

the everting-and were attired in tuxedos -.

or-mess jackets.

The guse shifted to morning meet-
ings to avoid the kind of nighttime
demonstiations that accompanied Sir
Etienne? ‘s\ anti-discrimination resolution







espite its very nature and the
adversarial atmosphere in
which most of its business is conducted,
the decorum’ of parliament cannot be

dispensed with altogether, and its rules -’
—.although designed to be flexible — ..

cannot be consistently ignored and





ces en The Island”

»



The decorum of parliament cannot
be dispensed with altogether, and its



so, it must be with the unanimous con-
sent of the members.

Under no circumstances should a
Minister of Government who sits in the
Senate be allowed to address the elect-
ed branch of parliament in session. But

last Week Mr Christie proposed that Dr



* * *

ncidentally, someone should
instruct the reverend ministers of
the gospel who are invited to be chap-
lains to the House that they should




from people who are
making news in their











THE TRIBUNE

Pilot killed
in plane
crash off
Florida

Hi FLORIDA
Fort Pierce —

A PILOT was killed when a
twin-engine plane crashed in a

nations
to oppose
torture





which had provoked a very emotional _ abused. Otherwise the public will lose Bernard Nottage, the Minister of Health remain at the bar during the opening 4.
debate and a confrontation with then __ respect for this foundational institution. . who sits in the Senate, should do.just_ prayers and not walk onto the green m@ AUSTRIA i
Speaker Asa Pritchard. _ That is precisely the direction in _ that. carpet. Vienna ;
Sir Asa was a strict disciplinarian but — which the House has forsome time now The. opposition tightly withheld its Only elected members of parliament, : j 3
not everybody appreciated that. Eti- been headed. What is particularly, wor- consent but,agreed toa compromise in _ and the public officers who serve them, THE European Union, which 2.
enne Dupuch Jr once-depicted him ina _ rying is that it comes at a time when “ which Dr Nottage could address the should go beyond the bar while the has been harshly critical of US
cartoon as a tyrant in the chair cracking slackness seems:to be growing as a ‘House during an adjournment. Even House is in session. prisoner abuse at Iraq’s Abu ~
the whip‘over cowering members. Mr national characteristic and when too that was unnecessary as there were Ghraib prison and the deten-
_ Speaker was not amused. ‘many of our young people no longer many other ways in which this matter gee Se tion center at Guantanamo Bay,” “~
Sir Asa preserved the decorum of the - find’ discipline, good manners and __ could have been handled, including a . Cuba, urged all nations Mon-
House and-most of the time it took only’ respect tobe attractive... _ national broadcast on radio and televi- “sf ; day to sign a global convention a
a slightly inflected “Order!” to.calm. These days, meetings of the: House sion. erhaps after the next election against torture and condemned st
agitated members. During his term as seldom, if ever, start-ontime, and that. Yet, at the appointed time, the Prime the Bahamian people will have the practice for any reason,
Speaker.House meetings started on — too is becoming a bad habit with most Minister still raised the question and _ a better crop of representatives who, if according to Associated Press. be
time and you could set your watch as. organised events in this country. Mem- forced the opposition to state their they are unfamiliar with the ways ‘of “No culture of impunity is
the black. rod'would announce his. «bers of parliament. should be. setting a ‘objection publicly. He-was supported parliament to begin with, will at least acceptable,” the 25-nation bloc é:
entrance into the chamber'at procbely » better example. ~’ in this piece of political chicanery by have the care and competence to edu- warned in a statement coincid- 5
the aupnitta hour. . Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham ‘Tennyson Wells, an experienced par-. cate themselves about the rules and ing with observances of the ni
Ba _, . pointed out in the House last week that liamentarian, who urged members to conventions and to conduct themselves United Nations’ ninth annual 5
eR aM ay aaee m spite. of their huge majority the Gov- -. leave ‘politics out of it! _' accordingly. International Day to Support =|
» Weta Ag ace sibel GS. AMR Sal But Mr Ingraham was protectingthe _ Any panlinientanae worth his salt the Victims of Torture. a
= wl Ve Annee Lai eatesnetey ~ rules of the House. It was Mr Christie welcomes some heckling and interven- The EU resolves to continue 3
STEAM ; a who was politicking. Mr Christie also tion. That can make for good debate. and intensify its own efforts to 5
a pl Bie yest z : manipulated the system when he caused, But constant interruptions and loud SCCULE RE world free from tor- 8
Leet A parliament to be prorogued so that new- _ chatter are unfair to the member speak- Ba ea cat ea Z
! ly-appointed Governor General Arthur ing, not to mention the persistent abuse con-
It was wr ong for Prime Minister Panna could preside over:an opening. aie rules governing ise of order. or ULE ObCiak te lee oe
There was nothing wrong with this For the duration of this parliament, ‘ J c .
Pe erry Christie. -- to grandstand. at the except ‘that the House had not been however, that is likely to continue since a atise ane eee ane :
es a rorogued in four years and it was after four years the Speaker himself we - y ces, 3
expense of the rules and long stand Foubtful that it would have been if a apparently has not grasped the differ- eee grounds of nation- ;
ing: ‘conventions of parliament — Seer ‘general had not been Searor on aempl: intervention and Bush aleaiaitectionvorials 0"
0) ' It was blindingly obvious what Mr have said the US uses legal inter- ¢
1! Christie was up to in the case of Dr : rogation techniques — not tor- in
i xmvekdaer seen -Nottage: The Minister, who until recent- www.bahamapundit.typepad.com ture — to gain information that =)
aa ly had’been holding out as leader of the sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com could head off terror attacks. £
P J.
LL YOUR DECORATING | Share your news| |
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THE TRIBUNE

In brief |

Man faces
charge of
sex with

daughters

A MAN accused of commit-
ting incest with his daughters
was arraigned in Magistrate's
Court yesterday.

It is alleged that the man
committed the offence with his
16-year-old daughter between
April and June of this year.

He was also charged with
having unlawful sex with his 20-
year-old daughter between Jan-
uary and June of this year.

The man was arraigned
before Magistrate Marilyn
Meers at Court Five, Bank
Lane yesterday.

He was not required to enter
a plea to the charges and was
granted $10,000 bail on each
charge.

The matter was adjourned to
* September 27, when a prelimi-
nary inquiry into the matter is
set to begin.

18-year-old
arrested for
firearm

possession

POLICE arrested an 18 year-
old man from North Andros,
for allegedly being in posses-
sion of an illegal firearm.

According to reports, officers
from the internal security divi-
sion were in the Potter’s Cay
area when, acting on a tip, they
searched a box and found a
loaded handgun and 40 live
rounds of ammunition.

Delegates
seeking

‘restraint’ on.

gay bishops

@ OHIO

EPISCOPAL delegates asked
church leaders to “exercise
restraint” when considering
openly gay candidates for bish-
op, a vote that ended days of
painful debate but fell far short
of demands to preserve Anglican
unity by banning gay bishops,
according to Associated Press.

The Wednesday measure
calls on Episcopal prelates to
“exercise restraint. by not con-
senting to the consecration” of
candidates for bishop “whose
manner of life presents a chal-
lenge to the wider church.”
However it is nonbinding and
—in a sign of the deep split over
gay clergy — at least one bishop
_ vowed immediately to ignore it.

Archbishop of Canterbury
Rowan Williams, the spiritual
leader of the global Anglican
Communion, has been trying to
broker a truce between conser-
vative and liberal archbishops
worldwide ever since the Epis-
copal Church shocked tradi-
tionalists by consecrating Bish-
op Gene Robinson of New
Hampshire.

Robinson, who was elected
in 2003, lives with his longtime
male partner. Anglican conser-
vatives — a majority in the 77-

million-member communion — »

hold that the Bible prohibits gay
Sex.

Episcopal delegates did vote
to'affirm the denomination’s
commitment to the Anglican
fellowship; the church is the US
arm of the communion. But a
proposal for.a temporary mora-
torium on gay bishops never hit
the convention floor.

On Tuesday, the House of
Deputies rebuffed a measure
that would have urged dioceses

o “refrain from” choosing bish-
ops in same-gender relationships.
Some saw its language as sending
a slightly tougher signal.

Whether the Episcopal Gen-
eral Convention went. far
enough to preserve Anglican

ties will play out over months, if
not years. World Anglican lead-"

ers meet next in February in
Tanzania.

Many Anglican churches
have already broken ties with
the US church over Robinson’s
elevation. And if overseas lead-
ers dislike the outcome of the
American meeting, it greatly
increases the chances that the
association of 38 national
churches will break apart.

Wednesday’s vote, just hours
before the end of a nine-day

meeting, won praise from

Williams but pleased neither
American conservatives nor
advocates for full inclusion of

gays.

\










@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE face of the Cable
Beach is set to change forever
starting this summer, as mas-
sive road works to transform
West Bay Street are scheduled
to begin within the next few
weeks.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, vice-president of
administration and external
affairs at the Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company Robert
Sands said that the first work to
reroute and, reshape the road
will start in the next two to
three weeks.

However, he emphasised
that traffic on West Bay Street
will not be disrupted during the
construction.

“It will have absolutely no
effect on the traffic,” he said.

As the road works get under-
way, Baha Mar will turn its
attention towards demolishing
the police and fire stations on
West Bay Street and rebuilding
them on alternate sites.

Funeral homes accused of delay ote :
dead body from home for senior citizens |:

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE owner of a local home
for senior citizens yesterday
accused funeral homes of
refusing to collect a dead resi-
dent from the home due to a
lack of funds.

Administrator and owner of
Unity House, Rev Janet
Smith-Butler, told The Tri-
bune yesterday that a 65-year-
old resident of the home died
on Sunday. She said it took
calls to four different funeral
homes, before one came for
the body.

In one instance, Unity
House was told that the owner
and the workers were out of
town taking care of a funeral.



solving

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Democrat-
ic Movement yesterday
claimed that the PLP govern-
ment was not concerned with
settling the Bozine Town res-
idents’ property dispute.

“The residents of Bozine
Town have been suffering for
too many years now, and for
them (to be) ignored in this
way is shameful,” said BDM
deputy leader Omar Smith in
a press release.

“After Justice Jeannie
Thompson ruled on May 11
to dismiss the residents’ apph-
cation to set aside the title
obtained by Landco, via the
Quieting of Titles Act, the
people in Bozine ‘Town now
have a few weeks to either
pay Landco for the property,
or they will be removed from
their land,” he said.

The land dispute between
the people of Bozine Town
and the Harrold Road Land
Development Company
(Landco) first began in late
2004. At that time more than
500 residents received letters
from the law firm of Lock-

- hart and Munroe informing
them that their client Landco
had been given certificates of
title for the land in the Bozine
Town and Knowles Drive

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This is expected to happen
in the next two to three
months.

“We are currently in the
review stage. We are review-
ing the bids by contractors,”
Mr Sands said.

Major demolition work on
the Cable Beach hotels is not
scheduled to begin until sum-
mer 2007.

Mr Sands said that the Nas-
sau Beach Hotel and two tow-
ers of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal-Palace Casi-
no will be the only structures of
the three hotels to be com-
pletely demolished.

“We are not looking at the
implosion of the hotel until
2007. 1 would say that the Nas-
sau Beach has another 12
months at the maximum,” he
said.

In a recent address to the
Bahamas Contractors Associ-
ation, Mr Sands reiterated that
Baha Mar will spend more
than $2 billion in the redevel-
opment and transformation of
Cable Beach.







@ THE owner of Unity
House, Rev Janet
Smith-Butler

M1 asc aee

However, Mrs Butler thinks

that there should have been a

back up.

LOCAL NEWS







i AN artist’s impression of how the Baha Mar development will look

Starting July 1, work costing
more than $205 million will
begin.

Mr Sands said that all work
at:Cable Beach will be done in

“I feel the type of people
that I deal with at the home
— I don’t expect for every-’
body to have that compassion
inside of them,” said Mrs But-
ler.

According to Mrs Butler,
the woman Alma Veronica
Smith (nee Malcolm) is of
Jamaican descent and for four
years had been a resident at
the senior citizens’ home.

From the little Mrs Butler
knew about her, she was mar-
ried to a Bahamian, now
deceased. Also she has a
daughter in Jamaica and a sis-
ter in Fort Lauderdale. .
Mrs Butler would ‘like any °
member of Mrs Smith’s: hus-
band’s family to contact Unity
House at 323-6128.

concerned’ with
ozine Town issue

‘area. Essentially it would dis-

place residents who had lived
on the land for more than 50
years.

“Why.should the people of
Bozine Town have to pay a
second time for their proper-
ties and homes? The residents
of Bozine already have mort-
gages from banks in this coun-
try, based on clear titles,
granted by the same courts,”
said Mr Smith.

“These people have spent
thousands and thousands of
dollars in legal fees trying to
fight for their homes that they
have already paid for. This
cannot be right,” Mr Smith
said.

Mr Smith said that while
Bahamians are being bullied
from their homes, it is the
lack of proper representation
of the area and the country’s
leadership that is.most
appalling in this case.

“This battle for Bozine
Town and Knowles Drive res-
idents to hold on to their
homes has been going on for
too long. There is no way that
Bahamians should be treated
this way in their own country.

He said politicians should
stop playing politics with the
residents of Bozine Town and
Knowles Drive. “These peo-
ple,” he said, “are not asking
for judicial interference, they
















- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)





_of my extended family”,



are asking for justice.”

However, when speaking
with The Tribune yesterday Mr
Miller said he considers the res-
idents of that area to be “a part
and
promised that he would stand
firmly at their side to ensure
that justice is done.

“No one in Bozine Town or
Knowles Town will be dis-
placed,” he assured residents.
“Everything must go through
the legal process and channels,
but the government will do
whatever it takes to ensure that
no one is displaced from their
homes.”

phases so as not to disrupt
hotel operations along the
strip.

According to projections, in
its a year of operations, from

| issscesscesssscsssscsssecseescessecesceesenseesaessssccesessesececeussssnscassssssssesensessanacenssessasevssacssaseessnacessscasasousnscesssssoasssssesesusecenesatenecssasessnacennese@eat Caes

OPEN



F aA T
2010 to 2011, Baha Map,is.+ ivy

expected to contribute nearly; ,~ =;

$400 to the country’s gross.; i+,
domestic product, adding 6,5;.- rage
per cent to the current GDP: + /~”

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- PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1 914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1 986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
me Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
- Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Do police need help from outside?

THE CARIBBEAN is now turning to
_ the UK for seasoned police officers to help
_tackle crime that has crept into and under-

so “mined its local forces.

Trinidad, crippled by kidnappings and

: murders — 235 kidnappings and 386 mur-

‘ders last year — will spend £13 million in
. the next three years to brihg in 39 serving
~ and retired British police officers to assist
_ its local force.

Trinidad and Tobago’s National Securi-
ty Minister said that when his country was
first used as a trans-shipment point no one
"paid any attention because the locals were

x not users of the drugs or guns that were

sen ey

as

cer mee

-a we DEA RSS ERASERS HRY RA

‘being shipped through.

However, he said, some of the contra-
band started to remain in the island as part-

~ payment.

“As a result, our law enforcement got
out of alignment .. . It seems for some peo-
ple that crime is paying. Clearly we needed
assistance,” he explained.

As a result of the growing attacks on

visitors to the tourist island of Tobago, the.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office issued
a travel advisory warning that the “inabil-
ity of local authorities to apprehend and
prosecute the perpetrators is a serious con-
cern.”

Jamaica has also turned to London’s
Metropolitan Police for help. According
to the Daily Gleaner, Jamaicans have had
enough.

They have grown disenchanted with their
‘own police force.

“They believe that it had grown corrupt,
inept and repressive, contributing more to
social instability than the prevention or
solution of crime.”

St Lucia and Guyana have also request-
ed British officers. And Barbados has
joined the queue.

It’s now time for the Bahamas to give
this matter serious consideration, before
crime in these islands escalates to ‘the lev-
els of Trinidad, Tobago and Jamaica.

In 1987 Paul Adderley, then attorney
general, told the House of Assembly that in
the interest of the Bahamas and the secu-
rity of its citizens government might have to
recruit non-Bahamian policemen.

He said that prospects for increasing

the needed personnel for the Royal
Bahamas Police Force from among young
Bahamian men and women “are on
November 24, (1987) not very good.”

Despite nation-wide recruitment exer-
cises the manpower was just not there —
they did not qualify.

He said that in one Family Island 23
young men were identified as being poten-
tial members of the force.

However, after medical examinations,
18 were found to be unsuitable. Remem-
bering the year — 1987 — drugs were
probably the problem.

Another island, which at one time was a
fertile source of excellent recruits, said Mr
Adderley, “was described to me by one of
the recruiting officers as a disaster area
and they found none there.” Again it
sounds as though drugs were their down-
fall.

. Today the only change is that. while
young male recruits remain an endangered
species, young women are qualifying. How-
ever, more men are needed, especially in
the Defence Force. _

If the information that Health Minister
Dr Bernard Nottage disclosed at the com-

’- missioning yesterday of the anti-drug sec-

retariat is any indicator, the recruitment
future looks even less promising. Accord-
ing.to the doctor even 10 year olds are now
marijuana users.

Today the police cannot recruit
“squeaky-clean” young men, because dur-
ing their pre-teen and teen years they have
run afoul of the law, either by dabbling in
drugs, loitering, or commiting various
minor offences.

Now that they have grown to adulthood
it is hoped that some of them have left
their misdemeanours behind and will prove
to be upright citizens.

It is understood that the situation is so
dire, that rules are being “slightly” bent in
the name of being practical to try to include
them in the service.

But, if it is true that corruption is endem-
ic to our society, and it is from this society
that these young recruits are being drawn,
then common sense should tell us that they
need a strong, outside influence to help
keep them on the straight and narrow.



THE TRIBUNE

A new kind

of leader |

has emerged.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THIS past Friday my spirit
was lifted, much higher than it
has been lifted in many moons.
I witnessed the emergence of a
new kind of leader, one who
has blazed the trail in mentoring
our youth not only through edu-
cation but her civic work.

St Anselm’s Catholic Church

in Fox Hill was jam-packed and
came alive with the many well
wishers who came from across
the political divide, the eco-
nomic borders and from every
other walk of life to show their
love, respect and admiration in
a service of thanksgiving for Dr
Jacinta Higgs. Dr Higgs is a lady
with “world class ability” and
who has made significant
achievements. This Bahamas is
the recipient of an outstanding
scholar, civic leader, teacher,
community builder, just to
name a few.

The celebration at St
Anselms was arranged to give
glory and thanks to almighty

’ God for enabling Dr Higgs, a

humble lady, to achieve the

highest academic achievement.

The atmosphere at St Anselms
was so calming, so peaceful; it
would be an understatement to
say the holy spirit presided over
the celebration.
Dr Higgs’ dissertation was
“Colonial education, African
amnesia”, quite appropriate,
especially because the village
where Dr Higgs hails from is
steeped rich in African heritage.
The people of Fox Hill who
helped her with her research
were present to receive the
thanks from Dr Higgs for their
invaluable help. Some of us
seem to forget from whence we
came. Dr Higgs on the other
hand obviously won’t let any
forget where she came from.
The many accolades heaped
on Dr Higgs by Mrs Erma Gar-
raway, Permanent Secretary to

the Ministry of Health, while’

she boasted of having a hand in
the early development of this
rare lady, Dr Higgs. Mrs Gar-
raway elaborated that she
recognised even in the twelfth
grade that Dr Higgs was just
not an ordinary young lady, but
she had already distinguished
herself from her peers. Accord-
ing to Mrs Garraway “she was
articulate, assertive, determined
and self confident”. This was
certainly an indication and the
makings that the young lady
exemplified extreme leadership
qualities.

Her thirst for knowledge and

her willingness to help others
_ and to share, played out in her

untiring work with her students

DSM MU SI RAS

letters@triounemecia.net






and the Girl Guides. Dr Higgs
has been intricately involved in
the Girl Guides. She is present-
ly preparing papers on the his-
tory of Guides in the Bahamas.
This special lady has touched
many lives and is still touching
lives in a most positive way.

The humility displayed by Dr
Higgs shows just how sensitive
she is. This was obvious from
the crescendo, almost in unison,
by the many persons who sang
her praises during the reception
after the thanksgiving service.
I was baffled how a lady such.as
this has gone by practically
unnoticed for so long.

It is time for the whole
Bahamas to know Dr Higgs. In
fact the Bahamas needs to
know Dr Jacinta Higgs. She has
a contribution to make and it

is extremely obvious that she 4 is

willing to make a contribution:

She is no phony. She is highly
respected. Even though she has
achieved, she never left her peg-
ple in Fox Hill. She loves and
brags about Fox Hill, and by all
indications the people of Fox
Hill love her.
Fox Hill, being the wise peo-
ple that they are, will do what-
ever they must to show their
appreciation to a lady that has
literally given her life for Fox
Hill. Fox Hill knows. that she
has their best interest at hear,
She can identify with Fox Hill’
I am certain that the village of
Fox Hill and-the whole |
Bahamas will hear more about
and from Dr Jacinta Higgs very
soon. Fox Hill needs a “real Figx

Hill gal”.
This warms my heart. 4
IVOINE W INGRAHAM:
Nassau, y
June, 2006. i

sbeseecenssenscessceeceeccaeceneesncaeseseneesaseneaenesceeeeang es

a

ee
situation —

EDITOR, The Tribune.

2

CAN someone please explain to me this perplexing situation
which is occurring in The Bahamas.

Why is it that people are focused on the Opposition Party ait
its leader in Parliament who are not currently in power, but fet
the governing party and its leader off “Scot free”.

It seems to me that opposing parties not now in Partianien
should set their sights on the governing party and its policies.

Yet in the newspaper today, the leader of one opposing pat-
ty spent time criticising the Opposition Parliamentary Leader
together with those members who left the CDR, but not on
word against the present government.

Then in the same newspaper it was stated that two Indepep-
dents have allegedly “cut a deal” with the governing party and
in return for criticising the FNM and its leader, the governing
party allegedly will not run candidates in those districts in the .
next election even though they said they would not offer for re-

election.

If true, how is that for keeping one’s word? ' y
There are also others, including one columnist who a s unre-

lenting in criticising the FNM leader during the last «

\ \etion.

However, in these times, there has not been one serious cx:::"ism

written against the PLP Leader.

Can someone explain what is going on and the reason for such

behaviour?

9

Are there some people who are “untouchable” in This

Bahamas?

SHIRLEA VOTER
Nassau,
June, 2006.

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THE TRIBUNE

Robberies
believed
to be
connected

POLICE are investigating
two robberies that occurred
within an hour of each other on
Friday evening.

The incidents are thought to
be connected.

af Just after 9pm, two mask gun-
men entered the Super Saver
on Madeira Street, one bran-
dishing a handgun and the oth-
‘er a shotgun.

. They forced an employee to
‘Open the safe and took an
“andisclosed amount of cash
before escaping in a silver Hon-
“da.

/~ About an hour later, D&T
‘Convenience store on Dean and

Nassau Street was robbed by : :

two gunmen.

'' One of the men who entered
‘the facility was armed with
“handgun and the other with a
“shotgun.

“ The employees were also
robbed of an undetermined
amount of cash.

'C The men reportedly fled in a
Silver Honda.

‘Kidnapped —
Canadian
released
by gang

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

A CANADIAN missionary —

kidnapped a week ago has been
released, a colleague said. Sun-
day as U.N. peacekeepers
increased patrols amid an
upsurge of violence in the Hait-
ian capital, according to Asso-
ciated Press. X

Ed Hughes was released late

Saturday on a rural road after

ckidnappers received a ransom
raised by the missionary’s
tfriends and colleagues, said Nel-
yson Ryman, co-director with
Hughes of the Tytoo Gardens
s;erphanage.

“He called me in the morning
_and was extremely disoriented,”
Ryman said from his home in
“Tampa, Florida, “A bit later I
“falked to him again and he said
he plans to return to his chil-

en in the orphanage and plans

LG stay in Haiti.” °
3 Ryman said the ransom was
Yess than US$10,000 but would
“fot specify the amount.

Police and U.N. officials

worked through a Haitian medi-
ator to secure Hughes’ release.
'.6 Hughes, 72, was kidnapped
ss apparently by gang members



pHaiti’s capital of Port-au-Prince
on June 18. They threatened to
ill him unless a US$45,000
ransom was paid and later low-
ered the demand, according to
Ryman. .

Ryman said Hughes told him
he was released during a storm
Saturday night and was put ina
“tap-tap” — pickup trucks used
as collective taxis. Hughes, who
made it back to the capital ear-

a Sunday, was resting at-a-safe
gecation in Port-au- Prince,
Baas said.

























Paes IN LAWN SERVICE
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eC ELC
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@ By MARK HUMES

THE Director of Catholic
Education and other inde-
pendent school administra-
tors are once again extend-
ing an offer of partnership
to the Ministry of Educa-
tion in its reform efforts —
saying: “we are all con-
cerned about the nation’s
children.”

In an interview Sat The
Tribune yesterday, Catholic
Education’s Claudette Rolle
said that after last year’s
national conference on edu-
cation, the Ministry of Edu-

LOCAL NEWS

But board yet to hear
from ministry officials



cation made a promise to
invite them to be a part of a
committee looking to
address areas of concern in
public education.

However, to date, said the
director, the Catholic Edu-
cation board has not heard
from ministry officials.

“T always thought it would
be a wise move to partner
with Education,” Mrs Rolle
said. “All of us are a part
of this human development
and formation of persons,
so it is most critical for us to
get together and talk about
how we can move education

Ron Pinder: some
‘Potter’ s Cay vendors
are still ineligible
_ for alcohol permit

a By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SOME Potter’s Cay vendors are still ineli-
gible for a permit to legally sell alcohol, Envi-
ronmental Health director Ron Pinder report-
ed yesterday.

After meeting with the vendors on several
occasions to discuss the criteria for such a

licence, Mr Pinder said he realised that many |

vendors find the requirements too harsh.

“A lot of the compliance is ongoing,” Mr
Pinder explained, “so we continue to have
some difficulty with the vendors. Overall it
was not met favourably because a number
of them had to upgrade their stalls.”

“But those persons who have implemented
the necessary recommendations made by the
various government ministries and agencies
are with licenses.

“There are some who still haven’t, and
there are still one or two.persons who are
not in compliance and are selling alcohol ille-
gally — but: we will address that shortly,” he
said.

In order to obtain a licence, Pinder
explained, vendors have to meet several
requirements — including ensuring that all
food is stored and prepared in kitchens that
meet environmental health standards.

Although some vendors are resisting the
changes, others approve of the steps the gov-
ernment is taking to improve Potter’s Cay.

Mr Louis, co-owner of TZ’s Bayou, said

‘there must be some system of rules in place.

He said many of vendors are in favour of
the requirements, because of the number of
persons that take advantage of the present sit-
uation.

“There are some people who come out
here and sell alcohol out of there cars, while
those of us who have licenses to sell food
and conch can’t sell drinks,” he said.

Mr Louis has already applied for a licence
but said that it usually takes about six months
to a year to get one..

Charlie Brown, who has been a vendor for





@ ENVIRONMENTAL Health
director Ron Pinder

over 20 years, already has a licence.

He said it took him about nine months to
get his because of the number of require-
ments he had to meet in order to qualify.

“Fach person in given a list of require-
ments they need to meet in order to get a
licence,” he explained.

Brown admitted the changes he had to
make sét him back financially, but agreed
that in the end, it was a necessary improve-
ment. “Things needed to change,” he said.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 5

Catholic Education director offers |
partnership over education reform

forward in the country.”

With the success that
independent schools have
had over the years, both she
and Queen’s College’s vice-
principal Mrs Shawn Turn-
quest believe that there is a
great deal their systems can
offer the ministry, if they
were asked. ;

“JT think our administra-
tors, teachers, and students
have said that they would
be more than happy to talk
to anybody who is interest-
ed,” said Mrs Turnquest.
“We would be able to shed
alot of light on where to go
in advancing public educa-
tion.”

“Firstly, in just about all
of our private schools,” said
the administrator, “we do
stress that it is a team effort,
as the schools cannot do it
alone. We insist that our
parents get involved, and we
try. to put the proper
emphasis on key areas.”

Parent

However, she said that
while the schools stress the
role of the parent, as they
are the most influential per-
son in the child’s life, in the
end the influence of leader-
ship is most important.

“Tf there doesn’t appear
to be a sincere interest in
what takes place, then the
entire system will suffer,”
said Mrs Turnquest.

“Teachers need to feel

CABINET WORKSHOP



supported. Students need to
feel supported, and parents
need to feel that those who
are in charge care. :

“They need to make sure
that there are adequate sup-
plies, that the schools are
fixed, that books are avail-
able, grounds are main-
tained and pleasant to look
upon. They need to create
an environment that will
invoke pride.

Encourage |

“Additionally,” said: Mrs
Turnquest, “they need to
encourage students on.a
regular basis to make sure
that they are prepared for
school and life after high
school.”

Mrs Rolle, however, feels
that it is not the lack of sin-
cere interest that slows the
public education system
down. In her opinion, much
of it has to do with-bureau-.
cracy.

“IT believe there are ae
tiatives being put forward,
but it is just the time it takes
and the bureaucracy that is
involved in actually expé-
diting the initiatives that js
the challenge — it slows the
system down.”

However, she said: “wie
are always open to having
a dialogue with the Ministry
of Education and whatever
we can do to help education
progress, we are very Open
to that.” -

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





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Invites applications for the position of

PHOTO SHOP SITE MANAGER

.|. The successful applicant should satisfy the following minimum requirements:-

iLs >. Have a diploma or degree in Management/Marketing or a related field

i Fade: Have a minimum of 3 years experience in the hotel/hospitality industry in
peaks a management position

we a Have a minimum of 3 years experience in sales/retail

\ * Have a strong command of MS Excel, MS Word, MS PowerPoint

: Experience in Photo Shop Editing Suite (Adobe PhotoShop) is a definite

* Have a basic knowledge of digital photography

Be bright, energetic and must be a self-starter

Must demonstrate flexibility and:assertiveness in generating sales proposals
and‘concepts for increasing Photo Shop revenue

Be a team player with the ability to manage staff and daily Photo Shop

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Pear ar

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ther duties will include:

* Daily supervision of work area ensuring maximum overall performance
through effective crew/staff management

» Maintenance of employee records, as well as establishing and maintaining

fair and consistent crew/staff practices

Liaising with resort Sales Manager and assisting the resort General Manager

and Photo Shop Group Manager with all internal communications, site

*v” reporting, evaluations and meeting coordination within designated site.

i

re Applications should be emailed or faxed to:

: GROUP MANAGER, PHOTOGRAPHY OPERATIONS
1} ‘Sandals Resorts International
"FO, Box 100
+S-Montego Bay ‘
Wo 'Rax: 518-0995
Lo Email: ehanna@sri.sandals.com and hrd@sri.sandals.com

eon.

«Applications close on Friday March 31, 2006



GENERAL BAHAMIAN COMPANIES LIMITED

DIVIDEND NOTICE
TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS
We are pleased to advise that a Dividend of $1.50 per

- share shall.be paid to Ordinary Shareholders of record
“as at 30th June 2005.

3 : ‘The Payment will be made in the usual manner, on
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asset a

@ MINISTER of Ener-
gy and the Environment
Dr Marcus Bethel, along
with Michael Turner,
under secretary, Melony
McKenzie, Director of
Environmental Health
Services, and
representatives from the
BEST Commission
toured Motana Holdings
Limited development
project in Rum Cay last
Wednesday. Jason
Dean, chief financial
officer, leads Mr Bethel
and his team to a
lookout point.

































@ MARCUS Bethel, along
with Michael Turner,

Ms McKenzie and
representatives from the
BEST Commission toured
The Mayaguana Company
LLC. development project
on Wednesday, June 21,
2006. From left, Sergeant
1155 Curtis, Ramadan
McKenzie, operation
manager, Mr Bethel,

Mr Tourner, and Ms
McKenzie view a map of
the island showing areas
to be developed. )



@ FROM left are Ramadan McKenzie, operations manager, Mr
Turner and Mr Bethel

(Photos: BIS/
Raymond A Bethel)

@ From left are
Archie Cartwright,
operations manager;
Mr Bethel; Jason
Dean, chief financial
officer; and Garbriella
Frazer, business
development analyst,
view an artist’s
rendition of the
marina

Tug oaiches light
off Arawak Cay

@ By Gladstone Thurston
Bahamas Information
Services

A PRIVATELY owned 110-
foot steel hull tug boat, The
Carrizal, caught fire at about
3.30am yesterday at Arawak
Cay and sank four miles north
of Paradise Island.

The vessel Sank in 1,000 feet
of water after being towed away
from Arawak Cay by the owner
Edgar Curling. No injuries were
reported.

According to Mr Curling, the
vessel contained 200 gallons of
diesel fuel in its tank when the
fire broke out.

The Fire Department was
called. They battled the fire for
three hours before a decision
was made to tow the vessel
away from the docks to avoid
additional damage to sur-
rounding vessels.

In what was called a con-
trolled burn, the vessel eventu-
ally sank at 9.42am.

Che Ministry of Transport
and Aviation, the lead agency

for oil spills on the seas, was
informed at about 9.15am of a
vessel on fire with the potential
of an oil spill.

The Port Department and
the oil spill response company.
Baychem, were immediately
mobilised and dispatched to
the scene to monitor and pro-
vide assessment on the situa-
tion.

An international oil spill
response company in Ft Laud-
erdale, Clean Caribbean &
Americas, was placed on alert
should their assistance be need-
ed.

Meeting

The Ministry immediately
called an emergency meetiug of
the National Oil Spill Contin-
gency Advisory Committee to
review the.information at hand
and to strategise on a plan of
action with respect to the poten-
tial spill.

The Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) which had a

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presence during the “con-
trolled burn” gathered
debris from the area and
reported a light sheen on
the surface of the.sea as the
vessel went down. It is
believed that the fire may
have burned out most of the
fuel contained on the ves-
sel.

According to the meteo-
rological report, the winds
are from the south-east to
south at six knots per hour
and, given the ebbing tide,
these conditions will allow
for the sheen to move out
to sea, thereby reducing any
threat to the coast line.

The Ministry of Transport
and Aviation along with the
National Oil Spill Advisory
Coninittee have put m place
a strong monitoring pro
gramme to alert the ministry
in the event there may be
trapped oil remaining in the
tanks of the sunken vessel
which may surface.

Aitplanes and vessels in
the area are advised to
report any sightings of oil
or diesel on the waters to
the Ministry of ‘Transport,
the Port Department and
the Civil Aviation Depart
ment,

The RBDE and the Port
Department will also be
monitoring this area over
the next several days.



Three men
arrested
for attack
on couple

@ ST LUCIA
Castries

THREE men have been
arrested in connection with an
attack on a European couple as
they slept on a yacht moored
off the north coast of this
Caribbean island, police said
Monday, according to Associ-
ated Press

The three men, two from St.
Lucia and one from another
unidentified island, were being
held as suspects after being cap-
tured over the weekend, but
had not yet been charged in the
attack, Assistant Police Com:
missioner Hermangild Francis
said,

Authorities said the tourists, a
Dutch man and a French
woman, were attacked on June
18 as they slept on the boat off
Gros Islet on the country’s
“north coast.

Police said the woman was
raped and the man was beaten
unconscious, and the assailants
stole a computer, cameras ans
money.

Other boaters had tivedtened
to boycott the island if the gov-
ernment failed to solve the
crime, officials said.

Jamaica
receives
cement
from Cuba

@ JAMAICA
Kingston

A SHIPMENT of 8,000 tons
of cement from Cuba arrived
in the Jamaican capital on Sun-
day — some two months after
officials expected it would
arrive, according to Associated
Press.

The cement, which will help
ease a shortage that has slowed
construction on the island, will
be issued for local distribution
on Monday, said Commerce
Minister Phillip Paulwell. It was
not clear why the shipment was
delayed.

Paulwell said it is the first of
several shipments expected
from Cuba to ease the cement
shortage.

“This shipment, in addition
to the other imports and pro-
duction from the Caribbean
Cement Company, should sup-
ply the weekly domestic
demand,” Paulwell said.

Jamaica began negotiating
with Cuba to supply cement
after the main local producci,
Caribbean Cement Company
Limited, temporarily suspended
production in March following
claims of substandard product

An internal inquiry later
revealed that the company had
distributed some 551,000 tons
of faulty cement since Novem.
ber, according to Trinidad
Cement Limited, the company’s
major shareholder

INSIGHT
For the stories
behind the

tC gy: Le.
Insight on
Mondays

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CAMPS 2006

Held at cam Symonette in James’ Cistern,
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July 1-7 for ages 13-17 and July 10-16 for
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Registration $100. for more information
contact Debra Gibson at the BCMC office at
393-3726, visit our website at:
www.angelfire.com/rmb/campsymonette or
send an email to:
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THE TRIBUNE







In brief

Court ruling
may end
Guantanamo
trials

m@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

A FORMER driver for
Osama bin Laden may help
‘decide the fate of dozens of
‘Guantanamo Bay detainees,
and perhaps all of them, as the
‘Supreme Court prepares to rule
on his legal challenge to the first
‘US war crimes trials since
“World War II, according to
Associated Press.

The court, which is expected
‘to rule as early as Monday, ts
‘considering a range of issues in
Salim Ahmed Hamdan’s case,
including whether US President
George W Bush had the author-
ity to order military trials for
men captured in the war or er-
ror and sent to the Navy base at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

‘Bush recently suggested the
ruling will help him determine
‘what should be done with all
‘the prisoners at Guantanamo,
where the US holds about 450
“men on suspicion of links to al-
‘Qaida or the Taliban.

« Amnesty International and

‘the American Civil Liberties

Union said Friday that Bush

‘doesn’t need a court decision

to close the prison, which has

drawn intense international crit-

icism. The case has nothing to

do with the prison itself, they .
said.

“Bush can close Guan-
tanamo, but this (court) deci-
sion can’t,” said Ben Wizner,
an ACLU attorney who moni.
tors Guantanamo. “That’s not a
question before this court.”

The'ruling, however, could
determine whether the govern-
ment can proceed with military
trials for Hamdan anc aine oth-
er detainees who have been
charged with crimes.














TROPICAL |
Us ee ot
PEST CONTROL .
arr a Tra A 57



eee ear

=e ORD SSHRKASHRD A SEHR -

ame

DIAIRARASAS AVAL AA

od

TICKETS

THE Defence Force and the police
should do everything they can to stay on
the cutting edge of technology, accord-
ing to Captain Raymond Farquharson.

Captain Farquharson, a Defence Force
officer, made this comment after wit-
nessing the uses to which Rhode Island’s
armed services can put their emergency
equipment, during a tour of the state’s
storm disaster management facilities.

“We started sort of shoulder to shoul-
der to them. However, we now seek to
get the additional equipment needed
to upgrade our storm area — which is
something we will do in this budget
year,” said Captain Farquharson.

“T’m sure it will not.take a lot of
funds, since we are pretty effective right

Last Friday, a group of nine Bahami-
an emergency services officials returned
from the tour, which was a follow-up to
the visit of Rhode Island’s emergency
planners to the Bahamas in March.

The exchange programme pairs
American states with Caribbean coun-
tries, and permits two trips a year for
each team to analyse the progress of
the other’s emergency procedures.

“The trip went very well as far as | am
concerned,” said Captain Farquharson,
who claimed that he could only speak of
his own experience, since each mem-
ber of the team went to different loca-
tions, depending on their specialty.

“For example, (police) Commission-
er Paul Farquharson would have been

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 7 4

Defence Force
be at ‘cutting edge’ of technolo

Superintendent Charles Rolle went to
the prison with his people, and I went
with the Coast Guard, since I am with
the Defence Force.

Farquharson said he also travelled to
Rhode Island in November last year.

“A section of Rhode Island’s Nation-
al Guard réturned the favour by coming
back with their general in January, and
then visited us again sometime in March
or May.”

In the most recent trip, Captain Far-
quharson says that he got to see how
Rhode Islanders use their Coast Guard.

“[ toured their operations center and
saw how they carry out search and res-
cue procedures.

“From there, I was taken by one of









they had a change of command: cérd-
mony at another one of the Cont
Guard stations,” he said.

Captain Farquharson said that at. ‘the
end of the trip, the Bahamian delegd-
tion came together to discuss what'the
did, listen to necommendanone apd
take notes.

He ensured the public that the ‘ate:
mation he received will be passed: on
to other Defence Force officers, who
will use it to improve the force’s emet-
gency response capability. eae

“There is no doubt there were a Jot‘of
things that the Bahamian delegation
learned from Rhode Island, and ‘they
also came, here to learn from us. This
was a wonderful exchange experience

AVAILABLE AT:

now,” he added

with the Rhode Island police, Deputy

their officers to a second base, where

for both sides,” he said.

'
abinsUone peddcceasdocdiecpeedan ddan cuSaactucacescubevcaed asscidcssaccedacpeunceadiduencasectavebscvodecevscsaduatiaesledncddcuerduenveseedesghs saqoneeaséscedsesesdesapencig seseyvinessdoanoerngesossiinsisavadsasebar oe ogseoebdadegdecesesasedevensbadasedeasescdacseavsesesdcenancscebdbanbseua se nedeasasuccesdceeessassecsecncacecccenncse ta yeces

,

f

Public give their views on police and crime

ACCORDING to Assis-
tant Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson, the
crime rate so far this year is
more or less the same as it
was in 2005.

This is true except for in a
few key areas such as house
break-ins, which have risen
in New Providence, he said.

However, as police have
admitted before, actual
crime and the fear of crime
can be two very different
things.

With. this in mind, The
Tribune took to the streets
to seé how members of the
public feel about crime,
safety and the performance
of the police.

Most interviewees said
they feel the police are
doing a very good job in
local communities and have
brought a feeling of safety
to their everyday lives.

One the other hand,
many of those interviewed
said there is a need for bet-
ier community/police rela-
tions and some said they are

living in fear because of

crime. -

» “We live in fear constant-
ly: gangs and crime are like
a way of lite these days.”
said one interviewee. "The

The Home Store, Sandyport
La Rose,The British Hilton Hotel - 356-3467



@ LAVETTE McFall said:
“Police officers can alert the
community with tips to help
prevent us from becoming

victims.”

citizens are made to fear the
system and the police; the gov-
ernment is not doing anything
about it,” he said.

Local businesswoman Lavette

McFall said: “The police can

only do their jobs as best as we
assist them. It is our responsi-
bility as a people to band togeth-
er to help the police.”

She went on to say that crime
develops when neighborhoods
turn a blind eye and a deaf ear
to their own problems.

"Police officers can alert the
community with tips to help
prevent us from becoming vic-
tims" she added.

"T feel safe in general, but as”



ES

@S Johnson said: “When
safety is concerned, on a scale
on one to ten its about a seven
for me.”



far as police and community
relations go, I'll have to say that
some of the officers need to be

trained in social skills" said a
local barber. "You go to report
a matter and they make you feel
like the criminal,” he said.
During an interview, Assis-
tant Commissioner Fer guson
said: "Fighting crime is only a
part of it, we also try to main-
tain our communication with

‘the community as well."

327-1132

@ SEAN Johnson said: “I
don’t feel really safe,
considering how many times.
I’ve had break-ins.”

Ferguson said senior officers
are always seeking new ways to
"bridge the gap between com-
munities and the police force."

S Johnson said: “Where safe-
ty is concerned, on a scale of one
to 10, its about a seven for me..”

“A better relationship with
young men in the community is
needed,” he continued. “I think
this would even help older per-
sons to feel safer where they
live.”

“I've felt more comfortable
other places," said Michael
Brown. "Although I respect the
police, I wouldn't rely on them.
The police force needs to be

‘more aware of the areas they





Mi MICHAEL Brown said:
“More planning and
involvement with the :
community is needed so we |:
all can have a sense of safety. ig

‘
'
f

6

work in, more planing, aid
involvement with the commu-
nity is also needed so we all can
have a sense of safety,” he sald:

CEO of TTL Productions,
Sean Johnson said: “Fdon't’.
really feel safe considering how -
many times I've had break-in.”

He continued, "I think crime
is on the rise. The police’ ean't
do anything about it — it has
more to do with social issues:”

Mr Johnson went on to say
that the relationship between
the police force and the com-
munity needs to be strength-
ened if there is to be any hopé
for preventing crime in the
future,” ‘a



Saturday, July Ist
‘The Radisson Ballroom,
Cable Beach Resort

Vanya as pin
Dinner 8:30pin




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«[ TUESDAY EVENING

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Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

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Haiti’s pres
needs roads to boost touris

#@ FLORIDA
Miami Beach __ ets
HAITI cannot expect to be
seen as a desirable tourist des-
tination until the necessary
‘ roads are built and political sta-

‘ bility is achieved, Haitian Pres- .

: ident Rene Preval said on Sun-
‘ day at a tourism conference in
‘South Florida, according to
' Associated Press.

The president’s speech at a
Miami Beach hotel capped a
three-day conference where
jocal and Haitian business
investors discussed how tourism
could boost the Caribbean
country’s crippled economy.
Haitian leaders want potential
tourists to envision the coun-
iry’s beautiful landscape, rich
culture and exotic cuisine ~ not
the western hemisphere’s poor-
est nation riddled with violence.

Neighbouring Caribbean
island Cuba had 2.5 million vis-
itors and the Dominican
Republic had 4 million visitors
in 2005, Preval said in a 90-
minute speech that was delayed
néarly three hours. ,

‘Haiti had 112,000 tourists that
same year, he said.

“The first thing everybody is
asking for is roads. How can
-you talk about tourism without
-having the highways that take

‘the tourists to places in a com-
‘tortable way?” Preval said
‘through an interpreter.

Preval said he would rely on

international financial help to









Hi PRESIDENT of Haiti Rene Preval, center, and Haitian
Ambassador to the US Ray Joseph, left, listen as former mayor
of Atlanta Andrew Young talks at the Second Annual Haiti
Tourism Development Summit on Sunday

defray the cost of road build-
ing, though he did not specify
the estimated cost or a timeline
for construction.

Governor Jeb Bush had also
been scheduled to speak at Sun-
day, but did not attend the
event. A spokeswoman said
Bush, who governs a state with
a large Haitian community, sent
a representative to the confer-
ence and is committed to work-
ing with Haiti to improve its sit-
uation.

“We want to help with a
strong Haiti, a healthy Haiti,”
spokeswoman Alia Faraj said.

Serge Philippe Pierre, mar-

(AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

keting director for the Haitian
airline Tortug’ Air, said he was
encouraged by Préval’s vision
to boost tourism. “It is a good
way for Haiti to rebuild the
country,” he said. “It’s a not a
dream, it will become a reality.
The money is there -- we can
find it from the international
community.”

Preval, a 63-year-old cham-
pion of the gor, took power
last month rolemiaee two-year
i :ent installed
ent Jean-
Bertrand Aristide was deposed
amid a February 2004 revolt.

Throughout his speech,







Preval repeated the need for
siability in his country and
begged his countrymen to stop
the violence. Political unrest
was the main reason why Haiti
was not viewed as a safe, desir-
able tourist destination, he said.

“We have other islands in the
Caribbean that have far more
crime than we do, but nobody
talks about them because they
have political stability,” Preval
told about a.packed hotel ball-
room of about 400 diners, most-
ly from South Florida’s Haitian
community. ,

Haiti had been relatively calm
since Preval was elected Feb-
ruary 7, but recent kidnappings
and attacks on police and UN
peacekeepers have raised fears
of a flare
lar to the mayhem following the
2004 revolt that toppled Aris-
tide. An upsurge in gang. vio-
lence has led UN troops to
increase patrols and checkpoints
in Port-au-Prince, the volatile
Haitian capital.

A Canadian missionary kid-
napped from his home north
of Port-au-Prince a week ago
was released on Sunday. ‘Twen-
iy-nine people were kidnapped
in Haiti’s capital last month,
up from 15 in April, according
to the UN peacekeeping mis-
sion.

Haiti also needs to stream-
line the process for investors,
he said. In the Dominican
Republic investors can open a
business in two days, but Haiti’s



Japan fo fight global warming by pumping carhon dioxide underground

TOKYO a

JAPAN hopes to slash green-
house gas emissions and fight
global warming with a revolu-

tionary plan to pump carbon

dioxide into underground stor-
age reservoirs instead of releas-
ing it into the atmosphere, an
official said Monday, according
to Associated Press.

' The proposal aims to bury
200 million tons of carbon diox-
ide a year by 2020, cutting the
country’s emissions by one-
sixth, said Masahiro Nishio, an
official at the Ministry of Econ-

\

Inventory

SALE

JUNE
zoth
through
30th

omy, Trade and Industry. Intro-
duced last month, the plan is
still under study.
Underground storage of car-
bon dioxide underlines the new
urgency felt’ by, industrialized
countries trying to rein in the
effects of global warming. But
capturing carbon dioxide from
factory emissions and pressur-
izing it into liquid form, scien-
tists can inject it into under-
ground aquifers, gas fields or
gaps between rock strata, safe-
ly keeping it out of the air.
Japan has no commercial

underground carbon dioxide

storage operations, Nishio said.

Dowdeswell Street
Telephone: 322-2100



But the proposed project would
dwarf similar operations under
way in Norway, Canada and
Algeria, each of which pump
about 1 million tons a year.

Tackling carbon dioxide is a
top priority for Japan, the
world’s second-largest econo-
my. The country expels 1.3 bil-
lion tons of carbon dioxide a
year, making it one of the
world’s top offenders. despite
being a key driver behind to the
Kyoto Protocol — an interna-
tional agreement to cut global
output. of carbon dioxide by
2012.

‘Underground storage could

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begin as early as 2010, but there

are still many hurdles to over-
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Capturing carbon dioxide and
injecting it underground is pro-
hibitively expensive costing up
to $52 a ton, Nishio said. Under
the new initiative, the ministry
aims to halve that cost. by 2020
under.




















e-up of violence simi- -

political red tape often forces
investors to donate to political
causes before they can open a
business, he said.

Preval also called on US law-
makers to help boost Haiti’s
economy by passing the Hait-
ian Hemispheric Opportunity
Through Partnership Encour-
agement Act, which supporters
say could create as many as
20,000 jobs in the Caribbean
country.

IUESUAY, JUNE 2/, 2000, MALE'S -





Kwame Raoul, an Illinois:
state senator whose parents:

immigrated from Haiti’ to: —

Chicago, said the HOPE.Act,
was “a very limited step” and!
would only create jobs that paid:
less than $2 an hour.
“But even that is a symbolic!
step forward,”
is lobbying to pass the act. “The |
situation of despair (in Haiti) ;
has reached a level to where’
nobody can deny what exists."

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Kerzner official tells students to
‘believe in themselves and soar’

GRADUATES of Queen’s
College Class 2006 were chal-
lenged to “believe in themselves
and soar” by Ed Fields, Kerzner

'- International’s vice president of
retail services and public affairs.

Mr Fields, who is also the
general manager of the Ocean
Club Estates Homeowners
Association, was the guest
speaker at the graduation cere-
mony held in the school’s audi-
torium on Wednesday, June 21.

The former Queen’s College
graduate told the graduating
class of 2006 that “conventional
thinking maintains our standard
of living and maintains mankind,
but it does very little to advance

_ mankind. |

- “Tt is only through thinking
out of the box that we are able
to advance ourselves,” he said.
“Advancement is not only
essential, but it is critical for our
continued survival as human
beings.”

Pointing to the school’s

‘ theme, “Because we believe...
we soar” Fields used the oppor-

. tunity to challenge the 84 grad-
uates to personalise the theme
by thinking: “because I
believe...I soar.”

Decisions |

Fields told the graduates that
they have reached the point in
their lives where they are the
ones making the important deci-
sions that will affect their future.

“Whether you are going off

to college or entering into the

. work place, ‘mommy and daddy’
* will not be there to make deci-

sions for you. What direction
will you choose? Will you.

choose your friend’s choice, will
it be a boyfriend’s or girlfriend’s
choice, or a conventional
choice?” .

In making decisions, Fields .

urged the students to get input
and guidance from mentors and
loved ones and to make smart
décisions based on what they
believe. £2.



“What we are talking about.

here today, is about mature,
thought-out choices that allow



H QUEEN’S College graduates marching into the school’s auditorium for the graduation ceremony.

us. (human beings) to co-exist
with each other.”

Fields told the graduates that
along the way, some bad choic-
es will be made.

“Bad outcomes are not the
end of a situation, they are the
beginning of an opportunity, life
is like a maze — not a dead end.
The thinkers will find their.w;
out. ce

“At the same time




Nei,



2c

yourself from bad choices
is not necessarily a fun chal-
lenge.

“Tt is only when life situations
deal you a bad hand, that you
should use your creativity to win
the game,” he said.

Mr Fields impressed upon the
graduates’ parents the need to
counsel and guide the young
dwits, rather than mold them,
%, Héurged the parents to finda
balance between what they
think is best for their children







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and what their children believe
is best for themselves.

While delivering the school’s
report, Andrea Gibson, princi-
pal of Queen’s College, pointed
out that the school’s students
continue to perform above the
national average on the BGCSE
(Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Education Exam-
nations).

@ PICTURED is Ed Fields, Kerzner International’s vice president of retail services and pub-

“The performance of our stu-
dents from grade seven to 11
confirmed that when we raised
the bar our students are able to
respond,” she said.

Miss Gibson noted that of the
accelerated students who sat the
BGCSE exam in grade 11, three
gained top marks in their
respective subjects — which
included religious education,
history, craft and geography.

Mrs Shawn Turnquest, vice
principal and head of Queen’s
College high school, said that
over the school’s 116 years of
existence it has withstood the
test of time.

She said that as the oldest pri-
vate school in the Bahamas,
Queen’s College has been a
front-runner in producing many
of this country’s outstanding cit-
izens.

“Today our graduates stand
on the bridge that connects this
school’s great past to its glorious
future.

“We welcome you to the cer-
emony that marks the-end of
one stage of an educational
journey and the beginning of
another which, with the right
heart and the right attitude,
promises to be an incredible
one,” said Mrs Turnquest.

Valedictorian Tajh Ferguson
and salutorian Leslie Ann
Sealey, were presented with the
Susan Eliza Young Prize.

- Awards

Since 1925, the four top stu-
dents in each graduating class
have been recognised through
the presentation of the awards
established through legal trusts
in memory of Susan Eliza
Young and the young son of
Rev and Mrs Parkinson.

The award is presented based

- on the students cumulative GPA

from grades 10 to 12.

Kyle Ingraham received the
Principal’s Prize which is award-
ed to the student who displays
the most consistent effort, and
excellence.

Ingraham also received the -

Head Boy Prize.

Jessica Lowe was presented

with the Head Girl Prize.
A number of graduates

received top awards in the Sub- ©

ject Prizes and Special Awards
category. The school also recog-
nised students from grades sev-
en to 11 who made the Princi-
pal’s List for attaining a 3.
grade point average. '



Ses eRe &

OSS eos es

%

v

lic affairs at first left, along with Mrs Shawn Turnquest, vice principal and head of Queen’s Col-- ‘
lege high school and Rev Dr Laverne Lockhart, vice president of the Bahamas Conference of the’

' Methodist Church.

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ess



#5

2

+


THE TRIBUNE



THESE two views of Sand Banks shanty
settlement near Treasure Cay, Abaco, show
tightly-packed Haitian shacks right next toa -

‘swamp.



The community on S C Bootle Highway,

highway... -







FROM page one _

Ambassador Rood was able to
come to a “general agreement”

with US government officials
regarding the funding of
OPBAT.

He emphasised that there will
ibe no reduction of the funds



‘Dr N ottage |
reveals that
~ children part
_of ‘alarming’
statistic —
FROM page one

-’ One hundred and five
kilo-grams of cocaine and
33 pounds of marijuana,.:
with an estimated street:
value of over $1.7 million,
were seized.

Police also confiscated a
large quantity of cash and.
an illegal fire arm. Thre¢
months ago the police ;
made a similar raid.



“Two things are: signifi: e

cant about these incidents.

One is that drug trafficking :

continues to be a pressing.
problem in our country





and, secondly, the Bahami- |.
ans are appalled and‘deter-’

mined to keep their com

munities drug free by pro-.".
viding police with the rele--

vant information to’ aie
hend suppliers,” Mrs Prat
said. :
The major goal i is to
‘bring about a drug free
society, the Deputy Prime
Minister said, while refer-
ring to the secretariat as a
“long awaited tool of the
government.
“The plan represents the
government’s policy and’
. Strategy to address the
_ probjJem of drugs. It is an
integrated strategy incor-
porating adequate legisla-
tive framework, and other
‘ controls to address the
movement of chemicals
and precursors. 5
“Money laundering EO
improve our capacity to -
‘wage an effective war on
_ drugs.”

pedvitied to othe Sperone









In the: weeks leading up to
the ambassador’s trip, concerns
were raised that the US might
withdraw. its, Amy ‘helicopters
from the. programme and 'sig-
nificantly reduce its. financial
support.

However, the: ambassador
quickly moved: to. quell: those
fears by’ saying, sthat there was

no talkof removing: ‘the heli- Bes
copters from OPBAT. ”

The Western: Hemisphere

Travel Initiative was also a top-

ic-of discussion during the
‘Washington trip.

Although he could not yet
disclose any details of the



outcome of talks regarding -

the ‘travel initiative, Mr
Floyd said that the’ “news is
good.”

The initiative, which requires
all US citizens, travelling. to.the
Bahamas to have.a valid pass-_

Poth has caused Breat, concern



like Pigeon Pea in Marsh Harbour, is con-
’ sidered a major fire hazard.

The fenced area on the lower right is the
' Treasure Cay cemetery, which borders the

LOCAL NEWS

Fire hazard concerns i



for the countty’s tourism indus-

try.

It was estimated that the
Caribbean could lose billions of
dollars in revenue if the dead-
line for the new initiative. were
to be enforced before US trav-
ellers — the majority of whom
do not possess passports — had
sufficient time to obtain the nec-
essary documents.

The Caribbean region was

“asking for a deadline on par “|

with that set for Mexico and
Canada —aJ anuary, 2008 dead-
line.

» After consideration of the
region’s concerns, the US
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity decided to extend the orig-

‘inal deadline for the Caribbean,

a January, 2006 deadline, to
2007.

Information regarding the
possible additional extension of
the deadline is expected to be
released tomorrow.

An island resident said: “This is another,
potential disaster as a fire here could take 50-
100 houses. There is no fire engine on North
Abaco and the Marsh Harbour engines are.
probably 30. to 40 minutes away.’

”

Abaco residents fear disaster «












































(Photos: Colyn Reese)







3

wid

t

lve always been health conscious is but now that I'ma mother I’m even
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“The Woman & Health
Section of The Tribune is
a great resource to me and
my family. We love its
timely articles on food,
health, fashion and beauty.
The Tribune is y
newspaper.”

DESEREA WALKINE

“My Gourmet Lunch &
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‘EVERY TUESDAY ~~

The Tribune

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at Haitian settlement : *



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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006



June 27, 2006






THE E TRIBUNE



issue XIV.



The Bahamas Telecommunications Co, Ltd,
BIG, Take Punta Cana by “Storm” during the
22” Annual CANTO Tradeshow & Exhibition.

The event which was held on the beautiful
Caribbean island of Punta Cana in the
Dominican Republic, attracted some 600
members of the Telecommunications
industry in and throughout the Caribbean.
BTC's Acting President & CEO, Leon Williams,
serves on the CANTO Board of Directors as
Chairman and leads a team of 8 Directors on
the road to ensuring the Caribbean remains
at the forefront of technology and the
Telecommunications Industry.

The Caribbean Association of National
Telecommunication Organizations (CANTO)
was founded in 1985 as a non profit
association of telephone companies in the
Caribbean. CANTO’s objective, then and now,
is to establish a forum through which
Caribbean Telecommunication Organizations
may exchange information and expertise in
the telecommunication field.

THEME: PARTNERS IN TRANSITION
During the 4 day conference numerous

issues where addressed including New &

Emerging Technologies, Human Resources,
Finance and Advisory, Marketing,
Communications and Disaster Recovery
Planning. BTC was well represented by a
delegation of 12 who focused on BTC’s new
initiatives as well as the Bahamas Domestic
Submarine Network International (BDSN).
BTC’s exhibition booth as the conference
showcased a map of the BDSNI, HELLO,
Blackberry and several other produces:
offered by BTC.

During Mr. Leon Williams address to the
CANTO members at the opening ceremony
he stated,”When the rate of change for the

p

outside environment is In excess to that of |

the rate of change with in an organization,
the end is near” Mr. Williams focused on a
plan of action that Included New Discoveries
in Technology, Globalization and
Multinational Corporations (many nations
one voice), BTC also sponsored the luncheon
that was held.on the final day of the
conference, during this time Mr, Willams
extended the opportunity for CANTO
participants to learn more about BTC and
rade a brief presentation on BTC and
Nortel’s extended partnership, This
partnership will positively affect Global
System for Mobile Communication (GM5),
and General Packet Radio System (GPRS -
internet access via mobile phone) therefore,
extended the capability of both services
throughout The Bahamas and the Caribbean,
This partnership triples the capacity of the
current wireless network and extends

roaming capability, Next year CANTO will be
held in Barbados and hosted by Cable & —

Wireless and once again BTC will represent
The Bahamas as the leading
telecommunications company, networking
with other on an international level allows
BTC to forge relationships, establish
creditability and remain knowledgeable of
the many new and upcoming products and
services which are offered, BTC Is proud to
be affiliated with CANTO as it represents a
group of companies that are all striving
towards a common goal’partnering together
to create a stronger linkage between the
Caribbean and the technology that is offered
to the residents of the Caribbean.












































meres a ecrenine hee




SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

BU

Miami: Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street










Diibaand

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Excessive franchises could Bank aims to
‘cause industry's collapse’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor

Ithough jitney

operators earn

a combined

$78,400 in rev-

enue per day,
“the industry would collapse”
if all 790 franchises that have
been issued were used, a gov-
ernment report has conclud-
ed.

A 46-page report on devel-
oping a model to unify New
Providence’s public transport
system found that while the jit-
ney sector’s annual turnover
was around $28.6 million, only
280 jitneys were on the roads
during a typical week day in
April 2005.

. But out of the 790 franchise ;

plates issued, only 258 were
“active” as at March 24, 2005,
meaning that they had paid all
fees and taxes owed to' the
Government:

, This, the report. said, meant.

that 532 or 67.3 per cent of all
jitney franchise plates issued
were: “non-active”, meaning
that they were either ‘dead

plates’ or unpaid and unli-
censed.

The report also revealed that
only 464 of the 790 issued fran-
chise plates had been allocated

approved routes on which to.

operate jitney services, mean-
ing that 326 licence plates did

‘not have a route.

The report starkly exposes
the chaotic nature of New
Providence’s public bus and
transportation system, which
has stemmed from years of
poor planning, neglect and lack
of regulatory enforcement.

It said: “Approximately 100
franchise. holders own their
own buses, equating to approx-
imately 140 jitneys. As at
March 24, 2004, there were
about 532 non-active/unpaid
franchise plates; 258 franchise

plates were paid up.

“Tf all the franchise plates
were to be used, the industry _

would collapse.”

The report added; “‘Irre-
spective of whether the unifi-
cation succeeds as proposed,

it is imperative that the defi-

ciencies in the current licensing
system are fixed and. an effec-

tively and equitable regulatory
system is established and fully
enforced.”

This findings from the latest
report on New Providence’s
public transport system should
not be surprising, since two
previous studies undertaken
under the former FNM admin-
istration had reached the same
conclusions.

Those studies concluded that
the current jitney system “no
longer effectively serves” the
needs of the travelling public
or its owners and operators. It
said:the problems involved
“destructive competition” and
“the indiscriminate granting of
franchises resulting in too
many ill-equipped operators in
the system”.

About 50 per cent.of fran-
chise holders “have neither the
experiencé nor the inclination
to operate a publicly-scheduled
bus service”.

To calculate the sector’s’

earnings, the report based its

average, daily fare collected fig-

ure of between $280-$320 per
jitney on figures supplied by
the Public Transit Association

(PTA) and individual. opera-
tors.

With 280 jitneys on the road,
collecting an average $280 per
day,.the report. calculated. the
industry’s gross daily turnover
at about $78,400. It:also.relied
on a passenger split of 82 per
cent adults, each paying $1,
and 14 per cent children and

4 per cent seniors, the former, |

paying $0.75 and the latter
$0.50.

Breaking down the number
of daily riders, the report esti-
mated that 64,288 were adults;
14,635 children; and 6,272
seniors. ;

Passenger demand for jitney
trips was likely to increase in
line with population and eco-
nomic activity, but the report
said. demand would be “sup-
pressed” unless issues such as
security, safety, comfort and
driver behaviour’. were
addressed.

By tackling these areas, the
report estimated that passen-
ger numbers could “increase

SEE page 5B

Banks cig optimistic’ on ACH by ‘06 end

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
ribune Business Edi or





THE Clearine Banks Association’s
(CBA) chairman yesterday told The Tri-
bune that the organisation was “still opti-
mistic” that the first phase of the Auto-
mated Clearing House (ACH) would be in
place by year-end, having received 20
applications from companies interested in
supplying the software to runit.

Paul McWeeney, who is also Bank of
the Bahamas International’s chairman,
said the Request for Proposal (RFP) for
software vendors to submit their applica-

tions expires on June 30.

He added: “We have about up ‘to 20.
vendors participating in the exercise. It’s
_ reached a much broader ee than

before?” |





eos i PAUL MeWEENEY

three.

The Association has been trying to get
the ACH off the ground for some time,
missing its initial target of having it estab-
lished by 2005 after it brought the first
tendering process to an end, unable to
select a vendor to install the system.

In that round, Mr McWeeney said the
CBA had received about seven applica-
tions from software vendors, who were
subsequently reduced to’a final field of

Apart from the software tender, Mr
McWeeney told The Tribune that the
clearing banks would shortly begin the
process of interviewing applicants for the ,
separate role of ACH project manager.

In addition, the CBA was also assessing

SEE page 6B . 3

reduce US$
cheque process
waiting time by
up to 700%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL ee
Tribune usiness Editor ea







‘BANK. of the Bahamas iitemanondl vercaay said: its
introduction of a service that will reduce the time for-cleating ,
US$ cheques to three from 40 days would improve: -Cashy ‘flow
for Bahamian businesses. and enhance their operating. tf:
ciency:

Paul McWeeney, the bank’s managing director, told The Tri.
bune that the new service - slated to reduce the time to-clear
US$ cheques made out to Bahamian businesses and individ-
uals by up to 700 per cent - was a “natural progression””’ of, ‘the
institution’s existing cheque imaging programme. ;

That initiative allows Bank of the Bahamas International
clients to view electronic images of their cheques online.

Under the US$ cheque initiative, once received,,the bank
will scan these cheques to create images of them electronically.

The images, which serve as a substitute cheque but maintain
the same legal integrity as their paper equivalent, will then be
sent electronically by Bank of the Bahamas International to
their US correspondent bank, Bank of America.

The US bank then places the cheque images into the US

- clearing system for payment, eliminating a costly, bureau-

cratic process that required the physical cheque to besént from
the Bahamas to the US for settlement - a process that could
take up to-40 days: :

Apart from the US$ cheque imaging, Mr McWeeney yes-
terday told The Tribune that Bank of the Bahanias Interna- -
tional. was. currently converting its.technology platform toa

“new “core banking solution”

supplied by an Indian compa- .
aed mei” SEE page 6B.

Bahamas told not to ‘relax’

â„¢ By CARA BRENNEN CTO secretary-general
Tribune Business i
Reporter . urges nation to promote
at the Caribbean Hotel ‘att ee ya
Investment Conference _ destination diversity,
are and praises it lead on.
_ MIAMI, Florida — The Woenes
Bahamas cannot afford,to rest Internet marketing

on its tourism laurels even _
though it is a leader in mar- ©

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keting itself via the Internet, a

former tourism director-gen-
eral told The Tribune yester-
day, urging this nation to pro-
mote its diversity of island
experiences.

The current Caribbean
Tourism Organisation (CTO)
secretary-general, Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, said that

while the Bahamas was

doing%o “all the right things,
we need to make sure that no
one thinks it is time to relax”.
_ “T think the Bahamas is
already doing all the thing we
talk about in terms of restruc-

turing ourselves,” he said,

pointing out that increeased

WESTWARD VILLAS #3385:

competition in the tourism sec-
tor was making this critical.
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
joined Frank Vanderpost, the
senior vice-president of the |
Americas for Jumierah, Dubai;
Dr Hudson Husbands of
Tourism Global Inc; and: Dr
Ewart F Brown, the Bermuda
Minister of Tourism and
Transport, for the first session
of the three-day Caribbean
Hotel Investment Conference

(CHIC), which is being held

atthe Hyatt Regency in SOR:
town Miami.

SEE page 7B

Immaculate, turn-key 3 bed

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system. New electric shutters to be installed. US$729,000,
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\W Damianos

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t 242.322.2305

Sotheby's

INTERNATIONAL REALTY -

f 242.322.2033


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

Government should release



RSS es



saad eS a



Sees

Ee:

oh

a

‘
‘
‘
‘
a
4
4



LAST November, the Min-

ister of State for Finance,
James Smith, was quoted as
saying: “We have received the
relevant studies and very soon
I hope to go to my colleagues
to get: permission to formally
launch discussions with the
wider. public and stakeholders
to share with them the results
of these studies, and to have
discussions about the way for-
ward.”

‘Almost three years ago I
wrote: and published a four-
part series on Tax Reform, and
at the:end I recommended a
combination of a low income

tax attd a sales tax. It seems’

from ‘all a¢counts that the Gov-
ernment has more or less set-
tled ona Value Added Tax
(VATye ‘as the way forward. My
concérn at the time was that I
thought that a VAT was quite
complicated to understand,
and there was already talk of
exempting too many sectors
from ‘the tax.

Expressed

Also, I expressed a frustra-
tion that there was insufficient
data in the public domain to

enable independent analysis of
the income yield from all taxa-
tion models, being considered.
No doubt, such analysis is
included in the information
that the Minister intends to
release.

Cabinet

Why is it taking Gihinets so
long to approve the relédse of
thesg studies? It is my hope
that Cabinet gives approval to
the Minister of State, in very
short order, to put these stud-
ies in the public domain and
start the process of tax reform
in earnest. I also hope this
process will produce consen-
sus and generate sustained
interest.

However, I personally feel
it is'‘unlikely that tax reform
will be addressed now, given
that there is less than’ 12
months to go before general
elections. Such an important
initiative requires non-partisan
political discussion, and histo-

ry has shown that coming so .

close ‘to elections, the simplest
matter becomes highly politi-
cised, Therefore, it is probably
unrealistic to expect a major

f



discussion for such a funda-_
mental change to get a bal-_

anced hearing in such an envi-
ronment, notwithstanding that
our current system of taxation
‘has taken us as far as it can.

Marathon

Last Thursday, after a
‘marathon late night session,
the 2006-2007 Budget was
passed by.Parliament and now
goes to the Senate this week
for final approval. While I

admit that I missed all the -

debate due to being off-island,
I was able to follow some of
the presentations in online edi-

tions of the press. As far as I...

\

Financial

By eras Gibson

reanennnarsnnannscnnngonnansnnennrseanaegansnnennnpeeaparqnengnaqnre/dPepenesanvonsnennanannnsnnnananannannasnnnns nn

Focus

~ could tell, no one touched the

issue of tax reform, notwith-
standing the fact that our bud-
getary options are constantly
being challenged by our over-
reliance on ‘customs duties’:

Call for a Policy Paper

It is clear from public pro-
nouncements over the past |
four years that the Govern-
ment has decided‘upon a Val-
ue’ Added Tax (VAT):as the
way forward: This. being the
case, it only makes sense that
the Government proceed to
publish a ‘white paper’ on tax
reform.

According to Wikipedia, the
online encyclopedia: “In the



Commonwealth of Nations,
‘white paper’ is an informal
name for a parliamentary
‘paper; in the United Kingdom

these. are issued as ‘Command

‘papers... White ‘papers. are
issued by the Government and
lay out policy, or proposed
action, on a topic of current
concern. Although a white
paper may occasion consulta-

“tion as to the details of new
Jegislation, it does signify a

clear intention on the part of a

government to pass new law.”

Decision

Conversely, if-a’ final deci-
sion: has not been made, then it
would be appropriate. to pub-

lish a ‘green paper’ on the sub-

ject. Green papers, also.known

as consultation documents,

which are issued much more
frequently, are more’ open-end-
ed and may merely propose a

- strategy to be implemented in.
the details of other legislation,.
or set out proposals on which
the ¢



Vvernment wishes to
obtail public views and opin-
ion, :

“Whether it is a white or
ereen pi Det theta is a matter







for the Government of the day.

However, the publication of
such documents would go a
long way in helping the
Bahamas to develop a tradi-
tion of participatory democra-
cy, whereby persons from all

walks of life and all sides of

the political divide can come
together in a non-partisan way
to, help shape policies for the
long-term benefit of the coun-

. try.

-Until'next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions. Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or.any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please’
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

Â¥

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Ne rr err creer ee en ares erate snmnanict em ten remnant
THE TRIBUNE

‘Little sense’





@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN economic think-tank
said “there is little practical sense” for this
nation to sign on to the PetroCaribe ini-
tiative, as it would rapidly increase the
national debt through by it to the world’s

. most unstable commodity - oil prices.

Responding to renewed efforts during ~
the Budget debate to promote the Petro- -

Caribe accord, the Nassau Institute in its
latest commentary called on the Govern-
ment’s Petroleum Usage Review Com-
mittee to release data showing how much
less Bahamian consumers would pay for
petroleum-related products if this nation
signed on to Hugo Chavez’s accord.

Comunittee

While Pierre Dupuch, the MP who sits
on the Committee, and PetroCaribe’s chief
promoter, Leslie Miller, former minister of
trade and industry, both talked up the
accord’s virtues in their Budget speech-
es, the Nassau Institute said gas prices in
Caribbean countries who had signed on to
the scheme had not fallen.

Describing PetroCaribe as a “loans for
oil” scheme, which had been designed by
Venezuelan president, Hugo Chavez, as
way to obtain Caribbean political in his
ongoing war of words with the US, the

think-tank said neither MP had produced .

documents to support their assertions.

The Nassau Institute said: “The current
price of fuel, as high as it is, is no reason
for the Government to indenture the
Bahamas and her citizens to Venezuela, a
country where political and economic free-
doms erode daily under the arbitrary rule
of Hugo Chavez’s ‘flexible authoritarian-
ism’.

“In other words, there is little practical
sense for the Bahamas to increase its inter-
national debt for a consumable product
like oil. The gasoline will be gone and
future generations of Bahamians will owe
Venezuela millions of dollars for-gas they
did not use.”

A draft copy of the PetroCaribe accord
obtained by The Tribune showed how







@ LESLIE MILLER

much Venezuela will subsidise Bahami-
an purchases of oil from PDV Caribe, an
affiliate of its PDVSA state-owned oil
company. It effectively showed that Petro-
Caribe is an oil-for-credit deal, and does
not mean lower gas prices.

Price

_ If the price is above $15 per barrel, the
level of subsidisation will be 5 per cent. For
$20 per barrel it will be 10 per cent; $22
per barrel at-15 per cent; $24 per barrel at

20 per cent; $30 per barrel at 25 per cent;

$40 per barrel at 30 per cent; and for $50
and $100, 40 per cent and 50 per cent
respectively.



Clearing Banks Association

NG OT ICE

The Central Bank of The Buhanias issued Guidelirts, on 1 the’

Prevention & Detection of Money Laundering for Licensees

- (Guidelines) in October 2005. The Guidelines direct figenisees
to complete verification of existing clients by June 30) 2006
in accordance with section 6(6) of the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, 2000.

Failure to verify your facility may negatively impact the normal
operation of your account/facility. Customers are encouraged
to visit their respective Bank (s) to update MuNenaNee
accounts/facilities on or before June 30% 2006.

The following docurhents, in addition to your respective bank’s

verification documentation, are required for updating personal —

accounts.
Official Current Photo for example:
Current Valid Passport;

Driver’s License;
or Voter’s Card

Verification of Address for example:

Voter’s card;

Utility bill;

National Insurance Card ;or
Bank or credit card statement.

In the case of Corporate/Business accounts/facilities please
contact your nearest Bank for verification requirements.

Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
Royal Bank of Canada



Mr Miller had touted cost savings for
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) as one of the major benefits to
flow from PetroCaribe. |

“BEC could easily save between $10!

and $15 million a year with this agree-
ment. We have a deal now where BEC

can purchase 60 per cent of their fuel and
get the other 40 per cent on credit. And on
that AO per cent they have 90 days to pay
for it, with only a one per cent interest
rate. And, Venezuela has agreed to also
assist in the shipping of the fuel," he said.

Study

Yet a Nassau Institute study, réleased in
October 2005, showed that the Bahamas
could owe Venezuela $202 million in debt
within five years if BEC was allowed to
buy oil under PetroCaribe.

It said its calculations were based on
the assumption that BEC purchased $100
million of fuel products per year, and that
under PetroCaribe, some $40 million of
this would be financed by Venezuela. The

financing would be over a 25-year period |

at a 1 per cent per annum interest rate.

And based on the fact that the Bahamas
imported $265 million of petroleum-relat-
ed products in 2004 - an amount that
increased sharply in 2005 - the Nassau
Institute said that based on the same
terms, an extra $106 million in loans per
annum would result.

When added to BEC purchases, the
Nassau Institute said this could result in
the Bahamas owing $737.3 million to
Venezuela. Over 25 years, this could
increase the national debt by $3.7 billion,
it added.

The Nassau Institute urged the Petrole-
um Usage Review Committee to state
how much the Bahamas would owe
Venezuela over 25 years if it signed on to
PetroCaribe.

It added: “We spoke with a contact in
Jamaica who indicated that the price of
fuel at the pumps has not dropped in
Jamaica since the implementation of
PetroCaribe, and his country is using the
money for budgetary purposes rather than
lowering the price of fuel at the pumps.”

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 8B: *.



PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL.-

The Public is hereby advised that |, MATTHEW OWEN |:
BATHOLEMEW ROBERTS, of of SeaBreeze lane, Nassau,

Bahamas, P.O. Box N-8815 intend to change my name to
MATTHEW OWEN BATHOLEMEW SIMMS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box.
N-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days afte
the date of publication of this notice. ay



ao) Oy Amiag
EVERYTHING
in our FAB!
cldrlaiidendes

o Sale hour bam 4th
Monday - Saturday

The Law Firm of -
Harry B. Sands, _.
Lobosky & Company
will be closed on
Friday, June 30, 2006
for the Firm’s
Annual Fun Day



Backed by a
3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER
_ Parts and service guar teed Terrol C

| Available in Grand rd Baramna @ Quality Auto Sales (Freepot) Gueene Honey . 36:





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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

THE TRIBUNE









NEW YORK (Dow
Jones/AP) — Gold and silver
futures ended the session near-
ly flat yesterday at the New
York Mercantile Exchange as
traders await Thursday’s Fed-
eral Reserve meeting on inter-
est rates.

.. The benchmark August gold
“contract settled 30 cents lower
-‘at $587.70 a troy ounce. The

positive territory to reach a ses-
sion high of $589.50 an ounce
for the day session but was
unable to hold onto gains.
“There is not much of a sto-
ry besides waiting on the Fed,”
said Frank Lesh, a futures ana-
lyst with Future Path Trading.
Lesh said gold and silver
came off of lows amid some
short covering but light vol-

i
1

capped the highs.

“We are likely to see that
kind of trade action at least
until Thursday,” said Lesh.

The most-active July silver
contract followed gold’s lead
and settled lower on the day
at $10.24 an ounce, down 4.5
cents.

July platinum settled $14.40
higher at $1,181.30 an ounce.

$10.75 highet at $320.55 an
ounce.

The most-active September
copper contract settled up 8.20
cents at $3.230 per pound.

August crude oil rose 93
cents to $71.80 a barrel.

July gasoline rose 5.12 cents
to $2.1788 a gallon.

July heating oif rose 1.63
cents higher to $1.9789 a gal-
lon.

.-contract moved slightly into ume and range bound trade September palladium settled

July natural gas fell 25.7
cents to settle at $5.969 a mil-
lion British thermal units.

On the New York Board of
Trade, Arabica coffee futures

FIDELITY

has a vacancy for the position of

GROUP AUDIT MANAGER

PROFILE:

Relevant graduate or postgraduate degree and/or professional
qualneaions e.g. ACCA, CPA, CGA, CFA,

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Management of the Internal Audit function within all Fidelity Group
operations (Bahamas, Cayman, Turks & Caicos Islands)

Liaison with Price WaterhouseCoopers to oversee their internal audit
functions

Formalization of the risk management process

Updating and maintaining the policy and procedural manuals

Overseeing the implementation of the disaster recovery plans

Preparation of business-focused recommendations/reports that
provide clear actions to address control weakness.

Ree RAE A A A

CRITICAL SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE:

Good level of bisinges: awareness and an understanding of
Fidelity’s strategic and tactical goals.

Specialist expertise in capital markets, asset management, financial
management, audit and risk management

An awareness of general financial services issues including regula-
tory requirements.

Reasonable knowledge of core banking processes and banking
functions

® Strong communication & PC skills
The person will report directly to the Audit, Risk and Compliance Committee.
The successful candidate will be offered a competitive

compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.

Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:

_ The Human Resource Director

dropped to one and-a-half-year
lows as fund selling pushed the
September contract through
major support and into sell
stops. Spot July managed to
hold above its recent nine-
month low at 94.50 cents a
pound. July ended 0.70 cent
lower at 94.60 cents while Sep-
tember lost 0.65 cent to 95.95

‘cents.

The most active September
cocoa contract settled up $14 at
$1,557 per metric ton, Decem-
ber settled up $14 at $1,592 per
metric ton.

Futurés‘on raw sugar in for-



nd session ‘nearly flat’

eign ports for July settled up
0.31 cent at 15.76 cents a
pound while October gained
0.38 cent to 16.31 cents a
pound.

On the Chicago Board of
Trade, July corn declined 5.25
cents to $2.23 per bushel, and
December fell 6.25 cents to
$2.49 per bushel.

July soybeans ended 11 cents

- lower at $5.6950, and Nov -soy-

beans finished 12 cents lower
at $5.9450 a bushel.
September wheat contract

settled 4.25 cents higher at

$3.8575 per bushel.

Business leaders
attend US-Arab
Economic Forum



a LEAGUE of Arab States Secretary General Amre Moussa (left), Saudi Arabia Minister of State

~

old and silver futures |

oe we

Abdullah Zainal Alireza (centre) and Qatar Second Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of
Energy and Industry Abdullah Bin Hamad Al-Attiyah (right) talk before the start of a session on
US-Arab relations at the US-Arab Economic Forum yesterday in Houston. Leaders from the Mid-
dle East, CEO’s from the oil companies and other business tenders are here to discuss US-Arab rela-
tions during the three-day event.

Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WEINCE JOSEPH ERME OF
BAHAMA AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who. knows. any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.






=) FIDELITY

























52wk-Low













Symbol Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
0.59 Abaco Markets 7.59 4.70 O11 3,000. -0.019 0.000 N/M 0.00% a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
8.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.75 11.75 0.00 1.568 0.380 7.5 3.23% eight days from the 28TH day of JUNE , 2006 to the Minister
6.35 Bank of Bahamas 7.23 7.23 0.00 0.738 0.330 9.8 4.56%
BO. oo Beate oa oe 506 Soe! nea aoe ae responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
1.26. Bahamas Waste 1.43 1.43 0.00 10.143 0.060 10.0 4.20% Nassau, Bahamas.
1.05 Fidelity Bank 1.49 1.49 0.00 0.188 0.050 7.9 3.68%
8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.21 9.21 0.00 0.618 0.240 14.9 2.61%
- 1.39 Colina Holdings 1.90 4.90 0.00 -0.067 0.000 NM 0.00%
8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.80 40.80 0.00 4,000 0.931 0.600 11.6 5.56% Legal Notice
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.17 4.98 -0.19 0.115 0.045 1.5 26.47%
2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.283 0.000 8.8 0.00%
4.02 Famguard 6.21 6.21 0.00 0.539 0.240 11.5 3.86%
10.45 —- Finco 11.50 11.50 0.00 400 0.745 0.540 15.1 4.78% NOTICE
8.60 FirstCaribbean 12.43 12.43 0.00 0.885 ‘ 4.07% :
8.42 Focol 11.07 11.15 0.08 1,100 0.885 4.48%
0.95 Freeport Concrete 0.95 0.95 0.00 -0.162 0.00%
9.50 ICD Utilities 9.50 9.50 0.00 0.526 4.26% GUN P OINT INVESTMENTS LIMITED
8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 0.00 0.565 6.15%
5.30 Kerzner International BDRs 7.91 0.00 0.160 0.00%
2.036 9



al .
: This is to inform the General Public that all that private throughfare
or roadway known as Gun Point situate northeastwards of the
Settlement of Spanish Wells at the northwestern end of the Island

of North Eleuthera will be closed to the public from 6:00 a.m. on









EPS $ Div $ Yield
1.923
0.000

0.084

Last Price
1 1.00



52wk-Low Symbol Weekly Vol
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

ND Holdi

7.8 4.80%
7.80%

15.00
10.35





28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings

Saturday, 8th July, 2006 to’ 6:00 a.m. to Sunday, 9th July, 2006 to
protect the right of ownership.

1.750 2.57%
















52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA _V YTD% Last12 Months Div $
1.2933 1.2367 Colina Money Market Fund 1.293348*
2.8564 2.3657 + Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.78564 *** 10.44 22.44

2.2487 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480** 3.417

Colina Bond Fund 1.164331***"









1.1006





Everette Sands
President

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price



52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
Sawk-| Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
4 Pravious Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

*- 16 June 2006





Tdday's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week **- 31 May 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value i ** - 30 April 2006

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
4 P/E -’Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings




31 March 2006


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 5B



Despite the storms, —
manufactured homes
are still attractive

@ By BRITT KENNERLY
Florida Today

BAREFOOT BAY, Fla.
(AP) — They’re not tradition-
al homes, but don’t’call them
trailers — and don’t expect to
pay trailer prices for them.

Despite the hard hit from

the storms of 2004, when at ©

least 1,000 of Barefoot Bay’s
5,000 single- or double-wide
manufactured homes had to be
replaced or moved, properties
there haven’t been left behind
in the booming real estate mar-
ket of the past two years.

While the market may have
cooled, as it has for all types of
housing countywide, agents say
lots in the largest land-owned
manufactured home commu-
nity still command as much as
$75,000. Many homes are listed
for more than $125,000, and
one recently sold, for around
$169,000.

Though demand was slow to
come back after every home

in Barefoot Bay sustained -

damage in hurricanes Frances

and Jeanne, those who buy -

here now pay tens of thou-
sands more for homes than
they would have two years ago,
along with hurricane-hiked
insurance rates.

Knowing the potential for
serious damage and the inflat-
ed price tag of settling here,
one question seems a natural:
“Why would anyone pay that

price for a manufactured ©

home?”

-The answer is simple, real
estate agents and many long-
time residents say.:People will:
take their chances to have a
comfortable home in a safe,
sunny neighborhood, even if
it’s on a $30,000, 50-by-80-foot
lot surrounded by old homes.

“We’re still probably the
least expensive alternative for
the working man who wants to
retire. You can buy a really
nice home here for $125,000



FROM page 1B

by at least 50 per cent, or pos-
sibly even by. 100 per cent”.

The report estimated that a

10. per cent rise in passenger

_ numbers could increase the jit-

ney industry’s annual revenues,

from the current $28.6 million
- to. $34.2 million. A 20 per cent
_.rise could take turnover to
$37.3 million; 30 per cent to
$40.4 million; a 50 per cent
increase to $46.6 million; and a
100 per cent increase to $69.2
million.
The report pointed out that
obtaining reliable, consistent

“We're still probably the
least expensive alternative
for the working man who

wants to retire. You can buy

a really nice home here

for $125,000 or less.”

— Broker Pat Webb, co Oitae
of Webb Realty in Barefoot Bay



or less,” said broker Pat Webb,
co-owner of Webb Realty in
Barefoot Bay.

“You can buy an older home
here in good repair, but not
updated on decor, from
$69,000 to $80,000-something.
Some homes go for up to

-$100,000 or more if they’re

totally renovated. Average
price is $100,000 to $115,000.”

For quite a while after the
storms, vacant lots were scarce.

“A lot of people were try-
ing to determine if they were
going to rebuild, sell their lot,
what they were going to do,”

Webb said. “Then slowly but

surely, we got more and more,
as they started pressuring peo-
ple to get rid of damaged
homes.”

Hurricanes, however,
changed the red-hot market of
early 2004. Prestorms, “if we
had 10 homes for sale, that was
a lot, and they went fast,” said
Judy Trier, sales associate at

- Barefoot Bay Realty. “It.was.a..

seller’s market.”
The landscape, along with
prices, has “changed drastical-

. ly. | think people got scared,”

Trier said. “It’s really slowed
down. It’ll pass, I think, if we
have a good season this year;
with no traumatic hurricanes.
But the insurance is still all out
of whack.”

financial information on the
jitney industry was often diffi-
cult, due to a reluctance to dis-
close finances by many indus-
try participants.

“It is evident that many
operators do not maintain
accounts of their business
transactions,” the report said:

A more reliable and safer

public transport-system has -

been cited as one way to
reduce the high level of traf-
fic congestion on New Provi-
dence, as it would lower the
incentive for Bahamians and
residents to always travel by,
and purchase cars.

Economic productivity and
efficiency is heavily impacted

NOTICE

Poststorm business also was-
n’t helped by the fact that for a
while, banks withdrew financ-
ing for homes built before
1980.

. “It was difficult for a while,”
Webb said. “Now we can
finance anything in Barefoot
Bay, but there’s.a slig

ence in una
homes. There’s a shor ter term’
on therii and a quarter-percent
higher interest rate.”

So who’s buying, given those
impediments? Old and young,
Webb said, and people with
children. Unlike many retire-
ment-area meccas, Barefoot
Bay isn’t age-restricted.

Most Barefoot Bay residents
come out of the East, “where a
standard home is $225,000,”
Webb said.

“This sounds like a bargain
to them. I tell people, don’t get
in over their heads; to buy
something they can afford.”

Peggy Galeone is one of
those who is sold on Barefoot
Bay and Brevard County.

“T dan’t think I'd ever want
to go back to New Jersey,” she
said.

“This is a good area, with
good housing prices compared
to other places. And one of the
things it has going for it is that
you own your own property.”

One of the only communi-



by the current school run, with
60 per cent of all school pupils
taken to school - and picked
up - by car. More than 90 per
cent of primary school students
are transported in this way.
And the report said: “The
number of vehicles being reg-
istered in New Providence is
increasing unabated. In the last
10 years, the population of
New Providence has increased
by approximately 50,000 peo-

ple, and concurrently, over the.

same period an additional
57,500 new vehicles have been
registered - a growth factor of
115 cars per 100 persons. It is
essential that this trend be
changed.”

Notice is herby given of the loss of Bahamas Government
Registered Stock Certificate as follow:

Interest

Stock Rate

BGRS

0.1562SAPR

Certificate

No.
57-052

Maturity
Date
May 11, 2006

$50,000.00

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a replacement
certificate. If this certificate is found, please cail 393-3691
or write to PO.Box SS-6314, Nassau, Bahamas.



ties of its type in the state,
Barefoot Bay was established
in 1969. Its amenities include
community buildings, a 776-
foot pier on the Indian River,
heated pools and activities’
from tennis to dance. _

Hal Brooks is one of the
diehards. He and Margie, his
wife of 57 years, are avid
square dancers and wouldn’t,
Brooks said, entertain the idea
of moving back to Pennsylva-
nia

The two had $32,000 worth
of damage at their manufac-
tured home in 2004, losing a
carport and root, among other
things. It took 18 months to
get needed repairs.

Still, the two think the pros
outweigh the cons. There are
99 different types of clubs,
Brooks said, and “the food’s
cheaper down here.”

He admits that “the biggest
thing that’s scaring everybody
away is hurricanes.”

“But a lot of that would stop
if they'd stop blowing it up on
TV, in the newspapers and on
the radio,” he said. “Other
than that, we call it paradise.”

It’s a paradise that people
say is appealing to a new breed
of retiree, too.

Some have just retired from
the military; others are leav-
ing teaching and law enforce-
ment jobs with good retire-
ment programs and saying,
“We’re. going to buy here, live
here a year or two while we’re
thinking about starting a sec-
ond career,” Webb said.

There’s yet another type of
resident, real estate experts
say: the kind who.leaves out
of fear after a storm, moves in
with children out of state, and
later starts to miss Florida.

“And then they came back
and said, "I’ve sold my beauti-
ful home and now I can’t get it
back,’ Trier said. “I’ve seen
it. | try and tell people, ’Stick it

399

out. Just wait.”

Profile:

NOTICE is hereby given that VIOLA CHARLES, OF
PINDER’S POINT, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be

granted, should send a written and signed statement of the |

facts within twenty-eight days from the 27TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,

NOTICE



aw
N2o2s

NOTICE is hereby given that CHENET JOSEPH OF EAST |,

ST./ ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX N.P.-8180, NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for i
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be.

facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JUNE,

. granted, should send a written and signed statement of the .

2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, |

P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
POBEDA INC.

(In Voluntary Liaigedon!

43

2 +2 oes 9

Notice is hereby. given that the above-named Company:
is in dissolution, which commenced on the 23rd day of June;,.,
2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp,. Inc., RO. Box N- 7757: ;
Nassau, Bahamas. Lt

ARGOSA CORP, INC.
(Liquidator)

WS See

wl

Winding Bav
ABARAT, BARA AS

Has two (BD vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:

SWE Tee e ew

i

e

ae

PCr EY EY
eer our vae es se we wee

-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration anid® +34
marketing. m3
-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory. te?
-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement :
self developed program ra
-Implementation of tour efficieacy and building of strong team values’.
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others
-Strong leadership skills

. «Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimum 5 years inarketing in management of sales, marketing an

administration

-College degree preferred, but not required.

ye ey
eee 544 4 +

Bo
4%
=

te a a eae

&

$3

Please Send Resumes: to:

ieee 8
, PRE e eee ae ew y
i Ae ee Oe ee a

Attn: HR Director

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB2057

Mash Harbour, Abaco

or

Fax: 242-367-0077

* 4
+e

* Kk 4s

ame

Supa

Position Available

Network Engineer

MCSE or MCP with N+

~ CCNA or higher a distinct advantage
Key Responsibilities:

Day to day operations of a datacentre
Providing support to clients
- Network and System troubleshooting

Knowledge and Skills:

Good Organisational Skills

Polite And Well Presented

Experience with PCs and IP Networking
Must be willing to travel

Salary & Benefits Negotiable

Send resume no later than Friday July 7th, 2006 to:

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f 326.3000



'

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AP BR BAT ee
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

LEE TRIBUNE



- ”

ln LegallNotice

NOTICE

+ QOSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC.

So
sos 4

]



In)VoluntarylLiquidation

NN
6 Moe

', (4)0 off thel Internationall Business? Companiesf Act.02000,
' OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC fislinidissolutionlasofiFebruary
18th,02005.

JaimelOrtizlof0Carreral 130No.0 1020-053 JBogota,IColombialis
: theDLiquidator.

FROM page 1B

“We are in the midst of that conversion
right now, and it will enhance the way we
conduct business internally as well as
externally,” Mr McWeeney said.

He added that the conversion was
Kae expected to be completed by the end of
sham this year, and it would provide the plat-
ca form for Bank of the Bahamas Interna-
; LegallNotice . tional to launch new products.
te Tanya Wright, Bank of the Bahamas

Beaas ot International’s senior manager for busi-
ag NOTICE ness development and public relations,
hype, said the bank’s business clients had indi-
eee cated they were “very pleased” with the
abode US$ cheque clearing system.
fs) OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC. ,

In)VoluntarylLiquidation

|
|
NOTICElistherebyl givenlIthatJinlaccordancelwithDSectionl 137
LIQUIDATOR





integrated with the global economy, and
Bahamian companies raised the volume of
business they did with US firms and others
internationally, the ability to reduce the
time to settle US$ transactions will be key
for business efficiency and the economy’s
competitiveness.

Mrs Wright said: “This technology has
the ability to significantly reduce the time
they have to wait for access to their funds.”

She added that Bahamas-based compa-

NOTICEdistherebylgiventhatlinlaccordancelwithlSectionl137
ee ~ (40 off the Internationall Business? Companiesi Act.0 2000,
: * - OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIIN C.fislinidissolutionlaslofiFebruary
Sah 02005.

j ‘sumed Ortizlof0Carreral 130No.01020-053 JBogota,JColombialis
- theDLiquidator.

ae LIQUIDATOR





As the Bahamas became increasingly |

nies, particularly those in the financial ser-

vices industry and professional services, .

such as accountants and lawyers, received
payment in US$ and other currencies
because they were involved in interna-
tional business.

Mrs Wright said these businesses would
be “thrilled at the opportunity of having
more ready access to their cash, improving
the efficiency of running and operating
their businesses”.

- She added: “Time is money. We are in
the business of...... saving them [customers]
time and saving them money.”

Director

Vaughn Delaney, Bank of the Bahamas
International’s deputy managing director
for information technology and human
resources, said the bank’s previous invest-
ments in IT had borne fruit, with the insti-
tution being the first to introduce cheque
imaging in the Caribbean.

He said: “We are able to electronically
settle US dollar cheques in a short period
of time.

“This bank will allow our customers to
receive the value of their US deposit items
in a very short period of time.”

Mr McWeeney said the US$ cheque

oS Bank aims to reduce US$
cheque process waiting
time by up to 700%

imaging and clearance service would
“enhance the ability of Bahamians and —

' businesspersons to more efficiently con-

duct their business enterprises”, enabling
them to receive instant value for transac-

tions conducted with cheques. . ye
’ The Bank of the Bahamas Internation- erik gd
al managing director said the service, ful: |: |||:
ly launched yesterday, would ‘level the +):

playing field’ between the clearance of,
US$ and Bahamian$ cheques.

From a business perspective, Mr
McWeeney said the key was that entre-
preneurs got access to their due funds
instantly, bolstering cash flow and enabling
them to better plan as a result of a three-
day settlement period.
In addition, businesses would no longer
have to wait for 30 to 40 days to learn
with a US$ cheque had been returned or
bounced, with that time now reduced to
three to four days.

A change in US law, created by the Sep-.
tember 11 terror attacks, had aided Bank
of the Bahamas International in its initia-
tive. Those attacks had disrupted the US
payments and settlement system, so’
Cheque 21 was introduced to enable more:
cheques to be handled electronically, mak-.
ing the payments system faster and more,
efficient.

Banks ‘still optimistic’
on ACH by end of year

tees

RS

si



- be taken, by. ‘agmoured car to »:
a central location where they

are settled by representatives
of the various institutions.

»oMr»McWeeney said the
ACH’s implementation sought
to “improve on the efficiency
of clearing Bahamian dollar

‘ LegallNotice

+ ;

; »~ NOTICE. -=. FROM page 1B:

4 ii

‘ QSBOURNEIOVERSEASIINC. sa :

: In) VoluntarylLiquidation porte Jeravens and staffing

i | or the ;

4 . “We’re still optimistic we

4 will have the first phase in transactions”.
4 place by the end of the current

a + NOTICElistherebyt givenlthatlinDaccordancelwithl Section 137
4 4 (40 off thel Internationall Businessi Companiesi Act.0 2000,
‘ s OSBOURNEIOVERSEASIIN C. hislinidissolutionlaslofiFebruary
: > 18th, 02005.

o
my

< Jaimel OrtizloflCarrerall 130No.01020-153,0Bogota,IColombiallis
thelLiquidator. ~ :

LIQUIDATOR





Profile:

- Bachelors Degree

Key Responsibilities: .

year,” Mr McWeeney said.
He explained that the
ACH’s.. implementation
involved several phases, the
first one involving the ability to

process cheques, plus direct .
debit and direct. credit trans- —

actions.

The ACH is intended to
replace the current manual sys-
tem for settling cheque trans-
actions, where cheques drawn

on one bank but due to be’

deposited at another have to

= ) FIDELITY

Bank Automation Specialist

He added: “We hope to
reduce the time [for clearing
cheques] from the current four
days down to two days.

“It brings finality to the
transaction. It allows business-
es to be appraised of the value
or not good value of transac-
tions, and to be more efficient
in running their businesses.”

To pave the way for the
ACH’s first. phase, Mr
McWeeney said all six mem-
bers of the CBA - Royal Bank
of Canada, Commonwealth

> Banks wbcotiakanke. ria
ay Caribbean International Bank »

( Bahamas), Fidelity Bank

(Bahamas) and the Bank of ©
the Bahamas International -

had committed to the installa-
tion of cheque imaging services
at their institutions.

Currently, only Common-
wealth Bank and the Bahamas
International have live cheque
imaging services.

Apart from allowing inter-
bank cheques to be processed
electronically rather than man-
ually at a cheque clearing facil-
ity, the ACH system will allow
direct debits and credits from
accounts, debit cards and a
shared Automatic Teller
Machine (ATM) network. The
latter would allow Bahamians
to use their cash cards at any
bank branch. It would also

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILBERT MESIDOR, #11

PINEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister |.

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should.send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



reduce shesimes persons: spent.
in line: waiting-to cash and os
deposit pay cheques, as they:
could be deposited to he
account. x
Bahamian consumers would

also be able to use direct deb-..

its from their bank accounts to
pay bills such as cable televi-:
sion and electricity. '

Mr McWeeney said the
ACH could ultimately lead to
the creation of just one back
office system for the entire
Bahamas.

He added that it would also’
help develop SWITCH prod-
ucts, where Bahamians could
use their cash cards at any
bank’s ATM machine.

A further potential bonus
from the ACH, would open up |
a whole range of electronic
banking services in the:
Bahamas, would be its use in:
the online purchase of govern:
ment goods and services.

Ultimately, through mod-.
ernising the Bahamian pay-
ments system through elec-.
tronic means, the ACH will
provide buyers and sellers with:
more certainty and confidence,
especially when it comes to set- »
tling their transactions.

It will also enhance eco-w - '
nomic and business efficiency” . :
by settling transactions quick-"
er, boosting business cash. °.

a

te

flows.

Assist in implementing the bank’s automation project

PUBLIC NOTICE ;

- FRIDAY CLOSURE OF
ALL NATIONAL INSURANCE OFFICES -

The National Insurance Board wishes to advise
the general public that all of its
departments/offices throughout The Bahamas,
including the Pay Windows at the Post Offices,
will be closed on Friday, June 30, 2006.

Liaise with Service Centres to set up scanning process



Scan days work and documentation from Service Centres
and accounting and operation areas




Knowledge and Skills




Attentive to detail
PC Skills

Some knowledge of bank processes and functions





Ability to process high volumes of work accurately and
~ efficiently



Send resume no later than Friday June 30th, 2006 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

The Board’s New Providence offices will re-open
on Monday at the usual time.




THE TRIBUNE

SUTIN SoS

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006, PAGE 7%.



Multi-billion dollar acquisitions
give Wall Street modest advance

a m By eee J. MARTINEZ.



NEW YORK (AP) — A series of
multi-billion dollar acquisitions gave
Wall Street a modest advance yester-
day although many. investors

‘ remained cautious ahead of the Fed-
eral Reserve’s decision on interest
rates later this week.

Investors were cheered by news
from mining company: ‘Phelps Dodge

Corp. that it will pay. $40. billion: in

cash and stock for rivak





and Falconbridge Ltd.,
billion bid from Dae tom Steel Co.



consumer produ

Activity aN

" Merger-and-aequisit n activity: is
seen as a sign of economic health, as
major companies aren "t expected to
make major deals. if they expecta

maker Arcelor SA-agréed to a $33,

decline in the economy. Yet Wall

* Stréet’s boost from these deals could

be short-lived as investors continue
to fret over just how far the Fed will
raise rates to combat inflation.

“T think the hand-wringing that’s
hampered the market will get out of
the way after the Fed’s meeting
Thursday,” said Chris Johnson, man-
ager of quantitative analysis at Scha-
éffer’s Investment Research in Cincin-
nati. “But clearly, the Fed is still going
to be hawkish on inflation, and that
means the possibility of more hikes

» down the road.”

According to prelimimary caicula-
tions, the Dow rose 56.19, or ee per

“cent, t6 11,045.28.

‘Broader stock ndigators A also made
gains. The Standard & Poor's 300

index was up 6.06, or 0.49 per.cent, at

1,250.56, and the Nasdaq composite
index climbed 12.20, or 0.58 per cent,
to 2,133.67.

- Bonds were little changed after last
week’s record-setting selloff, with the

yield on the 10-year Treasury note '

rising to 5.24 per cent from 5.23 per
cent late Friday. The .dollar fell

against most major currencies, while
gold prices were little changed.

Oil priced moved higher on con-
cerns about a shipping glitch in the

Gulf of Mexico. A barrel of light .

crude settled at $71.80, up 93 cents, on
the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Economic

In a week with little fresh econom-
ic data, investors welcomed the latest
Commerce Department report on
new home sales. Sales fell to an annu-
alized rate of 1.234 million in May,
down from 1.198 million the previ-
ous month but better than the 1.15
tnillion economists expected.

While the Fed likely will dominate
trading later in the week, traders wel-
comed the. chance to buy up stocks
in the mining, steel and healthcare
sectors, Which aside from the M&A
activity there, are seen as defensive
plays for a questionable economy.

“It’s definitely about the M&A
activity today, because other than
that, you’re really not seeing much
else out there moving,” said Brian

Williamson, equity trader at The
Boston Company Asset Management.

Inco surged $5.95, or 10 per cent, to
$64.21 and Falconbridge gained $2.50,
or 5.1 per cent, to $51.80 on Phelps
Dodge’s takeover announcement.
The combined company, to be called
Phelps Dodge Inco, will be the
world’s largest nickel producer and
the world’s largest publicly traded
copper producer. Phelps Dodge tum-
bled $6.72, or 8.1 per cent, to $76.23.

Mittal Steel fell 77 cents to $31.40
after wrapping up a sometimes-acri-
monious acquisition agreement of
Belgium’s Arcelor. However, Arcelor
shareholders must still vote down a
competing offer from Russian ‘steel-
maker OAO Severstal at a share-
holder meéting Friday for the Mittal
deal to be finished.

Pfizer’ climbed 37 cents to $23.01
after it agreed to sell Johnson & John-
son its consumer products unit, which
includes such brand names as Lister-
ine, Nicorette and Sudafed. Johnson
& Johnson fell $1.11 to $60.21.

In earnings news, Walgreen Co.’s
quarterly earnings rose 14 per cent

as newly opened stores generated

increased:sales. Shares of Walgreen,

which beat ‘analysts’ profit forecasts
by two cents per share, added 49 cents

to $44.10.

Homebuilder Lennar Corp. gained.
$1.14 to $45.68 after it announced a 33
per cent jump in second-quarter prof-
it. However, the company reduced its:
full-year earnings forecasts due to an
anticipated slowdown in the housing
market. ©

Issues

Advancing issues outnumbered
decliners by nearly five to three on
the New York Stock Exchange, where:
volume came to 1.35 billion shares,
compared with 1.42 billion traded on’
Friday. The Russell 2000 index’ of
smaller companies rose 8.50, or 1.23: -
per cent, to 698.64, Overseas, Japan’s: -

_ Nikkei stock average rose 0.19 per,

cent. In Europe, Britain’s FTSE 100, :
closed down 0.19 per cent, France’s' -
CAC-40 fell 0.34 per cent for the ses-'

sion, and Germany’s DAX index lost. .
0.27. per cent in late trading. —

the Internet revolution, “the
changes in social valués of trav-
ellers, competition andthe new ”

According =

cent of airline travellers - use
the Internet to make their trav-
el plans: -



Mr Vanderpool: -Wallace told
delegates that it was therefore

. vital that Internet development

played a major role in market

ing Strategy ~ |
“You have to reorganise



your offices in order to reflect.

what is happening in the mnar-
Ket,” he said.

As far as the Bahamas was
concerned, Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace noted: “The Bahamas
is one of only two destinations
that have the URL as its name
.com, a very important part of

miaking sure that you are out...
there because people naturally

look for the name of the desti-
nation.com.

_ “The Bahamas and Aruba
are the only ones to have that
because we had the foresight
to make sure you pul yourself



tune with what is happening in

IERPOOL- WALLACE









pehaied are Moe much in







Me the. world.”

he panelists also discussed.
he changing demographics of
érs, notably the trend

~ towards more affluent visitors
and more family-based vaca-



tions. . -
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said

‘the Bahamas had done every-

thing to.reflect those changing

"target audiences.
research, two a ar ‘every: |
three travelers - and 50 per |

What is needed going for-
ward, he said, was for the
Bahamas to continue to mar-
ket itself as a diverse destina-

* tion so that when someone vis-

its one island, they do not feel

- like they have visited the entire

country.

Mt Vanderpool-Wallace said
many of the resort properties,
if used correctly, can become

_ an outpost for different expe-
_ riences.

He said that people most
want to experience the culture
of a destination.

“Once we differentiate from
other countries we can have a
product with a large variety of
accommodations, giving the
customer exactly what they
want,” he said.

“The only thing I think is
very important is making sure
that the experience is differ-
ent. People are island collec-
tors, so one great advantage

_ we have in the Bahamas is that
they can collect the islands, as

ng as théy understand that
you continue to grow your des-
tinations.”

NOTICE is hereby:given that MAXINSOND DECIUS, P.O.

BOX GENERAL DELIV



Nationality and Citizenship, for

ERY, OF HOPE TOWN, ABACO,

ister: responsible for |

registration/naturalization as

a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the

facts within twenty-éi
2006 to the Mini



he 20TH day of JUNE,
tionality and Citizenship,



Eee ee MES Pp

in circulation, just call 322-1986 today!











da 3iim asicr
Bank of Baroda

(A Govt. of India Undertaking)
(incorporated in India) (Head Office : Mandvi, Baroda)

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AS ON 31st MARCH, 2006 To





i ; (000's omitted). 1
31. Arf 2006 @Y «= «31 ARE 2005 a
As on Ason .
SCHEDULE 31" March 2006 31% March 2005
sei AP a : et a Re. ws.
CAPITAL & LIABILITIES. :
Capital = °° qe 9365,52,74 294,52,74
Reserves & Surplus 2 7748,30,88 5556,53,82
Minority Interest 2A 24,61,43 41,76,53 2
Deposits. 3 -98051,01,01--89405,12,13
Borrowings. §048,87,42 1924,83,67
Other Liabilities: & Provisions 5 7446,63,93 __ 6178,15,26
TOTAL ; 116679,97,41 97400,63,15 és
ASSETS.
. Cash. and balances with : f
. Reserve Bank of India 6 3470.96,39 - 2777,10,68
Balances with Banks and . :
Money at Call and Short Notice 7 10471,33,01_ 6839,89,84
investments 8 35645,17,30 38023,34,80
Loans & Advances “9 61483,12,15 44477,15,56
Fixed Assets | 10 974,84,55 905,36,71
Other Assets __ a sits * 4392,79,69 4377,75,56
Goodwill on Consolidation ___241,74,32 : -
TOTAL 5 116679,97,41 97400,63,15
Contingent, Liabilities 12 39346,11,94 36954,03,59
Bills for Collection 6096,95,97 6340,39,06
Significant Accounting Policies 18 :
Notes on Accounts 19 <

The Schedules referred to above form an integral part of the Balance Shee!

Sonoita Profit & Loss Account for the year ended 31st March, 2006)





(0900's, omitted)
31 Arf 2006 #31 TE 2005 a
ware af & fe waa ad & fee
: Year ended Year ended a
SCHEDULE 31" March 2006 31* March 2005 4
u, Rs. @. Rs.
INCOME
Interest Earned zs 13 7358,60,41 6657,63,73
Other Income 14 1302,76,71 1386,31,03
TOTAL 8661,37,12 8043,94,76
EXPENDITURE =
Interest Expended 15 3993,27,58 3564,64,96
Operating Expenses . 16 2520,53,90 2084,53,25
Provisions and Contingencies 1251,44,45 1684,64,78
TOTAL 7765,25,93 7333,82,99
Consolidated Profit before Minority hee PO RNa
Interest and share of earning in 5
Associates 896,11,19 710,11,77
Share of earnings in Associates 17 14,21,57 46,35,47
Consolidated Net Profit for the year
betore deducting Minority interest 910,32,76 756,47,24
Less : Minority Interest 5,63,61 645,31
Consolidated Profit for the year ;
attributable to the group 904,69,15 750,01,93
Balance ‘in Profit and Loss A/c
brought forward — 27,57,45 6.



Amount available for appropriatior: 9 ) ‘
APPROPRIATIONS. ts

Transfér to Statutory Reserve 210,36,27 “177,16.57
Transfer to Revenue & Other Reserves 471,11,14 390,73,65
Proposed Dividend (Including Dividend Tax) 207,67,69 166,95,62
Balance carried over to consolidated

Balance Sheet + 58.27,59 __42,73,54
TOTAL on 847,42,69 | ___777,59.38
Earnings pér Share (Basic & Diluted) in Rs. 29.65 25.57
Significant. Accounting Policies 18 a

Notes on Accounts 19

The Schedules referred to above form an integral part of the Profit & Loss Account

DIRECTORS AUDITORS

Shri Vinod Rai

Shi H. N. Prasad:

Shri TR. Balasubramanian
Smt. Masarrat Shahid

Br. Anil K. Khandelwal
Shaimman & Managing Director
Shit A.C: Manajarr; 25s
Executive Ditector f

ay For S.Venkataram & Co
Shri B. P. Chakrabarti

Chartered Accountants

For T R Chadha & Co.
Chartered Accountants

For Ray

(Accounts & Audit) Chanered Accountants Chanerea Accountants







Place : Mumopai. Tie a eht eas : Shri D. D. Chanchani Shri Nilesh S. Bhimani Snn Rar
Date : 24th May; 2006 * a ah i is Panner Panther Panna



As per oir separate report of even dale attached .

Chartered Accountants

Chanered Accountants

Auditors’ Report_on con nsolidated
financial statements of Bank of Baroda’

The Board of Directors, Bank of Baroda

. We have audited the attached Consolidated Balance Sheet
~ of BANK OF BARODA (the "Bank") as on 31* March 2006

and also the Consolidated Profit and Loss Account for the
year ended on that date as also the Consolidated Cash Flow
Statement for the year ended on that date annexed thereto.
These Financial Statements are the responsibility of the
Bank's managernent and have been prepared by the
management on the basis of separate financial statements
and other finafcial information regarding subsidiaries and
associates.-Qur responsfbillty is to express our opinion on
these Financial Staternents based on our audit.

. Tha Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared by
, the Bank in aecordance with the requirements of Accounting

Standard 21 ~ “Corisolidated Financia! Statements” and
Accounting Standard 23 -- “Accounting for Investment in
Associates in Consolidated Financial Statements”, issued by
the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India andthe guidelines
issued by the Reserve Bank of India (except as otherwise stated)
and on the basis of the separate Audited Financial Statements

of the Bank, its Subsidiaries and Associates incorporated in the’

Consolidated Financial Statements.

- (a) -We have noi audited the Financial Statements of:-

(i) .the 13: Subsidiaries, whose financial statements
reflect total assets of Rs.4179.22 crores as on
31* March 2006 and Total Revenue of Rs.386.61
crores and cash flow amounting to Rs.124.85
crores for the year ended on that date.

(ii) the 9 Associates reflecting Net Profit of Rs.182.32
crores for the year ended 31% March 2006.

(b) We have been provided with the unaudited Financial
Statements as of 31% March 2006 for reckoning
valuation of Investment made by the Bank in UTI Asset
Management Company Private Limited and audited
financial! statrnent as of 31.3.2005 for reckoning
valuation of Investment in UTI Trustee ‘Company
Private Limited, which, for the purpose of the
Consolidated Financial Statements, have been
considered as “Associate”.

(c) | These financial statements and other financial
information have been audited by other auditors whose
reports have been furnished to us and our opinion is
based solely on the reports of other auditors.
Unaudited financial statement of UTI Asset
Management Company Private Limited for the year
ended 31st March 2006 forms the sole basis of its
incorporation in consolidated accounts. -

. We conducted our audit of the Consolidated Financial

Statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Auditing
Standards in India. These standards require that we plan and
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the
Financial Statements are. prepared, in all material respects, in
accordance with an identified financial reporting framework and
are free of material mis-statements. An audit includes,
examining on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts
and disclosures in the financial statements and audit also
includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by the management as well as
evaluating the overall, financial statement presentation. We
believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

. Attention is drawn to the following notes in Schedule — 19:-

(a) Note No.4 - regarding non-ascertainment of goodwill/
capital reserve on acquisition of shares in subsidiaries
and associates till 31.03.2005 and consequent non-
disclosure of Minority Interest (Schedule 2A) in the
manner so required, and

‘(b) Note No.6 — regarding adjustments arising from

reconciliation/clearance of outstanding items stated
therein.
The consequential effect of the above has not been ascertained.
Earnings per share (Note No. 21) in Schedule 19 are subject
to our observations in paragraphs 3(b) and 5 above.

Based on our audit and on consideration of reports of other
auditors on separate financial statements and on the other
financial information of the components, and to the best of
our information and according to the explanations given to
us and subject to paragraphs 3(b),5 and 6 above, we are of
the opinion that the attached consolidated financial
statements give a true and fair view in conformity with the
accounting principles generally accepted in India:

(i) in the case of the Consolidated Balance Sheet, of the
consolidated state of affairs of the Bank, its Subsidiaries
and interests in its Associates (Bank of Baroda Group)
as on 31% March 2006;

(ii) in the case of the Consolidated Profit & Loss Account, of
the Profit of Bank of Baroda Group on that date, and
(iii) in the case of Consolidated Cash Flow Statement, of the
cash flows for the year covered by the Consolidated

Financial Statements. ‘

& Ray
The interested parties may obtain a

Gerteral Manager 5 ‘
(Corp ACs) Dr. Dharmendra Bhandari Sh yikes ume suis, Sundaraman Stu Ail Kaine complete balance sheet from the bank
Shri R. K. Veiu Shri Manesh P. Mehta . : at its office !ocated at Gold Circle House,
Deputy General Manager For G. Basu & Co. For G. P. Kapadia & Co. For B.C. Jain & Co Essi Day Street, Nassau



yeet Sinan /



































































2AGE 8B, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006



a INSTRUCTOR Alesandiia ‘Shaq’ Fernander gets the attention of some of the campers she and D’ Asti Delany:
will be working with at the Jeff Rodgers Summer Basketball Camp.

Jeff Rodgers Basketball |
Camp off to a ‘great start’.

@ BASKETBALL
_~ By BRENT STUBBS.

who will be working this

sharing their experiences with
the campers and they will also

Senior Sports Reporter

ALTHOUGH the 19th Jeff
Rodgers Basketball Camp
won't officially open until next
Monday at the Bahamas Acad-
emy Auditorium, the first day
attracted a large number of par-
ticipants.

Organiser Jeff Rodgers said
he’s been impressed with what
he has saw so far and, if the
numbers are any indication, the
month-long camp should live
up to its advanced billing. °

“As you know, we're getting
ready for our 20th year next
year, so we’re really trying to
set the tone at this year’s camp,”
Rodgers stressed. “It’s already
gotten off to a great start.”

_ Organiser impressed with

what he has saw so far

During the first day of the
camp yesterday, the participants
were placed in their respective
age groups where they met their
instructors and had a chance to
meet old and new friends.

“We’re just going through the
basic stuff so each day they will
know exactly what they have to
go through,” Rodgers stated.
“But, we expect for the camp to

. be very exciting this year.

“We normally have 300-400
campers, but this year, we antic-
ipate that those numbers will

increase because of what we
have seen out here so far.”

A number of instructors, who
either came up the ranks in the
camp, or are back home from.
college in the United States, will
be lending their expertise.

There will be at least two

campers assigned to each age
group.

“We have college instructors
and high school instructors,”
Rodgers pointed out. “So we
are looking forward to having a
good time with the instructors

One of those instructors,
D’asti Delancy, is making her

initial appearance, and she’s

excited about her projection for
the campers. °

“T hope.that they-will learn.a
lot of things by the end of the
camp,” said Delancy, who is
working along with Alexandria .
‘Shaq’ Fernander with the 6-7
age group.

“T just want them to be
patient, but at the same time,
have fun with what they do.”

As the camp progresses,
Rodgers said he’s expecting a
number of players from the
National Basketball Associa-
tion (NBA) to come in and par-
ticipate.

The NBA players will be

participate in a charity celebrity
game that will be played at the
end of the camp.at the Kendal

Isaacs Gymnasium.

The campers will be attend-

ing-a‘luncheon at Government:

House and there will be a num-
ber of field trips that they will
be participating in.

At Monday’s opening, Prime -

Minister Perry Christie is sched-
uled to be the keynote speaker.
He will be joined by Minister

of Youth, Sports and Housing .

Neville Wisdom; Attorney Gen-
eral Allyson Maynard-Gibson;
Bahamas Olympic Association
president Arlington Butler;
Tommy Turnquest; Alvin Smith
and members of the Bahamas
Seventh Day Adventists.

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)

D-Squad to teach the fundamentals

= BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

COACHES from the DW Davis
Junior High and the Dame Doris John-
son Secondary High School physical edu-
cation departments have joined forces
to stage the D-Squad Basketball Camp.

“Our vision is to prepare and present
high school basketball athletes for com-
petition by providing them with the fun-
damentals of defence, passing, dribbling
and shooting,” said camp director Har-
court McCoy.

In their effort to provide the student-
athletes for the upcoming school year,
-McCoy said when they get started on

Monday, they will cater to boys and girls.

between the ages of 8-17.

“We hope to raise the level of basket-
ball in the country by starting at the pri-
mary school level,” McCoy stressed.
“Hopefully in the next three years with
the continuation of the camp, we can
affect the change for basketball i in the
country.”

The camp, scheduled for July 3-19
from 9am to 1pm, is being co-sponsored
by Doc’s Pharmacy, legendary basketball
standout Sterling Quant and Brenda
Moore of the Die Hard Games.

Through their sponsorship, each
camper will be presented with a D-Squad
t-shirt, a basketball and trophies that
they will earn for their performances in
various aspects of the game.

At the end of the camp, the players
will also be able to participate in a three-
point shooting and the All-Star Classic.

Joining McCoy as‘instructors at the
camp are Marilyn Toote, Ann Sturrup,
Hector Rolle and Kevon Spence.

“TI think we have put together a group
of coaches who we know can reach the
kids,” McCoy pointed out. “What the
other camps have is a large following,
but we plan to be hands on and in that
way, we can work more with the
campers.”

Interested persons can contact either
the DW Davis or Dame Doris Johnson
High Schools for further information.



li ORGANISERS and sponsors announce plans for the first DW Davis/Dame Doris Johnson D-Squad Summer Basketball Camp
that starts on Monday at the DW Davis Gym. Seated from left are sponsors Delton ‘Doc’ Bain of Doc’s Pharmacy and Bren-
da Moore of Die Hard Games; coach Kevon Spence; organiser Harcourt McCoy; sponsor Sterling Quant and coach Hector Rolle.
Standing in the back are coaches Ann Sturrup and Marilyn Toote.

Registration, however, will be conducted
through Friday.

Although his sister, Ann Sturrup is
heavily involved in the camp, Quant said
he prefers to provide some of the skills
that he acquired over the years as a
player on the local and international
scene.

“T would also like to ask parents who
at this time have not yet registered their
children in a camp to register them in a
camp, preferably this camp so that they

can be involved doing something con-
structive over the summer,” Quant not-
ed.

Delton ‘Doc’ Bain, who came on
board as the major sponsor of the camp,
said he was impressed with the coaching
staff responsible for putting on the event.

“With the coaching staff and the tal-
ented people here, I will always be will-
ing to sponsor this camp in the future,”
he said. “I’m very proud to be involved
with this camp.”

Moore, who adopted the DW Davis
having sponsored their basketball tour-
nament last year, said she’s been pleased
with the support she received, so she
decided to come back and lend her sup-
port.

Toote, a former high school
classmate of Moore, said when
Sturrup first approached her about
the idea of putting on the camp, she
contacted McCoy and the ball got
rolling.

TRIBUNE SPORTS.

Bahamas to
host Volleyball
Championships

FROM page one :

cessfully host the tourna: ~
ment, Wisdom made a
plea to the public to assist '
the federation as they:
attempt to not only revive - '
the sport but to bring.a-
high level of roo RE to
the country.

He added: “So I Wane 162
call on all corporate spon -
sors, I want to call on all of : '
the national federations, I’
have already spoken:to'
some of the presidents, I
want to call on the
Bahamas national sports
advisory council and the - :
persons of good will in the " . se
public and private sectors *
who like sports. Let’s hold: :
hands with the Bahamas °°
Volleyball Federation and <
let’s make this event suc- -
cessful. “yah

“The last time it was ‘
hosted in the Bahamas at
the Kendal G.L Isaac gym
was sold out, Iam particu-’- :
larly pleased that I was --
able to intervene with the:
presidents of the-
Caribbean volleyball fed-::
eration and ensure the par-": ~
ticipation of Jamaica and -*- |
Haiti and in connection: *
with those two countries: '
participating I wanted to. -
ask the person in the’.
Jamaican and the Haitian’ »
communities for their~~-

, 4

_ assistance as we go abotit -

the hosting of this event: o
“The teams from thosé’~*
two countries will require-~--
- some special assistance ~’-
and I know that the local’ :
Haitian community and -
the local Jamaican com: ”
munity will do their best-'-
to ensure that the visit of
their national Haitian and -
Jamaican volleyball teams
are comfortable and suc-
cessfully. I am so pleased:
this morning that we were.

able to come to an:
arrangement with the fed+’~*

eration and that we are'
able to host this event’!
from the 20th to the 28th

G.L. Isaacs gym. [just’:
want to encourage all
Bahamians to give their
support.”

This will be the first time”, *

a

’ of August and the Kendal- ie

in several years since Haiti. ’~

has decided to participate_—
in the tournament and,-

- according to federation’s '~'

vice president Joseph ~~":

Smith, their Phe lvelal: *
will only boost the level a
play and the fan support. -
Although the Bahamas”: '
national teams on both the «
men and women’s sides
haven’t been named as yet; :
Smith revealed that the
process will not be an easy —'
job since more than 45 -‘:
girls have shown up to-":
practices and 25 on the ''"
males side. A Yeo
Smith said: “We are- '
going tomakeacutbythe :
first week in July so we can’
concentrate on the core of °
the team. The teams now ' °
know that the pressure is °

on, they wanted the tour- +>:

nament here and now
they’ve got it. But we are -
looking good, physically: °:
they are ready now all we. me
have to do is get into ne
minds of the players so”
they can be prepared on a -
very high level mentally. :

“The Bahamas has a
good chance of playing in
the gold medal rounds for
both the men and the. ..
women. We were in the
rebuilding stages for the
last few tournaments, but: -
now I am certain the teams. >
are ready. .

“We have persons like}-
Katrina Johnson who did-:+ :
n’t play with us last year*
and on the men’s side we
have two professional
beach volleyball players
who will be coming home
to assist in the effort, those
two guys are ready so we
will have to just plug them :
in.

“We can’t forget the col- :
lege girls, so basically we
have a good core of per-.
sons coming out all it will
take is the cutting.”
At last year’s champi-
onships the Bahamas fin-
ished up fifth in both the
men and women’s division.
Winning best blocker was -
Annastacia Sands; best
passer was Renaldo’:'
Knowles and best server ::
was Prince Wilson.

PUY AA

fre

ts

weer r ere eer-
TRIBUNE SPORTS

Swim team
heads to
Puerto Rico

= SWIMMING

THE Bahamas Swim-
ming. Federation is send-
ing a,.24 member swim
team to the XVI
Caribbean Swimming
Championships 2006 being
hosted by Federacion
Puertorriquea de Natacion
in Salinas, Puerto Rico
from June 26th to June
30th, 2006.

The team is led by
Nikia‘ Deveaux, a
Bahamas Olympian who
will-be competing in sever-
al events including her
specialty, the 50 freestyle,
in the 18 & over age
group.

The.other female swim-
mers include Je'nae Saun-
ders, Bria Deveaux,
Shante Moss, Shalyla
Campbell in the 12 & 12
age group, Kadesha Cul-
mer, Ashley Butler,

* Anthaya Rolle and Ariel
Weech in the 13 & 14 age
group, Arianna Vander-
pool-Wallace, Alicia
Lightbourne, Jenna Chap-
lin and Teisha Light-
bourne in the 15 to 17 age
group and Alana Dillette
in the 18 & over age
group.

The male swimmers
representing the Bahamas
include Mathew Lowe,
Evante Gibson, Devonn
Knowles, Mancer Roberts
and-Delano McIntosh in
the 41 & 12 age group,
John Bradley in the 13 &
14 age group, Vereance
Burrows, Ashton Knowles
and-Je'vaughan Saunders
in the 15 to 17 age group
and Inoa Charlton in the
18 & over age group.

Algernon Cargill, Presi-
dent of the Bahamas
Swimming Federation, is
optimistic about the
results that these hard
working athletes will get in
. this;¢ompetition. cee

“The Bahamas:has sev-
eral swimmers seeded in
the tap three going into
this meet and several up ~
and coming younger swim-
mers who improve every
time,they compete who.
are likely to make the
podium.

This meet is the first of
three events that some of
these swimmers will see
action in over the coming .
four,weeks. CISC is fol-."
lowed’by the Bahamas
National Swimming .
Championships being held
at the Betty Kelly Kenning
Aquatic Center from July
6th to the 9th, 2006 and
then-ten swimmers, pend-
ing ratification from the
Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation, will be competing
for the Bahamas at the
CAC Games in Cartage-
na, Columbia from July
17th, to July 22nd, 2006. ©
This.is an extremely
demanding schedule and
the swimmers are ready
for the challenge."

The Head Coach for
the team is Mark Sowa
and:he will be assisted by
Shawn Neely. Team Man-
ageris Mr. John Bradley,
Chaperone Kathryn Dil-
lette. Team Doctor Bren-
da Desouza and sports.
therapists are Elsa Barrett
and Dorthey Roberts.

‘your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
‘neighbourhoods. Perhaps’
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





Last gasp win for Italy over Australia |

SPORTS



Bahamas’ Carey is
beaten by Bacchus

@ ABOVE: American Nicholas Bacchus delivers this shot =

while eliminating Bahamian Rodney Carey Jr. from the Secu-.
rity & General International Junior Tennis Open on Monday at.
the National Tennis Centre. 7
@ LEFT: Bahamian Rodney Carey Jr tries concentrates on, >
hitting the ball in his match at the Security & General Interna: +
tional Junior Tennis Open on Monday at the National Tennis...
Centre. ES Po ea F EN SHA OEGINS SEED

* SEE SPORTS FRONT“

Bit
10

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staffy me

at



"iar

ORT

wes



L

vhs
POF aSy

m AUSTRALIA'S goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer, centre, fails to make a save against a penalty kick by Italy's Francesco Totti, right, during the last minute of the Aus-.!
tralia vs Italy Round of 16 World Cup soccer match at Fritz Walter Stadium in Kaiserslautern, Germany, Monday, June 26, 2006. Italy won 1-0. ai

oli

(AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian)
- TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 2006

SECTION EPO Cele
and swim |

Fax: (242) 328-2398

Oem t ae



BYALNUT IPAM
host Caribbean

olny
Championships

@ VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON and
ANDRE DAVIS



IT’S official, the
Bahamas will host the 11th
annual Caribbean Volley-
ball Championships
(CVC), August 20th-28th,
at Sir Kendal Isaacs Gym-

TENNIS

nasium.
Minister of Youth Sports By BRENT STUBBS
and Housing Neville Wis- Senior Sports Reporter

dom along with the execu-
tive members of the
Bahamas Volleyball Fed-
eration (BVF) confirmed
yesterday that the bi-annu-
al regional tournament,
which originally kicked off
in the Bahamas in 1994,
will be hosted as an initia-
tive to revive the sport in
the Bahamas once again.

The Bahamas had won
the bid to host the games in
2004, but the government
declined the invitation by
the North, Central and
Caribbean Volleyball Con-
federation (NORCECA)
due to the hosting of the
Bahamas Games.

After the Bahamas
Games were postponed to
make way for the con-
struction of the new stadi-
um, both Wisdom and the
executive members decid-
ed to try their hand once
again to hosting the quali-
fying tournament for the
Olympic Games.

Pride

Although this decision :
went down to the 11th.
hour, Wisdom expressed
great pride and joy on
behalf of the government.

Wisdom said: “I am so
pleased to announce this
morning that the govern-
ment of Bahamas has
agreed to assist with the
hosting of the Caribbean
Volleyball Championship.
As you know the Bahamas
is apart of Caricom and a
part of Caricom’s overall
objective is the promotion
of sports, this is also an

‘important part of the
regional development.

“The Bahamas was orig-
inally scheduled to host this
event, however, it was
passed to another country
primarily because we
intended to host the
Bahamas Games. Now that
the Bahamas Games has
been postponed for the
National Sports Facility
development, the federa-
tion approached the gov-
ernment to see if we would
be inclined as to assist
them in the hosting of this
very prestigious and impor-
tant event.

Agreed —

“The country of Barba-
dos J am told had received
the invitation but were
unable to host it. And so
at, the 11th hour, the gov-
ernment was approached
and we agreed to do as best
we could to hold hands



LAST year, Jamaal Adder-
ley made his exit in the quar-
ter-final.

This year, as the top seeded
player, he’s back with a
vengeance and he’s hoping to
go all the way and win the
Security & General Interna-
tional Junior Tennis Open at
the National Tennis Centre.

On Monday, the 17-year-old
Grand Bahamian began his
quest for supremacy for the
Bahamas with an impressive
6-2, 6-2 win over qualifier Juan
Javier Ponce from Ecuador.

“Tt took me a little while to
find my groove, but I did
okay,” said Adderley, who
was surprised when he went
on the court and found out
that he had to face a south-
paw.

Adderley, ranked at num-
ber 211 in the world, played
a steady and solid game as he
landed the big shots to lead
the way for the Bahamian par-
ticipation at the tournament.

“I puess whatever happens,
happens, but there is no pres-
sure on me to perform here,”
said Adderley, who is coming
off a victory and a runner-up
finish at two tournaments he
participated in Barbados and
Trinidad & Tobago respec-
tively.

Adderley didn’t have to put
on too much of a show as
Ponce had his share of diffi-
culties. At times, he was irate
with himself after he couldn’t
return his volleys.

Another strong perfor-

mance for the Bahamas in the

boys’ division came from
Jason Rolle; who easily dis-
posed, of American qualifier
Sam Morris 6-3, 6-1.

“The fellow I played, played

fairly well, but I just tried to
keep the ball in play and
moved him around the court,”

Rolle reflected. “He was not:

very consistent and not very
patient either, so I just kept
the ball in play.”

The 15-year-old student of
Charles W. Saunders High
School said, after losing in the
qualifying round last year, he
vowed to improve on his per-
formance this year.

On the girls’ side, Kerrie
Cartwright produced a 6-3, 6-
1 win over American Bria Hitt
to pave the way for the
Bahamas in that category.

Cartwright, last year’s win-
ner Of the girls 14-and-under
division, took control of the
match in the first set and she
frustrated the shorter Hitt,
who was taken out of her
rhythm in the second set.

“T think I played really good
and I was doing what I was
supposed to do,” Cartwright
stressed. “When I went up 4-3
in the first set, I noticed that

@ ABOVE: Top seed Jamaal
Adderley hits a backhand vol-
ley in the Security & General
International Junior Tennis
Open at the National Tennis

Centre yesterday.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)

just a little more consistent in
her stokes and she prevailed

when it counted the most.

e In other, matches played
yesterday, Bahamian Elanqua
Griffin was eliminated with a
6-3, 6-3 loss to American
Sasha Gluck and Rodney

with the Bahamas Volley- h se That i Carey Jr was beaten 6-2, 6-3

ball Federation and see if . hi Ye olaved by Hes tat 4S by American Nicholas Bac-

we could make this event a | W2°0 + Playee Detter. chus.
Although she has moved up

success. We did it a year
ago with swimming and we
are going to do it with vol-
leyball.”

The BVF will host ten
teams in both the men and
women’s division; defend-
ing champions Barbados,
Trinidad and Tobago,
Jamaica, Haiti, Martinique,
US Virgin Islands, Guade-
loupe, Aruba, St Lucia,
Cayman Islands and the

Netherlands Antilles. i Britain 6-0, 6-2; American esterday.
Since it will cost the BVF i oar the American ee Kristie Ahn whitewashed 1 y
more than $200,000 to suc- erself trying to ae 9 1 Manuela Gil of Colombia 6-0, (Photo: Felipe Major/
, aa get ar the hole. 6-0 and Canadian Sara Tribune staff) |
SEE page 8B ile they played some] a7arevic ousted American Sa

the ranks, Cartwright, 13, said
she feels that she has the
potential to play with the old-
er girls and she. unticipates that
she will only get better as the
tournament progresses.
“There’s a lot of competi-
tion around here, but I’m
going to try my hardest to do
my best,” she projected.
After pulling off the first set,
Cartwright was able to put
Hitt in.a hole in the second

long rallies, Cartwright was

e Other boys matches saw
Kieran Warwick of Australia
defeat Patricio Escobar of
Ecuador 2-6, 6-3, 6-3; Ameri-
can William Parker upset
compatriot Davis Taylor 6-2,
6-4 and Patricio Alvardo of
Ecuador knocked off Panav
Jha of the Cayman Islands 6-2,
6-1.

e On the girls’ side, Yoshimi
Kawasaki of Japan eliminat-
ed Gabriella Phillips of Great





|) @ SOUTHPAW Juan
| Javier Ponce returns a
| shot to Bahamian top

seed Jamaal Adderley









o straight set win