Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION







Health officials BIE ereran

‘erred on the

side of caution’ |

B By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

HEALTH officials yesterday

- confirmed that the Haitian

detainee who had been quar-

antined following screening at

the Detention Centre had test-

ed positive for an “old infec-
tion” of malaria.

Speaking at a late press con-
ference, Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis, chief medical officer at
the Ministry of Health, said that
initially they-were unable to

“make a diagnosis of the patient
as it required a microbiological
distinction.

“So we erred on the’ side of
caution. We hospitalised the
individual, began treatment, and
then asked for additional review
of the slides. Once we got the
additional information, his
treatment was completed. He
was never symptomatic,” she
said. f ;

Dr Dahl-Regis could not con-
firm where the detainee was or
that he had been returned to
the Detention Centre. She
would only say that they are
“awaiting his repatriation”.

Minister of Health Dr B J
Nottage confirmed that of the
16 cases confirmed there were
12 new cases, and four. “old
infections”. } .

“Of the 12 cases with recent
infections, nine were Bahami-
ans, two were Uruguayans, who
_work in Exuma, and one Hait-
ian national, also employed.

* “All of the patients were
treated with Chloroquine and



&

all have: responded to their
treatment with no severe illness
or deaths. They will be closely
followed over the next several
weeks,” he said.

Dr Nottage-also informed the
media that the reports of a
Canadian “traveller” contract-
ing the disease while in Exuma
was, in fact, a Bahamian stu-
dent who had spent a period of
time on the island before
returning to Ottawa for school.

“I have spoken to his physi-
cian, who revealed that he was
not admitted to hospital
because his condition did not
require it. He has been treated
and was seen for evaluation
today. He has responded well
and is attending classes,” he
said.

Officials from the Pan Amer-
ican Health and World Health
Organisations confirm that the
population of the Anopheles
mosquito throughout their tests
has proven to be extremely low,
and even “non-existent” in most
of the surveyed locations. |

Also, health officials reported
that for the last six days, there
has been no transmission of
malaria on the island, and hope
that this a sign of them possible
gaining a handle on the spread.

However, in-spite of this good

-news, and noting that malaria

still kills about two million peo-
ple on average a year, the Min-
istry of Health states that they

will not “let up” on their efforts _

to combat the disease.

SEE page nine











m@ AN EMPTY
classroom at AF Adderley
Junior High School yester-
day. Of the 382 graduating
students from the school
this year, only five had a 3.0.
‘grade average or better.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

The Tribune

@ By MARK HUMES

FIGURES from one pub-
lic junior high school's grad-
uating class show that 78 per
cent of students will graduate
with less than a 2.0 grade
average, indicating that the
educational system is contin-
uing to fail Bahamian chil-
dren. ;

On Friday, A F Adderley
Junior High School held its
yearly commencement exer-
cise, and of the 382 graduat-
ing students, only five had
3,0 or better.

In addition to those five,
104 had a 2.0 or better, leav-
ing the remaining 273, or
two-thirds of the graduating
class, with a failing average.
Yet, despite their lack of
preparation, these students
seem poised to be socially
promoted in the fall, facing a
future for which they

SEE page 11

if































ie

Detainee’s malaria infection ‘ol







Decision on separate

trials expected today

SENIOR Justice Anita.
Allen is expected to decide
today whether murder sus-
pect Cordell Farrington, 38,
will be tried separately for
the murders of Jamaal
Robins, 22, and four Grand

‘Bahama schoolboys.

The matter was stood
down again yesterday after
Farrington's lawyer Romona
Farquharson asked for
another adjournment so as
to have time to put her sub-
missions into writing for Jus-
tice Anita Allen: Mrs Far-
quharson and prosecutors .
also met.in closed chambers
yesterday.

Local prosecutors want
separate charges to be laid
against Farrington for the
murders of Robins and the
schoolboys — Mackinson

‘Colas, 12, Junior Reme, 11,

DeAngelo McKenzie, 13,
and Desmond Rolle, 14. The
four boys disappeared
between May and Septem-
ber in 2003.

The four reportedly

worked as bag-packers at the
Winn Dixie Supermarket in
Freeport and played video
games nearby. Jamaal
Robins was not reported
missing until May, 2003,
although, according to
reports, it was believed he
had disappeared earlier.

Prosecutors say the cases
have been transferred from
Grand Bahama to New Prov-
idence Supreme Court to
avoid jury prejudice. Accord-
ing to them, Robins’ death
was in no way connected to
the deaths of the four boys.

However, Romona Far-
quharson, Farrington’s
lawyer, wants all of the mat-
ters to be combined.

Mrs Farquharson believes
it would be in the best inter-
est of her client to have the
five charges joined so that
her client will face one trial.
She maintains that the mur-
ders were all a part of a series
of events.

SEE page nine

yee

Distributed by:
Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, East West Highway
tel 242-894-1769 © fax: 242-394-1859 © email: bwabshameas@coralwave.com
in Freeport: tel; 242-351-2201 « fax: 242-851-2215

‘Significant
concern’ about
illegal drug
smuggling in
the Bahamas

THE intensity of local reac-

‘tion to the news that the US

might move air assets from
OPBAT shows there is signifi-

_ cant concern about illegal drug :

smuggling in the Bahamas, a =
top government official has *
claimed.

Permanent secretary Mr
Mark Wilson told a Narcotics
Joint Task Force at the Offices
of the Attorney General on
East Hill Street that this con-
cern greatly supports the work .
of OPBAT.

On Friday, Bahamas and US
government representatives

' held their semi-annual meeting,

which was co-chaired by Mr
Wilson, who led the Bahamian
delegation, and chargé d'affaires
Dr Brent Hardt, who headed
the US delegation.

In his opening remarks, Dr
Hardt empliasised US commit-
ment to OPBAT, noting that |
“pressures on the Army to meet
worldwide counter-terrorism
missions have prompted a close
review of OPBAT’s resource
needs and how best to meet
them.”

He emphasised that "there

should be no doubt, however,

that we remain committed to
OPBAT and are working with
senior officials in Washington
to identify other agencies to fill
the gap should the Army not
be able to continue its present
level of involvement with
OPBAT.”

The Joint Task Force, which
has been meeting regularly
since 1987, is a forum for senior
US and Bahamian officials to
review ongoing counter-drug
operations, assess progress
toward common goals, plan
future joint counter-narcotics
efforts, and examine ways to
collaborate more effectively to
further strengthen the already
close partnership that exists
between the US and the
Bahamas through Operations
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT).

During the meeting, both
sides engaged in a “construc-
tive and detailed discussion” of
their joint counter-narcotics
efforts over the past year and
exchanged ideas about addi-
tional steps that could be taken
to improve the efficiency and
effectiveness of their bilateral

SEE page nine

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006





THE TRIBUNE

Former CDR executives fare
_ better than former leader

T WAS not at all surprising that the
Coalition for Democratic Reform
folded its tent last week. The party was
wiped out in the last general election and
when its founding leader went back to the.
PLP recently it was obvious that yet anoth-
er attempt at establishing a viable third
party in the Bahamas would fail, like all
the others.
It is easy to start a political party. In a
. democracy like ours any group of citizens
can do it. They get together, draw up a
constitution and a platform, elect officers
and they are in business. In the Bahamas
the press will gladly afford their public
pronouncements and activities prominence
as if they were an established national par-
ty. ;
The Europeans are particularly good at
starting parties, especially the French and’
‘the Italians. It was said that any time three
Frenchmen got together to talk politics
that would be the beginning of another
party.

What is not so easy is to establish a par-
ty by organising nationally and getting a
foothold in parliament. Even the ones that
start out with a member, or members,
already in parliament have no guarantee of
survival. In this category the CDR follows
Sir Etienne Dupuch’s Bahamas Democ-
ratic League and Paul Adderley’s Nation-
al Democratic Party.

Perhaps the most remarkable story of
party organisation.in the Bahamas was
that of the PLP in 1953. Almost single-
handedly; the late Henry M Taylor estab-
lished branches throughout the islands and
kept in touch with them mainly through
the instrumentality of an old typewriter
and a manual Gestetner machine that
churned out circular letters.

ome of these letters disappeared
in the postal system as the powerful
Old Guard and its minions caught on to
what was happening; even Her Majesty’s
mail was not beyond their reach in those
days. But Sir Henry, assisted by volun-
teers who came in the afternoons to stuff .
envelopes, persisted. ; :
More important than Sir Henry’s dedi-
cated efforts was a confluence of events
that made the Bahamas ripe for the estab-
lishment and growth of a political
party with popular appeal across the
nation. :
Black Bahamians were becoming more
agitated over racial discrimination and.
that was exacerbated by the banning of
the movie No Way Out starring Sidney
Poitier; Sir Etienne fired the imagination
of black Bahamians when he moved his
_anti-discrimination resolution in the House
of Assembly in 1956, and, of course, there
was the general strike of 1958, the greatest
mass protest in the country’s history.
There had been many outstanding black’
politicians in the past but in the 1950s a
new cadre of younger and more militant



ea re

ices On The Island”





leaders was emerging. Among them were
Lynden Pindling, Cecil Wallace Whitfield
and Randol Fawkes. . :

The new black leadership abandoned
the old politics. of compromise, collabo-
ration and extracting concessions. They
were determined to remove the intransi-
gent Old Guard from power. The first

elected members of the PLP took their

seats in 1956.

In debating the future of third parties in
the Bahamas, some have pointed to the
FNM as an example of a third party which
achieved national status and permanence.
The facts do not offer much support for
this as the circumstances at the time were
unique and not likely to occur again. _

After the 1967 and 1968 general elec-
tions, the political division in the House of
Assembly was clearly along racial lines
and there was a good chance the UBP
would have been wiped out altogether. In
any event, the time had come to end racial
politics.

A few enlightened and perceptive mem-

bers of the UBP, led by Geoffrey John-
stone, understood this. So when in 1970 a
bloc of parliamentary members of the PLP
- the Dissident Eight - voted no confi-
dence in their leader and were suspended
fromthe party, Sir Geoffrey proposed the
dissolution of the UBP and turning over

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“The former
members of the CDR
who have joined the
FNM have got the
better part because
their credibility is
intact and they can
still do what they
intended to do in the
first place when
they left the PLP. ”



‘the responsibility for opposition to the
. Eight. |,

After all, this was not a minor parlia-
mentary defection and the Eight could
not credibly be accused of being Uncle
Toms. Some of them had been at the cen-
tre of a bitter, uncompromising and cost-
ly struggle against the Old Guard.
Indeed, one politician who had earlier
left the PLP was convinced at the time
that the party had lost its soul. Maybe

he had a point.

So in 1971 a new political party - the
FNM - was formed and assumed the role
of opposition, not third party. After a
disastrous splintering in 1977, the FNM
was reunified in time for the 1982 elec-
tion and has remained in parliament until
now.

Incidentally, the dissolution of the UBP
and formation of the FNM has been inac-
curately defined as a merger, and the
same thing is being done now with regard
to the CDR. In spite of the fact that for-
mer members of the CDR have joined

the FNM individually, some sections of ‘

the press still refer to it as a merger.

n the.case of the UBP, there can
be no question that Sir Geoffrey
_and his colleagues kept their promise to
dissolve the party even though some of
his die-hard members did not like the
idea and had great difficulty accommo-

dating themselves to the new reality in

Bahamian politics.

It may be of interest to note that while
Sir Geoffrey and his supporters fulfilled
their promise never to run for political
office in the Bahamas again, it was one or
two of the die-hards who insisted on stay-
ing!

In the case of the CDR it appears that

there are some who also do not agree
with what the executives have done and
plan to continue. If that happens they
may carry the name but it will be a far
different animal with even less chance



award.



STORE HOURS





STILL ALIVE

The Tribune wants to hear
i from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods: Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

of becoming a national party.

What is important is that the deck has
now been cleared — as far as that is ever
possible in politics — for a straight fight
between the PLP and the FNM in the
next election. There will be candidates
from other small parties, of course, and
independents as well, but circumstances
would seem to indicate that few, if any, of
them will survive.

The former members of the CDR who .
have joined the FNM have got the better’
part because their credibility is intact
and they can still-do what they intended

- to do in the first place when they left the

PLP. .

Like the Dissident Eight, they were’
disillusioned and wanted to help bring
better government to the Bahamas. So
they did not go back. Unlike the Dissi-
dent Eight, they may not have to wait so
long!

The former CDR leader, Dr Bernard
Nottage, is not in as good a position. His
going back to the PLP is unlikely to make
any fundamental difference with that par-
ty, as others who went back years ago
discovered in the long run.

r Nottage will enjoy the power
and glory for the time being
but he may have seriously damaged his
credibility with many people who had

' great confidence in him. They will ques-

tion why he abandoned his colleagues
and went, back. They will also question
why he left the PLP and started the CDR
in the first place.
" The answer may be found in an item on
Bahamas Uncensored, a website that
reflects the thinking of his PLP ministe-
tial colleague Fred Mitchell, Minister of
Foreign Affairs.

In November, 2005, BU carried an item
headed “Nottage Is Back”. It gave a brief

history of “retired Bahamian political |
parties” .and said all of them failed to_.
“fire the imagination of the country except

as a means of creating public debate.
Then BU added: “It was-not quite a
mistake because sometimes individuals
have to take marketing decisions to pro-
tect their futures. Dr Nottage-certainly
joins Paul Adderley and Fred Mitchell
in that category. Without their own indi-
vidual party political efforts, they would

not have seen the boost in their political -

careers that ultimately took them to the
very top.”

What a callous and cynical attitude!
Certain individuals start political parties
only as a marketing tactic to boost their
careers and protect their futures. At the
right moment they simply abandon their
sincere followers and their parties so they
can secure positions at the very top.

Incredible!

www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com


















i

oe |
‘ae le ee

We











THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Decomposed
remains are
discovered
in Abaco

FREEPORT - Police report
that the skeletal remairis of a
body were discovered on Sun-
day in Murphy Town, Abaco.

The decomposed remains
have reportedly been flown to
New Providence for an autopsy.

In the meantime, persons
missing a friend or relative, or
anyone with information that
can assist the investigation are
asked to call the Marsh Har-
bour police.

Chief Inspector Godfrey Fer-
guson said police do not know
the identity of the person whose
body was found at Coconut
Tree Beach.

According to reports, Tony
Davis, a resident of Murphy
Town, made'the discovery
sometime around noon while ,
walking along the beach in Mur, /
phy Town.

He reported the matter to the
Marsh Harbour police.

A team of officers led by
chief inspector Ferguson went
to the scene, where they
observed the decomposed body
of aman lying on the beach.

The body was transported to
the morgue at Marsh Harbour
Clinic and. later flown to Nas-
sau.

Any persons with informa-
tion that can assist police with
their investigations are asked
to call the Marsh Harbour
Police Station at 367-2560 or
Grand Bahama Police at 351-
1919.

Police hunt
for attacker
after man
is stabbed

AN early morning altercation
led'to a 27-year-old man being
stabbed repeatedly by another
man, according to police
reports.

Police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans said the
incident took place on Thomp-
son Blvd around 3am Monday
morning.

*The argument evolved to
the point whereby he received
stab wounds,” Mr Evans
explained.

The man was taken to the
hospital and is currently in seri-
ous condition.

His identity has not yet been
released by police.

This incident is still under
iniestigation as police are try
io; identify the, other person
involved in the altercation.

Inspector Evans reported that
the police are following several
Reads:

1 13 Ha iti ans
are seized
in New
Providence

IMMIGRATION officials
have releaséd statistics on their
most recent raids and repatria-
tion operations.

» Last week, 113 suspected ille-
gal Haitian nationals were
picked up in New Providence.

* Of this number, 99 were men,
nine women, and five children.

+ However, of this number, six
men were released, bringing the
number down to 107.

_Another raid in Freeport,
Grand Bahama, netted 19 sus-
pect illegal immigrants. Of this
number there was 12 Haitian
men, three Haitian women, and
four Jamaican men.

For the week of June 5 to 11,
officer in charge of the Deten-
tion Centre Weston Saunders
said, Immigration officials repa-
triated 226 immigrants.

: Of this number, he said, 203
were Haitians, 14 Jamaicans,
and nine Cubans.

‘Also during that week, 15
Haitian nationals in Freeport,
two Jamaicans in New Provi-
dence and eight Haitians in
Exuma were apprehended in
pirategic raids.

_Mr Saunders said that there
‘are currently 189 detainees at
the Carmichael Road centre.

Of this number, 152 are men,
30 are women and seven are
‘children,

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
RUE

PHONE: 322-2157



Licence suspension |
threatened on fish ©
houses for crawfish |

“M By TIFFANY GRANT

Tribune Staff Reporter

FISH house operators could
have their export licenses sus-
pended if they are found buy-
ing undersized crawfish, Min-
ister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Leslie
Miller warned.

Mr Miller stressed that his
ministry will put a stop to this
practise by imposing “very stiff
and harsh penalties” on the
fish houses who buy under-
sized crawfish from “unscrupu-
lous” fishermen.

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Mr Miller
said the ministry will have a
meeting with operators next
week to give them one final
warning.

“The fellow can only sell it if
you buy it. If you tell the guy
‘listen man, do not bring to my
establishment any undersized
lobsters, I am not going to buy
it and in addition to that I'll
report you to the authori-
ties’... which is what they
should do..

“It is a total disgrace that
this is happening with the full
concurrence of some of the
unscrupulous importers, dis-
tributors and the fish houses.

LOCAL NEWS —

We are going to put a SLO: to
it,” he said.

During his contribution to
the 2006-2007 budget debate,
Mr Miller also presented pro-
posals to change the current
catch limits for sportfishermen,
in a bid to cut pressure on
Bahamian fish resources. .

Mr Miller’s ministry is:

proposing that all catch limits
be changed from “per person
per day” to “per vessel per day.”

Later this week, Mr Miller
will travel to Long Island for a
one-day meeting with the
island’s fishermen to get their
views on the proposed change.

Major town meetings, he
said, have already been held
with the fishermen in Abaco,
Spanish Wells, Andros and
North Eleuthera.

Last week, sportsfishing
industry representatives said
they felt that the proposed
catch limits for fishing will

have negative impact on their

business, be hard to police,
and discourage sportfishermen
and tourists from coming to
the Bahamas.

An industry source said that
at present, many boats get at
least 25 to 30 dolphin-fish a
day — significantly more than
the three per vessel the minis-

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 3

Woman stabbed
_ several times in
brutal attack

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 28-year-old woman
of Dundas Town, Abaco, was stabbed
multiple times about the body early Mon-
day morning.

According to reports, the victim, a res-





i LESLIE Miller

ter-is proposing.

He suggested the minister
sit down with industry stake-
holders before any changes are
made.

Mr Miller claimed that what
some’ are terming sportsfish-
ing is in scanty commercial
fishing.

“When you are catching SIX -

dolphins a day that’s not sports
fishing. Six of them per day —
that is not my interpretation of
sportsfishing, that is commer-
cial fishing, which is not allowed
in this ue ” he said.

A JURY has been aéléctad for the retrial of
: the nurse Joan Lunn murder case which is
: > expected to get underway today.

Kendon Brown will stand trial again for Lun-
n's murder, the attempted murder of Anthony
“Blackus” Saunders and conspiracy to murder

Saunders.

Monty Thompson will be tried for conspiracy

to commit murder.

Nurse Lunn, 65 was shot and killed while
attending a patient Anthony "Blackus" Saunders

on Saturday July 7, 2001.

Saunders had just been transferred to the pri-
vate surgical ward of the Princess Margaret Hos-

pital the previous day.

‘He had already been shot twice during a dri-
ve-by shooting on Grand Bahama.

Nurse Lunn was reportedly shot in the heart.

Saunders was shot three times but survived.

Brown and Thompson were initially convict-
ed of the murder, but had their sentences
quashed by the Court of Appeal in 2004.

The accused are being represented by Murrio

Ducille and Dion Smith.

The case will be heard before a jury of five
women and seven men in the court of Justice Jon

Isaacs.

Prosecuting the case are Francis Cumber-
batch and Neil Brathwaite of the Attorney Gen-

eral’s Office.





i MONTY Thompson pictured in 2004, the

year his conviction was quashed

Disabled men meet
with PM Christie
and Minister Griffin

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

Three of the four disabled

men formerly of Cheshire
Home had an impromptu
meeting with Prime Minister
Perry Christie and yesterday
to discuss the rights of dis-
abled: persons in the
Bahamas.
_ Jerome Thompson, Jer-
vaisian Stuart and Kenneth
Storr were also able to see
Minister of Social Services
and Community Develop-
ment Melanie Griffin

“We wanted to meet with
the prime minister for two
reasons,” Jerome Thompson
explained. “First to share with
him how disgusted, angry and
hurt we were with how the
Ministry of Social Services
dealt with our situation and
secondly to ask for a grant for
crown land so that we can set
up the center for independent
living for disabled persons,
both male and female.”

Their “situation” began a
little over a year ago when
they were evicted from the
Cheshire Home on Dolphin
Drive.

Since then, they have been
living in an apartment in
Sandilands Village with the
assistance of the government.

The apartment was origi-
nally leased to the four men,
with the inclusion of Sean
Flowers for a year. They
were supposed to be evicted
again on June 10, but Minis-
ter Griffin got an extension.
According to Mr Thompson,

their lease has been extended
to July 10.

Mr Thompson noted that
last year the’ministry of social
services hosted a one-day
seminar under the theme,
Protection of the rights and
dignities of persons with dis-
abilities.

“After being evicted out of
the Cheshire Home those
rights and that dignity has
been extremely handi-
capped,” he said.

The men told Mr Christie
of their problems with inade-
quate transportation and
housing.

“We have the right to fair
and adequate housing and the
right to equal employment
and we will continue to fight
for them until they are
accomplished,” Mr Stuart
said.

One of the things they are
fighting for is the crown land
on which they intend to build

a “Center for Independent
Living”.

Once completed, the facil-
ity will house up to 16 dis-
abled persons. The blueprints
have already been drawn up.

The men said Prime Minis-
ter Christie agreed to meet
again with them next Mon-
day to further discuss this
project.

Private sponsors have
already been agreed to fund
the project, he said. “Every-
thing we need to make our
lives.a little easier and the
lives of all disabled adults will
be at this facility.”



ident of Forest Avenue, sustained wounds
to the neck and upper chest sometime
around 12.30am, during an attack in the
Spring City area.

The woman, who was unable to com-
municate at the time, was taken to the
clinic and later airlifted to the Princess
Margaret Hospital in New Providence for
further medical attention.

Inspector Loretta Mackey reported that
at about 4pm on Monday, the victim was
listed in stable condition after undergoing
surgery.

Mrs Mackey said that a 27-year-old
man of Murphy Town, Abaco, is assisting
police on Abaco with their investigations

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon:) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. |

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Galanis needs to face the truth

IN THIS COLUMN yesterday we discussed
a letter from PLP Senator Philip Galanis in
which he condemned Tribune Managing Edi-
tor John Marquis for an article he wrote in The
Tribune on May 29.

The “Insight” article was headed: “Anti-for-
eign attitudes are not a good idea.” It claimed
that “with the sniff of an election in the air, the
PLP government is again — according to its
critics — displaying an anti-foreign mindset
and appealing to the raw emotions of the ill-
informed. But more thinking Bahamians
believe this approach is unrealistic, counter-
productive and out-of-date with serious impli-
cations for the national economy.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Mr Galanis’ letter in which he condemned
Mr Marquis and claimed that he has no respect
- for either Bahamians or the Bahamas was
published on this page in yesterday’s Tribune.

Mr Galanis said that Mr Marquis’ “colonial
evaluation of the importance of foreigners to
all sectors of corporate Bahamas ... is a grave
insult to all bright young Bahamians. ath

Mr Galanis said he was “particularly
appalled at his (Mr Marquis’) choice of bitter
and malicious words that paint the Bahamas in
the most negative ways imaginable.”

His first objection was to the reference of
“an educational system that is practically
defunct.”

‘Mr Galanis has deliberately taken these
words out of context. They are not Mr Mar-
quis’ words. They were part of a long quote
from an American work permit holder who
was interviewed by Mr Marquis. The person
told Mr Marquis that he had been waiting
seven months for his permit. “This means,” he
said, “I can’t get Central Bank permission to
transfer money, I can’t get in and out of the
country without considerable difficulty and I
can’t renew my car licence. In practically every
official sense, my life is on hold while the
immigration department processes a docu-
ment.”

This is true. The smooth operation of busi-
nesses are being interrupted, and, if anything
is upsetting investors, Mr Galanis, it is Immi-
gration, not Mr Marquis’ article.

This permit holder’s comment continued
for several more paragraphs, much too long to
quote here in its entirety. However, the words
that upset Mr Galanis were a part of this
quote. And this is what the person who had
been waiting seven months for his work permit
had to say:

“The government’s proncti is one of com-
plete contempt simply because I am a for-
‘eigner. Yet this is a country which is far more
dependent on foreigners than most. It has no
resources of its own and an educational system

that is practically defunct. How do they seri-
ously expect to function without outsiders?”

Did Mr Galanis expect Mr Marquis to soft-
en the words of this annoyed foreigner, who
was speaking the truth, just because it offend-
ed Mr Galanis’ delicate, political ears? No.
So that Bahamians would get the true measure
of the problem, he quoted exactly what this
man had to say.

Space does not permit us to write what we
think of this country’s educational system. We
have a daily opportunity, because of our work,
to judge it — not only the products of the high
schools, but also those who have been sent to
us over the years from COB.

We still say that Bahamians educated in
the old Boys Central School, of which this
generation has never heard, but some of whom
were still on The Tribune’s staff when we
joined more than 50 years ago, had a better

grounding in the three “Rs” — reading, *Titing

and ’rithmatic — than students being gradu-
ated from government schools today. It was at
Boys Central that the late Sir Etienne Dupuch,
publisher of this newspaper, got his early edu-
cation.

And so, Mr Galanis, let’s face facts. Edu-

cation in this country is a disaster. It’s not Mr

Marquis’ fault. It is up to Bahamians, like Mr
Galanis and his government colleagues, to
correct it.

We could write a book about our experi-
ences with Bahamian students, many of them
keen, but too many of them ill-equipped for
the demands of today’s Bahamas.

Recently a foreign philanthropist, anxious
to encourage young Bahamian students in one
of the more deprived inner city areas, agreed

_ to give a computer to any high school student

who had a 3.0 cumulative grade average. A
bicycle was to go to any lower school student
with the same average. About 7,000 students
participated.

The donors expected to write a large
cheque. When the results were announced,
only one high school student qualified for a
computer, and seven lower schools students for
a bicycle.

Although, we have some brilliant students,
especially in our private school system, these
are very much in the minority. The country’s
general school certificate examination’s aver-
age is ‘D’. Now, if that isn’t an embarrass-
ment, we don’t know what is.

Instead of worrying about John Marquis
because he is a foreigner, who has the guts to
point out the problems, we had better start
doing something about our “practically
defunct” educational system.” Excuses won’t
get us through.

© To be continued.



Uplifting the :
College of |

_ EDITOR, The Tribune

KINDLY allow me an
opportunity to uplift our
great College of The
Bahamas (COB).

Let me first say thank you
to the many College of The
Bahamas Alumni who con-
tinue to display genuine
interest and support for the
College and The Alumni
Association of the College.
Secondly, I wish to thank all
those Alumni who partici-
pated in the Association’s
recent elections. I especially

thank those who placed their

names as candidates for. the
Association’s Executive
Office — these are the per-
sons who ensured that the
democratic process of elect-
ing the Association’s leaders
prevailed. The newly estab-
lished Office of Alumni
Affairs and its hard working
staff deserve accolades for
the organization and super-
vision of the aforesaid elec-
toral process. Since its estab-
lishment, just a few months
ago, the Office of Alumni
Affairs, under the dynamic
leadership of its Acting
Director, Mrs. Kim Rolle,
has truly shown its worth to
the Association, and more
importantly, to the College.

Yes, I must not forget to
thank all those Alumni who
supported me and secured
my re-election as President
of the Association. My oppo-
nent was a worthy candidate
and one who I am‘contident
will continue to support the
Association. I say the same
to all those other candidates
who were unsuccessful in
their bids. I thank our out-
going Executive members
who gave tirelessly to the
Association (namely, Mrs.
Melissa Thompson-Hall, for-
mer Vice President, and Ms.
Nekisha Simms, former Sec-
retary/Public Relations Offi-
cer) and congratulate our

’ new Executive team. I look

forward to our successful
term. I remind all, however,
that the Association is “big-
ger” than its Executive

Team. It will take all of us “

to build our Association and
to secure the success of its

’ programme and events.

In a few weeks COB will
bestow upon hundreds of its
graduates, Degrees, Certifi-
cates and Diplomas. At these
graduation ceremonies, I am

MULTI-DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



afforded the honour, as Pres-
ident of the College’s Alum-
ni Association, to induct our
new graduates into the Asso-
ciation.as full members. I
always take this opportuni-
ty to remind these proud
COB giants that upon grad-
uation, they not only walk
away as products, of the Col-
lege, but as Ambassadors,
and as such, we all have a
duty to represent the Col-
lege, to support by the Col-
lege (yes...financially and
otherwise) and to uplift the
College. I congratulate
COB’s 2006 graduates and
look forward to socializing
with them at the Alumni
Graduation Reception.

I respectfully say to those
persons in Bahamaland who
voice their concerns about
the College’s future, chiefly
as a result of the highly pub-
licized President Search
“process” and the UTEB
labour dispute, that the Col-
lege remains the same Col-
lege that we were so proud
of yesterday. You can still be
proud! The College remains

' the same institution that—

receives International
respect from other colleges
and universities throughout
the world. The College
remains the same College

that, year after year, produce?)

the vast majority of our
nation’s great teachers who
educate our children in our
public and private schools;
the vast majority of our
nation’s nurses who care for
us when we visit our public
and private clinics and hos-
pitals; a great majority of our
civil servants who we put our
trust in to run our public ser-
vices and agencies. Remem-
ber, this is the same College
of The Bahamas that also
educated so many of our
Bahamian professionals,
including our lawyers, doc-
tors, accountants and engi-
neers, just to name a few.
Persons who know me,
know that I am very much
interested in nation building,
both from a political and a
social aspect. In this regard, I
told so many persons during
my re-election campaign that
the pink building i in the cen-



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a



THE TRIBUNE








tre of Oakes Field are equal-.
ly as important to our nation
as those pink buildings in the
centre of Bay Street/down-
town. In fact, the pink build-

sons who now “sit” in thée:-"iiM
pink buildings in the centre’ oH
of Bay Street/downtown call -
their Alma Mater. I hope, “
therefore, we can now begin * OVE
to appreciate the importance fnat
of our beloved COB.

I beg all Bahamians to‘®70!
avoid becoming side- tracked‘
by the negative tones and: va
sayings of those who call our, ,, va ‘
educational home a “trous,, ate
bled COB”. The College is -. .:.,
not troubled. The College is
“stretching” and experienc-
ing normal growing pains. As” ).j,
the College continues to: 24;
grow there will continue to: +y<
be new issues that will spark:
internal (students/manage? {ric;
ment/faculty/staff/ council)” "is
debates. Indeed, as the Col-“17=1
lege moves to university sta?"''3%
tus, some of these same , ,
issues may inevitably spark.> iy
national debates...after all, ,
we too are a developing: >"
country, and like COB, will»;
experience the effects of" |
“stretching”. v

As a member of the Col: i
lege Council, I could say
without doubt that the Col-
lege Council’s intent is”
always to do (after reason+-*.:s
able reflection and consider+ |:
ation) what it feels is in the ‘™
best interest of the College _
and the nation as a whole... ‘?

|

Tem







Further, as the Alumni’s ™
Representative as Council, I” ‘°:
can also say that College. 5
Council respects the Associ; c i.
ation’s representation (i e.
views and contributions) and . ‘3
graciously support our-;.4
endeavours. So we, Ssayiy
thanks to COB’s Council; aA
especially in these “stretch- « +;
ing” times. 4
My fellow Alumni, get jy
involved in your Associaton
so that you can play yowrs 9)
part in COB’s continued six.
cess.
God Bless The College of”
The Bahamas and our Beau.





tiful nation. ~
cop

DON LSAUNDERS, —
ESQ |

COB Alumni Association,
President

Nassau, Al
May 7, 2006.













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contact Debra Gibson at the BCMC office at

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LOCAL NEWS



waren



In brief —

Ministry to
announce
youth job
initiative





@ NEVILLE Wisdom, .
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Housing

A NEW co- span initia-
tive that will revolutionise the
job market for aspiring young
Bahamians is set to be launched
today,

The Tribune has learned that

the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing will announce a
new mass employment forum
for all recent graduates and stu-
dents who will leave school in
the near future.
_ Although details remain
sketchy, an inside source said
the ministry. is buzzing with
excitement about the plan.

The initiative is reportedly a
joint government/private sector
effort, at which a number of

major foreign investors will be .
_ represented.

Yacht starts
to sink at _
Port Lucaya
Marina

AN American visitor was
asleep aboard his yacht when it

partially sank at Port Lucaya

Marina over the weekend.

Joey Lander, 37, of Cross
City, Florida, reportedly ; awoke
around Sam on Sunday to dis-
covey his 58-foot white Chero-
kee ‘cruising yacht, named
‘Shazam’ half submerged.

The mooring lines, which
were still fastened, prevented
the vessel from sinking to the
bottém.

Mr Lander told police that
he suspects that the bilge pump
may have accidentally been
turned off. He said the vessel is
valued at more than $500,000.

Arrangements are underway
to have the yacht salvaged.

American
complains
of theft
from yacht

JACQUELINE Titolo, 61, of

_ Lighthouse Point, Florida,

repuited to the police that
sometime between 12.30am and
7. 30am on Saturday morning,
somigone broke and entered the
58 yacht ‘Mega Sea II’ through
a rear sliding door and stole
$3, 600 cash along with a
Motorola cellular phone valued
at $400. .

Police are “investigating the
incident.

TW eRe

TUESDAY
JUNE 20

} 2:00am Community Page/1540 AM

11:00 Immediate Response

12:00 ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd

1:00 Island Life Destinations

1:30 Inside Hollywood

2:00 The Fun Farm

3:G0 Durone'Hepbum

3:30 — Ernest Leonard

4:00 — Dennis The Menace

4:30. Carmen San Diego

4:58 ZNS News Update

5:00 - Cricket World

5:30 Gillette World Cup 2006

6:00 Bahamian Things.

16:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 NEMA Preparations

8:30 ZNS School Round Up

9:00 Da’ Down Home Show

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

14:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540 AM
NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves

the right to make last minute
programme changes!
























-Keva Major alleges targeting by prison ouards

KEVA Major’s
lawyer Michael Kemp
claimed yesterday that
his client has been tar-
geted repeatedly by
female prison guards
and has even had buck-
ets of faeces thrown on
her.

These allegations
were made in Magis-

‘trates Court yesterday
when Major, who is
facing extradition to
the United States on
drug charges, appeared
before Magistrate Lin-
da Virgill.

Her appearance was
in connection with a
case involving more
than $800,000, which
was allegedly seized
from Keva Major.

Mr Kemp told the
court that one incident
involving faeces being
thrown on his client
occurred two Sundays
ago and another yes-
terday morning before
she was brought to

reason for her late
arrival.

According to Mr
Kemp, his client claims
that female guards
instructed a woman
inmate to throw a
bucket of faeces on her.

Mr Kemp went on to
state that his client
claimed that one guard
threw her belongings,
along with court docu-
ments into the prison
courtyard and threw
bleach on them.

He said that his
client was also being
forced to do manual
labour, and should not,
because she is a
remanded inmate.

Mr Kemp claimed
that his client was also
not getting her meals
on time.

On July 24, 25 and 26
Mr Kemp and prosecu-
tor Francis Cumber-
batch are expected to
make closing argu-
ments in the case

court — which was the

involving the money.



@ KEVA Major returning from court yesterday under the escort of a female police officer

Phaio: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Abaconians plan protest over
‘two-month closure of airport

_BUSINESSES in Abaco
were predicting “a full-scale
revolt” yesterday after being
told that Marsh Harbour air-

port would close for more than °

two months later this year.

The multi-million dollar

runway improvement project
is due to get underway on Sep-
tember 10. with a completion
date of November 20, island
sources said.

This would mean a two-and-
a-half months closure of a
facility which handles the vast
majority of aircraft move-
ments in Abaco, they added.

“Tt will mean total revolt on
this island,” one business
source told The Tribune.
“Everyone is steaming about
this. We are going to do some-
thing about it.”

Fearing the closure would
cost the island “millions of dol-

: . lars” in lost tourism business,
’ some islanders are considering

blocking the airport with air-
craft when work is due to start.

Denise Kelly of Abaco Air
also opposes the new construc-
tion of a runway. “This is the

fo capital, this is the hub. This new

plan can affect the surrounding
Cays who depend on tourism
for livelihood,” she said.

Kelly also suggested that
many airport staff might be laid
off, which would make it hard-
er to facilitate possible medical
emergencies into New Provi-
dence in an efficient manner.

“Abaco is not going to stand
by and let this happen,” said
one business source. “We are

willing to block the runway:

with aircraft.
“We’ve been told this is an



@ AN aerial view of Marsh Harbour Airport after Hurricane

Frances passed over the island in 2004

‘unofficial’ decision, but we
are going to get official con-

firmation in two weeks. Abaco

is going to have a fit.”

The island has been express-
ing concern for several months
now about the possible closure.

According to a airtraffic
official, there is no confirma-
tion that this project is going to
be enforced.

Ms Kelly suggested that the

issue came up about two weeks -

ago at an event sponsored by
the Ministry of Tourism.

“Since this, the local media
has been voicing their opin-
ions; with business owners,
operators and residents wor-
ried about the havoc this can
bring,” said Kelly.

In fact, alternative sugges-

tions have been put forward -

including the building of a new
runway, which would allow
the airport to stay in use dur-
ing the project.

SUMMER PROGRAMMES

SWIFT under the management of Andy and Nancy
Knowles will offer “Swim America”Learn to Swim,
Masters, Fitness, and Competitive swimming classes
for the summer. The classes, dates, times, and fees

are as follows:

Nassau — St. Andrews School
Abaco — Long Bay School

Learn To Swim “Swim America”
Session 1 — June 26th to July 7th. Days: Mon; Tues; Wed; Thurs; Fri.

Time : 4:00 or 4:30 PM

sessiqn es July 10th to July 21st. Days: Mon; Tues; Wed; Thurs; Fri.

Time: 4:00 or 4:30 PM

Cost: $150 per child per session

Masters/Fitness/Competitive Group
(must have Swim America Certificate or equivalent)

Sessions run from June 26th to July 28th. Monday through Saturday.

Morning Workouts: 5:00-7:00 AM Mon, Wed, Fri,
7:00-9:30 AM Saturday

Evening Workouts: 5:00-—7:00PM Monday through Saturday

According to Kelly, “the
existing runway does not have.,

~~” GRAB LIFE BY THE HORNS

IF THIS WERE A CONCERT,
WE'D BE THE HEADLINER










QUAD CAB

2006 RAM REG

CAB 4X2

Starting at

J igs om Sawyer

to be closed down-but resur-

faced, repaired, and refur- -

bished,” she said. She also sug-
gested that the government
should consider building a new
runway to the south.

Under this scheme, the
islanders said, the old runway
could be used as a taxiway, sav-
ing the need to build a new one.

-If Marsh Harbour airport

_closes, tourists taking vacations

in South Abaco will have to pay
$80 taxi fares — for two people —
from Treasure Cay.

Mr Tyrone Sawyer, director
of airlift development at the
Ministry of Tourism, said he did
not have enough information
to comment on the taxi fares.

However, notification of the
closure was said to have come
as islanders got

wi



itd spo

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wind of the plans “in an e-mail
from West Hill Street in Nas-

sau”, according to one source.

_ “We have put forward a very
reasonable suggestion for how
this project should proceed, but
the government has ignored
us,” said a business source.
“The plan is to resurface and
widen the existing runway and
build a taxiway. We believe the
old runway could be used as the
taxiway if the government had
opted to build a new runway.”
Sawyer claims that if the pro--
ject goes through, it will start
in September, when tourism in
Abaco usually dies down. ©
An improved airport is essen-

. tial in Marsh Harbour, which

now handles heavy private and
commercial traffic from Nassau
and the United States.

Automatic,



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GRAB LIFE BY THE HORNS



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

Security and facilities to be |
improved at detention centre,

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

MINISTER of Labour and
Immigration Shane Gibson yes-
terday announced a compre-
hensive plan to beef-up security
and improve facilities at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

Speaking during his contri-
bution to the 2006/2007 budget
debate, Mr Gibson said that in
addition to the construction of a
perimeter wall, extensive reno-
vation is expected to be carried
out to living and visiting quar-
ters of the holding facility.

Mr Gibson explained that a
blueprint for a new dormitory is



at the crowde Carmichael Road Detention -



# DETAINE
Centre

Commonwealth Bank is offering ten (10) Scholarship Awards to
Bahamian Students to attend The College of The Bahamas

Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank branch or at
the Financial Aid & Housing Department, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith
Building, The College of The Bahamas

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply)
rs ; , \ . * ol
Ci | DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS JULY 14, 2006

COMMONWEALTH BANK





' @2006 CreativeRetations.net

“Leader in Personal Banking Services” www.combankltd.com ©.



CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LTD. —

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION
_ INSTALLMENT PAYMENT

The Company would like to inform all holders of
Caribbean Crossings Ltd. 8% Series A Preference
Shares that the schedule first Redemption Installment
payment will be made on July 1, 2006 to all
shareholders of record June 1, 2006. This payment
is in accordance with the terms and conditions
attached to the Series A preference shares which
were issued in July 2001. Under these terms, the
Company will make five (5) annual redemption
installment payments of $2.00 per share commencing
July 1, 2006 and on each July 1 thereafter through
and including July 1, 2010. |

Caribbean Crossings is an International Internet and
Data company that operates a fully redundant
submarine fiber optic network linking the four islands
of New Providence, Eleuthera, Abaco and Grand
Bahama with the continental United States on two
diverse fiber landing points in South Florida. Caribbean

_ reported total revenues of $10.5 million in 2005 and
net income of $4.3 million.





ready, and that plans are also
in the making for additional
facilities to be built.

“The Ministry of Works has
completed architectural draw-
ings for the rebuilding of the
dormitory at the Detention
Centre,” Mr Gibson said.

Over the past two years
there have been numerous
disturbances and at least one
major riot at the Carmichael
Road facility.

In fact, last month three
refugees — two Cuban women
and a Jamaican man —
escaped from the centre, in
two separate incidents.

This took place just a
month after a group of
Cubans made a clean get-
away from the holding facility.

Two years. earlier, in 2004,
three Cuban men escaped just
before a riot broke out-at the
centre, during which a dormi-
tory was set on fire.

The incident left 11 guards
and nine detainees injured.

The upgrades are being car-
ried out in an attempt to curb
the number of break-outs
from the facility and to height-
en surveillance of the facility,
which has received interna-
tional attention regarding pur-
ported inhumane conditions
and the alleged abuse of
detainees, officials say. :

“The government has also
planned for the renovation
and expansion of the kitchen |
and dining hall areas; new
quarters for the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, doc-
tor’s office, detainees pro-
cessing reception building, vis-
itors’ shelter and restrooms
and most importantly — an
eight foot perimeter wall,” Mr
Gibson said.

“Additional lighting and
security cameras will be

placed at strategic points to

provide full surveillance of

activities at the facility.”
Improvements have also

been made to the administra-

-,tive building:on the com-

pound, which the minister
said is now ready to be occu-
pied.

Mr Gibson said “screening
apparatus” will be at all
entrances of the centre and
the Department of Immigra-
tion, to prevent the smuggling
in of contraband and weapons.














from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

- Poland,

you.are raising funds for a



@ MINISTER of
Immigration Shane Gibson

The minister also explained
that over the past three and a
half years more than 16,000
illegal migrants have been
repatriated.

“Some 16,412 illegal immi-
grants have been repatriated,
representing countries as
diverse as United States of
America, Austria, Ecuador,
India and. the
Cameroon Islands,” Mr Gib-
son explained.

“The point here is that not
only Haitians and Jamaicans
are the targets of the Immi-
gration Department, but also
persons of other nationali-
ties,” he said.

During the first quarter of
the year, the government
spent more than $100,000 on
repatriation exercises.

Manpower is also being
increased to strengthen secu-
rity at the centre, the minister
said.

“The government, has
approved the employment of
20 Immigration officers to.
strengthen the capacity of the
department’s presence... in
addition to nine immigration
officers that have been iden-
tified and are presently being
trained by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force in the
art of finger-printing,” he
said.

The government has allo-
cated $6.2 million to the
Department of Labour in the
2006/2007 budget.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

THE TRIBUNE



Financial
services
school is
predicted

FINANCIAL Services and
Investments Minister Vincent

_ Peet foreshadowed the estab-

lishment of a School of Finan-
cial Services in The Bahamas.,
“My Ministry is cognisant ef
the need for persons within the
financial services sector to
remain on the cutting edge#’
said Mr Peet, “and to continu-
ously upgrade their technic§l
skills, as competitive global
market trends demand. ‘
“We are also aware that this
skill training will have to begin,
if not at the high school level,
then immediately after. 4
“We therefore intend to col-
laborate with the College of the
Bahamas and the Bahamas.
Institute of Financial Services
with a view to establishing ‘a
school of financial services.”
Mr Peet was the guest speak-
er at the Association of Intef-
national Banks and Trust Com- .
panies in the Bahamas during
its June 15 monthly meeting at
Buena Vista. e
He assured them that the
Bahamas wants to remain “the
leading financial centre in the
hemisphere” as named by
Banker’s Magazine, an affiliate

: of the Financial Times Group.

4

Winners of |
Rotary :
competition
announced

THE winners of the Laws of ©
Life essay contest have been\

- announced.

Sponsored by the Rotary
Club of East Nassau, the contest
encouraged students to reflect
on their personal values and
write from the heart about what °
matters most in life.

The top five finishers in the
junior and senior divisions
respectively, in order, are:

Dan Ping Li, Nassau Christ-
ian Academy and Rachel Field-
ing, St Andrew’s School; Edwin
Rolle, Jr, Temple Christian
High and Shaquille Coleby, CV
Bethel Senior High; Trevonya
Bridgewater, Nassau Christian
Academy, and Arvis Mortimer
of Queen’s College; John Alao
of St Anne’s and Brittney Cul-.
mer of Queen’s College; and,

‘Mia Andrews of Queen’s Col-
lege, and Brian Jennings of C
V Bethel Senior High.

Cash prizes will be awarded
to the winners at a luncheon
which will take place at the Nas-
sau Yacht Club on June 23.

The laws of Life contest was
created in 1987 by Sir John
Templeton in Tennessee, USA
and has been launched in more
than 30 countries.

Representing 12 Nassau-area
junior and senior high schools,
110 students participated in the

~ contest, which began March 27.

YOUR CONNECTION®*TO THE WORLD

TENDER — APPRAISAL OF
BUILDINGS AND LAND

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) iS
pleased to invite Tenders to provide appraisal of its Buildings and

Land.

Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security’s Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Packages can also be collect in Freeport, from the Security’s desk,
BTC, Mall Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is 5:00 pm July 17th,

2006.

Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER —

APPRISAL OF BUILDINGS AND LAND” and should be
delivered to the attention of the Acting President and CEO, Mr.

Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 7



Florida firm buys

the first plot in
business centre







@ ATTORNEY Terrence Gape, instructs his client, Calvin Miller, president and CEO of
Associated Grocers of Florida, during the signing for-the purchase of 20 acres of land at the
Sea/Air Business Centre for the construction of an $8 million wholesale distribution facility in
Freeport. Grand Bahama Port Authority chairman Hannes Babak looks on.

“ll By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter ‘

"’ FREEPORT - Associated
“Grocers of Florida has pur-
chased 20 acres of land in the
-Sea/Air Business Centre on
_ “Grand Bahama for the con-
; “struction of its new $8million
Wholesale distribution facility
‘in Freeport.
Grand Bahama Port Author-

on
“ity.chairman.Hannes Babak and \ Bahi ( A Ie

of jobs needed to do logistic
warehouses, where we in Grand:

“CEO Sir Albert Miller made

the announcement on Monday

, during the signing of the pur-

“chase agreement in the Port
“A uthority’s boardroom.
2) The signing paves the way for

construction of a 100,000 sq ft
, - logistic warehouse distribution
‘facility for. International Dis-
“tributors of Grand Bahama
~‘Limited, which will export prod-
‘ucts to the Caribbean and the
United States.

The deal is.the first for the
- Sea/Air Business Centre, which
_ comprises of 741 acres of land
“between the harbour and airport.
Calvin Miller, president and

“CEO, said the company, cur~
: rently operating in Freeport,

expects to begin construction
within the next 60 to 180 days on
land at the corner of Fishing Hole
Road and Queen’s Highway.
Mr Babak said that Associ-
ated Grocers'and its subsidiary
company would greatly impact
the Grand Bahama economy.
“L believe this is a great indi-
cation for the thrust into Grand
Bahama for international com-
panies to come here. “It will be
a great impact for Grand
Bahama and there will be a lot

Bahama have the perfect. loca-
tion between North and South
America, and the Caribbean.
“We want to develop the
number one logistic centre for
international companies, which

from here with a great contain-

er port, can operate and dis-
tribute their goods, especially

‘into the east coast Florida, but

also to the south to Caribbean
and South America.”

Sir Albert said: “We welcome
this company to Freeport. It is a
huge company and their pres-
ence here would be far reach-
in

He added that there could be

OLYMPIC

P.O. Box SS- 6250, NASSAU, BAHAMAS



‘Tels 1 (242) 322 - 1595

(Photo: Denise Maycock)

almost immediately between 50
and 100 employees.

Sir Albert said the signing last
week of a $15 million brewery
and the project today should go
a long way in reviving the econ-
omy of Freeport and in creating
jobs for Grand Bahama. .

Calvin Miller said Grand
Bahama is perfectly located, just
65 miles off the coast of Florida,
where his company has its head-
quarters. “I absolutely loved
Freeport from the minute I
stépped on’ the island. I told
everyone in the.states that you
have never seen anything like
this (Freeport) in the your life.”

Associated Grocers services
42 countries, as well as all of
Florida, Georgia, and Alaba-
ma. The company distributes
food products by Kraft, Gener-
al Mills and Kellogg’s etc, and
general merchandise, and health
and beauty cares etc.

Chris Grey, CEO of Freeport
Container Port, said: “We hope
that when the next customer
comes along we now have a
template in place and that we
are hopeful the deal will be con-
cluded in a more timely man-
ner,” said Mr Grey.

PRESIDENT
H.E, Arlington Bulter, KMCMG.AP.DLC.
VICE-PRESIDENT
Sir Durward Knowles, O.B.E
Rev. A, Enoch Backford II, B.Sc,.B.Ed.

Harcourt M. Rolle

Leonard Archer '
Roscow A.L. Davis, B.S.,M.B.A
Wellington Miller
TREASURE
C.Vincent Wallace-Whitfield, LLB.,L.E.C
ASSISTANT TREASURES
S.Dianne Miller
SECRETARY GENERAL
Lawrence Davis, B.Sc:,Ph.D
ASSISTANT SECRETARY GENERAL,
B. Livingstone Bostwick
FAX:! (242)322 - 1195
E-MAIL :nocbah@coralwave.com

19th ANNUAL OLYMPIC HEAL’ rH DAY

° Health Breakfast



Name (Last):
Age: Date of Birth:

Event:

54 aS ERE ee ce Wee See Re

Signature Of Applicant

“T-shirts for all participants
¢ Trophies For all categories
¢ IOC Certificates all finishers

Run Route: Starts Q.E. Sports
Center, Nassau Street, Bay Street,
PJ. Bridge, Ends Native Crafts
Market On Paradise Island.

ENTRY FEF: School Children: FREE

5 Mile Run

5 MILE RACE

CATEGORIES.

WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK
7:00a.m.,. Saturday 24th June, 2006

Male: Under 19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49,50+
Female: Under19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50+

Children And Group Awards

Crafts Market

Adults: $10.00

Entry Form

(First):

WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK:
Starts Fort Montagu, West on Shirle Street .
to Church Street, P.I. Bridge to the

Olympic Day 5 Mile Race And Health Walk

Drop off ENTRY FORM at the BOA Office, Building #10. 7th Terrace West of Collins Avenue,
P.O.Box Ss-6250, Tel: 322-1595, Fax: 322-1195, E-mail:nocbah@coralwave.com

SEX:M F_ Affiliation:

Wheelchair

organizers and medcal advisers.
‘

Health Walk

Liability Waiver: In consideration of your accepting this entry, I, intending to be legally bound
hereby for myself, my heirs, executors and administrators waive and release any and all rights and claims
of damage I may have against the Bahamas Olympic Association and/ Or its successors and assigns for
all injuries or other eventualy sustained by me in this event. I agree to abide by the decisions of the

Parent/Guardian if under 18 years age



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

STAFF VACANCIES

The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the following posts:

Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development

START DATE: August 1, 2006

JOB DESCRIPTION |

SUMMARY:

Serves as a primary fundraiser for The College of The s Baharias, Designs, implements,
evaluates, and refines the Unit's development activities with an emphasis on major gifts as
defined by COB policy, Council and the President in conjunction with Vice President Institutional
Advancement. Personally identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards donors and prospects
in accordance with performance targets set by the Office of Institutional Advancement under
the direction of the Council and President. Collaborates with the President, Vice President
Institutional Advancement and Vice President Finance & Administration and colleagues in
the COB Office of Institutional Advancement to maximize total gift revenue through gift
planning, corporate and foundation relations, and annual fund strategies.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

. Identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards major donors and prospects including
individuals, corporations, and foundations, through visits and other forms of direct
personal contact in accordance with performance targets set and defined by the
relevant authorities.

. Enlists senior management in furthering the Development Unit's development

programme; assists in educating faculty and staff in respect of the roles they can
play in fundraising and development generally.

. Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them with leadership and direction

in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and prospects;
coordinates volunteers’ activities to ensure their integration into the Unit's programmes.

. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with the Boards of COB

Foundations and College development colleagues to maximize the Unit s total gift
revenue.

KNOWLEDGE: SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

° Knowledge of major funding and donor sources. Ms
Respected membership in networks of people and entities of high net worth

and ability to move with ease and influence in such circles.

Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.
Community relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community.

Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to work extended hours

as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all. responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

Prior experience at the CEO/CFO level with a major company/corporation is preferred
' Master degree preferred , bachelor’s degree acceptable with relevant experience
Prior development experience would be highly valued

Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication. skills

Basic computer skills expected

Assistant Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development

4

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION |

SUMMARY: The Assistant Development Officer has primary responsibility for supporting the
work of the Development Officer and team through the management of the day-to-day
operations of the Development Unit, its databases and records.

pues AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

. Creates for the institution and makes effective use of a prospect management database

and other institutional resources to ensure appropriate management of donors, prospects,
alumni, and volunteers in coordination with College/University objectives.

. Conducts research to identify prospects and creates strategies to match prospects’

interests to the priorities of the unit and the College/University.

. Researches, writes, edits, or oversees, in conjunction with the writing/editorial staff of

Institutional Advancement, the preparation of persuasive, accurate, and grammatically
and syntactically correct solicitations, proposals, case statements, reports,
correspondence, and other development- -related communication materials in support
of the Unit's fund-raising activities.

. Assists in short- and long-range strategic planning activities to create and implement

fundraising goals and objectives.

. Assists in planning and conducting programmes and activities designed to increase

the visibility of the Unit and the College/University to internal and external constituencies.

. Develops and manages budgets for fundraising activities under the supervision of the

Vice President Institutional Advancement and in conjunction with other relevant senior
managers.

7. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.
KNOWLEDGE: SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

e Ability to conduct research, gather data, analyze information, and prepare effective,
accurate, and timely reports and other documents to support development objectives.
Demonstrated mastery of major business and prospect research databases and general
database software such as Microsoft Excel with concomitant database management
skills.

Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

Ability to write proposals, solicitations, correspondence, reports, and other materials
in support of development activities independently;

Ability to exercise good judgment, to demonstrate an understanding of ethics related
to development activities, and to use discretion in interactions with donors, prospects,
volunteers, and others.

e Ability to work effectively within a team environment.

Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in managing events and other
complex activities in support of development objectives.
Willingness and availability to travel and to work extended hours as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree

Prior development experience a must

Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
Excellent computer skills expected

Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision.

Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The application deadline is June 21, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates
should submit a College of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive resume and
a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should request
three referees to send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
below:

The College of the Bahamas
Human Resources Department
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive
P O Box N 4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please visit our website at for more information about the College and to access the College's
Employment Application Form.







YOUR CONNECTION®*TO THE WORLD

Es

REDUCED RATES
FOR INTERNATIONAL CALLS

‘

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited (BTC) is pleased to announce to the general
Pune and our valued customers that effective July
4st 2006 all international calls will Be reduced as
follows:

DESTINATION
United States of America

$ per minute or part thereof

Copyrighted Material
—_-2
syndicated Content

—_





Available from Commercial News Providers

a &

IWC calls for probe
into air guns and >
whale strandings

[canada CO @ ST KITTS According to the unanimous- ‘organisation and more of a
Frigate Bay ly approved report.prepared by whale management group.

Canada 0. 90 the IWC’s scientific committee, “We will not take revenge <
LOUD blasts from underwa- __ repeated bursts of air cause high against anti-whaling nations,”

- Caribbean (Except Cuba) 0.66

All Other Countries 0. 85

BIC. thane’ the public for their continued support
and we look forward to onnernag You To The
World.

ter air guns on boats searching
for oil could harm, whales and
should be studied further, said a
report unanimously endorsed
by the International Whaling
Commission on Monday,
according to Associated Press.
The IWC’s support of the
report was one point of con-
sensus among the 70-nation
body, which is bitterly divided
over commercial whaling. On
Sunday, Japan and other pro-
whaling nations pushed through
a symbolic resolution embracing
a return to commercial whal-
ing. But they still lack the 75
per cent majority needed to
overturn the two-decade ban

on the practice.



Credit Suisse (Bahamas)Limited
is presently considering application for a
Senior Accountant - Derivatives & Structured Products

—$—$—$ <<< —

Credit Suisse is one the world’s premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go beyond traditional
banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investement counseling and professional portfolio management. Our total commiment
is always to our client and we focus without compromise, on their financial well-being and their personal
values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
* Preparing all financial statement for derivatives & structured products business of the bank.
* Provide expertise in defining accounting treatment for derivative products (Options, Swaps, etc.)
* Assisting in thé prepaing off reports for Senior management
* Assisting in ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated

Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issuses and projects

Recommend new products for implementation after receiving sign-offs of above specialized units

‘Ensure that new products implemented in a controlled manner and execute implementation review with IT,

Operations and Accounting
* Identifying potential tisks and suggest improvements regarding contols, systems in use and business management
* Work with senior business management to prioritize initiatives

. * Support implementation of standard software supplements

* A minimum of five(5)years experience with an offshore bank, trust company or accouting firm
* Technical product knowledge of derivatives / structured products MANDATORY. Must demonstrate sufficient

hands-on work experience in,accounting for derivative products,
* Product Control or Financial Control background required
* CPA,CA or equivalent
* Univeristy degree
* Knowledge of US GAAP would be an asset
* Good IT skills: familiar with Accounting and IT infrastructure basics
* A commitment to service excellence
* Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
* Good organizational and.interpersonal skills
* Ability to work independently
* Effective communicator and hands-on and proactive approach
* Strong analytical and organizational skills and good sense of control

* Competitive salary and benefits
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirments need not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Deparment
P.O.Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS JUNE 28, 2006



CREDIT SUISSE

levels of underwater sound that
could affect whales’ migration
and mating patterns. It also not-
ed there might be a link
between the loud sound waves
and humpback whale strand-
ings.

The IWC recommended that
governments and international
groups study the issue and
explore ways to mitigate noise
pollution in the world’s oceans.

"This has significant implica-
tions for reforming the way the
oil and gas industry.explore in
our world’s oceans,” said Joel

-Reynolds, a lawyer with the

nonprofit Natural Resources
Defense Council. “Impacts on
marine mammals can no longer
be ignored.”

Bruce Tackett, a spokesman
for ExxonMobil Biomedical Sci-
ences, said his company wasn’t
aware of harm done to marine

life due to their oil and gas sur- °

veys, and have initiated research
on the issue.

On Monday, Japan held its
first “normalisation” meeting —
a term used by Joji Morishita,
chief spokesman for the Japan-
ese delegation, to describe the
process of turning the [WC

away from being a conservation

Morishita said. “This is the
beginning of a rational process
of returning the IWC to a man-
agement organisation.”

No specific issues were dis-
cussed at the meeting, but Mor-
ishita said the pro-whaling
nations would meet early next

year in Japan to talk about.

moving forward. He also said
the Japanese government had
told him to consider pulling out
of the IWC, but they would try
to reach.a compromise before
doing so.

If the Japanese-led talks led
to.a whole new organisation,
“the IWC would be a dead
duck,” said British delegate
Richard Cowan, whose country.
opposes commercial whaling.

Still, most anti-whaling dele-
gates said it was too early to tell
what impact Japan’s efforts
would have on the IWC.

The IWC was meeting
through Tuesday on the
Caribbean island of St. Kitts.
The 60-year-old international
organization has a mandate to

conserve and manage the stocks ©

of the 13 different species of
great whales, such as hump-
backs and blue whales.

ae

scone Literate :
eGreat customer service skills

eProfessional

appearance

eEnergetic & enthusiastic team
eplayer Good communication sklls

sPepengenle

Submit Resurie io
The Manager, Kelso Medical
Laboratory
P.O. Box SS-6109, 10 Collins
Avenue,
322-7994 (ph) or 325-7208 (fax)
Email: Kelso@securenetbahamas.com



5

Be See HB ans 3 ; oe
CELE SE EES Oe See PRES

~ th a

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6 LIE.



TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 9 sf.

LOCAL NEWS ao

THE TRIBUNE





THE government was urged
yesterday to rethink its decision
to name Nassau International
Airport after the late prime
minister, Sir Lynden Pindling.

Readers responding to The
Tribune’s controversial
INSIGHT article said it was
wrong for a “tainted” politician
to be honoured in this way.

And several said: “Pindling
was no hero of mine.”

One even suggested that —

those who backed him politi-
cally should raise money them-
selves to erect their own memo-
rial.

But, he added, the country’s
airport should not be burdened
for eternity with a name that
many Bahamians reviled...espe-
cially as it was being paid for
by taxpayers’ money.

“Those of us who travel



not universally liked.

Some said it was “inappro-
priate” that the airport should
be named after a politician who
provoked mixed reactions.

Another said the name would
confuse travellers and add to
the woes of tourists. “The cur-
rent code for Nassau is NAS.
Will it have to change to PIN?

This is a tourism economy. ’

Think about good customer ser-
vice and don’t confuse trav-
ellers,” he said.

One reader asked whether
the Nassau airport code would
now become LOP. (for Lynden
Oscar Pindling) or whether the
government wotild go the whole
hog and call it PLP. “God, now
I’m giving them ideas,” she said.

One agreed with a reader’s
quote in INSIGHT saying:
“There are some people we

er said: “Mr Mitchell was a
vocal critic of Sir Lynden when
it suited him. He has no credi-
bility and intelligent people
stopped listening to him a long
time ago.”

Another reader, Ezzard
Rolle, said it was disappointing
that INSIGHT highlighted only
the “negative” part of Sir Lyn-
den’s contribution.

“The modern Bahamas was
largely due to the leadership of
this man,” he said.

National Insurance, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, the Cen-
tral Bank and many more
institutions were created

-under his leadership, he said.

“Responsible journalism
should reflect both sides of
the story and then allow
the readers to decide,” he
added.




























GHERUGBLR FARUECLEEE,

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through the airport every week —_ don’t need to remember. I think. e All responses will be 2
are going to be confronted with Sir Lynden was one of them.” —_ published in full in next #
his portrait. If he was a great However, Foreign Affairs Monday’s INSIGHT sec- uy
leader we could all respect, it Minister Fred Mitchell told a__ tion. =
would be different, but Pindling radio talk show that Sir Lynden _, ui
wasn’t.” was “Father of the Nation” and
The INSIGHT article record- | deserved such an honour. He an
ed the mixed views of several again attacked the press for, in NASSAU International Be More Than “
Bahamians and asked whether his words, “showing no ‘ Airport, check in desks, Just Another Prescription cs a
it was right for the airport to be respect”. and (inset) former Prime a ‘4
named after someone who was Responding, a Tribune read- Minister Sir Lynden Pindling , y
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about illegal drug | ; jetted Gir ie assn enone :

Son Ee, ie ‘ . 3 adeira Shopping Plaza 5

‘ ; tc. arate (ria ¢ side of caution - , -
smuggling in Bahamas : Accepting all major local insurance plans and
, FROM page one providing many discounts. : +

FROM page one : eX { dt (| ¥
pas i Exper e 0 dy _ “While we are now feeling a Registered Pharmacist on Duty, bs

efforts. : little more comfortable about Todd Culmer. ;

According to OPBAT statistics, during this fiscal year, 868
kilos of cocaine and 99,553 pounds of marijuana had been
seized, 78 had been arrested for drug-related offences, 674 ille-
gal migrants had been seized at sea, and 91 lives assisted through .

search-and-rescue missions.

“This success speaks to the continued importance to the }
United States, The Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands - :
of OPBAT," the chargé concluded, adding: "We remain fully:
committed to building upon our unique law enforcement part-
nership in the year ahead to keep drugs away from our shores
and strengthen security and the rule of law among all OPBAT

partners."

The two parties agreed that the next Joint Task Force meet-
ing would take place in December.



FROM page one

Prosecutors disagree.

They claim that Robins’
murder occurred in 2002,
nearly a year before those of
the younger boys.

Prosecutors want Farring-
ton to stand trial. for Robins’
murder first, followed by a tri-
al for the murders of the four
boys. rile Apel vse

lm PHOTOGRAPHER Franklyn Gustavus Darling-Ferguson —Franklyn G Ferguson — is sworn in
yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez as a Justice of the Peace.

Mr Ferguson, a native of Delectable Bay, Acklins, has been a freelance photographer for almost 40
years and.has seen many transitions in the course of the country’s life.

(Photo: Lorenzo Lockhart)

Migrants caught at sea near US territory

@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

THE U.S. Coast Guard
returned 13 migrants to the
Dominican Republic on Mon-

“day after picking them up at sea
near this U.S. territory, officials
said, according to Associated
Press.

The Dominicans — 10 men,
three women — were detained
Sunday evening by the Coast

Guard near Desecheo Island in
the Mona Passage, an often-per-
ilous stretch of sea separating
Puerto Rico and the Domini-
can Republic, said Ricardo Cas-
trodad, a Coast Guard
spokesman.

The migrants were in good
health. ;

Since October, U.S. authori-
ties and Puerto Rico police have
interdicted about 2,720 migrants

in the Mona Passage, Castro-
dad said.

Smugglers in small boats fre-
quently attempt to carry
migrants from the Dominican
Republic to Puerto Rico, a
roughly 70-mile (110-kilometer)
journey across the Mona Pas-
sage. In late April, at least five
migrants died when their boat
capsized en route to western
Puerto Rico.

the entire thing, we cannot let
up because we have to deter-
mine a source and follow it up.
We have to determine whether
there are any other persons who
may or may not have been
affected in some way or the oth-
er, and then ensure that they
have access to services. And we
have to look at vulnerable pop-
ulations in the Bahamas and
seek to ensure that they are
treated so that there can be no
transmission of malaria,” Dr
Nottage said.

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PAGE 10,

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING

8:00

New Florida © |NovaA minute-by-minute, eyewit-
WPBT ness account of hurricane Katrina.
1 (CC) (DVS)

@ WFOR
WTV4U |wood
@ wsvn

WPLG

JUNE 20, 2006








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mous bicyclist he believes is taking

five missing boys. (CC)
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ther and his mysteriously ill son hin-
der a diagnosis. 1 ipa) (CC) performance enhancers.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 2U, 2UU6, PAGE 11





Si By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamian family is chang-
ing; according to observers.

They have noticed that the same
“abandonment issues” that exist
in single parent homes are creeping
intd two-parent families as well.’

This development is said to be
coupled with a sociological shift,
in which “traditional” male and
female roles are being reversed.

When painter Georgia O'Keefe
was dying, she was quoted as say-
ing: “Nobody sees a flower — real-
ly + it is so small it takes time — we
haven't time — and to see takes
time, like to have a friend takes
time. And we have no time.”

er

“If you are a two-parent family, you

have to balance your careers

or else the children are going to get
hurt. If mom and dad is out everyday
working, the children may not be
getting enough time. Are you seeing
your children? Can you be with
them? Are you listening to their fears
and dreams?”

Physiologist Dr David Allen

This, According to Physiologist
Dr David Allen, defines a mod-
ern dilemma, in which time robs us
of being who the really are, and
individuals are prevented from
paying attention to the small yet
important things in life.

Experts now know that for a
child to have a meaningful lite in
western culture, they need to have
five meaningful people involved
in that life.

‘What is happening is that some
children don’t have five, so it
depends on not whether you were

frdm a single or double-parent, but .

the kind of people that were inter-
nalised in your life experience.

“The sad thing is the more
aggressive we become. and more
educated and busier we are, we
create the same abandonment
issues in our children as the kid
who has no family,” he said.

‘The majority of children in the

the 4,551 live births were to single
women. This does not include
those who were born to women
who were widowed or divorced,
which was a small number, 62.
This year, these children will be
celebrating their sixth birthday.
Whether their mothers remained
single or not obviously depends on
many factors; as numerous per-

haps as.the reasons why they were *

born out of wedlock in the first
place.

Statistics show that of-all the
households in the Bahamas, 38 per
cent are headed by a single female
and 25 per cent are headed by peo-
ple who have never been married.

The striking fact however, lies
in the fact that of that 25 per cent,
43 per cent of females were never
married, compared to only 13 per
cent of male heads.

Households headed by women
tend to be more vulnerable to

ness, this is a statement not many
people are willing to make — but it
is backed by hard statistical facts.

According to the Bahamians
Living Conditions Survey of 2001,
female-headed households tend-
ed to be larger — with six or more
members — than male-headed
households.

The statistics further suggest that
female-headed households have
more dependents in them than
male-headed households and are
poorer.

Half of the households in the
poorest sectors of the country are
headed by females. However in
these areas while female leader-
ship was about equivalent to that
of male leadership, the number of
female-headed homes declined as
the standard of living rose; the
opposite of their male-headed
counterparts.

In the social realm, Dr Allen

Bahamas, 56 percent,arebornto social ills.

single mothers. In 2000, 2,584 of

.E-ADDERLEY Junior High School.



In this age of political correct-

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff) - my

said that is easier to speak of the
issues associated with facts like







FROM page one

are ill-prepared.

i Are A F Adderley Junior School's figures just an
anomaly, or is it indicative of what is going on
throughout the public school system in the
Bahamas?

: Spurred on by these troubling statistics coming
gut of A F Adderley Junior School, The Tribune will,
once again, take a look at our educational system
with the objective of getting a grasp on systemic
problems that continue to produce an educational-
ly deficient population.

: In February, 1981, The Tribune ran an article in
which then minority leader of the opposition, J Hen-
ty Bostwick, attacked the educational system under
the Progressive Liberal Party as "an absolute and
total failure." ,

Ten years later, in 1991, High Rock MP CA
Smith expressed dismay that the then education
minister, Dr Bernard Nottage, had openly admitted
to the "total failure" of the Bahamian educational
system.

: Then, on a radio talk show in 2000, Dr Nottage,
upon resigning from the PLP, once again said that
the educational system has not been a success."

* Two years later, in September, 2002, the nation-
al grade point average stood at D, and the following
May, Prime Minister Perry Christie said that he
tmeasured "the Bahamas by the failure of the edu-
cation system to deal with children leaving school
who are not able to read or write."

"How can we allow something like this to happen
when we have 300,000 people?" the relatively new

"prime minister questioned.

:

to figure it out when, after 25 years, the public
school's national average for graduating exams
stands at around E or F+ and, according to the
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), 75 to
80 per cent of Bahamian students taking technical
ae vocational subjects read below their grade lev-
‘el.
Yet, the Minister of Education promises a "qual-
itative improvement" in education over the next
five years because of his ministry's efforts.

But whereas Minister Alfred Sears, in his address

y
meets a
3
hk

Shock graduating figures

* Now, in 2006, the government stilrhas not-seemed :-~

to the House during the 2006/2007 budget debate,
promised to make education in the next five years
"relevant to the needs of national development and
competitive with global development," some have
seen years of in-fighting at the ministry as one of sev-
eral factors hindering "qualitative" improvements
in education and the educational system.
According to North Eleuthera MP and shadow
Minister of Education, Alvin Smith, "what has hap-
pened under the ministership of Alfred Sears is that

. Mr Sears has chosen to just ignore, for the most

part, the Director of Education.

“She is the chief technocrat. That's the person
who advises the minister on educational matters.
The director should be the one who is a part of
their recruitment, their curriculum development,
the staffing, and they are circumventing the director.

"The director over the last three-and-half years
has not been involved in the process of improving
the educational system because the relationship

- between the director and minister has been so

strained that it has impacted, negatively, education,
and no matter what the situation, you have to be
mature enough and professional enough to allow the
system to work, and allow the director to function,"
said Mr Smith.

"The director, she knows education," Mr Smith
added. "Technically, she is very strong. But what has
been happening is there has been a tug-of-war" - a
tug-of-war, according to one secondary school prin-
cipal, that is impacting children down the ladder.

"There needs to be an evolution of authority in
the Ministry of Education," said the principal.
"There is too much politics involved. Whoever it is
in charge of education has to have a vision for edu-
cation, because meanwhile our kids are getting lost
een he re ee

"Most times, you don't have time to be stressing
yourself over the ministry's in-fighting, except when
you send copious amounts of information to the
ministry, and before it gets there it goes missing
somewhere," the principal added. "We are trying to
stay focused on doing the best we can right here
on site."

° Tomorrow, The Tribune looks at the bleak
future facing youngsters with sub-average grades.

these rather than speaking about
what causes them.

He pointed out that it is a long-
term belief in Bahamian society

- that a woman should have a child

at a certain age.

“Tt was just an accepted norm
that if you got to a certain age and
did not have a child you were
somewhat inadequate. That is

changing a bit now. Many times.
kids from single parent homes tend:

to have children. It’s a repetition
compulsion. The pain you have in

your life you seek to master it by:

recreating it,” Dr Allen said.

Often, women who have babies
out of wedlock tend to have inti-
macy issues and they tend to create
intimacy though the baby they
have.

“The sad thing is the reason the
mother brought the child into the
world was to give the mother inti-
macy. The trouble is that this puts
tremendous onus on that child
because the child needs intimacy
from the mother.

“The sad thing about human
pain is that we are doomed to
repeat it. When you are hurt, par-
ticularly as a young parent, that
pain is internalised and the idea is
that you keep repeating it in the

hope that you will master it some _

day,” the psychologist said.

This concept applies to Bahami-
an men as well, and can be seen in
those who believe their manhood
is tied to the number of children
they have.”

“Tts called the Don Juan syn-
drome. The idea is that because I
feel inadequate in my own mas-
culinity if Ihave more children I
may become more adequate,” Dr
Allen said.

Because of the underling reli-
gious convictions of Bahamian
society, the endorsement of con-
traception was considered for some

time to be linked to encouraging

sexual activity — and therefore was
disregarded in‘ favour of more
“morally correct” abstinence.

Dr Allen said’ that society has.’

not done a good job of teaching

‘ the use of contraception — that is,

up until the AIDS. epidemic.

“Tn essence we were using denial
when people were acting out their
sexually,” he said.

However, those children born —

into a single family home are not
doomed to failure. As Dr Allen
explained, the pathology of the sin-
gle parent home is neutralised by a
bonded community or society.
“What we are finding now is

that it is better to have a two-par- -

ent family, but if you have a single
parent family who has a extended
family or a neighborhood that
helps with that child, that child is
better seen. :

“Being seen in my field means
now you try to understand the
child, listening to the child, that
child’s dream and fears. To do that

takes time. The problem in our ~

modern Bahamas — particularly in
Nassau — is that we don’t have

“I’m a professional chef. My mom owns a ladies’
fashion boutique and my grandmother cares for her

grandkids all day long. The Tribune’s Woman & Health

section is invaluable to us. We are constantly updated
with articles on food, fashion and child-rearing. We
love The Tribune. The Tribune is our newspaper.”

DESEREA WALKINE “My Gourmet Lunch & Picnic Baskets”, _

CYNTHIA CLARKE “Maria’s Boutique”, and
FRANCIS CLARKE, Active Grandmother.

READ



EVERY TUESDAY

A brand new news feature from
The Tribune which delves deeper
‘into the stories that YOU care about.

The acute m ; on a i
he Bahamian family

time,” Dr Allen said

While the cliché of the “ideal
family” of a husband, wife and 2.3
children may look good on paper,
Dr Allen said that there is a strong
need to look at the needs. of each
family member. EH

“Tf you are a two-parent family,

you really have to balance your

careers or else the children are
going to get hurt. If mom and dad

_ is out everyday working, the chil-

dren may not be getting enough

_ time. Are you seeing your chil-
‘dren? Can you be with them? Are
‘you listening to their fears and

dreams?”

Now, even the roles of men and
women in families and society at
large are in flux, said Dr Allen, as

. some women are showing more

“masculine traits” and men are
exhibiting more feminine traits.
“In our field masculine means
someone who is assertive and goes
out there and hunts, as it were.

. Feminine means nurturer. What

is happening is that you are finding
Bahamian women who are exhib-
it both features and there are some
men who are having more nurtur-
ing than hunting features so we
are a society in flux,” Dr Allen
said.

However, in the 21 century, Dr
Allen said that there needs to be a
balance between the two on the
part of both sexes. Men need
to have a nurturing side and
women must be able to assert
themselves.

The Tribune

Gly Voie. Ply Vewspaean!



3
Â¥
'





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



ew fogging schedule ar announced

THE government has
released an updated mosquito

fogging schedule for New Prov- .

idence and Exuma.

The fogging, known as “adul-

ticiding” will be continued for
the rest of June by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services.

In a statement yesterday, the

government said that the adulti-
ciding of two areas within a mile
and a half-mile radius of the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre has now been completed.

The areas of New Providence
that have been treated so far
include:

° Spikenard Road

e Faith Avenue

e Carmichael Road

e¢ Cowpen Road

° Gladstone Road

e Firetrail Road

© Coral Harbour Road

e Bacardi Road

e Golden Isles Road

° JFK Drive

° Harrold Road

¢ Sir Milo Butler Highway

eerie kee

Saturday, June 17
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3

Monday, June 19
Areal
Area 2
Area 3_

Tuesday
Area 1
Area 2

Wednesday
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3

Thursday
Area 1
Area 2

Friday
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3



: Forest, Ocean Addition and Farmer’s Hill
: Bahamas Sound 18, Bahamas Sound 14 and Bahamas Sound 11
“: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

: Airport, Ramsey, Mt. Thompson and Forest _
: Moss Town, Hermitage, Tar Bay and Hooper’s Bay
: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

: Forest, Ocean Addition and Farmer’s Hill
: Bahama Sound 18, Bahama Sound 14 and Bahama Sound 11

: Airport, Ramsey, Mount Thompson and Forést
: Moss Town, Hermitage, Tar Bay and Hope: s Bay
: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

: Roker’s Point, Steventon, Curtis, Stuart Manor and Barrettere
: Rolle Town, Hartswell, Forbes Hill and Williams Town

: Roker’s Point, Steventon, Curtis, Stuart Manor & Barretere
: Rolle Town, Hartswell, Forbes Hill & Williams Town
: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

ee Providence

Monday, June 19

Areal
Area 2

Area 3
Area 4.

Tuesday
Area 9
Area 10

Area 11
Area 12

Wednesday
Area 17

_ Area 18
Area 19.
Area 20

Thursday
Area 13

Area 14

Area 15
Area 16

: Adelaide Village, Adelaide Road and Coral Harbour Road to the Defence

Force Base.

: Coral Harbour Road, Windsor Road, Mount Pleasant Village Road and

Clifton Pier Road.

: West Bay Street, JFK Drive and Windsor Road
: Blake Road, West Bay Street, West Bay Ridge Estates and JFK Drive

: Westridge Estates, West Bay Street; Prospect Ridge and JFK Drive
: Prospect Ridge Road, West Bay Street, White Grove Road, Marlin Drive,

Dolphin Drive and JEK Drive

: Dolphin Drive, Marlin Drive, West Bay Street, White Grove Road, Ferguson

Road or Perpall Track, West Bay Street and St Albans Drive to the back of
Batelco

: Faith Avenue, Sir Milo Butler Highway, Harrold Road, Baillou Hill Road and ° -

Carmichael Road

: Bethel Avenue, JFK Drive, Harrold Road, Bethel Avenue
: Bethe! Avenue, Harrold Road, Yellow Elder Highway, Sports Center Road,

Thompson Boulevard, Bethel Avenue

: Yellow Elder Way, Harrold Road, Blue Hill Road, Tucker Road, Thompson

Boulevard

_: Tucker Road, Blue Hill Road, Poinciana Drive, Thompson Boulevard

: Eden Street, Foster Street, Wallace Road, Farrington Road, Alto Street,

Saunders Road, Lightbourne Avenue and Kiki Street

: Eden Street South, Foster Street, Boyd Road, Nassau Street, Russell Road, ee

College Avenue and Farrington Road

: Farrington Road, Russell Road, Thompson Boulevard and Farrington Road
’ : Nassau Street, Meadow Street, Chapel Street, Market Street, Wulf Road and

Poinciana Avenue

° Hesobaing to the Department of Environmental Health, fogging will be conduc between the
hours of 10pm and 2am.



w UN Human Rights Council.



Tye s fre

i GENEVA

THE United,Nations inaugu-
rated its new Human Rights
Council on Monday, vowing to
uphold the highest standards of
human rights and erase the tar-
nished image of its predecessor
despite lingering doubts about
its effectiveness, according’ to
Associated Press.

The 47-member council -

replaces the Human Rights
Commission, which became dis-
credited in recent years as
rights-abusing countries con-
spired to escape condemnation.
_ U.N. Secretary-General Kofi
Annan urged the council’s
members not to squander. the
opportunity.
“Never allow this council to
‘become caught up in political

point-scoring or petty maheu- |

_ ver,” Annan said. “Think
always of those whose rights are
denied.”

He said the council has a
chance to start its work with a

tangible ‘achievement by pass- -

ing two “vital documents”
one against enforced disap-
pearances, the other guaran-
teeing the rights of indigenous
peoples — and sending them
for approval by the General
Assembly.

However, the council’s first
meeting, which runs through
June 30, aims only to establish
its operating procedures, includ-
ing how it should carry out
- human rights reviews of all 191

U.N. member states, and how
often.

Louise Arbour, the U.N. high
commissioner for human rights,
said the council should rededi-
cate itself to the “scaffolding of
human rights” enunciated by
former. President Franklin. D.
Roosevelt, whose widow,
Eleanor, was the first chair-
woman of the commission more
than 60 years ago.

“President Roosevelt’s four
freedoms — freedom from
want, freedom from fear, free-
dom of expression and freedom
of worship — challenged us to
promote liberty though democ-

‘racy, justice and an equitable
distribution of resources,”
Arbour said.

General Assembly President
Jan Eliasson, who guided the
negotiations that led to the cre-
ation of the council, told the
delegates they were “part of an
historic occasion.”

“Let us be guided by a spirit
of renewed cooperation and of
upholding the highest standards
of human rights,” Eliasson said.

The European Union said the
council should take inspiration
from Myanmar’s pro-democra-
cy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi,
who is under house arrest. Suu

Kyi, who celebrated her 61st
birthday Monday, has spent 10
of the last 17 years in confine-
ment, making her one of the
world’s most prominent pole
prisoners. <

“The EU is committed to
support. women human rights
defenders who put their free-
dom, safety and sometimes their
lives on the line to advance the
cause of human-rights,” Austri-
an Foreign Minister, Ursula
Plassnik said. “One of these
fearless women is Aung San
Suu Kyi ... Her vision and
courage should be our ipa
tion in this forum.’

Plassnik spoke for the 25-

‘nation bloc because Austria

holds the EU presidency.

The new council will hold
more meetings than the com-
mission, comprising 10 weeks a
year — greater than the current
six weeks. It will also be easier
to convene special sessions to
respond quickly to human rights
crises.

Furthermore, any member °
that “commits gross and sys-



tematic violations of human
rights” can be suspended from
the council by a two-thirds vote
of the General Assembly.

But some critics fear that the
council will be as weak as the
commission, undermined by
member states accused of major
rights violations. Cuba, Saudi
Arabia, China and Russia won
seats despite their poor human
rights records, although others
—notably Iran — were defeat-
ed.

Many countries accused of
rights violations, who had been
members of the old commis-
sion, didn’t even seek seats on
the new council, including
Sudan, Zimbabwe, Libya, Con-
go, Syria, Vietnam, Nepal, Sri

- Lanka, Eritrea and Ethiopia.

The United States has-been
skeptical of the council but has
promised to work for its suc-
cess even if it didn’t run for a
seat.

The US. delegation will be
headed by Warren Tichenor,
the new ambassador to the U.N.

_.offices in Geneva.



s amid hopes and doubts

presented by the”

° Jem Epsambley

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TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





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‘The Singapore or the

Hong Kong of t



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
he Bahamas could
become the “Hong

Kong or Singapore of
the west” if it was to
exploit Freeport’s poten-
tial as a transhipment hub for the
Americas by attracting Chinese

exporters and manufacturers, a .

Bahamian attorney said yesterday.

Michael Scott, Callenders & Co’s
senior litigation partner, told The Tri-
bune he was leaving today for a 10-
day trip to China and the Far East,
where he planned to market this
nation’s financial services and ship-
ping registry potential to customers in
that nation.

‘Apart from promoting those two
industries, Mr Scott said he was also
meeting a number of Chinese com-
panies with the aim of “getting Chi-
nese manufacturers to set up show-

f@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



. THE project to revitalise harbourfront Nassau aims to
“transform” Arawak Cay “into a unique destination, featur-
ing an-eco-park, shopping village, national fairgrounds and

expanded fish fry.

The master plan for revitalising downtown Nassau, pro-

Plan to ‘trans
Arawak, Potter’s Cay



west’

Bahamian law firm in tie-up with Chinese correspondent partner

‘ rooms in Grand Bahama with a view:

to soliciting or having orders sent out

“to North: American and Latin Amer-

ica”.

Mr Scott said that to further tap
into China’s economic potential, Cal-
lenders & Co had become the first
Bahamian law firm to link up with a
Chinese correspondent partner.

The company’s Beijing-based cor-
respondent was the Jincheng & Tong-
da law firm. mans

“We’re actively pushing our China
connections, and doing a lot of that
from our London office,” Mr Scott
said.

He added that it had become
increasingly important to push
Freeport’s potential as a port, ship
repair facility, storage terminal and
transhipment hub for Chinese firms

orm’

duced by 200 Bahamian stakeholders in conjunction with
urban planning firm EDAW, includes a blueprint for chang-
ing Arawak Cay and the nearby beach into a recreation and

given the recent tie-up announced
between Port Everglades, in Florida,
and COSCO, the Chinese firm that is
the world’s third largest shipping com-

pany. .

Mr Scott said that on his trip, which -

will take him to Guangdong Province,
Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong,
he would be meeting with both
COSCO and Hutchison Whampoa.

Following Prime Minister Perry
Christie’s official state visit to China,

then financial services and invest-
ments minister, Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, said COSCO was planning
to invest an initial $90 million in the
Grand Bahama Shipyard. However,
that has not happeried, and it appears
COSCO’s attention has wandered:to
Port Everglades.

Hutchison Whampoa, which owns

50 per cent of the Grand Bahama

Port Authority, owns 50 per cent
stakes in the Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company (Devco) and
Freeport Harbour Company, and also
holds the management contract for
Freeport International Airport.

In addition, Hutchison Whampoa
holds the management contract for
the Panama Canal, and owns storage
terminals at both ends of that facility.

Mr Scott said Freeport had
“tremendous potential” in the tran-
shipment and logistics businesses, and
Chinese companies would be able to
use it to “ship goods in, ship them
out” and send them on to end user
destinations in North, Central and
South America.

He added that Freeport, with the

business, trade. and tax incentives’

derived from the Hawksbill Creek

- Agreement, “lends itself to that kind

of use”.

If Freeport exploited that poten-
tial, Mr Scott said the economic
impact could be “phenomenal, and
put the Bahamas on the map for tran-
shipment. It’s a natural evolution”.

“We’re on it, enthusiastic about it,

. and think the future potential is enor- -

mous,” Mr Scott said. “We should be
looking at things like that, making |
the Bahamas the Singapore or Hong
Kong of the west. Obviously, tourism -
can’t be the.only paradigm.” ;
With the rapid development of Chi-
na’s economy, iand the increase in © —
numbers of high net worth individuals -

_ SEE page 9B

t
4
‘4

M By NEILHARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE developers behind the ==
$700 million Rum Cay Resort °
Marina project told The Tri-
bune that “all the construction
materials” for the island’s new
airport terminal, set to become
the Bahamas’ third largest,
arrived on the island last week.

-Tim Perkins, construction
director for Montana Holdings,
the tourism and real estate
developer behind the project,

event destination for both Bahamians and tourists, a move that
will generate “Bahamian business opportunities”.

The proposed blueprint includes a private resort at the
western end of Arawak Cay, a marina village accessible to the
public, and a Fast Ferry Port ia
and terminal.

SEE page 6B

The master plan said: “The




said the company was building
its construction offices at the
site over “the next two weeks”.
All materials for those facilities





sa

i FROM L to R: Pictured at the signing of an almost $7 million contract to construct a marina for
the Rum Cay Resort Marina project are Tim Perkins, director of construction for Montana Hold-
ings; Dwayne Pratt, president of Heavy Marine and Foundation; Michael Pratt, general manager
of Heavy Marine and Foundation; and Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, MP for Rum Cay



SEE page 7B



Minister hits back
over work permits









| just got a lod banc.

for do W Y / :

m@ By CARA BRENNEN " tistics proved that criticism that
Tribune Staff Reporter the Government was not
responding quickly enough to.

MORE than 8,000 work per- -work . applications was

unfounded. ;
During his contribution to

the 2006-2007 Budget debate,

Mr Gibson said that since Jan-

mit applications have either
been renewed or approved in
the past 12 months, the Minis-
ter of Labour, Immigration
and Training told the House
of Assembly yesterday. \
Shane Gibson said these sta- .

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006



Financial services must take
note of CAFTA’s implic

LAST week, I wrote about the
visit of former President Flores of
El Salvador to Nassau as a guest
of the Nassau Institute and the
Atlas Research Foundation. El
Salvador was one of the first
countries to ratify the Central
American Free Trade Agree-
ment (CAFTA). President Flores
and his administration (1999-
2004) felt strongly that participa-
tion in a free trade agreement
was a necessary component in
his country’s economic restruc-
turing.

This view has continued with
the new administration, as the
current Salvadoran President,
Antonio Saca, in a June 2005
interview in Business Week, said
that “... a free trade agreement
with the US is essential to his
country’s and the region's growth
and stability”.

The passage of CAFTA was
not without controversy in each



signatory state. Indeed, in the
US, President Bush had to call
in a lot of political favours to get
the agreement through the Sen-
ate. Today, I will reprint a col-
umn about CAFTA almost a
year ago.

CAFTA Blueprint

In February 2004, I wrote in a
column: “In the Americas, the
United States current - and in
negotiation - Free Trade Agree-
ment (FTA’s) partners represent
more than two-thirds of the
hemisphere’s economy, not
counting the US.” I then went
on to predict that within a few
years, all of the hemisphere’s
economies will be covered by an
FTA, of oné kind or another,
with the US.

It is widely believed that CAF-
TA will be the blueprint for all
other hemispheric FTAs between
the US and other regional group-

NOTICE:



Financial
Focus



ings. It is likely that, eventually,
the US will pursue an FTA with
Caricom, or individual countrie:
within the region.

CAFTA is a trade pact signed
between Costa Rica, the Domini-
can, Republic, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua
and the US. The terms of the
agreement were actually agreed
in early 2004, but each individ-
ual country’s legislature must
then approve it before it becomes
law. The only countries left to
ratify the agreement are Costa
Rica, Nicaragua and the Domini-
can Republic.

GN363 ©

Office of The Deputy Prime Minister and
Ministry of National Security

The Ministry of National security advises all insurance brokers, duly registered under part 4 of the
Insurance Act, Statute Laws of The Bahamas Chapter 347, that tenders for the supply of medical

insurance for law

enforcement officers and certain categories of public

bona fide insurance brokers.

service officers are available for distribution to

Persons presenting themselves for the receipt of tender documents should be in possession of proof
of their registration and picture identification. if

The distribution of the tender documents will be held in the Conference Room of the department of
Customs, Thompson Boulevard, Oakes field. Distribution will be made during the hours of 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m on Thursday 22 June, 2006 and Friday, 23 June, 2006. °



peaks cera mach tod
as low as

Market Size

The countries of CAFTA
(excluding the US) represent a
population of about 45 million
persons, and a combined GDP
of less than 1 percent of that of
the United States. Looking at the
relative size another way, the
CAFTA economy is about equal
in size to that of the city of Sacra-
mento (the capital of California).

Notwithstanding the lop-sided
relative GDP size comparisons,
CAFTA countries represent the
US’ second largest export market
in Latin America, and 13th
largest export market worldwide
— as surprising as it seems. In
2003, the US exported some $15
billion worth of goods to CAFTA
countries, while it imported some
$17 billion worth of goods.

Historically, CAFTA countries
exported primarily agricultural
products such as fruits, vegeta-
bles, meat, coffee, sugar and
tobacco to the US, whereas now
it seems increasingly tilted
towards textiles for large compa-
nies, such as Wal-Mart. US
exports were items such a equip-
ment and machinery. However, if
CAFTA passes in all countries —
services (financial services, in par-
ticular) will become a much larg-
er component of US exports to
the region.

What does CAFTA have to
say about Financial Services?

-While the Bahamas does not
produce or export any significant
amount of agricultural products
or textiles, financial services is
an important component of its
economy. However, the notable
exception to this is our fisheries
exports.

If we accept that the US will
seek FTAs with essentially the
entire hemisphere, then we must
concern ourselves with the finan-
cial services. concessions that
counterparties have to concede
to the US.

The US Department of Com-
merce, on its website, says:
“Improving the conditions for



CITCO

Citco Fund Services

The Citco Group Ltd. is an organization of financial service companies with offices
throughout the world and which provides corporate, fiduciary, fund administration and

banking services.

We invite candidates from qualified Bahamians or persons with Bahamian status for the

position of:

financial institutions to provide
services is a key component of
the US trade liberalisation agen-
da. The financial sector is a criti-
cal component of a nation's econ-
omy: it not only contributes
directly to output and employ-
ment, but also provides an essen-
tial infrastructure for the func-
tioning of the entire economy.”
And: “The CAFTA countries’
commitments in the financial ser-
vices sector include’ core obliga-
tions of national treatment, most-
favoured nation treatment, and.
additional market access obliga-
tions for investment. “The agree-
ment also includes provisions on
cross-border trade in financial
services, new financial services,
regulatory transparency, and
objective and impartial adminis-

tration of domestic regulation. In .

addition, the agreement includes
important commitments relating
to branching, asset management
and use of foreign-based portfo-
lio managers by mutual funds.”

Banking and Securities
CAFTA will lock in rights for
US financial service suppliers to
establish wholly-owned sub-
sidiaries or joint ventures. Also,
banks will be given the ability to
establish a direct branch from
abroad in most countries. Cen-
tral America has committed with-
‘out reservation to’ allow its citi-
zens to consume banking and
securities services abroad, and
will also allow US-based firms to
offer services cross-border to
Central Americans in areas such
as financial information and data
processing, and financial adviso-
ry services.

Insurance

The insurance commitments
contained in the financial services
chapter of the agreement are
comprehensive ,and generally
provide good treatment for insur-
ance providers. Significant liber-
alisation was achieved with the
removal of economic needs tests
and foreign equity limitations.

(Bahamas) Ltd

THE TRIBUNE



These insurance commitments
are significant improvements .
over current WTO obligations.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the CAFTA .,
agreement as it relates to finan-_
cial services has one fundamental *
underpinning and that is the issue '
of market access. While CSME
has been put to bed for now, , a
issues such as market access and - |
rights of establishment will come ,
back at us through the WTO and. °
FTAA.

I would urge participants in. |
the Bahamian banking and insur-.,
ance sectors to start strategically’ -/
planning for the changes that will
be inevitable in the not too dis-7
tant future. Market access is a, .,
key part of the US trade agen-. “
da. This will have significant ,*
implications for competition, .
within the domestic financial sec-."
tor, exchange controls and our
policy of reservations as it relates, .
to certain economic activity. It,”
will also raise the capital ante for _,
most types of businesses operat- —
ing in the sector, and unfortu- _
nately marginalise many existing
operators. While this article did, .
not focus on the arguments...
against CAFTA (which are,’
numerous and significant), it is’
fair to say that many do not see,
this as being advantageous to the. .
other parties (countries). Until...

‘next week... Pe

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-,
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial .,
Pensions Services (Bahamas), 4
wholly-owned subsidiary of Colo- —

‘ nial Group International, which
owns Atlantic Medical Insurance. ,
and is a major shareholder of.
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas. i

The views expressed are those:
of the author and do not neces...
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or any.;
of its subsidiary and/or affiliated .
companies. Please direct .any.,
questions or comments to rlgib-,,
son@atlantichouse.com.bs ,

eae)

/

He ew

Be BEAR MAN ia INN a RPC tA! Bin

Vice President /Resident Manager

yo)

> The candidate will be responsible for overseeing the overall daily operations of the bank,
which primarily consist of the custody and trading of Hedge Funds in addition to normal |:
banking operations. The candidate will be providing guidance and strategic direction |:

for the development and/or marketing of the necessary banking product and services, |:
and seeking commercial opportunities for the bank. :

Operational responsibilities include management of the bank’s client desk which work
consist of the input and reconciliation of general ledger data and administrative and
clerical responsibilities. Other duties consist of preparing the bank’s business plan,
periodic internal reporting and maintaining contact with local authorities and external
auditor. Experience in reporting to a Central Bank is a definite advantage.

Ow owowe lease,

Given the synergy with the services provided by other Citco affiliates in the corporate
management, trust and offshore mutual fund administration, a good working knowledge
of these services is required for the proper functioning of the candidate. Given the
importance to the bank of the increased number of customers, strong knowledge of the

Dutch language is a requirement.

The current environment of International Banking requires an extensive knowledge of
local and international regulation. As such the candidate such have experience with these

regulations.

The successful candidate should have a minimum of 10 years experience in one or more
of the mentioned affiliated/related areas of service or responsibility, with strong emphasis
on custody and trading of Hedge Funds. At least 5 years of the minimum 10 years
experience should be in a banking environment with some years at a managerial level.
The candidate should be willing to be relocated.

Scotiabank's ‘Forgive & Forget’ Mortgage Campaign

To celebrate our 50th year in The Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving
dai. 950,000 in: prizes. The candidate must be highly motivated with excellent communication skills and
demonstrable career achievements. A high level of computer literacy is also required,
with the candidate having experience with IBM AS/400 mainframe systems, Microsoft

Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage indemnity Insurance)
Office applications, SQL and Visual Basic knowledge.

Campaign runs until July 14 2006
Remuneration is based on knowledge and experience. Citco offers benefits and medical

insurance and excellent prospects for further career growth with the Citco Group of '}:

Call or visit us today and fet Scotiabank help you to "Forgive & Forget" Companies.

If you are interested, please send your curriculum vitae and covering letter to:

Fax or mail resumes to:
Managing Director
PO. Box N-4906
Nassau, Bahamas

betel



Life, Money. Balance both:

Traces of Tap Duos 0 thon atin Taner sed enw navies aie anc CARS whe RAS ik Sea





~



THE TRIBUNE

Doing ‘whatever we need’ to

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 3B

save Freeport pre-clearance



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR Ministry of

Tourism official said the Gov-_

ernment and his ministry would
“do whatever we need to do” to
ensure that Freeport Interna-
tional Airport retained its pre-
clearance facilities, as the US
Customs Border Protection
Agency assesses the cost-effec-
tiveness of such operations.
David Johnson, the Ministry
of Tourism’s former deputy
director-general for Grand
Bahama, emphasised that the sit-
uation had not reached the point
where the US government had
suspended or closed Freeport’s
pre-clearance facilities - a move
that would have disastrous con-
sequences for Grand Bahama’s

economy and its tourism sector. .

He said: “Obviously, that’s
nothing anyone in the Bahamas
or Grand Bahama would want
to see happen.

“We will examine any con-
cerns that arise, and do whatever
we need to do to ensure it is
maintained as a pre-clearance
facility for the good and health of
the industry.”

‘Mr Johnson, who is now the
Ministry’s deputy director-gen-
eral for investment and planning,
said the issue was one that would
be addressed by the Bahamian
and US governments.

“Fred Mitchell, minister of for-
eign affairs, said in his Budget
address to the House of Assem-
bly that the issue of pre-clear-
ance in Freeport was one the
Government was working to
address. .

“He added that he had written
to US Secretary of State, Con-
doleeza Rice, on the issue, and
spoken to senior US officials.

“Mr Mitchell said: “We have
known since last year that
because of the dramatic drop in

‘the: volumes of tourists through
the Freeport airport, that there is
a possibility of the scaling back of
the pre-clearancé in Freeport.”

The reduction in tourist num-
bers moving through Freeport







Bi SHOWN are Deborah Bartlett (left), president of the CEO Network,
and the Ministry of Tourism’s David Johnson.

International Airport has largely
been caused by the closure since
September 2004 of Grand
Bahama’s Royal Oasis Resort.
That reduced Grand Bahama’s
hotel room inventory by one
third.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
announced recently that a buyer
for the Royal Oasis had been
found, and it is unclear whether
the uncertainty surrounding
Freeport’s pre-clearance status
could impact the deal.

The Tribune understands that
the Royal Oasis deal has been
done in principle only, and that
one or two steps have to fall into
place before the deal goes ‘hard’.

Loss of pre-clearance would
cause Freeport’s tourist industry
to become uncompetitive at a
time when, apart from the Royal
Oasis situation, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and gov-
ernment are looking to develop
the industry on that island. Any

such move would send the wrong
signals to potential investors.
The Ginn project in West End
is starting to take shape following
last year’s Heads of Agreement

signing, while existing invest-

ments include the Westin & Sher-

aton at Our Lucaya and the

Grand Bahama Film Studios.
Dr Brent Hardt, Chief of Mis-

sion at'the US Embassy, said that.

while there were no immediate
plans to close US pre-clearance at



Manager and Senior

Accountants.

Entry Level

. (Photo: Derek Smith/BIS)

‘Freeport, the facility was being

reassessed as to whether cost-
wise its continued operation is
feasible.

Dr Hardt said that if pre-
clearence posts were not cost-

‘effective, there could be pres-

sures from the agencies that pay
for them to cut back.

“But we as an Embassy would
certainly oppose that, and that is
what we are looking at. I would
say that the Ambassador will

’

Are you looking for a new challenge?

make clear the importance of, -
in any of the routine assessments
that go forward, the Ambas-'
sador would make clear the
importance of the facility and
that we believe that it is helpful
for the economy of Grand
Bahama,” he said.

Dr Hardt estimated that of the
$15 million spent annually to
have pre-clearence facilities in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama, Freeport can consume
about a third of this annual fig-

ure, or $5 million.

The Grand Bahama Airport
Company,-which owns Freeport
International Airport, has invest-
ed between $25-$30 million to
build its pre-clearance facility to
the US Homeland Security
Department’s specifications. It
was the first facility of its kind to
be built after the September 11
attacks. The Grand Bahama Air-
port Company is part of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Group of Companies.





NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(6) of the International Business
Companies Act.of 2000 TRADPAC S.A. is in
Dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 16th day of June, 2006. Melanie Moxey and
Paula J ohnson, of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
~of TRADPAC S.A. LTD.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TRADPAC S.A.

s

Melanie Moxey and Paula Johnson
Liquidator



We are currently seeking qualified Managers and Seniors as well as Entry Level candidates to join our Audit practice.

Successful candidates for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years professional public accounting
experience, two of which will have been at a supervisory level. Candidates for'thé Senior position will have approximately
two to four years ef work experience in a public accounting firm. The Manager and Senior positions will require the
individual te hold a CPA, CA or other professional designation. recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered








‘Candidates must have obtained the necessary educational requirements qualifying them to write the CPA examinations or

Winoing Bay have already done so,

6 ABAECO BAHAMAS
' Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership Sales Executives:







KPMG’s entry ievel program provides financial support to write the CPA examinations including travel costs, hotel
accommodations, paid study leave and the costs of revision courses such as the Becker Review,

Excellent opportunities exist in our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice
that offers competitive compensation and benefits packages. ; 4

-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, erganization
Skills

_ -Exceptional Telephone skills
-Publie speaking preferred
-Ability fo demonstrate strong relationship sales capability |
-Ability to interface professionally with all members of'staff
-Generation and execution of an annual business plan 4 we?
-Self generation of buisness through referrals and other personal ee gee, :
contacts f + i i
-Exceptional skills in long range guest relaional maintenace AUDIT « TAX » ADVISORY
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer purchase ;
sequence
-College degree preferred









Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification ‘ante cop

a copy Of their transcripts if applying for an entry level position,
_ to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Bax N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies @kpmig.corn. bs. ;

aS 2006, KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Ashamian membet firm af KPMG internatiansl, a Swiss cooperative. All cights reserved.



Please Send Resumes to:

Attn: HR Director : : '
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay ei
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
. Fax: 242-367-0077

: Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.



Pricing Tnformation As Of:

19 June 20¢









































i S2wk-Low i
aE “dD Abaco Ma 2 ee % oO.
Dd 5257;5. 8.50 Bahamas Pro ty Fund L725 2 75: 0.00 3.
7.24 6.35 Bank of Bahamas Fee SB Vises. 0.00 4.
0.85 0.70 Benchmark : : 0.80 0.80 0.00 2.
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.30 1.30 0.00 4.
1.03: 1.05 Fidelity Bank 1.36 4°36 0.00 3.
9.60 8:00 Cable Bahamas 9.40 9.40 0.00 2.
2.20 O39. Colina Holdings L 83 1.81 0.00 oO.
. 10.80 8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.70 10.80 0.10 2,921 5.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs "5.46 5.14 -0.32 Oo.
“ 2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.60 2.60 0.00 “0%
6.21 4.02 Famguard . 6.21 6.21 0.00 Se
LE 250 10.45 Finco 11.50 Dis. 5.0) 0.00 1,290 4.
‘ : 2.2 43 8.60 FirstCaribbean 420.43: 12.43 0.00 4.07

Ld O'O: 8.42 Focol : ta 20:0 11.00 0.00 a

1.27 OB: Freeport Concrete 1.20.3 1.03 0.00

epor afr S 10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities F506” 9.50 0.00

: 9.10 8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 -10 0.00

7.98 Six 0 Kerzner International BDRs : 5 :



Premier R



52wk-H
14.00
10:14

Report Cards will be distributed on Thursday, June

12.2Bahamas Supermarkets
10.0Qaribbean’ Cro





29th, and Friday, June 30th, 2006 in the
Administration Office of St. Augustine’s College. 2.220 0.0009.4
5 Supermarkets L4:,:010 2750 0.360.0 2.57
ie 0.29 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00

















Office hours are from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Parents —
are asked to please come to the school and collect
the reports on these dates, as there are very important



Fund Name









52wk-Low
1.2353 Colina Money Market Fund PsEBoss73*
2.3657 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Furkd78564 ***
2.2487 Colina MS1 red Fund 2.391480**

1006 Colina Bond Fund 1s 1 G4 33 A

22.44



Prefer







letters attached.









NAY_KEX.
Rid $- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
z Ask $- Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 09 June 2006
The Report Cards will not be given to the students, Ist Price Last traded over-the-counter price
. = Today's Close Current day I C ly vol- Trading volume of the prior week ** - 31 May 2006
only a parent or guardian may collect them. Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV ~ Net Asset value +** = 30 April 2006

%.Number of total shares traded today

1 12 months N/M- Not Meaningful



are paid in







h 2006
WW ¥

WELTY
MS







PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



xuma hotels report —
no malaria ‘no-shows’

m@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
EXUMA hoteliers said yes-

terday that they had not expe-
rienced any booking cancella-

tions, despite news of the
malaria outbreak on the island
making the international news
media.

Even though a Canadian vis-
itor became the latest person

to contract malaria over the
weekend, there have been no
cancellations or major:fears
expressed by guests regarding
the disease.

Antoine Chawan, manager
at the Four Seasons Resort at

Emerald Bay, told The Tribune —

right with its guests and given
them every update on the situ-
ation as it became available.
He said the hotel has been
engaged in mosquito spraying,
but added that this was not in
response to the malaria out-
break. Instead, it was standard














Travel Agency Manager.

- Three year experience in Travel Agencies
management war

- Experience organizing team work

- Analytical skills for direction

- Fully trained in Tour Tek Computer System

- Strong Accounting knowledge

- Speak Spanish fluently

- Wide knowledge of the Cuban Tourist products.

- Only serious applicant

Send the resume to P.O. Box:EE-16319 before
June 30, 2006
Only the successful applicants will be contacted.







































































~ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
- NEW PROVIDENCE
CLE/qui/2004/00368

- IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land containing by admeasurements 26,963
square feet being a part of Malcolm's Allotment
no. 59 situate in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and being more
particularly situate Northwards of a 30 feet wide
Road Reservation and Westwards of a 20 feet
‘wide Right -of-Way in the aforesaid Southen

District of the Island of New Providence.




AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT,
1959




AND ~ ;

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Drexel Rolle
of the Southern District in the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas

KREWE IKKE IER RR

NOTICE

KIRN INARA IER REE

The Petition of Drexel Rolle of the Southern District in the Island of
New Providence, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in respect of:- ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in
the Southern District.in the Island of New Providence ane of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and bounded on the
South by a 30 feet wide Road Reservation and running thereon inan
Eastwardly direction 150 feet and then on the East by another 30
Feet wide Road Reservation and running thereon two hundred and
ten and nine hundredths (210.09) feet on the North by a 20 feet wide
Right-of-Way and running in a Westardly direction thereon 50 feet
and then on thereon the west and running Southwardly along the
Eastern Boundary of land the property of one Stacey Talbot and
running thereon 110 feet and then on the North and running
Westardly by land southern boundary of the said Stacey Talbot and
running thereon 50 feet and then Eastwardly and along Western
Boundary in part by land the property of the said Stacey Talbot and in
part by the dead end of the aforementioned 20 feet wide Right-of-
Way and together running thereon 130 feet and then on the North
by land which is another part of Malcolm's Allotments no.59 and-
running thereon 50 feet and on the West by land which is another
part of Malcolm's Allotment 230 feet which said pieces parcels or lot
" of land has such shapes, boundaries, marks and dimensions more
particularly described on the diagram or plan filed herein and
thereon colored Pink.
DREXEL ROLLE the Petitioner claims to be the owner of the.
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances. :
AND the Peitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas of under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles act 1959 to have his title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a certificate of Title to beg ranted by the court in accor-
dance with provisions of the said act.




NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that-any person having, Dower
ora Right to Dower or adverse Claim ora claim-not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 7th day of August A.D., 2006 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit
to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 7th day of August.A.D., 2006
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Copy of the filed plan may be inspected at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court

2. The Chambers of S.A. HARRIS-SMITH SR. & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioners , Mackey & Rosedale
Streets, Deal’s Plaza Suite No.8 P.O. Box N-4255,
Nassau, Bahamas '
Dated the 20th day of June A.D., 2006



S.A. HARRIS-SMITH SR.& CO.
Chambers ;
Mackey & Rosedale Streets
P.0.Box N-4255
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner

that the hotel has been forth-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATASHA SIMEON OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-. 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. |

NURSING CAREER
OPPORTUNITY.

Plastic Surgery office is seeking a full time

REGISTERED
NURSE.

Great benefits; including assistance in
funding for Specialized training.

procedure at the Four Seasons




































Interested persons please fax resume to

328-6479 or cau 356-3189 -

_ for further information. .



teas

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

- Must be a team player. .

_- Excellent probem solving skills.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

- Fluent in French.

- CFA qualifiction.

Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

P.O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in




SC PICTET |
PICKET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:

PORTFOLIO MANAGER

- Strong supervisory and organisational skills
- Commitment to excellent customer service.

- Excellent oral and written communication skills.

- Ability to work under pressure and to meet strict deadlines.

- Knowledge of another language would be an asset.
- Working knowledge of investment instruments.
.- At least five (5) years Private Banking experience.

- Proficiency in a variety of software applications including
“ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE
CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Please send resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park

Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourge, London, Montreal,
Vancouver, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong

Resort during the summer
months or whenever there
appeared to be an incréase in
mosquitos.

At the Peace and Plenty Inn,
a spokeswoman told The Tri-
bune there have been no can-
cellations or major concerns at
their property either.

In Nassau, Ed Fields, vice-
president of public affairs ‘at
Kerzner International, told
The Tribune that at this point
Atlantis has not seen any
impact either.

The Canadian press yester-

_day reported that the Public

Health Agency of Canada was
monitoring the outbreak of
malaria in the Bahamas, and
was recommending Canadians

going to Great Exuma use.

anti-malarial medication and

Minister hits

insect repellents.

The Centre For Disease
Control website gave an “ Out-
break Notice” that the CDC
had recently received official
reports of 14 confirmed malar-
ia cases in Great Exuma,
Bahamas, “an area where
malaria transmission does not
normally occur and for which
anti-malarial drugs have not
previously been recommend-
ed”. sat

According to that website,
13 cases were Bahamians and -
the 14th was an American vis-
itor to the island. :

The CDC recommended
that visitors to the island take
chloroquine as an anti-malari-
al medication and use insect
repellent as they avoid being
bitten by mosquitos. :

back over

work permits

FROM page 1B

uary 2006, in Nassau 3,019
work permit renewals were
approved and 526 were
refused. He said that during

the same period, 987 persons

were granted new work per-

“mits while 408 were refused.

During the period July 2005-
May 2006, 3,778 work and res-
idency permits were approved






on Grand Bahama, and 557
applications were refused. «¢

In Abaco, Mr Gibson said
1,100 work permits were
approved and 181 were turned
down, and in Bimini 211 work
permits were approved and'19
were turned down. :

“This is a total of some 5,089
permits that were approved
and: 757 turned down in the
Northern region,” the minis- .
tersaid. , ;

Mr Gibson aded that the
majority of persons whose
work permits were approved
were Haitian nationals. -'

“This is because they occtlpy

- a unique place in the labour

force as maids, housekeepers
and caregivers,” he said.

Mr Gibson added that from
January to May 2006, some 414
Haitians were approvid for
work permits while «»}v,20
were turned down. 5

Nine hundred Haitians,‘
said, were approved toibé
handymen/gardeners and
labourers, while 451 were
approved to be farm labour-
ers and 74 were refused. ”

He said these figures should
also put to rest any suggestion
that the PLP government was
“anti- Haitian”.

Mr Gibson said more need-
ed to be done to ensure that
Bahamians were given first
preference for jobs. He point-
ed out that often, some com-
panies will advertise jobs even
though they have specific can-
didates already in mind.

He suggested that if Bahami-
ans do apply for a specific job,
they should forward a copy of
their resumes and applications
to the Department of Labour,
so that officials can be aware of
which Bahamians have applied
for which positions.

Mr Gibson said the Depart-
ment of Labour will require
any company applying for five
or more work permits in a
technology-related field to
ensure they hire at least one
Bahamian ‘and train them in
their fields of expertise.

Mr Gibson said this will
ensure that the next time a
job becomes available, a
Bahamian is qualified to do
the work.

Mr Gibson added that the
Government will enact legis-
lation for the full payment of
processing and work permit
fees at the time the application
is submitted to the Department
of Immigration.

“What happens is that per-
sons apply for the permit, and
once they get the letter that it
is approved, then they don’t
check any more,” Mr Gibson
said.

“The difficulty is that we
don’t have sufficient manpow-
er to monitor it, and so what
we are looking at is persons
upon application will have to
pay for the work permit the
same time, and if the work per-
mit is denied then we will
refund your money.”



THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, JUNE 20; 2006, PAGE 5B












Street awaits rates

Copyrighted Materia
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEATRICE NOEL, P.O. Box



responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.






Abaco

WINDING Bar
ABAD, BANAMAS
Has two (1) vacancies for

Sales & Marketing Project Director:

-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and
marketing.

-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory.
-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement
self developed program

«Implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong team values -
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others

«Strong leadership skills .

-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership

-Minimum 5 years marketing in management of sales, marketing and /or
administration

-College degree preferred, but not required.

Please Send Resumes to:

Attn: HR Director

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O, Box AB2087 -

Mash Harbour, Abaco

or. ;

Fax: 242-367-0077

esb consultants limited





ad Presently considering applications for

FULL- TIME

ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS

: | Looking for candidates with:

1. 2+ years experience in structural and civil drafting and the creation of construction

: documents.
{| 2. Strong working knowledge of the PC, AutoCAD 2004 Release software and

Autodesk Land experience is a plus.

i? || Responsibilities include:

to sH#l 1. The drafting and creation of construction documents.
tim Ii] 2. Assisting Engineers on site with supervision and management duties.
Cool 3. Participating in design development meetings.

|| Candidates should be hard working and be able to handle a number of projects
pues i] simultaneously. csb consultants limited is a team orientated company, and potential
“tl employees should capable of adapting to this philosophy.

All interested candidates should email there resumes to:
mark@csbconsultantslimited.com

OR fax to:

~ (242) 325-7209
ATTN: Mr. Mark Williams





EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister |





Mike’s Stainless Steel Manufacturing Co

Qur Product Surpasses Standards. Our service exceeds expectations.



GRAND OPENING INVITATIONAL

Thursday June oon
12 noon to 6:30 pm

Fowler Street*
P.O. Box N-4199

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 393-2504

Appointments during our normal operating hours, Mondays-Fridays 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Limited appointment requests available outside of operating hours.

“Cum right at comer of Esso On the Run East Bay we are located on the left hand side across
» . from Nassau Stadium, next to jet ski feta:

oH) PICTET

i8aos
PICKET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:
ACCOUNTING OFFICER

REQUIRED oS -

Preparation of the bates financial statements for internal
and external reporting purpose.

- Preparation of regulatory reports for Central Bank
Preparation of statistical reports
Preparation of various client statements and customized
reports.
Assisting with the soondination of year-end audits.
Responsibility for the accounting activity of managed banks.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

University degree, preferably in accounting.

CPA, CA or equivalent.

Two (2) to three (3) years audit experience.

Strong communication, administrative, time management
and reporting skills.

Advanced level capbility in Micrsoft OTE

Analytical Skills.

Proficient in Microsoft Word.

Must be willing to take initiative and be a team player.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE
CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please send resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park
P.O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in
Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourge, London, Montreal,
Vancouver, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong .

Peo hrs ak sas Sah







PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE

oo ue
Plan to ‘transform’ Arawak, Potter’s Cay













NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXINSOND DECIUS, P.O.
BOX GENERAL DELIVERY, OF HOPE TOWN, ABACO,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ODERICK ST. JULISSE,
intend to change my name to ODERICK BENOIR. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box |
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.










| IBC NO. 121,086B

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
SECOND MANAGED FUTURES LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with the
International Business Companies Act 2000,

The date of commencement of dissolution was June
13th, 2006. Shameka Fernander of P.O.Box CB-
12345, 28 de La Plaine House, Parliament Street
Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed liquidator.

Shameka Fernander
Liquidator

IBC NO. 121,086B

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby. given that, in accordance with
panies Act 2000,

The date of commencement of dissolution was June
13th, 2006. Shameka Fernander of P.O.Box CB-
12345, 28 de La Plaine House, Parliament Street
Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed liquidator.

- Shameka Fernander
Liquidator

Established Bahamian Company
is seeking to fill the position of

‘FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum requirements:

Extensive experience in all aspects of
financial accounting including inventory
control, cost accounting and accounts
payable;

Proficient knowledge of accounting
principles and standards;

Excellent computer skills;

Good communication and management
skills; |
Must be driven, energetic, a team-worker;

Duties will include:
Preparation of complete set of financial
statements;
Cash flow management; __
Liaison with external auditors;
Management reporting;
Budget preparation, business plans and
special projects, as assigned.

Only qualified persons should apply.

If interested, please send detailed resume and
cover letter to fenassau@yahoo.com.

FROM page 1B

Arawak Cay and Beach pro-
ject revitalises the area west of
downtown to make it more
inviting for Bahamian tourists,
creating a western gateway to
the Bay Street area. Under-
utilised industrial land is pro-
posed for more densely popu-
lated uses that take advantage
of waterfront access and
views.” ,

The master plan blueprint
said the plans to revive
Arawak Cay could increase
spending in the area by up to
$77 million per year, with
tourists spending 98,000 more
days in the area per annum.

Property values, if the mas-
ter plan as implemented in full,
were projected to rise by $28
million, with cruise visitors
spending an additional 248,000
hours per annum on Arawak
Cay.

“The Arawak Cay and
Beach project calls for an

IBC NO. 121,086B

extensive redevelopment
focused on retail, office and
tourist uses,” the master plan
said.

“Nearly 750,000 square feet
of new retail, 195,000 square
feet of new hotel space, and
130,000 square feet of office
space are projected.

“Also, 35,000 square feet of
entertainment space is pro-
posed. Sixty-four acres of new
or revitalised park space is pro-
posed. Much of the new devel-
opment will be conducted by
private enterprise with public
guidance.”

The master plan said the
expanded Fish Fry, shopping
village and Fort Charlotte,
along with the expanded beach
area, were “expected to attract
Bahamians as wéll as tourists
to the Arawak Beach area”.

Also set for a makeover is
Potter’s Cay, which will incor-
porate a Gateway Park to
define the entrance to Nassau
from Paradise Island.

The master plan said: “Pot- ,

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with the ~
International Business Companies Act 2000, SEX TH.
MANAGED FUTURES LIMITED is in dissolu-

tion.

The date of commencement of dissolution was June
13th, 2006. Shameka Fernander of P.O.Box CB-
12345, 28 de La Plaine House, Parliament Street
Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed liquidator.

Shameka F ernander
Liquidator














seeking

NOTICE

International Offshore Bank
with Latin American ties is
an OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT. Familiar with
general office duties, loan
documentation,
Applicant must be. fluent in
SPANISH. Proven knowledge
of MS Office products. Please |
submit your resume to
Managing Director, P.O. Box
CB11903, Nassau,




filing.

NP.




TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites

applications from qualified teachers for positions available at
St. John’s College, St. Anne’s School, Bishop Michael

Eldon School, Freeport, and St. Andrew’s School, Exuma

Nassau.
Primary
Language / Literature
Mathematics
Freeport
French
Exuma
Science
Pre-School

Secretary

Only qualified Teachers , with Bachelor or Master Degrees from
an accredited University or College and Teaching
| Certificate need apply

For Further details and application forms, please contact the An-
glican Central Education Authority on Sands Road at-telephone

(242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and /or completed application forms with
copies of required documents must be sent by Friday, June 30th
2006.to the Anglican Education Department addressed to:-

ter’s Cay is reorganised to
include both industrial and cul-
tural uses. Maintained and
reorganised industrial uses
include shipping operations
and the fish exchange.
“Cultural /local market uses

include an expanded and |

improved Fish Fry, a new
marina, a farmer’s market, a
produce exchange and an
island exchange.”

The master plan proposed
the addition of more than

‘180,000 square feet of new

retail space on Potter’s Cay

‘through the local markets,

along with 9,000 square feet of
community space.

The master plan said: “Pot-
ter’s Cay will host a number



Bahamas.



Bahamas.

NOTICE

| NOTICE is hereby given that CHENET JOSEPH OF EAST
ST./ ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX N.P.-8180, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILBERT MESIDOR, #11
PINEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
‘| responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE is hereby given that BEAUNENFANT NOEL, P.O.
Box EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible’
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

of new local market destina-
tions, with the fish fry, the
island exchange and the

farmer’s market. Potter’s Cay«,

will become the primary place
for visitors and tourists to
experience the atmosphere of a
true Bahamian marketplace...

“New destinations and mar-
kets for tourists will encour-
age more spending in the Pot-
ter’s Crossing district. The esti-
mated impact of these projects
will be $34 million annually in
new tourist spending, andthe
creation of over 300 new jobs
in these markets.

“New parks and better
organisation of uses will result
in an increase in existing prop-
erty values.”











LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GRANDE TRAFALGAR INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 25th

day of June, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




















a Spot.




Activities:

Camperdown Riding Club

SUMMER CAMP!!

Weekly camps running June 26th - August 25th.
Yam - 3pm, Mon - Fri
Cost: $170.00/Week

Ages: 6+

Please contact Judy Pinder at 324-2065 between
the hours of 8am - lam & 2pm - 6pm to reserve
your spot. The camp only has 20 spots per week
and it is on a first come, first serve basis. There
is a deposit of $50.00 non-refundable to reserve

e Learn to ride English style.



















The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656

Nassau,Bahamas

e Swim with the horses.
° Grooming & tacking up.
© Basic care of horses.

e and lots more









.., THE TRIBUNE

*
HBL

& &
vee

8
9

25 FROM page 1B

had also arrived on the island.

Mr Perkins said the almost

. + $7 million contract for Bahami-

.:,an firm, Heavy Marine and

Foundation, to complete the

,- marina and project’s first phase

is, would see some 50 Bahamians

..employed at the construction
site.

He added that Montana
Holdings was still “awaiting
final approval from the Gov-
ernment” to begin construc-
tion of the marina, but once

; work began the developers
| Syould directly employ 10 staff,
ps “with the remainder hired by
‘Heavy Marine and Founda-



Mr Perkins said barged
deliveries of equipment to the
development site were arriv-
ing on Rum Cay every two
weeks, and the receipt of sub-
division approvals from the
Government mean that the
developers could now begin
building work.

Apart from 1,000 yards of
sand and gravel for the marina
construction, heavy machinery,
plant, trucks and trailers had
already been transported to
Rum Cay.

Mr Perkins said: “Every-
thing’s moving very well now.
We’ve transported all the
native trees from the marina
site. We’re not going down
there and bulldozing it all and

We’re taking it and moving it
to our nursery. It shows we’re
doing it right.”

Phase I of the project will
involve developing the 80-slip
‘marina, marina village and
associated condominiums and
estates.

The second Phase will
involve construction of the
development’s hotel and sur-
rounding amenities, and the
final phase will complete the
residential estates as well as
expand the marina village.

Montana Holdings said 300
workers would be employed
during peak construction, with
the Phase II hotel scheduled
to open by 2010. Phase IIT and
the Rum Cay Resort Marina’s





BUSINESS.

$700m resort
“moving very well now’

cenisletion by 2016.

In a previous interview with
The Tribune, John Mittens,
Montana Holdings chairman
said the developers would cre-
ate the “third largest airport
terminal in the Bahamas" to
service the resort.

“We would like to put in.
place a fixed base operation,"
Mr Mittens explained, point-
ing out that there were no air-
craft refuelling facilities in that
part of the Bahamas.

“We want to put in refu-
elling, storage and mainte-
nance facilfties at the airport."

He added that when com-
pleted, the Rum Cay terminal
would have all the essential
requirements, including immi-

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 7B

The hotel will be structured
around a. central facility that
will incorporate a spa, with the
accommodation featuring 50.

- cottages set in a garden-type,

authentic Bahamian setting.

The fractional ownership
component will consist of
about 80 units, and the project
will include other land and real
estate segments.

The developers are already
employing eight of Rum Cay's
existing inhabitants, out of a
total population of around 80. ,

With all financing in place |
to complete the project, Mr
Mittens said the Rum Cay
Resort Marina's "big market"
will be the US. He explained
that it "probably had the best



spa facilities and equestrian |
centre would prove attractive -
for wives and families when

the husband was out at sea.

The development is target-
ing active families and trav-
ellers, who are seeking adven-

ture and plenty of activities
‘during a vacation, whether it

be an extended vacation or’
weekend trip.

“The American market,
we've found, has boaters who
may want their boats left in
Rum Cay for dry storage," Mr
Mittens said. These clients.
would be able to fly into the
island from the US, and the
resort would have ensured
their boats were ready to go,
all prepared for a day's fish-









é Stion mowing everything down. _ full build-out are planned for ... gration and customs facilities. _ fishing in the world"; while the ing.

ad

6d

al

‘i, FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD. e FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.

| Consolidated Balance Sheet — (Unaudited) Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity (Unaudited)
j As of March 31, 2006 For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2006
' | (Expressed in Bahamian dollars) _ enblessed In Baliapal dots)
ie Ee a) =

7] Share Capital Share Capital’

10 31-Mat-06_ 31-Mar-05 _ 31-Dec-05_ Ordinary Preference Revaluation Retained

ee Shares Shares Surplus Earnings Total_

") ASSETS : | 7
lis Atat1 January 2005 ~ $ 5,000,001 $ 10,000,000 $ 1,735,925 $ 7,996,358 $ 24,732,284 |
| ON Cash on hand and at banks $ 8398688 $ 15,028,767 $ 10,098,542 is
‘1 Investment:in securities 21,656,293 17,613,500 22,128,439 Property, plant and equipment revaluation (40,605) 40,605 : i
ee 4 7 NetIncome - 3,669,343 3,669,343.

Mortgages, consumer and other loans 100,835,773 92,711,522 101,766,790 Dividends ld ony haves (686,667 (686,667

ih Property, plant and equipment 6,934,241 6,964,899 7,051,337 Dividends paid/payable preference shares - : : (750,000) (750,000)
rele OMe axsee 923,044 1,856,900 1,092,718 as at31 December 2005 5,000,001 10,000,000 4,695,320 "10,289,899 26,984,960

$ = 138,748,039 $ 134,175,588 $ 142,137,827 ;

d As at 1 January 2006 5,000,001 10,000,000 1,695,320 10,289,639 26,984,960
i Of LIABILITIES ; : : Property, plant and equipment revaluation (9,017) 9,017 -
| 0} Customer deposits $ 108,839,824 $ 104,482,870 $ 109,774,426 Net Income ae 464,486 464,486
: “7, Mortgage-backed bonds at 755,500 - Dividends paid ordinary shares = ae
| nope Long: “term angie. | ie 450,000 ete 650'000 : *"590:000° =a ~» Dividends paid/payable preference shares mpifehtaad 2 petty t at (187,500) (187,500) :
nal Other liabilities and accrued expenses 1,296,661 2,443,209 3,990,087 pe ato March eG 5 SONOS ILO 8 So Ee ee
u 110,586,485 108,331,579 114,264,512
ve EQUITY
; | Capital & reserve attributable to the
Bank's equity holders: Be
' Share capital - ordinary shares 5,000,001 5,000,001 5,000,001

Share capital - preference shares 10,000,000 10,000,000 — 10,000,000 FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.

Revaluation surplus _ 1,686,303 1,725,774 1,695,320 Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
Retained earnings 10,575,643 8,268,329 10,289,639 ~ For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2006
27,261,947 24,994,104 26,984,960 ff — (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

i Minority interest 899,607 849,905 888,354 —_——— __ .00€—CO( CC
Bi 28,161,554 25,844,009 - 27,873,315 co ce StMar06 = SMar5 | St-Deo-05
By SETI Ry) pe Sea tere ea ps tae ash flow from operating activities \

by $__ 138,748,039 $__ 134,175,588 $_142,137,827_ Net income (before minor interes) $ A757 §~— «456,358 $3,714,830
ee Adjustments for: \
Net change in provision for credit losses ~ 444,312 17,510 310,237
~ Depreciation i 160,699. 76,193 489,269

i : - Operating income before changes in operating
» | FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD. assets and liabilities —TTTT8A 560,061 4,514,336

: Consolidated Statement of Income — (Unaudited) Decreasel(increase) in mortgages, consumer and other loans ~ 789,706 (49,570) (9,361,477)
i For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2006 Decrease/(Increase) in other assets 169,674 (401,263) 292,546
ta . . Decrease in customer deposits (934,602) (219,824) 4,733,246

: (Expressed in Bahamian dollars) | ~Inrease in oher ibis and aorrued expenses (2,880,926) _ (536,070) __1,536,964
3 Months Ending © Net cash flows used in operating activities (2,078,396) (655,666) 1,715,615
31-Mar-06 31-Mar-05
: Income ‘ Cash flows ftom investing activities

| , Purchase of government securities : (2,491,500)
i Haha pees : $ ae $ ee Purchase of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss (527,859) (2,828,639)
Nee eee $$ Sale of government securities : 805,200
Net Interest Income - 1,712,570. 1,533,106 Sale of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss 4,000,000 :

' : Purchase of property, plant & equipment (43,603) - (461,229)
‘ Sale of property, plant & equipment - 38,285 -

; Non-Interest Income 808,101 633,577 SEINE EES cP oS
i : Sa aR Net cash flows provided by investing actitivies 428,542 38,285 (4,976,168)
' | Total Income 2,520,674 2,166,683 ee ee ee CR TERE Raat

. ; Cash flows from financing activities
, Expenses Maturity of mortgage-backed bonds (755,543)

; Salary and staff benefits 934,561 826,756 Payments of mortgage-backed bonds (42)

G aint Ordinary dividends paid (666,667)

a ae administrative 816,467 789,866 Preference dividends rai ’ (707.992)

‘ Depreciation 160,699 76,193 Repayment of long-term loans (50,000) (50,000) (200,000)
i Loss on Sale of Fixed Assets 2 i Net cash flows used in financing actitivies (50,000) (50,042) (2,330,202)
{ Total Non-Interest expense 1,911,727 1,692,815 Decrease in cash and cash equivalents (1,699,854) (667,423) (5,590,755)

Provision for credit losses 133,203 17,510 Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year 10,098,542 15,696,191 15,689,298

TotabExpenses 2,044,930 1,710,325 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period $ 8,398,688 : $ 15,028,767 $ 10,098,542

Net income $ 475,741 $ 456,358

i Attributable to: a5
4 Equity holders of the bank 464,486 449 320
j Minority Interest 11,254 7,038
‘ 475,741 456,358
: Weighted average number of $ 16,666,670 $ 16,666,670
; common shares outstanding ;

Earnings per share $ 0.03 $ 0.03



PAGE 8B . THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS 2







FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Chairmart’s Review

RP.

Of the Results) 7.) «.

> ‘

For the six months ended April 30, 2006

iyo

t

The consolidated net income of FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited for the
first six months of the 2006 fiscal year was $55.3 million, an increase of 14% over last year.
Earnings per share for the period was 46 cents, anincrease of 5.7 cents over last year. :

Net interest income for the Bank continued to improve and totaled $71 million for the ‘six

months ended April 30, 2006. This represented a $10 million or 16% improvement over the same
period last year, as total loans were 34% higher than last year with significant growth in

residential mortgages and business loans, additionally, US interest rates continued to increase.

Operating expenses for the period were $31.9 million, $1.7 million higher than the same period
last year primarily because of the gain on the sale of a building last year. The ratio of expenses

to revenue improved by 1.6% over last year to 35.5% for the first six months of this fiscal year.

fe :

Total assets of the Bank at April 30, 2006 were $3.8 billion representing a 13% growth or $433

million from last year. Total loans grew by $588 million to $2.3 billion as residential mortgages -

and business loans grew by $115 million and $416 million respectively. Total deposits for the
bank also increased 13% or by $374 million from last year to $3.15 billion. Both the return on
equity and the return on assets continued to reflect the Bank’s strong performance. The returri
on equity was 28% and the return on.assets rose to 3,05% for the six month period; which was

an improvement from the same period last year.

The Directors have declared an interim dividend of 25 cents per share, (April 2005 - 20 cents per
share), payable on July 5, 2006 to shareholders of record at the close of business on June 27,
2006.

We are looking forward to the continuation of the Bank’s strong performance and profitability,

as the economy remains strong and the market conditions favorable.

Consolidated Balance Sheet
BS'000

Assets
Cash and advances to banks
Securities
Loans
Goodwill
Fixed assets
Other. assets
Total assets
Liabilities

Total deposits
Other liabilities

Total liabilities

Shareholders' Equity

Share capital & reserves
Retained earnings

Total abilities and shareholders’ equity

i]

Ic. Sar
Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman

.FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Unaudited Unaudited Audited
April 30, 2006 April 30, 2005 October 31, 2005
647,046 ai 791,661
563,847 497, 468,811
2,305,917 1,717,444 1,972,392
187,747 187,747 187,747
30,115 33,066 31,764
47,231 55,270 57,761
3,781,903 3,348,930 3,510,142
3,154,207 2,780,501 2,856,737
29,561 16,587 73,685
3,183,768 2,797,088 2,930,422
432,983 416,464 417,281
165,152 _ 135,378 162,439,
598,135 551,842 579,720
3,781,903 3,348,930 3,510,142



FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Income 4
BS'000 ‘ ‘
: : a :
se Unaudited Unaudited Audited
Quarter Ended Six Months Ended Year Ended
. ril 30, 2006” ril 30, 2 April 30, 2006 ril 30, 2005 October 31, 2005
Pa . .
Total interest income : 55,419 ~ 45,364 108,783 90,619 | * «188,119
Total interest expenses (19,960) «_(15,000) * G7,977) (29,620) : (61,650)
Net interest income 35,459 “30,364 ‘70,806 ° 60,999 126.469
Non-interest income 1,716 9,865 id 18,928 20, 39,100
af 43,235 40.229: : 89,734 81,233 165.569
Non-interest expenses 15,443 14,365 : 31,960 30,164 62,158
Provision for credit losses’ 1,695 1,140 536 2,680 3,918
Se ean nS Lik
an 17,138 SSS 34,436 32,844 66.076
Net income : 8024724 55,298 48,389 99.493

—_— SSeS

Weighted average number of common ‘
shares outstanding for the period ~

Earnings per share (in cents)



aa, Ne 5c pions

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders' Equity
BS'000 4

Balance at October 31, 2004

Net income for the period
Dividends
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands

Balance at April 30, 2005

Balance at October 31, 2005

Net income for the period

Dividends

Revaluation gains/(losses)

Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks.& Caicos Islands
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve

Balance at April 30, 2006

st RET SS

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
BS'000

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities /
Net cash used in financing activities

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period ;
sf

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited .
Notes to Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

Six Months Ended

April 30, 2006

1. Accounting Policies

120,216,204





120,216,204 120,216,205
46.0 40.3 82.8
Share Capital & .
Reserves Retained Earnings Total
414,364 110,728 525,092
48,389 48,389
(21,639) (21,639)
2,100 (2,100) a
416,464 135,378 551,842.
417,281 162,439 579,720
55,298 55,298
(36,066) (36,066)
(817) (817)
4,000 (4,000). -
12,519 ~ (12,519) ——
3 432,983 165,152 "598,135
Unaudited Unaudited
Six Months Ended Six Months Ended
April 30, 2006 April 30, 2005
. (56,846) 12,793
(36,066) (21,639)
51,703 985
(144,615) (7.861)
742,111 819.798
597,496 $11,937

Pie

' &

These consolidated interim financial statements are > Prgpared in accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies used in the
. preparation of these consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October

31, 2005.

The consolidated interim financia) statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:

FirstCaribbean Intemational Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited:
FirstCaribbean Intemational (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited

2. Comparatives

Where necessary, comparative figures have been adjusted to comply with changes in presentation in the current period.

i
}
i

‘8











THE TRIBUNE

SS

The Tribune ’

Obstacles remain for businesswomen

@ By JIM WYSS
The Miami Herald

MIAMI (AP) — Shoving
aside an oversized spool of elec-
tfical cable and casually grab-
bing a pair of wire cutters to pose
for a picture, there’s little doubt
that Mercedes LaPorta feels at
ease in her sprawling warehouse
in Medley, surrounded by more
than $3 million in electrical sup-
plies.

: But there was a time it wasn’t
so comfortable being a woman
in a man’s world. In the early
days of her company, she would
send male employees to bid on
contracts and act as the public
face of Mercedes Electric Sup-
ply — the company she started
with her husband 27 years ago.

“I stayed in the background,”
said LaPorta, the company’s
president. “I would have been at
a disadvantage at that point —
but we’re talking years ago when
there were very few women in
construction.”

' Now, there are more than
14,500 women-owned construc-
tion firms in Florida alone.
Nationwide businesses run and
owned by women are booming.
By some accounts, women are
thajority owners of 48 percent of
the nation’s privately-held com-
panies.
* But even as gender barriers
topple, obstacles remain. Of the
billions of dollars that Fortune
{,000 companies spend on out-
side suppliers, only 4 percent
goes to women-owned enter-
prises, according to the Center
for Women’s Business Research.
~ Trying to bridge this gap is one
feason entrepreneurs like LaPor-
ta are turning to organizations
Such as the Women’s Business
Enterprise National Council, or
yen,
’ Founded in 1997, WBENC
represents almost 7, 000 women-
@wned business members and
works with more than 700 major
corporations to encourage busi-
ness ties.
From June 26-29, the organi-

b

ites
Siren nose

zation is hoping to broker such
supplier deals during its annual
conference, which will be held
at the Miami Beach Convention
Center. The three-day event is
expected to draw more than 300
corporate sponsors and about
2,500 participants.

The conference is unique
because of the caliber of corpo-
rate executives that will be pre-
sent, said Nancy Allen, the pres-
ident and CEO of The Women’s
Business Development Center
in Pinecrest —a WBENC affili-
ate. “It’s very exclusive and very
powerful in that there is the
opportunity to walk out of there
with contracts,” she said.

One of the keys to WBENC’s

. success with corporate America

has been its certification process.
It’s one of the few organizations
that carries out onsite visits to
verify that its women members
truly own and operate their com-
panies -- and are not merely
fronts for male partners.

WBENC certification costs
$300 and can take up to 90 days
to complete but is recognized by
a wide swath of corporations and
government bodies, Allen said.
In Florida more than 300 com-
panies have been certified, and
most buck popular conceptions
about women-owned business-
es. “Many people think of them
as being very small,” said Allen.
“There’s that image of a mom at
home doing something part-
time.”

Yet 60 percent of the Florida
members have revenue between
$3 million and $5 million and
most have 20 to 25 employees.

Office Depot Director of Ven-
dor Development Robert
McCormis-Ballou said the com-
pany favors WBENC certifica-
tion because it’s a way to pro-

tect against liability. When the
company makes claims about
doing business with women, it
wants to make sure it can stand
behind them, he said.

‘Of the roughly $10 billion in
products Office Depot sold in
the United States and Canada in










IN THE SUPREME COURT

of First Street

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land comprising 3,108 square feet and situate on Samuel
Guy Street in the eastern part of Spanish Wells, St. Georges
Cay, Eleuthera, Bahamas and ae 37 feet west

2005, about $430 million came
from minority and women sup-
pliers, he said.

“Tf you aren’t going to do busi-
ness with corporations, you may
not find the value in WBENC
certification,” he said. “But if
you want to do business with cor-
porate America, WBENC certi-
fication is the license plate to get
you on that interstate.”

While WBENC holds sway in
the corporate world, most local
governments have their own cer-
tification process.

Both Miami-Dade and
Broward counties try to channel
10 percent of all contracts
through sheltered market pro-
grams. In Miami-Dade that pro-
gram includes certified small
businesses but not women- and
minority-owned businesses. (The
county was sued in federal court
and forced to make all econom-
ic development programs race
and gender neutral).

Broward County has a free

. certification process for women-

owned businesses that takes
about two hours to complete,
said Edgar Tapia, the county’s
manager of small business devel-
opment. Despite the ease of the
process, fewer than 300 compa-
nies have gone through certifi-
cation, he said.

One reason for the low num-
bers may be lingering fears that
it’s too complicated to do busi-
ness with the government.

“You have to do more paper-
work than you would (to do busi-
ness) with a private company,
but at the end of the day, it’s
worth it,” he said. “It might take
an hour or two hours of your
time to become certified, but you
never know, you might get a con-

tract.”

One of WBENC’s main initia-
tives is to gain local government
acceptance of its certification
process, which it maintains is
among the most rigorous.

That would be a step in the .

right direction, said LaPorta, who
has been certified through sev-
eral local governments.



2005
CLE/Qui/No. 01362




TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 9B



Hea

Fitness Run/Walk/Push
Entry Form



Date: Saturday Ist July, 2006,

Time:6:30am

Route: Main Entrance of the Central Bank, north of Frederick Street, to

Promotion Week 2006

{BS LN Me oo PL EL I We ey es ee

VS OFF 64 TH TET

Jo Fa We Pay OEE EVV EV BE EF

SATE Fe

Fie



Pee Ge ENE ROLE.

ee Ae eee ee



Hate



SW Sows ey Wea Oe



oyun lites

Bay Street, East on Bay Street to the “new” Paradise Island Bridge,
ascending the new,Bridge to Paradise Island Drive, east on Paradise Island
Drive to,the as about humps oint, rotating south to the od Paradise

AND |
























IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT
OF 1959



Beye
Oia am
anes

FROM page 1B ,



AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
LEONARD ALBURY

NOTICE OF PETITON







Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 13th day of
January, A.D. 2006.

ELSE LES RES EES ROPE RES eee eee ee ER ET Eta

=.




- The Petition of Leonard Albury of Samuel Guy Street in
the Eastern part of Spanish Wells, St. Georges Cay, Eleuthera another
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas showeth
in respect of:

Fand their families, Mr Scott

“said the Bahamian financial
yeservices industry with its

wealth management products -
international Business Com-
» panies (IBCs), trusts and foun-
‘dations - held an obvious
attraction.

“They want separation or to
get some of their wealth out-
.*side, and one way of doing it is

‘=to exploit our financial ser-
‘vices, our products,” Mr Scott
»=said.



ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in the
Settlement of Spanish Wells, St. Georges Cay, Eleuthera,
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded on the
north by Samuel Guy Street and running thereon Thirty-
eight and forty-five hundredths feet (38.45’) and on the
east by land the property of Ethlyn Pinder and running
thereon Eighty-three and seventy-two hundredths feet
(83.72’) and on the south by land the property of Ceily
Higgs and running thereon Thirty-six and sixteen
hundredths feet (36.16) and on the west partly by land
the property of Louis Higgs and running thereon Twenty-
five and fifty hundredths feet (25.50’) and partly by land
the property of Garth Albury and running thereon Fifty-
_ five and forty-seven hundredths feet (55.47’).

Companies

He added that Chinese com-
panies and institutions could °
also use the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
«i(BISX) as a way to raise capi-
> tal, given that their home gov-
-sernment had “put the brakes”
on financing to prevent the
ne “economy from overheating.
*> To generate “an infusion of
~inward capital”, Mr Scott said
=these Chinese companies could
rafloat on BISX, “allowing them
“to penetrate” the mutual funds
-“market and brokerage houses
‘ein Latin and North America.
“. Callenders & Co'earlier this
“year became the third Bahami- °
“an law firm to open a London
~office, which will act as the
“bridge between the Bahamas
“and both the Far East, notably
"he China, and eastern Europe.

eer creas

The Petitioner, Leonard Albury, herein claims to be the owner in
fee simple in Possession of the said piece of land and has made
application to The Supreme Court Of The Commonwealth Of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his title to the said piece of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that
Act.







Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape marks
and dimensions of the said piece of land may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:












(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Bice North,
Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joseph C. Lédée, Suite No. 6, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(c) The office of the Commissioner/Administrator, Spanish Wells,

Eleuthera.

Please Print
Size:



Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower or right to
Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall on
or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication
of these presents file at the Registry of The Supreme Court in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas, and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a Statement of his/her Claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

Contact:
Walk: O

Institution:

Run: O Stroller (Push): O




Signature of Participant: Date:
Payment Method:
Cash

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement Of Claim
on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to such claim.







Dated this 12th day of June, A.D. 2006

ChequeO

Available Sizes: 3X-Large, 2X-Large, Large, Medium, Small
(T-Shirt or Tank-tops)

JOSEPH C. LEDEE, ESQ.
Chambers
Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorney for the Petitioner





TRIBUNE SPORTS:-.

+

PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

Bas
shor



SPORTS



t kraine
bounce
back for
viktory

eoe-- --
I Alm meee

etball teams fall
of qualification





-@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

IT’S back to the drawing
board for the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation (BBF), as
both the senior men and wom-
en’s teams failed to qualify for
the next round at the
Caribbean Basketball Cham-
pionships (CBC).

The event is the first step of
a three step qualification
process for the Olympic
Games. At this tournament
(CBC) the top three finishers
in each division advance to the
CentroBasket Championships
with the top finishers from the
CentroBasketball Champions
tournament moving onto the
Tournament of Americas
qualifying tournament.

The Tournament of Ameri-
cas is the last step for partici-
pation in either the World
Games and the Olympic
Games.

At the CBC tournament,
held in Jamaica last week, the
men’s team were able to finish
up in the second spot in their
pool, but when the final results
were in the Bahamas men
were fourth overall.

Qualifying in the men’s divi-
sion were Jamaica, the Virgin

Islands and Cuba.



_ syn

Available from Commercial New



Fourth place finishes for
men and women’s sides

On the women’s side the
Bahamas team had to settle
for a fourth place finishing,
with five points. Moving onto

the next round in this division
were Jamaica, Virgin Islands

and Barbados.

According to the BBF vice
president Larry Wilson, both
teams put in a gallant effort
in the tournament, but had
several factors that con-
tributed to a late start and the
namics that appeared on the
|2-rnan roster sheet.

Wilson said: “It.is extreme-
ly disappointing because we
put a huge effort into trying
to. get the teams ready for
competition this year. .

“It is disappointing in the
men’s case that we didn’t get
all the players we wanted to
get to come back home, but
we still thought that the teams
we sent were good enough to
make it out of this round and
our strategy was to try and
beef up the teams as they

_ mov ed on.

“We did get some type of
verbal commitment from
some of the other players that
should we qualify they would
be able to attend the later
qualifying tournaments.
Unfortunately we didn’t qual-
ify, this is just another sign
that we have to be a lot more
serious, as a total country
towards sports and put more
effort in trying to get our top
players home, in particularly
our team sports.”

Champions

The Bahamas men’s team
opened up the tournament
against defending champions
Cuba. Although the team did-
n’t have a big man present in
the center, they lost their first
match-up by six points.

The team was able to
regroup in the next two
games, against St Vincent and
the Grenadines and Antigua,
defeating them 75-62 and 83-

_ 67 respectively.

—_

Commenting on the fact
that the CBC champions,
Jamaica, were among two
teams that were able to utilise
the majority of their profes-
sional players to qualify, Wil-
son said that in order for the
Bahamas to contest with pro-
grammes such as the Jamaican
one, then assistance from the
Bahamian professional and
ole players will be need-
ed

“It takes a lot to try and get
the professional players out

of Europe and South Ameri- ~

ca. Then we have the players
in college who can also-assist
the programme, but it is very
difficult getting these players
home.

“Besides the scheduling of
the Caribbean tournaments,

_ most of the professional play-

ers will lose out on money or

their playoffs are going on |

around that time. So all of
these things need to be con-

sidered, how can we go about |

trying to get them home to

.

4 :

represent their country from
the very first qualifying tour-
nament.

“This will be the only way
we can ensure that we do
move on‘and hopefully make
it into the Olympics.

“We had a solid group of
ball players locally based who

were coming out to practise:
“and we still had some hopes of

bringing in some of the pro-
fessional players at the last
minute, they were trying to
get home and then they final-
ly confirmed that they will not,
be able to make it at the last
minute.

“So that kind of left us in a
fix and disappointed, and so
we had to work with what we
had.

“Despite all of this we still

didn’t think that the team was

a bad team, we view it as a
solid team.

“Our hat goes off to them
because they played some
pretty good games, to lose to
Cuba by six points, that’s
remarkable.”

The BBF executive mem-
bers are crossing their fingers,
hoping that the since Olympic
Games are scheduled for 2008,
officials in the governing body
will make a conscious decision
to host the bi-annual tourna-
ment next year.

WCopyrighted Material

dicated Content #
cC =

Cyclists in action ahead of championships

“CYCLING
; By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter se

WITH the Independence National
-Road Cycling Championships going to

‘North Andros next month, the New’

“Providence Cycling Association will
‘hold a pre-showdown on Saturday.
The association will hold a 50- mile
“cycling race that will start and finish 4
“the Coral Harbour round-a-bout
8am.
_ “In the month of June, we just hoid
‘one event because we utilise the month
‘for training for the nationals,” Mus-
«grove stressed. “This is an event we
snormally stage two weeks before as a
~tune up to see where the cyclists are.”
The cyclists will be tested over a route
that will leave Coral Harbour and head
west along the airport road, past both
round-a-bouts coming out to JFK Drive.

On JFK Drive, the cyclists will turn
left to Old Fort Bay, onto Lyford Cay to
Clifton Pier, onto South Ocean, passed
Adelaide and back onto Coral Harbour.

The cyclists will travel around the
round-a-bout again, pass Adelade onto
South Oc xan to Clifton Pier and Lyford
Cay, turning around at Templeton and
back the same route to the finish line.

Competitors

The junior competitors will go
straight to Clifton Pier onto Lyford Cay,
turning around at Templeton and head
back to Coral Harbour. They will then
travel all the way to the round-a-bout at
the airport und back to the finish line.

“We are just trying to encourage all of
the cyclists to come out to see where
their weaknesses and strength is right

“now,” Musgrove pointed out.

4

Cyclists from Grand Bahama are
expected to participate in the tune-up
meet, which will get the national team
ready for the Central American and
Caribbean Championships as well.

Already, selected to the team that
will be heading to Colombia next month
are Johnathan Massie, Barron Mus-
grove, Johnny Hoyte from Grand
Bahama.and Tracy Sweeting.

Kevin Richardson, the top junior
cyclist, has also been included on the
list of names that has been submitted to
the Bahamas Olympic Association for
ratification.

The team is expected to be finalised
at the completion of the Independence
National Road Championships that will
be held in North Andros on Saturday,
July 8 as a part of the regatta festivities.

“We have decided to stage the nation-
al road championships in the Family
Islands to gain some interest and search

out persons who we could leave to con-
tinue to work with the programme,’
Musgrove noted.

The programme was staged in

Eleuthera, then moved to Exuma and.

was held in Grand Bahama last year.
Next year, the championships are tipped
to be staged in Abaco.

“The event will start at the Bluff
where all of the regatta activities are
being held and it will finish there,” said
Musgrove of the estimated 70 mile
course on a 15-mile loop that they
intend to ride several times.

After the national champion is
crowned, if the cyclist is not already
selected to the national team, they will
be named to the team, pending ratifi-
cation from the BOA.

At least 20-30 competitors, half of
which are juniors, are expected to
participate in the national champi-

_ onship.’

4

————_~ ~ ——-

s Providers



TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 11B





BETTY BERNADINE, manager of the Colony Club (centre) receives a plaque from Frank
‘Pancho’ Rahming (left) and Sharon Harris (right), members of the organising committee of the
25th Primary Schools Track and Field Championships that were held in May at the Thomas A.

Robinson Track and Field Stadium.





§ FLORADELL ADDERLEY accepts an appreciation award for her late husband, Leviticus
‘Uncle Low Adderley, from the organising committee of the 25th Primary Schools Track and Field
Championships. Making the presentation are from left Sharon Harris (committee member) and right

Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming) (chairman).

Co

|
{





i BRIAN JACQUES, manager of Contract Services of BTC (centre) receives a plaque on behalf
of BTC for their sponsorship of the 25th Primary Schools Track and Field Championships that
were held in May at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Making the presentations
were committee chairman Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming (left) and Sharon Harris, committee mem-

ber.



@ COMMITTEE chairman Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming (left) and committee member Sharon Harris make
a presentation to Juan Moss, manager of Leisure Tours Limited, for their contribution to the 25th Pri-

mary Schools Track and Field Championships.

tribution to Primary School

track and field events recognised

ALTHOUGH she has been
here from its inception, Mon-
ca Woodside was thrilled to
1ave been remembered for
yer contribution to the 'Pri-
mary Schools Track and Field
Championships over the past
25 years. |



And Floradell Adderley |

said her late husband, Leviti-
cus ‘Uncle Lou’ Adderley,
would have been pleased as
well with the gesture from the
organising committee of the

and Housing’s annual
event. oes
After a year’s absence, the
meet returned to the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Asso-
ciations’ calendar in May and

was termed a tremendous suc-

cess.

However, Frank ‘Pancho’ |
Rahming, chairman of the
organising committee, said the
meet couldn’t have been a

Ministry of Youth, Sports



Knowles and Nestor
knocked out in semis

@ TENNIS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

BAHAMIAN tennis player Mark Knowles
and his Canadian doubles partner
Daniel Nestor were eliminated in the semi-
finals of the annual Stella Artois Champi-
onships, at Queen’s Club in London on Satur-
day.

Defeating Knowles and Nestor were second
seeded Jonas Bjorkman and Max Mirnyi with
a score of 6-7 (5), 7-6 (4) and 10-7.

Knowles and Nestor, who came into the tour-
nament in the third spot, were able to defeat
Tripp Phillips and partner Dmitry Tursunov in
the first round 6-7(4), 7-6 (6) and 13-11. They

then moved on to play Frantisek Cermak and
Leos Friedl, defeating them in two sets 7-5 and
6-4.

It is not to certain which one of the three
upcoming tournaments Knowles and Nestor
will participate in as they continue on in the
ATP doubles race.

On the Stanford ATP Doubles ranking list
Knowles is just ahead of partner Nestor with a
score of 3,965 points for sixth place while
Nestor has accumulated 3,810 points for sev-
enth place.

On the ATP doubles race the duo are in
third place with a score of 456 points. Leading
the way are the American twins Bob and Mike
Bryan with 630 points and Bjorkman and
Mirnyi are in second with 623 points.

Organising committee
gives thanks for support —

success without the support.

they received from patrons
such as Woodside and Adder-
ley.

The duo were recently hon-
oured, along with sponsors
Bahama Telecommunications
Company Limited, Leisure
Travel & Tours Limited and
the Colony Club for their con-
tribution.

Woodside, 74, said she was
appreciative of receiving the
plaque because she has been
involved in the meet since it
got started, stemming from
her involvement in track and
field from 1976.

Even though she’s not as
actively involved now because
of her age, Woodside said “the
athletes were more interest-
ed” than they are today.

And, as a word of advice to -

those involved, Woodside
offered: “Stay there and work
hard.”

Rahming said Adderley was
so keen on assisting the sport
that he eventually formed the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials and that was
why he was being honoured.

‘Uncle Lou’, as he is
remembered by his wife, had a
passion for the development
of young people. He died on

May 24, 2003 at the age of 71.

“His heart’ was in sports and
wherever children were, he
thought that he could bring
out the best in them,” she

reflected. “He thought that .
-every child could achieve his

greatest potential.”

While Adderley has left his
mark on athletes such as Lav-
ern Eve and twin sisters Dawn
and Dianne Woodside, his
daughter, Daria is keeping his

continue to make their con-
tribution.

Brian Jacques, manager of
Contract Services at BTC, said
it’s their job to keep “the com-
munity growing and this is one
way they can do that,” so they
will continue to provide the:
transportation to assist

- with the transfer of the ath-

letes.
And Juan Moss, manager of
Leisure Travel & Tours Lim-



“His heart was in sports and
wherever children were, he

though

t that he could bring

out the best in them. He
thought that every child could
achieve his greatest potential.”



Floradell Adderley commenting on her late
husband, Leviticus ‘Uncle Low’ Adderley

legacy alive by coaching swim-
ming and soccer.

The Colony Club, accord-
ing to Rahming, has played a
vital role in the housing of
some of the Family Island
teams that participate in the
meet.

Betty Bernadine, the hotel’s
manager who accepted the

‘plaque on behalf of owner

Harrison Petty, said they are
appreciated of the gesture by
the committee and they will

ited, said for as long as he
could remember, his father;
the late Richard Moss, was
there for the committee and
he will pledge the company’s
continued support on his
behalf.

‘It’s good. It makes my
heart glad. I only wish my
father was here,” he lamented.
“We do it to assist the Family
Islanders. We’re grateful that
we can take this plaque and
hang it up in the office.”





TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Bahamas
miss out
on Zone II
promotion

@ TENNIS

By BRENT STUBBS"

Senior Sports
Reporter

THE Bahamas youth-
ful team came so close
to returning to the
American Zone II in
their Davis Cup tie, but
fell short at the end and
will remain in Zone III
next year.

Playing in a round
robin tournament at the
Maya Country Club in
Nueva, San Salvador,
E] Salvador, the
Bahamas finished third
in the playoffs with a 1-
4 win-loss record on
Sunday.

The Bahamas team,
captained by John Far-
rington, needed to fin-
ish in the top two spots
in order to advance.
However, they were »
beaten out by undefeat-
ed El Salvador and
Cuba, who were 2-1. .

Both El Salvador and
Cuba blanked the
Bahamas 3-0 in their

-playoff action as the

combination of Marvin
Rolle and Devin
Mullings found the
competition a little
stiffer than it was in the
round robin tourna-
ment.

Playing as the num-
ber two seed, Rolle suf-
fered a 6-1 and 6-4 deci-
sion to Jaime Cuellar in
the first match against
E] Salvador as the play-

offs got underway.

Control

In the same fashion in '

the second match, top
seed Mullings also lost
6-1 and 6-4 to Rafael
Arevalo-Gonzalez as
the host nation took °
control.

Rolle and Mullings,
however, tried to make
it an interesting tie as
they took the team of
Arevalo-Gonzalez and
Cuellar to three sets
before they lost the
doubles 7-5, 2-6 and 6-
T.

In their second play-
off action, which ulti-
mately stopped the
Bahamas from return-
ing to Zone II, Rolle
lost 7-5, 3-6 and 6-3 to
Edgar Hernandez-Perez
in the opening match
against Cuba.

And in the second
match, Mullings
dropped identical set
scores of 6-2 and 6-2 to
Ricardo Chile-Fonte in
the first of the two
playoffs.

Once again, Mullings
and Rolle went on to
play in doubles, losing
6-1 and 7-5 to Favel-
Antonio Freyre-Perdo-
mo and Sandor Mar-
tiniez-Breijo.

The Bahamas came
out of the Pool A round
robin tied for first place
with Puerto Rico at 2-1
after beating Puerto
Rico and Trinidad &
Tobago, only to lose to
Honduras.

Rolle and Mullings
were successful in the
two matches against
Puerto Rico and
Trinidad & Tobago.
But the combo of
H’Cone Thompson and
Chris Eldon lost to
Honduras.

Farrington and mem-
bers of the team were
not available for com-

‘ments as they were in

transit from E] Salvador
up lo presstime.

BAAA national

Wins for Bar
and Moxey



















































Thompson’s record
eC R ia ances s

li TRACK AND FIELD
By ANDRE DAVIS:

TIAVANNI Thompson missed out on a national record per-
formance due to the weekend weather.

The sudden downpour on the second day of competition in the
Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) Nationals,
brought some strong winds that athletes had. to fight their way
through.

Thompson, who had already lowered the national record three
times this year, ran 13.44 seconds for the win, which would have
erased the old marking of 13.60 seconds set by her in May. The wind
reading was recorded at +2.7, an illegal marking. Finishing second
was Lencie Rolle in 14.66 seconds, Krystal Bodie was third in
14.81 seconds with Shannice Wright coming in fourth in a time of
15.84 seconds.

Romona Nicolls would get the better of Santisha Martin in the
women’s 1500m run, clocking a time of 4:57.50 seconds for the
win. Martin posted a final time of 5:23.60 seconds.

As in the women’s 1500m, only two men lined up — O’Neil
Williams and Lesley Dorceval. At the end of the event Williams
walked away with the national title in a time of 3:56.59 seconds to
Dorceval’s 4:29.09 seconds.

The women’s 400m hurdles event belonged to Michelle Cum-
berbatch, who edged out teammates Krystal Bodie and Tess"
Mullings. Cumberbatch won the event in a time of 1:05.39 sec-
onds, Bodie was second in 1:06.40 seconds while Mullings finished
up third in 1:07.21.

Two Carifta teammates Carlyle Thompson and Kayuse Bur-
rows challenged Commonwealth Games participant Douglas Lynes-
Bell for the crown in the men’s 400m hurdles event.

But, at the end of the event, collegiate Lynes-Bell posted a time
of 51.30 seconds for the win over Thompson, who finished up sec-
ond in a time of 53.66 seconds and Burrows in 54.09 seconds.

i TIA VANNI THOMPSON competes at the weekend.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Basketball
and cycling

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

WHILE most of the atten-
tion was placed on the track
at the annual Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions (BAAA) Nationals, the
men’s high:jump and long
jump events’ were also
thrilling

This year saw more than
five Bahamian males clear
the 2.00m marking in the high

jump — Trevor Barry, Don-.

ald Thomas, James Rolle,
Jamal Strachan and Jamal
Wilson.

The leading jump coming
from the quintette was 2.13m,
cleared by Donald Thomas
at this year’s Commonwealth
Games, Barry was trailing

him with a clearance of.

2.11m.

Performances

This would be the second
time this year Thomas and
Barry would go head-to-
head in competition, but
they had to add Rolle’s,
Strachan’s ,and Wilson’s
performances into the le
tion.

Barry would get his
revenge on Thomas with a
winning leap of 2.16m to
Thomas’ 2.14m. Coming in
third place was Rolle with
2.08m.

The transition from the
high jump bed to the long
jump pit has never been a
problem for Barry and he
proved that once again



news



r ‘ ohn
: a ee x

e





with an impressive perfor-
mance.

In a loaded field, Barty
would go up against
Osbourne Moxey and Adrian
Griffith.

The weekend meet reset
serve as a test: for Moxey,
who hasn’t competed since
the Commonwealth Games..
But this would be one test
Moxey didn’t have to study
for, as he soared his way to a
national title with a leap of
8.07m. Barry would take sec-

ond place with a leap of

7.70m while Griffith was third.
with 7.59m.

Moxey said: “This | is. just
my first meet since Com-
monwealth Games so I am
pleased with my perfor-
mance.

_ “I think I did what I really
wanted to do, I executed on
all my attempts, even though
T had a few fouls and hiccups
here and there inside the run-
up. te,
“I was able to get a little
time off from work to con-
centrate on the meet, and I’
am very grateful for that.
Now I’m able to concentrate
on track and field for the
remainder of the summer, so
that is great.

“The outdoor season is just

getting started for me so I am:
looking forward to putting:
some big jumps out there. I:
am working on some things:

‘right now and hopefully:
everything will come into Bee :

spective by then.”
The senior Central Ameri-

_ can and Caribbean Games

‘™@ OSBOURNE MOXEY in action in the long jump.

will take place 25th-29th July,
in Cartenga, Colombia.

ow
-
8

o
“oe

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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Full Text




m Lhe Tribune

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SUNNY,

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Volume: 102 No.172

PIS aS)

STORM |



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TCM Un Tae



PMLA UIA sae TAT

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PU at

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION







Health officials BIE ereran

‘erred on the

side of caution’ |

B By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

HEALTH officials yesterday

- confirmed that the Haitian

detainee who had been quar-

antined following screening at

the Detention Centre had test-

ed positive for an “old infec-
tion” of malaria.

Speaking at a late press con-
ference, Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis, chief medical officer at
the Ministry of Health, said that
initially they-were unable to

“make a diagnosis of the patient
as it required a microbiological
distinction.

“So we erred on the’ side of
caution. We hospitalised the
individual, began treatment, and
then asked for additional review
of the slides. Once we got the
additional information, his
treatment was completed. He
was never symptomatic,” she
said. f ;

Dr Dahl-Regis could not con-
firm where the detainee was or
that he had been returned to
the Detention Centre. She
would only say that they are
“awaiting his repatriation”.

Minister of Health Dr B J
Nottage confirmed that of the
16 cases confirmed there were
12 new cases, and four. “old
infections”. } .

“Of the 12 cases with recent
infections, nine were Bahami-
ans, two were Uruguayans, who
_work in Exuma, and one Hait-
ian national, also employed.

* “All of the patients were
treated with Chloroquine and



&

all have: responded to their
treatment with no severe illness
or deaths. They will be closely
followed over the next several
weeks,” he said.

Dr Nottage-also informed the
media that the reports of a
Canadian “traveller” contract-
ing the disease while in Exuma
was, in fact, a Bahamian stu-
dent who had spent a period of
time on the island before
returning to Ottawa for school.

“I have spoken to his physi-
cian, who revealed that he was
not admitted to hospital
because his condition did not
require it. He has been treated
and was seen for evaluation
today. He has responded well
and is attending classes,” he
said.

Officials from the Pan Amer-
ican Health and World Health
Organisations confirm that the
population of the Anopheles
mosquito throughout their tests
has proven to be extremely low,
and even “non-existent” in most
of the surveyed locations. |

Also, health officials reported
that for the last six days, there
has been no transmission of
malaria on the island, and hope
that this a sign of them possible
gaining a handle on the spread.

However, in-spite of this good

-news, and noting that malaria

still kills about two million peo-
ple on average a year, the Min-
istry of Health states that they

will not “let up” on their efforts _

to combat the disease.

SEE page nine











m@ AN EMPTY
classroom at AF Adderley
Junior High School yester-
day. Of the 382 graduating
students from the school
this year, only five had a 3.0.
‘grade average or better.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

The Tribune

@ By MARK HUMES

FIGURES from one pub-
lic junior high school's grad-
uating class show that 78 per
cent of students will graduate
with less than a 2.0 grade
average, indicating that the
educational system is contin-
uing to fail Bahamian chil-
dren. ;

On Friday, A F Adderley
Junior High School held its
yearly commencement exer-
cise, and of the 382 graduat-
ing students, only five had
3,0 or better.

In addition to those five,
104 had a 2.0 or better, leav-
ing the remaining 273, or
two-thirds of the graduating
class, with a failing average.
Yet, despite their lack of
preparation, these students
seem poised to be socially
promoted in the fall, facing a
future for which they

SEE page 11

if































ie

Detainee’s malaria infection ‘ol







Decision on separate

trials expected today

SENIOR Justice Anita.
Allen is expected to decide
today whether murder sus-
pect Cordell Farrington, 38,
will be tried separately for
the murders of Jamaal
Robins, 22, and four Grand

‘Bahama schoolboys.

The matter was stood
down again yesterday after
Farrington's lawyer Romona
Farquharson asked for
another adjournment so as
to have time to put her sub-
missions into writing for Jus-
tice Anita Allen: Mrs Far-
quharson and prosecutors .
also met.in closed chambers
yesterday.

Local prosecutors want
separate charges to be laid
against Farrington for the
murders of Robins and the
schoolboys — Mackinson

‘Colas, 12, Junior Reme, 11,

DeAngelo McKenzie, 13,
and Desmond Rolle, 14. The
four boys disappeared
between May and Septem-
ber in 2003.

The four reportedly

worked as bag-packers at the
Winn Dixie Supermarket in
Freeport and played video
games nearby. Jamaal
Robins was not reported
missing until May, 2003,
although, according to
reports, it was believed he
had disappeared earlier.

Prosecutors say the cases
have been transferred from
Grand Bahama to New Prov-
idence Supreme Court to
avoid jury prejudice. Accord-
ing to them, Robins’ death
was in no way connected to
the deaths of the four boys.

However, Romona Far-
quharson, Farrington’s
lawyer, wants all of the mat-
ters to be combined.

Mrs Farquharson believes
it would be in the best inter-
est of her client to have the
five charges joined so that
her client will face one trial.
She maintains that the mur-
ders were all a part of a series
of events.

SEE page nine

yee

Distributed by:
Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, East West Highway
tel 242-894-1769 © fax: 242-394-1859 © email: bwabshameas@coralwave.com
in Freeport: tel; 242-351-2201 « fax: 242-851-2215

‘Significant
concern’ about
illegal drug
smuggling in
the Bahamas

THE intensity of local reac-

‘tion to the news that the US

might move air assets from
OPBAT shows there is signifi-

_ cant concern about illegal drug :

smuggling in the Bahamas, a =
top government official has *
claimed.

Permanent secretary Mr
Mark Wilson told a Narcotics
Joint Task Force at the Offices
of the Attorney General on
East Hill Street that this con-
cern greatly supports the work .
of OPBAT.

On Friday, Bahamas and US
government representatives

' held their semi-annual meeting,

which was co-chaired by Mr
Wilson, who led the Bahamian
delegation, and chargé d'affaires
Dr Brent Hardt, who headed
the US delegation.

In his opening remarks, Dr
Hardt empliasised US commit-
ment to OPBAT, noting that |
“pressures on the Army to meet
worldwide counter-terrorism
missions have prompted a close
review of OPBAT’s resource
needs and how best to meet
them.”

He emphasised that "there

should be no doubt, however,

that we remain committed to
OPBAT and are working with
senior officials in Washington
to identify other agencies to fill
the gap should the Army not
be able to continue its present
level of involvement with
OPBAT.”

The Joint Task Force, which
has been meeting regularly
since 1987, is a forum for senior
US and Bahamian officials to
review ongoing counter-drug
operations, assess progress
toward common goals, plan
future joint counter-narcotics
efforts, and examine ways to
collaborate more effectively to
further strengthen the already
close partnership that exists
between the US and the
Bahamas through Operations
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos
(OPBAT).

During the meeting, both
sides engaged in a “construc-
tive and detailed discussion” of
their joint counter-narcotics
efforts over the past year and
exchanged ideas about addi-
tional steps that could be taken
to improve the efficiency and
effectiveness of their bilateral

SEE page nine

ae
Lah jenanener ec
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006





THE TRIBUNE

Former CDR executives fare
_ better than former leader

T WAS not at all surprising that the
Coalition for Democratic Reform
folded its tent last week. The party was
wiped out in the last general election and
when its founding leader went back to the.
PLP recently it was obvious that yet anoth-
er attempt at establishing a viable third
party in the Bahamas would fail, like all
the others.
It is easy to start a political party. In a
. democracy like ours any group of citizens
can do it. They get together, draw up a
constitution and a platform, elect officers
and they are in business. In the Bahamas
the press will gladly afford their public
pronouncements and activities prominence
as if they were an established national par-
ty. ;
The Europeans are particularly good at
starting parties, especially the French and’
‘the Italians. It was said that any time three
Frenchmen got together to talk politics
that would be the beginning of another
party.

What is not so easy is to establish a par-
ty by organising nationally and getting a
foothold in parliament. Even the ones that
start out with a member, or members,
already in parliament have no guarantee of
survival. In this category the CDR follows
Sir Etienne Dupuch’s Bahamas Democ-
ratic League and Paul Adderley’s Nation-
al Democratic Party.

Perhaps the most remarkable story of
party organisation.in the Bahamas was
that of the PLP in 1953. Almost single-
handedly; the late Henry M Taylor estab-
lished branches throughout the islands and
kept in touch with them mainly through
the instrumentality of an old typewriter
and a manual Gestetner machine that
churned out circular letters.

ome of these letters disappeared
in the postal system as the powerful
Old Guard and its minions caught on to
what was happening; even Her Majesty’s
mail was not beyond their reach in those
days. But Sir Henry, assisted by volun-
teers who came in the afternoons to stuff .
envelopes, persisted. ; :
More important than Sir Henry’s dedi-
cated efforts was a confluence of events
that made the Bahamas ripe for the estab-
lishment and growth of a political
party with popular appeal across the
nation. :
Black Bahamians were becoming more
agitated over racial discrimination and.
that was exacerbated by the banning of
the movie No Way Out starring Sidney
Poitier; Sir Etienne fired the imagination
of black Bahamians when he moved his
_anti-discrimination resolution in the House
of Assembly in 1956, and, of course, there
was the general strike of 1958, the greatest
mass protest in the country’s history.
There had been many outstanding black’
politicians in the past but in the 1950s a
new cadre of younger and more militant



ea re

ices On The Island”





leaders was emerging. Among them were
Lynden Pindling, Cecil Wallace Whitfield
and Randol Fawkes. . :

The new black leadership abandoned
the old politics. of compromise, collabo-
ration and extracting concessions. They
were determined to remove the intransi-
gent Old Guard from power. The first

elected members of the PLP took their

seats in 1956.

In debating the future of third parties in
the Bahamas, some have pointed to the
FNM as an example of a third party which
achieved national status and permanence.
The facts do not offer much support for
this as the circumstances at the time were
unique and not likely to occur again. _

After the 1967 and 1968 general elec-
tions, the political division in the House of
Assembly was clearly along racial lines
and there was a good chance the UBP
would have been wiped out altogether. In
any event, the time had come to end racial
politics.

A few enlightened and perceptive mem-

bers of the UBP, led by Geoffrey John-
stone, understood this. So when in 1970 a
bloc of parliamentary members of the PLP
- the Dissident Eight - voted no confi-
dence in their leader and were suspended
fromthe party, Sir Geoffrey proposed the
dissolution of the UBP and turning over

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“The former
members of the CDR
who have joined the
FNM have got the
better part because
their credibility is
intact and they can
still do what they
intended to do in the
first place when
they left the PLP. ”



‘the responsibility for opposition to the
. Eight. |,

After all, this was not a minor parlia-
mentary defection and the Eight could
not credibly be accused of being Uncle
Toms. Some of them had been at the cen-
tre of a bitter, uncompromising and cost-
ly struggle against the Old Guard.
Indeed, one politician who had earlier
left the PLP was convinced at the time
that the party had lost its soul. Maybe

he had a point.

So in 1971 a new political party - the
FNM - was formed and assumed the role
of opposition, not third party. After a
disastrous splintering in 1977, the FNM
was reunified in time for the 1982 elec-
tion and has remained in parliament until
now.

Incidentally, the dissolution of the UBP
and formation of the FNM has been inac-
curately defined as a merger, and the
same thing is being done now with regard
to the CDR. In spite of the fact that for-
mer members of the CDR have joined

the FNM individually, some sections of ‘

the press still refer to it as a merger.

n the.case of the UBP, there can
be no question that Sir Geoffrey
_and his colleagues kept their promise to
dissolve the party even though some of
his die-hard members did not like the
idea and had great difficulty accommo-

dating themselves to the new reality in

Bahamian politics.

It may be of interest to note that while
Sir Geoffrey and his supporters fulfilled
their promise never to run for political
office in the Bahamas again, it was one or
two of the die-hards who insisted on stay-
ing!

In the case of the CDR it appears that

there are some who also do not agree
with what the executives have done and
plan to continue. If that happens they
may carry the name but it will be a far
different animal with even less chance



award.



STORE HOURS





STILL ALIVE

The Tribune wants to hear
i from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods: Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

of becoming a national party.

What is important is that the deck has
now been cleared — as far as that is ever
possible in politics — for a straight fight
between the PLP and the FNM in the
next election. There will be candidates
from other small parties, of course, and
independents as well, but circumstances
would seem to indicate that few, if any, of
them will survive.

The former members of the CDR who .
have joined the FNM have got the better’
part because their credibility is intact
and they can still-do what they intended

- to do in the first place when they left the

PLP. .

Like the Dissident Eight, they were’
disillusioned and wanted to help bring
better government to the Bahamas. So
they did not go back. Unlike the Dissi-
dent Eight, they may not have to wait so
long!

The former CDR leader, Dr Bernard
Nottage, is not in as good a position. His
going back to the PLP is unlikely to make
any fundamental difference with that par-
ty, as others who went back years ago
discovered in the long run.

r Nottage will enjoy the power
and glory for the time being
but he may have seriously damaged his
credibility with many people who had

' great confidence in him. They will ques-

tion why he abandoned his colleagues
and went, back. They will also question
why he left the PLP and started the CDR
in the first place.
" The answer may be found in an item on
Bahamas Uncensored, a website that
reflects the thinking of his PLP ministe-
tial colleague Fred Mitchell, Minister of
Foreign Affairs.

In November, 2005, BU carried an item
headed “Nottage Is Back”. It gave a brief

history of “retired Bahamian political |
parties” .and said all of them failed to_.
“fire the imagination of the country except

as a means of creating public debate.
Then BU added: “It was-not quite a
mistake because sometimes individuals
have to take marketing decisions to pro-
tect their futures. Dr Nottage-certainly
joins Paul Adderley and Fred Mitchell
in that category. Without their own indi-
vidual party political efforts, they would

not have seen the boost in their political -

careers that ultimately took them to the
very top.”

What a callous and cynical attitude!
Certain individuals start political parties
only as a marketing tactic to boost their
careers and protect their futures. At the
right moment they simply abandon their
sincere followers and their parties so they
can secure positions at the very top.

Incredible!

www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com


















i

oe |
‘ae le ee

We








THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Decomposed
remains are
discovered
in Abaco

FREEPORT - Police report
that the skeletal remairis of a
body were discovered on Sun-
day in Murphy Town, Abaco.

The decomposed remains
have reportedly been flown to
New Providence for an autopsy.

In the meantime, persons
missing a friend or relative, or
anyone with information that
can assist the investigation are
asked to call the Marsh Har-
bour police.

Chief Inspector Godfrey Fer-
guson said police do not know
the identity of the person whose
body was found at Coconut
Tree Beach.

According to reports, Tony
Davis, a resident of Murphy
Town, made'the discovery
sometime around noon while ,
walking along the beach in Mur, /
phy Town.

He reported the matter to the
Marsh Harbour police.

A team of officers led by
chief inspector Ferguson went
to the scene, where they
observed the decomposed body
of aman lying on the beach.

The body was transported to
the morgue at Marsh Harbour
Clinic and. later flown to Nas-
sau.

Any persons with informa-
tion that can assist police with
their investigations are asked
to call the Marsh Harbour
Police Station at 367-2560 or
Grand Bahama Police at 351-
1919.

Police hunt
for attacker
after man
is stabbed

AN early morning altercation
led'to a 27-year-old man being
stabbed repeatedly by another
man, according to police
reports.

Police press liaison officer
Inspector Walter Evans said the
incident took place on Thomp-
son Blvd around 3am Monday
morning.

*The argument evolved to
the point whereby he received
stab wounds,” Mr Evans
explained.

The man was taken to the
hospital and is currently in seri-
ous condition.

His identity has not yet been
released by police.

This incident is still under
iniestigation as police are try
io; identify the, other person
involved in the altercation.

Inspector Evans reported that
the police are following several
Reads:

1 13 Ha iti ans
are seized
in New
Providence

IMMIGRATION officials
have releaséd statistics on their
most recent raids and repatria-
tion operations.

» Last week, 113 suspected ille-
gal Haitian nationals were
picked up in New Providence.

* Of this number, 99 were men,
nine women, and five children.

+ However, of this number, six
men were released, bringing the
number down to 107.

_Another raid in Freeport,
Grand Bahama, netted 19 sus-
pect illegal immigrants. Of this
number there was 12 Haitian
men, three Haitian women, and
four Jamaican men.

For the week of June 5 to 11,
officer in charge of the Deten-
tion Centre Weston Saunders
said, Immigration officials repa-
triated 226 immigrants.

: Of this number, he said, 203
were Haitians, 14 Jamaicans,
and nine Cubans.

‘Also during that week, 15
Haitian nationals in Freeport,
two Jamaicans in New Provi-
dence and eight Haitians in
Exuma were apprehended in
pirategic raids.

_Mr Saunders said that there
‘are currently 189 detainees at
the Carmichael Road centre.

Of this number, 152 are men,
30 are women and seven are
‘children,

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
RUE

PHONE: 322-2157



Licence suspension |
threatened on fish ©
houses for crawfish |

“M By TIFFANY GRANT

Tribune Staff Reporter

FISH house operators could
have their export licenses sus-
pended if they are found buy-
ing undersized crawfish, Min-
ister of Agriculture and
Marine Resources Leslie
Miller warned.

Mr Miller stressed that his
ministry will put a stop to this
practise by imposing “very stiff
and harsh penalties” on the
fish houses who buy under-
sized crawfish from “unscrupu-
lous” fishermen.

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Mr Miller
said the ministry will have a
meeting with operators next
week to give them one final
warning.

“The fellow can only sell it if
you buy it. If you tell the guy
‘listen man, do not bring to my
establishment any undersized
lobsters, I am not going to buy
it and in addition to that I'll
report you to the authori-
ties’... which is what they
should do..

“It is a total disgrace that
this is happening with the full
concurrence of some of the
unscrupulous importers, dis-
tributors and the fish houses.

LOCAL NEWS —

We are going to put a SLO: to
it,” he said.

During his contribution to
the 2006-2007 budget debate,
Mr Miller also presented pro-
posals to change the current
catch limits for sportfishermen,
in a bid to cut pressure on
Bahamian fish resources. .

Mr Miller’s ministry is:

proposing that all catch limits
be changed from “per person
per day” to “per vessel per day.”

Later this week, Mr Miller
will travel to Long Island for a
one-day meeting with the
island’s fishermen to get their
views on the proposed change.

Major town meetings, he
said, have already been held
with the fishermen in Abaco,
Spanish Wells, Andros and
North Eleuthera.

Last week, sportsfishing
industry representatives said
they felt that the proposed
catch limits for fishing will

have negative impact on their

business, be hard to police,
and discourage sportfishermen
and tourists from coming to
the Bahamas.

An industry source said that
at present, many boats get at
least 25 to 30 dolphin-fish a
day — significantly more than
the three per vessel the minis-

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 3

Woman stabbed
_ several times in
brutal attack

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 28-year-old woman
of Dundas Town, Abaco, was stabbed
multiple times about the body early Mon-
day morning.

According to reports, the victim, a res-





i LESLIE Miller

ter-is proposing.

He suggested the minister
sit down with industry stake-
holders before any changes are
made.

Mr Miller claimed that what
some’ are terming sportsfish-
ing is in scanty commercial
fishing.

“When you are catching SIX -

dolphins a day that’s not sports
fishing. Six of them per day —
that is not my interpretation of
sportsfishing, that is commer-
cial fishing, which is not allowed
in this ue ” he said.

A JURY has been aéléctad for the retrial of
: the nurse Joan Lunn murder case which is
: > expected to get underway today.

Kendon Brown will stand trial again for Lun-
n's murder, the attempted murder of Anthony
“Blackus” Saunders and conspiracy to murder

Saunders.

Monty Thompson will be tried for conspiracy

to commit murder.

Nurse Lunn, 65 was shot and killed while
attending a patient Anthony "Blackus" Saunders

on Saturday July 7, 2001.

Saunders had just been transferred to the pri-
vate surgical ward of the Princess Margaret Hos-

pital the previous day.

‘He had already been shot twice during a dri-
ve-by shooting on Grand Bahama.

Nurse Lunn was reportedly shot in the heart.

Saunders was shot three times but survived.

Brown and Thompson were initially convict-
ed of the murder, but had their sentences
quashed by the Court of Appeal in 2004.

The accused are being represented by Murrio

Ducille and Dion Smith.

The case will be heard before a jury of five
women and seven men in the court of Justice Jon

Isaacs.

Prosecuting the case are Francis Cumber-
batch and Neil Brathwaite of the Attorney Gen-

eral’s Office.





i MONTY Thompson pictured in 2004, the

year his conviction was quashed

Disabled men meet
with PM Christie
and Minister Griffin

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

Three of the four disabled

men formerly of Cheshire
Home had an impromptu
meeting with Prime Minister
Perry Christie and yesterday
to discuss the rights of dis-
abled: persons in the
Bahamas.
_ Jerome Thompson, Jer-
vaisian Stuart and Kenneth
Storr were also able to see
Minister of Social Services
and Community Develop-
ment Melanie Griffin

“We wanted to meet with
the prime minister for two
reasons,” Jerome Thompson
explained. “First to share with
him how disgusted, angry and
hurt we were with how the
Ministry of Social Services
dealt with our situation and
secondly to ask for a grant for
crown land so that we can set
up the center for independent
living for disabled persons,
both male and female.”

Their “situation” began a
little over a year ago when
they were evicted from the
Cheshire Home on Dolphin
Drive.

Since then, they have been
living in an apartment in
Sandilands Village with the
assistance of the government.

The apartment was origi-
nally leased to the four men,
with the inclusion of Sean
Flowers for a year. They
were supposed to be evicted
again on June 10, but Minis-
ter Griffin got an extension.
According to Mr Thompson,

their lease has been extended
to July 10.

Mr Thompson noted that
last year the’ministry of social
services hosted a one-day
seminar under the theme,
Protection of the rights and
dignities of persons with dis-
abilities.

“After being evicted out of
the Cheshire Home those
rights and that dignity has
been extremely handi-
capped,” he said.

The men told Mr Christie
of their problems with inade-
quate transportation and
housing.

“We have the right to fair
and adequate housing and the
right to equal employment
and we will continue to fight
for them until they are
accomplished,” Mr Stuart
said.

One of the things they are
fighting for is the crown land
on which they intend to build

a “Center for Independent
Living”.

Once completed, the facil-
ity will house up to 16 dis-
abled persons. The blueprints
have already been drawn up.

The men said Prime Minis-
ter Christie agreed to meet
again with them next Mon-
day to further discuss this
project.

Private sponsors have
already been agreed to fund
the project, he said. “Every-
thing we need to make our
lives.a little easier and the
lives of all disabled adults will
be at this facility.”



ident of Forest Avenue, sustained wounds
to the neck and upper chest sometime
around 12.30am, during an attack in the
Spring City area.

The woman, who was unable to com-
municate at the time, was taken to the
clinic and later airlifted to the Princess
Margaret Hospital in New Providence for
further medical attention.

Inspector Loretta Mackey reported that
at about 4pm on Monday, the victim was
listed in stable condition after undergoing
surgery.

Mrs Mackey said that a 27-year-old
man of Murphy Town, Abaco, is assisting
police on Abaco with their investigations

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon:) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. |

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Galanis needs to face the truth

IN THIS COLUMN yesterday we discussed
a letter from PLP Senator Philip Galanis in
which he condemned Tribune Managing Edi-
tor John Marquis for an article he wrote in The
Tribune on May 29.

The “Insight” article was headed: “Anti-for-
eign attitudes are not a good idea.” It claimed
that “with the sniff of an election in the air, the
PLP government is again — according to its
critics — displaying an anti-foreign mindset
and appealing to the raw emotions of the ill-
informed. But more thinking Bahamians
believe this approach is unrealistic, counter-
productive and out-of-date with serious impli-
cations for the national economy.”

We couldn’t agree more.

Mr Galanis’ letter in which he condemned
Mr Marquis and claimed that he has no respect
- for either Bahamians or the Bahamas was
published on this page in yesterday’s Tribune.

Mr Galanis said that Mr Marquis’ “colonial
evaluation of the importance of foreigners to
all sectors of corporate Bahamas ... is a grave
insult to all bright young Bahamians. ath

Mr Galanis said he was “particularly
appalled at his (Mr Marquis’) choice of bitter
and malicious words that paint the Bahamas in
the most negative ways imaginable.”

His first objection was to the reference of
“an educational system that is practically
defunct.”

‘Mr Galanis has deliberately taken these
words out of context. They are not Mr Mar-
quis’ words. They were part of a long quote
from an American work permit holder who
was interviewed by Mr Marquis. The person
told Mr Marquis that he had been waiting
seven months for his permit. “This means,” he
said, “I can’t get Central Bank permission to
transfer money, I can’t get in and out of the
country without considerable difficulty and I
can’t renew my car licence. In practically every
official sense, my life is on hold while the
immigration department processes a docu-
ment.”

This is true. The smooth operation of busi-
nesses are being interrupted, and, if anything
is upsetting investors, Mr Galanis, it is Immi-
gration, not Mr Marquis’ article.

This permit holder’s comment continued
for several more paragraphs, much too long to
quote here in its entirety. However, the words
that upset Mr Galanis were a part of this
quote. And this is what the person who had
been waiting seven months for his work permit
had to say:

“The government’s proncti is one of com-
plete contempt simply because I am a for-
‘eigner. Yet this is a country which is far more
dependent on foreigners than most. It has no
resources of its own and an educational system

that is practically defunct. How do they seri-
ously expect to function without outsiders?”

Did Mr Galanis expect Mr Marquis to soft-
en the words of this annoyed foreigner, who
was speaking the truth, just because it offend-
ed Mr Galanis’ delicate, political ears? No.
So that Bahamians would get the true measure
of the problem, he quoted exactly what this
man had to say.

Space does not permit us to write what we
think of this country’s educational system. We
have a daily opportunity, because of our work,
to judge it — not only the products of the high
schools, but also those who have been sent to
us over the years from COB.

We still say that Bahamians educated in
the old Boys Central School, of which this
generation has never heard, but some of whom
were still on The Tribune’s staff when we
joined more than 50 years ago, had a better

grounding in the three “Rs” — reading, *Titing

and ’rithmatic — than students being gradu-
ated from government schools today. It was at
Boys Central that the late Sir Etienne Dupuch,
publisher of this newspaper, got his early edu-
cation.

And so, Mr Galanis, let’s face facts. Edu-

cation in this country is a disaster. It’s not Mr

Marquis’ fault. It is up to Bahamians, like Mr
Galanis and his government colleagues, to
correct it.

We could write a book about our experi-
ences with Bahamian students, many of them
keen, but too many of them ill-equipped for
the demands of today’s Bahamas.

Recently a foreign philanthropist, anxious
to encourage young Bahamian students in one
of the more deprived inner city areas, agreed

_ to give a computer to any high school student

who had a 3.0 cumulative grade average. A
bicycle was to go to any lower school student
with the same average. About 7,000 students
participated.

The donors expected to write a large
cheque. When the results were announced,
only one high school student qualified for a
computer, and seven lower schools students for
a bicycle.

Although, we have some brilliant students,
especially in our private school system, these
are very much in the minority. The country’s
general school certificate examination’s aver-
age is ‘D’. Now, if that isn’t an embarrass-
ment, we don’t know what is.

Instead of worrying about John Marquis
because he is a foreigner, who has the guts to
point out the problems, we had better start
doing something about our “practically
defunct” educational system.” Excuses won’t
get us through.

© To be continued.



Uplifting the :
College of |

_ EDITOR, The Tribune

KINDLY allow me an
opportunity to uplift our
great College of The
Bahamas (COB).

Let me first say thank you
to the many College of The
Bahamas Alumni who con-
tinue to display genuine
interest and support for the
College and The Alumni
Association of the College.
Secondly, I wish to thank all
those Alumni who partici-
pated in the Association’s
recent elections. I especially

thank those who placed their

names as candidates for. the
Association’s Executive
Office — these are the per-
sons who ensured that the
democratic process of elect-
ing the Association’s leaders
prevailed. The newly estab-
lished Office of Alumni
Affairs and its hard working
staff deserve accolades for
the organization and super-
vision of the aforesaid elec-
toral process. Since its estab-
lishment, just a few months
ago, the Office of Alumni
Affairs, under the dynamic
leadership of its Acting
Director, Mrs. Kim Rolle,
has truly shown its worth to
the Association, and more
importantly, to the College.

Yes, I must not forget to
thank all those Alumni who
supported me and secured
my re-election as President
of the Association. My oppo-
nent was a worthy candidate
and one who I am‘contident
will continue to support the
Association. I say the same
to all those other candidates
who were unsuccessful in
their bids. I thank our out-
going Executive members
who gave tirelessly to the
Association (namely, Mrs.
Melissa Thompson-Hall, for-
mer Vice President, and Ms.
Nekisha Simms, former Sec-
retary/Public Relations Offi-
cer) and congratulate our

’ new Executive team. I look

forward to our successful
term. I remind all, however,
that the Association is “big-
ger” than its Executive

Team. It will take all of us “

to build our Association and
to secure the success of its

’ programme and events.

In a few weeks COB will
bestow upon hundreds of its
graduates, Degrees, Certifi-
cates and Diplomas. At these
graduation ceremonies, I am

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



afforded the honour, as Pres-
ident of the College’s Alum-
ni Association, to induct our
new graduates into the Asso-
ciation.as full members. I
always take this opportuni-
ty to remind these proud
COB giants that upon grad-
uation, they not only walk
away as products, of the Col-
lege, but as Ambassadors,
and as such, we all have a
duty to represent the Col-
lege, to support by the Col-
lege (yes...financially and
otherwise) and to uplift the
College. I congratulate
COB’s 2006 graduates and
look forward to socializing
with them at the Alumni
Graduation Reception.

I respectfully say to those
persons in Bahamaland who
voice their concerns about
the College’s future, chiefly
as a result of the highly pub-
licized President Search
“process” and the UTEB
labour dispute, that the Col-
lege remains the same Col-
lege that we were so proud
of yesterday. You can still be
proud! The College remains

' the same institution that—

receives International
respect from other colleges
and universities throughout
the world. The College
remains the same College

that, year after year, produce?)

the vast majority of our
nation’s great teachers who
educate our children in our
public and private schools;
the vast majority of our
nation’s nurses who care for
us when we visit our public
and private clinics and hos-
pitals; a great majority of our
civil servants who we put our
trust in to run our public ser-
vices and agencies. Remem-
ber, this is the same College
of The Bahamas that also
educated so many of our
Bahamian professionals,
including our lawyers, doc-
tors, accountants and engi-
neers, just to name a few.
Persons who know me,
know that I am very much
interested in nation building,
both from a political and a
social aspect. In this regard, I
told so many persons during
my re-election campaign that
the pink building i in the cen-



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a



THE TRIBUNE








tre of Oakes Field are equal-.
ly as important to our nation
as those pink buildings in the
centre of Bay Street/down-
town. In fact, the pink build-

sons who now “sit” in thée:-"iiM
pink buildings in the centre’ oH
of Bay Street/downtown call -
their Alma Mater. I hope, “
therefore, we can now begin * OVE
to appreciate the importance fnat
of our beloved COB.

I beg all Bahamians to‘®70!
avoid becoming side- tracked‘
by the negative tones and: va
sayings of those who call our, ,, va ‘
educational home a “trous,, ate
bled COB”. The College is -. .:.,
not troubled. The College is
“stretching” and experienc-
ing normal growing pains. As” ).j,
the College continues to: 24;
grow there will continue to: +y<
be new issues that will spark:
internal (students/manage? {ric;
ment/faculty/staff/ council)” "is
debates. Indeed, as the Col-“17=1
lege moves to university sta?"''3%
tus, some of these same , ,
issues may inevitably spark.> iy
national debates...after all, ,
we too are a developing: >"
country, and like COB, will»;
experience the effects of" |
“stretching”. v

As a member of the Col: i
lege Council, I could say
without doubt that the Col-
lege Council’s intent is”
always to do (after reason+-*.:s
able reflection and consider+ |:
ation) what it feels is in the ‘™
best interest of the College _
and the nation as a whole... ‘?

|

Tem







Further, as the Alumni’s ™
Representative as Council, I” ‘°:
can also say that College. 5
Council respects the Associ; c i.
ation’s representation (i e.
views and contributions) and . ‘3
graciously support our-;.4
endeavours. So we, Ssayiy
thanks to COB’s Council; aA
especially in these “stretch- « +;
ing” times. 4
My fellow Alumni, get jy
involved in your Associaton
so that you can play yowrs 9)
part in COB’s continued six.
cess.
God Bless The College of”
The Bahamas and our Beau.





tiful nation. ~
cop

DON LSAUNDERS, —
ESQ |

COB Alumni Association,
President

Nassau, Al
May 7, 2006.













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contact Debra Gibson at the BCMC office at

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LOCAL NEWS



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In brief —

Ministry to
announce
youth job
initiative





@ NEVILLE Wisdom, .
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Housing

A NEW co- span initia-
tive that will revolutionise the
job market for aspiring young
Bahamians is set to be launched
today,

The Tribune has learned that

the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing will announce a
new mass employment forum
for all recent graduates and stu-
dents who will leave school in
the near future.
_ Although details remain
sketchy, an inside source said
the ministry. is buzzing with
excitement about the plan.

The initiative is reportedly a
joint government/private sector
effort, at which a number of

major foreign investors will be .
_ represented.

Yacht starts
to sink at _
Port Lucaya
Marina

AN American visitor was
asleep aboard his yacht when it

partially sank at Port Lucaya

Marina over the weekend.

Joey Lander, 37, of Cross
City, Florida, reportedly ; awoke
around Sam on Sunday to dis-
covey his 58-foot white Chero-
kee ‘cruising yacht, named
‘Shazam’ half submerged.

The mooring lines, which
were still fastened, prevented
the vessel from sinking to the
bottém.

Mr Lander told police that
he suspects that the bilge pump
may have accidentally been
turned off. He said the vessel is
valued at more than $500,000.

Arrangements are underway
to have the yacht salvaged.

American
complains
of theft
from yacht

JACQUELINE Titolo, 61, of

_ Lighthouse Point, Florida,

repuited to the police that
sometime between 12.30am and
7. 30am on Saturday morning,
somigone broke and entered the
58 yacht ‘Mega Sea II’ through
a rear sliding door and stole
$3, 600 cash along with a
Motorola cellular phone valued
at $400. .

Police are “investigating the
incident.

TW eRe

TUESDAY
JUNE 20

} 2:00am Community Page/1540 AM

11:00 Immediate Response

12:00 ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd

1:00 Island Life Destinations

1:30 Inside Hollywood

2:00 The Fun Farm

3:G0 Durone'Hepbum

3:30 — Ernest Leonard

4:00 — Dennis The Menace

4:30. Carmen San Diego

4:58 ZNS News Update

5:00 - Cricket World

5:30 Gillette World Cup 2006

6:00 Bahamian Things.

16:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 NEMA Preparations

8:30 ZNS School Round Up

9:00 Da’ Down Home Show

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

14:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540 AM
NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves

the right to make last minute
programme changes!
























-Keva Major alleges targeting by prison ouards

KEVA Major’s
lawyer Michael Kemp
claimed yesterday that
his client has been tar-
geted repeatedly by
female prison guards
and has even had buck-
ets of faeces thrown on
her.

These allegations
were made in Magis-

‘trates Court yesterday
when Major, who is
facing extradition to
the United States on
drug charges, appeared
before Magistrate Lin-
da Virgill.

Her appearance was
in connection with a
case involving more
than $800,000, which
was allegedly seized
from Keva Major.

Mr Kemp told the
court that one incident
involving faeces being
thrown on his client
occurred two Sundays
ago and another yes-
terday morning before
she was brought to

reason for her late
arrival.

According to Mr
Kemp, his client claims
that female guards
instructed a woman
inmate to throw a
bucket of faeces on her.

Mr Kemp went on to
state that his client
claimed that one guard
threw her belongings,
along with court docu-
ments into the prison
courtyard and threw
bleach on them.

He said that his
client was also being
forced to do manual
labour, and should not,
because she is a
remanded inmate.

Mr Kemp claimed
that his client was also
not getting her meals
on time.

On July 24, 25 and 26
Mr Kemp and prosecu-
tor Francis Cumber-
batch are expected to
make closing argu-
ments in the case

court — which was the

involving the money.



@ KEVA Major returning from court yesterday under the escort of a female police officer

Phaio: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Abaconians plan protest over
‘two-month closure of airport

_BUSINESSES in Abaco
were predicting “a full-scale
revolt” yesterday after being
told that Marsh Harbour air-

port would close for more than °

two months later this year.

The multi-million dollar

runway improvement project
is due to get underway on Sep-
tember 10. with a completion
date of November 20, island
sources said.

This would mean a two-and-
a-half months closure of a
facility which handles the vast
majority of aircraft move-
ments in Abaco, they added.

“Tt will mean total revolt on
this island,” one business
source told The Tribune.
“Everyone is steaming about
this. We are going to do some-
thing about it.”

Fearing the closure would
cost the island “millions of dol-

: . lars” in lost tourism business,
’ some islanders are considering

blocking the airport with air-
craft when work is due to start.

Denise Kelly of Abaco Air
also opposes the new construc-
tion of a runway. “This is the

fo capital, this is the hub. This new

plan can affect the surrounding
Cays who depend on tourism
for livelihood,” she said.

Kelly also suggested that
many airport staff might be laid
off, which would make it hard-
er to facilitate possible medical
emergencies into New Provi-
dence in an efficient manner.

“Abaco is not going to stand
by and let this happen,” said
one business source. “We are

willing to block the runway:

with aircraft.
“We’ve been told this is an



@ AN aerial view of Marsh Harbour Airport after Hurricane

Frances passed over the island in 2004

‘unofficial’ decision, but we
are going to get official con-

firmation in two weeks. Abaco

is going to have a fit.”

The island has been express-
ing concern for several months
now about the possible closure.

According to a airtraffic
official, there is no confirma-
tion that this project is going to
be enforced.

Ms Kelly suggested that the

issue came up about two weeks -

ago at an event sponsored by
the Ministry of Tourism.

“Since this, the local media
has been voicing their opin-
ions; with business owners,
operators and residents wor-
ried about the havoc this can
bring,” said Kelly.

In fact, alternative sugges-

tions have been put forward -

including the building of a new
runway, which would allow
the airport to stay in use dur-
ing the project.

SUMMER PROGRAMMES

SWIFT under the management of Andy and Nancy
Knowles will offer “Swim America”Learn to Swim,
Masters, Fitness, and Competitive swimming classes
for the summer. The classes, dates, times, and fees

are as follows:

Nassau — St. Andrews School
Abaco — Long Bay School

Learn To Swim “Swim America”
Session 1 — June 26th to July 7th. Days: Mon; Tues; Wed; Thurs; Fri.

Time : 4:00 or 4:30 PM

sessiqn es July 10th to July 21st. Days: Mon; Tues; Wed; Thurs; Fri.

Time: 4:00 or 4:30 PM

Cost: $150 per child per session

Masters/Fitness/Competitive Group
(must have Swim America Certificate or equivalent)

Sessions run from June 26th to July 28th. Monday through Saturday.

Morning Workouts: 5:00-7:00 AM Mon, Wed, Fri,
7:00-9:30 AM Saturday

Evening Workouts: 5:00-—7:00PM Monday through Saturday

According to Kelly, “the
existing runway does not have.,

~~” GRAB LIFE BY THE HORNS

IF THIS WERE A CONCERT,
WE'D BE THE HEADLINER










QUAD CAB

2006 RAM REG

CAB 4X2

Starting at

J igs om Sawyer

to be closed down-but resur-

faced, repaired, and refur- -

bished,” she said. She also sug-
gested that the government
should consider building a new
runway to the south.

Under this scheme, the
islanders said, the old runway
could be used as a taxiway, sav-
ing the need to build a new one.

-If Marsh Harbour airport

_closes, tourists taking vacations

in South Abaco will have to pay
$80 taxi fares — for two people —
from Treasure Cay.

Mr Tyrone Sawyer, director
of airlift development at the
Ministry of Tourism, said he did
not have enough information
to comment on the taxi fares.

However, notification of the
closure was said to have come
as islanders got

wi



itd spo

Options:
Radio/CD Player, Power
Steering, Air Conditioning,
Power Windows & Locks.

wind of the plans “in an e-mail
from West Hill Street in Nas-

sau”, according to one source.

_ “We have put forward a very
reasonable suggestion for how
this project should proceed, but
the government has ignored
us,” said a business source.
“The plan is to resurface and
widen the existing runway and
build a taxiway. We believe the
old runway could be used as the
taxiway if the government had
opted to build a new runway.”
Sawyer claims that if the pro--
ject goes through, it will start
in September, when tourism in
Abaco usually dies down. ©
An improved airport is essen-

. tial in Marsh Harbour, which

now handles heavy private and
commercial traffic from Nassau
and the United States.

Automatic,



2006 RAM
QUAD CAB

Starting at



4. QA OO

2006 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB

Starting at

Cost: 1week -$40/swimmer
2 weeks - $70 / swimmer

3 weeks - $100 / swimmer

4 weeks - $130/ swimmer

5 weeks - $150 / swimmer

Application/Questions. E-mail
swiftswimming@coralwave.com
Telephone 242-324-1167





$33,097.0

Ni

Montrose Avenue,






AS BUS & TRUCK CO

Lohnited



GRAB LIFE BY THE HORNS



MLR
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

Security and facilities to be |
improved at detention centre,

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

MINISTER of Labour and
Immigration Shane Gibson yes-
terday announced a compre-
hensive plan to beef-up security
and improve facilities at the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.

Speaking during his contri-
bution to the 2006/2007 budget
debate, Mr Gibson said that in
addition to the construction of a
perimeter wall, extensive reno-
vation is expected to be carried
out to living and visiting quar-
ters of the holding facility.

Mr Gibson explained that a
blueprint for a new dormitory is



at the crowde Carmichael Road Detention -



# DETAINE
Centre

Commonwealth Bank is offering ten (10) Scholarship Awards to
Bahamian Students to attend The College of The Bahamas

Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank branch or at
the Financial Aid & Housing Department, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith
Building, The College of The Bahamas

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply)
rs ; , \ . * ol
Ci | DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS JULY 14, 2006

COMMONWEALTH BANK





' @2006 CreativeRetations.net

“Leader in Personal Banking Services” www.combankltd.com ©.



CARIBBEAN CROSSINGS LTD. —

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION
_ INSTALLMENT PAYMENT

The Company would like to inform all holders of
Caribbean Crossings Ltd. 8% Series A Preference
Shares that the schedule first Redemption Installment
payment will be made on July 1, 2006 to all
shareholders of record June 1, 2006. This payment
is in accordance with the terms and conditions
attached to the Series A preference shares which
were issued in July 2001. Under these terms, the
Company will make five (5) annual redemption
installment payments of $2.00 per share commencing
July 1, 2006 and on each July 1 thereafter through
and including July 1, 2010. |

Caribbean Crossings is an International Internet and
Data company that operates a fully redundant
submarine fiber optic network linking the four islands
of New Providence, Eleuthera, Abaco and Grand
Bahama with the continental United States on two
diverse fiber landing points in South Florida. Caribbean

_ reported total revenues of $10.5 million in 2005 and
net income of $4.3 million.





ready, and that plans are also
in the making for additional
facilities to be built.

“The Ministry of Works has
completed architectural draw-
ings for the rebuilding of the
dormitory at the Detention
Centre,” Mr Gibson said.

Over the past two years
there have been numerous
disturbances and at least one
major riot at the Carmichael
Road facility.

In fact, last month three
refugees — two Cuban women
and a Jamaican man —
escaped from the centre, in
two separate incidents.

This took place just a
month after a group of
Cubans made a clean get-
away from the holding facility.

Two years. earlier, in 2004,
three Cuban men escaped just
before a riot broke out-at the
centre, during which a dormi-
tory was set on fire.

The incident left 11 guards
and nine detainees injured.

The upgrades are being car-
ried out in an attempt to curb
the number of break-outs
from the facility and to height-
en surveillance of the facility,
which has received interna-
tional attention regarding pur-
ported inhumane conditions
and the alleged abuse of
detainees, officials say. :

“The government has also
planned for the renovation
and expansion of the kitchen |
and dining hall areas; new
quarters for the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force, doc-
tor’s office, detainees pro-
cessing reception building, vis-
itors’ shelter and restrooms
and most importantly — an
eight foot perimeter wall,” Mr
Gibson said.

“Additional lighting and
security cameras will be

placed at strategic points to

provide full surveillance of

activities at the facility.”
Improvements have also

been made to the administra-

-,tive building:on the com-

pound, which the minister
said is now ready to be occu-
pied.

Mr Gibson said “screening
apparatus” will be at all
entrances of the centre and
the Department of Immigra-
tion, to prevent the smuggling
in of contraband and weapons.














from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

- Poland,

you.are raising funds for a



@ MINISTER of
Immigration Shane Gibson

The minister also explained
that over the past three and a
half years more than 16,000
illegal migrants have been
repatriated.

“Some 16,412 illegal immi-
grants have been repatriated,
representing countries as
diverse as United States of
America, Austria, Ecuador,
India and. the
Cameroon Islands,” Mr Gib-
son explained.

“The point here is that not
only Haitians and Jamaicans
are the targets of the Immi-
gration Department, but also
persons of other nationali-
ties,” he said.

During the first quarter of
the year, the government
spent more than $100,000 on
repatriation exercises.

Manpower is also being
increased to strengthen secu-
rity at the centre, the minister
said.

“The government, has
approved the employment of
20 Immigration officers to.
strengthen the capacity of the
department’s presence... in
addition to nine immigration
officers that have been iden-
tified and are presently being
trained by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force in the
art of finger-printing,” he
said.

The government has allo-
cated $6.2 million to the
Department of Labour in the
2006/2007 budget.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

THE TRIBUNE



Financial
services
school is
predicted

FINANCIAL Services and
Investments Minister Vincent

_ Peet foreshadowed the estab-

lishment of a School of Finan-
cial Services in The Bahamas.,
“My Ministry is cognisant ef
the need for persons within the
financial services sector to
remain on the cutting edge#’
said Mr Peet, “and to continu-
ously upgrade their technic§l
skills, as competitive global
market trends demand. ‘
“We are also aware that this
skill training will have to begin,
if not at the high school level,
then immediately after. 4
“We therefore intend to col-
laborate with the College of the
Bahamas and the Bahamas.
Institute of Financial Services
with a view to establishing ‘a
school of financial services.”
Mr Peet was the guest speak-
er at the Association of Intef-
national Banks and Trust Com- .
panies in the Bahamas during
its June 15 monthly meeting at
Buena Vista. e
He assured them that the
Bahamas wants to remain “the
leading financial centre in the
hemisphere” as named by
Banker’s Magazine, an affiliate

: of the Financial Times Group.

4

Winners of |
Rotary :
competition
announced

THE winners of the Laws of ©
Life essay contest have been\

- announced.

Sponsored by the Rotary
Club of East Nassau, the contest
encouraged students to reflect
on their personal values and
write from the heart about what °
matters most in life.

The top five finishers in the
junior and senior divisions
respectively, in order, are:

Dan Ping Li, Nassau Christ-
ian Academy and Rachel Field-
ing, St Andrew’s School; Edwin
Rolle, Jr, Temple Christian
High and Shaquille Coleby, CV
Bethel Senior High; Trevonya
Bridgewater, Nassau Christian
Academy, and Arvis Mortimer
of Queen’s College; John Alao
of St Anne’s and Brittney Cul-.
mer of Queen’s College; and,

‘Mia Andrews of Queen’s Col-
lege, and Brian Jennings of C
V Bethel Senior High.

Cash prizes will be awarded
to the winners at a luncheon
which will take place at the Nas-
sau Yacht Club on June 23.

The laws of Life contest was
created in 1987 by Sir John
Templeton in Tennessee, USA
and has been launched in more
than 30 countries.

Representing 12 Nassau-area
junior and senior high schools,
110 students participated in the

~ contest, which began March 27.

YOUR CONNECTION®*TO THE WORLD

TENDER — APPRAISAL OF
BUILDINGS AND LAND

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) iS
pleased to invite Tenders to provide appraisal of its Buildings and

Land.

Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security’s Desk located in the Administrative
building on John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Packages can also be collect in Freeport, from the Security’s desk,
BTC, Mall Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is 5:00 pm July 17th,

2006.

Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER —

APPRISAL OF BUILDINGS AND LAND” and should be
delivered to the attention of the Acting President and CEO, Mr.

Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 7



Florida firm buys

the first plot in
business centre







@ ATTORNEY Terrence Gape, instructs his client, Calvin Miller, president and CEO of
Associated Grocers of Florida, during the signing for-the purchase of 20 acres of land at the
Sea/Air Business Centre for the construction of an $8 million wholesale distribution facility in
Freeport. Grand Bahama Port Authority chairman Hannes Babak looks on.

“ll By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter ‘

"’ FREEPORT - Associated
“Grocers of Florida has pur-
chased 20 acres of land in the
-Sea/Air Business Centre on
_ “Grand Bahama for the con-
; “struction of its new $8million
Wholesale distribution facility
‘in Freeport.
Grand Bahama Port Author-

on
“ity.chairman.Hannes Babak and \ Bahi ( A Ie

of jobs needed to do logistic
warehouses, where we in Grand:

“CEO Sir Albert Miller made

the announcement on Monday

, during the signing of the pur-

“chase agreement in the Port
“A uthority’s boardroom.
2) The signing paves the way for

construction of a 100,000 sq ft
, - logistic warehouse distribution
‘facility for. International Dis-
“tributors of Grand Bahama
~‘Limited, which will export prod-
‘ucts to the Caribbean and the
United States.

The deal is.the first for the
- Sea/Air Business Centre, which
_ comprises of 741 acres of land
“between the harbour and airport.
Calvin Miller, president and

“CEO, said the company, cur~
: rently operating in Freeport,

expects to begin construction
within the next 60 to 180 days on
land at the corner of Fishing Hole
Road and Queen’s Highway.
Mr Babak said that Associ-
ated Grocers'and its subsidiary
company would greatly impact
the Grand Bahama economy.
“L believe this is a great indi-
cation for the thrust into Grand
Bahama for international com-
panies to come here. “It will be
a great impact for Grand
Bahama and there will be a lot

Bahama have the perfect. loca-
tion between North and South
America, and the Caribbean.
“We want to develop the
number one logistic centre for
international companies, which

from here with a great contain-

er port, can operate and dis-
tribute their goods, especially

‘into the east coast Florida, but

also to the south to Caribbean
and South America.”

Sir Albert said: “We welcome
this company to Freeport. It is a
huge company and their pres-
ence here would be far reach-
in

He added that there could be

OLYMPIC

P.O. Box SS- 6250, NASSAU, BAHAMAS



‘Tels 1 (242) 322 - 1595

(Photo: Denise Maycock)

almost immediately between 50
and 100 employees.

Sir Albert said the signing last
week of a $15 million brewery
and the project today should go
a long way in reviving the econ-
omy of Freeport and in creating
jobs for Grand Bahama. .

Calvin Miller said Grand
Bahama is perfectly located, just
65 miles off the coast of Florida,
where his company has its head-
quarters. “I absolutely loved
Freeport from the minute I
stépped on’ the island. I told
everyone in the.states that you
have never seen anything like
this (Freeport) in the your life.”

Associated Grocers services
42 countries, as well as all of
Florida, Georgia, and Alaba-
ma. The company distributes
food products by Kraft, Gener-
al Mills and Kellogg’s etc, and
general merchandise, and health
and beauty cares etc.

Chris Grey, CEO of Freeport
Container Port, said: “We hope
that when the next customer
comes along we now have a
template in place and that we
are hopeful the deal will be con-
cluded in a more timely man-
ner,” said Mr Grey.

PRESIDENT
H.E, Arlington Bulter, KMCMG.AP.DLC.
VICE-PRESIDENT
Sir Durward Knowles, O.B.E
Rev. A, Enoch Backford II, B.Sc,.B.Ed.

Harcourt M. Rolle

Leonard Archer '
Roscow A.L. Davis, B.S.,M.B.A
Wellington Miller
TREASURE
C.Vincent Wallace-Whitfield, LLB.,L.E.C
ASSISTANT TREASURES
S.Dianne Miller
SECRETARY GENERAL
Lawrence Davis, B.Sc:,Ph.D
ASSISTANT SECRETARY GENERAL,
B. Livingstone Bostwick
FAX:! (242)322 - 1195
E-MAIL :nocbah@coralwave.com

19th ANNUAL OLYMPIC HEAL’ rH DAY

° Health Breakfast



Name (Last):
Age: Date of Birth:

Event:

54 aS ERE ee ce Wee See Re

Signature Of Applicant

“T-shirts for all participants
¢ Trophies For all categories
¢ IOC Certificates all finishers

Run Route: Starts Q.E. Sports
Center, Nassau Street, Bay Street,
PJ. Bridge, Ends Native Crafts
Market On Paradise Island.

ENTRY FEF: School Children: FREE

5 Mile Run

5 MILE RACE

CATEGORIES.

WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK
7:00a.m.,. Saturday 24th June, 2006

Male: Under 19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49,50+
Female: Under19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50+

Children And Group Awards

Crafts Market

Adults: $10.00

Entry Form

(First):

WHEELCHAIR AND HEALTH WALK:
Starts Fort Montagu, West on Shirle Street .
to Church Street, P.I. Bridge to the

Olympic Day 5 Mile Race And Health Walk

Drop off ENTRY FORM at the BOA Office, Building #10. 7th Terrace West of Collins Avenue,
P.O.Box Ss-6250, Tel: 322-1595, Fax: 322-1195, E-mail:nocbah@coralwave.com

SEX:M F_ Affiliation:

Wheelchair

organizers and medcal advisers.
‘

Health Walk

Liability Waiver: In consideration of your accepting this entry, I, intending to be legally bound
hereby for myself, my heirs, executors and administrators waive and release any and all rights and claims
of damage I may have against the Bahamas Olympic Association and/ Or its successors and assigns for
all injuries or other eventualy sustained by me in this event. I agree to abide by the decisions of the

Parent/Guardian if under 18 years age



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

STAFF VACANCIES

The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the following posts:

Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development

START DATE: August 1, 2006

JOB DESCRIPTION |

SUMMARY:

Serves as a primary fundraiser for The College of The s Baharias, Designs, implements,
evaluates, and refines the Unit's development activities with an emphasis on major gifts as
defined by COB policy, Council and the President in conjunction with Vice President Institutional
Advancement. Personally identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards donors and prospects
in accordance with performance targets set by the Office of Institutional Advancement under
the direction of the Council and President. Collaborates with the President, Vice President
Institutional Advancement and Vice President Finance & Administration and colleagues in
the COB Office of Institutional Advancement to maximize total gift revenue through gift
planning, corporate and foundation relations, and annual fund strategies.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

. Identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards major donors and prospects including
individuals, corporations, and foundations, through visits and other forms of direct
personal contact in accordance with performance targets set and defined by the
relevant authorities.

. Enlists senior management in furthering the Development Unit's development

programme; assists in educating faculty and staff in respect of the roles they can
play in fundraising and development generally.

. Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them with leadership and direction

in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and prospects;
coordinates volunteers’ activities to ensure their integration into the Unit's programmes.

. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with the Boards of COB

Foundations and College development colleagues to maximize the Unit s total gift
revenue.

KNOWLEDGE: SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

° Knowledge of major funding and donor sources. Ms
Respected membership in networks of people and entities of high net worth

and ability to move with ease and influence in such circles.

Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.
Community relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community.

Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to work extended hours

as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all. responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

Prior experience at the CEO/CFO level with a major company/corporation is preferred
' Master degree preferred , bachelor’s degree acceptable with relevant experience
Prior development experience would be highly valued

Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication. skills

Basic computer skills expected

Assistant Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development

4

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION |

SUMMARY: The Assistant Development Officer has primary responsibility for supporting the
work of the Development Officer and team through the management of the day-to-day
operations of the Development Unit, its databases and records.

pues AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

. Creates for the institution and makes effective use of a prospect management database

and other institutional resources to ensure appropriate management of donors, prospects,
alumni, and volunteers in coordination with College/University objectives.

. Conducts research to identify prospects and creates strategies to match prospects’

interests to the priorities of the unit and the College/University.

. Researches, writes, edits, or oversees, in conjunction with the writing/editorial staff of

Institutional Advancement, the preparation of persuasive, accurate, and grammatically
and syntactically correct solicitations, proposals, case statements, reports,
correspondence, and other development- -related communication materials in support
of the Unit's fund-raising activities.

. Assists in short- and long-range strategic planning activities to create and implement

fundraising goals and objectives.

. Assists in planning and conducting programmes and activities designed to increase

the visibility of the Unit and the College/University to internal and external constituencies.

. Develops and manages budgets for fundraising activities under the supervision of the

Vice President Institutional Advancement and in conjunction with other relevant senior
managers.

7. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.
KNOWLEDGE: SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

e Ability to conduct research, gather data, analyze information, and prepare effective,
accurate, and timely reports and other documents to support development objectives.
Demonstrated mastery of major business and prospect research databases and general
database software such as Microsoft Excel with concomitant database management
skills.

Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

Ability to write proposals, solicitations, correspondence, reports, and other materials
in support of development activities independently;

Ability to exercise good judgment, to demonstrate an understanding of ethics related
to development activities, and to use discretion in interactions with donors, prospects,
volunteers, and others.

e Ability to work effectively within a team environment.

Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in managing events and other
complex activities in support of development objectives.
Willingness and availability to travel and to work extended hours as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree

Prior development experience a must

Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
Excellent computer skills expected

Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision.

Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The application deadline is June 21, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates
should submit a College of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive resume and
a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should request
three referees to send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
below:

The College of the Bahamas
Human Resources Department
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive
P O Box N 4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please visit our website at for more information about the College and to access the College's
Employment Application Form.




YOUR CONNECTION®*TO THE WORLD

Es

REDUCED RATES
FOR INTERNATIONAL CALLS

‘

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company
Limited (BTC) is pleased to announce to the general
Pune and our valued customers that effective July
4st 2006 all international calls will Be reduced as
follows:

DESTINATION
United States of America

$ per minute or part thereof

Copyrighted Material
—_-2
syndicated Content

—_





Available from Commercial News Providers

a &

IWC calls for probe
into air guns and >
whale strandings

[canada CO @ ST KITTS According to the unanimous- ‘organisation and more of a
Frigate Bay ly approved report.prepared by whale management group.

Canada 0. 90 the IWC’s scientific committee, “We will not take revenge <
LOUD blasts from underwa- __ repeated bursts of air cause high against anti-whaling nations,”

- Caribbean (Except Cuba) 0.66

All Other Countries 0. 85

BIC. thane’ the public for their continued support
and we look forward to onnernag You To The
World.

ter air guns on boats searching
for oil could harm, whales and
should be studied further, said a
report unanimously endorsed
by the International Whaling
Commission on Monday,
according to Associated Press.
The IWC’s support of the
report was one point of con-
sensus among the 70-nation
body, which is bitterly divided
over commercial whaling. On
Sunday, Japan and other pro-
whaling nations pushed through
a symbolic resolution embracing
a return to commercial whal-
ing. But they still lack the 75
per cent majority needed to
overturn the two-decade ban

on the practice.



Credit Suisse (Bahamas)Limited
is presently considering application for a
Senior Accountant - Derivatives & Structured Products

—$—$—$ <<< —

Credit Suisse is one the world’s premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go beyond traditional
banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investement counseling and professional portfolio management. Our total commiment
is always to our client and we focus without compromise, on their financial well-being and their personal
values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:
* Preparing all financial statement for derivatives & structured products business of the bank.
* Provide expertise in defining accounting treatment for derivative products (Options, Swaps, etc.)
* Assisting in thé prepaing off reports for Senior management
* Assisting in ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated

Involvement in various investment banking and Group accounting issuses and projects

Recommend new products for implementation after receiving sign-offs of above specialized units

‘Ensure that new products implemented in a controlled manner and execute implementation review with IT,

Operations and Accounting
* Identifying potential tisks and suggest improvements regarding contols, systems in use and business management
* Work with senior business management to prioritize initiatives

. * Support implementation of standard software supplements

* A minimum of five(5)years experience with an offshore bank, trust company or accouting firm
* Technical product knowledge of derivatives / structured products MANDATORY. Must demonstrate sufficient

hands-on work experience in,accounting for derivative products,
* Product Control or Financial Control background required
* CPA,CA or equivalent
* Univeristy degree
* Knowledge of US GAAP would be an asset
* Good IT skills: familiar with Accounting and IT infrastructure basics
* A commitment to service excellence
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* Good organizational and.interpersonal skills
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* Effective communicator and hands-on and proactive approach
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* Competitive salary and benefits
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirments need not apply.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Deparment
P.O.Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS JUNE 28, 2006



CREDIT SUISSE

levels of underwater sound that
could affect whales’ migration
and mating patterns. It also not-
ed there might be a link
between the loud sound waves
and humpback whale strand-
ings.

The IWC recommended that
governments and international
groups study the issue and
explore ways to mitigate noise
pollution in the world’s oceans.

"This has significant implica-
tions for reforming the way the
oil and gas industry.explore in
our world’s oceans,” said Joel

-Reynolds, a lawyer with the

nonprofit Natural Resources
Defense Council. “Impacts on
marine mammals can no longer
be ignored.”

Bruce Tackett, a spokesman
for ExxonMobil Biomedical Sci-
ences, said his company wasn’t
aware of harm done to marine

life due to their oil and gas sur- °

veys, and have initiated research
on the issue.

On Monday, Japan held its
first “normalisation” meeting —
a term used by Joji Morishita,
chief spokesman for the Japan-
ese delegation, to describe the
process of turning the [WC

away from being a conservation

Morishita said. “This is the
beginning of a rational process
of returning the IWC to a man-
agement organisation.”

No specific issues were dis-
cussed at the meeting, but Mor-
ishita said the pro-whaling
nations would meet early next

year in Japan to talk about.

moving forward. He also said
the Japanese government had
told him to consider pulling out
of the IWC, but they would try
to reach.a compromise before
doing so.

If the Japanese-led talks led
to.a whole new organisation,
“the IWC would be a dead
duck,” said British delegate
Richard Cowan, whose country.
opposes commercial whaling.

Still, most anti-whaling dele-
gates said it was too early to tell
what impact Japan’s efforts
would have on the IWC.

The IWC was meeting
through Tuesday on the
Caribbean island of St. Kitts.
The 60-year-old international
organization has a mandate to

conserve and manage the stocks ©

of the 13 different species of
great whales, such as hump-
backs and blue whales.

ae

scone Literate :
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eProfessional

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The Manager, Kelso Medical
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P.O. Box SS-6109, 10 Collins
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322-7994 (ph) or 325-7208 (fax)
Email: Kelso@securenetbahamas.com



5

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TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 9 sf.

LOCAL NEWS ao

THE TRIBUNE





THE government was urged
yesterday to rethink its decision
to name Nassau International
Airport after the late prime
minister, Sir Lynden Pindling.

Readers responding to The
Tribune’s controversial
INSIGHT article said it was
wrong for a “tainted” politician
to be honoured in this way.

And several said: “Pindling
was no hero of mine.”

One even suggested that —

those who backed him politi-
cally should raise money them-
selves to erect their own memo-
rial.

But, he added, the country’s
airport should not be burdened
for eternity with a name that
many Bahamians reviled...espe-
cially as it was being paid for
by taxpayers’ money.

“Those of us who travel



not universally liked.

Some said it was “inappro-
priate” that the airport should
be named after a politician who
provoked mixed reactions.

Another said the name would
confuse travellers and add to
the woes of tourists. “The cur-
rent code for Nassau is NAS.
Will it have to change to PIN?

This is a tourism economy. ’

Think about good customer ser-
vice and don’t confuse trav-
ellers,” he said.

One reader asked whether
the Nassau airport code would
now become LOP. (for Lynden
Oscar Pindling) or whether the
government wotild go the whole
hog and call it PLP. “God, now
I’m giving them ideas,” she said.

One agreed with a reader’s
quote in INSIGHT saying:
“There are some people we

er said: “Mr Mitchell was a
vocal critic of Sir Lynden when
it suited him. He has no credi-
bility and intelligent people
stopped listening to him a long
time ago.”

Another reader, Ezzard
Rolle, said it was disappointing
that INSIGHT highlighted only
the “negative” part of Sir Lyn-
den’s contribution.

“The modern Bahamas was
largely due to the leadership of
this man,” he said.

National Insurance, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, the Cen-
tral Bank and many more
institutions were created

-under his leadership, he said.

“Responsible journalism
should reflect both sides of
the story and then allow
the readers to decide,” he
added.




























GHERUGBLR FARUECLEEE,

wh
a
wt,










through the airport every week —_ don’t need to remember. I think. e All responses will be 2
are going to be confronted with Sir Lynden was one of them.” —_ published in full in next #
his portrait. If he was a great However, Foreign Affairs Monday’s INSIGHT sec- uy
leader we could all respect, it Minister Fred Mitchell told a__ tion. =
would be different, but Pindling radio talk show that Sir Lynden _, ui
wasn’t.” was “Father of the Nation” and
The INSIGHT article record- | deserved such an honour. He an
ed the mixed views of several again attacked the press for, in NASSAU International Be More Than “
Bahamians and asked whether his words, “showing no ‘ Airport, check in desks, Just Another Prescription cs a
it was right for the airport to be respect”. and (inset) former Prime a ‘4
named after someone who was Responding, a Tribune read- Minister Sir Lynden Pindling , y
%

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6 ° o {*e . 9 a 4 \ ° é e
Significant concern’ —_foecjsign gn = Health officials eine a tT tt

i . Dispensing a dleatthier Lafe ndty
about illegal drug | ; jetted Gir ie assn enone :

Son Ee, ie ‘ . 3 adeira Shopping Plaza 5

‘ ; tc. arate (ria ¢ side of caution - , -
smuggling in Bahamas : Accepting all major local insurance plans and
, FROM page one providing many discounts. : +

FROM page one : eX { dt (| ¥
pas i Exper e 0 dy _ “While we are now feeling a Registered Pharmacist on Duty, bs

efforts. : little more comfortable about Todd Culmer. ;

According to OPBAT statistics, during this fiscal year, 868
kilos of cocaine and 99,553 pounds of marijuana had been
seized, 78 had been arrested for drug-related offences, 674 ille-
gal migrants had been seized at sea, and 91 lives assisted through .

search-and-rescue missions.

“This success speaks to the continued importance to the }
United States, The Bahamas, and the Turks and Caicos Islands - :
of OPBAT," the chargé concluded, adding: "We remain fully:
committed to building upon our unique law enforcement part-
nership in the year ahead to keep drugs away from our shores
and strengthen security and the rule of law among all OPBAT

partners."

The two parties agreed that the next Joint Task Force meet-
ing would take place in December.



FROM page one

Prosecutors disagree.

They claim that Robins’
murder occurred in 2002,
nearly a year before those of
the younger boys.

Prosecutors want Farring-
ton to stand trial. for Robins’
murder first, followed by a tri-
al for the murders of the four
boys. rile Apel vse

lm PHOTOGRAPHER Franklyn Gustavus Darling-Ferguson —Franklyn G Ferguson — is sworn in
yesterday before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez as a Justice of the Peace.

Mr Ferguson, a native of Delectable Bay, Acklins, has been a freelance photographer for almost 40
years and.has seen many transitions in the course of the country’s life.

(Photo: Lorenzo Lockhart)

Migrants caught at sea near US territory

@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

THE U.S. Coast Guard
returned 13 migrants to the
Dominican Republic on Mon-

“day after picking them up at sea
near this U.S. territory, officials
said, according to Associated
Press.

The Dominicans — 10 men,
three women — were detained
Sunday evening by the Coast

Guard near Desecheo Island in
the Mona Passage, an often-per-
ilous stretch of sea separating
Puerto Rico and the Domini-
can Republic, said Ricardo Cas-
trodad, a Coast Guard
spokesman.

The migrants were in good
health. ;

Since October, U.S. authori-
ties and Puerto Rico police have
interdicted about 2,720 migrants

in the Mona Passage, Castro-
dad said.

Smugglers in small boats fre-
quently attempt to carry
migrants from the Dominican
Republic to Puerto Rico, a
roughly 70-mile (110-kilometer)
journey across the Mona Pas-
sage. In late April, at least five
migrants died when their boat
capsized en route to western
Puerto Rico.

the entire thing, we cannot let
up because we have to deter-
mine a source and follow it up.
We have to determine whether
there are any other persons who
may or may not have been
affected in some way or the oth-
er, and then ensure that they
have access to services. And we
have to look at vulnerable pop-
ulations in the Bahamas and
seek to ensure that they are
treated so that there can be no
transmission of malaria,” Dr
Nottage said.

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PAGE 10,

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING

8:00

New Florida © |NovaA minute-by-minute, eyewit-
WPBT ness account of hurricane Katrina.
1 (CC) (DVS)

@ WFOR
WTV4U |wood
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WPLG

JUNE 20, 2006








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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 2U, 2UU6, PAGE 11





Si By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Bahamian family is chang-
ing; according to observers.

They have noticed that the same
“abandonment issues” that exist
in single parent homes are creeping
intd two-parent families as well.’

This development is said to be
coupled with a sociological shift,
in which “traditional” male and
female roles are being reversed.

When painter Georgia O'Keefe
was dying, she was quoted as say-
ing: “Nobody sees a flower — real-
ly + it is so small it takes time — we
haven't time — and to see takes
time, like to have a friend takes
time. And we have no time.”

er

“If you are a two-parent family, you

have to balance your careers

or else the children are going to get
hurt. If mom and dad is out everyday
working, the children may not be
getting enough time. Are you seeing
your children? Can you be with
them? Are you listening to their fears
and dreams?”

Physiologist Dr David Allen

This, According to Physiologist
Dr David Allen, defines a mod-
ern dilemma, in which time robs us
of being who the really are, and
individuals are prevented from
paying attention to the small yet
important things in life.

Experts now know that for a
child to have a meaningful lite in
western culture, they need to have
five meaningful people involved
in that life.

‘What is happening is that some
children don’t have five, so it
depends on not whether you were

frdm a single or double-parent, but .

the kind of people that were inter-
nalised in your life experience.

“The sad thing is the more
aggressive we become. and more
educated and busier we are, we
create the same abandonment
issues in our children as the kid
who has no family,” he said.

‘The majority of children in the

the 4,551 live births were to single
women. This does not include
those who were born to women
who were widowed or divorced,
which was a small number, 62.
This year, these children will be
celebrating their sixth birthday.
Whether their mothers remained
single or not obviously depends on
many factors; as numerous per-

haps as.the reasons why they were *

born out of wedlock in the first
place.

Statistics show that of-all the
households in the Bahamas, 38 per
cent are headed by a single female
and 25 per cent are headed by peo-
ple who have never been married.

The striking fact however, lies
in the fact that of that 25 per cent,
43 per cent of females were never
married, compared to only 13 per
cent of male heads.

Households headed by women
tend to be more vulnerable to

ness, this is a statement not many
people are willing to make — but it
is backed by hard statistical facts.

According to the Bahamians
Living Conditions Survey of 2001,
female-headed households tend-
ed to be larger — with six or more
members — than male-headed
households.

The statistics further suggest that
female-headed households have
more dependents in them than
male-headed households and are
poorer.

Half of the households in the
poorest sectors of the country are
headed by females. However in
these areas while female leader-
ship was about equivalent to that
of male leadership, the number of
female-headed homes declined as
the standard of living rose; the
opposite of their male-headed
counterparts.

In the social realm, Dr Allen

Bahamas, 56 percent,arebornto social ills.

single mothers. In 2000, 2,584 of

.E-ADDERLEY Junior High School.



In this age of political correct-

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff) - my

said that is easier to speak of the
issues associated with facts like







FROM page one

are ill-prepared.

i Are A F Adderley Junior School's figures just an
anomaly, or is it indicative of what is going on
throughout the public school system in the
Bahamas?

: Spurred on by these troubling statistics coming
gut of A F Adderley Junior School, The Tribune will,
once again, take a look at our educational system
with the objective of getting a grasp on systemic
problems that continue to produce an educational-
ly deficient population.

: In February, 1981, The Tribune ran an article in
which then minority leader of the opposition, J Hen-
ty Bostwick, attacked the educational system under
the Progressive Liberal Party as "an absolute and
total failure." ,

Ten years later, in 1991, High Rock MP CA
Smith expressed dismay that the then education
minister, Dr Bernard Nottage, had openly admitted
to the "total failure" of the Bahamian educational
system.

: Then, on a radio talk show in 2000, Dr Nottage,
upon resigning from the PLP, once again said that
the educational system has not been a success."

* Two years later, in September, 2002, the nation-
al grade point average stood at D, and the following
May, Prime Minister Perry Christie said that he
tmeasured "the Bahamas by the failure of the edu-
cation system to deal with children leaving school
who are not able to read or write."

"How can we allow something like this to happen
when we have 300,000 people?" the relatively new

"prime minister questioned.

:

to figure it out when, after 25 years, the public
school's national average for graduating exams
stands at around E or F+ and, according to the
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), 75 to
80 per cent of Bahamian students taking technical
ae vocational subjects read below their grade lev-
‘el.
Yet, the Minister of Education promises a "qual-
itative improvement" in education over the next
five years because of his ministry's efforts.

But whereas Minister Alfred Sears, in his address

y
meets a
3
hk

Shock graduating figures

* Now, in 2006, the government stilrhas not-seemed :-~

to the House during the 2006/2007 budget debate,
promised to make education in the next five years
"relevant to the needs of national development and
competitive with global development," some have
seen years of in-fighting at the ministry as one of sev-
eral factors hindering "qualitative" improvements
in education and the educational system.
According to North Eleuthera MP and shadow
Minister of Education, Alvin Smith, "what has hap-
pened under the ministership of Alfred Sears is that

. Mr Sears has chosen to just ignore, for the most

part, the Director of Education.

“She is the chief technocrat. That's the person
who advises the minister on educational matters.
The director should be the one who is a part of
their recruitment, their curriculum development,
the staffing, and they are circumventing the director.

"The director over the last three-and-half years
has not been involved in the process of improving
the educational system because the relationship

- between the director and minister has been so

strained that it has impacted, negatively, education,
and no matter what the situation, you have to be
mature enough and professional enough to allow the
system to work, and allow the director to function,"
said Mr Smith.

"The director, she knows education," Mr Smith
added. "Technically, she is very strong. But what has
been happening is there has been a tug-of-war" - a
tug-of-war, according to one secondary school prin-
cipal, that is impacting children down the ladder.

"There needs to be an evolution of authority in
the Ministry of Education," said the principal.
"There is too much politics involved. Whoever it is
in charge of education has to have a vision for edu-
cation, because meanwhile our kids are getting lost
een he re ee

"Most times, you don't have time to be stressing
yourself over the ministry's in-fighting, except when
you send copious amounts of information to the
ministry, and before it gets there it goes missing
somewhere," the principal added. "We are trying to
stay focused on doing the best we can right here
on site."

° Tomorrow, The Tribune looks at the bleak
future facing youngsters with sub-average grades.

these rather than speaking about
what causes them.

He pointed out that it is a long-
term belief in Bahamian society

- that a woman should have a child

at a certain age.

“Tt was just an accepted norm
that if you got to a certain age and
did not have a child you were
somewhat inadequate. That is

changing a bit now. Many times.
kids from single parent homes tend:

to have children. It’s a repetition
compulsion. The pain you have in

your life you seek to master it by:

recreating it,” Dr Allen said.

Often, women who have babies
out of wedlock tend to have inti-
macy issues and they tend to create
intimacy though the baby they
have.

“The sad thing is the reason the
mother brought the child into the
world was to give the mother inti-
macy. The trouble is that this puts
tremendous onus on that child
because the child needs intimacy
from the mother.

“The sad thing about human
pain is that we are doomed to
repeat it. When you are hurt, par-
ticularly as a young parent, that
pain is internalised and the idea is
that you keep repeating it in the

hope that you will master it some _

day,” the psychologist said.

This concept applies to Bahami-
an men as well, and can be seen in
those who believe their manhood
is tied to the number of children
they have.”

“Tts called the Don Juan syn-
drome. The idea is that because I
feel inadequate in my own mas-
culinity if Ihave more children I
may become more adequate,” Dr
Allen said.

Because of the underling reli-
gious convictions of Bahamian
society, the endorsement of con-
traception was considered for some

time to be linked to encouraging

sexual activity — and therefore was
disregarded in‘ favour of more
“morally correct” abstinence.

Dr Allen said’ that society has.’

not done a good job of teaching

‘ the use of contraception — that is,

up until the AIDS. epidemic.

“Tn essence we were using denial
when people were acting out their
sexually,” he said.

However, those children born —

into a single family home are not
doomed to failure. As Dr Allen
explained, the pathology of the sin-
gle parent home is neutralised by a
bonded community or society.
“What we are finding now is

that it is better to have a two-par- -

ent family, but if you have a single
parent family who has a extended
family or a neighborhood that
helps with that child, that child is
better seen. :

“Being seen in my field means
now you try to understand the
child, listening to the child, that
child’s dream and fears. To do that

takes time. The problem in our ~

modern Bahamas — particularly in
Nassau — is that we don’t have

“I’m a professional chef. My mom owns a ladies’
fashion boutique and my grandmother cares for her

grandkids all day long. The Tribune’s Woman & Health

section is invaluable to us. We are constantly updated
with articles on food, fashion and child-rearing. We
love The Tribune. The Tribune is our newspaper.”

DESEREA WALKINE “My Gourmet Lunch & Picnic Baskets”, _

CYNTHIA CLARKE “Maria’s Boutique”, and
FRANCIS CLARKE, Active Grandmother.

READ



EVERY TUESDAY

A brand new news feature from
The Tribune which delves deeper
‘into the stories that YOU care about.

The acute m ; on a i
he Bahamian family

time,” Dr Allen said

While the cliché of the “ideal
family” of a husband, wife and 2.3
children may look good on paper,
Dr Allen said that there is a strong
need to look at the needs. of each
family member. EH

“Tf you are a two-parent family,

you really have to balance your

careers or else the children are
going to get hurt. If mom and dad

_ is out everyday working, the chil-

dren may not be getting enough

_ time. Are you seeing your chil-
‘dren? Can you be with them? Are
‘you listening to their fears and

dreams?”

Now, even the roles of men and
women in families and society at
large are in flux, said Dr Allen, as

. some women are showing more

“masculine traits” and men are
exhibiting more feminine traits.
“In our field masculine means
someone who is assertive and goes
out there and hunts, as it were.

. Feminine means nurturer. What

is happening is that you are finding
Bahamian women who are exhib-
it both features and there are some
men who are having more nurtur-
ing than hunting features so we
are a society in flux,” Dr Allen
said.

However, in the 21 century, Dr
Allen said that there needs to be a
balance between the two on the
part of both sexes. Men need
to have a nurturing side and
women must be able to assert
themselves.

The Tribune

Gly Voie. Ply Vewspaean!



3
Â¥
'


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



ew fogging schedule ar announced

THE government has
released an updated mosquito

fogging schedule for New Prov- .

idence and Exuma.

The fogging, known as “adul-

ticiding” will be continued for
the rest of June by the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services.

In a statement yesterday, the

government said that the adulti-
ciding of two areas within a mile
and a half-mile radius of the
Carmichael Road Detention
Centre has now been completed.

The areas of New Providence
that have been treated so far
include:

° Spikenard Road

e Faith Avenue

e Carmichael Road

e¢ Cowpen Road

° Gladstone Road

e Firetrail Road

© Coral Harbour Road

e Bacardi Road

e Golden Isles Road

° JFK Drive

° Harrold Road

¢ Sir Milo Butler Highway

eerie kee

Saturday, June 17
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3

Monday, June 19
Areal
Area 2
Area 3_

Tuesday
Area 1
Area 2

Wednesday
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3

Thursday
Area 1
Area 2

Friday
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3



: Forest, Ocean Addition and Farmer’s Hill
: Bahamas Sound 18, Bahamas Sound 14 and Bahamas Sound 11
“: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

: Airport, Ramsey, Mt. Thompson and Forest _
: Moss Town, Hermitage, Tar Bay and Hooper’s Bay
: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

: Forest, Ocean Addition and Farmer’s Hill
: Bahama Sound 18, Bahama Sound 14 and Bahama Sound 11

: Airport, Ramsey, Mount Thompson and Forést
: Moss Town, Hermitage, Tar Bay and Hope: s Bay
: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

: Roker’s Point, Steventon, Curtis, Stuart Manor and Barrettere
: Rolle Town, Hartswell, Forbes Hill and Williams Town

: Roker’s Point, Steventon, Curtis, Stuart Manor & Barretere
: Rolle Town, Hartswell, Forbes Hill & Williams Town
: Cooper’s Yard and George Town

ee Providence

Monday, June 19

Areal
Area 2

Area 3
Area 4.

Tuesday
Area 9
Area 10

Area 11
Area 12

Wednesday
Area 17

_ Area 18
Area 19.
Area 20

Thursday
Area 13

Area 14

Area 15
Area 16

: Adelaide Village, Adelaide Road and Coral Harbour Road to the Defence

Force Base.

: Coral Harbour Road, Windsor Road, Mount Pleasant Village Road and

Clifton Pier Road.

: West Bay Street, JFK Drive and Windsor Road
: Blake Road, West Bay Street, West Bay Ridge Estates and JFK Drive

: Westridge Estates, West Bay Street; Prospect Ridge and JFK Drive
: Prospect Ridge Road, West Bay Street, White Grove Road, Marlin Drive,

Dolphin Drive and JEK Drive

: Dolphin Drive, Marlin Drive, West Bay Street, White Grove Road, Ferguson

Road or Perpall Track, West Bay Street and St Albans Drive to the back of
Batelco

: Faith Avenue, Sir Milo Butler Highway, Harrold Road, Baillou Hill Road and ° -

Carmichael Road

: Bethel Avenue, JFK Drive, Harrold Road, Bethel Avenue
: Bethe! Avenue, Harrold Road, Yellow Elder Highway, Sports Center Road,

Thompson Boulevard, Bethel Avenue

: Yellow Elder Way, Harrold Road, Blue Hill Road, Tucker Road, Thompson

Boulevard

_: Tucker Road, Blue Hill Road, Poinciana Drive, Thompson Boulevard

: Eden Street, Foster Street, Wallace Road, Farrington Road, Alto Street,

Saunders Road, Lightbourne Avenue and Kiki Street

: Eden Street South, Foster Street, Boyd Road, Nassau Street, Russell Road, ee

College Avenue and Farrington Road

: Farrington Road, Russell Road, Thompson Boulevard and Farrington Road
’ : Nassau Street, Meadow Street, Chapel Street, Market Street, Wulf Road and

Poinciana Avenue

° Hesobaing to the Department of Environmental Health, fogging will be conduc between the
hours of 10pm and 2am.



w UN Human Rights Council.



Tye s fre

i GENEVA

THE United,Nations inaugu-
rated its new Human Rights
Council on Monday, vowing to
uphold the highest standards of
human rights and erase the tar-
nished image of its predecessor
despite lingering doubts about
its effectiveness, according’ to
Associated Press.

The 47-member council -

replaces the Human Rights
Commission, which became dis-
credited in recent years as
rights-abusing countries con-
spired to escape condemnation.
_ U.N. Secretary-General Kofi
Annan urged the council’s
members not to squander. the
opportunity.
“Never allow this council to
‘become caught up in political

point-scoring or petty maheu- |

_ ver,” Annan said. “Think
always of those whose rights are
denied.”

He said the council has a
chance to start its work with a

tangible ‘achievement by pass- -

ing two “vital documents”
one against enforced disap-
pearances, the other guaran-
teeing the rights of indigenous
peoples — and sending them
for approval by the General
Assembly.

However, the council’s first
meeting, which runs through
June 30, aims only to establish
its operating procedures, includ-
ing how it should carry out
- human rights reviews of all 191

U.N. member states, and how
often.

Louise Arbour, the U.N. high
commissioner for human rights,
said the council should rededi-
cate itself to the “scaffolding of
human rights” enunciated by
former. President Franklin. D.
Roosevelt, whose widow,
Eleanor, was the first chair-
woman of the commission more
than 60 years ago.

“President Roosevelt’s four
freedoms — freedom from
want, freedom from fear, free-
dom of expression and freedom
of worship — challenged us to
promote liberty though democ-

‘racy, justice and an equitable
distribution of resources,”
Arbour said.

General Assembly President
Jan Eliasson, who guided the
negotiations that led to the cre-
ation of the council, told the
delegates they were “part of an
historic occasion.”

“Let us be guided by a spirit
of renewed cooperation and of
upholding the highest standards
of human rights,” Eliasson said.

The European Union said the
council should take inspiration
from Myanmar’s pro-democra-
cy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi,
who is under house arrest. Suu

Kyi, who celebrated her 61st
birthday Monday, has spent 10
of the last 17 years in confine-
ment, making her one of the
world’s most prominent pole
prisoners. <

“The EU is committed to
support. women human rights
defenders who put their free-
dom, safety and sometimes their
lives on the line to advance the
cause of human-rights,” Austri-
an Foreign Minister, Ursula
Plassnik said. “One of these
fearless women is Aung San
Suu Kyi ... Her vision and
courage should be our ipa
tion in this forum.’

Plassnik spoke for the 25-

‘nation bloc because Austria

holds the EU presidency.

The new council will hold
more meetings than the com-
mission, comprising 10 weeks a
year — greater than the current
six weeks. It will also be easier
to convene special sessions to
respond quickly to human rights
crises.

Furthermore, any member °
that “commits gross and sys-



tematic violations of human
rights” can be suspended from
the council by a two-thirds vote
of the General Assembly.

But some critics fear that the
council will be as weak as the
commission, undermined by
member states accused of major
rights violations. Cuba, Saudi
Arabia, China and Russia won
seats despite their poor human
rights records, although others
—notably Iran — were defeat-
ed.

Many countries accused of
rights violations, who had been
members of the old commis-
sion, didn’t even seek seats on
the new council, including
Sudan, Zimbabwe, Libya, Con-
go, Syria, Vietnam, Nepal, Sri

- Lanka, Eritrea and Ethiopia.

The United States has-been
skeptical of the council but has
promised to work for its suc-
cess even if it didn’t run for a
seat.

The US. delegation will be
headed by Warren Tichenor,
the new ambassador to the U.N.

_.offices in Geneva.



s amid hopes and doubts

presented by the”

° Jem Epsambley

* Sidewalk |
Art Gallery
Silent Auction

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TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





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NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

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Tel: (242) 351-3010 |





‘The Singapore or the

Hong Kong of t



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
he Bahamas could
become the “Hong

Kong or Singapore of
the west” if it was to
exploit Freeport’s poten-
tial as a transhipment hub for the
Americas by attracting Chinese

exporters and manufacturers, a .

Bahamian attorney said yesterday.

Michael Scott, Callenders & Co’s
senior litigation partner, told The Tri-
bune he was leaving today for a 10-
day trip to China and the Far East,
where he planned to market this
nation’s financial services and ship-
ping registry potential to customers in
that nation.

‘Apart from promoting those two
industries, Mr Scott said he was also
meeting a number of Chinese com-
panies with the aim of “getting Chi-
nese manufacturers to set up show-

f@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



. THE project to revitalise harbourfront Nassau aims to
“transform” Arawak Cay “into a unique destination, featur-
ing an-eco-park, shopping village, national fairgrounds and

expanded fish fry.

The master plan for revitalising downtown Nassau, pro-

Plan to ‘trans
Arawak, Potter’s Cay



west’

Bahamian law firm in tie-up with Chinese correspondent partner

‘ rooms in Grand Bahama with a view:

to soliciting or having orders sent out

“to North: American and Latin Amer-

ica”.

Mr Scott said that to further tap
into China’s economic potential, Cal-
lenders & Co had become the first
Bahamian law firm to link up with a
Chinese correspondent partner.

The company’s Beijing-based cor-
respondent was the Jincheng & Tong-
da law firm. mans

“We’re actively pushing our China
connections, and doing a lot of that
from our London office,” Mr Scott
said.

He added that it had become
increasingly important to push
Freeport’s potential as a port, ship
repair facility, storage terminal and
transhipment hub for Chinese firms

orm’

duced by 200 Bahamian stakeholders in conjunction with
urban planning firm EDAW, includes a blueprint for chang-
ing Arawak Cay and the nearby beach into a recreation and

given the recent tie-up announced
between Port Everglades, in Florida,
and COSCO, the Chinese firm that is
the world’s third largest shipping com-

pany. .

Mr Scott said that on his trip, which -

will take him to Guangdong Province,
Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong,
he would be meeting with both
COSCO and Hutchison Whampoa.

Following Prime Minister Perry
Christie’s official state visit to China,

then financial services and invest-
ments minister, Allyson Maynard-
Gibson, said COSCO was planning
to invest an initial $90 million in the
Grand Bahama Shipyard. However,
that has not happeried, and it appears
COSCO’s attention has wandered:to
Port Everglades.

Hutchison Whampoa, which owns

50 per cent of the Grand Bahama

Port Authority, owns 50 per cent
stakes in the Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company (Devco) and
Freeport Harbour Company, and also
holds the management contract for
Freeport International Airport.

In addition, Hutchison Whampoa
holds the management contract for
the Panama Canal, and owns storage
terminals at both ends of that facility.

Mr Scott said Freeport had
“tremendous potential” in the tran-
shipment and logistics businesses, and
Chinese companies would be able to
use it to “ship goods in, ship them
out” and send them on to end user
destinations in North, Central and
South America.

He added that Freeport, with the

business, trade. and tax incentives’

derived from the Hawksbill Creek

- Agreement, “lends itself to that kind

of use”.

If Freeport exploited that poten-
tial, Mr Scott said the economic
impact could be “phenomenal, and
put the Bahamas on the map for tran-
shipment. It’s a natural evolution”.

“We’re on it, enthusiastic about it,

. and think the future potential is enor- -

mous,” Mr Scott said. “We should be
looking at things like that, making |
the Bahamas the Singapore or Hong
Kong of the west. Obviously, tourism -
can’t be the.only paradigm.” ;
With the rapid development of Chi-
na’s economy, iand the increase in © —
numbers of high net worth individuals -

_ SEE page 9B

t
4
‘4

M By NEILHARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE developers behind the ==
$700 million Rum Cay Resort °
Marina project told The Tri-
bune that “all the construction
materials” for the island’s new
airport terminal, set to become
the Bahamas’ third largest,
arrived on the island last week.

-Tim Perkins, construction
director for Montana Holdings,
the tourism and real estate
developer behind the project,

event destination for both Bahamians and tourists, a move that
will generate “Bahamian business opportunities”.

The proposed blueprint includes a private resort at the
western end of Arawak Cay, a marina village accessible to the
public, and a Fast Ferry Port ia
and terminal.

SEE page 6B

The master plan said: “The




said the company was building
its construction offices at the
site over “the next two weeks”.
All materials for those facilities





sa

i FROM L to R: Pictured at the signing of an almost $7 million contract to construct a marina for
the Rum Cay Resort Marina project are Tim Perkins, director of construction for Montana Hold-
ings; Dwayne Pratt, president of Heavy Marine and Foundation; Michael Pratt, general manager
of Heavy Marine and Foundation; and Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, MP for Rum Cay



SEE page 7B



Minister hits back
over work permits









| just got a lod banc.

for do W Y / :

m@ By CARA BRENNEN " tistics proved that criticism that
Tribune Staff Reporter the Government was not
responding quickly enough to.

MORE than 8,000 work per- -work . applications was

unfounded. ;
During his contribution to

the 2006-2007 Budget debate,

Mr Gibson said that since Jan-

mit applications have either
been renewed or approved in
the past 12 months, the Minis-
ter of Labour, Immigration
and Training told the House
of Assembly yesterday. \
Shane Gibson said these sta- .

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006



Financial services must take
note of CAFTA’s implic

LAST week, I wrote about the
visit of former President Flores of
El Salvador to Nassau as a guest
of the Nassau Institute and the
Atlas Research Foundation. El
Salvador was one of the first
countries to ratify the Central
American Free Trade Agree-
ment (CAFTA). President Flores
and his administration (1999-
2004) felt strongly that participa-
tion in a free trade agreement
was a necessary component in
his country’s economic restruc-
turing.

This view has continued with
the new administration, as the
current Salvadoran President,
Antonio Saca, in a June 2005
interview in Business Week, said
that “... a free trade agreement
with the US is essential to his
country’s and the region's growth
and stability”.

The passage of CAFTA was
not without controversy in each



signatory state. Indeed, in the
US, President Bush had to call
in a lot of political favours to get
the agreement through the Sen-
ate. Today, I will reprint a col-
umn about CAFTA almost a
year ago.

CAFTA Blueprint

In February 2004, I wrote in a
column: “In the Americas, the
United States current - and in
negotiation - Free Trade Agree-
ment (FTA’s) partners represent
more than two-thirds of the
hemisphere’s economy, not
counting the US.” I then went
on to predict that within a few
years, all of the hemisphere’s
economies will be covered by an
FTA, of oné kind or another,
with the US.

It is widely believed that CAF-
TA will be the blueprint for all
other hemispheric FTAs between
the US and other regional group-

NOTICE:



Financial
Focus



ings. It is likely that, eventually,
the US will pursue an FTA with
Caricom, or individual countrie:
within the region.

CAFTA is a trade pact signed
between Costa Rica, the Domini-
can, Republic, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua
and the US. The terms of the
agreement were actually agreed
in early 2004, but each individ-
ual country’s legislature must
then approve it before it becomes
law. The only countries left to
ratify the agreement are Costa
Rica, Nicaragua and the Domini-
can Republic.

GN363 ©

Office of The Deputy Prime Minister and
Ministry of National Security

The Ministry of National security advises all insurance brokers, duly registered under part 4 of the
Insurance Act, Statute Laws of The Bahamas Chapter 347, that tenders for the supply of medical

insurance for law

enforcement officers and certain categories of public

bona fide insurance brokers.

service officers are available for distribution to

Persons presenting themselves for the receipt of tender documents should be in possession of proof
of their registration and picture identification. if

The distribution of the tender documents will be held in the Conference Room of the department of
Customs, Thompson Boulevard, Oakes field. Distribution will be made during the hours of 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m on Thursday 22 June, 2006 and Friday, 23 June, 2006. °



peaks cera mach tod
as low as

Market Size

The countries of CAFTA
(excluding the US) represent a
population of about 45 million
persons, and a combined GDP
of less than 1 percent of that of
the United States. Looking at the
relative size another way, the
CAFTA economy is about equal
in size to that of the city of Sacra-
mento (the capital of California).

Notwithstanding the lop-sided
relative GDP size comparisons,
CAFTA countries represent the
US’ second largest export market
in Latin America, and 13th
largest export market worldwide
— as surprising as it seems. In
2003, the US exported some $15
billion worth of goods to CAFTA
countries, while it imported some
$17 billion worth of goods.

Historically, CAFTA countries
exported primarily agricultural
products such as fruits, vegeta-
bles, meat, coffee, sugar and
tobacco to the US, whereas now
it seems increasingly tilted
towards textiles for large compa-
nies, such as Wal-Mart. US
exports were items such a equip-
ment and machinery. However, if
CAFTA passes in all countries —
services (financial services, in par-
ticular) will become a much larg-
er component of US exports to
the region.

What does CAFTA have to
say about Financial Services?

-While the Bahamas does not
produce or export any significant
amount of agricultural products
or textiles, financial services is
an important component of its
economy. However, the notable
exception to this is our fisheries
exports.

If we accept that the US will
seek FTAs with essentially the
entire hemisphere, then we must
concern ourselves with the finan-
cial services. concessions that
counterparties have to concede
to the US.

The US Department of Com-
merce, on its website, says:
“Improving the conditions for



CITCO

Citco Fund Services

The Citco Group Ltd. is an organization of financial service companies with offices
throughout the world and which provides corporate, fiduciary, fund administration and

banking services.

We invite candidates from qualified Bahamians or persons with Bahamian status for the

position of:

financial institutions to provide
services is a key component of
the US trade liberalisation agen-
da. The financial sector is a criti-
cal component of a nation's econ-
omy: it not only contributes
directly to output and employ-
ment, but also provides an essen-
tial infrastructure for the func-
tioning of the entire economy.”
And: “The CAFTA countries’
commitments in the financial ser-
vices sector include’ core obliga-
tions of national treatment, most-
favoured nation treatment, and.
additional market access obliga-
tions for investment. “The agree-
ment also includes provisions on
cross-border trade in financial
services, new financial services,
regulatory transparency, and
objective and impartial adminis-

tration of domestic regulation. In .

addition, the agreement includes
important commitments relating
to branching, asset management
and use of foreign-based portfo-
lio managers by mutual funds.”

Banking and Securities
CAFTA will lock in rights for
US financial service suppliers to
establish wholly-owned sub-
sidiaries or joint ventures. Also,
banks will be given the ability to
establish a direct branch from
abroad in most countries. Cen-
tral America has committed with-
‘out reservation to’ allow its citi-
zens to consume banking and
securities services abroad, and
will also allow US-based firms to
offer services cross-border to
Central Americans in areas such
as financial information and data
processing, and financial adviso-
ry services.

Insurance

The insurance commitments
contained in the financial services
chapter of the agreement are
comprehensive ,and generally
provide good treatment for insur-
ance providers. Significant liber-
alisation was achieved with the
removal of economic needs tests
and foreign equity limitations.

(Bahamas) Ltd

THE TRIBUNE



These insurance commitments
are significant improvements .
over current WTO obligations.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the CAFTA .,
agreement as it relates to finan-_
cial services has one fundamental *
underpinning and that is the issue '
of market access. While CSME
has been put to bed for now, , a
issues such as market access and - |
rights of establishment will come ,
back at us through the WTO and. °
FTAA.

I would urge participants in. |
the Bahamian banking and insur-.,
ance sectors to start strategically’ -/
planning for the changes that will
be inevitable in the not too dis-7
tant future. Market access is a, .,
key part of the US trade agen-. “
da. This will have significant ,*
implications for competition, .
within the domestic financial sec-."
tor, exchange controls and our
policy of reservations as it relates, .
to certain economic activity. It,”
will also raise the capital ante for _,
most types of businesses operat- —
ing in the sector, and unfortu- _
nately marginalise many existing
operators. While this article did, .
not focus on the arguments...
against CAFTA (which are,’
numerous and significant), it is’
fair to say that many do not see,
this as being advantageous to the. .
other parties (countries). Until...

‘next week... Pe

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-,
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial .,
Pensions Services (Bahamas), 4
wholly-owned subsidiary of Colo- —

‘ nial Group International, which
owns Atlantic Medical Insurance. ,
and is a major shareholder of.
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas. i

The views expressed are those:
of the author and do not neces...
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or any.;
of its subsidiary and/or affiliated .
companies. Please direct .any.,
questions or comments to rlgib-,,
son@atlantichouse.com.bs ,

eae)

/

He ew

Be BEAR MAN ia INN a RPC tA! Bin

Vice President /Resident Manager

yo)

> The candidate will be responsible for overseeing the overall daily operations of the bank,
which primarily consist of the custody and trading of Hedge Funds in addition to normal |:
banking operations. The candidate will be providing guidance and strategic direction |:

for the development and/or marketing of the necessary banking product and services, |:
and seeking commercial opportunities for the bank. :

Operational responsibilities include management of the bank’s client desk which work
consist of the input and reconciliation of general ledger data and administrative and
clerical responsibilities. Other duties consist of preparing the bank’s business plan,
periodic internal reporting and maintaining contact with local authorities and external
auditor. Experience in reporting to a Central Bank is a definite advantage.

Ow owowe lease,

Given the synergy with the services provided by other Citco affiliates in the corporate
management, trust and offshore mutual fund administration, a good working knowledge
of these services is required for the proper functioning of the candidate. Given the
importance to the bank of the increased number of customers, strong knowledge of the

Dutch language is a requirement.

The current environment of International Banking requires an extensive knowledge of
local and international regulation. As such the candidate such have experience with these

regulations.

The successful candidate should have a minimum of 10 years experience in one or more
of the mentioned affiliated/related areas of service or responsibility, with strong emphasis
on custody and trading of Hedge Funds. At least 5 years of the minimum 10 years
experience should be in a banking environment with some years at a managerial level.
The candidate should be willing to be relocated.

Scotiabank's ‘Forgive & Forget’ Mortgage Campaign

To celebrate our 50th year in The Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving
dai. 950,000 in: prizes. The candidate must be highly motivated with excellent communication skills and
demonstrable career achievements. A high level of computer literacy is also required,
with the candidate having experience with IBM AS/400 mainframe systems, Microsoft

Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage indemnity Insurance)
Office applications, SQL and Visual Basic knowledge.

Campaign runs until July 14 2006
Remuneration is based on knowledge and experience. Citco offers benefits and medical

insurance and excellent prospects for further career growth with the Citco Group of '}:

Call or visit us today and fet Scotiabank help you to "Forgive & Forget" Companies.

If you are interested, please send your curriculum vitae and covering letter to:

Fax or mail resumes to:
Managing Director
PO. Box N-4906
Nassau, Bahamas

betel



Life, Money. Balance both:

Traces of Tap Duos 0 thon atin Taner sed enw navies aie anc CARS whe RAS ik Sea





~
THE TRIBUNE

Doing ‘whatever we need’ to

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 3B

save Freeport pre-clearance



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR Ministry of

Tourism official said the Gov-_

ernment and his ministry would
“do whatever we need to do” to
ensure that Freeport Interna-
tional Airport retained its pre-
clearance facilities, as the US
Customs Border Protection
Agency assesses the cost-effec-
tiveness of such operations.
David Johnson, the Ministry
of Tourism’s former deputy
director-general for Grand
Bahama, emphasised that the sit-
uation had not reached the point
where the US government had
suspended or closed Freeport’s
pre-clearance facilities - a move
that would have disastrous con-
sequences for Grand Bahama’s

economy and its tourism sector. .

He said: “Obviously, that’s
nothing anyone in the Bahamas
or Grand Bahama would want
to see happen.

“We will examine any con-
cerns that arise, and do whatever
we need to do to ensure it is
maintained as a pre-clearance
facility for the good and health of
the industry.”

‘Mr Johnson, who is now the
Ministry’s deputy director-gen-
eral for investment and planning,
said the issue was one that would
be addressed by the Bahamian
and US governments.

“Fred Mitchell, minister of for-
eign affairs, said in his Budget
address to the House of Assem-
bly that the issue of pre-clear-
ance in Freeport was one the
Government was working to
address. .

“He added that he had written
to US Secretary of State, Con-
doleeza Rice, on the issue, and
spoken to senior US officials.

“Mr Mitchell said: “We have
known since last year that
because of the dramatic drop in

‘the: volumes of tourists through
the Freeport airport, that there is
a possibility of the scaling back of
the pre-clearancé in Freeport.”

The reduction in tourist num-
bers moving through Freeport







Bi SHOWN are Deborah Bartlett (left), president of the CEO Network,
and the Ministry of Tourism’s David Johnson.

International Airport has largely
been caused by the closure since
September 2004 of Grand
Bahama’s Royal Oasis Resort.
That reduced Grand Bahama’s
hotel room inventory by one
third.

Prime Minister Perry Christie
announced recently that a buyer
for the Royal Oasis had been
found, and it is unclear whether
the uncertainty surrounding
Freeport’s pre-clearance status
could impact the deal.

The Tribune understands that
the Royal Oasis deal has been
done in principle only, and that
one or two steps have to fall into
place before the deal goes ‘hard’.

Loss of pre-clearance would
cause Freeport’s tourist industry
to become uncompetitive at a
time when, apart from the Royal
Oasis situation, the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and gov-
ernment are looking to develop
the industry on that island. Any

such move would send the wrong
signals to potential investors.
The Ginn project in West End
is starting to take shape following
last year’s Heads of Agreement

signing, while existing invest-

ments include the Westin & Sher-

aton at Our Lucaya and the

Grand Bahama Film Studios.
Dr Brent Hardt, Chief of Mis-

sion at'the US Embassy, said that.

while there were no immediate
plans to close US pre-clearance at



Manager and Senior

Accountants.

Entry Level

. (Photo: Derek Smith/BIS)

‘Freeport, the facility was being

reassessed as to whether cost-
wise its continued operation is
feasible.

Dr Hardt said that if pre-
clearence posts were not cost-

‘effective, there could be pres-

sures from the agencies that pay
for them to cut back.

“But we as an Embassy would
certainly oppose that, and that is
what we are looking at. I would
say that the Ambassador will

’

Are you looking for a new challenge?

make clear the importance of, -
in any of the routine assessments
that go forward, the Ambas-'
sador would make clear the
importance of the facility and
that we believe that it is helpful
for the economy of Grand
Bahama,” he said.

Dr Hardt estimated that of the
$15 million spent annually to
have pre-clearence facilities in
New Providence and Grand
Bahama, Freeport can consume
about a third of this annual fig-

ure, or $5 million.

The Grand Bahama Airport
Company,-which owns Freeport
International Airport, has invest-
ed between $25-$30 million to
build its pre-clearance facility to
the US Homeland Security
Department’s specifications. It
was the first facility of its kind to
be built after the September 11
attacks. The Grand Bahama Air-
port Company is part of the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
Group of Companies.





NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137(6) of the International Business
Companies Act.of 2000 TRADPAC S.A. is in
Dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution
was the 16th day of June, 2006. Melanie Moxey and
Paula J ohnson, of Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator
~of TRADPAC S.A. LTD.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

TRADPAC S.A.

s

Melanie Moxey and Paula Johnson
Liquidator



We are currently seeking qualified Managers and Seniors as well as Entry Level candidates to join our Audit practice.

Successful candidates for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years professional public accounting
experience, two of which will have been at a supervisory level. Candidates for'thé Senior position will have approximately
two to four years ef work experience in a public accounting firm. The Manager and Senior positions will require the
individual te hold a CPA, CA or other professional designation. recognized by the Bahamas Institute of Chartered








‘Candidates must have obtained the necessary educational requirements qualifying them to write the CPA examinations or

Winoing Bay have already done so,

6 ABAECO BAHAMAS
' Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership Sales Executives:







KPMG’s entry ievel program provides financial support to write the CPA examinations including travel costs, hotel
accommodations, paid study leave and the costs of revision courses such as the Becker Review,

Excellent opportunities exist in our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice
that offers competitive compensation and benefits packages. ; 4

-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills, erganization
Skills

_ -Exceptional Telephone skills
-Publie speaking preferred
-Ability fo demonstrate strong relationship sales capability |
-Ability to interface professionally with all members of'staff
-Generation and execution of an annual business plan 4 we?
-Self generation of buisness through referrals and other personal ee gee, :
contacts f + i i
-Exceptional skills in long range guest relaional maintenace AUDIT « TAX » ADVISORY
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer purchase ;
sequence
-College degree preferred









Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification ‘ante cop

a copy Of their transcripts if applying for an entry level position,
_ to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Bax N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies @kpmig.corn. bs. ;

aS 2006, KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Ashamian membet firm af KPMG internatiansl, a Swiss cooperative. All cights reserved.



Please Send Resumes to:

Attn: HR Director : : '
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay ei
P.O. Box AB2057
Mash Harbour, Abaco
or
. Fax: 242-367-0077

: Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.



Pricing Tnformation As Of:

19 June 20¢









































i S2wk-Low i
aE “dD Abaco Ma 2 ee % oO.
Dd 5257;5. 8.50 Bahamas Pro ty Fund L725 2 75: 0.00 3.
7.24 6.35 Bank of Bahamas Fee SB Vises. 0.00 4.
0.85 0.70 Benchmark : : 0.80 0.80 0.00 2.
1.80 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.30 1.30 0.00 4.
1.03: 1.05 Fidelity Bank 1.36 4°36 0.00 3.
9.60 8:00 Cable Bahamas 9.40 9.40 0.00 2.
2.20 O39. Colina Holdings L 83 1.81 0.00 oO.
. 10.80 8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.70 10.80 0.10 2,921 5.
SAINT AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE 6.26 4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs "5.46 5.14 -0.32 Oo.
“ 2.88 2.10 Doctor's Hospital 2.60 2.60 0.00 “0%
6.21 4.02 Famguard . 6.21 6.21 0.00 Se
LE 250 10.45 Finco 11.50 Dis. 5.0) 0.00 1,290 4.
‘ : 2.2 43 8.60 FirstCaribbean 420.43: 12.43 0.00 4.07

Ld O'O: 8.42 Focol : ta 20:0 11.00 0.00 a

1.27 OB: Freeport Concrete 1.20.3 1.03 0.00

epor afr S 10.20 9.50 ICD Utilities F506” 9.50 0.00

: 9.10 8.27 J. S. Johnson 9.10 -10 0.00

7.98 Six 0 Kerzner International BDRs : 5 :



Premier R



52wk-H
14.00
10:14

Report Cards will be distributed on Thursday, June

12.2Bahamas Supermarkets
10.0Qaribbean’ Cro





29th, and Friday, June 30th, 2006 in the
Administration Office of St. Augustine’s College. 2.220 0.0009.4
5 Supermarkets L4:,:010 2750 0.360.0 2.57
ie 0.29 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00

















Office hours are from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Parents —
are asked to please come to the school and collect
the reports on these dates, as there are very important



Fund Name









52wk-Low
1.2353 Colina Money Market Fund PsEBoss73*
2.3657 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Furkd78564 ***
2.2487 Colina MS1 red Fund 2.391480**

1006 Colina Bond Fund 1s 1 G4 33 A

22.44



Prefer







letters attached.









NAY_KEX.
Rid $- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
z Ask $- Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 09 June 2006
The Report Cards will not be given to the students, Ist Price Last traded over-the-counter price
. = Today's Close Current day I C ly vol- Trading volume of the prior week ** - 31 May 2006
only a parent or guardian may collect them. Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV ~ Net Asset value +** = 30 April 2006

%.Number of total shares traded today

1 12 months N/M- Not Meaningful



are paid in







h 2006
WW ¥

WELTY
MS




PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



xuma hotels report —
no malaria ‘no-shows’

m@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
EXUMA hoteliers said yes-

terday that they had not expe-
rienced any booking cancella-

tions, despite news of the
malaria outbreak on the island
making the international news
media.

Even though a Canadian vis-
itor became the latest person

to contract malaria over the
weekend, there have been no
cancellations or major:fears
expressed by guests regarding
the disease.

Antoine Chawan, manager
at the Four Seasons Resort at

Emerald Bay, told The Tribune —

right with its guests and given
them every update on the situ-
ation as it became available.
He said the hotel has been
engaged in mosquito spraying,
but added that this was not in
response to the malaria out-
break. Instead, it was standard














Travel Agency Manager.

- Three year experience in Travel Agencies
management war

- Experience organizing team work

- Analytical skills for direction

- Fully trained in Tour Tek Computer System

- Strong Accounting knowledge

- Speak Spanish fluently

- Wide knowledge of the Cuban Tourist products.

- Only serious applicant

Send the resume to P.O. Box:EE-16319 before
June 30, 2006
Only the successful applicants will be contacted.







































































~ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
- NEW PROVIDENCE
CLE/qui/2004/00368

- IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or
lot of land containing by admeasurements 26,963
square feet being a part of Malcolm's Allotment
no. 59 situate in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and being more
particularly situate Northwards of a 30 feet wide
Road Reservation and Westwards of a 20 feet
‘wide Right -of-Way in the aforesaid Southen

District of the Island of New Providence.




AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT,
1959




AND ~ ;

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Drexel Rolle
of the Southern District in the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas

KREWE IKKE IER RR

NOTICE

KIRN INARA IER REE

The Petition of Drexel Rolle of the Southern District in the Island of
New Providence, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas in respect of:- ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in
the Southern District.in the Island of New Providence ane of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and bounded on the
South by a 30 feet wide Road Reservation and running thereon inan
Eastwardly direction 150 feet and then on the East by another 30
Feet wide Road Reservation and running thereon two hundred and
ten and nine hundredths (210.09) feet on the North by a 20 feet wide
Right-of-Way and running in a Westardly direction thereon 50 feet
and then on thereon the west and running Southwardly along the
Eastern Boundary of land the property of one Stacey Talbot and
running thereon 110 feet and then on the North and running
Westardly by land southern boundary of the said Stacey Talbot and
running thereon 50 feet and then Eastwardly and along Western
Boundary in part by land the property of the said Stacey Talbot and in
part by the dead end of the aforementioned 20 feet wide Right-of-
Way and together running thereon 130 feet and then on the North
by land which is another part of Malcolm's Allotments no.59 and-
running thereon 50 feet and on the West by land which is another
part of Malcolm's Allotment 230 feet which said pieces parcels or lot
" of land has such shapes, boundaries, marks and dimensions more
particularly described on the diagram or plan filed herein and
thereon colored Pink.
DREXEL ROLLE the Petitioner claims to be the owner of the.
fee simple estate in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore
described free from encumbrances. :
AND the Peitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas of under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles act 1959 to have his title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declared in a certificate of Title to beg ranted by the court in accor-
dance with provisions of the said act.




NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that-any person having, Dower
ora Right to Dower or adverse Claim ora claim-not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the 7th day of August A.D., 2006 file in the
Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit
to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 7th day of August.A.D., 2006
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Copy of the filed plan may be inspected at:
1. The Registry of the Supreme Court

2. The Chambers of S.A. HARRIS-SMITH SR. & CO.,
Attorneys for the Petitioners , Mackey & Rosedale
Streets, Deal’s Plaza Suite No.8 P.O. Box N-4255,
Nassau, Bahamas '
Dated the 20th day of June A.D., 2006



S.A. HARRIS-SMITH SR.& CO.
Chambers ;
Mackey & Rosedale Streets
P.0.Box N-4255
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner

that the hotel has been forth-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NATASHA SIMEON OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-. 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. |

NURSING CAREER
OPPORTUNITY.

Plastic Surgery office is seeking a full time

REGISTERED
NURSE.

Great benefits; including assistance in
funding for Specialized training.

procedure at the Four Seasons




































Interested persons please fax resume to

328-6479 or cau 356-3189 -

_ for further information. .



teas

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

- Must be a team player. .

_- Excellent probem solving skills.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

- Fluent in French.

- CFA qualifiction.

Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

P.O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in




SC PICTET |
PICKET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:

PORTFOLIO MANAGER

- Strong supervisory and organisational skills
- Commitment to excellent customer service.

- Excellent oral and written communication skills.

- Ability to work under pressure and to meet strict deadlines.

- Knowledge of another language would be an asset.
- Working knowledge of investment instruments.
.- At least five (5) years Private Banking experience.

- Proficiency in a variety of software applications including
“ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE
CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Please send resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park

Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourge, London, Montreal,
Vancouver, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong

Resort during the summer
months or whenever there
appeared to be an incréase in
mosquitos.

At the Peace and Plenty Inn,
a spokeswoman told The Tri-
bune there have been no can-
cellations or major concerns at
their property either.

In Nassau, Ed Fields, vice-
president of public affairs ‘at
Kerzner International, told
The Tribune that at this point
Atlantis has not seen any
impact either.

The Canadian press yester-

_day reported that the Public

Health Agency of Canada was
monitoring the outbreak of
malaria in the Bahamas, and
was recommending Canadians

going to Great Exuma use.

anti-malarial medication and

Minister hits

insect repellents.

The Centre For Disease
Control website gave an “ Out-
break Notice” that the CDC
had recently received official
reports of 14 confirmed malar-
ia cases in Great Exuma,
Bahamas, “an area where
malaria transmission does not
normally occur and for which
anti-malarial drugs have not
previously been recommend-
ed”. sat

According to that website,
13 cases were Bahamians and -
the 14th was an American vis-
itor to the island. :

The CDC recommended
that visitors to the island take
chloroquine as an anti-malari-
al medication and use insect
repellent as they avoid being
bitten by mosquitos. :

back over

work permits

FROM page 1B

uary 2006, in Nassau 3,019
work permit renewals were
approved and 526 were
refused. He said that during

the same period, 987 persons

were granted new work per-

“mits while 408 were refused.

During the period July 2005-
May 2006, 3,778 work and res-
idency permits were approved






on Grand Bahama, and 557
applications were refused. «¢

In Abaco, Mr Gibson said
1,100 work permits were
approved and 181 were turned
down, and in Bimini 211 work
permits were approved and'19
were turned down. :

“This is a total of some 5,089
permits that were approved
and: 757 turned down in the
Northern region,” the minis- .
tersaid. , ;

Mr Gibson aded that the
majority of persons whose
work permits were approved
were Haitian nationals. -'

“This is because they occtlpy

- a unique place in the labour

force as maids, housekeepers
and caregivers,” he said.

Mr Gibson added that from
January to May 2006, some 414
Haitians were approvid for
work permits while «»}v,20
were turned down. 5

Nine hundred Haitians,‘
said, were approved toibé
handymen/gardeners and
labourers, while 451 were
approved to be farm labour-
ers and 74 were refused. ”

He said these figures should
also put to rest any suggestion
that the PLP government was
“anti- Haitian”.

Mr Gibson said more need-
ed to be done to ensure that
Bahamians were given first
preference for jobs. He point-
ed out that often, some com-
panies will advertise jobs even
though they have specific can-
didates already in mind.

He suggested that if Bahami-
ans do apply for a specific job,
they should forward a copy of
their resumes and applications
to the Department of Labour,
so that officials can be aware of
which Bahamians have applied
for which positions.

Mr Gibson said the Depart-
ment of Labour will require
any company applying for five
or more work permits in a
technology-related field to
ensure they hire at least one
Bahamian ‘and train them in
their fields of expertise.

Mr Gibson said this will
ensure that the next time a
job becomes available, a
Bahamian is qualified to do
the work.

Mr Gibson added that the
Government will enact legis-
lation for the full payment of
processing and work permit
fees at the time the application
is submitted to the Department
of Immigration.

“What happens is that per-
sons apply for the permit, and
once they get the letter that it
is approved, then they don’t
check any more,” Mr Gibson
said.

“The difficulty is that we
don’t have sufficient manpow-
er to monitor it, and so what
we are looking at is persons
upon application will have to
pay for the work permit the
same time, and if the work per-
mit is denied then we will
refund your money.”
THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, JUNE 20; 2006, PAGE 5B












Street awaits rates

Copyrighted Materia
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers






NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEATRICE NOEL, P.O. Box



responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.






Abaco

WINDING Bar
ABAD, BANAMAS
Has two (1) vacancies for

Sales & Marketing Project Director:

-Responsible for onsite coordination of sales, sales administration and
marketing.

-Achievement of targeted sales volume and maintaining inventory.
-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and implement
self developed program

«Implementation of tour efficiency and building of strong team values -
-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others

«Strong leadership skills .

-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership

-Minimum 5 years marketing in management of sales, marketing and /or
administration

-College degree preferred, but not required.

Please Send Resumes to:

Attn: HR Director

The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O, Box AB2087 -

Mash Harbour, Abaco

or. ;

Fax: 242-367-0077

esb consultants limited





ad Presently considering applications for

FULL- TIME

ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS

: | Looking for candidates with:

1. 2+ years experience in structural and civil drafting and the creation of construction

: documents.
{| 2. Strong working knowledge of the PC, AutoCAD 2004 Release software and

Autodesk Land experience is a plus.

i? || Responsibilities include:

to sH#l 1. The drafting and creation of construction documents.
tim Ii] 2. Assisting Engineers on site with supervision and management duties.
Cool 3. Participating in design development meetings.

|| Candidates should be hard working and be able to handle a number of projects
pues i] simultaneously. csb consultants limited is a team orientated company, and potential
“tl employees should capable of adapting to this philosophy.

All interested candidates should email there resumes to:
mark@csbconsultantslimited.com

OR fax to:

~ (242) 325-7209
ATTN: Mr. Mark Williams





EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister |





Mike’s Stainless Steel Manufacturing Co

Qur Product Surpasses Standards. Our service exceeds expectations.



GRAND OPENING INVITATIONAL

Thursday June oon
12 noon to 6:30 pm

Fowler Street*
P.O. Box N-4199

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 393-2504

Appointments during our normal operating hours, Mondays-Fridays 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Limited appointment requests available outside of operating hours.

“Cum right at comer of Esso On the Run East Bay we are located on the left hand side across
» . from Nassau Stadium, next to jet ski feta:

oH) PICTET

i8aos
PICKET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:
ACCOUNTING OFFICER

REQUIRED oS -

Preparation of the bates financial statements for internal
and external reporting purpose.

- Preparation of regulatory reports for Central Bank
Preparation of statistical reports
Preparation of various client statements and customized
reports.
Assisting with the soondination of year-end audits.
Responsibility for the accounting activity of managed banks.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

University degree, preferably in accounting.

CPA, CA or equivalent.

Two (2) to three (3) years audit experience.

Strong communication, administrative, time management
and reporting skills.

Advanced level capbility in Micrsoft OTE

Analytical Skills.

Proficient in Microsoft Word.

Must be willing to take initiative and be a team player.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE
CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Please send resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park
P.O. Box 4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in
Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourge, London, Montreal,
Vancouver, Nassau, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong .

Peo hrs ak sas Sah




PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE

oo ue
Plan to ‘transform’ Arawak, Potter’s Cay













NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXINSOND DECIUS, P.O.
BOX GENERAL DELIVERY, OF HOPE TOWN, ABACO,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ODERICK ST. JULISSE,
intend to change my name to ODERICK BENOIR. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box |
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice.










| IBC NO. 121,086B

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
SECOND MANAGED FUTURES LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with the
International Business Companies Act 2000,

The date of commencement of dissolution was June
13th, 2006. Shameka Fernander of P.O.Box CB-
12345, 28 de La Plaine House, Parliament Street
Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed liquidator.

Shameka Fernander
Liquidator

IBC NO. 121,086B

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby. given that, in accordance with
panies Act 2000,

The date of commencement of dissolution was June
13th, 2006. Shameka Fernander of P.O.Box CB-
12345, 28 de La Plaine House, Parliament Street
Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed liquidator.

- Shameka Fernander
Liquidator

Established Bahamian Company
is seeking to fill the position of

‘FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum requirements:

Extensive experience in all aspects of
financial accounting including inventory
control, cost accounting and accounts
payable;

Proficient knowledge of accounting
principles and standards;

Excellent computer skills;

Good communication and management
skills; |
Must be driven, energetic, a team-worker;

Duties will include:
Preparation of complete set of financial
statements;
Cash flow management; __
Liaison with external auditors;
Management reporting;
Budget preparation, business plans and
special projects, as assigned.

Only qualified persons should apply.

If interested, please send detailed resume and
cover letter to fenassau@yahoo.com.

FROM page 1B

Arawak Cay and Beach pro-
ject revitalises the area west of
downtown to make it more
inviting for Bahamian tourists,
creating a western gateway to
the Bay Street area. Under-
utilised industrial land is pro-
posed for more densely popu-
lated uses that take advantage
of waterfront access and
views.” ,

The master plan blueprint
said the plans to revive
Arawak Cay could increase
spending in the area by up to
$77 million per year, with
tourists spending 98,000 more
days in the area per annum.

Property values, if the mas-
ter plan as implemented in full,
were projected to rise by $28
million, with cruise visitors
spending an additional 248,000
hours per annum on Arawak
Cay.

“The Arawak Cay and
Beach project calls for an

IBC NO. 121,086B

extensive redevelopment
focused on retail, office and
tourist uses,” the master plan
said.

“Nearly 750,000 square feet
of new retail, 195,000 square
feet of new hotel space, and
130,000 square feet of office
space are projected.

“Also, 35,000 square feet of
entertainment space is pro-
posed. Sixty-four acres of new
or revitalised park space is pro-
posed. Much of the new devel-
opment will be conducted by
private enterprise with public
guidance.”

The master plan said the
expanded Fish Fry, shopping
village and Fort Charlotte,
along with the expanded beach
area, were “expected to attract
Bahamians as wéll as tourists
to the Arawak Beach area”.

Also set for a makeover is
Potter’s Cay, which will incor-
porate a Gateway Park to
define the entrance to Nassau
from Paradise Island.

The master plan said: “Pot- ,

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with the ~
International Business Companies Act 2000, SEX TH.
MANAGED FUTURES LIMITED is in dissolu-

tion.

The date of commencement of dissolution was June
13th, 2006. Shameka Fernander of P.O.Box CB-
12345, 28 de La Plaine House, Parliament Street
Nassau, Bahamas has been appointed liquidator.

Shameka F ernander
Liquidator














seeking

NOTICE

International Offshore Bank
with Latin American ties is
an OPERATIONS
ASSISTANT. Familiar with
general office duties, loan
documentation,
Applicant must be. fluent in
SPANISH. Proven knowledge
of MS Office products. Please |
submit your resume to
Managing Director, P.O. Box
CB11903, Nassau,




filing.

NP.




TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites

applications from qualified teachers for positions available at
St. John’s College, St. Anne’s School, Bishop Michael

Eldon School, Freeport, and St. Andrew’s School, Exuma

Nassau.
Primary
Language / Literature
Mathematics
Freeport
French
Exuma
Science
Pre-School

Secretary

Only qualified Teachers , with Bachelor or Master Degrees from
an accredited University or College and Teaching
| Certificate need apply

For Further details and application forms, please contact the An-
glican Central Education Authority on Sands Road at-telephone

(242) 322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and /or completed application forms with
copies of required documents must be sent by Friday, June 30th
2006.to the Anglican Education Department addressed to:-

ter’s Cay is reorganised to
include both industrial and cul-
tural uses. Maintained and
reorganised industrial uses
include shipping operations
and the fish exchange.
“Cultural /local market uses

include an expanded and |

improved Fish Fry, a new
marina, a farmer’s market, a
produce exchange and an
island exchange.”

The master plan proposed
the addition of more than

‘180,000 square feet of new

retail space on Potter’s Cay

‘through the local markets,

along with 9,000 square feet of
community space.

The master plan said: “Pot-
ter’s Cay will host a number



Bahamas.



Bahamas.

NOTICE

| NOTICE is hereby given that CHENET JOSEPH OF EAST
ST./ ANDROS AVENUE, P.O. BOX N.P.-8180, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 20TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILBERT MESIDOR, #11
PINEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
‘| responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 20TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE is hereby given that BEAUNENFANT NOEL, P.O.
Box EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible’
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

of new local market destina-
tions, with the fish fry, the
island exchange and the

farmer’s market. Potter’s Cay«,

will become the primary place
for visitors and tourists to
experience the atmosphere of a
true Bahamian marketplace...

“New destinations and mar-
kets for tourists will encour-
age more spending in the Pot-
ter’s Crossing district. The esti-
mated impact of these projects
will be $34 million annually in
new tourist spending, andthe
creation of over 300 new jobs
in these markets.

“New parks and better
organisation of uses will result
in an increase in existing prop-
erty values.”











LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

GRANDE TRAFALGAR INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 25th

day of June, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




















a Spot.




Activities:

Camperdown Riding Club

SUMMER CAMP!!

Weekly camps running June 26th - August 25th.
Yam - 3pm, Mon - Fri
Cost: $170.00/Week

Ages: 6+

Please contact Judy Pinder at 324-2065 between
the hours of 8am - lam & 2pm - 6pm to reserve
your spot. The camp only has 20 spots per week
and it is on a first come, first serve basis. There
is a deposit of $50.00 non-refundable to reserve

e Learn to ride English style.



















The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656

Nassau,Bahamas

e Swim with the horses.
° Grooming & tacking up.
© Basic care of horses.

e and lots more






.., THE TRIBUNE

*
HBL

& &
vee

8
9

25 FROM page 1B

had also arrived on the island.

Mr Perkins said the almost

. + $7 million contract for Bahami-

.:,an firm, Heavy Marine and

Foundation, to complete the

,- marina and project’s first phase

is, would see some 50 Bahamians

..employed at the construction
site.

He added that Montana
Holdings was still “awaiting
final approval from the Gov-
ernment” to begin construc-
tion of the marina, but once

; work began the developers
| Syould directly employ 10 staff,
ps “with the remainder hired by
‘Heavy Marine and Founda-



Mr Perkins said barged
deliveries of equipment to the
development site were arriv-
ing on Rum Cay every two
weeks, and the receipt of sub-
division approvals from the
Government mean that the
developers could now begin
building work.

Apart from 1,000 yards of
sand and gravel for the marina
construction, heavy machinery,
plant, trucks and trailers had
already been transported to
Rum Cay.

Mr Perkins said: “Every-
thing’s moving very well now.
We’ve transported all the
native trees from the marina
site. We’re not going down
there and bulldozing it all and

We’re taking it and moving it
to our nursery. It shows we’re
doing it right.”

Phase I of the project will
involve developing the 80-slip
‘marina, marina village and
associated condominiums and
estates.

The second Phase will
involve construction of the
development’s hotel and sur-
rounding amenities, and the
final phase will complete the
residential estates as well as
expand the marina village.

Montana Holdings said 300
workers would be employed
during peak construction, with
the Phase II hotel scheduled
to open by 2010. Phase IIT and
the Rum Cay Resort Marina’s





BUSINESS.

$700m resort
“moving very well now’

cenisletion by 2016.

In a previous interview with
The Tribune, John Mittens,
Montana Holdings chairman
said the developers would cre-
ate the “third largest airport
terminal in the Bahamas" to
service the resort.

“We would like to put in.
place a fixed base operation,"
Mr Mittens explained, point-
ing out that there were no air-
craft refuelling facilities in that
part of the Bahamas.

“We want to put in refu-
elling, storage and mainte-
nance facilfties at the airport."

He added that when com-
pleted, the Rum Cay terminal
would have all the essential
requirements, including immi-

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 7B

The hotel will be structured
around a. central facility that
will incorporate a spa, with the
accommodation featuring 50.

- cottages set in a garden-type,

authentic Bahamian setting.

The fractional ownership
component will consist of
about 80 units, and the project
will include other land and real
estate segments.

The developers are already
employing eight of Rum Cay's
existing inhabitants, out of a
total population of around 80. ,

With all financing in place |
to complete the project, Mr
Mittens said the Rum Cay
Resort Marina's "big market"
will be the US. He explained
that it "probably had the best



spa facilities and equestrian |
centre would prove attractive -
for wives and families when

the husband was out at sea.

The development is target-
ing active families and trav-
ellers, who are seeking adven-

ture and plenty of activities
‘during a vacation, whether it

be an extended vacation or’
weekend trip.

“The American market,
we've found, has boaters who
may want their boats left in
Rum Cay for dry storage," Mr
Mittens said. These clients.
would be able to fly into the
island from the US, and the
resort would have ensured
their boats were ready to go,
all prepared for a day's fish-









é Stion mowing everything down. _ full build-out are planned for ... gration and customs facilities. _ fishing in the world"; while the ing.

ad

6d

al

‘i, FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD. e FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.

| Consolidated Balance Sheet — (Unaudited) Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity (Unaudited)
j As of March 31, 2006 For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2006
' | (Expressed in Bahamian dollars) _ enblessed In Baliapal dots)
ie Ee a) =

7] Share Capital Share Capital’

10 31-Mat-06_ 31-Mar-05 _ 31-Dec-05_ Ordinary Preference Revaluation Retained

ee Shares Shares Surplus Earnings Total_

") ASSETS : | 7
lis Atat1 January 2005 ~ $ 5,000,001 $ 10,000,000 $ 1,735,925 $ 7,996,358 $ 24,732,284 |
| ON Cash on hand and at banks $ 8398688 $ 15,028,767 $ 10,098,542 is
‘1 Investment:in securities 21,656,293 17,613,500 22,128,439 Property, plant and equipment revaluation (40,605) 40,605 : i
ee 4 7 NetIncome - 3,669,343 3,669,343.

Mortgages, consumer and other loans 100,835,773 92,711,522 101,766,790 Dividends ld ony haves (686,667 (686,667

ih Property, plant and equipment 6,934,241 6,964,899 7,051,337 Dividends paid/payable preference shares - : : (750,000) (750,000)
rele OMe axsee 923,044 1,856,900 1,092,718 as at31 December 2005 5,000,001 10,000,000 4,695,320 "10,289,899 26,984,960

$ = 138,748,039 $ 134,175,588 $ 142,137,827 ;

d As at 1 January 2006 5,000,001 10,000,000 1,695,320 10,289,639 26,984,960
i Of LIABILITIES ; : : Property, plant and equipment revaluation (9,017) 9,017 -
| 0} Customer deposits $ 108,839,824 $ 104,482,870 $ 109,774,426 Net Income ae 464,486 464,486
: “7, Mortgage-backed bonds at 755,500 - Dividends paid ordinary shares = ae
| nope Long: “term angie. | ie 450,000 ete 650'000 : *"590:000° =a ~» Dividends paid/payable preference shares mpifehtaad 2 petty t at (187,500) (187,500) :
nal Other liabilities and accrued expenses 1,296,661 2,443,209 3,990,087 pe ato March eG 5 SONOS ILO 8 So Ee ee
u 110,586,485 108,331,579 114,264,512
ve EQUITY
; | Capital & reserve attributable to the
Bank's equity holders: Be
' Share capital - ordinary shares 5,000,001 5,000,001 5,000,001

Share capital - preference shares 10,000,000 10,000,000 — 10,000,000 FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD.

Revaluation surplus _ 1,686,303 1,725,774 1,695,320 Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
Retained earnings 10,575,643 8,268,329 10,289,639 ~ For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2006
27,261,947 24,994,104 26,984,960 ff — (Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

i Minority interest 899,607 849,905 888,354 —_——— __ .00€—CO( CC
Bi 28,161,554 25,844,009 - 27,873,315 co ce StMar06 = SMar5 | St-Deo-05
By SETI Ry) pe Sea tere ea ps tae ash flow from operating activities \

by $__ 138,748,039 $__ 134,175,588 $_142,137,827_ Net income (before minor interes) $ A757 §~— «456,358 $3,714,830
ee Adjustments for: \
Net change in provision for credit losses ~ 444,312 17,510 310,237
~ Depreciation i 160,699. 76,193 489,269

i : - Operating income before changes in operating
» | FIDELITY BANK BAHAMAS LTD. assets and liabilities —TTTT8A 560,061 4,514,336

: Consolidated Statement of Income — (Unaudited) Decreasel(increase) in mortgages, consumer and other loans ~ 789,706 (49,570) (9,361,477)
i For the Quarter Ended March 31, 2006 Decrease/(Increase) in other assets 169,674 (401,263) 292,546
ta . . Decrease in customer deposits (934,602) (219,824) 4,733,246

: (Expressed in Bahamian dollars) | ~Inrease in oher ibis and aorrued expenses (2,880,926) _ (536,070) __1,536,964
3 Months Ending © Net cash flows used in operating activities (2,078,396) (655,666) 1,715,615
31-Mar-06 31-Mar-05
: Income ‘ Cash flows ftom investing activities

| , Purchase of government securities : (2,491,500)
i Haha pees : $ ae $ ee Purchase of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss (527,859) (2,828,639)
Nee eee $$ Sale of government securities : 805,200
Net Interest Income - 1,712,570. 1,533,106 Sale of financial assets at fair value through profit and loss 4,000,000 :

' : Purchase of property, plant & equipment (43,603) - (461,229)
‘ Sale of property, plant & equipment - 38,285 -

; Non-Interest Income 808,101 633,577 SEINE EES cP oS
i : Sa aR Net cash flows provided by investing actitivies 428,542 38,285 (4,976,168)
' | Total Income 2,520,674 2,166,683 ee ee ee CR TERE Raat

. ; Cash flows from financing activities
, Expenses Maturity of mortgage-backed bonds (755,543)

; Salary and staff benefits 934,561 826,756 Payments of mortgage-backed bonds (42)

G aint Ordinary dividends paid (666,667)

a ae administrative 816,467 789,866 Preference dividends rai ’ (707.992)

‘ Depreciation 160,699 76,193 Repayment of long-term loans (50,000) (50,000) (200,000)
i Loss on Sale of Fixed Assets 2 i Net cash flows used in financing actitivies (50,000) (50,042) (2,330,202)
{ Total Non-Interest expense 1,911,727 1,692,815 Decrease in cash and cash equivalents (1,699,854) (667,423) (5,590,755)

Provision for credit losses 133,203 17,510 Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year 10,098,542 15,696,191 15,689,298

TotabExpenses 2,044,930 1,710,325 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period $ 8,398,688 : $ 15,028,767 $ 10,098,542

Net income $ 475,741 $ 456,358

i Attributable to: a5
4 Equity holders of the bank 464,486 449 320
j Minority Interest 11,254 7,038
‘ 475,741 456,358
: Weighted average number of $ 16,666,670 $ 16,666,670
; common shares outstanding ;

Earnings per share $ 0.03 $ 0.03
PAGE 8B . THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS 2







FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Chairmart’s Review

RP.

Of the Results) 7.) «.

> ‘

For the six months ended April 30, 2006

iyo

t

The consolidated net income of FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited for the
first six months of the 2006 fiscal year was $55.3 million, an increase of 14% over last year.
Earnings per share for the period was 46 cents, anincrease of 5.7 cents over last year. :

Net interest income for the Bank continued to improve and totaled $71 million for the ‘six

months ended April 30, 2006. This represented a $10 million or 16% improvement over the same
period last year, as total loans were 34% higher than last year with significant growth in

residential mortgages and business loans, additionally, US interest rates continued to increase.

Operating expenses for the period were $31.9 million, $1.7 million higher than the same period
last year primarily because of the gain on the sale of a building last year. The ratio of expenses

to revenue improved by 1.6% over last year to 35.5% for the first six months of this fiscal year.

fe :

Total assets of the Bank at April 30, 2006 were $3.8 billion representing a 13% growth or $433

million from last year. Total loans grew by $588 million to $2.3 billion as residential mortgages -

and business loans grew by $115 million and $416 million respectively. Total deposits for the
bank also increased 13% or by $374 million from last year to $3.15 billion. Both the return on
equity and the return on assets continued to reflect the Bank’s strong performance. The returri
on equity was 28% and the return on.assets rose to 3,05% for the six month period; which was

an improvement from the same period last year.

The Directors have declared an interim dividend of 25 cents per share, (April 2005 - 20 cents per
share), payable on July 5, 2006 to shareholders of record at the close of business on June 27,
2006.

We are looking forward to the continuation of the Bank’s strong performance and profitability,

as the economy remains strong and the market conditions favorable.

Consolidated Balance Sheet
BS'000

Assets
Cash and advances to banks
Securities
Loans
Goodwill
Fixed assets
Other. assets
Total assets
Liabilities

Total deposits
Other liabilities

Total liabilities

Shareholders' Equity

Share capital & reserves
Retained earnings

Total abilities and shareholders’ equity

i]

Ic. Sar
Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman

.FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Unaudited Unaudited Audited
April 30, 2006 April 30, 2005 October 31, 2005
647,046 ai 791,661
563,847 497, 468,811
2,305,917 1,717,444 1,972,392
187,747 187,747 187,747
30,115 33,066 31,764
47,231 55,270 57,761
3,781,903 3,348,930 3,510,142
3,154,207 2,780,501 2,856,737
29,561 16,587 73,685
3,183,768 2,797,088 2,930,422
432,983 416,464 417,281
165,152 _ 135,378 162,439,
598,135 551,842 579,720
3,781,903 3,348,930 3,510,142



FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Consolidated Statement of Income 4
BS'000 ‘ ‘
: : a :
se Unaudited Unaudited Audited
Quarter Ended Six Months Ended Year Ended
. ril 30, 2006” ril 30, 2 April 30, 2006 ril 30, 2005 October 31, 2005
Pa . .
Total interest income : 55,419 ~ 45,364 108,783 90,619 | * «188,119
Total interest expenses (19,960) «_(15,000) * G7,977) (29,620) : (61,650)
Net interest income 35,459 “30,364 ‘70,806 ° 60,999 126.469
Non-interest income 1,716 9,865 id 18,928 20, 39,100
af 43,235 40.229: : 89,734 81,233 165.569
Non-interest expenses 15,443 14,365 : 31,960 30,164 62,158
Provision for credit losses’ 1,695 1,140 536 2,680 3,918
Se ean nS Lik
an 17,138 SSS 34,436 32,844 66.076
Net income : 8024724 55,298 48,389 99.493

—_— SSeS

Weighted average number of common ‘
shares outstanding for the period ~

Earnings per share (in cents)



aa, Ne 5c pions

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders' Equity
BS'000 4

Balance at October 31, 2004

Net income for the period
Dividends
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks & Caicos Islands

Balance at April 30, 2005

Balance at October 31, 2005

Net income for the period

Dividends

Revaluation gains/(losses)

Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund - Turks.& Caicos Islands
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve

Balance at April 30, 2006

st RET SS

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
BS'000

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities /
Net cash used in financing activities

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period ;
sf

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited .
Notes to Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

Six Months Ended

April 30, 2006

1. Accounting Policies

120,216,204





120,216,204 120,216,205
46.0 40.3 82.8
Share Capital & .
Reserves Retained Earnings Total
414,364 110,728 525,092
48,389 48,389
(21,639) (21,639)
2,100 (2,100) a
416,464 135,378 551,842.
417,281 162,439 579,720
55,298 55,298
(36,066) (36,066)
(817) (817)
4,000 (4,000). -
12,519 ~ (12,519) ——
3 432,983 165,152 "598,135
Unaudited Unaudited
Six Months Ended Six Months Ended
April 30, 2006 April 30, 2005
. (56,846) 12,793
(36,066) (21,639)
51,703 985
(144,615) (7.861)
742,111 819.798
597,496 $11,937

Pie

' &

These consolidated interim financial statements are > Prgpared in accordance with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting policies used in the
. preparation of these consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those used in the annual financial statements for the year ended October

31, 2005.

The consolidated interim financia) statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:

FirstCaribbean Intemational Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited:
FirstCaribbean Intemational (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited

2. Comparatives

Where necessary, comparative figures have been adjusted to comply with changes in presentation in the current period.

i
}
i

‘8








THE TRIBUNE

SS

The Tribune ’

Obstacles remain for businesswomen

@ By JIM WYSS
The Miami Herald

MIAMI (AP) — Shoving
aside an oversized spool of elec-
tfical cable and casually grab-
bing a pair of wire cutters to pose
for a picture, there’s little doubt
that Mercedes LaPorta feels at
ease in her sprawling warehouse
in Medley, surrounded by more
than $3 million in electrical sup-
plies.

: But there was a time it wasn’t
so comfortable being a woman
in a man’s world. In the early
days of her company, she would
send male employees to bid on
contracts and act as the public
face of Mercedes Electric Sup-
ply — the company she started
with her husband 27 years ago.

“I stayed in the background,”
said LaPorta, the company’s
president. “I would have been at
a disadvantage at that point —
but we’re talking years ago when
there were very few women in
construction.”

' Now, there are more than
14,500 women-owned construc-
tion firms in Florida alone.
Nationwide businesses run and
owned by women are booming.
By some accounts, women are
thajority owners of 48 percent of
the nation’s privately-held com-
panies.
* But even as gender barriers
topple, obstacles remain. Of the
billions of dollars that Fortune
{,000 companies spend on out-
side suppliers, only 4 percent
goes to women-owned enter-
prises, according to the Center
for Women’s Business Research.
~ Trying to bridge this gap is one
feason entrepreneurs like LaPor-
ta are turning to organizations
Such as the Women’s Business
Enterprise National Council, or
yen,
’ Founded in 1997, WBENC
represents almost 7, 000 women-
@wned business members and
works with more than 700 major
corporations to encourage busi-
ness ties.
From June 26-29, the organi-

b

ites
Siren nose

zation is hoping to broker such
supplier deals during its annual
conference, which will be held
at the Miami Beach Convention
Center. The three-day event is
expected to draw more than 300
corporate sponsors and about
2,500 participants.

The conference is unique
because of the caliber of corpo-
rate executives that will be pre-
sent, said Nancy Allen, the pres-
ident and CEO of The Women’s
Business Development Center
in Pinecrest —a WBENC affili-
ate. “It’s very exclusive and very
powerful in that there is the
opportunity to walk out of there
with contracts,” she said.

One of the keys to WBENC’s

. success with corporate America

has been its certification process.
It’s one of the few organizations
that carries out onsite visits to
verify that its women members
truly own and operate their com-
panies -- and are not merely
fronts for male partners.

WBENC certification costs
$300 and can take up to 90 days
to complete but is recognized by
a wide swath of corporations and
government bodies, Allen said.
In Florida more than 300 com-
panies have been certified, and
most buck popular conceptions
about women-owned business-
es. “Many people think of them
as being very small,” said Allen.
“There’s that image of a mom at
home doing something part-
time.”

Yet 60 percent of the Florida
members have revenue between
$3 million and $5 million and
most have 20 to 25 employees.

Office Depot Director of Ven-
dor Development Robert
McCormis-Ballou said the com-
pany favors WBENC certifica-
tion because it’s a way to pro-

tect against liability. When the
company makes claims about
doing business with women, it
wants to make sure it can stand
behind them, he said.

‘Of the roughly $10 billion in
products Office Depot sold in
the United States and Canada in










IN THE SUPREME COURT

of First Street

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of
land comprising 3,108 square feet and situate on Samuel
Guy Street in the eastern part of Spanish Wells, St. Georges
Cay, Eleuthera, Bahamas and ae 37 feet west

2005, about $430 million came
from minority and women sup-
pliers, he said.

“Tf you aren’t going to do busi-
ness with corporations, you may
not find the value in WBENC
certification,” he said. “But if
you want to do business with cor-
porate America, WBENC certi-
fication is the license plate to get
you on that interstate.”

While WBENC holds sway in
the corporate world, most local
governments have their own cer-
tification process.

Both Miami-Dade and
Broward counties try to channel
10 percent of all contracts
through sheltered market pro-
grams. In Miami-Dade that pro-
gram includes certified small
businesses but not women- and
minority-owned businesses. (The
county was sued in federal court
and forced to make all econom-
ic development programs race
and gender neutral).

Broward County has a free

. certification process for women-

owned businesses that takes
about two hours to complete,
said Edgar Tapia, the county’s
manager of small business devel-
opment. Despite the ease of the
process, fewer than 300 compa-
nies have gone through certifi-
cation, he said.

One reason for the low num-
bers may be lingering fears that
it’s too complicated to do busi-
ness with the government.

“You have to do more paper-
work than you would (to do busi-
ness) with a private company,
but at the end of the day, it’s
worth it,” he said. “It might take
an hour or two hours of your
time to become certified, but you
never know, you might get a con-

tract.”

One of WBENC’s main initia-
tives is to gain local government
acceptance of its certification
process, which it maintains is
among the most rigorous.

That would be a step in the .

right direction, said LaPorta, who
has been certified through sev-
eral local governments.



2005
CLE/Qui/No. 01362




TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 9B



Hea

Fitness Run/Walk/Push
Entry Form



Date: Saturday Ist July, 2006,

Time:6:30am

Route: Main Entrance of the Central Bank, north of Frederick Street, to

Promotion Week 2006

{BS LN Me oo PL EL I We ey es ee

VS OFF 64 TH TET

Jo Fa We Pay OEE EVV EV BE EF

SATE Fe

Fie



Pee Ge ENE ROLE.

ee Ae eee ee



Hate



SW Sows ey Wea Oe



oyun lites

Bay Street, East on Bay Street to the “new” Paradise Island Bridge,
ascending the new,Bridge to Paradise Island Drive, east on Paradise Island
Drive to,the as about humps oint, rotating south to the od Paradise

AND |
























IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT
OF 1959



Beye
Oia am
anes

FROM page 1B ,



AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
LEONARD ALBURY

NOTICE OF PETITON







Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 13th day of
January, A.D. 2006.

ELSE LES RES EES ROPE RES eee eee ee ER ET Eta

=.




- The Petition of Leonard Albury of Samuel Guy Street in
the Eastern part of Spanish Wells, St. Georges Cay, Eleuthera another
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas showeth
in respect of:

Fand their families, Mr Scott

“said the Bahamian financial
yeservices industry with its

wealth management products -
international Business Com-
» panies (IBCs), trusts and foun-
‘dations - held an obvious
attraction.

“They want separation or to
get some of their wealth out-
.*side, and one way of doing it is

‘=to exploit our financial ser-
‘vices, our products,” Mr Scott
»=said.



ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate in the
Settlement of Spanish Wells, St. Georges Cay, Eleuthera,
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas,
which said piece parcel or lot of land is bounded on the
north by Samuel Guy Street and running thereon Thirty-
eight and forty-five hundredths feet (38.45’) and on the
east by land the property of Ethlyn Pinder and running
thereon Eighty-three and seventy-two hundredths feet
(83.72’) and on the south by land the property of Ceily
Higgs and running thereon Thirty-six and sixteen
hundredths feet (36.16) and on the west partly by land
the property of Louis Higgs and running thereon Twenty-
five and fifty hundredths feet (25.50’) and partly by land
the property of Garth Albury and running thereon Fifty-
_ five and forty-seven hundredths feet (55.47’).

Companies

He added that Chinese com-
panies and institutions could °
also use the Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
«i(BISX) as a way to raise capi-
> tal, given that their home gov-
-sernment had “put the brakes”
on financing to prevent the
ne “economy from overheating.
*> To generate “an infusion of
~inward capital”, Mr Scott said
=these Chinese companies could
rafloat on BISX, “allowing them
“to penetrate” the mutual funds
-“market and brokerage houses
‘ein Latin and North America.
“. Callenders & Co'earlier this
“year became the third Bahami- °
“an law firm to open a London
~office, which will act as the
“bridge between the Bahamas
“and both the Far East, notably
"he China, and eastern Europe.

eer creas

The Petitioner, Leonard Albury, herein claims to be the owner in
fee simple in Possession of the said piece of land and has made
application to The Supreme Court Of The Commonwealth Of The
Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have
his title to the said piece of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to
be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that
Act.







Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape marks
and dimensions of the said piece of land may be inspected during
normal office hours at the following places:












(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, East Bice North,
Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Joseph C. Lédée, Suite No. 6, Grosvenor
Close, Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(c) The office of the Commissioner/Administrator, Spanish Wells,

Eleuthera.

Please Print
Size:



Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower or right to
Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall on
or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final publication
of these presents file at the Registry of The Supreme Court in the
City of Nassau, Bahamas, and serve on the Petitioner or the
undersigned a Statement of his/her Claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

Contact:
Walk: O

Institution:

Run: O Stroller (Push): O




Signature of Participant: Date:
Payment Method:
Cash

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement Of Claim
on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after the final
publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to such claim.







Dated this 12th day of June, A.D. 2006

ChequeO

Available Sizes: 3X-Large, 2X-Large, Large, Medium, Small
(T-Shirt or Tank-tops)

JOSEPH C. LEDEE, ESQ.
Chambers
Suite No. 6, Grosvenor Close
Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorney for the Petitioner


TRIBUNE SPORTS:-.

+

PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

Bas
shor



SPORTS



t kraine
bounce
back for
viktory

eoe-- --
I Alm meee

etball teams fall
of qualification





-@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

IT’S back to the drawing
board for the Bahamas Bas-
ketball Federation (BBF), as
both the senior men and wom-
en’s teams failed to qualify for
the next round at the
Caribbean Basketball Cham-
pionships (CBC).

The event is the first step of
a three step qualification
process for the Olympic
Games. At this tournament
(CBC) the top three finishers
in each division advance to the
CentroBasket Championships
with the top finishers from the
CentroBasketball Champions
tournament moving onto the
Tournament of Americas
qualifying tournament.

The Tournament of Ameri-
cas is the last step for partici-
pation in either the World
Games and the Olympic
Games.

At the CBC tournament,
held in Jamaica last week, the
men’s team were able to finish
up in the second spot in their
pool, but when the final results
were in the Bahamas men
were fourth overall.

Qualifying in the men’s divi-
sion were Jamaica, the Virgin

Islands and Cuba.



_ syn

Available from Commercial New



Fourth place finishes for
men and women’s sides

On the women’s side the
Bahamas team had to settle
for a fourth place finishing,
with five points. Moving onto

the next round in this division
were Jamaica, Virgin Islands

and Barbados.

According to the BBF vice
president Larry Wilson, both
teams put in a gallant effort
in the tournament, but had
several factors that con-
tributed to a late start and the
namics that appeared on the
|2-rnan roster sheet.

Wilson said: “It.is extreme-
ly disappointing because we
put a huge effort into trying
to. get the teams ready for
competition this year. .

“It is disappointing in the
men’s case that we didn’t get
all the players we wanted to
get to come back home, but
we still thought that the teams
we sent were good enough to
make it out of this round and
our strategy was to try and
beef up the teams as they

_ mov ed on.

“We did get some type of
verbal commitment from
some of the other players that
should we qualify they would
be able to attend the later
qualifying tournaments.
Unfortunately we didn’t qual-
ify, this is just another sign
that we have to be a lot more
serious, as a total country
towards sports and put more
effort in trying to get our top
players home, in particularly
our team sports.”

Champions

The Bahamas men’s team
opened up the tournament
against defending champions
Cuba. Although the team did-
n’t have a big man present in
the center, they lost their first
match-up by six points.

The team was able to
regroup in the next two
games, against St Vincent and
the Grenadines and Antigua,
defeating them 75-62 and 83-

_ 67 respectively.

—_

Commenting on the fact
that the CBC champions,
Jamaica, were among two
teams that were able to utilise
the majority of their profes-
sional players to qualify, Wil-
son said that in order for the
Bahamas to contest with pro-
grammes such as the Jamaican
one, then assistance from the
Bahamian professional and
ole players will be need-
ed

“It takes a lot to try and get
the professional players out

of Europe and South Ameri- ~

ca. Then we have the players
in college who can also-assist
the programme, but it is very
difficult getting these players
home.

“Besides the scheduling of
the Caribbean tournaments,

_ most of the professional play-

ers will lose out on money or

their playoffs are going on |

around that time. So all of
these things need to be con-

sidered, how can we go about |

trying to get them home to

.

4 :

represent their country from
the very first qualifying tour-
nament.

“This will be the only way
we can ensure that we do
move on‘and hopefully make
it into the Olympics.

“We had a solid group of
ball players locally based who

were coming out to practise:
“and we still had some hopes of

bringing in some of the pro-
fessional players at the last
minute, they were trying to
get home and then they final-
ly confirmed that they will not,
be able to make it at the last
minute.

“So that kind of left us in a
fix and disappointed, and so
we had to work with what we
had.

“Despite all of this we still

didn’t think that the team was

a bad team, we view it as a
solid team.

“Our hat goes off to them
because they played some
pretty good games, to lose to
Cuba by six points, that’s
remarkable.”

The BBF executive mem-
bers are crossing their fingers,
hoping that the since Olympic
Games are scheduled for 2008,
officials in the governing body
will make a conscious decision
to host the bi-annual tourna-
ment next year.

WCopyrighted Material

dicated Content #
cC =

Cyclists in action ahead of championships

“CYCLING
; By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter se

WITH the Independence National
-Road Cycling Championships going to

‘North Andros next month, the New’

“Providence Cycling Association will
‘hold a pre-showdown on Saturday.
The association will hold a 50- mile
“cycling race that will start and finish 4
“the Coral Harbour round-a-bout
8am.
_ “In the month of June, we just hoid
‘one event because we utilise the month
‘for training for the nationals,” Mus-
«grove stressed. “This is an event we
snormally stage two weeks before as a
~tune up to see where the cyclists are.”
The cyclists will be tested over a route
that will leave Coral Harbour and head
west along the airport road, past both
round-a-bouts coming out to JFK Drive.

On JFK Drive, the cyclists will turn
left to Old Fort Bay, onto Lyford Cay to
Clifton Pier, onto South Ocean, passed
Adelaide and back onto Coral Harbour.

The cyclists will travel around the
round-a-bout again, pass Adelade onto
South Oc xan to Clifton Pier and Lyford
Cay, turning around at Templeton and
back the same route to the finish line.

Competitors

The junior competitors will go
straight to Clifton Pier onto Lyford Cay,
turning around at Templeton and head
back to Coral Harbour. They will then
travel all the way to the round-a-bout at
the airport und back to the finish line.

“We are just trying to encourage all of
the cyclists to come out to see where
their weaknesses and strength is right

“now,” Musgrove pointed out.

4

Cyclists from Grand Bahama are
expected to participate in the tune-up
meet, which will get the national team
ready for the Central American and
Caribbean Championships as well.

Already, selected to the team that
will be heading to Colombia next month
are Johnathan Massie, Barron Mus-
grove, Johnny Hoyte from Grand
Bahama.and Tracy Sweeting.

Kevin Richardson, the top junior
cyclist, has also been included on the
list of names that has been submitted to
the Bahamas Olympic Association for
ratification.

The team is expected to be finalised
at the completion of the Independence
National Road Championships that will
be held in North Andros on Saturday,
July 8 as a part of the regatta festivities.

“We have decided to stage the nation-
al road championships in the Family
Islands to gain some interest and search

out persons who we could leave to con-
tinue to work with the programme,’
Musgrove noted.

The programme was staged in

Eleuthera, then moved to Exuma and.

was held in Grand Bahama last year.
Next year, the championships are tipped
to be staged in Abaco.

“The event will start at the Bluff
where all of the regatta activities are
being held and it will finish there,” said
Musgrove of the estimated 70 mile
course on a 15-mile loop that they
intend to ride several times.

After the national champion is
crowned, if the cyclist is not already
selected to the national team, they will
be named to the team, pending ratifi-
cation from the BOA.

At least 20-30 competitors, half of
which are juniors, are expected to
participate in the national champi-

_ onship.’

4

————_~ ~ ——-

s Providers
TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006, PAGE 11B





BETTY BERNADINE, manager of the Colony Club (centre) receives a plaque from Frank
‘Pancho’ Rahming (left) and Sharon Harris (right), members of the organising committee of the
25th Primary Schools Track and Field Championships that were held in May at the Thomas A.

Robinson Track and Field Stadium.





§ FLORADELL ADDERLEY accepts an appreciation award for her late husband, Leviticus
‘Uncle Low Adderley, from the organising committee of the 25th Primary Schools Track and Field
Championships. Making the presentation are from left Sharon Harris (committee member) and right

Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming) (chairman).

Co

|
{





i BRIAN JACQUES, manager of Contract Services of BTC (centre) receives a plaque on behalf
of BTC for their sponsorship of the 25th Primary Schools Track and Field Championships that
were held in May at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Making the presentations
were committee chairman Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming (left) and Sharon Harris, committee mem-

ber.



@ COMMITTEE chairman Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming (left) and committee member Sharon Harris make
a presentation to Juan Moss, manager of Leisure Tours Limited, for their contribution to the 25th Pri-

mary Schools Track and Field Championships.

tribution to Primary School

track and field events recognised

ALTHOUGH she has been
here from its inception, Mon-
ca Woodside was thrilled to
1ave been remembered for
yer contribution to the 'Pri-
mary Schools Track and Field
Championships over the past
25 years. |



And Floradell Adderley |

said her late husband, Leviti-
cus ‘Uncle Lou’ Adderley,
would have been pleased as
well with the gesture from the
organising committee of the

and Housing’s annual
event. oes
After a year’s absence, the
meet returned to the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Asso-
ciations’ calendar in May and

was termed a tremendous suc-

cess.

However, Frank ‘Pancho’ |
Rahming, chairman of the
organising committee, said the
meet couldn’t have been a

Ministry of Youth, Sports



Knowles and Nestor
knocked out in semis

@ TENNIS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

BAHAMIAN tennis player Mark Knowles
and his Canadian doubles partner
Daniel Nestor were eliminated in the semi-
finals of the annual Stella Artois Champi-
onships, at Queen’s Club in London on Satur-
day.

Defeating Knowles and Nestor were second
seeded Jonas Bjorkman and Max Mirnyi with
a score of 6-7 (5), 7-6 (4) and 10-7.

Knowles and Nestor, who came into the tour-
nament in the third spot, were able to defeat
Tripp Phillips and partner Dmitry Tursunov in
the first round 6-7(4), 7-6 (6) and 13-11. They

then moved on to play Frantisek Cermak and
Leos Friedl, defeating them in two sets 7-5 and
6-4.

It is not to certain which one of the three
upcoming tournaments Knowles and Nestor
will participate in as they continue on in the
ATP doubles race.

On the Stanford ATP Doubles ranking list
Knowles is just ahead of partner Nestor with a
score of 3,965 points for sixth place while
Nestor has accumulated 3,810 points for sev-
enth place.

On the ATP doubles race the duo are in
third place with a score of 456 points. Leading
the way are the American twins Bob and Mike
Bryan with 630 points and Bjorkman and
Mirnyi are in second with 623 points.

Organising committee
gives thanks for support —

success without the support.

they received from patrons
such as Woodside and Adder-
ley.

The duo were recently hon-
oured, along with sponsors
Bahama Telecommunications
Company Limited, Leisure
Travel & Tours Limited and
the Colony Club for their con-
tribution.

Woodside, 74, said she was
appreciative of receiving the
plaque because she has been
involved in the meet since it
got started, stemming from
her involvement in track and
field from 1976.

Even though she’s not as
actively involved now because
of her age, Woodside said “the
athletes were more interest-
ed” than they are today.

And, as a word of advice to -

those involved, Woodside
offered: “Stay there and work
hard.”

Rahming said Adderley was
so keen on assisting the sport
that he eventually formed the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials and that was
why he was being honoured.

‘Uncle Lou’, as he is
remembered by his wife, had a
passion for the development
of young people. He died on

May 24, 2003 at the age of 71.

“His heart’ was in sports and
wherever children were, he
thought that he could bring
out the best in them,” she

reflected. “He thought that .
-every child could achieve his

greatest potential.”

While Adderley has left his
mark on athletes such as Lav-
ern Eve and twin sisters Dawn
and Dianne Woodside, his
daughter, Daria is keeping his

continue to make their con-
tribution.

Brian Jacques, manager of
Contract Services at BTC, said
it’s their job to keep “the com-
munity growing and this is one
way they can do that,” so they
will continue to provide the:
transportation to assist

- with the transfer of the ath-

letes.
And Juan Moss, manager of
Leisure Travel & Tours Lim-



“His heart was in sports and
wherever children were, he

though

t that he could bring

out the best in them. He
thought that every child could
achieve his greatest potential.”



Floradell Adderley commenting on her late
husband, Leviticus ‘Uncle Low’ Adderley

legacy alive by coaching swim-
ming and soccer.

The Colony Club, accord-
ing to Rahming, has played a
vital role in the housing of
some of the Family Island
teams that participate in the
meet.

Betty Bernadine, the hotel’s
manager who accepted the

‘plaque on behalf of owner

Harrison Petty, said they are
appreciated of the gesture by
the committee and they will

ited, said for as long as he
could remember, his father;
the late Richard Moss, was
there for the committee and
he will pledge the company’s
continued support on his
behalf.

‘It’s good. It makes my
heart glad. I only wish my
father was here,” he lamented.
“We do it to assist the Family
Islanders. We’re grateful that
we can take this plaque and
hang it up in the office.”


TUESDAY, JUNE 20, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Bahamas
miss out
on Zone II
promotion

@ TENNIS

By BRENT STUBBS"

Senior Sports
Reporter

THE Bahamas youth-
ful team came so close
to returning to the
American Zone II in
their Davis Cup tie, but
fell short at the end and
will remain in Zone III
next year.

Playing in a round
robin tournament at the
Maya Country Club in
Nueva, San Salvador,
E] Salvador, the
Bahamas finished third
in the playoffs with a 1-
4 win-loss record on
Sunday.

The Bahamas team,
captained by John Far-
rington, needed to fin-
ish in the top two spots
in order to advance.
However, they were »
beaten out by undefeat-
ed El Salvador and
Cuba, who were 2-1. .

Both El Salvador and
Cuba blanked the
Bahamas 3-0 in their

-playoff action as the

combination of Marvin
Rolle and Devin
Mullings found the
competition a little
stiffer than it was in the
round robin tourna-
ment.

Playing as the num-
ber two seed, Rolle suf-
fered a 6-1 and 6-4 deci-
sion to Jaime Cuellar in
the first match against
E] Salvador as the play-

offs got underway.

Control

In the same fashion in '

the second match, top
seed Mullings also lost
6-1 and 6-4 to Rafael
Arevalo-Gonzalez as
the host nation took °
control.

Rolle and Mullings,
however, tried to make
it an interesting tie as
they took the team of
Arevalo-Gonzalez and
Cuellar to three sets
before they lost the
doubles 7-5, 2-6 and 6-
T.

In their second play-
off action, which ulti-
mately stopped the
Bahamas from return-
ing to Zone II, Rolle
lost 7-5, 3-6 and 6-3 to
Edgar Hernandez-Perez
in the opening match
against Cuba.

And in the second
match, Mullings
dropped identical set
scores of 6-2 and 6-2 to
Ricardo Chile-Fonte in
the first of the two
playoffs.

Once again, Mullings
and Rolle went on to
play in doubles, losing
6-1 and 7-5 to Favel-
Antonio Freyre-Perdo-
mo and Sandor Mar-
tiniez-Breijo.

The Bahamas came
out of the Pool A round
robin tied for first place
with Puerto Rico at 2-1
after beating Puerto
Rico and Trinidad &
Tobago, only to lose to
Honduras.

Rolle and Mullings
were successful in the
two matches against
Puerto Rico and
Trinidad & Tobago.
But the combo of
H’Cone Thompson and
Chris Eldon lost to
Honduras.

Farrington and mem-
bers of the team were
not available for com-

‘ments as they were in

transit from E] Salvador
up lo presstime.

BAAA national

Wins for Bar
and Moxey



















































Thompson’s record
eC R ia ances s

li TRACK AND FIELD
By ANDRE DAVIS:

TIAVANNI Thompson missed out on a national record per-
formance due to the weekend weather.

The sudden downpour on the second day of competition in the
Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) Nationals,
brought some strong winds that athletes had. to fight their way
through.

Thompson, who had already lowered the national record three
times this year, ran 13.44 seconds for the win, which would have
erased the old marking of 13.60 seconds set by her in May. The wind
reading was recorded at +2.7, an illegal marking. Finishing second
was Lencie Rolle in 14.66 seconds, Krystal Bodie was third in
14.81 seconds with Shannice Wright coming in fourth in a time of
15.84 seconds.

Romona Nicolls would get the better of Santisha Martin in the
women’s 1500m run, clocking a time of 4:57.50 seconds for the
win. Martin posted a final time of 5:23.60 seconds.

As in the women’s 1500m, only two men lined up — O’Neil
Williams and Lesley Dorceval. At the end of the event Williams
walked away with the national title in a time of 3:56.59 seconds to
Dorceval’s 4:29.09 seconds.

The women’s 400m hurdles event belonged to Michelle Cum-
berbatch, who edged out teammates Krystal Bodie and Tess"
Mullings. Cumberbatch won the event in a time of 1:05.39 sec-
onds, Bodie was second in 1:06.40 seconds while Mullings finished
up third in 1:07.21.

Two Carifta teammates Carlyle Thompson and Kayuse Bur-
rows challenged Commonwealth Games participant Douglas Lynes-
Bell for the crown in the men’s 400m hurdles event.

But, at the end of the event, collegiate Lynes-Bell posted a time
of 51.30 seconds for the win over Thompson, who finished up sec-
ond in a time of 53.66 seconds and Burrows in 54.09 seconds.

i TIA VANNI THOMPSON competes at the weekend.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Basketball
and cycling

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

WHILE most of the atten-
tion was placed on the track
at the annual Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associa-
tions (BAAA) Nationals, the
men’s high:jump and long
jump events’ were also
thrilling

This year saw more than
five Bahamian males clear
the 2.00m marking in the high

jump — Trevor Barry, Don-.

ald Thomas, James Rolle,
Jamal Strachan and Jamal
Wilson.

The leading jump coming
from the quintette was 2.13m,
cleared by Donald Thomas
at this year’s Commonwealth
Games, Barry was trailing

him with a clearance of.

2.11m.

Performances

This would be the second
time this year Thomas and
Barry would go head-to-
head in competition, but
they had to add Rolle’s,
Strachan’s ,and Wilson’s
performances into the le
tion.

Barry would get his
revenge on Thomas with a
winning leap of 2.16m to
Thomas’ 2.14m. Coming in
third place was Rolle with
2.08m.

The transition from the
high jump bed to the long
jump pit has never been a
problem for Barry and he
proved that once again



news



r ‘ ohn
: a ee x

e





with an impressive perfor-
mance.

In a loaded field, Barty
would go up against
Osbourne Moxey and Adrian
Griffith.

The weekend meet reset
serve as a test: for Moxey,
who hasn’t competed since
the Commonwealth Games..
But this would be one test
Moxey didn’t have to study
for, as he soared his way to a
national title with a leap of
8.07m. Barry would take sec-

ond place with a leap of

7.70m while Griffith was third.
with 7.59m.

Moxey said: “This | is. just
my first meet since Com-
monwealth Games so I am
pleased with my perfor-
mance.

_ “I think I did what I really
wanted to do, I executed on
all my attempts, even though
T had a few fouls and hiccups
here and there inside the run-
up. te,
“I was able to get a little
time off from work to con-
centrate on the meet, and I’
am very grateful for that.
Now I’m able to concentrate
on track and field for the
remainder of the summer, so
that is great.

“The outdoor season is just

getting started for me so I am:
looking forward to putting:
some big jumps out there. I:
am working on some things:

‘right now and hopefully:
everything will come into Bee :

spective by then.”
The senior Central Ameri-

_ can and Caribbean Games

‘™@ OSBOURNE MOXEY in action in the long jump.

will take place 25th-29th July,
in Cartenga, Colombia.

ow
-
8

o
“oe

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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