Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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i'm lovin’ it.

FSTORM






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CLOUDS, SUN,



Concern on Exuma
as 12 cases confirmed

@ By PAUL

TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH 12 cases of malaria
confirmed out of Exuma, resi-
dents on the island are con-
cerned: that’ with the lack of
spraying being done, a possi-
ble outbreak of the disease
will not only affect their
tourism product, but their
heaith as weil.

According to residents, the
only pesticide spraying being
done on the island is at the
Four Seasons Hotel.

However, officials from the
Ministry of Environment state
that the spraying programme
is underway, and that it would
not be unusual for residents
not to see the actual spraying
as it is normally done during
either the early morning or

evening hours.

Journalist and Exuma resi-
dent Cordell Thompson main-
tains, however, that he, with
other residents, have scoured
the island and have seen no
evidence of any spray trucks
within the communities.

Mr Thompson said that the
only example they have seen is
a small golf cart used by the
Four Seasons Resort to spray
their own environment. And

since the rainy Labour day

weekend, he said, residents
have become very concerned
as the mosquito population
has “substantially increased.”

“People are very concerned
that if this goes out into the,
wider community outside of
the Bahamas that this will cer-

. tainly affect the tourism econ-

omy down here. They are con-

cerned about their livelihood
as much as they are concerned
about their health and their
general comfort. I mean it is
really thick down here. I can’t
imagine people at Four Sea-
sons having a good day unless
their spraying has been very
effective,” he said. —
Minister of Energy and the
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel said it would not be
uncominon for the irucks to
be missed as the spraying is

done during specific times of

the day.

“There are two modes for
managing the mosquito pop-
ulation. One is the fogging and
spraying that occurs at specif-.
ic times of the evening or ear-
ly morning because that is the
time that the mosquitos begin
to move.

“So it is specific times of the
day that the fogging or spray-
ing happens,” he said.

The treatment of sitting
pools of water.is an ongoing
exercise Dr Bethel said, as
they have to treat the same
area day after day.

“The chemicals kill the lar-
vae and it is fine for quite a
number of weeks.

“So the fogging is what is
done at specific times of the
day. So unless you happen to
be in an area that is being
fogged you wouldn’t: see
that happening during the day-
light hours — generally speak-
ing.

“This has 'to do with the life —

cycle of the mosquito. So it is
not unusual for people not to
see them fogging because they
may have already retired to
their homes,” he said.

AUTO INSURANCE





Che Miami ‘Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



i SOME parts of the sea have become like a ‘graveyard’ for conch (shown at Potter’s Cay yesterday) and crawfish, accord:
ing to Jeremiah Rolle, owner and operator of a stall at Benge s Cay Dock. e SEE PAGE FIVE :
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune tty

Foul play ruled out in
prison officer’ s death

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE _

BASED on a recently
released autopsy report, Police
officials have ruled out foul
play in the death of prison offi-
cer Van Johnson, Assistant
Commissioner in charge of
Crime, Reginald Ferguson, told
The Tribune yesterday.

Early last month Mr John-
son’s body was found sitting
upright in his red Nissan truck
at the entrance to Potter’s Cay
dock.

family members, had labelled
his death “suspicious,” because
of the controversy surrounding
the deadly break-out from Fox
Hill prison.

But, despité widespread
speculation that Johnson’s
death may have been a “hit”

‘to keep him silent, Mr Fergu-

son said “there was nothing
suspicious about the results.”
Mr Johnson had been impli-
cated in the Coroner Court’s
inquest into the deaths of a
prison officer and an inmate

‘SEE page 11



Motor failure a ‘major
cause’ of recent power cuts

lâ„¢ By CHESTER ROBARDS

FAULTS in generators
along with planned mainte-
nance were the cause of the
recent power cuts throughout
New Providence, according to
General manager of BEC
Kevin Basden.

According to Anthony
Forbes, Deputy General Man-
ager of Engineering and Plan-
ning at BEC, the failure of a
critical motor was a major
cause of the outages; a prob-
lem, which he said, has
occurred on a few occasions.

He also said that BEC is await-
ing a replacement part and
therefore cannot promise that
there will be no more outages.

“We’ve done all in our pow-
er to minimize the possibility of
an outage, but we cannot guar-
antee that from time to time a
piece of plant might not fail,
but once we have our avail-
ability up then those instances
will not be sustained,” he said.

According to Mr. Basden,
BEC had recently commis-
sioned a new gas turbine and

SEE page 11

Many persons, especially

Mitchell hits out at daily newspapers

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE country’s daily newspapers have
moved “down market” by publishing “per-
verse” and “twisted’* interpretations of the

facts, according to Foreign Affairs and Pub- —

lic Service Minister Fred Mitchell.

Giving his contribution to this year’s bud-
get debate, Minister Mitchell during par-
liament’s evening session on Monday made
a point to address what he considers a
“major problem in the dissemination of
information in this country.”

Mr Mitchell said that in his view the
Bahamian newspapers have a significant
problem with simply reporting “what was

said and done without editorialising it.”

“This is only an issue for press that con-
siders itself papers of record, not the trashy
papers that simply sit down and manufac-
ture information for the entertainment of its
readers.

“T believe that these papers have moved
down-market, trying to compete with the
trashy papers for lurid headlines and with
salacious material in an effort to attract
readers frightened off by the trashy papers,”
he said.

He explained that his party once before in
the past thought it necessary to create its
own information machinery “because the
message of the party was simply not getting
out.”

“It has become so bad in my view that
one sees the most perverse and twisted
interpretation of facts, so that this party
and this government has to find a better
way to get its message to its supporters,” he
said.

More specifically, Mr Mitchell accused
certain factions of the press of deliberately
twisting information “to promote an agen-
da, to perpetuate a great falsehood that
there is some problem between the United
States and ourselves.”

As an example the minister named the
news stories anu editorials published last
week in all the dailies regarding US Secre- :

SEE page two





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



~The Tribune’s duty is to |
the people of the Bahamas

OPINION

i By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Re orter





THE press in the Bahamas
has misplaced a champion for its
rights, a man who, like the myth-
ical King Arthur, seems to have
retired to the mist-shrouded isle
of Avalon to return on a day
when he is most needed. '

One would think that with the
recent onslaught of veiled
threats and insults from politi-
cians and party chairmen, this
man would return once again to
a more terrestrial sphere and

_ wield, like Excalibur, such words








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as the ones he uttered in 1998:
“It seems to me that the press
does not fight for itself suffi-
ciently in this country. J am
sometimes amazed at what the
members of the press will take
from politicians and, of course,
you know that I am seriously
concerned about the lack of
legal protection which the press
has for publishing material
which is in the public interest.”

Who could this lofty quote be
attributed to, you ask? Well, it
was a man who not only voiced
his support of the press but also,
in the hallowed halls of the Sen-

ate, moved a resolution sup-
porting freedom of the press.
The man? None other than For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell.

This is the same man who



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To educate the public about the
important health issues, presented by

chastised the country’s daily
newspapers in the House of
Assembly on Monday for mov-
ing “down market” by publish-
ing “perverse” and “twisted”
interpretations of the facts.

If this isn’t enough to send
your mind into a torrent of con-
fusion and then frustration fol-
lowed by nausea, you are a
stronger person than most.

Mr Mitchell has been resur-
rected in the minds of most peo-
ple in the press, not as Arthur
returned to his people once
more, but as the Roman god of
gates, Janus, who is depicted
with two faces.

Janus is used to symbolise
change and transition. And Mr
Mitchell has changed from the
opposition Senator in 1998 who
declared that it appeared to him
that the press simply responds
by shrinking back from the ire of
politicians and judges.

“In my view this does not
serve the country well,” Mr
Mitchell said then.

Press

In fact, like Odysseus, he
stood against a prime minister
whom he described at the time
as tyrannical, and praised the
press, in particular The Tribune,
which he no doubt saw as his

-men (and women) from Ithica

left over from the Trojan war,
and railed against “the degree
of disrespect shown the press by
the prime minister (Hubert
Ingraham) which would not be
tolerated in any other civil soci-
ety in this hemisphere.”

Mr Mitchell wanted to know
what then Tribune news editor
Athena Damianos did to suffer
the “slings and arrows” of the
then prime Minster’s ire for
“daring to bow to the outra-
geous suggestion that she, as an
editor of The Tribune, was twist-
ing stories.”

“So what we need is a press
which is not intimidated by the
government nor intimidated by
* he said.
‘But this is the same man who

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i MINISTER of Foreign
' Affairs Fred Mitchell
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

now says in the House that he
will not bother to respond to the
press on some matters.

And this is the man who this
very Monday, in light of criti-
cism recently laid at his and the
government’s feet from the edi-

tors of various newspapers, who °

said: “I believe that these papers
have moved down-market, try-
ing to compete with the trashy
papers for lurid headlines and
with salacious material in an
effort to attract readers fright-
ened off by the trashy papers.

“It has become so bad in my
view that one sees the most per-
verse and twisted interpretation
of facts that this party and this
government has to find a better
way to get its message to its sup-
porters,” he said.

What is the truth in this situa-
tion? Is it that the once great
champion of the freedom of the
press has been betrayed and
made a “victim” of an “unfair
and unscrupulous press”?

Or could this man, who
inspired such headlines as: “Sen-
ator tells media to guard against
politicians’ intrigue”, ““(Mitchell)
Strongly condemns Punch, calls
for boycott by PLP, warns
Guardian, Calls Tribune fairest
of all papers”, just be the crea-
ture he is —.a politician — who

te
ANN RS
A Nia”

(as they all are), when in oppo-
sition is the dearest friend of the
press and when in government is
its most ardent critic?

So ironic is the fact that Mr
Mitchell would at that time have
to come to the aid of a weak Tri-
bune unable to protect itself
from the “slings and arrows” of
an FNM government, that one
is tempted to forget that now he,
and a plethora of PLP ministers,
accuse The Tribune of being an
“FNM” paper.

One would also forget that
during its time in government
FNM ministers would accuse
Tribune reporters of being PLP
sympathisers.

| Knowledge

Where is the consistent fact
in this? It lies in the comfort-
able knowledge, for those in The
Tribune at least, that whatever
the government, the newspaper’s
duty is to the people of the
Bahamas. This is paramount.

How comfortable is a politi-
cian, whose loyalty to the press
tends to be as constant as the
direction of a leaf blown in a
hurricane, that truth comes not
even secondary, but at the bot-
tom of a long list of priorities.

Mr Mitchell is a politician and
every word that proteeds from
his mouth and the mouth of
every politician, no matter what
side of the’ divide he/she sits,

should be taken with a grain of |

salt. .

The world has changed, per-
haps right under the nose of
most politicians in this country.
The younger generation is no
longer tethered to party loyal-

ty. They are more cynical and

less trusting of authority.
The status of these “hon-

ourable” men and women of .

parliament has been demystified
in the warm glow of the truth
that they, although senior
amongst them, are public ser-
vants — servants of the public.
No-one begged them to take
their job.

In fact, it was they who, no
longer than four years ago, were
humble transients marching with

their sparse army of campaign.

generals appealing and persuad-

_WE LOVE YOU

stent sence petmertnt



THE TRIBUNE





ing: the lords and: ladies of the
homes in their constituencies for :
their support. shh

And just like any applicant for '. °
a job, they present resumés ands.;",
put their best foot forward dur- :16 >
ing the “interview”, which is the , :,:
campaign trail. And afterwe go ,-;'
to the polls we inform these can- 4,
didates whether they got the job.

Now fully supported, now _,.
elected to-a place where they .
are afforded the privilege to ..
serve the Bahamian people they
forget, as Mr Mitchell does. from 7.
time to time, that like every “.”'
employee they are answerable
to their boss — the Bahamian ‘: |
public. as fi

Being called prime minister, ““°!
minister, member of parliament,
senator, minister of state or par-
liamentary secretary does not
make them immune to.criticism.
In fact, the nature of their posi- 43 44
tion requires that they are held * We
to the highest standard and are a
subjected to the most intense. ¢.8
scrutiny.

The press is not infallible, but » ey
nor are politicians. However, ae
whereas politicians tend to make«:\ .~,
missteps and ill-advised moves, Ta
they tend to do so, more often
than not, pursuing their own
self-interest and that of their ,--,-:
party. . in

The legitimate press, on the,
other hand, do:so with the best”





WS

ved





- of intentions in a sincere effort

to empower the public with the — |
information needed to enhance * : ;
ult

their lives and the lives of their, :
loved ones.

Mitchell

FROM page one


















tary of Defence ‘Donald
Rumsfeld’s suggestion; to «
remove the army helicoptéts ”
from the anti-drug.smug- |°
gling initiative OPBAT and '
re-deploy them.in the fight .
against terrorism... 2°)

Mr Mitchell said that.
despite US Ambassador
John Rood’s assurances that
there have been no talks to
withdraw the helicopters _
from the OPBAT ‘pro.
gramme, the editorials ©
remained the same, indicat-
ing “that there was some
secret message. from‘ the’
United States’ to’ “the
Bahamas.” et

“What is happening is’a.
hindrance to the orderly,
development of public poli ~
cy and it ought to be cor-"
rected,” he said.









Man sought for «*;
questioning in
connection “
with murder at
laundromat rs

POLICE are still seeking a
man wanted for questioning in
connection with the shooting
death of a Bacardi Road man at
a popular laundromat a month ;
ago. Bt

Eric Megregor, 23, was
reportedly shot in his upper ry
body as he was about to enter 13m)
the Pond Wash laundromat in sre
the Bacardi Road areaon May ‘4, /j
18. na

Mcgregor was reportedly shot 4
as he neared the entrance by a
lone gunman who then fled the
scene in a light-coloured Subur-., |
ban. Mcgregor reportedly mus-
tered enough energy to make
his way inside the laundromat
where he then collapsed and
died, police say. Mcgregor was +
the second homicide victimthat
day. pee

Superintendent Marvin’ JG
Dames told the Tribune yester- :
day that police have still not} 90sei
been able to locate Edward vs
Taylor, 35, alias "Sin", who is 7O8
wanted for questioning incdn- 7."
nection to Mcgregor's murder, | °.s:)
although they are following seyr) > >
eral leads in their efforts to; (aiy0c,
locate him. ai

Taylor, a resident of Mcquay - a
Street, is described as being of :
medium build and dark brown. xs
complexion. He is listed as ;
being Sft 9in tall.



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 3 . .



*
. â„¢ fue.



In brief

oe T.
jailed for

drug
possession

A HAITIAN man of Key
West Street has been sentenced
to jail after pleading guilty toa
drug possession charge.

Claude Morrissett, 21,
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel yesterday to
answer to the charge of posses-
sion of dangerous drugs with
the intent to supply. It is alleged
that on Monday, June 5 Mor-
rissett was found in possession
of the drugs.

Morrissett pleaded guilty to
this charge and to making a
false statement to police. He
was sentenced to eight months
in prison on the drug charge
and three months in jail for
deceit of a public officer. The
sentences are to run concur-
rently.

Man faces
cocaine
possession
charge

A 32-YEAR-OLD man has
been arraigned in magistrate's
court on a cocaine possession
charge. .

It is alleged that Carl Russell
was found in possession of 12
grams of cocaine on Friday,
June 9, which police believed
he intended to supply to anoth-
er. Russell pleaded not guilty
to the charge before Magistrate
_Carolita Bethel and was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000. The
case was adjourned to June 26.

Assault
and drug
charges
denied

A 45-YEAR-OLD man has
.been arraigned in magistrate's
court on drug and assault
charges on Monday.

It is alleged that on Friday
June 9 Julian Forbes was found
in possession, of 12 grams of
cocaine which police believed
he intended to supply to anoth-
er.

He was also charged with
assaulting a police officer. It is
alleged that on Friday 11 June
on York Street, Nassau, Forbes
unlawfully assaulted R/C 750
Rolle. He was also charged with
resisting arrest.

Forbes pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted
$7,500 bail. The case was
adjourned to November 21.

Caribbean
carrier
leases
planes

@ TRINIDAD |
Port-of-Spain

CARIBBEAN carrier BWIA
has leased two airplanes staffed
with crews to avoid further dis-
ruptions to its schedule after sev-
eral employees called in sick over
the weekend, leading to some
flight cancellations, a company
spokeswoman said Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.

The company leased the Boe-
ing 737 aircraft for its London
and New York routes after an
“abnormally” high number of
its crews were absent Saturday
due to illness, said Dionne
Ligoure, a spokeswoman for the
Trinidad-based airline. She
declined to say how many peo-
ple called in sick.

Curtis John, president of a
union that represents many
BWIA employees, said the sick
leave was not a coordinated
sickout. He also said the air-
craft lease was a pressure tactic
to get workers to agree to a new
contract before their current
one expires in February 2007
— which Ligoure denied.

John couldn’t explain the
absences, but he said Trinidad’s
historic debut at the World Cup
might be a reason. Sections of
Port-of-Spain were jammed with
revelers following Trinidad’s 0-
O draw with Sweden.

Trinidad has repeatedly
bailed out BWIA since passen-
gers fell off after the Septem-
ber 11, 2001, terror attacks.

Church leaders urge Bozine

Towners to suspend protest.

@ By DARNELL DORSETTE

BOZINE TOWN residents have been
urged to suspend today’s planned
demonstration outside parliament until
religious leaders have met Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to sort out their land
dispute.

Bahamas Christian Council vice-pres-
ident Bishop John Humes told a meet-
ing that the government was now fight-

ing not only the people of Bozine Town

but the Christian church itself.

“We are Bahamians,” he said, “We
were born here. We are not Haitians
that they can run us off our land.”

His comments came at a meeting at

Lakeview Church of God in Bozine ©

Town. Also present were the Rev
Everett Brown, pastor of the New Beth-
lehem Baptist Church, Pastor Dean of
Lakeview and Bahamas Democratic

Movement members who have sup-
ported the residents’ case.

Bishop Humes said Christian Council
president Rev Dr William Thompson
was expected to return to Nassau on
Thursday, after which they should be
able to meet the prime minister.

He added: “Let me tell you something,
we are not going anywhere. I know this is
a crucial time for you. We could demon-
strate, but does it mean much? The

Bahamas government realises that they .

are not only fighting the residents of
Bozine Town, but they are fighting the
Christian church now.”

He said the property Lakeview
Church sits on was donated by Deacon
Benjamin Brown, whose family still lives
in Bozine Town.

“While I can’t speak on behalf of all
the churches in the Bahamas, I can
speak on behalf of the Church of God

and the Baptist churches. You don’t
have to be alarmed. You just stay to
your door and no-one can move you.”

Bishop Humes said the Supreme
Court made a ruling, which could not be
denied. “But we the people have more
power than any Supreme Court in this
land. Do not let anybody intimidate
you.”

He said he had already been in touch

‘with the area’s MP, Leslie Miller, and

the prime minister’s office.

-“You don’t need to go downtown on
Wednesday,” he said, “This battle
belongs to the Lord. The Supreme
Court may have spoken, but there is a
higher power. All along you may not

- have seen us before, but now we have

joined you in this fight.”

He said the churches had “come to
mediate on your behalf”, adding: “If
the courts say they would evict you in

two weeks’ time, let them evict you first,
then they will see how strong we are in
Bozine Town. If we come together as:a |

people, with the church leading the way, °-

and the Heavenly father directing us,
they cannot defeat us.’

Rev Brown, whose grandmother Mrs
Idell Dawkins was a founder of Boziné

a5 8

vvyvryTEy

wa

Town, said the church would fight with ** -

the community until the very end.

“This is the government’s time to step Fy,

up to the plate and do something, »'he*
added, “Those who ain’t standing and

helping you right now, you vote their” _

backside out.”

Bozine Town residents recently lost A , ;

Supreme Court action against LAND-

CO, which since 2004 has been trying to &
_ enforce its title claims in the area. ;

Residents are claiming they ea
proper title to the land, with some hay-;
ing lived on it for 50 years.

ea
e@
e
=~ @
_e
t
“
@

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Abaconian
Ian Knowles is on trial in the
Supreme Court for the mur-
der of Jermaine. Thompson,
whose body was found float-

ing in a blue hole in Abaco two. -

years ago.

The case opened yesterday
before Justice Stephen Isaacs,
and is being heard by a jury of
nine women and three men.

Vernal Collie, assisted by
Eurika Charlton, is appearing
on behalf of the Crown. Carl-
son Shurland and Jameko

i Green are representing
i: Knowles.
Knowles is accused of killing

Thompson sometime between
April 2 and April 9, 2004.

Thompson, 32, was alleged-
ly stabbed to death, and bound
in duct tape and chains from
head to foot. A cement block
was attached to his feet by
rope.

Prosecutor Vernal Collie
told the jury that Thompson
was stabbed 12 times in the
chest and back.

It is alleged that Knowles
lured Thompson into a vehi-





IAN Knowles

le and went to an area off S C
Bootle Highway, where he
killed him because he was hav-

ing a relationship with Thomp- —

son’s girlfriend.

DC Stephan Moultrie told
the court that on April 9 that
year, he went to an area
known as Merlin’s Lair off S C
Bootle Highway as a result of
certain information he
received.

When he arrived at the
scene, he said that he was
shown a blue hole, where a
body was floating.

The following day at around

i Jermaine Thompson
\

8am, rescuer Michael Parrotti
assisted police in retrieving the
body from the blue hole.

Attempts were made to peel
away the duct tape from the
face, but a chain prevented any
further removal of tape.

Bolt cutters had to be used

_to remove the chains.

Visiting Merlin’s Lair, offi-
cers obtained ‘soil samples,
scrapings from a spoon, a cig-
arette but,. vines and leaves
with suspected blood, were all
packaged and sent to the
Forensic Lab.

The trial continues today.

Health chief: risk from all
erectile dysfunction drugs

m@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

ALL erectile dysfunction
drugs — even those prescribed
by a doctor — can cause severe
health problems according to
Dr Marvin Smith, deputy
director of the Bahamas
National Drug Agency.

He said that these problems
“may include heart attack,
strokes and other ailments of
that nature.”

Dr Smith was clarifying a
warning about the potential
risk-of heart attack from coun-
terfeit erectile dysfunction
drugs printed in Tuesday’s Tri-
bune.

He explained that while
there is a risk factor of every
single type of drug in that par-
ticular class, persons who con-
sult a doctor and get a pre-
scription are monitored —

Cushions

whereas those who do not
remain unprotected.
"So whether it is fake or not,

you want to have monitored |

use directed by your doctor
and monitored by your phar-
macist when you use this type
of product.

“And this is why it is impor-
tant not to purchase these
things off the street," Dr Smith
explained. "Because whether
it is fake or real, you can put
yourself at a risk that you may
not be aware of."

He also explained that the
government is placing more
emphasis on strengthening the
pharmaceutical sector and
ensuring patient safety.

“The government’s efforts
are not because of counterfeit
erectile dysfunction drugs, but
as a continuing move to co-
ordinate efforts with the Pan
American Health Organisa-



tion, the Organisation of
American States and other
international bodies to address
this global problem of coun-
terfeit medicines,” he said.

Dr Smith said that products
such as antibiotics, vaccines
and chronic care medications
(which treat diseases like
hypertension, diabetes and
heart disease) are the particu-
lar focus of the governmient’s
attention.

Dr Smith also explained that
patients should ask questions
to ensure that their prescrip-
tion drugs are coming from
reliable sources.

“Speak with your pharma-
cist or your doctor and ask
them who makes the product,
were the product is being
made, or what wholesaler it is
coming from,” he said. “You,
want to make sure that you are
using registered companies.”

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

Sele Mca ee ateinels

THE TRIBUNE,



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. .

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 -
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Malaria threat in the Bahamas

MALARIA IN THE Bahamas is bad
news. Residents in Exuma are rightly con-
cerned, not only for their own health, but
for their tourist industry as they don’t want
their island to join those areas of the plan-
et where visitors are warned that they are
entering a malaria-risk zone and have to
take their medication with them.

When the news made headlines-late last
week that there were three suspected cases
in Exuma, a young person shrugged his
shoulders. “Oh, they’re only mosquitoes,
nothing to worry about,” he scoffed.

Unfortunately, malaria is something to
worry about and is no scoffing matter. At
one time it was one of the scourges of the
world, and accounted for millions of deaths.

We always had mosquitoes in Nassau,
but if one really wants to experience mos-
quitoes during mosquito season, then some
of our Out Islands are the places to visit.

We recall many, many years ago that it
was at Long Cay at dusk and just before a
hurricane that we ‘had our first encounter
with real Bahamian mosquitoes. And what
an experience that was. They buzzed
towards us like a swarm of locusts. We
could see them coming, but there was no
protection from them. The force at which
they hit our face and body was as though
someone was pelting us, with, handfuls of

- sand. Wave upon wave hurled themselves at
" us, blinding us as we dove into the sea to get
away from them.

As a child we remember sleeping under

_ nets to be protected from them.

’ Fortunately, the Bahamas does not — at

‘. « Jeast has not had so far — the malaria-bear-
“. ing mosquito. But in the past week on Exu-
ma 12 malaria cases have been reported.
The first case was of an American who,
; it was said, had just come from a malaria
_« area. The Bahamas was notified of his case
' when he returned to the US from Exuma,
‘ became ill with flu-like symptoms and
-.; Sought medical assistance.
“*. Tt was thought that his was an isolated
“case of someone who had contacted malar-
ia elsewhere. However, concern mounted
- when a second case, and then a third was
reported at Exuma. By Tuesday 12 cases
were confirmed. Is it possible that we now
have the malaria-bearing mosquito, or
have mosquitoes that bit the first victim
carried the parasite from him to other vic-
tims? Although it is known that malaria

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cannot be transmitted from one human to
another, it can be transmitted by the mos-
quito..

We recall persons who served in the East
for many years having contracted malaria in
their youth and suffering recurrences of
terrible fevers for the rest of their lives.
Our husband’s uncle, a British Brigadier
who served in a Mahratta cavalry regiment
in India, contracted malaria during his ser-
vice: Every three or four years after he
returned to England, he suffered terrible
bouts of malaria, each bout threatening his

life. Although the attacks continued for the .

rest of his life, it was cancer that eventually
took him.

Although malaria has been eradicated
from the United States since 1951, it is

reported that “US residents remain at risk.

especially when travelling in malaria-
endemic countries.”

According to the CDC, it received
reports of “1,324 cases of malaria, with four
deaths, that occurred in 2004 in the United
States. All but four cases were in persons
who had travelled to a malaria-risk area.
Of the four cases in persons who had not
travelled to a malaria-risk area, three were
caused by congenital transmission (from
mother to foetus).”

According to Bruce-Chwatt in Essential
Malariology “prehistoric‘man in the Old
World was subject to malaria. It is probable
that the disease originated in Africa, which
is believed to be the cradle of the human
race. Fossil mosquitoes were found in geo-
logical strata 30 million years old and there
is no doubt that they have spread the infec-
tion through the warmer regions of the
globe, long before the dawn of history.
Malaria followed in the wake of human
migrations to the Mediterranean shores, to
Mesopotamia, the Indian peninsula and
South-East Asia. How malaria established
itself in the New World is subject to specu-
lation, as no reliable historical or other
data exist on this point.”

Malaria infections can be fatal if not
diagnosed and treated promptly.

It is hoped that, contrary to reports we

are receiving from Exuma, the Ministry of
‘Health is aggressively fogging the area. And
- now that we are in the rainy season — the

breeding time for the mosquito — everyone
should take precautions against being bit-

* ten.











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PP wre eri.

Ambassador’s

view on the |
S and Cuba |

(This is the second of two letters
written by Cuban Ambassador
Félix Wilson Hernandez in
defence of his homeland. The first
letter was published in Tuesday’s
Tribune).

- EDITOR, The Tribune
A clear and vivid example of

double standards and the hypo-
critical position of the US Gov-

_ ernment on Cuba is the “fight

against terrorism”

The US Government has
planned, coordinated and spon-
sored terrorists actions against
Cuba since the beginning of the
Cuban Revolution. A total of
3478 persons have been killed as
a result of terrorist activities and
2099 have received injuries.

In 1976, Cuban national Luis
Posada Carriles, masterminded
the blowing up over Barbados of
a Cubana Airlines plane with 73
persons on board, including 11
Guyanese citizens. Now Posada
Carrilles is requested in extradi-
tion from the US where he is in
prison for “illegal entry into the
country” and not for being as a
master in terrorism, considered
the Osama Bin Laden of the
Americas. |

At the same time, the US Gov-
ernment has in prison five heroes
of the Republic of Cuba, fighters
against terrorism, Human Rights
defenders, who were gathering
information on terrorist plans tar-
geting Cubans and American cit-
izens, much of which was deliv-
ered to the US by the Cuban
Government. They were tried in
Miami under the pressure of the
extreme right Cuban group of
that city, some of them sentenced
to more than one life term in
prison, been denied of, the con-
dition of political prisoners, they
can’t receive visits by their rela-
tives, including their children and
the: defence lawyers can hardly
meet with them.

Last year, the Working Group
onArbitrary: Detentions of the
UN Human Rights Commission
publicly declared that theirs was

an arbitrary detention. But

they’re still in jail. Isn’t it a human
rights violation by the US? I wish
Cuba’s critics could answer this
question.

At its meeting in the City of
Havana on April 11 and 12, 2006,
the Bureau-of the International
Association of Democratic
Lawyers (IADL) recognized the
illegal and unjust character of the
legal process organized against
these five Cuban heroes impris-
oned in the United States for the
sole crime of fighting terrorism.

A Washington Post article on
June 3, 2006 reads ...““There has
been a groundswell of support for
the five acknowledged agents
among some American liberal
groups and celebrities, including
Alice Walker, author of ‘The
Colour Purple,’ actor Danny
Glover and author Noam Chom-

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sky”. “A San Francisco group
maintains a Web site called
‘National Committee to Free the
Cuban Five.’ The Detroit City
Council even passed a resolution
in March calling for their release,
saying the agents were attempting
to prevent terrorism against
Cuba”.

“The calls for their release
gained momentum last August
when a three-judge panel of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
11th Circuit, based in. Atlanta,
overturned the convictions and
ordered a new trial, because of a
‘perfect storm’ of bias in the
Cuban exile bastion of Miami”,
the newspaper said.

If the US and all those critics of
Cuba really believe in pluralism,
diversity, freedom and democracy,
why is it that we cannot build a
different kind of society, based on
the interest of our people?

Persons who criticize Cuba
should first think that it is a coun-
try that several US Governments

‘have always wanted to annex

using the excuse that being in its
backyard it must belong to them.
But thanks to Fidel Castro who
led a Revolution in 1959, every-
thing changed in Cuba. We left
behind 20,000 people murdered
by the Batista Government, spon-
sored by the US.

Education, Science, Health,
Sports, Culture, Social Services,
the Economy, now belong to the
Cuban people, not to a minority
group of millonaires and cor-
rupts.

I urge Bahamians to visit
Cuba: They will not see shanty
towns. Despite the limits imposed
by the US embargo, nobody
starves because the little we have
is shared by everybody. Life
expectancy is higher than in many
parts of the US, while infant mor-
tality is among the lowest in the
world.

The important achievements
of Cuba in areas such as health-
care, education, scientific and
technical research, culture and
sports are internationally known.

An example of Cuba’s suc-
cess in ‘health is what we have

- been doing to fight AIDS. On

May 30th, the UNAIDS report
on the world AIDS epidemics,
presented at the UN headquar-
ters in New York, Cuba was high-
lighted as the Caribbean country
with the lowest HIV-AIDS levels
as well as for carrying out one of
the most efficient programmes in
the world to prevent the trans-
mission of the illness from.moth-
ers to children.

The document says that in the
case of Cuba, there was a 0.1 per-
cent rate for adults by the end of
2005, with some 4,800 people liv-
ing with HIV and fewer than 500
dead due to diseases associated
with AIDS.

The Cuban programme to pre-
vent mother-child transmission
of HIV has kept the number of
newborn HIV children under 100
so far, the report praises. .

In Sports, Juan Antonio Sama-
ranch, former President of the
International Olympic Commit-
tee has said that “Cuba's sport sys-
tem is one of the most advanced
around the world...” “...Cuban
athletes rise to the challenge in
cup games...". And there are
many other areas J can mention.

I have also been surprised by
comments made by persons who
are not properly informed about
Cuba. Some are saying that the
Cubans are not allowed to travel.
Being a Cuban representative in
The Bahamas, I should only
speak in regards to our citizens
coming to this country.

Last year only, over 500
Cubans travelled to The
Bahamas on letters of invitation
by Bahamian nationals presented
either in Cuba, or at our Embassy
in Nassau. As of May 31st, there
have been more than 250.

The procedures are: you pre-
sent a letter of invitation. Then
the person needs to apply for a
passport if he/she doesn’t have it,
go to the British Embassy, get a
Police record and at the end if
there is no criminal record he/she
is allowed to travel.

It is important to note that at
the British Embassy in Havana, a
Letter of Invitation is a condition
imposed on all applicants of visas
to The Bahamas, including Gov-
ernment Officials who travel to
attend an event on their working
capacity. It is not the Cuban Gov-
ernment who imposed this.

Every country in the world has
rules to comply “with when it has
to do with travel by its citizens. In
terms of the professionals, Cuba
can’t be brain drained by the US

or any other country. After
spending thousands of dollars’ih’
free Education, having to enduré:
a cruel and inhumane embargo!
for over 45 years, we can’t let ouri
professionals go to the US,
whose Government through thet
embargo, wants to destroy us.)
Actually, I am told that many
countries worldwide, when
financing the education of its cit-
izens, on their return they are
required to give a determined
amount of years service to their
Government
Speaking about the right 3
travel, last Tuesday, Gov. Jey
Bush signed the Travel to Ter:
rorist States Act, banning Florida
scholars from travelling to Cuba
proving once again that the polit=
ical leadership in the US... does
not respect the Human Right 10
travel. ty
There are in-Cuba, more ilaw
56 different religions, with over,
five hundred churches. Likewise,
to give possibility to believers
who may not have a Church,
where to preach, the Cuban Gov-
ernment has approved 1624 Cult.
Houses, and among them, Bap-.
tists have 174 Cult Houses?
Adventists, 149; Evangelist Pén-
tecostals 572; Methodists, 105: in’
this regard, more than 4, 000: reli’
gious persons visited Cuba from
different countries, inledine: the,
US in 2005. #
On the contrary, in the Us,
May 31, 2006, the National Coun-
cil of Churches USA and Chuich
World Service (the churches,
global development’ agency)
joined with other organizations to
renew objections to new Ameri:
can Government restrictions“on
religious travel to Cuba.
"The current US policy toward
Cuba restricts religious freedom:
and is contrary to the principles,
upon which our nation was,
founded," said the Rev Brenda
Girton- Mitchell, the. NCC ‘staff
Executive for Justice ‘and Advo~’
cacy during a news conference.
Last‘ year; the NCC and Ews,
along with the United Methodist!
Board of Global Ministries, —
American Baptist Churches, Pres-!
byterian Church (USA) ‘and the’
United Church of Christ/Disci-
ples of Christ Global Ministries,:
received notices from ‘the US:

» Office of Foreign. Assets that their:

existing licenses for religious trav-
el to Cuba would not be;renewed:;

Additionally, I should mention:
that in the US, followers. of ex otic,
religions like Santeria, very. ;: LU
lar in Cuba, are restricted to giv. ys s
of 25 persons, chosen.:by the. <3
Government. But such restrictioi®
do not apply to the Catholic
Church. Isn’t it interesting? -

Needless to say that the State
Department has adopted a policy
to deny visas for religious travel to
the United States by officials of
the Cuban Council of Churches
because it believes these officials
are agents of the Cuban Govern-
ment. Isn’t that discrimination and
violation of the religious rights?

Cuba will always be as it Has
been all over the years since of
the Revolution led by our Presi-~
dent Fidel Castro. Friendly, shar
ing the little we have with others;
and cooperating the way we cani
with the rest of the world. Show!
ing our commitment to the
advancement of human rights for,
all, worldwide, being an example
by having more than 19,000.
Cuban physicians who have,
reached the remotest villages,,
mountains and the most inacces;
sible corners of 63 nations in,
Latin America, the Caribbean,
Africa, Asia and the Pacific, in
order to share with those peoples
Cuban accomplishments in health;
care and scientific research. We
will continue adding graduate stu}
dents to the over 45,000 youths;
from Third World countries grad
uated during the last four
decades. Many will be added to;
the more than 23,000 youths from|
120 countries, currently studying’
free of any charge in Cuban unis
versities.

Critics can use US propaganda’
and their own emotions when
criticising Cuba. The option ig
theirs and they are free to do as
they like. But in doing so, remem-
ber that the Cuban people are;
entitled to continue supporting’
the Leader and Government,
whom we believe to be the best!
choice for our country. Cuba nor
its Government criticises the,
choice by the people of other
nations when choosing their Goy-
ernments. Then why should other,
people try, to choose our Gov+
ernment for us? r

Félix Wilson Hernandez — 5, |

Ambassador of Cuba; 4

The Bahamas Wes

Embassy of the Republic

of Cuba ;

Nassau

June 9 2006





IN tnipune

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 5"



‘Untrained staff to gain access to

entry-level public service jobs



Ministry

announces
change in
fuel prices

THE Ministry of Local
Government and Consumer
Affairs has announced that
effective today, the price of
some fuels will be reduced.

FOCOL’s lead-free (87)
gasoline will decrease by 20

cents from $4.61 to $4.41 per .

gallon, and its diesel oil by
five cents from $3.61 to $3.56
per gallon.

The ministry advised
members of the public to do
their best to conserve fuel.

Book of
newspaper
articles
published

MP John Carey has pub-
lished a collection of his news-
paper articles in book form.
.. They deal with issues of
the day, including the role of
young people in politics and
cortuption and accountabil-
ity in government.

He also urges Bahamian
people to “push politicians
and theologians to the lim-
it” and to become active cit-
izens.

The, book, Political Dis-
course: Compilation of
Columns, is described as
“provocative and profound.”

Workshop
on family

budgeting
to be held

~ A’ WORKSHOP will be
held today as part of a series
of Ministry of Social Services
activities for families.

‘The workshop, beginning

at 9am, will deal with main-
tenance and budgeting.
Tomorrow (7pm) a fami-
ly: variety show will be
staged; with groups from var-
ious urban renewal projects
performing. '
- The venue for both events
is the Earl Weech Auditori-
um, Calvary Bible Church,
Collins Avenue.

Earlier in the week, an
essential'services fair was
held'to advise families on
how to ‘access and use cer-
tain services.

Delay in
suicide
notification
criticised

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

, LAWYERS for Guan-
tanamo Bay detainees who
committed suicide criticized
the US military Tuesday for
taking nearly three days to
notify them that their clients
had died at the military
prison in south-east Cuba,
according to Associated Press.
* Attorneys said the lack of
notification added to confu-
sion and distress among
detainee families because of
uncertainty about the iden-
tities of those who hanged
themselves

TV SCHEDULE

WED. JUNE 14

2: 00am Community Pg. 1540AM
8: Bahamas@Sunrise
Underdog Fun
Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
Da’ Down Home Show
~ Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Immediate Response Cont'd
Island Lifestyles
Inside Hollywood
The Fun Farm
Morning Joy
Ecclesia Gospel
Dennis The Menace
- Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
“~ Cricket World
\ Gillette World Cup 2006
A Special Report
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Health For The Nation
Caribbean Passport
BTC Connection
Behind The Headlines
Caribbean Newsline
>’ “News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response °
Comm. Pg. 1540 AM

NOTE: ZNS - TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government hopes to make entry-
level public service jobs available to those
in need of training and those who lack
academic degrees as early as next year.

Minister of Public Service Fred

. Mitchell announced this in parliament

during the budget debate for the
2006/2007 fiscal year.

Speaking in the House of Assembly
on Monday night, Mr Mitchell said that
the categories of jobs offered will be for
general service workers.

“There is a hope that the government
will be able, in a limited sense, in the next
year, to ease the restrictions on hiring —
particularly for entry level jobs,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said that the moratorium
on hiring public servants which was intro-
duced in 2001 has had the unintended
effect of “running down in certain cate-
gories of the service.”

Due to the moratorium, he said, many
departments have been left “wanting
badly for personnel.”

He named schools in need of janitors
and ministries in need of workers as

examples of how the moratorium as

proved detrimental in certain instances.

Responding to criticism that the Pub-
lic Service was seeking to hire unquali-
fied workers, Mr Mitchell said that there
are no general requirements for acade-
mic qualifications when it comes to gen-
eral service workers.

“It is my view that there OHene to be

- some allocation for these general ser-

vice workers. People who have promise,
who are able to upgrade their skills with
a particular amount of time and then go
on to the next level,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said he hopes that in hir-
ing new persons, there will be an agree-
ment to upgrade the qualifications of
those individuals by a certain time.

“My hope is that this will be certain in
three years,” he said.

The minister said it is clear that the
country needs to put in place special
policies to assist young people who are
out of work. :

Mr Mitchell pointed out however that
this initiative is not designed to increase
the established strength of the public
service.

“It is also not anticipated that any
extra funding will be needed,” he said.

Mr Mitchell explained that so far, his
ministry has identified 1,238 posts at
entry level which have been authorised
by parliament, but are not yet funded.

However, the government will first

look at jobs that are funded and estab-

lished, but have been left vacant by
death, dismissal, resignation and retire-
ment, Mr Mitchell said.

The Ministry of Public Service, he said,
is still determining how many posts fit
those criteria.

He added that public service jobs are
by far the most popular jobs in the coun-
try, and that government has a social
obligation to offer training opportuni-
ties and support structures to its people.



Fishermen: bad conditions threaten resources

m@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE mistreatment of the
Bahamian sea-bed is driving
away some of the country’s
most valuable marine resources
according to local fishermen.

Conch and Crawfish — among
the slowest moving and most
sought-after delicacies of the
sea — are becoming harder to
gatch, the fishermen say.

They told The Tribune that’

this, is not because either ani-
mal has gained the ability to
elude divers — but because con-
ditions under the sea have wors-
ened, causing them to relocate
to untraditional areas.

Jeremiah Rolle, owner and
operator of stall nine at Potter’s
Cay Dock explained that the
growing number of man-made,
underwater “graveyards” are
driving away conch and craw-
fish.

“Some fishermen skin the
conch and throw the shells right

back in the water instead of dis-
posing of them properly. When
they do this, they create a grave-
yard.

“In response, the conch
moves further out, to get away
from the hundreds of empty
shells,” he said.

According to Mr Rolle, craw-
fish respond similarly to grave-
yards of crawfish heads.

One fisherman, who chose to
remain anonymous, had simi-
lar opinions. “Conch and fish
are moving into deeper water,”
he said.

He put most of the blame on
foreign fishermen: “They are
the ones breaking the conch and
leaving the shells on the sea
ground,” he said.

The fisherman admitted how-
ever that some Bahamians are
also to blame.

Because conch have moved
further out to sea, fishermen
now have to work harder, Mr
Rolle said. “Not only do boaters





@ A FISHING boat in Nassau Harbour

have to travel further — they
now have to dive deeper.”

Captain Rolle of the vessel
Lady Christy agreed, saying that
conch and crawfish are not hard
to find — “you just have to go
out further to find them.”

He believes,that more conch

REUBEN SHEARER asks three fishermen
about the growing shortage of conch

“On a large scale we have
these foreign fishermen break-
ing the conch in the water and
disposing the shell on conch
ground — that's mainly what is
diminishing the conch, because
they don't want to live where
the dead ones are. The govern-
ment needs to do something
about this.”

— name withheld

“One conch could lay a.bil-
lion other offspring. Putting a
ban on them makes fishermen

not dive them out and can lead:

to overpopulation.

“If the government wants to
put a ban on conch, then they
need to pick certain areas that
they want to put a ban on. What
happens to the areas that you
can’t reach — they still have
many conchs. If you .ban every
place to make space for all, then
you only hurt yourself finan-
cially.”

— Jeremiah Rolle

“After government, discov-..- |

ered that the grouper popula-

tion was getting a little weak.
they put a ban on it in certain

areas. The ban is good, but the
way they do it still affects the
market somehow. What they do
is put the ban on grouper in
December. Everyone knows
that December is the time when
grouper starts to spawn, and
that's the time when they come
out.”

- Joe Thompson

Miller says ‘Buy Bahamian’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

AGRICULTURE Minister
Leslie Miller has stressed the
need for Bahamians to buy local
produce and Bahamian-made
products..

In a candid address in the
House of Assembly on Monday
during the 2006/2007 budget
debate, Mr Miller showcased
local-grown produce and
Bahamian goods.

He said that at present, 20 -

per cent of the onions con-
sumed in the Bahamas are
locally-grown. However, he
asserted that farmers can pro-
duce 100 per cent of that crop.

“The problem is the food-
store, the major importers and
distributors.

“Before the season starts,
they.would bring in an over-
abundance of onions (and)
ripen the onions in their respec-
tive establishments.

“We ask them again to cease
and desist from doing so to the
detriment of the Bahamian
farmers,” said Mr Miller.

He announced that the Min-
istry of Agriculture will be
closely monitoring the quantity
of imported produce — particu-
larly onions.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Miller
claimed that the onions pro-
duced in Abaco and Andros are
of superior in quality to import-
ed onions.

“Why should we accept
someone else’s substitute when
we could grow our superior pro-
duce ourselves?” he asked.

Be gH
US

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157



Produce manager. at
Solomon’s Super Center Mario
Forde said the company does



buy local produce, which
accounts for between 20 and 30
per cent of the produce it sells.

There will be a book signing by
Ronald Lightbourn of his new book
Reminiscing I:



and crawfish boats are needed.

However many Nassau fish-
ermen are reluctant to travel
the long distance to areas where
conch can be found in abun-
dance.

They must go as far as Ack-
lins, Long Island or Cat Island
to find the kind of catch they

‘used to enjoy locally in days

Double Sheers

| Triple Drapes
Triple Sheers

Cotton, Moire Double Drapes
‘ Triple Cotton, Moire Drapes

Double Short Drapes 63” Long

gone by, Mr Rolle explained.

According to some fisher-
men, the trip is not worth the
trouble financially — as fuel
prices are currently very high
and there is no guarantee that
the conch and crawfish will sur-
vive the return voyage.

Over the last 10 years, conch

‘populations have diminished

significantly, according to one
fisherman. “Where you could
have gone in the last five years
and find 1,500 conchs, now you
can barely find 500.”

He believes that the govern-

“ment should implement a sea-

sonal conch period. “The season
should be closed in June and
July when conchs mate.”

“Tt would make a lot of people
angry," he admitted, ."but it is
the best thing to do right now.”

Mr Rolle, disagreed however,
pointing out that conch is in
great demand.

“The Bahamas can’t afford
to ban conch because too. many
people depend on it for their
livelihood,” he said.

- $170.00
- $170.00.

- $160.00
- $220.00

- $70.00

Wood Poles and Wall Scounce Available
Drapery Rods available up to 300”
Don’t Miss the Savings! Head on Down to
Studio of Draperies Of Draperies on Wulff Road.

Tel: 323-6410

Open Monday - Friday 9am - 5:30pm
Saturday: 9am - 3pm



Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978

ALSO FOR
WINDOWS

DON STAINTON.

(PROTECTION) LTD.

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PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219





ADw

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

i a a eee eee

| El Salvador:
model of t
free market >

|: © THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
ba STAFF VACANCIES

‘The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the following posts:

a

‘Development Officer
,DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
i UNIT: Development

“START DATE: August 1, 2006
‘JOB DESCRIPTION

‘SUMMARY:

Serves as a primary fundraiser for The College of The Bahamas. Designs, implements,
“sevaluates, and refines the Unit's development activities with an emphasis on major gifts as
defined by COB policy, Council and the President in conjunction with Vice President Institutional
‘ Advancement. Personally identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards donors and prospects
*in accordance with performance targets set by the Office of Institutional Advancement under
‘sthe direction of the Council and President. Collaborates with the President, Vice President
{Institutional Advancement and Vice President Finance & Administration and colleagues in
‘*the COB Office of Institutional Advancement to maximize total gift revenue through gift
‘jplanning, corporate and foundation relations, and annual fund strategies.

' DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

A foe Bde oR

ae a

SEP RF te

oS

So hb ws

y
%

%

4

Identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards major donors and prospects including
individuals, corporations, and foundations, through visits and other forms of direct
personal contact in accordance with performance targets set and defined by the

- relevant authorities.

t

2. Enlists senior management in furthering the Development Unit's development
programme; assists in educating faculty and staff in respect of the roles they can
play in fundraising and development generally.

-3. Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them with leadership and direction
in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and prospects;
. coordinates volunteers' activities to ensure their integration into the Unit's programmes.

4. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with the Boards of COB
.« Foundations and College development colleagues to maximize the Unit's total gift
* revenue.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

e Knowledge of major funding and donor sources.

e Respected membership in networks of people.and entities of high net worth
and ability to move with ease and influence in such circles.

e Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

e Community relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community.

‘e Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to work extended hours

as necessary.

"The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
~ performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

Pg ee a

vr

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:
e Prior experience at the CEO/CFO level with a major company/corporation is preferred
Master degree preferred , bachelor’s degree acceptable with relevant experience
® Prior development experience would be highly valued
¢ Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
e Basic computer skills expected

\ssistant Development Officer

DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development vate FEA wy Byeh

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY: The Assistant Development Officer has primary responsibility for supporting the

- work of the Development Officer and team through the management of the day-to-day:

operations of the Development Unit, its databases and records.

: DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

FeO CE Le

‘4. Creates for the institution and makes effective use of a prospect management database

‘4 and other institutional resources to ensure appropriate management of donors, prospects,
alumni, and volunteers in coordination with College/University objectives.

. Conducts research to identify prospects and creates strategies to match prospects’
interests to the priorities of the unit and the College/University.

3. Researches, writes, edits, or oversees, in conjunction with the writing/editorial staff of —

Institutional Advancement, the preparation of persuasive, accurate, and grammatically i

and syntactically correct solicitations, proposals, case statements, reports,
_ correspondence, and other development-related communication materials in support
of the Unit's fund-raising activities.
. Assists in short- and long-range strategic planning activities to create and implement .
¢, fundraising goals and objectives.
_ 5. Assists in planning and conducting programmes and activities designed to increase
‘“ the visibility of the Unit and the College/University to internal and external constituencies.
Develops and manages budgets for fundraising activities under the supervision of the
__ Vice President Institutional Advancement and in conjunction with other relevant senior
t- managers.
«,7. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

° Ability to conduct research, gather data, analyze information, and prepare effective,
accurate, and timely reports and other documents to support development objectives.
Demonstrated mastery of major business and prospect research databases and general
database software such as Microsoft Excel with concomitant database management
skills.

Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.
Ability to write proposals, solicitations, correspondence, reports, and other materials
in support of development activities independently;

Ability to exercise good judgment, to demonstrate an understanding of ethics related
to development activities, and to use discretion in interactions with donors, prospects, -
~ -- volunteers, and others.

Ability to work effectively within a team environment.

Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in managing events and other
complex activities in support of development objectives.
Willingness and availability to travel and to work extended hours as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities;
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

e Bachelor’s degree

e Prior development experience a must

¢ Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
6” Excellent computer skills expected

e. Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision. -

Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The application deadline is June 21, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates

should. submit a College of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive resume and

a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should request

eS referees to send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
elow:

4:6,

hi
ute

Wot

The College of the Bahamas
Human Resources Department
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive
P O Box N 4912
Nassau, Bahamas

_ Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs ;

Please visit our website at for more information about the College and to access the College’s
Employment Application Form.



Preanciseo Flores,
the former president of
EI Salvador, spoke at a confer-
ence here last week organised
by the Nassau Institute, a public
policy group that promotes cap-
italism and free markets.

The conference at the
Atlantis Resort was co-spon-
sored by the Atlas Economic
Research Foundation, which
supports a network of market-
oriented think tanks around the
globe. Atlas gets a lot of its
funding from the John Temple-
ton Foundation.

Flores was the guest of hon-
our. At only 45, he is the poster
boy of free marketeers every-
where. One of the most suc-
cessful post-Cold War leaders,
he helped reconstruct a notori-
ously failed state. And his mes-
sage is one that should be heed-
ed by Bahamian politicos —
who were, of course, conspicu-
ously absent at last Friday’s
event.

El Salvador is a relatively
insignificant Central American
country of about seven million
people. But during the 1980s it
was one of the major flash
points of the Cold War. And
today, it is a metaphor of the
changed relationship between
the political left and right since
the fall of the Berlin Wall.

To fully appreciate what Flo-
res had to say at the conference,
a little historical background is
necessary. The story begins in
the 1960s when reform-minded
groups like the Christian Demo-
cratic Party emerged to chal-
lenge the rigid status quo in El
Salvador.

But the landowning elite and
right-wing military continually
blocked the electoral option by
fraud and repression, so leftist
groups resorted to militant
action to promote change. And
a pattern of mounting violence
and polarization led to a 13-year
civil war. '

A middle-of-the-road Christ-
ian Democrat named Jose
Napoleon Duarte was the lead-
ing figure in Salvadoran poli-
tics for more than 30 years.
After being tortured and exiled,
he ended up as a tragic presi-
dent torn between the extremes
of right-wing juntas and left-
wing rebels.

Deze sporadic
attempts at reform, .

the country slid into chaos; and
in 1979 the. success of the com-
munist Sandinista rebels in
neighbouring Nicaragua gave
the El Salvador insurrection
renewed impetus.

The Sandinistas formed a
united front with the Soviet
Union and Cuba to promote
revolution throughout Central
America, Flores told scores of
businessmen, educators and stu-
dents at the conference last Fri-
day. El Salvador, he said, was
the final armed conflict of the
50-year Cold War between the
United States and the Soviet
Union.

‘Perhaps the defining event of
the Salvadoran civil war was the
1980 murder of Archbishop
Oscar Romero as he was say-
-ing mass in the national cathe-
dral. Romero had criticised the
military’s brutality and often
urged soldiers not to carry out
immoral orders. For good mea-
sure, police gunned down
unarmed demonstrators at his
funeral. Four American nuns
and several Jesuit priests were
also murdered.

A Salvadoran army intelli-
gence officer named Roberto
D’Aubuisson came to promi-
nence in the late 1970s. He was
a central figure behind the right-
wing death squads which were
implicated in many killings,
including that of Archbishop
Romero. And it was D’Aubuis-
son who founded the conserva-
tive Nationalist Republican

- Alliance (known as ARENA).

The Farabundo Marti
National Liberation Front (or
FMLN) was formed as an

umbrella group of five revolu-
tionary organizations in 1980.
Named after a 1930s Salvadoran
communist leader, the FMLN
was set up by Cuban President
Fidel Castro with support from
the Soviet Union. Its goal was



y



to recreate El Salvador as a
communist state.

Ak ~ achieved '
some early electoral

successes before losing in 1984
to Duarte, who became the first
freely elected president of El
Salvador in more than 50 years.
He began talks with the FMLN
and other Central American
leaders to lay the groundwork
for peace in the region.

The following year D’ Aubuis-
son resigned from ARENA and’
was replaced by Alfredo Cris-
tiani, who was elected president
in 1989, defeating Duarte, who
handed over power peacefully.
Both Duarte and D’Aubuisson
died of cancer a few years later,



El Salvador
went from
being a country
renowned for
poverty and
violence to a
model of
growth and
development.

1



effectively ending an.era of con-
flict.

After the 1984 presidential
election, ARENA began reach-
ing out to more moderate indi-
viduals and groups, particularly
in the private sector. And Cris-
tiani, a graduate of Georgetown
University in Washington, DC,
continued the peace talks that
Duarte had started. :

It took more than 70,000
deaths and massive human



“We know that
democracy and
economic free-
dom can only
deliver results
through real

.commercial

openness;
therefore we
pursue it
aggressively.”



rights violations on both sides
before ARENA and the FMLN
were able to sign a UN-bro-
kered peace accord. A ceremo-
ny in December 1992, marked
the official end of the conflict,
and the FMLN, following the
path of ARENA, transformed
itself into a legitimate political
party.

In 1994, Cristiani was suc-
ceeded by another ARENA
president. But the big test of
the peace process was the 1999
election when Francisco Flores,
then only 34, ran on the ARE-

NA ticket against a former ,

guerrilla leader. He won with
52 per cent of the vote, although
turnout was only 39 per cent.
“During the civil war,” Flores
told conference participants on
Friday, “one third of the popu-
lation fled, beggars were on

every street, bridges, highways, .

energy plants, and transmission
lines were destroyed, and mar-
tial law meant that citizens
could be shot on sight after
dark. There is not one family
in El Salvador that has not suf-
fered either the loss of one of its
members or the separation of
the family due to a forced
migration...And on top of the

LARRY SMITH.

‘per cent. Interest rates went

_ vadoran politicians: had to



nin §

THE TRIBUNE*®

ce na ee RE UE ES RE EEA



CR yap RRR TPT geen eee erp ee

ae Bel
war we suffered devastating
earthquakes.” - aig

| all seemed terribly hope-
less, yet 14 years later. El
Salvador is a different country.
During his term in officé, Flores
said: “Poverty was, reduced by
60 per cent — the highest rate
on the continent. Illiteracy was
reduced from 25 per cent to.18

from 30 per cent to 6.8 per'cent.
We have a free press and true
separation of powers.”

Under Flores, the ARENA
government promoted liberal
free market policies including
privatization, dollarization’,
structural adjustment,..as
required by thé International
Monetary Fund, and a Central
American free trade agreement.
And El Salvador went from
being a country renowned for
poverty and violence to a mod-
el of growth and development.
Flores reportedly ended his
presidency with a higher
approval rating (76 per cent)
than when he was elected (52
per cent)...

S: what was the magic
formula? Flores cited
four main reasons for his suc-
cess, rn

1. Responsibility: “Poverty in
El Salvador had always been
blamed on external factors,-but
we stopped blaming everyone |
else and took the responsibility ~3
ourselves.” 9 Sagesat F

2. Vision: “We developed a
strategy for the‘futuré with
enough depth to resolve the
country’s severe problems — a
long-term vision that ‘had "both
practical: and ~emotional
appeal.” ce ae

3. Innovation: “We adopted a
model based on .real,;democracy
and a strategy to fight poverty.
It was the antithesis of populism
and demanded courage, and. a
willingness to accept political
costs.”

4. Patriotism: “We. madeia =‘:
concerted effort to defend and
build a new nation. Don’t take
your country for granted:or-you
will lose your roots and memo-
ries. You have to fight for the
future of your country.”

According to Flores, Sal-

FARIA i PRENATAL TE AEE GLEE LIER RE EEE ARIELLE ELE GENITREL EIENE LE

eR

RTT TIT me te wt payne siggsyhor artes eae ode oe

ER RET TIO EE LEE IEE,

develop a new ethic: “Previ-
ously, parties had selected the
worst members of society, valu-
ing party loyalty most. It was
the same faces all the time. But
we created broader alliances
and achieved four consecutive
terms in office. Permanent
renewal is the strategy for suc-
cess — you need new young
leaders who are creative and &
energetic.” i

For example, he said, an
unexplained rise in crime can
be attributed to growing cor-
ruption within the police force,
which had to be addressed: “So
we fired one third of the force
and within months crime,was
at an all time low. There were ;
political costs, but we survived.”

Flores studied philosophy. at
Amherst University in the US,
and in another recent speech
he spelled out-his prescription
for change: “We chose an.eco-
nomic model based on freedom, §
assigning to government a reg- :
ulatory role and thereby liber- :
ating all economic actors. We
have opened our frontiers and
fought against monopolies. We
know that democracy and ‘eco-
nomic freedom. can only deliver :
results through real commercial
openness; therefore we pursue
it aggressively.”

It is a message that many :
Bahamian leaders are seeking |
to come to grips with as we
speak. And it emphasises the
futility of trying to apply tradi- i
tional left and right labels in ;
today’s complex and rapidly '
changing world.

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme- |;
dia.net Or visit www.bahama- /\



fi

SPARS ade olen, apie iba Saale

STi Ses tei Bra a

7

Saints alg Spee get

WiSANCa TEN



THE TRUE

GN-361



SUPREME COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
- PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
June 15, 2006

~ PROBATE DIVISION
NO,2006/PRO/NPR/00293

id the estate of CHARLES STANLEY COCKSHULL,
late of 116 Central Avenue ‘Southend on Sea Essex,

United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE i is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Side by KEVIN M. RUSSELL, of No.
44 Doubloon Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in'The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant
of Probate in the above estate granted to EILEEN
FRANCES DOROTHY TOTTMAN, the personal

representative, by the High Court of Justice, The |

Probate Registry of the Family Division, on the 26th
day « of February. 2 2004.

Tem i
| signed:

D. Robinson

(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Degee od ts 2 THE SUPREME COURT
aa PROBATE DIVISION



ah ee ‘ai clas oad

‘No. 2006/PRO/NPR/O0308

Whereas REBECCA FERGUSON, of The Settlement
‘off Forest. on the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
“of th the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful

- Widow has.made, application to.the Supreme Court
‘Of The' Bahamas, for’ Letters of Administration of the
-feal.and personal. estate of. NAAMON FERGUSON

a a. Ke 'NAAMAN' FERGUSON a.k.a. NAMON
, FERGUSON late of Forest Exuma, ‘one of the Islands

F of the Comrmionwealthy of The Bahamas, deceased.



f Notice, is hereby’ given n that! such Applications will

: be. ‘heard, by. the said ‘Court: at the expiration: of21.

“aye ra the’ date hereof.
‘pgs nth ~ D. Robinson
OP (for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Pg THE SUPREME COURT
of, / PROBATE DIVISION
ens June 15, 2006

"No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00309

- Whereas MARK ANTHONY BETHEL, of #45
e - Seabreeze Lane, Eastern District, New Providence,
fone of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

"Bahamas, the Eldest Lawful Son has made
ft: "for Letters of Administration for the real and personal
ms éstate of ETHELYN MAE BETHEL, late of #3 Baker
"Street, ‘Southern District, New Providence, one of
ee the’ Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

5 deceased.

Es z aisituey

“Notice i is hereby given that such applications will
a be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
ays: from fhe, date hereof.
es. D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



dune 15, 2006: :

a aR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00310

Whereas HARTIS EUGENE PINDER, of Mareva
House, 4 George Street, New. Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Beryl
Margaret Hall-Sturrup, the Sole Executor has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed
of the real and personal estate of JOHN KENNETH
CULMER, late of Murphyville in the Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEAT FE OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00311

Whereas SANDRA MAE MEADOWS, of Clifton
Street, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, one
of the Lawful Sisters has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
WILLIAM JAMES MEADOWS, late of Clifton Street,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14

- days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson -
'- (for) Regisiter

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION |

_ June 15, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00313
Whereas PATRICIA SCOTT, of Allen Lane of

‘Carmichael Road, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has

_ made application to the Supreme Court of The
-Bahamas, for.Letters of Administration de bonis non

of the real and personal estate of DONALD COLLIN

| SCOTT a.k.a. DONALD SCOTT late of Bobolink

Terrace, Monastery Park, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. »

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00314

Whereas FLORENCE ROLLE; of Harbour Close #5
Bel-Air Estates, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas the Lawful Widow, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of
REYNOLD ROLLE late of Harbour Close #5 Bel-Air
Estates, Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonweal of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS.

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00315 =

8

mm
om
et
fry

4
a

Vite a ect as

wie eke eae

Whereas TAMIKA K. SYMONETT of Shure al | g

Avenue, Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New: |
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Pamela Theresa Symmonette, the

4

Lawful Widow has made application to the Supreme. .

Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration.

of the real and personal estate of WAYNE’:#

GEOFFREY SYMMONETTE a.k.a. WAYNE
GEOFFREY SYMMONETT late of Churchill Avenue; -

Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New Providence,’ y :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The.

Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the oe of 14
days from. the date hereof.

D. Robinson |
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

A
yf



June 15,2006 ff

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00316

Whereas GORDON FITZGERALD LIGHTBOURNE
of Jubilee Gardens,’ Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the Lawful Widower has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of ROCHELLE LOUISE LIGHTBOURNE late
of Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the ERO raEOn of 14;

days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson i
‘ (for) Registrar.



eye

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS"

THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00320

Whereas BRIDGET EVANS of Boyd Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
LESTER DAVIS late of Unity House, East Street,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased:

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00321

Toe OB

Whereas MICHELLE GEORGINA JOHNSON of

Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Daughters has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters

of Administration of the real and personal estate of -

WILBER JOHN FERGUSON late of Imperial Park,

Eastern District, one of the Islands of the

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

¢

June 12, 13, 14



PAGE 8, WEUNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

THE TRIBUNE






MONDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New Prov-
idence Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to
7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315
meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council

"(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month

in the Board Room of the British Colonial .
Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron is
allowed into the club absolutely free and is given
a complimentary. glass of Carlo-Rossi. Tuesday
nights also include the Carlo Rossi's Hot Body
Competition. Hosted by Daddi-Renzi and music
provided bysDJ Ai from 100 Jamz. Master Chef
Devito Bodie provides scrumptious appetizers.

ff HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places:’'The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to
7Tpm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at

5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at

their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
~ Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to a oteh for
more info.

& CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm
@ CC Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room,
College Avenue off Moss Road ¢ Club Cousteau
7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickchar-
ney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros e Club
7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton.
Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassaw’ s Weekly
Jam Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located
East Bay Street two doors East of Esso On The
Run.









Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New Prov-
idence Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to
8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street,
Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets
6:30pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas
National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-
8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West High-
way. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th
Wednesday of each month at C C Sweeting
Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meet-
ings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each
month at Doctor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the
m @ St Augustine’s Monest



THURSDAY

B HEALTH

New - Free public health lectures featuring dis-
tinguished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room.
Free screenings between Spm & 6pm. For more
information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm
/ 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
for more info.

REACH — Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm
the second Thursday of each month in the cafete-
tia of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

THE ARTS

New - Artists Guild International (AGI) pre-
sents its 5th annual Evening of Sacred Music at
Christ Church Cathedral, George Street on
Thursday, June 15 at 8pm. Admission is free,
however an offering will be taken.

This concert will feature: Nikita Thompson-
Wells-Soprano; Alan Butler, Baritone; Can-
dace Bostwick, Soprano; Jeffrey Sturrup,
Organist and Bel Canto Singers, directed by
Eldridge McPhee.

New - The Natigual Art Gallery of The
Bahamas starts the summer season off with a
bang with a new installment of our ‘Summer
Film Series’ focusing on films from the
Caribbean and African Diaspora.

e "Ava & Gabriel" (Curacao & Netherlands)
on Thursday, June 15 ¢ "Amores Perros" (Mexi-
co) on Thursday, June 29.

All films are free and open to the general public.
Films begin at 8pm and take place at the NAG-



PLB AS Er .PUor

es
“QUT THERE”

a

“Lost in Reality”

- a production by the
Lyford Cay International School’s After-School
Drama Troupe - will be held Thursday, June 15
at 7pm at the New Providence Community
Center (NPCC).

B's Outdoor Cinema on West Hill Street. Due
to the content of some of the films, we urge par-
ents not to bring children under the age of 17

New - The NAGB is proud to launch its Sum-
mer Dance Programme with Roderick Johnson,
noted Bahamian dancer, teacher and choreogra-
pher. In a special preview of our summer of
dance, Mr Johnson will speak on "Bahamian
Dance" on Thursday, June 22 at 6:30pm

CIVIC CLUBS

"TM Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British

Colonial Hilton.
TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes. —

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

FRIDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks Ot
every Friday night with Happy Hour..: special.
drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nas:
sau’s first European Night Restaurant - Open
Friday night till Saturday morning Sam, serving
hot food/and take out - music, drinks and an
English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the perfect
place to spend your night out till the morning.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will be
held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Friday
between June 9 and July 29, from 1 to 10pm.

Roderick Johnson will be teaching open dance
classes @ the NAGB on Friday nights at 6pm
On Friday, June 23, there will be a motivational
session entitled "The Way We Move" where par-
ticipants will learn principles of coordination,
rhythm and new dance steps. On Friday, June

’ 30 is the "Ballroom and Romantic Dances" class

where traditional dances like the Tango, Salsa,
Waltz and Fox Trot will be taught. There will be .
a small donation for each session and partici-
pants are encouraged to wear comfortable fitting
clothes and shoes.

B HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the

- public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-

sau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm

& 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fri-
' days @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @

7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm,@ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Cen-
tre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info
call 325.1947 after 4pm.



SATURDAY

lm PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Sun City Entertainment presents Saturday &
Sunday night functions for the alternative
lifestyle crowd (Gay) at Renda s Auto Garage

tees I
"Safety comes in cans. I can, you can,

AROUND

2to 11pm.











NASSAU

VYDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —.
IN THE SUBJECT LINE

' on Gladstone road from 11: 30pm to 4am. Music




provided by DJ X. Heading south on Gladstone }
Road, Kendal’s is located immediately past Mos
Gas station.

m THE ARTS. pee

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Heritage and Cul-
tural Extravaganza - will be held at Arawak Cay
every Saturday between June 9 and July 29 from

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Box Cart Derby+ * qi
will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every Satur- “”
day between June 9 and July 29, from 2 to 6pm.

Back by popular demand - NAGB has invited) :<:
David Weech again to do another installment of '

his popular Kite Making Workshop for kids and
parents to take place on Saturday, June 10, and |
Saturday June 17 at 10am. Please call the Gallery::'-
early to secure your space in what promises to be: i
another fun workshop. 9

Wav

‘ § HEALTH Ode cere

44
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the '
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-. 3 1
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings-.
10am to 11am. Z

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third':’/
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and Decem- « -
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
Shirley Street. 3 ;

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are ‘

' offered every third Saturday of the month from | ii

9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Commu-"* «'
nity Training Representative at 302.4732 for .
more information and learn to save a life today. 5 *’

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
cycle. Parents interested in registering their chil-
dren should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com

SUNDAY



§ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS |

Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha
and the Caribbean Express - every Sunday from
6:30pm to 9:30pm.

' New -. Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition will

be held July 15 to 23. Under the theme, “Seduc-
tion Surrender”, the final night of competition
will be held on Sunday, July 23 at 8pm in the

~ Rain Forest Theatre. The show will be hosted by

Olympic medalist, Ato Boldon, America’s Next

>, Top Model (Season Three), Eva Pigford, and

Bahamian radio personality, Krissy Luv. There
will also be an after party immediately following
the Mr Caribbean Bahamas Competition to meet
the winner of the competition, delegates, the
international judges, and celebrity hosts.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Royal Poinciana :
Tea Party - will be held in Government House i
Gardens, every Sunday between June 9 and July:
29, from 3 to 6pm. ;

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Old Town Jazzat
Sandyport - will be held at the Olde Town ‘
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 — July
29 from 4 — 8pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the i
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events to t
The Tribune +
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@ ;
iribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

we can."







“THE TRIBUNE

@ FIRST grader Stanell Rolle receives a bike from Willard
bsclansey from the Miami Dade Police Department for reading 23

'pooks in the lower school.

(Photo: Fi elipé Major/Tribune staff)

MEMBERS of Sandals environ-
nental: group. ‘the Green. Team”

rought,excitement,.and intrigue
ito the;Environmental. Awareness
‘lub at. Cleveland Eneas Primary
is School: last week..
¢ The group delighted club mem-

ers with creative ways to re-use
every day items such as toilet rolls,
mpty baby food jars, plastic bot-

‘les and copy paper.

% Sandals environmental manag-
@r Janelle, .Hutcheson explained
at during-a sustainable develop-
‘ment workshop, she met and
' poke with the school’s principal
Linda ‘Missiok.: .
% “She toldime that they had an
€nvironmental club and extended
n invitation for me to address the
giub. 7
@ Amongethe.itopics digeunsed
‘with the:students was improugst garbage
Gisposal.

The class was told that it takes 100 years
hor a tinnto decompose, 200‘to 500 years
for an aluminum can, and 450 years for a
plastic six-pack cover.

Ms Hutcheson said, “Because of how
dong some-items: take;to.decompose, itis






LOCAL NEWS

Detective presents
prizes to top readers

lm By MARK HUMES

A MIAMI-Dade crime scene
investigator paid a special visit to
Woodcock Primary School yes-

terday to present prizes to.the:,, th
i ‘first-grader Stanell Rolle, who

school’s top readers.

Detective Willard Delancey,
who is of Bahamian parentage,
said that he was returning to
Woodcock Primary 10 years after
initiating a similar partnership
with the school, because of his

love of youth and of the

Bahamas.

“This is the first of many good
things to come,” Mr Delancey
told the primary school students.

“There were bicycles given
today, but we are going to be
working strongly in the near
future to try and get one of you a
nice trip to the Miami-Dade
Police Department.”

From February to May, Wood-
cock students were encouraged
to read as many books as possi-
ble.

As an incentive, Mr Delancey

agreed to donate bicycles for the
two students who read the most
books by the end of the reading
period.

Winning the top award from
the lower primary school was

read and wrote follow-up reports
on 23 books.
From the upper primary

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 9

continued to begin in prayer, they
would never have to worry about
how their day was going to turn
out.

‘tation, which was attended by
Sergeant Bruce Thompson and
Corporal Davey Pratt of the Roy-

school, grade five student Kim- -

berly Smith got the top honour
for having read a total of 37
books.
She, like Stanell, wrote book
reports on each of the books.
Before presenting the students
with their prizes, Mr Delancey

commended them on their morn-
ing presentation, saying: “I appre-.

ciate youths who can open their
day with the national anthem and
a prayer.’

“Youths in Miami, we don’ t
open up our day in prayer,” the
detective said. “Some open up
their day with alcohol, drugs, and
even death.”

He told the students that if they

Closing out the awards presen-

al Bahamas Police Force Com
munity Relations Department
senior mistress Debora Coleb,
thanked Detective Delancey fo:
his interest in the welfare of th.
boys and girls of the school anci
encouraged him to stay active iii
their lives.



are as follows: .

SUMMER PROGRAMMES

SWIFT under the management of Andy and Nancy»
Knowles will offer “Swim America”Learn to Swim, :
Masters, Fitness, and Competitive swimming classes
for the summer. The classes, dates, times, and fees |

Nassau — St. Andrews School
Abaco - Long Bay School



B JANELLE Hutcheson shows students

_how to creatively re-use empty baby food jars.

important that an effort to recycle is made
whenever possible. This way we can have
a cleaner and healthier environment for
ourselves, future generations and visitors.”

The Green Team showed students how
to decorate empty baby food jars for stor-
age of paint brushes and candies.

Toilet tissue rolls were used to make

-+pen holders.-Ms_ Hutcheson pointed: out:

. to come and share
othe..children.” Aisclccad aio tae Bea Se OLIN tags

that this is an artistic way to make

The Green Team also gave a
talk about the importance of
planting trees to absorb carbon
dioxide from the atmosphere.

Green Team Member Chelsea
Poitier explained how bush medi-
cines such as fever grass can be
used for tea and how aloe can be
used to healing of cuts.

School vice principal Patricia
Chisholm said she and teachers
Nicole Saunders and Vanessa
Turnquest came up with the
idea for the club take turns
teaching and working with the
children.

The club was formed one © year
ago and is a combination of grades
three, four, five and six,” she not-
ed. “We meet once each week to
discuss our goals and ideas we wish to
implement.

“Everyday our students pick up bottles
and cans in the schoolyard because we
believe in being environmentally friendly.
So it was.a treat for Sandals Green Team
aisienihae message with

an inexpensive Father’s Day gift. |



ASSOCIATE/CUSTOM BROKERAGE,
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
from suitably qualified individuals for the position of ASSOCIATE in its
Custom Brokerage/Purchasing Department.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Check all ports of entries for incoming shipments;

Prepare custom entries for all incoming shipments;

Prepare check requests for payment of all incoming shipments;

Prepare check requests for freight charges for all incoming shipments
Dispense of checks to customs airport/dock for all customs entries prepared;
Dispense of checks to freight forwarders;

Assist with the collection of all incoming shipments from ports of call;
Assist with the clearance of shipments for all ports of call;

Coordinate with the trucking department to ensure that all goods be delivered
from ports to the stores department,

Assist with customer queries (in-house and vendors);

Any, other requests assigned by the Manager. °

1.
2.
3.
4.
S:
6.
te
8.
9.

—
o

‘MIMIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or equivalent
Associate Degree with four (4) years practical experience.
Good interpersonal and communication skills;

Must possess good record-keeping skills;

Must be goal-oriented, a self-starter and a team player.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than JUNE 23", 2006 and addressed as follows:

' DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: ASSOCIATE/CUSTOM BROKERAGE, PURCHASING DEPARTMENT



Nea ps Be

Learn To Swim “Swim America”
Session 1 — June 26th to July 7th. Days: Mon: Tues; Wed: Thurs; Fri.
Time : 4:00 or 4:30 PM

Session 2 — July 10th to July 21st. Days: Mon; Tues; Wed; Thurs; Fri.
Time: 4:00 or 4:30 PM
Cost: $150 per child per session



Masters/Fitness/Competitive Group
.(must have Swim America Certificate or equivalent)

Sessions run from June 26th to July 28th. Monday through Saturday,

Morning Workouts: 5:00-7:00 AM Mon, Wed, Fri,
7:00 - 9:30 AM Saturday

Evening Workouts: 5:00-7:00PM Monday through Saturday
Cost: 1week -$40/swimmer
2 weeks - $70 / swimmer
3 weeks - $100 / swimmer
4 weeks - $130/ swimmer
5 weeks - $150 / swimmer

Application/Questions. E-mail
swiftswimming@coralwave.com
Telephone 242-324-1167

2006 ESCAPE - $30,874.00

PART OF YOUR LIFE

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



WEDNESDAY EVENING JUNE 14, 2006

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS
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WPBT |Butterflies” Ga a re ia Israel Lopez ‘Cachao”, Generoso Jimenez, Bebo |Music
: faldez, and others.

Edward James Olmos. (N) (CC)

Access Holy. NHL Hockey Stanley Cup Final Game 5 -- Edmonton Oilers at Carolina Hurricanes. If necessary. From the
WTV4J |wood (N) (CC) HC an fan .C. Alternate primetime lineup includes “Most Outrageous Moments” and "Law & Or-
: er.” (Live

Deco Drive So You Think You Can Dance The top 20 dancers perform. (N) © (CC)



a WSVN News (CC)

, Jeopardy! (N) George Lopez Freddie Freddie |Lost “Orientation” Michael, Sawyer |(:01) Commander In Chief Mac
WPLG (cc) George drops out|hosts a singles {and Jin wonder if their captors are |seizes an opportunity to get the
of school. mixer. ( (CC) |fellow survivors. ( (CC) Equal Rights Amendment passed.

CABLE CHANNELS

f (0) Keepers: A |Dog the Bounty |Dog the Bounty |Inked New hire; |Inked Jesse and |Criss sa Criss Angel
A&E job Behind Bars|Hunter Freddy |Hunter Hunting allife with twins, (N)|Joey compete. | Mindfreak “Ani- Mindtreak New
(CC) caught napping. jhousekeeper. | (CC) (cc) mal Magic” (N) _|motorcycle. (N)

BBC News World Business |BBC News Fast Track BBC News Asia Today
BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

BET |i

0

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) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)

0





N
CBC Just for Laughs /NHL Hockey Stanley Cup Final Game 5 -- Edmonton Oilers at Carolina Hurricanes. If necessary. From the
Gags (CC) RBC Center in Raleigh, N.C. (Live) (CC)

00) Onthe — |Kudlow & Company (CC) Mad Mone The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC ae

(:00) The Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC Anderson Cooper 360 (CC
CNN ree a
)
s 7

* NOT ANOTH: |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Mind of Mencia |South Park (CC) |South Park Dog Bites Man
COM ER TEEN MOVIE|With Jon Stew- |port Tim Flan- {Highlights from : Communicating }(N) (CC)
; (2001) art K. Mehlman. |nery. (CC) season two. with the dead. «|

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DISN “Unhappy Medi- |Pratt, Tommy Davidson. Animated. A mad scientist un- Dragon: Jake —_|"Marti the Mon- jon: Jake Long
um? leashes evil clones of a family. Long (CC) ster’ (CC)

DIY This Old House |DIY to the Res- DIY to the Res- |Kitchen Renova-/Kitchen Renova-|Home Transfor- |Assembly Re-
0 (CC) cue cue - tions tions mations (N) quired

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 11

Miller speaks out in favour of PetroCaribe

@ By MARK HUMES

MINISTER of Agriculture Leslie Miller
said he hopes nay-sayers will wake up and
see the benefit of buying gas directly from
Venezuela — as that country already sup-
plies more than 75 per cent of Bahamian
fuel.

Making his contribution to the 2006/2007
budget debate, Mr Miller once again
touched on the Venezuelan government’s
PetroCaribe fuel proposal — a cause he has
been championing over the past three years.

Mr Miller answered accusations that he
was pushing the oil agreement for person-
al benefit, by agreeing that he would indeed
save*‘around $1,200 per year” in fuel bills
under the deal.

the same as it has always been... and that
is to bring some relief to the small man
who may not have had a voice on these
matters,” said Mr Miller.

He went on to point out increases in
expenditure on petroleum products that
has impacted the ‘Bahamian economy in
recent years.

Mr Miller noted that BEC’s fuel cost
rose by $81.9 million between 2002 and
2005, which translated to an increase in
what consumers paid to the corporation
each month.

Because of the increase in fuel costs,
according to Mr Miller, the public paid an
average of $7.1 million more to BEC in
September of 2005 than it paid in October
of the 2004.

those in countries that have signed on to
PetroCaribe — showing the margins that
wholesalers and retailers get before prod-
ucts reach the consumer.

With wholesalers and retailers in the
Bahamas getting an average of 42 cents
more than those in Antigua, Barbados,
Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago, Mr
Miller pointed out that “buying directly
from the producer always creates savings, as
you cut out the middleman.”

According to Mr Miller, Jamaica con-
tinues to benefit from the PetroCaribe

agreement, and has saved around $300 mil- ©

lion in the last year.

However, some of the “nay-sayers” claim
that Mr Miller is oversimplifying the pro-
posed agreement.

Jamaica pays an initial 60 per cent of

their purchase-price on shipments of fuel,
and is allowed to pay the remaining 40 per
cent over a 25-year period at one per cent
interest.

With this “gas-on-credit” arrangement,
some critics believe that the Bahamas
would further add to its already substantial
debt burden, as public funds would even-
tually be used to pay off the 40 per cent
rolled over from each shipment, plus the
accrued interest.

Supporters of the agreement maintain
that even with the interest, the Bahamas
will spend less on fuel in the long run than
it would if it continued to operate through
energy company “middlemen”.

M@ MINISTER of Agriculture
‘Leslie Miller



“Mr Speaker, my real motivation was



He also compared petroleum prices to

Motor failure was a ‘major

/

FROM page one __

was'testing a new steam turbine,
which'is now producing power.

“In ‘effect what we're doing
is réplacing older plant while at
the saine time adding addition-
al capacity,” he said.

The number of power cuts,
hoor: was due to planned
load shedding because of gen-
erator’ difficulties, Mr. Forbes
said. Heysaid that after the fault
develdped, areas were taken out
on a rotational, basis to main-
tain supply to as many cus-
tonjets as possible.

nithe: past few weeks we
have experienced an lunaccept-

‘ -
+f fips
i

:

°
Fo :
O }

j
os
i
i

FROM page one



able level of faults on our major
plant, thesé faults have resulted
in disruptions to various areas
throughout New Providence for

periods over the last week —

our investigation has so far
revealed the major cause of
these problems and we have
been taking steps to correct
them,” said Mr Forbes. |

Mr Basden said the public
should try to conserve energy.

Members of the Bahamas
Electrical Workers Union

(BEWU) alleged yesterday that

the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration is trying to implicate

them for the recent power out-.

ages.
According to Mr Basden,

ul play ruled. out

when‘ ‘a’ witness. alleged that he had supplied instruments to facili-

tate the ,prison br eak in J anuary.

During the Coroner’s inquest in Aptil, inmate Barry Parcoi tes-
tified{that Mr Johnson was the officer who smuggled hacksaw
blades into the prison to help him, Neil Brown, Corey Hepburn and

Forrester Bowe escape on January 17.
Well placed‘sources told The Tribune that many factors con-

tribuféd;to Mr. Johnson’s death. Coronary artery disease was

among them.

“Prison officials meantime are planning a military state service for
Mr Johnson, which is scheduled for Saturday at the New Destiny

Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road.

i

cause’ of recent power cuts

“The corporation never blamed

or implicated ‘the union or any

other entity, the corporation is
responsible in all of its com-
ments and no instance of that

_ was suggested — we don't know

where that statement would
come from, definitely there was
no implication by management
to our employees.”

“We have a dedicated team
and they were the ones who
responded to the location and
have assisted as best they can
in these trying circumstances.”

According to BEWU mem-
bers, file footage of officials’

broadcasts on ZNS had strong

implications that the union
might have had something to
do with the power cuts.

The BEWU issued a press
statement yesterday stating that

. management. of BEC. is
attempting to mislead the pub- ~

lic as to the cause of the power
outages.

President of the BEWU Den-
nis Williams said the union has
had nothing to do with the pow-
er cuts and never will.

“A part of the union function
is to educate and inform the
public as to what.is going on

inside BEC if we feel something ~

is wrong — from a union stand-
point, it looks like it’s going to
be a very hot summer,” Mr
Williams said.

Ay

Brennen Curry

Sheniqua, a school teacher, met her
husband Petré at their first semester at
college...he proposed during a

Christmas break.

She enjoys sewing, working with
children, travelling, cooking and

socializing,

One of her future goais is to aspire to
be happy and comfortable.

“Her Bridal Choices were: “Palatial
Platinum” China by Mikasa; “Palatial
Platinum ” Crystal by Mikasa.

Kelly’s was chosen because “by far
Kelly’s offers the best and largest’ |
selection of items needed fo start our

new life.”

WIN FREE FABULOUS GIFTS!
* KELLY’S - $250 Gift Certificate
* SANDALS ROYAL BAHAMIAN - Dinner for Two

© BALTA « 23X43 Rug

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

TENDER — APPRAISAL OF
BUILDINGS AND LAND

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide appraisal of its Buildings and
Land.

’

Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a Tender

Specification from the Security’s Desk located in the Administrative

building on John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Packages can also be collect in Freeport, from the Security’s desk,

BTC, Mall Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is 5:00 pm July 17th,
2006. Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER —
APPRISAL OF BUILDINGS AND LAND” and should be
delivered to the attention of the Acting President and CEO, Mr.
Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.



Fettuccine Alfredo
Vegetables, Crab & Rice & Potato

f » BAHAMAS EMBROIDERY - Monogrammed Towels
-« BUTTONS BRIDAL - Gift Certificate
¢ MIKASA- Crystal Bow!
¢ NORITAKE: Tea Service for 4
* WEDGWOOD.- Coalport Collectables
® RUBBERMAID
* SCOTTDALE BEDDING: 2 Pillows
® THE BEAUTY SPOT - Gift Certificate
* WATERFORD - Crystal Salt & Pepper Set

Assorted Cakes, Pies &
Guava Pudding ©
and many more

Petré & Sheniqua receiving one of their many free
gifts from Sherry Carey, Bridal Consultant.

REGISTRY
Kelly‘ g Hon

You could become the next Bride of the i. be yao S096 So

Month/Year....Register today! www.kellysbahamas.com

. Brides eligible accepted during the month of wedding but entries accepted an register.
ALL ENTRIES BECOME THE PROPERTY OF KELLY’S JUDGES’ DECISIONS FINAL.

RIES Et TPL)
~ partners to make your wedding
dreams come true!





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Sinai

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH’

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Orta ivet
costs $7m

per year

Over 650 vehicles
stolen per year,
as insurers mull

premium discount

for clients who
install LoJack

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business
Editor



BAHAMIAN consumers
have lost $7 million per year
over the past five years as a
result of car thefts, which
have averaged more than
650 per year between 2001-
2005, the company behind a
vehicle tracking and recov-
ery system said yesterday.

Joseph Abely, chairman
and chief executive of
LoJack Corporation, said:
“Over the past five years,
the Bahamas has averaged
more than 650 stolen cars
per year, costing citizens
close to $7 million annually.

“The Government both
recognises the severity of the
problem for its citizens, and
has been instrumental in
bringing the LoJack System

| to the island."

LoJack’s Bahamas-based
licencee, Intelligent Security

Devices. International, Js NOW. |.



operating on New P |
‘| dence and will be responsi: |
ble for installing the compa-
ny’s LoJack Stolen Vehicle
Recovery Systems in the cars
of Bahamians and residents.
The Lo-Jack system is a
radio frequency-based theft
protection solution. which,
when installed in cars and
other vehicles, will enable
the police to track them
when they are reported

SEE page 4B

Consolidated Water
share target raised

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A WALL Street brokerage
has raised its. share price target
for Consolidated Water, the
Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant operator that is listed on
BISX, to $34 and upped its rat-
ing from ‘Hold’ to ‘Accumu-
late’ in the belief the firm’s
“srowth story can continue
beyond 2007”.

’ In his latest research note,
which will encourage Bahami-
_ an investors who bought into

Consolidated Water’s Bahami-
an Depository Receipt (BDR)
offering last year, Michael
Gaugler, of Brean, Murray,
Carret & Co, said the compa-
ny’s growth opportunities in
the Bahamas “are far from
over”. :

He wrote: “Our increased
confidence that the growth sto-
ry can continue beyond 2007
‘leads us to believe that a new

and attractive opportunity to.

begin accumulating shares is
now at hand.

“We are raising our trating

to ‘Accumulate’ from ‘Hold’,
and are establishing a $34 price
target price, based on 35 times
‘ our 2007 EPS estimate of
$0.96.”

The $34 target, if achieved,
would price the Consolidated
Water BDRs held by Bahami-
an investors at $6.8 each, given
that one ordinary share is
equivalent to five BDRs. Con-
solidated Water BDRs started
trading on BISX at $4.38.

The company’s ordinary
shares fell $0.99 in trading on
Wall Street yesterday, closing
at $27.91. This means each





































- have the inside track” on bid-

Collaborate to lower
$300m food imports

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

ahamian farmers were
yesterday urged to work
together to reduce this
nation’s per annum food
import bill of more than
$300 million, and increase the level of

- locally-grown produce available to the

tourism industry to ensure less of the
tourism dollar leaks out.

Arnold Dorsette, the Bahamas Agri-
culture and Industrial Corporation’s
(BAIC) assistant general manager, said
his office was doing its part to decrease
the 85 per cent of every tourism dollar
that leaks out of the Bahamas.

He said BAIC was seeking to address
the problem by improving the profile of
entrepreneurial opportunities in the
Bahamas. —

Mr Dorsette said the only way to:

ensure more of the money derived from
tourist spending remains in the
Bahamias is to create more of a local
market to link with tourism.

Bahamas imported $16m worth of decorative
product it could have supplied

plants in 2000,

A particularly large import spending
area is food, he explained, noting that
more than $300 million worth of food is
imported annually.

“ A considerable portion of that can
be produced locally,” he said, giving
mutton as an example.

Mr Dorsette explained that even
though there was mutton production
on Long Island, most of the mutton
enjoyed by tourists is imported all the
way from New Zealand.

“So we need to increase our mutton
production, our poultry production,

and fruit and vegetables, particularly
produce like bananas and potatoes,”
he added.

Mr Dorsette said most ‘hotels and

restaurants had expressed a willingness

to tap into a Bahamian market that was.

consistent on quality, quantity and
price, because it would be more eco-
nomical for them.

He said that if these companies made
provisions to purchase Bahamian-made
goods, they needed to have assurances
they would receive a constant supply if
they stopped making provisions to
obtain goods from the US.

Mr Dorsette said BAIC was meet-
ing with Bahamian farmers to encour-
age them to form small corporations
and work together. This way, they could
all work together and approach a
restaurant or hotel to be their supplier
as a group, with a much larger supply
than if they tried to sell separately.

Mr Dorsette said: “We want them to
work together so that they stagger their
harvest time, so that one week one

farmer reaps, and then the next week it

is someone else.

“This way you have sustained pro-
duce, because often what happens: is
that everyone plants at the same time.

Then the market is flooded one week, |
- which decreases the market price, and

then nothing is available the following
week.”

Another example of a linkage, Mr
Dorsette said was plants.

“Take plants that are used for deco-
rative purposes, for example. They can
be provided and grown from right here,

_ but in 2000, $16 million worth of plants

were imported into this country, many
of which could be grown right in the
Bahamas. .

- “ So we need to find the resources to
provide these same plants locally.”: :

Global United’s Discovery deal close ‘imminent’

\

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE “landmark” sale of Discovery Cruise Line to
Bahamas-based.Global-United-is imminent, the, det;
ater? 3 Owner. told The Tribune yesterday. . 2a

Captain Jackson Ritchie said his company was in
_ the process of finishing the final details regarding the

acquisition.

Captain Ritchie said he expected to give an exact
closing date for the sale\as early as next week. He said
the company would probably have some sort of cele-

bratory event at that time.

In January this year, Global United announced it

‘ had signed a Letter of Intent to acquire the cruise line,
which has provided daily cruise service between Fort
Lauderdale and Freeport for the past 19 years. It
currently brings more than 200, 000 cruise passengers

to Freeport annually.

When the transaction is completed, it is expected

that Captain Ritchie’s wife, Kim Ritchie, will serve as



BDR is valued at $5.582.

If the $34 price target is
achieved, the value of the
BDRs would increase by 21.8
per cent over yesterday’s close.

Mr Gaugler said he believed
Consolidated Water “would

ding for any more reverse
osmosis plant,contracts the
Government was contemplat-
ing putting out to tender in
New Providence.

This was because the com-
pany was constructing and
operating the Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant, and was
also supplying water to the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion from its existing Windsor
plant.

“The completion of the Blue
Hills plant does not mark the
end of opportunities for future
expansion,” Mr Gaugler wrote.

“While the additional capac-
ity generated by Consolidated
Water plants will likely be wel-
comed by Bahamians, we do
not expect it to solve all the
water problems in those spe-
cific areas.”

The Government’s water
supply strategy for New Prov-
idence involves three reverse
osmosis plants, with the one at
Blue Hills joined by further
sites. at Arawak Cay and Win-
ton.

The former of those two
sites will supply water to both
Kerzner International’s Phase
III expansion and Baha Mar’s
$2 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment, with Mr Gaugler
noting that the Arawak Cay





_ SEE page 5B




BES eae

22.44%

12 months to May, 2006

Rio ares ee ear yiet {

eHlas up, Past performance is no guarantee of future results’ Read the Offering Memoranduny catetully



@ CAPTAIN JACKSON RITCHIE





Cummulative Since Inception

; ee Te i i }
7 e0| 10-8 98 a INVESTMENT | TRUST &

MANAGEMENT |

years.

Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Performance through May 31, 2006*

60.81%

(February. 1999)

Fe esses es
Freeport -

eared st 0) bee
Paar Wa | LENDING
PLANNING

SERVICES

FUNDS




Average Annual Return

eee

MUTUAL.

executive vice -president of the cruise line. | | -.
Global United has worked with Discovery Cruise
Line for over 15 years as its port agent, providing
shore side support services to its vessel, and also act-
ing.as.its ticketing wholesale agent, which makes the.”
acquisition , “ a natural extension” of his present line
of work, Captain Ritchie said in January.
_ Global United was created following a rapid series
of acquisitions embarked on by Captain Ritchie’s
original company, Tanja Enterprises, over the past two

Tanja, which was formed in 1991, expanded its
business holdings by. buying United Shipping of
Freeport in 2004. It then acquired Global Customs
Brokers and World Bound Couriers Ltd, plus Sea
Air Aviation Ltd of Nassau, a year later. All three
companies were merged to form Global United.
The company has become: the largest shipping

SEE page 2B.






8.39%







Since Inception
(February 1999)

= FIDELITY

Beyond Banking

Call for an Offering Memorandum
Neat Maynard 356.7764 ext 3
Jennie Barr $517.3010 ext 3304

xiaa eV ee
|

NEWS
ELC e}

PARLE ATT
RETIREMENT
Pe te)

Helore Vou invest.





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



ee Ra Uy
The Tribune - the #1

newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!

FROM page 1B



Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.

Hoa 4 Tt

ites are invited from suitably qualitied Bahamians for the following position:

nen ne mee

Minimum 5 years Call to The Bahamas Bar Association

Minimum 5 years experience in the corporate services department or the Trust
Drafting Department of a seputable law firm or Frast Company

Excellent communications skills -

Computer literate

Fluency in Spanish desirable —

A TEP qualification is desirable

Must be highly motivated and focused.

Pe ee ee ee ee

bt bag tie

| Salary and other benefits commens urate with qualifications and experience |

eee

| Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be
| addressed to the Director of Human Resources, Santander Bank & Trust Ltd., P. O.
| Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas or via fax to 502 7955 not later than June 26, 2006.



Opportunity:
World Class Retailer

Esso, a market leader in fuels and convenience retailing, is looking
for operators/franchisees for its On The Run Cafes, Tiger Markets,
and service stations across New Providence.

If you have...

Successful experience in sales, finance, or administration
.A minimum of five years successfully supervising a team of

workers

A desire to provide superior customer service -

Computer literacy

Organizational discipline

Access to capital and a good credit History

.. We want to know you!

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
€ 3
4
4
4
q
4
4
4
4
4
q
«
4
«
4
4
4
“
«
4
«

Applications can be obtained from our division Office, Windsor Field
‘Road, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications from interested parties must
be submitted no later than June 16, 2006 to:

rr3rerere

Benita Rahming, Marketing Specialist

Esso Standard Oil SA Limited

Division Office, Windsor Field Road
“PO Box CB-10998

Nassau, Bahamas

rererewwre

covrwre

Life. Onthé Rn

We're drivers too.



agency of its kind in the
Bahamas and the Caribbean,
and is also involved in logis-
tics services, which include
shipping, customs clearance
and trucking.

Company

The company has offices in
Freeport, Nassau and Miami,
with over 250 employees.

Captain Ritchie called the

acquisition a “natural exten-
sion” on his present line of
work, extending his services
“from the shore to the seas”.
He encouraged other
Bahamian entrepreneurs to
follow his lead, because “inter-
national persons in the busi-
ness are no smarter or better
than us”.
’ “T am especially pleased that
[Rafael Ordonez, the owner of
Discovery Cruise Line] has

LIOKIM
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES:

(1) Computer Technician
(2) Systems Manager/ Network Specialist

Skill set:
~ Basic

hardware

and software

troubleshooting skills
Network skills and knowledge of TCP/IP

and NETBUI

Knowledge and applied

skills with

Windows NT and Windows XP

Exceptional

time

management and

customer service skills
Must be a team player

SEND RESUME TO:
Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
The Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
op. Fax: 394-4971...

Mail: P.O. Box SS-6295



Global United’s Discovery
deal close ‘imminent’

agreed to this transaction,
because it provides for the very
first time an historic opportu-
nity for Bahamians to become
more fully integrated into the
tourism industry- an industry:
which drives our economy,”
said Captain Ritchie at the -
time.

“Additionally, it affords a
Bahamian national, also for
the first time, the opportunity ;
to operate a casino on board
that vessel, once again provid-
ing greater empowerment to
Bahamians in this industry.”

Tanja, which was formed: in
1991, expanded its business
holdings by buying, United
Shipping of Freeport in;2004. It.,
then acquired Global Customs
Brokers and World Bound
Couriers Ltd, plus Sea, Air Avi-:
ation Ltd of Nassau, a year lat--
er. All three companies were’.
merged to form Global United.

Dollar

A dollar value for the ‘Dis-’
covery Cruise Line acquisition:
has not been revealed yet, with’.
both sides citing confidentiali-'
ty agreements. 3

When the sale is completed“
it will mean that for the first
time,‘a Bahamian will operate.
a casino onboard the vessel, .
which will provide even greater. :
empowerment to Bahamians-
in the industry. — ‘

Captain Ritchie has said that, .
in the future, he would like.
other islands, including his
birthplace, Long Island, to be..
considered ports of call for the
cruise line.

Captain Ritchie is a former:
Royal Bahamas Defense Force
marine, who trained at the .
Royal Navy College in the UK.
and with the British Navy.

; t

CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

The Project Manager (PM) will over see the inBlementaton of an Automated
Clering House (ACH) in The Bahamas. The successful candidate will be respon-. .

sible for liasing with potential vendors, assembling a project team, assingning < - :
individual, identifying appropriate resources needed, developing project schedules".
and providing reports to ensure the timely completion of the project. The PM must PP:
demonstrate appropriate specialized knowledge and experience with the imple-

Vacancy for

Project Manager

mentation of clearing and settlement systems; direct experience with (image
enabled) ACH systems is preferable.

The ideal candidate must possess the requisite skills to perform the following

activities:

¢ Assist with project education and orientation
* Assist with implementation schedule, approach, budget, and staffing

requirements

* Review and monitor project plan progress
¢ Review and assist with implementation plan strategy
¢ Ensure that the risks of material deviations are minimized
* Review and assist with the test plan strategy
¢ Review and assist with training plan
* Assist with development of the Go-Live Plan
* Create public awareness of the ACH and its function
f° Provide thought leadership
| ° Identify global issues and workflow opportunities
| ¢ Troubleshoot and escalate critical issues

2G oR Ea 2 AE NG SE Coe a a of NC A aE 2 of a a ee a ek



Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required:

* BSc or equivalent experience
* Knowledge of clearing and settlement systems

| * Knowledge of project management methodologies, project
management softwaretools and process improvement strategies

* Experience with implementation of financial system
* Exceptional communication and interpersonal skills
* Proven track record of managing project economics

* Effectiveness in meeting project deadlines and deliverable

CBA - ACH Project Manager Response
Bank of The Bahamas International
Ist Floor, Claughton House
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

E-mail responses may be sent to:

Send Resumes to:

Nassau, Bahamas



Cee Oe a ee i OR RAR

Samantha. Antonio@BankBahamas.com



‘4

i



Pil PwwVUINoe





Crawtish
exports
fall 14.6%

in value

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE value of Bahamian
crawfish exports in 2005
dropped 14.6 per cent below
their average worth for the past
five years, dropping to $75.43
million compared to $88.32 mil-
lion.

Leslie Miller, minister of agri-
culture and fisheries, said in his
House of Assembly Budget
debate contribution that the
“significance” of the crawfish
export production decline dur-
ing 2005 had not been decided,
although he said that “excep-
tional production levels”
achieved in the past.

_ Crawfish accounted for 86 per
cent of the value of commercial
fisheries landings on average,
Mr Miller said, and to ensure
the industry’s sustainability the
Department of Marine
Resources would enforce the
law to prevent the harvesting of
undersized lobster below the
size limit. Meanwhile, the min-
ister said he was planning to
change the regulations on limits
to catches by sportsfishermen
in Bahamian waters.

Mr Miller said: “Some of the
visitors who come to enjoy the
Bahamas abuse our marine
resources and thereby deprive
‘Bahamians. Fishing by visitors is
to be for sporting purposes, not
as an opportunity to finance a

vacation, sell for profit or fill

the freezers at home.
“All over the Bahamas, citi-

zens complain that the current,

sportfishing bag regulations are
too generous.’

Acknowledging that the cur-
rent regulations governing
sportsfishing in the Bahamas
have remained unchanged since

.1986, Mr Miller said: ““The num-

ber of visitors of all kinds has -

grown tremendously and the
pressure on resources by so-
called sportsfishermen in some
areas is significant enough to be
séen as direct competition by
Bahamians.”

Mr Miller proposed that the
following changes be made to

the existing fishing regulations: -

* Crawfish from six per per-

son per day to six per vessel per
day.

* Conch from six per person
per day to three per vessel per
day.

* Snapper, groupers, grunts
and other demersal fish from 20
pounds per person per day to
20 pounds per vessel per day.

* Mahi mahi, kingfish and



















on Duty when required.




weekends and holidays.

‘Tequired.

of standards in all units.









Ocean Club Resorts

P.O. Box 240
- Providenciales

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Ocean Club Resorts, Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands
is looking for qualified applicants to fill the following positions:

ASSISTANT OPERATIONS MANAGER - This person will be
computer literate with relevant experience in a similar position
in a condominium resort setting. Reporting directly to the
Operations Manager, they will have strong leadership skills and
proven experience in managing the following departments:
Housekeeping, Laundry, Property Services, Front Desk, Guest
and Owner Services, and be able to take on the role of Manager

Scheduled hours can change at any time, but include weekdays,

MAINTENANCE MANAGER - Reporting directly to the Chief
Engineer of Maintenance, they will have experience overseeing
all general maintenance requirements for all buildings in a
condominium style resort as well as management of waste
water treatment plant operations, irrigation system, and regular
swimming pool monitoring and maintenance.

Scheduled hours for all these positions can change at any
time, but include weekdays, weekends and holidays. Applicants §
must be able to take on the role of Menage on Duty when

CHIEF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE - Reporting directly
to the Managing Directors, they will have experience in a similar
position in a condominium resort setting, managing work order
systems, inventory control, and owner communication.

Additionally, he/she will oversee management of waste water
treatment plant operations, landscaping and grounds upkeep,
irrigation systems, swimming pool maintenance, general building
maintenance, including that of 2 restaurants. They will liaise
with the Refurbishing co-coordinator regarding the upholding

All interested applicants, please submit resumes to:
Attention: Human Resource Manager

TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
OR via email to diane@oceanclubresorts.tc.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 3B



@ MINISTER LESLIE MILLER

wahoo from six per person per
day to six per vessel per day,
He added that they are also
going to require that all fish
retained must have their head
and tail intact until landed
ashore. This is to facilitate iden-

tification and eliminate the pro- .

duction of fillets while the vessel
is at sea.





















Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

is presently considering applications for an

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. {tis setting new standards which go
beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with
comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and advisory services. Our total commitment is always
to our clients and we focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal. values.





Requirements:

- A minimum of five (6) years experience in banking with a large internatiorial institution

- Knowledge of trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities markets with particular
emphasis on emerging market derivative instruments

- - Ability to speak and write in Portuguese fluently in order to converse with clients directly and process

documentation internally

- Deep Knowledge and working experience with Microsoft products (including access, excel, etc.)

> Must have working knowledge of GLOBUS application

v Must be familiar with EUROCLEAR procedures and have deep knowledge of EUCLID application.

- Significant experience in an extremely active and dynamic operational environment

- Comprehensive knowledge of operational and information technology principles, practices and processes
sufficient to interpret/analyze complex issues and develop innovative solutions to the challenges effecting

the business unit

oe Strong problem solving and decision-making skills

> Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills

: Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Key Duties & Responsibilities will include:

- Co-ordinate day-to-day operations functions of the main office

- Oversee various Management functions; particularly the Payment, Settlement and Safe custody areas

- Risk Management and liaise with managers to ensure maintenance of standards

Applications should be faxed to:
Human Resources Department
Fax: 302-6398

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 16, 2006

KING & Co.

Please be advised that the offices
of
KING & Co.

and |
Worldwide Corporate Service
Providers Ltd.

Have Moved to the following address:
Old Towne Marina, Second Floor,
Sandyport, West Bay Street.
Telephone No.327-3127
Fascimile: 327-31 as(Tampprary),



eos









NORTHERN CAMPUS - FREEPORT

The Single and Three Phase —
trical Li Ex

will be held at

The College of The Bahamas,
West Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Saturday, July 1 at 9 a.m.

a ERE ETEEBRE AEA AYN

EI

The Examination Fee of $175.00 must be paid
by Monday, June 26.

Interested persons are asked to call CEES at -
352-9761 for additional information.





= ) FIDELITY
~ invites applications for the position of _
BRANCH OPERATIONS MANAGER.

424








PROFILE:

Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration or Finance —
10 years retail banking experience with a minimum of 3 years in a
managerial position

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS & SALES SUPPORT

o Functional responsibility for the day-to-day management of the
branch
Training, coaching and assessment of Sales Support Staff

o Monitoring cash limits

o Accurate and timely processing of all accounting entries, banking
fees & service charges

o Compliance reviews for new and continuing accounts to ensure
adherence to Central Bank Anti-Money Laundering Guidelines,
KYC requirements of FTRA/FTRR and F sie internal
instructions

o Reporting losses and exceptional occurrences

Reporting on business development & financial results



























CREDIT
o Review of loan documentation
o Disbursement of loan proceeds




OTHER
o Sales initiatives and business development

o Review of workflows and procedures

o Maintain and update all procedure/training manuals
o Monitor dormant accounts

TIME ALLOCATION

o Sales=15%

o Customer Service=20%

o Operations/Administration=35%

o Training & Coaching=15%
o Change Management=15%















BACKUP FOR
o Service Centre Manager '

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than Monday 19th, June 2006 to:
Human Resources Department
JH
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853

Nassau
Fax 326.3000

careers@fidelitybahamas.com —



e-mail:



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



For the stories behind the news,

read Insight on Mondays

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES PETIT - BOS, of
Strachan Corner off of East St, P.O. Box N-3331, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Mt
Councel and Attorneys-of-Law Notories Public

i WILL BE CLOSED
“" On Friday, 16th June, 2006














erend

‘ SES o
s PT ORE LO HD
SPORE GPL HEE GF = lh

te Be fe he

: due to the observance of the firms
re Annual “Fun Day”

The office will re-open on
Monday, 19th June 2006

We regret any inconvenience caused





fetetetetepetetatatatetatetes tenet ttt tata a tate t eta te tata tatatetatatatatatatatatatata tate tetetetetetatetetetatetatatatatetatetetate

NTATIV

PR




BUSINESS

Car theft costs

THE TRIBUNE:

aa



t

y OW y

Apo 8

4 «
"

S7m per year

FROM page 1B

stolen. Ultimately, the system
aims to. aid law enforcement
in recovering stolen cars and
apprehending offenders.

The Tribune was told yes-
terday that the Bahamas Gen-
eral Insurance Association
(BGIA) and its individual car-
rier members were consider-
ing whether to offer insurance
premium discounts to clients
who installed and maintained
the LoJack system in their
vehicles.

’ This would be viewed as
reducing the risk of them being
stolen and never recovered,
but it is unclear whether the
BGIA and its member compa-

nies have taken a decision yet

on this matter.

The BGIA and four of its
members - Bahamas First,
RoyalStar Assurance; Summit
Insurance and Insurance Com-
pany of the Bahamas - played
a key role in bringing the
LoJack system to the
Bahamas, helping to fund the
system’s infrastructure, such as

Royal Holiday

Ts looking for

Energetic, Self Motivated, Goal Oriented, Individuals

Tua
po

Must be over 25yrs.

For it’s High Volume Sales Centre

_ THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!

Highest commissions and bonuses in the industry.

Have a Positive Mental Attitude,
Excellent Conversational Skills

c | Ability to Think on Feet
Articulate and Outgoing

Minimum 3 BGCSE

Become a part of our Winning Team

Please contact:
Royal Holiday,

327-5595 Ext-222.
Or in person:

om ye

10am-3pm.

3 RT ee ee

se




SUSE

Pficing Information As Of:
13 June 2006



Abaco Markets

8.50 Bahamas Property Fund
6.35 Bank of Bahamas
0.70 Benchmark
1.26 Bahamas Waste
1.05 Fidelity Bank
8.00 Cable Bahamas
1.39 Colina Holdings
. 8.50 Commonwealth Bank
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.10 Doctor's Hospital
4.02 Famguard
10.45 Finco
8.52 FirstCaribbean
8.42 Focol
1.03 Freeport Concrete
9.50 ICD Utilities
8.27 J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier R

52wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)






28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets





Royal Holiday, ground floor,
Nassau Wyndham Resort and Casino.

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd,





Last Price Weekly Vol










Fund Name NA V

1.2897 1.2339 Colina Money Market Fund 1.289693*
2.8564 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.78564 ***
2.3915 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480**






Colina Bond Fund

AL Ri -



52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months








Last 12 Months Div $

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value’

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

' ff you are raising funds for.a

towers, and other equipment.
The industry is hoping that
by reducing the level of vehicle
theft in New Providence, the
LoJack system will also play a
role in helping to reduce auto
insurance premiums, although
the effect may not be signifi-
cant.

Implemented

“I think once we can get it
implemented, the LoJack will
work extremely well,” one
insurance industry source said.
“If a car is stolen and it has got
the system, it can be tracked
immediately.”

Insurance carriers only pay
claims on cars that are stolen if
the policies covering them are
either comprehensive or for
third party, fire and theft.

Those policyholders who
insure their cars with just third
party policies are faced with
having to purchase a new car if
their vehicle cannot be recov-
ered.

Bahamian general insurance
carriers believe that many of
the cars stolen in New Provi-
dence are either stripped down
for parts, or transported to the
Family Islands.

They are also faced with the
increasing problem of fraudu-
lent claims from consumers
who stage the burning or theft
of their cars in a bid to collect
the insurance claim proceeds.:

The Tribune understands

that at least one insurance car-
rier.has also pushed for the
implementation of a claims
information exchange system
‘in the Bahamas, believing this
would help to detect and weed
out persons who persistently
submitted, questionable and
fraudulent claims.

A study performed for the
BGIA in 2002 showed that









The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ;

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
















NAV KEY,
* 31 May 2006
** 34 May 2006

=** - 30 April 2006



- 31 March 2006



Nissan was the most popular
make for car thieves, some 81
cars being stolen that year. The
next most popular vehicle
make was Honda, with 24 cars
stolen that year, while 14 Toy-
otas were stolen, along with 13
Ford and Hyundai cars stolen.

The most popular Nissan
model among car thieves was,
unsurprisingly, the Sentra, with
56 such cars stolen in 2002. The
next most popular vehicle
model among thieves was the
Honda Accord, with 13 cars
stolen.

Addressing a conference last
year on New approaches to
overcoming Crime, organised
by the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and IBM

(Bahamas), the Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of
National Security, Cynthia
Pratt, said of the ‘LoJack’ sys- :

tem: “We expect this project
will put a significant dent in
stolen vehicle recovery and act
as a deterrent to vehicle theft,

. in general.”

Several sources, though,
have questioned whether con-

_ sumers whose cars were val-

ued well below $10,000 would
want to pay for having the
LoJack system installed and
maintained in their¢ars.
LoJack’s Mr Abely said:
“Although only a small region,
the Bahamas represents.anoth-
er step in our global expan-
sion, under our original
licenseemodel.
“We are pleased to add the
Bahamas to the growing list of
countries whose citizens can,
rest a little easier knowing that
LoJack's Stolen Vehicle
Recovery Systems soon will be
available in the area."















) obtain applica
477-1901, 0r



NCOs ues
21st Century Welding Co.
Sale/Save Big

20% off storm panels, 5/8” + 1/2” rebars.
Ideal for, “The Do Yourself”. ie
Ph# 3254624 / 3252830

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that SONEL AUGUSTIN of Mackey | -
St, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible}.
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization | :

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows‘] .
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not bé
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the] ’
facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and’|'
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that LIONEL SYLVESTRE of Mackey
St, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be,
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the4
| facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH day of JUNE;;}

2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and |
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas:

} aasseanssannsenansonenstes
| S (15 days) qcecssssessensesssceseresrerscssssansaesed.
- 4WEEKS © 20 AayS)...ccsssessreconecesseseorcnonsseseseaneaa:





coachgeoff@dolphinswimmin yclub.com
_ or download the applications from our website



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SA RAP ISOS IB ARIA A ARTARTAMOSE







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 5B



zon

Consolidated Water share target raised

ROM page 1B

contract would “provide addi-
tional opportunities and
demand for water going for-
wards

Yet his research note made
no mention of the controversy
that has embroiled the Arawak
Cay reverse osmosis plant con-
tract.

The Tribune understands
that the current status of the

matter is that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation and the
Government’ s Tenders Board
have both recommended that
the contract be awarded to a
rial bidder, BK Water, the
Bahamian investor group
whose principals include
Jerome Fitzgerald, the RND
Holdings chairman; business-

-man Mark Finlayson, son of |

entrepreneur Garet ‘Tiger’
Finalyson; and ex-Burns
House chief financial officer
Phillip Kemp.

However, the contract award
has yet to be approved by the
Cabinet, and that is where the
issue currently resides.

If successful, The Tribune
understands that while BK
Water would own the Arawak
Cay plant and sell water to the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, the plant’s operations
would be run by French com-
pany, Veolia Enerserve, under

a Management/operating part:

net agreement.

‘¥he Government is thought
lik ely to look favourably on
any group with Bahamian
involvement, wanting to place
privatised infrastructure assets
ito Bahamian hands as part
of its Bahamianisation policy.

‘There is also understood to
be concern about handing a
sécond reverse osmosis plant
td Consolidated Water, for fear
that would give the company a
monopoly over water produc-
tion on New Providence.

However, some sources told

e Tribune that,Consolidated
Water's bid was the lowest by
$10 million, providing the Cor-
poration with the greatest sav-
if and consumers with the
I
puted by others, with some
saying the BK Water/Veolia
bid.was offering extra services

|
eg
!

west price. Yet this was dis- °

that Consolidated Water did
not propose to.

Meanwhile, Mr Gaugler said
Gerardo Capo’s Bimini Bay
Resort could provide further
opportunities for Consolidat-
ed Water, as it also had a pres-
ence in the area.

“Outside Nassau, Bimini is
seeing increased levels of inter-
est from developers looking at
building a casino complex to
take advantage of the island’s
close proximity to the US,” he
wrote.

“While no firm commit-
ments have yet been reached,
the potential for Consolidated
Water to provide water for a
casino development is defi-
nitely worth mentioning and
monitoring.”

Elsewhere, Mr Gaugler said



Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that REYNALDO ANTONIO AMOS,
P.O. Box SS-6292, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Consolidated Water faced only
one rival bidder on the con-
tract for a 1.3 million gallon
plant in Bermuda, with May
31 the deadline for all bids to
be received.

The company was building
a second plant in Tortola, the
British Virgin Islands, that was
expected to go online in the
2006 third quarter, while it had
pre-qualified to bid on a pro-
posed $50 million project in
Barbados.

Volumes in Consolidated
Water’s home market of
Grand Cayman were increas-
ing, as properties came back
on line after Hurricane Ivan,
while the new Ritz-Carlton
resort and Caymana Bay town
were likely to generate
increased demand.









Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOSPHORE LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BOSPHORE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies

Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 12th June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust of 17
bis, rue de Lausanne - 1211 Geneva 70 - Switzerland.

Dated this 13th day of June, A.D. 2006.

Credit Suisse Trust
Liquidator



_ CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

Vacancy for

Administrative Assistant

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible to the project Manager and
; gclérical'and Administrative support. The successful candidate will be
i responsible for documenting meetings, organizing and coordinating meeting
aschedules, preparing all project communications and correspondence,
distributing project information and generally ensuring that all matters
lating to the project are fully and project documented in a timely manner.
Hine candidate must possess excellent typing and record keeping skills and be

proficient i in the use of various software a

yowerPoint and MS Excel, among others.

ok 2s +h

3K fe 2

: | Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required:

pplications such as MS Word, MS

| Associates Degree or Certified Professional Secretary Rating , or Certified
‘Administrative Professional Rating;
+ Detailed knowledge of computers to complete correspondence (e.g. MS Word),
‘ create and maintain forms, reports (e.g., MS Excel), presentation (e.g., MS
‘Power Point), and brochures and to respond to email as necessary;
¢ Basic business and accounting knowledge to prepare documentation and

‘statistical report;

“Excellent oral and written communication skills, including etiquette and
writing skills, to interact with associates and external persons, and to créate

‘correspondence;

* Judgement requirement in treatment of information with confidentiality and

‘professionalism;

“Ability to operate a variety of office equipment, including computer, calculator,

Sele en pin BS ER Sar Sam Soh ea i



printer, fax, machine, and photocopier

Send Resumes to:
CBA - ACH Administrative Assistant Response
Bank of the Bahamas International
1st Floor, Claughton House
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail responses may be sent to:

Samantha.Antonio@BankBahamas.com



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Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of



is seeking candidates for the position of :

Internal Auditor

Candidates should possess the following qualifications:

Certified Public Accountant or equivalent

Bachelors Degree in Finance, Banking or Accounting

Banking experience as Internal auditor or International Accounting Firm
experience in audit banking dept.(min.5 yrs) ; :

*Fluency (or working knowledge) in French would be an asset.

Personal qualities:

*Excellent organizational skills & ability to work with minimal
~ SUPEFVISION.

*Commitment to quality and service excellence
*Self-motivated, flexible, positive attitude.

Responsibilities:

«Review and Control of:
Bank Operating transactions
Bank Corporate Governance
Compliatice procedures
¢Various audit coordination
‘Report directly to the General Manager of the Group and
the Group Audit department Manager.

Please apply to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas
Fax: (242)327-1514

Email: bzi@pasche.ch

(Please no phone calls)





PAUE Ob, WEUNESVDAY, JUNE 14, 20U0 IMIDUINE Oruntis

ie oS

‘ss’ Ian Symonette looking





. forward to ‘new hapied

@ FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IAN ‘Big Bahama’ Symonette is eagerly
looking forward to beginning a new chap-
ter in his life.

He’s currently home, spending the.

remainder of his summer break before he
leaves next Friday to begin his tenure as a
member of the Hurricanes’ football team at
the University of Miami.

“Since I’ve been home, I’ve been going
: over to Mystics Gym, going on the beach
i and today (Tuesday), I will be going to the

start of the Pros’ training camp,” Symonette’

disclosed.

“Other than that, I’ve just been going
on the beach and working out in the gym.”

After graduating in May from St. Pius
High School in Houston, Texas where he
shined for the past two years, the 19-year-
old offensive linesman returned home for
some “home cooking” before he enters his
freshman season in college.

Excited

Highly sought by a number of colleges
before he settled on UM because of its
close proximity to the Bahamas, Symonette
said he’s excited about getting started.

“Tt’s a brand new level, but it’s a level
that will help my game of football a whole
lot,” Symonette charged. “It’s a totally dif-
ferent level from high school sports.

“I’m really trying to see how people
respond to college life. So I’m hoping that
I can go there and enjoy it.”

Looking back at his two-year stint at Pius
High School, Symonette called it a “learn-
ing experience because that’s where I went
off to school, breaking away from my par-
ents and living with Frank (Rutherford,
Olympic bronze medalist).

f



“When I go
running on the beach
in the mornings, they

would stop me and

congratulate me on
the accomplishments
that Pve made.”

Ian Symonette



“Tt was a lot of responsibility. It was an
experience that helped me a whole lot
because I had an early start in the lessons of
life. It was a great start.”

Symonette, who turns 19 on December
31, will be gearing up for the start of his
freshman season on Monday, August 4
against Florida State at 8pm at the Orange
Bowl.

But the former St. Augustine’s College
basketball standout, converted into a foot-
ball player by the Pros, said the public has
been very receptive to him.

“When I go running on the beach in the
mornings, they would stop me and con-
gratulate me on the accomplishments that
I’ve made,” he summed up.

“So I feel good about what I’ve done
and to see that the Bahamian people are
behind me.”

The 6-foot-9, 334-pounder said he intends
to make an impression as a left tackle for
the Hurricanes before he ventures into a
professional career in the National Football

League. a

“I’m looking forward to entering a new
chapter in my career,” he added.”

9 j

5 2







> ‘
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Available from Commercial News Providers
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Brazil edge past Croatia in Worid Cup opener







SPORTS

: = Blake beats Gimelstob
= ~ in all-American clash



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Available eo News Providers —

Weather stops the fourth dayof
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= @
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WA

na NES Gur

ee ep SENS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

AyGutieaeny tails

SY

a BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

MCMURRAY State women’s
basketball coach Sam Nicholls and
his entourage of assistant coach
Charles Parnell and three players
wrapped up another trip to the
Bahamas on Tuesday.

The contingent spent some time
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
where they instructed coaches
from the Ministry of Education’s
Physical Edueation Unit on basic
skills for primary school students.

Dawn Knowles, director of the
Physical Education at the min-
istry, said it was a good opportuni-
ty for the coaches to expand their
knowledge from the visiting
coaches.

“Every year they come here,
they afford us this opportunity, so
we are very pleased to be able to
take part in this,” Knowles
stressed. ;

This marked the second year
that the primary schools partici-
pated in a one day clinic.

For first timer Kayser Spence,
who has been teaching at Naomi
Blatch since January, the course
couldn’t have come at a more
opportune time.

“I learned a lot because my
school is a very small school and
coming here will-be very benefi-
cial,” she indicated. “So I was very
eager to go through the drills. It -
was very beneficial.”

Naomi Blatch has just recently
participated in some of the schools
sports, but Spence said this will
allow her to try and get a basket-
ball team together as well.

Jeremy Major, a coach at
Garvin Tynes, said: “What I knew
all along was the basic skills for
the older children and grown up,

they made it so much more funda- .

mentally sound about the pro-
gramme for children.”

Like Spence, Major said he
learned a lot in the short space of
time and he’s eager to get started
in the new school year.

Exciting

Centreville Primary’s coach
Saron Cox said: “Every year, you
think you covered everything and
every year they bring something
new. So it’s always exciting.

“J learned some new techniques
to get the kids more excited in
learning the new skills. I think I
know how I can keep the kids
focussed and motivated.”

Other coaches who participated

were Donna Lundy.from Yellow
Elder; Lisa Mortimer (Mable
Walker); Kiva Bridgewater (Thel-
ma Gibson); Doris Ramsay (Ger-
ald Cash); Alfie Bethel (Thelma
Gibson); Monty Charlton (Sandi-
lands Primary);:Theodore Neely
(Gerald Cash); Greer Thompson
(Albury Sayle) and Theodore
Hanna (Cleveland Eneas).

While Nicholls has been coming
to the Bahamas for the past eight
years, this was coach Parnell’s
fourth trip and he was quite
‘impressed with what he saw this
time around.

“One of the first things I
noticed was the improvement of
the elementary students,” Parnell
stated. “They have improved on
the drills that we left with them
last year.”

Patricia ‘Patti’? Johnson, who
organised the trip that was spon-
sored by the Caribbean Bottling
Company Limited and Coca-Cola,
along with Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, said the
whole idea behind the visit was to
allow the coaches and players to
reach the inner-city children and
those less fortunate on some of
the Family Islands.

“I think we need to show them
more drills, new drills and a com-
bination of drills so that they can
use them when the season starts,”
Johnson pointed out.

Johnson credited Knowles, her
former teacher, who encouraged
her to give back to the communi-
ty.

Brittany Densman, who along
with Jennifer Poetzel and Carli
Engelke joined the coaches for a
return trip, said they had another
wonderful time.

“All of the people we have
worked with since we got here
have responded very well,” Dens-
man added. “We know that they
have learned whatever it was we
taught them.

“So it’s just a honour to be back
here because we feel that every
year, we reach some new kids. We
just got a lot of respect that we
would not have gotten back in
Texas.”



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



soomerreeewrenererrert} som .
. Ton iyi Toni er]

Tei ulelaic
Tee fora

new Ar ae



Top athletes to”
compete in 200m

vallable



@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

DESPITE the hype that is
being placed on the first day of
competition in the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tion’s (BAAA) national champi-
onships, day two will be twice'as
heated.

The sprint events are igitally

the ‘eye catcher’ in track and

field, especially the 100 metres,
but the half lap (200m) event
will surely raise a few eyebrows.

The highly contested 200m will
see two of the world’s top per-
formers in the 400m settle in the
blocks in a head to head clash.

Olympian and World Champi-
onships gold medalist Tonique
Williams-Darling and Olympic .
finalist Christine Amertil have
signed up to take part in the
event.

But the two quarter-milers will
have to ward-off the event’s
national record holder, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie, if they
want to claim the win.

Fastest

So far, Ferguson-McKenzie
has posted the fastest time out
of all the entrees, 22.67 seconds
with Amertil recording the sec-
ond fastest time of 23.22 sec-
onds. The next three times. __.-- -
fastest times are posted by a trio:
of high school athletes Sheniqua ©
Ferguson, Nivea Smith and «—
Cache Armbrister, who have .:
posted 23.44 seconds, 23.66 sec-
onds and 23.98 seconds respec-
tively.

‘Out of the trio, both Ferguson
and Smith are ranked amongst:
the World Youth leaders in the
event, while Amertil is ranked
15th in the Women’s listing. ~

The 200m event, scheduled for
6pm at the Thomas A Robinson
stadium, will be the first half . ~
lapper for the Olympic champi-
on Williams-Darling.

Also taking up the challenge
to compete in the 200m will be
Chris, Brown.

Contended

The change of scenery for
Brown will be contended by
national record and Indoor
Champion holder Dominic
Demeritte, who has posted the
fastest time of 20.71 seconds.

Like Williams-Darling, this
will be the first 200m for 400m
runner, who will have Jamal |
Rolle, Michael Matthieu, Adrian
Griffith and Karlton Rolle lining
up at the starting line.

Rolle has the second fastest
time heading into the event,
20.89 seconds, followed by
Matthieu with 20.83 seconds,
Rolle with 21.33 seconds and
Griffith with 21.36 seconds.

The women’s 100m hurdles
will also be a highlight as newly
national record holder Tiavannia
Thompson looks to lower the
time on home soil.

Thompson, ‘the new kid on the
block’, has dipped below the
national record three times this
year, clocking 13.75 seconds at
the recent NCAA national
championships. The national
record is set at 13.63 seconds,
recorded on May 11th ata
preparation meet for the NCAA.

@ FROM top: Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie, Tonique
Williams-Darling and Christine
Amertil will all compete in the
half lap (200m) event.

(FILE Photos



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i'm lovin’ it.

FSTORM






88F
79F

CLOUDS, SUN,



Concern on Exuma
as 12 cases confirmed

@ By PAUL

TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

WITH 12 cases of malaria
confirmed out of Exuma, resi-
dents on the island are con-
cerned: that’ with the lack of
spraying being done, a possi-
ble outbreak of the disease
will not only affect their
tourism product, but their
heaith as weil.

According to residents, the
only pesticide spraying being
done on the island is at the
Four Seasons Hotel.

However, officials from the
Ministry of Environment state
that the spraying programme
is underway, and that it would
not be unusual for residents
not to see the actual spraying
as it is normally done during
either the early morning or

evening hours.

Journalist and Exuma resi-
dent Cordell Thompson main-
tains, however, that he, with
other residents, have scoured
the island and have seen no
evidence of any spray trucks
within the communities.

Mr Thompson said that the
only example they have seen is
a small golf cart used by the
Four Seasons Resort to spray
their own environment. And

since the rainy Labour day

weekend, he said, residents
have become very concerned
as the mosquito population
has “substantially increased.”

“People are very concerned
that if this goes out into the,
wider community outside of
the Bahamas that this will cer-

. tainly affect the tourism econ-

omy down here. They are con-

cerned about their livelihood
as much as they are concerned
about their health and their
general comfort. I mean it is
really thick down here. I can’t
imagine people at Four Sea-
sons having a good day unless
their spraying has been very
effective,” he said. —
Minister of Energy and the
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel said it would not be
uncominon for the irucks to
be missed as the spraying is

done during specific times of

the day.

“There are two modes for
managing the mosquito pop-
ulation. One is the fogging and
spraying that occurs at specif-.
ic times of the evening or ear-
ly morning because that is the
time that the mosquitos begin
to move.

“So it is specific times of the
day that the fogging or spray-
ing happens,” he said.

The treatment of sitting
pools of water.is an ongoing
exercise Dr Bethel said, as
they have to treat the same
area day after day.

“The chemicals kill the lar-
vae and it is fine for quite a
number of weeks.

“So the fogging is what is
done at specific times of the
day. So unless you happen to
be in an area that is being
fogged you wouldn’t: see
that happening during the day-
light hours — generally speak-
ing.

“This has 'to do with the life —

cycle of the mosquito. So it is
not unusual for people not to
see them fogging because they
may have already retired to
their homes,” he said.

AUTO INSURANCE





Che Miami ‘Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



i SOME parts of the sea have become like a ‘graveyard’ for conch (shown at Potter’s Cay yesterday) and crawfish, accord:
ing to Jeremiah Rolle, owner and operator of a stall at Benge s Cay Dock. e SEE PAGE FIVE :
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune tty

Foul play ruled out in
prison officer’ s death

@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE _

BASED on a recently
released autopsy report, Police
officials have ruled out foul
play in the death of prison offi-
cer Van Johnson, Assistant
Commissioner in charge of
Crime, Reginald Ferguson, told
The Tribune yesterday.

Early last month Mr John-
son’s body was found sitting
upright in his red Nissan truck
at the entrance to Potter’s Cay
dock.

family members, had labelled
his death “suspicious,” because
of the controversy surrounding
the deadly break-out from Fox
Hill prison.

But, despité widespread
speculation that Johnson’s
death may have been a “hit”

‘to keep him silent, Mr Fergu-

son said “there was nothing
suspicious about the results.”
Mr Johnson had been impli-
cated in the Coroner Court’s
inquest into the deaths of a
prison officer and an inmate

‘SEE page 11



Motor failure a ‘major
cause’ of recent power cuts

lâ„¢ By CHESTER ROBARDS

FAULTS in generators
along with planned mainte-
nance were the cause of the
recent power cuts throughout
New Providence, according to
General manager of BEC
Kevin Basden.

According to Anthony
Forbes, Deputy General Man-
ager of Engineering and Plan-
ning at BEC, the failure of a
critical motor was a major
cause of the outages; a prob-
lem, which he said, has
occurred on a few occasions.

He also said that BEC is await-
ing a replacement part and
therefore cannot promise that
there will be no more outages.

“We’ve done all in our pow-
er to minimize the possibility of
an outage, but we cannot guar-
antee that from time to time a
piece of plant might not fail,
but once we have our avail-
ability up then those instances
will not be sustained,” he said.

According to Mr. Basden,
BEC had recently commis-
sioned a new gas turbine and

SEE page 11

Many persons, especially

Mitchell hits out at daily newspapers

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE country’s daily newspapers have
moved “down market” by publishing “per-
verse” and “twisted’* interpretations of the

facts, according to Foreign Affairs and Pub- —

lic Service Minister Fred Mitchell.

Giving his contribution to this year’s bud-
get debate, Minister Mitchell during par-
liament’s evening session on Monday made
a point to address what he considers a
“major problem in the dissemination of
information in this country.”

Mr Mitchell said that in his view the
Bahamian newspapers have a significant
problem with simply reporting “what was

said and done without editorialising it.”

“This is only an issue for press that con-
siders itself papers of record, not the trashy
papers that simply sit down and manufac-
ture information for the entertainment of its
readers.

“T believe that these papers have moved
down-market, trying to compete with the
trashy papers for lurid headlines and with
salacious material in an effort to attract
readers frightened off by the trashy papers,”
he said.

He explained that his party once before in
the past thought it necessary to create its
own information machinery “because the
message of the party was simply not getting
out.”

“It has become so bad in my view that
one sees the most perverse and twisted
interpretation of facts, so that this party
and this government has to find a better
way to get its message to its supporters,” he
said.

More specifically, Mr Mitchell accused
certain factions of the press of deliberately
twisting information “to promote an agen-
da, to perpetuate a great falsehood that
there is some problem between the United
States and ourselves.”

As an example the minister named the
news stories anu editorials published last
week in all the dailies regarding US Secre- :

SEE page two


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



~The Tribune’s duty is to |
the people of the Bahamas

OPINION

i By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Re orter





THE press in the Bahamas
has misplaced a champion for its
rights, a man who, like the myth-
ical King Arthur, seems to have
retired to the mist-shrouded isle
of Avalon to return on a day
when he is most needed. '

One would think that with the
recent onslaught of veiled
threats and insults from politi-
cians and party chairmen, this
man would return once again to
a more terrestrial sphere and

_ wield, like Excalibur, such words








an
2B

to
Morgan
Alicia
Hanna

On her graduation
from Kingsway
Academy Class - .
KSPH and her

_ attainment of Most
Outstanding Female
Student. Best wishes
comes from your
proud parents
Alexander and
Michelle Hanna,
grandparents, great
grandparents,
godparents,aunts,
uncles, cousins and
your best buddy
Morrett.

a

BUS OSS0S660 6906086089 069099869986906908




free



EER RecovesescvovecscoseseoeoREee

“Monthly Health
- Lecture Every

3rd Thursday of
-. the Month

2006 Lecture Series

Schedule

as the ones he uttered in 1998:
“It seems to me that the press
does not fight for itself suffi-
ciently in this country. J am
sometimes amazed at what the
members of the press will take
from politicians and, of course,
you know that I am seriously
concerned about the lack of
legal protection which the press
has for publishing material
which is in the public interest.”

Who could this lofty quote be
attributed to, you ask? Well, it
was a man who not only voiced
his support of the press but also,
in the hallowed halls of the Sen-

ate, moved a resolution sup-
porting freedom of the press.
The man? None other than For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell.

This is the same man who



Purpose:

Date:
‘January 19 July 20
Women’s fab Chien s SHEA Time:
February 1¢ 16 August 17 W7 e
Heart Month Headaches Venue:
March 16 September 21 RSVP:
Buabicres & Kidney Disease Thyroid Awareness



' the prime minister,’

To educate the public about the
important health issues, presented by

chastised the country’s daily
newspapers in the House of
Assembly on Monday for mov-
ing “down market” by publish-
ing “perverse” and “twisted”
interpretations of the facts.

If this isn’t enough to send
your mind into a torrent of con-
fusion and then frustration fol-
lowed by nausea, you are a
stronger person than most.

Mr Mitchell has been resur-
rected in the minds of most peo-
ple in the press, not as Arthur
returned to his people once
more, but as the Roman god of
gates, Janus, who is depicted
with two faces.

Janus is used to symbolise
change and transition. And Mr
Mitchell has changed from the
opposition Senator in 1998 who
declared that it appeared to him
that the press simply responds
by shrinking back from the ire of
politicians and judges.

“In my view this does not
serve the country well,” Mr
Mitchell said then.

Press

In fact, like Odysseus, he
stood against a prime minister
whom he described at the time
as tyrannical, and praised the
press, in particular The Tribune,
which he no doubt saw as his

-men (and women) from Ithica

left over from the Trojan war,
and railed against “the degree
of disrespect shown the press by
the prime minister (Hubert
Ingraham) which would not be
tolerated in any other civil soci-
ety in this hemisphere.”

Mr Mitchell wanted to know
what then Tribune news editor
Athena Damianos did to suffer
the “slings and arrows” of the
then prime Minster’s ire for
“daring to bow to the outra-
geous suggestion that she, as an
editor of The Tribune, was twist-
ing stories.”

“So what we need is a press
which is not intimidated by the
government nor intimidated by
* he said.
‘But this is the same man who

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i MINISTER of Foreign
' Affairs Fred Mitchell
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

now says in the House that he
will not bother to respond to the
press on some matters.

And this is the man who this
very Monday, in light of criti-
cism recently laid at his and the
government’s feet from the edi-

tors of various newspapers, who °

said: “I believe that these papers
have moved down-market, try-
ing to compete with the trashy
papers for lurid headlines and
with salacious material in an
effort to attract readers fright-
ened off by the trashy papers.

“It has become so bad in my
view that one sees the most per-
verse and twisted interpretation
of facts that this party and this
government has to find a better
way to get its message to its sup-
porters,” he said.

What is the truth in this situa-
tion? Is it that the once great
champion of the freedom of the
press has been betrayed and
made a “victim” of an “unfair
and unscrupulous press”?

Or could this man, who
inspired such headlines as: “Sen-
ator tells media to guard against
politicians’ intrigue”, ““(Mitchell)
Strongly condemns Punch, calls
for boycott by PLP, warns
Guardian, Calls Tribune fairest
of all papers”, just be the crea-
ture he is —.a politician — who

te
ANN RS
A Nia”

(as they all are), when in oppo-
sition is the dearest friend of the
press and when in government is
its most ardent critic?

So ironic is the fact that Mr
Mitchell would at that time have
to come to the aid of a weak Tri-
bune unable to protect itself
from the “slings and arrows” of
an FNM government, that one
is tempted to forget that now he,
and a plethora of PLP ministers,
accuse The Tribune of being an
“FNM” paper.

One would also forget that
during its time in government
FNM ministers would accuse
Tribune reporters of being PLP
sympathisers.

| Knowledge

Where is the consistent fact
in this? It lies in the comfort-
able knowledge, for those in The
Tribune at least, that whatever
the government, the newspaper’s
duty is to the people of the
Bahamas. This is paramount.

How comfortable is a politi-
cian, whose loyalty to the press
tends to be as constant as the
direction of a leaf blown in a
hurricane, that truth comes not
even secondary, but at the bot-
tom of a long list of priorities.

Mr Mitchell is a politician and
every word that proteeds from
his mouth and the mouth of
every politician, no matter what
side of the’ divide he/she sits,

should be taken with a grain of |

salt. .

The world has changed, per-
haps right under the nose of
most politicians in this country.
The younger generation is no
longer tethered to party loyal-

ty. They are more cynical and

less trusting of authority.
The status of these “hon-

ourable” men and women of .

parliament has been demystified
in the warm glow of the truth
that they, although senior
amongst them, are public ser-
vants — servants of the public.
No-one begged them to take
their job.

In fact, it was they who, no
longer than four years ago, were
humble transients marching with

their sparse army of campaign.

generals appealing and persuad-

_WE LOVE YOU

stent sence petmertnt



THE TRIBUNE





ing: the lords and: ladies of the
homes in their constituencies for :
their support. shh

And just like any applicant for '. °
a job, they present resumés ands.;",
put their best foot forward dur- :16 >
ing the “interview”, which is the , :,:
campaign trail. And afterwe go ,-;'
to the polls we inform these can- 4,
didates whether they got the job.

Now fully supported, now _,.
elected to-a place where they .
are afforded the privilege to ..
serve the Bahamian people they
forget, as Mr Mitchell does. from 7.
time to time, that like every “.”'
employee they are answerable
to their boss — the Bahamian ‘: |
public. as fi

Being called prime minister, ““°!
minister, member of parliament,
senator, minister of state or par-
liamentary secretary does not
make them immune to.criticism.
In fact, the nature of their posi- 43 44
tion requires that they are held * We
to the highest standard and are a
subjected to the most intense. ¢.8
scrutiny.

The press is not infallible, but » ey
nor are politicians. However, ae
whereas politicians tend to make«:\ .~,
missteps and ill-advised moves, Ta
they tend to do so, more often
than not, pursuing their own
self-interest and that of their ,--,-:
party. . in

The legitimate press, on the,
other hand, do:so with the best”





WS

ved





- of intentions in a sincere effort

to empower the public with the — |
information needed to enhance * : ;
ult

their lives and the lives of their, :
loved ones.

Mitchell

FROM page one


















tary of Defence ‘Donald
Rumsfeld’s suggestion; to «
remove the army helicoptéts ”
from the anti-drug.smug- |°
gling initiative OPBAT and '
re-deploy them.in the fight .
against terrorism... 2°)

Mr Mitchell said that.
despite US Ambassador
John Rood’s assurances that
there have been no talks to
withdraw the helicopters _
from the OPBAT ‘pro.
gramme, the editorials ©
remained the same, indicat-
ing “that there was some
secret message. from‘ the’
United States’ to’ “the
Bahamas.” et

“What is happening is’a.
hindrance to the orderly,
development of public poli ~
cy and it ought to be cor-"
rected,” he said.









Man sought for «*;
questioning in
connection “
with murder at
laundromat rs

POLICE are still seeking a
man wanted for questioning in
connection with the shooting
death of a Bacardi Road man at
a popular laundromat a month ;
ago. Bt

Eric Megregor, 23, was
reportedly shot in his upper ry
body as he was about to enter 13m)
the Pond Wash laundromat in sre
the Bacardi Road areaon May ‘4, /j
18. na

Mcgregor was reportedly shot 4
as he neared the entrance by a
lone gunman who then fled the
scene in a light-coloured Subur-., |
ban. Mcgregor reportedly mus-
tered enough energy to make
his way inside the laundromat
where he then collapsed and
died, police say. Mcgregor was +
the second homicide victimthat
day. pee

Superintendent Marvin’ JG
Dames told the Tribune yester- :
day that police have still not} 90sei
been able to locate Edward vs
Taylor, 35, alias "Sin", who is 7O8
wanted for questioning incdn- 7."
nection to Mcgregor's murder, | °.s:)
although they are following seyr) > >
eral leads in their efforts to; (aiy0c,
locate him. ai

Taylor, a resident of Mcquay - a
Street, is described as being of :
medium build and dark brown. xs
complexion. He is listed as ;
being Sft 9in tall.



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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 3 . .



*
. â„¢ fue.



In brief

oe T.
jailed for

drug
possession

A HAITIAN man of Key
West Street has been sentenced
to jail after pleading guilty toa
drug possession charge.

Claude Morrissett, 21,
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel yesterday to
answer to the charge of posses-
sion of dangerous drugs with
the intent to supply. It is alleged
that on Monday, June 5 Mor-
rissett was found in possession
of the drugs.

Morrissett pleaded guilty to
this charge and to making a
false statement to police. He
was sentenced to eight months
in prison on the drug charge
and three months in jail for
deceit of a public officer. The
sentences are to run concur-
rently.

Man faces
cocaine
possession
charge

A 32-YEAR-OLD man has
been arraigned in magistrate's
court on a cocaine possession
charge. .

It is alleged that Carl Russell
was found in possession of 12
grams of cocaine on Friday,
June 9, which police believed
he intended to supply to anoth-
er. Russell pleaded not guilty
to the charge before Magistrate
_Carolita Bethel and was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000. The
case was adjourned to June 26.

Assault
and drug
charges
denied

A 45-YEAR-OLD man has
.been arraigned in magistrate's
court on drug and assault
charges on Monday.

It is alleged that on Friday
June 9 Julian Forbes was found
in possession, of 12 grams of
cocaine which police believed
he intended to supply to anoth-
er.

He was also charged with
assaulting a police officer. It is
alleged that on Friday 11 June
on York Street, Nassau, Forbes
unlawfully assaulted R/C 750
Rolle. He was also charged with
resisting arrest.

Forbes pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted
$7,500 bail. The case was
adjourned to November 21.

Caribbean
carrier
leases
planes

@ TRINIDAD |
Port-of-Spain

CARIBBEAN carrier BWIA
has leased two airplanes staffed
with crews to avoid further dis-
ruptions to its schedule after sev-
eral employees called in sick over
the weekend, leading to some
flight cancellations, a company
spokeswoman said Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.

The company leased the Boe-
ing 737 aircraft for its London
and New York routes after an
“abnormally” high number of
its crews were absent Saturday
due to illness, said Dionne
Ligoure, a spokeswoman for the
Trinidad-based airline. She
declined to say how many peo-
ple called in sick.

Curtis John, president of a
union that represents many
BWIA employees, said the sick
leave was not a coordinated
sickout. He also said the air-
craft lease was a pressure tactic
to get workers to agree to a new
contract before their current
one expires in February 2007
— which Ligoure denied.

John couldn’t explain the
absences, but he said Trinidad’s
historic debut at the World Cup
might be a reason. Sections of
Port-of-Spain were jammed with
revelers following Trinidad’s 0-
O draw with Sweden.

Trinidad has repeatedly
bailed out BWIA since passen-
gers fell off after the Septem-
ber 11, 2001, terror attacks.

Church leaders urge Bozine

Towners to suspend protest.

@ By DARNELL DORSETTE

BOZINE TOWN residents have been
urged to suspend today’s planned
demonstration outside parliament until
religious leaders have met Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie to sort out their land
dispute.

Bahamas Christian Council vice-pres-
ident Bishop John Humes told a meet-
ing that the government was now fight-

ing not only the people of Bozine Town

but the Christian church itself.

“We are Bahamians,” he said, “We
were born here. We are not Haitians
that they can run us off our land.”

His comments came at a meeting at

Lakeview Church of God in Bozine ©

Town. Also present were the Rev
Everett Brown, pastor of the New Beth-
lehem Baptist Church, Pastor Dean of
Lakeview and Bahamas Democratic

Movement members who have sup-
ported the residents’ case.

Bishop Humes said Christian Council
president Rev Dr William Thompson
was expected to return to Nassau on
Thursday, after which they should be
able to meet the prime minister.

He added: “Let me tell you something,
we are not going anywhere. I know this is
a crucial time for you. We could demon-
strate, but does it mean much? The

Bahamas government realises that they .

are not only fighting the residents of
Bozine Town, but they are fighting the
Christian church now.”

He said the property Lakeview
Church sits on was donated by Deacon
Benjamin Brown, whose family still lives
in Bozine Town.

“While I can’t speak on behalf of all
the churches in the Bahamas, I can
speak on behalf of the Church of God

and the Baptist churches. You don’t
have to be alarmed. You just stay to
your door and no-one can move you.”

Bishop Humes said the Supreme
Court made a ruling, which could not be
denied. “But we the people have more
power than any Supreme Court in this
land. Do not let anybody intimidate
you.”

He said he had already been in touch

‘with the area’s MP, Leslie Miller, and

the prime minister’s office.

-“You don’t need to go downtown on
Wednesday,” he said, “This battle
belongs to the Lord. The Supreme
Court may have spoken, but there is a
higher power. All along you may not

- have seen us before, but now we have

joined you in this fight.”

He said the churches had “come to
mediate on your behalf”, adding: “If
the courts say they would evict you in

two weeks’ time, let them evict you first,
then they will see how strong we are in
Bozine Town. If we come together as:a |

people, with the church leading the way, °-

and the Heavenly father directing us,
they cannot defeat us.’

Rev Brown, whose grandmother Mrs
Idell Dawkins was a founder of Boziné

a5 8

vvyvryTEy

wa

Town, said the church would fight with ** -

the community until the very end.

“This is the government’s time to step Fy,

up to the plate and do something, »'he*
added, “Those who ain’t standing and

helping you right now, you vote their” _

backside out.”

Bozine Town residents recently lost A , ;

Supreme Court action against LAND-

CO, which since 2004 has been trying to &
_ enforce its title claims in the area. ;

Residents are claiming they ea
proper title to the land, with some hay-;
ing lived on it for 50 years.

ea
e@
e
=~ @
_e
t
“
@

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Abaconian
Ian Knowles is on trial in the
Supreme Court for the mur-
der of Jermaine. Thompson,
whose body was found float-

ing in a blue hole in Abaco two. -

years ago.

The case opened yesterday
before Justice Stephen Isaacs,
and is being heard by a jury of
nine women and three men.

Vernal Collie, assisted by
Eurika Charlton, is appearing
on behalf of the Crown. Carl-
son Shurland and Jameko

i Green are representing
i: Knowles.
Knowles is accused of killing

Thompson sometime between
April 2 and April 9, 2004.

Thompson, 32, was alleged-
ly stabbed to death, and bound
in duct tape and chains from
head to foot. A cement block
was attached to his feet by
rope.

Prosecutor Vernal Collie
told the jury that Thompson
was stabbed 12 times in the
chest and back.

It is alleged that Knowles
lured Thompson into a vehi-





IAN Knowles

le and went to an area off S C
Bootle Highway, where he
killed him because he was hav-

ing a relationship with Thomp- —

son’s girlfriend.

DC Stephan Moultrie told
the court that on April 9 that
year, he went to an area
known as Merlin’s Lair off S C
Bootle Highway as a result of
certain information he
received.

When he arrived at the
scene, he said that he was
shown a blue hole, where a
body was floating.

The following day at around

i Jermaine Thompson
\

8am, rescuer Michael Parrotti
assisted police in retrieving the
body from the blue hole.

Attempts were made to peel
away the duct tape from the
face, but a chain prevented any
further removal of tape.

Bolt cutters had to be used

_to remove the chains.

Visiting Merlin’s Lair, offi-
cers obtained ‘soil samples,
scrapings from a spoon, a cig-
arette but,. vines and leaves
with suspected blood, were all
packaged and sent to the
Forensic Lab.

The trial continues today.

Health chief: risk from all
erectile dysfunction drugs

m@ By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

ALL erectile dysfunction
drugs — even those prescribed
by a doctor — can cause severe
health problems according to
Dr Marvin Smith, deputy
director of the Bahamas
National Drug Agency.

He said that these problems
“may include heart attack,
strokes and other ailments of
that nature.”

Dr Smith was clarifying a
warning about the potential
risk-of heart attack from coun-
terfeit erectile dysfunction
drugs printed in Tuesday’s Tri-
bune.

He explained that while
there is a risk factor of every
single type of drug in that par-
ticular class, persons who con-
sult a doctor and get a pre-
scription are monitored —

Cushions

whereas those who do not
remain unprotected.
"So whether it is fake or not,

you want to have monitored |

use directed by your doctor
and monitored by your phar-
macist when you use this type
of product.

“And this is why it is impor-
tant not to purchase these
things off the street," Dr Smith
explained. "Because whether
it is fake or real, you can put
yourself at a risk that you may
not be aware of."

He also explained that the
government is placing more
emphasis on strengthening the
pharmaceutical sector and
ensuring patient safety.

“The government’s efforts
are not because of counterfeit
erectile dysfunction drugs, but
as a continuing move to co-
ordinate efforts with the Pan
American Health Organisa-



tion, the Organisation of
American States and other
international bodies to address
this global problem of coun-
terfeit medicines,” he said.

Dr Smith said that products
such as antibiotics, vaccines
and chronic care medications
(which treat diseases like
hypertension, diabetes and
heart disease) are the particu-
lar focus of the governmient’s
attention.

Dr Smith also explained that
patients should ask questions
to ensure that their prescrip-
tion drugs are coming from
reliable sources.

“Speak with your pharma-
cist or your doctor and ask
them who makes the product,
were the product is being
made, or what wholesaler it is
coming from,” he said. “You,
want to make sure that you are
using registered companies.”

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

Sele Mca ee ateinels

THE TRIBUNE,



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. .

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387 -
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Malaria threat in the Bahamas

MALARIA IN THE Bahamas is bad
news. Residents in Exuma are rightly con-
cerned, not only for their own health, but
for their tourist industry as they don’t want
their island to join those areas of the plan-
et where visitors are warned that they are
entering a malaria-risk zone and have to
take their medication with them.

When the news made headlines-late last
week that there were three suspected cases
in Exuma, a young person shrugged his
shoulders. “Oh, they’re only mosquitoes,
nothing to worry about,” he scoffed.

Unfortunately, malaria is something to
worry about and is no scoffing matter. At
one time it was one of the scourges of the
world, and accounted for millions of deaths.

We always had mosquitoes in Nassau,
but if one really wants to experience mos-
quitoes during mosquito season, then some
of our Out Islands are the places to visit.

We recall many, many years ago that it
was at Long Cay at dusk and just before a
hurricane that we ‘had our first encounter
with real Bahamian mosquitoes. And what
an experience that was. They buzzed
towards us like a swarm of locusts. We
could see them coming, but there was no
protection from them. The force at which
they hit our face and body was as though
someone was pelting us, with, handfuls of

- sand. Wave upon wave hurled themselves at
" us, blinding us as we dove into the sea to get
away from them.

As a child we remember sleeping under

_ nets to be protected from them.

’ Fortunately, the Bahamas does not — at

‘. « Jeast has not had so far — the malaria-bear-
“. ing mosquito. But in the past week on Exu-
ma 12 malaria cases have been reported.
The first case was of an American who,
; it was said, had just come from a malaria
_« area. The Bahamas was notified of his case
' when he returned to the US from Exuma,
‘ became ill with flu-like symptoms and
-.; Sought medical assistance.
“*. Tt was thought that his was an isolated
“case of someone who had contacted malar-
ia elsewhere. However, concern mounted
- when a second case, and then a third was
reported at Exuma. By Tuesday 12 cases
were confirmed. Is it possible that we now
have the malaria-bearing mosquito, or
have mosquitoes that bit the first victim
carried the parasite from him to other vic-
tims? Although it is known that malaria

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cannot be transmitted from one human to
another, it can be transmitted by the mos-
quito..

We recall persons who served in the East
for many years having contracted malaria in
their youth and suffering recurrences of
terrible fevers for the rest of their lives.
Our husband’s uncle, a British Brigadier
who served in a Mahratta cavalry regiment
in India, contracted malaria during his ser-
vice: Every three or four years after he
returned to England, he suffered terrible
bouts of malaria, each bout threatening his

life. Although the attacks continued for the .

rest of his life, it was cancer that eventually
took him.

Although malaria has been eradicated
from the United States since 1951, it is

reported that “US residents remain at risk.

especially when travelling in malaria-
endemic countries.”

According to the CDC, it received
reports of “1,324 cases of malaria, with four
deaths, that occurred in 2004 in the United
States. All but four cases were in persons
who had travelled to a malaria-risk area.
Of the four cases in persons who had not
travelled to a malaria-risk area, three were
caused by congenital transmission (from
mother to foetus).”

According to Bruce-Chwatt in Essential
Malariology “prehistoric‘man in the Old
World was subject to malaria. It is probable
that the disease originated in Africa, which
is believed to be the cradle of the human
race. Fossil mosquitoes were found in geo-
logical strata 30 million years old and there
is no doubt that they have spread the infec-
tion through the warmer regions of the
globe, long before the dawn of history.
Malaria followed in the wake of human
migrations to the Mediterranean shores, to
Mesopotamia, the Indian peninsula and
South-East Asia. How malaria established
itself in the New World is subject to specu-
lation, as no reliable historical or other
data exist on this point.”

Malaria infections can be fatal if not
diagnosed and treated promptly.

It is hoped that, contrary to reports we

are receiving from Exuma, the Ministry of
‘Health is aggressively fogging the area. And
- now that we are in the rainy season — the

breeding time for the mosquito — everyone
should take precautions against being bit-

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Ambassador’s

view on the |
S and Cuba |

(This is the second of two letters
written by Cuban Ambassador
Félix Wilson Hernandez in
defence of his homeland. The first
letter was published in Tuesday’s
Tribune).

- EDITOR, The Tribune
A clear and vivid example of

double standards and the hypo-
critical position of the US Gov-

_ ernment on Cuba is the “fight

against terrorism”

The US Government has
planned, coordinated and spon-
sored terrorists actions against
Cuba since the beginning of the
Cuban Revolution. A total of
3478 persons have been killed as
a result of terrorist activities and
2099 have received injuries.

In 1976, Cuban national Luis
Posada Carriles, masterminded
the blowing up over Barbados of
a Cubana Airlines plane with 73
persons on board, including 11
Guyanese citizens. Now Posada
Carrilles is requested in extradi-
tion from the US where he is in
prison for “illegal entry into the
country” and not for being as a
master in terrorism, considered
the Osama Bin Laden of the
Americas. |

At the same time, the US Gov-
ernment has in prison five heroes
of the Republic of Cuba, fighters
against terrorism, Human Rights
defenders, who were gathering
information on terrorist plans tar-
geting Cubans and American cit-
izens, much of which was deliv-
ered to the US by the Cuban
Government. They were tried in
Miami under the pressure of the
extreme right Cuban group of
that city, some of them sentenced
to more than one life term in
prison, been denied of, the con-
dition of political prisoners, they
can’t receive visits by their rela-
tives, including their children and
the: defence lawyers can hardly
meet with them.

Last year, the Working Group
onArbitrary: Detentions of the
UN Human Rights Commission
publicly declared that theirs was

an arbitrary detention. But

they’re still in jail. Isn’t it a human
rights violation by the US? I wish
Cuba’s critics could answer this
question.

At its meeting in the City of
Havana on April 11 and 12, 2006,
the Bureau-of the International
Association of Democratic
Lawyers (IADL) recognized the
illegal and unjust character of the
legal process organized against
these five Cuban heroes impris-
oned in the United States for the
sole crime of fighting terrorism.

A Washington Post article on
June 3, 2006 reads ...““There has
been a groundswell of support for
the five acknowledged agents
among some American liberal
groups and celebrities, including
Alice Walker, author of ‘The
Colour Purple,’ actor Danny
Glover and author Noam Chom-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVE. |
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LETTERS

eucie CuloUncaml cle






sky”. “A San Francisco group
maintains a Web site called
‘National Committee to Free the
Cuban Five.’ The Detroit City
Council even passed a resolution
in March calling for their release,
saying the agents were attempting
to prevent terrorism against
Cuba”.

“The calls for their release
gained momentum last August
when a three-judge panel of the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
11th Circuit, based in. Atlanta,
overturned the convictions and
ordered a new trial, because of a
‘perfect storm’ of bias in the
Cuban exile bastion of Miami”,
the newspaper said.

If the US and all those critics of
Cuba really believe in pluralism,
diversity, freedom and democracy,
why is it that we cannot build a
different kind of society, based on
the interest of our people?

Persons who criticize Cuba
should first think that it is a coun-
try that several US Governments

‘have always wanted to annex

using the excuse that being in its
backyard it must belong to them.
But thanks to Fidel Castro who
led a Revolution in 1959, every-
thing changed in Cuba. We left
behind 20,000 people murdered
by the Batista Government, spon-
sored by the US.

Education, Science, Health,
Sports, Culture, Social Services,
the Economy, now belong to the
Cuban people, not to a minority
group of millonaires and cor-
rupts.

I urge Bahamians to visit
Cuba: They will not see shanty
towns. Despite the limits imposed
by the US embargo, nobody
starves because the little we have
is shared by everybody. Life
expectancy is higher than in many
parts of the US, while infant mor-
tality is among the lowest in the
world.

The important achievements
of Cuba in areas such as health-
care, education, scientific and
technical research, culture and
sports are internationally known.

An example of Cuba’s suc-
cess in ‘health is what we have

- been doing to fight AIDS. On

May 30th, the UNAIDS report
on the world AIDS epidemics,
presented at the UN headquar-
ters in New York, Cuba was high-
lighted as the Caribbean country
with the lowest HIV-AIDS levels
as well as for carrying out one of
the most efficient programmes in
the world to prevent the trans-
mission of the illness from.moth-
ers to children.

The document says that in the
case of Cuba, there was a 0.1 per-
cent rate for adults by the end of
2005, with some 4,800 people liv-
ing with HIV and fewer than 500
dead due to diseases associated
with AIDS.

The Cuban programme to pre-
vent mother-child transmission
of HIV has kept the number of
newborn HIV children under 100
so far, the report praises. .

In Sports, Juan Antonio Sama-
ranch, former President of the
International Olympic Commit-
tee has said that “Cuba's sport sys-
tem is one of the most advanced
around the world...” “...Cuban
athletes rise to the challenge in
cup games...". And there are
many other areas J can mention.

I have also been surprised by
comments made by persons who
are not properly informed about
Cuba. Some are saying that the
Cubans are not allowed to travel.
Being a Cuban representative in
The Bahamas, I should only
speak in regards to our citizens
coming to this country.

Last year only, over 500
Cubans travelled to The
Bahamas on letters of invitation
by Bahamian nationals presented
either in Cuba, or at our Embassy
in Nassau. As of May 31st, there
have been more than 250.

The procedures are: you pre-
sent a letter of invitation. Then
the person needs to apply for a
passport if he/she doesn’t have it,
go to the British Embassy, get a
Police record and at the end if
there is no criminal record he/she
is allowed to travel.

It is important to note that at
the British Embassy in Havana, a
Letter of Invitation is a condition
imposed on all applicants of visas
to The Bahamas, including Gov-
ernment Officials who travel to
attend an event on their working
capacity. It is not the Cuban Gov-
ernment who imposed this.

Every country in the world has
rules to comply “with when it has
to do with travel by its citizens. In
terms of the professionals, Cuba
can’t be brain drained by the US

or any other country. After
spending thousands of dollars’ih’
free Education, having to enduré:
a cruel and inhumane embargo!
for over 45 years, we can’t let ouri
professionals go to the US,
whose Government through thet
embargo, wants to destroy us.)
Actually, I am told that many
countries worldwide, when
financing the education of its cit-
izens, on their return they are
required to give a determined
amount of years service to their
Government
Speaking about the right 3
travel, last Tuesday, Gov. Jey
Bush signed the Travel to Ter:
rorist States Act, banning Florida
scholars from travelling to Cuba
proving once again that the polit=
ical leadership in the US... does
not respect the Human Right 10
travel. ty
There are in-Cuba, more ilaw
56 different religions, with over,
five hundred churches. Likewise,
to give possibility to believers
who may not have a Church,
where to preach, the Cuban Gov-
ernment has approved 1624 Cult.
Houses, and among them, Bap-.
tists have 174 Cult Houses?
Adventists, 149; Evangelist Pén-
tecostals 572; Methodists, 105: in’
this regard, more than 4, 000: reli’
gious persons visited Cuba from
different countries, inledine: the,
US in 2005. #
On the contrary, in the Us,
May 31, 2006, the National Coun-
cil of Churches USA and Chuich
World Service (the churches,
global development’ agency)
joined with other organizations to
renew objections to new Ameri:
can Government restrictions“on
religious travel to Cuba.
"The current US policy toward
Cuba restricts religious freedom:
and is contrary to the principles,
upon which our nation was,
founded," said the Rev Brenda
Girton- Mitchell, the. NCC ‘staff
Executive for Justice ‘and Advo~’
cacy during a news conference.
Last‘ year; the NCC and Ews,
along with the United Methodist!
Board of Global Ministries, —
American Baptist Churches, Pres-!
byterian Church (USA) ‘and the’
United Church of Christ/Disci-
ples of Christ Global Ministries,:
received notices from ‘the US:

» Office of Foreign. Assets that their:

existing licenses for religious trav-
el to Cuba would not be;renewed:;

Additionally, I should mention:
that in the US, followers. of ex otic,
religions like Santeria, very. ;: LU
lar in Cuba, are restricted to giv. ys s
of 25 persons, chosen.:by the. <3
Government. But such restrictioi®
do not apply to the Catholic
Church. Isn’t it interesting? -

Needless to say that the State
Department has adopted a policy
to deny visas for religious travel to
the United States by officials of
the Cuban Council of Churches
because it believes these officials
are agents of the Cuban Govern-
ment. Isn’t that discrimination and
violation of the religious rights?

Cuba will always be as it Has
been all over the years since of
the Revolution led by our Presi-~
dent Fidel Castro. Friendly, shar
ing the little we have with others;
and cooperating the way we cani
with the rest of the world. Show!
ing our commitment to the
advancement of human rights for,
all, worldwide, being an example
by having more than 19,000.
Cuban physicians who have,
reached the remotest villages,,
mountains and the most inacces;
sible corners of 63 nations in,
Latin America, the Caribbean,
Africa, Asia and the Pacific, in
order to share with those peoples
Cuban accomplishments in health;
care and scientific research. We
will continue adding graduate stu}
dents to the over 45,000 youths;
from Third World countries grad
uated during the last four
decades. Many will be added to;
the more than 23,000 youths from|
120 countries, currently studying’
free of any charge in Cuban unis
versities.

Critics can use US propaganda’
and their own emotions when
criticising Cuba. The option ig
theirs and they are free to do as
they like. But in doing so, remem-
ber that the Cuban people are;
entitled to continue supporting’
the Leader and Government,
whom we believe to be the best!
choice for our country. Cuba nor
its Government criticises the,
choice by the people of other
nations when choosing their Goy-
ernments. Then why should other,
people try, to choose our Gov+
ernment for us? r

Félix Wilson Hernandez — 5, |

Ambassador of Cuba; 4

The Bahamas Wes

Embassy of the Republic

of Cuba ;

Nassau

June 9 2006


IN tnipune

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 5"



‘Untrained staff to gain access to

entry-level public service jobs



Ministry

announces
change in
fuel prices

THE Ministry of Local
Government and Consumer
Affairs has announced that
effective today, the price of
some fuels will be reduced.

FOCOL’s lead-free (87)
gasoline will decrease by 20

cents from $4.61 to $4.41 per .

gallon, and its diesel oil by
five cents from $3.61 to $3.56
per gallon.

The ministry advised
members of the public to do
their best to conserve fuel.

Book of
newspaper
articles
published

MP John Carey has pub-
lished a collection of his news-
paper articles in book form.
.. They deal with issues of
the day, including the role of
young people in politics and
cortuption and accountabil-
ity in government.

He also urges Bahamian
people to “push politicians
and theologians to the lim-
it” and to become active cit-
izens.

The, book, Political Dis-
course: Compilation of
Columns, is described as
“provocative and profound.”

Workshop
on family

budgeting
to be held

~ A’ WORKSHOP will be
held today as part of a series
of Ministry of Social Services
activities for families.

‘The workshop, beginning

at 9am, will deal with main-
tenance and budgeting.
Tomorrow (7pm) a fami-
ly: variety show will be
staged; with groups from var-
ious urban renewal projects
performing. '
- The venue for both events
is the Earl Weech Auditori-
um, Calvary Bible Church,
Collins Avenue.

Earlier in the week, an
essential'services fair was
held'to advise families on
how to ‘access and use cer-
tain services.

Delay in
suicide
notification
criticised

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

, LAWYERS for Guan-
tanamo Bay detainees who
committed suicide criticized
the US military Tuesday for
taking nearly three days to
notify them that their clients
had died at the military
prison in south-east Cuba,
according to Associated Press.
* Attorneys said the lack of
notification added to confu-
sion and distress among
detainee families because of
uncertainty about the iden-
tities of those who hanged
themselves

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@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government hopes to make entry-
level public service jobs available to those
in need of training and those who lack
academic degrees as early as next year.

Minister of Public Service Fred

. Mitchell announced this in parliament

during the budget debate for the
2006/2007 fiscal year.

Speaking in the House of Assembly
on Monday night, Mr Mitchell said that
the categories of jobs offered will be for
general service workers.

“There is a hope that the government
will be able, in a limited sense, in the next
year, to ease the restrictions on hiring —
particularly for entry level jobs,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said that the moratorium
on hiring public servants which was intro-
duced in 2001 has had the unintended
effect of “running down in certain cate-
gories of the service.”

Due to the moratorium, he said, many
departments have been left “wanting
badly for personnel.”

He named schools in need of janitors
and ministries in need of workers as

examples of how the moratorium as

proved detrimental in certain instances.

Responding to criticism that the Pub-
lic Service was seeking to hire unquali-
fied workers, Mr Mitchell said that there
are no general requirements for acade-
mic qualifications when it comes to gen-
eral service workers.

“It is my view that there OHene to be

- some allocation for these general ser-

vice workers. People who have promise,
who are able to upgrade their skills with
a particular amount of time and then go
on to the next level,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said he hopes that in hir-
ing new persons, there will be an agree-
ment to upgrade the qualifications of
those individuals by a certain time.

“My hope is that this will be certain in
three years,” he said.

The minister said it is clear that the
country needs to put in place special
policies to assist young people who are
out of work. :

Mr Mitchell pointed out however that
this initiative is not designed to increase
the established strength of the public
service.

“It is also not anticipated that any
extra funding will be needed,” he said.

Mr Mitchell explained that so far, his
ministry has identified 1,238 posts at
entry level which have been authorised
by parliament, but are not yet funded.

However, the government will first

look at jobs that are funded and estab-

lished, but have been left vacant by
death, dismissal, resignation and retire-
ment, Mr Mitchell said.

The Ministry of Public Service, he said,
is still determining how many posts fit
those criteria.

He added that public service jobs are
by far the most popular jobs in the coun-
try, and that government has a social
obligation to offer training opportuni-
ties and support structures to its people.



Fishermen: bad conditions threaten resources

m@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE mistreatment of the
Bahamian sea-bed is driving
away some of the country’s
most valuable marine resources
according to local fishermen.

Conch and Crawfish — among
the slowest moving and most
sought-after delicacies of the
sea — are becoming harder to
gatch, the fishermen say.

They told The Tribune that’

this, is not because either ani-
mal has gained the ability to
elude divers — but because con-
ditions under the sea have wors-
ened, causing them to relocate
to untraditional areas.

Jeremiah Rolle, owner and
operator of stall nine at Potter’s
Cay Dock explained that the
growing number of man-made,
underwater “graveyards” are
driving away conch and craw-
fish.

“Some fishermen skin the
conch and throw the shells right

back in the water instead of dis-
posing of them properly. When
they do this, they create a grave-
yard.

“In response, the conch
moves further out, to get away
from the hundreds of empty
shells,” he said.

According to Mr Rolle, craw-
fish respond similarly to grave-
yards of crawfish heads.

One fisherman, who chose to
remain anonymous, had simi-
lar opinions. “Conch and fish
are moving into deeper water,”
he said.

He put most of the blame on
foreign fishermen: “They are
the ones breaking the conch and
leaving the shells on the sea
ground,” he said.

The fisherman admitted how-
ever that some Bahamians are
also to blame.

Because conch have moved
further out to sea, fishermen
now have to work harder, Mr
Rolle said. “Not only do boaters





@ A FISHING boat in Nassau Harbour

have to travel further — they
now have to dive deeper.”

Captain Rolle of the vessel
Lady Christy agreed, saying that
conch and crawfish are not hard
to find — “you just have to go
out further to find them.”

He believes,that more conch

REUBEN SHEARER asks three fishermen
about the growing shortage of conch

“On a large scale we have
these foreign fishermen break-
ing the conch in the water and
disposing the shell on conch
ground — that's mainly what is
diminishing the conch, because
they don't want to live where
the dead ones are. The govern-
ment needs to do something
about this.”

— name withheld

“One conch could lay a.bil-
lion other offspring. Putting a
ban on them makes fishermen

not dive them out and can lead:

to overpopulation.

“If the government wants to
put a ban on conch, then they
need to pick certain areas that
they want to put a ban on. What
happens to the areas that you
can’t reach — they still have
many conchs. If you .ban every
place to make space for all, then
you only hurt yourself finan-
cially.”

— Jeremiah Rolle

“After government, discov-..- |

ered that the grouper popula-

tion was getting a little weak.
they put a ban on it in certain

areas. The ban is good, but the
way they do it still affects the
market somehow. What they do
is put the ban on grouper in
December. Everyone knows
that December is the time when
grouper starts to spawn, and
that's the time when they come
out.”

- Joe Thompson

Miller says ‘Buy Bahamian’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

AGRICULTURE Minister
Leslie Miller has stressed the
need for Bahamians to buy local
produce and Bahamian-made
products..

In a candid address in the
House of Assembly on Monday
during the 2006/2007 budget
debate, Mr Miller showcased
local-grown produce and
Bahamian goods.

He said that at present, 20 -

per cent of the onions con-
sumed in the Bahamas are
locally-grown. However, he
asserted that farmers can pro-
duce 100 per cent of that crop.

“The problem is the food-
store, the major importers and
distributors.

“Before the season starts,
they.would bring in an over-
abundance of onions (and)
ripen the onions in their respec-
tive establishments.

“We ask them again to cease
and desist from doing so to the
detriment of the Bahamian
farmers,” said Mr Miller.

He announced that the Min-
istry of Agriculture will be
closely monitoring the quantity
of imported produce — particu-
larly onions.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Miller
claimed that the onions pro-
duced in Abaco and Andros are
of superior in quality to import-
ed onions.

“Why should we accept
someone else’s substitute when
we could grow our superior pro-
duce ourselves?” he asked.

Be gH
US

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157



Produce manager. at
Solomon’s Super Center Mario
Forde said the company does



buy local produce, which
accounts for between 20 and 30
per cent of the produce it sells.

There will be a book signing by
Ronald Lightbourn of his new book
Reminiscing I:



and crawfish boats are needed.

However many Nassau fish-
ermen are reluctant to travel
the long distance to areas where
conch can be found in abun-
dance.

They must go as far as Ack-
lins, Long Island or Cat Island
to find the kind of catch they

‘used to enjoy locally in days

Double Sheers

| Triple Drapes
Triple Sheers

Cotton, Moire Double Drapes
‘ Triple Cotton, Moire Drapes

Double Short Drapes 63” Long

gone by, Mr Rolle explained.

According to some fisher-
men, the trip is not worth the
trouble financially — as fuel
prices are currently very high
and there is no guarantee that
the conch and crawfish will sur-
vive the return voyage.

Over the last 10 years, conch

‘populations have diminished

significantly, according to one
fisherman. “Where you could
have gone in the last five years
and find 1,500 conchs, now you
can barely find 500.”

He believes that the govern-

“ment should implement a sea-

sonal conch period. “The season
should be closed in June and
July when conchs mate.”

“Tt would make a lot of people
angry," he admitted, ."but it is
the best thing to do right now.”

Mr Rolle, disagreed however,
pointing out that conch is in
great demand.

“The Bahamas can’t afford
to ban conch because too. many
people depend on it for their
livelihood,” he said.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

i a a eee eee

| El Salvador:
model of t
free market >

|: © THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
ba STAFF VACANCIES

‘The College of the Bahamas invites applications for the following posts:

a

‘Development Officer
,DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
i UNIT: Development

“START DATE: August 1, 2006
‘JOB DESCRIPTION

‘SUMMARY:

Serves as a primary fundraiser for The College of The Bahamas. Designs, implements,
“sevaluates, and refines the Unit's development activities with an emphasis on major gifts as
defined by COB policy, Council and the President in conjunction with Vice President Institutional
‘ Advancement. Personally identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards donors and prospects
*in accordance with performance targets set by the Office of Institutional Advancement under
‘sthe direction of the Council and President. Collaborates with the President, Vice President
{Institutional Advancement and Vice President Finance & Administration and colleagues in
‘*the COB Office of Institutional Advancement to maximize total gift revenue through gift
‘jplanning, corporate and foundation relations, and annual fund strategies.

' DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

A foe Bde oR

ae a

SEP RF te

oS

So hb ws

y
%

%

4

Identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards major donors and prospects including
individuals, corporations, and foundations, through visits and other forms of direct
personal contact in accordance with performance targets set and defined by the

- relevant authorities.

t

2. Enlists senior management in furthering the Development Unit's development
programme; assists in educating faculty and staff in respect of the roles they can
play in fundraising and development generally.

-3. Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them with leadership and direction
in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and prospects;
. coordinates volunteers' activities to ensure their integration into the Unit's programmes.

4. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with the Boards of COB
.« Foundations and College development colleagues to maximize the Unit's total gift
* revenue.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

e Knowledge of major funding and donor sources.

e Respected membership in networks of people.and entities of high net worth
and ability to move with ease and influence in such circles.

e Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

e Community relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community.

‘e Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to work extended hours

as necessary.

"The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
~ performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

Pg ee a

vr

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:
e Prior experience at the CEO/CFO level with a major company/corporation is preferred
Master degree preferred , bachelor’s degree acceptable with relevant experience
® Prior development experience would be highly valued
¢ Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
e Basic computer skills expected

\ssistant Development Officer

DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development vate FEA wy Byeh

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION
SUMMARY: The Assistant Development Officer has primary responsibility for supporting the

- work of the Development Officer and team through the management of the day-to-day:

operations of the Development Unit, its databases and records.

: DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

FeO CE Le

‘4. Creates for the institution and makes effective use of a prospect management database

‘4 and other institutional resources to ensure appropriate management of donors, prospects,
alumni, and volunteers in coordination with College/University objectives.

. Conducts research to identify prospects and creates strategies to match prospects’
interests to the priorities of the unit and the College/University.

3. Researches, writes, edits, or oversees, in conjunction with the writing/editorial staff of —

Institutional Advancement, the preparation of persuasive, accurate, and grammatically i

and syntactically correct solicitations, proposals, case statements, reports,
_ correspondence, and other development-related communication materials in support
of the Unit's fund-raising activities.
. Assists in short- and long-range strategic planning activities to create and implement .
¢, fundraising goals and objectives.
_ 5. Assists in planning and conducting programmes and activities designed to increase
‘“ the visibility of the Unit and the College/University to internal and external constituencies.
Develops and manages budgets for fundraising activities under the supervision of the
__ Vice President Institutional Advancement and in conjunction with other relevant senior
t- managers.
«,7. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

° Ability to conduct research, gather data, analyze information, and prepare effective,
accurate, and timely reports and other documents to support development objectives.
Demonstrated mastery of major business and prospect research databases and general
database software such as Microsoft Excel with concomitant database management
skills.

Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.
Ability to write proposals, solicitations, correspondence, reports, and other materials
in support of development activities independently;

Ability to exercise good judgment, to demonstrate an understanding of ethics related
to development activities, and to use discretion in interactions with donors, prospects, -
~ -- volunteers, and others.

Ability to work effectively within a team environment.

Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in managing events and other
complex activities in support of development objectives.
Willingness and availability to travel and to work extended hours as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities;
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

e Bachelor’s degree

e Prior development experience a must

¢ Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
6” Excellent computer skills expected

e. Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision. -

Compensation is commensurate with qualifications and experience.

The application deadline is June 21, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates

should. submit a College of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive resume and

a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should request

eS referees to send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
elow:

4:6,

hi
ute

Wot

The College of the Bahamas
Human Resources Department
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive
P O Box N 4912
Nassau, Bahamas

_ Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs ;

Please visit our website at for more information about the College and to access the College’s
Employment Application Form.



Preanciseo Flores,
the former president of
EI Salvador, spoke at a confer-
ence here last week organised
by the Nassau Institute, a public
policy group that promotes cap-
italism and free markets.

The conference at the
Atlantis Resort was co-spon-
sored by the Atlas Economic
Research Foundation, which
supports a network of market-
oriented think tanks around the
globe. Atlas gets a lot of its
funding from the John Temple-
ton Foundation.

Flores was the guest of hon-
our. At only 45, he is the poster
boy of free marketeers every-
where. One of the most suc-
cessful post-Cold War leaders,
he helped reconstruct a notori-
ously failed state. And his mes-
sage is one that should be heed-
ed by Bahamian politicos —
who were, of course, conspicu-
ously absent at last Friday’s
event.

El Salvador is a relatively
insignificant Central American
country of about seven million
people. But during the 1980s it
was one of the major flash
points of the Cold War. And
today, it is a metaphor of the
changed relationship between
the political left and right since
the fall of the Berlin Wall.

To fully appreciate what Flo-
res had to say at the conference,
a little historical background is
necessary. The story begins in
the 1960s when reform-minded
groups like the Christian Demo-
cratic Party emerged to chal-
lenge the rigid status quo in El
Salvador.

But the landowning elite and
right-wing military continually
blocked the electoral option by
fraud and repression, so leftist
groups resorted to militant
action to promote change. And
a pattern of mounting violence
and polarization led to a 13-year
civil war. '

A middle-of-the-road Christ-
ian Democrat named Jose
Napoleon Duarte was the lead-
ing figure in Salvadoran poli-
tics for more than 30 years.
After being tortured and exiled,
he ended up as a tragic presi-
dent torn between the extremes
of right-wing juntas and left-
wing rebels.

Deze sporadic
attempts at reform, .

the country slid into chaos; and
in 1979 the. success of the com-
munist Sandinista rebels in
neighbouring Nicaragua gave
the El Salvador insurrection
renewed impetus.

The Sandinistas formed a
united front with the Soviet
Union and Cuba to promote
revolution throughout Central
America, Flores told scores of
businessmen, educators and stu-
dents at the conference last Fri-
day. El Salvador, he said, was
the final armed conflict of the
50-year Cold War between the
United States and the Soviet
Union.

‘Perhaps the defining event of
the Salvadoran civil war was the
1980 murder of Archbishop
Oscar Romero as he was say-
-ing mass in the national cathe-
dral. Romero had criticised the
military’s brutality and often
urged soldiers not to carry out
immoral orders. For good mea-
sure, police gunned down
unarmed demonstrators at his
funeral. Four American nuns
and several Jesuit priests were
also murdered.

A Salvadoran army intelli-
gence officer named Roberto
D’Aubuisson came to promi-
nence in the late 1970s. He was
a central figure behind the right-
wing death squads which were
implicated in many killings,
including that of Archbishop
Romero. And it was D’Aubuis-
son who founded the conserva-
tive Nationalist Republican

- Alliance (known as ARENA).

The Farabundo Marti
National Liberation Front (or
FMLN) was formed as an

umbrella group of five revolu-
tionary organizations in 1980.
Named after a 1930s Salvadoran
communist leader, the FMLN
was set up by Cuban President
Fidel Castro with support from
the Soviet Union. Its goal was



y



to recreate El Salvador as a
communist state.

Ak ~ achieved '
some early electoral

successes before losing in 1984
to Duarte, who became the first
freely elected president of El
Salvador in more than 50 years.
He began talks with the FMLN
and other Central American
leaders to lay the groundwork
for peace in the region.

The following year D’ Aubuis-
son resigned from ARENA and’
was replaced by Alfredo Cris-
tiani, who was elected president
in 1989, defeating Duarte, who
handed over power peacefully.
Both Duarte and D’Aubuisson
died of cancer a few years later,



El Salvador
went from
being a country
renowned for
poverty and
violence to a
model of
growth and
development.

1



effectively ending an.era of con-
flict.

After the 1984 presidential
election, ARENA began reach-
ing out to more moderate indi-
viduals and groups, particularly
in the private sector. And Cris-
tiani, a graduate of Georgetown
University in Washington, DC,
continued the peace talks that
Duarte had started. :

It took more than 70,000
deaths and massive human



“We know that
democracy and
economic free-
dom can only
deliver results
through real

.commercial

openness;
therefore we
pursue it
aggressively.”



rights violations on both sides
before ARENA and the FMLN
were able to sign a UN-bro-
kered peace accord. A ceremo-
ny in December 1992, marked
the official end of the conflict,
and the FMLN, following the
path of ARENA, transformed
itself into a legitimate political
party.

In 1994, Cristiani was suc-
ceeded by another ARENA
president. But the big test of
the peace process was the 1999
election when Francisco Flores,
then only 34, ran on the ARE-

NA ticket against a former ,

guerrilla leader. He won with
52 per cent of the vote, although
turnout was only 39 per cent.
“During the civil war,” Flores
told conference participants on
Friday, “one third of the popu-
lation fled, beggars were on

every street, bridges, highways, .

energy plants, and transmission
lines were destroyed, and mar-
tial law meant that citizens
could be shot on sight after
dark. There is not one family
in El Salvador that has not suf-
fered either the loss of one of its
members or the separation of
the family due to a forced
migration...And on top of the

LARRY SMITH.

‘per cent. Interest rates went

_ vadoran politicians: had to



nin §

THE TRIBUNE*®

ce na ee RE UE ES RE EEA



CR yap RRR TPT geen eee erp ee

ae Bel
war we suffered devastating
earthquakes.” - aig

| all seemed terribly hope-
less, yet 14 years later. El
Salvador is a different country.
During his term in officé, Flores
said: “Poverty was, reduced by
60 per cent — the highest rate
on the continent. Illiteracy was
reduced from 25 per cent to.18

from 30 per cent to 6.8 per'cent.
We have a free press and true
separation of powers.”

Under Flores, the ARENA
government promoted liberal
free market policies including
privatization, dollarization’,
structural adjustment,..as
required by thé International
Monetary Fund, and a Central
American free trade agreement.
And El Salvador went from
being a country renowned for
poverty and violence to a mod-
el of growth and development.
Flores reportedly ended his
presidency with a higher
approval rating (76 per cent)
than when he was elected (52
per cent)...

S: what was the magic
formula? Flores cited
four main reasons for his suc-
cess, rn

1. Responsibility: “Poverty in
El Salvador had always been
blamed on external factors,-but
we stopped blaming everyone |
else and took the responsibility ~3
ourselves.” 9 Sagesat F

2. Vision: “We developed a
strategy for the‘futuré with
enough depth to resolve the
country’s severe problems — a
long-term vision that ‘had "both
practical: and ~emotional
appeal.” ce ae

3. Innovation: “We adopted a
model based on .real,;democracy
and a strategy to fight poverty.
It was the antithesis of populism
and demanded courage, and. a
willingness to accept political
costs.”

4. Patriotism: “We. madeia =‘:
concerted effort to defend and
build a new nation. Don’t take
your country for granted:or-you
will lose your roots and memo-
ries. You have to fight for the
future of your country.”

According to Flores, Sal-

FARIA i PRENATAL TE AEE GLEE LIER RE EEE ARIELLE ELE GENITREL EIENE LE

eR

RTT TIT me te wt payne siggsyhor artes eae ode oe

ER RET TIO EE LEE IEE,

develop a new ethic: “Previ-
ously, parties had selected the
worst members of society, valu-
ing party loyalty most. It was
the same faces all the time. But
we created broader alliances
and achieved four consecutive
terms in office. Permanent
renewal is the strategy for suc-
cess — you need new young
leaders who are creative and &
energetic.” i

For example, he said, an
unexplained rise in crime can
be attributed to growing cor-
ruption within the police force,
which had to be addressed: “So
we fired one third of the force
and within months crime,was
at an all time low. There were ;
political costs, but we survived.”

Flores studied philosophy. at
Amherst University in the US,
and in another recent speech
he spelled out-his prescription
for change: “We chose an.eco-
nomic model based on freedom, §
assigning to government a reg- :
ulatory role and thereby liber- :
ating all economic actors. We
have opened our frontiers and
fought against monopolies. We
know that democracy and ‘eco-
nomic freedom. can only deliver :
results through real commercial
openness; therefore we pursue
it aggressively.”

It is a message that many :
Bahamian leaders are seeking |
to come to grips with as we
speak. And it emphasises the
futility of trying to apply tradi- i
tional left and right labels in ;
today’s complex and rapidly '
changing world.

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme- |;
dia.net Or visit www.bahama- /\



fi

SPARS ade olen, apie iba Saale

STi Ses tei Bra a

7

Saints alg Spee get

WiSANCa TEN
THE TRUE

GN-361



SUPREME COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
- PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
June 15, 2006

~ PROBATE DIVISION
NO,2006/PRO/NPR/00293

id the estate of CHARLES STANLEY COCKSHULL,
late of 116 Central Avenue ‘Southend on Sea Essex,

United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE i is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Side by KEVIN M. RUSSELL, of No.
44 Doubloon Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in'The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant
of Probate in the above estate granted to EILEEN
FRANCES DOROTHY TOTTMAN, the personal

representative, by the High Court of Justice, The |

Probate Registry of the Family Division, on the 26th
day « of February. 2 2004.

Tem i
| signed:

D. Robinson

(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Degee od ts 2 THE SUPREME COURT
aa PROBATE DIVISION



ah ee ‘ai clas oad

‘No. 2006/PRO/NPR/O0308

Whereas REBECCA FERGUSON, of The Settlement
‘off Forest. on the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
“of th the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful

- Widow has.made, application to.the Supreme Court
‘Of The' Bahamas, for’ Letters of Administration of the
-feal.and personal. estate of. NAAMON FERGUSON

a a. Ke 'NAAMAN' FERGUSON a.k.a. NAMON
, FERGUSON late of Forest Exuma, ‘one of the Islands

F of the Comrmionwealthy of The Bahamas, deceased.



f Notice, is hereby’ given n that! such Applications will

: be. ‘heard, by. the said ‘Court: at the expiration: of21.

“aye ra the’ date hereof.
‘pgs nth ~ D. Robinson
OP (for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Pg THE SUPREME COURT
of, / PROBATE DIVISION
ens June 15, 2006

"No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00309

- Whereas MARK ANTHONY BETHEL, of #45
e - Seabreeze Lane, Eastern District, New Providence,
fone of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

"Bahamas, the Eldest Lawful Son has made
ft: "for Letters of Administration for the real and personal
ms éstate of ETHELYN MAE BETHEL, late of #3 Baker
"Street, ‘Southern District, New Providence, one of
ee the’ Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

5 deceased.

Es z aisituey

“Notice i is hereby given that such applications will
a be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
ays: from fhe, date hereof.
es. D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



dune 15, 2006: :

a aR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00310

Whereas HARTIS EUGENE PINDER, of Mareva
House, 4 George Street, New. Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Beryl
Margaret Hall-Sturrup, the Sole Executor has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed
of the real and personal estate of JOHN KENNETH
CULMER, late of Murphyville in the Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEAT FE OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00311

Whereas SANDRA MAE MEADOWS, of Clifton
Street, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, one
of the Lawful Sisters has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
WILLIAM JAMES MEADOWS, late of Clifton Street,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14

- days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson -
'- (for) Regisiter

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION |

_ June 15, 2006
No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00313
Whereas PATRICIA SCOTT, of Allen Lane of

‘Carmichael Road, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has

_ made application to the Supreme Court of The
-Bahamas, for.Letters of Administration de bonis non

of the real and personal estate of DONALD COLLIN

| SCOTT a.k.a. DONALD SCOTT late of Bobolink

Terrace, Monastery Park, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. »

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00314

Whereas FLORENCE ROLLE; of Harbour Close #5
Bel-Air Estates, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas the Lawful Widow, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of
REYNOLD ROLLE late of Harbour Close #5 Bel-Air
Estates, Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonweal of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS.

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00315 =

8

mm
om
et
fry

4
a

Vite a ect as

wie eke eae

Whereas TAMIKA K. SYMONETT of Shure al | g

Avenue, Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New: |
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Pamela Theresa Symmonette, the

4

Lawful Widow has made application to the Supreme. .

Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration.

of the real and personal estate of WAYNE’:#

GEOFFREY SYMMONETTE a.k.a. WAYNE
GEOFFREY SYMMONETT late of Churchill Avenue; -

Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New Providence,’ y :
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The.

Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the oe of 14
days from. the date hereof.

D. Robinson |
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

A
yf



June 15,2006 ff

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00316

Whereas GORDON FITZGERALD LIGHTBOURNE
of Jubilee Gardens,’ Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the Lawful Widower has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of ROCHELLE LOUISE LIGHTBOURNE late
of Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the ERO raEOn of 14;

days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson i
‘ (for) Registrar.



eye

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS"

THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00320

Whereas BRIDGET EVANS of Boyd Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
LESTER DAVIS late of Unity House, East Street,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased:

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00321

Toe OB

Whereas MICHELLE GEORGINA JOHNSON of

Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Daughters has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters

of Administration of the real and personal estate of -

WILBER JOHN FERGUSON late of Imperial Park,

Eastern District, one of the Islands of the

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

¢

June 12, 13, 14
PAGE 8, WEUNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

THE TRIBUNE






MONDAY



@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New Prov-
idence Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to
7pm. The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315
meets Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Club 3596 meets at the British
Colonial Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council

"(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month

in the Board Room of the British Colonial .
Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

10.10.2.20. @ Club Nirvana: Tuesday nights at
Club Nirvana, Elizabeth Avenue, have been
dubbed 10.10.2.20. Every tenth female patron is
allowed into the club absolutely free and is given
a complimentary. glass of Carlo-Rossi. Tuesday
nights also include the Carlo Rossi's Hot Body
Competition. Hosted by Daddi-Renzi and music
provided bysDJ Ai from 100 Jamz. Master Chef
Devito Bodie provides scrumptious appetizers.

ff HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places:’'The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to
7Tpm/8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at

5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at

their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
~ Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to a oteh for
more info.

& CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm
@ CC Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room,
College Avenue off Moss Road ¢ Club Cousteau
7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickchar-
ney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros e Club
7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega
chapter meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @
the Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau
Resort, Cable Beach.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second
Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office,
4th floor meeting room.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton.
Please call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassaw’ s Weekly
Jam Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located
East Bay Street two doors East of Esso On The
Run.









Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: New Prov-
idence Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to
8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street,
Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets
6:30pm every third Wednesday at the Bahamas
National Pride Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-
8pm in the Solomon’s Building, East-West High-
way. TM Club 2437 meets the 2nd and 4th
Wednesday of each month at C C Sweeting
Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication,
Essence Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meet-
ings on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each
month at Doctor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus
meets the second and fourth Wednesday of the
m @ St Augustine’s Monest



THURSDAY

B HEALTH

New - Free public health lectures featuring dis-
tinguished physicians are held at Doctors Hos-
pital every third Thursday of the month at 6pm
in the Doctors Hospital Conference Room.
Free screenings between Spm & 6pm. For more
information call 302-4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm
/ 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register or
for more info.

REACH — Resources & Education for Autism
and related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm
the second Thursday of each month in the cafete-
tia of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

THE ARTS

New - Artists Guild International (AGI) pre-
sents its 5th annual Evening of Sacred Music at
Christ Church Cathedral, George Street on
Thursday, June 15 at 8pm. Admission is free,
however an offering will be taken.

This concert will feature: Nikita Thompson-
Wells-Soprano; Alan Butler, Baritone; Can-
dace Bostwick, Soprano; Jeffrey Sturrup,
Organist and Bel Canto Singers, directed by
Eldridge McPhee.

New - The Natigual Art Gallery of The
Bahamas starts the summer season off with a
bang with a new installment of our ‘Summer
Film Series’ focusing on films from the
Caribbean and African Diaspora.

e "Ava & Gabriel" (Curacao & Netherlands)
on Thursday, June 15 ¢ "Amores Perros" (Mexi-
co) on Thursday, June 29.

All films are free and open to the general public.
Films begin at 8pm and take place at the NAG-



PLB AS Er .PUor

es
“QUT THERE”

a

“Lost in Reality”

- a production by the
Lyford Cay International School’s After-School
Drama Troupe - will be held Thursday, June 15
at 7pm at the New Providence Community
Center (NPCC).

B's Outdoor Cinema on West Hill Street. Due
to the content of some of the films, we urge par-
ents not to bring children under the age of 17

New - The NAGB is proud to launch its Sum-
mer Dance Programme with Roderick Johnson,
noted Bahamian dancer, teacher and choreogra-
pher. In a special preview of our summer of
dance, Mr Johnson will speak on "Bahamian
Dance" on Thursday, June 22 at 6:30pm

CIVIC CLUBS

"TM Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British

Colonial Hilton.
TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes. —

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ Superclubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

FRIDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks Ot
every Friday night with Happy Hour..: special.
drinks, live music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nas:
sau’s first European Night Restaurant - Open
Friday night till Saturday morning Sam, serving
hot food/and take out - music, drinks and an
English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the perfect
place to spend your night out till the morning.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival, Street Party, will be
held on Woodes Rodgers Wharf every Friday
between June 9 and July 29, from 1 to 10pm.

Roderick Johnson will be teaching open dance
classes @ the NAGB on Friday nights at 6pm
On Friday, June 23, there will be a motivational
session entitled "The Way We Move" where par-
ticipants will learn principles of coordination,
rhythm and new dance steps. On Friday, June

’ 30 is the "Ballroom and Romantic Dances" class

where traditional dances like the Tango, Salsa,
Waltz and Fox Trot will be taught. There will be .
a small donation for each session and partici-
pants are encouraged to wear comfortable fitting
clothes and shoes.

B HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the

- public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-

sau Group, Rosetta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm

& 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church - Fri-
' days @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @

7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm,@ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Cen-
tre at St Augustine’s Monestary. For more info
call 325.1947 after 4pm.



SATURDAY

lm PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Sun City Entertainment presents Saturday &
Sunday night functions for the alternative
lifestyle crowd (Gay) at Renda s Auto Garage

tees I
"Safety comes in cans. I can, you can,

AROUND

2to 11pm.











NASSAU

VYDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —.
IN THE SUBJECT LINE

' on Gladstone road from 11: 30pm to 4am. Music




provided by DJ X. Heading south on Gladstone }
Road, Kendal’s is located immediately past Mos
Gas station.

m THE ARTS. pee

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Heritage and Cul-
tural Extravaganza - will be held at Arawak Cay
every Saturday between June 9 and July 29 from

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Box Cart Derby+ * qi
will be held on Marcus Bethel Way every Satur- “”
day between June 9 and July 29, from 2 to 6pm.

Back by popular demand - NAGB has invited) :<:
David Weech again to do another installment of '

his popular Kite Making Workshop for kids and
parents to take place on Saturday, June 10, and |
Saturday June 17 at 10am. Please call the Gallery::'-
early to secure your space in what promises to be: i
another fun workshop. 9

Wav

‘ § HEALTH Ode cere

44
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the '
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-. 3 1
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings-.
10am to 11am. Z

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third':’/
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and Decem- « -
ber) @ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close,
Shirley Street. 3 ;

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are ‘

' offered every third Saturday of the month from | ii

9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Commu-"* «'
nity Training Representative at 302.4732 for .
more information and learn to save a life today. 5 *’

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling
are pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors
between 10 and 17. The free clinic will be held
every Saturday in an effort to encourage kids to
cycle. Parents interested in registering their chil-
dren should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com

SUNDAY



§ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS |

Traveller’s Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street,
features special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha
and the Caribbean Express - every Sunday from
6:30pm to 9:30pm.

' New -. Mr Caribbean Bahamas competition will

be held July 15 to 23. Under the theme, “Seduc-
tion Surrender”, the final night of competition
will be held on Sunday, July 23 at 8pm in the

~ Rain Forest Theatre. The show will be hosted by

Olympic medalist, Ato Boldon, America’s Next

>, Top Model (Season Three), Eva Pigford, and

Bahamian radio personality, Krissy Luv. There
will also be an after party immediately following
the Mr Caribbean Bahamas Competition to meet
the winner of the competition, delegates, the
international judges, and celebrity hosts.

@ THE ARTS

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Royal Poinciana :
Tea Party - will be held in Government House i
Gardens, every Sunday between June 9 and July:
29, from 3 to 6pm. ;

Junkanoo Summer Festival - Old Town Jazzat
Sandyport - will be held at the Olde Town ‘
Sandyport every Sunday between June 9 — July
29 from 4 — 8pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the i
public of its meeting times and places: The Nas-
sau Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

Send all your civic and social events to t
The Tribune +
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@ ;
iribunemedia.net/Out there in subject line

we can."




“THE TRIBUNE

@ FIRST grader Stanell Rolle receives a bike from Willard
bsclansey from the Miami Dade Police Department for reading 23

'pooks in the lower school.

(Photo: Fi elipé Major/Tribune staff)

MEMBERS of Sandals environ-
nental: group. ‘the Green. Team”

rought,excitement,.and intrigue
ito the;Environmental. Awareness
‘lub at. Cleveland Eneas Primary
is School: last week..
¢ The group delighted club mem-

ers with creative ways to re-use
every day items such as toilet rolls,
mpty baby food jars, plastic bot-

‘les and copy paper.

% Sandals environmental manag-
@r Janelle, .Hutcheson explained
at during-a sustainable develop-
‘ment workshop, she met and
' poke with the school’s principal
Linda ‘Missiok.: .
% “She toldime that they had an
€nvironmental club and extended
n invitation for me to address the
giub. 7
@ Amongethe.itopics digeunsed
‘with the:students was improugst garbage
Gisposal.

The class was told that it takes 100 years
hor a tinnto decompose, 200‘to 500 years
for an aluminum can, and 450 years for a
plastic six-pack cover.

Ms Hutcheson said, “Because of how
dong some-items: take;to.decompose, itis






LOCAL NEWS

Detective presents
prizes to top readers

lm By MARK HUMES

A MIAMI-Dade crime scene
investigator paid a special visit to
Woodcock Primary School yes-

terday to present prizes to.the:,, th
i ‘first-grader Stanell Rolle, who

school’s top readers.

Detective Willard Delancey,
who is of Bahamian parentage,
said that he was returning to
Woodcock Primary 10 years after
initiating a similar partnership
with the school, because of his

love of youth and of the

Bahamas.

“This is the first of many good
things to come,” Mr Delancey
told the primary school students.

“There were bicycles given
today, but we are going to be
working strongly in the near
future to try and get one of you a
nice trip to the Miami-Dade
Police Department.”

From February to May, Wood-
cock students were encouraged
to read as many books as possi-
ble.

As an incentive, Mr Delancey

agreed to donate bicycles for the
two students who read the most
books by the end of the reading
period.

Winning the top award from
the lower primary school was

read and wrote follow-up reports
on 23 books.
From the upper primary

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 9

continued to begin in prayer, they
would never have to worry about
how their day was going to turn
out.

‘tation, which was attended by
Sergeant Bruce Thompson and
Corporal Davey Pratt of the Roy-

school, grade five student Kim- -

berly Smith got the top honour
for having read a total of 37
books.
She, like Stanell, wrote book
reports on each of the books.
Before presenting the students
with their prizes, Mr Delancey

commended them on their morn-
ing presentation, saying: “I appre-.

ciate youths who can open their
day with the national anthem and
a prayer.’

“Youths in Miami, we don’ t
open up our day in prayer,” the
detective said. “Some open up
their day with alcohol, drugs, and
even death.”

He told the students that if they

Closing out the awards presen-

al Bahamas Police Force Com
munity Relations Department
senior mistress Debora Coleb,
thanked Detective Delancey fo:
his interest in the welfare of th.
boys and girls of the school anci
encouraged him to stay active iii
their lives.



are as follows: .

SUMMER PROGRAMMES

SWIFT under the management of Andy and Nancy»
Knowles will offer “Swim America”Learn to Swim, :
Masters, Fitness, and Competitive swimming classes
for the summer. The classes, dates, times, and fees |

Nassau — St. Andrews School
Abaco - Long Bay School



B JANELLE Hutcheson shows students

_how to creatively re-use empty baby food jars.

important that an effort to recycle is made
whenever possible. This way we can have
a cleaner and healthier environment for
ourselves, future generations and visitors.”

The Green Team showed students how
to decorate empty baby food jars for stor-
age of paint brushes and candies.

Toilet tissue rolls were used to make

-+pen holders.-Ms_ Hutcheson pointed: out:

. to come and share
othe..children.” Aisclccad aio tae Bea Se OLIN tags

that this is an artistic way to make

The Green Team also gave a
talk about the importance of
planting trees to absorb carbon
dioxide from the atmosphere.

Green Team Member Chelsea
Poitier explained how bush medi-
cines such as fever grass can be
used for tea and how aloe can be
used to healing of cuts.

School vice principal Patricia
Chisholm said she and teachers
Nicole Saunders and Vanessa
Turnquest came up with the
idea for the club take turns
teaching and working with the
children.

The club was formed one © year
ago and is a combination of grades
three, four, five and six,” she not-
ed. “We meet once each week to
discuss our goals and ideas we wish to
implement.

“Everyday our students pick up bottles
and cans in the schoolyard because we
believe in being environmentally friendly.
So it was.a treat for Sandals Green Team
aisienihae message with

an inexpensive Father’s Day gift. |



ASSOCIATE/CUSTOM BROKERAGE,
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
from suitably qualified individuals for the position of ASSOCIATE in its
Custom Brokerage/Purchasing Department.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Check all ports of entries for incoming shipments;

Prepare custom entries for all incoming shipments;

Prepare check requests for payment of all incoming shipments;

Prepare check requests for freight charges for all incoming shipments
Dispense of checks to customs airport/dock for all customs entries prepared;
Dispense of checks to freight forwarders;

Assist with the collection of all incoming shipments from ports of call;
Assist with the clearance of shipments for all ports of call;

Coordinate with the trucking department to ensure that all goods be delivered
from ports to the stores department,

Assist with customer queries (in-house and vendors);

Any, other requests assigned by the Manager. °

1.
2.
3.
4.
S:
6.
te
8.
9.

—
o

‘MIMIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or equivalent
Associate Degree with four (4) years practical experience.
Good interpersonal and communication skills;

Must possess good record-keeping skills;

Must be goal-oriented, a self-starter and a team player.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than JUNE 23", 2006 and addressed as follows:

' DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

RE: ASSOCIATE/CUSTOM BROKERAGE, PURCHASING DEPARTMENT



Nea ps Be

Learn To Swim “Swim America”
Session 1 — June 26th to July 7th. Days: Mon: Tues; Wed: Thurs; Fri.
Time : 4:00 or 4:30 PM

Session 2 — July 10th to July 21st. Days: Mon; Tues; Wed; Thurs; Fri.
Time: 4:00 or 4:30 PM
Cost: $150 per child per session



Masters/Fitness/Competitive Group
.(must have Swim America Certificate or equivalent)

Sessions run from June 26th to July 28th. Monday through Saturday,

Morning Workouts: 5:00-7:00 AM Mon, Wed, Fri,
7:00 - 9:30 AM Saturday

Evening Workouts: 5:00-7:00PM Monday through Saturday
Cost: 1week -$40/swimmer
2 weeks - $70 / swimmer
3 weeks - $100 / swimmer
4 weeks - $130/ swimmer
5 weeks - $150 / swimmer

Application/Questions. E-mail
swiftswimming@coralwave.com
Telephone 242-324-1167

2006 ESCAPE - $30,874.00

PART OF YOUR LIFE

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com




PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



WEDNESDAY EVENING JUNE 14, 2006

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
NETWORK CHANNELS
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EWTN [ayircufrmie Boer [ey |

FIT TV (tn) Cardio {Ship Out, pte Up The trainers |The Gym “Hot Squad” Amber tries _ | FitTV’s Housecalls The trainers
























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5 The Insider (N) /AFI’s 100 Years ... 100 Cheers Comments rape clips of the 100 most-inspiring films, selected by more
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(2005)'NR’ —_|mates. (0 'PG-19' (CC)

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TMC L, Jackson, Andy Garcia. An inspector investigates the |Deborah Kara Unger. A businessman takes part in an unusual form of
deaths of her ex-lovers. 1 'R’ (CC) recreation. ‘R’ (CC)







THE TRIBUNE

y hednen rss



















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~






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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 11

Miller speaks out in favour of PetroCaribe

@ By MARK HUMES

MINISTER of Agriculture Leslie Miller
said he hopes nay-sayers will wake up and
see the benefit of buying gas directly from
Venezuela — as that country already sup-
plies more than 75 per cent of Bahamian
fuel.

Making his contribution to the 2006/2007
budget debate, Mr Miller once again
touched on the Venezuelan government’s
PetroCaribe fuel proposal — a cause he has
been championing over the past three years.

Mr Miller answered accusations that he
was pushing the oil agreement for person-
al benefit, by agreeing that he would indeed
save*‘around $1,200 per year” in fuel bills
under the deal.

the same as it has always been... and that
is to bring some relief to the small man
who may not have had a voice on these
matters,” said Mr Miller.

He went on to point out increases in
expenditure on petroleum products that
has impacted the ‘Bahamian economy in
recent years.

Mr Miller noted that BEC’s fuel cost
rose by $81.9 million between 2002 and
2005, which translated to an increase in
what consumers paid to the corporation
each month.

Because of the increase in fuel costs,
according to Mr Miller, the public paid an
average of $7.1 million more to BEC in
September of 2005 than it paid in October
of the 2004.

those in countries that have signed on to
PetroCaribe — showing the margins that
wholesalers and retailers get before prod-
ucts reach the consumer.

With wholesalers and retailers in the
Bahamas getting an average of 42 cents
more than those in Antigua, Barbados,
Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago, Mr
Miller pointed out that “buying directly
from the producer always creates savings, as
you cut out the middleman.”

According to Mr Miller, Jamaica con-
tinues to benefit from the PetroCaribe

agreement, and has saved around $300 mil- ©

lion in the last year.

However, some of the “nay-sayers” claim
that Mr Miller is oversimplifying the pro-
posed agreement.

Jamaica pays an initial 60 per cent of

their purchase-price on shipments of fuel,
and is allowed to pay the remaining 40 per
cent over a 25-year period at one per cent
interest.

With this “gas-on-credit” arrangement,
some critics believe that the Bahamas
would further add to its already substantial
debt burden, as public funds would even-
tually be used to pay off the 40 per cent
rolled over from each shipment, plus the
accrued interest.

Supporters of the agreement maintain
that even with the interest, the Bahamas
will spend less on fuel in the long run than
it would if it continued to operate through
energy company “middlemen”.

M@ MINISTER of Agriculture
‘Leslie Miller



“Mr Speaker, my real motivation was



He also compared petroleum prices to

Motor failure was a ‘major

/

FROM page one __

was'testing a new steam turbine,
which'is now producing power.

“In ‘effect what we're doing
is réplacing older plant while at
the saine time adding addition-
al capacity,” he said.

The number of power cuts,
hoor: was due to planned
load shedding because of gen-
erator’ difficulties, Mr. Forbes
said. Heysaid that after the fault
develdped, areas were taken out
on a rotational, basis to main-
tain supply to as many cus-
tonjets as possible.

nithe: past few weeks we
have experienced an lunaccept-

‘ -
+f fips
i

:

°
Fo :
O }

j
os
i
i

FROM page one



able level of faults on our major
plant, thesé faults have resulted
in disruptions to various areas
throughout New Providence for

periods over the last week —

our investigation has so far
revealed the major cause of
these problems and we have
been taking steps to correct
them,” said Mr Forbes. |

Mr Basden said the public
should try to conserve energy.

Members of the Bahamas
Electrical Workers Union

(BEWU) alleged yesterday that

the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration is trying to implicate

them for the recent power out-.

ages.
According to Mr Basden,

ul play ruled. out

when‘ ‘a’ witness. alleged that he had supplied instruments to facili-

tate the ,prison br eak in J anuary.

During the Coroner’s inquest in Aptil, inmate Barry Parcoi tes-
tified{that Mr Johnson was the officer who smuggled hacksaw
blades into the prison to help him, Neil Brown, Corey Hepburn and

Forrester Bowe escape on January 17.
Well placed‘sources told The Tribune that many factors con-

tribuféd;to Mr. Johnson’s death. Coronary artery disease was

among them.

“Prison officials meantime are planning a military state service for
Mr Johnson, which is scheduled for Saturday at the New Destiny

Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road.

i

cause’ of recent power cuts

“The corporation never blamed

or implicated ‘the union or any

other entity, the corporation is
responsible in all of its com-
ments and no instance of that

_ was suggested — we don't know

where that statement would
come from, definitely there was
no implication by management
to our employees.”

“We have a dedicated team
and they were the ones who
responded to the location and
have assisted as best they can
in these trying circumstances.”

According to BEWU mem-
bers, file footage of officials’

broadcasts on ZNS had strong

implications that the union
might have had something to
do with the power cuts.

The BEWU issued a press
statement yesterday stating that

. management. of BEC. is
attempting to mislead the pub- ~

lic as to the cause of the power
outages.

President of the BEWU Den-
nis Williams said the union has
had nothing to do with the pow-
er cuts and never will.

“A part of the union function
is to educate and inform the
public as to what.is going on

inside BEC if we feel something ~

is wrong — from a union stand-
point, it looks like it’s going to
be a very hot summer,” Mr
Williams said.

Ay

Brennen Curry

Sheniqua, a school teacher, met her
husband Petré at their first semester at
college...he proposed during a

Christmas break.

She enjoys sewing, working with
children, travelling, cooking and

socializing,

One of her future goais is to aspire to
be happy and comfortable.

“Her Bridal Choices were: “Palatial
Platinum” China by Mikasa; “Palatial
Platinum ” Crystal by Mikasa.

Kelly’s was chosen because “by far
Kelly’s offers the best and largest’ |
selection of items needed fo start our

new life.”

WIN FREE FABULOUS GIFTS!
* KELLY’S - $250 Gift Certificate
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© BALTA « 23X43 Rug

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

TENDER — APPRAISAL OF
BUILDINGS AND LAND

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide appraisal of its Buildings and
Land.

’

Interested companies/firms in Nassau may collect a Tender

Specification from the Security’s Desk located in the Administrative

building on John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Packages can also be collect in Freeport, from the Security’s desk,

BTC, Mall Drive.

The deadline for submission of tenders is 5:00 pm July 17th,
2006. Tenders should be sealed and marked “TENDER —
APPRISAL OF BUILDINGS AND LAND” and should be
delivered to the attention of the Acting President and CEO, Mr.
Leon Williams by the above date and time.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders.



Fettuccine Alfredo
Vegetables, Crab & Rice & Potato

f » BAHAMAS EMBROIDERY - Monogrammed Towels
-« BUTTONS BRIDAL - Gift Certificate
¢ MIKASA- Crystal Bow!
¢ NORITAKE: Tea Service for 4
* WEDGWOOD.- Coalport Collectables
® RUBBERMAID
* SCOTTDALE BEDDING: 2 Pillows
® THE BEAUTY SPOT - Gift Certificate
* WATERFORD - Crystal Salt & Pepper Set

Assorted Cakes, Pies &
Guava Pudding ©
and many more

Petré & Sheniqua receiving one of their many free
gifts from Sherry Carey, Bridal Consultant.

REGISTRY
Kelly‘ g Hon

You could become the next Bride of the i. be yao S096 So

Month/Year....Register today! www.kellysbahamas.com

. Brides eligible accepted during the month of wedding but entries accepted an register.
ALL ENTRIES BECOME THE PROPERTY OF KELLY’S JUDGES’ DECISIONS FINAL.

RIES Et TPL)
~ partners to make your wedding
dreams come true!


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Sinai

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH’

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Orta ivet
costs $7m

per year

Over 650 vehicles
stolen per year,
as insurers mull

premium discount

for clients who
install LoJack

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business
Editor



BAHAMIAN consumers
have lost $7 million per year
over the past five years as a
result of car thefts, which
have averaged more than
650 per year between 2001-
2005, the company behind a
vehicle tracking and recov-
ery system said yesterday.

Joseph Abely, chairman
and chief executive of
LoJack Corporation, said:
“Over the past five years,
the Bahamas has averaged
more than 650 stolen cars
per year, costing citizens
close to $7 million annually.

“The Government both
recognises the severity of the
problem for its citizens, and
has been instrumental in
bringing the LoJack System

| to the island."

LoJack’s Bahamas-based
licencee, Intelligent Security

Devices. International, Js NOW. |.



operating on New P |
‘| dence and will be responsi: |
ble for installing the compa-
ny’s LoJack Stolen Vehicle
Recovery Systems in the cars
of Bahamians and residents.
The Lo-Jack system is a
radio frequency-based theft
protection solution. which,
when installed in cars and
other vehicles, will enable
the police to track them
when they are reported

SEE page 4B

Consolidated Water
share target raised

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



A WALL Street brokerage
has raised its. share price target
for Consolidated Water, the
Blue Hills reverse osmosis
plant operator that is listed on
BISX, to $34 and upped its rat-
ing from ‘Hold’ to ‘Accumu-
late’ in the belief the firm’s
“srowth story can continue
beyond 2007”.

’ In his latest research note,
which will encourage Bahami-
_ an investors who bought into

Consolidated Water’s Bahami-
an Depository Receipt (BDR)
offering last year, Michael
Gaugler, of Brean, Murray,
Carret & Co, said the compa-
ny’s growth opportunities in
the Bahamas “are far from
over”. :

He wrote: “Our increased
confidence that the growth sto-
ry can continue beyond 2007
‘leads us to believe that a new

and attractive opportunity to.

begin accumulating shares is
now at hand.

“We are raising our trating

to ‘Accumulate’ from ‘Hold’,
and are establishing a $34 price
target price, based on 35 times
‘ our 2007 EPS estimate of
$0.96.”

The $34 target, if achieved,
would price the Consolidated
Water BDRs held by Bahami-
an investors at $6.8 each, given
that one ordinary share is
equivalent to five BDRs. Con-
solidated Water BDRs started
trading on BISX at $4.38.

The company’s ordinary
shares fell $0.99 in trading on
Wall Street yesterday, closing
at $27.91. This means each





































- have the inside track” on bid-

Collaborate to lower
$300m food imports

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

ahamian farmers were
yesterday urged to work
together to reduce this
nation’s per annum food
import bill of more than
$300 million, and increase the level of

- locally-grown produce available to the

tourism industry to ensure less of the
tourism dollar leaks out.

Arnold Dorsette, the Bahamas Agri-
culture and Industrial Corporation’s
(BAIC) assistant general manager, said
his office was doing its part to decrease
the 85 per cent of every tourism dollar
that leaks out of the Bahamas.

He said BAIC was seeking to address
the problem by improving the profile of
entrepreneurial opportunities in the
Bahamas. —

Mr Dorsette said the only way to:

ensure more of the money derived from
tourist spending remains in the
Bahamias is to create more of a local
market to link with tourism.

Bahamas imported $16m worth of decorative
product it could have supplied

plants in 2000,

A particularly large import spending
area is food, he explained, noting that
more than $300 million worth of food is
imported annually.

“ A considerable portion of that can
be produced locally,” he said, giving
mutton as an example.

Mr Dorsette explained that even
though there was mutton production
on Long Island, most of the mutton
enjoyed by tourists is imported all the
way from New Zealand.

“So we need to increase our mutton
production, our poultry production,

and fruit and vegetables, particularly
produce like bananas and potatoes,”
he added.

Mr Dorsette said most ‘hotels and

restaurants had expressed a willingness

to tap into a Bahamian market that was.

consistent on quality, quantity and
price, because it would be more eco-
nomical for them.

He said that if these companies made
provisions to purchase Bahamian-made
goods, they needed to have assurances
they would receive a constant supply if
they stopped making provisions to
obtain goods from the US.

Mr Dorsette said BAIC was meet-
ing with Bahamian farmers to encour-
age them to form small corporations
and work together. This way, they could
all work together and approach a
restaurant or hotel to be their supplier
as a group, with a much larger supply
than if they tried to sell separately.

Mr Dorsette said: “We want them to
work together so that they stagger their
harvest time, so that one week one

farmer reaps, and then the next week it

is someone else.

“This way you have sustained pro-
duce, because often what happens: is
that everyone plants at the same time.

Then the market is flooded one week, |
- which decreases the market price, and

then nothing is available the following
week.”

Another example of a linkage, Mr
Dorsette said was plants.

“Take plants that are used for deco-
rative purposes, for example. They can
be provided and grown from right here,

_ but in 2000, $16 million worth of plants

were imported into this country, many
of which could be grown right in the
Bahamas. .

- “ So we need to find the resources to
provide these same plants locally.”: :

Global United’s Discovery deal close ‘imminent’

\

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE “landmark” sale of Discovery Cruise Line to
Bahamas-based.Global-United-is imminent, the, det;
ater? 3 Owner. told The Tribune yesterday. . 2a

Captain Jackson Ritchie said his company was in
_ the process of finishing the final details regarding the

acquisition.

Captain Ritchie said he expected to give an exact
closing date for the sale\as early as next week. He said
the company would probably have some sort of cele-

bratory event at that time.

In January this year, Global United announced it

‘ had signed a Letter of Intent to acquire the cruise line,
which has provided daily cruise service between Fort
Lauderdale and Freeport for the past 19 years. It
currently brings more than 200, 000 cruise passengers

to Freeport annually.

When the transaction is completed, it is expected

that Captain Ritchie’s wife, Kim Ritchie, will serve as



BDR is valued at $5.582.

If the $34 price target is
achieved, the value of the
BDRs would increase by 21.8
per cent over yesterday’s close.

Mr Gaugler said he believed
Consolidated Water “would

ding for any more reverse
osmosis plant,contracts the
Government was contemplat-
ing putting out to tender in
New Providence.

This was because the com-
pany was constructing and
operating the Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant, and was
also supplying water to the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion from its existing Windsor
plant.

“The completion of the Blue
Hills plant does not mark the
end of opportunities for future
expansion,” Mr Gaugler wrote.

“While the additional capac-
ity generated by Consolidated
Water plants will likely be wel-
comed by Bahamians, we do
not expect it to solve all the
water problems in those spe-
cific areas.”

The Government’s water
supply strategy for New Prov-
idence involves three reverse
osmosis plants, with the one at
Blue Hills joined by further
sites. at Arawak Cay and Win-
ton.

The former of those two
sites will supply water to both
Kerzner International’s Phase
III expansion and Baha Mar’s
$2 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment, with Mr Gaugler
noting that the Arawak Cay





_ SEE page 5B




BES eae

22.44%

12 months to May, 2006

Rio ares ee ear yiet {

eHlas up, Past performance is no guarantee of future results’ Read the Offering Memoranduny catetully



@ CAPTAIN JACKSON RITCHIE





Cummulative Since Inception

; ee Te i i }
7 e0| 10-8 98 a INVESTMENT | TRUST &

MANAGEMENT |

years.

Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Performance through May 31, 2006*

60.81%

(February. 1999)

Fe esses es
Freeport -

eared st 0) bee
Paar Wa | LENDING
PLANNING

SERVICES

FUNDS




Average Annual Return

eee

MUTUAL.

executive vice -president of the cruise line. | | -.
Global United has worked with Discovery Cruise
Line for over 15 years as its port agent, providing
shore side support services to its vessel, and also act-
ing.as.its ticketing wholesale agent, which makes the.”
acquisition , “ a natural extension” of his present line
of work, Captain Ritchie said in January.
_ Global United was created following a rapid series
of acquisitions embarked on by Captain Ritchie’s
original company, Tanja Enterprises, over the past two

Tanja, which was formed in 1991, expanded its
business holdings by. buying United Shipping of
Freeport in 2004. It then acquired Global Customs
Brokers and World Bound Couriers Ltd, plus Sea
Air Aviation Ltd of Nassau, a year later. All three
companies were merged to form Global United.
The company has become: the largest shipping

SEE page 2B.






8.39%







Since Inception
(February 1999)

= FIDELITY

Beyond Banking

Call for an Offering Memorandum
Neat Maynard 356.7764 ext 3
Jennie Barr $517.3010 ext 3304

xiaa eV ee
|

NEWS
ELC e}

PARLE ATT
RETIREMENT
Pe te)

Helore Vou invest.


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



ee Ra Uy
The Tribune - the #1

newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!

FROM page 1B



Santander Bank & Trust Ltd.

Hoa 4 Tt

ites are invited from suitably qualitied Bahamians for the following position:

nen ne mee

Minimum 5 years Call to The Bahamas Bar Association

Minimum 5 years experience in the corporate services department or the Trust
Drafting Department of a seputable law firm or Frast Company

Excellent communications skills -

Computer literate

Fluency in Spanish desirable —

A TEP qualification is desirable

Must be highly motivated and focused.

Pe ee ee ee ee

bt bag tie

| Salary and other benefits commens urate with qualifications and experience |

eee

| Applications in writing with details of education and experience should be
| addressed to the Director of Human Resources, Santander Bank & Trust Ltd., P. O.
| Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas or via fax to 502 7955 not later than June 26, 2006.



Opportunity:
World Class Retailer

Esso, a market leader in fuels and convenience retailing, is looking
for operators/franchisees for its On The Run Cafes, Tiger Markets,
and service stations across New Providence.

If you have...

Successful experience in sales, finance, or administration
.A minimum of five years successfully supervising a team of

workers

A desire to provide superior customer service -

Computer literacy

Organizational discipline

Access to capital and a good credit History

.. We want to know you!

4
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4
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€ 3
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Applications can be obtained from our division Office, Windsor Field
‘Road, Nassau, Bahamas. Applications from interested parties must
be submitted no later than June 16, 2006 to:

rr3rerere

Benita Rahming, Marketing Specialist

Esso Standard Oil SA Limited

Division Office, Windsor Field Road
“PO Box CB-10998

Nassau, Bahamas

rererewwre

covrwre

Life. Onthé Rn

We're drivers too.



agency of its kind in the
Bahamas and the Caribbean,
and is also involved in logis-
tics services, which include
shipping, customs clearance
and trucking.

Company

The company has offices in
Freeport, Nassau and Miami,
with over 250 employees.

Captain Ritchie called the

acquisition a “natural exten-
sion” on his present line of
work, extending his services
“from the shore to the seas”.
He encouraged other
Bahamian entrepreneurs to
follow his lead, because “inter-
national persons in the busi-
ness are no smarter or better
than us”.
’ “T am especially pleased that
[Rafael Ordonez, the owner of
Discovery Cruise Line] has

LIOKIM
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES:

(1) Computer Technician
(2) Systems Manager/ Network Specialist

Skill set:
~ Basic

hardware

and software

troubleshooting skills
Network skills and knowledge of TCP/IP

and NETBUI

Knowledge and applied

skills with

Windows NT and Windows XP

Exceptional

time

management and

customer service skills
Must be a team player

SEND RESUME TO:
Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
The Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza
op. Fax: 394-4971...

Mail: P.O. Box SS-6295



Global United’s Discovery
deal close ‘imminent’

agreed to this transaction,
because it provides for the very
first time an historic opportu-
nity for Bahamians to become
more fully integrated into the
tourism industry- an industry:
which drives our economy,”
said Captain Ritchie at the -
time.

“Additionally, it affords a
Bahamian national, also for
the first time, the opportunity ;
to operate a casino on board
that vessel, once again provid-
ing greater empowerment to
Bahamians in this industry.”

Tanja, which was formed: in
1991, expanded its business
holdings by buying, United
Shipping of Freeport in;2004. It.,
then acquired Global Customs
Brokers and World Bound
Couriers Ltd, plus Sea, Air Avi-:
ation Ltd of Nassau, a year lat--
er. All three companies were’.
merged to form Global United.

Dollar

A dollar value for the ‘Dis-’
covery Cruise Line acquisition:
has not been revealed yet, with’.
both sides citing confidentiali-'
ty agreements. 3

When the sale is completed“
it will mean that for the first
time,‘a Bahamian will operate.
a casino onboard the vessel, .
which will provide even greater. :
empowerment to Bahamians-
in the industry. — ‘

Captain Ritchie has said that, .
in the future, he would like.
other islands, including his
birthplace, Long Island, to be..
considered ports of call for the
cruise line.

Captain Ritchie is a former:
Royal Bahamas Defense Force
marine, who trained at the .
Royal Navy College in the UK.
and with the British Navy.

; t

CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

The Project Manager (PM) will over see the inBlementaton of an Automated
Clering House (ACH) in The Bahamas. The successful candidate will be respon-. .

sible for liasing with potential vendors, assembling a project team, assingning < - :
individual, identifying appropriate resources needed, developing project schedules".
and providing reports to ensure the timely completion of the project. The PM must PP:
demonstrate appropriate specialized knowledge and experience with the imple-

Vacancy for

Project Manager

mentation of clearing and settlement systems; direct experience with (image
enabled) ACH systems is preferable.

The ideal candidate must possess the requisite skills to perform the following

activities:

¢ Assist with project education and orientation
* Assist with implementation schedule, approach, budget, and staffing

requirements

* Review and monitor project plan progress
¢ Review and assist with implementation plan strategy
¢ Ensure that the risks of material deviations are minimized
* Review and assist with the test plan strategy
¢ Review and assist with training plan
* Assist with development of the Go-Live Plan
* Create public awareness of the ACH and its function
f° Provide thought leadership
| ° Identify global issues and workflow opportunities
| ¢ Troubleshoot and escalate critical issues

2G oR Ea 2 AE NG SE Coe a a of NC A aE 2 of a a ee a ek



Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required:

* BSc or equivalent experience
* Knowledge of clearing and settlement systems

| * Knowledge of project management methodologies, project
management softwaretools and process improvement strategies

* Experience with implementation of financial system
* Exceptional communication and interpersonal skills
* Proven track record of managing project economics

* Effectiveness in meeting project deadlines and deliverable

CBA - ACH Project Manager Response
Bank of The Bahamas International
Ist Floor, Claughton House
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

E-mail responses may be sent to:

Send Resumes to:

Nassau, Bahamas



Cee Oe a ee i OR RAR

Samantha. Antonio@BankBahamas.com



‘4

i
Pil PwwVUINoe





Crawtish
exports
fall 14.6%

in value

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE value of Bahamian
crawfish exports in 2005
dropped 14.6 per cent below
their average worth for the past
five years, dropping to $75.43
million compared to $88.32 mil-
lion.

Leslie Miller, minister of agri-
culture and fisheries, said in his
House of Assembly Budget
debate contribution that the
“significance” of the crawfish
export production decline dur-
ing 2005 had not been decided,
although he said that “excep-
tional production levels”
achieved in the past.

_ Crawfish accounted for 86 per
cent of the value of commercial
fisheries landings on average,
Mr Miller said, and to ensure
the industry’s sustainability the
Department of Marine
Resources would enforce the
law to prevent the harvesting of
undersized lobster below the
size limit. Meanwhile, the min-
ister said he was planning to
change the regulations on limits
to catches by sportsfishermen
in Bahamian waters.

Mr Miller said: “Some of the
visitors who come to enjoy the
Bahamas abuse our marine
resources and thereby deprive
‘Bahamians. Fishing by visitors is
to be for sporting purposes, not
as an opportunity to finance a

vacation, sell for profit or fill

the freezers at home.
“All over the Bahamas, citi-

zens complain that the current,

sportfishing bag regulations are
too generous.’

Acknowledging that the cur-
rent regulations governing
sportsfishing in the Bahamas
have remained unchanged since

.1986, Mr Miller said: ““The num-

ber of visitors of all kinds has -

grown tremendously and the
pressure on resources by so-
called sportsfishermen in some
areas is significant enough to be
séen as direct competition by
Bahamians.”

Mr Miller proposed that the
following changes be made to

the existing fishing regulations: -

* Crawfish from six per per-

son per day to six per vessel per
day.

* Conch from six per person
per day to three per vessel per
day.

* Snapper, groupers, grunts
and other demersal fish from 20
pounds per person per day to
20 pounds per vessel per day.

* Mahi mahi, kingfish and



















on Duty when required.




weekends and holidays.

‘Tequired.

of standards in all units.









Ocean Club Resorts

P.O. Box 240
- Providenciales

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Ocean Club Resorts, Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands
is looking for qualified applicants to fill the following positions:

ASSISTANT OPERATIONS MANAGER - This person will be
computer literate with relevant experience in a similar position
in a condominium resort setting. Reporting directly to the
Operations Manager, they will have strong leadership skills and
proven experience in managing the following departments:
Housekeeping, Laundry, Property Services, Front Desk, Guest
and Owner Services, and be able to take on the role of Manager

Scheduled hours can change at any time, but include weekdays,

MAINTENANCE MANAGER - Reporting directly to the Chief
Engineer of Maintenance, they will have experience overseeing
all general maintenance requirements for all buildings in a
condominium style resort as well as management of waste
water treatment plant operations, irrigation system, and regular
swimming pool monitoring and maintenance.

Scheduled hours for all these positions can change at any
time, but include weekdays, weekends and holidays. Applicants §
must be able to take on the role of Menage on Duty when

CHIEF ENGINEER OF MAINTENANCE - Reporting directly
to the Managing Directors, they will have experience in a similar
position in a condominium resort setting, managing work order
systems, inventory control, and owner communication.

Additionally, he/she will oversee management of waste water
treatment plant operations, landscaping and grounds upkeep,
irrigation systems, swimming pool maintenance, general building
maintenance, including that of 2 restaurants. They will liaise
with the Refurbishing co-coordinator regarding the upholding

All interested applicants, please submit resumes to:
Attention: Human Resource Manager

TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
OR via email to diane@oceanclubresorts.tc.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 3B



@ MINISTER LESLIE MILLER

wahoo from six per person per
day to six per vessel per day,
He added that they are also
going to require that all fish
retained must have their head
and tail intact until landed
ashore. This is to facilitate iden-

tification and eliminate the pro- .

duction of fillets while the vessel
is at sea.





















Credit Suisse Wealth Management Limited

is presently considering applications for an

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. {tis setting new standards which go
beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with
comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and advisory services. Our total commitment is always
to our clients and we focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal. values.





Requirements:

- A minimum of five (6) years experience in banking with a large internatiorial institution

- Knowledge of trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities markets with particular
emphasis on emerging market derivative instruments

- - Ability to speak and write in Portuguese fluently in order to converse with clients directly and process

documentation internally

- Deep Knowledge and working experience with Microsoft products (including access, excel, etc.)

> Must have working knowledge of GLOBUS application

v Must be familiar with EUROCLEAR procedures and have deep knowledge of EUCLID application.

- Significant experience in an extremely active and dynamic operational environment

- Comprehensive knowledge of operational and information technology principles, practices and processes
sufficient to interpret/analyze complex issues and develop innovative solutions to the challenges effecting

the business unit

oe Strong problem solving and decision-making skills

> Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills

: Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Key Duties & Responsibilities will include:

- Co-ordinate day-to-day operations functions of the main office

- Oversee various Management functions; particularly the Payment, Settlement and Safe custody areas

- Risk Management and liaise with managers to ensure maintenance of standards

Applications should be faxed to:
Human Resources Department
Fax: 302-6398

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 16, 2006

KING & Co.

Please be advised that the offices
of
KING & Co.

and |
Worldwide Corporate Service
Providers Ltd.

Have Moved to the following address:
Old Towne Marina, Second Floor,
Sandyport, West Bay Street.
Telephone No.327-3127
Fascimile: 327-31 as(Tampprary),



eos









NORTHERN CAMPUS - FREEPORT

The Single and Three Phase —
trical Li Ex

will be held at

The College of The Bahamas,
West Settler’s Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama
on Saturday, July 1 at 9 a.m.

a ERE ETEEBRE AEA AYN

EI

The Examination Fee of $175.00 must be paid
by Monday, June 26.

Interested persons are asked to call CEES at -
352-9761 for additional information.





= ) FIDELITY
~ invites applications for the position of _
BRANCH OPERATIONS MANAGER.

424








PROFILE:

Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration or Finance —
10 years retail banking experience with a minimum of 3 years in a
managerial position

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS & SALES SUPPORT

o Functional responsibility for the day-to-day management of the
branch
Training, coaching and assessment of Sales Support Staff

o Monitoring cash limits

o Accurate and timely processing of all accounting entries, banking
fees & service charges

o Compliance reviews for new and continuing accounts to ensure
adherence to Central Bank Anti-Money Laundering Guidelines,
KYC requirements of FTRA/FTRR and F sie internal
instructions

o Reporting losses and exceptional occurrences

Reporting on business development & financial results



























CREDIT
o Review of loan documentation
o Disbursement of loan proceeds




OTHER
o Sales initiatives and business development

o Review of workflows and procedures

o Maintain and update all procedure/training manuals
o Monitor dormant accounts

TIME ALLOCATION

o Sales=15%

o Customer Service=20%

o Operations/Administration=35%

o Training & Coaching=15%
o Change Management=15%















BACKUP FOR
o Service Centre Manager '

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than Monday 19th, June 2006 to:
Human Resources Department
JH
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853

Nassau
Fax 326.3000

careers@fidelitybahamas.com —



e-mail:
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006



For the stories behind the news,

read Insight on Mondays

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES PETIT - BOS, of
Strachan Corner off of East St, P.O. Box N-3331, Nassau,
Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

HALSBURY
CHAMBERS

Mt
Councel and Attorneys-of-Law Notories Public

i WILL BE CLOSED
“" On Friday, 16th June, 2006














erend

‘ SES o
s PT ORE LO HD
SPORE GPL HEE GF = lh

te Be fe he

: due to the observance of the firms
re Annual “Fun Day”

The office will re-open on
Monday, 19th June 2006

We regret any inconvenience caused





fetetetetepetetatatatetatetes tenet ttt tata a tate t eta te tata tatatetatatatatatatatatatata tate tetetetetetatetetetatetatatatatetatetetate

NTATIV

PR




BUSINESS

Car theft costs

THE TRIBUNE:

aa



t

y OW y

Apo 8

4 «
"

S7m per year

FROM page 1B

stolen. Ultimately, the system
aims to. aid law enforcement
in recovering stolen cars and
apprehending offenders.

The Tribune was told yes-
terday that the Bahamas Gen-
eral Insurance Association
(BGIA) and its individual car-
rier members were consider-
ing whether to offer insurance
premium discounts to clients
who installed and maintained
the LoJack system in their
vehicles.

’ This would be viewed as
reducing the risk of them being
stolen and never recovered,
but it is unclear whether the
BGIA and its member compa-

nies have taken a decision yet

on this matter.

The BGIA and four of its
members - Bahamas First,
RoyalStar Assurance; Summit
Insurance and Insurance Com-
pany of the Bahamas - played
a key role in bringing the
LoJack system to the
Bahamas, helping to fund the
system’s infrastructure, such as

Royal Holiday

Ts looking for

Energetic, Self Motivated, Goal Oriented, Individuals

Tua
po

Must be over 25yrs.

For it’s High Volume Sales Centre

_ THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!

Highest commissions and bonuses in the industry.

Have a Positive Mental Attitude,
Excellent Conversational Skills

c | Ability to Think on Feet
Articulate and Outgoing

Minimum 3 BGCSE

Become a part of our Winning Team

Please contact:
Royal Holiday,

327-5595 Ext-222.
Or in person:

om ye

10am-3pm.

3 RT ee ee

se




SUSE

Pficing Information As Of:
13 June 2006



Abaco Markets

8.50 Bahamas Property Fund
6.35 Bank of Bahamas
0.70 Benchmark
1.26 Bahamas Waste
1.05 Fidelity Bank
8.00 Cable Bahamas
1.39 Colina Holdings
. 8.50 Commonwealth Bank
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.10 Doctor's Hospital
4.02 Famguard
10.45 Finco
8.52 FirstCaribbean
8.42 Focol
1.03 Freeport Concrete
9.50 ICD Utilities
8.27 J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier R

52wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)






28.00 ABDAB
13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets





Royal Holiday, ground floor,
Nassau Wyndham Resort and Casino.

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd,





Last Price Weekly Vol










Fund Name NA V

1.2897 1.2339 Colina Money Market Fund 1.289693*
2.8564 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.78564 ***
2.3915 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.391480**






Colina Bond Fund

AL Ri -



52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months








Last 12 Months Div $

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value’

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

' ff you are raising funds for.a

towers, and other equipment.
The industry is hoping that
by reducing the level of vehicle
theft in New Providence, the
LoJack system will also play a
role in helping to reduce auto
insurance premiums, although
the effect may not be signifi-
cant.

Implemented

“I think once we can get it
implemented, the LoJack will
work extremely well,” one
insurance industry source said.
“If a car is stolen and it has got
the system, it can be tracked
immediately.”

Insurance carriers only pay
claims on cars that are stolen if
the policies covering them are
either comprehensive or for
third party, fire and theft.

Those policyholders who
insure their cars with just third
party policies are faced with
having to purchase a new car if
their vehicle cannot be recov-
ered.

Bahamian general insurance
carriers believe that many of
the cars stolen in New Provi-
dence are either stripped down
for parts, or transported to the
Family Islands.

They are also faced with the
increasing problem of fraudu-
lent claims from consumers
who stage the burning or theft
of their cars in a bid to collect
the insurance claim proceeds.:

The Tribune understands

that at least one insurance car-
rier.has also pushed for the
implementation of a claims
information exchange system
‘in the Bahamas, believing this
would help to detect and weed
out persons who persistently
submitted, questionable and
fraudulent claims.

A study performed for the
BGIA in 2002 showed that









The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. ;

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
















NAV KEY,
* 31 May 2006
** 34 May 2006

=** - 30 April 2006



- 31 March 2006



Nissan was the most popular
make for car thieves, some 81
cars being stolen that year. The
next most popular vehicle
make was Honda, with 24 cars
stolen that year, while 14 Toy-
otas were stolen, along with 13
Ford and Hyundai cars stolen.

The most popular Nissan
model among car thieves was,
unsurprisingly, the Sentra, with
56 such cars stolen in 2002. The
next most popular vehicle
model among thieves was the
Honda Accord, with 13 cars
stolen.

Addressing a conference last
year on New approaches to
overcoming Crime, organised
by the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and IBM

(Bahamas), the Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of
National Security, Cynthia
Pratt, said of the ‘LoJack’ sys- :

tem: “We expect this project
will put a significant dent in
stolen vehicle recovery and act
as a deterrent to vehicle theft,

. in general.”

Several sources, though,
have questioned whether con-

_ sumers whose cars were val-

ued well below $10,000 would
want to pay for having the
LoJack system installed and
maintained in their¢ars.
LoJack’s Mr Abely said:
“Although only a small region,
the Bahamas represents.anoth-
er step in our global expan-
sion, under our original
licenseemodel.
“We are pleased to add the
Bahamas to the growing list of
countries whose citizens can,
rest a little easier knowing that
LoJack's Stolen Vehicle
Recovery Systems soon will be
available in the area."















) obtain applica
477-1901, 0r



NCOs ues
21st Century Welding Co.
Sale/Save Big

20% off storm panels, 5/8” + 1/2” rebars.
Ideal for, “The Do Yourself”. ie
Ph# 3254624 / 3252830

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that SONEL AUGUSTIN of Mackey | -
St, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible}.
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization | :

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows‘] .
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not bé
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the] ’
facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH day of JUNE,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and’|'
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that LIONEL SYLVESTRE of Mackey
St, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be,
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the4
| facts within twenty-eight days from the 14TH day of JUNE;;}

2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and |
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas:

} aasseanssannsenansonenstes
| S (15 days) qcecssssessensesssceseresrerscssssansaesed.
- 4WEEKS © 20 AayS)...ccsssessreconecesseseorcnonsseseseaneaa:





coachgeoff@dolphinswimmin yclub.com
_ or download the applications from our website



he.
?








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SA RAP ISOS IB ARIA A ARTARTAMOSE




THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006, PAGE 5B



zon

Consolidated Water share target raised

ROM page 1B

contract would “provide addi-
tional opportunities and
demand for water going for-
wards

Yet his research note made
no mention of the controversy
that has embroiled the Arawak
Cay reverse osmosis plant con-
tract.

The Tribune understands
that the current status of the

matter is that the Water &
Sewerage Corporation and the
Government’ s Tenders Board
have both recommended that
the contract be awarded to a
rial bidder, BK Water, the
Bahamian investor group
whose principals include
Jerome Fitzgerald, the RND
Holdings chairman; business-

-man Mark Finlayson, son of |

entrepreneur Garet ‘Tiger’
Finalyson; and ex-Burns
House chief financial officer
Phillip Kemp.

However, the contract award
has yet to be approved by the
Cabinet, and that is where the
issue currently resides.

If successful, The Tribune
understands that while BK
Water would own the Arawak
Cay plant and sell water to the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion, the plant’s operations
would be run by French com-
pany, Veolia Enerserve, under

a Management/operating part:

net agreement.

‘¥he Government is thought
lik ely to look favourably on
any group with Bahamian
involvement, wanting to place
privatised infrastructure assets
ito Bahamian hands as part
of its Bahamianisation policy.

‘There is also understood to
be concern about handing a
sécond reverse osmosis plant
td Consolidated Water, for fear
that would give the company a
monopoly over water produc-
tion on New Providence.

However, some sources told

e Tribune that,Consolidated
Water's bid was the lowest by
$10 million, providing the Cor-
poration with the greatest sav-
if and consumers with the
I
puted by others, with some
saying the BK Water/Veolia
bid.was offering extra services

|
eg
!

west price. Yet this was dis- °

that Consolidated Water did
not propose to.

Meanwhile, Mr Gaugler said
Gerardo Capo’s Bimini Bay
Resort could provide further
opportunities for Consolidat-
ed Water, as it also had a pres-
ence in the area.

“Outside Nassau, Bimini is
seeing increased levels of inter-
est from developers looking at
building a casino complex to
take advantage of the island’s
close proximity to the US,” he
wrote.

“While no firm commit-
ments have yet been reached,
the potential for Consolidated
Water to provide water for a
casino development is defi-
nitely worth mentioning and
monitoring.”

Elsewhere, Mr Gaugler said



Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that REYNALDO ANTONIO AMOS,
P.O. Box SS-6292, Nassau, Bahamas is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Consolidated Water faced only
one rival bidder on the con-
tract for a 1.3 million gallon
plant in Bermuda, with May
31 the deadline for all bids to
be received.

The company was building
a second plant in Tortola, the
British Virgin Islands, that was
expected to go online in the
2006 third quarter, while it had
pre-qualified to bid on a pro-
posed $50 million project in
Barbados.

Volumes in Consolidated
Water’s home market of
Grand Cayman were increas-
ing, as properties came back
on line after Hurricane Ivan,
while the new Ritz-Carlton
resort and Caymana Bay town
were likely to generate
increased demand.









Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOSPHORE LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) BOSPHORE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies

Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 12th June,
2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust of 17
bis, rue de Lausanne - 1211 Geneva 70 - Switzerland.

Dated this 13th day of June, A.D. 2006.

Credit Suisse Trust
Liquidator



_ CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

Vacancy for

Administrative Assistant

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible to the project Manager and
; gclérical'and Administrative support. The successful candidate will be
i responsible for documenting meetings, organizing and coordinating meeting
aschedules, preparing all project communications and correspondence,
distributing project information and generally ensuring that all matters
lating to the project are fully and project documented in a timely manner.
Hine candidate must possess excellent typing and record keeping skills and be

proficient i in the use of various software a

yowerPoint and MS Excel, among others.

ok 2s +h

3K fe 2

: | Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required:

pplications such as MS Word, MS

| Associates Degree or Certified Professional Secretary Rating , or Certified
‘Administrative Professional Rating;
+ Detailed knowledge of computers to complete correspondence (e.g. MS Word),
‘ create and maintain forms, reports (e.g., MS Excel), presentation (e.g., MS
‘Power Point), and brochures and to respond to email as necessary;
¢ Basic business and accounting knowledge to prepare documentation and

‘statistical report;

“Excellent oral and written communication skills, including etiquette and
writing skills, to interact with associates and external persons, and to créate

‘correspondence;

* Judgement requirement in treatment of information with confidentiality and

‘professionalism;

“Ability to operate a variety of office equipment, including computer, calculator,

Sele en pin BS ER Sar Sam Soh ea i



printer, fax, machine, and photocopier

Send Resumes to:
CBA - ACH Administrative Assistant Response
Bank of the Bahamas International
1st Floor, Claughton House
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

Nassau, Bahamas

E-mail responses may be sent to:

Samantha.Antonio@BankBahamas.com



Learn to sa

sudden Infant Death
yadrome (SIDS) -

Association. Our
CPR course. The ¢

ee
course introduces the

warning signs of respirator
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Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of



is seeking candidates for the position of :

Internal Auditor

Candidates should possess the following qualifications:

Certified Public Accountant or equivalent

Bachelors Degree in Finance, Banking or Accounting

Banking experience as Internal auditor or International Accounting Firm
experience in audit banking dept.(min.5 yrs) ; :

*Fluency (or working knowledge) in French would be an asset.

Personal qualities:

*Excellent organizational skills & ability to work with minimal
~ SUPEFVISION.

*Commitment to quality and service excellence
*Self-motivated, flexible, positive attitude.

Responsibilities:

«Review and Control of:
Bank Operating transactions
Bank Corporate Governance
Compliatice procedures
¢Various audit coordination
‘Report directly to the General Manager of the Group and
the Group Audit department Manager.

Please apply to:
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas
Fax: (242)327-1514

Email: bzi@pasche.ch

(Please no phone calls)


PAUE Ob, WEUNESVDAY, JUNE 14, 20U0 IMIDUINE Oruntis

ie oS

‘ss’ Ian Symonette looking





. forward to ‘new hapied

@ FOOTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IAN ‘Big Bahama’ Symonette is eagerly
looking forward to beginning a new chap-
ter in his life.

He’s currently home, spending the.

remainder of his summer break before he
leaves next Friday to begin his tenure as a
member of the Hurricanes’ football team at
the University of Miami.

“Since I’ve been home, I’ve been going
: over to Mystics Gym, going on the beach
i and today (Tuesday), I will be going to the

start of the Pros’ training camp,” Symonette’

disclosed.

“Other than that, I’ve just been going
on the beach and working out in the gym.”

After graduating in May from St. Pius
High School in Houston, Texas where he
shined for the past two years, the 19-year-
old offensive linesman returned home for
some “home cooking” before he enters his
freshman season in college.

Excited

Highly sought by a number of colleges
before he settled on UM because of its
close proximity to the Bahamas, Symonette
said he’s excited about getting started.

“Tt’s a brand new level, but it’s a level
that will help my game of football a whole
lot,” Symonette charged. “It’s a totally dif-
ferent level from high school sports.

“I’m really trying to see how people
respond to college life. So I’m hoping that
I can go there and enjoy it.”

Looking back at his two-year stint at Pius
High School, Symonette called it a “learn-
ing experience because that’s where I went
off to school, breaking away from my par-
ents and living with Frank (Rutherford,
Olympic bronze medalist).

f



“When I go
running on the beach
in the mornings, they

would stop me and

congratulate me on
the accomplishments
that Pve made.”

Ian Symonette



“Tt was a lot of responsibility. It was an
experience that helped me a whole lot
because I had an early start in the lessons of
life. It was a great start.”

Symonette, who turns 19 on December
31, will be gearing up for the start of his
freshman season on Monday, August 4
against Florida State at 8pm at the Orange
Bowl.

But the former St. Augustine’s College
basketball standout, converted into a foot-
ball player by the Pros, said the public has
been very receptive to him.

“When I go running on the beach in the
mornings, they would stop me and con-
gratulate me on the accomplishments that
I’ve made,” he summed up.

“So I feel good about what I’ve done
and to see that the Bahamian people are
behind me.”

The 6-foot-9, 334-pounder said he intends
to make an impression as a left tackle for
the Hurricanes before he ventures into a
professional career in the National Football

League. a

“I’m looking forward to entering a new
chapter in my career,” he added.”

9 j

5 2







> ‘
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Brazil edge past Croatia in Worid Cup opener




SPORTS

: = Blake beats Gimelstob
= ~ in all-American clash



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Available eo News Providers —

Weather stops the fourth dayof
West Indies second test against India

= @
= |




WA

na NES Gur

ee ep SENS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

AyGutieaeny tails

SY

a BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

MCMURRAY State women’s
basketball coach Sam Nicholls and
his entourage of assistant coach
Charles Parnell and three players
wrapped up another trip to the
Bahamas on Tuesday.

The contingent spent some time
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
where they instructed coaches
from the Ministry of Education’s
Physical Edueation Unit on basic
skills for primary school students.

Dawn Knowles, director of the
Physical Education at the min-
istry, said it was a good opportuni-
ty for the coaches to expand their
knowledge from the visiting
coaches.

“Every year they come here,
they afford us this opportunity, so
we are very pleased to be able to
take part in this,” Knowles
stressed. ;

This marked the second year
that the primary schools partici-
pated in a one day clinic.

For first timer Kayser Spence,
who has been teaching at Naomi
Blatch since January, the course
couldn’t have come at a more
opportune time.

“I learned a lot because my
school is a very small school and
coming here will-be very benefi-
cial,” she indicated. “So I was very
eager to go through the drills. It -
was very beneficial.”

Naomi Blatch has just recently
participated in some of the schools
sports, but Spence said this will
allow her to try and get a basket-
ball team together as well.

Jeremy Major, a coach at
Garvin Tynes, said: “What I knew
all along was the basic skills for
the older children and grown up,

they made it so much more funda- .

mentally sound about the pro-
gramme for children.”

Like Spence, Major said he
learned a lot in the short space of
time and he’s eager to get started
in the new school year.

Exciting

Centreville Primary’s coach
Saron Cox said: “Every year, you
think you covered everything and
every year they bring something
new. So it’s always exciting.

“J learned some new techniques
to get the kids more excited in
learning the new skills. I think I
know how I can keep the kids
focussed and motivated.”

Other coaches who participated

were Donna Lundy.from Yellow
Elder; Lisa Mortimer (Mable
Walker); Kiva Bridgewater (Thel-
ma Gibson); Doris Ramsay (Ger-
ald Cash); Alfie Bethel (Thelma
Gibson); Monty Charlton (Sandi-
lands Primary);:Theodore Neely
(Gerald Cash); Greer Thompson
(Albury Sayle) and Theodore
Hanna (Cleveland Eneas).

While Nicholls has been coming
to the Bahamas for the past eight
years, this was coach Parnell’s
fourth trip and he was quite
‘impressed with what he saw this
time around.

“One of the first things I
noticed was the improvement of
the elementary students,” Parnell
stated. “They have improved on
the drills that we left with them
last year.”

Patricia ‘Patti’? Johnson, who
organised the trip that was spon-
sored by the Caribbean Bottling
Company Limited and Coca-Cola,
along with Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, said the
whole idea behind the visit was to
allow the coaches and players to
reach the inner-city children and
those less fortunate on some of
the Family Islands.

“I think we need to show them
more drills, new drills and a com-
bination of drills so that they can
use them when the season starts,”
Johnson pointed out.

Johnson credited Knowles, her
former teacher, who encouraged
her to give back to the communi-
ty.

Brittany Densman, who along
with Jennifer Poetzel and Carli
Engelke joined the coaches for a
return trip, said they had another
wonderful time.

“All of the people we have
worked with since we got here
have responded very well,” Dens-
man added. “We know that they
have learned whatever it was we
taught them.

“So it’s just a honour to be back
here because we feel that every
year, we reach some new kids. We
just got a lot of respect that we
would not have gotten back in
Texas.”



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



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. Ton iyi Toni er]

Tei ulelaic
Tee fora

new Ar ae



Top athletes to”
compete in 200m

vallable



@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

DESPITE the hype that is
being placed on the first day of
competition in the Bahamas
Association of Athletic Associa-
tion’s (BAAA) national champi-
onships, day two will be twice'as
heated.

The sprint events are igitally

the ‘eye catcher’ in track and

field, especially the 100 metres,
but the half lap (200m) event
will surely raise a few eyebrows.

The highly contested 200m will
see two of the world’s top per-
formers in the 400m settle in the
blocks in a head to head clash.

Olympian and World Champi-
onships gold medalist Tonique
Williams-Darling and Olympic .
finalist Christine Amertil have
signed up to take part in the
event.

But the two quarter-milers will
have to ward-off the event’s
national record holder, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie, if they
want to claim the win.

Fastest

So far, Ferguson-McKenzie
has posted the fastest time out
of all the entrees, 22.67 seconds
with Amertil recording the sec-
ond fastest time of 23.22 sec-
onds. The next three times. __.-- -
fastest times are posted by a trio:
of high school athletes Sheniqua ©
Ferguson, Nivea Smith and «—
Cache Armbrister, who have .:
posted 23.44 seconds, 23.66 sec-
onds and 23.98 seconds respec-
tively.

‘Out of the trio, both Ferguson
and Smith are ranked amongst:
the World Youth leaders in the
event, while Amertil is ranked
15th in the Women’s listing. ~

The 200m event, scheduled for
6pm at the Thomas A Robinson
stadium, will be the first half . ~
lapper for the Olympic champi-
on Williams-Darling.

Also taking up the challenge
to compete in the 200m will be
Chris, Brown.

Contended

The change of scenery for
Brown will be contended by
national record and Indoor
Champion holder Dominic
Demeritte, who has posted the
fastest time of 20.71 seconds.

Like Williams-Darling, this
will be the first 200m for 400m
runner, who will have Jamal |
Rolle, Michael Matthieu, Adrian
Griffith and Karlton Rolle lining
up at the starting line.

Rolle has the second fastest
time heading into the event,
20.89 seconds, followed by
Matthieu with 20.83 seconds,
Rolle with 21.33 seconds and
Griffith with 21.36 seconds.

The women’s 100m hurdles
will also be a highlight as newly
national record holder Tiavannia
Thompson looks to lower the
time on home soil.

Thompson, ‘the new kid on the
block’, has dipped below the
national record three times this
year, clocking 13.75 seconds at
the recent NCAA national
championships. The national
record is set at 13.63 seconds,
recorded on May 11th ata
preparation meet for the NCAA.

@ FROM top: Debbie Fergu-
son-McKenzie, Tonique
Williams-Darling and Christine
Amertil will all compete in the
half lap (200m) event.

(FILE Photos