Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Claims of






#m lovin’ it.

88F
77F

SHOWER OR
FSTORM



‘al Baker F oT

| DEVELOPERS ‘REALLY FOCUSED’





. The Tribune

The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





JESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006





PRICE — 75¢





Eight reportedly
infected,
to update public

te ie

>
?
>

i By. PAUL TURNQUEST
and PACO NUNEZ

““ THERE are now at least

eight confirmed cases of
malaria in the Bahamas,
according to .well-placed
sources.

Initial reports from the Min-
istry of Health indicated that a
case discovered in Exuma last
week was isolated — however,
two independent sources
inside the medical community
say the government is now
treating at-least eight cases of.
the fever.

One source said health offi-
cials were aware of three cas-
es by last week Friday and an
additional five by Monday.
However, the government has
yet to update the ube on

the matter.

It is understood government
has ordered a rush delivery of

chloroquine phosphate, a

chetnical used 'to treat: malaria,
as only a small supply is kept
in the'‘country to inoculate res-
idents who are travelling to
regions where the fever is
prevalent.

Yesterday, The Tribune
attempted to contact Minister
of Health Dr Bernard Nottage
for comment, as well as Direc-
tor of Public Health Baldwin
Carey, Health Permanent Sec-
retary Elma Garroway, Chief
Medical Officer Merceline

Dahl-Regis and Public Hos- ~

pitals Authority managing

ext) ONLY GN TUESDAYS!

t
L
a

govt yet

director Herbert Brown, but:
all were said to be in meet-

ings.
According to one source, all

- eight cases were diagnosed i in

Exuma and the patients were
sent to New Providence,
where biood tests confirmed

that they were suffering from

malaria.

Another source stated that
Ministry of Health officials
were first alerted to the case

.. after an American, working

on one of the cays in Exuma,
tested positive for the disease
upon his return to the US.
Reportedly, it was the US
medical officials who contact-
ed the Bahamas' Ministry of
Health, thus spurring on the
department’ s push for the
immediate implementation of
preventative measures. .
Health officials maintain
that the kind of mosquito that
carries the disease is not
prevalent in the Bahamas, but
that sporadic cases are
encountered from time to
time. As Health officials pre-
viously emphasised, such cas-
es are usually imported.
Common symptoms of
malaria include recurrent
bouts of fever, chills, body
aches, pains and headaches.

The ministry advised that if

persons are experiencing
such symptoms they should
report immediately to the
nearest health care provider
or clinic.



Taree cars in PPE

â„¢@ THERE was a three-car collision on Dowdeswell Street. yesterday. The accident

reportedly caused a substantial back up of traffic, with the funeral of ZNS veteran Gor- -
don Lowe taking place nearby. There were no reports of any injuries in the accident.



Prosecutors want

separate trials for man

accused of murders
of 22-year-old and
four schoolboys

i By NATARIO McKENZIE

’ PROSECUTORS want mur-
der accused Cordell Farrington

to be tried separately for the

murders of Jamaal Robins, 22,
and four Grand Bahama school-
boys whose disappearance in
2003 sparked fear throughout
the country.

According to prosecutors, the
cases. have been transferred
from Grand Bahama to, New

- Providence Supreme Court to

avoid jury prejudice.

Cheryl Grant-Bethel, deputy
director of prosecutions, who
was accompanied by prosecu-
tors Stephanie Pintard and-Shirl
Deveaux made several submis-
sion before Acing Chief Justice
Anita Allen yesterday as to why
murder accused Farrington
should be tried separately for
Robins’ murder and the mur-
der of the four boys. Accord-
ing to. Mrs Grant-Bethel,

SEE page 11



(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune staff)

(ee

| Group forme
to investigate

concerns over

marine life -

m By MARK HUMES



AGRICULTURE Minister
Leslie Miller announced the
formation of a.group to-inves-
tigate and respond to ques-
tions about the environmen-
tal impact on Bahamian
marine life as a result of activ-
ities at the AUTEC facility.

_The announcement by Min-
ister Miller comes as a result
of calls by local and interna-

_ tional environmentalists seek-

ing an explanation for the
recent beaching of whales in
areas around the facility.
“Recently many questions
have been raised with regards
to the stranding of marine
mammals in The Bahamas,”
said Minister Miller. “In

- response to these questions

and others raised about other
possible environmental
impacts, a working group has

SEE page 10

_ Bozine Town committee hits out at minister’ S comments

i. By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

COMMENTS by Minister of Agriculture
Leslie Miller in the Bozine Town land dispute
have left residents fearing that their democratic
rights are being threatened, aeounne to the
area’s steering committee.

In an interview with The Tribune, Mr Miller,

MP for the area, advised Bozine Town residents
that their planned demonstration in front of the
House of Assembly on Wednesday will not
advance their cause by “one single step.”

_ “Such a statement should not be made in a
democracy, we have the right to peacefully
protest for our cause,”

SEE page 11

Tyrone Brown, chair-

A farewell to ZNS veteran y

FRIENDS and family gathered yesterday to pay a final farewell to ZNS veteran Gor-
don Lowe at St Matthew’s Anglican Church-on Shirley and Church Street.

Mr Lowe died last week of a heart attack at the age of 58.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, East West Highway
tol:242-304-1759 » fax: 242-384-1859 » email: bwabahamaa@voretwave.com
In Freeport: tet; 242-361-2201 » fax: 242-961.2216





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

Songbird’s life reminds us of

our potential for greatness —

QUITE remarkable Bahami-

an life came to an end recent-
ly. Kayla Lockhart Edwards sang her
way with joy, performed the closing
notes with grace, and orchestrated her
going home with style.

Throughout the entire performance
she brought much enjoyment to the
nation, made us feel good about our-
selves and taught us some valuable
lessons.

Mrs Edwards finally succumbed after
a protracted but spirited battle with

cancer. Although she received a Silver .

Jubilee Award in 1998, she was inade-
quately recognised for the outstanding
services she rendered to her country.
Prime Minster Perry Christie alluded
to this in his remarks at her going home
celebration when he acknowledged that
we have not yet got it right when it

comes: to recognising outstanding.

Bahamians during their lifetime.

One reason for that is, of course, that
we.sometimes allow petty politics to
interfere with our best judgment. One of
those listening to Mr Christie was
Edmund Moxey, another Bahamian cul-
tural giant and brother of Mrs Edwards.

Nearly four decades ago Mr Moxey
had the brilliant idea of creating a com-
prehensive national cultural village
Over-the-Hill. It would have been a
permanent exhibition of Bahamian cul-
ture in all its aspects and a centre for the
development of Bahamian arts and
crafts. -

One.can only imagine the positive
impact Jumbey Village might have had
on succeeding generations of Bahami-
ans’~'and the nation as a whole — in
terms of cultural advancement, person-
al development, national pride and eco-
nomuc opportunities.

\ he project was actually started,

but petty politics got in the way
and it was aborted. Now, as the
Bahanmias struggles against'a sea of neg-
ative cultural influences and so many
of our young people are adrift, the
deferral of Mr Moxey’s dream is to be
especially lamented. It was a colossal
mistake.

The prodigious conttibution of Mrs
“y fection.”

Edwards’ to our cultural developme
was widely, if not. officially, re

in her lifetime. She was, ‘attistically "

speaking, first and foremost a songbird,
and all her other cultural pursuits sprang
from the love of that musical expres-
sion.

Hers was the voice that taught a
fledgling nation how to sing its new
national anthem, an anthem written by






the talented Bahamian teacher and
composer Timothy Gibson more than
three decades ago.

For the celebration of our transition
from colony to sovereign nation in 1973,
she was also musical producer and co-
director of the Independence Cultural
Pageant, and Cultural Affairs Assistant
to our first Director of Culture, E
Clement Bethel, yet another superbly
talented Bahamian.

But there was more, a great deal
more. Mrs Edwards organised many
cultural events at home and led or
participated in many Bahamian cul-
tural expeditions abroad. She was
writer, composer, producer, organiser,
actor and teacher. Her passion in all
these things was the pursuit of per-

Happily, just weeks before she
passed, Mrs Edwards was made aware
of the love and gratitude felt by so many
as she was honoured by her colleagues
in the performing arts community with
a wonderful variety show at the Theatre
for the Performing Arts.

The cultural tributes continued at a
memorial event and at her going home



“The couniey ¢ can be proud that the
tradition continues today with an
abundant crop of fine younger
performers, many of whom have had
their talents honed and nurtured by

Mrs Edwards.



FREE ANT IeG ANY WHERE IN eo FW Kew eID MAIL BOAT
° E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

onald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

> SExT H TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322- 1731 OR 322-3875




.

ces On The Island”



Mrs Edwards was not only
multi-talented, vivacious and beautiful;
she was also generous with her art, in
her commitment to developing the
talents of others, and in her direct
service to the nation.



‘celebration at the Diplomat Centre on

Carmichael Road. All of these were
attended by impressive cross-sections
of the community.

ow, both Prime. Minster

Y Christie and Leader of the

Opposition Hubert Ingraham are in

agreement that her life and work should
be suitably memorialised.

Why such an outpouring? Mrs

Edwards was not only multi-talented,

' vivacious and beautiful; she was also
generous with her art, in her commit-.

ment to developing the talents of others,
and in her direct service to the nation.
“Kayla loved her country and all its
people,” said Mr Christie. “She was
proud of its heritage and cultural tradi-
tions. She believed i in her country and
celebrated it in drama, poetry and in
song, and she didn’t do it alone either.
“She brought thousands along with
her whether as actors, or dancers, choir
members or musicians, or as one of the
many who can trace their appreciation

of the arts to the enthusiastic example of

Kayla Lockhart Edwards.”

Mr Ingraham noted that Mrs
Edwards understood what culture was
all about and its importance in the
process of nation-building:

“Her approach to culture and cultur-
al expression was holistic, inclusive. She
understood that if we are to remain a
great people and if we are to achieve
our full potential, then we must con-
sciously develop and nurture all that is
good in our Bahamian culture, and try
to weed out all that is negative.”

\

rs Edwards did indeed

believe in her country and
in her people. More than tHat, her life
was a reminder of the fact that as a
small country we have been blessed
with a succession of talented people.

We need to remember this from time |

to time even as we carry on the neces-
sary debate about our failures and
weaknesses. To tell a child constantly
that he or she is no good runs the risk of
producing a maladjusted adult.

The same can be true of a nation. In
the case of the Bahamas there are still
remnants of the bar syndrome (that if it
comes from across the bar it must nec-
essarily be better than the home-grown
product), and no shortage of those will-
ing to exploit it for their own purposes.

Many nations that have become great
have also been successful at projecting
aspirations as qualities already attained,
and by not only remembering their
great ones but making myths and leg-

STORE HOURS
MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY - SATURDA’



/





IDEN NDI Wy
STILL ALIVE

ends of them.

This is not so easy in today’s world
where instant mass communications
facilitate the work of a multitude of
gleeful iconoclasts. But we can still do
much more to celebrate and commem-
orate great Bahamians living and dead,
and the name of Kayla Lockhart
Edwards is on an illuminated list of

Bahamians who have achieved world-’

class standards at home and abroad.

In the performing arts alone, this lit-
tle country has produced treasures like
vaudevillian Bert Williams; cabaret
dancers Paul Meeres, Naomi Taylor
and Abby LaFleur; opera singer Ran-
dolph Symonette; actors Sidney Poitier,
Calvin Lockhart and Cedric Scott; musi-
cians Peanuts Taylor, Joe Spence,
George Symonette and Freddie
Munnings.

_ These are obviously only represen-
tative of older generations. The country
can be proud that the tradition contin-
ues today with an abundant crop of fine
younger performers, many of whom
have had their talents honed and nur-
tured'by Mrs Edwards.

The same level of Bahamian achieve-
ment is apparent in the world of sports
where persons like Sir Durward
Knowles, Tommy Robinson and Andre
Rodgers blazed a trail in international
competition for hundreds more to fol-
low, and they are following in grand
style.

ahamians have excelled in

world-class terms in many oth-
er areas as well; including academia. A
few: years ago 4 Bahamian living and
working in the United States proposed
the idea of compiling a register of
Bahamians serving in top positions in
the US.

It was not so much to encourage them:

to come home but that the Bahamas
Government and local institutions could
access their specialised knowledge,

experience and goodwill from time to

time on a consultative basis.

It was recognising and developing the

rich human potential of a remarkably
gifted little nation that Kayla Edwards
was about.
' But there was yet another side to this
remarkable lady, a dimension shaped
by her deep spirituality. With all the
things she had to do in an all too short
lifetime, Kayla Lockhart Edwards was
also'a devoted wife and mother and a
loyal friend to many who were fortunate
enough to share her space.

www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













Share your news



THE TRIBUNE





In brief.

_ ‘Affordable --
services’ to ..
_ be provided ..
_ for disabled.

THE government will ensure.
that affordable services are pro-
vided for individuals with'sig- “~:
nificant disabilities, Minister of |;
Social Services Melanie Griffin ; ,-
said.

Addressing a one-day, forum.
for persons living with disabili-,..;.
ties hosted by the Disability. ;,
Affairs Division, Mrs Griffin:.::
said the government is making.
this pledge in an effort to ensure’
that disabled persons can: live >:
independently. y

Topping the list of these * %
important services, she said, is'’
attendant care —-as assistance.”
with daily tasks in the home can
help the. disabled avoid being '
placed in an institution. ;

Mrs Griffin said that other 2
areas the government.plans to .
focus on include wheelchair
repair, lift repair, and. the cre:
ation of accessible sidewalls’
and disabled-friendly ening
to buildings.

The minister stressed that
while there-can be no denying *-
the many improvements for dis- ’
abled persons in terms of infra- .,
structural planning, education. :
rehabilitation, vocational train- ,
ing, information, employment :-
and living conditions. —.more ,
will have to be done “for inde
pendent living to truly be‘suc-;
cessful”. .

<8 4

“t

Mandies |
after

collapsing —
at home :

ml By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport

Reporter :

FREEPORT - Grand! °
Bahama Police are awaiting the ;

- results of an autopsy on a 43-.

year-old man who collapsed and , -
died at his residence while tend-
ing to his yard on.the weekend: 5

According to reports, Trevor t:
Charlton Blatch, a resident of *
East Coral Estates Section 3)°*
was mowing his lawn around _
12.25pm on Saturday when ' he‘:
suddenly became ill.

He walked to his porch add
complained to a family mem--
ber that he was not feeling well,--
then suddenly collapsed. s" "3

Mr Blatch was transported to.
Rand Memorial Hospital,**
where he was pronounced dead ~,
shortly after his arrival.

Chief Superintendent Basile * $
Rahming said police do not sus- ~
pect foul play, but are awaiting
the results of:an autopsy toy.
determine the cause of death.: +:



















THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 3



ile dysfunction drug



Three men
stabbed
during fish
fry fight

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police are investigat-
ing an altercation at Pinder’s
Point early Saturday morning
that resulted in three men being
stabbed.

According to reports, the inci-
dent occurred around 2.20am,
when a fight broke out during a
fish fry at the home of 22-year-
old Robert Ramsey.

Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said officers of
the Central Detective Unit were
dispatched to the scene and
found, Ramsey, Jackson
Charles, 23, and

Michael Newbold, 22, suffer-
ing from stab wounds.

Mr Rahming said Ramsey
sustained multiple injuries
about the body and that Charles
was stabbed in the back and
Newbold on the arm.

The victims were taken to the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where Newbold and Charles
were treated and discharged.

However, Ramsey remained
in hospital as his injuries are
serious. Investigations continue.

Security
guard is
quizzed on
missing cash

A SECURITY guard is being
questioned in connection with
the alleged theft of a deposit
envelope containing cash
belonging to Texaco Service
Station at Eight Mile Rock.

Police reportedly received a
call at about 11.40pm from a
29-year-old male security guard
employed with Sharp Eye Secu-
rity Firm.

The guard reported that

while attempting to deposit .

funds from Texaco Service Sta-
tion at the night deposit vault at’
the Bank of the Bahamas in the
Harbour West Shopping Cen-
ter, he was held up.and robbed
of the deposit by two armed
men.

According to Superintendent
Basil Rahming, during a search
of the guard’s vehicle, an officer
found an envelope in the trunk
containing a large sum of cash.

He said police suspect that
the money belongs to the ser-
vice station.

The security guard was arrest-
ed and taken into custody.

Police
discover
concealed
pistol |
ACTING on a tip, two police

officers from the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit went to a track road

in Wisteria Subdivision around —

11.45pm on Friday, where they
discovered a Lorcin .380 semi-
automatic pistol concealed
underneath some debris.

The weapon is expected to
undergo ballistic examination
and testing at the Forensic Lab
in New Providence to deter-
mine whether it has been used
in any criminal matters that
have been reported to police.

Missing man
is searched
for in Grand
Bahama

FREEPORT - A Nassau man
who has been reportedly miss-
ing since May 22, is believed by
police to be in Grand Bahama.

Officers of the Central Detec-
tive Unit are seeking the pub-
lic’s help in their efforts to learn
the whereabouts of 38-year-old
Tyrone Glinton of Jubilee Gar-
dens.

Mr Glinton is described as
being of medium-brown com-
plexion with brown eyes.

He is about 5ft 10in tall and
of medium built. There is a
noticeable scar on his left cheek.

Anyone who has information
on his whereabouts is asked to
call police at 919, or CDU at
242-502-9991/502-9941 or 502-
9914.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157





Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor —

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!

www.prochemsystem.com * www.stonetechpro.com * www.iicrc.org
* psp@coralwave.com




‘could cause heart attacks’

mi By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

A FAKE erectile dysfunc-
tion drug being sold on the
streets of New Providence
could cause its users to suffer a
heart attack, a senior regula-
tory official has warned.

Dr Marvin Smith, deputy
director of the Bahamas
National Drug Agency
(BNDA), announced that the
government has decided, to
tighten the screening process
on all pharmaceutical drugs
that enter the country — after
learning of a trend of fake
erectile dysfunction drug sales
in New Providence.

“We are trying to keep a
close eye on what is coming
in, and the government is
actively looking at ways (to)
incorporate more stringent lev-
els of control in terms of prod-
uct importation into the
Bahamas,” Dr Smith said.

Dr Smith explained that
heart attacks are a known side-
effect of counterfeit drugs for
male impotence.

“We are working with the
Ministry of Health, police, cus-
toms and various other inter-
national agencies to heighten
awareness of this and other

related matters through the:

‘pharmacy association, the
wholesale companies and drug
distribution companies to edu-

New limits are proposed
on sports fishing catches

\

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

FISHERIES Minister

Leslie Miller presented pro-
posals to change the current
catch limits for sportfisher-
men in a bid to cut pressure
on Bahamian fish resources.

Mr Miller, in his contribu-.

tion to the Budget debate yes-
terday, pointed out that fish-
eries regulations on sports
fishing have remained essen-
tially unchanged since 1986.

However, he said, the num-
ber of visitors has grown
tremendously and the pres-
sure on the resources by
sports fishermen is sometimes
seen as direct competition by
some Bahamians.

“Fishing by visitors is to be
for sporting purposes, not as
an opportunity to finance a

vacation, sell for profit or fill

the freezers at home. All over
the Bahamas, citizens com-
plain that the current sports
fishing bag limits are too gen-
erous,” said Mr Miller.

The Ministry of Agricul-
ture, Fisheries and Marine
Resource is proposing that all
catch limits be changed from

cate pharmacists and doctors
on why it is important to know
where products are coming
from.”

Counterfeit drugs. are false
products designed to appear
as genuine, that may not have
the active ingredients in cor-

rect proportions.

They are illegal by both

- international and domestic law

and the manufacturers are not
registered and are often con-

nected with illegal organisa-

tions.

_ Dr Smith explained that
while the Bahamas is one
among many countries that do
not have product registration,
it is a major target because the
economy is robust and
Bahamians will spend money
on drugs.

“The other thing is that we
are relatively small, so there is
not a lot of ground to cover
and the Bahamas is becoming
more economically indepen-
dent and people are going on
the Internet to find more stuff
so they make us a target also.”

Studies released earlier this
year by Judith Oulton, chief
executive officer of the Inter-
national Council of Nurses —
an organisation that represents
13 million nurses worldwide —
reveal that 25 per cent of the
medication used in developing
countries is either counterfeit
or substandard.



@ LESLIE Miller

“per person per day” to “per
vessel per day.”

This means that the catch
limit would be allotted to a
particular vessel and not one
particular individual.

Mr Miller proposed that the

'. following changes.be made to

the existing regulations:

¢ Crawfish from six per per-
son per day to six per vessel
per day.

e Conch from six per per-
son per day to three per vessel
per day.’

e Snapper, groupers, grunts

nA OR aU Sala:



TOP brass executives of: ‘Tropical Shipping Company Limit-
ed paid a courtesy call on Sir Albert Miller, CEO of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority. The company said in a statement that
it has every confidence in the economy of Grand Bahama and

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Most THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB 1S FREE!
NASSAU’S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.

Restoration Specialist.

at a fraction of replacement cost.

Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone

Restoration & Care+

Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &

Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new

Carpet, Sofa’s, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,

Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

the new leadership of the Port Authority.

(Photo: Vandyke Hepburn)



















- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)








' be true, it usually is because



These drugs are a tremen- [|
dous and growing threat to
patients, the studies say.

In fact, during the most
recent Drug Counterfeiting
Conference held in Trinidad, it
was reported that 3,000 peo-
ple died in Nigeria, Africa,
from a fake meningitis vaccine.

Deaths due to fake cough
medicine have also been
reported. In Nigeria,
Bangladesh and Haiti.

Dr Smith explained that it
is important to use common
‘sense when purchasing medi-
cine over the Internet.

“If the price is too good to

= By MARK HUMES

A TRAFFIC accident
which claimed the life on an
18-year-old occured with such
force that the teenager was
flung from his car, police
believe

The death this weekend of
St John’s student Alonzo
Peter Francis Jr brings traffic’
fatalities to 21 for the year.

According to Inspector
Walter Evans, around 2am

, on Sunday, the Jeep Chero-
kee driven by Mr Francis was
travelling west on Prince
Charles Drive when it collid-
ed with a white Chrysler trav-
elling in the opposite direc-
tion.

Upon impact, it is believed
that Mr Francis was ejected
from his vehicle. He was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

The driver of the Chrysler



you get what you pay for; be
mindful of the manufacturer’s
sale policy ... and remember
ignorance is not a legal
defence.”

The World Health Organi-
sation estimates that up to
eight per cent of drugs on the
world market are counterfeit —
40 per cent in underdeveloped
countries such as Mexico,
Argentina and Columbia’and
up to 70 per cent in West
Africa. ;

Calling the fight against
counterfeit drugs the “new
drug war,” Dr Simith said that and three other passengers

many such operations are con- received injuries, but were all
trolled by organised crime or =

terrorist groups that target
countries with little or no reg-
ulation.





and other demersal fish from
20 pounds per person per day to
20 pounds per vessel per day.

e Mahi mahi, kingfish and
wahoo from six per person per
day to six per yessel per day.

He added that they are also
going to require that all fish
retained must have their head
and tail intact until landed
ashore. This is to facilitate iden-
tification and eliminate the pro-
duction of fillets while the vessel
isatsea. -

Mr Miller also said that his
ministry would investigate “the
feasibility of enhancing wild
populations or the captive cul-
ture of land crabs.”

The initial study will focus on
the white land crabs.

He added that the increasing
rate of harvesting and develop-
ment in the Family Islands are
placing pressure on the land
crab resources.

“With development, increas-
ingly many are accidentally
killed by vehicular traffic, and
displaced by real estate devel-
opment. A proper scientific
study of this economically
important resource will offer
real options to preserving this
resource,” said Mr Miller.



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
¢ Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121

Teenager ‘was
flung from car’

taken to hospital in a con-
scious state.

One neighbour of the
Francis family, Juanita Nairn-
Grant, expressed surprise and

sadness on hearing of Mr '

Francis’s death.
“He was close to my boy,

and he would call me ‘mom’. ’
He would love to tease me, in ||

a respectful manner, because :

that was just the way he was.”

Mr Francis’s death follows *

a series of motor accidents in

New Providence and the :

Family Islands.

Last Thursday, another '

teenager,
became the fourth person, ‘to

die in a car accident in less ee

than four days.
His death closely followed

those of David Burrows and | _,
sisters Brigetta and Santura

Adderley of Long Island:

The crash that caused Mr -

Francis’s death is being ir inves: | ie

tigated.

| OPEN
| 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE

Flashing flag pins, -

$2.99yd
| $3.99yd

© 4x 6 stick flag) $ 1.00
¢ Line of flags $24.00
° Car flags $ 4.99

e 2ft. x 3ft
Sale Priced @ $ 5.00

<¢ We also have USA flags, Bunting, Bows, Ribbon & Decorations.
Beem Ge and Inspiration

my Ce elite

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 » Fax:[242] 322-5251 * www.homefabricsltd.com

Flag Appliques,
Lapel Pins,
TriColour Shakers

and Florasatin











Theo Davis, |’ —



PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday
|

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ;
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Difference between Cuba and U:S.

“NO ONE pretends that democracy is
perfect or all-wise,” Sir Winston Churchill
told the House of Commons in November

. 1947. “Indeed, it has been said that democ-
racy is the worst form of Government'except
for all those other forms that have been
tried from time to time.”

And just as democracy is not the perfect
form of government, other than acknowl-
edging that it is an imperfect improvement
over the many other.forms of government
that have been tried and failed. we do not
hold out that America is a perfect country —
far from it. There is much wrong with Amer-
ican society today — depraved materialism
being its major degradation. However, the
difference between America and the world’s
dictatorships is that the American people
are free to hold their government in check.
While dictators imprison their critics, Amer-
ican governments are very sensitive to pub-
lic opinion.

The Cuban ambassador to the Bahamas,
whose first letter is published on this page
today, wonders why we don’t condemn
America for such atrocities as Abu Ghraib,
the recent allegations of a massacve at
Haditha, the controversy over Guantdnamo,
the allegations of secret prisons in Eastern
Europe, and the like. Americans are their
own severest critics. When their servicemen
are accused of atrocities, they. are investi-

“gated and if found guilty punished. And if
the American. people don’t approve of their
government’s policies, whether those poli-
cies be domestic or foreign, they have the
opportunity to dismiss their commander-in-
chief every four years. No, America is not a
perfect country, but it is a healthy country.
Daily democracy’s grand debate between
its people and its government is in progress.

Not so: Cuba. For example, the debate
now going on ‘between ourselves and
Ambassador Wilson could never take place
in Cuba. Mr Wilson could write his letters in
Grandma, but we would be rotting in some
dank Cuban cell for daring to even think
our independent thoughts.

There is no free speech in Cuba and no
free press— certainly an outspoken news-
paper like The Tribune that encourages free
speech and a healthy exchange of ideas
would not be able to catch its first breath in
Cuba.

According to its constitution Cubans have
free speech and a free press as long as both
“conform to the aims of a socialist society.”
And, of course, government decides what
those aims are, and imposes stiff penalties on




Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

For all of your hydraulic hose requirements

contact

Versatility ° Productivity ¢ Reliability

Crawford St., Oakes Field
Tel: 323-5171



Fax: 322-6969

independent journalists. For example, there
is a one year jail term for those spreading
anti-government propaganda. Translated
this means that one either agrees with the
government or goes to jail — any disagree-
ment is classified as propaganda. We are
sobered to think of how many jail terms we
would have had to have served.

There is also jail terms for any written
disrespect of officials. For example, anyone
criticising President Fidel Castro or mem-
bers of the Council of State could be sent to
the gulag for three years. And as for spread-
ing enemy propaganda — that probably
means American opinions — can win them-
selves a sentence Of up to 14 years. “Clan-
destine printing” is forbidden by the penal
code, and failure to identify the author or
press of a publication is punishable by three

_ to-six months in jail.

Recently, even the Internet — an infor-
mation tool, that is now essential in today’s
schools — is limited in Cuba to officially
licensed businesses and government offices.
In other words, Cuba boasts its education,
but that education is limited to what the
state believes is good for its citizens. There
are libraries, but those libraries are stacked
with books that the state believes its people
should read.
The ambassador. in one of his letters:to

_ this newspaper, says, that Cuba does not per-

mit a brain drain and so keeps its citizens at
home to repay the state for what it has

“invested in them.
Here in the Bahamas, particularly in the -

medical field, our scholarship students are
required to work for a limited period of
time at the Princess Margaret Hospital to
repay their scholarship. However, this is'a
short period, not a lifetime.

We have a philosophical difference with
the Cuban government. We believe that goy-

_ ernments were created for the good of the

people, not the reverse. And it is. because
the Cuban people exist for the good of their
government that that country’s first woman
neurosurgeon has been told that she can-
not leave Cuba because the Cuban govern-
ment has the right to “preserve her brain.”

It is true — Cuba has specialised in edu-
cation, it has thousands of doctors to dis-
tribute throughout the world, but the spirit
of the Cuban people can only soar as high as
its government will permit. That, obviously,
is why so many of them are risking their
lives on the high sees and ending up in the
squalor of the Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.





QUALIT

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway » 352-6122

as

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



Cuba and th



cLaRmsL ea ARR T



THE TRIBUNE



UN Human

Rights

(This is the first of two letters
that Cuban Ambassador to the
Bahamas Félix Wilson Hernandez
has written to The Tribune for pub-
lication. The second letter will be
published in The Tribune tomor-
row).

EDITOR, The Tribune.

During.the days prior to and
after the voting on the member-
ship to the UN Human Rights
Council, on May 9, 2006, I have
been reading comments made by
some persons in the news media,
including foreigners, questioning
Cuba’s record on Human Rights
and giving the Bahamian public
their views on what is good or bad
about Cuba in this important area
of Human Development. Also,
there have been comments on oth-
er areas related to Cuba.

I should begin by saying that on
May 9, 2006, a total of 135 countries
out of 191 voted for Cuba to be a
member of the UN Human Rights
Council. Who is going to argue that
more than 2/3 of the UN member-

ship are fools? Who can say that all-

these countries were wrong by
choosing Cuba for such an impor-

tant body? Isn’t that a recognition.

of the kind of Human Rights that
Cuba stands for?

When I was interviewed after
the vote at the UN by a local daily
and asked if that was considered a
victory, I said that the election to
the UN Council could only be
regarded ’as.a victory against those
like the US Government and its
allies, including of course, a few of
them in The Bahamas, who are
engaged in a futile exercise. always
trying to attack Cuba and portray a
bad image about the country | ,ep-
resent. Cuba wasn’t alraid of pre-
senting its candidacy to the UN
body, because we ‘knew that the
international community is not
blind

Critics of Cuba must ask them-
selves why is it that after exerting
all kinds of pressures on countries
and being overwhelmingly defeat-
ed in their effort to impose their
will on the way to set up the new

Human Rights Council, the US ©

Government, along with three of its
allies voted against its Constitu-
tion.

Also, those persons must ask
themselves why the US did not pre-
sent its candidacy for the new UN
body. Be sure that Guantanamo,
the Eastern Europe Secret Prisons,
Abu Ghraib, the killing of inno-
cent civilians in Iraq, etc, made
them doubt about their clection on
a secret ballot exercise. They knew
they would be held accountable for
many things that are going on
wrong now in the world. On the

contrary, Cuba had nothing to tear. -

With its membership on the
Human Rights Council, Cuba
hopes to contribute in a decisive
manner to the consolidation of an
approach to cooperation and
understanding in the United

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘00 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
‘05 SUZUKI IGNIS (like new)
‘89 TOYOTA BUS
‘96 TOYOTA COROLLA

Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!

auto <=, =
sales (2





jamb

letters@tribunemedia.net



Nations Human Rights machinery.
Its experience will be applied to
avoid the harmful experiences of
confrontation and unjust condem-
nation to the south to be passed
on to the new body, from spurious
motivations that are completely
alien to the legitimate cause of the
defense of all human rights.

Our country has a dignified and
vast record in terms of international
cooperation in the field of human
rights. Cuba is.a state party to 15 of
the main international instruments
in this field and has already signed
two more. We have been visited
by several thematic rapporteurs
under the Commission and ranked
among the first to receive in our
territory the United Nations High
Commissioner for Human Rights,
barely a year after this mandate
had been established. Cuba sys-
tematically responds to all the
requests of information forward-
ed through the thematic proce-
dures:

For those who oppose Cuba’s
membership at the Council, I can
say that my country participated

in an active and constructive man- -

ner in the negotiation of the modal-
ities that.brought about the estab-
lishment of the previous Human
Rights Commission, presenting in
ihe different phases of the process
proposals and contributions aimed

at guaranteeing that the new body °

(Human Rights Council) eradicates
from its works the harmful prac-
tices of confrontation and political
manipulation which brought dis-
credit on the Commission on

Human Rights.
- Cuba also strived to facilitate

the attention to the fair historicai
demands by the peoples of the
south, including the Caribbean and

‘the large majorities of the entire

planet, on issues such as the effec-
tive realization of the right to devel-
opment, the struggle against racism,
racial discrimination, xenophobia
and other forms of related intoler-
ance; and to ensure full respect to
the principles of universality, indi-
visibility, objectivity.and non-selec-
tivity in strengthening the cooper-
ation and frank and genuine dia-
logue in human rights matters.

Cuba will work to uphold truth,
justice, genuine dialogue and the
much-needed international coop-
eration in favour of promoting and
protecting all human rights for. all
peoples and nations.

Some (honestly, no more than
six voices) brought to the attention
of the Bahamian public aspects
with regards to Cuba. They are a
few, but unfortunately, have the
control of certain news media orga-
nizations.

One of the latter last week tried

to mislead the Bahamian public by |

introducing a front page article
speaking of alleged complications
on 17 patients from a friendly coun-
try who went to Cuba for opera-
tions. But it did not mention that a
total of 2,196 patients of that coun-
try have already been operated on
in Havana. J have recently seen in
The Bahamas that an outstanding
person went toa close country for
a minor operation and after it,
some complications came up and
the person died. Everybody knows

that in medicine such things are |

possible. But no critic has come
out to question what happened in
that country.

\ Most recently, another local dai-
ly publistied its approximately 20th
long article in more or less_ three
months attacking Cuba (as usual)
on the situation which apparently
happened in the above-mentioned
friendly country:in the Caribbean
with medical operations taking
place in Cuba and pretending to
influence and therefore discourage
Bahamians to go for surgery to my
country. I wouldn't be honest if I
don’t say what I feel: there must
be someone in this daily who is
either heavily obsessed and there-
fore sick about Cuba, or directly
working on behalf of the only ene-
my Cuba has in the world. Or both.

This same daily prior to the
beginning of the eye operations in
The Bahamas had many articles
trying lo prevent the programme
from starting. It began in January
with tremendous success. No word
about it coming from this daily
despite of the fact that hundreds
of operations have taken place.

It is crystal clear that the daily is
only waiting for the first problem to
happen to again begin its attacks
against Cuba.

Journalism should be about the
truth, honesty, objectiveness, and
non partisanship. Otherwise, some
may think they are journalists. But
they aren’t. And people, who are

ounci



raviG

not illiterate, at the ‘end of the road
will make their own. judgments.
Nobody can believe that everything
coming from a country, in this case
Cuba, is bad as certain media in
The Bahamas wants to:sell.. -;;

_ Lwould like to see long articles
written about what the aggressors
did or are doing in Abu Ghraib;

Guantanamo; the thousands of
innocent people killed in Iraq: the
embargo on Cuba; the Eastern
European illegal prisons; the ban-
ning of the musical group the “Dix-
ie Chicks” in the US for’ criticizing
President Bush; the way American
journalist Peter Arnett was called
“unpatriotic” for giving a point of
view different than that of the US
Government cueing the wat in
Iraq, etc.

It is only then when I sade riany
others who have approached’ me
will have the opinion that this dai-
ly is making a good journalism and
not based on biased points of views.

I think it is very important, for
Bahamians to know more about
my country, but not influenced by
critics who appear to be driven by
the US propaganda and by sheer
emotions.

I should be honest in saying | that
there have also been a number of
persons who wrote in rebuttal to
these critics of recent issues related
to Cuba, namely Mr. Allen of “The
Tribune”, Mr. Watkins of “The
Guardian”, Ms. Kelly of “The
Punch” and Dr. Alcena, of “The
Bahama Journal”, whose articles
were not ideoiogical ‘or emotion-
al, but honest, factual, realistic

My country is not perfect and in
fact, no country is, simply because
all of them are run by human
beings. There is only one country in
the whole world whose Govern-
ment deems appropriate to criti-
cise and impose on others their will,
claiming to have the best society
and to be an example to be;fol-
lowed by the-rest of the world. That
is the US Government. The one,
which contrary to the Internation-
al Community, including Human
Rights Organizations, has. kept a
Concentration Camp in Cuanta-
namo.

The same US Géverainént
which under the excuse of seeking
weapons of mass. destruction has
killed thousands of innocent peo- -
ple, among them m:ay children in
Iraq the'most receni belts the 25
civilians killed in cola ohaod i in
Haditha, last November. ‘i ' Same
country known for the atroc:. ‘si in
Abu Ghraib.

It is precisely the US Govern-
ment which had secret prisons in
Eastern Europe for torturing per
sons they qualified as enemies;-the
one that discriminated against poor
people, including blacks during the
Katrina disaster; the samevone
, which ordered eavesdropping on
Americans without court, AO:
tization.

The main crusader against Cuba
and its Human Rights Record is
the Government that imposed an
economic and. commercial block-
ade ona small country } ‘whose ‘only

“crime” is trying to build a différent
society based on values, including
Human rights values different from
theirs. Isn’t the embargo.an exam-
ple of gross violation of Human
Rights?

On May, 2004, President
George W. Bush approved areport
submitted by the so-called Com-
mittee for the Assistance.to.a ‘Free
Cuba and the fast-track imple-
mentation of the measures in. this
report to “hasten the transition
enforced by the US Government
against Cuba: a strategy to deprive
the Cuban people of their right to
self determination and to reimpose
a regime of neocolonial and racial

dominance”. \

I wish the critics of Cubascan
think of what would be their sgac-
tion if such a plan is approved toi
their country.

But they and the US Govern-
ment must be aware that transition
in Cuba began in 1959 with the tri-
umph of the Revolution leq by
Fidel Castro.



Félix Wilson Hernandez
Ambassador of Cuba,

The Bahamas

Embassy of the Republic of
Cuba,

Nassau, 4
June 9, 2006. ;

(A paragraph was deleted from
the Cuban ambassador’s letter. In
that paragraph the ambassador
alleged fraud at the polls in a
Florida precinct in favour of Pres-
ident Bush in the 2000 presidential
elections. He attributed this elec-
tion rigging to “a small number of
members” of Florida’s Cuban
community. He claimed that Pres-
ident Bush owes this group “many
favours.” — Ed).

e To be continued tomorrow.







marks
early start
for storms

H By REUBEN SHEARER

“}°LESS than two weeks into
“the 2006/07 hurricane season,
‘storm activity is off to an even
‘Carlier start than last year — as
«tropical storm Alberto looms
over the Bahamas.
In the aftermath of the high-
- ly active 2005 hurricane season
-- which recorded a record-
breaking 28 storms — some
members of the public have
expressed concern about what
the early start means for the
rest of the season.

However, chief meteorologist
Basil Dean assured The Tribune
that 2006/07 will not be as active
as the year before.

He explained that this year’s
predictions only call for 17
unnamed storms, or seven
above the 30-year mean of
about 10 named storms per
year.

Mr Dean also commented on
the warmth of the water,
explaining that it can improve
the likelihood of hurricanes
forming.

He said the current water
temperature is at least 28
degrees Celsius, which is an ide-
al temperature for cyclone for-
mation. as
- But according to Mr Dean
Alberto should not cause too
much worry, as it is not unusual
for tropical storms to form in
June. —

“We even had occasions
when tropical storms form
before the season starts, but

. those instances are very rare,”
_ he added.
./0 He admitted however that
iJune is unusually not a (very
: cactive) month, and that it is “the
first time in a little while,” that
‘a tropical storm has formed so
» Learly.

- Public officers’ union and
NIB sign five-year agreement

â„¢@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SIX months of negotiations
concluded yesterday with a
new five-year industrial agree-
ment between the manage-

: ment of the National Insurance
:* Board (NIB) and the Union of
: Public Officers (UPO).

The agreement ‘significantly’
improves employee benefits,
according to NIB. chairman
Philip Davis, MP.

The agreement covers the
period from June 1, 2004, to
May 31, 2009, and affects more
than 75 per cent of the 434
employees at the NIB.

Paternity leave has increased
from one week at full pay to two
weeks, payable once every three
years to married male staff.

The agreement also includes






H NIB chairman Philip Davis, MP speaks to the press yesterday
after signing an industrial agreement
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

increases in daily allowances _ for employees traveling on offi-



Jeweller is to sponsor
Miss Bahamas pageant

@ By Tribune Staff Writer

THE. custom-made Miss
Bahamas Diamonds Interna-
tional Crown, a “spectacular
work of art” crafted by
Venezuelan jeweller George
Wittels, will be on display at
Diamonds International start-
ing this month.

Diamonds International
(DI) is now the pageant’s
“platinum partner” and the
official jeweller of the 2006
Miss Bahamas World Pageant,
which will take place on July 8
at the Rainforest Theatre.

The beauty of the “Elite
Eleven” who will be compet-
ing for the title of Miss

.. x
. Ss

cial business. Additionally,
monthly gas allowances have
increased by 100 per cent, to
$500 a month.

For the first time the agree-
ment will includes a cost.of liv-
ing payment to employees. If
the retail price index for New
Providence - a figure compiled
by the Department of Statis-
tics based on the price of sev-
eral goods which indicate the
rate of inflation — goes up by
more than five per cent
between the anniversary dates
of the agreement, the payment
will go up by one per cent for
every percentage point past
five, to a maximum payment
of five per cent of the employ-
ee’s annual basic salary.

Mr Davis said that negotia-
tions were conducted without

the usual “antagonism and con-
frontations which too often
attend union/management
talks.”

Both parties reported mutu-
al satisfaction with the outcome
of the agreement.

“In any industrial agreement
it is a known fact that neither
side ever gets ever what they
want,, but we have reached an
agreement that both sides can
be happy with — it’s a win/win
situation for everyone,”
Stephen Fountain, first vice-
president of UPO said.

President of UPO Donald
‘Mckenzie added, “The nego-
tiations went very well I hope
to be an example to all the
unions that are still putting
their contracts on to the table.
It could be done,” he contin-

~~ NOTICE

21st Centur

}

Welding Co.

Sale/Save Big |

20% off storm panels, 5/8” + 1/2” rebars
Ideal for, “The Do Yourself’.
Ph# 3254624 / 3252830.



ou Say, [Say”
The Dundas Centre

June 14th - 17th at 8:30pm - Tickets $20.00








SANDRA Ford, Diamonds International marketing
representative, Anthony Smith, Diamonds
International senior marketing representative, (sitting) Michelle
Malcolm, president of Miss Bahamas
Organization and Dorien Alexander, store manager — Dia-

'82\ Alberto is set to pass just
'. “north of the Bahamas, and will
* “bring cloudiness and some scat-
; tered showers in the next few








Bahamas World as well as two
other titles, will be comple-
mented during the pageant by
fine jewellery courtesy of DI.

Benefit Performance
Cancer Society of The Bahamas
Tuesday, June 13th ° Tickets $25.00






- "days. :
nels The woman who'is crowned i Box Office: The Dundas Centre
“Dost official és Doha oddone lee cemmatonal 393-3728 ot 394-7179 from 9:30am - 5:00pm Dai

ell G $15,000 worth jewellry from be created in the downtown
.discuss a coneeny rss Nassau branches of the com-
Be oni Gad, island manager _ pany, as well as DI Watch and
é improvi ng for DI, said this partnership Design and Tanzanite Inter-
“serv illustrates the confidence that national, featuring glamour
, se ice ee Sopa has in the Miss shots of all the contestants.
at Bahamas Organisation. | The winner will be the local
3 ‘a ST VINCENT : “This partnership exempli- _ spokesmodel for DI Bahamas
Kingstown i. fies Diamonds International's _ and will have the opportunity



commitment and support of
yet another prestigious social
: event and provides our local
:- market with information on
the products, services and
opportunities offered to the
‘Bahamian people,” she said.
One of,the Miss Bahamas
Organisation's adopted chari-
ties, the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas, is also supported by
DI. . .
Anthony Smith, senior mar- *
keting representative for DI,
announced that galleries will

to appear in future print and
media campaigns.

Michelle Malcolm, head.of
the Miss Bahamas Organisa-
tion, said that with the sup-
port of DI, “we are anticipat-
ing putting on a spectacular
event that will restore
pageantry in the Bahamas to
its rightful place and give the
Bahamian audience a night to
remember”. :

The total commitment of DI
to the Miss Bahamas Organi-
sation is $25,000.

se IMPROVING postal service
,- in the Caribbean as the region
__ prepares to implement a single
=; market and economy will top
discussions at a five-day meet-
ing of mail officials and suppli-
~ ers in this island chain, an offi-
«cial said Sunday, according to
- 4:Associated Press. ie
ico, Postal services in the region
4 need to synchronize their oper-
tations to meet the challenges of
~ the single market, said John
“Power, ‘a Caribbean Postal
_ Union official.
“4. Mail officials also need to
- “consider running their depart-
“. ments more like commercial
“"pusinesses with “the power to
_* make decisions on an economic
basis,” he said.





MULTI-DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

The First Stop on your Shopping List!

BEAT THE HEAT

Air Conditioners

t
Â¥







ri

asec
ei
‘PHONE: 322-2157

TRE:
TUESDAY
JUNE 13

2:00am Community Page/1540 AM
7 11:00 Immediate Response ~
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 _ Island Life Destinations
1:30 ° Inside Hollywood
2:00' ° The Fun Farm
3:00 +-Durone Hepburn
3:30 Ernest Leonard
4:00 Dennis The Menace



Buy Early
PUMA
Summer Rush



6000 BTU Remote ........0.00.000.$234.00

; : 8000 BIU Veccccsssereee sesssssseeeeeeD205.00
4:30 Carmen San Diego ,
458 _ZNS News Update 8000 BTU Remote
‘5:00 — Cricket World High Energy Efficient Model ..$350.00
5:30 — Gillette World Cup 2006 10000 BTU Remote .......... ssveese $377.00
6:00 Bahamian Things 12000 BTU Remote.......... eeccseees $389.00
6:30 News Night 13 12000 BTU Remote

Bahamas Tonight High Energy Efficient Model ..$409.00
Ethnic Health America 14000 BTU Remote ................

Island Lifestyles
Da’ Down Home Show
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540 AM




24000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..$755.00

ij MULTI DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

: APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE’
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS



et ee ee hk ee Ra ee a

2006 EXPLORER - $34,995.00
FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD :

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



Montrose Avenue
(Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.)
Phone:
322-2536 © 325-2040 © 323-7758 © 328-7494

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!



a ee




PART OF YOUR LIFE





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

THE TRIBUNE”



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

STAFF VACANCIES

The College of.the Bahamas invites applications for the following posts:

Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION

SUMMARY: ‘

Serves as a primary fundraiser for The College of The Bahamas. Designs, implements,
evaluates, and refines the Unit's development activities with an emphasis on major gifts as
defined by COB policy, Council and the President in conjunction with Vice President Institutional
Advancement. Personally identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards donors and prospects
in accordance with performance targets set by the Office of Institutional Advancement under
the direction of the Council and President. Collaborates with the President, Vice President
Institutional Advancement and Vice President Finance & Administration and colleagues in
the COB Office of Institutional Advancement to maximize total gift revenue through gift
planning, corporate and foundation relations, and annual fund strategies.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. Identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards major donors and prospects including
individuals, corporations, and foundations, through visits and other forms of direct
personal contact in accordance with performance targets set and defined by the
relevant authorities.

2. Enlists senior management in furthering the Development Unit's development
programime; assists in educating faculty and staff in respect of the roles they can
play in fundraising and development generally.

3. Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them with leadership and direction
in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and prospects;
coordinates volunteers’ activities to ensure their integration into the Unit's programmes.

4. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with the Boards of COB
Foundations and College development colleagues to maximize the Unit's total gift
revenue.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

© Knowledge of major funding and donor sources.

e Respected membership in networks of people and entities of high net worth
and ability to move with ease and influence in such circles.

e Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

e Community relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community.

e Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to.work extended hours

_ as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the.general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS: *
® Prior experience at the CEO/CFO level with a major company/corporation is preferred
¢ Master degree preferred , bachelor’s degree acceptable with relevant experience
e Prior development experience would be highly valued
e Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
e Basic computer skills expected

Assistant Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development : eee

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION

SUMMARY: The Assistant Development Officer has primary responsibility for supporting the
work of the Development Officer and team through the management of the day-to-day
operations of the Development Unit, its databases and records.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. Creates for the institution and makes effective use of a prospect management database
and other institutional resources to ensure appropriate management of donors, prospects,
alumni, and volunteers in coordination with College/University objectives.

2. Conducts research to identify prospects and creates strategies to match prospects’
interests to the priorities of the unit and the College/University.

3. Researches, writes, edits, or oversees, in conjunction with the writing/editorial staff of
Institutional Advancement, the preparation of persuasive, accurate, and grammatically
and syntactically correct solicitations, proposals, case statements, reports,
correspondence, and other development-related communication materials in support
of the Unit's fund-raising activities. :

4. Assists in short- and long-range strategic planning activities to create and implement
fundraising goals and objectives.

5. Assists in planning and conducting programmes and activities designed to increase
the visibility of the Unit and the College/University to internal and external constituencies.

6. Develops and manages budgets for fundraising activities under the supervision of the
Vice President Institutional Advancement and in conjunction with other relevant senior
managers. s :

7. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

e Ability to conduct research, gather data, analyze information, and prepare effective,
accurate, and timely reports and other documents to support development objectives.

e Demonstrated mastery of major business and prospect research databases and general
database software such as Microsoft Excel with concomitant database management
skills.

e Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

e Ability to write proposals, solicitations, correspondence, reports, and other materials
in support of development activities independently;

e Ability to exercise good judgment, to demonstrate an understanding of ethics related
to development activities, and to use discretion in interactions with donors, prospects,
volunteers, and others.

e Ability to work effectively within a team environment.

e Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in managing events and other
complex activities in support of development objectives.

e Willingness and. availability to travel and to work extended hours as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

e Bachelor’s degree

Prior development experience a must

Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
Excellent computer skills expected

Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision.

Compensation is commensurate with: qualifications and experience.

The application deadline is June 21, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates
should submit a College of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive resume and
a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should request
three referees to send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
below:

The College of the Bahamas
Human Resources Department
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive
: P O Box N 4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please visit our website at for more information about the College and to access the College’s
Employment Application Form.



’ Christie joined South Andros





Catchin’ the crab







@ ANDROSIANS rush to catch live crabs released into the crowd at the end of the official open-
ing ceremony Friday night to the strains of Eddie Minnis’ Church Out, Crab Crawlin’. The —
release of the crabs was greeted with delight by the Androsian crowd and the consternation of a
few visitors. Thousands of Bahamians joined Androsians at Fresh Creek for the annual event ,
which is said to have grown into the largest festival of its kind in The Bahamas.

(Photos: BIS)
@ PRIME Minister Perry



MP Whitney Bastian, Ron
Pinder, parliamentary secre-
tary for Energy and Environ-
ment, and area chief council-
lor Clyde Duncombe at the
9th annual Andros Crab Fest
at Fresh Creek at the week-
end. The Prime Minister is
pictured with the group during
the opening ceremony.

@ ORGANISERS of the 9th
annual Andros Crab Fest held
in Fresh Creek, Andros this
past weekend, singled out two
Androsians for special hon-
our. Joan Hanna, connected
to Andros since the early
1960s, was named patron of - |
- the event. Mis Hanna, the
wife of noted Bahamian enter-
tainer, businessman and
unionist Leroy ‘Duke’ Hanna -
and mother of environmental -
activist and college lecturer
Margo Blackwell first came to®
Andros in 1960 with her fami-
ly from Canada to establish _
the Small Hope Bay Lodge.
Mrs Hanna worked at the :
Lodge before joining the Min-
istry of Education as a teacher.
at Calabash Bay School in
Andros. She later taught at
Eastern Senior School. Mrs.
Hanna is pictured with Fresh |
Creek area chief councillor
Clyde Duncombe. «..

@ THE Crab Fest also hon-
oured popular Bahamian
musician Elon Moxey from
Andros. Mr Moxey is the
writer and musician of three
best selling CDs of Bahamian
music and was paid tribute by
broadcast personality Darrold
Miller during the opening cer-
emony. He was also awarded a
trophy by leading business-
man and Andros native Frank
Hanna. The trophy was pre-
sented by Prime Minister Per-.
ry Christie. From left are
Darrold Miller, Mr Christie,
Mr Moxey and Mr Hanna.



CLIFTON HERITAGE AUTHORITY
. LOGO COMPETITION






The Clifton Heritage Authority announces a competition to create an official logo for the
Authority.

The competition is open to artists 18 years and older.













¢ A maximum of two entries may be submitted in full color. Images should be at
least 8.5x11 and no larger than 11x17.

° The logo should depict the historical and environmental significance of the
proposed Clifton Heritage Park, located at Clifton.

e Each entry should be accompanied by a short paragraph describing the entry.
¢ Entries must received by 4:00 p.m., June 22™, 2006.
Winners will be awarded prizes as follows:

© 1" place- $1,500




e 2"! nlace- $1,000

© 3 place- $750



Entry forms may be collected from the Authority’s office located at the Collins House
Complex, Shirley Street and Collins Avenue with the entrance on Collins Avenue.

The contest judges reserve the right to award no prizes at all.








TEL: (242) 325-1505
FAX: (242) 326-2568
P.O.BOX EE-15082
NASSAU, BAHAMAS



THE TRIBUNE

=







:
:

sesssgonoonnsnsoe:





PAE HUEDAUS RR EA RS OOOR

coaectancceaie nie usantaenteet







+ Revé BAIN: Bahamian. Student of
LCIS for three years. IB Certificate
candidate (English AL(HL), Spanish
B, History, Biology, Math Studies and
Visual Arts). Revé has applied to
University of Waterloo, Ontario,
Canada to study Accounting and
Financial Management. She wishes to
pursue a carcer in this area and her
ambition is to obtain a qualification
in. Chartered) Public Accountancy.

Has previously acted as master of



ceremonies af public events (such as
concerts) put on by the school.







AAO EASA ROCA NNO IEA 5 PROPOSES ESOS SEE



Lyfo



B Diplonra |

candidate (HL in English Al, History and




: Biology, SL in Spanish B, Maih Studies and

Visual Arts), Alena has obtained a piace at

* Collison INGRAHAM: Bahamian














Student of LCES for five years. IB
Certificate candidate (English Al,
Biology, History). C.C, as he is known,
has applied to the Fort Lauderdale Art
Institute in Florida to study photogra-
phy with the aim of a possible career in

photojownalisor. | Some of his

photographic artwork has woo prizes tn



the Bahamas.





ony mamas s on Sets ovate Ra A DRAM ARORA? pe ABBA eA DABOUSIOLIERLOEDSAAGAAIAESADERALOAASEIEOLALLESESEIONSELMIOLLEEE CCIE EY SDEIDEEE OLE SERED SEABED LEAS EREEASE ASSIS LEONEL LDA ALOE GEENA AE

International Schoo

CONGRATULATIONS
TO OUR FIRST

DUATION CLASS

The only school in the Caribbean offering all the |

programs of the International Baccalaureate Organization

Eduarde has

Nursery
















ne

AL

Seg



‘TUESDAY, JUINE 15, ZULU, I



LABORA RAN ROUEN BEES





erttenaes MgO ya patente TPR IARI RARER REA C8 PARED ADP SAL MEA




oasienoonrareannannannece!















and “Dutch heritage.

been at LCIS since






he is the first student to



of education. at.









Tiago SILVA: Portuguese and US

nationality, Student of LCIS for three.



“years. IB Certificate candidate






English Ads History; Spanish B




)). Tiagosbas applied to Florida

cAtlantic University to. study Interuau-




tional Business with the eventual sin

of pursuing # career in this field.
























citizen,



¢ Samantha HILL: US
Student of LCIS for three years.
1B Certificate candidate (English
AICHL), Spanish B,
Biology, Math Studies and Visual





History




Arts). Samantha has obtained a






place at the University of Chicago

to study Marketing and Finance







avd woule tke to work ino the







entertainment business, especially
the world of fashion. She has done

some modeling.







SAO GVA AA MOM



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006





THE TRIBUNE



Tributes at death of EXXSEteii
Livingston Coakley

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter —

THE condolences of “a grate-
ful nation” were extended to
the family of Livingston Coak-
ley on behalf of the government
and people of the Bahamas.

Mr Coakley passed away on
Sunday night at the age of 80
following a massive stroke.

Both Prime Minister Perry
Christie and opposition leader
Hubert Ingraham yesterday
paid homage to a man who they
say will be remembered as one
of the great nation-builders of
the modern Bahamas.

Mr Christie said that he react-
ed to the news of Mr Coakley’s
with death “profound sadness”
because the Bahamas has lost
a founding father.

“T extend the condolences of
a grateful nation to Mr Coak-
ley’s family on behalf of the
government and people of the
Bahamas,” the prime minister
said.

He said that Mr Coakley will
be remembered particularly for
his contribution to the educa-
tional development of a young
nation...

“He began as a teacher at the
blackboard in Bahamian edu-
cation and rose to become one
of the most memorable minis-
ters of Education.

“His passion for education
and his appreciation of the
unique importance of the teach-
ing profession in our national
development earned him the
respect of teachers and school
administrators throughout our
country,” Mr Christie said.

During his time in govern-
ment, Mr Coakley served his
country as a minister of Works,
Tourism, Health, Labour,
Youth, Sports and Community
Affairs.

“It was a mark of the kind of
man that ‘Sir Coaks’ was that
during one of the most tempes-
tuous periods of our modern
political history, he maintained
his standing as the most beloved
politician in the halls of parlia-
ment.

“He was held in warm and

@ LIVINGSTON Coakley

affectionate regard even by his
political opponents, who recog-
nised that he was an individual
completely without guile or
malice towards anyone,” Mr
Christie said.

Former prime minister and
opposition leader Hubert Ingra-
ham said that Mr Coakley was
dedicated to public service.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that during World War II, Mr
Coakley volunteered for mili-
tary service in the Bahamas
Battalion, where he rose to the
rank of sergeant

“Mr Coakley was in the van-
guard of those who achieved
the significant political and
social advances of the Sixties.
He was elected to represent

OCAL NEWS



constituency for nearly two.

decades.

“Mr. Coakley — or Sir Coak,
as he was affectionately known
to his many friends — will be
fondly remembered for the
unfailing cheerfulness which
became his hallmark through-
out life,” Mr Ingraham said.

He said Mr Coakley was at.

the center of many intense polit-
ical conflicts in the Bahamas
and held passionate views, but
never gave in to the temptation
to be unkind or abusive to his
opponents.

“It was simply not in his
nature. This endeared him to
the many friends that he culti-
vated in all walks of life and of
all political stripes,” the former
prime minister said.

Exuma in 1968 and served that













Thursday June 22â„¢
12 noon to,6:30 pm

Fowler Street*
P.O. Box N-4199
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 393-2504

Appointments during our normal operating hours, Mondays-Fridays 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Limited appointment requests available outside of operating hours,

*(Turn right at corner of Esso On the Run East Bay we are located on the left hand side across
from Nassau Stadium, next to jet ski rental)

Mike's Stainless Steel Manufacturing co

ur Product Surpasses Standards. Qur service exceeds expectations,

GRAND OPENING INVITATIONAL













































@ ACTING chief justice Anita Allen swears in Paul Adderley, the deputy to the governor
general, to act in Governor General Arthur Hanna’s absence while he is travelling to England
on an official visit. Mr Hanna, on his trip from June 11 to 25, will be accompanied by his wife
and aide-de-camp.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Artists present an annual
evening of sacred music

ARTISTS Guild Internation-
al (AGI) is presenting its fifth
annual Evening of Sacred Music
at Christ Church Cathedral,
George Street, on Thursday,

“June 15 at 8pm.

This concert will feature
some well-known Bahamian tal-
ent, including Nikita Thomp-
son-Wells - soprano; Alan But-
ler, baritone; Candace Bost-
wick, soprano; Jeffrey Sturrup,
organist and Bel Canto Singers,
directed by Eldridge McPhee.

The artists will present sev-
eral genres of sacred music; Bel
Canto will present masterpieces,
including works by Anton Dvo-
rak’s Stabat Mater — featuring
tenor soloist Dana Knowles, a
rousing yet relatively unknown
arrangement of the famous
“Lift Every Voice and Sing”,
two spirituals arranged by the
world renowned Moses Hogan
and two contemporary gospel
pieces, written for and per-
formed by the Brooklyn Taber-
nacle Choir.

Jeffrey Sturrup, affection-
ately referred to as “The
Bahamian Mozart”, is a prolific
organist and will present three
pieces.

Nikita Thompson-Wells,
Candace Bostwick and Eldridge
McPhee have graced many
stages in the Bahamas, not the
least of which was their perfor-
mance in AGI’s concert pre-
sentation of the Phantom of the

Opera.



Special _

Gifts

all with love from Kellg’s
ease

ye
ho ats

off - DIVING &
SS CAMPING
017m)

- TOOL SETS

TO eG (selected)

» LUGGAGE
June 12th - 17th, 2006

- BRIEFCASES
Kelly’

Tel; (242) 393-4002

Fax: (242) 393-4096

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
RToI We fo 9:00am-9:00pm
closed

Houses
aloyaale

AIT Xe (op
www. kellysbahamas.com



TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 9







~ THE TRIBUNE





=! TUESDAY EVENING aes

One Piece - One Price

yk WN ana a na e - 7 |
New Florida \ Wrinkle Cure With Dr. Nicholas Perricone Dr. —_|(:45) UltraMetabolism: The Simple Plan for Auto-. ‘ 4
WPBT Nicholas Perricone explores non-surgical ways to defy nate Weight Loss, Presented by Mark Hyman, al

the aging process. 1 (CC)
The Insider (N) |NCIS “Ravenous” The team search- |The Unit ‘Security’ The team goes |Tuesday Night Book Club Seven
| WEFOR |n (CC) es for Marine who went missing in a under cover at the Russianem- — |women share secrets in Scottsdale,
national forest. (CC) bassy in Israel. ( (CC) Ariz. (N) (CC)

Last Comic Standing Last round of|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

“Fault” A serial pede kidnaps
two young children. (CC)

House ‘TB or Not TB" A renowned |News (CC) ,
piyste has symptoms of tubercu-
josis. (PA) ( C)

:31) NBA Nation|NBA Basketball Finals Game 3 -- Dallas Mavericks at Miami Heat. From
Live) © (CC) |the American Airlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (CC)




















PTT ANE

set



pac
























Access Holly- |Fear Factor “Reality Stars 1” Reali- m
wood (N) (CC) ty TV ait 6 15 more minutes of |the semi-finals, (N) 1 (CC)
fame.

Deco Drive House “Humpty Dumpty” Cuddy's
handyman als n (2 (CC)

@ ww







Jeopardy! (N) _|Heat Wave Spe-
(Cc) cial









CABLE CHANNELS
Biography “Andre the Giant’ A pra-












00) Cold Case King of Cars

te AMinneso-


















































































'
{
Dog the Bounty |Dog the Bounty |King of Cars i
A&E fle of pro wrestler Andre the Giant. |Hunter Team — Hunter ‘Ifthe Thanksgiving {Chop cuts his |
ta serial-killer. _{(co) must find father. |Shirt Fits...” sale. (CC) sales force. |
BBC News World Business |BBC News Destination Mu- BBC News -. Asia Today
oe (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sic — |(Latenight). |
of ‘ Movie Top Awards Show Moments (N) ; :
ne peel RW ed, B | cb Small space? |
'CBC Just for Laughs |Diet Confidential An inside take an diets and modern marketing. (N) |CBC News: The National (CC) Sah (
Gags (CC) (CC) Limited budget
CNBC inter the Rulon & Company (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch We've got the culation: |
73
(:00) The Sia [Paul Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) Our armoire’s and trundle |
CNN ae Room ea beds are the perfect
* OUTCOLD |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Mind of Mencia |South Park The |Dog Bites Man Chappelle's cin Sa B ‘esas
COM (2001) Jason {With Jon Stew- |port Robert F. {Robin Williams. jsex life of Stan's |Sexual harass- Show Black Gal- space-saver. buy a single piece |
London. (CC) fart T. Friedman. [Kennedy dr. (CC) dog. ment training. —_|lagher, DMX. ar fumineeand get he functionality |
Cons ‘Cops in {Cops ‘Too Hot: [Cops © (CC) |Cops Shootings [Cops “Extreme. |The World's Scariest Police at a, : 4 , 2an%
COURT Boston (6c) Special Edition” | aa in tee cities, |Cops’ M (CC) Stings © (CC) , of three or four pieces. Replace yOuE closet...) |
That's So Raven COW BELLES (2006, Comedy) Alyson Michalka, (is) Kim Possi- |American Drag- |American Drag- chest-of-drawers and shelf with a single
DISN ‘When in Dome” |Amanda Michalka. Two teenagers ty fo save theirfa- ble ‘Roachie” jon: Jake Long on: Jake Long armoire. Perfect for a child’s room, oar
|(CC) ther's business. ‘NR’ (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) dle bed rid se dechad
DIY This Old House |DIY to the Res- [DIY to the Res- [Bathroom Reno-|Bathroom Reno-|Restoration Re- |Trade School trundle beds provice two single bects, |
(CC) —_joue cue vations vations alities “Quarrying” a pull-out desk and drawers.
DW Euromaxx Death In hi (Ger- repeata : Politik direkt Dent In Euromaxx Visit our showroom today to see for yourself. :
E! The Daily 10 (N) |50 Most Shocking Celebrity Confessions Revealing celebrity confes- Sexiest “Bad Boys’ Bad boys. (N) 2
: sions,



NFL Live (CC) {2005 U.S. Poker Championships ]2005 U.S. Poker Championships |Baseball Tonight (Live)
ESPN iC (AN CC) .

Spirit of Yacht- [Rally World Championship Mid- [Triathlon ITU Mooloolaba World | Gol ESPN: Germany Today
: ESPNI ing (N) season Special iN) Cup. From Mooloolaba, Australia. |Fuera de Juego |

Daily Mass: Our |Mother Angelica Live Classic id of Hop




Religious Cata- |The Holy Rosary| Threshold of Hope



) EWTN

































“Full Recovery” {needy children. (CC)



City Gardener |Take It Outside [Designer Guys |How Not to Decorate ‘Letchworth’ |Debbie Travis’ Facelift “Sigal’s
Matt transforms a|Outdoor living/din-|Spa-inspired {Seven ean share a small home. |Den” Dated family room. 1 (CC)
style. M (CC) | (CC)

Christ in Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) | This Is Your Day
Prophecy day.” (CO);

|

Lady Episodes logue es
00) Cardio [Living Fresh [Blaine’s Low. |Reunion Story “A Dose of Reality" |neat Space for |neat © (CC)
FITTV baer avec) (cc) Carb Kitchen (CC) chidren. (CC)
Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) [Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) jn the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC {shepard smith Susteren (Liv) (CC)
-| FSNEL ( MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Florida Marlins, From Dolphins Stadium in Miami. — |Best Damn Sports Show Period i
‘ Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC) i
s (:00)-Live From the U.S. Open (Live) 2005 U.S. Open |inside the PGA |U.S. Open Golf
: | GOLF e Tour (N) [Highlights ,
E G SN: Lingo (CC) CG Wants to Be a Milonalte 1) |Weakest Link 1 (CC) Greed (CC) : | |
a (:00) Attack of [Star Trek: The Next Generation [Star Trek: The Next Generation |The Man Show |The Man Show -ertified Mem i
GATeCH fire show! (x) _|'Schisms’ A (CC) "True OP A (CC) Underwear. _|'Spors" (CC) Bere are |
-00) Walker, _|Walker, Texas Ranger Thieves beal|OUR HOUSE (2006, Drama) Doris Roberts, Judy Re es. A wealthy wid- | |
HALL exas Ranger |up a pastor and steal toys meant for|ow helps a homeless woman who saved her life (cc) |





concrete yard. ing room. (N)
INSP [Morris Cerullo Fresicough









The Gospel
Truth



Everybody





-KTLA |bate. 0 (CC) [With Randy 0 |Kids ‘Jr. Gets_ {Kids “Bahamas” [One With the [Loves Raymond |Loves Raymond :
(CC), His License” |(CC)\»~—«|Candy Hearts’ "The Bird” (CC) | (CC)

Aft % & AVOW TO KILL (1995, Suspense) Julianne |WICKED MINDS (2002, Suspense) Angie Everhart, Andrew Walker, Win-
LIFE __- |Philips, Richard Grieco. Premiere, A new bride's hus- |ston Rekert. A man’s affair leads to the murder of his father. (CC)

~~"1§ Simple Rules |Maximum Living|My Wife and [My Wife and [Friends ‘The [Everybody



























‘ et } Jpand has deadly plans in store for her. (CC)
x eg ; - 7 : = =
i 00) Hardball [Countdown With Keith Olber- [Scarborough Country Rita Cosby Live & Direct
—/MSNBC eq" rem
| eg N | K Jiminy Neutron: [SpongeBob Zoey 101. |Full House ‘The |Hi-Jinks Singer |Fresh Prince of |Roseanne (
dee] AN iC Boy Genius: /SquarePants 1 (cy Test” (CC) Patti LaBelle. |Bel-Air =. — {(CC)
| {TV Will & Grace (\ |Fear Factor Reality TV stars get 15 House A renowned physician has |News © (CC) |News
rs N (CC) more minutes of fame. (N) symptoms of tuberculosis. (CC) :
ye ‘OLN Ultimate Shark |Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna- [Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna- |Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna-
Tourn. ment Stakes are raised. ment ment The big prize is on the line. |

Ve 2 Wheel Tues- |V-Twin Motorcy- |American Thun- |Corbin’s Ride Build or Bust
|__| | SPEED Pre ea Tele TV der (N) On (N)




























a
Fulton Sheen Behind the Joyce Meyer: /John Hagee To- [Bill Gaither (CC) |Praise the Lord (CC)
y'
TBN Scenes (CC) — Enjoying Every: |day (CC) |
soths'Woe. day Life (CC)
Everybody Friends 1 (CC) |Friends Rachel’ |Sex and the City/Sex and the City|Seinfeld Elaine Seinfeld George |
TBS Loves Raymond hires a male nan-|Invitations toa | M (CC) creates an alter- /hunts for a lost
(cc) ny. © (CC) wedding. nate persona. key ring, (CC) .
{ee Overhaulin’|Million Dollar Auctions Rare and unique vehicles are sold during RM’s |Miami Ink “Going for the Gold” An
TLC CC Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction in California. (N) Olympic athlete comes in for some
finish work. (CC)
(a Without a [Law & Order “Open Season’ A cop-|Law & Order “Blaze” A fire Ips Law & Order Detectives discover a
TNT . [Trace “Birthday |killer’s acquittal leads to the murder tou an audience at a rock con- murdered prosecutor had been liv-
4 |Boy’ O (CC) jof a defense attorney. 1 cert, Killing 23 fans. 0 ing under an alias. (CC) (DVS)
TOON Home for Imagi- |Ed, Edd n Eddy |Grim Adven- Naruto Xiaolin Show- |The Life & Futurama 1
nary Friends tures down 1 (CC) |Times of Juni |(CC)
TV5 (:00) Tout le monde en parle : , TV5 Le Journal

Twc co Weather: /Storm Stories [Storm Stories |Weather: Evening Edition (CC) l et Ch aA | le the mi
o|- M Edition (CC) |Tornadoes. (CC) |(CC) . B : Pp d oe 3 |
a ; (a0) Peregrina |La Fea Mas Bella (N) Barrera de Amor (N) Que Madre Tan |Vecinos |. a ha MIAN Upp et ana oy 4|

N) Padre ; : Mn D " |
lel sa : his sidekick Derek out ay ) :

~ 1(:00) Law & Or- jLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Law & Order: Criminal Intent De- ;
tectives track a rac armen after Some sin" | es on y our



der: Criminal In-|"Rage” 1 (CC) Detectives link an assault to illegal












tent 0 (CC) trafficking in painkillers. a doctor is shot. A ees
Hogan Knows |Hogan Knows [Hogan Knows |The Drug Years The counter-cul- My Fair Brady: Love-Crazed lei d ss fa ces. |
ra it Best 0 Best 1 Best 1 ture’s drug experimentation. Get Married . |Celeb Couples. | |

| al ears aus (00) America’s |THIS OLD CUB (2004, Documentary) Ron Santo, Dennis Franz, Joe |WGN News at Nine 1, (CC) I *

1) WGN unniest Home |Montegna. Ballplayer Ron Santo pursues his career while living with dia- es
A ene Videos ( (CC) |betes. M (CC see
cy. “[Everybody [Gilmore Girls ‘Tm OK, You're OK” [Pepper Dennis Reporter Pepper |WB11 News at Ten With Kaity WT 5, = |
“| WPIX —_ |Loves Raymond Rory pays a visit to Lorelai; Zack [Dennis thinks she is about island Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Mareniai B a AG your chi | d ren to the ot

ey poe, [Oo (CC) asks to marry Lane. (CC) her dream anchor-job. (CC} & Mr. G (CC) ies : |
| WSBK sere (N) [America’s Next Top Model The |Veronica hea ‘Blast Fromthe —_|Dr. Phil Guests feel trapped in mar- | M C +] a p QD y + our at M cD ona | d sin |

competitors get the ppeiunly to |Past” © (CC) riages. O (CC)
| win asoponigaree ACE) : Palmdale every Thursda
| ) PREMIUM CHANNELS ie every LMU ¥

c : 6:45) & * THE GRUDGE (2004, Countdown to |**Â¥% THE SKELETON KEY (2005, Suspense) Kate Hudson, Gena : :
-| HBO-E fire) Sarah Michelle Gellar, Jason|Taylor-Wright —|Rowlands, John Hurt. A te a in a New rleans house with an odd fro M 5 ‘ 5 O P m to 4: 3 O Pp M d url NG the
(ibe es Behr. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) 1 (CC) history. ‘PG-13' (CC) h = 9 0 0 é
Entourage Eric |Dane Cook’s. /%%% THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS (2005, Come- of yj '
SILO IBLUES has a plan for the nous ‘The |dy-Drama) Amber Tamblyn, Alexis Bledel, America rae Fa teens es nt UU Re
premiere, irst

(1988) ‘PG-13' augh” \_|keep in touch by passing along a pair of jeans. 1 ‘PG’ (CC)

ve : a xx [x THE PERFECT MAN (2005, Romance-Comedy) |(:45) % & THE GRUDGE (2004, Horror) Sarah
HBO-W_ [THE PHANTOM |Hilary Duff, Chris Noth. A teen invents a secret admirer |Michelle Gellar, Jason Behr. A woman and her
fe OF THE OPERA |for her mother. © ‘PG’ (CC) boyfriend encounter vengeful spirits. © ‘PG-13' (CC)

ele -00) & THE VANISHING (1993, Suspense) Jeff [x & THE FABULOUS BAKER BOYS (1989, Romance-Comedy) Jef . .

a fa H BO-S i es, Kiefer Sutherland. A woman's abduction leads |Bridges, Michelle Pfeiffer, Beau Bridges. A chanteuse joins two eae Ca od, l /0

aay her bist ona three-year search. 1 ‘R’ (CC) lounge lizard act. 1 ‘R'(CC) : | E njoy Gr t Fo Prizes and ts of Fun

4 (30) % x JIN- |x x WHY DO FOOLS FALL IN LOVE (1998, Biography) Halle Berry, |x x THE WEDDING DATE (2005,

| MAX-E |GLEALL THE [Vivica A. Fox, Lela Rochon. A look at 1950s crooner Frankie Lymon and Romrance-Comed Debra Messing,
WAY (1996) 1. |his three wives. 1 'R’ (CC) ; Amy Adams, 0 'PG-13'(CC)

(00) +x & WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005, Science [* x & ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 (2006, Action) Ethan Hawke, Lau: |
iction) Tom Cruise. A man and his children try to sur- {rence Fishburne, John aan, Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta-
vive an alien invasion. O 'PG-13' (CC tion to kill a gangster. 1 "R’ (CC)

fi (00) 4 #& SKY CAPTAIN AND THE WORLD OF | # x x INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (1994, Horror) Tom Cruise, |
| SHOW OMORROW (2004) Gwyneth Paltrow. An aviator and [Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas. iTV Premiere. A vampire recalls the tragic
ie a reporter fight gigantic robots. ‘PG’ (CC) events of his 200-year life. 0 ‘R’

(30 *% THE |PURSUED (2004, Suspense) Christian Slater, Gil Bel- mt 4% CODE 46 (2003, Science Fiction) Tim
ILL NG CLUB lows, Estella Warren. A corporate headhunter will not |Robbins, Samantha Morton, Jeanne Balibar. A futuristic
(1999) 'R' (CC) take no for an answer. 1 'R’ (CC) investigator falls for his quarry. © ‘R’ (CC






6:00) * ek

‘| HBO-P
















:/ MOMAX

i'm lovin’ it oe 1 |
|



: TMC









PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006



MOTORISTS have com-
plained for years about the
dense morning traffic into cen-
tral Nassau from all areas of
New Providence.

Despite the public frustration
with the problem and the cre-
ation of several strategies to
alleviate the daily log jam, many
believe the traffic is just getting
worse.

With this in mind, The Tri-
bune hit the streets to ask the
public what they feel should be
done about the problem.

Most persons interviewed
suggested that more roads
should be cut to accommodate
the growing number of vehi-
cles.

On the other hand, a number
of persons suggested that new
laws need to be put in place to
restrict the number of cars on
the road at any one time.

A Bay Street businesswoman

said: “I think the government .

should pass a law to limit the
number of cars in every house-
hold, starting with the senior
citizens — they should not be
allowed to have cars of their
own.” ,

She added that more police

officers and Road Traffic per-



@ RUSSARA Bain said: “The
traffic lights need to be working
at all times.”

sonnel need to be on duty dur-
ing peak traffic hours to direct
the flow of traffic.

A taxi driver commented:
“More roads should be con-
structed in the right areas, start-
ing with the down town area,
because the traffic in the morn-
ing is overwhelming.”

Local radio personality Scott
Richards said that the traffic is
bad every morning.

“More Road Traffic officers
to guide the traffic in the east-
ern area would help,” he said.



Mi SCOTT Richards said: “More
road traffic officers to guide the
traffic in the eastern area would
‘be helpful.”

Mr Richards went on to say
that the repair of broken traffic
lights and the construction of
alternate roadways from the

pee enteceneeeeceneeseneneeeeneeeseeseea ees eneneusenananeceeaeeseeenseaensensaseasaneces leneeeeaeeaeeasasceneesensuseceeneeeereneseseee een eenenesneseareenenseee esa eee een seneneeneee ene ese ese ge

Group formed to investigate concerns over marine life

NOTICE,

Large multinational mechanical
contracting firm leader in its field is
looking for two (2) qualified
contruction material warehouse -
assistants

Assistant one:

e Experience with plumbing and electrical meterials
(reception, review, loading/unloading and

delivery).

Experience with Quickbooks software (a plus).
Ability to drive standard shift vehicle

_-Driver’s license.

Assistant Two:

¢ Experience with plumbing and electrical meterials
(reception, review, loading/unloading and

delivery).

Ability to drive standard shift vehicle

Driver’s license.

If you are interested:

Please submit resume to

Mechanical Contractor
P.O. Box: EE-15284
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Jessica Salmeron

Be sure to include full name, address,
telephone numbers where you can be reached,
work experience and person’s names and
phone numbers to verify the information



FROM page one

been formed to investigate.»

these matters.”






eastern end of the island would
also improve the situation.
“T would say there should be

_.a limit on the number of cars

+ The group, according to
Minister Miller, includes

representatives from the
Ministry ‘of Foreign

St. Augustine’s College
PTA



-Car Raffle-2006

WINNERS
June 1, 2006

Name

01671 | LLoyd, Ismay, Daulton

Harbour Island
bic

4-Trip

8-Dinner
Humidor

22315

11490 | Lydia Hanna

iter |



Other Icky Dads will win

® Round-trip tickets on Bahamas Ferries

* A-set-top-box with free 1-month subscription to

Ocean's Digital Movies from Cable Ba hamas



@ FRANK Adderley said: ““The
implementation on proper bus
systems for schools would help fix
the problem.”



per family, but everyone doesn’t
leave home at the same time,”
pointed out Bay Street employ-
ee Russara Bain.

“Roads should be constructed
if there is space for it and the
traffic lights should be working
at all times,” she said.

“Perhaps an overpass should
be built in the East Street area”
said Frank Adderley. “The
proper implementation of bus

systems would help and 4 ferry -

should run from the eastern
road to down-town every 20



@ GEROME Clark said:
“Schools should go in earlier to. - -
eliminate the overflow of morning.
traffic.”

minutes. A large parking lot
needs to be built also for this
idea to work.” . ae ie

Bay Street business owner |
Gerome Clark said: “The
schools should go in earlier to
eliminate the overflow of morn-
ing traffic. We have a lot of

’ growth in the Bahamas but we

don’t accommodate it.”
Mr Clark. added that the
maintenance of traffic lights
need to be addressed, and that
there is an urgent need for a
proper bus system.



Affairs, the Department of
Marine Resources, the
BEST Commission, the
Ministry of Health, and
the Department of
Environmental Health Ser-
vices.

_ Additionally, persons
from outside of the gov-
ernment have been invited
to participate in the inves-
tigations.

The group of invited par-
ticipants is to include
Ms Diane Claridge, a
Bahamian scientist, and
Dr Alan Bater, a veteri-
narian, both of whom are
said to have extensive
marine mammal experi-
ence.

Minister Miller said The
College of the Bahamas
will also be represented in
the person of Dr Kathleen
Sullivan Sealey, the Dean
of Pure and Applied Sci-
ence and the Acting Direc-
tor of the Marine and
Environmental Studies
Institute.

According to the. minis-
ter, this working group will
have access to internation-
al expertise from a variety
of sources, among them, Dr

-Marsha Green and Ms

Susan Millward of the
International Noise Coali-
tion.

“Inclusive of all the
species of marine mammals
that occur. within our
waters,” Minister Miller
said, “the commitment
from the Ministry of Agri-
culture and Marine
Resources is to protect the
marine resources of The
Bahamas.”

* A Bottle of Hennessy XO Cognac from Burns House



HAW ETE

estate today

Carmen Massoni

Making
it stick’ |

IF you have ever |.
bought or sold a home, *
you are probably =...
familiar with the term |
Multiple Listing Ser-.,.., 5
vice. LAF

It’s a convenient way .,
to locate most homes...
for sale, and access to”:
that data has createdia-\
new kind of buyer who”:
expects a high level of-’
service from real estate: ’
professionals, and the’~ !
competition is admit!~"
tedly fierce. pts

With nearly three out
of four buyers search-" *
ing the Internet for |. |
homes, the role of .-,
agents has certainly, ; .
changed, but has 5
not lessened in any >,
way. ite

Now that locating a - ;
suitable property has. ,
become easier, it’s the.
ability to negotiate an.
accepted offer to pur-;
chase that becomes
paramount, especially
in hot markets
where sellers may be
entertaining multiple
offers. CORO.

» When the offer is”
accepted, the rest of
the big picture comes:
INtO VIEW. sm ore a

An agent or broker\i
essential for-organising
all the aspects that will
bring the transaction
to a successful close. °

Consider arranging
inspections, guiding
the mortgage process,
setting up escrow
accounts, securing
title insurance, helping
plan the move, arrange
the closing, and so
on.

There is no doubt
that the Internet and.;
wide access to real
estate data has
‘improved the buyer’s
knowledge and posi- *
tion, but you can’t buy |
the kind of experience
that a professional can *
offer. fea

You can find your
next home online, but
it takes an agent to put)
you in it! roe







THE TRIBUNE



“Bozine Town
committee hits
out at minister's
comments
FROM page one

eh of the steering committee,
said "yesterday.

' The ‘minister also said that
the demands for a meeting with
Prime Minister Perry Christie
over the matter are completely

vote
EG

unnecessary at this point. He .

said that calls for such a meet-
ing stém from a small group of
“rabble rousers.”

“Weare not rabble rousers.
Rabble rousers do not hire
lawyers. Rabble rousers do not
deprive themselves of necessi-
ties,so that they can meet legal
fees every month,” the com-
mittee spokesman said.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Brown said he
had received calls all day from
Bozine Town residents who
were “very disturbed” by Min-
ister Miller’s comments.

“We are not violent, all we
want to do is have our peaceful
demonstration. Rabble rousers
would be violent, they would
‘grab their weapons and incite
violence. We have done noth:

ing of the sort, We have been at _

our most peaceful, not con-
frontational at all.

. “All we are asking is for the
government that we put there
to protect the poor man, to help
us in this matter,” he said.

: Taking exception to the claim

by Mr Miller that certain mem- —

bers:of the’ community are
attempting to turn the issue into

a “cheap political matter,” Mr.

Brown said:

: \“We'never made this a polit-
ical issue, never was there a
menti ion of any party in this dis-

pute. Other parties have
pproached us and asked us

how they could help. We

always told them ‘no thank you’
daq.explained to them that we
havé'a lawyer and are pursu-
ing: ‘this through the proper
channels.”
he Bozine. Town Steering
@buimittee last. week
anounced that they would
prdtest in front of parliament
ey do not receive a written
assurance from the prime min-
ister that they will not be dis-
plaged from the land which
some of them have been living
on for the past 50 years.
: The people of Bozine Town
how have little more than a
week to appeal last. month’s





Supreme Court ruling which.

upheld the Harrold Road Land

Devélopment Company’s..

(LANDCO) titles for the land

in the Bozine Town and:

Knowles Drive area.
‘ The land dispute first began
in late 2004 when 500 or so res-
identsreceived letters from the
law‘firm of Lockhart and
Munroe, informing them that
its clients, LANDCO, had been
granted. certificates of title to
property between Bozine
‘Town, Knowles Drive and Har-
told Road.

~ However, Mr Miller last
month, assured his constituents
that they will not be displaced,
and that government is cur-
rently reviewing the possibili-
ty of offering LANDCO Crown
land in‘exchange for the Bozine
Town and'Knowles Drive land:

Members of.the steering

committee said that waiting on
the ‘government to follow
through with its promises has
cost}them valuable time which
could have been used in prepar-
ing- aicase for the Court of



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have-wonan-—
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
ahd share your story.

Prosecutors want separate tria
for man accused of murders
of 22-year-old and four schoolboys

FROM page one

Robins’ murder was in no way
connected to the deaths of the
four boys.

However; Romona Far-
quharson, Farrington’s lawyer
argued that she wanted all the
matters to be combined.
According to Mrs, Farquhar-
son it would be in the best

' interest of her client to have

the five charges joined togeth-
er, and her client stand one
trial, as the murders were all a
part of a series of events. Mrs
Farquharson said that psychi-
atrists had concurred that
although Robins’ murder was
the first, reportedly occurring
several months before those
of the four missing boys, it
was the beginning of the
series.

Mrs Grant-Bethel dis-
agreed saying that Robins’-
murder occurred in 2002,
nearly a full year before those
of the younger boys. She also
noted Robins was mature, his
age not being in the same
range as the. boys. She also

claimed that the way Robins

died was in no way similar to
the death of the boys. The
body of the young boys were
found in the area of Barbary
Beach and Robins’ off the
Grand Bahama highway, she
noted.

Mrs Farquharson argued
that it was not true that all of
the boys’ bodies were found
in the same place. She sub-
mitted that the serial killings
had started with Jamaal’s
death and the gap:between
his murder and that of the
young boys was no contradic-
tion. Mrs Farquharson also
noted that everyone knows
that Farrington has been
charged with five murders
and there would be no preju-
dice in charging him with the
combined offences.

Farrington was-charged



with the Freeport in 2003 with
the murders of Jamaal
Robins, 22, Mackinson Colas,
12, Junior Reme, 11, DeAn-
gelo McKenzie, 13, and
Desmond Rolle, 14, All four
ofthe younger boys disap-
peared between May and
September of that year. The
four reportedly worked as
bag-packers at the Winn Dix-
ie Supermarket in Freeport
and played video games near-
by. Jamaal Robins was not
reported missing until May of
2003, although it was believed
he had disappeared earlier,
according to reports.
Arguments from both sides
initially arose yesterday when
Mrs Grant Bethel made it evi-

Se ratulationc’!

aa Congratulations

i
®
@
®
®
@
&
&
®
@
®
@
@
@
®
@
g
®
o-
®
®
@
®
e
@
®
@
@
®
@
ao
@
e
@
®
e
u
a
a

to
Morgan
Alicia
Hanna

Cool, ciaamy, Chocolaty...



On her graduation from Kingsway Academy Class
- K5PH and her attainment of Most Outstanding
Female Student. Best wishes comes from your proud
parents Alexander and Michelle Hanna,
grandparents, great grandparents, godparents,aunts,
uncles, cousins and your best buddy Morrett.

— We Love You. Continue to do well!
New eceeeeeeoseesagooeseeoee nh

Catch the
CHILL.
Do a one
of a kind

dent that the prosecution
intended to deal with the
murder of Jamaal Robins first
and as a separate case, as he

was believed to be Farring-

ton’s first victim. Ms Far-
quharson, however, said that
she was under the impression
that they were there to seek
an adjournment for Farring-
ton’s trial for the death of
Junior Reme, 11. According
to Mrs Grant Bethel, the
prosecution intended to deal
with the murder of Jamaal
Robins first, then try Far-
rington later for the murder
of the four younger boys.

Justice Allen is expected
to give her decision on the
matter on Friday.

Ri rateutrean edwied (ep 1ye3

Aa G ieesiaeaieana



































a8 eb heesdekebesedeneenccees0eseaeeeecsunEe

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 11

Make every day
special with

KEROR

Its Apple, Raspberry

& Peach Flavours are:

* Natural

¢ Not from concentrate

* Without preservatives
° 100% fruit juice
* Alcohol free

Available at your favourtie

_ liquor store and in all
ae ns House Beverage De

ey

and Butler & Sands stores.

>d retail price in Nassau Stores





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006 THE TRIBUNE.



YOUR CONN







BTC. —s—i“és«é "W'P}! VV
_ CONNECTION | © S# WS GEN
SHOW | : Esbutor as Claime IS

: WINNER coe a ee yet!

j WIDE |

i
fh



streurtan
| paapalieinias
: ; : : ze oe ‘Qe
Tyler Clarke is pictured receiving ee . yt Oe
-his new NOKIA 6680, Mr. Clarke: 0 Ewa “O@
was last week's BTC Connection ;
radio show trivia question winner.
Pictured left to right: Margo
Gibson, BTC PR department and _
Tyler Clarke, radio show winner.









TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

Dinan

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







Tel: (242) 356-7764




Tel:. (242) 351-3010




NASSAU OFFICE |

FREEPORT OFFICE



Developers resume |

ork at Baker’s Bay (eran

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

evelopers behind
the controversial

$175 million Bak- -

er’s Bay project
at Great Guana

: ay yesterday confirmed to The
: Tribune they had “resumed some
‘ activities” at the project site after
i the courts ruled they could be
: relieved from June 1 onwards of
' their previous undertaking not to
: do any new work.

Dr Livingstone Marshall,

. Senior vice-president of environ-
mental and community affairs for

the Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean.

Club, told The Tribune that the
developers were “really focused”
on construction of a $2.5 million

BEC’s fuel

costs up 99%

in three years

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
. Tribune Business Editor

~ SOARING global oil prices
have almost doubled the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) fuel costs over a
three-year period to $164.419 mil-

lion in its fiscal year'2005-2006,°

with Leslie Miller using this to
support his renewed plea for the

_ Bahamas to sign on to the Petro-

Caribe initiative.

Mr Miller, the former minister
of trade and industry, who has
seen responsibility for BEC and
the petroleum industry switched
to Dr Marcus Bethel following
the Cabinet reshuffle, said the

rise in BEC’s fuel costs from the ~

$82.519 million in fiscal 2002-2003
had impacted all Bahamians
through its fuel surcharge.

SEE page 4B

Just got alot loan.

service pier on the island, part of
the Abacos chain.

He explained that this would
allow the developers, San Fran-
cisco-based Discovery Land Com-
pany, to bring materials and
equipment on to the island. The
service pier would also be open to
use by the local population. »

Discovery Land Company has
resumed work on Great Guana
Cay following a Court‘of Appeal
verdict that relieved it of the
undertaking given. von November
22, 2005, in which it promised not
to do any moré/work at the devel-
opment site.

It gave the/undertaking on con-
dition that the legal action being
brought by/the Save-‘Guana Cay
Reef Asgociation, which is
ts to stop the develop-

Tal ks start

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



NEGOTIATIONS between
the Government and Bluewa-
ter Communications Holdings

over the Bahamas Telecom- |

munications Company’s (BTC)
privatisation begun “about a
week or two ago”, the minister
of state for finance told. The
Tribune yesterday.

James Smith confirmed that
the Government had appoint-
eda “special committee” to
negotiate with Bluewater over
the proposed sale of a stake in
BTC, along with management
control over the state-owned
telecommunications company.

With talks in their early
stages, Mr Smith said he had
not received any update from
the committee on how they
had progressed to date. In any
event, he added that the talks
were “embargoed”.

ment, be heard on its merits in

the Supreme Court by the end of
January 2006.

After several delays, Acting
Justice Norris Carroll heard the
trial on its merits: in February, but
has yet to deliver his verdict. As a
result, Discovery Land Compa-
ny successfully appealed to the
Court of Appeal last month that
its interests were being harmed
by the length of time being taken
to decide the Supreme Court
case.

Dr Marshall yesterday told The
Tribune that Discovery Land
Company was continuing with its

» permit and approval applications

to the Government, particularly
for subdivisions.
He added: “We’ve just about

completed subdivision activities -



@ JAMES SMITH

Mr Smith said the commit-

tee’s membership had been
appointed by the Cabinet, and
chosen from a combination of
the public sector, quasi-public
sector and the private sector.
Among the agencies likely
to.be represented on the Com-
mittee are the Ministry of
Finance, Attorney General’s

for Phase I, and are looking at
starting up permits and applica-
tions for Phase II. We’re looking

~ at the marina, and hope to soon

put that in.’

Fred Smith, attorney for the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associa-
tion, has since filed a motion with
the Court of Appeal, seeking to
appeal their decision to relieve
Discovery Land Company of its
undertaking to the Privy Coun-
cil.

Dr Marshall said the develop-

-ers were neither concerned nor

surprised by this, adding that Mr,
Smith had long indicated that he

- and his clients would be prepared

to take their case to the highest

SEE page 4B

over BIC privatisation

Office, Ministry of Public
Works, and the directors and
management of BTC itself.
The Government has vest-
ed the current privatisation
process with heavy secrecy,
due in part to the failed ‘open
beauty contest’ method that
was tried in 2003, when it

decided none of the three

offers made for a 49 per cent
stake in BTC matched its own
valuation. ° =

It is open to question,
though, whether BTC’s pri-
vatisation will be concluded
any time soon, given that a
general election’is coming
within the next 12 months, and
both major political parties will
want to attract the votes of
BTC staff and their depen-
dents.

This year, though, marks

SEE page 3B

ann eee Lot Loan

Michael's on top of his game.
He got a Zero Down Fidelity Lot Loan.

How coal is that?

ar:
Tepe

YTwgery
a

| @ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

| GIVEN the similarities
| between the Bahamian econ-
omy and those of. CARI-
COM members, High Com-
missioner Leonard Archer
said yesterday it made sense
for this nation to sign on to

& Economy (CSME), since
it would give the Bahamas
greater bargaining power to
obtain financial benefits in
trading with the US.

to Brian Moree, a ‘senior
partner at McKinney, Ban-
croft & Hughes, who told a
conference last week that it
was not in the Bahamas’
interests to join the CSME.
Doing so, he said, would
| harm this nation economi-
cally, as the Bahamas had
nothing in common with the
' rest of the Caribbean.
Instead, Mr Moree argued
that the Bahamas should
look towards its major trad-
ing partner and the Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA) for its. economic
future, rather than the
CSME.
However, Mr Archer said
| it was in the Bahamas’ best
interests to join the CSME
and negotiate with the US
| through CARICOM. :
| Mr Archer said: “The
| Bahamas should join the



| FTAA along with the rest of

the Americas - that is South

| America, Central America,
and the Caribbean. To get.

the best deal in the FTAA,
the Bahamas should join
CSME first, because then we
would be negotiating with
partners and not by our-
selves.

“The reason for j joining the

would be negotiating with
| CARICOM partners. The
| agreement would have to be
|. structured:so that the weak-
| est members of CARICOM
|



| can implement the agree-
ment. Obviously, if the terms

of the agreement are benefi-
cial to the weakest. member,
it becomes even more beéne-
ficial to the strongest mem-
| ber.” Among the strongest
| CSME members would be
| the Bahamas.

Mr Archer said this would
mean that whatever conces-
| sions and trade benefits the
US gave to the weakest
|. member of the CSME, the
| Bahamas would receive the

same’ treatment, enabling it
to also enjoy those prefer-



the Caribbean Single Market -

Mr Archer was responding -

advantage
_ Caribbean. $1 billion of that

CSME is that the Bahamas.



ences.

“If we are negoigating on

our own, we would be’

negoigating as a very strong

‘developed country. -and

therefore we would have to

make concessions to the

Americans,” Mr Archer said.

“Negotiating as a part of
the CSME, we benefit from:
all of the concessions that the
United States or apy other

developed county would:



make to the economic group- |

ing under world trade rules.”
Mr Archer explained that,

at present, the US does not |

oping country.

_ see the Bahamas as a devel- |

“The financial benefits niet |

that for all of the countries,® |
services, particularly tourism,’

is the most important sector,”
Mr Archer said.

“With the exception of |

Trinidad, Suriname and |:
Guyana, tourism is by far the | -

largest importing sector. We
all trade with the US. The
US. has a $6 billion trade
over the

comes from the Bahamas.
“So when the argument. is
made that we are different
from them, that argument is
by far not true. America is
the biggest trading partner
for Jamaica, Barbados and
for Trinidad. We all buy and.
purchase goods from the
United States, we all go to

Miami and Fort Lauderdale. |

We are all-into services,
tourism and financial ser-
vices.

“They have agriculture, |
which we don’t have, but |

agriculture is not the most
important sector of the econ-

omy, and agriculture is not |

growing because, as you
know, the bananas are in
trouble due to World Trade

Organisation rules. So is sug- |
ar, and these are the two big |

agricultural items, and rice to |

SEE page 2B



Op Fort BAY #H1200: Secluded island ambiance at this
home situated high above Old Fort Bay Beach, Main house has 5 -
bedrooms, 6 baths, all beautifully appointed, Infinity pool and sepa-
rate Honeymoon Suite with private outdoor jacuzzi and terrace.
Across the street there is additional parking and 100 feet of dock.
US$5,800,000, Exciusivety Listed, George Damianos.

wy Wfrdcay | Sothebys

Properties INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Call Fidelity reQeENV?

= ) FIDELITY

Beyond Banking
Â¥ 356.7764. F 326.3000

Choose Wisely
Choose Fidelity

Faniao\aistlel <
ata

PARADISE
ISLAND

ert 3) a FREEPORT

dra toa

MACKEY.

Big t 242.362.4211 £ 242.362.6098

SIRlyfordcay.com

4
x
‘





. PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

THE TRIBUNE

El Salvador shows Bahamas

the way on hard reforms

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT .
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of The
International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution
of LINWOOD COMMERCIAL LTD. is in dissolution.
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS)
LTD. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Malborough & Queen
Streets. P.O. Box N-10429, Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their names,

addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator _

before the 8th day of July 2006.

| TN te arieot hatte
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT

SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD:
Liquidator

Signed:

Legal Notice
NOTICE
BOSPHERE LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) BOSPHERE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the

provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies

-Act 2000. :

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 12th June,

2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and

registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust of 17
. bis, rue de Lausanne - 1211 Geneva 70 - Switzerland.

Dated this 13th day of June, A.D. 2006.

ast week, the Nassau Institute
and the Atlas Research Foun-
dation sponsored a one-day

conference entitled Taking â„¢
Small Nations to Greatness: '

Free Trade, Security and Education. The lun-
cheon speaker at the conference was for-
mer President Francisco Flores of El Sal-
vador, who served from 1999 until 2004.
Under the Salvadoran constitution, presi-
dents cannot serve consecutive terms in
office.

President Flores was one of the most
impressive speakers that I have heard in the
Bahamas. It was simply a pity that many
more Bahamians.did not avail themselves

of this opportunity to hear a speaker of his _

calibre and accomplishment.

Almost exactly one year ago, President
Flores was nominated for the position of
Secretary General of the Organisation of
American States (OAS).

President Flores declined to let his name
go forward, to which US Secretary of State,
Condoleezza Rice lamented: “President Flo-
res has demonstrated that he is.a talented
and dynamic leader, successfully articulating
a forward-thinking vision for a hemisphere
that thrives on democracy, respect for human
rights and economic opportunity.”

What exactly did President Flores accom-
plish to earn such accolades?

EI Salvador
El Salvador is the smallest and most
densely populated country in Central Amer-

: ica, a country of 6.7 million people, occu-

pying a land mass of some 8,000 square miles
sandwiched between Guatemala and Hon-
duras, It is roughly the size of the state of
Massachusetts and its income per capita is
approximately US$2,100 per capita
(Bahamas $18,000). Literacy is 87 per cent
(97 per cent for the Bahamas), and the size
of the economy (GDP) is US$32. 4 billion
(Bahamas $6 billion).

An interesting side note is that annual
remittances (money sent back home by Sal-
vadorans living abroad) account for 17 per

Financial

Focus



cent of GDP.

Forward-thinking vision

-E] Salvador suffered a brutal civil war
from 1980-1992, which resulted in the loss of
75,000 lives and the decimation of the econ-
omy and public infrastructure. —

Voted to power in 1999 at the age of 37,
President Flores and his administration are
largely responsible for making El Salvador's
voice heard throughout the world's main
international forums. He was also one of
the first leaders to meet with George W.

Bush shortly after he was voted in as presi- 5

dent of the US.

On a subsequent official visit to Bl Sal-
vador in 2002, President Bush had this to
say: “El Salvador is one of the really great
stories of economic and political transfor-
mation of our time. Just over a decade ago,
this country was in civil war.

“For millions of Salvadorans, violence was
a daily reality, and prosperity was just a dis-
tant dream. Today, El Salvador is at peace.
The country has renewed its commitment
to democracy and economic reform and
trade. It is one of the freest and strongest and

most stable countries in our hemisphere.”

Presentation
President Flores provided his Bahamian
audience with an extremely articulate and

passionate speech, highlighting some of the

radical reforms his government had to imple-
ment, and some of the difficult decisions
they had to make. For instance, in order to
restore the rule of law, they had to fire 20 per
cent of the officers on the police force, who
were corrupt.

The Flores administration had an unshake-

able commitment to free markets and care-
ful fiscal management. Free market policy
initiatives included the privatisation of the
banking system, telecommunications, public
pensions, electrical distribution and some
electrical generation, reduction of import
duties, elimination of price controls, and
enhancing the investment climate tntoueh
trarisparent policies.

Food for thought

At the end of his presentation, I had the
brief opportunity to speak one-on-one with
President Flores. I asked him: “How were
you able to drive through so many funda-
mental and radical changes in such as short
time?” He paused for a moment, and then
responded: “Things were so bad, that the
people were willing to give anything a try.
The sense of hopelessness was pervasive.”

The Bahamas has always been fortunate in
that we have never really suffered from a
political, social or economic catastrophe that
severely damaged out economy. To date we
have done a reasonably good job of building
credible institutions, although there have
been some bumps along the way and there i is
still a lot of work to be‘done.

However, we still have some pressing
issues such as education and training, crime,
land policy, immigration and tax reform, all
of which require some new and even tadical
re-thinking, along with an unshakeable com-
mitment to fixing them. f

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Finan-
cial Analyst, is vice-president - pensions,

Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas), a

wholly-owned subsidiary of Colonial Group

International, which owns Atlantic Medical

Insurance and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance Company in
the Bahamas.

The. views expressed are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any questions or com-

‘ments to rlgibson@atlantichouse.com. bs 2



CSME to give Bahamas more bargaining power

Credit Suisse Trust
Liquidator; =.

FROM page 1B



~ CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

Vacancy for
Project Manager

The Project Manager (PM) will over see the implementation of an Automated

| Cleritig House (ACH) in The Bahamas. The successful candidate will be respon-
sible for liasing with potential vendors, assembling a project team, assingning
individual, identifying appropriate resources needed, developing project schedules
‘and providing reports to ensure the timely completion of the project. The PM must
‘demonstrate appropriate specialized knowledge and experience with the imple-
mentation of clearing and settlement systems; direct experience with (image
th) ACH systems is preferable. —

T he ideal catidlidates must possess the requisite skills to » perorn the following
activities:

© © Assist with project education and orientation
e Assist with implementation schedule, approach, puget. and staffing
requirements
i ¢ Review and monitor project plan srdgress
‘© Review and assist with implementation plan strategy
e Ensure that the risks: of material deviations are minimized
Review and assist with the test plan strategy
” Review and assist with training plan

| * Assist with development of the Go-Live Plan
* Create public awareness of the ACH and its function
° Provide thought leadership
* Identify global issues and workflow opportunities
f° Troubleshoot and escalate critical issues

a smaller extent.

“But the fact is, tourism and
financial services are the seg-
ments of the Caribbean econ-
omy that are growing.”

Mr Archer added that other
Caribbean country economies
were looking more like the
Bahamas every day. “There is
a certain syngery that devel-
ops that needs to be recon-
gisied,” he said. .

Mr Archer added: “He says
[Mr Moree] we are different
from them, but he doesn’t say
how we are different from
them. The fact is we are not
that different. If you went to
Barbados or Jamaica, you
would see the emphasis on ser-
vices as opposed to agriculture
and other things.”

Mr Moree said of the

CSME: “It takes away a much
more important issue, which is
our relationship with the Unit-
ed States, negotiating the
FTAA or a free trade agree-
ment (FTA) with the United
States.

Minimal

“] think there would be min- .

imal advantages accruing to
the Bahamas through mem-
betship of the CSME, because
we have very little trade with
the region.’

“I think it will be contrary
to the national interests of the
Bahamas to join the CSME. I
think it would have adverse
consequences for us economi-
cally and bring minimal bene-
fits to us.

aaah tet eles et atatesatad



Is looking for

_ THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!!.

Highest commissions and bonuses in the industry.

“It would come at a signifi-’
cant cost, because we have the
highest [per capita] gross
domestic product among
CARICOM member states.”

However, Mr Archer also
disputed that claim, noting that
there was an agreement by
CARICOM countries that
Trinidad pays 25 per cent of
the organisation’s budget,

Jamaica pays 24 per cent and

the rest is shared amoung the
other countries, with the
Bahamas paying 11 per cent.

“ It is based on GDP and
not based on GDP per capita
(which is GDP divided by pop-
ulation). I think there is some
confusion that because our
GDP per capita is higher, then

- our GDP is also bigger, but

that is not so,” Mr Archer said.

Royal Holiday

“Energetic Self Motivated, Goal Oriented, individuals ¥
For it’s High Volume Sales Centre

A aaacaecnssncanscnnsncase

Minimum 3 BGCSE

| » management softwaretools and process improvement strategies
i © Experience with implementation of financial system
f ° Exceptional communication and interpersonal skills’
H ° Proven track record of managing project economics
; ° Effectiveness in meeting project deadlines and deliverable

; oe oh of oh ok oh oe eR sbeebs abt seb de Must be over 25yrs

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required: Have a Positive Mental Attitude,

; eee Excellent Conversational Skills .
H © BSc or equivalent experience i Ability to Think on Feet i
e Knowledge of clearing and settlement systems Articulate and Outgoing

| * Knowledge of project management methodologies, project i

Become a part of our Winning Team
Please contact: , i

Royal Holiday, i

327-5595 Ext-222. i

Send Resumes to: a Or in person: i
CBA - ACH Project Manager Response |
Bank of The Bahamas International
1st Floor, Claughton House

Royal Holiday, ground floor, i
Shirley & Charlotte Streets ‘gee

Nassau Wyndham Resort and Casino.



Nassau, Bahamas 10am-3pm. :

E-mail responses may be sent to: if i
_Samantha.Antonio@BankBahamas.com i
Velpeapb ues ihe hoist etal ei aa sae Heaicg anaes tnduaisleestceliodavtncs ;

\ a



wee wee

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 3B





‘Nothing to fear’
from the CSME

‘By CARA BRENNEN
_ Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIANS would be willing to
accept the Caribbean Single Market &
Economy (CSME) if they were given the
facts without disortations, the Foreign
Affairs Ministry’s High Commissioner told
The Tribune yesterday

Leonard Archer said that people often
read more into the Revised Treaty of
Chaguaramas than what really existed

“If they would understand the need for,
‘they could accept it as a part of the world
we live in and that this is necessary,” he
said.

For example, Mr Archer said Bahami-
ans continued to agitate against the free-
dom of movement of Caribbean nationals
- an aspect of the CSME which is some-
thing that the Bahamas does not have to
be part of.

, “It is not a fundamental issue in the
‘CSME. All the CARICOM countries have
problems of immigration, so that issue

was left for the future, when conditions
are better, when countries are more under-
standing, when people understand that
free movement is not going to. be cata-
strophic, as some people try to make it
out to be}” Mr Archer said.

“But that will be subject to a future
agreement, As it is now, the only persons
who are guaranteed movement are those
who are a part of an economic enterprise.
If an employee comes to the Bahamas,
their key people would be able to come
with them.”

Argument

Mr Archer said another argument is
that the CSME will create a federation of
some kind, similar to the European Union
(EU).

“That is not possible under the current
treaty. For that to happen, there would
have to be another treaty. You can’t
import to a treaty that what isn’t there;
the treaty says what can be done and no

where does it say a federation,” Mr Archer |

said.

Speaking to the issue of a singe curren-
cy, Mr Archer explained that if adopted, it
would be the value of the Bahamian dol-
lar. “There is nothing to fear from a com-
mon currency,” he said.

He also addressed the issue of the
CARICOM passport, saying it was mere-

ly symbolic and would be useful for per-

sons travelling through the Caribbean.

“The CARICOM passport is a national
passport with the symbol of CARICOM
on it. In most CARICOM. countries, they
have a CARICOM line for persons to use
when they are clearing immigration and
customs.

“Unfortunately, in the Caribbean we
don’t treat our visitors better than we treat
our own. It should be the other way
around.

“Caribbean nationals should no longer
be considered visitors, and the CARI-
COM passport reinforces that,” said Mr

- Archer. -

T alks start over BTC privatisation



PUBLIC NOTICE -

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LAVITO TRAVINCI
THOMAS, of #229 Hudson Estate, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
P.O.- Box 42332, intend to change my name to LAVITO
TRAVINCI MARTIN. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box F-43536, Grand Bahama, no
later than thirty (30) Hays after the date of publication of this

notice.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a)

DOLPHIN CAPITAL LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business. Companies Act 2000.

The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on June 12, 2006,
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registéred by
the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of Shirley
House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company is
required 'on or before the 12th day of July 2006 to send their names |
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

June 13, 2006

ALISA RICHARDSON

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

.. LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

- FROM page 1B

sight years since the former
FNM administration first
began moves to privatise BTC,
and the failure to complete this
process yet is a mark against
both governments.

The Government has also
stated that it will wait until the
talks with Bluewater are com-

‘pleted, whatever the outcome,
before it talks to other groups
that are interested in privatis-
ing BTC.

» Mr Smith previously con-
firmed that Cable & Wireless
(C&W) was among the other
parties interested in BTC, that
company having looked at the


































branch

CREDIT

OTHER

=_

PROFILE:

Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration or Finance
10 years retail banking experience with a minimum of 3 years in a
managerial position

e-mail:

state-owned firm during the
2003 process and passed the
initial qualifying round,
although no formal bid was
ever made.

Offering

The Government is “start-
ing out” by offering Bluewa-
ter a 49 per cent stake in BTC,
the same percentage on offer
during the failed 2003 process.
This could change, though, but
sticking to this percentage, the
Government would retain a 51
per cent stake, with Bluewa-
ter gaining management con-
trol.

Among the key issues likely

invites applications for the position of
BRANCH OPERATIONS MANAGER

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS & SALES SUPPORT |
o Functional responsibility for the day-to-day management of the

Training, coaching and assessment of Sales Support Staff
o Monitoring cash limits
o Accurate and timely processing of all accounting entries, Bantnig
fees & service charges
o Compliance reviews for new and continuing accounts to ensure
adherence to Central Bank Anti-Money Laundering Guidelines,
KYC requirements of FTRA/FTRR and pape internal -
instructions
o Reporting losses and exceptional occurrences
o ° Reporting on business development & financial results

o Review of loan documentation
o Disbursement of loan proceeds

o Sales initiatives and business development
o Review of workflows and procedures
o Maintain and update all procedure/training manuals
o Monitor dormant accounts

TIME ALLOCATION

o Sales=15%

o Customer Service=20%

o Operations/Administration=35%

BACKUP FOR
o Service Centre Manager

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than Monday 19th, June 2006 to:

Human Resources Department

Fe) FIDELITY

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

o Training & Coaching=15%
o Change Management=15%

careers@fidelitybahamas.com

to dominate the talks are the |

price Bluewater is willing to
pay for its BTC stake; condi-
tions of any agreement; the
extent of the monopoly BTC

holds in fixed-line and cellular |

services and how long they will
be maintained; capital expen-
diture and how much Bluewa-

-ter is willing to put into its busi-

ness plan; how much the
group will invest in training
Bahamians; and the composi-
tion of the Board and man-
agement agreements.

BTC’s financial performance
is said to have recovered to a
$34.533 million net profit in
2005, up from $8.34 million in
2004, but the firm is heavily











depetidént on its continuing
cellular monopoly to remain
afloat.

Competition has eroded
BTC’s profitability and rev-
enues in almost every area it
competes in, and opening up
cellular - while the benefiting
the Bahamian private sector
and consumer - could have dis-
astrous consequences for BTC.

The failure to privatise is
also holding up liberalisation
of the Bahamian telecoms
industry, with the Government
doing everything it can to pre-
serve BTC’s competitive posi-
tion by holding back rivals
Cable Bahamas and Systems
Resource Group (SRG).

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ROYCE MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

(b) The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on June 12, 2006,
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of Shirley -
House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company is
required on or before the 12th day of July 2006 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

June 13, 2006

ALISA RICHARDSON
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



chy Ne

Ramey
wealth of The Bahamas

also....make plans to attend the prestigious...

CEE Awards
June 16th, 2006

The Rain Forest Auditorium, Whyndam, Nassau Resort
NY

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND OUR SCHEDULE PLEASE CONTACT

Poy Sy eat) a,



POBOEOEEeH42

eeerveeces

evevee



La aie

PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

course, expanding the reverse

those interested in buying prop-

THE TRIBUNE.

imposing its vision for the devel-





NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that GIBSON RAPHAEL,HAMPTON
‘ST OFF WULFF RD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
‘the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
‘that any person who knows any reason why registration/
‘naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
‘and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
‘from the 6TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
‘for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
‘Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEATRICE NOEL, P.O. Box
‘EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
‘responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
.|‘registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
‘from the 13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
‘for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
‘Bahamas. ;



















Guana Cay, from 1B

court.

The Tribune had been told by
informed sources that the devel-
opers had been relatively cir-
cumspect over the pace at which
they had restarted work, given
that Justice Carroll was yet to rule
on the merits of the Association’s
case.

Dr Marshall more or less con-
firmed this yesterday, saying in
reference to the Supreme Court:
“We obviously have to keep that
in mind.”

However, he pointed out that
developments of the size pro-
posed by Baker’s Bay did not
happen overnight, saying a
tremendous amount of planning
and preparatory work had to be
undertaken.

The developers were now refo-
cusing on activities such as mov-
ing native trees out of the devel-
opment’s way, designing the golf

BEC, from 1B

CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

Vacancy for

Administrative Assistant

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible to the project Manager and
clerical and Administrative support. The successful candidate will be
responsible for documenting meetings, organizing and coordinating meeting
schedules, preparing all project communications and correspondence,
distributing project information and generally ensuring that all matters
relating to the project are fully and project documented in a timely manner.
The candidate must possess excellent typing and record keeping skills and be
proficient in the use of various software applications such as MS Word, MS

PowerPoint and MS Excel, among others.

. .

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required:

¢ Associates Degree or Certified Professional Secretary Rating , or Certified

_ Administrative Professional Rating; .

* Detailed knowledge of computers to complete correspondence (e.g.,MS Word),
create and maintain forms, reports (e.g., MS Excel), presentation (e.g., MS
Power Point), and brochures and to respond to email as necessary;

¢ Basic business and accounting knowledge to prepare-documentation. and...

Sen een nt} wey ny
aye

/bRsee ater at

statistical report;

Oa VEL

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills, including etiquette and
writing skills, to interact with associates and external persons, and to create

correspondence;

¢ Judgement requirement in treatment of information with confidentiality and

professionalism; ;

* Ability to operate a variety of office equipment, including computer, calculator,

printer, fax, machine, and photocopier -

Send Resumes to:

CBA - ACH Administrative Assistant Response
Bank of the Bahamas International.
1st Floor, Claughton House
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

Nassau, Bahamas

__ E-mail responses may be sent to:
Samantha.Antonio@BankBahamas.com





as:

Pricing Information As Of:
9 June 2006



Close Today's Close _

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank.
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

, Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs°
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson :
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings
.00 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets



Fund Name




1.2897 1.2339 Colina Money Market Fund 1.289693"

2.8564 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.78564 ***

2.3560 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**
Colina Bond Fund

BISX Al 5 |
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

10.44



2D

“Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Last 12 Months

22.44

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity





Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

Div $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
P/E = Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The






osmosis plant and paving roads.
They had been unable to do some
of those projects while the under-
taking was in effect.

“In a development of this size,
you’re going to have some chal-
lenges now and then,” Dr Mar-
shall said. “Once people get a
close up look at the plans, those
that sit and visit with us will see
what we’re doing is environmen-
tally friendly and makes a lot of
sense.

“We think we’re going to con-
tinue on as before, making the
project better and doing what’s
best for the environment.”

Dr Marshall said Baker’s Bay,
which when built will be a pri-
vate member’s club, featuring 350
residential lots and a 75-room lux-
ury villa, had not closed any real
estate sales yet.

“We haven’t doné any sales
yet,” he added. “We have been
talking to potential buyers and
had a magnificent response from

The $81.9 million increase in
BEC’s fuel bill over three years
had been passed on to Bahamian

businesses and residential con-_

sumers through the fuel sur-
charge, Mr Millersaid. .

He added that in 2005, the
average fuel surcharge paid by
low income Bahamian families,
based on average consumption of
200 kilowatt hours per month,
was $178.93. For middle income
families, using 1,000 kilowatt
hours per month, they were pay-
ing $894.63.

For upper income families, Mr
Miller said they were paying an
average of $1,789.25 per month
to BEC for the fuel surcharge,
based on 2,000 kilowatt hours per
month. Commercial enterprises
were paying $254,969 per month
to BEC, based on 275,000 kilo-
watt hours per month usage.

Turning to the hotel.industry, .

Mr Miller said small hotels with
between 50-100 rooms were pay-
ing a fuel surcharge to BEC of
around $244,600 per month.
For properties with 200-300
rooms, this increased to $377,115,
while for hotels with 500-1,000
rooms, the figure was $1.722 mil-
lion.

Mr Miller said these figures did
not include the basic electricity
rate that BEC also charged con-
sumers.

He added that.in October 2004,
BEC received $4.9 million from
consumers as a result of the fuel
surcharge, while by September
2005, this had risen to $12 mil-
lion.

Mr Miller told the House of

“Assembly yesterday: “Based on
proposals we had received, BEC ©

could have saved approximately

’ $10 million per annum, while hav-

ing access to credit facilities of up

to 40 per cent of their annual pur- *.

chases at 1 per cent interest
instead of the present interest
rates of around 6 per cent per
annum. This would have meant
further savings of about $5 million
over the grace period.”

Thus did Mr Miller make an -

impassioned plea for the. Gov-
ernment to revisit PetroCaribe,
even though he no longer has
ministerial responsibility for the
issue.

His address did not touch on
the fact that PetroCaribe, the
brainchild of Venezuelan leader
Hugo: Chavez, which many
observers view as an attempt to
buy the support of Caribbean
nations in global forums in his
ongoing verbal war with the US,
does not mean lower oil - and
therefore lower gas - prices.

PetroCaribe would entail an
‘oil on credit’ deal, with the
Bahamas - if it signed on - pur-
chasing oil and petroleum-related
products directly from Venezue-

la’s state-owned PDVSA via a.

National Energy Agency, cutting
_ out the wholesale. arm of the
major oil companies.

iS) Ouine

Div $

ae
19.4
8.0
N/M

0.000
0.360
000





*-31 May 2006

** - 01 May 2006

EPS $ - A company's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths

*** - 30 April 2006

se** - 31 March 2006

erties.
“Once we’ve completed the

Phase IJ subdivision and all items, .

we'll be in a position to move for-
ward with hard sales.” ’

Dr Marshall also denied claims
that Discovery Land Company
had begun hiring Mexican work-
ers to work on the Baker’s Bay
project, as the developers had
been unable to find enough
Bahamians with sufficient skills.

He said: “I have no knowledge
of that. I don’t think we’re at that
stage yet. Our first priority and
commitment is certainly to hire
Bahamians first, and beyond that
we'll see.”

The dispute between the devel-
opers and Association over the
Baker’s Bay investment project
has raised’ a host of issues relating
to this nation’s processes for
approving major investment pro-
jects.

Apart from consultation with
local populations and Nassau

‘Although the Bahamas would

- only have to pay a percentage of

the full price, say $0.60 of every
$1, up front, and be able to pay
the rest off over time, critics of

' the PetroCaribe arrangement’
believe this would add further to

the Bahamas already substantial
debt burden, storing up future
problems for the public finances.

Mr Miller was also previously

frustrated in his attempts to per- |

suade the Ministry of Finance to
reduce the taxes levied on the
landed cost of fuel, amounting to
$1.06 per gallon of unleaded gaso-



Bahamas.



Bahamas. «

of publication of this notice.








NOTICE is hereby given that NATASHA SIMEON OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
‘and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 138TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-.7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEAUNENFANT NOEL, P.O. | |.
Box EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed.statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the.13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
‘The Public is hereby advised that |, VETILUS JEANITE, of
Washington St., Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my,name
to FRANCILLAN MITCHELL. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,:
-| Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
THE TRADING COMPANY, LTD.

Interested persons please fax resume to

opment of the Bahamas on areas |

"that may not want major projects,

the controversy has also high~
lighted the need for a National

Land Use policy and the leasing ©,"

of Crown and Treasury land.to
developers. .

Some 105 acres of Crown Land
and 20 acres of Treasury Land
are being leased to the developers
at what the Government
describes as “normal commercial
terms”.

While Discovery Land Com-
pany has pledged that 66 acres of
the leased land will be used for a
nature preserve accessible to
Bahamians and Guana Cay resi-
dents, the issue has sparked
debate on whether Crown and
Treasury Land should be
reserved exclusively for the ben-
efit of Bahamians. :

Other issues raised by the bat-
tle include the transparency

involved in the investor approvals

process in the Bahamas.

line, with a further 7 per cent:

stamp duty on top. Hi

The minister argued that sign-
ing on to PetroCaribe could have
saved Bahamian consumers any-
where between $0.25-$1 per gal-
lon on gasoline and diesel import-
ed. At $0.25 per gallon, this would
have saved the Bahamas $21 mil-
‘lion per year, and at $1 per gallon,
$85 million per year.

Mr Miller said the Bahamas
collectively spent $525.2 million
on petroleum ‘products in. 2005,
an increase of $159.8 million or 44
per cent over 2004. ate
























|








(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, commencing on the 7th day of June, 2006.
Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the
Registrar. The Liquidator is Barry W. Herman, P.O. Box N-
10818, Nassau, The Bahamas.

‘All persons having claims against the above-names
Company are required, on or before the 8th day of July, 2006
to send their names and addresses and particulars of their |
debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company or, in j
default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit or
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Dated this 7th day of June 2006.

ett ee

BARRY W. HERMAN
LIQUIDATOR’

NURSING CAREER:
OPPORTUNITY

Plastic Surgery office is seeking a full-time

REGISTERED
NURSE.

Great benefits; including assistance in
funding for Specialized training.









PLE

328-6479 or Call 356-3189

for further information.




SIPS gp hs SSS SEE RE oT BHI +
ASEM g SSNs eee s

Sat

est

aR

x

PRA TT Dene
MEeae dere

ee MoS na Sp aap AL RL RN RS a ATER SY GS SON ARR

DEERE RE ERO, Oe Ge at 9 a

&

NN

a

SEY Ot SHG ANN

+ALL ERLE ERA ARG LSA TRE moh

gisiacn

wenteiees

we

eters



“THE TV RERUIME BUGHNEaaa

GN-361



' SUPREME COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas

June 15, 2006

-~PROBATE DIVISION
‘ NO.2006/PRO/NPR/00293

"In the estate of CHARLES STANLEY COCKSHULL,

‘late of 116 Central Avenue Southend on Sea Essex,

;, United Kingdom,
- deceased.

,NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
“of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Side by KEVIN M. RUSSELL, of No.

[ 14 Doubloon Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
7 | Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney

in The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant

-of Probate in the above estate granted to EILEEN
| FRANCES DOROTHY TOTTMAN, the personal
| ‘representative, by the High Court of Justice, The
| Probate Registry of the Family Division, on the 26th
: day oF Reomualy 2004.

Signed
D. Robinson
i - (for) Registrar © ~

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT

| ays epie-vire PROBATE DIVISION
Geaes RY GEC OS qinet sun arabe A OU8

“No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00308

Whereas REBECCA FERGUSON, of The Settlement
of Forest on the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful

‘Widow has made application to the Supreme Court
: ‘of The Bahamas, for Letters of. Administration ‘of the
| | real and. personal estate of NAAMON FERGUSON

a. k.a. NAAMAN FERGUSON a.k.a. NAMON

| FERGUSON late of Forest Exuma, one of the Islands

B: “of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

| Notice is hereby given ‘that such applications will
| be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
a | days from the date hereof.

: D. Robinson
: (for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE.BAHAMAS
: THE SUPREME COURT
thy PROBATE DIVISION

BAGO (here arcs June 15, 2006

'
oo}
1

T No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00309

| Whereas MARK ANTHONY BETHEL, of #45 |

Seabreeze Lane, Eastern District, New Providence,
-one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

- Bahamas, the Eldest Lawful Son has made

application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,

for;Letters of Administration for the real and personal .

estate of ETHELYN MAE BETHEL, late of #3 Baker
us ' Street, Southern District, New Providence, one of

i the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, ©

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

PY ce

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00310

Whereas HARTIS EUGENE PINDER, of Mareva
House, 4 George Street, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Beryl

Margaret Hall-Sturrup, the Sole Executor has made |'

application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed
of the real and personal estate of JOHN KENNETH
CULMER, late of Murphyville in the Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14

‘days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/0031 1
Whereas SANDRA MAE MEADOWS, of Clifton

Street, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, one

‘of the Lawful: Sisters has made application to the

Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate’ of

- WILLIAM JAMES MEADOWS, late of Clifton Street, |

Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF: THE BAHAMAS
. THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00313

Whereas PATRICIA SCOTT, of Allen Lane of
Carmichael Road, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration de bonis non
of the real and personal estate of DONALD COLLIN
SCOTT a.k.a. DONALD SCOTT late of Bobolink

_ Terrace, Monastery Park, New Providence, one of

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. |

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00314 -

Whereas FLORENCE ROLLE, of Harbour Close #5

Bel-Air Estates, Western District, New Providence,

one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas the Lawful Widow, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of
REYNOLD ROLLE late of Harbour Close #5 Bel-Air
Estates, Western District, New Providence, one of

‘the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

VIERA, ENS Dt, AUG, PAGE SE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. °
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006 -

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00315

Whereas TAMIKA K. SYMONETT of Churchill |

Avenue, Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New: |
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth”
of The Bahamas, the Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Pamela Theresa Symmonette, the
Lawful Widow has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration §

-of the real and personal estate of WAYNE -

GEOFFREY SYMMONETTE a.k.a. WAYNE ..|
GEOFFREY SYMMONETT late of Churchill Avenue,

Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonweatth of The ||
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications wilt .
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof. -

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEATI A OF THE - BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT —

_ PROBATE DIVISION

‘June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00316

Whereas GORDON FITZGERALD LIGHTBOURNE ©
of Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New §
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the Lawful Widower has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,

for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of ROCHELLE LOUISE LIGHTBOURNE late
of Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New.
Providence, one of the Islands of the Conmonwedtt
of The Bahamas, deceased. ;

Notice is hereby given that such applications will:

be. heard by the said, Court at the eXpIaNOne of ids

days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS.
THE SUPREME COURT
~~ PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00320
Whereas BRIDGET EVANS of Boyd Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
LESTER DAVIS late of Unity House, East Street,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

‘Notice is hereby given that such applications will §
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof. _

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

' June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00321

Whereas MICHELLE GEORGINA JOHNSON of
Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Daughters has made application .
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of
WILBER JOHN FERGUSON late of Imperial Park,
Eastern District, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will |
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

June 12, 13, 14







PAGE 6B,
‘ - <
-
+
a —
( wet'Ge ow oot

| =m Cth of

| UESDAY, JUNE 13, 2UU0

Re re ee



. Bahamas’ cricketers
shine i in the s potlight

@ CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter

PLAYING ‘under the lights’
was a huge concern for the

Bahamas Cricket Association |

(BCA), but the 20-member
team passed their first test with
flying colours.

Participating in several exhi-
bition games over the weekend,
as preparation for the historic
Stanford 20/20 aside tourna-
ment, the squad travelled to
South Florida capturing two vic-
tories from the three games

played.

Having to play for the first
time ‘under the lights’, the
Bahamas didn’t adjust straight

_away, losing the match-up to

the South Florida Cricket

Team impresses
‘under the lights’



Batting first, the All-Star
team scored a total of 214 runs
in their 20 overs with the
Bahamas being bowled out for
129 runs. The All-Star team
won. the game by 85 runs.

Top scorers in this match-up
were Dhillion Mandeep of the
All-Star team with 11 runs and
Allan Dennis with 66 runs.

Bahamas’ bowler Dwight
Weakly took two wickets, with
Gary Armstrong and Venris

Returning to the field on Sat-
urday morning, the Bahamas
came storming back to win the
game held at Brian Picolo Park
by 15 runs. Batting first, the
team was bowled out for 158
runs in 30 overs while the All-
Star team was bowled out for
143 runs.

Top scorers were Armstrong
with 40 runs, William Atkinson

with 34 runs, Wayne Patrick

scored 15 while Mario Ford bat-
ted in 16 runs. The bowling was

shared once again in this game .

for the Bahamas with Patrick
taking four wickets for 25 runs,
Gary Armstrong, Lew Arm-
strong and Dwight Weakley
took one wicket each.

The second test at an ‘under
the: lights’ game for the
Bahamas was played late Sat-
urday night against the Lauder-
hill All-Stars. This was the first
20/20 match for the Bahamas
since being selected to partici-
pate in the 20/20 tournament.

The Bahamas, who won the
match-up by five wickets,
scored 146 runs in their loss of
five wickets.

Top scorers in the game for
the Bahamas were Ford with 51
runs and Weakley with 38 runs.
Ken Singh scored 39 runs for
the Lauderhill All-Stars with

Roy Weeks and Ray Bascas

League All-Star team.

Bennett taking one wicket each.

birewt rome w in

Copyrighted Material
Syndicated
Available from Commercial News Providers

| a

Content
a









Event aims to send youth
on the right direction

‘BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

EMPHASISING the importance of

the youngsters being guided in the right

direction, coach Greg Cash is launching
his fifth annual Royal Priesthood Bas-
ketball Camp and Summer League.

The duel event will get underway on
June 29 and run through July 22 at the
Temple Christian Gymnasium between
the hours of 9am and 1pm.

“We’re hoping to have all those per-

: sons who were a part of the camp last

year and all those persons who are look-
ing forward to developing their skills in
basketball,” Cash stressed.

“The camp has been real productive i in
helping the youngsters, boys and girls.

But the camp is limited because the facil-
ities in the gym are very tight.”

On a daily basis, Cash said the partic-
ipants will be taken through the basic
dribbling, passing and shooting skills and
they will also bé taught about the local

basketball players who excelled in the

past.

Greats

Some of the greats like Reggie Forbes,.

Peter Gilcud and Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove
are expected to lend their assistance —
along with persons from the business
community — to share their expertise
with the participants.

“The gym is pretty small and we bring
in another basketball rim to assist with

the younger players,” Cash noted. “We
know many of the schools have bene-
fitted from the camp because many of
the players have gone on to represent
their schools in the GSSSA and the
BAISS.”

The camp is geared to boys and girls

between the ages of 8-16.

They will be divided into the ages of 7-
9, 10-12 and 13-16 — the latter of
which is geared to the developmental
skills.

Each day will get started with devo-
tions, followed by a pep talk, condition-
ing drill and then the basic skills of pass-
ing, shooting and dribbling skills.

After they have been instructed, the
players have an opportunity to display to
the instructors what they have been
taught in scrimmage games.

fu

scoring 37 and 33 runs respec-
tively.

T he historic Stanford 20/20.
tournament, which will feature: -
19 teams from throughout the
Caribbean vying for the top
prize of US $1,000,000, will start :
on July 11th, with the Bahamas}
playing the second match-up:
against the Cayman Islands
squad.

The tournament, which. is.
being played at the Stanford,
Cricket grounds in Antigua, will;
feature teams from Anguilla,
Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas,
Barbados, Bermuda, British |
Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands,
Dominica, Grenada, Guyana’,
Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts’
and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Marten, -

- St. Vincent and the Grenadines,

Trinidad & Tobago, and ihe .
Virgin Islands.

Congtdout t6 |
basketball and)

swim camp.. |
i By ANDRE DAVIS |

VETERAN basketball
coach John Todd is in high
spirits as the countdown: to|'
his annual Basketball and‘).
Swim Camp continues. .

The 22nd annual event;
which will commence three
weeks from today (July 3rd-
14th) at St Augustine’s Col- -
lege, will cater to boys and
girls between the ages of six
through 14.

The camp, being spon-
sored by the Caribbean Bot-
tling Company and First
Caribbean Bank, ‘stresses
discipline through the two
sports of basketball and
swimming. —

Unlike the other camps
hosted during the summer
months whose major attrac-
tions are top international
players, the John Todd Bas-
ketball and Swim Camp fea- |
tures the accomplishments
of outstanding Bahamian
players and coaches.

According to Todd, “The
camp is an excellent oppor-
tunity for the ‘youth of our. |
nation to improve their skills
on and off the court.” ‘|.

“I might not be able. to.
award your child or children
the opportunity to meet |'
international players or |'
coaches, but they will have |
the basics of the two disci-' |’
plines when they leave the i
camp,” he added. ets

“Along with the funda-:'
mentals awarded the child
will know the pioneers of the: |:
sports, like the Cynthia}:
‘Mother’ Pratt, the first: 4;
female to hit a jump shot. |;
History is important and I:
strongly believe if a child can
relate to where these per-).
sons came from then their,.
journey in life will be pros-
perous.” ;

As the history of the two. 1.
sports in the Bahamas is -
highlighted at the camp, ite
was fitting for Todd to seek’ |’
the assistance of instructors’ |”
who have played and suc/
ceed on the national level. *'|'

Leading the way is Reg="|?
gie Forbes, current Dean. of ‘|’
students at St. Augustine’s '}?
College and a former nation-
al team player, coach and }°
official. He will be assisted
by Anastacia Moultrie, assis~
tant coach of the junior girls {.
national team and a mem-.};
ber of the senior ladies_|.
national basketball and vol-
leyball Teams; Devon John-_|;
son, physical education
teacher at St. Francis
Joseph, and a coach and bas-
ketball. offictal and Counte
Graham, Canadian basket-
ball coach and physical edu- '
cation teacher. i.

The camp’s package this °
year will include an Intense
Basic Basketball and Swim- ’
ming Fundamentals kit, bas-
ketball shirts, awards and |:
prizes, quality instruction, |
team competition, group ses-
sions, special guest appear-
ance with lunch and drinks:
The camp runs from 9am-
2.30pm.

For more information
please contact John Todd at
324-1512 or 341-2646. Appli-
cation forms can be picked
up at St. Augustine’s Col-
lege between 8am- 4pm
Monday through Friday.



TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 7B 7



SPORTS

= Kumble, Sehwag and Patel “—

‘sx India to match-winning —

_——-
—_-S- —
— x
'_—o> >< _—_ --— 2
- —_ —, —
-* _—— 7 —_— —ie
__ > - ~- ——_— — Guew § = _ —_ _
— o- - . -~® -«
-_ o- —_ ——
= - — — > tm - . -
a - _ —_—*- —_ —_— -
- - = - - - - -~ ——
7 _ ._—-
-- ee 7 >
on -_ ° —— - ~— = =
i _— =— & = =
e =a = —_ a
- _ =_— —-—p
rc. h- «a *& --
- - —_> J — a “~ -_- *
- = ~ ——_-— -
= ma - 7 °
“ = ~-> - -
~~



at





He: : 2 ~ Copyrighted Material

_ Syndicated Content Z
-— ~~



—_—_ &

~ - i

i

ed





TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Auite Oe

fg TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

RETIRED veteran Leo
Rolle has been around
long enough to know what
it takes for the Bahamas to
succeed in the Americas
Davis Cup tie.

Rolle, a legend from the
Commonwealth Caribbean
team before the Bahamas
gained the rights to play
under its own flag, is cur-
rently in El Salvador with
this year’s youthful Davis
Cup team.

The Bahamas, captained
by Jobn Farrington and
comprising of Devin
Mullings, Marvin Rolle,
H’Cone Thompson and
Chris Eldon, has been
placed in Group III of the
round robin tournament as
the number one seed
against Costa Rica, Cuba,
E] Salvador and Haiti.

The first two teams from
each pool advance to
another round-robin
group. The teams finishing
first and second in this
final pool are promoted to
Americas Zone Group II
in 2007.

‘The teams finishing third
and fourth in each pool

advance to another round- |

robin pool. The teams fin-
ishing in third and fourth
in this subsequent pool are
relegated to Americas
Zone Group IV in 2007.

Rolle, the lone Bahami-
an supporting the team,
said they had a good prac-
tice on Monday morning,
but weren’i able to return
to the courts at the Mia
Country Club in the after-
noon because of the rain.

“But the players are
excited and ready to go,”
Rolle stressed. “This is a.
young team and they are
progressing year by year
and they are working hard
at trying to get us back up
to zone one.’

However, he was unable

to disclose any further —
details on the draw as Far-
rington was attending a
Captain’s meeting at the
club where the draw was
being finalised.

This is the first time that
the Bahamas has béen
dropped to Zone III after
enjoying a great deal of
success at Zone One for at
least a decade.

Having played at the
Davis Cup level before,
Rolle said.the Bahamas
“chances.are as good as
any other team.”

“Tt’s the best of three,”

_he said, “not the best of
five as in the World Group
or Zone One and II.

“So you can look at the
possibility of splitting the -
singles and having to go

with the doubles to decide |

the match. It’s similar to
-Zone One and II, only you
play three matches in each
tie.”

Rolle, the son of Marvin
Rolle, last played on the
Davis Cup team in 1990
when the Bahamas played
in Barbados in the second
round.

As the third member of
the team behind Roger
Smith and Farrington,
Rolle was scheduled to
play in the rubber match,
but gave up his spot for
younger Sean Cartwright
to gain the experience.

The team, captained.
then by. John Antonas,
eventually lost 4-1 to Bar-
bados. That year, the
BLTA was headed by Bar-
rie Farrington as the presi-
dent.

Three years after that
loss, the Bahamas
advanced to Zone One in
1993 and stayed there until
2003 before dropping to
Zone II. Last year in
Colombia, the Bahamas
dropped to Zone III.

“I saw this coming,” said
Rolle of the Bahamas’
drop. “But I feel kind con-
fident that the this team
will do us very well this
year.”

The Bahamas is expect-
ed to start play on
Wednesday.







MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers

Pe eo *



ry

2

bel new heights

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AS USUAL, the men and
women’s sprints are expect-
ed to be in the spotlight at
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’
National Open Track and
Field Championships this
weekend.

But one of the marquee
events the fans can look for-
ward to watching on the
field will be the men’s high
jump on Friday night at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

At least six competitors,
who have cleared over seven
feet, are entered in the
event.

BAAA’s public relations
officer Ralph McKinney said
although they anticipate the
fans coming out to view the
sprints, collegians Trevor
Barry and Donald Thomas,
along with veterans James
Rolle and Edgar Light-
bourne and young rising
stars Jamaal Wilson and Carl
Grant from Grand Bahama
should raise some eyebrows
in the high jump pit.

“This is a high calibre high
jump event,” McKinney pro-
jected. “I could safely say
that the. winner will do at

BAAA National Open Track and



least 7-4 or even 7-5 and I
think the fourth place fin-
isher could do at least 7-0.

“This is probably the
deepest field of high jumpers
that we’ve had in a long
time. So. it should be very,
very competitive.”

Bahamians will get the
first chance to see Thomas
live in person after the
Grand Bahama former bas-
ketball player made a splash
in a collegiate meet, clear-
ing 7-0 in his basketball
shorts.

Stunned

Thomas went on to the

Commonwealth Games in
Melbourne, Australia in
March where he stunned the
field, competing in his
sneakers.

He turned in an incredible
fourth place finish, but was
quite disappointed that he
didn’t medal in his interna-
tional debut for the
Bahamas.

Barry, Rolle, Lightbourne,
Wilson and Grant all repre-
sented the Bahamas at either
the Carifta Games or the
Central American and
Caribbean Games. .

Also on the field Friday
night, the fans will get to see
Aymara Albury go after
another record breaking per-
formance in the women’s
shot put.

Representing the Univer-

sity of Alabama Tigers,

Albury is coming off a ninth
place finish at the NCAA
Outdoor Championships on
Saturday night. .

Albury has lowered the
national record at least three
times this year.

The highlight on the track

. Friday night will come in the

100 metres.

On the men’s side,
Michael Reckley has posted
the fastest time of the field
entered with 10.23 seconds.
The next fastest time is 10.29
by Adrian Griffin.

Jamial Rolle,
member of the Common-

another |

Field Championships preview

wealth Gamies team, has the
third best time of 10.34, the
same as Dereck Atkins.
Everette Frazer round out
the top five in 10.38.
Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie, coming off an injury year

last year, has clocked the

fastest time on the women’s
side in 11.14. She is in con-
tention for a share of the $1
million jackpot on the Grand
Prix circuit.

Injuries

Chandra-Sturrup, also
back after a series of
injuries, has the next best
time of 11.58. Common-
wealth Games’ team-mate
Timicka Clarke is third on
the list at 11.47.

Sheniqtia Ferguson, one of
the top young stars, has
climbed to number four with
a time of 11.63 she posted at
the Carifta Games in Guade-
loupe in April. ,

She sits ahead of. veteran
Sevatheda Fynes, who is also



slowly working her badk
from a series of injuries atid
has the fifth best time of
11.70. bes

The field is also expected
to include collegian Petra
Munroe (11.76) and Carifta
team-mates T’Shonda Webb
(11.81) and Grand Bahavae
an Nivea Smith (11.90).

Also on Friday, the pre-
liminaries of the 400 will be
contested, but top contender
Chris Brown has already
announced that he will opt
out of the men’s event
and just run the 200 on Sat-
urday.

And world cham pigeh
Tonique Williams-Darling
and Christine Amertil may
not clash again in, the wom-
en’s 400 as they have both
been entered in the 200...::

“We, as an association,
have to find a way to give
the fans what they want to
see,” said McKinney,-in
terms of the competitors
competing in their specialty
events.

The meet will get started
at 6pm on Friday. The meet
serves as a trials for the
NACAC Under-23 Champi-
onships, July.7-9 in Santo
Domingo and the Central
American and Caribbean
Games, July 25-29 in El Sal-
vador.

v

ae



Full Text


Claims of






#m lovin’ it.

88F
77F

SHOWER OR
FSTORM



‘al Baker F oT

| DEVELOPERS ‘REALLY FOCUSED’





. The Tribune

The Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION





JESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006





PRICE — 75¢





Eight reportedly
infected,
to update public

te ie

>
?
>

i By. PAUL TURNQUEST
and PACO NUNEZ

““ THERE are now at least

eight confirmed cases of
malaria in the Bahamas,
according to .well-placed
sources.

Initial reports from the Min-
istry of Health indicated that a
case discovered in Exuma last
week was isolated — however,
two independent sources
inside the medical community
say the government is now
treating at-least eight cases of.
the fever.

One source said health offi-
cials were aware of three cas-
es by last week Friday and an
additional five by Monday.
However, the government has
yet to update the ube on

the matter.

It is understood government
has ordered a rush delivery of

chloroquine phosphate, a

chetnical used 'to treat: malaria,
as only a small supply is kept
in the'‘country to inoculate res-
idents who are travelling to
regions where the fever is
prevalent.

Yesterday, The Tribune
attempted to contact Minister
of Health Dr Bernard Nottage
for comment, as well as Direc-
tor of Public Health Baldwin
Carey, Health Permanent Sec-
retary Elma Garroway, Chief
Medical Officer Merceline

Dahl-Regis and Public Hos- ~

pitals Authority managing

ext) ONLY GN TUESDAYS!

t
L
a

govt yet

director Herbert Brown, but:
all were said to be in meet-

ings.
According to one source, all

- eight cases were diagnosed i in

Exuma and the patients were
sent to New Providence,
where biood tests confirmed

that they were suffering from

malaria.

Another source stated that
Ministry of Health officials
were first alerted to the case

.. after an American, working

on one of the cays in Exuma,
tested positive for the disease
upon his return to the US.
Reportedly, it was the US
medical officials who contact-
ed the Bahamas' Ministry of
Health, thus spurring on the
department’ s push for the
immediate implementation of
preventative measures. .
Health officials maintain
that the kind of mosquito that
carries the disease is not
prevalent in the Bahamas, but
that sporadic cases are
encountered from time to
time. As Health officials pre-
viously emphasised, such cas-
es are usually imported.
Common symptoms of
malaria include recurrent
bouts of fever, chills, body
aches, pains and headaches.

The ministry advised that if

persons are experiencing
such symptoms they should
report immediately to the
nearest health care provider
or clinic.



Taree cars in PPE

â„¢@ THERE was a three-car collision on Dowdeswell Street. yesterday. The accident

reportedly caused a substantial back up of traffic, with the funeral of ZNS veteran Gor- -
don Lowe taking place nearby. There were no reports of any injuries in the accident.



Prosecutors want

separate trials for man

accused of murders
of 22-year-old and
four schoolboys

i By NATARIO McKENZIE

’ PROSECUTORS want mur-
der accused Cordell Farrington

to be tried separately for the

murders of Jamaal Robins, 22,
and four Grand Bahama school-
boys whose disappearance in
2003 sparked fear throughout
the country.

According to prosecutors, the
cases. have been transferred
from Grand Bahama to, New

- Providence Supreme Court to

avoid jury prejudice.

Cheryl Grant-Bethel, deputy
director of prosecutions, who
was accompanied by prosecu-
tors Stephanie Pintard and-Shirl
Deveaux made several submis-
sion before Acing Chief Justice
Anita Allen yesterday as to why
murder accused Farrington
should be tried separately for
Robins’ murder and the mur-
der of the four boys. Accord-
ing to. Mrs Grant-Bethel,

SEE page 11



(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune staff)

(ee

| Group forme
to investigate

concerns over

marine life -

m By MARK HUMES



AGRICULTURE Minister
Leslie Miller announced the
formation of a.group to-inves-
tigate and respond to ques-
tions about the environmen-
tal impact on Bahamian
marine life as a result of activ-
ities at the AUTEC facility.

_The announcement by Min-
ister Miller comes as a result
of calls by local and interna-

_ tional environmentalists seek-

ing an explanation for the
recent beaching of whales in
areas around the facility.
“Recently many questions
have been raised with regards
to the stranding of marine
mammals in The Bahamas,”
said Minister Miller. “In

- response to these questions

and others raised about other
possible environmental
impacts, a working group has

SEE page 10

_ Bozine Town committee hits out at minister’ S comments

i. By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

COMMENTS by Minister of Agriculture
Leslie Miller in the Bozine Town land dispute
have left residents fearing that their democratic
rights are being threatened, aeounne to the
area’s steering committee.

In an interview with The Tribune, Mr Miller,

MP for the area, advised Bozine Town residents
that their planned demonstration in front of the
House of Assembly on Wednesday will not
advance their cause by “one single step.”

_ “Such a statement should not be made in a
democracy, we have the right to peacefully
protest for our cause,”

SEE page 11

Tyrone Brown, chair-

A farewell to ZNS veteran y

FRIENDS and family gathered yesterday to pay a final farewell to ZNS veteran Gor-
don Lowe at St Matthew’s Anglican Church-on Shirley and Church Street.

Mr Lowe died last week of a heart attack at the age of 58.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, East West Highway
tol:242-304-1759 » fax: 242-384-1859 » email: bwabahamaa@voretwave.com
In Freeport: tet; 242-361-2201 » fax: 242-961.2216


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

Songbird’s life reminds us of

our potential for greatness —

QUITE remarkable Bahami-

an life came to an end recent-
ly. Kayla Lockhart Edwards sang her
way with joy, performed the closing
notes with grace, and orchestrated her
going home with style.

Throughout the entire performance
she brought much enjoyment to the
nation, made us feel good about our-
selves and taught us some valuable
lessons.

Mrs Edwards finally succumbed after
a protracted but spirited battle with

cancer. Although she received a Silver .

Jubilee Award in 1998, she was inade-
quately recognised for the outstanding
services she rendered to her country.
Prime Minster Perry Christie alluded
to this in his remarks at her going home
celebration when he acknowledged that
we have not yet got it right when it

comes: to recognising outstanding.

Bahamians during their lifetime.

One reason for that is, of course, that
we.sometimes allow petty politics to
interfere with our best judgment. One of
those listening to Mr Christie was
Edmund Moxey, another Bahamian cul-
tural giant and brother of Mrs Edwards.

Nearly four decades ago Mr Moxey
had the brilliant idea of creating a com-
prehensive national cultural village
Over-the-Hill. It would have been a
permanent exhibition of Bahamian cul-
ture in all its aspects and a centre for the
development of Bahamian arts and
crafts. -

One.can only imagine the positive
impact Jumbey Village might have had
on succeeding generations of Bahami-
ans’~'and the nation as a whole — in
terms of cultural advancement, person-
al development, national pride and eco-
nomuc opportunities.

\ he project was actually started,

but petty politics got in the way
and it was aborted. Now, as the
Bahanmias struggles against'a sea of neg-
ative cultural influences and so many
of our young people are adrift, the
deferral of Mr Moxey’s dream is to be
especially lamented. It was a colossal
mistake.

The prodigious conttibution of Mrs
“y fection.”

Edwards’ to our cultural developme
was widely, if not. officially, re

in her lifetime. She was, ‘attistically "

speaking, first and foremost a songbird,
and all her other cultural pursuits sprang
from the love of that musical expres-
sion.

Hers was the voice that taught a
fledgling nation how to sing its new
national anthem, an anthem written by






the talented Bahamian teacher and
composer Timothy Gibson more than
three decades ago.

For the celebration of our transition
from colony to sovereign nation in 1973,
she was also musical producer and co-
director of the Independence Cultural
Pageant, and Cultural Affairs Assistant
to our first Director of Culture, E
Clement Bethel, yet another superbly
talented Bahamian.

But there was more, a great deal
more. Mrs Edwards organised many
cultural events at home and led or
participated in many Bahamian cul-
tural expeditions abroad. She was
writer, composer, producer, organiser,
actor and teacher. Her passion in all
these things was the pursuit of per-

Happily, just weeks before she
passed, Mrs Edwards was made aware
of the love and gratitude felt by so many
as she was honoured by her colleagues
in the performing arts community with
a wonderful variety show at the Theatre
for the Performing Arts.

The cultural tributes continued at a
memorial event and at her going home



“The couniey ¢ can be proud that the
tradition continues today with an
abundant crop of fine younger
performers, many of whom have had
their talents honed and nurtured by

Mrs Edwards.



FREE ANT IeG ANY WHERE IN eo FW Kew eID MAIL BOAT
° E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

onald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

> SExT H TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322- 1731 OR 322-3875




.

ces On The Island”



Mrs Edwards was not only
multi-talented, vivacious and beautiful;
she was also generous with her art, in
her commitment to developing the
talents of others, and in her direct
service to the nation.



‘celebration at the Diplomat Centre on

Carmichael Road. All of these were
attended by impressive cross-sections
of the community.

ow, both Prime. Minster

Y Christie and Leader of the

Opposition Hubert Ingraham are in

agreement that her life and work should
be suitably memorialised.

Why such an outpouring? Mrs

Edwards was not only multi-talented,

' vivacious and beautiful; she was also
generous with her art, in her commit-.

ment to developing the talents of others,
and in her direct service to the nation.
“Kayla loved her country and all its
people,” said Mr Christie. “She was
proud of its heritage and cultural tradi-
tions. She believed i in her country and
celebrated it in drama, poetry and in
song, and she didn’t do it alone either.
“She brought thousands along with
her whether as actors, or dancers, choir
members or musicians, or as one of the
many who can trace their appreciation

of the arts to the enthusiastic example of

Kayla Lockhart Edwards.”

Mr Ingraham noted that Mrs
Edwards understood what culture was
all about and its importance in the
process of nation-building:

“Her approach to culture and cultur-
al expression was holistic, inclusive. She
understood that if we are to remain a
great people and if we are to achieve
our full potential, then we must con-
sciously develop and nurture all that is
good in our Bahamian culture, and try
to weed out all that is negative.”

\

rs Edwards did indeed

believe in her country and
in her people. More than tHat, her life
was a reminder of the fact that as a
small country we have been blessed
with a succession of talented people.

We need to remember this from time |

to time even as we carry on the neces-
sary debate about our failures and
weaknesses. To tell a child constantly
that he or she is no good runs the risk of
producing a maladjusted adult.

The same can be true of a nation. In
the case of the Bahamas there are still
remnants of the bar syndrome (that if it
comes from across the bar it must nec-
essarily be better than the home-grown
product), and no shortage of those will-
ing to exploit it for their own purposes.

Many nations that have become great
have also been successful at projecting
aspirations as qualities already attained,
and by not only remembering their
great ones but making myths and leg-

STORE HOURS
MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY - SATURDA’



/





IDEN NDI Wy
STILL ALIVE

ends of them.

This is not so easy in today’s world
where instant mass communications
facilitate the work of a multitude of
gleeful iconoclasts. But we can still do
much more to celebrate and commem-
orate great Bahamians living and dead,
and the name of Kayla Lockhart
Edwards is on an illuminated list of

Bahamians who have achieved world-’

class standards at home and abroad.

In the performing arts alone, this lit-
tle country has produced treasures like
vaudevillian Bert Williams; cabaret
dancers Paul Meeres, Naomi Taylor
and Abby LaFleur; opera singer Ran-
dolph Symonette; actors Sidney Poitier,
Calvin Lockhart and Cedric Scott; musi-
cians Peanuts Taylor, Joe Spence,
George Symonette and Freddie
Munnings.

_ These are obviously only represen-
tative of older generations. The country
can be proud that the tradition contin-
ues today with an abundant crop of fine
younger performers, many of whom
have had their talents honed and nur-
tured'by Mrs Edwards.

The same level of Bahamian achieve-
ment is apparent in the world of sports
where persons like Sir Durward
Knowles, Tommy Robinson and Andre
Rodgers blazed a trail in international
competition for hundreds more to fol-
low, and they are following in grand
style.

ahamians have excelled in

world-class terms in many oth-
er areas as well; including academia. A
few: years ago 4 Bahamian living and
working in the United States proposed
the idea of compiling a register of
Bahamians serving in top positions in
the US.

It was not so much to encourage them:

to come home but that the Bahamas
Government and local institutions could
access their specialised knowledge,

experience and goodwill from time to

time on a consultative basis.

It was recognising and developing the

rich human potential of a remarkably
gifted little nation that Kayla Edwards
was about.
' But there was yet another side to this
remarkable lady, a dimension shaped
by her deep spirituality. With all the
things she had to do in an all too short
lifetime, Kayla Lockhart Edwards was
also'a devoted wife and mother and a
loyal friend to many who were fortunate
enough to share her space.

www.bahamapundit.typepad.com
sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













Share your news



THE TRIBUNE





In brief.

_ ‘Affordable --
services’ to ..
_ be provided ..
_ for disabled.

THE government will ensure.
that affordable services are pro-
vided for individuals with'sig- “~:
nificant disabilities, Minister of |;
Social Services Melanie Griffin ; ,-
said.

Addressing a one-day, forum.
for persons living with disabili-,..;.
ties hosted by the Disability. ;,
Affairs Division, Mrs Griffin:.::
said the government is making.
this pledge in an effort to ensure’
that disabled persons can: live >:
independently. y

Topping the list of these * %
important services, she said, is'’
attendant care —-as assistance.”
with daily tasks in the home can
help the. disabled avoid being '
placed in an institution. ;

Mrs Griffin said that other 2
areas the government.plans to .
focus on include wheelchair
repair, lift repair, and. the cre:
ation of accessible sidewalls’
and disabled-friendly ening
to buildings.

The minister stressed that
while there-can be no denying *-
the many improvements for dis- ’
abled persons in terms of infra- .,
structural planning, education. :
rehabilitation, vocational train- ,
ing, information, employment :-
and living conditions. —.more ,
will have to be done “for inde
pendent living to truly be‘suc-;
cessful”. .

<8 4

“t

Mandies |
after

collapsing —
at home :

ml By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport

Reporter :

FREEPORT - Grand! °
Bahama Police are awaiting the ;

- results of an autopsy on a 43-.

year-old man who collapsed and , -
died at his residence while tend-
ing to his yard on.the weekend: 5

According to reports, Trevor t:
Charlton Blatch, a resident of *
East Coral Estates Section 3)°*
was mowing his lawn around _
12.25pm on Saturday when ' he‘:
suddenly became ill.

He walked to his porch add
complained to a family mem--
ber that he was not feeling well,--
then suddenly collapsed. s" "3

Mr Blatch was transported to.
Rand Memorial Hospital,**
where he was pronounced dead ~,
shortly after his arrival.

Chief Superintendent Basile * $
Rahming said police do not sus- ~
pect foul play, but are awaiting
the results of:an autopsy toy.
determine the cause of death.: +:
















THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 3



ile dysfunction drug



Three men
stabbed
during fish
fry fight

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police are investigat-
ing an altercation at Pinder’s
Point early Saturday morning
that resulted in three men being
stabbed.

According to reports, the inci-
dent occurred around 2.20am,
when a fight broke out during a
fish fry at the home of 22-year-
old Robert Ramsey.

Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said officers of
the Central Detective Unit were
dispatched to the scene and
found, Ramsey, Jackson
Charles, 23, and

Michael Newbold, 22, suffer-
ing from stab wounds.

Mr Rahming said Ramsey
sustained multiple injuries
about the body and that Charles
was stabbed in the back and
Newbold on the arm.

The victims were taken to the
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where Newbold and Charles
were treated and discharged.

However, Ramsey remained
in hospital as his injuries are
serious. Investigations continue.

Security
guard is
quizzed on
missing cash

A SECURITY guard is being
questioned in connection with
the alleged theft of a deposit
envelope containing cash
belonging to Texaco Service
Station at Eight Mile Rock.

Police reportedly received a
call at about 11.40pm from a
29-year-old male security guard
employed with Sharp Eye Secu-
rity Firm.

The guard reported that

while attempting to deposit .

funds from Texaco Service Sta-
tion at the night deposit vault at’
the Bank of the Bahamas in the
Harbour West Shopping Cen-
ter, he was held up.and robbed
of the deposit by two armed
men.

According to Superintendent
Basil Rahming, during a search
of the guard’s vehicle, an officer
found an envelope in the trunk
containing a large sum of cash.

He said police suspect that
the money belongs to the ser-
vice station.

The security guard was arrest-
ed and taken into custody.

Police
discover
concealed
pistol |
ACTING on a tip, two police

officers from the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit went to a track road

in Wisteria Subdivision around —

11.45pm on Friday, where they
discovered a Lorcin .380 semi-
automatic pistol concealed
underneath some debris.

The weapon is expected to
undergo ballistic examination
and testing at the Forensic Lab
in New Providence to deter-
mine whether it has been used
in any criminal matters that
have been reported to police.

Missing man
is searched
for in Grand
Bahama

FREEPORT - A Nassau man
who has been reportedly miss-
ing since May 22, is believed by
police to be in Grand Bahama.

Officers of the Central Detec-
tive Unit are seeking the pub-
lic’s help in their efforts to learn
the whereabouts of 38-year-old
Tyrone Glinton of Jubilee Gar-
dens.

Mr Glinton is described as
being of medium-brown com-
plexion with brown eyes.

He is about 5ft 10in tall and
of medium built. There is a
noticeable scar on his left cheek.

Anyone who has information
on his whereabouts is asked to
call police at 919, or CDU at
242-502-9991/502-9941 or 502-
9914.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
322-2157





Authorized StoneTech Professional Contractor —

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHONE: 323-8083 or 323-1594

ONLY WE CAN DO IT RIGHT!

www.prochemsystem.com * www.stonetechpro.com * www.iicrc.org
* psp@coralwave.com




‘could cause heart attacks’

mi By ROYANNE
FORBES-DARVILLE

A FAKE erectile dysfunc-
tion drug being sold on the
streets of New Providence
could cause its users to suffer a
heart attack, a senior regula-
tory official has warned.

Dr Marvin Smith, deputy
director of the Bahamas
National Drug Agency
(BNDA), announced that the
government has decided, to
tighten the screening process
on all pharmaceutical drugs
that enter the country — after
learning of a trend of fake
erectile dysfunction drug sales
in New Providence.

“We are trying to keep a
close eye on what is coming
in, and the government is
actively looking at ways (to)
incorporate more stringent lev-
els of control in terms of prod-
uct importation into the
Bahamas,” Dr Smith said.

Dr Smith explained that
heart attacks are a known side-
effect of counterfeit drugs for
male impotence.

“We are working with the
Ministry of Health, police, cus-
toms and various other inter-
national agencies to heighten
awareness of this and other

related matters through the:

‘pharmacy association, the
wholesale companies and drug
distribution companies to edu-

New limits are proposed
on sports fishing catches

\

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

FISHERIES Minister

Leslie Miller presented pro-
posals to change the current
catch limits for sportfisher-
men in a bid to cut pressure
on Bahamian fish resources.

Mr Miller, in his contribu-.

tion to the Budget debate yes-
terday, pointed out that fish-
eries regulations on sports
fishing have remained essen-
tially unchanged since 1986.

However, he said, the num-
ber of visitors has grown
tremendously and the pres-
sure on the resources by
sports fishermen is sometimes
seen as direct competition by
some Bahamians.

“Fishing by visitors is to be
for sporting purposes, not as
an opportunity to finance a

vacation, sell for profit or fill

the freezers at home. All over
the Bahamas, citizens com-
plain that the current sports
fishing bag limits are too gen-
erous,” said Mr Miller.

The Ministry of Agricul-
ture, Fisheries and Marine
Resource is proposing that all
catch limits be changed from

cate pharmacists and doctors
on why it is important to know
where products are coming
from.”

Counterfeit drugs. are false
products designed to appear
as genuine, that may not have
the active ingredients in cor-

rect proportions.

They are illegal by both

- international and domestic law

and the manufacturers are not
registered and are often con-

nected with illegal organisa-

tions.

_ Dr Smith explained that
while the Bahamas is one
among many countries that do
not have product registration,
it is a major target because the
economy is robust and
Bahamians will spend money
on drugs.

“The other thing is that we
are relatively small, so there is
not a lot of ground to cover
and the Bahamas is becoming
more economically indepen-
dent and people are going on
the Internet to find more stuff
so they make us a target also.”

Studies released earlier this
year by Judith Oulton, chief
executive officer of the Inter-
national Council of Nurses —
an organisation that represents
13 million nurses worldwide —
reveal that 25 per cent of the
medication used in developing
countries is either counterfeit
or substandard.



@ LESLIE Miller

“per person per day” to “per
vessel per day.”

This means that the catch
limit would be allotted to a
particular vessel and not one
particular individual.

Mr Miller proposed that the

'. following changes.be made to

the existing regulations:

¢ Crawfish from six per per-
son per day to six per vessel
per day.

e Conch from six per per-
son per day to three per vessel
per day.’

e Snapper, groupers, grunts

nA OR aU Sala:



TOP brass executives of: ‘Tropical Shipping Company Limit-
ed paid a courtesy call on Sir Albert Miller, CEO of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority. The company said in a statement that
it has every confidence in the economy of Grand Bahama and

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

THE Most THOROUGH RESTORATION & CLEANING EVER, OR THE JOB 1S FREE!
NASSAU’S ONLY PROFESSIONAL, CERTIFIED STONE CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CARE SYSTEMS.

Restoration Specialist.

at a fraction of replacement cost.

Boats, Grout, Tiles, Marble & Stone

Restoration & Care+

Carpet, Upholstery, Stone and Marble Cleaning &

Prochem Cleaning Systems removes Deep & Heavy
Soil, Bacteria, Grease, Watermarks and Stains from
Carpeting & Furniture, restoring them to like new

Carpet, Sofa’s, Loveseats, Chairs, Dining Chairs, Cars,

Persian, Wool & Silk Carpet Cleaning Specialist

the new leadership of the Port Authority.

(Photo: Vandyke Hepburn)



















- YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)








' be true, it usually is because



These drugs are a tremen- [|
dous and growing threat to
patients, the studies say.

In fact, during the most
recent Drug Counterfeiting
Conference held in Trinidad, it
was reported that 3,000 peo-
ple died in Nigeria, Africa,
from a fake meningitis vaccine.

Deaths due to fake cough
medicine have also been
reported. In Nigeria,
Bangladesh and Haiti.

Dr Smith explained that it
is important to use common
‘sense when purchasing medi-
cine over the Internet.

“If the price is too good to

= By MARK HUMES

A TRAFFIC accident
which claimed the life on an
18-year-old occured with such
force that the teenager was
flung from his car, police
believe

The death this weekend of
St John’s student Alonzo
Peter Francis Jr brings traffic’
fatalities to 21 for the year.

According to Inspector
Walter Evans, around 2am

, on Sunday, the Jeep Chero-
kee driven by Mr Francis was
travelling west on Prince
Charles Drive when it collid-
ed with a white Chrysler trav-
elling in the opposite direc-
tion.

Upon impact, it is believed
that Mr Francis was ejected
from his vehicle. He was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

The driver of the Chrysler



you get what you pay for; be
mindful of the manufacturer’s
sale policy ... and remember
ignorance is not a legal
defence.”

The World Health Organi-
sation estimates that up to
eight per cent of drugs on the
world market are counterfeit —
40 per cent in underdeveloped
countries such as Mexico,
Argentina and Columbia’and
up to 70 per cent in West
Africa. ;

Calling the fight against
counterfeit drugs the “new
drug war,” Dr Simith said that and three other passengers

many such operations are con- received injuries, but were all
trolled by organised crime or =

terrorist groups that target
countries with little or no reg-
ulation.





and other demersal fish from
20 pounds per person per day to
20 pounds per vessel per day.

e Mahi mahi, kingfish and
wahoo from six per person per
day to six per yessel per day.

He added that they are also
going to require that all fish
retained must have their head
and tail intact until landed
ashore. This is to facilitate iden-
tification and eliminate the pro-
duction of fillets while the vessel
isatsea. -

Mr Miller also said that his
ministry would investigate “the
feasibility of enhancing wild
populations or the captive cul-
ture of land crabs.”

The initial study will focus on
the white land crabs.

He added that the increasing
rate of harvesting and develop-
ment in the Family Islands are
placing pressure on the land
crab resources.

“With development, increas-
ingly many are accidentally
killed by vehicular traffic, and
displaced by real estate devel-
opment. A proper scientific
study of this economically
important resource will offer
real options to preserving this
resource,” said Mr Miller.



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
¢ Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121

Teenager ‘was
flung from car’

taken to hospital in a con-
scious state.

One neighbour of the
Francis family, Juanita Nairn-
Grant, expressed surprise and

sadness on hearing of Mr '

Francis’s death.
“He was close to my boy,

and he would call me ‘mom’. ’
He would love to tease me, in ||

a respectful manner, because :

that was just the way he was.”

Mr Francis’s death follows *

a series of motor accidents in

New Providence and the :

Family Islands.

Last Thursday, another '

teenager,
became the fourth person, ‘to

die in a car accident in less ee

than four days.
His death closely followed

those of David Burrows and | _,
sisters Brigetta and Santura

Adderley of Long Island:

The crash that caused Mr -

Francis’s death is being ir inves: | ie

tigated.

| OPEN
| 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE

Flashing flag pins, -

$2.99yd
| $3.99yd

© 4x 6 stick flag) $ 1.00
¢ Line of flags $24.00
° Car flags $ 4.99

e 2ft. x 3ft
Sale Priced @ $ 5.00

<¢ We also have USA flags, Bunting, Bows, Ribbon & Decorations.
Beem Ge and Inspiration

my Ce elite

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 » Fax:[242] 322-5251 * www.homefabricsltd.com

Flag Appliques,
Lapel Pins,
TriColour Shakers

and Florasatin











Theo Davis, |’ —
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday
|

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ;
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Difference between Cuba and U:S.

“NO ONE pretends that democracy is
perfect or all-wise,” Sir Winston Churchill
told the House of Commons in November

. 1947. “Indeed, it has been said that democ-
racy is the worst form of Government'except
for all those other forms that have been
tried from time to time.”

And just as democracy is not the perfect
form of government, other than acknowl-
edging that it is an imperfect improvement
over the many other.forms of government
that have been tried and failed. we do not
hold out that America is a perfect country —
far from it. There is much wrong with Amer-
ican society today — depraved materialism
being its major degradation. However, the
difference between America and the world’s
dictatorships is that the American people
are free to hold their government in check.
While dictators imprison their critics, Amer-
ican governments are very sensitive to pub-
lic opinion.

The Cuban ambassador to the Bahamas,
whose first letter is published on this page
today, wonders why we don’t condemn
America for such atrocities as Abu Ghraib,
the recent allegations of a massacve at
Haditha, the controversy over Guantdnamo,
the allegations of secret prisons in Eastern
Europe, and the like. Americans are their
own severest critics. When their servicemen
are accused of atrocities, they. are investi-

“gated and if found guilty punished. And if
the American. people don’t approve of their
government’s policies, whether those poli-
cies be domestic or foreign, they have the
opportunity to dismiss their commander-in-
chief every four years. No, America is not a
perfect country, but it is a healthy country.
Daily democracy’s grand debate between
its people and its government is in progress.

Not so: Cuba. For example, the debate
now going on ‘between ourselves and
Ambassador Wilson could never take place
in Cuba. Mr Wilson could write his letters in
Grandma, but we would be rotting in some
dank Cuban cell for daring to even think
our independent thoughts.

There is no free speech in Cuba and no
free press— certainly an outspoken news-
paper like The Tribune that encourages free
speech and a healthy exchange of ideas
would not be able to catch its first breath in
Cuba.

According to its constitution Cubans have
free speech and a free press as long as both
“conform to the aims of a socialist society.”
And, of course, government decides what
those aims are, and imposes stiff penalties on




Constant Working
Pressure Hoses

For all of your hydraulic hose requirements

contact

Versatility ° Productivity ¢ Reliability

Crawford St., Oakes Field
Tel: 323-5171



Fax: 322-6969

independent journalists. For example, there
is a one year jail term for those spreading
anti-government propaganda. Translated
this means that one either agrees with the
government or goes to jail — any disagree-
ment is classified as propaganda. We are
sobered to think of how many jail terms we
would have had to have served.

There is also jail terms for any written
disrespect of officials. For example, anyone
criticising President Fidel Castro or mem-
bers of the Council of State could be sent to
the gulag for three years. And as for spread-
ing enemy propaganda — that probably
means American opinions — can win them-
selves a sentence Of up to 14 years. “Clan-
destine printing” is forbidden by the penal
code, and failure to identify the author or
press of a publication is punishable by three

_ to-six months in jail.

Recently, even the Internet — an infor-
mation tool, that is now essential in today’s
schools — is limited in Cuba to officially
licensed businesses and government offices.
In other words, Cuba boasts its education,
but that education is limited to what the
state believes is good for its citizens. There
are libraries, but those libraries are stacked
with books that the state believes its people
should read.
The ambassador. in one of his letters:to

_ this newspaper, says, that Cuba does not per-

mit a brain drain and so keeps its citizens at
home to repay the state for what it has

“invested in them.
Here in the Bahamas, particularly in the -

medical field, our scholarship students are
required to work for a limited period of
time at the Princess Margaret Hospital to
repay their scholarship. However, this is'a
short period, not a lifetime.

We have a philosophical difference with
the Cuban government. We believe that goy-

_ ernments were created for the good of the

people, not the reverse. And it is. because
the Cuban people exist for the good of their
government that that country’s first woman
neurosurgeon has been told that she can-
not leave Cuba because the Cuban govern-
ment has the right to “preserve her brain.”

It is true — Cuba has specialised in edu-
cation, it has thousands of doctors to dis-
tribute throughout the world, but the spirit
of the Cuban people can only soar as high as
its government will permit. That, obviously,
is why so many of them are risking their
lives on the high sees and ending up in the
squalor of the Carmichael Road Detention
Centre.





QUALIT

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway » 352-6122

as

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



Cuba and th



cLaRmsL ea ARR T



THE TRIBUNE



UN Human

Rights

(This is the first of two letters
that Cuban Ambassador to the
Bahamas Félix Wilson Hernandez
has written to The Tribune for pub-
lication. The second letter will be
published in The Tribune tomor-
row).

EDITOR, The Tribune.

During.the days prior to and
after the voting on the member-
ship to the UN Human Rights
Council, on May 9, 2006, I have
been reading comments made by
some persons in the news media,
including foreigners, questioning
Cuba’s record on Human Rights
and giving the Bahamian public
their views on what is good or bad
about Cuba in this important area
of Human Development. Also,
there have been comments on oth-
er areas related to Cuba.

I should begin by saying that on
May 9, 2006, a total of 135 countries
out of 191 voted for Cuba to be a
member of the UN Human Rights
Council. Who is going to argue that
more than 2/3 of the UN member-

ship are fools? Who can say that all-

these countries were wrong by
choosing Cuba for such an impor-

tant body? Isn’t that a recognition.

of the kind of Human Rights that
Cuba stands for?

When I was interviewed after
the vote at the UN by a local daily
and asked if that was considered a
victory, I said that the election to
the UN Council could only be
regarded ’as.a victory against those
like the US Government and its
allies, including of course, a few of
them in The Bahamas, who are
engaged in a futile exercise. always
trying to attack Cuba and portray a
bad image about the country | ,ep-
resent. Cuba wasn’t alraid of pre-
senting its candidacy to the UN
body, because we ‘knew that the
international community is not
blind

Critics of Cuba must ask them-
selves why is it that after exerting
all kinds of pressures on countries
and being overwhelmingly defeat-
ed in their effort to impose their
will on the way to set up the new

Human Rights Council, the US ©

Government, along with three of its
allies voted against its Constitu-
tion.

Also, those persons must ask
themselves why the US did not pre-
sent its candidacy for the new UN
body. Be sure that Guantanamo,
the Eastern Europe Secret Prisons,
Abu Ghraib, the killing of inno-
cent civilians in Iraq, etc, made
them doubt about their clection on
a secret ballot exercise. They knew
they would be held accountable for
many things that are going on
wrong now in the world. On the

contrary, Cuba had nothing to tear. -

With its membership on the
Human Rights Council, Cuba
hopes to contribute in a decisive
manner to the consolidation of an
approach to cooperation and
understanding in the United

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘00 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
‘05 SUZUKI IGNIS (like new)
‘89 TOYOTA BUS
‘96 TOYOTA COROLLA

Visit us and see other used cars
and make your own deal!

auto <=, =
sales (2





jamb

letters@tribunemedia.net



Nations Human Rights machinery.
Its experience will be applied to
avoid the harmful experiences of
confrontation and unjust condem-
nation to the south to be passed
on to the new body, from spurious
motivations that are completely
alien to the legitimate cause of the
defense of all human rights.

Our country has a dignified and
vast record in terms of international
cooperation in the field of human
rights. Cuba is.a state party to 15 of
the main international instruments
in this field and has already signed
two more. We have been visited
by several thematic rapporteurs
under the Commission and ranked
among the first to receive in our
territory the United Nations High
Commissioner for Human Rights,
barely a year after this mandate
had been established. Cuba sys-
tematically responds to all the
requests of information forward-
ed through the thematic proce-
dures:

For those who oppose Cuba’s
membership at the Council, I can
say that my country participated

in an active and constructive man- -

ner in the negotiation of the modal-
ities that.brought about the estab-
lishment of the previous Human
Rights Commission, presenting in
ihe different phases of the process
proposals and contributions aimed

at guaranteeing that the new body °

(Human Rights Council) eradicates
from its works the harmful prac-
tices of confrontation and political
manipulation which brought dis-
credit on the Commission on

Human Rights.
- Cuba also strived to facilitate

the attention to the fair historicai
demands by the peoples of the
south, including the Caribbean and

‘the large majorities of the entire

planet, on issues such as the effec-
tive realization of the right to devel-
opment, the struggle against racism,
racial discrimination, xenophobia
and other forms of related intoler-
ance; and to ensure full respect to
the principles of universality, indi-
visibility, objectivity.and non-selec-
tivity in strengthening the cooper-
ation and frank and genuine dia-
logue in human rights matters.

Cuba will work to uphold truth,
justice, genuine dialogue and the
much-needed international coop-
eration in favour of promoting and
protecting all human rights for. all
peoples and nations.

Some (honestly, no more than
six voices) brought to the attention
of the Bahamian public aspects
with regards to Cuba. They are a
few, but unfortunately, have the
control of certain news media orga-
nizations.

One of the latter last week tried

to mislead the Bahamian public by |

introducing a front page article
speaking of alleged complications
on 17 patients from a friendly coun-
try who went to Cuba for opera-
tions. But it did not mention that a
total of 2,196 patients of that coun-
try have already been operated on
in Havana. J have recently seen in
The Bahamas that an outstanding
person went toa close country for
a minor operation and after it,
some complications came up and
the person died. Everybody knows

that in medicine such things are |

possible. But no critic has come
out to question what happened in
that country.

\ Most recently, another local dai-
ly publistied its approximately 20th
long article in more or less_ three
months attacking Cuba (as usual)
on the situation which apparently
happened in the above-mentioned
friendly country:in the Caribbean
with medical operations taking
place in Cuba and pretending to
influence and therefore discourage
Bahamians to go for surgery to my
country. I wouldn't be honest if I
don’t say what I feel: there must
be someone in this daily who is
either heavily obsessed and there-
fore sick about Cuba, or directly
working on behalf of the only ene-
my Cuba has in the world. Or both.

This same daily prior to the
beginning of the eye operations in
The Bahamas had many articles
trying lo prevent the programme
from starting. It began in January
with tremendous success. No word
about it coming from this daily
despite of the fact that hundreds
of operations have taken place.

It is crystal clear that the daily is
only waiting for the first problem to
happen to again begin its attacks
against Cuba.

Journalism should be about the
truth, honesty, objectiveness, and
non partisanship. Otherwise, some
may think they are journalists. But
they aren’t. And people, who are

ounci



raviG

not illiterate, at the ‘end of the road
will make their own. judgments.
Nobody can believe that everything
coming from a country, in this case
Cuba, is bad as certain media in
The Bahamas wants to:sell.. -;;

_ Lwould like to see long articles
written about what the aggressors
did or are doing in Abu Ghraib;

Guantanamo; the thousands of
innocent people killed in Iraq: the
embargo on Cuba; the Eastern
European illegal prisons; the ban-
ning of the musical group the “Dix-
ie Chicks” in the US for’ criticizing
President Bush; the way American
journalist Peter Arnett was called
“unpatriotic” for giving a point of
view different than that of the US
Government cueing the wat in
Iraq, etc.

It is only then when I sade riany
others who have approached’ me
will have the opinion that this dai-
ly is making a good journalism and
not based on biased points of views.

I think it is very important, for
Bahamians to know more about
my country, but not influenced by
critics who appear to be driven by
the US propaganda and by sheer
emotions.

I should be honest in saying | that
there have also been a number of
persons who wrote in rebuttal to
these critics of recent issues related
to Cuba, namely Mr. Allen of “The
Tribune”, Mr. Watkins of “The
Guardian”, Ms. Kelly of “The
Punch” and Dr. Alcena, of “The
Bahama Journal”, whose articles
were not ideoiogical ‘or emotion-
al, but honest, factual, realistic

My country is not perfect and in
fact, no country is, simply because
all of them are run by human
beings. There is only one country in
the whole world whose Govern-
ment deems appropriate to criti-
cise and impose on others their will,
claiming to have the best society
and to be an example to be;fol-
lowed by the-rest of the world. That
is the US Government. The one,
which contrary to the Internation-
al Community, including Human
Rights Organizations, has. kept a
Concentration Camp in Cuanta-
namo.

The same US Géverainént
which under the excuse of seeking
weapons of mass. destruction has
killed thousands of innocent peo- -
ple, among them m:ay children in
Iraq the'most receni belts the 25
civilians killed in cola ohaod i in
Haditha, last November. ‘i ' Same
country known for the atroc:. ‘si in
Abu Ghraib.

It is precisely the US Govern-
ment which had secret prisons in
Eastern Europe for torturing per
sons they qualified as enemies;-the
one that discriminated against poor
people, including blacks during the
Katrina disaster; the samevone
, which ordered eavesdropping on
Americans without court, AO:
tization.

The main crusader against Cuba
and its Human Rights Record is
the Government that imposed an
economic and. commercial block-
ade ona small country } ‘whose ‘only

“crime” is trying to build a différent
society based on values, including
Human rights values different from
theirs. Isn’t the embargo.an exam-
ple of gross violation of Human
Rights?

On May, 2004, President
George W. Bush approved areport
submitted by the so-called Com-
mittee for the Assistance.to.a ‘Free
Cuba and the fast-track imple-
mentation of the measures in. this
report to “hasten the transition
enforced by the US Government
against Cuba: a strategy to deprive
the Cuban people of their right to
self determination and to reimpose
a regime of neocolonial and racial

dominance”. \

I wish the critics of Cubascan
think of what would be their sgac-
tion if such a plan is approved toi
their country.

But they and the US Govern-
ment must be aware that transition
in Cuba began in 1959 with the tri-
umph of the Revolution leq by
Fidel Castro.



Félix Wilson Hernandez
Ambassador of Cuba,

The Bahamas

Embassy of the Republic of
Cuba,

Nassau, 4
June 9, 2006. ;

(A paragraph was deleted from
the Cuban ambassador’s letter. In
that paragraph the ambassador
alleged fraud at the polls in a
Florida precinct in favour of Pres-
ident Bush in the 2000 presidential
elections. He attributed this elec-
tion rigging to “a small number of
members” of Florida’s Cuban
community. He claimed that Pres-
ident Bush owes this group “many
favours.” — Ed).

e To be continued tomorrow.




marks
early start
for storms

H By REUBEN SHEARER

“}°LESS than two weeks into
“the 2006/07 hurricane season,
‘storm activity is off to an even
‘Carlier start than last year — as
«tropical storm Alberto looms
over the Bahamas.
In the aftermath of the high-
- ly active 2005 hurricane season
-- which recorded a record-
breaking 28 storms — some
members of the public have
expressed concern about what
the early start means for the
rest of the season.

However, chief meteorologist
Basil Dean assured The Tribune
that 2006/07 will not be as active
as the year before.

He explained that this year’s
predictions only call for 17
unnamed storms, or seven
above the 30-year mean of
about 10 named storms per
year.

Mr Dean also commented on
the warmth of the water,
explaining that it can improve
the likelihood of hurricanes
forming.

He said the current water
temperature is at least 28
degrees Celsius, which is an ide-
al temperature for cyclone for-
mation. as
- But according to Mr Dean
Alberto should not cause too
much worry, as it is not unusual
for tropical storms to form in
June. —

“We even had occasions
when tropical storms form
before the season starts, but

. those instances are very rare,”
_ he added.
./0 He admitted however that
iJune is unusually not a (very
: cactive) month, and that it is “the
first time in a little while,” that
‘a tropical storm has formed so
» Learly.

- Public officers’ union and
NIB sign five-year agreement

â„¢@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

SIX months of negotiations
concluded yesterday with a
new five-year industrial agree-
ment between the manage-

: ment of the National Insurance
:* Board (NIB) and the Union of
: Public Officers (UPO).

The agreement ‘significantly’
improves employee benefits,
according to NIB. chairman
Philip Davis, MP.

The agreement covers the
period from June 1, 2004, to
May 31, 2009, and affects more
than 75 per cent of the 434
employees at the NIB.

Paternity leave has increased
from one week at full pay to two
weeks, payable once every three
years to married male staff.

The agreement also includes






H NIB chairman Philip Davis, MP speaks to the press yesterday
after signing an industrial agreement
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

increases in daily allowances _ for employees traveling on offi-



Jeweller is to sponsor
Miss Bahamas pageant

@ By Tribune Staff Writer

THE. custom-made Miss
Bahamas Diamonds Interna-
tional Crown, a “spectacular
work of art” crafted by
Venezuelan jeweller George
Wittels, will be on display at
Diamonds International start-
ing this month.

Diamonds International
(DI) is now the pageant’s
“platinum partner” and the
official jeweller of the 2006
Miss Bahamas World Pageant,
which will take place on July 8
at the Rainforest Theatre.

The beauty of the “Elite
Eleven” who will be compet-
ing for the title of Miss

.. x
. Ss

cial business. Additionally,
monthly gas allowances have
increased by 100 per cent, to
$500 a month.

For the first time the agree-
ment will includes a cost.of liv-
ing payment to employees. If
the retail price index for New
Providence - a figure compiled
by the Department of Statis-
tics based on the price of sev-
eral goods which indicate the
rate of inflation — goes up by
more than five per cent
between the anniversary dates
of the agreement, the payment
will go up by one per cent for
every percentage point past
five, to a maximum payment
of five per cent of the employ-
ee’s annual basic salary.

Mr Davis said that negotia-
tions were conducted without

the usual “antagonism and con-
frontations which too often
attend union/management
talks.”

Both parties reported mutu-
al satisfaction with the outcome
of the agreement.

“In any industrial agreement
it is a known fact that neither
side ever gets ever what they
want,, but we have reached an
agreement that both sides can
be happy with — it’s a win/win
situation for everyone,”
Stephen Fountain, first vice-
president of UPO said.

President of UPO Donald
‘Mckenzie added, “The nego-
tiations went very well I hope
to be an example to all the
unions that are still putting
their contracts on to the table.
It could be done,” he contin-

~~ NOTICE

21st Centur

}

Welding Co.

Sale/Save Big |

20% off storm panels, 5/8” + 1/2” rebars
Ideal for, “The Do Yourself’.
Ph# 3254624 / 3252830.



ou Say, [Say”
The Dundas Centre

June 14th - 17th at 8:30pm - Tickets $20.00








SANDRA Ford, Diamonds International marketing
representative, Anthony Smith, Diamonds
International senior marketing representative, (sitting) Michelle
Malcolm, president of Miss Bahamas
Organization and Dorien Alexander, store manager — Dia-

'82\ Alberto is set to pass just
'. “north of the Bahamas, and will
* “bring cloudiness and some scat-
; tered showers in the next few








Bahamas World as well as two
other titles, will be comple-
mented during the pageant by
fine jewellery courtesy of DI.

Benefit Performance
Cancer Society of The Bahamas
Tuesday, June 13th ° Tickets $25.00






- "days. :
nels The woman who'is crowned i Box Office: The Dundas Centre
“Dost official és Doha oddone lee cemmatonal 393-3728 ot 394-7179 from 9:30am - 5:00pm Dai

ell G $15,000 worth jewellry from be created in the downtown
.discuss a coneeny rss Nassau branches of the com-
Be oni Gad, island manager _ pany, as well as DI Watch and
é improvi ng for DI, said this partnership Design and Tanzanite Inter-
“serv illustrates the confidence that national, featuring glamour
, se ice ee Sopa has in the Miss shots of all the contestants.
at Bahamas Organisation. | The winner will be the local
3 ‘a ST VINCENT : “This partnership exempli- _ spokesmodel for DI Bahamas
Kingstown i. fies Diamonds International's _ and will have the opportunity



commitment and support of
yet another prestigious social
: event and provides our local
:- market with information on
the products, services and
opportunities offered to the
‘Bahamian people,” she said.
One of,the Miss Bahamas
Organisation's adopted chari-
ties, the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas, is also supported by
DI. . .
Anthony Smith, senior mar- *
keting representative for DI,
announced that galleries will

to appear in future print and
media campaigns.

Michelle Malcolm, head.of
the Miss Bahamas Organisa-
tion, said that with the sup-
port of DI, “we are anticipat-
ing putting on a spectacular
event that will restore
pageantry in the Bahamas to
its rightful place and give the
Bahamian audience a night to
remember”. :

The total commitment of DI
to the Miss Bahamas Organi-
sation is $25,000.

se IMPROVING postal service
,- in the Caribbean as the region
__ prepares to implement a single
=; market and economy will top
discussions at a five-day meet-
ing of mail officials and suppli-
~ ers in this island chain, an offi-
«cial said Sunday, according to
- 4:Associated Press. ie
ico, Postal services in the region
4 need to synchronize their oper-
tations to meet the challenges of
~ the single market, said John
“Power, ‘a Caribbean Postal
_ Union official.
“4. Mail officials also need to
- “consider running their depart-
“. ments more like commercial
“"pusinesses with “the power to
_* make decisions on an economic
basis,” he said.





MULTI-DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

The First Stop on your Shopping List!

BEAT THE HEAT

Air Conditioners

t
Â¥







ri

asec
ei
‘PHONE: 322-2157

TRE:
TUESDAY
JUNE 13

2:00am Community Page/1540 AM
7 11:00 Immediate Response ~
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 _ Island Life Destinations
1:30 ° Inside Hollywood
2:00' ° The Fun Farm
3:00 +-Durone Hepburn
3:30 Ernest Leonard
4:00 Dennis The Menace



Buy Early
PUMA
Summer Rush



6000 BTU Remote ........0.00.000.$234.00

; : 8000 BIU Veccccsssereee sesssssseeeeeeD205.00
4:30 Carmen San Diego ,
458 _ZNS News Update 8000 BTU Remote
‘5:00 — Cricket World High Energy Efficient Model ..$350.00
5:30 — Gillette World Cup 2006 10000 BTU Remote .......... ssveese $377.00
6:00 Bahamian Things 12000 BTU Remote.......... eeccseees $389.00
6:30 News Night 13 12000 BTU Remote

Bahamas Tonight High Energy Efficient Model ..$409.00
Ethnic Health America 14000 BTU Remote ................

Island Lifestyles
Da’ Down Home Show
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
Bahamas Tonight
:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540 AM




24000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..$755.00

ij MULTI DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

: APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE’
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS



et ee ee hk ee Ra ee a

2006 EXPLORER - $34,995.00
FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD :

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com



Montrose Avenue
(Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.)
Phone:
322-2536 © 325-2040 © 323-7758 © 328-7494

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!



a ee




PART OF YOUR LIFE


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

THE TRIBUNE”



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

STAFF VACANCIES

The College of.the Bahamas invites applications for the following posts:

Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION

SUMMARY: ‘

Serves as a primary fundraiser for The College of The Bahamas. Designs, implements,
evaluates, and refines the Unit's development activities with an emphasis on major gifts as
defined by COB policy, Council and the President in conjunction with Vice President Institutional
Advancement. Personally identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards donors and prospects
in accordance with performance targets set by the Office of Institutional Advancement under
the direction of the Council and President. Collaborates with the President, Vice President
Institutional Advancement and Vice President Finance & Administration and colleagues in
the COB Office of Institutional Advancement to maximize total gift revenue through gift
planning, corporate and foundation relations, and annual fund strategies.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. Identifies, cultivates, solicits, and stewards major donors and prospects including
individuals, corporations, and foundations, through visits and other forms of direct
personal contact in accordance with performance targets set and defined by the
relevant authorities.

2. Enlists senior management in furthering the Development Unit's development
programime; assists in educating faculty and staff in respect of the roles they can
play in fundraising and development generally.

3. Recruits and manages volunteers and provides them with leadership and direction
in support of the cultivation and solicitation of major donors and prospects;
coordinates volunteers’ activities to ensure their integration into the Unit's programmes.

4. Establishes and maintains effective working relationships with the Boards of COB
Foundations and College development colleagues to maximize the Unit's total gift
revenue.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

© Knowledge of major funding and donor sources.

e Respected membership in networks of people and entities of high net worth
and ability to move with ease and influence in such circles.

e Exceptional interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

e Community relations skills and the ability to communicate and work effectively
within a diverse community.

e Willingness and availability to travel extensively and to.work extended hours

_ as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the.general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS: *
® Prior experience at the CEO/CFO level with a major company/corporation is preferred
¢ Master degree preferred , bachelor’s degree acceptable with relevant experience
e Prior development experience would be highly valued
e Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
e Basic computer skills expected

Assistant Development Officer
DIVISION: Institutional Advancement
UNIT: Development : eee

START DATE: August 1, 2006
JOB DESCRIPTION

SUMMARY: The Assistant Development Officer has primary responsibility for supporting the
work of the Development Officer and team through the management of the day-to-day
operations of the Development Unit, its databases and records.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. Creates for the institution and makes effective use of a prospect management database
and other institutional resources to ensure appropriate management of donors, prospects,
alumni, and volunteers in coordination with College/University objectives.

2. Conducts research to identify prospects and creates strategies to match prospects’
interests to the priorities of the unit and the College/University.

3. Researches, writes, edits, or oversees, in conjunction with the writing/editorial staff of
Institutional Advancement, the preparation of persuasive, accurate, and grammatically
and syntactically correct solicitations, proposals, case statements, reports,
correspondence, and other development-related communication materials in support
of the Unit's fund-raising activities. :

4. Assists in short- and long-range strategic planning activities to create and implement
fundraising goals and objectives.

5. Assists in planning and conducting programmes and activities designed to increase
the visibility of the Unit and the College/University to internal and external constituencies.

6. Develops and manages budgets for fundraising activities under the supervision of the
Vice President Institutional Advancement and in conjunction with other relevant senior
managers. s :

7. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

e Ability to conduct research, gather data, analyze information, and prepare effective,
accurate, and timely reports and other documents to support development objectives.

e Demonstrated mastery of major business and prospect research databases and general
database software such as Microsoft Excel with concomitant database management
skills.

e Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to interact effectively with academic
leadership, faculty, prospects, donors, and volunteers in a wide range of roles.

e Ability to write proposals, solicitations, correspondence, reports, and other materials
in support of development activities independently;

e Ability to exercise good judgment, to demonstrate an understanding of ethics related
to development activities, and to use discretion in interactions with donors, prospects,
volunteers, and others.

e Ability to work effectively within a team environment.

e Demonstrated organizational skills and experience in managing events and other
complex activities in support of development objectives.

e Willingness and. availability to travel and to work extended hours as necessary.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being
performed. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities,
duties and skills required of the Development Officer.

MINIMUM JOB REQUIREMENTS:

e Bachelor’s degree

Prior development experience a must

Demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills
Excellent computer skills expected

Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision.

Compensation is commensurate with: qualifications and experience.

The application deadline is June 21, 2006. To ensure full consideration, interested candidates
should submit a College of The Bahamas Application Form, a comprehensive resume and
a cover letter of interest. To expedite the appointment procedure, applicants should request
three referees to send references under confidential cover directly to the address listed
below:

The College of the Bahamas
Human Resources Department
Ground Floor, Administration Building
Thompson Blvd and Poinciana Drive
: P O Box N 4912
Nassau, Bahamas

Email: hrapply@cob.edu.bs

Please visit our website at for more information about the College and to access the College’s
Employment Application Form.



’ Christie joined South Andros





Catchin’ the crab







@ ANDROSIANS rush to catch live crabs released into the crowd at the end of the official open-
ing ceremony Friday night to the strains of Eddie Minnis’ Church Out, Crab Crawlin’. The —
release of the crabs was greeted with delight by the Androsian crowd and the consternation of a
few visitors. Thousands of Bahamians joined Androsians at Fresh Creek for the annual event ,
which is said to have grown into the largest festival of its kind in The Bahamas.

(Photos: BIS)
@ PRIME Minister Perry



MP Whitney Bastian, Ron
Pinder, parliamentary secre-
tary for Energy and Environ-
ment, and area chief council-
lor Clyde Duncombe at the
9th annual Andros Crab Fest
at Fresh Creek at the week-
end. The Prime Minister is
pictured with the group during
the opening ceremony.

@ ORGANISERS of the 9th
annual Andros Crab Fest held
in Fresh Creek, Andros this
past weekend, singled out two
Androsians for special hon-
our. Joan Hanna, connected
to Andros since the early
1960s, was named patron of - |
- the event. Mis Hanna, the
wife of noted Bahamian enter-
tainer, businessman and
unionist Leroy ‘Duke’ Hanna -
and mother of environmental -
activist and college lecturer
Margo Blackwell first came to®
Andros in 1960 with her fami-
ly from Canada to establish _
the Small Hope Bay Lodge.
Mrs Hanna worked at the :
Lodge before joining the Min-
istry of Education as a teacher.
at Calabash Bay School in
Andros. She later taught at
Eastern Senior School. Mrs.
Hanna is pictured with Fresh |
Creek area chief councillor
Clyde Duncombe. «..

@ THE Crab Fest also hon-
oured popular Bahamian
musician Elon Moxey from
Andros. Mr Moxey is the
writer and musician of three
best selling CDs of Bahamian
music and was paid tribute by
broadcast personality Darrold
Miller during the opening cer-
emony. He was also awarded a
trophy by leading business-
man and Andros native Frank
Hanna. The trophy was pre-
sented by Prime Minister Per-.
ry Christie. From left are
Darrold Miller, Mr Christie,
Mr Moxey and Mr Hanna.



CLIFTON HERITAGE AUTHORITY
. LOGO COMPETITION






The Clifton Heritage Authority announces a competition to create an official logo for the
Authority.

The competition is open to artists 18 years and older.













¢ A maximum of two entries may be submitted in full color. Images should be at
least 8.5x11 and no larger than 11x17.

° The logo should depict the historical and environmental significance of the
proposed Clifton Heritage Park, located at Clifton.

e Each entry should be accompanied by a short paragraph describing the entry.
¢ Entries must received by 4:00 p.m., June 22™, 2006.
Winners will be awarded prizes as follows:

© 1" place- $1,500




e 2"! nlace- $1,000

© 3 place- $750



Entry forms may be collected from the Authority’s office located at the Collins House
Complex, Shirley Street and Collins Avenue with the entrance on Collins Avenue.

The contest judges reserve the right to award no prizes at all.








TEL: (242) 325-1505
FAX: (242) 326-2568
P.O.BOX EE-15082
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
THE TRIBUNE

=







:
:

sesssgonoonnsnsoe:





PAE HUEDAUS RR EA RS OOOR

coaectancceaie nie usantaenteet







+ Revé BAIN: Bahamian. Student of
LCIS for three years. IB Certificate
candidate (English AL(HL), Spanish
B, History, Biology, Math Studies and
Visual Arts). Revé has applied to
University of Waterloo, Ontario,
Canada to study Accounting and
Financial Management. She wishes to
pursue a carcer in this area and her
ambition is to obtain a qualification
in. Chartered) Public Accountancy.

Has previously acted as master of



ceremonies af public events (such as
concerts) put on by the school.







AAO EASA ROCA NNO IEA 5 PROPOSES ESOS SEE



Lyfo



B Diplonra |

candidate (HL in English Al, History and




: Biology, SL in Spanish B, Maih Studies and

Visual Arts), Alena has obtained a piace at

* Collison INGRAHAM: Bahamian














Student of LCES for five years. IB
Certificate candidate (English Al,
Biology, History). C.C, as he is known,
has applied to the Fort Lauderdale Art
Institute in Florida to study photogra-
phy with the aim of a possible career in

photojownalisor. | Some of his

photographic artwork has woo prizes tn



the Bahamas.





ony mamas s on Sets ovate Ra A DRAM ARORA? pe ABBA eA DABOUSIOLIERLOEDSAAGAAIAESADERALOAASEIEOLALLESESEIONSELMIOLLEEE CCIE EY SDEIDEEE OLE SERED SEABED LEAS EREEASE ASSIS LEONEL LDA ALOE GEENA AE

International Schoo

CONGRATULATIONS
TO OUR FIRST

DUATION CLASS

The only school in the Caribbean offering all the |

programs of the International Baccalaureate Organization

Eduarde has

Nursery
















ne

AL

Seg



‘TUESDAY, JUINE 15, ZULU, I



LABORA RAN ROUEN BEES





erttenaes MgO ya patente TPR IARI RARER REA C8 PARED ADP SAL MEA




oasienoonrareannannannece!















and “Dutch heritage.

been at LCIS since






he is the first student to



of education. at.









Tiago SILVA: Portuguese and US

nationality, Student of LCIS for three.



“years. IB Certificate candidate






English Ads History; Spanish B




)). Tiagosbas applied to Florida

cAtlantic University to. study Interuau-




tional Business with the eventual sin

of pursuing # career in this field.
























citizen,



¢ Samantha HILL: US
Student of LCIS for three years.
1B Certificate candidate (English
AICHL), Spanish B,
Biology, Math Studies and Visual





History




Arts). Samantha has obtained a






place at the University of Chicago

to study Marketing and Finance







avd woule tke to work ino the







entertainment business, especially
the world of fashion. She has done

some modeling.







SAO GVA AA MOM
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006





THE TRIBUNE



Tributes at death of EXXSEteii
Livingston Coakley

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter —

THE condolences of “a grate-
ful nation” were extended to
the family of Livingston Coak-
ley on behalf of the government
and people of the Bahamas.

Mr Coakley passed away on
Sunday night at the age of 80
following a massive stroke.

Both Prime Minister Perry
Christie and opposition leader
Hubert Ingraham yesterday
paid homage to a man who they
say will be remembered as one
of the great nation-builders of
the modern Bahamas.

Mr Christie said that he react-
ed to the news of Mr Coakley’s
with death “profound sadness”
because the Bahamas has lost
a founding father.

“T extend the condolences of
a grateful nation to Mr Coak-
ley’s family on behalf of the
government and people of the
Bahamas,” the prime minister
said.

He said that Mr Coakley will
be remembered particularly for
his contribution to the educa-
tional development of a young
nation...

“He began as a teacher at the
blackboard in Bahamian edu-
cation and rose to become one
of the most memorable minis-
ters of Education.

“His passion for education
and his appreciation of the
unique importance of the teach-
ing profession in our national
development earned him the
respect of teachers and school
administrators throughout our
country,” Mr Christie said.

During his time in govern-
ment, Mr Coakley served his
country as a minister of Works,
Tourism, Health, Labour,
Youth, Sports and Community
Affairs.

“It was a mark of the kind of
man that ‘Sir Coaks’ was that
during one of the most tempes-
tuous periods of our modern
political history, he maintained
his standing as the most beloved
politician in the halls of parlia-
ment.

“He was held in warm and

@ LIVINGSTON Coakley

affectionate regard even by his
political opponents, who recog-
nised that he was an individual
completely without guile or
malice towards anyone,” Mr
Christie said.

Former prime minister and
opposition leader Hubert Ingra-
ham said that Mr Coakley was
dedicated to public service.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that during World War II, Mr
Coakley volunteered for mili-
tary service in the Bahamas
Battalion, where he rose to the
rank of sergeant

“Mr Coakley was in the van-
guard of those who achieved
the significant political and
social advances of the Sixties.
He was elected to represent

OCAL NEWS



constituency for nearly two.

decades.

“Mr. Coakley — or Sir Coak,
as he was affectionately known
to his many friends — will be
fondly remembered for the
unfailing cheerfulness which
became his hallmark through-
out life,” Mr Ingraham said.

He said Mr Coakley was at.

the center of many intense polit-
ical conflicts in the Bahamas
and held passionate views, but
never gave in to the temptation
to be unkind or abusive to his
opponents.

“It was simply not in his
nature. This endeared him to
the many friends that he culti-
vated in all walks of life and of
all political stripes,” the former
prime minister said.

Exuma in 1968 and served that













Thursday June 22â„¢
12 noon to,6:30 pm

Fowler Street*
P.O. Box N-4199
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 393-2504

Appointments during our normal operating hours, Mondays-Fridays 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Limited appointment requests available outside of operating hours,

*(Turn right at corner of Esso On the Run East Bay we are located on the left hand side across
from Nassau Stadium, next to jet ski rental)

Mike's Stainless Steel Manufacturing co

ur Product Surpasses Standards. Qur service exceeds expectations,

GRAND OPENING INVITATIONAL













































@ ACTING chief justice Anita Allen swears in Paul Adderley, the deputy to the governor
general, to act in Governor General Arthur Hanna’s absence while he is travelling to England
on an official visit. Mr Hanna, on his trip from June 11 to 25, will be accompanied by his wife
and aide-de-camp.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Artists present an annual
evening of sacred music

ARTISTS Guild Internation-
al (AGI) is presenting its fifth
annual Evening of Sacred Music
at Christ Church Cathedral,
George Street, on Thursday,

“June 15 at 8pm.

This concert will feature
some well-known Bahamian tal-
ent, including Nikita Thomp-
son-Wells - soprano; Alan But-
ler, baritone; Candace Bost-
wick, soprano; Jeffrey Sturrup,
organist and Bel Canto Singers,
directed by Eldridge McPhee.

The artists will present sev-
eral genres of sacred music; Bel
Canto will present masterpieces,
including works by Anton Dvo-
rak’s Stabat Mater — featuring
tenor soloist Dana Knowles, a
rousing yet relatively unknown
arrangement of the famous
“Lift Every Voice and Sing”,
two spirituals arranged by the
world renowned Moses Hogan
and two contemporary gospel
pieces, written for and per-
formed by the Brooklyn Taber-
nacle Choir.

Jeffrey Sturrup, affection-
ately referred to as “The
Bahamian Mozart”, is a prolific
organist and will present three
pieces.

Nikita Thompson-Wells,
Candace Bostwick and Eldridge
McPhee have graced many
stages in the Bahamas, not the
least of which was their perfor-
mance in AGI’s concert pre-
sentation of the Phantom of the

Opera.



Special _

Gifts

all with love from Kellg’s
ease

ye
ho ats

off - DIVING &
SS CAMPING
017m)

- TOOL SETS

TO eG (selected)

» LUGGAGE
June 12th - 17th, 2006

- BRIEFCASES
Kelly’

Tel; (242) 393-4002

Fax: (242) 393-4096

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
RToI We fo 9:00am-9:00pm
closed

Houses
aloyaale

AIT Xe (op
www. kellysbahamas.com
TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 9







~ THE TRIBUNE





=! TUESDAY EVENING aes

One Piece - One Price

yk WN ana a na e - 7 |
New Florida \ Wrinkle Cure With Dr. Nicholas Perricone Dr. —_|(:45) UltraMetabolism: The Simple Plan for Auto-. ‘ 4
WPBT Nicholas Perricone explores non-surgical ways to defy nate Weight Loss, Presented by Mark Hyman, al

the aging process. 1 (CC)
The Insider (N) |NCIS “Ravenous” The team search- |The Unit ‘Security’ The team goes |Tuesday Night Book Club Seven
| WEFOR |n (CC) es for Marine who went missing in a under cover at the Russianem- — |women share secrets in Scottsdale,
national forest. (CC) bassy in Israel. ( (CC) Ariz. (N) (CC)

Last Comic Standing Last round of|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit

“Fault” A serial pede kidnaps
two young children. (CC)

House ‘TB or Not TB" A renowned |News (CC) ,
piyste has symptoms of tubercu-
josis. (PA) ( C)

:31) NBA Nation|NBA Basketball Finals Game 3 -- Dallas Mavericks at Miami Heat. From
Live) © (CC) |the American Airlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (CC)




















PTT ANE

set



pac
























Access Holly- |Fear Factor “Reality Stars 1” Reali- m
wood (N) (CC) ty TV ait 6 15 more minutes of |the semi-finals, (N) 1 (CC)
fame.

Deco Drive House “Humpty Dumpty” Cuddy's
handyman als n (2 (CC)

@ ww







Jeopardy! (N) _|Heat Wave Spe-
(Cc) cial









CABLE CHANNELS
Biography “Andre the Giant’ A pra-












00) Cold Case King of Cars

te AMinneso-


















































































'
{
Dog the Bounty |Dog the Bounty |King of Cars i
A&E fle of pro wrestler Andre the Giant. |Hunter Team — Hunter ‘Ifthe Thanksgiving {Chop cuts his |
ta serial-killer. _{(co) must find father. |Shirt Fits...” sale. (CC) sales force. |
BBC News World Business |BBC News Destination Mu- BBC News -. Asia Today
oe (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sic — |(Latenight). |
of ‘ Movie Top Awards Show Moments (N) ; :
ne peel RW ed, B | cb Small space? |
'CBC Just for Laughs |Diet Confidential An inside take an diets and modern marketing. (N) |CBC News: The National (CC) Sah (
Gags (CC) (CC) Limited budget
CNBC inter the Rulon & Company (CC) Mad Money The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch We've got the culation: |
73
(:00) The Sia [Paul Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) Our armoire’s and trundle |
CNN ae Room ea beds are the perfect
* OUTCOLD |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Mind of Mencia |South Park The |Dog Bites Man Chappelle's cin Sa B ‘esas
COM (2001) Jason {With Jon Stew- |port Robert F. {Robin Williams. jsex life of Stan's |Sexual harass- Show Black Gal- space-saver. buy a single piece |
London. (CC) fart T. Friedman. [Kennedy dr. (CC) dog. ment training. —_|lagher, DMX. ar fumineeand get he functionality |
Cons ‘Cops in {Cops ‘Too Hot: [Cops © (CC) |Cops Shootings [Cops “Extreme. |The World's Scariest Police at a, : 4 , 2an%
COURT Boston (6c) Special Edition” | aa in tee cities, |Cops’ M (CC) Stings © (CC) , of three or four pieces. Replace yOuE closet...) |
That's So Raven COW BELLES (2006, Comedy) Alyson Michalka, (is) Kim Possi- |American Drag- |American Drag- chest-of-drawers and shelf with a single
DISN ‘When in Dome” |Amanda Michalka. Two teenagers ty fo save theirfa- ble ‘Roachie” jon: Jake Long on: Jake Long armoire. Perfect for a child’s room, oar
|(CC) ther's business. ‘NR’ (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) dle bed rid se dechad
DIY This Old House |DIY to the Res- [DIY to the Res- [Bathroom Reno-|Bathroom Reno-|Restoration Re- |Trade School trundle beds provice two single bects, |
(CC) —_joue cue vations vations alities “Quarrying” a pull-out desk and drawers.
DW Euromaxx Death In hi (Ger- repeata : Politik direkt Dent In Euromaxx Visit our showroom today to see for yourself. :
E! The Daily 10 (N) |50 Most Shocking Celebrity Confessions Revealing celebrity confes- Sexiest “Bad Boys’ Bad boys. (N) 2
: sions,



NFL Live (CC) {2005 U.S. Poker Championships ]2005 U.S. Poker Championships |Baseball Tonight (Live)
ESPN iC (AN CC) .

Spirit of Yacht- [Rally World Championship Mid- [Triathlon ITU Mooloolaba World | Gol ESPN: Germany Today
: ESPNI ing (N) season Special iN) Cup. From Mooloolaba, Australia. |Fuera de Juego |

Daily Mass: Our |Mother Angelica Live Classic id of Hop




Religious Cata- |The Holy Rosary| Threshold of Hope



) EWTN

































“Full Recovery” {needy children. (CC)



City Gardener |Take It Outside [Designer Guys |How Not to Decorate ‘Letchworth’ |Debbie Travis’ Facelift “Sigal’s
Matt transforms a|Outdoor living/din-|Spa-inspired {Seven ean share a small home. |Den” Dated family room. 1 (CC)
style. M (CC) | (CC)

Christ in Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) | This Is Your Day
Prophecy day.” (CO);

|

Lady Episodes logue es
00) Cardio [Living Fresh [Blaine’s Low. |Reunion Story “A Dose of Reality" |neat Space for |neat © (CC)
FITTV baer avec) (cc) Carb Kitchen (CC) chidren. (CC)
Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) [Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) jn the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC {shepard smith Susteren (Liv) (CC)
-| FSNEL ( MLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Florida Marlins, From Dolphins Stadium in Miami. — |Best Damn Sports Show Period i
‘ Subject to Blackout) (Live) (Live) (CC) i
s (:00)-Live From the U.S. Open (Live) 2005 U.S. Open |inside the PGA |U.S. Open Golf
: | GOLF e Tour (N) [Highlights ,
E G SN: Lingo (CC) CG Wants to Be a Milonalte 1) |Weakest Link 1 (CC) Greed (CC) : | |
a (:00) Attack of [Star Trek: The Next Generation [Star Trek: The Next Generation |The Man Show |The Man Show -ertified Mem i
GATeCH fire show! (x) _|'Schisms’ A (CC) "True OP A (CC) Underwear. _|'Spors" (CC) Bere are |
-00) Walker, _|Walker, Texas Ranger Thieves beal|OUR HOUSE (2006, Drama) Doris Roberts, Judy Re es. A wealthy wid- | |
HALL exas Ranger |up a pastor and steal toys meant for|ow helps a homeless woman who saved her life (cc) |





concrete yard. ing room. (N)
INSP [Morris Cerullo Fresicough









The Gospel
Truth



Everybody





-KTLA |bate. 0 (CC) [With Randy 0 |Kids ‘Jr. Gets_ {Kids “Bahamas” [One With the [Loves Raymond |Loves Raymond :
(CC), His License” |(CC)\»~—«|Candy Hearts’ "The Bird” (CC) | (CC)

Aft % & AVOW TO KILL (1995, Suspense) Julianne |WICKED MINDS (2002, Suspense) Angie Everhart, Andrew Walker, Win-
LIFE __- |Philips, Richard Grieco. Premiere, A new bride's hus- |ston Rekert. A man’s affair leads to the murder of his father. (CC)

~~"1§ Simple Rules |Maximum Living|My Wife and [My Wife and [Friends ‘The [Everybody



























‘ et } Jpand has deadly plans in store for her. (CC)
x eg ; - 7 : = =
i 00) Hardball [Countdown With Keith Olber- [Scarborough Country Rita Cosby Live & Direct
—/MSNBC eq" rem
| eg N | K Jiminy Neutron: [SpongeBob Zoey 101. |Full House ‘The |Hi-Jinks Singer |Fresh Prince of |Roseanne (
dee] AN iC Boy Genius: /SquarePants 1 (cy Test” (CC) Patti LaBelle. |Bel-Air =. — {(CC)
| {TV Will & Grace (\ |Fear Factor Reality TV stars get 15 House A renowned physician has |News © (CC) |News
rs N (CC) more minutes of fame. (N) symptoms of tuberculosis. (CC) :
ye ‘OLN Ultimate Shark |Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna- [Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna- |Shark Hunters: Ultimate Tourna-
Tourn. ment Stakes are raised. ment ment The big prize is on the line. |

Ve 2 Wheel Tues- |V-Twin Motorcy- |American Thun- |Corbin’s Ride Build or Bust
|__| | SPEED Pre ea Tele TV der (N) On (N)




























a
Fulton Sheen Behind the Joyce Meyer: /John Hagee To- [Bill Gaither (CC) |Praise the Lord (CC)
y'
TBN Scenes (CC) — Enjoying Every: |day (CC) |
soths'Woe. day Life (CC)
Everybody Friends 1 (CC) |Friends Rachel’ |Sex and the City/Sex and the City|Seinfeld Elaine Seinfeld George |
TBS Loves Raymond hires a male nan-|Invitations toa | M (CC) creates an alter- /hunts for a lost
(cc) ny. © (CC) wedding. nate persona. key ring, (CC) .
{ee Overhaulin’|Million Dollar Auctions Rare and unique vehicles are sold during RM’s |Miami Ink “Going for the Gold” An
TLC CC Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction in California. (N) Olympic athlete comes in for some
finish work. (CC)
(a Without a [Law & Order “Open Season’ A cop-|Law & Order “Blaze” A fire Ips Law & Order Detectives discover a
TNT . [Trace “Birthday |killer’s acquittal leads to the murder tou an audience at a rock con- murdered prosecutor had been liv-
4 |Boy’ O (CC) jof a defense attorney. 1 cert, Killing 23 fans. 0 ing under an alias. (CC) (DVS)
TOON Home for Imagi- |Ed, Edd n Eddy |Grim Adven- Naruto Xiaolin Show- |The Life & Futurama 1
nary Friends tures down 1 (CC) |Times of Juni |(CC)
TV5 (:00) Tout le monde en parle : , TV5 Le Journal

Twc co Weather: /Storm Stories [Storm Stories |Weather: Evening Edition (CC) l et Ch aA | le the mi
o|- M Edition (CC) |Tornadoes. (CC) |(CC) . B : Pp d oe 3 |
a ; (a0) Peregrina |La Fea Mas Bella (N) Barrera de Amor (N) Que Madre Tan |Vecinos |. a ha MIAN Upp et ana oy 4|

N) Padre ; : Mn D " |
lel sa : his sidekick Derek out ay ) :

~ 1(:00) Law & Or- jLaw & Order: Special Victims Unit|Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Law & Order: Criminal Intent De- ;
tectives track a rac armen after Some sin" | es on y our



der: Criminal In-|"Rage” 1 (CC) Detectives link an assault to illegal












tent 0 (CC) trafficking in painkillers. a doctor is shot. A ees
Hogan Knows |Hogan Knows [Hogan Knows |The Drug Years The counter-cul- My Fair Brady: Love-Crazed lei d ss fa ces. |
ra it Best 0 Best 1 Best 1 ture’s drug experimentation. Get Married . |Celeb Couples. | |

| al ears aus (00) America’s |THIS OLD CUB (2004, Documentary) Ron Santo, Dennis Franz, Joe |WGN News at Nine 1, (CC) I *

1) WGN unniest Home |Montegna. Ballplayer Ron Santo pursues his career while living with dia- es
A ene Videos ( (CC) |betes. M (CC see
cy. “[Everybody [Gilmore Girls ‘Tm OK, You're OK” [Pepper Dennis Reporter Pepper |WB11 News at Ten With Kaity WT 5, = |
“| WPIX —_ |Loves Raymond Rory pays a visit to Lorelai; Zack [Dennis thinks she is about island Tong, Jim Watkins, Sal Mareniai B a AG your chi | d ren to the ot

ey poe, [Oo (CC) asks to marry Lane. (CC) her dream anchor-job. (CC} & Mr. G (CC) ies : |
| WSBK sere (N) [America’s Next Top Model The |Veronica hea ‘Blast Fromthe —_|Dr. Phil Guests feel trapped in mar- | M C +] a p QD y + our at M cD ona | d sin |

competitors get the ppeiunly to |Past” © (CC) riages. O (CC)
| win asoponigaree ACE) : Palmdale every Thursda
| ) PREMIUM CHANNELS ie every LMU ¥

c : 6:45) & * THE GRUDGE (2004, Countdown to |**Â¥% THE SKELETON KEY (2005, Suspense) Kate Hudson, Gena : :
-| HBO-E fire) Sarah Michelle Gellar, Jason|Taylor-Wright —|Rowlands, John Hurt. A te a in a New rleans house with an odd fro M 5 ‘ 5 O P m to 4: 3 O Pp M d url NG the
(ibe es Behr. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) 1 (CC) history. ‘PG-13' (CC) h = 9 0 0 é
Entourage Eric |Dane Cook’s. /%%% THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELING PANTS (2005, Come- of yj '
SILO IBLUES has a plan for the nous ‘The |dy-Drama) Amber Tamblyn, Alexis Bledel, America rae Fa teens es nt UU Re
premiere, irst

(1988) ‘PG-13' augh” \_|keep in touch by passing along a pair of jeans. 1 ‘PG’ (CC)

ve : a xx [x THE PERFECT MAN (2005, Romance-Comedy) |(:45) % & THE GRUDGE (2004, Horror) Sarah
HBO-W_ [THE PHANTOM |Hilary Duff, Chris Noth. A teen invents a secret admirer |Michelle Gellar, Jason Behr. A woman and her
fe OF THE OPERA |for her mother. © ‘PG’ (CC) boyfriend encounter vengeful spirits. © ‘PG-13' (CC)

ele -00) & THE VANISHING (1993, Suspense) Jeff [x & THE FABULOUS BAKER BOYS (1989, Romance-Comedy) Jef . .

a fa H BO-S i es, Kiefer Sutherland. A woman's abduction leads |Bridges, Michelle Pfeiffer, Beau Bridges. A chanteuse joins two eae Ca od, l /0

aay her bist ona three-year search. 1 ‘R’ (CC) lounge lizard act. 1 ‘R'(CC) : | E njoy Gr t Fo Prizes and ts of Fun

4 (30) % x JIN- |x x WHY DO FOOLS FALL IN LOVE (1998, Biography) Halle Berry, |x x THE WEDDING DATE (2005,

| MAX-E |GLEALL THE [Vivica A. Fox, Lela Rochon. A look at 1950s crooner Frankie Lymon and Romrance-Comed Debra Messing,
WAY (1996) 1. |his three wives. 1 'R’ (CC) ; Amy Adams, 0 'PG-13'(CC)

(00) +x & WAR OF THE WORLDS (2005, Science [* x & ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 (2006, Action) Ethan Hawke, Lau: |
iction) Tom Cruise. A man and his children try to sur- {rence Fishburne, John aan, Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta-
vive an alien invasion. O 'PG-13' (CC tion to kill a gangster. 1 "R’ (CC)

fi (00) 4 #& SKY CAPTAIN AND THE WORLD OF | # x x INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (1994, Horror) Tom Cruise, |
| SHOW OMORROW (2004) Gwyneth Paltrow. An aviator and [Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas. iTV Premiere. A vampire recalls the tragic
ie a reporter fight gigantic robots. ‘PG’ (CC) events of his 200-year life. 0 ‘R’

(30 *% THE |PURSUED (2004, Suspense) Christian Slater, Gil Bel- mt 4% CODE 46 (2003, Science Fiction) Tim
ILL NG CLUB lows, Estella Warren. A corporate headhunter will not |Robbins, Samantha Morton, Jeanne Balibar. A futuristic
(1999) 'R' (CC) take no for an answer. 1 'R’ (CC) investigator falls for his quarry. © ‘R’ (CC






6:00) * ek

‘| HBO-P
















:/ MOMAX

i'm lovin’ it oe 1 |
|



: TMC






PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006



MOTORISTS have com-
plained for years about the
dense morning traffic into cen-
tral Nassau from all areas of
New Providence.

Despite the public frustration
with the problem and the cre-
ation of several strategies to
alleviate the daily log jam, many
believe the traffic is just getting
worse.

With this in mind, The Tri-
bune hit the streets to ask the
public what they feel should be
done about the problem.

Most persons interviewed
suggested that more roads
should be cut to accommodate
the growing number of vehi-
cles.

On the other hand, a number
of persons suggested that new
laws need to be put in place to
restrict the number of cars on
the road at any one time.

A Bay Street businesswoman

said: “I think the government .

should pass a law to limit the
number of cars in every house-
hold, starting with the senior
citizens — they should not be
allowed to have cars of their
own.” ,

She added that more police

officers and Road Traffic per-



@ RUSSARA Bain said: “The
traffic lights need to be working
at all times.”

sonnel need to be on duty dur-
ing peak traffic hours to direct
the flow of traffic.

A taxi driver commented:
“More roads should be con-
structed in the right areas, start-
ing with the down town area,
because the traffic in the morn-
ing is overwhelming.”

Local radio personality Scott
Richards said that the traffic is
bad every morning.

“More Road Traffic officers
to guide the traffic in the east-
ern area would help,” he said.



Mi SCOTT Richards said: “More
road traffic officers to guide the
traffic in the eastern area would
‘be helpful.”

Mr Richards went on to say
that the repair of broken traffic
lights and the construction of
alternate roadways from the

pee enteceneeeeceneeseneneeeeneeeseeseea ees eneneusenananeceeaeeseeenseaensensaseasaneces leneeeeaeeaeeasasceneesensuseceeneeeereneseseee een eenenesneseareenenseee esa eee een seneneeneee ene ese ese ge

Group formed to investigate concerns over marine life

NOTICE,

Large multinational mechanical
contracting firm leader in its field is
looking for two (2) qualified
contruction material warehouse -
assistants

Assistant one:

e Experience with plumbing and electrical meterials
(reception, review, loading/unloading and

delivery).

Experience with Quickbooks software (a plus).
Ability to drive standard shift vehicle

_-Driver’s license.

Assistant Two:

¢ Experience with plumbing and electrical meterials
(reception, review, loading/unloading and

delivery).

Ability to drive standard shift vehicle

Driver’s license.

If you are interested:

Please submit resume to

Mechanical Contractor
P.O. Box: EE-15284
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Jessica Salmeron

Be sure to include full name, address,
telephone numbers where you can be reached,
work experience and person’s names and
phone numbers to verify the information



FROM page one

been formed to investigate.»

these matters.”






eastern end of the island would
also improve the situation.
“T would say there should be

_.a limit on the number of cars

+ The group, according to
Minister Miller, includes

representatives from the
Ministry ‘of Foreign

St. Augustine’s College
PTA



-Car Raffle-2006

WINNERS
June 1, 2006

Name

01671 | LLoyd, Ismay, Daulton

Harbour Island
bic

4-Trip

8-Dinner
Humidor

22315

11490 | Lydia Hanna

iter |



Other Icky Dads will win

® Round-trip tickets on Bahamas Ferries

* A-set-top-box with free 1-month subscription to

Ocean's Digital Movies from Cable Ba hamas



@ FRANK Adderley said: ““The
implementation on proper bus
systems for schools would help fix
the problem.”



per family, but everyone doesn’t
leave home at the same time,”
pointed out Bay Street employ-
ee Russara Bain.

“Roads should be constructed
if there is space for it and the
traffic lights should be working
at all times,” she said.

“Perhaps an overpass should
be built in the East Street area”
said Frank Adderley. “The
proper implementation of bus

systems would help and 4 ferry -

should run from the eastern
road to down-town every 20



@ GEROME Clark said:
“Schools should go in earlier to. - -
eliminate the overflow of morning.
traffic.”

minutes. A large parking lot
needs to be built also for this
idea to work.” . ae ie

Bay Street business owner |
Gerome Clark said: “The
schools should go in earlier to
eliminate the overflow of morn-
ing traffic. We have a lot of

’ growth in the Bahamas but we

don’t accommodate it.”
Mr Clark. added that the
maintenance of traffic lights
need to be addressed, and that
there is an urgent need for a
proper bus system.



Affairs, the Department of
Marine Resources, the
BEST Commission, the
Ministry of Health, and
the Department of
Environmental Health Ser-
vices.

_ Additionally, persons
from outside of the gov-
ernment have been invited
to participate in the inves-
tigations.

The group of invited par-
ticipants is to include
Ms Diane Claridge, a
Bahamian scientist, and
Dr Alan Bater, a veteri-
narian, both of whom are
said to have extensive
marine mammal experi-
ence.

Minister Miller said The
College of the Bahamas
will also be represented in
the person of Dr Kathleen
Sullivan Sealey, the Dean
of Pure and Applied Sci-
ence and the Acting Direc-
tor of the Marine and
Environmental Studies
Institute.

According to the. minis-
ter, this working group will
have access to internation-
al expertise from a variety
of sources, among them, Dr

-Marsha Green and Ms

Susan Millward of the
International Noise Coali-
tion.

“Inclusive of all the
species of marine mammals
that occur. within our
waters,” Minister Miller
said, “the commitment
from the Ministry of Agri-
culture and Marine
Resources is to protect the
marine resources of The
Bahamas.”

* A Bottle of Hennessy XO Cognac from Burns House



HAW ETE

estate today

Carmen Massoni

Making
it stick’ |

IF you have ever |.
bought or sold a home, *
you are probably =...
familiar with the term |
Multiple Listing Ser-.,.., 5
vice. LAF

It’s a convenient way .,
to locate most homes...
for sale, and access to”:
that data has createdia-\
new kind of buyer who”:
expects a high level of-’
service from real estate: ’
professionals, and the’~ !
competition is admit!~"
tedly fierce. pts

With nearly three out
of four buyers search-" *
ing the Internet for |. |
homes, the role of .-,
agents has certainly, ; .
changed, but has 5
not lessened in any >,
way. ite

Now that locating a - ;
suitable property has. ,
become easier, it’s the.
ability to negotiate an.
accepted offer to pur-;
chase that becomes
paramount, especially
in hot markets
where sellers may be
entertaining multiple
offers. CORO.

» When the offer is”
accepted, the rest of
the big picture comes:
INtO VIEW. sm ore a

An agent or broker\i
essential for-organising
all the aspects that will
bring the transaction
to a successful close. °

Consider arranging
inspections, guiding
the mortgage process,
setting up escrow
accounts, securing
title insurance, helping
plan the move, arrange
the closing, and so
on.

There is no doubt
that the Internet and.;
wide access to real
estate data has
‘improved the buyer’s
knowledge and posi- *
tion, but you can’t buy |
the kind of experience
that a professional can *
offer. fea

You can find your
next home online, but
it takes an agent to put)
you in it! roe




THE TRIBUNE



“Bozine Town
committee hits
out at minister's
comments
FROM page one

eh of the steering committee,
said "yesterday.

' The ‘minister also said that
the demands for a meeting with
Prime Minister Perry Christie
over the matter are completely

vote
EG

unnecessary at this point. He .

said that calls for such a meet-
ing stém from a small group of
“rabble rousers.”

“Weare not rabble rousers.
Rabble rousers do not hire
lawyers. Rabble rousers do not
deprive themselves of necessi-
ties,so that they can meet legal
fees every month,” the com-
mittee spokesman said.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Brown said he
had received calls all day from
Bozine Town residents who
were “very disturbed” by Min-
ister Miller’s comments.

“We are not violent, all we
want to do is have our peaceful
demonstration. Rabble rousers
would be violent, they would
‘grab their weapons and incite
violence. We have done noth:

ing of the sort, We have been at _

our most peaceful, not con-
frontational at all.

. “All we are asking is for the
government that we put there
to protect the poor man, to help
us in this matter,” he said.

: Taking exception to the claim

by Mr Miller that certain mem- —

bers:of the’ community are
attempting to turn the issue into

a “cheap political matter,” Mr.

Brown said:

: \“We'never made this a polit-
ical issue, never was there a
menti ion of any party in this dis-

pute. Other parties have
pproached us and asked us

how they could help. We

always told them ‘no thank you’
daq.explained to them that we
havé'a lawyer and are pursu-
ing: ‘this through the proper
channels.”
he Bozine. Town Steering
@buimittee last. week
anounced that they would
prdtest in front of parliament
ey do not receive a written
assurance from the prime min-
ister that they will not be dis-
plaged from the land which
some of them have been living
on for the past 50 years.
: The people of Bozine Town
how have little more than a
week to appeal last. month’s





Supreme Court ruling which.

upheld the Harrold Road Land

Devélopment Company’s..

(LANDCO) titles for the land

in the Bozine Town and:

Knowles Drive area.
‘ The land dispute first began
in late 2004 when 500 or so res-
identsreceived letters from the
law‘firm of Lockhart and
Munroe, informing them that
its clients, LANDCO, had been
granted. certificates of title to
property between Bozine
‘Town, Knowles Drive and Har-
told Road.

~ However, Mr Miller last
month, assured his constituents
that they will not be displaced,
and that government is cur-
rently reviewing the possibili-
ty of offering LANDCO Crown
land in‘exchange for the Bozine
Town and'Knowles Drive land:

Members of.the steering

committee said that waiting on
the ‘government to follow
through with its promises has
cost}them valuable time which
could have been used in prepar-
ing- aicase for the Court of



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have-wonan-—
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
ahd share your story.

Prosecutors want separate tria
for man accused of murders
of 22-year-old and four schoolboys

FROM page one

Robins’ murder was in no way
connected to the deaths of the
four boys.

However; Romona Far-
quharson, Farrington’s lawyer
argued that she wanted all the
matters to be combined.
According to Mrs, Farquhar-
son it would be in the best

' interest of her client to have

the five charges joined togeth-
er, and her client stand one
trial, as the murders were all a
part of a series of events. Mrs
Farquharson said that psychi-
atrists had concurred that
although Robins’ murder was
the first, reportedly occurring
several months before those
of the four missing boys, it
was the beginning of the
series.

Mrs Grant-Bethel dis-
agreed saying that Robins’-
murder occurred in 2002,
nearly a full year before those
of the younger boys. She also
noted Robins was mature, his
age not being in the same
range as the. boys. She also

claimed that the way Robins

died was in no way similar to
the death of the boys. The
body of the young boys were
found in the area of Barbary
Beach and Robins’ off the
Grand Bahama highway, she
noted.

Mrs Farquharson argued
that it was not true that all of
the boys’ bodies were found
in the same place. She sub-
mitted that the serial killings
had started with Jamaal’s
death and the gap:between
his murder and that of the
young boys was no contradic-
tion. Mrs Farquharson also
noted that everyone knows
that Farrington has been
charged with five murders
and there would be no preju-
dice in charging him with the
combined offences.

Farrington was-charged



with the Freeport in 2003 with
the murders of Jamaal
Robins, 22, Mackinson Colas,
12, Junior Reme, 11, DeAn-
gelo McKenzie, 13, and
Desmond Rolle, 14, All four
ofthe younger boys disap-
peared between May and
September of that year. The
four reportedly worked as
bag-packers at the Winn Dix-
ie Supermarket in Freeport
and played video games near-
by. Jamaal Robins was not
reported missing until May of
2003, although it was believed
he had disappeared earlier,
according to reports.
Arguments from both sides
initially arose yesterday when
Mrs Grant Bethel made it evi-

Se ratulationc’!

aa Congratulations

i
®
@
®
®
@
&
&
®
@
®
@
@
@
®
@
g
®
o-
®
®
@
®
e
@
®
@
@
®
@
ao
@
e
@
®
e
u
a
a

to
Morgan
Alicia
Hanna

Cool, ciaamy, Chocolaty...



On her graduation from Kingsway Academy Class
- K5PH and her attainment of Most Outstanding
Female Student. Best wishes comes from your proud
parents Alexander and Michelle Hanna,
grandparents, great grandparents, godparents,aunts,
uncles, cousins and your best buddy Morrett.

— We Love You. Continue to do well!
New eceeeeeeoseesagooeseeoee nh

Catch the
CHILL.
Do a one
of a kind

dent that the prosecution
intended to deal with the
murder of Jamaal Robins first
and as a separate case, as he

was believed to be Farring-

ton’s first victim. Ms Far-
quharson, however, said that
she was under the impression
that they were there to seek
an adjournment for Farring-
ton’s trial for the death of
Junior Reme, 11. According
to Mrs Grant Bethel, the
prosecution intended to deal
with the murder of Jamaal
Robins first, then try Far-
rington later for the murder
of the four younger boys.

Justice Allen is expected
to give her decision on the
matter on Friday.

Ri rateutrean edwied (ep 1ye3

Aa G ieesiaeaieana



































a8 eb heesdekebesedeneenccees0eseaeeeecsunEe

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 11

Make every day
special with

KEROR

Its Apple, Raspberry

& Peach Flavours are:

* Natural

¢ Not from concentrate

* Without preservatives
° 100% fruit juice
* Alcohol free

Available at your favourtie

_ liquor store and in all
ae ns House Beverage De

ey

and Butler & Sands stores.

>d retail price in Nassau Stores


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006 THE TRIBUNE.



YOUR CONN







BTC. —s—i“és«é "W'P}! VV
_ CONNECTION | © S# WS GEN
SHOW | : Esbutor as Claime IS

: WINNER coe a ee yet!

j WIDE |

i
fh



streurtan
| paapalieinias
: ; : : ze oe ‘Qe
Tyler Clarke is pictured receiving ee . yt Oe
-his new NOKIA 6680, Mr. Clarke: 0 Ewa “O@
was last week's BTC Connection ;
radio show trivia question winner.
Pictured left to right: Margo
Gibson, BTC PR department and _
Tyler Clarke, radio show winner.






TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

Dinan

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







Tel: (242) 356-7764




Tel:. (242) 351-3010




NASSAU OFFICE |

FREEPORT OFFICE



Developers resume |

ork at Baker’s Bay (eran

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

evelopers behind
the controversial

$175 million Bak- -

er’s Bay project
at Great Guana

: ay yesterday confirmed to The
: Tribune they had “resumed some
‘ activities” at the project site after
i the courts ruled they could be
: relieved from June 1 onwards of
' their previous undertaking not to
: do any new work.

Dr Livingstone Marshall,

. Senior vice-president of environ-
mental and community affairs for

the Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean.

Club, told The Tribune that the
developers were “really focused”
on construction of a $2.5 million

BEC’s fuel

costs up 99%

in three years

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
. Tribune Business Editor

~ SOARING global oil prices
have almost doubled the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) fuel costs over a
three-year period to $164.419 mil-

lion in its fiscal year'2005-2006,°

with Leslie Miller using this to
support his renewed plea for the

_ Bahamas to sign on to the Petro-

Caribe initiative.

Mr Miller, the former minister
of trade and industry, who has
seen responsibility for BEC and
the petroleum industry switched
to Dr Marcus Bethel following
the Cabinet reshuffle, said the

rise in BEC’s fuel costs from the ~

$82.519 million in fiscal 2002-2003
had impacted all Bahamians
through its fuel surcharge.

SEE page 4B

Just got alot loan.

service pier on the island, part of
the Abacos chain.

He explained that this would
allow the developers, San Fran-
cisco-based Discovery Land Com-
pany, to bring materials and
equipment on to the island. The
service pier would also be open to
use by the local population. »

Discovery Land Company has
resumed work on Great Guana
Cay following a Court‘of Appeal
verdict that relieved it of the
undertaking given. von November
22, 2005, in which it promised not
to do any moré/work at the devel-
opment site.

It gave the/undertaking on con-
dition that the legal action being
brought by/the Save-‘Guana Cay
Reef Asgociation, which is
ts to stop the develop-

Tal ks start

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



NEGOTIATIONS between
the Government and Bluewa-
ter Communications Holdings

over the Bahamas Telecom- |

munications Company’s (BTC)
privatisation begun “about a
week or two ago”, the minister
of state for finance told. The
Tribune yesterday.

James Smith confirmed that
the Government had appoint-
eda “special committee” to
negotiate with Bluewater over
the proposed sale of a stake in
BTC, along with management
control over the state-owned
telecommunications company.

With talks in their early
stages, Mr Smith said he had
not received any update from
the committee on how they
had progressed to date. In any
event, he added that the talks
were “embargoed”.

ment, be heard on its merits in

the Supreme Court by the end of
January 2006.

After several delays, Acting
Justice Norris Carroll heard the
trial on its merits: in February, but
has yet to deliver his verdict. As a
result, Discovery Land Compa-
ny successfully appealed to the
Court of Appeal last month that
its interests were being harmed
by the length of time being taken
to decide the Supreme Court
case.

Dr Marshall yesterday told The
Tribune that Discovery Land
Company was continuing with its

» permit and approval applications

to the Government, particularly
for subdivisions.
He added: “We’ve just about

completed subdivision activities -



@ JAMES SMITH

Mr Smith said the commit-

tee’s membership had been
appointed by the Cabinet, and
chosen from a combination of
the public sector, quasi-public
sector and the private sector.
Among the agencies likely
to.be represented on the Com-
mittee are the Ministry of
Finance, Attorney General’s

for Phase I, and are looking at
starting up permits and applica-
tions for Phase II. We’re looking

~ at the marina, and hope to soon

put that in.’

Fred Smith, attorney for the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associa-
tion, has since filed a motion with
the Court of Appeal, seeking to
appeal their decision to relieve
Discovery Land Company of its
undertaking to the Privy Coun-
cil.

Dr Marshall said the develop-

-ers were neither concerned nor

surprised by this, adding that Mr,
Smith had long indicated that he

- and his clients would be prepared

to take their case to the highest

SEE page 4B

over BIC privatisation

Office, Ministry of Public
Works, and the directors and
management of BTC itself.
The Government has vest-
ed the current privatisation
process with heavy secrecy,
due in part to the failed ‘open
beauty contest’ method that
was tried in 2003, when it

decided none of the three

offers made for a 49 per cent
stake in BTC matched its own
valuation. ° =

It is open to question,
though, whether BTC’s pri-
vatisation will be concluded
any time soon, given that a
general election’is coming
within the next 12 months, and
both major political parties will
want to attract the votes of
BTC staff and their depen-
dents.

This year, though, marks

SEE page 3B

ann eee Lot Loan

Michael's on top of his game.
He got a Zero Down Fidelity Lot Loan.

How coal is that?

ar:
Tepe

YTwgery
a

| @ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

| GIVEN the similarities
| between the Bahamian econ-
omy and those of. CARI-
COM members, High Com-
missioner Leonard Archer
said yesterday it made sense
for this nation to sign on to

& Economy (CSME), since
it would give the Bahamas
greater bargaining power to
obtain financial benefits in
trading with the US.

to Brian Moree, a ‘senior
partner at McKinney, Ban-
croft & Hughes, who told a
conference last week that it
was not in the Bahamas’
interests to join the CSME.
Doing so, he said, would
| harm this nation economi-
cally, as the Bahamas had
nothing in common with the
' rest of the Caribbean.
Instead, Mr Moree argued
that the Bahamas should
look towards its major trad-
ing partner and the Free
Trade Area of the Americas
(FTAA) for its. economic
future, rather than the
CSME.
However, Mr Archer said
| it was in the Bahamas’ best
interests to join the CSME
and negotiate with the US
| through CARICOM. :
| Mr Archer said: “The
| Bahamas should join the



| FTAA along with the rest of

the Americas - that is South

| America, Central America,
and the Caribbean. To get.

the best deal in the FTAA,
the Bahamas should join
CSME first, because then we
would be negotiating with
partners and not by our-
selves.

“The reason for j joining the

would be negotiating with
| CARICOM partners. The
| agreement would have to be
|. structured:so that the weak-
| est members of CARICOM
|



| can implement the agree-
ment. Obviously, if the terms

of the agreement are benefi-
cial to the weakest. member,
it becomes even more beéne-
ficial to the strongest mem-
| ber.” Among the strongest
| CSME members would be
| the Bahamas.

Mr Archer said this would
mean that whatever conces-
| sions and trade benefits the
US gave to the weakest
|. member of the CSME, the
| Bahamas would receive the

same’ treatment, enabling it
to also enjoy those prefer-



the Caribbean Single Market -

Mr Archer was responding -

advantage
_ Caribbean. $1 billion of that

CSME is that the Bahamas.



ences.

“If we are negoigating on

our own, we would be’

negoigating as a very strong

‘developed country. -and

therefore we would have to

make concessions to the

Americans,” Mr Archer said.

“Negotiating as a part of
the CSME, we benefit from:
all of the concessions that the
United States or apy other

developed county would:



make to the economic group- |

ing under world trade rules.”
Mr Archer explained that,

at present, the US does not |

oping country.

_ see the Bahamas as a devel- |

“The financial benefits niet |

that for all of the countries,® |
services, particularly tourism,’

is the most important sector,”
Mr Archer said.

“With the exception of |

Trinidad, Suriname and |:
Guyana, tourism is by far the | -

largest importing sector. We
all trade with the US. The
US. has a $6 billion trade
over the

comes from the Bahamas.
“So when the argument. is
made that we are different
from them, that argument is
by far not true. America is
the biggest trading partner
for Jamaica, Barbados and
for Trinidad. We all buy and.
purchase goods from the
United States, we all go to

Miami and Fort Lauderdale. |

We are all-into services,
tourism and financial ser-
vices.

“They have agriculture, |
which we don’t have, but |

agriculture is not the most
important sector of the econ-

omy, and agriculture is not |

growing because, as you
know, the bananas are in
trouble due to World Trade

Organisation rules. So is sug- |
ar, and these are the two big |

agricultural items, and rice to |

SEE page 2B



Op Fort BAY #H1200: Secluded island ambiance at this
home situated high above Old Fort Bay Beach, Main house has 5 -
bedrooms, 6 baths, all beautifully appointed, Infinity pool and sepa-
rate Honeymoon Suite with private outdoor jacuzzi and terrace.
Across the street there is additional parking and 100 feet of dock.
US$5,800,000, Exciusivety Listed, George Damianos.

wy Wfrdcay | Sothebys

Properties INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Call Fidelity reQeENV?

= ) FIDELITY

Beyond Banking
Â¥ 356.7764. F 326.3000

Choose Wisely
Choose Fidelity

Faniao\aistlel <
ata

PARADISE
ISLAND

ert 3) a FREEPORT

dra toa

MACKEY.

Big t 242.362.4211 £ 242.362.6098

SIRlyfordcay.com

4
x
‘


. PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

THE TRIBUNE

El Salvador shows Bahamas

the way on hard reforms

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT .
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of The
International Business Companies Act No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolution
of LINWOOD COMMERCIAL LTD. is in dissolution.
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS)
LTD. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Malborough & Queen
Streets. P.O. Box N-10429, Nassau Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their names,

addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator _

before the 8th day of July 2006.

| TN te arieot hatte
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT

SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD:
Liquidator

Signed:

Legal Notice
NOTICE
BOSPHERE LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) BOSPHERE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under the

provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies

-Act 2000. :

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 12th June,

2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and

registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust of 17
. bis, rue de Lausanne - 1211 Geneva 70 - Switzerland.

Dated this 13th day of June, A.D. 2006.

ast week, the Nassau Institute
and the Atlas Research Foun-
dation sponsored a one-day

conference entitled Taking â„¢
Small Nations to Greatness: '

Free Trade, Security and Education. The lun-
cheon speaker at the conference was for-
mer President Francisco Flores of El Sal-
vador, who served from 1999 until 2004.
Under the Salvadoran constitution, presi-
dents cannot serve consecutive terms in
office.

President Flores was one of the most
impressive speakers that I have heard in the
Bahamas. It was simply a pity that many
more Bahamians.did not avail themselves

of this opportunity to hear a speaker of his _

calibre and accomplishment.

Almost exactly one year ago, President
Flores was nominated for the position of
Secretary General of the Organisation of
American States (OAS).

President Flores declined to let his name
go forward, to which US Secretary of State,
Condoleezza Rice lamented: “President Flo-
res has demonstrated that he is.a talented
and dynamic leader, successfully articulating
a forward-thinking vision for a hemisphere
that thrives on democracy, respect for human
rights and economic opportunity.”

What exactly did President Flores accom-
plish to earn such accolades?

EI Salvador
El Salvador is the smallest and most
densely populated country in Central Amer-

: ica, a country of 6.7 million people, occu-

pying a land mass of some 8,000 square miles
sandwiched between Guatemala and Hon-
duras, It is roughly the size of the state of
Massachusetts and its income per capita is
approximately US$2,100 per capita
(Bahamas $18,000). Literacy is 87 per cent
(97 per cent for the Bahamas), and the size
of the economy (GDP) is US$32. 4 billion
(Bahamas $6 billion).

An interesting side note is that annual
remittances (money sent back home by Sal-
vadorans living abroad) account for 17 per

Financial

Focus



cent of GDP.

Forward-thinking vision

-E] Salvador suffered a brutal civil war
from 1980-1992, which resulted in the loss of
75,000 lives and the decimation of the econ-
omy and public infrastructure. —

Voted to power in 1999 at the age of 37,
President Flores and his administration are
largely responsible for making El Salvador's
voice heard throughout the world's main
international forums. He was also one of
the first leaders to meet with George W.

Bush shortly after he was voted in as presi- 5

dent of the US.

On a subsequent official visit to Bl Sal-
vador in 2002, President Bush had this to
say: “El Salvador is one of the really great
stories of economic and political transfor-
mation of our time. Just over a decade ago,
this country was in civil war.

“For millions of Salvadorans, violence was
a daily reality, and prosperity was just a dis-
tant dream. Today, El Salvador is at peace.
The country has renewed its commitment
to democracy and economic reform and
trade. It is one of the freest and strongest and

most stable countries in our hemisphere.”

Presentation
President Flores provided his Bahamian
audience with an extremely articulate and

passionate speech, highlighting some of the

radical reforms his government had to imple-
ment, and some of the difficult decisions
they had to make. For instance, in order to
restore the rule of law, they had to fire 20 per
cent of the officers on the police force, who
were corrupt.

The Flores administration had an unshake-

able commitment to free markets and care-
ful fiscal management. Free market policy
initiatives included the privatisation of the
banking system, telecommunications, public
pensions, electrical distribution and some
electrical generation, reduction of import
duties, elimination of price controls, and
enhancing the investment climate tntoueh
trarisparent policies.

Food for thought

At the end of his presentation, I had the
brief opportunity to speak one-on-one with
President Flores. I asked him: “How were
you able to drive through so many funda-
mental and radical changes in such as short
time?” He paused for a moment, and then
responded: “Things were so bad, that the
people were willing to give anything a try.
The sense of hopelessness was pervasive.”

The Bahamas has always been fortunate in
that we have never really suffered from a
political, social or economic catastrophe that
severely damaged out economy. To date we
have done a reasonably good job of building
credible institutions, although there have
been some bumps along the way and there i is
still a lot of work to be‘done.

However, we still have some pressing
issues such as education and training, crime,
land policy, immigration and tax reform, all
of which require some new and even tadical
re-thinking, along with an unshakeable com-
mitment to fixing them. f

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Finan-
cial Analyst, is vice-president - pensions,

Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas), a

wholly-owned subsidiary of Colonial Group

International, which owns Atlantic Medical

Insurance and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance Company in
the Bahamas.

The. views expressed are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any questions or com-

‘ments to rlgibson@atlantichouse.com. bs 2



CSME to give Bahamas more bargaining power

Credit Suisse Trust
Liquidator; =.

FROM page 1B



~ CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

Vacancy for
Project Manager

The Project Manager (PM) will over see the implementation of an Automated

| Cleritig House (ACH) in The Bahamas. The successful candidate will be respon-
sible for liasing with potential vendors, assembling a project team, assingning
individual, identifying appropriate resources needed, developing project schedules
‘and providing reports to ensure the timely completion of the project. The PM must
‘demonstrate appropriate specialized knowledge and experience with the imple-
mentation of clearing and settlement systems; direct experience with (image
th) ACH systems is preferable. —

T he ideal catidlidates must possess the requisite skills to » perorn the following
activities:

© © Assist with project education and orientation
e Assist with implementation schedule, approach, puget. and staffing
requirements
i ¢ Review and monitor project plan srdgress
‘© Review and assist with implementation plan strategy
e Ensure that the risks: of material deviations are minimized
Review and assist with the test plan strategy
” Review and assist with training plan

| * Assist with development of the Go-Live Plan
* Create public awareness of the ACH and its function
° Provide thought leadership
* Identify global issues and workflow opportunities
f° Troubleshoot and escalate critical issues

a smaller extent.

“But the fact is, tourism and
financial services are the seg-
ments of the Caribbean econ-
omy that are growing.”

Mr Archer added that other
Caribbean country economies
were looking more like the
Bahamas every day. “There is
a certain syngery that devel-
ops that needs to be recon-
gisied,” he said. .

Mr Archer added: “He says
[Mr Moree] we are different
from them, but he doesn’t say
how we are different from
them. The fact is we are not
that different. If you went to
Barbados or Jamaica, you
would see the emphasis on ser-
vices as opposed to agriculture
and other things.”

Mr Moree said of the

CSME: “It takes away a much
more important issue, which is
our relationship with the Unit-
ed States, negotiating the
FTAA or a free trade agree-
ment (FTA) with the United
States.

Minimal

“] think there would be min- .

imal advantages accruing to
the Bahamas through mem-
betship of the CSME, because
we have very little trade with
the region.’

“I think it will be contrary
to the national interests of the
Bahamas to join the CSME. I
think it would have adverse
consequences for us economi-
cally and bring minimal bene-
fits to us.

aaah tet eles et atatesatad



Is looking for

_ THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS!!.

Highest commissions and bonuses in the industry.

“It would come at a signifi-’
cant cost, because we have the
highest [per capita] gross
domestic product among
CARICOM member states.”

However, Mr Archer also
disputed that claim, noting that
there was an agreement by
CARICOM countries that
Trinidad pays 25 per cent of
the organisation’s budget,

Jamaica pays 24 per cent and

the rest is shared amoung the
other countries, with the
Bahamas paying 11 per cent.

“ It is based on GDP and
not based on GDP per capita
(which is GDP divided by pop-
ulation). I think there is some
confusion that because our
GDP per capita is higher, then

- our GDP is also bigger, but

that is not so,” Mr Archer said.

Royal Holiday

“Energetic Self Motivated, Goal Oriented, individuals ¥
For it’s High Volume Sales Centre

A aaacaecnssncanscnnsncase

Minimum 3 BGCSE

| » management softwaretools and process improvement strategies
i © Experience with implementation of financial system
f ° Exceptional communication and interpersonal skills’
H ° Proven track record of managing project economics
; ° Effectiveness in meeting project deadlines and deliverable

; oe oh of oh ok oh oe eR sbeebs abt seb de Must be over 25yrs

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required: Have a Positive Mental Attitude,

; eee Excellent Conversational Skills .
H © BSc or equivalent experience i Ability to Think on Feet i
e Knowledge of clearing and settlement systems Articulate and Outgoing

| * Knowledge of project management methodologies, project i

Become a part of our Winning Team
Please contact: , i

Royal Holiday, i

327-5595 Ext-222. i

Send Resumes to: a Or in person: i
CBA - ACH Project Manager Response |
Bank of The Bahamas International
1st Floor, Claughton House

Royal Holiday, ground floor, i
Shirley & Charlotte Streets ‘gee

Nassau Wyndham Resort and Casino.



Nassau, Bahamas 10am-3pm. :

E-mail responses may be sent to: if i
_Samantha.Antonio@BankBahamas.com i
Velpeapb ues ihe hoist etal ei aa sae Heaicg anaes tnduaisleestceliodavtncs ;

\ a
wee wee

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 3B





‘Nothing to fear’
from the CSME

‘By CARA BRENNEN
_ Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIANS would be willing to
accept the Caribbean Single Market &
Economy (CSME) if they were given the
facts without disortations, the Foreign
Affairs Ministry’s High Commissioner told
The Tribune yesterday

Leonard Archer said that people often
read more into the Revised Treaty of
Chaguaramas than what really existed

“If they would understand the need for,
‘they could accept it as a part of the world
we live in and that this is necessary,” he
said.

For example, Mr Archer said Bahami-
ans continued to agitate against the free-
dom of movement of Caribbean nationals
- an aspect of the CSME which is some-
thing that the Bahamas does not have to
be part of.

, “It is not a fundamental issue in the
‘CSME. All the CARICOM countries have
problems of immigration, so that issue

was left for the future, when conditions
are better, when countries are more under-
standing, when people understand that
free movement is not going to. be cata-
strophic, as some people try to make it
out to be}” Mr Archer said.

“But that will be subject to a future
agreement, As it is now, the only persons
who are guaranteed movement are those
who are a part of an economic enterprise.
If an employee comes to the Bahamas,
their key people would be able to come
with them.”

Argument

Mr Archer said another argument is
that the CSME will create a federation of
some kind, similar to the European Union
(EU).

“That is not possible under the current
treaty. For that to happen, there would
have to be another treaty. You can’t
import to a treaty that what isn’t there;
the treaty says what can be done and no

where does it say a federation,” Mr Archer |

said.

Speaking to the issue of a singe curren-
cy, Mr Archer explained that if adopted, it
would be the value of the Bahamian dol-
lar. “There is nothing to fear from a com-
mon currency,” he said.

He also addressed the issue of the
CARICOM passport, saying it was mere-

ly symbolic and would be useful for per-

sons travelling through the Caribbean.

“The CARICOM passport is a national
passport with the symbol of CARICOM
on it. In most CARICOM. countries, they
have a CARICOM line for persons to use
when they are clearing immigration and
customs.

“Unfortunately, in the Caribbean we
don’t treat our visitors better than we treat
our own. It should be the other way
around.

“Caribbean nationals should no longer
be considered visitors, and the CARI-
COM passport reinforces that,” said Mr

- Archer. -

T alks start over BTC privatisation



PUBLIC NOTICE -

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LAVITO TRAVINCI
THOMAS, of #229 Hudson Estate, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
P.O.- Box 42332, intend to change my name to LAVITO
TRAVINCI MARTIN. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box F-43536, Grand Bahama, no
later than thirty (30) Hays after the date of publication of this

notice.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a)

DOLPHIN CAPITAL LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business. Companies Act 2000.

The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on June 12, 2006,
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registéred by
the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of Shirley
House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company is
required 'on or before the 12th day of July 2006 to send their names |
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

June 13, 2006

ALISA RICHARDSON

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

.. LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

- FROM page 1B

sight years since the former
FNM administration first
began moves to privatise BTC,
and the failure to complete this
process yet is a mark against
both governments.

The Government has also
stated that it will wait until the
talks with Bluewater are com-

‘pleted, whatever the outcome,
before it talks to other groups
that are interested in privatis-
ing BTC.

» Mr Smith previously con-
firmed that Cable & Wireless
(C&W) was among the other
parties interested in BTC, that
company having looked at the


































branch

CREDIT

OTHER

=_

PROFILE:

Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration or Finance
10 years retail banking experience with a minimum of 3 years in a
managerial position

e-mail:

state-owned firm during the
2003 process and passed the
initial qualifying round,
although no formal bid was
ever made.

Offering

The Government is “start-
ing out” by offering Bluewa-
ter a 49 per cent stake in BTC,
the same percentage on offer
during the failed 2003 process.
This could change, though, but
sticking to this percentage, the
Government would retain a 51
per cent stake, with Bluewa-
ter gaining management con-
trol.

Among the key issues likely

invites applications for the position of
BRANCH OPERATIONS MANAGER

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS & SALES SUPPORT |
o Functional responsibility for the day-to-day management of the

Training, coaching and assessment of Sales Support Staff
o Monitoring cash limits
o Accurate and timely processing of all accounting entries, Bantnig
fees & service charges
o Compliance reviews for new and continuing accounts to ensure
adherence to Central Bank Anti-Money Laundering Guidelines,
KYC requirements of FTRA/FTRR and pape internal -
instructions
o Reporting losses and exceptional occurrences
o ° Reporting on business development & financial results

o Review of loan documentation
o Disbursement of loan proceeds

o Sales initiatives and business development
o Review of workflows and procedures
o Maintain and update all procedure/training manuals
o Monitor dormant accounts

TIME ALLOCATION

o Sales=15%

o Customer Service=20%

o Operations/Administration=35%

BACKUP FOR
o Service Centre Manager

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, together
with a comprehensive range of benefits.

Send resume no later than Monday 19th, June 2006 to:

Human Resources Department

Fe) FIDELITY

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

o Training & Coaching=15%
o Change Management=15%

careers@fidelitybahamas.com

to dominate the talks are the |

price Bluewater is willing to
pay for its BTC stake; condi-
tions of any agreement; the
extent of the monopoly BTC

holds in fixed-line and cellular |

services and how long they will
be maintained; capital expen-
diture and how much Bluewa-

-ter is willing to put into its busi-

ness plan; how much the
group will invest in training
Bahamians; and the composi-
tion of the Board and man-
agement agreements.

BTC’s financial performance
is said to have recovered to a
$34.533 million net profit in
2005, up from $8.34 million in
2004, but the firm is heavily











depetidént on its continuing
cellular monopoly to remain
afloat.

Competition has eroded
BTC’s profitability and rev-
enues in almost every area it
competes in, and opening up
cellular - while the benefiting
the Bahamian private sector
and consumer - could have dis-
astrous consequences for BTC.

The failure to privatise is
also holding up liberalisation
of the Bahamian telecoms
industry, with the Government
doing everything it can to pre-
serve BTC’s competitive posi-
tion by holding back rivals
Cable Bahamas and Systems
Resource Group (SRG).

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ROYCE MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution
under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

(b) The Dissolution of the said Company commenced on June 12, 2006,
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of Shirley -
House, 50 Shirley Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named Company is
required on or before the 12th day of July 2006 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator
of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

June 13, 2006

ALISA RICHARDSON
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



chy Ne

Ramey
wealth of The Bahamas

also....make plans to attend the prestigious...

CEE Awards
June 16th, 2006

The Rain Forest Auditorium, Whyndam, Nassau Resort
NY

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND OUR SCHEDULE PLEASE CONTACT

Poy Sy eat) a,



POBOEOEEeH42

eeerveeces

evevee
La aie

PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

course, expanding the reverse

those interested in buying prop-

THE TRIBUNE.

imposing its vision for the devel-





NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that GIBSON RAPHAEL,HAMPTON
‘ST OFF WULFF RD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
‘the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
‘that any person who knows any reason why registration/
‘naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
‘and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
‘from the 6TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
‘for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
‘Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEATRICE NOEL, P.O. Box
‘EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
‘responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
.|‘registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
‘from the 13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
‘for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
‘Bahamas. ;



















Guana Cay, from 1B

court.

The Tribune had been told by
informed sources that the devel-
opers had been relatively cir-
cumspect over the pace at which
they had restarted work, given
that Justice Carroll was yet to rule
on the merits of the Association’s
case.

Dr Marshall more or less con-
firmed this yesterday, saying in
reference to the Supreme Court:
“We obviously have to keep that
in mind.”

However, he pointed out that
developments of the size pro-
posed by Baker’s Bay did not
happen overnight, saying a
tremendous amount of planning
and preparatory work had to be
undertaken.

The developers were now refo-
cusing on activities such as mov-
ing native trees out of the devel-
opment’s way, designing the golf

BEC, from 1B

CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION

Vacancy for

Administrative Assistant

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible to the project Manager and
clerical and Administrative support. The successful candidate will be
responsible for documenting meetings, organizing and coordinating meeting
schedules, preparing all project communications and correspondence,
distributing project information and generally ensuring that all matters
relating to the project are fully and project documented in a timely manner.
The candidate must possess excellent typing and record keeping skills and be
proficient in the use of various software applications such as MS Word, MS

PowerPoint and MS Excel, among others.

. .

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities required:

¢ Associates Degree or Certified Professional Secretary Rating , or Certified

_ Administrative Professional Rating; .

* Detailed knowledge of computers to complete correspondence (e.g.,MS Word),
create and maintain forms, reports (e.g., MS Excel), presentation (e.g., MS
Power Point), and brochures and to respond to email as necessary;

¢ Basic business and accounting knowledge to prepare-documentation. and...

Sen een nt} wey ny
aye

/bRsee ater at

statistical report;

Oa VEL

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills, including etiquette and
writing skills, to interact with associates and external persons, and to create

correspondence;

¢ Judgement requirement in treatment of information with confidentiality and

professionalism; ;

* Ability to operate a variety of office equipment, including computer, calculator,

printer, fax, machine, and photocopier -

Send Resumes to:

CBA - ACH Administrative Assistant Response
Bank of the Bahamas International.
1st Floor, Claughton House
Shirley & Charlotte Streets

Nassau, Bahamas

__ E-mail responses may be sent to:
Samantha.Antonio@BankBahamas.com





as:

Pricing Information As Of:
9 June 2006



Close Today's Close _

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank.
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

, Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs°
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson :
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings
.00 ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets



Fund Name




1.2897 1.2339 Colina Money Market Fund 1.289693"

2.8564 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.78564 ***

2.3560 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**
Colina Bond Fund

BISX Al 5 |
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Colina

Financial Advisors Ltd.

10.44



2D

“Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Last 12 Months

22.44

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity





Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

Div $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
P/E = Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The






osmosis plant and paving roads.
They had been unable to do some
of those projects while the under-
taking was in effect.

“In a development of this size,
you’re going to have some chal-
lenges now and then,” Dr Mar-
shall said. “Once people get a
close up look at the plans, those
that sit and visit with us will see
what we’re doing is environmen-
tally friendly and makes a lot of
sense.

“We think we’re going to con-
tinue on as before, making the
project better and doing what’s
best for the environment.”

Dr Marshall said Baker’s Bay,
which when built will be a pri-
vate member’s club, featuring 350
residential lots and a 75-room lux-
ury villa, had not closed any real
estate sales yet.

“We haven’t doné any sales
yet,” he added. “We have been
talking to potential buyers and
had a magnificent response from

The $81.9 million increase in
BEC’s fuel bill over three years
had been passed on to Bahamian

businesses and residential con-_

sumers through the fuel sur-
charge, Mr Millersaid. .

He added that in 2005, the
average fuel surcharge paid by
low income Bahamian families,
based on average consumption of
200 kilowatt hours per month,
was $178.93. For middle income
families, using 1,000 kilowatt
hours per month, they were pay-
ing $894.63.

For upper income families, Mr
Miller said they were paying an
average of $1,789.25 per month
to BEC for the fuel surcharge,
based on 2,000 kilowatt hours per
month. Commercial enterprises
were paying $254,969 per month
to BEC, based on 275,000 kilo-
watt hours per month usage.

Turning to the hotel.industry, .

Mr Miller said small hotels with
between 50-100 rooms were pay-
ing a fuel surcharge to BEC of
around $244,600 per month.
For properties with 200-300
rooms, this increased to $377,115,
while for hotels with 500-1,000
rooms, the figure was $1.722 mil-
lion.

Mr Miller said these figures did
not include the basic electricity
rate that BEC also charged con-
sumers.

He added that.in October 2004,
BEC received $4.9 million from
consumers as a result of the fuel
surcharge, while by September
2005, this had risen to $12 mil-
lion.

Mr Miller told the House of

“Assembly yesterday: “Based on
proposals we had received, BEC ©

could have saved approximately

’ $10 million per annum, while hav-

ing access to credit facilities of up

to 40 per cent of their annual pur- *.

chases at 1 per cent interest
instead of the present interest
rates of around 6 per cent per
annum. This would have meant
further savings of about $5 million
over the grace period.”

Thus did Mr Miller make an -

impassioned plea for the. Gov-
ernment to revisit PetroCaribe,
even though he no longer has
ministerial responsibility for the
issue.

His address did not touch on
the fact that PetroCaribe, the
brainchild of Venezuelan leader
Hugo: Chavez, which many
observers view as an attempt to
buy the support of Caribbean
nations in global forums in his
ongoing verbal war with the US,
does not mean lower oil - and
therefore lower gas - prices.

PetroCaribe would entail an
‘oil on credit’ deal, with the
Bahamas - if it signed on - pur-
chasing oil and petroleum-related
products directly from Venezue-

la’s state-owned PDVSA via a.

National Energy Agency, cutting
_ out the wholesale. arm of the
major oil companies.

iS) Ouine

Div $

ae
19.4
8.0
N/M

0.000
0.360
000





*-31 May 2006

** - 01 May 2006

EPS $ - A company's reported earings per share for the last 12 mths

*** - 30 April 2006

se** - 31 March 2006

erties.
“Once we’ve completed the

Phase IJ subdivision and all items, .

we'll be in a position to move for-
ward with hard sales.” ’

Dr Marshall also denied claims
that Discovery Land Company
had begun hiring Mexican work-
ers to work on the Baker’s Bay
project, as the developers had
been unable to find enough
Bahamians with sufficient skills.

He said: “I have no knowledge
of that. I don’t think we’re at that
stage yet. Our first priority and
commitment is certainly to hire
Bahamians first, and beyond that
we'll see.”

The dispute between the devel-
opers and Association over the
Baker’s Bay investment project
has raised’ a host of issues relating
to this nation’s processes for
approving major investment pro-
jects.

Apart from consultation with
local populations and Nassau

‘Although the Bahamas would

- only have to pay a percentage of

the full price, say $0.60 of every
$1, up front, and be able to pay
the rest off over time, critics of

' the PetroCaribe arrangement’
believe this would add further to

the Bahamas already substantial
debt burden, storing up future
problems for the public finances.

Mr Miller was also previously

frustrated in his attempts to per- |

suade the Ministry of Finance to
reduce the taxes levied on the
landed cost of fuel, amounting to
$1.06 per gallon of unleaded gaso-



Bahamas.



Bahamas. «

of publication of this notice.








NOTICE is hereby given that NATASHA SIMEON OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
‘and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 138TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-.7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEAUNENFANT NOEL, P.O. | |.
Box EL-27448, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed.statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the.13TH day of JUNE, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
‘The Public is hereby advised that |, VETILUS JEANITE, of
Washington St., Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my,name
to FRANCILLAN MITCHELL. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,:
-| Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
THE TRADING COMPANY, LTD.

Interested persons please fax resume to

opment of the Bahamas on areas |

"that may not want major projects,

the controversy has also high~
lighted the need for a National

Land Use policy and the leasing ©,"

of Crown and Treasury land.to
developers. .

Some 105 acres of Crown Land
and 20 acres of Treasury Land
are being leased to the developers
at what the Government
describes as “normal commercial
terms”.

While Discovery Land Com-
pany has pledged that 66 acres of
the leased land will be used for a
nature preserve accessible to
Bahamians and Guana Cay resi-
dents, the issue has sparked
debate on whether Crown and
Treasury Land should be
reserved exclusively for the ben-
efit of Bahamians. :

Other issues raised by the bat-
tle include the transparency

involved in the investor approvals

process in the Bahamas.

line, with a further 7 per cent:

stamp duty on top. Hi

The minister argued that sign-
ing on to PetroCaribe could have
saved Bahamian consumers any-
where between $0.25-$1 per gal-
lon on gasoline and diesel import-
ed. At $0.25 per gallon, this would
have saved the Bahamas $21 mil-
‘lion per year, and at $1 per gallon,
$85 million per year.

Mr Miller said the Bahamas
collectively spent $525.2 million
on petroleum ‘products in. 2005,
an increase of $159.8 million or 44
per cent over 2004. ate
























|








(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that the above-named Company
is in dissolution, commencing on the 7th day of June, 2006.
Articles of Dissolution have been duly registered by the
Registrar. The Liquidator is Barry W. Herman, P.O. Box N-
10818, Nassau, The Bahamas.

‘All persons having claims against the above-names
Company are required, on or before the 8th day of July, 2006
to send their names and addresses and particulars of their |
debts or claims to the Liquidator of the Company or, in j
default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit or
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Dated this 7th day of June 2006.

ett ee

BARRY W. HERMAN
LIQUIDATOR’

NURSING CAREER:
OPPORTUNITY

Plastic Surgery office is seeking a full-time

REGISTERED
NURSE.

Great benefits; including assistance in
funding for Specialized training.









PLE

328-6479 or Call 356-3189

for further information.




SIPS gp hs SSS SEE RE oT BHI +
ASEM g SSNs eee s

Sat

est

aR

x

PRA TT Dene
MEeae dere

ee MoS na Sp aap AL RL RN RS a ATER SY GS SON ARR

DEERE RE ERO, Oe Ge at 9 a

&

NN

a

SEY Ot SHG ANN

+ALL ERLE ERA ARG LSA TRE moh

gisiacn

wenteiees

we

eters
“THE TV RERUIME BUGHNEaaa

GN-361



' SUPREME COURT

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas

June 15, 2006

-~PROBATE DIVISION
‘ NO.2006/PRO/NPR/00293

"In the estate of CHARLES STANLEY COCKSHULL,

‘late of 116 Central Avenue Southend on Sea Essex,

;, United Kingdom,
- deceased.

,NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
“of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
on its Probate Side by KEVIN M. RUSSELL, of No.

[ 14 Doubloon Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The
7 | Bahamas, Attorney-at-Law, the Authorized Attorney

in The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant

-of Probate in the above estate granted to EILEEN
| FRANCES DOROTHY TOTTMAN, the personal
| ‘representative, by the High Court of Justice, The
| Probate Registry of the Family Division, on the 26th
: day oF Reomualy 2004.

Signed
D. Robinson
i - (for) Registrar © ~

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT

| ays epie-vire PROBATE DIVISION
Geaes RY GEC OS qinet sun arabe A OU8

“No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00308

Whereas REBECCA FERGUSON, of The Settlement
of Forest on the Island of Exuma, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Lawful

‘Widow has made application to the Supreme Court
: ‘of The Bahamas, for Letters of. Administration ‘of the
| | real and. personal estate of NAAMON FERGUSON

a. k.a. NAAMAN FERGUSON a.k.a. NAMON

| FERGUSON late of Forest Exuma, one of the Islands

B: “of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

| Notice is hereby given ‘that such applications will
| be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
a | days from the date hereof.

: D. Robinson
: (for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE.BAHAMAS
: THE SUPREME COURT
thy PROBATE DIVISION

BAGO (here arcs June 15, 2006

'
oo}
1

T No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00309

| Whereas MARK ANTHONY BETHEL, of #45 |

Seabreeze Lane, Eastern District, New Providence,
-one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The

- Bahamas, the Eldest Lawful Son has made

application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,

for;Letters of Administration for the real and personal .

estate of ETHELYN MAE BETHEL, late of #3 Baker
us ' Street, Southern District, New Providence, one of

i the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, ©

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

PY ce

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00310

Whereas HARTIS EUGENE PINDER, of Mareva
House, 4 George Street, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Beryl

Margaret Hall-Sturrup, the Sole Executor has made |'

application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will Annexed
of the real and personal estate of JOHN KENNETH
CULMER, late of Murphyville in the Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14

‘days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/0031 1
Whereas SANDRA MAE MEADOWS, of Clifton

Street, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, one

‘of the Lawful: Sisters has made application to the

Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate’ of

- WILLIAM JAMES MEADOWS, late of Clifton Street, |

Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF: THE BAHAMAS
. THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00313

Whereas PATRICIA SCOTT, of Allen Lane of
Carmichael Road, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration de bonis non
of the real and personal estate of DONALD COLLIN
SCOTT a.k.a. DONALD SCOTT late of Bobolink

_ Terrace, Monastery Park, New Providence, one of

the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. |

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson

(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00314 -

Whereas FLORENCE ROLLE, of Harbour Close #5

Bel-Air Estates, Western District, New Providence,

one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas the Lawful Widow, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of
REYNOLD ROLLE late of Harbour Close #5 Bel-Air
Estates, Western District, New Providence, one of

‘the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

VIERA, ENS Dt, AUG, PAGE SE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. °
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006 -

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00315

Whereas TAMIKA K. SYMONETT of Churchill |

Avenue, Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New: |
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth”
of The Bahamas, the Attorney by Deed of Power of
Attorney for Pamela Theresa Symmonette, the
Lawful Widow has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration §

-of the real and personal estate of WAYNE -

GEOFFREY SYMMONETTE a.k.a. WAYNE ..|
GEOFFREY SYMMONETT late of Churchill Avenue,

Boyd Subdivision, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonweatth of The ||
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications wilt .
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof. -

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEATI A OF THE - BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT —

_ PROBATE DIVISION

‘June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00316

Whereas GORDON FITZGERALD LIGHTBOURNE ©
of Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New §
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, the Lawful Widower has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,

for Letters of Administration of the real and personal
estate of ROCHELLE LOUISE LIGHTBOURNE late
of Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New.
Providence, one of the Islands of the Conmonwedtt
of The Bahamas, deceased. ;

Notice is hereby given that such applications will:

be. heard by the said, Court at the eXpIaNOne of ids

days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS.
THE SUPREME COURT
~~ PROBATE DIVISION

June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00320
Whereas BRIDGET EVANS of Boyd Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the real and personal estate of
LESTER DAVIS late of Unity House, East Street,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

‘Notice is hereby given that such applications will §
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof. _

K. Mackey
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

' June 15, 2006

No. 2006/PRO/NPR/00321

Whereas MICHELLE GEORGINA JOHNSON of
Jubilee Gardens, Western District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Daughters has made application .
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the real and personal estate of
WILBER JOHN FERGUSON late of Imperial Park,
Eastern District, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will |
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

June 12, 13, 14




PAGE 6B,
‘ - <
-
+
a —
( wet'Ge ow oot

| =m Cth of

| UESDAY, JUNE 13, 2UU0

Re re ee



. Bahamas’ cricketers
shine i in the s potlight

@ CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter

PLAYING ‘under the lights’
was a huge concern for the

Bahamas Cricket Association |

(BCA), but the 20-member
team passed their first test with
flying colours.

Participating in several exhi-
bition games over the weekend,
as preparation for the historic
Stanford 20/20 aside tourna-
ment, the squad travelled to
South Florida capturing two vic-
tories from the three games

played.

Having to play for the first
time ‘under the lights’, the
Bahamas didn’t adjust straight

_away, losing the match-up to

the South Florida Cricket

Team impresses
‘under the lights’



Batting first, the All-Star
team scored a total of 214 runs
in their 20 overs with the
Bahamas being bowled out for
129 runs. The All-Star team
won. the game by 85 runs.

Top scorers in this match-up
were Dhillion Mandeep of the
All-Star team with 11 runs and
Allan Dennis with 66 runs.

Bahamas’ bowler Dwight
Weakly took two wickets, with
Gary Armstrong and Venris

Returning to the field on Sat-
urday morning, the Bahamas
came storming back to win the
game held at Brian Picolo Park
by 15 runs. Batting first, the
team was bowled out for 158
runs in 30 overs while the All-
Star team was bowled out for
143 runs.

Top scorers were Armstrong
with 40 runs, William Atkinson

with 34 runs, Wayne Patrick

scored 15 while Mario Ford bat-
ted in 16 runs. The bowling was

shared once again in this game .

for the Bahamas with Patrick
taking four wickets for 25 runs,
Gary Armstrong, Lew Arm-
strong and Dwight Weakley
took one wicket each.

The second test at an ‘under
the: lights’ game for the
Bahamas was played late Sat-
urday night against the Lauder-
hill All-Stars. This was the first
20/20 match for the Bahamas
since being selected to partici-
pate in the 20/20 tournament.

The Bahamas, who won the
match-up by five wickets,
scored 146 runs in their loss of
five wickets.

Top scorers in the game for
the Bahamas were Ford with 51
runs and Weakley with 38 runs.
Ken Singh scored 39 runs for
the Lauderhill All-Stars with

Roy Weeks and Ray Bascas

League All-Star team.

Bennett taking one wicket each.

birewt rome w in

Copyrighted Material
Syndicated
Available from Commercial News Providers

| a

Content
a









Event aims to send youth
on the right direction

‘BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

EMPHASISING the importance of

the youngsters being guided in the right

direction, coach Greg Cash is launching
his fifth annual Royal Priesthood Bas-
ketball Camp and Summer League.

The duel event will get underway on
June 29 and run through July 22 at the
Temple Christian Gymnasium between
the hours of 9am and 1pm.

“We’re hoping to have all those per-

: sons who were a part of the camp last

year and all those persons who are look-
ing forward to developing their skills in
basketball,” Cash stressed.

“The camp has been real productive i in
helping the youngsters, boys and girls.

But the camp is limited because the facil-
ities in the gym are very tight.”

On a daily basis, Cash said the partic-
ipants will be taken through the basic
dribbling, passing and shooting skills and
they will also bé taught about the local

basketball players who excelled in the

past.

Greats

Some of the greats like Reggie Forbes,.

Peter Gilcud and Felix ‘Fly’ Musgrove
are expected to lend their assistance —
along with persons from the business
community — to share their expertise
with the participants.

“The gym is pretty small and we bring
in another basketball rim to assist with

the younger players,” Cash noted. “We
know many of the schools have bene-
fitted from the camp because many of
the players have gone on to represent
their schools in the GSSSA and the
BAISS.”

The camp is geared to boys and girls

between the ages of 8-16.

They will be divided into the ages of 7-
9, 10-12 and 13-16 — the latter of
which is geared to the developmental
skills.

Each day will get started with devo-
tions, followed by a pep talk, condition-
ing drill and then the basic skills of pass-
ing, shooting and dribbling skills.

After they have been instructed, the
players have an opportunity to display to
the instructors what they have been
taught in scrimmage games.

fu

scoring 37 and 33 runs respec-
tively.

T he historic Stanford 20/20.
tournament, which will feature: -
19 teams from throughout the
Caribbean vying for the top
prize of US $1,000,000, will start :
on July 11th, with the Bahamas}
playing the second match-up:
against the Cayman Islands
squad.

The tournament, which. is.
being played at the Stanford,
Cricket grounds in Antigua, will;
feature teams from Anguilla,
Antigua & Barbuda, Bahamas,
Barbados, Bermuda, British |
Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands,
Dominica, Grenada, Guyana’,
Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts’
and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Marten, -

- St. Vincent and the Grenadines,

Trinidad & Tobago, and ihe .
Virgin Islands.

Congtdout t6 |
basketball and)

swim camp.. |
i By ANDRE DAVIS |

VETERAN basketball
coach John Todd is in high
spirits as the countdown: to|'
his annual Basketball and‘).
Swim Camp continues. .

The 22nd annual event;
which will commence three
weeks from today (July 3rd-
14th) at St Augustine’s Col- -
lege, will cater to boys and
girls between the ages of six
through 14.

The camp, being spon-
sored by the Caribbean Bot-
tling Company and First
Caribbean Bank, ‘stresses
discipline through the two
sports of basketball and
swimming. —

Unlike the other camps
hosted during the summer
months whose major attrac-
tions are top international
players, the John Todd Bas-
ketball and Swim Camp fea- |
tures the accomplishments
of outstanding Bahamian
players and coaches.

According to Todd, “The
camp is an excellent oppor-
tunity for the ‘youth of our. |
nation to improve their skills
on and off the court.” ‘|.

“I might not be able. to.
award your child or children
the opportunity to meet |'
international players or |'
coaches, but they will have |
the basics of the two disci-' |’
plines when they leave the i
camp,” he added. ets

“Along with the funda-:'
mentals awarded the child
will know the pioneers of the: |:
sports, like the Cynthia}:
‘Mother’ Pratt, the first: 4;
female to hit a jump shot. |;
History is important and I:
strongly believe if a child can
relate to where these per-).
sons came from then their,.
journey in life will be pros-
perous.” ;

As the history of the two. 1.
sports in the Bahamas is -
highlighted at the camp, ite
was fitting for Todd to seek’ |’
the assistance of instructors’ |”
who have played and suc/
ceed on the national level. *'|'

Leading the way is Reg="|?
gie Forbes, current Dean. of ‘|’
students at St. Augustine’s '}?
College and a former nation-
al team player, coach and }°
official. He will be assisted
by Anastacia Moultrie, assis~
tant coach of the junior girls {.
national team and a mem-.};
ber of the senior ladies_|.
national basketball and vol-
leyball Teams; Devon John-_|;
son, physical education
teacher at St. Francis
Joseph, and a coach and bas-
ketball. offictal and Counte
Graham, Canadian basket-
ball coach and physical edu- '
cation teacher. i.

The camp’s package this °
year will include an Intense
Basic Basketball and Swim- ’
ming Fundamentals kit, bas-
ketball shirts, awards and |:
prizes, quality instruction, |
team competition, group ses-
sions, special guest appear-
ance with lunch and drinks:
The camp runs from 9am-
2.30pm.

For more information
please contact John Todd at
324-1512 or 341-2646. Appli-
cation forms can be picked
up at St. Augustine’s Col-
lege between 8am- 4pm
Monday through Friday.
TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006, PAGE 7B 7



SPORTS

= Kumble, Sehwag and Patel “—

‘sx India to match-winning —

_——-
—_-S- —
— x
'_—o> >< _—_ --— 2
- —_ —, —
-* _—— 7 —_— —ie
__ > - ~- ——_— — Guew § = _ —_ _
— o- - . -~® -«
-_ o- —_ ——
= - — — > tm - . -
a - _ —_—*- —_ —_— -
- - = - - - - -~ ——
7 _ ._—-
-- ee 7 >
on -_ ° —— - ~— = =
i _— =— & = =
e =a = —_ a
- _ =_— —-—p
rc. h- «a *& --
- - —_> J — a “~ -_- *
- = ~ ——_-— -
= ma - 7 °
“ = ~-> - -
~~



at





He: : 2 ~ Copyrighted Material

_ Syndicated Content Z
-— ~~



—_—_ &

~ - i

i

ed


TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Auite Oe

fg TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

RETIRED veteran Leo
Rolle has been around
long enough to know what
it takes for the Bahamas to
succeed in the Americas
Davis Cup tie.

Rolle, a legend from the
Commonwealth Caribbean
team before the Bahamas
gained the rights to play
under its own flag, is cur-
rently in El Salvador with
this year’s youthful Davis
Cup team.

The Bahamas, captained
by Jobn Farrington and
comprising of Devin
Mullings, Marvin Rolle,
H’Cone Thompson and
Chris Eldon, has been
placed in Group III of the
round robin tournament as
the number one seed
against Costa Rica, Cuba,
E] Salvador and Haiti.

The first two teams from
each pool advance to
another round-robin
group. The teams finishing
first and second in this
final pool are promoted to
Americas Zone Group II
in 2007.

‘The teams finishing third
and fourth in each pool

advance to another round- |

robin pool. The teams fin-
ishing in third and fourth
in this subsequent pool are
relegated to Americas
Zone Group IV in 2007.

Rolle, the lone Bahami-
an supporting the team,
said they had a good prac-
tice on Monday morning,
but weren’i able to return
to the courts at the Mia
Country Club in the after-
noon because of the rain.

“But the players are
excited and ready to go,”
Rolle stressed. “This is a.
young team and they are
progressing year by year
and they are working hard
at trying to get us back up
to zone one.’

However, he was unable

to disclose any further —
details on the draw as Far-
rington was attending a
Captain’s meeting at the
club where the draw was
being finalised.

This is the first time that
the Bahamas has béen
dropped to Zone III after
enjoying a great deal of
success at Zone One for at
least a decade.

Having played at the
Davis Cup level before,
Rolle said.the Bahamas
“chances.are as good as
any other team.”

“Tt’s the best of three,”

_he said, “not the best of
five as in the World Group
or Zone One and II.

“So you can look at the
possibility of splitting the -
singles and having to go

with the doubles to decide |

the match. It’s similar to
-Zone One and II, only you
play three matches in each
tie.”

Rolle, the son of Marvin
Rolle, last played on the
Davis Cup team in 1990
when the Bahamas played
in Barbados in the second
round.

As the third member of
the team behind Roger
Smith and Farrington,
Rolle was scheduled to
play in the rubber match,
but gave up his spot for
younger Sean Cartwright
to gain the experience.

The team, captained.
then by. John Antonas,
eventually lost 4-1 to Bar-
bados. That year, the
BLTA was headed by Bar-
rie Farrington as the presi-
dent.

Three years after that
loss, the Bahamas
advanced to Zone One in
1993 and stayed there until
2003 before dropping to
Zone II. Last year in
Colombia, the Bahamas
dropped to Zone III.

“I saw this coming,” said
Rolle of the Bahamas’
drop. “But I feel kind con-
fident that the this team
will do us very well this
year.”

The Bahamas is expect-
ed to start play on
Wednesday.







MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Copyrighted Material
syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers

Pe eo *



ry

2

bel new heights

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AS USUAL, the men and
women’s sprints are expect-
ed to be in the spotlight at
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations’
National Open Track and
Field Championships this
weekend.

But one of the marquee
events the fans can look for-
ward to watching on the
field will be the men’s high
jump on Friday night at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

At least six competitors,
who have cleared over seven
feet, are entered in the
event.

BAAA’s public relations
officer Ralph McKinney said
although they anticipate the
fans coming out to view the
sprints, collegians Trevor
Barry and Donald Thomas,
along with veterans James
Rolle and Edgar Light-
bourne and young rising
stars Jamaal Wilson and Carl
Grant from Grand Bahama
should raise some eyebrows
in the high jump pit.

“This is a high calibre high
jump event,” McKinney pro-
jected. “I could safely say
that the. winner will do at

BAAA National Open Track and



least 7-4 or even 7-5 and I
think the fourth place fin-
isher could do at least 7-0.

“This is probably the
deepest field of high jumpers
that we’ve had in a long
time. So. it should be very,
very competitive.”

Bahamians will get the
first chance to see Thomas
live in person after the
Grand Bahama former bas-
ketball player made a splash
in a collegiate meet, clear-
ing 7-0 in his basketball
shorts.

Stunned

Thomas went on to the

Commonwealth Games in
Melbourne, Australia in
March where he stunned the
field, competing in his
sneakers.

He turned in an incredible
fourth place finish, but was
quite disappointed that he
didn’t medal in his interna-
tional debut for the
Bahamas.

Barry, Rolle, Lightbourne,
Wilson and Grant all repre-
sented the Bahamas at either
the Carifta Games or the
Central American and
Caribbean Games. .

Also on the field Friday
night, the fans will get to see
Aymara Albury go after
another record breaking per-
formance in the women’s
shot put.

Representing the Univer-

sity of Alabama Tigers,

Albury is coming off a ninth
place finish at the NCAA
Outdoor Championships on
Saturday night. .

Albury has lowered the
national record at least three
times this year.

The highlight on the track

. Friday night will come in the

100 metres.

On the men’s side,
Michael Reckley has posted
the fastest time of the field
entered with 10.23 seconds.
The next fastest time is 10.29
by Adrian Griffin.

Jamial Rolle,
member of the Common-

another |

Field Championships preview

wealth Gamies team, has the
third best time of 10.34, the
same as Dereck Atkins.
Everette Frazer round out
the top five in 10.38.
Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie, coming off an injury year

last year, has clocked the

fastest time on the women’s
side in 11.14. She is in con-
tention for a share of the $1
million jackpot on the Grand
Prix circuit.

Injuries

Chandra-Sturrup, also
back after a series of
injuries, has the next best
time of 11.58. Common-
wealth Games’ team-mate
Timicka Clarke is third on
the list at 11.47.

Sheniqtia Ferguson, one of
the top young stars, has
climbed to number four with
a time of 11.63 she posted at
the Carifta Games in Guade-
loupe in April. ,

She sits ahead of. veteran
Sevatheda Fynes, who is also



slowly working her badk
from a series of injuries atid
has the fifth best time of
11.70. bes

The field is also expected
to include collegian Petra
Munroe (11.76) and Carifta
team-mates T’Shonda Webb
(11.81) and Grand Bahavae
an Nivea Smith (11.90).

Also on Friday, the pre-
liminaries of the 400 will be
contested, but top contender
Chris Brown has already
announced that he will opt
out of the men’s event
and just run the 200 on Sat-
urday.

And world cham pigeh
Tonique Williams-Darling
and Christine Amertil may
not clash again in, the wom-
en’s 400 as they have both
been entered in the 200...::

“We, as an association,
have to find a way to give
the fans what they want to
see,” said McKinney,-in
terms of the competitors
competing in their specialty
events.

The meet will get started
at 6pm on Friday. The meet
serves as a trials for the
NACAC Under-23 Champi-
onships, July.7-9 in Santo
Domingo and the Central
American and Caribbean
Games, July 25-29 in El Sal-
vador.

v

ae