Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
“mim Lhe Tribune

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

i'm lovin’ it. |

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LOW



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——— —t

Volume: 102 No.157



<3
ahs Se ST Toy

aamasai breaktiou

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Airline employees
closer to new
industrial agreement

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter. —

AFTER weeks of high ten-
sions and public protest,
Bahamasair employees and gov-
ernment negotiators yesterday
achieved a breakthrough in
reaching a new industrial agree-
ment.

Nerelene Harding, president
of the Airport, Airline, and
Allied Workers , Union
(AAWU) —'who represent
Bahamasair employees told The
Tribune that management yes-
terday proposed a new contract
which is more to the union’s lik-’
ing,

“They gave us a new propos-
al which gives us pay increments
based on performance. It pro-
poses those increments for the
next three years, and two years

retroactive,” she said.

Earlier drafts of the contract
had proposed a five-year con-
tract in which employees would
receive a lump sum of $500 per
year and the ability to earn pay

increments in the last three —

years, contingent on their job
performance.

Ms Harding said that after
more than nine months of nego-
tiations, this development is
considered a “significant step
forward” to reaching an indus-
trial-agreement which has been
outstanding for almost two
years.

“Our big problem was that
they were not willing to give us
the increments retroactively for
the past two years. That was not
fair. We’ve had people who

SEE page nine

‘Hotel union
chaos continues

CHAOS continued today as members of the “I For Justice”
team continued their efforts to have new hotel union elections.

According to a report on ZNS news last night, the group
had decided not to participate in an official recount, but after
some five hours decided to comply.

“We are going through with the count under protest,” said one

protester.

“J think we should have a re-election. We should have what-
ever the people want. If they want a re-election, I think there
should be a re-election,” another said..

The union’s leadership election was left i in a shambles after
three ballot boxes allegedly “went missing” over the weekend.

No official results were released up to press time last night.
























UESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

Residents freeones by ROS)

AFTER two months, the Water and Sewerage Corporation has still to complete road
works in a residential area in St Albans Drive. Residents have been forced to go far out of their
way on a daily basis in order to exit the area.

Detention Centre escapees

‘may have left Bahamas’

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IMMIGRATION officials admitted that the
two Cuban women who escaped in the early
morning hours of May 26 from the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre may have already left
the Bahamas.

Minister of Immigration Shane Gibson ‘said
that based on former escapes the two women,
Anet Savia Gainza and Karina Reyes Labra,

SEE page nine

Protects While
Available ina variety

Street; Central Animal Hospital, Tenwich Street
SKC] Ken

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



Government fails to meet
its promise on vehicle

emission standards testing

a By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT has failed on its promise to
begin implementing vehicle emission standards
testing by early 2006, The Tribune learned yes-
terday.

Despite stating in December 2004 that equip-
ment for testing emissions should arrive by mid-

: 2005, and then saying in December of last year

SEE page nine

It Nourishes

Ross Corner: Animal Clinic, Wulf? Read,

Distributed by Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, 394-1759



a Frescata Picnic.



BUT denies
reports of
contractual






@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter:



THE Bahamas Union of
Teachers yesterday denied
reports that the union has
signed a contractual agreement
with government negotiators.

BUT President Ida Poitier:
Turnquest said that everything
with their negotiations is going
“fine”, but nothing has been
signed as yet.

The union, which is expect-
ed to meet with negotiators
today, will hold a general meet-
ing tonight.

For months now the two sides
have been locked in a bitter bat-
tle as union leaders seek to
improve working conditions and
increase salaries for their 3 200

SEE page nine

Ingraham: ‘legal’

residents have just
cause to sue state
over ‘violations’

lm By MARK HUMES

OPPOSITION Leader
Hubert Ingraham reiterated his
position that “legal” Haitian
residents in the Bahamas have
just cause to sue the state over
violations in its human rights
practices.

Yesterday, the issue of Mr
Ingraham’s comments again
came to the forefront when,
during a press conference with
Iowa‘Senator Tom Harkin (D)
and officials from the Ameri-
can Embassy, a.reporter
inquired about the public
“debate” in which he and Immi-
gration Minister Shane Gibson
seem to be embroiled.

Not wanting his comments to
be misconstrued, Mr Ingraham
emphatically stated: “People
who are legal residents of the
Bahamas — they have been giv-
en legal papers by the Govern-
ment to be permanent residence
here, they have committed-no
offence whatsoever — if the
were picked up (illegally) ina
raid which the government ¢on-

SEE page nine

2

>

3
”

»



/ of flavours.at: Pet Heaven, Shirley

s Dragon elt



ae

espécially our rich marine

PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



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an
â„¢

A FEW weeks
ago it was

reported that certain per-
sons who had been given
perinits ‘to do research in
Bahamian waters were
removing marine species
.o Lestack aquariums in
the United States.

In another news story in
The Nassau Guardian last
week it was alleged that
the Bahamas was selling
itself cheap while foreign
scientists and institutions
were benefiting from
important research using
the country’ s natural
resources.

If these reports and oth-
er evidence of environ-
mental abuse and unau-
thorised exploitation are
true, Bahamians have
good reason to ask: Who
is guarding our heritage,

resources, our fish and
conch and lobster, and our
coral reefs?

If persons and institu-
tions licensed to do
research in Bahamian
waters ‘are removing our
resources without permis-
sion and for commercial
gain, then there is some-
thing wrong with the
process. of deciding who is
allowed-to do this kind of
research. ; and under what

conditi jos.
Pebple: who visit the Bahamas

on ‘yathits every year. are’

allawed to take reasonable
quahiitiés of fish and lobster for
theseeonel use, but there are
cred efeports that this privi-
legé a$sbeing abused and that
some @ bf:them leave our waters
wellSstOcked with fish, conch
and: Jobster to be disposed of
conn ially.

ig not so easy to control,
but: certainly the Government
of the. Bahamas should not with
its dyes wide open give permis-
sion.to foreigners to remove
mariné: resources from our
waters. ag Boalt
The cpepioiiation of these



resources should be the exclu-

sive right of Bahamians, and if

any institutions want stocks for
aquariums or other commercial
purposes then authorised
Bahamians should be the ones
to supply them.

ast week’s news story
by Guardian reporter
LaShonne Outten quotes Peter

Douglas of the Andros Nation- —

al Conservancy and Trust who
claims that American scientists

are exploring newly-discovered

reefs which may have the poten-

tial.to.treat diseases such as can;

cer and Alzheimer’s: = *



/

LOCAL NEWS

7ith threats all around us, who’s

“Our natural resource
information and value
are being pirated out of
our country by foreign
institutions. A lot of the
information that is
derived from the
research on these organ-
isms never stays in the
Bahamas. We never

never shared with the
public. It is never valued
and we are never com-
pensated for it. We sell
ourselves cheap.

“Research on marine
organisms for medicinal
purposes has been going
on in the Bahamas for a
very long time. One of
the things...we were
advocating...is for the
Bahamian Government,
through the United
Nations, to put a value
on our marine resources
that are used by private
research organisations to
gather huge profits
through pharmaceutical
usage.”

Mr Douglas makes an
extremely important
point that other devel-
oping countries around

ing - and trying to do
something about. But it
is doubtful that Prime
Minister Perry Christie
and his PLP Govern-
ment will pay any atten-
tion.

They are too busy plotting
with energy corporations to
launch an additional assault on
our already endangered marine
environment by establishing
LNG plants in the Bahamas and
digging up the ocean bed to lay
pipes to Florida.

Developing countries are no
longer being seduced by the
siren song of globalisation and
trade liberalisation while the
developed world - especially the
United States and Europe -
strive to make the world a safer
place for their big corporations
to make huge profits.

The scandalous excesses and

have access to it. It is -

the world are also mak- ©

greed of the oil and energy
industry are well-known.
Obscene profits are raked in



Developing
countries are
no longer
being
seduced by
the siren
song of
globalisation
and trade

liberalisation



from the natural resources of
other countries while some of
the ‘people living on top of
these resources remain in
abject poverty - and they do it
without so much as an embar-
rassed blush.

4 A few weeks ago one
of the captains of

this industry decided to retire.
While his own fellow citizens
were groaning under the bur-



We have to
be careful
how we allow
outsiders to
come in to
research and
exploit
resources |
that belong to

the Bahamian’

people

(



den of record high gasoline
prices, this tycoon walked
away with a retirement pack-
age of $400 million!

The captains of the phar-
maceutical industry are also
doing their part. In the trade
councils of the world and in
negotiated trade deals, their
objective is to keep profits as
high as possible for as long as
possible, sometimes at the
expense of the world’s disease-
ridden poor.

At the same time, these cor-
porations act as if the earth is
theirs and the fullness thereof.
They are busy trying to extract

| the rich healing resources of

the world right from under the

noses of the people who own

them:

But the natives are striking
back. In South America,
Africa and Asia, national gov-
ernments are fighting to pro-
tect resources and local knowl-
edge of cures going back thou-
sands of years. The corpora-
tions want to patent them for
their own exclusive profit and

prevent the natives from using:

them!

Fortunately for small coun-
tries like the Bahamas, some
big players in the developing
world are leading the fight,

- guarding our natural heritage?

and we should vigorously sup-
port them and seek their help.

At the World Trade Organ-
isation talks in Hong Kong last
year, India, China and Brazil
were among the nations mov-
ing to protect the developing
world from the expropriation
of native plants, animals and
traditional remedies. They
have coined a new word for
this: biopiracy.

The Wall Street Journal,
which is not too tickled over
this development and sees
almost insurmountable prob-
iems with it, nevertheless
reported in December, 2005,
what was happening in Hong
Kong.

These countries, said The
Journal, want WTO members
to recognise the need for a sys-
tem that would control how
corporations, scientists and
other interests in the devel-
oped world can use a nation’s
native plants, animals and cen-

turies-old knowledge to make .

pharmaceuticals and other
products.

“The developing nations are
particularly concerned that a
future blockbuster drug might
be based on a plant or animal
species originating in their jun-
gles, without giving them any
financial benefit. ...

“Indian officials point to
attempts over the past decade
by scientists in the US and
Europe to patent the medici-
nal qualities of the spice
tumeric and neem, a tropical
evergreen found in Asia.

“The patents were over-

- turned by US and European

authorities after India helped
establish that the plants’ med-
icinal properties were already
widely known in that country.”

W hat The Journal
did not say but

was reported by other sources,
was that this 1999 legal battle
was quite costly to the Gov-
ernment of India.

Just imagine that! Trying to
patent tumeric, which the

Indians probably knew about

and were using for thousands
of years!

The lesson for us is clear.
We have to be careful how we
allow outsiders to come in to
research and exploit resources)
that belong to the Bahamian
people without any benefit to
the Bahamian people, as Mr
Douglas warns.

We know that the waters
around these islands are the
source of great wealth in the
form of fish, conch and lob-
ster but we do not know what
other valuable resources, such
as cures for diseases, might
also be there.

We have also to protect our

other resources and local
knowledge such as herbal.
remedies, what we call bush
medicine. Just suppose that
what we believe about the
healing power of cerasee is
true. And five fingers, and
strongback, and love vine!
_ In today’s world we cannot
take for granted that these
things are ours because there
are people out there who
would gladly “discover” them
and then apply for patents in
their own country. If Mr Dou-
glas is correct, we have already
let some of them in to begin
the process of biopiracy in the
Bahamas.

www. bahamapundit@type-
pad.com

sirarthurfoulkes@hot-
mail.com





THE TRIBUNE

denies >
$23k fraud -
charge

A 37-year-old woman
appeared in court in connection
with a $23,000 fraud allegation.

y

Charmaine Hanna was :%

arraigned before Magistrate

Marilyn Meers on.a.charge of ‘:
conspiracy to commit fraud as -
well as a charge of committing '
fraud by means of false pre- *:

tenses.
It was alleged that the con-

oF
2

spiracy offence took place *"

between Thursday, December
8, 2005 and Friday, April 7,
2006.

She was charged with obtain-

ing $23,040 in cash by means of °'’

false pretenses from First

Caribbean Bank on John F oy

Kennedy Drive during that *
time.

Hanna pleaded not guilty. to
the charges and was Da Res
bail in the sum of $20,000 with
two sureties.

The matter was adjourned to
August 30.

Whaling
stance in

Dominica
challenged —

DOMINICA

Roseau

DOMINICA’S image as an

iy

s

ecotourism destination is under- ~: '

mined. by the Caribbean island’s
support of whaling, a tourism
official said Monday — just
weeks before a critical interna-

tional vote on the issue, accord-. '*

ing to Associated Press.

Sam Raphael, vice president * mu

of the Dominica Hotel and |
Tourism Association, said the
organization sent a letter to the

government urging it to vote ’

‘

against Japan’s request for addi- -~
tional whaling at the Interna- »'

tional’ Whaling Commission
meeting next month in St. Kitts.

Dominica’s past support for
Japan on the issue sends an
“inconsistent” message for a
nation that has called itself the

“Nature Island,” and sought to .-!,

te
t

i.
3

4
r

4

lure tourists with whale-watch- ° +

ing, Raphael said.
“We cannot call ourselves the
Nature Island.of the Caribbean

“4

and support the killing of |“

whales,” he told The Associated
Press.

The government had not
responded to the letter but
Dominica supports the “sus-
tainable use of natural
resources,” said Lloyd Pascal,
Dominica’s delegate to the
whaling commission.

More |

Cubans
make it to
Puerto Rico

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

A DOZEN Cuban migrants,

including a 12-year-old girl, ;,:

landed early Monday ona
remote Puerto Rican nature
preserve that has become an |
increasingly frequent destina- °

347

Re

a

wy

av

}

yok

tion for people from Cuba who © .:

are trying to reach U.S. territo-

ry, according to Associated

Press. a
The others in the group,

which also included three |.

women and eight men, were all
in good health after rangers

found them on Mona Island and ° .°

turned them over to U.S. immi-
gration authorities, police said.
Cubans who reach USS. soil
are generally allowed to remain
in the country while those
stopped at sea are returned
home. On Saturday, authorities
on Mona Island found another
group of Cubans, including a 2-
year-old boy, who were left by a
boat that then returned to the
Dominican Republic.

ORL MN 31/14
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Aya COTIRO|

at TM a MTEL TS
322-2197





THE TRIBUNE







In brief

Migrants
detained

in New
Providence

A GROUP of 18 suspected
illegal immigrants were
detained yesterday on the
streets of New Providence as
part of Operation Quiet Storm
—a joint initiative by police and
the Department of Immigra-
tion.

Among those detained were
10 Haitian men, three Haitian
women, two Jamaican men, two
Dominican men and one Peru-
vian woman.

The group was turned over
to the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre for processing.

FNM rally
to be
streamed
on internet

THE Free National Move-
ment’s rally tonight at 7pm will
be streamed live on the internet.

According to.supporters, the
use of the World Wide Web to
bring a political rally to sup-
porters is a benchmark decision
by the FNM, offering the
chance to get involved to not
only those who can not make it
locally, but students and trav-
ellers who come home to vote.

Today’s rally at RM Bailey
Park, is expected to draw a
large number of supporters.

However, rumours that
prospective candidates would
be announced during today’s
rally have been sketchy.
According to one FNM, the
electoral body has not formally
met to decide on candidates,
and is not expected to meet
before the start of the rally.

The decision to make these
individuals public is ultimately
up to party leader, Hubert
Ingraham, he said.

The official website for the
Live Internet Broadcast is
http://freenationalmovement.org.

Puerto Rico
governor
signs
reform bill

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

GOVERNOR Anibal
Acevedo Vila on Sunday said
a new fiscal reform law contains
vague language because he
wants to accelerate a tax agree-
ment in this US Caribbean ter-
ritory, according to Associated
Press.

Acevedo signed into law on
Thursday a fiscal reform bill
that he said included “confusing
’ language” but that had ele-
ments that would ensure that
Puerto Rico was put on the path
to budgetary discipline, he told
Univision television. The US
Caribbean territory ended a
damaging two-week partial gov-
ernment shutdown on May 13.

The governor said imprecise
wording of the new law requires
the executive branch of the
island’s government to cut
US$350 million during the next
fiscal year, which begins July 1,
without layoffs or salary cuts.
Acevedo emphasized he had
flexibility in how to implement
the law. .

The budget. crisis was
resolved with a US$741 million
bailout loan, as the legislature
approved a fund to help pay
down the island’s debt, using 1
percent of a first-ever sales tax.

However, the tax rate is still
being debated by the Puerto
Rico’s political leaders.





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Donation

presented

to Cancer
Society

@ PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Cancer Society
Terrance Fountain
accepts a cheque for
$75,000 from the Cancer
Society Ball’s chairman
Ear] Bethell on Saturday
night at the Radisson
Cable Beach Resort
during their annual ball

Ferguson)

Officials unable to

H By ONAN BRIDGEWATER

GOVERNMENT officials
were unable to explain the
cause of the blackout that
affected the western half of
New Providence on Sunday
night.

It was the latest in a series
of blackouts that have hit sev-
eral parts of the island over
the last week.

Several members of the
public contacted The Tribune
to express their outrage over
the extensive power cut. One
commented that if BEC finds
it impossible to keep the lights
on, they should begin. giving
discounts for hours lost.

Attempts to contact BEC
officials proved fruitless, as
no-one answered repeated
phone calls to the corporation.

Minister of Energy and
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel, who has responsibility
for BEC, said he was unable
give a “technical” explanation,
as he had not yet been pro-
vided a report on the matter.

Dr Béthel stated: “I cannot
give a technical answer
because I have not yet received

a technical report on the mat-
ter. Problems such as this need
to be assessed carefully before
a report can be made.”

BEC officials have stated in
the past that steps were to: be
taken to upgrade their systems

to stop regular blackouts. The .

corporation also mentioned
implementing a form of
breaker-box system to reduce
mass blackouts. Exact dates
for the new upgrades were
never released by BEC.

A resident of Star Estates
complained that the constant
blackouts are affecting his
career.

“The unannounced power
cuts have prevented me from
scheduling my work,” he said,
explaining that he works from
home.

The caller also said he is
concerned about the damage
power surges can do to his
computer, fax machine or
copier.

Another member of the
public said: “It is notoriously
difficult to get any recom-
pense from BEC after they
have destroyed your appli-
ances. We should not have to

BIC refuse to
respond to
IndiGo charge

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company has
refused to comment on alle-
gations that it may be
“potentially putting profits
before lives.”

Margo Gibson, public
relations officer for BTC,
told The Tribune that the
head ‘officials at BTC were
unable to respond to claims
that the company was “refus-
ing to route calls originating
on a competitor’s network
to emergency services.”

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny
President of IndiGo, BTC’s
competitor, said that he was
mainly concerned about the
general public. In a letter

' drafted to the Public Utili-

ties Commission (PUC), he
said: “It is only a matter of
time before a member of
the general public suffers
serious harm as a result of
BTC’s failure to accommo-
date emergency service calls
originating on IndiGo’s net-
work.”
. Allegations like these are
apparently nothing new.
Barrett Russell, executive
director of the PUC, told
The Tribune that “the issue
of routing emergency calls
was one of several wrapped
up in concerns BTC has
about interconnecting with
IndiGo’s network.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny










+ YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)








reported to The Tribune yes-
terday that BTC has failed to
accommodate the routing of
emergency service calls origi-
nating on IndiGo’s network.

He warned that this is a
breach of public safety and if
the situation is not rectified
someone will suffer the reper-
cussions.

Minister of Works and Utili-
ties, Bradley Roberts was
unavailable for comment up to
press time.




. explain blackout

live in fear of losing our invest-
ment every time the power goes
out.”

A complaint was also made
by a Fire Trail Road resident
who claimed that his power had
been out for at least four hours
on several occasions in the last
week.

Bahamians have come to
expect power cuts when sum-
mer arrives, as electricity usage
is increased by use of fans and
air-conditioners.

This year, the cuts reportedly
began in the eastern end of the
island, which experienced suc-
cessive blackouts on Thursday

night.

NEW MARKDOWNS

(Photo: Franklyn G .










TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 3:



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY SU, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

Mr Mitchell’s decision termed ‘illogical’

WE ARE STILL on the subject of For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell’s expla-
nation to the House of Assembly on May 17

in which he justified the Bahamas’ vote for .

Cuba to sit on the newly formed 47-member
UN Human Rights Council. We are trying to
find justification for the decision, because
we find the reasoning behind the decision
both illogical and, in some instances, mis-
leading.

For example, Mr Mitchell emphasises the
fact that the Bahamas sits as near as “15 miles
away from our western border.” He pointed
out that the Bahamas was in discussions with
Cuba on “delimiting our maritime bound-
aries with them,” and the two countries have
signed a migration treaty. Then he says:

~£We have been provided significant assis-
‘tance in health care and education. No other
country, unsolicited, has offered the level of

assistance to this country, assistance that is-

‘not of direct benefit to the country offering
‘the assistance.”
s ‘. Maybe, Mr Mitchell would care to explain
.this misleading sentence. He must know
“something that is being withheld from the
public. How, for example, is Cuba not receiv-
-Ing direct benefit from our students attending
-their: institutes of learning, and our people
~seeking medical care in Cuban hospitals?
Doesn’t Mr Mitchell know that these are
among the tourists that Fidel Castro encour-
ages to his country to bring in much needed
‘foreign exchange? He also uses his educa-
‘tional and medical schemes to spread his
‘influence and convince countries like the

Bahamas to cast their UN vote his way? Cas-' ~

tro is reaping great dividends from the appar-
ent ‘ ‘assistance” of which Mr Mitchell speaks.
:«: Is Mr Mitchell not aware of what caused
‘ ‘the split between Dr Hilda Molina, Cuba’s
f < first woman neurosurgeon, and Fidel Castro
‘to whom she was most loyal until he ordered
“her to force Cubans out of their hospital beds
to: make way for his foreign patients as he
k strated medicine for dollars?
In 1987, Dr Molina founded the Interna-
i eral Centre for Neurological Restoration
.:(CIREN). By 1991, her centre had become
‘ -one.of the most important scientific centres in
:*Cuba. At the time she was Deputy to the
, Communist Party for her home region. She
‘was. very much in the bosom of the party
: when the split came. It was in 1991 that the
. Health Minister informed her that in the
' future the more modern areas of her centre
‘were to be held exclusively for foreign
‘patients paying in US dollars. This drastical-
ly reduced hospital beds for Cubans. Until
then the centre had been for Cubans only.
She also objected to being asked to violate

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international medical protocol by releasing
Cuban patients early without proper follow
up treatment to make space for even more
foreign patients. .

In protest she resigned her party position,
her seat in. parliament and returned all her
medals to the state. The state retaliated. She
became the victim of harassment — veiled
threats, mob attacks in the streets, interrupt-
ed telephone calls and a denial to travel for
personal or professional reasons.

It was Dr Molina who was told that she
could not leave Cuba, even to see her son,
and meet her srandchildren in Argentina,
because the Cuban government had the right

o “preserve her brain”.

It is reported that “in June 1997 alone,
Dr Molina received four invitations to travel
abroad for professional purposes to the US,
Argentina, Sweden, and Japan. Any invita-
tions received directly by the Ministry of
Health for Dr Molina have been answered by
a statement informing the host organisation
that Dr Molina cannot attend and suggesting
that another doctor take her place.”

This.is the country that our government in
its great wisdom has voted to sit on a com-

mittee that is supposed to “address human ~
‘ yights abuses around the world.” A commit-

tee that is supposed to condemn, not to treat
as a partner, countries like Cuba.

“The results of elections of Council mem-
bers on May 9,” said Freedom House, “indi-
cate that serious obstacles remain. While
states with good records.on human rights
won a niajority of seats, a number of notori-
ous violators were also elected, giving them
what they apparently want, the opportunity to
block serious action.”

And the Bahamas is now on record as
having helped put one of the violators there.

“In Cuba,” said Cuban Ambassador Felix
Wilson, who is stationed in the Bahamas,
“the most important human right is the right
to be alive, to have education, to have health
care, and to have all social benefits.” How-
ever, Dr Molina resigned her important med-
ical post because she found that these rights
were for foreigners who brought with them
much-needed. American dollars — many
Cubans are left out in the cold.

The Bahamas is trying to hide behind the
secret voting system that the UN allowed.
On the next time around, this curtain of secre-

_ cy is likely to be drawn back.

Said Freedom House: “Voting was carried
out directly and individually for each candi-
date country. However, the provision of

secret ballots effectively shields governments -
from accountability for their votes, and.



should be revisited going forward.”

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Summer Rush:

Appreciation
for pillar of
community

EDITOR, The Tribune »

JUST a few words to express
my love, sincere appreciation

‘and thank you, to a wonderful

dear friend, my priest, Father
Kolyvas.

I knew Father Kolyvas for 53
years since his arrival in Nas-
sau, on July 1, 1953 with his
dear wife and son, Emmanuel.
It was an honour and a privi-
lege to have served under such
a fine and distinguished priest.

My 53 years serving with Father

Kolyvas on the altar of our
church has been a blessing and
a learning experience in my life,
and I am truly deeply grateful
and thankful for everything he
has taught me. I have learned a
lot from Father Kolyvas and I
will never forget him. He was
my role model and I’m sure he
was everyone else’s, also.
Metropolitan Germanos
Polyzoides of New York was
once asked where could they
could find a good example of a
priest, and he replied: “You
could go all over the world, and
the place you will find such a
priest is in Nassau, Bahamas,

and his name is Father Koly-

vas.”

This year’s Easter services
were the first he had missed in
53 years. He was too ill to offi-
ciate. Father Kolyvas was a
tremendous man, a loving and
compassionate man, who was
also very humble and always
had a warm smile.. He was there
for anyone who needed him. He
was a spiritual father to every-
one.

He was certainly my spiritual
father, my beloved priest, and
my friend. ©
_ Father Kolyvas was a printer,

career civil servant, chanter;and..

instructor of Byzantine music
prior to his ordination in 1953.

With his successful and dis-
tinguished calling as a priest, he
was a “friend to all” having
served his God, his church, his
community and people of the
Bahamas to the fullest.
Almighty God has blessed him
tremendously. If anyone can be
called a saint, it would be Father
Kolyvas. Truly one can say
without fear of contradiction,
he was a “priest and gentleman
for all seasons.”

In St Matthew ch 25 v 21,
God’s way says, “well done,
thou good and faithful servant.”
Also in 2nd Timothy ch 4 v 7-8,
God’s Word says, “I have
fought a good fight, I have fin-
ished my course, I have kept
the faith. Henceforth there is
laid up for me a crown of right-
eousness, which the Lord, the

B letters@tribunemedia.net

LETTERS






righteous judge shall give me at
that day, and not to me only,
but unto all them also that love
his appearing.”

The Bible refers to the ten
lepers-who were healed by
Jesus. Only one returned to give
Him thanks.

I wish to take this opportu-
nity to give thanks to Almighty
God for the life and witness for
such a fine priest as Father
Kolyvas. Jesus said to his disci-
ples, “Love ye one another.”
Father Kolyvas has shown love
to his fellowman and he will
hear Almighty God say to him,
“Well done thou good and
faithful servant”, and he will
receive his “crown”. The Lord
God has taken Father Kolyvas
home to be with Him, a beauti-
ful flower to be planted in
God’s beautiful heavenly gar-
den.

Fathér Kolyvas fell asleep in
the Lord on Thursday, May 4,
2006 in the Intensive Care Unit
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital following an operation on
April 7th.

The funeral was held on May
10, 2006 and there was a large «
turnout of people from all walks -
of life. Governor General
Arthur Hanna and other digni- :
taries came to pay their last :.
respects for such a wonderful
priest. 3

The service was presided over .
by Bishop Savas of Troas, New '
York and also Father Kolyvas
Triantafilou, the President of «
the Hellenic College, Holy:
Cross Greek Orthodox School .

‘ of Theology.

I wish to extend my love and °
sincere condolences to his
beloved dear wife and family.

There will never be another
priest like Father Kolyvas, who
always had encouraging words :
to uplift his fellowman. His
pleasant and warm smile, his
compassionate understanding,
his humility, his inspiring ser-
mons, and all the other won-
derful qualities. he possessed, -
will be greatly missed. May
Almighty God bless and receive
his soul into His Heavenly
Kingdom. :

Love in Christ, his friend.

always.

TONY G ZERVOS
Nassau
May 2006



Condolences for
Kayla Edwards

EDITOR, The Tribune

“T OFFER my condolences to the family of Kayla Lockhart
Edwards, who retired from battle last Sunday afternoon. Of -
course we should honour her individually by persisting in
what we see to be God’s purpose for our lives. We should also
honour her as a nation by establishing a suitable memorial in
her name.

On Monday gone I heard a young male broadcaster on
one of the FM stations suggest that we rename the National .
Centre for The Performing Arts The Kayla Lockhart Edwards
Centre for The Performing Arts. Yesterday, I think it was, I
saw a clip on TV13 of Kayla speaking of establishing a “house
of Culture”. Perhaps we can put the two together — the cen-
tre for the performing arts and Kayla’s house of culture, as our’
tribute to a modern-day woman of La Mancha. The one prec-
vision? The centre should be the best of which we are capa-
ble.

I tend to be cautious about naming buildings after per-
sons. The Clarence Bain and Rodney Bain buildings have fall-
en into such disrepair as to bring dishonour to the memory of
those gentlemen. The Cecil V Wallace Whitfield Building
that houses the Prime Minister’s Office will be part of Baha
Mar’s scrapheap when it demolishes a bit of Bahamian history
on the Cable Beach strip. I don’t like naming buildings after
persons because buildings are too temporary; but Kayla’s
Performing Arts Centre would be more than a building. It will
be a composite of the spirit of our people — our fears, joys,
failures and triumphs. A composite by our people, for our peo-
ple.

TELCINE TURNER-ROLLE
Nassau
May 24 2006

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THE TRIBUNE



Students
win special
award at
COB

TWO students who have
earned bachelor’s degrees in
social work and religion have
won the Governor General’s
Award at the College of the
Bahamas.

Terrece Bethell and Vernetta
Ferguson both won bachelor of
education degrees with the
highest cumulative grade point
average and consistently excel-
lent academic performance.

The President’s Award went
to Deborah Smith, who won a
bachelor of arts degree in social
work.

tion Leadership Award was
won by Tanya Northeast, who
earned a bachelor of business
administration degree in man-
agement.

Bachelor degree graduates
earning distinctions were: Shar-
lene Leo, Candace Rolle,
Jacqueline Symonette (all in
accounting); Norma Cartwright
(management); Marilyn Fowler,
Dominique McCartney (busi-
ness studies); Marva Boateng,
Crystal Green, Vanessa
Williams (English language and
literature); Chavez Rutherford,
Betty Taylor (mathematics),
Vernetta Ferguson, Keva
Richards (religion); Terrece
Bethell, Sally Johnson, Heather
McQueen, Ricardo Patterson,
Venolia Sears (social studies);
Yolanda Johnson (Spanish);
Shanika Swann (art); Celanthia
Brown (biology); Adrian Gib-
son (geography and history);
Patricia Pierre (Spanish); Tanya
Abraham, Barbara Duncombe,
Dellarease Johnson-Hield,
Triskinka McPhee, Ginger
Turnquest, Dionne Williams,
Thakurdaye Williams (primary
advanced placement); Renay
Small (general); Melinda
Green, Debbie Johnson, Marcia
McPhee; Prescola’ Moss,
Shashauna Russell, Stacee Sears
(early childhood); Melissa
Carey-Burrows, Keshna Camp-
bell (special education) Se

Man
admits to
theft
charges

A 42-YEAR-OLD man
pleaded guilty to charges of
shop-breaking and stealing yes-
terday.

John Rolle, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester, admitted to breaking
into the Bahamas Heart and
Chest Centre on Collins
Avenue between May 24 and
25 of this year.

Rolle also admitted to steal-
ing items worth $2,170 from the
establishment. /

He was fined $1,000 on each
charge or will have to serve a
year in jail if he fails to pay the
fines.

Waa
eS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157

TV 13 SCHEDULE
TUESDAY
MAY 30

2: ean Community Page/1540 AM
11:00 Immediate Response

ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Immediate Response Cont'd
Mirror, Mirror
Inside Hollywood
Carmen San Diego
Fun














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4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30. Fun Farm
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 FunFarm

15:30 411
6:00 Bahamian Things
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Kerzner Today
8:15 | Good News Bahamas
8:30 ZNS 70th Anniversary

Roundtable Discussion





10:00 Mirror, Mirror

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540 AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!







The COB Alumni Associa-

nation’s cee psoas:

MINISTER of Youth Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom
has called for a report on child
safety levels in country’s youth
and sports programmes — in the
wake of some “very alarming”
revelations.

Refusing to’be more specific,
Mr Wisdom would only say
that he has asked the Youth
Advisory Council and the
Sports Advisory Council to
look into certain “incidents”
that have taken place involv-
ing children.

“T don’t want to go any fur-
ther than to say that consenting

adults under the law are able to .

do basically whatever they
want to do sexually or other-
wise privately. But it is unfair, it
is illegal, it is wrong for adults
to prey on children,” he said.
Mr Wisdom said he is con-
cerned about the number of
instances in which youths are
being exploited by older peo-

LOCAL NEWS

ple. He said that
such adults, “should
not only be dis-
suaded but skould
be disallowed from
even participation
in youth matters,
youth affairs and
youth organisa-
tions.”

He added that
this summer, all
youth programmes
will be properly
monitored and
audited and all
adults taking part
will be properly
trained jn the “core
values’and basic
concepts” that his
ministry promotes.

The ministers admitted that a
few years ago, the chairman of
the Youth Advisory Council
had tried to bring attention to
certain “challenges” develop-

them.



Hi MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture, Neville
Wisdom is pictured here with permanent secretary Leila
Green as he spoke about the challenges facing our
youths, particularly as it relates to older men preying on

ing in youth and sports pro-
grammes — but that the gov-
ernment was not listening.
According to Mr Wisdom,
the chairman had referred to

: ot gy My
’

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 5 «

lesbian gangs in
schools, and accu-
sations of older

to do with summer pro-!
grammes to register their inter- |
ests with the Ministry of Youth, '
persons preying Sports and Housing. f
on younger peo- “So whether you want to hire :
ple. a young person for the sum-,
“One need just mer, whether you want to run a!
to open theireyes programme for.the summer we }
and visit some of ask that you register with the:
the facilities . ministry in order for us to be:
around this coun- _ able firstly to monitor, to justi- '
try and see what fy your programme or your:
is going on, and employment.
we need to “Secondly, to be able to audiel
aggressively it; and thirdly to ensure that!
approach it. objectives that you set for the :
“As I said, programme or for the employ- |
there is no homo- , ment situation or whatever, is |
phobia here or any’ adhered to and is successful.”
attempt to discred- Mr Wisdom said the ministry :
it anyone other will advertise the: programmes ,



than to protect the that have been approved as}
interest of young People, he safe for children.
said. The minister said he expects :
Mr Wisdom asked all public, the councils’ report to be sub- ;

private and government organ-
isations which have anything

mitted to him in the next few!

weeks.

Government ‘failing to follow 1995.

regulations on access for disabled’ |

HB By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE government is failing to com-
ply with a 1995 regulation which says
that.all new public buildings should be
accessible to the disabled, according to
activists.

Iris Adderly, a disabled consultant,
said that this failing is just one of the dif-
ficulties facing disabled persons in
today’s Bahamas.

Since 1995, all new public buildings
are meant to have been built so that it
would be accessible for the disabled.
“It is not happening,” Miss Adderly
insisted, ““We are advocating.”

Her comments come shortly before a
week of activities organised for disabled
persons by the Disability Affairs Divi-
sion, beginning on June 6.

Miss Adderly also spoke on the diffi-

culty disabled persons have obtaining

jobs. She explained that once employers:

find out the person applying is disabled,
the application is automatically disre-
garded.

“Put yourself in the disabled person-
’s shoes,” she challenged employers.

Miss Adderly, who is disabled her-
self, said disabled persons need to take
up the cause and say: “This needs to
stop.”

Melanie Griffin, Minister of Social
Services and Community Development,
admitted that all government buildings
are not accessible to the disabled. “All

government buildings ought to be dis- | ,

abled-friendly,” she said.

“For toollong we have been looking
at persons with disabilities as persons
looking for a ‘handout, but we know

_ they go, beyond any porculek divide,”

Ms Griffin said, whose mS is spon-
soring the events.

“They are very talented and we want
to be able to profile these people,” Min-
ister Griffin said.

The Ministry of Social Services cur-
rently employs seven disabled persons.

Issues

The most pressing issues facing dis-
abled persons in the Bahamas include
the inability to find suitable employ-

ment, educational setbacks, transporta-
tion problems and unfit building infra-_

structure. '

The activities will begin on Tuesday,
June 6 with a disaster preparedness
presentation by the National Emer-
gency Management Agency (NEMA)

and continue until Sunday where. the |
week. will culminate at Trinity Assem- }
bly City of Praise with a chuset ser- |
vice.

Several educational and siiseinational't
sharing activities are planned for next }
week including an ‘independent living !
forum’ planned for Thursday, June 8 at :

- Worker’s House and a Health Clinic !

on Friday June 9 on 8th Terrace ey vl i
ability Affairs.

The clinic is designed to help disabled! i
persons make healthier choices and also |
to learn ways to help prevent some: of |
the common medial problems associat: '
ed with disabled persons. :

The Disability Affairs Division offers i
services such as Braille, computer class- '
es, internet.access for research purpos- :
es and a support group for women with |
disabilities. i |



Walls of Fame appeal made

e@ ¢@¢@0@ 6 @h6Uhhm—UchOClUhSOHMUCMCh—C(ChM HhUChHhUlCUhM!S

LOCAL government offi-
cials are being called upon to
oversee the erection of “Walls
of Fame” on their respective
islands in time for the 33rd
Independence celebrations.

The Wall of Fame scheme is

the brainchild of Winston Saun- ~

ders, chairman of the Indepen-
dence Celebrations Committee.

In the scheme, photographs
of the local legends will be
accompanied by brief biogra-
phies highlighting their contri-

: ‘ butions to society.

“Tt is necessary for these
monuments to be placed on
each island in an area locals
frequent,” said Mr Saunders.
“You may have old persons in
the island communities who
remember the legacy of their

local heroes but when they die,
those memories die with them.

“Young Bahamians will
undoubtedly be inspired by the
accomplishments of someone
who lived right down the street.
and be motivated to make a
difference on their island to
cement their own place on the
wall.”

Mr Saunders will be travel-
ling to islands throughout the
archipelago to meet with local
government officials in the run-
up to July 10.

In order to be considered for
the Walls of Fame, applicants

must be Bahamian citizens ©

native to the islend on which
they will be honoured. ©

This includes those born in
New Providence of Family

Island parents. The honourees
should have returned to their
island shortly after birth. -

Honourees must or should
have been community leaders
and exemplary role models to
young Bahamians,

They must also have con-
tributed to the growth and

* development of their respec-

tive islands.

In addition to being consid-
ered a pioneer for their island
(or nation, where applicable),
Wall of Fame honourees
shbuld be able to represent
their island and country with
pride and dignity.

Nominations for hometown

_ heroes should be submitted to

the office of the Administra-
tor on each Family Island.

Santander Bank & Trust is accepting applications from suitably qualified
Bahamians for the following position:

| COMPLIANCE MANAGER/ CORPORATE SECRETARY/LEGAL COUNSEL

Minimum 5 years Call to the Bar
Minimum 3 years experience in Corporate Dept. of law firm

Good knowledge of Bahamian, U.S. and Spanish financial legislation.
in depth knowledge of compliance policies and procedures

Good working knowledge of PC applications.
Excellent organizational and management skills
Excellent communications skills (oral and written)

Fluency in English and Spanish (oral and written) essential.
Good legal drafting capability in English and Spanish.
Must be highly motivated and focused.
Travel may be required.

Salary and other benefits commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applications In writing with details of education and experience should be
faxed or mailed by May 31, 2006 to:



i CHAIRMAN of the 33rd Independence Celebrations

Committee Winston Saunders reveals plans for the erection of
Walls of Fame for each island while deputy-chairman Peter |. |
Deveaux-Isaacs listens on. |

(Photo by Capital City Marketing)



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Fax:

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Nassau, Bahamas



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

@ By MARK HUMES





THE Bahamian music
scene has a-new kid on the
block, and the 22-year-old

@ SINGER and songwnter Wendell Avione Javaughn Mortimer Jr,
aka Avvy

YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

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4. An understanding of marketing: Ginaunicalons: sdvertising and pub relations that.

LOCAL NEWS

Young musician
setting down to |
Bahamian roots

Inagua native is making
“Ghost Moves” up the music
charts.

With his first single “Roach
on my Bread” already a local
party favourite, singer/song-
writer Wendall Avione Mor-
timer Jr, better known as
“Avvy”, is slowly adjusting to
his new found “fame”.

Sitting down with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Avvy said that
he still finds the reception that
he has gotten from the local
audience to be surreal.

“T do this for fun,” said the
young musician laughing. “It

was not like one day I thought

I was going to be a Bahamian
musician/“ghost move” man. I
just like to have fun, and it
still hasn’t set in yet.”

Yet despite his sudden suc-
cess, Avvy is still humbled by
the experience and says that
he is appreciative of God’s
blessing.

The last child in a family of
three, Avvy credits his father,
Wendall Sr, a local gospel and
rack and scrape musician, with
introducing him to music. But
since the passing of his father
two years ago, his mother
Audrey has.taken over as his
greatest supporter.

Growing up in an environ-
ment where he was surround-
ed by Bahamian music, it was
almost natural that Avvy
would follow in the tradition.

“T had a strong feeling
toward the music,” the young
artist reminisced. “So, I was
one of those weird persons in
high school who was waiting
for Bahamian music to come
out.”

“I think Bahamian music

has something for everybody,
as it is really something that
we can identify with. And
what I always admired about
Bahamian musicians and
artists is that they havea
unique way of writing, with a
lot of hidden messages and
storytelling.”

When asked about the story ©

behind “Roach on my Bread,”
the artist quickly denied that it
drawn from a personal expe-
rience. Not wanting to jinx
himself, however, he rapped
on the table and said: “Every-
body thinking I experience it,
but up to this day, I have not
experience it yet. But too
much of that going on in
Inagua.”

He explained that he draws
on the experience of others
for material and gets great
pleasure from watching other
young people “getting down”
to his music. “What make me
most happiest when I listen to
my music being played is see-
ing people in my set get down
and say “I like that song’,”
Avvy said. “I just appreciate
the fact that they are still into
Bahamian music.”

Attributing much of the suc-

cess he is experiencing right

now to his producers Ira Storr
and Dillan McKinzie, Avvy
does not want to be seen as a
“star”, joking: “Stars belong
in the sky. I belong on
Arawak Cay drinking a Kalik
and eating some crack conch.”
Bahamian fans of “Roach
on my Bread,” and “Ghost
Moves” can party with Avvy
when he takes over the stage
at next week’s Bahamas Inter-
national Music Festival.

THE TRIBUNE



Guantanamo
- hunger strike
numbers
reach 75

m@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

THE number of Guan-
tanamo Bay detainees partici-
pating in a hunger strike has

ballooned from three to around,

75, the US military said Mon-
day, revealing growing defiance
among prisoners held for up to
four and a half years with no
end in sight, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Navy Cmdr Robert Durand
called the hunger strike at the
US naval base in southeastern

't Cuba an “attention-getting” tac- . “4
tic to step up pressure for the * ~~
inmates’ release and said it might

be related to a May 18 clash

between detainees and guards

that injured six prisoners.

“The hunger strike technique a

is consistent with al-Qaida prac-

tice and reflects detainee"

attempts to elicit media atten-
tion to bring international pres-
sure on the United States to

‘release them back to the bat-

tlefield,” Durand said from
Guantanamo Bay.

The United States now holds
about 460 people at Guan-
tanamo on suspicion of links to

al-Oaida or the Taliban. But ‘

human rights groups say inno-
cent people have been sent to
the jail.

Defence lawyers said the
hunger strike, which began last
year, reflects increasing frustra-
tion among men who have little ,
contact with the world outside .

the remote prison.

“T think it is escalating because -
the people down there are get-

ting more and more desperate,”

said Bill Goodman, legal director _,
for the New York-based Center ..__
for Constitutional Rights, which ~
many of the...
detainees. “Obviously, things -

represents

have reached a crisis point.”

_ The military did not release ,
the names of the striking |
detainees, and lawyers said they . ,
have no way of learning whether .
their clients are involved until

they can visit the base.

“All these men want is a.

j







chance to have a trial,” said ©
Zachary Katznelson, an attor-
ney for Reprieve, a British,
human rights group that repre-
sents 36 Guantanamo detainees. -: = ’
“Tf they are guilty, punish them. *.
If not, then send them home.” | =~
Only 10.of the prisoners have .°!
been charged and face trial . ?
before military tribunals. The © »
US Supreme Court is expected — ;
to rule in June whether Presi- |:
dent Bush overstepped his |
authority in ordering the tri- -
bunals. :

would allow the candidate to successfully manage marketing, ‘sales, communications and
s+ public relations teams and provide an excellent return on the marketing, adverting and
PR budgets. ]



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













The successful candidate will participate fully as part of the senior management team, preparing
marketing, advertising and business development plans, as well as formulating and implementing
projects and special campaigns that support overall company business development and branding
Objectives.





li order to be successful in this executive-level position, the Vice-President must accomplish
the following:

RESPONSIBILITIES



¢ Lead the Company’s marketing, advertising, business evelopment: PR and sales teams.
Establish and execute the strategic marketing direction and Hane ultimate responsibility
for managing product line P & L’s.
Plan, develop and implement product strategies, marketing programs and the sales
process, including product life cycle planning, coordination with engineering regarding
technical product development, definition of promotional activities and product launch.
Perform a market review, industry and competitive analysis to identify existing and
potential markets and customer segments, and axle strategies to penetrate identified
markets.
Direct sales forecasting, develop sales initiatives and set performance goals.
Manage the Company’s public relations, protocol and external communications.
Collaborate with other members of the executive management team evaluating business
opportunities, alliances and partnerships.
Responsible for understanding customers' current and emerging needs and maintaining
VIP customer relationships.
Conduct market and customer surveys to determine needs, customer satisfaction and
competitor strengths and weaknesses
Preparation of annual budget and thereafter monitor expenditures and, appropHations
of the division to ensure conformity to budgetary requirements.
Successor development, training and mentoring
Liaison with senior executive responsible for customer service and CTOs

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Superior understanding of and experience with marketing fundamentals (positioning,
pricing, promotion, and product).

Proven success in developing new business through appropriate marketing, planning and
execution.

Product management and planning experience from concept to successful launch.

The ability to establish credibility with, motivate and develop the sales and marketing
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Ability to develop rapport aid maintain relationships with key clients.

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TT TN AC 15 sh ao epee Oto) dt Ae) ea a tie L Oe Tee elt) edu
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“ : ‘Director of Human Resources

‘The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F. Kennedy Drive

P. O. Box N-3048

“Nassau, Bahamas

Re: .Vice President of Marketing & Sales





THE TRIBUNE



Jamaica’s
female PM
receives
new civic
honour

mw JAMAICA
Kingston |

PORTIA Simpson Miller,
who in March became Jamaica’s
first woman prime minister,
received the right Monday to
add a new title to her name:
“Most Honorable”, according
to Associated Press

Simpson Miller, known to
many of her supporters as “Sista
P,” received the nation’s sec-
ond highest civic honor, Order
of the Nation, at a ceremony
conducted by Chief Justice
Lensley Wolfe.

Recipients of the honor are
referred to as “Most Honor-
able,” and have included three
past prime ministers, P.J. Pat-
terson, Edward Seaga and
Hugh Shearer.

Simpson Miller was a long-
serving member of parliament
from one of Jamaica’s most
crime-ridden slums before she
beat three opponents to take
the leadership of the ruling Peo-
ple’s National Party from out-
going Patterson, who led
Jamaica for 14 years.

° In brief Contrac

THE College of the Bahamas has
announced that it is building a state-of-

the-art performing arts theatre — which -

is expected to be ready in about five
months.

Acting COB President Dr Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson said the centre, which
is being constructed on the site of the
existing auditorium at the Oakes Field
Campus, will be a facility “like no other
in the Bahamas”.

On Monday, May 29, college princi-
pals signed a contract with Top Heights
Construction for the conversion of the
auditorium into the Performing Arts
Centre of the University: of the
Bahamas.

Participating in the event were Col-
lege Council chairman Franklyn Wil-
son; Dr Chipman-Johnson; council sec-
retary Patricia Glinton-Meicholas; prin;
cipal of Architects Associates Victor
Cartwright; and principal of Top
Heights Construction Thomas Lewis.

Mr Wilson called the venture “an
important building-block in the move
to university status” and one that is
“critical to the idea of providing stu-
dents with what they require to become
all they can be.”

Janice Cartwright, special assistant to
the president for revenue growth and
projects and co-ordinator for the Per-
forming Arts Centre project, assured
that the sound quality at the facility
would excellent.

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 77 ~

See tomorrow’s Tribune for |
a reprint of chapter 18 of





@ PROJECT co-ordinator Janice Cartwright explains the specifications of the
new Performing Arts Centre at the College of The Bahamas. Listening intently
is College Council chairman Franklyn Wilson and Top Heights Construction’s

principal Thomas Lewis

“It will be a multi-purpose, state-of-
the-art theatre,” Ms Cartwright said.

She added that the centre’ will have
around 400 tiered seats that will give

Our Services -

an unobstructed view of the stage, spa- _

cious dressing rooms behind the stage
area and a well-appointed concession
stand. .



A cutting-edge control room at the
back of the auditorium will command «
panoramic view of the performing area
and will house a computer-controlled
lighting system.

Flanked by two galleries for paini-
ings and other works of art, the auditc-
rium will be fully air-conditioned and
handicap-accessible.

It is projected that the facility will be
used for lectures, seminars, concerts,
film showings and dramatic productions

1

Resource |

an

Saying the centre will be a resource”
for'the entire community, Mr Wilson:
added that the project is building on
the rich arts tradition that developed ai.
the old Government High School aud:-
torium. tee

He said the centre will take the pez-
forming arts in the Bahamas to a new
level. e ;

Thomas Lewis of Top Heights Con-
struction expressed his determination
to-do a professional job and Victor
Cartwright, the architect, explained the
challenge of designing the conversion.

He said that because of the historical
value of the building itself, his aim is to
retain the exterior of the existing struc-
ture'so that it will continue to blend in
with the college buildings that surround

it.

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a

«

t is signed to construct |
performing arts centre at COB

£7 ETA RE AOS AOE TE DAE SO LAP a a 2 . sam .
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ers

wr hearer eT



PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

THE TRIBUNE.



Bahamas claims eighth h highest
percentage prison oa



_& THE entrance to Fox Hill Prison

‘OCEAN CLUB ESTATES LOT #108
_PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS
-E:/$1,350,000.00 GROSS

Buyer &-Seller share Govt. Stamp Tax 5% each and pay own Legal Fees

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: overlooking Golf Course

www.bahamasproperty. COM
Telephone:

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Facsimile: —
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Charlotte Street,
PO. Box N-1458
Nassau, BAHAMAS



Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resorts

ag EE SEL E XS



Invites applications for the position
Director of Marketing

All applicants must possess the following Attributes

Excellent Leadership Skills
‘Excellent Communication Skills
“Excellent Interpersonal Skills
Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills
Excellent Organizational Skills
‘| The successful applicant:must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
| Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible, with top
‘|| notch propriety. Minimum three (3) years experience as Director of
Marketing or Asst. with proven track record and statistics.

Compensation package includes:

Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost
‘Attractive Bonus Plan
. Medical Coverage
Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)

Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591



@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

THE Bahamas has the eighth
highest per capita prison rate
in the world according to a
study compiled by the British
government.

The study, undertaken by the
Research, Development and
Statistics Directorate of the UK
Home office, estimates that

- there are 447 prisoners in the

Bahamas per 100,000 of the
national population.
The United States is listed as

‘ having the highest prison rate

in the world, with 686 per
100,000 of its population incar-
cerated, followed by the Cay-
man Islands (664), Russia (638),
Belarus (554), Kazakhstan

(522), Turkmenistan (489),

Belize (459), the Bahamas, Suri-
name (437) and Dominica
(420).

According to local lawyer and
human rights activist Paul Moss,
the Bahamas’ prominent place
on the list is no surprise — and
reflects the government’s fail-
ure to implement meaningful
prison reform.

“The government appointed
Elliston Rahming (as prison
superintendent), but there has
been no legislation drafted to
limit the incarceration of per-
sons who do not belong in
prison,” said Mr Moss. “In
many cases, persons are given
custodial sentences when they
do not need to be.”

He said that as a result, many
non-violent offenders are being
indoctrinated into prison cul-
ture and are released back into
society as hardened criminals.

The practice of mixing petty
offenders and serious criminals is
one of the factors behind the
high recidivism rate in the
Bahamas, according to Mr Moss.

“Right now, you have 18, 19,
20-year-olds in there for petty
theft or stealing by reason of
employment, incarcerated with
persons convicted of murder,
manslaughter, armed robbery
and rape.

“There must be a law passed
to make it easier to give non-
custodial sentences to such
offenders, so they can give back
to the community — or even to
the victims they have wronged, i
he said.

The government recently
announced the implementation
of a new system that would
allow for inmates convicted of
similar offences to be detained
together.

According to Mr Moss how-
ever, the practice of “mixing”
is still taking ‘place.

The World Prison Population







HA PRIS

‘list (fourth edition), compiled
in 2003, gives details of the
number of prisoners in 205
independent countries and
dependent territories.

'- It is published online at
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdf
s2/1188.pdf.

“Prison population rates vary
considerably between different
regions of the world, and
between different parts of the
same continent. For example:
in Africa the median rate for
western and certtral African
countries is 50 whereas for
southern African countries it is

. 362; in the Americas the median

rate for south American coun-
tries
Caribbean countries it is 297; in
Asia the median rate for south
central Asian countries (mainly
the Indian sub-continent) is 54
whereas for (ex-Soviet) central
Asian countries it is 426; in
Europe the median rate for
southern European countries is
69 whereas for central and east-
ern European countries it is 213;
in Oceania (including Australia
_and New Zealand) the median
rate is 110,” the study said.

It said that prison populations
are growing in many areas world.
According to updated informa-
tion on countries included in the
previous editions of the study,
penal populations have risen 61
per cent in Africa, 68 per cent in
the Americas, 87 per cent in



j from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ER in the workshop at Fox Hill Prison

is 107 whereas for’



1 ~\t

Asia, 65 per cent in Europe and
50 per cent in Oceania.

The report continued: “More: ’-

than 8.75 million people are
held in penal institutions
throughout the world, mostly

as pre-trial detainees (remand. °

prisoners) or having been con-
victed and sentenced.

. “About half of these are’ in |

the United States (1.96 million),

‘Russia (0.92 million) or China

(1.43 million),” it said.
In 2005, former prison super-

- intendent Edwin Culmer admit-

ted to The Tribune that in the
Bahamas, pre-trial detainees are
often held for up to four years
before their matter is heard by a
court.

Allyson Maynard-Gibson, the
new attorney general and min-
ister of legal affairs, has intro-
duced an initiative known as
“Swift Justice” in an effort to
tackle this problem.

Earlier this month, her office
announced that remand time in
on the decline.

Calls to Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of National
Security Cynthia Pratt were not
returned up to press time.

The Tribune also attempted
to contact National Security

Permanent Seécretary Mark Wil- -'

son, but was informed by: his
office that all questions from

the press should be forwarded :
in writing through Bahanias

Information Services:

Share your news |

The Tribune wants to hear

Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resorts

Invites applications for the position

Of

Director of Sales

All applicants must possess the following Attributes

Excellent Leadership Skills

Excellent Communication Skills

Excellent Interpersonal Skills

Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills

Excellent Organizational Skills

In-depth Knowledge and Experience of Points/Credits System

The successful applicant must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible. Three (3)
years minimum experience as Director of Sales or Asst. with proven track
record and statistics

Compensation package includes:

_Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost
Attractive Bonus Plan
Medical Coverage

Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)

Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591



cn ELLA















sate



Tht TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 9



| | Rey as l:

Escapees ©
FROM page one

would more than likely have
already made good their
escape.

“We believe that they are
out of the country,” Mr Gib-
son said. “Based on the
trend of the others, really
the trend is to get out of the
Bahamas. Because I don’t
think you would have
Cubans in particular who
would break out of the
Detention Centre and
remain in the Bahamas.

“The trend is generally to
get out of the country. We
don’t have any evidence to
that effect but we believe
that they may already be out
of the country,” he said.

The pair made their early
morning escape between the
hours‘of 3am and 4am, and
Mr:Gibson said that he
cout not conclusively say if



tion Centre. Howev-
er he ‘did state that the
women “must have” had
some help from the outside.

“Certainly there was help
from the outside, because
don‘t.forget someone had to
be there to receive them and
transport them to wherever
they wanted to go. I won’t
say there had to be help
from the inside but certainly
there had to help from the
outside because someone
had to pick them up — they
didn’t; just vanish into thin
air.

“So. they had to have
transportation waiting for
them and they had to be
housed somewhere. So
based on the trend we really
think they are out of the
country,” he said.

According to sources the
two.women escaped froma
section of the Centre that
was labelled as an “unsafe”
area by Defence Force offi-
cials because it was extreme-
ly poorly lit.

Reportedly it was this
same area that was also used
by two Cuban men and a
Jamaican. within recent
weeks-to escape the Centre.

As such Mr Gibson said
that they have started
improvements at the hold-
ing facility: Nine officers
have been trained.in finger-
printing and guard dogs
have:been installed in an
area just beyond the hold-
ing area-between the two
security fences.

“It is important to note
that: the guard dogs will have
no access to the compound
itself. They are only on the
perimeter. So there is a
fence separating them from
the public and the detainees,
which:means the only per-
sons'who would have access
to them would be the people
who\train them,” he said.

i

aanniees ES a pct ore

Bahamasair
FROM page one

have performed exemplary
on the job, and whose work
was evaluated. Why should
they not receive their incre-
ments?” she asked.

MsiHarding explained that
with the new proposed con-
tract, employees — according
to rank and position can
receive between $450 and
$850 a year in increments if
their performance meets cer-
tain criteria.

“Normal employees, staff,

cleaners and such can get
$4504 year, licensed engi-
neers:can get $850, and oth-
er employees can get any-
where between that,” she
added.
' However, despite this
promising breakthrough at
the negotiating table,
Bahamasair employees yes-
terday maintained their
work-to-rule mode — an
action which has been insti-
tuted more than once in the
past months.

The union was expected
to meet with Minister of
Labour and Immigration
Shane Gibson and his nego-
tiating team yesterday after
5pm.

“Until we come out of that .
meeting, and depending on
the outcome of that meet-
ing, our work-to-rule con-
tinues,” Ms Harding said.

_ Tension between manage-

ment and union members
reached a boiling point ear-
lier this month when
Bahamasair staff walked out
of the Nassau International
Airport for a “collective
lunch break.”

This act of protest in the
wake of botched salary nego-
tiations grounded Bahama-
sair flights to Fort Laud-
erdale, Miami, Eleuthera .
and Abaco for over an hour.

Government fails to meet its promise
on vehicle emission standards testing

FROM page one

that the equipment was likely
to arrive in early 2006, the test-
ing is yet to start.

Mr Pinder admitted yester-
day-that the equipment has not
yet been ordered. It is expect-
ed to be ordered in the new
budget year.

In 2004, he said that a few
months of research was need-
ed to ascertain what standards
were in other countries, and
how they should be set in the
Bahamas.

“One of the reasons why it
has not been ordered, is
because there has been much
discussion between the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services and the
Road Traffic Department with

respect to the management
and regulation of fuel emis-
sion standards.

“The second thing was that
we had lengthy discussions
with regards to the specs for
the equipment, the kind of
equipment we were going to
bring into the. country. That
whole process took longer
than expected,” said Mr Pin-
der.

He added that the process
is still going on, but it is being
projected that in this budget
cycle the equipment would be
ordered and the whole process
should be finalised.

Currently, he said, there is
consultation between the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services, The Road
Traffic Department and the
private stakeholders.

Ingraham reiterates position

_ FROM page one

ducted through the police, such persons, if they choose to sue the

state they ought to do so.’

In previous statements, the former Prime Minister said that the
manner in which Haitians were raided and rounded up in Eleuthera
violated the Organization of American States Convention on the

rights of migrants in the country.

Nobody paid attention to these legal residents of Eleuthera
when they attempted to show officials documentation to prove

their legality, said Mr Ingraham.

Eventually, as reflected in the news reports, those residents
were placed on a boat and brought to Nassau where they were
incarcerated at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, until they
were eventually taken back to Spanish Wells by a private citizen.

Continuing to hold firm to his position, Mr Ingraham said: “Such
persons have a legal right not to be interfered with illegally or

- unlawfully by the government.”

By using the courts as a first step in’ protecting the rights of
legal residents of the Bahamas, Mr Ingraham said: “We can estab-
lish once and for all, by a decision of the courts of our country, that
no government has a right to act in such an arbitrary fashion and
deal with legal residents of our country in that way.”

However, Labour and Immigration Minister, Shane Gibson,
whose tactics have been compared to former PLP Immigration

chief Loftus Roker, has taken exception to his shadow misters a

comments calling them “dangerous.”

Mr Gibson has said in the past that he found it str ange and out= "|

rageous that anybody seeking to hold the office of prime minister
Once again, would encourage persons to sue the government. But
Mr Ingraham said that he stands by his word: “We believe that
enforcement of any law, including our immigration law, must be
dealt with humanely and in.accordance with standards, human
rights procedures, and established human rights norms that exist in

all civilized societies.”

Reports denied

FROM page one —

members, stationed throughout
the Bahamas. However the
process has encountered a num-
ber of road blocks.

~ Questions over exactly who
the union could represent was
one of the. many stumbling

blocks. The union believed it .

had the right to represent both
teachers and principals as it has
done since 1965. The union won
this right in its bid at the Indus-
trial Tribunal, however govern-
ment officials maintain that they
were not forced to concede on
this point. Instead, they said, it
was an issue on which they had
decided to compromise.

The latest dispute between

Prices shown based on 15% customer
down payment over a 60-month term

with approved bank credit.

the two was the forced closure
of schools on May 5, when it
was reported that a number of
teachers staged a “sit out”.
However, Mrs Poitier-Turn-
quest said that when she heard
of the incident she personally

visited schools throughout the -

island and found that all teach-
ers were at their posts. until
3.15pm that day.

“T-do not understand what
action they are accused of tak-
ing,” she said, explaining that
the teachers were involved in
no industrial action and that no
trade dispute had been filed. :

The union has also thanked
parents and the community for
their support during their
“arduous” negotiations.

06 Epica a

$36

er 36S
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A preliminary report had
already been written and there
are additional discussions as a
result of it, he said.

The preliminary report
includes recommendations for
the management and the vari-
ous procedures to monitor fuel
emission standards in the
country.

“The discussion surround-
ing the procedures and the
management of fuel emission
standards in the country has
taken longer than expected,
and hence the delay as to why
the whole process has not been

finalised yet, and hence equip-
ment has not been ordered as
yet,” explained Mr Pinder.
Vehicular emissions, in par-
ticular carbon dioxide, harms

‘plants, soil and water and

affects the ecological balance
of the planet.

It is also a major contributor
to global warming.

Environmentalist Sam Dun-
combe said the issue of air pol-
lution is “very serious,” and is
particularly bad for asthmat-
ics and people with respirato-
ry problems. She pointed out

that it also has implications for

people who are currently
healthy.

“There are a number of air

pollutants in the stuff that

comes out of your car — some -
of them can cause cancer, .

obviously some of them cause
respiratory diseases. %

“It is very important for us
to sort of get on stream with
that level of protection so that
each individual is actually
responsible for keeping their

car running as well as it can

run, so that it does not create

any additional problems,” said

Mrs:'Duncombe.

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING MAY 30, 2006

7:30_| 8:00] 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:90 | 10:00 | 10:30

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shop run by Marines. (CC) (CC) s their killer. (N) © (CC)
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looking for aspiring comics. (N) (CC) A suspect becomes enraged and at-
tacks Detéctive Fin. (CC)

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CNN (:00) The Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) - Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
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Beach Volley: |Beach Volleyball AVP Tempe Open Soccer Germany vs. Japan.
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On the Record With Greta Van

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(:00) MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Florida Marlins. From Dolphins Stadium in Mi- |Best Damn Sports Show Period





















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@ LAPAZ, Bolivia

ay

VENEZUELAN President
Hug6éChavez told Bolivian forces
to. be-pn guard against conspira-
torssalleging U.S. President
Geofge W. Bush is plotting
againat’ Bolivia's left-leaning gov-
ernnjent, according to Associat-
ed Press.

‘Chayez delivered his weekly
radiéand, television program
"Hello President" on Sunday
from the ruins of Tiawanacu, an
anciént city located roughly 56
kilometers (35 miles) west of La
Paz it Bolivia's highlands.

"When the U.S. president said
a fewidays ago that he was wor-
ried because democracy is erod-

344



y OW that the Cable
: Beach redevelop-
ment is about to start, creat-
ing ‘a counter point in the
west.to the reborn Paradise
Island in the east, our atten-
tion must now be drawn to
what's in between.
During the past thirty plus
years I have watched the
area between cruise ship pier
in the centre of town and
Arawak Cay evolve and not
always for the better. Bay
Street used to be the jewel
of Nassau, it no longer is.
The hotels west of the
Hilton on the south side of
West Bay Street have
remained less than an asset
to the image of Nassau.
The time has come for the
development of a\master
plan for this area to encour-
age its redevelopment into
Nassau's version of South
Beach. It should be teeming
with visitors going to shops
and‘ restaurants day and
night. The small hotels,
hopefully locally owned and
operated, in the area could
be renovated so as to
become fashionable and
attractive alternatives to the
large, mostly foreign owned,
hotels on Cable Beach and
Paradise Island. Special
incentives could be offered
to! €ncourage invéstment in
this designated area.
Imagine spacious side-
walks with sidewalk cafes,
small inns and boutique
hotels inter mixed with
these, bordered by well
maintained public beaches
with the necessary facilities,
camplementing an enter-
tainment complex on
Ayawak Cay.

“A second cruise ship dock- |

ing facility needs to be
déveloped at Arawak Cay,
as the present one has
reached its capacity. The
high price of fuel makes the
Bahamas an even more
attractive port of call to this
industry. It is necessary to
make the town more attrac-
tive to the cruise passenger,
otherwise we will see an ever
increasing number of cruise
stop$ at unpopulated cays
which results in the cruise
lines'retaining even more of
the cruise dollar for them-
selves. —

The consequences of such
a development would not
just be economic, but would
also be social. It would
broaden and deepen the par-
ticipation of Bahamians in
the Tourism Industry and it
would give a psychological
lift to the city's citizens as
they watch the rebirth of
Nassau's core.

I don't think anyone
would deny that these are
not all good things.

Kill the
Casuarinas

I don't know who brought
these trees to the Caribbean.
I don't know when they
arrived.

But there must be more
Casuarinas than people in
the Bahamas.

These Australian natives
invaded the islands of the
Bahamas long before con-
cern for the health and pro-

‘

i
‘



t

ing in Bolivia it/s because, you
can be sure, he has a plan against
Bolivia," Chavéz said without
elaborating. |

He urged "his brothers, the
Bolivian soldiers," not to be
caught off guard.’

The comments were Chavez's
latest response to{Bush's remarks
last week that he was "concerned
about the erosion! of democracy"
in Bolivia and Venezuela.

The U.S. State Department
says it has no plans, to overthrow
the Bolivian government. But

Bush has expressed concern ©

about a growing Venezuelan-
Cuban-Bolivian partnership, and
has tacitly sided with the govern-
ments of Peru and Nicaragua,
which have accused Chavez of



F]
tection of the environment
was as developed as it is
today. a

_ However even today most
persons do not realize the
damage to our ‘native flora
caused by these) trees.

They smother 'all growth
under their canopies and
extract a great deal of
moisture from the soil killing
off the native plants
nearby. | ape

Examine beneath a stand
of these trees and you will
find a desert. |

We have. the ‘wonderful
Abaco Pine which is more
environmentally friendly and
which, I am advised, is
native to our islands. I think
most people would agree
that it is also far more attrac-
tive.

It would therefore seem to
make sense for|the Casuari-
nas to be declared pests and
for them to be cut down and
replaced by the Abaco Pine
or some other native tree.

|

‘|
By
\

interfering in their presidential
elections.

Undeterred, Chavez on Sun-
day strongly endorsed Peru's left-
ist presidential candidate Ollanta
Humala and continued his war of
words with Peru's president, say-
ing that Alejando Toledo was
"subordinate" to U.S. interests.

Chavez called Peru's leading

presidential hopeful, Alan Gar- :

cia a demagogue. who “wants to
be president so he can continue
stealing."

"Hopefully the Peruvian peo-
ple, who we love, will give a
demonstration next Sunday of
historical consciousness and allow
Ollanta Humala to be Peru's next
president," Chavez said.

Garcia leads Humala with just
a week left before Peru's June 4
presidential runoff, according to a
final poll published Sunday.

In comments to reporters on
Saturday, Toledo said: "He can-
not meddle-in (our). domestic
affairs. You have been notified
Mr. Chavez ... don't mess with
my country."

Chavez said Bolivia's upcoming
election of an assembly responsi-
ble for drafting a new constitu-
tion was necessary for a transfor-

RULES






















a cele

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be positive (slides)

mation of the nation's democracy
and public institutions.

"You are still under an old
regime," Chavez told to Bolivian
President Evo Morales. ;

"The political system collapsed
and it's necessary to create a new
democracy."

Leaders of the political party
led by Morales — the Movement
Toward Socialism — announced

- last week they would seek

reforms allowing the indigenous
leader to be re-elected when a

iri
bration

®

1 Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photogra
“A CELEBRATION OF NATURE”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or
as found in The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2006.

3 Allentries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am
and 5:00pm weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.

5 Only ‘colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm. film can
or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing
signs of photo manipulation or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best c [ U
RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the'original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints ©
which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints submitted without 35mm slides or negatives or CDs will not be eligible.)

The photographer's name and photo subject should be written on the reverse of the print. : ee
Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality ‘and quality of photograph. Preference will be given syeae
to fauna photographed in its natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian’s 2007
calendar. The decision of the judges will be final. ; :
All entries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company’s intention to return all entries in their original condition. However, Family Guardian
‘will assume no liability for'any loss, damage or. deterioration. eee ; oh ee as \
gift certificate - valued at $400 will be presented fo
hotographer may be selected. Photographic credits will he given in the calendar. The number o

rs are not eligible.
ly published photos not eligible.

of

any reserves the right to use such in the future.
s of Family Guardian, ‘its affiliated companies or

alleges US is plotting
t Bolivia’s leftist govt



constituent assembly begins
reworking Bolivia's constitution

in August.

The Bolivian Constitution cur-
rently allows presidents to serve
one five-year term, after which
they must wait another five years
to run for office again.

Morales' party is favored to
lead in the July 2 elections of
assembly members although it is
not clear if it will win the required

two-thirds of the 255 seats to -

approve the reform.



i 2007 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM j af

SIGNATURE ..



phers. The title for the company’s 2007 calendar will be —.-
a scene which is a striking example of nature -

olour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in

r each of the photographs selected: More than one entry froma single
f entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of ~



| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner
in the 2007 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family
Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Famity Guardian all rights pertaining to its use
in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos enteréd in this contest were taken in
The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.





(maximum of 5)

Return with photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate
Centre, Village & Eastern Road Roundabodt, Nassau, Bahamas
ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY-31, 2006

Wa FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY

VV, CYUYYU, I riwik 1!

@ IN THIS picture released -
by Miraflores Press Office
Venezuela's President Hugo |
Chavez speaks during his week-
ly broadcast Alo Presidente in
Tiwuanaku, Bolivia, Sunday, .
May 28, 2006. ee

uae

(AP Photo/ : :

Miraflores Press, HO)







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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

CLASS A 3
Winner & National Champion

2nd place
3rd. place
4th place
5th place
6th place
7th place
8th . place
9th place
10th place

" 11th place

12th place

CLASS B ses.
Winner and National Champion

2nd place
3rd_ place
Ath place
5th place
6th place
7th place
8th place
9th. place
10th place
11th place

~ 12thplace

13th place

‘CLASS CW

Cc
Winner and National Champion

2nd place
3rd_place
Ath place
5th place
6th place

~ 7th: place
‘8th place

9th place
10th place
11th place
12th place
13th place
14th place
15th place
16th place
17th place
18th place
19th place
20th place

CLASS

Ath place
5th place
6th place
7th place

D
. Winner and N
_ 2nd place
3rd place

ational Champion

Stl UREA SLOT RURST LALOR RSNA TERRDKO ERA GRUNDY

The official results are as follows:

- Tida Wave

Good News
New Courageous
Abaco Rage

Earlie’s Rupert Legend

Running Tide
New Thunderbird
Pieces of Eight
Silent Partner

Red Stripe

Lucayan Lady

New Southern Cross .

Lonesome Dove
New Susan Chase

Rowdy Boys Pin-AH

Eudeva

Lady Nathalie
Ants Nest
Ansbacher Queen
Barbarian

Lady Sonia
Sherwin’s Dream
Uncle Rey.
Hummingbird
Passion

Bull Reg
Fugitive
Termites
Woodpecker _
Crazy Partner
Sacrifice
Slaughter

Lady Eunice ©
WG Thunderbird
Unknown 500
Golden Girl
Legal Weapon
Miss Ellen
Warrior |

I've Tried .
Sea Wind

Two Friends
Chaser |

Lady T
Paparazzi

Blue Wing
Regret

Baby Chase
Fredrica
Respect |
Dream Girl

Bad Motor Finger

NATIONAL JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP:

Ist Place - Termites

2nd Place - Sacrifice
d Place - Fugitive

r
Ath Place - Legal Weapon
5th Place - Vite Malt
6th Place - Fredrica

7th Place - Miss. Ellen’
8th Place - Unknown 500
th Place - Dream Girl

9
10th Place - Slaughter

Prime Minister Cup Winner

Governor General Cup Winner



Commodore Emeritus Cup Winner



underbird

Nioshe Rolle

Garret Knowles

Harcourt Rolle

Sanchez Ferguson
Mchale Rolle.
Henry Rolle Jr.
Marco Knowles
Nestor Rolle

Greg Godfrey
Tyler Knowles

Tida Wave, Brooks Miller

New Susan Chase,

Laurin Knowles

Bull Reg, Buzzy Rolle,

34points

31 points
30 points
25 points
23 points
20 points
13 points:
12 points
12 points
9 points
8 points
8 points

39 points
30 points
30 points
28 points
25 points
21 points
18 points
17 points
16 points
15 points
14 points
12 points
6 points

42 points
38 points
38 points
36 points
32 points
28 points
26 points
26 points
25 points
24 points
23 points
22 points
19 points
17 points
17 points
14 points
8 points
6 points
4 points
2 points

16 points
13 points
11 points
11 points
9 points
6 points
2 points

Staniel Cay, Exuma

Mangrove Bush, Long Island

George Town, Exuma
Staniel Cay, Exuma
George Town, Exuma
Black Point, Exuma

Mangrove Bush, Long Island

George Town, Exuma
Rolleville,, Exuma
Salt Pond, Long Island

Staniel Cay, Exuma

Mangrove Bush, Long Island

George Town, Exuma

| MINISTRY OFTOURISM st

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THE TRIBUNE

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BANK OF THE BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL
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“TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

AUT Vee



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







Qian”

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Realtors frustrated by
the Investment Board

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter .

ahamian real estate

agents have expressed

frustration at what they

allege is the Investment

Board’s inefficiency in
handling applications from foreigners
wishing to purchase real estate in the
Bahamas.

According to some realtors, unnec-
essary delays in obtaining permits such
as a Certificate of Registration, under
the International Persons Landholding
Act 1993, are causing potential real
estate investors to take their business

tial revenue for the Bahamas.
One realtor told The Tribune yester-
day that he heard some applications

were taking as long as two years to be.

processed.

“Basically, they ask persons for cer-
tain documents, and when they send in
the information, they are making them
go round and round. This has. been
going on for a long time,” he said.

The realtor added, that rather than
wait to be approved, the investors sim-
ply take their business elsewhere.

“ People have changed their minds,
because the Bahamas is not the only
place in the world where they can pur-
chase real estate,” the realtor said.

not to be identified, told The Tribune
that there was a serious problem with
the Investment Board.

“It simply does not meet. When it
does meet, they deal with large invest-
ments, but no one looks after foreign
investors who are buying single homes,”
he said.

The realtor added that the Board’s
claim that it processes applications with-
in 30-60 days was “complete rubbish”:

“It is typical for applications to lan-

guish for six months up to a veAt ” he
said.

The realtor added that his company .

will no longer accept sales that have to
go to the Investment Board for
approval.

The realtor said he wished not to be
identified because in his experience,

-members of the Government.and civil
service take criticism personally. and -

refuse to deal with any other business
you may have before them.

Bahamas Real Estate Association
president, Larry Roberts, told The Tri-
bune that he has a scheduled meeting

with the Investments Board later this.

week. He said he would prefer not to
comment until he has had a chance to
attend that meeting. °

Financial Services and. Tavostuiénts
Minister, Vincent Péet, was off the
island and unavailable for comment
when The Tribune tried to contact him



elsewhere, resulting in a loss of poten-

Baker’s Bay confident
project will ‘prevail’ |

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



EXECUTIVES with the
controversial $175 million Bak-
er’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club
development yesterday said
they were confident the pro-
ject would “prevail”, even
though their opponents are
seeking to appeal a ruling that
relieves the developers from

an undertaking not to proceed.

with the development. .
Fred Smith, attorney for the

Save Guana Cay Reef Associ- -

ation, said he had filed a

‘motion with the Court of:

Appeal seeking leave to appeal
its ruling on the developers’
undertaking to the Privy Coun-
cil.

He added that the appeal.

was seeking to also overturn
the Court of Appeal’s refusal
to grant an injunction restrain-
ing the Government and the
Baker’s Bay developers, San
Francisco-based Discovery
Land Company.

The Court of Appeal ruled
earlier this month that the
developers would only have to
remain faithful to their under-
taking not to perform any new
work on Guana Cay until May
31-- tomorrow.

The undertaking was given
on November 22, 2005, and
was only supposed to last until
Supreme Court Acting Justice,
Norris Carroll, had delivered
, his verdict in the lower court
‘on the merits of the’ case
brought by the Association.
However, the Supreme Court
judgement has yet to be deliv-

As opponents file
Appeal Motion to
prevent developers
being released from
stop-work undertaking

‘ered.

In his Notice of Motion
applying for leave to appeal to
the Privy Council, Mr Smith
argued that Discovery Land

Company’s position - that it

should be relieved from the
undertaking because the
Supreme Court was taking
longer than thought to render

its verdict and costing it:
- increasing sums of money - was

“unsustainable”.

Mr Smith argued: “The
delay to the development
pending the delivery of judge-
ment is likely to.be no more
than a few months at most. If
the development goes ahead
in the meantime, the damage
to the Crown and Treasury

lands, which the developers do ©

not even yet have title to,

would take generations to

repair, if indeed the wetlands
and the forest could ever
recover.’

A supporting affidavit from
Michelle Petty, an attorney
with Callenders & Co, who
works with Mr Smith on the

case, said an earlier affidavit -
from Deborah Fraser, director »
of legal affairs at the Attorney .

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Another senior realtor, who asked

|
|
a

|
|
St
|

| munications.

on both last Friday and yesterday.

BIC tariff cuts backed

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas Telecom-
Company’s
(BTC) application fora
reduction in its international
long distance rates of between
7.8 per cent to 51.43 per cent
has been approved, with the
industry. regulator refusing
IndiGo Networks’ urgings
that this be linked to the pro-

| vision of interconnection ser-

vices to the latter’s network.
In its statement of results

on BTC’s application, the.

Public Utilities Commission

(PUC) said it saw “no valid ©

reasons, legal or otherwise”

to link regulatory approval of —
BTC’s proposed rates to oth- .
er issues such as the provi- -

sion of interconnection ser-
vices and facilities to IndiGo

| Networks.

| only licensed competitor on

IndiGo Networks, BTC’s

PUC rejects IndiGo’s demands tha this

be linked to interconnection issue

fixed-ine voice services, had
previously alleged that its
state-owned rival was being
allowed to violate “the terms
of its licence with impunity”,
harming both consumers and
the Bahamian economy’s
competitiveness.

The source of the contro-
versy is BTC’s alleged non-
cooperation on a variety! of
interconnection issues. Inter-
connection between BTC’s
and IndiGo’s networks is vital
to enable calls that originate
on one network to be seam-
lessly transferred to the other.

BTC’s non-cooperation
had its roots in fears that
interconnection with IndiGo’s
network would be exploited

-by illegal Voice over Internet

Protocol (VoIP) providers,
harraing tb the state-owned car-

Poca
CMa

a

rier’s financial hettotinance.
In addition, IndiGo’s par-
ent, Systems Resource Group

(SRG), is the only other oper-

ator apart from BTC to be
licensed to provide VoIP ser- -
vices in the Bahamas, some-

thing it could exploit legally

to increase market share. This
is likely to be of even greater

‘concern to BTC.

‘However, the PUC said
IndiGo’s concerns would be
“better addressed” under the
Telecommunications Act
1999, and the Interconnection

‘Agreement signed in 2004

between it and BTC.

Back on BTC’s interna-
tional and inter-island long
distance. rates, the PUC said

ae page 6B

ni iy

CEG ot Ne
* ay tenn)



BSC da ab





= JAMES SMITH -

Bahamas

‘must ‘insist’

oe
~
os
&
&

on OECD ©
equality.

o
‘e
*

te ee eT

@ By NEIL HARTNELL S
Tribune Business Editer :



-

JAMES Smith, minister oiSEs

state for finance, yesterday told.
The Tribune it was more:
important for the Bahamas«
than other so-called’ offshore «

“centres to “insist” on a-‘level:

playing field’ for global finan- °
cial services regulation because -
many felt:-this nation had gone -
beyond the standards OECD -
countries were meeting. :

Mr Smith was commenting
after the Organisation for Eco-.
nomic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) yester-
day.released its latest report
on the ‘harmful tax practices’
initiative, producing a docu-
ment-that attempted to’bench-
mark what the Bahamas and
more than 80 other nations
were doing on transparency
and the exchange of inform-
tion for tax purposes.

The Bahamas appeared to
fare relatively well in the
benchmarking exercise, the
OECD only offering muted
comments in regard to this
nation in the areas of partner-



SEE page 4B

= FIDELITY
Bayond Banking

Li} WANA LA)





\
}



PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





Prudent investing will give
you good retirement value

“Reporting for The Tribune is a
responsibility and privilege. We
respect and honour the people’s
right to know everyday. ’m
proud to be a part of the leading
print medium in The Bahamas.
The Tribune is my newspaper.”

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

Te report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.





The Winterbotham Merchant Bank

a division of

The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited
Winterbotham Place - Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Email: ghooper@winterbotham.com, adavidson@winterbotham.com,

' jhooper@winterbotham.com - Tel: (242) 356- 5454
www.winterbotham.com

n April 26,
2006, the
American
Institute of
Certified Pub-
lic Accountants (CPAs) issued
a press release announcing the
results of their most recent
pension survey. According to
the release: “The vast majority
of CPAs serving as corporate
chief executives, chief finan-
cial officers and financial con-
trollers, and in other executive
positions, believe American
companies can’t continue pro-
viding pensions that adequate-
ly cover their employees’
retirement years.” —

When asked if US compa-
nies could continue providing
employees with pensions that
adequately cover their retire-
ment needs, nearly three in
four (74 per cent) of the
respondents said ‘No’. More
than half believe rising health-
care costs are the biggest bar-
rier to a company’s ability to
offer pension benefits, while
nearly a third (30 per cent) said
the pressures to compete in the
marketplace outweighed the
pressures to provide retirement
benefits.

“These findings are a wake-
up call,” said John Morrow,
vice-president of the AICPA’s
division for CPAs in business
and industry. “The traditional
system of rewarding employ-
ees with pensions after long
years of service is on its way

out, because companies sim-.

ply cannot bear the cost.
Therefore, employees will have
to find alternate methods of
funding their retirement.”

Implications
The implication is that we

are all ‘going 't to. have to- become’. oe
more ‘Tesponsible for our own

retirements. And, the more
money we have in our pocket
when we retire, the more
choices we have about that
retirement.

While it’s good to do retire-
ment planning, it’s especially
good to be realistic while doing
it. So, here are some pieces of
reality to include in your big
picture.

Knowing how much income
you need in retirement

The old rule of thumb states
that you need 60 per cent to
80 per cent of your pre-retire-
ment income to maintain your
current lifestyle in retirement.
This assumed you had no
mortgage; your children were



educated and not living at
home; and you have relatively
little consumer debt..

Newer studies now suggest
that 60 per cent to 80 per cent

_.is simply not enough, and that

a more realistic number is 80
per cent to 110 per cent. Wow!
How can it be more?:

The, rationale is: in retire-
ment, medical expenses and
certain capital expenses must
be factored in. Let’sgassume
that you will live affnr 25
years after you retiré. If you
own your own house, you will
have periodic repairs to con-
tend with — a new roof, refur-
bishment of the plumbing or
electric wiring. These are in
addition to annual expenses
such as utility bills, real prop-
erty tax, insurance and the like.

If you own a vehicle, how -

long will it continue to be oper-
ational? The lifespan of an
average car today is less than
10 years. So, obviously, you
would need to consider one or
more vehicle replacements
during retirement.

In retirement, some health
insurers will automatically
drop coverage once you reach
a certain age. For most per-

-sons, healthcare becomes a
more significant burden as we

age, and it is one that many
have to fund out of their avail-
able resources if they. wish to
maintain the quality of health-

care they enjoyed while work- _

ing.

While many older Tetirees
spend very little, the most real-
istic way. to calculate retire-
ment spending needs is to sit
down and work vheouen a
detailed budget.



You could live a very long
time in retirement
The newer demographic

studies are indicating that if.

you make it to age 60, then ‘on
average’ it is not unreasonable

to expect to live almost anoth- :

er 30 years or more, if you are
in good health at retirement.



Financial



Focus




For some persons, it is possible
that you could spend almost
one-third of FOU lifespan in
retirement.

Therefore, it is, important
you do not stumble upon

retirement and post-retirement
life without a plan. Far too
many people fail, simply
because: they fail to plan.

Are you prepared to deal
with Involuntary Retirement?

While many companies pro-
vide for early retirement,
which is usually 10 years before
normal retirement, very few
persons in reality can truly
‘retire’ early simply because

they have not organised their .

financial affairs in a way to
allow them to do so. Those
who retire early typically have
a small business that they oper-
ate, or they embark ona sec-
ond career, such as real estate
sales — where you can basically
work your own hours.
However, there is another
type of early retirement...the
type that is forced upon you.
Increasingly, persons in. their
early to mid fifties who find
themselves ‘casualties of cor-

_ porate downsizing’ find they

are never able to “land anoth-
er job ata comparable, level”
again.

It is sound advice to always
ensure you have the current
market qualifications for the
job you hold. Also, it is advis-
able to satisfy yourself that
your job title actually reflects

the level at which you truly

function.

Using the equity in your
home to fund retirement —.

Most people do, at some
point. In fact, many persons
reach retirement having paid
off their mortgage in full. Some
people use this as an opportu-

nity to sell their house and buy ~

a ‘smaller place’, and use the

SEE page 5B

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THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 3B



BTC’s concerns on access deficit.

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) will launch public
consultation on the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company’s
(BTC) universal service obliga-
tion in 2006-2007, as it moves to
address inefficient cross-subsi-
dising between the state-owned
carrier’s different business sec-
tors.

In a submission to the PUC on
BTC’s application for a reduc-
tion in its international and inter-
island long distance rates, Felici-
ty Johnson, the carrier’s company
secretary and vice-president of
legal and regulatory affairs, said
BTC was concerned that the rate
reductions - coupled with its uni-
versal service obligation - would

Fiscal

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government's fiscal
deficit narrowed 20.7 per cent to
$92.8 million during the first nine
months of the 2005-2006 fiscal
year when compared to the same
period last year, the Central Bank
of the Bahamas reported in its
economic and financial report for
April.

The Central Bank said the
Government’s total revenues ben-
efited from favourable economic
conditions to grow by $136.7 mil-

cause it losses.

Ms Johnson wrote: “The mag-
nitude of BTC’s universal service
obligation, which will increase
with further expansion of BTC’s
network into non-commercially
viable areas where the new
entrants will have no incentive
nor licence obligations to go,
must not be overlooked in the
benchmarking of BTC’s rates
with other jurisdictions.

“BTC expects that under the
proposed rates, its combined cost
of providing local and interna-
tional long distance services and
its obligations as provider of last
resort will exceed the revenues it
will receive from the provision of
those services, thereby incurring a
residual access deficit which must
be addressed by the PUC.”

Ms Johnson said a cost study of

deficit

lion to $856.1 million in the peri-
od from July 2005 to end-March
2006.

Tax earnings rose by 16 pér
cent to $108.9 million, supported
by increases in stamp taxes on
import of 18.3 per cent; a rise in
import duties of 18.2 per cent,
and other stamp taxes grew by
29.7 per cent.

In addition, non -tax revenue
advanced by $24.8 million or 65.5
per cent. Total spending expand-
ed by 13.4 pér cent to $948.9 mil-
lion, the result of increases in
both current and-capital expen-

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‘Great benefits; including assistance in
funding for Specialized training.

Intérested persons please fax resume to

Se8: at or Call 356-3189

for further information.









lat

Winoine Bay
ABACLEH BAHAMAS

Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership sales Executives:

-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills,

organization skills

-Exceptional Telephone skills

~Public speaking preferred

-Ability to demonstrate strong relationship sales capability
-Ability to interface professionally with all members

of staff

-Generation and execution of an annual business plan
Self generation of buisness through referrals and other

personal contacts

~Exceptionat skills in long range guest relaional anaaneenace
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer

purchase sequence
_ College degree preferred



its services, performed by an éco-
nomic consultancy, NERA, had
shown that its international and
inter-island long distance rates
were substantially above the cost
of services.

However, BTC’s local rates
were priced below the cost of ser-
vice, and the state-owned carrier
would raise local rates as it
reduced long-distance tariffs in a
rate rebalancing exercise.

Ms Johnson said the cost of
providing local services in the
Family Islands were five to 10
times higher than in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama.

She added that the NERA
study had shown that the cost of
providing a telephone line var-
ied from $511 in New Providence
to $960 in Grand Bahama, $1,334
in Bimini, $2,308 in Cat Island,
ditures

In its outlook for 2006, the
Central Bank said that supported
by a number of tourism invest-
ment projects, the Bahamas was
poised to sustain a healthy level of
economic expansion. Private sec-
tor demand remained strong and
continued to stimulate construc-
tion investments.

‘However, the Central Bank
added that further gains in inter-
national oil and commodity prices
may place pressure on domestic
prices via inflation, as well as the
balance of payments’ current
account: in the medium term.

Comparing April 2006, to April
2005, the Central. Bank reported
that banks’ excess reserves
increased by $42.2 million to
$278.9 million, 52 per cent lower
than the 2005. advance.

Excess liquid assets grew $6.7
million to $179.4 million, signifi-
cantly below last year’s growth
of $44.4 million.

The external reserves in April
2006 advanced by $10.7 million
to $647.9 million, which was $9.5
million less than last year. This
development was reflected in the
47 per cent reduction in the Cen-
tral Bank’s net foreign currency
purchases to $10 million.

. Net purchases from commer-

cial banks narrowed by $12 mil-
lion to $18.6 million, while the

.Central Bank’s net sale. to the

public fell by $3.2 million to $8.6
million. There was also a signifi-
cant reduction in banks’ net pur-

and $4,103 in Mayaguana.

In addition, Ms Johnson said
NERA had calculated the aver-
age cost for BTC to maintain a
telephone line at $48 per month,
compared to the current $15 and
$36 charged to residential and
business customers respectively.

However, the PUC declined to
comment on BTC’s statements
regarding its universal service
obligation and access deficit.

Ms Johnson added: “BTC sub-
mits that for the sector to grow
and for the Bahamian public to
fully reap the economic and social
benefits of competition and
evolving technology, issues on the
access deficit and universal ser-
vice obligations of BTC must be
addressed expeditiously in the
face of an evolving sector where
new entrants ‘cherry pick’ the

20.7%

chases from their customers of
$25.7 million to $7.6 million.

Exchange control data sug-
gested that non- imports
remained relatively unchanged.

Bahamian dollar credit growth
of $34.3 million contrasted with

-last year’s contraction of $13.2
million.

Private sector credit growth
outpaced the 2005 advance of $40
million to reach $55.8 million.
This continued to be underpinned
by hikes in mortgages, $23.5 mil-
lion, and consumer credit of $22.2
million.

Foreign currency credit expan-
sion was relatively stable at $11
million, led by a $7.6 million
increase in credit to the private
sector ,which included a $2.5 mil-
lion hike in mortgages.

Bahamian dollar deposit
growth more than doubled to
$33.9 million, up from the $14.6
million in the previous year. In

addition, demand deposits firmed .

by $7.2 million to rebound from
the $15.7 million contraction last
year. Fixed deposits surpassed
last year’s $12 million to reach
$16 million. However, savings
deposits slowed from $18. 2 mil-
lion to $10.7 million.

’ During the first four months of
2006, excess reserves grew by
$83.6 million, $25.4 million high-

er than the previous year’s expan- .

sion, while excess liquid assets
saw reduced growth of*$67 mil-
lion, compared to 2005’s $73.8
million increase.

CREDIT SUISSE

markets which they will target.”

In response to BTC, the PUC
said it welcomed the carrier’s
intention to switch from regulat-
ed prices to ones that were cost-
oriented, as this would benefit
consumers and the Bahamian
economy.

In addition, the telecoms regu-
lator said cost-oriented prices
would encourage investment by
other operators in the Bahamian
telecoms sector.

The PUC offered BTC some
crumbs of support, agreeing with
the carrier that it was “in a hybrid
state of emergence” awaiting



Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCOIS WILLY, #11 KEMR
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to ihe Masest
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship,*;i¢r
‘| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
that any person who knows any reason why registra
naturalization should not be granted, should send a writtén
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight da
from the 30TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister resporisibie i}
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassali,

decisions on its possible privati-*..
sation. ora
And it also agreed that a num-
ber of rival Caribbean countries
did not face the challenge BTC
did in providing services to 18
islands in a 1,000 square mile - reg
radius, plus cays and island chains *
where there were settlements of {+
10 or more households. e
BTC also pointed out that’
some Caribbean countries were f,
now charging for local calls, with ~
Jamaica levying a tariff of $0.01
per minute, and the Sets
Islands charging $0.11 for the first » >
minute and $002 after that. ° «°

a”















ge %

E2ES ESA

"ge8 :
ty att sn & &

% & %

isa NUT YN ae lets i)

We are expanding our operations in Nassau and recite
Restaurant Hianagers.

THE IDEAL CANIDATES MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING;

Two years or more restaurant management experience
A strong background in a quick food service restaurant

environment

Motivated to be a good, role model for fellow workers
Computer skills including Excel and Microsoft Word
* Strong ability to communicate with customers, staff and others

A secondary education degree required



Compensation is based upon experience & skills

Bonus is base upon performance

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS ACCEPTED

Foward resumes to: info@sbarr obahamas.com oi
evk@sbarrobahamas.com or Fax # 356-033



Great Suisse Wealth Management Limited

is presently considering applications for a

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks.

CHIEF FINANCIAL/OPERATING OFFICER

It is setting new

standards which go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff
provides our clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and
professional portfolio management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus
without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

Requirements:



- Aminimum of ten (10) years experience in banking with a large international institution at
Head Office level
- . Knowledge of trading, trade reconciliation, custody business, securities markets and funds

business

- Extensive experience with SWIFT and EUROCLEAR systems and procedures

- Deep knowledge of SOX related issues and US-GAAP standards
- Ability to speak and write in Portuguese and English

- Experience in analysis of financial ratios, variance analysis, Management Information Systems,
forecasting, budgeting and accounting
- Knowledge and working experience with Microsoft products (including word, excel, access,

etc.)

- Must have extensive working knowledge of GLOBUS and ADAC applications

- Ability to evaluate financial reports sent to our Head Office, create and/or implement new
financial reports according to Head Office guidelines and streamline the business segments

- Significant experience in a senior management role in an operational environment

- Comprehensive knowledge of operational and information technology principles, practices and
processes sufficient to interpret/analyze complex issues and develop innovative solutions to the
challenges effecting the business unit
- Strong problem solving and decision-making skills

- Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills
- Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Key Duties & Responsibilities will include:

- (Co-ordinate day-to-day operating of the main office
- Oversee various Management functions; particularly the Accounts and information &
Technology Departments
- Audit and liaisé with managers to ensure maintenance of standards

Applications should be faxed to: (242) 302-6398
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 2, 2006

«





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



ARNER BANK & TRUST (BAHAMAS) LTD.

Small offshore bank accepting applications for the position of: |

Private Banking Administrator

Knowledge/Skill Requirements

Minimum of two years banking or general office administration
experience

Knowledge of IBC legislation

Knowledge of Bahamas Investment Fund Legislation would
be an advantage

BIFS Banking certification preferred or with progress being
made to completion



Highly motivated and enthusiastic with good time management
skills

Ability to work well in small group enviroment

Computer skills essential

All applicants are asked to send their resumes by fax
for the attention of the Assistant Manager to:

Fax no. 242 394 5975
(NO TELEPHONE CALLS PLEASE)

Bahamas must ‘insist’™:
on OECD equality ©

FROM page 1B

ships and company accounts
record keeping.

The Bahamas was named as
being one of 21 nations, also
including the US and Ger-
many, plus chief competitors
such as the Cayman Islands
and Bermuda, which “either
have a type of partnership for
which no partner identity infor-
mation is required to be
reported, or a class of partners
(limited partners in a limited
partnership) where no identity
information is reported, or
both”.

The benchmarking exercise







@ play an active role in defining and implementing the group fiduciary strategy;

reported that in the Bahamas,
information on the identities
of general partnerships in the
Bahamas did not have to be
held by te authorities. Howev-
er, anti-money laundeing due
diligence still applied.

Meanwhile, on accounts
record keeping, the OECD
report alleged that the
Bahamas and other nations -
again including many of its
international financial services
competitors - did not meet one
of the standards developed by
its Global Forum, namely that
there was “no explicit require-
ment in all instances” to keep
underlkying documents such
as contracts and invoices.

In addition, while the Glob-
al Forum had said accounting

records should be kept for five: '
years or more, this retention”

period was “less than five years
in certain circumstances” in the
Bahamas and 15 other coun-
tries. Again, the Bahamas was
in good company, because the
US was also in this group.

Entities

The OECD said the
Bahamas-registered entities
that met all its accounting
information standards were
public companies and those in
the banking, securities and
insurance sectors.

‘ Mr Smith said the OECD
report had to be placed in a
global context where regula-

’ tory standards were constantly
evolving.

He added that the Bahamas
was moving in pace with this
process, and pointed out that
this nation had gone further
than many competitors and
OECD rivals in areas such as
banning the issuance of bearer
shares.

Many nations placed the’ |

burden for regulating bearer
shares on the registered entity
that incorporated the vehicles

SG Hambros, part of the SG Private Banking, provides a comprehensive wealth
management service.

SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Head of Trust & Fiduciary. Your primary role will be to:

manage the daily business operations of the Fiduciary Services area in an efficient, effective and profitable manner;

B be responsible for the growth of the fiduciary activities in compliance with legal, regulatory and industry standards;

â„¢@ ensure bank's relationships with clients are nurtured and optimized.

You should ideally hold. a Bachelor's of Law, Masters Degree in Business Administration, Society of Trust & Estate
Practitioners (STEP) designation or equivalent, and have at least 10 to 15 years’ international trust/private banking

experience.

You should have excellent client relationship and an in-depth knowledge of investment, trust and banking products.

SG Hambros

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package.

SG

Private Banking



Manager, Human Resources

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7788

SG Hambros Building, West Bay Street

.. Nassau, Bahamas
SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP



Pricing Information As Of:
29 May 20C






Previous: Clo Today's Clo

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of: Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRSs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

BH

NUOPUORPRPON?FO

pay

RR
NEO

.2Bahamas Supermarkets
~-OGaribbean Crossings (Pref)



. OABDAB
.OBahamas Supermarkets
3RND Holdings



SRE

Fund Name

1.2887 1.2327 Colina Money Market Fund 1.288727*
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Funa.7451 ***
2.3560 2.2072Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**

Colina Bond Fund 1 2h6AS SDF eee

1.1643 1.1006
sill

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Colina

‘Financial Advisors Lid.



YIELD - last 12 month dividends

Fluency in French or Spanish would be an advantage. The incumbent will be required to travel.

Applications should be submitted to the following address, to arrive on or before 31 May 2006.

www.sghambros.com

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited is

licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act.



Change

b
NRO

EBOANUOFURFHO



Le

5S2wk-Hi- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily vot.Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months







ng price divided by the last 12 month earning

Bid $- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $- Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol- Trading volume of the prior week






* - 19 May 2006

** - O01 May 2006

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bah
saserceeoee pope eeceray

Ep ee ee





*** - 30 April 2006



for which they were issues,
with the shares often having
to ‘immobilised’ by these
agents acting as custodian.

In addition, US states such
as Delaware and Nevada con-
tinue to issue bearer shares,
while the OECD report noted
that China did not have any
mechanism for identifying the
owner of bearer shares.

Mr Smith said: “It’s been an

argument that’s been made in.

the Bahamas for some time,
that we’ve gone way beyond
the OECD countries, which is
why it’s so important for us to
insist on a ‘level playing field’.

“By and large; we’ve demon-
strated the ability ti meet inter-
national standards and surpass
them.”

© Mr Smnith'said the Bahamas,
‘going forward, had to’be care-,



ful not to exceed or surpass
global standards on regulation
and information sharing, for
otherwise it was possible to
suspect the OECD was “push-
ing us more for their competi-
tive advantage”. -

The former FNM adminis-
tration in’ 2002 gave a condi-
tional commitment to the
OECD that the Bahamas was
willing -to comply with
demands for more transparen-
cy and show a willingness to
enter discussions on exchang-
ing information for tax pur-
poses, but only if OECD states
committed to a ‘level playing

store.
Requirements:
V Responsible

V Respectful
VY Trustworthy

V Team Player

VY Motivated

V Good Personality -
V Must have sure ride to and from work
Y At least 4 BGCSE’s

An increasingly growing entertainment store
seeks to-employ a Sales Clerk to assist in the



ing field’ was:achieved. CH

Bahamas: had gained:.a ‘Cons:
» vention’ Tax: deduction bene-3:: +\:

THE TRIBUNE: 33+i 7

Bui

yf re
















a we SH
Getic nl at

field’ on the issue. is Nitoaes
This they have conspicuous- +: :
ly failed to achieve, and this is.» «
likely to remain an elusive goal: : .
for the OECD. aged

Signed

‘Mr Smith said that while the -: »
Bahamas had signed a Tax: -.
Information Exchange Agree- ».
ment (TIEA) with the US,
which has now gone live:for: : .

‘civil-cases from this tax year:

onwards; it had. told:the 4
OECD it would only consider: ||
further TIEAs with its Euro-.;: :
pean members if a ‘level play- =:
He also pointed out that the =; >.”
US TIEA had to be seen in a »'
slightly different light, as the’) .



fit to boost the conferencing —
side of its tourism industry
under the principle of reci-
procity. grte”
Mr Smith said difficulties iri 42

meeting the ‘level playing field’ EE
condition were becoming
increasingly evident, with
countries becoming more pro-* “#7”
tective of their own interests.

“T don’t think we’ll ever see ‘y,

- it die,” Mr Smith said of the

‘harmful tax practices’ issue.
“What is dead is the manner}
in which they were trying high-
handedly to get others to com-.__

ply when they were not doing?! -:
it themselves.” WET

]
ee
ied
fs
f
en

\

ah ea

CASS EES Tae ara

Toy ny

Ec ae ea de eel tal

Interested persons, please telephone - . i

392-2435 to set up an interview.

3 UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of theleading Wealth © te



Managers in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value-enhancing services. In order to strengthen our
team we look for an additional? .

Client Advisor Brazil

In this challenging position you will be responsible
for the following tasks (traveling required):



tN:

Advisory of existing clients’

Acquisition of high net worth individuals
Presentation and implementation of investment
solutions in the client’s mother tongue

We are searching for a personality with solid
experience in wealth management, specialized in the
fields of customer relations, investment advice and
portfolio management. Excellent sales and advisory
skills as well as solid knowledge of investment
products are key requirements. A proven track record
with a leading global financial institution as well as
fluency in English and Portugese is essential.

Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O.Box N7757
Nassau, Bahamas



aA ese SEE ee eg paints

REARS NE OF ORE BE Teer a

La DOS eR EE:





THE FRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

General’s Office, said no lease
or grant had been signed to
convey the Treasury and
Crown land earmarked for the
development to Discovery
Land Company.

Dr Livingstone Marshall,
Baker’s Bay’s senior vice-pres-
ident for environmental and
community affairs, said the lat-
est legal move by the Associa-
tion “doesn’t come as a sur-
prise to:us”.

He added that the develop-
ers’ attorneys,: Graham,
Thompson & Co, would
“address this matter as appro-
priate”, with. Discovery Land
Company wanting the
Supreme Court-to deliver its
verdict and “bring this matter
to a close”.

“These legal: manoeuvrings :
are delaying opportunities for

Bahamians more than delay-
ing the project,” Dr Marshall
said. “We are confident that
based on what has been said
and done, Baker’s Bay will
prevail.”

He admitted that the.devel-
opers “did not anticipate it
would be five plus months
before we would be released”
from the undertaking, and they

were now looking forward to ©

getting on with the project
“and making an impact for this
country”.

Some 80-85 staff were still
employed at Baker’s Bay, with
Dr Marshall saying the delay
had mainly impacted Bahami-

- an contractors who would oth-

erwise have been employed to
construct the marina, buildings
and roads at the development.

On the Association, Dr Mar-

shall said: “The real challenge

for these folks is to sit down

BUSINESS

Baker’s Bay confident
project will ‘prevail’ §

and look at what is being
planned for this area, and stop
trying to try this case through
the newspapers.

“We feel very confident that
what we’re laying out in this
project is best for the environ-
ment.”

In his Notice of Motion, Mr
Smith alleged that the devel-
opers could not proceed with
the development because an
Environmental Management
Plan had yet to be approved
by the Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission.

He alleged that the Heads
of Agreement stipulated this
needed to be approved before
any construction phase could
commence.

Mr Smith also claimed that
the developers had not

‘ obtained the Town Planning...

and Building permits required



for the development.

To support his appeal for an
injunction, Mr Smith said it
was required to protect the
environment if the undertaking
was withdrawn. He claimed
that there would be “no preju-
dice to the developers” if the
project did not proceed while
waiting for the Supreme Court
verdict.

“The development is not, for
instance, the construction of a
dam, or power plant or other
urgently needed public infra-
structure for the benefit of the
general public,” Mr Smith
alleged.

“It is nothing more than a
real estate development for
private, not public, benefit.
The Government and thereby
the people of the Bahamas get
very little taxes, in view of the

‘concessions intended to be giv-

Prudent investing will give
you good retirement value

FROM page 2B

equity they built up over the years to
finance their retirement.

In the US, ‘reverse mortgages’ have
become hugely popular among retirees.
A reverse mortgage is a special type of
loan available to ‘equity-rich’, older home
owners. Repayment is not necessary until
the borrower sells the property or moves
into ajretirement community. The upside
of this type of loan is that you get to
unlock your equity and use these funds
to maintain a good quality of life.

- A downside to a reverse mortgage is
that the old ‘homestead’ no longer passes
\ wa A Ry Ls be '
i



to another family member, but becomes
another piece of marketable real estate
in the mortgage portfolio of a lending
institution. *

Your investment decisions matter

If you have $50,000 in savings, and you
earn 5 per cent a year on that money,
you'll run out of money in 14 years if you
withdraw $400 a month.

If you can earn 10 per cent a year on
that money, you can withdraw $400 a
month for your remaining lifetime and
perhaps also leave a little something to

_ your estate.

This means the value of learning about
investing can be worth more than a part-

cultural & Industrial

Corporation

Handicraft Development Department

Handicraft “STRAW” Training

(BAIC) |

Program
- Date: June 6th - 16th, 2006
Application Form

Registration Fee: $100.00

Name.
Island
Telephone

P.O. Box

District
Cellular

E-Mail

time job in one of our Malls.
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered
Financial Analyst, is-vice-president - pen-
sions, Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major

shareholder of Security & General Insur-

ance Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantichouse.com. bs

eo h pp byrne?












uSTSELL



The Holiday Ice Building —

i No: 2B, peck tar .
| eg a

re eport City Subdivision
West Settler's Way




Space Is Limited To Twenty-Five (25) Persons ONLY

Contact:

Handicraft Development & Marketing Department
Antoinette Rolle, Antoinette Bain or Pam Deveaux at BAIC

Telephone #242 - 322-3740

Fax #242-322-2123 or 242-328-6542



TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 5B



For the pe pee
tat: news, resto, Insight -
| on Mondays: a

Data Systems International Ltd

’ Immediate Opening

| For a development lead programmer for is flagship eae

product

INTERNATIONAL PRIVATE BANKING SYSTEMS |.

The successful candidate will have a minimum of} »”
ten years working experience using Microsoft) ,
software development technologies and will}
demonstrate significant experience with the following}. ;:

development tools and skills.

- Visual Basic /VBA/VB.NET
- C/C++/C#

- SQL Server

- Windows Architecture

- Web development

- ACOA SET el - COM/DCOM

NET Platform - ADO/ADO.NET - ASP. NeT| 7.

Qualified candidates — please forward current C.V.:

via e-mail to HYPERLINK "mailto: info@ipbs. com". we o3
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i line.

International Private Banking Systems (IPBS) is
a leading technology product for the wealth
management and private banking sector. IPBS

—is a fully integrated accounting and management
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international private banks, investment managers,
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For further information, please visit HYPERLINK
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SALE



~ 1 ACRE PLOT LICENSED TO.
NUFACTURE ICE AND WATER |

Located At :



and Bahama, Bahamas





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



Bey at- ee
MEd ea
newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!

NOTICE

HR AND OFFICE MANAGER

A leading mid-size professional firm is looking
- for someone to serve as both HR and Office
Manager. Applicants must have accredited HR
qualifications, a minimum of 5 years experience
in HR and possess a good working knowledge
of labour law.

Please send resumes via email to:

HRBahamas@hotmail.com

| Credit Suisse Wealth
nited

is presently considering applications for a



WES Ess

FROM page 1B

the reductions would especial-
ly benefit the Bahamian
tourism and financial services
industries.

However, it acknowledged
that BTC’s new international
and inter-island tariffs would
make use of illegal callback
and VoIP services only “mar-
ginally” less attractive for
Bahamian business and resi-
dential consumers, as the rates
were still relatively high i in a
global context.

The regulator said bench-
marking studies had shown
that BTC’s proposed new rates
were not anti-competitive, as
they were not substantially
below the efficient costs to pro-
vide the service.

Instead, the PUC. said:
“International long distance
rates in the Bahamas reflect
primarily market conditions
and BTC’s- unbalanced price
structure - the need to sub-

sidise local prices and fund uni-

versal Service..........

“The PUC’s benchmark

study revealed that BTC’s pro-
posed rates/prices were only
comparable to rates in juris-

‘ab ops | are ae ~~ HEAD OF SALES
(Private Banking)

dictions where markets are

characterised by monopolistic
conditions and the pricing
structure

“Furthermore, the proposed
rates/prices are still high by
international standards, and it

‘is unlikely that these rates are

below cost, and hence there is
no basis for raising concerns
about predatory pricing in
retail markets.”

Rates

The only jurisdictions found:

to have similar rates to BTC’s
were those still suffering from
monopolies in their telecoms
sectors - the British Virgin
Islands, Turks & Caicos Islands
and Antigua & Barbuda.
Even after BTC implements

' the rate reduction, its interna-

tional long distance rates will
still be 62.1 per cent to 100 per
cent higher than the costs of
making a call to the Bahamas
from its major trading partners
- the US, Canada and Switzer-
land."Compared to the UK,
BTC's rates will be between
15-28.8 per cent higher.

And compared to the cost
of calling the Bahamas from



Management

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. itis setting new standards that go

“eae beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investment counseling and professional portfolio management. Our total commitment is always

Qualifications:

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Ve: |: _to our clients and we focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

- Minimum 10 years weil rounded investment banking experience géared toward the marketing and



Advising clients on investment opportunities in the global markets
Resporisible for execution of client orders, monitor cash management and client portfolios

eh
ey Rae

f
e
&
&

Strong risk management and portfolio management skills

- Strong management and leadership skills

Well versed in Swiss banking practices and standards
PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel) and Bloomberg experience

Fluent Portuguese and English

Duties:
The candidate will be expected to:

sale of investment products and services in an aggressive trade oriented environment

Manage a highly sophis ticated and trade oriented team of relationship managers
In-depth knowledge of international Money Market/Forex Exchange Trading/Treasuties/Emerging
Markets/Derivatives/Securities Operations/Execution, etc.

Manage a substantial clientele base of sophisticated ultra high net worth individuals

Develop, recommend and ensure the implementation of the bank’s marketing and sales strategy
Travel extensively tc develop new client relationships
Monitor/evaluate the bank's position and oversee existing and prospective trading activities
Provide advice and guidance to dealers and traders engaged in treasury activities
Supervise Provide sales support to relationship managers

Personal walities:

- Excellent organizational and communication skills
- Highly motivated with a commitment to service excellence
“ Degree (or equivalent) in Business Administration, Finance or Economics

Benefits provided include:

zs Competitive salary, performance bonus plus health and life Insurance

Applications should be submitted by fax to: (242) 302-6398
Or by mail to: Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 2; 2006

‘MK |

is very unbal-.

other islands that have a rela-
tively high per capita income
level, BTC's proposed ILD
rates will still be 112.9 per cent
to 165.6 per cent higher when
approved.

The high income island
economies the PUC used as
benchmarks for its survey were
Bermuda, Barbados, the
British Virgin Islands, the Cay-
man Islands and Guernsey. All
are competitors in financial
services, and most are also
rivals in tourism.

Finally, benchmarked
against Caribbean competitors
in tourism and financial ser-
vices, BTC’s rates will be 20-
247 per cent higher.

BTC's proposed rate

reductions are:

* For outgoing calls to the
US, a reduction from $0.51 per
minute to $0.47 per minute, a
drop of $0.04 or 7.8 per cent.

* For calls to Canada, a drop
from $0.54 per minute to $0.50

per minute, a cut of 74 per

cent.

* For the Caribbean apart

from ‘Cuba, a reduction from .

$0.70 per minute to $0.66 per
minute, a fall of 5:7 per cent.

* For calls to Cuba, a‘cut
from $1.75 per minute to $0.85
per minute, a reduction of

_ $0.90 or 51.43 per cent.

* For all other countries, a

THE TRIBUNE



cut from $0.89 per minute. to
$0.85 per minute, a drop of 4:5
per cent.

However, in a partial ou
cession to IndiGo Networks,
the PUC said BTC was
‘required to begin discussions
on new interconnection rates
for long distance calls in return
for its new rates being
approved.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for ai, 4
good cause, campaigning »
for improvements in the
area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
and share your story. Ei



on

WINDING Bay
ABACR BAHAMAS

Has two (2) vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:

: -Responsibile for. onsite coordination of ‘sales, sales

administration and market.

-Achievement of targeted salés volume and maintaining

inventory.

-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and

implement self employed

-Implementation of tour efficiency and building g of strong

team values

-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others

-Strong leadership skills

-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimuin 5 years marketing in management of sales,
marketing and/ or administration
-College degree preffed, but not required.

OF SALE

NOTICE

The Town Court Management Company -:
(hereafter “the Company’’) invites offers for
the purchase of ALL THAT Unit Number C-
44 of The Town Court Condominiums situated.
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence being a one
bedroom/one bath apartment unit together with:
ALL THAT 1.26% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or
warranties with respect to the state of repair of
the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale |
contained in a Declaration of Condominium

of Town Court Condominiums dated 8th -
October 1979 which is recorded in Book 3189 i

at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the

purchase price at the time of
contract and the balance upon
completion within Thirty (30)

days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The }.
Company reserves the right to reject any and

all offers.

x
4}

«

Interested persons may submit written offers '

addressed to the Attorney R. Dorsett, P.O. Box : |
N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be received no},
later than the close of business on the 2nd day ; |

of June, A.D., 2006.





TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 7B





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CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS
1 ~ Step taken with heavy heart in
prison (5)
Is such grass nice to lie on? (5)

accommodation (5)

In which the spectators have no
seats? (5)

Do the same (5)

She helps hang out the
washing (3)
Story of the picture (4)

Many keen to make a name (5)
Could it make a hole in a towel
outright? (6)

Brilliant performer in space (4)
Crime of passing dud notes? (3)
We figure to tum up ata

Operatic character to see and
Copy (5) se

Full of intestinal fortitude (5)

A drink and a good thing to eat?
Thats the stuffl (7)

Father leaves the pageant to be

. arranged by a deputy (5)

# 8 B88 8 8 BBN SESS BES FE Bee

Exclude a law that’s wrong (4,3)
A growing source of second-class

Mother with one baby at least (7)

Grating the front of the car! (6)

Those bashed by the peelers? (5)

BBR 8 SR SEERE

DOWN
Boiling could tum one soft (6)
Being sarcastic gets one right
ahead, | see (6)

The odd bit of crumpet (3): -
Bearing in mind, maybe, the
overall requirement (5)

Sweet letter for us, tucked inside a
card (7)

Mr Cotton's forename? (4)
Scrub a can opener clean,
perhaps (6) fs
Said to be due to Calvin being
noble (5)

Warms to me and some.
Officers (5) ‘

Gir stuff (5)

Dog in orbit (5)

Such painting can be green (5)
Farmer, saint or soldier boy (5)
If.cited wrongly, shows
inadequacy (7)

Equestrianism in old Yorkshire (6)
Start scoffing steak, and steal
some fruit (6)

Moming employed in being
entertained (6)

Jam and cake, perhaps (5)
Write something personal (4)
Too much talk of a terror

weapon (3)

SEE a a TTT

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Out-pu-t 7, Clear off 8, Tripod 10, Areas 13, P-e-al 14, M-end 15,
W-ant 16, Sin. 17, Abet 19, 1O-TA 21, Di-rectory 23, To-re 24, Hind 26, Tot 27,
Thus 29, Emit 32, Co-O-p 33, Prior 34, Lament 35, Every-day 36, Port-a-L

DOWN: 1, S-Cram 2, He me-n 3, Eros 4, Of-ten 5, Tail 6, Utopia 9, Ration 11, Reg.
12, Adair 13, Patch up 15, We-E 16, Sty 18, Br-Eton 20, (in) Order 21, Dot 22,
T-Is. 23, To-bag-O 25, Rio 28, Hotel 30, Minds 31, Trays 32, Cent 33, Park

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Secure 7, Elephant 8, Aromas 10, Slope 13, Drew 14, Tuna 15, Feel

16, Sew

17, Stir 19, Arid 21, Statistic 23, Seen 24, Vied 26, Bet 27, Deep 29,

Edit 32, Herd 33, Crude 34, Resume 35, Complete 36, Sextet

DOWN: 1, Beast 2, Heron 3, Shoe 4, Stare 5, Crow 6, Reaped 9, Relate 11, Lug 12,
Paste 13, Derived 15, Fit 16, Sic 18, Tandem 20, Rider 21, Set 22, Sip 23,
Serene 25, Bid 28, Erect 30, Duped 31, Tenet 32, Hunt 33, Cope

Ld
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RSS & BS HERESS OF

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. this place (4)

jap
’ affectionately
3)

Pa game (7)
Started (5)

-Greek dish (5)

Viper (5)
Obtain (7)
Type of
wood (5)
Box (5)



COMICS PAGE

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Importance of Good Timing

East dealer.

Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
#K732
Â¥Q10942
07
&A 105
WEST EAST
#31085 @AD ©
V86 VAK53
8632 #QJ1094
842 $96
SOUTH
@Q64
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#KQI73
The bidding:
East South West North
1¢ 1NT Pass 39
Pass 3-NT

Opening lead — two of diamonds.

In many hands, declarer appears
to have only a remote chance to
make the contract. Nevertheless, he
is duty-bound to exploit whatever
chance he has. (

A simple illustration of this prin-
ciple is provided by today’s deal.
West led a diamond, taken by
declarer with the ace. South could
count seven sure tricks and, in an
effort to: gain two more, set about
establishing the heart suit.

“East took the jack with the: king



shown here?

In making a word, each letter may be
used once only. Each must contain the
centre letter and there must be at least
nine-letter word in the list. No plurals or
verb forms ending in s, no words with initial
capitals and no words with a hyphen or

apostrophe are permitted. The first word

a phrase is permitted (eg inkjet in

inkjet printer).

TODAY'S TARGET
Good 33;

very good 49;
excellert 65.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

Bea

HOW many words of four letters or —
more can you make from the letters.



and returned a diamond. South won
and led another heart. This play
brought declarer to 10 winners, but,
unfortunately, East cashed three dia-
monds and the ace of spades to
defeat the contract two tricks.

The outcome indicates the impor-
tance of timing. Declarer’s line of
play was bound to fail, since there
was no way he could come to nine
tricks before the opponents scored at
least six of their own if he tried to

“develop dummy’s hearts.

South has. but one chance to
make the contract: He must try to
score two spade tricks before the
opponents’ diamonds become estab-
lished. The bidding’ indicates that
East has the ace of spades. Declarer’s
only real hope is that East was dealt

the singleton or doubleton ace, and .

he should proceed accordingly.

At trick two, South should cross
to dummy with a club and lead a low
spade. East has no choice but to play
low, and South wins with the queen.
Declarer then returns a spade, and
after West follows low, so does
dummy. When East produces the ace,
South has nine tricks.

It may be argued that South has to
be lucky to make the contract on this
line of play, but when no other realis-
tic option exists, luck is about My one

- can hope:-for.

BIMONTHLY bint blot bolt both bothy hilt hint holt hotly into ‘lint litho loth
milt mint minty molt month monthly moth myth omit thin thinly thymol tiny

toby toil tomb

oe un (4)
Curve-(3)

A device.that
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Brel ka gy aoe
Brats a til



Krisztin Szabo v Lajos Portisch,
Hungarian championship
2006. A sad position, this.
Forty years ago Portisch was
Hungary's undisputed chess
king, a world-title candidate
and a grandmaster admired for
his deep strategic concepts. 3
Now aged 69, he went a
bridge too far when he entered _
the 2006 national contest
against a much younger
generation. Following a series
of defeats, today’s game
represented his last realistic
opportunity to avoid the
dreaded bottom place. By
coincidence his opponent had
the same surname as Laszlo
Szabo, another great player
whom Portisch had deposed
after a bitter struggle. Sadly
for the old maestro, the

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

TUESDAY,
MAY 30.

ARIES — March 21/April 20
Remember that you are free to make
your own decisions in life, Aries.
Don’t let others tell you what to do
this week.

TAURUS - April 21/May 1
Usually, you prefer to play it safe,
but this week you may be tempted
to gamble on something. Be. careful,
this is not a good time to take risks
with what you own and earn:

GEMINI — May 22/June 21
You’ll feel a burst of energy this
week, Gemini. The good times have
returned for you. Live it up —
you’ve worked hard in recent weeks,
and deserve the chance to celebrate.
Getaway for the weekend if you can.

CANCER -— June 22/July 22
You want to succeed in the world at
large, Cancer, and at long last, the
chance to prove yourself has
arrived. Make the most of it — stop
dreaming and start doing.

LEO - July 23/August 23

Power struggles of one sort or
another may highlight your week,
Leo, but things will get better by the
weekend. In the meantime, try to

‘pwork' with people; not against them.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

You won’t be able to please every-
one this week, Virgo, so you’re
going to have to make a choice.
Then, you have to stick to your guns.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Optimism is a great thing; and you
certainly have a lot of it this week,
Libra. However, be careful not to let
this translate into risky behavior.
Even you are not invincible.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Something that has worried you for
some time will no longer matter this
week. The problem itself may not
change, but your attitude toward it
will. This, as you will see, makes all
the difference.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Are you someone who brings peo-
ple together or ‘pushes them apart?
If you’re lucky, it’s the former, but

# if not, now is the time to make a

positive change.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll accomplish more if you
don’t try to fit everything into a
:.gid timetable this week. A little
chaos may be a good thing and
inspire you to be more creative.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18
The trials and: tribulations of recent
weeks have passed. There has never
been a better time to begin your life
anew. Think only of the future.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20

Someone out there may make life
tough for you this week, but you’ll
give as good as you get. By
Thursday, things will settle down,
and you can get back to your old self.

&





diagram shows his h8 king eyed
for the kill by White's queen, rooks
and bishops. How did White (to

play) win quickly?

LEONARD BARDEN

SI Ea EE NE ET PS LF PN TE

__*SUIM pue g6Xq 2 +79%0 F968
+164 € B6y +9Na Z 6x9 {xd T6778 VORNIOS ssett)



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



uincy Pratt aims for comebac
fight against Meacher Major

BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

CALLING him a “paper
champion who hasn’t been test-
ed on the local front”, Quincy

’ *Thrill-A-Minute’ Pratt said he
has a personal interest in fight-
ing Bahamas and FEDECaribe
lightweight champion Meacher
‘Pain’ Major.

Forced to retire three years
ago after the Bahamas Boxing
Commission stripped him of
his licence because of an eye
injury, Pratt said he wants to
come back just to fight Major
before the year is over.

“I was highly upset with the
way the fight went down,” said
Pratt of Major’s recent achieve-
ment at the First Class Promo-
tions’ show at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort Ballroom when
he stopped Mexican Luis
‘Lichi’ Couch in the first round.

“I talked with a lot of fans
in the past week and they were
highly upset about what hap-
pened and that encouraged me
to come back and fight Meach-
er.”

Pratt, now devoting his time
to coaching his Eastside Ama-
teur Boxing Club, said he’s
hoping that the new board of
the commission will renew his
licence so that he can take on
Major.

“Meacher, to me, has not
proven himself, especially at
home. Holbert Storr is the
number one contender for his
title and that fight never mat-
eralised.

“But I want him to ‘exw
that since I was the last one to
fight for the title before he won
it, I hope that I will be given
the opportunity to fight him.”



Nadal starts his French

Open defe

Before he retired, Pratt had
three memorable fights with
Ray Minus Jr. for the ban-
tamweight and lightweight
titles, losing all three encoun-
ters.

Minus Jr., who also has
retired, has nurtured and
groomed Major to where he is
today.

At age 36, Pratt said once ,

the commission gives him per-
mission, he will take a tune-up
fight and then take on Major
for his Bahamas lightweight
title.

“[’m‘not interested in the
FEDECaribe title because it
means nothing to me. To me,
it’s just a paper title,” Pratt
charged. “It’s short cut boxing
because the only titles that
matter are the British Com-
monwealth and the WBA,

WBC, IFA and IFF titles. You-

have to earn them.

“T hear them saying that
Meacher is going to fight for
the British Commonwealthti-
tle, but he has to get ranked
first. He can’t just walk into
the British Commonwealth
fight because it’s totally differ-
ent from the Caribbean title
fights.”

Despite his age, Pratt said
he’s as active as “he was when
he was training for the show-
downs against Minus Jr. — run-
ning at least four times a week
and sparring in the gym while
he trains his young protégés.

“The people want to see this
fight because Meacher Major is
one of the better fighters in the
country,” Pratt noted. “I’m

‘sure that if me and him fight,

we will have to have that fight
in the Sports Centre because
the people know what I can do.
It will be a fight.”









SPORTS





@ HOPING FOR COMEBACK: Quincy Pratt

nce with record



nted Material
ed Content

Copyri

\ Syndicate
Available from Commercial News Providers

TRIBUNE SPORTS ,

_ Baseball
- Federation
| prepares for

_ ‘Big Show

a BASEBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

IT WILL be a busy
weekend for the
Bahamas Baseball Feder-
ation as it hosts the.
fourth annual.National
Junior Baseball Champi-
onships.

The four day champi-
onships will get under-
way on Thursday and run
through Sunday with
games being played at
the Freedom Farm in
Yamacraw and the
Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.

Federation secretary
general Teddy Sweeting
said they are looking for-
ward to this year’s cham-
pionship being the most
competitive with more
than 30 teams registered
from seven different
islands.

“We’re calling it ‘the
Big Show,’” said Sweet-
ing. “It’s truly an indica-
tion of where baseball is
headed in the country.

Registered

“When we first started
out and getting it organ-
ised, we had just 12
teams participating in
our initial tournament.
This year, we have close
to 34 teams registered to
compete for the national
championship i in five
divisions.”

With so many games to ~

be played, Sweeting said
they are gearing up fora

,

very long weekend, but it |
will be a significant occa-

sion for the sport in the
country.

“We’re seeing the
resurgence of baseball
coming back to the

prominence it once had,” vo
Sweeting insisted. “When :*

you have seven of your
Family Islands coming
together to compete in a
junior sport, I think that
is significant for team
sports.”

Teams from Inagua,
Eleuthera, Abaco, Exu-
ma, Grand. Bahama and

‘Bimini are expected to

converge in New Provi-

dence this weekend for

the championships.
From the champi-

‘onships, the federation

will be selecting players
to represent the national
team that will compete in
the 9-10 Pony World
Series and the 12-and-
under team for the Little
League World Series in
Puerto Rico in July 6-12
and 26-30 respectively.

Direction

“We feel we’re heading
in the right direction and
from this tournament, we
will look at all of our
people, especially those
who are coming home
from college,” said
Sweeting, of the junior

team that will travel to
Orlando in August.

’

The championship will .

kick off at 5.30pm on
Thursday when the play-
ers and officials will

march from Chapter One |

Book Store at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas to

the Andre Rodgers Base-,

ball Stadium.

A rematch of last
year’s finals in two of the
five divisions will follow.
In the Coaches’ Pitcher,
champions Freedom
Farm will take on the
Junior Baseball League
of Nassau, followed by
champions Spanish Wells
Divers against Freedom

Farm in the 12-and-under

division.
On Friday at 8am, the
championship will



ta wae

resume with a full slate «

of games being played at
Freedom Farm. The

championship games will’:

be played on Sunday and ,

the teams will return
home on Monday.

%,

SOI



TRIBUNE SPORTS . A TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 9B



SPORTS co ) : ae
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CLUE #7:

One of the objects
involved in 100 Jamz's
Secret Sound is wooden
but not necessarily
always. :











TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398 |






Available f
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seeceseceee

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Copyrighted Material
> Syndicated Content
rom Commercial News Provider



19

-.-.«

CO me =e mm

SPORTS

- MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Cleare clocks
. stadium ' ecord |

at NAIA event

. @ TRACK AND FIELD ;
' By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter

AARON Cleare headed
’ into the National Association
- of Intercollegiate Athletics

- (NAIA) Outdoor Track and,

‘ Field Championships with the
' third fastest time in the men’s
400 metres, then, when the
_ clock was stopped, the
: Olympian walked off with a
new stadium record.

Cleare of Dickinson State,
clocked 47.15 seconds to take
top honours and set a new
stadium record at the meet
which was held at Fresno
Pacific University, in Fresno,
California. The two-year old
record of 47.87 seconds was
held by Tony Ramirez.

Also lining up in the finals
of the 400m was Ramon
Miller. In the semi-final
rounds Miller clocked 47.46
seconds for second in his
heat, but didn’t finish in the
finals.

Adrian Griffith wheeled in
two medals, a silver and
bronze to assist Dickinson
State with their third consec-
utive conference title.

The silver medal for -Grif-
fith came in the 200m while
the bronze medal was secured
in the 100m.

Winning the 200m was

Michael Rodger in 21.23 sec- |

onds and Rascive Grant was
third in 21.46 seconds. In the
* 100m Griffith recorded 10.29
seconds, finishing in second
was Rodger in 10.21 seconds
while the first spot went to
Yhann Plummer in 10.20 sec-
onds.
It was a Bahamian affair in

Bahamians compete —
in Fresno, California



the long jump event at the
nationals. The three top spots

-in the event went to Bahami-

ans — leading the. charge was
Trevor Barry.

Barry soared to 7.82m (25-
08.00) for the win over Grif-
fith who leapt to 7.74m (25-
04.75) and Rudon Bastian’s
7.69m (25-02.75).

From the long jump pit
Barry moved to the high
jump bed where he had to
settle for second. Barry was
among six athletes to set a
new stadium record, a new
national record was also set
in the event by top performer
Mike Mason.

Mason cleared 2.22m (7-
03.25) for the win, the old
national record was record-
ed at 2.21m and stood for 10
years. Second spot in the
event went to Barry who
cleared 2.19m (7-02.25) and
the third spot to Jerome Fos-
ter of Missouri Baptist in
2.13m (6-11.75).

Getting things started for
the females were Tamara
Rigby, Petra Munroe and
Lanece Clarke, all competi-
tors in the 100m.

Out the trio, Rigby would
walk away with the medal
leaving Munroe and Clarke
out of the haul.

Rigby clocked 11.77 sec-
onds for second place behind

|

4

Nickesha Anderson who ran
to 11.41 seconds for the top
spot and Equilla Weatherton
recorded 11.78 seconds for
third. Munroe would finish
just short of the medal with a
timing of 11.82 seconds for
fourth place. Clarke woul |
line-up for the start, but had
to walk away empty handed
after false starting.

Rigby would move onto the
finals of the 200m to capture
a bronze medal with a timing
of 24.55 seconds, while
Clarke would have to settle

for a seventh place ranking

with 24.95 seconds. Winning
the event was Anderson with
23.86 seconds and Stephanie
Allers was second with 24.36
seconds.

Winning the women’s title
was Missouri Baptist. Partic-
ipating for the school at the
national championships was
Clarke.

At the NCAA Regional
East championships, Douglas
Lynes-Bell finished up sixth
in the men’s 400m hurdles
with a best time of 50.93 sec-
onds. His qualifying time was
clocked at 50.62 seconds.
Winning the event was Bryan
Steele in 49.65 seconds, Jason
Richardson was second with
49.90 seconds and Justin Gay-
mon was third in 50.20 sec-
onds.



‘Injury hampers

Chandra Sturrup

‘TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT WASN'T the type of season
opener that sprinter Chandra
Sturrup expected. In fact, anoth-
er nagging injury almost pre-
vented her from competing.

But, having sat out the entire
indoor season, Sturrup didn’t
want to pass up the opportunity
to compete in one of the biggest
outdoor meets in the United
States.

Competing at the Prefontaine
Classic in Eugene, Oregon on
Sunday, Sturrup clocked a sub-
par 11.58 seconds for eighth place
in the women’s 100 metres.

The event was won by Ameri-
can Torri Edwards in 11.08 with
Jamaican Sherone Simpson sec-
ond in 11.12 and American
Rachel Boone-Smith third in
11.21.

“T shouldn’t have ran yester-
day, but I was feeling a lot better,
so I just decided to go out and
give it an effort,” said Sturrup,
who suffered spasms in her ver-
tebrate and her left shoulder and
neck.

“T’m in shape, but because of.

the problem, I really should not
have competed.”

Also at the meet was quarter-
miler Christine Amertil. She ran
51.86 for fifth place just behind
American Dee Dee Trotter, who

Star struggles at
-Prefontaine Classic



was clocked in the same time.

American Sanya Richards won
the race in 50.89 with Jamaican
Shericka Williams second in 51.29
and Mexican Ana Guevara third
in 51.62.

Sturrup, the oldest of the
famed Bahamian Golden Girls’
sprinting crop still competing, suf-

fered the injury last Wednesday.
when she was wrapping up her.
training for the weekend season

opener.
“But when I was up there in
Eugene, it kind of calmed down,”
said Sturrup, who just wanted to
get back on the track after miss-
ing the majority of last year.
This weekend, Sturrup is

’ scheduled to travel to Oslo, Nor-

way to compete in the Bislett
Games on Friday and then she
will travel to Norwich. Union
British Grand Prix in Gateshead,
Great Britain on Friday, June 11.

“I’m hoping that by Oslo, it
would calm down even more,”
Sturrup stressed. “If it does, then
I know I will be able to compete
the way I should.

“Before this happened, Iwas
feeling real good and my training
was coming on real well. I was
looking forward to opening up
with at least 11.0’s or 11.1.”

Depending on how she does.
in those two meets, Sturrup: will.
make a determination on how;
the remainder of the outdoor sea-_
son will go for her. eee

The good thing is that this is an
off-year with not any major inter-
national meet to compete in,
except for the Central American .
and Caribbean Games in Carta-
gena, Colombia at the end of

_ July.

“J just want to stay healthy and
run some races and do well,”
Sturrup projected. “My main
focus is to do well and stay
healthy because I’ve been injured ©
all year, keeping me out of
indoors for at least 3-4 months.

“But things happen and ’m
just trying to move on. I’m just
going to take it race by race and
see how my body feels.

“That’s my main concern right
now.”




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Full Text


“mim Lhe Tribune

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

i'm lovin’ it. |

HIGH
LOW



W SPOTS



‘e- SUN, FSTORM







|
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——— —t

Volume: 102 No.157



<3
ahs Se ST Toy

aamasai breaktiou

Hs

Airline employees
closer to new
industrial agreement

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter. —

AFTER weeks of high ten-
sions and public protest,
Bahamasair employees and gov-
ernment negotiators yesterday
achieved a breakthrough in
reaching a new industrial agree-
ment.

Nerelene Harding, president
of the Airport, Airline, and
Allied Workers , Union
(AAWU) —'who represent
Bahamasair employees told The
Tribune that management yes-
terday proposed a new contract
which is more to the union’s lik-’
ing,

“They gave us a new propos-
al which gives us pay increments
based on performance. It pro-
poses those increments for the
next three years, and two years

retroactive,” she said.

Earlier drafts of the contract
had proposed a five-year con-
tract in which employees would
receive a lump sum of $500 per
year and the ability to earn pay

increments in the last three —

years, contingent on their job
performance.

Ms Harding said that after
more than nine months of nego-
tiations, this development is
considered a “significant step
forward” to reaching an indus-
trial-agreement which has been
outstanding for almost two
years.

“Our big problem was that
they were not willing to give us
the increments retroactively for
the past two years. That was not
fair. We’ve had people who

SEE page nine

‘Hotel union
chaos continues

CHAOS continued today as members of the “I For Justice”
team continued their efforts to have new hotel union elections.

According to a report on ZNS news last night, the group
had decided not to participate in an official recount, but after
some five hours decided to comply.

“We are going through with the count under protest,” said one

protester.

“J think we should have a re-election. We should have what-
ever the people want. If they want a re-election, I think there
should be a re-election,” another said..

The union’s leadership election was left i in a shambles after
three ballot boxes allegedly “went missing” over the weekend.

No official results were released up to press time last night.
























UESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

Residents freeones by ROS)

AFTER two months, the Water and Sewerage Corporation has still to complete road
works in a residential area in St Albans Drive. Residents have been forced to go far out of their
way on a daily basis in order to exit the area.

Detention Centre escapees

‘may have left Bahamas’

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IMMIGRATION officials admitted that the
two Cuban women who escaped in the early
morning hours of May 26 from the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre may have already left
the Bahamas.

Minister of Immigration Shane Gibson ‘said
that based on former escapes the two women,
Anet Savia Gainza and Karina Reyes Labra,

SEE page nine

Protects While
Available ina variety

Street; Central Animal Hospital, Tenwich Street
SKC] Ken

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



Government fails to meet
its promise on vehicle

emission standards testing

a By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT has failed on its promise to
begin implementing vehicle emission standards
testing by early 2006, The Tribune learned yes-
terday.

Despite stating in December 2004 that equip-
ment for testing emissions should arrive by mid-

: 2005, and then saying in December of last year

SEE page nine

It Nourishes

Ross Corner: Animal Clinic, Wulf? Read,

Distributed by Bahamas Wholesale Agencies, 394-1759



a Frescata Picnic.



BUT denies
reports of
contractual






@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter:



THE Bahamas Union of
Teachers yesterday denied
reports that the union has
signed a contractual agreement
with government negotiators.

BUT President Ida Poitier:
Turnquest said that everything
with their negotiations is going
“fine”, but nothing has been
signed as yet.

The union, which is expect-
ed to meet with negotiators
today, will hold a general meet-
ing tonight.

For months now the two sides
have been locked in a bitter bat-
tle as union leaders seek to
improve working conditions and
increase salaries for their 3 200

SEE page nine

Ingraham: ‘legal’

residents have just
cause to sue state
over ‘violations’

lm By MARK HUMES

OPPOSITION Leader
Hubert Ingraham reiterated his
position that “legal” Haitian
residents in the Bahamas have
just cause to sue the state over
violations in its human rights
practices.

Yesterday, the issue of Mr
Ingraham’s comments again
came to the forefront when,
during a press conference with
Iowa‘Senator Tom Harkin (D)
and officials from the Ameri-
can Embassy, a.reporter
inquired about the public
“debate” in which he and Immi-
gration Minister Shane Gibson
seem to be embroiled.

Not wanting his comments to
be misconstrued, Mr Ingraham
emphatically stated: “People
who are legal residents of the
Bahamas — they have been giv-
en legal papers by the Govern-
ment to be permanent residence
here, they have committed-no
offence whatsoever — if the
were picked up (illegally) ina
raid which the government ¢on-

SEE page nine

2

>

3
”

»



/ of flavours.at: Pet Heaven, Shirley

s Dragon elt
ae

espécially our rich marine

PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



Ae
an
â„¢

A FEW weeks
ago it was

reported that certain per-
sons who had been given
perinits ‘to do research in
Bahamian waters were
removing marine species
.o Lestack aquariums in
the United States.

In another news story in
The Nassau Guardian last
week it was alleged that
the Bahamas was selling
itself cheap while foreign
scientists and institutions
were benefiting from
important research using
the country’ s natural
resources.

If these reports and oth-
er evidence of environ-
mental abuse and unau-
thorised exploitation are
true, Bahamians have
good reason to ask: Who
is guarding our heritage,

resources, our fish and
conch and lobster, and our
coral reefs?

If persons and institu-
tions licensed to do
research in Bahamian
waters ‘are removing our
resources without permis-
sion and for commercial
gain, then there is some-
thing wrong with the
process. of deciding who is
allowed-to do this kind of
research. ; and under what

conditi jos.
Pebple: who visit the Bahamas

on ‘yathits every year. are’

allawed to take reasonable
quahiitiés of fish and lobster for
theseeonel use, but there are
cred efeports that this privi-
legé a$sbeing abused and that
some @ bf:them leave our waters
wellSstOcked with fish, conch
and: Jobster to be disposed of
conn ially.

ig not so easy to control,
but: certainly the Government
of the. Bahamas should not with
its dyes wide open give permis-
sion.to foreigners to remove
mariné: resources from our
waters. ag Boalt
The cpepioiiation of these



resources should be the exclu-

sive right of Bahamians, and if

any institutions want stocks for
aquariums or other commercial
purposes then authorised
Bahamians should be the ones
to supply them.

ast week’s news story
by Guardian reporter
LaShonne Outten quotes Peter

Douglas of the Andros Nation- —

al Conservancy and Trust who
claims that American scientists

are exploring newly-discovered

reefs which may have the poten-

tial.to.treat diseases such as can;

cer and Alzheimer’s: = *



/

LOCAL NEWS

7ith threats all around us, who’s

“Our natural resource
information and value
are being pirated out of
our country by foreign
institutions. A lot of the
information that is
derived from the
research on these organ-
isms never stays in the
Bahamas. We never

never shared with the
public. It is never valued
and we are never com-
pensated for it. We sell
ourselves cheap.

“Research on marine
organisms for medicinal
purposes has been going
on in the Bahamas for a
very long time. One of
the things...we were
advocating...is for the
Bahamian Government,
through the United
Nations, to put a value
on our marine resources
that are used by private
research organisations to
gather huge profits
through pharmaceutical
usage.”

Mr Douglas makes an
extremely important
point that other devel-
oping countries around

ing - and trying to do
something about. But it
is doubtful that Prime
Minister Perry Christie
and his PLP Govern-
ment will pay any atten-
tion.

They are too busy plotting
with energy corporations to
launch an additional assault on
our already endangered marine
environment by establishing
LNG plants in the Bahamas and
digging up the ocean bed to lay
pipes to Florida.

Developing countries are no
longer being seduced by the
siren song of globalisation and
trade liberalisation while the
developed world - especially the
United States and Europe -
strive to make the world a safer
place for their big corporations
to make huge profits.

The scandalous excesses and

have access to it. It is -

the world are also mak- ©

greed of the oil and energy
industry are well-known.
Obscene profits are raked in



Developing
countries are
no longer
being
seduced by
the siren
song of
globalisation
and trade

liberalisation



from the natural resources of
other countries while some of
the ‘people living on top of
these resources remain in
abject poverty - and they do it
without so much as an embar-
rassed blush.

4 A few weeks ago one
of the captains of

this industry decided to retire.
While his own fellow citizens
were groaning under the bur-



We have to
be careful
how we allow
outsiders to
come in to
research and
exploit
resources |
that belong to

the Bahamian’

people

(



den of record high gasoline
prices, this tycoon walked
away with a retirement pack-
age of $400 million!

The captains of the phar-
maceutical industry are also
doing their part. In the trade
councils of the world and in
negotiated trade deals, their
objective is to keep profits as
high as possible for as long as
possible, sometimes at the
expense of the world’s disease-
ridden poor.

At the same time, these cor-
porations act as if the earth is
theirs and the fullness thereof.
They are busy trying to extract

| the rich healing resources of

the world right from under the

noses of the people who own

them:

But the natives are striking
back. In South America,
Africa and Asia, national gov-
ernments are fighting to pro-
tect resources and local knowl-
edge of cures going back thou-
sands of years. The corpora-
tions want to patent them for
their own exclusive profit and

prevent the natives from using:

them!

Fortunately for small coun-
tries like the Bahamas, some
big players in the developing
world are leading the fight,

- guarding our natural heritage?

and we should vigorously sup-
port them and seek their help.

At the World Trade Organ-
isation talks in Hong Kong last
year, India, China and Brazil
were among the nations mov-
ing to protect the developing
world from the expropriation
of native plants, animals and
traditional remedies. They
have coined a new word for
this: biopiracy.

The Wall Street Journal,
which is not too tickled over
this development and sees
almost insurmountable prob-
iems with it, nevertheless
reported in December, 2005,
what was happening in Hong
Kong.

These countries, said The
Journal, want WTO members
to recognise the need for a sys-
tem that would control how
corporations, scientists and
other interests in the devel-
oped world can use a nation’s
native plants, animals and cen-

turies-old knowledge to make .

pharmaceuticals and other
products.

“The developing nations are
particularly concerned that a
future blockbuster drug might
be based on a plant or animal
species originating in their jun-
gles, without giving them any
financial benefit. ...

“Indian officials point to
attempts over the past decade
by scientists in the US and
Europe to patent the medici-
nal qualities of the spice
tumeric and neem, a tropical
evergreen found in Asia.

“The patents were over-

- turned by US and European

authorities after India helped
establish that the plants’ med-
icinal properties were already
widely known in that country.”

W hat The Journal
did not say but

was reported by other sources,
was that this 1999 legal battle
was quite costly to the Gov-
ernment of India.

Just imagine that! Trying to
patent tumeric, which the

Indians probably knew about

and were using for thousands
of years!

The lesson for us is clear.
We have to be careful how we
allow outsiders to come in to
research and exploit resources)
that belong to the Bahamian
people without any benefit to
the Bahamian people, as Mr
Douglas warns.

We know that the waters
around these islands are the
source of great wealth in the
form of fish, conch and lob-
ster but we do not know what
other valuable resources, such
as cures for diseases, might
also be there.

We have also to protect our

other resources and local
knowledge such as herbal.
remedies, what we call bush
medicine. Just suppose that
what we believe about the
healing power of cerasee is
true. And five fingers, and
strongback, and love vine!
_ In today’s world we cannot
take for granted that these
things are ours because there
are people out there who
would gladly “discover” them
and then apply for patents in
their own country. If Mr Dou-
glas is correct, we have already
let some of them in to begin
the process of biopiracy in the
Bahamas.

www. bahamapundit@type-
pad.com

sirarthurfoulkes@hot-
mail.com





THE TRIBUNE

denies >
$23k fraud -
charge

A 37-year-old woman
appeared in court in connection
with a $23,000 fraud allegation.

y

Charmaine Hanna was :%

arraigned before Magistrate

Marilyn Meers on.a.charge of ‘:
conspiracy to commit fraud as -
well as a charge of committing '
fraud by means of false pre- *:

tenses.
It was alleged that the con-

oF
2

spiracy offence took place *"

between Thursday, December
8, 2005 and Friday, April 7,
2006.

She was charged with obtain-

ing $23,040 in cash by means of °'’

false pretenses from First

Caribbean Bank on John F oy

Kennedy Drive during that *
time.

Hanna pleaded not guilty. to
the charges and was Da Res
bail in the sum of $20,000 with
two sureties.

The matter was adjourned to
August 30.

Whaling
stance in

Dominica
challenged —

DOMINICA

Roseau

DOMINICA’S image as an

iy

s

ecotourism destination is under- ~: '

mined. by the Caribbean island’s
support of whaling, a tourism
official said Monday — just
weeks before a critical interna-

tional vote on the issue, accord-. '*

ing to Associated Press.

Sam Raphael, vice president * mu

of the Dominica Hotel and |
Tourism Association, said the
organization sent a letter to the

government urging it to vote ’

‘

against Japan’s request for addi- -~
tional whaling at the Interna- »'

tional’ Whaling Commission
meeting next month in St. Kitts.

Dominica’s past support for
Japan on the issue sends an
“inconsistent” message for a
nation that has called itself the

“Nature Island,” and sought to .-!,

te
t

i.
3

4
r

4

lure tourists with whale-watch- ° +

ing, Raphael said.
“We cannot call ourselves the
Nature Island.of the Caribbean

“4

and support the killing of |“

whales,” he told The Associated
Press.

The government had not
responded to the letter but
Dominica supports the “sus-
tainable use of natural
resources,” said Lloyd Pascal,
Dominica’s delegate to the
whaling commission.

More |

Cubans
make it to
Puerto Rico

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

A DOZEN Cuban migrants,

including a 12-year-old girl, ;,:

landed early Monday ona
remote Puerto Rican nature
preserve that has become an |
increasingly frequent destina- °

347

Re

a

wy

av

}

yok

tion for people from Cuba who © .:

are trying to reach U.S. territo-

ry, according to Associated

Press. a
The others in the group,

which also included three |.

women and eight men, were all
in good health after rangers

found them on Mona Island and ° .°

turned them over to U.S. immi-
gration authorities, police said.
Cubans who reach USS. soil
are generally allowed to remain
in the country while those
stopped at sea are returned
home. On Saturday, authorities
on Mona Island found another
group of Cubans, including a 2-
year-old boy, who were left by a
boat that then returned to the
Dominican Republic.

ORL MN 31/14
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Aya COTIRO|

at TM a MTEL TS
322-2197


THE TRIBUNE







In brief

Migrants
detained

in New
Providence

A GROUP of 18 suspected
illegal immigrants were
detained yesterday on the
streets of New Providence as
part of Operation Quiet Storm
—a joint initiative by police and
the Department of Immigra-
tion.

Among those detained were
10 Haitian men, three Haitian
women, two Jamaican men, two
Dominican men and one Peru-
vian woman.

The group was turned over
to the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre for processing.

FNM rally
to be
streamed
on internet

THE Free National Move-
ment’s rally tonight at 7pm will
be streamed live on the internet.

According to.supporters, the
use of the World Wide Web to
bring a political rally to sup-
porters is a benchmark decision
by the FNM, offering the
chance to get involved to not
only those who can not make it
locally, but students and trav-
ellers who come home to vote.

Today’s rally at RM Bailey
Park, is expected to draw a
large number of supporters.

However, rumours that
prospective candidates would
be announced during today’s
rally have been sketchy.
According to one FNM, the
electoral body has not formally
met to decide on candidates,
and is not expected to meet
before the start of the rally.

The decision to make these
individuals public is ultimately
up to party leader, Hubert
Ingraham, he said.

The official website for the
Live Internet Broadcast is
http://freenationalmovement.org.

Puerto Rico
governor
signs
reform bill

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

GOVERNOR Anibal
Acevedo Vila on Sunday said
a new fiscal reform law contains
vague language because he
wants to accelerate a tax agree-
ment in this US Caribbean ter-
ritory, according to Associated
Press.

Acevedo signed into law on
Thursday a fiscal reform bill
that he said included “confusing
’ language” but that had ele-
ments that would ensure that
Puerto Rico was put on the path
to budgetary discipline, he told
Univision television. The US
Caribbean territory ended a
damaging two-week partial gov-
ernment shutdown on May 13.

The governor said imprecise
wording of the new law requires
the executive branch of the
island’s government to cut
US$350 million during the next
fiscal year, which begins July 1,
without layoffs or salary cuts.
Acevedo emphasized he had
flexibility in how to implement
the law. .

The budget. crisis was
resolved with a US$741 million
bailout loan, as the legislature
approved a fund to help pay
down the island’s debt, using 1
percent of a first-ever sales tax.

However, the tax rate is still
being debated by the Puerto
Rico’s political leaders.





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Donation

presented

to Cancer
Society

@ PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Cancer Society
Terrance Fountain
accepts a cheque for
$75,000 from the Cancer
Society Ball’s chairman
Ear] Bethell on Saturday
night at the Radisson
Cable Beach Resort
during their annual ball

Ferguson)

Officials unable to

H By ONAN BRIDGEWATER

GOVERNMENT officials
were unable to explain the
cause of the blackout that
affected the western half of
New Providence on Sunday
night.

It was the latest in a series
of blackouts that have hit sev-
eral parts of the island over
the last week.

Several members of the
public contacted The Tribune
to express their outrage over
the extensive power cut. One
commented that if BEC finds
it impossible to keep the lights
on, they should begin. giving
discounts for hours lost.

Attempts to contact BEC
officials proved fruitless, as
no-one answered repeated
phone calls to the corporation.

Minister of Energy and
Environment Dr Marcus
Bethel, who has responsibility
for BEC, said he was unable
give a “technical” explanation,
as he had not yet been pro-
vided a report on the matter.

Dr Béthel stated: “I cannot
give a technical answer
because I have not yet received

a technical report on the mat-
ter. Problems such as this need
to be assessed carefully before
a report can be made.”

BEC officials have stated in
the past that steps were to: be
taken to upgrade their systems

to stop regular blackouts. The .

corporation also mentioned
implementing a form of
breaker-box system to reduce
mass blackouts. Exact dates
for the new upgrades were
never released by BEC.

A resident of Star Estates
complained that the constant
blackouts are affecting his
career.

“The unannounced power
cuts have prevented me from
scheduling my work,” he said,
explaining that he works from
home.

The caller also said he is
concerned about the damage
power surges can do to his
computer, fax machine or
copier.

Another member of the
public said: “It is notoriously
difficult to get any recom-
pense from BEC after they
have destroyed your appli-
ances. We should not have to

BIC refuse to
respond to
IndiGo charge

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company has
refused to comment on alle-
gations that it may be
“potentially putting profits
before lives.”

Margo Gibson, public
relations officer for BTC,
told The Tribune that the
head ‘officials at BTC were
unable to respond to claims
that the company was “refus-
ing to route calls originating
on a competitor’s network
to emergency services.”

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny
President of IndiGo, BTC’s
competitor, said that he was
mainly concerned about the
general public. In a letter

' drafted to the Public Utili-

ties Commission (PUC), he
said: “It is only a matter of
time before a member of
the general public suffers
serious harm as a result of
BTC’s failure to accommo-
date emergency service calls
originating on IndiGo’s net-
work.”
. Allegations like these are
apparently nothing new.
Barrett Russell, executive
director of the PUC, told
The Tribune that “the issue
of routing emergency calls
was one of several wrapped
up in concerns BTC has
about interconnecting with
IndiGo’s network.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny










+ YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)








reported to The Tribune yes-
terday that BTC has failed to
accommodate the routing of
emergency service calls origi-
nating on IndiGo’s network.

He warned that this is a
breach of public safety and if
the situation is not rectified
someone will suffer the reper-
cussions.

Minister of Works and Utili-
ties, Bradley Roberts was
unavailable for comment up to
press time.




. explain blackout

live in fear of losing our invest-
ment every time the power goes
out.”

A complaint was also made
by a Fire Trail Road resident
who claimed that his power had
been out for at least four hours
on several occasions in the last
week.

Bahamians have come to
expect power cuts when sum-
mer arrives, as electricity usage
is increased by use of fans and
air-conditioners.

This year, the cuts reportedly
began in the eastern end of the
island, which experienced suc-
cessive blackouts on Thursday

night.

NEW MARKDOWNS

(Photo: Franklyn G .










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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MAY SU, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

Mr Mitchell’s decision termed ‘illogical’

WE ARE STILL on the subject of For-
eign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell’s expla-
nation to the House of Assembly on May 17

in which he justified the Bahamas’ vote for .

Cuba to sit on the newly formed 47-member
UN Human Rights Council. We are trying to
find justification for the decision, because
we find the reasoning behind the decision
both illogical and, in some instances, mis-
leading.

For example, Mr Mitchell emphasises the
fact that the Bahamas sits as near as “15 miles
away from our western border.” He pointed
out that the Bahamas was in discussions with
Cuba on “delimiting our maritime bound-
aries with them,” and the two countries have
signed a migration treaty. Then he says:

~£We have been provided significant assis-
‘tance in health care and education. No other
country, unsolicited, has offered the level of

assistance to this country, assistance that is-

‘not of direct benefit to the country offering
‘the assistance.”
s ‘. Maybe, Mr Mitchell would care to explain
.this misleading sentence. He must know
“something that is being withheld from the
public. How, for example, is Cuba not receiv-
-Ing direct benefit from our students attending
-their: institutes of learning, and our people
~seeking medical care in Cuban hospitals?
Doesn’t Mr Mitchell know that these are
among the tourists that Fidel Castro encour-
ages to his country to bring in much needed
‘foreign exchange? He also uses his educa-
‘tional and medical schemes to spread his
‘influence and convince countries like the

Bahamas to cast their UN vote his way? Cas-' ~

tro is reaping great dividends from the appar-
ent ‘ ‘assistance” of which Mr Mitchell speaks.
:«: Is Mr Mitchell not aware of what caused
‘ ‘the split between Dr Hilda Molina, Cuba’s
f < first woman neurosurgeon, and Fidel Castro
‘to whom she was most loyal until he ordered
“her to force Cubans out of their hospital beds
to: make way for his foreign patients as he
k strated medicine for dollars?
In 1987, Dr Molina founded the Interna-
i eral Centre for Neurological Restoration
.:(CIREN). By 1991, her centre had become
‘ -one.of the most important scientific centres in
:*Cuba. At the time she was Deputy to the
, Communist Party for her home region. She
‘was. very much in the bosom of the party
: when the split came. It was in 1991 that the
. Health Minister informed her that in the
' future the more modern areas of her centre
‘were to be held exclusively for foreign
‘patients paying in US dollars. This drastical-
ly reduced hospital beds for Cubans. Until
then the centre had been for Cubans only.
She also objected to being asked to violate

MULTLDISCOUNT FURNITURE &

international medical protocol by releasing
Cuban patients early without proper follow
up treatment to make space for even more
foreign patients. .

In protest she resigned her party position,
her seat in. parliament and returned all her
medals to the state. The state retaliated. She
became the victim of harassment — veiled
threats, mob attacks in the streets, interrupt-
ed telephone calls and a denial to travel for
personal or professional reasons.

It was Dr Molina who was told that she
could not leave Cuba, even to see her son,
and meet her srandchildren in Argentina,
because the Cuban government had the right

o “preserve her brain”.

It is reported that “in June 1997 alone,
Dr Molina received four invitations to travel
abroad for professional purposes to the US,
Argentina, Sweden, and Japan. Any invita-
tions received directly by the Ministry of
Health for Dr Molina have been answered by
a statement informing the host organisation
that Dr Molina cannot attend and suggesting
that another doctor take her place.”

This.is the country that our government in
its great wisdom has voted to sit on a com-

mittee that is supposed to “address human ~
‘ yights abuses around the world.” A commit-

tee that is supposed to condemn, not to treat
as a partner, countries like Cuba.

“The results of elections of Council mem-
bers on May 9,” said Freedom House, “indi-
cate that serious obstacles remain. While
states with good records.on human rights
won a niajority of seats, a number of notori-
ous violators were also elected, giving them
what they apparently want, the opportunity to
block serious action.”

And the Bahamas is now on record as
having helped put one of the violators there.

“In Cuba,” said Cuban Ambassador Felix
Wilson, who is stationed in the Bahamas,
“the most important human right is the right
to be alive, to have education, to have health
care, and to have all social benefits.” How-
ever, Dr Molina resigned her important med-
ical post because she found that these rights
were for foreigners who brought with them
much-needed. American dollars — many
Cubans are left out in the cold.

The Bahamas is trying to hide behind the
secret voting system that the UN allowed.
On the next time around, this curtain of secre-

_ cy is likely to be drawn back.

Said Freedom House: “Voting was carried
out directly and individually for each candi-
date country. However, the provision of

secret ballots effectively shields governments -
from accountability for their votes, and.



should be revisited going forward.”

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Summer Rush:

Appreciation
for pillar of
community

EDITOR, The Tribune »

JUST a few words to express
my love, sincere appreciation

‘and thank you, to a wonderful

dear friend, my priest, Father
Kolyvas.

I knew Father Kolyvas for 53
years since his arrival in Nas-
sau, on July 1, 1953 with his
dear wife and son, Emmanuel.
It was an honour and a privi-
lege to have served under such
a fine and distinguished priest.

My 53 years serving with Father

Kolyvas on the altar of our
church has been a blessing and
a learning experience in my life,
and I am truly deeply grateful
and thankful for everything he
has taught me. I have learned a
lot from Father Kolyvas and I
will never forget him. He was
my role model and I’m sure he
was everyone else’s, also.
Metropolitan Germanos
Polyzoides of New York was
once asked where could they
could find a good example of a
priest, and he replied: “You
could go all over the world, and
the place you will find such a
priest is in Nassau, Bahamas,

and his name is Father Koly-

vas.”

This year’s Easter services
were the first he had missed in
53 years. He was too ill to offi-
ciate. Father Kolyvas was a
tremendous man, a loving and
compassionate man, who was
also very humble and always
had a warm smile.. He was there
for anyone who needed him. He
was a spiritual father to every-
one.

He was certainly my spiritual
father, my beloved priest, and
my friend. ©
_ Father Kolyvas was a printer,

career civil servant, chanter;and..

instructor of Byzantine music
prior to his ordination in 1953.

With his successful and dis-
tinguished calling as a priest, he
was a “friend to all” having
served his God, his church, his
community and people of the
Bahamas to the fullest.
Almighty God has blessed him
tremendously. If anyone can be
called a saint, it would be Father
Kolyvas. Truly one can say
without fear of contradiction,
he was a “priest and gentleman
for all seasons.”

In St Matthew ch 25 v 21,
God’s way says, “well done,
thou good and faithful servant.”
Also in 2nd Timothy ch 4 v 7-8,
God’s Word says, “I have
fought a good fight, I have fin-
ished my course, I have kept
the faith. Henceforth there is
laid up for me a crown of right-
eousness, which the Lord, the

B letters@tribunemedia.net

LETTERS






righteous judge shall give me at
that day, and not to me only,
but unto all them also that love
his appearing.”

The Bible refers to the ten
lepers-who were healed by
Jesus. Only one returned to give
Him thanks.

I wish to take this opportu-
nity to give thanks to Almighty
God for the life and witness for
such a fine priest as Father
Kolyvas. Jesus said to his disci-
ples, “Love ye one another.”
Father Kolyvas has shown love
to his fellowman and he will
hear Almighty God say to him,
“Well done thou good and
faithful servant”, and he will
receive his “crown”. The Lord
God has taken Father Kolyvas
home to be with Him, a beauti-
ful flower to be planted in
God’s beautiful heavenly gar-
den.

Fathér Kolyvas fell asleep in
the Lord on Thursday, May 4,
2006 in the Intensive Care Unit
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital following an operation on
April 7th.

The funeral was held on May
10, 2006 and there was a large «
turnout of people from all walks -
of life. Governor General
Arthur Hanna and other digni- :
taries came to pay their last :.
respects for such a wonderful
priest. 3

The service was presided over .
by Bishop Savas of Troas, New '
York and also Father Kolyvas
Triantafilou, the President of «
the Hellenic College, Holy:
Cross Greek Orthodox School .

‘ of Theology.

I wish to extend my love and °
sincere condolences to his
beloved dear wife and family.

There will never be another
priest like Father Kolyvas, who
always had encouraging words :
to uplift his fellowman. His
pleasant and warm smile, his
compassionate understanding,
his humility, his inspiring ser-
mons, and all the other won-
derful qualities. he possessed, -
will be greatly missed. May
Almighty God bless and receive
his soul into His Heavenly
Kingdom. :

Love in Christ, his friend.

always.

TONY G ZERVOS
Nassau
May 2006



Condolences for
Kayla Edwards

EDITOR, The Tribune

“T OFFER my condolences to the family of Kayla Lockhart
Edwards, who retired from battle last Sunday afternoon. Of -
course we should honour her individually by persisting in
what we see to be God’s purpose for our lives. We should also
honour her as a nation by establishing a suitable memorial in
her name.

On Monday gone I heard a young male broadcaster on
one of the FM stations suggest that we rename the National .
Centre for The Performing Arts The Kayla Lockhart Edwards
Centre for The Performing Arts. Yesterday, I think it was, I
saw a clip on TV13 of Kayla speaking of establishing a “house
of Culture”. Perhaps we can put the two together — the cen-
tre for the performing arts and Kayla’s house of culture, as our’
tribute to a modern-day woman of La Mancha. The one prec-
vision? The centre should be the best of which we are capa-
ble.

I tend to be cautious about naming buildings after per-
sons. The Clarence Bain and Rodney Bain buildings have fall-
en into such disrepair as to bring dishonour to the memory of
those gentlemen. The Cecil V Wallace Whitfield Building
that houses the Prime Minister’s Office will be part of Baha
Mar’s scrapheap when it demolishes a bit of Bahamian history
on the Cable Beach strip. I don’t like naming buildings after
persons because buildings are too temporary; but Kayla’s
Performing Arts Centre would be more than a building. It will
be a composite of the spirit of our people — our fears, joys,
failures and triumphs. A composite by our people, for our peo-
ple.

TELCINE TURNER-ROLLE
Nassau
May 24 2006

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THE TRIBUNE



Students
win special
award at
COB

TWO students who have
earned bachelor’s degrees in
social work and religion have
won the Governor General’s
Award at the College of the
Bahamas.

Terrece Bethell and Vernetta
Ferguson both won bachelor of
education degrees with the
highest cumulative grade point
average and consistently excel-
lent academic performance.

The President’s Award went
to Deborah Smith, who won a
bachelor of arts degree in social
work.

tion Leadership Award was
won by Tanya Northeast, who
earned a bachelor of business
administration degree in man-
agement.

Bachelor degree graduates
earning distinctions were: Shar-
lene Leo, Candace Rolle,
Jacqueline Symonette (all in
accounting); Norma Cartwright
(management); Marilyn Fowler,
Dominique McCartney (busi-
ness studies); Marva Boateng,
Crystal Green, Vanessa
Williams (English language and
literature); Chavez Rutherford,
Betty Taylor (mathematics),
Vernetta Ferguson, Keva
Richards (religion); Terrece
Bethell, Sally Johnson, Heather
McQueen, Ricardo Patterson,
Venolia Sears (social studies);
Yolanda Johnson (Spanish);
Shanika Swann (art); Celanthia
Brown (biology); Adrian Gib-
son (geography and history);
Patricia Pierre (Spanish); Tanya
Abraham, Barbara Duncombe,
Dellarease Johnson-Hield,
Triskinka McPhee, Ginger
Turnquest, Dionne Williams,
Thakurdaye Williams (primary
advanced placement); Renay
Small (general); Melinda
Green, Debbie Johnson, Marcia
McPhee; Prescola’ Moss,
Shashauna Russell, Stacee Sears
(early childhood); Melissa
Carey-Burrows, Keshna Camp-
bell (special education) Se

Man
admits to
theft
charges

A 42-YEAR-OLD man
pleaded guilty to charges of
shop-breaking and stealing yes-
terday.

John Rolle, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester, admitted to breaking
into the Bahamas Heart and
Chest Centre on Collins
Avenue between May 24 and
25 of this year.

Rolle also admitted to steal-
ing items worth $2,170 from the
establishment. /

He was fined $1,000 on each
charge or will have to serve a
year in jail if he fails to pay the
fines.

Waa
eS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157

TV 13 SCHEDULE
TUESDAY
MAY 30

2: ean Community Page/1540 AM
11:00 Immediate Response

ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Immediate Response Cont'd
Mirror, Mirror
Inside Hollywood
Carmen San Diego
Fun














Durone Hepburn
Sid Roth













4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30. Fun Farm
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 FunFarm

15:30 411
6:00 Bahamian Things
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Kerzner Today
8:15 | Good News Bahamas
8:30 ZNS 70th Anniversary

Roundtable Discussion





10:00 Mirror, Mirror

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540 AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!







The COB Alumni Associa-

nation’s cee psoas:

MINISTER of Youth Sports
and Culture Neville Wisdom
has called for a report on child
safety levels in country’s youth
and sports programmes — in the
wake of some “very alarming”
revelations.

Refusing to’be more specific,
Mr Wisdom would only say
that he has asked the Youth
Advisory Council and the
Sports Advisory Council to
look into certain “incidents”
that have taken place involv-
ing children.

“T don’t want to go any fur-
ther than to say that consenting

adults under the law are able to .

do basically whatever they
want to do sexually or other-
wise privately. But it is unfair, it
is illegal, it is wrong for adults
to prey on children,” he said.
Mr Wisdom said he is con-
cerned about the number of
instances in which youths are
being exploited by older peo-

LOCAL NEWS

ple. He said that
such adults, “should
not only be dis-
suaded but skould
be disallowed from
even participation
in youth matters,
youth affairs and
youth organisa-
tions.”

He added that
this summer, all
youth programmes
will be properly
monitored and
audited and all
adults taking part
will be properly
trained jn the “core
values’and basic
concepts” that his
ministry promotes.

The ministers admitted that a
few years ago, the chairman of
the Youth Advisory Council
had tried to bring attention to
certain “challenges” develop-

them.



Hi MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture, Neville
Wisdom is pictured here with permanent secretary Leila
Green as he spoke about the challenges facing our
youths, particularly as it relates to older men preying on

ing in youth and sports pro-
grammes — but that the gov-
ernment was not listening.
According to Mr Wisdom,
the chairman had referred to

: ot gy My
’

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 5 «

lesbian gangs in
schools, and accu-
sations of older

to do with summer pro-!
grammes to register their inter- |
ests with the Ministry of Youth, '
persons preying Sports and Housing. f
on younger peo- “So whether you want to hire :
ple. a young person for the sum-,
“One need just mer, whether you want to run a!
to open theireyes programme for.the summer we }
and visit some of ask that you register with the:
the facilities . ministry in order for us to be:
around this coun- _ able firstly to monitor, to justi- '
try and see what fy your programme or your:
is going on, and employment.
we need to “Secondly, to be able to audiel
aggressively it; and thirdly to ensure that!
approach it. objectives that you set for the :
“As I said, programme or for the employ- |
there is no homo- , ment situation or whatever, is |
phobia here or any’ adhered to and is successful.”
attempt to discred- Mr Wisdom said the ministry :
it anyone other will advertise the: programmes ,



than to protect the that have been approved as}
interest of young People, he safe for children.
said. The minister said he expects :
Mr Wisdom asked all public, the councils’ report to be sub- ;

private and government organ-
isations which have anything

mitted to him in the next few!

weeks.

Government ‘failing to follow 1995.

regulations on access for disabled’ |

HB By KRYSTEL ROLLE

THE government is failing to com-
ply with a 1995 regulation which says
that.all new public buildings should be
accessible to the disabled, according to
activists.

Iris Adderly, a disabled consultant,
said that this failing is just one of the dif-
ficulties facing disabled persons in
today’s Bahamas.

Since 1995, all new public buildings
are meant to have been built so that it
would be accessible for the disabled.
“It is not happening,” Miss Adderly
insisted, ““We are advocating.”

Her comments come shortly before a
week of activities organised for disabled
persons by the Disability Affairs Divi-
sion, beginning on June 6.

Miss Adderly also spoke on the diffi-

culty disabled persons have obtaining

jobs. She explained that once employers:

find out the person applying is disabled,
the application is automatically disre-
garded.

“Put yourself in the disabled person-
’s shoes,” she challenged employers.

Miss Adderly, who is disabled her-
self, said disabled persons need to take
up the cause and say: “This needs to
stop.”

Melanie Griffin, Minister of Social
Services and Community Development,
admitted that all government buildings
are not accessible to the disabled. “All

government buildings ought to be dis- | ,

abled-friendly,” she said.

“For toollong we have been looking
at persons with disabilities as persons
looking for a ‘handout, but we know

_ they go, beyond any porculek divide,”

Ms Griffin said, whose mS is spon-
soring the events.

“They are very talented and we want
to be able to profile these people,” Min-
ister Griffin said.

The Ministry of Social Services cur-
rently employs seven disabled persons.

Issues

The most pressing issues facing dis-
abled persons in the Bahamas include
the inability to find suitable employ-

ment, educational setbacks, transporta-
tion problems and unfit building infra-_

structure. '

The activities will begin on Tuesday,
June 6 with a disaster preparedness
presentation by the National Emer-
gency Management Agency (NEMA)

and continue until Sunday where. the |
week. will culminate at Trinity Assem- }
bly City of Praise with a chuset ser- |
vice.

Several educational and siiseinational't
sharing activities are planned for next }
week including an ‘independent living !
forum’ planned for Thursday, June 8 at :

- Worker’s House and a Health Clinic !

on Friday June 9 on 8th Terrace ey vl i
ability Affairs.

The clinic is designed to help disabled! i
persons make healthier choices and also |
to learn ways to help prevent some: of |
the common medial problems associat: '
ed with disabled persons. :

The Disability Affairs Division offers i
services such as Braille, computer class- '
es, internet.access for research purpos- :
es and a support group for women with |
disabilities. i |



Walls of Fame appeal made

e@ ¢@¢@0@ 6 @h6Uhhm—UchOClUhSOHMUCMCh—C(ChM HhUChHhUlCUhM!S

LOCAL government offi-
cials are being called upon to
oversee the erection of “Walls
of Fame” on their respective
islands in time for the 33rd
Independence celebrations.

The Wall of Fame scheme is

the brainchild of Winston Saun- ~

ders, chairman of the Indepen-
dence Celebrations Committee.

In the scheme, photographs
of the local legends will be
accompanied by brief biogra-
phies highlighting their contri-

: ‘ butions to society.

“Tt is necessary for these
monuments to be placed on
each island in an area locals
frequent,” said Mr Saunders.
“You may have old persons in
the island communities who
remember the legacy of their

local heroes but when they die,
those memories die with them.

“Young Bahamians will
undoubtedly be inspired by the
accomplishments of someone
who lived right down the street.
and be motivated to make a
difference on their island to
cement their own place on the
wall.”

Mr Saunders will be travel-
ling to islands throughout the
archipelago to meet with local
government officials in the run-
up to July 10.

In order to be considered for
the Walls of Fame, applicants

must be Bahamian citizens ©

native to the islend on which
they will be honoured. ©

This includes those born in
New Providence of Family

Island parents. The honourees
should have returned to their
island shortly after birth. -

Honourees must or should
have been community leaders
and exemplary role models to
young Bahamians,

They must also have con-
tributed to the growth and

* development of their respec-

tive islands.

In addition to being consid-
ered a pioneer for their island
(or nation, where applicable),
Wall of Fame honourees
shbuld be able to represent
their island and country with
pride and dignity.

Nominations for hometown

_ heroes should be submitted to

the office of the Administra-
tor on each Family Island.

Santander Bank & Trust is accepting applications from suitably qualified
Bahamians for the following position:

| COMPLIANCE MANAGER/ CORPORATE SECRETARY/LEGAL COUNSEL

Minimum 5 years Call to the Bar
Minimum 3 years experience in Corporate Dept. of law firm

Good knowledge of Bahamian, U.S. and Spanish financial legislation.
in depth knowledge of compliance policies and procedures

Good working knowledge of PC applications.
Excellent organizational and management skills
Excellent communications skills (oral and written)

Fluency in English and Spanish (oral and written) essential.
Good legal drafting capability in English and Spanish.
Must be highly motivated and focused.
Travel may be required.

Salary and other benefits commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applications In writing with details of education and experience should be
faxed or mailed by May 31, 2006 to:



i CHAIRMAN of the 33rd Independence Celebrations

Committee Winston Saunders reveals plans for the erection of
Walls of Fame for each island while deputy-chairman Peter |. |
Deveaux-Isaacs listens on. |

(Photo by Capital City Marketing)



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Nassau, Bahamas



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

@ By MARK HUMES





THE Bahamian music
scene has a-new kid on the
block, and the 22-year-old

@ SINGER and songwnter Wendell Avione Javaughn Mortimer Jr,
aka Avvy

YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

POSITION VACANCY
Vice President of Marketing & Sales

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications for the above
position from suitably qualified persons with relevant experience in marketing, sales and business
development.

The Vice President of Marketing & Sales will contribute to the Company’s success by creating
and: driving the marketing, sales and business development strategy. This position will set the
strategic direction to achieve revenue and profitability goals in order to meet key corporate
objectives of the Company.

ss :

The holder of this position will report to the President and CEO.
Key. Personal Requirements:

» 1. Ademonstrated ability to successfully lead the revenue and income generation through
the leadership of a multi-channel marketing, sales and business development department
or organization.

2, A track record of building an exceptional sales organization of 20 or more sales
professionals,

, 3. Proven success of expanding market share as-well as developing: ond implementing us new.
lines of business and the Sarthe am Beane str aE i

“+H

4. An understanding of marketing: Ginaunicalons: sdvertising and pub relations that.

LOCAL NEWS

Young musician
setting down to |
Bahamian roots

Inagua native is making
“Ghost Moves” up the music
charts.

With his first single “Roach
on my Bread” already a local
party favourite, singer/song-
writer Wendall Avione Mor-
timer Jr, better known as
“Avvy”, is slowly adjusting to
his new found “fame”.

Sitting down with The Tri-
bune yesterday, Avvy said that
he still finds the reception that
he has gotten from the local
audience to be surreal.

“T do this for fun,” said the
young musician laughing. “It

was not like one day I thought

I was going to be a Bahamian
musician/“ghost move” man. I
just like to have fun, and it
still hasn’t set in yet.”

Yet despite his sudden suc-
cess, Avvy is still humbled by
the experience and says that
he is appreciative of God’s
blessing.

The last child in a family of
three, Avvy credits his father,
Wendall Sr, a local gospel and
rack and scrape musician, with
introducing him to music. But
since the passing of his father
two years ago, his mother
Audrey has.taken over as his
greatest supporter.

Growing up in an environ-
ment where he was surround-
ed by Bahamian music, it was
almost natural that Avvy
would follow in the tradition.

“T had a strong feeling
toward the music,” the young
artist reminisced. “So, I was
one of those weird persons in
high school who was waiting
for Bahamian music to come
out.”

“I think Bahamian music

has something for everybody,
as it is really something that
we can identify with. And
what I always admired about
Bahamian musicians and
artists is that they havea
unique way of writing, with a
lot of hidden messages and
storytelling.”

When asked about the story ©

behind “Roach on my Bread,”
the artist quickly denied that it
drawn from a personal expe-
rience. Not wanting to jinx
himself, however, he rapped
on the table and said: “Every-
body thinking I experience it,
but up to this day, I have not
experience it yet. But too
much of that going on in
Inagua.”

He explained that he draws
on the experience of others
for material and gets great
pleasure from watching other
young people “getting down”
to his music. “What make me
most happiest when I listen to
my music being played is see-
ing people in my set get down
and say “I like that song’,”
Avvy said. “I just appreciate
the fact that they are still into
Bahamian music.”

Attributing much of the suc-

cess he is experiencing right

now to his producers Ira Storr
and Dillan McKinzie, Avvy
does not want to be seen as a
“star”, joking: “Stars belong
in the sky. I belong on
Arawak Cay drinking a Kalik
and eating some crack conch.”
Bahamian fans of “Roach
on my Bread,” and “Ghost
Moves” can party with Avvy
when he takes over the stage
at next week’s Bahamas Inter-
national Music Festival.

THE TRIBUNE



Guantanamo
- hunger strike
numbers
reach 75

m@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

THE number of Guan-
tanamo Bay detainees partici-
pating in a hunger strike has

ballooned from three to around,

75, the US military said Mon-
day, revealing growing defiance
among prisoners held for up to
four and a half years with no
end in sight, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Navy Cmdr Robert Durand
called the hunger strike at the
US naval base in southeastern

't Cuba an “attention-getting” tac- . “4
tic to step up pressure for the * ~~
inmates’ release and said it might

be related to a May 18 clash

between detainees and guards

that injured six prisoners.

“The hunger strike technique a

is consistent with al-Qaida prac-

tice and reflects detainee"

attempts to elicit media atten-
tion to bring international pres-
sure on the United States to

‘release them back to the bat-

tlefield,” Durand said from
Guantanamo Bay.

The United States now holds
about 460 people at Guan-
tanamo on suspicion of links to

al-Oaida or the Taliban. But ‘

human rights groups say inno-
cent people have been sent to
the jail.

Defence lawyers said the
hunger strike, which began last
year, reflects increasing frustra-
tion among men who have little ,
contact with the world outside .

the remote prison.

“T think it is escalating because -
the people down there are get-

ting more and more desperate,”

said Bill Goodman, legal director _,
for the New York-based Center ..__
for Constitutional Rights, which ~
many of the...
detainees. “Obviously, things -

represents

have reached a crisis point.”

_ The military did not release ,
the names of the striking |
detainees, and lawyers said they . ,
have no way of learning whether .
their clients are involved until

they can visit the base.

“All these men want is a.

j







chance to have a trial,” said ©
Zachary Katznelson, an attor-
ney for Reprieve, a British,
human rights group that repre-
sents 36 Guantanamo detainees. -: = ’
“Tf they are guilty, punish them. *.
If not, then send them home.” | =~
Only 10.of the prisoners have .°!
been charged and face trial . ?
before military tribunals. The © »
US Supreme Court is expected — ;
to rule in June whether Presi- |:
dent Bush overstepped his |
authority in ordering the tri- -
bunals. :

would allow the candidate to successfully manage marketing, ‘sales, communications and
s+ public relations teams and provide an excellent return on the marketing, adverting and
PR budgets. ]



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













The successful candidate will participate fully as part of the senior management team, preparing
marketing, advertising and business development plans, as well as formulating and implementing
projects and special campaigns that support overall company business development and branding
Objectives.





li order to be successful in this executive-level position, the Vice-President must accomplish
the following:

RESPONSIBILITIES



¢ Lead the Company’s marketing, advertising, business evelopment: PR and sales teams.
Establish and execute the strategic marketing direction and Hane ultimate responsibility
for managing product line P & L’s.
Plan, develop and implement product strategies, marketing programs and the sales
process, including product life cycle planning, coordination with engineering regarding
technical product development, definition of promotional activities and product launch.
Perform a market review, industry and competitive analysis to identify existing and
potential markets and customer segments, and axle strategies to penetrate identified
markets.
Direct sales forecasting, develop sales initiatives and set performance goals.
Manage the Company’s public relations, protocol and external communications.
Collaborate with other members of the executive management team evaluating business
opportunities, alliances and partnerships.
Responsible for understanding customers' current and emerging needs and maintaining
VIP customer relationships.
Conduct market and customer surveys to determine needs, customer satisfaction and
competitor strengths and weaknesses
Preparation of annual budget and thereafter monitor expenditures and, appropHations
of the division to ensure conformity to budgetary requirements.
Successor development, training and mentoring
Liaison with senior executive responsible for customer service and CTOs

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REQUIREMENTS

An MBA degree or BA degree with a minimum of 15 years marketing and sales
management experience

Superior understanding of and experience with marketing fundamentals (positioning,
pricing, promotion, and product).

Proven success in developing new business through appropriate marketing, planning and
execution.

Product management and planning experience from concept to successful launch.

The ability to establish credibility with, motivate and develop the sales and marketing
teams.

Ability to develop rapport aid maintain relationships with key clients.

Strong written, oral and organizational communication skills.

Strong business acumen, including analytical and financial skills, as well as a technical
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‘BIC offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits commensurate with
‘qualifications and experience and in line with compensation and benefits afforded
genlon executives in the private sector.

ati is BTC’s intention to execute a contract with the successful applicant for a period
‘of three (3) years with an option to renew the contract for a mutually agreed period.

“All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later
‘than Tuesday, June 6, 2006 and addressed as follows:

available at

OR INDUSTRIES

TT TN AC 15 sh ao epee Oto) dt Ae) ea a tie L Oe Tee elt) edu
SAT 8:00am-12 noon

“ : ‘Director of Human Resources

‘The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F. Kennedy Drive

P. O. Box N-3048

“Nassau, Bahamas

Re: .Vice President of Marketing & Sales


THE TRIBUNE



Jamaica’s
female PM
receives
new civic
honour

mw JAMAICA
Kingston |

PORTIA Simpson Miller,
who in March became Jamaica’s
first woman prime minister,
received the right Monday to
add a new title to her name:
“Most Honorable”, according
to Associated Press

Simpson Miller, known to
many of her supporters as “Sista
P,” received the nation’s sec-
ond highest civic honor, Order
of the Nation, at a ceremony
conducted by Chief Justice
Lensley Wolfe.

Recipients of the honor are
referred to as “Most Honor-
able,” and have included three
past prime ministers, P.J. Pat-
terson, Edward Seaga and
Hugh Shearer.

Simpson Miller was a long-
serving member of parliament
from one of Jamaica’s most
crime-ridden slums before she
beat three opponents to take
the leadership of the ruling Peo-
ple’s National Party from out-
going Patterson, who led
Jamaica for 14 years.

° In brief Contrac

THE College of the Bahamas has
announced that it is building a state-of-

the-art performing arts theatre — which -

is expected to be ready in about five
months.

Acting COB President Dr Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson said the centre, which
is being constructed on the site of the
existing auditorium at the Oakes Field
Campus, will be a facility “like no other
in the Bahamas”.

On Monday, May 29, college princi-
pals signed a contract with Top Heights
Construction for the conversion of the
auditorium into the Performing Arts
Centre of the University: of the
Bahamas.

Participating in the event were Col-
lege Council chairman Franklyn Wil-
son; Dr Chipman-Johnson; council sec-
retary Patricia Glinton-Meicholas; prin;
cipal of Architects Associates Victor
Cartwright; and principal of Top
Heights Construction Thomas Lewis.

Mr Wilson called the venture “an
important building-block in the move
to university status” and one that is
“critical to the idea of providing stu-
dents with what they require to become
all they can be.”

Janice Cartwright, special assistant to
the president for revenue growth and
projects and co-ordinator for the Per-
forming Arts Centre project, assured
that the sound quality at the facility
would excellent.

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 77 ~

See tomorrow’s Tribune for |
a reprint of chapter 18 of





@ PROJECT co-ordinator Janice Cartwright explains the specifications of the
new Performing Arts Centre at the College of The Bahamas. Listening intently
is College Council chairman Franklyn Wilson and Top Heights Construction’s

principal Thomas Lewis

“It will be a multi-purpose, state-of-
the-art theatre,” Ms Cartwright said.

She added that the centre’ will have
around 400 tiered seats that will give

Our Services -

an unobstructed view of the stage, spa- _

cious dressing rooms behind the stage
area and a well-appointed concession
stand. .



A cutting-edge control room at the
back of the auditorium will command «
panoramic view of the performing area
and will house a computer-controlled
lighting system.

Flanked by two galleries for paini-
ings and other works of art, the auditc-
rium will be fully air-conditioned and
handicap-accessible.

It is projected that the facility will be
used for lectures, seminars, concerts,
film showings and dramatic productions

1

Resource |

an

Saying the centre will be a resource”
for'the entire community, Mr Wilson:
added that the project is building on
the rich arts tradition that developed ai.
the old Government High School aud:-
torium. tee

He said the centre will take the pez-
forming arts in the Bahamas to a new
level. e ;

Thomas Lewis of Top Heights Con-
struction expressed his determination
to-do a professional job and Victor
Cartwright, the architect, explained the
challenge of designing the conversion.

He said that because of the historical
value of the building itself, his aim is to
retain the exterior of the existing struc-
ture'so that it will continue to blend in
with the college buildings that surround

it.

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Only Apply If You .

financial services.

We are a part of a financially strong group. Specifically,
we are a subsidiary of Sunshine Holdings Co. Ltd., which
is also the parent company..of Arawak Homes Limited
and Sunshine Insurance (Agents & Brokers) Ltd. as well
as the largest investor in Focol Holdings Co. Ltd. and
Cotton Bay Developers Ltd.

Our clients are primarily persons who benefit from
another chance to re-organize their financial affairs,
especially, but not exclusively, within the context of
seeking to achieve a meaningful goal like home
ownership, most typically with the co-operation of another
institution. We are not focused on casual consumer
lending.

Have a diploma, or degree or certificate in Banking,
Accounting or Law, at the college level.

Have been employed in the Collections or Accounts
Control Department of a Bank or other financial services
institution, with direct involvement in credit administration
and collections as opposed to strictly lending.

Have a strong work ethic, and a motivation to have an
opportunity to be a meaningful part of a small and
dynamic team with the determination to build a leadership
position within a niche section of the overall capital
markets of the country.

Commensurate with both qualification and
experience.

Assurance is given that every applicant will be treated
in the strictest of confidence. ’

Apply, only in writing to:
The Operations Manager,
Sunshine Finance Ltd.,
P.O. Box N-3180,
Nassau, Bahamas.

or email to: position@sunshinefinanceltd.com

Kindly include three references.





a

«

t is signed to construct |
performing arts centre at COB

£7 ETA RE AOS AOE TE DAE SO LAP a a 2 . sam .
ma uae, POT A As AF BE TNE DPE RITE INTE BI RE IR NRO APN RR RRL RE Opn

ers

wr hearer eT
PAGE 8, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

THE TRIBUNE.



Bahamas claims eighth h highest
percentage prison oa



_& THE entrance to Fox Hill Prison

‘OCEAN CLUB ESTATES LOT #108
_PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS
-E:/$1,350,000.00 GROSS

Buyer &-Seller share Govt. Stamp Tax 5% each and pay own Legal Fees

Single Family Residence i

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213.51
116.27

2 South:
West:
North:
East:

' Close to Marina & Lake
: overlooking Golf Course

www.bahamasproperty. COM
Telephone:

1.242.322.1069
Facsimile: —
1.242.325.7514

Charlotte Street,
PO. Box N-1458
Nassau, BAHAMAS



Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resorts

ag EE SEL E XS



Invites applications for the position
Director of Marketing

All applicants must possess the following Attributes

Excellent Leadership Skills
‘Excellent Communication Skills
“Excellent Interpersonal Skills
Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills
Excellent Organizational Skills
‘| The successful applicant:must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
| Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible, with top
‘|| notch propriety. Minimum three (3) years experience as Director of
Marketing or Asst. with proven track record and statistics.

Compensation package includes:

Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost
‘Attractive Bonus Plan
. Medical Coverage
Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)

Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591



@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

THE Bahamas has the eighth
highest per capita prison rate
in the world according to a
study compiled by the British
government.

The study, undertaken by the
Research, Development and
Statistics Directorate of the UK
Home office, estimates that

- there are 447 prisoners in the

Bahamas per 100,000 of the
national population.
The United States is listed as

‘ having the highest prison rate

in the world, with 686 per
100,000 of its population incar-
cerated, followed by the Cay-
man Islands (664), Russia (638),
Belarus (554), Kazakhstan

(522), Turkmenistan (489),

Belize (459), the Bahamas, Suri-
name (437) and Dominica
(420).

According to local lawyer and
human rights activist Paul Moss,
the Bahamas’ prominent place
on the list is no surprise — and
reflects the government’s fail-
ure to implement meaningful
prison reform.

“The government appointed
Elliston Rahming (as prison
superintendent), but there has
been no legislation drafted to
limit the incarceration of per-
sons who do not belong in
prison,” said Mr Moss. “In
many cases, persons are given
custodial sentences when they
do not need to be.”

He said that as a result, many
non-violent offenders are being
indoctrinated into prison cul-
ture and are released back into
society as hardened criminals.

The practice of mixing petty
offenders and serious criminals is
one of the factors behind the
high recidivism rate in the
Bahamas, according to Mr Moss.

“Right now, you have 18, 19,
20-year-olds in there for petty
theft or stealing by reason of
employment, incarcerated with
persons convicted of murder,
manslaughter, armed robbery
and rape.

“There must be a law passed
to make it easier to give non-
custodial sentences to such
offenders, so they can give back
to the community — or even to
the victims they have wronged, i
he said.

The government recently
announced the implementation
of a new system that would
allow for inmates convicted of
similar offences to be detained
together.

According to Mr Moss how-
ever, the practice of “mixing”
is still taking ‘place.

The World Prison Population







HA PRIS

‘list (fourth edition), compiled
in 2003, gives details of the
number of prisoners in 205
independent countries and
dependent territories.

'- It is published online at
www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdf
s2/1188.pdf.

“Prison population rates vary
considerably between different
regions of the world, and
between different parts of the
same continent. For example:
in Africa the median rate for
western and certtral African
countries is 50 whereas for
southern African countries it is

. 362; in the Americas the median

rate for south American coun-
tries
Caribbean countries it is 297; in
Asia the median rate for south
central Asian countries (mainly
the Indian sub-continent) is 54
whereas for (ex-Soviet) central
Asian countries it is 426; in
Europe the median rate for
southern European countries is
69 whereas for central and east-
ern European countries it is 213;
in Oceania (including Australia
_and New Zealand) the median
rate is 110,” the study said.

It said that prison populations
are growing in many areas world.
According to updated informa-
tion on countries included in the
previous editions of the study,
penal populations have risen 61
per cent in Africa, 68 per cent in
the Americas, 87 per cent in



j from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
| good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ER in the workshop at Fox Hill Prison

is 107 whereas for’



1 ~\t

Asia, 65 per cent in Europe and
50 per cent in Oceania.

The report continued: “More: ’-

than 8.75 million people are
held in penal institutions
throughout the world, mostly

as pre-trial detainees (remand. °

prisoners) or having been con-
victed and sentenced.

. “About half of these are’ in |

the United States (1.96 million),

‘Russia (0.92 million) or China

(1.43 million),” it said.
In 2005, former prison super-

- intendent Edwin Culmer admit-

ted to The Tribune that in the
Bahamas, pre-trial detainees are
often held for up to four years
before their matter is heard by a
court.

Allyson Maynard-Gibson, the
new attorney general and min-
ister of legal affairs, has intro-
duced an initiative known as
“Swift Justice” in an effort to
tackle this problem.

Earlier this month, her office
announced that remand time in
on the decline.

Calls to Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of National
Security Cynthia Pratt were not
returned up to press time.

The Tribune also attempted
to contact National Security

Permanent Seécretary Mark Wil- -'

son, but was informed by: his
office that all questions from

the press should be forwarded :
in writing through Bahanias

Information Services:

Share your news |

The Tribune wants to hear

Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resorts

Invites applications for the position

Of

Director of Sales

All applicants must possess the following Attributes

Excellent Leadership Skills

Excellent Communication Skills

Excellent Interpersonal Skills

Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills

Excellent Organizational Skills

In-depth Knowledge and Experience of Points/Credits System

The successful applicant must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible. Three (3)
years minimum experience as Director of Sales or Asst. with proven track
record and statistics

Compensation package includes:

_Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost
Attractive Bonus Plan
Medical Coverage

Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)

Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591



cn ELLA















sate
Tht TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 9



| | Rey as l:

Escapees ©
FROM page one

would more than likely have
already made good their
escape.

“We believe that they are
out of the country,” Mr Gib-
son said. “Based on the
trend of the others, really
the trend is to get out of the
Bahamas. Because I don’t
think you would have
Cubans in particular who
would break out of the
Detention Centre and
remain in the Bahamas.

“The trend is generally to
get out of the country. We
don’t have any evidence to
that effect but we believe
that they may already be out
of the country,” he said.

The pair made their early
morning escape between the
hours‘of 3am and 4am, and
Mr:Gibson said that he
cout not conclusively say if



tion Centre. Howev-
er he ‘did state that the
women “must have” had
some help from the outside.

“Certainly there was help
from the outside, because
don‘t.forget someone had to
be there to receive them and
transport them to wherever
they wanted to go. I won’t
say there had to be help
from the inside but certainly
there had to help from the
outside because someone
had to pick them up — they
didn’t; just vanish into thin
air.

“So. they had to have
transportation waiting for
them and they had to be
housed somewhere. So
based on the trend we really
think they are out of the
country,” he said.

According to sources the
two.women escaped froma
section of the Centre that
was labelled as an “unsafe”
area by Defence Force offi-
cials because it was extreme-
ly poorly lit.

Reportedly it was this
same area that was also used
by two Cuban men and a
Jamaican. within recent
weeks-to escape the Centre.

As such Mr Gibson said
that they have started
improvements at the hold-
ing facility: Nine officers
have been trained.in finger-
printing and guard dogs
have:been installed in an
area just beyond the hold-
ing area-between the two
security fences.

“It is important to note
that: the guard dogs will have
no access to the compound
itself. They are only on the
perimeter. So there is a
fence separating them from
the public and the detainees,
which:means the only per-
sons'who would have access
to them would be the people
who\train them,” he said.

i

aanniees ES a pct ore

Bahamasair
FROM page one

have performed exemplary
on the job, and whose work
was evaluated. Why should
they not receive their incre-
ments?” she asked.

MsiHarding explained that
with the new proposed con-
tract, employees — according
to rank and position can
receive between $450 and
$850 a year in increments if
their performance meets cer-
tain criteria.

“Normal employees, staff,

cleaners and such can get
$4504 year, licensed engi-
neers:can get $850, and oth-
er employees can get any-
where between that,” she
added.
' However, despite this
promising breakthrough at
the negotiating table,
Bahamasair employees yes-
terday maintained their
work-to-rule mode — an
action which has been insti-
tuted more than once in the
past months.

The union was expected
to meet with Minister of
Labour and Immigration
Shane Gibson and his nego-
tiating team yesterday after
5pm.

“Until we come out of that .
meeting, and depending on
the outcome of that meet-
ing, our work-to-rule con-
tinues,” Ms Harding said.

_ Tension between manage-

ment and union members
reached a boiling point ear-
lier this month when
Bahamasair staff walked out
of the Nassau International
Airport for a “collective
lunch break.”

This act of protest in the
wake of botched salary nego-
tiations grounded Bahama-
sair flights to Fort Laud-
erdale, Miami, Eleuthera .
and Abaco for over an hour.

Government fails to meet its promise
on vehicle emission standards testing

FROM page one

that the equipment was likely
to arrive in early 2006, the test-
ing is yet to start.

Mr Pinder admitted yester-
day-that the equipment has not
yet been ordered. It is expect-
ed to be ordered in the new
budget year.

In 2004, he said that a few
months of research was need-
ed to ascertain what standards
were in other countries, and
how they should be set in the
Bahamas.

“One of the reasons why it
has not been ordered, is
because there has been much
discussion between the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services and the
Road Traffic Department with

respect to the management
and regulation of fuel emis-
sion standards.

“The second thing was that
we had lengthy discussions
with regards to the specs for
the equipment, the kind of
equipment we were going to
bring into the. country. That
whole process took longer
than expected,” said Mr Pin-
der.

He added that the process
is still going on, but it is being
projected that in this budget
cycle the equipment would be
ordered and the whole process
should be finalised.

Currently, he said, there is
consultation between the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services, The Road
Traffic Department and the
private stakeholders.

Ingraham reiterates position

_ FROM page one

ducted through the police, such persons, if they choose to sue the

state they ought to do so.’

In previous statements, the former Prime Minister said that the
manner in which Haitians were raided and rounded up in Eleuthera
violated the Organization of American States Convention on the

rights of migrants in the country.

Nobody paid attention to these legal residents of Eleuthera
when they attempted to show officials documentation to prove

their legality, said Mr Ingraham.

Eventually, as reflected in the news reports, those residents
were placed on a boat and brought to Nassau where they were
incarcerated at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre, until they
were eventually taken back to Spanish Wells by a private citizen.

Continuing to hold firm to his position, Mr Ingraham said: “Such
persons have a legal right not to be interfered with illegally or

- unlawfully by the government.”

By using the courts as a first step in’ protecting the rights of
legal residents of the Bahamas, Mr Ingraham said: “We can estab-
lish once and for all, by a decision of the courts of our country, that
no government has a right to act in such an arbitrary fashion and
deal with legal residents of our country in that way.”

However, Labour and Immigration Minister, Shane Gibson,
whose tactics have been compared to former PLP Immigration

chief Loftus Roker, has taken exception to his shadow misters a

comments calling them “dangerous.”

Mr Gibson has said in the past that he found it str ange and out= "|

rageous that anybody seeking to hold the office of prime minister
Once again, would encourage persons to sue the government. But
Mr Ingraham said that he stands by his word: “We believe that
enforcement of any law, including our immigration law, must be
dealt with humanely and in.accordance with standards, human
rights procedures, and established human rights norms that exist in

all civilized societies.”

Reports denied

FROM page one —

members, stationed throughout
the Bahamas. However the
process has encountered a num-
ber of road blocks.

~ Questions over exactly who
the union could represent was
one of the. many stumbling

blocks. The union believed it .

had the right to represent both
teachers and principals as it has
done since 1965. The union won
this right in its bid at the Indus-
trial Tribunal, however govern-
ment officials maintain that they
were not forced to concede on
this point. Instead, they said, it
was an issue on which they had
decided to compromise.

The latest dispute between

Prices shown based on 15% customer
down payment over a 60-month term

with approved bank credit.

the two was the forced closure
of schools on May 5, when it
was reported that a number of
teachers staged a “sit out”.
However, Mrs Poitier-Turn-
quest said that when she heard
of the incident she personally

visited schools throughout the -

island and found that all teach-
ers were at their posts. until
3.15pm that day.

“T-do not understand what
action they are accused of tak-
ing,” she said, explaining that
the teachers were involved in
no industrial action and that no
trade dispute had been filed. :

The union has also thanked
parents and the community for
their support during their
“arduous” negotiations.

06 Epica a

$36

er 36S
List Price
$26,020

A preliminary report had
already been written and there
are additional discussions as a
result of it, he said.

The preliminary report
includes recommendations for
the management and the vari-
ous procedures to monitor fuel
emission standards in the
country.

“The discussion surround-
ing the procedures and the
management of fuel emission
standards in the country has
taken longer than expected,
and hence the delay as to why
the whole process has not been

finalised yet, and hence equip-
ment has not been ordered as
yet,” explained Mr Pinder.
Vehicular emissions, in par-
ticular carbon dioxide, harms

‘plants, soil and water and

affects the ecological balance
of the planet.

It is also a major contributor
to global warming.

Environmentalist Sam Dun-
combe said the issue of air pol-
lution is “very serious,” and is
particularly bad for asthmat-
ics and people with respirato-
ry problems. She pointed out

that it also has implications for

people who are currently
healthy.

“There are a number of air

pollutants in the stuff that

comes out of your car — some -
of them can cause cancer, .

obviously some of them cause
respiratory diseases. %

“It is very important for us
to sort of get on stream with
that level of protection so that
each individual is actually
responsible for keeping their

car running as well as it can

run, so that it does not create

any additional problems,” said

Mrs:'Duncombe.

a

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



TUESDAY EVENING MAY 30, 2006

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+ & x CARLITO'S WAY ee Al




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@ LAPAZ, Bolivia

ay

VENEZUELAN President
Hug6éChavez told Bolivian forces
to. be-pn guard against conspira-
torssalleging U.S. President
Geofge W. Bush is plotting
againat’ Bolivia's left-leaning gov-
ernnjent, according to Associat-
ed Press.

‘Chayez delivered his weekly
radiéand, television program
"Hello President" on Sunday
from the ruins of Tiawanacu, an
anciént city located roughly 56
kilometers (35 miles) west of La
Paz it Bolivia's highlands.

"When the U.S. president said
a fewidays ago that he was wor-
ried because democracy is erod-

344



y OW that the Cable
: Beach redevelop-
ment is about to start, creat-
ing ‘a counter point in the
west.to the reborn Paradise
Island in the east, our atten-
tion must now be drawn to
what's in between.
During the past thirty plus
years I have watched the
area between cruise ship pier
in the centre of town and
Arawak Cay evolve and not
always for the better. Bay
Street used to be the jewel
of Nassau, it no longer is.
The hotels west of the
Hilton on the south side of
West Bay Street have
remained less than an asset
to the image of Nassau.
The time has come for the
development of a\master
plan for this area to encour-
age its redevelopment into
Nassau's version of South
Beach. It should be teeming
with visitors going to shops
and‘ restaurants day and
night. The small hotels,
hopefully locally owned and
operated, in the area could
be renovated so as to
become fashionable and
attractive alternatives to the
large, mostly foreign owned,
hotels on Cable Beach and
Paradise Island. Special
incentives could be offered
to! €ncourage invéstment in
this designated area.
Imagine spacious side-
walks with sidewalk cafes,
small inns and boutique
hotels inter mixed with
these, bordered by well
maintained public beaches
with the necessary facilities,
camplementing an enter-
tainment complex on
Ayawak Cay.

“A second cruise ship dock- |

ing facility needs to be
déveloped at Arawak Cay,
as the present one has
reached its capacity. The
high price of fuel makes the
Bahamas an even more
attractive port of call to this
industry. It is necessary to
make the town more attrac-
tive to the cruise passenger,
otherwise we will see an ever
increasing number of cruise
stop$ at unpopulated cays
which results in the cruise
lines'retaining even more of
the cruise dollar for them-
selves. —

The consequences of such
a development would not
just be economic, but would
also be social. It would
broaden and deepen the par-
ticipation of Bahamians in
the Tourism Industry and it
would give a psychological
lift to the city's citizens as
they watch the rebirth of
Nassau's core.

I don't think anyone
would deny that these are
not all good things.

Kill the
Casuarinas

I don't know who brought
these trees to the Caribbean.
I don't know when they
arrived.

But there must be more
Casuarinas than people in
the Bahamas.

These Australian natives
invaded the islands of the
Bahamas long before con-
cern for the health and pro-

‘

i
‘



t

ing in Bolivia it/s because, you
can be sure, he has a plan against
Bolivia," Chavéz said without
elaborating. |

He urged "his brothers, the
Bolivian soldiers," not to be
caught off guard.’

The comments were Chavez's
latest response to{Bush's remarks
last week that he was "concerned
about the erosion! of democracy"
in Bolivia and Venezuela.

The U.S. State Department
says it has no plans, to overthrow
the Bolivian government. But

Bush has expressed concern ©

about a growing Venezuelan-
Cuban-Bolivian partnership, and
has tacitly sided with the govern-
ments of Peru and Nicaragua,
which have accused Chavez of



F]
tection of the environment
was as developed as it is
today. a

_ However even today most
persons do not realize the
damage to our ‘native flora
caused by these) trees.

They smother 'all growth
under their canopies and
extract a great deal of
moisture from the soil killing
off the native plants
nearby. | ape

Examine beneath a stand
of these trees and you will
find a desert. |

We have. the ‘wonderful
Abaco Pine which is more
environmentally friendly and
which, I am advised, is
native to our islands. I think
most people would agree
that it is also far more attrac-
tive.

It would therefore seem to
make sense for|the Casuari-
nas to be declared pests and
for them to be cut down and
replaced by the Abaco Pine
or some other native tree.

|

‘|
By
\

interfering in their presidential
elections.

Undeterred, Chavez on Sun-
day strongly endorsed Peru's left-
ist presidential candidate Ollanta
Humala and continued his war of
words with Peru's president, say-
ing that Alejando Toledo was
"subordinate" to U.S. interests.

Chavez called Peru's leading

presidential hopeful, Alan Gar- :

cia a demagogue. who “wants to
be president so he can continue
stealing."

"Hopefully the Peruvian peo-
ple, who we love, will give a
demonstration next Sunday of
historical consciousness and allow
Ollanta Humala to be Peru's next
president," Chavez said.

Garcia leads Humala with just
a week left before Peru's June 4
presidential runoff, according to a
final poll published Sunday.

In comments to reporters on
Saturday, Toledo said: "He can-
not meddle-in (our). domestic
affairs. You have been notified
Mr. Chavez ... don't mess with
my country."

Chavez said Bolivia's upcoming
election of an assembly responsi-
ble for drafting a new constitu-
tion was necessary for a transfor-

RULES






















a cele

14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian's 2007 calendar. Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each. Entry deadline is May 31, 2006

be positive (slides)

mation of the nation's democracy
and public institutions.

"You are still under an old
regime," Chavez told to Bolivian
President Evo Morales. ;

"The political system collapsed
and it's necessary to create a new
democracy."

Leaders of the political party
led by Morales — the Movement
Toward Socialism — announced

- last week they would seek

reforms allowing the indigenous
leader to be re-elected when a

iri
bration

®

1 Family Guardian’s Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photogra
“A CELEBRATION OF NATURE”. Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or
as found in The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.

2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2006.

3 Allentries are to be delivered to Family Guardian’s Corporate Centre, Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am
and 5:00pm weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked “Calendar Contest”.

4 Allentries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.

5 Only ‘colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm. film can
or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing
signs of photo manipulation or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best c [ U
RAW, TIFF or high quality JPEG and in the'original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints ©
which will be used in the judging process. (Note: prints submitted without 35mm slides or negatives or CDs will not be eligible.)

The photographer's name and photo subject should be written on the reverse of the print. : ee
Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality ‘and quality of photograph. Preference will be given syeae
to fauna photographed in its natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian’s 2007
calendar. The decision of the judges will be final. ; :
All entries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company’s intention to return all entries in their original condition. However, Family Guardian
‘will assume no liability for'any loss, damage or. deterioration. eee ; oh ee as \
gift certificate - valued at $400 will be presented fo
hotographer may be selected. Photographic credits will he given in the calendar. The number o

rs are not eligible.
ly published photos not eligible.

of

any reserves the right to use such in the future.
s of Family Guardian, ‘its affiliated companies or

alleges US is plotting
t Bolivia’s leftist govt



constituent assembly begins
reworking Bolivia's constitution

in August.

The Bolivian Constitution cur-
rently allows presidents to serve
one five-year term, after which
they must wait another five years
to run for office again.

Morales' party is favored to
lead in the July 2 elections of
assembly members although it is
not clear if it will win the required

two-thirds of the 255 seats to -

approve the reform.



i 2007 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM j af

SIGNATURE ..



phers. The title for the company’s 2007 calendar will be —.-
a scene which is a striking example of nature -

olour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in

r each of the photographs selected: More than one entry froma single
f entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of ~



| agree that in the event one or more of my entered photographs is selected as a winner
in the 2007 Family Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it will become the property of Family
Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and | assign to Famity Guardian all rights pertaining to its use
in any way whatsoever. | also confirm that the photos enteréd in this contest were taken in
The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been previously published.





(maximum of 5)

Return with photos to: Calendar Contest, Family Guardian Corporate
Centre, Village & Eastern Road Roundabodt, Nassau, Bahamas
ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY-31, 2006

Wa FAMILY
GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY

VV, CYUYYU, I riwik 1!

@ IN THIS picture released -
by Miraflores Press Office
Venezuela's President Hugo |
Chavez speaks during his week-
ly broadcast Alo Presidente in
Tiwuanaku, Bolivia, Sunday, .
May 28, 2006. ee

uae

(AP Photo/ : :

Miraflores Press, HO)







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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

CLASS A 3
Winner & National Champion

2nd place
3rd. place
4th place
5th place
6th place
7th place
8th . place
9th place
10th place

" 11th place

12th place

CLASS B ses.
Winner and National Champion

2nd place
3rd_ place
Ath place
5th place
6th place
7th place
8th place
9th. place
10th place
11th place

~ 12thplace

13th place

‘CLASS CW

Cc
Winner and National Champion

2nd place
3rd_place
Ath place
5th place
6th place

~ 7th: place
‘8th place

9th place
10th place
11th place
12th place
13th place
14th place
15th place
16th place
17th place
18th place
19th place
20th place

CLASS

Ath place
5th place
6th place
7th place

D
. Winner and N
_ 2nd place
3rd place

ational Champion

Stl UREA SLOT RURST LALOR RSNA TERRDKO ERA GRUNDY

The official results are as follows:

- Tida Wave

Good News
New Courageous
Abaco Rage

Earlie’s Rupert Legend

Running Tide
New Thunderbird
Pieces of Eight
Silent Partner

Red Stripe

Lucayan Lady

New Southern Cross .

Lonesome Dove
New Susan Chase

Rowdy Boys Pin-AH

Eudeva

Lady Nathalie
Ants Nest
Ansbacher Queen
Barbarian

Lady Sonia
Sherwin’s Dream
Uncle Rey.
Hummingbird
Passion

Bull Reg
Fugitive
Termites
Woodpecker _
Crazy Partner
Sacrifice
Slaughter

Lady Eunice ©
WG Thunderbird
Unknown 500
Golden Girl
Legal Weapon
Miss Ellen
Warrior |

I've Tried .
Sea Wind

Two Friends
Chaser |

Lady T
Paparazzi

Blue Wing
Regret

Baby Chase
Fredrica
Respect |
Dream Girl

Bad Motor Finger

NATIONAL JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP:

Ist Place - Termites

2nd Place - Sacrifice
d Place - Fugitive

r
Ath Place - Legal Weapon
5th Place - Vite Malt
6th Place - Fredrica

7th Place - Miss. Ellen’
8th Place - Unknown 500
th Place - Dream Girl

9
10th Place - Slaughter

Prime Minister Cup Winner

Governor General Cup Winner



Commodore Emeritus Cup Winner



underbird

Nioshe Rolle

Garret Knowles

Harcourt Rolle

Sanchez Ferguson
Mchale Rolle.
Henry Rolle Jr.
Marco Knowles
Nestor Rolle

Greg Godfrey
Tyler Knowles

Tida Wave, Brooks Miller

New Susan Chase,

Laurin Knowles

Bull Reg, Buzzy Rolle,

34points

31 points
30 points
25 points
23 points
20 points
13 points:
12 points
12 points
9 points
8 points
8 points

39 points
30 points
30 points
28 points
25 points
21 points
18 points
17 points
16 points
15 points
14 points
12 points
6 points

42 points
38 points
38 points
36 points
32 points
28 points
26 points
26 points
25 points
24 points
23 points
22 points
19 points
17 points
17 points
14 points
8 points
6 points
4 points
2 points

16 points
13 points
11 points
11 points
9 points
6 points
2 points

Staniel Cay, Exuma

Mangrove Bush, Long Island

George Town, Exuma
Staniel Cay, Exuma
George Town, Exuma
Black Point, Exuma

Mangrove Bush, Long Island

George Town, Exuma
Rolleville,, Exuma
Salt Pond, Long Island

Staniel Cay, Exuma

Mangrove Bush, Long Island

George Town, Exuma

| MINISTRY OFTOURISM st

| EMERALD BAY HOLDINGS ONS

THE TRIBUNE

SPONSORS:

MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMEN

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL
BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATION COMPANY
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DARVILLE LUMBER COMPANY

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COMMONWEALTH BANK

BURROWS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LIMITED
GRAHAM & MISSY LANG oe,
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“TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

AUT Vee



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







Qian”

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010





Realtors frustrated by
the Investment Board

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter .

ahamian real estate

agents have expressed

frustration at what they

allege is the Investment

Board’s inefficiency in
handling applications from foreigners
wishing to purchase real estate in the
Bahamas.

According to some realtors, unnec-
essary delays in obtaining permits such
as a Certificate of Registration, under
the International Persons Landholding
Act 1993, are causing potential real
estate investors to take their business

tial revenue for the Bahamas.
One realtor told The Tribune yester-
day that he heard some applications

were taking as long as two years to be.

processed.

“Basically, they ask persons for cer-
tain documents, and when they send in
the information, they are making them
go round and round. This has. been
going on for a long time,” he said.

The realtor added, that rather than
wait to be approved, the investors sim-
ply take their business elsewhere.

“ People have changed their minds,
because the Bahamas is not the only
place in the world where they can pur-
chase real estate,” the realtor said.

not to be identified, told The Tribune
that there was a serious problem with
the Investment Board.

“It simply does not meet. When it
does meet, they deal with large invest-
ments, but no one looks after foreign
investors who are buying single homes,”
he said.

The realtor added that the Board’s
claim that it processes applications with-
in 30-60 days was “complete rubbish”:

“It is typical for applications to lan-

guish for six months up to a veAt ” he
said.

The realtor added that his company .

will no longer accept sales that have to
go to the Investment Board for
approval.

The realtor said he wished not to be
identified because in his experience,

-members of the Government.and civil
service take criticism personally. and -

refuse to deal with any other business
you may have before them.

Bahamas Real Estate Association
president, Larry Roberts, told The Tri-
bune that he has a scheduled meeting

with the Investments Board later this.

week. He said he would prefer not to
comment until he has had a chance to
attend that meeting. °

Financial Services and. Tavostuiénts
Minister, Vincent Péet, was off the
island and unavailable for comment
when The Tribune tried to contact him



elsewhere, resulting in a loss of poten-

Baker’s Bay confident
project will ‘prevail’ |

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



EXECUTIVES with the
controversial $175 million Bak-
er’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club
development yesterday said
they were confident the pro-
ject would “prevail”, even
though their opponents are
seeking to appeal a ruling that
relieves the developers from

an undertaking not to proceed.

with the development. .
Fred Smith, attorney for the

Save Guana Cay Reef Associ- -

ation, said he had filed a

‘motion with the Court of:

Appeal seeking leave to appeal
its ruling on the developers’
undertaking to the Privy Coun-
cil.

He added that the appeal.

was seeking to also overturn
the Court of Appeal’s refusal
to grant an injunction restrain-
ing the Government and the
Baker’s Bay developers, San
Francisco-based Discovery
Land Company.

The Court of Appeal ruled
earlier this month that the
developers would only have to
remain faithful to their under-
taking not to perform any new
work on Guana Cay until May
31-- tomorrow.

The undertaking was given
on November 22, 2005, and
was only supposed to last until
Supreme Court Acting Justice,
Norris Carroll, had delivered
, his verdict in the lower court
‘on the merits of the’ case
brought by the Association.
However, the Supreme Court
judgement has yet to be deliv-

As opponents file
Appeal Motion to
prevent developers
being released from
stop-work undertaking

‘ered.

In his Notice of Motion
applying for leave to appeal to
the Privy Council, Mr Smith
argued that Discovery Land

Company’s position - that it

should be relieved from the
undertaking because the
Supreme Court was taking
longer than thought to render

its verdict and costing it:
- increasing sums of money - was

“unsustainable”.

Mr Smith argued: “The
delay to the development
pending the delivery of judge-
ment is likely to.be no more
than a few months at most. If
the development goes ahead
in the meantime, the damage
to the Crown and Treasury

lands, which the developers do ©

not even yet have title to,

would take generations to

repair, if indeed the wetlands
and the forest could ever
recover.’

A supporting affidavit from
Michelle Petty, an attorney
with Callenders & Co, who
works with Mr Smith on the

case, said an earlier affidavit -
from Deborah Fraser, director »
of legal affairs at the Attorney .

SEE page SB

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INTERNATIONAL REALTY

f 242.322.2033



Another senior realtor, who asked

|
|
a

|
|
St
|

| munications.

on both last Friday and yesterday.

BIC tariff cuts backed

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas Telecom-
Company’s
(BTC) application fora
reduction in its international
long distance rates of between
7.8 per cent to 51.43 per cent
has been approved, with the
industry. regulator refusing
IndiGo Networks’ urgings
that this be linked to the pro-

| vision of interconnection ser-

vices to the latter’s network.
In its statement of results

on BTC’s application, the.

Public Utilities Commission

(PUC) said it saw “no valid ©

reasons, legal or otherwise”

to link regulatory approval of —
BTC’s proposed rates to oth- .
er issues such as the provi- -

sion of interconnection ser-
vices and facilities to IndiGo

| Networks.

| only licensed competitor on

IndiGo Networks, BTC’s

PUC rejects IndiGo’s demands tha this

be linked to interconnection issue

fixed-ine voice services, had
previously alleged that its
state-owned rival was being
allowed to violate “the terms
of its licence with impunity”,
harming both consumers and
the Bahamian economy’s
competitiveness.

The source of the contro-
versy is BTC’s alleged non-
cooperation on a variety! of
interconnection issues. Inter-
connection between BTC’s
and IndiGo’s networks is vital
to enable calls that originate
on one network to be seam-
lessly transferred to the other.

BTC’s non-cooperation
had its roots in fears that
interconnection with IndiGo’s
network would be exploited

-by illegal Voice over Internet

Protocol (VoIP) providers,
harraing tb the state-owned car-

Poca
CMa

a

rier’s financial hettotinance.
In addition, IndiGo’s par-
ent, Systems Resource Group

(SRG), is the only other oper-

ator apart from BTC to be
licensed to provide VoIP ser- -
vices in the Bahamas, some-

thing it could exploit legally

to increase market share. This
is likely to be of even greater

‘concern to BTC.

‘However, the PUC said
IndiGo’s concerns would be
“better addressed” under the
Telecommunications Act
1999, and the Interconnection

‘Agreement signed in 2004

between it and BTC.

Back on BTC’s interna-
tional and inter-island long
distance. rates, the PUC said

ae page 6B

ni iy

CEG ot Ne
* ay tenn)



BSC da ab





= JAMES SMITH -

Bahamas

‘must ‘insist’

oe
~
os
&
&

on OECD ©
equality.

o
‘e
*

te ee eT

@ By NEIL HARTNELL S
Tribune Business Editer :



-

JAMES Smith, minister oiSEs

state for finance, yesterday told.
The Tribune it was more:
important for the Bahamas«
than other so-called’ offshore «

“centres to “insist” on a-‘level:

playing field’ for global finan- °
cial services regulation because -
many felt:-this nation had gone -
beyond the standards OECD -
countries were meeting. :

Mr Smith was commenting
after the Organisation for Eco-.
nomic Co-Operation and
Development (OECD) yester-
day.released its latest report
on the ‘harmful tax practices’
initiative, producing a docu-
ment-that attempted to’bench-
mark what the Bahamas and
more than 80 other nations
were doing on transparency
and the exchange of inform-
tion for tax purposes.

The Bahamas appeared to
fare relatively well in the
benchmarking exercise, the
OECD only offering muted
comments in regard to this
nation in the areas of partner-



SEE page 4B

= FIDELITY
Bayond Banking

Li} WANA LA)





\
}
PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





Prudent investing will give
you good retirement value

“Reporting for The Tribune is a
responsibility and privilege. We
respect and honour the people’s
right to know everyday. ’m
proud to be a part of the leading
print medium in The Bahamas.
The Tribune is my newspaper.”

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER, THE TRIBUNE

Te report the news, call our
News Tips Line at 502-2359.





The Winterbotham Merchant Bank

a division of

The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited
Winterbotham Place - Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau
Email: ghooper@winterbotham.com, adavidson@winterbotham.com,

' jhooper@winterbotham.com - Tel: (242) 356- 5454
www.winterbotham.com

n April 26,
2006, the
American
Institute of
Certified Pub-
lic Accountants (CPAs) issued
a press release announcing the
results of their most recent
pension survey. According to
the release: “The vast majority
of CPAs serving as corporate
chief executives, chief finan-
cial officers and financial con-
trollers, and in other executive
positions, believe American
companies can’t continue pro-
viding pensions that adequate-
ly cover their employees’
retirement years.” —

When asked if US compa-
nies could continue providing
employees with pensions that
adequately cover their retire-
ment needs, nearly three in
four (74 per cent) of the
respondents said ‘No’. More
than half believe rising health-
care costs are the biggest bar-
rier to a company’s ability to
offer pension benefits, while
nearly a third (30 per cent) said
the pressures to compete in the
marketplace outweighed the
pressures to provide retirement
benefits.

“These findings are a wake-
up call,” said John Morrow,
vice-president of the AICPA’s
division for CPAs in business
and industry. “The traditional
system of rewarding employ-
ees with pensions after long
years of service is on its way

out, because companies sim-.

ply cannot bear the cost.
Therefore, employees will have
to find alternate methods of
funding their retirement.”

Implications
The implication is that we

are all ‘going 't to. have to- become’. oe
more ‘Tesponsible for our own

retirements. And, the more
money we have in our pocket
when we retire, the more
choices we have about that
retirement.

While it’s good to do retire-
ment planning, it’s especially
good to be realistic while doing
it. So, here are some pieces of
reality to include in your big
picture.

Knowing how much income
you need in retirement

The old rule of thumb states
that you need 60 per cent to
80 per cent of your pre-retire-
ment income to maintain your
current lifestyle in retirement.
This assumed you had no
mortgage; your children were



educated and not living at
home; and you have relatively
little consumer debt..

Newer studies now suggest
that 60 per cent to 80 per cent

_.is simply not enough, and that

a more realistic number is 80
per cent to 110 per cent. Wow!
How can it be more?:

The, rationale is: in retire-
ment, medical expenses and
certain capital expenses must
be factored in. Let’sgassume
that you will live affnr 25
years after you retiré. If you
own your own house, you will
have periodic repairs to con-
tend with — a new roof, refur-
bishment of the plumbing or
electric wiring. These are in
addition to annual expenses
such as utility bills, real prop-
erty tax, insurance and the like.

If you own a vehicle, how -

long will it continue to be oper-
ational? The lifespan of an
average car today is less than
10 years. So, obviously, you
would need to consider one or
more vehicle replacements
during retirement.

In retirement, some health
insurers will automatically
drop coverage once you reach
a certain age. For most per-

-sons, healthcare becomes a
more significant burden as we

age, and it is one that many
have to fund out of their avail-
able resources if they. wish to
maintain the quality of health-

care they enjoyed while work- _

ing.

While many older Tetirees
spend very little, the most real-
istic way. to calculate retire-
ment spending needs is to sit
down and work vheouen a
detailed budget.



You could live a very long
time in retirement
The newer demographic

studies are indicating that if.

you make it to age 60, then ‘on
average’ it is not unreasonable

to expect to live almost anoth- :

er 30 years or more, if you are
in good health at retirement.



Financial



Focus




For some persons, it is possible
that you could spend almost
one-third of FOU lifespan in
retirement.

Therefore, it is, important
you do not stumble upon

retirement and post-retirement
life without a plan. Far too
many people fail, simply
because: they fail to plan.

Are you prepared to deal
with Involuntary Retirement?

While many companies pro-
vide for early retirement,
which is usually 10 years before
normal retirement, very few
persons in reality can truly
‘retire’ early simply because

they have not organised their .

financial affairs in a way to
allow them to do so. Those
who retire early typically have
a small business that they oper-
ate, or they embark ona sec-
ond career, such as real estate
sales — where you can basically
work your own hours.
However, there is another
type of early retirement...the
type that is forced upon you.
Increasingly, persons in. their
early to mid fifties who find
themselves ‘casualties of cor-

_ porate downsizing’ find they

are never able to “land anoth-
er job ata comparable, level”
again.

It is sound advice to always
ensure you have the current
market qualifications for the
job you hold. Also, it is advis-
able to satisfy yourself that
your job title actually reflects

the level at which you truly

function.

Using the equity in your
home to fund retirement —.

Most people do, at some
point. In fact, many persons
reach retirement having paid
off their mortgage in full. Some
people use this as an opportu-

nity to sell their house and buy ~

a ‘smaller place’, and use the

SEE page 5B

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THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 3B



BTC’s concerns on access deficit.

& By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) will launch public
consultation on the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company’s
(BTC) universal service obliga-
tion in 2006-2007, as it moves to
address inefficient cross-subsi-
dising between the state-owned
carrier’s different business sec-
tors.

In a submission to the PUC on
BTC’s application for a reduc-
tion in its international and inter-
island long distance rates, Felici-
ty Johnson, the carrier’s company
secretary and vice-president of
legal and regulatory affairs, said
BTC was concerned that the rate
reductions - coupled with its uni-
versal service obligation - would

Fiscal

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government's fiscal
deficit narrowed 20.7 per cent to
$92.8 million during the first nine
months of the 2005-2006 fiscal
year when compared to the same
period last year, the Central Bank
of the Bahamas reported in its
economic and financial report for
April.

The Central Bank said the
Government’s total revenues ben-
efited from favourable economic
conditions to grow by $136.7 mil-

cause it losses.

Ms Johnson wrote: “The mag-
nitude of BTC’s universal service
obligation, which will increase
with further expansion of BTC’s
network into non-commercially
viable areas where the new
entrants will have no incentive
nor licence obligations to go,
must not be overlooked in the
benchmarking of BTC’s rates
with other jurisdictions.

“BTC expects that under the
proposed rates, its combined cost
of providing local and interna-
tional long distance services and
its obligations as provider of last
resort will exceed the revenues it
will receive from the provision of
those services, thereby incurring a
residual access deficit which must
be addressed by the PUC.”

Ms Johnson said a cost study of

deficit

lion to $856.1 million in the peri-
od from July 2005 to end-March
2006.

Tax earnings rose by 16 pér
cent to $108.9 million, supported
by increases in stamp taxes on
import of 18.3 per cent; a rise in
import duties of 18.2 per cent,
and other stamp taxes grew by
29.7 per cent.

In addition, non -tax revenue
advanced by $24.8 million or 65.5
per cent. Total spending expand-
ed by 13.4 pér cent to $948.9 mil-
lion, the result of increases in
both current and-capital expen-

~ Microsoft Server 2003, Exchange 2003, Linu, and

ACCPAC

* Ability to work with Minimal supervision —
e Excellent communicatin and organizational skills
* Willingness to relocate to Freeport, Bahamas

To apply for this position please e-mail your resume to:
hr@abcomarkets.com










NURSING CAREER
OPPORTUNITY

Plastic Surgery office is seeking a full time

REGISTERED
NURSE.

‘Great benefits; including assistance in
funding for Specialized training.

Intérested persons please fax resume to

Se8: at or Call 356-3189

for further information.









lat

Winoine Bay
ABACLEH BAHAMAS

Has two (2) vacancies for
Membership sales Executives:

-Exceptional written and verbal communication skills,

organization skills

-Exceptional Telephone skills

~Public speaking preferred

-Ability to demonstrate strong relationship sales capability
-Ability to interface professionally with all members

of staff

-Generation and execution of an annual business plan
Self generation of buisness through referrals and other

personal contacts

~Exceptionat skills in long range guest relaional anaaneenace
-Use of tracking system for effective follow up andcustomer

purchase sequence
_ College degree preferred



its services, performed by an éco-
nomic consultancy, NERA, had
shown that its international and
inter-island long distance rates
were substantially above the cost
of services.

However, BTC’s local rates
were priced below the cost of ser-
vice, and the state-owned carrier
would raise local rates as it
reduced long-distance tariffs in a
rate rebalancing exercise.

Ms Johnson said the cost of
providing local services in the
Family Islands were five to 10
times higher than in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama.

She added that the NERA
study had shown that the cost of
providing a telephone line var-
ied from $511 in New Providence
to $960 in Grand Bahama, $1,334
in Bimini, $2,308 in Cat Island,
ditures

In its outlook for 2006, the
Central Bank said that supported
by a number of tourism invest-
ment projects, the Bahamas was
poised to sustain a healthy level of
economic expansion. Private sec-
tor demand remained strong and
continued to stimulate construc-
tion investments.

‘However, the Central Bank
added that further gains in inter-
national oil and commodity prices
may place pressure on domestic
prices via inflation, as well as the
balance of payments’ current
account: in the medium term.

Comparing April 2006, to April
2005, the Central. Bank reported
that banks’ excess reserves
increased by $42.2 million to
$278.9 million, 52 per cent lower
than the 2005. advance.

Excess liquid assets grew $6.7
million to $179.4 million, signifi-
cantly below last year’s growth
of $44.4 million.

The external reserves in April
2006 advanced by $10.7 million
to $647.9 million, which was $9.5
million less than last year. This
development was reflected in the
47 per cent reduction in the Cen-
tral Bank’s net foreign currency
purchases to $10 million.

. Net purchases from commer-

cial banks narrowed by $12 mil-
lion to $18.6 million, while the

.Central Bank’s net sale. to the

public fell by $3.2 million to $8.6
million. There was also a signifi-
cant reduction in banks’ net pur-

and $4,103 in Mayaguana.

In addition, Ms Johnson said
NERA had calculated the aver-
age cost for BTC to maintain a
telephone line at $48 per month,
compared to the current $15 and
$36 charged to residential and
business customers respectively.

However, the PUC declined to
comment on BTC’s statements
regarding its universal service
obligation and access deficit.

Ms Johnson added: “BTC sub-
mits that for the sector to grow
and for the Bahamian public to
fully reap the economic and social
benefits of competition and
evolving technology, issues on the
access deficit and universal ser-
vice obligations of BTC must be
addressed expeditiously in the
face of an evolving sector where
new entrants ‘cherry pick’ the

20.7%

chases from their customers of
$25.7 million to $7.6 million.

Exchange control data sug-
gested that non- imports
remained relatively unchanged.

Bahamian dollar credit growth
of $34.3 million contrasted with

-last year’s contraction of $13.2
million.

Private sector credit growth
outpaced the 2005 advance of $40
million to reach $55.8 million.
This continued to be underpinned
by hikes in mortgages, $23.5 mil-
lion, and consumer credit of $22.2
million.

Foreign currency credit expan-
sion was relatively stable at $11
million, led by a $7.6 million
increase in credit to the private
sector ,which included a $2.5 mil-
lion hike in mortgages.

Bahamian dollar deposit
growth more than doubled to
$33.9 million, up from the $14.6
million in the previous year. In

addition, demand deposits firmed .

by $7.2 million to rebound from
the $15.7 million contraction last
year. Fixed deposits surpassed
last year’s $12 million to reach
$16 million. However, savings
deposits slowed from $18. 2 mil-
lion to $10.7 million.

’ During the first four months of
2006, excess reserves grew by
$83.6 million, $25.4 million high-

er than the previous year’s expan- .

sion, while excess liquid assets
saw reduced growth of*$67 mil-
lion, compared to 2005’s $73.8
million increase.

CREDIT SUISSE

markets which they will target.”

In response to BTC, the PUC
said it welcomed the carrier’s
intention to switch from regulat-
ed prices to ones that were cost-
oriented, as this would benefit
consumers and the Bahamian
economy.

In addition, the telecoms regu-
lator said cost-oriented prices
would encourage investment by
other operators in the Bahamian
telecoms sector.

The PUC offered BTC some
crumbs of support, agreeing with
the carrier that it was “in a hybrid
state of emergence” awaiting



Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCOIS WILLY, #11 KEMR
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to ihe Masest
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship,*;i¢r
‘| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
that any person who knows any reason why registra
naturalization should not be granted, should send a writtén
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight da
from the 30TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister resporisibie i}
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassali,

decisions on its possible privati-*..
sation. ora
And it also agreed that a num-
ber of rival Caribbean countries
did not face the challenge BTC
did in providing services to 18
islands in a 1,000 square mile - reg
radius, plus cays and island chains *
where there were settlements of {+
10 or more households. e
BTC also pointed out that’
some Caribbean countries were f,
now charging for local calls, with ~
Jamaica levying a tariff of $0.01
per minute, and the Sets
Islands charging $0.11 for the first » >
minute and $002 after that. ° «°

a”















ge %

E2ES ESA

"ge8 :
ty att sn & &

% & %

isa NUT YN ae lets i)

We are expanding our operations in Nassau and recite
Restaurant Hianagers.

THE IDEAL CANIDATES MUST POSSESS THE FOLLOWING;

Two years or more restaurant management experience
A strong background in a quick food service restaurant

environment

Motivated to be a good, role model for fellow workers
Computer skills including Excel and Microsoft Word
* Strong ability to communicate with customers, staff and others

A secondary education degree required



Compensation is based upon experience & skills

Bonus is base upon performance

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS ACCEPTED

Foward resumes to: info@sbarr obahamas.com oi
evk@sbarrobahamas.com or Fax # 356-033



Great Suisse Wealth Management Limited

is presently considering applications for a

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks.

CHIEF FINANCIAL/OPERATING OFFICER

It is setting new

standards which go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff
provides our clientele with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and
professional portfolio management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus
without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

Requirements:



- Aminimum of ten (10) years experience in banking with a large international institution at
Head Office level
- . Knowledge of trading, trade reconciliation, custody business, securities markets and funds

business

- Extensive experience with SWIFT and EUROCLEAR systems and procedures

- Deep knowledge of SOX related issues and US-GAAP standards
- Ability to speak and write in Portuguese and English

- Experience in analysis of financial ratios, variance analysis, Management Information Systems,
forecasting, budgeting and accounting
- Knowledge and working experience with Microsoft products (including word, excel, access,

etc.)

- Must have extensive working knowledge of GLOBUS and ADAC applications

- Ability to evaluate financial reports sent to our Head Office, create and/or implement new
financial reports according to Head Office guidelines and streamline the business segments

- Significant experience in a senior management role in an operational environment

- Comprehensive knowledge of operational and information technology principles, practices and
processes sufficient to interpret/analyze complex issues and develop innovative solutions to the
challenges effecting the business unit
- Strong problem solving and decision-making skills

- Strong interpersonal, oral and written communications skills
- Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Key Duties & Responsibilities will include:

- (Co-ordinate day-to-day operating of the main office
- Oversee various Management functions; particularly the Accounts and information &
Technology Departments
- Audit and liaisé with managers to ensure maintenance of standards

Applications should be faxed to: (242) 302-6398
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 2, 2006

«


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



ARNER BANK & TRUST (BAHAMAS) LTD.

Small offshore bank accepting applications for the position of: |

Private Banking Administrator

Knowledge/Skill Requirements

Minimum of two years banking or general office administration
experience

Knowledge of IBC legislation

Knowledge of Bahamas Investment Fund Legislation would
be an advantage

BIFS Banking certification preferred or with progress being
made to completion



Highly motivated and enthusiastic with good time management
skills

Ability to work well in small group enviroment

Computer skills essential

All applicants are asked to send their resumes by fax
for the attention of the Assistant Manager to:

Fax no. 242 394 5975
(NO TELEPHONE CALLS PLEASE)

Bahamas must ‘insist’™:
on OECD equality ©

FROM page 1B

ships and company accounts
record keeping.

The Bahamas was named as
being one of 21 nations, also
including the US and Ger-
many, plus chief competitors
such as the Cayman Islands
and Bermuda, which “either
have a type of partnership for
which no partner identity infor-
mation is required to be
reported, or a class of partners
(limited partners in a limited
partnership) where no identity
information is reported, or
both”.

The benchmarking exercise







@ play an active role in defining and implementing the group fiduciary strategy;

reported that in the Bahamas,
information on the identities
of general partnerships in the
Bahamas did not have to be
held by te authorities. Howev-
er, anti-money laundeing due
diligence still applied.

Meanwhile, on accounts
record keeping, the OECD
report alleged that the
Bahamas and other nations -
again including many of its
international financial services
competitors - did not meet one
of the standards developed by
its Global Forum, namely that
there was “no explicit require-
ment in all instances” to keep
underlkying documents such
as contracts and invoices.

In addition, while the Glob-
al Forum had said accounting

records should be kept for five: '
years or more, this retention”

period was “less than five years
in certain circumstances” in the
Bahamas and 15 other coun-
tries. Again, the Bahamas was
in good company, because the
US was also in this group.

Entities

The OECD said the
Bahamas-registered entities
that met all its accounting
information standards were
public companies and those in
the banking, securities and
insurance sectors.

‘ Mr Smith said the OECD
report had to be placed in a
global context where regula-

’ tory standards were constantly
evolving.

He added that the Bahamas
was moving in pace with this
process, and pointed out that
this nation had gone further
than many competitors and
OECD rivals in areas such as
banning the issuance of bearer
shares.

Many nations placed the’ |

burden for regulating bearer
shares on the registered entity
that incorporated the vehicles

SG Hambros, part of the SG Private Banking, provides a comprehensive wealth
management service.

SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Head of Trust & Fiduciary. Your primary role will be to:

manage the daily business operations of the Fiduciary Services area in an efficient, effective and profitable manner;

B be responsible for the growth of the fiduciary activities in compliance with legal, regulatory and industry standards;

â„¢@ ensure bank's relationships with clients are nurtured and optimized.

You should ideally hold. a Bachelor's of Law, Masters Degree in Business Administration, Society of Trust & Estate
Practitioners (STEP) designation or equivalent, and have at least 10 to 15 years’ international trust/private banking

experience.

You should have excellent client relationship and an in-depth knowledge of investment, trust and banking products.

SG Hambros

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package.

SG

Private Banking



Manager, Human Resources

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7788

SG Hambros Building, West Bay Street

.. Nassau, Bahamas
SOCIETE GENERALE GROUP



Pricing Information As Of:
29 May 20C






Previous: Clo Today's Clo

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of: Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRSs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

BH

NUOPUORPRPON?FO

pay

RR
NEO

.2Bahamas Supermarkets
~-OGaribbean Crossings (Pref)



. OABDAB
.OBahamas Supermarkets
3RND Holdings



SRE

Fund Name

1.2887 1.2327 Colina Money Market Fund 1.288727*
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Funa.7451 ***
2.3560 2.2072Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**

Colina Bond Fund 1 2h6AS SDF eee

1.1643 1.1006
sill

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX- 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

Colina

‘Financial Advisors Lid.



YIELD - last 12 month dividends

Fluency in French or Spanish would be an advantage. The incumbent will be required to travel.

Applications should be submitted to the following address, to arrive on or before 31 May 2006.

www.sghambros.com

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited is

licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act.



Change

b
NRO

EBOANUOFURFHO



Le

5S2wk-Hi- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily vot.Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months







ng price divided by the last 12 month earning

Bid $- Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $- Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol- Trading volume of the prior week






* - 19 May 2006

** - O01 May 2006

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bah
saserceeoee pope eeceray

Ep ee ee





*** - 30 April 2006



for which they were issues,
with the shares often having
to ‘immobilised’ by these
agents acting as custodian.

In addition, US states such
as Delaware and Nevada con-
tinue to issue bearer shares,
while the OECD report noted
that China did not have any
mechanism for identifying the
owner of bearer shares.

Mr Smith said: “It’s been an

argument that’s been made in.

the Bahamas for some time,
that we’ve gone way beyond
the OECD countries, which is
why it’s so important for us to
insist on a ‘level playing field’.

“By and large; we’ve demon-
strated the ability ti meet inter-
national standards and surpass
them.”

© Mr Smnith'said the Bahamas,
‘going forward, had to’be care-,



ful not to exceed or surpass
global standards on regulation
and information sharing, for
otherwise it was possible to
suspect the OECD was “push-
ing us more for their competi-
tive advantage”. -

The former FNM adminis-
tration in’ 2002 gave a condi-
tional commitment to the
OECD that the Bahamas was
willing -to comply with
demands for more transparen-
cy and show a willingness to
enter discussions on exchang-
ing information for tax pur-
poses, but only if OECD states
committed to a ‘level playing

store.
Requirements:
V Responsible

V Respectful
VY Trustworthy

V Team Player

VY Motivated

V Good Personality -
V Must have sure ride to and from work
Y At least 4 BGCSE’s

An increasingly growing entertainment store
seeks to-employ a Sales Clerk to assist in the



ing field’ was:achieved. CH

Bahamas: had gained:.a ‘Cons:
» vention’ Tax: deduction bene-3:: +\:

THE TRIBUNE: 33+i 7

Bui

yf re
















a we SH
Getic nl at

field’ on the issue. is Nitoaes
This they have conspicuous- +: :
ly failed to achieve, and this is.» «
likely to remain an elusive goal: : .
for the OECD. aged

Signed

‘Mr Smith said that while the -: »
Bahamas had signed a Tax: -.
Information Exchange Agree- ».
ment (TIEA) with the US,
which has now gone live:for: : .

‘civil-cases from this tax year:

onwards; it had. told:the 4
OECD it would only consider: ||
further TIEAs with its Euro-.;: :
pean members if a ‘level play- =:
He also pointed out that the =; >.”
US TIEA had to be seen in a »'
slightly different light, as the’) .



fit to boost the conferencing —
side of its tourism industry
under the principle of reci-
procity. grte”
Mr Smith said difficulties iri 42

meeting the ‘level playing field’ EE
condition were becoming
increasingly evident, with
countries becoming more pro-* “#7”
tective of their own interests.

“T don’t think we’ll ever see ‘y,

- it die,” Mr Smith said of the

‘harmful tax practices’ issue.
“What is dead is the manner}
in which they were trying high-
handedly to get others to com-.__

ply when they were not doing?! -:
it themselves.” WET

]
ee
ied
fs
f
en

\

ah ea

CASS EES Tae ara

Toy ny

Ec ae ea de eel tal

Interested persons, please telephone - . i

392-2435 to set up an interview.

3 UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of theleading Wealth © te



Managers in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value-enhancing services. In order to strengthen our
team we look for an additional? .

Client Advisor Brazil

In this challenging position you will be responsible
for the following tasks (traveling required):



tN:

Advisory of existing clients’

Acquisition of high net worth individuals
Presentation and implementation of investment
solutions in the client’s mother tongue

We are searching for a personality with solid
experience in wealth management, specialized in the
fields of customer relations, investment advice and
portfolio management. Excellent sales and advisory
skills as well as solid knowledge of investment
products are key requirements. A proven track record
with a leading global financial institution as well as
fluency in English and Portugese is essential.

Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O.Box N7757
Nassau, Bahamas



aA ese SEE ee eg paints

REARS NE OF ORE BE Teer a

La DOS eR EE:


THE FRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

General’s Office, said no lease
or grant had been signed to
convey the Treasury and
Crown land earmarked for the
development to Discovery
Land Company.

Dr Livingstone Marshall,
Baker’s Bay’s senior vice-pres-
ident for environmental and
community affairs, said the lat-
est legal move by the Associa-
tion “doesn’t come as a sur-
prise to:us”.

He added that the develop-
ers’ attorneys,: Graham,
Thompson & Co, would
“address this matter as appro-
priate”, with. Discovery Land
Company wanting the
Supreme Court-to deliver its
verdict and “bring this matter
to a close”.

“These legal: manoeuvrings :
are delaying opportunities for

Bahamians more than delay-
ing the project,” Dr Marshall
said. “We are confident that
based on what has been said
and done, Baker’s Bay will
prevail.”

He admitted that the.devel-
opers “did not anticipate it
would be five plus months
before we would be released”
from the undertaking, and they

were now looking forward to ©

getting on with the project
“and making an impact for this
country”.

Some 80-85 staff were still
employed at Baker’s Bay, with
Dr Marshall saying the delay
had mainly impacted Bahami-

- an contractors who would oth-

erwise have been employed to
construct the marina, buildings
and roads at the development.

On the Association, Dr Mar-

shall said: “The real challenge

for these folks is to sit down

BUSINESS

Baker’s Bay confident
project will ‘prevail’ §

and look at what is being
planned for this area, and stop
trying to try this case through
the newspapers.

“We feel very confident that
what we’re laying out in this
project is best for the environ-
ment.”

In his Notice of Motion, Mr
Smith alleged that the devel-
opers could not proceed with
the development because an
Environmental Management
Plan had yet to be approved
by the Bahamas Environment,
Science and Technology
(BEST) Commission.

He alleged that the Heads
of Agreement stipulated this
needed to be approved before
any construction phase could
commence.

Mr Smith also claimed that
the developers had not

‘ obtained the Town Planning...

and Building permits required



for the development.

To support his appeal for an
injunction, Mr Smith said it
was required to protect the
environment if the undertaking
was withdrawn. He claimed
that there would be “no preju-
dice to the developers” if the
project did not proceed while
waiting for the Supreme Court
verdict.

“The development is not, for
instance, the construction of a
dam, or power plant or other
urgently needed public infra-
structure for the benefit of the
general public,” Mr Smith
alleged.

“It is nothing more than a
real estate development for
private, not public, benefit.
The Government and thereby
the people of the Bahamas get
very little taxes, in view of the

‘concessions intended to be giv-

Prudent investing will give
you good retirement value

FROM page 2B

equity they built up over the years to
finance their retirement.

In the US, ‘reverse mortgages’ have
become hugely popular among retirees.
A reverse mortgage is a special type of
loan available to ‘equity-rich’, older home
owners. Repayment is not necessary until
the borrower sells the property or moves
into ajretirement community. The upside
of this type of loan is that you get to
unlock your equity and use these funds
to maintain a good quality of life.

- A downside to a reverse mortgage is
that the old ‘homestead’ no longer passes
\ wa A Ry Ls be '
i



to another family member, but becomes
another piece of marketable real estate
in the mortgage portfolio of a lending
institution. *

Your investment decisions matter

If you have $50,000 in savings, and you
earn 5 per cent a year on that money,
you'll run out of money in 14 years if you
withdraw $400 a month.

If you can earn 10 per cent a year on
that money, you can withdraw $400 a
month for your remaining lifetime and
perhaps also leave a little something to

_ your estate.

This means the value of learning about
investing can be worth more than a part-

cultural & Industrial

Corporation

Handicraft Development Department

Handicraft “STRAW” Training

(BAIC) |

Program
- Date: June 6th - 16th, 2006
Application Form

Registration Fee: $100.00

Name.
Island
Telephone

P.O. Box

District
Cellular

E-Mail

time job in one of our Malls.
Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered
Financial Analyst, is-vice-president - pen-
sions, Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major

shareholder of Security & General Insur-

ance Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are those of the
author and do not necessarily represent
those of Colonial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated com-
panies. Please direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantichouse.com. bs

eo h pp byrne?












uSTSELL



The Holiday Ice Building —

i No: 2B, peck tar .
| eg a

re eport City Subdivision
West Settler's Way




Space Is Limited To Twenty-Five (25) Persons ONLY

Contact:

Handicraft Development & Marketing Department
Antoinette Rolle, Antoinette Bain or Pam Deveaux at BAIC

Telephone #242 - 322-3740

Fax #242-322-2123 or 242-328-6542



TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 5B



For the pe pee
tat: news, resto, Insight -
| on Mondays: a

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SALE



~ 1 ACRE PLOT LICENSED TO.
NUFACTURE ICE AND WATER |

Located At :



and Bahama, Bahamas


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



Bey at- ee
MEd ea
newspaper in circulation,
just call 322-1986 today!

NOTICE

HR AND OFFICE MANAGER

A leading mid-size professional firm is looking
- for someone to serve as both HR and Office
Manager. Applicants must have accredited HR
qualifications, a minimum of 5 years experience
in HR and possess a good working knowledge
of labour law.

Please send resumes via email to:

HRBahamas@hotmail.com

| Credit Suisse Wealth
nited

is presently considering applications for a



WES Ess

FROM page 1B

the reductions would especial-
ly benefit the Bahamian
tourism and financial services
industries.

However, it acknowledged
that BTC’s new international
and inter-island tariffs would
make use of illegal callback
and VoIP services only “mar-
ginally” less attractive for
Bahamian business and resi-
dential consumers, as the rates
were still relatively high i in a
global context.

The regulator said bench-
marking studies had shown
that BTC’s proposed new rates
were not anti-competitive, as
they were not substantially
below the efficient costs to pro-
vide the service.

Instead, the PUC. said:
“International long distance
rates in the Bahamas reflect
primarily market conditions
and BTC’s- unbalanced price
structure - the need to sub-

sidise local prices and fund uni-

versal Service..........

“The PUC’s benchmark

study revealed that BTC’s pro-
posed rates/prices were only
comparable to rates in juris-

‘ab ops | are ae ~~ HEAD OF SALES
(Private Banking)

dictions where markets are

characterised by monopolistic
conditions and the pricing
structure

“Furthermore, the proposed
rates/prices are still high by
international standards, and it

‘is unlikely that these rates are

below cost, and hence there is
no basis for raising concerns
about predatory pricing in
retail markets.”

Rates

The only jurisdictions found:

to have similar rates to BTC’s
were those still suffering from
monopolies in their telecoms
sectors - the British Virgin
Islands, Turks & Caicos Islands
and Antigua & Barbuda.
Even after BTC implements

' the rate reduction, its interna-

tional long distance rates will
still be 62.1 per cent to 100 per
cent higher than the costs of
making a call to the Bahamas
from its major trading partners
- the US, Canada and Switzer-
land."Compared to the UK,
BTC's rates will be between
15-28.8 per cent higher.

And compared to the cost
of calling the Bahamas from



Management

Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. itis setting new standards that go

“eae beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investment counseling and professional portfolio management. Our total commitment is always

Qualifications:

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Ve: |: _to our clients and we focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

- Minimum 10 years weil rounded investment banking experience géared toward the marketing and



Advising clients on investment opportunities in the global markets
Resporisible for execution of client orders, monitor cash management and client portfolios

eh
ey Rae

f
e
&
&

Strong risk management and portfolio management skills

- Strong management and leadership skills

Well versed in Swiss banking practices and standards
PC Literacy (MS Word, Access, Excel) and Bloomberg experience

Fluent Portuguese and English

Duties:
The candidate will be expected to:

sale of investment products and services in an aggressive trade oriented environment

Manage a highly sophis ticated and trade oriented team of relationship managers
In-depth knowledge of international Money Market/Forex Exchange Trading/Treasuties/Emerging
Markets/Derivatives/Securities Operations/Execution, etc.

Manage a substantial clientele base of sophisticated ultra high net worth individuals

Develop, recommend and ensure the implementation of the bank’s marketing and sales strategy
Travel extensively tc develop new client relationships
Monitor/evaluate the bank's position and oversee existing and prospective trading activities
Provide advice and guidance to dealers and traders engaged in treasury activities
Supervise Provide sales support to relationship managers

Personal walities:

- Excellent organizational and communication skills
- Highly motivated with a commitment to service excellence
“ Degree (or equivalent) in Business Administration, Finance or Economics

Benefits provided include:

zs Competitive salary, performance bonus plus health and life Insurance

Applications should be submitted by fax to: (242) 302-6398
Or by mail to: Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS JUNE 2; 2006

‘MK |

is very unbal-.

other islands that have a rela-
tively high per capita income
level, BTC's proposed ILD
rates will still be 112.9 per cent
to 165.6 per cent higher when
approved.

The high income island
economies the PUC used as
benchmarks for its survey were
Bermuda, Barbados, the
British Virgin Islands, the Cay-
man Islands and Guernsey. All
are competitors in financial
services, and most are also
rivals in tourism.

Finally, benchmarked
against Caribbean competitors
in tourism and financial ser-
vices, BTC’s rates will be 20-
247 per cent higher.

BTC's proposed rate

reductions are:

* For outgoing calls to the
US, a reduction from $0.51 per
minute to $0.47 per minute, a
drop of $0.04 or 7.8 per cent.

* For calls to Canada, a drop
from $0.54 per minute to $0.50

per minute, a cut of 74 per

cent.

* For the Caribbean apart

from ‘Cuba, a reduction from .

$0.70 per minute to $0.66 per
minute, a fall of 5:7 per cent.

* For calls to Cuba, a‘cut
from $1.75 per minute to $0.85
per minute, a reduction of

_ $0.90 or 51.43 per cent.

* For all other countries, a

THE TRIBUNE



cut from $0.89 per minute. to
$0.85 per minute, a drop of 4:5
per cent.

However, in a partial ou
cession to IndiGo Networks,
the PUC said BTC was
‘required to begin discussions
on new interconnection rates
for long distance calls in return
for its new rates being
approved.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for ai, 4
good cause, campaigning »
for improvements in the
area or have won an

award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
and share your story. Ei



on

WINDING Bay
ABACR BAHAMAS

Has two (2) vacancies for
Sales & Marketing Project Director:

: -Responsibile for. onsite coordination of ‘sales, sales

administration and market.

-Achievement of targeted salés volume and maintaining

inventory.

-Develop future(MVCI experience preferred) managers and

implement self employed

-Implementation of tour efficiency and building g of strong

team values

-Forecast and budget annual sales targets.
-Ensure communication, between personnel and others

-Strong leadership skills

-Minimum 5 years marketing vacation ownership
-Minimuin 5 years marketing in management of sales,
marketing and/ or administration
-College degree preffed, but not required.

OF SALE

NOTICE

The Town Court Management Company -:
(hereafter “the Company’’) invites offers for
the purchase of ALL THAT Unit Number C-
44 of The Town Court Condominiums situated.
on Nassau Street in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence being a one
bedroom/one bath apartment unit together with:
ALL THAT 1.26% share in the common
property of the Condominiums.

The Company makes no representations or
warranties with respect to the state of repair of
the building situate thereon.

The Company will sell under Power of Sale |
contained in a Declaration of Condominium

of Town Court Condominiums dated 8th -
October 1979 which is recorded in Book 3189 i

at pages 366 to 405.

TERMS:

Ten percent (10%) of the

purchase price at the time of
contract and the balance upon
completion within Thirty (30)

days of contract.

This sale is subject to reserve price. The }.
Company reserves the right to reject any and

all offers.

x
4}

«

Interested persons may submit written offers '

addressed to the Attorney R. Dorsett, P.O. Box : |
N-272, Nassau, Bahamas to be received no},
later than the close of business on the 2nd day ; |

of June, A.D., 2006.


TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 7B





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CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS
1 ~ Step taken with heavy heart in
prison (5)
Is such grass nice to lie on? (5)

accommodation (5)

In which the spectators have no
seats? (5)

Do the same (5)

She helps hang out the
washing (3)
Story of the picture (4)

Many keen to make a name (5)
Could it make a hole in a towel
outright? (6)

Brilliant performer in space (4)
Crime of passing dud notes? (3)
We figure to tum up ata

Operatic character to see and
Copy (5) se

Full of intestinal fortitude (5)

A drink and a good thing to eat?
Thats the stuffl (7)

Father leaves the pageant to be

. arranged by a deputy (5)

# 8 B88 8 8 BBN SESS BES FE Bee

Exclude a law that’s wrong (4,3)
A growing source of second-class

Mother with one baby at least (7)

Grating the front of the car! (6)

Those bashed by the peelers? (5)

BBR 8 SR SEERE

DOWN
Boiling could tum one soft (6)
Being sarcastic gets one right
ahead, | see (6)

The odd bit of crumpet (3): -
Bearing in mind, maybe, the
overall requirement (5)

Sweet letter for us, tucked inside a
card (7)

Mr Cotton's forename? (4)
Scrub a can opener clean,
perhaps (6) fs
Said to be due to Calvin being
noble (5)

Warms to me and some.
Officers (5) ‘

Gir stuff (5)

Dog in orbit (5)

Such painting can be green (5)
Farmer, saint or soldier boy (5)
If.cited wrongly, shows
inadequacy (7)

Equestrianism in old Yorkshire (6)
Start scoffing steak, and steal
some fruit (6)

Moming employed in being
entertained (6)

Jam and cake, perhaps (5)
Write something personal (4)
Too much talk of a terror

weapon (3)

SEE a a TTT

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Out-pu-t 7, Clear off 8, Tripod 10, Areas 13, P-e-al 14, M-end 15,
W-ant 16, Sin. 17, Abet 19, 1O-TA 21, Di-rectory 23, To-re 24, Hind 26, Tot 27,
Thus 29, Emit 32, Co-O-p 33, Prior 34, Lament 35, Every-day 36, Port-a-L

DOWN: 1, S-Cram 2, He me-n 3, Eros 4, Of-ten 5, Tail 6, Utopia 9, Ration 11, Reg.
12, Adair 13, Patch up 15, We-E 16, Sty 18, Br-Eton 20, (in) Order 21, Dot 22,
T-Is. 23, To-bag-O 25, Rio 28, Hotel 30, Minds 31, Trays 32, Cent 33, Park

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Secure 7, Elephant 8, Aromas 10, Slope 13, Drew 14, Tuna 15, Feel

16, Sew

17, Stir 19, Arid 21, Statistic 23, Seen 24, Vied 26, Bet 27, Deep 29,

Edit 32, Herd 33, Crude 34, Resume 35, Complete 36, Sextet

DOWN: 1, Beast 2, Heron 3, Shoe 4, Stare 5, Crow 6, Reaped 9, Relate 11, Lug 12,
Paste 13, Derived 15, Fit 16, Sic 18, Tandem 20, Rider 21, Set 22, Sip 23,
Serene 25, Bid 28, Erect 30, Duped 31, Tenet 32, Hunt 33, Cope

Ld
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RSS & BS HERESS OF

4



. this place (4)

jap
’ affectionately
3)

Pa game (7)
Started (5)

-Greek dish (5)

Viper (5)
Obtain (7)
Type of
wood (5)
Box (5)



COMICS PAGE

~~"

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Importance of Good Timing

East dealer.

Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
#K732
Â¥Q10942
07
&A 105
WEST EAST
#31085 @AD ©
V86 VAK53
8632 #QJ1094
842 $96
SOUTH
@Q64
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#KQI73
The bidding:
East South West North
1¢ 1NT Pass 39
Pass 3-NT

Opening lead — two of diamonds.

In many hands, declarer appears
to have only a remote chance to
make the contract. Nevertheless, he
is duty-bound to exploit whatever
chance he has. (

A simple illustration of this prin-
ciple is provided by today’s deal.
West led a diamond, taken by
declarer with the ace. South could
count seven sure tricks and, in an
effort to: gain two more, set about
establishing the heart suit.

“East took the jack with the: king



shown here?

In making a word, each letter may be
used once only. Each must contain the
centre letter and there must be at least
nine-letter word in the list. No plurals or
verb forms ending in s, no words with initial
capitals and no words with a hyphen or

apostrophe are permitted. The first word

a phrase is permitted (eg inkjet in

inkjet printer).

TODAY'S TARGET
Good 33;

very good 49;
excellert 65.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

Bea

HOW many words of four letters or —
more can you make from the letters.



and returned a diamond. South won
and led another heart. This play
brought declarer to 10 winners, but,
unfortunately, East cashed three dia-
monds and the ace of spades to
defeat the contract two tricks.

The outcome indicates the impor-
tance of timing. Declarer’s line of
play was bound to fail, since there
was no way he could come to nine
tricks before the opponents scored at
least six of their own if he tried to

“develop dummy’s hearts.

South has. but one chance to
make the contract: He must try to
score two spade tricks before the
opponents’ diamonds become estab-
lished. The bidding’ indicates that
East has the ace of spades. Declarer’s
only real hope is that East was dealt

the singleton or doubleton ace, and .

he should proceed accordingly.

At trick two, South should cross
to dummy with a club and lead a low
spade. East has no choice but to play
low, and South wins with the queen.
Declarer then returns a spade, and
after West follows low, so does
dummy. When East produces the ace,
South has nine tricks.

It may be argued that South has to
be lucky to make the contract on this
line of play, but when no other realis-
tic option exists, luck is about My one

- can hope:-for.

BIMONTHLY bint blot bolt both bothy hilt hint holt hotly into ‘lint litho loth
milt mint minty molt month monthly moth myth omit thin thinly thymol tiny

toby toil tomb

oe un (4)
Curve-(3)

A device.that
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Brel ka gy aoe
Brats a til



Krisztin Szabo v Lajos Portisch,
Hungarian championship
2006. A sad position, this.
Forty years ago Portisch was
Hungary's undisputed chess
king, a world-title candidate
and a grandmaster admired for
his deep strategic concepts. 3
Now aged 69, he went a
bridge too far when he entered _
the 2006 national contest
against a much younger
generation. Following a series
of defeats, today’s game
represented his last realistic
opportunity to avoid the
dreaded bottom place. By
coincidence his opponent had
the same surname as Laszlo
Szabo, another great player
whom Portisch had deposed
after a bitter struggle. Sadly
for the old maestro, the

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

TUESDAY,
MAY 30.

ARIES — March 21/April 20
Remember that you are free to make
your own decisions in life, Aries.
Don’t let others tell you what to do
this week.

TAURUS - April 21/May 1
Usually, you prefer to play it safe,
but this week you may be tempted
to gamble on something. Be. careful,
this is not a good time to take risks
with what you own and earn:

GEMINI — May 22/June 21
You’ll feel a burst of energy this
week, Gemini. The good times have
returned for you. Live it up —
you’ve worked hard in recent weeks,
and deserve the chance to celebrate.
Getaway for the weekend if you can.

CANCER -— June 22/July 22
You want to succeed in the world at
large, Cancer, and at long last, the
chance to prove yourself has
arrived. Make the most of it — stop
dreaming and start doing.

LEO - July 23/August 23

Power struggles of one sort or
another may highlight your week,
Leo, but things will get better by the
weekend. In the meantime, try to

‘pwork' with people; not against them.

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

You won’t be able to please every-
one this week, Virgo, so you’re
going to have to make a choice.
Then, you have to stick to your guns.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Optimism is a great thing; and you
certainly have a lot of it this week,
Libra. However, be careful not to let
this translate into risky behavior.
Even you are not invincible.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Something that has worried you for
some time will no longer matter this
week. The problem itself may not
change, but your attitude toward it
will. This, as you will see, makes all
the difference.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Are you someone who brings peo-
ple together or ‘pushes them apart?
If you’re lucky, it’s the former, but

# if not, now is the time to make a

positive change.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll accomplish more if you
don’t try to fit everything into a
:.gid timetable this week. A little
chaos may be a good thing and
inspire you to be more creative.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18
The trials and: tribulations of recent
weeks have passed. There has never
been a better time to begin your life
anew. Think only of the future.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20

Someone out there may make life
tough for you this week, but you’ll
give as good as you get. By
Thursday, things will settle down,
and you can get back to your old self.

&





diagram shows his h8 king eyed
for the kill by White's queen, rooks
and bishops. How did White (to

play) win quickly?

LEONARD BARDEN

SI Ea EE NE ET PS LF PN TE

__*SUIM pue g6Xq 2 +79%0 F968
+164 € B6y +9Na Z 6x9 {xd T6778 VORNIOS ssett)
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006



uincy Pratt aims for comebac
fight against Meacher Major

BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

CALLING him a “paper
champion who hasn’t been test-
ed on the local front”, Quincy

’ *Thrill-A-Minute’ Pratt said he
has a personal interest in fight-
ing Bahamas and FEDECaribe
lightweight champion Meacher
‘Pain’ Major.

Forced to retire three years
ago after the Bahamas Boxing
Commission stripped him of
his licence because of an eye
injury, Pratt said he wants to
come back just to fight Major
before the year is over.

“I was highly upset with the
way the fight went down,” said
Pratt of Major’s recent achieve-
ment at the First Class Promo-
tions’ show at the Wyndham
Nassau Resort Ballroom when
he stopped Mexican Luis
‘Lichi’ Couch in the first round.

“I talked with a lot of fans
in the past week and they were
highly upset about what hap-
pened and that encouraged me
to come back and fight Meach-
er.”

Pratt, now devoting his time
to coaching his Eastside Ama-
teur Boxing Club, said he’s
hoping that the new board of
the commission will renew his
licence so that he can take on
Major.

“Meacher, to me, has not
proven himself, especially at
home. Holbert Storr is the
number one contender for his
title and that fight never mat-
eralised.

“But I want him to ‘exw
that since I was the last one to
fight for the title before he won
it, I hope that I will be given
the opportunity to fight him.”



Nadal starts his French

Open defe

Before he retired, Pratt had
three memorable fights with
Ray Minus Jr. for the ban-
tamweight and lightweight
titles, losing all three encoun-
ters.

Minus Jr., who also has
retired, has nurtured and
groomed Major to where he is
today.

At age 36, Pratt said once ,

the commission gives him per-
mission, he will take a tune-up
fight and then take on Major
for his Bahamas lightweight
title.

“[’m‘not interested in the
FEDECaribe title because it
means nothing to me. To me,
it’s just a paper title,” Pratt
charged. “It’s short cut boxing
because the only titles that
matter are the British Com-
monwealth and the WBA,

WBC, IFA and IFF titles. You-

have to earn them.

“T hear them saying that
Meacher is going to fight for
the British Commonwealthti-
tle, but he has to get ranked
first. He can’t just walk into
the British Commonwealth
fight because it’s totally differ-
ent from the Caribbean title
fights.”

Despite his age, Pratt said
he’s as active as “he was when
he was training for the show-
downs against Minus Jr. — run-
ning at least four times a week
and sparring in the gym while
he trains his young protégés.

“The people want to see this
fight because Meacher Major is
one of the better fighters in the
country,” Pratt noted. “I’m

‘sure that if me and him fight,

we will have to have that fight
in the Sports Centre because
the people know what I can do.
It will be a fight.”









SPORTS





@ HOPING FOR COMEBACK: Quincy Pratt

nce with record



nted Material
ed Content

Copyri

\ Syndicate
Available from Commercial News Providers

TRIBUNE SPORTS ,

_ Baseball
- Federation
| prepares for

_ ‘Big Show

a BASEBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

IT WILL be a busy
weekend for the
Bahamas Baseball Feder-
ation as it hosts the.
fourth annual.National
Junior Baseball Champi-
onships.

The four day champi-
onships will get under-
way on Thursday and run
through Sunday with
games being played at
the Freedom Farm in
Yamacraw and the
Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre.

Federation secretary
general Teddy Sweeting
said they are looking for-
ward to this year’s cham-
pionship being the most
competitive with more
than 30 teams registered
from seven different
islands.

“We’re calling it ‘the
Big Show,’” said Sweet-
ing. “It’s truly an indica-
tion of where baseball is
headed in the country.

Registered

“When we first started
out and getting it organ-
ised, we had just 12
teams participating in
our initial tournament.
This year, we have close
to 34 teams registered to
compete for the national
championship i in five
divisions.”

With so many games to ~

be played, Sweeting said
they are gearing up fora

,

very long weekend, but it |
will be a significant occa-

sion for the sport in the
country.

“We’re seeing the
resurgence of baseball
coming back to the

prominence it once had,” vo
Sweeting insisted. “When :*

you have seven of your
Family Islands coming
together to compete in a
junior sport, I think that
is significant for team
sports.”

Teams from Inagua,
Eleuthera, Abaco, Exu-
ma, Grand. Bahama and

‘Bimini are expected to

converge in New Provi-

dence this weekend for

the championships.
From the champi-

‘onships, the federation

will be selecting players
to represent the national
team that will compete in
the 9-10 Pony World
Series and the 12-and-
under team for the Little
League World Series in
Puerto Rico in July 6-12
and 26-30 respectively.

Direction

“We feel we’re heading
in the right direction and
from this tournament, we
will look at all of our
people, especially those
who are coming home
from college,” said
Sweeting, of the junior

team that will travel to
Orlando in August.

’

The championship will .

kick off at 5.30pm on
Thursday when the play-
ers and officials will

march from Chapter One |

Book Store at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas to

the Andre Rodgers Base-,

ball Stadium.

A rematch of last
year’s finals in two of the
five divisions will follow.
In the Coaches’ Pitcher,
champions Freedom
Farm will take on the
Junior Baseball League
of Nassau, followed by
champions Spanish Wells
Divers against Freedom

Farm in the 12-and-under

division.
On Friday at 8am, the
championship will



ta wae

resume with a full slate «

of games being played at
Freedom Farm. The

championship games will’:

be played on Sunday and ,

the teams will return
home on Monday.

%,

SOI
TRIBUNE SPORTS . A TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006, PAGE 9B



SPORTS co ) : ae
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TUESDAY, MAY 30, 2006

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19

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CO me =e mm

SPORTS

- MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Cleare clocks
. stadium ' ecord |

at NAIA event

. @ TRACK AND FIELD ;
' By KELSIE JOHNSON

Junior Sports Reporter

AARON Cleare headed
’ into the National Association
- of Intercollegiate Athletics

- (NAIA) Outdoor Track and,

‘ Field Championships with the
' third fastest time in the men’s
400 metres, then, when the
_ clock was stopped, the
: Olympian walked off with a
new stadium record.

Cleare of Dickinson State,
clocked 47.15 seconds to take
top honours and set a new
stadium record at the meet
which was held at Fresno
Pacific University, in Fresno,
California. The two-year old
record of 47.87 seconds was
held by Tony Ramirez.

Also lining up in the finals
of the 400m was Ramon
Miller. In the semi-final
rounds Miller clocked 47.46
seconds for second in his
heat, but didn’t finish in the
finals.

Adrian Griffith wheeled in
two medals, a silver and
bronze to assist Dickinson
State with their third consec-
utive conference title.

The silver medal for -Grif-
fith came in the 200m while
the bronze medal was secured
in the 100m.

Winning the 200m was

Michael Rodger in 21.23 sec- |

onds and Rascive Grant was
third in 21.46 seconds. In the
* 100m Griffith recorded 10.29
seconds, finishing in second
was Rodger in 10.21 seconds
while the first spot went to
Yhann Plummer in 10.20 sec-
onds.
It was a Bahamian affair in

Bahamians compete —
in Fresno, California



the long jump event at the
nationals. The three top spots

-in the event went to Bahami-

ans — leading the. charge was
Trevor Barry.

Barry soared to 7.82m (25-
08.00) for the win over Grif-
fith who leapt to 7.74m (25-
04.75) and Rudon Bastian’s
7.69m (25-02.75).

From the long jump pit
Barry moved to the high
jump bed where he had to
settle for second. Barry was
among six athletes to set a
new stadium record, a new
national record was also set
in the event by top performer
Mike Mason.

Mason cleared 2.22m (7-
03.25) for the win, the old
national record was record-
ed at 2.21m and stood for 10
years. Second spot in the
event went to Barry who
cleared 2.19m (7-02.25) and
the third spot to Jerome Fos-
ter of Missouri Baptist in
2.13m (6-11.75).

Getting things started for
the females were Tamara
Rigby, Petra Munroe and
Lanece Clarke, all competi-
tors in the 100m.

Out the trio, Rigby would
walk away with the medal
leaving Munroe and Clarke
out of the haul.

Rigby clocked 11.77 sec-
onds for second place behind

|

4

Nickesha Anderson who ran
to 11.41 seconds for the top
spot and Equilla Weatherton
recorded 11.78 seconds for
third. Munroe would finish
just short of the medal with a
timing of 11.82 seconds for
fourth place. Clarke woul |
line-up for the start, but had
to walk away empty handed
after false starting.

Rigby would move onto the
finals of the 200m to capture
a bronze medal with a timing
of 24.55 seconds, while
Clarke would have to settle

for a seventh place ranking

with 24.95 seconds. Winning
the event was Anderson with
23.86 seconds and Stephanie
Allers was second with 24.36
seconds.

Winning the women’s title
was Missouri Baptist. Partic-
ipating for the school at the
national championships was
Clarke.

At the NCAA Regional
East championships, Douglas
Lynes-Bell finished up sixth
in the men’s 400m hurdles
with a best time of 50.93 sec-
onds. His qualifying time was
clocked at 50.62 seconds.
Winning the event was Bryan
Steele in 49.65 seconds, Jason
Richardson was second with
49.90 seconds and Justin Gay-
mon was third in 50.20 sec-
onds.



‘Injury hampers

Chandra Sturrup

‘TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

IT WASN'T the type of season
opener that sprinter Chandra
Sturrup expected. In fact, anoth-
er nagging injury almost pre-
vented her from competing.

But, having sat out the entire
indoor season, Sturrup didn’t
want to pass up the opportunity
to compete in one of the biggest
outdoor meets in the United
States.

Competing at the Prefontaine
Classic in Eugene, Oregon on
Sunday, Sturrup clocked a sub-
par 11.58 seconds for eighth place
in the women’s 100 metres.

The event was won by Ameri-
can Torri Edwards in 11.08 with
Jamaican Sherone Simpson sec-
ond in 11.12 and American
Rachel Boone-Smith third in
11.21.

“T shouldn’t have ran yester-
day, but I was feeling a lot better,
so I just decided to go out and
give it an effort,” said Sturrup,
who suffered spasms in her ver-
tebrate and her left shoulder and
neck.

“T’m in shape, but because of.

the problem, I really should not
have competed.”

Also at the meet was quarter-
miler Christine Amertil. She ran
51.86 for fifth place just behind
American Dee Dee Trotter, who

Star struggles at
-Prefontaine Classic



was clocked in the same time.

American Sanya Richards won
the race in 50.89 with Jamaican
Shericka Williams second in 51.29
and Mexican Ana Guevara third
in 51.62.

Sturrup, the oldest of the
famed Bahamian Golden Girls’
sprinting crop still competing, suf-

fered the injury last Wednesday.
when she was wrapping up her.
training for the weekend season

opener.
“But when I was up there in
Eugene, it kind of calmed down,”
said Sturrup, who just wanted to
get back on the track after miss-
ing the majority of last year.
This weekend, Sturrup is

’ scheduled to travel to Oslo, Nor-

way to compete in the Bislett
Games on Friday and then she
will travel to Norwich. Union
British Grand Prix in Gateshead,
Great Britain on Friday, June 11.

“I’m hoping that by Oslo, it
would calm down even more,”
Sturrup stressed. “If it does, then
I know I will be able to compete
the way I should.

“Before this happened, Iwas
feeling real good and my training
was coming on real well. I was
looking forward to opening up
with at least 11.0’s or 11.1.”

Depending on how she does.
in those two meets, Sturrup: will.
make a determination on how;
the remainder of the outdoor sea-_
son will go for her. eee

The good thing is that this is an
off-year with not any major inter-
national meet to compete in,
except for the Central American .
and Caribbean Games in Carta-
gena, Colombia at the end of

_ July.

“J just want to stay healthy and
run some races and do well,”
Sturrup projected. “My main
focus is to do well and stay
healthy because I’ve been injured ©
all year, keeping me out of
indoors for at least 3-4 months.

“But things happen and ’m
just trying to move on. I’m just
going to take it race by race and
see how my body feels.

“That’s my main concern right
now.”




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