Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

?m lovin’ it.

Ss Biriit,

Wal
72F |

VARIABLE CLOUDS, |
I STORM OR 10 |



ne

SECRET SOUND

Officer set to face

manslaught

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN A move that sparked
outrage among the island’s
police force, the inquest into

the shooting death of
Pinewood resident Deron
Bethel was called off yester-
day when an officer suspected
in the shooting was referred
to the magistrate’s court to
face manslaughter charges.

Detective Corporal

Nathaniel Charlow of the-

Central Detective Unit
(CDU) appeared before the
Coroner’s Court yesterday
morning, only to be told by
Coroner Linda Virgill that the
Attorney General had
referred the matter to a crim-
inal- court, eliminating the
need to conduct an inquest.

However, up until press
time last night’Charlow had
not been arraigned before the
courts.

Speaking with The Tribune
late yesterday afternoon,
deputy of prosecutions Cheryl
Bethell-Grant said that the
case is still under review by
Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson.

“She is expected to make a
decision (today),” she said.

Mrs Bethell-Grant said she
could not disclose the reason
for the cancellation of the
inquest.

However, she said that call-

ing off an inquest is one of the’

constitutional rights of the
attorney general and not an
unusual occurrence.

. police shootings,”

er charges

Deron Bethel, 20, was killed
on March 28 in a run in with
police. The incident allegedly
happened when police entered
the Pinewood community to
investigate a report of domes-
tic violence.

In a show of solidarity,
scores.of officers from the
CDU left their posts yester-
day to appear on Bank Lane

“to support their colleague.

Talking to The Tribune in
front of the.courts, Inspector
Bradley Sands, executive
chairman of the Police Staff
Association, claimed that this
move by the Attorney. Gen-
eral shows a “total disregard
for the whole process.’

“Tn all of my 20 years plus,
police shootings have been
dealt with by the Coroner’s.

“Due process is the order
of the day. If we extend due

_process to the common crimi-

nal on the road, let’s extend
it to members of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force that
find themselves embroiled in
Inspector
Sands said. _

Desmond Bannister, lawyer
for Officer Charlow, claimed
that the attorney general’s
decision was “very unfair” to

_his client and all police offi-

cers.

“Police officers put their
lives-on the line on every sin-
gle day. This man is putting
his life on the line and those of
his colleagues, and having to
be threatened and facing

SEE page eight



AUTO INSURANCE

ace







Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006









@ FROM right te to left: Detective Corporal Nathaniel Charlow with his site,
attorney Desmond Bannister and a police officer in the background.

Ingraham responds
to criticism by
Shane Gibson

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter



“IN A democratic society, demagoguery
should not prevent persons from pursuing
their rights before the courts, former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Ingraham was answering criticism lev-
elled at him by Labour and Immigration Min-
ister Shane Gibson for criticising the former
prime minister for encouraging Haitian immi-
grants to sue the Bahamas government fol-
lowing the recent controversial apprehension
exercise carried out by the immigration
department in Eleuthera.

And while he said that the “foolish state-
ment” made by Mr Gibson— that the FNM
government and its weak immigration policy
was the cause of the illegal immigration prob-
lem — was not worthy of comment by him, it

SEE page 11

&







FOUR oiiee
SUS nas

brewkiust howrs oly.

Officers reluctant to
respond to violent
dispute reports

@ By ANASTACIA MOREE

WITNESSES were shocked by the reluc-
tance of four police officers to respond to
reports of a violent dispute that resulted in a
gun being drawn.

Bystanders called the police to report a
man brandishing a gun in public. Eventually
they had to go to a nearby police station for
help when officers failed to arrive.

Upon arriving at the South Beach Police
Station, the concerned members of the public
were surprised to see four officers - who
admitted being aware of the incident — sitting
at a desk eating pizza and drinking sodas.

According to the sergeant on duty, there
were not enough officers at the station for
anyone to be dispatched.

When officers from the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) finally arrived, an half-hour after

the incident was reported, the man with the

SEE page 11
WITH SCWNIELSY SGG3:

sare

UD SHESSS on

Available during





(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Police officials deny:-
claim that officers were
detained in raid on
suspected numbers racket
@ By MARK HUMES

POLICE officials have denied allegations
that officers attached to the Royal Bahamas
Police Force were among the 23 individuals
taken into custody after being’ found in a
house suspected of illegal gambling.

A source with close connections to the
force claimed on Tuesday that some officers
were detained during a raid on a suspected
numbers racket in the Grove last week.

Police press liaison officer Inspector Wal-
ter Evans said 23 Haitians were rounded up
in the raids and that around $40,000 in cash
and gambling paraphernalia were confiscat-
ed. .

However, speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday, Assistant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson said that he was unaware of any
officers being detained during the operation.

“If any police officers were arrested in that

SEE page 11











PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

ee

Unionists predict an unhappy
future for Bahamian workers |

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

UNION leaders Patrick Bain
and Obie Ferguson predict a
grave future for Bahamian
workers if things do not change
in the Bahamas.

Mr Bain, president of Nation-
al Congress of Trade Unions
(NCTU), in outlining the future
facing: Bahamian workers, said
that “workers of this country
are facing many problems —
from unsafe and unhealthy
working conditions, to failure
of employers to make national
insurance contributions for their
employees, union-busting tac-

tics, inadequate laws to protect
workers, the onset of trade
agreements like the FTAA,
WTO and the CSME and the
uncertainty these new features
will bring to the Bahamian
labour market.” :

The unions have been invited
by the new Minister of Immi-
gration, Labour and Training
Shane Gibson to submit a list
of recommendations on the
Labour Code, addressing issues
that negatively affect workers
in the Bahamas.

The list is reported to include
a proposal that the minimum
wage be increased.

NOW HIRING

Wendy's is now recruiting

Crew Members,

Mr Ferguson, president of
the Trade Union Congress
(TUC), said that this has been
an issue with Bahamian labour-
ers for many years. Currently
the minimum wage is $150.
The recommendation is to
increase that by at least $150.

“The average worker can-
not survive on the minimum
wage — the cost of living is too
high,” Mr Ferguson argued.

The NCTU and the TUC
have collaborated to finalise
the list that will be presented
to Mr Gibson the day before
Labour Day.

Both parties believe that the
recommendations will be met
favourably. “It is our view that
once these recommendations
are submitted, Minister Gibson
will take immediate steps to
bring the amendments to par-
liament and help the Bahamian
workers improve their standard
of living,” Mr Bain said.

Another concern of the

‘unions is the apparent prefer-

Celebrations planned for

THE National Congress of

Trade Unions and the Trade .

Union Congress invited all



THE TRIBUNE

© In brief

' Reward
announced
for missing
person

& FROM left, Obie Ferguson (president of CBTUC), Patrick
Bain (president of NCTU) and Fred Munnings jr



@ ANDREW Sands

Mr Ferguson said he
believes that the Bahamas has
some of the most productive
employers do not have enough _ workers in the world, but that :
respect for Bahamian work- they are sometimes placed in — ;
ers. situations “not conductive to

“If Bahamian workers have _ productivity.”
similar qualifications they He said employers need to
should be given the same introduce incentives for
opportunities as the extrane- employees to go beyond their
ous workers,” he said. normal duties.

Labour Day

NCTU, said he expects the cel-

ebrations to be just as festive as

last year—ifnot moreso.
The NCTU and the TUC

ence that employers have for
foreign workers.

Mr Ferguson believes that Ac $7/0;000-salssitis, Persone

reward has been issued for
Andrew Sidney Sands of Trea-
sure Cay, Abaco..

According to the police, Mr
Sands, 39, was last seen on April
18, 2005 in Treasure Cay.

He is described as a five foot, .
six inch tall caucasian and is said
to weigh 140 pounds.

Anyone with information
should contact the Central
Detective Unit’s northern office
at (242) 325-9774, the Marsh
Harbour Police Station at (242)
367-2560, or the Treasure Cay
Police Station at (242) 365-8048.

Information can also be com-

Labour Day church service at
Mount Olive Baptist Church
on Meadow and Augusta

Cashiers &
Maintenance Staff

workers to join them in cele-
brating Labour Day and the
freedom that all Bahamian
workers enjoy.

The week of May 28 was
declared Labour Week by
Prime Minister Perry Christie
and the occasion will be cele-
brated under the theme, “Unit-
ed to face the challenges of
globalisation”.

The celebrations will kick off
on Sunday with the annual

for all locations.

"Must be able to work shifts & weekends.
Interested persons should apply in person.

at Any Wendy's Locations
Wednesday, May 24 - Friday, May 26
Between 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon

A HEARTBROKEN moth-
er last night appealed for infor-
mation about her missing
teenage son, who left home nine
days ago and has not been seen
since.



+5 DR HATCHBACK

New Interior!
‘

Features include: ©
1.6-litre 4-cylinder engine
Automatic transmission
AM/FM/CD Player

Power steering, windows, —
door locks & mirrors

Spacious interior with .
plenty of leg room

Expand Your
Imagination —

The 2006 Suzuki Liana takes
you out of the ordinary and
into a realm where your
imagination and sense of
adventure have free reign.

$ SUZUKI
reel f/f

Dependable, Reliable Quality ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY:

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 * 325-3079

. Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916





Streets, beginning at 1lam.

The festivities will continue
through June 2 with the
Labour Day parade which is
scheduled to begin and end at
Windsor Park, where a rally
will also take place.

President of the Caribbean
Congress of Labour, Comrade
Lincoln Lewis will be making a
special appearance and will
speak at the rally.

Patrick Bain, president of the

Lanky Tamiko “Tallboy”
McKenzie, 19, was dropped
off by his stepbrother near his
home at. Water Street, Big
Pond sub-division, at about
11pm on Monday last week.
“Since then, he seems to have
vanished,” a family friend told
The Tribune.

McKenzie, who stands 6ft
6ins tall and weighs about 180
pounds, was described by his
mother Janice as “a very quiet
young man.” He has four dis-
tinctive gold teeth in the front
of his mouth.

“He has never given us any
problems,” she said, “Apart
from a dispute with a neigh-
bour, I can’t think of any reason
why anyone should harm him.”

Tamiko is his mother’s only
child. His stepbrother is his
father’s son. é

The family friend said: “His
mother is very cut up about
this, but she has no gut feelings
as to what happened to him. It
seems she doesn’t want to
think too much about it.”



CLOSED FOR STOCKTAKING

have joined together to ensure

that the Bahamian workers are :

fully represented during
Labour Week.

Obie Ferguson, president of
TUC, said that although this

year’s focus is on challenges, :

relating to globalisation, the
unions will remain committed
to working with all social part-
ners in the process of national
development.

Mother makes anguished appeal
for information on missing youth

i TAMIKO McKenzie

Tamiko played basketball

as a student at C R Walker
High School and performed
as a high-jumper in CARIF-

‘ TA. He is said to have plenty A

of friends.

e Anyone with information
should contact their nearest
police station or call 919, 502-
9991, 502-9941 or 502-9914.

Nassau Motor Company's
Parts Department

will be closed for stocktaking...



We will be closed from 5:00pm
on Friday, May 26 through
Tuesday, May 30.

We will re-open on Wednesday, May 31.

We regret any inconvenience



to our valued customers.

Shirley Street - 356-7932

partsorder@nassaumotor.com * www.nassaumotor.com





municated to the Central
Detective Unit in New Provi-
dence at (242) 322-2561, the °
Police Control Room at (242) .
322-3333, or Crime Stoppers at
(242) 328-8474.

Man admits
to sex with
disabled
girl

A NASSUA Village man
pleaded guilty yesterday to hav-
ing unlawful intercourse with a
mentally disabled girl.

Jermaine Prosper, 30, was
arraigned before magistrate
Marilyn Meers on the charge of
unlawful intercourse with a per-
son suffering from a mental dis-
order.

Prosper allegedly committed
the offense between February
and May 2006. He has been
remanded to Her Majesty’s
prison and sentencing has been
referred to the Supreme Court.

‘Robbery

charge is
denied by
woman

FREEPORT - A 35-year-old
woman was charged in connec-
tion with an armed robbery inci-
dent in Grand Bahama.

Shavonne Adderley, 35, of
Outlaw Lane, was not required
to enter a plea to the charge,
which was in relation to a report
made on May 8 by tourist
Ricardo Santos.

She was denied bail and a
preliminary inquiry was set for
July 18.

Man denies

raping
younger

woman

A MAN accused of forcibly

. detaining and raping a 20-year-

old woman was arraigned in a
magistrate’s court yesterday.
It is alleged that Benjamin

Miller, 40, alias “Dogman”,
committed the offences on Sat-
urday May 20.

Miller denied the charge yes-
terday. A bail hearing has been
scheduled for today.

Man pleads
not guilty
to armed
robbery

Charles Fritzgerald, 20, of
Limewood Lane, was charged
with armed robbery in Court
Two of the Freeport Magis-
trate’s Court.

He was not required to enter
a plea to the charge, which
resulted from a report made by
Schamal Gardiner on May 15
at Gilbert Crest.

A preliminary inquiry into
the matter was set for August
14.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 3: *'



Customs officials: ‘no information’
to back reports of collusion scheme

In brief

Blood bank
donations
soar after
appeal

DONORS poured into blood

banks after an island-wide
appeal went out for A-negative
and O-negative blood for jet ski
accident victim Megan Sands.
* Megan's father cited over-
whelming support for his
daughter's blood drive and said
the family would like to thank
the public for their donations.

It was reported in The Tri-
bune that 20-year-old Megan
was severely injured in a. freak
jet ski accident on Rose Island
on Sunday.

Up to press time on Tuesday,
she was listed in serious but sta-
ble condition in the intensive
care unit, and was in urgent
need of blood.

According to a friend of the
family, Megan is now doing
very well.

Policeman
faces
bribery
charge

FREEPORT - A police con-
stable was arraigned in connec-
tion with a bribery charge in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court this
week.

Constable 1906 Vaughn
Malakius, 41, of Freeport,
appeared before Magistrate
Franklyn Williams in Court
One.

He pleaded not guilty to
accepting a bribe, which result-
ed from a report made on
December. 29, 2005. °

The officer was released on
$5,000 bail with one surety and
the matter was adjourned to
October 23 for trial.

Multiple
counts of
theft are
admitted

A 49-YEAR-OLD, was sen-
tenced to serve a year and a half
in prison yesterday after plead-
ing guilty to several shop-break-
ing and stealing charges.

Joseph Taylor admitted to
breaking into Bonaventure
Medical lab on East ‘Avenue
between Monday May 15 and
Tuesday May 16.

He also pleaded guilty to
stealing a computer and com-
puter system, valued at $3,360,
from the establishment.

Taylor also pleaded guilty to
breaking into Hibiscus Phar-
macy on Madeira Street
between Saturday April 29 and
Sunday April 30 and stealing
nearly $4,000 in similar goods.



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

My Pe Ma Tt
322-2157



@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

CUSTOMS officials “can-
not confirm or deny” -reports
that the owners of underval-
ued luxury vehicles might have
been in collusion with a fraud-
ulent importer, according to
Comptroller of Customs John
Rolle.

Mr Rolle said that they are

' investigating every possible

angle in this case. However, to
date they have yet to come
across any information that
would support such claims.

Currently, a number of high-
end cars remain “seized” by
Customs officials and are being
held at their lot on Thompson
Boulevard.

Mr Rolle said that if reports
of collusion are true, the vehi-
cles would be forfeited to the
department to be handled as
Customs decides.

Mr Rolle explained that the

cars do not have to be sold
back to the original purchas-
er, but can be sold to anyone in
the country, and the funds
deposited directly into the
Treasury.

He said it is for this reason

‘that laws governing the Cus-

toms Department are set up in
this way.

“The law is really set up to
deal with the goods. Because
there are some circumstances
that exist where there is collu-
sion between the importer and
seller. Rather than try and
prove whether there is this
agreement between them, the
law simply made it possible

. that anybody who made a false

or incorrect statement commits
an offence.

“And so this is easily verifi-
able if the statement that you
made to Customs by way of an
entry or declaration. The fact
that we reveal a difference in
the goods or quality as the case

may be. So we don’t go about
trying to prove complicity,
unless there is direct evidence
to that effect,” he said.

According to well placed
sources, Customs officials have
seized over 37 “luxury cars”
including Jaguars, Mercedes,
jeeps and other vehicles in an
opération that started on
Mother’s Day.

Mr Rolle said that to date,
their investigations are about
50 per cent complete.

He also said that he has
been contacted by a number
of the vehicle’s owners since
The Tribune broke the story
on the Customs operation. Mr
Rolle said that in some
instances the owners have
received their vehicles back
under strict guarantees that if
the department’s investigations
prove that there was some dis-
crepancy, the cars would be
returned to Customs.

“Some have gotten their







B IMPOUNDED cars

vehicles back, with some assur-
ance that depending on the out-
come if need be they will sur-
render their vehicle,” he said.
Mr Rolle repeated that he
wanted this operation to be a
warning to any unscrupulous
business person who wished to
defraud the Customs Depart-
ment or the government.
“This can serve as a warning
to those who not only are in

who import goods and undei-
value them and believe that



4

a

the car business, but all those ©

after they leave the Customs *-

area, they are home free. Or

even those who may hav
avoided what the border con:
trols are, we want to make. it





clear that we still have the right =

to come back and seize the
goods if the full duty has not
been paid,” he said.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT -— Ann Per-

centie-Russell, parliamentary
secretary in the Office of the

Prime Minister, has vehe-.

mently denied that staff in the
Freeport office, particularly
Lady Naomi Wallace-Whit-
field, are being politically vic-
timised.

Mrs Russell, MP for Piner-
idge, expressed her disap-
pointment with an article pub-
lished in Tuesday’s Freeport
News, accusing her of victimi-
sation and changing the lock
to Lady Whitfield’s office.

“There is no political vic-
timisation in the Office of the .

Prime Minister,” said Mrs Rus-
sell.

Lady Whitfield, who: serves
as office manager of the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investment, is on vacation. She
is the widow of FNM founder

-and former party leader, the

late Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield.

Lady Whitfield is due back
in office on May 29.

This is not the first time that
allegations of victimisation
regarding Lady Wallace-Whit-
field have arisen at the Office

-of the Prime Minister.

The article claimed that
Lady Wallace-Whitfield had
been locked out of her office
on several occasions.

Mrs Russell said she was
very distressed to learn that
she was being accused of vic-
timisation. She said she had
contacted the editor about the
article.

“He told me that he instruct-
ed the reporter to do so. He
was very irate with me and then
he told to me, which is very dis-
tasteful, that I have to stop play-
ing these political whatever he
called it. I was shocked to hear
him say such a thing.

According to the article,
sources alleged that Mrs Per-
centie-Russell had a locksmith
come in last Friday to again

Political vicimisation

change the lock to Lady Whit-
field’s office while she is On
vacation.

When asked whether she

had changed the locks to Lady
Whitfield’s office, Mrs Per-
centie-Russell said: “No
Ma’am. It is really distasteful
because we are here to serve
the people, not cause friction.”

It was also alleged that Mrs
Percentie-Russell has most of
the staff “walking on pins and
needle.”

“My staff would like to go
to ZNS because they are not
referring to the Office of Prime
Minister’s staff. There is no
political victimisation in the
Office of the Prime Minister,
and I wish my staff would be
able to talk to the media
because they are being
blamed,” she said.

Elkina George Pinder was
very disturbed to learn of alle-
gations of political victimisa-
tion in the newspaper.

He said that although the

- Prime Minister’s Office and

Man accused of brother’s murder

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE tearful family mem-
bers of two brothers — one of
whom is accused of killing the
other — watched as their
shackled relative was brought
before a court yesterday to
face a murder charge.

Romeo Griffith, 30,
accused of the stabbing death
of his brother Omellio Grif-
fith, 21.

Griffith was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez at Court One in Bank
Lane.

He is represented by lawyer
Murrio Ducille.

The defendant was remind-
ed by Magistrate Gomez that
he was not required to enter a
plea to the charge.

The magistrate said a pre-



Hi MURDER accused Romeo Griffith

liminary inquiry would be held
to determine whether or not
there is sufficient evidence
against Griffith for him to be
tried in the Supreme Court.
Griffith was told that he





NEW MARKDOWNS

TWO WEEKS ONLY! MAY 22 - JUNE 3RD
ENTIRE STOCK OF UPHOLSTERY & DRAPERY FABRICS & PANELS

SELECT ROI

OF DECORATOR FABRICS

Home Fabrics

Madeira St, [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 © Fax:[242] 322-5251 » www.homefabricsttd.com

ENTIR

Madeira

St. Store

Bur RES eee OF WAVERLY, PERY SHEERS,
FABRIC FROM SPAIN, NEW ‘COORDINATED BROCADES





DRAPERY PANELS

TTON PRINTS, OUTDOOR FABRICS
AND JACQUARDS



would be remanded to Her

_Majesty’s prison. The matter was

transferred to Court Five and
adjourned to May 30 when a
mention date for the start of the
proceedings will be announced.
Several family members of the

‘accused, who were packed into .

the small court room on Bank
Lane, cried loudly in the court
room as Griffith was taken back
to the Central Police Station.

e
e
@
@
e
o
°
e
oe

| Cushions

the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices are situated on the same
floor in the Government Office
Complex they are two separate
government entities.

“T hope that this is not true.
But, if it is found out to be true,

Ms Percentie-Russell should be

removed forthwith.”
“I went this morning to Lady
Whitfield’s office to find out for



myself, but I understand that
she is still on vacation and would
be back in office on May 29:

Mr Pinder said he made a
promise to Sir Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield some many years ago
in the presence of his wife that
he would take care of Lady
Whitfield as best he could.

“Tintend to do just that, ” he
said.

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

Elegance







1D MSS Re Meh S SSeS D'S OS O49



Ae be Ute ae a te

a! be fe te

bs

bak me te teas bee’





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH. Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

e

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322- 1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Bleachers’ question still unanswered.

. f

THE AUDITOR-GENERAL was forced
to rely on the files of the Ministry of Youth
because the requested relevant copies of Cab-
inet conclusions did not “seem to be forth-

coming” to clarify the controversial 2002 pur-

chase of the Junkanoo bleachers.
According to the Auditor-General’s report
the $1.2 million bleachers were ordered in

October 2002, a month before Cabinet

approved their purchase.

This is one of the items in the 2002-2003
audited report that is certain'to send angry
words bouncing back and forth across the floor

of:the House on May 31 when the Budget:

' debate opens.

*-In 2002, in what became known as the
“bleachers” scandal”, Youth Minister Neville
Wisdom vehemently denied that the purchase
had been made before he had cabinet approval.

However, according to the auditor-general.,
the Youth Ministry’s files contradict his denial.
but, despite the auditor-general’s request, cab-
inet has failed to confirm whether their files
support either the auditor’s findings or the
minister’s denial.

Reported the Auditor-General:

“Based on documentation (records of the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture) it
appears that the contract for rental of the
bleachers did not receive Cabinet. approval
before an agreement was signed between the
Ministry of Youth, Sports ‘and Culture and
Towers Scaffold Services, Inc.

“Section 58 of the Financial Revistiaton
states that ‘all awarded contracts for supplies,

- works and services required by the Govern-
ment for amounts in excess of $250,000 shall be
made by the Cabinet.’

“The records at the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture show that an agreement
with Towers Scaffold Services Inc was execut-
ed on the 28th October, 2002. However,
. approval by Cabinet for the venture was noted
on 28th November, 2002.

“We have requested relevant copies of Cab-
inet Conclusions which does not seem to be
forthcoming therefore we relied on information
from files at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture.”

The handling of the public’s money under
the late Sir Lynden Pindling’s PLP adminis-
‘tration makes interesting reading. We now go
» back to October 11, 1990.

In the House of Assembly that morning

, Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham accused
* Sir Lynden, as Finance Minister, of spending
$27 million over the 1988 budget. “And he has

TULTIDISCOUNT FURNITURE &

The First Stop on your Shopping List!

BEAT THE HEAT

Air Conditioners



Buy Early
OLD
NT a

$234.00
$285.00
8000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model . $350. 00
“10000 BTU Remote
12000 BTU Remote
12000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..8409.00
14000 BTU Remote
18000 BTU Remote
24000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..$755.00

$339.00

MULTI DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
WE AGGEPT ALL MAJOR ‘CREDIT CARDS

Montrose Avenue

(Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.)

Phone:

-302- PAIR Aor ANAC sor ERLE

not seen fit to come to aeeieneat and pro-
vide an explanation to parliament for this
unlawful act,” Mr Ingraham added.

It was noted that no government minister
rose to Sir Lynden’s defence.

The maximum amount a Finance Minister
can lawfully take frem the Treasury to spend
without parliament’s approval is $20 million
and “even that has to be justified and in accor-
dance with the law,” said Mr Ingraham.

On the morning of October 24, 1990 Sir Lyn-
den left the House to find answers to unravel
government’s tangled finances. .

Mr Ingraham, who was called by then Edu-
cation Minister Dr Bernard Nottage “an unnec-
essarily hard task master” on public expenditure,
met with Sir Lynden privately in the smokers

_ room when the front bench could not provide

explanations to the Opposition’s questions.

Sir Lynden agreed to leave the House to go
in search of the answers.

In the meantime, Fred Mitchell, not yet a
member of parliament, but leader of the Peo-
ple’s Democratic League, entered the argu-
ment from the outside. His position was that ‘Sir
Lynden should be held personally liable for
all the public money spent without parliamen-
t’s approval.

“If our reading of the law is correct,” said Mr
Mitchell, “then an action ought to be brought

in the Supreme Court against Lynden Pindling .

personally for the expenditure made without
parliamentary approval in advance.

“We believe that any member of parlia-
ment has the necessary locus standi to bring
the action against the Prime Minister. Perhaps
the official opposition ought to consider such
an action.”

Mr Mitchell launched a lengthy argument,

referring to the Constitution, the Financial

Administration and Audit Act, the House's
Manual of Procedure and a 1924 Privy Coun-
cil case to support his position.

He argued that Finance Minister Pindling
went to parliament to get it to ratify an uncon-
stitutional act that he had committed.

“That means, if we are correct,” he said,
“the House of Assembly is seeking to make
good an illegality without an amendment to the
Constitution.”

In.1990 Private Citizen Mitchell argued an

_interesting case for holding a finance minister
personally responsible for mishandling public -

funds. Today we wonder how much of that
arguinent Foreign Affairs Minister Mitchell,
now a member of the PLP cabinet, would
endorse. °

Standing for
shared values

EDITOR, The Tribune

SIXTY years ago, the United
Nations created the Commission
on Human Rights. The Com-
mission’s great achievement was
the development of the Univer-
sal Declaration of Human Rights
in 1948, a declaration that recog-
nised the rights of all persons to
freedom of opinion and expres-
sion, freedom of religion and
conscience, freedom of move-
ment and freedom to leave one’s
own country. It recognised the
universal rights to be free from
arbitrary arrest, detention and
exile, freedom to assemble, free-
dom to own property and the
right for all persons to take part
in their own government.

In recent years the Commis-
sion unfortunately failed to pro-

mote these universal rights. As’

stated by UN Secretary General
Kofi Annan, “the Commission
has been increasingly under-
mined by its declining credibility
and professionalism.” He point-
ed out that some states sought
membership on the Commission
“not to strengthen human rights,
but to protect themselves against
criticism.” In its place, Annan
proposed creating a Human
Rights Council, whose members

“should undertake to abide by °

the highest human rights stan-
dards.”

As the UN sought to reform
the discredited human rights
body, the United States and oth-
er responsible members of the
international community worked
hard to ensure that only coun-
tries that respected the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights
and strove to uphold its tenets

would be responsible for pro- |

tecting it. Most of the countries
elected to the Council meet this
standard.

In our own hemisphere, only
one of the elected members
elected fails to meet this stan-
dard. According to the watch-
dog group Freedom House,
Cuba is one of the world’s “most
repressive” regimes. A quick

look at the pee Ss aoe

Das B Sey

letters@triounemedcia. net






and Cuba’s record shows why.
Religious freedom, as Pope
John Paul II reminded the UN
when he addressed it in 1979, is
the most fundamental of all free-
doms. It is a freedom that
Bahamians and Americans hold
near and dear. Unfortunately, as
the independent US Commis-
sion on International Religious
Freedom states in its 2005 report:
“Religious belief and practice

continue to be tightly controlled _

in Cuba.”
Bahamians and Americans also
share our devotion to free
expression, the freedom to
assemble and associate. We both
insist on the freedom to move
and travel, and we are both com-
mitted to the rule of law based in
an independent judiciary. In
Cuba, by contrast, Human
Rights Watch reports that
“Cubans are systematically
denied basic rights to free
expression, association, assem-
bly, privacy, movement and due
process of law.” In fact, the
Government maintains a tight
media monopoly, and harasses
and imprisons pro-democracy

activists, labour activists, inde- .

pendent journalists. and librari-
ans, often forcing them into
exile. In March 2003, while Cuba
sat on the former UN Commis-
sion on Human Rights, the Gov-
ernment imprisoned 75 human
rights activists for nothing other
than peacefully expressing oppo-
sition to the government.

These abuses continue. Over
the past several months, the Cas-
tro regime has directed govern-

_ ment-sponsored mobs to intimi-

date, threaten, and even attack
peaceful dissidents including Hil-
da Molina, Felix Bonne, and
members of the Sigler Amaya
family. The most recent incident
occurred April 25 — while Cuba
was lobbying for a seat on the
new Human Rights | Council —

e.

when dissident Martha Beatriz
Roque was attacked in her
home, beaten, bruised and pre-
vented from exercising her uni-
versal right to associate and
speak freely.

The United States welcomes '
reasoned debate about how best
to improve Cuba’s human rights
record and promote universally
recognised basic rights for the
Cuban people. Accordingly, we
do not criticise governments for
engaging Cuba or disagreeing
with the US decision not to have
economic or diplomatic relations
with Cuba. What should be
beyond debate, however, is that
a government with Cuba’s .
record on human rights should
not be responsible for enforcing ~
and promoting the Universal |
Declaration of Human Rights.
Cuba’s own diplomatic.repre- —
sentative here in The Bahamas ,
has publicly made clear Cuba
does not share a commitment to ~
the rights enshrined in the Uni- |
versal Declaration.

If the Human Rights Council '
is ever to achieve the goals Kofi
Annan envisaged for it, all coun-
tries must take a clear stand on
the side of repressed people '
around the world who live with-
out freedom. If the United
Nations is to be relevant and
effective in promoting universal
human rights, its member’
nations must. have the courage
to promote their own values, as
reflected in the Universal Dec-
laration of Human Rights. I
know the people of the Bahamas
hold these rights dear, just as we
in the United States do. The
United States has taken a public
pledge to support only countries
genuinely committed to these
ideals; we hope in the future The
Bahamas will join in this pledge

. and work with us to build a

world where respect for
mankind’s most fundamental -
rights is truly universal.’

AMBASSADOR
JOHN D ROOD
Nassau

May 2 22 mee

Irony of Church’s objections

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE objections raised by the

Church to the movie ‘The Da.

Vinci Code’ point to an irony
and expose contradictions in the

faith. | am not a scholar, but it is .

obvious that the Bible is an
amalgam of various scripts,
selected by the early Church to
unify and institutionalise the
Christianity. The main story line
in ‘The Da Vinci Code” builds
on this, and suggests that some
gospels were, suppressed, and
particularly those suggesting that
Jesus was married and had a
child. I do not know if this is
true, but the strong reaction
from the Church suggests an ele-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVE.
aul Rae al Ce
i Looking for.
Japanese used cars?

New Arrivals Weekly
‘Mitsubishi

We have \v various. makes
Check our prices
Before Buying



Bahamas Bus & Truck
call:

322 - 1722-25

ment of possibility. Perhaps it
cuts close to the bone.
Neither do I understand why

church leaders, spending week °

in and week out with their fol-
lowers, are scared of a movie put

forward as a fiction. Do they

think all those years of indoctri-
nation will fall aparts in an hour
or two? To paraphrase. Shake-
speare, ‘the church doth protest
too much, methinks”

Next,
months ago, the church object-
ed to (and had banned) a
movie portraying homosexual
love, and now it objects to a

movie suggesting that a partic-

ular man (and Jesus was a man,
not a god) may have loved a

the irony. A few |

woman and fathered a child!

As a final observation, the
churches sent their children to
see a bloody and sadistic movie
‘The Passion of Christ’. This was
clearly not suitable tor younger
audiences.

The objecting church lexa:rs
are inverting Christian prins:-
ples. Movies showing violencs -
are preferred over movies show-
ing love, albeit homosexual. And
is it not then ironic for Chris-
tians to object to the suggestion °
that Jesus may have loved a
woman?

HOWARD JUNEAU
Nassau
May 21 2006



Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd.

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND CALL
AS PER THE
CO-OPERATIVE ACT 2005 SECTION 22

The 21st Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Limited
will be held on
Friday, May 26th, 2006
at

9:00am

Holy Trinity Activities Centre
Trinity Way
Stapledon Gardens

Refreshments willbe provided





Ine mmipuine

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 5:





Police
inspection
unit head
Is chosen

CHIEF Superintendent of
Police Juanita Colebrooke has
been selected to head the new-
ly-established Royal Bahamas
Police Force Inspection and
Review Unit.

The appointment is another
first for Ms Colebrooke, the
highest-ranking woman in the
Bahamas.

She said the unit will conduct
inspections and reviews of all
police branches and divisions in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and the Family Islands
where there is an established
police presence.

Ms Colebrooke said unit ,

members consider it their duty
to ensure that commanders,
officers, divisions and branch-
es are conforming to the man-
date established for them.

A 40-year veteran, Chief Supt
Colebrooke joined the RBPF
in 1966.

She made history in 2003 by
becoming the first female offi-
cer to be promoted to the rank
of chief superintendent.

Ms Colebrooke has worked
in many of the front-line areas
of policing, including the for-
mer Criminal Investigation
Department (now Central
Detective Unit) and Traffic
Division, and has commanded a
number of police stations.

She has also served as com-
mander of the Eastern, South-
eastern and Southern Divisions
and as the first female superin-
tendent of New Providence and
the Family Islands.

She also served as vice-presi-
dent of the Police Tribunal and
on the Police Promotions Inter-
view Board.

The Inspection and Review
Unit, located at Police Head-
quarters, falls under the com-
mand of the Deputy Commis-
sioner John Rolle.

St Lucia to
sign deal
with Cuba
on tourism

@ ST LUCIA
Castries

ST Lucian officials will sign
two agreements with Cuba and
ask the communist-run island

for help filling a cement short- .

age during an official visit to

the country this week, the.

nation’s leader said, according
to Associated Press.

Prime Minister Kenny Antho-
ny said he will sign the deals on
arts and tourism. He also said
he would ask Cuba about buy-
ing cement since St Lucia, like
some other Caribbean countries,
was experiencing a shortage of
the product.

St Lucia, an island in the
south-east Caribbean Sea, is
home to 168,000 people.





By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS time slowly runs out for the peo-
ple of Bozine Town to appeal the
Supreme Court ruling in the land dis-
pute, members of the community are
eagerly awaiting government to follow
through with its promises.

Milton Evans, legal representative
for the community of Bozine Town and
Knowles Drive, told The Tribune yes-
terday that his clients are hoping for a
formal assurance from government —
preferably the prime minister himself -—
that they will not be dispossessed and
moved from the land some of them
have been living on for the past 50
years.

Mr Evans said that although appeal-
ing the judgment will prove to be very

LOCAL NEWS

costly for the residents of Bozine Town,
some of who already find themselves
in financial straights, there may be no
other option available.

“We cannot wait indefinitely. We only
have four and a half weeks left to
appeal, and if nothing materialises (on
the government’s part) then that’s what
we will have to do,” he said.

The area in question has been at the
centre a massive land dispute since late
2004, when the 500 or so residents
received letters from the law firm of

‘Lockhart and Munroe, informing them

that its clients, the Harrold Road Land
Development Company, (LANDCO)
had been granted certificates of title to
property between Bozine Town,
Knowles Drive and Harrold Road.
The Supreme Court last week ruled
to dismiss the community’s action

Bozine Town residents hope
for backing from government

‘

against LANDCO.

However, in a recent town meeting,

MP for the area Agriculture Minister
Leslie Miller assured his constituents
that they will not be displaced.

He said that government is currently
reviewing the possibility of offering

~ LANDCO Crown land in exchange for

the Bozine Town and Knowles Drive
land.

Since that announcement, however,
the residents of Bozine Town have not
received any further formal communi-
cation from the government regarding
this exchange.

Mr Evans said that if plans are under-
way to trade government-owned land
for the Bozine Town land, then he
would expect to hear from the minister
responsible for Crown Lands — Prime
Minister Perry Christie.

“We hope that Mr Miller was fore-
shadowing what he hopes to happen.
But he is not the person we expect to
hear from in this matter,” he said.

If the case does go before the Court
of Appeal, Mr Evans said he foresees
that his clients stand a good chance of





having the Supreme Court ruling over- —

turned.

“I would say our chances are fairly
good. I wish I could say that a win is
guaranteed, but unfortunately I can’t,”
he said.

Mr Milton pointed out that his clients
hold surveyance titles to their land and »
have over the past 30 years been able to |

attain mortgages due to the title docu- |

ments they hold.
“Our law would be in a sad state if the

ruling is allowed to stand as it is,” he |~

said.

TIL

POUL

The Tribune took to the
streets on Tuesday to pose
the question: ‘Should a public
building or monument be
named after Kayla Edwards?’





B ETTAMAE J ohiisons
“Yes, because she has con-
tributed to our society.”



: i SARAH Lubin, “Sure,

because she devoted her life
to the development of the
Bahamian culture in art,
music and the performing
arts.”



@ RUDY Carroll: “I don’t
know. a whole lot about her,
but if she was a national
hero, it is a shame that she
had to die before we heard
anything about her.”

2:00am Communi
8:00



Ingraham praises Edwards’ legacy

THE Bahands owes a
tremendous debt of grati-
tude to Kayla Lockhart
Edwards according to FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham.

Issuing a tribute to Mrs
Edwards, who died on Sun-
day after a seven-year bat-
tle with cancer, Mr Ingra-
ham said she brought hon-
our and glory to her coun-
try and “gave unstintingly”
to others. >

“My colleagues in the
FNM family and my wife

and I join the people of the.

Bahamas in mourning the
passing of Mrs Kayla Lock-
hart Edwards. Our hearts
go out to Mr Edwards, her
bereaved husband and our
dear friend and colleague,
and to all members of the
family,” he said.

The FNM leader said
Mrs Edwards was “one of
those rare human beings
who are born with an abun-
dance of talents, and she

TV SCHEDULE

WED. MAY 24

Pg. 1540AM
Bahamas@Sunrise

CMJ Club Zone

Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
Da’ Down Home Show .
Immediate Response

ZNS News Update
Immediate Response Cont’d
Island Life Destinations
Gumbo TV

Carmen San Diego .

Fun

Morning Joy

Ecclesia Gospel

Dennis The Menace
Carmen San Diego

ZNS News Update

ae School Round Up

A Special Report

News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight
Hurricane Preparedness:
Looking Back At 2005 Season
NWCCU Trade Fair 2006
Freeport

BTC Connection.
Behind The Headlines

’ Above The Rim: We Fall Down
We Get ip
News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Comm. Pg. 1540 AM

NOTE: ZNS - TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!



NM KAYLA Edwards

put each and every one of those

' valuable gifts to good use

throughout her life.
“In so doing Mrs Edwards








brought much joy to her fellow
country men and women, and
to thousands of others outside
the borders of the Bahamas
who had the puvilegen of seeing
her perform.”

Mr Ingraham went on to say «

that Mrs Edwards was not the
kind of person who used her
talent for her own benefit, but
“save unstintingly of her con-
siderable gifts to her fellow
Bahamians”. :

He continued: “It was good
that, before she departed, so
many of her colleagues in the
Bahamian cultural community,
together with ordinary citizens,
gathered at the Centre for Per-
forming Arts on Shirley Street to
entertain. her and to express their
love and appreciation for her.

Under the distinguished patronage of
The Governor General of The Bahamas

“Mrs Edwards was not erly a
cultural icon. She was a dedi-
cated public servant who also
gave of her best to her people
through faithful service to suc-
cessive governments.

“For that and for all that she
did to sweeten and elevate our
lives, I should like to pay sin-
cere tribute to her. And I thank

sharing her with us,” he said. ’

TROPICAL
UU

aed Mths ES
PHONE: 322-2157






The Honorable Arthur D. Hanna

The Salvation Army Advisory Board

invites you to share in a salute to

on the occasion of its

75th Anniversary
Diamond Jubilee
Awards Dinner

Friday May 26, 2006 ~ 7:00 PM @ Wyndham Nassau Resort

Music by The Royal Bahamas Police Force Pop Band
A Silent Auction will be featured; Contribution ~ $75.00

You are invited to celebrate with us! ees
Call 393.2745 or 393.2340 for tickets and information!









‘Visit us é and see sther uéed cars
~and make your own deal!

QUALITY: sales @ S

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE sdeae

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775

325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals + Queen's Highway * 352-6122





. Mr Edwards and her family for













SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Commonwealth Bank is offering ten (10) Scholarship Awards to
Bahamian Students to attend The College of The Bahamas

. Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank branch or at
‘. the Financial Aid & Housing Department, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith
Building, The College of The Bahamas

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
P.O. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply)

Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK



DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS JULY 14, 2006



@2006-CrastiveRolations.nat





“Leader in Personal Banking Services”

a ne eed



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

: TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exist in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.
The Technical Trainer (Mechanical) is responsible for the technical instruction of employ-
ees from all engineering departments within the Corporation, encompassing Mechanical
Engineering, Transmission and Distribution Operations, Power Generation Operations
inclusive of Plant Install ion, Maintenance Operation and Control Workshop.



Responsibilities of the positions include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for
_ employees within the Corporation
' * Preparing candidates for external examinations certifications by local and overseas
organizations :
* Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work. habits
- * Providing instructions to participants in classroom, workshops and
job environments
* Preparing program criteria and marketing schemes for trade testing
electrical based trades
* Preparing timetables and examinations schedules for visiting -
external examiners.
Identifying. developing and delivering engineering courses( Le.,
electrical technical Training).
* Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students
attending training courses
* Preparing courses notes, training aids, evaluating and marking

schemes for all courses.

Job requirements include:

*A minimum of Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical engineer or an OND
in Engineering or equivalent qualifications

* A minimum of 10+ years of experience in industrial traini ng setting

* Sound Knowledge of technical skills related fo electrical engineering principles

* Giood judgement and sound reasoning ability

* Excellent time management skills

* Proficient oral and written communication skills

* Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant

* Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings.
troubleshooting and technical activities

* Good information transfer skills

* Computer literate

*
%
*
&

1
+
5
4
*.
aa

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form to:
The Manager, Human Resources & Training Head Office

Blue Hill Road and Tucker Roads

P.O.Box N-7509 ‘

Nassau, Bahamas

On or before Tuesday May 30, 2006.





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

*BRILAND Park has taken
on a life of its own thanks to a
number of generous private cit-
izens.

The most recent contribution,
by an anonymous contributor, is
an entire children’s playground,
complete with swings, double
sea-saws, monkey bars, slides,
and more. The equipment was
expertly constructed and
installed by Cleveland Rolle of
Creative Woodworks, in Nas-
sau.

Several tournaments have
already christened the basket-
ball court and early mornings
and late afternoons, the tennis
court is usually in full swing.

And speaking of swing, there
is always great enthusiasm when
the cheerleaders practice their
routines on the park.

According to Andrew John-
son, president forthe ’Briland
Park committee, there are still

_ many projects to complete, such

as a gazebo, landscaping, light-

THE TRIBUNE |

Cee ee
’Briland park gets into the rhythm

Â¥





& THE new children’s playground at ’Briland Park

ing, painting, and gates for both
entrances.

The ’Briland Committee was
formed several years ago with a
goal to convert the old dump
site into a healthy, family-ori-

ented park of which the entire
community could be proud. To
date, that goal is almost accom-
plished, but only through the
generosity of many kind per-
sons. ; i

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Twelve build-
ings on Grand Bahama have
been officially designated as
shelters for hurricane season —
in the hope that this year they
will stand up to the storms.

The Disaster Preparedness
Committee announced that
nine shelters have been selected
in Freeport and three in West
Grand Bahama. ;

Committee deputy chairman
Stephanie Rahming said that
together, the shelters can more
than 2,400 persons.

And NEMA official Carnard
Bethel stressed that this year, the
committee has ensured that prop-
er shelters were selected, that
there is proper communication
equipment and that persons are
trained in disaster management;

He said: “During recent hur-
ricanes we had to evacuate
three shelters, but we believe

Office

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT



elter

propriate’

that the centres which have
been chosen are appropriate.”

The designated shelters in
Freeport, include First Baptist
Church, St Georges High
School, Sir Jack Hayward High

School, Maurice Moore Prima- -

_ty School, Living Waters
Assembly of God, Christ the
King Anglican Church Hall
(special needs), the Church of
Christ, the Cancer Association
and Central Church of God.

In West Grand Bahama, the
designated shelters are Bethel
Baptist Church, Eight Mile Rock
High School gym and Martin
Town Community Church.

Ms Rahming said . the
Freeport shelters can accom-
modate 1,976 persons, and the
three in West Grand Bahama
475 persons. -

Assistant. director of Social

*:, Services Lillian; Quant Forbes

said the committee is seeking
to identify: additional shelters.

“We look at the square.

footage, the number: of bath-
room facilities and whether the
facility is a concrete block struc-
ture,” she explained.

Mr Bethel said there is a pos-
sibility that the Sweeting’s Cay
All Age School: might be:
strengthened so that residents
would not have to cross over'in
rough seas to Grand Bahama.

“There has been a question-
mark whether or not we should
be evacuating Sweeting’s Cay
across the water to the main-
land of Grand Bahama. But,
there were two things that came
to mind — one.was that quite
often before the storm comes
there is precipitation and bad
weather and we have to bring
them across in rough seas.

“Secondly, there are certain
young men who never leave the
cay and there is looting and pil-
laging on the island.” yu

‘However, Mr Bethel said‘he
is not sure whether the struc-
ture can be reinforced in time.

iby names

has a vacancy for the position of

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT

PROFILE:

A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or
Finance or professional accounting qualification and
planning to pursue the CPA

Prepare financial statements

Administrative support

Liaise with clients and management

One - three years relevant experience with a bank/ trust
company preferred

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Assist with reconciliation of custody accounts and
shareholder registers

Maintain general accounting systems, policies and
procedures

Ability to work with minimum supervision

Strong verbal and written communication skills and
organizational abilities

Good knowledge of software packages including MS

The successful candidate will report to the Group Accountant

The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.

The Human Resource Director

Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE



Sorority
holds its
scholarship
programme

THE Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority held its 29th annual
Honour’s Day Scholarship
awards programme to recognise
the top female studexts from
around the Bahamas.

The young women were hon-
joured for their outstanding aca-
demic achievements at the cer-
emony, held at Government
House.

Tara Lewis, honour roll stu-
dent and head girl at St Anne's
School, was awarded an $8,000
scholarship to attend Middle
Tennessee State University.

She scored highest on a gen-
eral knowledge test adminis-
tered to the top 27 graduating
female participants — each of
whom had a grade point aver-
age of 3.0 or better.

Aretha Curry of Eight Mile
Rock High School received a
$4,000 scholarship to attend the
College of the Bahamas as the
top family island student award
winner.

The programme’s essay win-
ner, Tajh Ferguson, walked
away with a cash award of $500.

According to Mavis Johnson-
Collie, president of the Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, the

‘young women were recom-,

mended by their respective
schools and represent the best
‘and the brightest that the coun-
-try has to offer.

‘Man is
charged
following

‘shooting

-. FREEPORT - Stefan Saun-
ders, 25, of Pinta Avenue, was
- charged in connection with the
shooting of Schamal Gardiner
.1on April 16 at Caravel Beach,
.Grand Bahama.
-1, He was not required to enter
a plea to the charge. Bail was
“denied anda preliminary
-sinquiry is set for August 21.



THE Bahamas’ treatment
of asylum-seekers and Hait-
ian immigrants has again
come under fire from the
human rights organisation,
Amnesty International.

In its latest annual report,
for 2005, Amnesty criticises
harsh detention conditions and
reported ill-treatment of
detainees, and refers to con-
tinued police abuse.

“There were continued
reports of abuses against asy-
lum-seekers and other
detainees at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre.
Inmates were reportedly beat-
en and received inadequate
medical attention, food and
water,” says the report.

“Asylum-seekers were
forcibly returned to countries,
including Cuba and Haiti,
without access to a full and
fair determination procedure.”

Amnesty said hostility
increased towards Haitian
immigrants, with the Depart-
ment of Immigration forcibly

returning 5,543 irregular immi-
grants - 4,504 from Haiti - to
their countries of origin.

The report also attacked
Fox Hill Prison, which has
been subject to Amnesty crit-
icism in the past.

“In April, 12 prisoners on
death row at the Fox Hill

Prison staged a three-day '

hunger strike to protest at
their ‘inhumane’ conditions.

“Inmates alleged inade-
quate sanitation, food, water
and medical care. In October,
a new prison building was
commissioned, for completion
in 2007.”

The report, referring to
“continued reports of police
brutality”, added: “In Janu-
ary, a riot erupted in Nassau
Village after police allegedly
abused Haitian women and
shot a young man aged 19 in
the face. A police investiga-
tion had not concluded by the
end of 2005.”

The report also noted the
Bahamas’ stance on the death

An increasingly growing entertainment store
seeks to employ a Sales Clerk to assist in the

store. -
Requirements:

V Responsible
V Respectful
V Trustworthy
V Team Player
V Motivated

V Good Personality
Y Must have sure ride to and from work
V At least 4 BGCSE’s

Interested persons, please telephone
392-2435 to set up an interview.

It’s time to |





“Live your Dreams”

9.79%

on Savings & Investments

Some Facts About our Company:

To help with:

° Retirement

¢ College

e Savings

e Investments

* We have been operating in the Bahamas since 1920.

.;] ¢ We manage more than 40,000 Policyholders and

your money.

more than 400 Institutional clients.
° We offer Professional and Prudent Management of



penalty, saying that courts
continued to pass death sen-
tences, though none was car-
ried out. ,

“At the end of 2005, there
were at least 39 prisoners on
death row. Numerous peo-
ple, including the Commis-
sioner of Police, called for
the resumption of executions
in reaction to an increase in
violent crime,” the report
added.

Since this latest report was
compiled, the Bahamas has
been at the centre of more
human rights issues.

Not only do the prison
and detention centre con-
tinue tobe criticised for
poor conditions, Amnesty’s
attention will be drawn to
this year’s prison breakout

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 7

and the beating in broad
daylight of a US journalist
outside the detention cen-
tre.

In its general conclusions,
Amnesty described 2005 as a
year of contradictions in
which signs of hope for
human rights were under-
mined through the decep-
tion and failed promises of
powerful governments.

Secretary general Irene
Khan said the security agen-
da of the powerful and priv-
ileged had hijacked the ener-
gy and attention‘of the world
from serious human rights
crises elsewhere.

GUARDS watch |
. over detainees at
Carmichael Road

rom

9%, off a

Prom Fabrics

e Striking Special Occasion Fabrics
e Beaded Sequined Fabrics

@ lridescent Taffeta

¢ Two Tone Shantung
Lamour - new low prices $11.99
60” Pongee and Lining now $2.99 yd.

off Prom

0

when purch

Accessories ,

ased same day as fabric

e Rhinestone Chokers & Earrings

-¢ Tiaras °
e Evening Purses ¢

Gloves
Capes

Baan aa YB GLa

iva cline

~~ Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 © Fox:[242] 322-5251 © www.hometabricsitd.com



q

2006 ESCAPE - $30,874.00
FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

A strong link in your financial future



Telephone: (242) 461-1000 ¢ Fax (242) 361-2524 ¢ Email: financialservices@bainsurance.com PART OF YOUR LIFE



a





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

‘Rock of Ages
Huneral Chapel

Wulff Road & oe
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

Sr SERVICE FOR

GWENDOLYN
"GWENNIE" BARR, 84

of Pleasant Bay, South
| Andros will be held at
| Johnson Road Seventh-
| Day Adventist Church,
Farrington Road Friday
May 26th, 2006 at
2pm. Officiating will
ibe Pastor Eric D.
| Clarke, Pastor Gary
King, Elder C.M.
| Lewis and other
Ministers and Elders.
Interment will be Old Trail Cemetery.





Ea SORIANO TRTONTEIVG pase
i





| Left to cherish hér memories is her son,
' Howard Daniel Barr; 2 sisters, Mable Wilson
| and Albertha Bain; 2 brothers-in-law,

| Richard and Howard John Barr of Pleasant

| Bay, South Andros; sisters-in-law, Julia,

: Leona, Eloise Barr and Muriel Roker;
| daughters-in-law, Patronella, Mary and
| Madell Barr; step-daughter, Sylvia Griffin;

| 14 grand children, Tesia Pierre, Akin Barr,

| Jason, Theotis, Joresa, Christina, Priscilla,
| Mark, Samantha, Donna, Linda, Moliqua
| and Samantha Samara Barr; seven great-
| children including Tamica, Shakim Barr,
| B.J. Pierre, Teanglo, Tevan and Britton
| Pierre and McGregor Bodie; 10 nieces,
i Rhonda Duncombe, Sharon Knowles,
| Courtnell and Tanya Bain, Dorothy Hilton,
| Deborah Kikivarakis, Laverne Gardiner,
| Beatrice Beadle, Christable Johnson and

| Gina Craigg; 10 nephews, Peter Wilson,

| Kendall Pinder, Roscoe, Brian, Andrew,
| Pennial Bain, Castell, Hugh, Kieth and Eric
Morrison; and a host of other relatives and
i friends including: Mr and Mrs. George and.
| Bonnie Férguson, Mr and Mrs. Keloson
i Dorcas Cox, Arimentha Taylor, Blanch
| Forbes, Eula Nixon, Mr and Mrs. George
| Black, Mr and Mrs. Edwin Sands, Mr and
| Mrs. Theophilus Rolle and families; staff
| at the Kemps Bay home for the aged, the
| medical staff of the Kemps Bay Clinic, the
entire community of South Andros, Pastors
| Gary King, Eric D. Clarke and Elder C.M.
Lewis and the executive and members of
| the Johnson Park Seventh-Day Adventist
| Church, and of course the directors and staff

of Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel.

| Friends may pay their last respects at Rock
' of Ages Funeral Chapel, Wulff Road and
: Pinedale on Thursday from 10am to 6pm
; and at the Church on Friday from 1pm until
| Funeral time.

DIEUVELA
MUCHEL, 62

of Chippingham; will
be held on Friday 26th,
May 2006 at Queen of
Peace Catholic,
Church, Faith Avenue
at llam. Officiating
will be Fr. Kaze



will be Old Trail Cemetery.

\ She is survived by her one daughter,
| Alescanne Loui; one son, Framond; three
| grand children, Pe Gi Loui, Jeri Loui, Dafene
| Loui; son-in-law, Alecsanne Loui; nine
sisters, Elianise, Claudia, Marie, Marieline,
Diauvlia, Itila, Doloreste, Elaine and Sara
Coicou; nieces, Sandra, Merllane, Annette,
Gina, Danie, Tyane Coicou; nephews,
| James, Evans, Kevin, Jeffery, Adlyn,
Seintonil, Nesly and Jerome Coicou and a
| host of other relatives and friends

Friends may pay their last respect at Rock
of Ages Funeral Chapel on Wulff Road and

| Pinedale from 10am to 6pm on Thursday
and on Saturday at the Church from 10am
until Funeral Time.

Eugene and interment |



vi sfoy Vay

“Action is ; demanded

THE TRIBUNE.





on protesting officers

ALL police officers involved
in yesterday’s court protest
should be fired, furious com-
munity activists claimed last

night.
They said if action was not
taken immediately, then

National Security Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt and Commissioner
Paul Farquharson must resign.

The protest was attacked as
“an act of defiance” against the
attorney general and “a threat
to the rule of law.”



TO OUR VALUED
* CUSTOMERS
Please be advised _ that,
June 1, 2006 due to operation
costs we here at the Holiday Ice.
Company will be selling our ice
at the new prices listed below:



Large Bags $7.00
Medium Bags $5.00
Small Bags = $2.50

Thank you.

And one said: “This is a dan-
gerous day for the Bahamas.”
Senior college lecturer Felix

Bethel, a friend of Deron.

Bethel’s family, and Workers
Party leader Rodney Moncur
both said the commissioner
“must rein these men in” or
face the consequences.

“Tf he doesn’t, someone must
call for his resignation,” said Mr
Bethel. He claimed that this was
“happening because the police
are accustomed to cover-ups.

But the attorney general is say-
ing there will be no cover-up
and she is being true to her
word.” |

For members of a “disci-
plined force” to act this way was
out of order, he said.

Mr Moncur supported Mr
Bethel’s view, saying: “Two
things must happen: either
Mother Pratt fires the commis-
sioner or she needs to resign.

“The police force is the mili-
tary arm of the state. When they













effective

FINALLY AFFORDABLE...

Plugging you into the power of the sun...

SOLAR POWER CONCEPTS LTD.

A Star in the Galaxy Group of Companies
Crawford St., Oakes Field

Tel: 323-5171

Fax: 322-6969







are prepared to protest because
the rule of law is being estab-
lished, we are in trouble.

“T am now going to organise
a counter protest because the
tule of law has to be protect-
ed. This is an attempt to pre-
vent justice.”

The activists claimed the
police action was “in direct con-
frontation with the indepen-
dence of the attorney general”
and all officers involved “should

~ be fired forthwith.” ~



Shooting inquest is
called off: CDU
‘officer now to face -
manslaughter charge

FROM page one

manslaughter charges is very
unfair.

“No reason was given for call-
ing off the inquest and the
inquest would be the proper
procedure to follow. The attor-
ney general ought never to
interfere with the discretion of
the coroner to hold an inquest,”
he said.

However, Mr Bannister said
that he was very pleased with
the turn-out of CDU officers
yesterday.

“I believe that the support
‘that the police officers have giv-

en him is an indication of how. .
they feel about the fact that
they have to put their lives on
the line so often. They cannot.
have the Executive treat them’
like that,” he said.

Mr Bannister said that his
client has been through an
“amazing ordeal” in the past.
months and that he hopes that
the. attorney general will
decide to let the inquest go
forth.

* “We hope that this is the end
of it, that there will be no more
threats of manslaughter charges.
It is unfair to him, to his family,”
he said.

ATTENTION COLLEGE STUDENTS!!
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Call: 394-4949

or

E-mail: shopkeeper@stopnshopbahamas.com

on entire stock from May 24-June 30

ye & Pearls is the direct importer of Gemstones,

Beads lkt Gold findings, Turquoise, Coral, Bali

ees Quartz, Crystals, Tiger Eye, Agate, Citrine,
Amber and Fresh Water Pearls.

We offer abincingis services
Pearl and bead strands whole sale and refail.

Also - buy two strands of pearls and gef another oe
You can cusfomize your own necklace
and waif while ifs being made.



Y . Sega aN :
= LS



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 9



The unknown constitutional battle

A etouce you
might not know it, a.

constitutional battle has been
raging here for the past five
years.

The government is in the
metaphorical dock, fighting a
war Of attrition in the hope that
Maurice Glinton and Leandra
Esfakis, the two maverick
lawyers leading the fray, will
give up and go away.

The battle is over the confi-
dentiality of lawyer-client rela-
tions — something which experts
say is a cornerstone of our jus-
tice system. ©

Glinton and Esfakis sued the ~

government soon after the
Ingraham administration
rammed a package of 11 finan-
cial laws through parliament in
December 2000 under heavy
pressure from Western coun-
tries and the Financial Action
Task Force those countries had
set up to regulate international
banking.

At the time, the Bahamas was
ranked among the world's
worst-regulated offshore cen-
tres, and was blacklisted for

being "uncooperative" in fight- _

ing money laundering. Rich
countries had reached the point
where they would no longer tol-
erate tax havens, so we faced
unprecedented sanctions that
would have ended our banking
relations with the rest of the
world.

Almost overnight (by
Bahamian standards), costly
new layers of regulation were
added to the financial sector to
control criminal activities -
that’s why we had to fill out all
those ridiculous identity forms.
The laws were written and
passed in record time, with the
involvement of only a few top
ministers.

‘According to critics, this
kitchen cabinet hijacked the
authority of parliament to
appease international regula-
tors, and Bahamian legislators
were never able to debate the
matter. But others say there was
good reason for Ingraham’s
“madness”. ee!

“Perhaps he learned from
Pindling’s experience,” one
authoritative source told Tough
Call. The reference was to the
spectacular disclosures. of offi-

eae




LS

PANY

“ep?





LARRY SMITH

cial corruption in the Bahamas
by American news media in the
early 1980s, which led to a dam-
aging commission of inquiry
into drug trafficking.

“If you want to play the
game, you have to play by the
rules. Offshore financial centres
had let the lack of oversight get
out of hand and the G7 coun-
tries decided that certain things
had to be done. Obviously, the
more you have at stake in these
matters, the quicker you are to
react.”

(): course, Ingraham’s
rapid reaction drew -

howls of protest from all quar-
ters — including the then oppo-
sition Progressive Liberal Party,
which vowed to revisit the leg-
islation when it came to pow-
er. But significantly, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie has avoided
that over four years.

As lawyer Brian Moree said
at the time: The government
delivered “a massive response
to the financial crisis. Only time
will tell if this was a stroke of
genius or a harbinger of the
demise of our financial services
industry."

Moree said it was right to
make “reasonable concessions
to eliminate criminal activity,”
but contended that the process
was “offensive, unorthodox and
dangerously disrespectful of
public international law and the
rules regulating relations
between sovereign countries."

The Financial Transactions
Reporting Act affects
lawyer/client privilege by
requiring the inspection of client
files by government agents.
According to

Glinton and Esfakis, this
“abrogates the individual’s con-
stitutional right of confidential-
ity as we have understood it in
common law tradition.”

So these two indepéndent
lawyers challenged the govern-
ment in 2001 and’were later

NOTICE

joined by the Bar Council,
which wants to resolve the issue.
In the meantime, the govern-
ment has suspended inspections
while the lawsuit winds its way
laboriously through the courts.

But despite. dozens of court

‘appearances over the past five

years, the substantive issue of
lawyer/client privilege has yet
to be heard. That’s because —
since 2002 — the argument has
been over whether our finan-
cial laws are unconstitutional
because they were enacted

_under pressure from other juris-

dictions.

In that year Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall struck out argu-
ments in the lawsuit’s statement
of claim that he said were “not
justiciable” — in other words,
they could not be settled by a
court.

The part of the claim that he
deleted argues that the laws are
unconstitutional because they
were “not made for the peace,
order and good government of
The Bahamas”, and that
enforcement will cause “serious

‘harm to the legal profession,

clients, and the public interest.”

_ What Glinton and Esfakis are
saying is that the government
ceded its authority: “I don’t

_ believe that the overseas pres-

sure‘is such that we have to
behave like fools and give up
all of our sovereignty to other

‘countries and non-state actors

like the Financial Action Task
Force,” Glinton told Tough
Call.

“At end of the day the law is
supposed to be for our protec-
tion as citizens, and we need to

‘demand rational behaviour and

accountability from our gov-
ernment. These are matters of
principle that are fundamental
to our practice of law.” .
The constitutional arguments
were later restored by the Court
of Appeal. But the government
waited until last year to appeal
that decision — well after the

time allowed-for an appeal-had :

, THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD ;

Payment of Benefits and Assistances for the month of August 2005, will be made in the following
districts, at the following pay stations between the hours stated below:

ADELAIDE DISTRICT:

‘

Thursday, May 25, 2006: 12 noon - 12:30p.m., at the Church Hall.

CARMICHAEL DISTRICT :

Thursday, May 25, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 11:45a.m., at Beacon Hill Church of Nazarene, Carmichael

Road.

GAMBIER DISTRICT:

Thursday, May 25, 2006: 12:45p.m. - 1:30p.m., at St. Peter’s Church Hall.

FOX HILL DISTRICT:

Thursday, May 25, 2006: Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 3:00p.m., at the National Insurance
Board’s Fox Hill Sub- Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may collect
them throughout the month of September 2005, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

WULFF ROAD LOCAL OFFICE:

Thursday, May 25, 2006:Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 4:00p.m. at the National Insurance
Board’s Wulff Road Local Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may
collect them throughout the month of June 2006, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT:

Thursday, May 25, 2006: May 29, 2006: 9:30a.m.- 4:00p.m., at The Bahamas Public Service Union

Hall, East Street South.

GRANTS TOWN DISTRICT:

1. Thursday, May 25 - Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters “A” - “L”, at the Cat Island United
Association Hall #1, Market and Vesey Streets.

2. Thursday, May 25 - Monday, May 29, 2006: 9:30 a.m. - 4:00. p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters “M” - “Z”, at the Salvation Army

Hall, Meadow Street.

3. Tuesday, May 30 - Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.

Persons who did not collect their cheques from the respective stations on the days
specified, may collect them at the Cat Island United Association Hall #1, Market and
Vesey Streets, on the above-mentioned dates.

PLEASE NOTE:

Cheques must be collected from the listed pay stations on the dates and times given. In cases of
emergency, uncollected cheques may be collected from the Pensions Department, at the Jumbey
Village Complex throughout the month of June 2006 between the hours of 9:30a.m. and 4:00p.m.

Claimants and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in order to collect
their cheques. Acceptable forms of identification for claimants collecting their own payments are:Their
National Insurance Registration Card, together with any one of the following:

1. A Passport;
2. A Voter’s Card; or

3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the claimant is sending a representative to collect his/ her cheque, the representative should
provide an Authorization Form completed by the claimant, or a letter authorizing the Board to pay
the representative, together with any of the above-listed items to identify the representative.

All claimants and/or their representatives are advised that should they fail to provide satisfactory
documents to identify themselves as requested above, there may be a delay or denial of payments.

N.B. Pensionrs whose cheques are deposited directly to their bank accounts are advised that

expired. The Privy Council will
now hear the matter on June
26.

( osts for the London

hearing will be almost
$100,000. And up to last Octo-
ber — when Glinton and Esfakis
officially asked the Bar Council
for funds — they had spent many
unbilled hours of their own time
preparing documents and
attending hearings, often involv-
ing travel to and from Freeport,
where Glinton is based. They
insist that no clients are funding
their action.

And it is a huge risk finan-
cially. If they lose the appeal
(or the action as a whole), costs
will be awarded against Glin-
ton.and Esfakis alone. And if
those costs are not paid, they
can be declared bankrupt and
disbarred.

According to Glinton, if'the
government’s appeal is success-

ful “it would affirm a judge’s

tion, and we can’t get the main
issue before a judge.”

Since lawyers maintain
accounts, form companies and
handle transactions on behalf
of their clients, they come under
regulatory scrutiny just like
banks and trust companies.

. The financial regulations
require lawyers to collect infor-
mation on their clients and pro-
vide it to government inspec-
tors. The actual job of inspect-
ing has been delegated to a list
of chartered accountants, who
must be paid for their services.

The Financial Transactions
Reporting Act governs escrow
accounts. If you hold money on
behalf of anyone, under that
legislation, you are obliged to
account to the Compliance
Commission auditors, who can
examine that account.

Law firms must also provide
the KYC documentation on
those clients, and documentary
evidence proving why they are
holding that money.



If the Privy Council rules against
the government’s appeal next
month, then things will stay on
course and the substantive issue of —
legal privilege will eventually come

to trial.



right to strike out a constitu-
tional claim at a preliminary
stage and thus frustrate further
constitutional challenges to the
executive.

“The attorney-general will
say that these are not issues to
be tried, which could give the
first instance judge a final say
without a hearing on the merits
of the case,” he said. “And since
we don’t have judges who spe-
cialise in constitutional law, that
could be dangerous.”

If the Privy Council rules
against the government’s appeal
next month, then things will stay

on course and the substantive -
issue of legal privilege will even- ”

tually come to trial.

“They are trying to dismem-
ber our case,” Glinton said.
“They don’t want to argue judi-
cial review-of government

actions..So_it’s a_war.of attri-:

So what about the 700 plus
other Bahamian lawyers who
are affected by these regulations
and the five-year-old lawsuit?

Although the Bar Association -

supports the action, and once
threatened to “discipline” any
lawyer who complied with
inspections, it has not come up
with any funding.

Part of the reluctance to join
in the action may be a lack of
awareness of what it means to
be a citizen and a lawyer in a
constitutional democracy,
knowing that it is an uphill bat-
tle all the way.

S tatistically there is little
chance of citizens suc-
ceeding against the state at the

first level — the Supreme
Court. And to go the whole

process is expensive and time-

3 YEAR WARRANTY / 100,000km

JD. Powers:
“Most appealing vehicle in it’s Class”

SANPIN MOTORS LTD.

Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377, 326- 6464/5, 326- 0013/4, 326-6382 + Fax: 326-6315

consuming.

And historically, a judicial
success at the Privy Council lev-
el — as in the D'Arcy Ryan,cit-
izenship case — has not always:
yielded a success in practical
terms.

According to one observer,
“Leadership is lacking in this
country in every aspect of social

-enterprise. In other countries

the Bar has been the main force
in bringing these matters. to

‘court. Here it is more a matter

of form over substance.” - ae r

And some law firms are deal-
ing with the prospect of inspée-
tions by setting up new compa-
nies to hold duplicate sets of
corporate files. This means that
inspectors won’t be able 40
examine client files within. “the
law firm, but would be directed
to corporate files in a separate
company.

A lawyer at one major fizin
said: “We would definitely be
concerned if they came to
inspect client files in our law
offices. This is just one practical
on-the-ground approach that
some firms have had to the
financial regulations.

But, he added, “there is>no
question that the underlying
issue is very serious, and courts

’ around the world have consis-

tently upheld the integrity of
lawyer/client privilege.”

And the real question is, are
these really maverick lawyers
pursuing a futile quest?

“This constitutional litigation
was filed by the Canadian Bar
Association and the various
provincial bar associations .in
Canada, and the law societies
in Australia, after ours was
filed,” Esfakis told Touch Call.
“Tt has been determined already
in favour of their bar associa:
tions.”

The dictionary defines mav-
erick as "one who is unorthodox

in his ideas and attitudes"> Are

the law societies of those juris-
dictions mavericks?

Perhaps we should describe
Glinton and Esfakis as “verte-
brate" lawyers instead, inele--
gant as it may sound. However,
that might imply that the rest
of the bar is “invertebrate”.

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme
dia.net. Or visit www.bahama-

_ pundit.com

TEST DRIVE -
ONE TODAY!

ON THE SPOT ante

FINANCING WITH = ysuRANCE Sgarten’
AVAILABLE WITH 5 3

f

payments for the month of May 2006 will be deposited to their accounts on
Thursday, May 18, 2006.

by
E an @ a.
mail: sanpin.vehicles@coralwave.com EGMMONWEALTHIBANKC okers





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

RARER YL

BRS RRR RRR AR RR TRI I ARE RT AD or



YOUR CONNEC rion-Fo THE WORLD
POSITION VACANCY
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications for
the above position from suitably qualified persons with relevant experience in the
telecommunications or related industry.

GENERAL ACCOUNTABILITIES

This position develops and directs the Company’s accounting and control activities to
protect the assets of BTC and to ensure the internal and external integrity of accounting
standards and financial controls. The CFO is to provide accurate and timely monthly
corporate performance reports and annual budgeting information to Board members,

executives, senior managers and line managers. The CFO also directs the formulation
and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and objectives including cash
management, banking and relations with banks and investment firms, risk management
and capital funding requirements. The enhancement of revenue (including the

implementation of measures to stop revenue leakage) 1 is an important requirement for

this position.

This is an executive management position reporting to the President & Chief Executive
Officer and the Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Board of Directors. As the
Chief Financial Officer of BTC, the holder of this position provides the Board and
senior management with informed and timely opinions on the Company’s financial
performance and trends impacting operations.

SPECIFIC ACCOUNTABILITIES

1. Develop and direct the Company’s accounting and control activities to protect the
assets of BTC, to ensure the internal and external integrity of accounting standards
and financial controls, and to provide accurate and timely reporting and budgeting

information to Board members, executives, senior managers and line managers.

2 Direct and prepare for printing and distribution all statutory accounts and annual
audited financial reports. ©

3. Direct the formulation and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and
objectives including: cash management, banking and relations with banks and
investment houses, risk management and capital funding requirements.

4. Provide the Board and Executive Management with informed and timely opinions
on the Company’s financial performance and trends impacting operations.

5. Protect the assets of the Company by directing the accounting and control, financial
planning, statutory reporting, and risk management activities on a a COHAN Y NAGE
basis.

6. Enhance the Company’s public image by ensuring the integrity of accounting and
control standards and procedures and by providing the published annual report on
_ atimely basis.

7. Contribute to the aims and abjextives of BTC by sroviding informed advice relative
to the Company’s financial performance, the general business environment and
developing trends impacting BTC’s activities.

8. Contribute to increased corporate revenues through effective cash management and
by preparing and presenting financial operating data for Board and executive
approval.

9. Contribute to the reduction of operating expenses through the development and
implementation of accounting and control procedures and systems to provide
accurate and timely data for the information of the Board, executives and managers.

10. Ensure the Company’s continued access to capital at competitive rates by ensuring
the flow of financial information, by maintaining contact with commercial and
investment banks and by directing accurate and timely | financial planning and
budgeting.

11. Ensure the necessary human resources to meet both the current and future needs
of the finance division by participating in the selection, mentoring, motivation
and development of managers and staff. ©

12. To attend as required all meetings of the Executive Committee, the Board of
Directors and the Finance Committee of the Board and any other relevant committee.

‘43. To arrange for the audit of BTC’s financial statements ina timely manner and to

liaise with BTC’s external auditors as required.

_ 14. To ensure prompt action to implement recommendations made by the Internal

Audit Department in their reports to the Audit Committee of the Board and the
senior management.

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate should be a member of a recognized accounting body from
the U.K., Canada or the USA, possess a thorough working knowledge of International
Accounting Standards (IAS) and meet the following requirements:

¢ ACPA or ACA designation with at least ten (10) years of commercial post-qualification
experience with proven senior management experience in the telecommunications
industry.

¢ Exceptional interpersonal and communications skills.
¢ Expertise in implementing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.
COMPENSATION

BTC offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits commensurate with
qualifications and experience and in line with compensalion and benefits afforded
senior executives in the private sector.

It is BTC’s intention to execute a contract with the successful applicant for a
period of three (3) years with an option to renew the contract for a mutually agreed
period.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive,
no later than June 6", 2006 and addressed as follows:

Director of Human Resources

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited:
. John F. Kennedy Drive

P. O. Box N-3048

Nassau, Bahamas

Re: Vacancy: Chief Financial Officer

’ : THE TRIBUNE":





YOUR. CONNECTIO O THE WORLD

POSITION VACANCY
Deputy Chief Financial Officer (DCFO)

The Bahamas Telecorimunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications for the above
position from suitably qualified persons with relevant experience in the telecommunications or
related industry.

GENERAL ACCOUNTABILITIES | \

The holder of this position assists the Chief Financial Officer as he or she develops and directs
the Company’s accounting and control activities to protect the assets of BTC and to ensure the
internal and external integrity of accounting standards and financial controls. The CFO is to
provide accurate and timely monthly corporate performance reports and annual budgeting
information to Board members, executives, senior managers and line managers. The CFO also
directs the formulation and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and objectives
including cash management, banking and relations with banks and investment firms, risk
management and capital funding requirements. The enhancement of revenue (including the
implementation of measures to stop revenue leakage) is an important requirement for this position.

This is an executive management position reporting to the Chief Financial Officer (CFO). |

SPECIFIC ACCOUNTABILITIES

To assist the CFO and provide leadership in the Finance Division with the following:

1. Develop and direct the Company’s accounting and control activities to protect the
assets of BTC, to ensure the internal and external integrity of accounting standards
and financial controls, and to provide accurate and timely reporting and budgeting
information to Board members, executives, senior managers and line managers.

2. Direct and prepare for printing and distribution all sation accounts and annual
audited financial reports.

3. Direct the formulation and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and
objectives including: cash management, banking and relations with banks and
investment houses, risk management and capital funding requirements.

4, Provide the Board and Executive Management with informed and timely opinions
on the Company’s financial performance and trends impacting operations.

"5, Protect the assets of the Company by directing the accounting and control, financial »
planning, statutory reporting, and risk management activities on a conan -wide ~
basis.

6. Enhance the Company’s public image by ensuring the integrity of accounting and
control standards and procedures and by providing the published annual report on a -
timely basis.

7. Contribute to the aims and objectives of BTC by providing informed advice relative —
to the Company’s financial performance, the general business environment and
_ developing trends impacting BTC’s activities.

8. Contribute to increased corporate revenues through effective cash management and ‘|:

by preparing and presenting financial operating data for Board and executive approval. » |

9, Contribute to the reduction of operating expenses through the development and
implementation of accounting and control procedures and systems to provide accurate
and timely data for the information of the Board, executives and managers.

10. Ensure the Company’s continued access to capital at competitive rates by ensuring
the flow of financial information, by maintaining contact with commercial and
investment banks and by directing accurate and timely financial planning and
budgeting.

11. Ensure the necessary human resources to meet both the current and future needs of
the finance division by participating in the selection, mentoring, motivation and
development of managers and staff.

12. In the absence of the Chief Financial Officer to attend as required all meetings of
the Executive Committee and the Finance Committee of the Board and any other
relevant committees.

13. To arrange for the audit of BTC’s financial statements in a timely manner and to
liaise with BTC’s external auditors as required.

14. To ensure prompt action to implement recommendations made by the Internal Audit
Department in their reports to the Audit Committee of the Board and the senior
management.

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate should be a member of a recognized accounting body from the U.K.,
Canada or the USA, possess a thorough working knowledge of International Accounting Standards
(IAS) and meet the following requirements:

* ACPA or ACA designation with at least five (5) years of commercial post-qualification
experience with proven management experience in the telecommunications industry.

¢ Exceptional interpersonal and communications skills.

+ Expertise in implementing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.

COMPENSATION

BTC offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits commensurate with qualifications
and experience and in line with compensation and benefits afforded senior executives in

the private sector.

It is BTC’s intention to execute a contract with the successful applicant for a period of three
(3) years with an option to renew the contract for a mutually agreed period.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later
than June 6th, 2006 and addressed as follows:

Director of Human Resources

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F. Kennedy Drive

P. O. Box N-3048

Nassau, Bahamas

Re: Vacancy: Deputy Chief Financial Officer



THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

was during the FNM’s term in
office that about 25,000 illegal
Haitians were repatriated.

“Anyone in the Bahamas would
know better than that, including
someone like Mr Gibson,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said that he found
it odd that Mr Gibson, who he
described as a “Johnny-come-late-
ly” to the debate of illegal immi-
gration in the Bahamas, would
allow Haitians, while he was Min-
ister of Housing to construct
homes for the ministry.

The opposition leader said that
it was inexcusable that persons
with legal status in the Bahamas
could be taken from their homes
at four and five in the morning as
they were in Eleuthera.

He pointed out that those who
sought to make their work per-
mits available to the police were
not allowed to do so and were sub-
sequently brought to New Provi-
dence and dumped in the deten-
tion centre.

“T encouraged them to file suit
against the government so that
their rights and the rights of others
would not be abused in the future.
We want a government of laws in
the Bahamas so when the police
excéed their authority persons

Police officials

Ingraham

would be able to sue the police
department. When we were in
government on numerous occa-
sion we settled with persons when
the police were wrong. When the
hospital was negligent we were
sued. When trees fell on cars and
persons got hurt we were sued.

“Government has a duty to
obey the law. So no amount of
demagoguery, because they are
Haitians, Jamaica, British or what-
ever, should, if their rights are
abused, prevent them from seek-
ing their rights before the courts.
Haitians should not be excluded
from that and in fact that is in the
International Convention on the
Rights of Migrants,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Amnesty International in their
newly released report says esti-
mates are that 60,000 out of the
Bahamas’ 300,000 strong popula-
tion is of Haitian descent.

In 2005, according to the
Department of Immigration 5,543
illegal immigrants were repatriat-
ed, 4504 to Haiti.

Mr Ingraham said that when his
party came to office in 1992 they
found the immigration system ina
state of disarray.

He pointed out that the former
government had hundreds of ille-
gal immigrants housed in Fox Hill
prison, not in a proper detention
centre, and were unable to repa-
triate them to Haiti.

“The Haitian government
would not accept them because
there was a breakdown in com-
munication between Haiti and the
Bahamas and we had to work out
an agreement for them to be
accepted back into Haiti,” Mr
Ingraham said.

The FNM leader said that even
the method of repatriation used

before his government changed it ~

was archaic and inefficient.

“The government used to trans-
port the immigrants on a boat
called the Eastore which was very
slow and it tied-up immigration
and defence force officers for an
extended period of time because it
took several days to get Haiti.

“We initiated a programme of
chartering aircraft to take the
immigrants back to Haiti for the
first time in the history of the
Bahamas, this is a programme that
is continuing today,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

Even then, the only airport
which the Haitian government
would allow the migrants to come
into Haiti through was the one in
Port-au-Prince.

FROM page one

matter, I would have known, and IJ didn't hear
that: we locked up any police officers in this raid,”
Mr Ferguson said. .

“However," he said, "if officers are implicated —
and these things do happen — they would be charged
like‘everybody else. If it is straight forward in con-
travention of the Gaming Lottery Act, they would
be subject to the same thing like anybody else."

All of the confiscated material, according to

Assistant Commissioner Ferguson, has been secured
by police to be used as an exhibit against the gam-
bling house owners when the case goes to court.

Addressing the status of the persons appre-
hended during the raid, an official from the Immi-
gration Department said that of the 23 Haitians
arrested, only four were illegal, and those four were
being held at the detention centre on Carmichael
Road. The others, he said, were charged by the
police and granted bail.

The raid on the Grove establishment was a part
of a police initiative called "Operation Quiet
Storm", which seeks to focus on and address crim-
inal activities within the community. And whereas
police officials say that the gambling establishment
was targeted because it. was operating in contra-
vention of the country's gambling laws, sources
claim that the raid was conducted after police
received information that the operation may have
had financial ties to an illegal Haitian smuggling
rink in the Bahamas

In response to these allegations, Inspector Evans
denied that the establishment was targeted for any
reason other than the fact that it was operating in

Violent dispute reports

FROM page one

gun had already disappeared.

When informed-of the-ineident,- Assistant Com- |

missioner of Police Reginald. Ferguson apologised to
the public for the station’s failure to respond quickly.

He said an investigation into the matter would be
launched as soon as possible.

A Tribune reporter witnessed the entire incident.

At around 5.30pm en Saturday, while a passenger in
a taxi, the reporter saw.a group of young men stand-
ing on the roadside when an argument started.

One of the young men then pulled a hand gun from
his waist band, showed it off, and then put it back.

The reporter called 919 and alerted the police.

When no officers arrived, the reporter.and the taxi »

driver went to the South Beach Police Station, but left
and returned to the scene after the officers refused to
respond to the incident.

The taxi driver implored the officers to take action,
and even offered to drive one of them to the scene.
However the officers seemed reluctant to do any-
thing.

“Just wait on the CDU officers,” said the sergeant,
adding that this was the best he could do.

A young officer pointed out that by the time they
got to the scene, the persons involved in the altercation

i would most likely have left anyway. .

An ex-police officer, ‘who was on the scene, said that
if he were still in uniform, he would have left the sta-
tion immediately on receiving such a call.

Mr Fergurson said any nonchalant response by.any
police officer will not be tolerated.

“That was very slack of the officers. It is discour-

cor{travention of the law.

the situation.”

Terios and Sirion feature auto. Pan. pla
and colours available. 24-month/30, ‘000- mile ae warranty on a ‘new veh cle :

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER
Parts and service guaranteed

Salespersons:
Terrol Cash

aging to me to hear that this is hay, my. officers handled

Collins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 3:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 * Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs é

Pam Palacious
L.J. Albury

Available in Granda Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mail, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916



WEUNESVAY, WIAY <4, CUUU, FmUL 11

on your way to college?
_an outstanding student and
a leader?

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
has a fantastic opportunity for you.
The President’s Scholars Programme.

a ee
- Successful applicants receive:

« Full payment of tuition and general student fees

« Annual book allowance

* Retreats

¢ Monthly seminars

* Access to the President's Scholars/Honours
Centre, including computer lab, caplet and
study lounge

* Opportunities for local and FeNELOFAl student

-. leadership conferences, and

* Special recognition at commencement with
President’s Scholar award.

» E-mail account and Internet access

For further information contact
Oyiincne eee
President's Scholars Programme/
Honours Programme

Oakes Field Campus
The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas

Telephone:

(Rae



FIRSTCARIBBEAN |

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY —

for
MANAGER, RETAIL CREDIT (NASSAU)

Qualifications/Experience:

. Bachelor’s Degree in Banking or related field.

e At least five years banking experience at senior supervisory
level

e At least three years lending experience

General Req uirements/Responsibilities:

¢ To provide assessment of retail credits submitted by 2
jurisdictions
Sanction/authorize retail credit loan applications including
International mortgages within delegated limits up to US$400
thousand secured and US$100 thousand unsecured
Prepare recommendations on retail loan applications outside
of delegated limits for the Senior Manager, Retail Credit /
Head of Retail Credit to sanction / authorize.

If you are interested:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before
may 26, 2006 to:

- Dawnika Rolle
HR Business Associate
Shirley Street, Financial Centre
P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: dawnika.rolle@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their

_ interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian nationals only.



twee ee ew



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Judicial review could ‘reinvigorate’
justice system, says committee chair

@ By MARK HUMES

THE changes sug-
gested by a newly-com-
pleted judicial review
could reinvigorate the
justice system in the
Bahamas according to
Sean McWeeney.

Mr McWeeney, who
served as the review
committee chairman,
called it the widest-
ranging review of the
judiciary ever under-
taken in the Bahamas.

“We believe if it is
adopted, it will per-
haps, for the very first
time in our history,
make a career on the
bench a truly attractive
proposition,” he said.

The committee presented a
copy of the review report to the









ATTORNEY General Allyson Maynard-Gibson. _
receiving a report of the judicial review commission
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Attorney General’s Office ear-
lier this month.

Speaking with The Tribune

- on Monday, Attorney General

statement.



Allyson May-
nard-Gibson
said that it is
still too early
for her office
to comment
on the find-
ings, as they
are yet to be
reviewed by
all the proper
authorities.
Speaking
with The Tri-
bune, Mrs
Maynard-
Gibson said
that once this
process is
completed,

she would be ~
‘in a better
position to make an official

According to Mr McWeeney,



Thompson Blvd. __
eran)









the current salaries and benefits

’ offered to members of the judi-

ciary are not adequate and com-
pare poorly to those of legal pro-
fessionals in the private sector.
The committee therefore rec-
ommended that the salaries,
benefits, and terms of service
be adjusted for members of the
judiciary, in the hope of attract-
ing young lawyers to the bench
and reinvigorating the profes-

_ sion.
Mr McWeeney said that tra-"

ditionally, financial considera-
tions would prevent a lawyer

my newspaper.”

HAROLD ANTOR

“Home delivery of The
Tribune gives me a head
start. The Tribune is

INSURANCE EXECUTIVE

from considering an appoint-
ment to the bench until he or
she came close to retirement age.
However, he added that he
feels the report’s recommenda-
tions represent a recipe for
attracting the most qualified
and talented attorneys from
both the public and private Bar
to the bench.
When the report was pre-
sented, Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said that she hoped to have
some of the commission’s
suggestions implemented

when this year’s budget

debate begins on May 31.

“Tt is clear that security in pay
and position frees judges to
exercise their best legal judg-
ment in applying the law fairly
and impartially -to the parties
before them,” she said.

Mr McWeeney said that the
country will benefit in the long.
run, as the better the quality of
judges attracted to the to the
profession, the better the qual-
ity of the jurisprudence — and
the better the quality of
jurisprudence, the better the
quality of the civilization.



@ ATTORNEY General Allyson Maynard-Gibson and her













team share notes with the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
during a courtesy call on Monday. Pictured from right are the
chamber’s executive director Philip Simon, president Tanya

. Wright, Mrs Maynard-Gibson, permanent secretary Jacqueline

Murray, and director of legal affairs Deborah Fraser.

(BES Beene Derek Smith)

Chamber of
Commerce is 4
invited to join

swift justice

initiative

‘THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce has been invited to
join Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson’s “swift jus-
tice” initiative.

Chamber of Commerce pres-
ident Tanya Wright and execu-
tive director Philip Simon visit-
ed Mrs Maynard-Gibson on
Monday..

“T am happy to work with the
chamber on our swift justice ini-
tiative,” said Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son during the courtesy call. “I
eagerly anticipate their co-oper-
ation with us in this regard.”

Said Mrs Wright: “We always
look forward to an opportunity
to speak with Mrs Maynard-
Gibson who has always made
herself available to the cham-
ber.

“We are proud of the rela-
tionship that we have begun to
develop and we will do all that
we can to continue to foster that.

“We are looking at mandates
that we need to create in order

to strengthen not only the busi-
ness community but our vari-
ous relationships with other key
partners, the public sector,” said
Mrs Wright. ;

She continued: “This minis-
ter in particular has seriously
invested in the private/public
sector relationship and a testa-
ment of that is the fact that we
are meeting with her again
today.

“So, we are looking at ways
to strengthen that relationship
and to see how best the cham-
ber can align its mandate for
the betterment of the business
community and the community
at large.”

Mr Simon underscored the
desire of the chamber to speak
from the perspective of its pub-
lic policy and legislation com-
mittee “and to see how we can
better consult with this office
in the drafting of legislation that
impacts the business and wider
community.”

INSIGHT
oe the stories behind iat)
Me EMC (e DET) roy Mondays

For delivery: of the leading
Bahamian newspaper, call The
Tribune’s. Circulation Department
at 502-2383) or visit ous offices on
Shirley Street to sign up today!





The Tribune

Why Voice. Why Vlowspaper!






SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street













= )PIDELITY

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH





NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764



FREEPORT OFFICE
‘Tel: (242) 351-3010








Bahamas Waste

‘looks good’ for | S250m resort investment
set for June 15 opening ©

2006 full-year

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

BAHAMAS Waste’s man- :
aging director yesterday told :
The Tribune that economic :
growth generated by foreign ;
direct investment could help it :
expand tu “three to four” Fam- :
ily Islands, the company hav- :
ing experienced a 123.31 per :
cent increase in 2006 first quar- :
ter net income to $247,000. i

Francisco de Cardenas said :
the BISX-listed waste disposal :
company seémed to be starting :
to “reap the reWards” from its ;
2005 fiscal year, when it invest- ;
ed heavily in equipment: :
replacement and its $1 million :
medical waste facility. i

Describing himself as :
“extremely pleased” with :
Bahamas Waste’s first quarter :
results, Mr de Cardenas said: }
“All last year we had the dis- :
traction of our medical waste :
facility, getting that up. and run- :
ning and securing customers.

.“At the end of the year, ;
everything fell into place. The :
medical institutions are now :
seeing what a benefit it is to i
them and the environment as: ;
well. The medical waste facility :
is generating revenue and mak- :
ing money.” i

Disa Harper, Bahamas :
Waste’s chief financial officer, :
said the remainder of 2006 was :
“looking pretty good” for the :
company, which has seen a 4
“slight increase” in business }
from its commercial units. “Y

Bahamas Waste has: imple- :
mented price increases for its :
commercial business segment :
since May 1, as it was “lagging :
behind” due to rising costs. :

Mr de Cardenas said’ steel }
costs had doubled, while bin :
and vehicle maintenance and :
other costs had also risen. Then :
there was the company’s fuel :
- bill, which in 2005 rose by :
almost 70 per cent in 2005, strik- ;
ng $330,990 compared to :
$196,826 in 2004. i

Bahamas Waste was talking :
to its individual commercial ;
clients and roll-off business cus- :
tomers over rate increases that’ :
would suit both sides, the man- :
aging director said. :

And Mrs Harper added: “We :
spend a lot of money to make :
sure our service is above stan- ?
dard. Compliance, insurance

SEE page 6B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor |

A $250 million investment
project is set for a soft re-open-
ing of its marina on June 15,
with the developers telling The
Tribune that clients and real.
estate purchasers were “sali-
vating” to be part of the devel-
opment.

Maura Brassil, Chub Cay
International’s vice-president
of sales and marketing, said

that although the centrepiece °

of the Berry Islands project,
the new 20,000 square foot
clubhouse, was 60 days behind
schedule, the existing facility
had been refurbished in time
for the re-opening. .

‘The. developers, headed by
south Florida businessmen
Kaye Pearson and Walt
McCrory, chairman and chief
executive of Fort Lauderdale-
based International Marinas,
the firm that manages the Port
Lucaya marina on Grand
Bahama, began construction at
the Chub Cay Club in June last
year.

Ms Brassil said the marina
was almost completed, with 110
brand new slips installed, and

the marina and channel lead- -

ing to it dredged to a depth of,
12.feet at low tide.

She added that seven of the
14 villas currently under con-
struction were “close to com-
pletion”, with the workforce at
the site scaled down from a

high of 458 to about 258, with °

much of the infrastructure work
now finished.

The club was close to finish-
ing its own power and water
plant, Ms Brassil said, shipping
the materials to the island,
while a generator house and 33
staff houses had already been
constructed.

Ms Brassil revealed the
developers were planning a
Phase II expansion of the pro-
ject, which was due to start lat-
er this year or in early 2007.

She said: “There’s a lot of
land we have to deal with.
We’re finishing up Phase I, and
can’t start on Phase IT until the
autumn or beginning of 2007.”

City Markets profits
rise 11.9% to $6.6m

BAHAMAS Supermarkets yesterday announced that net income
for the first three quarters of its current fiscal year had risen by 11.9
per cent to $6.6 million, as its new majority owner continued efforts
to replace its former Trinidad-based operating partner in the $54

million buyout consortium.

The company, which operates 12 stores in the Bahamas under the

City Markets and Winn-Dixie brands, indicated the unfavourable
timing of Easter, which fell in the 2005 third quarter‘as opposed to
this year’s fourth quarter, may have contributed to third quarter net

income being down.

For the 12 weeks to April 5; 2005, Bahamas Supermarkets saw its
net income fall by 13.6 per cent to. $1.9 million compared to $2.2 mil-
lion in the 2005 comparative period.

However, for the three quarters or 40 weeks to April 5, 2006, net
income at Bahamas Supermarkets had risen to $6.6 million, or
$1.44 per share, compared to $5.9 million, or $1.28 per share, in fis-

cal 2005.

The increase in net earnings and earnings per share is likely to
provide further encouragement to BSL Holdings, the buyout group
featuring Abaco Markets directors Craig Symonette and Franklyn
Butler, that has acquired. Bahamas Supermarkets for $54 million.

SEE page 5B

Government: No
Budget loss from
oil firm’s pull-out

@ By CARA BRENNEN .
- Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government has not’

lost any budgeted revenue from
the decision by US-based oil
exploration company, Kerr-
McGee, to cease operations in
the Bahamas, the Minister with
responsibility for Energy and
the Environment told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Senator Dr Marcus Bethel
said the company had complet-
ed all its financial obligations

for the first phase of the pro-
ject, and added: “So nothing has
been lost.”

He said any other fees would
only have applied if Kerr
McGee decided to continue its
operations, but added that the
Government had not made any
budgetary allocations based on
expected revenues from its oil
exploration efforts.

While theGovernment would
have received between 12.5 and

SEE page 4B

Phase II, she added, will
involve increasing the marina
in-size from 110 to 210 slips,
along with the construction of
townhouses and preparation of
lots. When completed, the pro-
ject will feature 138 lots, town-
houses and villas.

The developers are also plan-
ning to widen and resurface the
existing .runway at Chub Cay,
currently. 5,000 feet in length,
with a new Customs and Immi-
gration building to be con-
structed at the airport. .

The Chub Cay Club had
“needed major surgery” when
the developers acquired it, hav-
ing had no upgrade in the pre-
vious 20 years, and Ms Brassil
described the demand from

marina and real estate clients as

“phenomenal”. ace

Telling The Tribune she had
just returned from Chub Cay
after selling a 70-foot marina
slip yesterday, Ms Brassil said:
“The sales are going well. Peo-
ple are just salivating, waiting
for it to open. They just love it
and want to be part of it.

“The Berry Islands are
always popular for fishing and
diving, and this [development]
gives an opportunity for peo-
ple to have an upscale place in
the Bahamas.

“It’s such as beautiful island
and the area is so nice. Chub

Cay is a great jumping off |

point. Boaters can base them-
selves here to’visit the Exuma

chain and Andros. It’s an

opportunity. to. see the

Bahamas.” ;

The developers plan to
employ a minimum of 100 peo-
ple when the project is com-
pleted, Ms Brassil said, com-
pared to the 25-30 employees
they inherited upon acquiring
the Chub Cay Club.

She added: “There’ll be a lot

more employment opportuni-:
ty for the surrounding areas,

pulling in people from Andros
and Great Harbour Cay. It’ll

put the focus on the Berry |
- Istands, which it hasn’t had for

a long time.”

_ Ina previous interview with .
The Tribune, Mr Pearson said:
-“““When you undertake a pro-.
ject of this size and begin to”

review the various forms of rev-

enue and the overall economic

~ impact, it certainly will be very

substantial, including the trans-
fer of ownership tax and prop-
erty taxes on the new homes
being built.

“The expansion of the mari-
na will bring in more boating
activity and traffic, and also,
my background and involve-
ment in the marine industry

- over 30 years puts me in a posi-

tion to generate boating activi-
ties, charity events and to bring
in super yachts and mega
yachts, the same kind of boats:
seen at Atlantis.”

Asked why he chose Chub
Cay, Mr Pearson said he had
been a member of the island's
club since-1971. Regarded.as.a

SEE page 5B

ISU SHIR LU A a imma



@ PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie
will officially open the new casino at
Exuma’s Four Seasons Emerald Bay
resort, managed by Pinnacle.
Entertainment.

lm By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

-FORTY-SEVEN Bahamians have.
~ been employed at Pinnacle Entertain-

ment’s Casino at Emerald Bay, which
opened on Monday, providing further
potential growth for Exuma’s economy.

The casino, which is adjacent to the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay resort, is the
first and only casino to open on the
island. reteeciatens

It covers 5,000 square feet, and
includes about 65 slot machines and eight

table games; including blackjack craps:

and roulette, and is open seven days a
week
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday,

Charity Armbrister, the Ministry of |

Tourism’s director for Exuma, ‘said the
casino had hired 47 Bahamians from

Exuma, New Providence and Grand .

Bahama. :

The staff includes only two expatri-
ates, the casino’s general manager and
the manager of security and surveillance.

This Pinnacle Entertainment casino
“definitely speaks volumes” for Exuma’s
economy, Ms Armbrister said.

“It means a lot of employment oppor-
tunities, not just for the hotel employees,

. but for taxi drivets, restaurants and oth-

ers on the island as well,” she added.’ ; >
Ms Armbrister said the Four Seasons,

"resort has increases the number of high->

end visitors to the island. The casino,’
which is relatively small when compared:
to other facilities such as those at Atlantis,
and Cable Beach, was expected to cater:
to “high rollers” in an intimate setting.”
Customers would come not just from:

the Four Seasons, but other properties»
'-on the island such as Grand Isle Villas,-

Emerald Bay Marina and February,
Point. - eae

Ms Armbrister added that followings
Monday evening’s “soft opening”, Prime:
Minister Perry Christie was expected to

officially open the casino in a ceremony

next month.

“The Casino at Emerald Bay adds an
air of excitement to:the magnificent
resort experience on the island of Great
Exuma,” said Daniel R Lee, chairman of
Pinnacle Entertainment in a statement.

“Guests travel to Great Exuma from
around the United States and the world;
and this will create yet another reason for
them to visit more often and stay longer.
We are honoured to be part of such an
important tourism component.”

- Pinnacle Entertainment also owns and
operates casinos in Nevada, Louisiana,
Indiana and Argentina.

Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Performance through April 30, 2006* -

| 23.44%

12 months to April 2006

54.54%

Cummulative Since Inception
(February 1999)

Nassau- Marsha Mi
eo coit ell dGemeco ial etci

Peete encore

761%

Average Annual Return
- Since Inception
(February 1999)

= ) FIDELITY

CN AeL ate at LAL Ile]

. Cal for an Offering Memorandum.
lop ara at mod Gn

Bas Rein
PLANNING PRIVATE
BANKING



Nec U aN Ge Se Mit



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





Segment company
that needs to be sec

he term ‘knowledge is

power’ is very accu-
rate in the corporate world, as
information is key to staying
ahead of the game. But really,
two questions stick out for me.
There is the “What is there to
know?” and “Who needs to
know”.

The first questions sees the
executive ask about what type

of information exists in public
about theeir organisation. The
latter, when summed up, real-
ly asks about who is looking at
the information and what they
looking at or looking it up for.
Well, let us investigate the side
effects of doing business, which
is exposure and what or who
we are being exposed to.

Doing business requires

putting oneself in the limelight.

\

This can be a bowertal ‘Sai
when speaking of your compa-
ny’s products and success sto-
ries.

We are bombarded every
day by news stories of how this
product or service is better that
the-next, and how company: A
has experienced a certain
growth percentage during a
particular quarter. Not to:men-
tion the Internet, especially

Desa
as low as

Aa

Scotiabank's ‘Forgive & Forget’ Mortgage Campaign

Te ésiebente our 50th year in the Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving
away $50,000 in prizes. ©

Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)

Campaign ruris until July 14 2006

Call or visit.us today and let Scotiabank help you to ‘Forgive & Forget”

Pricing Information As Of:
22 May 2006






0.2











28.00 ABDAB



52wk-Hi 52wk-Low



Abaco Markets

Kerzner international BDRs
Premier Real Estate



mbo!
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

eae

Life, Monay, Balance both!





8.50 Bahamas Property Fund 11.25
6.35 Bank of Bahamas 7.10
0.70 Benchmark 0.71
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.29
1.05 Fidelity Bank i 1.25
8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.35
1.39 Colina Holdings 1.67
8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.60
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs : 5.61
1.64 Doctor’s. Hospital ; 2.70
4.02 Famguard 6.21
10.45 Finco 11.25
8.46 FirstCaribbean 12.22
8.35 Focol : 10.50
1.04. Freeport Concrete : 1.04
9.50 ICD Utilities : 9.50
8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.10

i
14.00





NA _V

4.2879 1.2327. Colina Money Market Fund 1.287880*
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.7451 ***
12.3560 -°2.2072 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**







1643

Colina

Financiai Advisors Lid,

15.00:



11.25
7.10 0.00
0.71 0.00
1.30 0.01 4,500
1.25 , 0.00
9.35 0.00 500
1.67 0.00 _
10.65 0.05 —-6 310
5.65 0.04
2.70 0.00
6.21 0.00
11.25 0.00
12.22 0.00
10.50 0.00
41.04 0.00
9.50 0.00
9.10 0.00

Last 12 Months Div. $

els



















search engines. By typing in
key words and phrases, you can
find out almost anything on any
company. Is this a problem?
Isn’t much of the information a
company has actually intend-
ed for public disclosure?

Information such as that
contained within “marketing
materials” is a clear example.
Some information must be dis-
closed as a matter of law, and
is actually public record.

he issue is the second

question: “Who needs
to know?” Today, even in the
smallest business unit, it is
understood that not everyone -
even those holding high posi-
tions in the company structure
- do not really “need to know”
all the information that is. being
protected.

To better appreciate this

concept, we have all since Sep-
tember 11, 2001, been educat-
ed about terrorist operations
and heard the terms ‘cell’ being
used. In a terrorist cell (unit,
group, division), its members
are only provided with a limit-
ed amount of knowledge about
the activities of the overall ter-
rorist organisation of which
that cell is a small part.

In the event of their arrest or
capture, even if the individual
wanted to co-operate with
authorities, that person does
not have knowledge that
would be particularly damag-
ing to the overall organisation.



We are
bombarded every
day by news
stories of how
this product or
service is better’

that the next, and

how company A
has experienced
a certain growth
percentage
during a
particular quar-
ter.



The practice illustrates the
‘need to know’ principle, which

. can also be called “compart-
. mentalisation”.

When we look at Best Prac-
tices and Benchmarking, we
see that this type of organisa-

- tional behaviour is critical to

‘keeping our secrets, secret’.
For example, the vice-presi-

dent for marketing may be.

very high in the company hier-
archy but does not ‘need to
know’ the details about an
employee’s confidential health
records in order for him or her
to fulfill their duties. This sep-
aration is important, because




9.6 4.65%
3.9 2.82%
11.8 4.62%
7.1 4.00%
15.1 2.57%
NM 0.00%
11.4 5.26%
48.8 0.80%
6.1 0.00%
11.5 3.86%
15.2 4.80%|
14.0 4.09%
12.6 4.76%
N/M 0.00%
18.1 4.26%















NAV KEY

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52k-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price |
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

MARKET TERMS.

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity "-12 May 2006
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price :

Today’s Close - Current day’s weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week *- 01 May 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** - 30 April 2006

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closh rice divided by the last 12 month eamings

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 4, 1994 = 100 - 31 March 2006







it makes it more difficult for
unauthorised persons to get a
clear picture of the company’s
intentions and manoevering.

Thus we see the need for
well-established internal con-
trols on information sharing,
which cannot be limited to the
IT Department. Information
stored on the computer has its
origin as some idea or concept
that most likely gets discussed
in meetings, where hard copy
notes are taken. We must
realise that security of infor-
mation begins long before you
secure it on you computer.

So, just how do we begin this
process, which obviously
becomes a task of educating
personnel on how to imple-
ment and maintain security,
rather than the consultant hav-
ing extensive access to the
information itself.

Michael Miner, a senior
associate in Kroll Schiff &
Associates, suggests the fol-
lowing categorising of infor-
mation.

PERSONNEL CONFI-
DENTIAL - These are the

‘portions of employee records

that are to be protected Senet
general disclosure.

BUSINESS CONFIDEN-.

TIAL - Generally, this would

be information.that is not:sub-..

ject to the Trade Secrets Act,

but that does have commercial

value to competitors.

SPECIAL CONTROLS -
A description for this class
might include that it is of sig-
nificant economic value to ‘the
holder, and would include
ideas that may be at a stage of
development.

SECURITY SENSITIVE -
Information that could be
used to.compromise or cir-
cumvent security measures.



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

da

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora :





This needs particular care.

As with any security pro-



The vice-presi-
dent for market-
ing may be very ©

1igh im the com-
pany hierarchy
but does not
‘need to know’
the details about
an employee’s
confidential
health records in
order for him or
her to fulfill their
duties





gramme, tthe parameters must
be tailored to the particular
company. When dealing with
information, the particular cul-
ture of tthe company must not

be overlooked.
We will continue this discus-

sion and provide some more .

guidance in developing and

implementing this type. of BIOs, .

gram IMC: Cg yen aig

NB: Gamal Newry is the
ident of Preventative Mea-

sures, a loss prevention and.

asset protection training and
consaltmg company, specialis-
img in policy and procedure
@evelopment, business security
reviews and audits, and emer-
gency and crisis ,anagement.
‘Cemments can be sent to PO
Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas,

or e-mail; info@preventative-
measures.net or visit us at
wwwpreventativemeasures.net













MANAGER NEEDED

(FOR NEW STATE OF THE ART PRODUCTION LINE
CABINET FACTORY IN NASSAU)

QUALIFICATIONS:

STRONG MANAGEMENT SKILLS

CABINET MAKING SKILLS

A SECONDARY DEGREE WITH GOOD WRITING SKILLS
MOTIVATED TO ASPIRE TO A:HIGHER LEVEL OF

MANAGEMNT

COMPUTER SKILLS IN EXCEL, WORD/AND OUTLOOK
GOOD COMMUNICATION, LEADERSHIP, AND PEOPLE

MANAGEMENT SKILLS

RESPONSIBILITIES:

DAILY WORK SCHEDULES & WEEKLY SHIFT SCHEDULES

OF EMPLOYEES

DAY END PROGRESS REPORTS
MONTHLY REVIEWS OF EMPLOYEES & PRODUCTION
ORGANIZE AND IMPLEMENT EFFICIENT MATERIAL

STORAGE AND ACCESS

INVENTORY MANAGEMENT ‘& CONTROL

ORDERING MATERIALS FROM LOCAL & FOREIGN VENDORS
SIMPLE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE TO MACHINERY, AND
OVERSEEING LARGE REPAIRS

BENEFITS:

¢ ATTRACTIVE SALARY
« BONUSES

¢ HEALTH BENEFITS

FORWARD RESUMES TO:
EMAIL: kccbah@hotmail:com
FAX: 394-4159



}



THE TRIBUNE

ast week, we gave a

primer on credit rating
symbols and what they convey
to investors. The article also
gave a comparison between the
symbols used by the leading
global rating agencies and those
that CariCRIS, the Caribbean
region’s only local credit rating
agency, has adopted.

This week, we answer the
question: “How can a regional
credit rating agency help devel-
op the region’s capital mar-
kets?”

We begin by a reminder ona
few macroeconomic fundamen-
tals. Investment — both private
and public — is the means by
which an economy grows. The
money to finance this invest-
ment comes from savings —

either domestic savings or for- .

eign savings. While the globali-
sation of capital markets is mak-
ing it ever easier to access for-
eign savings, reliance on exter-
nal financing may come with
the risk of a system-wide liq-
uidity or solvency crisis that can
be precipitated by a’sudden stop
in external finance. This is why
most policymakers agree on the
critical role that domestic capi-
tal markets play in both growing
“ the domestic economy and in
insulating it from global finan-
cial crises.

The year 2004 gave a stark
reminder of how a governmen-
t’s access to domestic savings
could make or break a coun-
try’s fiscal position. The
Dominican Republic, whose
external public debt to GDP
ratio was 22 per cent (total debt
to GDP was 50 per cent, which
is considered moderate), was
forced to default due to its lack
of access to a vibrant domestic

_ capital market.

On the other hand, Jamaica,
whose external debt was in fact
much higher at 75 per cent

(total debt to GDP was 136 per.

cent) was able to avoid a default
due to a vibrant domestic capi-
tal market, from which the gov-
ernment raised monies to meet
maturing debt obligations in
both local currency.and foreign
currency. It is precisély because
of the flexibility a healthy
domestic bond market gives to a
government that such a factor
can improve its sovereign for-
eign currency credit rating.

Savings have to be placed
somewhere, either deposited
into the banking system or
invested in various tradable
financial instruments in capital
markets. Credit ratings, in esti-
mating the probability of
default, help savers (investors)
to assess their options and ratio-
nally match their risk tolerance
with their savings objectives.
This use of credit ratings to pool
risks results in a more efficient
use of funds.

In the absence of analytical
information about a company’s
financial position and corporate
strategy, many would-be
investors in capital markets stay
within the confines of the rela-
tive comfort (and lower returns)
of the banking system. Thus,
by virtue of enabling investors
to compare credit risk across
companies, industries and coun-
tries, credit ratings deepen the
capital market by attracting
more investors.

From the ‘perspective of those
trying to raise funds, credit rat-
ings enable them to access funds
from a wider range of instru-
ments (and not only bank
loans), as well as reduce infor-
mation risk, both of which
should result in more efficient
pricing. This reduces the cost
of capital and allows a larger
number of projects to be eco-
nomically viable, thus increasing
the rate at which the overall
economy can grow.

BUSINESS

How rating agencies
develop markets and
aribbean economy

On account of a greater num-
ber of projects being funded,
credit ratings also improve the
liquidity of a bond market. Inef-
ficiencies typically inherent in

any banking system, such as °

high operating costs, the man-
agement of non-performing
loans and the cost of maintain-
ing high reserve requirements
at the central bank, are usually
less prevalent in capital mar-
kets.

Credit ratings reduce infor-
mational asymmetry, not only
via the information contained



There are very
few debt issues
that have been

‘rated in the

English-speak-
ing Caribbean
by global rating
agencies



in the credit rating symbols
assigned to various instruments,
but also by supporting greater
financial disclosure, better cor-
porate governance and

improved access to publicly .

available expert analysis.
Greater information disclo-
sure and improved liquidity also
deepen the market by attract-
ing money that would otherwise
have been placed offshore or in
real assets, which is not as pro-
ductive to the economy as
investments in the real sector
(manufacturing/services). While
there is no reliably accurate data
on deposits from the Caribbean
region held abroad, the persis-
tent “bubble” in real estate
prices evident in Barbados,

P.O. BOX N-3897 CLIFTON PIER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 362-4790/2, 302-2900, 302-2901/ FAX: (242) 362-4793

" VACAN CY NOTICE

A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of
New Providence, is presently seeking the following:

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

Position:



eee PAYABLE ea

Duties Incliide:

* Processing of accounts payable documents.
e Processing of periodic payment runs.

¢ Reconciling payable and accrual accounts

e Maintenance of freight expense account.

e Maintenance of prepayments schedules

¢ Maintenance of miscellaneous excel reports.



Minimum Requirements:
¢ University Degree: Finance or Accounting;
¢ Two years Experience in financial arena;
° Strong communication, administrative, time management skills .
and reporting skills;
° Excel spreadsheets u sage at an advanced level a must;
¢ Proficiency in Word applications required; -
e Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong
commitment to detail and god analytical skills.

THE IDEAL CANDIDATE:
e Must be a team player that is willing to aappoit the efforts of the
team or any team member.
¢ The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative with little supervision.
¢ Must have good communication skills

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available to
he successful candidate.

Interested persons sii submit a current resume and cover letter to ii
address below no later than May 26th, 2006:

Human Resources Manager
commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas

‘Fax: 1-242-362-4793.



Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago .

is well-known to us all. One esti-
mate of the increase in real
estate prices in T&T over the
last three years is 150 per cent.

Greater participation overall
in the financial markets enables
a government to have more
flexible and, arguably, more
effective monetary policies. This
is because it is more effective
for governments to manage
short-term interest rates by

‘open market operations using

government securities than by

making direct loans or chang- .

ing the repo rate.
We explained earlier in our
series that regular issuance of

government paper in different:

amounts, and of varying tenors,
is necessary for the construction
ofa base yield curve that is fun-
damental to the development of
a healthy domestic bond mar-
ket. It must also be noted that it
is impossible to construct any

yield curve other than the gov- .

ernment one in the absence of
credit ratings. Why? Because
credit ratings give the indepen-
dent measure by which to allo-
cate various instruments into
risk buckets (AAA, AA, A,
etc.):for which a curve can be

constructed. By enabling such |

construction, credit ratings cause
inefficiencies in the bond mar-
kets to be glaringly obvious and
thus allow for their correction.

In order to fully answer the .

question posed at the start of
the article as to how a regional

credit rating agency can help -

develop the region’s capital

market,.it is necessary to note

two things. '
The first is that there are very

few debt issues that have been .

ratéd:in the English-speaking
Caribbean by global rating
agencies. Therefore, global
credit ratings obviously cannot
provide. allt the benef

as



WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 3B



tal markets, according to the
foregoing.
The reason that global credit

ratings cannot provide signifi- |

cant benefits to our bond mar-
kets is because global credit rat-
ings are not very relevant to
domestic and regional investors.
While they are necessary for
those institutions who wish to
raise funds in the international
capital markets, global credit
ratings do not help local
investors in differentiating the
credit quality of alternative
investment options within the
region.

The global scale credit ratings’

assigned to companies and oth-
er non-sovereign entities are
typically capped by sovereign
ratings. For their part, the sov-

-ereign ratings.in this region tend

to remain low in the global rat-
ing scale (BBB or below),

reflecting the small size of the’

regional economies, moderate
stage of development and rela-
tive lack of income diversity.
This, in turn, leads to a bunching
of all credit ratings assigned in
the lower end of the global scale.
While this is:not of material

‘importance to!a global investor,..
- who is deciding whether to place

their funds in Eastern Europe
or the Caribbean, it is of vital
importance to the focal or
regional investor:

The second matter of note is

_& Credit Rating Services, Caris .

Venkat Neer

~ CariCRIS

that CariCRIS is based locally,
and will provide an estimate of
the relative probability. of
default in the universe of debt
issued in the Caribbean.
Because they will provide far
more relevant information to
investors and enable useful dif-
ferentiation of credit risk within
the region, it is anticipated that
CariCRIS’s rating penetration
will be far higher than that of
the global rating agencies. - - -;
These two factors - a better |
differentiation of credit risk !
within the region and a greater | {
penetration of credit ratings - ;
will go a long way in the devel- :
opment of our regional bond :
markets, as highlighted in- this | i
article. "}

NB: Caribbean Information‘

1h ae ay

CRIS, is the Caribbean's |
Regional Credit Rating Agency: 4
This article forms part ‘of: ‘de
series on issues surroundm
capital markets and credit Qs
ings. E-mail: info@caricris bh

_ or call 868-627-8879 <4

S.Venkat Raman is the chief ;
executive and chief rating: of |
cer of the Caribbean Inforja; ‘
tion & Credit Rating Servicws; :
CariCRIS. Prior to this, Ve
Raman was director of r:
at CRISIL Ltd, the large
ing agericy in Asia and ar; pe
sidiary of Standard & Podeess:

ae





ADMINISTRATIVE/PERSONAL STs
looking for work.










All banking, typing, travel arrangements, assistint

with payroll at private residence and alky
administrative duties included. Flexible. hours3:
preferably to work from home, but willing to co a
into the office as needed.

Please Call










Tel.#364-0067/Gell.# 454-7059: :

PROFILE:

—¢@ Aminimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or
Finance and professional accounting qualification (CPA)

e Three — five years relevant bank/trust company experi-
ence preferred

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:










iP aaa

has a vacancy for the position of

GROUP ACCOUNTANT

e Prepare financial records for all groups











e Prepare Central Bank reports, financial statements, lead
schedules, and management reports

-® Maintain bank records and reconciliations
© Manage and maintain general accounting systems,
policies, procedures and accounting administrative
services

e Treasury management responsibilities

e Supervise accounts personnel















e Assist with audits
e Ability to work with minimum supervision

e Strong verbal and written communication skills and
organizational abilities

© Good knowledge of software packages including MS
Office

The successful candidate will report to the Financial Controller

The successful candidate will be offered a competitive.
compensation package including benefits and bonuses |

commensurate with his/her experience and performance.
The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

GROUP ACCOUNTA

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDETTE ALMONOR OF
P.O. BOX N-170, CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of MAY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










Group Financial Officer Needed

A client of our Firm, a progressive medical group with multiple
corporate structures, requires a professionally qualified accountant
to serve as the Group’s Financial Officer. The successful applicant
must possess the following experience and qualifications:













¢ CPA or equivalent

* 3 to 5 years post qualifying accounting experience in private
industry

¢ Proficient in Quickbooks and other accounting software

° Ability to supervise accounting staff

¢ Experienced in filing annual corporate documents

e Ability to multitask

¢ Organizational and managerial skills essential






Excellent benefits. All responses are confidential and should be mailed
to the following address:








Paul A. Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON

Chartered Accountants. .
Paje House
Marlborough Street
PO. Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P., ~
. The Bahamas
Email: pgomez@gtbahamas.com

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUXON JEAN JACQUES OF
FOWLER STREET,NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX N8889
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STEVENSON JACQUES:
PEARDALE OF NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX SS-6360
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
_|twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





























BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.

- The Technical Trainer (Mechanical) is responsible for the technical instruction of
employees from all engineering departments within the Corporation, encompassing
Mechanical Engineering, Transmission and Distribution Operations, Power Generation
Operations inclusive of Plant Installation, Maintenance, Operation and Control

Workshop.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for employees

within the Corporation

Preparing candidate for external examination certification by local and overseas

organizations :

Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work habits
Providing instructions to participants in classroom, workshops and job

environments :

Preparing program criteria and marking schemes for trade testing in electrical

based trades, -

Preparing timetables and examination schedules for visiting external examiners.
Identifying, developing and delivering engineering courses (i.e., Electrical

Technician Training).

Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students attending

training courses

Preparing course notes, training aids, evaluating and marking schemes for

all courses.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineer or an OND in

Engineering or equivalent qualifications

A minimum of 10+ years of experience in an industrial training setting
Sound knowledge of technical skills related to electrical engineering principles

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
_ Excellent time management skills
Proficient oral and written communications skills

Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant
Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings, troubleshooting

and technical activities
Good information transfer skills
Computer literate

' ~ Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form to:
The Manager, Human Resources & Training Head Office, Blue Hill and Tucker
f« Roads, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before Tuesday, May 30, 2006.

‘1a written and signed statement of the facts within



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
BLUE FUTURES FUND LIMITED

VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 BLUE FUTURES FUND
LIMITED. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register of
Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 19th April 2006.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT MERZIUS OF
BARCARDI ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person.who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send








twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the




N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
FASHION STYLE INVESTMENTS LTD.

VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the

International Business Companies Act 2000 FASHION STYLE

INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register
of Companies. ,

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 19th April 2006.



N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

e ABM

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com



Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box |

harp



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELINE FORBES OF |.
TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

*
Â¥
®

THE TRIBUNE

Oil firm’s pull-out

FROM page one

25 per cent of any revenues gen-
erated if oil had been discov-
ered in Bahamian waters, the
Government had not based its
budget on that potential
income. .

“We would have’ only
included it if the company
had discovered oil and had
a projection of income,” Dr
Bethel said.

He added that Kerr-
McGee’s decision not to
continue did not mean
there were no oil deposits,
but instead meant that the
company had not found
enough to be of a mar-
ketable quantity.

Kerr McGee spokesman,

_ John Christiansen, con-

firmed yesterday that as
part of the company’s strat-
egy to focus exploration in
proven world-class hydro-
carbon basins, it had
advised the Bahamian gov-
ernment it would not pro-
ceed with further off shore
exploration in the
Bahamas.

Mr Christiansen would
not give any further reason
for the company’s decision,
or provide any information

regarding what would be.

the outcome of a previous-
ly announced joint.venture
between Kerr McGee and
Talisman, a Canadian-

based company also
involved in worldwide oil
exploration.

Mr Christiansen would
only say that the company
has fulfilled all its obliga-



Grand’Bahama, Batiamas. ~




IMPORTANT
NOTICE
| SERVICE INTERRUPTION

e Point-Of-Sale (POS) Transactions
¢ VISA Transactions via ABM
e Internet and Telephone Banking

“NOTICE _

NOTICE is hereby given that RODRICK McDONALD OF BAYSHORE
ROAD, WEST END, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17H day of MAY, 2006 to the
finister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085,









tions to the Bahamian gov- -

ernment.

To date, Kerr McGee has
spent more than $25 mil- .-
lion exploring for oil in the : .

Bahamas.
Since the company first

began its operations in the ..-

Bahamas, the Government .

has earned more than $3 °:

million dollars in revenues,

Prior to its announce- |:

ment that it planned to.

cease operations, Kerr:
McGee had been analysing“:

laboratory data obtained °
from seismic testing in»

waters off the Great
Bahama Bank since 2004.

In 2003, the company-''

acquired a 100 per cent '

interest in nine licenses -*
. that allowed it to begin «—
operations in the Great -'

Bahama Banks.

The licences were in the '

Grand Bahama Island, cov-
ering 6.5 million acres in

Blake Plateau about 100
miles north of Freeport,” '

water depths ranging from '

650 feet to more than 7,000 ‘

feet.

have paid a one-time appli-

Kerr McGee was said to °

cation fee of $900,000 and, |

based on its three year —

agreement, was required to
pay a yearly rental fee. In

the first year, 2004-2005,

the Treasury received
$450,000.

In 2005, the Treasury was
to. receive an additional
$675,000, and in the final
year of the contract was to
collect.some $900,000 from
the company.









Share
- your
news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
‘cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have
won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.








From 11 p.m. on Saturday 27th May
to 10 p.m. Sunday 28th May 2006.

Our Electronic Banking System will be temporarily unavailable |
during the times listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance on our System Network.

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.









Resort
FROM page one

great destination by visitors
for many years, particularly
for its diving and boating
opportunities, its reputation
as a family resort also made
the island attractive.

Mr Pearson said the for-
mer group of investors, who
owned Chub Cay for the past
27 years, had told him many
no longer had the energy or
drive to start another resort
project. As a result, there
was both motivation to sell
and motivation to buy and
make Chub Cay into a first-
class resort.

With no major improve-
ments to the resort since
Hurricane Andrew, the:pur-
chase has provided the
developers with an opportu-
nity to develop a resort that
retains the character and
style of a former world class-
property.

Mr Pearson said: “The
Bahamas has matured both
in its economic position and
as a country, in that it is try-
ing to encourage economic
investment and tourism
development, like Chub Cay.
I think that it’s not unusual
for that to be happening here
any more than it happens in
the United States, the

‘Caribbean, Mexico or any

country that has to deal with
the global economy.

“And the one thing we've
seen in working with the
Government is they seem to
be very aggressive in encour-
aging new investments, and
they are also very aggressive
in making sure the back-
ground of individuals
involved in the investment

. doesn't pose a threat to the

conducting of business in the
Bahamas, particularly in
regard to environmental
issues and concerns and
building controls."

FROM page one

BSL Holdings is likely to rely
heavily on the dividends it
upstreams from Bahamas
Supermarkets to pay-off the
debt it used to finance its pur-
chase of a majority 78 per.cent
stake in the company from
Winn-Dixie.

However, the group and its

corporate adviser, Fidelity Mer-.

chant Bank & Trust, is under-
stood to be concentrating on
raising financing to replace Neal
& Massy, the Trinidadian con-
glomerate, as a 40 per cent com-
ponent of its bid group.

Neal & Massy was dropped
to allay Winn-Dixie’s fears that
BSL Holdings’ purchase could
be held up in the Government
approval process here, as the
foreign ownership component
would require Cabinet backing.
Winn-Dixie wants to get its
hands on the $54 million sales
price quickly, as it is in Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection in the
US

Meanwhile, Bahamas Super-
markets said third quarter sales
had increased by $2.2 million
or 7.1 per cent to $33.7 million,
compared to 2005.

The sales growth rate for the
three quarters to April 5, 2006,
was even greater, standing at 8

per cent or a rise of $8 million,.

taking year-to-date sales to
$108.8 million.

Bahamas Supermarkets said
that while it had faced strong
competition on New Provi-
dence, this had been more than
offset by economic growth, with
the sales increase generated by
competitive pricing, sales pro-
motion, “improved store con-
ditions” and a lack of competi-
tion on Grand Bahama, where
Abaco Markets is still recover-

ing from the 2004 hurricane sea-
son.
The Bahamas Supermarkets
release indicated that a “suc-
cessful sales campaign” helped
to offset the impact of Easter
falling in the fourth quarter.

Third quarter gross profit
rose by 3.3 per cent over the
same period in 2005, although
as a percentage of sales it fell to
26.2 per cent compared to 27.2
per cent in fiscal 2005.

“The decrease in gross profit
as a percentage of sales for the
quarter was due primarily to the
investment in promotions, offset
partially by supplier subsidies
and inventory shrink,” Bahamas
Supermarkets said.

However, for the year-to-
date, the supermarket chain
reported that gross profit was
ahead of its 2005 comparative
by 8 per cent, and as a percent-
age of sales exactly matched the
previous year’s figure of 26.9
per cent. Both increases were
attributed to the rise in sales.

Meanwhile, Bahamas Super-
markets said the $0.6 million or
10 per cent increase in operating
and administrative expenses
experienced during the 2006
third quarter was caused by ris-
es in payroll, utility and supply
costs.

As a percentage of sales,
these costs increased to 20.7 per
cent during the quarter, as
opposed to 20.2 per cent last
year.

Year-to-date, operating costs

were up by $1.5 million or 7.2

per cent, yet as a percentage of
sales they were lower at 21 per
cent, compared to.21.2 per cent
the previous year...

Cash and fixed deposits stood
at $13.2 million at April 5, 2006,
compared to $10.5 million the
year before, driven by increases

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Lending/Credit Department

Management Position

We are seeking to employ for a senior position within our lending team, with a minimum
of five years experience in the financial services arena. This role provides service support
to senior management and relationship managers in respect of credit related matters
and will participate fully as a member of the Bank's junior management team.

This challenging and demanding position will require the job holder to continually improve
a process of credit analysis that will identify and document the strengths and weaknesses
of an allocated portfolio of credit proposals, including analysis of the suitability of security
offered. The job holder will also be fully involved in the business development activities
of the Bank to generate new lending business.

The job holder will also provide training and guidance as required to junior members
of the Lending department in keeping with the Bank's business objectives.

Candidates should:-

Posses a minimum of five years experience of credit analysis

Have an in-depth knowledge of credit risk assessment, measurement and control
techniques and corporate credit and cash-flow analysis.

Possess a sound knowledge and understanding of the workings of the international
treasury, capital and securities markets -
Demonstrate an ability to work effectively under pressure

Have excellent negotiation, communication, inter-personal and time management

skills

Supervisor/Senior Administrator

In addition to the above management position, we are also looking to fill a more junior
position, with a minimum of 3 years experience in the financial services arena. Skills
will be similar to those above.

Investment Management:

Management Position

This challenging and exciting role encompasses relationship management with skills
and knowledge of international markets.

The role involves maintaining excellent internal communications and also ensuring the
highest quality customer service to the Bank's client base. The successful candidate
will be expected to contribute towards the group’s investment strategy and comment,
as well as dealing face to face with private clients and introducers of business. Working
closely with the Business Development Manager, the successful applicant will be
expected to travel, develop relationships and contribute to new revenues on an on-

going basis.

Candidates should:-

Have proven experience in the development and nurturing of client relationships
Have a sound knowledge and experience of the rules and workings of the major
international securities markets
Have gained a relevant professional qualification, or be prepared to commence
studying for such a qualification
Possess robust IT skill sets.

Be able to demonstrate a high level of communication, strong personal organization
and the ability to maintain accuracy while working to deadlines.

Attractive salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted by June 9, 2006 to the following address:

Head of Human Resources
P O Box N-4944
Nassau, Bahamas



’ amounts due to majority share-














The office of

in net earnings, accounts
payable and accrued expenses.
Inventories and prepaid expens-
es decreased, as did the

has relocated, The new
address is as follows.

holder W-D (Bahamas) and the ©
ultimate parent, Winn-Dixie. —

Inventories fell by $0.5 mil-
lion due to increased sales.
Meanwhile, net cash from oper-
ating activities was $5.5 million
for the year to April 5, com-
pared to $4.1 million the year
before. :

Working capital stood at
$19.5 million. as at April 5, 2006,
compared to $15.2 million on
June 29, 2005.

RAYMOND A. ROLLE & CO.,
Suite 3, Grosvenors Glose
Shirley Street
PO. BOX $8-19462.
Nassau, NP, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 356-7984 or
(242)326-1183

LARGE MULTINATIONAL MECHANICAL CONTRACTIONG FIRM LEADER IN ITS FIELD IS LOOKING
: FOR QUALIFIED PERSONNEL FOR SEVERAL PROJECTS TO BE CARRIED OUT IN
PARADISE ISLAND, BAH

WILL BE INTERVIEWING PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYEES FOR THE FOLLOWING TECHNICAL DISCIPLINES:

SHEETMETAL, MECHANICS . '
Minimum of 5 years experience in layout, fabrication and installation of duct systems manufactured out of galvanized
sheet metal, black sheet steel and stainless steel. Welding experience a plus, |

PIPE FITTERS

Minimum of 5 years experience in layout, fabrication and installation of piping systems for chilled water, condensing
water, steam, sea water and condensate lines. :

Must have experience in the installation of piping-systems out of steel pipe, copper pipe and schedule 80 pvc pipe.

WELDERS .
Minimum of 5 years ‘experince in welding of pipe systems of schedule 40 black steel, pipe systems. Positions will required |
AWS certification.(ANST B31.10-1967) standard quality qualification est insection IX ASIME. Boilers an vesel code.

INSULATORS
Minimum of 5 years experience in applying the following types of insulation.

PIPING
Application of fibre. glass, duct wrap insulation. Application of interior duct liner on sheet metal duct systems, with pin
system and adhesives following ASHRAE and SMACNA guidelines. “lagye



SMACNA guidelines.

for fabrication of multi piece elbow connections, valves and accessories. . - +

ELECTRIC /ELECTRONIC CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR HVAC. |
Minimum of 5 years experience in the installation of control systems for the air conditioning equipment. Be able to read
and interpret wiring diagrams, test and trouble shoot these systems. Some programming experience a plus. i

HELPERS :
CURRICULM VITAE, STATING POSITION YOU ARE APPLYING
MECHANICAL CONTRACTOR
P.O. BOX EE-15284

NASSAU BAHAMAS “di
Attention: SALLY FUENTE.



COMMONWEALTH BREWERY LIMITED

P.O. BOX N-3897 CLIFTON PIER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS .
TEL: (242) 362-4790/2, 302-2900, 302-2901/ FAX: (242) 362-4793

A VACANCY _
Exists in the Utilities Department .

JOB TITLE: UTILITIES OPERATOR

Duties Include: :

. Monitoring of Utility Equipment specifically the Ammonia Plant,
Co? Plant, Generator, Water, Air and Lagoon Plants.
Perform lubrication and first line maintenance of equipment.

- Perform daily sample collections and analysis of fluids related to
Utility Equipment to ensure efficient operation of the equipment.
Responsible for off loading bulk diesel fuel and Co2.

Maintain housekeeping standards within the Utility Area.

. Maintains adequate stock levels of chemicals, oils and fuels.
Maintains daily logs of activities within the Utilities Area
Accurate recording of performance data of all utility equipment.

Minimum Requirements

High school diploma with BGCSE in Math, English and in one
of the sciencés or the equivalent. .
At least three years éxperience in operation of utility equipment
(Boilers, Cooling Plant, Compressors or similar equipment).
Basic computer skills necessary (Excel spreadsheets)

_ Must be a team player and have a proactive approach to area of
responsibility.
Must be willing to work in a three shift rotation system.

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available
to he successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to
the address below no later than May 26th, 2006:

Human Resources Manager
commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 1-242-362-4793

jt

at

BLACK STEEL -DUCT WORK- for kitchen hoods. Application of fire master insulation with external pin system, ; :
7 . . a A ; ‘

PRESSURE VESSELS- Insulations of pressure vessels for chilled water systems, such as air seperations, expansions Py
and compression tanks and pumps. Application of foam sheets with adhesives SMACNA standards. : Lodi

ALL APPLICANTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO PASS AN APTITUDE TEST IN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS. a
3 t

Some helpers will also be selected to assist in the aforementioned trades. IF INTERESTED, PLEASE SEND YOUR | * :

FOR AND WORK EXPERIENCE WITH PERSONS NAMES AND PHONES FOR VERIFICATION INFORMATION. : a
BE SURE TO INCLUDE FULL NAME, ADDRESS AND TELEPHONE NUMBERS WHERE YOU CAN BE REACHED: *

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 5B’.

RAYMOND A. ROLLE & CO,|

i

EXTERIOR JACKETINGS- Aluminum and pvc eterior protective jacketing for piping systems. Knowledge of layout i ;

LARGE MULTINATIONAL MECHANICAL CONTRACTING FIRM ql











The world’s smallest
glucose meter

m World’s smallest sample size
(0.3 pL, about the size of a pinhead).

m Fast 7 second average test time.

m Test yourself on different, less painful areas, such as.

the palm of your hand, forearms, thighs, or calves.



-4 alarms to remind patients when it’s time to test.

FREE GLUCOSE TESTiyq

Thursday, 25 May
10am ~ 1pm

Lowe’s Harbour Bay

Bae ek ole CeCe cEL MCE n

FIDELITY
has a vacancy for the position of

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

® Record/prepare/circulate executive meeting minutes
Manage records and filing

© Organize schedules and diary systems for both the CFO and
the CEO

@ Provide customer service to clients & respond to enquiries
and complaints

Type a variety of material and correspondence
Assist with compilation of statistical data, reports and research
General office duties

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

Strong organizational skills a must

E ASSISTANT

Strong computer skills, including Microsoft Office Suite

Shorthand an asset 7

Excellent vatbalk writtea and interpersonal skills
Ability to work with minimum supervision
Ability to handle me and to multi-task
Professional and dase satis

Confident and able to manage on own initiative

The successful candidate will report to the Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

‘The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
_ compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

EXECUTI

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLIN EDMOND OF P.O.
BOX SB-50847, #32 BALFOUR AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of MAY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-.7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

UBS
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the leading Wealth
Managers in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value-enhancing services. In order to strengthen our
team we look for an additional.











Client Advisor Brazil





In this challenging position you will be responsible
for the following tasks (traveling required):




e Advisory of existing: clients
¢ Acquisition of high net worth individuals

¢ Presentation and implementation of investment
solutions in the client’s mother tongue






We are searching for a personality with solid
experience in wealth management, specialized in the
fields of customer relations, investment advice and
portfolio management. Excellent sales and advisory
skills as well as solid knowledge of investment
_products are key requirements. A proven track record
with a leading global financial institution as well as
fluency in English and Portugese is essential.










Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources ©
P.O.Box N7757
Nassau, Bahamas









Core responsibilities:

functions

- external and internal audits
¢ Coordinates Pension administration

. letters |
Maintains personnel files

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:



¢ Must be confidential
-¢ Excellent interpersonal skills

e Associate Degree or Banking Certificate

Send resume to:

P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline: May 26, 2006
























INTERNATIONAL
“A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT, HUMAN RESOURCES

Knowledge of Human Resources to effectively carry out all HR

© Serves as payroll officer; conduct necessary calculations associated |
with payrolls such as insurance premiums and staff loans

¢ Complies and prepares statistical reports and other data needed for .

¢ Preparation of accounting entries to complete various HR transactions

¢ Completes administrative functions like the accurate typing of offer

Strong desire to work in Human Resources;

* Three years Human Resources experience .

° Excellent oral and written communication skills
Ability to take initiative and be a good team player

- Benefits include: Competitive salary (commensurate with
qualifications); group medical, vision, and life insurance; attractive
package and a pension scheme.

The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International



’ THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS | o

Bahamas
Waste

FROM page one

costs, everything is going up.
We're trying to get minimum
standards for the licensed
hauler industry.”

Bahamas Waste’s business
is heavily capital intensive,
the key to the company’s .
success being that it keeps.it
truck and vehicle fleet out'on
the road. Maintenance is
therefore both critical and
costly.

The company had
“changed all the equipment
over on Paradise Island,
putting in new equipment

i. last year”, and invested heav-

ily in open-top containers,
Mr de Cardenas said. The:
company’s number of open-
top containers on Abaco had
increased from 12 to 60 in
two years.

Bahamas. Waste’s presence *
on Abaco was expanding, Mr
de Cardenas said, having .
picked up the waste removal
contract for Elbow Cay last
year, in addition to the con-
tract for Discovery Land -
Company’s $175 million’
Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club project on Abaco.

‘Mr de Cardenas said
Bahamas Waste had “dou-
bled our inventory” of
portable toilets since the
same period last year, due to
increased demand from spe-
cial events and construction
projects such as Kerzner
International’s Phase III
expansion on Atlantis. .

Bahamas Waste had con-

a cluded a study on the feasi-

bility of a bio-diesel facility,
converting vegetable oil into
bio-diesel with the help of
additives, and Mr de Carde- -
nas said: “We’re now in
negotiations with a partner
‘to possibly go further on it.”

He added that the compa-
ny had the ability to take
over all residential waste _
removal and collection on
New Providence, having
shown the Government what
it could do with a pilot pro-
ject in Bain Town.

Bahamas Waste’s 2006
first quarter earnings per
share (EPS) rose from $0.03
to $0.06, with total assets ris-
ing 6.11 per cent or $445,000
to $7.7 million, aided by an
18.64 per cent increase in

i -aceounts receivables. -;






























WEDNESDAY EVENING

ra 50 00 0 La 70:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Romances|Queen Victoria: Secrets of a American Masters
@ WPBT ea car Queen 1 (CC) (DVS) fae the Choon of Sau? 1

@ J panies He a ateler cm : Oo “Magnet” pee ce et Order “A 4 ai
WTV4 |wood (N) ( naan aD ateline's undercover |investigate the strangling of a prom- |Detectives investigate when a man
wat Nee) meet teens. ising Hi eva student. h is killed by a car bomb: A C)

American Idol (Season Finale) The (a 12 contestants reunite; the new |News (Co)
a wsvn |" ina Idol is ere (Live) 0 (C

Heopardy (N) Lost “Reckoning” Faith ite the |Lost “Live Together, Die Alone” (Season iia | Jack and Sai devise a
O wetale angie of Oceanic Flight 815. © |plan to confront the Others and get Walt back. MN a 100)

CABLE CHANNELS
Dog the Bounty |Dog the Bounty jInked co Las Vegas tattoo Criss
my Bars (eo) ate “Double |Hunter Search- artists. (C Mi (CC)
Trouble” (CC) jing for Jonah. teeta

-|Hardtalk BBC News World Business |BBC i“ [Fast Track BC News
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). ani
BET ___|iisieSpecal |The Parkers 0 The Parkers 0 Gren 0 aids on

(CC). ( (CC) gt Peg

CBC NHL Hocke ay Eastem Conference Final Game 3 -- ae “sera at Billo Sabres Cc Ne
a the HSBC Arena in Butfalo, N.Y. (Live) (CC) ae oppo aes

CC ill a al

CNN a ra a > asa ok

e eS a Gaffi- |The Dally Show |The bert Re- Mind of Mencla
ey the] With Jon Stew- sa B BBaslone cae speaking. |notorious Derek toes
Bale ce) art B. Connolly. feo) Crips. (CC). Jagenc
Cops “Coast t0 Video dustic. Video Justice /Forensic Files _|Forensic Files
COURT [fea ea Fe ae





That's So Raven| ¥ & x HERCULES (er , Adventure) Voices of Tate. Donovan, Joshua {Lite
nimated. The strongman iesaiies a Greek hero. 4

DISN er" & Keaton, Roger Bart.

Dr..90210 A piercing oe ” Br. 9021
tears his earlobe in two.

00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at T Boston Red Sox. From Fania Park in Boston, "| Base
Subject = Blackout) (Live) (CC)

ar ‘put in : Fs (Ger Journal
man). Tagestema.

TBoxin Wednesday wh ue Lu
poe _ (Live) :

Dai Tae ‘i EWTN Live |
EWTN ie

-00) Cardio IShip Out, Shape Up ‘SitUps At
FIT TV - bee 2 [time =

:00) aa ie Baseball Tan Bay: Devil.Ra sa Tn Blue Ja S. From ers Cate in Best Damn
FSNFL an MWe ore Frama eee

or - JGaishaw and Jack Niklas

= eoneeeen

00) Attack of sate The Next Generation _ |Star Trek: The Next scat i
Grech tre bhow!(N) Night Troe” (OC “identity Cisis® (CC)

ee Designed to Sell) Trading U Selling Houses |Hot Pro

HGTV fi ric His n! Joi Oe ee ‘asi 0. lidylic ea {Cape Cod v
__ [sen 1 (0) fae

INSP

@ Simple Rules sia he wa riends
KTLA i rouble" Ts With Kids Loarnng tol Kids Michael isafbuys ite
(CO) Eam (CC) {hand model. jets. 0V.(C

= MIRACLE RUN (2004, Drama).Mary-Louise . |%* * SEE You. IN.MY DREAMS (2002, , Drama) Ai Aidan n Quinn,
Parker, Aidan Quinn, Ie Efron. Asingle mother fights Harden, Will Estes. Fremiere. Aroubed eae ee!
for her autistic twins’ education: (Co) Foe ses ship with his family. es as

ai — ‘Neutrons an
“ {Boy Genius. « |SquarePants'7\.0\ (CC) -
:00) 24 “Day 5: 5-00AM-6:00AM/6:00AM-7:00AM”
at tries to avenge the loss of innocent lives. eles



~ Home for Imag dE
-|nary Friends: |

UNIV

[Law & Order: Special victine Unit (aw & Oars cat vain tiie Law & 0
USA der: Criminal In- |Detectives face off against a drug’ |“Serendipity” A dead newbom pall
. {tent “Pravda”. [cartel andthe DEA. (CC) —_isfoundinasewer.

(00) 40 Greatest Pranks 2 "Heavy: The Story of Metal Meta
VH1 tives in Caifora, ved
i America’s. [Becker Becker eoker A patient Home limprove- Home lmpro
WGN unniest Home: |takes Reggie's: beats dating ~ -|ment Cupid visits ment Ma

Videos. (CC) |dating advice, . |Reggie. (cel the Taylors... lieves.in ali

_ Everybody. |&& DAREDEVIL (2003, Action) Ben Affleck, Jennifer Gamer, Michael
WPIX | _ [Loves Raymond |Clarke Duncan. Premiere. A ta man isa lawyer by day and a super- {To
AO (CC). -- thero by night (CC) " i Mr. a

i “Tea HAIR SHOW (2004, Comedy) Mo Nowe, Kella Smith sie Ar Ph t a
WSBK : hast needs hr Sr hp win ce a (CC). Pe tee

Sey eae

() Poseidon: |Big Love “Where There's a Will’. |The Sopranos “Cold.Stones”A .
HBO-E a Look |Barb is a ome for Mother ofthe frenzy of borrowing money hits the pine, Gonety
A(CC) Near. A.C crew. (CC). ‘

fa cov ~_|Six Feet a "Dancing for Me" | & & THE ROOKIE Tso, Aaton) Cit Ezine, hale
HBO-P ito A100 Nate spends time wih fends from |Jula, A young detective teams up with a fwo-fi
high school. (CC) (CC)

ge: Real es A (CC) + KING’S RANSOM (2006, Comedy) Anon I ¢
derson, Jay Mohr. A businessman plots own kid HBO F
napping to foil his wife. 1 PG. 18: (CC, oH

il dean re Portralt of a Po-|& x PAPARAZZI (2004, 8
NE FINE DAY nce yo: Robin Tunney, Dennis Far
1996) ‘PG’ (co ee on intrusive photographers. .

eae a ce ae NEXT OF KIN 1989, Drama) Patrick Swayze, Liam Neeson, Adam
MAX-E Baldwin, Ail clan stalks he mobsters wha killed their broter. A ee
APOCALYPSE. (CC) ‘ a

can & FAT ALBERT: (2004 Kenan Thomnbeon
ionvanimated: The cartoon ecg. becomes jHeder, Jon Gries, Aa
ca and ae alonely tear. “PG (C

+ FADE TO, BLACK (2004, Documentary) in Rapper Jay-Z per-
SHOW a WHER PARK forms in concert and cco n' ie cli

MOMAX

¢ (1996, Comedy) Mara Wilson, Dan- (45) & &* STAGE BEAUTY (2004,
TMC... ahi ate at ‘ ‘i 1%
s : Tad mee Cc).



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Insider (N) |r. Phil Primetime Special: Ee- — Minds “Extreme Aggres- GSE NY The death of @ cologo str
@ WFORIn ne cag Addiction No.2 (N) 0 i ‘one go missing in Seattle. |dent on the subway tracks may not
have been an accident. acl

This Old cy picks oe Dot Res- Kitchen Renova Kitchen Renove Home Transfor- [Assembly Re- if ce
Classics cue tions - __{m i Sigua te

Thee Stow |
(00) Walker, vale Texas Ranger Bounty - |x x AFISTFUL OF DOLLARS (1964, Weston) Cint =e ‘Gian
HALL i pangs hunter Hayes Cooper protects set- {Maria Volonte, Marianne Koch. Teme Wo Name" en-
_{tlers from vicious bandits. (CC) ters a border wa. Pees lu Raa cence tage erode tet
stuniere [Bay We Wendy
0

2 TY he

: Simply’ the Best” _

Small space?
Limited budget? @
We've got the solution.
Our armoire’s and trundle
beds are the perfect
space-saver. Buy a single piece
of furniture and get the functionality

of three or four pieces. Replace your closet,
chest-of-drawers and shelf with a single °

armoire. Perfect for a child’s room, our
trundle beds provide two single beds,

a pull-out desk and drawers.

Visit our spauoone today to see for your. ul

“has WOOD

Seed ntesia 20 Maseire 5 treet

\WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE



7B





problem for cricketers

@ CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

TRAINING on the old
Haynes Oval cricket playing

fields ahead of the Stanford |

20/20 tournament may be a
‘problem for team Bahamas
‘due to the lack of lighting
facilities:

The team; which is forced
to train and play on the out-
dated facility, are scheduled
to face off with the Cayman
Islands in their first game of
the tournament.

The Stanford 20-20 will take
place between mid-July and

’ September at the Stanford
Cricket grounds in Antigua.
The Bahamas’ first game
against the Cayman Islands
will be played at night.

This game will be the
biggest challenge for the
Bahamas at the tournament.
The BCA usually have to sus-
pend lengthy games played at
the Haynes Oval until the fol-
lowing day due to limited
lighting.

The Haynes Oval paying
field, located on the West Bay
Street strip, was opened in the
early 1930's. |

According to honourary

B IMPROVEMENTS are taking place at the Haynes Oval cricket playing fields. '
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Light teinkeban may be a

board member Paul Thomp-
son, the majority of the ath-
letes selected to the national
training programme for the
tournament will be at a disad-
vantage if the Bahamas Crick-
et Association (BCA) doesn’t
schedule several scrimmage
matches.

Matches

Taking the notes handed in

~ by Thompson into considera-

tion, the BCA has scheduled
several preparatory matches
in the South Florida region for
the teams. These matches will
be played early next month.

Thompson said: “Some of
the guys will really be playing
at a disadvantage if they don’t
get these games in. These
games are critical ones for the
team.

“The members need to gain
some experience when it
comes to under light games,
because we might have to play
several other under light
games.”

Being selected as a team to
compete in the Stanford 20-
20 tournament, the BCA was
given a $100,000 stipend
designed to assist with the



development and improve-
ment of cricket and their facil-
ities. This stipend cheque was
given to all participating
team’s governing bodies.

Along with the improve-
ments set for the Haynes
Oval, the BCA is looking into
building a new facility, with
better lighting. °

Thompson confirmed that

the BCA has approached the ©

government about requiring
land for the facility, and are
awaiting the response. —

He said: “The money given
to the BCA hasn’t been spent,
let me clear that up. What
happens is the money has to
be authorised by the commit-

tions to the BCA for the
improvement of the environ-
ment, that money is being
handled by the president and
the executive board members
of the BCA.

Equipment

“They have done some
work in regards.to the new
mat, an out house for equip-
ment is also on the improve-
ment agenda along with some
cricket gear. I think they were
also supposed to get some
money for the players that are
in training, a stipend. But all
that is being handled by the
president and the executive

'

field, we are also hoping.to
get an expansion of Haynes
Oval.”

Besides the new facilities
the BCA is hoping to build,
the association members are
hoping to acquire at least 10
or more yards around the
existing Haynes Oval grounds
when they expand.

The next step for improv-
ing the sport will be obtain-
ing a turf wicket. The turf
wicket is the ground used in
international competitions.
Laying the turf wicket will
take at least three to four
months — especially since the
soil needed to lay the wicket
has to be imported.

tee here which the Stanford
20-20 tournament has put
together.

“There were some dona-

board.

“We were asking govern-
ment for land to build a new

Since acquiring the money
from the Stanford tourna-
‘ment, an area for practice
pitches has been built.

Streetball Legends
o host tournament

M@ BASKETBALL
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

SUMMER months usually mean an
increase in temperature, but one organi-
sation is hoping that the season will ignite
the action on the basketball court as well.

The Streetball Legends Organisation
will be hosting their second annual tour-
nament at the Blue Hill sporting Complex
attracting the best and brightest in the
sport.

The two-week tournament, scheduled
to begin June 9th, will feature play if
three divisions: Open Men’s, High Schools
and Independent Youth.

This year’s edition of the tournament
will honour five of the most well known
names in basketball who have contributed
years of service to the game’s develop-
ment.

Sharon Storr, Anthony Swaby, Pattie
Moxey, Doug Collins and Gladstone
“Moon” McPhee will be honoured over
the course of the two-week tournament.

Wilton Russell, founder and president of
Streetball Legends, says that this year’s
tournament will be a definite improve-
ment on last year’s initial success.

“Last year’s tournament was pretty good
for it being our first time,” he said, “But
we realised there were a few things we
could change to make this year’s tourna-
ment even better.”

One such change was the major shift in
the tournament’s format.

Last year’s tournament ran for a month,
however it has been shortened to just two
weeks, a change that Russell said will gen-

erate more excitement.

“It was stretched out over a whole
month last year, and I think it took away
from some people’s interest and the gen-
eral excitement,” he said. “Now that we
have the action more compact in two
weeks and it should make for a better
tournament.

Russell said the tournament will feature
some of the most intense competition in
the country.

“We expect the best players throughout
the country to compete. Players from night
leagues, parks and colleges abroad are
expected to compete,” he said.

Inspiration

Russell said the inspiration for the cre-
ation of the Streetball Legends Organisa-
tion and the tournament itself came
when he saw a need to reinvigorate the
sport.

“Night League basketball has lost a lot
of its excitement so we felt a need to take
the game back to the streets were most
of the great players and excitement origi-
nated,” he said, “And with more attractive
prizes anda high level of competition, this
tournament should be a memorable one,
no one wants to lose.”

Last year, the winning team in the Men’s
division received a $1000 cash prize, this
year winners can expected to be awarded
gold championship rings.

Nearly 30 teams are scheduled to com-
pete in this year’s tournament
and with the first games still a few weeks
away, more teams are expected to
enter,

’ reg barn! .
imeewn

= aeete te:
elvcrw Dee

be re anf

JU9}U04 payedipuAs
jeliazey payybiuAdoy

TRIBUNE SPORTS

%



ee

ore pom ‘ re es Weer re eT Aa ILS

Genssppeiaetatnsyes bagip om Saab yt ely



Asi if igh dlgiti ana ian



TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS



West Indies hit back after
Virender Sehwag’s 96 _
























# > mg” |

Copyrighted Material :

~~ Ou :

Syndicated Conten |

Available from n Commercial News Providers; |



or :

oo -
- .
-« - -
-“—— * =
al - — - « -
—_ . - ;
- - -
- -
- .
= a
- _— ,
i
*-* o =
- - - - - .
-
-
-_





Both objects involved in if:
100 Jamz's Secret Sound cf
weight less than 20 pounds. HE



WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

EG TION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Mulling’s

tennis team

bows out
ume [Weare
finals

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS»
Senior Sports
Reporter

DEVIN Mullings and
the Ohio State Buckeyes
men’s tennis team fell
short of extending their
impressive season over
the weekend in San
Francisco.

After winning their
first Big, Ten Conference
Championships over Illi-
nois, Mullings and the
No.6 Buckeyes fell vic-
tim to No.3 Texas on
Saturday in the NCAA

. quarterfinals.

It was the second time
in three years that Ohio
State failed to get past
the quarters. In their
previous outing in 2004,
they were eliminated by
Baylor, who went on to"
win the title.

Despite their exit,
Mullings said he was still
pleased with the way his
Buckeyes’ team played,
posting a 28-2 win-loss
record, the best record in
Ohio State’s history,
while recording their.

longest winning streak of

19 and their best winning
percentage of .933.

Mullings, a communi-
cation major in his junior
season, said “It’s a good
feeling. It’s something
that will stay with me
forever. It’s not an indi-
vidual effort, but it’s a
team effort.

“I think I can a lot of
what'I learned from ~
Ohio State to the Davis
Cup team where I will

_have to put in that same
type of team concept this
summer.’

Playing between the
number one to three
seeded player on the
Buckeyes’ team,
.Mullings was basically
undefeated in singles,
but it was doubles where

Ohio State suffered their
downfall.

Mullings, 20, is now
concentrating on his final
exams at Ohio State. But
he’s also preparing for
the American Zone III
Davis Cup tie when the
Bahamas heads to San
Salvador, El Salvador
from June 12-18 to play
against seven other
teams in the round robin
to see who will advance
to zone II next year.

“I think we’re going to
be fine,” said Mullings,
of the team that is
expected to comprise of
Marvin Rolle, H’Cone
Thompson and Chris . .
Eldon with John Farring-
ton as the captain.

“I’m going to try and
practise on the clay
before I get out there.
My school gets out in.
two weeks, so.I will be
doing all in my power to
be ready when we head
down to San Salvador. I
think we will do very
well.”

The Bahamas will be
matched against Costa
Rica, Cuba, El Salvador,
Haiti, Honduras, Puerto
Rico and Trinidad &
-Tobago.

The first two teams
from ‘each pool advance
to another round-robin
group. The teams finish-
ing first and second in
this final pool are pro-
moted to Americas Zone
Group II in 2007.

The teams finishing
third and fourth in each
pool advance to another
round-robin pool. The
teams finishing in third
and fourth in this subse-
quent pool are relegated
to Americas Zone Group
IV in 2007.

Knowle



Uae tel



MIAMI! HERALD SPORTS



Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
rom m Commercial News Providers



- «












eye grand slam title

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER having their 12-
match win streak snapped as
they fell short of winning
their third straight title,
Mark Knowles said both he
and Daniel Nestor are hop-

ing that their performances

will propel them to the
French Open Grand Slam
title that has eluded them
twice in the final.

Coming off their loss in
the final of the ATP Masters
Series in Hamburg, Ger-
many on Sunday to the team
of Paul Hanley and Kevin
Ullyett, Knowles and Nestor
are preparing for their trip
to France for the Roland
Garros tournament that
starts on Monday.

“It was a good match. We
had a chance to take it toa
third set, but we were unable

Doubles pair set.
for French Open



to pull it off, which was a
tough loss,” said Knowles,
who had enjoyed back-to-
back victories in Barcelona
and Rome with Nestor
before going to Germany.
“We won a couple of close

matches, but it was one of

those things where we did-
n’t pull through. In this
sport, you can’t win them all.
But we felt great about the
way we played. It’s pretty
hard to win one tournament,
yet win three in a row.”
Going into the French
Open, Knowles said he and
Nestor are confident and
they are eager to play who-
ever they face in the second

Grand Slam tournament for
the year.

The French Open is one
of the two Grand Slams that
Knowles and Nestor have
not been able to win. The
other is Wimbledon, sched-
uled for England from June
26.

Having lost in the finals of
the French Open twice,

’ Knowles is not making any

predictions, but he said it
would be good if the
momentum they have devel-
oped can be carried over in
France.

“This is our time, but
every year it’s our time,” he
quipped. “We’ve been one

of the top teams for the past
8-10 years and we always
have high expectations going
into the Grand Slams. We’re
obviously one of the hottest
teams going into the French
Open, which bodes well.”

Knowles, however, admit-
ted that it will be.a different
ball game when the tourna-
ment starts because “it’s a
big goal to go there and to
win. So we have to take it
one match at a time and try
to win six matches in two
weeks. So we’re going in
there and play to the best of
our ability.”

On hearing the news that
US Open junior champion
Ryan Sweeting has decided
to end his Bahamian citizen-
ship to play for the United
States, Knowles said he’s
certainly disappointed.

- “J don’t know him that
well, but obviously they have
taken a family decision and I

can’t really comment on it,”

he stated. “But as you find
out now, not too many ath-
letes stay with their country.

“I had many offers to play
for England where I was
offered much more money,
but I’m a Bahamian and
that’s who I am. Maybe he
doesn’t feel that strong
about where he was born.
Maybe he had financial rea-
sons or something else.”

“We had two: young
Bahamians - Timothy Neeily
and now Ryan - who have
gone to the United States.
Obviously, having played
Davis Cup, he had a great
opportunity to play in the
Olympics for us as well.”

By going to the United
States, Knowles said Sweet-
ing has definitely forfeited
those opportunities right
now and he will probably
have to wait:a long time to
fulfill those goals.



Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

?m lovin’ it.

Ss Biriit,

Wal
72F |

VARIABLE CLOUDS, |
I STORM OR 10 |



ne

SECRET SOUND

Officer set to face

manslaught

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN A move that sparked
outrage among the island’s
police force, the inquest into

the shooting death of
Pinewood resident Deron
Bethel was called off yester-
day when an officer suspected
in the shooting was referred
to the magistrate’s court to
face manslaughter charges.

Detective Corporal

Nathaniel Charlow of the-

Central Detective Unit
(CDU) appeared before the
Coroner’s Court yesterday
morning, only to be told by
Coroner Linda Virgill that the
Attorney General had
referred the matter to a crim-
inal- court, eliminating the
need to conduct an inquest.

However, up until press
time last night’Charlow had
not been arraigned before the
courts.

Speaking with The Tribune
late yesterday afternoon,
deputy of prosecutions Cheryl
Bethell-Grant said that the
case is still under review by
Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson.

“She is expected to make a
decision (today),” she said.

Mrs Bethell-Grant said she
could not disclose the reason
for the cancellation of the
inquest.

However, she said that call-

ing off an inquest is one of the’

constitutional rights of the
attorney general and not an
unusual occurrence.

. police shootings,”

er charges

Deron Bethel, 20, was killed
on March 28 in a run in with
police. The incident allegedly
happened when police entered
the Pinewood community to
investigate a report of domes-
tic violence.

In a show of solidarity,
scores.of officers from the
CDU left their posts yester-
day to appear on Bank Lane

“to support their colleague.

Talking to The Tribune in
front of the.courts, Inspector
Bradley Sands, executive
chairman of the Police Staff
Association, claimed that this
move by the Attorney. Gen-
eral shows a “total disregard
for the whole process.’

“Tn all of my 20 years plus,
police shootings have been
dealt with by the Coroner’s.

“Due process is the order
of the day. If we extend due

_process to the common crimi-

nal on the road, let’s extend
it to members of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force that
find themselves embroiled in
Inspector
Sands said. _

Desmond Bannister, lawyer
for Officer Charlow, claimed
that the attorney general’s
decision was “very unfair” to

_his client and all police offi-

cers.

“Police officers put their
lives-on the line on every sin-
gle day. This man is putting
his life on the line and those of
his colleagues, and having to
be threatened and facing

SEE page eight



AUTO INSURANCE

ace







Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006









@ FROM right te to left: Detective Corporal Nathaniel Charlow with his site,
attorney Desmond Bannister and a police officer in the background.

Ingraham responds
to criticism by
Shane Gibson

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter



“IN A democratic society, demagoguery
should not prevent persons from pursuing
their rights before the courts, former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Ingraham was answering criticism lev-
elled at him by Labour and Immigration Min-
ister Shane Gibson for criticising the former
prime minister for encouraging Haitian immi-
grants to sue the Bahamas government fol-
lowing the recent controversial apprehension
exercise carried out by the immigration
department in Eleuthera.

And while he said that the “foolish state-
ment” made by Mr Gibson— that the FNM
government and its weak immigration policy
was the cause of the illegal immigration prob-
lem — was not worthy of comment by him, it

SEE page 11

&







FOUR oiiee
SUS nas

brewkiust howrs oly.

Officers reluctant to
respond to violent
dispute reports

@ By ANASTACIA MOREE

WITNESSES were shocked by the reluc-
tance of four police officers to respond to
reports of a violent dispute that resulted in a
gun being drawn.

Bystanders called the police to report a
man brandishing a gun in public. Eventually
they had to go to a nearby police station for
help when officers failed to arrive.

Upon arriving at the South Beach Police
Station, the concerned members of the public
were surprised to see four officers - who
admitted being aware of the incident — sitting
at a desk eating pizza and drinking sodas.

According to the sergeant on duty, there
were not enough officers at the station for
anyone to be dispatched.

When officers from the Central Detective
Unit (CDU) finally arrived, an half-hour after

the incident was reported, the man with the

SEE page 11
WITH SCWNIELSY SGG3:

sare

UD SHESSS on

Available during





(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Police officials deny:-
claim that officers were
detained in raid on
suspected numbers racket
@ By MARK HUMES

POLICE officials have denied allegations
that officers attached to the Royal Bahamas
Police Force were among the 23 individuals
taken into custody after being’ found in a
house suspected of illegal gambling.

A source with close connections to the
force claimed on Tuesday that some officers
were detained during a raid on a suspected
numbers racket in the Grove last week.

Police press liaison officer Inspector Wal-
ter Evans said 23 Haitians were rounded up
in the raids and that around $40,000 in cash
and gambling paraphernalia were confiscat-
ed. .

However, speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday, Assistant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson said that he was unaware of any
officers being detained during the operation.

“If any police officers were arrested in that

SEE page 11








PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

ee

Unionists predict an unhappy
future for Bahamian workers |

@ By KRYSTEL ROLLE

UNION leaders Patrick Bain
and Obie Ferguson predict a
grave future for Bahamian
workers if things do not change
in the Bahamas.

Mr Bain, president of Nation-
al Congress of Trade Unions
(NCTU), in outlining the future
facing: Bahamian workers, said
that “workers of this country
are facing many problems —
from unsafe and unhealthy
working conditions, to failure
of employers to make national
insurance contributions for their
employees, union-busting tac-

tics, inadequate laws to protect
workers, the onset of trade
agreements like the FTAA,
WTO and the CSME and the
uncertainty these new features
will bring to the Bahamian
labour market.” :

The unions have been invited
by the new Minister of Immi-
gration, Labour and Training
Shane Gibson to submit a list
of recommendations on the
Labour Code, addressing issues
that negatively affect workers
in the Bahamas.

The list is reported to include
a proposal that the minimum
wage be increased.

NOW HIRING

Wendy's is now recruiting

Crew Members,

Mr Ferguson, president of
the Trade Union Congress
(TUC), said that this has been
an issue with Bahamian labour-
ers for many years. Currently
the minimum wage is $150.
The recommendation is to
increase that by at least $150.

“The average worker can-
not survive on the minimum
wage — the cost of living is too
high,” Mr Ferguson argued.

The NCTU and the TUC
have collaborated to finalise
the list that will be presented
to Mr Gibson the day before
Labour Day.

Both parties believe that the
recommendations will be met
favourably. “It is our view that
once these recommendations
are submitted, Minister Gibson
will take immediate steps to
bring the amendments to par-
liament and help the Bahamian
workers improve their standard
of living,” Mr Bain said.

Another concern of the

‘unions is the apparent prefer-

Celebrations planned for

THE National Congress of

Trade Unions and the Trade .

Union Congress invited all



THE TRIBUNE

© In brief

' Reward
announced
for missing
person

& FROM left, Obie Ferguson (president of CBTUC), Patrick
Bain (president of NCTU) and Fred Munnings jr



@ ANDREW Sands

Mr Ferguson said he
believes that the Bahamas has
some of the most productive
employers do not have enough _ workers in the world, but that :
respect for Bahamian work- they are sometimes placed in — ;
ers. situations “not conductive to

“If Bahamian workers have _ productivity.”
similar qualifications they He said employers need to
should be given the same introduce incentives for
opportunities as the extrane- employees to go beyond their
ous workers,” he said. normal duties.

Labour Day

NCTU, said he expects the cel-

ebrations to be just as festive as

last year—ifnot moreso.
The NCTU and the TUC

ence that employers have for
foreign workers.

Mr Ferguson believes that Ac $7/0;000-salssitis, Persone

reward has been issued for
Andrew Sidney Sands of Trea-
sure Cay, Abaco..

According to the police, Mr
Sands, 39, was last seen on April
18, 2005 in Treasure Cay.

He is described as a five foot, .
six inch tall caucasian and is said
to weigh 140 pounds.

Anyone with information
should contact the Central
Detective Unit’s northern office
at (242) 325-9774, the Marsh
Harbour Police Station at (242)
367-2560, or the Treasure Cay
Police Station at (242) 365-8048.

Information can also be com-

Labour Day church service at
Mount Olive Baptist Church
on Meadow and Augusta

Cashiers &
Maintenance Staff

workers to join them in cele-
brating Labour Day and the
freedom that all Bahamian
workers enjoy.

The week of May 28 was
declared Labour Week by
Prime Minister Perry Christie
and the occasion will be cele-
brated under the theme, “Unit-
ed to face the challenges of
globalisation”.

The celebrations will kick off
on Sunday with the annual

for all locations.

"Must be able to work shifts & weekends.
Interested persons should apply in person.

at Any Wendy's Locations
Wednesday, May 24 - Friday, May 26
Between 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon

A HEARTBROKEN moth-
er last night appealed for infor-
mation about her missing
teenage son, who left home nine
days ago and has not been seen
since.



+5 DR HATCHBACK

New Interior!
‘

Features include: ©
1.6-litre 4-cylinder engine
Automatic transmission
AM/FM/CD Player

Power steering, windows, —
door locks & mirrors

Spacious interior with .
plenty of leg room

Expand Your
Imagination —

The 2006 Suzuki Liana takes
you out of the ordinary and
into a realm where your
imagination and sense of
adventure have free reign.

$ SUZUKI
reel f/f

Dependable, Reliable Quality ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY:

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 * 325-3079

. Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916





Streets, beginning at 1lam.

The festivities will continue
through June 2 with the
Labour Day parade which is
scheduled to begin and end at
Windsor Park, where a rally
will also take place.

President of the Caribbean
Congress of Labour, Comrade
Lincoln Lewis will be making a
special appearance and will
speak at the rally.

Patrick Bain, president of the

Lanky Tamiko “Tallboy”
McKenzie, 19, was dropped
off by his stepbrother near his
home at. Water Street, Big
Pond sub-division, at about
11pm on Monday last week.
“Since then, he seems to have
vanished,” a family friend told
The Tribune.

McKenzie, who stands 6ft
6ins tall and weighs about 180
pounds, was described by his
mother Janice as “a very quiet
young man.” He has four dis-
tinctive gold teeth in the front
of his mouth.

“He has never given us any
problems,” she said, “Apart
from a dispute with a neigh-
bour, I can’t think of any reason
why anyone should harm him.”

Tamiko is his mother’s only
child. His stepbrother is his
father’s son. é

The family friend said: “His
mother is very cut up about
this, but she has no gut feelings
as to what happened to him. It
seems she doesn’t want to
think too much about it.”



CLOSED FOR STOCKTAKING

have joined together to ensure

that the Bahamian workers are :

fully represented during
Labour Week.

Obie Ferguson, president of
TUC, said that although this

year’s focus is on challenges, :

relating to globalisation, the
unions will remain committed
to working with all social part-
ners in the process of national
development.

Mother makes anguished appeal
for information on missing youth

i TAMIKO McKenzie

Tamiko played basketball

as a student at C R Walker
High School and performed
as a high-jumper in CARIF-

‘ TA. He is said to have plenty A

of friends.

e Anyone with information
should contact their nearest
police station or call 919, 502-
9991, 502-9941 or 502-9914.

Nassau Motor Company's
Parts Department

will be closed for stocktaking...



We will be closed from 5:00pm
on Friday, May 26 through
Tuesday, May 30.

We will re-open on Wednesday, May 31.

We regret any inconvenience



to our valued customers.

Shirley Street - 356-7932

partsorder@nassaumotor.com * www.nassaumotor.com





municated to the Central
Detective Unit in New Provi-
dence at (242) 322-2561, the °
Police Control Room at (242) .
322-3333, or Crime Stoppers at
(242) 328-8474.

Man admits
to sex with
disabled
girl

A NASSUA Village man
pleaded guilty yesterday to hav-
ing unlawful intercourse with a
mentally disabled girl.

Jermaine Prosper, 30, was
arraigned before magistrate
Marilyn Meers on the charge of
unlawful intercourse with a per-
son suffering from a mental dis-
order.

Prosper allegedly committed
the offense between February
and May 2006. He has been
remanded to Her Majesty’s
prison and sentencing has been
referred to the Supreme Court.

‘Robbery

charge is
denied by
woman

FREEPORT - A 35-year-old
woman was charged in connec-
tion with an armed robbery inci-
dent in Grand Bahama.

Shavonne Adderley, 35, of
Outlaw Lane, was not required
to enter a plea to the charge,
which was in relation to a report
made on May 8 by tourist
Ricardo Santos.

She was denied bail and a
preliminary inquiry was set for
July 18.

Man denies

raping
younger

woman

A MAN accused of forcibly

. detaining and raping a 20-year-

old woman was arraigned in a
magistrate’s court yesterday.
It is alleged that Benjamin

Miller, 40, alias “Dogman”,
committed the offences on Sat-
urday May 20.

Miller denied the charge yes-
terday. A bail hearing has been
scheduled for today.

Man pleads
not guilty
to armed
robbery

Charles Fritzgerald, 20, of
Limewood Lane, was charged
with armed robbery in Court
Two of the Freeport Magis-
trate’s Court.

He was not required to enter
a plea to the charge, which
resulted from a report made by
Schamal Gardiner on May 15
at Gilbert Crest.

A preliminary inquiry into
the matter was set for August
14.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 3: *'



Customs officials: ‘no information’
to back reports of collusion scheme

In brief

Blood bank
donations
soar after
appeal

DONORS poured into blood

banks after an island-wide
appeal went out for A-negative
and O-negative blood for jet ski
accident victim Megan Sands.
* Megan's father cited over-
whelming support for his
daughter's blood drive and said
the family would like to thank
the public for their donations.

It was reported in The Tri-
bune that 20-year-old Megan
was severely injured in a. freak
jet ski accident on Rose Island
on Sunday.

Up to press time on Tuesday,
she was listed in serious but sta-
ble condition in the intensive
care unit, and was in urgent
need of blood.

According to a friend of the
family, Megan is now doing
very well.

Policeman
faces
bribery
charge

FREEPORT - A police con-
stable was arraigned in connec-
tion with a bribery charge in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court this
week.

Constable 1906 Vaughn
Malakius, 41, of Freeport,
appeared before Magistrate
Franklyn Williams in Court
One.

He pleaded not guilty to
accepting a bribe, which result-
ed from a report made on
December. 29, 2005. °

The officer was released on
$5,000 bail with one surety and
the matter was adjourned to
October 23 for trial.

Multiple
counts of
theft are
admitted

A 49-YEAR-OLD, was sen-
tenced to serve a year and a half
in prison yesterday after plead-
ing guilty to several shop-break-
ing and stealing charges.

Joseph Taylor admitted to
breaking into Bonaventure
Medical lab on East ‘Avenue
between Monday May 15 and
Tuesday May 16.

He also pleaded guilty to
stealing a computer and com-
puter system, valued at $3,360,
from the establishment.

Taylor also pleaded guilty to
breaking into Hibiscus Phar-
macy on Madeira Street
between Saturday April 29 and
Sunday April 30 and stealing
nearly $4,000 in similar goods.



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

My Pe Ma Tt
322-2157



@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

CUSTOMS officials “can-
not confirm or deny” -reports
that the owners of underval-
ued luxury vehicles might have
been in collusion with a fraud-
ulent importer, according to
Comptroller of Customs John
Rolle.

Mr Rolle said that they are

' investigating every possible

angle in this case. However, to
date they have yet to come
across any information that
would support such claims.

Currently, a number of high-
end cars remain “seized” by
Customs officials and are being
held at their lot on Thompson
Boulevard.

Mr Rolle said that if reports
of collusion are true, the vehi-
cles would be forfeited to the
department to be handled as
Customs decides.

Mr Rolle explained that the

cars do not have to be sold
back to the original purchas-
er, but can be sold to anyone in
the country, and the funds
deposited directly into the
Treasury.

He said it is for this reason

‘that laws governing the Cus-

toms Department are set up in
this way.

“The law is really set up to
deal with the goods. Because
there are some circumstances
that exist where there is collu-
sion between the importer and
seller. Rather than try and
prove whether there is this
agreement between them, the
law simply made it possible

. that anybody who made a false

or incorrect statement commits
an offence.

“And so this is easily verifi-
able if the statement that you
made to Customs by way of an
entry or declaration. The fact
that we reveal a difference in
the goods or quality as the case

may be. So we don’t go about
trying to prove complicity,
unless there is direct evidence
to that effect,” he said.

According to well placed
sources, Customs officials have
seized over 37 “luxury cars”
including Jaguars, Mercedes,
jeeps and other vehicles in an
opération that started on
Mother’s Day.

Mr Rolle said that to date,
their investigations are about
50 per cent complete.

He also said that he has
been contacted by a number
of the vehicle’s owners since
The Tribune broke the story
on the Customs operation. Mr
Rolle said that in some
instances the owners have
received their vehicles back
under strict guarantees that if
the department’s investigations
prove that there was some dis-
crepancy, the cars would be
returned to Customs.

“Some have gotten their







B IMPOUNDED cars

vehicles back, with some assur-
ance that depending on the out-
come if need be they will sur-
render their vehicle,” he said.
Mr Rolle repeated that he
wanted this operation to be a
warning to any unscrupulous
business person who wished to
defraud the Customs Depart-
ment or the government.
“This can serve as a warning
to those who not only are in

who import goods and undei-
value them and believe that



4

a

the car business, but all those ©

after they leave the Customs *-

area, they are home free. Or

even those who may hav
avoided what the border con:
trols are, we want to make. it





clear that we still have the right =

to come back and seize the
goods if the full duty has not
been paid,” he said.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT -— Ann Per-

centie-Russell, parliamentary
secretary in the Office of the

Prime Minister, has vehe-.

mently denied that staff in the
Freeport office, particularly
Lady Naomi Wallace-Whit-
field, are being politically vic-
timised.

Mrs Russell, MP for Piner-
idge, expressed her disap-
pointment with an article pub-
lished in Tuesday’s Freeport
News, accusing her of victimi-
sation and changing the lock
to Lady Whitfield’s office.

“There is no political vic-
timisation in the Office of the .

Prime Minister,” said Mrs Rus-
sell.

Lady Whitfield, who: serves
as office manager of the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investment, is on vacation. She
is the widow of FNM founder

-and former party leader, the

late Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield.

Lady Whitfield is due back
in office on May 29.

This is not the first time that
allegations of victimisation
regarding Lady Wallace-Whit-
field have arisen at the Office

-of the Prime Minister.

The article claimed that
Lady Wallace-Whitfield had
been locked out of her office
on several occasions.

Mrs Russell said she was
very distressed to learn that
she was being accused of vic-
timisation. She said she had
contacted the editor about the
article.

“He told me that he instruct-
ed the reporter to do so. He
was very irate with me and then
he told to me, which is very dis-
tasteful, that I have to stop play-
ing these political whatever he
called it. I was shocked to hear
him say such a thing.

According to the article,
sources alleged that Mrs Per-
centie-Russell had a locksmith
come in last Friday to again

Political vicimisation

change the lock to Lady Whit-
field’s office while she is On
vacation.

When asked whether she

had changed the locks to Lady
Whitfield’s office, Mrs Per-
centie-Russell said: “No
Ma’am. It is really distasteful
because we are here to serve
the people, not cause friction.”

It was also alleged that Mrs
Percentie-Russell has most of
the staff “walking on pins and
needle.”

“My staff would like to go
to ZNS because they are not
referring to the Office of Prime
Minister’s staff. There is no
political victimisation in the
Office of the Prime Minister,
and I wish my staff would be
able to talk to the media
because they are being
blamed,” she said.

Elkina George Pinder was
very disturbed to learn of alle-
gations of political victimisa-
tion in the newspaper.

He said that although the

- Prime Minister’s Office and

Man accused of brother’s murder

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE tearful family mem-
bers of two brothers — one of
whom is accused of killing the
other — watched as their
shackled relative was brought
before a court yesterday to
face a murder charge.

Romeo Griffith, 30,
accused of the stabbing death
of his brother Omellio Grif-
fith, 21.

Griffith was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez at Court One in Bank
Lane.

He is represented by lawyer
Murrio Ducille.

The defendant was remind-
ed by Magistrate Gomez that
he was not required to enter a
plea to the charge.

The magistrate said a pre-



Hi MURDER accused Romeo Griffith

liminary inquiry would be held
to determine whether or not
there is sufficient evidence
against Griffith for him to be
tried in the Supreme Court.
Griffith was told that he





NEW MARKDOWNS

TWO WEEKS ONLY! MAY 22 - JUNE 3RD
ENTIRE STOCK OF UPHOLSTERY & DRAPERY FABRICS & PANELS

SELECT ROI

OF DECORATOR FABRICS

Home Fabrics

Madeira St, [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 © Fax:[242] 322-5251 » www.homefabricsttd.com

ENTIR

Madeira

St. Store

Bur RES eee OF WAVERLY, PERY SHEERS,
FABRIC FROM SPAIN, NEW ‘COORDINATED BROCADES





DRAPERY PANELS

TTON PRINTS, OUTDOOR FABRICS
AND JACQUARDS



would be remanded to Her

_Majesty’s prison. The matter was

transferred to Court Five and
adjourned to May 30 when a
mention date for the start of the
proceedings will be announced.
Several family members of the

‘accused, who were packed into .

the small court room on Bank
Lane, cried loudly in the court
room as Griffith was taken back
to the Central Police Station.

e
e
@
@
e
o
°
e
oe

| Cushions

the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices are situated on the same
floor in the Government Office
Complex they are two separate
government entities.

“T hope that this is not true.
But, if it is found out to be true,

Ms Percentie-Russell should be

removed forthwith.”
“I went this morning to Lady
Whitfield’s office to find out for



myself, but I understand that
she is still on vacation and would
be back in office on May 29:

Mr Pinder said he made a
promise to Sir Cecil Wallace-
Whitfield some many years ago
in the presence of his wife that
he would take care of Lady
Whitfield as best he could.

“Tintend to do just that, ” he
said.

Harbour Green Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com

Elegance







1D MSS Re Meh S SSeS D'S OS O49



Ae be Ute ae a te

a! be fe te

bs

bak me te teas bee’


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH. Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

e

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322- 1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Bleachers’ question still unanswered.

. f

THE AUDITOR-GENERAL was forced
to rely on the files of the Ministry of Youth
because the requested relevant copies of Cab-
inet conclusions did not “seem to be forth-

coming” to clarify the controversial 2002 pur-

chase of the Junkanoo bleachers.
According to the Auditor-General’s report
the $1.2 million bleachers were ordered in

October 2002, a month before Cabinet

approved their purchase.

This is one of the items in the 2002-2003
audited report that is certain'to send angry
words bouncing back and forth across the floor

of:the House on May 31 when the Budget:

' debate opens.

*-In 2002, in what became known as the
“bleachers” scandal”, Youth Minister Neville
Wisdom vehemently denied that the purchase
had been made before he had cabinet approval.

However, according to the auditor-general.,
the Youth Ministry’s files contradict his denial.
but, despite the auditor-general’s request, cab-
inet has failed to confirm whether their files
support either the auditor’s findings or the
minister’s denial.

Reported the Auditor-General:

“Based on documentation (records of the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture) it
appears that the contract for rental of the
bleachers did not receive Cabinet. approval
before an agreement was signed between the
Ministry of Youth, Sports ‘and Culture and
Towers Scaffold Services, Inc.

“Section 58 of the Financial Revistiaton
states that ‘all awarded contracts for supplies,

- works and services required by the Govern-
ment for amounts in excess of $250,000 shall be
made by the Cabinet.’

“The records at the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture show that an agreement
with Towers Scaffold Services Inc was execut-
ed on the 28th October, 2002. However,
. approval by Cabinet for the venture was noted
on 28th November, 2002.

“We have requested relevant copies of Cab-
inet Conclusions which does not seem to be
forthcoming therefore we relied on information
from files at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture.”

The handling of the public’s money under
the late Sir Lynden Pindling’s PLP adminis-
‘tration makes interesting reading. We now go
» back to October 11, 1990.

In the House of Assembly that morning

, Opposition Leader Hubert Ingraham accused
* Sir Lynden, as Finance Minister, of spending
$27 million over the 1988 budget. “And he has

TULTIDISCOUNT FURNITURE &

The First Stop on your Shopping List!

BEAT THE HEAT

Air Conditioners



Buy Early
OLD
NT a

$234.00
$285.00
8000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model . $350. 00
“10000 BTU Remote
12000 BTU Remote
12000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..8409.00
14000 BTU Remote
18000 BTU Remote
24000 BTU Remote
High Energy Efficient Model ..$755.00

$339.00

MULTI DISCOUNT FURNITURE &

APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
WE AGGEPT ALL MAJOR ‘CREDIT CARDS

Montrose Avenue

(Just North of Bahamas Bus & Truck Co.)

Phone:

-302- PAIR Aor ANAC sor ERLE

not seen fit to come to aeeieneat and pro-
vide an explanation to parliament for this
unlawful act,” Mr Ingraham added.

It was noted that no government minister
rose to Sir Lynden’s defence.

The maximum amount a Finance Minister
can lawfully take frem the Treasury to spend
without parliament’s approval is $20 million
and “even that has to be justified and in accor-
dance with the law,” said Mr Ingraham.

On the morning of October 24, 1990 Sir Lyn-
den left the House to find answers to unravel
government’s tangled finances. .

Mr Ingraham, who was called by then Edu-
cation Minister Dr Bernard Nottage “an unnec-
essarily hard task master” on public expenditure,
met with Sir Lynden privately in the smokers

_ room when the front bench could not provide

explanations to the Opposition’s questions.

Sir Lynden agreed to leave the House to go
in search of the answers.

In the meantime, Fred Mitchell, not yet a
member of parliament, but leader of the Peo-
ple’s Democratic League, entered the argu-
ment from the outside. His position was that ‘Sir
Lynden should be held personally liable for
all the public money spent without parliamen-
t’s approval.

“If our reading of the law is correct,” said Mr
Mitchell, “then an action ought to be brought

in the Supreme Court against Lynden Pindling .

personally for the expenditure made without
parliamentary approval in advance.

“We believe that any member of parlia-
ment has the necessary locus standi to bring
the action against the Prime Minister. Perhaps
the official opposition ought to consider such
an action.”

Mr Mitchell launched a lengthy argument,

referring to the Constitution, the Financial

Administration and Audit Act, the House's
Manual of Procedure and a 1924 Privy Coun-
cil case to support his position.

He argued that Finance Minister Pindling
went to parliament to get it to ratify an uncon-
stitutional act that he had committed.

“That means, if we are correct,” he said,
“the House of Assembly is seeking to make
good an illegality without an amendment to the
Constitution.”

In.1990 Private Citizen Mitchell argued an

_interesting case for holding a finance minister
personally responsible for mishandling public -

funds. Today we wonder how much of that
arguinent Foreign Affairs Minister Mitchell,
now a member of the PLP cabinet, would
endorse. °

Standing for
shared values

EDITOR, The Tribune

SIXTY years ago, the United
Nations created the Commission
on Human Rights. The Com-
mission’s great achievement was
the development of the Univer-
sal Declaration of Human Rights
in 1948, a declaration that recog-
nised the rights of all persons to
freedom of opinion and expres-
sion, freedom of religion and
conscience, freedom of move-
ment and freedom to leave one’s
own country. It recognised the
universal rights to be free from
arbitrary arrest, detention and
exile, freedom to assemble, free-
dom to own property and the
right for all persons to take part
in their own government.

In recent years the Commis-
sion unfortunately failed to pro-

mote these universal rights. As’

stated by UN Secretary General
Kofi Annan, “the Commission
has been increasingly under-
mined by its declining credibility
and professionalism.” He point-
ed out that some states sought
membership on the Commission
“not to strengthen human rights,
but to protect themselves against
criticism.” In its place, Annan
proposed creating a Human
Rights Council, whose members

“should undertake to abide by °

the highest human rights stan-
dards.”

As the UN sought to reform
the discredited human rights
body, the United States and oth-
er responsible members of the
international community worked
hard to ensure that only coun-
tries that respected the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights
and strove to uphold its tenets

would be responsible for pro- |

tecting it. Most of the countries
elected to the Council meet this
standard.

In our own hemisphere, only
one of the elected members
elected fails to meet this stan-
dard. According to the watch-
dog group Freedom House,
Cuba is one of the world’s “most
repressive” regimes. A quick

look at the pee Ss aoe

Das B Sey

letters@triounemedcia. net






and Cuba’s record shows why.
Religious freedom, as Pope
John Paul II reminded the UN
when he addressed it in 1979, is
the most fundamental of all free-
doms. It is a freedom that
Bahamians and Americans hold
near and dear. Unfortunately, as
the independent US Commis-
sion on International Religious
Freedom states in its 2005 report:
“Religious belief and practice

continue to be tightly controlled _

in Cuba.”
Bahamians and Americans also
share our devotion to free
expression, the freedom to
assemble and associate. We both
insist on the freedom to move
and travel, and we are both com-
mitted to the rule of law based in
an independent judiciary. In
Cuba, by contrast, Human
Rights Watch reports that
“Cubans are systematically
denied basic rights to free
expression, association, assem-
bly, privacy, movement and due
process of law.” In fact, the
Government maintains a tight
media monopoly, and harasses
and imprisons pro-democracy

activists, labour activists, inde- .

pendent journalists. and librari-
ans, often forcing them into
exile. In March 2003, while Cuba
sat on the former UN Commis-
sion on Human Rights, the Gov-
ernment imprisoned 75 human
rights activists for nothing other
than peacefully expressing oppo-
sition to the government.

These abuses continue. Over
the past several months, the Cas-
tro regime has directed govern-

_ ment-sponsored mobs to intimi-

date, threaten, and even attack
peaceful dissidents including Hil-
da Molina, Felix Bonne, and
members of the Sigler Amaya
family. The most recent incident
occurred April 25 — while Cuba
was lobbying for a seat on the
new Human Rights | Council —

e.

when dissident Martha Beatriz
Roque was attacked in her
home, beaten, bruised and pre-
vented from exercising her uni-
versal right to associate and
speak freely.

The United States welcomes '
reasoned debate about how best
to improve Cuba’s human rights
record and promote universally
recognised basic rights for the
Cuban people. Accordingly, we
do not criticise governments for
engaging Cuba or disagreeing
with the US decision not to have
economic or diplomatic relations
with Cuba. What should be
beyond debate, however, is that
a government with Cuba’s .
record on human rights should
not be responsible for enforcing ~
and promoting the Universal |
Declaration of Human Rights.
Cuba’s own diplomatic.repre- —
sentative here in The Bahamas ,
has publicly made clear Cuba
does not share a commitment to ~
the rights enshrined in the Uni- |
versal Declaration.

If the Human Rights Council '
is ever to achieve the goals Kofi
Annan envisaged for it, all coun-
tries must take a clear stand on
the side of repressed people '
around the world who live with-
out freedom. If the United
Nations is to be relevant and
effective in promoting universal
human rights, its member’
nations must. have the courage
to promote their own values, as
reflected in the Universal Dec-
laration of Human Rights. I
know the people of the Bahamas
hold these rights dear, just as we
in the United States do. The
United States has taken a public
pledge to support only countries
genuinely committed to these
ideals; we hope in the future The
Bahamas will join in this pledge

. and work with us to build a

world where respect for
mankind’s most fundamental -
rights is truly universal.’

AMBASSADOR
JOHN D ROOD
Nassau

May 2 22 mee

Irony of Church’s objections

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE objections raised by the

Church to the movie ‘The Da.

Vinci Code’ point to an irony
and expose contradictions in the

faith. | am not a scholar, but it is .

obvious that the Bible is an
amalgam of various scripts,
selected by the early Church to
unify and institutionalise the
Christianity. The main story line
in ‘The Da Vinci Code” builds
on this, and suggests that some
gospels were, suppressed, and
particularly those suggesting that
Jesus was married and had a
child. I do not know if this is
true, but the strong reaction
from the Church suggests an ele-

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVE.
aul Rae al Ce
i Looking for.
Japanese used cars?

New Arrivals Weekly
‘Mitsubishi

We have \v various. makes
Check our prices
Before Buying



Bahamas Bus & Truck
call:

322 - 1722-25

ment of possibility. Perhaps it
cuts close to the bone.
Neither do I understand why

church leaders, spending week °

in and week out with their fol-
lowers, are scared of a movie put

forward as a fiction. Do they

think all those years of indoctri-
nation will fall aparts in an hour
or two? To paraphrase. Shake-
speare, ‘the church doth protest
too much, methinks”

Next,
months ago, the church object-
ed to (and had banned) a
movie portraying homosexual
love, and now it objects to a

movie suggesting that a partic-

ular man (and Jesus was a man,
not a god) may have loved a

the irony. A few |

woman and fathered a child!

As a final observation, the
churches sent their children to
see a bloody and sadistic movie
‘The Passion of Christ’. This was
clearly not suitable tor younger
audiences.

The objecting church lexa:rs
are inverting Christian prins:-
ples. Movies showing violencs -
are preferred over movies show-
ing love, albeit homosexual. And
is it not then ironic for Chris-
tians to object to the suggestion °
that Jesus may have loved a
woman?

HOWARD JUNEAU
Nassau
May 21 2006



Bahamas Law Enforcement
Co-operative Credit Union Ltd.

NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

THERE WILL NOT BE A SECOND CALL
AS PER THE
CO-OPERATIVE ACT 2005 SECTION 22

The 21st Annual General Meeting of the Bahamas
Law Enforcement Co-operative Credit Union Limited
will be held on
Friday, May 26th, 2006
at

9:00am

Holy Trinity Activities Centre
Trinity Way
Stapledon Gardens

Refreshments willbe provided


Ine mmipuine

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 5:





Police
inspection
unit head
Is chosen

CHIEF Superintendent of
Police Juanita Colebrooke has
been selected to head the new-
ly-established Royal Bahamas
Police Force Inspection and
Review Unit.

The appointment is another
first for Ms Colebrooke, the
highest-ranking woman in the
Bahamas.

She said the unit will conduct
inspections and reviews of all
police branches and divisions in
New Providence, Grand
Bahama and the Family Islands
where there is an established
police presence.

Ms Colebrooke said unit ,

members consider it their duty
to ensure that commanders,
officers, divisions and branch-
es are conforming to the man-
date established for them.

A 40-year veteran, Chief Supt
Colebrooke joined the RBPF
in 1966.

She made history in 2003 by
becoming the first female offi-
cer to be promoted to the rank
of chief superintendent.

Ms Colebrooke has worked
in many of the front-line areas
of policing, including the for-
mer Criminal Investigation
Department (now Central
Detective Unit) and Traffic
Division, and has commanded a
number of police stations.

She has also served as com-
mander of the Eastern, South-
eastern and Southern Divisions
and as the first female superin-
tendent of New Providence and
the Family Islands.

She also served as vice-presi-
dent of the Police Tribunal and
on the Police Promotions Inter-
view Board.

The Inspection and Review
Unit, located at Police Head-
quarters, falls under the com-
mand of the Deputy Commis-
sioner John Rolle.

St Lucia to
sign deal
with Cuba
on tourism

@ ST LUCIA
Castries

ST Lucian officials will sign
two agreements with Cuba and
ask the communist-run island

for help filling a cement short- .

age during an official visit to

the country this week, the.

nation’s leader said, according
to Associated Press.

Prime Minister Kenny Antho-
ny said he will sign the deals on
arts and tourism. He also said
he would ask Cuba about buy-
ing cement since St Lucia, like
some other Caribbean countries,
was experiencing a shortage of
the product.

St Lucia, an island in the
south-east Caribbean Sea, is
home to 168,000 people.





By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS time slowly runs out for the peo-
ple of Bozine Town to appeal the
Supreme Court ruling in the land dis-
pute, members of the community are
eagerly awaiting government to follow
through with its promises.

Milton Evans, legal representative
for the community of Bozine Town and
Knowles Drive, told The Tribune yes-
terday that his clients are hoping for a
formal assurance from government —
preferably the prime minister himself -—
that they will not be dispossessed and
moved from the land some of them
have been living on for the past 50
years.

Mr Evans said that although appeal-
ing the judgment will prove to be very

LOCAL NEWS

costly for the residents of Bozine Town,
some of who already find themselves
in financial straights, there may be no
other option available.

“We cannot wait indefinitely. We only
have four and a half weeks left to
appeal, and if nothing materialises (on
the government’s part) then that’s what
we will have to do,” he said.

The area in question has been at the
centre a massive land dispute since late
2004, when the 500 or so residents
received letters from the law firm of

‘Lockhart and Munroe, informing them

that its clients, the Harrold Road Land
Development Company, (LANDCO)
had been granted certificates of title to
property between Bozine Town,
Knowles Drive and Harrold Road.
The Supreme Court last week ruled
to dismiss the community’s action

Bozine Town residents hope
for backing from government

‘

against LANDCO.

However, in a recent town meeting,

MP for the area Agriculture Minister
Leslie Miller assured his constituents
that they will not be displaced.

He said that government is currently
reviewing the possibility of offering

~ LANDCO Crown land in exchange for

the Bozine Town and Knowles Drive
land.

Since that announcement, however,
the residents of Bozine Town have not
received any further formal communi-
cation from the government regarding
this exchange.

Mr Evans said that if plans are under-
way to trade government-owned land
for the Bozine Town land, then he
would expect to hear from the minister
responsible for Crown Lands — Prime
Minister Perry Christie.

“We hope that Mr Miller was fore-
shadowing what he hopes to happen.
But he is not the person we expect to
hear from in this matter,” he said.

If the case does go before the Court
of Appeal, Mr Evans said he foresees
that his clients stand a good chance of





having the Supreme Court ruling over- —

turned.

“I would say our chances are fairly
good. I wish I could say that a win is
guaranteed, but unfortunately I can’t,”
he said.

Mr Milton pointed out that his clients
hold surveyance titles to their land and »
have over the past 30 years been able to |

attain mortgages due to the title docu- |

ments they hold.
“Our law would be in a sad state if the

ruling is allowed to stand as it is,” he |~

said.

TIL

POUL

The Tribune took to the
streets on Tuesday to pose
the question: ‘Should a public
building or monument be
named after Kayla Edwards?’





B ETTAMAE J ohiisons
“Yes, because she has con-
tributed to our society.”



: i SARAH Lubin, “Sure,

because she devoted her life
to the development of the
Bahamian culture in art,
music and the performing
arts.”



@ RUDY Carroll: “I don’t
know. a whole lot about her,
but if she was a national
hero, it is a shame that she
had to die before we heard
anything about her.”

2:00am Communi
8:00



Ingraham praises Edwards’ legacy

THE Bahands owes a
tremendous debt of grati-
tude to Kayla Lockhart
Edwards according to FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham.

Issuing a tribute to Mrs
Edwards, who died on Sun-
day after a seven-year bat-
tle with cancer, Mr Ingra-
ham said she brought hon-
our and glory to her coun-
try and “gave unstintingly”
to others. >

“My colleagues in the
FNM family and my wife

and I join the people of the.

Bahamas in mourning the
passing of Mrs Kayla Lock-
hart Edwards. Our hearts
go out to Mr Edwards, her
bereaved husband and our
dear friend and colleague,
and to all members of the
family,” he said.

The FNM leader said
Mrs Edwards was “one of
those rare human beings
who are born with an abun-
dance of talents, and she

TV SCHEDULE

WED. MAY 24

Pg. 1540AM
Bahamas@Sunrise

CMJ Club Zone

Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
Da’ Down Home Show .
Immediate Response

ZNS News Update
Immediate Response Cont’d
Island Life Destinations
Gumbo TV

Carmen San Diego .

Fun

Morning Joy

Ecclesia Gospel

Dennis The Menace
Carmen San Diego

ZNS News Update

ae School Round Up

A Special Report

News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight
Hurricane Preparedness:
Looking Back At 2005 Season
NWCCU Trade Fair 2006
Freeport

BTC Connection.
Behind The Headlines

’ Above The Rim: We Fall Down
We Get ip
News Night 13

The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
Comm. Pg. 1540 AM

NOTE: ZNS - TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!



NM KAYLA Edwards

put each and every one of those

' valuable gifts to good use

throughout her life.
“In so doing Mrs Edwards








brought much joy to her fellow
country men and women, and
to thousands of others outside
the borders of the Bahamas
who had the puvilegen of seeing
her perform.”

Mr Ingraham went on to say «

that Mrs Edwards was not the
kind of person who used her
talent for her own benefit, but
“save unstintingly of her con-
siderable gifts to her fellow
Bahamians”. :

He continued: “It was good
that, before she departed, so
many of her colleagues in the
Bahamian cultural community,
together with ordinary citizens,
gathered at the Centre for Per-
forming Arts on Shirley Street to
entertain. her and to express their
love and appreciation for her.

Under the distinguished patronage of
The Governor General of The Bahamas

“Mrs Edwards was not erly a
cultural icon. She was a dedi-
cated public servant who also
gave of her best to her people
through faithful service to suc-
cessive governments.

“For that and for all that she
did to sweeten and elevate our
lives, I should like to pay sin-
cere tribute to her. And I thank

sharing her with us,” he said. ’

TROPICAL
UU

aed Mths ES
PHONE: 322-2157






The Honorable Arthur D. Hanna

The Salvation Army Advisory Board

invites you to share in a salute to

on the occasion of its

75th Anniversary
Diamond Jubilee
Awards Dinner

Friday May 26, 2006 ~ 7:00 PM @ Wyndham Nassau Resort

Music by The Royal Bahamas Police Force Pop Band
A Silent Auction will be featured; Contribution ~ $75.00

You are invited to celebrate with us! ees
Call 393.2745 or 393.2340 for tickets and information!









‘Visit us é and see sther uéed cars
~and make your own deal!

QUALITY: sales @ S

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE sdeae

EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775

325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals + Queen's Highway * 352-6122





. Mr Edwards and her family for










SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Commonwealth Bank is offering ten (10) Scholarship Awards to
Bahamian Students to attend The College of The Bahamas

. Applications are available at any Commonwealth Bank branch or at
‘. the Financial Aid & Housing Department, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith
Building, The College of The Bahamas

APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO:

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
FINANCIAL AID & HOUSING

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
P.O. BOX N-4912

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

(Students from the Family Islands are invited to apply)

Ck

COMMONWEALTH BANK



DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS JULY 14, 2006



@2006-CrastiveRolations.nat





“Leader in Personal Banking Services”

a ne eed



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

: TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exist in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.
The Technical Trainer (Mechanical) is responsible for the technical instruction of employ-
ees from all engineering departments within the Corporation, encompassing Mechanical
Engineering, Transmission and Distribution Operations, Power Generation Operations
inclusive of Plant Install ion, Maintenance Operation and Control Workshop.



Responsibilities of the positions include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for
_ employees within the Corporation
' * Preparing candidates for external examinations certifications by local and overseas
organizations :
* Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work. habits
- * Providing instructions to participants in classroom, workshops and
job environments
* Preparing program criteria and marketing schemes for trade testing
electrical based trades
* Preparing timetables and examinations schedules for visiting -
external examiners.
Identifying. developing and delivering engineering courses( Le.,
electrical technical Training).
* Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students
attending training courses
* Preparing courses notes, training aids, evaluating and marking

schemes for all courses.

Job requirements include:

*A minimum of Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical engineer or an OND
in Engineering or equivalent qualifications

* A minimum of 10+ years of experience in industrial traini ng setting

* Sound Knowledge of technical skills related fo electrical engineering principles

* Giood judgement and sound reasoning ability

* Excellent time management skills

* Proficient oral and written communication skills

* Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant

* Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings.
troubleshooting and technical activities

* Good information transfer skills

* Computer literate

*
%
*
&

1
+
5
4
*.
aa

Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form to:
The Manager, Human Resources & Training Head Office

Blue Hill Road and Tucker Roads

P.O.Box N-7509 ‘

Nassau, Bahamas

On or before Tuesday May 30, 2006.





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

*BRILAND Park has taken
on a life of its own thanks to a
number of generous private cit-
izens.

The most recent contribution,
by an anonymous contributor, is
an entire children’s playground,
complete with swings, double
sea-saws, monkey bars, slides,
and more. The equipment was
expertly constructed and
installed by Cleveland Rolle of
Creative Woodworks, in Nas-
sau.

Several tournaments have
already christened the basket-
ball court and early mornings
and late afternoons, the tennis
court is usually in full swing.

And speaking of swing, there
is always great enthusiasm when
the cheerleaders practice their
routines on the park.

According to Andrew John-
son, president forthe ’Briland
Park committee, there are still

_ many projects to complete, such

as a gazebo, landscaping, light-

THE TRIBUNE |

Cee ee
’Briland park gets into the rhythm

Â¥





& THE new children’s playground at ’Briland Park

ing, painting, and gates for both
entrances.

The ’Briland Committee was
formed several years ago with a
goal to convert the old dump
site into a healthy, family-ori-

ented park of which the entire
community could be proud. To
date, that goal is almost accom-
plished, but only through the
generosity of many kind per-
sons. ; i

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Twelve build-
ings on Grand Bahama have
been officially designated as
shelters for hurricane season —
in the hope that this year they
will stand up to the storms.

The Disaster Preparedness
Committee announced that
nine shelters have been selected
in Freeport and three in West
Grand Bahama. ;

Committee deputy chairman
Stephanie Rahming said that
together, the shelters can more
than 2,400 persons.

And NEMA official Carnard
Bethel stressed that this year, the
committee has ensured that prop-
er shelters were selected, that
there is proper communication
equipment and that persons are
trained in disaster management;

He said: “During recent hur-
ricanes we had to evacuate
three shelters, but we believe

Office

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT



elter

propriate’

that the centres which have
been chosen are appropriate.”

The designated shelters in
Freeport, include First Baptist
Church, St Georges High
School, Sir Jack Hayward High

School, Maurice Moore Prima- -

_ty School, Living Waters
Assembly of God, Christ the
King Anglican Church Hall
(special needs), the Church of
Christ, the Cancer Association
and Central Church of God.

In West Grand Bahama, the
designated shelters are Bethel
Baptist Church, Eight Mile Rock
High School gym and Martin
Town Community Church.

Ms Rahming said . the
Freeport shelters can accom-
modate 1,976 persons, and the
three in West Grand Bahama
475 persons. -

Assistant. director of Social

*:, Services Lillian; Quant Forbes

said the committee is seeking
to identify: additional shelters.

“We look at the square.

footage, the number: of bath-
room facilities and whether the
facility is a concrete block struc-
ture,” she explained.

Mr Bethel said there is a pos-
sibility that the Sweeting’s Cay
All Age School: might be:
strengthened so that residents
would not have to cross over'in
rough seas to Grand Bahama.

“There has been a question-
mark whether or not we should
be evacuating Sweeting’s Cay
across the water to the main-
land of Grand Bahama. But,
there were two things that came
to mind — one.was that quite
often before the storm comes
there is precipitation and bad
weather and we have to bring
them across in rough seas.

“Secondly, there are certain
young men who never leave the
cay and there is looting and pil-
laging on the island.” yu

‘However, Mr Bethel said‘he
is not sure whether the struc-
ture can be reinforced in time.

iby names

has a vacancy for the position of

JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT

PROFILE:

A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or
Finance or professional accounting qualification and
planning to pursue the CPA

Prepare financial statements

Administrative support

Liaise with clients and management

One - three years relevant experience with a bank/ trust
company preferred

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Assist with reconciliation of custody accounts and
shareholder registers

Maintain general accounting systems, policies and
procedures

Ability to work with minimum supervision

Strong verbal and written communication skills and
organizational abilities

Good knowledge of software packages including MS

The successful candidate will report to the Group Accountant

The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.

The Human Resource Director

Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE



Sorority
holds its
scholarship
programme

THE Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority held its 29th annual
Honour’s Day Scholarship
awards programme to recognise
the top female studexts from
around the Bahamas.

The young women were hon-
joured for their outstanding aca-
demic achievements at the cer-
emony, held at Government
House.

Tara Lewis, honour roll stu-
dent and head girl at St Anne's
School, was awarded an $8,000
scholarship to attend Middle
Tennessee State University.

She scored highest on a gen-
eral knowledge test adminis-
tered to the top 27 graduating
female participants — each of
whom had a grade point aver-
age of 3.0 or better.

Aretha Curry of Eight Mile
Rock High School received a
$4,000 scholarship to attend the
College of the Bahamas as the
top family island student award
winner.

The programme’s essay win-
ner, Tajh Ferguson, walked
away with a cash award of $500.

According to Mavis Johnson-
Collie, president of the Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, the

‘young women were recom-,

mended by their respective
schools and represent the best
‘and the brightest that the coun-
-try has to offer.

‘Man is
charged
following

‘shooting

-. FREEPORT - Stefan Saun-
ders, 25, of Pinta Avenue, was
- charged in connection with the
shooting of Schamal Gardiner
.1on April 16 at Caravel Beach,
.Grand Bahama.
-1, He was not required to enter
a plea to the charge. Bail was
“denied anda preliminary
-sinquiry is set for August 21.



THE Bahamas’ treatment
of asylum-seekers and Hait-
ian immigrants has again
come under fire from the
human rights organisation,
Amnesty International.

In its latest annual report,
for 2005, Amnesty criticises
harsh detention conditions and
reported ill-treatment of
detainees, and refers to con-
tinued police abuse.

“There were continued
reports of abuses against asy-
lum-seekers and other
detainees at the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre.
Inmates were reportedly beat-
en and received inadequate
medical attention, food and
water,” says the report.

“Asylum-seekers were
forcibly returned to countries,
including Cuba and Haiti,
without access to a full and
fair determination procedure.”

Amnesty said hostility
increased towards Haitian
immigrants, with the Depart-
ment of Immigration forcibly

returning 5,543 irregular immi-
grants - 4,504 from Haiti - to
their countries of origin.

The report also attacked
Fox Hill Prison, which has
been subject to Amnesty crit-
icism in the past.

“In April, 12 prisoners on
death row at the Fox Hill

Prison staged a three-day '

hunger strike to protest at
their ‘inhumane’ conditions.

“Inmates alleged inade-
quate sanitation, food, water
and medical care. In October,
a new prison building was
commissioned, for completion
in 2007.”

The report, referring to
“continued reports of police
brutality”, added: “In Janu-
ary, a riot erupted in Nassau
Village after police allegedly
abused Haitian women and
shot a young man aged 19 in
the face. A police investiga-
tion had not concluded by the
end of 2005.”

The report also noted the
Bahamas’ stance on the death

An increasingly growing entertainment store
seeks to employ a Sales Clerk to assist in the

store. -
Requirements:

V Responsible
V Respectful
V Trustworthy
V Team Player
V Motivated

V Good Personality
Y Must have sure ride to and from work
V At least 4 BGCSE’s

Interested persons, please telephone
392-2435 to set up an interview.

It’s time to |





“Live your Dreams”

9.79%

on Savings & Investments

Some Facts About our Company:

To help with:

° Retirement

¢ College

e Savings

e Investments

* We have been operating in the Bahamas since 1920.

.;] ¢ We manage more than 40,000 Policyholders and

your money.

more than 400 Institutional clients.
° We offer Professional and Prudent Management of



penalty, saying that courts
continued to pass death sen-
tences, though none was car-
ried out. ,

“At the end of 2005, there
were at least 39 prisoners on
death row. Numerous peo-
ple, including the Commis-
sioner of Police, called for
the resumption of executions
in reaction to an increase in
violent crime,” the report
added.

Since this latest report was
compiled, the Bahamas has
been at the centre of more
human rights issues.

Not only do the prison
and detention centre con-
tinue tobe criticised for
poor conditions, Amnesty’s
attention will be drawn to
this year’s prison breakout

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 7

and the beating in broad
daylight of a US journalist
outside the detention cen-
tre.

In its general conclusions,
Amnesty described 2005 as a
year of contradictions in
which signs of hope for
human rights were under-
mined through the decep-
tion and failed promises of
powerful governments.

Secretary general Irene
Khan said the security agen-
da of the powerful and priv-
ileged had hijacked the ener-
gy and attention‘of the world
from serious human rights
crises elsewhere.

GUARDS watch |
. over detainees at
Carmichael Road

rom

9%, off a

Prom Fabrics

e Striking Special Occasion Fabrics
e Beaded Sequined Fabrics

@ lridescent Taffeta

¢ Two Tone Shantung
Lamour - new low prices $11.99
60” Pongee and Lining now $2.99 yd.

off Prom

0

when purch

Accessories ,

ased same day as fabric

e Rhinestone Chokers & Earrings

-¢ Tiaras °
e Evening Purses ¢

Gloves
Capes

Baan aa YB GLa

iva cline

~~ Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 » Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 © Fox:[242] 322-5251 © www.hometabricsitd.com



q

2006 ESCAPE - $30,874.00
FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD

THOMPSON BOULEVARD ° TEL.: 356-7100 * FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢ WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas.com

A strong link in your financial future



Telephone: (242) 461-1000 ¢ Fax (242) 361-2524 ¢ Email: financialservices@bainsurance.com PART OF YOUR LIFE



a


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

‘Rock of Ages
Huneral Chapel

Wulff Road & oe
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

Sr SERVICE FOR

GWENDOLYN
"GWENNIE" BARR, 84

of Pleasant Bay, South
| Andros will be held at
| Johnson Road Seventh-
| Day Adventist Church,
Farrington Road Friday
May 26th, 2006 at
2pm. Officiating will
ibe Pastor Eric D.
| Clarke, Pastor Gary
King, Elder C.M.
| Lewis and other
Ministers and Elders.
Interment will be Old Trail Cemetery.





Ea SORIANO TRTONTEIVG pase
i





| Left to cherish hér memories is her son,
' Howard Daniel Barr; 2 sisters, Mable Wilson
| and Albertha Bain; 2 brothers-in-law,

| Richard and Howard John Barr of Pleasant

| Bay, South Andros; sisters-in-law, Julia,

: Leona, Eloise Barr and Muriel Roker;
| daughters-in-law, Patronella, Mary and
| Madell Barr; step-daughter, Sylvia Griffin;

| 14 grand children, Tesia Pierre, Akin Barr,

| Jason, Theotis, Joresa, Christina, Priscilla,
| Mark, Samantha, Donna, Linda, Moliqua
| and Samantha Samara Barr; seven great-
| children including Tamica, Shakim Barr,
| B.J. Pierre, Teanglo, Tevan and Britton
| Pierre and McGregor Bodie; 10 nieces,
i Rhonda Duncombe, Sharon Knowles,
| Courtnell and Tanya Bain, Dorothy Hilton,
| Deborah Kikivarakis, Laverne Gardiner,
| Beatrice Beadle, Christable Johnson and

| Gina Craigg; 10 nephews, Peter Wilson,

| Kendall Pinder, Roscoe, Brian, Andrew,
| Pennial Bain, Castell, Hugh, Kieth and Eric
Morrison; and a host of other relatives and
i friends including: Mr and Mrs. George and.
| Bonnie Férguson, Mr and Mrs. Keloson
i Dorcas Cox, Arimentha Taylor, Blanch
| Forbes, Eula Nixon, Mr and Mrs. George
| Black, Mr and Mrs. Edwin Sands, Mr and
| Mrs. Theophilus Rolle and families; staff
| at the Kemps Bay home for the aged, the
| medical staff of the Kemps Bay Clinic, the
entire community of South Andros, Pastors
| Gary King, Eric D. Clarke and Elder C.M.
Lewis and the executive and members of
| the Johnson Park Seventh-Day Adventist
| Church, and of course the directors and staff

of Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel.

| Friends may pay their last respects at Rock
' of Ages Funeral Chapel, Wulff Road and
: Pinedale on Thursday from 10am to 6pm
; and at the Church on Friday from 1pm until
| Funeral time.

DIEUVELA
MUCHEL, 62

of Chippingham; will
be held on Friday 26th,
May 2006 at Queen of
Peace Catholic,
Church, Faith Avenue
at llam. Officiating
will be Fr. Kaze



will be Old Trail Cemetery.

\ She is survived by her one daughter,
| Alescanne Loui; one son, Framond; three
| grand children, Pe Gi Loui, Jeri Loui, Dafene
| Loui; son-in-law, Alecsanne Loui; nine
sisters, Elianise, Claudia, Marie, Marieline,
Diauvlia, Itila, Doloreste, Elaine and Sara
Coicou; nieces, Sandra, Merllane, Annette,
Gina, Danie, Tyane Coicou; nephews,
| James, Evans, Kevin, Jeffery, Adlyn,
Seintonil, Nesly and Jerome Coicou and a
| host of other relatives and friends

Friends may pay their last respect at Rock
of Ages Funeral Chapel on Wulff Road and

| Pinedale from 10am to 6pm on Thursday
and on Saturday at the Church from 10am
until Funeral Time.

Eugene and interment |



vi sfoy Vay

“Action is ; demanded

THE TRIBUNE.





on protesting officers

ALL police officers involved
in yesterday’s court protest
should be fired, furious com-
munity activists claimed last

night.
They said if action was not
taken immediately, then

National Security Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt and Commissioner
Paul Farquharson must resign.

The protest was attacked as
“an act of defiance” against the
attorney general and “a threat
to the rule of law.”



TO OUR VALUED
* CUSTOMERS
Please be advised _ that,
June 1, 2006 due to operation
costs we here at the Holiday Ice.
Company will be selling our ice
at the new prices listed below:



Large Bags $7.00
Medium Bags $5.00
Small Bags = $2.50

Thank you.

And one said: “This is a dan-
gerous day for the Bahamas.”
Senior college lecturer Felix

Bethel, a friend of Deron.

Bethel’s family, and Workers
Party leader Rodney Moncur
both said the commissioner
“must rein these men in” or
face the consequences.

“Tf he doesn’t, someone must
call for his resignation,” said Mr
Bethel. He claimed that this was
“happening because the police
are accustomed to cover-ups.

But the attorney general is say-
ing there will be no cover-up
and she is being true to her
word.” |

For members of a “disci-
plined force” to act this way was
out of order, he said.

Mr Moncur supported Mr
Bethel’s view, saying: “Two
things must happen: either
Mother Pratt fires the commis-
sioner or she needs to resign.

“The police force is the mili-
tary arm of the state. When they













effective

FINALLY AFFORDABLE...

Plugging you into the power of the sun...

SOLAR POWER CONCEPTS LTD.

A Star in the Galaxy Group of Companies
Crawford St., Oakes Field

Tel: 323-5171

Fax: 322-6969







are prepared to protest because
the rule of law is being estab-
lished, we are in trouble.

“T am now going to organise
a counter protest because the
tule of law has to be protect-
ed. This is an attempt to pre-
vent justice.”

The activists claimed the
police action was “in direct con-
frontation with the indepen-
dence of the attorney general”
and all officers involved “should

~ be fired forthwith.” ~



Shooting inquest is
called off: CDU
‘officer now to face -
manslaughter charge

FROM page one

manslaughter charges is very
unfair.

“No reason was given for call-
ing off the inquest and the
inquest would be the proper
procedure to follow. The attor-
ney general ought never to
interfere with the discretion of
the coroner to hold an inquest,”
he said.

However, Mr Bannister said
that he was very pleased with
the turn-out of CDU officers
yesterday.

“I believe that the support
‘that the police officers have giv-

en him is an indication of how. .
they feel about the fact that
they have to put their lives on
the line so often. They cannot.
have the Executive treat them’
like that,” he said.

Mr Bannister said that his
client has been through an
“amazing ordeal” in the past.
months and that he hopes that
the. attorney general will
decide to let the inquest go
forth.

* “We hope that this is the end
of it, that there will be no more
threats of manslaughter charges.
It is unfair to him, to his family,”
he said.

ATTENTION COLLEGE STUDENTS!!
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Call: 394-4949

or

E-mail: shopkeeper@stopnshopbahamas.com

on entire stock from May 24-June 30

ye & Pearls is the direct importer of Gemstones,

Beads lkt Gold findings, Turquoise, Coral, Bali

ees Quartz, Crystals, Tiger Eye, Agate, Citrine,
Amber and Fresh Water Pearls.

We offer abincingis services
Pearl and bead strands whole sale and refail.

Also - buy two strands of pearls and gef another oe
You can cusfomize your own necklace
and waif while ifs being made.



Y . Sega aN :
= LS
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 9



The unknown constitutional battle

A etouce you
might not know it, a.

constitutional battle has been
raging here for the past five
years.

The government is in the
metaphorical dock, fighting a
war Of attrition in the hope that
Maurice Glinton and Leandra
Esfakis, the two maverick
lawyers leading the fray, will
give up and go away.

The battle is over the confi-
dentiality of lawyer-client rela-
tions — something which experts
say is a cornerstone of our jus-
tice system. ©

Glinton and Esfakis sued the ~

government soon after the
Ingraham administration
rammed a package of 11 finan-
cial laws through parliament in
December 2000 under heavy
pressure from Western coun-
tries and the Financial Action
Task Force those countries had
set up to regulate international
banking.

At the time, the Bahamas was
ranked among the world's
worst-regulated offshore cen-
tres, and was blacklisted for

being "uncooperative" in fight- _

ing money laundering. Rich
countries had reached the point
where they would no longer tol-
erate tax havens, so we faced
unprecedented sanctions that
would have ended our banking
relations with the rest of the
world.

Almost overnight (by
Bahamian standards), costly
new layers of regulation were
added to the financial sector to
control criminal activities -
that’s why we had to fill out all
those ridiculous identity forms.
The laws were written and
passed in record time, with the
involvement of only a few top
ministers.

‘According to critics, this
kitchen cabinet hijacked the
authority of parliament to
appease international regula-
tors, and Bahamian legislators
were never able to debate the
matter. But others say there was
good reason for Ingraham’s
“madness”. ee!

“Perhaps he learned from
Pindling’s experience,” one
authoritative source told Tough
Call. The reference was to the
spectacular disclosures. of offi-

eae




LS

PANY

“ep?





LARRY SMITH

cial corruption in the Bahamas
by American news media in the
early 1980s, which led to a dam-
aging commission of inquiry
into drug trafficking.

“If you want to play the
game, you have to play by the
rules. Offshore financial centres
had let the lack of oversight get
out of hand and the G7 coun-
tries decided that certain things
had to be done. Obviously, the
more you have at stake in these
matters, the quicker you are to
react.”

(): course, Ingraham’s
rapid reaction drew -

howls of protest from all quar-
ters — including the then oppo-
sition Progressive Liberal Party,
which vowed to revisit the leg-
islation when it came to pow-
er. But significantly, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie has avoided
that over four years.

As lawyer Brian Moree said
at the time: The government
delivered “a massive response
to the financial crisis. Only time
will tell if this was a stroke of
genius or a harbinger of the
demise of our financial services
industry."

Moree said it was right to
make “reasonable concessions
to eliminate criminal activity,”
but contended that the process
was “offensive, unorthodox and
dangerously disrespectful of
public international law and the
rules regulating relations
between sovereign countries."

The Financial Transactions
Reporting Act affects
lawyer/client privilege by
requiring the inspection of client
files by government agents.
According to

Glinton and Esfakis, this
“abrogates the individual’s con-
stitutional right of confidential-
ity as we have understood it in
common law tradition.”

So these two indepéndent
lawyers challenged the govern-
ment in 2001 and’were later

NOTICE

joined by the Bar Council,
which wants to resolve the issue.
In the meantime, the govern-
ment has suspended inspections
while the lawsuit winds its way
laboriously through the courts.

But despite. dozens of court

‘appearances over the past five

years, the substantive issue of
lawyer/client privilege has yet
to be heard. That’s because —
since 2002 — the argument has
been over whether our finan-
cial laws are unconstitutional
because they were enacted

_under pressure from other juris-

dictions.

In that year Chief Justice Sir
Burton Hall struck out argu-
ments in the lawsuit’s statement
of claim that he said were “not
justiciable” — in other words,
they could not be settled by a
court.

The part of the claim that he
deleted argues that the laws are
unconstitutional because they
were “not made for the peace,
order and good government of
The Bahamas”, and that
enforcement will cause “serious

‘harm to the legal profession,

clients, and the public interest.”

_ What Glinton and Esfakis are
saying is that the government
ceded its authority: “I don’t

_ believe that the overseas pres-

sure‘is such that we have to
behave like fools and give up
all of our sovereignty to other

‘countries and non-state actors

like the Financial Action Task
Force,” Glinton told Tough
Call.

“At end of the day the law is
supposed to be for our protec-
tion as citizens, and we need to

‘demand rational behaviour and

accountability from our gov-
ernment. These are matters of
principle that are fundamental
to our practice of law.” .
The constitutional arguments
were later restored by the Court
of Appeal. But the government
waited until last year to appeal
that decision — well after the

time allowed-for an appeal-had :

, THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD ;

Payment of Benefits and Assistances for the month of August 2005, will be made in the following
districts, at the following pay stations between the hours stated below:

ADELAIDE DISTRICT:

‘

Thursday, May 25, 2006: 12 noon - 12:30p.m., at the Church Hall.

CARMICHAEL DISTRICT :

Thursday, May 25, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 11:45a.m., at Beacon Hill Church of Nazarene, Carmichael

Road.

GAMBIER DISTRICT:

Thursday, May 25, 2006: 12:45p.m. - 1:30p.m., at St. Peter’s Church Hall.

FOX HILL DISTRICT:

Thursday, May 25, 2006: Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 3:00p.m., at the National Insurance
Board’s Fox Hill Sub- Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may collect
them throughout the month of September 2005, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

WULFF ROAD LOCAL OFFICE:

Thursday, May 25, 2006:Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 4:00p.m. at the National Insurance
Board’s Wulff Road Local Office. Persons who cannot collect their cheques on the dates stated, may
collect them throughout the month of June 2006, from 9:30a.m. to 4:30p.m., Monday to Friday.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT:

Thursday, May 25, 2006: May 29, 2006: 9:30a.m.- 4:00p.m., at The Bahamas Public Service Union

Hall, East Street South.

GRANTS TOWN DISTRICT:

1. Thursday, May 25 - Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters “A” - “L”, at the Cat Island United
Association Hall #1, Market and Vesey Streets.

2. Thursday, May 25 - Monday, May 29, 2006: 9:30 a.m. - 4:00. p.m.
All persons with surnames beginning with the letters “M” - “Z”, at the Salvation Army

Hall, Meadow Street.

3. Tuesday, May 30 - Wednesday, May 31, 2006: 9:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.

Persons who did not collect their cheques from the respective stations on the days
specified, may collect them at the Cat Island United Association Hall #1, Market and
Vesey Streets, on the above-mentioned dates.

PLEASE NOTE:

Cheques must be collected from the listed pay stations on the dates and times given. In cases of
emergency, uncollected cheques may be collected from the Pensions Department, at the Jumbey
Village Complex throughout the month of June 2006 between the hours of 9:30a.m. and 4:00p.m.

Claimants and/or their representatives are required to produce proper identification in order to collect
their cheques. Acceptable forms of identification for claimants collecting their own payments are:Their
National Insurance Registration Card, together with any one of the following:

1. A Passport;
2. A Voter’s Card; or

3. Any other document which establishes, conclusively, the identity of the claimant.

Where the claimant is sending a representative to collect his/ her cheque, the representative should
provide an Authorization Form completed by the claimant, or a letter authorizing the Board to pay
the representative, together with any of the above-listed items to identify the representative.

All claimants and/or their representatives are advised that should they fail to provide satisfactory
documents to identify themselves as requested above, there may be a delay or denial of payments.

N.B. Pensionrs whose cheques are deposited directly to their bank accounts are advised that

expired. The Privy Council will
now hear the matter on June
26.

( osts for the London

hearing will be almost
$100,000. And up to last Octo-
ber — when Glinton and Esfakis
officially asked the Bar Council
for funds — they had spent many
unbilled hours of their own time
preparing documents and
attending hearings, often involv-
ing travel to and from Freeport,
where Glinton is based. They
insist that no clients are funding
their action.

And it is a huge risk finan-
cially. If they lose the appeal
(or the action as a whole), costs
will be awarded against Glin-
ton.and Esfakis alone. And if
those costs are not paid, they
can be declared bankrupt and
disbarred.

According to Glinton, if'the
government’s appeal is success-

ful “it would affirm a judge’s

tion, and we can’t get the main
issue before a judge.”

Since lawyers maintain
accounts, form companies and
handle transactions on behalf
of their clients, they come under
regulatory scrutiny just like
banks and trust companies.

. The financial regulations
require lawyers to collect infor-
mation on their clients and pro-
vide it to government inspec-
tors. The actual job of inspect-
ing has been delegated to a list
of chartered accountants, who
must be paid for their services.

The Financial Transactions
Reporting Act governs escrow
accounts. If you hold money on
behalf of anyone, under that
legislation, you are obliged to
account to the Compliance
Commission auditors, who can
examine that account.

Law firms must also provide
the KYC documentation on
those clients, and documentary
evidence proving why they are
holding that money.



If the Privy Council rules against
the government’s appeal next
month, then things will stay on
course and the substantive issue of —
legal privilege will eventually come

to trial.



right to strike out a constitu-
tional claim at a preliminary
stage and thus frustrate further
constitutional challenges to the
executive.

“The attorney-general will
say that these are not issues to
be tried, which could give the
first instance judge a final say
without a hearing on the merits
of the case,” he said. “And since
we don’t have judges who spe-
cialise in constitutional law, that
could be dangerous.”

If the Privy Council rules
against the government’s appeal
next month, then things will stay

on course and the substantive -
issue of legal privilege will even- ”

tually come to trial.

“They are trying to dismem-
ber our case,” Glinton said.
“They don’t want to argue judi-
cial review-of government

actions..So_it’s a_war.of attri-:

So what about the 700 plus
other Bahamian lawyers who
are affected by these regulations
and the five-year-old lawsuit?

Although the Bar Association -

supports the action, and once
threatened to “discipline” any
lawyer who complied with
inspections, it has not come up
with any funding.

Part of the reluctance to join
in the action may be a lack of
awareness of what it means to
be a citizen and a lawyer in a
constitutional democracy,
knowing that it is an uphill bat-
tle all the way.

S tatistically there is little
chance of citizens suc-
ceeding against the state at the

first level — the Supreme
Court. And to go the whole

process is expensive and time-

3 YEAR WARRANTY / 100,000km

JD. Powers:
“Most appealing vehicle in it’s Class”

SANPIN MOTORS LTD.

Thompson Boulevard, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas, P.O. Box GT-2947
Tel: 326-6377, 326- 6464/5, 326- 0013/4, 326-6382 + Fax: 326-6315

consuming.

And historically, a judicial
success at the Privy Council lev-
el — as in the D'Arcy Ryan,cit-
izenship case — has not always:
yielded a success in practical
terms.

According to one observer,
“Leadership is lacking in this
country in every aspect of social

-enterprise. In other countries

the Bar has been the main force
in bringing these matters. to

‘court. Here it is more a matter

of form over substance.” - ae r

And some law firms are deal-
ing with the prospect of inspée-
tions by setting up new compa-
nies to hold duplicate sets of
corporate files. This means that
inspectors won’t be able 40
examine client files within. “the
law firm, but would be directed
to corporate files in a separate
company.

A lawyer at one major fizin
said: “We would definitely be
concerned if they came to
inspect client files in our law
offices. This is just one practical
on-the-ground approach that
some firms have had to the
financial regulations.

But, he added, “there is>no
question that the underlying
issue is very serious, and courts

’ around the world have consis-

tently upheld the integrity of
lawyer/client privilege.”

And the real question is, are
these really maverick lawyers
pursuing a futile quest?

“This constitutional litigation
was filed by the Canadian Bar
Association and the various
provincial bar associations .in
Canada, and the law societies
in Australia, after ours was
filed,” Esfakis told Touch Call.
“Tt has been determined already
in favour of their bar associa:
tions.”

The dictionary defines mav-
erick as "one who is unorthodox

in his ideas and attitudes"> Are

the law societies of those juris-
dictions mavericks?

Perhaps we should describe
Glinton and Esfakis as “verte-
brate" lawyers instead, inele--
gant as it may sound. However,
that might imply that the rest
of the bar is “invertebrate”.

What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme
dia.net. Or visit www.bahama-

_ pundit.com

TEST DRIVE -
ONE TODAY!

ON THE SPOT ante

FINANCING WITH = ysuRANCE Sgarten’
AVAILABLE WITH 5 3

f

payments for the month of May 2006 will be deposited to their accounts on
Thursday, May 18, 2006.

by
E an @ a.
mail: sanpin.vehicles@coralwave.com EGMMONWEALTHIBANKC okers


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

RARER YL

BRS RRR RRR AR RR TRI I ARE RT AD or



YOUR CONNEC rion-Fo THE WORLD
POSITION VACANCY
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications for
the above position from suitably qualified persons with relevant experience in the
telecommunications or related industry.

GENERAL ACCOUNTABILITIES

This position develops and directs the Company’s accounting and control activities to
protect the assets of BTC and to ensure the internal and external integrity of accounting
standards and financial controls. The CFO is to provide accurate and timely monthly
corporate performance reports and annual budgeting information to Board members,

executives, senior managers and line managers. The CFO also directs the formulation
and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and objectives including cash
management, banking and relations with banks and investment firms, risk management
and capital funding requirements. The enhancement of revenue (including the

implementation of measures to stop revenue leakage) 1 is an important requirement for

this position.

This is an executive management position reporting to the President & Chief Executive
Officer and the Chairman of the Finance Committee of the Board of Directors. As the
Chief Financial Officer of BTC, the holder of this position provides the Board and
senior management with informed and timely opinions on the Company’s financial
performance and trends impacting operations.

SPECIFIC ACCOUNTABILITIES

1. Develop and direct the Company’s accounting and control activities to protect the
assets of BTC, to ensure the internal and external integrity of accounting standards
and financial controls, and to provide accurate and timely reporting and budgeting

information to Board members, executives, senior managers and line managers.

2 Direct and prepare for printing and distribution all statutory accounts and annual
audited financial reports. ©

3. Direct the formulation and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and
objectives including: cash management, banking and relations with banks and
investment houses, risk management and capital funding requirements.

4. Provide the Board and Executive Management with informed and timely opinions
on the Company’s financial performance and trends impacting operations.

5. Protect the assets of the Company by directing the accounting and control, financial
planning, statutory reporting, and risk management activities on a a COHAN Y NAGE
basis.

6. Enhance the Company’s public image by ensuring the integrity of accounting and
control standards and procedures and by providing the published annual report on
_ atimely basis.

7. Contribute to the aims and abjextives of BTC by sroviding informed advice relative
to the Company’s financial performance, the general business environment and
developing trends impacting BTC’s activities.

8. Contribute to increased corporate revenues through effective cash management and
by preparing and presenting financial operating data for Board and executive
approval.

9. Contribute to the reduction of operating expenses through the development and
implementation of accounting and control procedures and systems to provide
accurate and timely data for the information of the Board, executives and managers.

10. Ensure the Company’s continued access to capital at competitive rates by ensuring
the flow of financial information, by maintaining contact with commercial and
investment banks and by directing accurate and timely | financial planning and
budgeting.

11. Ensure the necessary human resources to meet both the current and future needs
of the finance division by participating in the selection, mentoring, motivation
and development of managers and staff. ©

12. To attend as required all meetings of the Executive Committee, the Board of
Directors and the Finance Committee of the Board and any other relevant committee.

‘43. To arrange for the audit of BTC’s financial statements ina timely manner and to

liaise with BTC’s external auditors as required.

_ 14. To ensure prompt action to implement recommendations made by the Internal

Audit Department in their reports to the Audit Committee of the Board and the
senior management.

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate should be a member of a recognized accounting body from
the U.K., Canada or the USA, possess a thorough working knowledge of International
Accounting Standards (IAS) and meet the following requirements:

¢ ACPA or ACA designation with at least ten (10) years of commercial post-qualification
experience with proven senior management experience in the telecommunications
industry.

¢ Exceptional interpersonal and communications skills.
¢ Expertise in implementing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.
COMPENSATION

BTC offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits commensurate with
qualifications and experience and in line with compensalion and benefits afforded
senior executives in the private sector.

It is BTC’s intention to execute a contract with the successful applicant for a
period of three (3) years with an option to renew the contract for a mutually agreed
period.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive,
no later than June 6", 2006 and addressed as follows:

Director of Human Resources

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited:
. John F. Kennedy Drive

P. O. Box N-3048

Nassau, Bahamas

Re: Vacancy: Chief Financial Officer

’ : THE TRIBUNE":





YOUR. CONNECTIO O THE WORLD

POSITION VACANCY
Deputy Chief Financial Officer (DCFO)

The Bahamas Telecorimunications Company Limited (BTC) invites applications for the above
position from suitably qualified persons with relevant experience in the telecommunications or
related industry.

GENERAL ACCOUNTABILITIES | \

The holder of this position assists the Chief Financial Officer as he or she develops and directs
the Company’s accounting and control activities to protect the assets of BTC and to ensure the
internal and external integrity of accounting standards and financial controls. The CFO is to
provide accurate and timely monthly corporate performance reports and annual budgeting
information to Board members, executives, senior managers and line managers. The CFO also
directs the formulation and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and objectives
including cash management, banking and relations with banks and investment firms, risk
management and capital funding requirements. The enhancement of revenue (including the
implementation of measures to stop revenue leakage) is an important requirement for this position.

This is an executive management position reporting to the Chief Financial Officer (CFO). |

SPECIFIC ACCOUNTABILITIES

To assist the CFO and provide leadership in the Finance Division with the following:

1. Develop and direct the Company’s accounting and control activities to protect the
assets of BTC, to ensure the internal and external integrity of accounting standards
and financial controls, and to provide accurate and timely reporting and budgeting
information to Board members, executives, senior managers and line managers.

2. Direct and prepare for printing and distribution all sation accounts and annual
audited financial reports.

3. Direct the formulation and implementation of the Company’s financial goals and
objectives including: cash management, banking and relations with banks and
investment houses, risk management and capital funding requirements.

4, Provide the Board and Executive Management with informed and timely opinions
on the Company’s financial performance and trends impacting operations.

"5, Protect the assets of the Company by directing the accounting and control, financial »
planning, statutory reporting, and risk management activities on a conan -wide ~
basis.

6. Enhance the Company’s public image by ensuring the integrity of accounting and
control standards and procedures and by providing the published annual report on a -
timely basis.

7. Contribute to the aims and objectives of BTC by providing informed advice relative —
to the Company’s financial performance, the general business environment and
_ developing trends impacting BTC’s activities.

8. Contribute to increased corporate revenues through effective cash management and ‘|:

by preparing and presenting financial operating data for Board and executive approval. » |

9, Contribute to the reduction of operating expenses through the development and
implementation of accounting and control procedures and systems to provide accurate
and timely data for the information of the Board, executives and managers.

10. Ensure the Company’s continued access to capital at competitive rates by ensuring
the flow of financial information, by maintaining contact with commercial and
investment banks and by directing accurate and timely financial planning and
budgeting.

11. Ensure the necessary human resources to meet both the current and future needs of
the finance division by participating in the selection, mentoring, motivation and
development of managers and staff.

12. In the absence of the Chief Financial Officer to attend as required all meetings of
the Executive Committee and the Finance Committee of the Board and any other
relevant committees.

13. To arrange for the audit of BTC’s financial statements in a timely manner and to
liaise with BTC’s external auditors as required.

14. To ensure prompt action to implement recommendations made by the Internal Audit
Department in their reports to the Audit Committee of the Board and the senior
management.

REQUIREMENTS

The successful candidate should be a member of a recognized accounting body from the U.K.,
Canada or the USA, possess a thorough working knowledge of International Accounting Standards
(IAS) and meet the following requirements:

* ACPA or ACA designation with at least five (5) years of commercial post-qualification
experience with proven management experience in the telecommunications industry.

¢ Exceptional interpersonal and communications skills.

+ Expertise in implementing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems.

COMPENSATION

BTC offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits commensurate with qualifications
and experience and in line with compensation and benefits afforded senior executives in

the private sector.

It is BTC’s intention to execute a contract with the successful applicant for a period of three
(3) years with an option to renew the contract for a mutually agreed period.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later
than June 6th, 2006 and addressed as follows:

Director of Human Resources

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
John F. Kennedy Drive

P. O. Box N-3048

Nassau, Bahamas

Re: Vacancy: Deputy Chief Financial Officer
THE TRIBUNE

FROM page one

was during the FNM’s term in
office that about 25,000 illegal
Haitians were repatriated.

“Anyone in the Bahamas would
know better than that, including
someone like Mr Gibson,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said that he found
it odd that Mr Gibson, who he
described as a “Johnny-come-late-
ly” to the debate of illegal immi-
gration in the Bahamas, would
allow Haitians, while he was Min-
ister of Housing to construct
homes for the ministry.

The opposition leader said that
it was inexcusable that persons
with legal status in the Bahamas
could be taken from their homes
at four and five in the morning as
they were in Eleuthera.

He pointed out that those who
sought to make their work per-
mits available to the police were
not allowed to do so and were sub-
sequently brought to New Provi-
dence and dumped in the deten-
tion centre.

“T encouraged them to file suit
against the government so that
their rights and the rights of others
would not be abused in the future.
We want a government of laws in
the Bahamas so when the police
excéed their authority persons

Police officials

Ingraham

would be able to sue the police
department. When we were in
government on numerous occa-
sion we settled with persons when
the police were wrong. When the
hospital was negligent we were
sued. When trees fell on cars and
persons got hurt we were sued.

“Government has a duty to
obey the law. So no amount of
demagoguery, because they are
Haitians, Jamaica, British or what-
ever, should, if their rights are
abused, prevent them from seek-
ing their rights before the courts.
Haitians should not be excluded
from that and in fact that is in the
International Convention on the
Rights of Migrants,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Amnesty International in their
newly released report says esti-
mates are that 60,000 out of the
Bahamas’ 300,000 strong popula-
tion is of Haitian descent.

In 2005, according to the
Department of Immigration 5,543
illegal immigrants were repatriat-
ed, 4504 to Haiti.

Mr Ingraham said that when his
party came to office in 1992 they
found the immigration system ina
state of disarray.

He pointed out that the former
government had hundreds of ille-
gal immigrants housed in Fox Hill
prison, not in a proper detention
centre, and were unable to repa-
triate them to Haiti.

“The Haitian government
would not accept them because
there was a breakdown in com-
munication between Haiti and the
Bahamas and we had to work out
an agreement for them to be
accepted back into Haiti,” Mr
Ingraham said.

The FNM leader said that even
the method of repatriation used

before his government changed it ~

was archaic and inefficient.

“The government used to trans-
port the immigrants on a boat
called the Eastore which was very
slow and it tied-up immigration
and defence force officers for an
extended period of time because it
took several days to get Haiti.

“We initiated a programme of
chartering aircraft to take the
immigrants back to Haiti for the
first time in the history of the
Bahamas, this is a programme that
is continuing today,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

Even then, the only airport
which the Haitian government
would allow the migrants to come
into Haiti through was the one in
Port-au-Prince.

FROM page one

matter, I would have known, and IJ didn't hear
that: we locked up any police officers in this raid,”
Mr Ferguson said. .

“However," he said, "if officers are implicated —
and these things do happen — they would be charged
like‘everybody else. If it is straight forward in con-
travention of the Gaming Lottery Act, they would
be subject to the same thing like anybody else."

All of the confiscated material, according to

Assistant Commissioner Ferguson, has been secured
by police to be used as an exhibit against the gam-
bling house owners when the case goes to court.

Addressing the status of the persons appre-
hended during the raid, an official from the Immi-
gration Department said that of the 23 Haitians
arrested, only four were illegal, and those four were
being held at the detention centre on Carmichael
Road. The others, he said, were charged by the
police and granted bail.

The raid on the Grove establishment was a part
of a police initiative called "Operation Quiet
Storm", which seeks to focus on and address crim-
inal activities within the community. And whereas
police officials say that the gambling establishment
was targeted because it. was operating in contra-
vention of the country's gambling laws, sources
claim that the raid was conducted after police
received information that the operation may have
had financial ties to an illegal Haitian smuggling
rink in the Bahamas

In response to these allegations, Inspector Evans
denied that the establishment was targeted for any
reason other than the fact that it was operating in

Violent dispute reports

FROM page one

gun had already disappeared.

When informed-of the-ineident,- Assistant Com- |

missioner of Police Reginald. Ferguson apologised to
the public for the station’s failure to respond quickly.

He said an investigation into the matter would be
launched as soon as possible.

A Tribune reporter witnessed the entire incident.

At around 5.30pm en Saturday, while a passenger in
a taxi, the reporter saw.a group of young men stand-
ing on the roadside when an argument started.

One of the young men then pulled a hand gun from
his waist band, showed it off, and then put it back.

The reporter called 919 and alerted the police.

When no officers arrived, the reporter.and the taxi »

driver went to the South Beach Police Station, but left
and returned to the scene after the officers refused to
respond to the incident.

The taxi driver implored the officers to take action,
and even offered to drive one of them to the scene.
However the officers seemed reluctant to do any-
thing.

“Just wait on the CDU officers,” said the sergeant,
adding that this was the best he could do.

A young officer pointed out that by the time they
got to the scene, the persons involved in the altercation

i would most likely have left anyway. .

An ex-police officer, ‘who was on the scene, said that
if he were still in uniform, he would have left the sta-
tion immediately on receiving such a call.

Mr Fergurson said any nonchalant response by.any
police officer will not be tolerated.

“That was very slack of the officers. It is discour-

cor{travention of the law.

the situation.”

Terios and Sirion feature auto. Pan. pla
and colours available. 24-month/30, ‘000- mile ae warranty on a ‘new veh cle :

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED DAIHATSU DEALER
Parts and service guaranteed

Salespersons:
Terrol Cash

aging to me to hear that this is hay, my. officers handled

Collins Ave (South of 6th Terrace)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 3:30pm
Sat 8am - 12noon
Tel: 322-6705/6 * Fax: 322-6714
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs é

Pam Palacious
L.J. Albury

Available in Granda Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-6122 * Abaco Motor Mail, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916



WEUNESVAY, WIAY <4, CUUU, FmUL 11

on your way to college?
_an outstanding student and
a leader?

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
has a fantastic opportunity for you.
The President’s Scholars Programme.

a ee
- Successful applicants receive:

« Full payment of tuition and general student fees

« Annual book allowance

* Retreats

¢ Monthly seminars

* Access to the President's Scholars/Honours
Centre, including computer lab, caplet and
study lounge

* Opportunities for local and FeNELOFAl student

-. leadership conferences, and

* Special recognition at commencement with
President’s Scholar award.

» E-mail account and Internet access

For further information contact
Oyiincne eee
President's Scholars Programme/
Honours Programme

Oakes Field Campus
The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas

Telephone:

(Rae



FIRSTCARIBBEAN |

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY —

for
MANAGER, RETAIL CREDIT (NASSAU)

Qualifications/Experience:

. Bachelor’s Degree in Banking or related field.

e At least five years banking experience at senior supervisory
level

e At least three years lending experience

General Req uirements/Responsibilities:

¢ To provide assessment of retail credits submitted by 2
jurisdictions
Sanction/authorize retail credit loan applications including
International mortgages within delegated limits up to US$400
thousand secured and US$100 thousand unsecured
Prepare recommendations on retail loan applications outside
of delegated limits for the Senior Manager, Retail Credit /
Head of Retail Credit to sanction / authorize.

If you are interested:

Submit your resume private & confidential in WRITING ONLY before
may 26, 2006 to:

- Dawnika Rolle
HR Business Associate
Shirley Street, Financial Centre
P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: dawnika.rolle@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their

_ interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian nationals only.



twee ee ew
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Judicial review could ‘reinvigorate’
justice system, says committee chair

@ By MARK HUMES

THE changes sug-
gested by a newly-com-
pleted judicial review
could reinvigorate the
justice system in the
Bahamas according to
Sean McWeeney.

Mr McWeeney, who
served as the review
committee chairman,
called it the widest-
ranging review of the
judiciary ever under-
taken in the Bahamas.

“We believe if it is
adopted, it will per-
haps, for the very first
time in our history,
make a career on the
bench a truly attractive
proposition,” he said.

The committee presented a
copy of the review report to the









ATTORNEY General Allyson Maynard-Gibson. _
receiving a report of the judicial review commission
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Attorney General’s Office ear-
lier this month.

Speaking with The Tribune

- on Monday, Attorney General

statement.



Allyson May-
nard-Gibson
said that it is
still too early
for her office
to comment
on the find-
ings, as they
are yet to be
reviewed by
all the proper
authorities.
Speaking
with The Tri-
bune, Mrs
Maynard-
Gibson said
that once this
process is
completed,

she would be ~
‘in a better
position to make an official

According to Mr McWeeney,



Thompson Blvd. __
eran)









the current salaries and benefits

’ offered to members of the judi-

ciary are not adequate and com-
pare poorly to those of legal pro-
fessionals in the private sector.
The committee therefore rec-
ommended that the salaries,
benefits, and terms of service
be adjusted for members of the
judiciary, in the hope of attract-
ing young lawyers to the bench
and reinvigorating the profes-

_ sion.
Mr McWeeney said that tra-"

ditionally, financial considera-
tions would prevent a lawyer

my newspaper.”

HAROLD ANTOR

“Home delivery of The
Tribune gives me a head
start. The Tribune is

INSURANCE EXECUTIVE

from considering an appoint-
ment to the bench until he or
she came close to retirement age.
However, he added that he
feels the report’s recommenda-
tions represent a recipe for
attracting the most qualified
and talented attorneys from
both the public and private Bar
to the bench.
When the report was pre-
sented, Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said that she hoped to have
some of the commission’s
suggestions implemented

when this year’s budget

debate begins on May 31.

“Tt is clear that security in pay
and position frees judges to
exercise their best legal judg-
ment in applying the law fairly
and impartially -to the parties
before them,” she said.

Mr McWeeney said that the
country will benefit in the long.
run, as the better the quality of
judges attracted to the to the
profession, the better the qual-
ity of the jurisprudence — and
the better the quality of
jurisprudence, the better the
quality of the civilization.



@ ATTORNEY General Allyson Maynard-Gibson and her













team share notes with the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
during a courtesy call on Monday. Pictured from right are the
chamber’s executive director Philip Simon, president Tanya

. Wright, Mrs Maynard-Gibson, permanent secretary Jacqueline

Murray, and director of legal affairs Deborah Fraser.

(BES Beene Derek Smith)

Chamber of
Commerce is 4
invited to join

swift justice

initiative

‘THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce has been invited to
join Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson’s “swift jus-
tice” initiative.

Chamber of Commerce pres-
ident Tanya Wright and execu-
tive director Philip Simon visit-
ed Mrs Maynard-Gibson on
Monday..

“T am happy to work with the
chamber on our swift justice ini-
tiative,” said Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son during the courtesy call. “I
eagerly anticipate their co-oper-
ation with us in this regard.”

Said Mrs Wright: “We always
look forward to an opportunity
to speak with Mrs Maynard-
Gibson who has always made
herself available to the cham-
ber.

“We are proud of the rela-
tionship that we have begun to
develop and we will do all that
we can to continue to foster that.

“We are looking at mandates
that we need to create in order

to strengthen not only the busi-
ness community but our vari-
ous relationships with other key
partners, the public sector,” said
Mrs Wright. ;

She continued: “This minis-
ter in particular has seriously
invested in the private/public
sector relationship and a testa-
ment of that is the fact that we
are meeting with her again
today.

“So, we are looking at ways
to strengthen that relationship
and to see how best the cham-
ber can align its mandate for
the betterment of the business
community and the community
at large.”

Mr Simon underscored the
desire of the chamber to speak
from the perspective of its pub-
lic policy and legislation com-
mittee “and to see how we can
better consult with this office
in the drafting of legislation that
impacts the business and wider
community.”

INSIGHT
oe the stories behind iat)
Me EMC (e DET) roy Mondays

For delivery: of the leading
Bahamian newspaper, call The
Tribune’s. Circulation Department
at 502-2383) or visit ous offices on
Shirley Street to sign up today!





The Tribune

Why Voice. Why Vlowspaper!



SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street













= )PIDELITY

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH





NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764



FREEPORT OFFICE
‘Tel: (242) 351-3010








Bahamas Waste

‘looks good’ for | S250m resort investment
set for June 15 opening ©

2006 full-year

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

BAHAMAS Waste’s man- :
aging director yesterday told :
The Tribune that economic :
growth generated by foreign ;
direct investment could help it :
expand tu “three to four” Fam- :
ily Islands, the company hav- :
ing experienced a 123.31 per :
cent increase in 2006 first quar- :
ter net income to $247,000. i

Francisco de Cardenas said :
the BISX-listed waste disposal :
company seémed to be starting :
to “reap the reWards” from its ;
2005 fiscal year, when it invest- ;
ed heavily in equipment: :
replacement and its $1 million :
medical waste facility. i

Describing himself as :
“extremely pleased” with :
Bahamas Waste’s first quarter :
results, Mr de Cardenas said: }
“All last year we had the dis- :
traction of our medical waste :
facility, getting that up. and run- :
ning and securing customers.

.“At the end of the year, ;
everything fell into place. The :
medical institutions are now :
seeing what a benefit it is to i
them and the environment as: ;
well. The medical waste facility :
is generating revenue and mak- :
ing money.” i

Disa Harper, Bahamas :
Waste’s chief financial officer, :
said the remainder of 2006 was :
“looking pretty good” for the :
company, which has seen a 4
“slight increase” in business }
from its commercial units. “Y

Bahamas Waste has: imple- :
mented price increases for its :
commercial business segment :
since May 1, as it was “lagging :
behind” due to rising costs. :

Mr de Cardenas said’ steel }
costs had doubled, while bin :
and vehicle maintenance and :
other costs had also risen. Then :
there was the company’s fuel :
- bill, which in 2005 rose by :
almost 70 per cent in 2005, strik- ;
ng $330,990 compared to :
$196,826 in 2004. i

Bahamas Waste was talking :
to its individual commercial ;
clients and roll-off business cus- :
tomers over rate increases that’ :
would suit both sides, the man- :
aging director said. :

And Mrs Harper added: “We :
spend a lot of money to make :
sure our service is above stan- ?
dard. Compliance, insurance

SEE page 6B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor |

A $250 million investment
project is set for a soft re-open-
ing of its marina on June 15,
with the developers telling The
Tribune that clients and real.
estate purchasers were “sali-
vating” to be part of the devel-
opment.

Maura Brassil, Chub Cay
International’s vice-president
of sales and marketing, said

that although the centrepiece °

of the Berry Islands project,
the new 20,000 square foot
clubhouse, was 60 days behind
schedule, the existing facility
had been refurbished in time
for the re-opening. .

‘The. developers, headed by
south Florida businessmen
Kaye Pearson and Walt
McCrory, chairman and chief
executive of Fort Lauderdale-
based International Marinas,
the firm that manages the Port
Lucaya marina on Grand
Bahama, began construction at
the Chub Cay Club in June last
year.

Ms Brassil said the marina
was almost completed, with 110
brand new slips installed, and

the marina and channel lead- -

ing to it dredged to a depth of,
12.feet at low tide.

She added that seven of the
14 villas currently under con-
struction were “close to com-
pletion”, with the workforce at
the site scaled down from a

high of 458 to about 258, with °

much of the infrastructure work
now finished.

The club was close to finish-
ing its own power and water
plant, Ms Brassil said, shipping
the materials to the island,
while a generator house and 33
staff houses had already been
constructed.

Ms Brassil revealed the
developers were planning a
Phase II expansion of the pro-
ject, which was due to start lat-
er this year or in early 2007.

She said: “There’s a lot of
land we have to deal with.
We’re finishing up Phase I, and
can’t start on Phase IT until the
autumn or beginning of 2007.”

City Markets profits
rise 11.9% to $6.6m

BAHAMAS Supermarkets yesterday announced that net income
for the first three quarters of its current fiscal year had risen by 11.9
per cent to $6.6 million, as its new majority owner continued efforts
to replace its former Trinidad-based operating partner in the $54

million buyout consortium.

The company, which operates 12 stores in the Bahamas under the

City Markets and Winn-Dixie brands, indicated the unfavourable
timing of Easter, which fell in the 2005 third quarter‘as opposed to
this year’s fourth quarter, may have contributed to third quarter net

income being down.

For the 12 weeks to April 5; 2005, Bahamas Supermarkets saw its
net income fall by 13.6 per cent to. $1.9 million compared to $2.2 mil-
lion in the 2005 comparative period.

However, for the three quarters or 40 weeks to April 5, 2006, net
income at Bahamas Supermarkets had risen to $6.6 million, or
$1.44 per share, compared to $5.9 million, or $1.28 per share, in fis-

cal 2005.

The increase in net earnings and earnings per share is likely to
provide further encouragement to BSL Holdings, the buyout group
featuring Abaco Markets directors Craig Symonette and Franklyn
Butler, that has acquired. Bahamas Supermarkets for $54 million.

SEE page 5B

Government: No
Budget loss from
oil firm’s pull-out

@ By CARA BRENNEN .
- Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government has not’

lost any budgeted revenue from
the decision by US-based oil
exploration company, Kerr-
McGee, to cease operations in
the Bahamas, the Minister with
responsibility for Energy and
the Environment told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Senator Dr Marcus Bethel
said the company had complet-
ed all its financial obligations

for the first phase of the pro-
ject, and added: “So nothing has
been lost.”

He said any other fees would
only have applied if Kerr
McGee decided to continue its
operations, but added that the
Government had not made any
budgetary allocations based on
expected revenues from its oil
exploration efforts.

While theGovernment would
have received between 12.5 and

SEE page 4B

Phase II, she added, will
involve increasing the marina
in-size from 110 to 210 slips,
along with the construction of
townhouses and preparation of
lots. When completed, the pro-
ject will feature 138 lots, town-
houses and villas.

The developers are also plan-
ning to widen and resurface the
existing .runway at Chub Cay,
currently. 5,000 feet in length,
with a new Customs and Immi-
gration building to be con-
structed at the airport. .

The Chub Cay Club had
“needed major surgery” when
the developers acquired it, hav-
ing had no upgrade in the pre-
vious 20 years, and Ms Brassil
described the demand from

marina and real estate clients as

“phenomenal”. ace

Telling The Tribune she had
just returned from Chub Cay
after selling a 70-foot marina
slip yesterday, Ms Brassil said:
“The sales are going well. Peo-
ple are just salivating, waiting
for it to open. They just love it
and want to be part of it.

“The Berry Islands are
always popular for fishing and
diving, and this [development]
gives an opportunity for peo-
ple to have an upscale place in
the Bahamas.

“It’s such as beautiful island
and the area is so nice. Chub

Cay is a great jumping off |

point. Boaters can base them-
selves here to’visit the Exuma

chain and Andros. It’s an

opportunity. to. see the

Bahamas.” ;

The developers plan to
employ a minimum of 100 peo-
ple when the project is com-
pleted, Ms Brassil said, com-
pared to the 25-30 employees
they inherited upon acquiring
the Chub Cay Club.

She added: “There’ll be a lot

more employment opportuni-:
ty for the surrounding areas,

pulling in people from Andros
and Great Harbour Cay. It’ll

put the focus on the Berry |
- Istands, which it hasn’t had for

a long time.”

_ Ina previous interview with .
The Tribune, Mr Pearson said:
-“““When you undertake a pro-.
ject of this size and begin to”

review the various forms of rev-

enue and the overall economic

~ impact, it certainly will be very

substantial, including the trans-
fer of ownership tax and prop-
erty taxes on the new homes
being built.

“The expansion of the mari-
na will bring in more boating
activity and traffic, and also,
my background and involve-
ment in the marine industry

- over 30 years puts me in a posi-

tion to generate boating activi-
ties, charity events and to bring
in super yachts and mega
yachts, the same kind of boats:
seen at Atlantis.”

Asked why he chose Chub
Cay, Mr Pearson said he had
been a member of the island's
club since-1971. Regarded.as.a

SEE page 5B

ISU SHIR LU A a imma



@ PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie
will officially open the new casino at
Exuma’s Four Seasons Emerald Bay
resort, managed by Pinnacle.
Entertainment.

lm By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

-FORTY-SEVEN Bahamians have.
~ been employed at Pinnacle Entertain-

ment’s Casino at Emerald Bay, which
opened on Monday, providing further
potential growth for Exuma’s economy.

The casino, which is adjacent to the
Four Seasons Emerald Bay resort, is the
first and only casino to open on the
island. reteeciatens

It covers 5,000 square feet, and
includes about 65 slot machines and eight

table games; including blackjack craps:

and roulette, and is open seven days a
week
Speaking with The Tribune yesterday,

Charity Armbrister, the Ministry of |

Tourism’s director for Exuma, ‘said the
casino had hired 47 Bahamians from

Exuma, New Providence and Grand .

Bahama. :

The staff includes only two expatri-
ates, the casino’s general manager and
the manager of security and surveillance.

This Pinnacle Entertainment casino
“definitely speaks volumes” for Exuma’s
economy, Ms Armbrister said.

“It means a lot of employment oppor-
tunities, not just for the hotel employees,

. but for taxi drivets, restaurants and oth-

ers on the island as well,” she added.’ ; >
Ms Armbrister said the Four Seasons,

"resort has increases the number of high->

end visitors to the island. The casino,’
which is relatively small when compared:
to other facilities such as those at Atlantis,
and Cable Beach, was expected to cater:
to “high rollers” in an intimate setting.”
Customers would come not just from:

the Four Seasons, but other properties»
'-on the island such as Grand Isle Villas,-

Emerald Bay Marina and February,
Point. - eae

Ms Armbrister added that followings
Monday evening’s “soft opening”, Prime:
Minister Perry Christie was expected to

officially open the casino in a ceremony

next month.

“The Casino at Emerald Bay adds an
air of excitement to:the magnificent
resort experience on the island of Great
Exuma,” said Daniel R Lee, chairman of
Pinnacle Entertainment in a statement.

“Guests travel to Great Exuma from
around the United States and the world;
and this will create yet another reason for
them to visit more often and stay longer.
We are honoured to be part of such an
important tourism component.”

- Pinnacle Entertainment also owns and
operates casinos in Nevada, Louisiana,
Indiana and Argentina.

Fidelity Bahamas Growth & Income Fund
Total Performance through April 30, 2006* -

| 23.44%

12 months to April 2006

54.54%

Cummulative Since Inception
(February 1999)

Nassau- Marsha Mi
eo coit ell dGemeco ial etci

Peete encore

761%

Average Annual Return
- Since Inception
(February 1999)

= ) FIDELITY

CN AeL ate at LAL Ile]

. Cal for an Offering Memorandum.
lop ara at mod Gn

Bas Rein
PLANNING PRIVATE
BANKING



Nec U aN Ge Se Mit
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





Segment company
that needs to be sec

he term ‘knowledge is

power’ is very accu-
rate in the corporate world, as
information is key to staying
ahead of the game. But really,
two questions stick out for me.
There is the “What is there to
know?” and “Who needs to
know”.

The first questions sees the
executive ask about what type

of information exists in public
about theeir organisation. The
latter, when summed up, real-
ly asks about who is looking at
the information and what they
looking at or looking it up for.
Well, let us investigate the side
effects of doing business, which
is exposure and what or who
we are being exposed to.

Doing business requires

putting oneself in the limelight.

\

This can be a bowertal ‘Sai
when speaking of your compa-
ny’s products and success sto-
ries.

We are bombarded every
day by news stories of how this
product or service is better that
the-next, and how company: A
has experienced a certain
growth percentage during a
particular quarter. Not to:men-
tion the Internet, especially

Desa
as low as

Aa

Scotiabank's ‘Forgive & Forget’ Mortgage Campaign

Te ésiebente our 50th year in the Bahamas, Scotiabank is giving
away $50,000 in prizes. ©

Down-payment as low as 5% (with Mortgage Indemnity Insurance)

Campaign ruris until July 14 2006

Call or visit.us today and let Scotiabank help you to ‘Forgive & Forget”

Pricing Information As Of:
22 May 2006






0.2











28.00 ABDAB



52wk-Hi 52wk-Low



Abaco Markets

Kerzner international BDRs
Premier Real Estate



mbo!
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

Fund Name

eae

Life, Monay, Balance both!





8.50 Bahamas Property Fund 11.25
6.35 Bank of Bahamas 7.10
0.70 Benchmark 0.71
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.29
1.05 Fidelity Bank i 1.25
8.00 Cable Bahamas 9.35
1.39 Colina Holdings 1.67
8.50 Commonwealth Bank 10.60
4.12 Consolidated Water BDRs : 5.61
1.64 Doctor’s. Hospital ; 2.70
4.02 Famguard 6.21
10.45 Finco 11.25
8.46 FirstCaribbean 12.22
8.35 Focol : 10.50
1.04. Freeport Concrete : 1.04
9.50 ICD Utilities : 9.50
8.22 J. S. Johnson 9.10

i
14.00





NA _V

4.2879 1.2327. Colina Money Market Fund 1.287880*
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.7451 ***
12.3560 -°2.2072 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**







1643

Colina

Financiai Advisors Lid,

15.00:



11.25
7.10 0.00
0.71 0.00
1.30 0.01 4,500
1.25 , 0.00
9.35 0.00 500
1.67 0.00 _
10.65 0.05 —-6 310
5.65 0.04
2.70 0.00
6.21 0.00
11.25 0.00
12.22 0.00
10.50 0.00
41.04 0.00
9.50 0.00
9.10 0.00

Last 12 Months Div. $

els



















search engines. By typing in
key words and phrases, you can
find out almost anything on any
company. Is this a problem?
Isn’t much of the information a
company has actually intend-
ed for public disclosure?

Information such as that
contained within “marketing
materials” is a clear example.
Some information must be dis-
closed as a matter of law, and
is actually public record.

he issue is the second

question: “Who needs
to know?” Today, even in the
smallest business unit, it is
understood that not everyone -
even those holding high posi-
tions in the company structure
- do not really “need to know”
all the information that is. being
protected.

To better appreciate this

concept, we have all since Sep-
tember 11, 2001, been educat-
ed about terrorist operations
and heard the terms ‘cell’ being
used. In a terrorist cell (unit,
group, division), its members
are only provided with a limit-
ed amount of knowledge about
the activities of the overall ter-
rorist organisation of which
that cell is a small part.

In the event of their arrest or
capture, even if the individual
wanted to co-operate with
authorities, that person does
not have knowledge that
would be particularly damag-
ing to the overall organisation.



We are
bombarded every
day by news
stories of how
this product or
service is better’

that the next, and

how company A
has experienced
a certain growth
percentage
during a
particular quar-
ter.



The practice illustrates the
‘need to know’ principle, which

. can also be called “compart-
. mentalisation”.

When we look at Best Prac-
tices and Benchmarking, we
see that this type of organisa-

- tional behaviour is critical to

‘keeping our secrets, secret’.
For example, the vice-presi-

dent for marketing may be.

very high in the company hier-
archy but does not ‘need to
know’ the details about an
employee’s confidential health
records in order for him or her
to fulfill their duties. This sep-
aration is important, because




9.6 4.65%
3.9 2.82%
11.8 4.62%
7.1 4.00%
15.1 2.57%
NM 0.00%
11.4 5.26%
48.8 0.80%
6.1 0.00%
11.5 3.86%
15.2 4.80%|
14.0 4.09%
12.6 4.76%
N/M 0.00%
18.1 4.26%















NAV KEY

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52k-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price |
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

MARKET TERMS.

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity "-12 May 2006
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price :

Today’s Close - Current day’s weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week *- 01 May 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** - 30 April 2006

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closh rice divided by the last 12 month eamings

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 4, 1994 = 100 - 31 March 2006







it makes it more difficult for
unauthorised persons to get a
clear picture of the company’s
intentions and manoevering.

Thus we see the need for
well-established internal con-
trols on information sharing,
which cannot be limited to the
IT Department. Information
stored on the computer has its
origin as some idea or concept
that most likely gets discussed
in meetings, where hard copy
notes are taken. We must
realise that security of infor-
mation begins long before you
secure it on you computer.

So, just how do we begin this
process, which obviously
becomes a task of educating
personnel on how to imple-
ment and maintain security,
rather than the consultant hav-
ing extensive access to the
information itself.

Michael Miner, a senior
associate in Kroll Schiff &
Associates, suggests the fol-
lowing categorising of infor-
mation.

PERSONNEL CONFI-
DENTIAL - These are the

‘portions of employee records

that are to be protected Senet
general disclosure.

BUSINESS CONFIDEN-.

TIAL - Generally, this would

be information.that is not:sub-..

ject to the Trade Secrets Act,

but that does have commercial

value to competitors.

SPECIAL CONTROLS -
A description for this class
might include that it is of sig-
nificant economic value to ‘the
holder, and would include
ideas that may be at a stage of
development.

SECURITY SENSITIVE -
Information that could be
used to.compromise or cir-
cumvent security measures.



from people who are
making news in their

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

da

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora :





This needs particular care.

As with any security pro-



The vice-presi-
dent for market-
ing may be very ©

1igh im the com-
pany hierarchy
but does not
‘need to know’
the details about
an employee’s
confidential
health records in
order for him or
her to fulfill their
duties





gramme, tthe parameters must
be tailored to the particular
company. When dealing with
information, the particular cul-
ture of tthe company must not

be overlooked.
We will continue this discus-

sion and provide some more .

guidance in developing and

implementing this type. of BIOs, .

gram IMC: Cg yen aig

NB: Gamal Newry is the
ident of Preventative Mea-

sures, a loss prevention and.

asset protection training and
consaltmg company, specialis-
img in policy and procedure
@evelopment, business security
reviews and audits, and emer-
gency and crisis ,anagement.
‘Cemments can be sent to PO
Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas,

or e-mail; info@preventative-
measures.net or visit us at
wwwpreventativemeasures.net













MANAGER NEEDED

(FOR NEW STATE OF THE ART PRODUCTION LINE
CABINET FACTORY IN NASSAU)

QUALIFICATIONS:

STRONG MANAGEMENT SKILLS

CABINET MAKING SKILLS

A SECONDARY DEGREE WITH GOOD WRITING SKILLS
MOTIVATED TO ASPIRE TO A:HIGHER LEVEL OF

MANAGEMNT

COMPUTER SKILLS IN EXCEL, WORD/AND OUTLOOK
GOOD COMMUNICATION, LEADERSHIP, AND PEOPLE

MANAGEMENT SKILLS

RESPONSIBILITIES:

DAILY WORK SCHEDULES & WEEKLY SHIFT SCHEDULES

OF EMPLOYEES

DAY END PROGRESS REPORTS
MONTHLY REVIEWS OF EMPLOYEES & PRODUCTION
ORGANIZE AND IMPLEMENT EFFICIENT MATERIAL

STORAGE AND ACCESS

INVENTORY MANAGEMENT ‘& CONTROL

ORDERING MATERIALS FROM LOCAL & FOREIGN VENDORS
SIMPLE REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE TO MACHINERY, AND
OVERSEEING LARGE REPAIRS

BENEFITS:

¢ ATTRACTIVE SALARY
« BONUSES

¢ HEALTH BENEFITS

FORWARD RESUMES TO:
EMAIL: kccbah@hotmail:com
FAX: 394-4159



}
THE TRIBUNE

ast week, we gave a

primer on credit rating
symbols and what they convey
to investors. The article also
gave a comparison between the
symbols used by the leading
global rating agencies and those
that CariCRIS, the Caribbean
region’s only local credit rating
agency, has adopted.

This week, we answer the
question: “How can a regional
credit rating agency help devel-
op the region’s capital mar-
kets?”

We begin by a reminder ona
few macroeconomic fundamen-
tals. Investment — both private
and public — is the means by
which an economy grows. The
money to finance this invest-
ment comes from savings —

either domestic savings or for- .

eign savings. While the globali-
sation of capital markets is mak-
ing it ever easier to access for-
eign savings, reliance on exter-
nal financing may come with
the risk of a system-wide liq-
uidity or solvency crisis that can
be precipitated by a’sudden stop
in external finance. This is why
most policymakers agree on the
critical role that domestic capi-
tal markets play in both growing
“ the domestic economy and in
insulating it from global finan-
cial crises.

The year 2004 gave a stark
reminder of how a governmen-
t’s access to domestic savings
could make or break a coun-
try’s fiscal position. The
Dominican Republic, whose
external public debt to GDP
ratio was 22 per cent (total debt
to GDP was 50 per cent, which
is considered moderate), was
forced to default due to its lack
of access to a vibrant domestic

_ capital market.

On the other hand, Jamaica,
whose external debt was in fact
much higher at 75 per cent

(total debt to GDP was 136 per.

cent) was able to avoid a default
due to a vibrant domestic capi-
tal market, from which the gov-
ernment raised monies to meet
maturing debt obligations in
both local currency.and foreign
currency. It is precisély because
of the flexibility a healthy
domestic bond market gives to a
government that such a factor
can improve its sovereign for-
eign currency credit rating.

Savings have to be placed
somewhere, either deposited
into the banking system or
invested in various tradable
financial instruments in capital
markets. Credit ratings, in esti-
mating the probability of
default, help savers (investors)
to assess their options and ratio-
nally match their risk tolerance
with their savings objectives.
This use of credit ratings to pool
risks results in a more efficient
use of funds.

In the absence of analytical
information about a company’s
financial position and corporate
strategy, many would-be
investors in capital markets stay
within the confines of the rela-
tive comfort (and lower returns)
of the banking system. Thus,
by virtue of enabling investors
to compare credit risk across
companies, industries and coun-
tries, credit ratings deepen the
capital market by attracting
more investors.

From the ‘perspective of those
trying to raise funds, credit rat-
ings enable them to access funds
from a wider range of instru-
ments (and not only bank
loans), as well as reduce infor-
mation risk, both of which
should result in more efficient
pricing. This reduces the cost
of capital and allows a larger
number of projects to be eco-
nomically viable, thus increasing
the rate at which the overall
economy can grow.

BUSINESS

How rating agencies
develop markets and
aribbean economy

On account of a greater num-
ber of projects being funded,
credit ratings also improve the
liquidity of a bond market. Inef-
ficiencies typically inherent in

any banking system, such as °

high operating costs, the man-
agement of non-performing
loans and the cost of maintain-
ing high reserve requirements
at the central bank, are usually
less prevalent in capital mar-
kets.

Credit ratings reduce infor-
mational asymmetry, not only
via the information contained



There are very
few debt issues
that have been

‘rated in the

English-speak-
ing Caribbean
by global rating
agencies



in the credit rating symbols
assigned to various instruments,
but also by supporting greater
financial disclosure, better cor-
porate governance and

improved access to publicly .

available expert analysis.
Greater information disclo-
sure and improved liquidity also
deepen the market by attract-
ing money that would otherwise
have been placed offshore or in
real assets, which is not as pro-
ductive to the economy as
investments in the real sector
(manufacturing/services). While
there is no reliably accurate data
on deposits from the Caribbean
region held abroad, the persis-
tent “bubble” in real estate
prices evident in Barbados,

P.O. BOX N-3897 CLIFTON PIER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 362-4790/2, 302-2900, 302-2901/ FAX: (242) 362-4793

" VACAN CY NOTICE

A manufacturing entity located on the western tip of
New Providence, is presently seeking the following:

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

Position:



eee PAYABLE ea

Duties Incliide:

* Processing of accounts payable documents.
e Processing of periodic payment runs.

¢ Reconciling payable and accrual accounts

e Maintenance of freight expense account.

e Maintenance of prepayments schedules

¢ Maintenance of miscellaneous excel reports.



Minimum Requirements:
¢ University Degree: Finance or Accounting;
¢ Two years Experience in financial arena;
° Strong communication, administrative, time management skills .
and reporting skills;
° Excel spreadsheets u sage at an advanced level a must;
¢ Proficiency in Word applications required; -
e Must be a team player with a professional attitude, strong
commitment to detail and god analytical skills.

THE IDEAL CANDIDATE:
e Must be a team player that is willing to aappoit the efforts of the
team or any team member.
¢ The successful applicant should be able to act on his or her own
initiative with little supervision.
¢ Must have good communication skills

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available to
he successful candidate.

Interested persons sii submit a current resume and cover letter to ii
address below no later than May 26th, 2006:

Human Resources Manager
commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas

‘Fax: 1-242-362-4793.



Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago .

is well-known to us all. One esti-
mate of the increase in real
estate prices in T&T over the
last three years is 150 per cent.

Greater participation overall
in the financial markets enables
a government to have more
flexible and, arguably, more
effective monetary policies. This
is because it is more effective
for governments to manage
short-term interest rates by

‘open market operations using

government securities than by

making direct loans or chang- .

ing the repo rate.
We explained earlier in our
series that regular issuance of

government paper in different:

amounts, and of varying tenors,
is necessary for the construction
ofa base yield curve that is fun-
damental to the development of
a healthy domestic bond mar-
ket. It must also be noted that it
is impossible to construct any

yield curve other than the gov- .

ernment one in the absence of
credit ratings. Why? Because
credit ratings give the indepen-
dent measure by which to allo-
cate various instruments into
risk buckets (AAA, AA, A,
etc.):for which a curve can be

constructed. By enabling such |

construction, credit ratings cause
inefficiencies in the bond mar-
kets to be glaringly obvious and
thus allow for their correction.

In order to fully answer the .

question posed at the start of
the article as to how a regional

credit rating agency can help -

develop the region’s capital

market,.it is necessary to note

two things. '
The first is that there are very

few debt issues that have been .

ratéd:in the English-speaking
Caribbean by global rating
agencies. Therefore, global
credit ratings obviously cannot
provide. allt the benef

as



WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 3B



tal markets, according to the
foregoing.
The reason that global credit

ratings cannot provide signifi- |

cant benefits to our bond mar-
kets is because global credit rat-
ings are not very relevant to
domestic and regional investors.
While they are necessary for
those institutions who wish to
raise funds in the international
capital markets, global credit
ratings do not help local
investors in differentiating the
credit quality of alternative
investment options within the
region.

The global scale credit ratings’

assigned to companies and oth-
er non-sovereign entities are
typically capped by sovereign
ratings. For their part, the sov-

-ereign ratings.in this region tend

to remain low in the global rat-
ing scale (BBB or below),

reflecting the small size of the’

regional economies, moderate
stage of development and rela-
tive lack of income diversity.
This, in turn, leads to a bunching
of all credit ratings assigned in
the lower end of the global scale.
While this is:not of material

‘importance to!a global investor,..
- who is deciding whether to place

their funds in Eastern Europe
or the Caribbean, it is of vital
importance to the focal or
regional investor:

The second matter of note is

_& Credit Rating Services, Caris .

Venkat Neer

~ CariCRIS

that CariCRIS is based locally,
and will provide an estimate of
the relative probability. of
default in the universe of debt
issued in the Caribbean.
Because they will provide far
more relevant information to
investors and enable useful dif-
ferentiation of credit risk within
the region, it is anticipated that
CariCRIS’s rating penetration
will be far higher than that of
the global rating agencies. - - -;
These two factors - a better |
differentiation of credit risk !
within the region and a greater | {
penetration of credit ratings - ;
will go a long way in the devel- :
opment of our regional bond :
markets, as highlighted in- this | i
article. "}

NB: Caribbean Information‘

1h ae ay

CRIS, is the Caribbean's |
Regional Credit Rating Agency: 4
This article forms part ‘of: ‘de
series on issues surroundm
capital markets and credit Qs
ings. E-mail: info@caricris bh

_ or call 868-627-8879 <4

S.Venkat Raman is the chief ;
executive and chief rating: of |
cer of the Caribbean Inforja; ‘
tion & Credit Rating Servicws; :
CariCRIS. Prior to this, Ve
Raman was director of r:
at CRISIL Ltd, the large
ing agericy in Asia and ar; pe
sidiary of Standard & Podeess:

ae





ADMINISTRATIVE/PERSONAL STs
looking for work.










All banking, typing, travel arrangements, assistint

with payroll at private residence and alky
administrative duties included. Flexible. hours3:
preferably to work from home, but willing to co a
into the office as needed.

Please Call










Tel.#364-0067/Gell.# 454-7059: :

PROFILE:

—¢@ Aminimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or
Finance and professional accounting qualification (CPA)

e Three — five years relevant bank/trust company experi-
ence preferred

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:










iP aaa

has a vacancy for the position of

GROUP ACCOUNTANT

e Prepare financial records for all groups











e Prepare Central Bank reports, financial statements, lead
schedules, and management reports

-® Maintain bank records and reconciliations
© Manage and maintain general accounting systems,
policies, procedures and accounting administrative
services

e Treasury management responsibilities

e Supervise accounts personnel















e Assist with audits
e Ability to work with minimum supervision

e Strong verbal and written communication skills and
organizational abilities

© Good knowledge of software packages including MS
Office

The successful candidate will report to the Financial Controller

The successful candidate will be offered a competitive.
compensation package including benefits and bonuses |

commensurate with his/her experience and performance.
The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

GROUP ACCOUNTA

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDETTE ALMONOR OF
P.O. BOX N-170, CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of MAY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










Group Financial Officer Needed

A client of our Firm, a progressive medical group with multiple
corporate structures, requires a professionally qualified accountant
to serve as the Group’s Financial Officer. The successful applicant
must possess the following experience and qualifications:













¢ CPA or equivalent

* 3 to 5 years post qualifying accounting experience in private
industry

¢ Proficient in Quickbooks and other accounting software

° Ability to supervise accounting staff

¢ Experienced in filing annual corporate documents

e Ability to multitask

¢ Organizational and managerial skills essential






Excellent benefits. All responses are confidential and should be mailed
to the following address:








Paul A. Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON

Chartered Accountants. .
Paje House
Marlborough Street
PO. Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P., ~
. The Bahamas
Email: pgomez@gtbahamas.com

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUXON JEAN JACQUES OF
FOWLER STREET,NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX N8889
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STEVENSON JACQUES:
PEARDALE OF NASSAU, BAHAMAS, P.O. BOX SS-6360
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
_|twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





























BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

TECHNICAL TRAINER
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING DEPARTMENT

A vacancy exists in the Human Resources & Training Division for a Technical Trainer.

- The Technical Trainer (Mechanical) is responsible for the technical instruction of
employees from all engineering departments within the Corporation, encompassing
Mechanical Engineering, Transmission and Distribution Operations, Power Generation
Operations inclusive of Plant Installation, Maintenance, Operation and Control

Workshop.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Providing instructions and training in engineering trade skills for employees

within the Corporation

Preparing candidate for external examination certification by local and overseas

organizations :

Providing instructions on developing safe and efficient work habits
Providing instructions to participants in classroom, workshops and job

environments :

Preparing program criteria and marking schemes for trade testing in electrical

based trades, -

Preparing timetables and examination schedules for visiting external examiners.
Identifying, developing and delivering engineering courses (i.e., Electrical

Technician Training).

Evaluating, recording and reporting on the progress of students attending

training courses

Preparing course notes, training aids, evaluating and marking schemes for

all courses.

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineer or an OND in

Engineering or equivalent qualifications

A minimum of 10+ years of experience in an industrial training setting
Sound knowledge of technical skills related to electrical engineering principles

Good judgment and sound reasoning ability
_ Excellent time management skills
Proficient oral and written communications skills

Ability to keep current with newly installed or modified plant
Comprehension of schematics, technical reports, drawings, troubleshooting

and technical activities
Good information transfer skills
Computer literate

' ~ Interested persons may apply by completing and returning the Application form to:
The Manager, Human Resources & Training Head Office, Blue Hill and Tucker
f« Roads, P.O. Box N-7509, Nassau, Bahamas on or before Tuesday, May 30, 2006.

‘1a written and signed statement of the facts within



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
BLUE FUTURES FUND LIMITED

VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 BLUE FUTURES FUND
LIMITED. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register of
Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 19th April 2006.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALBERT MERZIUS OF
BARCARDI ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person.who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send








twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the




N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
FASHION STYLE INVESTMENTS LTD.

VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the

International Business Companies Act 2000 FASHION STYLE

INVESTMENTS LTD. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register
of Companies. ,

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 19th April 2006.



N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

e ABM

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com



Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box |

harp



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ROSELINE FORBES OF |.
TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

*
Â¥
®

THE TRIBUNE

Oil firm’s pull-out

FROM page one

25 per cent of any revenues gen-
erated if oil had been discov-
ered in Bahamian waters, the
Government had not based its
budget on that potential
income. .

“We would have’ only
included it if the company
had discovered oil and had
a projection of income,” Dr
Bethel said.

He added that Kerr-
McGee’s decision not to
continue did not mean
there were no oil deposits,
but instead meant that the
company had not found
enough to be of a mar-
ketable quantity.

Kerr McGee spokesman,

_ John Christiansen, con-

firmed yesterday that as
part of the company’s strat-
egy to focus exploration in
proven world-class hydro-
carbon basins, it had
advised the Bahamian gov-
ernment it would not pro-
ceed with further off shore
exploration in the
Bahamas.

Mr Christiansen would
not give any further reason
for the company’s decision,
or provide any information

regarding what would be.

the outcome of a previous-
ly announced joint.venture
between Kerr McGee and
Talisman, a Canadian-

based company also
involved in worldwide oil
exploration.

Mr Christiansen would
only say that the company
has fulfilled all its obliga-



Grand’Bahama, Batiamas. ~




IMPORTANT
NOTICE
| SERVICE INTERRUPTION

e Point-Of-Sale (POS) Transactions
¢ VISA Transactions via ABM
e Internet and Telephone Banking

“NOTICE _

NOTICE is hereby given that RODRICK McDONALD OF BAYSHORE
ROAD, WEST END, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17H day of MAY, 2006 to the
finister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box F-41085,









tions to the Bahamian gov- -

ernment.

To date, Kerr McGee has
spent more than $25 mil- .-
lion exploring for oil in the : .

Bahamas.
Since the company first

began its operations in the ..-

Bahamas, the Government .

has earned more than $3 °:

million dollars in revenues,

Prior to its announce- |:

ment that it planned to.

cease operations, Kerr:
McGee had been analysing“:

laboratory data obtained °
from seismic testing in»

waters off the Great
Bahama Bank since 2004.

In 2003, the company-''

acquired a 100 per cent '

interest in nine licenses -*
. that allowed it to begin «—
operations in the Great -'

Bahama Banks.

The licences were in the '

Grand Bahama Island, cov-
ering 6.5 million acres in

Blake Plateau about 100
miles north of Freeport,” '

water depths ranging from '

650 feet to more than 7,000 ‘

feet.

have paid a one-time appli-

Kerr McGee was said to °

cation fee of $900,000 and, |

based on its three year —

agreement, was required to
pay a yearly rental fee. In

the first year, 2004-2005,

the Treasury received
$450,000.

In 2005, the Treasury was
to. receive an additional
$675,000, and in the final
year of the contract was to
collect.some $900,000 from
the company.









Share
- your
news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
‘cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have
won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.








From 11 p.m. on Saturday 27th May
to 10 p.m. Sunday 28th May 2006.

Our Electronic Banking System will be temporarily unavailable |
during the times listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance on our System Network.

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.






Resort
FROM page one

great destination by visitors
for many years, particularly
for its diving and boating
opportunities, its reputation
as a family resort also made
the island attractive.

Mr Pearson said the for-
mer group of investors, who
owned Chub Cay for the past
27 years, had told him many
no longer had the energy or
drive to start another resort
project. As a result, there
was both motivation to sell
and motivation to buy and
make Chub Cay into a first-
class resort.

With no major improve-
ments to the resort since
Hurricane Andrew, the:pur-
chase has provided the
developers with an opportu-
nity to develop a resort that
retains the character and
style of a former world class-
property.

Mr Pearson said: “The
Bahamas has matured both
in its economic position and
as a country, in that it is try-
ing to encourage economic
investment and tourism
development, like Chub Cay.
I think that it’s not unusual
for that to be happening here
any more than it happens in
the United States, the

‘Caribbean, Mexico or any

country that has to deal with
the global economy.

“And the one thing we've
seen in working with the
Government is they seem to
be very aggressive in encour-
aging new investments, and
they are also very aggressive
in making sure the back-
ground of individuals
involved in the investment

. doesn't pose a threat to the

conducting of business in the
Bahamas, particularly in
regard to environmental
issues and concerns and
building controls."

FROM page one

BSL Holdings is likely to rely
heavily on the dividends it
upstreams from Bahamas
Supermarkets to pay-off the
debt it used to finance its pur-
chase of a majority 78 per.cent
stake in the company from
Winn-Dixie.

However, the group and its

corporate adviser, Fidelity Mer-.

chant Bank & Trust, is under-
stood to be concentrating on
raising financing to replace Neal
& Massy, the Trinidadian con-
glomerate, as a 40 per cent com-
ponent of its bid group.

Neal & Massy was dropped
to allay Winn-Dixie’s fears that
BSL Holdings’ purchase could
be held up in the Government
approval process here, as the
foreign ownership component
would require Cabinet backing.
Winn-Dixie wants to get its
hands on the $54 million sales
price quickly, as it is in Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection in the
US

Meanwhile, Bahamas Super-
markets said third quarter sales
had increased by $2.2 million
or 7.1 per cent to $33.7 million,
compared to 2005.

The sales growth rate for the
three quarters to April 5, 2006,
was even greater, standing at 8

per cent or a rise of $8 million,.

taking year-to-date sales to
$108.8 million.

Bahamas Supermarkets said
that while it had faced strong
competition on New Provi-
dence, this had been more than
offset by economic growth, with
the sales increase generated by
competitive pricing, sales pro-
motion, “improved store con-
ditions” and a lack of competi-
tion on Grand Bahama, where
Abaco Markets is still recover-

ing from the 2004 hurricane sea-
son.
The Bahamas Supermarkets
release indicated that a “suc-
cessful sales campaign” helped
to offset the impact of Easter
falling in the fourth quarter.

Third quarter gross profit
rose by 3.3 per cent over the
same period in 2005, although
as a percentage of sales it fell to
26.2 per cent compared to 27.2
per cent in fiscal 2005.

“The decrease in gross profit
as a percentage of sales for the
quarter was due primarily to the
investment in promotions, offset
partially by supplier subsidies
and inventory shrink,” Bahamas
Supermarkets said.

However, for the year-to-
date, the supermarket chain
reported that gross profit was
ahead of its 2005 comparative
by 8 per cent, and as a percent-
age of sales exactly matched the
previous year’s figure of 26.9
per cent. Both increases were
attributed to the rise in sales.

Meanwhile, Bahamas Super-
markets said the $0.6 million or
10 per cent increase in operating
and administrative expenses
experienced during the 2006
third quarter was caused by ris-
es in payroll, utility and supply
costs.

As a percentage of sales,
these costs increased to 20.7 per
cent during the quarter, as
opposed to 20.2 per cent last
year.

Year-to-date, operating costs

were up by $1.5 million or 7.2

per cent, yet as a percentage of
sales they were lower at 21 per
cent, compared to.21.2 per cent
the previous year...

Cash and fixed deposits stood
at $13.2 million at April 5, 2006,
compared to $10.5 million the
year before, driven by increases

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Lending/Credit Department

Management Position

We are seeking to employ for a senior position within our lending team, with a minimum
of five years experience in the financial services arena. This role provides service support
to senior management and relationship managers in respect of credit related matters
and will participate fully as a member of the Bank's junior management team.

This challenging and demanding position will require the job holder to continually improve
a process of credit analysis that will identify and document the strengths and weaknesses
of an allocated portfolio of credit proposals, including analysis of the suitability of security
offered. The job holder will also be fully involved in the business development activities
of the Bank to generate new lending business.

The job holder will also provide training and guidance as required to junior members
of the Lending department in keeping with the Bank's business objectives.

Candidates should:-

Posses a minimum of five years experience of credit analysis

Have an in-depth knowledge of credit risk assessment, measurement and control
techniques and corporate credit and cash-flow analysis.

Possess a sound knowledge and understanding of the workings of the international
treasury, capital and securities markets -
Demonstrate an ability to work effectively under pressure

Have excellent negotiation, communication, inter-personal and time management

skills

Supervisor/Senior Administrator

In addition to the above management position, we are also looking to fill a more junior
position, with a minimum of 3 years experience in the financial services arena. Skills
will be similar to those above.

Investment Management:

Management Position

This challenging and exciting role encompasses relationship management with skills
and knowledge of international markets.

The role involves maintaining excellent internal communications and also ensuring the
highest quality customer service to the Bank's client base. The successful candidate
will be expected to contribute towards the group’s investment strategy and comment,
as well as dealing face to face with private clients and introducers of business. Working
closely with the Business Development Manager, the successful applicant will be
expected to travel, develop relationships and contribute to new revenues on an on-

going basis.

Candidates should:-

Have proven experience in the development and nurturing of client relationships
Have a sound knowledge and experience of the rules and workings of the major
international securities markets
Have gained a relevant professional qualification, or be prepared to commence
studying for such a qualification
Possess robust IT skill sets.

Be able to demonstrate a high level of communication, strong personal organization
and the ability to maintain accuracy while working to deadlines.

Attractive salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted by June 9, 2006 to the following address:

Head of Human Resources
P O Box N-4944
Nassau, Bahamas



’ amounts due to majority share-














The office of

in net earnings, accounts
payable and accrued expenses.
Inventories and prepaid expens-
es decreased, as did the

has relocated, The new
address is as follows.

holder W-D (Bahamas) and the ©
ultimate parent, Winn-Dixie. —

Inventories fell by $0.5 mil-
lion due to increased sales.
Meanwhile, net cash from oper-
ating activities was $5.5 million
for the year to April 5, com-
pared to $4.1 million the year
before. :

Working capital stood at
$19.5 million. as at April 5, 2006,
compared to $15.2 million on
June 29, 2005.

RAYMOND A. ROLLE & CO.,
Suite 3, Grosvenors Glose
Shirley Street
PO. BOX $8-19462.
Nassau, NP, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 356-7984 or
(242)326-1183

LARGE MULTINATIONAL MECHANICAL CONTRACTIONG FIRM LEADER IN ITS FIELD IS LOOKING
: FOR QUALIFIED PERSONNEL FOR SEVERAL PROJECTS TO BE CARRIED OUT IN
PARADISE ISLAND, BAH

WILL BE INTERVIEWING PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYEES FOR THE FOLLOWING TECHNICAL DISCIPLINES:

SHEETMETAL, MECHANICS . '
Minimum of 5 years experience in layout, fabrication and installation of duct systems manufactured out of galvanized
sheet metal, black sheet steel and stainless steel. Welding experience a plus, |

PIPE FITTERS

Minimum of 5 years experience in layout, fabrication and installation of piping systems for chilled water, condensing
water, steam, sea water and condensate lines. :

Must have experience in the installation of piping-systems out of steel pipe, copper pipe and schedule 80 pvc pipe.

WELDERS .
Minimum of 5 years ‘experince in welding of pipe systems of schedule 40 black steel, pipe systems. Positions will required |
AWS certification.(ANST B31.10-1967) standard quality qualification est insection IX ASIME. Boilers an vesel code.

INSULATORS
Minimum of 5 years experience in applying the following types of insulation.

PIPING
Application of fibre. glass, duct wrap insulation. Application of interior duct liner on sheet metal duct systems, with pin
system and adhesives following ASHRAE and SMACNA guidelines. “lagye



SMACNA guidelines.

for fabrication of multi piece elbow connections, valves and accessories. . - +

ELECTRIC /ELECTRONIC CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR HVAC. |
Minimum of 5 years experience in the installation of control systems for the air conditioning equipment. Be able to read
and interpret wiring diagrams, test and trouble shoot these systems. Some programming experience a plus. i

HELPERS :
CURRICULM VITAE, STATING POSITION YOU ARE APPLYING
MECHANICAL CONTRACTOR
P.O. BOX EE-15284

NASSAU BAHAMAS “di
Attention: SALLY FUENTE.



COMMONWEALTH BREWERY LIMITED

P.O. BOX N-3897 CLIFTON PIER, NASSAU, BAHAMAS .
TEL: (242) 362-4790/2, 302-2900, 302-2901/ FAX: (242) 362-4793

A VACANCY _
Exists in the Utilities Department .

JOB TITLE: UTILITIES OPERATOR

Duties Include: :

. Monitoring of Utility Equipment specifically the Ammonia Plant,
Co? Plant, Generator, Water, Air and Lagoon Plants.
Perform lubrication and first line maintenance of equipment.

- Perform daily sample collections and analysis of fluids related to
Utility Equipment to ensure efficient operation of the equipment.
Responsible for off loading bulk diesel fuel and Co2.

Maintain housekeeping standards within the Utility Area.

. Maintains adequate stock levels of chemicals, oils and fuels.
Maintains daily logs of activities within the Utilities Area
Accurate recording of performance data of all utility equipment.

Minimum Requirements

High school diploma with BGCSE in Math, English and in one
of the sciencés or the equivalent. .
At least three years éxperience in operation of utility equipment
(Boilers, Cooling Plant, Compressors or similar equipment).
Basic computer skills necessary (Excel spreadsheets)

_ Must be a team player and have a proactive approach to area of
responsibility.
Must be willing to work in a three shift rotation system.

A competitive salary, performance related compensation, career related
training and a competitive employee benefits package are all available
to he successful candidate.

Interested persons should submit a current resume and cover letter to
the address below no later than May 26th, 2006:

Human Resources Manager
commonwealth Brewery Limited
P.O. Box N-4936
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 1-242-362-4793

jt

at

BLACK STEEL -DUCT WORK- for kitchen hoods. Application of fire master insulation with external pin system, ; :
7 . . a A ; ‘

PRESSURE VESSELS- Insulations of pressure vessels for chilled water systems, such as air seperations, expansions Py
and compression tanks and pumps. Application of foam sheets with adhesives SMACNA standards. : Lodi

ALL APPLICANTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO PASS AN APTITUDE TEST IN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS. a
3 t

Some helpers will also be selected to assist in the aforementioned trades. IF INTERESTED, PLEASE SEND YOUR | * :

FOR AND WORK EXPERIENCE WITH PERSONS NAMES AND PHONES FOR VERIFICATION INFORMATION. : a
BE SURE TO INCLUDE FULL NAME, ADDRESS AND TELEPHONE NUMBERS WHERE YOU CAN BE REACHED: *

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE 5B’.

RAYMOND A. ROLLE & CO,|

i

EXTERIOR JACKETINGS- Aluminum and pvc eterior protective jacketing for piping systems. Knowledge of layout i ;

LARGE MULTINATIONAL MECHANICAL CONTRACTING FIRM ql








The world’s smallest
glucose meter

m World’s smallest sample size
(0.3 pL, about the size of a pinhead).

m Fast 7 second average test time.

m Test yourself on different, less painful areas, such as.

the palm of your hand, forearms, thighs, or calves.



-4 alarms to remind patients when it’s time to test.

FREE GLUCOSE TESTiyq

Thursday, 25 May
10am ~ 1pm

Lowe’s Harbour Bay

Bae ek ole CeCe cEL MCE n

FIDELITY
has a vacancy for the position of

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

® Record/prepare/circulate executive meeting minutes
Manage records and filing

© Organize schedules and diary systems for both the CFO and
the CEO

@ Provide customer service to clients & respond to enquiries
and complaints

Type a variety of material and correspondence
Assist with compilation of statistical data, reports and research
General office duties

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS

Strong organizational skills a must

E ASSISTANT

Strong computer skills, including Microsoft Office Suite

Shorthand an asset 7

Excellent vatbalk writtea and interpersonal skills
Ability to work with minimum supervision
Ability to handle me and to multi-task
Professional and dase satis

Confident and able to manage on own initiative

The successful candidate will report to the Chief Financial Officer (CFO)
and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

‘The successful candidate will be offered a competitive
_ compensation package including benefits and bonuses
commensurate with his/her experience and performance.

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity
51 Frederick Steet
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
f: 326.3000

EXECUTI

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLIN EDMOND OF P.O.
BOX SB-50847, #32 BALFOUR AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of MAY,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.0.Box N-.7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

UBS
UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the leading Wealth
Managers in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy
private clients by providing them with comprehensive,
value-enhancing services. In order to strengthen our
team we look for an additional.











Client Advisor Brazil





In this challenging position you will be responsible
for the following tasks (traveling required):




e Advisory of existing: clients
¢ Acquisition of high net worth individuals

¢ Presentation and implementation of investment
solutions in the client’s mother tongue






We are searching for a personality with solid
experience in wealth management, specialized in the
fields of customer relations, investment advice and
portfolio management. Excellent sales and advisory
skills as well as solid knowledge of investment
_products are key requirements. A proven track record
with a leading global financial institution as well as
fluency in English and Portugese is essential.










Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources ©
P.O.Box N7757
Nassau, Bahamas









Core responsibilities:

functions

- external and internal audits
¢ Coordinates Pension administration

. letters |
Maintains personnel files

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:



¢ Must be confidential
-¢ Excellent interpersonal skills

e Associate Degree or Banking Certificate

Send resume to:

P.O. Box N-7118
Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline: May 26, 2006
























INTERNATIONAL
“A growing and dynamic Bahamian institution”

VACANCY FOR THE POSITION OF:
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT, HUMAN RESOURCES

Knowledge of Human Resources to effectively carry out all HR

© Serves as payroll officer; conduct necessary calculations associated |
with payrolls such as insurance premiums and staff loans

¢ Complies and prepares statistical reports and other data needed for .

¢ Preparation of accounting entries to complete various HR transactions

¢ Completes administrative functions like the accurate typing of offer

Strong desire to work in Human Resources;

* Three years Human Resources experience .

° Excellent oral and written communication skills
Ability to take initiative and be a good team player

- Benefits include: Competitive salary (commensurate with
qualifications); group medical, vision, and life insurance; attractive
package and a pension scheme.

The Manager, Human Resources and Training
Bank of The Bahamas International



’ THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS | o

Bahamas
Waste

FROM page one

costs, everything is going up.
We're trying to get minimum
standards for the licensed
hauler industry.”

Bahamas Waste’s business
is heavily capital intensive,
the key to the company’s .
success being that it keeps.it
truck and vehicle fleet out'on
the road. Maintenance is
therefore both critical and
costly.

The company had
“changed all the equipment
over on Paradise Island,
putting in new equipment

i. last year”, and invested heav-

ily in open-top containers,
Mr de Cardenas said. The:
company’s number of open-
top containers on Abaco had
increased from 12 to 60 in
two years.

Bahamas. Waste’s presence *
on Abaco was expanding, Mr
de Cardenas said, having .
picked up the waste removal
contract for Elbow Cay last
year, in addition to the con-
tract for Discovery Land -
Company’s $175 million’
Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean
Club project on Abaco.

‘Mr de Cardenas said
Bahamas Waste had “dou-
bled our inventory” of
portable toilets since the
same period last year, due to
increased demand from spe-
cial events and construction
projects such as Kerzner
International’s Phase III
expansion on Atlantis. .

Bahamas Waste had con-

a cluded a study on the feasi-

bility of a bio-diesel facility,
converting vegetable oil into
bio-diesel with the help of
additives, and Mr de Carde- -
nas said: “We’re now in
negotiations with a partner
‘to possibly go further on it.”

He added that the compa-
ny had the ability to take
over all residential waste _
removal and collection on
New Providence, having
shown the Government what
it could do with a pilot pro-
ject in Bain Town.

Bahamas Waste’s 2006
first quarter earnings per
share (EPS) rose from $0.03
to $0.06, with total assets ris-
ing 6.11 per cent or $445,000
to $7.7 million, aided by an
18.64 per cent increase in

i -aceounts receivables. -;



























WEDNESDAY EVENING

ra 50 00 0 La 70:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Romances|Queen Victoria: Secrets of a American Masters
@ WPBT ea car Queen 1 (CC) (DVS) fae the Choon of Sau? 1

@ J panies He a ateler cm : Oo “Magnet” pee ce et Order “A 4 ai
WTV4 |wood (N) ( naan aD ateline's undercover |investigate the strangling of a prom- |Detectives investigate when a man
wat Nee) meet teens. ising Hi eva student. h is killed by a car bomb: A C)

American Idol (Season Finale) The (a 12 contestants reunite; the new |News (Co)
a wsvn |" ina Idol is ere (Live) 0 (C

Heopardy (N) Lost “Reckoning” Faith ite the |Lost “Live Together, Die Alone” (Season iia | Jack and Sai devise a
O wetale angie of Oceanic Flight 815. © |plan to confront the Others and get Walt back. MN a 100)

CABLE CHANNELS
Dog the Bounty |Dog the Bounty jInked co Las Vegas tattoo Criss
my Bars (eo) ate “Double |Hunter Search- artists. (C Mi (CC)
Trouble” (CC) jing for Jonah. teeta

-|Hardtalk BBC News World Business |BBC i“ [Fast Track BC News
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). ani
BET ___|iisieSpecal |The Parkers 0 The Parkers 0 Gren 0 aids on

(CC). ( (CC) gt Peg

CBC NHL Hocke ay Eastem Conference Final Game 3 -- ae “sera at Billo Sabres Cc Ne
a the HSBC Arena in Butfalo, N.Y. (Live) (CC) ae oppo aes

CC ill a al

CNN a ra a > asa ok

e eS a Gaffi- |The Dally Show |The bert Re- Mind of Mencla
ey the] With Jon Stew- sa B BBaslone cae speaking. |notorious Derek toes
Bale ce) art B. Connolly. feo) Crips. (CC). Jagenc
Cops “Coast t0 Video dustic. Video Justice /Forensic Files _|Forensic Files
COURT [fea ea Fe ae





That's So Raven| ¥ & x HERCULES (er , Adventure) Voices of Tate. Donovan, Joshua {Lite
nimated. The strongman iesaiies a Greek hero. 4

DISN er" & Keaton, Roger Bart.

Dr..90210 A piercing oe ” Br. 9021
tears his earlobe in two.

00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at T Boston Red Sox. From Fania Park in Boston, "| Base
Subject = Blackout) (Live) (CC)

ar ‘put in : Fs (Ger Journal
man). Tagestema.

TBoxin Wednesday wh ue Lu
poe _ (Live) :

Dai Tae ‘i EWTN Live |
EWTN ie

-00) Cardio IShip Out, Shape Up ‘SitUps At
FIT TV - bee 2 [time =

:00) aa ie Baseball Tan Bay: Devil.Ra sa Tn Blue Ja S. From ers Cate in Best Damn
FSNFL an MWe ore Frama eee

or - JGaishaw and Jack Niklas

= eoneeeen

00) Attack of sate The Next Generation _ |Star Trek: The Next scat i
Grech tre bhow!(N) Night Troe” (OC “identity Cisis® (CC)

ee Designed to Sell) Trading U Selling Houses |Hot Pro

HGTV fi ric His n! Joi Oe ee ‘asi 0. lidylic ea {Cape Cod v
__ [sen 1 (0) fae

INSP

@ Simple Rules sia he wa riends
KTLA i rouble" Ts With Kids Loarnng tol Kids Michael isafbuys ite
(CO) Eam (CC) {hand model. jets. 0V.(C

= MIRACLE RUN (2004, Drama).Mary-Louise . |%* * SEE You. IN.MY DREAMS (2002, , Drama) Ai Aidan n Quinn,
Parker, Aidan Quinn, Ie Efron. Asingle mother fights Harden, Will Estes. Fremiere. Aroubed eae ee!
for her autistic twins’ education: (Co) Foe ses ship with his family. es as

ai — ‘Neutrons an
“ {Boy Genius. « |SquarePants'7\.0\ (CC) -
:00) 24 “Day 5: 5-00AM-6:00AM/6:00AM-7:00AM”
at tries to avenge the loss of innocent lives. eles



~ Home for Imag dE
-|nary Friends: |

UNIV

[Law & Order: Special victine Unit (aw & Oars cat vain tiie Law & 0
USA der: Criminal In- |Detectives face off against a drug’ |“Serendipity” A dead newbom pall
. {tent “Pravda”. [cartel andthe DEA. (CC) —_isfoundinasewer.

(00) 40 Greatest Pranks 2 "Heavy: The Story of Metal Meta
VH1 tives in Caifora, ved
i America’s. [Becker Becker eoker A patient Home limprove- Home lmpro
WGN unniest Home: |takes Reggie's: beats dating ~ -|ment Cupid visits ment Ma

Videos. (CC) |dating advice, . |Reggie. (cel the Taylors... lieves.in ali

_ Everybody. |&& DAREDEVIL (2003, Action) Ben Affleck, Jennifer Gamer, Michael
WPIX | _ [Loves Raymond |Clarke Duncan. Premiere. A ta man isa lawyer by day and a super- {To
AO (CC). -- thero by night (CC) " i Mr. a

i “Tea HAIR SHOW (2004, Comedy) Mo Nowe, Kella Smith sie Ar Ph t a
WSBK : hast needs hr Sr hp win ce a (CC). Pe tee

Sey eae

() Poseidon: |Big Love “Where There's a Will’. |The Sopranos “Cold.Stones”A .
HBO-E a Look |Barb is a ome for Mother ofthe frenzy of borrowing money hits the pine, Gonety
A(CC) Near. A.C crew. (CC). ‘

fa cov ~_|Six Feet a "Dancing for Me" | & & THE ROOKIE Tso, Aaton) Cit Ezine, hale
HBO-P ito A100 Nate spends time wih fends from |Jula, A young detective teams up with a fwo-fi
high school. (CC) (CC)

ge: Real es A (CC) + KING’S RANSOM (2006, Comedy) Anon I ¢
derson, Jay Mohr. A businessman plots own kid HBO F
napping to foil his wife. 1 PG. 18: (CC, oH

il dean re Portralt of a Po-|& x PAPARAZZI (2004, 8
NE FINE DAY nce yo: Robin Tunney, Dennis Far
1996) ‘PG’ (co ee on intrusive photographers. .

eae a ce ae NEXT OF KIN 1989, Drama) Patrick Swayze, Liam Neeson, Adam
MAX-E Baldwin, Ail clan stalks he mobsters wha killed their broter. A ee
APOCALYPSE. (CC) ‘ a

can & FAT ALBERT: (2004 Kenan Thomnbeon
ionvanimated: The cartoon ecg. becomes jHeder, Jon Gries, Aa
ca and ae alonely tear. “PG (C

+ FADE TO, BLACK (2004, Documentary) in Rapper Jay-Z per-
SHOW a WHER PARK forms in concert and cco n' ie cli

MOMAX

¢ (1996, Comedy) Mara Wilson, Dan- (45) & &* STAGE BEAUTY (2004,
TMC... ahi ate at ‘ ‘i 1%
s : Tad mee Cc).



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Insider (N) |r. Phil Primetime Special: Ee- — Minds “Extreme Aggres- GSE NY The death of @ cologo str
@ WFORIn ne cag Addiction No.2 (N) 0 i ‘one go missing in Seattle. |dent on the subway tracks may not
have been an accident. acl

This Old cy picks oe Dot Res- Kitchen Renova Kitchen Renove Home Transfor- [Assembly Re- if ce
Classics cue tions - __{m i Sigua te

Thee Stow |
(00) Walker, vale Texas Ranger Bounty - |x x AFISTFUL OF DOLLARS (1964, Weston) Cint =e ‘Gian
HALL i pangs hunter Hayes Cooper protects set- {Maria Volonte, Marianne Koch. Teme Wo Name" en-
_{tlers from vicious bandits. (CC) ters a border wa. Pees lu Raa cence tage erode tet
stuniere [Bay We Wendy
0

2 TY he

: Simply’ the Best” _

Small space?
Limited budget? @
We've got the solution.
Our armoire’s and trundle
beds are the perfect
space-saver. Buy a single piece
of furniture and get the functionality

of three or four pieces. Replace your closet,
chest-of-drawers and shelf with a single °

armoire. Perfect for a child’s room, our
trundle beds provide two single beds,

a pull-out desk and drawers.

Visit our spauoone today to see for your. ul

“has WOOD

Seed ntesia 20 Maseire 5 treet

\WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006, PAGE



7B


problem for cricketers

@ CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

TRAINING on the old
Haynes Oval cricket playing

fields ahead of the Stanford |

20/20 tournament may be a
‘problem for team Bahamas
‘due to the lack of lighting
facilities:

The team; which is forced
to train and play on the out-
dated facility, are scheduled
to face off with the Cayman
Islands in their first game of
the tournament.

The Stanford 20-20 will take
place between mid-July and

’ September at the Stanford
Cricket grounds in Antigua.
The Bahamas’ first game
against the Cayman Islands
will be played at night.

This game will be the
biggest challenge for the
Bahamas at the tournament.
The BCA usually have to sus-
pend lengthy games played at
the Haynes Oval until the fol-
lowing day due to limited
lighting.

The Haynes Oval paying
field, located on the West Bay
Street strip, was opened in the
early 1930's. |

According to honourary

B IMPROVEMENTS are taking place at the Haynes Oval cricket playing fields. '
(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Light teinkeban may be a

board member Paul Thomp-
son, the majority of the ath-
letes selected to the national
training programme for the
tournament will be at a disad-
vantage if the Bahamas Crick-
et Association (BCA) doesn’t
schedule several scrimmage
matches.

Matches

Taking the notes handed in

~ by Thompson into considera-

tion, the BCA has scheduled
several preparatory matches
in the South Florida region for
the teams. These matches will
be played early next month.

Thompson said: “Some of
the guys will really be playing
at a disadvantage if they don’t
get these games in. These
games are critical ones for the
team.

“The members need to gain
some experience when it
comes to under light games,
because we might have to play
several other under light
games.”

Being selected as a team to
compete in the Stanford 20-
20 tournament, the BCA was
given a $100,000 stipend
designed to assist with the



development and improve-
ment of cricket and their facil-
ities. This stipend cheque was
given to all participating
team’s governing bodies.

Along with the improve-
ments set for the Haynes
Oval, the BCA is looking into
building a new facility, with
better lighting. °

Thompson confirmed that

the BCA has approached the ©

government about requiring
land for the facility, and are
awaiting the response. —

He said: “The money given
to the BCA hasn’t been spent,
let me clear that up. What
happens is the money has to
be authorised by the commit-

tions to the BCA for the
improvement of the environ-
ment, that money is being
handled by the president and
the executive board members
of the BCA.

Equipment

“They have done some
work in regards.to the new
mat, an out house for equip-
ment is also on the improve-
ment agenda along with some
cricket gear. I think they were
also supposed to get some
money for the players that are
in training, a stipend. But all
that is being handled by the
president and the executive

'

field, we are also hoping.to
get an expansion of Haynes
Oval.”

Besides the new facilities
the BCA is hoping to build,
the association members are
hoping to acquire at least 10
or more yards around the
existing Haynes Oval grounds
when they expand.

The next step for improv-
ing the sport will be obtain-
ing a turf wicket. The turf
wicket is the ground used in
international competitions.
Laying the turf wicket will
take at least three to four
months — especially since the
soil needed to lay the wicket
has to be imported.

tee here which the Stanford
20-20 tournament has put
together.

“There were some dona-

board.

“We were asking govern-
ment for land to build a new

Since acquiring the money
from the Stanford tourna-
‘ment, an area for practice
pitches has been built.

Streetball Legends
o host tournament

M@ BASKETBALL
By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

SUMMER months usually mean an
increase in temperature, but one organi-
sation is hoping that the season will ignite
the action on the basketball court as well.

The Streetball Legends Organisation
will be hosting their second annual tour-
nament at the Blue Hill sporting Complex
attracting the best and brightest in the
sport.

The two-week tournament, scheduled
to begin June 9th, will feature play if
three divisions: Open Men’s, High Schools
and Independent Youth.

This year’s edition of the tournament
will honour five of the most well known
names in basketball who have contributed
years of service to the game’s develop-
ment.

Sharon Storr, Anthony Swaby, Pattie
Moxey, Doug Collins and Gladstone
“Moon” McPhee will be honoured over
the course of the two-week tournament.

Wilton Russell, founder and president of
Streetball Legends, says that this year’s
tournament will be a definite improve-
ment on last year’s initial success.

“Last year’s tournament was pretty good
for it being our first time,” he said, “But
we realised there were a few things we
could change to make this year’s tourna-
ment even better.”

One such change was the major shift in
the tournament’s format.

Last year’s tournament ran for a month,
however it has been shortened to just two
weeks, a change that Russell said will gen-

erate more excitement.

“It was stretched out over a whole
month last year, and I think it took away
from some people’s interest and the gen-
eral excitement,” he said. “Now that we
have the action more compact in two
weeks and it should make for a better
tournament.

Russell said the tournament will feature
some of the most intense competition in
the country.

“We expect the best players throughout
the country to compete. Players from night
leagues, parks and colleges abroad are
expected to compete,” he said.

Inspiration

Russell said the inspiration for the cre-
ation of the Streetball Legends Organisa-
tion and the tournament itself came
when he saw a need to reinvigorate the
sport.

“Night League basketball has lost a lot
of its excitement so we felt a need to take
the game back to the streets were most
of the great players and excitement origi-
nated,” he said, “And with more attractive
prizes anda high level of competition, this
tournament should be a memorable one,
no one wants to lose.”

Last year, the winning team in the Men’s
division received a $1000 cash prize, this
year winners can expected to be awarded
gold championship rings.

Nearly 30 teams are scheduled to com-
pete in this year’s tournament
and with the first games still a few weeks
away, more teams are expected to
enter,

’ reg barn! .
imeewn

= aeete te:
elvcrw Dee

be re anf

JU9}U04 payedipuAs
jeliazey payybiuAdoy

TRIBUNE SPORTS

%
ee

ore pom ‘ re es Weer re eT Aa ILS

Genssppeiaetatnsyes bagip om Saab yt ely



Asi if igh dlgiti ana ian



TRIBUNE SPORTS
SPORTS



West Indies hit back after
Virender Sehwag’s 96 _
























# > mg” |

Copyrighted Material :

~~ Ou :

Syndicated Conten |

Available from n Commercial News Providers; |



or :

oo -
- .
-« - -
-“—— * =
al - — - « -
—_ . - ;
- - -
- -
- .
= a
- _— ,
i
*-* o =
- - - - - .
-
-
-_





Both objects involved in if:
100 Jamz's Secret Sound cf
weight less than 20 pounds. HE
WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2006

EG TION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Mulling’s

tennis team

bows out
ume [Weare
finals

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS»
Senior Sports
Reporter

DEVIN Mullings and
the Ohio State Buckeyes
men’s tennis team fell
short of extending their
impressive season over
the weekend in San
Francisco.

After winning their
first Big, Ten Conference
Championships over Illi-
nois, Mullings and the
No.6 Buckeyes fell vic-
tim to No.3 Texas on
Saturday in the NCAA

. quarterfinals.

It was the second time
in three years that Ohio
State failed to get past
the quarters. In their
previous outing in 2004,
they were eliminated by
Baylor, who went on to"
win the title.

Despite their exit,
Mullings said he was still
pleased with the way his
Buckeyes’ team played,
posting a 28-2 win-loss
record, the best record in
Ohio State’s history,
while recording their.

longest winning streak of

19 and their best winning
percentage of .933.

Mullings, a communi-
cation major in his junior
season, said “It’s a good
feeling. It’s something
that will stay with me
forever. It’s not an indi-
vidual effort, but it’s a
team effort.

“I think I can a lot of
what'I learned from ~
Ohio State to the Davis
Cup team where I will

_have to put in that same
type of team concept this
summer.’

Playing between the
number one to three
seeded player on the
Buckeyes’ team,
.Mullings was basically
undefeated in singles,
but it was doubles where

Ohio State suffered their
downfall.

Mullings, 20, is now
concentrating on his final
exams at Ohio State. But
he’s also preparing for
the American Zone III
Davis Cup tie when the
Bahamas heads to San
Salvador, El Salvador
from June 12-18 to play
against seven other
teams in the round robin
to see who will advance
to zone II next year.

“I think we’re going to
be fine,” said Mullings,
of the team that is
expected to comprise of
Marvin Rolle, H’Cone
Thompson and Chris . .
Eldon with John Farring-
ton as the captain.

“I’m going to try and
practise on the clay
before I get out there.
My school gets out in.
two weeks, so.I will be
doing all in my power to
be ready when we head
down to San Salvador. I
think we will do very
well.”

The Bahamas will be
matched against Costa
Rica, Cuba, El Salvador,
Haiti, Honduras, Puerto
Rico and Trinidad &
-Tobago.

The first two teams
from ‘each pool advance
to another round-robin
group. The teams finish-
ing first and second in
this final pool are pro-
moted to Americas Zone
Group II in 2007.

The teams finishing
third and fourth in each
pool advance to another
round-robin pool. The
teams finishing in third
and fourth in this subse-
quent pool are relegated
to Americas Zone Group
IV in 2007.

Knowle



Uae tel



MIAMI! HERALD SPORTS



Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
rom m Commercial News Providers



- «












eye grand slam title

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER having their 12-
match win streak snapped as
they fell short of winning
their third straight title,
Mark Knowles said both he
and Daniel Nestor are hop-

ing that their performances

will propel them to the
French Open Grand Slam
title that has eluded them
twice in the final.

Coming off their loss in
the final of the ATP Masters
Series in Hamburg, Ger-
many on Sunday to the team
of Paul Hanley and Kevin
Ullyett, Knowles and Nestor
are preparing for their trip
to France for the Roland
Garros tournament that
starts on Monday.

“It was a good match. We
had a chance to take it toa
third set, but we were unable

Doubles pair set.
for French Open



to pull it off, which was a
tough loss,” said Knowles,
who had enjoyed back-to-
back victories in Barcelona
and Rome with Nestor
before going to Germany.
“We won a couple of close

matches, but it was one of

those things where we did-
n’t pull through. In this
sport, you can’t win them all.
But we felt great about the
way we played. It’s pretty
hard to win one tournament,
yet win three in a row.”
Going into the French
Open, Knowles said he and
Nestor are confident and
they are eager to play who-
ever they face in the second

Grand Slam tournament for
the year.

The French Open is one
of the two Grand Slams that
Knowles and Nestor have
not been able to win. The
other is Wimbledon, sched-
uled for England from June
26.

Having lost in the finals of
the French Open twice,

’ Knowles is not making any

predictions, but he said it
would be good if the
momentum they have devel-
oped can be carried over in
France.

“This is our time, but
every year it’s our time,” he
quipped. “We’ve been one

of the top teams for the past
8-10 years and we always
have high expectations going
into the Grand Slams. We’re
obviously one of the hottest
teams going into the French
Open, which bodes well.”

Knowles, however, admit-
ted that it will be.a different
ball game when the tourna-
ment starts because “it’s a
big goal to go there and to
win. So we have to take it
one match at a time and try
to win six matches in two
weeks. So we’re going in
there and play to the best of
our ability.”

On hearing the news that
US Open junior champion
Ryan Sweeting has decided
to end his Bahamian citizen-
ship to play for the United
States, Knowles said he’s
certainly disappointed.

- “J don’t know him that
well, but obviously they have
taken a family decision and I

can’t really comment on it,”

he stated. “But as you find
out now, not too many ath-
letes stay with their country.

“I had many offers to play
for England where I was
offered much more money,
but I’m a Bahamian and
that’s who I am. Maybe he
doesn’t feel that strong
about where he was born.
Maybe he had financial rea-
sons or something else.”

“We had two: young
Bahamians - Timothy Neeily
and now Ryan - who have
gone to the United States.
Obviously, having played
Davis Cup, he had a great
opportunity to play in the
Olympics for us as well.”

By going to the United
States, Knowles said Sweet-
ing has definitely forfeited
those opportunities right
now and he will probably
have to wait:a long time to
fulfill those goals.