Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
=m Lhe Iribune



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Ingraham slams govt on Cuba

FNM leader speaks

out on UN Human —

Rights Council vote

FNM leader Hubert Ingraham

has blasted the government’s
decision to vote in favour of Cuba
joining the United Nations
Human Rights Council, and for
not disclosing its decision to the
peopie. .
_ Addressing the party’s con-
stituents on Grand Bahama, Mr
Ingraham said: “[Prime Minister]
Perry Christie has spent four
years in office shuffling his feet,
averting his eyes and keeping
secrets from the Bahamian peo-
ple?

Mr Ingraham’s heated attack
on government was said by some

to set the tone for the FNM’s ral- ©

ly on May 30. (See page three)

“He would now have us believe
that the United Nations wants
him to keep secrets from the
Bahamian people. Secrets on, of
all things, human rights. Can you
believe that? ;

“If we were in office, Cuba
would not have the nerve or the
gumption to ask us to vote for
them to be on.a Human Rights
commission. That’s an unthink-
able event.”

Before Mr Ingraham’s address,
a Grand Bahama resident
expressed concern about the vote,

" and the fact that the government

did not inform the country what it
planned to do.

“One of the fundamental rights
of an individual is that he or she is
able to leave their country when-
ever they like and come back
whenever they like,” Mr Ingra-
ham pointed out.

Cuba is one of a small number
of.countries which does not allow
its citizens to freely leave their
country.

“And now we’ve-got to hear

_all of this [the vote] through gos-
sip and rumour,” Mr Ingraham
-added. “They have no right to
cast a vote for Cuba at the UN,

not in our name, not on our

behalf. And we are going to pay

them back for that!” .

It was claimed that Cabinet
ministers held a vote recently and
the outcome was in favour of cast-
ing the country’s ballot in sup-
port of Cuba.

The Tribune attempted to learn
how the Bahamas voted from
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell. However, Mr Mitchell
was said by his staff to be out of
the country.

Several officials in the Ministry

- of Foreign Affairs and the Prime

Minister’s Office were also con-
tacted, but claimed they could not
comment on the vote.

One Foreign
spokesman said that The Tribune
should ask the ministry’s perma-
nent secretary, Dr Patricia
Rodgers. However, she was said
to be in a meeting. Other gov-
ernment spokespersons were
unavailable for comment.

Contrary to the hopes of local
US officials, Cuba secured a seat
on-the newly established Human
Rights Council at the United
Nations General Assembly yes-
terday. :

The US and Cuba had both
voiced their wishes that the
Bahamas would support their
respective interests during the
voting process.

US officials stated that they
hoped that countries with “ques-
tionable human rights records” -
such,as Cuba - would receive no
votes: Meanwhile, Cuba said the
US was hardly in a position to
pass judgment on other countries.

As the voting process was car-
ried out through secret ballots, it
is not known officially in whose
favour the Bahamas voted. It was
claimed that UN officials asked
respective countries to not reveal
how they had voted.

_
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Affairs

‘Mother of the Year’ Baw

’







JENNYMAE HUMES was crowned the Mother of the Year 2006/2007 yesterday
at the annual Mother’s Day Service held at the Southern Recreation Grounds. Bahami-
ans across the nation celebrated Mother’s Day yesterday in glorious weather.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

conflicting

information on

surveillance
aircraft

@ By MARK HUMES

OFFICIALS at the Ministry
of National Security-continue to
give conflicting information about _
a Defence Force ’surveillance air-
craft and the state of affairs at.
the defence base, calling into”
question the level of consultative -
‘communication taking place
between the agency and its
national security facility.

In an interview with The Tri-.
bune last'week, permanent sec-°
retary at National Security, Mark
Wilson, said the King Air 350 tur-
bo craft in question had been sent: -
off to the United States for
repairs. See RENO

However, he had to retract ‘the~ .
statement when a photo of the,
aircraft on the tarmac of Nassai
International Airport appeared!
on The Tribune’s front page the’
following day. :

Now it seems another portion
of the permanent secretary's
interview is being called into
question, as comments made by
the Minister of National Security
during a House debate on the
Police Service Act appear to con-
tradict his version of the aircraft's
future in service.

Mr Wilson said in Friday’s Tri-
bune that the aircraft would be
"supplied with modern surveil-
lance equipment that would allow
it to do surveillance at an altitude
above 10,000 ft."

However, a day before Mr
Wilson gave his-interview to The
Tribune, his boss, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt, told the
House of Assembly that the air-
craft, once it returns from being
serviced, will be sold to Bahama-
sair and a new aircraft will be
bought for the Defence Force.

SEE page 14








Ingraham: Immigration law must be dealt with humanely

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham is calling on the PLP government
to return to “internationally accepted” stan-
dards and norm for the apprehension of
illegal immigrants in the Bahamas.

He believes the manner in which Haitians
were recently “rounded up” in the Family
Islands and elsewhere is inappropriate, and
violates the Organisation of American
States Convention on the rights of migrants
in a country.

Mr Ingraham stressed that the enforce-
ment of any law, including the immigration
law, must be dealt with humanely and not
for political partisan purposes.

The former prime minister said the FNM
government carried out a.sustained and
consistent apprehension exercise to ensure
that illegal immigrants were found and repa-
triated to their homeland.

Mr Ingrahani was in Grand Bahama over
weekend and met FNM supporters to dis-
cuss potential candidates and to hear their
concerns and suggestions going into the
next general election.

After a meeting with supporters at the
Foster B Pestaina Hall on Saturday after-
noon, he met with the media. Recent raids
by the immigration department were among
many topics he addressed.

“We believe it is hypocritical of this gov-
ernment to use illegal Haitian labour in its
housing programme and build many hous-
es by using Haitian labour through con-
tractors and sub-contractors, and then to
suddenly wake up one morning and say. the
Haitians are here and we have to get rid of

SEE page 14

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Security chief says
school break-in

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Investigations
conducted by school security into
an apparent break-in at Jack
Hayward High School suggest
that access was gained by “some-
one with legitimate access to the
school’s master key,” according
to a top security official.

During a press conference yes-
terday, Stephen Plakaris, deputy
director of sécurity for schools
on Grand Bahama, revealed that
there was no evidence of forced
entry at the school on April 28.

Ministry of Education officials
on Grand Bahama and New
Providence were concerned that
the break-in could have compro-
mised the BJC and BGCSE
national exams, which were
being kept in a room that was
broken into.

Fortunately, none of the exam
scripts were breached, avoiding a



nationwide recall and potential
costs of $2 million to the govern-
ment.

Mr Plakaris said the security
department immediately carried
out investigations and has sub-
mitted a report to the Ministry of
Education. He said they are still
awaiting a police report.

Based on his findings, Mr
Plakaris does not believe any stu-
dent or thief could have been
responsible for the break-in, but
indicated that it appeared to have
been an “inside job” by some-
one with access to the school.

He said there had been other
instances of alleged break-ins in
the last month at the school. In
all cases, there was no sign of
forced entry.

Mr Plakaris, a reserve police
inspector, has interviewed three
people so far. “No forced entry
can be determined at this time
and the primary entry doors were
initially not secured, contrary to

an ‘inside job’

reports given by persons at the
school,” he said.

“The time factor does not cor-
respond. It is possible that the
perpetrator of this is someone
with legitimate access to the
administration area with possi-
ble possession of a master key,”
said Mr Plakaris. ,

When the security officer
arrived at the school at 9.30pm
he discovered entry doors to the
foyer unlocked. A short time lat-
er, he said, someone placed a call
to ZNS to report a. break-in at
the school. Mr Plakaris said
police also responded.

He said the only interior dam-
age was to one office door, but
not’on the exterior from where
the culprit should have entered.
He said the exams, two cell-
phones, radio, and jewellery left

in the offices were not disturbed.

“We may be dealing with
someone who respects academia,
but certainly we are not dealing



@ STEPHEN Plakaris displays silategesphi taken after the break-in

with a thief,” he said.

“Based on the information
it is alarming news. The cir-
cumstantial evidence indicates
that it was an inside job at Jack
Hayward High School.

“We feel we have sufficient
information to clarify some
rumours that were going
through the community
regarding school security,” he
said.

Mr Plakaris said he believes
the break-ins may be an

attempt to cause confusion, or
cast aspersions on Ministry of
Education officials and ulti-
mately embarrass the minister

and the government.

“We are obligated to put the
facts on the table. We don’t
want people pointing fingers

and blaming security when it is

negligence on the part of cer-
tain individuals.

“The impact of this could
have negatively impacted the
schools in the country if those

(Photo: Denise Mayceck)

exams were compromised. If *
it is an inside job, it is a high. ,
level of irresponsibility and dis-. «
regard for public decency,
especially if it comes from per-
sons who are employed by
government. .
“We are appealing to who-
ever is doing it to not embar- »
rass the school, and put itina.
bad light and interrupt the
educational and testing ;
process in the school,” Mr.
oe said. ‘i

Film studio ‘is addressing Gold Rock Creek situation’.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -— Bahamas Film Stu-
dios proprietor Paul Quigley said his
company is working with the BEST
Commission to address the situation at
Gold Rock Creek Beach, which has
been besieged by rocks.

Gold Rock Creek residents are
blaming the movie studio for the envi-
ronmental deterioration of the beach
in East Grand Bahama.

The beach, featured on the Ministry
of Tourism’s website, was known for
its beautiful powdery white sand.

Grand Bahama resident Peter

Adderley is very concerned about the ©

present state of the beach and has
called for immediate action to address



the situation.

Last year, Disney filmed its Pirates

of the Caribbean movies at Gold Rock
Creek. A huge water tank was con-
structed on the beach for the filming of
water scenes.

Mr Adderley said he intends to
make a presentation to Disney repre-
sentatives of what has happened at
Gold Rock Creek. He claims that since
the movie production there has been
environmental impact to the beach,
creek and water table.

Mr Quigley, however, said the beach
is not destroyed and feels that resi-
dents are exaggerating.

“They are obviously overreacting.
The beach is not destroyed by any
means,” he told The Tribune.

“There has been a deposit of small

‘

rocks on the beach and we don’t

know for sure whether they came
from excavation of the tank, or
whether it was after the hurricane,
which had unique winds that might
have blown in those rocks, which are
rounded from being weathered from
the ocean,” he said.

Nevertheless, Mr Quigley said it is
an issue that his company is dealing
with.

“We are working with BEST at the
moment. I met with the minister
responsible, Marcus Bethel, and we
are providing them with a manage-
ment plan and out of that will come
how we need to deal with the situa-
tion because we don’t know exactly
what to do to.

“We can clear the rocks off, which

we have done, but we can’t keep doing

that all the time. We are told by our ~

environmental people that it will cease
at some point, although it depends on
how things are during the hurricane
season, when matters could get worse.”

Mr Quigley said Disney had finished
its filming in Grand Bahama and had
no plans to come back.

However, he revealed that a British
company is expected to come in July
for the filming of another movie on
the fascinating life story of female
pirate Mary Reid.

“We are also looking at doing a big
budget series for Japan on the Japan-
ese-Russian War and they are expect-
ed to come over to look at the tank.

“It is going to provide a lot of work
for the Bahamas, and Grand Bahama

Genevie Eloise Bastian
August 31, 1948 - May 13, 2005

Leaving not a single ray

-in Se taliee because there are a lot of

ships involved and they want to build
those ships here.”

Mr Quigley said the movie studio is
halfway completed with the installa-
tion of fresh piped water for residents.

In its agreement with government,
the company will supply fresh water to
people in the area.

Mr Quigley said that pipe installa-
tion work had been halted due to road
elevation work being carried out in
the area.

“We are unable, to get access to
some houses and we can’t put in piping
until they get that road finished, but we
managed to get halfway down the
street and those people have beautiful
fresh crystal clear water now,” he said.



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The Light

Each day you looked out the window
And saw the rising sun

It shone so bright and brilliant

Until cach day was done

The sky was clean, the wind so pure

What a somber mood it can create \
Nothing but darkness from above \
Left to live life without the light

You came to know and love








But then you sit and ponder
The rain that caused so much sorrow





G feel quili

Ee eon roesee, May bring Lee. trees and clear the air
For perhaps a brighter tomorrow

Butterflies flying ever so free And rear touct ae ain fe




From the storm that came your way
It can’t take away your precious memory
Of that bright and sunny day.

Then from mine came the clouds
Filled with anger and dismay
Bringing rain, thunder and lightening bolts








From Wes, Owen, Gavin &
Bryan Bastian & Family





uA YALUt AL Rietpep ty





THE TRIBUNE



Haitians
arrested
for firearm
possession

TWO Haitians were arrested
over the weekend for illegal
possession of a handgun.
On Saturday at 3 am, officers
from Operation Quiet Storm
were near Quinine Alley when
they saw a red Ford Explorer
with two male occupants.

The vehicle was stopped and
searched. Officers found a
loaded 9 mm handgun.

Police
investigate
club
shooting

POLICE are investigating a
shooting at a club that left one
man injured yesterday.

The shooting occurred after a
fight broke out at premises on
Ragged Island Street.

A bystander, believed to be in
his mid-20s, was hit in his lower
back. He was taken to Princess
Margaret Hospital where he is
in stable condition.

Police are following some
leads.

Suriname
lowlands
devastated
by floods

@ SURINAME
Paramaribo

FLOODS that have engulfed
about 15 percent of Suriname’s
territory have left the South

American nation’s lowlands in .

“total chaos,” the country’s.
leader said Saturday, according
to Associated Press.

“There is total chaos in the
homes and total chaos in school
buildings,” President Ronald
Venetiaan told reporters in the
capital of Paramaribo after
returning from flooded areas in
the country’s.southeast.

Floods triggered by torren-
tial rains have killed at least
three people and left up to
22,000 homeless along river-
banks in Suriname’s lowlands,
aid workers have said.

Thousands of flood victims
from Indian settlements in Suri-
name’s southern hinterlands
have fled across the border into
neighboring French Guiana and
Brazil in search of food. More
than a 100 thatched-hut villages
populated by descendants of
West African slaves known as
Maroons remained submerged
beneath muddy water after
rivers burst their banks.

While flooding has subsided
in the upper Suriname River in
the central part of the country,
the situation in the southeast
has worsened as runoff contin-

ues to feed into rivers, said.

Regional Development minis-
ter Michel Felisi. |

A number of small villages in

the southeast have completely

_ disappeared below the rising

water, Felisi said.

Ne RRON cities

Jaa ecaae areata
Bee A) A OU) 11a) eee

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MONDAY,
MAY 15

| 6:30 Bahamas@Sunrise

11:00 Immediate Response
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12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
)} 1:00 BTC Connection







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Bahamas Tonight

Immediate Response

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‘NOTE: ZNS-TV.13 reserves
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FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham has criticised Public Ser-
vice Minister Fred Mitchell’s
announcement that the gov-
ernment plans to hire 1,200
additional public servants, say-
ing that money could be used
to give teachers what they
need — parity in pay between
them and other professionals
in the public service.

“When we were in office, we
accepted the teachers’ premise,
which was 'there:was:not pari-
ty in pay in the public sector
for teachers with similar qual-
ifications as others.in the pub-
lic service,” Mr Ingraham told
reporters.

. “Our aim and objective was
that over a period of time we
were going to bring the teach-
ers’ pay up in line with other
professionals within the public
service.

“And so what we would
expect for the government to
be doing now is to be taking
what the FNM did between

BB HUBERT Ingraham

1997 and 2002 and raising that
level of pay so that at the end
of a given period of time there
would be reasonable parity in
pay.
Mr Ingraham said that, after
taking all relevant factors into
account, the FNM would seek
to reach a fair and reasonable
agreement with teachers that
showed respect for and com-







mitment to the development
of teachers in society, and to
the payment of a reasonable
wage by the government.
“Our commitment to this
regard is in concrete and has
been demonstrated over and
over again and teachers in the
Bahamas know that when the
FNM is returned to office, as
we believe we will be, we will
continue where we left off.
“So all this nonsense about a
$750 payment and $100 base
pay on salary for teachers
because that’s what the pub-
lic service got — that’s non-
sense. Fine, give teachers that,
but give teachers the adjust-
ment in their pay in accor-
dance with previously deter-
mined policy commitments to
produce parity in pay between
teachers and other profession-
als within the public service. .
“And the same applies to
nurses and other profession-
als in the health care sector
and several other sectors of



FNM candidates to be chosen soon

Addressing hundreds of
FNM supporters on Grand
Bahama, FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham said the party
hopes to have all its prepara-
tory work in selecting
prospective electoral candi-
dates completed by the end
of May.

And he announced that the
FNM will hold a mass rally at
the R M Bailey Park in Nas-
sau on May 30.

Mr Ingraham met with
executives of the four con-
stituencies on Friday. evening,
and told reporters following
Saturday’s meeting that exec-
utives have agreed on the
selection procedures, and
that prospective candidates
have agreed to the procedure

- and have committed to sup-

port the candidate chosen as

Drinks Trolleys
Coffee Tables.



a result of those procedures.
He also said that he was happy

with the number of women
standing to be candidates

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the public service. That’s what
an FNM government will do.”
Mr Ingraham said it is unnec-
essary for the government to
attempt to expand the public ser-
vice by 1,200 people. He said the
reason the government is seeking

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 3.

macrerenee







to resort to the public p
produce jobs is that 8
are complaining about fhe hick of
jobs, and that the poverminent
has failed to prod
of the numero
ment it has been:

















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GE a, WIUINDAY, Wir. 6G, 2uUu

THE TRIBUNE



Wea CRO ean

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

ae

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas uf’. 1

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

O.BLES KM. K-CS.G:;

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas"
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Failing in the country’s business

BRENT SYMONETTE, chairman of the
Public Accounts Committee, has complained
that government, which promised Bahamians in
2002 that if elected its administration would be
one of transparency, is anything but transparent
— especially when it comes to accounting for
how the people’s money is being spent.

He said that government’s decision to hide
behind a legal opinion that only documents

tabled in the House of Assembly are to be sub- °

mitted to the Public Accounts Committee
(PAC) was hampering the work of the com-
mittee.

From the day in 1913 that this committee was
created it was “mandatory that the committee
report at least twice every session and at least 60
‘days before the end of the session.”

Mr Symonette said the PAC had asked gov-
ernment to disclose the spending for the fiscal
years ending in 2004 and 2005. However, he
said, it has met with constant roadblocks
because the Auditor General’s report for those
years is not yet on the table of the House. It was
only last month that Government tabled the
Auditor General’s report for the 2002-2003 fis-
cal year.

This is no way to run a business — in fact it
is an impossible way to run a business. But this
is the way that the finances of government —
the biggest business of all — is mismanaged.

This problem never arose until the PLP came
on the scene in 1967. Until then no one knew
that such a rule existed, because until the advent
of the PLP, government was managed by effi-
cient businessmen. Bahamians can say what
they like about the UBP, but they managed

-. government like a business. The Auditor Gen-

eral’s report was up to date as required by law,
and the Public Accounts Committee, having
. received the public accounts on time, was able
to meet its statutory obligation to report to the
House at least twice every session.

In all the years that we reported the House
— pre-PLP — the Public Accounts Commit-
tee was recognised as parliament’s most pow-
erful standing committee. And the commit-
tee’s ability to send for persons and papers was
not an issue, because the documents were pre-
sented, and the persons involved must have
cooperated because we never heard that they
did not.

However, it was in 1 the eighties that govern-
ment’s: blocking of the PAC’s right to docu-
ments became a real issue.

And of all persons to bring it to the fore was
then Attorney General Paul Adderley. Mr
Adderley must have known what the problem
was when the PAC ceased to function because
it was he who had blocked information request-
ed by the PAC, under the chairmanship of Nor-

man Salomon. Mr Solomon was trying to
account to Bahamians on how their money: was
being used by the Pindling government to sub-
sidise a failing y Bahamasair.

According to Mr Adderley “Bahamasair
Holdings Limited was not a department or
office ‘of the government and therefore it is not
the function of the Auditor General to audit the
accounts of that company.”

And so, “as night follows day,” if the auditor
general could not audit the accounts, there were
no accounts for the PAC to check. Apparently,
it was nobody’s business that in the first three
months of 1975, $2.6 million of the people’s
money went from the Public Treasury to under-
write Bahamasair. Probably the last time the
PAC was heard from was on July 2, 1975 when
Mr Solomon complained of the difficulty his
committee was having investigating legitimate
matters of concern.

In view of this we don’t know if Mr Adder-
ley’s memory failed him, or if he was just trying
to play cute and score political brownie points
when on November 24, 1987 he reminded the
House that the PAC had not met once between
1982 and 1987.

“It is the most important committee of the
House and the only one that is in the hands of
the Opposition,” Mr Adderley intoned sancti-
moniously, as he proceeded to lecture the Oppo-
sition on its duties. His tongue really must have
been in his cheek during that harangue.

The only way that public expenditure can be
properly watched by parliament is by the Oppo-
sition, said Mr Adderley. He wanted the “com-
mittee system to work.”

Once:the Treasury closes its books for a
financial year, “there is no means and no
method by which you can hide from them (the
PAC) public expenditure.”

Obviously, he had forgotten how he had
blocked the committee trying to investigate the
people’s money which had gone from the Pub-
lic Treasury to support the national airline.

If Mr Adderley was not laughing at the polit-
ical hypocrisy, many Bahamians were.

Having prodded among the Opposition’s
dying embers, ostensibly to rekindle their flame
and awaken them to their public duty, Mr
Adderley was probably sorry in the end that
he didn’t let “sleeping dogs lie.”

The middle eighties saw the battle to restore
the PAC to the powerful position that members
claimed it had. In fact on the government side
members were only giving lip service to the
claim. In fact they had reduced the committee to
aeunuch. | -

Despite what Mr Adderley had said every
method was used to successfully hide the public
accounts from this country’s taxpayers. *



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immigration problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HAVE been reading the var-
ious comments and points of view
on this topic for a while now and
have decided to express some
views of my own. It would there-
fore be appreciated if you would

‘allow me to express these views

via the medium of your newspa-
per. My primary intention is to
stimulate some thought process-
es, which will eventually (and
hopefully very quickly) allow us
to make some decisions and
come up with some reasonable
answers to this age-old problem.
We need to begin to take some
form of positive action and cease
being afflicted with “(he paralysis
of too much analysis

I request that you treat the Lol-
lowing comments as “food for
thought”.

For too long. we in The
Bahamas have tinproperly
viewed the immigration problem
as an employment problem,

Whilst there ts much overlapping, |,
I believe that the automatic cou-

pling of these two distinctly sep-
arate but somehow associated
matters has been the cause for
much debate and/or confusion.
Let us view: them in isolation for
a moment.

Immigration

The Bahamas has very ciear
policies on immigration. Persons
are permitted entry into the
country for various reasons.
These reasons may include vaca-
tion/holiday visits, visits for con-
ferences, training, religious and
medical reasons, as well as entry
for the purpose of being gainful-
ly employed. There, may be oth-
ers, but the reasons stated above
should cover most of the usual
categories. Additionally, it is
understood that the possibility
exists for someone to enter the
country with one type of visa and
subsequently have this converted
to another. There is, however,
due process that must be fol-
lowed if this is to.happen.

If we were to look at the above
and then'compare this to some
of the scenarios that we are cur-
rently hearing about and debat-
ing amongst ourselves, the ques-
tion would automatically be “why
are we making this so complicat-
ed and so political?”

Now, for the benefit of any-
one who may be inclined to chal-
lenge this and perhaps be moved
to respond in rebuttal, I would
like to add that I am very much
aware that due to social and
political issues, this is clearly not
a very simple matter. I am fur-
ther aware that there are a host
of other considerations to be tak-
en into account (ie the humani-
tarian issue of how we deal with
persons who do not know the
country from whence. they may
have come as babies; how to deal
with families with children born
in The Bahamas; what to do with
elderly persons who are no
longer able to care for them-
selves, etc, etc; but, as a Bahami-
an, I believe that it is vitally
important that we view this seri-
ously and decide what we believe
should happen, insofar as the law




A

~ ong
ee

Seay
Aan
Summer Rush






SO SAWNEO

letters@trilbunemedia.net



permits.

° Should the person from
Haiti, who may have been smug-
gled into the country, be treated
any differently from the Jamaican
who came in as a visitor and
decided to overstay?

e Should the Cuban national, .

on his/her way to Miami, who
became stranded in Bahamian
waters alter. his boat collapsed
be treated any differently from
the person from the Far East who
paid thousands of dollars to be
smuggled in and who ends up
working in a family business?

* Should the Englishman, who
cuimie IN Oli a tourist visa. but
decides to begin working with a
financial institution, in anticipa-
tion of receiving a positive
respoise to a work permit appli
cation, be deall with in a different
manner than the person from the
Philippines who came in to visit a
friend and ended up working as a
maid?

I believe you get the picture...

Employment

It is my understanding that
persons seeking gainful employ-
ment in the Bahamas must meet
one of the following criteria:

* Be a Bahamian citizen or
legal Permanent Resident with
permission to work and possess a
valid national insurance number,
along with supporting documents
that clearly demonstrates that the
person is entitled to work in The;
Bahamas.

e Be in possession of a valid
work permit, which has been
issued by the relevant authority
and possess a valid national insur-
ance number.

Again, there may be other
valid categories, but I believe
these cover the majority of legal
workers in the country.

Now, if we again viewed this in
isolation and asked whether per-
sons who fall outside any of the
above categories should be

‘allowed gainful employment, I

believe the answer would be a
simple one to arrive at.

In Summation

On the Immigration topic, I
believe that we must review the
laws to determine whether they
are sufficiently modern, to deal
with the requirements of today’s
Bahamas. We must also accept
that immigrants are, and have
been for a long time, of vital
importance to the country, so we
must find a way to implement
quotas, either annually or peri-
odically and improve the systems
that monitor and control the
issuance of visas and what hap-
pens when a person overstays his
or her allotted time. I do not nec-
essarily support the system of
pulling over jitneys and asking
everyone on board with an accent
to prove that they are in The
Bahamas legitimately. This is not
only inhumane, but it could also
result in dangerous situations for
other legitimate residents riding
on the bus and could prove

equally as dangerous for the
Immigration Officers involved.
Unfortunately I do not have a
better solution, so I will ask that
we consider the other, numerous
options that must be available to
us.
On the subject of employment,
I am of the view that the time
has come for us to hold the
employers of illegal workers
responsible for their actions. This
has to be the equivalent of har-
bouring a criminal (if illegal
immigration is unlawful then it
stands to reason that this act may
be construed as the legal equiva+
lent of harbouring a criminal). I
will, however, leave it to the
members of the honoured legal
society to sort this one out. There
should be strict penalties imposed
to discourage the employment of
illegal workers and, correspond-
ingly there should be a reason-
able and fairly simple process for
persons to apply for and receive
permission for legitimately
required workers without nega-
tively impacting upon thé
employment opportunities avail-
able for Bahamian citizens and

. legal resident.

Whilst I am most certain that
this letter will generate varied
reactions, please permit me to
add the comment that its content
is not meant to offend anyone,
but again, to stimulate some rea+

‘sonable thought processes from

the persons we have entrusted
with the responsibility of running
our country.

In conclusion, I will leave you
with the following questions:

e Are persons who have over;
stayed their allotted time being
actively sought after by the immi-
gration authorities?

e Is it fair to law-abiding citi-
zens and residents to allow com-
munities of illegal immigrants to
be built up and continue to exist?

e Is it fair for structures in
these communities to be con-
structed. without regard-for the
established standards, codes and
policies?

¢ Should the illegal use of elec-
tricity and water be ignored in
the interest of being humane? '

e Should citizens and legal res-
idents be penalised or prosecuted
for harbouring and/or employing
illegal immigrants?

e Should there be public
notices listing the names and last’
known addresses of persons who
have entered the country legally
and then overstayed their time?

e Should there be a “hot-line”
or immigration web-site where
prospective employers can call
or log in to get answers to certain
questions or clarification on cer-
tain points relating to the
employment of a foreign born
person?

We all know that it is impossi-
ble for us to completely seal-off
our borders, but certainly more
can be done to police it.

Thank you in advance for your
kind attention.

SAM HAVEN
Miami, Florida
May 3, 2006.



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THE TRIBUNE




In brief

$24, 000 of
marijuana
confiscated
at airport



POLICE confiscated $24,000
worth of marijuana from Nas-
sau International Airport over
the weekend.

On Saturday, after 10am, air-
port police stopped and
searched a Jamaican who
arrived from San Andros. He
fled the scene.

A box he left behind con-
tained 24 pounds of marijuana.

Americans
are charged
following
drug bust

= BARBADOS
Bridgetown

TWO Americans charged in
connection with one of the
biggest drug busts in this
Caribbean island’s history were
scheduled to appear in court
Monday, police said, according
to Associated Press.

Terry Moore, 33, and Joshua
Walker, 26, both of Florida, are
accused of trying to import 61kg
of cocaine, Barbados police
spokesman Barry Hunte.

. The pair was charged with pos-
session and intent to supply, traf-
fic and import the drugs, Hunte
said. They were arrested Friday
after police received a tip.

Authorities found the drugs
‘and US$15,000 on the men’s
boat, as well as two high-pow-
éred guns and several rounds
‘of ammunition. Moore also had
US$27,400 on him, Hunte said.
_ The men will be formally
charged at the court hearing
when bail will be set.

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LOCAL NEWS

unt for Freedom of

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 5

Information Act to be 4

@ By MARK HUMES

IN recent weeks, the gov-
ernment has refused to
respond to public calls for
transparency on how it man-
ages business on behalf of its
people, prompting a growing

.call for the establishment of a

Freedom of Information Act.

With the government's
vote on Cuba’s admission to
the Human Right Council
under question, the Minister
of Youth, Sports, and Hous-
ing’s public debate with the
Auditor General over the
lack of disclosure in the
Junkanoo bleachers fiasco,
his reluctance to disclose
information on “favoured”
building contractors, and
questions as to why, after
four years, talks of new
school construction is once
again in the headlines, public
patience with government
“ducking and dodging”
appears to be wearing thin.

“This should be a hotbed
2007 election issue,” said attor-
ney Fred Smith, speaking with
The Tribune. “The Bahamas
is a democratic sovereign con-
stitutional nation, and the cit-
izens should not be kept in the
dark, especially when their
government is negotiating con-
tracts which affect their
rights.’”

The cry was echoed late last
week by Joan Thompson,
president of The Nassau Insti-

tute, after it was suspected that

the Bahamas voted to. admit
Cuba to the UN’s Human
Rights Council.

In an open letter to the
Minister of Foreign Affairs,
Fred Mitchell, Mrs Thomp-
son raised the question of a
citizen's “right” to know
what is being said or done in
their name. In the event that
the government does not feel
justified in disclosing how it
voted, Mrs Thompson said
that a case must be made by
the government as to why
citizens are being denied

SINCE

ATE

SES
“ARAMA

Re

eee

SOON



FRED Smith

their “right to know.”

However, according to the
Auditor General’s 2003 report,
not only Bahamian citizens are
having a hard time obtaining
information.

This government office has
also experienced difficulties in
obtaining information that it
needs to make informed deci-
sions. In its report, the Auditor
General complained: “We
have requested relevant copies
of Cabinet conclusions which
do not seem to be forthcoming
therefore we relied on infor-
mation from files at the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture.”

Bleachers

The comments by the Audi-
tor General were connected
to financial transactions by the
then Minister of Youth; Sport,
and Culture, Neville Wisdom,
as related to the rental of
Junkanoo bleachers. :

Now the same minister finds
himself at the centre of anoth-
er disclosure battle, after
promising, then refusing to
turn over information related
to the distribution of govern-
ment building contracts award-
ed during his and Shane Gib-
son’s tenure at the helm of the

tile Supplies Last

housing ministry.

In relation to this attorney
Fred Smith added: “Govern-
ment by their nature likes to
hide behind a shroud of secre-
cy. This prevents them from
having to be accountable, and
it ensures that their decisions
are very rarely challenged.

"If we had a freedom of
Information Act, you would
find the behaviour of govern-
ment officials changing dra-
matically because they are
then subject or at risk of being

. disclosed," said Mr Smith.

The president of the public
accounts committee, Brent
Symonette, said: “Public infor-
mation, such as the awarding
of contracts and who bidders
are should be exactly that,
public. The permanent secre-
taries, as persons responsible
in a ministry, should be oblig-
ed to provide, when requested
to do so, information because
it is the public’s funds. In cas-
es like that, there should be a
freedom of information act.

“Obviously, though, there
would have to be safeguards
in the interest of national secu-
rity issues, but I can’t see any
national security issues on
what it cost to build low cost
homes. That is government
funds, and we the people, pay
our taxes and we should be
able to be informed of how
our taxes are spent.”

Interestingly enough, in a
speech given last week, Fort
Charlotte MP Alfred Sears
told fellow MPs that “there
are too many times our citi-
zens complain about the lack
of responsiveness in our public
institutions.”

He went on to say that he

wished there was a provision,

of accountability in all branch-
es of government.

When officials at the Attor-
ney General's office were con-

tacted on Friday about this |

matter, they told The Tribune
that, as it stood, they knew of
no, government plan to move
in the direction of establish-

We’reg











BRENT Symonette

ing a freedom of information
act here in the Bahamas.



Nw

my Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

Officials at the agency said
that because we have no free-
dom of information legislation
on the book, individuals would
not be able to pursue legal]
actions against the government
to acquire information unless
they can prove standing ~ that
the information which the gov-
ernment withholds personally
affects the individual.

“In every nation they have
passed a freedom of informa-
tion legislation,” Fred Smith
said. “Even in Costa Rica,

‘Bermuda, countries in Latin

America, the United Kingdom,
the US, and Canada they have
freedom of information legisla-
tion. In these countries, the cit-
izen’s right to know is acknow!-
edged as the fundamental
bedrock of democracy.”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





BDM leader urges more young
people to get involved in politics

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

IT is important that more of

this present generation of young
people step out of their indi-
vidual worlds and become more

active players in the shaping of



















the Bahamas, BDM leader
Cassius Stuart said ina release
yesterday marking National
Youth Month.

He said the Bahamas needs
more leaders of this new gener-
ation to rise up and become
strong political leaders.



TEACHERS & SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

Neen le
GENERAL MEETING

There Will Be No Second Call Notice As Per
The Co-operative Act 2005 Section 22

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited East Street South
and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-Ninth (29th) Annual
Meeting of Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit
Union Limited will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
located on Bay Street, on Saturday, May 20,2006 commencing
at 8: 00am for the following purposes:

° To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for 2005,
° To receive the Audited Accounts for 2005.
° To elect members of the Board of Directors
* To elect members of the Supervisory Committee.
-e To discuss and approve the Budget for 2006.
° To take action on such matters as may come before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary

“Without strong political
leadership to provide a vision
and guidance for the country.
the edifice the earlier genera-
tions have built will decay and
crumble.

“Yes, all the hard work of Sir
Lynden Pindling. Sir Cecil Wal-
lace-Whittield, Sir Kendal
Isaacs, Sir Orville Vurnquest
and even our former Prime
Minister, Hubert Ingraham, and
even Perry Christie, will come
to nothing tf this generation
refuses to rise up.

“If The Bahamas is to
become a truly great nation, the
new generation of leadership
must step forward and make
their contribution to our soct-
ety. The new leadership is not
about being FNM or PLP or
even BDM, but it’s about being
Bahamian, standing on the
shoulders of our past great lead-
ers, united in one mission, to
make the Bahamas a better
place for our children’s chil-
dren,” Mr Stuart said.

In remaking The Bahamas,
he said, Bahamians need to go
beyond economics.

“With the increase in social
tension within our society
among our youth, it is impera-
tive that this new generation
develop social skills and EQ or
emotional intelligence because
The Bahamas has lost its social
cohesion. Our murder count
stands now at nine for the year.
A high 1Q alone will not ensure
success in life,” the BDM leader
said.

He pointed out that a highly
intelligent person will not nec-
essarily fit well into society and
there needs to be more under-
standing for the importance of
conflict resolution so that young
people can get along well with
others, and be team players. °

“In order to guarantee and
sustain a successful Bahamas 1n
the tuture, this generation of

Bahamians must come torward
to contribute their ideas and
efforts to the development of
this great nation. As one gener-
ation fades, one arises.



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@ LEADER of the Bahamas Democratic Movement Cassius
Stuart

“Every generation must
define its values, beliefs and
commitment to self and coun-
try. Our country’s future
development should not be
left to our elders alone. After
all, our youth are among the
many Bahamians who have
the greatest stake and will
inherit tomorrow’s Bahamas,”
said Mr Stuart.

Older Bahamians; he said,

‘tend to be guided by their past

experiences, the Bahamas’
history, the systems and envi-
ronment in which they grew
up. \

“This generation, on the
other hand, is not weighed
down by traditions, history
and mindset. We are less

' afraid of change and are more

willing to look for fresh per-
spe ctives and initiatives.

“Hence, the perceived gen- ...,
_ eration gap and the challenge ~
for policy-makers. to: bridge

that gap. What we really need
is a combination of approach-
es, both traditional and uncon-
ventional, tested and new to

meet the more complex chal-:

lenges the Bahamas is now
facing,” Mr Stuart said.

He admitted, however, that
it is a challenge to reach out to
this generation and get them

Each unique flavour of Mrs. Dash is created from a blend of 14 natural herbs and =

to think in terms of country
and society.

Many of the Bahamas”

youth, Mr Stuart said, are too
engrossed in pursuing their
own personal interests and
careers and it is not easy to
spark their idealism and to tap
into thier energies for the
“sreater good”, especially
when there are no life-threat-
ening issues. °

“Today’s generation is apa-
thetic because it was spared
by history, and has no cause
bigger than itself to believe
in. It has not experienced
powerful historic events such
as the Burma Road riot,

--Majority- Rule and racial

oppression:
“The older generation of
Bahamians has created the

environment for us.to grow |

up. in. a, better Bahamas in

comparison to what they had..

Wein this generation have
never experienced hostilities,
like the riots that we had in
the 1940s, when three
Bahamians were killed, or the
fight for majority rule in the
1960s. We have never had to

seriously consider how our

society could be improved by
our involvement until now,”
Mr Stuart said.





“i PUERTO RICO

SALT FARE

In brief

Biker 2
becomes
14th traffic
_ fatality

THE country’s 14th traftic
fatality of the year was recorded
over the weekend wheii' a
motor-cyclist was thrown from
his machine after colliding with
a car.

The crash took place -6n
Carmichael Road near Faith
Avenue. A Ford Escort was
involved.

The motor-cyclist was fake
to Princess Margaret Hospital
but died on the way.



Bill signed :
to end

Puerto Rico
shutdown ©

San Juan



ment eter and a half-miil-
lion students will return to théir
jobs and classrooms Monday
morning after a two-week bret
they never planned for wa
‘resolved with a signature lale
Saturday, according to. Asse
ated Press.

Governor Anibal Acevedo
Vila signed a key bill that ended
a partial government shutdown
that closed the US Caribbean
territory’s public schools and
idled half of the central
government’s work force, sin €
May 1.

“The government will reopi i
and return to normal on Mén-
day. This has. been an. extrao) ~
dinary victory for the peop
Puerto Rico,” said Acevedo,
referring to the House and Sén-
ate’s approval of an emer;
Joan to fund the government’s
-operations and payroll until: the
-end of the fiscal year on pune
30.

The end to the budget
impasse followed a unanimous
vote by the Senate which autho-
rized the loan. Earlier, in a ses-
sion that stretched well past
midnight, the opposition-domi-
nated House unanimously
approved the bailout hours after
Acevedo warned that the déal
to end the shutdown — which
affected almost 10 per cent of
workers in the US Caribbean
territory — could u.-avel if law-
makers didn’t act thi “weekend.



€
















(100%

Natural

No

Calories.



PB RRR EB REE DE I RD EA LEH OM AE IE At EEO TE AE I PPI ID OEP PET OE EIT pI Se PT HT EN

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tasting meals full of only one thing ~ mouthwatering flavour. A diet low in salt could
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Distributed Ey Lowe’s Wholesale ¢ tel: 393-7111 * fax: 393-0440



IHE | RIBUNE



MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Ingraham condemns
on Grand Bahama during visit

FREEPORT - The PLP gov-
ernment has been bad for
Grand Bahama, FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham said on Sat-
urday.

He said Freeport, which has
seen its “best days” under the
FNM government, has again
returned to the days of the late
1980s and early 1990s when the
PLP was last in office.

“When we were in office we
demonstrated very convincing-
ly to all and sundry what it was
that we could do, and did do to
produce Freeport to its best
days since the 60s,” said Mr
Ingraham.

During his visit to Grand
Bahama over the weekend, Mr
Ingraham met with some 400 to
500 key supporters from Grand
Bahama and Bimini to discuss
selection procedures of candi-





dates for the four available seats
- Pine Ridge, Eight Mile Rock,
Marco City and West End and
Bimini - in the upcoming gen-
eral election. :

He also met with the media
and addressed many burning
issues, criticising the govern-
ment about the recent Haitian
raids, teachers’ salaries, and sell-
ing of land on Bay Street to for-
eigners.

Mr Ingraham was very con-
cerned about the state of the
Grand Bahama economy. He
believes that the Royal Oasis
Resort was a true anchor prop-
erty for Freeport’s economy.

In response to comments
made recently by Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie in Grand
Bahama on May 3, Mr Ingra-
ham said that while it was the
FNM that initially brought the

Ministry of Health awards

Driftwood Group to Grand
Bahama, the Royal Oasis was
closed on the PLP’s watch.

During his speech to urban
renewal stakeholders, Mr
Christie had indicated that the
PLP was not responsible for
bringing the group to Freeport.

“They didn’t say that when
they came to office and they
came down here to open the
new Driftwood facilities. They
like to reap without sowing.

“And they were happy that
day to make all the flowery
speeches; those of us who
brought them here like myself
were not even invited to the
function.

Mr Ingraham said hopefully
the Royal Oasis property will
be sold, and hopefully it will
provide jobs in Grand
Bahama.

i GERARD Brown, centre, from the Department of Environmental Health Services, receives his
award and gifts from parliamentary secretary John Carey (left) and parliamentary secretary Ron
Pinder during the Ministry of Health Awards ceremony at Government House

(Photo: BIS/Patrick Hanna)

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VACANT POSITION IS AVAILABLE FOR

SAFETY & ENVIRONMENT MANAGER

The Corporation invites applications for the Position of Safety and Environment Manager.
This is a Management position that reports directly to the Training Manager.

The principle duties and responsibilities of the position include but are not limited to

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Develop specifications on safety equipment, clothing and gear for corporation use.
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

key ea

THE TRIBUNE



Commonwealth moral authority
is vital to Caribbean interests

@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).

HE preservation of the
moral authority of the
Commonwealth (formerly the
British Commonwealth) is vital

to the Caribbean.

Sidelined, as they are, in
international organisations
because of their smallness and
lack of clout, the Common-
wealth presents the leadership
of Caribbean states with unique
opportunities to advance their
concerns in the international
community.

The Commonwealth is the
only multilateral organisation
in which heads of government

BAHA MAR

PARES, ESAS



aoe aay ae): } yr

of Caribbean States enjoy equal
status with heads of larger and
more powerful countries. such
as Britain, Canada, Australia,
India, Nigeria and South
Africa. They can present their
causes in the Commonwealth
and, having won support, expect
the larger countries to back
them in organisations such as
the IMF and the World Bank.
But the Commonwealth’s
moral authority is being eroded

ROADS CIVIL Sea aaiiNre) Tene

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and Baha Mar Devel- ©
opment Company Ltd invite additional companies interested
in tendering for the construction of the realignment of 6,250
feet of West Bay Street and the extension of Gladstone Road
5,000 feet from John F. Kennedy Drive to West Bay Street to
complete an Expression of Interest Pre-Qualification State-

ment.

The project works include the demolition of existing build-
ings, site clearance, bulk earthworks, non-public utility
diversions, road construction and associated landscaping.

_ Suitably licensed companies interested in submitting a
-tender should collect and complete an Expression of
Interest Pre-Qualification Statement. This can be collected
between May 15-17, 2006, from Baha Mar Development.
Offices at the Wyndham Resort, Mezzanine Level, Cable

Beach, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Companies who have

' responded to the previous invitation need not respond.

The deadline for submission of the Expression of Interest is
4:00pm on Friday, May 19, 2006. pieeee address your sub-

_ mission to:

Nir. Mark Piekarz

Baha Mar Development Company Ltd.

Mezzanine Level

Wyndham Nassau Resort

Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas

Both parties reserve the right to reject any or all Expres-

sions of Interest.





3 LEP

Society of Trust and
Estate Practitione





because of its silence over Zim-
babwe where the government
of President Robert Mugabe
has violated human and civil
rights, destroyed democratic
institutions and presided over
the ruin of a once vibrant econ-
omy.

This issue has come into focus
in the last few weeks during the
official celebration of the 80th
birthday of Britain’s Head of
State, Queen Elizabeth.

The Queen is also Head of
the Commonwealth, a volun-
tary association of 54 States
made up of Britain and many
of its former colonies in the
Americas, the Caribbean,
Africa and Asia.

But, repeatedly, the interna-

tional media have been: ques-

tioning the authority of the
Commonwealth which did not

_ deal with Zimbabwe at its last

Heads of Government Confer-
ence in Malta late last year, and
on whose work agenda Zim-
babwe does not now appear.

Journalists have pointed with
alarm to the response of Don
McKinnon, the Commonwealth
Secretary-General, to the ques-
tion: Why was Zimbabwe not
discussed at Malta? The Secre-
tary-General said that Zimbab-
we was no longer a member of
the. Commonwealth, Mr
Mugabe having withdrawn his
country’s membership prior to
the Conference.

These journalists have been
quick to point out that South
Africa’s withdrawal from the

. Commonwealth did not stop the '

organisation from discussing its
atrocious Apartheid policies,
nor did it stop the Common-
wealth from taking initiating
international action against the
Apartheid regime including
sanctions.

There are many i in the Com-
monwealth who, like the jour-

nalists, worry that the Com-

monwealth is weakening its
credibility and authority by not
dealing with Zimbabwe. And
such persons include the
strongest supporters of the

-Commonwealth.

The Commonwealth has a
unique responsibility for Zim-
babwe. It was the Common-
wealth that stood up against the
infamous Unilateral Declara-
tion of Independence from
Britain by a white minority gov-
ernment led by Mr Ian Smith
under a Constitution that
deprived black Zimbabweans
of rights in their own country.

Heads of Commonwealth
governments had repeatedly
called for “the removal of the
illegal Smith regime and the dis-
mantling of its apparatus of
repression in order to pave the
way for the creation of police





Be TaylorWessing |



Hy

HIGGS & JOHNSON

Honor Ec titegritas

because of its





SIR Ronald Sanders

and armed forces which would
be responsive to the needs of
the people of Zimbabwe and
ensure the orderly and effective
transfer of power” (commu-
niqué, London 1977).
Zimbabwe’s independence
under majority rule with Mr
Mugabe as President was
uniquely a Commonwealth
achievement for the organisa-
tion persuaded the UK and US
governments to turn away from
Ian Smith and contemplate



The Common-
wealth’s moral
authority is
being eroded

silence over
Zimbabwe



independence for Zimbabwe
under majority rule.

Caribbean governments were .

extremely active on behalf of
Mugabe and. the majority of the
Zimbabwean people. They had
spoken out and acted against
racial discrimination, political
oppression,,and the denial of
human rights. They expected
that Zimbabwe would become a
model for African development
based on majority rule, peaceful
racial coexistence and respect
for democracy.

Instead, Mr Mugabe.has cut .

down political opponents,
repressed opposition, and pur-
sued policies that have wrecked
the Zimbabwean economy



including the seizure of once
arable farm land that are now
unproductive.

Few would have quarrelled
with Mr Mugabe’s position that
80 per cent of the country’s
arable land in the hands of a
minority of white farmers was
wrong. Right thinking persons
would have supported a well
thought-out policy of land redis-
tribution which included ade-
quate compensation and the
continued productivity of farms.

But, there was illegal seizure,
little or no compensation, and
land was given to persons with
no experience of farming.
Today, a country which once
offered the prospect of being
one of the richest in Africa has
all but collapsed economically,
and democracy has been dis-

carded as Mr Mugabe hangs « on

to power by force.
Isuspect that when Mr Mck-
innon justified not discussing
Zimbabwe at Malta, he did so
to preserve the organisation
from a deep rift between some
African countries, particularly
South Africa, and other Com-

- monwealth members. Thabo

Mbeki, the President of South
Africa, has to manage a diffi-
cult racial situation in his own
country that could ignite over
Zimbabwe.

Mr McKinnon had himself
secured a policy decision in 2003
to continue Zimbabwe’s ‘sus-
pension from the Common-
wealth and he had quietly initi- .
ated several diplomatic efforts
to engage Mr Mugabe. These

» were all rebuffed.

But, as conditions in Bin
babwe worsen, the Common-
wealth cannot appear to be
standing aloof on the basis that
the country is no longer a mem-
ber of the Commonwealth. ;

If the Commonwealth is ‘to
maintain its integrity and moral
authority, Zimbabwe must
again become a focus of its con- .
cern, and African countries,

_.° particularly South Africa,

should be persuaded that the
majority of Commonwealth
members are of this view. - |

But, Mr McKinnon needs the
help of the member States of
the Commonwealth if he is.to
initiate’ action on behalf of the
people of Zimbabwe.

The two groups of countries
best placed to give the Secre-
tary-General such help are the
Caribbean and Asia.

Caribbean sovSnamients
should be expressing their deep
concern'to the Secretary-Gen-
eral and Commonwealth gov-
ernments in Africa not only
about the abuse in Zimbabwe,
but also about the damage
being inflicted upon the Com-
monwealth by its inaction. ©

It is in the interest of Zim-

-babwe, the Commonwealth,

and their own countries that
Caribbean governments express
such concern.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd.
MONTROSE AVE.
aN SR

Looking: or
: _ Japanese used Cé

‘New Arrivals We

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How much?

e USD 950
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When & Where?
° 6 and 7 June 2006

e Jam — 5pm

¢ Lunch included

What do you get?
e 25 CPD hours.

* A course pack comprising a guide
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prepared by Taylor Wessing, a leading
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for the Bahamas by Higgs & Johnson.

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¢ A practical and up to date review of the
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terial, presentation, content &

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the future

Phi pi thoiw

Rum Cay Resort Marina

t By LARRY SMITH

PORT NELSON, Rum Cay:
Prime minister Perry Christie and
British investor John Mittens flew
to Rum Cay on Friday for a
groundbreaking ceremony inau-
gurating the $90. million Rum Cay





CHAIRMAN'S REPORT .

Second Quarter Ended January 31st 2006 a
Unaudited Results ove

FOCOL Holdings Limited (FOCOL) has
achieved another quarter of record profit.
Net income was $3.682 million for the first
six months of this year compared to $2.916
million last year, representing an increase of
26.2%. Earnings ‘per share increased to 43
cents per share up from 34 cents for the same
period in 2005. Our price per share has.
increased from 10.05 to 10.42.

‘Marine sales to the international market are’
one of the driving forces behind improved
profits for our company.

FOCOL has successfully completed the’

* acquisition of Shell Bahamas Limited, and
took over its operation on January 16th,
2006. The name of Shell Bahamas Limited
has been changed to Sun Oil Limited. The

purchase price was $32.750 million, subject
to financial working capital adjustments _
which should be completed by August 2006.





To-date, the integration and restructuring of
the Sun Oil Limited is exceeding
management's initial projections. Therefore,

‘ the Board of Directors and Management are
very confident that, should this trend
continue, FOCOL is well positioned to
record another year of record profits.







yement and

Our Board of Directors, mani
staff remain committed to seeking every
avenue to contribute to the growth of
FOCOL.

ha.

Sir Albert J. Miller
Se Chairman & President










FOCOL HOLDINGS CO.LTD

' ing.

Resort Marina.

For the tiny community of
Port Nelson, it was one of the
most exciting events in recent
memory. And virtually the entire
town turned up for the party in
their Sunday best.

In a first for the island, enter-
tainment was provided by the
police band, which arrived on a
special Bahamasair flight. Food,
drinks and tents catered by
Daniel Ferguson arrived in a cube
truck aboard the Lady Francis.

“This is something we’ve been
hoping and praying for,” said
retired chief councillor Sam May-
cock. “I only hope the young
folks will take advantage of the
opportunities.”

There are fewer than 80 peo-
ple living -on Rum Cay, and the
Montana development will cre-
ate 400 permanent jobs and pump

hundreds of millions of dollars,

into the economy at full build-

out, which is projected by 2016. A |

heads of agreement was signed

with the government in 2004.

At one time, this 30-square-
mile island supported prosperous
cotton plantations, cattle ranches,
pineapple and sisal farms, as well
as the second largest salt industry
in the Bahamas.

But since the early. years of
the 20th century, economic

decline and emigration have char-

acterised Rum Cay. Port Nelson
is the last of six original settle-
ments and the government pro-
vides most of the employment.
Until the late 1960s there was
no air access at all. And Prime
Minister Christie recalled that,
when visiting the island years ago,
there was only a dirt airstrip. He
vowed to change that when he
came to power and... “so said, so
done”. Rum Cay now has a gov-

-ernment-issue 5,000-foot paved
runway and Montana will begin”

work soon on:a terminal build-

According to Mr Mittens, a
contractor is about to be named
for the marina and a barge will
soon arrive to house construction
workers and provide a medical
centre: There will be 300 workers
‘on the project at the peak of con-
struction, he said.

The development will feature
an 80-slip marina just west of Cot-
tonfield Point, The marina basin
will be excavated inland and a

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE.SHEET



100-foot wide navigation channel
will be dredged to a depth of 12
feet for a distance of about 1,300
feet. And a 60-foot flushing chan-
nel will also be dredged to a
depth of four feet.

Besides the sale of private
estate lots, the resort will feature
hundreds of condos and villas, a
commercial village around the
marina, a yacht club and dive cen-
tre, a low-rise luxury hotel, a 20-
acre organic farm operated joint-
ly with the township, an eques-
trian centre and a fixed base oper-
ation. The resort will also install
two reverse osmosis water purifi-
cation plants and a sewerage
treatment plant. “

Montana hopes to create “the
most distinctive residential resort
marina in the region, with access
to world-class fishing, diving and
boating,” Mr Mittens said.

“We are committed to building
Rum Cay Resort Marina with the
utmost sensitivity to environ-
mental harmony and ecological
balance. And we are dedicated
to the conservation of the antiq-
uities within the development
site.”

Besides Mr Christie and Mr
Mittens, speakers at the ground-
‘breaking included Investments
Minister Vincent Peet; Philip
Davis, the island’s MP; and
Delores Wilson, the 74-year-old
proprietor of Kaye’s Bar who is
the unofficial matriarch of Rum
Cay.

There was an opening prayer
by Pearl Maycock and the nation-
al anthem was sung by Jackie
Nottage, accompanied by the
police band: The ending prayer
was by Philip Strachan.

The event was scheduled for
10am, but according to one
observer “it's amazing how Rum |

_ Cayans know that if something is

scheduled for 10 they are not
going to start showing up until
after 11. Finally the crowd arrived
at 11.45 and the ceremony
began.”

The groundbreaking was fol-
lowed that afternoon by a politi-
cal event when Maderich Stra-
chan, Theodore. Bain, Samuel
Maycock and Toby Kelly were
installed as PLP stalwart council-
. lors by the prime minister. In the
evening there was another com-
munity-wide party at the Ocean
View Restaurant and Bar.






(B $000) (unaudited)
: January 31, 2006 July 31,2005
Assets S$ 98,979 29,876
Liabilities 52,162 9,600
Total shareholders’ equity 46,817 (20,276
$ 98,979 29,876



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
SIX MONTHS ENDED JANUARY 31, 2006

Six months ended

Six months ended







January 31, 2006 January 31, 2005
Sale & revenues $ 55,996 33,072
Cost and expenses 52,276 31,100
Income from operations 3,720 2,672
Other income (expense) (38) 244
Net Income $ 3,682 2,916
Earnings per share $ 0.43 0.34
Dividends per share $ 0.28 0.28







sf a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
n Adderley, at the Freeport Oil Company located on Queens Highway, Free-
yd Bahama, Monday through Friday from 8:30 AMTO 5:00 PM.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 11





_ MINSPECTOR Percy Grant is pictured holding the Humane
Society International Animal Advocates Award with Tyrone,
_one of the BHS’s needy, friendly, young male potcakes, hoping
,for someone to give him a loving home.

Pioneering Rum

Recognition for Humane
Society education official

Bahamas Humane Society
education officer Inspector Per-
cy Grant addressed interna-
tional representatives of animal
welfare societies in Los Angeles
from as far afield as Australia,
Philippines, Chile, France,
Brazil, Tonga, Canada, South
Africa and Mexico.

He was talking to some 80
delegates about the work the
BHS does in educating school-

children about responsible ani- .

mal ownership, and support for
the proposed Animal Protec-
tion and Control Act being pre-
sented to Parliament this year.

He emphasised the impor-
tance of educating children to
address an obvious gap in young
people’s knowledge of what ani-

“mals really need in a modern
caring society. He also empha-
sised making good animal pro-
tection law and enforcing it.

In recognition of the work the
BHS does, ‘Percy Grant
received the Humane Society

-International: Animal Advo-
cates Award on behalf of the

-BHS-from their executive direc-_

tor Neil Trent.

Over 30 years ago, Washing-
ton DC based Neil Trent was a
BHS inspector based in Nassau

and he said: “It gave me
tremendous pleasure to give this
award to The Bahamas

Humane Society as I had first-

hand knowledge of the work
done by them years ago.

“JT am particularly impressed
with the willingness of this soci-
ety to also help other smaller
societies within The Bahamas,
and | am grateful for their sup-
port with the- forthcoming
Caribbean Animal Welfare
Conference, which HSI is spon-
soring in Antigua.”

The Caribbean Animal Wel-
fare Conference is taking place
in Antigua from today until
Wednesday and the BHS will
have their chief inspector,
Stephen Turnquest, and exec-
utive director Kevin Degenhard
there delivering a high profile
two-day workshop to support
animal welfare groups, police,
government agencies and other
non-government organisations
and improve skills when inves-

.. tigating animal cruelty. Inspec-

tor Missick and Inspector
Deveaux of the Royal Bahamas

“Police Force will also-be attend-

ing.
The conference is not only
sponsored by the US Humane

dies at 84 in Illinois, US

Dr Wylie Mullen - a globe-
“trotting aviator and pioneer
radiologist who was one of the
_ earliest American residents on

Rum Cay - died on Monday in
‘Joliet, [linois. He was 84.

_ Dr Mullen built a winter
>home near Port Nelson in 1971.
-He flew his own plane to the

island almost every winter until

his daughter, Sue, and her hus-~

band, Oscar, acquired the prop-
‘erty a few years ago.
~ Dr Mullen's passion for avia-
tion began in 1944 when he got
his first pilot's licence and con-
tinued until 2001. He had an
»airline transport rating and an
-instructor’s rating for over 46
*years for airplanes, gliders, heli-
“copters, instruments, and multi-
- engine land and sea planes. .
Through the years, he owned
“and flew helicopters and over
125 different makes and models






of airplanes, gliders and bal-
loons, including a DC-3 and P-
51 Mustang. He flew more than
two million miles and visited
136 countries on every conti-
nent.

He was president of Mainline
Aviation, which operated at the
Joliet Airport for many years,
and started two avionics com-

~ panies: He also co-founded Joli---

et Metallurgical Laboratories
in 1957 - the largest laboratory

of its kind in the United States -.

and was active as its CEO until
his death.

Dr Mullen's pioneering dri-
ve went beyond the skies. He
was a clinical instructor in radi-
ology at the University of Ili-
nois in Chicago for several years
and he introduced cutting edge
technology to his radiology
practice.

He and. his associates were

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ihe first in the United States to
use remote controlled closed
circuit television for gastroin-
testinal fluroscopy.

He was a life member and
past director of the Flying
Physicians Association, and a
life member and past director
of the Soaring Society of Amer-
ica. He was also a founding

--member of the National Air

and Space Museum.
A sports lover, he competed

in football, track and wrestling’

in college. In his adult life he
enjoyed tennis, bowling, golf,
water skiing, SCUBA diving,
blue water sailing, deep sea fish-
ing and hunting.

Dr Mullen served four years
during and after World War II
on active duty with the US
Navy, and later as a medical

. officer with a submarine unit of

the Naval Reserve.

He was born in 1921 in
Boone, Iowa. He obtained his
medical degree from the Uni-
versity of Iowa and'served his
residency at the Cleveland Clin-
ic in Ohio.

His first wife was Doris

Clausen, a pilot who was killed

in a plane crash in 1966. He is
survived by his current wife,
Shirley; his children, Dr Den-
nis Mullen, Barbara Lezotte,
Nancy Hall and Susan Davis;
four grandchildren, and two
great-grandchildren.

















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Society International, it will also
be sponsored by the World
Society for the Protection of
Animals based in London, the
Pegasus Foundation based in
New Hampshire and the Amer-

‘ican Society for the Prevention

of Cruelty to Animals based in
New York. :

Representatives from these
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

ae eA

THE TRIBUNE



Graduates complete straw work course

Black Point, Exuma — Twen-
ty-four women graduated with
top honours in BAIC’s handi-
craft training programme.

Trained by handicraft expert
Eloise Smith, of nearby
Farmer’s Cay, the graduates
produced a variety of souvenir
items combining straw work
with various ingredients found
on the island.

A straw market is being
planned for souvenir workers
at the public dock, downtown
Black Point, said Minister of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Vincent Peet, the
keynote speaker.

“It is small business persons
like you who are the engine of
the economy,” said Mr Peet,
whose Cabinet responsibilities
include Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC).

“You are playing and will
continue to play a critical roll in



2006 Lecture Series

Schedule



January 19 July 20
Women's Health Children's Health
February 16 August 17
Hatt Month Headaches
March 6 September 24
Kidney Month Thyroid Awareness
Ryanietes & Kidney Disease :
October 19
April 20 Mental Health
Asthma/ Lung Disease a3
November 16
May 18 Alzheimer's Disease Month
Arthritis ee :
December 21 | affecting society today.
June 15 Menopause
Men's Health





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Thursday of the Month

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Health For Li



B FINANCIAL Services and Investments Minister Vincent Peet
admires a bag produced by graduates of BAIC’s Black Point
handicraft training programme. Also pictured are trainer Eloise
Smith (right) and graduate Althea Adderley.

the development of not just the
Exumas but our Bahamaland.”

To educate the public about the
important health issues, presented by
distinguished physicians.
Every third Thursday of the month
6:00pm - 7:30pm, followed by Q & A
Doctors Hospital Conference Room —

To ensure available seating,

Screenings: Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, arid
Glucose testing between Spm & 6 pm.

Please join us as our guest every month for this
scintillating series of the most relevant health issues



The township and visitors to
_ the island packed the school













Refreshments will be provided.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO RSVP CALL:

RSVP 302-4603

SS







li THIS visitor fancies this hat, a sroduet of BAIC’s Black Point

handicraft training programme

room to commend graduates
and view their colourful exhibits.

Dignitaries included Exuma
representative and Deputy

Speaker of the House of

Assembly Anthony Moss,
administrator Alexander Flow-
ers, BAIC officials and board





@ HOSTESS Lorraine Rolle pours Financial Services and
Investments Minister Vincent Peet a coconut delight. BAIC
consultant Benjamin Rahming is at right.

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members, and local govern,
ment representatives.
Graduates were Althea :
Adderley, Eulease Brown,
Karen Gray, Hestine Kemp,
Onen McPhee, Samara Roker, °
Curline Rolle, Elvy Rolle, Ive-
na Rolle, Mavis Rolle, Doris
Smith, Sharon Taylor, Brenda
Brown, Esther Cooper, Beryl |
Kemp, Katie Kemp, Ida Pat- ’
ton, Corene Rolle, Dossiemae —
Rolle, Francis Rolle, Lorraine,
Rolle, Winnie Rolle, Shiner '
Smith and Trenda Taylor. BENS
Using primarily ingredients |
found on the islands - silver top.
palm, sisal, coconut fronds,
poinciana seeds, pine needles,
seashells, raffia - the graduates
fashioned baskets, bags, purses, :
wallets, place mats, hats, caps
and other items. \ \

“wv
T
£

e
Fashion =.

BAIC’s handicraft develop- ,
ment and marketing manager, .
Donnalee Bowe noted that, -
straw work is again fashionable ,
among Bahamian women. It is.
a hit with the tourists. mig"

“When I started I was told
that straw work was a dying;
industry,” noted Ms Bowe,.,
“Today that is definitely Ce
the case.

“Wherever I go, almost one }
of every two ladies is carrying:
Bahamian-made bags. It is the,»
fashion of the day. I feel cer: |
tain this trend is going to cons
tinue.” Mag

BAIC was formed to assist ;
in the creation and develop-:
ment of commerce and industry
within the Bahamas, and to ;
expand and create opportuni:
ties for Bahamians to partici-3
pate in the economic develop-:!
ment of the Bahamas, said coh-' |
sultant Mr Rahming.

BAIC places emphasis: on:
small and medium+size busi a
nesses, including cottage. indus- ‘
tries, he added.

Mr Peet’s responsibilities lop
include domestic investmen

“That means -creating:
Bahamian business people, that-
means making Bahamiat S.'
employers as ope to j ist, *
arya 2 he said Fe

ree











“You have S orodited first-.
class products that canbe sold
in any fine store anywhere ' ‘int
the world, made by Bahamidns:
_and trained by BAIC.” :

BAIC and the government
will provide necessary funding
to ensure that those who.want
to will be given assistance to-

‘expand their businesses, he.
- said.

“The government i is commit=
ted to giving Bahamians the:

best this country has to offer,” a
-said.Mr Peet. “We' are there+

fore giving Bahamian business:
persons more incentives. and
concessions than we do for the:
foreign investors.” *
Mr Peet underscored the
“mega investments” the. gov
ernment has been able to wih.’ :
“Sometimes we take thie
development of our country
and the investors coming in for.
granted because we start to;
believe it has always been that
way,” he said. “But that is not
true. . eS
“It has not always been that
every other month a govern
ment could announce a billion
dollar investment in the
Bahamas. That is most unusual}
“That has happened because;
of excellent, exemplary leaders
ship and the confidence that
the foreign investor has in}
Prime Minister Perry Christie!
and his leadership and the
Bahamas. i
“Over the last four years in
our Bahamas, this Christie gov+
ernment has attracted almost
$12 billion worth of investment
to our Bahamas. There is nd
other country in the region who
could say that.” q
As part of negotiations with
investors, said Mr Peet, “they
are now being told that they
have to provide opportunities
for Bahamians and in some cas+
es joint ventures between for-

ex a
eS) Scotia on eign investors and Bahamians..?
Prices shown based on 15% customer

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THE TRIBUNE



Venezuela’s Chavez —
visits London, but
he won’t meet Blair

@ LONDON



VENEZUELAN President
Hugo Chavez arrived im Lon-
don ‘Sunday for a two-day vis-
it that includes meetings with
London's maverick mayor,
left-leaning lawmakers and
trade unions. The one thing
missing is a face-to-face with
Britain's prime minister, or
any government official for
that matter, according to
Associated Press.

The visit is in stark contrast
to His trip to Britain in 2001
when he warmly embraced
Tony Blair.

Tensions between the two
governments have been esca~
iating since February, when
Blair told legislators in the
House of Commons that
Venezuela “should abide by
the rules of the international
community" and that he
wotld like to see Venezue-
a’$ close ally Cuba become a
“tunctioning democracy."

€havez responded by-say-
:ng ‘Blair's comments came
ikea "cannon blast."

Outside a conference cen-
ter in north London where
Chavez was to meet repre-
sentatives of hon-goyern-
mental organizatious and
left-leaning parties Sunday
afternoon, dozens of sup-
porters waited to greet him,
waving ‘yellow signs pro-
claiming "London welcomes
President Chavez." One sup-
porter was wrapped. in the
Venezuelan flag while anoth-
ericarried a Cuban flag, tes-
tament to Chavez's close
links to .Cuban leader

Fidel Castro,

Chavez, a fierce critic of
the war in Iraq, has charac-
ierized Blair as a "pawn of
imperialism” over his close
alliance with U.S President
George W. Bush, whom
Chavez has compared to
Adolf Hitler.

Chavez's moves to exert
greater control over his coun-
try's vast petroleum reserves
have also drawn criticism
from Britain and other coun-
tries.

Venezuela s Loadon
embassy issued a statement
Thursday, confirming that
Chavez would not have any
contact with the British goy -
ernment during his visit. The
statement did not mention
the recent tensions, saying
only that Chavez has
“already had an official visit
to the United Kingdom
where he met with the prime
minister and other Briiish
authorities."

Officials in Blair's office
and the Foreign Ministry

have declined to comment on.
the reasons why Chavez 1s.

noi Meeting with any senior
British official, saying only
that the Venezuelan leader's
Visit iS ‘piivate.'

A spokeswoman in Blair's
office added that Venezue-
jan officials had not request-
ed a meeting.

A researcher at the
Chatham House think tank
in London said that if every-
thing was fine between the
two countries, Chavez would
at least meet with a senior
British official.

ae ee & niente
April Ue Mey 13th

re Sherwin: Williams yo our
Ter ere MSC

rer,

rince Charles Drive





Cuban ‘ambassador pays courtesy





MONEE MAY 15.2006, PAGE 13

esse scecaabunanins 2



ete he AN ae









ison, Minister Nottage and Dr. ‘Ester A. Atkinson, MD.
(BIS Photo: Raymond A. Bethel) .







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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Pk

iS

Ee ae B. cS “% PESO IS Ms PEI IE



The new

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ach

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Pmeoyey Via TSN)



onflicting information
on surveillance aircraft

FROM page one

"It will be going to Florida, where they
are going to service the aircraft," said Mrs
Pratt. "And it will return so that we will be
able to have this transaction made with
Bahamas Air."

This mix-up in communication being giv- -

en to the public by the two top officials at the
government's national security office came
about when the MP for Eleuthera, Alvin
Smith, called into question decisions being
made by the agency in relation to defence
spending.

Mr Smith asked for the defence agency to
explain why millions of dollars in’ public
funds were spent on an aircraft which was
considered wrong for its intended military
purpose, only to have it sit, unused, at NIA.

In response, the national security chief
told the House that neither she nor MP
Smith were technicians. Therefore, she relied
on the advice of the technical people about
the kind of equipment that they should have
purchased.

“We have been advised by people who
are specialists in the area, and that's the
kind of aircraft that the Defence Force said

Ingraham on immigration law

that they needed," said Minister Pratt, "and

that is the kind of aircraft that was pur-

chased."

Admitting that he was not a specialist,
Mr Smith, however, questioned the logic of
having "specialists" advise and recommend
purchasing an aircraft for defence use, only
to have the aircraft sold to a passenger air-
line. Mr Smith said that, in all this confusion,
"the Defense Force is operating in the
dark."

Since the story concerning the King Air
350 broke last week, members of the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force have stepped for-
ward to criticize operations at the base, say-
ing "the men right now are demoralized and
wondering when the government is going to
open up the general review of the Defense
Force and reveal what the finding and rec-
ommendations were.’

As revelations that a number of high
ranking officers at the Defense Force base
are suspected of being on the United States's
Immigration stop list, Minister Alvin Smith
has also called on the government to update
the Bahamian people on the review of the
Defense Force that was completedsat the
end of 2005.

"Keeping pertinent information from the

them.

_ Wednesday.

FROM page one

citizenry seems to be a pat of this govern- “'"

ment's culture," said Mr Smith.
"The minister ought to explain to the

Bahamian people why the government has :

hidden this document from them, and why it.:
has not been tabled in the House of Assem- :

bly, as the Free National Movement did with ., :

the CDR review of the police force."

The Minister of National Security said |
that because of information in the review.
that could not be released the way it was, the
government has seen fit not to have the doc-.

ument tabled in the House for review. She | ,

said that the Prime Minister has briefed the.
leader of the opposition in connection with, :
the review, and she went on to promise that '
a communication would be Prous,
before the House at its next sitting | on |

will be welcomed by members of the forcé,

as they question why individuals on the US 3)>
stoplist continue to be employed with the :"
agency, and more qualified officers or offi-.'»
cers who are seeking to make themselves: >; ;

more qualified face firings, transfers, or the.
prospect of being denied promotions by. :
commanding officers who Perceive them as:
threats. ih

illegal immigrants. You round
up cattle not human beings.”': -
Mr Ingraham believes the:

government ought to have a sus-:.”

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“That is different from us. We
believe in a consistent policy.
Secondly, we believe that
enforcement of any law, includ-
ing our immigration law, must
dealt with humanely and in
accordance with standards,
human rights procedures, and

established human rights norms ,

that exist in all civilized soci-
eties. ,

“That it is not right to go to
people’s home at three and four
in the morning and round them
up: First of all the word round-

up is inappropriate, at best it

should be an apprehension exer-

‘cise;;an exercise to apprehend.

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Tr

,
bs

tained and ongoing regular con-: ::
sistent exercise to ensure that .*)
those who are in the Bahamas:~
without permission are:found +.’

and repatriated to their home |

country.

The FNM, he said, demon-
strated that quite vividly in
office and repatriated on aver-
age 5,000 illegal immigrants per
year over the last four or Ave
yeas.

- “There came.a time when we

-had to pay the Haitian govern-

ment $100 per person on every.

illegal immigrant we sent back
- because they said we'were send-
- ing back too many and that
“cost was too high.



“We would send them back’ .

to Port-au-Prince and they °

would transport them by bus to.
wherever they: came from: “And «
the Bahamas government paid
$100 per person to make sure
we facilitated them. We believe
that.same exercise should cop,
tinue,” Mr Ingraham said. *



a0

®

ke

3

&
wp

However, he does not believe 3

that illegal immigrants should,
be sought out at public clinics’ .
where people go for public

churches.
“These are all fntetaationally

“accepted standards and norm

for the apprehension of illegal
immigrants in a society.

“And we call upon the PLP
government to return to those
standards. To do its job, but
return to those standards.”

According to Mr Ingraham,

the 100 or more legal residents: |
with permanent residency who’ »

were apprehended at four and’
five in the morning in Eleuthera,

transported to Nassau by police,
taken to the Detention Centre,
and who had to be taken back:
by a private citizen, should not
have been picked up.

“T met with the commissioner
of police and senior officers after
the raid took place in Eleuthera
and I told them privately ‘some
things, but one thing I gave
them was a copy of the interna-
tional migrant and alien con-
vention and I underlined a cou-
ple of sections for the police to
be mindful of that at all times.

“They act on my behalf and:
on your behalf. They act in my

name, and in your name, and’ *

the name of the Bahamias,,
because it is our country and wes
want our country to be in com»

pliance with international stan’ ne

dards and norms.
“And Haitians are people Ate
like everybody else and it should

not be used like they are now -

being used for political partisan
purposes.

“The grass roots are getting
restless, they are complaining

and so the government is going
round picking up the Haitians.
That is not right.”

Mr Ingraham commended
lawyer Fred Smith for helping
those in Spanish Wells who are
going to take action against the
government.

“I encourage them (those
legal residents) to sue the state
so that we can establish in law in
the Bahamas what the rules are
to. any government - mine,
politician’s own or anybody’s
own - so we can abide by it in
the future. But that is not the
way to do business in this coun-
try,” he said.

K

'

* health care, or at schools and;



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 15\~:





Peet urges business people to

improve their productivity

MINISTER of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments Vincent
Peet implored a group of busi-
ness. people to improve their
level.of productivity to reap the
benefits of their labour.

His message came as he offi-
cially opened LORAM Corpo-
rate and Family Services at the
Royal Palm Plaza, Mackey
Street.

The business was established
to help potential domestic
entrepreneurs provide office
space ‘and support services for
existing corporations and fami-
lies.

He. ‘said the Christie adminis-
tration seeks to aggressively
enhance the climate for domes-
tic investment through sound
economic policies, legislative
incentives and concessions, joint
ventures and relevant leading
agencies.

‘Also attending the opening
wereé/Mr Neville Adderley,
chairman of The Bahamas
Development Bank; Mr Philip
Simon, executive director of
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Mrs Marlo
Murphy- Braynen, president of
LORAM. Corporate and Fami-
ly Services.

Mr Peet implored LORAM
professionals to improve. their
level of productivity to reap the
benefits of their labour.

“Research reveals that organ-
isations have to grapple with
trends:like rapid product and
technological change, global
competition, deregulation, polit-
ical instability, demographic

changes and a shift to a service
economy,” Mr Peet said.

He added that these factors
have increased the need for
organisations to be responsive,
flexible and generally more
competitive.

“The objective of LORAM,
which is basically to provide
finance, accounting and out-
sourcing services, will be a sig-

‘nificant benefit to the contin-

ued growth and development
of our economy,” Mr Peet said.

He said the partnership this
company formed with the gov-
ernment would promote the
environment for the establish-
ment of small and medium-
sized businesses in The
Bahamas, a genuine source of
job and wealth creation.

Also, the partnership pro-
vides opportunities for train-
ing entrepreneurs who wish to
start or expand an existing busi-
ness, which in turn would facil-
itate growth while creating a
sustained economy.

The minister warned
investors to regularly review
their operation, evaluate their
performance and make the nec-
essary changes to reflect best
practices.

“Understand the scope and
relevance of your worth and
work and express the same to
your clients who will be looking
to you for guidance and advice,
the minister noted.

He also encouraged persons
to acquire, The Bahamas: A
Paradise for Investment,
brochure produced by the min-

& MARLO Mutphy-Braynen, president and CEO of Laram
Corporation and Family Services, cuts the ribbon at the official
opening last Monday in the-Royal Palm Mall, Mackey Street.
From left, looking on: Tyrone Greene, operation manager;
Philip. Simon, executive director Bahamas Chamber of
‘Commerce; and Mr Peet. .



‘i (Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

!



«| The‘Hon. Bradley B. Roberts, Minister of Works, and Donald Demeritte,
Chairman of the Water and Sewerage Corporation, are pleased to announce
the, appointment of Ms. Cheri Hanna to Assistant General Manager of
Commercial Operations at the Water and Sewerage Corporation.



MS, CHER] HANNA /
sistant General Manager, Commercial Operations


















| Ms. Cheri Hanna, the newest member of the
i ' Executive Management Team, joined the Corpora-
ion in 1984 as Senior Clerk in the Delinquent
, Accounts Section of the former Accounting and
inance Department. Over the years Ms. Hanna

' in the Commercial Operations area, having also
: worked in Customer Services. Ms. Hanna is a
; Summa Cum Laude Graduate with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Accounting with a minor in
' Business Administration and Mathematics from
: Bethune,...Cookman College, Daytona Beach,
Florida, Additionally, she Has attended’a number: of
managerial workshops, and has obtained a
+ number of. certifications — including Certified
ele hee Public’ Accountant; (CPA), Georgia State: Board. of
ne Nonny Jnited. Negro College Fund:(UNGF) and’ Selby Foundation scholar. She
© has. attenided-numeérous internal and’ external” workshops including sessions at



: Nortiwestern:; University,:the.University-of-Singapore and the Water Institute of Malta. —

in December 2004"Ms,.Hanna was promoted to the position of Senior Manager. She
is described as being a highly motivated;-self-starter,.results-oriented: professional,
with exceptional organizing, analytical, communication and leadership skills, and an
extensive background in a number of broad-based competencies.

as gained a wealth of knowledge and experience .

a business. bridge the gap to help persons
_ _Mrs Murphy-Braynen said all _ bridge the transition from being
the services will be provided to employees to employers.

effort for persons to familiarise
themselves with what is avail-
able to them when establishing

istry which outlines legislative
incentives and concessions for
Bahamian entrepreneurs in an

Na aaa io a NO ea amulles



















Jitra Siliconizerâ„¢ is applied:
the temperature lowers up to:




‘Concre c Roof ith sph
| on — VTL8E
Neal toat OF












*Based on labor er
“etek ted Never 22 2008
































Wulff Road (Opp “Meckevs St)
Tel:(242) 398-0512, 393. 93-351:





Amilo in’ it

ee ee i
Ba A a a a



PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 15, 20068 THE TRIBUNE





Performing well
for arts festival







Mi COLONEL HILL, Crooked Island, The Bahamas — Crooked.
Island High School student Berkley Pinder creating beats at the
E.Clement Bethel National Arts Festival adjudication in Colonel |
Hill, Crooked Island. His performance placed him as a possible ;.
national-finalist in his division.





LIABILITY
CASUALTY @ CONTRACT WORKS
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY @ MARINE
ra: 325-3809 | oe

COLONEL HILL, Crooked Island, The Bahamas - the choral -





Rosetta Street music adjudicator for the E Clement Bethel National Arts Festi-
eolinagemeral.com | val and renowned soprano JoAnn Deveaux-Callender speaking
ae ral.ce i during the festival's adjudication in Colonel Hill, Crooked
sem = Island, on May 10, 2006.







ommunity Project Endorsed by My ¢
is to mybahamas@bahamas.com—s*:



Join My Bahamas...
Support a community project je



amas initiative lately? Tell us about it. Email
¢ photos fo mybahamas@bahamas.com





MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



BUSI



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

SS Colinalmperial.
. insurance Lid. . 2



Royal Oasis ‘crunch time’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government and de

facto owner of

Freeport’s still-closed

Royal Oasis resort have

reached “crunch time”

in determining the property’s future,

The Tribune has learned, following a

series of meetings held in New York

last Wednesday to assess the various
offers for the hotel.

Sources familiar with the situation

said “the time has come” for Lehman .

Brothers’ private equity arm and the
Government to choose which of the
various bids they have received will be
the one to acquire the Royal Oasis,
which has been closed since Hurri-
cane Frances struck in September
2004.

Coca-Cola maker |
seeking a buyer

m By NEIL HARTNELL
- Tribune Business Editor

. CARIBBEAN Bottling Company, the company that manu-
factures, bottles and distributes Coca-Cola products in the
Bahamas, is seeking a buyer, informed sources have told The Tri-

bune.

. Among the interested parties is understood to be the holders
of Coca-Cola’s Puerto Rico franchise, although The Tribune has
been unable to learn the identities of any other groups.

Caribbean Bottling, whose main shareholders are Judy Munroe
and Carleton Williams, distributes Fanta and Schweppes products
in addition to Coca-Cola, along with the Dae and Aqua oe

al Water products.
The company had been seek-
ing outside investors to inject



SEE page 7B

The Tribune iiuderstands that rep-
resentatives from the Hotel Corpo-
ration, including Dr Baltron Bethel,
its deputy chairman and managing
director, and officials from the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA),
attended the New York meetings.

The meetings involved Lehman

_ Brothers’ private equity arm and its

managing director, Jay Flannery, and

the various suitors for the Royal

Oasis.

The Tribune understands that two
bidders have offered around $42-$42.5
million for the Royal Oasis, the high-
est price laid on the table so far.

One of those is the Barlow Group,
a Toronto-based real estate develop-





New NOs meeting last ae assessed offers from ly BE L@o) babe iil

er, which has projects located across
Europe and in Canada. That group

is promising an investment of between -

$175-$250 million, inclusive of the
purchase price, to revitalise the Roy-
al Oasis.

The identity of the other top bidder
is unknown, but The Tribune under-
stands that it is a group that has
entered the Royal Oasis race at the
last minute. That group set its offer
price without inspecting the Royal
Oasis’s physical premises, and it is
understood that discussions are ongo-
ing over whether to allow this bidder
to perform this part of preliminary
due diligence.

Meanwhile, the Irish property

. (FILE photo)

ha achat ica

with your CORPORATE INVES







Ws Reet be Pl l(t x Pea ee

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BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
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DELL



PARADISE Island’s Atlantis resort saw
its operating income for the 2006 first quarter
fall by 3.9 per cent to $61 million, compared to
last year’s $63.4 million, largely due to a 4
per cent margin decline caused by a greater
reliance on food and beverage revenues.

developer that already has interests in
Freeport, Harcourt Developments,

has offered $30 million for the Royal ©

Oasis.

It was initially part of a three- -strong
group including Westgate Resorts and
Planet Hollywood, the proposed hotel
and casino operators, proposing a
$200 million investment in the Royal

Oasis. All three parties are still inter-’

ested in the Grand Bahama property,
although it is unknown f they are part
of the same consortium.

Any purchaser of the Royal Oasis
would have to be approved by the
Government and, to a lesser extent,
the Port Authority. However, it is
possible that the interests and objec-

tives of Lehman Brothers, which owns

- the Royal Oasis through the mort-

gage it lent to Driftwood Freeport,
and the Government may not coin-
cide.

Lehman Brothers will want to |
achieve the.best sales price possible,
while the Government will be most
concerned about attracting a buyer
who has the business plan and model

most likely to make the Royal Oasis.

work long-term, and the financing

and ability to carry this out.
Therefore, the Government may

not necessarily want the party that

SEE page 6B



Atlantis margins fall in 2006 Qu

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

4% decline caused by
ereater contribution
from food and beverage,
as resort’s net income

soll

. Kerzner International, the Atlantis owner,
revealed that net income at its flagship resort
had fallen despite a 7.8 per cent rise in net rev-
enues to $169.7 million, compared to $157.4
million in the 2005 first quarter.

: ee 3 : Reporting on the three months to March
@ ATLANTIS, Paradise Island 31, 2006, Kerzner International said operating
aie commande margins at Atlantis had declined to 36 per

also down slightly

cent from 40 per cent last year.
It said the margin decline was “mainly due
to a higher proportion of food and beverage
revenue, which has a lower [operating income]

SEE page 6B ie







= eet a on ‘softwar Sis

Freeport storage facility
in $303,000 revenue fall :

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



GRAND Bahama’s South
Riding Point storage terminal
saw revenues for the first three
months in 2006 decline by

. $303,000:compared to last year,

due’ to what its parent
described as “lower marine
révenues”.

In its statement to share-
holders for the 2006 first quar-

ter, World Point Terminals

said that in contrast to the 2005
first quarter, marine activity in
2006 had “been considerably
slower as our customers have
tended to hold their inventory
to take advantage of current
market conditions”.

In addition, World Point © -
Terminals said the 2005 first
quarter had also included pay-
ments from the Blue Marlin -
consortium, which had an -
option on land at South Riding ©
Point as the site of a proposed
liquefied natural gas (LNG)
terminal and pipeline.

That option, which involved
a Florida Power & light (FPL)

subsidiary, El Paso and Suez °.

North America, was “no
longer being pursued”, World
Point Terminals said, after the
site was rejected by the Gov-
ernment on Enuroseutal
grounds.

SEE page 7B

Rum Cay residents are excited,
but cautious on resort project

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

RUM Cay residents are
excited about the opportuni-
ties the multi-million dollar
Rum Cay Resort Marina will
bring to the island, but have
some reservations about how it

‘will change their way of life,

as it will more than quadruple
the island’s population.
Ground was broken on the
$700 million Montana Hold-
ings project on Friday. During
construction of Phase I, it is
anticipated that 300 workers
will join the population of
Rum Cay, which at present









stands at just under 100.

By 2016, when the entire
resort community is complet-
ed, including a marina, luxury
hotel, residential component,
retail space and dining facul-
ties, up to 400 permanent jobs
will have been created.

Rum Cay resident Delores
Wilson said that while the
community loved the peace
and tranquility of their current
existence, they were excited
about the opportunity and job
security the Rum Cay Resort
Marina will provide for the

SEE page 7B

rr eae ‘ Prenenint





BUSINESS

ee A aa



CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
& By Fidelity Capital market saw 15 out of its 20 list- accounting for 38 per cent of also recorded new 52-week | SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
Markets ed stocks trade, of which nine __ the total shares traded. The big _ highs of $10.50 and $1.25, gain-_ | AML $0.77 $0.06 at 54g
advanced, two declined and advancer for the week was __ ing $0.08 and $0.04 respective- BAB $1.25 $0.04 3600 13.64%
t was another blister- four remained unchanged. Commonwealth Bank (CBL),, ly. On the down side, Freeport | BBL SOT aici go ae |
ing week of trading in The volume leader for the up $0.20 to close at anew 52- Concrete Company (FCC) | BOB $723 " ° se saoe,
the Bahamian market, week was Doctors Hospital week high of $10.60. declined by $0.11 to close the | BPF $11.00 ‘ 0 577%
as over 216,000 shares Health Systems (DHS), with FOCOL Holdings (FCL) week at $1.04. BSL $14.00 $- 0 9.80%
changed hands. The 81,920 shares changing hands, and Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) The FINDEX increased by | BWL $1 29 $0.02 1.000 738%
1.19-points to end ihe week at | CAB $9.15 $0.15 te 38%
O20 St | CBL $10.60 $0.20 8,080
| CHL $1.67 - 20,300
‘ | CIB $12.00 $- 0
COMPANY NEWS | DHS $2.54 $0.08 81,920 . ;
: FAM $6.21 $0.01 3,800
Cl | rou Consolidated Water FCC $1.04 $-0.11 1,000
Company (CWCO) - FCL $10.50 $0.08 21,900
. Last week, Consolidated FIN $11.25 $- 0
corporate and : Water Company (CWCO) ICD - $9.50 $- 0
investment ban king released its financial results for JSJ $9.00 ee 0
the quarter ended March 31, KZLB — $7.95 $-0.03 1,487
CITIBANK N.A., NASSAU, BAHAMAS BRANCH 2006. Impressive is one word PRE $10.00 $- 0

Citigroup (NYSE; C), the preeminent global financial services has some 200 million customers accounts
and does business in more than 100 countries, providing consumers, corporations, governments and
institutions with a broad range of financial products and services, including consumer banking and credit,

. corporate and investment banking, insurance, securities brokerage, and asset management. Major brand
names under Citigroup’s trademark red umbrella include Citibank, CitiFinancial, Diner’s Club, Primerica,
Smith Barney, Banamex, and Travelers Life and Annuity.

We are currently accepting resumes for the following position:-
SOMPL ANCE CPRICER/ MANAGER

Knowledge/Skill Requirements:
Extensive working knowledge of compliance policies and internal control procedures.

Detailed understanding of Bahamas and US financial legislations.
Minimum 3 yeas supervisory experience in compliance and/or internal control.

Bachelors Degree with a concentration in Finance, Economics or Accounting. Certified
compliance audit or internal control credentials. would be a plus.

Superior analysis, communications (oral and written) and project management skills.

Extensice working knowledge of PC applications (Microsoft Office) is required.

used to explain the good
results posted by CWCO.

Total revenues increased by
$3.1 million or 52.6 per cent to
$9.2 million from $6 million in
2005, while net income grew
significantly by doubling to $3
million, a $1.7 million or 124
per cent gain from 2005’s $1.3
million.

Following suit was earnings
per share, which gained $0.13
or 108 per cent to $0.25, while
total shareholders' equity
stood at $63.1 million, a $3.6
million or 6.09 per cent gain.

For the week, CWCO saw
its stock price close as high as
$31.05.

BISX-

|

Dividend/AGM Notes:






¢ Bahamas Waste will hold its Annual General Meeting on:
May 23, 2006, at 6pm at the National Tennis Centre, Queen:
Elizabeth Sports Centre, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas.

e Commonwealth Bank will hold its Annual General Meet-'
ing on May 24, 2006, at Spm at the SuperClubs Breezes, ;
Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ Cable Bahamas will hold its Annual General Meeting a on:
May 24, 2006, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Pe
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

OA MAO NS By BO

e J. S. Johnson Company will hold its Annual General

Meeting on May 29, 2006, at 6pm at Radisson Cable Beach &itee
Golf Resort, Nassau, Bahamas. : ;

emer mm meta rncnrtrnnr erratsmatet mete:

International Markets:



Duties:
¢ To assist in developing / ensuring that an adequate aenipliance program exists which suitably covers e
the risks associated with all buisiness activities, products and processes. li St e d F OREX Rates 2
To assist in administering the compliance program through the disseminaton of any relevant training Fee Weekly a ‘%o Change
programs or materials aimed at improving the Bank’s compliance culture and adherence to : rp
regulatory requirements... . ‘ a jae Be
To assist in developing procedures for, and periodically executing, independent in-depth testing of C i I | EUR 1.2920 - 1.51
the effectiveness of business’ compliance with applicable local and US laws, regulations aE
and policies.
Implementing the regional information security program aimed at securing the confidentially, de clare S Commodities
integrity and availablity of all:Citigroup business information. ‘ 5 : Weekly % Change
. Assisting in developing and implementing a local Anti-Fraud Plan. which includes staff traininng. e e Crude Oil $71.73 VAT abe |
Play an active role in monitoring, containing and eradicating reported and emerging control issues di \ ride | | d Gold $714.80 ADAM

as well as the status of corréctive action plans and escalating any slippages to senior management.

Verifyin that operational procedures and internal controls exist for every product and service
provided by the bank, commensurate with level of inherent risk through peroidic
independent testing.

is constructing the $29 million Weekly
Reporting to Senior Management on the aca and efficacy of the system of internal control Blue Hills reverse osmosis ;
(accounting, operating and administrative). plant, has declared a second DJIA 11.380 99 a
: quarter cash dividend of $0.06 S & P 500 1,291. 24
Interested applicants may deliver, fax or e-mail resumes to: per share. ; NASDAQ 2,243.78
‘ : The dividend is payable on Nie, 16, 601. 7B.

Business Head
: Citigroup Corporate and Investment Bank
: 4th Fir, 110 Thompson Boulevard,
Nassau, The Bahamas
' Fax: (242) 302-8569
‘E-mail: tadesee.anja.mcekenzie@citigroup.com

‘Resumes should be recieved by



citigroup: l

une 1, 2006



3 date, the — will publish the audited sins! ned ne 30 ona! for: the: year ended
2005 in a newspaper circulating generally in The Bahamas... Factors contributing to

December 31, 2 |
the delay include the following:

* A delay in the finalization of the Appointed Actus

harmonization of reserving methodologies: used. by the former

those of the Company.

"s report due to the.
Imperial to

CONSOLIDATED Water,
the BISX-listed company that

July 31, 2006, to shareholders
of record as at June 30, 2006.

This means that Bahamian
investors who have purchased
Consolidated Water’s Bahami-
an Depository Receipts (Bars)
will receive $0.012 per BD.
Five BDRs are equivalent to
one Consolidated Water ordi-
nary share.






International Stock Market Indexes: —





* Modification of certain presentation and. accounting methodologies of the
financial statements of the former Imperial which were prepared under
Catiadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles to conform to
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

¢ The implementation of new disclosures as required by TERS 4— Insurance
Contracts. °

¢ Turnover among key accounting and management personnel during the
audit.

« Issues related to the integration of various subsystems acquired with the
former Imperial Life portfolio, particularly the integration of the mortgage
portfolios.

¢ Additional time required by the Company’s external auditors to complete
their audit procedures as a result of the foregoing matters.

Colina.

Holdings Bahamas







Phi bhiimuive

BUSINESS

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 3B



um Cay terminal to be

Bahamas’ third largest



i PRIME Minister Perry Christie (left) with MP Philip “Brave”



Davis on Rum Cay during Friday’s groundbreaking ceremony.

(Photo: Onan Bridgewater)

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter.

round has been

cleared at the

future site of

the Rum Cay

airport termi-
nal, which when completed at
5,500 square feet, will become
the Bahamas’ third largest ter-
minal.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie was given an update
on the project by Tim Perkins,
the director of construction for
Montana Holdings, which is
building the facility along with

_its $600-$700 million Rum Cay
Resort Marina.

-Mr Christie and Financial
Services and Investments min-
ister, Vincent Peet, were on
the island for the resort’s
groundbreaking on Friday.

The Prime Minister
expressed pleasure at the plans
for the three-storey complex,
which when completed will
include areas for arrivals and
departures, fuel facilities and
an Internet lounge. It will also
provide space for Fixed Base
Operations in the same build-
ing.

Montana Holdings views the
project as a public -private
partnership.

Mr Christie said that with
the terminal, the island now
had the potential to introduce
direct flights to and from Rum
Cay. This would, he said; cre-
ate a need for a Customs and
Immigration presence on the
island.

Mr Christie told the resi-
dents he had promised them
both paved roads and an air-
port. “ So said, so done,” he



PM: Resort is Rum Cay’s salvation

§ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



TWO years after signing a
Heads of Agreement with the
Bahamian government, Mon-
tana Holdings on Friday broke
ground on its multi-million
dollar Rum Cay Resort Mari-
na.

When completed in 2016,
the project is. expected to be a
$700 million investment, cre-
ating 300 construction-related

jobs and 400 permanent ones. ©

The mixed-use resort will fea-
ture a marina, marina village,
luxury hotel, residences, fine
dining and retail facilities.
Phase one of the project, the
development of the 80-slip
marina, marina village, and
marina condominium and
estates, is expected to reach
“full swing” later this year.

' Speaking at the ceremony,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
called the groundbreaking a “
great beginning” to help
rebound the island’s economy.

He added that in the past,

Rum Cay could at one time
boast of having a population of
2,000 people, but with a lack of
development currently has a
population of about 80.
“Clearly but for an inter-
vention such as this, settle-
ments such as this one would
slowly disappear into history,”

the Prime Minister said.

Mr Christie said this was
true of communities all over
the country, particularly in the
southern Bahamas, which
makes his vision of an anchor
property on each island even
more important.

Mr Christie added that the
Rum Cay resort, in addition

‘to creating on-site jobs for
*Bahamians, will also create a

number of entrepreneurial
opportunities for residents.

Challenge

“T challenge you (residents)
not to sit and look through the
window at your opportunity.
Take advantage, otherwise
hundreds of Bahamians will
come in and do it for you,”
said Mr Christie.

In addition, the Prime Min-
ister reminded the residents
that they will need to play an
important role in the success
of the development.

* “The future of Rum Cay will
be shaped by this, and it can

- only succeed if people play the

role that they are destined to
play,” he added.

Montana Holdings chair-
man, John Mittens, who host-
ed the entire community to a
luncheon after the ground
breaking, assured residents
that the protection of the envi-





An established law firm requires the following:

AN ATTORNEY

with a least five (5) years experience in litigation,

commercial and general law.
Must be willing to relocate to a Family Island.

*,

: A LEGAL SECRETARY

with at least three (3) years litigation experience.

Applicants must be able to work on their own initiative.

Please send resumés:
c/o The Tribune,
P.O. Box N-3207

: DA 46420

“ Nassau, The Bahamas





MG






ronment during the construc-
tion and maintenance of the
resort remains at the forefront
of the developers’ minds.

“If we destroy it, we will
have all failed,” he said.
Montana will not let.you
down.”

Mr Mittens said the devel-
opers planted a tree farm on
the island as another way of
preserving the environment,
and have chosen a design that
seeks to blend into the existing
environment rather than
change it.

Also attending Friday’s cer-

“emony was the Minister of

Financial Services and Invest-
ments, Vincent Peet, and the
island’s MP, Phillip Davis.

Mr Peet assured residents
that save some specialised
areas, the majority of work on
the project will be done by
Bahamian labour.

BIs

Pricing Information As Of:
12 May 2006





Abaco Markets



said, in an echo of the recent
PLP convention.

Montana Holdings, he
added, has agreed to provide a
sewerage and water system for
the island, including a reverse
osmosis plant.

Mr Christie noted that in the
Heads of Agreement, the
developer had the legal right to
provide its own electricity sup-

ply in the event that BEC was
unable to do so.

However, Mr Christie
expressed his full confidence
that BEC would have no prob-
lem supplying power to the
island or the development
when they needed it.

He also told them that
thanks to the $66 million
Bahamas Telecommunications

Company (BTC) cable laid to
the island, in four to five
months, he expects Rum Cay
residents to be able to have
cable television, Internet access
and cellular service.

Combining these infrastruc-
tural developments with the
island’s anchor property, Mr
Christie said Rum Cay’s future
appeared bright.

(INTERNATIONAL BANK

‘CAREER OPPORTUNITY

[OF

MANAGER, RETAIL CREDIT (NASSAU)

Qualifications/Experience:

Bachelor’s Degree in Banking or related field.
At least five years banking experience at senior supervisory

level

At least three years lending experience

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

To provide assessment of retail credits submitted by 2

jurisdictions

Sanction/authorize retail credit loan applications including
International mortgages within delegated limits up to US$400
thousand secured and US$100 thousand unsecured

Prepare recommendations on retail loan applications outside
of delegated limits for the Senior Manager, Retail Credit /
Head of Retail Credit to sanction / authorize.

If you are interested:
Submit your resume private & confidential i in WRITING ONLY Dee

may 26, 2006 to:

Dawnika Rolle

HR Business Associate

Shirley Street, Financial Centre

P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: dawnika.rolle@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their
interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian nationals only.



Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

.Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier ae Estate i

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdi

28.00 ABDAB

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

* $52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name
1.2858 1.2296 Colina Money Market Fund 1.285819"
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 2.7451 ***
2.3560 2.2072 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**
1.1643 Colina Bond Fund 1.164331****



1.1006

S2wk-Hi



- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT APR. 30, 2006/ **** - AS AT MAY. 01, 2006

* - AS AT APR. 28, 2006/ *** - AS AT APR. 30, 2006




EPS EOS 2



Colina

Financial Advisors Lid.

1,000

1,062





0.000 N/M
0.360 . 7.0
0.330 11.2
0.020 3.9
0.060

0.050

0.240 16.2
0.000 NM
0.560 11.4
0.045 53.0
0.000 5.6
0.240 11.5
0.540 15.2
0.500 13.7
0.500 12.6
0.000 N/M
0.405 18.1
0.560 15.7
0.000 59.3

es oe an i

Weekly V

aa ELLE a a




thes
Last 12 Months Div $

ELD - last 12



a so
5 baa

z Rees ae g
onth dividends divided by closing

3 35 = 5
. oae NM
Mee

°. 260

a





Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Me

SSSA

sys



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006



PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMMES 2006

What is your goal?

YÂ¥ PROMOTION

Â¥ QUALITY SERVICE

/Â¥ SALARY INCREASE

/ NEW CAREER

— Y CAREER ENHANCEMENT

| We can provide you with superior education and training
to help you accomplish your goal.

{ Call 242-328-0093 or 242-328-1936 for an interview
today!



For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am — 12noon.
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? Our Professional
Development Department can help you achieve your career goal!

No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.

SUMMER COURSES

CERTIFICATION IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

PROJ901 Mastering Project Management - $800

| This course explores the core competencies of project management, and the following topics are
discussed at the advanced level: leadership, project performance management, project plan
development, and people-based project management, project quality, scope, time, cost, human
resources, communications, risk, procurement, and integration management. Upon successful
completion of the programme, candidates are encouraged to sit the American Academy of Project
Management Executive Level Certification Examination. To be awarded the Master Project
Manager Certification, candidates must score a minimum of 75% on the AAPM Master Certification
Final Examination. :

Prerequisite: A Master’s Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university
and a minimum of one. year’s experience as a project management apprentice; or a Bachelor’s
degree with four years’ project management experience; Curriculum vitae.

| ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
Begins: Spring, Summer and Fall ‘Day/Time: Saturday 8:00am - 12n

Master Project Management Intensive Review- $800 Duration: 4 Weeks

Duration: 8 Weeks

Begins: Spring, Summer or Fall Day/Time: Saturday 8:00am - 12n

THE BECKER CPA REVIEW

"ff The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer-Based Test (CBT). Besides

the obvious transition from a pencil-and-paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA
Exam will also contain a new content focus - broadening the scope of audit and attest areas and
incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam
also has increased emphasis on general business. knowledge and information technology. Students
may sit the final exams under the United States CPA Board for which they have qualified.

CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520

CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650
CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465

| CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465

Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least
21 credit hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall

A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION

This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to sit the international
A+ Microsoft Certification Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems
related to the personal computer are explored. The programme provides hands-on learning experience
with lab exercises that help students to apply theory to practice.

TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware- $510
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS

CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR - Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)

Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am - 5:30pm _, Duration: 12 Weeks

i This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel,

Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation
and design skills, the instructor provides easy-to-understand notes and conducts live demonstrations
on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Students who complete the external international

# examinations successfully will be awared the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification. The ~

programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:

‘TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP $06 Microsoft Office Specialist ETHC900 Ethics & Profes. Responsibility- $250 (Optional)
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3

Microsoft Outlook COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
(Optional).

NOTE: COMP906 is offered in Spring, Summer and Fall terms. Students are free to select the term of study.

PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION |

APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMMES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in
conjunction with foreign institutions are required to contact the CEES Office for information on
external application and examination fees.

FEES ‘ :
1. COB Registration.........ccceseceeeceseeeeeee $40.00 (one-time fee)
D. INSUPANCE. \...ccececsscccstsosssesscelsacessenecsentebinedions $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
Bi AD Cards ...5schstesstediccrsc. todeseccevafagisisistveeveattans $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee...........:ceeceeeeeeeeesenteseeneens $100
5. BOOKS rwccccsursheetactevexescstesssageegessatiens Siivecewees Please contact COB Bookstore fy prices. |
6. Awards Ceremony (Optional)...........cceee $150.00 (must be paid by the 2 ~ TERM)
7. External Application Fees... eee Please check with the CEES Office for
information.

THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY

The Annual Awards Ceremony and Reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel
once during TERM 38. Adult students successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded
certificates or certification documents.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!

Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 or visit us on Moss Road in Oakes Field.
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To:
The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees reserves the right to change tuition, fees, course content, course schedule and course materials.

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
SUMMER SEMESTER 022006
CODE BEGINS DUR.
1. Gourmet Cooking | COOK 823 Y
COOK #06 $10- $12 per week

3. Introduction to Bartending | ITFB 903 May 15 6weeks | Mon/Wed. | 6:00-9:00pm | $402.98 : CHMI 15
Skills Dining Rm.

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary
7 & Hospitality Management Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175

REE











RESOURCE
MATERIALS






TUITION
& FEE

COURSE















6:00-9:00pm | $200.00 $20 per week SHTS Main Kitchen




ae ke

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs




CONSTRUCTION SEMINAR GROUP

Construction Seminar Group & The College of The Bahamas
“Lessons Learnt from the Disastrous Hurricane Season: 2004-2005”

Tuesday, May 16-Thursday, May 17, 2006

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute, Bahamas Tourisin Training Centre
; The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas

Day One Tuesday: May 16, 2006

1:00-2:30 p.m. Registration
2:00-7:00p.m.iTrade Show

Master of Ceremonies:
Mr. Henry Hepburn, Lecturer, School of Sciences & Technology, COB

2:30-3:30 p.m. Opening/introduction - COB and CSG
Mr. Cyprian Gibson, President ,BSE
Mr. Amos Ferguson, President, IBA

Dr. Rhonda Chipman-Johnson, Acting President, COB -
Mr. Henry Hepburn, Organising Committee

Welcome Remarks
Introduction of Minister

Remarks ; Hon. Bradley B. Roberts, MP, Minister of Works and Utilities
Introduction of Speaker Mrs. Lelawattee Rahming :
3:45 - 4:15 p.m. Keynote Speaker: Herbert Saffir, Codeveloper, Saffir-Simpson

Hurricane Scale :

General Discussion

4:30 - 5:15 p.m..
Reception and Cocktails -

5:15 - 6:00 p.m.

Day Two Wednesday: May 17, 2006

8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Registration
9:00 - 9:10 a.m. Introduction: Mr. Hammond Rahming

‘ Member Organising Committee
PRESENTATIONS

9:10 - 10:10 a.m: “Hurricane Damage Assessment”

Presenter: Tony Gibbs

“Architecture and Structures”
Presenter: Amos Ferguson - “Architecture”
Presenter: Nick Dean - “Structures”

Coffee Break

10:10 - 11:20 a.m.

11:20 - 11:30 a.m.
11:30 - 12:30 p.m. “Design and Construction of Buildings in High Winds Regions”
Presenter: Gary Williams é

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. “Coastal Engineering” —
Presenter: Dr David Smith

1:30 — 2:30 p.m. Lunch

2:30 - 2:40 p.m. - * Panel
. Introductory Comments
_ Mr. Michael Diggiss, Organising Committe
PANEL Representatives Of The Following Agencies:
National Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA)
Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC)
Bahamas Telephone Company (BTC)
Water & Sewerage Corporation

, Insurance Company
2:40 - 4:15 p.m. .
Panel Discussion Mr.Michael Diggiss
4:15 - 5:30 p.m.
Discussion & Recommendations
For the Way Forward Mr. Hammond Rahming

COST - $150 per person, including breaks and lunch. Students - $25 with ID
Call 326-3467 :: 394-1886 :: 341-9389 to register now!

GOLD SPONSOR:
SILVER SPONSORS

Timber Systems ‘
InterAmerican Development Bank
Bahamas Electricity Corporation

CSI Metal Disk fo hake
BRONZE SPONSORS: The Engineering Group * Paradise Blue Waters Limited * Henry A.
Hepburn Associates, Architects - Planners * Jackson Burnside Ltd * Ministry of Tourism *
Bahamas Society of Engineers * George V. Cox & Co. Ltd * Brokell Construction® Watson
Construction Company Ltd. :





COB GRADUATION
ACTIVITIES















hes Copvoralias
























Nurses Plonieg Ceremony D6 7THO DI Bandghe!) 8
“Bagvalaureste Service 12006 / 700 p.m, Chureh of God of Propaecy East $1 Tabernacle /
Graduates Award Bleaktast 2006 /8.00am. —_Wyridhram Nassau Resor! & Seystal Casino. C

May 25, 2000/7 00pm, Bandshell
fay 27, 2008 700 p.m. Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute

Sammencenient Serenriony 7
Alunini Reception





NORTHERN BAHAMAS CARP US COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AND RELATED EVENTS
SVEST SSYE/TIME YESRE

yf May 31, 2006 / 12 noon Nor’
‘May 34, 2006 / 7:00 p.m.
dune #, 2006 / 7:30 a.m.
Thursday / June #, 2006 / 5:00 pam.



n Campus Grounds









jaccalaureate Wednes St Vincent de Paui Catholic Church





Xanadu Beach &



3 Award 8

Gradu



Commensement Ceremony Our Lucaya Resor

_ Honours CONVOCATION.

- IF YOU FIT INTO ANY OF THE CATEGORIES BELOW, WE CONGRATULATE

_ YOU. YOUR DETERMINATION TO ACHIEVE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE HAS °
PAID OFF! THE COLLEGE IS HONOURING YOU AT HONOURS:
CONVOCATION 2006, 22" MAY 2006 AT 7:00 P.M. AT THE BANDSHELL.
°©DEAN’SHONOURROLL ———.. ie ee
STUDENTS WITH A G.P.A. OF 3.00 OR ABOVE COMPLETING at least 12

CREDIT HOURS IN THE FALL 2005 OR SPRING 2006 SEMESTERS.

e PRESIDENT’S HONOUR ROLL fl

STUDENTS WITH A G.P.A. OF 3.50 OR ABOVE COMPLETING at least 12
CREDIT HOURS IN BOTH FALL 2005 AND SPRING 2006 SEMESTERS
CONSECUTIVELY.

WE WANT TO PUBLICLY RECOGNIZE YOU FOR YOUR ACHIEVEMENT. ~





CONTACT THE COUNSELLING & HEALTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT,
" 302-4439/302-4380 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.

PLEASE NOTE THAT PAST CERTIFICATES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AT aust?
SECRETARIAT, COUNSELLING & HEALTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 3°~
FLOOR, PORTIA M. SMITH STUDENT SERVICES BUILDING.

SEIVESAA TTL Se Treat LE eee SS REMUS TSU ING VET SMES SO PY Ad Ny



Suan ARES ISNT LRT,

Ths



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Pe

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SEER EED

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SAREE TS

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ESRC ESTER:



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES |

COMPUTER OFFERINGS - SUMMER 2006

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not
understand how it works. This course covers the major computer concepis with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (1) Microsoft Office - Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel -- Spreadsheet (tii)
Microsoft Access — Database Management.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Monday, 15 May 2006 6:00pm - 9:30pm Section 0! (CEES)
Saturday, 13 May 2006 10:00am - 1:30pm Section 02 (CEES)

Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Tuition: $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of .
various software using: (1) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet (iti) Microsoft
Access — Database Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I

Begins: Thursday, 18 May 2006
Time:' 6:00pm - 9:30pm
Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Thursday, |“ June 2006
Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00
MICROSOFT EXCEL

Course Description: This course covers the fundamentals of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Tools that are
needed for basic entry and manipulation of cells and worksheets are presented. The.course assumes no
particular background.

Pre-requisite: Keyboarding

Begins: Monday, 15 May, 2006
Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer La
Fees $250.00
MICROSOFT WORD

Course Description: The course assumes no particular background and takes the student from the level of
novice to an advanced level. A thorough grounding in all ofthe fundamentals of document handling in
Microsoft Word 1s presented.

Keyboarding
Wednesday, 17 May 2006.

Pre-requisite:
Begins:

Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm,
Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees

$250.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments.The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Tr oubleshooting
and Repairs.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 16'" May 2006

Time: 6:00pm — 8:00pm Tuesdays.and Thursdays
Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: BHTC Computer Lab

Fees: $500.00

QUICKBOOKS

Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than
20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software.
Students will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and
employees.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 16" May 2006
Time: 6:00pm — 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks ©

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will
cover Web page creation; Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics wall include Formatting, Graphics,
Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of
word-processing !

Pre-requisite:

Begins: Thursday & Friday, | 15" 16" June 2006
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
$550.00

Fees:

HEALTH 7a) 1M UND SS



ee OFFERINGS — Summer 2006 _

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological
and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and‘Complementary
Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Thursday, 18° May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm

Starting:

Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: The College of the Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II

This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics
include introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals
or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.

Starting: Monday, 15" May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10 Weeks

Juition Fee: $620.00

Venue: The College of the Bahamas

CHAPTER ONE Phone 397-2650 e

- service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.



MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 5B



PERSONAL AARON ONGD Re ey

SUMMER SEMESTER 2006



SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer

1** June 2006



Date: Thursday, i
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm A
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre 4
Tuition: $170.00 |



EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on ae effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday i Tune 2006

Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $160.00

WEB PAGE DESIGN



This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling
with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will

include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages. :
Date: Thursday & Friday, June gt f & 9 ih 2008 :
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm 4
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road F
Tuition: $550.00 :

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT :
SUMMER SEMESTER :














































COURSE SECT | COURSE
INOS > __NO. | DESCRIPTION | Sh Oe,
LaccounTing [OO
[ACGROG0 [01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS ea
LACCASOt "| Ot "ACCA FOR BEGINNERS ii
ACCAS02 04 ae ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ill
[BUSINESS Se eas
BUSI900 =~ (OT CREDIT & COLLECTION 6:00-900PM _| | Hl
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE BF
CUST900 01 WIS _ | 9:30-4:30pm i
(OMY eReS hi nee en ett hh ie ae ee aaa F
[COMPSON | OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |_| 6:00-9:30pm__ H
i . “COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10am-1:30pm a
| COMPUT











| COMP 944 Ot










































































































/01 | QUICKBOOKS |[6:00-9: Soa 2 f
_COMP953. 01. | PCUPGRADEAND REPAIR | 6:00-8:00pm_ | Tue/Thur |” Fl
ComPso7 | 01 [MICROSOFT EXCEL Ei
COMP960 01._| MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S_ Hi
| COMP905 ot | MICROSOFT WORD FP
_COMP930. | OT | WEBPAGE DESIGN WIS ‘
COSMETOLOG :
| COSM802 :
ty
_COSM804 | B
| COSM807 _NAIL ART TECHNICIAN oe
i | tf
= oe Shects a jetta e, | Soe ss us
DECORATING |" ett aul isestees gene :
| DECO800 01._| INTERIOR DECORATING | ~[6:00-9:00pm | Tue | 16-May a
| FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00pm. | Thur 18-May i
FLOR801_—| 07 FLORAL DESIGN It, 6:00-9:00pm_| Tue 16-May f
HEALTH AND ‘i o incite
| FITNESS L
TMASG900 | 07 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS! | 6:00-9:00pm_| Thur 18-May| 10weeks, $465) ff
| MASGS01 i 01 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |__| 6:00-9:00pm_| Mon poy 10 weeks | $620 fa
LANGUAGES [oo Se MN eA ac a SSN oa aE ho sl ev aE
| CRE 900 01 | CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE! _| 6:00-7:30pm_| MoniWed | 15-May | 10 weeks | kes $225) ff
_SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH | 6:00-7:30pm _| Mon/Wed | 15-May | 10 weeks | _ ~ $225. Fe
“I
{ > A ea x Peak es. pe. |e ees ee @
LMANAGEMENT | | Gains haem cobh ah, Ne Beall param (Pee aay Saeed Ec eed, I
MGMTS900 01 | HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT! _| 6:00-9:30pm_| Thur | 18- a 9 weeks | ~ $250"
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Il_| 6:00-9:30pm_| Mon di 15-May | Sweeks | $300.
| MEDICAL Sess eos B
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY WOweeks | $225
SEW :
SEW 800 01 | BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING | "10 weeks ‘ $225|
RAPERY MAKING | mmm y.|_10 weeks | $225}
PHOLSTERY MAKING | 10weeks | $225) &
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ i
— 328-1936/302-4300 ext. 5202 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs f
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) . a
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, d
Course Schedule and Course Materials. f

Personal Development Courses ||

CREDIT EQUIVALENCY

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the
Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners |
ACCA901 - Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management |
MGMTS801- Human Resource Management II
SPA 900 = Conversational Spanish |

- SPA 901 - Conversational Spanish II

Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional
development in both private and public sectors with the added recognition
that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward a degree
programme.

Fax 325- 7394

CAMPUS SECURITY - DIRECT LINES 302-4566, 302-4493, 302-4494

TARA Te SEO





FROM page 1B

otfers Lehman Brothers the highest
price. Both it and the Port Authority
have seemed keen on Harcourt
Developments, together with its con-

Package

Obie Wilchcombe, minister of
tourism, told The Tribune previously
that the Government was seeking
“the whole package" from a buyer of
the Royal Oasis.

He said: “Grand Bahama needs a .

real push. A brand to draw attention
to Grand Bahama, and give it that
promotion in the market.

“West End has Ginn, Lucaya is
doing pretty good. The centre of
! yeeport needs that engine to drive it,

omy err

and if we get the right player it should
create tremendous opportunities for
the people of Grand Bahama.’

The Government is looking for a
buyer that already has its hotel and
casino Management components,
rather than one that seeks to sign
these agreements once the purchase is
complete.

Still, one source told The Tribune:
“Tt’s now the job of Lehman and the
Government to say what they think

they would like to do - which one of

these bids they would like to go with.”

Back in 2005, Mr Wilchcombe had
described the more than $22 million
owéd by the Royal Oasis to various

creditors - including many govern- ~

ment and Grand Bahama Port
Authority agencies - as a "quagmire".

The Bahamas Hotel Industry Man-
agement Pension Fund and Bahamas

Hotel and Allied Industries Pension
Fund have both executed a judge-
ment to "take possession" of the
resort's assels, meaning that a por-
tion of the sales proceéds will have
to be used to settle the sums owed to
them by the Royal Oasis, which in
January 2005 amounted to $4.1 mil-
lion. ;

However, the insurance claim from
the 2004 hurricane season has finally
been settled, enabling Lehman Broth-
ers to reduce its asking price for the
Royal Oasis to levels that have inter-
ested potential buyers.

Advanced

Apart from the $25 million
advanced to Driftwood to enable it to
acquire the Royal Oasis, Lehman
Brothers has also invested at least

$70 million in renovating it.

The private equity firm is said by
sources to be waiting to achieve the
best sales price possible, feeling it is in
a position where it can squeeze more
concessions from a government facing
a general election within the next 15
months, and which has set solving the
Royal Oasis "quagmire" as a priority.

While Prime Minister Perry
Christie has twice hinted at stripping
Royal Oasis of its casino licence,
potentially the property's most valu-
able asset, in a bid to force Lehman
Brothers’ hand, the threat has never
been followed through.

The resort’s closure in September
2004 cost Grand Bahama 1200 direct
jobs, and has had a much wider
impact, particularly on the Interna-
tional Bazaar.

Mr Christie said last week that the



fate of the Royal Oasis is a matter
that "exercises every degree of atten-
tion" from the Government.

Meeting

"A meeting date has been set and
applications are. being considered.
And I believe. it is fair for.me to,say
that if the people who have to sell
cannot find a purchaser to present to
us when we meet shortly, that the
government would-be faced with hav-
ing to exercise another option. ___ |

“I do not propose to be hostag¢ to
circumstances where people - as they
are in lawfully entitled to do - exercise
their best interest which does not nec-
essarily coincide with the best interest
of our country and Grand Bahama; to
leave myself, and my government
hostage to those circumstances.”





Atlantis margins fall in 2006 Q1

FROM page LB

margin, and increased levels of
utility and sales and market-
ing expenses”.

Kerzner International, in
what could be its last or penul-
timate results announcement

before the company is taken-

private, said the net revenue
rise was driven by a 17 per cent
icrease in food and beverage
revenues.

This growth came from the

_, 75,000 square foot Marina Vil-

lage and its five restaurants,
plus retail and entertainment
attractions, which opened in
July 2005 and would not have
been included in the 2005 first
comparative. In addition,
-Nobu Atlantis was opened in
January.

The lower Atlantis operat-
ing income did not impact
results, with net income rising
by 28.1 per cent to $48.7 mil-
ion, compared to $38 million

la suk
Care

the year before.

Diluted earnings per share
(EPS) for the 2006 first quarter
stood at $1.27, compared to
$1.01 the year before.

Meanwhile, Atlantis’s rev-
enue per available room
(RevPAR) a key indicator of
hotel performance, increased
2.6 per cent to $276, compared
to $269 the previous’year.

Atlantis’s 2006 first quarter
average occupancy levels fell
to 86 per cent, compared to 87
per cent in 2005, with average
daily room rates (ADRs) rising
to $320 from $310.

The Atlantis casino saw its
slot win increase by 4 per cent
over the 2005. first quarter,
although table win fell by 5 per
cent. There was a 1 per cent
increase in table drop, but a
lower hold, causing the table
win decrease.

Kerzner International said
Phase II of the Harborside
timeshare development, which

‘consist of 116 three and two-

bedroom units completed last
year, was 42 per cent sold at

vey requires that businesses and ins
owing information: oo

Number of Eee
ages and Salaries _

Annual Hours Worked :
evenues and Expendit

~ March 31, 2006.4

Harborside, which has a
total of 198 units, generated
$3.7 million in equity earnings,
compared to $3.6 million last

. year, for Kerzner Internation-

al as the development is a
50/50 joint venture with Star-
wood.

The $130 million Ocean
Club Residences & Marina,
featuring 88 units, was 33 per
cent finished at the end of the
2006 first quarter. Kerzner
International said deposits had
been received on 83 units since
they went on the market in
May 2005, and the four 22-unit
buildings are expected to be
completed between January
and May 2007.

The 495-unit condo hotel
that Kerzner International is
planning as a joint venture with
Turnberry Associates is
expected to start when financ-
ing is secured. -

Meanwhile, the One & Only
Océan Club also saw its oper-
ating income for the first quar-

‘ter decline by 5.8 per cent to

epreciation and Acquisitions

$4.9 million, compared to $5.2
million the year before.
Kerzner International

blamed the decline on the clo-’

sure of one of the resort’s
restaurants during the 2005
third quarter.

The Paradise Island-based
resort saw its first quarter
RevPAR rise by 7 per cent
over the 2005 comparative to
$953, compared to $445, with
average occupancies during the

| # ERNST & YOUNG

Board of Directors

three months to March 31
standing at 86 per cent and an
ADR of $1,107.

This compared to average

‘ occupancies and an ADR of

87 per cent and $1,023 in the
same period in 2005.
Kerzner International added
that it incurred $5.8 million in
transaction costs during the
2006 first quarter, largely
involving financial and legal
advisory fees, relating to the

@ Ernst & Young up
* 5 Times Square

New Yark, New York 10036-6530 A ant ay

Report of Independent Auditors

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

New York, New York

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the MY
United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain”
‘reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting
the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. An’ audit also“™

We have audited the. accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate, ., ..,
Bank (USA) (the “Bank”) as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and. the, related.
consolidated statements of income and cash flows for the years then. ended. These.
financial statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our résponsibility., .
is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our.audits. : cstee Lys



bid by Sol and Butch Kerzn-
er, the company’s chairiian
and chief executive respéc-
tively, to take the company pri,

ye}

’ vate. :

The Kerzners’ buyout bid,
backed by numerous private

equity groups, has been

approved by the Board, and
the deal is expected to close in
the 2006 third quarter after
receiving final approval from
all shareholders. at ee

ne
<





includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated , financial : statement
presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred ‘to above present fairly, in
all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate; Bank EN
(USA) at December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the consolidated results of its operations and .
its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally

accepted in the United States.

~ March 15, 2006

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

Consolidated Balance Sheets



December 31

(In thousands, except share amounts) “2005 2004
Assets : :

Cash and due from banks (Note 3) $ 34,352 $ 66,903
Interest-bearing depcsits with banks 568 78,679
Federal funds sold 75,000 -

Securities (Note 4)

Available-for-sale . 309,915 209,228
Held-to-maturity 417,165 531,880
Loans and leases (Note 5, 22) 2,192,811 1,942,742

Allowance for credit losses (Note 6)

Net loans and leases

Accrued interest receivable and other assets

Total assets

Liabilities :
Noninterest-bearing deposits

Interest-bearing deposits (Note 10)

(17,837) (23,287)

2,174,974 1,919,455 ql
86,935 73,584
$3,098,909 _ $2,879,729 -
4 »
$ 99,937 $ 123,798

1,080,035 1,184,553’

. Total deposits 1,179,972 1,308,351

0, Hf yoo invol Ss of goods and Be yee Federal funds purchased 810,000 360,000
can help contr statistics by completing the ‘Other honowings (Note T1) 1.144 6267
Annual B y questionnaire accurately Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities 129,059 143,134 |
er . Capital notes (Note 12) : 25,000 135,000 i

Total liabilities 2,145,175 1,952,752 Wi

A i [ Stockholder’s equity (Note 15)
€ Common Stock—$100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding }
Es Se 984,742 shares in 2005 and 2004) 98,474 98,474 * |
the Depar Capital surplus 1,222,036 1,222,036
4 Retained deficit (366,462) (392,883) |
Accumulated other comprehensive loss 314 - (650
Total stockholder’s equity ~ “ 953,734 926,977 }
Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity $3,098,909 $2,879,729 |
!

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

SECTOR

AND OUR NATION'S PROGRESS

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited
Accounts from §G Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, .
P.O. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

INE: 326-4602/4



—
—



lHE TRIBUNE



TAL RETINOL EEF NEE SN RR EE TIER



iene

MONDAY MAY 45 2996

ESIMCRL EE TSE TO cl i ema Ad SSE a AR REE TRS TT RT

PAGE 7B

5:





Coca-Cola maker seeking a buyer

&

FROM page 1B

capital into the business for some
time, The Tribune having learned that
it was contemplating a private place-
ment before eventually selling its
three properties to the Premier Com-

mercial Real Estate Investment Cor-
poration mutual fund, which is listed
on the Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange (BISX).

Premier acquired Cariboean Bot-
tling’s New Providence-based manu
facturing and distribution facilities,
plus its Freeport distribution facility.

Initially, Premier proposed to pay

$4.8 million for Caribbean Bottling’s »

Coca-Cola production plant, and $2.5
million and $522,000 for the Nassau
and Freeport distribution facilities
respectively.

However, it later reducéd the
amounts it was paying for the Nas-

million respectively.



Freeport storage facility

In its offering: memorandum, Pre-
mier said the annual rent for
Caribbean Bottling’s production facil-
ity was $463,268. The rents on the
Nassau and Freeport distribution cen-
tres were $240,180 and $49,920

‘.. Tespectively.
sau facilities to $4.7 million and $2.4

Some $5.5 million of the funds
invested in Premier Real Estate came

from the controversial Olympus Uni-
vest fund, the Bahamian investment
fund that is in court-supervised liq-
uidation, with investors trying to
recover as much as Cdn$550 million
for investors.

The Premier Real Estate invest-
ment is one of tiose the liquidators
are targeting for recovery. .

Rum Cay resort project

FROM page 1B

The company added that it invested $6.5
million on property, plant and equipment dur-
ing the first three months of 2006, compared to
almost $2 million iast year, a large chunk of it
going on further hurricane: repairs al South
; Riding Point.

¢s- Meanwhile, Freepoint, World Point’s tug
“and towing services subsidiary, which oper-
. ates five tug boats at South Riding point and
jt the Freeport Container Port, saw revenues
rise by $51,000 in the 2006 first quarter.



in $303,000 revenue fall

. This reflected an increase in rates, and
World Point Terntinals said ship movements at
the Container Port “remain steady”.

“With the exception of marine revenues at |

South Riding Point, which are unpredictable,
revenues for the company's: operating seg-
ments are expected to continue at levels con-
sistent with the first quarter for the remainder
of 2006,” World Point Terminals said.

South Riding Point is an oil storage and
‘break-bulk’ transshipment facility on Grand
Bahama, able to handle 5.25 million barrels of
oil per day.



FROM page 1B

island.

“We have hada dream of
something like this for, Rum
Cay, and we just thank God
for it. It means a lot to ‘Us,
because it is something that Wes.»
weren’t expecting to happen. ih

but it has,” she said.

Ms Wilson noted that the:
development had cone at a

time when many of the island’s

young men had left home in’

search of work.

“They have their homes °

here, and now we can call our

‘boys and, you know, our girls,
_ too, and tell them to come

back home because they will
be able to find work,” Ms Wil-

son said.

“Carlin Dorsette is one of the

young men who have already

taken advantage of the
éinployment opportunities in
the com»munity.

. Without the Moritana Hold-

-” jtigs presence on the island, he
‘aiid other residents would have

been forced to leave.

“] think it is a great thing,
and it will bring more people
into the island, too, which

Scavella said. “We really need
it, because down here some
people work and some people
don’t, so the more work, the
better, more money. It will be
hard because now we know
everybody and there’s going
to be a lot of strangers.”

Ms Scavella said this could
mean having to worry about
crime on the island, something
no one worries about now.

“You could go anywhere
now and leave your door open,
and when you come back, you
meet everything just as you left
it. Other than that, people are
looking forward to it whole-

brie

means more fun,” Shernell heartedly,” she said.

otey
‘

NOTICE i is hereby given that: DAVID EDWARD JENNETTE,
#57 SEA VIEW LN, P.O. BOX F-40287, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
;as.a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
vany reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
: facts within twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of MAY, 2006
-to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
EP.O. Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

“NOTICE i is hereby given that PAMELLA LEWIS OF JEROME
“AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
‘naturalization should’ not be granted, shouichsend a written |:
‘and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
‘Bahamas.



OTN ONT AVAILABLE
SECURITIES Se CVn ye

LEADING LAW FIRM

invites applications for an attorney for Abaco Office... Leading Offshore Bank pequestapp lications for the
position of an experienced securities specialist.
Applicants must have a minimum of 3 years experience
in the areas of Conveyancing and Litigation, demonstrate _
an ability to work independently and possess.a thorough :
working knowledge and technical competence in the

mentioned areas.

The candidates must possess the following
qualifications and skills:







Two years related mutual fund experience,

t ;
including cash settlements

Successful applicants cé can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits. a












Strong emphasis in tradde processin and

Apply in confidence to: settlements

G. Bastian _
P.O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
Ur io:
Soe hotmail.com

Strong PC, organization skills
Strong communication skills

Qualified applicants should fax or email resumes to:



Branch Manager Banking -
P.O. Box N-4906
Nassau, Bahamas

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2001 No.44 #
7 Fax: 394-0701

IN THE SUPREME COURT
EQUITY SIDE





Temple Christian High School NOTICE



“Teach Me, O Lard. Thy Way’ ...Psalm 119-33 » ; : ar ia
: mera e IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act 1959” 1” COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005:
Invites applications for qualified Christian teachers for the following | : See IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/Gen/No. 206 °
positions for the 2006-2007 school year. AND. oh. Sie i EAU - COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION (CLE) ;
- Hismil Lilietdive (Gn 10.19) IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Remelda Smith | cits «
ournalism/ Literature (Gr. as (ae page haya OE NOTICE

- Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-2)
- Math (Gr. 7-12) .
Physics (Gr. 10-12).
Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
- Lechnicai Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
- Avcounts/Commerce/Economies (Gr. 10-12)
- Physical Education (Gr.. 7-12)
- Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
- Geagraphy/History (Gr, 10-12)
» Chemistry
- Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
- Health Science (G7. 7-9)
General Science (Gr. 7-9)
- Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
- Music (Gr. 7-12)
- Biology (Gr. 10-12)
- Language Arts/Literature (Fr. 7-12)
- Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12}
Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
- Home Economies (Gr. 7-9)

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel of lot of land)
comprising Four Thousand Seven Hundred and Twenty’.
(4720) Square feet and situate East of East Street and North ; i
of Thompson Lane in the Southern District of the Isiand of:

_ New Providence and bounded in the North by land now or” ff
formely the property of H.E. Ferguson and: running thereon’ ff)
Seventy- Three and Forty Three Hundreds (74.43) feet on the»
East by land now or formerly the property of James Newton
‘and running thereon Sixty Five and Ninety Four Hundredths
(65.94) feet on the South by Thonipson Lane ‘and running
thereon Sixty Eight and’ Seventy Hundredths (68.70),feet on
the West by land occupied by the Ministry of Housing and
National Insurance and running thereon Sixty Six and Ninety
Nine Hundredths (66.99) feet. Remelda Smith claims ‘to be
the owner in fee simple in possession of the tract ‘of land

- herein before mentioned described and the Petitioner has ap-
plied to the Supreme Court to have her title investigated un-
der section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act and nature and extent
there of determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
said Act. Copies of the plan may be inspected duri ing pons}
working hours at the following places, : ‘e

_ THE PETITION OF HOSEA COX IN
RESPECT OF:-

: ALL THOSE piece parcels or lot of land being Lot Number 283

“yoeasuring approximately 4.27 acres and Lot No. 284 measuring
approximately 4.98 acres and situate between Cow Pen Road
and Oxford Street situate in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence and being bounded NORTHWARDLY by a-
Forty (40) feet wide Road Reservation anc running thereon Five
Hundred and Thirty and Seventy-five Hundredths (5300175) feet
thereon Eight Hundred and Twenty-four and Fifty nine Hundredths
(824.59) feet SOUTHWARDLY by a Forty (40) feet wide Road
Reservation and running thereon Five Hiindved and Twenty-five
Hundredths (528.25) feet EAST WARDLÂ¥ by Lot Number 282
and running thereon Seven Hundred and Six and Seventy-six»
Hundredths (706.76) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land
is shown on the plan attached hereto and is thereon colored RED.

HOSEA COX claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession
of the said land and has made application to the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined declared
in a certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land may
bé.inspected during normal working hours at the following places.

“| Applicants must:

1. The Supreme Court Registry Ansbacher House, Is ‘ast.
Street North Nassau Bahainas

"| A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is williig to subscribe

tw the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian Schools.

B. Have u Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the relevant
subject area with excellent communication skills.

E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare Suderas TOF all
examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.

I. Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra curricular

2. Chambers of Dorsey McPhee & Co Columbus House
Annex, Shirley & East Streets Nassau Bahamas.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or claim not recognized in the
Petition shall before the day of May 2006 file in the Supreme

Court and serve on the Petitoner or her Attorney a Statement _

of his or her claim in the prescribed form verified by an Af-
fidavit and other related documents to be filed therewith.
failure of any such persons to file and serve a Statement of
his or her claim together with other related documents ov or
before the day of May A.D., 2006 will opexate as. a bar to

a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor BitCo
Building, New Providence, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of V. Alfred Gray & Company, Suite
#5 The Malcolm Building, Bay Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person or persons
having dower or right of dower-or an Adverse Claim or Claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before 26th day of July,
2006 file in the Supreme Court ef the City of Nassau aforesaid
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his
Claim aforesaid non compliance with this Notice will operate as
a bar to such claim.

Programmes

Application must be picked up at the high school office an Shirley
Street be returned with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

such claun
DATED the day of March A.D; 2006

DORSEY MCPHEE & CO.
Chamber

V._ ALFRED GRAY & CO.
Chaiiiber
Nassau, The Bahamas

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box.N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

Columbus House Annex
Shirley & East Street
Nassau Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



Deadline eye APRN is MOE 25th, 2006

peace ae



ree eirees ae aes Metalic Attorneys for the Petitioner.



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

TRIBUNE SPORTS



V8 SPLASH won the masters division in the Florida State Tour-
nament held in Miami. Desmond “Dance” Burrows won the masters
singles event and Donald Rahming placed fourth.

From left, Desmond Burrows, Abraham Adderly, Roosevelt Moss,
Brian Bastian, Donald Rahming, Joey Knowles. Missing from the pic-

ture is James Lockhart.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

3 SSS





Milli’s Strokers overcome the odds for victory

GOLD atlast. Faced with seemingly impossible odds, the Milli’s Strokers became only the second Bahamian team to win the Florida Valley Eightball Nation-
al Association State Championship.
Battling from the loser’s bracket and forced to beat the unbeaten Florida Crazy Eights twice, the Milli’s Stroker’s pulled out all stops to succeed in doing just
that. The team was lead by Michael Demeritte, Cedric Farqgharson and Arlington Lowe with clutch performances by Everette Munroe (Mr Clutch) running a
skunk in the final match to seal the championship. Honourable mention must be made of Alex Burnside and Nyugen Clumer who, without a doubt, made the
shot of the tournament executing a jump bank shot for a ten zip score. ,

(Left to Right) Cedric Farqharson, Arlington Lowe, Michael Demeritte, Nyugen Clumer, Jimmy Chea Sponour, Everette





Hi BOMMER George Swingers’ catcher Dorothy Marshall gets ready to swing her bat against
Mary 'Cruise' Edgecombe and the Electro Telecom Wildcats on Saturday night at the Churchill
Tener Knowles National Softball Stadium.











"We got together very *
late in the season, so we've
had very few practices," she
stated. "We are just trying
to play our way into shape.
But like I always say, the
race is not for the stiffest,
but to those who endure.
"Our goal is to win some
games and make it to the
playoffs. I think once we

(Phoie: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

FROM page one E agl e S

begin to gel and practise
some more, we will be a
team to reckon with."

Briteley's had a chance to
win their first game, cutting
the deficit to 4-3 in the top
of the sixth. But Whirlpool
stayed on top in the bottom
of the frame when they put
their final run on the score-
board.

ee.



Indira Thompson went 2-
for-4 with an RBI, scoring
twice; Alexis Moss was 1-
for-2 with a pair of RBIs
and Alicia Culmer added
an RBI with a run scored
to lead the Eagles. Dotson
finished 1-for-1 with two
RBIs and a run scored;
Gwen Adderley was 1-for-2
with a run and Dawn
Forbes 1-for-4 with an RBI
and run scored for the
Angels.



FROM page one

clause indicates that membership
in the league shall be open to all
individuals residing on New Prov-

‘idence or those who, due to being

away because of studies, normal-

- ly reside on New Providence.

But Swingers' manager
Gary 'Super' Johnson said the
NPSA left a loophole in the
constitution and they are
going to challenge it in order
to have the players available
when they play the Whirlpool
Eagles on Tuesday night.

"The girls are not on the
roster, which I agree with, but
as long as the girls are resi-
dents of the Bahamas, they
can play," Johnson argued.
"There's nothing in the con-
stitution that says you have to
be here for five days or work-
ing or employed. There's
nothing in the constitution."

Johnson, did however,
admit that the drama prior to
the start of the game had an
effect on the way his team
played.

"I was late because I had to
work, but the girls said it
killed their morale," Johnson
noted. "But we can't use that
as an excuse. We should still
go out there and play ball and
beat this team without these
girls."

While Nunez had to watch
from the stands with Neely,
the Wildcats went wild on the
Swingers, producing two runs
in the bottom of the first, five
in the second and three in the
third to head towards the
stoppage with a commanding
10-1 advantage.

Refusing to go down with-
out a fight, the Swingers, who
scored their first run in the
third, added another in the

Munroe, Alex Burnside.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Wildcats bring the
Swingers to a halt

fourth and two more in the
fifth to at least ensure that
they could stretch the game a
little longer.

But, as Curry pointed out,
Bommer George couldn't stop
the Electro Telecom from
scoring when they needed
to.

In fact, in the bottom of the
fifth, it was Curry who got a
one-out walk, stole second,
reached third on a passed ball
and scored on a wild pitch to
winning pitcher Mary ‘Cruise’
Edgecombe at the plate.

Curry's final of three runs
on two hits with an RBI,
resulted in the game being
stopped via the seven-run rule
as the Wildcats made the
Swingers walk off the field.

"J heard everybody say
watch out for the Swingers,
but this is the worst Bommer
George team I ever see in the
three years they've been in
the league," Curry stressed.
"They have to go back and
regroup and tear up their line-
up sheet. I don't see no threat
to them."

Edgecombe, who had an
RBI double, scoring twice,
limited the Swingers to eight
hits with a pair of strike outs
for her second consecutive
victory. Desire Taylor gave up
nine hits in suffering her first
loss.

Electro Telecom also got a
pair of RBIs with a hit and
run scored from Hyacinth Far-
rington, an RBI triple and two
runs scored from Dornette
Edwards and an RBI single
from Chryshann Percentie.

For Bommer George, Beat-
rice Riley went 2-for-3 with a
run scored. and Theresa Miller
was 2-for-3 with a pair of
RBIs. /

_ Constructioners
rally for the
division II title

@ BASKETBALL

‘THE Elvis McIntosh
Constructioners made
sure that none of the
men's titles will be in New
Providence this year.
Hosting the Bunny
Levarity best-of-three |
championship series in
Abaco, the Construction-
ers rallied from losing =. :
gamie one on Friday night ::
to pull a two-game sweep =.»
on Saturday over the pee
Police Crimestoppers f
from New Providence. ~
They are now crowned ‘.;
the Bahamas Basketball <
Federation men's division.’
II champions. They joined» * ~
Grand Bahama, which
clinched the men's divi-
sion one title overthe <:
Real Deal Shockers earli-=°
er this month. Re
Last month, the John- {'
son's Lady Truckers made.
sure that New Providence’: >>»
maintained its strangle- ed
hold on the ladies’ crown
by winning the title over ,
an All-Star team from
Eleuthera. .
Unlike the men's divi- .:
sion one and ladies’ play:
where only two teams
each participated, the
men's division II had to
go through the round
robin tournament at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um where the Construc-
tioners and the
Crimestoppers emerged
as the top two-teams.
After losing game one
before their home fans on
Friday night, the Con-
structioners made sure
that they didn't lose the
title as well.
They rebounded in
game two on Saturday
with a 107-80 rout as
Dwayne Adderley con-
nected on a game high 45° :-
points, while Dudley St
art added 25. Ronnie
Cadeau led the
Crimestoppers with 22.
And in the clincher, the
Constructioners got
another 39 points from
Adderley as they pulled
off a 95-84 victory over
the Crimestoppers to
claim the division IT
national title. Jamaal
Hepburn added 25.
Jamailial Rose came up
with 21 points in the loss.

Nadal beats
Federer in
Rome Masters

TENNIS
ROME
Associated Press










RAFAEL NADAL still
has the edge against Roger

though.

In a showdown between
the world’s top two play-
ers, Nadal beat Federer in
a fifth-set tiebreaker Sun-
day to successfully defend
his Rome Masters title and
tie Guillermo Vilas’ record

.53-match winning streak
on clay in the Open era.

Nadal, a 19-year-old
Spaniard ranked No. 2,
won 6-7 (0), 7-6 (5), 6-4, 2-
6, 7-6 (5) in 5 hours, 5 min-
utes. He improved to 5-1
against the No. 1-ranked
Swiss.

Federer dropped to 39-3
this year, with his only loss-
es coming to Nadal. Nadal
also won a matchup at
Dubai in March.

In the Monte Carlo final
last month, Nadal beat
Federer in a fourth-set
tiebreaker. Both tourna-
ments are clay-court
warmups for the French
Open, which starts in two
weeks. Another of Nadal’s
wins over Federer came in
the semifinals at Roland
Garros last year.

“Obviously I would have
liked to win, but I already
knew after Monaco I was
extremely close,” Federer
said. “I think this is anoth-
er step closer.”

Federer led 4-1 in the
fifth set and the top-ranked
Swiss wasted two match
points at 6-5, both with
errant forehands.

“T should have won,”
Federer said. “He caught
me right at the finish line.”





Federer. The gap is closing, ~~ -



SPORTS .

Region’s young gymnasts ar



Flippin’ All Over the World



Ey



wee 4

2%



Hl NASSAU NASTICS GYMEEST was held in New Providence over the weekend. The theme for the event was ‘Flippin’ All Over the World”. Pictured above are members from the visiting .

team, Motions Unlimited, from the Cayman Islands. :



ee



(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staf}

PICTURED left and below are level two gymnasts competing at the event.

(Photos: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff). .











ee

ee SS

Sh R St eee AE ERBS

#







eyed

EHS &

~ ae y eo







MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

a TENNIS |

DOUBLES pair Mark
Knowles and Daniel
Nestor won the Rome
Masters doubles champi-
onship at the weerend.

The pair defeated
Jonathan Erlich and Andy
Ram of Israel 6-4, 5-7, 13-
11.

Eagles
are ‘the
team to
watch’

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter



THE youthful
Whirlpool Eagles have
already won more games
than they did in the entire
season last year and now
they are being touted as
the team to watch in the
New Providence Softball
Association.

The Eagles, with
national manager Ali

! Culmer on the sidelines
with manager Ricardo
Treco, picked up their
second straight victory,
holding off the hapless
Briteley's Angels 5-3 in
the opening game on Sat-
urday at the Churchill
Tener Knowles National
Softball Stadium. |

"For me, this is very
exciting because last year
we took a lot of beating
because we had no pitch-
ing," said Thela Johnson,
who is back, more com-
mitted and dedicated as
the ace pitcher. |

"If we can get better .
defence, better bats, we
can do this. We only won
one game last year, but
this is a new beginning
for us. We're ssh) to
play."

Johnson even went as
far as projecting that, if
their defence can hold up,
Whirlpool can actually be
the "spoiler" by not only
making the playofts, but
winning the champi-
onship.

Whirlpool, however,
will have two big tests,
back-to-back when they
play the Bommer George
Swingers on Tuesday and
the defending champions
Electro Telecom Wildcats
on Thursday, May 25.

The Angels, on the oth-
er hand, have suffered
their second straight
defeat, but infielder Jen-
ny Dotson said there's no
need forthe fans to
push the panic button just
yet.

SEE page 8B.





& SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

NOT even the presence of
two Dominican Republic play-
ers in uniforms for the Bommer
George Swingers was enough
to intimidate defending cham-
pions Electro Telecom Wildcats

_‘on Saturday night.

In fact, it only added more
fuel to the fire as the Wildcats
took out their frustration by
stopping the Swingers - minus
the Dominican Republicans -
11-4 in five innings via the new
game duration rule applied to
the New Providence Softball
Association's by-laws this sea-
son.

The fans at the Churchill
Tener Knowles National Soft-
ball Stadium were eagerly
awaiting the appearance of
Luisa Nunez and Geouanny
Nunez, who were the first to
come on the field for the final
warm-up before the featured

game on the pre-Mother's Day ©

special.
But when it was time to play



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

ball, plate umpire Anthony
‘Rakes' Bowe and first base
umpire Michael Hanna
informed the Swingers that nei-

ther of the two players could
play and coach Kevin Neely
would not be allowed to assist
them because of the new resi-

NPSA.

dency clause instituted by the -

Could they have made a dif-
ference for the Wildcats, who

Bahamians

_are right
on cue






@ ELECTRO Telecom
Wildcats' catcher Dormette
Edwards avoided the tag at
home as Bommer George
Swingers' catcher Dorothy
Marshall dropped the ball.

improved to 2-1, while the
Swingers dropped to 1-1?

Wildcats' player/manager
Vernie Curry didn't think so.
Her Wildcats stopped the game
at the bottom of the fifth with
an 11-4 victory via the new
game duration rule stating the
game could be stopped with
seven Or more runs instead of
10 at the end of five innings.

"I couldn't see them the game
being any closer with them in
the line-up,” said Curry. “It
might have been closer on their
part, but I couldn't see.them
stopping us from hitting, unless
one of those girls was pitching.
It might have been a better
game, but I don't think they
could hold our bats."

The NPSA's new residency

SEE page 8B

Gymnast Simone brings the crowd to their feet







Breakfast at Subway...
A Delicious Morning Ritual



BREAKFAST DELI
SANDWICHES®

A DELICIOUS WAY
TO START YOUR DAY!



@ GYMNASTICS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter



SIMONE Hall flipped her way to a stand-
ing ovation on Saturday afternoon at the
Nassau Nastics’ ‘Flipping All Over the
World’ show.

Hall, who is competing at level seven in
gymnastics, mixed her graceful moves on
the carpet. to the sounds of the goat
skin drums and. ‘Rake and Scrape’

music, delivering a perfectly executed

performance.

For her, the moves came naturally even
though the performance was rated difficult
by the crowd.

Hall described her exhibition performance

"as a warm-up, as she prepared for the vault

and the beam.

She said: “I enjoy doing gymnastics, when
I do it sometimes it feels as if I am doing it
for the first time, it is so much fun: A lot of
people ask.me if I am scared when I do it,
but I’m not, it feels great.

“Not too many girls can do what I can on
the floor so when I look at it, I feel very
special. I get to learn a lot of new things, but

the best thing about gymnastics is putting

the new things I’ve learned to work.

“It is always fun putting together a rou-
tine. I try to work hard on the routines so
when I have to do it I could dovit perfect,

I’m more confident when I am out there on

the floor, it’s so fun.

“The next best thing about gymnastics is
going off to competition and showing every-
one what I can do. Some people don’t think
the Bahamas has great gymnasts, but we do
coe I will be looking to take it to the next

evel.”

The Bahamas squared up against a 19-
member team from the Cayman Islands on
the weekend and, for seven-year old Kristin
Smith, the tournament was a once in a life-'
time experience. - ;

Smith said: “We don’t have a lot of com-:
petitions to let our parents see what we can.
do, so competing at home it feels great. I
was excited but I wasn’t scared.”

According to Trevor Ramsey, head coach’
of the Nassau Nastics Gymnastics team, an’
event of this magnitude can only be done:
every five to six months, prior to the closing:
of the season. . :

Perform 3

Revealing that he would love to see the

‘gymnasts perform at home on a consistent

basis, Ramsey said he would have to first
ensure that all the gymnasts are ready, and
sound with the fundamentals.

Ramsey said: “An event like this usually
takes like several months to put on. This
usually starts from the beginning of our
term in September.

“We.start working on different skills for
different levels and based on where they
are at by March we can definitely pinpoint
which’ level they are on.

“The gymnasts’ routines are put together
by March, they have at least two months to
perfect what they’ve learned and what they
want to do. We don’t determine the level,
the kids’ abilities place them on the correct
level.

“Tt doesn’t matter what age they are, you
can be a beginner who catches on very
quickly. But we do encourage the gymnasts
to learn a lot.”

@ LEVEL seven gymnast Simone Hall puts on a show at the weekend.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)





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=m Lhe Iribune



PANT Pm lovin’ it.

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Volume: 102 No.144

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Ingraham slams govt on Cuba

FNM leader speaks

out on UN Human —

Rights Council vote

FNM leader Hubert Ingraham

has blasted the government’s
decision to vote in favour of Cuba
joining the United Nations
Human Rights Council, and for
not disclosing its decision to the
peopie. .
_ Addressing the party’s con-
stituents on Grand Bahama, Mr
Ingraham said: “[Prime Minister]
Perry Christie has spent four
years in office shuffling his feet,
averting his eyes and keeping
secrets from the Bahamian peo-
ple?

Mr Ingraham’s heated attack
on government was said by some

to set the tone for the FNM’s ral- ©

ly on May 30. (See page three)

“He would now have us believe
that the United Nations wants
him to keep secrets from the
Bahamian people. Secrets on, of
all things, human rights. Can you
believe that? ;

“If we were in office, Cuba
would not have the nerve or the
gumption to ask us to vote for
them to be on.a Human Rights
commission. That’s an unthink-
able event.”

Before Mr Ingraham’s address,
a Grand Bahama resident
expressed concern about the vote,

" and the fact that the government

did not inform the country what it
planned to do.

“One of the fundamental rights
of an individual is that he or she is
able to leave their country when-
ever they like and come back
whenever they like,” Mr Ingra-
ham pointed out.

Cuba is one of a small number
of.countries which does not allow
its citizens to freely leave their
country.

“And now we’ve-got to hear

_all of this [the vote] through gos-
sip and rumour,” Mr Ingraham
-added. “They have no right to
cast a vote for Cuba at the UN,

not in our name, not on our

behalf. And we are going to pay

them back for that!” .

It was claimed that Cabinet
ministers held a vote recently and
the outcome was in favour of cast-
ing the country’s ballot in sup-
port of Cuba.

The Tribune attempted to learn
how the Bahamas voted from
Foreign Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell. However, Mr Mitchell
was said by his staff to be out of
the country.

Several officials in the Ministry

- of Foreign Affairs and the Prime

Minister’s Office were also con-
tacted, but claimed they could not
comment on the vote.

One Foreign
spokesman said that The Tribune
should ask the ministry’s perma-
nent secretary, Dr Patricia
Rodgers. However, she was said
to be in a meeting. Other gov-
ernment spokespersons were
unavailable for comment.

Contrary to the hopes of local
US officials, Cuba secured a seat
on-the newly established Human
Rights Council at the United
Nations General Assembly yes-
terday. :

The US and Cuba had both
voiced their wishes that the
Bahamas would support their
respective interests during the
voting process.

US officials stated that they
hoped that countries with “ques-
tionable human rights records” -
such,as Cuba - would receive no
votes: Meanwhile, Cuba said the
US was hardly in a position to
pass judgment on other countries.

As the voting process was car-
ried out through secret ballots, it
is not known officially in whose
favour the Bahamas voted. It was
claimed that UN officials asked
respective countries to not reveal
how they had voted.

_
i

£

=check ouiouE website a

wanes destinations



Affairs

‘Mother of the Year’ Baw

’







JENNYMAE HUMES was crowned the Mother of the Year 2006/2007 yesterday
at the annual Mother’s Day Service held at the Southern Recreation Grounds. Bahami-
ans across the nation celebrated Mother’s Day yesterday in glorious weather.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

conflicting

information on

surveillance
aircraft

@ By MARK HUMES

OFFICIALS at the Ministry
of National Security-continue to
give conflicting information about _
a Defence Force ’surveillance air-
craft and the state of affairs at.
the defence base, calling into”
question the level of consultative -
‘communication taking place
between the agency and its
national security facility.

In an interview with The Tri-.
bune last'week, permanent sec-°
retary at National Security, Mark
Wilson, said the King Air 350 tur-
bo craft in question had been sent: -
off to the United States for
repairs. See RENO

However, he had to retract ‘the~ .
statement when a photo of the,
aircraft on the tarmac of Nassai
International Airport appeared!
on The Tribune’s front page the’
following day. :

Now it seems another portion
of the permanent secretary's
interview is being called into
question, as comments made by
the Minister of National Security
during a House debate on the
Police Service Act appear to con-
tradict his version of the aircraft's
future in service.

Mr Wilson said in Friday’s Tri-
bune that the aircraft would be
"supplied with modern surveil-
lance equipment that would allow
it to do surveillance at an altitude
above 10,000 ft."

However, a day before Mr
Wilson gave his-interview to The
Tribune, his boss, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt, told the
House of Assembly that the air-
craft, once it returns from being
serviced, will be sold to Bahama-
sair and a new aircraft will be
bought for the Defence Force.

SEE page 14








Ingraham: Immigration law must be dealt with humanely

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT - FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham is calling on the PLP government
to return to “internationally accepted” stan-
dards and norm for the apprehension of
illegal immigrants in the Bahamas.

He believes the manner in which Haitians
were recently “rounded up” in the Family
Islands and elsewhere is inappropriate, and
violates the Organisation of American
States Convention on the rights of migrants
in a country.

Mr Ingraham stressed that the enforce-
ment of any law, including the immigration
law, must be dealt with humanely and not
for political partisan purposes.

The former prime minister said the FNM
government carried out a.sustained and
consistent apprehension exercise to ensure
that illegal immigrants were found and repa-
triated to their homeland.

Mr Ingrahani was in Grand Bahama over
weekend and met FNM supporters to dis-
cuss potential candidates and to hear their
concerns and suggestions going into the
next general election.

After a meeting with supporters at the
Foster B Pestaina Hall on Saturday after-
noon, he met with the media. Recent raids
by the immigration department were among
many topics he addressed.

“We believe it is hypocritical of this gov-
ernment to use illegal Haitian labour in its
housing programme and build many hous-
es by using Haitian labour through con-
tractors and sub-contractors, and then to
suddenly wake up one morning and say. the
Haitians are here and we have to get rid of

SEE page 14

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© Registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. ™ The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Security chief says
school break-in

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Investigations
conducted by school security into
an apparent break-in at Jack
Hayward High School suggest
that access was gained by “some-
one with legitimate access to the
school’s master key,” according
to a top security official.

During a press conference yes-
terday, Stephen Plakaris, deputy
director of sécurity for schools
on Grand Bahama, revealed that
there was no evidence of forced
entry at the school on April 28.

Ministry of Education officials
on Grand Bahama and New
Providence were concerned that
the break-in could have compro-
mised the BJC and BGCSE
national exams, which were
being kept in a room that was
broken into.

Fortunately, none of the exam
scripts were breached, avoiding a



nationwide recall and potential
costs of $2 million to the govern-
ment.

Mr Plakaris said the security
department immediately carried
out investigations and has sub-
mitted a report to the Ministry of
Education. He said they are still
awaiting a police report.

Based on his findings, Mr
Plakaris does not believe any stu-
dent or thief could have been
responsible for the break-in, but
indicated that it appeared to have
been an “inside job” by some-
one with access to the school.

He said there had been other
instances of alleged break-ins in
the last month at the school. In
all cases, there was no sign of
forced entry.

Mr Plakaris, a reserve police
inspector, has interviewed three
people so far. “No forced entry
can be determined at this time
and the primary entry doors were
initially not secured, contrary to

an ‘inside job’

reports given by persons at the
school,” he said.

“The time factor does not cor-
respond. It is possible that the
perpetrator of this is someone
with legitimate access to the
administration area with possi-
ble possession of a master key,”
said Mr Plakaris. ,

When the security officer
arrived at the school at 9.30pm
he discovered entry doors to the
foyer unlocked. A short time lat-
er, he said, someone placed a call
to ZNS to report a. break-in at
the school. Mr Plakaris said
police also responded.

He said the only interior dam-
age was to one office door, but
not’on the exterior from where
the culprit should have entered.
He said the exams, two cell-
phones, radio, and jewellery left

in the offices were not disturbed.

“We may be dealing with
someone who respects academia,
but certainly we are not dealing



@ STEPHEN Plakaris displays silategesphi taken after the break-in

with a thief,” he said.

“Based on the information
it is alarming news. The cir-
cumstantial evidence indicates
that it was an inside job at Jack
Hayward High School.

“We feel we have sufficient
information to clarify some
rumours that were going
through the community
regarding school security,” he
said.

Mr Plakaris said he believes
the break-ins may be an

attempt to cause confusion, or
cast aspersions on Ministry of
Education officials and ulti-
mately embarrass the minister

and the government.

“We are obligated to put the
facts on the table. We don’t
want people pointing fingers

and blaming security when it is

negligence on the part of cer-
tain individuals.

“The impact of this could
have negatively impacted the
schools in the country if those

(Photo: Denise Mayceck)

exams were compromised. If *
it is an inside job, it is a high. ,
level of irresponsibility and dis-. «
regard for public decency,
especially if it comes from per-
sons who are employed by
government. .
“We are appealing to who-
ever is doing it to not embar- »
rass the school, and put itina.
bad light and interrupt the
educational and testing ;
process in the school,” Mr.
oe said. ‘i

Film studio ‘is addressing Gold Rock Creek situation’.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -— Bahamas Film Stu-
dios proprietor Paul Quigley said his
company is working with the BEST
Commission to address the situation at
Gold Rock Creek Beach, which has
been besieged by rocks.

Gold Rock Creek residents are
blaming the movie studio for the envi-
ronmental deterioration of the beach
in East Grand Bahama.

The beach, featured on the Ministry
of Tourism’s website, was known for
its beautiful powdery white sand.

Grand Bahama resident Peter

Adderley is very concerned about the ©

present state of the beach and has
called for immediate action to address



the situation.

Last year, Disney filmed its Pirates

of the Caribbean movies at Gold Rock
Creek. A huge water tank was con-
structed on the beach for the filming of
water scenes.

Mr Adderley said he intends to
make a presentation to Disney repre-
sentatives of what has happened at
Gold Rock Creek. He claims that since
the movie production there has been
environmental impact to the beach,
creek and water table.

Mr Quigley, however, said the beach
is not destroyed and feels that resi-
dents are exaggerating.

“They are obviously overreacting.
The beach is not destroyed by any
means,” he told The Tribune.

“There has been a deposit of small

‘

rocks on the beach and we don’t

know for sure whether they came
from excavation of the tank, or
whether it was after the hurricane,
which had unique winds that might
have blown in those rocks, which are
rounded from being weathered from
the ocean,” he said.

Nevertheless, Mr Quigley said it is
an issue that his company is dealing
with.

“We are working with BEST at the
moment. I met with the minister
responsible, Marcus Bethel, and we
are providing them with a manage-
ment plan and out of that will come
how we need to deal with the situa-
tion because we don’t know exactly
what to do to.

“We can clear the rocks off, which

we have done, but we can’t keep doing

that all the time. We are told by our ~

environmental people that it will cease
at some point, although it depends on
how things are during the hurricane
season, when matters could get worse.”

Mr Quigley said Disney had finished
its filming in Grand Bahama and had
no plans to come back.

However, he revealed that a British
company is expected to come in July
for the filming of another movie on
the fascinating life story of female
pirate Mary Reid.

“We are also looking at doing a big
budget series for Japan on the Japan-
ese-Russian War and they are expect-
ed to come over to look at the tank.

“It is going to provide a lot of work
for the Bahamas, and Grand Bahama

Genevie Eloise Bastian
August 31, 1948 - May 13, 2005

Leaving not a single ray

-in Se taliee because there are a lot of

ships involved and they want to build
those ships here.”

Mr Quigley said the movie studio is
halfway completed with the installa-
tion of fresh piped water for residents.

In its agreement with government,
the company will supply fresh water to
people in the area.

Mr Quigley said that pipe installa-
tion work had been halted due to road
elevation work being carried out in
the area.

“We are unable, to get access to
some houses and we can’t put in piping
until they get that road finished, but we
managed to get halfway down the
street and those people have beautiful
fresh crystal clear water now,” he said.



Bt oy te

«> 6.44



one of 24 Frescata Picnics for up to 12 friends!

_ Drawings will be held each week for (4) weeks. Tune in to 100
JAMZ and JOY F.M radio stations for details.







The Light

Each day you looked out the window
And saw the rising sun

It shone so bright and brilliant

Until cach day was done

The sky was clean, the wind so pure

What a somber mood it can create \
Nothing but darkness from above \
Left to live life without the light

You came to know and love








But then you sit and ponder
The rain that caused so much sorrow





G feel quili

Ee eon roesee, May bring Lee. trees and clear the air
For perhaps a brighter tomorrow

Butterflies flying ever so free And rear touct ae ain fe




From the storm that came your way
It can’t take away your precious memory
Of that bright and sunny day.

Then from mine came the clouds
Filled with anger and dismay
Bringing rain, thunder and lightening bolts








From Wes, Owen, Gavin &
Bryan Bastian & Family





uA YALUt AL Rietpep ty


THE TRIBUNE



Haitians
arrested
for firearm
possession

TWO Haitians were arrested
over the weekend for illegal
possession of a handgun.
On Saturday at 3 am, officers
from Operation Quiet Storm
were near Quinine Alley when
they saw a red Ford Explorer
with two male occupants.

The vehicle was stopped and
searched. Officers found a
loaded 9 mm handgun.

Police
investigate
club
shooting

POLICE are investigating a
shooting at a club that left one
man injured yesterday.

The shooting occurred after a
fight broke out at premises on
Ragged Island Street.

A bystander, believed to be in
his mid-20s, was hit in his lower
back. He was taken to Princess
Margaret Hospital where he is
in stable condition.

Police are following some
leads.

Suriname
lowlands
devastated
by floods

@ SURINAME
Paramaribo

FLOODS that have engulfed
about 15 percent of Suriname’s
territory have left the South

American nation’s lowlands in .

“total chaos,” the country’s.
leader said Saturday, according
to Associated Press.

“There is total chaos in the
homes and total chaos in school
buildings,” President Ronald
Venetiaan told reporters in the
capital of Paramaribo after
returning from flooded areas in
the country’s.southeast.

Floods triggered by torren-
tial rains have killed at least
three people and left up to
22,000 homeless along river-
banks in Suriname’s lowlands,
aid workers have said.

Thousands of flood victims
from Indian settlements in Suri-
name’s southern hinterlands
have fled across the border into
neighboring French Guiana and
Brazil in search of food. More
than a 100 thatched-hut villages
populated by descendants of
West African slaves known as
Maroons remained submerged
beneath muddy water after
rivers burst their banks.

While flooding has subsided
in the upper Suriname River in
the central part of the country,
the situation in the southeast
has worsened as runoff contin-

ues to feed into rivers, said.

Regional Development minis-
ter Michel Felisi. |

A number of small villages in

the southeast have completely

_ disappeared below the rising

water, Felisi said.

Ne RRON cities

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MONDAY,
MAY 15

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FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham has criticised Public Ser-
vice Minister Fred Mitchell’s
announcement that the gov-
ernment plans to hire 1,200
additional public servants, say-
ing that money could be used
to give teachers what they
need — parity in pay between
them and other professionals
in the public service.

“When we were in office, we
accepted the teachers’ premise,
which was 'there:was:not pari-
ty in pay in the public sector
for teachers with similar qual-
ifications as others.in the pub-
lic service,” Mr Ingraham told
reporters.

. “Our aim and objective was
that over a period of time we
were going to bring the teach-
ers’ pay up in line with other
professionals within the public
service.

“And so what we would
expect for the government to
be doing now is to be taking
what the FNM did between

BB HUBERT Ingraham

1997 and 2002 and raising that
level of pay so that at the end
of a given period of time there
would be reasonable parity in
pay.
Mr Ingraham said that, after
taking all relevant factors into
account, the FNM would seek
to reach a fair and reasonable
agreement with teachers that
showed respect for and com-







mitment to the development
of teachers in society, and to
the payment of a reasonable
wage by the government.
“Our commitment to this
regard is in concrete and has
been demonstrated over and
over again and teachers in the
Bahamas know that when the
FNM is returned to office, as
we believe we will be, we will
continue where we left off.
“So all this nonsense about a
$750 payment and $100 base
pay on salary for teachers
because that’s what the pub-
lic service got — that’s non-
sense. Fine, give teachers that,
but give teachers the adjust-
ment in their pay in accor-
dance with previously deter-
mined policy commitments to
produce parity in pay between
teachers and other profession-
als within the public service. .
“And the same applies to
nurses and other profession-
als in the health care sector
and several other sectors of



FNM candidates to be chosen soon

Addressing hundreds of
FNM supporters on Grand
Bahama, FNM leader Hubert
Ingraham said the party
hopes to have all its prepara-
tory work in selecting
prospective electoral candi-
dates completed by the end
of May.

And he announced that the
FNM will hold a mass rally at
the R M Bailey Park in Nas-
sau on May 30.

Mr Ingraham met with
executives of the four con-
stituencies on Friday. evening,
and told reporters following
Saturday’s meeting that exec-
utives have agreed on the
selection procedures, and
that prospective candidates
have agreed to the procedure

- and have committed to sup-

port the candidate chosen as

Drinks Trolleys
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a result of those procedures.
He also said that he was happy

with the number of women
standing to be candidates

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the public service. That’s what
an FNM government will do.”
Mr Ingraham said it is unnec-
essary for the government to
attempt to expand the public ser-
vice by 1,200 people. He said the
reason the government is seeking

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 3.

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THE TRIBUNE



Wea CRO ean

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

ae

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas uf’. 1

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

O.BLES KM. K-CS.G:;

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas"
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Failing in the country’s business

BRENT SYMONETTE, chairman of the
Public Accounts Committee, has complained
that government, which promised Bahamians in
2002 that if elected its administration would be
one of transparency, is anything but transparent
— especially when it comes to accounting for
how the people’s money is being spent.

He said that government’s decision to hide
behind a legal opinion that only documents

tabled in the House of Assembly are to be sub- °

mitted to the Public Accounts Committee
(PAC) was hampering the work of the com-
mittee.

From the day in 1913 that this committee was
created it was “mandatory that the committee
report at least twice every session and at least 60
‘days before the end of the session.”

Mr Symonette said the PAC had asked gov-
ernment to disclose the spending for the fiscal
years ending in 2004 and 2005. However, he
said, it has met with constant roadblocks
because the Auditor General’s report for those
years is not yet on the table of the House. It was
only last month that Government tabled the
Auditor General’s report for the 2002-2003 fis-
cal year.

This is no way to run a business — in fact it
is an impossible way to run a business. But this
is the way that the finances of government —
the biggest business of all — is mismanaged.

This problem never arose until the PLP came
on the scene in 1967. Until then no one knew
that such a rule existed, because until the advent
of the PLP, government was managed by effi-
cient businessmen. Bahamians can say what
they like about the UBP, but they managed

-. government like a business. The Auditor Gen-

eral’s report was up to date as required by law,
and the Public Accounts Committee, having
. received the public accounts on time, was able
to meet its statutory obligation to report to the
House at least twice every session.

In all the years that we reported the House
— pre-PLP — the Public Accounts Commit-
tee was recognised as parliament’s most pow-
erful standing committee. And the commit-
tee’s ability to send for persons and papers was
not an issue, because the documents were pre-
sented, and the persons involved must have
cooperated because we never heard that they
did not.

However, it was in 1 the eighties that govern-
ment’s: blocking of the PAC’s right to docu-
ments became a real issue.

And of all persons to bring it to the fore was
then Attorney General Paul Adderley. Mr
Adderley must have known what the problem
was when the PAC ceased to function because
it was he who had blocked information request-
ed by the PAC, under the chairmanship of Nor-

man Salomon. Mr Solomon was trying to
account to Bahamians on how their money: was
being used by the Pindling government to sub-
sidise a failing y Bahamasair.

According to Mr Adderley “Bahamasair
Holdings Limited was not a department or
office ‘of the government and therefore it is not
the function of the Auditor General to audit the
accounts of that company.”

And so, “as night follows day,” if the auditor
general could not audit the accounts, there were
no accounts for the PAC to check. Apparently,
it was nobody’s business that in the first three
months of 1975, $2.6 million of the people’s
money went from the Public Treasury to under-
write Bahamasair. Probably the last time the
PAC was heard from was on July 2, 1975 when
Mr Solomon complained of the difficulty his
committee was having investigating legitimate
matters of concern.

In view of this we don’t know if Mr Adder-
ley’s memory failed him, or if he was just trying
to play cute and score political brownie points
when on November 24, 1987 he reminded the
House that the PAC had not met once between
1982 and 1987.

“It is the most important committee of the
House and the only one that is in the hands of
the Opposition,” Mr Adderley intoned sancti-
moniously, as he proceeded to lecture the Oppo-
sition on its duties. His tongue really must have
been in his cheek during that harangue.

The only way that public expenditure can be
properly watched by parliament is by the Oppo-
sition, said Mr Adderley. He wanted the “com-
mittee system to work.”

Once:the Treasury closes its books for a
financial year, “there is no means and no
method by which you can hide from them (the
PAC) public expenditure.”

Obviously, he had forgotten how he had
blocked the committee trying to investigate the
people’s money which had gone from the Pub-
lic Treasury to support the national airline.

If Mr Adderley was not laughing at the polit-
ical hypocrisy, many Bahamians were.

Having prodded among the Opposition’s
dying embers, ostensibly to rekindle their flame
and awaken them to their public duty, Mr
Adderley was probably sorry in the end that
he didn’t let “sleeping dogs lie.”

The middle eighties saw the battle to restore
the PAC to the powerful position that members
claimed it had. In fact on the government side
members were only giving lip service to the
claim. In fact they had reduced the committee to
aeunuch. | -

Despite what Mr Adderley had said every
method was used to successfully hide the public
accounts from this country’s taxpayers. *



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immigration problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HAVE been reading the var-
ious comments and points of view
on this topic for a while now and
have decided to express some
views of my own. It would there-
fore be appreciated if you would

‘allow me to express these views

via the medium of your newspa-
per. My primary intention is to
stimulate some thought process-
es, which will eventually (and
hopefully very quickly) allow us
to make some decisions and
come up with some reasonable
answers to this age-old problem.
We need to begin to take some
form of positive action and cease
being afflicted with “(he paralysis
of too much analysis

I request that you treat the Lol-
lowing comments as “food for
thought”.

For too long. we in The
Bahamas have tinproperly
viewed the immigration problem
as an employment problem,

Whilst there ts much overlapping, |,
I believe that the automatic cou-

pling of these two distinctly sep-
arate but somehow associated
matters has been the cause for
much debate and/or confusion.
Let us view: them in isolation for
a moment.

Immigration

The Bahamas has very ciear
policies on immigration. Persons
are permitted entry into the
country for various reasons.
These reasons may include vaca-
tion/holiday visits, visits for con-
ferences, training, religious and
medical reasons, as well as entry
for the purpose of being gainful-
ly employed. There, may be oth-
ers, but the reasons stated above
should cover most of the usual
categories. Additionally, it is
understood that the possibility
exists for someone to enter the
country with one type of visa and
subsequently have this converted
to another. There is, however,
due process that must be fol-
lowed if this is to.happen.

If we were to look at the above
and then'compare this to some
of the scenarios that we are cur-
rently hearing about and debat-
ing amongst ourselves, the ques-
tion would automatically be “why
are we making this so complicat-
ed and so political?”

Now, for the benefit of any-
one who may be inclined to chal-
lenge this and perhaps be moved
to respond in rebuttal, I would
like to add that I am very much
aware that due to social and
political issues, this is clearly not
a very simple matter. I am fur-
ther aware that there are a host
of other considerations to be tak-
en into account (ie the humani-
tarian issue of how we deal with
persons who do not know the
country from whence. they may
have come as babies; how to deal
with families with children born
in The Bahamas; what to do with
elderly persons who are no
longer able to care for them-
selves, etc, etc; but, as a Bahami-
an, I believe that it is vitally
important that we view this seri-
ously and decide what we believe
should happen, insofar as the law




A

~ ong
ee

Seay
Aan
Summer Rush






SO SAWNEO

letters@trilbunemedia.net



permits.

° Should the person from
Haiti, who may have been smug-
gled into the country, be treated
any differently from the Jamaican
who came in as a visitor and
decided to overstay?

e Should the Cuban national, .

on his/her way to Miami, who
became stranded in Bahamian
waters alter. his boat collapsed
be treated any differently from
the person from the Far East who
paid thousands of dollars to be
smuggled in and who ends up
working in a family business?

* Should the Englishman, who
cuimie IN Oli a tourist visa. but
decides to begin working with a
financial institution, in anticipa-
tion of receiving a positive
respoise to a work permit appli
cation, be deall with in a different
manner than the person from the
Philippines who came in to visit a
friend and ended up working as a
maid?

I believe you get the picture...

Employment

It is my understanding that
persons seeking gainful employ-
ment in the Bahamas must meet
one of the following criteria:

* Be a Bahamian citizen or
legal Permanent Resident with
permission to work and possess a
valid national insurance number,
along with supporting documents
that clearly demonstrates that the
person is entitled to work in The;
Bahamas.

e Be in possession of a valid
work permit, which has been
issued by the relevant authority
and possess a valid national insur-
ance number.

Again, there may be other
valid categories, but I believe
these cover the majority of legal
workers in the country.

Now, if we again viewed this in
isolation and asked whether per-
sons who fall outside any of the
above categories should be

‘allowed gainful employment, I

believe the answer would be a
simple one to arrive at.

In Summation

On the Immigration topic, I
believe that we must review the
laws to determine whether they
are sufficiently modern, to deal
with the requirements of today’s
Bahamas. We must also accept
that immigrants are, and have
been for a long time, of vital
importance to the country, so we
must find a way to implement
quotas, either annually or peri-
odically and improve the systems
that monitor and control the
issuance of visas and what hap-
pens when a person overstays his
or her allotted time. I do not nec-
essarily support the system of
pulling over jitneys and asking
everyone on board with an accent
to prove that they are in The
Bahamas legitimately. This is not
only inhumane, but it could also
result in dangerous situations for
other legitimate residents riding
on the bus and could prove

equally as dangerous for the
Immigration Officers involved.
Unfortunately I do not have a
better solution, so I will ask that
we consider the other, numerous
options that must be available to
us.
On the subject of employment,
I am of the view that the time
has come for us to hold the
employers of illegal workers
responsible for their actions. This
has to be the equivalent of har-
bouring a criminal (if illegal
immigration is unlawful then it
stands to reason that this act may
be construed as the legal equiva+
lent of harbouring a criminal). I
will, however, leave it to the
members of the honoured legal
society to sort this one out. There
should be strict penalties imposed
to discourage the employment of
illegal workers and, correspond-
ingly there should be a reason-
able and fairly simple process for
persons to apply for and receive
permission for legitimately
required workers without nega-
tively impacting upon thé
employment opportunities avail-
able for Bahamian citizens and

. legal resident.

Whilst I am most certain that
this letter will generate varied
reactions, please permit me to
add the comment that its content
is not meant to offend anyone,
but again, to stimulate some rea+

‘sonable thought processes from

the persons we have entrusted
with the responsibility of running
our country.

In conclusion, I will leave you
with the following questions:

e Are persons who have over;
stayed their allotted time being
actively sought after by the immi-
gration authorities?

e Is it fair to law-abiding citi-
zens and residents to allow com-
munities of illegal immigrants to
be built up and continue to exist?

e Is it fair for structures in
these communities to be con-
structed. without regard-for the
established standards, codes and
policies?

¢ Should the illegal use of elec-
tricity and water be ignored in
the interest of being humane? '

e Should citizens and legal res-
idents be penalised or prosecuted
for harbouring and/or employing
illegal immigrants?

e Should there be public
notices listing the names and last’
known addresses of persons who
have entered the country legally
and then overstayed their time?

e Should there be a “hot-line”
or immigration web-site where
prospective employers can call
or log in to get answers to certain
questions or clarification on cer-
tain points relating to the
employment of a foreign born
person?

We all know that it is impossi-
ble for us to completely seal-off
our borders, but certainly more
can be done to police it.

Thank you in advance for your
kind attention.

SAM HAVEN
Miami, Florida
May 3, 2006.



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THE TRIBUNE




In brief

$24, 000 of
marijuana
confiscated
at airport



POLICE confiscated $24,000
worth of marijuana from Nas-
sau International Airport over
the weekend.

On Saturday, after 10am, air-
port police stopped and
searched a Jamaican who
arrived from San Andros. He
fled the scene.

A box he left behind con-
tained 24 pounds of marijuana.

Americans
are charged
following
drug bust

= BARBADOS
Bridgetown

TWO Americans charged in
connection with one of the
biggest drug busts in this
Caribbean island’s history were
scheduled to appear in court
Monday, police said, according
to Associated Press.

Terry Moore, 33, and Joshua
Walker, 26, both of Florida, are
accused of trying to import 61kg
of cocaine, Barbados police
spokesman Barry Hunte.

. The pair was charged with pos-
session and intent to supply, traf-
fic and import the drugs, Hunte
said. They were arrested Friday
after police received a tip.

Authorities found the drugs
‘and US$15,000 on the men’s
boat, as well as two high-pow-
éred guns and several rounds
‘of ammunition. Moore also had
US$27,400 on him, Hunte said.
_ The men will be formally
charged at the court hearing
when bail will be set.

ah
ENTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS



PHONE: 322-2157

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Calls mo





LOCAL NEWS

unt for Freedom of

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 5

Information Act to be 4

@ By MARK HUMES

IN recent weeks, the gov-
ernment has refused to
respond to public calls for
transparency on how it man-
ages business on behalf of its
people, prompting a growing

.call for the establishment of a

Freedom of Information Act.

With the government's
vote on Cuba’s admission to
the Human Right Council
under question, the Minister
of Youth, Sports, and Hous-
ing’s public debate with the
Auditor General over the
lack of disclosure in the
Junkanoo bleachers fiasco,
his reluctance to disclose
information on “favoured”
building contractors, and
questions as to why, after
four years, talks of new
school construction is once
again in the headlines, public
patience with government
“ducking and dodging”
appears to be wearing thin.

“This should be a hotbed
2007 election issue,” said attor-
ney Fred Smith, speaking with
The Tribune. “The Bahamas
is a democratic sovereign con-
stitutional nation, and the cit-
izens should not be kept in the
dark, especially when their
government is negotiating con-
tracts which affect their
rights.’”

The cry was echoed late last
week by Joan Thompson,
president of The Nassau Insti-

tute, after it was suspected that

the Bahamas voted to. admit
Cuba to the UN’s Human
Rights Council.

In an open letter to the
Minister of Foreign Affairs,
Fred Mitchell, Mrs Thomp-
son raised the question of a
citizen's “right” to know
what is being said or done in
their name. In the event that
the government does not feel
justified in disclosing how it
voted, Mrs Thompson said
that a case must be made by
the government as to why
citizens are being denied

SINCE

ATE

SES
“ARAMA

Re

eee

SOON



FRED Smith

their “right to know.”

However, according to the
Auditor General’s 2003 report,
not only Bahamian citizens are
having a hard time obtaining
information.

This government office has
also experienced difficulties in
obtaining information that it
needs to make informed deci-
sions. In its report, the Auditor
General complained: “We
have requested relevant copies
of Cabinet conclusions which
do not seem to be forthcoming
therefore we relied on infor-
mation from files at the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture.”

Bleachers

The comments by the Audi-
tor General were connected
to financial transactions by the
then Minister of Youth; Sport,
and Culture, Neville Wisdom,
as related to the rental of
Junkanoo bleachers. :

Now the same minister finds
himself at the centre of anoth-
er disclosure battle, after
promising, then refusing to
turn over information related
to the distribution of govern-
ment building contracts award-
ed during his and Shane Gib-
son’s tenure at the helm of the

tile Supplies Last

housing ministry.

In relation to this attorney
Fred Smith added: “Govern-
ment by their nature likes to
hide behind a shroud of secre-
cy. This prevents them from
having to be accountable, and
it ensures that their decisions
are very rarely challenged.

"If we had a freedom of
Information Act, you would
find the behaviour of govern-
ment officials changing dra-
matically because they are
then subject or at risk of being

. disclosed," said Mr Smith.

The president of the public
accounts committee, Brent
Symonette, said: “Public infor-
mation, such as the awarding
of contracts and who bidders
are should be exactly that,
public. The permanent secre-
taries, as persons responsible
in a ministry, should be oblig-
ed to provide, when requested
to do so, information because
it is the public’s funds. In cas-
es like that, there should be a
freedom of information act.

“Obviously, though, there
would have to be safeguards
in the interest of national secu-
rity issues, but I can’t see any
national security issues on
what it cost to build low cost
homes. That is government
funds, and we the people, pay
our taxes and we should be
able to be informed of how
our taxes are spent.”

Interestingly enough, in a
speech given last week, Fort
Charlotte MP Alfred Sears
told fellow MPs that “there
are too many times our citi-
zens complain about the lack
of responsiveness in our public
institutions.”

He went on to say that he

wished there was a provision,

of accountability in all branch-
es of government.

When officials at the Attor-
ney General's office were con-

tacted on Friday about this |

matter, they told The Tribune
that, as it stood, they knew of
no, government plan to move
in the direction of establish-

We’reg











BRENT Symonette

ing a freedom of information
act here in the Bahamas.



Nw

my Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

Officials at the agency said
that because we have no free-
dom of information legislation
on the book, individuals would
not be able to pursue legal]
actions against the government
to acquire information unless
they can prove standing ~ that
the information which the gov-
ernment withholds personally
affects the individual.

“In every nation they have
passed a freedom of informa-
tion legislation,” Fred Smith
said. “Even in Costa Rica,

‘Bermuda, countries in Latin

America, the United Kingdom,
the US, and Canada they have
freedom of information legisla-
tion. In these countries, the cit-
izen’s right to know is acknow!-
edged as the fundamental
bedrock of democracy.”

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

THE TRIBUNE





BDM leader urges more young
people to get involved in politics

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

IT is important that more of

this present generation of young
people step out of their indi-
vidual worlds and become more

active players in the shaping of



















the Bahamas, BDM leader
Cassius Stuart said ina release
yesterday marking National
Youth Month.

He said the Bahamas needs
more leaders of this new gener-
ation to rise up and become
strong political leaders.



TEACHERS & SALARIED WORKERS
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT UNION LIMITED

Neen le
GENERAL MEETING

There Will Be No Second Call Notice As Per
The Co-operative Act 2005 Section 22

TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited East Street South
and Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Twenty-Ninth (29th) Annual
Meeting of Teachers & Salaried Workers Co-operative Credit
Union Limited will be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel
located on Bay Street, on Saturday, May 20,2006 commencing
at 8: 00am for the following purposes:

° To receive the Report of the Board of Directors for 2005,
° To receive the Audited Accounts for 2005.
° To elect members of the Board of Directors
* To elect members of the Supervisory Committee.
-e To discuss and approve the Budget for 2006.
° To take action on such matters as may come before the meeting.

Lenn King
Secretary

“Without strong political
leadership to provide a vision
and guidance for the country.
the edifice the earlier genera-
tions have built will decay and
crumble.

“Yes, all the hard work of Sir
Lynden Pindling. Sir Cecil Wal-
lace-Whittield, Sir Kendal
Isaacs, Sir Orville Vurnquest
and even our former Prime
Minister, Hubert Ingraham, and
even Perry Christie, will come
to nothing tf this generation
refuses to rise up.

“If The Bahamas is to
become a truly great nation, the
new generation of leadership
must step forward and make
their contribution to our soct-
ety. The new leadership is not
about being FNM or PLP or
even BDM, but it’s about being
Bahamian, standing on the
shoulders of our past great lead-
ers, united in one mission, to
make the Bahamas a better
place for our children’s chil-
dren,” Mr Stuart said.

In remaking The Bahamas,
he said, Bahamians need to go
beyond economics.

“With the increase in social
tension within our society
among our youth, it is impera-
tive that this new generation
develop social skills and EQ or
emotional intelligence because
The Bahamas has lost its social
cohesion. Our murder count
stands now at nine for the year.
A high 1Q alone will not ensure
success in life,” the BDM leader
said.

He pointed out that a highly
intelligent person will not nec-
essarily fit well into society and
there needs to be more under-
standing for the importance of
conflict resolution so that young
people can get along well with
others, and be team players. °

“In order to guarantee and
sustain a successful Bahamas 1n
the tuture, this generation of

Bahamians must come torward
to contribute their ideas and
efforts to the development of
this great nation. As one gener-
ation fades, one arises.



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@ LEADER of the Bahamas Democratic Movement Cassius
Stuart

“Every generation must
define its values, beliefs and
commitment to self and coun-
try. Our country’s future
development should not be
left to our elders alone. After
all, our youth are among the
many Bahamians who have
the greatest stake and will
inherit tomorrow’s Bahamas,”
said Mr Stuart.

Older Bahamians; he said,

‘tend to be guided by their past

experiences, the Bahamas’
history, the systems and envi-
ronment in which they grew
up. \

“This generation, on the
other hand, is not weighed
down by traditions, history
and mindset. We are less

' afraid of change and are more

willing to look for fresh per-
spe ctives and initiatives.

“Hence, the perceived gen- ...,
_ eration gap and the challenge ~
for policy-makers. to: bridge

that gap. What we really need
is a combination of approach-
es, both traditional and uncon-
ventional, tested and new to

meet the more complex chal-:

lenges the Bahamas is now
facing,” Mr Stuart said.

He admitted, however, that
it is a challenge to reach out to
this generation and get them

Each unique flavour of Mrs. Dash is created from a blend of 14 natural herbs and =

to think in terms of country
and society.

Many of the Bahamas”

youth, Mr Stuart said, are too
engrossed in pursuing their
own personal interests and
careers and it is not easy to
spark their idealism and to tap
into thier energies for the
“sreater good”, especially
when there are no life-threat-
ening issues. °

“Today’s generation is apa-
thetic because it was spared
by history, and has no cause
bigger than itself to believe
in. It has not experienced
powerful historic events such
as the Burma Road riot,

--Majority- Rule and racial

oppression:
“The older generation of
Bahamians has created the

environment for us.to grow |

up. in. a, better Bahamas in

comparison to what they had..

Wein this generation have
never experienced hostilities,
like the riots that we had in
the 1940s, when three
Bahamians were killed, or the
fight for majority rule in the
1960s. We have never had to

seriously consider how our

society could be improved by
our involvement until now,”
Mr Stuart said.





“i PUERTO RICO

SALT FARE

In brief

Biker 2
becomes
14th traffic
_ fatality

THE country’s 14th traftic
fatality of the year was recorded
over the weekend wheii' a
motor-cyclist was thrown from
his machine after colliding with
a car.

The crash took place -6n
Carmichael Road near Faith
Avenue. A Ford Escort was
involved.

The motor-cyclist was fake
to Princess Margaret Hospital
but died on the way.



Bill signed :
to end

Puerto Rico
shutdown ©

San Juan



ment eter and a half-miil-
lion students will return to théir
jobs and classrooms Monday
morning after a two-week bret
they never planned for wa
‘resolved with a signature lale
Saturday, according to. Asse
ated Press.

Governor Anibal Acevedo
Vila signed a key bill that ended
a partial government shutdown
that closed the US Caribbean
territory’s public schools and
idled half of the central
government’s work force, sin €
May 1.

“The government will reopi i
and return to normal on Mén-
day. This has. been an. extrao) ~
dinary victory for the peop
Puerto Rico,” said Acevedo,
referring to the House and Sén-
ate’s approval of an emer;
Joan to fund the government’s
-operations and payroll until: the
-end of the fiscal year on pune
30.

The end to the budget
impasse followed a unanimous
vote by the Senate which autho-
rized the loan. Earlier, in a ses-
sion that stretched well past
midnight, the opposition-domi-
nated House unanimously
approved the bailout hours after
Acevedo warned that the déal
to end the shutdown — which
affected almost 10 per cent of
workers in the US Caribbean
territory — could u.-avel if law-
makers didn’t act thi “weekend.



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MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Ingraham condemns
on Grand Bahama during visit

FREEPORT - The PLP gov-
ernment has been bad for
Grand Bahama, FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham said on Sat-
urday.

He said Freeport, which has
seen its “best days” under the
FNM government, has again
returned to the days of the late
1980s and early 1990s when the
PLP was last in office.

“When we were in office we
demonstrated very convincing-
ly to all and sundry what it was
that we could do, and did do to
produce Freeport to its best
days since the 60s,” said Mr
Ingraham.

During his visit to Grand
Bahama over the weekend, Mr
Ingraham met with some 400 to
500 key supporters from Grand
Bahama and Bimini to discuss
selection procedures of candi-





dates for the four available seats
- Pine Ridge, Eight Mile Rock,
Marco City and West End and
Bimini - in the upcoming gen-
eral election. :

He also met with the media
and addressed many burning
issues, criticising the govern-
ment about the recent Haitian
raids, teachers’ salaries, and sell-
ing of land on Bay Street to for-
eigners.

Mr Ingraham was very con-
cerned about the state of the
Grand Bahama economy. He
believes that the Royal Oasis
Resort was a true anchor prop-
erty for Freeport’s economy.

In response to comments
made recently by Prime Minis-
ter Perry Christie in Grand
Bahama on May 3, Mr Ingra-
ham said that while it was the
FNM that initially brought the

Ministry of Health awards

Driftwood Group to Grand
Bahama, the Royal Oasis was
closed on the PLP’s watch.

During his speech to urban
renewal stakeholders, Mr
Christie had indicated that the
PLP was not responsible for
bringing the group to Freeport.

“They didn’t say that when
they came to office and they
came down here to open the
new Driftwood facilities. They
like to reap without sowing.

“And they were happy that
day to make all the flowery
speeches; those of us who
brought them here like myself
were not even invited to the
function.

Mr Ingraham said hopefully
the Royal Oasis property will
be sold, and hopefully it will
provide jobs in Grand
Bahama.

i GERARD Brown, centre, from the Department of Environmental Health Services, receives his
award and gifts from parliamentary secretary John Carey (left) and parliamentary secretary Ron
Pinder during the Ministry of Health Awards ceremony at Government House

(Photo: BIS/Patrick Hanna)

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

key ea

THE TRIBUNE



Commonwealth moral authority
is vital to Caribbean interests

@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat who publishes widely
on Small States in the global
community).

HE preservation of the
moral authority of the
Commonwealth (formerly the
British Commonwealth) is vital

to the Caribbean.

Sidelined, as they are, in
international organisations
because of their smallness and
lack of clout, the Common-
wealth presents the leadership
of Caribbean states with unique
opportunities to advance their
concerns in the international
community.

The Commonwealth is the
only multilateral organisation
in which heads of government

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of Caribbean States enjoy equal
status with heads of larger and
more powerful countries. such
as Britain, Canada, Australia,
India, Nigeria and South
Africa. They can present their
causes in the Commonwealth
and, having won support, expect
the larger countries to back
them in organisations such as
the IMF and the World Bank.
But the Commonwealth’s
moral authority is being eroded

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because of its silence over Zim-
babwe where the government
of President Robert Mugabe
has violated human and civil
rights, destroyed democratic
institutions and presided over
the ruin of a once vibrant econ-
omy.

This issue has come into focus
in the last few weeks during the
official celebration of the 80th
birthday of Britain’s Head of
State, Queen Elizabeth.

The Queen is also Head of
the Commonwealth, a volun-
tary association of 54 States
made up of Britain and many
of its former colonies in the
Americas, the Caribbean,
Africa and Asia.

But, repeatedly, the interna-

tional media have been: ques-

tioning the authority of the
Commonwealth which did not

_ deal with Zimbabwe at its last

Heads of Government Confer-
ence in Malta late last year, and
on whose work agenda Zim-
babwe does not now appear.

Journalists have pointed with
alarm to the response of Don
McKinnon, the Commonwealth
Secretary-General, to the ques-
tion: Why was Zimbabwe not
discussed at Malta? The Secre-
tary-General said that Zimbab-
we was no longer a member of
the. Commonwealth, Mr
Mugabe having withdrawn his
country’s membership prior to
the Conference.

These journalists have been
quick to point out that South
Africa’s withdrawal from the

. Commonwealth did not stop the '

organisation from discussing its
atrocious Apartheid policies,
nor did it stop the Common-
wealth from taking initiating
international action against the
Apartheid regime including
sanctions.

There are many i in the Com-
monwealth who, like the jour-

nalists, worry that the Com-

monwealth is weakening its
credibility and authority by not
dealing with Zimbabwe. And
such persons include the
strongest supporters of the

-Commonwealth.

The Commonwealth has a
unique responsibility for Zim-
babwe. It was the Common-
wealth that stood up against the
infamous Unilateral Declara-
tion of Independence from
Britain by a white minority gov-
ernment led by Mr Ian Smith
under a Constitution that
deprived black Zimbabweans
of rights in their own country.

Heads of Commonwealth
governments had repeatedly
called for “the removal of the
illegal Smith regime and the dis-
mantling of its apparatus of
repression in order to pave the
way for the creation of police





Be TaylorWessing |



Hy

HIGGS & JOHNSON

Honor Ec titegritas

because of its





SIR Ronald Sanders

and armed forces which would
be responsive to the needs of
the people of Zimbabwe and
ensure the orderly and effective
transfer of power” (commu-
niqué, London 1977).
Zimbabwe’s independence
under majority rule with Mr
Mugabe as President was
uniquely a Commonwealth
achievement for the organisa-
tion persuaded the UK and US
governments to turn away from
Ian Smith and contemplate



The Common-
wealth’s moral
authority is
being eroded

silence over
Zimbabwe



independence for Zimbabwe
under majority rule.

Caribbean governments were .

extremely active on behalf of
Mugabe and. the majority of the
Zimbabwean people. They had
spoken out and acted against
racial discrimination, political
oppression,,and the denial of
human rights. They expected
that Zimbabwe would become a
model for African development
based on majority rule, peaceful
racial coexistence and respect
for democracy.

Instead, Mr Mugabe.has cut .

down political opponents,
repressed opposition, and pur-
sued policies that have wrecked
the Zimbabwean economy



including the seizure of once
arable farm land that are now
unproductive.

Few would have quarrelled
with Mr Mugabe’s position that
80 per cent of the country’s
arable land in the hands of a
minority of white farmers was
wrong. Right thinking persons
would have supported a well
thought-out policy of land redis-
tribution which included ade-
quate compensation and the
continued productivity of farms.

But, there was illegal seizure,
little or no compensation, and
land was given to persons with
no experience of farming.
Today, a country which once
offered the prospect of being
one of the richest in Africa has
all but collapsed economically,
and democracy has been dis-

carded as Mr Mugabe hangs « on

to power by force.
Isuspect that when Mr Mck-
innon justified not discussing
Zimbabwe at Malta, he did so
to preserve the organisation
from a deep rift between some
African countries, particularly
South Africa, and other Com-

- monwealth members. Thabo

Mbeki, the President of South
Africa, has to manage a diffi-
cult racial situation in his own
country that could ignite over
Zimbabwe.

Mr McKinnon had himself
secured a policy decision in 2003
to continue Zimbabwe’s ‘sus-
pension from the Common-
wealth and he had quietly initi- .
ated several diplomatic efforts
to engage Mr Mugabe. These

» were all rebuffed.

But, as conditions in Bin
babwe worsen, the Common-
wealth cannot appear to be
standing aloof on the basis that
the country is no longer a mem-
ber of the Commonwealth. ;

If the Commonwealth is ‘to
maintain its integrity and moral
authority, Zimbabwe must
again become a focus of its con- .
cern, and African countries,

_.° particularly South Africa,

should be persuaded that the
majority of Commonwealth
members are of this view. - |

But, Mr McKinnon needs the
help of the member States of
the Commonwealth if he is.to
initiate’ action on behalf of the
people of Zimbabwe.

The two groups of countries
best placed to give the Secre-
tary-General such help are the
Caribbean and Asia.

Caribbean sovSnamients
should be expressing their deep
concern'to the Secretary-Gen-
eral and Commonwealth gov-
ernments in Africa not only
about the abuse in Zimbabwe,
but also about the damage
being inflicted upon the Com-
monwealth by its inaction. ©

It is in the interest of Zim-

-babwe, the Commonwealth,

and their own countries that
Caribbean governments express
such concern.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

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© Certificate of Attendance.

¢ Optional formal assessment (in the form -
of an assignment to be completed within
_a set time after the lecture programme).

¢ Suggestions as to how trustees might
avoid litigation arising and what to do if
it does.










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the future

Phi pi thoiw

Rum Cay Resort Marina

t By LARRY SMITH

PORT NELSON, Rum Cay:
Prime minister Perry Christie and
British investor John Mittens flew
to Rum Cay on Friday for a
groundbreaking ceremony inau-
gurating the $90. million Rum Cay





CHAIRMAN'S REPORT .

Second Quarter Ended January 31st 2006 a
Unaudited Results ove

FOCOL Holdings Limited (FOCOL) has
achieved another quarter of record profit.
Net income was $3.682 million for the first
six months of this year compared to $2.916
million last year, representing an increase of
26.2%. Earnings ‘per share increased to 43
cents per share up from 34 cents for the same
period in 2005. Our price per share has.
increased from 10.05 to 10.42.

‘Marine sales to the international market are’
one of the driving forces behind improved
profits for our company.

FOCOL has successfully completed the’

* acquisition of Shell Bahamas Limited, and
took over its operation on January 16th,
2006. The name of Shell Bahamas Limited
has been changed to Sun Oil Limited. The

purchase price was $32.750 million, subject
to financial working capital adjustments _
which should be completed by August 2006.





To-date, the integration and restructuring of
the Sun Oil Limited is exceeding
management's initial projections. Therefore,

‘ the Board of Directors and Management are
very confident that, should this trend
continue, FOCOL is well positioned to
record another year of record profits.







yement and

Our Board of Directors, mani
staff remain committed to seeking every
avenue to contribute to the growth of
FOCOL.

ha.

Sir Albert J. Miller
Se Chairman & President










FOCOL HOLDINGS CO.LTD

' ing.

Resort Marina.

For the tiny community of
Port Nelson, it was one of the
most exciting events in recent
memory. And virtually the entire
town turned up for the party in
their Sunday best.

In a first for the island, enter-
tainment was provided by the
police band, which arrived on a
special Bahamasair flight. Food,
drinks and tents catered by
Daniel Ferguson arrived in a cube
truck aboard the Lady Francis.

“This is something we’ve been
hoping and praying for,” said
retired chief councillor Sam May-
cock. “I only hope the young
folks will take advantage of the
opportunities.”

There are fewer than 80 peo-
ple living -on Rum Cay, and the
Montana development will cre-
ate 400 permanent jobs and pump

hundreds of millions of dollars,

into the economy at full build-

out, which is projected by 2016. A |

heads of agreement was signed

with the government in 2004.

At one time, this 30-square-
mile island supported prosperous
cotton plantations, cattle ranches,
pineapple and sisal farms, as well
as the second largest salt industry
in the Bahamas.

But since the early. years of
the 20th century, economic

decline and emigration have char-

acterised Rum Cay. Port Nelson
is the last of six original settle-
ments and the government pro-
vides most of the employment.
Until the late 1960s there was
no air access at all. And Prime
Minister Christie recalled that,
when visiting the island years ago,
there was only a dirt airstrip. He
vowed to change that when he
came to power and... “so said, so
done”. Rum Cay now has a gov-

-ernment-issue 5,000-foot paved
runway and Montana will begin”

work soon on:a terminal build-

According to Mr Mittens, a
contractor is about to be named
for the marina and a barge will
soon arrive to house construction
workers and provide a medical
centre: There will be 300 workers
‘on the project at the peak of con-
struction, he said.

The development will feature
an 80-slip marina just west of Cot-
tonfield Point, The marina basin
will be excavated inland and a

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE.SHEET



100-foot wide navigation channel
will be dredged to a depth of 12
feet for a distance of about 1,300
feet. And a 60-foot flushing chan-
nel will also be dredged to a
depth of four feet.

Besides the sale of private
estate lots, the resort will feature
hundreds of condos and villas, a
commercial village around the
marina, a yacht club and dive cen-
tre, a low-rise luxury hotel, a 20-
acre organic farm operated joint-
ly with the township, an eques-
trian centre and a fixed base oper-
ation. The resort will also install
two reverse osmosis water purifi-
cation plants and a sewerage
treatment plant. “

Montana hopes to create “the
most distinctive residential resort
marina in the region, with access
to world-class fishing, diving and
boating,” Mr Mittens said.

“We are committed to building
Rum Cay Resort Marina with the
utmost sensitivity to environ-
mental harmony and ecological
balance. And we are dedicated
to the conservation of the antiq-
uities within the development
site.”

Besides Mr Christie and Mr
Mittens, speakers at the ground-
‘breaking included Investments
Minister Vincent Peet; Philip
Davis, the island’s MP; and
Delores Wilson, the 74-year-old
proprietor of Kaye’s Bar who is
the unofficial matriarch of Rum
Cay.

There was an opening prayer
by Pearl Maycock and the nation-
al anthem was sung by Jackie
Nottage, accompanied by the
police band: The ending prayer
was by Philip Strachan.

The event was scheduled for
10am, but according to one
observer “it's amazing how Rum |

_ Cayans know that if something is

scheduled for 10 they are not
going to start showing up until
after 11. Finally the crowd arrived
at 11.45 and the ceremony
began.”

The groundbreaking was fol-
lowed that afternoon by a politi-
cal event when Maderich Stra-
chan, Theodore. Bain, Samuel
Maycock and Toby Kelly were
installed as PLP stalwart council-
. lors by the prime minister. In the
evening there was another com-
munity-wide party at the Ocean
View Restaurant and Bar.






(B $000) (unaudited)
: January 31, 2006 July 31,2005
Assets S$ 98,979 29,876
Liabilities 52,162 9,600
Total shareholders’ equity 46,817 (20,276
$ 98,979 29,876



CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
SIX MONTHS ENDED JANUARY 31, 2006

Six months ended

Six months ended







January 31, 2006 January 31, 2005
Sale & revenues $ 55,996 33,072
Cost and expenses 52,276 31,100
Income from operations 3,720 2,672
Other income (expense) (38) 244
Net Income $ 3,682 2,916
Earnings per share $ 0.43 0.34
Dividends per share $ 0.28 0.28







sf a full set of the unaudited financial statements can be obtained from
n Adderley, at the Freeport Oil Company located on Queens Highway, Free-
yd Bahama, Monday through Friday from 8:30 AMTO 5:00 PM.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 11





_ MINSPECTOR Percy Grant is pictured holding the Humane
Society International Animal Advocates Award with Tyrone,
_one of the BHS’s needy, friendly, young male potcakes, hoping
,for someone to give him a loving home.

Pioneering Rum

Recognition for Humane
Society education official

Bahamas Humane Society
education officer Inspector Per-
cy Grant addressed interna-
tional representatives of animal
welfare societies in Los Angeles
from as far afield as Australia,
Philippines, Chile, France,
Brazil, Tonga, Canada, South
Africa and Mexico.

He was talking to some 80
delegates about the work the
BHS does in educating school-

children about responsible ani- .

mal ownership, and support for
the proposed Animal Protec-
tion and Control Act being pre-
sented to Parliament this year.

He emphasised the impor-
tance of educating children to
address an obvious gap in young
people’s knowledge of what ani-

“mals really need in a modern
caring society. He also empha-
sised making good animal pro-
tection law and enforcing it.

In recognition of the work the
BHS does, ‘Percy Grant
received the Humane Society

-International: Animal Advo-
cates Award on behalf of the

-BHS-from their executive direc-_

tor Neil Trent.

Over 30 years ago, Washing-
ton DC based Neil Trent was a
BHS inspector based in Nassau

and he said: “It gave me
tremendous pleasure to give this
award to The Bahamas

Humane Society as I had first-

hand knowledge of the work
done by them years ago.

“JT am particularly impressed
with the willingness of this soci-
ety to also help other smaller
societies within The Bahamas,
and | am grateful for their sup-
port with the- forthcoming
Caribbean Animal Welfare
Conference, which HSI is spon-
soring in Antigua.”

The Caribbean Animal Wel-
fare Conference is taking place
in Antigua from today until
Wednesday and the BHS will
have their chief inspector,
Stephen Turnquest, and exec-
utive director Kevin Degenhard
there delivering a high profile
two-day workshop to support
animal welfare groups, police,
government agencies and other
non-government organisations
and improve skills when inves-

.. tigating animal cruelty. Inspec-

tor Missick and Inspector
Deveaux of the Royal Bahamas

“Police Force will also-be attend-

ing.
The conference is not only
sponsored by the US Humane

dies at 84 in Illinois, US

Dr Wylie Mullen - a globe-
“trotting aviator and pioneer
radiologist who was one of the
_ earliest American residents on

Rum Cay - died on Monday in
‘Joliet, [linois. He was 84.

_ Dr Mullen built a winter
>home near Port Nelson in 1971.
-He flew his own plane to the

island almost every winter until

his daughter, Sue, and her hus-~

band, Oscar, acquired the prop-
‘erty a few years ago.
~ Dr Mullen's passion for avia-
tion began in 1944 when he got
his first pilot's licence and con-
tinued until 2001. He had an
»airline transport rating and an
-instructor’s rating for over 46
*years for airplanes, gliders, heli-
“copters, instruments, and multi-
- engine land and sea planes. .
Through the years, he owned
“and flew helicopters and over
125 different makes and models






of airplanes, gliders and bal-
loons, including a DC-3 and P-
51 Mustang. He flew more than
two million miles and visited
136 countries on every conti-
nent.

He was president of Mainline
Aviation, which operated at the
Joliet Airport for many years,
and started two avionics com-

~ panies: He also co-founded Joli---

et Metallurgical Laboratories
in 1957 - the largest laboratory

of its kind in the United States -.

and was active as its CEO until
his death.

Dr Mullen's pioneering dri-
ve went beyond the skies. He
was a clinical instructor in radi-
ology at the University of Ili-
nois in Chicago for several years
and he introduced cutting edge
technology to his radiology
practice.

He and. his associates were

| Distributed by Lowe’s Wholesale
Soldier Road * 393-7111 © Fax: 393-0440



ihe first in the United States to
use remote controlled closed
circuit television for gastroin-
testinal fluroscopy.

He was a life member and
past director of the Flying
Physicians Association, and a
life member and past director
of the Soaring Society of Amer-
ica. He was also a founding

--member of the National Air

and Space Museum.
A sports lover, he competed

in football, track and wrestling’

in college. In his adult life he
enjoyed tennis, bowling, golf,
water skiing, SCUBA diving,
blue water sailing, deep sea fish-
ing and hunting.

Dr Mullen served four years
during and after World War II
on active duty with the US
Navy, and later as a medical

. officer with a submarine unit of

the Naval Reserve.

He was born in 1921 in
Boone, Iowa. He obtained his
medical degree from the Uni-
versity of Iowa and'served his
residency at the Cleveland Clin-
ic in Ohio.

His first wife was Doris

Clausen, a pilot who was killed

in a plane crash in 1966. He is
survived by his current wife,
Shirley; his children, Dr Den-
nis Mullen, Barbara Lezotte,
Nancy Hall and Susan Davis;
four grandchildren, and two
great-grandchildren.

















PART OF YOUR LIFE



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Animals based in London, the
Pegasus Foundation based in
New Hampshire and the Amer-

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of Cruelty to Animals based in
New York. :

Representatives from these
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

ae eA

THE TRIBUNE



Graduates complete straw work course

Black Point, Exuma — Twen-
ty-four women graduated with
top honours in BAIC’s handi-
craft training programme.

Trained by handicraft expert
Eloise Smith, of nearby
Farmer’s Cay, the graduates
produced a variety of souvenir
items combining straw work
with various ingredients found
on the island.

A straw market is being
planned for souvenir workers
at the public dock, downtown
Black Point, said Minister of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Vincent Peet, the
keynote speaker.

“It is small business persons
like you who are the engine of
the economy,” said Mr Peet,
whose Cabinet responsibilities
include Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC).

“You are playing and will
continue to play a critical roll in



2006 Lecture Series

Schedule



January 19 July 20
Women's Health Children's Health
February 16 August 17
Hatt Month Headaches
March 6 September 24
Kidney Month Thyroid Awareness
Ryanietes & Kidney Disease :
October 19
April 20 Mental Health
Asthma/ Lung Disease a3
November 16
May 18 Alzheimer's Disease Month
Arthritis ee :
December 21 | affecting society today.
June 15 Menopause
Men's Health





Free Monthly Health
Lecture Every 3rd
Thursday of the Month

Â¥ DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Li



B FINANCIAL Services and Investments Minister Vincent Peet
admires a bag produced by graduates of BAIC’s Black Point
handicraft training programme. Also pictured are trainer Eloise
Smith (right) and graduate Althea Adderley.

the development of not just the
Exumas but our Bahamaland.”

To educate the public about the
important health issues, presented by
distinguished physicians.
Every third Thursday of the month
6:00pm - 7:30pm, followed by Q & A
Doctors Hospital Conference Room —

To ensure available seating,

Screenings: Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, arid
Glucose testing between Spm & 6 pm.

Please join us as our guest every month for this
scintillating series of the most relevant health issues



The township and visitors to
_ the island packed the school













Refreshments will be provided.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO RSVP CALL:

RSVP 302-4603

SS







li THIS visitor fancies this hat, a sroduet of BAIC’s Black Point

handicraft training programme

room to commend graduates
and view their colourful exhibits.

Dignitaries included Exuma
representative and Deputy

Speaker of the House of

Assembly Anthony Moss,
administrator Alexander Flow-
ers, BAIC officials and board





@ HOSTESS Lorraine Rolle pours Financial Services and
Investments Minister Vincent Peet a coconut delight. BAIC
consultant Benjamin Rahming is at right.

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Intensify the experience!

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Monday - Saturday 9am - 9pm

Also Represented by

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Bernard Road (opp Poinciana Inn)
Monday - Friday 8:30am - 5:30pm
Saturday 8:30am - 1:00pm

For further information call 394- 2604

AP19



members, and local govern,
ment representatives.
Graduates were Althea :
Adderley, Eulease Brown,
Karen Gray, Hestine Kemp,
Onen McPhee, Samara Roker, °
Curline Rolle, Elvy Rolle, Ive-
na Rolle, Mavis Rolle, Doris
Smith, Sharon Taylor, Brenda
Brown, Esther Cooper, Beryl |
Kemp, Katie Kemp, Ida Pat- ’
ton, Corene Rolle, Dossiemae —
Rolle, Francis Rolle, Lorraine,
Rolle, Winnie Rolle, Shiner '
Smith and Trenda Taylor. BENS
Using primarily ingredients |
found on the islands - silver top.
palm, sisal, coconut fronds,
poinciana seeds, pine needles,
seashells, raffia - the graduates
fashioned baskets, bags, purses, :
wallets, place mats, hats, caps
and other items. \ \

“wv
T
£

e
Fashion =.

BAIC’s handicraft develop- ,
ment and marketing manager, .
Donnalee Bowe noted that, -
straw work is again fashionable ,
among Bahamian women. It is.
a hit with the tourists. mig"

“When I started I was told
that straw work was a dying;
industry,” noted Ms Bowe,.,
“Today that is definitely Ce
the case.

“Wherever I go, almost one }
of every two ladies is carrying:
Bahamian-made bags. It is the,»
fashion of the day. I feel cer: |
tain this trend is going to cons
tinue.” Mag

BAIC was formed to assist ;
in the creation and develop-:
ment of commerce and industry
within the Bahamas, and to ;
expand and create opportuni:
ties for Bahamians to partici-3
pate in the economic develop-:!
ment of the Bahamas, said coh-' |
sultant Mr Rahming.

BAIC places emphasis: on:
small and medium+size busi a
nesses, including cottage. indus- ‘
tries, he added.

Mr Peet’s responsibilities lop
include domestic investmen

“That means -creating:
Bahamian business people, that-
means making Bahamiat S.'
employers as ope to j ist, *
arya 2 he said Fe

ree











“You have S orodited first-.
class products that canbe sold
in any fine store anywhere ' ‘int
the world, made by Bahamidns:
_and trained by BAIC.” :

BAIC and the government
will provide necessary funding
to ensure that those who.want
to will be given assistance to-

‘expand their businesses, he.
- said.

“The government i is commit=
ted to giving Bahamians the:

best this country has to offer,” a
-said.Mr Peet. “We' are there+

fore giving Bahamian business:
persons more incentives. and
concessions than we do for the:
foreign investors.” *
Mr Peet underscored the
“mega investments” the. gov
ernment has been able to wih.’ :
“Sometimes we take thie
development of our country
and the investors coming in for.
granted because we start to;
believe it has always been that
way,” he said. “But that is not
true. . eS
“It has not always been that
every other month a govern
ment could announce a billion
dollar investment in the
Bahamas. That is most unusual}
“That has happened because;
of excellent, exemplary leaders
ship and the confidence that
the foreign investor has in}
Prime Minister Perry Christie!
and his leadership and the
Bahamas. i
“Over the last four years in
our Bahamas, this Christie gov+
ernment has attracted almost
$12 billion worth of investment
to our Bahamas. There is nd
other country in the region who
could say that.” q
As part of negotiations with
investors, said Mr Peet, “they
are now being told that they
have to provide opportunities
for Bahamians and in some cas+
es joint ventures between for-

ex a
eS) Scotia on eign investors and Bahamians..?
Prices shown based on 15% customer

down payment over a 60-month term
with approved bank credit.

(Photos: BIS/ Gladstone
Thurston)

BAHAMAS HOT ROD
SOCIATION

$327
per month/sOmonths
Ust Pnees $22; 933

per month/60months
st Price pe eens

NEXT EVENT
27th & 28th May, 2006
at lpm

Toe MM OR DRM UM TTOU THOROLD DS
of officers will be held on
Sth May 2006 at 7pm onthe track

Election will be held on

On-the-spot financing Eachus?
Ist June 2006

: aa eee ALU crea a2 2A


THE TRIBUNE



Venezuela’s Chavez —
visits London, but
he won’t meet Blair

@ LONDON



VENEZUELAN President
Hugo Chavez arrived im Lon-
don ‘Sunday for a two-day vis-
it that includes meetings with
London's maverick mayor,
left-leaning lawmakers and
trade unions. The one thing
missing is a face-to-face with
Britain's prime minister, or
any government official for
that matter, according to
Associated Press.

The visit is in stark contrast
to His trip to Britain in 2001
when he warmly embraced
Tony Blair.

Tensions between the two
governments have been esca~
iating since February, when
Blair told legislators in the
House of Commons that
Venezuela “should abide by
the rules of the international
community" and that he
wotld like to see Venezue-
a’$ close ally Cuba become a
“tunctioning democracy."

€havez responded by-say-
:ng ‘Blair's comments came
ikea "cannon blast."

Outside a conference cen-
ter in north London where
Chavez was to meet repre-
sentatives of hon-goyern-
mental organizatious and
left-leaning parties Sunday
afternoon, dozens of sup-
porters waited to greet him,
waving ‘yellow signs pro-
claiming "London welcomes
President Chavez." One sup-
porter was wrapped. in the
Venezuelan flag while anoth-
ericarried a Cuban flag, tes-
tament to Chavez's close
links to .Cuban leader

Fidel Castro,

Chavez, a fierce critic of
the war in Iraq, has charac-
ierized Blair as a "pawn of
imperialism” over his close
alliance with U.S President
George W. Bush, whom
Chavez has compared to
Adolf Hitler.

Chavez's moves to exert
greater control over his coun-
try's vast petroleum reserves
have also drawn criticism
from Britain and other coun-
tries.

Venezuela s Loadon
embassy issued a statement
Thursday, confirming that
Chavez would not have any
contact with the British goy -
ernment during his visit. The
statement did not mention
the recent tensions, saying
only that Chavez has
“already had an official visit
to the United Kingdom
where he met with the prime
minister and other Briiish
authorities."

Officials in Blair's office
and the Foreign Ministry

have declined to comment on.
the reasons why Chavez 1s.

noi Meeting with any senior
British official, saying only
that the Venezuelan leader's
Visit iS ‘piivate.'

A spokeswoman in Blair's
office added that Venezue-
jan officials had not request-
ed a meeting.

A researcher at the
Chatham House think tank
in London said that if every-
thing was fine between the
two countries, Chavez would
at least meet with a senior
British official.

ae ee & niente
April Ue Mey 13th

re Sherwin: Williams yo our
Ter ere MSC

rer,

rince Charles Drive





Cuban ‘ambassador pays courtesy





MONEE MAY 15.2006, PAGE 13

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(BIS Photo: Raymond A. Bethel) .







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PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



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Pmeoyey Via TSN)



onflicting information
on surveillance aircraft

FROM page one

"It will be going to Florida, where they
are going to service the aircraft," said Mrs
Pratt. "And it will return so that we will be
able to have this transaction made with
Bahamas Air."

This mix-up in communication being giv- -

en to the public by the two top officials at the
government's national security office came
about when the MP for Eleuthera, Alvin
Smith, called into question decisions being
made by the agency in relation to defence
spending.

Mr Smith asked for the defence agency to
explain why millions of dollars in’ public
funds were spent on an aircraft which was
considered wrong for its intended military
purpose, only to have it sit, unused, at NIA.

In response, the national security chief
told the House that neither she nor MP
Smith were technicians. Therefore, she relied
on the advice of the technical people about
the kind of equipment that they should have
purchased.

“We have been advised by people who
are specialists in the area, and that's the
kind of aircraft that the Defence Force said

Ingraham on immigration law

that they needed," said Minister Pratt, "and

that is the kind of aircraft that was pur-

chased."

Admitting that he was not a specialist,
Mr Smith, however, questioned the logic of
having "specialists" advise and recommend
purchasing an aircraft for defence use, only
to have the aircraft sold to a passenger air-
line. Mr Smith said that, in all this confusion,
"the Defense Force is operating in the
dark."

Since the story concerning the King Air
350 broke last week, members of the Royal
Bahamas Defense Force have stepped for-
ward to criticize operations at the base, say-
ing "the men right now are demoralized and
wondering when the government is going to
open up the general review of the Defense
Force and reveal what the finding and rec-
ommendations were.’

As revelations that a number of high
ranking officers at the Defense Force base
are suspected of being on the United States's
Immigration stop list, Minister Alvin Smith
has also called on the government to update
the Bahamian people on the review of the
Defense Force that was completedsat the
end of 2005.

"Keeping pertinent information from the

them.

_ Wednesday.

FROM page one

citizenry seems to be a pat of this govern- “'"

ment's culture," said Mr Smith.
"The minister ought to explain to the

Bahamian people why the government has :

hidden this document from them, and why it.:
has not been tabled in the House of Assem- :

bly, as the Free National Movement did with ., :

the CDR review of the police force."

The Minister of National Security said |
that because of information in the review.
that could not be released the way it was, the
government has seen fit not to have the doc-.

ument tabled in the House for review. She | ,

said that the Prime Minister has briefed the.
leader of the opposition in connection with, :
the review, and she went on to promise that '
a communication would be Prous,
before the House at its next sitting | on |

will be welcomed by members of the forcé,

as they question why individuals on the US 3)>
stoplist continue to be employed with the :"
agency, and more qualified officers or offi-.'»
cers who are seeking to make themselves: >; ;

more qualified face firings, transfers, or the.
prospect of being denied promotions by. :
commanding officers who Perceive them as:
threats. ih

illegal immigrants. You round
up cattle not human beings.”': -
Mr Ingraham believes the:

government ought to have a sus-:.”

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should send resume and photo to:

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It’s time to



“That is different from us. We
believe in a consistent policy.
Secondly, we believe that
enforcement of any law, includ-
ing our immigration law, must
dealt with humanely and in
accordance with standards,
human rights procedures, and

established human rights norms ,

that exist in all civilized soci-
eties. ,

“That it is not right to go to
people’s home at three and four
in the morning and round them
up: First of all the word round-

up is inappropriate, at best it

should be an apprehension exer-

‘cise;;an exercise to apprehend.

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bs

tained and ongoing regular con-: ::
sistent exercise to ensure that .*)
those who are in the Bahamas:~
without permission are:found +.’

and repatriated to their home |

country.

The FNM, he said, demon-
strated that quite vividly in
office and repatriated on aver-
age 5,000 illegal immigrants per
year over the last four or Ave
yeas.

- “There came.a time when we

-had to pay the Haitian govern-

ment $100 per person on every.

illegal immigrant we sent back
- because they said we'were send-
- ing back too many and that
“cost was too high.



“We would send them back’ .

to Port-au-Prince and they °

would transport them by bus to.
wherever they: came from: “And «
the Bahamas government paid
$100 per person to make sure
we facilitated them. We believe
that.same exercise should cop,
tinue,” Mr Ingraham said. *



a0

®

ke

3

&
wp

However, he does not believe 3

that illegal immigrants should,
be sought out at public clinics’ .
where people go for public

churches.
“These are all fntetaationally

“accepted standards and norm

for the apprehension of illegal
immigrants in a society.

“And we call upon the PLP
government to return to those
standards. To do its job, but
return to those standards.”

According to Mr Ingraham,

the 100 or more legal residents: |
with permanent residency who’ »

were apprehended at four and’
five in the morning in Eleuthera,

transported to Nassau by police,
taken to the Detention Centre,
and who had to be taken back:
by a private citizen, should not
have been picked up.

“T met with the commissioner
of police and senior officers after
the raid took place in Eleuthera
and I told them privately ‘some
things, but one thing I gave
them was a copy of the interna-
tional migrant and alien con-
vention and I underlined a cou-
ple of sections for the police to
be mindful of that at all times.

“They act on my behalf and:
on your behalf. They act in my

name, and in your name, and’ *

the name of the Bahamias,,
because it is our country and wes
want our country to be in com»

pliance with international stan’ ne

dards and norms.
“And Haitians are people Ate
like everybody else and it should

not be used like they are now -

being used for political partisan
purposes.

“The grass roots are getting
restless, they are complaining

and so the government is going
round picking up the Haitians.
That is not right.”

Mr Ingraham commended
lawyer Fred Smith for helping
those in Spanish Wells who are
going to take action against the
government.

“I encourage them (those
legal residents) to sue the state
so that we can establish in law in
the Bahamas what the rules are
to. any government - mine,
politician’s own or anybody’s
own - so we can abide by it in
the future. But that is not the
way to do business in this coun-
try,” he said.

K

'

* health care, or at schools and;
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 15\~:





Peet urges business people to

improve their productivity

MINISTER of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments Vincent
Peet implored a group of busi-
ness. people to improve their
level.of productivity to reap the
benefits of their labour.

His message came as he offi-
cially opened LORAM Corpo-
rate and Family Services at the
Royal Palm Plaza, Mackey
Street.

The business was established
to help potential domestic
entrepreneurs provide office
space ‘and support services for
existing corporations and fami-
lies.

He. ‘said the Christie adminis-
tration seeks to aggressively
enhance the climate for domes-
tic investment through sound
economic policies, legislative
incentives and concessions, joint
ventures and relevant leading
agencies.

‘Also attending the opening
wereé/Mr Neville Adderley,
chairman of The Bahamas
Development Bank; Mr Philip
Simon, executive director of
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce and Mrs Marlo
Murphy- Braynen, president of
LORAM. Corporate and Fami-
ly Services.

Mr Peet implored LORAM
professionals to improve. their
level of productivity to reap the
benefits of their labour.

“Research reveals that organ-
isations have to grapple with
trends:like rapid product and
technological change, global
competition, deregulation, polit-
ical instability, demographic

changes and a shift to a service
economy,” Mr Peet said.

He added that these factors
have increased the need for
organisations to be responsive,
flexible and generally more
competitive.

“The objective of LORAM,
which is basically to provide
finance, accounting and out-
sourcing services, will be a sig-

‘nificant benefit to the contin-

ued growth and development
of our economy,” Mr Peet said.

He said the partnership this
company formed with the gov-
ernment would promote the
environment for the establish-
ment of small and medium-
sized businesses in The
Bahamas, a genuine source of
job and wealth creation.

Also, the partnership pro-
vides opportunities for train-
ing entrepreneurs who wish to
start or expand an existing busi-
ness, which in turn would facil-
itate growth while creating a
sustained economy.

The minister warned
investors to regularly review
their operation, evaluate their
performance and make the nec-
essary changes to reflect best
practices.

“Understand the scope and
relevance of your worth and
work and express the same to
your clients who will be looking
to you for guidance and advice,
the minister noted.

He also encouraged persons
to acquire, The Bahamas: A
Paradise for Investment,
brochure produced by the min-

& MARLO Mutphy-Braynen, president and CEO of Laram
Corporation and Family Services, cuts the ribbon at the official
opening last Monday in the-Royal Palm Mall, Mackey Street.
From left, looking on: Tyrone Greene, operation manager;
Philip. Simon, executive director Bahamas Chamber of
‘Commerce; and Mr Peet. .



‘i (Photo: BIS/Raymond Bethel)

!



«| The‘Hon. Bradley B. Roberts, Minister of Works, and Donald Demeritte,
Chairman of the Water and Sewerage Corporation, are pleased to announce
the, appointment of Ms. Cheri Hanna to Assistant General Manager of
Commercial Operations at the Water and Sewerage Corporation.



MS, CHER] HANNA /
sistant General Manager, Commercial Operations


















| Ms. Cheri Hanna, the newest member of the
i ' Executive Management Team, joined the Corpora-
ion in 1984 as Senior Clerk in the Delinquent
, Accounts Section of the former Accounting and
inance Department. Over the years Ms. Hanna

' in the Commercial Operations area, having also
: worked in Customer Services. Ms. Hanna is a
; Summa Cum Laude Graduate with a Bachelor of
Science degree in Accounting with a minor in
' Business Administration and Mathematics from
: Bethune,...Cookman College, Daytona Beach,
Florida, Additionally, she Has attended’a number: of
managerial workshops, and has obtained a
+ number of. certifications — including Certified
ele hee Public’ Accountant; (CPA), Georgia State: Board. of
ne Nonny Jnited. Negro College Fund:(UNGF) and’ Selby Foundation scholar. She
© has. attenided-numeérous internal and’ external” workshops including sessions at



: Nortiwestern:; University,:the.University-of-Singapore and the Water Institute of Malta. —

in December 2004"Ms,.Hanna was promoted to the position of Senior Manager. She
is described as being a highly motivated;-self-starter,.results-oriented: professional,
with exceptional organizing, analytical, communication and leadership skills, and an
extensive background in a number of broad-based competencies.

as gained a wealth of knowledge and experience .

a business. bridge the gap to help persons
_ _Mrs Murphy-Braynen said all _ bridge the transition from being
the services will be provided to employees to employers.

effort for persons to familiarise
themselves with what is avail-
able to them when establishing

istry which outlines legislative
incentives and concessions for
Bahamian entrepreneurs in an

Na aaa io a NO ea amulles



















Jitra Siliconizerâ„¢ is applied:
the temperature lowers up to:




‘Concre c Roof ith sph
| on — VTL8E
Neal toat OF












*Based on labor er
“etek ted Never 22 2008
































Wulff Road (Opp “Meckevs St)
Tel:(242) 398-0512, 393. 93-351:





Amilo in’ it

ee ee i
Ba A a a a
PAGE 16, MONDAY, MAY 15, 20068 THE TRIBUNE





Performing well
for arts festival







Mi COLONEL HILL, Crooked Island, The Bahamas — Crooked.
Island High School student Berkley Pinder creating beats at the
E.Clement Bethel National Arts Festival adjudication in Colonel |
Hill, Crooked Island. His performance placed him as a possible ;.
national-finalist in his division.





LIABILITY
CASUALTY @ CONTRACT WORKS
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY @ MARINE
ra: 325-3809 | oe

COLONEL HILL, Crooked Island, The Bahamas - the choral -





Rosetta Street music adjudicator for the E Clement Bethel National Arts Festi-
eolinagemeral.com | val and renowned soprano JoAnn Deveaux-Callender speaking
ae ral.ce i during the festival's adjudication in Colonel Hill, Crooked
sem = Island, on May 10, 2006.







ommunity Project Endorsed by My ¢
is to mybahamas@bahamas.com—s*:



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Support a community project je



amas initiative lately? Tell us about it. Email
¢ photos fo mybahamas@bahamas.com


MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



BUSI



Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

SS Colinalmperial.
. insurance Lid. . 2



Royal Oasis ‘crunch time’

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government and de

facto owner of

Freeport’s still-closed

Royal Oasis resort have

reached “crunch time”

in determining the property’s future,

The Tribune has learned, following a

series of meetings held in New York

last Wednesday to assess the various
offers for the hotel.

Sources familiar with the situation

said “the time has come” for Lehman .

Brothers’ private equity arm and the
Government to choose which of the
various bids they have received will be
the one to acquire the Royal Oasis,
which has been closed since Hurri-
cane Frances struck in September
2004.

Coca-Cola maker |
seeking a buyer

m By NEIL HARTNELL
- Tribune Business Editor

. CARIBBEAN Bottling Company, the company that manu-
factures, bottles and distributes Coca-Cola products in the
Bahamas, is seeking a buyer, informed sources have told The Tri-

bune.

. Among the interested parties is understood to be the holders
of Coca-Cola’s Puerto Rico franchise, although The Tribune has
been unable to learn the identities of any other groups.

Caribbean Bottling, whose main shareholders are Judy Munroe
and Carleton Williams, distributes Fanta and Schweppes products
in addition to Coca-Cola, along with the Dae and Aqua oe

al Water products.
The company had been seek-
ing outside investors to inject



SEE page 7B

The Tribune iiuderstands that rep-
resentatives from the Hotel Corpo-
ration, including Dr Baltron Bethel,
its deputy chairman and managing
director, and officials from the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA),
attended the New York meetings.

The meetings involved Lehman

_ Brothers’ private equity arm and its

managing director, Jay Flannery, and

the various suitors for the Royal

Oasis.

The Tribune understands that two
bidders have offered around $42-$42.5
million for the Royal Oasis, the high-
est price laid on the table so far.

One of those is the Barlow Group,
a Toronto-based real estate develop-





New NOs meeting last ae assessed offers from ly BE L@o) babe iil

er, which has projects located across
Europe and in Canada. That group

is promising an investment of between -

$175-$250 million, inclusive of the
purchase price, to revitalise the Roy-
al Oasis.

The identity of the other top bidder
is unknown, but The Tribune under-
stands that it is a group that has
entered the Royal Oasis race at the
last minute. That group set its offer
price without inspecting the Royal
Oasis’s physical premises, and it is
understood that discussions are ongo-
ing over whether to allow this bidder
to perform this part of preliminary
due diligence.

Meanwhile, the Irish property

. (FILE photo)

ha achat ica

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PARADISE Island’s Atlantis resort saw
its operating income for the 2006 first quarter
fall by 3.9 per cent to $61 million, compared to
last year’s $63.4 million, largely due to a 4
per cent margin decline caused by a greater
reliance on food and beverage revenues.

developer that already has interests in
Freeport, Harcourt Developments,

has offered $30 million for the Royal ©

Oasis.

It was initially part of a three- -strong
group including Westgate Resorts and
Planet Hollywood, the proposed hotel
and casino operators, proposing a
$200 million investment in the Royal

Oasis. All three parties are still inter-’

ested in the Grand Bahama property,
although it is unknown f they are part
of the same consortium.

Any purchaser of the Royal Oasis
would have to be approved by the
Government and, to a lesser extent,
the Port Authority. However, it is
possible that the interests and objec-

tives of Lehman Brothers, which owns

- the Royal Oasis through the mort-

gage it lent to Driftwood Freeport,
and the Government may not coin-
cide.

Lehman Brothers will want to |
achieve the.best sales price possible,
while the Government will be most
concerned about attracting a buyer
who has the business plan and model

most likely to make the Royal Oasis.

work long-term, and the financing

and ability to carry this out.
Therefore, the Government may

not necessarily want the party that

SEE page 6B



Atlantis margins fall in 2006 Qu

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

4% decline caused by
ereater contribution
from food and beverage,
as resort’s net income

soll

. Kerzner International, the Atlantis owner,
revealed that net income at its flagship resort
had fallen despite a 7.8 per cent rise in net rev-
enues to $169.7 million, compared to $157.4
million in the 2005 first quarter.

: ee 3 : Reporting on the three months to March
@ ATLANTIS, Paradise Island 31, 2006, Kerzner International said operating
aie commande margins at Atlantis had declined to 36 per

also down slightly

cent from 40 per cent last year.
It said the margin decline was “mainly due
to a higher proportion of food and beverage
revenue, which has a lower [operating income]

SEE page 6B ie







= eet a on ‘softwar Sis

Freeport storage facility
in $303,000 revenue fall :

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



GRAND Bahama’s South
Riding Point storage terminal
saw revenues for the first three
months in 2006 decline by

. $303,000:compared to last year,

due’ to what its parent
described as “lower marine
révenues”.

In its statement to share-
holders for the 2006 first quar-

ter, World Point Terminals

said that in contrast to the 2005
first quarter, marine activity in
2006 had “been considerably
slower as our customers have
tended to hold their inventory
to take advantage of current
market conditions”.

In addition, World Point © -
Terminals said the 2005 first
quarter had also included pay-
ments from the Blue Marlin -
consortium, which had an -
option on land at South Riding ©
Point as the site of a proposed
liquefied natural gas (LNG)
terminal and pipeline.

That option, which involved
a Florida Power & light (FPL)

subsidiary, El Paso and Suez °.

North America, was “no
longer being pursued”, World
Point Terminals said, after the
site was rejected by the Gov-
ernment on Enuroseutal
grounds.

SEE page 7B

Rum Cay residents are excited,
but cautious on resort project

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

RUM Cay residents are
excited about the opportuni-
ties the multi-million dollar
Rum Cay Resort Marina will
bring to the island, but have
some reservations about how it

‘will change their way of life,

as it will more than quadruple
the island’s population.
Ground was broken on the
$700 million Montana Hold-
ings project on Friday. During
construction of Phase I, it is
anticipated that 300 workers
will join the population of
Rum Cay, which at present









stands at just under 100.

By 2016, when the entire
resort community is complet-
ed, including a marina, luxury
hotel, residential component,
retail space and dining facul-
ties, up to 400 permanent jobs
will have been created.

Rum Cay resident Delores
Wilson said that while the
community loved the peace
and tranquility of their current
existence, they were excited
about the opportunity and job
security the Rum Cay Resort
Marina will provide for the

SEE page 7B

rr eae ‘ Prenenint


BUSINESS

ee A aa



CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
& By Fidelity Capital market saw 15 out of its 20 list- accounting for 38 per cent of also recorded new 52-week | SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
Markets ed stocks trade, of which nine __ the total shares traded. The big _ highs of $10.50 and $1.25, gain-_ | AML $0.77 $0.06 at 54g
advanced, two declined and advancer for the week was __ ing $0.08 and $0.04 respective- BAB $1.25 $0.04 3600 13.64%
t was another blister- four remained unchanged. Commonwealth Bank (CBL),, ly. On the down side, Freeport | BBL SOT aici go ae |
ing week of trading in The volume leader for the up $0.20 to close at anew 52- Concrete Company (FCC) | BOB $723 " ° se saoe,
the Bahamian market, week was Doctors Hospital week high of $10.60. declined by $0.11 to close the | BPF $11.00 ‘ 0 577%
as over 216,000 shares Health Systems (DHS), with FOCOL Holdings (FCL) week at $1.04. BSL $14.00 $- 0 9.80%
changed hands. The 81,920 shares changing hands, and Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) The FINDEX increased by | BWL $1 29 $0.02 1.000 738%
1.19-points to end ihe week at | CAB $9.15 $0.15 te 38%
O20 St | CBL $10.60 $0.20 8,080
| CHL $1.67 - 20,300
‘ | CIB $12.00 $- 0
COMPANY NEWS | DHS $2.54 $0.08 81,920 . ;
: FAM $6.21 $0.01 3,800
Cl | rou Consolidated Water FCC $1.04 $-0.11 1,000
Company (CWCO) - FCL $10.50 $0.08 21,900
. Last week, Consolidated FIN $11.25 $- 0
corporate and : Water Company (CWCO) ICD - $9.50 $- 0
investment ban king released its financial results for JSJ $9.00 ee 0
the quarter ended March 31, KZLB — $7.95 $-0.03 1,487
CITIBANK N.A., NASSAU, BAHAMAS BRANCH 2006. Impressive is one word PRE $10.00 $- 0

Citigroup (NYSE; C), the preeminent global financial services has some 200 million customers accounts
and does business in more than 100 countries, providing consumers, corporations, governments and
institutions with a broad range of financial products and services, including consumer banking and credit,

. corporate and investment banking, insurance, securities brokerage, and asset management. Major brand
names under Citigroup’s trademark red umbrella include Citibank, CitiFinancial, Diner’s Club, Primerica,
Smith Barney, Banamex, and Travelers Life and Annuity.

We are currently accepting resumes for the following position:-
SOMPL ANCE CPRICER/ MANAGER

Knowledge/Skill Requirements:
Extensive working knowledge of compliance policies and internal control procedures.

Detailed understanding of Bahamas and US financial legislations.
Minimum 3 yeas supervisory experience in compliance and/or internal control.

Bachelors Degree with a concentration in Finance, Economics or Accounting. Certified
compliance audit or internal control credentials. would be a plus.

Superior analysis, communications (oral and written) and project management skills.

Extensice working knowledge of PC applications (Microsoft Office) is required.

used to explain the good
results posted by CWCO.

Total revenues increased by
$3.1 million or 52.6 per cent to
$9.2 million from $6 million in
2005, while net income grew
significantly by doubling to $3
million, a $1.7 million or 124
per cent gain from 2005’s $1.3
million.

Following suit was earnings
per share, which gained $0.13
or 108 per cent to $0.25, while
total shareholders' equity
stood at $63.1 million, a $3.6
million or 6.09 per cent gain.

For the week, CWCO saw
its stock price close as high as
$31.05.

BISX-

|

Dividend/AGM Notes:






¢ Bahamas Waste will hold its Annual General Meeting on:
May 23, 2006, at 6pm at the National Tennis Centre, Queen:
Elizabeth Sports Centre, Oakes Field, Nassau, Bahamas.

e Commonwealth Bank will hold its Annual General Meet-'
ing on May 24, 2006, at Spm at the SuperClubs Breezes, ;
Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.

¢ Cable Bahamas will hold its Annual General Meeting a on:
May 24, 2006, at 6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Pe
Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

OA MAO NS By BO

e J. S. Johnson Company will hold its Annual General

Meeting on May 29, 2006, at 6pm at Radisson Cable Beach &itee
Golf Resort, Nassau, Bahamas. : ;

emer mm meta rncnrtrnnr erratsmatet mete:

International Markets:



Duties:
¢ To assist in developing / ensuring that an adequate aenipliance program exists which suitably covers e
the risks associated with all buisiness activities, products and processes. li St e d F OREX Rates 2
To assist in administering the compliance program through the disseminaton of any relevant training Fee Weekly a ‘%o Change
programs or materials aimed at improving the Bank’s compliance culture and adherence to : rp
regulatory requirements... . ‘ a jae Be
To assist in developing procedures for, and periodically executing, independent in-depth testing of C i I | EUR 1.2920 - 1.51
the effectiveness of business’ compliance with applicable local and US laws, regulations aE
and policies.
Implementing the regional information security program aimed at securing the confidentially, de clare S Commodities
integrity and availablity of all:Citigroup business information. ‘ 5 : Weekly % Change
. Assisting in developing and implementing a local Anti-Fraud Plan. which includes staff traininng. e e Crude Oil $71.73 VAT abe |
Play an active role in monitoring, containing and eradicating reported and emerging control issues di \ ride | | d Gold $714.80 ADAM

as well as the status of corréctive action plans and escalating any slippages to senior management.

Verifyin that operational procedures and internal controls exist for every product and service
provided by the bank, commensurate with level of inherent risk through peroidic
independent testing.

is constructing the $29 million Weekly
Reporting to Senior Management on the aca and efficacy of the system of internal control Blue Hills reverse osmosis ;
(accounting, operating and administrative). plant, has declared a second DJIA 11.380 99 a
: quarter cash dividend of $0.06 S & P 500 1,291. 24
Interested applicants may deliver, fax or e-mail resumes to: per share. ; NASDAQ 2,243.78
‘ : The dividend is payable on Nie, 16, 601. 7B.

Business Head
: Citigroup Corporate and Investment Bank
: 4th Fir, 110 Thompson Boulevard,
Nassau, The Bahamas
' Fax: (242) 302-8569
‘E-mail: tadesee.anja.mcekenzie@citigroup.com

‘Resumes should be recieved by



citigroup: l

une 1, 2006



3 date, the — will publish the audited sins! ned ne 30 ona! for: the: year ended
2005 in a newspaper circulating generally in The Bahamas... Factors contributing to

December 31, 2 |
the delay include the following:

* A delay in the finalization of the Appointed Actus

harmonization of reserving methodologies: used. by the former

those of the Company.

"s report due to the.
Imperial to

CONSOLIDATED Water,
the BISX-listed company that

July 31, 2006, to shareholders
of record as at June 30, 2006.

This means that Bahamian
investors who have purchased
Consolidated Water’s Bahami-
an Depository Receipts (Bars)
will receive $0.012 per BD.
Five BDRs are equivalent to
one Consolidated Water ordi-
nary share.






International Stock Market Indexes: —





* Modification of certain presentation and. accounting methodologies of the
financial statements of the former Imperial which were prepared under
Catiadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles to conform to
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

¢ The implementation of new disclosures as required by TERS 4— Insurance
Contracts. °

¢ Turnover among key accounting and management personnel during the
audit.

« Issues related to the integration of various subsystems acquired with the
former Imperial Life portfolio, particularly the integration of the mortgage
portfolios.

¢ Additional time required by the Company’s external auditors to complete
their audit procedures as a result of the foregoing matters.

Colina.

Holdings Bahamas




Phi bhiimuive

BUSINESS

MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 3B



um Cay terminal to be

Bahamas’ third largest



i PRIME Minister Perry Christie (left) with MP Philip “Brave”



Davis on Rum Cay during Friday’s groundbreaking ceremony.

(Photo: Onan Bridgewater)

@ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter.

round has been

cleared at the

future site of

the Rum Cay

airport termi-
nal, which when completed at
5,500 square feet, will become
the Bahamas’ third largest ter-
minal.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie was given an update
on the project by Tim Perkins,
the director of construction for
Montana Holdings, which is
building the facility along with

_its $600-$700 million Rum Cay
Resort Marina.

-Mr Christie and Financial
Services and Investments min-
ister, Vincent Peet, were on
the island for the resort’s
groundbreaking on Friday.

The Prime Minister
expressed pleasure at the plans
for the three-storey complex,
which when completed will
include areas for arrivals and
departures, fuel facilities and
an Internet lounge. It will also
provide space for Fixed Base
Operations in the same build-
ing.

Montana Holdings views the
project as a public -private
partnership.

Mr Christie said that with
the terminal, the island now
had the potential to introduce
direct flights to and from Rum
Cay. This would, he said; cre-
ate a need for a Customs and
Immigration presence on the
island.

Mr Christie told the resi-
dents he had promised them
both paved roads and an air-
port. “ So said, so done,” he



PM: Resort is Rum Cay’s salvation

§ By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



TWO years after signing a
Heads of Agreement with the
Bahamian government, Mon-
tana Holdings on Friday broke
ground on its multi-million
dollar Rum Cay Resort Mari-
na.

When completed in 2016,
the project is. expected to be a
$700 million investment, cre-
ating 300 construction-related

jobs and 400 permanent ones. ©

The mixed-use resort will fea-
ture a marina, marina village,
luxury hotel, residences, fine
dining and retail facilities.
Phase one of the project, the
development of the 80-slip
marina, marina village, and
marina condominium and
estates, is expected to reach
“full swing” later this year.

' Speaking at the ceremony,
Prime Minister Perry Christie
called the groundbreaking a “
great beginning” to help
rebound the island’s economy.

He added that in the past,

Rum Cay could at one time
boast of having a population of
2,000 people, but with a lack of
development currently has a
population of about 80.
“Clearly but for an inter-
vention such as this, settle-
ments such as this one would
slowly disappear into history,”

the Prime Minister said.

Mr Christie said this was
true of communities all over
the country, particularly in the
southern Bahamas, which
makes his vision of an anchor
property on each island even
more important.

Mr Christie added that the
Rum Cay resort, in addition

‘to creating on-site jobs for
*Bahamians, will also create a

number of entrepreneurial
opportunities for residents.

Challenge

“T challenge you (residents)
not to sit and look through the
window at your opportunity.
Take advantage, otherwise
hundreds of Bahamians will
come in and do it for you,”
said Mr Christie.

In addition, the Prime Min-
ister reminded the residents
that they will need to play an
important role in the success
of the development.

* “The future of Rum Cay will
be shaped by this, and it can

- only succeed if people play the

role that they are destined to
play,” he added.

Montana Holdings chair-
man, John Mittens, who host-
ed the entire community to a
luncheon after the ground
breaking, assured residents
that the protection of the envi-





An established law firm requires the following:

AN ATTORNEY

with a least five (5) years experience in litigation,

commercial and general law.
Must be willing to relocate to a Family Island.

*,

: A LEGAL SECRETARY

with at least three (3) years litigation experience.

Applicants must be able to work on their own initiative.

Please send resumés:
c/o The Tribune,
P.O. Box N-3207

: DA 46420

“ Nassau, The Bahamas





MG






ronment during the construc-
tion and maintenance of the
resort remains at the forefront
of the developers’ minds.

“If we destroy it, we will
have all failed,” he said.
Montana will not let.you
down.”

Mr Mittens said the devel-
opers planted a tree farm on
the island as another way of
preserving the environment,
and have chosen a design that
seeks to blend into the existing
environment rather than
change it.

Also attending Friday’s cer-

“emony was the Minister of

Financial Services and Invest-
ments, Vincent Peet, and the
island’s MP, Phillip Davis.

Mr Peet assured residents
that save some specialised
areas, the majority of work on
the project will be done by
Bahamian labour.

BIs

Pricing Information As Of:
12 May 2006





Abaco Markets



said, in an echo of the recent
PLP convention.

Montana Holdings, he
added, has agreed to provide a
sewerage and water system for
the island, including a reverse
osmosis plant.

Mr Christie noted that in the
Heads of Agreement, the
developer had the legal right to
provide its own electricity sup-

ply in the event that BEC was
unable to do so.

However, Mr Christie
expressed his full confidence
that BEC would have no prob-
lem supplying power to the
island or the development
when they needed it.

He also told them that
thanks to the $66 million
Bahamas Telecommunications

Company (BTC) cable laid to
the island, in four to five
months, he expects Rum Cay
residents to be able to have
cable television, Internet access
and cellular service.

Combining these infrastruc-
tural developments with the
island’s anchor property, Mr
Christie said Rum Cay’s future
appeared bright.

(INTERNATIONAL BANK

‘CAREER OPPORTUNITY

[OF

MANAGER, RETAIL CREDIT (NASSAU)

Qualifications/Experience:

Bachelor’s Degree in Banking or related field.
At least five years banking experience at senior supervisory

level

At least three years lending experience

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

To provide assessment of retail credits submitted by 2

jurisdictions

Sanction/authorize retail credit loan applications including
International mortgages within delegated limits up to US$400
thousand secured and US$100 thousand unsecured

Prepare recommendations on retail loan applications outside
of delegated limits for the Senior Manager, Retail Credit /
Head of Retail Credit to sanction / authorize.

If you are interested:
Submit your resume private & confidential i in WRITING ONLY Dee

may 26, 2006 to:

Dawnika Rolle

HR Business Associate

Shirley Street, Financial Centre

P.O. Box N-3221
Nassau, Bahamas

Or email: dawnika.rolle@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank thanks all applicants for their
interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamian nationals only.



Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

.Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
Premier ae Estate i

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdi

28.00 ABDAB

13.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

* $52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name
1.2858 1.2296 Colina Money Market Fund 1.285819"
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 2.7451 ***
2.3560 2.2072 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**
1.1643 Colina Bond Fund 1.164331****



1.1006

S2wk-Hi



- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT APR. 30, 2006/ **** - AS AT MAY. 01, 2006

* - AS AT APR. 28, 2006/ *** - AS AT APR. 30, 2006




EPS EOS 2



Colina

Financial Advisors Lid.

1,000

1,062





0.000 N/M
0.360 . 7.0
0.330 11.2
0.020 3.9
0.060

0.050

0.240 16.2
0.000 NM
0.560 11.4
0.045 53.0
0.000 5.6
0.240 11.5
0.540 15.2
0.500 13.7
0.500 12.6
0.000 N/M
0.405 18.1
0.560 15.7
0.000 59.3

es oe an i

Weekly V

aa ELLE a a




thes
Last 12 Months Div $

ELD - last 12



a so
5 baa

z Rees ae g
onth dividends divided by closing

3 35 = 5
. oae NM
Mee

°. 260

a





Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Me

SSSA

sys
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006



PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMMES 2006

What is your goal?

YÂ¥ PROMOTION

Â¥ QUALITY SERVICE

/Â¥ SALARY INCREASE

/ NEW CAREER

— Y CAREER ENHANCEMENT

| We can provide you with superior education and training
to help you accomplish your goal.

{ Call 242-328-0093 or 242-328-1936 for an interview
today!



For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am — 12noon.
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? Our Professional
Development Department can help you achieve your career goal!

No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available.

SUMMER COURSES

CERTIFICATION IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

PROJ901 Mastering Project Management - $800

| This course explores the core competencies of project management, and the following topics are
discussed at the advanced level: leadership, project performance management, project plan
development, and people-based project management, project quality, scope, time, cost, human
resources, communications, risk, procurement, and integration management. Upon successful
completion of the programme, candidates are encouraged to sit the American Academy of Project
Management Executive Level Certification Examination. To be awarded the Master Project
Manager Certification, candidates must score a minimum of 75% on the AAPM Master Certification
Final Examination. :

Prerequisite: A Master’s Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university
and a minimum of one. year’s experience as a project management apprentice; or a Bachelor’s
degree with four years’ project management experience; Curriculum vitae.

| ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
Begins: Spring, Summer and Fall ‘Day/Time: Saturday 8:00am - 12n

Master Project Management Intensive Review- $800 Duration: 4 Weeks

Duration: 8 Weeks

Begins: Spring, Summer or Fall Day/Time: Saturday 8:00am - 12n

THE BECKER CPA REVIEW

"ff The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer-Based Test (CBT). Besides

the obvious transition from a pencil-and-paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA
Exam will also contain a new content focus - broadening the scope of audit and attest areas and
incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication. The new exam
also has increased emphasis on general business. knowledge and information technology. Students
may sit the final exams under the United States CPA Board for which they have qualified.

CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520

CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650
CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465

| CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465

Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least
21 credit hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall

A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION

This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to sit the international
A+ Microsoft Certification Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems
related to the personal computer are explored. The programme provides hands-on learning experience
with lab exercises that help students to apply theory to practice.

TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware- $510
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS

CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR - Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)

Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am - 5:30pm _, Duration: 12 Weeks

i This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel,

Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation
and design skills, the instructor provides easy-to-understand notes and conducts live demonstrations
on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Students who complete the external international

# examinations successfully will be awared the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification. The ~

programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:

‘TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP $06 Microsoft Office Specialist ETHC900 Ethics & Profes. Responsibility- $250 (Optional)
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3

Microsoft Outlook COMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
(Optional).

NOTE: COMP906 is offered in Spring, Summer and Fall terms. Students are free to select the term of study.

PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS

IMPORTANT INFORMATION |

APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMMES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in
conjunction with foreign institutions are required to contact the CEES Office for information on
external application and examination fees.

FEES ‘ :
1. COB Registration.........ccceseceeeceseeeeeee $40.00 (one-time fee)
D. INSUPANCE. \...ccececsscccstsosssesscelsacessenecsentebinedions $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
Bi AD Cards ...5schstesstediccrsc. todeseccevafagisisistveeveattans $25.00 (one time fee)
4. Technology Fee...........:ceeceeeeeeeeesenteseeneens $100
5. BOOKS rwccccsursheetactevexescstesssageegessatiens Siivecewees Please contact COB Bookstore fy prices. |
6. Awards Ceremony (Optional)...........cceee $150.00 (must be paid by the 2 ~ TERM)
7. External Application Fees... eee Please check with the CEES Office for
information.

THE ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY

The Annual Awards Ceremony and Reception is normally held at The British Colonial Hilton Hotel
once during TERM 38. Adult students successfully completing programmes and courses are awarded
certificates or certification documents.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!

Call (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 or visit us on Moss Road in Oakes Field.
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To:
The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees reserves the right to change tuition, fees, course content, course schedule and course materials.

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
SUMMER SEMESTER 022006
CODE BEGINS DUR.
1. Gourmet Cooking | COOK 823 Y
COOK #06 $10- $12 per week

3. Introduction to Bartending | ITFB 903 May 15 6weeks | Mon/Wed. | 6:00-9:00pm | $402.98 : CHMI 15
Skills Dining Rm.

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary
7 & Hospitality Management Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175

REE











RESOURCE
MATERIALS






TUITION
& FEE

COURSE















6:00-9:00pm | $200.00 $20 per week SHTS Main Kitchen




ae ke

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs




CONSTRUCTION SEMINAR GROUP

Construction Seminar Group & The College of The Bahamas
“Lessons Learnt from the Disastrous Hurricane Season: 2004-2005”

Tuesday, May 16-Thursday, May 17, 2006

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute, Bahamas Tourisin Training Centre
; The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas

Day One Tuesday: May 16, 2006

1:00-2:30 p.m. Registration
2:00-7:00p.m.iTrade Show

Master of Ceremonies:
Mr. Henry Hepburn, Lecturer, School of Sciences & Technology, COB

2:30-3:30 p.m. Opening/introduction - COB and CSG
Mr. Cyprian Gibson, President ,BSE
Mr. Amos Ferguson, President, IBA

Dr. Rhonda Chipman-Johnson, Acting President, COB -
Mr. Henry Hepburn, Organising Committee

Welcome Remarks
Introduction of Minister

Remarks ; Hon. Bradley B. Roberts, MP, Minister of Works and Utilities
Introduction of Speaker Mrs. Lelawattee Rahming :
3:45 - 4:15 p.m. Keynote Speaker: Herbert Saffir, Codeveloper, Saffir-Simpson

Hurricane Scale :

General Discussion

4:30 - 5:15 p.m..
Reception and Cocktails -

5:15 - 6:00 p.m.

Day Two Wednesday: May 17, 2006

8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Registration
9:00 - 9:10 a.m. Introduction: Mr. Hammond Rahming

‘ Member Organising Committee
PRESENTATIONS

9:10 - 10:10 a.m: “Hurricane Damage Assessment”

Presenter: Tony Gibbs

“Architecture and Structures”
Presenter: Amos Ferguson - “Architecture”
Presenter: Nick Dean - “Structures”

Coffee Break

10:10 - 11:20 a.m.

11:20 - 11:30 a.m.
11:30 - 12:30 p.m. “Design and Construction of Buildings in High Winds Regions”
Presenter: Gary Williams é

12:30 - 1:30 p.m. “Coastal Engineering” —
Presenter: Dr David Smith

1:30 — 2:30 p.m. Lunch

2:30 - 2:40 p.m. - * Panel
. Introductory Comments
_ Mr. Michael Diggiss, Organising Committe
PANEL Representatives Of The Following Agencies:
National Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA)
Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC)
Bahamas Telephone Company (BTC)
Water & Sewerage Corporation

, Insurance Company
2:40 - 4:15 p.m. .
Panel Discussion Mr.Michael Diggiss
4:15 - 5:30 p.m.
Discussion & Recommendations
For the Way Forward Mr. Hammond Rahming

COST - $150 per person, including breaks and lunch. Students - $25 with ID
Call 326-3467 :: 394-1886 :: 341-9389 to register now!

GOLD SPONSOR:
SILVER SPONSORS

Timber Systems ‘
InterAmerican Development Bank
Bahamas Electricity Corporation

CSI Metal Disk fo hake
BRONZE SPONSORS: The Engineering Group * Paradise Blue Waters Limited * Henry A.
Hepburn Associates, Architects - Planners * Jackson Burnside Ltd * Ministry of Tourism *
Bahamas Society of Engineers * George V. Cox & Co. Ltd * Brokell Construction® Watson
Construction Company Ltd. :





COB GRADUATION
ACTIVITIES















hes Copvoralias
























Nurses Plonieg Ceremony D6 7THO DI Bandghe!) 8
“Bagvalaureste Service 12006 / 700 p.m, Chureh of God of Propaecy East $1 Tabernacle /
Graduates Award Bleaktast 2006 /8.00am. —_Wyridhram Nassau Resor! & Seystal Casino. C

May 25, 2000/7 00pm, Bandshell
fay 27, 2008 700 p.m. Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute

Sammencenient Serenriony 7
Alunini Reception





NORTHERN BAHAMAS CARP US COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES AND RELATED EVENTS
SVEST SSYE/TIME YESRE

yf May 31, 2006 / 12 noon Nor’
‘May 34, 2006 / 7:00 p.m.
dune #, 2006 / 7:30 a.m.
Thursday / June #, 2006 / 5:00 pam.



n Campus Grounds









jaccalaureate Wednes St Vincent de Paui Catholic Church





Xanadu Beach &



3 Award 8

Gradu



Commensement Ceremony Our Lucaya Resor

_ Honours CONVOCATION.

- IF YOU FIT INTO ANY OF THE CATEGORIES BELOW, WE CONGRATULATE

_ YOU. YOUR DETERMINATION TO ACHIEVE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE HAS °
PAID OFF! THE COLLEGE IS HONOURING YOU AT HONOURS:
CONVOCATION 2006, 22" MAY 2006 AT 7:00 P.M. AT THE BANDSHELL.
°©DEAN’SHONOURROLL ———.. ie ee
STUDENTS WITH A G.P.A. OF 3.00 OR ABOVE COMPLETING at least 12

CREDIT HOURS IN THE FALL 2005 OR SPRING 2006 SEMESTERS.

e PRESIDENT’S HONOUR ROLL fl

STUDENTS WITH A G.P.A. OF 3.50 OR ABOVE COMPLETING at least 12
CREDIT HOURS IN BOTH FALL 2005 AND SPRING 2006 SEMESTERS
CONSECUTIVELY.

WE WANT TO PUBLICLY RECOGNIZE YOU FOR YOUR ACHIEVEMENT. ~





CONTACT THE COUNSELLING & HEALTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT,
" 302-4439/302-4380 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.

PLEASE NOTE THAT PAST CERTIFICATES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE AT aust?
SECRETARIAT, COUNSELLING & HEALTH SERVICES DEPARTMENT, 3°~
FLOOR, PORTIA M. SMITH STUDENT SERVICES BUILDING.

SEIVESAA TTL Se Treat LE eee SS REMUS TSU ING VET SMES SO PY Ad Ny



Suan ARES ISNT LRT,

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

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CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES |

COMPUTER OFFERINGS - SUMMER 2006

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Course Description: This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers and does not
understand how it works. This course covers the major computer concepis with extensive hands on practice
of various software using: (1) Microsoft Office - Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel -- Spreadsheet (tii)
Microsoft Access — Database Management.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Monday, 15 May 2006 6:00pm - 9:30pm Section 0! (CEES)
Saturday, 13 May 2006 10:00am - 1:30pm Section 02 (CEES)

Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab

Tuition: $450.00

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Course Description: This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands on practice of .
various software using: (1) Microsoft Office — Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet (iti) Microsoft
Access — Database Management.

Pre-requisite: Computer Applications I

Begins: Thursday, 18 May 2006
Time:' 6:00pm - 9:30pm
Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees $550.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint.
It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Thursday, |“ June 2006
Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm
Duration: 1 day

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $160.00
MICROSOFT EXCEL

Course Description: This course covers the fundamentals of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Tools that are
needed for basic entry and manipulation of cells and worksheets are presented. The.course assumes no
particular background.

Pre-requisite: Keyboarding

Begins: Monday, 15 May, 2006
Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer La
Fees $250.00
MICROSOFT WORD

Course Description: The course assumes no particular background and takes the student from the level of
novice to an advanced level. A thorough grounding in all ofthe fundamentals of document handling in
Microsoft Word 1s presented.

Keyboarding
Wednesday, 17 May 2006.

Pre-requisite:
Begins:

Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm,
Duration: 6 weeks

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees

$250.00

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

Course Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in information
environments.The course will cover the following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Tr oubleshooting
and Repairs.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 16'" May 2006

Time: 6:00pm — 8:00pm Tuesdays.and Thursdays
Duration: 9 weeks

Venue: BHTC Computer Lab

Fees: $500.00

QUICKBOOKS

Course Description: This course is designed to train new and existing small business entrepreneurs (fewer than
20 employees) how to organize and manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software.
Students will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and
employees.

Pre-requisite: None

Begins: Tuesday, 16" May 2006
Time: 6:00pm — 9:00pm
Duration: 6 weeks ©

Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $330.00

WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Course Description: This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal web pages will
cover Web page creation; Web site management, and HTML. Specific topics wall include Formatting, Graphics,
Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of
word-processing !

Pre-requisite:

Begins: Thursday & Friday, | 15" 16" June 2006
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm
Duration: 2 days
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
$550.00

Fees:

HEALTH 7a) 1M UND SS



ee OFFERINGS — Summer 2006 _

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major
topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness Education (Psychological
and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving Special Populations and‘Complementary
Bodywork Systems to include Aromatherapy Essentials.

Thursday, 18° May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm

Starting:

Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: The College of the Bahamas

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II

This is an advanced course for learning techniques of massage therapy and its many benefits. Major topics
include introduction to hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments; the basic facial; aromatherapy-fundamentals
or essential oils; relaxation and meditative methods; and hot stone therapy.

Starting: Monday, 15" May, 2006
6:00-9:00pm

Duration: 10 Weeks

Juition Fee: $620.00

Venue: The College of the Bahamas

CHAPTER ONE Phone 397-2650 e

- service. It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee motivation.



MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006, PAGE 5B



PERSONAL AARON ONGD Re ey

SUMMER SEMESTER 2006



SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior customer

1** June 2006



Date: Thursday, i
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm A
Venue: Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre 4
Tuition: $170.00 |



EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on ae effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date: Thursday i Tune 2006

Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm

Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $160.00

WEB PAGE DESIGN



This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling
with computers and would like to create their own web pages are encouraged to attend. Specific topics will

include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages. :
Date: Thursday & Friday, June gt f & 9 ih 2008 :
Time: 9:30am — 4:30pm 4
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road F
Tuition: $550.00 :

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT :
SUMMER SEMESTER :














































COURSE SECT | COURSE
INOS > __NO. | DESCRIPTION | Sh Oe,
LaccounTing [OO
[ACGROG0 [01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS ea
LACCASOt "| Ot "ACCA FOR BEGINNERS ii
ACCAS02 04 ae ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Ill
[BUSINESS Se eas
BUSI900 =~ (OT CREDIT & COLLECTION 6:00-900PM _| | Hl
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE BF
CUST900 01 WIS _ | 9:30-4:30pm i
(OMY eReS hi nee en ett hh ie ae ee aaa F
[COMPSON | OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |_| 6:00-9:30pm__ H
i . “COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10am-1:30pm a
| COMPUT











| COMP 944 Ot










































































































/01 | QUICKBOOKS |[6:00-9: Soa 2 f
_COMP953. 01. | PCUPGRADEAND REPAIR | 6:00-8:00pm_ | Tue/Thur |” Fl
ComPso7 | 01 [MICROSOFT EXCEL Ei
COMP960 01._| MICROSOFT POWERPOINT W/S_ Hi
| COMP905 ot | MICROSOFT WORD FP
_COMP930. | OT | WEBPAGE DESIGN WIS ‘
COSMETOLOG :
| COSM802 :
ty
_COSM804 | B
| COSM807 _NAIL ART TECHNICIAN oe
i | tf
= oe Shects a jetta e, | Soe ss us
DECORATING |" ett aul isestees gene :
| DECO800 01._| INTERIOR DECORATING | ~[6:00-9:00pm | Tue | 16-May a
| FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00pm. | Thur 18-May i
FLOR801_—| 07 FLORAL DESIGN It, 6:00-9:00pm_| Tue 16-May f
HEALTH AND ‘i o incite
| FITNESS L
TMASG900 | 07 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS! | 6:00-9:00pm_| Thur 18-May| 10weeks, $465) ff
| MASGS01 i 01 | MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS |__| 6:00-9:00pm_| Mon poy 10 weeks | $620 fa
LANGUAGES [oo Se MN eA ac a SSN oa aE ho sl ev aE
| CRE 900 01 | CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE! _| 6:00-7:30pm_| MoniWed | 15-May | 10 weeks | kes $225) ff
_SPA 900 01 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH | 6:00-7:30pm _| Mon/Wed | 15-May | 10 weeks | _ ~ $225. Fe
“I
{ > A ea x Peak es. pe. |e ees ee @
LMANAGEMENT | | Gains haem cobh ah, Ne Beall param (Pee aay Saeed Ec eed, I
MGMTS900 01 | HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT! _| 6:00-9:30pm_| Thur | 18- a 9 weeks | ~ $250"
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Il_| 6:00-9:30pm_| Mon di 15-May | Sweeks | $300.
| MEDICAL Sess eos B
MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY WOweeks | $225
SEW :
SEW 800 01 | BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING | "10 weeks ‘ $225|
RAPERY MAKING | mmm y.|_10 weeks | $225}
PHOLSTERY MAKING | 10weeks | $225) &
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093/ i
— 328-1936/302-4300 ext. 5202 or email nlacroix@cob.edu.bs f
All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) . a
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, d
Course Schedule and Course Materials. f

Personal Development Courses ||

CREDIT EQUIVALENCY

The following Personal Development courses have been approved by the
Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

ACCA900 - Accounting for Beginners |
ACCA901 - Accounting for Beginners II
MGMT 900 -Human Resource Management |
MGMTS801- Human Resource Management II
SPA 900 = Conversational Spanish |

- SPA 901 - Conversational Spanish II

Students may continue to utilize the courses as a means of professional
development in both private and public sectors with the added recognition
that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward a degree
programme.

Fax 325- 7394

CAMPUS SECURITY - DIRECT LINES 302-4566, 302-4493, 302-4494

TARA Te SEO


FROM page 1B

otfers Lehman Brothers the highest
price. Both it and the Port Authority
have seemed keen on Harcourt
Developments, together with its con-

Package

Obie Wilchcombe, minister of
tourism, told The Tribune previously
that the Government was seeking
“the whole package" from a buyer of
the Royal Oasis.

He said: “Grand Bahama needs a .

real push. A brand to draw attention
to Grand Bahama, and give it that
promotion in the market.

“West End has Ginn, Lucaya is
doing pretty good. The centre of
! yeeport needs that engine to drive it,

omy err

and if we get the right player it should
create tremendous opportunities for
the people of Grand Bahama.’

The Government is looking for a
buyer that already has its hotel and
casino Management components,
rather than one that seeks to sign
these agreements once the purchase is
complete.

Still, one source told The Tribune:
“Tt’s now the job of Lehman and the
Government to say what they think

they would like to do - which one of

these bids they would like to go with.”

Back in 2005, Mr Wilchcombe had
described the more than $22 million
owéd by the Royal Oasis to various

creditors - including many govern- ~

ment and Grand Bahama Port
Authority agencies - as a "quagmire".

The Bahamas Hotel Industry Man-
agement Pension Fund and Bahamas

Hotel and Allied Industries Pension
Fund have both executed a judge-
ment to "take possession" of the
resort's assels, meaning that a por-
tion of the sales proceéds will have
to be used to settle the sums owed to
them by the Royal Oasis, which in
January 2005 amounted to $4.1 mil-
lion. ;

However, the insurance claim from
the 2004 hurricane season has finally
been settled, enabling Lehman Broth-
ers to reduce its asking price for the
Royal Oasis to levels that have inter-
ested potential buyers.

Advanced

Apart from the $25 million
advanced to Driftwood to enable it to
acquire the Royal Oasis, Lehman
Brothers has also invested at least

$70 million in renovating it.

The private equity firm is said by
sources to be waiting to achieve the
best sales price possible, feeling it is in
a position where it can squeeze more
concessions from a government facing
a general election within the next 15
months, and which has set solving the
Royal Oasis "quagmire" as a priority.

While Prime Minister Perry
Christie has twice hinted at stripping
Royal Oasis of its casino licence,
potentially the property's most valu-
able asset, in a bid to force Lehman
Brothers’ hand, the threat has never
been followed through.

The resort’s closure in September
2004 cost Grand Bahama 1200 direct
jobs, and has had a much wider
impact, particularly on the Interna-
tional Bazaar.

Mr Christie said last week that the



fate of the Royal Oasis is a matter
that "exercises every degree of atten-
tion" from the Government.

Meeting

"A meeting date has been set and
applications are. being considered.
And I believe. it is fair for.me to,say
that if the people who have to sell
cannot find a purchaser to present to
us when we meet shortly, that the
government would-be faced with hav-
ing to exercise another option. ___ |

“I do not propose to be hostag¢ to
circumstances where people - as they
are in lawfully entitled to do - exercise
their best interest which does not nec-
essarily coincide with the best interest
of our country and Grand Bahama; to
leave myself, and my government
hostage to those circumstances.”





Atlantis margins fall in 2006 Q1

FROM page LB

margin, and increased levels of
utility and sales and market-
ing expenses”.

Kerzner International, in
what could be its last or penul-
timate results announcement

before the company is taken-

private, said the net revenue
rise was driven by a 17 per cent
icrease in food and beverage
revenues.

This growth came from the

_, 75,000 square foot Marina Vil-

lage and its five restaurants,
plus retail and entertainment
attractions, which opened in
July 2005 and would not have
been included in the 2005 first
comparative. In addition,
-Nobu Atlantis was opened in
January.

The lower Atlantis operat-
ing income did not impact
results, with net income rising
by 28.1 per cent to $48.7 mil-
ion, compared to $38 million

la suk
Care

the year before.

Diluted earnings per share
(EPS) for the 2006 first quarter
stood at $1.27, compared to
$1.01 the year before.

Meanwhile, Atlantis’s rev-
enue per available room
(RevPAR) a key indicator of
hotel performance, increased
2.6 per cent to $276, compared
to $269 the previous’year.

Atlantis’s 2006 first quarter
average occupancy levels fell
to 86 per cent, compared to 87
per cent in 2005, with average
daily room rates (ADRs) rising
to $320 from $310.

The Atlantis casino saw its
slot win increase by 4 per cent
over the 2005. first quarter,
although table win fell by 5 per
cent. There was a 1 per cent
increase in table drop, but a
lower hold, causing the table
win decrease.

Kerzner International said
Phase II of the Harborside
timeshare development, which

‘consist of 116 three and two-

bedroom units completed last
year, was 42 per cent sold at

vey requires that businesses and ins
owing information: oo

Number of Eee
ages and Salaries _

Annual Hours Worked :
evenues and Expendit

~ March 31, 2006.4

Harborside, which has a
total of 198 units, generated
$3.7 million in equity earnings,
compared to $3.6 million last

. year, for Kerzner Internation-

al as the development is a
50/50 joint venture with Star-
wood.

The $130 million Ocean
Club Residences & Marina,
featuring 88 units, was 33 per
cent finished at the end of the
2006 first quarter. Kerzner
International said deposits had
been received on 83 units since
they went on the market in
May 2005, and the four 22-unit
buildings are expected to be
completed between January
and May 2007.

The 495-unit condo hotel
that Kerzner International is
planning as a joint venture with
Turnberry Associates is
expected to start when financ-
ing is secured. -

Meanwhile, the One & Only
Océan Club also saw its oper-
ating income for the first quar-

‘ter decline by 5.8 per cent to

epreciation and Acquisitions

$4.9 million, compared to $5.2
million the year before.
Kerzner International

blamed the decline on the clo-’

sure of one of the resort’s
restaurants during the 2005
third quarter.

The Paradise Island-based
resort saw its first quarter
RevPAR rise by 7 per cent
over the 2005 comparative to
$953, compared to $445, with
average occupancies during the

| # ERNST & YOUNG

Board of Directors

three months to March 31
standing at 86 per cent and an
ADR of $1,107.

This compared to average

‘ occupancies and an ADR of

87 per cent and $1,023 in the
same period in 2005.
Kerzner International added
that it incurred $5.8 million in
transaction costs during the
2006 first quarter, largely
involving financial and legal
advisory fees, relating to the

@ Ernst & Young up
* 5 Times Square

New Yark, New York 10036-6530 A ant ay

Report of Independent Auditors

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

New York, New York

We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the MY
United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain”
‘reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of
material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting
the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. An’ audit also“™

We have audited the. accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Mizuho Corporate, ., ..,
Bank (USA) (the “Bank”) as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and. the, related.
consolidated statements of income and cash flows for the years then. ended. These.
financial statements are the responsibility of the Bank’s management. Our résponsibility., .
is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our.audits. : cstee Lys



bid by Sol and Butch Kerzn-
er, the company’s chairiian
and chief executive respéc-
tively, to take the company pri,

ye}

’ vate. :

The Kerzners’ buyout bid,
backed by numerous private

equity groups, has been

approved by the Board, and
the deal is expected to close in
the 2006 third quarter after
receiving final approval from
all shareholders. at ee

ne
<





includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated , financial : statement
presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred ‘to above present fairly, in
all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Mizuho Corporate; Bank EN
(USA) at December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the consolidated results of its operations and .
its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally

accepted in the United States.

~ March 15, 2006

Mizuho Corporate Bank (USA)

Consolidated Balance Sheets



December 31

(In thousands, except share amounts) “2005 2004
Assets : :

Cash and due from banks (Note 3) $ 34,352 $ 66,903
Interest-bearing depcsits with banks 568 78,679
Federal funds sold 75,000 -

Securities (Note 4)

Available-for-sale . 309,915 209,228
Held-to-maturity 417,165 531,880
Loans and leases (Note 5, 22) 2,192,811 1,942,742

Allowance for credit losses (Note 6)

Net loans and leases

Accrued interest receivable and other assets

Total assets

Liabilities :
Noninterest-bearing deposits

Interest-bearing deposits (Note 10)

(17,837) (23,287)

2,174,974 1,919,455 ql
86,935 73,584
$3,098,909 _ $2,879,729 -
4 »
$ 99,937 $ 123,798

1,080,035 1,184,553’

. Total deposits 1,179,972 1,308,351

0, Hf yoo invol Ss of goods and Be yee Federal funds purchased 810,000 360,000
can help contr statistics by completing the ‘Other honowings (Note T1) 1.144 6267
Annual B y questionnaire accurately Accrued taxes, interest payable and other liabilities 129,059 143,134 |
er . Capital notes (Note 12) : 25,000 135,000 i

Total liabilities 2,145,175 1,952,752 Wi

A i [ Stockholder’s equity (Note 15)
€ Common Stock—$100 par value; (authorized, issued and outstanding }
Es Se 984,742 shares in 2005 and 2004) 98,474 98,474 * |
the Depar Capital surplus 1,222,036 1,222,036
4 Retained deficit (366,462) (392,883) |
Accumulated other comprehensive loss 314 - (650
Total stockholder’s equity ~ “ 953,734 926,977 }
Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity $3,098,909 $2,879,729 |
!

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

SECTOR

AND OUR NATION'S PROGRESS

Interested persons may obtain a complete copy of the Audited
Accounts from §G Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, .
P.O. Box N-7788, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas

INE: 326-4602/4



—
—
lHE TRIBUNE



TAL RETINOL EEF NEE SN RR EE TIER



iene

MONDAY MAY 45 2996

ESIMCRL EE TSE TO cl i ema Ad SSE a AR REE TRS TT RT

PAGE 7B

5:





Coca-Cola maker seeking a buyer

&

FROM page 1B

capital into the business for some
time, The Tribune having learned that
it was contemplating a private place-
ment before eventually selling its
three properties to the Premier Com-

mercial Real Estate Investment Cor-
poration mutual fund, which is listed
on the Bahamas International Secu-
rities Exchange (BISX).

Premier acquired Cariboean Bot-
tling’s New Providence-based manu
facturing and distribution facilities,
plus its Freeport distribution facility.

Initially, Premier proposed to pay

$4.8 million for Caribbean Bottling’s »

Coca-Cola production plant, and $2.5
million and $522,000 for the Nassau
and Freeport distribution facilities
respectively.

However, it later reducéd the
amounts it was paying for the Nas-

million respectively.



Freeport storage facility

In its offering: memorandum, Pre-
mier said the annual rent for
Caribbean Bottling’s production facil-
ity was $463,268. The rents on the
Nassau and Freeport distribution cen-
tres were $240,180 and $49,920

‘.. Tespectively.
sau facilities to $4.7 million and $2.4

Some $5.5 million of the funds
invested in Premier Real Estate came

from the controversial Olympus Uni-
vest fund, the Bahamian investment
fund that is in court-supervised liq-
uidation, with investors trying to
recover as much as Cdn$550 million
for investors.

The Premier Real Estate invest-
ment is one of tiose the liquidators
are targeting for recovery. .

Rum Cay resort project

FROM page 1B

The company added that it invested $6.5
million on property, plant and equipment dur-
ing the first three months of 2006, compared to
almost $2 million iast year, a large chunk of it
going on further hurricane: repairs al South
; Riding Point.

¢s- Meanwhile, Freepoint, World Point’s tug
“and towing services subsidiary, which oper-
. ates five tug boats at South Riding point and
jt the Freeport Container Port, saw revenues
rise by $51,000 in the 2006 first quarter.



in $303,000 revenue fall

. This reflected an increase in rates, and
World Point Terntinals said ship movements at
the Container Port “remain steady”.

“With the exception of marine revenues at |

South Riding Point, which are unpredictable,
revenues for the company's: operating seg-
ments are expected to continue at levels con-
sistent with the first quarter for the remainder
of 2006,” World Point Terminals said.

South Riding Point is an oil storage and
‘break-bulk’ transshipment facility on Grand
Bahama, able to handle 5.25 million barrels of
oil per day.



FROM page 1B

island.

“We have hada dream of
something like this for, Rum
Cay, and we just thank God
for it. It means a lot to ‘Us,
because it is something that Wes.»
weren’t expecting to happen. ih

but it has,” she said.

Ms Wilson noted that the:
development had cone at a

time when many of the island’s

young men had left home in’

search of work.

“They have their homes °

here, and now we can call our

‘boys and, you know, our girls,
_ too, and tell them to come

back home because they will
be able to find work,” Ms Wil-

son said.

“Carlin Dorsette is one of the

young men who have already

taken advantage of the
éinployment opportunities in
the com»munity.

. Without the Moritana Hold-

-” jtigs presence on the island, he
‘aiid other residents would have

been forced to leave.

“] think it is a great thing,
and it will bring more people
into the island, too, which

Scavella said. “We really need
it, because down here some
people work and some people
don’t, so the more work, the
better, more money. It will be
hard because now we know
everybody and there’s going
to be a lot of strangers.”

Ms Scavella said this could
mean having to worry about
crime on the island, something
no one worries about now.

“You could go anywhere
now and leave your door open,
and when you come back, you
meet everything just as you left
it. Other than that, people are
looking forward to it whole-

brie

means more fun,” Shernell heartedly,” she said.

otey
‘

NOTICE i is hereby given that: DAVID EDWARD JENNETTE,
#57 SEA VIEW LN, P.O. BOX F-40287, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
;as.a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
vany reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
: facts within twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of MAY, 2006
-to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
EP.O. Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

“NOTICE i is hereby given that PAMELLA LEWIS OF JEROME
“AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
‘naturalization should’ not be granted, shouichsend a written |:
‘and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 15TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
‘Bahamas.



OTN ONT AVAILABLE
SECURITIES Se CVn ye

LEADING LAW FIRM

invites applications for an attorney for Abaco Office... Leading Offshore Bank pequestapp lications for the
position of an experienced securities specialist.
Applicants must have a minimum of 3 years experience
in the areas of Conveyancing and Litigation, demonstrate _
an ability to work independently and possess.a thorough :
working knowledge and technical competence in the

mentioned areas.

The candidates must possess the following
qualifications and skills:







Two years related mutual fund experience,

t ;
including cash settlements

Successful applicants cé can look forward to competitive
remuneration and benefits. a












Strong emphasis in tradde processin and

Apply in confidence to: settlements

G. Bastian _
P.O. Box N-3247
Nassau, Bahamas
Ur io:
Soe hotmail.com

Strong PC, organization skills
Strong communication skills

Qualified applicants should fax or email resumes to:



Branch Manager Banking -
P.O. Box N-4906
Nassau, Bahamas

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2001 No.44 #
7 Fax: 394-0701

IN THE SUPREME COURT
EQUITY SIDE





Temple Christian High School NOTICE



“Teach Me, O Lard. Thy Way’ ...Psalm 119-33 » ; : ar ia
: mera e IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act 1959” 1” COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005:
Invites applications for qualified Christian teachers for the following | : See IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/Gen/No. 206 °
positions for the 2006-2007 school year. AND. oh. Sie i EAU - COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION (CLE) ;
- Hismil Lilietdive (Gn 10.19) IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Remelda Smith | cits «
ournalism/ Literature (Gr. as (ae page haya OE NOTICE

- Religious Knowledge Bible (Gr. 7-2)
- Math (Gr. 7-12) .
Physics (Gr. 10-12).
Agriculture (Gr. 7-9)
- Lechnicai Drawing (Gr. 7-12)
- Avcounts/Commerce/Economies (Gr. 10-12)
- Physical Education (Gr.. 7-12)
- Spanish (Gr. 7-12)
- Geagraphy/History (Gr, 10-12)
» Chemistry
- Business Studies (Gr. 10-12)
- Health Science (G7. 7-9)
General Science (Gr. 7-9)
- Computer Studies (Gr. 7-12)
- Music (Gr. 7-12)
- Biology (Gr. 10-12)
- Language Arts/Literature (Fr. 7-12)
- Art/Craft (Gr. 7-12}
Food Nutrition (Gr. 10-12)
- Home Economies (Gr. 7-9)

IN THE MATTER of all that piece parcel of lot of land)
comprising Four Thousand Seven Hundred and Twenty’.
(4720) Square feet and situate East of East Street and North ; i
of Thompson Lane in the Southern District of the Isiand of:

_ New Providence and bounded in the North by land now or” ff
formely the property of H.E. Ferguson and: running thereon’ ff)
Seventy- Three and Forty Three Hundreds (74.43) feet on the»
East by land now or formerly the property of James Newton
‘and running thereon Sixty Five and Ninety Four Hundredths
(65.94) feet on the South by Thonipson Lane ‘and running
thereon Sixty Eight and’ Seventy Hundredths (68.70),feet on
the West by land occupied by the Ministry of Housing and
National Insurance and running thereon Sixty Six and Ninety
Nine Hundredths (66.99) feet. Remelda Smith claims ‘to be
the owner in fee simple in possession of the tract ‘of land

- herein before mentioned described and the Petitioner has ap-
plied to the Supreme Court to have her title investigated un-
der section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act and nature and extent
there of determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be
granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
said Act. Copies of the plan may be inspected duri ing pons}
working hours at the following places, : ‘e

_ THE PETITION OF HOSEA COX IN
RESPECT OF:-

: ALL THOSE piece parcels or lot of land being Lot Number 283

“yoeasuring approximately 4.27 acres and Lot No. 284 measuring
approximately 4.98 acres and situate between Cow Pen Road
and Oxford Street situate in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence and being bounded NORTHWARDLY by a-
Forty (40) feet wide Road Reservation anc running thereon Five
Hundred and Thirty and Seventy-five Hundredths (5300175) feet
thereon Eight Hundred and Twenty-four and Fifty nine Hundredths
(824.59) feet SOUTHWARDLY by a Forty (40) feet wide Road
Reservation and running thereon Five Hiindved and Twenty-five
Hundredths (528.25) feet EAST WARDLÂ¥ by Lot Number 282
and running thereon Seven Hundred and Six and Seventy-six»
Hundredths (706.76) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land
is shown on the plan attached hereto and is thereon colored RED.

HOSEA COX claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession
of the said land and has made application to the Supreme Court
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of The
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined declared
in a certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance
with the provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land may
bé.inspected during normal working hours at the following places.

“| Applicants must:

1. The Supreme Court Registry Ansbacher House, Is ‘ast.
Street North Nassau Bahainas

"| A. Be a practicing born-again Christian who is williig to subscribe

tw the Statement of Faith of Temple Christian Schools.

B. Have u Bachelor's Degree in Education or higher from a
recognized College or University in the area of specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

D. Have at least two years teaching experience in the relevant
subject area with excellent communication skills.

E. Applicants must have the ability to prepare Suderas TOF all
examinations to the BJC/BGCSE levels.

I. Be willing to participate in the high school’s extra curricular

2. Chambers of Dorsey McPhee & Co Columbus House
Annex, Shirley & East Streets Nassau Bahamas.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or claim not recognized in the
Petition shall before the day of May 2006 file in the Supreme

Court and serve on the Petitoner or her Attorney a Statement _

of his or her claim in the prescribed form verified by an Af-
fidavit and other related documents to be filed therewith.
failure of any such persons to file and serve a Statement of
his or her claim together with other related documents ov or
before the day of May A.D., 2006 will opexate as. a bar to

a) The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor BitCo
Building, New Providence, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of V. Alfred Gray & Company, Suite
#5 The Malcolm Building, Bay Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person or persons
having dower or right of dower-or an Adverse Claim or Claim
not recognized in the Petition shall on or before 26th day of July,
2006 file in the Supreme Court ef the City of Nassau aforesaid
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his
Claim aforesaid non compliance with this Notice will operate as
a bar to such claim.

Programmes

Application must be picked up at the high school office an Shirley
Street be returned with a full curriculum vitae, recent coloured
photograph and three references to:

such claun
DATED the day of March A.D; 2006

DORSEY MCPHEE & CO.
Chamber

V._ ALFRED GRAY & CO.
Chaiiiber
Nassau, The Bahamas

Mr. Neil Hamilton
The Principal
Temple Christian High School
P.O. Box.N-1566
Nassau, Bahamas

Columbus House Annex
Shirley & East Street
Nassau Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



Deadline eye APRN is MOE 25th, 2006

peace ae



ree eirees ae aes Metalic Attorneys for the Petitioner.
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

TRIBUNE SPORTS



V8 SPLASH won the masters division in the Florida State Tour-
nament held in Miami. Desmond “Dance” Burrows won the masters
singles event and Donald Rahming placed fourth.

From left, Desmond Burrows, Abraham Adderly, Roosevelt Moss,
Brian Bastian, Donald Rahming, Joey Knowles. Missing from the pic-

ture is James Lockhart.

(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

3 SSS





Milli’s Strokers overcome the odds for victory

GOLD atlast. Faced with seemingly impossible odds, the Milli’s Strokers became only the second Bahamian team to win the Florida Valley Eightball Nation-
al Association State Championship.
Battling from the loser’s bracket and forced to beat the unbeaten Florida Crazy Eights twice, the Milli’s Stroker’s pulled out all stops to succeed in doing just
that. The team was lead by Michael Demeritte, Cedric Farqgharson and Arlington Lowe with clutch performances by Everette Munroe (Mr Clutch) running a
skunk in the final match to seal the championship. Honourable mention must be made of Alex Burnside and Nyugen Clumer who, without a doubt, made the
shot of the tournament executing a jump bank shot for a ten zip score. ,

(Left to Right) Cedric Farqharson, Arlington Lowe, Michael Demeritte, Nyugen Clumer, Jimmy Chea Sponour, Everette





Hi BOMMER George Swingers’ catcher Dorothy Marshall gets ready to swing her bat against
Mary 'Cruise' Edgecombe and the Electro Telecom Wildcats on Saturday night at the Churchill
Tener Knowles National Softball Stadium.











"We got together very *
late in the season, so we've
had very few practices," she
stated. "We are just trying
to play our way into shape.
But like I always say, the
race is not for the stiffest,
but to those who endure.
"Our goal is to win some
games and make it to the
playoffs. I think once we

(Phoie: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

FROM page one E agl e S

begin to gel and practise
some more, we will be a
team to reckon with."

Briteley's had a chance to
win their first game, cutting
the deficit to 4-3 in the top
of the sixth. But Whirlpool
stayed on top in the bottom
of the frame when they put
their final run on the score-
board.

ee.



Indira Thompson went 2-
for-4 with an RBI, scoring
twice; Alexis Moss was 1-
for-2 with a pair of RBIs
and Alicia Culmer added
an RBI with a run scored
to lead the Eagles. Dotson
finished 1-for-1 with two
RBIs and a run scored;
Gwen Adderley was 1-for-2
with a run and Dawn
Forbes 1-for-4 with an RBI
and run scored for the
Angels.



FROM page one

clause indicates that membership
in the league shall be open to all
individuals residing on New Prov-

‘idence or those who, due to being

away because of studies, normal-

- ly reside on New Providence.

But Swingers' manager
Gary 'Super' Johnson said the
NPSA left a loophole in the
constitution and they are
going to challenge it in order
to have the players available
when they play the Whirlpool
Eagles on Tuesday night.

"The girls are not on the
roster, which I agree with, but
as long as the girls are resi-
dents of the Bahamas, they
can play," Johnson argued.
"There's nothing in the con-
stitution that says you have to
be here for five days or work-
ing or employed. There's
nothing in the constitution."

Johnson, did however,
admit that the drama prior to
the start of the game had an
effect on the way his team
played.

"I was late because I had to
work, but the girls said it
killed their morale," Johnson
noted. "But we can't use that
as an excuse. We should still
go out there and play ball and
beat this team without these
girls."

While Nunez had to watch
from the stands with Neely,
the Wildcats went wild on the
Swingers, producing two runs
in the bottom of the first, five
in the second and three in the
third to head towards the
stoppage with a commanding
10-1 advantage.

Refusing to go down with-
out a fight, the Swingers, who
scored their first run in the
third, added another in the

Munroe, Alex Burnside.
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)

Wildcats bring the
Swingers to a halt

fourth and two more in the
fifth to at least ensure that
they could stretch the game a
little longer.

But, as Curry pointed out,
Bommer George couldn't stop
the Electro Telecom from
scoring when they needed
to.

In fact, in the bottom of the
fifth, it was Curry who got a
one-out walk, stole second,
reached third on a passed ball
and scored on a wild pitch to
winning pitcher Mary ‘Cruise’
Edgecombe at the plate.

Curry's final of three runs
on two hits with an RBI,
resulted in the game being
stopped via the seven-run rule
as the Wildcats made the
Swingers walk off the field.

"J heard everybody say
watch out for the Swingers,
but this is the worst Bommer
George team I ever see in the
three years they've been in
the league," Curry stressed.
"They have to go back and
regroup and tear up their line-
up sheet. I don't see no threat
to them."

Edgecombe, who had an
RBI double, scoring twice,
limited the Swingers to eight
hits with a pair of strike outs
for her second consecutive
victory. Desire Taylor gave up
nine hits in suffering her first
loss.

Electro Telecom also got a
pair of RBIs with a hit and
run scored from Hyacinth Far-
rington, an RBI triple and two
runs scored from Dornette
Edwards and an RBI single
from Chryshann Percentie.

For Bommer George, Beat-
rice Riley went 2-for-3 with a
run scored. and Theresa Miller
was 2-for-3 with a pair of
RBIs. /

_ Constructioners
rally for the
division II title

@ BASKETBALL

‘THE Elvis McIntosh
Constructioners made
sure that none of the
men's titles will be in New
Providence this year.
Hosting the Bunny
Levarity best-of-three |
championship series in
Abaco, the Construction-
ers rallied from losing =. :
gamie one on Friday night ::
to pull a two-game sweep =.»
on Saturday over the pee
Police Crimestoppers f
from New Providence. ~
They are now crowned ‘.;
the Bahamas Basketball <
Federation men's division.’
II champions. They joined» * ~
Grand Bahama, which
clinched the men's divi-
sion one title overthe <:
Real Deal Shockers earli-=°
er this month. Re
Last month, the John- {'
son's Lady Truckers made.
sure that New Providence’: >>»
maintained its strangle- ed
hold on the ladies’ crown
by winning the title over ,
an All-Star team from
Eleuthera. .
Unlike the men's divi- .:
sion one and ladies’ play:
where only two teams
each participated, the
men's division II had to
go through the round
robin tournament at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um where the Construc-
tioners and the
Crimestoppers emerged
as the top two-teams.
After losing game one
before their home fans on
Friday night, the Con-
structioners made sure
that they didn't lose the
title as well.
They rebounded in
game two on Saturday
with a 107-80 rout as
Dwayne Adderley con-
nected on a game high 45° :-
points, while Dudley St
art added 25. Ronnie
Cadeau led the
Crimestoppers with 22.
And in the clincher, the
Constructioners got
another 39 points from
Adderley as they pulled
off a 95-84 victory over
the Crimestoppers to
claim the division IT
national title. Jamaal
Hepburn added 25.
Jamailial Rose came up
with 21 points in the loss.

Nadal beats
Federer in
Rome Masters

TENNIS
ROME
Associated Press










RAFAEL NADAL still
has the edge against Roger

though.

In a showdown between
the world’s top two play-
ers, Nadal beat Federer in
a fifth-set tiebreaker Sun-
day to successfully defend
his Rome Masters title and
tie Guillermo Vilas’ record

.53-match winning streak
on clay in the Open era.

Nadal, a 19-year-old
Spaniard ranked No. 2,
won 6-7 (0), 7-6 (5), 6-4, 2-
6, 7-6 (5) in 5 hours, 5 min-
utes. He improved to 5-1
against the No. 1-ranked
Swiss.

Federer dropped to 39-3
this year, with his only loss-
es coming to Nadal. Nadal
also won a matchup at
Dubai in March.

In the Monte Carlo final
last month, Nadal beat
Federer in a fourth-set
tiebreaker. Both tourna-
ments are clay-court
warmups for the French
Open, which starts in two
weeks. Another of Nadal’s
wins over Federer came in
the semifinals at Roland
Garros last year.

“Obviously I would have
liked to win, but I already
knew after Monaco I was
extremely close,” Federer
said. “I think this is anoth-
er step closer.”

Federer led 4-1 in the
fifth set and the top-ranked
Swiss wasted two match
points at 6-5, both with
errant forehands.

“T should have won,”
Federer said. “He caught
me right at the finish line.”





Federer. The gap is closing, ~~ -
SPORTS .

Region’s young gymnasts ar



Flippin’ All Over the World



Ey



wee 4

2%



Hl NASSAU NASTICS GYMEEST was held in New Providence over the weekend. The theme for the event was ‘Flippin’ All Over the World”. Pictured above are members from the visiting .

team, Motions Unlimited, from the Cayman Islands. :



ee



(Photos: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staf}

PICTURED left and below are level two gymnasts competing at the event.

(Photos: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff). .











ee

ee SS

Sh R St eee AE ERBS

#







eyed

EHS &

~ ae y eo




MONDAY, MAY 15, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

a TENNIS |

DOUBLES pair Mark
Knowles and Daniel
Nestor won the Rome
Masters doubles champi-
onship at the weerend.

The pair defeated
Jonathan Erlich and Andy
Ram of Israel 6-4, 5-7, 13-
11.

Eagles
are ‘the
team to
watch’

@ SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter



THE youthful
Whirlpool Eagles have
already won more games
than they did in the entire
season last year and now
they are being touted as
the team to watch in the
New Providence Softball
Association.

The Eagles, with
national manager Ali

! Culmer on the sidelines
with manager Ricardo
Treco, picked up their
second straight victory,
holding off the hapless
Briteley's Angels 5-3 in
the opening game on Sat-
urday at the Churchill
Tener Knowles National
Softball Stadium. |

"For me, this is very
exciting because last year
we took a lot of beating
because we had no pitch-
ing," said Thela Johnson,
who is back, more com-
mitted and dedicated as
the ace pitcher. |

"If we can get better .
defence, better bats, we
can do this. We only won
one game last year, but
this is a new beginning
for us. We're ssh) to
play."

Johnson even went as
far as projecting that, if
their defence can hold up,
Whirlpool can actually be
the "spoiler" by not only
making the playofts, but
winning the champi-
onship.

Whirlpool, however,
will have two big tests,
back-to-back when they
play the Bommer George
Swingers on Tuesday and
the defending champions
Electro Telecom Wildcats
on Thursday, May 25.

The Angels, on the oth-
er hand, have suffered
their second straight
defeat, but infielder Jen-
ny Dotson said there's no
need forthe fans to
push the panic button just
yet.

SEE page 8B.





& SOFTBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

NOT even the presence of
two Dominican Republic play-
ers in uniforms for the Bommer
George Swingers was enough
to intimidate defending cham-
pions Electro Telecom Wildcats

_‘on Saturday night.

In fact, it only added more
fuel to the fire as the Wildcats
took out their frustration by
stopping the Swingers - minus
the Dominican Republicans -
11-4 in five innings via the new
game duration rule applied to
the New Providence Softball
Association's by-laws this sea-
son.

The fans at the Churchill
Tener Knowles National Soft-
ball Stadium were eagerly
awaiting the appearance of
Luisa Nunez and Geouanny
Nunez, who were the first to
come on the field for the final
warm-up before the featured

game on the pre-Mother's Day ©

special.
But when it was time to play



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

ball, plate umpire Anthony
‘Rakes' Bowe and first base
umpire Michael Hanna
informed the Swingers that nei-

ther of the two players could
play and coach Kevin Neely
would not be allowed to assist
them because of the new resi-

NPSA.

dency clause instituted by the -

Could they have made a dif-
ference for the Wildcats, who

Bahamians

_are right
on cue






@ ELECTRO Telecom
Wildcats' catcher Dormette
Edwards avoided the tag at
home as Bommer George
Swingers' catcher Dorothy
Marshall dropped the ball.

improved to 2-1, while the
Swingers dropped to 1-1?

Wildcats' player/manager
Vernie Curry didn't think so.
Her Wildcats stopped the game
at the bottom of the fifth with
an 11-4 victory via the new
game duration rule stating the
game could be stopped with
seven Or more runs instead of
10 at the end of five innings.

"I couldn't see them the game
being any closer with them in
the line-up,” said Curry. “It
might have been closer on their
part, but I couldn't see.them
stopping us from hitting, unless
one of those girls was pitching.
It might have been a better
game, but I don't think they
could hold our bats."

The NPSA's new residency

SEE page 8B

Gymnast Simone brings the crowd to their feet







Breakfast at Subway...
A Delicious Morning Ritual



BREAKFAST DELI
SANDWICHES®

A DELICIOUS WAY
TO START YOUR DAY!



@ GYMNASTICS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter



SIMONE Hall flipped her way to a stand-
ing ovation on Saturday afternoon at the
Nassau Nastics’ ‘Flipping All Over the
World’ show.

Hall, who is competing at level seven in
gymnastics, mixed her graceful moves on
the carpet. to the sounds of the goat
skin drums and. ‘Rake and Scrape’

music, delivering a perfectly executed

performance.

For her, the moves came naturally even
though the performance was rated difficult
by the crowd.

Hall described her exhibition performance

"as a warm-up, as she prepared for the vault

and the beam.

She said: “I enjoy doing gymnastics, when
I do it sometimes it feels as if I am doing it
for the first time, it is so much fun: A lot of
people ask.me if I am scared when I do it,
but I’m not, it feels great.

“Not too many girls can do what I can on
the floor so when I look at it, I feel very
special. I get to learn a lot of new things, but

the best thing about gymnastics is putting

the new things I’ve learned to work.

“It is always fun putting together a rou-
tine. I try to work hard on the routines so
when I have to do it I could dovit perfect,

I’m more confident when I am out there on

the floor, it’s so fun.

“The next best thing about gymnastics is
going off to competition and showing every-
one what I can do. Some people don’t think
the Bahamas has great gymnasts, but we do
coe I will be looking to take it to the next

evel.”

The Bahamas squared up against a 19-
member team from the Cayman Islands on
the weekend and, for seven-year old Kristin
Smith, the tournament was a once in a life-'
time experience. - ;

Smith said: “We don’t have a lot of com-:
petitions to let our parents see what we can.
do, so competing at home it feels great. I
was excited but I wasn’t scared.”

According to Trevor Ramsey, head coach’
of the Nassau Nastics Gymnastics team, an’
event of this magnitude can only be done:
every five to six months, prior to the closing:
of the season. . :

Perform 3

Revealing that he would love to see the

‘gymnasts perform at home on a consistent

basis, Ramsey said he would have to first
ensure that all the gymnasts are ready, and
sound with the fundamentals.

Ramsey said: “An event like this usually
takes like several months to put on. This
usually starts from the beginning of our
term in September.

“We.start working on different skills for
different levels and based on where they
are at by March we can definitely pinpoint
which’ level they are on.

“The gymnasts’ routines are put together
by March, they have at least two months to
perfect what they’ve learned and what they
want to do. We don’t determine the level,
the kids’ abilities place them on the correct
level.

“Tt doesn’t matter what age they are, you
can be a beginner who catches on very
quickly. But we do encourage the gymnasts
to learn a lot.”

@ LEVEL seven gymnast Simone Hall puts on a show at the weekend.

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)