Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
CLOUDS AND
SUNSHINE |



ee



The Tribun

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATIO



Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION







Volume: 102 No.142



nipltlasts Geis cy




*

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

3 PRICE — 75¢

Call for military jet answers

MP claim

s millions

spent on plane
not suitable for
surveillance job

By. MARK HUMES... sti

NORTH Eleuthera MP
Alvin Smith called on the Min-
istry of National Security to
account for a dysfunctional
Defence Force military jet that
has been sitting unused at Inter-
national Airport for more than
six months.

In his contribution to the

Police Service Act 2006, Mr
Smith wanted to know why mil-
lions in public funds had been
spent to acquire a plane that
was not suitable for surveil-
lance.
-* No individual on the Defence
Force, according to Mr Smith,
has passed the qualifying check
ride to fly the plane, and there-
fore, the plane has had to sit on
the tarmac.

Additionally, Mr Smith said,
the King Air 350 Turbo Prop
high altitude aircraft, which is

believed to cost around two and
‘a half million dollars, is not
good for patrolling the
Bahamas because "if you want
to patrol in the Bahamas, you
would want to be able to fly
below 10,000 ft."

However, this plane, accord-
ing to Mr Smith, is designed to
fly at altitudes above 10,000 ft.
Additionally, he'said, "flying
below 10,000 ft in this craft is
very costly, as it will burn more
fuel and cause more wear and
tear on engines, reducing its life
span to about 50 per cent."

3

-Mr,.Smith said he has. been

_ advised that this aircraft — to

- get out of an airport comfort-

ably and safely — needs an
approximate minimum length
of 4,500 ft, and in this instance,

.a short take off and landing air-

craft would have been more
appropriate if one considers the
surfaces and short lengths of
some Family Island airports.

However, Mark Wilson, Per-
manent Secretary at the Min-
istry of National Security,
defended his ministry and char-
acterized Mr Smith's comments
as a matter of opinion. |

Only offering what he was at
liberty to disclose at this time,
Mr Wilson, first denied claims
that the aircraft was still parked
at NIA. However, he admitted
that Mr Smith was partially
right in saying that it had been
parked there for awhile, but, he
said, it was not parked there
anywhere near the six months
claimed by Mr Smith.

Saying that the aircraft was

~ operational for a brief period,

Mr Wilson told The Tribune
that it was only grounded after
it experienced some difficulties.

Mr Wilson said that the craft

is a military aircraft, but it was .

registered with the FAA as a
civilian aircraft. This caused
some confusion, he said, and
until these issues were ironed

out, the craft was grounded.

SEE page 13



Mi THE Defence Force’s King Air 350 Surveillance

4

Aircraft, photographed yesterday afte

Man is shot | MP to ask Roberts to put
inthe neck contract bids to tender

while driving

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 32-YEAR-OLD man is
lucky to be alive after being
shot in the neck while driving
on Bay Lilly Drive Wednesday
night.

_- Police state that the man was
driving in the area near Sea
Breeze around 9.10pm with his
wife when he heard gun shots.

According to their reports, it
was shortly afterwards that the
man discovered that he had
been shot in the left side of his
neck.

Police say they are actively
investigating the matter, but.at
this time cannot say for certain
if the man may have been “tar-
geted” or simply the victim of a
stray bullet.

Chief Superintendent Regi-
nald Ferguson said that the man
was taken to hospital for treat-

SEE page 13




CERTIFIED BY FLORID

INDEPENDENT MP Whit-
ney Bastian said he will ask
Works Minister Bradley
Roberts to put contract bids to
tender instead of negotiating
contracts with individuals.

“Taxpayers’ money should be »

spent more wisely and who wins
the job wins the job, but don’t
hand pick persons to give the
jobs to persons who are unable
to do the work.

“The work that have been

going on the PLP have been try-
ing to give those jobs to their
generals not knowing that these
generals they continue to give
these jobs to have no influence
over the voters.

“Most of the time they give
those jobs to people who cannot
complete the job in the. space
allotted to them. The contract
had been signed for the reno-

SEE page 13

Ministry believes economy will
orow by up to five per cent this year

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

NOW that it has completed its revenue analysis for the 2006-2007
budget, the Ministry of Finance believes it is possible that the Bahamas’
economy will grow by up to five per cent this year, Minister of State for
Finance James Smith told The Tribune.

Mr Smith said the new budget will include the continuation of pro-
jects started two or three years ago and perhaps an acceleration of con-

struction in new schools or docks.

It. will also contain — for the first time — provisions explicitly for

SEE page 15





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‘(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Trial date set
in pastor case

A TRIAL date has been
set for the case of a local
pastor accused of having sex
with a minor. ie

Bishop Earl Randolph
Fraser, pastor of Pilgrim
Baptist Temple on St James
Road, is charged with
having sex with a depen-
dent.

Fraser was arraigned on
the charge last month.

It is alleged that Frasér,
being a person who held a
position of trust, sometime
between July 2005 and Feb-
ruary 2006, had sexual
intercourse with the now
17-year-old girl.

Fraser denied that he
committed the offence and
a trial date was set yester-
day.

The case will be heard in
Court Five on Bank Lane’

i before Magistrate Marilyn

Meers. o
The trial is scheduled-to
begin on July 17. re

Fraser is represented by on
lawyer Wellington Orlando. — -

‘







Cibo. te







vs

PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Mitchell appeals to Spain for help»

FOREIGN Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell met with Span-
ish Prime Minister Jose Luis




















Rodriguez Zapatero and asked
for Spain’s assistance for access
to Schengen visas.

Schengen visas are the docu-
ments required by travellers seek-
ing access to continental Europe.

There is currently no issuing
office for the visas in the
Bahamas and Bahamian busi-

in numbers

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in Family Guardian's Group Life & Health Division,
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ICA was founded in 1909 to provide a forum for
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nessmen, students and tourists
complain about the difficulty
involved in getting them.

According to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, the Spanish
government is currently circu-
lating a plan to open an EU
consular office in Nassau to deal
with the requests for Schengen
visas.

Mr Mitchell was in Spain for
the third Spain/Caricom Sum-
mit, which ended in Madrid on
Wednesday.

He said that all Caricom del-
egations believed that the meet-
ing went well.

Mr Mitchell pointed out in a
statement issued yesterday that
there has been a significant
increase in the Spanish econo-
my in the last 20 years as result

- of their entry into the European
Union.

“They are now. the eighth
largest economy in the world
and a significant investor in the
Caribbean region, particularly
in tourism,” said the minister.

“In. the English speaking

Caribbean, Spanish investors
have hotel properties. The same
RIU Group of Spain that owns

hotels in Jamaica owns the for-
mer Grand Hotel on Paradise
Island.”

According to the statement,
the Spanish prime minister said
that Spain was hoping an invest-
ment protection treaty could be

with visas to continental Europe —

negotiated between Caricom . .

and Spain.

Mr Mitchell also thanked

Spain for a $50,000 donation to

the Bahamas’ hurricane relief :

efforts,
Mr Mitchell is now in Vienna,

Austria for the start of a Euro- ©

pean Union, Latin American

and Caribbean heads of gov-..
ernment meeting which begins ,-

today.

The statement continued: :

“The Caribbean region is seek-
ing to create more direct rela-
tions with countries in the EU,

given that its traditional part- .:'

ner Britain seems to be moving
its focus toward Europe.
“Europe is now the largest
donor of development assis-
tance in the world. The
Bahamas is pledged to receive
some 9 million Euros of devel-
opment assistance in the next
fiscal year.” spi emroani es

*,

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2



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2K



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS |

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 3





identify
dead man

POLICE have identified
the man who was found dead
in a yard in Stapeldon Gar-
dens.

According to Assistant
Commissioner of Police with
responsibility for crime Regi-
nald Ferguson, the man was
Davon Capron, 44, of
Seabreeze.

The fully clothed body of
Capron was discovered short-
ly before noon on Wednes-
day.

The man reportedly had a
wound to the right side of his
neck. He was wearing blue
jeans, a dark shirt and white
sneakers.

Mr Ferguson said that
police are not sure how the
man received the injury to his
neck but have not ruled the
death a homicide at this
point. i

Investigations are ongoing
and police are awaiting the
results of an autopsy.

Woman is
assaulted
by armed
men

A DEVEAUX Street
woman was assaulted on
Tuesday by two armed men
who attempted to rob her
according to police.

Assistant Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said the
woman reported the incident
to sometime after 11am on
Wednesday.

It is reported that while she
was entering her home, the
woman was approached by

cash.
The woman tol. “TO bers’

Robbery |
reported. at.
man’s home

A NASSAU Village man
was reportedly robbed at his
home early Wednesday
morning.

Police say they received a
report of the incident just
after 1.30am that day.

It was alleged that the man
was leaving his home and was
approached by four men
armed with handguns.

The men reportedly robbed
him of his wallet then went
inside his apartment and stole
some coins.

They reportedly escaped in
a blue Ford Explorer.

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two men who demanded i





@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

TOO many Bahamians are
employed by the government
in jobs which they are not qual-
ified to do according to Inde-
pendent MP for South Andros
Whitney Bastian.

He urged the government to
work towards ensuring that
more persons have jobs that
conform to their qualifications.

“I continue to say to ministers
that if we are to build our com-
munity we should build them
with the best people,” he said.

“Give those persons a job who
are qualified to do a job. If they
are qualified to do maid work
then let them do maid work,”
said Mr Bastian. “But don’t put
someone with no BGCSEs to be
an Officer at national insurance
or in the commissioner’s office to
do clerk work when they can’t
type.”

The independent MP also
told The Tribune yesterday that
he is courting a European
investor to South Andros to in









a WHITNEY Bastian

an effort to create more jobs.
However, Mr Bastian said
that there are some unique
complications arising out of the
land situation in Andros.
“Most of the property in
South Andros is generation
property and those properties
have not been probated to be
eligible enough to be put on the
market. Investors won’t come

Mattes ey rey al























MERCHANTS who operate
down-town shops have been
urged to make any complaints
about police officers directly to

the commissioner’s office.

Several shop owners contact-
ed The Tribune earlier. this
week, saying their repeated
complaints about certain offi-
cers seem to have gone unno-
ticed.

They say the officers are inef-
fective at combating the drug

- problem in the area and that

the Tourism Police Unit has
failed to respond to calls for the
officers to be replaced.

When the matter was brought
to his attention yesterday, Assis-
tant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson said that in future, the
shop owners should go straight
to the top — as officers who
allow crime to go on “under
their noses” must be dealt with.

“If it is necessary to remove

. them, we’ll do that, because we

(| O
eH +

Independent MP’s claim



to Andros to straighten up a
family’s property. They will
come hopefully when the prop-
erty is straightened.

“The issue we have now is try-
ing to bring families together to
straighten their land to sell por-
tions of their land to potential
investors who want to do busi-
ness in Andros,” the MP said.

Mr Bastian said that he made |

the move because of the chal-
lenges he has faced in creating
jobs in hig constituency.

“The government.has said
there has been a freeze on hiring
for some time but the freeze is
on hold only for certain persons.
So the challenge is to create
opportunities other than jobs
from the government,” he said.

Mr Bastian conceded that the

government has been doing a lot —

of infrastructural work in his con-
stituency — but added that all of
this was due to his prompting.

@ TRAFFIC
‘| on the bridge
to Paradise
Island had to
be diverted
yesterday after
this delivery
truck crashed
into one of the
toll booth
entrances

(Photo:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



itown traders urged to take polit
complaints direct to commissioner

put them there to prevent
crime. That is what we are all
about — prevention,” he said.

Mr Ferguson, who is the offi-
cer-in-charge of crime, urged all
citizens who observe the police
béhaving in an inappropriate
manner to report them directly
to the commissioner’s office or
to senior police officials.

The shop owners, who wished
to remain anonymous, said cer-
tain officers stationed near their
shops consistently fail to deal
with drug pushers and other
“hustlers” who harass tourists
walking through the area.

The merchants said they have
complained several times to
officers from the new Police
Tourism Unit and to the Cen-
tral Police Station.

- When The Tribune contacted
the Tourism Unit for comment
on the matter, an officer who
identified herself as Officer
Richardson said she could not

Bay RSP ei ray Maat eae

© Tel: 242-356-7302
eae) pla aa ie



respond to the issue.

Although she acknowledged
that the area in question is
under the unit’s jurisdiction,
Officer Richardson said the
police press liaison office would
have to be contacted for com-
ment.

- She added only that the shop
owners know the correct pro-
cedure for making the com-
plaints,
The Tribune”.

“But that’s the whole prob-
lem,” said one of thé merchants.
“We have reported this prob-
lem repeatedly and nothing has
happened.”

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BAA (G ,



“other than contacting



“The government did not dis-
criminate against us in that
regard, in fact from the time the
PLP government got in power
the infrastructure got put in
place. The only thing I would
like for the government in terms
of the infrastructural develop-
ment is to complete the dock in
Fresh Creek so the people in
Central Andros can save money.

“Gas has gone up and they
now have to go to North Andros
to clear their stuff because the
dock is in bad condition. I am

Re tom es

their ‘obs

saying to them that we were
able to put the infrastructure in
place; now if they have a sec-
ond term it should be concen-
trating on creating job opportu-
nities in South Andros,” he said.

Mr Bastian added that he is’
certain he will win his seat by a

larger margin than he did last“

time.

“When I first got elected I
promised that I would do the
best I can in terms of represen-
tation because the people of
Andros have been complaining
that they were not able to hear *
my predecessor’s voice in par-
liament — now there is no doubt
that they will hear my voice,”
he said.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 20U6

THE TRIBUNE









LEON E. H. DUPUCH, +

(



EILEEN DUPUCH CARRO

Insurance Management Building., P.

























AMSTERDAM, Netherlands —— Fears that
the deadly strain of bird flu would move
through Africa and Europe in flocks of wild
birds have so far proven unfounded, but the
danger is not entirely over, a Dutch environ-
mental group said Thursday.

Experts from Wetlands International tesied

‘some 5,000 wild birds in countries including
Tunisia, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Sudan, Senegal,
Malawi and Kenya but didn’t find the highly
pathogenic HSN1 virus, which can be fatal in
humans, said Ward Hagemeijer, who studies
the disease for the organization.
» Scientists had feared that the spread of the
virus would pick up speed with the birds’ win-
ter migration to Africa and the Middle East,
and their spring return to Europe.

“Theoretically, it is. still possible,” Hage-
‘meijer said, referring to an outbreak of the dis-
ease in Europe. But he said the risks now

appear low.

‘Scientists say they do not know why bird flu
does not appear to be spreading in the wild as

' - widely and quickly as feared.

» While bird flu experts say they are relieved
‘that they have not found the deadly strain in
many migrating birds, the data they have gath-
ered is limited and they are not ready to

«declare victory against H5N1 in wild fowl.

“It’s a needle in the haystack, and in the
_ haystacks we looked, we didn’t find any nee-
: .dles,” said Juan Lubroth,.a senior officer for

rhe gny

. JERUSALEM -~-. The outgoing head of

“ Israel’s National Security Council said

‘Wednesday that time is‘ running out to find a

-~ diplomatic. solution to Iran’s nuclear pro-

gramme, but cautioned against talking about
military action.

Israel has grown increasingly concerned in
recent months by calls from Iran’s leader to
wipe out Israel, and by Iran’s efforts to devel-
op a nuclear capability. Iran insists the pro-

- gramme is for peaceful purposes, but Israel
and the West believe Iran is trying to develop
an atomic bomb.

“We do believe that a political solution to
the problem is still achievable although time
is running out,” Giora Eiland told foreign
reporters in Jerusalem.

“J don’t think that any military option
should be discussed right now,” added Eiland,
who is about to end his stint as head of the
policy-making council after a new Israeli gov-
ernment took office last week.

Eiland’s comments were in contrast to
Israeli Vice Premier Shimon Peres’ warning
on Monday that Iran could be threatened
with destruction if it continues to vow to
destroy Israel.

“Be careful with your, threats,” Peres told

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

| MULTDISCOUNT FURNITURE & [

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LOCAL NEWS

NA ete:
ara SCE

‘ublisher/ Editor 1903-1914

Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor i972-

N, CMG...

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas

O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Wild bird flu epidemic unproven

animai neaith at the ULN. Food and Agricul-
ture Organization in Rome.

In the Netherlands, which sits on a major
bird migration path, more thar 13,000 wild
birds have been tested since F ebruary. None
showed signs of HS5N1. Earlier this month,
the government attributed its success to mea-
sures to contain the spread of the virus, and
good luck.

“Naturally, there were the measures we
took, and maybe that had its effect, but you
can also say we were just lucky,” said Agri-
culture Ministry spokeswoman Nynke van der
Zee,

The virus appeared in February i in swans
and other wild birds in widely dispersed areas
of Europe, which went on high alert. The
European Union ordered free-range domestic
poultry to be kept indoors to avoid contact

with potentially infected geese and other _

migrators.

The EU has begun easing some restrictions _

in recent weeks, but extended preventive mea-
sures for poultry in farms near wildlite water
reserves and river deltas until the end of the
year.

HSN1 has been spreading from Asia to
Africa and Europe since 2003. At least 113
people have died from the strain, which led to
the slaughter of more than 200 million ani-
mals to prevent what health officials had
warned could be a lethal pandemic.

‘+: Tran’s nuclear programme fallout

Channel 1 TV. “Those who threaten to
destroy are in danger of being destroyed.”
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
on Wednesday dismissed Western concerns
over its nuclear programme as “a big lie,” a
day after key U.N. Security Council mem-
bers agreed to present Tehran with a choice of
incentives or sanctions in deciding whether to
suspend uranium enrichment.
Ahmadinejad told reporters in Jakarta,
Indonesia that Iran will “absolutely not back
out” of defending its right to pursue new tech-

nology, accusing the United States and other

Western nations of monopolizing the nuclear
technology market to secure profits while
engaging in non“peacefuil proliferation.

In recent months Israel has expanded its
military arsenal, acquiring dozens of war-
planes and long-range fuel tanks to allow
them to reach Iran. However, officials have
said they want te jet diplomacy take its course
and that joint action with other countries is
preferable to Israeli unilatefal moves.

Israeli officials have described Iran’s
nuclear quest as the Jewish state’s greatest
threat. Military experts disagree over whether
Israel would be capable of taking out Iran’s
nuclear programme on its own. —

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a een Avenue

Nea Rush









Considering

crime and
Brokeback

EDITOR, The Tribune

Two topics very briefly if you
please.

Topic 1:

Attorney General, Allyson
Maynard — Gibson has recently
stated very strongly that there
will be a new attitude from her
office in dealing with criminal
procedure. I am very inspired
by her pronouncement because
|, like many other inteliectually
honest Bahamians, understand
that punishment is second only

. in importance to prevention, as

a means of combating crime.
And, capital punishment is a jus-
tifiable, and necessary weapon
in the arsenal of criminal pun-
ishment, contrary to the very
liberal opinion. that it is not.



LETTERS

letters@tribunemecia.net




May ournew Attorney Gen-
eral experience every success in
her endeavours to bring crime
in this country under control. :

Topic 2:

Those people who have
denounced the recent decision -
by whomever it was — to. ban
Brokeback Mountain from the
Bahamas, and indeed all of
those global protesters claim-
ing that it was merely a bad case
of homophobia that caused the
film to be a failure at the box
office and not receive any
deserved awards, should be

aware of one other explanation
for the rejection of the film. It is
entirely possible that the film
was a failure simply because
there are still more “old fash-
ioned” people left in the US
and the Bahamas than there are
“newagers”.

Simply stated, we have the
right to reject the film, and we
did. Homophobia? I don’t think
so, but if it makes the gay com-
munity feel better, then Tam
homophobic I guess. However,
I still don’t hate gays..So what
does that make me? A nice pet-
son I hope.

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS

Abaco,

May 6 2006

Concern over the rising
price of our beer

EDITOR, The Tribune

Just a quick note from a con-

cerned beer consumer...

I am sure anyone who is
worth their weight in hops or
barely has found themselves
laying awake at night tossing
and turning over the frothy
height of beer prices...gas and

oil prices you say? Ha! I am_

much more concerned about
the price it takes to fill my trunk
with of a couple cases of the
good stuff vs. what it costs to

_ fill the old gas tank...heck, take

gas to $5:a gallon forall I care

as long.as-I can buy a six pack

for $5!

What’s the cheapest price for
a case of beer these days, that
would be Kalik for about $35 if
your lucky...now, why is it that
in the USA for example one of
their famous home brews (Bud-
weiser) goes for about $15 a
case...seems a little odd to me
but of course when you can buy
a case of Kalik cheaper in the
USA vs. The Bahamas then I
guess maybe we are floating
around in Coo-Coo land any-

way and nothing should come

as being odd.

My father recalls that about
35 years ago he could buy a case
of beer for about $5;
whoooaaaaa Nellie! Bring those
happy days back again...yes,
yes, yes, we have our friend
inflation but I will tell you this,
no way the average beer drink-
ing man’s salary has gone up
700 per cent in the same peri-

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NATALIA LON NIIHATNIINT

od..:conspiracy of crowns you
say well this is most certainly a
conspiracy of beers.

Now, J am not an expert on >

the matter and I don’t have a
clue which person or group of
persons is responsible for these
lofty beer prices, but I am sure

they have made enough mon--

ey over the last couple of
decades to continue to enjoy
the good life for themselves as
well as their offspring for gen-
erations to. come...bathing in
champagne and _rose petals,
hmmmph, they are probably
bubbling around in the golden
brew with a rubber duckey or
two (course the Champagne
and roses would be cheaper...)
Hey! I even heard a rumour
that this year beer prices could
fall due to some tariff or tax or
price gouge or crazy markup or
whatever you want to call it
being removed...sounds won-
derful 'm sure but until I can
hold a
hand that came from a case
costing less that $25 I will still
feel like myself along with my
beer-drinking Bahamian broth-
ers and sisters are getting a
skunk deal (no pun intended of
course).

I could go on for days and
days about this current national
crisis but I am afraid I need to
catch some sleep so I can get
up in the morning, head to
work, and make some money;
after all, maybe one day I will
be able to.afford more than one
case of beer and can trade in




cold, frosty beer in my -

5c uth ¢ PO. Box N-7984 @ Nassau, Bahamas

Plan ‘Ahead!

“yt wasn't raining when Noah
built the ark.
SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798

Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

my ice cold lemonade parties
for a beer party or two (watch it
now, one beer limit per’person!
Better yet, perhaps I could hand
out plastic cups and split one

- beer between two...pour a good

head on there and the cup may
even look full...sheesh, who
said beer drinkers couldn’t
think on their feet, (or off their
teet for that matter).

Not sure if it’s the lack of
sleep, lack of beer or too many
bubbles, but I just came across a
brilliant idea for the election
theme this year. To heck with
all the other trivial issues like
gas prices, grid-lock traffic and
the giving away of Bahamian
land, the first party to lie to
me.....ummmmm, I mean con-
vince me that they will find a
way to get the case of beer price
under $25 gets my vote...heck,
I will even make things easier, .
don’t worry about buying votes, .
just drop a pallet or two of beers
on my doorstep and I could
probably get the whole neigh-
bourhood on board your self-
less cause or causes I’m sure.

- I will close with a quote that
will both capture the hearts of
the beer drinkers among us and
maybe even a few of the church
going folk as well...“Beer is
proof that God loves us and
wants us to be happy” — Ben-
jamin Franklin.

Yours brewerly,

CAL LECK
Nassau
May 2006














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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 , PAGE 5





In brief —

Sewing
industry
planned
in Abaco

HOUSEWIVES in North
Abaco are hoping to launch a
new home-based industry
aimed at boosting the local
economy.

The women are learning to
sew as part of an initiative by
North Abaco Co-op and the
Caribbean Development Bank.

« This week, they are receiving
expert tuition from. Wayne
Cabosan, a West Indian tech-
nical co-ordinator who is teach-
ing them the crafts of sewing,
pattern-making and fabric
preparation.

“Jt is hoped the women will
be able to get a small industry
going in those parts because
there is not a lot going on up
there,” said an islander.

The scheme was co-ordinated
by Burnell Parker and Leon
Pinder of North Abaco Co-op,
working with Cheryl Bowe-
Moss of the Bahamas Co-op
League.

Around 20 women are under-
going training at the Anglican ©
Parish Hall at Foxtown. Most
come from the nearby settle-
ments of Crown Haven, Cedars
Harbour, Mount Hope and
Wood Cay.

The idea is that the women ~

could become involved in mak-
ing uniforms for the police and
Defence Force.

But they are also being urged
to produce tourist goods like
shorts and T-shirts.

‘The Co-op has supplied
equipment and fabric for this
week’s workshops.

‘North Abaco, unlike the,

Marsh Harbour area, is remote
and relatively depressed eco-
nomically. Fishing is the main
industry, but the Co-op would
like to see more diversity.

een aes ol
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-Bahamians treated unfairly
at Bimini Bay, say locals

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A small group
of locals are claiming that
Bahamian workers are being
treated unfairly at the Bimini
Bay Resort in North Bimini.

Early this week, a small num-
ber of concerned Biminites held
a protest against the treatment
of workers and the lack of pub-
lic access beyond the gate of the
multi-million dollar resort and
residential development.

Bimini Bay developer Ger-
ardo Capo was harshly criticised
by residents over the employ-
ment of large numbers of expa-
triates in the construction phase.

The construction of a gate
barring access to crown land
and to a beach has also been a

contentious issue among
Biminites.

One of the protesters claimed
that Bahamian workers are
being paid low wages. She also
alleged that workers are not
allowed to use bathroom facili-
ties or go into the cafeteria at
Bimini Bay.

The resident said Bahamian
workers are afraid to come for-
ward and complain for fear of
losing their jobs.

According to the protester,
there are more Mexican work-
ers than Bahamian workers
employed at Bimini Bay.

“Mr Capo is not complying
with the labour laws and has
failed to come through on
promises of better wages,”
claimed the resident. “He
don’t want Bahamians to
work overtime because he

does not want to pay!”

“Residents are also being
denied access through the gate.
How are we supposed ito land
and beaches on the other side?”
she asked.

The Bimini native said anoth-
er demonstration will be held
in the near future.

“T have sent a fax and e-mail
last week to Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe about the situation
at Bimini Bay, but I have not
received a response from him,”
she said.

Mr Wilchcombe could not be
reached for comments.

Mr Capo could also not be
reached. ,

When The Tribune called the
Bimini Bay Resort, the auto-
mated telephone answering sys-
tem seemed not to be function-

ing properly.

ll GERARDO Capo





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Coroner delays summation to allow
lawyers to prepare their addresses

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
AFTER hearing addresses from

counsel this morning, Coroner Linda’

Virgill is expected to give her summa-
tion of the inquest into the January 17
prison break which led to the deaths of
corporal Dion Bowles and inmate Neil
Brown.

Coroner Virgill delayed her summa-
tion yesterday to give lawyers repre-
senting witnesses time to formulate and
make their addresses to her.

This decision came yesterday when
lawyer Michael Hanna, who is repre-

senting Bettymae Trotman, the mother .

‘of deceased inmate Neil Brown, asked
to have until this morning to formulate
an address to the jury.

Mr Hanna noted that he joined the
inquest at a rather late stage and did not
get as much co-operation as he would
have liked in regards to attaining certain
information.

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The attorney said that he would be
ready this morning and that his address
would take about 30 minutes.

However, Director of Prosecutions
Bernard Turner pointed out that in a
coroners inquest, no addresses could
be made by anyone other than the coro-
ner.

Coroner Virgill concurred, noting
that whatever address Mr Hanna
wished to make would have to be deliv-
ered in the absence of the seven-mem-
ber jury.

Other lawyers who have placed them-
selves on the record will also be allowed
to make addresses to the coroner this
morning before she: gives her summa-
tion and allows the jury to deliberate.

Two prison officers were recalled to
the witness stand yesterday to give
information about a firearm that was
allegedly used on the morning of the
breakout.

However, no information could be

ascertained as to the serial number of
the gun.

Chief Officer Hanna told the court
that he worked the 2pm to 10pm shift
on January 16 and that he was the
senior officer on duty.

Mr Hanna said he could not say who

"was directly responsible for the armory

at the prison.

He told the court that he turned his
shift over to PO Gregory Rolle, who
was alone at the time.

When asked whether it was common
practice for someone to turn over his
shift to just one officer, Mr Hanna said
it was.

He also stated he returned to he
prison on the morning of January 17
after learning of the prison break.

. Officer Hanna stated that he knew
of the safe in the PO’s office but did
not know exactly how many weapons

“were kept i in it.

The wéapons, he said, were changed



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from time to time but no record of the
changes was kept.

During questioning by lawyer.
Michael Hanna, Chief Officer Hanna
said he could not recall seeing ASP Far-.
rington or Sgt Steven Sands during his
shift.

During his testimony, Principal Offi-
cer Rolle said he still could not recall
the serial number of the weapon he
issued to officer Neko Sergeant that
night.

He was asked whether it was com-
mon practice to simply hand a weapon,
to another officer over a fence.

Mr Rolle noted that it was not, but
said that because of what was going on
at the time, he did what was necessary.

He said that three guns were in the
safe in the PO’s office, for which he
had the key, and they were used 5
emergency. purposes.

He said that when issuing the gun to
Officer Sergeant, he had no time to

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

a eee ee

LOCAL NEWS



IN honour of Earth Day
2006, the Bahamas National
Trust partnered with RBC Roy-
al Bank of Canada to launch a
public education programme on
Love 97 Radio called the Envi-
ronmental Minute.

The Environmental Minute is
a series of 60-second radio com-
mercials that aim to educate the
public about the environment.

The commercials are played
during morning drive time on
Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day of each week, in an effort to
reach a wide group of persons
with practical conservation
information to help improve the
environment.



@ PICTURED in the front row, from left to right, are: Jan
Knowles, director of development for the Bahamas National
‘Trust; Deborah Zonicle, marketing manager of RBC for
Bahamas and the Caribbean, and Lynn Gape, director of id
“There is an increased aware- education for the Bahamas National Trust. In the back row are:
ness among.Bahamians with. . Tony Williams and Greg Lampkin of Love 97. ‘
regard to the environment,” | o
said Christopher Hamilton, our natural resources and this the entire cost of the Environ- 4,
executive director’ of “the---joint-venture-with-Royal Bank: -mental Minutes, RBC has also... 50
Bahamas National Trust. “Peo- is the perfect way to passonthe _ provided a $40, 000 grant to sup;
ple are open to learning, what knowledge that is needed.” port conservation education in...
they can do to help preserve In addition to underwriting public primary schools. “A

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FISHERMEN in booming
southern Abaco are seeking

more protection from tourists

who raid their lobster traps and
plunder local fish stocks.
They want official restrictions

placed on part-time recreation-.

al fishermen who interfere with
their livelihoods.

And they are demanding
weight limits on tourist catches
so that local fish stocks can be
preserved.

Agriculture and Fisheries
Minister Leslie Miller has been

_in Abaco this week to hear the

fishermen’s concerns. He was at
Treasure Cay last night and
Marsh Harbour the night before.

Fishermen have complained

that tourists not only raid lob- -

ster traps, but also the specially-
placed “condos” used to attract

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‘One suggestion is that tourists

crawfish colonies.
They feel tourists should

_Tecognise an extended “closed

season” for lobster catching and
be restricted in how much fish
they can land on a “per boat”

should catch lobster only from
October onwards, enabling
commercial fishermen to take.
advantage of August and Sep-
tember.

And fishermen would also
like to see a ban on fish imports
from Florida at certain times of
the year, thus protecting the
local industry.

They believe farmers get
preferential treatment from
government in this regard
because certain crop imports
are banned while Bahamian




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An islander told The. Tribune.

“Mr Miller has been. hearings”
what they have to say and will
no doubt take it all on board.”:

Residents feel Abaco is a vic-
tim.of its.own success. :

The foreign yachting com=*
munity and second home own-
ers are now the foundation of
the island’s burgeoning. econio— :
my. :

But one of Abaco’ s attrac. .
tions for boat-owners is its rich
fishing grounds.

“Finding a balance between’
recreational fishing and com- ‘
mercial fishing has never been
easy,” said the source. _ .

“However, there is no doubt |
that tourists raid lobster traps .





bt

gal, it’s certainly unethical.”

eke i 24

ame Nea es a oo SP km tL AB te She












THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 , PAGE 7







In brief

Arrest
following
shooting

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have arrested a
26-year-old man in connection
with a gunshot injury sustained
by a 32-year-old male resident
of Garden Villas.

According to reports, the vic-
tim, Godfrey Saunders of Wed-
dell Avenue, was shot in the
knee sometime around 11.30am
on Wednesday.

Police Superintendent Basil
Rahming said that after the
shooting, the suspect fled the
scene in a white Toyota Camry.

Despite being wounded,
Saunders gave chase in a white
Buick, Supt Rahming said.

He said officers from the
Mobile Patrol Division, the
Central Detective Unit and the
Flying Squad responded.

The Mobile Patrol officers
intercepted the white Camry on
Coral Road and took the dri-
ver into custody.

Saunders was also intercepted
on East Sunrise Highway.

He was removed from his
vehicle, placed into an ambu-
lance and taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he is
in stable condition.

Another man is assisting
police with their investigations
into the matter.

Police
discover
firearms.
stash

e Police made a firearms find
in the Pinewood Gardens area
on Tuesday afternoon.

Officers say they arrested
someone around 6pm after find-
ing a sawn-off, 12-gauge Mos-
berg shotgun which had its.ser-
ial number erased.

Investigations are ongoing.

Sears claims new
police act will bring
accountability _

THE proposed amend-
ments to the Police Service
Act would bring a much-
needed regime of account-
ability, transparency and
oversight to the force accord-
ing to Minister of Education
Alfred Sears.

Making his contribution to
the debate on the amend-
ments, Mr Sears said there is
an understandable and justi-
fied call for transparency and
accountability in all execu-
tive agencies of the state.

In a democratic country,
the minister went on to say,
the guardians of peace must
always be accountable to
parliament and the sovereign
people of the country.

“The police, in carrying
out its functions, must do so
in accordance with the laws
of the Bahamas,” said Mr
Sears, quoting from a section
of the Act. “The police must
observe and respect the fun-
damental rights and free-
doms of the individual as laid
down in the Constitution.”

He pointed out that the
police are also charged with

observing the rights af visi-.

tors and undocumented per-
sons in the country — as those
persons are recognised by the
Constitution as having funda-
mental rights and freedoms.
“What we are seeking to
do in the Bill is to declare to
the world that under our
Constitution, torture is ille-
gal,” Mr Sears said. “The

‘Constitution is very explicit

in saying that torture is not

’ punishment and that no per-

son in our country, irrespec-
tive of their status in our
country should be subjected
to torture.”

The fact that the commis-

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sioner of police and other offi-
cers are supporting the Bill is
“testimony of the maturity and
commitment of the police ser-
vice to uphold the rule of law
and order of our country,” he
said.

Mr Sears pointed out that the

Bill proposes six levels of

accountability to ensure trans-
parency, which set out clear
mechanisms to maximise the
efficiency of the police service.

Within these levels, there are
provisions for an internal and








external inspector, an inspec-
torate, and a complaints and
corruption unit which will inves-
tigate all complaints of corrup-
tion claims in the service.
Reminding the members of
the House that they derive their
legitimacy from the “sovereign
exercise” of the Bahamian peo-

ple every five years, Mr Sears |

said that he wished there was a
provision of accountability in
all branches of government —
because “there are too many
times ‘our citizens complain
about the lack of responsive-
ness in our public institutions.”






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HE TRIBUNE

BEFORE the FNM became the major

“political force it is today, it began as a small

‘: breakaway troop from the PLP.
However, if the founding fathers had

been opportunists, as those in other
‘so-called political parties today, I doubt that

we would have a formidable opposition.
According to historian John Berryman,
the groundwork for the FNM occurred.in
1970 when eight PLP members (Dissident
Eight) led by Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield
left the PLP, then the governing party, to

_form the Free PLP.

These non-conformists maintained that

‘they broke away because the PLP was

squandering money and creating
circumstances that would increase
joblessness.

Berryman states that in 1971, the Free
PLP and the UBP unified to shape the Free
National Movement. Its leader was Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield. After this point, the
UBP no longer existed, leading to the FNM
becoming the official opposition party in
1972.

However, all was not glossy within the
FNM. Mr Berryman notes that before the
1977 general election, there was a split
which resulted in the formation of the
Bahamian Democratic Party (BDP).

After the election, the PLP won 30 seats,
the BDP six and the FNM two. He states
that further opposition infighting, in 1980,
led many to believe that a viable option to
the PLP government was a distant dream.

In his book, The Bahamas, Berryman
writes that only the diminutive and
outspoken Vanguard Nationalist and
Socialist Party (VNSP), whose agenda was
to restructure the wealth of the country
from the affluent to the poor, served as any
challenge to the government during the
years of instability within the FNM.

With Sir Kendal Isaacs and Sir Cecil at
the helm of the FNi#@ in 1982, most
members of the BDP reunited with them,
feeling, as Berryman writes, that it was
‘Time for Change’.

Even with a new platform, the FNM was
sacked in the general elections by the PLP,
whose battle ery was ‘Step Now to the New
Frontier’. That year, the PLP won 32 seats
to the FNM’s eleven.

The FNM was to be defeated again in
1987, before being victorious in the 1992
general election, under the lgadershiE of
Hubert Ingraham.

Historian Don Maples notes that several
factors led to the PLP’s defeat:



Mr Ingraham’s political skills, Sir Lynden’s
misjudgment about the political climate,
mounting unemployment, allegations of
corruption and ineptitude, anda
floundering economy.

As recently as 2002, the FINM was
crushed in a landslide victory for the PLP.
Again, the public lost confidence in the
party, due to the leadership vacuum,
allegations of corruption and
mismanagement and the over-inflated,
self-serving egos of certain FNM politicians.

Last year, the party was again divided by
a leadership clash, which resulted in
Mr Ingrahami’s return to control of the
party. Yet, through the adversity, FNMs are
pushing on to the next election confident
that they will be the next government.

So, now that ve examined the struggles
of the FNM over a 35-year span, why won't
the leaders of the CDR stay the course,
especially if they are genuinely interested in
providing Bahamians with a feasible third
option? Could it be opportunism?

In the May 9, 2006, edition of The
Tribune, tt was reported that the FNM wa
courting CDR leader Charles Maynard anid

chairman Phenton Neymour. Even the
former head of the party's public relations,
Stephen Mitchell, bluntly stated: “Maynard
and Neymour seem to be headed to the
FNM.”

With the FNM taking no chances and

_trying to absorb the CDR leaders to secure

its votes, other so-called leaders
be now prepared to jump ship as

Dr Bernard Nofiage did last year, thereby,
heightening the notion that these men are
opportunists whose only interes? is
self-aggrandisement.

Based on Mr Maynard’s statements this
week, it seems he disbelieves that he can
“survive in politics or make a real
contribution” with the CDR.

So, as election time approaches, the
CDR can be compared to-a ship without a
rudder.

It is interesting to see the hybrid party
the FNM is now becoming in ihe lead up to
the elections, with Mr Maynard and others
reportedly being invited fo rum as
candidates. :

However, Mr Maynard, why won't you
and Bernard Nottage heed the old adage
that the captain should be the last to
abandon ship? i :



ppear to

ADRIAN GIBSON

afhahama@hatmailcom




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FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 9

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE







( Brea

Jt cS 4 pile

Good Books Unbound








STORY SO FAR: The children had been
running their one-room school but Mr. Jor-
dan of the school board closed the school
and called a school board meeting to keep it
closed.

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
The School Board Meets

‘HE school board meeting took

place the very next evening.
On a bench brought forward for the
occasion sat the four members of the
Elk Valley School Board. Mr. Jordan
was there. So too was Mr. Hawkins,
the Methodist Church minister, a roly-
poly man, too large for the dark suit he
wore. Ebeneezer Morris, sheep ranch-
er, was there, dressed in his working
clothes. By his side was Mr. Plum-
stead, head of the Elk Valley Bank,
looking very formal in his suit with
high white collar, tie, and wire frame
eyeglasses.

The eight worried children sat in a

row before the board. Behind them .

were their parents, plus some interest-
ed adults from the township.
Though Mr. Jordan was taken by sur-

_prise by all the people at the meeting,

he dared not say a word.

“Seems to me,’ he opened the meet-
ing by saying, “we’ve got a mess here.
This school was supposed to be closed.
These children were trespassing on
township property. And Ida Bidson
was pretending to be the teacher.”

“And I’m afraid,” interjected Mr.
Plumstead, “I saw Miss Fletcher lock
the front door. I gave the key to you,
Mr. Jordan. How did you children get
in?”

“Through the window,” Herbert
hooted.

“But may I ask,” Mr. Hawkins, the
minister, interrupted, “if there’s been
any damage done to the building? You
inspected it, Mr. Jordan. ny prob-
lems?”

“T can’t say there were,” Mr. Jordan
admitted. “But trespassing is trespass-
ing.”

“Now, now,” cut in Mr. Morris.
“These children were just trying to get
on with their education. Fact is, Mr.
Jordan, I didn’t even know Miss Fletch-
' er was gone. Leastways you never told
me. Did you know?” he asked the
minister.

“Only recently.”

“Too late to get a replacement,” Mr.

The Tribune

The Secret School



WRITTEN BY AVI
ILLUSTRATED BY BRIAN FLOCA



“S

MAX

a CA A \

+

J ordan growled. “Didn't want to both-
er you.’
. “Fine.” Mr. Morris said. “But I can’t

see how these kids did any real harm..

Fact, ?d say they were doing what we
want — learning. More power to them.”
The audience applauded.

Looking uncomfortable, Mr. Jordan .

said, “But this girl,” he pointed to Ida,
“this Ida Bidson was pretending to be a
teacher. Can’t pay the girl if she’s got

- no license.”

“Did we pay her?” called someone
from the audience.

“Course not,” Mr. Jordan said. “She
isn’t licensed.

“Then she saved us a heck of a lot of.

money, didn’t she?” said Mr. Morris.
‘The room erupted into laughter.
Ida raised her hand.
“What do you want?” Mr. Jordan
‘demanded.

“May I say something, please?” she

said.
_ “T don’t know as how .

“Oh, let the girl speak, > Mr. Morris
suggested. “After all, you have accused
her of something.”

The other men on the board nodded.

Ida rose up from her bench seat. “Mr.
Jordan, we didn’t mean any harm.. It’s
just that both Tom and I want so bad-
ly to go on: He’s going to be an electric
specialist. I’m to be a teacher. But we
need schooling for that. The other
children wanted to get on, too, not
repeat anything. Tom and I need to

take the exam so we can go to high

school. We did everything by votes.
Majority always ruled.”

“You can say that again,” Herbert
cried out.

rain;

“I would like,” Ida went on:
recite a brief poem we learnéd.”

“We don’t do poetry at School Béard

Meetings,” Mr. Jordan said gruffly.

“Might be a‘good thing if we did,”
Mr. Hawkins said.

Red faced, ‘Mr. Jordan said, “Well,
do your piece.”

Ida, hands extended, gesturing dra-
matically as she spoke, began: “Sowing
and Reaping.’
Procter.

‘Sow with a generous hand;

Pause not for toil and pain;

Weary not through the heat of sum-

‘mer,

Weary not through the cold spring

But wait till the autumn comes:
For the sheaves of golden grain.

Scatter the seed, and fear not,

A table will be spread;

What matter if you are too weary
To eat your hard-earned bread;
Sow, while the earth is broken,
‘For the hungry must be fed.’” __

Ida paused, then said, “Please, sirs,
the term is almost over. Miss
Sedgewick from the County Education
Office said she’d come and test us all.
We’d appreciate it-if you just gave us
the chance to pass. And,” she added,
“if we can’t meet at the schoolhouse,
we’ll meet elsewhere anyway. But
being here would make it official.”

There was great applause from the
crowd, even some stamping of feet.

As Ida sat down, Tom whispered,
“Great old job!”

The school board excused themselves

#0) abit

' going to let this ..

By Adelaide Anne —





and'went out to the porch. While they
were conferring, everyone else grouped -..
around Ida, congratulating her.
Finally, the school board men
trooped back in and sat down. ~

“We’ve had our discussion,” a grim- |*|.
“We're .

looking Mr. Jordan began:
. pretend school go
forward for two weeks. So the children |
can take their exams. No more.”
There were chee. from the audi- :
ence. — }
Ida stood up. “Thank—”
Mr. Jordan held up a hand. “But

‘there are conditions. First: the fami- | a

lies involved must take responsibility
for the building. Second, we expect ;
every child to pass their exams. If they
don’t, let the whole Valley know, it'“
won't be the board’s doing. It'll be the -
teacher’s.”

( Continued on Tuesday)

Please direct’ requests for a
teacher's guide (cost $7) containing
vocabulary words, story questions,
and newspaper. activities to The Tri-
bune’s marketing department on
Shirley Street, by calling 502-2394 or

DY e-mailing nie@tribunemedia. net

Text canyrisht © 2000 Avi

Illustrations copyright © 2000 Brian Floca
Reprinted by permission of Breakfast Serials,
Inc.

www.breakfastserials.com











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THE TRIBUNE

| otoy.\ ie Tie)

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 11



Con artist killer Kimes
seeks new trial in U

|
KILLER and con-artist Sante
Kimes, who is believed to have
drowned a banker in the bath at
her Cable Beach home, is seek-
ing a new trial in California over
the shooting of a family friend.
Her lawyer has argued that
jurors were not fully instructed
on the effect of accomplice tes-
timony when she was jailed for
life Jast year for the murder of
businessman David Kazdin.
Kimes, 71, was convicted~~
after her son and companion-

in-drime Kenny, 30; turned ~~

state’s evidence by confirming
that she told him to shoot
Kazdin after he had uncovered
a Idan fraud in which she had
forged his signature.

During his testimony, Kenny
Kimies also revealed that he and
his mother had drowned banker
Syed Bilal Ahmed at their
Cable Beach home in 1996.

Yhis occurred after Ahmed
had flown to Nassau from the
Cayman Islands to investigate
“irregularities” in a bank
account in her late husband’s
name. ;

Kenny Kimes said Ahmed’s
body was dumped at sea, a sto-
ry not believed by their neigh-
bours at Sulgrave Manor, who
think he was buried in the
grounds at their home.

The former Kimes home is
now derelict and its garden
overgrown,

‘At this week’s hearing, a
Kimes*attorney argued that
Sante deserved a new. trial in
the California case beeause ~
jurors were not fully instructed
on the effect of accomplice tes=~
timony.

The district court of appeal
was told by lawyer Seymour
Amster that the trial judge
erred by not telling jurors that
several witnesses were accom-
plices and conspirators.

Mr Amster argued to the
appellate panel that Los Ange-
les Superior Court Judge Kath-
leen Kennedy-Powell should
have told the jury that these wit-
nesses were potentially liable
for the murder.

‘He said that when the trial
judge instructed the jury on




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accomplices, she should have
listed the names of these wit-
nesses as being accomplices.

Mr Amster argued that the
witnesses were involved in
Kimes’ conspiracy to commit
bank fraud, and that Kazdin
was murdered in furtherance of
the conspiracy, specifically to
cover-it up. ~ -

The panel seemed doubtful,
asking whether the witnesses
‘knew of the murder; and-how—
that would clear Kimes. It said
the judge totd the jury: to-con--
sider the credibility of the wit-
nesses, given their involvement
in the fraud.

Mr Amster said witnesses
knew that documentary evi-
dence was being destroyed to
cover up the fraud, and that
Kazdin’s testimony was poten-
tially the most damaging evi-.
dence. The panel questioned
whether that was a real leap, ©
from destroying documents to
destroying a person.

Deputy District Attorney
Michael Johnsen argued that
any error was harmless, as there
was “abundant corroborative
evidence” with regard to Kenny
Kimes’ testimony. He also
argued that any error was
waived because Kimes’ trial
attorney did not seek an accom-
plice instruction listing the
names of witnesses.

He also argued that there
was no evidence that the wit-
nesses would have foreseen a
murder.

Sante and Kenny-Kimes 7

were both convicted of Kazd-
‘in’s murder: Their victim’s-body-
was left in a dumpster near Los
Angeles International Airport.

The pair got life without
parole to add to the 100-plus
years sentences they received
for murdering New York
socialite Irene Silverman in
1998,

Sante is now serving ier sen-
tence in California while Kenny
is in solitary confinement in
New York, having been addi-
tionally punished for taking a
television reporter hostage dur-
ing an interview.

Kenny was a student at St













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THE TRIBUNE






FROM page one

The matter with the FAA has
since been cleared up, he told
The Tribune.

According to Mr Wilson,
the aircraft next experienced
mechanical difficulties, and as
the procurement of parts was
not such a straightforward
matter, it has now been sent
abroad to be serviced.

Whether or not the aircraft
is appropriate to fly is a mat-
ter of opinion, said Mr Wil-
son.

Answering claims that the
force does not have qualified

pilots to fly the King Air 350°

craft, Mr Wilson said: "We
assure the country that the
commander of the airwing
was specifically trained to fly
the aircraft, as he has had spe-
cific theoretical and hands-on
training. Additionally, there
would have to be a person
who is qualified to fly second,
and we have such a person."
As to the craft's reconnais-
sance capabilities not being
suitable for the Bahamas, Mr
Wilson said Mr Smith's view
is only one view. He
explained the other view that
was given to government: "If

- you are dealing with recon-

naissance, you don't want to
be flying too low so that the

Man is shot in neck

FROM page one.

ment, and that his wounds were described as being “not life threat-

ening”.’

In other crime related matters, the body that was found in the
Stapeldon Gardens drea.on Wednesday evening has been identified
as 44-year-old Debron Capron-of Sea Breeze Lane.

The cause of death is still: unknown, but police are treating the
matter as a “suspicious death”. However Mr Ferguson said that they
have no reason to beliéve that foul play is involved at this stage of

their investigations.

Also at around 1.50 yesterday morning, police, acting on infor-
mation, executed a warrant on a house in the Nassau Village area
where they discovered a handgun, ammunition, and a small amount
of marijuana. Thrée persons were arrested, and a 9mm pistol with
nine live rounds of ammunition were also seized.

PERE

The Light

*, wee

SSS ae os 255 SY
a get SS is Lo
Seeae CaaS OM OS

In Memoriam

LOCAL NEWS

Call for answers

drug boys can see you. If you
are looking for slow motion
Haitian vessels, that is fine,
but if you are looking for bul-
let fast drug boats, you don't
need to fly at or below 10,000
ft."

“What has not yet hap-
pened, because we have not
been in funds to do it, is that
the aircraft has to be supplied
with modern surveillance
equipment that would allow
it to do surveillance at an alti-
tude above 10,000 ft," said Mr
Wilson.

Mr Wilson said he remem-
bered when the former
administration was criticized
for its purchase of two large
vessels —- HMBS Nassau and
Bahamas.

"The same thing applies to
the Defence Force plane," he
said. "You have to take
something that is already
manufactured and determine,
given what we have to do, if
this piece of equipment fits
that prescription best.

"That is the modality that
we used in the purchase of the
large boats, and that is the
modality that we used in the
purchase of the aircraft," Mr
Wilson said. "There are diver-
gent views about the aircraft,
and what we did was take the
best advice that we could get,
and that advice told us that
this aircraft would have been
the best for the job that we

have overall."



<3 ‘nares

Fach day you looked out the window |
And saw the rising sun.

It shone so bright and brilliant

Until cach day was done -

The sky was clean, the wind so pure
Giving a feel. of tranquility

Life blooming everwhere _-
Butterllies flying ever so free

Then from nowhere came the clouds
Filled with anger and dismay

Bringing rain, thunder and lightening bolts
Leaving nota single ray

What a somber mood it can create
Nothing but darkness from above

Left to live fife without the light

You came to know and love

But thea you sit and ponder

The rain that. caused so much sorrow

May bring flowers, trees and clear the air

For perhaps.a brighter tomorrow

‘And even though the: pain remains

From the storm that came your way

It can’t take away your:precious memory
suinity cay.

=. From Wes, Owen, Gavin &



SA
07

SE, tht brit

Genevie Eloise Bastian

1948 - 2005 | ou

BY:
a SEN
"SG, Ss

Seow






RD Oo

bo

9S
Ey. &
Co LSP











Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resorts

Pa protesting

Invites applications for the position
ios Of
Director of Marketing

All applicants must possess the following Attributes

_ Excellent Leadership Skills
Excellent Communication Skills

- Excellent Interpersonal Skills
Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills
Excellent Organizational Skills







The successful applicant must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible, with top
notch propriety. Minimum three (3) years experience as Director of
Marketing or Asst.-with proven track record and statistics.

Compensation package includes:






Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost
Attractive Bonus Plan
Medical Coverage
Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)






Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591





PS MAY 12, 2006, PAGE.13
MP to ask
Roberts




FROM page one

vation of the Central Andros High School in
2002 thai has been going on from 2002 to now.
I don’t know why these guys, up to 2006, still
are doing renovation work in the school in
Central Andros,” Mr Bannister said.

There were contracts also, lie said, given out
for the High Rock Primary School in Septem-
ber last year to last for six weeks.

“And this is now May and this job has not.
been completed as yet. Another job was given
out to a supporter in Deep Creek Primary
School to renovate for six weeks and up to

now the job has not been completed.

“I expect a government to look out for their
supporters, but if you are going to spend the
taxpayers’ money you should spend it wisely
and if you’re going to give it to your supporters
give it to your supporters who can do the
work,” the MP said.



Viva Wyiidham Fortuna Beach Resorts

Invites applications for the position
Of
Director of Sales

All applicants must possess the foliowing Attributes

Excellent Leadership Skills
Excellent Communication Skills
Excellent Interpersonal Skills
‘Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills
Excellent Organizational Skills
In-depth Knowledge and Experience of Points/Credits System

The successful applicant must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible. Three (3)
years minimum experience as Director of Sales or Asst. with proven track
record and statistics

Compensation package includes:

Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost :
Attractive Bonus Plan
Medical Coverage
Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)

Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006





Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

DEATH NOTICE _

IONA MARY WOOD STRACHAN
an accomplished and well-known master musician and youngest
daughter of the late George Herbert Wood and the late Sarah
Ann Roker Wood of Gregory Town Eleuthera and Nassau
Bahamas died at her home in Miami Florida on Tuesday May .
9th 2006. She was 75 years.






























Mrs. Strachan began her musical career in Nassau Bahamas.
As a young woman she was an avid and active singer, pianist,
organist and saxophonist, who committed her musical talents
to the Lord and St. Joseph Catholic Church, Nassau Bahamas



Mrs. Strachan married the late Lester Wilfred Strachan and
the family migrated to Miami Florida where she advanced her
professional musical career and furthered her career as a music
teacher. Mrs. Strachan Willingly and unselfishly continued a
life of dedication and unselfish musical service to the Holy
Redeemer Catholic Church, Miami Florida and numerous other
churches throughtout Dade and Broward Counties for over fifty
years and until her retirement. She was awarded many certificates
by the Catholic Community and by the Governor of Florida for her contributions and
services to the Florida Community.

Funeral Services for Mrs. Strachan will be held on Saturday 13th May 2006 at 10am
at the Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Miami, Florida.






























IONA MARY WOOD STRACHAN is survived by two sons: Anthong and Patrick

Strachan. one grandson: Stephen Strachan, Jr. one sister Ruth Wood Adderley. one
brother: James Wood. nephews: H. Arnold Wood, Thomas G. Wood; Richard and
Freddie Wood, Philip G. Fletcher. nieces: M. Veronica Seymour, Agnes Wood Hepburn
and Catherine R. Collie Johnson. Irene Wood, Sarah H. Albertha Thompson Targley,
Gail Maroon, Joan and Rose Wood. nephews-in-law: Harry Seymour, Hubert Hepburn,
Rufus Johnson, nieces-in-law: Shirley Wood, Bethsheba Wood, Melvine Wood. Grand
nephews and grand nieces: Ester Isabel, Edward Arnold, Francis Wood Collie, Arthur
Wood, Aris Wood Munroe, Verna Wood, Dario Wood, Bradley Wood, Roderick Wood,
George Seymour, Iona V. Seymour Higgs, Donna Hepburn Cherry, Gary Ephraim
Wood, Darian Wood, Tracy Wood Martin, Kent Wood, Terrance Wood, Thomas G,
Wood Jr.. Charles E. Wood, Sheldon Wood, Marvin Wood, Monet Wood, Kason
Wood, Catherine R. Wood, Tonia Wood Bain, Jeunessa Wood Morgan, Rose Wood
Collie, Kinshell Collie Delaney, Ingrid Collie Hart, Sheletta, Lavette and Tomecko
Collie. Dr. Joseph Evans and family and the families of the late Rupert Wood and
the late Leroy Greenslade.
cousins: Florence Wood Bell, Ronald Wood, Millicent Wood, Ivy Davis, Elaine
Bernard, Corel Foster, Yvonne Farquharson and their families. Lester and Hugh
Rollins, Nurse Orville Rollins Gibson, Nurse Ruth Rollins Henry and Rosie Rollins;
Francois "Frank" and Herbert Guillaume, Nurse Yvonne McPhee Pratt, Marie A.G.
taylor, Hadassah Guillaume Thompson, Margaret Guillaume and their families.
Walton Taylor, Fredricka Leonard, Eloise Archer, Shiela Delancy, Sylvia Rollins,
Marsha Taylor and Barbara Cartwright and their families. The families of the late

’ Jermaih Wood, Abraham Wood, George Wood, Mary Anne Wood, Linda Wood, Isaac
Wood, Thomes Wood, Martha Wood, Rebecca Wood, Belinda Wood, Jacob Wood,
Rhonda Wood, Eleanor Newbold, Karen Ringo, Alvin, Raymond, Rory and Raynard
Newbold, The Olander family, Monica Hanna, Cassandra, Monya and Joseph Hanna
and Catherine Stubbs and family, Mrs. A Range and family and Charles Richardson
and family and other relatives and friends too numefous to mention.

LOCAL NEWS

Health officials voice at.
level of diabetes and complications

THE level of diabetes in the
Bahamas and complications
from the disease seen at the
Princess Margaret Hospital has
health officials “very con-
cerned”,

“We are having at least two
persons every month presenting
to us who require dialysis due
to kidney failure — all because
of diabetes,” said medical chief
of staff Dr Patrick Whitfield.

“We are seeing in our emer-
gency rooms many people who
are returning as a result of poor
management of diabetes and
hypertension.”

Dr Whitfield was speaking at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal’s fourth annual Patient Edu-
cation Seminar, themed “Dia-
betes — a touch of sugar” on
Wednesday.

Dr Cherilyn P Hanna, chief
consultant in the Department
of Family Medicine, unveiled
the Healthier Lifestyle Pass-
port, which given to those who
registered for the seminar.

Through it, patients are
assigned a special number and
can closely monitor their
weight, blood pressure, choles-
terol, glucose level and BMI.

Dr Whitfield said PMH.

health care providers are “very,
very concerned about the level
of diabetes in Bahamian soci-
ety.

“Apart from the effect it will
have on the long term quality
and length of life of persons,
we are also concerned about
the level of complications that
are presenting at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH).”:

The effects of diabetes, he
said, “in terms of admissions.in
intensive care, is a major con-
tributor to strokes and heart
attacks.

“Tam sure many of you.

would be aware of persons who
would have recently passed or
sustained strokes or heart
attacks, seemingly.at.a younger

and younger age..This.is..of..

very, grave concern to.us.”

Dr Hanna added that at least
10 per cent of the population
suffers from diabetes.

.., “Putting patients at the cen-

tre of their care has been shown -

to bring about better adherence
to treatment that we prescribe,
and much better outcomes in
the long run,” she said.

“Most important to this
approach is the education, with

# .,which our patients can under-

stand the disease, know why
we want them-to do the treat-
ment, know what to expect in
the long run and how they can
contribute to healthier lives.”

Located Coral. owers lobby, lower level

JLANTE

PARADISE ISLAND



THE TRIBUNE



@ HEALTH care providers at the Princess Margaret Hospital
supported the Patient Education Seminar on Wednesday :


















@ DR Cherilyn P Hanna, chief consultant in the Department of

Family Medicine, shows of the Healthier Lifestyle Passport. _..

Share your news|

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you are raising funds for a
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award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
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KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

-22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE

COLYN PATRICK
BYLES, 54

of Freeporty: Grand
Bahama, will bé\held at
St. Matthew's Anglican
Church, Shirley ‘and
Church Streets, Nassau
on Saturday,13th May,
2006 at 11:00am. Rev. Dr.
James Moultrie, assisted
.by Rev. Fr. and Don
Hayes will Officiate.
Cremation will follow.

































His survivors include his wife Sandra, son, Jason;
father, K. Patrick Byles; sister, Michelle White;
stepmother: Claudia Byles; stepsons: Scott, Devin
and Cristian Miller; grandsons: Jackson, Scott,
Sevin, Jacob, and Aiden Miller; grand daughters:
Scottia, Scindy and Tyler; uncle Alan Byles; aunt
Margarita Byles; brothers-in-law: Dr. George White
and Jefferson Turnquest; sisters-in-law: Lorraine
Turnquest; Step daughters-in-law: Melvern and
Pamela Miller; Nieces Monique Morant Wade;
Carla Whittingham and Debra White; nephews
Andre White, Gregg White, Robert Whittingham,
and Dr. Yusef Morant Wade; grand nieces and
grand nephews: Tristan White, Angelique White,
Jessica Whittingham and Brent Whittingham;
Cousins: David Byles of Miami, Florida; Ingrid
Byles of Miami, Florida, Debbie Byles-Bulzacchelli
of Florida, Kemuel Fountain and wife Lynn, Dereck
Fountain and wife Shirley, Michael Fountain and
wife Rosie, Gregory Fountain, Brenda Knowles
and husband Patrick numerous other relatives
and friends, incuding Patricia Treco, Jim Berg of
Florida, Clover and P. Anthony White, and Patricia
Darville.




The family request that donations be sent to St
Matthew's Day Care Centre For The Aged-or The
Ranfurly Home For Children, P.O. Box N-1413,
Nassau or PACE Foundation P.O. Box N963 In
memory of Colyn P. Byles.



ee oF
Sets





HE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

iurricane relief.
-As usual; the-ministries of Education.and Health ..

‘ yill end up with the largest portion of the budget.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said that government has
yeen doing a good job holding off on spending.

“There‘have been very little changes in tax rates
‘or the entire term so the government could not be
iccused of over taxing and spending and, second-
y, the Bahamas has an overall economic growth
rom 1 per cent in the first year and is projected to
srow for up to five per cent maybe this year,” Mr
Smith said.

The economy, he said, like the economies of
most western countries are on the upswing.

“The US economy is performing well, which
always bodes well for us in the sense that when
they have rising disposable income then they trav-
el more. The Bahamas has been able over the
years to attract a number of foreign direct invest-
ments. So the Bahamas, based on those two macro
indicators, is performing quite well,” Mr Smith
said.

Nevertheless, the state minister said that you
can expect very little in the way of surpluses in this
next budget. :

“In the budget itself you will not see anything
different than you have seen before. The nature of

: the budget does not permit that kind of flexibility.

Sixty per cent of it is committed in advance to
salaries and pension benefits and maybe another 17
to 18 per cent of it is debt service and when you
factor in contractual obligations like leases and
rents it does not leave you much flexibility; so you
will have to look into the capital budget for any-
thing new and of course in the capital budget you
usually seg.a continuation of projects that started
two or three years ago and maybe an accelera-
tion of construction in new school or docks and
provision‘directly for hurricane relief,” Mr Smith
said.

With government boasting the signing of bil-
lions of dollars worth of heads of agreements séme
have questioned whether the Bahamian economy
may become inflated whet these developments-.
actually translate into jobs.

However, Mr Smith said that there will be little
chance of this happening.

“In 1996 -97 we saw exactly what happens with
that kind of investment with the Atlantis phase
one, phase two projects. What happens is that
people who are employed make good salaries and
begin to bring in a lot of imports so the taxes tend
to go up and the deficit is usually reduced. Because

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Bahamian economy

the economy is open you tend to see in the
Bahamas not inflationary pressures because we
import everything we consume — almost, and
there is no shortage of places to import from,”
the-state minister said. - Te te

At the beginning of March the Ministry of
Finance sends out a request to various ministries
and departments to start putting together their
“wish list” for the coming fiscal year..

In the meantime MOF has a detailed look at
the country’s revenue position to determine what
resources government is likely to have over the

next fiscal year.

Ministry budgets, Mr Smith said, are approved .
based on the resources a government has in hand

to spend irrespective of what the wants are.

“We would do a revenue analysis which we have
compiled and we will make the overall estimate for
the 06 -07 budget which would include any rec-
ommendations for increase taxes or increased tax
administration, a kind of ‘best case worst case sce-
nario’. :

“Once we have established a figure, then we
look at the other macro indicators, like the expect-
ed GDP. growth and our debt profile,” Mr Smith
said...

Recently the Bahamas economy has received
favourable ratings from agencies like Moody’s and
the IMF, but Mr Smith said that comments from
these entities have very little to do with budget
preparation.

“You will hear about it during the debate
because the government says they are doing well
and the opposition says it’s doing poorly, as is
usual, and they will buttress their arguments with
that but the rating agencies, in reconfirming a rat-
ing, we can expect that the bonds we have out
there will continue to attract reasonable rates,”
he said.

Keeping the Bahamas’ debt service ratio down
has been a constant source of concern for all gov-
ernments because of the openness of the economy
and the vulnerability of the economy to external
factors.

“If we were to get into areas where it gets real-
ly tight and we have a fall off like we had in 9-11,
‘then it could’be a problem because we generate
-most of our revenue at the border and any reduc-
tion of inflows like what we had when we stopped
the planes from coming in, we see the immediate
fall off and that is a very vulnerable position to be
in particularly fora county with an economy struc-
ture like the Bahamas. So we.try to keep the debt
to.GDP very low in case we need to put in place

quickly any emergency funding,” Mr Smith said.

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006



MR. GODFREY SHERMAN
Acting General Manager

Mr. Sherman joined the Water and Sewerage Corporation
in 1977 as an Assistant Engineer. From 1977 he served
in several sections of the Corporation including Engineer-
ing and Planning and various sections of the Operations
’ and Maintenance Department. In 1989 he was promoted
to Senior Manager/Sewerage Section. In 1991 he was
promoted to Assistant General Manager/New Providence
Operations and remained an Assistant General Manager
until 1999 when he was promoted to Acting Deputy
General Manager. Mr. Sherman graduated from North-
eastern University, Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a
Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering with an
Environmental Focus. In April/May 1991 he attended the



University of Pittsburgh’s intensive five-week Manage- _

ment Program for Executives. Also, in 1996, he attended Harvard University’s School of
Business Administration Program for Executive Management. Mr. Sherman is a member of
several professional bodies including the Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association and the
Bahamas Society of Professional Engineers. He has travelled and trained extensively in the
Water and Wastewater Industry. In April 2004, Mr. Sherman was assigned to the post of Deputy
General Manager/Systems Bperatlons and Control, and is now the Acting General Manager of
the Corporation.

MRS. SANDRA EDGECOMBE
Deputy General Manager of Finance

Mrs. Sandra Edgecombe joined the Corporation in 1982
as a Management Trainee in the Accounts Section after
completing studies at Lester B. Pearson College, Canada

mental in forming the Cost and Budget Section, now

and then as Financial Accountant. Other studies over the
years have included Executive Development Programs at



Senior Manager of the Business Office, a role that focused heavily on improving, customer
~ services. In 1999, she was appointed Assistant General Manager of Customer Services (now
called Commercial Operations), reporting to the General Manager. Mrs. Edgecombe expresses
her delight and appreciation at being afforded the opportunity: to be the Corporation’s first Chief
Financial Officer. This, she believes, is as much a testimony to her team’s performance as it is

to her own, adding that the Corporation is comprised of many very talented, Intelligent and

motivated staff who are eager to aed the Corporation excel.

sed
a. te

MR. DONALD DEMERITTE



and Lycee Camargue, France. In 1985, she was instru-

called the Management Accounts Department. After.
successfully completing her CPA examinations in 1988, -

she headed the Accounts Section first as Accountant II Assistant General Manager with responsibility for Human Resources, Employee Relations, Industrial Relations,

the National University of Singapore and Kellogg Gradu- : ‘THE NEW WSC EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM - (Pictured from right to left) -- Mr. Godfrey E. Sherman,
ate School of Management, Northwestern University. In:

1995 Mrs. Edgecombe was assigned the new portfolio of

THE TRIBUNE























































Mr. Christopher Sherman
Deputy General Manager, Engineering & Planning





Mr. Christopher Sherman began his career at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation as a draughtsman in July 1977. Following his promotion to
the post of Assistant Engineer he was relocated to North Andro: ‘i
November of 1981 where he headed the first wellfield expansion in’ at
‘island. He later returned to Nassau where he was stationed in he
Engineering & Planning section. In July of 1985, due to his continued
outstanding performance, he was promoted to the position of Engineer.
Among the numerous projects to which he contributed as Engineer is
the Yellow Elder Gardens/Big Pond Construction project. He has also
been involved with the coordination and management of the Second
World Bank program and is particularly knowledgeable in project
management and contract administration. In 1991 Mr. Sherman was
promoted to Assistant General Manager/Engineering and Construction
’ joining the Executive Management Team of the Corporation. He was later transferred in 1996 to lead the New
Providence Operation with prime responsibilities for Water Supply, Leakage Control, Sewerage and the Distri-
bution network until 2004 when he returned to the Engineering & Planning Division and assumed leadership
of that division.
Mr. Sherman holds a Bachelor of Science degree i in Civil Engineering from the University of Windsor, Ontario,
_ Canada. In addition he has attended numerous technical and management courses, seminars and confer-
ences that have broadened his horizons tremendously in the engineering field. Among these was the intensive
five-week Management Program for Executives at the University of Pittsburgh in April/May 1991 and the
Water Industry Training Association Programme in the U.K. in 1986. He is a member of the Canadian Society
of Civil Engineers, an associate member of the Institution of Civil Engineering (U.K.), graduate member of the
Bahamas Institute of Professional Engineers, and a member of the American Water Works Association.




MRS. DAPHNE SIMMONS
Senior Assistant General Manager of Human Resources

Mrs. Simmons joined the Corporation in 1999 as Assistant General
Manager with responsibility for Human Resources, Employee Relations,
Industrial Relations and Training. Mrs. Simmons brings a wealth of know!-
edge and experience to the Corporation having worked in the Public and
Private Sectors both in New Providence and Grand Bahama including
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Probation Department/Ministry of Home |
Affairs, Department of Labour (Industrial Relations Officer), Franklin
Chemicals/Gist Brocades (Personnel Officer) and the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (Human Resources Manager 1989-1999). She has a diploma.
from the University of Nairobi, Kenya (East Africa) having studied African
culture (History, and Geography). She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in
‘Psychology/Sociology from the University of Detroit, and trained in the
University of Miami's offshore Graduate Program in Counseling. Addition-
ally she holds a certificate i in Public Administration, Negotiating Strategies and has attended numerous local and
external courses relative to her functional responsibilities. In April 2004, Mrs. Simmons was promoted to Senior

and Training. Added to her exiting duties are the new responsibilities of Public Relations and Administration.

Acting General Manager; Mrs. Daphne L. Simmons, Senior AGM/Human Resources Division; Dr. Richant
V. Cant, Consultant; Mr. Elwood L. Donaldson, Senior AGM/Internal Control and Compliance; Ms. Cheri M.
Hanna, AGM/Commercial Operations; Mr. Philip J. Beneby, AGM/Business Development; Mrs. Sandra B.
Edgecombe, Deputy General Manager/Finance; Mr. Robert C. Deal, AGM/Family Islands; Mr. Christopher
B. Sherman, Deputy General Manager/ Engineering & Planning; Mr. Glen F. Laville, Acting Deputy General ;
Manager/New Providence Operations.







FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

SECTION

business @tribunemedia.net



BU

=
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Stree



o





Bidder seeks answers

e

from the Government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

onsolidated Water’s
most senior executives
yesterday said they will
be seeking answers
from the Government
over “the next two or three days”
regarding the proposed Arawak Cay
reverse osmosis plant, with the BISX-
listed firm maintaining its bid for the
multi-million dollar contract.

Jeffrey Parker, Consolidated
Water’s chairman, said in a confer-
ence call with Wall Street analysts:
“We're still got the Arawak Cay bid
in there, and there’s been no notifi-
cation of what the Government
intends to do after Blue Hills.

We hope to get a little more clari-
fication on that in the next two to
three days while we’re in Nassau.”

Mr Parker and Rick MacTaggert,
Consolidated Water’s president and
chief executive, are currently in Nas-
sau to attend a Board of Directors
meeting at its Waterfields subsidiary,
which was held yesterday. .

Waterfields owns the existing
Windsor reverse osmosis plant in Nas-
sau, and is also constructing the $29
million Blue Hills plant - the first of
three planned for New Providence -

_which will eliminate the need to barge
water to the island from the Andros
wellfields. . ey

The Arawak Cay plant was due to

Rival bids submitted —

be the second
plant con-
structed, and .
was intended
to supply both
Kerzner Inter- |
national’s $730 |
million. Phase |
III expansion
on Paradise |
Island and |
Baha Mar’s |
$1.6 billion |
Cable Beach

redevelop- —_ gw JEFFREY
ment with

water via the PARKER

Water & Sewerage Corporation.
The plant was due to be construct-

ed by April 2007, the date when Phase

IL will be finished, but the Corpora:




tion is understood to have been nego- |
tiating with Kerzner International to.

move this date back because the win-
ning bidder for Arawak Cay has not
been chosen. ;

Mr McTaggert told The Tribune in
January that Consolidated Water was

advised that its bid and that of “a

competitor” for the Arawak Cay con-
tract had both been “annulled”, and
nothing had been heard since then.
The “competitor” was BK Water, a
group of Bahamian investors whose
principals include Jerome Fitzgerald,
the RND Holdings chairman; busi-
nessman Mark Finlayson, son of

entrepreneur Garet ‘Tiger’ Finalyson;



_and ex-Burns House chief financial

officer Phillip Kemp. At least two to
three other investors, whose names
are not known, are understood to be
involved in the BK Water group.

The same BK group and principals
are the ones who have offered $50
million to acquire Winn-Dixie’s 78
per cent stake in Bahamas Super-
markets, in the guise of BK Foods
(see other story ‘on Page 1B). .

If successful, The Tribune under-
stands that while BK Water would
own the Arawak Cay plant and sell
water to the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration, the plant’s operations would
be run by French company, Veolia
Enerserve, under a
management/operating partner agree-
ment. .

The Government is thought likely
to look favourably on any group with
Bahamian involvement, wanting to
place privatised infrastructure assets
into Bahamian hands as part of its
Bahamianisation policy.

There is also understood to be con-

‘cern about handing a second reverse

osmosis plant to Consolidated Water,
for fear that would give the company

‘Freeport Concrete ‘forgave’ |

a monopoly over water production
on New Providence.
However, some sources told The
Tribune that Consolidated Water's
bid was the lowest by $10 million,
providing the Corporation with the
greatest savings and consumers with

~ the lowest price. Yet this was disput-

ed by others, with some saying the
BK Water/Veolia bid was offering
extra services that Consolidated

’ Water did not propose to.

The Arawak Cay reverse osmosis
plant contract seems, to have been
caught up in the internal squabble at
the Water & Sewerage Corporation
between its chairman, Donald
Demeritte, and general manager
Abraham Butler. The Government
has yet to resolve the dispute satis-

_factorily.

Differences over who to award the
Arawak Cay contract to were alleged
to have been at the centre of the

men’s dispute, and the situation has

been picked up by opposition FNM

. Senators. ;

Tommy Turnquest on Wednesday

tabled questions in the Senate related.
to the Arawak Cay contract. He

for City Markets stake

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



AT least one rival bid for
Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake
in Bahamas Supermarkets was
submitted before yesterday
afternoon’s 5pm deadline, The
Tribune can reveal, meaning
that the battle for majority
ownership of the Bahamian
grocery retailer will move on to
Monday’s auction.

‘Tt is understood that the buy-
out group being put together

by Fidelity International Bank .

& Trust submitted its offer
before -yesterday’s deadline,
although it was not confirmed
whether it had met Winn-Dix-
ie’s qualifying criteria.

-It is likely to meet this,
though, meaning that at least
one bid will face the $50 mil-
lion previously offered by BK
Foods when Winn-Dixie con-
ducts its auction on Monday,
May 15, to determine who the
successful bidder is. *-

“BK Foods, the Bahamian
’ investor group whose princi-
pals are RND Holdings chair-
man Jerome Fitzgerald, Mark
Finlayson and ex-Burns House
chief financial officer Phillip

Kemp, have the ability to raise.

their offer, though.

Any rival bid’ will have to
exceed their original offer by at
least $1.5 million, meaning that
the Fidelity group would have
to offer at least $51.5 million.
This is because BK Foods
would receive a $1 million
break-up fée if Winn-Dixie
went with a rival offer, and sev-
eral sources suggested that
Fidelity’s group was likely to
offer around $54-$55 million.

The Tribune revealed previ-
ously that Neal & Massy Hold-
ings, the Trinidadian industrial
conglomerate with investments
in sectors ranging from retail to
financial servicesand automo-
tive industries, was part of a
group looking to structure an
offer for the Bahamas Super-
markets, which operates 12
stores under the City Markets
and Winn-Dixie brands.

Fidelity International Bank
& Trust, and its subsidiaries,
are understood to be acting as

‘corporate. advisers and struc-

turing the bid for the group
which, apart from Neal &

SEE page 5B

Rum Cay resort in ‘full
swing’ by September

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DEVELOPERS behind the $600-$700 million Rum Cay Resort
Marina project expect the project, which is staging its ground-
breaking today, to be “in full swing” on Phase I construction by

this September.

Montana Holdings, the Nassau-based real estate and devel-
opment firm behind the project, said Phase I would involye
developing the 80-slip marina, marina village and associated

condominiums and estates.

The second Phase will involve construction of the develop-
ment’s hotel and surrounding amenities, and the final phase will
complete the residential estates as well as expand the marina vil-

lage.

Montana Holdings said 300 workers would be employed dur-
ing peak construction, with the Phase II hotel scheduled to open
by 2010. Phase III and the Rum Cay Resort Marina’s full build-
out are planned for completion by 2016.



| By NEIL HARTNELL
| . Tribune Business"
|. Editor



“forgave” or wrote-off some
| 59 per cent of the debts owed
| to it by its Robin Hood sub-




59% of Robin Hood’s debts

FREEPORT Concrete’

sidiary when it sold its 90 per
cent stake in that retailer to
Sandy Schaefer and his buy-
out group, the company’s
2005 annual report reveals.

SEE page 5B






1] Consolidated Water wants ‘clarification’ |
on Arawak Cay reverse osmosis bid o :

asked the,Government to identify the.
original bidders; the results of the.

original bidding process; and the dates
the bids were due.

He also asked whether outside con-
sultants, Camp, Dresser & McKee,
reviewed the bids and what their find-

ings were, plus the review of the bids

conducted by the Corporation and
the Government’s Tender’s Board.
Mr Turnquest also asked whether

the original bids were annulled; why;

and whether the Government was
negotiating with any company. He
also questioned whether BK Water
was pre-qualified as a bidder for the
project.

Both reverse osmosis. plant con-
tracts have been embroiled in con-
troversy. ae

On the Blue Hills plant, which Con-
solidated Water won, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation and Camp,
Dresser & McKee both awarded the
bid to rival bidder; Biwater Interna-

tional. hy
However, that had to be approved:

by the Cabinet, which rejected the
Biwater selection. Consolidated
Water was eventually chosen.

Government policy negates

Public Accounts Committee

‘By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government’s decision to hide behind a legal opinion that
only documents tabled in the House of Assembly have to. be
submitted to the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) is blocking
attempts to hold it to account

for use of taxpayers’ money, the
committee’s chairman told The

‘SEE page 4B ©











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Some 400 full-time jobs will
be created by the development,
Montana Holdings said.

SEE page 6B

© 2004 ADWORKS





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ness, there is often very little about it
that will be attractive to investors.

* Your track record may be patchy.

* Your credit rating may be poor.

* You probably don’t have any col-
lateral against which you can borrow

money.

* You have already been turned
down by a bank for a loan.

* You don’t have enough money
to maintain the business in the first six
months of operation.

This is not an unusual situation for

entrepreneurs to find themselves in.

The harsh fact is that banks are usu-
ally not interested in lending money
to start-ups. This is usually for three



Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer

paid out, so have no demonstrable
way of servicing bank debt. Start-ups
do not have the capacity to pay back
the principal on the loans. Start-ups
do not have sufficient collateral to
pledge against the loans.

So, assuming you have scrimped
and saved and possibly put some of
your own assets into the venture, your
next option will be to look to friends
and family as the obvious choice of
funding. You will be in good compa-
ny, as more than 75 per cent of entre-
preneurs choose to be funded by
these three main sources of capital,
namely their own funds, funds from
friends and funds from family. |

Before you approach family and
friends, you must consider how deeply
you want them involved in your busi-
ness. Do you want them to be silent
investors, or do you want them in the
heart of your operation? This needs
careful consideration, as the cash that
friends and family inject is often one




friends and family can often cause
your relationship with them to go
downhill fast when things don't turn
out as planned. Unlike professional
investors, friends and family often are
not as pragmatic, bring past baggage
with them, and tend to overreact emo-
tionally to bad news.

So, how do you avoid problems
down the line. There are at least two
steps you must take.

First, you need to decide whether
you give your friends and family debt
or equity in the venture. _

Debt is when they invest in your
business by way of a loan. This can be
in the form of cash, or it could also be
them guaranteeing a loan. If you don’t
want your friends or family to be too
deeply involved in your business, then
this may be the best option.

Make sure you arrange to pay the
loan back as quickly as possible, and
that you budget to pay them interest
on the loan. If possible, pay your
interest quarterly, as this can give you
some breathing space should things go
slower than anticipated.

Equity is when they invest in your

business and you give them shares in
return. They effectively become own-
ers in the business just like you, and
are more intimately involved, shar-
ing profits and losses. One of the
advantages is that unlike a loan, you

the business. The disadvantage is that
as shareholders they have many more
rights than a silent investor, and they
could end up meddling in the run-
ning of your business. If you are one
of the few people that don’t mind
your family and friends teaching you
how to drive, then this may be the
option for you.

Agreement

Second, make sure you get your
agreement in writing, as this will cir-
cumvent difficult conversations nine
months down the line that could have
easily been avoided. A written agree-
ment will protect the parties in the
transaction and, depending on
whether it is a debt or equity invest-
ment, your agreement will need to

-cover the following areas:

For debt you should write a promis-
sory note that explains the parties to
the transaction; the amount loaned,
often known as the principal; when
and how the principal is going to be
repaid; how the interest will be cal-
culated; the timing of such debt ser-
vice; and what happens if you are late
in either principal or debt service.

To avoid any misunderstanding, it
may also be useful to state what level
of involvement the lender is entitled
to take in your business and the level

IO

For equity, you should write a >,

. shareholders agreement that explains. 7
voting rights; class of shares offered; ,-
. what happens if someone wants to; +>

35

sell; what happens in the event of «4 +3
death; and the basis of valuation of. ,,;+»

their investment. Again, it would be,

“ty
afd

useful to state the level of involve-|,.,-
ment and reporting. Your lawyer can ;;.;;,

help you do this.
Third, manage their expectations.
Explain to them that their investment

could go down as well as up. Telly

them that the worst case scenario 1S;-;;5

that they could lose their investment,;'

133

entirely should things go badly wrong, jy!
Getting them to understand this can j..,7;
help should things not turn, out. as, 57)

planned.

Professionally managing an invest-
ment by family and friends is impor-
tant for your future peace of mind

f

So, in order to avoid the trap of;
antipreneurship, make sure you spend § |
time on this area. You could raise ® !

valuable capital for your business, and *

_ maintain healthy relationships with §

your investors at the same time. i

NB: Adapted from his upcoming * |

book, Antipreneurship And How to
Avoid It, Mark draws on’20 years of ;
top level business, marketing and }
communications experience in Lon- *

- don and The Bahamas. He consults *

and can be contacted: at:markalex: ¢

reasons. Start-ups do not have an _ of the hardest transactions for you to ieee : i
established track record of cash flow manage. have no obligation to pay back an of reporting on the business that you palmer@mac.com 3
equity investor unless you dispose of © Mark Palmer.

showing money received and money





The reason is that investments with

/

Tourism and Development Board; Sheila Cox,
the NTDB; and David McGorrin, The Haven.

are going to provide to them.

i
4

a
4

= SHOWN (From-L to R): Michael Hooper, general manager, the British Colonial Hilton;;-

Suzanne Pattusch-Smith, Nassau Tourism and Development Board; Telator Strachan, Nassau}.
Ministry of Tourism; Charles Klonaris, chairman o}

fi





AF LY AWLNAWLT aVLV ANALY





GOVERNMENT and pri-
vate sector tourism operators
have aided the Straw Market
enhancements led by Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt,
donating a wooden arbor to
upgrade an outside seating
‘area,

The arbor is a collective con-

‘tribution to the Straw Market

enhancement by the Ministry
of Tourism and the British
Colonial Hilton, in conjunc-
tion with the Nassau Tourism
and Development Board
(NTDB) and the Downtown
Improvement Initiative.
Colourful bougainvillea, pro-
vided by the Ministry of
Tourism, will grow over the
arbor in a decorative canopy.
“The Straw Market is an
important focal point down-

town, and we want to help
make it a pleasurable experi-
ence for our visitors” said
Michael Hooper, general man-
ager of the British Colonial

Hilton.
Arbor

The arbor provides much-
needed shade for visitors who
want to sit down while family
members shop at the various
stalls in the Straw Market.
Bahamian craftsman who are
part of a non-profit rehabilita-
tive organisation called The
Haven constructed the struc-
ture.

“The Ministry of Tourism is

committed to beautification

projects such as the Straw Mar-
ket and the Queens Staircase,”

, COOKIES FOR CANCER

For every McDonald’s Cookie you purchase during
the month of May 2006, McDonald’s will make a
donation to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas _ 4

‘Nassau Tourism and Develop- |

said Shiela Cox of the Ministry: |

of Tourism.
“These enhancements are so
important for our tourism
product as a whole.”
“The arbor is an ongoing:

Vet Weir waw i Uo eie eee

vee

process of improving the image” |

of the city itself,” said Charles .

Klonaris, chairman of the Nas—~

sau Tourism and Development ¢
Board. “It is the goal of the §

ment Board to make the city as ,
comfortable and consumer- }
friendly as possible.”

Projects to upgrade thes
Straw Market include the ren-
ovation of the public bathroom }
facilities, and the Police, Sta: }
tion, repairs to existing infra- }

er ease ney

Noe

’ structure and the installation 4

of interior amenities to the}
straw market. ti

aoe




_ Pmiovin’ it _

ee en

See ee

}



aS Sata a Rt ee eee See wet ett





THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 3B



Consolidated to supply 90% of Nassau’s water

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water,
the BISX-listed water produc-
er, said yesterday that the $29
million Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant and its existing
Windsor plant would supply
90 per cent of New Provi-
dence’s water when the former
was completed this July.

Rick MacTaggert, Consoli-
dated Water’s president and
chief executive, told a Wall
Street conference call that the
“final phase” of construction
on the Blue Hills plant was
“expected to be completed by
July”.

Plant

The plant will have the
capacity to deliver 7.2 million
gallons of water per day to the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion; and Mr MacTaggert said
the company would begin sell-

ing water from Blue Hills soon.

He said: “We are very
pleased that the Bahamian
government chose our compa-
ny to build and operate the
Blue Hills plant, which when
coupled with the Windsor
plant, will be providing 90 per
cent of Nassau’s water
demand.”

Mr MacTaggert said Con-
solidated Water was pressing
ahead with other aspects of the
Blue Hills contract, which
included reducing the Water
& Sewerage Corporation’s
non-revenue water by stopping
leaks from, its underground
pipe system.

“We continue to achieve
good progress on this project,
saving the Bahamian govern-
ment 435 million gallons of lost
water per year,” Mr MacTag-
gert said.

However, Jeffrey Parker,
Consolidated Water’s chair-
man, acknowledged the com-
pany was behind schedule on





toe




| McLindi House








NOTICE

; IN THE ESTATE OF MAX BUSLIK late of 220
| Central Park South, New York, New York, U.S.A. deceased. |

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons havin any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the Ist day of June, 2006 after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the date herein before mentioned.

DENNISON & CO

“, Executors of the'Estate of
*, ‘Betty Buslik, deceased

MAXAM (also ~ as WENDEL 3
in the City of Freeport, on the island oF Gi
Bahama, within the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all ee having any
‘claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
'the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
ithe ist day of June, 2006 after which date the Executrix will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
‘of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date herein before mentioned.

BULA MAY DELEON
Executrix of the Estate of
Wendell N. Maxam, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888
Freeport, Grand Bahama




























rand



building the Blue Hills plant,
but said it did not expect to
incur financial penalties for

this.
Schedule |

“We're behind the original
schedule, but there are provi-
sions in the contract enabling
us to claim time for [external]
events, and we intend to do
that,” he said.

Meanwhile, Joe Pivinski,
Consolidated Water’s chief
financial officer, told the con-
ference call that the company
“expects to arrange for extra
funds” to complete projects
including the Blue Hills plant.
It was talking to bankers in the
Bahamas and other countries
to achieve this.

Although not clear, it'is pos-

(

|

|

ee
|

|

|

|

|

|

sible that the need for extra
funds has been generated by
the fact that Blue Hills has
increased in cost from the ini-
tial $22 million projection to
about $29 million, while last
November’s Bahamian Depos-
itory Receipt (BDR) offering
only raised net $6.8 million
proceeds, rather than the antic-
ipated $10 million.

The 39 per cent increase in
bulk water sales during the
2006 first quarter, helped by
increased sales from Consoli-
dated Water’s existing Wind-
sor plant in Nassau, boosting
gross bulk margins to 22.2 per
cent.

Increased

Mr MacTaggert said the
increased bulk sales resulted

ect eee ee

Make over $1000 per week!!!

l
4
Opportunities now available to |
work closely with our lovely :
tourists helping to leave a |
beautiful and lasting impression :
of their visit to the Bahamas. |

Pa SST SS



must be...

eortTtc

Mature (25 yrs or older) ¢ Outgoing * Honest
Reliable * Willing to Learn ¢ Dedicated

l
|

: |

FAX LETTER TO 326-1747 |
)

or mail to Human-Resources, P.O. Box SS-6327, Nassau, Bahamas









NOTICE

; IN THE ESTATE OF ELEANOR K. PATTERSON
late of 2390 State St, Unit IE Hamden, New Haven, Connecticut,

U.S.A. deceased.

ct



NOTICE is hereby given that all persons havin any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the Ist day of June, 2006-after which date the Executrix will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
of which shall then have had notice.



AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
| before the date herein before mentioned.

NATALIE OLIVER
Executrix of the Estate of
Eleanor K. Patterson, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888



Freeport, Grand Bahama















Pricing Information As Of:
11 May 2006



Abaco Markets

IN THE ESTATE OF BETTY BUSLIK late of 220
Central Park South, New York, New York, U.S.A. deceased.

d -NOTICHis hereby given that all persons havin any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
same dply certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
‘the Ist day of June, 2006 ‘after which date the Executrix will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
f of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date: herein before mentioned.

DENNISON & CO
Executors of the Estate of
Betty Buslik, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888
Freeport, Grand Bahama
































ious Close Today's Close

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

- Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

1.2858 Colina Money Market Fund 1.285819*
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.7451 ***
2.3560 2.2072 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**

52wk-Hi

Colina Bond Fund

1.164331****

- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paidin the last 12 months .

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT APR. 30, 2006/ **** - AS AT MAY. 01, 2006



ronments on Blue Hills; not expecting penalties

from the Windsor plant’s 1.2
million gallon per day expan-
sion in the 2005 fourth quar-
ter.

He added: “We also bene-
fited from reduced production
shortfall pricing adjustments.

,We virtually eliminated the
“membrane fouling problems at

2°

the Windsor plant.......

The company’s first quarter

total revenue increased by 52.6
per cent to about $9.2 million,

compared with about $6.1 mil-

lion in the first quarter of 2005.

Net income increased 124
per cent to $3.078 million, or
$0.24 per diluted share, versus
$1.374 million or $0. 115 per
diluted share, in the quarter
ended March 31. 2005.

Retail water sales increased
61.4 per cent to about $5.1 mil-
lion in the first quarter of 2006,



|



NOTICE

eerie

Bahamas, deceased.

JEWELRY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and —
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

Do You Have What it Takes?

ARE YOU...
confident? * a leader? ¢ self motivated?
e professional? ¢ mature (25 yrs or older)? ¢ dedicated?
If your answer is YES then take the next step

FAX LETTER TO 326-1747 =

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION — [

compared with about $3.1 mil-
lion in the corresponding peri- °
~ od of the previous year.

Sales

Bulk water sales rose 39.1.
per cent to $3.7 million, ver-
sus about $2.7 million in pri-
or-year quarter. Revenue from
services increased 91.2 per cent
to $440,560 in the most recent,
quarter,
$230,456 million in the quar-
ter ended March 31, 2005.

Gross margin on retail sales
improved to 71.3 per cent in
the quarter ended March 31,
2006, versus 59.9 per cent in

‘compared with —

the first quarter of 2005, while

the gross margin on Bulk sales
expanded to 22.2 per cent,
compared with 16.2 per cent
in the prior-year period.

IN THE ESTATE OF MERRIL M. DORSETT laté
of 15B Paradise Lane in the City of Freeport on the Island of |
Grand Bahama one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons havin any

claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send

the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the Ist day of June, 2006 after which date the Executors will H
proceed to distribute the asseets having-regard only the claims:
of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date herein before mentioned.

MERRIL AND LUCY DORSETT |
Executors of the Estate of ;
Merril Dorsett, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama

yee

CHER TR ELEY ED

“Se Gu a+



Change Daily Vol. EPS $







Div $



Last Price
11.00
ey an

ses VL



Neekin V wae ibs oe Se $
1.997
a eae

nein ace ca

0.720 7.2
- ban ni



. ‘Oo
2.57%)
0.00%)

°. ‘380 ‘s: 0
aimee

lends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Vaiue
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ee

SSSA

iS Ne *

HEARSE SHAS

Roe
: eS |

.
PFRP ate vedse

SS
+



THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 4B:



BUSINESS





from people who are
making news in their
| neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

| If so, call us on 322-1986
‘and share your story.

< ANDREW,
scoot *



‘the huterantional School of The Bahamas
BOUNDED ip48

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

The Anglican Central
Education Authority

advises that SEATS ARE AVAILABLE

in our schools from
Kindergarten through Grade 6.

Interested persons are asked
to contact the schools











Dress: Black “he Optional
Cocktails: 7:00 - 8:00 pm
Dianer: §:50 pom
Douation: $120.00

FROM page 1B

Tribune yesterday.

Brent Symonette, who is also
the FNM’s deputy leader, told
The Tribune that while the
Government promoted itself
as being transparent and
accountable, the Bahamian
public was still unaware of how
its money was being spent.

This was because the Gov-
ernment was following a legal
opinion that said it need only
allow the committee to review
accounts tabled in the House
of Assembly, Mr Symonette
said.

Breaches

Last monthebe had called

the present government’s lack
of accountability “one of the
biggest and most serious
breaches of the spirit of the
Westminister system of gov-
ernment”.

Mr Symonette said the PAC
committee has requested that

Government policy :
negates the Public .
Accounts Committee

the Government disclose its
spending for the fiscal years
ending in 2004 and 2005 spend-
ing, but has met with constant
road blocks.

Debate

He added that this was par-
ticularly disturbing because

‘Parliament was about to begin

the 2006/-2007 Budget debate
next month, but did not have a
clear picture of what the Gov-
ernment has spent in the past
several years.

For example, Mr Symonette
said that just last month, the
Government tabled the Audi-
tor General’s report for the
2002-2003 fiscal year.

Mr Symonette said that even
then, the Government failed
to give him sufficient copies of
the report for his entire com-
mittee - giving him only three
copies when the committee
had five members. .-

He has not yet been given
the extra copies, although he
said yesterday that the Gov-

INSIGHT

For the stories behind

ate Male mmccee(e Merle [e) 4
on Mondays

yworld school

Inviting all parents, alumni and friends of St. Andrew’s School

: Tickets can be purchased from the office at St. Andrew’s School and
, reservations for tickets through hlockhart@st-andrews.com



ernment’s business leader in
the House, Vincent Peet, had
assured him he should have“
received them before the coke s
end.

Still, Mr Symonette said that’
even in the case of the 2002-
2003 report, it was certified by*
the auditor-general only in J ae ie
2005. 2

“It was signed off-for nearly!
a year and was just sitting?
around for a year, before they’
brought it to Parliament,” ME’
Symonette. fed

“Now there are some inte¥e)
esting things in it, but it is four
years out of date and thé!
accounts of 2004 and 2005 aré”

" past due.”

Mr Symonette added that he
will not fully examine the.
report until his entire commit®
teehasacopy. S.

Accounts

The failure to obtain timély
government accounts, plus the
lack of disclosure relating to
documents not tabled in the
House of Assembly, has seric.
ously hobbled one of Parlia: ,
ment’s most important’ watch:
dogs. -

The Public Accounts Cori;
mittee is unable to scrutinise :
whether the taxpayer is receiv.
ing the vbest value for money ,
from the Government, and,
whether public monies. are |
being used efficiently, for. thie’
correct purpose, and not being,
wasted or misappropriated.,

The issue goes to the heart
of transparency and account-_
ablity in governments: eS







Legal Notice

NOTICE es
TAGETES LIMITED i s =

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

VG

@) TAGETES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under itis
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the Intemational Business.Companies..

Act 20).

< a ui

The diselnnon of the id company conimenced on n May 10th, ey.
_. 2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and... {x 4
registered by the Registrar General. :

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd. of
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, B.V.I. a

- Dated this 11th day of May, AD. 2006.

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

UBS



UBS (Bahamas) Ltd, a leading global wealth
manager, is seeking an experienced professional

to join their team as

Operations Securities Specialist.

In order to meet our requirements all applicants

MUSt POSSESS:

*Minimum ‘of BA in Accounting, Banking or
Finance or min: three years work Experience) in
the securities industry; on

*Strong emphasis in trade processing,
settlements corporate actions;
sHighly skilled in all aspects of Mutual funds
subscription and Redemption;

*Keen knowledge of complex financial
instruments i.e structured proauels; hedge

. funds;

*Strong problem resolution skills;
*Excellent oral and written communication

skills;

Proficient in Microsoft Excel, bloomberg,

telekurs;

«Completion of the Series 7 or Series 6 course |

is a plus;

*Supervisory skills is a plus.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals only
should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 5B, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006



FROM page 1B

Massy, is also understood to
have connections to Abaco
Markets, the BISX-listed retail
group.
it is still unclear whether
Abaco Markets itself is
involved in the bidding group,
or whether its major share-
hojders - such as chairman and
chief executive, Craig Symon-
ette, and Frank Crothers - are
through a private company
that is separate from the BISX-
listed entity.
;Lhe Tribune understands
‘that several minority share-
holders have expressed con-

Freeport Concrete ‘forgave’

EROM page 1B

‘In addition to selling the
shares.for a sales price of
$571,000, Freeport Concrete,
which is listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX), said it had
“agreed to forgive repayment
$836,221 of the $1.415 mil-
lion debt due by Robin Hood”



to"if at 2005 year-end, which

was Atigust 31 last year.
‘This left a balance of

$578,500 owed by Robin Hood

to, Freeport Concrete at 2005

SAUOSUR Of




‘Bahamas.

seve Y

“a

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that SIDNEY SIMILIEN OF |
PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
‘naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
‘and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
‘from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

POSTION AVAILABLE _
SECURITIES SPECIALIST

cern about Abaco Markets
becoming involved in any bid
for Bahamas Supermarkets,
given that the company has yet
to return to consistent prof-
itability and is still burdened
down with debt.

Abaco Markets still owed
over $7 million to the Royal
Bank of Canada as at the 2005
third quarter, and also owes
$7.9 million to holders of its
preference share debt.

Therefore, minority share-
holders are concerned about
the prospect of loading Abaco
Markets up with debt to
finance any bid for Bahamas
Supermarkets. |

Another company said to be
involved in the Fidelity bid
group is Barbados Shipping &

year-end.

The carrying value of
Freeport Concrete’s invest-
ment in Robin Hood before
that debt was forgiven was list-
ed in the 2005 annual report
at $884,900.

This carrying value was
almost wiped out by the debt
forgiveness, meaning that
Freeport Concrete’s net gain
on the Robin Hood sale was
$620,179.

In addition, with the
$578,500 balance owed to
Freeport Concrete at August
31, 2005, the net worth of
Robin Hood as at that date is







‘Leading Offshore Bank request applications for the

position of an experienced securities specialist.

{
!
‘
§
1
i
i
'
i
!

The candidates must possess the following
qualifications and skills:

Two years related mutual fund experience,
including cash settlements

e Strong emphasis in tradde processin and.

settlements

* Strong PC, organization skills

Strong communication skills

Branch Manager Banking
P.O: Box N-4906
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 394-0701



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BAHIABRAZ CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th
| day of May 2006. This Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,
: P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Trading, a publicly-quoted
company in Barbados that has
a large retailing and distribu-
tion division, which includes
food products.

Winn-Dixie is under Chap-
ter 11 bankrupcty proceedings
in the US, so'the likely winner
of any auction for the majority
stake in Bahamas Supermar-
kets will be the highest bidder
- the one who offers the most
money.

Once the winner is decided,
Winn-Dixie will seek authori-
sation from the US Bankrupt-
cy Court in Jacksonville, Flori-
da, on May 18 for the sale of its
78 per cent stake.

BK Foods' main advantage
is that it is an all-Bahamian
offer, meaning that their bid

listed in Freeport Concrete’s

2005 annual report as at nega-
tive $48,679.

Robin Hood -paid the

$571,500 sales price to
Freeport Concrete in Decem-
ber 2005, immediately after the
sale was approved by the Gov-
ernment and. Investments
Board. ‘
Out of the outstanding
$578,500 owed to Freeport

Concrete, Robin Hood paid -

$233,500 in December 2005,
with a further payment of
$86,250 due on January 11,

2006.

No mention is made of
whether that had been paid,
and the remaining $258,750

- balance is being paid in week-

ly instalments of $17,250, which
started in the week beginning

THE TRIBUNE



would not require Cabinet or
National Economic Council
(NEC) approval. The only
approval necessary would be
Exchange Control approval to
allow Winn-Dixie to repatri-
ate its profits on the sale.
Neal & Massy is a foreign-
owned conglomerate, and its
involvement would go against
the Government's National
Investment Policy, which
requires retail to be 100 per
cent Bahamian-owned.
However, Bahamas Super-
markets is already foreign
majority-owned through Winn-
Dixie, so some have pointed
out that allowing in an owner-
ship group with some foreign
involvement would be no dif-
ferent from the situation that

exists today.

Yet with a general election
less than a year away, the Gov-
ernment might find it politi-
cally difficult to approve a bid
for Bahamas Supermarkets
that had a foreign component,
rather than the all-Bahamian

. BK Foods offer.

Still, the scene could be set
for a conflict between the US
Bankruptcy Court, if it
approves an offer with some

’ foreign ownership, and the

Bahamian government and its
investment policy.
The advantage of any group

_involving Neal & Massy would

be the huge financial and logis-
tical resources at the disposal,
plus the expertise in operating
and running supermarekt



for City Markets stake

chains, and inventory and sup-
ply chain management.
BK Foods, though, has

already been busy putting in

place an alternative supply
chain for when the one-year
transitions services agreement
with Winn-Dixie expires. | ~
Under the transition services
agreement, The Tribune
understands that BK Foods
will pay Winn-Dixie a $1 mil-
lion flat fee, plus the cost of all.
goods provided with a 5 per
cent mark-up on top of that... -
BK Foods' $50 million offer:
for Bahamas Supermarkets
values Winn-Dixie's 78 per,
cent stake at $14.1 per share,
compared to the $11 price at -
which the stock last traded on
the Over-the-Counter market.

59% of Robin Hood’s debts

January 18, 2006.

“The amount due from
Robin Hood is secured by way
of a debenture in favour of the

company up to $795,560, cre-

ating a specific charge on all
real and personal property of
Robin Hood, and a floating
charge over Robin Hood’s
remaining assets,” Freeport
Concrete’s annual report said.

Freeport Concrete sold
Robin Hood to enable it to

focus on its Grand Bahama -

operations, chiefly its planned
Home Centre Superstore - due

’ to open in June 2006 - and

relocating its concrete plant to
a new site.

Robin Hood’s sale also pos-

itively impacted Freeport Con-
crete’s accounts receivables,
which fell by $408,794 to $1.309

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JULIE LOUIMEME, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of JANUARY, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.











Bahamas.









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DONAT CHRISTOPHER HALL
OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who: knows any reason why fegistration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEVERLEY SONIA HALL nee
JACKSON OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





LEGAL NOTICE

eaten
NANCHANG RIVER CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 137(8) of the International Business Com-
panies Act 2000, the dissolution of NANCHANG
RIVER CORP has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP, INC.
(Liquidator)



million at 2005 year-end, com-
pared to $1.718 million a year
earlier. .

In addition, inventory value
declined by 45.7 per cent com-
pared to fiscal 2004, falling
from $3.432 million to $1.861
million, again aided by the
Robin Hood sale. -

Accounts payable and
accrued expenses were also










Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that WILFRID PETION OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister.
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for},
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and: |:
that any person who knows any reason why registratiori/ |
naturalization should-not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible |;
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,.Nassau, |:

helped by the Robin Hood
sale, falling by $258,868 to
$2.792 million at 2005 year-
end.

During fiscal 2005, Mr
Schaefer received a commis-
sion equal to 3 per cent of the
gross sales achieved by Robin
Hood, amounting to $245,085.
This exceeded the previous
year’s commission of $231,489.




NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that GUELIN MERILIEN OF JOAN’S
HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister |
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for]
registration/naturalization as a citizen.of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days |
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible |'
for Nationality and Citizenship, P-O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2005/CLE/gen/01227

IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN

MARY MICHELLE MAJOR

JUDY ATHENE KEMP-HIGGS

Plaintiffs

AND

KAIVON ELDON

Defendant

NOTICE —

Kaivon Eldon

Nassau, Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas Action No.
2005/CLE/gen/01227 by Mary Michelle Major
and Judy Athene Kemp-Higgs in which the
Plaintiffs’ claim is for an Order that you remove
a building which encroaches on the Plaintiffs’ §
property, damages for trespass and costs.

AND that it has been ordered that service of the
Writ in the said action be effected by this
advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must
enter an Appearance in this action on or before
the 2nd June 2006 otherwise judgment may be

entered against you.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
Attorneys for the Plaintiffs
Chambers
Frederick Street Steps
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006







FROM page 1B

John Mittens, Montana
Holdings chairman, said in a
statement: “We are commit-
ted to building Rum Cay
Resort Marina with the utmost
sensitivity to environmental
harmony and ecological bal-
ance. We are dedicated to the
preservation and conservation
of the antiquities and historical
relics identified within the
development site.”

In a previous interview with
The Tribune, Mr Mittens said
the developers would create
the “third largest airport ter-
minal in the Bahamas" to ser-
vice the resort.

“We would like to put in

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

um Cay resort
‘full swing’
by September

place a fixed base operation,"
Mr Mittens explained, point-
ing out that there were no air-
craft refuelling facilities in that
part of the Bahamas.

"We want to put in refu-
elling, storage and mainte-
nance facilities at the airport."

He added that when com-
pleted, the Rum Cay terminal
would have all the essential
requirements, including immi-
gration and customs facilities.

Structured

The hotel will be structured
around a central facility that
will incorporate a spa, with the
accommodation featuring 50
cottages set in a garden-type,
authentic Bahamian setting.

The fractional ownership

2005/CLE/qui/01390B

Holo







component will consist of
about 80 units, and the project
will include other land and real .
estate segments.

The developers are already
employing eight of Rum Cay's
existing inhabitants, out of a
total population of around 80.

With all financing in place
to complete the project, Mr
Mittens said the Rum Cay
Resort Marina's "big market"
will be the US. He explained
that it "probably had the best
fishing in the world", while the
spa facilities and equestrian
centre would prove attractive
for wives and families when
the husband was out at sea.

The development is target-
ing active families and trav-
ellers, who are seeking adven-
ture and plenty of activities -
during a vacation, whether it
be an extended vacation or
weekend trip.

“The American market,
we've found, has boaters. who
may want, their boats left in -
Rum Cay for dry:‘storage," Mr

THE TRIBUNE

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting of Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Millard Bethel

NOTICE OF PETITION



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Millard Bethel of North
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
is applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas to have his title investigated determined and declared
under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect of the
land-hereafter described, that is to say:
“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land-located Fifteen
(15.00) feet SOUTH of the centerline of the main
Eleuthera Highway and more fully described as bounded
NORTHWARDLY by the main Eleuthera Highway and
running thereon Five Hundred and Eighty-three. and Six
Hundredths (583.06) feet, EASTWARDLY by a Public
Roadway known as Pau Pau Bay Road and running
thereon a total distance of Eleven Hundred and Seventy-
nine and Eleven Hundredths (1179.11) feet,
SOUTHWARDLY by land the property of Eleuthera
Land Company Limited and running thereon for a total
distance of Five Hundred and Sixty- “eight and Sixty-two
Hundredths (568.62) feet, WESTWARDLY by land the
property of Eleuthera Land Company Limited and running
thereon for a total distance of Eleven Hundred and Seventy-
_ five and Forty-seven Hundredths (1175.47) feet continuing
back to point of commencement the said piece parcel or
tract of land described aforesaid comprises a total area
of 16.070 Acres and is delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with this application AND ALL THAT piece
parcel or tract of land located approximately Eighteen
Hundred and Fifty-two (1852) feet SOUTHWARDLY
of the main Eleuthera Highway and immediately Westside
of a Public Roadway known as Pau Pau Bay Road and
more fully described as bounded NORTHWARDLY by
land the property of Eleuthera Land Company Limited
and running thereon Three Hundred and Five and four
Hundredths (305.04) feet, EASTWARDLY by a Public
Road also known a Pau Pau Bay Road and running thereon
for a total distance of Four Hundred and Two and Five
Hundredths (402.05) feet; SOUTHWARDLY by land
the property of Lady Cochran and running thereon Eighty-
one and Thirty Hundredths (81.30) feet, EASTWARDLY
by land the property of the aforesaid Lady Cochran and
running thereon Two Hundred and thirty-eight and Twenty-
three Hundredths (238.23) feet, SOUTHWARDLY by
land the property of Western Securities Limited and
running thereon a total distance of Two Hundred and
Eighty-seven and Eighty-nine Hundredths (287.89) feet,
WESTWARDLY by Pau Pau Bay Pond and running
thereon for a total distance of Six Hundred and Thirty-
one and Twenty-two Hundredths (631.22) feet continuing
back to the point of comniencement the said piece parcel
’ or tract of land described aforesaid comprises a total area
of 3.931 Acres and the both pieces parcels or tracts of
land contains a total of Twenty and one Thousandth
(20.001) Acres and are delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with this application.

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and
Plan of the said Jand may be inspected during normal office hours
at the following places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street
North, New Providence, The Bahamas.

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co. Chambers, No. 57 Jerome Avenue,
Pyfrom’s Addition, New Providence, The Bahamas.

iii. The Administrator’s Office, Governor’s Harbour,
Eleuthera, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 30th day of June
A.D., 2006 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or his Attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form supported

by Affidavit. FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an.
| Adverse Claim on or before the said date will operate as a bar to

such a claim.

| Dated this 8th day of May A.D., 2006.

SHARON WILSON & CO.
Chambers
No. 57 Jerome Avenue
Pyfrom’s Addition
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



Mittens said: These clients
would be able to fly into the

island from the US, and the.

resort would have ensured
their boats were ready to go,
all prepared for a day's fish-
ing.

-relating to the SerSlOp ERE:







@ DEVELOPERS behind the $600-700 million Rum Cay Resort Marina expect the project to be

“in full swing” on Phase I construction by September. ABOVE, John Mittens, chairman of Mon-

tana Holdings (right), shows Minister of Financial Services & Investments Vincent Peet documents

(FILE ahoie)

ii: advertise ty ey eee ro Ne

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005 -
IN THE SUPREME COURT - CLE/qui/01389B

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
“IN THE MATTER of The Pet Petition of Charles Thompson
NOTICE OF PETITION
NOTICE IS'‘ HEREBY GIVEN that Charles Thompson of St.

Andrews Road in the Eastern District of New Providence, the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme

Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the |

Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas to have
his title investigated and determined and declared under the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect of the land hereafter

‘described, that is to say:
"ALL THAT piece of parcel or tract of land comprising

Two and eight hundred ad fourteen thousandths (2.814)
acres situate in the Malcolm Allotment Subdivision in
the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and being Allotment Number Sixty-two (62) on a plan
of the said Malcolm Allotment Subdivision that is
bounded NORTHWARDLY by a Twenty (20) foot wide
Road Reservation and running thereon One hundred and
sixty and eighty-three hundreths (160.83) feet,
EASTWARDLY by Allotment Number Sixty-three (63)
in the said Subdivision and running thereon Seven
hundred eighty-seven and fifty-seven hundredths (787.57)
feet, SOUTHWARDLY by vacant land in the said
Subdivision and running thereon One hundred forty-
nine and seventy-three hundredths (149.73) feet,
WESTWARDLY by a Ten (10) foot wide Road
Reservation in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Seven hundred ninety-six.and forty- six hundredths
(796.46) feet, which said piece parcel or allotment of
land has such shape, marks, boundaries; positions and
dimensions as are shown on the plan submitted with the
Petitioner's: Petition and delineated in PINK"

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and
Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal pines hours
at the following places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street
North, New Providence, The Bahamas

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, No. 57 Jerome
Avenue, Pyfrom's addition, New Providence, The °
Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim mot
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 30th day of June
A.D., 2006 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or his Attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form supported
by Affidavit

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the said date will operate as a bar to
such a claim.

Dated this 8th day of May A.D., 2006

SHARON WILSON & CO
Chambers
No.57 Jerome Avenue
Pyfrom's Addition
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner





NOTICE is hereby given that MARSHA GLAMORIA WATT OF

COCKBURN STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason. why. registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
-and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





2004/COM/bnk/00066

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER of MOORE PARK
| FUNDING LTD.
(in Voluntary Liquidation)

~ AND IN THE MATTER of THE INTERNA-
TIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
Ch. 309 Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000.
Edition

NOTICE OF INTENDED DIVIDEND
Pursuant to Rule 68, Companies (Winding-up) Rules

TAKE NOTICE that a first dividend is intended to be
declared in the above matter. Creditors who do not prove
their debts or claims by Monday, 12 June 2006 will be
excluded from the benefit of this dividend.

DATED the Tenth day of May 2006

Maria M. Ferere
Official Liquidator
Moore Park Funding Limited
(In Compulsory Liquidation)

This Notice was filed by Higgs & Johnson, of Ocean © :
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau,.,



Oo 3 7
ROA -
Le BETA SERIE TEI

Cae

siren



——

Sey

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SSRs ee

PRIS

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sou

am

BES

REISS

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EIA ee Bis Rare Se TERS

Sor ruse
TEESE AO ALE SEE FY



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N.P., The Bahamas, Attorneys for the Official Liquidator?”





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

ITEM 8 - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND
SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC
ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of
The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet

of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. and subsidiaries

(the “Company”) as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the

related consolidated statements of income, shareholders’

equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period
‘ ended December 31, 2005. These financial statements are the
responsibility of the Company’s management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial
statements based on ou: audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of
the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the
audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit
includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the
amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit
also includes assessing the accounting principles used and” ~~"
significant estimates made by management, as well as i
evaluating-the overall financial statement presentation. We
believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our
opinion.

Bae Fan Fo Be Gn Se. Ba Te Be Be Me,

Ree,
Ra Xe

&

Re Re Fan

Ro

San Bae Bas

In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements present
fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of The
PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. and subsidiaries as of
December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their
operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in
the-period ended December 31, 2005, in conformity with
accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of
America.

Ra Nan eda Pe Bui he Bede Bat be. Fn She

kaha
tay a Say a

&
S

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the
Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States),
the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over
financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, based on the

nado Bet



a criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework
3 : issued by the Committee of Spons::cing Organizations of the
as Treadway Commission and..u: :eport dated March 3, 2006
ge. expressed an unqualified opinion on management’s assessment
of of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over

ee financial reporting and an unqualified opinion on the

ad effectiveness of the Company’s internal control.over financial
re reporting.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
March 3, 2006
| CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
i THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

December 31













Jn millions, except por volve ~~" 2008 2008
\ Assets ‘ pamee’
Cash and due from banks Lat Sh she ee $3,518 $3,230
Federal finds sold atid resale agicements TN B50 OS
Other short-term investments, including trading, securities... i . 2,543 1,848
Loans held for sale... = ee i sec eeen metre cttne mentite ee cacctneronine eee ByG49" “1,670
1 Securities available for sale and held to maturity 20,710 16,761 0
/~-. - Loans, net of unearned income of $835 and $902 ee . -- 49,101 43,495
Allowance for loan and lease losses (596) (607)
38, 0: Net loans 48,505 42,888
4 }¢ Goodwill, “3,606 3,001
», Other intangible assets 860 354
Other fa 9,413, 8,336
__Total assets ' $91,954 $79,723
RS haGa ‘ - :
Deposits
Noninterest-bearing $14,988 $12,915
Interest-bearin ire ee tae 45,287 ° 40,354
“"“sTotal deposits , 60,275 53,269
Borrowed funds
Federal funds purchased 4,128 219
Repurchase agreements : 1,691 1,376
Bank notes and senior debt 3,875. 2,383
Subordinated debt 4,469 4.050
Commercial paper : . ; _10 2,251
Other borrowed funds : 2,724 1,685
Total borrowed funds 16,897 11,964
Allowance for unfunded loan commitments and letters of credit 100 75
Accrued expenses 2,770 2,406
Other rhs pe timer ter a8 2,759 4,032
Total liabilities a 2 82,801 71,746
Minority and noncontrolling interests in consolidated entities 590 504
| s.«, Shareholders’ Equity
; ’ Preferred stock (a)
Common stock - $5 par value
+ Authorized 800 shares, issued 353 shares 1,764 1,764
- Capital surplus : 1,358 1,265
... Retained earnings. 9,023 8,273
| \'~'' Deferred compensation expense (59) (51)
: . .’ Accumulated other comprehensive loss : (267) (54)
fz Common stock held in treasury at cost: 60 and 70 shares 3,256) (3,724)
Fe Total shareholders’ equi mace nev ennnnnaesamonenanery on sgsumn ssdemnm rin eenorvattae sens, 87563 7,473



i Total liabilities, minority and noncontrolling interests, and 4

i shareholders’ equity - SE “$91,954 $79,723

(a) Less than $.5 million at cach date. : Boer PE Mae SPS,
See accompanying Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements.

NOTE 2 ACQUISITIONS particularly in connection with its acquisition of SSRM. Asa

: PNC were reversed in the first quarter of 2005 in accordance

_ with SFAS 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” The reversal

’ of deferred tax liabilities increased our earnings by $45 million,
or approximately $.16 per diluted share, in the first quarter of
2005. :

2005 A COUISITIONS i
SSRM HOLDINGS, INC.
Effective January 31, 2005, our majority-owned subsidiary,
BlackRock, closed the acquisition of SSRM Holdings, Inc.
(“SRM”), the holding company of State Street Research &
Management Company and SSR Realty Advisors Inc., from
MétLife, Inc. (“MetLife”) for an adjustéd purchase price of
approximately $265 million in cash and approximately
550,000 shares of BlackRock restricted class A common
stack valued at $37 million. SSRM, through its subsidiaries,
actively manages stock, bond, balanced and real estate
portfolios for both institutional and individual investors.
Substantially all of SSRM’s operations were integrated into
BlackRock as of the closing date. BlackRock acquired assets
under management totaling $50 billion in connection wit
this transaction. ,

v

In January 2005, BlackRock issued a bridge promissory note
for $150 million, using the proceeds to fund a portion of the
purchase price for the SSRM acquisition. In February 2005,
BlackRock issued $250 million aggregate principal amount of
convertible debentures. BlackRock used a portion of the net
proceeds from this issuance to retire the bridge promissory
note. These convertible debentures are included with bank
notes and senior debt on our Consolidated Balance Sheet at
December 31; 2005.

RIGGS NATIONAL CORPORATION

a
The stock purchase agreement for the SSRM transaction : : P :
We acquired Riggs National Corporation (“Riggs”), a

provides for an additional payment to MetLife of up to $75
million based on BlackRock achieving specified retention
levels of assets under management and run-rate revenue for
thé-year ended January 31, 2006 Based on assets under
management levels and run-rate revenue as of January 31,
2006, the additional liability on this contingency is $50
million. In addition, the stock purchase agreement provides
fortwo other contingent payments. MetLife will receive 32.5% a market leading franchise in the affluent Washington, D.C.
of any performance fees earned, as of March 31, 2006, ona metropolitan area. In connection with the acquisition, Riggs
certain large institutional real estate client. As of December 31, shareholders received an aggregate of approximately $297

2005..Under the terms of the agreement, Riggs merged into
The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. and PNC Bank,
National Association (“PNC Bank, N.A.”) acquired
substantially all of the assets of Riggs Bank, National

acquisition gives us a substantial presence on which to build

result of the transfer, certain deferred tax liabilities recorded by,

Washington, D.C. based banking company, effective May 13, °

Association, the principal banking subsidiary of Riggs. The :

2005, no performance fees had been earned on this
institutional real estate client as the measurement peri
-nof concluded. In addition, on the fifth anniversary of th

closing of the SSRM transaction, MetLife could rec
: additional payment up toa maximum of $10 million based on
Ee retained assets under management associated
ae the MetLife defined benefit and defined contribution
plans.




is

As of December 31, 2005, BlackRock was unable to estimate
the:potential obligations under these contingent payments
because it was unable to predict at that time what specific
retention levels of run-rate revenue would be for certain
acquired accounts on the first anniversary of closing the SSRM
transaction, what performance fees would be earned on the
institutional real estate client and what BlackRock’s retained

: assets under management would be on the fifth anniversary of
theiclosing date of the SSRM transaction.

Contingent payments settled subsequent to the SSRM closing
on January 31, 2005 but prior to December 31, 2005 reduced
the'contingent liability established at the closing to $39.5

y million at December 31, 2005. The $50 million contingency

| payment due January 31, 2006 eliminated this contingent
liability balance. The $10.5 million excess of the January 31,
2006 contingency payment over the contingent liability
balance at December 31, 2005 and additional contingency

payments, if any, will be reflected as additional purchase price
and recorded as goodwill.

On January 18, 2005, our ownership in BlackRock was
uansferred from PNC Bank, N.A. to PNC Bancorp, Inc., our
intermediate bank holding company. The transfer was effected
primarily to give BlackRock more operating flexibility,

D



million in cash and 6.6 million shares of our common stock
yalued_at_$356 million. Qur Consolidated Balance Sheet at
June 30, 2005 included $2.8 billion Of loans; net of unearned
~“ihicontié, atid $3:5 dillioti Of deposits, including $.8 billion of
“brokered certificates of deposit, related to Riggs.
HARRIS WILLIAMS & Co.
On October 11, 2005, we acquired Harris Williams & Co.
(‘Harris Williams”), one of the nation’s largest firms focused
on providing mergers and acquisitions advisory and related
services to middle market companies, including private
equity firms and private and public companies.

ISITION.
UNITED NATIONAL BANCORP
We acquired United National Bancorp, Inc. (“United
National”) effective January 1, 2004 by merging United
National with and into our subsidiary, PNC Bancorp, Inc.
United National shareholders received an aggregate of
approximately $32] million in cash and 6.6 million shares of
our common stock valued at $360 million. As a result of the
acquisition, we added $3.7 billion of assets, including $.6
billion of goodwill, $2.3 billion of deposits, $1.0 billion of
borrowed funds and $.4 billion of shareholders’ equity to our
Average Consolidated Balance Sheet for the quarter ended
March 31, 2004.

AVIATION FINANCE GROUP ,

On September 1, 2004, we acquired the business of the
Aviation Finance Group, LLC, an Idaho-based company that
specializes in loans to finance private aircraft. The purchase
agreement calls for a contingent payment at the end of the
fifth anniversary date that may be due if certain loan balances
and profitability targets are exceeded on a cumulative five-
year basis.

A Copy of the Annual Report & Audited Accounts may be obtained trom Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited, Ansbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas.




HARRIS N.A AND SUBSIDIARIES





INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT







To the Stockholder and Board
of Directors of Harris N.A.



We have audited the accompanying consolidated statements of condition of Harris N.A (an indirect wholly-
owned subsidiary of Bank of Montreal) and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related
consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, changes in stockholder’s equity and cash flows for each
of the years in the three year period ended December 31, 2005., These consolidated financial statements are the

responsibility of Harris N.A.’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated
financial statements based on our audits.






We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of
America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the.amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting
principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement
presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.






In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects,
the financial position of Harris N.A. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their
operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three year period ended December 31, 2005 in con formity -
with United States. of America generally accepted accounting principles.






KPI Gs LEP







Chicago, Iinois
March 16, 2006




Harris N.A. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Condition








December 31 _ e
2005 2.004
(in thousands except share data)









































The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements are an integral part of these statements.







HARRIS N.A AND SUBSIDIARIES

Nores To CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS




1. Summary of Significant. Accounting Policies



Principles of consolidation and nature of operations




Harris N.A. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Harris Bankcorp, In¢:(“Bankcorp”), a Delaware corporation
which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Harris Financial Corp, (“HFC”), a Delaware corporation which is a wholly-
owned subsidiary of Bank of Montreal (“BMO”). Throughout these Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements,
the term “Bank” refers to Harris N.A. and subsidiaries. :










On May 27, 2005 Bankcorp consolidated 26 of its individually chartered bank subsidiaries (including Harris
Trust and Savings Bank) into one national bank, Harris N.A. The combination was recorded at historical carrying
value and prior year financial statements have been restated. : :




The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Bank and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.
Significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Certain reclassifications were made to
conform prior years’ financial statements to the current year’s presentation. See Note 23 to the Consolidated
Financial Statements for additional information on business combinations and Note 24 for additional information
on related party: transactions.







The Bank provides banking, trust and other services domestically and internationally through the main
banking facility and 5 active nonbank subsidiaries. The Bank provides a variety of financial services to commercial
and industrial companies, financial institutions, governmental units, not-for-profit organizations and individuals
throughout the U.S., primarily the Midwest, and abroad. Services rendered and products sold to customers include
demand and time deposit accounts and certificates; various types of loans; sales and purchases of foreign currencies,
interest rate management products; cash management services; underwriting of municipal bonds; financial
consulting; and personal trust and trust-related services.







A copy of the Annual Report & Audited Accounts may be obtained from Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited, Ansbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas.

'



4





you can advertise-your

Cars, Trucks, Boats, even your dogs

in

The Tribune’s

Bargain Finder

call us at

302-2351

FRIDAY, MAY 12,.2006, PAGE 7B:




ASSETS
Cash and demand balances due from banks............. cesadahe Reve ae, try $ 1,303,916 » $ 947,580
Money market assets:
Interest-bearing deposits at banks 0.0... 0.0... cee cece ete 1,007,212 662,366 |
Federal funds sold: 2.6) 850i Sa a eet at aa ee oe gol oa 303,130 94,950
Securities available-for-sale (including $3.71 billion and $4.27 billion of _
securities pledged as collateral for repurchase agreements at December 31, © o%
2005 and December 31, 2004, respectively) 0.0.0.0... cece eee ee eee 6,398,367 7,154,743
Trading account assets ........ 0.0.0 ecu eeee us lotacg let be ve putea belt an cota Mt aaah 181,121 90,130
EQANG crs eter ehaterd cag toe aha ene g Cele teh ene 22,971,375 20,218,993
Allowance for loan losses... 6... cece eee eee e een ene __G17,777) __ 16,575)
Netloansiie atts cai Site ends, Gans Chet Ae eh Bit wrete ah Satela a 22,653,598 19,902,418
Premises and equipment........... Blaney ORE E Ms Ce nane es alt A 416,578 455,211
Bank-owned insurance .............000- Lp ets tra Aides aheteaiatat aaa etalk decgeaiaarat 1,115,172 1,072,660
Loans ‘held: for Sale... isi6 esl ok etal Say etre ee els as Viki e hee 32,364 43,423
Goodwill and other intangible assets : 335,049 306,760 .
‘Other: assets 2S Pee eas TBE tule Bag AaE NET bode agua y dameasgr nel _ 731,241 651,119
Total assets... 2... cece cee cee wage he cs GanPate earth ters tahantean ace $34,477,748 $31,381,360
“LIABILITIES
Deposits in domestic offices — noninterest-bearing .......... cau ++ $ 6,077,792 $ 5,432,999
; : — interest-bearing ...... 0.0... eee ee eee 16,749,110 ~~ 15,646,690
Deposits in foreign offices — interest-bearing ................0. Weary). = 1,270,741 __ 1,677,428 |
Total. deposits! 735.5 408 f ddpisce sta e ding sole aonb S 24,097,643 22,757,117
Federal funds purchased .. 0... 0... e eee te ee ee ones _ 975,990 1.114,400 . &
Securities sold under agreement to repurchase............. Ney dee Bae Guonaeeaa yah 2,485,650 3,405,296 ~
Short-term borrowings .............200- tas ioatle kG AGAR Te cts GN AE A eee 2,041,715 214,145
Short-term senior nOteS. 2... ee te teens 800,000 200,000
Accrued interest, taxes and other expenses........-- 2-10 sce eee eee es 247,778 227,680 ~
Other liabilities 1) (eee eRe le Noes eee gaa ine elas oe SOR 247,544: 289,130
Minority interest — preferred stock of subsidiary.......--..0....+.000- 250,000 250,000
Preferred ‘stock issued to Harris Bankcorp, Inc.......- eR a ee ea — 5,000
Long-term notes — Senior... ieee eee tae 250,000 —_
Long-term notes — subordinated........ Se ee nr eee ae ___ 292,750 292,750
Total liabilities. ilo o000. 06.0 coe Ce ees te 31,689,070 _ 28,755,518
Stockholder’s Equity. Bier, ee ‘
Common stock ($10 par value); authorized 40,000,000 shares; issued“and ~’
outstanding 13,548,513 and 13,487,257 shares at December 31, 2005 and
December 31, 2004, respectively .......... airtR & Beg witty to Ai 135,485 134,873
Surplus (she etesechy eee Oe ealan On Sune Sash eat te aye: Me aN a whe ene eeoS ae 1,111,922 1,057,814
Retained, carningsys cep Geka wie oe apes cobs bie MBM OS wleje Daye ale 1,609,465 1,477,163
Accumulated other comprehensive loss... 2... eee eee eee (68,194) _ (44,008)
Total stockholder’s equity... . 00... 0. cece cee eee eee 2,788,678 2,625,842
Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity.............0..0000 02005 $34,477,748 $31,381,360







PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS

Bo 1s









BEARS FC pose with their trophies after winning the NPFL Knock Out Cup Final on Sunday May 7 2006 at the BFA Development Centre, Blue Hills. Bears romped to a 9-3 win to take the Cup over

Sharks FC. Bears also finished Division 1 runners-up in the regular NPFL season which recently concluded. :
(©Vision Photo/Craig Lenihan)

Final flurry for Division



)-4 victory to
seal NPFL Cup











m@ CAMERON Hepple of Bears F
Sharks FC player during the NPFL
Final on Sunday May 7 2006 at the BF
Centre, Blue, Hills.



il NESLEY JEAN of Bears FC runs away from a Chadlet Pierre of Sharks FC during the NPFL Knock Out Cup Final on Sunday May

7 2006 at the BFA Development Centre, Blue Hills. Bears romped to a 9-3 win to take the Cup.
(©Vision Photo/Craig Lenihan)






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FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



Local gymnasts

to take on
team from

Cayman Islands

@ GYMNASTICS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

IN THEIR final appear-
ance for the year, local
‘gymnasts from the Nassau
’Nastics company will
grace the floor against top
gymnasts from the Cay-
man Islands in the 8th
annual Gymfest ‘Flipping
All Over the World,’ com-
petition. - .

The friendly competi-
tion, which is set for Sat-
urday at the New Provi-
dence Community Centre,
is being used as an exhibi-
tion showing for the pub-
lic.

According to Barbara
Thompson, an executive
director in the Nassau
*Nastics company, the
show should increase the
interest level in the coun-

‘try, but most importantly
give the local gymnasts the
much needed.competition.

Thompson said: “This
last showing for the year —
will be great for the kids
because it gives their fami-
ly members an opportuni-
ty to see first hand what
they’ve learned. I must say
that this year has been
very productive for us and
the kids are really excited
to display their talents at
home.

“The sport is making
great strides in the coun-
try, we have more than
200 students in the Nassau
Nastics company.
Although we travel to
competition outside of the
Bahamas, the kids don’t
really get the opportunity
to display their talents
here. We do have some
talented young people in
the company so bringing
in a good team from Cay-
man Islands will help them
a lot.”

A team of gymnasts
traveled to Florida in the
early part of January for
competition, this was the
last time gymnasts in the
Nassau ’Nastics competed.

The 19-member team’
coming from the Cayman
Islands will arrive today.
Competition will start at
2pm. Also on the day will
be free gymnastics lessons
and exhibition of gymnas-
tics routines.

SPORTS
INBRIEF



@ SOFTBALL

BAHAMAS Govern-
ment Departmental Soft-
ball will host eight games
on Saturday as they cele-
brate the Ramon Hart
Fans Appreciation Fun
Day.

Five games will be
played on the North Field
and three on the South
Field. The first game will
start at 11:30am and will
feature CAD Nailers going
up against Sandilands.

@ SWIMMING

THE final local Invita-
tional Inter-Club Swim
meet before the National
Championships will be
hosted by the Dolphin
Swimming Club, at the St
John’s Pool on Saturday
May 13th.

The meet will be one of

. the last chances for swim-

_ mers to qualify for the

' National Championships

' to be held at the Betty Kel-

' ly Kenning Aquatic Centre
on July 6th-9th.















MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

SoS re eS









‘I THE Bahamas Baseball Federation held a press conference yesterday to announce their upcoming national championships. From left: Craig Kemp, First Vice

President; Greg Burrows, President; Theodore Sweeting, Secretary; Arthur Thompson, Chief Umpire.

@ BASEBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE lines are being drawn
and the grass is being cut,
preparing the baseball fields
for the 4th annual Andre
Rodgers Junior national
championships. ‘

With three days of stiff com-
petition and more than 600
enthused baseball players
divided into 34 teams, the
Bahamas Baseball Federation
(BBF) has scheduled this
year’s national championships
for June 1st-4th.

Since the programme has
grown, the BBF will be host-
ing games at the Freedom
Farm Baseball fields, Andre
Rodgers baseball diamond
and the Churchill Tener
Knowles stadium.

Categories

The national championships
will be divided into five cate-
gories, coach pitch for ages 7-
9; bantam minor group, ages
9-10; bantam senior, ages 12
and under; junior division,
ages 13-15; and senior divi-
sion, ages 16-20.

There will be two games on
hand on the opening night: the
first will be last year’s winners
in the coach pitch, the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau,

' taking on the Freedom Farm

Baseball League. The feature
game that night will be Free-
dom Farm Baseball League
playing the Spanish Wells
Baseball League. Opening
games and ceremonies will be
held at the Churchill Tener
Knowles stadium.
Participating leagues in the
fourth annual nationals will
be Bimini Little League, Exu-
ma Baseball, Grand Bahama
Amateur Baseball Association
and their Little Leagues,
Legacy Baseball League out
of Grand Bahama, Long

Island Baseball League,
Inagua Baseball Association,
Freedom Farm Baseball,
Junior Baseball League of
Nassau and the New Provi-
dence Amateur Baseball
League.

Grand Bahama Amateur
Baseball Association and their
Little Leagues and the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau
and the New Providence
Amateur Baseball League will
be the only teams competing
in all five leagues.

Bimini Little League has
confirmed that they will be
fielding three teams.

Newly formed association,
the Exuma Baseball League
and the Inagua Baseball Asso-
ciation will compete in the
coaches pitch only. The Long
Island Baseball League, which
will be making its second
appearance at the tournament
and. the Spanish Wells teams
will compete in two divisions.

BBF president Greg Bur-
rows said he is excited to see
the first pitch thrown, espe-
cially since all the teams and
coaches have made sure they
improved.

Burrows said: “This year’s
competition is expected to be
a grand slam, with participa-
tion from every association
that exists under the BBF’s
umbrella. The national cham-
pionships won't be like no oth-
er, this is truly going to be a
grand showing from all the
teams.

“We are expecting each
association to field a team,
some have confirmed that
they will be participating in all
divisions. _

“Both the coaches and the
players have shown improve-
ment so you can expect to see
some stiff competition from
all teams.”

The national championships
will be used as a selection
process for the three national
teams that are gearing up to
travel.



(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Hers event





Bears romp to





Full Text


CLOUDS AND
SUNSHINE |



ee



The Tribun

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATIO



Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION







Volume: 102 No.142



nipltlasts Geis cy




*

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

3 PRICE — 75¢

Call for military jet answers

MP claim

s millions

spent on plane
not suitable for
surveillance job

By. MARK HUMES... sti

NORTH Eleuthera MP
Alvin Smith called on the Min-
istry of National Security to
account for a dysfunctional
Defence Force military jet that
has been sitting unused at Inter-
national Airport for more than
six months.

In his contribution to the

Police Service Act 2006, Mr
Smith wanted to know why mil-
lions in public funds had been
spent to acquire a plane that
was not suitable for surveil-
lance.
-* No individual on the Defence
Force, according to Mr Smith,
has passed the qualifying check
ride to fly the plane, and there-
fore, the plane has had to sit on
the tarmac.

Additionally, Mr Smith said,
the King Air 350 Turbo Prop
high altitude aircraft, which is

believed to cost around two and
‘a half million dollars, is not
good for patrolling the
Bahamas because "if you want
to patrol in the Bahamas, you
would want to be able to fly
below 10,000 ft."

However, this plane, accord-
ing to Mr Smith, is designed to
fly at altitudes above 10,000 ft.
Additionally, he'said, "flying
below 10,000 ft in this craft is
very costly, as it will burn more
fuel and cause more wear and
tear on engines, reducing its life
span to about 50 per cent."

3

-Mr,.Smith said he has. been

_ advised that this aircraft — to

- get out of an airport comfort-

ably and safely — needs an
approximate minimum length
of 4,500 ft, and in this instance,

.a short take off and landing air-

craft would have been more
appropriate if one considers the
surfaces and short lengths of
some Family Island airports.

However, Mark Wilson, Per-
manent Secretary at the Min-
istry of National Security,
defended his ministry and char-
acterized Mr Smith's comments
as a matter of opinion. |

Only offering what he was at
liberty to disclose at this time,
Mr Wilson, first denied claims
that the aircraft was still parked
at NIA. However, he admitted
that Mr Smith was partially
right in saying that it had been
parked there for awhile, but, he
said, it was not parked there
anywhere near the six months
claimed by Mr Smith.

Saying that the aircraft was

~ operational for a brief period,

Mr Wilson told The Tribune
that it was only grounded after
it experienced some difficulties.

Mr Wilson said that the craft

is a military aircraft, but it was .

registered with the FAA as a
civilian aircraft. This caused
some confusion, he said, and
until these issues were ironed

out, the craft was grounded.

SEE page 13



Mi THE Defence Force’s King Air 350 Surveillance

4

Aircraft, photographed yesterday afte

Man is shot | MP to ask Roberts to put
inthe neck contract bids to tender

while driving

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 32-YEAR-OLD man is
lucky to be alive after being
shot in the neck while driving
on Bay Lilly Drive Wednesday
night.

_- Police state that the man was
driving in the area near Sea
Breeze around 9.10pm with his
wife when he heard gun shots.

According to their reports, it
was shortly afterwards that the
man discovered that he had
been shot in the left side of his
neck.

Police say they are actively
investigating the matter, but.at
this time cannot say for certain
if the man may have been “tar-
geted” or simply the victim of a
stray bullet.

Chief Superintendent Regi-
nald Ferguson said that the man
was taken to hospital for treat-

SEE page 13




CERTIFIED BY FLORID

INDEPENDENT MP Whit-
ney Bastian said he will ask
Works Minister Bradley
Roberts to put contract bids to
tender instead of negotiating
contracts with individuals.

“Taxpayers’ money should be »

spent more wisely and who wins
the job wins the job, but don’t
hand pick persons to give the
jobs to persons who are unable
to do the work.

“The work that have been

going on the PLP have been try-
ing to give those jobs to their
generals not knowing that these
generals they continue to give
these jobs to have no influence
over the voters.

“Most of the time they give
those jobs to people who cannot
complete the job in the. space
allotted to them. The contract
had been signed for the reno-

SEE page 13

Ministry believes economy will
orow by up to five per cent this year

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

NOW that it has completed its revenue analysis for the 2006-2007
budget, the Ministry of Finance believes it is possible that the Bahamas’
economy will grow by up to five per cent this year, Minister of State for
Finance James Smith told The Tribune.

Mr Smith said the new budget will include the continuation of pro-
jects started two or three years ago and perhaps an acceleration of con-

struction in new schools or docks.

It. will also contain — for the first time — provisions explicitly for

SEE page 15





AN

usec
ed









LABS © LIGHTW

Caeser
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s

is nas :
oe






er cliTrcec
1c SHUTTERS
EIGHT, DURABLE & EASY TO INSTALL
CUSTOM BUILT UP TO 10 FT.¢ HURRICANE PROTECTION MADE EASY







moon on the tarmac at NIA.
‘(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Trial date set
in pastor case

A TRIAL date has been
set for the case of a local
pastor accused of having sex
with a minor. ie

Bishop Earl Randolph
Fraser, pastor of Pilgrim
Baptist Temple on St James
Road, is charged with
having sex with a depen-
dent.

Fraser was arraigned on
the charge last month.

It is alleged that Frasér,
being a person who held a
position of trust, sometime
between July 2005 and Feb-
ruary 2006, had sexual
intercourse with the now
17-year-old girl.

Fraser denied that he
committed the offence and
a trial date was set yester-
day.

The case will be heard in
Court Five on Bank Lane’

i before Magistrate Marilyn

Meers. o
The trial is scheduled-to
begin on July 17. re

Fraser is represented by on
lawyer Wellington Orlando. — -

‘







Cibo. te




vs

PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Mitchell appeals to Spain for help»

FOREIGN Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell met with Span-
ish Prime Minister Jose Luis




















Rodriguez Zapatero and asked
for Spain’s assistance for access
to Schengen visas.

Schengen visas are the docu-
ments required by travellers seek-
ing access to continental Europe.

There is currently no issuing
office for the visas in the
Bahamas and Bahamian busi-

in numbers

Natasha Lightbourne-Dillett, FLM!, Claims Supervisor

in Family Guardian's Group Life & Health Division,
has been awarded the Fellow, Life & Health Claims.
(FLHC) professional designation.

y member companies.

itasha Lightbourne-Dillett
laims Supervisor








Conducted by the International Claim Association (ICA)

of Washington, D.C., the FLHC programme comprises

ten study courses and examinations covering the medical,
legal and administrative aspects of claims management.
ICA was founded in 1909 to provide a forum for
nformation exchange and education to promote high
tandards of performance in claims. administration

amily Guardian congratulates this dedicated
professional for her commitment to personal
development and customer service excellence:

INSURANCE
COMPAN-Y

ST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.0. BOX SS 6232



a * Health

Pes HFT RR aw





nessmen, students and tourists
complain about the difficulty
involved in getting them.

According to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, the Spanish
government is currently circu-
lating a plan to open an EU
consular office in Nassau to deal
with the requests for Schengen
visas.

Mr Mitchell was in Spain for
the third Spain/Caricom Sum-
mit, which ended in Madrid on
Wednesday.

He said that all Caricom del-
egations believed that the meet-
ing went well.

Mr Mitchell pointed out in a
statement issued yesterday that
there has been a significant
increase in the Spanish econo-
my in the last 20 years as result

- of their entry into the European
Union.

“They are now. the eighth
largest economy in the world
and a significant investor in the
Caribbean region, particularly
in tourism,” said the minister.

“In. the English speaking

Caribbean, Spanish investors
have hotel properties. The same
RIU Group of Spain that owns

hotels in Jamaica owns the for-
mer Grand Hotel on Paradise
Island.”

According to the statement,
the Spanish prime minister said
that Spain was hoping an invest-
ment protection treaty could be

with visas to continental Europe —

negotiated between Caricom . .

and Spain.

Mr Mitchell also thanked

Spain for a $50,000 donation to

the Bahamas’ hurricane relief :

efforts,
Mr Mitchell is now in Vienna,

Austria for the start of a Euro- ©

pean Union, Latin American

and Caribbean heads of gov-..
ernment meeting which begins ,-

today.

The statement continued: :

“The Caribbean region is seek-
ing to create more direct rela-
tions with countries in the EU,

given that its traditional part- .:'

ner Britain seems to be moving
its focus toward Europe.
“Europe is now the largest
donor of development assis-
tance in the world. The
Bahamas is pledged to receive
some 9 million Euros of devel-
opment assistance in the next
fiscal year.” spi emroani es

*,

bee, 4



2



a's

2K
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS |

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 3





identify
dead man

POLICE have identified
the man who was found dead
in a yard in Stapeldon Gar-
dens.

According to Assistant
Commissioner of Police with
responsibility for crime Regi-
nald Ferguson, the man was
Davon Capron, 44, of
Seabreeze.

The fully clothed body of
Capron was discovered short-
ly before noon on Wednes-
day.

The man reportedly had a
wound to the right side of his
neck. He was wearing blue
jeans, a dark shirt and white
sneakers.

Mr Ferguson said that
police are not sure how the
man received the injury to his
neck but have not ruled the
death a homicide at this
point. i

Investigations are ongoing
and police are awaiting the
results of an autopsy.

Woman is
assaulted
by armed
men

A DEVEAUX Street
woman was assaulted on
Tuesday by two armed men
who attempted to rob her
according to police.

Assistant Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson said the
woman reported the incident
to sometime after 11am on
Wednesday.

It is reported that while she
was entering her home, the
woman was approached by

cash.
The woman tol. “TO bers’

Robbery |
reported. at.
man’s home

A NASSAU Village man
was reportedly robbed at his
home early Wednesday
morning.

Police say they received a
report of the incident just
after 1.30am that day.

It was alleged that the man
was leaving his home and was
approached by four men
armed with handguns.

The men reportedly robbed
him of his wallet then went
inside his apartment and stole
some coins.

They reportedly escaped in
a blue Ford Explorer.

BV RRs
FRi., MAY 12

6:30 Bahamas @ Sunrise - live
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update - live
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 A Special Report

Gumbo TV

Carmen San Diego
International Fellowship of
Christian & Jews

Lobias Murray



































4:00 Dennis The Menace
4:30 Carmen San Diego
4:58 ZNS News Update
5:00 Fun Farm

5:30 411

Caribbean Passport

6:30 News Night 13
}7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Da’ Down Home Show:
70th Anniversary of Radio
Special
9:00 The Envy Life

9:30 3D’ Funk Studio

10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
11:30 Community Pg./1540AM

SAT. MAY 13

6:30 Community Page
ae Bahamas @ Sunrise
0:00 Underdo
10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Di
11:30 Tennessee Tuxedo & His
Tales
#12:00 411

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
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programme changes!





two men who demanded i





@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

TOO many Bahamians are
employed by the government
in jobs which they are not qual-
ified to do according to Inde-
pendent MP for South Andros
Whitney Bastian.

He urged the government to
work towards ensuring that
more persons have jobs that
conform to their qualifications.

“I continue to say to ministers
that if we are to build our com-
munity we should build them
with the best people,” he said.

“Give those persons a job who
are qualified to do a job. If they
are qualified to do maid work
then let them do maid work,”
said Mr Bastian. “But don’t put
someone with no BGCSEs to be
an Officer at national insurance
or in the commissioner’s office to
do clerk work when they can’t
type.”

The independent MP also
told The Tribune yesterday that
he is courting a European
investor to South Andros to in









a WHITNEY Bastian

an effort to create more jobs.
However, Mr Bastian said
that there are some unique
complications arising out of the
land situation in Andros.
“Most of the property in
South Andros is generation
property and those properties
have not been probated to be
eligible enough to be put on the
market. Investors won’t come

Mattes ey rey al























MERCHANTS who operate
down-town shops have been
urged to make any complaints
about police officers directly to

the commissioner’s office.

Several shop owners contact-
ed The Tribune earlier. this
week, saying their repeated
complaints about certain offi-
cers seem to have gone unno-
ticed.

They say the officers are inef-
fective at combating the drug

- problem in the area and that

the Tourism Police Unit has
failed to respond to calls for the
officers to be replaced.

When the matter was brought
to his attention yesterday, Assis-
tant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson said that in future, the
shop owners should go straight
to the top — as officers who
allow crime to go on “under
their noses” must be dealt with.

“If it is necessary to remove

. them, we’ll do that, because we

(| O
eH +

Independent MP’s claim



to Andros to straighten up a
family’s property. They will
come hopefully when the prop-
erty is straightened.

“The issue we have now is try-
ing to bring families together to
straighten their land to sell por-
tions of their land to potential
investors who want to do busi-
ness in Andros,” the MP said.

Mr Bastian said that he made |

the move because of the chal-
lenges he has faced in creating
jobs in hig constituency.

“The government.has said
there has been a freeze on hiring
for some time but the freeze is
on hold only for certain persons.
So the challenge is to create
opportunities other than jobs
from the government,” he said.

Mr Bastian conceded that the

government has been doing a lot —

of infrastructural work in his con-
stituency — but added that all of
this was due to his prompting.

@ TRAFFIC
‘| on the bridge
to Paradise
Island had to
be diverted
yesterday after
this delivery
truck crashed
into one of the
toll booth
entrances

(Photo:
Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



itown traders urged to take polit
complaints direct to commissioner

put them there to prevent
crime. That is what we are all
about — prevention,” he said.

Mr Ferguson, who is the offi-
cer-in-charge of crime, urged all
citizens who observe the police
béhaving in an inappropriate
manner to report them directly
to the commissioner’s office or
to senior police officials.

The shop owners, who wished
to remain anonymous, said cer-
tain officers stationed near their
shops consistently fail to deal
with drug pushers and other
“hustlers” who harass tourists
walking through the area.

The merchants said they have
complained several times to
officers from the new Police
Tourism Unit and to the Cen-
tral Police Station.

- When The Tribune contacted
the Tourism Unit for comment
on the matter, an officer who
identified herself as Officer
Richardson said she could not

Bay RSP ei ray Maat eae

© Tel: 242-356-7302
eae) pla aa ie



respond to the issue.

Although she acknowledged
that the area in question is
under the unit’s jurisdiction,
Officer Richardson said the
police press liaison office would
have to be contacted for com-
ment.

- She added only that the shop
owners know the correct pro-
cedure for making the com-
plaints,
The Tribune”.

“But that’s the whole prob-
lem,” said one of thé merchants.
“We have reported this prob-
lem repeatedly and nothing has
happened.”

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“other than contacting



“The government did not dis-
criminate against us in that
regard, in fact from the time the
PLP government got in power
the infrastructure got put in
place. The only thing I would
like for the government in terms
of the infrastructural develop-
ment is to complete the dock in
Fresh Creek so the people in
Central Andros can save money.

“Gas has gone up and they
now have to go to North Andros
to clear their stuff because the
dock is in bad condition. I am

Re tom es

their ‘obs

saying to them that we were
able to put the infrastructure in
place; now if they have a sec-
ond term it should be concen-
trating on creating job opportu-
nities in South Andros,” he said.

Mr Bastian added that he is’
certain he will win his seat by a

larger margin than he did last“

time.

“When I first got elected I
promised that I would do the
best I can in terms of represen-
tation because the people of
Andros have been complaining
that they were not able to hear *
my predecessor’s voice in par-
liament — now there is no doubt
that they will hear my voice,”
he said.

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/


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 20U6

THE TRIBUNE









LEON E. H. DUPUCH, +

(



EILEEN DUPUCH CARRO

Insurance Management Building., P.

























AMSTERDAM, Netherlands —— Fears that
the deadly strain of bird flu would move
through Africa and Europe in flocks of wild
birds have so far proven unfounded, but the
danger is not entirely over, a Dutch environ-
mental group said Thursday.

Experts from Wetlands International tesied

‘some 5,000 wild birds in countries including
Tunisia, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Sudan, Senegal,
Malawi and Kenya but didn’t find the highly
pathogenic HSN1 virus, which can be fatal in
humans, said Ward Hagemeijer, who studies
the disease for the organization.
» Scientists had feared that the spread of the
virus would pick up speed with the birds’ win-
ter migration to Africa and the Middle East,
and their spring return to Europe.

“Theoretically, it is. still possible,” Hage-
‘meijer said, referring to an outbreak of the dis-
ease in Europe. But he said the risks now

appear low.

‘Scientists say they do not know why bird flu
does not appear to be spreading in the wild as

' - widely and quickly as feared.

» While bird flu experts say they are relieved
‘that they have not found the deadly strain in
many migrating birds, the data they have gath-
ered is limited and they are not ready to

«declare victory against H5N1 in wild fowl.

“It’s a needle in the haystack, and in the
_ haystacks we looked, we didn’t find any nee-
: .dles,” said Juan Lubroth,.a senior officer for

rhe gny

. JERUSALEM -~-. The outgoing head of

“ Israel’s National Security Council said

‘Wednesday that time is‘ running out to find a

-~ diplomatic. solution to Iran’s nuclear pro-

gramme, but cautioned against talking about
military action.

Israel has grown increasingly concerned in
recent months by calls from Iran’s leader to
wipe out Israel, and by Iran’s efforts to devel-
op a nuclear capability. Iran insists the pro-

- gramme is for peaceful purposes, but Israel
and the West believe Iran is trying to develop
an atomic bomb.

“We do believe that a political solution to
the problem is still achievable although time
is running out,” Giora Eiland told foreign
reporters in Jerusalem.

“J don’t think that any military option
should be discussed right now,” added Eiland,
who is about to end his stint as head of the
policy-making council after a new Israeli gov-
ernment took office last week.

Eiland’s comments were in contrast to
Israeli Vice Premier Shimon Peres’ warning
on Monday that Iran could be threatened
with destruction if it continues to vow to
destroy Israel.

“Be careful with your, threats,” Peres told

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

| MULTDISCOUNT FURNITURE & [

| The First Stop on your Shopping List!

BEAT THE HEAT

LOCAL NEWS

NA ete:
ara SCE

‘ublisher/ Editor 1903-1914

Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor i972-

N, CMG...

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas

O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Wild bird flu epidemic unproven

animai neaith at the ULN. Food and Agricul-
ture Organization in Rome.

In the Netherlands, which sits on a major
bird migration path, more thar 13,000 wild
birds have been tested since F ebruary. None
showed signs of HS5N1. Earlier this month,
the government attributed its success to mea-
sures to contain the spread of the virus, and
good luck.

“Naturally, there were the measures we
took, and maybe that had its effect, but you
can also say we were just lucky,” said Agri-
culture Ministry spokeswoman Nynke van der
Zee,

The virus appeared in February i in swans
and other wild birds in widely dispersed areas
of Europe, which went on high alert. The
European Union ordered free-range domestic
poultry to be kept indoors to avoid contact

with potentially infected geese and other _

migrators.

The EU has begun easing some restrictions _

in recent weeks, but extended preventive mea-
sures for poultry in farms near wildlite water
reserves and river deltas until the end of the
year.

HSN1 has been spreading from Asia to
Africa and Europe since 2003. At least 113
people have died from the strain, which led to
the slaughter of more than 200 million ani-
mals to prevent what health officials had
warned could be a lethal pandemic.

‘+: Tran’s nuclear programme fallout

Channel 1 TV. “Those who threaten to
destroy are in danger of being destroyed.”
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
on Wednesday dismissed Western concerns
over its nuclear programme as “a big lie,” a
day after key U.N. Security Council mem-
bers agreed to present Tehran with a choice of
incentives or sanctions in deciding whether to
suspend uranium enrichment.
Ahmadinejad told reporters in Jakarta,
Indonesia that Iran will “absolutely not back
out” of defending its right to pursue new tech-

nology, accusing the United States and other

Western nations of monopolizing the nuclear
technology market to secure profits while
engaging in non“peacefuil proliferation.

In recent months Israel has expanded its
military arsenal, acquiring dozens of war-
planes and long-range fuel tanks to allow
them to reach Iran. However, officials have
said they want te jet diplomacy take its course
and that joint action with other countries is
preferable to Israeli unilatefal moves.

Israeli officials have described Iran’s
nuclear quest as the Jewish state’s greatest
threat. Military experts disagree over whether
Israel would be capable of taking out Iran’s
nuclear programme on its own. —

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Considering

crime and
Brokeback

EDITOR, The Tribune

Two topics very briefly if you
please.

Topic 1:

Attorney General, Allyson
Maynard — Gibson has recently
stated very strongly that there
will be a new attitude from her
office in dealing with criminal
procedure. I am very inspired
by her pronouncement because
|, like many other inteliectually
honest Bahamians, understand
that punishment is second only

. in importance to prevention, as

a means of combating crime.
And, capital punishment is a jus-
tifiable, and necessary weapon
in the arsenal of criminal pun-
ishment, contrary to the very
liberal opinion. that it is not.



LETTERS

letters@tribunemecia.net




May ournew Attorney Gen-
eral experience every success in
her endeavours to bring crime
in this country under control. :

Topic 2:

Those people who have
denounced the recent decision -
by whomever it was — to. ban
Brokeback Mountain from the
Bahamas, and indeed all of
those global protesters claim-
ing that it was merely a bad case
of homophobia that caused the
film to be a failure at the box
office and not receive any
deserved awards, should be

aware of one other explanation
for the rejection of the film. It is
entirely possible that the film
was a failure simply because
there are still more “old fash-
ioned” people left in the US
and the Bahamas than there are
“newagers”.

Simply stated, we have the
right to reject the film, and we
did. Homophobia? I don’t think
so, but if it makes the gay com-
munity feel better, then Tam
homophobic I guess. However,
I still don’t hate gays..So what
does that make me? A nice pet-
son I hope.

WILLIAM (BILLY)
ROBERTS

Abaco,

May 6 2006

Concern over the rising
price of our beer

EDITOR, The Tribune

Just a quick note from a con-

cerned beer consumer...

I am sure anyone who is
worth their weight in hops or
barely has found themselves
laying awake at night tossing
and turning over the frothy
height of beer prices...gas and

oil prices you say? Ha! I am_

much more concerned about
the price it takes to fill my trunk
with of a couple cases of the
good stuff vs. what it costs to

_ fill the old gas tank...heck, take

gas to $5:a gallon forall I care

as long.as-I can buy a six pack

for $5!

What’s the cheapest price for
a case of beer these days, that
would be Kalik for about $35 if
your lucky...now, why is it that
in the USA for example one of
their famous home brews (Bud-
weiser) goes for about $15 a
case...seems a little odd to me
but of course when you can buy
a case of Kalik cheaper in the
USA vs. The Bahamas then I
guess maybe we are floating
around in Coo-Coo land any-

way and nothing should come

as being odd.

My father recalls that about
35 years ago he could buy a case
of beer for about $5;
whoooaaaaa Nellie! Bring those
happy days back again...yes,
yes, yes, we have our friend
inflation but I will tell you this,
no way the average beer drink-
ing man’s salary has gone up
700 per cent in the same peri-

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se Phone:
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94



SAAN yy TT TT NNN I

NATALIA LON NIIHATNIINT

od..:conspiracy of crowns you
say well this is most certainly a
conspiracy of beers.

Now, J am not an expert on >

the matter and I don’t have a
clue which person or group of
persons is responsible for these
lofty beer prices, but I am sure

they have made enough mon--

ey over the last couple of
decades to continue to enjoy
the good life for themselves as
well as their offspring for gen-
erations to. come...bathing in
champagne and _rose petals,
hmmmph, they are probably
bubbling around in the golden
brew with a rubber duckey or
two (course the Champagne
and roses would be cheaper...)
Hey! I even heard a rumour
that this year beer prices could
fall due to some tariff or tax or
price gouge or crazy markup or
whatever you want to call it
being removed...sounds won-
derful 'm sure but until I can
hold a
hand that came from a case
costing less that $25 I will still
feel like myself along with my
beer-drinking Bahamian broth-
ers and sisters are getting a
skunk deal (no pun intended of
course).

I could go on for days and
days about this current national
crisis but I am afraid I need to
catch some sleep so I can get
up in the morning, head to
work, and make some money;
after all, maybe one day I will
be able to.afford more than one
case of beer and can trade in




cold, frosty beer in my -

5c uth ¢ PO. Box N-7984 @ Nassau, Bahamas

Plan ‘Ahead!

“yt wasn't raining when Noah
built the ark.
SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798

Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

my ice cold lemonade parties
for a beer party or two (watch it
now, one beer limit per’person!
Better yet, perhaps I could hand
out plastic cups and split one

- beer between two...pour a good

head on there and the cup may
even look full...sheesh, who
said beer drinkers couldn’t
think on their feet, (or off their
teet for that matter).

Not sure if it’s the lack of
sleep, lack of beer or too many
bubbles, but I just came across a
brilliant idea for the election
theme this year. To heck with
all the other trivial issues like
gas prices, grid-lock traffic and
the giving away of Bahamian
land, the first party to lie to
me.....ummmmm, I mean con-
vince me that they will find a
way to get the case of beer price
under $25 gets my vote...heck,
I will even make things easier, .
don’t worry about buying votes, .
just drop a pallet or two of beers
on my doorstep and I could
probably get the whole neigh-
bourhood on board your self-
less cause or causes I’m sure.

- I will close with a quote that
will both capture the hearts of
the beer drinkers among us and
maybe even a few of the church
going folk as well...“Beer is
proof that God loves us and
wants us to be happy” — Ben-
jamin Franklin.

Yours brewerly,

CAL LECK
Nassau
May 2006














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PM
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 , PAGE 5





In brief —

Sewing
industry
planned
in Abaco

HOUSEWIVES in North
Abaco are hoping to launch a
new home-based industry
aimed at boosting the local
economy.

The women are learning to
sew as part of an initiative by
North Abaco Co-op and the
Caribbean Development Bank.

« This week, they are receiving
expert tuition from. Wayne
Cabosan, a West Indian tech-
nical co-ordinator who is teach-
ing them the crafts of sewing,
pattern-making and fabric
preparation.

“Jt is hoped the women will
be able to get a small industry
going in those parts because
there is not a lot going on up
there,” said an islander.

The scheme was co-ordinated
by Burnell Parker and Leon
Pinder of North Abaco Co-op,
working with Cheryl Bowe-
Moss of the Bahamas Co-op
League.

Around 20 women are under-
going training at the Anglican ©
Parish Hall at Foxtown. Most
come from the nearby settle-
ments of Crown Haven, Cedars
Harbour, Mount Hope and
Wood Cay.

The idea is that the women ~

could become involved in mak-
ing uniforms for the police and
Defence Force.

But they are also being urged
to produce tourist goods like
shorts and T-shirts.

‘The Co-op has supplied
equipment and fabric for this
week’s workshops.

‘North Abaco, unlike the,

Marsh Harbour area, is remote
and relatively depressed eco-
nomically. Fishing is the main
industry, but the Co-op would
like to see more diversity.

een aes ol
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

aa rte SE
822-21 Ly Ae



-Bahamians treated unfairly
at Bimini Bay, say locals

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A small group
of locals are claiming that
Bahamian workers are being
treated unfairly at the Bimini
Bay Resort in North Bimini.

Early this week, a small num-
ber of concerned Biminites held
a protest against the treatment
of workers and the lack of pub-
lic access beyond the gate of the
multi-million dollar resort and
residential development.

Bimini Bay developer Ger-
ardo Capo was harshly criticised
by residents over the employ-
ment of large numbers of expa-
triates in the construction phase.

The construction of a gate
barring access to crown land
and to a beach has also been a

contentious issue among
Biminites.

One of the protesters claimed
that Bahamian workers are
being paid low wages. She also
alleged that workers are not
allowed to use bathroom facili-
ties or go into the cafeteria at
Bimini Bay.

The resident said Bahamian
workers are afraid to come for-
ward and complain for fear of
losing their jobs.

According to the protester,
there are more Mexican work-
ers than Bahamian workers
employed at Bimini Bay.

“Mr Capo is not complying
with the labour laws and has
failed to come through on
promises of better wages,”
claimed the resident. “He
don’t want Bahamians to
work overtime because he

does not want to pay!”

“Residents are also being
denied access through the gate.
How are we supposed ito land
and beaches on the other side?”
she asked.

The Bimini native said anoth-
er demonstration will be held
in the near future.

“T have sent a fax and e-mail
last week to Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe about the situation
at Bimini Bay, but I have not
received a response from him,”
she said.

Mr Wilchcombe could not be
reached for comments.

Mr Capo could also not be
reached. ,

When The Tribune called the
Bimini Bay Resort, the auto-
mated telephone answering sys-
tem seemed not to be function-

ing properly.

ll GERARDO Capo





OPE





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Coroner delays summation to allow
lawyers to prepare their addresses

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
AFTER hearing addresses from

counsel this morning, Coroner Linda’

Virgill is expected to give her summa-
tion of the inquest into the January 17
prison break which led to the deaths of
corporal Dion Bowles and inmate Neil
Brown.

Coroner Virgill delayed her summa-
tion yesterday to give lawyers repre-
senting witnesses time to formulate and
make their addresses to her.

This decision came yesterday when
lawyer Michael Hanna, who is repre-

senting Bettymae Trotman, the mother .

‘of deceased inmate Neil Brown, asked
to have until this morning to formulate
an address to the jury.

Mr Hanna noted that he joined the
inquest at a rather late stage and did not
get as much co-operation as he would
have liked in regards to attaining certain
information.

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The attorney said that he would be
ready this morning and that his address
would take about 30 minutes.

However, Director of Prosecutions
Bernard Turner pointed out that in a
coroners inquest, no addresses could
be made by anyone other than the coro-
ner.

Coroner Virgill concurred, noting
that whatever address Mr Hanna
wished to make would have to be deliv-
ered in the absence of the seven-mem-
ber jury.

Other lawyers who have placed them-
selves on the record will also be allowed
to make addresses to the coroner this
morning before she: gives her summa-
tion and allows the jury to deliberate.

Two prison officers were recalled to
the witness stand yesterday to give
information about a firearm that was
allegedly used on the morning of the
breakout.

However, no information could be

ascertained as to the serial number of
the gun.

Chief Officer Hanna told the court
that he worked the 2pm to 10pm shift
on January 16 and that he was the
senior officer on duty.

Mr Hanna said he could not say who

"was directly responsible for the armory

at the prison.

He told the court that he turned his
shift over to PO Gregory Rolle, who
was alone at the time.

When asked whether it was common
practice for someone to turn over his
shift to just one officer, Mr Hanna said
it was.

He also stated he returned to he
prison on the morning of January 17
after learning of the prison break.

. Officer Hanna stated that he knew
of the safe in the PO’s office but did
not know exactly how many weapons

“were kept i in it.

The wéapons, he said, were changed



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from time to time but no record of the
changes was kept.

During questioning by lawyer.
Michael Hanna, Chief Officer Hanna
said he could not recall seeing ASP Far-.
rington or Sgt Steven Sands during his
shift.

During his testimony, Principal Offi-
cer Rolle said he still could not recall
the serial number of the weapon he
issued to officer Neko Sergeant that
night.

He was asked whether it was com-
mon practice to simply hand a weapon,
to another officer over a fence.

Mr Rolle noted that it was not, but
said that because of what was going on
at the time, he did what was necessary.

He said that three guns were in the
safe in the PO’s office, for which he
had the key, and they were used 5
emergency. purposes.

He said that when issuing the gun to
Officer Sergeant, he had no time to

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

a eee ee

LOCAL NEWS



IN honour of Earth Day
2006, the Bahamas National
Trust partnered with RBC Roy-
al Bank of Canada to launch a
public education programme on
Love 97 Radio called the Envi-
ronmental Minute.

The Environmental Minute is
a series of 60-second radio com-
mercials that aim to educate the
public about the environment.

The commercials are played
during morning drive time on
Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day of each week, in an effort to
reach a wide group of persons
with practical conservation
information to help improve the
environment.



@ PICTURED in the front row, from left to right, are: Jan
Knowles, director of development for the Bahamas National
‘Trust; Deborah Zonicle, marketing manager of RBC for
Bahamas and the Caribbean, and Lynn Gape, director of id
“There is an increased aware- education for the Bahamas National Trust. In the back row are:
ness among.Bahamians with. . Tony Williams and Greg Lampkin of Love 97. ‘
regard to the environment,” | o
said Christopher Hamilton, our natural resources and this the entire cost of the Environ- 4,
executive director’ of “the---joint-venture-with-Royal Bank: -mental Minutes, RBC has also... 50
Bahamas National Trust. “Peo- is the perfect way to passonthe _ provided a $40, 000 grant to sup;
ple are open to learning, what knowledge that is needed.” port conservation education in...
they can do to help preserve In addition to underwriting public primary schools. “A

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FISHERMEN in booming
southern Abaco are seeking

more protection from tourists

who raid their lobster traps and
plunder local fish stocks.
They want official restrictions

placed on part-time recreation-.

al fishermen who interfere with
their livelihoods.

And they are demanding
weight limits on tourist catches
so that local fish stocks can be
preserved.

Agriculture and Fisheries
Minister Leslie Miller has been

_in Abaco this week to hear the

fishermen’s concerns. He was at
Treasure Cay last night and
Marsh Harbour the night before.

Fishermen have complained

that tourists not only raid lob- -

ster traps, but also the specially-
placed “condos” used to attract

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‘One suggestion is that tourists

crawfish colonies.
They feel tourists should

_Tecognise an extended “closed

season” for lobster catching and
be restricted in how much fish
they can land on a “per boat”

should catch lobster only from
October onwards, enabling
commercial fishermen to take.
advantage of August and Sep-
tember.

And fishermen would also
like to see a ban on fish imports
from Florida at certain times of
the year, thus protecting the
local industry.

They believe farmers get
preferential treatment from
government in this regard
because certain crop imports
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An islander told The. Tribune.

“Mr Miller has been. hearings”
what they have to say and will
no doubt take it all on board.”:

Residents feel Abaco is a vic-
tim.of its.own success. :

The foreign yachting com=*
munity and second home own-
ers are now the foundation of
the island’s burgeoning. econio— :
my. :

But one of Abaco’ s attrac. .
tions for boat-owners is its rich
fishing grounds.

“Finding a balance between’
recreational fishing and com- ‘
mercial fishing has never been
easy,” said the source. _ .

“However, there is no doubt |
that tourists raid lobster traps .





bt

gal, it’s certainly unethical.”

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ame Nea es a oo SP km tL AB te She









THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 , PAGE 7







In brief

Arrest
following
shooting

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police have arrested a
26-year-old man in connection
with a gunshot injury sustained
by a 32-year-old male resident
of Garden Villas.

According to reports, the vic-
tim, Godfrey Saunders of Wed-
dell Avenue, was shot in the
knee sometime around 11.30am
on Wednesday.

Police Superintendent Basil
Rahming said that after the
shooting, the suspect fled the
scene in a white Toyota Camry.

Despite being wounded,
Saunders gave chase in a white
Buick, Supt Rahming said.

He said officers from the
Mobile Patrol Division, the
Central Detective Unit and the
Flying Squad responded.

The Mobile Patrol officers
intercepted the white Camry on
Coral Road and took the dri-
ver into custody.

Saunders was also intercepted
on East Sunrise Highway.

He was removed from his
vehicle, placed into an ambu-
lance and taken to Rand
Memorial Hospital, where he is
in stable condition.

Another man is assisting
police with their investigations
into the matter.

Police
discover
firearms.
stash

e Police made a firearms find
in the Pinewood Gardens area
on Tuesday afternoon.

Officers say they arrested
someone around 6pm after find-
ing a sawn-off, 12-gauge Mos-
berg shotgun which had its.ser-
ial number erased.

Investigations are ongoing.

Sears claims new
police act will bring
accountability _

THE proposed amend-
ments to the Police Service
Act would bring a much-
needed regime of account-
ability, transparency and
oversight to the force accord-
ing to Minister of Education
Alfred Sears.

Making his contribution to
the debate on the amend-
ments, Mr Sears said there is
an understandable and justi-
fied call for transparency and
accountability in all execu-
tive agencies of the state.

In a democratic country,
the minister went on to say,
the guardians of peace must
always be accountable to
parliament and the sovereign
people of the country.

“The police, in carrying
out its functions, must do so
in accordance with the laws
of the Bahamas,” said Mr
Sears, quoting from a section
of the Act. “The police must
observe and respect the fun-
damental rights and free-
doms of the individual as laid
down in the Constitution.”

He pointed out that the
police are also charged with

observing the rights af visi-.

tors and undocumented per-
sons in the country — as those
persons are recognised by the
Constitution as having funda-
mental rights and freedoms.
“What we are seeking to
do in the Bill is to declare to
the world that under our
Constitution, torture is ille-
gal,” Mr Sears said. “The

‘Constitution is very explicit

in saying that torture is not

’ punishment and that no per-

son in our country, irrespec-
tive of their status in our
country should be subjected
to torture.”

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sioner of police and other offi-
cers are supporting the Bill is
“testimony of the maturity and
commitment of the police ser-
vice to uphold the rule of law
and order of our country,” he
said.

Mr Sears pointed out that the

Bill proposes six levels of

accountability to ensure trans-
parency, which set out clear
mechanisms to maximise the
efficiency of the police service.

Within these levels, there are
provisions for an internal and








external inspector, an inspec-
torate, and a complaints and
corruption unit which will inves-
tigate all complaints of corrup-
tion claims in the service.
Reminding the members of
the House that they derive their
legitimacy from the “sovereign
exercise” of the Bahamian peo-

ple every five years, Mr Sears |

said that he wished there was a
provision of accountability in
all branches of government —
because “there are too many
times ‘our citizens complain
about the lack of responsive-
ness in our public institutions.”






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HE TRIBUNE

BEFORE the FNM became the major

“political force it is today, it began as a small

‘: breakaway troop from the PLP.
However, if the founding fathers had

been opportunists, as those in other
‘so-called political parties today, I doubt that

we would have a formidable opposition.
According to historian John Berryman,
the groundwork for the FNM occurred.in
1970 when eight PLP members (Dissident
Eight) led by Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield
left the PLP, then the governing party, to

_form the Free PLP.

These non-conformists maintained that

‘they broke away because the PLP was

squandering money and creating
circumstances that would increase
joblessness.

Berryman states that in 1971, the Free
PLP and the UBP unified to shape the Free
National Movement. Its leader was Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield. After this point, the
UBP no longer existed, leading to the FNM
becoming the official opposition party in
1972.

However, all was not glossy within the
FNM. Mr Berryman notes that before the
1977 general election, there was a split
which resulted in the formation of the
Bahamian Democratic Party (BDP).

After the election, the PLP won 30 seats,
the BDP six and the FNM two. He states
that further opposition infighting, in 1980,
led many to believe that a viable option to
the PLP government was a distant dream.

In his book, The Bahamas, Berryman
writes that only the diminutive and
outspoken Vanguard Nationalist and
Socialist Party (VNSP), whose agenda was
to restructure the wealth of the country
from the affluent to the poor, served as any
challenge to the government during the
years of instability within the FNM.

With Sir Kendal Isaacs and Sir Cecil at
the helm of the FNi#@ in 1982, most
members of the BDP reunited with them,
feeling, as Berryman writes, that it was
‘Time for Change’.

Even with a new platform, the FNM was
sacked in the general elections by the PLP,
whose battle ery was ‘Step Now to the New
Frontier’. That year, the PLP won 32 seats
to the FNM’s eleven.

The FNM was to be defeated again in
1987, before being victorious in the 1992
general election, under the lgadershiE of
Hubert Ingraham.

Historian Don Maples notes that several
factors led to the PLP’s defeat:



Mr Ingraham’s political skills, Sir Lynden’s
misjudgment about the political climate,
mounting unemployment, allegations of
corruption and ineptitude, anda
floundering economy.

As recently as 2002, the FINM was
crushed in a landslide victory for the PLP.
Again, the public lost confidence in the
party, due to the leadership vacuum,
allegations of corruption and
mismanagement and the over-inflated,
self-serving egos of certain FNM politicians.

Last year, the party was again divided by
a leadership clash, which resulted in
Mr Ingrahami’s return to control of the
party. Yet, through the adversity, FNMs are
pushing on to the next election confident
that they will be the next government.

So, now that ve examined the struggles
of the FNM over a 35-year span, why won't
the leaders of the CDR stay the course,
especially if they are genuinely interested in
providing Bahamians with a feasible third
option? Could it be opportunism?

In the May 9, 2006, edition of The
Tribune, tt was reported that the FNM wa
courting CDR leader Charles Maynard anid

chairman Phenton Neymour. Even the
former head of the party's public relations,
Stephen Mitchell, bluntly stated: “Maynard
and Neymour seem to be headed to the
FNM.”

With the FNM taking no chances and

_trying to absorb the CDR leaders to secure

its votes, other so-called leaders
be now prepared to jump ship as

Dr Bernard Nofiage did last year, thereby,
heightening the notion that these men are
opportunists whose only interes? is
self-aggrandisement.

Based on Mr Maynard’s statements this
week, it seems he disbelieves that he can
“survive in politics or make a real
contribution” with the CDR.

So, as election time approaches, the
CDR can be compared to-a ship without a
rudder.

It is interesting to see the hybrid party
the FNM is now becoming in ihe lead up to
the elections, with Mr Maynard and others
reportedly being invited fo rum as
candidates. :

However, Mr Maynard, why won't you
and Bernard Nottage heed the old adage
that the captain should be the last to
abandon ship? i :



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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

THE TRIBUNE







( Brea

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Good Books Unbound








STORY SO FAR: The children had been
running their one-room school but Mr. Jor-
dan of the school board closed the school
and called a school board meeting to keep it
closed.

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
The School Board Meets

‘HE school board meeting took

place the very next evening.
On a bench brought forward for the
occasion sat the four members of the
Elk Valley School Board. Mr. Jordan
was there. So too was Mr. Hawkins,
the Methodist Church minister, a roly-
poly man, too large for the dark suit he
wore. Ebeneezer Morris, sheep ranch-
er, was there, dressed in his working
clothes. By his side was Mr. Plum-
stead, head of the Elk Valley Bank,
looking very formal in his suit with
high white collar, tie, and wire frame
eyeglasses.

The eight worried children sat in a

row before the board. Behind them .

were their parents, plus some interest-
ed adults from the township.
Though Mr. Jordan was taken by sur-

_prise by all the people at the meeting,

he dared not say a word.

“Seems to me,’ he opened the meet-
ing by saying, “we’ve got a mess here.
This school was supposed to be closed.
These children were trespassing on
township property. And Ida Bidson
was pretending to be the teacher.”

“And I’m afraid,” interjected Mr.
Plumstead, “I saw Miss Fletcher lock
the front door. I gave the key to you,
Mr. Jordan. How did you children get
in?”

“Through the window,” Herbert
hooted.

“But may I ask,” Mr. Hawkins, the
minister, interrupted, “if there’s been
any damage done to the building? You
inspected it, Mr. Jordan. ny prob-
lems?”

“T can’t say there were,” Mr. Jordan
admitted. “But trespassing is trespass-
ing.”

“Now, now,” cut in Mr. Morris.
“These children were just trying to get
on with their education. Fact is, Mr.
Jordan, I didn’t even know Miss Fletch-
' er was gone. Leastways you never told
me. Did you know?” he asked the
minister.

“Only recently.”

“Too late to get a replacement,” Mr.

The Tribune

The Secret School



WRITTEN BY AVI
ILLUSTRATED BY BRIAN FLOCA



“S

MAX

a CA A \

+

J ordan growled. “Didn't want to both-
er you.’
. “Fine.” Mr. Morris said. “But I can’t

see how these kids did any real harm..

Fact, ?d say they were doing what we
want — learning. More power to them.”
The audience applauded.

Looking uncomfortable, Mr. Jordan .

said, “But this girl,” he pointed to Ida,
“this Ida Bidson was pretending to be a
teacher. Can’t pay the girl if she’s got

- no license.”

“Did we pay her?” called someone
from the audience.

“Course not,” Mr. Jordan said. “She
isn’t licensed.

“Then she saved us a heck of a lot of.

money, didn’t she?” said Mr. Morris.
‘The room erupted into laughter.
Ida raised her hand.
“What do you want?” Mr. Jordan
‘demanded.

“May I say something, please?” she

said.
_ “T don’t know as how .

“Oh, let the girl speak, > Mr. Morris
suggested. “After all, you have accused
her of something.”

The other men on the board nodded.

Ida rose up from her bench seat. “Mr.
Jordan, we didn’t mean any harm.. It’s
just that both Tom and I want so bad-
ly to go on: He’s going to be an electric
specialist. I’m to be a teacher. But we
need schooling for that. The other
children wanted to get on, too, not
repeat anything. Tom and I need to

take the exam so we can go to high

school. We did everything by votes.
Majority always ruled.”

“You can say that again,” Herbert
cried out.

rain;

“I would like,” Ida went on:
recite a brief poem we learnéd.”

“We don’t do poetry at School Béard

Meetings,” Mr. Jordan said gruffly.

“Might be a‘good thing if we did,”
Mr. Hawkins said.

Red faced, ‘Mr. Jordan said, “Well,
do your piece.”

Ida, hands extended, gesturing dra-
matically as she spoke, began: “Sowing
and Reaping.’
Procter.

‘Sow with a generous hand;

Pause not for toil and pain;

Weary not through the heat of sum-

‘mer,

Weary not through the cold spring

But wait till the autumn comes:
For the sheaves of golden grain.

Scatter the seed, and fear not,

A table will be spread;

What matter if you are too weary
To eat your hard-earned bread;
Sow, while the earth is broken,
‘For the hungry must be fed.’” __

Ida paused, then said, “Please, sirs,
the term is almost over. Miss
Sedgewick from the County Education
Office said she’d come and test us all.
We’d appreciate it-if you just gave us
the chance to pass. And,” she added,
“if we can’t meet at the schoolhouse,
we’ll meet elsewhere anyway. But
being here would make it official.”

There was great applause from the
crowd, even some stamping of feet.

As Ida sat down, Tom whispered,
“Great old job!”

The school board excused themselves

#0) abit

' going to let this ..

By Adelaide Anne —





and'went out to the porch. While they
were conferring, everyone else grouped -..
around Ida, congratulating her.
Finally, the school board men
trooped back in and sat down. ~

“We’ve had our discussion,” a grim- |*|.
“We're .

looking Mr. Jordan began:
. pretend school go
forward for two weeks. So the children |
can take their exams. No more.”
There were chee. from the audi- :
ence. — }
Ida stood up. “Thank—”
Mr. Jordan held up a hand. “But

‘there are conditions. First: the fami- | a

lies involved must take responsibility
for the building. Second, we expect ;
every child to pass their exams. If they
don’t, let the whole Valley know, it'“
won't be the board’s doing. It'll be the -
teacher’s.”

( Continued on Tuesday)

Please direct’ requests for a
teacher's guide (cost $7) containing
vocabulary words, story questions,
and newspaper. activities to The Tri-
bune’s marketing department on
Shirley Street, by calling 502-2394 or

DY e-mailing nie@tribunemedia. net

Text canyrisht © 2000 Avi

Illustrations copyright © 2000 Brian Floca
Reprinted by permission of Breakfast Serials,
Inc.

www.breakfastserials.com











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THE TRIBUNE

| otoy.\ ie Tie)

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 11



Con artist killer Kimes
seeks new trial in U

|
KILLER and con-artist Sante
Kimes, who is believed to have
drowned a banker in the bath at
her Cable Beach home, is seek-
ing a new trial in California over
the shooting of a family friend.
Her lawyer has argued that
jurors were not fully instructed
on the effect of accomplice tes-
timony when she was jailed for
life Jast year for the murder of
businessman David Kazdin.
Kimes, 71, was convicted~~
after her son and companion-

in-drime Kenny, 30; turned ~~

state’s evidence by confirming
that she told him to shoot
Kazdin after he had uncovered
a Idan fraud in which she had
forged his signature.

During his testimony, Kenny
Kimies also revealed that he and
his mother had drowned banker
Syed Bilal Ahmed at their
Cable Beach home in 1996.

Yhis occurred after Ahmed
had flown to Nassau from the
Cayman Islands to investigate
“irregularities” in a bank
account in her late husband’s
name. ;

Kenny Kimes said Ahmed’s
body was dumped at sea, a sto-
ry not believed by their neigh-
bours at Sulgrave Manor, who
think he was buried in the
grounds at their home.

The former Kimes home is
now derelict and its garden
overgrown,

‘At this week’s hearing, a
Kimes*attorney argued that
Sante deserved a new. trial in
the California case beeause ~
jurors were not fully instructed
on the effect of accomplice tes=~
timony.

The district court of appeal
was told by lawyer Seymour
Amster that the trial judge
erred by not telling jurors that
several witnesses were accom-
plices and conspirators.

Mr Amster argued to the
appellate panel that Los Ange-
les Superior Court Judge Kath-
leen Kennedy-Powell should
have told the jury that these wit-
nesses were potentially liable
for the murder.

‘He said that when the trial
judge instructed the jury on




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accomplices, she should have
listed the names of these wit-
nesses as being accomplices.

Mr Amster argued that the
witnesses were involved in
Kimes’ conspiracy to commit
bank fraud, and that Kazdin
was murdered in furtherance of
the conspiracy, specifically to
cover-it up. ~ -

The panel seemed doubtful,
asking whether the witnesses
‘knew of the murder; and-how—
that would clear Kimes. It said
the judge totd the jury: to-con--
sider the credibility of the wit-
nesses, given their involvement
in the fraud.

Mr Amster said witnesses
knew that documentary evi-
dence was being destroyed to
cover up the fraud, and that
Kazdin’s testimony was poten-
tially the most damaging evi-.
dence. The panel questioned
whether that was a real leap, ©
from destroying documents to
destroying a person.

Deputy District Attorney
Michael Johnsen argued that
any error was harmless, as there
was “abundant corroborative
evidence” with regard to Kenny
Kimes’ testimony. He also
argued that any error was
waived because Kimes’ trial
attorney did not seek an accom-
plice instruction listing the
names of witnesses.

He also argued that there
was no evidence that the wit-
nesses would have foreseen a
murder.

Sante and Kenny-Kimes 7

were both convicted of Kazd-
‘in’s murder: Their victim’s-body-
was left in a dumpster near Los
Angeles International Airport.

The pair got life without
parole to add to the 100-plus
years sentences they received
for murdering New York
socialite Irene Silverman in
1998,

Sante is now serving ier sen-
tence in California while Kenny
is in solitary confinement in
New York, having been addi-
tionally punished for taking a
television reporter hostage dur-
ing an interview.

Kenny was a student at St













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Andrew’s School during the
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until he and his mother left the
Bahamas to engage in a con-
and-kill crime spree across the

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 : THE TRIBUNE



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THE TRIBUNE






FROM page one

The matter with the FAA has
since been cleared up, he told
The Tribune.

According to Mr Wilson,
the aircraft next experienced
mechanical difficulties, and as
the procurement of parts was
not such a straightforward
matter, it has now been sent
abroad to be serviced.

Whether or not the aircraft
is appropriate to fly is a mat-
ter of opinion, said Mr Wil-
son.

Answering claims that the
force does not have qualified

pilots to fly the King Air 350°

craft, Mr Wilson said: "We
assure the country that the
commander of the airwing
was specifically trained to fly
the aircraft, as he has had spe-
cific theoretical and hands-on
training. Additionally, there
would have to be a person
who is qualified to fly second,
and we have such a person."
As to the craft's reconnais-
sance capabilities not being
suitable for the Bahamas, Mr
Wilson said Mr Smith's view
is only one view. He
explained the other view that
was given to government: "If

- you are dealing with recon-

naissance, you don't want to
be flying too low so that the

Man is shot in neck

FROM page one.

ment, and that his wounds were described as being “not life threat-

ening”.’

In other crime related matters, the body that was found in the
Stapeldon Gardens drea.on Wednesday evening has been identified
as 44-year-old Debron Capron-of Sea Breeze Lane.

The cause of death is still: unknown, but police are treating the
matter as a “suspicious death”. However Mr Ferguson said that they
have no reason to beliéve that foul play is involved at this stage of

their investigations.

Also at around 1.50 yesterday morning, police, acting on infor-
mation, executed a warrant on a house in the Nassau Village area
where they discovered a handgun, ammunition, and a small amount
of marijuana. Thrée persons were arrested, and a 9mm pistol with
nine live rounds of ammunition were also seized.

PERE

The Light

*, wee

SSS ae os 255 SY
a get SS is Lo
Seeae CaaS OM OS

In Memoriam

LOCAL NEWS

Call for answers

drug boys can see you. If you
are looking for slow motion
Haitian vessels, that is fine,
but if you are looking for bul-
let fast drug boats, you don't
need to fly at or below 10,000
ft."

“What has not yet hap-
pened, because we have not
been in funds to do it, is that
the aircraft has to be supplied
with modern surveillance
equipment that would allow
it to do surveillance at an alti-
tude above 10,000 ft," said Mr
Wilson.

Mr Wilson said he remem-
bered when the former
administration was criticized
for its purchase of two large
vessels —- HMBS Nassau and
Bahamas.

"The same thing applies to
the Defence Force plane," he
said. "You have to take
something that is already
manufactured and determine,
given what we have to do, if
this piece of equipment fits
that prescription best.

"That is the modality that
we used in the purchase of the
large boats, and that is the
modality that we used in the
purchase of the aircraft," Mr
Wilson said. "There are diver-
gent views about the aircraft,
and what we did was take the
best advice that we could get,
and that advice told us that
this aircraft would have been
the best for the job that we

have overall."



<3 ‘nares

Fach day you looked out the window |
And saw the rising sun.

It shone so bright and brilliant

Until cach day was done -

The sky was clean, the wind so pure
Giving a feel. of tranquility

Life blooming everwhere _-
Butterllies flying ever so free

Then from nowhere came the clouds
Filled with anger and dismay

Bringing rain, thunder and lightening bolts
Leaving nota single ray

What a somber mood it can create
Nothing but darkness from above

Left to live fife without the light

You came to know and love

But thea you sit and ponder

The rain that. caused so much sorrow

May bring flowers, trees and clear the air

For perhaps.a brighter tomorrow

‘And even though the: pain remains

From the storm that came your way

It can’t take away your:precious memory
suinity cay.

=. From Wes, Owen, Gavin &



SA
07

SE, tht brit

Genevie Eloise Bastian

1948 - 2005 | ou

BY:
a SEN
"SG, Ss

Seow






RD Oo

bo

9S
Ey. &
Co LSP











Viva Wyndham Fortuna Beach Resorts

Pa protesting

Invites applications for the position
ios Of
Director of Marketing

All applicants must possess the following Attributes

_ Excellent Leadership Skills
Excellent Communication Skills

- Excellent Interpersonal Skills
Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills
Excellent Organizational Skills







The successful applicant must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible, with top
notch propriety. Minimum three (3) years experience as Director of
Marketing or Asst.-with proven track record and statistics.

Compensation package includes:






Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost
Attractive Bonus Plan
Medical Coverage
Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)






Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591





PS MAY 12, 2006, PAGE.13
MP to ask
Roberts




FROM page one

vation of the Central Andros High School in
2002 thai has been going on from 2002 to now.
I don’t know why these guys, up to 2006, still
are doing renovation work in the school in
Central Andros,” Mr Bannister said.

There were contracts also, lie said, given out
for the High Rock Primary School in Septem-
ber last year to last for six weeks.

“And this is now May and this job has not.
been completed as yet. Another job was given
out to a supporter in Deep Creek Primary
School to renovate for six weeks and up to

now the job has not been completed.

“I expect a government to look out for their
supporters, but if you are going to spend the
taxpayers’ money you should spend it wisely
and if you’re going to give it to your supporters
give it to your supporters who can do the
work,” the MP said.



Viva Wyiidham Fortuna Beach Resorts

Invites applications for the position
Of
Director of Sales

All applicants must possess the foliowing Attributes

Excellent Leadership Skills
Excellent Communication Skills
Excellent Interpersonal Skills
‘Advanced Sales/Sales Training Skills
Excellent Organizational Skills
In-depth Knowledge and Experience of Points/Credits System

The successful applicant must possess minimal computer skills in MS Word,
Excel and Power Point, Be creative, self motivated and flexible. Three (3)
years minimum experience as Director of Sales or Asst. with proven track
record and statistics

Compensation package includes:

Override on Sales
Override on Closing Cost :
Attractive Bonus Plan
Medical Coverage
Relocation & Housing (non G.B. Residents Only)

Send Cover Letter and Resume to

todd@vivaresorts.com or fax to 242-373-8591


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006





Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

DEATH NOTICE _

IONA MARY WOOD STRACHAN
an accomplished and well-known master musician and youngest
daughter of the late George Herbert Wood and the late Sarah
Ann Roker Wood of Gregory Town Eleuthera and Nassau
Bahamas died at her home in Miami Florida on Tuesday May .
9th 2006. She was 75 years.






























Mrs. Strachan began her musical career in Nassau Bahamas.
As a young woman she was an avid and active singer, pianist,
organist and saxophonist, who committed her musical talents
to the Lord and St. Joseph Catholic Church, Nassau Bahamas



Mrs. Strachan married the late Lester Wilfred Strachan and
the family migrated to Miami Florida where she advanced her
professional musical career and furthered her career as a music
teacher. Mrs. Strachan Willingly and unselfishly continued a
life of dedication and unselfish musical service to the Holy
Redeemer Catholic Church, Miami Florida and numerous other
churches throughtout Dade and Broward Counties for over fifty
years and until her retirement. She was awarded many certificates
by the Catholic Community and by the Governor of Florida for her contributions and
services to the Florida Community.

Funeral Services for Mrs. Strachan will be held on Saturday 13th May 2006 at 10am
at the Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, Miami, Florida.






























IONA MARY WOOD STRACHAN is survived by two sons: Anthong and Patrick

Strachan. one grandson: Stephen Strachan, Jr. one sister Ruth Wood Adderley. one
brother: James Wood. nephews: H. Arnold Wood, Thomas G. Wood; Richard and
Freddie Wood, Philip G. Fletcher. nieces: M. Veronica Seymour, Agnes Wood Hepburn
and Catherine R. Collie Johnson. Irene Wood, Sarah H. Albertha Thompson Targley,
Gail Maroon, Joan and Rose Wood. nephews-in-law: Harry Seymour, Hubert Hepburn,
Rufus Johnson, nieces-in-law: Shirley Wood, Bethsheba Wood, Melvine Wood. Grand
nephews and grand nieces: Ester Isabel, Edward Arnold, Francis Wood Collie, Arthur
Wood, Aris Wood Munroe, Verna Wood, Dario Wood, Bradley Wood, Roderick Wood,
George Seymour, Iona V. Seymour Higgs, Donna Hepburn Cherry, Gary Ephraim
Wood, Darian Wood, Tracy Wood Martin, Kent Wood, Terrance Wood, Thomas G,
Wood Jr.. Charles E. Wood, Sheldon Wood, Marvin Wood, Monet Wood, Kason
Wood, Catherine R. Wood, Tonia Wood Bain, Jeunessa Wood Morgan, Rose Wood
Collie, Kinshell Collie Delaney, Ingrid Collie Hart, Sheletta, Lavette and Tomecko
Collie. Dr. Joseph Evans and family and the families of the late Rupert Wood and
the late Leroy Greenslade.
cousins: Florence Wood Bell, Ronald Wood, Millicent Wood, Ivy Davis, Elaine
Bernard, Corel Foster, Yvonne Farquharson and their families. Lester and Hugh
Rollins, Nurse Orville Rollins Gibson, Nurse Ruth Rollins Henry and Rosie Rollins;
Francois "Frank" and Herbert Guillaume, Nurse Yvonne McPhee Pratt, Marie A.G.
taylor, Hadassah Guillaume Thompson, Margaret Guillaume and their families.
Walton Taylor, Fredricka Leonard, Eloise Archer, Shiela Delancy, Sylvia Rollins,
Marsha Taylor and Barbara Cartwright and their families. The families of the late

’ Jermaih Wood, Abraham Wood, George Wood, Mary Anne Wood, Linda Wood, Isaac
Wood, Thomes Wood, Martha Wood, Rebecca Wood, Belinda Wood, Jacob Wood,
Rhonda Wood, Eleanor Newbold, Karen Ringo, Alvin, Raymond, Rory and Raynard
Newbold, The Olander family, Monica Hanna, Cassandra, Monya and Joseph Hanna
and Catherine Stubbs and family, Mrs. A Range and family and Charles Richardson
and family and other relatives and friends too numefous to mention.

LOCAL NEWS

Health officials voice at.
level of diabetes and complications

THE level of diabetes in the
Bahamas and complications
from the disease seen at the
Princess Margaret Hospital has
health officials “very con-
cerned”,

“We are having at least two
persons every month presenting
to us who require dialysis due
to kidney failure — all because
of diabetes,” said medical chief
of staff Dr Patrick Whitfield.

“We are seeing in our emer-
gency rooms many people who
are returning as a result of poor
management of diabetes and
hypertension.”

Dr Whitfield was speaking at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal’s fourth annual Patient Edu-
cation Seminar, themed “Dia-
betes — a touch of sugar” on
Wednesday.

Dr Cherilyn P Hanna, chief
consultant in the Department
of Family Medicine, unveiled
the Healthier Lifestyle Pass-
port, which given to those who
registered for the seminar.

Through it, patients are
assigned a special number and
can closely monitor their
weight, blood pressure, choles-
terol, glucose level and BMI.

Dr Whitfield said PMH.

health care providers are “very,
very concerned about the level
of diabetes in Bahamian soci-
ety.

“Apart from the effect it will
have on the long term quality
and length of life of persons,
we are also concerned about
the level of complications that
are presenting at Princess Mar-
garet Hospital (PMH).”:

The effects of diabetes, he
said, “in terms of admissions.in
intensive care, is a major con-
tributor to strokes and heart
attacks.

“Tam sure many of you.

would be aware of persons who
would have recently passed or
sustained strokes or heart
attacks, seemingly.at.a younger

and younger age..This.is..of..

very, grave concern to.us.”

Dr Hanna added that at least
10 per cent of the population
suffers from diabetes.

.., “Putting patients at the cen-

tre of their care has been shown -

to bring about better adherence
to treatment that we prescribe,
and much better outcomes in
the long run,” she said.

“Most important to this
approach is the education, with

# .,which our patients can under-

stand the disease, know why
we want them-to do the treat-
ment, know what to expect in
the long run and how they can
contribute to healthier lives.”

Located Coral. owers lobby, lower level

JLANTE

PARADISE ISLAND



THE TRIBUNE



@ HEALTH care providers at the Princess Margaret Hospital
supported the Patient Education Seminar on Wednesday :


















@ DR Cherilyn P Hanna, chief consultant in the Department of

Family Medicine, shows of the Healthier Lifestyle Passport. _..

Share your news|

The’ Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

-22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE

COLYN PATRICK
BYLES, 54

of Freeporty: Grand
Bahama, will bé\held at
St. Matthew's Anglican
Church, Shirley ‘and
Church Streets, Nassau
on Saturday,13th May,
2006 at 11:00am. Rev. Dr.
James Moultrie, assisted
.by Rev. Fr. and Don
Hayes will Officiate.
Cremation will follow.

































His survivors include his wife Sandra, son, Jason;
father, K. Patrick Byles; sister, Michelle White;
stepmother: Claudia Byles; stepsons: Scott, Devin
and Cristian Miller; grandsons: Jackson, Scott,
Sevin, Jacob, and Aiden Miller; grand daughters:
Scottia, Scindy and Tyler; uncle Alan Byles; aunt
Margarita Byles; brothers-in-law: Dr. George White
and Jefferson Turnquest; sisters-in-law: Lorraine
Turnquest; Step daughters-in-law: Melvern and
Pamela Miller; Nieces Monique Morant Wade;
Carla Whittingham and Debra White; nephews
Andre White, Gregg White, Robert Whittingham,
and Dr. Yusef Morant Wade; grand nieces and
grand nephews: Tristan White, Angelique White,
Jessica Whittingham and Brent Whittingham;
Cousins: David Byles of Miami, Florida; Ingrid
Byles of Miami, Florida, Debbie Byles-Bulzacchelli
of Florida, Kemuel Fountain and wife Lynn, Dereck
Fountain and wife Shirley, Michael Fountain and
wife Rosie, Gregory Fountain, Brenda Knowles
and husband Patrick numerous other relatives
and friends, incuding Patricia Treco, Jim Berg of
Florida, Clover and P. Anthony White, and Patricia
Darville.




The family request that donations be sent to St
Matthew's Day Care Centre For The Aged-or The
Ranfurly Home For Children, P.O. Box N-1413,
Nassau or PACE Foundation P.O. Box N963 In
memory of Colyn P. Byles.



ee oF
Sets


HE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

iurricane relief.
-As usual; the-ministries of Education.and Health ..

‘ yill end up with the largest portion of the budget.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said that government has
yeen doing a good job holding off on spending.

“There‘have been very little changes in tax rates
‘or the entire term so the government could not be
iccused of over taxing and spending and, second-
y, the Bahamas has an overall economic growth
rom 1 per cent in the first year and is projected to
srow for up to five per cent maybe this year,” Mr
Smith said.

The economy, he said, like the economies of
most western countries are on the upswing.

“The US economy is performing well, which
always bodes well for us in the sense that when
they have rising disposable income then they trav-
el more. The Bahamas has been able over the
years to attract a number of foreign direct invest-
ments. So the Bahamas, based on those two macro
indicators, is performing quite well,” Mr Smith
said.

Nevertheless, the state minister said that you
can expect very little in the way of surpluses in this
next budget. :

“In the budget itself you will not see anything
different than you have seen before. The nature of

: the budget does not permit that kind of flexibility.

Sixty per cent of it is committed in advance to
salaries and pension benefits and maybe another 17
to 18 per cent of it is debt service and when you
factor in contractual obligations like leases and
rents it does not leave you much flexibility; so you
will have to look into the capital budget for any-
thing new and of course in the capital budget you
usually seg.a continuation of projects that started
two or three years ago and maybe an accelera-
tion of construction in new school or docks and
provision‘directly for hurricane relief,” Mr Smith
said.

With government boasting the signing of bil-
lions of dollars worth of heads of agreements séme
have questioned whether the Bahamian economy
may become inflated whet these developments-.
actually translate into jobs.

However, Mr Smith said that there will be little
chance of this happening.

“In 1996 -97 we saw exactly what happens with
that kind of investment with the Atlantis phase
one, phase two projects. What happens is that
people who are employed make good salaries and
begin to bring in a lot of imports so the taxes tend
to go up and the deficit is usually reduced. Because

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Bahamian economy

the economy is open you tend to see in the
Bahamas not inflationary pressures because we
import everything we consume — almost, and
there is no shortage of places to import from,”
the-state minister said. - Te te

At the beginning of March the Ministry of
Finance sends out a request to various ministries
and departments to start putting together their
“wish list” for the coming fiscal year..

In the meantime MOF has a detailed look at
the country’s revenue position to determine what
resources government is likely to have over the

next fiscal year.

Ministry budgets, Mr Smith said, are approved .
based on the resources a government has in hand

to spend irrespective of what the wants are.

“We would do a revenue analysis which we have
compiled and we will make the overall estimate for
the 06 -07 budget which would include any rec-
ommendations for increase taxes or increased tax
administration, a kind of ‘best case worst case sce-
nario’. :

“Once we have established a figure, then we
look at the other macro indicators, like the expect-
ed GDP. growth and our debt profile,” Mr Smith
said...

Recently the Bahamas economy has received
favourable ratings from agencies like Moody’s and
the IMF, but Mr Smith said that comments from
these entities have very little to do with budget
preparation.

“You will hear about it during the debate
because the government says they are doing well
and the opposition says it’s doing poorly, as is
usual, and they will buttress their arguments with
that but the rating agencies, in reconfirming a rat-
ing, we can expect that the bonds we have out
there will continue to attract reasonable rates,”
he said.

Keeping the Bahamas’ debt service ratio down
has been a constant source of concern for all gov-
ernments because of the openness of the economy
and the vulnerability of the economy to external
factors.

“If we were to get into areas where it gets real-
ly tight and we have a fall off like we had in 9-11,
‘then it could’be a problem because we generate
-most of our revenue at the border and any reduc-
tion of inflows like what we had when we stopped
the planes from coming in, we see the immediate
fall off and that is a very vulnerable position to be
in particularly fora county with an economy struc-
ture like the Bahamas. So we.try to keep the debt
to.GDP very low in case we need to put in place

quickly any emergency funding,” Mr Smith said.

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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006



MR. GODFREY SHERMAN
Acting General Manager

Mr. Sherman joined the Water and Sewerage Corporation
in 1977 as an Assistant Engineer. From 1977 he served
in several sections of the Corporation including Engineer-
ing and Planning and various sections of the Operations
’ and Maintenance Department. In 1989 he was promoted
to Senior Manager/Sewerage Section. In 1991 he was
promoted to Assistant General Manager/New Providence
Operations and remained an Assistant General Manager
until 1999 when he was promoted to Acting Deputy
General Manager. Mr. Sherman graduated from North-
eastern University, Boston, Mass., in 1977 with a
Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering with an
Environmental Focus. In April/May 1991 he attended the



University of Pittsburgh’s intensive five-week Manage- _

ment Program for Executives. Also, in 1996, he attended Harvard University’s School of
Business Administration Program for Executive Management. Mr. Sherman is a member of
several professional bodies including the Caribbean Water and Wastewater Association and the
Bahamas Society of Professional Engineers. He has travelled and trained extensively in the
Water and Wastewater Industry. In April 2004, Mr. Sherman was assigned to the post of Deputy
General Manager/Systems Bperatlons and Control, and is now the Acting General Manager of
the Corporation.

MRS. SANDRA EDGECOMBE
Deputy General Manager of Finance

Mrs. Sandra Edgecombe joined the Corporation in 1982
as a Management Trainee in the Accounts Section after
completing studies at Lester B. Pearson College, Canada

mental in forming the Cost and Budget Section, now

and then as Financial Accountant. Other studies over the
years have included Executive Development Programs at



Senior Manager of the Business Office, a role that focused heavily on improving, customer
~ services. In 1999, she was appointed Assistant General Manager of Customer Services (now
called Commercial Operations), reporting to the General Manager. Mrs. Edgecombe expresses
her delight and appreciation at being afforded the opportunity: to be the Corporation’s first Chief
Financial Officer. This, she believes, is as much a testimony to her team’s performance as it is

to her own, adding that the Corporation is comprised of many very talented, Intelligent and

motivated staff who are eager to aed the Corporation excel.

sed
a. te

MR. DONALD DEMERITTE



and Lycee Camargue, France. In 1985, she was instru-

called the Management Accounts Department. After.
successfully completing her CPA examinations in 1988, -

she headed the Accounts Section first as Accountant II Assistant General Manager with responsibility for Human Resources, Employee Relations, Industrial Relations,

the National University of Singapore and Kellogg Gradu- : ‘THE NEW WSC EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM - (Pictured from right to left) -- Mr. Godfrey E. Sherman,
ate School of Management, Northwestern University. In:

1995 Mrs. Edgecombe was assigned the new portfolio of

THE TRIBUNE























































Mr. Christopher Sherman
Deputy General Manager, Engineering & Planning





Mr. Christopher Sherman began his career at the Water and Sewerage
Corporation as a draughtsman in July 1977. Following his promotion to
the post of Assistant Engineer he was relocated to North Andro: ‘i
November of 1981 where he headed the first wellfield expansion in’ at
‘island. He later returned to Nassau where he was stationed in he
Engineering & Planning section. In July of 1985, due to his continued
outstanding performance, he was promoted to the position of Engineer.
Among the numerous projects to which he contributed as Engineer is
the Yellow Elder Gardens/Big Pond Construction project. He has also
been involved with the coordination and management of the Second
World Bank program and is particularly knowledgeable in project
management and contract administration. In 1991 Mr. Sherman was
promoted to Assistant General Manager/Engineering and Construction
’ joining the Executive Management Team of the Corporation. He was later transferred in 1996 to lead the New
Providence Operation with prime responsibilities for Water Supply, Leakage Control, Sewerage and the Distri-
bution network until 2004 when he returned to the Engineering & Planning Division and assumed leadership
of that division.
Mr. Sherman holds a Bachelor of Science degree i in Civil Engineering from the University of Windsor, Ontario,
_ Canada. In addition he has attended numerous technical and management courses, seminars and confer-
ences that have broadened his horizons tremendously in the engineering field. Among these was the intensive
five-week Management Program for Executives at the University of Pittsburgh in April/May 1991 and the
Water Industry Training Association Programme in the U.K. in 1986. He is a member of the Canadian Society
of Civil Engineers, an associate member of the Institution of Civil Engineering (U.K.), graduate member of the
Bahamas Institute of Professional Engineers, and a member of the American Water Works Association.




MRS. DAPHNE SIMMONS
Senior Assistant General Manager of Human Resources

Mrs. Simmons joined the Corporation in 1999 as Assistant General
Manager with responsibility for Human Resources, Employee Relations,
Industrial Relations and Training. Mrs. Simmons brings a wealth of know!-
edge and experience to the Corporation having worked in the Public and
Private Sectors both in New Providence and Grand Bahama including
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Probation Department/Ministry of Home |
Affairs, Department of Labour (Industrial Relations Officer), Franklin
Chemicals/Gist Brocades (Personnel Officer) and the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (Human Resources Manager 1989-1999). She has a diploma.
from the University of Nairobi, Kenya (East Africa) having studied African
culture (History, and Geography). She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in
‘Psychology/Sociology from the University of Detroit, and trained in the
University of Miami's offshore Graduate Program in Counseling. Addition-
ally she holds a certificate i in Public Administration, Negotiating Strategies and has attended numerous local and
external courses relative to her functional responsibilities. In April 2004, Mrs. Simmons was promoted to Senior

and Training. Added to her exiting duties are the new responsibilities of Public Relations and Administration.

Acting General Manager; Mrs. Daphne L. Simmons, Senior AGM/Human Resources Division; Dr. Richant
V. Cant, Consultant; Mr. Elwood L. Donaldson, Senior AGM/Internal Control and Compliance; Ms. Cheri M.
Hanna, AGM/Commercial Operations; Mr. Philip J. Beneby, AGM/Business Development; Mrs. Sandra B.
Edgecombe, Deputy General Manager/Finance; Mr. Robert C. Deal, AGM/Family Islands; Mr. Christopher
B. Sherman, Deputy General Manager/ Engineering & Planning; Mr. Glen F. Laville, Acting Deputy General ;
Manager/New Providence Operations.




FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

SECTION

business @tribunemedia.net



BU

=
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Stree



o





Bidder seeks answers

e

from the Government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

onsolidated Water’s
most senior executives
yesterday said they will
be seeking answers
from the Government
over “the next two or three days”
regarding the proposed Arawak Cay
reverse osmosis plant, with the BISX-
listed firm maintaining its bid for the
multi-million dollar contract.

Jeffrey Parker, Consolidated
Water’s chairman, said in a confer-
ence call with Wall Street analysts:
“We're still got the Arawak Cay bid
in there, and there’s been no notifi-
cation of what the Government
intends to do after Blue Hills.

We hope to get a little more clari-
fication on that in the next two to
three days while we’re in Nassau.”

Mr Parker and Rick MacTaggert,
Consolidated Water’s president and
chief executive, are currently in Nas-
sau to attend a Board of Directors
meeting at its Waterfields subsidiary,
which was held yesterday. .

Waterfields owns the existing
Windsor reverse osmosis plant in Nas-
sau, and is also constructing the $29
million Blue Hills plant - the first of
three planned for New Providence -

_which will eliminate the need to barge
water to the island from the Andros
wellfields. . ey

The Arawak Cay plant was due to

Rival bids submitted —

be the second
plant con-
structed, and .
was intended
to supply both
Kerzner Inter- |
national’s $730 |
million. Phase |
III expansion
on Paradise |
Island and |
Baha Mar’s |
$1.6 billion |
Cable Beach

redevelop- —_ gw JEFFREY
ment with

water via the PARKER

Water & Sewerage Corporation.
The plant was due to be construct-

ed by April 2007, the date when Phase

IL will be finished, but the Corpora:




tion is understood to have been nego- |
tiating with Kerzner International to.

move this date back because the win-
ning bidder for Arawak Cay has not
been chosen. ;

Mr McTaggert told The Tribune in
January that Consolidated Water was

advised that its bid and that of “a

competitor” for the Arawak Cay con-
tract had both been “annulled”, and
nothing had been heard since then.
The “competitor” was BK Water, a
group of Bahamian investors whose
principals include Jerome Fitzgerald,
the RND Holdings chairman; busi-
nessman Mark Finlayson, son of

entrepreneur Garet ‘Tiger’ Finalyson;



_and ex-Burns House chief financial

officer Phillip Kemp. At least two to
three other investors, whose names
are not known, are understood to be
involved in the BK Water group.

The same BK group and principals
are the ones who have offered $50
million to acquire Winn-Dixie’s 78
per cent stake in Bahamas Super-
markets, in the guise of BK Foods
(see other story ‘on Page 1B). .

If successful, The Tribune under-
stands that while BK Water would
own the Arawak Cay plant and sell
water to the Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration, the plant’s operations would
be run by French company, Veolia
Enerserve, under a
management/operating partner agree-
ment. .

The Government is thought likely
to look favourably on any group with
Bahamian involvement, wanting to
place privatised infrastructure assets
into Bahamian hands as part of its
Bahamianisation policy.

There is also understood to be con-

‘cern about handing a second reverse

osmosis plant to Consolidated Water,
for fear that would give the company

‘Freeport Concrete ‘forgave’ |

a monopoly over water production
on New Providence.
However, some sources told The
Tribune that Consolidated Water's
bid was the lowest by $10 million,
providing the Corporation with the
greatest savings and consumers with

~ the lowest price. Yet this was disput-

ed by others, with some saying the
BK Water/Veolia bid was offering
extra services that Consolidated

’ Water did not propose to.

The Arawak Cay reverse osmosis
plant contract seems, to have been
caught up in the internal squabble at
the Water & Sewerage Corporation
between its chairman, Donald
Demeritte, and general manager
Abraham Butler. The Government
has yet to resolve the dispute satis-

_factorily.

Differences over who to award the
Arawak Cay contract to were alleged
to have been at the centre of the

men’s dispute, and the situation has

been picked up by opposition FNM

. Senators. ;

Tommy Turnquest on Wednesday

tabled questions in the Senate related.
to the Arawak Cay contract. He

for City Markets stake

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



AT least one rival bid for
Winn-Dixie’s 78 per cent stake
in Bahamas Supermarkets was
submitted before yesterday
afternoon’s 5pm deadline, The
Tribune can reveal, meaning
that the battle for majority
ownership of the Bahamian
grocery retailer will move on to
Monday’s auction.

‘Tt is understood that the buy-
out group being put together

by Fidelity International Bank .

& Trust submitted its offer
before -yesterday’s deadline,
although it was not confirmed
whether it had met Winn-Dix-
ie’s qualifying criteria.

-It is likely to meet this,
though, meaning that at least
one bid will face the $50 mil-
lion previously offered by BK
Foods when Winn-Dixie con-
ducts its auction on Monday,
May 15, to determine who the
successful bidder is. *-

“BK Foods, the Bahamian
’ investor group whose princi-
pals are RND Holdings chair-
man Jerome Fitzgerald, Mark
Finlayson and ex-Burns House
chief financial officer Phillip

Kemp, have the ability to raise.

their offer, though.

Any rival bid’ will have to
exceed their original offer by at
least $1.5 million, meaning that
the Fidelity group would have
to offer at least $51.5 million.
This is because BK Foods
would receive a $1 million
break-up fée if Winn-Dixie
went with a rival offer, and sev-
eral sources suggested that
Fidelity’s group was likely to
offer around $54-$55 million.

The Tribune revealed previ-
ously that Neal & Massy Hold-
ings, the Trinidadian industrial
conglomerate with investments
in sectors ranging from retail to
financial servicesand automo-
tive industries, was part of a
group looking to structure an
offer for the Bahamas Super-
markets, which operates 12
stores under the City Markets
and Winn-Dixie brands.

Fidelity International Bank
& Trust, and its subsidiaries,
are understood to be acting as

‘corporate. advisers and struc-

turing the bid for the group
which, apart from Neal &

SEE page 5B

Rum Cay resort in ‘full
swing’ by September

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

DEVELOPERS behind the $600-$700 million Rum Cay Resort
Marina project expect the project, which is staging its ground-
breaking today, to be “in full swing” on Phase I construction by

this September.

Montana Holdings, the Nassau-based real estate and devel-
opment firm behind the project, said Phase I would involye
developing the 80-slip marina, marina village and associated

condominiums and estates.

The second Phase will involve construction of the develop-
ment’s hotel and surrounding amenities, and the final phase will
complete the residential estates as well as expand the marina vil-

lage.

Montana Holdings said 300 workers would be employed dur-
ing peak construction, with the Phase II hotel scheduled to open
by 2010. Phase III and the Rum Cay Resort Marina’s full build-
out are planned for completion by 2016.



| By NEIL HARTNELL
| . Tribune Business"
|. Editor



“forgave” or wrote-off some
| 59 per cent of the debts owed
| to it by its Robin Hood sub-




59% of Robin Hood’s debts

FREEPORT Concrete’

sidiary when it sold its 90 per
cent stake in that retailer to
Sandy Schaefer and his buy-
out group, the company’s
2005 annual report reveals.

SEE page 5B






1] Consolidated Water wants ‘clarification’ |
on Arawak Cay reverse osmosis bid o :

asked the,Government to identify the.
original bidders; the results of the.

original bidding process; and the dates
the bids were due.

He also asked whether outside con-
sultants, Camp, Dresser & McKee,
reviewed the bids and what their find-

ings were, plus the review of the bids

conducted by the Corporation and
the Government’s Tender’s Board.
Mr Turnquest also asked whether

the original bids were annulled; why;

and whether the Government was
negotiating with any company. He
also questioned whether BK Water
was pre-qualified as a bidder for the
project.

Both reverse osmosis. plant con-
tracts have been embroiled in con-
troversy. ae

On the Blue Hills plant, which Con-
solidated Water won, the Water &
Sewerage Corporation and Camp,
Dresser & McKee both awarded the
bid to rival bidder; Biwater Interna-

tional. hy
However, that had to be approved:

by the Cabinet, which rejected the
Biwater selection. Consolidated
Water was eventually chosen.

Government policy negates

Public Accounts Committee

‘By CARA BRENNEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Government’s decision to hide behind a legal opinion that
only documents tabled in the House of Assembly have to. be
submitted to the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) is blocking
attempts to hold it to account

for use of taxpayers’ money, the
committee’s chairman told The

‘SEE page 4B ©











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Some 400 full-time jobs will
be created by the development,
Montana Holdings said.

SEE page 6B

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ie . }
Ti Me
ii

Avoiding grief with frie
amily in a business setting -

hen you are start-

ing as_ self-

employed or a

business owner,

one of your biggest
challenges will be raising sufficient
capital to get your business off the
ground.

The initial infusion of money, or
start-up financing, is often difficult to
find. When you establish your busi-
ness, there is often very little about it
that will be attractive to investors.

* Your track record may be patchy.

* Your credit rating may be poor.

* You probably don’t have any col-
lateral against which you can borrow

money.

* You have already been turned
down by a bank for a loan.

* You don’t have enough money
to maintain the business in the first six
months of operation.

This is not an unusual situation for

entrepreneurs to find themselves in.

The harsh fact is that banks are usu-
ally not interested in lending money
to start-ups. This is usually for three



Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer

paid out, so have no demonstrable
way of servicing bank debt. Start-ups
do not have the capacity to pay back
the principal on the loans. Start-ups
do not have sufficient collateral to
pledge against the loans.

So, assuming you have scrimped
and saved and possibly put some of
your own assets into the venture, your
next option will be to look to friends
and family as the obvious choice of
funding. You will be in good compa-
ny, as more than 75 per cent of entre-
preneurs choose to be funded by
these three main sources of capital,
namely their own funds, funds from
friends and funds from family. |

Before you approach family and
friends, you must consider how deeply
you want them involved in your busi-
ness. Do you want them to be silent
investors, or do you want them in the
heart of your operation? This needs
careful consideration, as the cash that
friends and family inject is often one




friends and family can often cause
your relationship with them to go
downhill fast when things don't turn
out as planned. Unlike professional
investors, friends and family often are
not as pragmatic, bring past baggage
with them, and tend to overreact emo-
tionally to bad news.

So, how do you avoid problems
down the line. There are at least two
steps you must take.

First, you need to decide whether
you give your friends and family debt
or equity in the venture. _

Debt is when they invest in your
business by way of a loan. This can be
in the form of cash, or it could also be
them guaranteeing a loan. If you don’t
want your friends or family to be too
deeply involved in your business, then
this may be the best option.

Make sure you arrange to pay the
loan back as quickly as possible, and
that you budget to pay them interest
on the loan. If possible, pay your
interest quarterly, as this can give you
some breathing space should things go
slower than anticipated.

Equity is when they invest in your

business and you give them shares in
return. They effectively become own-
ers in the business just like you, and
are more intimately involved, shar-
ing profits and losses. One of the
advantages is that unlike a loan, you

the business. The disadvantage is that
as shareholders they have many more
rights than a silent investor, and they
could end up meddling in the run-
ning of your business. If you are one
of the few people that don’t mind
your family and friends teaching you
how to drive, then this may be the
option for you.

Agreement

Second, make sure you get your
agreement in writing, as this will cir-
cumvent difficult conversations nine
months down the line that could have
easily been avoided. A written agree-
ment will protect the parties in the
transaction and, depending on
whether it is a debt or equity invest-
ment, your agreement will need to

-cover the following areas:

For debt you should write a promis-
sory note that explains the parties to
the transaction; the amount loaned,
often known as the principal; when
and how the principal is going to be
repaid; how the interest will be cal-
culated; the timing of such debt ser-
vice; and what happens if you are late
in either principal or debt service.

To avoid any misunderstanding, it
may also be useful to state what level
of involvement the lender is entitled
to take in your business and the level

IO

For equity, you should write a >,

. shareholders agreement that explains. 7
voting rights; class of shares offered; ,-
. what happens if someone wants to; +>

35

sell; what happens in the event of «4 +3
death; and the basis of valuation of. ,,;+»

their investment. Again, it would be,

“ty
afd

useful to state the level of involve-|,.,-
ment and reporting. Your lawyer can ;;.;;,

help you do this.
Third, manage their expectations.
Explain to them that their investment

could go down as well as up. Telly

them that the worst case scenario 1S;-;;5

that they could lose their investment,;'

133

entirely should things go badly wrong, jy!
Getting them to understand this can j..,7;
help should things not turn, out. as, 57)

planned.

Professionally managing an invest-
ment by family and friends is impor-
tant for your future peace of mind

f

So, in order to avoid the trap of;
antipreneurship, make sure you spend § |
time on this area. You could raise ® !

valuable capital for your business, and *

_ maintain healthy relationships with §

your investors at the same time. i

NB: Adapted from his upcoming * |

book, Antipreneurship And How to
Avoid It, Mark draws on’20 years of ;
top level business, marketing and }
communications experience in Lon- *

- don and The Bahamas. He consults *

and can be contacted: at:markalex: ¢

reasons. Start-ups do not have an _ of the hardest transactions for you to ieee : i
established track record of cash flow manage. have no obligation to pay back an of reporting on the business that you palmer@mac.com 3
equity investor unless you dispose of © Mark Palmer.

showing money received and money





The reason is that investments with

/

Tourism and Development Board; Sheila Cox,
the NTDB; and David McGorrin, The Haven.

are going to provide to them.

i
4

a
4

= SHOWN (From-L to R): Michael Hooper, general manager, the British Colonial Hilton;;-

Suzanne Pattusch-Smith, Nassau Tourism and Development Board; Telator Strachan, Nassau}.
Ministry of Tourism; Charles Klonaris, chairman o}

fi





AF LY AWLNAWLT aVLV ANALY





GOVERNMENT and pri-
vate sector tourism operators
have aided the Straw Market
enhancements led by Deputy
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt,
donating a wooden arbor to
upgrade an outside seating
‘area,

The arbor is a collective con-

‘tribution to the Straw Market

enhancement by the Ministry
of Tourism and the British
Colonial Hilton, in conjunc-
tion with the Nassau Tourism
and Development Board
(NTDB) and the Downtown
Improvement Initiative.
Colourful bougainvillea, pro-
vided by the Ministry of
Tourism, will grow over the
arbor in a decorative canopy.
“The Straw Market is an
important focal point down-

town, and we want to help
make it a pleasurable experi-
ence for our visitors” said
Michael Hooper, general man-
ager of the British Colonial

Hilton.
Arbor

The arbor provides much-
needed shade for visitors who
want to sit down while family
members shop at the various
stalls in the Straw Market.
Bahamian craftsman who are
part of a non-profit rehabilita-
tive organisation called The
Haven constructed the struc-
ture.

“The Ministry of Tourism is

committed to beautification

projects such as the Straw Mar-
ket and the Queens Staircase,”

, COOKIES FOR CANCER

For every McDonald’s Cookie you purchase during
the month of May 2006, McDonald’s will make a
donation to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas _ 4

‘Nassau Tourism and Develop- |

said Shiela Cox of the Ministry: |

of Tourism.
“These enhancements are so
important for our tourism
product as a whole.”
“The arbor is an ongoing:

Vet Weir waw i Uo eie eee

vee

process of improving the image” |

of the city itself,” said Charles .

Klonaris, chairman of the Nas—~

sau Tourism and Development ¢
Board. “It is the goal of the §

ment Board to make the city as ,
comfortable and consumer- }
friendly as possible.”

Projects to upgrade thes
Straw Market include the ren-
ovation of the public bathroom }
facilities, and the Police, Sta: }
tion, repairs to existing infra- }

er ease ney

Noe

’ structure and the installation 4

of interior amenities to the}
straw market. ti

aoe




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aS Sata a Rt ee eee See wet ett


THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 3B



Consolidated to supply 90% of Nassau’s water

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

CONSOLIDATED Water,
the BISX-listed water produc-
er, said yesterday that the $29
million Blue Hills reverse
osmosis plant and its existing
Windsor plant would supply
90 per cent of New Provi-
dence’s water when the former
was completed this July.

Rick MacTaggert, Consoli-
dated Water’s president and
chief executive, told a Wall
Street conference call that the
“final phase” of construction
on the Blue Hills plant was
“expected to be completed by
July”.

Plant

The plant will have the
capacity to deliver 7.2 million
gallons of water per day to the
Water & Sewerage Corpora-
tion; and Mr MacTaggert said
the company would begin sell-

ing water from Blue Hills soon.

He said: “We are very
pleased that the Bahamian
government chose our compa-
ny to build and operate the
Blue Hills plant, which when
coupled with the Windsor
plant, will be providing 90 per
cent of Nassau’s water
demand.”

Mr MacTaggert said Con-
solidated Water was pressing
ahead with other aspects of the
Blue Hills contract, which
included reducing the Water
& Sewerage Corporation’s
non-revenue water by stopping
leaks from, its underground
pipe system.

“We continue to achieve
good progress on this project,
saving the Bahamian govern-
ment 435 million gallons of lost
water per year,” Mr MacTag-
gert said.

However, Jeffrey Parker,
Consolidated Water’s chair-
man, acknowledged the com-
pany was behind schedule on





toe




| McLindi House








NOTICE

; IN THE ESTATE OF MAX BUSLIK late of 220
| Central Park South, New York, New York, U.S.A. deceased. |

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons havin any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the Ist day of June, 2006 after which date the Executors will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
before the date herein before mentioned.

DENNISON & CO

“, Executors of the'Estate of
*, ‘Betty Buslik, deceased

MAXAM (also ~ as WENDEL 3
in the City of Freeport, on the island oF Gi
Bahama, within the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all ee having any
‘claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
'the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
ithe ist day of June, 2006 after which date the Executrix will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
‘of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date herein before mentioned.

BULA MAY DELEON
Executrix of the Estate of
Wendell N. Maxam, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888
Freeport, Grand Bahama




























rand



building the Blue Hills plant,
but said it did not expect to
incur financial penalties for

this.
Schedule |

“We're behind the original
schedule, but there are provi-
sions in the contract enabling
us to claim time for [external]
events, and we intend to do
that,” he said.

Meanwhile, Joe Pivinski,
Consolidated Water’s chief
financial officer, told the con-
ference call that the company
“expects to arrange for extra
funds” to complete projects
including the Blue Hills plant.
It was talking to bankers in the
Bahamas and other countries
to achieve this.

Although not clear, it'is pos-

(

|

|

ee
|

|

|

|

|

|

sible that the need for extra
funds has been generated by
the fact that Blue Hills has
increased in cost from the ini-
tial $22 million projection to
about $29 million, while last
November’s Bahamian Depos-
itory Receipt (BDR) offering
only raised net $6.8 million
proceeds, rather than the antic-
ipated $10 million.

The 39 per cent increase in
bulk water sales during the
2006 first quarter, helped by
increased sales from Consoli-
dated Water’s existing Wind-
sor plant in Nassau, boosting
gross bulk margins to 22.2 per
cent.

Increased

Mr MacTaggert said the
increased bulk sales resulted

ect eee ee

Make over $1000 per week!!!

l
4
Opportunities now available to |
work closely with our lovely :
tourists helping to leave a |
beautiful and lasting impression :
of their visit to the Bahamas. |

Pa SST SS



must be...

eortTtc

Mature (25 yrs or older) ¢ Outgoing * Honest
Reliable * Willing to Learn ¢ Dedicated

l
|

: |

FAX LETTER TO 326-1747 |
)

or mail to Human-Resources, P.O. Box SS-6327, Nassau, Bahamas









NOTICE

; IN THE ESTATE OF ELEANOR K. PATTERSON
late of 2390 State St, Unit IE Hamden, New Haven, Connecticut,

U.S.A. deceased.

ct



NOTICE is hereby given that all persons havin any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the Ist day of June, 2006-after which date the Executrix will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
of which shall then have had notice.



AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or
| before the date herein before mentioned.

NATALIE OLIVER
Executrix of the Estate of
Eleanor K. Patterson, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888



Freeport, Grand Bahama















Pricing Information As Of:
11 May 2006



Abaco Markets

IN THE ESTATE OF BETTY BUSLIK late of 220
Central Park South, New York, New York, U.S.A. deceased.

d -NOTICHis hereby given that all persons havin any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send
same dply certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
‘the Ist day of June, 2006 ‘after which date the Executrix will
proceed to distribute the asseets having regard only the claims
f of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date: herein before mentioned.

DENNISON & CO
Executors of the Estate of
Betty Buslik, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888
Freeport, Grand Bahama
































ious Close Today's Close

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

- Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

1.2858 Colina Money Market Fund 1.285819*
2.7451 2.3329 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.7451 ***
2.3560 2.2072 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.329423**

52wk-Hi

Colina Bond Fund

1.164331****

- Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paidin the last 12 months .

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT APR. 30, 2006/ **** - AS AT MAY. 01, 2006



ronments on Blue Hills; not expecting penalties

from the Windsor plant’s 1.2
million gallon per day expan-
sion in the 2005 fourth quar-
ter.

He added: “We also bene-
fited from reduced production
shortfall pricing adjustments.

,We virtually eliminated the
“membrane fouling problems at

2°

the Windsor plant.......

The company’s first quarter

total revenue increased by 52.6
per cent to about $9.2 million,

compared with about $6.1 mil-

lion in the first quarter of 2005.

Net income increased 124
per cent to $3.078 million, or
$0.24 per diluted share, versus
$1.374 million or $0. 115 per
diluted share, in the quarter
ended March 31. 2005.

Retail water sales increased
61.4 per cent to about $5.1 mil-
lion in the first quarter of 2006,



|



NOTICE

eerie

Bahamas, deceased.

JEWELRY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and —
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

Do You Have What it Takes?

ARE YOU...
confident? * a leader? ¢ self motivated?
e professional? ¢ mature (25 yrs or older)? ¢ dedicated?
If your answer is YES then take the next step

FAX LETTER TO 326-1747 =

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION — [

compared with about $3.1 mil-
lion in the corresponding peri- °
~ od of the previous year.

Sales

Bulk water sales rose 39.1.
per cent to $3.7 million, ver-
sus about $2.7 million in pri-
or-year quarter. Revenue from
services increased 91.2 per cent
to $440,560 in the most recent,
quarter,
$230,456 million in the quar-
ter ended March 31, 2005.

Gross margin on retail sales
improved to 71.3 per cent in
the quarter ended March 31,
2006, versus 59.9 per cent in

‘compared with —

the first quarter of 2005, while

the gross margin on Bulk sales
expanded to 22.2 per cent,
compared with 16.2 per cent
in the prior-year period.

IN THE ESTATE OF MERRIL M. DORSETT laté
of 15B Paradise Lane in the City of Freeport on the Island of |
Grand Bahama one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons havin any

claim or demand against the above Estate are required to send

the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before
the Ist day of June, 2006 after which date the Executors will H
proceed to distribute the asseets having-regard only the claims:
of which shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is here by given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or

before the date herein before mentioned.

MERRIL AND LUCY DORSETT |
Executors of the Estate of ;
Merril Dorsett, deceased
C/O P.O. Box F-41888
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama

yee

CHER TR ELEY ED

“Se Gu a+



Change Daily Vol. EPS $







Div $



Last Price
11.00
ey an

ses VL



Neekin V wae ibs oe Se $
1.997
a eae

nein ace ca

0.720 7.2
- ban ni



. ‘Oo
2.57%)
0.00%)

°. ‘380 ‘s: 0
aimee

lends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Vaiue
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ee

SSSA

iS Ne *

HEARSE SHAS

Roe
: eS |

.
PFRP ate vedse

SS
+
THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006, PAGE 4B:



BUSINESS





from people who are
making news in their
| neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

| If so, call us on 322-1986
‘and share your story.

< ANDREW,
scoot *



‘the huterantional School of The Bahamas
BOUNDED ip48

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

The Anglican Central
Education Authority

advises that SEATS ARE AVAILABLE

in our schools from
Kindergarten through Grade 6.

Interested persons are asked
to contact the schools











Dress: Black “he Optional
Cocktails: 7:00 - 8:00 pm
Dianer: §:50 pom
Douation: $120.00

FROM page 1B

Tribune yesterday.

Brent Symonette, who is also
the FNM’s deputy leader, told
The Tribune that while the
Government promoted itself
as being transparent and
accountable, the Bahamian
public was still unaware of how
its money was being spent.

This was because the Gov-
ernment was following a legal
opinion that said it need only
allow the committee to review
accounts tabled in the House
of Assembly, Mr Symonette
said.

Breaches

Last monthebe had called

the present government’s lack
of accountability “one of the
biggest and most serious
breaches of the spirit of the
Westminister system of gov-
ernment”.

Mr Symonette said the PAC
committee has requested that

Government policy :
negates the Public .
Accounts Committee

the Government disclose its
spending for the fiscal years
ending in 2004 and 2005 spend-
ing, but has met with constant
road blocks.

Debate

He added that this was par-
ticularly disturbing because

‘Parliament was about to begin

the 2006/-2007 Budget debate
next month, but did not have a
clear picture of what the Gov-
ernment has spent in the past
several years.

For example, Mr Symonette
said that just last month, the
Government tabled the Audi-
tor General’s report for the
2002-2003 fiscal year.

Mr Symonette said that even
then, the Government failed
to give him sufficient copies of
the report for his entire com-
mittee - giving him only three
copies when the committee
had five members. .-

He has not yet been given
the extra copies, although he
said yesterday that the Gov-

INSIGHT

For the stories behind

ate Male mmccee(e Merle [e) 4
on Mondays

yworld school

Inviting all parents, alumni and friends of St. Andrew’s School

: Tickets can be purchased from the office at St. Andrew’s School and
, reservations for tickets through hlockhart@st-andrews.com



ernment’s business leader in
the House, Vincent Peet, had
assured him he should have“
received them before the coke s
end.

Still, Mr Symonette said that’
even in the case of the 2002-
2003 report, it was certified by*
the auditor-general only in J ae ie
2005. 2

“It was signed off-for nearly!
a year and was just sitting?
around for a year, before they’
brought it to Parliament,” ME’
Symonette. fed

“Now there are some inte¥e)
esting things in it, but it is four
years out of date and thé!
accounts of 2004 and 2005 aré”

" past due.”

Mr Symonette added that he
will not fully examine the.
report until his entire commit®
teehasacopy. S.

Accounts

The failure to obtain timély
government accounts, plus the
lack of disclosure relating to
documents not tabled in the
House of Assembly, has seric.
ously hobbled one of Parlia: ,
ment’s most important’ watch:
dogs. -

The Public Accounts Cori;
mittee is unable to scrutinise :
whether the taxpayer is receiv.
ing the vbest value for money ,
from the Government, and,
whether public monies. are |
being used efficiently, for. thie’
correct purpose, and not being,
wasted or misappropriated.,

The issue goes to the heart
of transparency and account-_
ablity in governments: eS







Legal Notice

NOTICE es
TAGETES LIMITED i s =

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

VG

@) TAGETES LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under itis
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the Intemational Business.Companies..

Act 20).

< a ui

The diselnnon of the id company conimenced on n May 10th, ey.
_. 2006 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and... {x 4
registered by the Registrar General. :

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd. of
Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, B.V.I. a

- Dated this 11th day of May, AD. 2006.

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

UBS



UBS (Bahamas) Ltd, a leading global wealth
manager, is seeking an experienced professional

to join their team as

Operations Securities Specialist.

In order to meet our requirements all applicants

MUSt POSSESS:

*Minimum ‘of BA in Accounting, Banking or
Finance or min: three years work Experience) in
the securities industry; on

*Strong emphasis in trade processing,
settlements corporate actions;
sHighly skilled in all aspects of Mutual funds
subscription and Redemption;

*Keen knowledge of complex financial
instruments i.e structured proauels; hedge

. funds;

*Strong problem resolution skills;
*Excellent oral and written communication

skills;

Proficient in Microsoft Excel, bloomberg,

telekurs;

«Completion of the Series 7 or Series 6 course |

is a plus;

*Supervisory skills is a plus.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals only
should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 5B, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006



FROM page 1B

Massy, is also understood to
have connections to Abaco
Markets, the BISX-listed retail
group.
it is still unclear whether
Abaco Markets itself is
involved in the bidding group,
or whether its major share-
hojders - such as chairman and
chief executive, Craig Symon-
ette, and Frank Crothers - are
through a private company
that is separate from the BISX-
listed entity.
;Lhe Tribune understands
‘that several minority share-
holders have expressed con-

Freeport Concrete ‘forgave’

EROM page 1B

‘In addition to selling the
shares.for a sales price of
$571,000, Freeport Concrete,
which is listed on the Bahamas
International Securities
Exchange (BISX), said it had
“agreed to forgive repayment
$836,221 of the $1.415 mil-
lion debt due by Robin Hood”



to"if at 2005 year-end, which

was Atigust 31 last year.
‘This left a balance of

$578,500 owed by Robin Hood

to, Freeport Concrete at 2005

SAUOSUR Of




‘Bahamas.

seve Y

“a

NOTICE

‘NOTICE is hereby given that SIDNEY SIMILIEN OF |
PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
‘naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
‘and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
‘from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

POSTION AVAILABLE _
SECURITIES SPECIALIST

cern about Abaco Markets
becoming involved in any bid
for Bahamas Supermarkets,
given that the company has yet
to return to consistent prof-
itability and is still burdened
down with debt.

Abaco Markets still owed
over $7 million to the Royal
Bank of Canada as at the 2005
third quarter, and also owes
$7.9 million to holders of its
preference share debt.

Therefore, minority share-
holders are concerned about
the prospect of loading Abaco
Markets up with debt to
finance any bid for Bahamas
Supermarkets. |

Another company said to be
involved in the Fidelity bid
group is Barbados Shipping &

year-end.

The carrying value of
Freeport Concrete’s invest-
ment in Robin Hood before
that debt was forgiven was list-
ed in the 2005 annual report
at $884,900.

This carrying value was
almost wiped out by the debt
forgiveness, meaning that
Freeport Concrete’s net gain
on the Robin Hood sale was
$620,179.

In addition, with the
$578,500 balance owed to
Freeport Concrete at August
31, 2005, the net worth of
Robin Hood as at that date is







‘Leading Offshore Bank request applications for the

position of an experienced securities specialist.

{
!
‘
§
1
i
i
'
i
!

The candidates must possess the following
qualifications and skills:

Two years related mutual fund experience,
including cash settlements

e Strong emphasis in tradde processin and.

settlements

* Strong PC, organization skills

Strong communication skills

Branch Manager Banking
P.O: Box N-4906
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: 394-0701



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

BAHIABRAZ CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 8th
| day of May 2006. This Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc.,
: P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Trading, a publicly-quoted
company in Barbados that has
a large retailing and distribu-
tion division, which includes
food products.

Winn-Dixie is under Chap-
ter 11 bankrupcty proceedings
in the US, so'the likely winner
of any auction for the majority
stake in Bahamas Supermar-
kets will be the highest bidder
- the one who offers the most
money.

Once the winner is decided,
Winn-Dixie will seek authori-
sation from the US Bankrupt-
cy Court in Jacksonville, Flori-
da, on May 18 for the sale of its
78 per cent stake.

BK Foods' main advantage
is that it is an all-Bahamian
offer, meaning that their bid

listed in Freeport Concrete’s

2005 annual report as at nega-
tive $48,679.

Robin Hood -paid the

$571,500 sales price to
Freeport Concrete in Decem-
ber 2005, immediately after the
sale was approved by the Gov-
ernment and. Investments
Board. ‘
Out of the outstanding
$578,500 owed to Freeport

Concrete, Robin Hood paid -

$233,500 in December 2005,
with a further payment of
$86,250 due on January 11,

2006.

No mention is made of
whether that had been paid,
and the remaining $258,750

- balance is being paid in week-

ly instalments of $17,250, which
started in the week beginning

THE TRIBUNE



would not require Cabinet or
National Economic Council
(NEC) approval. The only
approval necessary would be
Exchange Control approval to
allow Winn-Dixie to repatri-
ate its profits on the sale.
Neal & Massy is a foreign-
owned conglomerate, and its
involvement would go against
the Government's National
Investment Policy, which
requires retail to be 100 per
cent Bahamian-owned.
However, Bahamas Super-
markets is already foreign
majority-owned through Winn-
Dixie, so some have pointed
out that allowing in an owner-
ship group with some foreign
involvement would be no dif-
ferent from the situation that

exists today.

Yet with a general election
less than a year away, the Gov-
ernment might find it politi-
cally difficult to approve a bid
for Bahamas Supermarkets
that had a foreign component,
rather than the all-Bahamian

. BK Foods offer.

Still, the scene could be set
for a conflict between the US
Bankruptcy Court, if it
approves an offer with some

’ foreign ownership, and the

Bahamian government and its
investment policy.
The advantage of any group

_involving Neal & Massy would

be the huge financial and logis-
tical resources at the disposal,
plus the expertise in operating
and running supermarekt



for City Markets stake

chains, and inventory and sup-
ply chain management.
BK Foods, though, has

already been busy putting in

place an alternative supply
chain for when the one-year
transitions services agreement
with Winn-Dixie expires. | ~
Under the transition services
agreement, The Tribune
understands that BK Foods
will pay Winn-Dixie a $1 mil-
lion flat fee, plus the cost of all.
goods provided with a 5 per
cent mark-up on top of that... -
BK Foods' $50 million offer:
for Bahamas Supermarkets
values Winn-Dixie's 78 per,
cent stake at $14.1 per share,
compared to the $11 price at -
which the stock last traded on
the Over-the-Counter market.

59% of Robin Hood’s debts

January 18, 2006.

“The amount due from
Robin Hood is secured by way
of a debenture in favour of the

company up to $795,560, cre-

ating a specific charge on all
real and personal property of
Robin Hood, and a floating
charge over Robin Hood’s
remaining assets,” Freeport
Concrete’s annual report said.

Freeport Concrete sold
Robin Hood to enable it to

focus on its Grand Bahama -

operations, chiefly its planned
Home Centre Superstore - due

’ to open in June 2006 - and

relocating its concrete plant to
a new site.

Robin Hood’s sale also pos-

itively impacted Freeport Con-
crete’s accounts receivables,
which fell by $408,794 to $1.309

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JULIE LOUIMEME, MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of JANUARY, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.











Bahamas.









NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DONAT CHRISTOPHER HALL
OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who: knows any reason why fegistration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEVERLEY SONIA HALL nee
JACKSON OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





LEGAL NOTICE

eaten
NANCHANG RIVER CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
section 137(8) of the International Business Com-
panies Act 2000, the dissolution of NANCHANG
RIVER CORP has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP, INC.
(Liquidator)



million at 2005 year-end, com-
pared to $1.718 million a year
earlier. .

In addition, inventory value
declined by 45.7 per cent com-
pared to fiscal 2004, falling
from $3.432 million to $1.861
million, again aided by the
Robin Hood sale. -

Accounts payable and
accrued expenses were also










Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that WILFRID PETION OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister.
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for},
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and: |:
that any person who knows any reason why registratiori/ |
naturalization should-not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible |;
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,.Nassau, |:

helped by the Robin Hood
sale, falling by $258,868 to
$2.792 million at 2005 year-
end.

During fiscal 2005, Mr
Schaefer received a commis-
sion equal to 3 per cent of the
gross sales achieved by Robin
Hood, amounting to $245,085.
This exceeded the previous
year’s commission of $231,489.




NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that GUELIN MERILIEN OF JOAN’S
HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister |
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for]
registration/naturalization as a citizen.of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days |
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible |'
for Nationality and Citizenship, P-O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2005/CLE/gen/01227

IN THE SUPREME COURT
BETWEEN

MARY MICHELLE MAJOR

JUDY ATHENE KEMP-HIGGS

Plaintiffs

AND

KAIVON ELDON

Defendant

NOTICE —

Kaivon Eldon

Nassau, Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that action has been commenced
against you in the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas Action No.
2005/CLE/gen/01227 by Mary Michelle Major
and Judy Athene Kemp-Higgs in which the
Plaintiffs’ claim is for an Order that you remove
a building which encroaches on the Plaintiffs’ §
property, damages for trespass and costs.

AND that it has been ordered that service of the
Writ in the said action be effected by this
advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must
enter an Appearance in this action on or before
the 2nd June 2006 otherwise judgment may be

entered against you.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
Attorneys for the Plaintiffs
Chambers
Frederick Street Steps
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006







FROM page 1B

John Mittens, Montana
Holdings chairman, said in a
statement: “We are commit-
ted to building Rum Cay
Resort Marina with the utmost
sensitivity to environmental
harmony and ecological bal-
ance. We are dedicated to the
preservation and conservation
of the antiquities and historical
relics identified within the
development site.”

In a previous interview with
The Tribune, Mr Mittens said
the developers would create
the “third largest airport ter-
minal in the Bahamas" to ser-
vice the resort.

“We would like to put in

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

um Cay resort
‘full swing’
by September

place a fixed base operation,"
Mr Mittens explained, point-
ing out that there were no air-
craft refuelling facilities in that
part of the Bahamas.

"We want to put in refu-
elling, storage and mainte-
nance facilities at the airport."

He added that when com-
pleted, the Rum Cay terminal
would have all the essential
requirements, including immi-
gration and customs facilities.

Structured

The hotel will be structured
around a central facility that
will incorporate a spa, with the
accommodation featuring 50
cottages set in a garden-type,
authentic Bahamian setting.

The fractional ownership

2005/CLE/qui/01390B

Holo







component will consist of
about 80 units, and the project
will include other land and real .
estate segments.

The developers are already
employing eight of Rum Cay's
existing inhabitants, out of a
total population of around 80.

With all financing in place
to complete the project, Mr
Mittens said the Rum Cay
Resort Marina's "big market"
will be the US. He explained
that it "probably had the best
fishing in the world", while the
spa facilities and equestrian
centre would prove attractive
for wives and families when
the husband was out at sea.

The development is target-
ing active families and trav-
ellers, who are seeking adven-
ture and plenty of activities -
during a vacation, whether it
be an extended vacation or
weekend trip.

“The American market,
we've found, has boaters. who
may want, their boats left in -
Rum Cay for dry:‘storage," Mr

THE TRIBUNE

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting of Titles Act, 1959

AND
IN THE MATTER of The Petition of Millard Bethel

NOTICE OF PETITION



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Millard Bethel of North
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
is applying to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas to have his title investigated determined and declared
under the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect of the
land-hereafter described, that is to say:
“ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land-located Fifteen
(15.00) feet SOUTH of the centerline of the main
Eleuthera Highway and more fully described as bounded
NORTHWARDLY by the main Eleuthera Highway and
running thereon Five Hundred and Eighty-three. and Six
Hundredths (583.06) feet, EASTWARDLY by a Public
Roadway known as Pau Pau Bay Road and running
thereon a total distance of Eleven Hundred and Seventy-
nine and Eleven Hundredths (1179.11) feet,
SOUTHWARDLY by land the property of Eleuthera
Land Company Limited and running thereon for a total
distance of Five Hundred and Sixty- “eight and Sixty-two
Hundredths (568.62) feet, WESTWARDLY by land the
property of Eleuthera Land Company Limited and running
thereon for a total distance of Eleven Hundred and Seventy-
_ five and Forty-seven Hundredths (1175.47) feet continuing
back to point of commencement the said piece parcel or
tract of land described aforesaid comprises a total area
of 16.070 Acres and is delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with this application AND ALL THAT piece
parcel or tract of land located approximately Eighteen
Hundred and Fifty-two (1852) feet SOUTHWARDLY
of the main Eleuthera Highway and immediately Westside
of a Public Roadway known as Pau Pau Bay Road and
more fully described as bounded NORTHWARDLY by
land the property of Eleuthera Land Company Limited
and running thereon Three Hundred and Five and four
Hundredths (305.04) feet, EASTWARDLY by a Public
Road also known a Pau Pau Bay Road and running thereon
for a total distance of Four Hundred and Two and Five
Hundredths (402.05) feet; SOUTHWARDLY by land
the property of Lady Cochran and running thereon Eighty-
one and Thirty Hundredths (81.30) feet, EASTWARDLY
by land the property of the aforesaid Lady Cochran and
running thereon Two Hundred and thirty-eight and Twenty-
three Hundredths (238.23) feet, SOUTHWARDLY by
land the property of Western Securities Limited and
running thereon a total distance of Two Hundred and
Eighty-seven and Eighty-nine Hundredths (287.89) feet,
WESTWARDLY by Pau Pau Bay Pond and running
thereon for a total distance of Six Hundred and Thirty-
one and Twenty-two Hundredths (631.22) feet continuing
back to the point of comniencement the said piece parcel
’ or tract of land described aforesaid comprises a total area
of 3.931 Acres and the both pieces parcels or tracts of
land contains a total of Twenty and one Thousandth
(20.001) Acres and are delineated in PINK on the plan
submitted with this application.

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and
Plan of the said Jand may be inspected during normal office hours
at the following places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street
North, New Providence, The Bahamas.

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co. Chambers, No. 57 Jerome Avenue,
Pyfrom’s Addition, New Providence, The Bahamas.

iii. The Administrator’s Office, Governor’s Harbour,
Eleuthera, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 30th day of June
A.D., 2006 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or his Attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form supported

by Affidavit. FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an.
| Adverse Claim on or before the said date will operate as a bar to

such a claim.

| Dated this 8th day of May A.D., 2006.

SHARON WILSON & CO.
Chambers
No. 57 Jerome Avenue
Pyfrom’s Addition
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



Mittens said: These clients
would be able to fly into the

island from the US, and the.

resort would have ensured
their boats were ready to go,
all prepared for a day's fish-
ing.

-relating to the SerSlOp ERE:







@ DEVELOPERS behind the $600-700 million Rum Cay Resort Marina expect the project to be

“in full swing” on Phase I construction by September. ABOVE, John Mittens, chairman of Mon-

tana Holdings (right), shows Minister of Financial Services & Investments Vincent Peet documents

(FILE ahoie)

ii: advertise ty ey eee ro Ne

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005 -
IN THE SUPREME COURT - CLE/qui/01389B

IN THE MATTER of The Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
“IN THE MATTER of The Pet Petition of Charles Thompson
NOTICE OF PETITION
NOTICE IS'‘ HEREBY GIVEN that Charles Thompson of St.

Andrews Road in the Eastern District of New Providence, the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the Supreme

Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, is applying to the |

Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas to have
his title investigated and determined and declared under the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 (Ch. 393) in respect of the land hereafter

‘described, that is to say:
"ALL THAT piece of parcel or tract of land comprising

Two and eight hundred ad fourteen thousandths (2.814)
acres situate in the Malcolm Allotment Subdivision in
the Southern District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
and being Allotment Number Sixty-two (62) on a plan
of the said Malcolm Allotment Subdivision that is
bounded NORTHWARDLY by a Twenty (20) foot wide
Road Reservation and running thereon One hundred and
sixty and eighty-three hundreths (160.83) feet,
EASTWARDLY by Allotment Number Sixty-three (63)
in the said Subdivision and running thereon Seven
hundred eighty-seven and fifty-seven hundredths (787.57)
feet, SOUTHWARDLY by vacant land in the said
Subdivision and running thereon One hundred forty-
nine and seventy-three hundredths (149.73) feet,
WESTWARDLY by a Ten (10) foot wide Road
Reservation in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Seven hundred ninety-six.and forty- six hundredths
(796.46) feet, which said piece parcel or allotment of
land has such shape, marks, boundaries; positions and
dimensions as are shown on the plan submitted with the
Petitioner's: Petition and delineated in PINK"

AND TAKE NOTICE that copies of the Petition and
Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal pines hours
at the following places:

i. Supreme Court Registry, Ansbacher House, East Street
North, New Providence, The Bahamas

ii. Sharon Wilson & Co., Chambers, No. 57 Jerome
Avenue, Pyfrom's addition, New Providence, The °
Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that any person
having dower or right to dower, an adverse claim or a claim mot
recognized in the Petition shall on or before the 30th day of June
A.D., 2006 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or his Attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form supported
by Affidavit

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the said date will operate as a bar to
such a claim.

Dated this 8th day of May A.D., 2006

SHARON WILSON & CO
Chambers
No.57 Jerome Avenue
Pyfrom's Addition
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner





NOTICE is hereby given that MARSHA GLAMORIA WATT OF

COCKBURN STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason. why. registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
-and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





2004/COM/bnk/00066

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMERCIAL DIVISION

IN THE MATTER of MOORE PARK
| FUNDING LTD.
(in Voluntary Liquidation)

~ AND IN THE MATTER of THE INTERNA-
TIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
Ch. 309 Statute Laws of The Bahamas, 2000.
Edition

NOTICE OF INTENDED DIVIDEND
Pursuant to Rule 68, Companies (Winding-up) Rules

TAKE NOTICE that a first dividend is intended to be
declared in the above matter. Creditors who do not prove
their debts or claims by Monday, 12 June 2006 will be
excluded from the benefit of this dividend.

DATED the Tenth day of May 2006

Maria M. Ferere
Official Liquidator
Moore Park Funding Limited
(In Compulsory Liquidation)

This Notice was filed by Higgs & Johnson, of Ocean © :
Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, Nassau,.,



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N.P., The Bahamas, Attorneys for the Official Liquidator?”


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

ITEM 8 - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND
SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC
ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of
The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet

of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. and subsidiaries

(the “Company”) as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the

related consolidated statements of income, shareholders’

equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period
‘ ended December 31, 2005. These financial statements are the
responsibility of the Company’s management. Our
responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial
statements based on ou: audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of
the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United
States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the
audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit
includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the
amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit
also includes assessing the accounting principles used and” ~~"
significant estimates made by management, as well as i
evaluating-the overall financial statement presentation. We
believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our
opinion.

Bae Fan Fo Be Gn Se. Ba Te Be Be Me,

Ree,
Ra Xe

&

Re Re Fan

Ro

San Bae Bas

In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements present
fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of The
PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. and subsidiaries as of
December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their
operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in
the-period ended December 31, 2005, in conformity with
accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of
America.

Ra Nan eda Pe Bui he Bede Bat be. Fn She

kaha
tay a Say a

&
S

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the
Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States),
the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over
financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, based on the

nado Bet



a criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework
3 : issued by the Committee of Spons::cing Organizations of the
as Treadway Commission and..u: :eport dated March 3, 2006
ge. expressed an unqualified opinion on management’s assessment
of of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over

ee financial reporting and an unqualified opinion on the

ad effectiveness of the Company’s internal control.over financial
re reporting.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
March 3, 2006
| CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
i THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

December 31













Jn millions, except por volve ~~" 2008 2008
\ Assets ‘ pamee’
Cash and due from banks Lat Sh she ee $3,518 $3,230
Federal finds sold atid resale agicements TN B50 OS
Other short-term investments, including trading, securities... i . 2,543 1,848
Loans held for sale... = ee i sec eeen metre cttne mentite ee cacctneronine eee ByG49" “1,670
1 Securities available for sale and held to maturity 20,710 16,761 0
/~-. - Loans, net of unearned income of $835 and $902 ee . -- 49,101 43,495
Allowance for loan and lease losses (596) (607)
38, 0: Net loans 48,505 42,888
4 }¢ Goodwill, “3,606 3,001
», Other intangible assets 860 354
Other fa 9,413, 8,336
__Total assets ' $91,954 $79,723
RS haGa ‘ - :
Deposits
Noninterest-bearing $14,988 $12,915
Interest-bearin ire ee tae 45,287 ° 40,354
“"“sTotal deposits , 60,275 53,269
Borrowed funds
Federal funds purchased 4,128 219
Repurchase agreements : 1,691 1,376
Bank notes and senior debt 3,875. 2,383
Subordinated debt 4,469 4.050
Commercial paper : . ; _10 2,251
Other borrowed funds : 2,724 1,685
Total borrowed funds 16,897 11,964
Allowance for unfunded loan commitments and letters of credit 100 75
Accrued expenses 2,770 2,406
Other rhs pe timer ter a8 2,759 4,032
Total liabilities a 2 82,801 71,746
Minority and noncontrolling interests in consolidated entities 590 504
| s.«, Shareholders’ Equity
; ’ Preferred stock (a)
Common stock - $5 par value
+ Authorized 800 shares, issued 353 shares 1,764 1,764
- Capital surplus : 1,358 1,265
... Retained earnings. 9,023 8,273
| \'~'' Deferred compensation expense (59) (51)
: . .’ Accumulated other comprehensive loss : (267) (54)
fz Common stock held in treasury at cost: 60 and 70 shares 3,256) (3,724)
Fe Total shareholders’ equi mace nev ennnnnaesamonenanery on sgsumn ssdemnm rin eenorvattae sens, 87563 7,473



i Total liabilities, minority and noncontrolling interests, and 4

i shareholders’ equity - SE “$91,954 $79,723

(a) Less than $.5 million at cach date. : Boer PE Mae SPS,
See accompanying Notes To Consolidated Financial Statements.

NOTE 2 ACQUISITIONS particularly in connection with its acquisition of SSRM. Asa

: PNC were reversed in the first quarter of 2005 in accordance

_ with SFAS 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” The reversal

’ of deferred tax liabilities increased our earnings by $45 million,
or approximately $.16 per diluted share, in the first quarter of
2005. :

2005 A COUISITIONS i
SSRM HOLDINGS, INC.
Effective January 31, 2005, our majority-owned subsidiary,
BlackRock, closed the acquisition of SSRM Holdings, Inc.
(“SRM”), the holding company of State Street Research &
Management Company and SSR Realty Advisors Inc., from
MétLife, Inc. (“MetLife”) for an adjustéd purchase price of
approximately $265 million in cash and approximately
550,000 shares of BlackRock restricted class A common
stack valued at $37 million. SSRM, through its subsidiaries,
actively manages stock, bond, balanced and real estate
portfolios for both institutional and individual investors.
Substantially all of SSRM’s operations were integrated into
BlackRock as of the closing date. BlackRock acquired assets
under management totaling $50 billion in connection wit
this transaction. ,

v

In January 2005, BlackRock issued a bridge promissory note
for $150 million, using the proceeds to fund a portion of the
purchase price for the SSRM acquisition. In February 2005,
BlackRock issued $250 million aggregate principal amount of
convertible debentures. BlackRock used a portion of the net
proceeds from this issuance to retire the bridge promissory
note. These convertible debentures are included with bank
notes and senior debt on our Consolidated Balance Sheet at
December 31; 2005.

RIGGS NATIONAL CORPORATION

a
The stock purchase agreement for the SSRM transaction : : P :
We acquired Riggs National Corporation (“Riggs”), a

provides for an additional payment to MetLife of up to $75
million based on BlackRock achieving specified retention
levels of assets under management and run-rate revenue for
thé-year ended January 31, 2006 Based on assets under
management levels and run-rate revenue as of January 31,
2006, the additional liability on this contingency is $50
million. In addition, the stock purchase agreement provides
fortwo other contingent payments. MetLife will receive 32.5% a market leading franchise in the affluent Washington, D.C.
of any performance fees earned, as of March 31, 2006, ona metropolitan area. In connection with the acquisition, Riggs
certain large institutional real estate client. As of December 31, shareholders received an aggregate of approximately $297

2005..Under the terms of the agreement, Riggs merged into
The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. and PNC Bank,
National Association (“PNC Bank, N.A.”) acquired
substantially all of the assets of Riggs Bank, National

acquisition gives us a substantial presence on which to build

result of the transfer, certain deferred tax liabilities recorded by,

Washington, D.C. based banking company, effective May 13, °

Association, the principal banking subsidiary of Riggs. The :

2005, no performance fees had been earned on this
institutional real estate client as the measurement peri
-nof concluded. In addition, on the fifth anniversary of th

closing of the SSRM transaction, MetLife could rec
: additional payment up toa maximum of $10 million based on
Ee retained assets under management associated
ae the MetLife defined benefit and defined contribution
plans.




is

As of December 31, 2005, BlackRock was unable to estimate
the:potential obligations under these contingent payments
because it was unable to predict at that time what specific
retention levels of run-rate revenue would be for certain
acquired accounts on the first anniversary of closing the SSRM
transaction, what performance fees would be earned on the
institutional real estate client and what BlackRock’s retained

: assets under management would be on the fifth anniversary of
theiclosing date of the SSRM transaction.

Contingent payments settled subsequent to the SSRM closing
on January 31, 2005 but prior to December 31, 2005 reduced
the'contingent liability established at the closing to $39.5

y million at December 31, 2005. The $50 million contingency

| payment due January 31, 2006 eliminated this contingent
liability balance. The $10.5 million excess of the January 31,
2006 contingency payment over the contingent liability
balance at December 31, 2005 and additional contingency

payments, if any, will be reflected as additional purchase price
and recorded as goodwill.

On January 18, 2005, our ownership in BlackRock was
uansferred from PNC Bank, N.A. to PNC Bancorp, Inc., our
intermediate bank holding company. The transfer was effected
primarily to give BlackRock more operating flexibility,

D



million in cash and 6.6 million shares of our common stock
yalued_at_$356 million. Qur Consolidated Balance Sheet at
June 30, 2005 included $2.8 billion Of loans; net of unearned
~“ihicontié, atid $3:5 dillioti Of deposits, including $.8 billion of
“brokered certificates of deposit, related to Riggs.
HARRIS WILLIAMS & Co.
On October 11, 2005, we acquired Harris Williams & Co.
(‘Harris Williams”), one of the nation’s largest firms focused
on providing mergers and acquisitions advisory and related
services to middle market companies, including private
equity firms and private and public companies.

ISITION.
UNITED NATIONAL BANCORP
We acquired United National Bancorp, Inc. (“United
National”) effective January 1, 2004 by merging United
National with and into our subsidiary, PNC Bancorp, Inc.
United National shareholders received an aggregate of
approximately $32] million in cash and 6.6 million shares of
our common stock valued at $360 million. As a result of the
acquisition, we added $3.7 billion of assets, including $.6
billion of goodwill, $2.3 billion of deposits, $1.0 billion of
borrowed funds and $.4 billion of shareholders’ equity to our
Average Consolidated Balance Sheet for the quarter ended
March 31, 2004.

AVIATION FINANCE GROUP ,

On September 1, 2004, we acquired the business of the
Aviation Finance Group, LLC, an Idaho-based company that
specializes in loans to finance private aircraft. The purchase
agreement calls for a contingent payment at the end of the
fifth anniversary date that may be due if certain loan balances
and profitability targets are exceeded on a cumulative five-
year basis.

A Copy of the Annual Report & Audited Accounts may be obtained trom Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited, Ansbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas.




HARRIS N.A AND SUBSIDIARIES





INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT







To the Stockholder and Board
of Directors of Harris N.A.



We have audited the accompanying consolidated statements of condition of Harris N.A (an indirect wholly-
owned subsidiary of Bank of Montreal) and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related
consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, changes in stockholder’s equity and cash flows for each
of the years in the three year period ended December 31, 2005., These consolidated financial statements are the

responsibility of Harris N.A.’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated
financial statements based on our audits.






We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of
America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether
the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the.amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting
principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement
presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.






In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects,
the financial position of Harris N.A. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their
operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three year period ended December 31, 2005 in con formity -
with United States. of America generally accepted accounting principles.






KPI Gs LEP







Chicago, Iinois
March 16, 2006




Harris N.A. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Condition








December 31 _ e
2005 2.004
(in thousands except share data)









































The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements are an integral part of these statements.







HARRIS N.A AND SUBSIDIARIES

Nores To CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS




1. Summary of Significant. Accounting Policies



Principles of consolidation and nature of operations




Harris N.A. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Harris Bankcorp, In¢:(“Bankcorp”), a Delaware corporation
which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Harris Financial Corp, (“HFC”), a Delaware corporation which is a wholly-
owned subsidiary of Bank of Montreal (“BMO”). Throughout these Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements,
the term “Bank” refers to Harris N.A. and subsidiaries. :










On May 27, 2005 Bankcorp consolidated 26 of its individually chartered bank subsidiaries (including Harris
Trust and Savings Bank) into one national bank, Harris N.A. The combination was recorded at historical carrying
value and prior year financial statements have been restated. : :




The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Bank and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.
Significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Certain reclassifications were made to
conform prior years’ financial statements to the current year’s presentation. See Note 23 to the Consolidated
Financial Statements for additional information on business combinations and Note 24 for additional information
on related party: transactions.







The Bank provides banking, trust and other services domestically and internationally through the main
banking facility and 5 active nonbank subsidiaries. The Bank provides a variety of financial services to commercial
and industrial companies, financial institutions, governmental units, not-for-profit organizations and individuals
throughout the U.S., primarily the Midwest, and abroad. Services rendered and products sold to customers include
demand and time deposit accounts and certificates; various types of loans; sales and purchases of foreign currencies,
interest rate management products; cash management services; underwriting of municipal bonds; financial
consulting; and personal trust and trust-related services.







A copy of the Annual Report & Audited Accounts may be obtained from Ansbacher (Bahamas)
Limited, Ansbacher House, Bank Lane, Nassau, Bahamas.

'



4





you can advertise-your

Cars, Trucks, Boats, even your dogs

in

The Tribune’s

Bargain Finder

call us at

302-2351

FRIDAY, MAY 12,.2006, PAGE 7B:




ASSETS
Cash and demand balances due from banks............. cesadahe Reve ae, try $ 1,303,916 » $ 947,580
Money market assets:
Interest-bearing deposits at banks 0.0... 0.0... cee cece ete 1,007,212 662,366 |
Federal funds sold: 2.6) 850i Sa a eet at aa ee oe gol oa 303,130 94,950
Securities available-for-sale (including $3.71 billion and $4.27 billion of _
securities pledged as collateral for repurchase agreements at December 31, © o%
2005 and December 31, 2004, respectively) 0.0.0.0... cece eee ee eee 6,398,367 7,154,743
Trading account assets ........ 0.0.0 ecu eeee us lotacg let be ve putea belt an cota Mt aaah 181,121 90,130
EQANG crs eter ehaterd cag toe aha ene g Cele teh ene 22,971,375 20,218,993
Allowance for loan losses... 6... cece eee eee e een ene __G17,777) __ 16,575)
Netloansiie atts cai Site ends, Gans Chet Ae eh Bit wrete ah Satela a 22,653,598 19,902,418
Premises and equipment........... Blaney ORE E Ms Ce nane es alt A 416,578 455,211
Bank-owned insurance .............000- Lp ets tra Aides aheteaiatat aaa etalk decgeaiaarat 1,115,172 1,072,660
Loans ‘held: for Sale... isi6 esl ok etal Say etre ee els as Viki e hee 32,364 43,423
Goodwill and other intangible assets : 335,049 306,760 .
‘Other: assets 2S Pee eas TBE tule Bag AaE NET bode agua y dameasgr nel _ 731,241 651,119
Total assets... 2... cece cee cee wage he cs GanPate earth ters tahantean ace $34,477,748 $31,381,360
“LIABILITIES
Deposits in domestic offices — noninterest-bearing .......... cau ++ $ 6,077,792 $ 5,432,999
; : — interest-bearing ...... 0.0... eee ee eee 16,749,110 ~~ 15,646,690
Deposits in foreign offices — interest-bearing ................0. Weary). = 1,270,741 __ 1,677,428 |
Total. deposits! 735.5 408 f ddpisce sta e ding sole aonb S 24,097,643 22,757,117
Federal funds purchased .. 0... 0... e eee te ee ee ones _ 975,990 1.114,400 . &
Securities sold under agreement to repurchase............. Ney dee Bae Guonaeeaa yah 2,485,650 3,405,296 ~
Short-term borrowings .............200- tas ioatle kG AGAR Te cts GN AE A eee 2,041,715 214,145
Short-term senior nOteS. 2... ee te teens 800,000 200,000
Accrued interest, taxes and other expenses........-- 2-10 sce eee eee es 247,778 227,680 ~
Other liabilities 1) (eee eRe le Noes eee gaa ine elas oe SOR 247,544: 289,130
Minority interest — preferred stock of subsidiary.......--..0....+.000- 250,000 250,000
Preferred ‘stock issued to Harris Bankcorp, Inc.......- eR a ee ea — 5,000
Long-term notes — Senior... ieee eee tae 250,000 —_
Long-term notes — subordinated........ Se ee nr eee ae ___ 292,750 292,750
Total liabilities. ilo o000. 06.0 coe Ce ees te 31,689,070 _ 28,755,518
Stockholder’s Equity. Bier, ee ‘
Common stock ($10 par value); authorized 40,000,000 shares; issued“and ~’
outstanding 13,548,513 and 13,487,257 shares at December 31, 2005 and
December 31, 2004, respectively .......... airtR & Beg witty to Ai 135,485 134,873
Surplus (she etesechy eee Oe ealan On Sune Sash eat te aye: Me aN a whe ene eeoS ae 1,111,922 1,057,814
Retained, carningsys cep Geka wie oe apes cobs bie MBM OS wleje Daye ale 1,609,465 1,477,163
Accumulated other comprehensive loss... 2... eee eee eee (68,194) _ (44,008)
Total stockholder’s equity... . 00... 0. cece cee eee eee 2,788,678 2,625,842
Total liabilities and stockholder’s equity.............0..0000 02005 $34,477,748 $31,381,360




PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006 TRIBUNE SPORTS

Bo 1s









BEARS FC pose with their trophies after winning the NPFL Knock Out Cup Final on Sunday May 7 2006 at the BFA Development Centre, Blue Hills. Bears romped to a 9-3 win to take the Cup over

Sharks FC. Bears also finished Division 1 runners-up in the regular NPFL season which recently concluded. :
(©Vision Photo/Craig Lenihan)

Final flurry for Division



)-4 victory to
seal NPFL Cup











m@ CAMERON Hepple of Bears F
Sharks FC player during the NPFL
Final on Sunday May 7 2006 at the BF
Centre, Blue, Hills.



il NESLEY JEAN of Bears FC runs away from a Chadlet Pierre of Sharks FC during the NPFL Knock Out Cup Final on Sunday May

7 2006 at the BFA Development Centre, Blue Hills. Bears romped to a 9-3 win to take the Cup.
(©Vision Photo/Craig Lenihan)



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FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



Local gymnasts

to take on
team from

Cayman Islands

@ GYMNASTICS
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter

IN THEIR final appear-
ance for the year, local
‘gymnasts from the Nassau
’Nastics company will
grace the floor against top
gymnasts from the Cay-
man Islands in the 8th
annual Gymfest ‘Flipping
All Over the World,’ com-
petition. - .

The friendly competi-
tion, which is set for Sat-
urday at the New Provi-
dence Community Centre,
is being used as an exhibi-
tion showing for the pub-
lic.

According to Barbara
Thompson, an executive
director in the Nassau
*Nastics company, the
show should increase the
interest level in the coun-

‘try, but most importantly
give the local gymnasts the
much needed.competition.

Thompson said: “This
last showing for the year —
will be great for the kids
because it gives their fami-
ly members an opportuni-
ty to see first hand what
they’ve learned. I must say
that this year has been
very productive for us and
the kids are really excited
to display their talents at
home.

“The sport is making
great strides in the coun-
try, we have more than
200 students in the Nassau
Nastics company.
Although we travel to
competition outside of the
Bahamas, the kids don’t
really get the opportunity
to display their talents
here. We do have some
talented young people in
the company so bringing
in a good team from Cay-
man Islands will help them
a lot.”

A team of gymnasts
traveled to Florida in the
early part of January for
competition, this was the
last time gymnasts in the
Nassau ’Nastics competed.

The 19-member team’
coming from the Cayman
Islands will arrive today.
Competition will start at
2pm. Also on the day will
be free gymnastics lessons
and exhibition of gymnas-
tics routines.

SPORTS
INBRIEF



@ SOFTBALL

BAHAMAS Govern-
ment Departmental Soft-
ball will host eight games
on Saturday as they cele-
brate the Ramon Hart
Fans Appreciation Fun
Day.

Five games will be
played on the North Field
and three on the South
Field. The first game will
start at 11:30am and will
feature CAD Nailers going
up against Sandilands.

@ SWIMMING

THE final local Invita-
tional Inter-Club Swim
meet before the National
Championships will be
hosted by the Dolphin
Swimming Club, at the St
John’s Pool on Saturday
May 13th.

The meet will be one of

. the last chances for swim-

_ mers to qualify for the

' National Championships

' to be held at the Betty Kel-

' ly Kenning Aquatic Centre
on July 6th-9th.















MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

SoS re eS









‘I THE Bahamas Baseball Federation held a press conference yesterday to announce their upcoming national championships. From left: Craig Kemp, First Vice

President; Greg Burrows, President; Theodore Sweeting, Secretary; Arthur Thompson, Chief Umpire.

@ BASEBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE lines are being drawn
and the grass is being cut,
preparing the baseball fields
for the 4th annual Andre
Rodgers Junior national
championships. ‘

With three days of stiff com-
petition and more than 600
enthused baseball players
divided into 34 teams, the
Bahamas Baseball Federation
(BBF) has scheduled this
year’s national championships
for June 1st-4th.

Since the programme has
grown, the BBF will be host-
ing games at the Freedom
Farm Baseball fields, Andre
Rodgers baseball diamond
and the Churchill Tener
Knowles stadium.

Categories

The national championships
will be divided into five cate-
gories, coach pitch for ages 7-
9; bantam minor group, ages
9-10; bantam senior, ages 12
and under; junior division,
ages 13-15; and senior divi-
sion, ages 16-20.

There will be two games on
hand on the opening night: the
first will be last year’s winners
in the coach pitch, the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau,

' taking on the Freedom Farm

Baseball League. The feature
game that night will be Free-
dom Farm Baseball League
playing the Spanish Wells
Baseball League. Opening
games and ceremonies will be
held at the Churchill Tener
Knowles stadium.
Participating leagues in the
fourth annual nationals will
be Bimini Little League, Exu-
ma Baseball, Grand Bahama
Amateur Baseball Association
and their Little Leagues,
Legacy Baseball League out
of Grand Bahama, Long

Island Baseball League,
Inagua Baseball Association,
Freedom Farm Baseball,
Junior Baseball League of
Nassau and the New Provi-
dence Amateur Baseball
League.

Grand Bahama Amateur
Baseball Association and their
Little Leagues and the Junior
Baseball League of Nassau
and the New Providence
Amateur Baseball League will
be the only teams competing
in all five leagues.

Bimini Little League has
confirmed that they will be
fielding three teams.

Newly formed association,
the Exuma Baseball League
and the Inagua Baseball Asso-
ciation will compete in the
coaches pitch only. The Long
Island Baseball League, which
will be making its second
appearance at the tournament
and. the Spanish Wells teams
will compete in two divisions.

BBF president Greg Bur-
rows said he is excited to see
the first pitch thrown, espe-
cially since all the teams and
coaches have made sure they
improved.

Burrows said: “This year’s
competition is expected to be
a grand slam, with participa-
tion from every association
that exists under the BBF’s
umbrella. The national cham-
pionships won't be like no oth-
er, this is truly going to be a
grand showing from all the
teams.

“We are expecting each
association to field a team,
some have confirmed that
they will be participating in all
divisions. _

“Both the coaches and the
players have shown improve-
ment so you can expect to see
some stiff competition from
all teams.”

The national championships
will be used as a selection
process for the three national
teams that are gearing up to
travel.



(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Hers event





Bears romp to