Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text







BUSINESS. —







Firing thre

BUT members who
attended ‘illegal’
meeting will lose
jobs or have pay cut

& By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT has
announced that it will either be
firing or cutting the pay of all

members of the Bahamas -

Union of Teachers who attend-
ed an “illegal” meeting yester-
day. morning.

Between 350 to 400 teachers
attended the BUT’s meeting
yesterday, which its executives
claim was merely a normal gen-
eral meeting.

However, Minister of Educa-
tion Alfred Sears said the meet-
ing disrupted the regularly
scheduled ‘negotiating meeting
between government and the
BUT.

_. As such, he said, this “rude”
interruption cannot be over-
looked.

“Having tolerated miscon-
duct on a number of occasions,
{ will tell you.now that there
will be consequences,” Mr Sears
warned. -

With him, Minister of For-

eign Affairs and the Public Ser-

vice Fred Mitchell echoed these .

comments, stating that for too
‘long such actions have been
allowed to go unhindered.

Mr Sears stated: “I hereby

call on the BUT to cease and.

desist from any further illegal
disruption of the educational
system and to negotiate in a
constructive and reasonable
manner as required by law and
which the government under-
takes to do as well.

“The government has at all
times acted in a reasonable and
constructive manner and in a


























FT. LAUDERDALE ADDRESS
Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1 (954) 527-0034
Fax; 1 (954) 522-4828

spirit of compromise, to negoti-
ate an industrial agreement.
The government will not be
intimidated by any illegal acts
by any group or individual and
expects that all employees,
especially educators, to pursue
their interests in a lawful man-
ner,” he said.

Noting that an. “obvious
problem” can be expected with-
in the weeks to come, the Min-
istry of Education has
announced that it has created
a contingency plan for the pos-
sible interruption of school.

Realising that 12th graders
are expected to write BGCSE
exams within the coming weeks,
the ministry said that if.a strike
were tooccur, officers from the
Department of Education will
be in the schools to help invigi-
late the exams.

Noting this,

come to those who “aban-
doned” their posts and that

‘their punishment will be in

accordance with the regulations
of the Public Service.

Mr Sears also said that gov-
ernment has been “
lenient” by allowing the BUT
to represent both teachers and
principals under their collective
bargaining agreement.

However,‘ the BUT has hailed
this recognition as one of their
major victories after the Indus-
trial Tribunal ruled in their
favour allowing them to repre-
sent both principals and teach-
ers as they have been doing
since 1965.

SEE page 12

NASSAU /
Tel: (242) 393-2628
Fax: (242) 394-0847 .

FREEPORT _.
Tel: (242) 351-1501

MIAMI ADDRESS

Laser Freight International
3218 N.W. North River Drive
4 i A

Mr Sears.
promised that swift action will-

quite‘

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



fuelling station
(Photo by J oe Huterre uy)

‘mi By PAUL

TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A WORKER from
Caribbean Recycling is lucky
to be alive after a fire erupt-
ed around him while work-
ing off Joe Farrington Road
yesterday.

It is reported that the
working area was saturated
with “some flammable liq-
uid” when spar ks ignited the
substance causing the
immense fire that thr eatened
a nearby Texaco fueling sta-
tion. ,

- However, workers in the
area complained that the fire,
which had only been 15 to 18
feet wide when it started,
grew much larger because of
the Fire Department’s slow
response.

Billows of black smoke |

enveloped the area, and a
number of metal cutting
machines were consumed by

SEE page two

al for 40

gins erupts off ine errsntenn Reet

Andros set for
new subdivision,
world-class
sports project

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE ISLAND of Andros is set
for a revitalisation with the con-
struction of anew housing subdi-
vision and a world-class sports
project.

Minister of Financial Services
and Investment, and MP for
North Andros, Vincent Peet yes-
terday said that these projects
will be “a major infusion into the

economy and a catalyst for :.

growth for the island.”
Government officials have
signed contracts for a 50-acre
housing subdivision and the
resurfacing of the North Andros
High School track.
“We are building over 90

‘SEE page 12





“4



Haitian Ambassador: justice will
be served concerning alleged
Detention Centre incident

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter _

HAITIAN Ambassador
Louis Joseph said he is cer-
tain justice will be served con-
cerning the recent incident at
the Detention Centre involv-
ing an alleged abuse of a
Haitian national.

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Mr Joseph
said that a diplomatic note
from the Haitian Embassy i is
being sent to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs to report. the
incident.

- An BpEOR reportedly

SEE page 14

>

Coroner's inquest: lawyer claims client’s
constitutional rights being ‘infringed’

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE

A LAWYER'S claim yesterday that his client's constitu-
tional rights ‘were being "infringed" threatened to put an
immediate end to the Coroners inquest into the January 17
prison break that led to the death of inmate Neil Brown and

Corporal Dion Bowles.

Dion Smith, lawyer for prison officer Sandy Mackey, sub-

SEE page 14





i
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;



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PAGE 2, Fi






FROM page one

the fire which continued to
grow, threatening the nearby
Texaco station that stood only a
few feet away.

According to one eyewitness,
it took firefighters more than
45 minutes to respond to the
blaze that could be seen from
the Atlantis resort on Paradise
Island,

One concerned resident told
The Tribune that his greatest

a

WIAY 5, 2006

- fear was the possible igniting of

the gas station’s fuel tanks,

“Tf those tanks would have
blown, they would have
destroyed all the buildings in
this area, including my home,”
he said,

Luckily the blaze was con-
tained before any further loss
of property,

Police press liaison inspector

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Drawings will be held each week for (4) weeks. Tune in to 100
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10%



Blaze off Joe Farrington Road

© what tastes right’

LOCAL NEWS

Walter Evans said that the blaze
was contained to the recycling
plant and that based on the time
that the department was alerted .
to the fire, their response time
was as quick as possible.

Mr Evans said he could not
quote the exact time, but three
units, were at the blaze
within 10 minutes of the initial
call,



(Phato: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)

- THICK black smoke from the fire is seen

across New Providence yesterday.
















;
i
;

COOKIES FOR CANC
For every McDonald’s Cookie you purchase during un

the month of May 2006, McDonald’s will makea sf
donation to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE -:-



In brief ©

NT Vee ee eee eens
Peavaerererepesneveverertege © 8 88



Â¥

Griffin calls ee nf
anyone with —
knowledge Of: e
child abuse to
speak out»

MINISTER of Socia
Services and Communit
Development Melanie
Griffin has called for any- \
one with knowledge of \i
child abuse to speak out.

Minister Griffin’s
appeal came during a Par-
ents Teacher Association
meeting at Our Lady’s
Catholic Church on id
Young Street. thE

In 2005, 534 cases of
child abuse were investi- -.: 3!

en









- gated by the Department.

of Social Services. Wo

Of this number, 247.
were cases of neglect;163 °° +
involved physical abuse; - |
64 were cases of sexual .~ “
abuse and 43 were incest- ©
related.

“These despicable acts . ~
that are particularly com- ©
mitted by persons who
supposedly love, nurture, ,
care and protect our chil- ._-,
dren are heart wrenching.
and should not be.experi- =...
enced by our children,” yor
Mrs Griffin said. iadt

“Incidents of abuse {
must be reported in order ©
for action to be takento ©
protect the child, sate

“Experience has shown °.''
that abuse is a cycle which '.*
if left unbroken, will pro- i
long,” the minister said. ‘°”

She said that persons
who have knowledge of . -<#
child abuse but fail to ar
report it are breaking the | «
law. 5

Mrs Griffin also advised | 7;
parents not to allow chil- :
dren to spend time in Ey
parks, parking lots, school‘
yards or places that may .
be deserted after hours. i

“Teach your children to.“
scream loudly and run
away if anyone triesto |,
take them or touch them |
in anyway that makes '
them uncomfortable,” she ~.
added. “4

a

Cy



The Tribune wants
to hear from people
who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. |
Perhaps you are
raising funds for a
good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.



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CR
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Tropical Exterminators
322-2107 a





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bt de te ay & 2

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In brief —

Toddler’s
parents
renew
criticism

THE parents of a toddler
who died on Paradise Island are
repeating their criticism of
Bahamian authorities as two
' London police detectives pre-
' pare to revisit the case.

According to the website

www.thisislocallondon.co.uk,
while they welcomed news of
‘the officers’ involvement,
Andrea and Paul Gallagher face
a “tense wait” while the offi-
cers get set to travel to the
Bahamas.

The report said the Gal-
laghers are “concerned and anx-



ious” because they will not meet

the officers before they leave.
Mr Gallagher, 41, was quoted
in the report as saying: “I think
it is crucial they meet the family
because there are so many peo-
ple involved at so many levels.
“They need to know what
they are going to face over there.
“Ever since Paul died all we
have had from the Bahamian
authorities is a lack of co-oper-
ation and missing evidence,” Mr
Gallagher said. °
“I have serious reservations
crucial information will be with-
held and we just want to meet
them so they are aware of what
they are up against.”
Two-year-old Paul Gallagher
was killed in 2002 after being
struck by a speedboat on Cab-
bage Beach. The Bahamian
Coroner’s Court held an inquiry
‘into the death and ruled that it
was an accident.

Baha Mar
inundated
by artists’
responses

BAHA Matr’s panel of judges

has a difficult job on their hands 3 :

after the company’s “call to”
artists” received an over-
whelming response.

When the competition closed —
Mar 22, some 70 artists submit-
ted a total of 268 images.

Baha Mar Development
Company announced the com-
petition a few weeks ago with a
commitment to purchase and
showcase the winning pieces.

The resort said the effort 8
part of its pledge to create “
authentic Bahamian abe:
metropolis” on,Cable Beach.

The winning artwork will to
adorn the walls at the Sheraton
Cable Beach Hotel, which will
be the name of the redeveloped
Radisson Cable Beach Resort.

Vice-president of administra-
tion and external affairs Robert

Sands said, “Bahamians are

very talented artists and we
expected that the response
would be great. We are
impressed with the quality of
the work we have seen, which

has made the job of the judges a |

bit harder.”

The judges are now in the
process of reviewing the art-
work to choose a first, second
and third place winner, as well
as three “honourable men-
tions,” who will receive portions
of the $10,000 total prize.

Rival cell
phone
service in
Haiti

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

MOBILE telephone provider
Digicel began offering service
Wednesday in Haiti, providing a
rare infusion of foreign invest-
ment to the Western Hemi-
sphere's poorest country,
according to Associated Press.

The launch followed a splashy
marketing campaign in which
Digicel promised cheaper calling
rates, a reliable network and
free phones to anyone who can-
celed service with Haiti's top
mobile provider, Comcel.

"For too long the people of
Haiti have had to put up with a
terrible service, bad networks,
high prices and total unreliabil-
ity if you pick up the phone to
make a call," said billionaire
Irish entrepreneur Denis
O'Brien, Digicel's chairman and
founder. "From today, we see a
new beginning in Haiti."

la Ae
Uae

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
: batt asics 7 2 dar LY



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

LACK of proper parenting is
causing major problems in youth
development in the Bahamas,
Minister of Sports, Youth and
Culture, Neville Wisdom said yes-
terday.

Addressing the media during
the announcement of May as
National Youth Month, Mr Wis-
dom said that his ministry is com-
mitted to addressing the problem
of inadequate parenting in the
country.

“What we are finding is that
while we have consequences for
the actions of young people, there
seem to be very little if any con-
sequences for the non- -activities
or the actions of parents who are
adults,” he said.

Mr Wisdom said that his min-
istry this year will focus “some
major attention” to the question
of parenting.

“We want to encourage a phi-
losophy of responsibility,” he said.

The minister encouraged
churches and the various youth

organisations to support him in -

this endeavour.

He added that recent statistics
have indicated that 45 per cent of
young Bahamians are not

Wisdom
problem o f

involved in any youth organisa-
tions, and that 55 per cent do not
attend church.

To address some of the prob-
lems afflicting the country’s youth,
the ministry has established the
National Youth Crisis Youth
Committee.

Speaking at yesterday’s press
conference, Rev Diana Francis
said that the newly-formed’ com-
mittee will undertake several ini-
tiatives to “curtail the negative
vices relative to youth.”

A national youth survey, a
national youth leadership train-
ing programme, as well as keeping
the media alert of the commit-
tee’s developments and findings,
are among the planned initiatives,
Rev Francis said.

Coinciding with this year’s
National Youth Month — under
the theme “empowering youth in.
the eradication of crime, poverty
and HIV/AIDS” — the 6th Com-
monwealth Youth Ministers Con-
ference will also be held in Nassau
from May 22-29 at the Radisson
Cable Beach resort.

In addition to Commonwealth
ministers discussing the issues of
crime, poverty and HIV/AIDS,
young people from all attending
countries will also have parallel
meetings.

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 3







address
parenting







B REV Diana Francis speaks to the press yesterday about National Youth Crisis committee. . -:
To her left is Minister of Sports, Youth and Culture Neville Wisdom mae

ree Felipé Major/T ribune staff)

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Light goes out ii

By NATARIO MCKENZIE

PRISON surveillance
footage shows that the lights
suddenly went out on cell
block C and two men ran
across the corridor moments
after officer Dion Bowles is
seen handing an object toa
prisoner.

The Coroner’s Court jury.

saw this and much more yes-
terday, during an extended

screening of the footage of

Ys
technical difficulties limited
viewing of the footage.

The video showed that at

2.06am Sgt Steven Sands,
who had a warrant issued for
his arrest yesterday when he
failed to show up to court,
conducted. an apparent
inspection alone.

Mr Sands can be seen
going to Corey Hepburn's
cell, where he stood for sev-
eral seconds and appeared to
be conversing with the
inmate, according to prison
surveillance officer Travis
Bowe. .

Officer Bowe, who pre-
sented the screening, said
that it was not.clear whether

Sands passed anything to the

inmate.

He also noted that it
appeared as though officer
Sands stopped at no other
cell.

As it was reported previ-
ously, while corporal Bowles
attempted to leave the C
block at 4.11am, he handed
an item to an inmate whose

: cell was located at the far end

Apparel Fabric

$499 to $ 499

Lamour, Linen, Suiting,
Cotton, Crepe, Poplin, Taffeta

Waverly Fabric ©53 °** ss



of the block.

There was no camera posi-
tioned at any other angle of that
block, other than the one which
focused on cells C 16 to C25.

Prison surveillance footage

shows that officer Bowles :

returned to the block by himself
at 4.10 that morning and went
directly to. the rear of the block
where Corey Hepburn's cell
was located.

According to officer Bowe,
-Bowles then stopped at cell C
and. appeared to speak with
theinmate inside foradew seg:

> -onds.~

It apouired from the foptake
as though while Bowles was
attempting to leave, he was



called by the inmate in what

appeared to be cell C 16 -.

Corey Hepburn's cell.

Bowles seemed to have been
beckoned by the inmate to
retrieve an item that was on the
ground near the door of the cell
directly opposite Hepburn's.

Bowles is seen stooping to
pick up an object and seemed to
pass it to an inmate on his way
back out of the corridor, just
before the lights went out.

. Just after this, two figures
could be seen running across
sthe corridor. One individual

_apparently had on a pair of

short dark trousers and the oth-
er had on long, dark trousers
and a dark jacket. -





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The person in the short
trousers seemed to be waiting
hesitantly in the corridor, while
something:appeared to be hap-

' pening in the shadows, though it

could not be picked up by the
camera.
Several seconds afterwards,

an individual with what the

Coroner noted as a “peculiar”
stride, could be seen walking
out of the shadows dressed in
long, dark trousers and what
appeared to be a long dark jack-’
et.

Surveillance footage also
shows that at 2.14am, the
inmate in cell C 21 passed an
item which looked as though it
was wrapped in a white cloth

,from cell. C 17 to,¢
-Hepburn's cell. ~



to an inmate in cell C 18. at

”

It was noted by the Coroner
that this exchange took placé-">+ -
between inmates Robert Green, es
and Wesley Guist. nn,

Officer Bowe also noted dur- °
ing the viewing that at 3.30am, °.*
there was an inspection by Prin-
cipal Officer Rolle and Sgt ,.
Sands.” ns 5% 7

Mr Rolle had the flashlight >”
and checked cells C 24to C15, »
which were on the cell block+/.-7
officer Bowe explained. =... ,

At 3.48 an item was passed







The inquest was adjourned ny
to next Tuesday. ye

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTER TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERRA MAGISTRI

Af Ms

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of Né MMasier

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

_ EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor I 972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Freedom of Information Act needed

A FREEDOM of Information Act is way
overdue in this country. For a government
that campaigned on the principle of trans-
parency, the Christie government is daily
becoming more opaque.

Bahamians are pressing The Tribune for
more investigative reporting — it is felt that
only half the story is being told in this country.
We disagree. The truth is that in certain areas
only a quarter of the story is being told. How-
ever, until the Bahamas enacts a Freedom of
Information Act, the Bahamian ‘people will
always be halfinformed. -

The Tribune does its best, but if the public
only knew how hard it is to squeeze informa-
tion out of certain quarters, they would cred-
it our staff with doing an outstanding job.

For example, something as simple as a pile
of sand that suddenly appeared one day on the
Montagu foreshore, squeezed between two
houses just west of Dick’s Point, has grown
into a closed-mouthed mystery. Dredging was
also going on, and obviously whoever was
responsible for both the dredging and the
mountain of sand was hiding nothing, indi-
cating that he had permission from someone in
authority to do what he was doing. When res-
idents in the area complained and The Tribune
started probing, the dredging stopped, work-
men disappeared, but the mound of sand
remains waiting for the first hurricane to
smother neighbouring properties.

Someone must have applied for.a licence to

proceed with whatever plans the developer.

had in mind, and someone in authority must
have issued a permit for the work to be carried
out. But when Tribune reporters tried to get
information about what was going on, who
issued the permits, who’ eventiially’ stopped
the work,‘and a date for the removal of the
sand, they ran into a blank wall. And on that
wall sat three monkeys. Their names were:
Sees Nothing, Speaks Nothing and Hears
Nothing. And so, thanks to the silence of the
monkeys, The Tribune has nothing to report.
But the sand is still there.

Residents in the area believe The Tribune
has let them down. To them we say: Support
us in what is now going to be a fight for a

Freedom of Information Act. The people have |

a right to know. At his mini-rally this week
Prime Minister Christie reminded his ministers
that the people were their masters and that
they were the people’s servants. Parliamen-
tarians should not forget this. .

We can recall many instances of the
“closed-mouth-catch-no flies” attitude among
civil servants who former prime minister Ingra-
ham ordered to be open with the press when
his party became the government in 1992.
After 10 years of openness, we are slipping
back to the Pindling era, a time when “no
comment” was the reflex response by civil
servants to Tribune reporters even before a
question was asked.

ECC ur SIU Marat ed ¢ oe ie

MONTROSE Nis

ten = Rape Ve eee

\
It’s a dangerous attitude when a govern-
ment information officer thinks that a treaty
between governments might not be for public
consumption. However, that was the answer a
Tribune reporter received when he asked a
government information officer for the
Bahamas-Cuba agreement, which was the crux
of the matter in the recent detention of the
Cuban dentists. The Tribune got the agree-
ment, but not from the Bahamas government.
Only this week The Tribune faced the same
blank wall when it asked questions on behalf
of the public about the awarding of contracts
by the Ministry of Housing.

This is public information. Why the secre-
cy? We have been told that “an unusually
large proportion of government housing pro-
jects has been awarded to a preferred group of
contractors.” True or false?

We remember the days — in the UBP era
— when The Tribune published such infor-
mation on a regular basis. It was as regular as
the timetable that we used to publish on the
sailing of the mailboats and the produce com-
ing into the Produce Exchange.

But today, oh no, the hatches have been
nailed down. Today, if we want these records
we have to put our requests in writing. And
then that request has to be cleared by the
Minister or his Permanent Secretary.

Our reporters are complaining that they
find themselves writing more requests to var-

ious departments for permission to get infor- -

mation than they are now writing news for
our readers. This undoubtedly is an exagger-
ation, but they are trying to emphasise a seri-
ous problem in news gathering.

All contracts awarded by the Housing'Min-
istry come*before the tenders board; and'the
names of those tendering are a matter of pub-
lic record. However, there are some contracts,
which because they fall below the maximum
level do not have to go to the tenders board. It
is alleged that some large contracts, which
because of their value would have to go to
the board, are being broken up to get them
under the line. Members of the public are
claiming favouritism in the department. As
their tax money pays these contractors they
are entitled to know.

Montagu MP Brent Symonette, who heads
the Public Accounts Committee, said he also
has asked for a list of all persons who have
received contracts to build low cost homes.

“For four years, in Parliament, I have asked
for that information, and they have not
answered me yet,” said Mr Symonette.

We recall that when in Opposition, Minister
Bradley Roberts, who was then on the Public
Accounts Committée, asked for the school
building contracts under the FNM. They were
made. available.

If the FNM could do it, what’s wrong with
the PLP?

Is there in fact something to hide?



In praise of
the new PLP’s
performance

EDITOR, The Tribune

WE don’t hear much talk
about it, but never in our coun-
try’s developing history have
we had so many investment
projects announced and getting
off the ground, as we have had
and are having under this
Christie-led Government.

Atlantis Phase Three, Exu-
ma, Eleuthera, Cat Island, Aba-
co, Rum Cay, Athol Island,

Cable Beach, Mayaguana, °°

Bimini and many of the Exu-
ma and Abaco Cays; plus the
biggest of them all, the massive
$3.7 billion Ginn project which
promises to transform West
End and West Grand Bahama
into a metropolis: It is interest-
ing to note that, instead of talk-
ing about no investment we are,
nowadays, talking about too
much investment — too fast; we
are focusing now on the fear
that we are getting too far
ahead of our people, which
could be a problem — but a
somewhat, good problem. |
On Darold Miller’s show a
few weeks ago, Rodney Moncur
opined that it might be that we
are approving too many invest-
ment projects and that his

_advice to the Government

would be to slow down. I under-
stood what he was saying how-
ever, it is a “be damned if I do;
be damned if I don’t” situation
that the Government finds itself
in: and, quite frankly, it is a
good “be damned if I do; be
damned if I don’t” dilemma.
For years, Bahamians have
been wanting to see substantial
investments come to the Fami-

ly Islands, including those very’

“remote ‘Fainily Islands; and‘now""'
Pérry Chiistie is‘delivering the
_ under the sun”. Prime Minister

goods — big time.

I personally was a little appre-
hensive about the Governmen-
t’s decision to pursue an anchor
property for each of the islands

— what they could, potentially, .

do to the islands — when the
idea was first touted: that the
culture shock would have been
too much for most of the island
peoples,
changed my mind and now con-
gratulate the Prime Minister for
this visionary approach to the
development of our Family
Islands. While I am in this com-
plimentary mood, I would like
to commend the Prime Minister
on another brilliant first for him,

cand that is‘the Urban Renewal

Programme which is designed
specifically to rescue our inner

city neighbourhoods and the.

people living in them.

We are already reaping great
rewards from this innovative
programme which has earned



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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




international praise in the
region and has so impressed
regional law enforcement and
social agencies that a number
of them have decided to adopt
the programme to their own cir-
cumstances.

‘It is interesting to note that
we are doing so very well on all
fronts that Hubert Ingraham
and his hand-picked deputy
from Montagu are hard pressed
to find anything of credibility
and substance to bring to public
debate. Their efforts so far have
been the trite, hollow and inef-
fective posturing of men clutch-
ing at straws. Their actions to
date remind us of the section in
the English novel entitled ‘Silas
Marner’ where the author,
Mary Ann Evans (George
Eliot,1819-1880) offers this pen-
etrating observation...“A man
falling into dark waters, seeks a
-momentary footing even on
sliding stones...”

‘The state of the FNM’s
befuddlement continues to
grow, since the squalid leader-
ship displays leading up to the
disgraceful scams involved in
the ill-fated leadership conven-
tion earlier this year. The FNM,
to the alarm of their monied
backers among the aging rem-
nants of the vanquished UBP,
shows no sign of recovery in
their present political convales-
cence and disarray.

Mr Ingraham, and his ill cho-

‘sen lieutenant from Montagu,

must understand this well: that
“there is a'time for everything

Perry Gladstone Christie has
been emplaced by He who
emplacés and displaces govern-
ments and leaders of govern-
ments. The evidence, since he
became Prime Minister, shows
that he is where he is, by design,
for such a time as this.

The alliance which he has
enacted with others in the com-
munity with like minds, has
strengthened his hand; and the
blessings which have come to
our country are but an indica-
tion of what we can expect if

we continue to honour God, in
all our doings. :

This is Perry Christie’s time,
so it is with Portia Simpson
Miller elsewhere, so long as they
walk before the Lord, so will
they and their people be blessed.
You have had your time, Mr
Ingraham, and. you made cer-
tain promises which you con-
veyed to the country at large
but have not kept. The country
cannot now countenance your
misplaced and insufferable ego.
I perceive, above all, that the
Lord is not with thee, sir. Stop
your renewed quest for power
because the “writing on the
wall” says you will not succeed.
Should you persist you will be
badly defeated. Repent and ask
to be forgiven and with peni-
tence and time, may come peace
in your party.

What is happening in our
country is the Lord’s doing and
until you, your Deputy, and oth-
ers of like ilk realise and accept
that, so will continue your polit-
ical travail.

' In the meantime, so long as
Perry Christie and those called
to: assist him, continue under
the new dispensation, so shall
our country reap the rewards
of ever greater blessings and
manifold prosperity under God..

Mr Ingraham, your-errors
pre-date the general election of
2002, but history shows that you
have not yet learned from those
errors which led to your explo-
sive defeat at the polls.

The new dispensation, which |
that defeat set in motion, is now
so effective and impressive in”
its results that no power born
of the devil can stay it, on its
present path of Christianity
empowerment, blessings and
prosperity under the Almighty.

The Bahamian: people are
greatly pleased with the changes
which have flowed from the
political change of 2002 and they
are not about to tamper with
what they consider to have been
a refreshing and a healthy adjust-
ment in the political directorate.
Man Propeses.- — God ais:
poses.

FORRESTER
CARROLL

Freeport, Grand Bahama
April 29 2006

An alternative prayer

EDITOR, The Tribune —

WITH regard to the ban-
ning of the critically acclaimed
movie “Brokeback Mountain”
I offer up this sincere prayer:

Dear God, please save us from
the Christian Council.

GREGORY LOWE
Nassau
April 4 2006



“He who angers —
you controls you”

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE:5



Experts urge Bahamians to press

for freedom of information act



In brief

Free lecture
at gallery

on cultural
development

A FREE public lecture and
workshop on cultural develop-
ment will be held at the Nation-
al Art Gallery of the Bahamas
on Monday, May 8 at 7pm.
The event will take the form
of a series of short lectures and
discussions on how the arts and
business communities in the
Bahamas can promote and
manage creativity and leader-
ship.
“Creativity is the key ihgre-
dient to success in artistic and
commercial ventures,” said the
organisers in a press release.
“However, it is only recently
that systematic thought has
béen given to identifying, train-
ing and nurturing the next gen-
eration of cultural leaders.”
Speakers at the event will be:
e Viv Tyler from UK Busi-
“ness in the Arts North West

e Michael Diggiss, MDR

e Venu Dhupa from the UK
‘National Endowment for Sci-
ence, Technology and the Arts
(NESTA) °

e Dr Nicolette Bethel, Direc-
tor of Culture

e Steve Miller from Norton

Priory Museum, UK

- © In the chair: Dr Daniel
Glaser, co-author of the
Bahamas National Cultural Pol-

‘icy

Cricket boosts
‘Barbados
economy by
‘4.4 per cent.

@ BARBADOS
Bridgetown

BARBADOS reported 4.4
per cent economic growth in the
first quarter of the year, boost-
ed partly by the construction
boom for the 2007 cricket
World Cup, a banking official

» said, according to Associated
? Press.
The result — aided by an
- 15,000 seat expansion to the
- cricket stadium and a surge in
tourism —, marked the
. Caribbean island’s seventh con-
' secutive quarter of gross domes-
‘tic product growth above 3 per
; cent, said Central Bank Gover-
-nor Marion Williams.
Unemployment remained
-low on the former British
colony, while inflation showed
signs of evening out, Williams
said. Exports of goods and net
services receipts saw a modest
increase, while import growth
slowed. 4 re.

For the fiscal year ending

' -March 2006, the budget deficit

was estimated at US$65.8 mil-
lion or 2.1 per cent of GDP,
compared to US$71.6 million
or 2.5 per cent of GDP in the
previous fiscal year, Williams
said.

Barbados, home to about
: 280,000 people, is located in the

-eastern Caribbean.

RRR ha) tng

FRI., MAY 5

Bahamas @ Sunrise - live

Immediate Response

ZNS News Update - live

Immediate Response

A Special Report

A Cultural Corner

» Legends: Whence We -

Came Dr. Keva Bethel

International Fellowship of

Christian & Jews

Lobias Murray

Lisa Knight & The Round

Table

Cybernet

ZNS News Update

Fun Farm

411 ;

Caribbean Passport

News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

Da’ Down Home Show:

70th Anniversary of Radio

Special

The Envy Life

Caribbean Newsline

News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

Immediate Response
Community Pg./1540AM







































SAT. MAY 6
6:30 cone Page
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

10:00 eeesey

10:30 Dennis The Menace

11:00 Tennessee Tuxedo & His
Tales

11:30 cane San ee

12:00

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
- Chief Reporter

THE citizens of the
Bahamas must be encouraged
to get involved in the push for
a Freedom of Information
Act, two international experts
told reporters yesterday.

George Papagiannis, direc-
tor of programme develop-
ment and support for
Internews Network and Lucy
Dalglish, executive director
of the Reporters Committee
for Freedom of the Press
addressed journalists during a
teleconference yesterday at
the US Embassy on World
Press Freedom Day.

“We sometimes think of
FOIA (Freedom of Informa-
tion Act) as a part of the
news business’ agenda. It is
something that journalists



@ LEFT to right: Michael Taylor, Embassy spokesman; Dr
Brent Hardt, Deputy Chief of Mission; Rupert Missick, Tribune
chief reporter; Quincy Parker, Bahamas Journal reporter; and
Mindell Small, Nassau Guardian reporter, during a video

confrence call

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)

have to have. But we are not
the only constituent. In fact the
real constituent of a FOIA is
the community that you serve,”
Mz Papagiannis said.

For any democracy to be
strong, Mr Papagiannis said,
people need to have access to
information and governments
need to be transparent.

“The real constituents here
are the people of the Bahamas.
They have to understand that
this is something that it is impor-
tant to them and it is about good
governance,” he said.

He cautioned that the press
must engage the public in the
discussion.

“You don’t want to look like
the gladiators in the ring. This is
not sport. People need to have a
vested interest and I think it is
the role of the media to point
out to people that there is a
vested interest in how these bat-
tles unfold,” he said.

Ms Dalglish said one of the
countries that has recently
adopted a freedom of informa-
tion act is Mexico. The act is
only a couple of years old but it

sescecaececdececcnccccennacencecenceceesecesensecenseseseereneesentenneseeseeneeeaneseensesereeseseeseneeeeneessaneeeceeeneeee nen esseeeesseeenseananen eases esses esses eases saseasssasseseeerseesessenne

Burt Todd dies in US

THE death of Burt Kerr
Todd, a long-time winter resi-
dent of Nassau was announced
in Ligonier, Pennsylvania.

Burt was the younger son of
Mr and Mrs Kirkland Todd of
Ligonier, Pa, who became
British citizens and made Nas-
sau their permanent home.

Burt, who had married well-
known Pennsylvania horse-
woman Susan Hays, resided at

;.. Foxley Farms, the family home.
: :.at Ligonier, visiting Nassau ~

during the winter months.
Burt Todd was educated at

Choate School in the US
where he was a contemporary
of the late Sir Sydney Oakes.
After service in the US Air
Force during World War II he
continued his education at
Oxford University where he
- was graduated in 1949 with a
degree in English, French and
Law.
After graduating, he joined
two fellow Oxonians, Edward
. St. George and Paul Bower, on

took them to India, Nepal,
Tibet, Bhutan, China other far

a round-the-world trip which:

eastern countries before they
embarked on their lifetime
careers.

Burt, however, kept in touch
with the ruling family of
Bhutan, sponsoring their vis-
its to the US and Europe.

The company Burt Todd
founded quickly became the
largest importer of Chinese
goods into the US and still
operates from Ligonier.

Burt.Todd is survived by his

wife, Susan-and: his flausbiereits

Laura and Frances ,and.their
children.

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was based on a recognition that

. democracy functions best when

the public has information.

“Your publications need to
have the editorial message that
gets out repeatedly. This is tax-
payer money and the people
have a right to know where it is
going,” she said.

Chairman of the Public
Accounts Committee, Montagu
MP Brent Symonette, told The

Tribune yesterday that his com- :

mittee is having a difficult time
getting information on the cur-
rent state of the country’s
finances.

Situations such as this Mr’

Symonette said should not
necessitate.a FOIA and should
just be common courtesy of the
government of the day. -

“They finally gave us the 2003
accounts for the Public
Accounts Committee to review
and only brought three copies
fora committee of five people.
That was 10 days ago and when
I went back to the House yes-
terday I asked where the extra








Bomeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
e MARKET STREET -
* P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

Ame naa

Calvary Deliverance:

_Clementina Stubbs,

copies were and they were not
available.

Mr Symonette said it was
pointless to pass a Freedom of
Information Act for the pur-
poses of forcing government to
make public the spending of
public funds because there are
current laws that require that
they lay that information on the
table of the House.

While that may be true, there
is no way for anyone outside of
government to “enforce” the
current law other than suing the
establishment for the informa-
tion. Mr Symonette conceded:
“Unless there is a will on behalf
of the current government of
the day you are wasting your
time.” ,

Mr Papagiannis pointed out
that democracy is a work in ©
progress while there is nothing
perfect about the system the
checks and balances that,exist
within in it cannot exist with-
out an independent and vigor-

-ous press that can highlight'a

‘government’ s shortcomings. |





Pastor Emiritus of |

Church,
Rey. Mother

83



a resident of Sunlight Village and
formerly of Devils Point, Cat
“Island will be held at Calvary
Deliverance Church, East Street
South,.on Sunday May 7th, 2006 |
ret at. 2:00-p.m. Officiating. will: be. Bishop V.G,Clarke,.assisted by |
.| associate ministers. Interment follows in Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.










































She is survived by seven children, Tryphena Moss, Ethan Stubbs
I, Zennarene Kemp, Margal McIntosh, McKallan Stubbs, Evangelist |
Sherryl Forbes and Linkworth Stubbs Jr; twenty grandchildren,
Deac. Demerris (Jannelle), Jehucal (Dr. Laura) and Min. LaNasio
(Lynette) Forbes, Qyntynne and Kelzya Moss, Ethan II, McKell,
Erica, Dario, Cynara, Chynna, Elon, Jewel, Latiesha, and Tiara
Stubbs, Shrel Bethel (Brandon), Clementina, John, and Delonique |
Kemp, Rasean McIntosh; two great-grandchildren, Shama Ky-
Mani and Trinity; daughters- in- law, Barbara, Donna and Lisa
Stubbs; sons- in-law, Deac. Frederick Moss, Sgt. 536 Keith McIntosh
and Rev. Dr. Philip Forbes; nieces, Vivian Long (Herbert), Amanda
Stubbs, Roselda Rigby (Franklin), Orean, Dr. Paula Mortimer
(Averell), Angela Brown, Candace and Elaine Pratt, Ceola Charles,
Vernetta "Velma" Reid (Winston), Iva Mae Jacqueline Cox (Marvin), |.
Judy Anne Robinson (Daniel), Leila Newman, Shela Brown

(Chester), Pauline Norris, Jeanette McKenzie (Albert), Marie
Simmons (Errol), Carmen Francis (Victor), Dawn Francis (Leon),
Joan Newbold, Willamae, Renea, and Beatrice Stubbs; nephews,
Rev. Pagel (Karen), Winston (patricia), Michael (Sharon) and Grady
(Carol) Williams, Alvin Ferguson (Deborah), Dr. Godfrey (Elita),
Deraine (Francel), Mathian (Joyann) and Vandyke Pratt (Latoya),
Clayton and Rollis Cooper, Milton, Anthony, Cedric and Rodney
Newbold; grand nieces and nephews, Glenda Francis, Shayne
(Lenora), Nelson and Jay Jr. Brown, Granville, Brittanye, David,
Harry, Herbert, Maurice, Calvin, Evelyn, Nora, Adra, Arlene,
Alpheus, Keturah, Donald, Katrina, Alexander, Llereva, Brandon,
Alaina, Vania, Sean, Bjorn, Adrian, Janalle, Deverall, Devon, Jasort,
Cakon, Tonya, Trevor, Carlton, Crystal, Angel, Gabriel, Glorielle,
Emmanuel, Raphael, Chanel, Joel, Daniel, Natasha, Durainth












































Candace, Titania, Michele, Michael, Melody, Matthew, Ja
Joshua, Lewis, Charles Christopher, Tray, Andre, Sandra, Gan
and Anthony; sisters- in- law, Palma Pratt, Ellen Stubbs and Ruth
Sumuda; brothers- in- law, Ernest Stubbs of New York and Hexiin
Pratt; aunts, Alice Roberts and Mary Young, other relatives*ind
| friends, Kenneth and Randolph Williams, Leah, Adelle, Beulah,
Melba, John, Geneva Dorsette and family, Maudrina Lewis and
family, Bishop V.G. and Elder Beverly Clarke and family, Lady
Margaurite Pindling, Brenetha Whyms and Family, Mary Dawkin$
and family, Pastor Helen McPhee, Deac. Damion Celestine, Lenora
Pinder, Juan Garcia, Kerry Smith and family, Edith Rolle and
family, Pastor Dorothy Moss and family, Bishop Carlos L. Malone
Sr. and The Bethel Full Gospel Baptist Church family, Pastor Jame’
Newry and family, Dr. Myles Munroe, Bishop Neil Ellis, Bishop
John Humes, Bishop Dr. Brice Thompson, Bishop Elgarnet Rahming,
Rev. Lavinia Stewart, Pastor Rod Parsley, Mother Ellen Parsley,
‘| Rev. Teuton Stubbs, Bishop Dr. William Thompson, Bishop William
Johnson, Bishop Albert Hepburn, Apostle Roston Davis, Bishop
Samuel Green, Pastor Terrence Morrison, Elder Oris Campbell and
family, Ian Cooper and family, Greg Stubbs and family, the Dawkins,
Martin, Williams, Farrington, Stubbs and Bethel families, Bisho
Franklin Ferguson, John Kemp, Elder Clifton Scavella, Maedawn
Munroe and family, Tony and Charlene Heard, Evangelist Rosetta
Scavella, Theresa Deleveaux, Lenox Major and family, Rev. Df.
O. A. Pratt, Elder Lena Pratt, Debbie McDonald, Brenda, Catherine
and Gregg Allen, Rev. Emily Demeritte and family, Mannix Ospin
and family, Juster Otero and family, Latoya, Dave, Vivienne Brown
and family, Rose, Dr. Mary Alfred and family, Dorothy Bowles,
Bishop James A. Darling, Peter Galanos and family, Calvin Johnson,
Rev. J. J. Stubbs and family, Leon Stubbs and family, Pastor David
Sweeting, Italia Johnson, Darleen, Delreese, Anwar, Ethel, Enda,
Apostle Quebell Martin, Bishop Rueben Deleveaux, the Hannah
and Miller family, Richard Dean and family, Ezra Dean and family,
Dario Pinder, the community of Sunlight Village, Sunlight Cottage,
Toote Shop Comer and Fritz Lane, Paula Mae Russell and family,
Livingston Austin and family, the Calvary Deliverance Church
family, Leyota, Ismella and Rose Davis, Delta's Christian School
of Excellence family, the Turnquest, Cartwright, Ambrister, and
Rigby families, Calvary Temple Church family and a host of opher
relatives and friends, too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Calvary Deliverence Church,
East Street South, on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and
on Sunday at Demeritte's Funeral Home from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00
noon and at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service tinie:

4
a



PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Watch your words, Cousin Raynard

N George Orwell’s satire
Animal Farm, Squealer, a
small fat pig represented the
(government’s) propaganda,
_and was thought of as being
“capable of turning black into
white. Squealer was depicted as
a brilliant talker, who very con-
vincingly skipped from side to
side and whisked his tail to
make a persuasive argument.
Unfortunately, for Raynard
Rigby, whilst as the PLP’s chief
propagandist he can be likened



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to Squealer, his persuasiveness
as a spokesman can only be
described as “eloquently fee-
ble”.

Beyond the elaborate nature
-of Mr Rigby’s speeches, which
are attempts at spinning his par-
ty’s mediocre performance in
governance, it is easy to discov-
er why rational people are not
so easily hoodwinked.

Last week, my dear second
cousin Raynard (my grandfa-
ther, Edward Gibson, is his
grandmother’s brother) effec-





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tively placed his foot in his
mouth once again by launching
a boorish attack against the
press — particularly The Tribune
~ at a press conference held

under the guise of promoting”

his government’s achievements.

According to cousin Raynard,
he was cautioning the press, and
ensuring that they adhere to
their obligation to objectively
report to the Bahamian people.
He ended his cautionary tale by
stating “I trust this is the last
time”.

r Rigby’s egregious
and inflammatory
attack on journalists leads one
to examine his political history

and thereby his credibility.
Among diehard PLP insiders,
Mr Rigby’s credibility has been
questionable as he has been
seen as having joined the party

- in the fourth quarter in the lead

up to the 2002 general elections
when it became clear by the
public’s opposition to the
FNM’s referendum that the
PLP would likely form the next
government.

At his press conference, Mr
Rigby also said he will match

: the press “step by step”. Now,

today’s questions is: How? Will
we the press be victimised and
spat on again?

In a December 4, 2005

| appearance on the talk show

Parliament Street he again dis-






















































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te

» Pam will be glad to answer
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while Ryu Byer

Dothe Seminar {

with

played his ineptness as the +

PLP’s spokesman by blatantly |
attempting to spin the racial |
undertones in the speeches of

certain PLP speakers at their

convention, concerning Hubert
Ingraham and Brent Symonet-
te’s election to the leadership |
post within the FNM. Here,
PLP representatives attempted.

to exploit scaremongering tac- ~

tics to urge Bahamians not to
elect a team, inclusive of a white
Symonette to a leadership role
in the Bahamas, as they alleged
it would be a return to the days
of the UBP and segregation.

n his endeavour to.bam-.

boozle listeners, Mr Rigby :
asserted that his party’s posi-:
tion was not to use race as an’!
issue, and that they were simply :
enunciating the history of the ;
yb

Bahamas. ‘Yet, he went on to
contradict himself by stating
“we will move the country for-
ward, never looking: back-
wards”. Cousin Raynard fur-
ther claimed that his party
“engaged in a discussion” of
race “having a comparative
analysis over periods and eras”.
Mr Rigby must live under a
rock! :

Raynard Rigby, who has once
again caught foot-in-mouth dis-

- ease by threatening the press,
_has proven why no one takes

him seriously. Mr Rigby has
become known to overstate and
use exaggerated prose, and as
party chairman, is most laugh-
able and possibly the most inef-
fectual spinner in local politics.

Either Raynard Rigby thinks
that Bahamians are ignoramus-
es or is simply trying to mislead
us or both!

his week finds the
chairman bragging
about the PLP’s performance,
stating that it has led to a com-

plete economic and social trans- .

formation in the Bahamas. Pre-
viously, he has claimed that the

: work of the PLP is unmatched.

Mr Chairman, of what record
do you persistently speak?
Whilst the PLP government

' has signed many agreements

and boasted of their invest-
ments, there is nothing tangi-

. ble that can be seen as they are .
. all stuck in.some pipeline. By

now, this pipeline should extend
from here to Florida!

Raynard Rigby and certain
members of the “new” PLP are
seemingly continuing a legacy
of dishonesty with voters.

Cos, bear in mind that this
generation is more educated

. and smarter than before, and

know to save your lawyeriny;
and fancy talk for the boar:!-

room. When you threaten the
freedom of the press, you

- threaten democracy!

ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



iar Warren

The Singer Sewing Company



“Making a Grooming Case”
Date: Tuesday May 9th, 2006
Time: 9am-12pm (hourly)
3pm- 7pm (hourly)

Place: Linen Department,
Kelly’s Home Centre

bring into Kelly’s before May 9th, 2006





























I
| Name:
I I
| Tele #:
Ey
; P.O. Box:
Time of session:
I Registration forms also available at Kelly’s, Linen Dept.
Sold i at Mal ot Marathon BS
Saurdcy 30qn- 00pm
K Moyse Sahn
eC Ig Tel: (242) 393-4002





CC ARYey

Home
SR PISA a nee, ere wee
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Fax: (242) 393-4096 4 :
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= TRIBUNE

@ A

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 7

[ In brief Government may consider |

edia summit
or Caribbean
region to be
held in Florida

THE Media Summit, the only
production, programming and
technology television conference
developed specifically for the
Caribbean and Central Ameri-
ca, announced that its 2006
meeting will be at the Radisson
Hotel in Miami, Florida.

The sixth annual meeting will
take place May 31 to June 2,
2006 under the theme: “Adapt-
ing to digital integration.”

Discussion will focus on con-
verting new technologies into
revenue generators for broad-
cast television.

Maggie Castillo, the confer-
ence organiser said: ““The Media
Summit serves an important
niche in-the television industry.
While many of the islands ‘and
countries in this region could
be considered small on their
own, regionally they represent
nearly $20 million in expendi-
tures in television programming,
technology and infrastructure.”

The conference is targeted at
station owners, managers and
operators including production
and post-production persons.

“This year’s summit aims to
demystify new technologies and
provide ideas of how regional
television owners and their
management can deploy them
to ultimately make-more rev-
enue,” Castillo said.

Those who wish to partici-
pate can register online at
www.caribbeanmediasummit.
com.













Visit us and see other used cars.
and make your own deal!

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m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK .
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - If those
overseeing the sale of Royal
Oasis Resort do not find a
purchaser soon, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie warned
that the government “would
be faced with having to exer-
cise another option”.

However, Mr Christie
remained tight-lipped about
what this other option might
be.

The prime minister said the
government and the sellers
are expected to meet shortly
in New Providence to review
the applications of interest-
ed parties and decide on who
should buy the resort.

Mr Christie was addressing
an Urban Renewal meeting
held at the Hilton Outten
Convention Center on Thurs-
day.

“As prime minister, it is

_important for me in passing

to address what is a signifi-
cant problem to business per-
sons, and since J am here I
just want to briefly speak to
the current status of Royal
Oasis,” he said.

The closure of Royal Oasis
following two hurricanes in
2004 has resulted.in the loss
of 1,200 jobs. . :

The loss of tourist business
negatively impacted the









auto
sales‘

other options on Royal Oasis

Christie ‘optimistic’ about
future of resort: refuses to
speculate on possible action





’ MB PERRY Christie

International Bazaar, where
many merchants were forced to
close their shops.

Mr Christie said the fate of
the Royal Oasis is a matter that
“exercises every degree of
attention” from the govern-
ment.

PT TIO







“A meeting date has been set
and applications are being con-
sidered. And I believe it is fair,
for me to say that if the people
who have to sell cannot find a
purchaser to present to us when
we meet shortly, that the gov-
ernment would be faced with
having to exercise another
option.

“I do not propose to be
hostage to circumstances where
people — as they are in lawfully
entitled to do — exercise their
best interest which does not
necessarily coincide with the

. best interest of our country and

Grand Bahama; to leave myself,
and my government hostage to

- those circumstances.

Mr Christie said he is opti-

_ mistic about the future of the

Royal Oasis, because he is sat-
isfied that the government will
be reimbursed for the funds it
advanced for worker redun-
dancy payments.

TIFFANY & CO.

Return to Tiffany” collection. Necklace in sterling silver or 18k gold.

NASSAU 288 BAY STREET PARADISE ISLAND CRYSTAL COURT AT ATLANTIS
ABACO MARSH HARBOUR HARBOUR ISLAND DUNMORE TOWN EXUMA EMERALD BAY
242 202 2800

Join? Bull































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, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

PAGE 8

Ae)

| Dorsett

lione

Shirley Paul





THIRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 9





Moye Va

eTurnquest





1 criticises

Rent Control
amendment |

THE ode feta amendment

to the RenjControl Act is

another exanple of the PLP

government; “patchy, piece-

meal” approich to legislation,

according jo FNM senator
Pp

Tommy Tunquest.

Mr Turngiest said that rather
than dealirg with issues com-
prehensivdy, the government
seems to highlight “small
aspects”~-in an attempt to give
the impression that it is help-
ing theublic. ~

“Thi government appears to
alwaysseek to avoid the hard
task ¢ governance, and just
‘profes’ and puts out propa-
gand that they are working
hard’ he said.

M Turnquest said that
althagh the Rent Control Act is
mor than 30 years old, the only
amadment the government has
proosed is an increase in the
ceing on protected dwellings,
fron $25,000 to $75,000.

fe added that in the 2002
Spech from the Throne, the
gvernment spoke of the need
fc changes to the Act, including
tk creation of a corporation
vth private partners to increase
te number of rental units avail-
ole for low-income families and
oung single workers.

Mr Turnquest added that the
zovernment said it would review
the Act “with a vrsw to making
it more responsive “the plight
of low-income tena ~“s

But according to‘war Yurn-
quest, the proposed amendment
does not fulfill any of the objec-
tives outlined in the speech.

“What the amendment does,
however, is increase the cost of
rentals in the Bahamas, and by
extension increases the cost of
living for low and middle-income

4
iy
yy



@ TOMMY Turnquest

families, in. many cases,” he said.

Mr Turnquest pointed out
that while a higher ceiling is
proposed, the percentage
afforded a landlord for charging

rent is not amended, and would

remain at 15 per cent.

“This means landlords who
own modest duplexes valued at
$150,000 (which is $75,000 per
dwelling unit) can charge with-
in the law as much as $937.50
monthly for a single unit,” Mr
Turnquest explained.

The senator said he failed to
see how this increases the num-
ber of rental units available for
low-income families and young
single workers, “considering that
the average monthly rental cost
for dwellings of this value cur-
rently is $500 to $700 per month”.

Mr Turnquest said such a sys-
tem will only trap low-income
Bahamian families into paying
rent forever.

“Instead of increasing the cost
of living and laying the founda-
tion for homelessness in the
Bahamas, the government should
be dealing with setting standards
for rental dwellings,” he said.

We are the leading garment care organization
who has. the following challenging positions for
energetic, dynamic and team oriented individuals.

DRY CLEANER
Are you a skilled stain removal technician?
Do you take pride in your work? Would you like to earn
more money? Experience preferred but will train.

; PRESSER
Are you an experienced presser who would like
to make $375 or more a week?

TEAM LEADER |
Are you fed up with “graveyard shifts” or low pay?
Do you like to smile? . Do you have a positive attitude?

If you have answered YES to ALL of the questions
for a given position, please fax your resume detailing
work experience, training and salary requirements
to 393-8902, or pick up an application form.

NO TELEPHONE CALLS, PLEASE.





plans.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS

education and experience).

ACCESS and GIS.

strategic goals.



natural areas planning or manag

¢ Experience in developing, directing, managing and implementing
strategies to protect marine habitats and species, demonstrating a thorough
knowledge of the science, issues and methods of marine conservation.

* Working knowledge of marine resource management agencies and marine
resource management policy framework.

¢ Demonstrated experience in MS Office Suite. Prefer experience with

* Experience in leading and managing multiple projects and implementing

Management experience, including the ability to motivate and lead, set
objectives, and manage the performance of interdisciplinary teams.

Employment Opportunity
The Nature Conservancy Bahamas Program is seeking to fill the position
of Marine Conservation Specialist. The individual will have
responsibility for directing the marine aspects of the Bahamas program
by working collaboratively with internal staff, governmental agencies
and NGO partners. S/he will be responsible for developing new
partnerships to meet the conservation goals identified in the Bahamas
Ecoregional plan. S/he will also identify and implement strategies for }
specific marine initiatives and projects and ensure the coordination of
marine conservation activities, site conservation plans, and annual work



* Masters in biology, especially marine biology, public policy, natural
resources, Or science preferred and at least 5-7 years related experience in
ement (or an equivalent combination of



Experience developing and successfully administering departmental budgets.

Interested persons should apply in writing with full details, including resume
and cover letter, to bahamas@tnc.org by May 15th, 2006.







NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072 ;
: Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pagers: 340-8043 / 340-4424 / 340-8034 e Fax: (242) 340-8034

FREEPORT
11-A East Coral Road, P.O. Box F-42312
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005
Page 340-8043

PT Tay tees ssi



ADRIEL HENRY SAUNDERS, 88

of #28 Waterfall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama and formerly of Bailey Town, Bimini
will be held on Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 10am at the Pro-Cathedral of Christ The
King Anglican Church, East Atlantic Drive and Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand

Bahama. Officiating will be Rev’d Canon Harry Bain, Rector, the Rev'd Dr. Bernard
Been, Assistant Curate, the Rev’d Canon Winfield Goodridge, Assistant, Venerable
I Ranfurly Brown, the Venerable Keith Cartwright, the Rev'd Fr. Stephen Grant,
the Rev’d Fr Norman Lightbourne, the Rev’d Fr. Rudolph Cooper and the Rev'd Fr.
Mario Conliffe. Interment will follow at the “Columbarium” at the Pro-Cathedral of
Christ The King, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his precious memory are his beloved and devoted wife of 61 years,
Agnes; children, Caren Saunders, Vandra Rolle, Stephanie Evans, Rev’d Fr. Colin
Saunders, Tirzah Carey and Bernadine Roberts; adopted children, James Weech, Rev.

' David Ellis, Stephen and Clinton Weech, Philippa Weech-Lloyd, Enoch Saunders,
Verenencha Nesbitt, Elton Smith, Wendy Duncombe; daughter-in-law, Revon Saunders; sons-in-law, Lorenzo Saunders,
Rev. Franklyn Rolle, Patrick Evans, James Carey and Trevor Roberts; grandchildren, Dirk and Naja Saunders, Judi
Saunders, Anthony, Avaran and Andrew (Aydee) Rolle, Jason and Sebastian Evans, Cara, Cameron and Candawn
Saunders, Tanya and Evan Cartwright, Tracy, Trent and Tre’ Roberts and Saphari Elie; great-grandchildren, Dimaj
Saunders, Zoe Evans and Kelvin German; sisters, Alma Brown, Tirzah Duncombe, Elva Ellis and Vivian Taylor; sisters-
in-law, Vinola Harvey, Winifred Sherman, Eleanor, Blanche, Barbara and Curlene Weech; brothers-in-law, Wilfred
“Peter” Weech, George Weech and Clarence Ellis; nephews, Lionel Rolle, Lowell, Wallace, Rodney and Charles Roberts,
Dr. Paul Duncombe, Sherrick, Prince, Rev’d Edmund, Rev’d Oral, Bishop Neil, Rev’d Delton and Ken Ellis, Dennis,
Marcellus and Shawn Taylor, Basil, Cecil, Alvin, Bert, Godfrey, Ivan and Brentley Sherman, Julian, Michael, Philip,
Calnan, Jackson, Dr. Mark, Andre and George Jr. Weech; nieces, Elmetta Rolle, Theora Duncombe, Delores Levarity,
Inez Saunders, Alqueenia Pratt, Elizabeth Sherman, Frances Williams, Iona Waiters, Sandra Johnson, Carol Duncombe

' Sherman, Edris, Deborah Meade, Shane Taylor, Terry Strong, Yvonne Cocker, Eltha Bannister, Anne Clarke, Verdell

Harvey, Roslyn Dean, Dressler, Iris and Kenva Sherman, Gilda House, Katherine and Michelle Weech, Jeanine Weech-

Gomez, Allison Weech, Sonia Lightbourne, Yvette Styles, Ursula King, Tabitha Burrows and Antonique Weech;

Godchildren, Basil Sherman, Coralee Butler, Mary Clarke and Rodger Brown; numerous relatives including cousins,
Wealthy Gomez, Archbishop Drexel Gomez and Mrs. Gomez, Prescola Lockhart, Stanley and Florence Levarity, Curtis
Cartwright, Chloe Smith, Lucius Weech, Arthur Sherman, Sterling Saunders, Marvin Rolle and Louise Weech; numerous
friends including Harry, Enid, Corrine, Carrol and Aubrey Sherman, Herbert C. and Pam Walkine Francis and Yvonne
Noronha, Canon Harry and ann Bain, Sister Agatha Hunt, Joanna Rolle, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Sir Albert and Lady Miller
and family, Brenda Cheong, V.A. and Delores Knowles, Augusta Webb, Albena Harding, Agatha Beckles, Simeon and
Beulah Smith, Kelly Burrows, Randy and Rena Woods and family, Maxwell and Patricia Sweeting, Samuel and Bernadine
Rigby, Christopher and Anna Cooper, Keith and Stephanie Seymour, Edmund Granger, the family of the Pro-Cathedral
of Christ The King, Freeport, and the entire community of Bimini, Bahamas. .

Viewing will be held at the “Irenic Suite: of Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral’
Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10am to 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30am until service
time. :



GERRARD RANA ARLINGTON SANDS, 32

of #7 Shepherd’s Resort, Freeport, Grand Bahama and formerly of Nassau, Bahamas
will be held on Saturday May 6th, 2006, 10am at Hope Church of the Nazarenes, Settlers
Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Pastor Kirk Curry. Interment will
follow in the Gtand Bahama Memorial Park, Settlers Way and Forbisher Drive, Freeport,
Grand Bahama. ° .
Cherished memory will forever linger in the hearts of his mother, Adelaide Sands;

two sons, Gerrard Jr. and Deangelo; one daughter, Patricia Sweeting; two sisters, Jewel
Sands of Hollywood, Florida and Staffandrea Rigby; one niece, Yannique Sands of
Hollywood, Florida; adopted sisters, Shanrique and Stephanie Clarke, Terrell and Vanessa
Darville; aunts, Elizabeth Carey and Adrianna Whylly of Nassau, Veronica Wells of
Deadmans Cay, Long Island, Angela Burrows of Freeport, Alelia Morton of Key West,
Florida; adopted aunt, Juanita Major; grandaunts, Winifred Darville and Maria Carey of
Nassau uncles, Benson Carey and Vivian Whylly, John Wells, Kelly Burrows Sr; adopted
uncle, Hugh Burke Jr.; granduncle, Eric Darville of Nassau and a host of other relatives and friends including, Sgt. #21
Ricardo and Jennifer Burrows and family, Edmund Saunders and family, Michelle, Lester Jr. and Duran Adderley, Sophia
McKinney and family, Dala and Darren Smith and family, Gary Sr. and Linda Roberts and family, Yannique and Lawrence
Thomas of Hollywood, Florida, Michelle, Paul and Vivian Whylly, Leroy and Vanessa Risher and family of South Carolina,
Kenda and Kelly Burrows Jr., Stephen Wells of New York, Garece Davis and RoxyMae Cartwright and family, Fredericka
Gordon and family, Lynn Clarke and family, Tina Nesbitt and family of San Salvador, Shavonne Sweeting and family, Sgt.
Audie Murphy and family, Jack and Charlene Larrimore and family, Shirley Cartwright and family, Rev. and Mrs. Feltow
Rolle and family, Mrs. Patsy Neymour and family, Mark Burrows and family, Maxim ad Martha Eilsaime and family, the
Jervis family, the Karamo family, Katrina Mackey and family, Dwayne Poitier and family, Kevin Moore and family, Morris
and Michelle Simmons, the staff of Simmons Security and Investigations, Pastors and Mrs. Kirk Curry and family and the
members of Grace Church of the Nazerene. . :

Viewing will be held at the “Perpetual Suite: of Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral
Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10am to 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30am until service time.

a



MANES SAINT-ILIEN, 61

of Hepburn Town, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama and formerly of Port-De-Paix, Haiti
will be held on Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 11am at St. Stephen’s Anglican Church, Eight
“Mile Rock, Grand Bahama. Officiating will be the Rev’d Fr. Rudolph V. Cooper and
Rev’d Sepoudy Pompilos. Interment will follow in Harbour West Public Cemetery,
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his memory are his sister, Elidie Calixte of Port-De-Paix, Haiti; brother
and best friend, Samuel “Sammy” Lubin and Marcel Lubin of Fort Lauderdale; stepsister,
Charmantine St. Fleur; nephews, Dukerne Elidie Saintilien, Elide Saintilien; long time
friend, David Williams; adopted children, Lundy Lubin and Sepoudy Pompilus of Fort
Lauderdale; adopted grandchildren, Devonte and Devin Lubin; adopted daughters-in-
law, Desiree Lubin, Annette Marcelus, Ilene Williams, Andy Marcelus, Cornelius Romer,
Terell Williams Roseline Oscar, Jean Claude, Bernard, Neisha and Lashawn Marcelus,

Vilner and Shawn Lubin; a host of friends and other relatives including Ilent Morstime,
Veronica Rolle and family, Lynn, Keith Finley, Agatha, the staff of Glenerik International, Burrows family, Johnson family,
Sylvia Demerite and family and: the community of Hepburn Town.

Viewing will be held at the “Celestial Suite: of Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral

Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10am to 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am until service time.





DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT

MS. SHERYL THERESA MARTIN, 38

of Queens Cove, Freeport, Grand Bahama died in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday, April
28th, 2006.

She is survived by her two sons, Arlington and Winchenslow Martin; four daughters,
Suzette and Sherise Edden, Deneika and Sherenika Strachan; two sisters, Clemencia Thompson
and Sandra Rolle; three brothers, Felix and Keith Dixon and Elvis Martin and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.





PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 6, 2006






MONDAY



@ THE ARTS

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) is
holding an African Art Exhibition - “What is Africa to
Me” from the private collection of Kay Crawford
running until Saturday, July 29.

New - The NAGB will be hosting a Cultural Leader-
ship and Managing Creativity Workshop - a free pub-
lic lecture and workshop @ 7pm until 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk:
Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at

New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road. —

Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

@ CIVIC CLUB

St Andrew’s Kirk launches an After-School Pro-
gramme for children from the Woodcock and Albury
Sayle Primary Schools. The programme, is held Mon-
day to Friday @ St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. The
programme is free to children from the Bain and
Grants Town communities. Parents interested in
enrolling their children should contact the church at
322.5475 or email: standrewskirk@yahoo.com

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Chub 612315.meets Mon-
day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ¢
Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
days at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

BART

New - “Africa in Bahamian Junkanoo & Religion” -
The NAGB will be holding a panel discussion during
its “What is Africa to Me” series. Tuesday, May 16 @
7pm. The event is free and open the public.

New - “Bahamain Art 1492 -1992” - NAGB will be |

hosting a Bahamian Art History Lecture @ the gallery
Tuesday, May 25.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of

‘its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to
9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for
more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

4

@ CIVIC CLUB

New - BAHAMIAN FORUM - "The Bahamas: Bal-
ancing its Relationship with the U.S.A., China and
Cuba". Sir Arthur Foulkes speaks. Tuesday May 9 @
6pm at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel. Please con-
firm your interest in attending by e-mail to bahami-
anforumpress@yahoo.com so that adequate seating
arrangements can be made.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday night at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Cen-
tral Andros.

Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at the Cancer Soci-
ety of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.





Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please
call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tues-
day, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor
meeting room. ,

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call

502.4842/377.4589 for more info.
\

WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS



LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassau’s Weekly Jam
Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located East Bay
Street two doors East of Esso On The Run.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau
Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

‘i CIVIC CLUB

Bahamas Association for Social Healih presents the
Earth Village Ranch (petting zoo), St Albans Drive
and Columbus Avenue, offers free admission every
Wednesday by appointment between 9am and 3pm.
For more information or to book events call 356.2274
or 434.8981. Special rates available for groups of 20 or
more with a two week advance reservation.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sig-
ma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every
third Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pride
Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm
in the Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday at C C
Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hos-
pital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets

the second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm
@ St Augustine’s Monestary. ;

Licor pe Sar

Eom A lie
PLEASE PUT



“OUT THERE”

a

Virtue Christian Dance Company
will be performing ‘The Prophet’s
Wife’ Saturday, May 6.at the Holy
SUiinmaCe MA Ameo eer
Gardens - Matinee @ 3pm and

Prime Time Show @ 8pm.



€

THURSDAY
MART

New - The NAGB invites you to its African Film
Series with a screening of "Hyenas" Thursday, May 4
at 8pm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The event is
free and open to the public.

New - Artist Talk: Bahamian NeoRealists - NAGB
will be hosting the event Thursday, May 11 at 6:30pm.
The event is free and open to the public. Guest Artists:
Kishan Munroe and Sheldon Saint

New - NAGB’s African Film Series will be screening-
“DARESALAM” (Let there be peace) Thursday,
May 18 at 8pm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The
event is free and open to the public.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The
Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm :

Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location
(off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required.
Call 364.8423 to register or for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the second
Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC
building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUB

TM Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colo-
nial Hilton. :

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs
Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.



FRIDAY

& PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks off every
Friday night with Happy Hour... special drinks, live
music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nassau’s first European
Night Restaurant - Open Friday night till Saturday
morning Sam, serving hot food/and take out - music,
drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the
perfect place to spend your night out till the morning.

@ HEALTH

New - Autism Awareness Week

Conference on Autism Spectrum Disorders
Workshop for Professionals - May 19 @ 9am - 4pm
(New Providence Community Centre)

Workshop for Families - May 20 @ 9am - 4pm (Garvin
Tynes Primary School)

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
Sacred Heart Church - Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to
8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUB

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of
the month at COB’s Tourism Training Centre at 7pm

A ROU: ND

THE TRIBUNE



NAS SAU



YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
ENooHeE “SBE Tr LINE

in Room 144 during the academic year. The group
promotes the Spanish language and culture in the com-
munity.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St
Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325.1947
after 4pm.



SATURDAY ©



THE ARTS

New- Virtue Christian Dance Company - in a theatri-
cal production - will be performing ‘The Prophet’s
Wife’ Saturday, May 6 at the Holy Trinity Activity
Center, Stapledon Gardens Matinee @ 3pm and Prime
Time Show @ 8pm. ‘The Prophet’s Wife’ is Episode IV

in the hit series “Dance Of The Scrolls”, a God-inspired’

creation of Professor Marilyn Deveaux.

New - NAGB, in collaboration with Post House
Gallery, PopopStudios Gallery, StingraeStudios, Doon-
galik Gallery and New Providence Art and Antiques,
will be launching "Transforming Spaces 2006" Saturday,
May 6 and Saturday, May 13.

New - NAGB will be holding a Youth Workshop on
Audio Recording - Saturday, May 27 from 10am to
1pm, for children 12 years and older. Instructor: Chris-
tian McCabe. Contact the Gallery to reserve a seat @
328.5801.

@ HEALTH

New - The Town Centre Mail will be hosting its 4th
annual Woman To Woman Expo - May 13 from 12
noon to 6pm. Over 20 booths, live entertainment,
supervised kids corner, male models decorated with
body art, fashion extravaganza, free blood pressure
and cholesterol checks, free immunizations, casting
call for models:and actresses, dunking booth and more
are expected. -

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Saturday mornings - 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Sat-

urday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @ the _

Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training
Representative at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUB

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10
and 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in an
effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in
registering their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal and
Friends perform Sunday, 7pm - 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Sunday Night Interlude.@ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food,
drinks.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of

its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

i CIVIC CLUBS

New - The Cat Island Sailing Club will host its Annual
Cat Island Day - Sunday, May 28 at the Western
Esplanade from 10am - until.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net /Out there in subject line



if!

Me





THE: fRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 11



MONDAY



THE ARTS

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) is
holding an African Art Exhibition - “What is Africa to
Me” from the private collection of Kay Crawford
running until Saturday, July 29.

New - The NAGB will be hosting a Cultural Leader-
ship and Managing Creativity Workshop - a free pub-
lic lecture and workshop @ 7pm until 9:30pm.

Alcoholits Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of

its meeting times.and places: New-Previdence-Com-——~

munity Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk:
Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm. ....... ....

‘Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group —

‘meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
‘New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
‘Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
‘sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more
‘info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Halainas meets the third
Monday every month, opm @ Doctors Hospital con-
| ference room.

‘CIVIC CLUB

‘St Andrew’s Kirk launches an After-School Pro-
' gramme for children from the Woodcock and Albury
_ Sayle Primary Schools. The programme, is held Mon-
: day to Friday @ St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. The
‘ programme is free to children from the Bain and
Grants Town communities. Parents interested in
enrolling their children should contact the church at
322.5475 or email: standrewskirk@yahoo.com

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Mon-
: day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach e
, Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
days at 7pm.
The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Couiedl (NPHO)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Beard

: Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



MART.
New - “Africa in Bahamian Junkanoo & Religion” -
: The NAGB will be holding a panel discussion during

its “What is Africa to Me” series. Tuesday, May 16@ .

7pm. The event is free and open the public.

New - “Bahamain Art 1492 -1992” - NAGB will be
hosting a Bahamian Art History Lecture @ the gallery
Tuesday, May 25.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,

Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to

9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for
more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held

6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes

location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to.register for more info. .

@ CIVIC CLUB

New- BAHAMIAN FORUM - "The Bahamas: Bal-
ancing its Relationship with the U-S-A., China and —
Cuba”. Sir Arthur Foulkes speaks. Tuesday May 9 @-
6pm at the British Coloniat Hilton Hotet. Pleasecon=
firm your interest in attending by e-mail to bahami-
anforumpress@yahoo.com so that adequate seating
arrangements can be made.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
CC Sweeting Senior School's Dining] Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday night at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Cen-
tral Andros.

Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at the Cancer Soci-
ety of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.














Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please
call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tues:

day, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, 1BM Oliice. 4th floor a

meeting room.

_Alpha Phi Alpha Fratemity mects every first Tuesday.
6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
(502. ABA2I3TT. 4589 for. more info.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassau’s Weekly Jam
Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located East Bay
Street two doors East of Esso On The.Run.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

' B HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau
Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ CIVIC CLUB

Bahamas Association for Social Health presents the
Earth Village Ranch (petting zoo), St Albans Drive
and Columbus Avenue, offers free admission every
Wednesday by appointment between 9am and 3pm.
For more information or to book events call 356.2274
or 434.8981. Special rates available for groups of 20 o1
more with a two week advance reservation.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sig-
ma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every
third Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pr ide
—Building.——-—---.

_.IM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-Spm
in the Solomon’s Building; East-West Highway.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday at CC
Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hos
pital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus mecis
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month, Spm
@ St Augustine’s Monestary.

EM A PL
PLEASE PUT







‘OUT THERE”



THURSDAY

ART

New - The NAGB invites you to its African Film

- Series with a screening of "Hyenas" Thursday, May 4

at Spm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The event is
free and open to the public.

New.- Artist Talk: Bahamian NeoRealists - NAGB
will be hosting the event Thursday, May 11 at 6:30pm.
The event is free and open to the public. Guest Artists:
Kishan Munroe and Sheldon Saint

New - NAGB’s African Film Series will be screening-
“DARESALAM” (Let there be peace), Thursday,
May 18 at Spm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The
event.is free and open to the public. .

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-

ta Street: Thur sday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The.

Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

“Pre & Posi Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
‘Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Séagrapes location

(off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required.
Call 364.8423 to register or for more info.

REACH — Resources & Education for Autism and

~ related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the second

Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC
building, Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUB

TM Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colo-
nial Hilton.

TM Club (600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm ¢ uperelubs
Breezes.

Intemational Association of Administrative Profes-

sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

FRIDAY

i PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS



Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks off every
Friday night with Happy Hour... special drinks, live
music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nassau’s first European
Night Restaurant - Open Friday night till Saturday
morning Sam, serving hot food/and take out - music,
drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the
perfect place to spend your night out till the morning.

i@ HEALTH

New - Autism Awareness Week

Conference on Autism Spectrum, Disorders
Workshop [or Professionals - May 19 @ 9am - 4pm
(New Providence Community Centre)

Workshop for Families - May 20 @ 9am - 4pm (Garvin
Tynes Primary School)

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
Sacred Heart Church - Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to
Spm.

M@CIvic CLUB

LN Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm ALY, Jean St.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of
the month at COB’s Tourism Training Centre at 7pm

-The Graham Holden Deal



YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
IN THE SUBJECT LINE

in Room 144 during the academic year. The group
promotes the Spanish language and culture in the com-
munity.

“a

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-

.day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St

Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325.1947
after 4pm. iy



SATURDAY



BE THE ARTS

New - Virtue Christian Dance Company - in a theatri-
cal production - will be performing ‘The Prophet’s
Wife’ Saturday, May 6 at the Holy Trinity Activity
Center, Stapledon Gardens Matinee @ 3pm and Prime
Time Show @ 8pm. ‘The Prophet’s Wife’ is Episode TV
in the hit series “Dance Of The Scrolls”, a God-inspired
creation of Professor Marilyn Deveaux.

} :
New - NAGB, in collaboration with Post House

' Gallery, PopopStudios Gallery, StingraeStudios, Doon-

galik Gallery and New Providence Art and Antiques,
will be launching "Transforming Spe? 2006" Saturday,
May 6 and Saturday, May 13.

New - NAGB will be holding a Youth Workshop on
Audio Recording - Saturday, May 27 from 10am to
1pm, for children 12 years and older. Instructor: Chris-
tian McCabe. Contact the Gallery to reserve a seat @
328.5801.

@ HEALTH

New - The Town Centre Mall will be hosting its 4th”
amual Woman To Woman Expo - May 13 from 12

noon to 6pm. Over 20 booths, live entertainment,

supervised kids corner, male models decorated with

body art, fashion extravaganza, free blood pressure

and cholesterol checks, free immunizations, casting

call. for models and actressés, dunking booth and more

are expected.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Saturday mornings - 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Sat-
urday, 2:30pm (except August.and December) @ the
Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training
Representative at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUB

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10
and 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in an
effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in
registering their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS -

& RESTAURANTS

@ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal and
Friends perform Sunday, 7pm - 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food,
drinks.

5 HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pii/ 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

New - The Cat Island Sailing Club will host its Annual
Cat Island Day - Sunday, May 28 at the Western
Esplanade from 10am - until:

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net /Out there in subject line



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Firing threat |

for teachers
FROM page one

“We are prepared to put forward the
correspondence with the union, and fur-
thermore I think we know basic law that
you have to hear both sides. We never
appeared before a Tribunal. On this

particular issue we were not forced by:

any Tribunal to concede any point. The
point was that we decided that if this
was an issue that was going to hold up
any negotiations we would concede so
that we can move forward,” he said.

Mr Sears said that government
allowed this recognition on a point of
“compromise” but even having com-
prised on this issue, the union has found
additional areas to create road blocks.

He also said that even though they
could have docked the pay of teachers
on a number of occasions they have held
their hand.

“We said this was a show of good
faith, but when we reach a point when
students are being injured — we can-

Andros set for subdivis



on,

world-class sports project

FROM page one

affordable homes on 50 acres. The
lots will be between 100 and 150 in
feet — the largest anywhere in the
country.

“Tt will create a brand new
community with all the neces-
sary infrastructure and all the
benefits, all the paths and every-
thing else that comes with a sub-
division that size,” the minister
said at the contract signing held
yesterday afternoon at the Min-
istry of Housing.

of the subdivision off Queen’s
Highway - the island’s main
highway — will “revolutionise and
move North Andros to the next
level.”

“It will attract those living in
Nassau and elsewhere back to
Andros,” he said.

Minister Peet encouraged all

‘Bahamians, and in particular

Androsians, to take advantage
of this new development.

“Now is the time to take
advantage of the opportunity,
this will create new shops, new
schools, new parks, everything.

more people,” he said.

The minister said he was espe-
cially calling on small and medi-
um businesses to exploit the
spin-off effects fromthe subdi-
vision.

Mr Peet said that those inter-
ested in applying for homes with
the Ministry of Housing should
move fast, as he is confident that
there will be a great demand for
the houses.

In addition to the new hous-
ing development, government.
yesterday also signed a contract
for the upgrading of the Carl

in Nicholl’s Town, Andros.

The track, which has been
named after Bahamian Olympian
Carl Oliver, will first be resur-
faced and then, following the
signing of a second contract, giv-
en a new finishing.

at will become a Has class



Also ‘attending the signing yes-
terday, Mr Oliver.said- he is cer-
tain that the refurbished track
will produce many more Bahami-

not cross that line,” he said. s Mr Peet said that the creation an Olympians.

And there will be a demand for Oliver Track and Field Stadium ,





% £
ie g

CABLE BAHAMAS
VACANCY

IP Network Engineer

CAB B.
VAC A N. C.Y..







UNIX/AIX
System Administrator



3 MINISTRY OF
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
& CONSUMER AFFAIRS

The Price Control Act (1971)
(Chapter 339)
_ The Price Control (General) (amendment)
(No. ) Regulations, 2006 -

NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective Tuesday, |
May 2, 2006, The Honorable Minister of Local |

Duties & Responsibilities

Assistance with the daily administration of, but are not
limited to the following:



Cable Bahamas Ltd is seeking a qualified IP Network
Engineer. The successful candidate must have a solid
technical background as well as strong leadership skills
working within a team environment and _ providing daily
operational leadership. Individual will be responsible for
the day-to-day operations and support of customers in a
Service Provider network. Candidate must have strong
customer service and interpersonal skills.

*UNIX server installs, configuration & migrations with AIX
*Configuration & administering servers in high availability
environment using HACMP
*Perform UNIX system administration, troubleshooting,
user and account management
*UNIX shell-scripting to automate administration tasks
*Provide on call support for the various Unix, systems
*Support for approx. 50 users on site with IBM P-Series
*Scripting experience in several languages necessary
*System set-up including hardware and OS installation
*Patch management and Unix environment control
*Design, implement and manage LAN & WAN systems

Technical skill requirements include the installation,
maintainance and supporting IP routers and Layer 3
switches in a mixed vendor environment. An in depth
understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 protocols. Must
understand at an advanced level BGP, OSPF and ISIS -
routing protocols and operations. Previous experience

_ ee TE and MPLS La/ i ven : . : pins. al nS *“Work under general direction from direct management Government & Consumer Affairs has. approved
Ge DE ony, Sb en woe y ie: MEd er On sce Ce MEN ESTO: *Establish and recommend system usage policies ‘prices for the following breadbasket commodit
network management and IP related diagnostic tools. seni , : ; 5 p g y:

Experience within .the Cable Service - Provider Complete milestones on time & produce reliable and
environment supporting DOCSIS ~ cable modem manageable systems
technologies, Packeteable’ and VoIP technologies. *Documentation of systems, procedures and solutions 1) Butter

Familiarity of HFC infrastructure as well as general RF ~*REPOFl/ Escalate issues to relevant soups for resolution
principles a must. Must have an in-depth understanding
of TCP/IP from both administrative and technical
perspectives. Must be familiar with procedures such as
supernetting, subnetting, ARIN policies, address request
processes, address allocation and SWIP procedures.
Must also possess a strong understanding of DNS
principles and management in a Service Provider
environment. Candidate should have experience working
with the following key vendors, Arris, CedarPoint, Cisco,
Extreme, Juniper and Redback. Minimum educational
background should include a Bachelors Degree with key
vendor certification (CCNA/JNCIA/MCSE).

3) Cooking Oil

4) Cored Beed
5) Evaporated Milk
6) Flour

7) Mayonnaise

8) Rice

9) Sugar

Other Administrator-related Duties .

To be considered, the candidate must have strong UNIX
experience. Preference will be given to applicants with an -
AIX background. Distinguishing characteristics include.



* Punctuality and Dependability

* Solution-oriented

* Detail-oriented

* Strong oral'and written communication skills
* Effective time management skills



Working Conditions & Physical Effort

* Work normally done in an interior/office environment
* Periodically will be required to work flexible hours

* Considerable physical work required at times

Interested candidates should submit detailed
resumes to rbadderley@cablebahamas.com
by Friday, May 19, 2006.



e HARRISON THOMPSON.
Me Richard ®. Addetley.or sentria etal ty, PERMANENT SECRETARY

rbadderley@cablebahamas.com..







Bahamas Bus and Truck Company Limited
Montrose Avenue

Phone: (242) 322-1722

Fax: (242) 326-7452

44 Montrose Avenue

S$ 50,181.00
2,000.00 Cash Rebate

S$ 48,181.00

S 52,042.00

BI 204.00 Discount
5 46,838.00

2,000.00 Cash Rebate

Ss: 44,838.00

} S 38,60
Discount 3,860. 00
S 34,745.00

S 41,607.

S

Discount 4,160.

37,447.00

mS 63, 553.00
Ss
aS Se

| Discount 6,355.00
2 57,198.00

Jeep Commander
7 Passenger

Jeep Grand Cherokee

Jeep Wrangler X See Tee

s 40,881.00

Discount 4,086.00
S 36.795.00

S 39,102.00

$ 40,561.00 Discount___ 3,910.00

Discount 4, 056.00 |
S 3G,! 50! >, O0





THE TRIBUNE _ FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 13





The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services
_ “Building Professionals in the Financtal Services Sector”
Innovative Training:

“Responding to the needs in Financial Services”
May 15 - 19, 2006



a hag

_ Venue: Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa
Cable Beach ¢ P.O. Box CB 13005 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-327-6400 thru 4 ° Fax: 242-327-3971

, WEEK OF SEMINARS : : www.sandals.com ¢ www.bifs-bahamas.com

SEMINAR PROGRAMME
MONDAY, May 15, 2006





10:00 am - 10:20 am Introduction & Reception
~ Opening Session TOPIC: “Anti Money Laundering & Terrorism” . :
10:30 am - 12:00 pm © SPEAKER: Mr. Bernard Turner, Director of Public Prosecution, Attorney Generals Office

The media is inundated with cases of well-known individuals involved in money laundering and fraud. Reports of terrorist activities have reached
an all time high throughout the world and have greatly affected the business and: financial sector. This topic will provide an update on Anti Money
Laundering and Terrorism and its effects. 2 =" 7 anon pte }

TOPIC: Innovative Training: “Responding to the needs of the Financial Services”

Luncheon Session
SPEAKER: The Hon. Vincent Peet, MP, Minister of Financial Services and Investments

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

In the past it was sufficient to have an Associates or Bachelor's degree in the financial sector and to routinely work at any financial
institution. Now, the demands to comply with international standards have raised the bar and the need for innovative training in
order for any institution to compete with the constant changes. Highlighted in this presentation is the need to respond to these changes
i through constant innovative training of every employee. a Benn



Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Good Client Gone Bad”
2:30 pm 4:30 pm SPEAKER: Mrs. Cheryl Bazard, Attorney

-All the necessary “Know your client” (KYC) and tiveetpations were done on the potential client. Excellent references were received and the client is
well known internationally as an excellent businessman. After many years, reports are in the media about the client’s involvement in Money Laundering
and other illegal activities. What would you do? And how could this have been detected before it reached the media? This presentation will enhance

‘ _ the skills of managers, supervisors, relationship manager and staff members that interact with clients and their accounts making them aware of the
signs to look for when “a good client is gone bad”. nove

Morning Secession TOPIC: Panel Discussion: “Proposed Private Trust Company Legislation”

10:00 am - 12:00 pm SPONSORED BY: STEP Executives Ke

There are requests from many clients for Private Trust Companies. To meet this demand and remain competitive internationally legislation was
proceed for Private Trust Companies. Highlighted in this presentation would be the main features of the legislation and how the client’s need could
e met through Private Trust Companies. PEN MSS ag) eh :

Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Hedge Funds - How the Product Works”
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm SPEAKER; Mr. Antoine Bastian, Genesis Fund Ltd.

2 ptm meee oe
ey A

Many Investment department managers and Client Relationship managers are seeking new ways to increase their client’s assets and preserve the
’ value of the portfolio. The Hedge fund is a product that may provide a solution for the investors. This presentation will outline how the hedge fund
works and how it can assist in meeting the investment needs of the client.







WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2006
Morning Session TOPIC: “Policing The Industry”
10:00 am - 12:00 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Stephen Thompson, Inspector, Compliance Commission

The constant threat of money laundering, fraud, terrorism and illegal activities created the need locally and internationally for the financial services
induct to be monitored. There were also new developments in the Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA) since the effective date. A current,
e eee

detailed and informative presentation will be made on these areas of interest to the financial industry.
Luncheon Session TOPIC: Recognizing Internet Scams t
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Jordan Kalpin, IBM Global Services Division of IBM Canada Ltd. ©

: eh The criminal mind has become very creative when using the Internet to facilitate their illegal activities. Reports are circulated throughout the financial
industry of how business and clients lose millions of dollars through the Internet scams. It is vital that every financial institution ensures that their
staff is aware and is able to recognize the various forms of Internet scams.

i Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Directors Responsibilities - Corporate Governance” _
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Kendrick Christie, CPA, President of BICA - Sponsored by BICA

One of the latest “buzz words” in the financial services sector is “Corporate Governance”. It is important to know as Directors there is now a greater
demand for accountability with regard to Corporate Governance. This presentation will inform the directors and potential Directors of the importance
of good Corporate Governance. kc PRG HE, S28




THURSDAY, May 18, 2006 -

Morning Session TOPIC: “Relaxation of Exchange Controls” ou
— 10:00 am-11:30am == SPEAKER: Mrs. Wendy M. Craigg, Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas



\ :

need to implement some changes in this area. This topic will inform the financial secret of why there was a ‘need to relax the exchange controls and

| és ‘
i clk : wane
The exchange control policy in the Bahamas has been the same for many years. Due to the constant changes of the financial environment there is a
4
: how it would affect the various institutions and the economy.

Mid Day Session _ TOPIC: “Update on Global int’ developments related to TIEA” a
11:30 am - 12:30 pm SPEAKER: Ms. Rowena Bethel, Legal Advisor, Executive Commissioner, Compliance Commission x
Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Disaster Preparedness”

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Leonard Gravesande, J P Morgan Trust - New York Office

- The following announcements is made on radio and television “the Bahamas is about to be hit by a category 3 hurricane within the next
24 hours, ensure that the necessary precautions are in place” It will be too late at that time to begin discussing what should be done to
secure the financial institutions. The procedures that financial institutions should have in place for their staff and to ensure that continuity
with business operations when there is a major disaster will be discussed in this presentation.



FRIDAY, May 19, 2006



Morning Session TOPIC: “Outsourcing/Out Jobbing”
10:00am -12:00pm - SPEAKER: Dr. Gilbert Morris

' Financial Institutions are constantly faced with the decision to outsource parts of its business activities in an effort to reduce operational
cost and expenses. Many times the general public view this as causing employees to become unemployed. This presentation will take
an objective look at “outsourcing/ out jobbing”

Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Increasing Anti Money Laundering Awareness: Defender of the Front Line”
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm (who should attend: Relationship Officers, Tellers, Customer services Representatives)
- SPEAKER: Mrs. Tameka Forbes & Mrs. Cheryl Bazard
SPONSORED BY: BACO

In any institution the non-management staff are the first line of defence for the detection of Money Laundering and fraud. This presentation
will outline the importance of training and developing every staff member and provide information on what they should know and look
for when interacting with the clients suspected of money laundering or fraud. The importance of reporting their suspicions to the
Compliance and/or Anti Money Laundering Officer and the danger of “tipping off”.

Seminar Tickets RT

° Morning Sessions $45
e Luncheon Sessions $50
e Afternoon Sessions - $45

Cheques should be made payable to:
The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services




Cancellations: There will be no refund or cancellations after tickets purchase.



Parking is available in the Sandals Team Member Parking Lot.
NOTE: Please do not park in the Hoffer Plaza or the Cable Beach Post Office.






. To register no log on to: www.bifs-bahamas.com







PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

Coronet’s inquest



FROM page one

mitted yesterday that his client
was not aware that adverse
claims could be made against
him during the inquest.

Some witnesses’ testimony
implicate officer Mackey as
the officer who shot and may
have killed inmate Neil
Brown. Mr Smith argued that
his client should have been
informed at his initial appear-
ance at the proceedings that
he would need to have a
lawyer present during the pro-
ceedings to cross-examine any
witnesses that were called to
give evidence against him. It
was Mr Smith's argument that
his client's constitutional
rights had been infringed. He
noted that under article 20 of
the constitution his client
should be awarded a fair trial
and he submitted that the jury
be discharged or the matter
be referred to the Supreme
Court.

Prosecutor Neil Brathwaite
however noted that lawyer Ian
Cargill had appeared at the
initial stage of the inquest. He
said Mr Cargill had been
retained on behalf of all of the
prison officers giving testimo-

ny at the trial. According to
Mr Brathwaite, Mr Cargill
had placed himself on record
and had made several earlier
appearances. Mr Brathwaite
said that Mr Mackey's testi-
mony did not amount to any-
thing incriminating, noting
that the officer had merely
testified previously that he
had obtained a gun from
another officer on the morn-
ing of January 17 and dis-
charged the weapon when hé
felt that his life was threat-
ened. Mr Brathwaite also not-
ed that any findings of an
inquest could bé challenged
by a judicial review.

Mr Smith said he had spo-
ken with Mr Cargill who had
informed him that he had not
received any instructions to
represent officer Mackey and
that Mackey had said that he
had never given instructions
to Cargill.

Coroner Linda Virgill
informed him that that partic-
ular issue could be taken up

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with the Bar Council. She also
noted that on April 3, the
beginning of the inquest, Mr
Cargill had appeared on
behalf of the prison officers.
Coroner Virgill said she did
not see how Mr Mackey's
rights were being infringed,
nor did she see any reason to
have the jury discharged or to
refer the matter to the
Supreme ‘Court. She then
reminded Mr Mackey, who
was still standing in the wit-
ness box, that he could stand
in the box and give evidence
which could be used against
him or say nothing at all.

The proceedings continued
as Mr Brathwaite asked offi-
cer Mackey several questions
relative to testimony that he
had given at a-previous ses-
sion. Mr Mackey was then
questioned by Mr Brathwaite
on how many shots he fired
on the morning of January 17.
Mr Mackey said he fired two
shots, one a warning shot and
another at a person or object
as he put it, that was
approaching him. Mr Mackey
said that at that time he was in
the bushes on the side of the
road when the object
approached. Mr Mackey said
he had been chasing some

person and had yelled “stop”
before he fired the first shot,
which was a warning shot. At
that time one of the persons
he was chasing turned around
and headed back towards him
with their hands in the air, he
said. Officer Mackey told the
court that he felt threatened
and thus fired a shot at the
person and the person slowly
went to their knees. Officer
Mackey admitted that he was

FROM page one

broke out at the Carmichael Road Detention
Centre on Tuesday after it was claimed a detainee

was beaten by a guard.

On Wednesday morning, Mr Joseph met
with Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
and Immigration Minister Shane Gibson.

Mr Joseph said he expressed his concern
about the Haitian nationals here, particularly
the Eleuthera raids and the detention centre

abuse.

“The meeting with the ministers went very
well. The Bahamas is a democratic country, a
country of law. I am sure that justice will be

- served,” he said.

Minister of Immigration Shane Gibson yes-
terday reported that the Director of Immi-
gration said he received an incident report
from the immigration officer on duty at the
time of the incident. However, he is still wait-
ing for a report from the Defence Force.

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not issued the weapon he dis-
charged that night although it
was standard procedure for an
officer to sign and state the
intended purpose for any gun
they were issued. Officer
Mackey told the court that the
gun he used that night had
come from officer Neko Sar-
gent because at that time he
was the senior officer and he
was on duty while Sargent was
not.

Mr Mackey denied knowing
inmate Forrester Bowe. He
also denied getting on the bus
that morning. The officer told
the court that he caught a ride
with another officer back to

THE TRIBUNE.

the prison compound and then
gave the gun he had to ASP
James Farrington.

_ Coroner Virgill put it to
him that had told police and
the court that the person on.
Yamacraw Road had had.
approached him with ‘two

hands in the air but officer's
Mackey denied it stating:©
that he had only said one::.:

hand.
The coroner also asked him
if he knew who these men
were who he was chasing on
Yamacraw Road. Officeér
Mackey's reply was that he
only knew that there was a
prison escape. iy

Haitian Ambassador

It is also his understanding that the police
have been asked to investigate the matter.

Mr Gibson added that he is certain that the

inhumanely.

appropriate action will be taken whenever the. .
investigation is completed. Wrest
Haitian lawyer Eliezer Regnier told; The
Tribune that while he acknowledges that there
is an immigration problem in the Bahamas,
one never needs to resort to treating Haitians

comes around,” said Mr Regnier.

them.

Haiti.”

“There is no need to be afraid to return to

for Clarks &
Shoe Village Shoe Stores.

Please fax your applications to

326-0570
or mail to

P.O. Box N 3009
Nassau, Bahamas

POSITIONS: AVAL LAB LE IMMEDIATELY:

‘Controller:

The Ginn:Company is. looking for’ talented,.energetic‘qualified:CPA or equivalent ta
assist in the. création of and to supervise the operation of the day-to-day operations: of
its Finance Department in Freeport Grand Bahama: ‘ :

‘The role: involves the maintenance of the ‘General Lédger, product

an of Feports' re:

“We all have a common background and
there is no need to mistreat our cousins in.a
degrading fashion, because what goes aroun

He added: “I encourage Haitians, whether |
or not born here, to seriously consider return-
ing to Haiti to see what the future holds for





ao le Wie lk a a a le a eae ace Sa ae




ce! en a

‘at ca an am ate Lal ee a

r.

*

a Te Tain Dae Ta te Se ae ala at

quired by the Group Finance ‘Department:on .both an ad: hoc basis and.regular month
end ahd ‘assisting the Senior Bahamas Administrator and Financial ‘Controller as rf
needéd. The Finance Department. consists of four other persons whom you will super- Sos
Vise. ao

. - (
The: ideal: candidate:will have’3:to:4 years experience:working for a major, accounting oh 4
firm and be able-té demonstrate enthusiasm,.a record of achievement in his/her career ret
aS well as‘thé ‘experience: of managing ‘a team to: achieve: project goals-within tight ee
deadlines, strong personal and organizational skills:and:the adaptability to function ina i a
fast-paced constantly evolving environment.

(S)he Will also:be-able to demonstrate ‘the ability, to,use: Microsoft Office tools to ah.ad-
vanced level (especially Excel). Some’ travel will be required -on an-voccasional basis
for training.:and meetings.

Accounts.Department Staff

The Ginn Company is looking: for-a-talented, ‘experienced, ‘energetic. accourits depart-
ment personnel forthe operation-of the day-to-day. operations of its Finance: Depart-
mentin Freeport: Grand Bahama..

The roles involve:

» Accounts.Payable:

« Payroll/Human Resources
» -Job:.costing



The ideal candidates will be able.to demonstrate enthusiasm; a recérd of achievement
in their career, the ability:to work.as part of a team, the work:ethic:ta.achieve project
‘goals Within tight deadlines and adaptability to function in’a' fast-paced constantly
evolving environment.
They will also’ be able to: démonstrate the. ability to Use Microsoft’Office'todls to anad-
vanced level (especially Excel). Some®travel will be required on an occasional basis
for training.

Receptionist

The Ginn Company has an employment opportunity: for a Receptionist in Freeport
‘Grahd Bahama. Nil ; :

This important role involves, among other matters, béing the first person to greet.a visi-
tor or caller to the company’s premises and dealing:with them in’a courteous and pro-
fessional manner .in:accordance with Ginn. Company: standards.



The ideal candidate will be. able to demonstrate’ enthusiasin,':strong personal and or».
ganizational skills, work ethic, the ‘ability'to;work as pait of a team ‘and the adaptability

to function in’a fast-paced constantly evolving environment. + es . a
(S)he will-also be.able to-demonstrate the ability to type andiuse: Microsoft Office:toolss.\” ah,
to an intermediate: evel (especially,\Word). Some travel. will be tequired on an occa *

‘Se
sional basis for training. Mist Mts C ia
Candidates must he available to bé on site from 8.30a.m. to 12:30p.m. and 4.30p.t. to se
5.00p:m.. : : : EG BBG eke ‘Gy

‘ EU Rie



s : Bens a / ‘ i Ma ik eas 2% #
All candidates must be of legal age, medically capable of perfdrming the pertan. a
gally employable and have the unrestricted, right to engage in gainfulemploymaent.in'
The Bahamas. : , EPH

ackage will be offered, commensurate: Nata:





"A very competitive salary and benefits pac
your demohsttated experience and ability, fi)



Send resumes and a summary of your curtrent:compensation and benefits to
bahamaresume@ginncompany.com i
or PO Box F-42498-343









THE. TRIBUNE





ee



ahd

IS gc

oye

Aesth Jnterna-
tional today made

publica report detailing its con-
cerns about torture and other
cruel, inhuman oF degrading
treatment of prisoners and
detainees both in the US and
in US detention sites around
the world.

The report has already been
sent to members of the UN
Committee Against Torture,
who will be examining the US
compliance with the Conven-
tion against Torture and Other
Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading
Treatment or Punishment on
May 5 and 8 in Geneva. The
Convention against Torture

prohibits the:use of torture in all:

circumstances and requires
states to take effective legal and
other measures to prevent tor-

ture and to’ provide: appropri- |

ate punishment : for those who
commit torture,
The US is reportedly sending

a 30-strong delegation to Gene- __

va to defend its record. In its
written:report to. the Commit-

tee, the US government assert-. |

ed its unequivocal opposition
to the use:or practice of torture
under‘any circumstances —

including war‘or. public emer- .

gency.

“Although the US govern- .-

ment continues to assert its con-





treatien hese statement,
contradict what is happening in.
practige,”

tor Of Amnesty International
USA.HS

eradigate ‘torture it is actually









‘and Rev. Dr.



uncles.

fo service time.

X.



demnation of torture and ill-.

said ‘Curt Goering,
Senior{Deputy Executive Direc-'

‘The US government is .
not only failing to take steps to.

creatifig a climate in which tor-

Good d Shepherd
‘Funeral Home

Montrose Avenue 322-4258 ¢ Fax: 325-8343
Paging: 382-0040, 382-0039

Ronen

Le Ormando Rolle, 19

will be held on Sunday 7th May, 2006.
at 2pm at Christ the King Anglican
Ghurch, Ridgeland Park West.
Officiating | will be the Venerable
‘Archdeacon |. Ranfurly Brown and
| internment will be at Woodlawn Garden
Cemetery, Soldier Rd.

He is: survived by his grand parents
Ms. Florine Rolle and Geraldine Smith,
Irvin Clarke; father,
Raymond Smith; 4 sisters, Ms. Tammy
and La- Shea. Rolle, Shantell and
Georgette Smith; 3 brothers, ‘Mr. Dillon
Fowler, ‘Raymond Smith Jr. and
Cleveland Davis; 10 uncles, Fletcher
: _ Patrick. Bain, Ron and Gary.
Rolle, Charles and Hulen Whylly,
# Solomon, Samuel, Bruce, Lynden, Irvin
Clarke Jt 9 aunts, Carnie and Terry
| Rolle, Sharlen and Brenda Clarke,

Evelyn Whylly, Lovely Hanna, Yvonne
| Smith Gardiner, Edith and Gennie.
-Rahming, 14 grand aunts and 4 grand

Arrangement are being handle by Good |
saat Funeral Home, Mountrose

Relatives and friends may pay their
respects at the Funeral home:from
Friday-at to and at the Church 1:30 pm



ture and other ill-treatment can
flourish — including by trying to
narrow the definition of tor-

. ture.”

-The Amnesty International
report describes how measures
taken by the US government in

‘ response to widespread torture
_and ill-treatment of detainees
: held in US military. custody in

the.context of the. “war on ter-

ror” shave: been far from ade- -
», quate, This is‘despite evidence

that much of the ill-treatment

stemmed directly from official |
-policy and practice. =~

L if he report reviews sev-
eral. cases. where




etainees held in US custody in

“Afghanistan and Iraq have died

under torture. To this day,.no

_ US agent has been prosecuted
for.“torture” or “war crimes”. :
“Phe heaviest sentence: —

imposed on anyone to date for a
torture-related death while in
US custody.is five months —

‘




































‘apt






the same sentence that you
might receive in the US for
stealing a bicycle. In this case,
the five-month sentence was for
assaulting a 22-year-old taxi-dri-
ver who was hooded and
chained to a ceiling while being
kicked and beaten until he
died,” said Curt Goering.
“While the government con-
tinues to try to claim ‘that the
abuse of detainees in US cus-

tody was mainly due to a few .

‘aberrant’ soldiers, there is clear
evidence to the contrary. Most
of the torture and ill-treatment
stemmed directly from official-
ly sanctioned procedures and
policies — including interroga-
tion techniques approved by
Secretary of Defence Donald
Rumsfeld,” said Javier Zuniga,

‘Amnesty International’s Amer-

icas Programme Director.

he report also lists con-
cerns surrounding vio-
lations of the Convention

against Torture under US

domestic law, including ill-treat-
ment and excessive force by

police, cruel use of:electro-
. shock -weapons, inhuman. and : :
degrading conditions of isola-

tion in “super-max” security
prisons and abuses against
women in the prison system —
including sexual abuse by male
guards and shackling while
pregnant and in labour.

The US last appeared before
the Committee Against Torture
in May 2000. Practices criticized
by the Committee six years ago
— such as the use of electro-
shock weapons and excessive-
ly harsh conditions in “super-
maximum” security prisons —
have in some cases been export-
ed for use by US forces abroad
— serving as a model for the
treatment: of US detainees in
the context of the * ‘war on ter-
ror”

“The US has long taken a
selective approach to interna-
tional standards, but in recent
years, the US government has
taken unprecedented steps to
disregard its obligations under
international treaties. This
threatens to undermine the
whole framework of interna-
tional human rights law —
including the consensus on the
absolute prohibition of torture
and other cruel, inhuman or
degrading treatment or punish-

. ment,” said Javier Zuniga,

#

Amnesty International called
on the US to demonstrate its
commitment to eradicating tor-
ture, by withdrawing the reser-
vations it has entered to the
Convention against Torture,
including its “understanding”
of Article 1 of the Convention,
which could restrict the scope
of the definition of torture by
the US:

The organisation also called
on the US to clarify to the Com-
mittee in no uncertain terms
that under its laws no one,

including the President, has the

right or authority to order the
torture or ill-treatment of

_detainees, under any circum-

stances whatsoever — and that
anyone who does so, including
the President, will have com-
mitted a crime.

BACKGROUND

] he Committee Against
Torture is a 10-mem-

_ber body of independent

experts established by the Con-
vention against Torture to mon-
itor the compliance of states
with their obligations under the
treaty. It meets twice a year

sovernment creating ‘climate of torture’

and, among other tasks, reviews
the periodic reports of states.
At its forthcoming 36th session,
which will take place from May
1 to 19, 2006, it will consider
reports presented by Georgia,
Guatemala, Republic of Korea,
Qatar, Peru, Togo and the US.
Amnesty International has pro-
vided written briefings to the
Committee in respect of Geor-
gia, Guatemala, Qatar, Togo
and the US.

The second and third period-
ic reports of the US will be con-
sidered by the Human Rights
Committee, which monitors
states’ compliance under the
International Covenant on Civ-
il and Political Rights, at its 87th
session in July.

In total, 141 states have rati-

fied the Convention against |

Torture.

For a full copy of the report, _
see http://web.amnesty.org/ —
library/index/engamr510612006

Amnesty International is
campaigning to stop torture
and other ill-treatment in
the “war.on terror”. For more
information, please go to
the campaign home page::
http://web.amnesty.org/pages/st
optorture-index-eng 4

Ther new vOn The Run store from ESSO is open again, at the
corner of Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue. There is
fresh food and everthing you'll ever need.

“T read The Tribune for local
news, sports, and health &
beauty tips. My day isn’t

complete until I’ve read it.

The Tribune is my

newspaper.”

SHENIQUE RILEY-MCKENZIE

PARADISE ISLAND STRAW VENDOR,
ARTIST & SOCCER COACH

Purchase The Tribune from your lecal
convenience store:or street vendor.



The Tribune

Why Voice, Why Pongpaper”



PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006



LOCAL AND CARIBBEAN NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Kerzner helps out
with Coastal
Awareness Month

KEEPING the country’s

environment clean for present,

and future generations was the
focus of a recent clean-up cam-
paign at Montagu Beach organ-
ised by Kerzner International’s
Discover Atlantis Department.

The employees from Discov-
er Atlantis were also joined by
Kerzner’s marine aquarium
operations and marine mammal
operation.

The clean up effort coincided
with Coastal Awareness’ Month



a PICTURED left to right are Kersaer’s employees during the

clean up effort at Montague Beach. Pictured is Niketa Braynen, °

Lab Assistant, marine aquarium operations; Pamela Govett,
Veterinarian, marine mammal operations; Vanessa Haley,
assistant manager, Discover Atlantis and Miaya Armstrong, lab
manager, nee Seton

tease sveasuessavacescorsneneseguebeeueneeaquessencusssesenassegnenguapsensonsaqusapuenscnsvavensessesevsonevsersarsabaccsesesensseensaqerenesesassnsucaseseysenuaneneratsaeagyeananenenacseersaaeeeeses

in April by the Ministry of
Tourism along with its various
public and private sector part-
ners. The clean up at Montagu
Beach, one of.our country’s
most significant historical attrac-
tions, was held in conjunction
with Bahamas Waste, the
Bahamas National Trust and
The Nature Conservancy.

On hand for the event was
Kerzner International’s senior

-vice-president of marine and

water park operations Mark
Gsellman, who applauded the
division’s efforts and.joined the
employees in protecting one of
our country’s most vital
resources — the environment.
Kerzner’s senior director of
marine mammal qperations, Al
Kelley said that Kerzner Inter-
national was excited to be a part
of the beach clean up and do its

part to help preserve the envi-

ronment, “The oceans are too
precious for us to lose and this is
a battle that will be on going for

_ along time,” said Kelly.

Ron Pinder, junior minister
in the Ministry of Energy and
Environment said the govern-
ment.is always grateful when
its efforts and various. policies
are supported by non-govern-

i

@ CRISPIN Smith of Kerzner

International does his part in ,
assisting with the clean up
effort at Montagu Beach

mental organisations.
Vanessa Haley, assistant
manager at Discover Atlantis
came up with the idea to hold a
beach clean-up. She thought
that there would be no better
place to hold the initiative than
Montagu Beach, which was pre-
viously adopted by Kerzner
International and other busi-
nesses within the area.
Eleanor Phillips, director of

the Bahamas programme of

The Nature Conservancy
described the clean- -up cam-
paign as “a fantastic initiative”
by Kerzner International.

Haiti’s president-elect wraps up visit to Canada

M MONTREAL __
HAITYS President-elect Rene Preval

wrapped up an informal visit to Canada on _

Wednesday, insisting that he did not come.
to plead for money, yet taking home anoth-
er C$48 million (US$43 million) in. ids
according to Associated Press.: _

Preval ended four days of meetings i in

Ottawa and the French-speaking province ~

of Quebec saying he intends to put an end
to visits by Haitian leaders in which they
beg for foreign aid and instead focus on

explaining the crisis facing the poorest ~



(We're taking

nation in the western hémispliere:

“J have not, come here asking for pro-
jects or money,” he said after meeting with
Quebec Premiet Jean Charest in Quebec
City, home to some 120,000 Haitians. “I

- have come to explain. I have come to seek
- comprehension and friendship.”

‘Preval, who. was. elected on February 7

-. and will be sworn in later this month, said

he hoped to remain in power for five years,

’ during which time he would push to give his
‘ jmpoverished Caribbean nation a sound

infrastructure and solid institutions.

Earlier this week, Preval.met with Prime .

it back to the good ole days!

Minister Stephen Harper, Haitian-born Gov-
ernor-General Michaelle Jean and Foreign
Affairs Minister Peter MacKay. He also vis-
ited Montreal, where he mingled with mem-
bers of the city’s Haitian community.
During the visit, Ottawa announced an
additional financial assistance package of
C$48 million (US$43 million) to promote
good governance and democracy in Haiti.
‘Haiti is the largest beneficiary of Cana-
dian aid in the Americas. Over the last two
years, Canada has spent more than C$190
million (US$171 million) funding recon-
struction and development projects.

We're taking



it back to the real music!
A smart casual dress code will be strictly enforced













FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Park Hyatt to

“THE investment group
behind the proposed develop-
ment at Governor’s Harbour’s
former Club Med resort yes-
terday announced that Global
Hyatt Corporation had select-
ed the project as the first
Caribbean location for its Park
Hyatt brand.

: EIC Resorts, the group
headed by Pennsylvania-based
investor Edward Lauth, has
signed a Letter of Intent with
Global Hyatt Corporation that
will see it operate the
Eleuthera-based resort’s bou-
tique hotel and amenities.

In a statement, EIC Resorts
said its French Leave Resoit,
featuring the Park Hyatt Hotel
and Savannah Hill, an “upscale
residential community”, will
cover 356 acres. Resort "resi-
dences, a marina village and
restaurants are also involved
in the development.

-Mr Lauth told The Tribune
earlier this.year that the project

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

a

CABLE Bahamas ide slamed the

. Tribune Business Editor -



B EDWARD LAUTH

-was still moving forward and

that construction was planned
to begin this year, despite suf-
fering several temporary set-
backs.

He explained that he was

‘close to concluding negotia-

SEE page 2B

Believes digital boxes will ‘eradicate’ security |
problems in 2006; says refusal to give basic

‘Model for Family Island

brand Eleuthera sustainable development’
investment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL.
Tribune Business Editor

n investor yes-

terday told The

Tribune’ he

believed his

project was “a

model for sustainable develop-
ment” in the Family Islands,
creating “critical economic
mass” on Eleuthera while
respecting its environment and
character, as all parties sought
to resolve electrical supply
problems to the development.
Carry Rich, the principal
behind the Windermere Island
Club, said the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation was “being
very proactive” in seeking to
solve the issue of supplying
power to the development,
which is: currently under con-

struction on the island just off
‘mainland Eleuthera that was

once a renowned vacation des-
tination for the British Royal
Family.

The project requires a new
electricity substation to be built
to supply three-phase power to

Windermere investor working with BEC to resolve
power supply, with $15-$20m invested to date

the project, which currently only
receives one-phase power.

Mr Rich said all parties
involved were collaborating
closely to “figure it out”, as
BEC’s priorities understandably
lay with upgrading its infra-
structure in New Providence

He added that he was “com-
mitted to the long term, how-
ever long it takes” with the
Windermere Island Club, hav-
ing invested not just for finan-
cial motives but to provide a
place that his family could also
enjoy.

Mr Rich ‘said the project,
which currently directly
employs 40-50 workers, was tak-
ing “small steps” towards estab-
lishing a sustainable boutique
resort and residential commu-
nity on the 160 acres of land it
owns at the northern end of
Windermere Island.

arrival of “pirated and security compro-
mised set top boxes” in the Bahamian
‘market for its flat cable television rev-
enues in fiscal.2005, but believes the
introduction of its digital services will
combat this in 2006.

The BISX-listed company’s annual
report said piracy had caused it “signifi-
cant revenue losses” in 2005, with pre-
mium cable television revenue showing
“virtually no growth” over 2004, and pay-

| per-view revenues off by more than 26
per cent. ,

“These results are believed to be pri-
marily the product of the introduction
of pirated and security compromised set-

© 2004 ADWORRR?

cable rate increase ‘unprecedented’

top boxes into the local community,”
Cable Bahamas said.

“These boxes have the ability to deci-
pher our entire encrypted analogue pre-
mium channel offering, providing the ille-
gal users free access to the full premium
tier programmes without obtaining a
valid subscription fromthe company.

- “As a result of this proliferation in ille-
gal activity, the company experienced
significant revenue losses.”

Yet through the arrival et Aigital set

top boxes and an all-digital set of service
offerings, Cable Bahamas said it expect-
ed to “fully eradicate” piracy by phasing
out the old analogue premium tiers.

As a result, the company said premium
and pay-per-view revenues were, set to
rebound in 2006. 5g

Revenues from cable television account
for 59 per cent of Cable Bahamas’ total

SEE page 5B

focused

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Visitor arrivals fall by 6%

While the electricity supply
difficulties illustrate the prob-
lems of providing utilities and

infrastructure for Family Island

developments, Mr Rich said his
aim was to create a lasting pro-
ject that was sustained by both
the natural environment and
the resources of the local
Eleuthera community, without
resorting to brings in outside
labour.

“There are no words to
describe how important it is,”
said Mr Rich of sustainable
development. “I would stop
doing it if we didn’t do it ina

- sustainable fashion. That’s the

ethos.
“Tf you don’t build it proper-

ly, it-cannot be sustainable. If

you try to do it too fast, it can-
not be sustainable. It doesn’t
just flower. If you force some-
thing to bloom, it dies.”

Mr Rich said the reason some
Family Island investment pro-
jects failed was because they

‘lacked “critical mass”, while he
felt imposing a 200-300-room. -

hotel was not in keeping’ with
the character of many islands.
“T selected Windermere not
only because of its natural beau-
ty, but the critical mass that was

~valready here,” he explained:

Windermere already had 75
families resident, and “without
a base of people, you can’t sur-

The Windermere Island Club —

will add about 75 further fami-
lies to the mix, and Mr Rich
‘said: “We feel 150, that is the
basis to start a sustainable com-
munity. It has enough individual
people here residing that we can
employ full-time a group of
people that are local to support
the community.

’ “This is not about Carry Rich.
This is about the people of
Savannah Sound, Tarpum Bay, .

Governor’s Harbour and Rock. .

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TOTAL visitor arrivals to

‘the Bahamas fell by 6 per cent

in January 2006, a 7 per cent
increase in air arrivals being
offset by an 11 per cent decline
in sea arrivals.

The Ministry of Tourism.

said the 11 per cent fall in
cruise arrivals to Nassau/Par-
adise Island as a first port of
entry occurred because the

TE CLO TERS

Sound.

“This is about a single pro-
ject built on extremely sustain-
able plans, that will have a foun-

_ dation that allows it to grow and

provide opportunities for gen-
erations to come because we
will have attained a critical, sus-
tainable economic mass.

“This is a team here. That’s
the biggest thing. That’s what

it’s all about. It’s about the con-
,cept, ethos of Windermere,

developing a sustainable Out
Island community with the
indigenous people of that com-
munity at the forefront.” |

Mr Rich said some $15- $20
million had been invested in the
project to date, including pur=
chasing the land.

He added that the project was
seeking to obtain the permits
to construct the first 12 suites
of its 50-room boutique hotel,
and-had started construction on .
three of the 52 residential sites.

_ Deposits have been received for

about 22 of the residential sites.

The development will also
feature, when completed, a spa
and 20 cottage sites, and Mr
Rich said a further four home
sites and the “model cottage”:
will “come‘on line” this sum-
AMEr, RAE a Fett

The development has com-.
pleted construction of its utili-
ties plant, including a reverse

iL ToS

- osmosis plant, and is anticipat-

ing the arrival of a 132,000 gal-

' lon water tank, Mr Rich said.

’ He added that about 90 per
cent of Windermere Island
Club’s infrastructure was com-
plete, the development having
laid all its water lines and now
in the process of installing elec-
tricity and telephone lines.
Almost three miles of roads
have been plaid out.

__SEE page 4B

Air arrivals increase
7% in January, but not
enough to offset 11%
sea decline —

major lines brought in fewer
passengers. However, cruise
arrivals to Nassau/Paradise

SEE page 2B

PAKADISE ISLAND
Saturday, May oth

OLY Ryapeacn Ya pm 6)



ain
ep



PAGE 2B, FRic...

, MAY 5, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



SOK Natok



Firms must select investors wisely

he final member of your
team that you need to
pick is your investor.
Unlike partners,
investors are harder to
find, so you may be tempted to wel-
come them initially with open arms.
Yet-they, too, will be your long-term
partner, so your due diligence will be
of equal importance.

Choosing your investor should be
made with the same care as choosing
your partner. The four-part test that
one-can use for choosing your partner
can also be used to determine which
investor is suitable for you.

Trust

First, you should always trust your
gut instinct. If you sense anything is
not quite right, then be wary of taking
on that investor. There is an old
expression that “a principle is only a
principle when it costs you money”. If
you compromise your principles on
investor choice, it may cost you a lot
more than money.

Sécond, you must do due diligence
on your prospective investors. Are
they of sound character? What track
record have they got in making invest-
ments? Are they sound financially?
An.investor of suspect character, and
with a poor credit rating, could be
dangerous for your business.

Investors with financial problems
are: more likely to try and recover

é



| Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer

their investment early if their cir-
cumstances change. If they can’t
afford to lose their investment, they
could become increasingly desperate
should things not go to plan. And
they may even resort to legal action to
get their demands met. So, do your
due diligence, by taking references
and talking to people that know them,
aswell as people in the companies
they have an investment relationship
with.

Third, be clear about why you want
this person as an investor. Do you
want a financially sophisticated, expe-
rienced investor? Or would you settle
for someone of lesser experience? Do
you want a financial investor, who
will leave you alone to run the busi-
ness? Are you looking for someone
who will take an added interest in the
business, sit on your Board or advi-
sory panel, bring his or her contacts to
the table, and give you valuable
advice and introductions?

Or, are you looking for someone
to take a management role in the
business, roll up their sleeves and get
involved in the minutiae of your busi-

ness? You will need to think this
through clearly, as each possibility
has different advantages and disad-
vantages.

Fourth, try to develop an under-
standing of what is expected from
each of you during the term of the
investment; what goals each of you
have for the business; and what inter-
action you expect to have between
each other. Knowing these things ear-
ly on will make it easier for you to
walk from a deal up front if you can’t
achieve a compromise. Try to put
your agreement in writing, so if things
get difficult you will have a document
to resolve any disputes.

So, what else can you do to ensure
that your relationship with your
potential investor will go smoothly?
There are three things you should
consider.

Investors

First, try and find risk-tolerant
investors who are willing and able to
accept and live with the downside risk

_of their investment. Look for

investors who are diversified, have
experience with start-ups, have excess

capacity, and are risk-seeking, partic-

ularly those serial entrepreneurs-who
invest in multiple businesses. They
will be more pragmatic should things
go wrong and also be able to offer

useful advice. Investors with a high

profile should be approached, as they

could be the anchor investor that
draws others to your venture.
Second, explain the risks to your
potential investors as honestly as you
can. Make sure that they understand
the potential risks and downsides.
Their investment can go down as well
as up. If the worst-case scenario is
that they could lose all their money,
explain this to them up front as you
don’t want them spending sleepless
nights when things go wrong.
Thirdly, explain the timeframe of
the investment. Make clear to them
they are going to be in for the long
haul, possibly as-much as five years
before they can get their money out.
Let them know that if the business
does really well and you obtain sec-
ond round financing, they may have
to leave their money in even longer.
They need to know that it will be vir-
tually impossible for them to sell their
shareholding to others, as the mar-
ket for that type of transaction is illiq-
uid. You should also warn them that
if things go well, you might need fur-
ther finance, which could dilute their
investment. Managing your investors’
expectations will be critical if you are
to get the best.out of the relationship.
Remember, your investors will be
looking to minimise the downside
exposure of their investment. They
will be looking for you to demon-

“strate:

* Good financial control over cash
flow, careful budgeting of your

resources and good cost control.
Marketing

* Well thought out targeted mar-
keting campaigns that have a chance
of success.

* Faith and enthusiasm in what you
are doing.

* Good execution skills.

* That you have honoured past
commitments and not left investors
high and dry.

* Well-thought-out contingency

plans should things not go to plan.
x

nifty «

Make sure that when you present to \

them, that you will have these areas \.

covered.

Choosing the right investor is a cru-”

cial area that will require much disci-

\

pline, as it will have a direct bearing ©

on your future success or failure. So,

in order to avoid the trap of.

antipreneurship, make sure you spend °

your time properly, as it will pay large

dividends for your future business

success.
NB: Adapted from his upcoming

book, Antipreneurship And How to’

Avoid It, Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing and
communications experience in Lon-

don and the Bahamas. He consults’

and currently lives in Nassau, and can —

be contacted at:
markalexpalmer@mac.com
© Mark Palmer. All rights reserved



Total visitor arrivals to
the Bahamas fall by 6%

FROM page 1B

Island as a second port of entry
were up in January 2006 com-
pared to the previous year.
While Norwegian Cruise
Lines brought in more passen- .
gers during January’ 20065"
Princess Cruises brought in na,
passengers at all. There was.a
44 per cent fall in passengers
brought in by Celebrity Cruise
Lines; a 4 per cent decline in
Carnival passengers; a 9 per
cent drop in Costa Cruises
arrivals; a 45 per cent decline
in‘Holland American Cruises
passengers; a 10 per cent fall in
Royal Caribbean arrivals; and
43 per cent drop on Imperial
Majesty Cruises arrivals.
However, increased num-
bers of passengers brought to’
the island by Carnival Cruise
Lines and Norwegian Cruise
Lines ensured that arrivals to
Grand Bahama were up by 25
per cent by first port of entry

\

for January 2006.

The Ministry of Tourism
said: “Carnival brought in 57
per cent more passengers to
Grand Bahama in January
2006 using their ships the Fas-

: ination, Fantasy, Celebration. |
wand the, Carnival Liberty..,Nor-, .
-wegian Cruises brought.in 211, -

per cent more cruise passen-
gers to Grand Bahama as a
first port of call than in January
2005.

Increase

“The increase in cruise
arrivals brought in by Carni-
val Cruise Lines and Norwe-
gian Cruises was enough to
counteract the decline in cruise
arrivals by Celebrity Cruises,
Disney Cruises, Holland
American Cruise Lines, and

.Royal Caribbean Internation-

al.”
Sea arrivals to the Family

‘ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2005/CLE/gen/01227

- IN THE SUPREME COURT
_ BETWEEN

MARY MICHELLE MAJOR

JUDY ATHENE KEMP- -HIGGS

Plaintiffs

AND

KAIVON ELDON

Defendant

NOTICE

Kaivon Eldon

Nassau, Bahamas

. Princess Cruises brought in

' of éntry than in 2005, it “failed

~ New York up.19 per cent; Mia-

stopover arrivals enjoyed

Islands fell in January 2006
because cruise arrivals
declined. While Celebrity
Cruises, Royal Caribbean and

more passengers by first port

to counteract the decline”. .|.
caused by Disney Cruises and
Holland American Cruises,
which were down by 66 per
cent and 27 per cent respec-
tively.

However, air arrivals - the
higher spending stopover visi-
tors to the Bahamas -
increased by 7 per cent in Jan-
uary 2006 to 81,367, while air
arrivals to the Family Islands
rose by 8 per cent. Air arrivals
to Grand Bahama were off by _
5 per cent. '

Eight out of 10 of
Nassau/Paradise Island’s top
10 destination markets expe-
rienced stopover arrivals
growth in January 2006, with

mi-Fort Lauderdale ahead by 3
per cent; and Washington DC
up by 43 per cent.

Half of Grand Bahama’s top
10 destination markets for

growth in January 2006, but
the other five all saw declines.

Air arrivals to all Family
Island destinations saw increas-
es for January 2006, with the
exception of Andros, the Berry
Islands and Cat Cay. -

Bis:

Pricing Information As Of:



52wk-Low
Abaco Markets

62wk-Hi

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank

HOM page 1B

- tions with Starwood’s high-end, luxury bou-
ae brand, St Regis, to operate the resort,
but this deal was halted when the hotel group.
- including St Regis - signed up to become

part of Baha Mar Development Company’ S
$1.6 billion Cable Beach expansion.

St Regis signed a contract with Baha Mar _
that prevented it from branding any other

. resort in the Bahamas, bringing negotiations
with Mr Lauth to an end. However, Park
Hyatt is not a bad replacement.

In addition, the Government was also. con-
cerned about the environmental implications
of BIC Resorts constructing a second marina

‘in Savannah Sound. :
_. BIC Resorts said yesterday that it had |
retained architects, Bernardo Fort-Brescia of
Arquitectonica, and Cesar Molina to lead the 4
designs of the property.
The Lyford Cay Club’s former managing
_ director for 24 years, Paul Thompson, will
oversee a! resort operations.

Colina

Financial Advisors Lid.



4

cottages and invitation- -only memberships.’
Mr Lauth’s background is in real estate and | |
the bottled water industry, his compan on
AquaPenn, having plants in California, Flori- | |
da and Pennsylvania. oe
_ ~~ His partners are Bob Poole and Mike L ni- |:
gan. Mr Poole is a residential developer in | |
- Pennsylvania, and is currently developing the | |
$135 million Penn State University Retire- | |
_ ment Village, while Mr Lanigan, of Mi-Jack
Products, is a provider of construction equip-
ment, material handling and intermodal ser-
- vices worldwide.
Charles Stronach is the development direc-
tor of the French Leave Resort and Marina
: Milage

brand Eleuther
-investm pi

FIC Resorts said: “Brench Leave offers
pre-construction..single-family oceanfront _
home sites and villas, and boutique luxury.
Park Hyatt condominium hotel residences | |

_ with a pool area, restaurant and full-service |.
spa. This will mark the first Caribbean loca-
tion for the Park Hyatt bran
“The more exclusive purchase opport
is at Savannah Hill, with up to 10 estate lots, —

NIE



To Pate in The Tribune,
eS al RPS 986 today!





‘ TAKE NOTICE that action has been commenced
' against you in the Supreme Court of the
‘ Commonwealth of The Bahamas Action No.
| 2005/CLE/gen/01227 by Mary Michelle Major
' and Judy Athene Kemp-Higgs in which the
Plaintiffs’ claim is for an Order that you remove
a building which encroaches on the Plaintiffs’
property, damages for trespass and costs.

AND that it has been ordered that service of the’
Writ in the said action be effected by this

advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must
enter an Appearance in this action on or before
the 2nd June 2006 otherwise judgment may be
entered against you.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
Attorneys for the Plaintiffs
Chambers
Frederick Street Steps
Nassau, Bahamas

Previous Close
Today's Close

Dally Vol,



'BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ;
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco |
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

"J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RN

"28,00 ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets
: RND Holdings

Ht

id

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Bond Fund









- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

- Current day's weighted price for dally valume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

- Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
** = AS AT APR. 30, 2006/ **** -
AS AT APR. 28, 200

”

AS AT MAR. 31, 2006
28. eee









~ Weekly Vol

Yield %

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Fiscal deficit falls

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 3B



33.5% to $79.9m

But Central Bank sounds oil warning

& By CARA BRENNEN ;
Tribune Staff Reporter



he Government’s

fiscal deficit for

the first eight

months in its

2005-2006 year

decreased by 33.5 percent to

$79.9 million, the Central Bank

said yesterday, wityh revenues

increasing by 20.8 per cent
over 2004-2005.

Tax receipts expanded by

$106.2 million or by 17.8 per’

cent to end-February 2006, due
mainly to growth in import
duties and related stamp taxes
of 16.7 per cent and 17.5 per
cent respectively.

Receipts

Non-tax receints also rose
by $21.1 million (65.5 per cent),
an increase due mainly to a $14
million hike in immigration
fees.

However, the Central
Bank’s report on monthly eco-

nomic developments for
March found that total spend-
ing rose by 15.1 per cent to
$808.4 million, which was the
result of increases in both
recurrent and capital expendi-
ture spending.

There was an 11.4 per/cent
rise in recurrent spending, gen-
erated by increases in personal
emoluments( 7 per cent) and
transfer payments (16.8 per
cent.)

Ongoing road and building
construction activities largely
explained the 80.7 per cent
increase in capital spending.

While the report suggested
the Bahamas’ short to medi-
um-term prospects remained
positive, global developments
in international oil prices
remained a risk to that out-
look, given the potential
adverse implications for the
domestic price level and the

current account position.
Quarterly average prices at

the pump for diesel and gaso-

line rose on a year-to-year

' basis by 71 cents and 80 cents

respectively.
Control

Exchange control data
showed that non-oil imports
expanded by $11.2 million to
$132.4 million, while oil
imports doubled to $50.7mil-
lion in March 2006.

Bahamian dollar credit con-
tinued to strengthen in March,
although at:a slower place than
the increase in total deposits.
As a result, both excess
reserves and excess liquid
assets advanced during the
period.

March also saw an increase
in the bank’s excess reserves,
which increased by $26.5 mil-

lion to $236.8 million. Com-
mercial banks’ excess liquid
assets firmed by $4.5 million
to $172.7 million, in contrast
to an $18.2 million contraction
in the previous year.

Growth in external reserves
strengthened by $28.2 million,
to $38.8 million for March
2006, as the Central Bank’s net
foreign currency purchase of
$37.6 million was more than
three times higher than the
previous year’s level.

The Central Bank’s net pur-
chase from banks was appre-

.ciably higher at $61.6 million,

which completely mitigated
the increase in net sales to the
public sector from $1 million to
$24 million.

Commercial Banks’ net cur-

rency purchase improved by

$51.3 million to $63.7 million.
The Bahamian dollar credit
growth more than doubled to

$73.1 million from $31.8 mil-
lion a year ago. Net credit to
government rose by 5.9 mil-
lion to $21.4 million, and
growth to the public sector was
$1.4 million at $8.million
Domestic foreign currency
credit rebounded by $22.4 mil-
lion from the $4.3 million
decrease registered in 2005.
The private sector saw a $19
million advance in credit, up

from an $8.8 million decline in .

the previous year.
Demand

Elevated demand conditions
caused a surge in private sector



“NOTICE




The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

f you are raising funds for a —

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



credit by $139.9 million, up

from $42.7 million in 2005, and

was reinforced by ongoing
growth in consumer credit and
mortgages.

The Central Bank predicted

Lb

that the economy will remain. *

positive, strengthened by for-

eign investments and ongoing _
construction activity. we







ENEAS CORNER OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU, |

NOTICE is hereby given that CARLTON DORELUS OF |:












PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MAURICE MENNETTE
SWEETING nee RICHARDSON, of Western District of
New Providence, Bahamas, intend to. change my name
to MERIC] MENNETTE SWEETING nee RICHARDSON.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
TOPSHAM LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 20th
day of April, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. .

~ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the leading Wealth Managers
‘in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy private clients by
‘providing them with comprehensive, value-enhancing
‘services. For our Products & Services team in Nassau we

are looking for a seasoned



international Wealth Planner

:In this challenging senior position you will be responsible
‘for providing personalized event-specific and comprehensive
‘wealth structuring strategies and solutions through the
Client Advisors to high net worth clients, addressing their
: present and future planning needs of financial, tax, estate -
‘ and insurance related matters. This may include tailor made
solutions and the sale of in-house fiduciary instruments,
life insurance, and other instruments. You will join Client
Advisors on business trips to clients with a key focus on
- advisory, acquisition and retention support. In addition you
will travel to other international UBS offices in order to
conduct marketing and business development activities.
You will also support and conduct products and wealth
planning related training to Client Advisors.

_ We are searching for a seasoned professional with extensive
international experience in wealth planning and client
consulting as well as expert knowledge of investment
products, fiduciary instruments and tax solutions. Applicants
must possess an excellent education in a relevant discipline

_ and a proven track record in a comparable position with a
leading global financial institution. Fluency in several
languages (e.g. English, French, German, Spanish) is
essential.

_ Written applications by. Bahamian nationals only should be
addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757,
Nassau, Bahamas






NOTICE ié hereby given that SIDNEY SIMILIEN OF

PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

-| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
No.45 of 2000 Ne

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
VENUS HOLDINGS LIMITED, has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

| therefore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was April 11, 2006.

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

“f UBS

UBS’ (Bahamas) Ltd..is one of the leading Wealth Managers in the
Caribbean. We look after wealthy private clients by providing them
with comprehensive, value-enhancing services. For our Human
Resources team in Nassau we are looking for a seasoned

Human Resources Manager

The main responsibilities of the position holder include:

Advise management, local employees and International

Assignees;

Recruit managerial and non-managerial staff (locally and on

international level);

Develop, review.and execute HR processes and policies;

Manage projects and processes in connection with Education
_ & Development, Compensation & Benefits, International

Assignment Services, Employee Relations, etc.;

Administer Payroll, Pension Plan.as well as annual performance

and compensation review processes;

Act as coach and supervisor;

Liaise with Ministry of Immigration, Labour & Training;

Liaise and negotiate with internal specialists and external service

providers.

in order to satisfy our requirements the applicants must possess:

Bachelor's degree in a relevant discipline from a recognized and
accredited educational institution, any further training is a plus;
Several years of experience in a comparable Human Resources
Management position with a leading global company (preferably
in thé banking industry);

- Solid international experience in a very diverse, complex and
dynamic environment;
Capability to successfully build up and foster relationships and
networks;
Proven track record as manager, leader and team player;
Excellent communication, presentation and coaching skills;
Sound knowledge of MS Office and HR software applications;
Fluency in a foreign language is a plus.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals or permanent residents
_only should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.

| Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas









BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for |
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as} ~
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not bey, *
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the |:
facts within twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of MAY, |;
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas..

NOTICE is hereby given that DONAT CHRISTOPHER HALL |
OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to | -
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and }.
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days | .
fromthe 5TH day-of:MAY, 2006 tothe Minister responsible }---
Hs Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
ahamas.















ene

_ Weare currently seeking talented and highly motivated candidates to join our Information Technology ("IT") Services and
Information Risk Management (“IRM”) practices.

Are you looking for a new challenge?

TT Services and IRM Associate

Successful candidates for the dual role of IT Services and IRM Associate will have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree from
an accredited institution and one to two years of experience, Exceptional writing and documentation skills are required,
Experience with Active Directory, TCPIP, network and application security skills, and backup software preferred. Duties will
include technical support for staff, management of backend {T infrastructure, IT audit compliance testing, change
management recording, and security documentation, MCP and/or CCNA certification and experience preferred.

This is an excellent opportunity to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice that offers competitive
compensation and benefits packages. :

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, copy of their transcripts and copies of any relevant certifications, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.0.
Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@komg.com.bs,

AUDIT | TAX e ADVISORY

© 0G. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Behamian member firm of KPMG knterational, a Swiss cooperative. Al rights reserved.

NOTICE |

We would like to advise our clients that we,
VINCENT A. KNOWLES and NIGEL °
CASH are not longer associated with

' K.A.P. INSURANCE
AGENTS AND BROKERS

We are please to advise that we will continue‘
to offer insurance services to you!

Contact us at

LAMPKIN & COMPANY

_ 12 Montrose Avenue
Tel: 325-0850, Fax: 326-8024

Mr. Vincent A. Knowles and Nigel Cash



PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SIGERMAIN JOHNSON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 28TH day of APRIL, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUELIN MERILIEN OF JOAN’S
HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ROSENDALE PLUM LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 5th day of April
2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ACCOUNTANT



ADO Det OO ee

We are a globally operating Investment Fund leading.in the;-areas of Health...
Wellness and Nutrition, operating out of offices in Nassau - The Bahamas,
Geneva - Switzerland, Auckland’- New Zealand. The Fund is operating international
since 1999 and has currently more than USS 1.3 billion under management.



An opportunity arises for a qualified accountant to provide accounting services
to the fund, associated companies and their shareholders in Nassau. The role
represents a ground floor opportunity in the establishment of a physical presence
in Nassau and will provide an exciting challenge to an ambitious accountant
who is looking to gain entry to a successful and fast growing international team.

The successful candidate will be Bahamian or will have the right to work in The
Bahamas, be fully qualified (USA CPA, Canadian or UK CA or equivalent), and
will have gained some sound practical experience in an audit firm, commercial
or industrial business, particularly closing IFRS. Financial Statements and/or
auditing them. The candidate must be able to demonstrate excellent interpersonal
communication and first class English language skills (other language skills will
be a plus), PC literacy and an attention to detail. The position calls for a young
but mature executive with lots of energy and willingness to work whatever hours
may be necessary, as transactional circumstances require, in order to get the job
done accurately and on time, as portfolio companies are located in America,
Europe, Asia and Oceania.

The terms and conditions of employment will be commensurate with the
qualifications and experience of the applicant and will be attractive to the right
candidate.,

Please send or deliver detailed CV to Recruitment, IVC Americas SA,
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau,
The Bahamas or email to hr@inventages.com or alternatively
pgomez@ gtbahamas.com (Grant Thorton, Accountants). Applications will be
treated with full confidentiality. 2



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A small Offshore Bank is looking




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mess

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Dublin in hor ov advised that |, ROSEMOND JEAN
THOwmAS, vi FO. box CB-12299, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to ROSEMOND ETIENNE.
lf there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEVERLEY SONIA HALL nee
JACKSON OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P-O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. ;























Secretary / Typist

Professional Office has an immediate Opening for
a Secretary / Typist. The ideal candidate must have
a minimum of Three (3) Year Office experience with
excellent communications & Computer Skills. The
applicant must possess exceptional telephone
etiquette, good attitude and be capable of working
independently and/or as a team member; should have.
a minimum typewriting skills of 5|0 wpm; and must
proficient in the Windows XP or 2000 environment;
particularly w/ software such as Microsoft Word,
Excel and Quickbooks.











Bahamians and/or Bahamian Residents are invited
to apply.




Please Fax Resume to 394-4458
e-mail: wwb @coralwave.com



for an experienced temporary




Tat
ADMINISTRATOR —



With knowledge of the International
Business Companies Act and the
formation and administration of
IBC's. ees |




Please send resume
no later than

May 12th 2006
to fax number 322-5807.










THE TRIBUNE

i

‘Sustainable development’.
FROM page 1B a

The site of the Windermere
Island Club was busy with land-
scaping and early-stage con-
struction activity when The Tri- .
bune visited yesterday.

Although there had been
claims that the project had suf-
fered delays and the Govern-
ment was unhappy with the
speed of its progress, Mr Rich
said: “We’ve been here for
three years working in the face
of a lot of opposition, detrac-
tors. The people who have been
here have been working consis-
tently since the signing of our
Heads of Agreement” in July
2003. The signing of a Heads of
Agreement between the Gov-
ernment and a developer does
not mean that construction



would offer workers a “career
path” and training, enticing peo---*’
ple to come back to the island.

He added that some 30 peo-
ple had already received full-., :
training, including horticultur/*
ists and mechanics, who had
been schooled by Daimler-
Chrysler executives who visite: ) +.
ed the project themselves, SESW Lo

The Windermere Island Clubi:.,
is working closely with five envi.» :
ronmental engineers to ensure |. :
the project maintains the nat-':.:
ural surroundings. Three of. | -,,
these are paid, Mr Rich said, ,_:
and two unpaid, including Dr,+;.;
Kathleen Sullivan-Seeley of the: ;;
University of Miami. aph 9!

“T don’t take a step without .\).,.
their direction,” Mr Rich said...
“We are trying to follow the; —

guidelines they give us to devel... , ,.,

activity will start overnight, op this project.” Pe.
something many Bahamians He added that the Winder- . , ,
seem to expect, but instead mere Island Club was “remedi-, _; ,

ating” environmental impacts. . '
caused by previous developers, °
including a 27-foot deep hole ©. ..
just offshore that had been left ~
by dredging. Sr,
Some 2500 casuarinas - an ©
invasive species - had already °
been removed from the devel-
opment site, while three nurs-
eries had been set up, with ~%
native Bahamians plants’ ,
removed and replanted from |
the roads that were cut. . |

marks the beginning of what
can become a lengthy planning
and approvals process.

Mr Rich, in common with
other developers, had an 18-
month wait for his subdivision
approvals. Without subdivision
approvals, no building permits
will be issued, preventing con-
struction work.

All employees at the project
were from Eleuthera, and Mr .
Rich said the development

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JONATHAN SYLVANAS
BRICE, of #6 East Bch Drive, RO. Box F-40993, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
JONATHAN SYLVANAS COx. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box F-43536, |:
Grand Bahama, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days |.
after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VILLY AUGUSTINE OF MARSH
. HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister.
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for |
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and i
that any person who knows any reason why registration/ {
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written {
and signed statement .of the facts within twenty-eight days
from.the 28TH day of APRIL, 2006 to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that WILFRID PETION OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written |

Fins
















BP dinates HRS?

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
-LUWARD INVESTMENT LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act. 2000, LUWARD
INVESTMENT LTD. is in dissolution, as of April 25th, 2006.

ERR A ESET TRE Si RAR he A La PN a i. ih ei fa SF oe Oo Dat MR REG 8

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent]
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE

NYK LNG SHIPPING (NO. TWO) LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of |
the International Business Companies Act. 2000, NYK LNG
SHIPPING (NO. TWO) LIMITED. is in dissolution, as of April
25th, 2006.

Mr. Hitoshi Nagasawa, No. 3-2, Marunouchi 2-chome, Chiyoda-
ku, Tokyo, Japan is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 5B

Cable Bahamas hit by ‘piracy’

FROM page 1B

revenues, The cable business
generated $33.4 million In rev-
enue for the company in fiscal
2005, a rise of 6.9 per cent Over
2004.

Subscribers increased by 6.8
- per cent im 2005 to 70,255,
growth that Cable Bahamas
said stemmed from the launch
of its Oceans Digital TV, satel-
lite dish owners converting to
cable, and the expansion of its
network to new homes.

Among the new subdivisions
that provided Cable Bahamas
with an increased customer
base were Jacaranda, Coral
Vista, Millennium Gardens
and John Clive Pugh.

However, Brendan Paddick,
Cable Bahamas chairman,
described as “unprecedented
in the cable television indus-
try” the Government’s failure

































Human Resources Manager
Deltec Bank & Trust Limited
P. O. Box N.3229

Nassau, Bahamas

to approve an increase in the
basic cable television rate of
$30 per month since the ser-
vice was first launched in 1995.

Mr Paddick said:the compa-
ny’s third application for a rate
increase was turned down by
the Television Regulatory
Authority in June 2005, forcing
Cable Bahamas to examine its
costs.

Mr Paddick wrote: “Man-
agement quickly enacted its
contingency plan to reduce
operational costs by repackag-
ing its basic television line up.

“Going forward, manage-
ment will continually review
and control its costs associated
with the basic television offer-
ing, while continuing its appeal
for reasonable rate adjust-
ments.” :

Cable television’ program-
ming costs rose by 25 per cent
in fiscal 2005, increasing from
$4.7 million in 2004 to $5.9 mil-

CITCO

Citco Fund Services

(Bahamas) Ltd

SENIOR FUND ACCOUNTANT

&

FUND ACCOUNTANT

Internationally recognized Fund Administrator, requires an experienced
Hedge Fund Accountant. The only acceptable candidates will have at least
3 years of related fund experience including excellent knowledge of complex
financial instruments including derivatives, OTC securities and private
equities. Candidates must be able to demonstrate their understanding of
financial statement preparation. ‘bh

We offer a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits plan.
' Please fax your CV along with references to the attention of:

Citco Fund Services (Bahamas) Limited

Vice President

- Fax Number: 242-393-4692.

DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED.
OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATOR

Responsibilities will include (but are not limited to):

e Trade processing, settlements & payments.
_ ¢ . Cash and Broker reconciliations

?

The successful candidate should have:

* Minimum of Associate degree in Accounting, —
Banking or Finance

e At least three years back office experience in trade
processing, settlement and broker reconciliations

Completion of the Series 7 course would be a plus.

We offer an excellent benefit package and salary will be
commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may submit resumes as follows:

Resumes may also be faxed c/o 362-4623 or emailed to

anh@deltecbank.com.
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS

lion, something the company
said was the largest cost com-
ponent in providing cable tele-
vision services.

Cable television revenues
rose by only 7 per cent, and
Cable Bahamas added: “Since
the company’s inception, pro-
gramming costs and other
operational costs required in
providing cable television ser-
vices have continued to rise at
a greater rate than the associ-
ated revenues.

“This has caused the profit
margins derived from the cable
television division to decline
over the past years. In 2005,
these margins dropped further
to 40 per cent from 42 per cent.

_ “Current trends in the indus-
try suggest that programming
costs will continue to rise sig-
nificantly, and thus the com-

‘pany must apply even greater
efforts to maintain profitabili-

ty.”



ott

/




On a brighter note, Mr Pad-
dick said that since Cable
Bahamas launched Oceans
Digital TV in the 2005 fourth
quarter, some 5,500 customers
had subscribed to it in the first
nine weeks. Some 7,000 digital
set top boxes are deployed in
the Bahamas.

Cable Bahamas said its total
revenues had increased by
$31.2 million or 120 per cent
since 2000, rising from $25.9

million to $57.1 million.

The company’s Internet
business had accounted for $15
million or 48 per cent of that
growth; with cable television
contributing $8.8 million or 28
per cent; and data some $7.4
million or 24 per cent.

Cable Bahamas said that,
now, cable television account-
ed for 59 per cent of revenues;
Internet some 28 per cent; and
data another 13 per cent.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news, :

igs le hy 7° /¢) 4
on Mondays

































‘



Needed
Executive Director

The Bahama Out Islands Promotion Board, based in Plantation, Florida, is looking for
an Executive Director to lead, strategize, plan, develop and execute all marketing activities
on behalf of its fifty plus hotel membership. In addition, candidate will be responsible for
the hotel membership program, i.e., retaining the existing members through quality service
and tangible results and obtaining-additional relevant hotel members with an increasing
list of benefits, Candidate will continue efforts for increasing airlift to all relevant Out
Islands, improving the Board’s sales distribution channels, as well as maintaining and
improving the working relationship between the Board and the relevant Bahamas Government
Ministries. Candidate will also liaise with the local hotel association in areas such as product
development and lobbying/advocacy initiatives, all in an effort to “protect and enhance the
natural beauty of the Bahama Out Islands” while increasing business for the Board’s

members.

Candidate must, above all, be a solid leader that is also articulate, tenacious, persuasive,
prepared, organized, and self motivated. He or she must possess at least a four-year business
degree from an accredited university and at least 10 years of successful work experience
in tourism marketing and management. Candidate will also be responsible for preparing
annual budgets, overseeing the Board’s financial activities and for maintaining and improving
the financial health of the Board. Candidate will be responsible for a staff of approximately
five persons and previous management experience will be critical for utilizing this team
for the successful implementation of the above outlined responsibilities.

Candidate must also be a team player and a team leader; ready and willing to work in a
diverse and small team environment. Some experience in working with Caribbean government
tourism ministries is preferred. The ability to travel is a must and product knowledge of
the Bahama Out Islands and tourism market is preferable, but not mandatory.

Send résumé to: HumanResources@boipb.com. \

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Our client, a leading Bahamian company, is seeking applications for Senior
Accountant.

JOB OBJECTIVE:

To provide financial assistance in managing the company’s financial resources,
preparing financial reports and analysis, supervising certain key aspects of the
accounting function and maintaining appropriate relaions with investors and
regulatory agencies. The Senior Accountant will report to the Vice President of
Finance and the Financial Controller

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Assist in managing the financial affairs of the company
Supervise key components of the accounting department and accounting and

internal control functions

Assist with preparation of accurate and timely interim and annual financial
reporting in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
Assist in the annual budget exercise

Assist in training and development of line accounting staff

Coordinate the annual audit process

Assist in managing cash flow and treasury functions

Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Candidates should meet the following criteria:

Bachelor’s Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field

Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of

Chartered Accountants — mira

Minimum of three years post qualifying experience in accounting

Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required

Very good working knowledge of International Financial Reporting Standards

Bahamian Citizen

Solomon accounting software experience

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications

Strong technical and managerial skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills

Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the team and team
oals

Fonest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan,
medical, life, dental, and vision coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before
May 5, 2006 to:

Mark E. Munnings
Deloitte & Touche
P. O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Email:mmunnings @deloitte.com.bs

Deloitte. |:





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PRICEWATERHOUsE(COPERS @



East Hil] Street
P.O. Box N-3910

Nassav, Bahamas

Website: www.pwo.com
B-mail: pwebs@bs.pwc.com
Telephone (242) 302-5300
Facsimile (242) 302-5350

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT
To the Sharcholders of Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited
(the Bank) as of 31 December 2005. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank's
management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our
audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing.. Those
Standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test
basis, evidence supporting the amiounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also
includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management,
as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a
reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
the Bank as of 31 December 2005 in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards.

Sah hoe

Chartered Accountants
24 February 2006

Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited
(incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2005
(Expressed in Swiss Francs) ! ;
Note 2005 2004
SFr SFr —
ASSETS
Due from banks;
Demand and call deposits : 3 2,104,438 774,607
. Time deposits ‘ 3 28,102,310 23,437,773
“he y's : 30,206,748 24,212,380
Loans and advances to customers 3 428,752 499,501
Derivative financial assets 9 235,113 281,361
Investments
- At fair value through income 4 276,276 274,862
- Held-to-maturity 3,4 769,825 508,500
Accrued interest and other assets 87,381 / 106,945
’ Advisory fees receivable 6 54,000 929,069
Investment in subsidiary, at cost 17,781 17,781
Fixed assets ; 5 57,254 98,569
Intangible asset (net of accumulated amortization of
SFr 386,052; 2004: SFr 309,326) 52,274 63,105
TOTAL ASSETS 32,185,404 26,992,073
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Liabilities
Bank overdrafts 3 - 13,400
Deposits from banks : MEGS 3 8,991,183 8,375,048
Customers’ deposits 3 15,155,898 11,647,689
Derivative financial liabilities 3,9 231,005 277,351
Accrued interest and other liabilities 3 177,509 114,032
. Management and distribution fees payable 3,6 183,500 273,000
Total liabilities 24,739,095 20,700,520
Equity
Share capital
Authorized, issued and fully paid
5,000,000 shares of SFr 1.00 each 5,000,000 5,000,000
General reserve 8 800,000 400,000
Retained earnings 1,646,309 891,553
Total equity , 7,446,309 6,291,553
‘ TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY _ 32,185,404 __ 26,992,073




Director

SIGNED ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD:



24 February 2006
Date .

Notes to Balance Sheet
31 December 2005

1.

General Informatton

Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited (the Bank) was incorporated on 15 October 1999

under the Companies Act, 1992, of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed
under the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act, 2000, to carry on banking and trust
business from within The Bahamas. The principal activities of the Bank consist of
providing banking, trust and investment management services to a predominantly European
based clientele. The Bank is also licensed in The Bahamas under the Securities Industry
Act, 1999, and related regulations as a Broker Dealer Class II.

The Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of Banca del Sempione, Lugano, Switzerland (the
Parent Bank) which is in tum owned by Eburnea Holding SA, Sion (52%), Molu SA,
Lugano (35%), Golden Hom Finanz AG, Lugano (11.75%), and a private investor (1.25%).

The registered office of the Bank is located at Providence House, East Hill Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas. The registered office of the Parent Bank is located at Via Peri 5, Lugano,
Switzerland. The Bank had 4 employees.as of 31 December 2005 and 2004.

2. Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of this balance sheet are set out
below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless
- otherwise stated.

(a) Basis of preparation

. The Bank prepares its balance sheet in accordance with Intemational Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRS) and under the histori: a! cost convention, as modified by
the revaluation of investments held at fair value through income and all derivative
contracts.

The preparation of the balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires management to
make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and
liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial
statements. Actual amounts could differ from those estimates.

As a result of the transitional provisions of IAS 39 (revised 2004) Financial
Instruments: Recognition and Measurement, on 1 January 2005 the Bank re-
designated all investments previously categorized as available-for-sale as investments
at fair value through income.

(b) Loans and advances

Loans and advances to customers are collateralized by cash, cash equivalents and
marketable securities held by the Bank on behalf of the borrowers. Accordingly, the
Bank has not established an impairment provision for loss on loans and advances.
Advances are due on demand.

3.

(c)

(d)

(ec)

(f)

(g)

@)

(i)

p

©

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS! |!

Investments

Investments at fair value through income comprise shares held in sub-funds of BASE
Investments SICAV, an investment company domiciled in Luxembourg (see Note 6).
Investments classified as investments at fair value through income on acquisition are
initially recognized at cost (which includes transaction costs) and are subsequently re-
measured at fair value. Fair value is based on the reported net asset value per share of
the particular sub-fund as determined by its directors on a mark-to-market basis, as of
the last business day of each month (valuation date).

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial. assets with fixed or
determinable payments and fixed maturities that the Bank’s management has the
positive intention and ability to hold to maturity. Investments classified as held-to-
maturity are carried at cost which closely approximates amortized cost as of the
balance sheet date. ,

All regular way purchases and sales of investments are recognized at trade date,
which is the date that the Bank commits to purchase or sell! the asset.

Valuation of derivative financial instruments

Forward currency contracts are initially recognized in the balance sheet at cost
(including transaction costs) and are subsequently re-measured to fair value using the
forward rate for the remaining period to maturity as of the last business day of the
financial year. f

Investment in subsidiary

Investment in subsidiary represents the cost of the Bank’s wholly owned corporate
service company, BdS Corporate Services Limited. A consolidated balance sheet is
Not presented because the Bank itself is a wholly owned subsidiary and the Parent

Bank prepares consolidated financial statements incorporating all subsidiaries that it
directly or indirectly controls.

Fixed assets

Fixed assets are stated at cost and are depreciated on a straight-line basis over their
expected useful lives, as follows:

‘Computer hardware & software 5 years

Fumiture & fixtures 9 years
Leasehold improvements 5 years :

Costs associated with maintaining computer software programs are recognized as an
expense when incurred. However, expenditures that enhance or extend the benefits |
of computer software programs beyond their original specifications and lives are
recognized as capital improvements and added to the original cost of the software.
Computer software ‘development costs recognized as assets are amortized using the
straight-line method over their useful lives but not exceeding a period of 5 years.

Intangible asset

The intangible asset represents the unamortized cost of licence fees paid for the use
of computer software. The licence fees are being amortized on a straight-line basis
over the software's estimated useful economic life of five years.

Pensions

The Bank makes contributions to a defined contribution pension plan for its
employees. The Bank’s contributions to the plan are paid in the period when they are
due.

Taxation -

The Bank is not subject to income or capital gains taxes in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas. :
Fiduciary activities

The Bank commonly acts as trustee and in other fiduciary capacities that result in the -

holding or placing of assets on behalf of individuals, trusts and other institutions. These
assets are excluded from the balance sheet, as they are not assets.of the Bank.

Foreign currency translation

The currency of The Bahamas is the Bahamian dollar; however, the Bank’s -

functional and presentation currency is the Swiss franc as the Swiss franc is the
currency that best reflects. the economic substance of the underlying events and
circumstances relevant to the Bank. Monetary assets and liabilities and non-
monetary assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the Swiss franc

* are translated into Swiss francs using year-end rates of exchange and rates of
exchange at the dates of the transactions, respectively.

Risk Management

The Bank engages in transactions that expose it to various types of risk in the normal
course of business. These risks include credit, currency, interest rate, liquidity and
fiduciary risk. The Bank’s financial performance is dependent on its ability to understand
and effectively manage these risks.

| (a)

Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of a counterparty to perform according to the terms of
the contract. From this perspective, the Bank’s credit risk exposure is primarily
concentrated in its deposits placed with other banking institutions and in its loans and
advances to customers. The Bank’s deposits have been placed with high quality
intemational banking institutions, and loans and advances to customers are
collateralized by assets held by the Bank on behalf of the borrowers. The table below
summarizes the Bank’s exposure based upon the geographical distribution of the on-
balance sheet assets and liabilities:

North & Caribbean

Central and
America Europe Bahamas Total
SFr SFr SFr SFr
Assets
Due from banks : = 30,144,228 62,520 30,206,748
Loans and advances 9,559 403,424 . 15,769 428,752
All other assets : : 1,092,808 457,096 1,549,904
Total Assets as of 31 December 2005 9,359 31,640,460 535,385 32,185,404
Liabilities
Bank overdrafts and deposits from banks - 8,991,183 - 8,991,183
Customers’ deposits and other liabilities 1,541,242 9,070,549 5,136,121 15,747,912

Total Liabilities as of 31 December 2005 1,541,242 18,061,732 $,136,121_ 24,739,095

Total Assets as of 31 December 2004 37,813 26,402,865 551,395 26,992,073

Total Liabilities as of 31 December 2004 1,391,995 12,588,793 6,719,732 20,700,520

(b) Currency risk

The Bank takes on exposure, which arises from the fluctuations in the prevailing
foreign currency exchange rates on its financial position and cash flows. The Board
of Directors sets limits on the level of exposure by currency and in total for both
overnight and intra-day positions, which are monitored daily. The table below
summarizes the Bank’s exposure to foreign currency exchange rate risk. Included in
the table are the Bank’s assets and liabilities at carrying amounts, categorized by
currency:

SFr Euro USD _. Other Total
Assets ;
Due from banks 9,643,805 14,124,143 5,000,608 1,438,192 30,206,748
_ Loans and advances 17,709 392,687. 17,989 367 428,752
All other assets 1,504,479 38,142 7,283 5 1,549,904
Total Assets as of ? .
31 December 2005 11,165,993 14,584,972 5,025,880 1,438,559 32,185,404
Liabilities
Bank overdrafts and
deposits from banks 2 6,559,104 2,432,079 3 8,991,183
Customers’ deposits 547912

and other liabilities 5,262,639 7,134,147 1,964,706 1,386,420

Total Liabilties as of

31 December 2005 5,262,639 13,693,251 4,396,785 .__1,386,420..__ 24,739,098
wales on 4,903,354 861,721 629,095 52,139 1,446

a Becueccuoed 9,859,768 12,462,900 3,763,189 906,216 ___ 26,992,073
afnccueie sud = 3,644,096 12,405,547 3,758,899 891,978 20,7
Caier as pat 215,672 57,353 4,290 14 6,291,553

a3

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=’



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 7B

The Bank also acts as investment manager of Lepton Fund Ltd. (Lepton) under the terms of
an agreement dated 20 February 2004. Lepton is an open-end investment company
incorporated as an International Business Company in the British Virgin Islands. Lepton
seeks capital appreciation by investing its assets in hedge funds operated by other
investment managers, The Bank is responsible for, among other things: (i) managing the
investment and reinvestment of cash,. securities and other property from time to time -
comprising Lepton’s assets, (ii) arranging for the general administration of Lepton, and (iii)
effecting the proper and efficient management and safekeeping of Lepton’s assets. Lepton

(c) Interest rate risk

The Bank takes on exposure arising from the fluctuations in the prevailing levels of
market interest rates on its financial position and cash flows. Interest margins may
increase as a result of such changes, but may reduce or create losses in the event that
unexpected movements arise. The Bank manages this risk by retaining a level of
assets to liabilities with similar principal values, interest rates and maturity dates.

nbn one he aicfanaisnhalnbobabaeta

4 The tables below summarise the effective interest rate by major currencies as of the .

f balance sheet date: was launched in February 2005 and the Bank earns management fees equal to 1.25% per
i annum based on Lepton’s average monthly net asset value. Furthermore, the Bank is
a 31 December 2005 SFr Euro USD entitled to a performance fee equal to 15% of Lepton’s net new profits including unrealized
} eae % % % gains after achieving a 5% hurdle rate. The Bank shares 50% of the management and
i . ;

H Pe wie oe ci en eras ase ae earned with an extemal investment consultant. For the year ended 31
i Feed ae. EG cs 400 ember 2005, the Bank earned management fees from Lepton of approximately SFr 182
if thousand (2004: SFr Nil) before payments to the external investment consultant.

it Liabilities

ve Deposits from banks 2 2.13 3.25 7. Related Party Balances

es Customers’ deposits 0.65 1.71 2.80

pe i ; 1 . a
i 4 tual ; Ges ee ie Parties are considered to be related if one party has the ability to control the other party or
4 Dece : o % exercise significant influence over the other party in making financial. or operational
i Assets decisions. The Bank is a member of a group of affiliated companies and has extensive
t ( Deposits with banke: 0.61 2.07 2.08 transactions and relationships with members of the group. Related parties (termed
i Loans and advances to customers 4,20 2.57 ‘5.95 affiliates) comprise the Parent Bank, its directors, companies in which it controls 20% or
i 3 tae. more of the share capital, the Bank’s own directors, and companies which are significantly
¥ resuils Hoes als _ Ae a influenced by the Bank’s own directors.

{ Customers’ deposits 0.14 1.77 1.85

Included in the balance sheet are the following balances with related parties:

ty
ef
i
i (d) Liquidity risk
A 2005 2004
dq Liquidity risk is the risk that the Bank might not have the necessary liquidity to meet apes. SFr
| its contractual obligations. The Bank manages its liquidity by matching liabilities Balances :
M4 with assets of similar maturity periods. The table below summarizes the significant
H assets and Jiabilities of the Bank which are classified, based on the period remaining Assets
Fl to maturity from the balance sheet date: Due from banks — demand and call deposits 2,041,918 757,029
i ‘Three months Threeto More than ae Sa ae ~ time deposits 41 64 685,807
; or less six months six months Total ans ancacyances to customers 9 3
i SFr SFr SFr SFr Derivative financial assets 161,796 281,361
a Ametnas = es 2005 Investments at fair value through income 276,276 274,862
5 ~ Demand and eall deposits 2,104,438 - 2,104,438 Accrued interest and other assets 14,650 16,880
2 - Time deposits 28,402,310 - 28,102,310 Advisory fees receivable 54,000 914,069
: Loans and advances to customers 187,837 240,915 . 428,752 : sas 1 1 17
Held-to-maturity investments 254,525 254,050 261,250 169,825 Investment in subsidiary 7,78 781
Tota! 30,649,110 494,965 261,250 __31,405,325 /
. Liabilities
Liabilities as of 31 December 2005 : Bank overdrafts - 13,400
Deposits from banks 8,447,181 544,002 - 8,991,183 Deposits from banks 8 991.183 $.375,048
ipa ; “Customers? deposi 2.716841 1,111,439
- Demand 12,931,983 . - 12,931,983 omers’ deposits 1716, i111,
- Time 1,959,686 264,229 : 2,223,915 Derivative financial liabilities 212,113 15,577
Total _ 23,338,850 808,231 24,147,081 Accrued interest and other liabilities - 109,206 41,011
Net liquidity gap 7,310,260 (313,266) 261,250 7,258,244 Management and distribution fees payable 183,500 Le
Three months Three to More than : j ;
or less six months six months Total
“ SFr SFr Sfr SFr
Assets as of 31 December 2004 8. General Reserve
; - Due from banks . p ‘
} = rs und call deposits a oo z Elgg oar The Bank occasionally makes an appropriation to the general reserve account for
-. Time deposits 437, - iS 437,773 . nt
if ‘cand’ aad ad varices 16 Guster 260,381 239,120 : y 499,301 unforeseeable risks and future losses. Amounts transferred to the general reserve account
a Held-to-maturity investments é - 508,500 508,500 can only be distributed following approval by the shareholders in a general meeting.
Total 24,472,761 239,120 $08,500 __ 25,220,381
th fer of SFr 400,000 from retained
Liabilities ne of°31 Decerubier 2004 On 24 Ce 2005, the shareholders approved the transfer of SFr 400,000 fro
Bank overdrafts 13,400 ° vty asa ae 13,400 earnings to the general reserve account.
Deposits from banks 7,565,126 809,922 - 8,375,048 i, A ‘
Customers’ deposits cease
S Denia 7,780,937 wu . 7,780,937 9. Commitments and Contingent Liabilities
rs - Time 3,612,205 254,547 . 3,866,752
- Total 18,971,668 1,064,469 = 20,036,137 (a) Lease
Net liquidity gap 5,501,093 (825,349) 508,500 5,184,244

Effective 1. July 2003, the Bank renewed its lease agreement for the rental of office
space for a further period of three years. For the year ended 31 December 2005 the
rental charge amounted to SFr 37,534 (2004: SFr 36,664). Future minimum rental

(e) Fiduciary risk
payments under the lease total SFr 21,355, all of which is due in 2006.

The Bank provides custody and advisory services to third parties, as well as trustee and
corporate administration services. These activities give rise to fiduciary risk, which is
the risk that the Bank may fail in carrying out certain mandates im accordance with the

_wishes of its clients. To manage this exposure, the Bank generally takes a conservative
approach in its undertakings for customers. Ht aoe ake eo

EEE BA CARES BR I i Rr Aha hp

Computer upgrade and:module commitment * | Ne cae
ROE Br ar b ;



The Bank has entered into a contractual agreement to purchase compute! -
system upgrades and software modules to assist with statistics, risk management, and
consolidation. Future minimum payments under the agreement total SFr 170,500, all -
of which is due in 2006. : !

acaba eae ey

4:. Investments

Investments at fair value through income represent the Bank’s holding of shares in sub-

funds of BASE Investment SICAV (See Note 6). (c) Professional service agreement

Effective 25 March 2003, the Bank entered into an agreement with the Parent Bank
to compensate the Parent Bank for the provision of support and resources for the
Bank to carry out its daily operations. Services provided by the Parent Bank include
‘review of internal control systems and procedures, provision of intemal audit -
services, technology assistance, risk management review and back-office assistance.

Held-to-maturity investments as of the year-end reporting date comprise:
31 December 2005

Nominal Fair Carrying

Value Bonds Maturity Value Value The agreement is automatically renewed at yearly intervals in the absence of written
_ SFr SFr notice of intention not to renew by either party. For the provision of these services
: during 2005, the Parent Bank charged the Bank a fee of SFr 180,000 (2004: SFr
250,000 — Citta di Vienna - 2.5% 12.01.06 250,075 254,525 180,000).
250,000 Oest Kontrollbk — 2.5% 28.05.06 251,375 254,050
250,000 Kingdom of Sweden — 4.5% 18.09.06 255,625 261,250 '
(d) Guarantees
787,075 769,825
Sr a ere EN TT As of 31 December 2005, the Bank was contingently liable to other parties in respect
of guarantees issued on behalf of its customers totalling SFr 7,792,151 (2004: SFr.
31 December 2004 6,704,659). This amount includes guarantees issued in favour of the Parent Bank
; totalling SFr 7,192,151 (2004: SFr 6,104,659). Assets held by the Bank on behalf of
Nominal Fair Carrying _the customers concemed collateralize these guarantees.
Value Bonds Maturity Value Value }
“i SFr SFr (e) Derivative financial instruments
, 250,000 . Deutsche Bank 15.08.05 253,450 253,975 The Bank enters into forward currency contracts solely as part of its client-related
AG / Frankfurt — 3.25% trading activities. Forward currency contracts are contracts to purchase and sell
| ; 250,000 Citta di Vienna — 2.5% 12.01.06 253,750 254,525 foreign currencies at specific rates of exchange on specific dates in the future. Risk
Fane Ge ce ae arises from the potential inability of counterparties to perform under the terms of the
507,200 508.500 contracts (credit risk) and from fluctuations in the foreign exchange rates (market
—= or tisk). The Bank manages the market risk of client-related positions by taking

offsetting positions with the Parent Bank, resulting in minimal market exposure. The
credit risk of client-related positions is managed by applying uniform credit standards
muintained for all activities with credit risk. Collateral held generally includes cash,
cash equivalents, and investment securities.

The fair value of held-to-maturity investments is based on the closing trade price
| established on the last trading day of the reporting period by the exchange on which the
i securities are principally traded.

5. Fixed Assets |
As of the year-end reporting date, the Bank had contractual commitments under open

Furniture Coasts forward currency contracts as follows:
Leasehold and Hardware : ,

Improvements Fixtures & Software Total 2005 2004
aus SFr SFr SFr i SFr C : 3 SFr SFr
Balance as of 31 December 2004 109,335 112,805 ° 651,081 873,221 orca iments fo BurrAse tee.

Additions Die. SMe aeat 1 rae Parent Bank 18,739,848 8,635,348
Balance as of 31 December 2005 .. 111,474 116,526 655,759 883,759 Customers 2B OBA B97.) 18,353,986
Accumulated Depreciation :
Balance as of 3{ December 2004 102,046 99,884 572,722 774,652 aS T024, TAS: <__16,989,338
Depreciation charge 7,7\7 10,276 33,860. 51.853
is 5 ee ce Saree Se Commitments to sell currencies

_ Balance as of 31 December 2005 109,763 110,160 606,582 826,505 Parent Bank 18,944,385 8,353,986
Net Book Vaine Customers 18,076,252 8,631,338
As of 31 December 2005 1,711 6,366 49,177 57,254

= 37,020,637 16,985,3

AS of 31 December 2004 7,289 12,921 78,359 98,569 oot

The contract amounts of these instruments reflect the extent of the Bank's involvement
in forward currency contracts and do not represent the Bank’s risk of loss due to
counterparty non-performance (credit risk). As of 31 December 2005, the Bank’s
exposure to credit risk on forward currency contracts is limited to those contracts with a
positive fair value, which amounted to SFr 235,113 (2004: SFr 281,361).

6. Advisory Fees

The Bank acts as the advisory company to BASE Investments SICAV (BASE) under an
agreement dated 11 July 2001 (revised 15 December 2003), BASE is an investment
company with multiple sub-funds each of which represents a separate pool of assets and
liabilities and each with a distinct policy of investment. Under the terms of the agreement,

10. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

% &

tee ARS TW.

Ripe eae os a ae, er A Oe

ORE RR ra oe Sr: ap sear ge me

ote

BE ae

the Bank is responsible for identifying and making recommendations to BASE on the
investment managers to be selected for the various sub-funds, and for monitoring their
performance. The Bank earns advisory fees at rates ranging between 0.1% and 2.1% of the
ng net asset value of each of the sub-funds and is paid on a quarterly basis. A portion
ad pilett tits earned by the Bank, in the form of management and distribution fees,
ah © investment managers, distributors, and nominees in remuneration for the

oe rendered by them to BASE. For the year ended 31 December 2005, the Bank
camed total advisory fees of approximately SFr 3.8 million (2004: SFr 3.7 million) before
payments to the managers and others, including the Parent Bank.



Financial instruments utilized by the Bank include recorded assets and liabilities, as well as
items that principally involve off-balance sheet risk. It is the Bank’s policy not to take on
material exposure to the effects of fluctuations in prevailing foreign currency exchange
rates on its financial position and cash flows. As the Bank has no significant unmatched
foreign currency positions, change in interest rates is the main cause of changes in the fair
value of the Bank’s financial instruments. The majority of the Bank’s financial instruments
are either short-term in nature or have interest rates that automatically reset to market on &
periodic basis. Accordingly, the estimated fair value is not significantly different from the
carrying value for each major category of the Bank’s recorded assets and liabilities.



PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006





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| MAX-E___ [PRETTY INPINK rence Fishburne, John uate Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta-DERDOG STORY 2004. coe
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| Access ch Deal or No Deal ea eta |Las i “Fidelity, Security, Deliv- ton eae’ respect-|
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ia xx [Six Feet Under “Falling Into Place” | * %% LIVE FROM BAGHDAD (2002; Docudrama) Michael Keaton, He-



Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kkids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of May 2006.

Enjoy Creal Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

ply: t the Best"

mths: #

OKVO
TORIF T

FRERGROARAEE OEr BeUNBaE Bene! RANE RAUEY > CURE CURT Ree reary Bo,





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS © |



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 9B





HOBBES, WE'RE
TRAVELING AT
LIGHT SPEED




IST TIME
FOR SNACKS

Eq







TRAVEL, INTRIGUE, ADVEN- ee
TURE...



I THINK EVERYONE
HAS THAT FANTASY,
DON?T THEY? i





BEING ACCEPTED
BY THE CIA was

‘Y HzeN Oe

TI;
DES

ACTUALLY, CLANCY'S
BOOKS wERE MY ays
INSPIRATON/ ’








CONLD FIN
RIGHT INTO
THE BIG BANG /



LAPSE! WAIT
TILL WE LAND!

| ‘putrs ear,



IN REAL LIFE THERE AR
OFTEN MITIGATING
WORK WAS REAL. HE SAVED CIRCUMSTANCES.
LIVES IN THE DOMINICAN
REPUBLIC.

FACTS
DON'T
ALWAYS
TELL THE
WHOLE STORY,

Meo. “My Mom SAYS T SHOULD ONLY DRINK
f/f. iD

SOMETHING THAT MATCHES THE COLOR
_ OF YOUR CARPET.”





© 2006 by King Features Syndxate, Inc, Work Rights reserved

ARE YOU KIDDING?! I KNOW
EXACTLY WHAT TIME
IT (Ss! -










WHY DO YOU THINK I WAS
m TRYING TO SNEAK IN?!












es

Partnership Harmony

North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

But, as usual with the Italians, the
partnership functioned in perfect har-








FRIDAY,

NORTH mony. '
454 Gray made an inspired decision _ MAY 5. \
Z ¥jI54 when he elected to bid four spades on rye
8 $64 a four-card suit. D’Alelio would | ARTES — Mar 21/Apr 20’ ee ie
5 K76543 |. have made five hearts, and the || Put your best foot forward when you /'
: WEST EAST British pair did exceedingly well to { meet someone for the first time! this
AK 102 #Q)97 find their spade fit at such a high ] week, Aries. This is your only chance ;
'Â¥98 v7 level. to make a good impression, so makejit
#37532 #¢AKQ1098 Avarelli led the jack of hearts, |} count. This is an influential meeting.
MARVIN : eQI #108 and D’Alelio played the ten on it. | TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21::
H EY 7 “I DON'T HAVE SOUTH This was a suit-preference signal in J A financial situation puts you ini the ..
bei we < TO,.T'M IN MY $863 the Italian methods, asking partner to J red for a few days, Taurus,, until ‘;
YOU ve *-™N ¥ cR RIBLE VAKQ10632 shift to the higher ranking of the two | your next paycheck clears. You
YIELD”: T \ ¢— side suits. - must be a bit more careful with your . :
kbAD2 So Avarelli — showing full faith | money for the next week. me Gt
The bidding: and confidence in his’ partner — at
North East South West switched to a diamond. D’Alelio GEMINI 8 een aa
Pass 1¢ 494 44 ruffed, played the ace and another | offers advice, take it. Just because ‘:
5 54¢ Dble club, and Avarelli, after. taking the you're older doesn’t necessarily -

Lo aco ny ner ares Syren, re. Wer ron rnanee
NON SEQUITUR




[_. | FANN, DENA?




WARTS NeoT

BOT PEOPLE WINE |
To we A STUPID
BATAROOM?










QoS TWAT RNORK NAN
QUESTION, DEKR ?

Opening lead — jack of hearts. .

Yesterday, we featured a hand

‘from the Tournament of Champions

where the British East-West pair,

_ Kenneth Konstam and Maurice Har-

rison-Gray (aka ‘“‘Gray”), hada
misunderstanding about a suit-pref-
erence signal and permitted the Ital-
ian pair, Walter Avarelli and Mas--
simo D’Alelio, to make five hearts
doubled. ,
- By a strange coincidence, the Ital-
ian pair on the very next deal also

king, led a second diamond for South
to ruff. As a result, the Italians col-
lected 500. points. ,

The hand points up the value of a

clear partnership understanding in a.
situation where most players at best-

have only a vague arrangement.
Adopting a special convention in
either the bidding or the play’ —
because you think it will pay im the
long run — is not nearly as important
as making sure that you and partner
are on the same page whenever the
situation actually arises..That.is what

make you wiser. Benefit from the .:

experiences of this other person. -

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul.22

Again you must be the center of

attention, Cancer. Unfortunately, ,
those around you are tired of shining
the spotlight solely on you. Give '
-others a chance for a change. *

LEO - Jul 23/Aug23. 0.
It’s hard to avoid a catastrophe at }
work, Leo. Luckily, it’s short-lived. |

Coworkers rally together to pick up

the pieces. You'll have a key role in ;

the reconstruction, .

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22).
That difficult situation at work has; '
blown over, Virgo, leaving you in ‘'

WELL... Not

\F NAAN'R A
FISARAMAN







HOW COME CTBER
ANIMPLS GET To
GO NACREVER

TREN ARE...







had. a suit-preference opportunity. \ makes for a'good partnership.





AUC ARTHUME HET

TIGER













UCOAICS.COP.



a2 J Lie

MAN DIST. BN OBIE RSP PRESS SYNO.











HOW many words of
four letters or more .
can you make from
the letters shown
here? In making a
word, each letter:may















the clear to resume your previous :

duties without distraction. Enjoy the
minor victory.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 °-

A big move is in store for you, Libra. ''

You -have the financial means to
make a change, and ndw’s the time |
to pack up and get going. Expect :
some family resistance.



_—
EE
ope
ge
®
ak
1 V be used once onl = 2 E
. —
MON SAID TO GNE Y HANT-ME- Y You Shoup \I GuESss YOU COWL? HAVE Fach must satan the a5 SCORPIO ~ Oct 24/Nov 22
You THESE THINGS VOWNS GE GRATEFUL / YOU'RE BEEN MY OLVER centre letter and there ae You've finally seen a light at the
| T OUTSREW AGAIN 7 KIGNT SISTER! must be at least one GQ | ond of the tunnel, Scorpio. Kudos
nine-letter word. No ~ BE for the newfound positive attitude.
; plurals or verb forms er Sm e. Apply it to all areas of your life for
: ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no AL 9 maximum benefit.”
A words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The 4% | SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in 2 3 ‘3 You'll receive quite a blow when-a
4 cS Cos 2) Cl inkjet printer). Wn DO family member shares some news
‘ Dior ia Cnt 2 SH f with you that you hadn’t expected.
(Mp S) n ¢.) Safe TODAY'S, TARGET ct Gs | There will be no way to hide your
Dp iJ Good 21; very good 31; excellent 41 (or more). es a ‘s surprise, so grin and bear it.
Solution tomorrow. ; E pes CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20
Pve vee tod me x wes gv There are troubles brewing with a
sisi romantic partner, Capricom. You both
CRYPTI Cc PUZZLE just can’t see eye to eye on anything.
You’re actually questioning whether
: ROPERSEE LS Suu yg zien? you should stay together. -
mcnOSS DOWN ee ro | Ay AQUARIUS - J i
— Jan 21/Feb 18
1 Revolutionary design for a tram (5) "2 Canit protect a beast when trouble ee ae a lee re as sous looking for a night out with '
6 Roaming rider comparatively starts? (6) =. ae pa ih the guys or gals, Aquarius. Make it,
parched (6) 3 Asallor’s behind (6) ff ie a He ee | word happen now, because in a’ few
9 What to call a pie 4 Those in an outworn : paints ae d ONY i weeks you’ll be too busy to spare
en aes CPC) | [ese] RE
10 Got us wrong with relish (5) _ 5 She has both lustre and 17 a Fi iF PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
11 An Informal word with a superior: nv ; a ne peste Wee ee Me cs a Maly, te niGet of 8 uuecane want an
officar (5) = 6 ee 7 take sid a ie Poe 5 : gee M eaear nian |. cutting way to take sides | j a oleae alte. | Fal uh Lo the rim and the this person in a while, and you
. if you get my on court (7) $e ae Ea 95 a hub: of a wheel should make up for lost time.
a a cone
13 Further test of a trailer, possibly (7) 8 — Anoted horse trophy, rE Peay i '
Dee [te Comme oP RONNIE |
bus back (3) 12 Pick up a bag and get past, with : & ie ea eM ieee aaells | ; Cy i CHESS oY Tol aT Tce Barden
17 Breton town? (4) much to say (5) ee
18 Capers around with 13 Respond to a crate ae ae ei Bee hae as se
Gifficulty (6) going astray (5) a ae 5 Yrjo Verho v Ali Krogius, Helsinki
19° To do with a fight (6) 14 Add up to a pound, ae ia me Pea este a sae: TRE meyers Wore UNM:
20 Posh girl in extremes of in sum (5) A and in particular the black player '
cuplaty (6) : ie eee » was no relation to the Soviet
22 Leo being loud? ree a grandmaster Nikolai Krogius, who
10 being loud? (4) 16 Canithelp keep a man a bit warm gave Boris Spassky and Anatoly
24 lenye means of in bed? (5) ACROSS _ Karpov some banal psychological
communication (3) 18 Like a beaming smile (5) 1 Plump (5) Be ai on (6) advice for their world-titie '
25 Displeased when done 19° Confidently told by a fathead being | & Type of nut (5) 3 Novelist (6) matches. Here the Finnish Krogius if
~ any wrong (7) terribly rude (7) + Melee 4 Males (3) looks up against it. White’s 97
26 Maried man somewhat atthe centre | 21 Top parson’ arte Lu 11 Roason () 5 Side pawnisjust one square off a
at ragolus : _i . , 6 Ocean (7) queening, and if Black gives up a
: lon? (5) 22 = To tear around in N 12 Blemish (5) 7 Dash (4) rook for it by Re8 g8Q Rxg8 Rxg8 45
27 Participant in snakes circles (6) N 13 Furniture item (7) Reply (6) then Black's own pawn duo are
and ladders? (5 = 15 Moist (3) eae ily cee is ol
(5) 23 Is such warfare by radio? (6) o. 17 Spoken (4) 12 Painful afflictions (5) easily stopped. Black (to play) é
28 One man's motto (6) 25 Abraham holds us ta 18 Basa two (6) 13 Charred bread (5) found a brilliant answer, a virtually "vice can compete for cash prizes oi
29° What to wear when there's water be rudel (5) pa 19 Keepsake (5) 14 Loaded (5) forced sequence from the diagram and national ranking points at a “
around (3,4) 26 Attwo points, he 2 20 Play sections (6) 15 Biscuit (6) which led to a rare type of convenient venue. For details, call
30. Matk’s new qualification (6 points, ii 22. Yield (4) 16 Wheel checkmate. Can you foresee what Adam Raoof on 020 8202 0982.
1. (Crooked ries tanaet vou) gets axed! (4) 24 Brown (3) covers (5) happened? Golders Green stages a ;
get you into 28 At the centre in 25 Esteems (7) 18 Chews (5) one-day, open-to-all festival on
Sladel (5) semidarkness (3) 26° Contras (5) 19 Withdrew (7) 6) Saturday. Anyone from expert to LEONARD BARDEN
27 Ghost (6) Beer \
SED EE TT ETT 28 Classification (5) 7 rat (6) ESS ITT)
29 Aquatic 23 Subtract (6)
Yesterday's cryptic solutions Yesteraay’s easy solutions bird (7) 25 Sap (5)
ACROSS: 3, Gru-ff 8, Manor 10, Ruler 11,7-On 12, Remus | ACROSS: 3, Flals 8, Right 10, Relay 11, Doo 12, Straw 19, 39 War-horse (6) 26 Manage (4)
iS Stripes 15, Get on 18, Cap 19, Casino 21, Nat-Ural | Cadence 15, Decal 18, Tie 19, Deride 21, Happier 22, 31 Condition (5) 28 Type ot
» O-pal 23, But-E 24, Zeal-ous 26, Cha-fe-d 29, Fry 31, | Utah 23, Here 24, Trainer 26, impure 29, Bar 31, No-one element (3) PU ee EOL UONS



Ageiins Robbery 34, Liver 35, Age 36, Spit 37, Scone
DOWN: 1, Ratty 2, Conical 4, Rues 5, Fru-gal 6, F-use-s 7
Heron 8, Nor 12, Re-pu-ted 14, Pat 16, T-ilus 17, Nol-Ed_
19, Cal-I for 20, Torch 21, Nat-Al 23, Buy back 24, Zenith
25, Orb 27, H-eaps 28, Falls 30, Wrens 32, Real 33, E-go

a pena 34, Carol 35, Tag 36, Dealt 37, Timid 38, ; i
yrle : ‘ “BJELUYIAYO [UY dtp dn yas yyGyuy 0} UOQOWOUd aser me
DOWN: 1, Midas 2, Cheetah 4, Late 5, Trader 6, Sewer 7 " BUL YEW PIN ERY 9 i+NTOXq Zey ae PY p ;
Salad 9 God 12, Sceptre 14, Nip 16, Cider 17, Lever 19 96 ‘ +794
Decibel 20, Cumin 21, Harpo 23, Heretic 24, Treaty 25 TEN € +ZPN O86 Z IE>RY“T ‘90TS UORNIOs say)
Nan 27, Moped 28, Uncle 30, Magic 32, Gobi 33, Rar.







PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006






HB CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas Cricket
Association (BCA)
revealed the names of a 30-
member training
team yesterday.

The team, which
will participate in
the first annual
Stanford 20-20
tournament, will
begin practice
today at the
Haynes Oval
grounds.

The tournament
will take place
between mid-July
and September at
the Stanford Crick-
et Grounds in
Antigua.

The hefty cash
prize will be
played for in the
single elimination
knockout format which has
attracted some 21 teams
from throughout the
Caribbean.

With the first place team
cashing in on $1,000,000,

@ THE TEAM

L Armstrong
G Armstrong
W Atkinson
J Barry

G Blair

V Bennett

S Brathwaite
G Campbell
P Cole

R Coakley

N Ekanayake
M Ford

A Ford

R Ganpat



the second-place team will
receive $500,000.

The man of the match in
every game will receive
$25,000 and the man of the
match in the championship
game will receive $100,000.

E Greene
O James

O Levy

L Melville
D Morrison
A Nash

W Patrick

S Perrera

H Roy

R Tappins
G Taylor Sr
G Taylor Jr
M Taylor .
C Waddell
D Wheatley



The tournament, which is
named after Texas billion-
aire Allen Stanford, is
designed to improve the
sport and increase the
involvement throughout

—

V Rampersad



the Caribbean.

It will also assist in the
development of junior pro-
grammes.

Prior to the final settings
of the tournament’s dates,
each country’s governing
cricket body
received $100,000
which was used for
‘improvement of
facilities, practice
fields and other
cricket equip-
ment. ;

An additional
$10,000 stipend per
month will be giv-
en to assist players
and coaches, and
$5,000 per month
will be distributed
for maintenance
and the facil-
ities.

Also added into
the handsome
package was the
assistance of two
full-time nutritionists and
four professional athletic
trainers who will travel
around the Caribbean ona
regular basis to train the
teams. ,

m@ SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

STEVE MCCLAREN was
hired as the next coach of-Eng-
land’s national soccer coach
team on Thursday and
shrugged off suggestions that
he was far from the first
choice.

, While The Football Associ-
ation dismissed reports it
offered Luiz Felipe Scolari the
job a week ago, McClaren
declared himself the proudest
man in England as he started
preparing to take over from
Sven-Goran Eriksson.on Aug.
1.

“The FA had to pick the
best man for the job and I
believe they have,” he toid
reporters after signing a four-
year contract which takes him
through the 2008 European
Championship and the 2010
World Cup. “That's/all that
matters.”

McClaren only became the
favorite in the recent days fol-
lowing three months of specu-
lation that the FA had been
chasing more prominent can-
didates, a group that was
thought to include Scolari,
Australia and PSV Eindhoven

Kingsway make a fight of it
in the BAISS volleyball final

m@ ABOVE: Kingsway’s co-captain Ashley Newbold dives in for the play.
Wi LEFT: Kingsway’s coach Bill Slater talks to his team during a time out.

coach Guus Hiddink and for-
mer Glasgow Celtic manager
Martin O’Neill.

“TI always felt I was in the
process, and that’s how it
turned out,” McClaren said.

“T’ve been very comfortable

with the process and very com-
fortable, as you can imagine,
with the outcome.” :

FA chief executive Brian
Barwick told skeptical
reporters that McClaren had
been his No. 1 choice all along
and had been the unanimous
selection of the- three-man
search panel and the FA
Board.

Barwick said he met three
times with Scolari.

“There were potential devel-
opments,” he said. “He then
declared he had no interest in
the job. We never offered him
the job. My first choice was
always Steve McClaren. That
might be difficult for people
to get their heads across.”

McClaren, currently Mid-
dlesbrough’s manager, had
been Eriksson’s assistant for
five years. England’s first game
after he takes over is an exhi-
bition against European cham-
pion Greece on Aug. 16.

“This is the biggest honor
that any coach can have, and is

TRIBUNE SPORTS









e SEE SPORTS FRONT.

(Photos: Onan Bridgewater)

obviously the highlight of my
career,” he said. “It’s a mas-
sive challenge and one that I
welcome.”

Eriksson, a Swede who is
the first foreigner to coach.
England, announced this year:
he would leave after the World’
Cup, two years before the end*.
of his contract.

“I’m obviously very pleased
for Steve, but also for the Eng-.
land team,” Eriksson said. “I:
have worked closely with>
Steve ever since I came to”
England and know how good a.
coach he is. He is well-liked:
and well-respected by the play-'
ers and staff.

“T have no doubt that he has:
all the credentials to be very
successful in the job and wish
him all the best.”

McClaren, who also served
as Alex Ferguson’s assistant at
Manchester Ca ie ie

ears, guided Middlesbroug
to AeaE Wednesday's UEFA
Cup final against Sevilla. It’s
the first European final for the
club. 3

“I have hugely enjoyed my
time at Middlesbrough and am
very grateful to the club,”
McClaren said. “However, this
was an opportunity I couldn't
refuse.”

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Saturday
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elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high. and the low for the aay: : 2:56pm. 2.2 8:59p.m.. 0.6
Saturday 220am. 23 38am. 06
—— : Scan ee 3:53 p.m. 2.3 10:00pm. 0.6
Statistics are re for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday ~ Sunday 4:20am. 23 10:26am. 05
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High. ww. ssssseessestsessseeersee BOD F/80° € — 540 73 ;
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Normal figh .o...ecccssscsscssseceeccseesee 88° F/28°-C :
Normal low ..... 70° F/21° C
- Last year’s high 86° F/30° C.



Last year’s low 73° F/23°.C
Precipitation i
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .. 0.00”
Year to date .......
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006



1:19 p.m.

High: 88° F/31°G B : ee : 2
; “O42 am.

~ Low: 63° F/A7°G

Sunrise..>...6:32am. Moonrise ...
Sunset....... 7:42 p.m... Moonset . ‘

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High: 83° F/28° C
Low:70°F/21°C






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Today Saturday : Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
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60/15. 40/4 pc Ad) High: 88° F/32°6
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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY SE TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: W at 5-10 Knots 0-1 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
___ Saturda SSW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
FREEPORT Today: VAR at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
Saturday: __ SW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
ABACD Today: WSW at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
Saturda' SW at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 17°F



Tovay’s U.S

NNN] Showers
f > > j T-storms
[o~3"] Rain
[*_*] Flurties

Snow



FORECAST

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Miami
87/72

__ Fronts
Cold ——~=—

Warm ania
Stationary geil









FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

K.-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

The Wildcats
pay off their
fine in time

gy SOFTBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter





FOUR time defending
champions the Electro
Telecom Wildcats have
paid off their fine
received by the New
Providence Softball Asso-
ciation (NPSA) on Satur-
day night.

According to league
president Steven Coak-
ley, “the team had satis-
fied the association by
paying off the penalty
that was imposed upon
them, before the dead-
line.”

The Wildcats’ team was
the first team in the
league to feel the effects
of the zero-tolerance
rules set in place by the
executive members of the
NPSA on April 20th this
year. These rules were
also agreed upon by all
registered teams.

The Ford brothers,
Mario and Andy, were
also penalised under the |
association’s new rulings.

The Wildcats penalty
came after they opted not
to play in the league’s
opening game against the
DHL Brackettes on Sat-
urday night.

As a result the team
was slapped with a $50
fine, and a blemish on
their win-loss record.

The team was given
until Wednesday to pay
off their debts to the
NPSA or face suspension
from the league for the
remainder of the season.

Coakley said: “The
team have paid off their
fine and we have added
them to the schedule, but
I am not too sure what
at ee going to do when

s their turn to play
again.

“But they were
penalised and they paid
off their fine in full in the
time the association had
requested of them.”

The association and
teams. decided on the
zero-tolerance rules as a
new approach, hoping to
clean-up the atmosphere
around the park, making
the environment more
family oriented.

SPORTS
BRIEF

@ TENNIS

THE Brajaxba Tennis
tournament wili get under-
way this Saturday with a
Rookie Challenge round
robin and junior and senior
round robin tournament.

Rookie matches will start
at liam, junior and. senior
matches are set to start at
Spm.

a a





@ GOLF

THE Bahamas Profes-
sional Golfers Association
is all set for its upcoming
annual general meeting and
election of officers, May
20th at the Cable Beach
Golf Club, 6pm.

There will be an 18-hole
shootout prior to the AGM
meeting starting at 12 noon.
All professional golfers are
invited to participate. Entry
fees are set at $50.00 for
financial members and $200
for non-financial members.

Cash prizes will be award-
ed in the regular and senior
categories.

straight

@ VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE road to the senior
girls championships in th

Bahamas Association of

Independent Secondary
Schools (BAISS) wasn’t an
easy one for the Kingsway
Saints and their meeting with
the defending champions
wasn’t any different.

Behind the. thunderous
spikes of Camilla Miller, the
St Augustines Big Red
Machines were able to ride
their way to a fourth straight
title, defeating the Saints 25-
14 and 25-19.

When the Saints took to
the court, they were hoping
that the momentum that got
them into the championship
round would spill over in the
game, but Miller and the
Big Red Machines had a

i

}



MIAMI HERALD SP

@ SAC’S Krystal Christie and Kingsway’s Ashley Newbold go head to head yesterday.



Defending champs

defeat Kingsway



different plan.

Although they were domi-
nating the league, finishing
up with a perfect win-foss
record which led to the pen-
nant crown, their spiking
game wasn’t at the level they
wanted it to be. But Miller
changed all that yesterday.

Playing in her last cham-
pionship game for the school,
Miller was hitting from all
areas off the court.

With no blocks contesting
her hits, Miller continuously
gave her team the edge in
the first set.

She said: “It feels great to

win the title once again, this ~

is my last year and T wanted
to go out with a bang. I got
the hits but I didn’t hit the
way I really wanted to, my
timing was off a little.

“But overall we played
great as a team, the first set
we came out firing, they
weren’t able to stop us, but
in the second set we played
around and they came back
on us, ;

“T wasn’t too worried when
this happened though, I
knew we were a better team
than them so that helped to
make our job easier.”





The Saints tried to clean-
up on the errors made in the
first set quickly in the sec-
ond set, but the tough Big
Red Machines would not
break.

With victory in sight, the
Big Red Machines head
coach Anastacia Sands
looked to her bench to finish
off the game, leaving Miller,
Terese Clarke and Krystal
Christie to help out when
needed.

But her strategy didn’t go |

as planned as the Saints took
full advantage of the substi-
tutions made.

The team rallied back from
nine points to tie the score
at 18-all, forcing the Big Red
Machines to call a time out.

Although the Big Red
Machines were still not play-
ing-at full strength, they were
able to dig deep, pulling
away from the Saints.



(Photo: Onan Bridgewater)

SAC cruise to fourth

title

Saints head, coach Bill
Slater said: “It was really
good game, the girls worked
a all season, we came and

e beat NCA so that give-us
a ante more confidence
heading into this game:. It
feels great to make it to the
championships.

“We came out flat in ‘the
first set thinking that-we
could bounce back but: we

never did.
“There was no momentum

in that set, so I tried: “bo
rally the troops for the next
swe got the momentuin
we were looking for but it
just wasn’t enough. This will
bé a great team next year,
only a few of the girls are
leaving.

“Next year we will; tie
back and hopefully bettér

our performance in tite
finals.”

ee



Full Text









BUSINESS. —







Firing thre

BUT members who
attended ‘illegal’
meeting will lose
jobs or have pay cut

& By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT has
announced that it will either be
firing or cutting the pay of all

members of the Bahamas -

Union of Teachers who attend-
ed an “illegal” meeting yester-
day. morning.

Between 350 to 400 teachers
attended the BUT’s meeting
yesterday, which its executives
claim was merely a normal gen-
eral meeting.

However, Minister of Educa-
tion Alfred Sears said the meet-
ing disrupted the regularly
scheduled ‘negotiating meeting
between government and the
BUT.

_. As such, he said, this “rude”
interruption cannot be over-
looked.

“Having tolerated miscon-
duct on a number of occasions,
{ will tell you.now that there
will be consequences,” Mr Sears
warned. -

With him, Minister of For-

eign Affairs and the Public Ser-

vice Fred Mitchell echoed these .

comments, stating that for too
‘long such actions have been
allowed to go unhindered.

Mr Sears stated: “I hereby

call on the BUT to cease and.

desist from any further illegal
disruption of the educational
system and to negotiate in a
constructive and reasonable
manner as required by law and
which the government under-
takes to do as well.

“The government has at all
times acted in a reasonable and
constructive manner and in a


























FT. LAUDERDALE ADDRESS
Betsy Rodriquez
St. Johns Shipping
Ware House #4
1800 S.E. 19th Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
Phone: 1 (954) 527-0034
Fax; 1 (954) 522-4828

spirit of compromise, to negoti-
ate an industrial agreement.
The government will not be
intimidated by any illegal acts
by any group or individual and
expects that all employees,
especially educators, to pursue
their interests in a lawful man-
ner,” he said.

Noting that an. “obvious
problem” can be expected with-
in the weeks to come, the Min-
istry of Education has
announced that it has created
a contingency plan for the pos-
sible interruption of school.

Realising that 12th graders
are expected to write BGCSE
exams within the coming weeks,
the ministry said that if.a strike
were tooccur, officers from the
Department of Education will
be in the schools to help invigi-
late the exams.

Noting this,

come to those who “aban-
doned” their posts and that

‘their punishment will be in

accordance with the regulations
of the Public Service.

Mr Sears also said that gov-
ernment has been “
lenient” by allowing the BUT
to represent both teachers and
principals under their collective
bargaining agreement.

However,‘ the BUT has hailed
this recognition as one of their
major victories after the Indus-
trial Tribunal ruled in their
favour allowing them to repre-
sent both principals and teach-
ers as they have been doing
since 1965.

SEE page 12

NASSAU /
Tel: (242) 393-2628
Fax: (242) 394-0847 .

FREEPORT _.
Tel: (242) 351-1501

MIAMI ADDRESS

Laser Freight International
3218 N.W. North River Drive
4 i A

Mr Sears.
promised that swift action will-

quite‘

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



fuelling station
(Photo by J oe Huterre uy)

‘mi By PAUL

TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A WORKER from
Caribbean Recycling is lucky
to be alive after a fire erupt-
ed around him while work-
ing off Joe Farrington Road
yesterday.

It is reported that the
working area was saturated
with “some flammable liq-
uid” when spar ks ignited the
substance causing the
immense fire that thr eatened
a nearby Texaco fueling sta-
tion. ,

- However, workers in the
area complained that the fire,
which had only been 15 to 18
feet wide when it started,
grew much larger because of
the Fire Department’s slow
response.

Billows of black smoke |

enveloped the area, and a
number of metal cutting
machines were consumed by

SEE page two

al for 40

gins erupts off ine errsntenn Reet

Andros set for
new subdivision,
world-class
sports project

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE ISLAND of Andros is set
for a revitalisation with the con-
struction of anew housing subdi-
vision and a world-class sports
project.

Minister of Financial Services
and Investment, and MP for
North Andros, Vincent Peet yes-
terday said that these projects
will be “a major infusion into the

economy and a catalyst for :.

growth for the island.”
Government officials have
signed contracts for a 50-acre
housing subdivision and the
resurfacing of the North Andros
High School track.
“We are building over 90

‘SEE page 12





“4



Haitian Ambassador: justice will
be served concerning alleged
Detention Centre incident

By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter _

HAITIAN Ambassador
Louis Joseph said he is cer-
tain justice will be served con-
cerning the recent incident at
the Detention Centre involv-
ing an alleged abuse of a
Haitian national.

In an interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Mr Joseph
said that a diplomatic note
from the Haitian Embassy i is
being sent to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs to report. the
incident.

- An BpEOR reportedly

SEE page 14

>

Coroner's inquest: lawyer claims client’s
constitutional rights being ‘infringed’

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE

A LAWYER'S claim yesterday that his client's constitu-
tional rights ‘were being "infringed" threatened to put an
immediate end to the Coroners inquest into the January 17
prison break that led to the death of inmate Neil Brown and

Corporal Dion Bowles.

Dion Smith, lawyer for prison officer Sandy Mackey, sub-

SEE page 14





i
Â¥
j
{

‘
;



Sua eee
PAGE 2, Fi






FROM page one

the fire which continued to
grow, threatening the nearby
Texaco station that stood only a
few feet away.

According to one eyewitness,
it took firefighters more than
45 minutes to respond to the
blaze that could be seen from
the Atlantis resort on Paradise
Island,

One concerned resident told
The Tribune that his greatest

a

WIAY 5, 2006

- fear was the possible igniting of

the gas station’s fuel tanks,

“Tf those tanks would have
blown, they would have
destroyed all the buildings in
this area, including my home,”
he said,

Luckily the blaze was con-
tained before any further loss
of property,

Police press liaison inspector

~ WIN one of 24 Frescata Picnics for up to 12 friends!

Drawings will be held each week for (4) weeks. Tune in to 100
JAMZ and JOY F.M radio stations for details.



10%



Blaze off Joe Farrington Road

© what tastes right’

LOCAL NEWS

Walter Evans said that the blaze
was contained to the recycling
plant and that based on the time
that the department was alerted .
to the fire, their response time
was as quick as possible.

Mr Evans said he could not
quote the exact time, but three
units, were at the blaze
within 10 minutes of the initial
call,



(Phato: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)

- THICK black smoke from the fire is seen

across New Providence yesterday.
















;
i
;

COOKIES FOR CANC
For every McDonald’s Cookie you purchase during un

the month of May 2006, McDonald’s will makea sf
donation to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE -:-



In brief ©

NT Vee ee eee eens
Peavaerererepesneveverertege © 8 88



Â¥

Griffin calls ee nf
anyone with —
knowledge Of: e
child abuse to
speak out»

MINISTER of Socia
Services and Communit
Development Melanie
Griffin has called for any- \
one with knowledge of \i
child abuse to speak out.

Minister Griffin’s
appeal came during a Par-
ents Teacher Association
meeting at Our Lady’s
Catholic Church on id
Young Street. thE

In 2005, 534 cases of
child abuse were investi- -.: 3!

en









- gated by the Department.

of Social Services. Wo

Of this number, 247.
were cases of neglect;163 °° +
involved physical abuse; - |
64 were cases of sexual .~ “
abuse and 43 were incest- ©
related.

“These despicable acts . ~
that are particularly com- ©
mitted by persons who
supposedly love, nurture, ,
care and protect our chil- ._-,
dren are heart wrenching.
and should not be.experi- =...
enced by our children,” yor
Mrs Griffin said. iadt

“Incidents of abuse {
must be reported in order ©
for action to be takento ©
protect the child, sate

“Experience has shown °.''
that abuse is a cycle which '.*
if left unbroken, will pro- i
long,” the minister said. ‘°”

She said that persons
who have knowledge of . -<#
child abuse but fail to ar
report it are breaking the | «
law. 5

Mrs Griffin also advised | 7;
parents not to allow chil- :
dren to spend time in Ey
parks, parking lots, school‘
yards or places that may .
be deserted after hours. i

“Teach your children to.“
scream loudly and run
away if anyone triesto |,
take them or touch them |
in anyway that makes '
them uncomfortable,” she ~.
added. “4

a

Cy



The Tribune wants
to hear from people
who are making
news in their
neighbourhoods. |
Perhaps you are
raising funds for a
good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your
story.



2 eae a
CR
aAAG an |
Tropical Exterminators
322-2107 a





HO 4 O.5
bt de te ay & 2

ty be ae he



Pm tovin’ it

bse et
é

é


In brief —

Toddler’s
parents
renew
criticism

THE parents of a toddler
who died on Paradise Island are
repeating their criticism of
Bahamian authorities as two
' London police detectives pre-
' pare to revisit the case.

According to the website

www.thisislocallondon.co.uk,
while they welcomed news of
‘the officers’ involvement,
Andrea and Paul Gallagher face
a “tense wait” while the offi-
cers get set to travel to the
Bahamas.

The report said the Gal-
laghers are “concerned and anx-



ious” because they will not meet

the officers before they leave.
Mr Gallagher, 41, was quoted
in the report as saying: “I think
it is crucial they meet the family
because there are so many peo-
ple involved at so many levels.
“They need to know what
they are going to face over there.
“Ever since Paul died all we
have had from the Bahamian
authorities is a lack of co-oper-
ation and missing evidence,” Mr
Gallagher said. °
“I have serious reservations
crucial information will be with-
held and we just want to meet
them so they are aware of what
they are up against.”
Two-year-old Paul Gallagher
was killed in 2002 after being
struck by a speedboat on Cab-
bage Beach. The Bahamian
Coroner’s Court held an inquiry
‘into the death and ruled that it
was an accident.

Baha Mar
inundated
by artists’
responses

BAHA Matr’s panel of judges

has a difficult job on their hands 3 :

after the company’s “call to”
artists” received an over-
whelming response.

When the competition closed —
Mar 22, some 70 artists submit-
ted a total of 268 images.

Baha Mar Development
Company announced the com-
petition a few weeks ago with a
commitment to purchase and
showcase the winning pieces.

The resort said the effort 8
part of its pledge to create “
authentic Bahamian abe:
metropolis” on,Cable Beach.

The winning artwork will to
adorn the walls at the Sheraton
Cable Beach Hotel, which will
be the name of the redeveloped
Radisson Cable Beach Resort.

Vice-president of administra-
tion and external affairs Robert

Sands said, “Bahamians are

very talented artists and we
expected that the response
would be great. We are
impressed with the quality of
the work we have seen, which

has made the job of the judges a |

bit harder.”

The judges are now in the
process of reviewing the art-
work to choose a first, second
and third place winner, as well
as three “honourable men-
tions,” who will receive portions
of the $10,000 total prize.

Rival cell
phone
service in
Haiti

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

MOBILE telephone provider
Digicel began offering service
Wednesday in Haiti, providing a
rare infusion of foreign invest-
ment to the Western Hemi-
sphere's poorest country,
according to Associated Press.

The launch followed a splashy
marketing campaign in which
Digicel promised cheaper calling
rates, a reliable network and
free phones to anyone who can-
celed service with Haiti's top
mobile provider, Comcel.

"For too long the people of
Haiti have had to put up with a
terrible service, bad networks,
high prices and total unreliabil-
ity if you pick up the phone to
make a call," said billionaire
Irish entrepreneur Denis
O'Brien, Digicel's chairman and
founder. "From today, we see a
new beginning in Haiti."

la Ae
Uae

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
: batt asics 7 2 dar LY



@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

LACK of proper parenting is
causing major problems in youth
development in the Bahamas,
Minister of Sports, Youth and
Culture, Neville Wisdom said yes-
terday.

Addressing the media during
the announcement of May as
National Youth Month, Mr Wis-
dom said that his ministry is com-
mitted to addressing the problem
of inadequate parenting in the
country.

“What we are finding is that
while we have consequences for
the actions of young people, there
seem to be very little if any con-
sequences for the non- -activities
or the actions of parents who are
adults,” he said.

Mr Wisdom said that his min-
istry this year will focus “some
major attention” to the question
of parenting.

“We want to encourage a phi-
losophy of responsibility,” he said.

The minister encouraged
churches and the various youth

organisations to support him in -

this endeavour.

He added that recent statistics
have indicated that 45 per cent of
young Bahamians are not

Wisdom
problem o f

involved in any youth organisa-
tions, and that 55 per cent do not
attend church.

To address some of the prob-
lems afflicting the country’s youth,
the ministry has established the
National Youth Crisis Youth
Committee.

Speaking at yesterday’s press
conference, Rev Diana Francis
said that the newly-formed’ com-
mittee will undertake several ini-
tiatives to “curtail the negative
vices relative to youth.”

A national youth survey, a
national youth leadership train-
ing programme, as well as keeping
the media alert of the commit-
tee’s developments and findings,
are among the planned initiatives,
Rev Francis said.

Coinciding with this year’s
National Youth Month — under
the theme “empowering youth in.
the eradication of crime, poverty
and HIV/AIDS” — the 6th Com-
monwealth Youth Ministers Con-
ference will also be held in Nassau
from May 22-29 at the Radisson
Cable Beach resort.

In addition to Commonwealth
ministers discussing the issues of
crime, poverty and HIV/AIDS,
young people from all attending
countries will also have parallel
meetings.

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 3







address
parenting







B REV Diana Francis speaks to the press yesterday about National Youth Crisis committee. . -:
To her left is Minister of Sports, Youth and Culture Neville Wisdom mae

ree Felipé Major/T ribune staff)

eer rrery rer eer er rer errr errr errr yerrrsrererrerereer reser rr reerr errr rr errr reer tree rrr rrr rr errr rere error eer erererrerrrr rrr rr rer rer rere reer etre rer rrr eereerererer reir reer terrier rete eerie eee te rire eee

Light goes out ii

By NATARIO MCKENZIE

PRISON surveillance
footage shows that the lights
suddenly went out on cell
block C and two men ran
across the corridor moments
after officer Dion Bowles is
seen handing an object toa
prisoner.

The Coroner’s Court jury.

saw this and much more yes-
terday, during an extended

screening of the footage of

Ys
technical difficulties limited
viewing of the footage.

The video showed that at

2.06am Sgt Steven Sands,
who had a warrant issued for
his arrest yesterday when he
failed to show up to court,
conducted. an apparent
inspection alone.

Mr Sands can be seen
going to Corey Hepburn's
cell, where he stood for sev-
eral seconds and appeared to
be conversing with the
inmate, according to prison
surveillance officer Travis
Bowe. .

Officer Bowe, who pre-
sented the screening, said
that it was not.clear whether

Sands passed anything to the

inmate.

He also noted that it
appeared as though officer
Sands stopped at no other
cell.

As it was reported previ-
ously, while corporal Bowles
attempted to leave the C
block at 4.11am, he handed
an item to an inmate whose

: cell was located at the far end

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of the block.

There was no camera posi-
tioned at any other angle of that
block, other than the one which
focused on cells C 16 to C25.

Prison surveillance footage

shows that officer Bowles :

returned to the block by himself
at 4.10 that morning and went
directly to. the rear of the block
where Corey Hepburn's cell
was located.

According to officer Bowe,
-Bowles then stopped at cell C
and. appeared to speak with
theinmate inside foradew seg:

> -onds.~

It apouired from the foptake
as though while Bowles was
attempting to leave, he was



called by the inmate in what

appeared to be cell C 16 -.

Corey Hepburn's cell.

Bowles seemed to have been
beckoned by the inmate to
retrieve an item that was on the
ground near the door of the cell
directly opposite Hepburn's.

Bowles is seen stooping to
pick up an object and seemed to
pass it to an inmate on his way
back out of the corridor, just
before the lights went out.

. Just after this, two figures
could be seen running across
sthe corridor. One individual

_apparently had on a pair of

short dark trousers and the oth-
er had on long, dark trousers
and a dark jacket. -





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The person in the short
trousers seemed to be waiting
hesitantly in the corridor, while
something:appeared to be hap-

' pening in the shadows, though it

could not be picked up by the
camera.
Several seconds afterwards,

an individual with what the

Coroner noted as a “peculiar”
stride, could be seen walking
out of the shadows dressed in
long, dark trousers and what
appeared to be a long dark jack-’
et.

Surveillance footage also
shows that at 2.14am, the
inmate in cell C 21 passed an
item which looked as though it
was wrapped in a white cloth

,from cell. C 17 to,¢
-Hepburn's cell. ~



to an inmate in cell C 18. at

”

It was noted by the Coroner
that this exchange took placé-">+ -
between inmates Robert Green, es
and Wesley Guist. nn,

Officer Bowe also noted dur- °
ing the viewing that at 3.30am, °.*
there was an inspection by Prin-
cipal Officer Rolle and Sgt ,.
Sands.” ns 5% 7

Mr Rolle had the flashlight >”
and checked cells C 24to C15, »
which were on the cell block+/.-7
officer Bowe explained. =... ,

At 3.48 an item was passed







The inquest was adjourned ny
to next Tuesday. ye

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTER TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERRA MAGISTRI

Af Ms

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of Né MMasier

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

_ EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor I 972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Freedom of Information Act needed

A FREEDOM of Information Act is way
overdue in this country. For a government
that campaigned on the principle of trans-
parency, the Christie government is daily
becoming more opaque.

Bahamians are pressing The Tribune for
more investigative reporting — it is felt that
only half the story is being told in this country.
We disagree. The truth is that in certain areas
only a quarter of the story is being told. How-
ever, until the Bahamas enacts a Freedom of
Information Act, the Bahamian ‘people will
always be halfinformed. -

The Tribune does its best, but if the public
only knew how hard it is to squeeze informa-
tion out of certain quarters, they would cred-
it our staff with doing an outstanding job.

For example, something as simple as a pile
of sand that suddenly appeared one day on the
Montagu foreshore, squeezed between two
houses just west of Dick’s Point, has grown
into a closed-mouthed mystery. Dredging was
also going on, and obviously whoever was
responsible for both the dredging and the
mountain of sand was hiding nothing, indi-
cating that he had permission from someone in
authority to do what he was doing. When res-
idents in the area complained and The Tribune
started probing, the dredging stopped, work-
men disappeared, but the mound of sand
remains waiting for the first hurricane to
smother neighbouring properties.

Someone must have applied for.a licence to

proceed with whatever plans the developer.

had in mind, and someone in authority must
have issued a permit for the work to be carried
out. But when Tribune reporters tried to get
information about what was going on, who
issued the permits, who’ eventiially’ stopped
the work,‘and a date for the removal of the
sand, they ran into a blank wall. And on that
wall sat three monkeys. Their names were:
Sees Nothing, Speaks Nothing and Hears
Nothing. And so, thanks to the silence of the
monkeys, The Tribune has nothing to report.
But the sand is still there.

Residents in the area believe The Tribune
has let them down. To them we say: Support
us in what is now going to be a fight for a

Freedom of Information Act. The people have |

a right to know. At his mini-rally this week
Prime Minister Christie reminded his ministers
that the people were their masters and that
they were the people’s servants. Parliamen-
tarians should not forget this. .

We can recall many instances of the
“closed-mouth-catch-no flies” attitude among
civil servants who former prime minister Ingra-
ham ordered to be open with the press when
his party became the government in 1992.
After 10 years of openness, we are slipping
back to the Pindling era, a time when “no
comment” was the reflex response by civil
servants to Tribune reporters even before a
question was asked.

ECC ur SIU Marat ed ¢ oe ie

MONTROSE Nis

ten = Rape Ve eee

\
It’s a dangerous attitude when a govern-
ment information officer thinks that a treaty
between governments might not be for public
consumption. However, that was the answer a
Tribune reporter received when he asked a
government information officer for the
Bahamas-Cuba agreement, which was the crux
of the matter in the recent detention of the
Cuban dentists. The Tribune got the agree-
ment, but not from the Bahamas government.
Only this week The Tribune faced the same
blank wall when it asked questions on behalf
of the public about the awarding of contracts
by the Ministry of Housing.

This is public information. Why the secre-
cy? We have been told that “an unusually
large proportion of government housing pro-
jects has been awarded to a preferred group of
contractors.” True or false?

We remember the days — in the UBP era
— when The Tribune published such infor-
mation on a regular basis. It was as regular as
the timetable that we used to publish on the
sailing of the mailboats and the produce com-
ing into the Produce Exchange.

But today, oh no, the hatches have been
nailed down. Today, if we want these records
we have to put our requests in writing. And
then that request has to be cleared by the
Minister or his Permanent Secretary.

Our reporters are complaining that they
find themselves writing more requests to var-

ious departments for permission to get infor- -

mation than they are now writing news for
our readers. This undoubtedly is an exagger-
ation, but they are trying to emphasise a seri-
ous problem in news gathering.

All contracts awarded by the Housing'Min-
istry come*before the tenders board; and'the
names of those tendering are a matter of pub-
lic record. However, there are some contracts,
which because they fall below the maximum
level do not have to go to the tenders board. It
is alleged that some large contracts, which
because of their value would have to go to
the board, are being broken up to get them
under the line. Members of the public are
claiming favouritism in the department. As
their tax money pays these contractors they
are entitled to know.

Montagu MP Brent Symonette, who heads
the Public Accounts Committee, said he also
has asked for a list of all persons who have
received contracts to build low cost homes.

“For four years, in Parliament, I have asked
for that information, and they have not
answered me yet,” said Mr Symonette.

We recall that when in Opposition, Minister
Bradley Roberts, who was then on the Public
Accounts Committée, asked for the school
building contracts under the FNM. They were
made. available.

If the FNM could do it, what’s wrong with
the PLP?

Is there in fact something to hide?



In praise of
the new PLP’s
performance

EDITOR, The Tribune

WE don’t hear much talk
about it, but never in our coun-
try’s developing history have
we had so many investment
projects announced and getting
off the ground, as we have had
and are having under this
Christie-led Government.

Atlantis Phase Three, Exu-
ma, Eleuthera, Cat Island, Aba-
co, Rum Cay, Athol Island,

Cable Beach, Mayaguana, °°

Bimini and many of the Exu-
ma and Abaco Cays; plus the
biggest of them all, the massive
$3.7 billion Ginn project which
promises to transform West
End and West Grand Bahama
into a metropolis: It is interest-
ing to note that, instead of talk-
ing about no investment we are,
nowadays, talking about too
much investment — too fast; we
are focusing now on the fear
that we are getting too far
ahead of our people, which
could be a problem — but a
somewhat, good problem. |
On Darold Miller’s show a
few weeks ago, Rodney Moncur
opined that it might be that we
are approving too many invest-
ment projects and that his

_advice to the Government

would be to slow down. I under-
stood what he was saying how-
ever, it is a “be damned if I do;
be damned if I don’t” situation
that the Government finds itself
in: and, quite frankly, it is a
good “be damned if I do; be
damned if I don’t” dilemma.
For years, Bahamians have
been wanting to see substantial
investments come to the Fami-

ly Islands, including those very’

“remote ‘Fainily Islands; and‘now""'
Pérry Chiistie is‘delivering the
_ under the sun”. Prime Minister

goods — big time.

I personally was a little appre-
hensive about the Governmen-
t’s decision to pursue an anchor
property for each of the islands

— what they could, potentially, .

do to the islands — when the
idea was first touted: that the
culture shock would have been
too much for most of the island
peoples,
changed my mind and now con-
gratulate the Prime Minister for
this visionary approach to the
development of our Family
Islands. While I am in this com-
plimentary mood, I would like
to commend the Prime Minister
on another brilliant first for him,

cand that is‘the Urban Renewal

Programme which is designed
specifically to rescue our inner

city neighbourhoods and the.

people living in them.

We are already reaping great
rewards from this innovative
programme which has earned



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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




international praise in the
region and has so impressed
regional law enforcement and
social agencies that a number
of them have decided to adopt
the programme to their own cir-
cumstances.

‘It is interesting to note that
we are doing so very well on all
fronts that Hubert Ingraham
and his hand-picked deputy
from Montagu are hard pressed
to find anything of credibility
and substance to bring to public
debate. Their efforts so far have
been the trite, hollow and inef-
fective posturing of men clutch-
ing at straws. Their actions to
date remind us of the section in
the English novel entitled ‘Silas
Marner’ where the author,
Mary Ann Evans (George
Eliot,1819-1880) offers this pen-
etrating observation...“A man
falling into dark waters, seeks a
-momentary footing even on
sliding stones...”

‘The state of the FNM’s
befuddlement continues to
grow, since the squalid leader-
ship displays leading up to the
disgraceful scams involved in
the ill-fated leadership conven-
tion earlier this year. The FNM,
to the alarm of their monied
backers among the aging rem-
nants of the vanquished UBP,
shows no sign of recovery in
their present political convales-
cence and disarray.

Mr Ingraham, and his ill cho-

‘sen lieutenant from Montagu,

must understand this well: that
“there is a'time for everything

Perry Gladstone Christie has
been emplaced by He who
emplacés and displaces govern-
ments and leaders of govern-
ments. The evidence, since he
became Prime Minister, shows
that he is where he is, by design,
for such a time as this.

The alliance which he has
enacted with others in the com-
munity with like minds, has
strengthened his hand; and the
blessings which have come to
our country are but an indica-
tion of what we can expect if

we continue to honour God, in
all our doings. :

This is Perry Christie’s time,
so it is with Portia Simpson
Miller elsewhere, so long as they
walk before the Lord, so will
they and their people be blessed.
You have had your time, Mr
Ingraham, and. you made cer-
tain promises which you con-
veyed to the country at large
but have not kept. The country
cannot now countenance your
misplaced and insufferable ego.
I perceive, above all, that the
Lord is not with thee, sir. Stop
your renewed quest for power
because the “writing on the
wall” says you will not succeed.
Should you persist you will be
badly defeated. Repent and ask
to be forgiven and with peni-
tence and time, may come peace
in your party.

What is happening in our
country is the Lord’s doing and
until you, your Deputy, and oth-
ers of like ilk realise and accept
that, so will continue your polit-
ical travail.

' In the meantime, so long as
Perry Christie and those called
to: assist him, continue under
the new dispensation, so shall
our country reap the rewards
of ever greater blessings and
manifold prosperity under God..

Mr Ingraham, your-errors
pre-date the general election of
2002, but history shows that you
have not yet learned from those
errors which led to your explo-
sive defeat at the polls.

The new dispensation, which |
that defeat set in motion, is now
so effective and impressive in”
its results that no power born
of the devil can stay it, on its
present path of Christianity
empowerment, blessings and
prosperity under the Almighty.

The Bahamian: people are
greatly pleased with the changes
which have flowed from the
political change of 2002 and they
are not about to tamper with
what they consider to have been
a refreshing and a healthy adjust-
ment in the political directorate.
Man Propeses.- — God ais:
poses.

FORRESTER
CARROLL

Freeport, Grand Bahama
April 29 2006

An alternative prayer

EDITOR, The Tribune —

WITH regard to the ban-
ning of the critically acclaimed
movie “Brokeback Mountain”
I offer up this sincere prayer:

Dear God, please save us from
the Christian Council.

GREGORY LOWE
Nassau
April 4 2006



“He who angers —
you controls you”

SUNDAY SERVICES

7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am

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Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE:5



Experts urge Bahamians to press

for freedom of information act



In brief

Free lecture
at gallery

on cultural
development

A FREE public lecture and
workshop on cultural develop-
ment will be held at the Nation-
al Art Gallery of the Bahamas
on Monday, May 8 at 7pm.
The event will take the form
of a series of short lectures and
discussions on how the arts and
business communities in the
Bahamas can promote and
manage creativity and leader-
ship.
“Creativity is the key ihgre-
dient to success in artistic and
commercial ventures,” said the
organisers in a press release.
“However, it is only recently
that systematic thought has
béen given to identifying, train-
ing and nurturing the next gen-
eration of cultural leaders.”
Speakers at the event will be:
e Viv Tyler from UK Busi-
“ness in the Arts North West

e Michael Diggiss, MDR

e Venu Dhupa from the UK
‘National Endowment for Sci-
ence, Technology and the Arts
(NESTA) °

e Dr Nicolette Bethel, Direc-
tor of Culture

e Steve Miller from Norton

Priory Museum, UK

- © In the chair: Dr Daniel
Glaser, co-author of the
Bahamas National Cultural Pol-

‘icy

Cricket boosts
‘Barbados
economy by
‘4.4 per cent.

@ BARBADOS
Bridgetown

BARBADOS reported 4.4
per cent economic growth in the
first quarter of the year, boost-
ed partly by the construction
boom for the 2007 cricket
World Cup, a banking official

» said, according to Associated
? Press.
The result — aided by an
- 15,000 seat expansion to the
- cricket stadium and a surge in
tourism —, marked the
. Caribbean island’s seventh con-
' secutive quarter of gross domes-
‘tic product growth above 3 per
; cent, said Central Bank Gover-
-nor Marion Williams.
Unemployment remained
-low on the former British
colony, while inflation showed
signs of evening out, Williams
said. Exports of goods and net
services receipts saw a modest
increase, while import growth
slowed. 4 re.

For the fiscal year ending

' -March 2006, the budget deficit

was estimated at US$65.8 mil-
lion or 2.1 per cent of GDP,
compared to US$71.6 million
or 2.5 per cent of GDP in the
previous fiscal year, Williams
said.

Barbados, home to about
: 280,000 people, is located in the

-eastern Caribbean.

RRR ha) tng

FRI., MAY 5

Bahamas @ Sunrise - live

Immediate Response

ZNS News Update - live

Immediate Response

A Special Report

A Cultural Corner

» Legends: Whence We -

Came Dr. Keva Bethel

International Fellowship of

Christian & Jews

Lobias Murray

Lisa Knight & The Round

Table

Cybernet

ZNS News Update

Fun Farm

411 ;

Caribbean Passport

News Night 13

Bahamas Tonight

Da’ Down Home Show:

70th Anniversary of Radio

Special

The Envy Life

Caribbean Newsline

News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

Immediate Response
Community Pg./1540AM







































SAT. MAY 6
6:30 cone Page
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

10:00 eeesey

10:30 Dennis The Menace

11:00 Tennessee Tuxedo & His
Tales

11:30 cane San ee

12:00

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!



@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
- Chief Reporter

THE citizens of the
Bahamas must be encouraged
to get involved in the push for
a Freedom of Information
Act, two international experts
told reporters yesterday.

George Papagiannis, direc-
tor of programme develop-
ment and support for
Internews Network and Lucy
Dalglish, executive director
of the Reporters Committee
for Freedom of the Press
addressed journalists during a
teleconference yesterday at
the US Embassy on World
Press Freedom Day.

“We sometimes think of
FOIA (Freedom of Informa-
tion Act) as a part of the
news business’ agenda. It is
something that journalists



@ LEFT to right: Michael Taylor, Embassy spokesman; Dr
Brent Hardt, Deputy Chief of Mission; Rupert Missick, Tribune
chief reporter; Quincy Parker, Bahamas Journal reporter; and
Mindell Small, Nassau Guardian reporter, during a video

confrence call

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/ Tribune staff)

have to have. But we are not
the only constituent. In fact the
real constituent of a FOIA is
the community that you serve,”
Mz Papagiannis said.

For any democracy to be
strong, Mr Papagiannis said,
people need to have access to
information and governments
need to be transparent.

“The real constituents here
are the people of the Bahamas.
They have to understand that
this is something that it is impor-
tant to them and it is about good
governance,” he said.

He cautioned that the press
must engage the public in the
discussion.

“You don’t want to look like
the gladiators in the ring. This is
not sport. People need to have a
vested interest and I think it is
the role of the media to point
out to people that there is a
vested interest in how these bat-
tles unfold,” he said.

Ms Dalglish said one of the
countries that has recently
adopted a freedom of informa-
tion act is Mexico. The act is
only a couple of years old but it

sescecaececdececcnccccennacencecenceceesecesensecenseseseereneesentenneseeseeneeeaneseensesereeseseeseneeeeneessaneeeceeeneeee nen esseeeesseeenseananen eases esses esses eases saseasssasseseeerseesessenne

Burt Todd dies in US

THE death of Burt Kerr
Todd, a long-time winter resi-
dent of Nassau was announced
in Ligonier, Pennsylvania.

Burt was the younger son of
Mr and Mrs Kirkland Todd of
Ligonier, Pa, who became
British citizens and made Nas-
sau their permanent home.

Burt, who had married well-
known Pennsylvania horse-
woman Susan Hays, resided at

;.. Foxley Farms, the family home.
: :.at Ligonier, visiting Nassau ~

during the winter months.
Burt Todd was educated at

Choate School in the US
where he was a contemporary
of the late Sir Sydney Oakes.
After service in the US Air
Force during World War II he
continued his education at
Oxford University where he
- was graduated in 1949 with a
degree in English, French and
Law.
After graduating, he joined
two fellow Oxonians, Edward
. St. George and Paul Bower, on

took them to India, Nepal,
Tibet, Bhutan, China other far

a round-the-world trip which:

eastern countries before they
embarked on their lifetime
careers.

Burt, however, kept in touch
with the ruling family of
Bhutan, sponsoring their vis-
its to the US and Europe.

The company Burt Todd
founded quickly became the
largest importer of Chinese
goods into the US and still
operates from Ligonier.

Burt.Todd is survived by his

wife, Susan-and: his flausbiereits

Laura and Frances ,and.their
children.

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was based on a recognition that

. democracy functions best when

the public has information.

“Your publications need to
have the editorial message that
gets out repeatedly. This is tax-
payer money and the people
have a right to know where it is
going,” she said.

Chairman of the Public
Accounts Committee, Montagu
MP Brent Symonette, told The

Tribune yesterday that his com- :

mittee is having a difficult time
getting information on the cur-
rent state of the country’s
finances.

Situations such as this Mr’

Symonette said should not
necessitate.a FOIA and should
just be common courtesy of the
government of the day. -

“They finally gave us the 2003
accounts for the Public
Accounts Committee to review
and only brought three copies
fora committee of five people.
That was 10 days ago and when
I went back to the House yes-
terday I asked where the extra








Bomeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
e MARKET STREET -
* P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

Ame naa

Calvary Deliverance:

_Clementina Stubbs,

copies were and they were not
available.

Mr Symonette said it was
pointless to pass a Freedom of
Information Act for the pur-
poses of forcing government to
make public the spending of
public funds because there are
current laws that require that
they lay that information on the
table of the House.

While that may be true, there
is no way for anyone outside of
government to “enforce” the
current law other than suing the
establishment for the informa-
tion. Mr Symonette conceded:
“Unless there is a will on behalf
of the current government of
the day you are wasting your
time.” ,

Mr Papagiannis pointed out
that democracy is a work in ©
progress while there is nothing
perfect about the system the
checks and balances that,exist
within in it cannot exist with-
out an independent and vigor-

-ous press that can highlight'a

‘government’ s shortcomings. |





Pastor Emiritus of |

Church,
Rey. Mother

83



a resident of Sunlight Village and
formerly of Devils Point, Cat
“Island will be held at Calvary
Deliverance Church, East Street
South,.on Sunday May 7th, 2006 |
ret at. 2:00-p.m. Officiating. will: be. Bishop V.G,Clarke,.assisted by |
.| associate ministers. Interment follows in Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.










































She is survived by seven children, Tryphena Moss, Ethan Stubbs
I, Zennarene Kemp, Margal McIntosh, McKallan Stubbs, Evangelist |
Sherryl Forbes and Linkworth Stubbs Jr; twenty grandchildren,
Deac. Demerris (Jannelle), Jehucal (Dr. Laura) and Min. LaNasio
(Lynette) Forbes, Qyntynne and Kelzya Moss, Ethan II, McKell,
Erica, Dario, Cynara, Chynna, Elon, Jewel, Latiesha, and Tiara
Stubbs, Shrel Bethel (Brandon), Clementina, John, and Delonique |
Kemp, Rasean McIntosh; two great-grandchildren, Shama Ky-
Mani and Trinity; daughters- in- law, Barbara, Donna and Lisa
Stubbs; sons- in-law, Deac. Frederick Moss, Sgt. 536 Keith McIntosh
and Rev. Dr. Philip Forbes; nieces, Vivian Long (Herbert), Amanda
Stubbs, Roselda Rigby (Franklin), Orean, Dr. Paula Mortimer
(Averell), Angela Brown, Candace and Elaine Pratt, Ceola Charles,
Vernetta "Velma" Reid (Winston), Iva Mae Jacqueline Cox (Marvin), |.
Judy Anne Robinson (Daniel), Leila Newman, Shela Brown

(Chester), Pauline Norris, Jeanette McKenzie (Albert), Marie
Simmons (Errol), Carmen Francis (Victor), Dawn Francis (Leon),
Joan Newbold, Willamae, Renea, and Beatrice Stubbs; nephews,
Rev. Pagel (Karen), Winston (patricia), Michael (Sharon) and Grady
(Carol) Williams, Alvin Ferguson (Deborah), Dr. Godfrey (Elita),
Deraine (Francel), Mathian (Joyann) and Vandyke Pratt (Latoya),
Clayton and Rollis Cooper, Milton, Anthony, Cedric and Rodney
Newbold; grand nieces and nephews, Glenda Francis, Shayne
(Lenora), Nelson and Jay Jr. Brown, Granville, Brittanye, David,
Harry, Herbert, Maurice, Calvin, Evelyn, Nora, Adra, Arlene,
Alpheus, Keturah, Donald, Katrina, Alexander, Llereva, Brandon,
Alaina, Vania, Sean, Bjorn, Adrian, Janalle, Deverall, Devon, Jasort,
Cakon, Tonya, Trevor, Carlton, Crystal, Angel, Gabriel, Glorielle,
Emmanuel, Raphael, Chanel, Joel, Daniel, Natasha, Durainth












































Candace, Titania, Michele, Michael, Melody, Matthew, Ja
Joshua, Lewis, Charles Christopher, Tray, Andre, Sandra, Gan
and Anthony; sisters- in- law, Palma Pratt, Ellen Stubbs and Ruth
Sumuda; brothers- in- law, Ernest Stubbs of New York and Hexiin
Pratt; aunts, Alice Roberts and Mary Young, other relatives*ind
| friends, Kenneth and Randolph Williams, Leah, Adelle, Beulah,
Melba, John, Geneva Dorsette and family, Maudrina Lewis and
family, Bishop V.G. and Elder Beverly Clarke and family, Lady
Margaurite Pindling, Brenetha Whyms and Family, Mary Dawkin$
and family, Pastor Helen McPhee, Deac. Damion Celestine, Lenora
Pinder, Juan Garcia, Kerry Smith and family, Edith Rolle and
family, Pastor Dorothy Moss and family, Bishop Carlos L. Malone
Sr. and The Bethel Full Gospel Baptist Church family, Pastor Jame’
Newry and family, Dr. Myles Munroe, Bishop Neil Ellis, Bishop
John Humes, Bishop Dr. Brice Thompson, Bishop Elgarnet Rahming,
Rev. Lavinia Stewart, Pastor Rod Parsley, Mother Ellen Parsley,
‘| Rev. Teuton Stubbs, Bishop Dr. William Thompson, Bishop William
Johnson, Bishop Albert Hepburn, Apostle Roston Davis, Bishop
Samuel Green, Pastor Terrence Morrison, Elder Oris Campbell and
family, Ian Cooper and family, Greg Stubbs and family, the Dawkins,
Martin, Williams, Farrington, Stubbs and Bethel families, Bisho
Franklin Ferguson, John Kemp, Elder Clifton Scavella, Maedawn
Munroe and family, Tony and Charlene Heard, Evangelist Rosetta
Scavella, Theresa Deleveaux, Lenox Major and family, Rev. Df.
O. A. Pratt, Elder Lena Pratt, Debbie McDonald, Brenda, Catherine
and Gregg Allen, Rev. Emily Demeritte and family, Mannix Ospin
and family, Juster Otero and family, Latoya, Dave, Vivienne Brown
and family, Rose, Dr. Mary Alfred and family, Dorothy Bowles,
Bishop James A. Darling, Peter Galanos and family, Calvin Johnson,
Rev. J. J. Stubbs and family, Leon Stubbs and family, Pastor David
Sweeting, Italia Johnson, Darleen, Delreese, Anwar, Ethel, Enda,
Apostle Quebell Martin, Bishop Rueben Deleveaux, the Hannah
and Miller family, Richard Dean and family, Ezra Dean and family,
Dario Pinder, the community of Sunlight Village, Sunlight Cottage,
Toote Shop Comer and Fritz Lane, Paula Mae Russell and family,
Livingston Austin and family, the Calvary Deliverance Church
family, Leyota, Ismella and Rose Davis, Delta's Christian School
of Excellence family, the Turnquest, Cartwright, Ambrister, and
Rigby families, Calvary Temple Church family and a host of opher
relatives and friends, too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Calvary Deliverence Church,
East Street South, on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and
on Sunday at Demeritte's Funeral Home from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00
noon and at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service tinie:

4
a
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Watch your words, Cousin Raynard

N George Orwell’s satire
Animal Farm, Squealer, a
small fat pig represented the
(government’s) propaganda,
_and was thought of as being
“capable of turning black into
white. Squealer was depicted as
a brilliant talker, who very con-
vincingly skipped from side to
side and whisked his tail to
make a persuasive argument.
Unfortunately, for Raynard
Rigby, whilst as the PLP’s chief
propagandist he can be likened



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to Squealer, his persuasiveness
as a spokesman can only be
described as “eloquently fee-
ble”.

Beyond the elaborate nature
-of Mr Rigby’s speeches, which
are attempts at spinning his par-
ty’s mediocre performance in
governance, it is easy to discov-
er why rational people are not
so easily hoodwinked.

Last week, my dear second
cousin Raynard (my grandfa-
ther, Edward Gibson, is his
grandmother’s brother) effec-





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Young man’s



tively placed his foot in his
mouth once again by launching
a boorish attack against the
press — particularly The Tribune
~ at a press conference held

under the guise of promoting”

his government’s achievements.

According to cousin Raynard,
he was cautioning the press, and
ensuring that they adhere to
their obligation to objectively
report to the Bahamian people.
He ended his cautionary tale by
stating “I trust this is the last
time”.

r Rigby’s egregious
and inflammatory
attack on journalists leads one
to examine his political history

and thereby his credibility.
Among diehard PLP insiders,
Mr Rigby’s credibility has been
questionable as he has been
seen as having joined the party

- in the fourth quarter in the lead

up to the 2002 general elections
when it became clear by the
public’s opposition to the
FNM’s referendum that the
PLP would likely form the next
government.

At his press conference, Mr
Rigby also said he will match

: the press “step by step”. Now,

today’s questions is: How? Will
we the press be victimised and
spat on again?

In a December 4, 2005

| appearance on the talk show

Parliament Street he again dis-






















































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while Ryu Byer

Dothe Seminar {

with

played his ineptness as the +

PLP’s spokesman by blatantly |
attempting to spin the racial |
undertones in the speeches of

certain PLP speakers at their

convention, concerning Hubert
Ingraham and Brent Symonet-
te’s election to the leadership |
post within the FNM. Here,
PLP representatives attempted.

to exploit scaremongering tac- ~

tics to urge Bahamians not to
elect a team, inclusive of a white
Symonette to a leadership role
in the Bahamas, as they alleged
it would be a return to the days
of the UBP and segregation.

n his endeavour to.bam-.

boozle listeners, Mr Rigby :
asserted that his party’s posi-:
tion was not to use race as an’!
issue, and that they were simply :
enunciating the history of the ;
yb

Bahamas. ‘Yet, he went on to
contradict himself by stating
“we will move the country for-
ward, never looking: back-
wards”. Cousin Raynard fur-
ther claimed that his party
“engaged in a discussion” of
race “having a comparative
analysis over periods and eras”.
Mr Rigby must live under a
rock! :

Raynard Rigby, who has once
again caught foot-in-mouth dis-

- ease by threatening the press,
_has proven why no one takes

him seriously. Mr Rigby has
become known to overstate and
use exaggerated prose, and as
party chairman, is most laugh-
able and possibly the most inef-
fectual spinner in local politics.

Either Raynard Rigby thinks
that Bahamians are ignoramus-
es or is simply trying to mislead
us or both!

his week finds the
chairman bragging
about the PLP’s performance,
stating that it has led to a com-

plete economic and social trans- .

formation in the Bahamas. Pre-
viously, he has claimed that the

: work of the PLP is unmatched.

Mr Chairman, of what record
do you persistently speak?
Whilst the PLP government

' has signed many agreements

and boasted of their invest-
ments, there is nothing tangi-

. ble that can be seen as they are .
. all stuck in.some pipeline. By

now, this pipeline should extend
from here to Florida!

Raynard Rigby and certain
members of the “new” PLP are
seemingly continuing a legacy
of dishonesty with voters.

Cos, bear in mind that this
generation is more educated

. and smarter than before, and

know to save your lawyeriny;
and fancy talk for the boar:!-

room. When you threaten the
freedom of the press, you

- threaten democracy!

ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



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= TRIBUNE

@ A

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 7

[ In brief Government may consider |

edia summit
or Caribbean
region to be
held in Florida

THE Media Summit, the only
production, programming and
technology television conference
developed specifically for the
Caribbean and Central Ameri-
ca, announced that its 2006
meeting will be at the Radisson
Hotel in Miami, Florida.

The sixth annual meeting will
take place May 31 to June 2,
2006 under the theme: “Adapt-
ing to digital integration.”

Discussion will focus on con-
verting new technologies into
revenue generators for broad-
cast television.

Maggie Castillo, the confer-
ence organiser said: ““The Media
Summit serves an important
niche in-the television industry.
While many of the islands ‘and
countries in this region could
be considered small on their
own, regionally they represent
nearly $20 million in expendi-
tures in television programming,
technology and infrastructure.”

The conference is targeted at
station owners, managers and
operators including production
and post-production persons.

“This year’s summit aims to
demystify new technologies and
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management can deploy them
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Those who wish to partici-
pate can register online at
www.caribbeanmediasummit.
com.













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FREEPORT - If those
overseeing the sale of Royal
Oasis Resort do not find a
purchaser soon, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie warned
that the government “would
be faced with having to exer-
cise another option”.

However, Mr Christie
remained tight-lipped about
what this other option might
be.

The prime minister said the
government and the sellers
are expected to meet shortly
in New Providence to review
the applications of interest-
ed parties and decide on who
should buy the resort.

Mr Christie was addressing
an Urban Renewal meeting
held at the Hilton Outten
Convention Center on Thurs-
day.

“As prime minister, it is

_important for me in passing

to address what is a signifi-
cant problem to business per-
sons, and since J am here I
just want to briefly speak to
the current status of Royal
Oasis,” he said.

The closure of Royal Oasis
following two hurricanes in
2004 has resulted.in the loss
of 1,200 jobs. . :

The loss of tourist business
negatively impacted the









auto
sales‘

other options on Royal Oasis

Christie ‘optimistic’ about
future of resort: refuses to
speculate on possible action





’ MB PERRY Christie

International Bazaar, where
many merchants were forced to
close their shops.

Mr Christie said the fate of
the Royal Oasis is a matter that
“exercises every degree of
attention” from the govern-
ment.

PT TIO







“A meeting date has been set
and applications are being con-
sidered. And I believe it is fair,
for me to say that if the people
who have to sell cannot find a
purchaser to present to us when
we meet shortly, that the gov-
ernment would be faced with
having to exercise another
option.

“I do not propose to be
hostage to circumstances where
people — as they are in lawfully
entitled to do — exercise their
best interest which does not
necessarily coincide with the

. best interest of our country and

Grand Bahama; to leave myself,
and my government hostage to

- those circumstances.

Mr Christie said he is opti-

_ mistic about the future of the

Royal Oasis, because he is sat-
isfied that the government will
be reimbursed for the funds it
advanced for worker redun-
dancy payments.

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, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

PAGE 8

Ae)

| Dorsett

lione

Shirley Paul


THIRIBUNE FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 9





Moye Va

eTurnquest





1 criticises

Rent Control
amendment |

THE ode feta amendment

to the RenjControl Act is

another exanple of the PLP

government; “patchy, piece-

meal” approich to legislation,

according jo FNM senator
Pp

Tommy Tunquest.

Mr Turngiest said that rather
than dealirg with issues com-
prehensivdy, the government
seems to highlight “small
aspects”~-in an attempt to give
the impression that it is help-
ing theublic. ~

“Thi government appears to
alwaysseek to avoid the hard
task ¢ governance, and just
‘profes’ and puts out propa-
gand that they are working
hard’ he said.

M Turnquest said that
althagh the Rent Control Act is
mor than 30 years old, the only
amadment the government has
proosed is an increase in the
ceing on protected dwellings,
fron $25,000 to $75,000.

fe added that in the 2002
Spech from the Throne, the
gvernment spoke of the need
fc changes to the Act, including
tk creation of a corporation
vth private partners to increase
te number of rental units avail-
ole for low-income families and
oung single workers.

Mr Turnquest added that the
zovernment said it would review
the Act “with a vrsw to making
it more responsive “the plight
of low-income tena ~“s

But according to‘war Yurn-
quest, the proposed amendment
does not fulfill any of the objec-
tives outlined in the speech.

“What the amendment does,
however, is increase the cost of
rentals in the Bahamas, and by
extension increases the cost of
living for low and middle-income

4
iy
yy



@ TOMMY Turnquest

families, in. many cases,” he said.

Mr Turnquest pointed out
that while a higher ceiling is
proposed, the percentage
afforded a landlord for charging

rent is not amended, and would

remain at 15 per cent.

“This means landlords who
own modest duplexes valued at
$150,000 (which is $75,000 per
dwelling unit) can charge with-
in the law as much as $937.50
monthly for a single unit,” Mr
Turnquest explained.

The senator said he failed to
see how this increases the num-
ber of rental units available for
low-income families and young
single workers, “considering that
the average monthly rental cost
for dwellings of this value cur-
rently is $500 to $700 per month”.

Mr Turnquest said such a sys-
tem will only trap low-income
Bahamian families into paying
rent forever.

“Instead of increasing the cost
of living and laying the founda-
tion for homelessness in the
Bahamas, the government should
be dealing with setting standards
for rental dwellings,” he said.

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Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005
Page 340-8043

PT Tay tees ssi



ADRIEL HENRY SAUNDERS, 88

of #28 Waterfall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama and formerly of Bailey Town, Bimini
will be held on Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 10am at the Pro-Cathedral of Christ The
King Anglican Church, East Atlantic Drive and Pioneers Way, Freeport, Grand

Bahama. Officiating will be Rev’d Canon Harry Bain, Rector, the Rev'd Dr. Bernard
Been, Assistant Curate, the Rev’d Canon Winfield Goodridge, Assistant, Venerable
I Ranfurly Brown, the Venerable Keith Cartwright, the Rev'd Fr. Stephen Grant,
the Rev’d Fr Norman Lightbourne, the Rev’d Fr. Rudolph Cooper and the Rev'd Fr.
Mario Conliffe. Interment will follow at the “Columbarium” at the Pro-Cathedral of
Christ The King, Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his precious memory are his beloved and devoted wife of 61 years,
Agnes; children, Caren Saunders, Vandra Rolle, Stephanie Evans, Rev’d Fr. Colin
Saunders, Tirzah Carey and Bernadine Roberts; adopted children, James Weech, Rev.

' David Ellis, Stephen and Clinton Weech, Philippa Weech-Lloyd, Enoch Saunders,
Verenencha Nesbitt, Elton Smith, Wendy Duncombe; daughter-in-law, Revon Saunders; sons-in-law, Lorenzo Saunders,
Rev. Franklyn Rolle, Patrick Evans, James Carey and Trevor Roberts; grandchildren, Dirk and Naja Saunders, Judi
Saunders, Anthony, Avaran and Andrew (Aydee) Rolle, Jason and Sebastian Evans, Cara, Cameron and Candawn
Saunders, Tanya and Evan Cartwright, Tracy, Trent and Tre’ Roberts and Saphari Elie; great-grandchildren, Dimaj
Saunders, Zoe Evans and Kelvin German; sisters, Alma Brown, Tirzah Duncombe, Elva Ellis and Vivian Taylor; sisters-
in-law, Vinola Harvey, Winifred Sherman, Eleanor, Blanche, Barbara and Curlene Weech; brothers-in-law, Wilfred
“Peter” Weech, George Weech and Clarence Ellis; nephews, Lionel Rolle, Lowell, Wallace, Rodney and Charles Roberts,
Dr. Paul Duncombe, Sherrick, Prince, Rev’d Edmund, Rev’d Oral, Bishop Neil, Rev’d Delton and Ken Ellis, Dennis,
Marcellus and Shawn Taylor, Basil, Cecil, Alvin, Bert, Godfrey, Ivan and Brentley Sherman, Julian, Michael, Philip,
Calnan, Jackson, Dr. Mark, Andre and George Jr. Weech; nieces, Elmetta Rolle, Theora Duncombe, Delores Levarity,
Inez Saunders, Alqueenia Pratt, Elizabeth Sherman, Frances Williams, Iona Waiters, Sandra Johnson, Carol Duncombe

' Sherman, Edris, Deborah Meade, Shane Taylor, Terry Strong, Yvonne Cocker, Eltha Bannister, Anne Clarke, Verdell

Harvey, Roslyn Dean, Dressler, Iris and Kenva Sherman, Gilda House, Katherine and Michelle Weech, Jeanine Weech-

Gomez, Allison Weech, Sonia Lightbourne, Yvette Styles, Ursula King, Tabitha Burrows and Antonique Weech;

Godchildren, Basil Sherman, Coralee Butler, Mary Clarke and Rodger Brown; numerous relatives including cousins,
Wealthy Gomez, Archbishop Drexel Gomez and Mrs. Gomez, Prescola Lockhart, Stanley and Florence Levarity, Curtis
Cartwright, Chloe Smith, Lucius Weech, Arthur Sherman, Sterling Saunders, Marvin Rolle and Louise Weech; numerous
friends including Harry, Enid, Corrine, Carrol and Aubrey Sherman, Herbert C. and Pam Walkine Francis and Yvonne
Noronha, Canon Harry and ann Bain, Sister Agatha Hunt, Joanna Rolle, Dr. Pamela Etuk, Sir Albert and Lady Miller
and family, Brenda Cheong, V.A. and Delores Knowles, Augusta Webb, Albena Harding, Agatha Beckles, Simeon and
Beulah Smith, Kelly Burrows, Randy and Rena Woods and family, Maxwell and Patricia Sweeting, Samuel and Bernadine
Rigby, Christopher and Anna Cooper, Keith and Stephanie Seymour, Edmund Granger, the family of the Pro-Cathedral
of Christ The King, Freeport, and the entire community of Bimini, Bahamas. .

Viewing will be held at the “Irenic Suite: of Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral’
Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10am to 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30am until service
time. :



GERRARD RANA ARLINGTON SANDS, 32

of #7 Shepherd’s Resort, Freeport, Grand Bahama and formerly of Nassau, Bahamas
will be held on Saturday May 6th, 2006, 10am at Hope Church of the Nazarenes, Settlers
Way, Freeport, Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Pastor Kirk Curry. Interment will
follow in the Gtand Bahama Memorial Park, Settlers Way and Forbisher Drive, Freeport,
Grand Bahama. ° .
Cherished memory will forever linger in the hearts of his mother, Adelaide Sands;

two sons, Gerrard Jr. and Deangelo; one daughter, Patricia Sweeting; two sisters, Jewel
Sands of Hollywood, Florida and Staffandrea Rigby; one niece, Yannique Sands of
Hollywood, Florida; adopted sisters, Shanrique and Stephanie Clarke, Terrell and Vanessa
Darville; aunts, Elizabeth Carey and Adrianna Whylly of Nassau, Veronica Wells of
Deadmans Cay, Long Island, Angela Burrows of Freeport, Alelia Morton of Key West,
Florida; adopted aunt, Juanita Major; grandaunts, Winifred Darville and Maria Carey of
Nassau uncles, Benson Carey and Vivian Whylly, John Wells, Kelly Burrows Sr; adopted
uncle, Hugh Burke Jr.; granduncle, Eric Darville of Nassau and a host of other relatives and friends including, Sgt. #21
Ricardo and Jennifer Burrows and family, Edmund Saunders and family, Michelle, Lester Jr. and Duran Adderley, Sophia
McKinney and family, Dala and Darren Smith and family, Gary Sr. and Linda Roberts and family, Yannique and Lawrence
Thomas of Hollywood, Florida, Michelle, Paul and Vivian Whylly, Leroy and Vanessa Risher and family of South Carolina,
Kenda and Kelly Burrows Jr., Stephen Wells of New York, Garece Davis and RoxyMae Cartwright and family, Fredericka
Gordon and family, Lynn Clarke and family, Tina Nesbitt and family of San Salvador, Shavonne Sweeting and family, Sgt.
Audie Murphy and family, Jack and Charlene Larrimore and family, Shirley Cartwright and family, Rev. and Mrs. Feltow
Rolle and family, Mrs. Patsy Neymour and family, Mark Burrows and family, Maxim ad Martha Eilsaime and family, the
Jervis family, the Karamo family, Katrina Mackey and family, Dwayne Poitier and family, Kevin Moore and family, Morris
and Michelle Simmons, the staff of Simmons Security and Investigations, Pastors and Mrs. Kirk Curry and family and the
members of Grace Church of the Nazerene. . :

Viewing will be held at the “Perpetual Suite: of Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral
Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10am to 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30am until service time.

a



MANES SAINT-ILIEN, 61

of Hepburn Town, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama and formerly of Port-De-Paix, Haiti
will be held on Saturday, May 6th, 2006, 11am at St. Stephen’s Anglican Church, Eight
“Mile Rock, Grand Bahama. Officiating will be the Rev’d Fr. Rudolph V. Cooper and
Rev’d Sepoudy Pompilos. Interment will follow in Harbour West Public Cemetery,
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

Left to cherish his memory are his sister, Elidie Calixte of Port-De-Paix, Haiti; brother
and best friend, Samuel “Sammy” Lubin and Marcel Lubin of Fort Lauderdale; stepsister,
Charmantine St. Fleur; nephews, Dukerne Elidie Saintilien, Elide Saintilien; long time
friend, David Williams; adopted children, Lundy Lubin and Sepoudy Pompilus of Fort
Lauderdale; adopted grandchildren, Devonte and Devin Lubin; adopted daughters-in-
law, Desiree Lubin, Annette Marcelus, Ilene Williams, Andy Marcelus, Cornelius Romer,
Terell Williams Roseline Oscar, Jean Claude, Bernard, Neisha and Lashawn Marcelus,

Vilner and Shawn Lubin; a host of friends and other relatives including Ilent Morstime,
Veronica Rolle and family, Lynn, Keith Finley, Agatha, the staff of Glenerik International, Burrows family, Johnson family,
Sylvia Demerite and family and: the community of Hepburn Town.

Viewing will be held at the “Celestial Suite: of Restview Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Limited, 11-A East Coral

Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday from 10am to 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 9:30am until service time.





DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT

MS. SHERYL THERESA MARTIN, 38

of Queens Cove, Freeport, Grand Bahama died in Freeport, Grand Bahama on Friday, April
28th, 2006.

She is survived by her two sons, Arlington and Winchenslow Martin; four daughters,
Suzette and Sherise Edden, Deneika and Sherenika Strachan; two sisters, Clemencia Thompson
and Sandra Rolle; three brothers, Felix and Keith Dixon and Elvis Martin and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MAY 6, 2006






MONDAY



@ THE ARTS

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) is
holding an African Art Exhibition - “What is Africa to
Me” from the private collection of Kay Crawford
running until Saturday, July 29.

New - The NAGB will be hosting a Cultural Leader-
ship and Managing Creativity Workshop - a free pub-
lic lecture and workshop @ 7pm until 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk:
Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at

New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road. —

Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more
info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday every month, 6pm @ Doctors Hospital con-
ference room.

@ CIVIC CLUB

St Andrew’s Kirk launches an After-School Pro-
gramme for children from the Woodcock and Albury
Sayle Primary Schools. The programme, is held Mon-
day to Friday @ St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. The
programme is free to children from the Bain and
Grants Town communities. Parents interested in
enrolling their children should contact the church at
322.5475 or email: standrewskirk@yahoo.com

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Chub 612315.meets Mon-
day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ¢
Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
days at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

BART

New - “Africa in Bahamian Junkanoo & Religion” -
The NAGB will be holding a panel discussion during
its “What is Africa to Me” series. Tuesday, May 16 @
7pm. The event is free and open the public.

New - “Bahamain Art 1492 -1992” - NAGB will be |

hosting a Bahamian Art History Lecture @ the gallery
Tuesday, May 25.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of

‘its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to
9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for
more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

4

@ CIVIC CLUB

New - BAHAMIAN FORUM - "The Bahamas: Bal-
ancing its Relationship with the U.S.A., China and
Cuba". Sir Arthur Foulkes speaks. Tuesday May 9 @
6pm at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel. Please con-
firm your interest in attending by e-mail to bahami-
anforumpress@yahoo.com so that adequate seating
arrangements can be made.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday night at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Cen-
tral Andros.

Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at the Cancer Soci-
ety of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.





Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please
call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tues-
day, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor
meeting room. ,

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call

502.4842/377.4589 for more info.
\

WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS



LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassau’s Weekly Jam
Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located East Bay
Street two doors East of Esso On The Run.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau
Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

‘i CIVIC CLUB

Bahamas Association for Social Healih presents the
Earth Village Ranch (petting zoo), St Albans Drive
and Columbus Avenue, offers free admission every
Wednesday by appointment between 9am and 3pm.
For more information or to book events call 356.2274
or 434.8981. Special rates available for groups of 20 or
more with a two week advance reservation.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sig-
ma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every
third Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pride
Building.

TM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-8pm
in the Solomon’s Building, East-West Highway.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday at C C
Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hos-
pital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets

the second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm
@ St Augustine’s Monestary. ;

Licor pe Sar

Eom A lie
PLEASE PUT



“OUT THERE”

a

Virtue Christian Dance Company
will be performing ‘The Prophet’s
Wife’ Saturday, May 6.at the Holy
SUiinmaCe MA Ameo eer
Gardens - Matinee @ 3pm and

Prime Time Show @ 8pm.



€

THURSDAY
MART

New - The NAGB invites you to its African Film
Series with a screening of "Hyenas" Thursday, May 4
at 8pm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The event is
free and open to the public.

New - Artist Talk: Bahamian NeoRealists - NAGB
will be hosting the event Thursday, May 11 at 6:30pm.
The event is free and open to the public. Guest Artists:
Kishan Munroe and Sheldon Saint

New - NAGB’s African Film Series will be screening-
“DARESALAM” (Let there be peace) Thursday,
May 18 at 8pm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The
event is free and open to the public.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The
Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm :

Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location
(off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required.
Call 364.8423 to register or for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the second
Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC
building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUB

TM Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colo-
nial Hilton. :

TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm @ SuperClubs
Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.



FRIDAY

& PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks off every
Friday night with Happy Hour... special drinks, live
music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nassau’s first European
Night Restaurant - Open Friday night till Saturday
morning Sam, serving hot food/and take out - music,
drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the
perfect place to spend your night out till the morning.

@ HEALTH

New - Autism Awareness Week

Conference on Autism Spectrum Disorders
Workshop for Professionals - May 19 @ 9am - 4pm
(New Providence Community Centre)

Workshop for Families - May 20 @ 9am - 4pm (Garvin
Tynes Primary School)

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
Sacred Heart Church - Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to
8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUB

TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of
the month at COB’s Tourism Training Centre at 7pm

A ROU: ND

THE TRIBUNE



NAS SAU



YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
ENooHeE “SBE Tr LINE

in Room 144 during the academic year. The group
promotes the Spanish language and culture in the com-
munity.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St
Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325.1947
after 4pm.



SATURDAY ©



THE ARTS

New- Virtue Christian Dance Company - in a theatri-
cal production - will be performing ‘The Prophet’s
Wife’ Saturday, May 6 at the Holy Trinity Activity
Center, Stapledon Gardens Matinee @ 3pm and Prime
Time Show @ 8pm. ‘The Prophet’s Wife’ is Episode IV

in the hit series “Dance Of The Scrolls”, a God-inspired’

creation of Professor Marilyn Deveaux.

New - NAGB, in collaboration with Post House
Gallery, PopopStudios Gallery, StingraeStudios, Doon-
galik Gallery and New Providence Art and Antiques,
will be launching "Transforming Spaces 2006" Saturday,
May 6 and Saturday, May 13.

New - NAGB will be holding a Youth Workshop on
Audio Recording - Saturday, May 27 from 10am to
1pm, for children 12 years and older. Instructor: Chris-
tian McCabe. Contact the Gallery to reserve a seat @
328.5801.

@ HEALTH

New - The Town Centre Mail will be hosting its 4th
annual Woman To Woman Expo - May 13 from 12
noon to 6pm. Over 20 booths, live entertainment,
supervised kids corner, male models decorated with
body art, fashion extravaganza, free blood pressure
and cholesterol checks, free immunizations, casting
call for models:and actresses, dunking booth and more
are expected. -

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Saturday mornings - 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Sat-

urday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @ the _

Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training
Representative at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUB

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10
and 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in an
effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in
registering their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

The Graham Holden Deal @ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal and
Friends perform Sunday, 7pm - 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Sunday Night Interlude.@ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food,
drinks.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of

its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

i CIVIC CLUBS

New - The Cat Island Sailing Club will host its Annual
Cat Island Day - Sunday, May 28 at the Western
Esplanade from 10am - until.

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net /Out there in subject line



if!

Me


THE: fRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 11



MONDAY



THE ARTS

The National Art Gallery of the Bahamas (NAGB) is
holding an African Art Exhibition - “What is Africa to
Me” from the private collection of Kay Crawford
running until Saturday, July 29.

New - The NAGB will be hosting a Cultural Leader-
ship and Managing Creativity Workshop - a free pub-
lic lecture and workshop @ 7pm until 9:30pm.

Alcoholits Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of

its meeting times.and places: New-Previdence-Com-——~

munity Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk:
Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm. ....... ....

‘Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group —

‘meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
‘New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
‘Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-
‘sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more
‘info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Halainas meets the third
Monday every month, opm @ Doctors Hospital con-
| ference room.

‘CIVIC CLUB

‘St Andrew’s Kirk launches an After-School Pro-
' gramme for children from the Woodcock and Albury
_ Sayle Primary Schools. The programme, is held Mon-
: day to Friday @ St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. The
‘ programme is free to children from the Bain and
Grants Town communities. Parents interested in
enrolling their children should contact the church at
322.5475 or email: standrewskirk@yahoo.com

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday’s at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Mon-
: day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach e
, Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mon-
days at 7pm.
The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Couiedl (NPHO)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Beard

: Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



MART.
New - “Africa in Bahamian Junkanoo & Religion” -
: The NAGB will be holding a panel discussion during

its “What is Africa to Me” series. Tuesday, May 16@ .

7pm. The event is free and open the public.

New - “Bahamain Art 1492 -1992” - NAGB will be
hosting a Bahamian Art History Lecture @ the gallery
Tuesday, May 25.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,

Rosetta Street: Tuesday - 6pm to 7pm/8:30pm to

9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm
on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-
quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for
more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held

6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes

location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to.register for more info. .

@ CIVIC CLUB

New- BAHAMIAN FORUM - "The Bahamas: Bal-
ancing its Relationship with the U-S-A., China and —
Cuba”. Sir Arthur Foulkes speaks. Tuesday May 9 @-
6pm at the British Coloniat Hilton Hotet. Pleasecon=
firm your interest in attending by e-mail to bahami-
anforumpress@yahoo.com so that adequate seating
arrangements can be made.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7.30pm @
CC Sweeting Senior School's Dining] Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road.
Club Cousteau 7343 meets every Tuesday night at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Cen-
tral Andros.

Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at the Cancer Soci-
ety of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.














Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6.30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday,
7pm @ Gaylord’s Restaurant, Dowdeswell St. Please
call 502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tues:

day, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House, 1BM Oliice. 4th floor a

meeting room.

_Alpha Phi Alpha Fratemity mects every first Tuesday.
6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
(502. ABA2I3TT. 4589 for. more info.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

LIVE MUSIC @ The Buzz, Nassau’s Weekly Jam
Session & Musicians Hook-up. Located East Bay
Street two doors East of Esso On The.Run.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

' B HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau
Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday - 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ CIVIC CLUB

Bahamas Association for Social Health presents the
Earth Village Ranch (petting zoo), St Albans Drive
and Columbus Avenue, offers free admission every
Wednesday by appointment between 9am and 3pm.
For more information or to book events call 356.2274
or 434.8981. Special rates available for groups of 20 o1
more with a two week advance reservation.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sig-
ma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30 pm every
third Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pr ide
—Building.——-—---.

_.IM Club 753494 meets every Wednesday, 6pm-Spm
in the Solomon’s Building; East-West Highway.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday at CC
Sweeting Senior High School, Oakes Field.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds its bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hos
pital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus mecis
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month, Spm
@ St Augustine’s Monestary.

EM A PL
PLEASE PUT







‘OUT THERE”



THURSDAY

ART

New - The NAGB invites you to its African Film

- Series with a screening of "Hyenas" Thursday, May 4

at Spm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The event is
free and open to the public.

New.- Artist Talk: Bahamian NeoRealists - NAGB
will be hosting the event Thursday, May 11 at 6:30pm.
The event is free and open to the public. Guest Artists:
Kishan Munroe and Sheldon Saint

New - NAGB’s African Film Series will be screening-
“DARESALAM” (Let there be peace), Thursday,
May 18 at Spm @ the NAGB Outdoor Theatre. The
event.is free and open to the public. .

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-

ta Street: Thur sday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The.

Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

“Pre & Posi Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
‘Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Séagrapes location

(off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required.
Call 364.8423 to register or for more info.

REACH — Resources & Education for Autism and

~ related Challenges meets from 7pm — 9pm the second

Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC
building, Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUB

TM Club 3956 meets Thursday, 7.30pm @ British Colo-
nial Hilton.

TM Club (600 meets Thursday, 8.30pm ¢ uperelubs
Breezes.

Intemational Association of Administrative Profes-

sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of
every month @ Superclubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

FRIDAY

i PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS



Cafe Europa on Charlotte Street North, kicks off every
Friday night with Happy Hour... special drinks, live
music/DJ from 6pm to 9pm and Nassau’s first European
Night Restaurant - Open Friday night till Saturday
morning Sam, serving hot food/and take out - music,
drinks and an English breakfast. Cafe Europa...the
perfect place to spend your night out till the morning.

i@ HEALTH

New - Autism Awareness Week

Conference on Autism Spectrum, Disorders
Workshop [or Professionals - May 19 @ 9am - 4pm
(New Providence Community Centre)

Workshop for Families - May 20 @ 9am - 4pm (Garvin
Tynes Primary School)

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Fridays 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm.
Sacred Heart Church - Fridays @ 6pm to 7pm

New Providence Community Centre: Fridays @ 7pm to
Spm.

M@CIvic CLUB

LN Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm ALY, Jean St.

AMISTAD, a Spanish club meets the third Friday of
the month at COB’s Tourism Training Centre at 7pm

-The Graham Holden Deal



YDELEVEAUX @TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET —
IN THE SUBJECT LINE

in Room 144 during the academic year. The group
promotes the Spanish language and culture in the com-
munity.

“a

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-

.day of each month, 7.30pm at Emmaus Centre at St

Augustine’s Monestary. For more info call 325.1947
after 4pm. iy



SATURDAY



BE THE ARTS

New - Virtue Christian Dance Company - in a theatri-
cal production - will be performing ‘The Prophet’s
Wife’ Saturday, May 6 at the Holy Trinity Activity
Center, Stapledon Gardens Matinee @ 3pm and Prime
Time Show @ 8pm. ‘The Prophet’s Wife’ is Episode TV
in the hit series “Dance Of The Scrolls”, a God-inspired
creation of Professor Marilyn Deveaux.

} :
New - NAGB, in collaboration with Post House

' Gallery, PopopStudios Gallery, StingraeStudios, Doon-

galik Gallery and New Providence Art and Antiques,
will be launching "Transforming Spe? 2006" Saturday,
May 6 and Saturday, May 13.

New - NAGB will be holding a Youth Workshop on
Audio Recording - Saturday, May 27 from 10am to
1pm, for children 12 years and older. Instructor: Chris-
tian McCabe. Contact the Gallery to reserve a seat @
328.5801.

@ HEALTH

New - The Town Centre Mall will be hosting its 4th”
amual Woman To Woman Expo - May 13 from 12

noon to 6pm. Over 20 booths, live entertainment,

supervised kids corner, male models decorated with

body art, fashion extravaganza, free blood pressure

and cholesterol checks, free immunizations, casting

call. for models and actressés, dunking booth and more

are expected.

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Saturday mornings - 10am to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Sat-
urday, 2:30pm (except August.and December) @ the
Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Training
Representative at 302.4732 for more information and
learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUB

JAR CYCLING: The owners of JAR Cycling are
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10
and 17. The free clinic will be held every Saturday in an
effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in
registering their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com



SUNDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS -

& RESTAURANTS

@ The Green
Parrot....David Graham, Steve Holden, Tim Deal and
Friends perform Sunday, 7pm - 10pm @ Hurricane
Hole on Paradise Island.

Sunday Night Interlude @ Briteley’s Restaurant &
Lounge, Eneas St off Poinciana Drive. Featuring
Frankie Victory at the key board in the After Dark
Room every Sunday, 8.30pm to midnight. Fine food,
drinks.

5 HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous, wishes to inform the public of
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Roset-
ta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pii/ 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

CIVIC CLUBS

New - The Cat Island Sailing Club will host its Annual
Cat Island Day - Sunday, May 28 at the Western
Esplanade from 10am - until:

Send all your civic and social events to The Tribune
via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail: ydeleveaux@tribuneme-
dia.net /Out there in subject line
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Firing threat |

for teachers
FROM page one

“We are prepared to put forward the
correspondence with the union, and fur-
thermore I think we know basic law that
you have to hear both sides. We never
appeared before a Tribunal. On this

particular issue we were not forced by:

any Tribunal to concede any point. The
point was that we decided that if this
was an issue that was going to hold up
any negotiations we would concede so
that we can move forward,” he said.

Mr Sears said that government
allowed this recognition on a point of
“compromise” but even having com-
prised on this issue, the union has found
additional areas to create road blocks.

He also said that even though they
could have docked the pay of teachers
on a number of occasions they have held
their hand.

“We said this was a show of good
faith, but when we reach a point when
students are being injured — we can-

Andros set for subdivis



on,

world-class sports project

FROM page one

affordable homes on 50 acres. The
lots will be between 100 and 150 in
feet — the largest anywhere in the
country.

“Tt will create a brand new
community with all the neces-
sary infrastructure and all the
benefits, all the paths and every-
thing else that comes with a sub-
division that size,” the minister
said at the contract signing held
yesterday afternoon at the Min-
istry of Housing.

of the subdivision off Queen’s
Highway - the island’s main
highway — will “revolutionise and
move North Andros to the next
level.”

“It will attract those living in
Nassau and elsewhere back to
Andros,” he said.

Minister Peet encouraged all

‘Bahamians, and in particular

Androsians, to take advantage
of this new development.

“Now is the time to take
advantage of the opportunity,
this will create new shops, new
schools, new parks, everything.

more people,” he said.

The minister said he was espe-
cially calling on small and medi-
um businesses to exploit the
spin-off effects fromthe subdi-
vision.

Mr Peet said that those inter-
ested in applying for homes with
the Ministry of Housing should
move fast, as he is confident that
there will be a great demand for
the houses.

In addition to the new hous-
ing development, government.
yesterday also signed a contract
for the upgrading of the Carl

in Nicholl’s Town, Andros.

The track, which has been
named after Bahamian Olympian
Carl Oliver, will first be resur-
faced and then, following the
signing of a second contract, giv-
en a new finishing.

at will become a Has class



Also ‘attending the signing yes-
terday, Mr Oliver.said- he is cer-
tain that the refurbished track
will produce many more Bahami-

not cross that line,” he said. s Mr Peet said that the creation an Olympians.

And there will be a demand for Oliver Track and Field Stadium ,





% £
ie g

CABLE BAHAMAS
VACANCY

IP Network Engineer

CAB B.
VAC A N. C.Y..







UNIX/AIX
System Administrator



3 MINISTRY OF
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
& CONSUMER AFFAIRS

The Price Control Act (1971)
(Chapter 339)
_ The Price Control (General) (amendment)
(No. ) Regulations, 2006 -

NOTICE

The public is hereby advised that effective Tuesday, |
May 2, 2006, The Honorable Minister of Local |

Duties & Responsibilities

Assistance with the daily administration of, but are not
limited to the following:



Cable Bahamas Ltd is seeking a qualified IP Network
Engineer. The successful candidate must have a solid
technical background as well as strong leadership skills
working within a team environment and _ providing daily
operational leadership. Individual will be responsible for
the day-to-day operations and support of customers in a
Service Provider network. Candidate must have strong
customer service and interpersonal skills.

*UNIX server installs, configuration & migrations with AIX
*Configuration & administering servers in high availability
environment using HACMP
*Perform UNIX system administration, troubleshooting,
user and account management
*UNIX shell-scripting to automate administration tasks
*Provide on call support for the various Unix, systems
*Support for approx. 50 users on site with IBM P-Series
*Scripting experience in several languages necessary
*System set-up including hardware and OS installation
*Patch management and Unix environment control
*Design, implement and manage LAN & WAN systems

Technical skill requirements include the installation,
maintainance and supporting IP routers and Layer 3
switches in a mixed vendor environment. An in depth
understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 protocols. Must
understand at an advanced level BGP, OSPF and ISIS -
routing protocols and operations. Previous experience

_ ee TE and MPLS La/ i ven : . : pins. al nS *“Work under general direction from direct management Government & Consumer Affairs has. approved
Ge DE ony, Sb en woe y ie: MEd er On sce Ce MEN ESTO: *Establish and recommend system usage policies ‘prices for the following breadbasket commodit
network management and IP related diagnostic tools. seni , : ; 5 p g y:

Experience within .the Cable Service - Provider Complete milestones on time & produce reliable and
environment supporting DOCSIS ~ cable modem manageable systems
technologies, Packeteable’ and VoIP technologies. *Documentation of systems, procedures and solutions 1) Butter

Familiarity of HFC infrastructure as well as general RF ~*REPOFl/ Escalate issues to relevant soups for resolution
principles a must. Must have an in-depth understanding
of TCP/IP from both administrative and technical
perspectives. Must be familiar with procedures such as
supernetting, subnetting, ARIN policies, address request
processes, address allocation and SWIP procedures.
Must also possess a strong understanding of DNS
principles and management in a Service Provider
environment. Candidate should have experience working
with the following key vendors, Arris, CedarPoint, Cisco,
Extreme, Juniper and Redback. Minimum educational
background should include a Bachelors Degree with key
vendor certification (CCNA/JNCIA/MCSE).

3) Cooking Oil

4) Cored Beed
5) Evaporated Milk
6) Flour

7) Mayonnaise

8) Rice

9) Sugar

Other Administrator-related Duties .

To be considered, the candidate must have strong UNIX
experience. Preference will be given to applicants with an -
AIX background. Distinguishing characteristics include.



* Punctuality and Dependability

* Solution-oriented

* Detail-oriented

* Strong oral'and written communication skills
* Effective time management skills



Working Conditions & Physical Effort

* Work normally done in an interior/office environment
* Periodically will be required to work flexible hours

* Considerable physical work required at times

Interested candidates should submit detailed
resumes to rbadderley@cablebahamas.com
by Friday, May 19, 2006.



e HARRISON THOMPSON.
Me Richard ®. Addetley.or sentria etal ty, PERMANENT SECRETARY

rbadderley@cablebahamas.com..







Bahamas Bus and Truck Company Limited
Montrose Avenue

Phone: (242) 322-1722

Fax: (242) 326-7452

44 Montrose Avenue

S$ 50,181.00
2,000.00 Cash Rebate

S$ 48,181.00

S 52,042.00

BI 204.00 Discount
5 46,838.00

2,000.00 Cash Rebate

Ss: 44,838.00

} S 38,60
Discount 3,860. 00
S 34,745.00

S 41,607.

S

Discount 4,160.

37,447.00

mS 63, 553.00
Ss
aS Se

| Discount 6,355.00
2 57,198.00

Jeep Commander
7 Passenger

Jeep Grand Cherokee

Jeep Wrangler X See Tee

s 40,881.00

Discount 4,086.00
S 36.795.00

S 39,102.00

$ 40,561.00 Discount___ 3,910.00

Discount 4, 056.00 |
S 3G,! 50! >, O0


THE TRIBUNE _ FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 13





The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services
_ “Building Professionals in the Financtal Services Sector”
Innovative Training:

“Responding to the needs in Financial Services”
May 15 - 19, 2006



a hag

_ Venue: Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa
Cable Beach ¢ P.O. Box CB 13005 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-327-6400 thru 4 ° Fax: 242-327-3971

, WEEK OF SEMINARS : : www.sandals.com ¢ www.bifs-bahamas.com

SEMINAR PROGRAMME
MONDAY, May 15, 2006





10:00 am - 10:20 am Introduction & Reception
~ Opening Session TOPIC: “Anti Money Laundering & Terrorism” . :
10:30 am - 12:00 pm © SPEAKER: Mr. Bernard Turner, Director of Public Prosecution, Attorney Generals Office

The media is inundated with cases of well-known individuals involved in money laundering and fraud. Reports of terrorist activities have reached
an all time high throughout the world and have greatly affected the business and: financial sector. This topic will provide an update on Anti Money
Laundering and Terrorism and its effects. 2 =" 7 anon pte }

TOPIC: Innovative Training: “Responding to the needs of the Financial Services”

Luncheon Session
SPEAKER: The Hon. Vincent Peet, MP, Minister of Financial Services and Investments

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

In the past it was sufficient to have an Associates or Bachelor's degree in the financial sector and to routinely work at any financial
institution. Now, the demands to comply with international standards have raised the bar and the need for innovative training in
order for any institution to compete with the constant changes. Highlighted in this presentation is the need to respond to these changes
i through constant innovative training of every employee. a Benn



Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Good Client Gone Bad”
2:30 pm 4:30 pm SPEAKER: Mrs. Cheryl Bazard, Attorney

-All the necessary “Know your client” (KYC) and tiveetpations were done on the potential client. Excellent references were received and the client is
well known internationally as an excellent businessman. After many years, reports are in the media about the client’s involvement in Money Laundering
and other illegal activities. What would you do? And how could this have been detected before it reached the media? This presentation will enhance

‘ _ the skills of managers, supervisors, relationship manager and staff members that interact with clients and their accounts making them aware of the
signs to look for when “a good client is gone bad”. nove

Morning Secession TOPIC: Panel Discussion: “Proposed Private Trust Company Legislation”

10:00 am - 12:00 pm SPONSORED BY: STEP Executives Ke

There are requests from many clients for Private Trust Companies. To meet this demand and remain competitive internationally legislation was
proceed for Private Trust Companies. Highlighted in this presentation would be the main features of the legislation and how the client’s need could
e met through Private Trust Companies. PEN MSS ag) eh :

Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Hedge Funds - How the Product Works”
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm SPEAKER; Mr. Antoine Bastian, Genesis Fund Ltd.

2 ptm meee oe
ey A

Many Investment department managers and Client Relationship managers are seeking new ways to increase their client’s assets and preserve the
’ value of the portfolio. The Hedge fund is a product that may provide a solution for the investors. This presentation will outline how the hedge fund
works and how it can assist in meeting the investment needs of the client.







WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2006
Morning Session TOPIC: “Policing The Industry”
10:00 am - 12:00 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Stephen Thompson, Inspector, Compliance Commission

The constant threat of money laundering, fraud, terrorism and illegal activities created the need locally and internationally for the financial services
induct to be monitored. There were also new developments in the Tax Information Exchange Agreement (TIEA) since the effective date. A current,
e eee

detailed and informative presentation will be made on these areas of interest to the financial industry.
Luncheon Session TOPIC: Recognizing Internet Scams t
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Jordan Kalpin, IBM Global Services Division of IBM Canada Ltd. ©

: eh The criminal mind has become very creative when using the Internet to facilitate their illegal activities. Reports are circulated throughout the financial
industry of how business and clients lose millions of dollars through the Internet scams. It is vital that every financial institution ensures that their
staff is aware and is able to recognize the various forms of Internet scams.

i Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Directors Responsibilities - Corporate Governance” _
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Kendrick Christie, CPA, President of BICA - Sponsored by BICA

One of the latest “buzz words” in the financial services sector is “Corporate Governance”. It is important to know as Directors there is now a greater
demand for accountability with regard to Corporate Governance. This presentation will inform the directors and potential Directors of the importance
of good Corporate Governance. kc PRG HE, S28




THURSDAY, May 18, 2006 -

Morning Session TOPIC: “Relaxation of Exchange Controls” ou
— 10:00 am-11:30am == SPEAKER: Mrs. Wendy M. Craigg, Governor of The Central Bank of The Bahamas



\ :

need to implement some changes in this area. This topic will inform the financial secret of why there was a ‘need to relax the exchange controls and

| és ‘
i clk : wane
The exchange control policy in the Bahamas has been the same for many years. Due to the constant changes of the financial environment there is a
4
: how it would affect the various institutions and the economy.

Mid Day Session _ TOPIC: “Update on Global int’ developments related to TIEA” a
11:30 am - 12:30 pm SPEAKER: Ms. Rowena Bethel, Legal Advisor, Executive Commissioner, Compliance Commission x
Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Disaster Preparedness”

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm SPEAKER: Mr. Leonard Gravesande, J P Morgan Trust - New York Office

- The following announcements is made on radio and television “the Bahamas is about to be hit by a category 3 hurricane within the next
24 hours, ensure that the necessary precautions are in place” It will be too late at that time to begin discussing what should be done to
secure the financial institutions. The procedures that financial institutions should have in place for their staff and to ensure that continuity
with business operations when there is a major disaster will be discussed in this presentation.



FRIDAY, May 19, 2006



Morning Session TOPIC: “Outsourcing/Out Jobbing”
10:00am -12:00pm - SPEAKER: Dr. Gilbert Morris

' Financial Institutions are constantly faced with the decision to outsource parts of its business activities in an effort to reduce operational
cost and expenses. Many times the general public view this as causing employees to become unemployed. This presentation will take
an objective look at “outsourcing/ out jobbing”

Afternoon Session TOPIC: “Increasing Anti Money Laundering Awareness: Defender of the Front Line”
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm (who should attend: Relationship Officers, Tellers, Customer services Representatives)
- SPEAKER: Mrs. Tameka Forbes & Mrs. Cheryl Bazard
SPONSORED BY: BACO

In any institution the non-management staff are the first line of defence for the detection of Money Laundering and fraud. This presentation
will outline the importance of training and developing every staff member and provide information on what they should know and look
for when interacting with the clients suspected of money laundering or fraud. The importance of reporting their suspicions to the
Compliance and/or Anti Money Laundering Officer and the danger of “tipping off”.

Seminar Tickets RT

° Morning Sessions $45
e Luncheon Sessions $50
e Afternoon Sessions - $45

Cheques should be made payable to:
The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services




Cancellations: There will be no refund or cancellations after tickets purchase.



Parking is available in the Sandals Team Member Parking Lot.
NOTE: Please do not park in the Hoffer Plaza or the Cable Beach Post Office.






. To register no log on to: www.bifs-bahamas.com




PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

Coronet’s inquest



FROM page one

mitted yesterday that his client
was not aware that adverse
claims could be made against
him during the inquest.

Some witnesses’ testimony
implicate officer Mackey as
the officer who shot and may
have killed inmate Neil
Brown. Mr Smith argued that
his client should have been
informed at his initial appear-
ance at the proceedings that
he would need to have a
lawyer present during the pro-
ceedings to cross-examine any
witnesses that were called to
give evidence against him. It
was Mr Smith's argument that
his client's constitutional
rights had been infringed. He
noted that under article 20 of
the constitution his client
should be awarded a fair trial
and he submitted that the jury
be discharged or the matter
be referred to the Supreme
Court.

Prosecutor Neil Brathwaite
however noted that lawyer Ian
Cargill had appeared at the
initial stage of the inquest. He
said Mr Cargill had been
retained on behalf of all of the
prison officers giving testimo-

ny at the trial. According to
Mr Brathwaite, Mr Cargill
had placed himself on record
and had made several earlier
appearances. Mr Brathwaite
said that Mr Mackey's testi-
mony did not amount to any-
thing incriminating, noting
that the officer had merely
testified previously that he
had obtained a gun from
another officer on the morn-
ing of January 17 and dis-
charged the weapon when hé
felt that his life was threat-
ened. Mr Brathwaite also not-
ed that any findings of an
inquest could bé challenged
by a judicial review.

Mr Smith said he had spo-
ken with Mr Cargill who had
informed him that he had not
received any instructions to
represent officer Mackey and
that Mackey had said that he
had never given instructions
to Cargill.

Coroner Linda Virgill
informed him that that partic-
ular issue could be taken up

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with the Bar Council. She also
noted that on April 3, the
beginning of the inquest, Mr
Cargill had appeared on
behalf of the prison officers.
Coroner Virgill said she did
not see how Mr Mackey's
rights were being infringed,
nor did she see any reason to
have the jury discharged or to
refer the matter to the
Supreme ‘Court. She then
reminded Mr Mackey, who
was still standing in the wit-
ness box, that he could stand
in the box and give evidence
which could be used against
him or say nothing at all.

The proceedings continued
as Mr Brathwaite asked offi-
cer Mackey several questions
relative to testimony that he
had given at a-previous ses-
sion. Mr Mackey was then
questioned by Mr Brathwaite
on how many shots he fired
on the morning of January 17.
Mr Mackey said he fired two
shots, one a warning shot and
another at a person or object
as he put it, that was
approaching him. Mr Mackey
said that at that time he was in
the bushes on the side of the
road when the object
approached. Mr Mackey said
he had been chasing some

person and had yelled “stop”
before he fired the first shot,
which was a warning shot. At
that time one of the persons
he was chasing turned around
and headed back towards him
with their hands in the air, he
said. Officer Mackey told the
court that he felt threatened
and thus fired a shot at the
person and the person slowly
went to their knees. Officer
Mackey admitted that he was

FROM page one

broke out at the Carmichael Road Detention
Centre on Tuesday after it was claimed a detainee

was beaten by a guard.

On Wednesday morning, Mr Joseph met
with Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
and Immigration Minister Shane Gibson.

Mr Joseph said he expressed his concern
about the Haitian nationals here, particularly
the Eleuthera raids and the detention centre

abuse.

“The meeting with the ministers went very
well. The Bahamas is a democratic country, a
country of law. I am sure that justice will be

- served,” he said.

Minister of Immigration Shane Gibson yes-
terday reported that the Director of Immi-
gration said he received an incident report
from the immigration officer on duty at the
time of the incident. However, he is still wait-
ing for a report from the Defence Force.

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not issued the weapon he dis-
charged that night although it
was standard procedure for an
officer to sign and state the
intended purpose for any gun
they were issued. Officer
Mackey told the court that the
gun he used that night had
come from officer Neko Sar-
gent because at that time he
was the senior officer and he
was on duty while Sargent was
not.

Mr Mackey denied knowing
inmate Forrester Bowe. He
also denied getting on the bus
that morning. The officer told
the court that he caught a ride
with another officer back to

THE TRIBUNE.

the prison compound and then
gave the gun he had to ASP
James Farrington.

_ Coroner Virgill put it to
him that had told police and
the court that the person on.
Yamacraw Road had had.
approached him with ‘two

hands in the air but officer's
Mackey denied it stating:©
that he had only said one::.:

hand.
The coroner also asked him
if he knew who these men
were who he was chasing on
Yamacraw Road. Officeér
Mackey's reply was that he
only knew that there was a
prison escape. iy

Haitian Ambassador

It is also his understanding that the police
have been asked to investigate the matter.

Mr Gibson added that he is certain that the

inhumanely.

appropriate action will be taken whenever the. .
investigation is completed. Wrest
Haitian lawyer Eliezer Regnier told; The
Tribune that while he acknowledges that there
is an immigration problem in the Bahamas,
one never needs to resort to treating Haitians

comes around,” said Mr Regnier.

them.

Haiti.”

“There is no need to be afraid to return to

for Clarks &
Shoe Village Shoe Stores.

Please fax your applications to

326-0570
or mail to

P.O. Box N 3009
Nassau, Bahamas

POSITIONS: AVAL LAB LE IMMEDIATELY:

‘Controller:

The Ginn:Company is. looking for’ talented,.energetic‘qualified:CPA or equivalent ta
assist in the. création of and to supervise the operation of the day-to-day operations: of
its Finance Department in Freeport Grand Bahama: ‘ :

‘The role: involves the maintenance of the ‘General Lédger, product

an of Feports' re:

“We all have a common background and
there is no need to mistreat our cousins in.a
degrading fashion, because what goes aroun

He added: “I encourage Haitians, whether |
or not born here, to seriously consider return-
ing to Haiti to see what the future holds for





ao le Wie lk a a a le a eae ace Sa ae




ce! en a

‘at ca an am ate Lal ee a

r.

*

a Te Tain Dae Ta te Se ae ala at

quired by the Group Finance ‘Department:on .both an ad: hoc basis and.regular month
end ahd ‘assisting the Senior Bahamas Administrator and Financial ‘Controller as rf
needéd. The Finance Department. consists of four other persons whom you will super- Sos
Vise. ao

. - (
The: ideal: candidate:will have’3:to:4 years experience:working for a major, accounting oh 4
firm and be able-té demonstrate enthusiasm,.a record of achievement in his/her career ret
aS well as‘thé ‘experience: of managing ‘a team to: achieve: project goals-within tight ee
deadlines, strong personal and organizational skills:and:the adaptability to function ina i a
fast-paced constantly evolving environment.

(S)he Will also:be-able to demonstrate ‘the ability, to,use: Microsoft Office tools to ah.ad-
vanced level (especially Excel). Some’ travel will be required -on an-voccasional basis
for training.:and meetings.

Accounts.Department Staff

The Ginn Company is looking: for-a-talented, ‘experienced, ‘energetic. accourits depart-
ment personnel forthe operation-of the day-to-day. operations of its Finance: Depart-
mentin Freeport: Grand Bahama..

The roles involve:

» Accounts.Payable:

« Payroll/Human Resources
» -Job:.costing



The ideal candidates will be able.to demonstrate enthusiasm; a recérd of achievement
in their career, the ability:to work.as part of a team, the work:ethic:ta.achieve project
‘goals Within tight deadlines and adaptability to function in’a' fast-paced constantly
evolving environment.
They will also’ be able to: démonstrate the. ability to Use Microsoft’Office'todls to anad-
vanced level (especially Excel). Some®travel will be required on an occasional basis
for training.

Receptionist

The Ginn Company has an employment opportunity: for a Receptionist in Freeport
‘Grahd Bahama. Nil ; :

This important role involves, among other matters, béing the first person to greet.a visi-
tor or caller to the company’s premises and dealing:with them in’a courteous and pro-
fessional manner .in:accordance with Ginn. Company: standards.



The ideal candidate will be. able to demonstrate’ enthusiasin,':strong personal and or».
ganizational skills, work ethic, the ‘ability'to;work as pait of a team ‘and the adaptability

to function in’a fast-paced constantly evolving environment. + es . a
(S)he will-also be.able to-demonstrate the ability to type andiuse: Microsoft Office:toolss.\” ah,
to an intermediate: evel (especially,\Word). Some travel. will be tequired on an occa *

‘Se
sional basis for training. Mist Mts C ia
Candidates must he available to bé on site from 8.30a.m. to 12:30p.m. and 4.30p.t. to se
5.00p:m.. : : : EG BBG eke ‘Gy

‘ EU Rie



s : Bens a / ‘ i Ma ik eas 2% #
All candidates must be of legal age, medically capable of perfdrming the pertan. a
gally employable and have the unrestricted, right to engage in gainfulemploymaent.in'
The Bahamas. : , EPH

ackage will be offered, commensurate: Nata:





"A very competitive salary and benefits pac
your demohsttated experience and ability, fi)



Send resumes and a summary of your curtrent:compensation and benefits to
bahamaresume@ginncompany.com i
or PO Box F-42498-343






THE. TRIBUNE





ee



ahd

IS gc

oye

Aesth Jnterna-
tional today made

publica report detailing its con-
cerns about torture and other
cruel, inhuman oF degrading
treatment of prisoners and
detainees both in the US and
in US detention sites around
the world.

The report has already been
sent to members of the UN
Committee Against Torture,
who will be examining the US
compliance with the Conven-
tion against Torture and Other
Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading
Treatment or Punishment on
May 5 and 8 in Geneva. The
Convention against Torture

prohibits the:use of torture in all:

circumstances and requires
states to take effective legal and
other measures to prevent tor-

ture and to’ provide: appropri- |

ate punishment : for those who
commit torture,
The US is reportedly sending

a 30-strong delegation to Gene- __

va to defend its record. In its
written:report to. the Commit-

tee, the US government assert-. |

ed its unequivocal opposition
to the use:or practice of torture
under‘any circumstances —

including war‘or. public emer- .

gency.

“Although the US govern- .-

ment continues to assert its con-





treatien hese statement,
contradict what is happening in.
practige,”

tor Of Amnesty International
USA.HS

eradigate ‘torture it is actually









‘and Rev. Dr.



uncles.

fo service time.

X.



demnation of torture and ill-.

said ‘Curt Goering,
Senior{Deputy Executive Direc-'

‘The US government is .
not only failing to take steps to.

creatifig a climate in which tor-

Good d Shepherd
‘Funeral Home

Montrose Avenue 322-4258 ¢ Fax: 325-8343
Paging: 382-0040, 382-0039

Ronen

Le Ormando Rolle, 19

will be held on Sunday 7th May, 2006.
at 2pm at Christ the King Anglican
Ghurch, Ridgeland Park West.
Officiating | will be the Venerable
‘Archdeacon |. Ranfurly Brown and
| internment will be at Woodlawn Garden
Cemetery, Soldier Rd.

He is: survived by his grand parents
Ms. Florine Rolle and Geraldine Smith,
Irvin Clarke; father,
Raymond Smith; 4 sisters, Ms. Tammy
and La- Shea. Rolle, Shantell and
Georgette Smith; 3 brothers, ‘Mr. Dillon
Fowler, ‘Raymond Smith Jr. and
Cleveland Davis; 10 uncles, Fletcher
: _ Patrick. Bain, Ron and Gary.
Rolle, Charles and Hulen Whylly,
# Solomon, Samuel, Bruce, Lynden, Irvin
Clarke Jt 9 aunts, Carnie and Terry
| Rolle, Sharlen and Brenda Clarke,

Evelyn Whylly, Lovely Hanna, Yvonne
| Smith Gardiner, Edith and Gennie.
-Rahming, 14 grand aunts and 4 grand

Arrangement are being handle by Good |
saat Funeral Home, Mountrose

Relatives and friends may pay their
respects at the Funeral home:from
Friday-at to and at the Church 1:30 pm



ture and other ill-treatment can
flourish — including by trying to
narrow the definition of tor-

. ture.”

-The Amnesty International
report describes how measures
taken by the US government in

‘ response to widespread torture
_and ill-treatment of detainees
: held in US military. custody in

the.context of the. “war on ter-

ror” shave: been far from ade- -
», quate, This is‘despite evidence

that much of the ill-treatment

stemmed directly from official |
-policy and practice. =~

L if he report reviews sev-
eral. cases. where




etainees held in US custody in

“Afghanistan and Iraq have died

under torture. To this day,.no

_ US agent has been prosecuted
for.“torture” or “war crimes”. :
“Phe heaviest sentence: —

imposed on anyone to date for a
torture-related death while in
US custody.is five months —

‘




































‘apt






the same sentence that you
might receive in the US for
stealing a bicycle. In this case,
the five-month sentence was for
assaulting a 22-year-old taxi-dri-
ver who was hooded and
chained to a ceiling while being
kicked and beaten until he
died,” said Curt Goering.
“While the government con-
tinues to try to claim ‘that the
abuse of detainees in US cus-

tody was mainly due to a few .

‘aberrant’ soldiers, there is clear
evidence to the contrary. Most
of the torture and ill-treatment
stemmed directly from official-
ly sanctioned procedures and
policies — including interroga-
tion techniques approved by
Secretary of Defence Donald
Rumsfeld,” said Javier Zuniga,

‘Amnesty International’s Amer-

icas Programme Director.

he report also lists con-
cerns surrounding vio-
lations of the Convention

against Torture under US

domestic law, including ill-treat-
ment and excessive force by

police, cruel use of:electro-
. shock -weapons, inhuman. and : :
degrading conditions of isola-

tion in “super-max” security
prisons and abuses against
women in the prison system —
including sexual abuse by male
guards and shackling while
pregnant and in labour.

The US last appeared before
the Committee Against Torture
in May 2000. Practices criticized
by the Committee six years ago
— such as the use of electro-
shock weapons and excessive-
ly harsh conditions in “super-
maximum” security prisons —
have in some cases been export-
ed for use by US forces abroad
— serving as a model for the
treatment: of US detainees in
the context of the * ‘war on ter-
ror”

“The US has long taken a
selective approach to interna-
tional standards, but in recent
years, the US government has
taken unprecedented steps to
disregard its obligations under
international treaties. This
threatens to undermine the
whole framework of interna-
tional human rights law —
including the consensus on the
absolute prohibition of torture
and other cruel, inhuman or
degrading treatment or punish-

. ment,” said Javier Zuniga,

#

Amnesty International called
on the US to demonstrate its
commitment to eradicating tor-
ture, by withdrawing the reser-
vations it has entered to the
Convention against Torture,
including its “understanding”
of Article 1 of the Convention,
which could restrict the scope
of the definition of torture by
the US:

The organisation also called
on the US to clarify to the Com-
mittee in no uncertain terms
that under its laws no one,

including the President, has the

right or authority to order the
torture or ill-treatment of

_detainees, under any circum-

stances whatsoever — and that
anyone who does so, including
the President, will have com-
mitted a crime.

BACKGROUND

] he Committee Against
Torture is a 10-mem-

_ber body of independent

experts established by the Con-
vention against Torture to mon-
itor the compliance of states
with their obligations under the
treaty. It meets twice a year

sovernment creating ‘climate of torture’

and, among other tasks, reviews
the periodic reports of states.
At its forthcoming 36th session,
which will take place from May
1 to 19, 2006, it will consider
reports presented by Georgia,
Guatemala, Republic of Korea,
Qatar, Peru, Togo and the US.
Amnesty International has pro-
vided written briefings to the
Committee in respect of Geor-
gia, Guatemala, Qatar, Togo
and the US.

The second and third period-
ic reports of the US will be con-
sidered by the Human Rights
Committee, which monitors
states’ compliance under the
International Covenant on Civ-
il and Political Rights, at its 87th
session in July.

In total, 141 states have rati-

fied the Convention against |

Torture.

For a full copy of the report, _
see http://web.amnesty.org/ —
library/index/engamr510612006

Amnesty International is
campaigning to stop torture
and other ill-treatment in
the “war.on terror”. For more
information, please go to
the campaign home page::
http://web.amnesty.org/pages/st
optorture-index-eng 4

Ther new vOn The Run store from ESSO is open again, at the
corner of Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue. There is
fresh food and everthing you'll ever need.

“T read The Tribune for local
news, sports, and health &
beauty tips. My day isn’t

complete until I’ve read it.

The Tribune is my

newspaper.”

SHENIQUE RILEY-MCKENZIE

PARADISE ISLAND STRAW VENDOR,
ARTIST & SOCCER COACH

Purchase The Tribune from your lecal
convenience store:or street vendor.



The Tribune

Why Voice, Why Pongpaper”
PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006



LOCAL AND CARIBBEAN NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Kerzner helps out
with Coastal
Awareness Month

KEEPING the country’s

environment clean for present,

and future generations was the
focus of a recent clean-up cam-
paign at Montagu Beach organ-
ised by Kerzner International’s
Discover Atlantis Department.

The employees from Discov-
er Atlantis were also joined by
Kerzner’s marine aquarium
operations and marine mammal
operation.

The clean up effort coincided
with Coastal Awareness’ Month



a PICTURED left to right are Kersaer’s employees during the

clean up effort at Montague Beach. Pictured is Niketa Braynen, °

Lab Assistant, marine aquarium operations; Pamela Govett,
Veterinarian, marine mammal operations; Vanessa Haley,
assistant manager, Discover Atlantis and Miaya Armstrong, lab
manager, nee Seton

tease sveasuessavacescorsneneseguebeeueneeaquessencusssesenassegnenguapsensonsaqusapuenscnsvavensessesevsonevsersarsabaccsesesensseensaqerenesesassnsucaseseysenuaneneratsaeagyeananenenacseersaaeeeeses

in April by the Ministry of
Tourism along with its various
public and private sector part-
ners. The clean up at Montagu
Beach, one of.our country’s
most significant historical attrac-
tions, was held in conjunction
with Bahamas Waste, the
Bahamas National Trust and
The Nature Conservancy.

On hand for the event was
Kerzner International’s senior

-vice-president of marine and

water park operations Mark
Gsellman, who applauded the
division’s efforts and.joined the
employees in protecting one of
our country’s most vital
resources — the environment.
Kerzner’s senior director of
marine mammal qperations, Al
Kelley said that Kerzner Inter-
national was excited to be a part
of the beach clean up and do its

part to help preserve the envi-

ronment, “The oceans are too
precious for us to lose and this is
a battle that will be on going for

_ along time,” said Kelly.

Ron Pinder, junior minister
in the Ministry of Energy and
Environment said the govern-
ment.is always grateful when
its efforts and various. policies
are supported by non-govern-

i

@ CRISPIN Smith of Kerzner

International does his part in ,
assisting with the clean up
effort at Montagu Beach

mental organisations.
Vanessa Haley, assistant
manager at Discover Atlantis
came up with the idea to hold a
beach clean-up. She thought
that there would be no better
place to hold the initiative than
Montagu Beach, which was pre-
viously adopted by Kerzner
International and other busi-
nesses within the area.
Eleanor Phillips, director of

the Bahamas programme of

The Nature Conservancy
described the clean- -up cam-
paign as “a fantastic initiative”
by Kerzner International.

Haiti’s president-elect wraps up visit to Canada

M MONTREAL __
HAITYS President-elect Rene Preval

wrapped up an informal visit to Canada on _

Wednesday, insisting that he did not come.
to plead for money, yet taking home anoth-
er C$48 million (US$43 million) in. ids
according to Associated Press.: _

Preval ended four days of meetings i in

Ottawa and the French-speaking province ~

of Quebec saying he intends to put an end
to visits by Haitian leaders in which they
beg for foreign aid and instead focus on

explaining the crisis facing the poorest ~



(We're taking

nation in the western hémispliere:

“J have not, come here asking for pro-
jects or money,” he said after meeting with
Quebec Premiet Jean Charest in Quebec
City, home to some 120,000 Haitians. “I

- have come to explain. I have come to seek
- comprehension and friendship.”

‘Preval, who. was. elected on February 7

-. and will be sworn in later this month, said

he hoped to remain in power for five years,

’ during which time he would push to give his
‘ jmpoverished Caribbean nation a sound

infrastructure and solid institutions.

Earlier this week, Preval.met with Prime .

it back to the good ole days!

Minister Stephen Harper, Haitian-born Gov-
ernor-General Michaelle Jean and Foreign
Affairs Minister Peter MacKay. He also vis-
ited Montreal, where he mingled with mem-
bers of the city’s Haitian community.
During the visit, Ottawa announced an
additional financial assistance package of
C$48 million (US$43 million) to promote
good governance and democracy in Haiti.
‘Haiti is the largest beneficiary of Cana-
dian aid in the Americas. Over the last two
years, Canada has spent more than C$190
million (US$171 million) funding recon-
struction and development projects.

We're taking



it back to the real music!
A smart casual dress code will be strictly enforced










FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Park Hyatt to

“THE investment group
behind the proposed develop-
ment at Governor’s Harbour’s
former Club Med resort yes-
terday announced that Global
Hyatt Corporation had select-
ed the project as the first
Caribbean location for its Park
Hyatt brand.

: EIC Resorts, the group
headed by Pennsylvania-based
investor Edward Lauth, has
signed a Letter of Intent with
Global Hyatt Corporation that
will see it operate the
Eleuthera-based resort’s bou-
tique hotel and amenities.

In a statement, EIC Resorts
said its French Leave Resoit,
featuring the Park Hyatt Hotel
and Savannah Hill, an “upscale
residential community”, will
cover 356 acres. Resort "resi-
dences, a marina village and
restaurants are also involved
in the development.

-Mr Lauth told The Tribune
earlier this.year that the project

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

a

CABLE Bahamas ide slamed the

. Tribune Business Editor -



B EDWARD LAUTH

-was still moving forward and

that construction was planned
to begin this year, despite suf-
fering several temporary set-
backs.

He explained that he was

‘close to concluding negotia-

SEE page 2B

Believes digital boxes will ‘eradicate’ security |
problems in 2006; says refusal to give basic

‘Model for Family Island

brand Eleuthera sustainable development’
investment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL.
Tribune Business Editor

n investor yes-

terday told The

Tribune’ he

believed his

project was “a

model for sustainable develop-
ment” in the Family Islands,
creating “critical economic
mass” on Eleuthera while
respecting its environment and
character, as all parties sought
to resolve electrical supply
problems to the development.
Carry Rich, the principal
behind the Windermere Island
Club, said the Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation was “being
very proactive” in seeking to
solve the issue of supplying
power to the development,
which is: currently under con-

struction on the island just off
‘mainland Eleuthera that was

once a renowned vacation des-
tination for the British Royal
Family.

The project requires a new
electricity substation to be built
to supply three-phase power to

Windermere investor working with BEC to resolve
power supply, with $15-$20m invested to date

the project, which currently only
receives one-phase power.

Mr Rich said all parties
involved were collaborating
closely to “figure it out”, as
BEC’s priorities understandably
lay with upgrading its infra-
structure in New Providence

He added that he was “com-
mitted to the long term, how-
ever long it takes” with the
Windermere Island Club, hav-
ing invested not just for finan-
cial motives but to provide a
place that his family could also
enjoy.

Mr Rich ‘said the project,
which currently directly
employs 40-50 workers, was tak-
ing “small steps” towards estab-
lishing a sustainable boutique
resort and residential commu-
nity on the 160 acres of land it
owns at the northern end of
Windermere Island.

arrival of “pirated and security compro-
mised set top boxes” in the Bahamian
‘market for its flat cable television rev-
enues in fiscal.2005, but believes the
introduction of its digital services will
combat this in 2006.

The BISX-listed company’s annual
report said piracy had caused it “signifi-
cant revenue losses” in 2005, with pre-
mium cable television revenue showing
“virtually no growth” over 2004, and pay-

| per-view revenues off by more than 26
per cent. ,

“These results are believed to be pri-
marily the product of the introduction
of pirated and security compromised set-

© 2004 ADWORRR?

cable rate increase ‘unprecedented’

top boxes into the local community,”
Cable Bahamas said.

“These boxes have the ability to deci-
pher our entire encrypted analogue pre-
mium channel offering, providing the ille-
gal users free access to the full premium
tier programmes without obtaining a
valid subscription fromthe company.

- “As a result of this proliferation in ille-
gal activity, the company experienced
significant revenue losses.”

Yet through the arrival et Aigital set

top boxes and an all-digital set of service
offerings, Cable Bahamas said it expect-
ed to “fully eradicate” piracy by phasing
out the old analogue premium tiers.

As a result, the company said premium
and pay-per-view revenues were, set to
rebound in 2006. 5g

Revenues from cable television account
for 59 per cent of Cable Bahamas’ total

SEE page 5B

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Visitor arrivals fall by 6%

While the electricity supply
difficulties illustrate the prob-
lems of providing utilities and

infrastructure for Family Island

developments, Mr Rich said his
aim was to create a lasting pro-
ject that was sustained by both
the natural environment and
the resources of the local
Eleuthera community, without
resorting to brings in outside
labour.

“There are no words to
describe how important it is,”
said Mr Rich of sustainable
development. “I would stop
doing it if we didn’t do it ina

- sustainable fashion. That’s the

ethos.
“Tf you don’t build it proper-

ly, it-cannot be sustainable. If

you try to do it too fast, it can-
not be sustainable. It doesn’t
just flower. If you force some-
thing to bloom, it dies.”

Mr Rich said the reason some
Family Island investment pro-
jects failed was because they

‘lacked “critical mass”, while he
felt imposing a 200-300-room. -

hotel was not in keeping’ with
the character of many islands.
“T selected Windermere not
only because of its natural beau-
ty, but the critical mass that was

~valready here,” he explained:

Windermere already had 75
families resident, and “without
a base of people, you can’t sur-

The Windermere Island Club —

will add about 75 further fami-
lies to the mix, and Mr Rich
‘said: “We feel 150, that is the
basis to start a sustainable com-
munity. It has enough individual
people here residing that we can
employ full-time a group of
people that are local to support
the community.

’ “This is not about Carry Rich.
This is about the people of
Savannah Sound, Tarpum Bay, .

Governor’s Harbour and Rock. .

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TOTAL visitor arrivals to

‘the Bahamas fell by 6 per cent

in January 2006, a 7 per cent
increase in air arrivals being
offset by an 11 per cent decline
in sea arrivals.

The Ministry of Tourism.

said the 11 per cent fall in
cruise arrivals to Nassau/Par-
adise Island as a first port of
entry occurred because the

TE CLO TERS

Sound.

“This is about a single pro-
ject built on extremely sustain-
able plans, that will have a foun-

_ dation that allows it to grow and

provide opportunities for gen-
erations to come because we
will have attained a critical, sus-
tainable economic mass.

“This is a team here. That’s
the biggest thing. That’s what

it’s all about. It’s about the con-
,cept, ethos of Windermere,

developing a sustainable Out
Island community with the
indigenous people of that com-
munity at the forefront.” |

Mr Rich said some $15- $20
million had been invested in the
project to date, including pur=
chasing the land.

He added that the project was
seeking to obtain the permits
to construct the first 12 suites
of its 50-room boutique hotel,
and-had started construction on .
three of the 52 residential sites.

_ Deposits have been received for

about 22 of the residential sites.

The development will also
feature, when completed, a spa
and 20 cottage sites, and Mr
Rich said a further four home
sites and the “model cottage”:
will “come‘on line” this sum-
AMEr, RAE a Fett

The development has com-.
pleted construction of its utili-
ties plant, including a reverse

iL ToS

- osmosis plant, and is anticipat-

ing the arrival of a 132,000 gal-

' lon water tank, Mr Rich said.

’ He added that about 90 per
cent of Windermere Island
Club’s infrastructure was com-
plete, the development having
laid all its water lines and now
in the process of installing elec-
tricity and telephone lines.
Almost three miles of roads
have been plaid out.

__SEE page 4B

Air arrivals increase
7% in January, but not
enough to offset 11%
sea decline —

major lines brought in fewer
passengers. However, cruise
arrivals to Nassau/Paradise

SEE page 2B

PAKADISE ISLAND
Saturday, May oth

OLY Ryapeacn Ya pm 6)



ain
ep
PAGE 2B, FRic...

, MAY 5, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



SOK Natok



Firms must select investors wisely

he final member of your
team that you need to
pick is your investor.
Unlike partners,
investors are harder to
find, so you may be tempted to wel-
come them initially with open arms.
Yet-they, too, will be your long-term
partner, so your due diligence will be
of equal importance.

Choosing your investor should be
made with the same care as choosing
your partner. The four-part test that
one-can use for choosing your partner
can also be used to determine which
investor is suitable for you.

Trust

First, you should always trust your
gut instinct. If you sense anything is
not quite right, then be wary of taking
on that investor. There is an old
expression that “a principle is only a
principle when it costs you money”. If
you compromise your principles on
investor choice, it may cost you a lot
more than money.

Sécond, you must do due diligence
on your prospective investors. Are
they of sound character? What track
record have they got in making invest-
ments? Are they sound financially?
An.investor of suspect character, and
with a poor credit rating, could be
dangerous for your business.

Investors with financial problems
are: more likely to try and recover

é



| Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer

their investment early if their cir-
cumstances change. If they can’t
afford to lose their investment, they
could become increasingly desperate
should things not go to plan. And
they may even resort to legal action to
get their demands met. So, do your
due diligence, by taking references
and talking to people that know them,
aswell as people in the companies
they have an investment relationship
with.

Third, be clear about why you want
this person as an investor. Do you
want a financially sophisticated, expe-
rienced investor? Or would you settle
for someone of lesser experience? Do
you want a financial investor, who
will leave you alone to run the busi-
ness? Are you looking for someone
who will take an added interest in the
business, sit on your Board or advi-
sory panel, bring his or her contacts to
the table, and give you valuable
advice and introductions?

Or, are you looking for someone
to take a management role in the
business, roll up their sleeves and get
involved in the minutiae of your busi-

ness? You will need to think this
through clearly, as each possibility
has different advantages and disad-
vantages.

Fourth, try to develop an under-
standing of what is expected from
each of you during the term of the
investment; what goals each of you
have for the business; and what inter-
action you expect to have between
each other. Knowing these things ear-
ly on will make it easier for you to
walk from a deal up front if you can’t
achieve a compromise. Try to put
your agreement in writing, so if things
get difficult you will have a document
to resolve any disputes.

So, what else can you do to ensure
that your relationship with your
potential investor will go smoothly?
There are three things you should
consider.

Investors

First, try and find risk-tolerant
investors who are willing and able to
accept and live with the downside risk

_of their investment. Look for

investors who are diversified, have
experience with start-ups, have excess

capacity, and are risk-seeking, partic-

ularly those serial entrepreneurs-who
invest in multiple businesses. They
will be more pragmatic should things
go wrong and also be able to offer

useful advice. Investors with a high

profile should be approached, as they

could be the anchor investor that
draws others to your venture.
Second, explain the risks to your
potential investors as honestly as you
can. Make sure that they understand
the potential risks and downsides.
Their investment can go down as well
as up. If the worst-case scenario is
that they could lose all their money,
explain this to them up front as you
don’t want them spending sleepless
nights when things go wrong.
Thirdly, explain the timeframe of
the investment. Make clear to them
they are going to be in for the long
haul, possibly as-much as five years
before they can get their money out.
Let them know that if the business
does really well and you obtain sec-
ond round financing, they may have
to leave their money in even longer.
They need to know that it will be vir-
tually impossible for them to sell their
shareholding to others, as the mar-
ket for that type of transaction is illiq-
uid. You should also warn them that
if things go well, you might need fur-
ther finance, which could dilute their
investment. Managing your investors’
expectations will be critical if you are
to get the best.out of the relationship.
Remember, your investors will be
looking to minimise the downside
exposure of their investment. They
will be looking for you to demon-

“strate:

* Good financial control over cash
flow, careful budgeting of your

resources and good cost control.
Marketing

* Well thought out targeted mar-
keting campaigns that have a chance
of success.

* Faith and enthusiasm in what you
are doing.

* Good execution skills.

* That you have honoured past
commitments and not left investors
high and dry.

* Well-thought-out contingency

plans should things not go to plan.
x

nifty «

Make sure that when you present to \

them, that you will have these areas \.

covered.

Choosing the right investor is a cru-”

cial area that will require much disci-

\

pline, as it will have a direct bearing ©

on your future success or failure. So,

in order to avoid the trap of.

antipreneurship, make sure you spend °

your time properly, as it will pay large

dividends for your future business

success.
NB: Adapted from his upcoming

book, Antipreneurship And How to’

Avoid It, Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing and
communications experience in Lon-

don and the Bahamas. He consults’

and currently lives in Nassau, and can —

be contacted at:
markalexpalmer@mac.com
© Mark Palmer. All rights reserved



Total visitor arrivals to
the Bahamas fall by 6%

FROM page 1B

Island as a second port of entry
were up in January 2006 com-
pared to the previous year.
While Norwegian Cruise
Lines brought in more passen- .
gers during January’ 20065"
Princess Cruises brought in na,
passengers at all. There was.a
44 per cent fall in passengers
brought in by Celebrity Cruise
Lines; a 4 per cent decline in
Carnival passengers; a 9 per
cent drop in Costa Cruises
arrivals; a 45 per cent decline
in‘Holland American Cruises
passengers; a 10 per cent fall in
Royal Caribbean arrivals; and
43 per cent drop on Imperial
Majesty Cruises arrivals.
However, increased num-
bers of passengers brought to’
the island by Carnival Cruise
Lines and Norwegian Cruise
Lines ensured that arrivals to
Grand Bahama were up by 25
per cent by first port of entry

\

for January 2006.

The Ministry of Tourism
said: “Carnival brought in 57
per cent more passengers to
Grand Bahama in January
2006 using their ships the Fas-

: ination, Fantasy, Celebration. |
wand the, Carnival Liberty..,Nor-, .
-wegian Cruises brought.in 211, -

per cent more cruise passen-
gers to Grand Bahama as a
first port of call than in January
2005.

Increase

“The increase in cruise
arrivals brought in by Carni-
val Cruise Lines and Norwe-
gian Cruises was enough to
counteract the decline in cruise
arrivals by Celebrity Cruises,
Disney Cruises, Holland
American Cruise Lines, and

.Royal Caribbean Internation-

al.”
Sea arrivals to the Family

‘ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2005/CLE/gen/01227

- IN THE SUPREME COURT
_ BETWEEN

MARY MICHELLE MAJOR

JUDY ATHENE KEMP- -HIGGS

Plaintiffs

AND

KAIVON ELDON

Defendant

NOTICE

Kaivon Eldon

Nassau, Bahamas

. Princess Cruises brought in

' of éntry than in 2005, it “failed

~ New York up.19 per cent; Mia-

stopover arrivals enjoyed

Islands fell in January 2006
because cruise arrivals
declined. While Celebrity
Cruises, Royal Caribbean and

more passengers by first port

to counteract the decline”. .|.
caused by Disney Cruises and
Holland American Cruises,
which were down by 66 per
cent and 27 per cent respec-
tively.

However, air arrivals - the
higher spending stopover visi-
tors to the Bahamas -
increased by 7 per cent in Jan-
uary 2006 to 81,367, while air
arrivals to the Family Islands
rose by 8 per cent. Air arrivals
to Grand Bahama were off by _
5 per cent. '

Eight out of 10 of
Nassau/Paradise Island’s top
10 destination markets expe-
rienced stopover arrivals
growth in January 2006, with

mi-Fort Lauderdale ahead by 3
per cent; and Washington DC
up by 43 per cent.

Half of Grand Bahama’s top
10 destination markets for

growth in January 2006, but
the other five all saw declines.

Air arrivals to all Family
Island destinations saw increas-
es for January 2006, with the
exception of Andros, the Berry
Islands and Cat Cay. -

Bis:

Pricing Information As Of:



52wk-Low
Abaco Markets

62wk-Hi

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank

HOM page 1B

- tions with Starwood’s high-end, luxury bou-
ae brand, St Regis, to operate the resort,
but this deal was halted when the hotel group.
- including St Regis - signed up to become

part of Baha Mar Development Company’ S
$1.6 billion Cable Beach expansion.

St Regis signed a contract with Baha Mar _
that prevented it from branding any other

. resort in the Bahamas, bringing negotiations
with Mr Lauth to an end. However, Park
Hyatt is not a bad replacement.

In addition, the Government was also. con-
cerned about the environmental implications
of BIC Resorts constructing a second marina

‘in Savannah Sound. :
_. BIC Resorts said yesterday that it had |
retained architects, Bernardo Fort-Brescia of
Arquitectonica, and Cesar Molina to lead the 4
designs of the property.
The Lyford Cay Club’s former managing
_ director for 24 years, Paul Thompson, will
oversee a! resort operations.

Colina

Financial Advisors Lid.



4

cottages and invitation- -only memberships.’
Mr Lauth’s background is in real estate and | |
the bottled water industry, his compan on
AquaPenn, having plants in California, Flori- | |
da and Pennsylvania. oe
_ ~~ His partners are Bob Poole and Mike L ni- |:
gan. Mr Poole is a residential developer in | |
- Pennsylvania, and is currently developing the | |
$135 million Penn State University Retire- | |
_ ment Village, while Mr Lanigan, of Mi-Jack
Products, is a provider of construction equip-
ment, material handling and intermodal ser-
- vices worldwide.
Charles Stronach is the development direc-
tor of the French Leave Resort and Marina
: Milage

brand Eleuther
-investm pi

FIC Resorts said: “Brench Leave offers
pre-construction..single-family oceanfront _
home sites and villas, and boutique luxury.
Park Hyatt condominium hotel residences | |

_ with a pool area, restaurant and full-service |.
spa. This will mark the first Caribbean loca-
tion for the Park Hyatt bran
“The more exclusive purchase opport
is at Savannah Hill, with up to 10 estate lots, —

NIE



To Pate in The Tribune,
eS al RPS 986 today!





‘ TAKE NOTICE that action has been commenced
' against you in the Supreme Court of the
‘ Commonwealth of The Bahamas Action No.
| 2005/CLE/gen/01227 by Mary Michelle Major
' and Judy Athene Kemp-Higgs in which the
Plaintiffs’ claim is for an Order that you remove
a building which encroaches on the Plaintiffs’
property, damages for trespass and costs.

AND that it has been ordered that service of the’
Writ in the said action be effected by this

advertisement.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must
enter an Appearance in this action on or before
the 2nd June 2006 otherwise judgment may be
entered against you.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
Attorneys for the Plaintiffs
Chambers
Frederick Street Steps
Nassau, Bahamas

Previous Close
Today's Close

Dally Vol,



'BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ;
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco |
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities

"J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs
Premier Real Estate

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RN

"28,00 ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets
: RND Holdings

Ht

id

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Bond Fund









- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

- Current day's weighted price for dally valume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

- Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
** = AS AT APR. 30, 2006/ **** -
AS AT APR. 28, 200

”

AS AT MAR. 31, 2006
28. eee









~ Weekly Vol

Yield %

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Fiscal deficit falls

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 3B



33.5% to $79.9m

But Central Bank sounds oil warning

& By CARA BRENNEN ;
Tribune Staff Reporter



he Government’s

fiscal deficit for

the first eight

months in its

2005-2006 year

decreased by 33.5 percent to

$79.9 million, the Central Bank

said yesterday, wityh revenues

increasing by 20.8 per cent
over 2004-2005.

Tax receipts expanded by

$106.2 million or by 17.8 per’

cent to end-February 2006, due
mainly to growth in import
duties and related stamp taxes
of 16.7 per cent and 17.5 per
cent respectively.

Receipts

Non-tax receints also rose
by $21.1 million (65.5 per cent),
an increase due mainly to a $14
million hike in immigration
fees.

However, the Central
Bank’s report on monthly eco-

nomic developments for
March found that total spend-
ing rose by 15.1 per cent to
$808.4 million, which was the
result of increases in both
recurrent and capital expendi-
ture spending.

There was an 11.4 per/cent
rise in recurrent spending, gen-
erated by increases in personal
emoluments( 7 per cent) and
transfer payments (16.8 per
cent.)

Ongoing road and building
construction activities largely
explained the 80.7 per cent
increase in capital spending.

While the report suggested
the Bahamas’ short to medi-
um-term prospects remained
positive, global developments
in international oil prices
remained a risk to that out-
look, given the potential
adverse implications for the
domestic price level and the

current account position.
Quarterly average prices at

the pump for diesel and gaso-

line rose on a year-to-year

' basis by 71 cents and 80 cents

respectively.
Control

Exchange control data
showed that non-oil imports
expanded by $11.2 million to
$132.4 million, while oil
imports doubled to $50.7mil-
lion in March 2006.

Bahamian dollar credit con-
tinued to strengthen in March,
although at:a slower place than
the increase in total deposits.
As a result, both excess
reserves and excess liquid
assets advanced during the
period.

March also saw an increase
in the bank’s excess reserves,
which increased by $26.5 mil-

lion to $236.8 million. Com-
mercial banks’ excess liquid
assets firmed by $4.5 million
to $172.7 million, in contrast
to an $18.2 million contraction
in the previous year.

Growth in external reserves
strengthened by $28.2 million,
to $38.8 million for March
2006, as the Central Bank’s net
foreign currency purchase of
$37.6 million was more than
three times higher than the
previous year’s level.

The Central Bank’s net pur-
chase from banks was appre-

.ciably higher at $61.6 million,

which completely mitigated
the increase in net sales to the
public sector from $1 million to
$24 million.

Commercial Banks’ net cur-

rency purchase improved by

$51.3 million to $63.7 million.
The Bahamian dollar credit
growth more than doubled to

$73.1 million from $31.8 mil-
lion a year ago. Net credit to
government rose by 5.9 mil-
lion to $21.4 million, and
growth to the public sector was
$1.4 million at $8.million
Domestic foreign currency
credit rebounded by $22.4 mil-
lion from the $4.3 million
decrease registered in 2005.
The private sector saw a $19
million advance in credit, up

from an $8.8 million decline in .

the previous year.
Demand

Elevated demand conditions
caused a surge in private sector



“NOTICE




The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

f you are raising funds for a —

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



credit by $139.9 million, up

from $42.7 million in 2005, and

was reinforced by ongoing
growth in consumer credit and
mortgages.

The Central Bank predicted

Lb

that the economy will remain. *

positive, strengthened by for-

eign investments and ongoing _
construction activity. we







ENEAS CORNER OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU, |

NOTICE is hereby given that CARLTON DORELUS OF |:












PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MAURICE MENNETTE
SWEETING nee RICHARDSON, of Western District of
New Providence, Bahamas, intend to. change my name
to MERIC] MENNETTE SWEETING nee RICHARDSON.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE
TOPSHAM LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the 20th
day of April, 2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., of
P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. .

~ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the leading Wealth Managers
‘in the Caribbean. We look after wealthy private clients by
‘providing them with comprehensive, value-enhancing
‘services. For our Products & Services team in Nassau we

are looking for a seasoned



international Wealth Planner

:In this challenging senior position you will be responsible
‘for providing personalized event-specific and comprehensive
‘wealth structuring strategies and solutions through the
Client Advisors to high net worth clients, addressing their
: present and future planning needs of financial, tax, estate -
‘ and insurance related matters. This may include tailor made
solutions and the sale of in-house fiduciary instruments,
life insurance, and other instruments. You will join Client
Advisors on business trips to clients with a key focus on
- advisory, acquisition and retention support. In addition you
will travel to other international UBS offices in order to
conduct marketing and business development activities.
You will also support and conduct products and wealth
planning related training to Client Advisors.

_ We are searching for a seasoned professional with extensive
international experience in wealth planning and client
consulting as well as expert knowledge of investment
products, fiduciary instruments and tax solutions. Applicants
must possess an excellent education in a relevant discipline

_ and a proven track record in a comparable position with a
leading global financial institution. Fluency in several
languages (e.g. English, French, German, Spanish) is
essential.

_ Written applications by. Bahamian nationals only should be
addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757,
Nassau, Bahamas






NOTICE ié hereby given that SIDNEY SIMILIEN OF

PLANTOL STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

-| registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
No.45 of 2000 Ne

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000,
VENUS HOLDINGS LIMITED, has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has

| therefore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was April 11, 2006.

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

“f UBS

UBS’ (Bahamas) Ltd..is one of the leading Wealth Managers in the
Caribbean. We look after wealthy private clients by providing them
with comprehensive, value-enhancing services. For our Human
Resources team in Nassau we are looking for a seasoned

Human Resources Manager

The main responsibilities of the position holder include:

Advise management, local employees and International

Assignees;

Recruit managerial and non-managerial staff (locally and on

international level);

Develop, review.and execute HR processes and policies;

Manage projects and processes in connection with Education
_ & Development, Compensation & Benefits, International

Assignment Services, Employee Relations, etc.;

Administer Payroll, Pension Plan.as well as annual performance

and compensation review processes;

Act as coach and supervisor;

Liaise with Ministry of Immigration, Labour & Training;

Liaise and negotiate with internal specialists and external service

providers.

in order to satisfy our requirements the applicants must possess:

Bachelor's degree in a relevant discipline from a recognized and
accredited educational institution, any further training is a plus;
Several years of experience in a comparable Human Resources
Management position with a leading global company (preferably
in thé banking industry);

- Solid international experience in a very diverse, complex and
dynamic environment;
Capability to successfully build up and foster relationships and
networks;
Proven track record as manager, leader and team player;
Excellent communication, presentation and coaching skills;
Sound knowledge of MS Office and HR software applications;
Fluency in a foreign language is a plus.

Written applications by Bahamian nationals or permanent residents
_only should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.

| Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas









BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for |
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as} ~
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not bey, *
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the |:
facts within twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of MAY, |;
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas..

NOTICE is hereby given that DONAT CHRISTOPHER HALL |
OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to | -
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and }.
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days | .
fromthe 5TH day-of:MAY, 2006 tothe Minister responsible }---
Hs Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
ahamas.















ene

_ Weare currently seeking talented and highly motivated candidates to join our Information Technology ("IT") Services and
Information Risk Management (“IRM”) practices.

Are you looking for a new challenge?

TT Services and IRM Associate

Successful candidates for the dual role of IT Services and IRM Associate will have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree from
an accredited institution and one to two years of experience, Exceptional writing and documentation skills are required,
Experience with Active Directory, TCPIP, network and application security skills, and backup software preferred. Duties will
include technical support for staff, management of backend {T infrastructure, IT audit compliance testing, change
management recording, and security documentation, MCP and/or CCNA certification and experience preferred.

This is an excellent opportunity to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice that offers competitive
compensation and benefits packages. :

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, copy of their transcripts and copies of any relevant certifications, to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.0.
Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@komg.com.bs,

AUDIT | TAX e ADVISORY

© 0G. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Behamian member firm of KPMG knterational, a Swiss cooperative. Al rights reserved.

NOTICE |

We would like to advise our clients that we,
VINCENT A. KNOWLES and NIGEL °
CASH are not longer associated with

' K.A.P. INSURANCE
AGENTS AND BROKERS

We are please to advise that we will continue‘
to offer insurance services to you!

Contact us at

LAMPKIN & COMPANY

_ 12 Montrose Avenue
Tel: 325-0850, Fax: 326-8024

Mr. Vincent A. Knowles and Nigel Cash
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SIGERMAIN JOHNSON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 28TH day of APRIL, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUELIN MERILIEN OF JOAN’S
HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ROSENDALE PLUM LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, which commenced on the 5th day of April
2006. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ACCOUNTANT



ADO Det OO ee

We are a globally operating Investment Fund leading.in the;-areas of Health...
Wellness and Nutrition, operating out of offices in Nassau - The Bahamas,
Geneva - Switzerland, Auckland’- New Zealand. The Fund is operating international
since 1999 and has currently more than USS 1.3 billion under management.



An opportunity arises for a qualified accountant to provide accounting services
to the fund, associated companies and their shareholders in Nassau. The role
represents a ground floor opportunity in the establishment of a physical presence
in Nassau and will provide an exciting challenge to an ambitious accountant
who is looking to gain entry to a successful and fast growing international team.

The successful candidate will be Bahamian or will have the right to work in The
Bahamas, be fully qualified (USA CPA, Canadian or UK CA or equivalent), and
will have gained some sound practical experience in an audit firm, commercial
or industrial business, particularly closing IFRS. Financial Statements and/or
auditing them. The candidate must be able to demonstrate excellent interpersonal
communication and first class English language skills (other language skills will
be a plus), PC literacy and an attention to detail. The position calls for a young
but mature executive with lots of energy and willingness to work whatever hours
may be necessary, as transactional circumstances require, in order to get the job
done accurately and on time, as portfolio companies are located in America,
Europe, Asia and Oceania.

The terms and conditions of employment will be commensurate with the
qualifications and experience of the applicant and will be attractive to the right
candidate.,

Please send or deliver detailed CV to Recruitment, IVC Americas SA,
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-3026, Nassau,
The Bahamas or email to hr@inventages.com or alternatively
pgomez@ gtbahamas.com (Grant Thorton, Accountants). Applications will be
treated with full confidentiality. 2



\
\

’

/

Vin








A small Offshore Bank is looking




PS ACA LN Pi






























mess

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Dublin in hor ov advised that |, ROSEMOND JEAN
THOwmAS, vi FO. box CB-12299, Nassau, Bahamas,
intend to change my name to ROSEMOND ETIENNE.
lf there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BEVERLEY SONIA HALL nee
JACKSON OF SIMMS STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P-O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas. ;























Secretary / Typist

Professional Office has an immediate Opening for
a Secretary / Typist. The ideal candidate must have
a minimum of Three (3) Year Office experience with
excellent communications & Computer Skills. The
applicant must possess exceptional telephone
etiquette, good attitude and be capable of working
independently and/or as a team member; should have.
a minimum typewriting skills of 5|0 wpm; and must
proficient in the Windows XP or 2000 environment;
particularly w/ software such as Microsoft Word,
Excel and Quickbooks.











Bahamians and/or Bahamian Residents are invited
to apply.




Please Fax Resume to 394-4458
e-mail: wwb @coralwave.com



for an experienced temporary




Tat
ADMINISTRATOR —



With knowledge of the International
Business Companies Act and the
formation and administration of
IBC's. ees |




Please send resume
no later than

May 12th 2006
to fax number 322-5807.










THE TRIBUNE

i

‘Sustainable development’.
FROM page 1B a

The site of the Windermere
Island Club was busy with land-
scaping and early-stage con-
struction activity when The Tri- .
bune visited yesterday.

Although there had been
claims that the project had suf-
fered delays and the Govern-
ment was unhappy with the
speed of its progress, Mr Rich
said: “We’ve been here for
three years working in the face
of a lot of opposition, detrac-
tors. The people who have been
here have been working consis-
tently since the signing of our
Heads of Agreement” in July
2003. The signing of a Heads of
Agreement between the Gov-
ernment and a developer does
not mean that construction



would offer workers a “career
path” and training, enticing peo---*’
ple to come back to the island.

He added that some 30 peo-
ple had already received full-., :
training, including horticultur/*
ists and mechanics, who had
been schooled by Daimler-
Chrysler executives who visite: ) +.
ed the project themselves, SESW Lo

The Windermere Island Clubi:.,
is working closely with five envi.» :
ronmental engineers to ensure |. :
the project maintains the nat-':.:
ural surroundings. Three of. | -,,
these are paid, Mr Rich said, ,_:
and two unpaid, including Dr,+;.;
Kathleen Sullivan-Seeley of the: ;;
University of Miami. aph 9!

“T don’t take a step without .\).,.
their direction,” Mr Rich said...
“We are trying to follow the; —

guidelines they give us to devel... , ,.,

activity will start overnight, op this project.” Pe.
something many Bahamians He added that the Winder- . , ,
seem to expect, but instead mere Island Club was “remedi-, _; ,

ating” environmental impacts. . '
caused by previous developers, °
including a 27-foot deep hole ©. ..
just offshore that had been left ~
by dredging. Sr,
Some 2500 casuarinas - an ©
invasive species - had already °
been removed from the devel-
opment site, while three nurs-
eries had been set up, with ~%
native Bahamians plants’ ,
removed and replanted from |
the roads that were cut. . |

marks the beginning of what
can become a lengthy planning
and approvals process.

Mr Rich, in common with
other developers, had an 18-
month wait for his subdivision
approvals. Without subdivision
approvals, no building permits
will be issued, preventing con-
struction work.

All employees at the project
were from Eleuthera, and Mr .
Rich said the development

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JONATHAN SYLVANAS
BRICE, of #6 East Bch Drive, RO. Box F-40993, Grand
Bahama, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
JONATHAN SYLVANAS COx. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box F-43536, |:
Grand Bahama, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days |.
after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that VILLY AUGUSTINE OF MARSH
. HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister.
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for |
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and i
that any person who knows any reason why registration/ {
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written {
and signed statement .of the facts within twenty-eight days
from.the 28TH day of APRIL, 2006 to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that WILFRID PETION OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written |

Fins
















BP dinates HRS?

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 5TH day of MAY, 2006 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
-LUWARD INVESTMENT LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act. 2000, LUWARD
INVESTMENT LTD. is in dissolution, as of April 25th, 2006.

ERR A ESET TRE Si RAR he A La PN a i. ih ei fa SF oe Oo Dat MR REG 8

International Liquidator Services Limited situated at 35A Regent]
Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



Legal Notice

NOTICE

NYK LNG SHIPPING (NO. TWO) LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of |
the International Business Companies Act. 2000, NYK LNG
SHIPPING (NO. TWO) LIMITED. is in dissolution, as of April
25th, 2006.

Mr. Hitoshi Nagasawa, No. 3-2, Marunouchi 2-chome, Chiyoda-
ku, Tokyo, Japan is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR


THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 5B

Cable Bahamas hit by ‘piracy’

FROM page 1B

revenues, The cable business
generated $33.4 million In rev-
enue for the company in fiscal
2005, a rise of 6.9 per cent Over
2004.

Subscribers increased by 6.8
- per cent im 2005 to 70,255,
growth that Cable Bahamas
said stemmed from the launch
of its Oceans Digital TV, satel-
lite dish owners converting to
cable, and the expansion of its
network to new homes.

Among the new subdivisions
that provided Cable Bahamas
with an increased customer
base were Jacaranda, Coral
Vista, Millennium Gardens
and John Clive Pugh.

However, Brendan Paddick,
Cable Bahamas chairman,
described as “unprecedented
in the cable television indus-
try” the Government’s failure

































Human Resources Manager
Deltec Bank & Trust Limited
P. O. Box N.3229

Nassau, Bahamas

to approve an increase in the
basic cable television rate of
$30 per month since the ser-
vice was first launched in 1995.

Mr Paddick said:the compa-
ny’s third application for a rate
increase was turned down by
the Television Regulatory
Authority in June 2005, forcing
Cable Bahamas to examine its
costs.

Mr Paddick wrote: “Man-
agement quickly enacted its
contingency plan to reduce
operational costs by repackag-
ing its basic television line up.

“Going forward, manage-
ment will continually review
and control its costs associated
with the basic television offer-
ing, while continuing its appeal
for reasonable rate adjust-
ments.” :

Cable television’ program-
ming costs rose by 25 per cent
in fiscal 2005, increasing from
$4.7 million in 2004 to $5.9 mil-

CITCO

Citco Fund Services

(Bahamas) Ltd

SENIOR FUND ACCOUNTANT

&

FUND ACCOUNTANT

Internationally recognized Fund Administrator, requires an experienced
Hedge Fund Accountant. The only acceptable candidates will have at least
3 years of related fund experience including excellent knowledge of complex
financial instruments including derivatives, OTC securities and private
equities. Candidates must be able to demonstrate their understanding of
financial statement preparation. ‘bh

We offer a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits plan.
' Please fax your CV along with references to the attention of:

Citco Fund Services (Bahamas) Limited

Vice President

- Fax Number: 242-393-4692.

DELTEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED.
OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATOR

Responsibilities will include (but are not limited to):

e Trade processing, settlements & payments.
_ ¢ . Cash and Broker reconciliations

?

The successful candidate should have:

* Minimum of Associate degree in Accounting, —
Banking or Finance

e At least three years back office experience in trade
processing, settlement and broker reconciliations

Completion of the Series 7 course would be a plus.

We offer an excellent benefit package and salary will be
commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may submit resumes as follows:

Resumes may also be faxed c/o 362-4623 or emailed to

anh@deltecbank.com.
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS

lion, something the company
said was the largest cost com-
ponent in providing cable tele-
vision services.

Cable television revenues
rose by only 7 per cent, and
Cable Bahamas added: “Since
the company’s inception, pro-
gramming costs and other
operational costs required in
providing cable television ser-
vices have continued to rise at
a greater rate than the associ-
ated revenues.

“This has caused the profit
margins derived from the cable
television division to decline
over the past years. In 2005,
these margins dropped further
to 40 per cent from 42 per cent.

_ “Current trends in the indus-
try suggest that programming
costs will continue to rise sig-
nificantly, and thus the com-

‘pany must apply even greater
efforts to maintain profitabili-

ty.”



ott

/




On a brighter note, Mr Pad-
dick said that since Cable
Bahamas launched Oceans
Digital TV in the 2005 fourth
quarter, some 5,500 customers
had subscribed to it in the first
nine weeks. Some 7,000 digital
set top boxes are deployed in
the Bahamas.

Cable Bahamas said its total
revenues had increased by
$31.2 million or 120 per cent
since 2000, rising from $25.9

million to $57.1 million.

The company’s Internet
business had accounted for $15
million or 48 per cent of that
growth; with cable television
contributing $8.8 million or 28
per cent; and data some $7.4
million or 24 per cent.

Cable Bahamas said that,
now, cable television account-
ed for 59 per cent of revenues;
Internet some 28 per cent; and
data another 13 per cent.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news, :

igs le hy 7° /¢) 4
on Mondays

































‘



Needed
Executive Director

The Bahama Out Islands Promotion Board, based in Plantation, Florida, is looking for
an Executive Director to lead, strategize, plan, develop and execute all marketing activities
on behalf of its fifty plus hotel membership. In addition, candidate will be responsible for
the hotel membership program, i.e., retaining the existing members through quality service
and tangible results and obtaining-additional relevant hotel members with an increasing
list of benefits, Candidate will continue efforts for increasing airlift to all relevant Out
Islands, improving the Board’s sales distribution channels, as well as maintaining and
improving the working relationship between the Board and the relevant Bahamas Government
Ministries. Candidate will also liaise with the local hotel association in areas such as product
development and lobbying/advocacy initiatives, all in an effort to “protect and enhance the
natural beauty of the Bahama Out Islands” while increasing business for the Board’s

members.

Candidate must, above all, be a solid leader that is also articulate, tenacious, persuasive,
prepared, organized, and self motivated. He or she must possess at least a four-year business
degree from an accredited university and at least 10 years of successful work experience
in tourism marketing and management. Candidate will also be responsible for preparing
annual budgets, overseeing the Board’s financial activities and for maintaining and improving
the financial health of the Board. Candidate will be responsible for a staff of approximately
five persons and previous management experience will be critical for utilizing this team
for the successful implementation of the above outlined responsibilities.

Candidate must also be a team player and a team leader; ready and willing to work in a
diverse and small team environment. Some experience in working with Caribbean government
tourism ministries is preferred. The ability to travel is a must and product knowledge of
the Bahama Out Islands and tourism market is preferable, but not mandatory.

Send résumé to: HumanResources@boipb.com. \

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Our client, a leading Bahamian company, is seeking applications for Senior
Accountant.

JOB OBJECTIVE:

To provide financial assistance in managing the company’s financial resources,
preparing financial reports and analysis, supervising certain key aspects of the
accounting function and maintaining appropriate relaions with investors and
regulatory agencies. The Senior Accountant will report to the Vice President of
Finance and the Financial Controller

PRINCIPAL DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Assist in managing the financial affairs of the company
Supervise key components of the accounting department and accounting and

internal control functions

Assist with preparation of accurate and timely interim and annual financial
reporting in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
Assist in the annual budget exercise

Assist in training and development of line accounting staff

Coordinate the annual audit process

Assist in managing cash flow and treasury functions

Any other related duties as considered necessary

REQUIREMENTS & PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Candidates should meet the following criteria:

Bachelor’s Degree or higher in accounting or related financial field

Professional accounting designation recognized by The Bahamas Institute of

Chartered Accountants — mira

Minimum of three years post qualifying experience in accounting

Leadership, management and direct supervision experience is required

Very good working knowledge of International Financial Reporting Standards

Bahamian Citizen

Solomon accounting software experience

Proficient in the use of the Microsoft range of applications

Strong technical and managerial skills

Excellent communication, analytical and reasoning skills

Excellent organizational and time management skills

Team Player with the ability to add value and strength to the team and team
oals

Fonest, hardworking and ability to meet deadlines

The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package, reflecting the
successful applicant’s experience and qualifications, including a pension plan,
medical, life, dental, and vision coverage.

Qualified individuals should submit complete resumés including references before
May 5, 2006 to:

Mark E. Munnings
Deloitte & Touche
P. O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas
or
Email:mmunnings @deloitte.com.bs

Deloitte. |:





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PRICEWATERHOUsE(COPERS @



East Hil] Street
P.O. Box N-3910

Nassav, Bahamas

Website: www.pwo.com
B-mail: pwebs@bs.pwc.com
Telephone (242) 302-5300
Facsimile (242) 302-5350

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT
To the Sharcholders of Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited
(the Bank) as of 31 December 2005. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the Bank's
management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on our
audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing.. Those
Standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about
whether the balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test
basis, evidence supporting the amiounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also
includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management,
as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe that our audit provides a
reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of
the Bank as of 31 December 2005 in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards.

Sah hoe

Chartered Accountants
24 February 2006

Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited
(incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas)

Balance Sheet
As of 31 December 2005
(Expressed in Swiss Francs) ! ;
Note 2005 2004
SFr SFr —
ASSETS
Due from banks;
Demand and call deposits : 3 2,104,438 774,607
. Time deposits ‘ 3 28,102,310 23,437,773
“he y's : 30,206,748 24,212,380
Loans and advances to customers 3 428,752 499,501
Derivative financial assets 9 235,113 281,361
Investments
- At fair value through income 4 276,276 274,862
- Held-to-maturity 3,4 769,825 508,500
Accrued interest and other assets 87,381 / 106,945
’ Advisory fees receivable 6 54,000 929,069
Investment in subsidiary, at cost 17,781 17,781
Fixed assets ; 5 57,254 98,569
Intangible asset (net of accumulated amortization of
SFr 386,052; 2004: SFr 309,326) 52,274 63,105
TOTAL ASSETS 32,185,404 26,992,073
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Liabilities
Bank overdrafts 3 - 13,400
Deposits from banks : MEGS 3 8,991,183 8,375,048
Customers’ deposits 3 15,155,898 11,647,689
Derivative financial liabilities 3,9 231,005 277,351
Accrued interest and other liabilities 3 177,509 114,032
. Management and distribution fees payable 3,6 183,500 273,000
Total liabilities 24,739,095 20,700,520
Equity
Share capital
Authorized, issued and fully paid
5,000,000 shares of SFr 1.00 each 5,000,000 5,000,000
General reserve 8 800,000 400,000
Retained earnings 1,646,309 891,553
Total equity , 7,446,309 6,291,553
‘ TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY _ 32,185,404 __ 26,992,073




Director

SIGNED ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD:



24 February 2006
Date .

Notes to Balance Sheet
31 December 2005

1.

General Informatton

Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Limited (the Bank) was incorporated on 15 October 1999

under the Companies Act, 1992, of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed
under the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act, 2000, to carry on banking and trust
business from within The Bahamas. The principal activities of the Bank consist of
providing banking, trust and investment management services to a predominantly European
based clientele. The Bank is also licensed in The Bahamas under the Securities Industry
Act, 1999, and related regulations as a Broker Dealer Class II.

The Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of Banca del Sempione, Lugano, Switzerland (the
Parent Bank) which is in tum owned by Eburnea Holding SA, Sion (52%), Molu SA,
Lugano (35%), Golden Hom Finanz AG, Lugano (11.75%), and a private investor (1.25%).

The registered office of the Bank is located at Providence House, East Hill Street, Nassau,
The Bahamas. The registered office of the Parent Bank is located at Via Peri 5, Lugano,
Switzerland. The Bank had 4 employees.as of 31 December 2005 and 2004.

2. Significant Accounting Policies

The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of this balance sheet are set out
below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless
- otherwise stated.

(a) Basis of preparation

. The Bank prepares its balance sheet in accordance with Intemational Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRS) and under the histori: a! cost convention, as modified by
the revaluation of investments held at fair value through income and all derivative
contracts.

The preparation of the balance sheet in accordance with IFRS requires management to
make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and
liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial
statements. Actual amounts could differ from those estimates.

As a result of the transitional provisions of IAS 39 (revised 2004) Financial
Instruments: Recognition and Measurement, on 1 January 2005 the Bank re-
designated all investments previously categorized as available-for-sale as investments
at fair value through income.

(b) Loans and advances

Loans and advances to customers are collateralized by cash, cash equivalents and
marketable securities held by the Bank on behalf of the borrowers. Accordingly, the
Bank has not established an impairment provision for loss on loans and advances.
Advances are due on demand.

3.

(c)

(d)

(ec)

(f)

(g)

@)

(i)

p

©

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS! |!

Investments

Investments at fair value through income comprise shares held in sub-funds of BASE
Investments SICAV, an investment company domiciled in Luxembourg (see Note 6).
Investments classified as investments at fair value through income on acquisition are
initially recognized at cost (which includes transaction costs) and are subsequently re-
measured at fair value. Fair value is based on the reported net asset value per share of
the particular sub-fund as determined by its directors on a mark-to-market basis, as of
the last business day of each month (valuation date).

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial. assets with fixed or
determinable payments and fixed maturities that the Bank’s management has the
positive intention and ability to hold to maturity. Investments classified as held-to-
maturity are carried at cost which closely approximates amortized cost as of the
balance sheet date. ,

All regular way purchases and sales of investments are recognized at trade date,
which is the date that the Bank commits to purchase or sell! the asset.

Valuation of derivative financial instruments

Forward currency contracts are initially recognized in the balance sheet at cost
(including transaction costs) and are subsequently re-measured to fair value using the
forward rate for the remaining period to maturity as of the last business day of the
financial year. f

Investment in subsidiary

Investment in subsidiary represents the cost of the Bank’s wholly owned corporate
service company, BdS Corporate Services Limited. A consolidated balance sheet is
Not presented because the Bank itself is a wholly owned subsidiary and the Parent

Bank prepares consolidated financial statements incorporating all subsidiaries that it
directly or indirectly controls.

Fixed assets

Fixed assets are stated at cost and are depreciated on a straight-line basis over their
expected useful lives, as follows:

‘Computer hardware & software 5 years

Fumiture & fixtures 9 years
Leasehold improvements 5 years :

Costs associated with maintaining computer software programs are recognized as an
expense when incurred. However, expenditures that enhance or extend the benefits |
of computer software programs beyond their original specifications and lives are
recognized as capital improvements and added to the original cost of the software.
Computer software ‘development costs recognized as assets are amortized using the
straight-line method over their useful lives but not exceeding a period of 5 years.

Intangible asset

The intangible asset represents the unamortized cost of licence fees paid for the use
of computer software. The licence fees are being amortized on a straight-line basis
over the software's estimated useful economic life of five years.

Pensions

The Bank makes contributions to a defined contribution pension plan for its
employees. The Bank’s contributions to the plan are paid in the period when they are
due.

Taxation -

The Bank is not subject to income or capital gains taxes in the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas. :
Fiduciary activities

The Bank commonly acts as trustee and in other fiduciary capacities that result in the -

holding or placing of assets on behalf of individuals, trusts and other institutions. These
assets are excluded from the balance sheet, as they are not assets.of the Bank.

Foreign currency translation

The currency of The Bahamas is the Bahamian dollar; however, the Bank’s -

functional and presentation currency is the Swiss franc as the Swiss franc is the
currency that best reflects. the economic substance of the underlying events and
circumstances relevant to the Bank. Monetary assets and liabilities and non-
monetary assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the Swiss franc

* are translated into Swiss francs using year-end rates of exchange and rates of
exchange at the dates of the transactions, respectively.

Risk Management

The Bank engages in transactions that expose it to various types of risk in the normal
course of business. These risks include credit, currency, interest rate, liquidity and
fiduciary risk. The Bank’s financial performance is dependent on its ability to understand
and effectively manage these risks.

| (a)

Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the failure of a counterparty to perform according to the terms of
the contract. From this perspective, the Bank’s credit risk exposure is primarily
concentrated in its deposits placed with other banking institutions and in its loans and
advances to customers. The Bank’s deposits have been placed with high quality
intemational banking institutions, and loans and advances to customers are
collateralized by assets held by the Bank on behalf of the borrowers. The table below
summarizes the Bank’s exposure based upon the geographical distribution of the on-
balance sheet assets and liabilities:

North & Caribbean

Central and
America Europe Bahamas Total
SFr SFr SFr SFr
Assets
Due from banks : = 30,144,228 62,520 30,206,748
Loans and advances 9,559 403,424 . 15,769 428,752
All other assets : : 1,092,808 457,096 1,549,904
Total Assets as of 31 December 2005 9,359 31,640,460 535,385 32,185,404
Liabilities
Bank overdrafts and deposits from banks - 8,991,183 - 8,991,183
Customers’ deposits and other liabilities 1,541,242 9,070,549 5,136,121 15,747,912

Total Liabilities as of 31 December 2005 1,541,242 18,061,732 $,136,121_ 24,739,095

Total Assets as of 31 December 2004 37,813 26,402,865 551,395 26,992,073

Total Liabilities as of 31 December 2004 1,391,995 12,588,793 6,719,732 20,700,520

(b) Currency risk

The Bank takes on exposure, which arises from the fluctuations in the prevailing
foreign currency exchange rates on its financial position and cash flows. The Board
of Directors sets limits on the level of exposure by currency and in total for both
overnight and intra-day positions, which are monitored daily. The table below
summarizes the Bank’s exposure to foreign currency exchange rate risk. Included in
the table are the Bank’s assets and liabilities at carrying amounts, categorized by
currency:

SFr Euro USD _. Other Total
Assets ;
Due from banks 9,643,805 14,124,143 5,000,608 1,438,192 30,206,748
_ Loans and advances 17,709 392,687. 17,989 367 428,752
All other assets 1,504,479 38,142 7,283 5 1,549,904
Total Assets as of ? .
31 December 2005 11,165,993 14,584,972 5,025,880 1,438,559 32,185,404
Liabilities
Bank overdrafts and
deposits from banks 2 6,559,104 2,432,079 3 8,991,183
Customers’ deposits 547912

and other liabilities 5,262,639 7,134,147 1,964,706 1,386,420

Total Liabilties as of

31 December 2005 5,262,639 13,693,251 4,396,785 .__1,386,420..__ 24,739,098
wales on 4,903,354 861,721 629,095 52,139 1,446

a Becueccuoed 9,859,768 12,462,900 3,763,189 906,216 ___ 26,992,073
afnccueie sud = 3,644,096 12,405,547 3,758,899 891,978 20,7
Caier as pat 215,672 57,353 4,290 14 6,291,553

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 7B

The Bank also acts as investment manager of Lepton Fund Ltd. (Lepton) under the terms of
an agreement dated 20 February 2004. Lepton is an open-end investment company
incorporated as an International Business Company in the British Virgin Islands. Lepton
seeks capital appreciation by investing its assets in hedge funds operated by other
investment managers, The Bank is responsible for, among other things: (i) managing the
investment and reinvestment of cash,. securities and other property from time to time -
comprising Lepton’s assets, (ii) arranging for the general administration of Lepton, and (iii)
effecting the proper and efficient management and safekeeping of Lepton’s assets. Lepton

(c) Interest rate risk

The Bank takes on exposure arising from the fluctuations in the prevailing levels of
market interest rates on its financial position and cash flows. Interest margins may
increase as a result of such changes, but may reduce or create losses in the event that
unexpected movements arise. The Bank manages this risk by retaining a level of
assets to liabilities with similar principal values, interest rates and maturity dates.

nbn one he aicfanaisnhalnbobabaeta

4 The tables below summarise the effective interest rate by major currencies as of the .

f balance sheet date: was launched in February 2005 and the Bank earns management fees equal to 1.25% per
i annum based on Lepton’s average monthly net asset value. Furthermore, the Bank is
a 31 December 2005 SFr Euro USD entitled to a performance fee equal to 15% of Lepton’s net new profits including unrealized
} eae % % % gains after achieving a 5% hurdle rate. The Bank shares 50% of the management and
i . ;

H Pe wie oe ci en eras ase ae earned with an extemal investment consultant. For the year ended 31
i Feed ae. EG cs 400 ember 2005, the Bank earned management fees from Lepton of approximately SFr 182
if thousand (2004: SFr Nil) before payments to the external investment consultant.

it Liabilities

ve Deposits from banks 2 2.13 3.25 7. Related Party Balances

es Customers’ deposits 0.65 1.71 2.80

pe i ; 1 . a
i 4 tual ; Ges ee ie Parties are considered to be related if one party has the ability to control the other party or
4 Dece : o % exercise significant influence over the other party in making financial. or operational
i Assets decisions. The Bank is a member of a group of affiliated companies and has extensive
t ( Deposits with banke: 0.61 2.07 2.08 transactions and relationships with members of the group. Related parties (termed
i Loans and advances to customers 4,20 2.57 ‘5.95 affiliates) comprise the Parent Bank, its directors, companies in which it controls 20% or
i 3 tae. more of the share capital, the Bank’s own directors, and companies which are significantly
¥ resuils Hoes als _ Ae a influenced by the Bank’s own directors.

{ Customers’ deposits 0.14 1.77 1.85

Included in the balance sheet are the following balances with related parties:

ty
ef
i
i (d) Liquidity risk
A 2005 2004
dq Liquidity risk is the risk that the Bank might not have the necessary liquidity to meet apes. SFr
| its contractual obligations. The Bank manages its liquidity by matching liabilities Balances :
M4 with assets of similar maturity periods. The table below summarizes the significant
H assets and Jiabilities of the Bank which are classified, based on the period remaining Assets
Fl to maturity from the balance sheet date: Due from banks — demand and call deposits 2,041,918 757,029
i ‘Three months Threeto More than ae Sa ae ~ time deposits 41 64 685,807
; or less six months six months Total ans ancacyances to customers 9 3
i SFr SFr SFr SFr Derivative financial assets 161,796 281,361
a Ametnas = es 2005 Investments at fair value through income 276,276 274,862
5 ~ Demand and eall deposits 2,104,438 - 2,104,438 Accrued interest and other assets 14,650 16,880
2 - Time deposits 28,402,310 - 28,102,310 Advisory fees receivable 54,000 914,069
: Loans and advances to customers 187,837 240,915 . 428,752 : sas 1 1 17
Held-to-maturity investments 254,525 254,050 261,250 169,825 Investment in subsidiary 7,78 781
Tota! 30,649,110 494,965 261,250 __31,405,325 /
. Liabilities
Liabilities as of 31 December 2005 : Bank overdrafts - 13,400
Deposits from banks 8,447,181 544,002 - 8,991,183 Deposits from banks 8 991.183 $.375,048
ipa ; “Customers? deposi 2.716841 1,111,439
- Demand 12,931,983 . - 12,931,983 omers’ deposits 1716, i111,
- Time 1,959,686 264,229 : 2,223,915 Derivative financial liabilities 212,113 15,577
Total _ 23,338,850 808,231 24,147,081 Accrued interest and other liabilities - 109,206 41,011
Net liquidity gap 7,310,260 (313,266) 261,250 7,258,244 Management and distribution fees payable 183,500 Le
Three months Three to More than : j ;
or less six months six months Total
“ SFr SFr Sfr SFr
Assets as of 31 December 2004 8. General Reserve
; - Due from banks . p ‘
} = rs und call deposits a oo z Elgg oar The Bank occasionally makes an appropriation to the general reserve account for
-. Time deposits 437, - iS 437,773 . nt
if ‘cand’ aad ad varices 16 Guster 260,381 239,120 : y 499,301 unforeseeable risks and future losses. Amounts transferred to the general reserve account
a Held-to-maturity investments é - 508,500 508,500 can only be distributed following approval by the shareholders in a general meeting.
Total 24,472,761 239,120 $08,500 __ 25,220,381
th fer of SFr 400,000 from retained
Liabilities ne of°31 Decerubier 2004 On 24 Ce 2005, the shareholders approved the transfer of SFr 400,000 fro
Bank overdrafts 13,400 ° vty asa ae 13,400 earnings to the general reserve account.
Deposits from banks 7,565,126 809,922 - 8,375,048 i, A ‘
Customers’ deposits cease
S Denia 7,780,937 wu . 7,780,937 9. Commitments and Contingent Liabilities
rs - Time 3,612,205 254,547 . 3,866,752
- Total 18,971,668 1,064,469 = 20,036,137 (a) Lease
Net liquidity gap 5,501,093 (825,349) 508,500 5,184,244

Effective 1. July 2003, the Bank renewed its lease agreement for the rental of office
space for a further period of three years. For the year ended 31 December 2005 the
rental charge amounted to SFr 37,534 (2004: SFr 36,664). Future minimum rental

(e) Fiduciary risk
payments under the lease total SFr 21,355, all of which is due in 2006.

The Bank provides custody and advisory services to third parties, as well as trustee and
corporate administration services. These activities give rise to fiduciary risk, which is
the risk that the Bank may fail in carrying out certain mandates im accordance with the

_wishes of its clients. To manage this exposure, the Bank generally takes a conservative
approach in its undertakings for customers. Ht aoe ake eo

EEE BA CARES BR I i Rr Aha hp

Computer upgrade and:module commitment * | Ne cae
ROE Br ar b ;



The Bank has entered into a contractual agreement to purchase compute! -
system upgrades and software modules to assist with statistics, risk management, and
consolidation. Future minimum payments under the agreement total SFr 170,500, all -
of which is due in 2006. : !

acaba eae ey

4:. Investments

Investments at fair value through income represent the Bank’s holding of shares in sub-

funds of BASE Investment SICAV (See Note 6). (c) Professional service agreement

Effective 25 March 2003, the Bank entered into an agreement with the Parent Bank
to compensate the Parent Bank for the provision of support and resources for the
Bank to carry out its daily operations. Services provided by the Parent Bank include
‘review of internal control systems and procedures, provision of intemal audit -
services, technology assistance, risk management review and back-office assistance.

Held-to-maturity investments as of the year-end reporting date comprise:
31 December 2005

Nominal Fair Carrying

Value Bonds Maturity Value Value The agreement is automatically renewed at yearly intervals in the absence of written
_ SFr SFr notice of intention not to renew by either party. For the provision of these services
: during 2005, the Parent Bank charged the Bank a fee of SFr 180,000 (2004: SFr
250,000 — Citta di Vienna - 2.5% 12.01.06 250,075 254,525 180,000).
250,000 Oest Kontrollbk — 2.5% 28.05.06 251,375 254,050
250,000 Kingdom of Sweden — 4.5% 18.09.06 255,625 261,250 '
(d) Guarantees
787,075 769,825
Sr a ere EN TT As of 31 December 2005, the Bank was contingently liable to other parties in respect
of guarantees issued on behalf of its customers totalling SFr 7,792,151 (2004: SFr.
31 December 2004 6,704,659). This amount includes guarantees issued in favour of the Parent Bank
; totalling SFr 7,192,151 (2004: SFr 6,104,659). Assets held by the Bank on behalf of
Nominal Fair Carrying _the customers concemed collateralize these guarantees.
Value Bonds Maturity Value Value }
“i SFr SFr (e) Derivative financial instruments
, 250,000 . Deutsche Bank 15.08.05 253,450 253,975 The Bank enters into forward currency contracts solely as part of its client-related
AG / Frankfurt — 3.25% trading activities. Forward currency contracts are contracts to purchase and sell
| ; 250,000 Citta di Vienna — 2.5% 12.01.06 253,750 254,525 foreign currencies at specific rates of exchange on specific dates in the future. Risk
Fane Ge ce ae arises from the potential inability of counterparties to perform under the terms of the
507,200 508.500 contracts (credit risk) and from fluctuations in the foreign exchange rates (market
—= or tisk). The Bank manages the market risk of client-related positions by taking

offsetting positions with the Parent Bank, resulting in minimal market exposure. The
credit risk of client-related positions is managed by applying uniform credit standards
muintained for all activities with credit risk. Collateral held generally includes cash,
cash equivalents, and investment securities.

The fair value of held-to-maturity investments is based on the closing trade price
| established on the last trading day of the reporting period by the exchange on which the
i securities are principally traded.

5. Fixed Assets |
As of the year-end reporting date, the Bank had contractual commitments under open

Furniture Coasts forward currency contracts as follows:
Leasehold and Hardware : ,

Improvements Fixtures & Software Total 2005 2004
aus SFr SFr SFr i SFr C : 3 SFr SFr
Balance as of 31 December 2004 109,335 112,805 ° 651,081 873,221 orca iments fo BurrAse tee.

Additions Die. SMe aeat 1 rae Parent Bank 18,739,848 8,635,348
Balance as of 31 December 2005 .. 111,474 116,526 655,759 883,759 Customers 2B OBA B97.) 18,353,986
Accumulated Depreciation :
Balance as of 3{ December 2004 102,046 99,884 572,722 774,652 aS T024, TAS: <__16,989,338
Depreciation charge 7,7\7 10,276 33,860. 51.853
is 5 ee ce Saree Se Commitments to sell currencies

_ Balance as of 31 December 2005 109,763 110,160 606,582 826,505 Parent Bank 18,944,385 8,353,986
Net Book Vaine Customers 18,076,252 8,631,338
As of 31 December 2005 1,711 6,366 49,177 57,254

= 37,020,637 16,985,3

AS of 31 December 2004 7,289 12,921 78,359 98,569 oot

The contract amounts of these instruments reflect the extent of the Bank's involvement
in forward currency contracts and do not represent the Bank’s risk of loss due to
counterparty non-performance (credit risk). As of 31 December 2005, the Bank’s
exposure to credit risk on forward currency contracts is limited to those contracts with a
positive fair value, which amounted to SFr 235,113 (2004: SFr 281,361).

6. Advisory Fees

The Bank acts as the advisory company to BASE Investments SICAV (BASE) under an
agreement dated 11 July 2001 (revised 15 December 2003), BASE is an investment
company with multiple sub-funds each of which represents a separate pool of assets and
liabilities and each with a distinct policy of investment. Under the terms of the agreement,

10. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

% &

tee ARS TW.

Ripe eae os a ae, er A Oe

ORE RR ra oe Sr: ap sear ge me

ote

BE ae

the Bank is responsible for identifying and making recommendations to BASE on the
investment managers to be selected for the various sub-funds, and for monitoring their
performance. The Bank earns advisory fees at rates ranging between 0.1% and 2.1% of the
ng net asset value of each of the sub-funds and is paid on a quarterly basis. A portion
ad pilett tits earned by the Bank, in the form of management and distribution fees,
ah © investment managers, distributors, and nominees in remuneration for the

oe rendered by them to BASE. For the year ended 31 December 2005, the Bank
camed total advisory fees of approximately SFr 3.8 million (2004: SFr 3.7 million) before
payments to the managers and others, including the Parent Bank.



Financial instruments utilized by the Bank include recorded assets and liabilities, as well as
items that principally involve off-balance sheet risk. It is the Bank’s policy not to take on
material exposure to the effects of fluctuations in prevailing foreign currency exchange
rates on its financial position and cash flows. As the Bank has no significant unmatched
foreign currency positions, change in interest rates is the main cause of changes in the fair
value of the Bank’s financial instruments. The majority of the Bank’s financial instruments
are either short-term in nature or have interest rates that automatically reset to market on &
periodic basis. Accordingly, the estimated fair value is not significantly different from the
carrying value for each major category of the Bank’s recorded assets and liabilities.
PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006





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| MAX-E___ [PRETTY INPINK rence Fishburne, John uate Gunmen attack a crumbling police sta-DERDOG STORY 2004. coe
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| FRIDAY EVENING MAY 5, 2006

| Access ch Deal or No Deal ea eta |Las i “Fidelity, Security, Deliv- ton eae’ respect-|
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ia xx [Six Feet Under “Falling Into Place” | * %% LIVE FROM BAGHDAD (2002; Docudrama) Michael Keaton, He-



Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kkids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of May 2006.

Enjoy Creal Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

ply: t the Best"

mths: #

OKVO
TORIF T

FRERGROARAEE OEr BeUNBaE Bene! RANE RAUEY > CURE CURT Ree reary Bo,





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS © |
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006, PAGE 9B





HOBBES, WE'RE
TRAVELING AT
LIGHT SPEED




IST TIME
FOR SNACKS

Eq







TRAVEL, INTRIGUE, ADVEN- ee
TURE...



I THINK EVERYONE
HAS THAT FANTASY,
DON?T THEY? i





BEING ACCEPTED
BY THE CIA was

‘Y HzeN Oe

TI;
DES

ACTUALLY, CLANCY'S
BOOKS wERE MY ays
INSPIRATON/ ’








CONLD FIN
RIGHT INTO
THE BIG BANG /



LAPSE! WAIT
TILL WE LAND!

| ‘putrs ear,



IN REAL LIFE THERE AR
OFTEN MITIGATING
WORK WAS REAL. HE SAVED CIRCUMSTANCES.
LIVES IN THE DOMINICAN
REPUBLIC.

FACTS
DON'T
ALWAYS
TELL THE
WHOLE STORY,

Meo. “My Mom SAYS T SHOULD ONLY DRINK
f/f. iD

SOMETHING THAT MATCHES THE COLOR
_ OF YOUR CARPET.”





© 2006 by King Features Syndxate, Inc, Work Rights reserved

ARE YOU KIDDING?! I KNOW
EXACTLY WHAT TIME
IT (Ss! -










WHY DO YOU THINK I WAS
m TRYING TO SNEAK IN?!












es

Partnership Harmony

North dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

But, as usual with the Italians, the
partnership functioned in perfect har-








FRIDAY,

NORTH mony. '
454 Gray made an inspired decision _ MAY 5. \
Z ¥jI54 when he elected to bid four spades on rye
8 $64 a four-card suit. D’Alelio would | ARTES — Mar 21/Apr 20’ ee ie
5 K76543 |. have made five hearts, and the || Put your best foot forward when you /'
: WEST EAST British pair did exceedingly well to { meet someone for the first time! this
AK 102 #Q)97 find their spade fit at such a high ] week, Aries. This is your only chance ;
'Â¥98 v7 level. to make a good impression, so makejit
#37532 #¢AKQ1098 Avarelli led the jack of hearts, |} count. This is an influential meeting.
MARVIN : eQI #108 and D’Alelio played the ten on it. | TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21::
H EY 7 “I DON'T HAVE SOUTH This was a suit-preference signal in J A financial situation puts you ini the ..
bei we < TO,.T'M IN MY $863 the Italian methods, asking partner to J red for a few days, Taurus,, until ‘;
YOU ve *-™N ¥ cR RIBLE VAKQ10632 shift to the higher ranking of the two | your next paycheck clears. You
YIELD”: T \ ¢— side suits. - must be a bit more careful with your . :
kbAD2 So Avarelli — showing full faith | money for the next week. me Gt
The bidding: and confidence in his’ partner — at
North East South West switched to a diamond. D’Alelio GEMINI 8 een aa
Pass 1¢ 494 44 ruffed, played the ace and another | offers advice, take it. Just because ‘:
5 54¢ Dble club, and Avarelli, after. taking the you're older doesn’t necessarily -

Lo aco ny ner ares Syren, re. Wer ron rnanee
NON SEQUITUR




[_. | FANN, DENA?




WARTS NeoT

BOT PEOPLE WINE |
To we A STUPID
BATAROOM?










QoS TWAT RNORK NAN
QUESTION, DEKR ?

Opening lead — jack of hearts. .

Yesterday, we featured a hand

‘from the Tournament of Champions

where the British East-West pair,

_ Kenneth Konstam and Maurice Har-

rison-Gray (aka ‘“‘Gray”), hada
misunderstanding about a suit-pref-
erence signal and permitted the Ital-
ian pair, Walter Avarelli and Mas--
simo D’Alelio, to make five hearts
doubled. ,
- By a strange coincidence, the Ital-
ian pair on the very next deal also

king, led a second diamond for South
to ruff. As a result, the Italians col-
lected 500. points. ,

The hand points up the value of a

clear partnership understanding in a.
situation where most players at best-

have only a vague arrangement.
Adopting a special convention in
either the bidding or the play’ —
because you think it will pay im the
long run — is not nearly as important
as making sure that you and partner
are on the same page whenever the
situation actually arises..That.is what

make you wiser. Benefit from the .:

experiences of this other person. -

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul.22

Again you must be the center of

attention, Cancer. Unfortunately, ,
those around you are tired of shining
the spotlight solely on you. Give '
-others a chance for a change. *

LEO - Jul 23/Aug23. 0.
It’s hard to avoid a catastrophe at }
work, Leo. Luckily, it’s short-lived. |

Coworkers rally together to pick up

the pieces. You'll have a key role in ;

the reconstruction, .

VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22).
That difficult situation at work has; '
blown over, Virgo, leaving you in ‘'

WELL... Not

\F NAAN'R A
FISARAMAN







HOW COME CTBER
ANIMPLS GET To
GO NACREVER

TREN ARE...







had. a suit-preference opportunity. \ makes for a'good partnership.





AUC ARTHUME HET

TIGER













UCOAICS.COP.



a2 J Lie

MAN DIST. BN OBIE RSP PRESS SYNO.











HOW many words of
four letters or more .
can you make from
the letters shown
here? In making a
word, each letter:may















the clear to resume your previous :

duties without distraction. Enjoy the
minor victory.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 °-

A big move is in store for you, Libra. ''

You -have the financial means to
make a change, and ndw’s the time |
to pack up and get going. Expect :
some family resistance.



_—
EE
ope
ge
®
ak
1 V be used once onl = 2 E
. —
MON SAID TO GNE Y HANT-ME- Y You Shoup \I GuESss YOU COWL? HAVE Fach must satan the a5 SCORPIO ~ Oct 24/Nov 22
You THESE THINGS VOWNS GE GRATEFUL / YOU'RE BEEN MY OLVER centre letter and there ae You've finally seen a light at the
| T OUTSREW AGAIN 7 KIGNT SISTER! must be at least one GQ | ond of the tunnel, Scorpio. Kudos
nine-letter word. No ~ BE for the newfound positive attitude.
; plurals or verb forms er Sm e. Apply it to all areas of your life for
: ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no AL 9 maximum benefit.”
A words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. The 4% | SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in 2 3 ‘3 You'll receive quite a blow when-a
4 cS Cos 2) Cl inkjet printer). Wn DO family member shares some news
‘ Dior ia Cnt 2 SH f with you that you hadn’t expected.
(Mp S) n ¢.) Safe TODAY'S, TARGET ct Gs | There will be no way to hide your
Dp iJ Good 21; very good 31; excellent 41 (or more). es a ‘s surprise, so grin and bear it.
Solution tomorrow. ; E pes CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20
Pve vee tod me x wes gv There are troubles brewing with a
sisi romantic partner, Capricom. You both
CRYPTI Cc PUZZLE just can’t see eye to eye on anything.
You’re actually questioning whether
: ROPERSEE LS Suu yg zien? you should stay together. -
mcnOSS DOWN ee ro | Ay AQUARIUS - J i
— Jan 21/Feb 18
1 Revolutionary design for a tram (5) "2 Canit protect a beast when trouble ee ae a lee re as sous looking for a night out with '
6 Roaming rider comparatively starts? (6) =. ae pa ih the guys or gals, Aquarius. Make it,
parched (6) 3 Asallor’s behind (6) ff ie a He ee | word happen now, because in a’ few
9 What to call a pie 4 Those in an outworn : paints ae d ONY i weeks you’ll be too busy to spare
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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006






HB CRICKET
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas Cricket
Association (BCA)
revealed the names of a 30-
member training
team yesterday.

The team, which
will participate in
the first annual
Stanford 20-20
tournament, will
begin practice
today at the
Haynes Oval
grounds.

The tournament
will take place
between mid-July
and September at
the Stanford Crick-
et Grounds in
Antigua.

The hefty cash
prize will be
played for in the
single elimination
knockout format which has
attracted some 21 teams
from throughout the
Caribbean.

With the first place team
cashing in on $1,000,000,

@ THE TEAM

L Armstrong
G Armstrong
W Atkinson
J Barry

G Blair

V Bennett

S Brathwaite
G Campbell
P Cole

R Coakley

N Ekanayake
M Ford

A Ford

R Ganpat



the second-place team will
receive $500,000.

The man of the match in
every game will receive
$25,000 and the man of the
match in the championship
game will receive $100,000.

E Greene
O James

O Levy

L Melville
D Morrison
A Nash

W Patrick

S Perrera

H Roy

R Tappins
G Taylor Sr
G Taylor Jr
M Taylor .
C Waddell
D Wheatley



The tournament, which is
named after Texas billion-
aire Allen Stanford, is
designed to improve the
sport and increase the
involvement throughout

—

V Rampersad



the Caribbean.

It will also assist in the
development of junior pro-
grammes.

Prior to the final settings
of the tournament’s dates,
each country’s governing
cricket body
received $100,000
which was used for
‘improvement of
facilities, practice
fields and other
cricket equip-
ment. ;

An additional
$10,000 stipend per
month will be giv-
en to assist players
and coaches, and
$5,000 per month
will be distributed
for maintenance
and the facil-
ities.

Also added into
the handsome
package was the
assistance of two
full-time nutritionists and
four professional athletic
trainers who will travel
around the Caribbean ona
regular basis to train the
teams. ,

m@ SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

STEVE MCCLAREN was
hired as the next coach of-Eng-
land’s national soccer coach
team on Thursday and
shrugged off suggestions that
he was far from the first
choice.

, While The Football Associ-
ation dismissed reports it
offered Luiz Felipe Scolari the
job a week ago, McClaren
declared himself the proudest
man in England as he started
preparing to take over from
Sven-Goran Eriksson.on Aug.
1.

“The FA had to pick the
best man for the job and I
believe they have,” he toid
reporters after signing a four-
year contract which takes him
through the 2008 European
Championship and the 2010
World Cup. “That's/all that
matters.”

McClaren only became the
favorite in the recent days fol-
lowing three months of specu-
lation that the FA had been
chasing more prominent can-
didates, a group that was
thought to include Scolari,
Australia and PSV Eindhoven

Kingsway make a fight of it
in the BAISS volleyball final

m@ ABOVE: Kingsway’s co-captain Ashley Newbold dives in for the play.
Wi LEFT: Kingsway’s coach Bill Slater talks to his team during a time out.

coach Guus Hiddink and for-
mer Glasgow Celtic manager
Martin O’Neill.

“TI always felt I was in the
process, and that’s how it
turned out,” McClaren said.

“T’ve been very comfortable

with the process and very com-
fortable, as you can imagine,
with the outcome.” :

FA chief executive Brian
Barwick told skeptical
reporters that McClaren had
been his No. 1 choice all along
and had been the unanimous
selection of the- three-man
search panel and the FA
Board.

Barwick said he met three
times with Scolari.

“There were potential devel-
opments,” he said. “He then
declared he had no interest in
the job. We never offered him
the job. My first choice was
always Steve McClaren. That
might be difficult for people
to get their heads across.”

McClaren, currently Mid-
dlesbrough’s manager, had
been Eriksson’s assistant for
five years. England’s first game
after he takes over is an exhi-
bition against European cham-
pion Greece on Aug. 16.

“This is the biggest honor
that any coach can have, and is

TRIBUNE SPORTS









e SEE SPORTS FRONT.

(Photos: Onan Bridgewater)

obviously the highlight of my
career,” he said. “It’s a mas-
sive challenge and one that I
welcome.”

Eriksson, a Swede who is
the first foreigner to coach.
England, announced this year:
he would leave after the World’
Cup, two years before the end*.
of his contract.

“I’m obviously very pleased
for Steve, but also for the Eng-.
land team,” Eriksson said. “I:
have worked closely with>
Steve ever since I came to”
England and know how good a.
coach he is. He is well-liked:
and well-respected by the play-'
ers and staff.

“T have no doubt that he has:
all the credentials to be very
successful in the job and wish
him all the best.”

McClaren, who also served
as Alex Ferguson’s assistant at
Manchester Ca ie ie

ears, guided Middlesbroug
to AeaE Wednesday's UEFA
Cup final against Sevilla. It’s
the first European final for the
club. 3

“I have hugely enjoyed my
time at Middlesbrough and am
very grateful to the club,”
McClaren said. “However, this
was an opportunity I couldn't
refuse.”

geqveeeerarre7r*

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Charleston, SC__





Today
Low W

Saturday
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a2: warm. | warm. cloudy and warm. warm. ° § greater the need for eye and skin protection.
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High: 84° Low: 68° Low: 72° Low: 72°. Low: 74° Low: fe
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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, ear and Today 2:28 a.m: 94 8:46a.m. 0.6
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high. and the low for the aay: : 2:56pm. 2.2 8:59p.m.. 0.6
Saturday 220am. 23 38am. 06
—— : Scan ee 3:53 p.m. 2.3 10:00pm. 0.6
Statistics are re for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday ~ Sunday 4:20am. 23 10:26am. 05
a - 4:46 p.m. 2.4 10:56 p.m. 0.5
High. ww. ssssseessestsessseeersee BOD F/80° € — 540 73 ;
ge ae Monda am. 23° 11:10am. 04
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Normal figh .o...ecccssscsscssseceeccseesee 88° F/28°-C :
Normal low ..... 70° F/21° C
- Last year’s high 86° F/30° C.



Last year’s low 73° F/23°.C
Precipitation i
As of 2 p.m. yesterday .. 0.00”
Year to date .......
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2006



1:19 p.m.

High: 88° F/31°G B : ee : 2
; “O42 am.

~ Low: 63° F/A7°G

Sunrise..>...6:32am. Moonrise ...
Sunset....... 7:42 p.m... Moonset . ‘

Last









High: 83° F/28° C
Low:70°F/21°C






May13 May 20

” May 27

7° Re ELEUTHERA
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KEY WEST CATISLAND |
High: 86° F/30° High:84°F/29°C 5
Low: 72 per Low: 70° F/21°C . a





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Low: 73°F/23°C Hight87° F/31°C 2s

Low: 72° F/22°C







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Today Saturday : Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA
Low W _ High W High L Ww igh Low High: 89° F/32° C
FO CFIC. - 2 F/23°C
76/24 47/8 po 74/93 49/9 :
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! High: 88° F/31°C
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76/24 54/12 68/20 46/7 co. ow:
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60/15. 40/4 pc Ad) High: 88° F/32°6
54/12 38/3 pe 58/4 41/5 _pe 69/17 51/10 po __ 64/17 51/10 Low: 73° F/23



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90/32 70/21 t 84/28 4/17 I Orlando 66/18 pc Washington, DC 78/25 58/14 pc 70/21 50/10 c Scent eonaae i-ice tone Tr-trace

Doe











WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY SE TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: W at 5-10 Knots 0-1 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
___ Saturda SSW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 79° F
FREEPORT Today: VAR at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
Saturday: __ SW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
ABACD Today: WSW at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
Saturda' SW at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 17°F



Tovay’s U.S

NNN] Showers
f > > j T-storms
[o~3"] Rain
[*_*] Flurties

Snow



FORECAST

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

Miami
87/72

__ Fronts
Cold ——~=—

Warm ania
Stationary geil






FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

K.-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

The Wildcats
pay off their
fine in time

gy SOFTBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter





FOUR time defending
champions the Electro
Telecom Wildcats have
paid off their fine
received by the New
Providence Softball Asso-
ciation (NPSA) on Satur-
day night.

According to league
president Steven Coak-
ley, “the team had satis-
fied the association by
paying off the penalty
that was imposed upon
them, before the dead-
line.”

The Wildcats’ team was
the first team in the
league to feel the effects
of the zero-tolerance
rules set in place by the
executive members of the
NPSA on April 20th this
year. These rules were
also agreed upon by all
registered teams.

The Ford brothers,
Mario and Andy, were
also penalised under the |
association’s new rulings.

The Wildcats penalty
came after they opted not
to play in the league’s
opening game against the
DHL Brackettes on Sat-
urday night.

As a result the team
was slapped with a $50
fine, and a blemish on
their win-loss record.

The team was given
until Wednesday to pay
off their debts to the
NPSA or face suspension
from the league for the
remainder of the season.

Coakley said: “The
team have paid off their
fine and we have added
them to the schedule, but
I am not too sure what
at ee going to do when

s their turn to play
again.

“But they were
penalised and they paid
off their fine in full in the
time the association had
requested of them.”

The association and
teams. decided on the
zero-tolerance rules as a
new approach, hoping to
clean-up the atmosphere
around the park, making
the environment more
family oriented.

SPORTS
BRIEF

@ TENNIS

THE Brajaxba Tennis
tournament wili get under-
way this Saturday with a
Rookie Challenge round
robin and junior and senior
round robin tournament.

Rookie matches will start
at liam, junior and. senior
matches are set to start at
Spm.

a a





@ GOLF

THE Bahamas Profes-
sional Golfers Association
is all set for its upcoming
annual general meeting and
election of officers, May
20th at the Cable Beach
Golf Club, 6pm.

There will be an 18-hole
shootout prior to the AGM
meeting starting at 12 noon.
All professional golfers are
invited to participate. Entry
fees are set at $50.00 for
financial members and $200
for non-financial members.

Cash prizes will be award-
ed in the regular and senior
categories.

straight

@ VOLLEYBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE road to the senior
girls championships in th

Bahamas Association of

Independent Secondary
Schools (BAISS) wasn’t an
easy one for the Kingsway
Saints and their meeting with
the defending champions
wasn’t any different.

Behind the. thunderous
spikes of Camilla Miller, the
St Augustines Big Red
Machines were able to ride
their way to a fourth straight
title, defeating the Saints 25-
14 and 25-19.

When the Saints took to
the court, they were hoping
that the momentum that got
them into the championship
round would spill over in the
game, but Miller and the
Big Red Machines had a

i

}



MIAMI HERALD SP

@ SAC’S Krystal Christie and Kingsway’s Ashley Newbold go head to head yesterday.



Defending champs

defeat Kingsway



different plan.

Although they were domi-
nating the league, finishing
up with a perfect win-foss
record which led to the pen-
nant crown, their spiking
game wasn’t at the level they
wanted it to be. But Miller
changed all that yesterday.

Playing in her last cham-
pionship game for the school,
Miller was hitting from all
areas off the court.

With no blocks contesting
her hits, Miller continuously
gave her team the edge in
the first set.

She said: “It feels great to

win the title once again, this ~

is my last year and T wanted
to go out with a bang. I got
the hits but I didn’t hit the
way I really wanted to, my
timing was off a little.

“But overall we played
great as a team, the first set
we came out firing, they
weren’t able to stop us, but
in the second set we played
around and they came back
on us, ;

“T wasn’t too worried when
this happened though, I
knew we were a better team
than them so that helped to
make our job easier.”





The Saints tried to clean-
up on the errors made in the
first set quickly in the sec-
ond set, but the tough Big
Red Machines would not
break.

With victory in sight, the
Big Red Machines head
coach Anastacia Sands
looked to her bench to finish
off the game, leaving Miller,
Terese Clarke and Krystal
Christie to help out when
needed.

But her strategy didn’t go |

as planned as the Saints took
full advantage of the substi-
tutions made.

The team rallied back from
nine points to tie the score
at 18-all, forcing the Big Red
Machines to call a time out.

Although the Big Red
Machines were still not play-
ing-at full strength, they were
able to dig deep, pulling
away from the Saints.



(Photo: Onan Bridgewater)

SAC cruise to fourth

title

Saints head, coach Bill
Slater said: “It was really
good game, the girls worked
a all season, we came and

e beat NCA so that give-us
a ante more confidence
heading into this game:. It
feels great to make it to the
championships.

“We came out flat in ‘the
first set thinking that-we
could bounce back but: we

never did.
“There was no momentum

in that set, so I tried: “bo
rally the troops for the next
swe got the momentuin
we were looking for but it
just wasn’t enough. This will
bé a great team next year,
only a few of the girls are
leaving.

“Next year we will; tie
back and hopefully bettér

our performance in tite
finals.”

ee



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