Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 102 No.108



BUSINESS —



& By CARA BRENNEN
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

THE family of a young life-
guard, who was fatally shot in a
run-in with police Monday night,
are demanding answers .to what
they believe was a senseless
death.

Deron Bethel, 20, of Pinewood
Gardens, was killed when a shot
was fired through his car window
by plainclothed police officers.

Shortly after the shots were
fired, the car which was in
reverse, slammed into poles at
the end of the road.

The Pinewood community yes-
terday accused police of shoot-
ing an innocent man.

However, police maintained
that Deron. was trying to allude

police and driving his car in “a,

violent manner” towards police
when officers were forced to open
fire. .

Yesterday Deron’s family,
including his mother, Diana
Bethel, father, Roger Bethel, a

“ police officer, and his brother,
Dwayne Bethel, an officer with
the Central Detective Unit, met
with police commissioner Paul
Farquharson.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mrs Bethel said that the
commissioner assured her that
there will be a thorough investi-
gation into the incident by a spe-
cial unit.

“He said no screws will be left
unturned. ;

“It is my intention not to let
my child’s death be in vain. He
didn’t do anything, and he had
nothing on him. No gun, no drugs,
no knife, no nothing, so I just
hope they don’t plant anything in
that car, because that won’t
work,” she said.

In addition to his family mem-
bers, Deron leaves behind his girl-
friend, Shakira Coakley, who is

79F
64F

PARTLY 10
» MOSTLY SUNNY

ee:







@ DERON BETHEL

five-months pregnant with his
child. .

Ms Coakley yesterday was too
distraught to speak with The Tri-
bune.

According to Deron’s moth-
er, he had just started a job as a
lifeguard and beach attendant at
the Paradise Island hotel, Riu.

Mrs Bethel said that Riu’s
management contacted her to
express their condolences.

“They said he was one of the

best workers they ever had,” she
said.
Deron’s friends told The Tri-
bune.that everyone in the com-
munity is considered family. The
yoyng men all said that his death
has hit them as if it were their
own brother.

However, despite the high tide
of emotion which ran through the
community Monday night, they
were determined not to lose their
tempers and create another inci-
dent like the Nassau Village Riot.

“We made sure nothing like
that happened, because we didn’t
want the situation to become
worse or for anyone else to
maybe get shot, but the residents

SEE page 11

an trust.

CE MANAGEMENT



GURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS












iami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006





An estimated $150m
of marijuana was
being cultivated
on raided farms

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IT IS estimated that more
than $150 million worth of mar-
ijuana was being cultivated on
Eleuthera at the three farms

raided this year by DEU and,

DEA officers.

DEA officials warned that if
it were not for the proactive
stance taken by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force (RBPF),
the Bahamas would be in “big
problems” as a result of the
other illicit activities that would
follow from the drug trade.

On February 27, 12,000 mar-
ijuana plants were discovered
in a field in Eleuthera, with an

SEE page 11

Nassau and Bahama

& US AMBASSADOR John Rood looks at the new bomb suit yesterday with officer
~ | Jamiro Pierre outside the US Embassy.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

ERAS ALD

SSRI SETTER

s



Stage play to
tackle incest,
sexual and

physical abuse

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - The contro-_

versial issue of incest, sexual
and physical abuse will take
centre stage for the first time at
the Regency Theatre, where
the play, ‘In His Hands’,
inspired by the real life autobi-
ography of a Bahamian
woman, premieres on Wednes-
day. -
The play, written by Bahami-
an playwright Arthur Jones, is
based on the book ‘Breaking
the Silence’ by Grand Bahama
businesswoman Gwen Rolle,
who was a victim of incest as a
child.

Psychologist Dr Jean Turn-

SEE page 11



COB council
chairman: we
are examining all
of our options

COB council chairman
Franklyn Wilson denied last
night that a high-level dele-
gation was being sent abroad
to ask Janyne Hodder to
reconsider the offer to head
the embattled institution.

Mr Wilson said: “The coun-
cil of the College of the
Bahamas, inclusive of all its
members, is examining all of
its options to see what is in
the best interest of the insti-
tution.”

In recent weeks, the college
has come under intense
scrutiny for another public
airing of personnel matters.

Unfortunately for Mr Wil-
son, the Hodder fiasco is the

SEE page two

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@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

OFFICERS of the police
bomb squad unit are better
equipped to respond to threats
of explosive devises with the
introduction of bomb protec-
tion suits and portable X-ray
machines. :

Yesterday, US Ambassador
John Rood presented the mem-
bers of the squad with the
equipment as a part of the US
Anti-Terrorism Assistance pro-
gramme.

The programme has trained
and assisted more than 48,000

“ foreign security. and law

enforcement officials from 141
countries. Rte

The presentation followed six
officers.of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force bomb squad unit
participating in a training pro-
gramme on explosive incidents
counter-measures in Baton
Rouge, Louisiana last year.

SEE page 11

IMF approves
National
Accounts

Statistics of .
the Bahamas

THE National Accounts Sta-
tistics of the Bahamas has final-
ly been approved by the Inter-
national Monetary Fund, it was
announced by Minister of State
for Finance, James Smith, this
week.

Speaking at a Department of
Statistics seminar for senior
public servants, Mr Smith said
that the IMF's acceptance is the
first of its kind for the country in
more than 30 years.

He said it had much to do
with a modernisation project
carried out by the Minister of
Finance and the Department of
Statistics with the assistance
of the IMF and Statistics Cana-
da.

He added that a "considered
and deliberate effort" was made
by the Ministry of Finance and
the Department of Statistics
with the assistance of the IMF
and Statistics Canada to put in
place the necessary resources,
equipment, manpower and
training.

e SEE TRIBUNE
BUSINESS SECTION

G.R. Sweeting's

MADEIRA
SHOPPING
PLAZA

Tel:
328-0703 -



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

{HE |RIBUNE



COB options |

FROM page one

third highly publicised incident at the
college under his leadership in as many
years. .

Another public row occurred between
Mr Wilson and Dr Rodney Smith last
year after Dr Smith was forced to resign
over allegations that he plagarised por-
tions of a speech given to the college
community.

Now, the new round of COB infight-
ing has drawn criticism from several
prominent members of the public, with
the pastor of New Covenant Baptist
Church being the latest to weigh in on
the issue.

Attacking the leadership of the col-
lege council, Bishop Simeon Hall said:
“It is a sad and telling commentary that
our nation’s highest educational facility
seems unable to hire or fire in a manner
befitting that institution.”

Without referring to Mr Wilson direct-
ly, Bishop Hall suggested that there are
persons at the College of the Bahamas
whose leadership style needs a second
look.

He went on to conclude that “what
was done to Leon Higgs was wrong, and
that the law of Kharma is hanging over
the College of the Bahamas.”

Bishop Hall’s reference was an allu-
sion to former COB president, Dr Leon
Higgs, who, in 2004, after a five-year
appointment, resigned amidst reported
tensions between him and other mem-
bers of the college’s executive board who
had been passed over for the position.

Some feel that Mr Wilson had a sub-
stantial role to play in Dr Higgs’ final
decision to step down.

Dr Hall said he expected what is going
on at the college to continue until they
do what is right.

Mr Wilson has all along maintained that
both he and the council had acted with
the best interest of the college at heart.

Seeking to put a positive. spin on a
matter that has somehow spiralled out of
control, Mr Wilson said that at present
“we are doing all we can to eliminate
any misunderstandings that existed or
whatever difficulties that night have
arisen.’

Still ‘50-50 chance’
Hodder will become |
new COB president

THERE is still a 50-50 chance that
Janyne Hodder will be lured back as
president of COB, a college source
said last night.

But even if she takes the job, she is
unlikely to last more than a year, it
was claimed.

Ms Hodder, vice-principal of McGill
University in Canada, would soon fall
victim to political forces - especially in
an election year, the source said.

It was felt that, Ms Hodder’s past life
in the Bahamas - she was formerly
married to Bahamian entertainer Pat
Rahming, by whom she has two chil-
dren - would create tensions of its own.

With lecturers’ union leader Ms Jen-
nifer Isaacs-Dotson the sister-in-law
of Mr Rahming, there would be the
possibility of family strains on cam-
pus, the source claimed.

Ms Hodder, who lived in Nassau for
14 years before her divorce, later pur-

‘sued a highly successful academic

career in her native Canada.

Apart from holding a top position at
McGill, she led Bishop’s University to
a high place in Canada’s university
league table.

In addition to her academic creden-
tials, Ms Hodder is said to have sound
personal qualities, and an ability to
“set her hands dirty” in community
projects.

Last night, a COB source said: “I
still think there is a 50-50 chance of
her coming back. But I predict that
she would not last a year.

“We are going into an election year

@ FRANKLIN Wilson — has com |
under fire for his handling of the
affair i

and the FNM are scratching around
for issues. You can bet that the party
action group would get involved in
nastiness galore.”

Although faculty and students com-
plained about the process for bring-
ing back Ms Hodder, it was felt the
majority would not resist her appoint-
ment on personal grounds.



BB JANYNE Hodder - lived i in 1 Nas-
sau for 14 years

The source said: “I don’t think the
issue was Janyne herself. If the matter
had been dealt with properly, I think
only a small element would have
opposed her.”

And the fact that she was white
would not have been. a factor, the
source added.



Cuba trade
show at Riu

FROM clothing to compact
discs, perfume to pottery,
Cuba is showing off what it
has to offer at a trade show
in Nassau this week.

Prominent names in Cuban
retailing and manufacturing
are on display. .

Ambassador Felix Wilson

told The Tribune yesterday::

“The trade show has made an
impact. It has drawn the
attention of the Bahamian
public and there has been a

lot of interest from local busi-'

nesses.

“The purpose of the show is
to strengthen bi-lateral rela-
tions between the Bahamas
and Cuba.”

Mr Frank Abel Portela
Chacon, secretary-general,
said: “Cuba is very competi-
tive with Florida, but is clos-
er to the interests of the

COLONIAL GROUP

fq INTERNATIONAL

Bahamian market.”

Products on display include
furniture, building supplies,
food items, perfume, bever-
ages, clothing, straw work,
ceramics, glass, woodwork,
jewellery, dolls, decorations,
instruments (drums and mara-
cas) and compact discs.

Display items were just a’

sample of what Cuba has to
offer to the Bahamas.

“Both the Chamber of
Commerce in the Bahamas
and the Chamber of Com-
merce in Cuba, along with the
Carribean Association of
Industry and Commerce
(CAIC), are jointly working

to increase productivity by

means of the trade show,”
said Mr Wilson.
The show is being held at

the Riu Hotel on Paradise -

Island.

Spelling bee winner honoured



US ‘Anibaseailot John Rood congratulates St Frances Xavier sixth grader Lauren Glinton
yesterday at the US Embassy for winning her spelling division in the Florida State Council

spelling Bee held by the Knights of Columbus.

_ Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

© In brief

New Yorker
dies after
traffic |

- accident

lm By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A 79-year-old
American man who was injured
in a tiaffic accident died on Sat-
urday at Rand Memorial Hos-
pital.

Police say Edmond Jurga of
New York, a part-time resident
of Grand Bahama, was driving

_east along Bishop Place when

he overlooked a stop sign at the
intersection with Balao Road
around 3pm on Friday.

Mr Jurga’s 2001 Hyundai
Accent reportedly collided with
a Pontiac Firebird driven by
Stacey Seymour, 44, of Wrex-
hem Drive.

Both vehicles were exten-
sively. damaged.

Seymour sustained an injury
to the head and Mr Jurga com-
plained of a pain in one of his
legs. They were both taken by
ambulance to hospital, where
Seymour was treated and dis-
charged.

However, ‘Mr Jurga was
admitted.:He died around
12.15pm on Saturday.

Supt Basil Rahming said
police are awaiting the results of

‘an autopsy to determine the

cause of death before a classifi-
cation is made. .

2nd traffic
fatality
this year

classified

POLICE have ‘classified the
death of Jerome Wells, 24, of
Albacore Street, as the second
traffic fatality for the year.

Wells, a passenger in a vehi-
cle on March 21, sustained
injuries to the head and chest
when that car was involved in

i -an accident on the Grand
i. Bahama Highway.

Man faces
firearm and
ammunition
charges
FREEPORT - A 28-year-old
Freeport man was arraigned in

Magistrate’s Court on firearm
and ammunition possession

_ charges on Monday.

Tito Maycock, also known as

- “Shadow” appeared before

Magistrate Helen Jones in
Court Two, where he pleaded:
not guilty to charges of posses-
sion of an unlicensed .9{mm pis-
tol and 15 bullets on March 22.
Maycock, who was repre-
sented by lawyer Simeon
Brown, was remanded to Fox
Hill Prison until August 30. |

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_ THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





In brief



US couple
airlifted
after traffic
accident

AN American couple vaca-
tioning in Green Turtle Cay,
Abaco, were airlifted to New
Providence over the weekend
after being seriously injured in a
traffic accident.

According to police reports,
Larry Vanliere, 60, and his wife,
Mary, 46, of Holland, Michigan,
are in serious condition at
Princess Margaret Hospital.

A third visitor, Judith Linn,
61, of Holland, Michigan, also
sustained a serious injury and
is being treated in Abaco.

Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming reported that
sometime around 7.15pm on
Saturday, a traffic accident
occurred on the Tommy Rus-
sell Road in Black Sound,
Green Turtle Cay.

According to police reports,
Mr Vanliere was driving a rent-
ed golf cart north when he
veered over onto the south-
bound lane and collided head-
on with a maroone Dodge Spir-
it driven by Lance Swain, 26, of
Green Turtle Cay.

The golf cart was extensively
damaged.

Ms Linn, a passenger in the
golf cart seated in the back was
knocked onto the ground and
sustained a,serious head injury.
Mr Vanliere sustained head and
back injuries. His wife, Mary, a
passenger in the front, sustained
injuries to both legs.

Mr Swain, and his passenger,
Lyndel Russell, 21, were not
injured.

The visitors were taken to the
Clinic at Green Turtle Cay,
where they received cimet gency
medical treatment.

The Vaniers were airlifted to
New Providence on a King Air
flight.

Four men
im court
after drug
seizures

F OURn men, who were arrest-
ed last Friday in connection
with a drug seizure in the South
Beach ‘area, were arraigned in
court on Monday.

Ian’ Porter, 35, of Andros
Avenue, 31-year-old Daryl
Saunders of Strachan’s Alley
and 25-year-old Derrick White
of Andros were arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethelon the charge of posses-
sion of dangerous drugs with
intent to supply.

The meri pleaded not guilty
and have been remanded to Fox
Hill prison until April 3 when a
bail hearing will take place.

Some’ 20 ‘crocus sacks con-
tainipg.921 pounds of marijuana
wer nfiscated during the






e . reportedly val-
ued aes, 31, 500. Lawyer Ian
Cargill is representing the men.

Elkin Butler Jr, 54, was also
arraigned in connection with
the incident, on the charge of
possession of dangerous drugs
with:the intent to supply.

He was accused of having 14
and 3/4 pounds of marijuana.
He also pleaded not guilty and
was remanded until April 3.

Drinks Tr¢
Coffee Te
End Tab
Cushions







Film ban ‘exposes
the hy pocritic al
thinking in society’

THE recent banning of the
film Brokeback Mountain is
“exposing the kind of hypo-
critical thinking that we have
in society”, lawyer and social
activist Paul Moss told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Mr Moss said that a certain
amount of censorship is nec-
essary, but that he believes that

. the Bahamas Plays and Film

Control Board is too liberal.

“Generally I would not want
the government to censor uni-
laterally on issues of national
importance. I do believe: that
that there is merit in the cen-
sorship of the kinds of movies
that come into our country,
but the thing is that we need to
censor more movies,” Mr
Moss said. ;

He said that there are many
vices that are glorified in films
that are shown in the Bahamas.

Mr Moss said he believed
that the only reason Broke-
back Mountain was banned
was for its homosexual con-
tent, rather than a concern
about morality in general.

“T believe that there should
be more censorship in that
regard so that we can have the
kind of edifying and up-lifting
theatre or movies that will
advance our society as a whole.
Along with Brokeback Moun-

: tain they probably need to ban

everything they are showing
to the movies today,” Mr Moss
said.

Veteran Bahamian director
of plays and actor Philip Bur-
rows in a recent interview with
The Tribune said that it



@ ACTORS Heath Ledger, left, and Jake Gyllenhaal in a
scene from Brokeback Mountain

appears that the Control
Board does not have any set
criteria on which they base
their decisions to ban movies.

Mr Burrows said he thought
it curious that. the board
banned Brokeback Mountain,
yet allowed the musical Rent,
which depicts two gay rela-
tionships, to be shown a few
months ago.

He explained that he has
dealt with the Control Board
for a number of years with the
production of plays, and still
has “no idea how they come
to their decisions.”

Mr Burrows said that in
2001 when Ringplay Produc-
tions, of which he is the artistic
director, decided to produce

.Macbeth, members of the

Control Board on the evening
before the play was to open,

(Photo: AP Archive)

gave it a ‘C’ rating, ensuring
that only adults would be able
to see it.

“Macbeth, a Shakespeare
work being studied in high
school would be rated ‘C’ so
that no high school students
studying it would be able to
see it. We protested this rat-
ing and informed the board
members that this was in fact a
work being studied in high
school and after some discus-
sion they relented and rated
the production ‘B’,” he said.

However, two years later a
repeat performance of the pro-
duction which was staged
slightly different but with not
one word of the text changed —
was rated “I” and described by
some members of the board as
a “wonderful production”, Mr
Burrows said.

Pratt concern at children
carrying knives to school

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter .

AN alarming number of
young children are now car-
rying knives to school
according to Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt.

Mrs Pratt said that she has
received reports from school
police about an increased
number of knives being
found in the bags and pock-
ets of students.

“When these reports
come into me, I am sitting
their in awe. Why would:a
13 or 12 year-old take a
knife to school? Teachers
fear for their lives in the
classroom because if chil-
dren cannot reason, they will
resort to violence,” she said.

Mrs Pratt appealed to par-
ents to help the police in
their efforts to fight the
problem, by doing their best
to monitor children leaving
home.

“It is because of the
school policing that we have
not had more incidents of
harm that has taken place,
because they had retrieved
those knives out of the
bags,” she pointed out.

Mrs Pratt made this
known at a press conference
held to announce an inter-
national crime summit to be





CYNTHIA Pratt

held in the Bahamas next
month.

The summit, which is sched--

uled for April 24 to 28, will
bring together persons involved
in law enforcement from
around the world.

The event will be hosted by
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force in conjunction with the
Institute for Social Crime.

The timing of the summit,
said Mrs Pratt, is “most appro-

ie aL
UU
Ms) Bt aS
PHONE: 322-2157

priate, ” as crime continues to
present a challenge not only for
the Bahamas, but the entire
region.

“It is important that we as a
nation take proactive steps to
address the problem of crime —
the solution of which requires
partnership at all levels of our
society and a firm resolve of the

‘ Bahamian people to take own-

ership of the problem and work
together towards bringing about
effective change,” said Mrs
Pratt.

The summit will address such

crime-related issues as money +

laundering, stalking, gangs iden-
tity theft and spousal abuse.

Inspector Bruce Arnett point-
ed out the importance of net-
working in the fight against
crime. ”

“The criminals are network-
ing. They are adopting from
other countries around the
world different crime trends and
bringing it here and applying it.

“We as a community, not

only in the Bahamas but around

the world, must network too.
We must be on top,” he said.







PATER













New consumer bill
‘should be expanded’

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE proposed Consumer
Protection Bill, though laud-
able, should be expanded to
include protection against
banks, financial institutions and
insurance companies, accord-
ing to the Grand Bahama
Human Rights Association.

The Bill, which was debated
in parliament last week, is
designed to protect the rights
of Bahamian consumers of
goods and services that are
provided by private companies.

In a press statement yester-
day, the GBHRA called on
government to take the con-
sumer protection even further.

Consumers, it said, should
also be protected from real
estate development companies
that collect service charges on
properties.

There should be an avenue
to hold such companies
accountable if they make
“grandiose promises”, the
association said.

It should also be made
mandatory for the companies to
provide services for all the annu-
al service charges they collect.

“This is a particularly impor-
tant issue in Freeport where
there is no real property tax,
but service charges payable to
private development companies
instead,” the GBHRA said.

The association said that it is
also important for special pro-

visions to be made for the pro-
tection of members of the
Bahamian public who bring in
goods from Florida.

“Once goods or services
from Florida are purchased,
and we pay duties and freight
on the importation, we have
hell to recover if they are not as
ordered. We can rarely afford
the cost or time to send them
back,” the statement said.

The human rights organisa-
tion suggested that the
Bahamas government negoti-
ate and legislate in tandem
with the Florida legislature, “so
that a breach of consumer pro-
tection of goods shipped from
Florida companies to the
Bahamas would have the same
consumer protection as if pur-
chased in Florida, and by co-
operation with the Florida reg-
ulatory authorities, Bahamians
could get remedies in Florida.”

The Bill should further
include provisions for con-
sumer protection from services
provided by government cor-
porations, it said.

This would ensure that the
public is not “at the mercy of
inefficiency and incompetence
paid for at top dollar by a pub-
lic that does not have any
alternative because of govern-
ment monopolies,” the asso-
ciation said.

The association also called
on government to give the
Registrar of Insurance Com-
panies “real teeth”.

Harbour eGeAi Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas |
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



Ts TE ON TLD

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

THE TRIBUNE!





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

_ EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ~
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Claptrap, or independent thought?

FOREIGN Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell’s recent chastisement of the
Opr osition in the House for not taking
th Gesu. tian view” in the controversy
cer the Wuban dentists, has annoyed many
Bahamians — - pPartieiarly the young set.

sizzc, in n life _ ’ particularly now that he is
fo.ciys. minister and has had to make deci-
sicas that have not always met with public
approval — where he expects a true patri-
o. +. defend his country “right or wrong.”

He ce:+-mned Opposition mrenibers
for not taking the “patriotic position of
standing up for our country” in the Cuban
debaie, but rather taking the ° ‘view
espous ‘ed by another vuntry.”

Obviously, by not turning a blind eye to
the 11 months it took government to reach
a decision in the Cuban dentists’ crisis, the
Opposition was unpatriotic for condemning
government for almost a year of “dither-
ing.” The Opposition’s position was that
government had eventually arrived at the
right decision, but had taken far too long to
do so.

In this column on Monday we con-
demned the thought that to be a true patri-
ot one had to blindly follow the dictum,
“my country, right or wrong.” This is prob-
ably the same slavish idea that inspired
the late Sir Lynden Pindling to encourage
supporters at a public rally to blindly
entrust their future to him. Meanwhile
their path should be one of: “Don’t worry,
be happy...” Thinking Bahamians know
exactly where such folly got us. It is when
Bahamians started to think that they start-
ed to make independent decisions, thus
ending Sir Lynden’s 25-year reign in 1992.

A young man drew our attention to an
item on Fred Mitchell’s website last week
that condemned a young Bahamian writer
who had apparently disappointed whoever
writes copy for the website. The writers
of the website review the newspapers and
listen to the radio “to spot some new voice
for reason, some voice of liberalism, some
leader for the future out of the next gen-
eration of people who will support demo-
cratic liberalism.”

The writer continued: “It is almost now
an old man’s lament that there are a few
good men and women but even those seem



to let us down from time to time.”
Apparently, columnist Craig Butler was

earmarked for the future. But, it would

seem that Mr Butler has slipped from

grace. He has at last shown that he is an:
independent thinker, with a mind that will:

not allow party-tinkering.

The website writer admits that often
young Butler writes a good column. How;
ever: “He is supposed to be part of the
PLP's New Progressive Institute. Yet more

. often than not, he engages in what we think

are gratuitous comments in Opposition to
policies of the PLP, based on inaccura-
cies. The latest foray was this view that
the Government’s position on the Cuban
dentists was hogwash. He based this on
his view that it did not have to take as long
as it did to settle the matter, and the
Bahamas simply capitulated to the U.S.
lobby.

“We don't expect such anti-intellectual
claptrap from one with Craig Butler's polit-
ical antecedents — this is Milo Butler’s
grandson after all.”

And so Craig Butler is to be forever
chained to a past...a past that is to limit his
future. In other words, he has no future
unless he accepts the rallying cry: My par-
ty, right or wrong!

'~Mr Butler must remember that his

| grandfather refused to have his thoughts

enchained. It is now his turn to stand up
and defend his future.

Mr Butler should ask Mr Mitchell what
he had in his mind on December 20, 1989
when Mr Mitchell took his usual protest
platform under the fig tree in front of the
Supreme Court and with his PDF col-
leagues burned the Bahamas’ constitution.

They were protesting because the disci-
plinary committee of the Bar Council was
to investigate a charge of “improper con-
duct” brought against lawyer Mitchell for
a statement he made critical of a Supreme
Court judge during an August press con-
ference under the same fig tree.

Mr Mitchell said that the Constitution’s
ashes were to be sent to Prime Minister
Pindling “as a reminder of how our coun-
try is being destroyed.”

Mr Mitchell’s generation set an example
of protest. They now want to put a curb bit
on today’s youth. It just won’t work.

Insurance,

ethics an



policies —

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE basic requirement of a
contractual agreement is “con-
sensus ad idem” or a meeting
of the minds. The subject matter
is mutually agreed upon by all
parties concerned and this legal
arrangement is merely a reflec-
tion of the intentions of the bar-
gaining parties. Such an agree-
ment imposes obligations on
both parties as specified by the
contents of the contract.
Whether they like it or not, the
parties are legally bound by the
terms and are duty bound to
fulfil whatever terms are
expressed in the contract. The
only exception to this is that if it
can be proven that the contract
is fundamentally different from
what was intended.

For example, if someone who
normally wears glasses signs a
contract and not being able to
read it as he is without his glass-
es. The defence of “non es fac-
tum” or this deed is not my
deed would be an acceptable
defence to excuse someone of
any obligation that they may
have mistakenly contracted.

However, the reality of con-
tractual obligations in the busi-
ness world is to bind unsus-
pecting individuals and impose
unwarranted obligations on
individuals that are unfair, bur-
densome and disastrous. By
shrewdly manipulating or dis-
guising your true intentions, it is

possible to force individuals to ,

commit individuals to situations
that they may not have intend-
ed to commit.

‘This misrepresentation and
pattern of deceitful behaviour
regrettably may only be discov-
ered when the stuff has hit the
fan. Unfortunately, for an inno-
cent victim of this scam, such a
logical conclusion may have
come too late and one may find
himself trapped by this immoral
if not illegal contract. Motivated

‘by greed, all too often a con-

tract may be rendered uncon-
scionable by an objective third
party because one party by its
position tries to unfairly take
advantage of the other.

For its part, the government
has attempted to regulate by
legislation the formation of con-
tracts in order to protect the
public by limiting, if not elimi-
nating, such fraudulent if not
criminal behaviour.

Only just recently, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas has
passed an amendment to The
Unfair Contract Act. Currently,
Parliament is debating the Con-
sumer Protection Act all in an
effort to reduce the possibility
of one party abusing or manip-

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ulating an agreement especially
when the other party has acted
in good faith. The temptation
to abuse the trust in a contrac-
tual agreément is more evident
where there is an inequality in
bargaining power, for example,
where there is a large company
such as a banking institution, a
real estate company, insurance
company, etc. and the other
party is an average member of
the public.

Insurance companies by far
has received the most criticism
for being deceitful and mis-
leading in their contracts or
policies. This is probably due
to the fact that so many people
can be affected at the same
time.

One just has to look at the
aftermath of hurricanes Frances
or Jeanne to see this point. So
many people came forward to
express their concerns and dis-
appointment with their insur-
ance policies. ‘There is no way
that so.many persons could
have misunderstood what they
thought that they were bar-
gaining for when they entered
their insurance contract, So
much was the outcry against the
deceitful behaviour and attitude
displayed, that prominent
lawyers and Human Rights
groups publicly demanded that
government enact legislation to
outlaw some of the positions
taken by insurance companies.
Little exemption clauses and
exemptions that were buried
somewhere in the back pages
of the policy suddenly become
so prominent that they appear
as bold as the headline on the
front page of a newspaper.
These are the phrases that
insurance companies would
cowardly hide behind in the
time of crisis.

To make matters worse, peo-
ple only obtain an insurance
policy for the purpose of it
being there in their time of
need. It is possible that a policy
holder may be paying a policy
for years or decades, mistaken-
ly operating under the belief
that their policy would be there
in their time of need. They then
find out the hard way that their
insurance policy has let them
down when the insurance com-
pany indicate that they were not
covered because of the nature
of the damage.

For example, the Insurance
Company will argue that the
damage to your house was not
due to the hurricane, but due
to water, therefore they have
no obligation to compensate
you. How stupid! Has anyone
ever seen a hurricane without
water? Whether it is due to
heavy rains or tidal actions,
these are all directly related to
and are a fundamental part of a
hurricane. So, how on God’s
earth can the Insurance com-
pany.argue that the damage was
not-due to'the actions of the
hurricane. “But for” the actions
of the hurricane, would this
property have suffered such

letters@tribunemedia.net §

damage? The answer is'a
resounding NO! des

This ridiculous position
adopted by the Insurance Com-
pany is not unique to the
Bahamas. Just look at the vic-
tims of hurricane Katrina that
went through Louisiana and .
Mississippi. Despite the obvi-
ous damage to any reasonable .
person, another disaster is
played out as the insurance
companies are claiming that the
vast majority of damage was not
due to the hurricane but due to
water. How on earth can the
Insurance Company say ‘that
they will pay for the damaged
roof in the bedroom, but not
the damage due to the six feet
of water in the kitchen of the
same house? At a time when
tension is running high, the gen-
eral perception is that many
Insurance Companies are a rip
off and that they only take your
money. Even if there were
winds of 135 mph, the Insur-
ance Company’s position in one
case was that the damage was
due to water and that the client
should have had a flood insur-
ance policy. This is pure fool-
ishness as The National Hurri-
cane Centre in Miami has pro-
duced a number of modelsias
to what damage can be expect-
ed from even a minimal hurri-
cane. Gio

On a personal note, this
writer would like to relate -his
experience with an Insurance
Company that directly illus-
trates the point of unethical
behaviour by Insurance Com-
panies. This centers around.an
“educational” policy that was
purchased when my son was
five years of age. The represen-
tation made by the Insurance
Salesman was absolutely clear.
This was an Educational Policy
that will be there to help defray
the cost of my.son’s College
education when he has reached
the age of 18 years. At age eigh-
teen, my son would receive four
annual payments of five thou-
sand dollars. This was the fact
that induced us to sign‘ Oy for
this policy.

Of course, this was all a bla-
tant lie concocted by this ing
ance company that completely
misrepresented their proditct.
Now that my son is eighteen
and in College, we discovered
the hard way that this insurance
company is full of crap! Shoftly
after we had signed up for the
policy, for whatever reason it
was discontinued. That in itself
should not have prejudice my
contract. However, what now
appears to be the case is the fact
that this insurance company_has
altered the terms of the policy
by indicating that my son was
only entitled to a loan and not
an outright payment as we had
expected. The only entitlement
right now is the cash value of
the policy which is a far. less
amount than had we paid the
monthly premium into a fixed
deposit. This is pure hogwash!
This insurance company should
be held accountable for this fact.

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE

Boston, Massachusetts
March 20 2006

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 5







In brief |

Two in court
charged with
stealing from
employment

TWO men charged in connec-
tion with the theft of thousands
of dollars worth of goods from
their place of employment were
arraigned in court yesterday.

Rodney Daniels, a 23-year-
old Haitian of Moss Lane, and
25-year-old Dennis Johnson of
Wilton Street, were together
arraigned before Magistrate
Guillemina Archer on 19 counts
of stealing by reason of employ-
ment.

. They were charged with steal-

ing more than $17,000 worth of
goods from Milo Butler and
Son-Company Limited on
Peach, Street.
.. Johnson; was also. charged
separately with nine counts of
stealing. It is alleged that act-
ing alone, he stole more than
$7;000 worth of goods:

The two men pleaded not

guilty to all of the charges
against them.
; ,Daniels was granted bail in
‘the sum of $10,000 and John-
‘son was granted bail in the sum
‘of: $15,000. The,.case was

Man charged
in connection
with armed
robberies

uA 21-YEAR-OLD Milton
Street man charged in connec-
tion with several armed. rob-
beries and other offences. was
arraigned in court yesterday. ,
. Airick Veron Whyms, alias
“*Man” was charged, being con-
cerned with another, with 11
ve@ounts of armed robbery dat-
‘ing back:to March 9.
:1, He was arraigned before
‘Magistrate, Susan Sylvester.

>: Whyms also faces charges of
:assault with a deadly weapon,
:causing harm damage and bur-
sglary. In all of the charges, it
wwas alleged that Whyms was
concerned with another and
‘armed with either a shotgun,
‘handgun or:both..

if He was not required to enter ,

a plea to the charges and was
‘remanded to prison.

ai The case.resumes on June 27.
'Whyms’is- represented by
eawyen? Ian Cargill.

‘Two youths
charged
following —
shopbreaking

a “TWO young men appeared in

ean Three of the Freeport
‘Magistrate’ s Court to be charged
dn, connection with a shop break-
‘ing 2 and stealing incident.

. DeAngelo Davis, 19, and a
‘17-year-old juvenile pleaded not
guilty to charges of shop break-

ing and. stealing { from Cin-Lorn ©

jae in the Grand Bahama
Centre Mall on March 22.
r was adjourned to




tf "Meanwhile, Davis and the
juyenile ; are on $4, 000 bail with
one surety. .



LOCAL NEWS

Weekend to sell

Bimini as a
tourism ‘mecca’

A WEEKEND of activities
will be launched on Bimini to
reposition the island as a thriv-
ing tourism mecca — following
the hardships it has endured
inrecenttimes. . ..,

Beginning on Wednesday,
March 29, the event will make
history, as tourism partners on
Bimini and New Providence
will stage the first tourism
careers fair to be held on a
Family Island.

Organisers said-the-general
aim of the careers fair will be
to generate a keen interest
among students-on Bimini of
“the plethora of professional
opportunities” available in the
tourism industry. :

A:statement from the Min-
istry of Tourism explained that
the students will be introduced

i “to ‘opportunities available on |
* Bimini as well as:to others

throughout the islands of the
Bahamas. - "|:
The fair will be held for two

days — March 29 and 30 — and
around 340 students i in grades

four through 12 will take part.

More than 18 companies
have already agreed to be rep-
resented and the number of
companies pledging their
involvement is still growing,
the statement said.

There are already firm com-

_mitments from: Bimini Bay,
Bimini Sands, Bimini Blue

Waters, Bimini Breeze Express,
Ansil Sunders, Atlantis, Dia-
monds International, Pinders
Souvenirs and many others.
Some of the tourism areas
to be represented include:
hotels, transportation, attrac-
tions, travel trade, tourism
adventures and retail services.

The careers fair will begin.

with a job preparation semi-
nar for grade 12 students,
which will cover topics like:
the importance of the tourism
industry to the economy of the

Bahamas, specific tourism |

careers, resumé writing skills

and interviewing techniques.
Students. also will be for-

mally saneNeeS to he Min-

istry of Tourism careers web-
site, bahamastourismca-
reers.com, which had an
extremely successful debut in
September 2004.

The website played a major
role in the recent National
Tourism Week Careers Fair
staged in January at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Extremely pleased with the
initiative, Angela Cleare,
senior director of Family
Islands and product in the
Ministry of Tourism, described
the upcoming fair as a much-
needed event for the Family
Islands.

“It is very important for us
to include all of our young
people on all of our islands
when we are educating about

’ the importance of tourism and
the many opportunities that

‘exist in this industry Hae e

she said.

*I am so happy that we are
beginning this initiative with
Bimini. And hopefully, this
will be just the first of many



@ ANGELA Cleare, senior director for Family Islands and
product in the Ministry of Tourism.

career fairs to be held through-
out our family of islands.”

This weekend, the Bimini
Tourist Office will stage a spe-
cial celebration at the Adminis-
trator’s residence in Alice Town
to honour eight special women
on Bimini.

Dubbed: “Honouring women
in sports”, the event will focus

re
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Activities for’

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport
Reporter _ ;

FREEPORT - Aidtiter
of activities have beén
planned by healthcare pro-
fessionals on Grand Bahama
to mark World Health

‘Month, which begins on

April 2.

The World Health Organ-
isation (WHO) will cele-
brate World Health Day on
April 7. Every year, a theme
is selected to highlight
important international

~health issues and concerns.

Under the theme: ‘Work-
ing together for health,’
WHO hopes to draw atten-
tion to the health workforce
crisis around the world.

According to WHO
reports, there is a chronic
global shortage of health
workers as.a result of
decades of under-investment
in education, training,
salaries, working environ-
ment and management.

This has led to a severe
lack of key skills, rising lev-
els of career changes and
early retirement, as well as
national and international
migration of such workers.

In Grand Bahama, health-
care officials will attend a
church service at 1lam at

: * Fairfield Church of God

East on Settler’s Way and
Balao Road.

Dr Bernard Nottage,
Minister of Health, will be
the keynote speaker at the

! World Health Day ceremo-

ny at Pro-Cathedral of
Christ the King at 10am on

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Other activities include a

health careers fair at the gym
at Jack Hayward High School
from 9am to 5pm on April 10
and 11.

A fun/run/walk will be held

starting at 6am at Sunrise Med-
ical Centre on April 22.

Laboratory Professionals

Week under the theme: ‘pro-
viding answers, guiding cures’, ©
and Administrative Assistants



@ HEALTHCARE officials plan-events for World Health
Month

(Photo: Denise Maycock)

Week under the theme: ‘creat-
ing excellence’ will both be
observed on the week begin-
ning April 23.

Volunteers Day, under the
theme: ‘inspire by example’ will
be held on April 25.

Town meetings showcasing
health professions will be held
in High Rock, Eight Mile Rock,
West End and Freeport on
April 4, 11, 18, and 25 respec-
tively.

orld Health Month

Diabetes
sufferers
invited to
meeting

TYPE two diabetics and
sufferers from other
chronic diseases are invited
to attend a meeting to hear
about how best to treat
their conditions.

At Holy Cross Centre on
March 29 and 30, beginning
at 7.30pm, Sportron
International
representative Jeff
Nicholls will address the
audience.

Sportron is a major
health product
manufacturer founded in
Dallas, Texas. It now has
additional offices.in
Canada, Mexico and
several countries in
Africa.





on the women of Bimini who

used fishing as a means of sup-
porting their families.

There are plans to stage an
elaborate float parade to hon-
our the women on March 31.
The parade will be followed by
a street festival peppered with
special Bahamian entertain-
ment.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Long Island hopes for planes’ return

A LOCAL contractor has
been engaged by the govern-
ment to revamp Stella Maris
Airport on Long Island.

Residents are now hoping
that planes will be landing there
again within two months.

The government was forced
to close the airport some weeks
ago because experts feared its
runway was not up to required
safety standards.

The decision struck fear into
developers and residents in
northern Long Island because

( ¢

4 4a
4 f 7
Nae



iain

yee

they were left stranded at the
end of a 40-mile drive from
Deadman’s Cay - the nearest
air terminal.

Now islanders have been reas-
sured by the government’s swift
action - and the hiring of a local
contractor to carry out improve-
ment work at Stella Maris.

The good news has been
compounded by response to a
Tribune INSIGHT article about
Long Island two weeks ago.

This is now being circulated
in the UK and elsewhere in a



cles

Oye



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bid to promote “the good life”
on what is often regarded as the
jewel of the Bahamas.

Long Island’s fantastic beach-
es and rolling green landscape
have often been cited as its most
alluring features.

But its friendly people -
and their renowned work
ethic - make Long Island one
of the best investment and
development opportunities

FAMIY ISLAND ROUND-UP



in the archipelago.

Relaxed, crime-free and near-
ly 200 miles away from Nassau’s
gunmen, this island is seen by
more and more home-plot
investors as the place to be.

¢e ORGANISERS of Cat
Island’s Rake ‘n’ Scrape Festi-
val are determined to make this
year’s event the best so far.

Mr Allworth Rolle and his

committee want the festival -
held between May 28 and June
5 - to be the biggest and most
enjoyable of all.

Bands are being urged to reg-
ister now, with the usual provi-
so that rake ‘n’ scrape tradition
demands that goatskin drum,
carpenter’s saw and concertina
are preferred instruments.

Mr Rolle can be contacted at
24354-6213.

¢ RISING crime and other
pressures in Nassau are prompt-
ing more and more Bahamians
to consider Family Islands life.
But not all the islands are the

quiet havens they used to be.
While Abaco has its growing
Haitian problem - itself the
source of tension from time to
time - Bimini now has to face
the fall-out caused by mass
importation of Hispanic labour.
The Bimini Bay resort devel-
opment has, according to locals,
created major social issues -
including the impregnation of
some local women by Mexican
workers. ;
“These guys are coming in
here and earning all the monéy,
so the women are falling for
them, as you would expect,”
said one islander.

Rotary makes books donation
to Urban Renewal Project

THE new Farm Road
Urban Renewal Project
library is off to a great
start thanks to a donation
of 100 books by the
Rotary Club of New
Providence.

The theme of the
Rotary Club for this year
is ‘Dealing with literacy’
— with a direct focus on
young people.

And, as part of the
club’s community ser-
vices, it chose to assist
children in the Farm
Road community to
enhance their reading
skills.

Farm Road Urban
Renewal is preparing a
resource and after school
outreach center in the
Windsor Lane govern-
ment complex.

Computer training, lit-
eracy and remedial stud-
ies, and religious educa-
tion will be provided.
The project team,
headed by Paulette
Forbes of the Farm Road
office, will partner with
community based organ-
isations to run the pro-
grammes.

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

& TOM Sutton, manager of the Peace and Plenty Beach Inn in Georgetown, Exuma; Charity
Axmbrister, director of the Exuma Tourist Office (accepting donation on behalf of Earlston
'VicPhee, chairman of the Coastal Awareness Committee) and Neville Leeeoys manager of Club
Peace and Ae cay

GEORGETOWN, Exuma
— The owners of Club Peace
and Plenty made a generous
donation to the Coastal Aware-
ness. Committee of the
Bahamas.

One per cent of all revenue
made during the months of Feb-
ruary and March at the charm-
ing and historical 32-room colo-
nial style inn have been pledged

- to the committee.

The funds are to be used for
both the National Coastal
Awareness Campaign and for
coastal awareness projects in
Exuma.

The Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee is a group of stakehold-
ers from the private and public

i pray yeah day f for peace
- to understand the pain,
6 stop. the open flood of tears
“that is often mistaken for rain.

q was not yours but God’s alone -
: He loved me best and called me home

Peet pay



Peace and Plenty
makes donation to
coastal awareness

sector formed to heighten the
public’s awareness of the impor-

_ tance of preserving the coast-

line.

“Exuma is my family’s sec-
ond home,” said Barry Ben-
jamin, owner of Peace and Plen-
ty. “We want to take care of
our unique environment and
will continue to do as much as
we can to promote environ-
mental education both in Exu-
ma and in the rest of the
Bahamas., We support Coastal
Awareness so that residents and
visitorsalike ‘cdiicontinue to
enjoy the Bahamas’ beautiful
natural resources,

“We are grateful to the own-

ers of the Péace’ aiid’Plenty.





God gave us an.angel for 24 years -
_. >. We were not to know
Our time with him would be limited’

His loss a devastating blow.
-. Sleep on my love, my sunshine,
Until we meet agai



BERRY Islands - Minister of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Vincent Peet thanked win-
ter residents and foreign. home
owners for investing in Great
Harbour Cay and contributing
to the Bahamian economy.

The minister’s remarks were
made on Friday at the fourth-
annual winter residents and
home owners reception, held at
the Beach House at. Great Har-
bour Cay.

Minister -Peet urged
Bahamians, winter residents
and home owners to work
‘together to further develop

at can never ever be filled.

Your Loving Mom, Ann Bease =
_ March a7, 2006.2 2%:

oving. issed by mom, Ann, | Dad Michael, Daddy | B, ‘Brothers, J demie & Conor! ;
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Upsilon fraternity of University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Doc Wisdom, Lexie
and friends from Cable Bahamas, one a Host of family ¢ & friends.









“A Leadership program
that develops our boys and
transforms them into
responsible, disciplined,
patriotic young men.”












The Youth Empowerment
& Skills Training Institute

In collaboration with the

Ministry of Youth, Sports & Housing

Juvttes

applications from adolescent males,
16 - 19 years old for enrollment in the 3-month

The National Youth Service Program
Nicolls Town, Andros
April 8th to July 7th, 2006

For Registration and Information, please contact:

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40 Deveaux Street
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Monday - Friday 8:00am to 4:00pm ° Tel: 322-8335












the Berry Island chain.

He said that the Department
of Environmental Health Ser-
vices has signed a contract with
a local resident to solve the pre-
sent difficulties at. the garbage

“site on Great Harbour Cay.
The minister added that the

island is too beautiful to be kept
in an unhygienic nianner and
implored the residents to use
the new garbage service so the
property value on the island:can
continue to rise.

The minister added that the
government recently appoint-
ed a police inspector as officer-

THE TRIBUNE







resorts for this generous dona-
tion,” said Earlston McPhee;
chairman of the Coastal
Awareness Committee. “Tak-

ing care of our coasts should
be everyone’s concern and we
thank all of the companies and.
individuals that have joined us
in this important national ini;

» tiative.”

The committee will oli
everits during April including:a
national church service, a.
national T-shirt day, a marine’

-exhibition, beach restoration.

projects, radio and newspaper
awareness campaigns and edu-
cational field trips. All events:
are. sponsored by private and

_ government agencies.

daeneaseatecececnsenscescncseceraceaeberresesenesoensenscesoesensesscrsescncecoeese! Vecsobadedsaeaeredeeciecsssscsctedserscesscertuevenasedstecdevecssestacecsdserepecsessccerdesonsessadscesecessesoesesesees

S$ tribute to

Berry Islands residents



=

| MINISTER of. Fisiucial Servings and Tnvestuieiits and MP for North Andros and the Berry ‘
Islands Vincent Peet hands out gift bags on Friday. Winter Resident Marcie Sener is shown centre,

(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

in-charge of the island.

“It is also. important for the
government to provide security
at its borders to protect its citi-

- zens and it is our obligation to

provide security,” he said. *
The Ministry of Tourism pre-

-sented winter residents and

home owners who have lived i in
the Berry Islands for 25 years or
longer with gifts and certificates.
Kevin Wallace, Tourism rep-
resentative for the Berry Island
district, commended the winter
residents for significantly cob-
tributing to the Bahamian ecob-
omy.

EEC Caste atta oa
MONTROSE AVE.
ao = ae ay 326-7452



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Rice and US policy development

[ss a safe bet that if US
Secretary of State Con-
doleezza Rice was white, most of
the Bahamian political elite
would despise her as one of the
chief architects of American
“exceptionalism” - a code word
for imperialism.

But as a black woman who is
fourth in line to the throne - and
often regarded as a future presi-
dential candidate - Rice enjoys
immense celebrity, especially
among leaders of the African
diaspora as her meetings with
CARICOM in Nassau last week
demonstrated.

‘Her great-grandparents were
slaves emancipated in the US Civ-
il War, and three generations of
hér family lived in Alabama — the
heart of the once segregated
Deep South. But Rice enjoyed a
nurturing middle class upbring-
ing, taking piano, ballet and
French lessons. Her father was a
Presbyterian minister and her
mother a dedicated teacher.

‘My parents were very strate-
gic,” Rice once said. “I was going
to be so well prepared, and I was
going to do all of these things that
were revered in white society so
well, that I would be armoured
somehow from racism. I would
be able to confront white society
on its own, terms.” ;

And that’s exactly what hap-
pened. Rice used her best weapon
— education — to achieve fame and
power. At the University of Den-
ver she came under the influence
of.a gifted teacher named Josef
Korbel, a Czech refugee from

Naziism whose own daughter

(Madelaine Albright) would also
rise to become secretary of state.

After earning credentials as an
éxpert on the Soviet Union, Rice
was picked in 1988 for a job on
George Bush senior’s National
Security Council, where she grew
close to the president and his fam-
aly. Ironically, she arrived just in
‘time to put her specialty to good
‘use as a traditional foreign policy
Fealist .

THE REALISTS VERSUS
. THE MORALISTS

A: the Cold War ended
and the Warsaw Pact

‘was being dismantled, Rice urged
‘continued engagement with the

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
‘. against the advice of hawks who



wanted to deal with the ex-com-
munist Russian president, Boris
Yeltsin.

Critics say neither she, nor her
colleagues, could conceive of a
world without the USSR. Accord-
ing to an article in the New York-
er Magazine, “The argument was
about whether the United States
should promote regime change
and democracy abroad—and it's
an argument that's still going on.”

Rice was a campaign adviser
to the younger George Bush in
2000 and was appointed national
security adviser after his election.
By most accounts, she changed
her tune during Dubyah’s first
administration — switching from a
foreign policy realist to a moralist.

The big issue between these



Condoleeza Rice’s

‘role is more like a.

senior civil servant
than an imperial
viceroy

two approaches was whether the
United States should just react
adroitly to events, or use its
unprecedented power to “affir-
matively undertake to reshape
the world”, as the moralists — also
called neo-conservatives — argue.

During the Cold War, the US
followed a cynical balance of
power strategy. Corrupt dictators
were propped up in return for
their help against the Soviet
empire. CIA-sponsored coups
and wars in places like Iran,
Guatemala, Southeast Asia,

Brazil, Mozambique and Chile |

destroyed or subverted legitimate
nationalist and democratic move:

ments in the interest of a grand.

global strategy.

It was not until Ronald Rea-
gan’s election in 1980 that this pat-
tern began to change. Perhaps the
best example is South Africa,
where the moralists under Rea-
gan hastened the end of the
apartheid regime by legislating stiff
economic sanctions in favour of
democracy. They went on to win
the Cold War, engineering the col-
lapse of totalitarian communism.

Rice was responsible for the
first National Security Strategy
developed by the younger Bush
administration — just after 9/11.

OPTIMA 2006



Oy eye Ne,

It set the guiding principles for a
more active foreign policy that
envisioned the pre-emptive war
in Iraq:

“The United States possesses

unequaled strength and influence
in the world. Sustained by faith in
the principles of liberty, and the
value of a free society, this posi-
tion comes with unparalleled
responsibilities, obligations, and
opportunity. The great strength
of this nation must be used to
promote a balance of power that
favours freedom.”
' And as Rice herself told an
interviewer in 2002, “if you go
through history you can make a
very strong argument that it was
not acting, or acting too late, that
has had the greatest consequences
for international politics—not the
other way around.”

TOWARDS A
MULTIPOLAR WORLD

[es in this vein that she
supported the (almost) uni-
lateralist 2003 American inter-
vention in Iraq, which damaged
relations with countries around
the world, including CARICOM,
leading to a drop in American
credibility. But after being named
secretary of state in January of
last year, Rice seems to have

', shifted gears somewhat to repair

the damage.

Her goal, analysts say, is to
“reconstitute a multilateral con-
sensus on globalization in which
the United States is (first among
others), guaranteeing the security
of world capitalism militarily, but
not using its military power to
impose policies ‘on its allies and
independent limited collaborators
(China and Russia) without gen-
uine negotiation and compromise.”

In other words - a multipolar
world, in which American lead-
ership is balanced between
regional power centres. And just
this month, Washington issued its
latest National Security Strategy,
which accepts the view that we
are, in fact, moving toward a mul-



tipolar world. This document
stresses the importance of "part-
nering" with regional powers.
“Transformational diplomacy
means working with our many
international partners to build
and sustain democratic, well-gov-
erned states that will respond to
the needs of their citizens and
conduct themselves responsibly
in the international system. ... The
times require an ambitious
national security strategy, yet one
recognizing the limits to what
even a nation as powerful as the
United States can achieve by
itself. Our national security strat-
egy is idealistic about goals, and

realistic about means.”

MISGUIDED POLICIES

Le is the broader context
of Rice’s recent meeting
with CARICOM leaders in Nas-
sau last week. Experts say the US
is trying to recreate trust, build

bridges, find compromises and

become more involved in regional’

politics. And it is clear that resent-
ment and resistance to American
power has been growing in recent
years. As one Bahamian diplomat
told Tough Call:

“The policies of the US are not

producing the results that it .

desires, and therefore how should
friends of the US respond to
those policies that are producing
such disastrous results? A true
friend is one who will point out
your mistakes, and who will not
encourage you in your wrongdo-
ing. If I am right, then CARI-
COM and the Bahamas have
been true friends to the US,
because they have refused to sup-
port misguided policies.”

Chief among those “misguided
policies” — in the eyes of CARI-
COM at least — has been the situ-
ation in Haiti, where the Bush
administration allowed the elect-
ed president, Bertrand Aristide,
to be removed by a rebellion in
February, 2004. CARICOM’s
relations with the US have been
strained ever since — but that is a

PICANTO

KIA MOTORS

discussion for another day.

Fact is, despite all the whining
about American arrogance, Con-
doleeza Rice’s role is more like a
senior civil servant than an impe-
rial viceroy. At least that’s the
view of Michael Mandelbaum, a
former Clinton adviser (now for-
eign policy professor at Johns
Hopkins University) who argues
that the US role in shaping the
modern global order is both
essential and benefits everyone.

THE CASE FOR GOLIATH

|: a new book, he contends
that this role is not imperi-
alism but governance: “Without
the US the world would be a less
stable place,” this view says.
“Other countries tacitly recog-
nize this, which is why no effec-
tive David has come along to
challenge the US. That is, no seri-
ous country actively opposes the
American role in the world,

although all have disagreements .

with the way the US carries out
this role.
“This is true of governments

‘within countries. We all agree

that our government should do
certain things — protect us, pro-
mote economic growth, etc — but
we disagree sharply about the
best way to do this. These dis-
agreements are inevitable, nor-

mal, indeed desirable. Politics:

does not disappear just because
the US plays the role of the

‘ world's government.”

On balance, American super-
vision makes the world safer and
richer, and especially works to
prevent the spread of weapons of
mass destruction — which is per-
haps our most clear and present
danger.

In Tough Call’s younger days it
was fashionable to equate the US
with the Soviet Union. But today

-it is obvious which was the real

“evil empire”. And although
some still view the world through
the prism of Pentagon conspira-
cies, there is a compelling argu-
ment that “the governing func-
tions performed by the US have
earned begrudging acceptance, a
tacit recognition that America is
no threat and that its role, on bal-
ance, is a positive one.”

The problem, in this view, is
not US unilateralism or excep-
tionalism, but the reluctance of
other countries to support the
governmental services that the

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world needs to function effec-
tively: “As for the UN, it is really
a trade association of sovereign
states, not a state itself, and so
doesn't have the resources to do
what the US does. You can no
more expect the UN to carry out
governmental roles in the world
than you can expect the trade
association of American hospi-
tals to perform heart surgery.”
The US may not perform its
global governmental roles out of
altruism, and the relevant poli-
cies receive support from the
American public to the extent
that the public believes that they
serve American interests. But it
so happens that these policies
serve the interests of other coun-
tries as well, and no-one else is
in a position to provide them.
“America is not the lion of the
international system, terrorizing
and preying on smaller, weaker
animals in order to survive itself. It
is, rather, the elephant, which sup-
ports a wide variety of other crea-
tures— smaller mammals, birds,
and insects—by generating nour-
ishment for them as it goes about

the business of feeding itself.”

THE UGLY BAHAMIAN

Me in the Bahamian
political class like to

profess a cliched anti-American-
ism. that dates to. the 1960s, and
consider the pursuit of relations
with Cuba, Venezuela and Chi-
na as a fashionable way to assert
these attitudes.

However, it can be easily
argued that China is the biggest
supporter of. American world
governance through its invest-
ment in US debt and securities,
Cuba will change dramatically as
soon as Castro falls down again,
and odds are that Venezuela’s
Hugo Chavez is little more than a
flare in the oil field. .

The question of relations with
these countries is relatively unim-
portant. It’s a matter of which
side you come down on in the
crunch, and how we allocate our
scant resources and limited atten-
tion. It was the failure to act on
clear priorities and needs that set
the tone for the visit of Perma-
nent Secretary Rice. More on that
next week. -

What do you think?

Send comments to larry@tri-
bunemedia.net. Or _ visit
www.bahamapundit.com








PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

QC foundation awards |
first full scholarship —

THE Queen’s College Foun-
dation has awarded its first full
scholarship to 11-year-old
Osano Neely.

Jillian Gibson, director of
development for the founda-
tion, announced that Osano, a
student of St Cecilia’s Catholic
Primary School, will enter

Queen’s College at grade seven
and will be fully funded for the
duration of his career there.
“In his 11 years, Osano has
made the Bahamas proud with
his outstanding musical talent.
The Queen’s College family is
honoured to welcome him to
the school where he will cer-

tainly excel in a quality learning
environment,” said the school
in a statement.

At St Cecilia’s, Osano
received merit awards for out-
standing academic achievement
and is a school prefect and
member of the school choir.

“This well-spoken young gen-

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tleman is the son of Mrs
Reynell Neely, a school
teacher, and Lieutenant
Whitfield Neely of the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force.

“Osano is a member of the
National Children’s Choir
and the Boys’ Choir of the
Bahamas. He has sung at
many religious, political and
civic events, always willing
to share his gift with others.

“His travels have brought
him to New York and he has
even sung for the television
network TBN with Pastor
Benney Hinn,” said the
statement.

It continued: “His most
unforgettable moment and
his greatest honour was
when he was announced the
winner of the E Clement
Bethel Award for Excel-
lence in Music this past June.
This little bundle of potential
is living his dream and using
his talent to make a positive
impact.”

The school said that Sir
Durward Knowles, chairman
of the Queen's College
Foundation, and the entire
staff are “thrilled” to wel-
come Osano to the school.

THE TRIBUNE:





| Teacher is honoured |

es



Bites

SHANTELL Poitier-Rolle was showered with gifts and
tributes during a special assembly held at Jack Hayward High
School’s:gymnasium. Mrs Poitier-Rolle was selected as the
teacher of the year for her outstanding accomplishments in the
lives of her students and for the school. She is pictureed being .
escorted by the principal of the school, Benjamin Stubbs.

(Photo: Derek Carroll):

<

Trinity Methodist Church

Trinity Place and Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Join us as we celebrate the

145th Anniversary

of the laying of the foundation stone and the
141st Anniversary of the Dedication of the Sanctuary

Sunday, 2nd April, 2006

11:00 a.m. Worship Service
“Remembering the Faithful...Celebrating the Blessings”

Claiborne inc.

SS

Followed by a Luncheon





(ne

Iniwbvine



FROM page one

of Pinewood Gardens are asking
for justice to be served immedi-
ately,: We will wait for justice to
take its.course,” said one friend.

Press, liaison officer Inspector
Walter Evans on Monday night
told the press that the incident
happened shortly after 8pm.

He: said police were making
inquities in the area when they
approached the vehicle. He said
the young man drove in a violent
mariner, which prompted police
to firé a single shot. Mr Evans
said police were now awaiting the
coroner’s report as to the exact
cause:of death.

However, residents of the area
say that is not the real version of
events.

Spéaking with The Tribune yes-
terday, a group of Deron’s
friends -who wished not to be
named — said that Deron’s death
was asenseless killing.

They maintained that Deron
was sitting in his car talking with
neighbours, minding his own busi-
ness when he was killed. They
said ‘the officers did not identify
themselves or state their reasons
for approaching him.

“They walk up to the car, and
try to open up the door, but he
didn’t know who they was or
what they wanted and so he put
the car into reverse. Two or three
seconds later, the officer fire a
shot through the windshield and
the car reverse all the way down
the road and crashed into the
pole,” one friend said.

One of his friends said, he ran
over to the car and saw Deron
try to lift up his head, and then
slumped in the'car.

“He didn’t get up no more
after that and I knew that he was
dead,” said another.

Mrs Bethel said that police
were called to the area earlier
that day to investigate a “scuffle
between a boyfriend and a girl-
friend” who live across the road
to the Bethel’s family home.

“Police first came at around
3pm and then returned around
8pm. They didn’t know who they
were looking’for when they
tapped on Deron’s car window,”
she said.

Mrs Bethel said she was at
home settling in for the night
when a friend of Deron’s came
to lier door and told her that her
son-‘had been shot by plainclothes
police officers.

She said that she immediately.
rushed to the scene at the end of
the road where her son’s car had
come to a stop.

“Tf don’t know how I got there
because I had on my pajamas and
I just managed to put a coat on
over it. When I got there, there
were three officers standing about
and’I asked.them what hap-
penéd,” she said.

Mrs Bethel said the officers
refused to answer her.

“T:said, ‘I want to see my child’
and: ‘they wouldn’t let me see him
andit was at that point in time
that‘Mummy (Deron’ s maternal
grandmother) came and demand-
ed td see him. The officers pushed
us away and would not let us near
the.car so we could see him.
Whén they pushed us Mummy
fell‘down, but I was able to keep
standing.

“And all that time he was
dead, ” she said.

“¢

Man dies

After waiting an hour, she said,
an ambulance finally arrived at
the scene.

“When we looked the ambu-
lance came and it was there for so
long and didn’t carry him and I
asked them why they ain’t carry
him. Deron was still sitting in the
car, and police come with the yel-
low tape and tell me this is a
crime scene.

“T asked them how this a crime
scene, they shot him up the road,”
she said.

Mrs Bethel said by the time the
hearse arrived there were hun-
dreds of people in the streets.

“And when I look the hearse
came and the hearse took my
child away and they still didn’t
let me see him. They didn’t even
let me get close to the car and
they couldn’t tell me why,” she
said.

Deron’s father, and his brother,
both said it would be inappropri-
ate to comment on the situation
although they both agreed with
Mrs Bethel’s comments about hee
son’s personality.

One of Deron’s friends said it is
incidents like this which give
police initiatives like the Urban
Renewal Programme and Com-
munity Policing a bad:name.

Mr Evans said that police
investigations continue, but
stressed that plainclothed officers
are always required to carry iden-
tification cards to verify that they
are members of the police force.

Equipment
boost
FROM page one

The officers studied the
assessment, neutralization and
safe disposition of convention-
al and improvised explosives/..
incendiary devices and materi-
als. Also a part of their train-
ing consisted of developing
emergency response plans and
how to investigate explosive
incidents.

The training and equipment

has cost approximately
$500,000.

"I think it is very important
that we all work together,”.
said Ambassador Rood. “The -
threats that we are facing now
around the world are much dif-
ferent than the threats we were
facing five years ago. This type
of equipment and training
makes sure police in the
Bahamas have the tools to deal
with this threat."

Sgt. Doyle Burrows, a par-
ticipant in the programme, said
the training was "very rigid." It
was the first time, he said, that
they have had training of that
magnitude.

"We are considered as a soft:
target, but we have persons
here who are trained and qual-
ified and capable to render the
assistance necessary as it per-
‘tains to terrorism," he said.

Mr Burrows said that in the
near future they will take part.
in follow-up training.

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i tistics available
: Bahama, Dr Turnquest said that

FROM page one

: quest of The Grand Bahama Cri-
i sis Centre said the organisation is
? sponsoring Wednesday’s gala
; night opening beginning with
: cocktails from 7pm to 8pm.

The play also will be staged on

} March 30, 31, and April 1 at 83pm
: by the Grand Bahama Players
: under the direction of Eisen-
: hower Williams.

Although there are no true sta-
in Grand

incest and sexual abuse is a “big

i problem” in Bahamian society.

“We continue to be in denial
and not be to aware that such
abuse does occur and we need

: to be reminded that it does
? occur.”

“We need to be aware as
adults and as parents that it does
occur and continue to protect our

children.

Whenever abuse occurs it’s

i because somebody was not pro-
i tecting the kids as they should
i have been protected.”

Dr Turnquest said every fami-

ly is touched by abuse in some
? way and each family needs to be
: aware of it.

Ms Gwen Rolle, a survivor of

} child sexual and physical abuse,
i will be on hand to sign copies

of her book, ‘Breaking the

Silence’.

‘ She hopes that her traumatic

i story of abuse portrayed in the
; play and in her book will help,
? not only victims of abuse to over-
i come the pain and find forgive-
i ness in their hearts, but also
; make parents aware of the warn-
; ing signs of abuse.

“We need more people to

i come forward who are able to be
-? transparent about the issue.

LOCAL NEWS

There are a lot of victims who
are not able to get over the pain
and move on with their lives.”

“I remember the confronta-
tion with my father and how he
was so pleased when I really got
the guts to confront him because
he was hurting too.

“And, as I watched rehearsals
there are moments when it still
hurts, but I know that the cause is
much greater than the pain. I
made.a choice to use this avenue
to reach out to people — itisa
message of healing, strength, for-
giveness and taking control of
your life.”

“You have to keep fighting
every day mentally and it has giv-
en me great joy that I have over-
come.’

Despite the difficulties she
faced, Ms Turnquest said that Ms
Rolle was able to overcome the
pain and has made great efforts
to have a productive life. She
commended her for bravely shar-
ing in her autobiography an inti-
mate look at her life and strug-
gles.

“Gwen has dramatically
demonstrated that victims of
abuse are not responsible for
their abuse and that a victim can
have a productive life after
abuse,” she said.

Mr Jones believes that the play
‘In His Hands’ probably has the
most beneficial messages than
any play that has been performed
at the Regency Theatre in the
last 20 years.

He was very disappointed that
the Bahamas Plays and Films
Board gave it an adult only ‘C’
rating. ,

“I was disappointed.. .because







there is a definite need for young
people to be aware of how abuse
happens and why it happens. I
feel that the play should have
been given a ‘PG’ rating rather
than a ‘C’.

“It was given a C because of






the contents and when I submii-
ted the script to the committee I
suggested to them advise what-
ever they would want me to do to
make it acceptable to children,
but they didn’t and they just gave
it a Crating.

Marijuana estimation

FROM page one

estimated street value of more than $24 million. For the year, in fact,
three marijuana farms have been found on Eleuthera and another on
Cat Island, proof of the police force warning that the illicit trade was

“on the rise.”

Kevin Stanfill, the country attaché for the US Drug Enforcement
Agency (DEA), said that their interdictions so far have already made
2006 the most productive drug seizure year that they have ever had.

“There is so much money to be made in marijuana. Marijuana for a
pound is going for $650 to $1,200 a pound in South Florida. That
same pound can go for $1,000 to $3,800 in New York, so getting mar-
ijuana to the United States is big, big profits.

“I think one of the things that you’re seeing here is a lot of individ-
uals from Jamaica that are coming to the Bahamas and trying to. do
some of the same things that they did in Jamaica — to grow their
marijuana crops so they can send it on to the US. The RBPF does an
outstanding job that has dealt with this, and I don’t believe we have
seized many plants that have been higher than your knee, so we are get-
ting the plants before they can produce the product,” he said.

Mr Stanfill explained that a marijuana plant would normally grow to
six or seven feet before developing large buds that can be cultivated for
sale. These buds, he explained, are what is being used by these farm-

ers to bring in the “big money.”

“T’ve talked to some of my counterparts in Jamaica and there is so
much marijuana in Jamaica, they say it is rotting as it is getting ready
to go out. And most of the marijuana that I have seen since i have been
here for three years, about 90 per cent of it is Jamaican marijuana that
is passing through on its way to the US,” he said.

According to Mr Stanfill, a normal marijuana plant could yield, if cul-
tivated by an experienced farmer, four pounds of marijuana a year.
Based on these calculations the estimated value of the total marijuana
cultivation from the three Eleuthera farms— 12,000 plants on one,
4,000 on another and more than 3,000 on a third — assuming the crops
were sold at $2,000 a pound in the US, could bring a return as high as

$152 million.

However, Mr Stanfill said that he felt that the marijuana cultivation
is not an organized industry, and that the farmers growing the crops on
the various islands are doing so as individual enterprises.

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS



COPPER arts and crafts spe- in Spanish history “The Galleon
cialist Nick Austin displayed this | Buena Fé.” [Good faith] With
piece, a depiction of the L6th cen- __ its large, heavy and square rigged
tury galleon Buena Fé at the shape, the Galleon Buena Fé
Bahamas National Trust Spring hosted a high stern and multiple
Fling event over the weekend. decks. Different from most

Phe showing of the piece is | Galleon type ships, the Buena Fé
accompanied by a story by Ryan — was a bit sleeker and easier to
\ustin, the artist's son, recount- manoeuvre; additionally it was
ing the tale of a fleet of soldiers often mistaken for a Galleass
and explorers who set sail — because of its large cannons.
towards the Island of Karukera During its travels, The Buena
(present-day Guadeloupe) in Fé became swept off course in a
1586 in hopes of finding treasures fierce storm and came across
and riches for Skull Mountain, home to gangs

For a trip of this magnitude of fearsome pirates. There, the
Capitan Nicholas Guzman _ crew of the Buena Fé and the
requested use of the greatest ship _ pirates fought a deadly battle...




























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pusiness@tribunemedianer MIAMI Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006









Bai eane

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



IMF accepts National
Accounts Statistics

@ By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter

he International Monetary
Fund, for the first time in

_ over 30 years, has accepted °

the National Accounts Sta-
tistics produced by the Bahamas
Department of Statistics, it was
announced this week.

The move means that realistic socio-
economic programmes and plans can
now be put in place more effectively
for the country.

Minister of State for Finance, James
Smith, told a Department of Statistics
seminar for senior public servants that
the IMF's acceptance of the National
Accounts Statistics was as a result of a
modernisation project carried out by
the Minister of Finance and the
Department of Statistics with the assis-
tance of the IMF and Statistics Canada.

The success was also attributed to a
state-of-the-art database using the lat-
est data processing software installed
by experienced software developers
who were contracted for that purpose.

"No country can even begin to devel-
op realistic socio-economic pro-
grammes and plans unless and until it

has in place an adequate statistical sys-
tem which produces, at a minimum,
good quality, reliable, timely and rele-
vant data on the social and economic
conditions existing in that country,"
said Mr Smith.

He added that many international
data banks, including the United
Nations, the IMF, the World Bank, the
Inter-American Development Bank,
the Organisation of American States,
CARICOM and the Caribbean Devel-
opment Bank would often place the
symbols "N/A" or "Not Available" in
the column representing The Bahamas'
contribution to international, hemi-
spheric or regional data collection
effort.

In an attempt to close that gap, a
"considered and deliberate effort" was
made by the Ministry of Finance and
the Department of Statistics with the
assistance of the IMF and Statistics
Canada to put in place the necessary
resources, equipment, manpower and
training, he said.

The Information Technology system
at the Department was upgraded util-

‘ising the latest fibre-optic technology,

state-of-the-art scanning hardware and
software were installed, and a modern

’



SENATOR JAMES SMITH

security system was implemented to
adequately address confidentiality con-
cerns.

While applauding the Department
for its efforts, Mr Smith warned that
"the real work has just begun".

"It is expected that at the end of this

’ workshop, many of your organisations

may recognise the urgency and useful-
ness of developing permanent mecha-
nisms for collecting and making avail-
able statistical information for use in

the national development process," he -

told delegates.

The 2001 Living Conditions Survey
as well as the recent 2003-2004 Occu-
pation and Wages Report were suc-
cessfully completed by the Department
of Statistics, and the information gar-

’ nered is proving useful in various sec-

tors of the country.

Mr. Smith said the critical value of
statistical information for national
development goals became clearly
apparent in the 2001 Living Conditions
Survey. He said it confirmed the sus-
picion that children from low or no-
income families are less likely to attend
pre-school or a tertiary institution and
those poor children are also more like-

ly to leave school without a qualifica-

tion.

"With this concrete knowledge of
the situation, the government's pro:
grammes, which are aimed at stamping
out illiteracy and eradicating poverty;
could now be more appropriately tar:
geted," he said. _

"As it is, this kind of information}.
which is so essential to good policy
development, is found in every min
istry, department or agency of governe
ment," Mr Smith said.

"What is needed, therefore, is a
more systematic and coherent way to
collect, collate and make available that
information to the policy makers and
the wider society."

The need for reliable statistical infor-
mation extends beyond the govern-
ment into the private sector and non-
governmental organisations, he said.

Mr Smith commended the Chamber
of Commerce for its contribution to
the project by entering into a partner-
ship arrangement with the Department
of Statistics to collect data from the
private sector.

"A private-public partnership is crit-
ical to the collection and dissemina-
tion of reliable national statistics," he
said.

GBHRA says Consumer Protection Bill ‘long overdue’

@ By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter

THE GRAND Bahama Human
Rights Association yesterday
applauded the government for intro-
ducing a Consumer Protection Bill to
parliament. .

In a press release, the GBHRA said
the "long overdue" bill is a "step in
the right direction".

"This is what the business of gov-
ernment is about," said the release.
"Not controlling the minutiae of busi-
ness transactions, but regulating some
fairness."

Alleging that consumers are "at the

Baha Mar executives
‘monitoring’ resort

mercy of the business community",
the association said: "Whilst there are
many businesses which operate ethi-
cally and reasonably towards the con-

. sumer of goods and services, there

are many that practise business as if it
is a war to be waged on the public,
and which must be won at all costs."

It alleged that businesses which are
able to take "abusive advantage" of
the public because there is little con-
sumer protection, regulatory account-
ability or supervision are real estate
development companies, service
charge companies, insurance compa-
nies, loss adjusters, brokers and agents
as well as foreign banks.

@ By A FELICITY .
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter

BOTH Baha Mar and
Atlantis Resorts are reserving
their comments on the sale of
the South Ocean Golf and
Beach Resort until more is
known about the recently-
announced $50 million acqui-
sition by the Stillman Organi-
sation.

But Baha Mar's executive
VP of administration and pub-
lic affairs Robert Sands indi-
cated that current tourism
trends could mean that there is
enough of the pie to share
without detriment to the other
major players.

"We don't know what will
happen (with South Ocean)
but we are monitoring it," said
Mr Sands. "We are satisfied
that the Bahamas is becoming
more and more popular, and
the opportunity for growth is a
very positive element for the
destination.”

He said that further com-
ment on the sale of the South
Ocean Resort would have to
wait until more concrete infor-
mation about "if and when"
the resort will open is known.

Atlantis VP of public affairs
Ed Fields also said that, at this
point, not enough is known
about plans for the South
Ocean resort, and that com-
ments about how it might
affect business for that hotel
would be reserved until fur-
ther notice.

Industry experts are watch-

ing the recent developments
with a cautious eye, to see if
the opening of another mega-
resort might split, the elite,
high-end tourist market too
thinly for New Providence.

Tribune Business exclusively
revealed on Monday that the
New York-based real estate
developer, the Stillman Organ-
isation, plans to invest $500
million in transforming the site
into a five-star, 1,000-room
hotel with a casino.

Atlantis is still in construc-
tion mode for its Phase III
development, in which over $2
billion is expected to be spent.

Meanwhile, BahaMar is
gearing up for a full overhaul
of the Cable Beach area, with a
proposed $1.6 billion revitali-
sation.

The resurrection of the

‘South Ocean Resort would

mean a triangle of three
anchor projects for the
Bahamian capital.

The acquisition is expected
to close by the end of this year,
and is still subject to due dili-
gence.

South Ocean has a casino
licence that will kick in if the
resort gets up to 500 rooms in
size. It presently has just 279,
plus six oceanfront houses. The
current resort also has a golf
course that it leases from New
Providence Development
Company, and che entire com-
plex occupies some 200 acres
that it either owns or leases.

The Stillman Organisation’s

SEE page 7B

The statement said: "They seduce
the unsuspecting public with profes-
sionalism. They mesmerise with the

‘glossy brochure and choke you to

death with the financial loss. They
take advantage of most of the public’s
weak bargaining position. They take
advantage of the high costs of litiga-
tion, the "lack of a jury system of dam-
ages, the lack of punitive damages,
the trusting nature-of island people,
the lack of education for the mast
part, the absence of fair trade practice
codes, bureaus or other government
regulatory bodies, and the absence of
consumer action groups."

The human rights watchdog alleged

that places like their city, which was
ravaged by Hurricanes Andrew,
Floyd, Jeanne, Frances and Wilma,
"have evidenced the true rapacious
nature of insurance companies,
adjusters and banks."

It advised: "We call on the govern-
ment to provide true protection to
the consumer against banks, finan-
cial institutions, and insurance com-
panies and their agents and adjusters.
Give the Registrar of Insurance com-
panies real teeth. Provide for good
faith negotiations in selling policies
and dealing with claims."

It also advised that the bill's reach
stretched to Florida-based retailers

and wholesalers. ;
"Goods or services from Florida
are purchased, and we pay duties and
freight on the importation we have
hell to recover if they are not as
ordered. We can rarely afford the cost
or time to send them back," said the

~ statement.

“Our government should negotiate
and try to legislate in tandem with
the Florida legislature, so that breach
of consumer protection of goods
shipped from Florida companies to
the Bahamas would have the same

SEE page 5B





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

ae ee eee eee eee
Leading insurance advisers attend

DRT Experience sales conference



FOUR leading insurance
advisers from Nassau were
among over 9,000 insurance
professionals and industry
partners attending the MDRT
Experience sales conference in
Bangkok, Thailand:

Sandra Seymour, Deveral
Ferguson, Alfreda Knowles
and Anthony (Tony) Longley,
all sales representatives with
ColinaImperial Insurance Litd.,
attended the four-day event,
sponsored by the Million Dol-

lar Round Table (MDRT).

The MDRT Experience is
held every two years in a dif-
ferent Asian country for the
purpose of promoting mem-
bership in MDRT, a US-based’
international sales organisa-
tion, with headquarters in Park
Ridge, Illinois.

The main MDRT sales con-
vention is held annually in
June, with this year’s venue
being San Diego, California.

MDRT was founded in 1927

to provide members with
resources to improve their
technical knowledge, sales and
client service while maintaining
a culture of high ethical stan-
dards.

There are about 30,000
MDRT members worldwide in
73 countries which constitute
less than five per cent of the
sales force worldwide.

The next biennial MDRT
Experience meeting will be
held in April, 2008, in Japan.





WELCOME =
MDRT EXPERIENC

BANGKOK 2006







Manager Position

Ma a eee net

3 Position available for Marketing Manager

to develop and implement marketing initiatives for retail outlets in Nassau, Bahamas

Key Responsibilities include:
Short and long term planning of brand development and strategic marketing
initiatives for multiple outlets.
-Day to day, seasonal and special event marketing planning and execution for retail
outlets (incl. advertising, promotions and public relations).
-Media placement and relations.
-Print, radio and television ad direction and development.
-Budgeting and. tracking expenditures based on department's strategy.
-Retail store support as it relates to promotions, signage, merchandising and special
events. ee
Special projects coordination.

Individuals applying must:
-Have a minimum of a Marketing Associate’s Degree and 3 years experience.
-Have excellent written and communication skills and be able to work with multiple
departments and personnel to accomplish tasks.
-Be outgoing and enjoy working with others.
-Be organized, able to take initiative and work unsupervised. Must be able to motivate
and supervise other team members.
-Have working knowledge of radio, print and television ad development.
-Have working knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes and basic graphics.
-Have own transportation and be available for travel and weekend and seasonal hours.
‘9. apply for this position, please submit resumes to:
marketingbahamas@yahoo.com

SE

—

\ _.
XK

\

The Bahamas Co-operative
League Limited

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
VACANCY |
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Manager, Business Office, Grand Bahama Health Services.





The Bahamas -
Co-operative League
Requires the services of a:




Applicant must possess the following qualifications.



Professional qualification Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Association of Certified Chartered
Accountant (ACCA) or Chartered Accountant (CA), Masters of Business Administration (MBA),
Master of Arts (MA) in the relevant area and one (1) year experience as Assistant Accountant or
Bachelors of Science Degree (BSc), Bachelors of Arts Degree (BA), Bachelors of Business
- Administration and two (2) years experience as Assistant Accountant; Associate Degree and a
minimum of four (4) years experience as an Assistant Accountant and must be Computer literate.







The Business Office Manager will report to the Financial and Accounting Officer and be responsible
for the management for the management of all operations of the Business Office.





Duties:




Prepares department budget and strategic plans for each fiscal year.




2. Prepares comparative analytical report on revenue collection for each fiscal year.



3. Prepares monthly analysis of revenue collected and ensures monthly financial reports are
reconciled.




4. Ensures policies and procedures are in place to prevent opportunity for fraud and system
manipulation. . : ‘



/



5. Reconciles end of year accounts receivable for private patients and submits findings and
recommendations to Finance Officer.



Ensures all effort is made to meet monthly and yearly revenue collection targets.





Consults and assists patients with financial constraints.



6
7. Establish new job functions to improve customer service and revenue collection.
8
9

Liaises with Social Services Department regarding approvals for patients medical procedures.




10. Ensures patients are made aware of outstanding balances and receive bills in a timely manner.

11. Evaluates staff and ensures that all business office employees adhere to their job descriptions

Deadline for application:
and any other duties assigned pertaining to their job function.

April 6, 2006





12. Assists in any other duties assigned by the Finance Officer to provide excellent customer
(internal and external) satisfaction and revenue enhancement.





13. Ensures that National Insurance Board and companies billings are forwarded for payments in
a timely manner.






Letters of application and curricula vita should be submitted to the Director of Human Resources,
Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale House, West
‘Bay Street or through your Head of Department.no later than 10th April, 2006: ~





THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Group’s



chief executive gets

prestigious award



THE Nassau-based Clipper
Group’s chief executive, Tor-
ben G. Jensen (shown above),
was awarded tthe prestigious
Commodore Of The Year
Award during the gala dinner
at the annual Connecticut Mar-
itime Association's Confer-
ence.

The immediate past Com-

Designed

modore was D. Sean Day,
chairman of Teekay Shipping,
another Nassau-headquartered

company. The award, present- -

ed to Mr Jensen on March 22,
is in recognition of an individ-
ual's contribution to the
growth and development of
the shipping industry.

The Clipper Group is head-



quartered.in Nassau, the
Bahamas and currently oper-
ates a fleet of over 250 vessels.
One hundred vessels are
owned, out of which 76 vessels
fly the Bahamian flag.

Clipper has another 45 new-
buildings under construction.
These vessels will also fly the
Bahamian flag.

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#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ° 322-3775 *° 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Lid for similar deals, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don Mackay Bivd, 367-2916



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 3B





To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,




just call 322-1986 today!

Tons: | een Officer

Position available for Chief Financial Officer
to provide strategic direction and oversight of Finance, Accounting and
Information Technology for multiple retail locations.

Key Responsibilities include:

General Finance: Directs short and long-term profit plans and budgets for all
facilities and the preparation and interpretation of the company’s financial
operating results. Directs internal auditing and development and maintenance
of procedures for safeguarding assets including inventories and accounts
receivable. Develops capital expenditure, daily finance and accounting functions
for the company. Interprets operating results of the company and makes
recommendations to senior management on cost reduction, productivity
improvements or profit improvement opportunities in line with company’s
strategic objectives. Establishes procedures and systems necessary to provide
adequate financial controls assuring compliance with company policy related to
finance, accounting and information technology functions, as well as
compliance government. reporting standards. .

Business Planning & Reporting: Directs the composition, review, and editing
of annual business plans prepared and presented to Board of Directors.

. Coordinates the preparation of long range and short range strategic financial
performance plans for the company. Directs the devel opinent a maintenance,

consolidation of financial reporting.

Information Technology: Directs an information technology. strategy that



supports the long-term goals of the corporation. Plans, directs, and evaluates
the use of current and new technologies / business systems to streamline and
enhance business operations. - ;

Education: Bachelor’s degree in Finance, Accounting or Business Admin.

required, CPA preferred.
and auditing experience required including 3+ years Executive level leadership /
management experience of a medium sized finance team.

Experience: 10+ years of cost accounting, finance,

To apply for this position, please submit resumes to:
Chief Financial Officer - P.O. Box N 10496

Nassau, The Bahamas
OR EMAIL: cfobahamas@yahoo.com

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* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia,





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006



ee ee ee:
Stocks tumble as Federal Reserve

suggests interest rate hikes on way

@ By SETH SUTEL
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tum-
bled Tuesday, with the Dow Jones
industrials dropping 95 points after
the Federal Reserve disappointed
investors by suggesting that more
interest rate hikes were on the way.

The Fed raised the nation’s bench-
mark interest rate Tuesday as expect-
ed, but the surprise for the markets
came in an accompanying statement
in which the Fed upgraded its view
on the economy, suggesting that at
least one and possibly even two more
rate increases were in the cards.

That sent stock prices sharply low-
er, despite a strong reading on con-
sumer confidence earlier Tuesday that
had provided support to the market.

The Dow Jones industrial average
closed down 95.57, or 0.85 per cent, at
11,154.54.

Broader stock indicators also fell
sharply. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index fell 8.38, or 0.64 per cent, to

index skidded 11.12, or 0.48 per cent,
to 2,304.46.

Bond prices also slid in response
to the Fed’s announcement. The yield
on the 10-year Treasury note, which
rises when the price of the note falls,
jumped to 4.78 per cent from 4.71 per
cent late Monday.

The latest fed funds rate increase,
the 15th consecutive rise of a quarter
percentage point, leaves the rate at
4.75 per cent, its highest level since
April 2001.

The Fed said in its statement that
“some further policy firming may be
needed,” indicating that it was
inclined to keep raising rates in an
effort to contain inflationary pres-
sures.

The Fed’s two-day meeting was the
first led by new chairman Ben
Bernanke.

Craig Coats, co-head of fixed
income trading at the brokerage
Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, said
investors had hoped to see signs that
the Fed might have just one more

rate increase to go in its current cycle.

But with the Fed upgrading its assess-
ment of the economy’s strength Tues-
day, Coats said one and possibly two
additional more hikes were now like-
ly.

“This was a little bit more than
most people were looking for,” Coats
said. “The market is going to have to
price this in over the next couple of
weeks.”

Raising

The Fed has been raising rates
steadily since June 2004 under a pro-
gramme begun by Bernanke’s prede-
cessor, Alan Greenspan. Since that
time, the benchmark federal funds
rate, the interest that banks charge
each other for overnight loans, has
risen from a low of one per cent.

Now that a federal funds rate of
five per cent is a given with at least
one more rate increase likely,
investors are now wondering how
likely a further increase to 5.25 per
cent willbe.

“T truly believe that they would like

to stop at five per cent, but if we get a
really strong number (for economic
growth) in the first quarter it may be
hard to do that,” said Wachovia Corp.
senior economist Mark Vitner.

Oil futures rose following the threat
of a strike in Norway. Light sweet

crude for May delivery rose $1.91 to’

settle at $66.07 a barrel on the New

York Mercantile Exchange.

General Motors Corp. announced
another round of layoffs Tuesday, and
its shares fell 18 cents to $22.75. _

The move, affecting several hun-
dred salaried workers, follows last
week’s announcement of buyout
offers to more than 100, 000 hourly
workers.

Shares of eBay Inc. rose $1.72 or 4.6
per cent to $38.87 after the online
retailer received an upbeat report
from a Goldman Sachs analyst. The
shares had been down about 14 per
cent for the year prior to Tuesday’s
rally.

Level 3 Communications Inc.

‘jumped 71 cents or 15.9 per cent to

raised its estimated quarterly operat-
ing income target to a range of $140
million to $150 million from a prior
level of $105 million to $125 million.

Drug maker Eli Lilly & Co. fell
$2.29 or 3.9 per cent to $56.38 as two
analysts downgraded the company.
One said Lilly was under pressure
from sluggish growth at some ‘of its
major products; a poor late-stage
pipeline for new drugs and competi-
tion in drugs for diabetes and depres-

sion.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller
companies fell 2.76, or 0.37 percent,
to 751.27.

Declining issues outnumbered
advancing ones two to one on. the
New York Stock Exchange. Prelimi-
nary consolidated volume was .2.21
billion shares, up from 2.04 billion at
the same time Monday.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei stock
average rose 0.2 per cent. Britain’s
FTSE 100 fell 0.6 per cent, Germany’s
DAX index was down 0.4 per cent,
and France’s CAC-40 was down 0.2
per cent.

1,293.23 and the Nasdaq composite

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ESS a EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
aa*CA NEW GUINEA LIMITED
Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to : ud particulars thereof to the undersigned
c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st April,
A.D., 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 28th day of March, A.D., 2006.

K. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA NEW GUINEA
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 27th day of
March, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. Floyd, of 16945 Northchase Dr.,
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 28th day of March, 2006.

HARRY B. SANDS
LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company





Bisi

Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
3 Premier Real Estate

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13. ‘00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings

1.278569*
2.6662 ***
10.8590*****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond
Bois gee TES 72

2.6662
10.8590
2.3312








x ALL ‘SHARE INDE. x-
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/ **** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2006

S AT MA: 10. 2006/
GEMS






Colina

Financial Advisors Lid.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA (JUHA/P’NYANG) LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st April,
A.D., 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded from the

benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 28th day of March, A.D., 2006.

K. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138(4) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the dissolution
of ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the-Company has therefore
been struck off the Registrar. The date of coupes of the dissolution
was March 20, 2006.

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

Sailtbaainy



Change Daily Vo!l. EPS$ Div $

Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $

oe
Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %







Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



$5.18 after the network operator






PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL.

-The Public is hereby advised that |, STEPHANIE SAINTIL,
of Joe Farrington Road in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence, intend to change my name to
_ STEPHANIE DELVA. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

A DEVELOPER

seeks to employ an.

Owner Representative

for projects in Nassau and the Islands.












Applicants must have a background in construction or
Architecture and possess people skills.



Reply to chara@coralwave.com

LEGAL NOTICE —

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA (JUHA/P’NYANG) LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA NEW GUINEA
(JUHA/P’NYANG) LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 27th day of’
March, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and... :
registered by the Registrar General. \

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. Floyd: of 16945 Northehatp Dr.
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A. -

Dated the 28th day of March, 2006.

HARRY B. SANDS .
LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD. |.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

itll |

Ofeoniure

is having a

Se AE SL

EVERYTHING MUST GO
Getting ready for new stock!

up to 20% Off Storewide

50% Cloth recliners, leather & cloth
ottomans, metal & wood bar stools,
bamboo & ficus plants

NOW IN STOCK

Harp shape Mahogany desk
Armoir
Victorian style dressers
Italian leather sofas
Leather sleigh bed
French grape 4 postal bed set

Manhattan Concave Entertainment Centre
ED Nase see eS eee Yc ae)

Store Hours: 9am - 5:30pm
located: Maderia Plaza, Palmdale across from Lorene’s parking lot
Call us at: (242) 328-8056 or (242) 328-8057





WHE | RIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 5!:







Burger King adds
more investment
anks to underwrite
initial public offering



WASHINGTON (Dow

Jones/AP) — Burger King
Holdings Inc. has added more
investment banks to under-
write its initial public offer-
ing.
The Miami-based burger
chain, the second largest in
the world after McDonald’s
Corp., also plans a manage-
ment “realignment” in its
-overseas.operations, it said in
a regulatory filing Tuesday.

Burger King... added
Wachovia Corp., Bear Stearns



Cos. and Lehman Brothers
Holdings Inc. to its list of IPO
underwriters. Already
involved in managing the IPO
are JP Morgan Chase & Co.,
Citigroup Inc., Goldman
Sachs Group Inc. and Mor-
gan Stanley. In an updated
preliminary prospectus filed
with the Securities and
Exchange Commission Tues-
day, the company said that its
board has authorized the

. realignment of the regional

management of its European

BHRA: Consumer |
Protection 5
‘long over



BUSINESS

Removal of Abaco Barge
is Imminent

Liberty Oil would like to provide current information to the #
f residents of Abaco as to the ongoing removal process of the barge ||
Rin stranded off their coast. ne






| History



Louis Goulet is an unpowered barge not a tanker or an oil |
| barge and it is used to support drilling. It has no oil products on
| board and was at anchor near Walkers Cay at the time hurricane
| Wilma struck. So
a At the time we became aware of a possible that a direct hit by |
©, Hurricane Wilma, Liberty Oil was refused request for sanctuary at [7
#2 South Ridding Point, Freeport, and US ports for the Louis Goulet.
2 When the barge broke loose the company’s tugboat was also
— pulled off her anchor. Liberty Oil tried to hire a local tug to assist us |
f+ before the barge was grounded but no assistance could be employed ||
| at any cost. Immediately after the grounding our crew got on board }
f to access the damage and have been working on board ever since.






and Asian business.

The realignment, which
includes the granting of fran-
chises in new European and
Asian entities, is expected to
have a positive impact on
Burger King’s future effective
tax rate; the company expects
to incur approximately $125
to $150 million in cash tax
payments and related costs in
the first quarter of fiscal 2007,
as a result. The chain hopes to
raise up to $400 million in the
IPO.




i Current Stranded Barge Information —



Reason why the barge has not yet been removed.



1. The barge is located over 100 ft. outside of the main reef near
Man-O-War Cay and is constantly subject to large waves which #@
often come over the bow and up on the deck which makes boarding §

or loading of equipment dangerous or impossible except in near 7
flat weather. -







2. The barge is 110 ft. tall and is an open cargo type with 1 million
gallons of seawater inside, due to several breaches in the bottom
of the hull. The breaches were not easily visible from outside and
inside the visibility is nearly zero. After many dives outside and
as many dives inside the cargo hold, the breaches were finally
located. The patching and repairing is now mostly completed.
There’s however a large hole in the bow which is very visible but
it separated and has now been sealed.








,@;
I 7
Sao we

FROM page 1B ©

consumer protection as if pur-
chased in Florida, and by co-
operation with the Florida reg-
ulatory authorities, Bahamians





9



3. Because of its tender stability, several stability studies were eS
_ required to determine the best way to remove the barge safely. &




4. With 1 million gallons of seawater in 1 compartments the proper : :
method of pumping the water off the barge would have to be
followed precisely.





could get remedies in Florida.

“Why should guarantees and

consumer protection lapse just
becauseonthey-~come-tovthenw
: Bahamas? We are an impors .:) Bae
tant trading partner of Flori-



ao

and shipped them to Marsh Harbour. We hired Abacay’s Crib #
o£ reight Company to delivery these 3000 pound pumps to the barge |






5. We purchased three additional 6 inch diesel pumps in Miami eS




where our crane could pick them up. It was Abacay’s captain’s |
call but it took 42 days of unsuitable weather before the captain |



Ez Ge

The “Majestad.1” has an open deck Defender Hull of fiberglasS |
construction with a 2nd deck affixed to accommodate passengers,
which also houses the pilot arrangements. Hull is in excellent
condition and all equipment onboard is in good working-condition.

Principal Dimensions

Length Overall:
Breadth:
Engine:

61.0 feet
18.0 feet
(2) Detroit Diesel 12V71 recently rebuilt

Vessel has five compartments w/ five bilge pumps equipped
with 1 inch discharge hoses and a capacity 2,000gpn.

PHONE 363-7163
SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY!







da."

The statement also said that
government services should
also be regulated under the
Bill. "The bill should include
services provided by govern-
ment corporations so that the
public does not remain at the °
mercy of inefficiency and
incompetence paid for at top
dollar by a public that does not
have any alternative because
of government monopolies."

INSIGHT
Pee mle
Bete m aur

Bre ete) 1 3
Te Ne

felt the weather was safe enough to load the 3 pumps on the deck
of the barge. :








6. After loading the pumps, each had to be placed in the correct
location in the cargo compartments to comply the stability studies
and pumping plans.





7. The reason that this process has been slow are many, but the -
overriding reason is that if the barge is not pumped in a precise
sequence and in the most favorable weather, 1.to 3 feet or less
waves, westerly or south westerly winds and on a falling tide, the
barge could be overturned and salvage at the point would be
almost impossible. Liberty Oil subsequently has contracted for a
tugboat, which has been dispatched to Marsh Harbour and is
requested to arrive Thursday, March 30th.







President: Kermitt Waters
Liberty Oil Refining & Association
March 27th, 2006



Are you looking for a new challenge?
We are currently seeking qualified Managers and Seniors as well as Entry Level candidates to join our Audit practice.

Manager and Senior

“ Successful candidates: for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years professional public accounting |
experience, two of which will have been at a supervisory level. Candidates for the Senior position will have approximately
two to four years of work experience in a public accounting firm. The Manager and Senior positions will require the |

; individua} to ,hold a CPA, CA.or other professional designation recognized by the Bahamas Institute of. Chartered
Accountants. ‘:< BOD : ;

Entry Level ai



~ Candidates miist have 6 éd the necessary educational requirements qualifying them to write the CPA examinations or

{.., have already done so. ."..’
” KPMG’s entry’ level program provides financial support to write the CPA examinations including travel costs, hotel
accommodations, paid study leave and the costs of revision courses such as the Becker Review.

Excellent opportunities exist in"our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice
that offers competitive compensation and benefits packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification and a copy of their transcripts if applying for an entry level position,
to: KPMG, Human.Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@kpmg.com.bs.

AUDIT « TAX «© ADVISORY

© 2006. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.







CPA/Chartered Accountant
Opportunity




Templeton Capital Advisors is seeking to recruit.a
CPA or Chartered Accountant to assist in accounting
and reporting responsibilities for its hedge fund
business. Responsibilities will include maintenance
of the general ledgers and reporting functions for the
firm as well as review, approval and reporting of net
asset values for the funds and their investors. The
candidate will be responsible for carrying out an array
of daily, weekly, and monthly control and risk
management functions. In addition, an important
aspect of the job will be managing and preparing
client communications, including. firm newsletters.















The successful candidate must be a enged CPA or
Chartered Accountant with at least ten years of
experience, not less than seven being with a major |
public accounting firm. A heavy emphasis in the
investment and financial services industries is
absolutely required and direct experiefice in the hedge
fund business would be preferred. The job
responsibilities require that the candidate be capable
of designing, maintaining and monitoring reporting
and control systems of the highest standard expected
in a global investment business. Applicants will be
required to demonstrate a thorough understanding of
the global investment industry. and investment
instruments as well as prime broker functions,
including the global clearance and settlements process.
The candidate will be required to regularly
communicate with sophisticated fund investors and
author a number of different forms of client
communications to report on the funds’ performance
and other financial matters, and accordingly, written
communication skills and expenencg) will be important
and carefully considered.

























Please send written expressions of interest, resumes
and relevant background materials to the CFO at
Templeton Captial Advisors Ltd., PQ. Box N-7759,
Nassau, Bahamas or fax “to” “242- 302-3661.




PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, BRIAN LUBIN ELISMA,
of #57 Brougham Street, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to BRIAN ELISMA . ‘If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later iar zeny (30) days

Ones

NOTICE is hereby given that FRENDY. BOYER OF |

BROUGHAM STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nations ty. and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citiz ‘of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reasof:why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of MARCH,.:2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Chtzensti PO. Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas. |



CREDIT SUISSE

Qualifications:

of an offshore. barik

PC Literacy (Mi
Experience in t

Fluent English and Portuguese
Proven track record:

Duties:
The candidate will be expected to:

Personal Qualities:

- A commitment to service excellence

Benefits provided include:
- Health and Life ieprance













Strong management and leadership skills

Well versed in-Swiss/ Brazilian banking practices and standards

‘In-depth knowledge of international Money Market/Forex Exchange Trading/T teasteaemetaing
Markets/Derivatives/Securities Operations/Execution, etc.

Nord, Access, Excel)

ading platforms like TradeWeb, eSpeed, Bloomberg Bond Trader.

Knowledge: ‘Om tisk Management and portfolio management.

PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

THE TRIBUNE

Dollar rises

against most
major currencies

By J W ELPHINSTONE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar rose against most major

Federal Reserve hiked interest
rates for the 15th consecutive
time and hinted at further
credit tightening.



Gold, silver slip

NEW YORK (Dow Jones/AP) — Precious metals
slipped in quiet trade Tuesday at the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange, as the Federal Reserve decided, as
widely expected, to raise interest rates by a quarter point.

Most-active April gold settled 40 cents lower at $567 an
ounce. Spot gold fell 40 cents to $566.60 an ounce.

Traders said market players were mostly sidelined
awaiting news about the Fed’s decision on interest rates
that was released at 2:15 p.m. EST.

The Federal Open Market Committee, as expected,
voted unanimously to raise its Federal funds target by 25
basis points to 4.75 per cent, its highest level since April
2001. It raised the largely symbolic discount rate by 25
basis points to 5.75 per cent.

Silver had a similar showing to gold on the day as the
benchmark May contract settled lower at $10. 87 an ounce,
down 2.5 cents.



Consolidating

The contract was consolidating after reaching fresh
19-year highs on Monday. Early on Tuesday, May popped
back up to a recent high of $10.94 an ounce but was
unable to sustain that level.

April platinum ended up $5.80 at $1, 074.30'an ounce
while June palladium settled the day down 55-cents at
$342.25 an ounce.

The most active May copper contract settled down
0.15 cent at $2.4285 per pound.

May light crude oil settled up $1.91 at $66.07 a barrel.

April heating oil settled up 4.66 cents at $1.8277 a gal-
lon.

April gasoline settled up 5.57 cents at $1.8845 a gallon:

April natural gas rose 14.7 cents to settle at $7.214 a mil-
lion British thermal units.

‘-On the New York Board of Trade, May Arabica coffee
closed 0.40 cent lower at $1.0555 a pound.

The most-active May cocoa contract settled down $2 at
$1,482 per metric ton.

The May contract of raw sugar in foreign ports set-
tled up 0.69 cent at 18.17 cents a pound.

On the Chicago Board of Trade, May corn settled 0.5
cent higher at $2.2225 per bushel. May soybeans settled
up 2 cents at $5.8150 a bushel. May wheat gained 1.5
cent to $3.4125 per bushel.

Credit Suisse Wealth Management
Limited |

is presently considering applications for a

HEAD TRADER

Credit Suisse Private Bankifig is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go
. beyond traditional banking services; Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investment-counseling and professional portfolio management. -Our total commitment is always
to our clients and we:focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

- Minimum of 10 years well rounded banking experience in treasury/execution and related departments

- ‘Develop, recommend and ensure the implementation of the bank’s trading operation strategy
- ‘ Monitor/evaluate the bank's position and oversee existing and prospective trading activities

- Provide advice and guidance to dealers and traders engaged in treasury activities

- Provide sales support to relationship managers

- Excellent organizational and communication skills

- Ability to work undér pressure and with minimum supervision

- Competitive salary and performance bonus

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.

Applications should be submitted by fax to: (242) 302-6398
Or by mail to: Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS APRIL 7, 2006

currencies Tuesday after the:

The euro bought $1.2009 in
afternoon New York trading,
down from $1.2012 in New
York late on Monday. The
British pound slipped to
$1.7434 from $1.7463.

The dollar rose against the
Japanese currency, climbing
to 117.91 yen from 116.69 on
Monday.

Under new chairman Ben
Bernanke, the central bank
raised short-term interest rates
by a quarter percentage point
to 4.75 per cent as the markets
widely had expected. The
Fed’s statement on the meet-
ing left open the possibility of
further rate increases.

“The statement gave no par-
ticular indication that the Fed
is close to being done with
raising rates,” said Dan
Katzive, a currency strategist
at UBS AG.

“The dollar is firming, and
the markets are discounting a
little bit more Fed tightening.”

push up a nation’s currency by
boosting returns from locally
denominated investments,
making them more attractive.

Exchange

Bob Sinche, head of global
foreign exchange strategy at
Bank of America,. said the
markets are now anticipating
another quarter-point hike at
the Fed’s next meeting in May
with an increased possibility
of further hikes beyond that. «

“But we think the markets
may be getting ahead of them-
selves,” he said.

The dollar’s afternoon per-
formance erases gains the euro
made earlier in the day on
news that business confidence
rose to new highs in Germany
and Italy.

In other trading, the dollar
bought 1.3082 Swiss francs,
down from 1.3085 late Mon-
day, and 1.1699 Canadian dol-
lars, up from 1.1684.

Higher interest rates tend to

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONICA IOTA BROWN DEAN
OF HAVEN STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29TH day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LAFRANCE BANES OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29TH day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, .
‘Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NAOMI ANESTA PANTRY OF
PINE BARON ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister

‘ responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- ie Hy,
Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLIFTON WELLS, of
#6 Weddell Avenue, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to CLIFTON SIMMS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,:PR.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.





PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ELIPHENE SANON, of Fox Hill in
the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and ROSANA NOEL of Yamacraw
Beach Estates also in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
aforesaid, parents of FENANEN NOEL, a minor, intend to change her
name to FENANEN SANON. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHENICKA CATURA WILLIAMS OF
#21B CORN WALLS, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of MARCH,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.







THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 7B



Baha Mar executives
‘monitoring’ resort

FROM page 1B

plan for South Ocean, apart
from the 1,000-room hotel; also
includes 1,000 residential units,
an expanded marina featuring
at least 60 slips, a marina vil-
lage with retail stores and
restaurants, and a Greg Nor-
man championship golf course.

The company, which fought
off five rival bids for South
Ocean, has worked on real
estate developments in New
York, Florida and New Eng-
land. Among its latest works

is the recently-completed, The
Metropolitan, a luxury resi-
dential tower in Manhattan.
The Stillman Organisation
‘is also the developer for the
Trump International Hotel and
Tower in Fort Lauderdale,
which will carry the resort
brand of international business
mogul, Donald Trump.

South Ocean’s golf course .

would prove a major attrac-
tion for sports tourists, in con-
junction with the One and
Only Ocean Club’s Tom
Weiskopf course; Baha Mar’s

planned Jack Nicklaus golf
course at Cable Beach and the
proposed course for the $1.4
billion Albany Project, whose
major investors include golf-
ing greats Tiger Woods and
Ernie Els. Although the Still-
man Organisation has to apply
to the government for approval
of its plans for South Ocean,
including the heads of agree-
ment, the sales agreement with
CCWIPP is likely to pave the
way for approving other invest-
ment projects in south-west-
ern New Providence.



SCHEDULE

F THE PRIME



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
_ NEW PROVIDENCE |
PROPOSED AIRSTRIP EXTENSION, MOORES ISLAND, ABACO



DECLARATION OF VESTING ‘A = 119.006 ACRES
GIVEN UNDER st
THE ACQUISITION OF LAND ACT : oe aii THOSE certain lots pieces or parcels of land together containing by admeasurement ONE
(Chapter 233) . “HUNDRED AND NINETEEN ACRES AND SIX THOUSANDTHS OF AN ACRE or

) oithereabouts being the Lots.on a plan on record in the Department of Lands and Surveys as-Plan

pery

numbered MP. 5028/XII of Abaco situate between the Settlements of Hard Bargain and The

\

WHEREAS as notified by Amended Notice of Possession dated the 8t ee ; ;
Bight in the Island of Moores Island, Abaco in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

D. ished in the Extraordinary Official Gazette oo
Sey GL FeO AN merce anapu erent a * y ii 2 ‘ ABUTTING AND BOUNDING towards the NORTH partly on a portion of an original Crown

dated the 14m day of February A.D., 2006 the land and hereditaments described Grant to Richardson and John Saunders (B-97) now claimed by Ethel Davis, William D.

in the Schedule hereto have been duly appropriated under the Acquisition of |i": Edwards and the McBride Family partly on a portion of. an original Crown Grant to Henry

Land Act for the public purpose, namely, for use as an airstrip and associated Johnson (B-98) and since commuted to John Williams (C2-116) and (C2-117) now claimed by

Veronica Williams and partly on Crown Lands (Black Wood Pond) towards the EAST partly on -

facilities at Moore’s Island, Abaco.
‘ Crown Lands ( Black Wood Pond) and partly on a portion of an eneinal Crown.Grant to Henry

Johnson (B-98) and since commuted to John Williams (Ge 116) and or 2 now claimed by

ce of Sections 18 and 36 of the aac Act, :
NOW THEREFORE in pursuan ; Meronica Williams towards the SOUTH partly ona portion oe: an: ‘original-Crown Grant to ao

do hereby declare that the land and hereditaments described in 1 the Schedule Tohnsen (B-98) an veisince-caimminted io: Tenn Willians (C2-11 6) and (C2-117) now Pisiewe d by

hereto have been vested in the Treasurer for the Commonwealth of The Veronica Williams and partly on a portion of an original Crown Grant to Richardson and John

Bahamas in Trust for Her Majesty in right of Her Government of the Saunders (B-97) now claimed by the McBride Family, William D. Edwards and Ethel Davis and

:. Commonwealth of The Bahanias for public purpose. towards the WEST on a portion of an original Crown Grant to Richardson and John Saunders
(B-97) now claimed by Ethel Davis or however else the same may abut and bound which said

lots pieces or parcels of land are more.particularly delineated and shown coloured pink on the

Dated the 23'¢ Day of March A.D., 2006

plan attached.

S.G

Perry G. Christie
_ Minister Responsible for
Acquisition and Disposition of Lands

08/03/05

























Schedule (Annexed)
vee sie CUMMUNWEAI IH Ut. !HE BAHAMAS ; :
i MOORES ISLAND
MP. 5028 XM LOCALNY-====-==e =
CORRESPONDENCE MP-5028 cath DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
- GH
FIELD BOOK--"~ ----------~-
as
: A « *o
. Ik
/ td _ a a
OTHER PORTION OF GRANT 8-97 - sas
/ (NOW CLAIMED @Y WILLIAMS 0. "EDMARDS) Se 5 te
; 7 ; . “aioe nn OF gniee 8-07 te = 7432650. E
7 . ‘ sh QAMD OY PE wCenoe : ;
3 N92"02'44" 1011.49" ae man ox J ay, (0338 Ac) £
8 “tg = —— gzon'4aa” — 1471.37 : 72°02'44"~_ 814.38" eS 5
SD ' [F 1?
i a he
2 3 5 AREAâ„¢ * :: 12.60 ACRES a AT AREAm 42,60 ACRES Hk iy _ a
y - = RES s ae! .
: E 8 . ; [3 AREA 16.99 ACRES 5 AREAS 8.34 ACRES! 2 .
8 & 3 . MEAS 1 ORT HC8 ER a : So
Bg 8 : SH A BOS *
3 > N27702'44" =~ 1485.50" g eee a :
3 3 3 8 - So" N92'02'44"- "819.84 8 - Ez BR 44 HOO bs eS
5 : ; g = — re % s
8 3 AREA= ! : Boone o . i en
; 8 we, 4260 ACRES y. 1, AREAS 17, 10 ACRES i? : a 4
B® AN Sly tere? sr fe. .
= otk “AREA = 9.41 ACRES 4h: % % \
z i ; a \
N9Z02"44" — 1100.00" Ses q \ g
: N92°02'44" — 1500.62' “age S . . =
N272°02'44" — 822.35" D202 44S OEE
: / bs %
OTHER PORTION OF GRANT B-97 ya %
; OTHER PORTION OF GRANT B- ;
(LAND CLAIMED BY ETHEL OA / 8-97 OTHER PORTION OF CRINTS Sys. ‘“ ane; -
‘QAMS) ‘NOW (NOW CLAIMED BY THE MC.BRIOE Faun y)d
; 0 CLAIMED BY WILLIAMS 9. EDWARDS) ' (WOW CLAMED BY VERONICA SBELMies) .
LEGEND /
© DENOTES STEM ROO SET
© O€WNOTES STEEL ROD FOUND
@ EMOTES STEEL ROO PIKNAL FOUND
Fi SURVEY PLAN exanricare
1. COOPREY HUMES, 0 surveyor registered ond kicensed in Se Donomes wemy certiy thet ths

hos been mode from surveys execuled by me. or under ty personel
Ben the pion ond survey ere corect and nove boon mode Wi ‘pccerdonce WB pre Tone
FE 5546 Survayor's Act, 1975 ond the Lond Surveyors Reguioions, 1475:emede eresnder

BETWEEN HARD ‘Baran "AND IME BIGHT SETNLEMENTS
“MOORES ISLAND”

GREAT ABACO - BAHAMAS

DATE: DEC.. 2004

SOWING
REFURENCE WAS MADE TO FLAN NO.1596 AB BY RIVERE & ASSOCKIES THE EXISTING AND PROPOSED EXTENSION OF MOORES ISLAND AIRSTRIP

(ANDO PLAN WO. 774 AB BY LUCAYAN SURVEYING CO.

comm nse to 5 te "â„¢ SECTION 3 OF
THE LANDS SURVEYORS ACT, 1975 AS PLAN NO. : Yor 2004

fT. 200 O 200 400 600 800 — 100 FT.

SCALE: 1 INCH = 200 FELT



- The Tribune’s Kelly's ——
MP EASIER

SA WY Coloring Contest |

- SECOND PRIZE ‘THIRD PRIZE -
- GIFT BASKET vate $100 © GIFT BASKET value $75
a A ate Age Group | , In Each Age Group ©

















GIFT BASKET vatue $125 _
5 In Each Age Group

- FIRST PRIZE — |





CONTEST RULES

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members arid relatives are not eligible to enter. .
2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
3, Enter as much times as you wish. Alll entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, April 10, 2006. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
April 12, 2006. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1OOJAMZ / JOY FM or COOL FM to-hear your name. oe

4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups. OT ee ee

5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY”



Child’s Name:___ , s Parent/Guardian Signature__

| . Address: | | Tel: ss Age:

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Z* Silk Flowers and much more! ex Tk: (242) 3904000 Fn 242} 3934096





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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, IVARCH 29, 2006



TRIBUNE SPORTS





Claridge Primary take







@ CLARIDGE Primary’s William Ferguson in action yes-
terday. His school’s boys and girls teams both won their respec-
tive titles. . .
Ferguson, who scored all four of the schools’ points in the
overtime victory, said he came into the game hoping to get his
teammates involved, but had to change the plans when he saw

so many missed baskets.
e SEE SPORTS FRONT

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)







@ TENNIS
KEY BISCAYNE, Fla.
Associated Press

ANDY RODDICK walked
off a winner Tuesday, even
though instant replay kept him
on the court longer than he
wanted.

Roddick was nursing a slim
lead in the third set when video
reviews cost him back-to-back
points, but he shook off the
overrules without complaint and
beat qualifier Simon Greul 6-3,
3-6, 6-2 to reach the quarterfi-
nals of the Nasdaq-100 Open.

Seeded fourth, Roddick need-
ed four match points to finish
off the dangerous Greul, who
came into the tournament with
one career victory on the ATP
Tour and beat three consecu-
tive top-60 players.

Roddick, the 2004 Key Bis-
cayne champion, is trying to
shake a slump and win his first
title of the year.

Also reaching the final were
big-serving Croats Ivan Ljubi-
cic and Mario Ancic. The sixth-
seeded Ljubicic hit 13 aces and
beat Christophe Rochus 6-3, 6-
1 in 55 minutes. Ancic, seeded
22nd, had nine aces and defeat-
ed No. 5 Nikolay Davydenko 7-
5, 6-4.

Ancic lost to Ljubicic in the

fourth round at Indian Wells’

this month. They could meet in
the semifinals Friday.
Ljubicic will next play
unseeded Agustin Calleri, who
eliminated No. 16 Nicolas
Kiefer 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. j

SSS
CO
CCK



thriller




& ANDY RODDICK of the USA returns the ball to Simon Greul
of Germany at the Nasdaq- 100 Open tennis tournament in Key
Biscayne, Fla. Tuesday, March 28, 2006.

No. 12 Svetlana Kuznetsova
became the first women’s semi-
finalist by beating No. 21 Ai
Sugiyama 6-0, 7-6 (4).
Kuznetsova, one of four Rus-
sians in the women’s final eight,
had 35 winners to five for
Sugiyama.

Ljubicic hit 34 winners to
eight for Rochus and earned his
23rd victory this year, second
only to Roger Federer’s 24.

Ljubicic ranks second this

(AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

year to Ivo Karlovic on the ATP
Tour in aces, and he has 36 in
his first three matches at Key
Biscayne, secorid to Ancic’s 38.
Ljubicic also reached the Key
Biscayne quarterfinals in 2001..

Ancic, who turns 22 Thurs-
day, earned his first quarterfinal
berth in a Masters Series event
and improved his record this
year to 18-7. Davydenko had
won their two previous meet-
ings on the tour.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

WE, VIOLA, MARC Lad







Ljubicic picks
himself in
Croatia's Davis
Cup quarterfinal
against Argentina

lm TENNIS
LONDON

’ Associated Press

IVAN LJUBICIC
picked himself to lead
defending champion
Croatia against Argentina
in the quarterfinals of the
Davis Cup.

- Andy Roddick, Lleyton
Hewitt and David Nalban-
dian will also be playing
when the competition
resumes April 7-9, the
International Tennis Fed-
eration announced Tues-
day.

The world's top two
players, Roger Federer
and Rafael Nadal, will
‘have that weekend off,
however. Neither Switzer-
land nor Spain qualified
for the Davis Cup quarter-
finals. Australia beat
Switzerland and Belarus
beat Spain in the first
round last month.

‘Ljubicic, who is both a
player and captain, also ©
picked Mario Ancic, Sasa
Tuksar and Marin Cilic
for Croatia's tie against
Argentina on indoor car-
pet in Zagreb.

In the other quarterfi- ©
nals, Australia hosts
Belarus, France welcomes
Russia and the United
States hosts Chile.

Ljubicic, who took over
as captain after Croatia
beat Slovakia in the final
last December; said he
would step down as cap-
tain after his team plays
_ Argentina because of a
conflict of interest.

““The federation recent-
ly: approached me to work
out salaries and rewards
forthe players," Ljubicic
said. "This is an obvious
clash of interests. If I
knew this was.waiting for
me; I would never. have
taken on the job." %...

Nalbandian, Tua Tgna-
cio-Chela, Jose Acasuso
and Agustin Calleri will
play for Argentina.

France, which will play
at‘Pau on indoor carpet,
nofninated Richard Gas-
quet, Arnaud Clement,
Michael Llodra and’
Sebastien Grosjean — the
same team that beat Ger-
many 3-2 in the first
round.

Russia has countered
with Marat Safin, Nikolay
Davydenko, Mikhail
Youzhny and Dmitry Tur-
sunov — leaving off Igor —
Andreev, who helped the
Russians beat the French
in the quarterfinals last
year.

Andréev was Russia’ s
second-highest ranked
player but the team was
gambling on Safin, coming
back from knee injury,
and. his 20-7 record
indoors in the Davis Cup.

The United States will
be led by fourth-ranked
Roddick when it faces

Chile on grass in Rancho |

Mirage, California.

James Blake, Mike
Bryan and Bob Bryan will
also represent the Ameri-
cans, While Fernando
Gonzalez, Nicolas Massu,
Pau] Capdeville and Adri-
an Garcia play for Chile.

Hewitt will be Australi-
a's No. 1 player on the
hardcourt in Melbourne.
He will be joined by Chris
Guccione, Wayne Arthurs
and Paul Hanley against
Belarus' Max Mirnyi,
Vladimir Voltchkov, Ser-
guei Tarasevitch and
Alexandr Zotov.

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If so, call us on 322-1986 __

and share your story.



@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation tipped off its nation-
al developmental programme
for juniors and seniors on Sat-
urday past at the DW Davis
gym.

The purpose of the pro-
gramme is to identify the top
athletes and bring them togeth-

er so they can work on their -

weaknesses and develop their
skills.

- However, vice president of
the BBF Larry Wilson said the
implementation of the pro-
gramme does not mean that the
athletes who join the pro-
gramme will automatically have
a place on the national team —
athletes who are interested will

SPORTS

Opportunity for
juniors and seniors



national teams. —

_ Wilson said: “This develop-
mental programme is to assist
the BBF with identifying the top
athletes so they can continuous-
ly work on their weaknesses.

“Some of the countries best.

coaches are involved in this pro-
gramme. Their role is to assist
the player with either boxing
out, ball handling, closing out
on defence, whatever the coach-
es believe will improve the ath-
letes’ game will be done.”

The senior women’s session
starts at 8am with the junior girls
ROTC wine ‘at 10am. Both the

next leg,"



still have to try-out for the BBF

rsenal win home
to close in on

eTTine meres

H# SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press



ARSENAL moved halfway toward its first appearance in
the Champions League semifinals with a 2-0 victory over Ital-
ian league leader Juventus on Tuesday and showed Patrick
Vieira it doesn't miss him at all.

Goals by Cesc Fabregas and Thierry Henry gave the Gun-
ners a quarterfinals first-leg lead which they defend next
week in Turin. Arsene Wenger's team of youngsters gave the
Old Lady of Italian soccer the run around at Highbury and
could have won by more.

"The only regret is that I feel there was one more goal in
this game for us," said Wenger, whose team was denied twice
by top. quality second-half saves by Juventus goalkeeper
Gianluigi Buffon.

"It was a great night for Arsenal because we wanted to play
well defensively and score goals, and we managed to.do both.
"IT am very happy with the performance of the team — the

fluency, the speed and the technical aspects.

“It shows that the team is getting better and better," said
Wenger who saw Fabregas outwit Vieira in midfield as his
team's slick passing repeatedly carved through the Juventus |
midfield and defense.

"There is still a difficult job to do in Turin," Wenger said.
"We are only halfway there and we want to finish the job.
next week, Juventus is at home and they will try and come at
us but we will want to play well and score goals."

Juventus finished the game with nine men after the late
ejections of Mauro Camoranesi and Jonathan Zebina, each
for second yellow cards.

-"We have to be confident that we can do better in the sec-
ond leg and we must do a big game in Turin," said Juventus
coach Fabio Capello, who won the trophy with AC Milan.
"You never know what will happen, especially in football.
We had some chances but, when we lost players at the end,
there was no way we could come back."

Form

Former Arsenal captain Vieira was among four Juventus °
players shown a yellow card as the visitor was unable to
recreate the form that has given it an eight-point lead in Serie
A. Camoranesi, Zebina and Vieira will sit out next week's
second leg because of suspension.

Vieira, who helped Arsenal win three Premier League and
four FA Cup titles before transferring to Juventus in July,
was given a warm welcome by Arsenal fans, who chanted his
name before kickoff despite his appearance in the black and
white stripes of Juventus.

"Patrick Vieira is a good player but he suffered tonight
because we are a good team," Wenger said. "We didn't give
him a chance to celebrate (his return to Highbury) tonight."

The home side went ahead when Robert Pires won the ball
from Vieira inside the Arsenal half and left his former team-
mate lying on the Highbury turf.

He found Henry with a pass and the striker fed the ball just
inside the area to Fabregas, who jinked right and shot
between Lilian Thuram's legs with a low, right-foot effort
that went in from 16 meters. ;

Kolo Toure rescued Arsenal when Juventus threatened
early in the second half, taking the ball off the foot.of Zlatan
Ibrahimovic when the lanky Sweden striker was about to
shoot.

Buffon then made his contributions — thwarting shots from
Henry and Fabregas after Jose Antonio Reyes twice had
opened up the visitor's defense. He also smothered a left-foot
shot from Alexander Hleb before Arsenal went 2-0 ahead.

Henry passed to Hleb on the right and the Belarus mid-
fielder found Fabregas breaking into the area. The Spanish
teenager only had Buffon to beat but pulled the ball square
to Henry, who controlled it before shooting.

Two minutes later, Vieira was shown the yellow card when
he hauled down Reyes in midfield.

Camoranesi gave the Gunners a late fright with a chip from
just outside the area which flew past the post with g goalkcener
Jens Lehmann well off his line.

But the Italy midfielder was sent off four minutes se the
end after a foul on Robin van Persie and he was followed two
minutes later by Zebina, who caught Henry's leg with his
right foot near th> corner flag.

Still, Wenger was cautious when looking forward to the
April 5 return match despite the Italian club's problems with
suspensions and form.

"They missed (Alessandro) Del Piero and (Pavel) Nedved,
who are great offensive players and can come Dag for the
Wenger said.

junior and senior men’s work-
outs are scheduled for 12 noon.

Top coaches in the country
have been selected to assist with
this programme and coaches

who are interested in assisting

the BBF in reaching their goals
are invited.

Wilson did confirm that the
coaches selected to head the
programme will be needing help
with their work-out sessions and
are looking forward to coaches
such as Kevin Johnson, Patricia
Johnson, Ken Lightbourne and
others to join.

He said: “When the pro-

gramme really gets off the -

ground, the coaches selected will
need help in order for it to be
successful.

“We can’t expect these coach-
es to be out there every Satur-
day because some of these
coaches will need to work with
the national programmes, so we
are really hoping that some of
the coaches come out and assist.

“We realise that we will have
to break-up in a number of ses-
sions so we can excel, but this
will come as long as we get the
assistance of the coaches. The
programme will be successful as
long as everyone is on the same
page.”

The senior women’s pro-
gramme is headed by Dr Linda
Davis. Junior women will also
be under her with a sub-group
of coaches headed by Felix Mus-
grove and Anthony Swaby.








Mario Bowleg will lead the
junior men while Charles Mack-
ey takes charge of the senior
men.

The national developmental
programme has also kicked-off
in Freeport under the watchful
eyes of Norris Bain and Ivan
Butler for men and Kelly
Albury for women.

However this is not the case
for Family Island associations.:
The BBF intends to move the
programmes into the other
islands but Wilson revealed
that they will not take place this
year.

The BBF is hoping that the
coaches and players will be able
to contact the local association

‘or the federations so arrange-

ments can be made.

The national developmental
practice will continue on this
weekend at the DW Davis gym.



@ JUVENTUS' former Arsenal ave Patrick Vieira, left, of France, battles for the ball with Arse-
nal's Francesc Fabregas during their Champions League quarterfinal soccer match at ‘Highbury sta-

dium i in morn London, Ruse, March 28, 2006. Arsenal won 2-0.

(AP Photo/Tom Hevesi



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een tr mapecemmea emai mayne; RER state NEMS Raab

Claridge Pr





MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



Boys and
girls teams
claim titles



@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter’

WITH a 14-point perfor-
mance, Brittany Deveaux
led Claridge Primary
School to one of two cham-
pionships titles yesterday.

Deveaux’s hot hands
awarded the girls the New
Providence Primary School
Sporting Association
(NPPSSA) basketball title
by beating Garvin Tynes
Primary girls 17-0 and their
boys were able to get past
the Stephen Dillet School
in overtime, 20-18.

Deveaux, the most valu-
able player in the league,
carried the team on her
shoulders and delivered the
shots when needed.

On the defensive end,
the man-to-man stand
being applied was. forcing
Garvin Tynes to turnover
the ball at the half court
line.

Confidence

After going through the
first half without being
able to produce a score,
Claridge: Primary’s confi-
dence was starting to build
and, by the sound of the
whistle, the team grew hun-
grier.

According to their head
coach Nikkita Taylor,
Deveaux is capable of lead-
ing the team and she will
score and get everyone
involved.

Taylor said: “It is always
a pleasure to win a cham-
pionship title. The girls
have won everything
they’ve played so far. They
-came out and showed that
they are capable of winning
the basketball tournament
as well.

“For the boys it feels
great to win over a team
that gave us our first loss
in the tournament.

“T always knew we could.
do it. All my boys needed
to do was come out and
play hard and they did. At
some point in the game
they were starting to make
some silly fouls and it was
costing them.

Overtime

“Going into overtime I
told the guys to play hard
on defence and stop num-
ber eight from going to the
basket and play clean
defence and we will be
alright.”

For William Ferguson,
the win by their girls was
the driving force behind
the boys’ victory.

Ferguson, who scored all
four of the schools’ points
in the overtime victory,
said he came into the game
hoping to get his team-
mates involved, but had to

8

@ CLARIDGE Primary’s Prince Bootle pushes the
ball up court as the defence of Stephen Dillet tries to

keep up yesterday.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

sme
es
R

change the plans when he
saw so many missed bas-
kets. Dominating the
boards for the school was
Prince Bootle.

He said: “I wanted to
come out and play hard,
trying to pass the ball to
my teammates so they
could score, I wanted them
to take the shot.

“After they didn’t score I
got the rebound and I laid
it back up and. it fell. Being



able to score all the points
in overtime feels great.

Strong

“It wasn’t hard and I
tried to do my best know-
ing that we were in over-
time. I tried to put the ball
back up strong, trying to
score.”

Losing to Claridge Pri-
mary didn’t bother head

coach Frank Johnson, espe-
cially after both squads
went into the finals with
the same win-loss record,
4-1.

In the regular play,
Stephen Dillet was able to
get the better part of Clar-
idge Primary.

But after taking the long
route to the champi-
onships, Claridge got
revenge.

Johnson said: “I am hap-

py. We wanted to come out’
and make the playoffs and -

we did.

“We wanted to get into
the championships and we
did.

“My buddy beat us,
Nikkita Taylor and Clar-
idge Primary, hats off to
them.

“They only beat us by
three points, we didn’t give
it to them they had to fight
hard to beat us.



“J have to give it up to,
my boys they played hard
for the win, that was a
tough team, but we stilk
able to take back a trophy
to the school and also an
individual trophy.”
Finishing in third place
for the girls were Yellow
Elder Primary with CW
Sawyer coming fourth. In
the boys, Columbus Prima-
ry took third place with
CW Sawyer taking third.



Full Text
fy The Tribune



i
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Volume: 102 No.108



BUSINESS —



& By CARA BRENNEN
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporters

THE family of a young life-
guard, who was fatally shot in a
run-in with police Monday night,
are demanding answers .to what
they believe was a senseless
death.

Deron Bethel, 20, of Pinewood
Gardens, was killed when a shot
was fired through his car window
by plainclothed police officers.

Shortly after the shots were
fired, the car which was in
reverse, slammed into poles at
the end of the road.

The Pinewood community yes-
terday accused police of shoot-
ing an innocent man.

However, police maintained
that Deron. was trying to allude

police and driving his car in “a,

violent manner” towards police
when officers were forced to open
fire. .

Yesterday Deron’s family,
including his mother, Diana
Bethel, father, Roger Bethel, a

“ police officer, and his brother,
Dwayne Bethel, an officer with
the Central Detective Unit, met
with police commissioner Paul
Farquharson.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mrs Bethel said that the
commissioner assured her that
there will be a thorough investi-
gation into the incident by a spe-
cial unit.

“He said no screws will be left
unturned. ;

“It is my intention not to let
my child’s death be in vain. He
didn’t do anything, and he had
nothing on him. No gun, no drugs,
no knife, no nothing, so I just
hope they don’t plant anything in
that car, because that won’t
work,” she said.

In addition to his family mem-
bers, Deron leaves behind his girl-
friend, Shakira Coakley, who is

79F
64F

PARTLY 10
» MOSTLY SUNNY

ee:







@ DERON BETHEL

five-months pregnant with his
child. .

Ms Coakley yesterday was too
distraught to speak with The Tri-
bune.

According to Deron’s moth-
er, he had just started a job as a
lifeguard and beach attendant at
the Paradise Island hotel, Riu.

Mrs Bethel said that Riu’s
management contacted her to
express their condolences.

“They said he was one of the

best workers they ever had,” she
said.
Deron’s friends told The Tri-
bune.that everyone in the com-
munity is considered family. The
yoyng men all said that his death
has hit them as if it were their
own brother.

However, despite the high tide
of emotion which ran through the
community Monday night, they
were determined not to lose their
tempers and create another inci-
dent like the Nassau Village Riot.

“We made sure nothing like
that happened, because we didn’t
want the situation to become
worse or for anyone else to
maybe get shot, but the residents

SEE page 11

an trust.

CE MANAGEMENT



GURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS












iami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006





An estimated $150m
of marijuana was
being cultivated
on raided farms

@ By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

IT IS estimated that more
than $150 million worth of mar-
ijuana was being cultivated on
Eleuthera at the three farms

raided this year by DEU and,

DEA officers.

DEA officials warned that if
it were not for the proactive
stance taken by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force (RBPF),
the Bahamas would be in “big
problems” as a result of the
other illicit activities that would
follow from the drug trade.

On February 27, 12,000 mar-
ijuana plants were discovered
in a field in Eleuthera, with an

SEE page 11

Nassau and Bahama

& US AMBASSADOR John Rood looks at the new bomb suit yesterday with officer
~ | Jamiro Pierre outside the US Embassy.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

ERAS ALD

SSRI SETTER

s



Stage play to
tackle incest,
sexual and

physical abuse

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - The contro-_

versial issue of incest, sexual
and physical abuse will take
centre stage for the first time at
the Regency Theatre, where
the play, ‘In His Hands’,
inspired by the real life autobi-
ography of a Bahamian
woman, premieres on Wednes-
day. -
The play, written by Bahami-
an playwright Arthur Jones, is
based on the book ‘Breaking
the Silence’ by Grand Bahama
businesswoman Gwen Rolle,
who was a victim of incest as a
child.

Psychologist Dr Jean Turn-

SEE page 11



COB council
chairman: we
are examining all
of our options

COB council chairman
Franklyn Wilson denied last
night that a high-level dele-
gation was being sent abroad
to ask Janyne Hodder to
reconsider the offer to head
the embattled institution.

Mr Wilson said: “The coun-
cil of the College of the
Bahamas, inclusive of all its
members, is examining all of
its options to see what is in
the best interest of the insti-
tution.”

In recent weeks, the college
has come under intense
scrutiny for another public
airing of personnel matters.

Unfortunately for Mr Wil-
son, the Hodder fiasco is the

SEE page two

ns

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@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

OFFICERS of the police
bomb squad unit are better
equipped to respond to threats
of explosive devises with the
introduction of bomb protec-
tion suits and portable X-ray
machines. :

Yesterday, US Ambassador
John Rood presented the mem-
bers of the squad with the
equipment as a part of the US
Anti-Terrorism Assistance pro-
gramme.

The programme has trained
and assisted more than 48,000

“ foreign security. and law

enforcement officials from 141
countries. Rte

The presentation followed six
officers.of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force bomb squad unit
participating in a training pro-
gramme on explosive incidents
counter-measures in Baton
Rouge, Louisiana last year.

SEE page 11

IMF approves
National
Accounts

Statistics of .
the Bahamas

THE National Accounts Sta-
tistics of the Bahamas has final-
ly been approved by the Inter-
national Monetary Fund, it was
announced by Minister of State
for Finance, James Smith, this
week.

Speaking at a Department of
Statistics seminar for senior
public servants, Mr Smith said
that the IMF's acceptance is the
first of its kind for the country in
more than 30 years.

He said it had much to do
with a modernisation project
carried out by the Minister of
Finance and the Department of
Statistics with the assistance
of the IMF and Statistics Cana-
da.

He added that a "considered
and deliberate effort" was made
by the Ministry of Finance and
the Department of Statistics
with the assistance of the IMF
and Statistics Canada to put in
place the necessary resources,
equipment, manpower and
training.

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

{HE |RIBUNE



COB options |

FROM page one

third highly publicised incident at the
college under his leadership in as many
years. .

Another public row occurred between
Mr Wilson and Dr Rodney Smith last
year after Dr Smith was forced to resign
over allegations that he plagarised por-
tions of a speech given to the college
community.

Now, the new round of COB infight-
ing has drawn criticism from several
prominent members of the public, with
the pastor of New Covenant Baptist
Church being the latest to weigh in on
the issue.

Attacking the leadership of the col-
lege council, Bishop Simeon Hall said:
“It is a sad and telling commentary that
our nation’s highest educational facility
seems unable to hire or fire in a manner
befitting that institution.”

Without referring to Mr Wilson direct-
ly, Bishop Hall suggested that there are
persons at the College of the Bahamas
whose leadership style needs a second
look.

He went on to conclude that “what
was done to Leon Higgs was wrong, and
that the law of Kharma is hanging over
the College of the Bahamas.”

Bishop Hall’s reference was an allu-
sion to former COB president, Dr Leon
Higgs, who, in 2004, after a five-year
appointment, resigned amidst reported
tensions between him and other mem-
bers of the college’s executive board who
had been passed over for the position.

Some feel that Mr Wilson had a sub-
stantial role to play in Dr Higgs’ final
decision to step down.

Dr Hall said he expected what is going
on at the college to continue until they
do what is right.

Mr Wilson has all along maintained that
both he and the council had acted with
the best interest of the college at heart.

Seeking to put a positive. spin on a
matter that has somehow spiralled out of
control, Mr Wilson said that at present
“we are doing all we can to eliminate
any misunderstandings that existed or
whatever difficulties that night have
arisen.’

Still ‘50-50 chance’
Hodder will become |
new COB president

THERE is still a 50-50 chance that
Janyne Hodder will be lured back as
president of COB, a college source
said last night.

But even if she takes the job, she is
unlikely to last more than a year, it
was claimed.

Ms Hodder, vice-principal of McGill
University in Canada, would soon fall
victim to political forces - especially in
an election year, the source said.

It was felt that, Ms Hodder’s past life
in the Bahamas - she was formerly
married to Bahamian entertainer Pat
Rahming, by whom she has two chil-
dren - would create tensions of its own.

With lecturers’ union leader Ms Jen-
nifer Isaacs-Dotson the sister-in-law
of Mr Rahming, there would be the
possibility of family strains on cam-
pus, the source claimed.

Ms Hodder, who lived in Nassau for
14 years before her divorce, later pur-

‘sued a highly successful academic

career in her native Canada.

Apart from holding a top position at
McGill, she led Bishop’s University to
a high place in Canada’s university
league table.

In addition to her academic creden-
tials, Ms Hodder is said to have sound
personal qualities, and an ability to
“set her hands dirty” in community
projects.

Last night, a COB source said: “I
still think there is a 50-50 chance of
her coming back. But I predict that
she would not last a year.

“We are going into an election year

@ FRANKLIN Wilson — has com |
under fire for his handling of the
affair i

and the FNM are scratching around
for issues. You can bet that the party
action group would get involved in
nastiness galore.”

Although faculty and students com-
plained about the process for bring-
ing back Ms Hodder, it was felt the
majority would not resist her appoint-
ment on personal grounds.



BB JANYNE Hodder - lived i in 1 Nas-
sau for 14 years

The source said: “I don’t think the
issue was Janyne herself. If the matter
had been dealt with properly, I think
only a small element would have
opposed her.”

And the fact that she was white
would not have been. a factor, the
source added.



Cuba trade
show at Riu

FROM clothing to compact
discs, perfume to pottery,
Cuba is showing off what it
has to offer at a trade show
in Nassau this week.

Prominent names in Cuban
retailing and manufacturing
are on display. .

Ambassador Felix Wilson

told The Tribune yesterday::

“The trade show has made an
impact. It has drawn the
attention of the Bahamian
public and there has been a

lot of interest from local busi-'

nesses.

“The purpose of the show is
to strengthen bi-lateral rela-
tions between the Bahamas
and Cuba.”

Mr Frank Abel Portela
Chacon, secretary-general,
said: “Cuba is very competi-
tive with Florida, but is clos-
er to the interests of the

COLONIAL GROUP

fq INTERNATIONAL

Bahamian market.”

Products on display include
furniture, building supplies,
food items, perfume, bever-
ages, clothing, straw work,
ceramics, glass, woodwork,
jewellery, dolls, decorations,
instruments (drums and mara-
cas) and compact discs.

Display items were just a’

sample of what Cuba has to
offer to the Bahamas.

“Both the Chamber of
Commerce in the Bahamas
and the Chamber of Com-
merce in Cuba, along with the
Carribean Association of
Industry and Commerce
(CAIC), are jointly working

to increase productivity by

means of the trade show,”
said Mr Wilson.
The show is being held at

the Riu Hotel on Paradise -

Island.

Spelling bee winner honoured



US ‘Anibaseailot John Rood congratulates St Frances Xavier sixth grader Lauren Glinton
yesterday at the US Embassy for winning her spelling division in the Florida State Council

spelling Bee held by the Knights of Columbus.

_ Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff)

© In brief

New Yorker
dies after
traffic |

- accident

lm By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A 79-year-old
American man who was injured
in a tiaffic accident died on Sat-
urday at Rand Memorial Hos-
pital.

Police say Edmond Jurga of
New York, a part-time resident
of Grand Bahama, was driving

_east along Bishop Place when

he overlooked a stop sign at the
intersection with Balao Road
around 3pm on Friday.

Mr Jurga’s 2001 Hyundai
Accent reportedly collided with
a Pontiac Firebird driven by
Stacey Seymour, 44, of Wrex-
hem Drive.

Both vehicles were exten-
sively. damaged.

Seymour sustained an injury
to the head and Mr Jurga com-
plained of a pain in one of his
legs. They were both taken by
ambulance to hospital, where
Seymour was treated and dis-
charged.

However, ‘Mr Jurga was
admitted.:He died around
12.15pm on Saturday.

Supt Basil Rahming said
police are awaiting the results of

‘an autopsy to determine the

cause of death before a classifi-
cation is made. .

2nd traffic
fatality
this year

classified

POLICE have ‘classified the
death of Jerome Wells, 24, of
Albacore Street, as the second
traffic fatality for the year.

Wells, a passenger in a vehi-
cle on March 21, sustained
injuries to the head and chest
when that car was involved in

i -an accident on the Grand
i. Bahama Highway.

Man faces
firearm and
ammunition
charges
FREEPORT - A 28-year-old
Freeport man was arraigned in

Magistrate’s Court on firearm
and ammunition possession

_ charges on Monday.

Tito Maycock, also known as

- “Shadow” appeared before

Magistrate Helen Jones in
Court Two, where he pleaded:
not guilty to charges of posses-
sion of an unlicensed .9{mm pis-
tol and 15 bullets on March 22.
Maycock, who was repre-
sented by lawyer Simeon
Brown, was remanded to Fox
Hill Prison until August 30. |

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
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_ THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS





In brief



US couple
airlifted
after traffic
accident

AN American couple vaca-
tioning in Green Turtle Cay,
Abaco, were airlifted to New
Providence over the weekend
after being seriously injured in a
traffic accident.

According to police reports,
Larry Vanliere, 60, and his wife,
Mary, 46, of Holland, Michigan,
are in serious condition at
Princess Margaret Hospital.

A third visitor, Judith Linn,
61, of Holland, Michigan, also
sustained a serious injury and
is being treated in Abaco.

Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming reported that
sometime around 7.15pm on
Saturday, a traffic accident
occurred on the Tommy Rus-
sell Road in Black Sound,
Green Turtle Cay.

According to police reports,
Mr Vanliere was driving a rent-
ed golf cart north when he
veered over onto the south-
bound lane and collided head-
on with a maroone Dodge Spir-
it driven by Lance Swain, 26, of
Green Turtle Cay.

The golf cart was extensively
damaged.

Ms Linn, a passenger in the
golf cart seated in the back was
knocked onto the ground and
sustained a,serious head injury.
Mr Vanliere sustained head and
back injuries. His wife, Mary, a
passenger in the front, sustained
injuries to both legs.

Mr Swain, and his passenger,
Lyndel Russell, 21, were not
injured.

The visitors were taken to the
Clinic at Green Turtle Cay,
where they received cimet gency
medical treatment.

The Vaniers were airlifted to
New Providence on a King Air
flight.

Four men
im court
after drug
seizures

F OURn men, who were arrest-
ed last Friday in connection
with a drug seizure in the South
Beach ‘area, were arraigned in
court on Monday.

Ian’ Porter, 35, of Andros
Avenue, 31-year-old Daryl
Saunders of Strachan’s Alley
and 25-year-old Derrick White
of Andros were arraigned
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethelon the charge of posses-
sion of dangerous drugs with
intent to supply.

The meri pleaded not guilty
and have been remanded to Fox
Hill prison until April 3 when a
bail hearing will take place.

Some’ 20 ‘crocus sacks con-
tainipg.921 pounds of marijuana
wer nfiscated during the






e . reportedly val-
ued aes, 31, 500. Lawyer Ian
Cargill is representing the men.

Elkin Butler Jr, 54, was also
arraigned in connection with
the incident, on the charge of
possession of dangerous drugs
with:the intent to supply.

He was accused of having 14
and 3/4 pounds of marijuana.
He also pleaded not guilty and
was remanded until April 3.

Drinks Tr¢
Coffee Te
End Tab
Cushions







Film ban ‘exposes
the hy pocritic al
thinking in society’

THE recent banning of the
film Brokeback Mountain is
“exposing the kind of hypo-
critical thinking that we have
in society”, lawyer and social
activist Paul Moss told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Mr Moss said that a certain
amount of censorship is nec-
essary, but that he believes that

. the Bahamas Plays and Film

Control Board is too liberal.

“Generally I would not want
the government to censor uni-
laterally on issues of national
importance. I do believe: that
that there is merit in the cen-
sorship of the kinds of movies
that come into our country,
but the thing is that we need to
censor more movies,” Mr
Moss said. ;

He said that there are many
vices that are glorified in films
that are shown in the Bahamas.

Mr Moss said he believed
that the only reason Broke-
back Mountain was banned
was for its homosexual con-
tent, rather than a concern
about morality in general.

“T believe that there should
be more censorship in that
regard so that we can have the
kind of edifying and up-lifting
theatre or movies that will
advance our society as a whole.
Along with Brokeback Moun-

: tain they probably need to ban

everything they are showing
to the movies today,” Mr Moss
said.

Veteran Bahamian director
of plays and actor Philip Bur-
rows in a recent interview with
The Tribune said that it



@ ACTORS Heath Ledger, left, and Jake Gyllenhaal in a
scene from Brokeback Mountain

appears that the Control
Board does not have any set
criteria on which they base
their decisions to ban movies.

Mr Burrows said he thought
it curious that. the board
banned Brokeback Mountain,
yet allowed the musical Rent,
which depicts two gay rela-
tionships, to be shown a few
months ago.

He explained that he has
dealt with the Control Board
for a number of years with the
production of plays, and still
has “no idea how they come
to their decisions.”

Mr Burrows said that in
2001 when Ringplay Produc-
tions, of which he is the artistic
director, decided to produce

.Macbeth, members of the

Control Board on the evening
before the play was to open,

(Photo: AP Archive)

gave it a ‘C’ rating, ensuring
that only adults would be able
to see it.

“Macbeth, a Shakespeare
work being studied in high
school would be rated ‘C’ so
that no high school students
studying it would be able to
see it. We protested this rat-
ing and informed the board
members that this was in fact a
work being studied in high
school and after some discus-
sion they relented and rated
the production ‘B’,” he said.

However, two years later a
repeat performance of the pro-
duction which was staged
slightly different but with not
one word of the text changed —
was rated “I” and described by
some members of the board as
a “wonderful production”, Mr
Burrows said.

Pratt concern at children
carrying knives to school

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter .

AN alarming number of
young children are now car-
rying knives to school
according to Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt.

Mrs Pratt said that she has
received reports from school
police about an increased
number of knives being
found in the bags and pock-
ets of students.

“When these reports
come into me, I am sitting
their in awe. Why would:a
13 or 12 year-old take a
knife to school? Teachers
fear for their lives in the
classroom because if chil-
dren cannot reason, they will
resort to violence,” she said.

Mrs Pratt appealed to par-
ents to help the police in
their efforts to fight the
problem, by doing their best
to monitor children leaving
home.

“It is because of the
school policing that we have
not had more incidents of
harm that has taken place,
because they had retrieved
those knives out of the
bags,” she pointed out.

Mrs Pratt made this
known at a press conference
held to announce an inter-
national crime summit to be





CYNTHIA Pratt

held in the Bahamas next
month.

The summit, which is sched--

uled for April 24 to 28, will
bring together persons involved
in law enforcement from
around the world.

The event will be hosted by
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force in conjunction with the
Institute for Social Crime.

The timing of the summit,
said Mrs Pratt, is “most appro-

ie aL
UU
Ms) Bt aS
PHONE: 322-2157

priate, ” as crime continues to
present a challenge not only for
the Bahamas, but the entire
region.

“It is important that we as a
nation take proactive steps to
address the problem of crime —
the solution of which requires
partnership at all levels of our
society and a firm resolve of the

‘ Bahamian people to take own-

ership of the problem and work
together towards bringing about
effective change,” said Mrs
Pratt.

The summit will address such

crime-related issues as money +

laundering, stalking, gangs iden-
tity theft and spousal abuse.

Inspector Bruce Arnett point-
ed out the importance of net-
working in the fight against
crime. ”

“The criminals are network-
ing. They are adopting from
other countries around the
world different crime trends and
bringing it here and applying it.

“We as a community, not

only in the Bahamas but around

the world, must network too.
We must be on top,” he said.







PATER













New consumer bill
‘should be expanded’

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE proposed Consumer
Protection Bill, though laud-
able, should be expanded to
include protection against
banks, financial institutions and
insurance companies, accord-
ing to the Grand Bahama
Human Rights Association.

The Bill, which was debated
in parliament last week, is
designed to protect the rights
of Bahamian consumers of
goods and services that are
provided by private companies.

In a press statement yester-
day, the GBHRA called on
government to take the con-
sumer protection even further.

Consumers, it said, should
also be protected from real
estate development companies
that collect service charges on
properties.

There should be an avenue
to hold such companies
accountable if they make
“grandiose promises”, the
association said.

It should also be made
mandatory for the companies to
provide services for all the annu-
al service charges they collect.

“This is a particularly impor-
tant issue in Freeport where
there is no real property tax,
but service charges payable to
private development companies
instead,” the GBHRA said.

The association said that it is
also important for special pro-

visions to be made for the pro-
tection of members of the
Bahamian public who bring in
goods from Florida.

“Once goods or services
from Florida are purchased,
and we pay duties and freight
on the importation, we have
hell to recover if they are not as
ordered. We can rarely afford
the cost or time to send them
back,” the statement said.

The human rights organisa-
tion suggested that the
Bahamas government negoti-
ate and legislate in tandem
with the Florida legislature, “so
that a breach of consumer pro-
tection of goods shipped from
Florida companies to the
Bahamas would have the same
consumer protection as if pur-
chased in Florida, and by co-
operation with the Florida reg-
ulatory authorities, Bahamians
could get remedies in Florida.”

The Bill should further
include provisions for con-
sumer protection from services
provided by government cor-
porations, it said.

This would ensure that the
public is not “at the mercy of
inefficiency and incompetence
paid for at top dollar by a pub-
lic that does not have any
alternative because of govern-
ment monopolies,” the asso-
ciation said.

The association also called
on government to give the
Registrar of Insurance Com-
panies “real teeth”.

Harbour eGeAi Centre, Lyford Cay
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas |
Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



Ts TE ON TLD

Ty Cee lt ace

Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd-[242] 322-3080 © Fax:[242] 322-5251 * www.homefabricsltd.com


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

THE TRIBUNE!





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

_ EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ~
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Claptrap, or independent thought?

FOREIGN Affairs Minister Fred
Mitchell’s recent chastisement of the
Opr osition in the House for not taking
th Gesu. tian view” in the controversy
cer the Wuban dentists, has annoyed many
Bahamians — - pPartieiarly the young set.

sizzc, in n life _ ’ particularly now that he is
fo.ciys. minister and has had to make deci-
sicas that have not always met with public
approval — where he expects a true patri-
o. +. defend his country “right or wrong.”

He ce:+-mned Opposition mrenibers
for not taking the “patriotic position of
standing up for our country” in the Cuban
debaie, but rather taking the ° ‘view
espous ‘ed by another vuntry.”

Obviously, by not turning a blind eye to
the 11 months it took government to reach
a decision in the Cuban dentists’ crisis, the
Opposition was unpatriotic for condemning
government for almost a year of “dither-
ing.” The Opposition’s position was that
government had eventually arrived at the
right decision, but had taken far too long to
do so.

In this column on Monday we con-
demned the thought that to be a true patri-
ot one had to blindly follow the dictum,
“my country, right or wrong.” This is prob-
ably the same slavish idea that inspired
the late Sir Lynden Pindling to encourage
supporters at a public rally to blindly
entrust their future to him. Meanwhile
their path should be one of: “Don’t worry,
be happy...” Thinking Bahamians know
exactly where such folly got us. It is when
Bahamians started to think that they start-
ed to make independent decisions, thus
ending Sir Lynden’s 25-year reign in 1992.

A young man drew our attention to an
item on Fred Mitchell’s website last week
that condemned a young Bahamian writer
who had apparently disappointed whoever
writes copy for the website. The writers
of the website review the newspapers and
listen to the radio “to spot some new voice
for reason, some voice of liberalism, some
leader for the future out of the next gen-
eration of people who will support demo-
cratic liberalism.”

The writer continued: “It is almost now
an old man’s lament that there are a few
good men and women but even those seem



to let us down from time to time.”
Apparently, columnist Craig Butler was

earmarked for the future. But, it would

seem that Mr Butler has slipped from

grace. He has at last shown that he is an:
independent thinker, with a mind that will:

not allow party-tinkering.

The website writer admits that often
young Butler writes a good column. How;
ever: “He is supposed to be part of the
PLP's New Progressive Institute. Yet more

. often than not, he engages in what we think

are gratuitous comments in Opposition to
policies of the PLP, based on inaccura-
cies. The latest foray was this view that
the Government’s position on the Cuban
dentists was hogwash. He based this on
his view that it did not have to take as long
as it did to settle the matter, and the
Bahamas simply capitulated to the U.S.
lobby.

“We don't expect such anti-intellectual
claptrap from one with Craig Butler's polit-
ical antecedents — this is Milo Butler’s
grandson after all.”

And so Craig Butler is to be forever
chained to a past...a past that is to limit his
future. In other words, he has no future
unless he accepts the rallying cry: My par-
ty, right or wrong!

'~Mr Butler must remember that his

| grandfather refused to have his thoughts

enchained. It is now his turn to stand up
and defend his future.

Mr Butler should ask Mr Mitchell what
he had in his mind on December 20, 1989
when Mr Mitchell took his usual protest
platform under the fig tree in front of the
Supreme Court and with his PDF col-
leagues burned the Bahamas’ constitution.

They were protesting because the disci-
plinary committee of the Bar Council was
to investigate a charge of “improper con-
duct” brought against lawyer Mitchell for
a statement he made critical of a Supreme
Court judge during an August press con-
ference under the same fig tree.

Mr Mitchell said that the Constitution’s
ashes were to be sent to Prime Minister
Pindling “as a reminder of how our coun-
try is being destroyed.”

Mr Mitchell’s generation set an example
of protest. They now want to put a curb bit
on today’s youth. It just won’t work.

Insurance,

ethics an



policies —

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE basic requirement of a
contractual agreement is “con-
sensus ad idem” or a meeting
of the minds. The subject matter
is mutually agreed upon by all
parties concerned and this legal
arrangement is merely a reflec-
tion of the intentions of the bar-
gaining parties. Such an agree-
ment imposes obligations on
both parties as specified by the
contents of the contract.
Whether they like it or not, the
parties are legally bound by the
terms and are duty bound to
fulfil whatever terms are
expressed in the contract. The
only exception to this is that if it
can be proven that the contract
is fundamentally different from
what was intended.

For example, if someone who
normally wears glasses signs a
contract and not being able to
read it as he is without his glass-
es. The defence of “non es fac-
tum” or this deed is not my
deed would be an acceptable
defence to excuse someone of
any obligation that they may
have mistakenly contracted.

However, the reality of con-
tractual obligations in the busi-
ness world is to bind unsus-
pecting individuals and impose
unwarranted obligations on
individuals that are unfair, bur-
densome and disastrous. By
shrewdly manipulating or dis-
guising your true intentions, it is

possible to force individuals to ,

commit individuals to situations
that they may not have intend-
ed to commit.

‘This misrepresentation and
pattern of deceitful behaviour
regrettably may only be discov-
ered when the stuff has hit the
fan. Unfortunately, for an inno-
cent victim of this scam, such a
logical conclusion may have
come too late and one may find
himself trapped by this immoral
if not illegal contract. Motivated

‘by greed, all too often a con-

tract may be rendered uncon-
scionable by an objective third
party because one party by its
position tries to unfairly take
advantage of the other.

For its part, the government
has attempted to regulate by
legislation the formation of con-
tracts in order to protect the
public by limiting, if not elimi-
nating, such fraudulent if not
criminal behaviour.

Only just recently, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas has
passed an amendment to The
Unfair Contract Act. Currently,
Parliament is debating the Con-
sumer Protection Act all in an
effort to reduce the possibility
of one party abusing or manip-

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ulating an agreement especially
when the other party has acted
in good faith. The temptation
to abuse the trust in a contrac-
tual agreément is more evident
where there is an inequality in
bargaining power, for example,
where there is a large company
such as a banking institution, a
real estate company, insurance
company, etc. and the other
party is an average member of
the public.

Insurance companies by far
has received the most criticism
for being deceitful and mis-
leading in their contracts or
policies. This is probably due
to the fact that so many people
can be affected at the same
time.

One just has to look at the
aftermath of hurricanes Frances
or Jeanne to see this point. So
many people came forward to
express their concerns and dis-
appointment with their insur-
ance policies. ‘There is no way
that so.many persons could
have misunderstood what they
thought that they were bar-
gaining for when they entered
their insurance contract, So
much was the outcry against the
deceitful behaviour and attitude
displayed, that prominent
lawyers and Human Rights
groups publicly demanded that
government enact legislation to
outlaw some of the positions
taken by insurance companies.
Little exemption clauses and
exemptions that were buried
somewhere in the back pages
of the policy suddenly become
so prominent that they appear
as bold as the headline on the
front page of a newspaper.
These are the phrases that
insurance companies would
cowardly hide behind in the
time of crisis.

To make matters worse, peo-
ple only obtain an insurance
policy for the purpose of it
being there in their time of
need. It is possible that a policy
holder may be paying a policy
for years or decades, mistaken-
ly operating under the belief
that their policy would be there
in their time of need. They then
find out the hard way that their
insurance policy has let them
down when the insurance com-
pany indicate that they were not
covered because of the nature
of the damage.

For example, the Insurance
Company will argue that the
damage to your house was not
due to the hurricane, but due
to water, therefore they have
no obligation to compensate
you. How stupid! Has anyone
ever seen a hurricane without
water? Whether it is due to
heavy rains or tidal actions,
these are all directly related to
and are a fundamental part of a
hurricane. So, how on God’s
earth can the Insurance com-
pany.argue that the damage was
not-due to'the actions of the
hurricane. “But for” the actions
of the hurricane, would this
property have suffered such

letters@tribunemedia.net §

damage? The answer is'a
resounding NO! des

This ridiculous position
adopted by the Insurance Com-
pany is not unique to the
Bahamas. Just look at the vic-
tims of hurricane Katrina that
went through Louisiana and .
Mississippi. Despite the obvi-
ous damage to any reasonable .
person, another disaster is
played out as the insurance
companies are claiming that the
vast majority of damage was not
due to the hurricane but due to
water. How on earth can the
Insurance Company say ‘that
they will pay for the damaged
roof in the bedroom, but not
the damage due to the six feet
of water in the kitchen of the
same house? At a time when
tension is running high, the gen-
eral perception is that many
Insurance Companies are a rip
off and that they only take your
money. Even if there were
winds of 135 mph, the Insur-
ance Company’s position in one
case was that the damage was
due to water and that the client
should have had a flood insur-
ance policy. This is pure fool-
ishness as The National Hurri-
cane Centre in Miami has pro-
duced a number of modelsias
to what damage can be expect-
ed from even a minimal hurri-
cane. Gio

On a personal note, this
writer would like to relate -his
experience with an Insurance
Company that directly illus-
trates the point of unethical
behaviour by Insurance Com-
panies. This centers around.an
“educational” policy that was
purchased when my son was
five years of age. The represen-
tation made by the Insurance
Salesman was absolutely clear.
This was an Educational Policy
that will be there to help defray
the cost of my.son’s College
education when he has reached
the age of 18 years. At age eigh-
teen, my son would receive four
annual payments of five thou-
sand dollars. This was the fact
that induced us to sign‘ Oy for
this policy.

Of course, this was all a bla-
tant lie concocted by this ing
ance company that completely
misrepresented their proditct.
Now that my son is eighteen
and in College, we discovered
the hard way that this insurance
company is full of crap! Shoftly
after we had signed up for the
policy, for whatever reason it
was discontinued. That in itself
should not have prejudice my
contract. However, what now
appears to be the case is the fact
that this insurance company_has
altered the terms of the policy
by indicating that my son was
only entitled to a loan and not
an outright payment as we had
expected. The only entitlement
right now is the cash value of
the policy which is a far. less
amount than had we paid the
monthly premium into a fixed
deposit. This is pure hogwash!
This insurance company should
be held accountable for this fact.

DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE

Boston, Massachusetts
March 20 2006

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 5







In brief |

Two in court
charged with
stealing from
employment

TWO men charged in connec-
tion with the theft of thousands
of dollars worth of goods from
their place of employment were
arraigned in court yesterday.

Rodney Daniels, a 23-year-
old Haitian of Moss Lane, and
25-year-old Dennis Johnson of
Wilton Street, were together
arraigned before Magistrate
Guillemina Archer on 19 counts
of stealing by reason of employ-
ment.

. They were charged with steal-

ing more than $17,000 worth of
goods from Milo Butler and
Son-Company Limited on
Peach, Street.
.. Johnson; was also. charged
separately with nine counts of
stealing. It is alleged that act-
ing alone, he stole more than
$7;000 worth of goods:

The two men pleaded not

guilty to all of the charges
against them.
; ,Daniels was granted bail in
‘the sum of $10,000 and John-
‘son was granted bail in the sum
‘of: $15,000. The,.case was

Man charged
in connection
with armed
robberies

uA 21-YEAR-OLD Milton
Street man charged in connec-
tion with several armed. rob-
beries and other offences. was
arraigned in court yesterday. ,
. Airick Veron Whyms, alias
“*Man” was charged, being con-
cerned with another, with 11
ve@ounts of armed robbery dat-
‘ing back:to March 9.
:1, He was arraigned before
‘Magistrate, Susan Sylvester.

>: Whyms also faces charges of
:assault with a deadly weapon,
:causing harm damage and bur-
sglary. In all of the charges, it
wwas alleged that Whyms was
concerned with another and
‘armed with either a shotgun,
‘handgun or:both..

if He was not required to enter ,

a plea to the charges and was
‘remanded to prison.

ai The case.resumes on June 27.
'Whyms’is- represented by
eawyen? Ian Cargill.

‘Two youths
charged
following —
shopbreaking

a “TWO young men appeared in

ean Three of the Freeport
‘Magistrate’ s Court to be charged
dn, connection with a shop break-
‘ing 2 and stealing incident.

. DeAngelo Davis, 19, and a
‘17-year-old juvenile pleaded not
guilty to charges of shop break-

ing and. stealing { from Cin-Lorn ©

jae in the Grand Bahama
Centre Mall on March 22.
r was adjourned to




tf "Meanwhile, Davis and the
juyenile ; are on $4, 000 bail with
one surety. .



LOCAL NEWS

Weekend to sell

Bimini as a
tourism ‘mecca’

A WEEKEND of activities
will be launched on Bimini to
reposition the island as a thriv-
ing tourism mecca — following
the hardships it has endured
inrecenttimes. . ..,

Beginning on Wednesday,
March 29, the event will make
history, as tourism partners on
Bimini and New Providence
will stage the first tourism
careers fair to be held on a
Family Island.

Organisers said-the-general
aim of the careers fair will be
to generate a keen interest
among students-on Bimini of
“the plethora of professional
opportunities” available in the
tourism industry. :

A:statement from the Min-
istry of Tourism explained that
the students will be introduced

i “to ‘opportunities available on |
* Bimini as well as:to others

throughout the islands of the
Bahamas. - "|:
The fair will be held for two

days — March 29 and 30 — and
around 340 students i in grades

four through 12 will take part.

More than 18 companies
have already agreed to be rep-
resented and the number of
companies pledging their
involvement is still growing,
the statement said.

There are already firm com-

_mitments from: Bimini Bay,
Bimini Sands, Bimini Blue

Waters, Bimini Breeze Express,
Ansil Sunders, Atlantis, Dia-
monds International, Pinders
Souvenirs and many others.
Some of the tourism areas
to be represented include:
hotels, transportation, attrac-
tions, travel trade, tourism
adventures and retail services.

The careers fair will begin.

with a job preparation semi-
nar for grade 12 students,
which will cover topics like:
the importance of the tourism
industry to the economy of the

Bahamas, specific tourism |

careers, resumé writing skills

and interviewing techniques.
Students. also will be for-

mally saneNeeS to he Min-

istry of Tourism careers web-
site, bahamastourismca-
reers.com, which had an
extremely successful debut in
September 2004.

The website played a major
role in the recent National
Tourism Week Careers Fair
staged in January at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Extremely pleased with the
initiative, Angela Cleare,
senior director of Family
Islands and product in the
Ministry of Tourism, described
the upcoming fair as a much-
needed event for the Family
Islands.

“It is very important for us
to include all of our young
people on all of our islands
when we are educating about

’ the importance of tourism and
the many opportunities that

‘exist in this industry Hae e

she said.

*I am so happy that we are
beginning this initiative with
Bimini. And hopefully, this
will be just the first of many



@ ANGELA Cleare, senior director for Family Islands and
product in the Ministry of Tourism.

career fairs to be held through-
out our family of islands.”

This weekend, the Bimini
Tourist Office will stage a spe-
cial celebration at the Adminis-
trator’s residence in Alice Town
to honour eight special women
on Bimini.

Dubbed: “Honouring women
in sports”, the event will focus

re
sedeeeenenensctesenensereceecerensarscusseuenenvesscecesneersenecssesessensnsabecesnsntasenestedeessansceeeneoens esas saiabag ses ae epee inhale gees hasta sitnesssatentriegabesceeyeeaneasratyy evtaaipaeretsrreotrescgeereee aneeaeaser rat

Activities for’

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport
Reporter _ ;

FREEPORT - Aidtiter
of activities have beén
planned by healthcare pro-
fessionals on Grand Bahama
to mark World Health

‘Month, which begins on

April 2.

The World Health Organ-
isation (WHO) will cele-
brate World Health Day on
April 7. Every year, a theme
is selected to highlight
important international

~health issues and concerns.

Under the theme: ‘Work-
ing together for health,’
WHO hopes to draw atten-
tion to the health workforce
crisis around the world.

According to WHO
reports, there is a chronic
global shortage of health
workers as.a result of
decades of under-investment
in education, training,
salaries, working environ-
ment and management.

This has led to a severe
lack of key skills, rising lev-
els of career changes and
early retirement, as well as
national and international
migration of such workers.

In Grand Bahama, health-
care officials will attend a
church service at 1lam at

: * Fairfield Church of God

East on Settler’s Way and
Balao Road.

Dr Bernard Nottage,
Minister of Health, will be
the keynote speaker at the

! World Health Day ceremo-

ny at Pro-Cathedral of
Christ the King at 10am on

ELEUTHERA
The Island BT

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7:00AM,
10:35AM

RETURN MONDAY APRIL 17TH

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10:00AM
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a

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Round Trip $70.
Round Tri $250.
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WITH DRIVER

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

JED MUNROE: 422-3594 pins,
CONRAD SWEETING: 477-6162 ser
THE ISLAND LINK TICKET BOOTH AT EASTERN END POTTERS CAY DOCK







East Atlantic Drive.

Other activities include a

health careers fair at the gym
at Jack Hayward High School
from 9am to 5pm on April 10
and 11.

A fun/run/walk will be held

starting at 6am at Sunrise Med-
ical Centre on April 22.

Laboratory Professionals

Week under the theme: ‘pro-
viding answers, guiding cures’, ©
and Administrative Assistants



@ HEALTHCARE officials plan-events for World Health
Month

(Photo: Denise Maycock)

Week under the theme: ‘creat-
ing excellence’ will both be
observed on the week begin-
ning April 23.

Volunteers Day, under the
theme: ‘inspire by example’ will
be held on April 25.

Town meetings showcasing
health professions will be held
in High Rock, Eight Mile Rock,
West End and Freeport on
April 4, 11, 18, and 25 respec-
tively.

orld Health Month

Diabetes
sufferers
invited to
meeting

TYPE two diabetics and
sufferers from other
chronic diseases are invited
to attend a meeting to hear
about how best to treat
their conditions.

At Holy Cross Centre on
March 29 and 30, beginning
at 7.30pm, Sportron
International
representative Jeff
Nicholls will address the
audience.

Sportron is a major
health product
manufacturer founded in
Dallas, Texas. It now has
additional offices.in
Canada, Mexico and
several countries in
Africa.





on the women of Bimini who

used fishing as a means of sup-
porting their families.

There are plans to stage an
elaborate float parade to hon-
our the women on March 31.
The parade will be followed by
a street festival peppered with
special Bahamian entertain-
ment.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control
‘Tropical Exterminators
Rar a |

TV SCHEDULE

WED. MARCH 29

2: :00am Community Pg. 1540AM

; Bahamas@Sunrise

Fun
- Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales
Da’ Down Home Show -
Immediate Response
ZNS News Update
Caribbean Today News
Immediate Response Cont'd
Island Life Destinations
Flashback
Spoken
Inside Hollywood
Morning Joy
Eddie Long
The Fun Farm
Aqua Kids
ZNS News Update
Around The Archipelago: C.C. °
Sweeting Junior High School
ZNS School Round Up
A Special Report
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Eye On Health
NCTU - Labour Speaks
BTC Connection
Caribbean Newsline
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Immediate Response
~ Comm. Pg. 1540 AM

NOTE: ZNS - TV 13 reserves
the right to make last minute
programme changes!




PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Long Island hopes for planes’ return

A LOCAL contractor has
been engaged by the govern-
ment to revamp Stella Maris
Airport on Long Island.

Residents are now hoping
that planes will be landing there
again within two months.

The government was forced
to close the airport some weeks
ago because experts feared its
runway was not up to required
safety standards.

The decision struck fear into
developers and residents in
northern Long Island because

( ¢

4 4a
4 f 7
Nae



iain

yee

they were left stranded at the
end of a 40-mile drive from
Deadman’s Cay - the nearest
air terminal.

Now islanders have been reas-
sured by the government’s swift
action - and the hiring of a local
contractor to carry out improve-
ment work at Stella Maris.

The good news has been
compounded by response to a
Tribune INSIGHT article about
Long Island two weeks ago.

This is now being circulated
in the UK and elsewhere in a



cles

Oye



EVERYTHING
‘MUST GO



SALENOWON

Mall at Marathon - Tel: 394-3205









bid to promote “the good life”
on what is often regarded as the
jewel of the Bahamas.

Long Island’s fantastic beach-
es and rolling green landscape
have often been cited as its most
alluring features.

But its friendly people -
and their renowned work
ethic - make Long Island one
of the best investment and
development opportunities

FAMIY ISLAND ROUND-UP



in the archipelago.

Relaxed, crime-free and near-
ly 200 miles away from Nassau’s
gunmen, this island is seen by
more and more home-plot
investors as the place to be.

¢e ORGANISERS of Cat
Island’s Rake ‘n’ Scrape Festi-
val are determined to make this
year’s event the best so far.

Mr Allworth Rolle and his

committee want the festival -
held between May 28 and June
5 - to be the biggest and most
enjoyable of all.

Bands are being urged to reg-
ister now, with the usual provi-
so that rake ‘n’ scrape tradition
demands that goatskin drum,
carpenter’s saw and concertina
are preferred instruments.

Mr Rolle can be contacted at
24354-6213.

¢ RISING crime and other
pressures in Nassau are prompt-
ing more and more Bahamians
to consider Family Islands life.
But not all the islands are the

quiet havens they used to be.
While Abaco has its growing
Haitian problem - itself the
source of tension from time to
time - Bimini now has to face
the fall-out caused by mass
importation of Hispanic labour.
The Bimini Bay resort devel-
opment has, according to locals,
created major social issues -
including the impregnation of
some local women by Mexican
workers. ;
“These guys are coming in
here and earning all the monéy,
so the women are falling for
them, as you would expect,”
said one islander.

Rotary makes books donation
to Urban Renewal Project

THE new Farm Road
Urban Renewal Project
library is off to a great
start thanks to a donation
of 100 books by the
Rotary Club of New
Providence.

The theme of the
Rotary Club for this year
is ‘Dealing with literacy’
— with a direct focus on
young people.

And, as part of the
club’s community ser-
vices, it chose to assist
children in the Farm
Road community to
enhance their reading
skills.

Farm Road Urban
Renewal is preparing a
resource and after school
outreach center in the
Windsor Lane govern-
ment complex.

Computer training, lit-
eracy and remedial stud-
ies, and religious educa-
tion will be provided.
The project team,
headed by Paulette
Forbes of the Farm Road
office, will partner with
community based organ-
isations to run the pro-
grammes.

5 New Restaurants,
21 New Shops,

All in the heart
of paradise.



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THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 7





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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

& TOM Sutton, manager of the Peace and Plenty Beach Inn in Georgetown, Exuma; Charity
Axmbrister, director of the Exuma Tourist Office (accepting donation on behalf of Earlston
'VicPhee, chairman of the Coastal Awareness Committee) and Neville Leeeoys manager of Club
Peace and Ae cay

GEORGETOWN, Exuma
— The owners of Club Peace
and Plenty made a generous
donation to the Coastal Aware-
ness. Committee of the
Bahamas.

One per cent of all revenue
made during the months of Feb-
ruary and March at the charm-
ing and historical 32-room colo-
nial style inn have been pledged

- to the committee.

The funds are to be used for
both the National Coastal
Awareness Campaign and for
coastal awareness projects in
Exuma.

The Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee is a group of stakehold-
ers from the private and public

i pray yeah day f for peace
- to understand the pain,
6 stop. the open flood of tears
“that is often mistaken for rain.

q was not yours but God’s alone -
: He loved me best and called me home

Peet pay



Peace and Plenty
makes donation to
coastal awareness

sector formed to heighten the
public’s awareness of the impor-

_ tance of preserving the coast-

line.

“Exuma is my family’s sec-
ond home,” said Barry Ben-
jamin, owner of Peace and Plen-
ty. “We want to take care of
our unique environment and
will continue to do as much as
we can to promote environ-
mental education both in Exu-
ma and in the rest of the
Bahamas., We support Coastal
Awareness so that residents and
visitorsalike ‘cdiicontinue to
enjoy the Bahamas’ beautiful
natural resources,

“We are grateful to the own-

ers of the Péace’ aiid’Plenty.





God gave us an.angel for 24 years -
_. >. We were not to know
Our time with him would be limited’

His loss a devastating blow.
-. Sleep on my love, my sunshine,
Until we meet agai



BERRY Islands - Minister of
Financial Services and Invest-
ments Vincent Peet thanked win-
ter residents and foreign. home
owners for investing in Great
Harbour Cay and contributing
to the Bahamian economy.

The minister’s remarks were
made on Friday at the fourth-
annual winter residents and
home owners reception, held at
the Beach House at. Great Har-
bour Cay.

Minister -Peet urged
Bahamians, winter residents
and home owners to work
‘together to further develop

at can never ever be filled.

Your Loving Mom, Ann Bease =
_ March a7, 2006.2 2%:

oving. issed by mom, Ann, | Dad Michael, Daddy | B, ‘Brothers, J demie & Conor! ;
ste. Sacha, The Andrean Community of St ‘Andrews College, Aurora, Ontario, Delta:
Upsilon fraternity of University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Doc Wisdom, Lexie
and friends from Cable Bahamas, one a Host of family ¢ & friends.









“A Leadership program
that develops our boys and
transforms them into
responsible, disciplined,
patriotic young men.”












The Youth Empowerment
& Skills Training Institute

In collaboration with the

Ministry of Youth, Sports & Housing

Juvttes

applications from adolescent males,
16 - 19 years old for enrollment in the 3-month

The National Youth Service Program
Nicolls Town, Andros
April 8th to July 7th, 2006

For Registration and Information, please contact:

AER
(>



40 Deveaux Street
(one door east of Our Lady’s Primary School)

Monday - Friday 8:00am to 4:00pm ° Tel: 322-8335












the Berry Island chain.

He said that the Department
of Environmental Health Ser-
vices has signed a contract with
a local resident to solve the pre-
sent difficulties at. the garbage

“site on Great Harbour Cay.
The minister added that the

island is too beautiful to be kept
in an unhygienic nianner and
implored the residents to use
the new garbage service so the
property value on the island:can
continue to rise.

The minister added that the
government recently appoint-
ed a police inspector as officer-

THE TRIBUNE







resorts for this generous dona-
tion,” said Earlston McPhee;
chairman of the Coastal
Awareness Committee. “Tak-

ing care of our coasts should
be everyone’s concern and we
thank all of the companies and.
individuals that have joined us
in this important national ini;

» tiative.”

The committee will oli
everits during April including:a
national church service, a.
national T-shirt day, a marine’

-exhibition, beach restoration.

projects, radio and newspaper
awareness campaigns and edu-
cational field trips. All events:
are. sponsored by private and

_ government agencies.

daeneaseatecececnsenscescncseceraceaeberresesenesoensenscesoesensesscrsescncecoeese! Vecsobadedsaeaeredeeciecsssscsctedserscesscertuevenasedstecdevecssestacecsdserepecsessccerdesonsessadscesecessesoesesesees

S$ tribute to

Berry Islands residents



=

| MINISTER of. Fisiucial Servings and Tnvestuieiits and MP for North Andros and the Berry ‘
Islands Vincent Peet hands out gift bags on Friday. Winter Resident Marcie Sener is shown centre,

(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

in-charge of the island.

“It is also. important for the
government to provide security
at its borders to protect its citi-

- zens and it is our obligation to

provide security,” he said. *
The Ministry of Tourism pre-

-sented winter residents and

home owners who have lived i in
the Berry Islands for 25 years or
longer with gifts and certificates.
Kevin Wallace, Tourism rep-
resentative for the Berry Island
district, commended the winter
residents for significantly cob-
tributing to the Bahamian ecob-
omy.

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Rice and US policy development

[ss a safe bet that if US
Secretary of State Con-
doleezza Rice was white, most of
the Bahamian political elite
would despise her as one of the
chief architects of American
“exceptionalism” - a code word
for imperialism.

But as a black woman who is
fourth in line to the throne - and
often regarded as a future presi-
dential candidate - Rice enjoys
immense celebrity, especially
among leaders of the African
diaspora as her meetings with
CARICOM in Nassau last week
demonstrated.

‘Her great-grandparents were
slaves emancipated in the US Civ-
il War, and three generations of
hér family lived in Alabama — the
heart of the once segregated
Deep South. But Rice enjoyed a
nurturing middle class upbring-
ing, taking piano, ballet and
French lessons. Her father was a
Presbyterian minister and her
mother a dedicated teacher.

‘My parents were very strate-
gic,” Rice once said. “I was going
to be so well prepared, and I was
going to do all of these things that
were revered in white society so
well, that I would be armoured
somehow from racism. I would
be able to confront white society
on its own, terms.” ;

And that’s exactly what hap-
pened. Rice used her best weapon
— education — to achieve fame and
power. At the University of Den-
ver she came under the influence
of.a gifted teacher named Josef
Korbel, a Czech refugee from

Naziism whose own daughter

(Madelaine Albright) would also
rise to become secretary of state.

After earning credentials as an
éxpert on the Soviet Union, Rice
was picked in 1988 for a job on
George Bush senior’s National
Security Council, where she grew
close to the president and his fam-
aly. Ironically, she arrived just in
‘time to put her specialty to good
‘use as a traditional foreign policy
Fealist .

THE REALISTS VERSUS
. THE MORALISTS

A: the Cold War ended
and the Warsaw Pact

‘was being dismantled, Rice urged
‘continued engagement with the

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
‘. against the advice of hawks who



wanted to deal with the ex-com-
munist Russian president, Boris
Yeltsin.

Critics say neither she, nor her
colleagues, could conceive of a
world without the USSR. Accord-
ing to an article in the New York-
er Magazine, “The argument was
about whether the United States
should promote regime change
and democracy abroad—and it's
an argument that's still going on.”

Rice was a campaign adviser
to the younger George Bush in
2000 and was appointed national
security adviser after his election.
By most accounts, she changed
her tune during Dubyah’s first
administration — switching from a
foreign policy realist to a moralist.

The big issue between these



Condoleeza Rice’s

‘role is more like a.

senior civil servant
than an imperial
viceroy

two approaches was whether the
United States should just react
adroitly to events, or use its
unprecedented power to “affir-
matively undertake to reshape
the world”, as the moralists — also
called neo-conservatives — argue.

During the Cold War, the US
followed a cynical balance of
power strategy. Corrupt dictators
were propped up in return for
their help against the Soviet
empire. CIA-sponsored coups
and wars in places like Iran,
Guatemala, Southeast Asia,

Brazil, Mozambique and Chile |

destroyed or subverted legitimate
nationalist and democratic move:

ments in the interest of a grand.

global strategy.

It was not until Ronald Rea-
gan’s election in 1980 that this pat-
tern began to change. Perhaps the
best example is South Africa,
where the moralists under Rea-
gan hastened the end of the
apartheid regime by legislating stiff
economic sanctions in favour of
democracy. They went on to win
the Cold War, engineering the col-
lapse of totalitarian communism.

Rice was responsible for the
first National Security Strategy
developed by the younger Bush
administration — just after 9/11.

OPTIMA 2006



Oy eye Ne,

It set the guiding principles for a
more active foreign policy that
envisioned the pre-emptive war
in Iraq:

“The United States possesses

unequaled strength and influence
in the world. Sustained by faith in
the principles of liberty, and the
value of a free society, this posi-
tion comes with unparalleled
responsibilities, obligations, and
opportunity. The great strength
of this nation must be used to
promote a balance of power that
favours freedom.”
' And as Rice herself told an
interviewer in 2002, “if you go
through history you can make a
very strong argument that it was
not acting, or acting too late, that
has had the greatest consequences
for international politics—not the
other way around.”

TOWARDS A
MULTIPOLAR WORLD

[es in this vein that she
supported the (almost) uni-
lateralist 2003 American inter-
vention in Iraq, which damaged
relations with countries around
the world, including CARICOM,
leading to a drop in American
credibility. But after being named
secretary of state in January of
last year, Rice seems to have

', shifted gears somewhat to repair

the damage.

Her goal, analysts say, is to
“reconstitute a multilateral con-
sensus on globalization in which
the United States is (first among
others), guaranteeing the security
of world capitalism militarily, but
not using its military power to
impose policies ‘on its allies and
independent limited collaborators
(China and Russia) without gen-
uine negotiation and compromise.”

In other words - a multipolar
world, in which American lead-
ership is balanced between
regional power centres. And just
this month, Washington issued its
latest National Security Strategy,
which accepts the view that we
are, in fact, moving toward a mul-



tipolar world. This document
stresses the importance of "part-
nering" with regional powers.
“Transformational diplomacy
means working with our many
international partners to build
and sustain democratic, well-gov-
erned states that will respond to
the needs of their citizens and
conduct themselves responsibly
in the international system. ... The
times require an ambitious
national security strategy, yet one
recognizing the limits to what
even a nation as powerful as the
United States can achieve by
itself. Our national security strat-
egy is idealistic about goals, and

realistic about means.”

MISGUIDED POLICIES

Le is the broader context
of Rice’s recent meeting
with CARICOM leaders in Nas-
sau last week. Experts say the US
is trying to recreate trust, build

bridges, find compromises and

become more involved in regional’

politics. And it is clear that resent-
ment and resistance to American
power has been growing in recent
years. As one Bahamian diplomat
told Tough Call:

“The policies of the US are not

producing the results that it .

desires, and therefore how should
friends of the US respond to
those policies that are producing
such disastrous results? A true
friend is one who will point out
your mistakes, and who will not
encourage you in your wrongdo-
ing. If I am right, then CARI-
COM and the Bahamas have
been true friends to the US,
because they have refused to sup-
port misguided policies.”

Chief among those “misguided
policies” — in the eyes of CARI-
COM at least — has been the situ-
ation in Haiti, where the Bush
administration allowed the elect-
ed president, Bertrand Aristide,
to be removed by a rebellion in
February, 2004. CARICOM’s
relations with the US have been
strained ever since — but that is a

PICANTO

KIA MOTORS

discussion for another day.

Fact is, despite all the whining
about American arrogance, Con-
doleeza Rice’s role is more like a
senior civil servant than an impe-
rial viceroy. At least that’s the
view of Michael Mandelbaum, a
former Clinton adviser (now for-
eign policy professor at Johns
Hopkins University) who argues
that the US role in shaping the
modern global order is both
essential and benefits everyone.

THE CASE FOR GOLIATH

|: a new book, he contends
that this role is not imperi-
alism but governance: “Without
the US the world would be a less
stable place,” this view says.
“Other countries tacitly recog-
nize this, which is why no effec-
tive David has come along to
challenge the US. That is, no seri-
ous country actively opposes the
American role in the world,

although all have disagreements .

with the way the US carries out
this role.
“This is true of governments

‘within countries. We all agree

that our government should do
certain things — protect us, pro-
mote economic growth, etc — but
we disagree sharply about the
best way to do this. These dis-
agreements are inevitable, nor-

mal, indeed desirable. Politics:

does not disappear just because
the US plays the role of the

‘ world's government.”

On balance, American super-
vision makes the world safer and
richer, and especially works to
prevent the spread of weapons of
mass destruction — which is per-
haps our most clear and present
danger.

In Tough Call’s younger days it
was fashionable to equate the US
with the Soviet Union. But today

-it is obvious which was the real

“evil empire”. And although
some still view the world through
the prism of Pentagon conspira-
cies, there is a compelling argu-
ment that “the governing func-
tions performed by the US have
earned begrudging acceptance, a
tacit recognition that America is
no threat and that its role, on bal-
ance, is a positive one.”

The problem, in this view, is
not US unilateralism or excep-
tionalism, but the reluctance of
other countries to support the
governmental services that the

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world needs to function effec-
tively: “As for the UN, it is really
a trade association of sovereign
states, not a state itself, and so
doesn't have the resources to do
what the US does. You can no
more expect the UN to carry out
governmental roles in the world
than you can expect the trade
association of American hospi-
tals to perform heart surgery.”
The US may not perform its
global governmental roles out of
altruism, and the relevant poli-
cies receive support from the
American public to the extent
that the public believes that they
serve American interests. But it
so happens that these policies
serve the interests of other coun-
tries as well, and no-one else is
in a position to provide them.
“America is not the lion of the
international system, terrorizing
and preying on smaller, weaker
animals in order to survive itself. It
is, rather, the elephant, which sup-
ports a wide variety of other crea-
tures— smaller mammals, birds,
and insects—by generating nour-
ishment for them as it goes about

the business of feeding itself.”

THE UGLY BAHAMIAN

Me in the Bahamian
political class like to

profess a cliched anti-American-
ism. that dates to. the 1960s, and
consider the pursuit of relations
with Cuba, Venezuela and Chi-
na as a fashionable way to assert
these attitudes.

However, it can be easily
argued that China is the biggest
supporter of. American world
governance through its invest-
ment in US debt and securities,
Cuba will change dramatically as
soon as Castro falls down again,
and odds are that Venezuela’s
Hugo Chavez is little more than a
flare in the oil field. .

The question of relations with
these countries is relatively unim-
portant. It’s a matter of which
side you come down on in the
crunch, and how we allocate our
scant resources and limited atten-
tion. It was the failure to act on
clear priorities and needs that set
the tone for the visit of Perma-
nent Secretary Rice. More on that
next week. -

What do you think?

Send comments to larry@tri-
bunemedia.net. Or _ visit
www.bahamapundit.com





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

QC foundation awards |
first full scholarship —

THE Queen’s College Foun-
dation has awarded its first full
scholarship to 11-year-old
Osano Neely.

Jillian Gibson, director of
development for the founda-
tion, announced that Osano, a
student of St Cecilia’s Catholic
Primary School, will enter

Queen’s College at grade seven
and will be fully funded for the
duration of his career there.
“In his 11 years, Osano has
made the Bahamas proud with
his outstanding musical talent.
The Queen’s College family is
honoured to welcome him to
the school where he will cer-

tainly excel in a quality learning
environment,” said the school
in a statement.

At St Cecilia’s, Osano
received merit awards for out-
standing academic achievement
and is a school prefect and
member of the school choir.

“This well-spoken young gen-

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tleman is the son of Mrs
Reynell Neely, a school
teacher, and Lieutenant
Whitfield Neely of the Roy-
al Bahamas Defence Force.

“Osano is a member of the
National Children’s Choir
and the Boys’ Choir of the
Bahamas. He has sung at
many religious, political and
civic events, always willing
to share his gift with others.

“His travels have brought
him to New York and he has
even sung for the television
network TBN with Pastor
Benney Hinn,” said the
statement.

It continued: “His most
unforgettable moment and
his greatest honour was
when he was announced the
winner of the E Clement
Bethel Award for Excel-
lence in Music this past June.
This little bundle of potential
is living his dream and using
his talent to make a positive
impact.”

The school said that Sir
Durward Knowles, chairman
of the Queen's College
Foundation, and the entire
staff are “thrilled” to wel-
come Osano to the school.

THE TRIBUNE:





| Teacher is honoured |

es



Bites

SHANTELL Poitier-Rolle was showered with gifts and
tributes during a special assembly held at Jack Hayward High
School’s:gymnasium. Mrs Poitier-Rolle was selected as the
teacher of the year for her outstanding accomplishments in the
lives of her students and for the school. She is pictureed being .
escorted by the principal of the school, Benjamin Stubbs.

(Photo: Derek Carroll):

<

Trinity Methodist Church

Trinity Place and Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Join us as we celebrate the

145th Anniversary

of the laying of the foundation stone and the
141st Anniversary of the Dedication of the Sanctuary

Sunday, 2nd April, 2006

11:00 a.m. Worship Service
“Remembering the Faithful...Celebrating the Blessings”

Claiborne inc.

SS

Followed by a Luncheon


(ne

Iniwbvine



FROM page one

of Pinewood Gardens are asking
for justice to be served immedi-
ately,: We will wait for justice to
take its.course,” said one friend.

Press, liaison officer Inspector
Walter Evans on Monday night
told the press that the incident
happened shortly after 8pm.

He: said police were making
inquities in the area when they
approached the vehicle. He said
the young man drove in a violent
mariner, which prompted police
to firé a single shot. Mr Evans
said police were now awaiting the
coroner’s report as to the exact
cause:of death.

However, residents of the area
say that is not the real version of
events.

Spéaking with The Tribune yes-
terday, a group of Deron’s
friends -who wished not to be
named — said that Deron’s death
was asenseless killing.

They maintained that Deron
was sitting in his car talking with
neighbours, minding his own busi-
ness when he was killed. They
said ‘the officers did not identify
themselves or state their reasons
for approaching him.

“They walk up to the car, and
try to open up the door, but he
didn’t know who they was or
what they wanted and so he put
the car into reverse. Two or three
seconds later, the officer fire a
shot through the windshield and
the car reverse all the way down
the road and crashed into the
pole,” one friend said.

One of his friends said, he ran
over to the car and saw Deron
try to lift up his head, and then
slumped in the'car.

“He didn’t get up no more
after that and I knew that he was
dead,” said another.

Mrs Bethel said that police
were called to the area earlier
that day to investigate a “scuffle
between a boyfriend and a girl-
friend” who live across the road
to the Bethel’s family home.

“Police first came at around
3pm and then returned around
8pm. They didn’t know who they
were looking’for when they
tapped on Deron’s car window,”
she said.

Mrs Bethel said she was at
home settling in for the night
when a friend of Deron’s came
to lier door and told her that her
son-‘had been shot by plainclothes
police officers.

She said that she immediately.
rushed to the scene at the end of
the road where her son’s car had
come to a stop.

“Tf don’t know how I got there
because I had on my pajamas and
I just managed to put a coat on
over it. When I got there, there
were three officers standing about
and’I asked.them what hap-
penéd,” she said.

Mrs Bethel said the officers
refused to answer her.

“T:said, ‘I want to see my child’
and: ‘they wouldn’t let me see him
andit was at that point in time
that‘Mummy (Deron’ s maternal
grandmother) came and demand-
ed td see him. The officers pushed
us away and would not let us near
the.car so we could see him.
Whén they pushed us Mummy
fell‘down, but I was able to keep
standing.

“And all that time he was
dead, ” she said.

“¢

Man dies

After waiting an hour, she said,
an ambulance finally arrived at
the scene.

“When we looked the ambu-
lance came and it was there for so
long and didn’t carry him and I
asked them why they ain’t carry
him. Deron was still sitting in the
car, and police come with the yel-
low tape and tell me this is a
crime scene.

“T asked them how this a crime
scene, they shot him up the road,”
she said.

Mrs Bethel said by the time the
hearse arrived there were hun-
dreds of people in the streets.

“And when I look the hearse
came and the hearse took my
child away and they still didn’t
let me see him. They didn’t even
let me get close to the car and
they couldn’t tell me why,” she
said.

Deron’s father, and his brother,
both said it would be inappropri-
ate to comment on the situation
although they both agreed with
Mrs Bethel’s comments about hee
son’s personality.

One of Deron’s friends said it is
incidents like this which give
police initiatives like the Urban
Renewal Programme and Com-
munity Policing a bad:name.

Mr Evans said that police
investigations continue, but
stressed that plainclothed officers
are always required to carry iden-
tification cards to verify that they
are members of the police force.

Equipment
boost
FROM page one

The officers studied the
assessment, neutralization and
safe disposition of convention-
al and improvised explosives/..
incendiary devices and materi-
als. Also a part of their train-
ing consisted of developing
emergency response plans and
how to investigate explosive
incidents.

The training and equipment

has cost approximately
$500,000.

"I think it is very important
that we all work together,”.
said Ambassador Rood. “The -
threats that we are facing now
around the world are much dif-
ferent than the threats we were
facing five years ago. This type
of equipment and training
makes sure police in the
Bahamas have the tools to deal
with this threat."

Sgt. Doyle Burrows, a par-
ticipant in the programme, said
the training was "very rigid." It
was the first time, he said, that
they have had training of that
magnitude.

"We are considered as a soft:
target, but we have persons
here who are trained and qual-
ified and capable to render the
assistance necessary as it per-
‘tains to terrorism," he said.

Mr Burrows said that in the
near future they will take part.
in follow-up training.

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i tistics available
: Bahama, Dr Turnquest said that

FROM page one

: quest of The Grand Bahama Cri-
i sis Centre said the organisation is
? sponsoring Wednesday’s gala
; night opening beginning with
: cocktails from 7pm to 8pm.

The play also will be staged on

} March 30, 31, and April 1 at 83pm
: by the Grand Bahama Players
: under the direction of Eisen-
: hower Williams.

Although there are no true sta-
in Grand

incest and sexual abuse is a “big

i problem” in Bahamian society.

“We continue to be in denial
and not be to aware that such
abuse does occur and we need

: to be reminded that it does
? occur.”

“We need to be aware as
adults and as parents that it does
occur and continue to protect our

children.

Whenever abuse occurs it’s

i because somebody was not pro-
i tecting the kids as they should
i have been protected.”

Dr Turnquest said every fami-

ly is touched by abuse in some
? way and each family needs to be
: aware of it.

Ms Gwen Rolle, a survivor of

} child sexual and physical abuse,
i will be on hand to sign copies

of her book, ‘Breaking the

Silence’.

‘ She hopes that her traumatic

i story of abuse portrayed in the
; play and in her book will help,
? not only victims of abuse to over-
i come the pain and find forgive-
i ness in their hearts, but also
; make parents aware of the warn-
; ing signs of abuse.

“We need more people to

i come forward who are able to be
-? transparent about the issue.

LOCAL NEWS

There are a lot of victims who
are not able to get over the pain
and move on with their lives.”

“I remember the confronta-
tion with my father and how he
was so pleased when I really got
the guts to confront him because
he was hurting too.

“And, as I watched rehearsals
there are moments when it still
hurts, but I know that the cause is
much greater than the pain. I
made.a choice to use this avenue
to reach out to people — itisa
message of healing, strength, for-
giveness and taking control of
your life.”

“You have to keep fighting
every day mentally and it has giv-
en me great joy that I have over-
come.’

Despite the difficulties she
faced, Ms Turnquest said that Ms
Rolle was able to overcome the
pain and has made great efforts
to have a productive life. She
commended her for bravely shar-
ing in her autobiography an inti-
mate look at her life and strug-
gles.

“Gwen has dramatically
demonstrated that victims of
abuse are not responsible for
their abuse and that a victim can
have a productive life after
abuse,” she said.

Mr Jones believes that the play
‘In His Hands’ probably has the
most beneficial messages than
any play that has been performed
at the Regency Theatre in the
last 20 years.

He was very disappointed that
the Bahamas Plays and Films
Board gave it an adult only ‘C’
rating. ,

“I was disappointed.. .because







there is a definite need for young
people to be aware of how abuse
happens and why it happens. I
feel that the play should have
been given a ‘PG’ rating rather
than a ‘C’.

“It was given a C because of






the contents and when I submii-
ted the script to the committee I
suggested to them advise what-
ever they would want me to do to
make it acceptable to children,
but they didn’t and they just gave
it a Crating.

Marijuana estimation

FROM page one

estimated street value of more than $24 million. For the year, in fact,
three marijuana farms have been found on Eleuthera and another on
Cat Island, proof of the police force warning that the illicit trade was

“on the rise.”

Kevin Stanfill, the country attaché for the US Drug Enforcement
Agency (DEA), said that their interdictions so far have already made
2006 the most productive drug seizure year that they have ever had.

“There is so much money to be made in marijuana. Marijuana for a
pound is going for $650 to $1,200 a pound in South Florida. That
same pound can go for $1,000 to $3,800 in New York, so getting mar-
ijuana to the United States is big, big profits.

“I think one of the things that you’re seeing here is a lot of individ-
uals from Jamaica that are coming to the Bahamas and trying to. do
some of the same things that they did in Jamaica — to grow their
marijuana crops so they can send it on to the US. The RBPF does an
outstanding job that has dealt with this, and I don’t believe we have
seized many plants that have been higher than your knee, so we are get-
ting the plants before they can produce the product,” he said.

Mr Stanfill explained that a marijuana plant would normally grow to
six or seven feet before developing large buds that can be cultivated for
sale. These buds, he explained, are what is being used by these farm-

ers to bring in the “big money.”

“T’ve talked to some of my counterparts in Jamaica and there is so
much marijuana in Jamaica, they say it is rotting as it is getting ready
to go out. And most of the marijuana that I have seen since i have been
here for three years, about 90 per cent of it is Jamaican marijuana that
is passing through on its way to the US,” he said.

According to Mr Stanfill, a normal marijuana plant could yield, if cul-
tivated by an experienced farmer, four pounds of marijuana a year.
Based on these calculations the estimated value of the total marijuana
cultivation from the three Eleuthera farms— 12,000 plants on one,
4,000 on another and more than 3,000 on a third — assuming the crops
were sold at $2,000 a pound in the US, could bring a return as high as

$152 million.

However, Mr Stanfill said that he felt that the marijuana cultivation
is not an organized industry, and that the farmers growing the crops on
the various islands are doing so as individual enterprises.

{per course
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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS



COPPER arts and crafts spe- in Spanish history “The Galleon
cialist Nick Austin displayed this | Buena Fé.” [Good faith] With
piece, a depiction of the L6th cen- __ its large, heavy and square rigged
tury galleon Buena Fé at the shape, the Galleon Buena Fé
Bahamas National Trust Spring hosted a high stern and multiple
Fling event over the weekend. decks. Different from most

Phe showing of the piece is | Galleon type ships, the Buena Fé
accompanied by a story by Ryan — was a bit sleeker and easier to
\ustin, the artist's son, recount- manoeuvre; additionally it was
ing the tale of a fleet of soldiers often mistaken for a Galleass
and explorers who set sail — because of its large cannons.
towards the Island of Karukera During its travels, The Buena
(present-day Guadeloupe) in Fé became swept off course in a
1586 in hopes of finding treasures fierce storm and came across
and riches for Skull Mountain, home to gangs

For a trip of this magnitude of fearsome pirates. There, the
Capitan Nicholas Guzman _ crew of the Buena Fé and the
requested use of the greatest ship _ pirates fought a deadly battle...




























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pusiness@tribunemedianer MIAMI Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006









Bai eane

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



IMF accepts National
Accounts Statistics

@ By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter

he International Monetary
Fund, for the first time in

_ over 30 years, has accepted °

the National Accounts Sta-
tistics produced by the Bahamas
Department of Statistics, it was
announced this week.

The move means that realistic socio-
economic programmes and plans can
now be put in place more effectively
for the country.

Minister of State for Finance, James
Smith, told a Department of Statistics
seminar for senior public servants that
the IMF's acceptance of the National
Accounts Statistics was as a result of a
modernisation project carried out by
the Minister of Finance and the
Department of Statistics with the assis-
tance of the IMF and Statistics Canada.

The success was also attributed to a
state-of-the-art database using the lat-
est data processing software installed
by experienced software developers
who were contracted for that purpose.

"No country can even begin to devel-
op realistic socio-economic pro-
grammes and plans unless and until it

has in place an adequate statistical sys-
tem which produces, at a minimum,
good quality, reliable, timely and rele-
vant data on the social and economic
conditions existing in that country,"
said Mr Smith.

He added that many international
data banks, including the United
Nations, the IMF, the World Bank, the
Inter-American Development Bank,
the Organisation of American States,
CARICOM and the Caribbean Devel-
opment Bank would often place the
symbols "N/A" or "Not Available" in
the column representing The Bahamas'
contribution to international, hemi-
spheric or regional data collection
effort.

In an attempt to close that gap, a
"considered and deliberate effort" was
made by the Ministry of Finance and
the Department of Statistics with the
assistance of the IMF and Statistics
Canada to put in place the necessary
resources, equipment, manpower and
training, he said.

The Information Technology system
at the Department was upgraded util-

‘ising the latest fibre-optic technology,

state-of-the-art scanning hardware and
software were installed, and a modern

’



SENATOR JAMES SMITH

security system was implemented to
adequately address confidentiality con-
cerns.

While applauding the Department
for its efforts, Mr Smith warned that
"the real work has just begun".

"It is expected that at the end of this

’ workshop, many of your organisations

may recognise the urgency and useful-
ness of developing permanent mecha-
nisms for collecting and making avail-
able statistical information for use in

the national development process," he -

told delegates.

The 2001 Living Conditions Survey
as well as the recent 2003-2004 Occu-
pation and Wages Report were suc-
cessfully completed by the Department
of Statistics, and the information gar-

’ nered is proving useful in various sec-

tors of the country.

Mr. Smith said the critical value of
statistical information for national
development goals became clearly
apparent in the 2001 Living Conditions
Survey. He said it confirmed the sus-
picion that children from low or no-
income families are less likely to attend
pre-school or a tertiary institution and
those poor children are also more like-

ly to leave school without a qualifica-

tion.

"With this concrete knowledge of
the situation, the government's pro:
grammes, which are aimed at stamping
out illiteracy and eradicating poverty;
could now be more appropriately tar:
geted," he said. _

"As it is, this kind of information}.
which is so essential to good policy
development, is found in every min
istry, department or agency of governe
ment," Mr Smith said.

"What is needed, therefore, is a
more systematic and coherent way to
collect, collate and make available that
information to the policy makers and
the wider society."

The need for reliable statistical infor-
mation extends beyond the govern-
ment into the private sector and non-
governmental organisations, he said.

Mr Smith commended the Chamber
of Commerce for its contribution to
the project by entering into a partner-
ship arrangement with the Department
of Statistics to collect data from the
private sector.

"A private-public partnership is crit-
ical to the collection and dissemina-
tion of reliable national statistics," he
said.

GBHRA says Consumer Protection Bill ‘long overdue’

@ By A FELICITY INGRAHAM
Tribune Business Reporter

THE GRAND Bahama Human
Rights Association yesterday
applauded the government for intro-
ducing a Consumer Protection Bill to
parliament. .

In a press release, the GBHRA said
the "long overdue" bill is a "step in
the right direction".

"This is what the business of gov-
ernment is about," said the release.
"Not controlling the minutiae of busi-
ness transactions, but regulating some
fairness."

Alleging that consumers are "at the

Baha Mar executives
‘monitoring’ resort

mercy of the business community",
the association said: "Whilst there are
many businesses which operate ethi-
cally and reasonably towards the con-

. sumer of goods and services, there

are many that practise business as if it
is a war to be waged on the public,
and which must be won at all costs."

It alleged that businesses which are
able to take "abusive advantage" of
the public because there is little con-
sumer protection, regulatory account-
ability or supervision are real estate
development companies, service
charge companies, insurance compa-
nies, loss adjusters, brokers and agents
as well as foreign banks.

@ By A FELICITY .
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter

BOTH Baha Mar and
Atlantis Resorts are reserving
their comments on the sale of
the South Ocean Golf and
Beach Resort until more is
known about the recently-
announced $50 million acqui-
sition by the Stillman Organi-
sation.

But Baha Mar's executive
VP of administration and pub-
lic affairs Robert Sands indi-
cated that current tourism
trends could mean that there is
enough of the pie to share
without detriment to the other
major players.

"We don't know what will
happen (with South Ocean)
but we are monitoring it," said
Mr Sands. "We are satisfied
that the Bahamas is becoming
more and more popular, and
the opportunity for growth is a
very positive element for the
destination.”

He said that further com-
ment on the sale of the South
Ocean Resort would have to
wait until more concrete infor-
mation about "if and when"
the resort will open is known.

Atlantis VP of public affairs
Ed Fields also said that, at this
point, not enough is known
about plans for the South
Ocean resort, and that com-
ments about how it might
affect business for that hotel
would be reserved until fur-
ther notice.

Industry experts are watch-

ing the recent developments
with a cautious eye, to see if
the opening of another mega-
resort might split, the elite,
high-end tourist market too
thinly for New Providence.

Tribune Business exclusively
revealed on Monday that the
New York-based real estate
developer, the Stillman Organ-
isation, plans to invest $500
million in transforming the site
into a five-star, 1,000-room
hotel with a casino.

Atlantis is still in construc-
tion mode for its Phase III
development, in which over $2
billion is expected to be spent.

Meanwhile, BahaMar is
gearing up for a full overhaul
of the Cable Beach area, with a
proposed $1.6 billion revitali-
sation.

The resurrection of the

‘South Ocean Resort would

mean a triangle of three
anchor projects for the
Bahamian capital.

The acquisition is expected
to close by the end of this year,
and is still subject to due dili-
gence.

South Ocean has a casino
licence that will kick in if the
resort gets up to 500 rooms in
size. It presently has just 279,
plus six oceanfront houses. The
current resort also has a golf
course that it leases from New
Providence Development
Company, and che entire com-
plex occupies some 200 acres
that it either owns or leases.

The Stillman Organisation’s

SEE page 7B

The statement said: "They seduce
the unsuspecting public with profes-
sionalism. They mesmerise with the

‘glossy brochure and choke you to

death with the financial loss. They
take advantage of most of the public’s
weak bargaining position. They take
advantage of the high costs of litiga-
tion, the "lack of a jury system of dam-
ages, the lack of punitive damages,
the trusting nature-of island people,
the lack of education for the mast
part, the absence of fair trade practice
codes, bureaus or other government
regulatory bodies, and the absence of
consumer action groups."

The human rights watchdog alleged

that places like their city, which was
ravaged by Hurricanes Andrew,
Floyd, Jeanne, Frances and Wilma,
"have evidenced the true rapacious
nature of insurance companies,
adjusters and banks."

It advised: "We call on the govern-
ment to provide true protection to
the consumer against banks, finan-
cial institutions, and insurance com-
panies and their agents and adjusters.
Give the Registrar of Insurance com-
panies real teeth. Provide for good
faith negotiations in selling policies
and dealing with claims."

It also advised that the bill's reach
stretched to Florida-based retailers

and wholesalers. ;
"Goods or services from Florida
are purchased, and we pay duties and
freight on the importation we have
hell to recover if they are not as
ordered. We can rarely afford the cost
or time to send them back," said the

~ statement.

“Our government should negotiate
and try to legislate in tandem with
the Florida legislature, so that breach
of consumer protection of goods
shipped from Florida companies to
the Bahamas would have the same

SEE page 5B


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006 THE TRIBUNE

ae ee eee eee eee
Leading insurance advisers attend

DRT Experience sales conference



FOUR leading insurance
advisers from Nassau were
among over 9,000 insurance
professionals and industry
partners attending the MDRT
Experience sales conference in
Bangkok, Thailand:

Sandra Seymour, Deveral
Ferguson, Alfreda Knowles
and Anthony (Tony) Longley,
all sales representatives with
ColinaImperial Insurance Litd.,
attended the four-day event,
sponsored by the Million Dol-

lar Round Table (MDRT).

The MDRT Experience is
held every two years in a dif-
ferent Asian country for the
purpose of promoting mem-
bership in MDRT, a US-based’
international sales organisa-
tion, with headquarters in Park
Ridge, Illinois.

The main MDRT sales con-
vention is held annually in
June, with this year’s venue
being San Diego, California.

MDRT was founded in 1927

to provide members with
resources to improve their
technical knowledge, sales and
client service while maintaining
a culture of high ethical stan-
dards.

There are about 30,000
MDRT members worldwide in
73 countries which constitute
less than five per cent of the
sales force worldwide.

The next biennial MDRT
Experience meeting will be
held in April, 2008, in Japan.





WELCOME =
MDRT EXPERIENC

BANGKOK 2006







Manager Position

Ma a eee net

3 Position available for Marketing Manager

to develop and implement marketing initiatives for retail outlets in Nassau, Bahamas

Key Responsibilities include:
Short and long term planning of brand development and strategic marketing
initiatives for multiple outlets.
-Day to day, seasonal and special event marketing planning and execution for retail
outlets (incl. advertising, promotions and public relations).
-Media placement and relations.
-Print, radio and television ad direction and development.
-Budgeting and. tracking expenditures based on department's strategy.
-Retail store support as it relates to promotions, signage, merchandising and special
events. ee
Special projects coordination.

Individuals applying must:
-Have a minimum of a Marketing Associate’s Degree and 3 years experience.
-Have excellent written and communication skills and be able to work with multiple
departments and personnel to accomplish tasks.
-Be outgoing and enjoy working with others.
-Be organized, able to take initiative and work unsupervised. Must be able to motivate
and supervise other team members.
-Have working knowledge of radio, print and television ad development.
-Have working knowledge of Microsoft Office programmes and basic graphics.
-Have own transportation and be available for travel and weekend and seasonal hours.
‘9. apply for this position, please submit resumes to:
marketingbahamas@yahoo.com

SE

—

\ _.
XK

\

The Bahamas Co-operative
League Limited

PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
VACANCY |
BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER
GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Manager, Business Office, Grand Bahama Health Services.





The Bahamas -
Co-operative League
Requires the services of a:




Applicant must possess the following qualifications.



Professional qualification Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Association of Certified Chartered
Accountant (ACCA) or Chartered Accountant (CA), Masters of Business Administration (MBA),
Master of Arts (MA) in the relevant area and one (1) year experience as Assistant Accountant or
Bachelors of Science Degree (BSc), Bachelors of Arts Degree (BA), Bachelors of Business
- Administration and two (2) years experience as Assistant Accountant; Associate Degree and a
minimum of four (4) years experience as an Assistant Accountant and must be Computer literate.







The Business Office Manager will report to the Financial and Accounting Officer and be responsible
for the management for the management of all operations of the Business Office.





Duties:




Prepares department budget and strategic plans for each fiscal year.




2. Prepares comparative analytical report on revenue collection for each fiscal year.



3. Prepares monthly analysis of revenue collected and ensures monthly financial reports are
reconciled.




4. Ensures policies and procedures are in place to prevent opportunity for fraud and system
manipulation. . : ‘



/



5. Reconciles end of year accounts receivable for private patients and submits findings and
recommendations to Finance Officer.



Ensures all effort is made to meet monthly and yearly revenue collection targets.





Consults and assists patients with financial constraints.



6
7. Establish new job functions to improve customer service and revenue collection.
8
9

Liaises with Social Services Department regarding approvals for patients medical procedures.




10. Ensures patients are made aware of outstanding balances and receive bills in a timely manner.

11. Evaluates staff and ensures that all business office employees adhere to their job descriptions

Deadline for application:
and any other duties assigned pertaining to their job function.

April 6, 2006





12. Assists in any other duties assigned by the Finance Officer to provide excellent customer
(internal and external) satisfaction and revenue enhancement.





13. Ensures that National Insurance Board and companies billings are forwarded for payments in
a timely manner.






Letters of application and curricula vita should be submitted to the Director of Human Resources,
Public Hospitals Authority, P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate Centre, Dockendale House, West
‘Bay Street or through your Head of Department.no later than 10th April, 2006: ~


THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS

Group’s



chief executive gets

prestigious award



THE Nassau-based Clipper
Group’s chief executive, Tor-
ben G. Jensen (shown above),
was awarded tthe prestigious
Commodore Of The Year
Award during the gala dinner
at the annual Connecticut Mar-
itime Association's Confer-
ence.

The immediate past Com-

Designed

modore was D. Sean Day,
chairman of Teekay Shipping,
another Nassau-headquartered

company. The award, present- -

ed to Mr Jensen on March 22,
is in recognition of an individ-
ual's contribution to the
growth and development of
the shipping industry.

The Clipper Group is head-



quartered.in Nassau, the
Bahamas and currently oper-
ates a fleet of over 250 vessels.
One hundred vessels are
owned, out of which 76 vessels
fly the Bahamian flag.

Clipper has another 45 new-
buildings under construction.
These vessels will also fly the
Bahamian flag.

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 3B





To advertise in The Tribune -
the #1 newspaper in circulation,




just call 322-1986 today!

Tons: | een Officer

Position available for Chief Financial Officer
to provide strategic direction and oversight of Finance, Accounting and
Information Technology for multiple retail locations.

Key Responsibilities include:

General Finance: Directs short and long-term profit plans and budgets for all
facilities and the preparation and interpretation of the company’s financial
operating results. Directs internal auditing and development and maintenance
of procedures for safeguarding assets including inventories and accounts
receivable. Develops capital expenditure, daily finance and accounting functions
for the company. Interprets operating results of the company and makes
recommendations to senior management on cost reduction, productivity
improvements or profit improvement opportunities in line with company’s
strategic objectives. Establishes procedures and systems necessary to provide
adequate financial controls assuring compliance with company policy related to
finance, accounting and information technology functions, as well as
compliance government. reporting standards. .

Business Planning & Reporting: Directs the composition, review, and editing
of annual business plans prepared and presented to Board of Directors.

. Coordinates the preparation of long range and short range strategic financial
performance plans for the company. Directs the devel opinent a maintenance,

consolidation of financial reporting.

Information Technology: Directs an information technology. strategy that



supports the long-term goals of the corporation. Plans, directs, and evaluates
the use of current and new technologies / business systems to streamline and
enhance business operations. - ;

Education: Bachelor’s degree in Finance, Accounting or Business Admin.

required, CPA preferred.
and auditing experience required including 3+ years Executive level leadership /
management experience of a medium sized finance team.

Experience: 10+ years of cost accounting, finance,

To apply for this position, please submit resumes to:
Chief Financial Officer - P.O. Box N 10496

Nassau, The Bahamas
OR EMAIL: cfobahamas@yahoo.com

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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006



ee ee ee:
Stocks tumble as Federal Reserve

suggests interest rate hikes on way

@ By SETH SUTEL
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks tum-
bled Tuesday, with the Dow Jones
industrials dropping 95 points after
the Federal Reserve disappointed
investors by suggesting that more
interest rate hikes were on the way.

The Fed raised the nation’s bench-
mark interest rate Tuesday as expect-
ed, but the surprise for the markets
came in an accompanying statement
in which the Fed upgraded its view
on the economy, suggesting that at
least one and possibly even two more
rate increases were in the cards.

That sent stock prices sharply low-
er, despite a strong reading on con-
sumer confidence earlier Tuesday that
had provided support to the market.

The Dow Jones industrial average
closed down 95.57, or 0.85 per cent, at
11,154.54.

Broader stock indicators also fell
sharply. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index fell 8.38, or 0.64 per cent, to

index skidded 11.12, or 0.48 per cent,
to 2,304.46.

Bond prices also slid in response
to the Fed’s announcement. The yield
on the 10-year Treasury note, which
rises when the price of the note falls,
jumped to 4.78 per cent from 4.71 per
cent late Monday.

The latest fed funds rate increase,
the 15th consecutive rise of a quarter
percentage point, leaves the rate at
4.75 per cent, its highest level since
April 2001.

The Fed said in its statement that
“some further policy firming may be
needed,” indicating that it was
inclined to keep raising rates in an
effort to contain inflationary pres-
sures.

The Fed’s two-day meeting was the
first led by new chairman Ben
Bernanke.

Craig Coats, co-head of fixed
income trading at the brokerage
Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, said
investors had hoped to see signs that
the Fed might have just one more

rate increase to go in its current cycle.

But with the Fed upgrading its assess-
ment of the economy’s strength Tues-
day, Coats said one and possibly two
additional more hikes were now like-
ly.

“This was a little bit more than
most people were looking for,” Coats
said. “The market is going to have to
price this in over the next couple of
weeks.”

Raising

The Fed has been raising rates
steadily since June 2004 under a pro-
gramme begun by Bernanke’s prede-
cessor, Alan Greenspan. Since that
time, the benchmark federal funds
rate, the interest that banks charge
each other for overnight loans, has
risen from a low of one per cent.

Now that a federal funds rate of
five per cent is a given with at least
one more rate increase likely,
investors are now wondering how
likely a further increase to 5.25 per
cent willbe.

“T truly believe that they would like

to stop at five per cent, but if we get a
really strong number (for economic
growth) in the first quarter it may be
hard to do that,” said Wachovia Corp.
senior economist Mark Vitner.

Oil futures rose following the threat
of a strike in Norway. Light sweet

crude for May delivery rose $1.91 to’

settle at $66.07 a barrel on the New

York Mercantile Exchange.

General Motors Corp. announced
another round of layoffs Tuesday, and
its shares fell 18 cents to $22.75. _

The move, affecting several hun-
dred salaried workers, follows last
week’s announcement of buyout
offers to more than 100, 000 hourly
workers.

Shares of eBay Inc. rose $1.72 or 4.6
per cent to $38.87 after the online
retailer received an upbeat report
from a Goldman Sachs analyst. The
shares had been down about 14 per
cent for the year prior to Tuesday’s
rally.

Level 3 Communications Inc.

‘jumped 71 cents or 15.9 per cent to

raised its estimated quarterly operat-
ing income target to a range of $140
million to $150 million from a prior
level of $105 million to $125 million.

Drug maker Eli Lilly & Co. fell
$2.29 or 3.9 per cent to $56.38 as two
analysts downgraded the company.
One said Lilly was under pressure
from sluggish growth at some ‘of its
major products; a poor late-stage
pipeline for new drugs and competi-
tion in drugs for diabetes and depres-

sion.

The Russell 2000 index of smaller
companies fell 2.76, or 0.37 percent,
to 751.27.

Declining issues outnumbered
advancing ones two to one on. the
New York Stock Exchange. Prelimi-
nary consolidated volume was .2.21
billion shares, up from 2.04 billion at
the same time Monday.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei stock
average rose 0.2 per cent. Britain’s
FTSE 100 fell 0.6 per cent, Germany’s
DAX index was down 0.4 per cent,
and France’s CAC-40 was down 0.2
per cent.

1,293.23 and the Nasdaq composite

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ESS a EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
aa*CA NEW GUINEA LIMITED
Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to : ud particulars thereof to the undersigned
c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st April,
A.D., 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 28th day of March, A.D., 2006.

K. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA NEW GUINEA
LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 27th day of
March, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. Floyd, of 16945 Northchase Dr.,
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 28th day of March, 2006.

HARRY B. SANDS
LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company





Bisi

Pricing Information As Of:

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Kerzner International BDRs
3 Premier Real Estate

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

13. ‘00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Holdings

1.278569*
2.6662 ***
10.8590*****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond
Bois gee TES 72

2.6662
10.8590
2.3312








x ALL ‘SHARE INDE. x-
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

**- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/ **** - AS AT FEB. 28, 2006

S AT MA: 10. 2006/
GEMS






Colina

Financial Advisors Lid.



Legal Notice

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA (JUHA/P’NYANG) LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned
c/o P.O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 21st April,
A.D., 2006. In default thereof they will be excluded from the

benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 28th day of March, A.D., 2006.

K. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northchase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138(4) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the dissolution
of ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the-Company has therefore
been struck off the Registrar. The date of coupes of the dissolution
was March 20, 2006.

For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

Sailtbaainy



Change Daily Vo!l. EPS$ Div $

Last Price Weekly Vol EPS $

oe
Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %







Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



$5.18 after the network operator






PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL.

-The Public is hereby advised that |, STEPHANIE SAINTIL,
of Joe Farrington Road in the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence, intend to change my name to
_ STEPHANIE DELVA. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.

A DEVELOPER

seeks to employ an.

Owner Representative

for projects in Nassau and the Islands.












Applicants must have a background in construction or
Architecture and possess people skills.



Reply to chara@coralwave.com

LEGAL NOTICE —

NOTICE

ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
PAPUA NEW GUINEA (JUHA/P’NYANG) LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION PAPUA NEW GUINEA
(JUHA/P’NYANG) LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 27th day of’
March, 2006 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and... :
registered by the Registrar General. \

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. Floyd: of 16945 Northehatp Dr.
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A. -

Dated the 28th day of March, 2006.

HARRY B. SANDS .
LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD. |.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

itll |

Ofeoniure

is having a

Se AE SL

EVERYTHING MUST GO
Getting ready for new stock!

up to 20% Off Storewide

50% Cloth recliners, leather & cloth
ottomans, metal & wood bar stools,
bamboo & ficus plants

NOW IN STOCK

Harp shape Mahogany desk
Armoir
Victorian style dressers
Italian leather sofas
Leather sleigh bed
French grape 4 postal bed set

Manhattan Concave Entertainment Centre
ED Nase see eS eee Yc ae)

Store Hours: 9am - 5:30pm
located: Maderia Plaza, Palmdale across from Lorene’s parking lot
Call us at: (242) 328-8056 or (242) 328-8057


WHE | RIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 5!:







Burger King adds
more investment
anks to underwrite
initial public offering



WASHINGTON (Dow

Jones/AP) — Burger King
Holdings Inc. has added more
investment banks to under-
write its initial public offer-
ing.
The Miami-based burger
chain, the second largest in
the world after McDonald’s
Corp., also plans a manage-
ment “realignment” in its
-overseas.operations, it said in
a regulatory filing Tuesday.

Burger King... added
Wachovia Corp., Bear Stearns



Cos. and Lehman Brothers
Holdings Inc. to its list of IPO
underwriters. Already
involved in managing the IPO
are JP Morgan Chase & Co.,
Citigroup Inc., Goldman
Sachs Group Inc. and Mor-
gan Stanley. In an updated
preliminary prospectus filed
with the Securities and
Exchange Commission Tues-
day, the company said that its
board has authorized the

. realignment of the regional

management of its European

BHRA: Consumer |
Protection 5
‘long over



BUSINESS

Removal of Abaco Barge
is Imminent

Liberty Oil would like to provide current information to the #
f residents of Abaco as to the ongoing removal process of the barge ||
Rin stranded off their coast. ne






| History



Louis Goulet is an unpowered barge not a tanker or an oil |
| barge and it is used to support drilling. It has no oil products on
| board and was at anchor near Walkers Cay at the time hurricane
| Wilma struck. So
a At the time we became aware of a possible that a direct hit by |
©, Hurricane Wilma, Liberty Oil was refused request for sanctuary at [7
#2 South Ridding Point, Freeport, and US ports for the Louis Goulet.
2 When the barge broke loose the company’s tugboat was also
— pulled off her anchor. Liberty Oil tried to hire a local tug to assist us |
f+ before the barge was grounded but no assistance could be employed ||
| at any cost. Immediately after the grounding our crew got on board }
f to access the damage and have been working on board ever since.






and Asian business.

The realignment, which
includes the granting of fran-
chises in new European and
Asian entities, is expected to
have a positive impact on
Burger King’s future effective
tax rate; the company expects
to incur approximately $125
to $150 million in cash tax
payments and related costs in
the first quarter of fiscal 2007,
as a result. The chain hopes to
raise up to $400 million in the
IPO.




i Current Stranded Barge Information —



Reason why the barge has not yet been removed.



1. The barge is located over 100 ft. outside of the main reef near
Man-O-War Cay and is constantly subject to large waves which #@
often come over the bow and up on the deck which makes boarding §

or loading of equipment dangerous or impossible except in near 7
flat weather. -







2. The barge is 110 ft. tall and is an open cargo type with 1 million
gallons of seawater inside, due to several breaches in the bottom
of the hull. The breaches were not easily visible from outside and
inside the visibility is nearly zero. After many dives outside and
as many dives inside the cargo hold, the breaches were finally
located. The patching and repairing is now mostly completed.
There’s however a large hole in the bow which is very visible but
it separated and has now been sealed.








,@;
I 7
Sao we

FROM page 1B ©

consumer protection as if pur-
chased in Florida, and by co-
operation with the Florida reg-
ulatory authorities, Bahamians





9



3. Because of its tender stability, several stability studies were eS
_ required to determine the best way to remove the barge safely. &




4. With 1 million gallons of seawater in 1 compartments the proper : :
method of pumping the water off the barge would have to be
followed precisely.





could get remedies in Florida.

“Why should guarantees and

consumer protection lapse just
becauseonthey-~come-tovthenw
: Bahamas? We are an impors .:) Bae
tant trading partner of Flori-



ao

and shipped them to Marsh Harbour. We hired Abacay’s Crib #
o£ reight Company to delivery these 3000 pound pumps to the barge |






5. We purchased three additional 6 inch diesel pumps in Miami eS




where our crane could pick them up. It was Abacay’s captain’s |
call but it took 42 days of unsuitable weather before the captain |



Ez Ge

The “Majestad.1” has an open deck Defender Hull of fiberglasS |
construction with a 2nd deck affixed to accommodate passengers,
which also houses the pilot arrangements. Hull is in excellent
condition and all equipment onboard is in good working-condition.

Principal Dimensions

Length Overall:
Breadth:
Engine:

61.0 feet
18.0 feet
(2) Detroit Diesel 12V71 recently rebuilt

Vessel has five compartments w/ five bilge pumps equipped
with 1 inch discharge hoses and a capacity 2,000gpn.

PHONE 363-7163
SERIOUS ENQUIRIES ONLY!







da."

The statement also said that
government services should
also be regulated under the
Bill. "The bill should include
services provided by govern-
ment corporations so that the
public does not remain at the °
mercy of inefficiency and
incompetence paid for at top
dollar by a public that does not
have any alternative because
of government monopolies."

INSIGHT
Pee mle
Bete m aur

Bre ete) 1 3
Te Ne

felt the weather was safe enough to load the 3 pumps on the deck
of the barge. :








6. After loading the pumps, each had to be placed in the correct
location in the cargo compartments to comply the stability studies
and pumping plans.





7. The reason that this process has been slow are many, but the -
overriding reason is that if the barge is not pumped in a precise
sequence and in the most favorable weather, 1.to 3 feet or less
waves, westerly or south westerly winds and on a falling tide, the
barge could be overturned and salvage at the point would be
almost impossible. Liberty Oil subsequently has contracted for a
tugboat, which has been dispatched to Marsh Harbour and is
requested to arrive Thursday, March 30th.







President: Kermitt Waters
Liberty Oil Refining & Association
March 27th, 2006



Are you looking for a new challenge?
We are currently seeking qualified Managers and Seniors as well as Entry Level candidates to join our Audit practice.

Manager and Senior

“ Successful candidates: for the Manager position will have a minimum of six years professional public accounting |
experience, two of which will have been at a supervisory level. Candidates for the Senior position will have approximately
two to four years of work experience in a public accounting firm. The Manager and Senior positions will require the |

; individua} to ,hold a CPA, CA.or other professional designation recognized by the Bahamas Institute of. Chartered
Accountants. ‘:< BOD : ;

Entry Level ai



~ Candidates miist have 6 éd the necessary educational requirements qualifying them to write the CPA examinations or

{.., have already done so. ."..’
” KPMG’s entry’ level program provides financial support to write the CPA examinations including travel costs, hotel
accommodations, paid study leave and the costs of revision courses such as the Becker Review.

Excellent opportunities exist in"our Nassau and Freeport offices to broaden your professional experience in a varied practice
that offers competitive compensation and benefits packages.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their professional certification and a copy of their transcripts if applying for an entry level position,
to: KPMG, Human.Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or tdavies@kpmg.com.bs.

AUDIT « TAX «© ADVISORY

© 2006. KPMG, a Bahamian partnership, the Bahamian member firm of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.




CPA/Chartered Accountant
Opportunity




Templeton Capital Advisors is seeking to recruit.a
CPA or Chartered Accountant to assist in accounting
and reporting responsibilities for its hedge fund
business. Responsibilities will include maintenance
of the general ledgers and reporting functions for the
firm as well as review, approval and reporting of net
asset values for the funds and their investors. The
candidate will be responsible for carrying out an array
of daily, weekly, and monthly control and risk
management functions. In addition, an important
aspect of the job will be managing and preparing
client communications, including. firm newsletters.















The successful candidate must be a enged CPA or
Chartered Accountant with at least ten years of
experience, not less than seven being with a major |
public accounting firm. A heavy emphasis in the
investment and financial services industries is
absolutely required and direct experiefice in the hedge
fund business would be preferred. The job
responsibilities require that the candidate be capable
of designing, maintaining and monitoring reporting
and control systems of the highest standard expected
in a global investment business. Applicants will be
required to demonstrate a thorough understanding of
the global investment industry. and investment
instruments as well as prime broker functions,
including the global clearance and settlements process.
The candidate will be required to regularly
communicate with sophisticated fund investors and
author a number of different forms of client
communications to report on the funds’ performance
and other financial matters, and accordingly, written
communication skills and expenencg) will be important
and carefully considered.

























Please send written expressions of interest, resumes
and relevant background materials to the CFO at
Templeton Captial Advisors Ltd., PQ. Box N-7759,
Nassau, Bahamas or fax “to” “242- 302-3661.




PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that I, BRIAN LUBIN ELISMA,
of #57 Brougham Street, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to BRIAN ELISMA . ‘If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later iar zeny (30) days

Ones

NOTICE is hereby given that FRENDY. BOYER OF |

BROUGHAM STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nations ty. and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citiz ‘of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reasof:why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of MARCH,.:2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Chtzensti PO. Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas. |



CREDIT SUISSE

Qualifications:

of an offshore. barik

PC Literacy (Mi
Experience in t

Fluent English and Portuguese
Proven track record:

Duties:
The candidate will be expected to:

Personal Qualities:

- A commitment to service excellence

Benefits provided include:
- Health and Life ieprance













Strong management and leadership skills

Well versed in-Swiss/ Brazilian banking practices and standards

‘In-depth knowledge of international Money Market/Forex Exchange Trading/T teasteaemetaing
Markets/Derivatives/Securities Operations/Execution, etc.

Nord, Access, Excel)

ading platforms like TradeWeb, eSpeed, Bloomberg Bond Trader.

Knowledge: ‘Om tisk Management and portfolio management.

PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006

THE TRIBUNE

Dollar rises

against most
major currencies

By J W ELPHINSTONE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar rose against most major

Federal Reserve hiked interest
rates for the 15th consecutive
time and hinted at further
credit tightening.



Gold, silver slip

NEW YORK (Dow Jones/AP) — Precious metals
slipped in quiet trade Tuesday at the New York Mer-
cantile Exchange, as the Federal Reserve decided, as
widely expected, to raise interest rates by a quarter point.

Most-active April gold settled 40 cents lower at $567 an
ounce. Spot gold fell 40 cents to $566.60 an ounce.

Traders said market players were mostly sidelined
awaiting news about the Fed’s decision on interest rates
that was released at 2:15 p.m. EST.

The Federal Open Market Committee, as expected,
voted unanimously to raise its Federal funds target by 25
basis points to 4.75 per cent, its highest level since April
2001. It raised the largely symbolic discount rate by 25
basis points to 5.75 per cent.

Silver had a similar showing to gold on the day as the
benchmark May contract settled lower at $10. 87 an ounce,
down 2.5 cents.



Consolidating

The contract was consolidating after reaching fresh
19-year highs on Monday. Early on Tuesday, May popped
back up to a recent high of $10.94 an ounce but was
unable to sustain that level.

April platinum ended up $5.80 at $1, 074.30'an ounce
while June palladium settled the day down 55-cents at
$342.25 an ounce.

The most active May copper contract settled down
0.15 cent at $2.4285 per pound.

May light crude oil settled up $1.91 at $66.07 a barrel.

April heating oil settled up 4.66 cents at $1.8277 a gal-
lon.

April gasoline settled up 5.57 cents at $1.8845 a gallon:

April natural gas rose 14.7 cents to settle at $7.214 a mil-
lion British thermal units.

‘-On the New York Board of Trade, May Arabica coffee
closed 0.40 cent lower at $1.0555 a pound.

The most-active May cocoa contract settled down $2 at
$1,482 per metric ton.

The May contract of raw sugar in foreign ports set-
tled up 0.69 cent at 18.17 cents a pound.

On the Chicago Board of Trade, May corn settled 0.5
cent higher at $2.2225 per bushel. May soybeans settled
up 2 cents at $5.8150 a bushel. May wheat gained 1.5
cent to $3.4125 per bushel.

Credit Suisse Wealth Management
Limited |

is presently considering applications for a

HEAD TRADER

Credit Suisse Private Bankifig is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards that go
. beyond traditional banking services; Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele with comprehensive
solutions in individual investment-counseling and professional portfolio management. -Our total commitment is always
to our clients and we:focus without compromise on their financial well-being and their personal values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

- Minimum of 10 years well rounded banking experience in treasury/execution and related departments

- ‘Develop, recommend and ensure the implementation of the bank’s trading operation strategy
- ‘ Monitor/evaluate the bank's position and oversee existing and prospective trading activities

- Provide advice and guidance to dealers and traders engaged in treasury activities

- Provide sales support to relationship managers

- Excellent organizational and communication skills

- Ability to work undér pressure and with minimum supervision

- Competitive salary and performance bonus

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.

Applications should be submitted by fax to: (242) 302-6398
Or by mail to: Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4801
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS APRIL 7, 2006

currencies Tuesday after the:

The euro bought $1.2009 in
afternoon New York trading,
down from $1.2012 in New
York late on Monday. The
British pound slipped to
$1.7434 from $1.7463.

The dollar rose against the
Japanese currency, climbing
to 117.91 yen from 116.69 on
Monday.

Under new chairman Ben
Bernanke, the central bank
raised short-term interest rates
by a quarter percentage point
to 4.75 per cent as the markets
widely had expected. The
Fed’s statement on the meet-
ing left open the possibility of
further rate increases.

“The statement gave no par-
ticular indication that the Fed
is close to being done with
raising rates,” said Dan
Katzive, a currency strategist
at UBS AG.

“The dollar is firming, and
the markets are discounting a
little bit more Fed tightening.”

push up a nation’s currency by
boosting returns from locally
denominated investments,
making them more attractive.

Exchange

Bob Sinche, head of global
foreign exchange strategy at
Bank of America,. said the
markets are now anticipating
another quarter-point hike at
the Fed’s next meeting in May
with an increased possibility
of further hikes beyond that. «

“But we think the markets
may be getting ahead of them-
selves,” he said.

The dollar’s afternoon per-
formance erases gains the euro
made earlier in the day on
news that business confidence
rose to new highs in Germany
and Italy.

In other trading, the dollar
bought 1.3082 Swiss francs,
down from 1.3085 late Mon-
day, and 1.1699 Canadian dol-
lars, up from 1.1684.

Higher interest rates tend to

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MONICA IOTA BROWN DEAN
OF HAVEN STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29TH day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LAFRANCE BANES OF FAITH
AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29TH day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N- 7147, .
‘Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NAOMI ANESTA PANTRY OF
PINE BARON ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 22ND day of MARCH, 2006 to the Minister

‘ responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- ie Hy,
Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, CLIFTON WELLS, of
#6 Weddell Avenue, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to CLIFTON SIMMS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,:PR.O.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.





PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ELIPHENE SANON, of Fox Hill in
the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and ROSANA NOEL of Yamacraw
Beach Estates also in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
aforesaid, parents of FENANEN NOEL, a minor, intend to change her
name to FENANEN SANON. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHENICKA CATURA WILLIAMS OF
#21B CORN WALLS, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of MARCH,
2006 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box F-41085, Grand Bahama, Bahamas.




THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2006, PAGE 7B



Baha Mar executives
‘monitoring’ resort

FROM page 1B

plan for South Ocean, apart
from the 1,000-room hotel; also
includes 1,000 residential units,
an expanded marina featuring
at least 60 slips, a marina vil-
lage with retail stores and
restaurants, and a Greg Nor-
man championship golf course.

The company, which fought
off five rival bids for South
Ocean, has worked on real
estate developments in New
York, Florida and New Eng-
land. Among its latest works

is the recently-completed, The
Metropolitan, a luxury resi-
dential tower in Manhattan.
The Stillman Organisation
‘is also the developer for the
Trump International Hotel and
Tower in Fort Lauderdale,
which will carry the resort
brand of international business
mogul, Donald Trump.

South Ocean’s golf course .

would prove a major attrac-
tion for sports tourists, in con-
junction with the One and
Only Ocean Club’s Tom
Weiskopf course; Baha Mar’s

planned Jack Nicklaus golf
course at Cable Beach and the
proposed course for the $1.4
billion Albany Project, whose
major investors include golf-
ing greats Tiger Woods and
Ernie Els. Although the Still-
man Organisation has to apply
to the government for approval
of its plans for South Ocean,
including the heads of agree-
ment, the sales agreement with
CCWIPP is likely to pave the
way for approving other invest-
ment projects in south-west-
ern New Providence.



SCHEDULE

F THE PRIME



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
_ NEW PROVIDENCE |
PROPOSED AIRSTRIP EXTENSION, MOORES ISLAND, ABACO



DECLARATION OF VESTING ‘A = 119.006 ACRES
GIVEN UNDER st
THE ACQUISITION OF LAND ACT : oe aii THOSE certain lots pieces or parcels of land together containing by admeasurement ONE
(Chapter 233) . “HUNDRED AND NINETEEN ACRES AND SIX THOUSANDTHS OF AN ACRE or

) oithereabouts being the Lots.on a plan on record in the Department of Lands and Surveys as-Plan

pery

numbered MP. 5028/XII of Abaco situate between the Settlements of Hard Bargain and The

\

WHEREAS as notified by Amended Notice of Possession dated the 8t ee ; ;
Bight in the Island of Moores Island, Abaco in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

D. ished in the Extraordinary Official Gazette oo
Sey GL FeO AN merce anapu erent a * y ii 2 ‘ ABUTTING AND BOUNDING towards the NORTH partly on a portion of an original Crown

dated the 14m day of February A.D., 2006 the land and hereditaments described Grant to Richardson and John Saunders (B-97) now claimed by Ethel Davis, William D.

in the Schedule hereto have been duly appropriated under the Acquisition of |i": Edwards and the McBride Family partly on a portion of. an original Crown Grant to Henry

Land Act for the public purpose, namely, for use as an airstrip and associated Johnson (B-98) and since commuted to John Williams (C2-116) and (C2-117) now claimed by

Veronica Williams and partly on Crown Lands (Black Wood Pond) towards the EAST partly on -

facilities at Moore’s Island, Abaco.
‘ Crown Lands ( Black Wood Pond) and partly on a portion of an eneinal Crown.Grant to Henry

Johnson (B-98) and since commuted to John Williams (Ge 116) and or 2 now claimed by

ce of Sections 18 and 36 of the aac Act, :
NOW THEREFORE in pursuan ; Meronica Williams towards the SOUTH partly ona portion oe: an: ‘original-Crown Grant to ao

do hereby declare that the land and hereditaments described in 1 the Schedule Tohnsen (B-98) an veisince-caimminted io: Tenn Willians (C2-11 6) and (C2-117) now Pisiewe d by

hereto have been vested in the Treasurer for the Commonwealth of The Veronica Williams and partly on a portion of an original Crown Grant to Richardson and John

Bahamas in Trust for Her Majesty in right of Her Government of the Saunders (B-97) now claimed by the McBride Family, William D. Edwards and Ethel Davis and

:. Commonwealth of The Bahanias for public purpose. towards the WEST on a portion of an original Crown Grant to Richardson and John Saunders
(B-97) now claimed by Ethel Davis or however else the same may abut and bound which said

lots pieces or parcels of land are more.particularly delineated and shown coloured pink on the

Dated the 23'¢ Day of March A.D., 2006

plan attached.

S.G

Perry G. Christie
_ Minister Responsible for
Acquisition and Disposition of Lands

08/03/05

























Schedule (Annexed)
vee sie CUMMUNWEAI IH Ut. !HE BAHAMAS ; :
i MOORES ISLAND
MP. 5028 XM LOCALNY-====-==e =
CORRESPONDENCE MP-5028 cath DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND SURVEYS
- GH
FIELD BOOK--"~ ----------~-
as
: A « *o
. Ik
/ td _ a a
OTHER PORTION OF GRANT 8-97 - sas
/ (NOW CLAIMED @Y WILLIAMS 0. "EDMARDS) Se 5 te
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- The Tribune’s Kelly's ——
MP EASIER

SA WY Coloring Contest |

- SECOND PRIZE ‘THIRD PRIZE -
- GIFT BASKET vate $100 © GIFT BASKET value $75
a A ate Age Group | , In Each Age Group ©

















GIFT BASKET vatue $125 _
5 In Each Age Group

- FIRST PRIZE — |





CONTEST RULES

1. Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members arid relatives are not eligible to enter. .
2. Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY
3, Enter as much times as you wish. Alll entries must be in The Tribune by 4pm on Monday, April 10, 2006. Winners will be announced Wednesday,
April 12, 2006. Look for your names in The Tribune or listen to 1OOJAMZ / JOY FM or COOL FM to-hear your name. oe

4. There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age groups. OT ee ee

5. All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

“NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY”



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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, IVARCH 29, 2006



TRIBUNE SPORTS





Claridge Primary take







@ CLARIDGE Primary’s William Ferguson in action yes-
terday. His school’s boys and girls teams both won their respec-
tive titles. . .
Ferguson, who scored all four of the schools’ points in the
overtime victory, said he came into the game hoping to get his
teammates involved, but had to change the plans when he saw

so many missed baskets.
e SEE SPORTS FRONT

(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)







@ TENNIS
KEY BISCAYNE, Fla.
Associated Press

ANDY RODDICK walked
off a winner Tuesday, even
though instant replay kept him
on the court longer than he
wanted.

Roddick was nursing a slim
lead in the third set when video
reviews cost him back-to-back
points, but he shook off the
overrules without complaint and
beat qualifier Simon Greul 6-3,
3-6, 6-2 to reach the quarterfi-
nals of the Nasdaq-100 Open.

Seeded fourth, Roddick need-
ed four match points to finish
off the dangerous Greul, who
came into the tournament with
one career victory on the ATP
Tour and beat three consecu-
tive top-60 players.

Roddick, the 2004 Key Bis-
cayne champion, is trying to
shake a slump and win his first
title of the year.

Also reaching the final were
big-serving Croats Ivan Ljubi-
cic and Mario Ancic. The sixth-
seeded Ljubicic hit 13 aces and
beat Christophe Rochus 6-3, 6-
1 in 55 minutes. Ancic, seeded
22nd, had nine aces and defeat-
ed No. 5 Nikolay Davydenko 7-
5, 6-4.

Ancic lost to Ljubicic in the

fourth round at Indian Wells’

this month. They could meet in
the semifinals Friday.
Ljubicic will next play
unseeded Agustin Calleri, who
eliminated No. 16 Nicolas
Kiefer 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. j

SSS
CO
CCK



thriller




& ANDY RODDICK of the USA returns the ball to Simon Greul
of Germany at the Nasdaq- 100 Open tennis tournament in Key
Biscayne, Fla. Tuesday, March 28, 2006.

No. 12 Svetlana Kuznetsova
became the first women’s semi-
finalist by beating No. 21 Ai
Sugiyama 6-0, 7-6 (4).
Kuznetsova, one of four Rus-
sians in the women’s final eight,
had 35 winners to five for
Sugiyama.

Ljubicic hit 34 winners to
eight for Rochus and earned his
23rd victory this year, second
only to Roger Federer’s 24.

Ljubicic ranks second this

(AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

year to Ivo Karlovic on the ATP
Tour in aces, and he has 36 in
his first three matches at Key
Biscayne, secorid to Ancic’s 38.
Ljubicic also reached the Key
Biscayne quarterfinals in 2001..

Ancic, who turns 22 Thurs-
day, earned his first quarterfinal
berth in a Masters Series event
and improved his record this
year to 18-7. Davydenko had
won their two previous meet-
ings on the tour.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

WE, VIOLA, MARC Lad







Ljubicic picks
himself in
Croatia's Davis
Cup quarterfinal
against Argentina

lm TENNIS
LONDON

’ Associated Press

IVAN LJUBICIC
picked himself to lead
defending champion
Croatia against Argentina
in the quarterfinals of the
Davis Cup.

- Andy Roddick, Lleyton
Hewitt and David Nalban-
dian will also be playing
when the competition
resumes April 7-9, the
International Tennis Fed-
eration announced Tues-
day.

The world's top two
players, Roger Federer
and Rafael Nadal, will
‘have that weekend off,
however. Neither Switzer-
land nor Spain qualified
for the Davis Cup quarter-
finals. Australia beat
Switzerland and Belarus
beat Spain in the first
round last month.

‘Ljubicic, who is both a
player and captain, also ©
picked Mario Ancic, Sasa
Tuksar and Marin Cilic
for Croatia's tie against
Argentina on indoor car-
pet in Zagreb.

In the other quarterfi- ©
nals, Australia hosts
Belarus, France welcomes
Russia and the United
States hosts Chile.

Ljubicic, who took over
as captain after Croatia
beat Slovakia in the final
last December; said he
would step down as cap-
tain after his team plays
_ Argentina because of a
conflict of interest.

““The federation recent-
ly: approached me to work
out salaries and rewards
forthe players," Ljubicic
said. "This is an obvious
clash of interests. If I
knew this was.waiting for
me; I would never. have
taken on the job." %...

Nalbandian, Tua Tgna-
cio-Chela, Jose Acasuso
and Agustin Calleri will
play for Argentina.

France, which will play
at‘Pau on indoor carpet,
nofninated Richard Gas-
quet, Arnaud Clement,
Michael Llodra and’
Sebastien Grosjean — the
same team that beat Ger-
many 3-2 in the first
round.

Russia has countered
with Marat Safin, Nikolay
Davydenko, Mikhail
Youzhny and Dmitry Tur-
sunov — leaving off Igor —
Andreev, who helped the
Russians beat the French
in the quarterfinals last
year.

Andréev was Russia’ s
second-highest ranked
player but the team was
gambling on Safin, coming
back from knee injury,
and. his 20-7 record
indoors in the Davis Cup.

The United States will
be led by fourth-ranked
Roddick when it faces

Chile on grass in Rancho |

Mirage, California.

James Blake, Mike
Bryan and Bob Bryan will
also represent the Ameri-
cans, While Fernando
Gonzalez, Nicolas Massu,
Pau] Capdeville and Adri-
an Garcia play for Chile.

Hewitt will be Australi-
a's No. 1 player on the
hardcourt in Melbourne.
He will be joined by Chris
Guccione, Wayne Arthurs
and Paul Hanley against
Belarus' Max Mirnyi,
Vladimir Voltchkov, Ser-
guei Tarasevitch and
Alexandr Zotov.

Share
your
news

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Â¥ you are raising funds for a
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area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986 __

and share your story.



@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports Reporter

THE Bahamas Basketball
Federation tipped off its nation-
al developmental programme
for juniors and seniors on Sat-
urday past at the DW Davis
gym.

The purpose of the pro-
gramme is to identify the top
athletes and bring them togeth-

er so they can work on their -

weaknesses and develop their
skills.

- However, vice president of
the BBF Larry Wilson said the
implementation of the pro-
gramme does not mean that the
athletes who join the pro-
gramme will automatically have
a place on the national team —
athletes who are interested will

SPORTS

Opportunity for
juniors and seniors



national teams. —

_ Wilson said: “This develop-
mental programme is to assist
the BBF with identifying the top
athletes so they can continuous-
ly work on their weaknesses.

“Some of the countries best.

coaches are involved in this pro-
gramme. Their role is to assist
the player with either boxing
out, ball handling, closing out
on defence, whatever the coach-
es believe will improve the ath-
letes’ game will be done.”

The senior women’s session
starts at 8am with the junior girls
ROTC wine ‘at 10am. Both the

next leg,"



still have to try-out for the BBF

rsenal win home
to close in on

eTTine meres

H# SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press



ARSENAL moved halfway toward its first appearance in
the Champions League semifinals with a 2-0 victory over Ital-
ian league leader Juventus on Tuesday and showed Patrick
Vieira it doesn't miss him at all.

Goals by Cesc Fabregas and Thierry Henry gave the Gun-
ners a quarterfinals first-leg lead which they defend next
week in Turin. Arsene Wenger's team of youngsters gave the
Old Lady of Italian soccer the run around at Highbury and
could have won by more.

"The only regret is that I feel there was one more goal in
this game for us," said Wenger, whose team was denied twice
by top. quality second-half saves by Juventus goalkeeper
Gianluigi Buffon.

"It was a great night for Arsenal because we wanted to play
well defensively and score goals, and we managed to.do both.
"IT am very happy with the performance of the team — the

fluency, the speed and the technical aspects.

“It shows that the team is getting better and better," said
Wenger who saw Fabregas outwit Vieira in midfield as his
team's slick passing repeatedly carved through the Juventus |
midfield and defense.

"There is still a difficult job to do in Turin," Wenger said.
"We are only halfway there and we want to finish the job.
next week, Juventus is at home and they will try and come at
us but we will want to play well and score goals."

Juventus finished the game with nine men after the late
ejections of Mauro Camoranesi and Jonathan Zebina, each
for second yellow cards.

-"We have to be confident that we can do better in the sec-
ond leg and we must do a big game in Turin," said Juventus
coach Fabio Capello, who won the trophy with AC Milan.
"You never know what will happen, especially in football.
We had some chances but, when we lost players at the end,
there was no way we could come back."

Form

Former Arsenal captain Vieira was among four Juventus °
players shown a yellow card as the visitor was unable to
recreate the form that has given it an eight-point lead in Serie
A. Camoranesi, Zebina and Vieira will sit out next week's
second leg because of suspension.

Vieira, who helped Arsenal win three Premier League and
four FA Cup titles before transferring to Juventus in July,
was given a warm welcome by Arsenal fans, who chanted his
name before kickoff despite his appearance in the black and
white stripes of Juventus.

"Patrick Vieira is a good player but he suffered tonight
because we are a good team," Wenger said. "We didn't give
him a chance to celebrate (his return to Highbury) tonight."

The home side went ahead when Robert Pires won the ball
from Vieira inside the Arsenal half and left his former team-
mate lying on the Highbury turf.

He found Henry with a pass and the striker fed the ball just
inside the area to Fabregas, who jinked right and shot
between Lilian Thuram's legs with a low, right-foot effort
that went in from 16 meters. ;

Kolo Toure rescued Arsenal when Juventus threatened
early in the second half, taking the ball off the foot.of Zlatan
Ibrahimovic when the lanky Sweden striker was about to
shoot.

Buffon then made his contributions — thwarting shots from
Henry and Fabregas after Jose Antonio Reyes twice had
opened up the visitor's defense. He also smothered a left-foot
shot from Alexander Hleb before Arsenal went 2-0 ahead.

Henry passed to Hleb on the right and the Belarus mid-
fielder found Fabregas breaking into the area. The Spanish
teenager only had Buffon to beat but pulled the ball square
to Henry, who controlled it before shooting.

Two minutes later, Vieira was shown the yellow card when
he hauled down Reyes in midfield.

Camoranesi gave the Gunners a late fright with a chip from
just outside the area which flew past the post with g goalkcener
Jens Lehmann well off his line.

But the Italy midfielder was sent off four minutes se the
end after a foul on Robin van Persie and he was followed two
minutes later by Zebina, who caught Henry's leg with his
right foot near th> corner flag.

Still, Wenger was cautious when looking forward to the
April 5 return match despite the Italian club's problems with
suspensions and form.

"They missed (Alessandro) Del Piero and (Pavel) Nedved,
who are great offensive players and can come Dag for the
Wenger said.

junior and senior men’s work-
outs are scheduled for 12 noon.

Top coaches in the country
have been selected to assist with
this programme and coaches

who are interested in assisting

the BBF in reaching their goals
are invited.

Wilson did confirm that the
coaches selected to head the
programme will be needing help
with their work-out sessions and
are looking forward to coaches
such as Kevin Johnson, Patricia
Johnson, Ken Lightbourne and
others to join.

He said: “When the pro-

gramme really gets off the -

ground, the coaches selected will
need help in order for it to be
successful.

“We can’t expect these coach-
es to be out there every Satur-
day because some of these
coaches will need to work with
the national programmes, so we
are really hoping that some of
the coaches come out and assist.

“We realise that we will have
to break-up in a number of ses-
sions so we can excel, but this
will come as long as we get the
assistance of the coaches. The
programme will be successful as
long as everyone is on the same
page.”

The senior women’s pro-
gramme is headed by Dr Linda
Davis. Junior women will also
be under her with a sub-group
of coaches headed by Felix Mus-
grove and Anthony Swaby.








Mario Bowleg will lead the
junior men while Charles Mack-
ey takes charge of the senior
men.

The national developmental
programme has also kicked-off
in Freeport under the watchful
eyes of Norris Bain and Ivan
Butler for men and Kelly
Albury for women.

However this is not the case
for Family Island associations.:
The BBF intends to move the
programmes into the other
islands but Wilson revealed
that they will not take place this
year.

The BBF is hoping that the
coaches and players will be able
to contact the local association

‘or the federations so arrange-

ments can be made.

The national developmental
practice will continue on this
weekend at the DW Davis gym.



@ JUVENTUS' former Arsenal ave Patrick Vieira, left, of France, battles for the ball with Arse-
nal's Francesc Fabregas during their Champions League quarterfinal soccer match at ‘Highbury sta-

dium i in morn London, Ruse, March 28, 2006. Arsenal won 2-0.

(AP Photo/Tom Hevesi



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MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



Boys and
girls teams
claim titles



@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Junior Sports
Reporter’

WITH a 14-point perfor-
mance, Brittany Deveaux
led Claridge Primary
School to one of two cham-
pionships titles yesterday.

Deveaux’s hot hands
awarded the girls the New
Providence Primary School
Sporting Association
(NPPSSA) basketball title
by beating Garvin Tynes
Primary girls 17-0 and their
boys were able to get past
the Stephen Dillet School
in overtime, 20-18.

Deveaux, the most valu-
able player in the league,
carried the team on her
shoulders and delivered the
shots when needed.

On the defensive end,
the man-to-man stand
being applied was. forcing
Garvin Tynes to turnover
the ball at the half court
line.

Confidence

After going through the
first half without being
able to produce a score,
Claridge: Primary’s confi-
dence was starting to build
and, by the sound of the
whistle, the team grew hun-
grier.

According to their head
coach Nikkita Taylor,
Deveaux is capable of lead-
ing the team and she will
score and get everyone
involved.

Taylor said: “It is always
a pleasure to win a cham-
pionship title. The girls
have won everything
they’ve played so far. They
-came out and showed that
they are capable of winning
the basketball tournament
as well.

“For the boys it feels
great to win over a team
that gave us our first loss
in the tournament.

“T always knew we could.
do it. All my boys needed
to do was come out and
play hard and they did. At
some point in the game
they were starting to make
some silly fouls and it was
costing them.

Overtime

“Going into overtime I
told the guys to play hard
on defence and stop num-
ber eight from going to the
basket and play clean
defence and we will be
alright.”

For William Ferguson,
the win by their girls was
the driving force behind
the boys’ victory.

Ferguson, who scored all
four of the schools’ points
in the overtime victory,
said he came into the game
hoping to get his team-
mates involved, but had to

8

@ CLARIDGE Primary’s Prince Bootle pushes the
ball up court as the defence of Stephen Dillet tries to

keep up yesterday.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

sme
es
R

change the plans when he
saw so many missed bas-
kets. Dominating the
boards for the school was
Prince Bootle.

He said: “I wanted to
come out and play hard,
trying to pass the ball to
my teammates so they
could score, I wanted them
to take the shot.

“After they didn’t score I
got the rebound and I laid
it back up and. it fell. Being



able to score all the points
in overtime feels great.

Strong

“It wasn’t hard and I
tried to do my best know-
ing that we were in over-
time. I tried to put the ball
back up strong, trying to
score.”

Losing to Claridge Pri-
mary didn’t bother head

coach Frank Johnson, espe-
cially after both squads
went into the finals with
the same win-loss record,
4-1.

In the regular play,
Stephen Dillet was able to
get the better part of Clar-
idge Primary.

But after taking the long
route to the champi-
onships, Claridge got
revenge.

Johnson said: “I am hap-

py. We wanted to come out’
and make the playoffs and -

we did.

“We wanted to get into
the championships and we
did.

“My buddy beat us,
Nikkita Taylor and Clar-
idge Primary, hats off to
them.

“They only beat us by
three points, we didn’t give
it to them they had to fight
hard to beat us.



“J have to give it up to,
my boys they played hard
for the win, that was a
tough team, but we stilk
able to take back a trophy
to the school and also an
individual trophy.”
Finishing in third place
for the girls were Yellow
Elder Primary with CW
Sawyer coming fourth. In
the boys, Columbus Prima-
ry took third place with
CW Sawyer taking third.



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