Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2006
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Ingraham

FNM leader slams PM
for ‘malicious attack’ —

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie was chastised by his
predecessor yesterday for a
“personal, malicious and vicious
attack” which, he said, showed
the PLP’s love of form over
substance.

Former Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham was hitting
back at criticism of his absence
from last week’s Speech From
the Throne ceremony.

Mr Ingraham came out fight-
ing, blaming Mr Christie for
what he described as. a “mean-
spirited and un-parliamentary
diatribe” against him.

“What is worse, the leader of
the governing party, spewing
misinformation, sought to
attribute to me and to my
deputy political shenanigans the
likes of which are typical of his
party’s conduct,” the FNM
leader said.

Mr Christie dropped hints in
the House of Assembly last
week about “parliamentary
appointments” Mr Ingraham
and his deputy Brent Symon-
ette were supposed to be keep-
ing during their absence.

But Mr Ingraham said Mr
Christie had not revealed either
the information or source
because there were no
“appointments”.

There were claims that the
FNM leader and his deputy
were campaigning for funds
from an LNG firm instead of
attending the opening of par-
liament.

“The ridiculous and untruth-
ful statements uttered in. con-
nection with my absence from
the-island on Wednesday would
amuse if they were not so
revealing of the complete lack

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of understanding by the gov-
erning party of our parliamen-
tary system of government,”
said Mr Ingraham.

“His one-line lame attempt
to cover his: mean-spirited and
unparliamentary diatribe
against me by qualifying his
unwarranted attack with the
gratuitous comment that if I had
gone to or was in hospital is
unacceptable suggests to me
that he knew exactly where I
was but chose to ignore the
truth, to insinuate otherwise and
to use his presence in parlia-
ment to misinform the people,”
Mr Ingraham added.

In his criticism of Mr Ingra- -

ham’s absence, Mr Christie said
the ex-PM continued to demon-
strate “a total disrespect and
contempt not just for parlia-
ment but for the people.”

He said Mr Ingraham’s

_absence was an example of

“intolerable arrogance that I

‘ hope each of you takes person-

ally.”

_And he accused the FNM
leader and his deputy of hav-
ing a “messianic point of view”
that everything must stop
because they had some other
agenda.

“T find it personally offensive,
not just as prime minister, as a
member of parliament...and the
reason I said to take it person-
al is because it is a personal
insult to all of us.”

Mr Ingraham said _ his
absence from parliament was
not'a boycott or protest of any
kind. Nothing could be further
from the truth.

“My absence, as I have

SEE page 14

Vertical

Tower
Heater

PLP women’s branch
chairman speaks out.

over Ingraham absence

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPPOSITION leader Hubert Ingraham
ought to consider relinquishing the position if

he is not prepared to fulfil his mandate, it was .

claimed yesterday.

The PLP’s women’s branch chairman, Dr
Madlene Sawyer, was referring to Mr Ingra-
ham’s controversial absence from the opening
of parliament. se

In an interview with The Tribune at the
organisation’s garden party yesterday, Dr
Sawyer said elected officials are expected to
perform certain functions.

She said when the highest office-holder in
the country, the Governor General, asks for
persons to be present at something as momen-
tous as the opening of parliament, they should
be present, unless they have a good excuse.

“J don’t know Mr Ingraham’s reason for
not being present at that event. I am sure in
due course ‘he will tell us why that was.

SEE page 14

@ FNM leader Hubert Ingraham holds a copy of a newspaper page from 1993 at yesterday’s press conference. Mr Ingraham said: ‘How
poorly the prime minister’s memory serves him. He certainly appears to h
opposition bench, including his good self and his then leader, Sir Lynden, absented thems
reading of the Speech from the Throne at the opening

of parliament under an FNM administration.’





ave forgotten that twice, in 1992 and again in 1993, the entire
elves in what they termed a boycott from the

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Political pundits
are forecasting
Cabinet reshuffle

THE political wires are vibrating once again
with talk of a possible Cabinet reshuffle today.
Newly-appointed Senator B J Nottage is

_ once more a prominent feature of the specu-

lation.

Political radio pundits were forecasting a
Cabinet reshuffle over the weekend, urging
listeners to expect an announcement today.

Prime Minister Perry Christie was said to be
in important meetings with advisers on Thurs-
day. ees

The latest view is that Dr B J Nottage would
go to the Ministry of Education or Financial
Services.

However, it is also speculated that he may
be moved to the Ministry of Health, where
he would help launch the national health insur-
ance scheme. — ’

On his return from the CARICOM meeting
two weeks ago, Mr Christie indicated that he
would be.making adjustments to various gov-
ernment portfolios.

However, there were doubts among

SEE page 14

: . = :

_ New programme
_ geared towards —
helping the poor

TO BREAK the cycle of
poverty in the Bahamas, the

: Ministry of Social Services is
i. establishing a new pro-
gramme geared towards
helping the extremely poor.

° SEE PAGE THREE

Andrew Allen’s
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COLUMNIST on the
Nassau Institute and Helen
Klonaris.

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Alarm as bush
fire blazes
near airport

®@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A BUSH fire blazed east of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA) on Saturday.

Police press liaison officer Walter Evans said
the fire started around 11am.

Two fire trucks, one from the airport crash and
rescue depot and another from the Royal
Bahamas Police, were battling the flames.

Mr Evans said firefighters were still on the
scene on Sunday morning. Police could not deter-

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An NIA employee said the fire caused a lot of
black smoke in the area. On her way to work
yesterday the bushes were still smoking.

Mr Evans said the fire was burning inland.
Firefighters had difficulty fighting the blaze
because it was close to swamp land and they did

‘not want to risk their resources.

Mr Evans said the fire did not pose a threat to
nearby property. However, he said, some people
would have experienced some discomfort from
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3





illegal
immigrants
detained
by police

A GROUP of illegal immi-
grants were arrested over the
weekend during the police
“Quiet Storm” operation. They
included six Haitians and one
Jamaican.

Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans said the immi-
grants were captured at differ-
ent locations throughout New
Providence on Friday. All seven
were taken to the Carmichael
Road detention centre.

Police are also investigating
two armed robberies at conve-
nience stores over the weekend.

At 10am ‘on Friday, two men,
one with a gun, entered and
robbed the Century Conve-
nience Food Store, Bacardi
Road.

Mr Evans said the suspects
fled on foot with a large sum of
cash.

Key’s Convenience Store,
Zion Boulevard, was robbed of
a small quantity of cash and sev-
eral phone cards, also on Fri-
day. :
Police said two masked men
entered the store after 9pm and
demanded cash. They fled in a
car, make and model unknown.

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New programm
aunched to help



‘extreme poor’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

TO break the cycle of pover-
ty in the Bahamas, the Min-
istry of Social Services is estab-
lishing a new programme
geared towards helping the
extremely poor.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna, in the Speech from the
Throne last week, said that,
according to the 2001 Bahamas
Living Conditions Survey, one
in 12 residents in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama and
one in five in the southern
islands are living under the
poverty line of $2,863 per
annum.

Five per cent of households
in the Bahamas live below the
poverty line. The survey found
that more than 50 per cent of
the country’s poor are children
14 years or younger.

In addition, Social Services
Minister Melanie Griffin said
that a Living Conditions Sur-
vey was conducted in 2004.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune on Saturday, Mrs Griffin
said one of the main pro-
grammes is a conditional cash
transfer programme.

Mrs Griffin said the pro-
gramme, which is already used
in countries such as Mexico
and Jamaica, is based on mod-
ifying and developing human
behaviour.

She said there will be a for-
mula in place to help the min-
istry tc determine who in the
population would be termed
the “extreme poor.”

“Those children who are in
poor families would most like-
ly, if any intervention is not
made, continue to be poor.
We have found that there are
grandparents, parents and chil-

dren, all on welfare,” said Mrs -

Griffin.

Each family, Mrs Griffin
said, would be profiled based
on their needs.

She said the programme will
work through a cash payment
periodically being made to the

family to assist them in their
educational and medical
expenses.

However, the family will
have to account for where the
money has been used. :

“In the Bahamas and in sev-
eral other countries, we have
just been doling out assistance
to the poor. (We have been)
throwing money behind pover-
ty, instead of investing in the

human capital investment,” '

she added. .
In making the programm
work for the betterment of the.
poor, Mrs Griffin said that
Social Services must work very
closely with the families. She
said they will schedule month-
ly sessions with the families to
give support and to ensure that
they are handling the funds

properly.
Mrs Griffin explained that

‘the programme is still a work

in progress, but it is expected
to be solidified as her min-
istry moves forward in the
year.

Minister ‘too vague’ on

housing development

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOUSING Minister Shane
Gibson was “too vague” when
outlining his redesign of a Per-
pall Tract homes develop-
ment, it was claimed yester-
day. -
The founder of the
Bahamas Association for
Social Health (BASH) Terry
Miller was commenting on Mr
Gibson’s reference to pre-
serving rare foliage and pro-
tected trees. He said it was
impossible to draw any con-
clusion from his remarks.

In a press release on Friday,
Mr Gibson said he had decid-
ed to redesign the residential
development after being guid-
ed by a Cabinet-appointed
committee, which conducted a
site visit. , ,

Mr Miller said: “I don’t
really know how to feel about
it because it is so vague. It is
really too vague for me to
draw a conclusion to exactly
what he is saying.

“He said with ‘particular
regard to preservation of rare
foliage and protected trees.’
If that is the case you'll look at
99 per cent of this tract of

land. I would like for them to.

be more specific,” said Mr
Miller.

In December, Chippingham
residents and environmental-
ists were furious when a trac-
tor cleared away a portion of
the Perpall Tract wellfields.

In early January, Mr Miller,
with others, raised a petition
in a bid to preserve the well-
fields.

Mr Miller felt that BASH
and the Bahamas National
Trust should have been on the
committee that discussed
technical concerns.

" Benct
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@ BASH founder Terry Miller pictured in December, holding

Bi BS s i

on to the tractor at the scene of the Perpall Well Fields. He
said the site is a ‘living lab’ and should never be destroyed.

The Cabinet-appointed
committee comprised repre-
sentatives from the Water and
Sewerage Corporation,
Department of Housing,
Department of Physical Plan-
ning and the BEST Commis-
sion.

“We look at this as a
national park. This should be
a national park, there is no
two ways about it. It would be
the only national park that is
accessible to Bahamians,” said
Mr Miller.



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352:
Circulation Department - (242) 502 -2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608



PM’s accusation off the mark

AS TWO political leaders pointed accus-
ing fingers at each other across the Florida
Straits last Wednesday it was left to the
Bahamian people to decide who was the
greater “threat to democracy” — the leader
who failed to show for the opening of a par-
liamentary session, or the leader who failed to
answer certain questions in parliament.

The fact that Opposition Leader Hubert
Ingraham, who was undergoing a physical
examination at the Cleveland Clinic in Fort
Lauderdale, was not present at the opening of
a new session of parliament was to Prime Min-
ister Christie, the most “scandalous experi-
ence” he had had in his whole parliamentary
career. To make matters worse, deputy oppo-
sition leader Brent Symonette was also absent
from Wednesday’s opening. Mr Symonette
had prior appointments in New York and
London. Both leaders were informed of the
prorogation of parliament too late to change
their schedules.

Mr Christie accused the two absent leaders
of disrespecting the parliament and the people
who elected them. Mr Ingraham quickly hit
back from Fort Lauderdale by accusing Mr
Christie of not respecting the rights of the
Opposition, and not according them the cour-
tesy of informing them of important matters of
state in sufficient time for them to change
their schedules.

For example, said Mr Ingraham, when Mr
A D Hanna was to be swoyn-in at Govern-
ment House as the new governor-general, Mr
Ingraham and his parliamentary colleagues
were only notified the afternoon before the
ceremony. Also when a special farewell recep-
tion was planned for retiring governor gener-
al Dame Ivy Dumont the Opposition was
again an afterthought — invited at the last
minute.

An example of the type of disrespect shown
Her Majesty’s loyal opposition — which is
very much a part of the parliamentary democ-
racy that Mr Christie so vociferously defend-
‘ed in the House on Wednesday — was the
invitation to participate in the funeral of for-
mer Fox Hill MP George Mackey.

A letter dated January 5 from the Secretary
to the Cabinet, informed Mr Ingraham that a
funeral service would be held for Mr Mackey
at 10am on January 12.

Mr Ingraham was instructed to advise the
Protocol Division of the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, no later than Monday, January 9,
whether he would attend the service so that
the necessary arrangements could be made
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of four opposition MPs to act as honorary
pall bearers. On the face of it everything
seemed to be in order. However, the letter
dated January 5, was delivered to Mr Ingra-
ham’s office on the afternoon of January 10, a
day after he was supposed to have contacted
the Protocol Office with the information
requested.

As Mr Ingraham pointed out the proroga-
tion of parliament — unlike setting a date for
an election — is not a state secret. And, if

‘ only to.show respect — a respect that Mr

Christie lamented was lacking in parliament —
Mr Christie should have given his opposition
colleagues sufficient notice for them to get
their private affairs in order. He didn’t, and so
they didn’t.

Some wise wit commented that it was for-
tunate for Mr Christie that Messrs Ingraham
and Symonette were absent from the opening
ceremonies. If they had turned up, he said,
Mr Christie would not have had anything to
talk about. At least their absence gave him a
political bone to chew and a public platform
from which to chew it.

FNM chairman Desmond Bannister found,

Mr Christie’s performance in the House
“unbecoming”. In our opinion he certainly

over reacted — but, as we all know, in all’

things theatrical, the show must go on. Mr
Bannister believed thinking people would
understand that the prime minister was “mere-,
ly show-boating”. In our opinion he was doing
more than “show-boating”, he was on a mis-
sion of political mischief-making.

According to Mr Ingraham, Mr Christie has
often bragged that through the police he
always knows where Mr Ingraham is, whether
here or abroad. During his harangue, Mr
Christie paused long enough to suggest that
Mr Ingraham could have been in hospital get-
ting a check-up. To us it suggested that Mr
Christie knew exactly where Mr Ingraham
was. However, Mr Christie preferred to work
“on the presumption that they (Messrs Ingra-
ham and Symonette) have gone in the business

of politics in total disrespect of the people of

the Bahamas,” adding in a conspiratorial tone,
that he happened “to have had certain advices
what the parliamentary appointment is, or
what the appointment they have gone to or
he’s attending.”

Without that presumption and his bogus bit
of advice, Mr Christie probably would not
have had a speech.

Obviously, elections are uppermost in Mr
Christie’s mind and the mud- slinging has
already started.

*





Reporting on
our country’s
education

EDITOR, The Tribune

IN early summer of 2005 the
Ministry of Education issued a
National Call for Papers for the
18th National Education Con-
ference scheduled for July 3rd
to July 7th.

A group of business and
labour organisations from the
tourism industry, the Coalition
for Education Reform, was
already working on sucha
paper and responded to the Call
by submitting its
“Bahamian Youth: The
Untapped Resource.” It was
included with nine other papers
in a booklet that was distrib-
uted exclusively to conference
attendees.

The Minister’s View on July
6, 2005

The Hon. Alfred M Seats, the
Attorney General and Minister
of Education, gave the keynote
address: “Transforming
Bahamian Education for the
21st Century.”

He stated that the two major
objectives of the conference
were -

e The examination of the con-
cept and state of Bahamian edu-
cation; and,

e The mapping of a process to
transform it “taking into
account new realities and
emerging challenges.”

The Minister gave the Gov-
ernment’s version of the history
of education in the Bahamas.
He emphasised the limited edu-
cational opportunities for the
Bahamian majority prior to the
late 1960s; and then ‘he
described the state of education
after 38 years of majority rule.

° The Bahamas now provides
universally available primary
and secondary education for all;
and..

° “There is still much work
for all of us to do to improve
the overall performance of our
students.”

He did not say what “overall
performance” meant; but one
can reasonably assume that it
relates to the quality of the pre-
sent school leavers, namely
what do they “know, under-
stand and can do” on leaving
high school.

The Minister did not go
beyond this one sentence
although he could have done so
since the Department produces
the relevant data annually. That
data tells a truly alarming story;
it confirms the public’s worst
fears and that. is probably the
reason it is kept from public
view.

problems of attracting qualified
teachers, student/teacher ratios,

paper

The Minister did discuss the

Dewan

letters@tribunemedia.:



the under achievement of male
students, the challenge of new
technologies and the present
budget of $215 million. How-
ever, he did not set either pri-
orities or measurable goals.

The Coalition Report of June
2005

The Coalition Report that
was submitted prior to the Con-
ference was not released to the
public until December. At that
time its contents were report-
ed in detail by the major news-
papers; and the Report is avail-
able to the reader on the Cham-
ber of Commerce website “the-
bahamaschamber.com”. A doc-
umentary based on the Report
was shown on cable television in
January and the Coalition indi-
cates that it will shortly be avail-

able as a streaming video on the

Internet.

Both the BGCSE 2004 and
the Coalition 2005 reports
found the following data trou-
blesome because of its implica-
tions for the country. The
inevitable conclusion is that the
present situation is unaccept-
able.

conclude that this was the typi-.

cal response of government
bureaucracies to a prob-:
lem...namely, create more and:
bigger staff departments.

e It was comforting to see’
that order and civility in the-
classroom was first on a list of.
initiatives shown on page one. :*

e Discomforting was the
treatment of other critical
issues.

For. instance, the interim
report describes ‘the Extended
Learning Programme (ELP) in
remedial Mathematics and,
Reading that is offered to fail-
ing students. But there is no
discussion of Social Promotion,’
the practice of passing failing
students, and how ELP does
or should relate to this prac-
tice.

And...the achievements of
the Testing and Evaluation Sec-
tion were given a half-page of
space but there is no mention of
the BGCSE results and the
implications for the state of edu-
cation. There are pictures of
three outstanding students with
their scores and awards, this is:
the only 2005 student academic
results reported.

The Hope of the Future

If one were setting the agen-
da for the 21st century, it would
appear that the first step would

2004 BGCSE Exams & Grades

Average
Grades
All Exams D

New Providence
(Public) . = F+
New Providence
(Private) D+

Mathematics E
English D-

Percent
Grade “A”
6.4%

9.8%

3.2%
3.0% 20.2%

Percent
Grade “F, G and U”
20.8%

3.2% 30.9%

10.0%
42.8%

Note: The BGCSE system grades student PoE: onan

eight point scale of A, B

._ The Coalition Report
analysed the data, suggested
quantitative goals and proposed
fourteen specific strategies. Fur-
thermore, it clearly indicated
that the basic problem went
beyond the classroom and suc-
cess in eliminating the problem
would come only with profound
changes in social behaviour.
This would require the long-
term commitment and active
participation of all parts of
Bahamian society.

The Ministry’s December

2005 Response

In December the Minister
published an interim report on
the Department’s accomplish-
ments. It appeared to be a pub-
lic relations effort to promote
the public image of the Depart-
ment rather than a report_on
the state of public education.

e It was a 32-page full colour
newspaper supplement that had
the pictures of 35 staff execu-
tives and described what they
had done. In the case of the
Minister of Education, it includ-
ed one-page of testimonials on
his character and performance.
The cynic (or realist) could con-
clude that this was a misuse of
public funds.

¢ It announced the creation
of new staff functions like the
Higher Education and Life-
Long Learning Division, the
Communications Division and
the National Co-Ordination
unit and the restructuring and
expansion of the Planning Sec-
tion. The cynic (or realist) could





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be a candid description of the.
state of affairs.
The last annual report of a

‘ Minister of Education to Par-

liament on the state of educa-
tion was in 1995 even though it

_ is a legal requirement of the

Education Act. The overall
mean average for the 1994
BGCSE exams was a D Minus
but this was not mentioned in
the report. At that time the.
Minister merely noted that,
some students exhibited “a lack:
of knowledge of the relevant,
subject matter” and more
research was needed to develop,
a scheme to assist them. a

The Interim 2005 Report,
shows that nothing has changed,
in the past decade. Both PLP:
and the FNM Governments:
have not been candid. é

The reality is that “we have a
problem with what is coming.
out of the education pipeline!”’;
and the relevant question ist
“How will the country initiaté*
and sustain meaningful educaks
tion reform?” ty

* Hopefully, an aroused pubs
lic will cause the Government’
(preferably both parties) to,
move beyond the Interim 2005;
Report. .

¢ Hopefully, there will be ae

* final report that is candid and '

sets priorities and specific goals
against which performance can
be measured.

RALPH J MASSEY
Nassau
February 6 2006

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5





Discussing racism, the Nassau
Institute and Helen Klonaris

THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
AND HELEN KLONARIS

So weeks ago, Helen
Klonaris, a white
Bahamian, published a letter on
the issue of racism and colonial-
ism in the Bahamas. Her letter
prompted several responses,
among them a rebuttal last week
from The Nassau Institute.

While it is easy to disagree
with some of Ms Klonaris’ sug-
gestions (such as the supposed
racism of most whites, or the
extent of ‘white’ economic pow-
er.in. The Bahamas today) it
would seem that the writer of
the institute’s response either did
not understand or did not want
to understand the broader thrust
of her arguments.

In fact, to her credit, Ms
Klonaris sets out, in a compelling
way, some of the legacies of the
colonial.and racial domination
that did undoubtedly blight most
of our history.

While we may or may not
agree with her observations
about race relations today, her
basic ideas about some of the
psychological effects of a colo-
nially imposed value system are
not effectively countered in the
Institute’s long-winded response.

It'is perhaps natural that the
Institute should focus on eco-
nomic theory in addressing some
of Ms Klonaris assertions. But
it is unfortunate that; having ini-
tially taken up what would seem
to have been her central point,
the letter from the institute then
fails to-directly address it. '

That'point is that there is, in

our society,.a “well defined sys-. .
including «

22.

‘tem. of relationships”
"ed cational: curricula, the’ legal




guage itself whose ‘effect is to
"suppress, condemn and ghet-
toise" other cultures. °

‘It would be interesting to see °

how the critics of Ms Klonaris
can directly deny, for instance,
that, where Judeo-Christian val-
ués have been. imposed among
indigenous peoples, their pro-
ponents have uniformly stigma-
tised and undermined the legiti-
macy of the thought systems they
have sought to replace, including
in The Bahamas.

‘This also ties in with the expe-
rience of colonial interactions
throughout the world, where
seemingly indisputable patterns
emerge.

: THE FILIPINO
_ AND JAPANESE
EXPERIENCES

§

J econ: first contacts with
‘J the west occurred in the
16th century. This was an era in
which European maritime pow-
ets, taking advantage of the new-
ly’ discovered Cape of Good
Hope, began large scale trade
with many East Asian societies.

“These trade relations evolved
into domination in some
instances, such as in the Philip-
pines (named after a particular-
ly-unsavoury Spanish King).
Here, evangelism and guns went
hand-in-hand to create a west-
ern satrapy, whose language, cus-

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toms and native religions were
all either obliterated or bas-
tardised.

What replaced them was a
society organised along pre-
dictable lines, with a small, high-
ly westernised elite presiding
over a large, ghettoised majority.
Those with ‘native’ characteris-
tics (such as followers of the old
religions) were made to accupy a

sub-class, while the ruling oli-

garchy lost all sense of social
responsibility toward the masses,
to whom they were now cultur-
ally alien.

Were it not for the wise deci-
sion of the 17th century Shogun,
Tokugawa Hidetada, to totally
ban the propagation of the
Christian faith in Japan, there
can be little doubt that Japan
would have suffered a similar
fate. Hidetada, sensibly, was hap-
py for the west’s guns, its tech-
nology and its learning, but had
no interest in its religion, which
he saw as the vanguard of an
attempt to psychologically dom-
inate Japan and undermine her
independence. So he sent in his
Samurai and expelled alll west-
erners except for a few useful,
clever Dutchmen.

At the time of the ban, mis-
sionaries and European “author-
ities” at the ports of Nagasaki

and Deshima (the two points

where western trade settlements
were initially allowed) had
already begun a campaign of
burning Buddhist and Shinto
texts and had begun debunking
Japanese traditional histories
(such as the origin of the Imper-
ial family) as shameful, savage
myths. Hidetada’s expulsion of
westerners and banning of their

faith was therefore a timely one,

and probably saved Japan from

the fate of the Philippines, ‘dis-
.. covered’ by the Spaniards at

around the same time.

Today, Japanese people are
probably more at ease with
themselves, their ancestors and
the historical achievements of
their country than almost any
non-European people. Their
faith, an easy accommodation of
Chinese, Indian and native reli-





Rosetta St.



PERSPECTIVES



ACN DURE Wo eae ESN

gious traditions, has proved high-
ly adaptable to the rapid changes
through which their country has
gone in the last 400 years. Japan,
incidentally, has the lowest inci-
dence of Christianity of any
major country.

THE INDIAN EXPERI-
; ENCE

hough India was the vic-

tim of colonisation, it
had the relative good fortune of
being colonised for commercial,

rather than evangelical purposes.
This was a feature that distin-

guished British (and, even more"

so, Dutch) colonial policy from
that of Spain or Portugal. India
was also fortunate in having a
complex and extremely old value
system of its own that was not
easily susceptible to penetration
by alien ones.

These factors saved India’s
original thought system intact
and spared it the marginalisa-
tion and stigmatisation that have
inevitably resulted elsewhere
from total colonial immersion.
Though Indians did and still do
suffer some of the traditional ill-
effects of colonialism, a rejec-
tion and stigmatisation of every-
thing associated with Indian-ness
never took root.

THE NEW WORLD SLAVE
SOCIETIES

he African in the new
A world is often wrongly
thought of as a blank slate who

only began accumulating culture
upon contact with his new colo-

. mial society. In fact, he brought

with him a fairly complex sys-
tem of social rules, beliefs and
values, including religious ones.

In the case of the Yoruba, for

instance, he brought a pantheon
of Gods, including Ogun, the
chief god of the Santeria religion
still practised in Cuba today. So
he did have values of his own.

But unlike the Indian or the
Japanese, the totality of his
immersion in the colonial sys-
tem produced a psychological
lack of resistance to the preju-
dices and presumptions by which
these were deemed worthless or
even worse. In this respect, he
had much in common with the
Amerindians of the Andean
nations especially.

Insofar as Ms Klonaris sees
racism as being responsible for
the ghettoisation of New World
blacks, I would disagree. Like so
many indigenous peoples, from
Australia to Bolivia, it was the
New World black who inter-
nalised the colonial value sys-
tem, and so ghettoised himself.

To empowered people, the
“racism” of others is a trivial
matter. The tragedy facing the
new world African, the
Amerindian and others was not
someone else’s “racism”. Rather,
it is that he has internalised
someone else’s values not on the
basis of a free exchange, but on
the basis of an uncritical hierar-
chy, which places anything orig-
inating outside western institu-
tions or western values at the
bottom.

He was psychologically pene-
trated to the point that he no
longer recognised value in any-
thing arising from his own her-
itage, ancient or modern. In fact,
he became an active accomplice
in the stigmatisation of such
things.

Take, for instance, the hierar-
chy of religions. To the colo-

notes high classicism, African
pantheism connotes a savage and

“unequivocally negative “black

magic”.

THE BAHAMAS MOVING
FORWARD

S: where does this leave
The Bahamas? For good
or ill, most Bahamians, black,
white and otherwise, today share
cultural and religious values
derived from sources from which
only a minority of Bahamians

physically descend. Most have -

also come to accept a basically
western narrative of history,
even though this narrative some-
times propagates harmful myths
and assumptions.

None of this need be fatal to
harmonious national develop-
ment for The Bahamas, so long
as our self-image is constantly
“tweaked” to reflect the inter-
ests of the Bahamas as an inde-
pendent nation of many races.

But huge and monstrous lega-
cies of the colonial psychological
system remain. Black Bahami-
ans routinely associate African
bone structures, curled hair and
dark skin with ugliness, and seem

nialised new world black, while “"}:

Hindu pantheism connotes a ..

neutral Eastern mysticism and“

Greco-Roman pantheism con-





Phone : 325 - 3336







to assume that there is some uni-
versality to that view.

In religion, it is shocking to
observe the extent to which
black Bahamians have taken up
the almost militant Christian big-
otry that once stigmatised their
own ancestors. Only recently,
Rastafarian students complained
of the horrendous discrimination
they faced at the College of The
Bahamas.

From time to time, local pas-
tors rail about ‘black magic’ and
voodoo is often cited among the
reasons for looking down at
Haitian immigrants.

Less exposed black Bahami-

‘ans, of course, will never realise
. that all these things come back to

a rejection of the legitimacy of
their own ancestors and, ulti-

‘ mately, of themselves.

On the other hand, some bet-
ter educated black Bahamians
may assume that whiteness in
the Bahamas is a monolithic phe-
nomenon, there being no diver-
sity of views among whites on
these very important, sensitive
issues.

Which is why honest, well
thought-out contributions from
intelligent white Bahamians like
Ms Klonaris are so helpful.

GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

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a 7

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Applications will not be accepted in person.
Cover letters and resumes must be sent to
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

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Ministries International

LOCAL NEWS

service on Sunday



wa EXECUTIVE Chairman Gregory Bethel shanks: at the BIC.

(Photos:Felipé. Major/Tribune staff)



commissioned in Exum:

THE commissioning of new housing at
the Operation Bahamas Turks and Caicos
base in Exuma marks another important
milestone in the development of the unique
relationship in the war against drugs
between the Bahamas, the UK and US.

Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
said: “Those of us who remember the 1980s
remember that some Bahamians used to
argue that the stuff was not staying here so
once it kept going they had no concern.

“Quite apart from the shortsightedness of

that ethic, it was not long before it also
started to stay here, and began to sap the

energies of our young people, both men
and women. It was then that the society
responded in a big way.”

He said some institutions felt the problem
dated back to the leadership exercised in
the 1980s.

“By this ceremony today, we signal to pol-
icy-makers and to the people of both our
countries that we can never let up, get it off
our radar scope, lest we be swamped by the
same forces of evil that threatened to swamp
us two decades ago,” Mr Mitchell said.

He congratulated the US for the renewal
of this commitment every year, the buildings





being the latest sign of that commitment,

“It signals once again that whether you
are large or,small;.we live. in;an. interde-
pendent world. You, cannot. be. big; with-
out someone who is small. ‘We owe. each
other to work. together in the progress for
and on behalf of our common humanity,”
the minister said.

He thanked the men and women “of
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THE TRIBUNE





Esso’s $36,000

contribution to

PMH Foundation

@ By Bahamas Information
Services

NASSAU, The Bahamas—
Esso gas stations have con-
tributed over $36,000 to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation from their “Help
Us Help” campaign during Sep-
tember 2005.

-Troy Simms, country manag-

‘er of Esso in the Bahamas,
announced last Monday Mon-
day that 11 gas stations partici-
pated in the drive to raise the
funds by contributing two cents
for every gallon of fuel sold.
: “They are South Beach On the
Run, Oakes Field On the Run,
East Bay Street On the Run,
Carmichael and Faith Avenue
On the Run, East Street and
Balfour Avenue On the Run,
Bargain City, Carmichael Road,
and Heastie’s Blue Hill Road.
Two stations on Eleuthera and
Long Island also contributed to
the fundraising campaign.

During the campaign, Esso
invited customers to help them
meet or surpass its target of
$35,000.

“We are honoured to
announce that together we were
able to raise $36,775.77,” Mr.
Simms said.

The campaign is an annual
programme focused on. assist-
ing organisations that help chil-
dren. -

Mr Simms noted that in 2004,
Esso raised almost $28,000 for
The Bahamas Red Cross to
assist in the hurricane relief
effort.

He said that an additional
$50,000 was raised in the “Help
Us Help” campaign to support
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force summer youth initiative
and other summer programmes.

Dr Myles Munroe, President

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation, said the
partnership with Esso is a suc-
cess.

“Funds from the Esso’s
‘Help Us Help’ programme
will be used to purchase much
needed equipment to assist in
paediatric care at the Princess
Margaret Hospital, mainly the
Children’s Ward, the Neona-
tal Intensive Care Units and
the Special Care Baby Unit,”
said Dr Munroe.

Dr Munroe said the part-
nership between the Founda-
tion and Esso proved that
“miracles can occur through
partnership and friendships in
the community.”

He added that the Founda-
tion will continue to promote

creative partnerships with oth-
er companies and program-
mmes to strengthen the level
of service provided by the
hospital.

Dr Munroe praised Esso —

Standard Oil dealers and sta-
tions, the media and the pub-
lic for making Esso their
choice during the one-month
campaign.

He said as a result of the
partnership, the oil compa-
ny’s name will be placed on
the “Miracle Donor Tree” in
the front lobby of the PMH
during 2006.

Mr Simms said Esso hopes
to continue the partnership
with the Foundation and will
continue to contribute to pae-
diatric care.



eT rae







Fs

SAN ANDROS, Andros, The Bahamas —

ribbon cutting for the new Department of Labour office in San Andros, Andros, on Febr'
Pictured, from left, are Minister of Labour and Immigration and Member of Parliament f

Andros and the Berry Islands Vincent Peet,
office, Mablene Bowleg and Cathy Martin.






Prime Minister Perry Christie looks on during



Mr Christie, Andrea Smith and Clerks at tire i

(Photo: BiS/Eric Rese)

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switches etc.)

° Effectively maintain the entire IT WAN including; project planning, scope managemenl budget
management, resource (i.e. internal, external, 3rd party resources) management, time management
(activities & task planning), communications, risk managemenl procurement, QA and testing, delivery,
transition planning and ongoing systems maintenance and support (problem resolution, outages,
version control, release management, upgrades, change management)












° Manage and track all reported issues received and escalated from the IT Level 1 Service Desk.

° Regularly interact with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs
and that support service levels are being met effectively and on time

° Communicates policy and procedural changes; develops, reviews and updates standard operating



procedure manuals for the WAN support
° Ensures staff members provide high quality support for the systems and to IT Business Partners






° Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect'the overall
operational effectiveness Of the IT WAN
° Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management




MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelors degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information

Systems, Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields.

° 7+ years experience managing. Implementing and maintaining WAN and peripheral devices such
as mediation devices, routers, Ethernet switches, etc.

° Supports Wide Area Network, Voice Over IP, and VPN capabilities

° Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem
management and tracking, SLA management, release/version management, escalalions and
notifications)

° Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC
processes, change management discipline. and project management processes).

° 2 years experience using network monitoring and support tools such as HP Openview to monitor

platform performance

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:













Broad range of network. network devices, mediation devices and processes
Expert knowledge of VPN and VOIP technologies
Strong knowledge of network.security.requirements.and,processes... f
Knowledge of firewalls, intrusion detection, and other network ‘security protocols
Strong knowledge of wireless networking protocols
Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines
Knowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration
tools and technologies
Strong leadership ability « Wp gel gb iy
Knowledge of project management’ processes, applications (MS. Project) and disciplines
Strong written and verbal communications skills”.

Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a nontechnical, simple
manner

° Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications . _

° Proficiency with HP Openview or other network management tools









@ MINISTER of Labour and
Immigration Vincent Peet
touring the grounds of Grand
Isle. Villas, in Emerald Bay,
Exuima, with Senior Vice
President of EGI Ltd, Pamela
McCullough, on February 16.
EGI Ltd, is the development
team behind the villas. Minis-
ter Peet toured various
tourism-related properties in
the Emerald Bay Resort area
and interacted with Bahami-
ans employed there.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)






All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no laler than
Monday, February 27. 2006 and addressed as follows:








DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING

THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS







RE; SENIOR ASSOCIATEISYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR, WIDE AREA NETWORK

PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

Reese

Bahamas real

estate today

Carmen Massoni.



ers in your neighbourhood.
Your home could actually take
longer to sell in the future if it’s
in the “upper end” of choices.
Purchasers historically opt for
the least expensive home in the
most expensive neighbourhood
they can afford.

Of course, there are many
improvements that will add to
your home’s resale value down
the road, without pricing you
out of the market. Visit the US
National Association of Home
Builders website at nahb.org for
information about the potential
value of a range of improve-

Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
installation & Maintenance

Homes ¢ Offices * Subdivisions
Call Us Today!
‘Tel: 393-7733

E-mail: info@lemconetworks.com

THE TRIBUNE



Moving or improving
— happiness at home



ments. Although these numbers
are derived from the average of
the US markets these numbers.
are pretty much the same here.

Regardless of market condi-
tions, your home is where you
should be happy. “Improve or
move” is an emotional as well
as a financial decision that
requires deep and honest eval-
uation.



Peet’s visit to tourism properties

te rte







A multinational company,
manufacturer of leading
brands in personal hygiene
consumer products, |
seeking a Territory Manager
for the Bahamas and other
islands in the Caribbean.

This position will be based in
Nassau. It requires extensive
business travel with sales and
marketing responsibilities.

A college degree in business and
prior experience in a similar _,;
position are required. An MBA
and fluency in Spanish are
preferred. Only Bahamians or
residents with the right to work
need apply.

Please send your detailed résumé,
including experience, references
and current compensation to:
P.O. Box N-773,;

Nassau, Bahamas

by March 3, 2006.

Tis a





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9





Haiti poses
challenges
for CARICOM

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
executive and _ former
Caribbean diplomat who
publishes widely on Small
States in the global commu-
nity).

THE victory by Rene
Preval in Haiti’s presidential
elections poses challenges for
the member countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM).

‘After the former Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide
accused the United States of
orchestrating his removal
and forcing him into exile in
February 2004, CARICOM,
as'a group, declined to recog-
nise the interim government
of Mr. Gerard Latortue.

-It was well known that the
regional grouping was divid-
ed on how to treat with
Haiti. In the end, the view
prevailed that the Latortue
regime would not be recog-
nised and Haiti would not be
allowed access to the coun-
cils of CARICOM.

‘ Preval’s election victory
changes all that and CARI-
COM Secretary-General
Edwin Carrington is report-
ed to have said: “We are
ready to receive Haiti back
into the institutions of the
Caribbean Community."

. But, he added, “We will
now sit with Haiti to discuss
the conditions of its re-entry
into CARICOM."

Attention

Importantly, Mr Carring-
ton drew attention to the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mias which includes provi-
sions for the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market (CSM) to which
Haiti i is not a signatory

“He said: "We now have to
sit with Haiti on this and oth-
er. issues, including how are
they prepared to come on
board with the Revised
Treaty and what is the
ptocess of acceding to the
various elements of the Sin-
gle Market."

- It is Haiti’s accession to
the CSM that poses the
gteatest challenge to CARI-
COM.

“ Haiti with a population of
83 million is the poorest
country in the Hemi-
sphere. Its people are 3 mil-

lion more than the rest of |

CARICOM combined.

‘Both its economic and
political conditions have
caused many of its people to
flee from its shores in search
of a better life.

; While the United States
has been the main target of
their refuge, the Dominican
Republic and the Bahamas
have also experienced the
illegal entry of Haitians into
their countries.

: Recently, groups of Hait-
ian refugees have turned up
in Jamaica, Antigua and
Dominica.

Ignite

: The election of Mr Preval,
by just over 51 per cent of
the population, does not
speak to a united coun-
try. Haiti continues to live
on a political powder
keg. And, the political
manipulation of its desper-
ate economic circumstances
is the match that could ignite
it any time.

In any event, Haiti is a far
way from the establishment
of democratic institutions,
and even farther away from
the kind of widespread
respect for them that would
underpin their maintenance.

: Consequently, CARI-
COM’s first duty of care to a
member of its community is
to welcome back into its fold
the constitutionally elected
government of Rene Preval
in elections which have been

State



endorsed by the Organisa-
tion of American States.
Having done so, CARI-
COM should take the lead
in the international commu-
nity in raising the financial
and other help that Haiti
urgently needs if the unwel-
come flight of its people to
other countries is to stop.
This will call for a serious
diplomatic effort, and may
well require the creation of a
special CARICOM Task
Force devoted to working
with the Haitian government
and international donor and
financial community for at
least two years to create the
machinery for financing and
managing projects in Haiti.

Projects

Among these should be
health care, particularly
HIV/AIDS, education and
human resource develop-
ment, infrastructural projects
that would encourage foreign
and local private sector
investment, and, very impor-
tantly, the building of demo-
cratic institutions supported
by legislation and enforce-
ment machinery.

In this regard, CARICOM |

might enlist the help of
Canada in a joint effort to
engage the US government
at the earliest opportunity in
the peaceful and progressive
development of Haiti.

Reports from the Domini-
can Republic, Haiti’s neigh-
bour, reveal that some 800
US troops landed at a port
city in the Dominican
Republic, barely 80 miles
from the Haitian border, last
Thursday. Ostensibly, they
are there for “New Hori-
zons”, a military exercise
that is to extend for several
months.

Nonetheless, the US gov-
ernment has congratulated
Mr Preval on his election and
Department
spokesman, Tom Casey, said
“We look forward to work-
ing with the new government
to help the Haitian people
build a better future for
themselves."

CARICOM should take

the US government at its-

word, and act as an honest

broker to unlock aid for °

Haiti that has already been
approved from the US and
other countries and agencies,
and to develop a programme
for additional aid.

Neither democracy nor

development, including the |
flight of Haitians seeking ©

refuge, will come unless gen-
erous assistance is forthcom-
ing.

And, CARICOM coun-
tries, however, determined
they may be, as they have
said, “to end years of isola-
tion and bring Haiti into the
Caribbean family to which it
belongs by geography, histo-
ry and common ancestry”,
should require considerable
advancement by Haiti in its
economic and political con-
ditions before it is encour-
aged to join the Caribbean
Single Market.

After all the Single Mar-
ket goes well beyond a free
trade arrangement between
groups of countries; it is a

’ deep form of integration that

makes a single space of all
the countries’ markets and
allows for the free movement
of goods and services, the
right of establishment by
nationals of the participat-
ing countries and free move-
ment of certain categories of
workers.

The countries that enter
such a Single Market, while

conscious of the importance
of “geography, history and
ancestry”, must also be alert
to the need to fulfil other
obligations such as the pro-
vision of funding under the
Regional Development Fund
(RDF) for disadvantaged
countries and sectors where
Haiti would be amongst the
neediest.

Also, it may be an oppor-
tune time for CARICOM
countries to revisit the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mas to create principles of
democracy, rights, and oblig-
ations to which every mem-
ber state must adhere as a
basis for entry, and for con-
tinued membership.

All CARICOM members,
including Haiti, should sign it
as a precondition for enter-
ing the CSM or remaining a
member.

CARICOM countries
must do all they can to
improve conditions for Haiti
as a member of the
Caribbean community. And,
Haiti must also play its part.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

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LOCAL NEWS

Equal opportunities for

THE TRIBUNE

disabled pledge by Griffin

@ By Bahamas Information
Services

MINISTER of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment Melanie Griffin said
Thursday that the government
will continue to ensure equal
opportunities for the disabled.

Mrs Griffin was addressing a
post-Valentine Day lunch for
persons living with disabilities,
sponsored by the Englerston
Urban Renewal Programme in
partnership with the Disability
Affairs Division of the Ministry
of Social Services and Commu-
nity Development.

The minister said the govern-
ment had launched a number

’ of initiatives that should con-

tinue to enhance the lifestyles of
persons living with disabilities,
chief among them being the
establishment of a Special

Needs Commission under the

auspices of the Ministry of Edu-
cation.

This is responsible for assess-
ing the special education needs
of persons living with disabili-
ties, the expansion of the Dis-
ability Unit into a Disability
Affairs Division and the hiring of
a consultant on Disability Affairs
to liaise with the ministry and

Tee anlesuce

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for
the position of Senior Associate/System Administrator, Operating Systems in our IT Technical Services |

Department.
~ POSITION SUMMARY:

The System Administrator, Operating systems (OS) is responsible for the hardware and operating system software. | |
The System Administrator OS installs new hardware, installs the operating system, maintains the operating system '

i
|
|
5

through patches, maintains security on the devices, ensures effective connectivity with tile network, and is responsible |
overall for the performance of the technical platform of application systems. The System Administrator, OS acts.
as the organizer, planner, problem solver, and overall leader for the hardware and software platforms for UNIX,
AIX, Linux, Windows and OS 400 systems. The administrator monitors systems and makes adjustments to maximize
functionality, availability and performance. The administrator manages growth and utilizes capacity planning to
ensure that adequate system resources are always available. This position requires regular interactions with internal .
customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being met effectively
and on time. The System Administrator, OS ensures adequate documentation and communication of all related
system upgrades, outages, and modifications, keeping Business Partners well informed of changes in network
systems and policies and procedures. This position interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, '

implement upgrades, and deliver solutions.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES: | ,

Manage the day-to-day health of the AIX, Linux, Windows, OS 400, Solaris, and UNIX operating

@ MINISTER of Social Services and Community Development the Hon. Melanie Griffin speaks at

i

OS



the Englerston Urban Renewal Project Disable Citizen Love Luncheon on Thursday, February 16,
2006 at Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church. ne

the disabled community.

Mrs Griffin said the Special
Needs Commission has
“already made some changes
and recommendations” with
regard to developing further
programmes to enhance educa-
tional opportunities for the dis-
abled.

She said the Disability Affairs
Division, located at Eighth Ter-
race, Centreville, and staffed by
a number of persons living with
disabilities, serves as a resource
centre, complete with comput-
ers.

She said her ministry will con-
tinue to subsidise computer
classes for the disabled in an
attempt to provide equal oppor-
tunity training in a number of
key areas, computer literacy
among them.

Minister Griffin said the gov-
ernment, through her ministry,
is also in the final stages of



preparing draft disability legis-
lation to protect the rights and
opportunities of those living
with disability.

Challenges

She said that despite the suc-
cesses, the government recog-
nised that there are still a num-
ber of challenges the disabled
face, including employment,
housing, education and training
opportunities.

“The government of the
Bahamas is aware of these chal-
lenges and has been working on
how we can have a turnaround
in these areas. The government
has responded and will continue
to respond to the needs of per-
sons living with disabilities,”
Mrs Griffin said.

She said the hiring of Ms Iris
Adderley as a consultant on dis-

= ) FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of |

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

ability has had a positive impact
in creating continued dialogue
between the government
through the Ministry of Social
Services and Community
Affairs and the disabled com
munity.

She commended Ms Adder-
ley for the launch of the radio
talk show, “Spotlight on Dis-
ability”, which has had a posi-
tive impact on. the disabled
community. The show airs the
second Thursday in each month
over ZNS 1540 in-New Provi-
dence and 810AM in Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

“This show has had a posi-
tive impact because it allows
persons living with disabilities
the opportunity to call-in and
give their recommendations for
the improvement and uplifting
and enhancing of persons liv-
ing with disabilities in this coun-
try, and of course, to give their



system platforms.
Installs new hardware devices, configures. them, and attaches them to the network.
Maintains operating system currency through migration of releases and patch implementation
Researches system patches to determine their suitability for implementation on specific systems
Troubleshoots hardware and software platforms problems
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to implement system backup procedures to
ensure that data is comprehensively-copied
Manages and configures system storage devices, monitors space, plans for future growth, and manages
the growth and performance of the platforms :
Works closely with the Manager of Data Security and implements prescribed security policies and

rocedures
ct as tier 2 Help Desk support to troubleshoot and resolved platform issues in a 24 x 7 environment
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of potential
problems
_ Stays current with new system offerings and technology, analyzes new technology and makes
recommendations where applicable

Works closely with the System Administrator WAN and the Database Administrator to a provide and
maintain a comprehensive IT technical architecture

Manage and track all reported issues received and escalated from the IT Level 1 Service Desk
oa toed interact with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs

and that support service levels are being met effectively and on time

Communicates policy and procedural changes: develops, reviews and updates standard operating

rocedure manuals for the hardware and software plattorm support
scalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall

operational effectiveness of the technical architecture

Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelors degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information
Systems, Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields.
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining hardware and software platforms for
AIX, OS 400, Linux, Windows and UN IX platforms

Strong leadership ability

2 years experience managing a storage area network (SAN)

2 years experience implementing and utilizing performance monitoring and alarming tools such as

BMC Patrol, Nagios. Site Angel, Tripwire, or other tools as required

Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem
management and tracking, SLA management, release / version management, escalations and notifications)
Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC
processes, change management discipline, and project management processes).

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

Broad range of hardware experience on IBM platform devices

Extensive knowledge of specific operating systems including 0S 400, Windows, AIX. Linux

Strong leadership ability with the ability to lead and take charge of a technical area

Strong knowledge of UNIX security, OS 400 security, Windows and Linux Security mechanisms,
knowledge of Peoplesoft security is a plus

Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines

Knowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration

tools and technologies

Knowledge of project management processes, applications (MS Project) and disciplines

Strong written and verbal communications skills.

Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a nontechnical, simple

manner.

Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.

Human Resource and
Training Officer







PROFILE:

Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/or HR Certification
fe Proficiency in Advanced Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook
& Internet Explorer
e Ability to work quickly and accurately and cope with large volumes.
i of work ; ‘
e Strong interpersonal skills and communication skills
|e Excellent organizational and administrative skills’
|e Facilitation and meeting skills


















4
4

k
i



RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Assists the Director of HR/Training and the HR Manager
Assists with Training duties and programmes

Assists with HR duties and research projects © ;
Assists in the planning and execution of all social/employee events i
Disseminates internal information to personnel as required
Composes letters, memos and reports

Prepares Training Certificates of Participation/Attendance

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, depend-
ing on experience, together with a comprehensive range of
benefits.






Send resume no later than March 3, 2006 to:

Director of HR & Training
= ) FIDELITY |

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than
Monday, February 27, 2006 and addressed as follows;








51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD
NASSAU. BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR, OPERATING SYSTEMS





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE



Resort worker claims she
was unfairly suspended

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A female
‘worker at Our Lucaya
"Resort claims she was unfair-

‘ly suspended and refused
‘help by a union representa-
:tive at the Bahamas Hotel
‘Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union.
' Hair-stylist Sandra Mader,
who is employed at Senses
-Spa, is claiming she was sus-
pended for 90 days after she
was out.sick from work for
Six days.

Ms Mader went to the

Snion *s office on Thursday
‘to seek help, only to be told
‘that there was nothing they
‘ould do to help her.
«< “I was in awe at what I was
being told,” said the moth-
er-of-four. “I was very dis-
appointed because I had
been paying union dues for
four years.

Employed

Ms. Mader. was initially
employed: as. a hair-stylist at
‘the; spa in 2001. She was
demoted to locker room
attendant after she was
allegedly accused of damag-
ing:a customer’s hair in 2003.
": She says she has been a
professional hair-stylist for
20 years.'Ms Mader said her
‘boss explained that she
‘would only be reinstated if
‘she received re- certification
‘training. © . rs
__ Ms Mader Slain she was
not, reinstated as a hair-styl-
ist even ‘though she under-
went a two-hour re-certifica-
tion trainin.










@ SANDRA Mader, four-year employee at Our Lucaya and Lionel Morley, BHCAWU.

After being taken ill with
the flu for six days, Ms Mad-
er returned to work and pre-
sented a three-day sick slip
to her boss. She said she was
suspended after she failed to
present a sick slip for the
additional three days.

Ms Mader turned to the ~

Labour Board for assistance.

She said a labour official
had advised the resort they
could either issue a two-
week suspension with pay or
without pay, but not a 90-day
suspension.

The labour official and Ms
Mader are expected to meet
with mane semen ‘on Mon-
day.

Senses Spa manager Chris-
tine Hays told The Tribune
that she did not wish to com-
ment on the matter..."

Union’ official "Lloyd
Cooper could not be reached

on Friday. -

Lionel Morley, BHCAWU
executive board member,
criticised the union for not
supporting Ms Mader.

Elections

Mr Morley said he intends
to contest an executive posi-
tion during union elections
in May. He claims that union
representation of workers
has deteriorated.

“The core objective and
purpose of the union is to
protect and preserve the
rights of its members. And
right now the union is in its
weakest state today.”

Mr Morley said he will
continue to,support and rep-

resent union members:in

need, even though the. union
had threatened to lock him
out of his office.

(Photos: Denise Maycock)

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YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

SENIOR MANAGER
_ECONOMIST, REGULATORY

for comment up to press time ; : sth za oy § os : oa
; ‘ The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified

individuals for the: et of SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST in our Regulatory Department.
JOB SUMMARY

le
ny. =) Exe cutive To develop and apply various telecommunications regulatory requirements to economic efficiencies
including interconnection issues, market analysis and pricing methodologies, quality of service standards
; te : and customer codes of practice.
Growing publishing company requires a
proven sales executive. Big $$$ are easy with DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
The Tribune wants to hear ;
from people who are
making news in their
Â¥ neighbourhoods. Perhaps
{| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. f
If so, call us on 322-1986
_and share your story.

good performance. Advertising or graphic

Provide specialist advice on the economic and financial performance of BTC as a regulated
arts experience preferred but not essential.

operator

Provide economic and financial analysis involving marketing research and changes in price
setting methodologies

Provide proficient application of economic principles to the licence compliance requirements
of BTC as a regulated telecommunications operator

Provide market research and other economic studies relevant to the current and future
development of BTC

Become proficient in knowledge of all necessary repaiatony documents including the
Telecommunications Act, Sector Policy and BTC's licence

Direct sales experience a must. Company
has good reputation, top publications and a
friendly, positive atmosphere with strong
work ethic. Flexible hours possible.

Call: 323-8888

or fax resume tO: 322-4527



SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST

Advise on and monitor PUC Rate Rebalancing Proposals and all epochs of BTC rates including
price regulated services

Advise on and monitor all relevant sector issues including universal service, price capping and
reference interconnection offer documents (RIO) including Public Consultations

Advise on and monitor all relevant interconnection issues e.g. revenue

To liaise with the Public Utilities Commission on all relevant compliance issues and to attend
to meetings and correspondence related thereto

To assist in the reporting of individual business units in the company on a line of business
basis for various services 3 8

To assist in the preparation of network and service development plans for the demonstration
of cost based pricing to assist with the determination of interconnection pricing

To assist in the development and implementation of strategies to keep the company competitive
and to secure its market share

Generally to assist with the division's objective of ensuing compliance with licence provisions
whilst ensuring that the company 4

To attend all staff meetings and prepare monthly status reports on tasks and assignments

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Come in to Premier Travel on Saturday March 4th from

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(Ii) Good experience in market research and regulatory methodologies

(iii) ~Some proficiency in accounting required

(iv) Computer skills in database, spreadsheets, statistics and word processing

(v) Membership in relevant professional associations

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Monday, February 27, 2006 and addressed as follows:

* Deposit must be
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from December 1st,
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DIRECTOR.
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

#57 Collins Avenue
Tel: 328-0264 / 328-0267

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST, REGULATORY







with the

B By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com_

IT COMES as no surprise
that lecturers, staff and stu-
dents at the College of the
Bahamas have raised a peti-
tion calling for the reinstate-

PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

4



ment of former president Dr
Rodney Smith.
aving just completed



4
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)
1
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DSL UPGRADE

In its continuing effort to improve its
telecommunications services, The
Bahamas Telecommunication Company
Ltd. (BTC) wishes to inform the public
and its valued customers that we will be
performing a DSL equipment upgrade
in the Eastern district of New Providence
on Tuesday, February 21st, 2006
beginning at 1:00am. As a result, some
subscribers in the Eastern district may
experience a brief disruption in their DSL
high speed internet service. Please note,
that telephone services will not be
interrupted, only 'DSL_ service.

‘

BTC apologizes for the inconvenience
caused, and assures the public that every
effort will be made to keep the disruption
of internet service to a minimum.






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COB, I can assure you that
these notions have existed
under the surface for quite

_ some time. In fact, since short-

ly after Dr Smith’s resignation
in early August, 2005.

The fact that the petition
bears more than 400 signa-
tures serves as a show of no
confidence in the present lead-
ership team.



looked them and begun the
search for someone from over-
seas to lead this institution to
university status. Now they are
just keeping the house until
they locate its rightful occu-
pant.

Students have been grum-
bling for months about what
they see as the cold atmos-
phere since Dr Smith’s depar-
ture.

Both the ‘acting president,
Dr Rhonda Chipman-John-
son, and her colleague, Dr
Pandora Johnson, are COB
stalwarts, but they are not



“While I'm not pressing for
Dr Smith’s return, I do admit
he did wonders for the college.
During his tenure, morale was
boosted, new ideas permeated
the atmosphere and students
felt like they were important
and not just seen as cash

cows.”



Just this week, The Tribune
reported that COB council
chairman Franklyn Wilson
had indicated that they were
still paying the rent -$4,000
per month - for the former
residence of Dr Smith on
Eastern Road.

This can be interpreted as
the council’s way of telling
local presidential candidates
with their own homes that
members have already over-

expected to lead the college
to university status.

While I’m not pressing for
Dr Smith’s return, I do admit
he did wonders for the col-
lege. During his tenure,
morale was boosted, new
ideas permeated the atmos-
phere and students felt like
they were important and not
just seen as‘cash cows... .
Dr Smith made it a point to
meet with the studentsand

peau

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COB can stil attain university status

hear their queries. He always
presented himself as a man
who was approachable and
steadfast in his belief that a
college/university can only
come to fruition with its stu-
dent body.

It is evident that Mr Wilson
must find someone with an
attractive persona and an evo-
lutionary outlook.

I disagree with my former
lecturer Felix Bethel’s notion
that it would take the college
another 20 years to become a
university.

It is my belief that if the
right person is at the helm of
the college, it can still attain
university status, maybe not
in 2007, but shortly thereafter.

Having been a student at
COB during Dr Smith’s pres-

THE TRIBUNE

at the helm

idency, I confirm that morale,
work drive and visionary out-
look of both staff and students
were at an all-time high.

The question now becomes:
Does it take Dr Smith to
return to fill this void or do
we find an outsider to rein-
vigorate the college? The lat-
ter seems more likely, because
as an historian, I know the
harsh, embarrassing implica-
tions of plagiarism or ‘any
notion that plagiarism had
occurred.

As things stand, the admin-
istration at COB is far from
appealing. I urge’ Mr Wilson to
think on these things and
make a decision that is in the
best interest of the college -
not popularity, politics or oth-
erwise.



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”













THE TRIBUNE os MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE iS,

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006



FROM page one

already relayed to the press,
was solely the result of previ-
ously scheduled medical tests
and evaluations at the Cleve-
land Clinic in Fort Lauderdale
which I had already been
forced to postpone once due to
pressing business and which I




<

&

Invite application for the position of:

DIRECTOR OF FOOD & BEVERAGE

Applicant must be experienced in their field,
excellent communication skills, written and oral;
Team building and management skills; position
offers attractive compensation packages, competitive
with relevant experience. .

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005 ’

Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com

Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

was reluctant, indeed unwill-
ing, to postpone again.

“TI am pleased to advise
that my doctors have found
me to be in good health,” he
said.

He also said that Mr

Christie was suffering from a
lapse of memory. He had
asserted that he had not read
about or heard about an














YOUR CONNECTIO

FO THE WORLD

LOCAL NEWS

opposition leader not attend-
ing the opening of parlia-
ment, but it had happened on
more than one occasion.

“How poorly the prime
minister’s memory serves
him. He certainly appears to
have forgotten that twice, in
1992 and again in 1993, the
entire opposition bench,
including his good self and
his then leader, Sir Lynden,
absented themselves in what
they termed a boycott from
the reading of the Speech
from the Throne at the open-
ing of parliament under an
FNM administration.

“And he appears also not
to recall the central role that
he and his co-deputy leader
played in 1996 in planning a
third PLP boycott of the
opening of a new session of
parliament. Action. which he
took in the absence of his

leader, who was not present —

due to ill-health,” Mr Ingra-
ham said. :
Mr Ingraham produced a
newspaper article from
August 16, 1993, which fea-

tured a press conference

where then PLP deputy lead-
ers B J Nottage and Mr
Christie explained why the
PLP would not be attending
the opening of that session of
parliament.

VACANCY NOTICE



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for the position
of Senior Associate/Database Administrator in our IT Technical Services Department.

JOB SUMMARY:

‘

The Database Administrator (DBA) is responsible for maintaining the health of BTC Oracle, DB2:and SQL databases. The
DBA implements databases, develops backup ‘and restoration procedures, performs databases tuning, ‘and manages the growth
and performance of the IT databases. The DBA utilizes diagnostic tools to determine system:performance problems and
implements database and indexing changes as needed in order to maximize database performance. The DBA also researches
patches and implements database upgrades and realeases to keep the database environment current. In addition, the DBA
serves as the resident expert on data retrieval and management through an expert knowledge of SQL and stored procedure,
providing technical support to developers as needed. The DBA works closely with the Manager of Data Security to implement
prescribed security rules and policies as determined at the database level. The DBA performs special application tuning duties
to improve performance on application systems for billing, accounting and customer service and other applications. The DBA
acts as the organzier, planner, problem solver and overall leader for the BTC IT databases. This position requires regular
interactions with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being
met effectively and on time. The DBA maintains adequate documentation and communication of all related system upgrades,
outages and modifications, keeping Business Partners well informed of changes in policies and procedures. This position,
interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, implement upgrades and deliver solutions.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

o © @ © 2 2 © @ @ @

data is comprehensive copied
Manages and configured database storage, monitors space, plans for future growth and manages the growth and
performance of the IT databases ,
Works closely with the Manager of Data Security and implements prescribed security policies and procedures
Acts as tier 2 Help Desk support to troubleshoot and resolve: database issues in a 24 x 7 environment
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of potential problems
Stays current with new system offerings and technology, analyzes new technology and makes recommendations

where applicable.

Manage the day to day health of the IT Oracle, DB2 and SQL production! databases

Implement and support various test and training database instances as required

Installs new databases, configures them, tunes them and monitors performance

Utilizes diagnostic tools and explain plans to identify database performance issues

Modifies the database schema where required to implement application system upgrades
Maintains database currently through migration of releases and patch implementation
Researches database patches to determine their suitability for implementation on specific. systems
Troubleshoots database problems and performance issues

Works with developers to design and create new application databases
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to implement database backup procedures to ensure that

Works closely with System Administrator Operating Systems, and Systems Architect to provide and maintain a
comprehensive IT technical architecture
Manages and tracks all reported issues received and escalated from the IT level 1/2 Service Desk
Regularly interacts with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that
support service levels are being effectively and on time
Communicates policy and procedural changes: develops, reviews and updates standard operating procedure
manuals for the hardware and software platform support
Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall operation
efféctiveness of the technical architecture

Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management ~

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information Systems,
’ Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields

7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaing Oracle databases

7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining DB2 databases

5 years experience with AIX, OS 400, Windows and Linux operating systems

Strong leadership ability

1 year experience utilizing a storage area network (SAN)
Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem management

and tracking, SLA management, release/version management, escalations and notifications)

Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC processes, change
management discipline, and project management processes).

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

Working knowledge of OS 400, AIX, WIndows, Solaris and Linux. operating systems
Strong leadership ability with the ability to lead and take charge of a technical area
Strong knowledge of database security, knowledge of Peoplesoft security is a plus
Ability to utilize performance tools to identify application system performance issues

Ability to monitor and tune database to maintain maximun performance

Expert knowledge of SQL and stored procedures
Working knowledge of UNIX security, OS 400 security, Windows and Linux Security mechanisms

Ability to extablish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA’s and develop guidelines

Kowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration tools and

technologies

Knowledge of project management processes, applications (MS Project) and disciplines
Strong written and verbal communications skills :
Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a non-technical, simple manner
Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.

All application are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F, Kennedy Drive no longer than Monday, February 27,

2006 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR

THE HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR



“In what dream world does
the prime minister exist? I
recommend that in the future
he might exercise his memo-
ry and ensure that his brain is
in gear before he speaks,” Mr
Ingraham said.

He said he was surprised
to learn that his absence from
the reading of the Speech
from the Throne so distracted
members of the government
that they permitted their
attention to be diverted from
the real business at hand -
their legislative agenda for
“their final 15 months in
office”.

“T am bowled over to learn
that the governing party
holds the office of leader of
the opposition in such high
esteem; and further consid-
ers the presence of the leader
of the opposition so central
to the government’s business.

“This is news to me. After
all, this is the same govern-
ment that routinely invites
the leader of the opposition
to formal government func-
tions by telephone on the
night before the function - as
was the case for the recent
demission from office of the
former Governor General
and the oath-taking by the
new Governor General, and
as was the notification of the
official arrangements for the
funeral of our late colleague,
George Mackey.

“Of course, this is par for
the course. The governing
party continues to give great-
est attention to form over
substance. They have no real
appreciation, respect or
understanding of and for the
true functioning of a parlia-
mentary democracy.

“For example, they do not
appear to know that the pro-
rogation and opening of a
new session of parliament in
a functioning democracy is
not a secret,” Mr Ingraham
said. |

He said that in a function-
ing democracy, parliamentary

courtesy ensures that consul. -



es-place prior. to
prorogation to determine
whether the opposition has
matters of interest they would

â„¢ leader slams PM

wish to have addressed prior
to prorogation or otherwise
carried forward to the new
session of parliament.

“But the governing party
does not understand or prac-
tise these basic democratic
principles. That is why they
could see fit to prorogue par-
liament on January 31 with
no prior notice to the oppo-
sition and leave some 60
questions, with as many as
200 sub-parts, put to the gov-
ernment by members of the
opposition unanswered.

“In a functioning democra-
cy.a government answers
questions put to it by the
opposition,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the gov-
erning party did not observe
any of these democratic
norms. Instead, they deter-
mined “in secret when the

‘House would be prorogued

and when the new session
would open.”

He said: “The absence of
consultation prior to proro-
gation meant that a number
of members of the opposition
found ourselves unable to
rearrange our schedules to
accommodate the secret
schedule of the governing
party.

“Then the leader of the
PLP pretends as if the
absence of a member, a justi-
fied absence, meant to send
no messages explicit or oth-
erwise, constitutes a threat to
democracy.

“T ask all of us, where is the
greater threat to parliamen-

. tary democracy? When on

prorogation and the sum-
moning of a new parliament,
the person who represents
himself to.be the alternative
PM does not appear, does not
come out, his deputy does not

appear and does not come : —

out, and they have not pro-
vided notice or excuse to the

parliament or to the Speak-:

er?” Mr Ingraham said.

He said the public will be
aware that there is no parlia-
mentary rule or custom that.
dictates that a member.
inform the Speaker of his/her
intended presence or absence
at a sitting of parliament.

ASSOCIATED BAHAMIAN DISTILLERS & BREWERS LTD

DIVIDEND NOTICE
TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS

We are pleased to advise that a Final Dividend
for 2003 of $0.30 per share shall be paid on 16th
February 2006 to Ordinary Shareholders of record
as at 31st December 2004. Having paid an interim
dividend of $0.50 for 2003, this makes the total
dividend paid for 2003 $0.80 per share.

The payment will be made in the usual manner,
on 16th February 2006, through Colina Financial
Advisors Limited, our Registrar and Transfer

agents.

Barry Newman
Company Secretary










a

"The material was very informative and will
definitely add value to me and my company. To
have the ability to resolve internal disputes in
house is a very positive thing."

Marion G. Smith, Bahamas Telecommunications Company, Nassau

"Material was excellent. Instructors very
effective. I work for the U.S. government and I
believe this course would be of benefit."

_ Dennis M. Weir, Federal Bureau’ of Prisons; Tuscon, USA Z



Negotiation ana Mediation skills |

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THE TRIBUNE




PLP women’s

branch chairman
FROM page one

“If it isn’t a good reason, I
think that we ought to be con-
cerned about that. Additionally,
he ought to be considering relin=
quishing the position if he isn’t
prepared to fulfil the mandate
of the position,” said Dr
Sawyer. th

She stressed that, if Mr Ingra-
ham had a good reason for not
attending, there was no debate:

With the upcoming general
election, Dr Sawyer said she is
moving up a notch, from “cruisé
control to full speed.” a

She said she is sure if the
organisation works hard, it will
be able to attract the women. =

“We want to get out there
and talk about the Progressive
Liberal Party, talk about the
issues that we feel strongly
about and how we would want
to see them handled and to pre=
sent our approach to them.” ;

She said the PLP’s philoso-
phy was concern for the peo-
ple.

Cabinet

FROM page one








left until a genera
to be calleds 3

Mr Christie said:-a't
initiative. was: du
ence to the econom
rity and safety of Bai

According to other 1 ts,
Minister of Immigration an
Labour Vincent:Peet w.
transferred to Fittancial Ser
vices. Shane Gibson maybe
moved from Housing. an¢
National. Insurance: tq :









gested the



istry of Finance.. ae
_ Alfred Sears. is expectec
remain as Minister of Educ:





.Dr Marcus Bethel is expectet
to head National Insurance witli
DrB J Nottage taking over: ag
Minister of Healths-.-22. 0°) 3¢

V Alfred Gray’s portfolio will
reportedly include local gov-
ernment, mailboats and post
offices. :
He would be relieved of Agri-



- culture and Fisheries, which

would be taken over by Leslie

Miller, who would retain Trade

and Industry under his portfo-
lio. wi

Fred Mitchell is expected to
remain Minister of Foreign
Affairs but will also take on
responsibility for international
trade, which would include
FTAA, CSME, LNG, and
PetroCaribe.

Obie Wilchcombe will report-
edly remain as.Minister of
Tourism and Bradley Roberts
is expected to retain responsi,
bility for the Ministry of Works
and Utilities.

Neville Wisdom will report-
edly remain Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture and Glenys
Hanna-Martin is also expected
to stay as Minister of Transport
and Aviation. a

It has also been claimed that
Pleasant Bridgewater may be
in the running for a Cabinet
post and that Michael Halkitis is
being considered for the post
of Minister of State for Finance,

,
a

s














to be held at the British
Colonial Hilton Nassau



¢ learn how to deal with tough bargainers
earn how to mediate disputes, saving time and money



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 15.





2

SPEL MUSIC CHANNEL F;

rye

gospel Music Chann

it

Gospel Splash, featuring
international gospel music
stars Anointed and Mary
Alessi, along with home-

the Bahamas and are certain to
put on a memorable show for
the Bahamian audience.”

The headline performers are
well-known in the gospel music
field. Anointed has been a pop-
ular gospel music group for
more than a decade and Mary
Alessi has been gaining recog-
nition as a worship and urban
vocalist.

Anointed has been celebrated

multi-ethnic following. Siblings
Da’dra and Steve Crawford,
while still masters of the
smooth, pop/R and B-flavoured
gospel their longtime fans have
come to know them for, also
give the urban, groove-driven
facets of their musical person-
alities plenty of space to shine in
their music. The resulting mix is
familiar but still fresh, as well
as new and innovative—and all

Artists turning up to
spread the gospel

HURRICANE Wilma’s
appearance last October may
have delayed the hosting of
one of the most anticipated
0.0, ii a ‘| gospel music events — but the
storm certainly could not stop

boardist and speaker, Mary
Alessi has released her second
independent album, More, a
live recording that features
many of her own songs.

A proud sponsor of Gospel
Splash, Joy 101.9 FM, will also
be giving listeners chances to
win free tickets during their
broadcasts.

Gospel Splash has also



grown inspirational music sen-
sations Shaback, TaDa and
Nehemiah Hield, will be held

Royal Bahamian Resort.
Doors will open at 8pm.
Angela Cannon, senior
marketing manager of Cable
Bahamas’ Gospel Music
channel, said: “Our artists are
raring to go! Both Anointed
and Mary Alessi are truly
thrilled about performing in



= BAHAMAS Heart Foundation chairman R E Barnes presents the Lady Sassoon Golden Heart

Award to Andrea Archer for exemplary community service on Saturday at the 42nd annual Heart
Ball. The Bahamas’ first school social worker, Mrs Archer was also lauded for her work with the
PACE and SURE programmes for the nation’s youth.

HUNDREDS showed their
support for children with heart
disease at the annual Heart Ball
on Saturday.

Organisers deemed the Ball,
in its:42nd year,.a.great.success...

A highlight was the announce-

ment of the Lady Sassoon Gold-
en Heart award. This is presented
to a person who has given exem-
plary service to other people. This
year’s recipient was Andrea

..Atcher, deputy permanent. sec-

retary in the Ministry of Health.

(Photo: Andrew Aitken)

A silent auction and a grand
raffle featured more than
$30,000 in prizes.

Supporters were entertained
with music from the Soulful

Groovers,.the Police. Pop Band. ..

and the Ed Brice Orchestra.

Digicel to enter Guyana
cell phone market

- o~-

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Seema Ure E ric

Betas

Mee TH IT Ca MU ee

for breaking down barriers of
genre, styles and markets, and

on February 25 at Sandals in the process building a broad,

3 months (13 weeks) $

rable.



For delivery of the leading Bahamian
newspaper, call The Tribune’s
Circulation Department at 502-2383
or visit our offices on Shirley Street
td sigh up today!



45.95
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instantly accessible and memo-

As a singer/songwriter, key-

received the support of local
companies such as KFC, Pepsi
and is fully supported by Gospel
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head start on my day. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

HAROLD ANTOR
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Tribune

wf DZ oe St ee az?
~ Yup FLOUSOa er
> 3







PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS |

Members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity

| F r ater nity helps got to work at the Simpson Penn School

for Boys on Saturday as they continued a

to clean up campaign to clean up school environs
school campus







@ N’KOMO Ferguson, a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc, along with volunteers gave a
helping hand on Saturday at the Simpsom Penn School for Boys by cutting grass



Si

os ott



= MEMBERS of the Sigma Beta club of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity move old beds on Saturday
at the Simpson Penn School for Boys



& MEMBERS of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, along with
volunteers, give a helping hand on Saturday at the Simpson
Penn School for Boys by cutting grass, as part of a sustained

&
campaign to help clean up schoois and public spaces ol ] nh a

wit. coling.coi







Because dreams can be wrecked,
stolen or go up in smoke.



@ MEMBERS of the Sigma Beta club of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity paint the walls of the cafeteria on Saturday at the

Simpson Penn School for Boys

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff) ‘ | | i : W fe a |e ie it Le lf Le fo | yO u e



HOME ® MOTOR © LIABILITY
CASUALTY ® CONTRACT WORKS
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ® MARINE

Tel: 325-3809
Rosetta Street
info@colinageneral.com

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


















SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 2006

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street






Insurance Le.



Credit union questions:
‘Where’s our red carpet?’

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter

he Teachers and
Salaried Workers
Cooperative
Credit Union told
The Tribune that
it feels the “carpet has been
pulled from underneath" its
proposed $3-$6 million invest-
ment for Inagua, and is urging
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments to seri-
ously consider its proposal.

Phase III set
to generate
$100m
operating
income

By NEIL HARTNELL.
Tribune Business Editor

KERZNER. International
expects the Phase III expan- —

sion on Paradise Island to gen-
erate $100 million in operating
income from its first full-year in
operation, a Wall Street ana-
lyst has noted. —

Lawrence Klatzkin, an ana-
lyst with Jefferies & Compa-
ny, said in a report for investors
following Kerzner Internation-
al’s fourth quarter results that
‘the Phase III expansion, which
was “proceeding on time and
on’ budget”, and scheduled to
open in April 2007, would gen-
erate an extra $7.10 in value
per ordinary share.

_ This was based on a rate of
return of 19 per cent on capital
invested by Kerzner Interna-
tionalon Phase WI.

Mr Klatzkin said of the
Phase III expansion: “Kerzner
plans on making the resort
‘more of a theme park with
more water rides and a new
‘Swim with the Dolphins’
encounter, which should help
the luxury mass market as
management has indicated
there has been a large demand
for a better lodging product at
Atlantis for families who want
to stay where the water activi-
ties are.”

In addition, he added that .

SEE page 5B



The call comes after hearing
the Government's renewed
commitment to paving a
smooth road for Bahamian
investors in last week’s Speech
from the Throne, through the
creation of a Domestic Invest-

ment Board to remove ‘red |

tape’ from the approvals
process.

After initially introducing
their $3 to $6 million Mayagua-
na proposal to the Ministry ear-
ly in 2005, a credit union
spokesman said that to date,
they have gotten no further
than an initial meeting with

ml JAMES CAMPBELL

brings
contempt
case
against



CFG duo >

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM —
Tribune Business
Reporter

CONTEMPT of court -
proceedings instituted
against Colina Financial
Group’s (CFG) two prin-
cipals, Emmanuel Alexiou
and Anthony Ferguson, by
their former business part-
ner James Campbell have
been adjourned until this
Thursday.

Mr Campbell's attor-
neys, Philip Davis and
Arthur Minns, indicated
that $9 million was paid by



SEE page 5B

Pension funds execute
Royal Oasis ruling

‘i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE hotel pension funds have executed a judgement that °

requires all the monies owed by the still-closed Royal Oasis
resort to be paid when the property is finally sold, The Tribune has

learnt.

The judgement was executed by the deputy Provost Marshal,
and means that when an agreement is

concluded for the resort’s sale, the
two pension funds - the Bahamas

SEE page 7B

Micronet

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pote) UL el epee copiers ‘ eae u eh Wert

officials.

The proposal is designed to
complement proposed major
investment on Mayaguana by
the Boston-based J-Group,
which has engaged in a 50/50
joint venture partnership with
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas.

The credit union aims to pro-
vide affordable housing units,
assisting islanders and descen-
dants with first and second
home constriction through cre-
ating three housing divisions in
Pirate’s Well, Abraham’s Bay
and Betsy Bay. It will also pro-

vide mortgages to homeown-
ers.

Other parts of the invest-
ment include creating a Busi-
ness Centre in Abraham’s Bay,
through providing shops and
rental facilities, and building a
shopping mall.

The credit union’s proposal

said: “The situation (in

Mayaguana) is likely to change

in the immediate future with
the developments proposed by
the I-Group of investors, to
whom the Government has giv-
en ‘approval in principle’. It is

also anticipated, and certainly —

Ties Par

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
' Tribune Business Editor |

BAHAMIAN employers will have to
undergo a “cultural change” by making
on-time contributions on behalf of their
employees under the proposed National
Health Insurance scheme, with the plan’s
advocates telling The Tribune that a
nationwide Information Technology (IT)
system will cut down fraud and eliminate
the need for a large bureaucracy.

Etoile Pinder, a health financing spe-
cialist with the National Health Insurance
(NHI) Implementation project, told The

expected, that the Teacher's

credit union would be given the ..

opportunity to partner in this
development." _

However, a spokesman said
the credit union’s Board was
disappointed, because instead
of having the red carpet rolled
out for them as with the I-
Group, the “carpet has been
pulled from underneath" them.

He claimed that several’
. scheduled meetings with Dr

Baltron Bethel, the Hotel Cor-
poration’s managing director

‘and deputy chairman, and a

representative from the Min-

istry were all cancelled, and a
fixed date for the meeting has
yet to be given to the credit
union.

Speaking specifically about
the newly-heralded Domestic
Investment Board, the credit
union spokesman said: “I see
the Domestic Investment
Board as a non-entity, another
means of setting up red tape. If
you have institutions like this

_union, the Bahamas Develop-

ment Bank, and BAIC, there is

_SEE page 7B

Itural change’



r National Health Insurance IT system

months later.

“We need the money and we need itina
timely fashion,” she explained.

Under the current NHI proposals,
monihly contributions would be pace 5:3 -

»

te pcr
We aE



Tribune that companies would “have to
. become used”. under the NHI scheme to
paying contributions on behalf of employ-
- ees on time, rather than three to four

seen as fraud and bureaucracy cure-all

per cent of an employee’s earned wages.
This would be split 50/50: between the
‘ employer and employee, with the latter
contributing 2.65 per cent of their own

salary, and the employer making a match-

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_ SEE page 10B



consulting



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



TAA Ls



& By Fidelity Capital as more than 50,000 shares four remained unchanged.
Markets changed hands. The market Volume leader for a second
saw eight out of the 20 listed consecutive week was Com-
IT was another active trading stocks trade, of which one monwealth Bank (CBL), with

34,615 shares changing hands
and accounting for 69 per cent
of the total shares traded.

The big advancer for the
week was also CBL, whose
share price increased by $0.19
to end the week at a new 52
week high of $9.29. On the
downside, J. S. Johnson Com-
pany’s (JSJ) share price
declined by $0.35 to close at
$8.75.

The FINDEX advanced 0.47
points for the week to close at
595.28.

week in the Bahamian market advanced, three declined and







International Markets

FOREX Rates






Weekly % Change
-0.26
-0.13
0.35










1.1501
1.7417
1.1936

CAD$
GBP
EUR















Commodities

Weekly % Change COMPANY NEWS
Crude Oil $59.88 -3.17 Kerzner International
Gold $554.00 -1.65 (KZL) -



For the 2005 fourth quarter,

International Stock Market Indexes: million compared to $8.4 mil-






% Change



Weekly






11,115.32 1.80

S & P 500 1,287.24 1.60
NASDAQ 2,282.36 0.91
ikkei 15,713.45 -3.35






Quality Auto Sales Ltd
PARTS DEPARTMENT
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
MARCH 1 thru 4

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 6.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments

will be open for business as usual.

QUALITY it

East Shirley. Street 323- 3529/323-3709

“ Club: development.



_ THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST IN.

SCHOOL OF CONTINUING STUDIES
COUNTRY CONFERENCE SERIES
June 8-9, 2006

CALL FOR PAPERS
BEYOND WALLS: MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES

The Bahamas Conference:
' A multi-disciplinary conference focusing on issues relevant to
The Bahamas

| INVITATION

| — The School of Continuing Studies has established a Country Conference Series focusing
| on non-campus countries of the UWI system. The overall aim of the Country Conference
| Series is to stimulate and highlight research in each country by academics in the country,

| and scholars with interest in Caribbean studies.

| OBJECTIVES
The Country Conference Series has the following objectives:
¢ Increasing research on matters of relevance to the country
¢ Enhancing the quality of public discourse on matters relevant to local development
¢ Contributing in a stimulating manner to intellectual activity in the country

° Espangue the quality and scope of the outreach programmes of UWI

The conference series would achieve its goal by bringing together scholars who have
a research interest in The Bahamas.

rc with an interest in The Bahamas. Conference

| Submissions are invited from pie
| presentations will be 20 minutes long with 20 minutes for discussion. Submissions should
| include:

A cover sheet containing the title of the paper, the author’s (or authors’) address
(email address/fax number), institution and a 25-word summary suitable for
publication in the conference programme

One page with a 250-word abstract of the paper

One page with a 50-word biography of each author

| For further information, please contact Donna Nicolls at (242)323- 6593, 424-4786 or e-
| mail: uwibahamas@hotmail.com.

| SEND SUBMISSIONS TO:

Ms. Simone Augier
School of Continuing Studies
University of the West Indies, Mona Jamaica
E-mail: mailto:saugier@uwimona.edu.jm Fax: 876-977-3443
SUBMISSION DEADLINES:

Abstracts: March 3, 2006
Full Papers: April 21, 2006

| The conference presentations are made available on the web following the conference and
| the papers are edited and published for distribution.

KZL posted net income of $7.1 °

Appeal to

be heard
on $175m
development

THE Save Guana Cay Reef Association will today appeal

_ a Supreme Court decision that turned down their request
for discovery and cross-examination of witnesses in the
dispute over the $175 million Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean

Both the developers, Discovery Land: company, and the
Government defendants - the Prime Minister, Treasurer
and Cabinet Secretary Wendall Major - had resisted
attempts by the Association and its attorney, Fred Smith,
to cross-examine their witnesses. _

Mr Smith’s application for an injunction against the
Crown and the developers, plus the discovery request and
|. permission to cross-examine witnesses, was refused by
Supreme | Cour Justice Carroll. -



lion for the same period in
2004. However, on an adjusted
basis, net income was $13.2 mil-
lion compared to $9.7 million in
2004.

Revenues increased by $33
million or 23 per cent to total
$177 million, while costs and
expenses rose by $38 million
or 28 per cent to total $176 mil-
lion. Income from operations
stood at $1.2 million versus $6.3
million in 2004.

Atlantis, Paradise Island con-
tributed net revenue and
EBITDA in the 2004 fourth
quarter of $124.9 million. and
$29.8 million, respectively, as
compared to $108 million and
$25.1 million, respectively, in
the same period in 2004.

The increase in net revenues
was driven mainly by gains in
food and beverage and casino
revenues, which rose by 23 per
cent and 22 per cent respec-
tively.












The Bahamian Stock Market |

YTD 7.84%








FINDEX 595.28%

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
PRICE CHANGE

411%





BISX
SYMBOL


























AML $0.70 $- 1500
BAB $1.15 $-0.02 2000 4.55%
BBL _ $0.70 $- 0 0.00%
BOB _ $7.00 . 0 0.00%
BPF $10.48 $- 0 0.77%
BSL $13.25 $. 0 3.92% |
BWL $1.26 $- 0 0.00% |
CAB $9.53 $- 0 0.21%
CBL $9.29 $0.19 34615 1.98%
CHL $1.70 $- 5304 3.66%
CIB $10.95 g 0 0.64%
CWCB $4.69 $0.36. 0 8.31%
DHS $2.79 $-0.07 4200 28.57%
FAM $6.21 $- 0 2.64%
FCC $1.15 $: 0 0.00% |
FCL $10.05 §: 1100 -3.31%
FIN $10.95 $- 0 0.46%
ICD _$9.95 §. 500 0.00%
ISI $8.75 $-035 1000 3.31%
KZLB $6.73 $0.16 1.75% |
0.00% _|

$10.00 $- 0

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:




¢ ICD Utilities (ICD) declared a dividend of $0. 135 per eh
- share payable on February 16, 2006, to all common share- a
holders as at record date February 2, 2006. a




° ‘Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared an extraordinary |
dividend of $0.12 per share payable on April 28, 2006, to all
common shareholders as at record date April 15, 2006.






¢ FOCOL Holdings will hold its Annual General Meeting . |
on February 23, 2006, at 10.30.am in its Board Room, |
FOCOL Holdings Corporate Office, Queens ey
Ereepert, Grand Bahama.






e FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) will hold its
Annual General Meeting on February 26, 2006, at 6pm at
the British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. |




INES fel aa

mela tree et Tite]
ma facts Le et
on gibi



THE AIRPORT AUTHORIT

VACANCY

The pines Authority is seeking suitably aualies Bahamians
to fill the positions noted below:-

INSPECTOR- (SECURITY DIVISION)

The Inspector of Security is generally responsible for a shift
and is therefore required to effectively manage, motivate and
coordinate the regular deployment of staff as well as to assist
them in their professional development.

The successful applicant must therefore be self-motivated
with excellent communication and inter-personal skills, ten
(10) years working experience; the last five (5) at the
Supervisory level in addition to tertiary level academic
qualifications. Tertiary level qualifications and experience in
Police or Security related duties and investigations will be
considered an asset.

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants should possesses a Bachelor of Science Degree
in Computer Science or Computer Technology, a Microsoft
Certified Professional Certificate, proficiency in Computer
Software and a minimum of three (3) to five (5) years
experience in installing and maintaining Information Systems
Network.

Qualified Bahamians should submit their Resume, no later
than 24th February 2006 to the

Manager, Human Resources

The Airport Authority

Nassau International Airport



P.O. Box AP 59222
Nassau, Bahamas



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3B

onsultants get



Pusiic NorIice

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSED ARCHITECTS

Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliment 1994
P.O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street, Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act, 1994 empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons
qualified to practice as Professional Architects in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person
shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or aneees in public practice unless he is the holder of a valid licence.”
Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine,
imprisonment or both.



Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects
Board” to practice as Professional Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2007.

set to ASSESS NHI

NAME ADDRESS LICENCE # NAME ADDRESS LICENCE #
Rodney W. Braynen Phone No. (242) 393-1874 001 :
FILB.A. B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1423 Donald A Dean Phone No. (242) 352-4835 057
Nassau, Bahamas Ee Soe “
reeport, Grand Bahama
John W. Darville Phone No. (242) 394-2600 002
@ Dip. Arch., R.I.B.A., .B.A. P.O. Box N-4556 Bruce LaFleur, A.P.A., A.A. Phone No. (242) 328-7240 060
Nassau, Bahamas B.Sc. Envin. Des, M. Arch. ao Se
J jassau, amas
Amos J ee Phone No. (242) 393-0079 003
Fl. BAA P.O. Box SS-6261 Michael J: Moss, 1.B.A. Phone N No. (242) 356-5913 061
B. Arch., ML “Arch jassau, Bahamas
, fiseaa, Sohumas i
i Gerald L. L. Higgs Phone No. (242) 356-2740 004
B. Arch. Tech. ro Boxee Garth W Sawyer oat wis (242) eu 063
* jassau, amas x N-1
Nassau, Senannes
Anthony J Jervis, |.B.A. | Phone No. (242) 323-2628 005 |
B.E.D.,B. Arch. M. Arch. P.O. Box N77 Enrique Roldan Phone No, (242) 304-6306 064
jassau, Bahamas »O. x Ne
Nassau,
Alvan K. Rolle 1.B.A, Phone No. (242) 326-8141 006
B. Arch. Tech P.O. BoxN-7401 Neville Bostield Phone No, 242) 322-1900 065
jassau, Bahamas . Arch. .O. Box
Nassau, Bahamas
Douglas R A Smith, R..B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-2600 007
1.B.A., Dip. Arch., BSc., MSc. fo Box tbe Wesley G R Thompson pone Se No. (282) 557-3718 066
jassau, Banamas
Exuma, "Lahanas
, F Gordon C Major, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 357-8741 008
@ By NEIL HARTNELL that the National Insurance the NIB’s. B. Arch. Tech P.O. Box N-3326 ; Leo D Ferguson Phone No, (242) 924-5566 067
Tribune Business Editor Board’s (NIB) administrative Critics of the proposed NHI Se meee hese Bchencs
i ae ft Te costs were still too high forthe scheme have argued that the PO Box hearag Timothy H Nell, P.LB.A. Phong No, (242) 366-9110 ani
A TEAM of foreign consul- NHI scheme to be feasible. economic assumptions under- Nassau, Bahamas Dip. Arch. CO Ban oe
tants will arrive in the Bahamas : pinning it and cost estimates Beer Ac at ‘A, Phone No, (242) 393-8893 OO DA ht Ea Endo ue cae fa
“in the next three months” Pr oposed are unrealistic, with the plan pA ccna ee Mec ey Le: PO Box E28076 i 9
ei orae . ; ; 1 1 jovernor’s Harbour,
assess the economic impact if ; unsustainable financially in the Michael C Alexiou, .B.A. Phone No. (242) 325-7363 oi; eevemen
the proposed National Health The NIB is proposed as the long-term due to an increas- B. Arch. Att gE Albeno 6 Suichi LAG”. Phone fie. An or eaes as
Insurance (NHI) plan is intro- arm of government to collect ingly older Bahamian popula- spb lvieiabaldats ae calc tau etna oi | Pha P.O. Box CB-13177
duced, The Tribune was told. | NHI contributions and admin- __ tion and rising healthcare costs. Bea eee een Box E6704 wks sy:
Dr Stanley Lalta, the NHI _ ister the scheme, but its admin- Dr Lalta toid The Tribune Nassau, Bahamas Pigonirnnee eet ee senna! Ont
project manager, said: istrative costs for 2004-thelast that the costings had been ne Behagg, R.LB.A., B.A. phohe Hed ao oie 013 Nassau, Bahamas
“We have preparedatermsof year for which accounts were based on the Bahamian econo- Nassau, Bahamas Tyrone Burrows, |.B.A. Phone No, ( No. (242) 382-0611 075
: * 2 - . Arch. x N-
reference for a team to come in available - were 23 percent of my achieving a 1.5-2 per cent Gaetano A Bonamy, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 367-2496 014 Nasau, ln
and help us to look at all the . contributions. average per annum growth rate B. Arch. Riven eaten hesba Dwight M-Thompson, LB.A. Phone No. (24a) say aoo0 ons
ic j j -5 j 2 ‘ B.Arch. P.O. Box CB-13826
macroeconomic impacts from The NHI report said these over a 40 0 year period, some sve Bobtui IBA“ hche WeSioAay SOA eas ang ore
the NHI. This is an important costs needed to be at least 10 thing it had been able to B.A., M. Arch P.O. Box N-8244 shi Saat
part of the whole thing - the per cent of revenues, or else _ achieve historically. Ree Renae ry rg cae Al —tdeg 8 ort oF
: Victor R Cartwright, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 324-1896 016 Nassau, Bahamas
impact on employment, wages, the proposed health care P e t d noe g ore ee 2
prices and savings.” financing scheme would “not roj ecte Nassau, Bahamas Livingston Forbes, B.A. Phone No; (242) 356-9798 078
He added that the consul- __ be feasible”. In comparison, Winston G Jones, R.LB.A. Phone No, (242) 325-1520 019 toe Nassau, Bahamas
tants would be brought in with- | administrative costs in the He added that the NHI’s SE aT eo eee hens sine thoethag Phone NO. (242) 373-1257. ave
: : : : Wi Dip. Arch. Tech P.O. Box F42707
in the next three months, once Canadian and French social projected $235 million total Kenneth VLan, RIB, LBA Phone No, 2 242) 906-2114 a p Pooport Gri aha
their appointment was con- health insurance systems were __ cost, it if had existed in 2005, MBA. P.O
oat ° : Nea Bahamas Pier Baldacci Phone No. (242) 323-4764 080
firmed at the policy level. less than 1 per cent of rev- was just the recurrent costs of As P.O. Box N-4574
Business groups and individ- _ enues. healthcare. It did not include ere ey boca = Hessen Babeniee
ual companies have long In response, Dr Lalta said _ capital spending on healthcare Nassausbanames Rawrence Chisholm Se 082
expressed concerns about how _ the Social Security Reform infrastructure, the Govern- dohn L MoKenzie, LBA. Phone No. (242) 308-8416 022 Nassau, Bahamas
the proposed NHI would Commission’s recommenda- ment’s Budget allocation to Rag Nassau, Bahamas Bruce M Stewart IBA, ALA. Phone No, (242) 323-8800 083
impact the Bahamian econo- tions on NIB reforms includ- _ health care, or the administra- Ginn Wipeagy Phone No. 242) 424-1469 on Pe Neen eames
: j 1 j 1 j 1 j . Arch. .O. Box EE-17989
my, viewing it as another tax eda series of targets aimed at __ tive costs of the public sector. Newco Ganaaae Michael A Digais Phone No. (242) 394-1886 Gai
that would act as a drag on _ reducing its costs to 10 per cent Many doctors and insurance B. Arch. : P.O. Box N-120
: i ts : : Andrew O sai RBA. ALA. ee re Rashes 393-7883 024 Nassau, Bahamas
both the economy and individ- of revenue. companies had queried the B, Arch. PO
ual incomes. In addition, he said that the $235 miition figure as a gross Nassau, Bahamas slyesarcly eed poe er oS
e A NHI scheme “would buy incre-. underestimate, arguing that the Ree he pe Been en 025 Nassau, Bahamas
Financing mental services from the NIB”, truer cost of healthcare in the Nassau, Bahamas Dirk K Saunders Phone No. 242) 341-4197 - 087
: - s le x Cl
meaning that no new offices | Bahamas was nearer $400-$500 Welington Woods, B.A. Phone No, (242) 323-7042 026 Nassau, Bahamas
: a ae ch sbi
oe a ne and Etolie ve . = aac million. fee eta Goodwin Cargill Phone No. (242) 356-0216 088
inder, a health financing spe- ter and collect contri aEHONS. Benjamin M Albury Phone No. (242) 393-3552 027 | Nassau, Bahamas
cialist with the NHI imple- As a result, the NHI’s costs SEE 6B B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1731
° jassau as
mentation team, acknowledged would be “much lower” than page or etre Robert Whittingham Phone No. 242) 322-6591 089
Frederick D Albury Phone No. (242) 325-5916 028 P.O. Box CB-13846
4 * BY Arch, . Nae phere Nassau. Bahamas
lassau, Bahamas .
WEY Michael Foster, 1.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-3385 032 Stephen J Bain Phone No. (262) 356-6029 090
B.Sc., B. Arch. P.O. Box N-119 B. Arch. P.0.Box N-1008
3 jassau, Banamas jassau, Bahamas
\ Henry AHepbum, R.I.B.A., A.A. Phone No. a 341-9389 033 Jeremiah Moxey Phone No. oe 341-4846 091
B. Arch. M. Arch, M.U.P. P.O. Box N . Arch. P.O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, ponanad Nassau, Bahamas
Sean R Mattews, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 356-4538 035 C Bernardo Deleveaux Phone No. 242) 325-5103 092
Dip. Arch P.O. Box SS-19909 P.O. Box 77
: Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
Charles J Moss Phone No. (242) 352-5204 036 Lawrence C Smith Phone No. (242) 427-1565 093
a
B. Sc. Arch. PO. Box F-41247 PO. Box N-14t2
reeport, Bal amas jassau, Banamas
Alicia C A Oxley, 1.B.A. Phone No. ian 394-3251 038. Harold S Johnson Phone No. eS 364-4694 095
B. Arch., M. Arch. ie Box » aleve B. Sc. Arch. Tech. ne Se :
assau, Bahamas: assau, Banamas
David $ White Phone No. (242) 324-1547 039 | Mark W Henderson, RL.B.A. Phone No. (242) 327-3274 096
R.1.B,A., RAC P.O, Box N-101 B. Sc. B. Arch. PO. Box CB-12496
lassau, Bal anes jassau, Ganamas
Daniel W J Davies, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 332-2012 040 Kevin R Bryce Phone No. (242) 356-4538 097
Dip. Arch. P.O. Box EL-25056 ‘ B. Sc. Arch. Eng. P.O, Box SS-19909
poverete Harbour, Nassau, Bahamas
jeutnera ‘ 2 7
Mark A Smith, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 323-0486 098
Douglas A Minns, |.B.A. | Phone No. (242) 394-4736 042 B. Arch., M.L.A. P.O. Box SS-6888
4 fo Box Te (908 Nassau, Bahamas
jassau, Banamas
Copeland Moxey, |.B.A. | Phone No, (242) 457-2107 os9
E aa Wane erpool, 1.B.A. Bote Me ea 356-7723 043 B. Arch, ¥ : Co Box iS 12689
. Arch., M. an esign .O. Box N-3! jassau, Banamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Carlos J Hepbum, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-5166 101
R John Paine, R.A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 322-2945 044 B. Arch. P.O. Box CR-54090
B. Arch. ro. Box & : -11499 Nassau, Bahamas
jassau, Banamas
Timothy F Johnson Phone No. (242) 364-7813 103
D Monty Knowles Phone No. (242) 326-2646 046 B. Arch. P.O. Box SS-6906
B. Arch. fe Box - eae Nassau, Bahamas
lassau, Bahamas
Tariq J O'Brien Phone No. (242) 328-1705 104
Gerard P Brown, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 377-0027 047 B.A., Dip. Arch P.O. Box N
B. Arch. no Box ee Dip. Urban Design Nassau, Bahamas
lassau, Banamas
Mark M Braithwaite Phone No. (242) 327-7259 105
Jackson L Burnside Il, B.A Phone No. (242) 394-1886 049 | B. Arts, B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11454
«Arch. .O. Bo: = jassau, Banamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Stefan P Russell Phone No. 2. (242) 94 341-4982 106
Larry Forbes Phone No. (242) 322-2021 050 B. Arch. P.O. Box C
B. Arch. Nee Box Bs ol Nassau, Sakon
lassau, Bahamas
; Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson Phone No. ig 362-6306 107
7 Leslie Johnson, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 393-8415 051 B.E.D.S. P.O. Box N
Re e a li Z e Our Home Equity Loan Plan can make your B. Arch. Fo, bor Ee eed Nassau, Bahamas,
‘ “oO % Kesna M. Hunt Phone No. (242) 352-4835 108
dreams come true with RATES AS LOW AS 7 ‘ 5 Yo P Curtis Malone Phone No. (242) 327-8045 052 | B.Arch. P.O. Box F-43578
: a Box eee Freeport, Grand Bahama
assau, Bahamas
and REDUCED LEGAL FEES! We can show you how : lan Brent Creary Phone No. (242) 394-1886 109
é Jason P Lorandos, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 393-4372 055 B. Arch. P.O. Box N-3857
: to make your home pay for: B. Arch., M. Arch. he aya ee Nassau, Bahamas.
° lassau, Bahamas
. Samuel R. Williams Phone No. (242) 393-1923 110
. David K Griffiths, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 559-7200 056 P.O. Box CR-54335
ream S / Home Improvements & Landscaping Dip. Arch. P.O. Box F-40257 Naseau, Bahamas.
; Freeport, Grand Bahama Registrar
/ Debt Consolidation ~ 8 February 2006

with our
HELP!

/ Furniture & Hurricane Shutters
/ College Education Or Any Worthwhile Purpose!

WE CAN ALSO HELP BY FINANCING YOUR
LEGAL AND CLOSING COSTS!

_ PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994 «.

Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board”

to practice as Professional Architectural Technicians until January 31, 2007.

NAME ADDRESS LICENCE # NAME ADDRESS LICENCE #
5 = . Wayde C. Russell Phone No. (242) 341-6144 T013 | Lockhart W Phone No. (242) 337-1086 T038
When approved, you’ll be automatically entered to win P.O. Box GR-12976 Tumquest Queens Highway
k h ‘ x f Nassau, Bahamas Deadmand Cay, Long Island
itt rorhomei r
@ room makeover or home Improvement project o you Henry A. Delancy Phone'No. (242) 334-0485 T016 | Solomon J Smith poe Mi aa perl TO45
me 1 : Whymms Bight .O. Box N-
choice*. Apply today! Our mortgage specialists are ee as Naseau Bahames
f ‘
waiting to HELP you! Michael A. Jones Phone No. (242) 325-0114 To18 | Wilfred B Dorsett’ Phone No. (242) 324-6529 1047
P.O. Box N-3049 P.O. Box N-842
*Valued up to $5,000. Offer ends March 31, 2006 ce oe
alue . Offer en ar i }
UP HO. 22. ; SMG ahs Laurin L. Knowles Phone No. (242) 337-0025 To2z6 | Coralyn T Phone No. (242) 341-1247 To49
‘ Mangrove Bush Adderley-Dames P.O. Box GT-2315
Long Island, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
Bertram Carey Tarpum Bay 7027 Jermaine Evans ehh Ne. Caan T051
“UO, xX Fel
Eleuthera, Bahamas Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bye er phone Ne eee ree 7028 | trevor Butterfield Phone No. (242) 352-7154 T053
. Sc. Arch. 0. 1. Box Radon
: Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Freeport, Grand Bahama
Livingston V. Evans Coke T030 | Brent Key Phone No. (242) 367-4143 T054
Freeport, Grand Bahama oe aes
RBC C. Jenkin Williams Phone No. (242) 352-2500 To32 Abaco, Bahamas
P.O. Box F-44107
Fi | CO Freeport, Grand Bahama
RBC 5 Registrar



8 February 2006



PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

aoe e a ee eee eee a eee eer nan eee

@ PICTURED seated from L to R are Jennifer
Frizelle (observing the meeting as TOG chief
operating officer); Greg Haycock (Bermuda,
chairman) and Theo Bulimore (Cayman
Islands). Standing from L to R are Joe Schembri
(Malta); Ralph Palm (Netherlands Antilles,
observer); David McGarry (Isle of Man);
Raphael Gordon (Caricom); Jonathan Hooley
(Channel Islands); and Tracy Knowles
(Bahamas).

JPMORGAN TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Career Opportunity for a

SENIOR FIDUCIARY OFFICER

Qualifications:

LLB degree, Certified Public Accountant, or Bachelor’s degree with
strong business analytical or legal components, ACIB/STEP or other
professional qualifications.

6-8 years in trust business or legal practice

Proficiency in PC skills

Fluency in Spanish and Portuguese an asset.

Personal Quaiities

Ability to work independently as a member of an integrated team
of bankers, investors and capital advisors
Experience in client contact

Ability to manage complex structures

Knowledge of investment products

Risk assessment and risk management skills
Excellent leadership skills and ability to influence
Results oriented

Commitment to service excellence

Strong organizational skills

Effective written and oral communication skills...

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interested applicants should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential’ to
the Human Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.




Colina

Financial Advisers Ltd.



HPricing Information As Of:

H17 February



10.8183
2.3241



BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - + 3 y
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Provious Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol.

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
**- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/ **

recto



TS



RADE CA



Daily Vol.
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

YTD% Last 12 Months
1.2085 Colina Money Market Fund 1.272793”
2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.6262 ***
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8183*****
2.1660 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.324145**









1442177" es

ET



ec =

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

- Number of total shares traded today

** - AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/






FEB. 03, 2006/ *

** AS AT JAN. 31, 2006



BUSINESS



=) FIDELITY.

EPS $

THE TRIBUNE.





Bahamas hosts

KPMG Offshor



Group event

THE Board of Directors for KPMG’s Off-
shore Group (TOG), a sub-region of KPMG
practices, held its board meeting in Nassau on +
February 13, 2006. The Board is made up of
senior partners from the KPMG practices in

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps —
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

H area or have won an -
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







Div $

Yield %

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





Bermuda, -the Channel Islands, the Cayman
Islands, CARICOM, Isle of Man, the Bahamas
and Malta. It has overall responsibility to provide
high-level guidance and decisions on matters
affecting the sub-region. ;

BUSINESS MANAGER
NEEDED

One of our Firm’s clients, a progressive law firm, requires
the services of a business manager. The qualified applicant
must possess experience working in a law firm along witha .
working understanding of accounting. Excellent benefits are.
available and all responses will be treated as confidential.

Responses should be sent to the address below:

Paul Andy Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON
Chartered Accountants
P.O. Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P.,

The Bahamas

Fax No. (242) 322-7517
Email: pgomez@gtbahamas.com

OWN ann ee soceyaueniony

An immediate opening is available for the position of:

-ACCOUNTS CLERK-

Applicants should posses the following qualities:

Demonstrate the ability to multi task

Strong interpersonal skills and self motivated
Organized and detail oriented

Working knowledge of the following:

¢ Accounts Receivable

¢ Accounts Payable

¢ Payroll functions

Interested persons should possess the following
qualifications:

¢ An Associate Degree in Accounting and two years working
experience or equivalent

¢ Computer literate- proficient in Excel and Microsoft
Word, experience with ACCPAC a plus

Applicant should fax their resume to
394-8573 or email to burrows.suntee@batelnet.bs



THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5B

ee BUSINESS =
Phase III set
to generate

$100m

operating
income
FROM page 1B

his $7.10 estimate for the
additional per share value
that Phase III would gener-
ate’ for investors in Kerzner
International, did not include
the possible contribution
from the Residences at
Atlantis. That is the joint
venture with Turnberry
Associates.on the $225 mil-
lion, 495-unit condo hotel.
Mr Klatzkin said Kerzner
International would still have
about.90 acres available for
further expansion on Par-
adise Island once Phase III
was completed. This could
be: used for timeshare, con-
dominium and real estate
projects, with prices around
$219. million per acre.
“Meanwhile, Mr Klatzkin
backed Kerzner Internation-
al’s'view that the $1.6 billion
redevelopment of Cable
Beach by Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company, in con-
junction with its partners
Starwood.and Harrah’s,
would also benefit Atlantis.
He added: “We also
believe this project will prove
to be beneficial for the
Bahamas, and it should
result‘in more flights to the
Bahamas, currently a limiting
factor, and additional visitors
to Atlantis, as the Atlantis
expansion is set up to han-
dle outside visitors to use its
outside water park. Baha
Mar will add to the poten-
tial base of customers.”
During a conference call
with Wall Street analysts,
Butch Kerzner, Kerzner
International’s president,
said the company was “very
enthusiastic” about the Baha



















































Campbell brings
contempt case
against CFG duo

FROM page 1B

cheque to their client after the Court of Appeal
ordered the CFG principals to pay the funds
“forthwith".

The $9 million was the final part of Mr Camp-
bell’s $12.5 million pay-off, which represented
the valuation placed on his 45 per cent stake in
CFG. He was ousted ina bitter dispute with Mr
Alexiou and Mr Ferguson, the latter two owning
the remaining 55 per cent stake between them.

Although the $9 million was paid by cheque
just after the ruling was handed down from the
Court of Appeal on February 8, Mr Minns said
his client was still going ahead with the applica-
tion for committal for contempt of court.

He explained that in January, Justice Anita
Allen, who is now hearing the. committal appli-
cation in the Supreme Court, ordered that $9
million be paid to Mr Campbell forthwith.

Mr Minns said the funds were not paid within ~

the required 21-day period, and it is his and Mr
Davis' contention before the court that Mr Alex-
iou and Mr Ferguson “willfully" did not follow
the court’s order and should be held in con-
tempt.

Mr Alexiou and Mr Ferguson attempted to
appeal Justice Allen’s ruling on the payment,
but the Court of Appeal rejected this. The latter
court also rejected their bid for a stay on exe-
cuting the judgement.

Neither of the two CFG principals was present
in court. Mr Alexiou's attorney, Colin Callender,
told the court his client had sent a letter, explain-
ing that he was out of town and would not be
returning until the beginning of next week.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF LAWSON ROLLE
late of Dew Gardens off Cow Pen Road in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Banamas, deceased.

Mr Davis asked for a warrant of arrest to be
issued against Mr Alexiou, because he should not
have left the jurisdiction, pending criminal pro-
ceedings.

Mr Callender replied, suggesting that Mr Alex-
iou was sufficiently represented by him. How-
ever, Justice Allen pointed out that for criminal
proceedings, the defendant must appear before
the court.

Mr Ferguson's:attorney, John Wilson of McK-
inney, Bancroft & Hughes, indicated that his
client was absent because he was told court was
to begin at 2pm.

Justice Allen said she had to reschedule the
session to 12pm on Friday at short notice, and
therefore would not move to place any penalties
against the defendants.

When court resumes on Thursday, the first
issue to be dealt with is for Justice Allen to
decide whether or not Mr Alexiou was proper-
ly served by a policeman, summoning him to
court.

Mr Davis brought a policeman to court, who
was prepared to take the stand and state that he
personally served Mr Alexiou, although the
defendant claims he was not served.

Also, on February 23, Mr Minns plans to have
Mr Alexiou put on the stand, to be cross-exam-
ined about information he submitted to the court
in an affidavit on February. 15.

According to Mr Campbell’ s attorneys, the
court has three options. Justice Allen could
decide to commit the men to prison for a speci-
fied period, she could impose a fine, or she’could
let the men go with a stern reprimand.

Established Bahamian Company

is seeking to fill the position of

Assistant Financial Controller

The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum requirements:

- Experience in all aspects of financial
accounting including inventory control

- Proficient knowledge of accounting
principles and standards

- Excellent computer skills

- Good communication and management
skills

Duties will include:

- Preparation of complete set of financial
statements

: Management reporting

- Budget preparation, business plans and
special projects, as assigned

Position will include regular travel to Family
Islands.

If interested, please send detailed resume and

cover letter to afcposition@yahoo.com.























We are looking for a MEP Coordinator/Superintendent for a mid - rise luxury
condominium project now under construction on Paradise Island, Bahamas. This is a
one year contract assignment. The individual must have 5 to 10 years experience in a
similar field, proficient in the reading and interpretation of drawings, specifications and
construction Manager and will be responsible. for the monitoring of Construction
Installation, Field Coordination, Problem Solving; Project Completion including Startup,
Testing, Commissioning and Acceptance. The candidate must be skilled in Microsoft
Office, Word, Excel and Project.

Mar project.

He added: “Development

on Cable Beach is good for
the destination. The moré
things that happen in the |
Bahamas, it’s good for all of
us. We consider it a very
good thing for the island.”
- Mr Klatzkin added that |
Kerzner International also
had “a very strong chance”
of gaining a licence from the
Singapore government to
build a casino on Sentosa
island.

« This would be a “very
fucrative” investment for
Kerzner International, and
the Singapore authorities are
expected to make a decision
Before the end of 2006. A
Request for Proposal (RFP)
process is expected to begin
th March.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 10th day of March, A.D., 2006 and if
required, to prove such debts or claims, or default be
excluded from any distribution; after the above date
the assets will be distributed having regard only to the
proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall

have had notice. Please respond by email to: info@pbwlbahamas.com

Fax: 242.363.1279
Mail to: ‘ PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386
Nassau, Bahamas

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement
on or before the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2006.

‘SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Attorneys for the Executrix
245 Baillou Hill Road
P.O. Box EE-15075
Nassau, Bahamas

PBWL SECURITY - MAIN GATE
Ocean Club DRIVE & Harbour Way
Paradise Island

Delivery By Hand:








Dr. Sharon A. Thompson

Practice Relocation

Please join us in welcoming the latest



5 TERRA OPE SP TELE SNE ALOR

addition to our center of highly

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

“qualified physicians in the



~ Renaissance. Medical Building.

‘TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF B1 FUEL SUPPLY LINE -
GREEN TURTLE CAY, ABACO

Tender No. 588/05

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for
the supply, fabrication, installation and commissioning of a new 3” EI fuel
supply line from the Government dock to the Green Turtle Cay Power Station
fuel bund facility.

» Dr. S. Thompson received her Doctor



‘of ‘Medicine dégree from Howard
‘ University College of Medicine in
é ‘Washington, D.C.

2

* She completed her Obstetrics and

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Adniinistration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

; Gynecology Residency at Rochester
-. General Hospital in Rochester, NY,

- where she served as Chief Resident / Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. 302-6852

: from 2000 - 2001. Dr. Thompson is
- American Board Certified in

iW OE ae BT uso
way Om UT, American College of
Obstetricians and Gynecologist

_ Obstetrics and Gynecology and has

Tender are to be hand- delivered on or before 03 MARCH 206 by 4:00 pm
and addressed as follows:

- enjoyed serving her Bahamian
community since 2001. Her practice,

- St. Elizabeth Women’s Medical
Center, will be Opening January 30, 2006. She looks forward to continuing to

The General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
provide Individualized and Specialized Care for Women. Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 588/05

“B1 FUEL SUPPLY LINE - G.T.C., ABACO”

St. Elizabeth Women’s Medical Center
- 155 Shirley Street (opposite Oriental Cleaners)
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 322-383 1/323-7477
www.acog.org/member-lookup

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE:



aaa aaa ae

Consultants get set to assess NH



impact ‘in next three months’

FROM page 3B

But Dr Lalta said once the
methodology behind the $235
million had been explained,
two Bahamian health insurance

companies were more recep-
tive to the costings.

In 2001, health care cost $343
million in total in the Bahamas,

_and this was likely to have now

increased to $360-$370 million

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BIRMORE HOLDING CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, BIRMORE HOLDING CORP., is in dissolution

as of February 16th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

FRIEDRUN PROPERTY S.A: °

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, FRIEDRUN PROPERTY S. A., is in dissolution |

a of February, 16th, , 2006.

” Ttehiational Ligidator'S Servides Limited situated: |

at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize city, Belize is

the Liquidator.

Liquidator

per annum.

Ms Pinder said the Bahamas
was in the middle of a five-year
exercise to enhance its health
care system; with NIB financ-
ing something called the

Health Infrastructure Plan. .

This included building a new
Rand Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, plus other clinics.

When questioned why NHI
was seen as the best option for
the Bahamas’ healthcare
financing needs, when similar
systems in the UK and Canada
were experiencing long patient
waiting lists and lack of funds,
Dr Lalta said waiting lists had
always been an issue for the
UK.

He added that this was.

linked to large. elderly popula-
tions that were common in
developed countries. In the
UK, the percentage of the pop-
ulation aged over 60, accord-
ing to the 2005 World Health
Organisation (WHO) report,
was 20.8 per cent, while for the
Bahamas it was 8.8 per cent.
However, the NHI’s own
2004 study warned that the
number of Bahamians aged
over 65 would increase six-fold
over the next 60 years, growing
from 5.2 per cent of the popu-

“,..This is an important part
of the whole thing - the

impact on employment,

wages, prices and savings.”
— Dr Stanley Lalta

lation in 2000 to 22 per cent by
2060.

Dr Lalta said the relatively
small population size in the
Bahamas, and capacity of the
public and private sector,
should combat the problem of
waiting lists under the NHI. In
addition, the Bahamas also had
the ability to send patients to
the US.

Dr Lalta added that NHI
was seen by the Blue Ribbon
Commission as the best option
for healthcare funding in the
Bahamas on both taxation and
equity ground.

He explained that because
personal incomes “seem to be
rising much faster than the abil-
ity of government revenue to
pump funds into the public sec-

’ tor”, income tax was seen as

the best funding option.
This also brought equity with
it, as there would be a “sharing

of resources, pooling of risk”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LULU BUSINESS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, LULU BUSINESS LTD.., is in dissolution as oF

. February . 16th, 2006.

“fhternational Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

Liquidator

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #39, BIk#12,
Seabreeze Estates Subdivision situated in the Eastern District on the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commowealth of
the Bahamas. Situated thereon-is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 10,400 sq. ft:~

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1485”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Town House Apt #5,
Delaporte Condo situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Condominium consisting of (2) Bedrooms, (1)
Bathroom.

Unit Size: 1,800 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 9267”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2005.

NOTICE |
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites.tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #147, Garden
Hills Estates #1 situated in the Southern District on the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms alone with a 1-2 Bedrooms, 1
Bathroomm Apartment.

Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,100 sq. ft.

‘This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded ‘in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 0735”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th February, 2006.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of larid being Lot #142, Garden Hills
Estates #1, situated in the South-western District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

. Situated thereon is a Single Family residence consisting of (3) three

bedrooms, (2) two Bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,125 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 9821”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006.



with both high income and low
income persons contributing.

“Those that are better off
will share the cost with those
not so well off,” Dr Lalta said.
You still have a large gap
between those in quintiles four
and five, and those in quintiles
one and two.”

He acknowledged, though,
that the 5.3 per cent contribu-
tion rates to the NHI system
were not fixed, and might have
to be increased to cope with
any substantial rises in health-
care costs. Dr Lalta said this
was unlikely to happen for 30-
40 years.

Ms Pinder also acknowl-
edged that efficiency in the
public health system was “not
where it needs to be yet” for
the NHI scheme to be feasible.
She added that both the
Department of Public Health
and the Public Hospitals
Authority were implementing

information management sys-
tems to improve this.

While most would agree that
something needs to be done to
aid the poor and indigent with
healthcare funding costs, critics
of the NHI proposal hive
a it is not the best way,to

"Ollie: studies have included
the Catastrophic Health Insur-
ance Fund idea that was looked
at under the former FNM
administration. However, this
was not looked at in detail-by
the NHI Blue Ribbon Com:
mission.

Ms Pinder said nathing, in
regard to the proposed: (NHI
plan was “set in stone”, and
there was no timeline for. its
introduction.

“We are trying to re as
broad-minded as possible:and
not stuck in the box,” :she
added. Shon

Nevertheless, critics of the
NHI scheme are likely: to
remain unconvinced of its mer-

its, with some branding ‘it as

‘too good to be true’. Others
believe it has only. been resus-
citated by the Government.due
to the impending general elec-
tion next year, as it will appeal
to a number of voters.

Legal Notice.

NOTICE

ALLEGRA OVERSEAS LTD.

In Voluntary PAguiciation:

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, ALLEGRA OVERSEAS LTD.), is in dissolution

as of February 16th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated |
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is"

the Liquidator.

Liquidator

RBC
FINCO

_ NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invités tenders for the purchase of the followings

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 80, Corlet Road
situated in the Southern and Western Districts on the Island of New:
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas!
Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment consisting of - 1-2 two bedrooms; i
(2) bathrooms and 1- (2) Bedrooms, (1)-Bathroom. =

Property Size: 5,864 sq. ft.
- Building Size: 1,727 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED:

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, uilfied
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 0213”. All offers must be received by the

close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006;

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 171, Twynam Heights
Subdivision situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single family Residence consisting of 3 Bedrooms,
2 Bathrooms.

Property Size: 10,149 sq. ft.

Building Size: 1,517 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage ,
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED. :

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed '
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1494”. All offers must be»
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2005.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 7B

BUSINESS





redit union |cosmuctonsERNTENDENT

questions:
‘Where’s our
red carpet?’

FROM page 1B

no ised for iether board. It's
just ‘another hurdle to put the
Bahamian through."
Nonetheless, the credit union
has: completed another fact-
finding mission to Mayaguana.
According to the credit union,
it'was clear that extensive land

had been given to the J-Group, ~

anda significant amount of
acreage was now being cleared
to prepare for the develop-
ment.

‘In addition, the credit union
spokesman said roads were
being cleared in all three major
settlements - Betsy's Bay,
Pirate's Well and Abraham's
Bay - and almost all the beach-
front property appeared to
have been given to the devel-
opers.

The credit union seid the sec-

ond visit was successful, in that
Mayaguana residenmts were
very receptive to its ideas,
designed to benefit all rési-
dents.
' On Friday, the credit union's
team returned from a third vis-
it. They have temporarily set
up office in a hotel room, as
residents were signing up to
‘join the union and looking for-
‘ward to having its proposals
implemented.

The credit union has $85 mil-

ae page 1B

lion in assets to date, with near-
ly 10,000 registered members.
Its sister company, the
Teacher's Real Estate Hold-
ings Ltd, is reportedly doing
well for its second year in exis-
tence.

Through the Teacher's Real
Estate Holdings Ltd, the cred-
it union has invested in a shop-
ping complex on Harrold
Road, has another under con-
struction in Freeport, and is
seeking Town Planning
approval for a third on the east
side of Ridgeland Park.

The credit union would also
like to open a branch in
Mayaguana, not only to pro-
vide a savings scheme for resi-
dents there, but also to facili-
tate Bahamian entrepreneur-
ship by way of reasonable
loans, especially for tourism-
related services.

"We are terribly soneemnied
about what the Heads of
Agreement with the I-Group
will entail," said the

‘ spokesman. “It means Bahami-
‘ans will have to spend quite ‘a

bit of money to purchase land
in and around the beautiful
beaches in Mayaguana.

“That is another reason why
the credit union is in:there; so
thosé who want to buy prop-
erty before all is consumed by
the I-Group to build homes on

the waterfront, can do so
through the credit union."

The credit union is prepared
to invest about $3 to $6 million
over a period of five years.

“While the credit union is
unaware of the concessions giv-
en to the group, it is fair to
assume that under the Heads
of Agreement to be
announced, there will be the
gtant of considerable Crown
Land to cause the proposal to
be successful," said the credit
union. "This, for all intents
and purposes, is standard oper-
ating procedure. A modus
operandi and provision we
believe are also available to
Bahamian companies willing
to take advantage of such con-
cessions.

“As a part of the lessons
learned from previous Heads
of Agreements, we are not
aware that any Bahamian
counterparts have been given
concessions, nor were they
invited to provide concessions

for the communities which ©
might not have been part of -
the agreement which, when put

in place, would have trans-
formed those communities to
the point where Bahamians

could own and operate.many -
of the local businesses along- ~

side their foreign counter-
parts."



‘Hotel and Allied Industries Pension fund and its

equivalent for’ managerial staff - will effectively

‘be-sat around the negotiating table.
- Thus when a sale is agreed, the parties
involved (buyer and seller) will have to come to
-an arrangement where the funds owed to the
‘two pension funds - totalling in the millions of
‘dollars - are paid in full. However, the issue will
‘not impede the sale.
‘ers**private equity arm, which is the Royal
Oasis’s financial backer and de facto owner, is
Jooking for about $45 million for the property
once its insurance claim - dating back to. the
2004 hurricane season - is settled.

That has been embroiled. in US court pro-

The Tribune understands that Lehman Broth-

ceedings, but is said to be near a resolution.
- The action by the hotel pension funds the-lat-
est headache for Lehman Brothers. Driftwood
(Freeport), and its affiliates, which act as the
holding companies for the Royal Oasis and its
casino, have also been served with a demand
for payment by Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny. The latter is owed at least $500,000 by the
Royal Oasis, whose holding companies were
given 21 days to pay up. That deadline is fast
approaching, and failure to meet it could see
Grand Bahama Power Company petition the
court to appoint a receiver/liquidator for the
Royal Oasis.

If this happened, it would complicate Lehman

Brothers efforts to sell the resort.

PRICEWWATERHOUSE(QOPERS

. Position of General Manager

One of our clients involved in the retail business is seeking an energetic experienced

General Manager for their Freeport, Grand Bahamas operations.

Interested candidates

should have a proven track record of accomplishments and a desire to advance a chain of
Drug/Convenience Stores and Perfume stores into a new era of growth and development.

;-The qualified candidate must have a minimum of five (5) years hands on experience in
‘multiple store management, preferably in convenience and perfume store retailing and

paVARLCB OH to the Chief Operations Officer. The General Manager will be directly
“:zesponsible for the stores’ management teams and he or she will lead them in the delivery |
-'of high standards of customer satisfaction, achievement of aggressive sales targets and to

drive the profitability of the business.

Proven track records in inventory control, merchandising and excellent communication

_ skills, are essentials the individual must posses. The ability to effectively provide a level
of customer service that exceeds customer expectations, and the expertise to train and
motivate sales staff in exceeding company sales targets are also a must.

An excellent remuneration and benefits package is offered, including generous
performance bonuses, medical, dental, and life insurance.

Interested candidates should submit their resumes to either of the addresses provided
below (by hand or mail) no later than Wednesday, February 22, 2006.

Resident Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Regent Centre East — Suite A
P.O. Box F- 42682

Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas

Re: GM

‘Human Resource Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
East Hill Street

P.O. Box N- 3910

Nassau, The Bahamas

Re: GM

BAHAMIANS NEED ONLY. APPLY



We require a superintendent(s) for a mid-rise luxury condominium sient now under
construction on Paradise Island, Bahamas. This is a.one year contract assignment. The
applicants must have a minimum of 5 to 10 years experience in similar construction.
The successful candidate must be capable of coordinating the activities of the various
trade groups, be proficient in the reading and interpretation of all drawings and specification.
Responsibilities will include communication with trades and suppliers; ensuring schedule
compliance, inspection of material and equipment delivered and to be installed are in
accordance with drawings and specifications. Skilled in the Microsoft Word, Excel and
Project is an asset. Demonstrated leadership ability is essential. The superintendent will
report directly to the Construction Manager.,

















Please respond by email to: tito@ phwibatamas.comn

Fax: 242.363.1279
Mail to: PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386

‘Nassau, Bahamas

PBWL SECURITY - MAIN GATE
Ocean Club DRIVE & Harbour Way
Paradise Island

Delivery By Hand:









BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

TENDER FOR THE RENOVATION AND UPGRADE
OF OFFICE BUILDING - CENTRAL ANDROS
Tender No. 595/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders to undertake
the renovation and upgrade of its office building at Fresh Creek, Central Andros.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting:-
; Mrs Delmeta Seymour...
Administrative Officer 14 &
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads '
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. 302-1158

.Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 24 February 2006 by 4:00pm and addressed
as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 595/06
“RENOVATION & UPGRADE OFFICE BUILDING - CENTRAL ANDROS”
t

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006-. THE: F








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PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet : PP ey eet ey agit Ra : :

Begins: Spring and Fall : Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic’ computer and Internet skills will Ke required ofall studen
TIFI Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof, of a certifica

CER CATE IN LAW from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency i ‘ tudents fail

This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives (ILEX), Bedford, England. i :
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level. the competency test will be required to take the Introduction To The, intemet Windows and | nt

Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers, for all programmes or single courses.












Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justices of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring.an impressive array of legal office skills, the : Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The inert
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include: : Tuition: $200
TERM 1 TERM 2 Day: , Saturdays: 12noon - 3pm (5 contact hours per day
. WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills “$350 . ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW900 ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
The Legal Environment -§600.00 iii LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00 ? Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
‘ - CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 i é The first four pages of your Passport
NE Options ore subjert to chan z , ; . Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
. Opti ge 3 . b d ; » et
LAW 903 Company Law . . LAW 906 Law of Mortgages : Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate’s Court ; ? OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION :,

LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience, COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am - 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS ;

THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a gencil -and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus -.broadening the scope of auditjand attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication, The new exam also has increased emphasis'on.

Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you'! will be bi
Non- Bahamians add $50 to each course/wo

Bop

“At the first class session, ALL student
of his/her stamped receipts representi

PROF ESSI AL DEVELOPMENT AND,

A edmpulsory: professional ‘development seminar is offered:for all’ candidates’ ‘enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars 4












general business knowledge and information technology. a ? and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students’ earning experience; Enrollment is‘also open to the general public...’
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520 < ? Thisis Js als designed tc to facilitate consis chica pois for professionals’ applying for peeprifcation in.their repediive disciplines te
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465 a Ed a i
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in sALOUTtInG. i ‘ requir
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am - 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks pee : See eK will be $210.
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Hides dE
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for Thee j
_ individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field. a 4
TERM 1 TERM 2 j he
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 | Secure Your ra B
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200 MP BSW EE p ; tact The Centre’ ter ‘





HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 ; : HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 ;



Call (242) 325 725 03 8-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712 ©





Aenea Labour Management Relations- $300 “Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit C: Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300 ) “Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Sehedhle And Course Materials

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

’ neh \
NN



BUNE BUSINESS





EDUCA]

Computer Offerings — Spring 2006

R APPLICATIONS |
Perec eytTSTea Sore Lo bere ers. and does not understand how it wor

software using: (1) Microsoft Office — Word

CRUE A See CLE pO

ROO Grecia OL DD)
SATU

IS Computer Lab

cel nT Nae 010)

XH NVein Ram ie OH UCT ASOLO
and Wed.. 20 Feb.. 2006
Duration: 12 weeks Sra
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II :
SAU oN Deen UCU AOrTr MOM Ton H far Nese Cem UOLCU SOONG LINN SUN Sea LL SOLES Lag of various software using: (1)

BPN AiMO jie teem MOK ante aETD YLLSO CLL pace MIRSTES NO AY RTOFUNCOd ta exec tice BETH SCaY FULCRUM
Fryers) BL TeLG COR
, 23. February: 2006

i HATIROR CO ML eanAeLU BOD
omputer Lab

Duration: 12 weeks
CHO L0H Boy
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRE ATIONS y S
This, workshop is designed to provid icipants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presemiations. : ; :

Thursday. 9 March 2006 Hae

Misatae URN Cce NCO
Grey pre Cle ex Fees: $160.00

DTrace

IN MATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas:
Basic Hardware Proficiency. Application Features Proficienes, Operating Svstem Proficiency, Internet and Email KOLA

eet Nyssa UG ND mee LTR

aKa user CISCO) (came
Fees:$450.00

Duration: 12 weeks

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course i

nto technology systems for use.i'information environments. The course will
cover the following topics: Basic i :

ystems. Troubleshooting and Repairs.

sahands-on introduct!
Hardware, Operating
dav. 21 February 2006
Thursdays
Mom econ raved orb

« Pre-requisite:None
Time:6:00pm — 7:30pm
Duration: 12 weeks Pare
QUICKBOOKS: :

- Course Description:This course is de MU COR UTI IOSUA TIC NGT
organize and‘manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks
chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.

small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
software. Students will learn how to set-tip their company fi

Pre-requisite:None: ~ Begins: Tuesday, 28 February 2006 b STROH I eRCR a)

~. Duration: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer-Lab Rota

UPGRADE PUNY AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP ; ; i

This workshop is a hands-on introduction to uper: MAUUreyUes osararesU DSA MSTESCOLCU exer 00 Cc Key (exgcoce el ef Kom beta LCN
operating systems, troubleshooting and rej E ; :

Pre-requisite:None See
Duration:1 day :
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP.
Course Description: This course. w : i

Seas sue nnretne clio ap WAG Omura VT COY SSSR ROCCO ROTEL CUT oe eT TLS Multimedia, Forms and Tab
oe etas

and hosting of web

por Keeiee UT cool esva tC raUT INNA nS CUED OLET LLORAS
ea Seno Nean EK A if)
* Venue:CEES Computer Lab

HEALTH AND FITNESS

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTI-

This is an introductory course for learning bi
_ Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniqu
Contraindications, Serving Special Populations <
Starting: Monday, February 27. 2006

Tuition Fee: $465.00

FTN CH NATAUI Nel Oreo LOSS
A CONUaTeNV BUNT INUIT) (oa
SAKURA INS IISE COMICS
AOC E AUT
Venue: The College.of the Bahamas

TICS RUENOHOH TUS
; URI AS
I DTU rTeCC ARO NMS

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS

This is. an advanced course for le:

hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments: the |
and hot stone therapy.

and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
ny-fundamentals or essential oils: relaxation and meditative methods,

CRUSE AAU bn “Duration: 10 Weeks

Starting: Thursday, February 23, 2006
:The College of the Bahamas

Goan case eNO
GROUP. FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

ission will include basic anatomy and physiology.
and how-to teach group exercise.

ANH OSIAUATLUKerelMTa Cola CoN esate )UTRCmea TOU PTS ERT NY ice Or eresre GIT

choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness. nut

. Starting: Thursday, February: 23. 2006
Tuition Fee:$400.00

Ia SONNE DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS

SUPERIOR (CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is.designed to provide p
customer value, ACHE ETERS

Duration:10 Weeks

Pthe fundamentals of superior customer-service. lt focuses on

:9:30am = 4:30pm

Date:Thursday, 23 February 2006
Tuition:$170.00.

Venue:Choices Restaurant; Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
~ » EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRES TIONS
This. workshop is designed to provide partici
effective and‘dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date:Thursday, 2 March 2006 Teco ea Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Muss Road

PUTiion eI AOLe

HUMAN RESO ICE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP ~
This two-day workshop i Uren oee RUT
professionals with the theory. tools and techniques

wreanizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource

Date:Thursday & Friday, 2nd — 3rd aL
Venue:Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre

UPGRADE REPAIRE, AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC ee aie
This workshop is.a tiands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
(oyoferettfnteah ASC oa UROLUL eS ICULON ear Cee De : pass ! teeta)

oes ACM MIU N Pe UR Fae aN [ir Cee NUN hee EU po Aorsxeel sierra Utcateels

Tuition:$250

WEB PAGE DESIGN f 5s
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HIME. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and ROeHe)
THU ReM ONCcrccre CoM ATCT TCCO UNCC EM TET COMT cr CNUTrerered nC Cer ey Ca eRe CUTS FUCCon reninara Ur roam Gripe PeNG UL CMe RODE UG
MU Uo) oeenar CesT ACO ANS naa i f

Date:Thursday & Friday 2nd» 3rd March. 2006 TSOP ease et PU
Tuition:$550.00

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

‘The following, Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

ACCA9D0- Accounting for Beginner |
B AYGCUU TT ites Coe BOUT
-Human Resource M
MGM L901 HMuman-Resource {
os) eA Demx xu secre ULES
= SPA 90K - Conversational Spanish TI

FAP OSU PTAA CeOPCURI DIU Oa CU CORRS AUTO
Ae

SITU GH ea TMH N TOIT MITA CD ULL CUA Cre Sree CSS ARO KGN Tua pare
recoenition that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward ¢ desiree pr

er Webpage creations

is with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses:on developing



| CUST900

; EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT

‘| HEALTH &
FITNESS

ny

‘

A

;|MGMT900__ 1.04
L i

MONDAY,



i







COURSE DESCRIPTION



a
[AGCA900 [01 _ | ACCAFOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm __| Mon/Wed
ACCA901 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm MiWed 10 weeks | $275

ACCAG02 101 |-ACCAFORBEGINNERS Il | 6:00-8:00pm___, Tue/Thur 10weeks | $300

Ce =|
/BUSI900 «| 01 ~——s| CREDIT & COLLECTIONS |

ac SUPERIOR CUSTOMER

01 SERVICE WIS. one
INTRODUCTION
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS ||
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMP902 4 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 11
COMP903 1 INFORMATION TECH. | __
COMP 941 1 QUICKBOOKS =
COMP953 1 ‘PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

f
q



‘eb | 10 weeks... {$225



72 Weeks | $450
12 Weeks | $450
12 Weeks
12 Weeks
12 Weeks
6 weeks
12 Weeks

——+

6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-7:30pm

_28-Feb
21-Feb

1 Day
9-Mar

2 Days

aoe

0
0
0 jel
0 | Tue/Thur
COMP: WIS

WEB PAGE DESIGN

WORKSHOP
Upgrade Repair and

04 9:30am-4:30pm_j Thur i
$550
[9:30am-4:30pm_| Thur/Fri

COMP930 01

COSM802___|01__| MAKE-UP APPLICATION

COSMs04 MANICURE & PEDICURE

COSM807 01 NAIL ART TEC

COMP923











01__| INTERIOR DECORATING | |
INTERIOR DECORATING I |

4
DECO801 | 01 RIOR DECOR,
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN|

FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II

[FLOR8O1 |
FLORS02 01 FLORAL DESIGN Ill’
LISH a

outset seeps eusattaral ‘eo
8 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks

i Wed
__{ Tue
i Tue
"Mon
i Thar



“| 6:00-9:00pm
| 6:00-9:00pm
| 6:00-9:00pm



EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS | 6:00-9:00pm__| Tue
ENGLISH AS A SECOND‘LANG | 6:00-9:00pm _| Mon/Fri
wea eet ; we as die? . 4 q



410 weeks $250



MASSAGE THERAPY m i 1 $465
ESSENTIALS At fu :+Â¥}-6:00-S:00pm 10 weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY - 1 ' | $620
ESSENTIALS Il 10 weeks
GROUP FITNESS

INSTRUCTOR

MASG900_°
MASG901 01
HLTH800 04

SPA900___| 01
SPA901___| Ot
FRE 900 | 04
MGMT.

6:00-9:00pm_ [hr
i : $400
10 Weeks}

6:00-9:00PM | Thur
i

i



| Tue/Thur

: Mon/Wed 10 weeks
"| Tue/Thur 10.weeks' | $225
___} Mon/Thur 10 weeks | $250

“V Mon/Wed | 70 Weeks | $225

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE |
CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE 1
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH |
CONV. SPANISH II 7
T CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH |

6:00-7:30pm
{ 6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm

01
01 $250



+



HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MANAGEMENT...
HUMAN RESOURCE.
MANAGEMENTAD so
HUMAN RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT W/S

12 Weeks

i|:6:00-9:00pm__
12 Weeks . | $300



MGMT901 - | 01 + |:6:00-9:00pm



$350
t

+

2 Days

MGMT902 01 | 9:30am-4:30pm aMat |

MEDICAL
01



MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY | 6:00-9:00pm 23-Feb La weeks [32285

i

BASIC OF FREEHAND
CUTTING | 7
BASIC OF FREEHAND
CUTTING Il

DRAPERY MAKING |

28-Feb | 10 weeks | $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING I]

TOweeks | $225
27-Feb



TO weeks | $260
23-Feb i













22-Feb | 10 weeks | $250
UPHOLSTERY MAKING | Lie 22-Feb | 10 weeks | $225.4

ae cS: Contact the Co-ordinator at ‘Vel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-U093/ 328-1936 or
email All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) .
When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport.
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course
Materials 42 ;

Prospective
EG.

Call Dr. Bondurant
at 302-4508 to register!

Open to everyone in the
community — all schools — all
bands — come and learn, have

fun and network with
international musicians as well!

in coltaboration
“with

* WHEELOGK,

Scholarships available!



SOCIAL SCIENCES
~ FORUM

st Social Issues 219
presents a lively forum concerning the
~ current D+ average of our National
Exam Scores. Learn about the factors
_ responsible for students’ poor
‘performance and the proposed solutions
to this growing deficiency.

‘Wednesday Feb 22, 2006 at 6pm
Room 8, Bahamas Tourism
Training Centre, Thompson Blvd.

GUEST SPEAKERS |
¢ Ida Poitier-Turnquest . ;
- Pres of The Bahamas Union,of‘Leachers:
e Dressler Sherman’ *' *»""
Pres of The Bahamas Principals Association
e Latasha Sherman- Young
COB Psychology Major on

- PHONE PROBLEMS

The Office of Admissions
Pee soe lenioiatiits
(302-4499)
is not working.

Calls eu be channeled to
302-4319, 302-4367, 302-4394,
1 =. 302-4377 or 302-4376.

We apologize for
any inconvenience caused.

FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9B

| _
oo

“yy











PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006






















swt c
“OWLMK ONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
\ 2005/CLE/equi/001137
TN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side

> Jane §
' separating it from land generated to Sarah Whewell and WEstwardly |

'

‘

t

He

1

‘ and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to |
, be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of the said

} Act.

t
)
f
t
t

» Nassau, eae:





seb eemisr 29 2a eco



' ALI THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing Tea (10) acres |
; situate in the vicinity of the Settlement of Kemp’s Bay on the Island
’ of Andros being Crown Grant F-2 at page 148 to Robert Woodside |
and bounded Northwardly by vacant land Eastwardly by a Thirty (30) |

| Act. 1959 to have its Title to the said land investigated and the nature |

Copies of the field plan may be inspected during normal office hours |

' at

Notice is here by given that any persons having Dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim not recognized in the Petition shall before

|} tae 2apire

i undersigned statement of such claim. Failure of any such person to |
| file and serve a statement of such claim within Thirty (30) days of the |

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NATASHA DEAN, of
the Fire Trail Road, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to NATASHA CAMPBELL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.







y Do

“FOR SALE

AS 400 E SERVER ae

“DEVICE PARITY PROTECTION-ALL
-V.24/51A232 20FT. PCI CABLE
-OPERATIONS CONSOLE PCI CABLE
-4317 LOAD SOURCE SPECIFY:
-125V 14-FT. LINE CORD |
.NTERACTIVE CAPACITY CARD
-MODEL 270 PROCESSOR
-PCI RAID DISK UNIT CTLR
-ENGLISH
-256MB MAIN STORAGE
-8.58GB 10K RPM DISK UNIT
-CD-ROM .
-16GB 1/4-INCH CARTRIDGE TAPE
-PCI] WAN IOA
-PC TWINAXIAL WORKSTN IOA
-PCI 100/1OMBPS ETHERNET IOA |
-TSP SPECIFY CODE
-SOFTWARE VERSION V5R1
-ALT IPL SPECIFY FOR 16GB
-SYS. CONSOLE ON OP. CONSOLE

SEND SEALED BIDS TO BAHAMAS
DEVELOPMENT BANK, P.O. BOX N-3034,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS NO LATER THAN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land |
containing Ten (10) acres situate in the vicinity of the Settlement of |
Kemp’s Bay on the Island of Andros being Crown Grant F-2 at page |
148 to Robert Woodside and bounded Northwardly by vacant land
y by a Thirty (30) Links Road Reservation separating it from |
cup Southwardly by a Twenty (20) Links Road Reservation |

Basi ward

tur







‘ by vacant Crown Land.
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
iN THE MATTER OF the Petition of IZM GROUP LTD.

NOTICE OF PETITION

', Link Road Reservation separating it from Jané Sturrup Southwardly |
iby a Twenty (20) links Road Reservation separating it from land granted |
to S: ar ah Whewell and Westwardly by vacant Crown Land. The Petitioner |
IZi GROUP LTD claims to be the Owner of the fee simple estate in |
| Pos session of the said lot of land hereinbefore described and the
' Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the |
: Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles |



a. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane, |

«« Chamber of Douglas Sands & Associates, Ltd., East & Shirley |
Strect, ¥.O. Box N-8566, Nassau; Bahamas; 4

c. The Attorney General’s Office, East Hill Street, Nassau, The Bahamas,

‘omraissioner’s Office in the Settlement of Kemp’s Bay, Andros,



‘ion of Thirty (30) days of the receipt of this Notice file in |
gisiry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner of the |



receipt of this Notice will operate as bar to such claim.

DOUGLAS SANDS & ASSOCIATES, LTD.,
Chambers
2nd Floor, Columbus House
East and Shirley Streets
P.O. Box N-8566
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



BUSINESS

Employer
‘cultural change’

FROM page 1B

The National Insurance
Board (NIB) has experienced
problems with some companies
not passing on contributions
deducted from their employ-
ees’ salaries, and the NHI pro-
ject team is pinning its faith in
the power of IT to ensure this
is not repeated.

Ms Pinder said all Bahami-
ans and residents would receive
an NHI membership card, and
upon seeking treatment, this

-‘would be scanned to determine

whether contributions - from
both the employer and employ-
ee.- are up to date. If Bahami-
ans were not up to date with
their-payments, then they
would be charged user fees to
meet healthcare costs, as the
NHI would not cover them.

Manager
Dr Stanley Lalta, the NHI

project manager and health
economist, said IT would
enable the NHI to avoid
employing compliance inspec-
tors, as NIB does, thus min-
imising costs.

Employees

It would also enable employ-
ees to avoid having to confront
employers over an alleged non-

payment of contributions on

their behalf.

“We have to have enforce-
ment,” Ms Pinder said. To
ensure employer compliance,
the NHI is looking at measures
already under exploration by
the NIB.

These include non-renewal
of business licences for compa-
nies that are not making pay-
ments on behalf of employees,
and refusal of foreign exchange
control approvals allowing
them to import goods into the
country.

The NHI scheme also

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
In Volunt ary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given fat i in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000)
- ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, is. in dissolution.

CONTIENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at No. 2; Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71,
Alofi, Niue Islands. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before, March

17, 2006.

_ For: Continental Liquidators, Ihe.’

Liquidator |



PROPERTY
FOR SALE

Lot Number 14, in the

Southern vicinity of ,
Westridge N orth Subdivision

Western District of :

New Providence

Being sold pursuant to

Power of Sale
Mortgage dated May 14, 2004
Appraised value $140,000

Interested parties,

please submit Bids to

British American Insurance
Co. Ltd,
Independence Drive
P.O. Box N-4815
Telephone: 461-1000

believes that membership cards
and IT will ensure a higher lev-
el of compliance from self-
employed Bahamians, again
eliminating problems that NIB
has experienced relating to
compliance from this sector.
The NHI scheme’s own 2004
report revealed that the NIB
was collecting contributions
from just 15 per cent or 3,500
out of 23,000 self-employed

‘workers who were supposed to

pay contributions.

But Ms. Pinder said the NHI
hoped to achieve greater com-
pliance because health care was
something all Bahamians need-
ed to some point in their lives.

She added: “If you don’t con-

tribute, you don’t get the ser-

vice. That’s the most important
thing for the self-employed

“If you don’t have a mem-
bership. card, don’t contribute
or your contributions are out
of date, you have.to pay the
full cost. It’s not a subsidised
user fee. Theére’s an incentive
to start with.”

Dr'‘Lalta described the IT
system as “the prerequisite”
for an NHI system to be imple-
mented in the Bahamas.

“We're looking at-an IT sys- ’.

tem to provide real-time online

claims processing,” he added.. .
This system, which Dr Lalta’

told The Tribune already exist-
ed in France, Jamaica and
Puerto Rico - countries that
have similar social health insur-
ance schemes - would validate
patiént'memberships and pro-

vide both public and private
healthcare providers with’ ~

assurances that.claims would

be met by NHI. :

Avoiding
“fn addition’ to ‘avoiding the
need for a huge claims depart-
ment and staff, Dr Lalta said

the proposed IT system would
enable bank transfers for

immediate..payments. by the.....
my, the MAB expressed’ con-

NHI to healthcare. providers.
In comparison, he’said that,
in some Caribbean countries,
healthcare providers had to
wait between 20-40 days for
their claims to be settled by a
social health insurance scheme.
However, the Bahamas does
not have an Automated Clear-
ing House (ACH) yet to settle
real-time transactions between
customers of different banks.
“Once we see that IT system

THE TRIBUNE



in place and what it’s going to
mean, there’s no need for a
huge bureaucracy,” Dr Lalta
said.

Ms Pinder said the IT sys-
tem would enable the NHI
management team to conduct
utilisation reviews, health care
provider audits, information
sharing, and deal with each
provider’s terms of contract.

She added that it would also
help to combat fraud and mis-
use by healthcare providers. In
one Caribbean country, an IT
system had shown that doctors
were increasingly recommend-
ing and performing Caesarean,
sections rather than normal
births for patients, simply
because the former was more
expensive and would earn them

. greater revenues. .

Status _

~ Both Dr'Lalta and Ms Pin-

“der éxpressed hope that the

NHI would have quasi-
autonomous status, and be
operated with some degree of
independence from govern-
ment, reducing the chances of
political interference.
However, critics of the plan

“are likely to be unconvinced.

Bahamian employers across all
industries are worried that it
will impose another tax burden
on their companies, making

. them. even-more uncompeti-.

tive, while employees are like-
ly to view contributions as an
income tax. that will reduce
take- home pay.

’ The Medical Association of
the Bahamas (MAB), whose
support and co-operation will

-.be needed to-get the NHI

scheme off the ground, has
already said the plan as pro-
posed “will adversely affect the
quality of healthcare received
by all Bahamians and curtail
timely access”

Apart from.a “negative
impact”, on the. overall econo-

cerns. that the NHI scheme
would transfer management of
healthcare financing from pri-
vate insurance companies to an
inefficient public sector.

It urged the Government to
continue on the public-private
partnership role, adding that
throwing more money at
healthcare was not necessarily
the answer to better equality
and access in the Bahamas:

Construction Company Seeking

CONSTRUCTION ~
SUPERINTENDENT

Responsibilities Include:

- Supervise the Field Construction of a project,
including its organization, planning and scheduling
to complete the work on time, within budget and

specified quality.

- Coordinate, direct, and monitor the activities of .
subcontractors, suppliers, direct labor and material.

- Develop and implement project schedules

- Enforce a project site safety and security program

- Direct, train aad evaluate field staff

- Perform other duties and responsibilities as required

Qualification:

Applicants should possess the following qualifications:

- Minimum of 12 years building construction

experience

- Thorough knowledge and understanding of the
general and subcontract documents, SAYINES and

specifications.

- Extensive knowledge of construction means,

methods and materials

- Experience in field engineering and surveying

- Computer skills and knowledge of construction

software programs

- Strong management, caceisp and interpersonal

,» Skills

Competitive Salary, Health and Life insurance and other

attractive benefits.

Interested Persons should send resume to:

~The Manager
P.O. Box SS-5580
"Nassau, Bahamas

RE: Construction Superintendent Position





‘THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 1

WOOD-YOU

REAL WOOD FURNITURE FOR LESS!



s like getting two,
pieces of furniture
for the price

of one!

Certified Member



Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
Mctlappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of February 2006.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

i'm lovin’ it







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



_ “Copyrighted Material
——« __ Syndicated Content
.. Available from Commercial News Providers”





TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY,

Colchester give Chelsea a
scare before FA Cup exit






“Copyrighted Material

‘Syndicated Content
ewailable rom Commercial News a



—



PAGE 14B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

TRIBUNE SPORTS





owles



in final for second year

= TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

IT WAS déja vu for Mark
Knowles and Daniel Nestor as
they lost for the second straight
year in the final of the Open 13 in
Marseille, France.

Seeded in the same position as
they were last year, number one
Knowles and Nestor fell victims
to the Czech Republic No.4 team
of Martin Damm and Radek
Stepanek.

Last year, they were beaten 7-6
(4) and 7-6 (5). This year, the
result was 6-3, 6-7 (6), 10-6.

Despite the gallant effort they
turned in, Knowles admitted that
the Czechs were just a little bit
more prepared for the final than
they were.

“We had a few chances at the
end, but they beat us in the tie-
breaker,” Knowles reflected.

Served

Damm (a part of the world’s
No.2 ranked team with Leander
Paes from India) and Stepanek
(who is not ranked) served
extremely well, according to
Knowles.

“We played better in the sec-
ond and the third went to a tie
breaker. But it was just a couple
points at the end where they were
able to pull it off,” he said.

Coming off their first two losses
in January in Australia, Knowles
and Nestor went into the tourna-
ment with their first victory under
their belt in before they went to
Europe.

As for losing another tourna-
ment, Knowles stressed: “Obvi-
ously, we’re disappointed.”

But he said they can take solace
in the fact that “this maybe is one
of those tournaments where we
have to give some credit to our
opponents.

“] think they played at a level
that they are not very comfortable

in playing at. They did a good job.
But we did our best to fight back.
So yeah, we’re disappointed
because we always want to win
another doubles title.”

Knowles and Nestor will now
head to ABN AMRO World Ten-
nis Tournament in Rotterdam this
week where they hope to redeem
themselves.

Last year as the top seeds, they
got into the quarterfinals before
they were ousted by another
Czech team — Cyril Suk and Pavel
Vizner in the semifinal. The
Czechs eventually lost in the final
to Jonathan Erlich and Andy Ram
from Israel.

Knowles and Nestor have been
drawn to play Erlich and Ram in
the first round of the tournament
this year.

“We've been playing well and
had a good streak going. Unfortu-
nately, we didn’t pull it out,”
Knowles noted. “We are going
back to the drawing board this
week and hopefully we can
advance and win the tournament.”

Like Marseille, Rotterdam will
be another of those tournaments
that will use the new format for
doubles.

According to the changes, when
you get to deuce in the first two
sets, it’s just one point to decide
the outcome. But in the third set,
instead of playing a normal point,
the match is decided by the first
team to score 10 points.

It’s a format that Knowles and

_ Nestor don’t particularly like, but

one they are trying their best to
make the necessary adjustments
to.

“T don’t think we will ever like it
because I don’t think it’s fair to
these type of tournaments,” he
stated.

“We can’t change it, so we just
have to focus on playing it the way
it is and get more used to it.”

The new rule is intended to
speed up the matches and gener-
ate a lot more interest in the game.

“We just have to try and make it
work,” Knowles summed up.



a MARK KNOWLES (pictured) and Daniel Nestor were defeated in the Open 13 final

(FILE Photo)

The Rattlers ‘are more than



prepare d



& BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE CI Gibson Rattlers are look-
ing forward to defending their title
this year in the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic for
senior boys.

The tournament will get started
today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um but, up until Sunday, the schedule
had not been released by the organ-
ising committee at the AF Adderley
Junior High School.

Speaking with The Tribune in an =

interview from Fort Lauderdale on
Sunday, Rattler’s coach Kevin ‘KJ’

“Copyrighted Material
= Syndicated ‘Content

. wr lie :

Johnson said they are more than pre-
pared for the tournament, having got
off to an 8-0 start in the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Associa-

‘tion’s regular season.

“We worked hard to get prepared
and be prepared. We want to stay in
shape because the tournament is a
grueling tournament and you have to
be shape to give yourself a chance to
compete,” Johnson stated.

“We’re doing that and hopefully
we will continue doing it and hope-

fully we will be successful again this

year.”

This year’s tournament, however, is
slightly different in that all of the
games will be played at the Kendal

Isaacs Gym instead of just the final
four and championships.

The move from the AF Adderley
Gym was made possible through a
request that was made by the Grand
Bahama schools.

Involvement

But, even though there was con-
troversy surrounding the involvement
of-the Grand Bahama teams this
year, Johnson said they still have to
come.to New Providence to play.

“J felt the tournament would have

‘gone on (with or without them) and

we would have still been successful, 7
he proclaimed.



- >
Available from Commercial News Providers”

w Si

Campbell

The way his Rattlers have been
performing this year, Johnson said it
will have to come down to a self-
destruction on their part for them
not to pull through.

“We just have to remember to do
all the right things that we have to
do,” he projected. “Once we do all
that stuff, we will give ourselves a
chance to be successful in terms of

getting back to the championshap and

winning it.’

While most of the teams will be
relying on their bench’ to pull them
through, Johnson said his Rattlers’
bench is definitely going to be their
strength.

“If one of the starters get in trou-

_ ble, we could go to our bench and

not miss a beat,” he stressed.

Difficulties

If there’s any weaknesses, Johnson
said it will probably come at the free
throw line where some of his players
have had some difficulties during the
regular season.

Seniors Deniko Bowles, Lavardo
Hepburn, Sidney Deveaux, Darrel
Rolle and Terino Mackey are expect-
ed to lead the way for CI Gibson.

“Hopefully the younger guys in
grade 10 and 11 will step up and help
out,” Johnson noted.

They include David Baylor, Nem-
man Strachan, Danny McKenzie and
Jermaine Storr.

“I’m looking for all of these guys to
step up,” Johnson stressed. “The key
is being mentally prepared on the
defensive end and, if we are in a posi-
tion to do that, we will be able to
stop the teams. If we don’t, we will be
on the outside looking in.”

Based on who they’re matched
against pool II, Johnson is confident
that CI Gibson will once again be a
team to watch this week.

They have to get through the
Catholic High Crusaders and Sun-
land Lutherans from Grand Bahama,
Nassau Christian Academy Cru-
saders, St John’s Giants, Government
High Magicmen, Queen’s College
Comets, Old Bight from Cat Island
and Mangrove Cay, Andros in their
pool.

The tournament will run through
Monday when the championship
game will be played.



' —_ 7 i .
. ev
Tn :
ee
ower —
o>
— — —

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The Tribune wants to hear
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award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
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TRIBUNE SPORTS . MUiseAi,
SPORTS

LwMiUAHY cu, cUU0, FAG



= - - oa -* =_—_— - = =>-_— <—.—— &- —

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Monday, Feb 20
: vs Sunshine Auto Riders at DW Davis Gym

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



Tonigque ends her indoor



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



ENT



season with a victory

Track star will not take part in Wor

lM TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS.
Senior Sports Reporter



AFTER losing her season open-
er at the Norwich Union Indoor
Invitational last month, Tonique
Williams-Darling closed out her
indoor season with a victory at the
Norwich Union Indoor Grand
Prix on Saturday.

Williams-Darling ran a season’s
best of 51.58 seconds, going
through the first 200-lap race in
24.43 as she improved on her sec-
ond place sub-par performance of
53.48 in Glasgow on January 28
behind Russian Olga Zaytseva
(50.62).

Her nearest rival in Birming-
ham on Saturday was Claudia
Marx of Germany in 52.09.

“For me, it was an average
race,” said Williams-Darling, who
was Off her national indoor record
of 50.87 that she set in Budapest,
Hungary in 2004.

Training

“T felt like I took control of the
race and just ran. There were
some things that I had to do. I did-
n’t start like Inormally do and I
think that was a reflection of
where I’m at in training. I haven’t
been able to peak. I just flat out
ran and was pretty strong.”

Already turning down her spot
on the Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation’s team to the Common-
wealth Games that kicks off the
outdoor season in Melbourne,
Australia, March 15-26, Williams-
Darling has now declared that she
will not participate on the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations’ team at the IAAF
World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia, March 10-12.

“That was my last competition
for.indoor season. I’m pleased
with my indoor. I had two fairly
good meets and I’m pleased with
my conditioning and where I’m at
this time of the year,” she reflect-
ed.



@ BASKETBALL

TEM Old

“Coming off that win and run-
ning the time that I did yesterday,
I’m just very pleased with my
indoor season. But I had no intten-
tions of doing the World Indoors
at all this year. So I’m calling it
quits for the indoors and just con-
tinuing my training for my first
meet outdoors in June.”

Last year, Williams-Darling said
she and her coach, Steve Riddick,
had made a decision that they
would have skipped the indoor
season, but they eventually
changed their plans slightly at the
beginning of the year.

But he said the World Indoors
and the Commonwealth Games
were not in. their plans.

“I only took on the two meets
because they were no pressure
meets,” she stressed.

“It was just to help me with my
conditioning and strength to see
where I’m at and to break up
some of the routines and
give me a break from all the train-
ing.
“But I decided that. after two

indoor worlds, two outdoor:

worlds, the Olympics and World
Championships in the last three

_ years, I wouldn’t do a major cham-

pionships this year.”

Williams-Darling said her plans -

were to use this year as one for
her to rest a little and recuperate
as she prepares for the outdoor
season and to defend her title at
the World Outdoors next year.

“To be able to run that kind of
time with no competition, I’m real-
ly happy,” Williams-Darling stat-
ed. “I’ve been holding back on
some of my training. I haven’t
been working on my speed, so it
was a pretty good time.”

Also at the meet, Jackie

Edwards soared to a sixth place |

finish with a season’s best leap of
20-feet, 9 1/4-inches in the wom-
en’s long jump as.she prepares for
the Commonwealth Games.

The event was won by Concep-
cion Montaner of Spain with a sea-

- son’s best of 21-4, the same mark

posted by Kelly Sotherton of
Great Britain for second.



ndoor Championships




“Copyrighted Material _.
Syndicated Content &

a — EE z .
Available from Commercial News Providers”

NPABA DOUBLE HEADER

THE Real Deal Shockers stunned the Y-Care Wreckers 91-88 and
the College of the Bahamas Caribs got by Copy Maxx Sharks 85-58 in
the New Providence Amateur Basketball Association men’s division IT
double header on Saturday night.

In the Shockers’ victory over the Wreckers, Keyrand Brice scored 25
points and Rarif Ferguson matched the game high 25 in the loss.

And in the Caribs’ victory over the Sharks, Latario Brooks scored a
game high 28 points in the win. Darvin Dean came up with.a side
high 18 in the loss for the Sharks.

In the men’s feature contest, the Coke Explorers won by default over
the Y-Care Wreckers.

@ BASKETBALL
NO NPWBA GAMES

The Johnson Lady Truckers won by default over the Junior All-Stars
to improve their second place record to 9-5 behind the front-running
two-time defending champions Cleaning Centre Angels (12-1) in the
New Providence Women’s Basketball Association action over the
weekend at the DW Davis Gym.

With the loss, the All-Stars remained at the bottom of the pile at 1-
12.

And the Sunshine Auto Cheetahs took sole possession of third ’
place at 8-6 and a half game ahead of the College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs with a defaulted win over the Royal Bahamas Defence Force
Bluewaves in the other game scheduled.

With the loss, the Bluewaves sit in fifth place at 2-11.



;

>





tea Una Cui

fe en



TELM

Bahamas Heart Association



UT ed I arrOMN | Deroga LMM aries Ace acta. Bical an Cont vidence

ae fe Colgan cola er, Bp EPO Giebra ne!) 15






MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006



The Tribune







The stories behind the news





ie







he Bahamas is
now a country

“

with only “a
veneer of civilisa-
tion” - a place

where political nastiness and
workplace treachery abound,
and common decency is in
retreat.

Who says so? A leading

Bahamian academic who sees -

himself as part of a rearguard
minority who, he feels, need to
become more vocal in defence
of national honour and integri-
ty.

As things stand, he claims,
the Bahamas is so steeped in
corruption, violence, dishon-
esty and venality that “it is a
case of every man for himself
and.God for us all.”

What’s worse is that, in his
eyes, few in power appear pre-
pared to make:a moral stand -
or even to state what the
Bahamas represents in terms
of everyday standards of
behaviour.

“When this government says
it is going to get to the bottom
of something, it’s really saying
it wants to know who took the
pictures, and who leaked the
story,” he said.

Bahamian religion, he added,
is all about “currying favour”
with God. “It is a question of
all for me — God is the cus-
toms officer who will fix you
u Ba

This damning appraisal of
the modern Bahamas follows
a long line of incidents which,
in the eyes of many, suggest
that there is now virtually no
accountability in the country.

An “anything goes” malaise
has descended on the land
which - according to the acad-
emic - will ultimately lead to a
social implosion.

The situation is exacerbated
by a glorification of material-
ism by the “haves” in a society
where the “have nots” are
barely scraping by.

“All the time poor people
see things around them they
cannot buy, so they take them.
Then you have young black



Buy a large 3-topping Pizza and



Le 0) =

Former prime minister
Hubert Ingraham and FNM
deputy Brent Symonette were
castigated in the House of
Assembly last week Wednes-
day for not attending the
opening of a new session of
parliament in what Prime
Minister Perry Christie (left)
described as the “most scan-
dalous experience” he has had
in his entire parliamentary
career... ,

concerned for his health last
week as they watched him refuse
food to. avoid what he thought
was an attempt to end his life
with poison. Ashley Newbold,
charged with the murder of 601
night club manager: Joy

Cartwright, reportedly went on

Family members and friends of
a death row inmate at Her
Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill, were




a hunger strike...


























‘ber of murders for the year ie at 10, ee are
concerned that the Bahamas has got off to a “bad start”
when it comes to violent crime...

He oe oe Rs

At the opening of a new session of parliament last
week, Government outlined new initiatives to produce
unprecedented economic advancement and social change
for the Bahamas. After inspecting the colour guard,
newly appointed Governor General Arthur D Hanna
was greeted with tremendous applause as he took his seat
on the throne to read. the speech prepared by Prime
Minister Perry Christie’s government...















Response to last week’s
article about the detention
centre, and specifically the
alleged attack on a foreign

journalist, shows that many
Bahamian citizens are now
seriously concerned at the
downward turn the country
appears to be taking.
INSIGHT reports...

men and women who are dis-
qualified from working because
of poor attitudes, bad educa-
tion and a whole pile of testos-
terone.

“Parents are not coping and
they are in over their heads.
You have a government which
keeps talking about big invest-
ments, but the average
Bahamian can’t work out how
this affects him.

Politicians

“The politicians are not
attending to the social situa-
tion here. They now have an
initiative to protect tourists
because the thugs have hit Bay
Street. Meanwhile, government
officials and‘the police want to
keep the truth from the media
because they fear its effects on
the industry.”

The alleged beating ofa for-
eign journalist by a Defence
Force officer in broad daylight
has conjured up new, unpalat-
able images of the Bahamas in.
the minds not only of many
Floridians, but right-thinking
Bahamians as well.

Whatever happens at the
detention centre is being done.

“in their name - and they don’t

like what they see. “If a guard

can beat a foreign newsman in
daylight OUTSIDE the com-
pound, what is he doing
INSIDE the compound in the
dead of night?” they ask, and
with good reason.

A country which carefully
cultivates alluring impressions
of blissful living in a sun-
splashed paradise is now
engaged in a life-or-death
struggle with the squalid reali-
ty.

While colourful posters pro-
claim the legend “It’s getting
better”, more and more
Bahamians are convinced that,
on the contrary, things are get-
ting worse. Much worse.

With no official condemna-
tion of the act, no genuine
expression of moral outrage,
an impression develops that
brutality against innocents
receives implicit sanction from
those in power. There is a
growing suspicion that the gov-
ernment has neither the will
nor wherewithal to act, seem-
ingly infected by institutional
paralysis.

Last week, the esteemed
Wall Street Journal turned its

sagacious eye on the Bahamas

SEE page 2C



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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE:





Are we a civilised nation:

FROM page 1C

NicDonald’s





with a comment which should
make every decent Bahamian
reflect earnestly on their coun-

try’s fate.
“The Bahamas is part of the
British Commonwealth and,

ew

the last time we checked, a
civilised place,” it said.
Now, it added, would be a

‘good time to prove this by

releasing two Cuban dentists
who have been held at the
detention centre for the past
ten months, having been
picked up by the US Coast

_ Guard while making a dash for

freedom.

What the Wall Street Jour-
nal didn’t state is that the den-
tists, like many Bahamians in
varying circumstances, are
caught up in a mish-mash of
indecision and procrastination

which seems to typify this gov-

ernment’s approach to every-
thing.

Blurring issues and hoping
they will disappear before their
eyes now appears to be part of
the government’s policy. It
seems to observers that nothing
ever gets done.

A Tribune reader said last
week: “There is only one thing
this government is good at, and
that’s travelling. They’re always
travelling.”

In the last two or three
weeks, disturbing incidents
have occurred which have
tended to underscore the Wall
Street Journal’s doubts about
Bahamian ‘civilisation’.

One was the aftermath of the

’ Fox Hill Prison breakout, when

two prisoners were pictured
lying prostrate in a blood-
smeared cell. Another was the
attack on the Cuban journal-
ist. Then came.a plaintive cry
from a prisoner at Fox Hill who
fears an attempt will be made
on his life to silence him
because of his alleged involve-
ment in a high-profile murder.

What all three cases have in
common is an apparent brutal-
ising or intimidation of indi-
viduals by uncaring authority, a
situation common in totalitari-
an countries but indefensible
in a supposedly free-thinking
democracy. .

This lack of compassion, mis-
use of power and selfish grasp-
ing for material riches. are,
according to the academic,
products of a growing realisa-
tion that the Bahamas’ current
prosperity cannot last.

“A lot of Bahamians believe
in their bones that what is hap-
pening now is not going to hep

tion who are seriously con-
cerned about the nation’s
moral bankruptcy. They are
wondering where it is going to
lead.”

One reader inspired to react
by last week’s INSIGHT wrote:
“With some exceptions, the
police force is corrupt. Many
law enforcement officers are a:
threat to the community rather
than protectors.

Profession

“Many get into the profes- _

sion so they can run drugs or
assist their criminal friends.
Others join with good inten-
tions, but after a while of seeing .
that the system is corrupt, they
too change. Some become
power happy, trigger happy
criminals themselves.”

The reader said that once the
Haitian immigration situation
had been factored into mod-
ern Bahamian life, the scenario
was far from reassuring.

“They (Haitians) have been
mistreated and ridiculed and
now they are becoming pow-
erful enough to do something
about it,” she said.

Pervasive Bahamian amoral-

‘ity combined with Haitian

volatility does not bode well
for the country’s future, par-
ticularly as there appears to be
no-one.in sight with the stature,
gravitas and credibility to lay
the groundwork for a new kind
of society.. -

One reader, also an acade-
mic, said: “Bahamian society
needs rebuilding from the
foundation upwards. But there
needs to be a real will on the
part of the decent minority to

become more vocal and get |

involved.

“At the moment, there is.a
sense that many politicians are
in it for themselves, either for
self-aggrandisement or to line
their own pockets. What we
need is a true statesman who
can counter the general air of
sleaziness that prevails here.

“As things stand, there is no
long-term, national planning
and, because most politicians
are lawyers, very little entre-
preneurial or business savvy.

“It is interesting that no-one
ever stands up and states cate- .
gorically what’s wrong with the



integral part of the hip-hop .cil::
ture. Violence towards others:1s:
seen as cool, and even lauded
in lyrics, so it is no surprise that:
impressionable black youths.
roam the blocks with guns and.
knives. They know nothi ng
else.
That is why the responsé-
incidents like the alleged bea t:,
ing of the journalist, and’ the:
suspected brutalising of the F 4
Hill escapees, is so important in-
moulding public attitudes.
If prison guards can hammer









-prisoners'so badly that they are

left prostrate and helpless on
a blood-smeared floor, why
can’t youths. on the blocks
crack heads at will?

If a Defence Force officer
can split a reporter’s face with
a baton, then smash his head.
on a car bumper, why can’t a
gang: of louts set about a pass:
er-by? ms

If some politicians can
engage in sleaze with impunity,
why shouldn’t Joe Citizen. help:
himself from time to time? “+

In bigger first-world ‘cons:
tries, groups exist which lies:















tive of mee society on'tra
In the Bahamas, silence.
norm. §

Is this the result of long y'
of intimidation and victimis
tion under the first PLP gov::
ernment? Or are many if not
most Bahamians so divorced
from the concept of right. and
wrong that they genuinely fail:
to see the significance of such
events? ©

Petition

Last week, news broke of-a
petition from College of the
Bahamas academics, staff and
students calling for the rein-
statement of Dr Rodney Smith,
who resigned as president last.
year after admitting plagiarism.

They feel he gave the college
vision and a sense of direction
and want him back to re-ener-
gise what they claim is now an
apathetic institution.

What they fail to realise: is
that Dr Smith’s confession was
so fundamental to academic



_ principles that, whatever.his

attributes, there can be.no
going back.





. ios, pen indefinitely. modern Bahamas and what Calling for Dr Smith’s teins
a yh es needs to be done to put things statement is like the police:
Crispy Chicken Success right. force backing a commissioner

Laminate/Wood





; : at
Travertine/Stone

Pm lovin’ it

cae starting at

e Do Windows...
with Drapery Hardware

“Our success is directly relat-

ed to the implosion of Cuba as.

a tourist destination. A lot of
people are focused: on accu-
mulation of wealth at all costs
while the going is good. But I
think there are about five per

-cent of the Bahamian popula-_





a
DAY

y SHIPPING!

“That’s because many politi-
cians here have no moral
authority themselves. Some are
afraid to take. moral positions
because they know how squalid
and rancid their own lives are.
Itisa sad and depressing situ-
ation.”

With children now begetting
children, and feral boys being
spawned in fatherless homes,
the new generation offers lit-
tle hope. The 24-year-old
grandmother is a reality in the
modern Bahamas, and it does
the nation little credit.

Increased violence in schools
is another. symptom of social
meltdown., With no father fig-
ure or discipline at home, wild
boys are strutting their stuff in
an increasingly feminised soci-
ety, living out their entire early
lives overseen by women.

‘On television, ex-druggies
are revered as rap stars.
Reformed gangsters are an



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

convicted of robbery.
While academics in first-
world societies would not con-

template such a petition, and

recognise fully the untenability
of such a move, a COB lobby
group pushing for Dr Smith’s
return simply failed to grasp
the point.

According to INSIGHT’s
two academic sources, therein
lies the problem of Bahamian
society. First, you have to
recognise wrong-doing for what
it is, and then react according-
ly. Without that recognition,
the veneer of civilisation is,
indeed, so thin that the rough
wood of lawlessness and unac-
countability shows ‘through.

Perhaps now is the time to
take stock before it’s too late.

e What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net













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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3C

H ACCUSED OF MURDER -
Melba Munroe, 25, of

Carmichael Road, was last week
charged in Magistrate’s Court
with murdering Dean Archer,
who was,reportedly stabbed in













WITH only a month and-a-
half into 2006 and the number
of murders for the year already
at 10, police are concerned that
the Bahamas has got off to a
“bad start” when it comes to
violent crime. “This does not
bode. well for the future. We
are’ extremely concerned about
this,” Chief Supt Hulan said
last week.

FORMER prime minister



Actual
Size





the heart on February 12.

Hubert Ingraham and FNM
deputy Brent Symonette were
castigated in the House of
Assembly last week Wednes-
day for not attending the open- .
ing of a new session of parlia-
ment.in what Prime Minister
Perry Christie described as the
“most scandalous experience”
he has had in his entire parlia-
mentary career.

Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham then criticised Prime
Minister Perry Christie for not
announcing the opening of a

(FILE photo)

new session of parliament in
time for members to adjust
their schedules to attend.
Speaking from Ft Lauderdale
where he was undergoing a
physical check-up at the Cleve-
land Ciinic, Mr Ingraham said

that the prorogation of parlia- _

ment is no state secret.
He said Mr Christie called
him only the day before the

swearing-in ceremonies for Mr —

SEE page 4C

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All Proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Heart Association and The Strider. Track Club. Trophies and prizes will be awards for different categories.

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Re: Arthur D Hanna
as Governor General

WHILE I applaud Mr
Arthur Hanna for his stand
against the Pindling govern-
ment in 1984, it has to be noted
that it took an awfully long
time to make up his mind.

It was apparent many years
before then which way the PLP
government was going, yet Mr
Hanna hung in there. However,
credit where it’s due. He is a
man of honour and therefore a
worthy symbol of the Bahamas.

— GM Pratt

















aekok ok

ARTHUR HANNA will be
receiving a handsome salary
and, presumably, a hefty pen-
sion as a result of his tenure as
Governor General.

While I’m sure your senti-
ments are correct, and that Mr
Hanna might well have some-
thing to impart to Bahamian
society at large, it’s possible
that his acceptance of the
appointment might well be
linked to the remuneration on
offer.

— JB Rahming

ens) FINANCING



fs os os fs os

THE piece on Hanna was
powerful, as usual, and gave
interesting background infor-
mation on the Bahamian polit-
ical situation in the 1960s.

What the Bahamas needs are
more people of high principle.
At the moment, there seem to
be few standards young peo-
ple can look up to, and that
must be considered part of the

| : cyl,

ons cecal



country’s problems.
— JL Lowe

Safe he cfs fs fs

Re: Alleged beating

of foreign reporter
outside detention centre

KEEP the heat on. Innocent

| people are suffering and politi-

cians should be forced to stand
on principle once in a while

FROM page 3C <

Arthur Hanna as the new gov-
ernor general to invite him to

attend. ©
safe fe as fe ok

FAMILY members and
friends of a death row inmate
at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox
Hill, were concerned for his
health last week as they
watched him refuse food to
avoid what he thought was an
attempt to end his life with poi-
son. Ashley Newbold, charged
with the murder of 601 night

hands.
—RG

ONCE again, an excellent
INSIGHT piece which hit
every button. The Bahamas’
good name as a civilised west-
ern society is at stake here. I
wonder if our politicians are
actually intelligent enough to
realise that.

— George L, Grand Bahama

2 of Ak eof

K IN REVIEW

club manager Joy Cartwright,
reportedly went on a hunger
strike. His lawyer, Michael
Hanna, last week Monday told
The Tribune that his client had
been refusing food for the past
10 days.

os Hs oi ks

AT the opening of a new ses-
sion of parliament last week,
Government outlined new ini-
tiatives to produce unprece-
dented economic advancement
and social change for the
Bahamas. After inspecting the

IT is clear we need indepen-
dent commissions to look into
many aspects of Bahamian life
at the moment, and the deten-
tion centre and the Defence
Force aretwoofthem. |:

However, how do we
appoint independent commis-
sions when everyone is com-
promised by political or reli-
gious considerations? It ig a
. very worrying thought.

— Concerned





colour guard, newly appointed
Governor General Arthur D
Hanna was greeted: with
tremendous applause..as he
took his seat on the throne to
read the speech prepared by
‘Prime Minister Ree Christie's

government. on
aR AB Ak sete 4

MELBA Munroe, 25, of
Carmichael Road, was'last
week charged in Magistrate’ 8
Court with murdering Dean
Archer on February 12. The
victim was stabbed in the heart.

v

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THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

ISSUES & IDEAS

INTERNATIONAL EDITION “SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2006 6C

<>



A LOOK BACK AT
THE WEEK OF FEB. 12

IRAQ ,
e The Iraqi Interior Ministry has

launched an investigation into an

alleged police death squad. Iraq’

Sunni Muslim minority has claimed
for more than a year that members
of Iraq’s Shiite Muslim-dominated
security forces intimidate, kidnap
and murder Sunnis, but the probe

was triggered by Iraqi soldiers’

chance discovery of 22 lraqi men

in police uniforms allegedly
preparing to kill a Sunni man.

e As of Thursday, at least 2,272
members of the U.S. military hav
died since March 2003, accordin
to an Associated Press count.

GUANTANAMO

e The United States should close

the prison at Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba, immediately, U.N.
human-rights investigators said i
a report released Thursday. The
report recommended that the U.
government either put the
detainees on trial before an
international tribunal or release
them. The report also found that
excessive violence against
detainees “must be assessed as’

amounting to torture” as defined

in the international Convention

Against Torture. White House

spokesman Scott McClellan

dismissed the 54-page report as

“rehash of allegations” made by
~ some detainees’ lawyers.

BOLIVIA

e Ina major concession to
President Evo Morales, the Bush
administration has agreed to |

in

Ss

e. |
g |



S.

HAITI

a



CUBA

e@ Cuba’s parliament speaker on
Thursday offered support to his
















| e A young man flips into the pool of the Montana Hotel in Port-au-Prince on Monday. Supporters of René |
i Préval had burst through the gated entrance of the Montana, where the Provisional Electoral Council hadits.
: center, demanding election results. Early Thursday, the council defused a political crisis and declared
i front-runner Préval the outright winner of the previous week’s presidential elections. Eight of the nine council .
i members signed an agreement to distribute the high number of blank ballots among the candidates according
to their percentages of the regular vote, giving Préval the outright majority he needed to avoid a runoff. Préval
i had just shy of 49 percent of the votes tallied before the counting process was stopped amidreportsof
missing ballots and allegations of fraud, and the redistribution of the blank ballots pushed him to 51.15 percent.



DENMARK

e Consumer boycotts of Danish
goods in Muslim countries in



reconsider its anti-drug trafficking
programs in Bolivia and is even
hinting it could allow more coca
farming. Concerned that more
coca could mean more cocaine,
Washington has so far balked at

visiting Iranian counterpart in an
escalating international dispute
over the Miiddle Eastern nation’s
use of nuclear power. “No one has
the right to monopolize any
source of energy fundamental for

protest of the publication of
caricatures of the Prophet
Mohammed are costing Denmark’s
companies millions. From Havarti

P cheeséto Lego toys, Danish

products have been removed from

easing a 30,000-acre limit on

Bolivia’s legal production of coca.

The cap is bitterly opposed by
many poor farmers who helped
Morales gain the presidency.





’ | humanity,” National Assembly
president Ricardo Alarcon said at
the start of a meeting with Iranian
parliament speaker Gholam Ali
Haddad Adel, who was beginning
a two-day visit to. the island.

EDITORIAL EXCERPTS :

On mistreatment of protesters in Iraq

i From Aftenposten,
Oslo, Norway:

ot just the British

army but all of West-

ern society faces a
serious challenge after the
release of a video showing
British soldiers abusite Iraqi
youth.

It makes little difference
that the video shows the
young people first throwing
stones at the soldiers. It
should make little differ-
ence.

The behavior was unac-
ceptable. ..

oe mistreatment reveals

-high stress level of sol-
dies in the pressed situa-
tion.

But it is precisely in such
situations that ethics and
morals, understanding right
and wrong, should kick in.

Soldiers must bring with
them a heavy ballast of val-
ues, values that are strength-
ened in training.

In addition, the military
command structure must be

. ety can afford or have the

stores jin Saudi Arabia and other
countriés around the Middle East
as Muslims. await an apology for
the cartoons, which the
Copenhagen ae has said
it cannot give.; :



WORLD VOICES

developed and trained so
that the morals of a group of
soldiers cannot break down
when things get heated.

We have already seen,
especially at the Abu Ghraib
prison near Baghdad, how
wrong things can go when
education, training and
‘unclear leadership signals
all pull in the wrong direc-
tion.

Such failings aresome-
thing no army and no soci-

right to commit.

On conflict over Muhammad cartoons



From Jyllands-Posten,
_Viby, Denmark:

believed that it was

fair game to lunge at a
small country like Denmark
with a trade boycott, threats
and insults.
. Ofcourse it is not ina
civilized world, and it is
symptomatic that leaders in
the Muslim world are tem-
pering the outrage as Den-
mark’s support in the West-
ern world is reaching full

strength.

S ome have mistakenly

The European Commis-
sion’s head, José Manuel
Barroso, was the latest to
come on stage with his unre-
served and wholehearted
backing to Denmark and the
freedom of speech...

It is especially notewor-
thy that Germany and
France, which split the Euro-
pean Union by taking their
own stands in the action
against Saddam Hussein,
were among the first to
come to Denmark’s rescue
without reservations of any
kind in the present Muham-

mad crisis.

It is valuable that there is
no doubt that the EU, in
such a serious situation,
stands united behind funda-
mental democratic values.

It could turn out to be
more important than a paper
with a treaty that cannot
gather full support in the
European hinterland. This
could lead to a new and bet-.
ter beginning that can give
new meaning and that also
can get the EU to concen-
trate on important initia-
tives in a global context.

On reprocessing of nuclear fuel:



From Yomiuri Shimbun,
Tokyo:

he U.S. Energy
Department
announced its Global
Nuclear Energy Partnership
on Feb. 6, reversing a dec-
ades-long policy against
reprocessing nuclear
fuel.

This decision will affect
the atoms-for-peace pro-
grams of not only Japan
but many other coun-
tries.

The sarhieesnip would
be a grand initiative to
establish a global recycling
system to separate energy
elements — uranium and

plutonium — from spent
fuel and turn them into new
reactor fuel.

Nuclear power plants are
very effective in alleviating
the energy crisis as well as
battling global warming.

We support the new U.S.
policy and say Japan should
cooperate with the partner-
ship in developing a new
technology.

If the GNEP were set up,
many countries would be
relieved of the burden of
dealing with spent reactor
fuel.

The potential fly i in the
ointment is that countries
with nuclear reprocessing
capabilities, including the

United States, would gain a -

hold over the nuclear plants
of countries that are depen-
dent on their fuel recycling A :
services.

Japan holds a special
position in this regard as the
only non-nuclear nation in
the world that is approved
internationally to reprocess
nuclear fuel, a technology it
promotes as a national pol-
icy.

Japan must achieve
nuclear fuel recycling , _
quickly and transmit tolthe: vy
world the fact that it has safe
nuclear technology and a
strong commitment to the
peaceful uses of atomic
energy. pe

pe Massachusetts, but youngsters did





WASHINGTON, D.C.

e The White House won two
national-security victories in the
Senate on Thursday, as the Patriot
Act cleared a major hurdle that.
ensures it will be renewed soon
and a compromise eased
Republican objections to a secret
domestic-wiretapping program,
probably ensuring that there won’t
be a congressional investigation of
it. The Senate voted 96-3 to move
toward final passage of new civil
liberties protections to the Patriot
Act, which the White House
negotiated with a handful of
Republicans.

e President Bush said Thursday
that he thinks Vice President Dick
Cheney handled his shooting
incident “just fine,” and authorities!
in Texas declared the case closed. |
Speaking publicly about the
matter for the first time, Bush
endorsed Cheney’s decision to
wait about 18 hours before
publicly acknowledging that he
had accidentally shot a hunting
companion during a Saturday
outing in South Texas. The
- president offered his views a few

hours after the local sheriff's

department absolved: Cheney of
any wrongdoing.

e A detailed federal study of
college completion has concluded
that undergraduates who take
. more than:a,semestér' break from
their courses are at great risk of
not graduating at all. “Continuous
enrollment... proves.to be
overpowering,” the report said.
‘TIt] increases the probability of
degree completion by 43 percent.
The: investigation of.what
happened: to 8, 900:students who
graduated from high school in
1992 by the federal. government’s
leading r ollege- -completion
i Iman, also
' iscoveréd that those who did not!
lleg within,a ear of
leaving high school were far less
likely to get degrees, but that the
freshman year of college was not
the make-or-break predictor of
college completion that many
experts had thought.

CARL JUSTE/MIAMI HERALD STAFF



THE NORTHEAST ©

e Drivers shoveled out their cars,
marooned travelers waited
impatiently for trains and planes to”
get back to full service, and utilit
crews struggled to restore powe
Monday after a record-breaking
snowstorm across the Northeast.
Hundreds of schools canceled
classes from West Virginia to








not get a holiday in New York City,
where subways ran and streets

were plowed despite aerec d- eu
breaking 26.9-inch snowfal





connate

orphan tracer rtonnnnnn anh






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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006





SPEECH ae THRONE
HIS EXCELLENCY THE HONOURABLE

ARTHUR D. HANNA

GOVERNOR-GENERAL
OPENING OF PARLIAMENT, 15th FEBRUARY,
2006



Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the
Honourable House of Assembly:

We meet early in this New Year to begin a new session of Parliament, the
second since my Government was elected to office in May of 2002.

The session we inaugurate today will continue my Government's efforts to
provide safe and secure communities, alleviate poverty and to provide growth
and prosperity for the Bahamian people.

My Government shall give primacy, therefore, to meeting the following chal-
lenges: eee

© To grow our economy so as fo provide ever increasing benefits and prosper-
ity for all our people throughout our archipelago;

© To protect and secure our borders against illegal immigration;

© To provide the Ids, policies, resources and fools necessary for the success-
ful campaign against crime and lawlessness and for the more efficient delivery
of judicial services;

© To-create the necessary policies and legislation fo modernize, advance and
meet the needs of essential public service delivery in the areas of poverty al-
leviation, health, education and housing;

© To support and protect the most vulnerable in our society, particularly the
poor, the elderly, the disabled and those in special needs;

© To protect and preserve the environment;

© To create a comprehensive system of land use planning; and

© To provide training programmes relevant to our developmental needs.

In broad terms those are the aims to which my Government intends to apply
itself with special determination and vigour during the new parliamentary ses-

sion we open foday.
RE-INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Madam President and Honourable Senators,

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will reintroduce for early consideration the following Bills
tabled during the last session of Parliament:

© ABill for an Act to enable The Bahamas to become a Member of The Inter-

national Development Association.

© ABill for an Act to amend the Supreme Court Act.

© A Bill for an Act to Protect Persons Appearing as Witnesses in Judicial Pro-
ceedings. ;

© A Bill for an Act to provide for The Establishment and Conferment of No-
tional Honours and for connected purposes.

© ABill for an Act to Institutionalize the Recognition by a Nation of the Contri-
bution made to its Emancipation and Growth by its National Heroes.

© A Bill for an act fo Repeal the Police Act.

© A Bill for an Act to Prohibit the Payment out of the Consolidated Fund of
a Prime Minister's Pension while any former holder of that office is still in
Parliament.

© ABill for an Act fo amend The Professional Engineers Act.

© A Bill for an Act to Amend the Rent Control and to Increase the Ceiling on
Controlled Rent.

THE ECONOMY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The Bahamian economy is in remarkably robust condition today. This is not
the result of accident. It is due instead to a variety of factors not the least of
which is the disciplined and prudent management of public finances to which
my Government has studiously adhered since May of 2002. Equally note-
worthy is my Government's promotion of economic expansion through sound
and sensible policies that have had wide appeal fo investors both foreign and
domestic over the past 3” years.

Indeed, my Government’s guidance and management.of the economy in that

period has been instrumental in making The Bahaiiias one of the most buoy-

ant and competitive economies in the region.

Astrong economy provides the launching pad for substantial improvements in
the living standards of all Bahamians. A strong economy means more and bet-
ter employment opportunities and more and better opportunities for business
development for Bahamian entrepreneurs.

A strong economy also means rising Government revenues which can be al-
located to progressively relieve the tax burden on lower-income Bahamian
households and to expand the range and quality of essential Government
services.

Indeed, since 2002, rather than increasing the burden of taxation by introduc-
ing new taxes, my Government confinues instead fo put primary emphasis on
maximizing revenue collection from existing taxes and duties and decreasing
the burden of taxation. The recent amendments fo the Stamp Act represent
an ae example of this emphasis and have already achieved impressive
results.

My Government is committed to strengthen revenue administration through
improved use of technology and analysis. Where considered necessary, amend-
ments will continue to be made to existing revenue laws to close loopholes, to
erhance the revenue collection process and to reduce leakages of revenue.

GOVERNMENT TO THE PEOPLE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government reaffirms its commitment to providing government's services
orine through The Bahamas Government On-line Initiative.

The Registrar General’s Department is already on-line. Other Ministries and
Departments will follow.

Special programmes will be put in place so that government will regularly ac-

count to the people.
ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will continue its strategy of attracting high quality international
and domestic investment but greater emphasis will now be placed on provid-
ing incentives and concessions for the more rapid development of Bahamian
entrepreneurial talent.

My Government is determined to spread the economic blessings of our land
amongst the widest number of persons possible. This will enable a new cadre of
Bahamian entrepreneurs with the talent, the drive, the management expertise
and the financial backing needed to succeed not only locally but in the highly
competitive global environment.

A new Domestic Investment Board will therefore be formed to act as the prima-
ry catalyst for the management of applications for assistance from Bahamian
entrepreneurs. The Domestic Investment Board will cut red tape for Bahamians
investors. Small businesses will also be supported by enhancing the relation-
ship between the Development Bank, BAIC, the various government loan guar-
a gal the government sponsored venture capital programme and
the Board.

FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Our Financial Services industry continues to hold vast, untapped potential for
the Bahamian economy and the Bahamian people.

My Government will therefore:

© Continue to focus on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Investment
and the Strategic Plan for Financial Services; and

© Continue to partner with the private sector to bring to market a new array
of financial products and services that will maintain the competitive advantage
of The Bahamas in international private banking, estate-planning and private
wealth management.

To give further support fo the industry, my Government intends to place before
you a Bill for an Act to Regulate Private Trust Companies. A Bill for a new
External Insurance Act is also expected to be laid before you.

My Government will continue to be vigilant in its goal of being a “One-Stop-
Shop” for investors, both local and foreign. In addition, my Government will

continue fo review its application procedures with a view to further expediting

the processing of applications.

HOTEL CORPORATION OF THE BAHAMAS
Madam President and Honourable Senators; °°
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government has successfully ‘completed the privatization of its Cable Beach
holdings with Baha Mar Development Co. Lid. for the development of a mega
world-class resort destination.
The Hotel Corporation of The Bahamas will focus in the immediate future on
securing suitable investors to develop its extensive properties in Andros and
Eleuthera and other Government-owned sites in other Family Islands, consistent
with my Government's anchor resort policy for major islands.

The Report On Poverty shows that the greatest incidence of poverty occurs in
the southern Bahamas. This fact was a catalyst in my government's decision
to enter into an historic public private sector joint venture between The Hotel
Corporation of The Bahamas and the | Group of Boston. *

The joint venture entity, to be known as Mayaguana Island Developers Lid.,
will spearhead the orderly development on the island of Mayaguana of an
ecc-sensitive resort community at the island of Mayaguana. It will have all
the infrastructural, social and educational facilities expected of a development
of this magnitude.

\
Awhole new range of economic opportunities for Bahamian families and entre-
preneurs, building and service contractors, and resort workers will open up as
a result of this pioneering venture in Mayaguana.

An initiative to develop Inagua as an eco-sensitive destination is on-going.

During this session, a bill will be laid before you for the establishment of a
Tourism Development Corporation to replace the Hotel Corporation of The Ba-
hamas. The role of this new corporation will be to engender greater ownership
of Bahamians in the tourism industry, whether as owners of resort properties or
as providers of goods and support services.

TOURISM

Madam President and Honourable Senators,

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The Bahamas achieved a second record-setting year in total tourist arrivals in
2005, receiving more than five million visitors.

Demand for the Islands of The Bahamas remains high.

Over the course of this session of Parliament, significant improvements in the
following areas will reap rewards for The Islands of The Bahamas.

© Downtown Redevelopment, including the Straw Market;
© Expanded and improved airport facilities;
© New or expanded cruise port facilities;

On the service-improvement front; renewed focus on the training and re-train-

Ling of persons employed in the fourism sector and Awareness Programmes for

the general public will be undertaken.

A new Time Share Act will be introduced to expand the time share business in
The Bahamas.

My Government will also introduce a bill for a Film Incentives Act to stimulate
the expansion of this sector f the tourism industry and to create greater op-
portunities for Bahamians in the film industry.

NATIONAL SECURITY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government continues to be committed to ensuring the safety and security
of our communities and to the maintenance of the territorial sovereignty of The
Bahamas.

My Government will therefore spare no effort to reduce crime and lawlessness
in our land and to better defend our borders against illegal immigrants, drug
traffickers and poachers and the possibility of terrorist acts.

THE TRIBUNE

5

ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE

My Government will continue the process of modernization of the Royal Baha-
mas Police Force.

The enrollment of the Force will be expanded as will its involvement in school
policing, tourism policing, and the highly successful and internationally ac-
claimed Urban Renewal Programme, which has been proven to be effective in
the prevention of crime. :

My Government will lay before you a Bill for a Police Service Act 2006. Whilst
society can never compensate for officers injured or fallen in the line of duty,
this Bill will ensure that their spouses and. dependents are properly compen-
sated and maintained. It is also intended that this Bill shall have retroactive
effect for those fallen in the line of duty and that these provisions shall apply to
all law enforcement agencies.

My Government will also build on the capacity of the Police for rapid response
and high visibility in communities throughout The Bahamas.

My Government will effect improvements at the forensic laboratory, including
the ability to conduct DNA testing. Legislation will be introduced to effect this
initiative. ;

My Government continues to be concerned about the use of firearms.and illegal
weapons to perpetrate crimes of violence. As a consequence, My Government
will design and place before you a broad range of strategies and legislation to
combat crime. These will include amendments to the Bail Act.

My Government will continue to intensify. its efforts to interdict illegal drugs
and drug smuggling. pie daha

ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE

The Royal Bahamas Defence Force in our archipelagic. nation continues to
represent the front line in our ongoing war against illegal immigration and
poaching.

Having engaged in a review, measures will be taken to expand and deepen the
training capacity of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

The enrollment of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force will be increased as well.
Efforts will be made fo continue to bring Royal Bahamas Defence Force marines
more fully into the national effort to interdict drug trafficking.

Improvements in the conditions of service will be effected in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION

My Government is deeply concerned about the problem of illegal immigration
in our country. We understand and appreciate the mounting concerns of the
on people over this issue: We shall resolutely protect the integrity of
our borders. :

Creative and innovative’ measures will:be faken in this regard, including the
amendment of the Immigration Act to make provision for the following mat-
fers:

- To more effectively combat the illegal trafficking in human persons that has -
grown so significantly of late; ss" vis os :
- To increase the punishment of persons who assist in the illegal landing of

aliens; and

- -To increase the punishment of persons who employ illegal immigrants without
> ©» obtaining thé’ requisite work permit.

Policies and strategies will be implemented to address the circumstances and is-
sues arising from the existence of communities of illegal immigrants. Steps will
he taken to eliminate the illegal occupancy of land throughout The Bahamas.

Legislation relating to the management of refugee and or asylum claims will
also be introduced.

PRISON SECURITY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will continue the process of modernization of Her Majesty's
Prison.

My Government will lay before you The Bahamas Department of Corrections Bill
(2006) to replace the Prison Act.

The Remand Court in the vicinity of the Prison will be completed by the end of
2006. This will eliminate the need to transport persons on remand along the

streets of New Providence.

My Government’s initiatives will enhance security systems at the Prison and
increase training resources as well as enhance conditions of service for Prison
Officers.

My Government will also continue with the necessary planning for a new, mod-
ern, maximum security prison. a

IMPROVING THE DELIVERY OF JUDICIAL SERVICES

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government recognizes that access to an efficient and fair justice system is
essential to our democracy and the rule of law.

My Government will provide every support to the Judiciary in implementing
its case management systems, using information technology, revised rules and
improved facilities and resources to address the backlog of cases.

My Government remains resolute in protecting the judicial process from any
interference or intimidation of witnesses. Therefore, my Government will pro-
ceed with a Justice Protection Bill in this session of Parliament fo:criminalize
acts which impede the co-operation of persons as witnesses in court. This new
measure will also establish a Witness Protection Programme to provide protec-
ua and safety for witnesses who may be the object of intimidation and threats
of harm.

My Government will bring to Parliament very early in this session an amend-
ment fo the Jurors Act to provide for alternate jurors in criminal trials in the
Supreme Court. This will avoid the loss of time and resources when a juror, for
whatever reason, has to be excused.

Further, my Government will establish a career path within the Public Service
for Court Reporters, to improve the efficiency of the recording of judicial pro-
ceedings.

Initiatives will be taken to address the rights of victims of crime.

The hard work and diligence of my Government have led to the removal of The
Bahamas from the monitoring list of the Financial Action Task Force (“FATE”).
My Government will continue to increase the resources and capacity of the
Office of the Attorney General to respond in a timely manner to judicial and
regulatory requests for international co-operation.

Further, my Government is committed to improving the terms and conditions of
service of legal officers.



THE TRIBUNE

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The per capita income in The Bahamas is $17,883, one of the highest in the
region - an indication of our strong economy.

The 2001 Bahamas Living Conditions Survey, received by my Government in
2005, has for the first time provided a factual assessment of the level of poverty
in our country. The survey found that more than 50% of the country’s poor are
children 14 years or younger.

Atthe same time 1 in 12 residents in New Providence and Grand Bahama and 1
in 5 in the Southern Islands are living under the poverty line of $2,863 per an-
num. Five percent of households in The Bahamas live below the poverty line.

My Government finds this state of affairs intolerable and unacceptable.

My Government has, therefore, designed policies to address this issue and will
resolutely continue our innovative empowerment and support programmes.

My Government shall also present initiatives to assist families experiencing
challenges with the support and control of children and fo increase the effi-
ciency of rehabilitative efforts and to promote alternatives fo the sentencing of

/juveniles, including the mandate that the child and parent attend parenting or
counseling sessions.

The following legislation will be introduced: -

(i) Affiliation Proceedings (Amendment) Bill

(ii) Domestic Violence & Sexual Harassment (Amendment) Bill

(iii) Children & Young Persons {Administration of Justice) (Amendment) Bill

don » EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY FOR THE DISABLED

My Government, after consultation, will also introduce legislation fo protect the
rights of persons with disabilities.

LAND POLICY

«Madam President and Honourable Senators,

My: Government: has.also initiated a project that will address key land issues

Mr: Speaker.and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government, in consultation with all stakeholders, including the Bahamian
public will create a new land policy. This land policy will address, amongst
other things; availability of land for current and future generations of Baha-
mians and beach access. The policy will also include a regulatory framework,
environmental components and monitoring mechanisms.

including: the development of a modern: land registration, system, the better

- utilization of commonage and the availability of Crown Land to Bahamians.

My Government is finalizing Master Development Plans for the Islands of Eleu-
thera, Exuma and Mayaguana:’A:plan:for, New.Providence is expected to be
completed by the end of 2006.: :. sores gu

AVIATION

Madam President and Honourable Senaters) 6 ee i : be
Mr. Speaker and Members-of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Legislation will be laid before Parliament for the.renaming of Nassau Interna-

tional Airport as The Sir Lynden Pindling International :Airpostin-tribute to the -

memory of the late Founding Father of our Nation.

My Government recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Vancou-
ver Airport Services, a company with worldwide airport management experi-
ence, for the operation, management and re-development of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport:-for a term of 10 years. Nassau International Airport, a principal
gateway fo our nation, will be transformed into a world-class facility.

Legislation will also be introduced to support airport development and enhance-
ment, including the creation of a Civil Aviation Authority.

My Government will install and inaugurate the ASR-9 Radar which was recently
acquired at a cost of more than $8 million.
METEOROLOGY

‘Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

“My Government will improve its preparedness to combat the effects of natural
weather disasters by the use of the Doppler Radar System. My Government will
further enhance its capabilities by a Direct Readout Ground Station which will

-¢ollect and post information from 14 major islands on the Internet.

MARITIME AFFAIRS

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government is committed to the modernization of legislation governing
maritime affairs. My Government will introduce legislation to amend the key

maritime laws. A commercial Watersports Bill to provide regulatory oversight
for commercial watersports activity in The Bahamas will be introduced fo the

Parliament.

ROAD TRAFFIC

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will introduce legislation to create a unified bussing system.
‘My Government is concerned about road safety and will introduce a series of
initiatives and legislation, including seat belt and breathalyzer provisions to

+ address this critical matter.

PUBLIC UTILITIES
. WATER & SEWERAGE CORPORATION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

i SineeMay 2002, :my Government has demonstrated its commitment to the

implementation of a Long-Term Strategic Plan fo ensure that each and every
citizen of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas has access to a high quality, reli-

: able potable water supply system and a modern sewerage collection, treatment
‘-and.disposal network in compliance with local and international standards.

My Government will continue to provide adequate supplies of potable water in
New Providence and the Family Islands: through public private sector partner-
ship.

BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.

My Government is pleased to: report that The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited has been able to reduce its Domestic Long Distance Rates
by some fifty-five (55%) percent and its International Long Distance Rates by
some 70%.

My Government remains committed to the privatization of The Bahamas Tele-
communications Company. ;

My Government is committed to enabling affordable, reliable communication
across The Bahamas. This will be accomplished by BTC’s fibre-optic cable link
of the entire Bahamas and by cable television services. These links will also
enable the entire Bahamas to receive cable television service.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

During 2006, the Bahamas Electricity Corporation, at a cost of some $21.8 Mik
lion, will conclude the installation of three additional generators. The addition
of these units to the BEC and Paradise Island network will increase capacity and
improve reliability and efficiency. Substantial cost savings should also be real-
ized through lower fuel costs. These savings will be passed on to consumers as
indeed was done for the first time in 2003 under my Government.

PUBLIC WORKS

The maintenance and continued expansion of public infrastructure is a major
priority of my government. Major road construction works presently in prog-
ress in New Providence, Grand Bahama, Bimini, Russell Island, and mainland
Eleuthera will be completed. The hurricane restoration project throughout the
Family Islands as well as in the western portion of New Providence will also
continue.

. The other important elements of my Government's ongoing programme for

infrastructural development, whether in terms of roadworks, bridges, health
care facilities, docks or other construction activity, will be laid out in detail.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Recognising the right of Bahamians to decent, affordable housing, my Govern-
ment has constructed more than eight hundred (800) homes since assuming
office and is now in the process of constructing an additional one. thousand
homes (1,000) in New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands.

My Government will also continue the construction of additional rental units

and will develop new housing initiatives, particularly in islands experiencing
rapid economic expansion.

In tandem with these initiatives, my Government, through The Bahamas Mort-
gage Corporation, will provide assistance to the Ministry of Housing & National
Insurance with financing of subdivisions totaling in excess of $42 million dollars
and for the completion of a corporate office complex to house the Bahamas
Mortgage Corporation, the Department of Housing and the Ministry of Hous-
ing.

’ URBAN RENEWAL PROGRAMME ©

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Recognising the success of the Urban Renewal Programme and its positive effect
on cemmunities and citizens, my Government will allocate more resources to
expand the programme to communities across The Bahamas.

EDUCATION .

Madam President and Honourable Senators,

‘Mr: Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government recognizes that education is the: primary means to sustain and
advance the economic, social and cultural growth and development of The Ba-
hamas. Far reaching initiatives will be introduced to continue the transforma-
tion of the system of education.

My Government, determined to give all Bahamian children a head start, will

continue its expansion of pre-school education by building additional pre-school:

units in New Providence and the Family Islands.

Reaching out to children of special needs, my Government will continue to imple-
ment the recommendations of the National Commission on Special Education,
especially in relation to early identification, implementation and remediation.

The infrastructural requirements of the education system will be addressed by
the construction of new schools, the modernization of existing schools and a
dedicated maintenance programme.

My Government reaffirms its commitment fo provide quality and equity in the
delivery of education throughout The Bahamas. A National Distance Education
Programme will be established. A Bill for the establishment of the Accreditation
and Equivalency Council will be introduced

~~ Legislation will’also be introduced to accredit all institutions of learning.

My Government appreciates the requirements of aligning technical and voca-
tional education and training to industry demand and the rapid expanding
economy. The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute will be restructured
to improve the delivery of technical and vocational education and training, and
major initiatives to equip Bahamians, particularly those who are presently un-
employed,will be established.

My Government will continue to transform the College of The Bahamas into an
accredited university.

HEALTH CARE

~ Madam President and Honourable Senators,

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government remains convinced that health care is a basic right to which all
people are entitled as a matter of moral imperative.

Therefore, my Government will continue with its announced programme of
building modern community clinics and mini hospitals across The Bahamas.
Major improvements will also be made to the Princess Margaret and Rand Me-
morial Hospitals and‘to the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and other health
care facilities.

The Healthy Lifestyle Initiative will be introduced throughout The Bahamas.
THE ENVIRONMENT

My Government will continue to assiduously pursue policies to protect our pris-
tine environment, a gift from God for generations of Bahamians yet unborn.

Legislation will be introduced to enhance and strengthen the regulatory and
enforcement powers of the BEST Commission.

NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government is convinced that a fully functioning, sustainable system of
National Health Insurance is necessary.

My Government will continue with extensive public consultations in this regard
and has mandated an independent review of the costing.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9C
I ne ek ae ee Si ea i ps Se he

PUBLIC SERVICE

Madam President and Honourable Senators
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly;

In furtherance of my government's new training thrust, an Institute for Public
Service Training will be created.

A comprehensive review of the system for engagement and pensions for all
classes of public employees will be conducted. .

Legislation will be introduced to amend the Parliamentary Pensions Act

FOREIGH AFFAIRS

My Government will also amend the Passport Act. My Government will pur-
chase a system for machine-readable passports which will introduce a signift-
cantly higher level of security for Bahamian passports.

My Government will cause Foreign Service Orders to be laid before you to estab-
lish and regulate the terms and conditions of service for diplomats and Consular
Officers who serve at home and abroad.

YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Honourable Members of the House of Assembly:

itis the intention of My Government to erect multi-purpose facilities, inclusive of
Track and Field, Softball, Baseball, Basketball, and Volleyball, on a scheduled
basis in the Family Islands.

My Government will immediately commence the construction of sports facilities
at the Doris Johnson High School and the C. V. Bethel High School.

My Government has successfully completed a pilot project towards the estab-
lishment of a National Youth Service and is committed to expanding the pro-
gramme.

My Government is committed to creating opportunities for our youth to maxi-
mize their potential so as to enable them to participate fully in the social and
economic life of our country. In this regard, we will continue to pursue initic-
tives to empower them.

CULTURE

Culture touches every facet of our national life. It contributes more than any-
thing else fo the consolidation of our national identity and an awareness of our
uniqueness.

My Government will redouble its efforts fo find and support Bahamian novel-
ists, playwrights, poets, artists, musicians and actors. -

The Clifton site has been purchased and is now being developed into a National
Heritage Park.

My Government will place before you legislation fo establish a National Endow-
ment for the Arts.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT,
AGRICULTURE & FISHERIES; CO-OPERATIVES

Mr. President and Honourable Senators, datiacnrehan
Madam Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly,

Amendments to the Local Government Act will be introduced to enable the sys-
tem of local government fo operate more efficiently.

Regulations to give effect fo the Cooperatives Act passed in 2003 will also be
promulgated.

The Food Safety legislation will be modernized to meet the current world situ-
ation with respect to international trade and new and emerging food safety ”
concerns.

The Animal Control Act will be amended to create greater responsibility and
accountability of owners of animals,

The Public Slaughter House Act will be amended to permit the designation of
locations other than New Providence as approved slaughter facilities and to
allow for the licencing of facilities as necessary. s

My Government will also introduce a number of initiatives within the area of
agriculture in.an effort to effect rapid and significant results. Of particular note
in this regard, my Government will establish a demonstration and training farm
at North Andros. This demonstration and training facility will be associated
with the Ministry Agricultural Fisheries, the College of The Bahamas and the
National Youth Programme.

My Government will expand the cascarilla industry in the Southeastern Baha-
mas.

CONCLUSION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Honourable Members of the House of Assembly:

The measures that | have outlined to you today will in their fotality move the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and its people fo unprecedented heights.

Unprecedented heights may be measured by the strength of our economy.

Today, my government challenges all Bahamians to another measure - a mea-

sure where the weakest amongst us is safe and our society is secure, cohesive

and strong - a society where no Bahamian is left behind and persons who may
have failed are empowered fo seize the opportunity of a second chance.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly;

If we are to be successful in this effort, we must become our brother's keeper
and each Bahamian regardless of race, denomination or gender, experiences
their God-given meaning, dignity and value.

Each Bahamian must also accept the challenge to fully develop their God given
talent.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honorable House of Assembly;

As we move forward, upward, and onward together let every section of the Ba-
hamian orchestra - the Church, private sector, charity groups and Government

’ come together to create symphony that will resound the length and breadth of

The Bahamas - a symphony that will cause all to acknowledge The Bahamas as
the hest little nation in the world.

May Almighty God rest upon your counsels
and guide your deliberations.







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OPINION

LER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR | JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR / a JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)



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Ingraham

FNM leader slams PM
for ‘malicious attack’ —

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie was chastised by his
predecessor yesterday for a
“personal, malicious and vicious
attack” which, he said, showed
the PLP’s love of form over
substance.

Former Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham was hitting
back at criticism of his absence
from last week’s Speech From
the Throne ceremony.

Mr Ingraham came out fight-
ing, blaming Mr Christie for
what he described as. a “mean-
spirited and un-parliamentary
diatribe” against him.

“What is worse, the leader of
the governing party, spewing
misinformation, sought to
attribute to me and to my
deputy political shenanigans the
likes of which are typical of his
party’s conduct,” the FNM
leader said.

Mr Christie dropped hints in
the House of Assembly last
week about “parliamentary
appointments” Mr Ingraham
and his deputy Brent Symon-
ette were supposed to be keep-
ing during their absence.

But Mr Ingraham said Mr
Christie had not revealed either
the information or source
because there were no
“appointments”.

There were claims that the
FNM leader and his deputy
were campaigning for funds
from an LNG firm instead of
attending the opening of par-
liament.

“The ridiculous and untruth-
ful statements uttered in. con-
nection with my absence from
the-island on Wednesday would
amuse if they were not so
revealing of the complete lack

‘Radiant Heater

1500watt

of understanding by the gov-
erning party of our parliamen-
tary system of government,”
said Mr Ingraham.

“His one-line lame attempt
to cover his: mean-spirited and
unparliamentary diatribe
against me by qualifying his
unwarranted attack with the
gratuitous comment that if I had
gone to or was in hospital is
unacceptable suggests to me
that he knew exactly where I
was but chose to ignore the
truth, to insinuate otherwise and
to use his presence in parlia-
ment to misinform the people,”
Mr Ingraham added.

In his criticism of Mr Ingra- -

ham’s absence, Mr Christie said
the ex-PM continued to demon-
strate “a total disrespect and
contempt not just for parlia-
ment but for the people.”

He said Mr Ingraham’s

_absence was an example of

“intolerable arrogance that I

‘ hope each of you takes person-

ally.”

_And he accused the FNM
leader and his deputy of hav-
ing a “messianic point of view”
that everything must stop
because they had some other
agenda.

“T find it personally offensive,
not just as prime minister, as a
member of parliament...and the
reason I said to take it person-
al is because it is a personal
insult to all of us.”

Mr Ingraham said _ his
absence from parliament was
not'a boycott or protest of any
kind. Nothing could be further
from the truth.

“My absence, as I have

SEE page 14

Vertical

Tower
Heater

PLP women’s branch
chairman speaks out.

over Ingraham absence

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPPOSITION leader Hubert Ingraham
ought to consider relinquishing the position if

he is not prepared to fulfil his mandate, it was .

claimed yesterday.

The PLP’s women’s branch chairman, Dr
Madlene Sawyer, was referring to Mr Ingra-
ham’s controversial absence from the opening
of parliament. se

In an interview with The Tribune at the
organisation’s garden party yesterday, Dr
Sawyer said elected officials are expected to
perform certain functions.

She said when the highest office-holder in
the country, the Governor General, asks for
persons to be present at something as momen-
tous as the opening of parliament, they should
be present, unless they have a good excuse.

“J don’t know Mr Ingraham’s reason for
not being present at that event. I am sure in
due course ‘he will tell us why that was.

SEE page 14

@ FNM leader Hubert Ingraham holds a copy of a newspaper page from 1993 at yesterday’s press conference. Mr Ingraham said: ‘How
poorly the prime minister’s memory serves him. He certainly appears to h
opposition bench, including his good self and his then leader, Sir Lynden, absented thems
reading of the Speech from the Throne at the opening

of parliament under an FNM administration.’





ave forgotten that twice, in 1992 and again in 1993, the entire
elves in what they termed a boycott from the

(Photo: Mario Duncanson/Tribune staff)

Political pundits
are forecasting
Cabinet reshuffle

THE political wires are vibrating once again
with talk of a possible Cabinet reshuffle today.
Newly-appointed Senator B J Nottage is

_ once more a prominent feature of the specu-

lation.

Political radio pundits were forecasting a
Cabinet reshuffle over the weekend, urging
listeners to expect an announcement today.

Prime Minister Perry Christie was said to be
in important meetings with advisers on Thurs-
day. ees

The latest view is that Dr B J Nottage would
go to the Ministry of Education or Financial
Services.

However, it is also speculated that he may
be moved to the Ministry of Health, where
he would help launch the national health insur-
ance scheme. — ’

On his return from the CARICOM meeting
two weeks ago, Mr Christie indicated that he
would be.making adjustments to various gov-
ernment portfolios.

However, there were doubts among

SEE page 14

: . = :

_ New programme
_ geared towards —
helping the poor

TO BREAK the cycle of
poverty in the Bahamas, the

: Ministry of Social Services is
i. establishing a new pro-
gramme geared towards
helping the extremely poor.

° SEE PAGE THREE

Andrew Allen’s
‘Perspectives’

COLUMNIST on the
Nassau Institute and Helen
Klonaris.

¢ SEE PAGE FIVE

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~ Nassau and Bahama vite ci eerie ene
PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





Alarm as bush
fire blazes
near airport

®@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

A BUSH fire blazed east of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport (NIA) on Saturday.

Police press liaison officer Walter Evans said
the fire started around 11am.

Two fire trucks, one from the airport crash and
rescue depot and another from the Royal
Bahamas Police, were battling the flames.

Mr Evans said firefighters were still on the
scene on Sunday morning. Police could not deter-

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An NIA employee said the fire caused a lot of
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Mr Evans said the fire was burning inland.
Firefighters had difficulty fighting the blaze
because it was close to swamp land and they did

‘not want to risk their resources.

Mr Evans said the fire did not pose a threat to
nearby property. However, he said, some people
would have experienced some discomfort from
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3





illegal
immigrants
detained
by police

A GROUP of illegal immi-
grants were arrested over the
weekend during the police
“Quiet Storm” operation. They
included six Haitians and one
Jamaican.

Police press liaison officer
Walter Evans said the immi-
grants were captured at differ-
ent locations throughout New
Providence on Friday. All seven
were taken to the Carmichael
Road detention centre.

Police are also investigating
two armed robberies at conve-
nience stores over the weekend.

At 10am ‘on Friday, two men,
one with a gun, entered and
robbed the Century Conve-
nience Food Store, Bacardi
Road.

Mr Evans said the suspects
fled on foot with a large sum of
cash.

Key’s Convenience Store,
Zion Boulevard, was robbed of
a small quantity of cash and sev-
eral phone cards, also on Fri-
day. :
Police said two masked men
entered the store after 9pm and
demanded cash. They fled in a
car, make and model unknown.

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‘extreme poor’

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

TO break the cycle of pover-
ty in the Bahamas, the Min-
istry of Social Services is estab-
lishing a new programme
geared towards helping the
extremely poor.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna, in the Speech from the
Throne last week, said that,
according to the 2001 Bahamas
Living Conditions Survey, one
in 12 residents in New Provi-
dence and Grand Bahama and
one in five in the southern
islands are living under the
poverty line of $2,863 per
annum.

Five per cent of households
in the Bahamas live below the
poverty line. The survey found
that more than 50 per cent of
the country’s poor are children
14 years or younger.

In addition, Social Services
Minister Melanie Griffin said
that a Living Conditions Sur-
vey was conducted in 2004.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune on Saturday, Mrs Griffin
said one of the main pro-
grammes is a conditional cash
transfer programme.

Mrs Griffin said the pro-
gramme, which is already used
in countries such as Mexico
and Jamaica, is based on mod-
ifying and developing human
behaviour.

She said there will be a for-
mula in place to help the min-
istry tc determine who in the
population would be termed
the “extreme poor.”

“Those children who are in
poor families would most like-
ly, if any intervention is not
made, continue to be poor.
We have found that there are
grandparents, parents and chil-

dren, all on welfare,” said Mrs -

Griffin.

Each family, Mrs Griffin
said, would be profiled based
on their needs.

She said the programme will
work through a cash payment
periodically being made to the

family to assist them in their
educational and medical
expenses.

However, the family will
have to account for where the
money has been used. :

“In the Bahamas and in sev-
eral other countries, we have
just been doling out assistance
to the poor. (We have been)
throwing money behind pover-
ty, instead of investing in the

human capital investment,” '

she added. .
In making the programm
work for the betterment of the.
poor, Mrs Griffin said that
Social Services must work very
closely with the families. She
said they will schedule month-
ly sessions with the families to
give support and to ensure that
they are handling the funds

properly.
Mrs Griffin explained that

‘the programme is still a work

in progress, but it is expected
to be solidified as her min-
istry moves forward in the
year.

Minister ‘too vague’ on

housing development

@ By TIFFANY GRANT
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOUSING Minister Shane
Gibson was “too vague” when
outlining his redesign of a Per-
pall Tract homes develop-
ment, it was claimed yester-
day. -
The founder of the
Bahamas Association for
Social Health (BASH) Terry
Miller was commenting on Mr
Gibson’s reference to pre-
serving rare foliage and pro-
tected trees. He said it was
impossible to draw any con-
clusion from his remarks.

In a press release on Friday,
Mr Gibson said he had decid-
ed to redesign the residential
development after being guid-
ed by a Cabinet-appointed
committee, which conducted a
site visit. , ,

Mr Miller said: “I don’t
really know how to feel about
it because it is so vague. It is
really too vague for me to
draw a conclusion to exactly
what he is saying.

“He said with ‘particular
regard to preservation of rare
foliage and protected trees.’
If that is the case you'll look at
99 per cent of this tract of

land. I would like for them to.

be more specific,” said Mr
Miller.

In December, Chippingham
residents and environmental-
ists were furious when a trac-
tor cleared away a portion of
the Perpall Tract wellfields.

In early January, Mr Miller,
with others, raised a petition
in a bid to preserve the well-
fields.

Mr Miller felt that BASH
and the Bahamas National
Trust should have been on the
committee that discussed
technical concerns.

" Benct
Umbrellas
Loungers

Drinks Trolleys

SSS

@ BASH founder Terry Miller pictured in December, holding

Bi BS s i

on to the tractor at the scene of the Perpall Well Fields. He
said the site is a ‘living lab’ and should never be destroyed.

The Cabinet-appointed
committee comprised repre-
sentatives from the Water and
Sewerage Corporation,
Department of Housing,
Department of Physical Plan-
ning and the BEST Commis-
sion.

“We look at this as a
national park. This should be
a national park, there is no
two ways about it. It would be
the only national park that is
accessible to Bahamians,” said
Mr Miller.



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352:
Circulation Department - (242) 502 -2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608



PM’s accusation off the mark

AS TWO political leaders pointed accus-
ing fingers at each other across the Florida
Straits last Wednesday it was left to the
Bahamian people to decide who was the
greater “threat to democracy” — the leader
who failed to show for the opening of a par-
liamentary session, or the leader who failed to
answer certain questions in parliament.

The fact that Opposition Leader Hubert
Ingraham, who was undergoing a physical
examination at the Cleveland Clinic in Fort
Lauderdale, was not present at the opening of
a new session of parliament was to Prime Min-
ister Christie, the most “scandalous experi-
ence” he had had in his whole parliamentary
career. To make matters worse, deputy oppo-
sition leader Brent Symonette was also absent
from Wednesday’s opening. Mr Symonette
had prior appointments in New York and
London. Both leaders were informed of the
prorogation of parliament too late to change
their schedules.

Mr Christie accused the two absent leaders
of disrespecting the parliament and the people
who elected them. Mr Ingraham quickly hit
back from Fort Lauderdale by accusing Mr
Christie of not respecting the rights of the
Opposition, and not according them the cour-
tesy of informing them of important matters of
state in sufficient time for them to change
their schedules.

For example, said Mr Ingraham, when Mr
A D Hanna was to be swoyn-in at Govern-
ment House as the new governor-general, Mr
Ingraham and his parliamentary colleagues
were only notified the afternoon before the
ceremony. Also when a special farewell recep-
tion was planned for retiring governor gener-
al Dame Ivy Dumont the Opposition was
again an afterthought — invited at the last
minute.

An example of the type of disrespect shown
Her Majesty’s loyal opposition — which is
very much a part of the parliamentary democ-
racy that Mr Christie so vociferously defend-
‘ed in the House on Wednesday — was the
invitation to participate in the funeral of for-
mer Fox Hill MP George Mackey.

A letter dated January 5 from the Secretary
to the Cabinet, informed Mr Ingraham that a
funeral service would be held for Mr Mackey
at 10am on January 12.

Mr Ingraham was instructed to advise the
Protocol Division of the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, no later than Monday, January 9,
whether he would attend the service so that
the necessary arrangements could be made
for seating. He was also asked to submit names



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of four opposition MPs to act as honorary
pall bearers. On the face of it everything
seemed to be in order. However, the letter
dated January 5, was delivered to Mr Ingra-
ham’s office on the afternoon of January 10, a
day after he was supposed to have contacted
the Protocol Office with the information
requested.

As Mr Ingraham pointed out the proroga-
tion of parliament — unlike setting a date for
an election — is not a state secret. And, if

‘ only to.show respect — a respect that Mr

Christie lamented was lacking in parliament —
Mr Christie should have given his opposition
colleagues sufficient notice for them to get
their private affairs in order. He didn’t, and so
they didn’t.

Some wise wit commented that it was for-
tunate for Mr Christie that Messrs Ingraham
and Symonette were absent from the opening
ceremonies. If they had turned up, he said,
Mr Christie would not have had anything to
talk about. At least their absence gave him a
political bone to chew and a public platform
from which to chew it.

FNM chairman Desmond Bannister found,

Mr Christie’s performance in the House
“unbecoming”. In our opinion he certainly

over reacted — but, as we all know, in all’

things theatrical, the show must go on. Mr
Bannister believed thinking people would
understand that the prime minister was “mere-,
ly show-boating”. In our opinion he was doing
more than “show-boating”, he was on a mis-
sion of political mischief-making.

According to Mr Ingraham, Mr Christie has
often bragged that through the police he
always knows where Mr Ingraham is, whether
here or abroad. During his harangue, Mr
Christie paused long enough to suggest that
Mr Ingraham could have been in hospital get-
ting a check-up. To us it suggested that Mr
Christie knew exactly where Mr Ingraham
was. However, Mr Christie preferred to work
“on the presumption that they (Messrs Ingra-
ham and Symonette) have gone in the business

of politics in total disrespect of the people of

the Bahamas,” adding in a conspiratorial tone,
that he happened “to have had certain advices
what the parliamentary appointment is, or
what the appointment they have gone to or
he’s attending.”

Without that presumption and his bogus bit
of advice, Mr Christie probably would not
have had a speech.

Obviously, elections are uppermost in Mr
Christie’s mind and the mud- slinging has
already started.

*





Reporting on
our country’s
education

EDITOR, The Tribune

IN early summer of 2005 the
Ministry of Education issued a
National Call for Papers for the
18th National Education Con-
ference scheduled for July 3rd
to July 7th.

A group of business and
labour organisations from the
tourism industry, the Coalition
for Education Reform, was
already working on sucha
paper and responded to the Call
by submitting its
“Bahamian Youth: The
Untapped Resource.” It was
included with nine other papers
in a booklet that was distrib-
uted exclusively to conference
attendees.

The Minister’s View on July
6, 2005

The Hon. Alfred M Seats, the
Attorney General and Minister
of Education, gave the keynote
address: “Transforming
Bahamian Education for the
21st Century.”

He stated that the two major
objectives of the conference
were -

e The examination of the con-
cept and state of Bahamian edu-
cation; and,

e The mapping of a process to
transform it “taking into
account new realities and
emerging challenges.”

The Minister gave the Gov-
ernment’s version of the history
of education in the Bahamas.
He emphasised the limited edu-
cational opportunities for the
Bahamian majority prior to the
late 1960s; and then ‘he
described the state of education
after 38 years of majority rule.

° The Bahamas now provides
universally available primary
and secondary education for all;
and..

° “There is still much work
for all of us to do to improve
the overall performance of our
students.”

He did not say what “overall
performance” meant; but one
can reasonably assume that it
relates to the quality of the pre-
sent school leavers, namely
what do they “know, under-
stand and can do” on leaving
high school.

The Minister did not go
beyond this one sentence
although he could have done so
since the Department produces
the relevant data annually. That
data tells a truly alarming story;
it confirms the public’s worst
fears and that. is probably the
reason it is kept from public
view.

problems of attracting qualified
teachers, student/teacher ratios,

paper

The Minister did discuss the

Dewan

letters@tribunemedia.:



the under achievement of male
students, the challenge of new
technologies and the present
budget of $215 million. How-
ever, he did not set either pri-
orities or measurable goals.

The Coalition Report of June
2005

The Coalition Report that
was submitted prior to the Con-
ference was not released to the
public until December. At that
time its contents were report-
ed in detail by the major news-
papers; and the Report is avail-
able to the reader on the Cham-
ber of Commerce website “the-
bahamaschamber.com”. A doc-
umentary based on the Report
was shown on cable television in
January and the Coalition indi-
cates that it will shortly be avail-

able as a streaming video on the

Internet.

Both the BGCSE 2004 and
the Coalition 2005 reports
found the following data trou-
blesome because of its implica-
tions for the country. The
inevitable conclusion is that the
present situation is unaccept-
able.

conclude that this was the typi-.

cal response of government
bureaucracies to a prob-:
lem...namely, create more and:
bigger staff departments.

e It was comforting to see’
that order and civility in the-
classroom was first on a list of.
initiatives shown on page one. :*

e Discomforting was the
treatment of other critical
issues.

For. instance, the interim
report describes ‘the Extended
Learning Programme (ELP) in
remedial Mathematics and,
Reading that is offered to fail-
ing students. But there is no
discussion of Social Promotion,’
the practice of passing failing
students, and how ELP does
or should relate to this prac-
tice.

And...the achievements of
the Testing and Evaluation Sec-
tion were given a half-page of
space but there is no mention of
the BGCSE results and the
implications for the state of edu-
cation. There are pictures of
three outstanding students with
their scores and awards, this is:
the only 2005 student academic
results reported.

The Hope of the Future

If one were setting the agen-
da for the 21st century, it would
appear that the first step would

2004 BGCSE Exams & Grades

Average
Grades
All Exams D

New Providence
(Public) . = F+
New Providence
(Private) D+

Mathematics E
English D-

Percent
Grade “A”
6.4%

9.8%

3.2%
3.0% 20.2%

Percent
Grade “F, G and U”
20.8%

3.2% 30.9%

10.0%
42.8%

Note: The BGCSE system grades student PoE: onan

eight point scale of A, B

._ The Coalition Report
analysed the data, suggested
quantitative goals and proposed
fourteen specific strategies. Fur-
thermore, it clearly indicated
that the basic problem went
beyond the classroom and suc-
cess in eliminating the problem
would come only with profound
changes in social behaviour.
This would require the long-
term commitment and active
participation of all parts of
Bahamian society.

The Ministry’s December

2005 Response

In December the Minister
published an interim report on
the Department’s accomplish-
ments. It appeared to be a pub-
lic relations effort to promote
the public image of the Depart-
ment rather than a report_on
the state of public education.

e It was a 32-page full colour
newspaper supplement that had
the pictures of 35 staff execu-
tives and described what they
had done. In the case of the
Minister of Education, it includ-
ed one-page of testimonials on
his character and performance.
The cynic (or realist) could con-
clude that this was a misuse of
public funds.

¢ It announced the creation
of new staff functions like the
Higher Education and Life-
Long Learning Division, the
Communications Division and
the National Co-Ordination
unit and the restructuring and
expansion of the Planning Sec-
tion. The cynic (or realist) could





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be a candid description of the.
state of affairs.
The last annual report of a

‘ Minister of Education to Par-

liament on the state of educa-
tion was in 1995 even though it

_ is a legal requirement of the

Education Act. The overall
mean average for the 1994
BGCSE exams was a D Minus
but this was not mentioned in
the report. At that time the.
Minister merely noted that,
some students exhibited “a lack:
of knowledge of the relevant,
subject matter” and more
research was needed to develop,
a scheme to assist them. a

The Interim 2005 Report,
shows that nothing has changed,
in the past decade. Both PLP:
and the FNM Governments:
have not been candid. é

The reality is that “we have a
problem with what is coming.
out of the education pipeline!”’;
and the relevant question ist
“How will the country initiaté*
and sustain meaningful educaks
tion reform?” ty

* Hopefully, an aroused pubs
lic will cause the Government’
(preferably both parties) to,
move beyond the Interim 2005;
Report. .

¢ Hopefully, there will be ae

* final report that is candid and '

sets priorities and specific goals
against which performance can
be measured.

RALPH J MASSEY
Nassau
February 6 2006

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5





Discussing racism, the Nassau
Institute and Helen Klonaris

THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
AND HELEN KLONARIS

So weeks ago, Helen
Klonaris, a white
Bahamian, published a letter on
the issue of racism and colonial-
ism in the Bahamas. Her letter
prompted several responses,
among them a rebuttal last week
from The Nassau Institute.

While it is easy to disagree
with some of Ms Klonaris’ sug-
gestions (such as the supposed
racism of most whites, or the
extent of ‘white’ economic pow-
er.in. The Bahamas today) it
would seem that the writer of
the institute’s response either did
not understand or did not want
to understand the broader thrust
of her arguments.

In fact, to her credit, Ms
Klonaris sets out, in a compelling
way, some of the legacies of the
colonial.and racial domination
that did undoubtedly blight most
of our history.

While we may or may not
agree with her observations
about race relations today, her
basic ideas about some of the
psychological effects of a colo-
nially imposed value system are
not effectively countered in the
Institute’s long-winded response.

It'is perhaps natural that the
Institute should focus on eco-
nomic theory in addressing some
of Ms Klonaris assertions. But
it is unfortunate that; having ini-
tially taken up what would seem
to have been her central point,
the letter from the institute then
fails to-directly address it. '

That'point is that there is, in

our society,.a “well defined sys-. .
including «

22.

‘tem. of relationships”
"ed cational: curricula, the’ legal




guage itself whose ‘effect is to
"suppress, condemn and ghet-
toise" other cultures. °

‘It would be interesting to see °

how the critics of Ms Klonaris
can directly deny, for instance,
that, where Judeo-Christian val-
ués have been. imposed among
indigenous peoples, their pro-
ponents have uniformly stigma-
tised and undermined the legiti-
macy of the thought systems they
have sought to replace, including
in The Bahamas.

‘This also ties in with the expe-
rience of colonial interactions
throughout the world, where
seemingly indisputable patterns
emerge.

: THE FILIPINO
_ AND JAPANESE
EXPERIENCES

§

J econ: first contacts with
‘J the west occurred in the
16th century. This was an era in
which European maritime pow-
ets, taking advantage of the new-
ly’ discovered Cape of Good
Hope, began large scale trade
with many East Asian societies.

“These trade relations evolved
into domination in some
instances, such as in the Philip-
pines (named after a particular-
ly-unsavoury Spanish King).
Here, evangelism and guns went
hand-in-hand to create a west-
ern satrapy, whose language, cus-

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toms and native religions were
all either obliterated or bas-
tardised.

What replaced them was a
society organised along pre-
dictable lines, with a small, high-
ly westernised elite presiding
over a large, ghettoised majority.
Those with ‘native’ characteris-
tics (such as followers of the old
religions) were made to accupy a

sub-class, while the ruling oli-

garchy lost all sense of social
responsibility toward the masses,
to whom they were now cultur-
ally alien.

Were it not for the wise deci-
sion of the 17th century Shogun,
Tokugawa Hidetada, to totally
ban the propagation of the
Christian faith in Japan, there
can be little doubt that Japan
would have suffered a similar
fate. Hidetada, sensibly, was hap-
py for the west’s guns, its tech-
nology and its learning, but had
no interest in its religion, which
he saw as the vanguard of an
attempt to psychologically dom-
inate Japan and undermine her
independence. So he sent in his
Samurai and expelled alll west-
erners except for a few useful,
clever Dutchmen.

At the time of the ban, mis-
sionaries and European “author-
ities” at the ports of Nagasaki

and Deshima (the two points

where western trade settlements
were initially allowed) had
already begun a campaign of
burning Buddhist and Shinto
texts and had begun debunking
Japanese traditional histories
(such as the origin of the Imper-
ial family) as shameful, savage
myths. Hidetada’s expulsion of
westerners and banning of their

faith was therefore a timely one,

and probably saved Japan from

the fate of the Philippines, ‘dis-
.. covered’ by the Spaniards at

around the same time.

Today, Japanese people are
probably more at ease with
themselves, their ancestors and
the historical achievements of
their country than almost any
non-European people. Their
faith, an easy accommodation of
Chinese, Indian and native reli-





Rosetta St.



PERSPECTIVES



ACN DURE Wo eae ESN

gious traditions, has proved high-
ly adaptable to the rapid changes
through which their country has
gone in the last 400 years. Japan,
incidentally, has the lowest inci-
dence of Christianity of any
major country.

THE INDIAN EXPERI-
; ENCE

hough India was the vic-

tim of colonisation, it
had the relative good fortune of
being colonised for commercial,

rather than evangelical purposes.
This was a feature that distin-

guished British (and, even more"

so, Dutch) colonial policy from
that of Spain or Portugal. India
was also fortunate in having a
complex and extremely old value
system of its own that was not
easily susceptible to penetration
by alien ones.

These factors saved India’s
original thought system intact
and spared it the marginalisa-
tion and stigmatisation that have
inevitably resulted elsewhere
from total colonial immersion.
Though Indians did and still do
suffer some of the traditional ill-
effects of colonialism, a rejec-
tion and stigmatisation of every-
thing associated with Indian-ness
never took root.

THE NEW WORLD SLAVE
SOCIETIES

he African in the new
A world is often wrongly
thought of as a blank slate who

only began accumulating culture
upon contact with his new colo-

. mial society. In fact, he brought

with him a fairly complex sys-
tem of social rules, beliefs and
values, including religious ones.

In the case of the Yoruba, for

instance, he brought a pantheon
of Gods, including Ogun, the
chief god of the Santeria religion
still practised in Cuba today. So
he did have values of his own.

But unlike the Indian or the
Japanese, the totality of his
immersion in the colonial sys-
tem produced a psychological
lack of resistance to the preju-
dices and presumptions by which
these were deemed worthless or
even worse. In this respect, he
had much in common with the
Amerindians of the Andean
nations especially.

Insofar as Ms Klonaris sees
racism as being responsible for
the ghettoisation of New World
blacks, I would disagree. Like so
many indigenous peoples, from
Australia to Bolivia, it was the
New World black who inter-
nalised the colonial value sys-
tem, and so ghettoised himself.

To empowered people, the
“racism” of others is a trivial
matter. The tragedy facing the
new world African, the
Amerindian and others was not
someone else’s “racism”. Rather,
it is that he has internalised
someone else’s values not on the
basis of a free exchange, but on
the basis of an uncritical hierar-
chy, which places anything orig-
inating outside western institu-
tions or western values at the
bottom.

He was psychologically pene-
trated to the point that he no
longer recognised value in any-
thing arising from his own her-
itage, ancient or modern. In fact,
he became an active accomplice
in the stigmatisation of such
things.

Take, for instance, the hierar-
chy of religions. To the colo-

notes high classicism, African
pantheism connotes a savage and

“unequivocally negative “black

magic”.

THE BAHAMAS MOVING
FORWARD

S: where does this leave
The Bahamas? For good
or ill, most Bahamians, black,
white and otherwise, today share
cultural and religious values
derived from sources from which
only a minority of Bahamians

physically descend. Most have -

also come to accept a basically
western narrative of history,
even though this narrative some-
times propagates harmful myths
and assumptions.

None of this need be fatal to
harmonious national develop-
ment for The Bahamas, so long
as our self-image is constantly
“tweaked” to reflect the inter-
ests of the Bahamas as an inde-
pendent nation of many races.

But huge and monstrous lega-
cies of the colonial psychological
system remain. Black Bahami-
ans routinely associate African
bone structures, curled hair and
dark skin with ugliness, and seem

nialised new world black, while “"}:

Hindu pantheism connotes a ..

neutral Eastern mysticism and“

Greco-Roman pantheism con-





Phone : 325 - 3336







to assume that there is some uni-
versality to that view.

In religion, it is shocking to
observe the extent to which
black Bahamians have taken up
the almost militant Christian big-
otry that once stigmatised their
own ancestors. Only recently,
Rastafarian students complained
of the horrendous discrimination
they faced at the College of The
Bahamas.

From time to time, local pas-
tors rail about ‘black magic’ and
voodoo is often cited among the
reasons for looking down at
Haitian immigrants.

Less exposed black Bahami-

‘ans, of course, will never realise
. that all these things come back to

a rejection of the legitimacy of
their own ancestors and, ulti-

‘ mately, of themselves.

On the other hand, some bet-
ter educated black Bahamians
may assume that whiteness in
the Bahamas is a monolithic phe-
nomenon, there being no diver-
sity of views among whites on
these very important, sensitive
issues.

Which is why honest, well
thought-out contributions from
intelligent white Bahamians like
Ms Klonaris are so helpful.

GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTR

Ow, Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

a 7

? _ Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448

BWA (Bahamas Wholesale Agencies) Ltd., a
local distributor, is seeking an experienced
professional to join their team as

Territory Sales Consultant

We are looking

for

highly-motivated,

outgoing, energetic, and driven candidates to
sell and execute special marketing initiatives
and provide category consulting services to

our retail partners.

In order to meet our requirements all
applicants should possess:

e Bachelors Degree or equivalent

© Strong written and
oral communication skills

Developed mathematical and

analytical skills
Computer Skills

Knowledge of retail environment
Ability to make decisions under

pressure

Prior sales and merchandising
experience preferred

Applications will not be accepted in person.
Cover letters and resumes must be sent to
the following e-mail address no later than

March 6th: jobs_bwa@hotmail.com


PAGE 6, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

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@ MINISTER of ois aid Utilities Bradley Roberts speaks at
the BTC service of thanksgiving on Sunday at Bahamas Faith

Ministries International

LOCAL NEWS

service on Sunday



wa EXECUTIVE Chairman Gregory Bethel shanks: at the BIC.

(Photos:Felipé. Major/Tribune staff)



commissioned in Exum:

THE commissioning of new housing at
the Operation Bahamas Turks and Caicos
base in Exuma marks another important
milestone in the development of the unique
relationship in the war against drugs
between the Bahamas, the UK and US.

Foreign Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
said: “Those of us who remember the 1980s
remember that some Bahamians used to
argue that the stuff was not staying here so
once it kept going they had no concern.

“Quite apart from the shortsightedness of

that ethic, it was not long before it also
started to stay here, and began to sap the

energies of our young people, both men
and women. It was then that the society
responded in a big way.”

He said some institutions felt the problem
dated back to the leadership exercised in
the 1980s.

“By this ceremony today, we signal to pol-
icy-makers and to the people of both our
countries that we can never let up, get it off
our radar scope, lest we be swamped by the
same forces of evil that threatened to swamp
us two decades ago,” Mr Mitchell said.

He congratulated the US for the renewal
of this commitment every year, the buildings





being the latest sign of that commitment,

“It signals once again that whether you
are large or,small;.we live. in;an. interde-
pendent world. You, cannot. be. big; with-
out someone who is small. ‘We owe. each
other to work. together in the progress for
and on behalf of our common humanity,”
the minister said.

He thanked the men and women “of
OPBAT, both Bahamians and Americans,
the Turks and Caicos islanders for all their
hard work, théir-courage and-bravéry in
working at the front line to’keep: their
respective countries safe.





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THE TRIBUNE





Esso’s $36,000

contribution to

PMH Foundation

@ By Bahamas Information
Services

NASSAU, The Bahamas—
Esso gas stations have con-
tributed over $36,000 to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation from their “Help
Us Help” campaign during Sep-
tember 2005.

-Troy Simms, country manag-

‘er of Esso in the Bahamas,
announced last Monday Mon-
day that 11 gas stations partici-
pated in the drive to raise the
funds by contributing two cents
for every gallon of fuel sold.
: “They are South Beach On the
Run, Oakes Field On the Run,
East Bay Street On the Run,
Carmichael and Faith Avenue
On the Run, East Street and
Balfour Avenue On the Run,
Bargain City, Carmichael Road,
and Heastie’s Blue Hill Road.
Two stations on Eleuthera and
Long Island also contributed to
the fundraising campaign.

During the campaign, Esso
invited customers to help them
meet or surpass its target of
$35,000.

“We are honoured to
announce that together we were
able to raise $36,775.77,” Mr.
Simms said.

The campaign is an annual
programme focused on. assist-
ing organisations that help chil-
dren. -

Mr Simms noted that in 2004,
Esso raised almost $28,000 for
The Bahamas Red Cross to
assist in the hurricane relief
effort.

He said that an additional
$50,000 was raised in the “Help
Us Help” campaign to support
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force summer youth initiative
and other summer programmes.

Dr Myles Munroe, President

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital Foundation, said the
partnership with Esso is a suc-
cess.

“Funds from the Esso’s
‘Help Us Help’ programme
will be used to purchase much
needed equipment to assist in
paediatric care at the Princess
Margaret Hospital, mainly the
Children’s Ward, the Neona-
tal Intensive Care Units and
the Special Care Baby Unit,”
said Dr Munroe.

Dr Munroe said the part-
nership between the Founda-
tion and Esso proved that
“miracles can occur through
partnership and friendships in
the community.”

He added that the Founda-
tion will continue to promote

creative partnerships with oth-
er companies and program-
mmes to strengthen the level
of service provided by the
hospital.

Dr Munroe praised Esso —

Standard Oil dealers and sta-
tions, the media and the pub-
lic for making Esso their
choice during the one-month
campaign.

He said as a result of the
partnership, the oil compa-
ny’s name will be placed on
the “Miracle Donor Tree” in
the front lobby of the PMH
during 2006.

Mr Simms said Esso hopes
to continue the partnership
with the Foundation and will
continue to contribute to pae-
diatric care.



eT rae







Fs

SAN ANDROS, Andros, The Bahamas —

ribbon cutting for the new Department of Labour office in San Andros, Andros, on Febr'
Pictured, from left, are Minister of Labour and Immigration and Member of Parliament f

Andros and the Berry Islands Vincent Peet,
office, Mablene Bowleg and Cathy Martin.






Prime Minister Perry Christie looks on during



Mr Christie, Andrea Smith and Clerks at tire i

(Photo: BiS/Eric Rese)

Welcome to our islands, Governor Bush

While you’re here discussing trade relations
take time to enjoy our natural resources
so you can appreciate why we want to preserve them.

Get the truth on the Risks and Dangers of Liquefied Natural Gas log on to reearth.org & ari the meen


VACANCY NOTICE



PEOPLE often move for job
opportunities on another island,
to follow family, or any num-
ber of other motivations. But
what if you’re simply too
“cramped” in your home? You
face a dilemma: move, or BS
improve?

First consider how long you
might stay where you are. It
doesn’t make much sense to
pour money into improvements
if you’re planning to sell any
time soon. Potential purchasers
may not agree with your choice
of improvements, and with all
the turmoil and inconvenience
involved in most remodeling
projects, your biggest benefit
comes from remaining and
enjoying the fruits of your
labour!

Investigate how your planned
improvements will impact the
value of your home against oth-



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals
for the position of Senior Associate/System Administrator, Wide Area Network in our IT Technical Services
Department.

POSITION SUMMARY:

The System Administrator, Wide Area Network (WAN). is responsible for supporting btcbahamas.com network
including the various devices used on the network such as routers, switches. and circuits necessary for the
support of IT systems. System Administrator WAN acts as the organizer, planner, problem solver, decision
maker, resource System Administrator and overall leader for the entire IT supported network and wireline/
wireless data networking devices. Responsibilities include the management of a 2nd level support group and
liaise with the end-user community to maintain, support and enhance solutions for maximum functionality,
availability and performance. This position requires regular interactions with Internal customers to understand
their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being met effectively and on time. The
System Administrator WAN performs the creation and analysis of Business Partner requirements, assesses the
impact of changes to the network and network devices, and determines the level of effort needed to implement
changes. The System Administrator ensures adequate documentation and communication of all related system
upgrades, outages, and modifications, keeping users well informed of changes in network systems and policies
and procedures. This position interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, implement upgrades,
and deliver solulions.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:





















° Manage the day-to-day networking connectivity of the WAN and related devices (Cisco routers,
switches etc.)

° Effectively maintain the entire IT WAN including; project planning, scope managemenl budget
management, resource (i.e. internal, external, 3rd party resources) management, time management
(activities & task planning), communications, risk managemenl procurement, QA and testing, delivery,
transition planning and ongoing systems maintenance and support (problem resolution, outages,
version control, release management, upgrades, change management)












° Manage and track all reported issues received and escalated from the IT Level 1 Service Desk.

° Regularly interact with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs
and that support service levels are being met effectively and on time

° Communicates policy and procedural changes; develops, reviews and updates standard operating



procedure manuals for the WAN support
° Ensures staff members provide high quality support for the systems and to IT Business Partners






° Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect'the overall
operational effectiveness Of the IT WAN
° Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management




MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelors degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information

Systems, Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields.

° 7+ years experience managing. Implementing and maintaining WAN and peripheral devices such
as mediation devices, routers, Ethernet switches, etc.

° Supports Wide Area Network, Voice Over IP, and VPN capabilities

° Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem
management and tracking, SLA management, release/version management, escalalions and
notifications)

° Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC
processes, change management discipline. and project management processes).

° 2 years experience using network monitoring and support tools such as HP Openview to monitor

platform performance

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:













Broad range of network. network devices, mediation devices and processes
Expert knowledge of VPN and VOIP technologies
Strong knowledge of network.security.requirements.and,processes... f
Knowledge of firewalls, intrusion detection, and other network ‘security protocols
Strong knowledge of wireless networking protocols
Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines
Knowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration
tools and technologies
Strong leadership ability « Wp gel gb iy
Knowledge of project management’ processes, applications (MS. Project) and disciplines
Strong written and verbal communications skills”.

Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a nontechnical, simple
manner

° Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications . _

° Proficiency with HP Openview or other network management tools









@ MINISTER of Labour and
Immigration Vincent Peet
touring the grounds of Grand
Isle. Villas, in Emerald Bay,
Exuima, with Senior Vice
President of EGI Ltd, Pamela
McCullough, on February 16.
EGI Ltd, is the development
team behind the villas. Minis-
ter Peet toured various
tourism-related properties in
the Emerald Bay Resort area
and interacted with Bahami-
ans employed there.

(BIS photo: Eric Rose)






All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no laler than
Monday, February 27. 2006 and addressed as follows:








DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING

THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS







RE; SENIOR ASSOCIATEISYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR, WIDE AREA NETWORK

PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

Reese

Bahamas real

estate today

Carmen Massoni.



ers in your neighbourhood.
Your home could actually take
longer to sell in the future if it’s
in the “upper end” of choices.
Purchasers historically opt for
the least expensive home in the
most expensive neighbourhood
they can afford.

Of course, there are many
improvements that will add to
your home’s resale value down
the road, without pricing you
out of the market. Visit the US
National Association of Home
Builders website at nahb.org for
information about the potential
value of a range of improve-

Telecommunications/Computer Network Design
installation & Maintenance

Homes ¢ Offices * Subdivisions
Call Us Today!
‘Tel: 393-7733

E-mail: info@lemconetworks.com

THE TRIBUNE



Moving or improving
— happiness at home



ments. Although these numbers
are derived from the average of
the US markets these numbers.
are pretty much the same here.

Regardless of market condi-
tions, your home is where you
should be happy. “Improve or
move” is an emotional as well
as a financial decision that
requires deep and honest eval-
uation.



Peet’s visit to tourism properties

te rte







A multinational company,
manufacturer of leading
brands in personal hygiene
consumer products, |
seeking a Territory Manager
for the Bahamas and other
islands in the Caribbean.

This position will be based in
Nassau. It requires extensive
business travel with sales and
marketing responsibilities.

A college degree in business and
prior experience in a similar _,;
position are required. An MBA
and fluency in Spanish are
preferred. Only Bahamians or
residents with the right to work
need apply.

Please send your detailed résumé,
including experience, references
and current compensation to:
P.O. Box N-773,;

Nassau, Bahamas

by March 3, 2006.

Tis a


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9





Haiti poses
challenges
for CARICOM

@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
executive and _ former
Caribbean diplomat who
publishes widely on Small
States in the global commu-
nity).

THE victory by Rene
Preval in Haiti’s presidential
elections poses challenges for
the member countries of the
Caribbean Community and
Common Market (CARI-
COM).

‘After the former Presi-
dent Jean-Bertrand Aristide
accused the United States of
orchestrating his removal
and forcing him into exile in
February 2004, CARICOM,
as'a group, declined to recog-
nise the interim government
of Mr. Gerard Latortue.

-It was well known that the
regional grouping was divid-
ed on how to treat with
Haiti. In the end, the view
prevailed that the Latortue
regime would not be recog-
nised and Haiti would not be
allowed access to the coun-
cils of CARICOM.

‘ Preval’s election victory
changes all that and CARI-
COM Secretary-General
Edwin Carrington is report-
ed to have said: “We are
ready to receive Haiti back
into the institutions of the
Caribbean Community."

. But, he added, “We will
now sit with Haiti to discuss
the conditions of its re-entry
into CARICOM."

Attention

Importantly, Mr Carring-
ton drew attention to the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mias which includes provi-
sions for the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market (CSM) to which
Haiti i is not a signatory

“He said: "We now have to
sit with Haiti on this and oth-
er. issues, including how are
they prepared to come on
board with the Revised
Treaty and what is the
ptocess of acceding to the
various elements of the Sin-
gle Market."

- It is Haiti’s accession to
the CSM that poses the
gteatest challenge to CARI-
COM.

“ Haiti with a population of
83 million is the poorest
country in the Hemi-
sphere. Its people are 3 mil-

lion more than the rest of |

CARICOM combined.

‘Both its economic and
political conditions have
caused many of its people to
flee from its shores in search
of a better life.

; While the United States
has been the main target of
their refuge, the Dominican
Republic and the Bahamas
have also experienced the
illegal entry of Haitians into
their countries.

: Recently, groups of Hait-
ian refugees have turned up
in Jamaica, Antigua and
Dominica.

Ignite

: The election of Mr Preval,
by just over 51 per cent of
the population, does not
speak to a united coun-
try. Haiti continues to live
on a political powder
keg. And, the political
manipulation of its desper-
ate economic circumstances
is the match that could ignite
it any time.

In any event, Haiti is a far
way from the establishment
of democratic institutions,
and even farther away from
the kind of widespread
respect for them that would
underpin their maintenance.

: Consequently, CARI-
COM’s first duty of care to a
member of its community is
to welcome back into its fold
the constitutionally elected
government of Rene Preval
in elections which have been

State



endorsed by the Organisa-
tion of American States.
Having done so, CARI-
COM should take the lead
in the international commu-
nity in raising the financial
and other help that Haiti
urgently needs if the unwel-
come flight of its people to
other countries is to stop.
This will call for a serious
diplomatic effort, and may
well require the creation of a
special CARICOM Task
Force devoted to working
with the Haitian government
and international donor and
financial community for at
least two years to create the
machinery for financing and
managing projects in Haiti.

Projects

Among these should be
health care, particularly
HIV/AIDS, education and
human resource develop-
ment, infrastructural projects
that would encourage foreign
and local private sector
investment, and, very impor-
tantly, the building of demo-
cratic institutions supported
by legislation and enforce-
ment machinery.

In this regard, CARICOM |

might enlist the help of
Canada in a joint effort to
engage the US government
at the earliest opportunity in
the peaceful and progressive
development of Haiti.

Reports from the Domini-
can Republic, Haiti’s neigh-
bour, reveal that some 800
US troops landed at a port
city in the Dominican
Republic, barely 80 miles
from the Haitian border, last
Thursday. Ostensibly, they
are there for “New Hori-
zons”, a military exercise
that is to extend for several
months.

Nonetheless, the US gov-
ernment has congratulated
Mr Preval on his election and
Department
spokesman, Tom Casey, said
“We look forward to work-
ing with the new government
to help the Haitian people
build a better future for
themselves."

CARICOM should take

the US government at its-

word, and act as an honest

broker to unlock aid for °

Haiti that has already been
approved from the US and
other countries and agencies,
and to develop a programme
for additional aid.

Neither democracy nor

development, including the |
flight of Haitians seeking ©

refuge, will come unless gen-
erous assistance is forthcom-
ing.

And, CARICOM coun-
tries, however, determined
they may be, as they have
said, “to end years of isola-
tion and bring Haiti into the
Caribbean family to which it
belongs by geography, histo-
ry and common ancestry”,
should require considerable
advancement by Haiti in its
economic and political con-
ditions before it is encour-
aged to join the Caribbean
Single Market.

After all the Single Mar-
ket goes well beyond a free
trade arrangement between
groups of countries; it is a

’ deep form of integration that

makes a single space of all
the countries’ markets and
allows for the free movement
of goods and services, the
right of establishment by
nationals of the participat-
ing countries and free move-
ment of certain categories of
workers.

The countries that enter
such a Single Market, while

conscious of the importance
of “geography, history and
ancestry”, must also be alert
to the need to fulfil other
obligations such as the pro-
vision of funding under the
Regional Development Fund
(RDF) for disadvantaged
countries and sectors where
Haiti would be amongst the
neediest.

Also, it may be an oppor-
tune time for CARICOM
countries to revisit the
Revised Treaty of Chaguara-
mas to create principles of
democracy, rights, and oblig-
ations to which every mem-
ber state must adhere as a
basis for entry, and for con-
tinued membership.

All CARICOM members,
including Haiti, should sign it
as a precondition for enter-
ing the CSM or remaining a
member.

CARICOM countries
must do all they can to
improve conditions for Haiti
as a member of the
Caribbean community. And,
Haiti must also play its part.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com

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LOCAL NEWS

Equal opportunities for

THE TRIBUNE

disabled pledge by Griffin

@ By Bahamas Information
Services

MINISTER of Social Ser-
vices and Community Devel-
opment Melanie Griffin said
Thursday that the government
will continue to ensure equal
opportunities for the disabled.

Mrs Griffin was addressing a
post-Valentine Day lunch for
persons living with disabilities,
sponsored by the Englerston
Urban Renewal Programme in
partnership with the Disability
Affairs Division of the Ministry
of Social Services and Commu-
nity Development.

The minister said the govern-
ment had launched a number

’ of initiatives that should con-

tinue to enhance the lifestyles of
persons living with disabilities,
chief among them being the
establishment of a Special

Needs Commission under the

auspices of the Ministry of Edu-
cation.

This is responsible for assess-
ing the special education needs
of persons living with disabili-
ties, the expansion of the Dis-
ability Unit into a Disability
Affairs Division and the hiring of
a consultant on Disability Affairs
to liaise with the ministry and

Tee anlesuce

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for
the position of Senior Associate/System Administrator, Operating Systems in our IT Technical Services |

Department.
~ POSITION SUMMARY:

The System Administrator, Operating systems (OS) is responsible for the hardware and operating system software. | |
The System Administrator OS installs new hardware, installs the operating system, maintains the operating system '

i
|
|
5

through patches, maintains security on the devices, ensures effective connectivity with tile network, and is responsible |
overall for the performance of the technical platform of application systems. The System Administrator, OS acts.
as the organizer, planner, problem solver, and overall leader for the hardware and software platforms for UNIX,
AIX, Linux, Windows and OS 400 systems. The administrator monitors systems and makes adjustments to maximize
functionality, availability and performance. The administrator manages growth and utilizes capacity planning to
ensure that adequate system resources are always available. This position requires regular interactions with internal .
customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being met effectively
and on time. The System Administrator, OS ensures adequate documentation and communication of all related
system upgrades, outages, and modifications, keeping Business Partners well informed of changes in network
systems and policies and procedures. This position interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, '

implement upgrades, and deliver solutions.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES: | ,

Manage the day-to-day health of the AIX, Linux, Windows, OS 400, Solaris, and UNIX operating

@ MINISTER of Social Services and Community Development the Hon. Melanie Griffin speaks at

i

OS



the Englerston Urban Renewal Project Disable Citizen Love Luncheon on Thursday, February 16,
2006 at Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church. ne

the disabled community.

Mrs Griffin said the Special
Needs Commission has
“already made some changes
and recommendations” with
regard to developing further
programmes to enhance educa-
tional opportunities for the dis-
abled.

She said the Disability Affairs
Division, located at Eighth Ter-
race, Centreville, and staffed by
a number of persons living with
disabilities, serves as a resource
centre, complete with comput-
ers.

She said her ministry will con-
tinue to subsidise computer
classes for the disabled in an
attempt to provide equal oppor-
tunity training in a number of
key areas, computer literacy
among them.

Minister Griffin said the gov-
ernment, through her ministry,
is also in the final stages of



preparing draft disability legis-
lation to protect the rights and
opportunities of those living
with disability.

Challenges

She said that despite the suc-
cesses, the government recog-
nised that there are still a num-
ber of challenges the disabled
face, including employment,
housing, education and training
opportunities.

“The government of the
Bahamas is aware of these chal-
lenges and has been working on
how we can have a turnaround
in these areas. The government
has responded and will continue
to respond to the needs of per-
sons living with disabilities,”
Mrs Griffin said.

She said the hiring of Ms Iris
Adderley as a consultant on dis-

= ) FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of |

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

ability has had a positive impact
in creating continued dialogue
between the government
through the Ministry of Social
Services and Community
Affairs and the disabled com
munity.

She commended Ms Adder-
ley for the launch of the radio
talk show, “Spotlight on Dis-
ability”, which has had a posi-
tive impact on. the disabled
community. The show airs the
second Thursday in each month
over ZNS 1540 in-New Provi-
dence and 810AM in Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

“This show has had a posi-
tive impact because it allows
persons living with disabilities
the opportunity to call-in and
give their recommendations for
the improvement and uplifting
and enhancing of persons liv-
ing with disabilities in this coun-
try, and of course, to give their



system platforms.
Installs new hardware devices, configures. them, and attaches them to the network.
Maintains operating system currency through migration of releases and patch implementation
Researches system patches to determine their suitability for implementation on specific systems
Troubleshoots hardware and software platforms problems
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to implement system backup procedures to
ensure that data is comprehensively-copied
Manages and configures system storage devices, monitors space, plans for future growth, and manages
the growth and performance of the platforms :
Works closely with the Manager of Data Security and implements prescribed security policies and

rocedures
ct as tier 2 Help Desk support to troubleshoot and resolved platform issues in a 24 x 7 environment
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of potential
problems
_ Stays current with new system offerings and technology, analyzes new technology and makes
recommendations where applicable

Works closely with the System Administrator WAN and the Database Administrator to a provide and
maintain a comprehensive IT technical architecture

Manage and track all reported issues received and escalated from the IT Level 1 Service Desk
oa toed interact with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs

and that support service levels are being met effectively and on time

Communicates policy and procedural changes: develops, reviews and updates standard operating

rocedure manuals for the hardware and software plattorm support
scalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall

operational effectiveness of the technical architecture

Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelors degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information
Systems, Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields.
7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining hardware and software platforms for
AIX, OS 400, Linux, Windows and UN IX platforms

Strong leadership ability

2 years experience managing a storage area network (SAN)

2 years experience implementing and utilizing performance monitoring and alarming tools such as

BMC Patrol, Nagios. Site Angel, Tripwire, or other tools as required

Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem
management and tracking, SLA management, release / version management, escalations and notifications)
Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC
processes, change management discipline, and project management processes).

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

Broad range of hardware experience on IBM platform devices

Extensive knowledge of specific operating systems including 0S 400, Windows, AIX. Linux

Strong leadership ability with the ability to lead and take charge of a technical area

Strong knowledge of UNIX security, OS 400 security, Windows and Linux Security mechanisms,
knowledge of Peoplesoft security is a plus

Ability to establish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA's and develop guidelines

Knowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration

tools and technologies

Knowledge of project management processes, applications (MS Project) and disciplines

Strong written and verbal communications skills.

Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a nontechnical, simple

manner.

Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.

Human Resource and
Training Officer







PROFILE:

Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/or HR Certification
fe Proficiency in Advanced Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook
& Internet Explorer
e Ability to work quickly and accurately and cope with large volumes.
i of work ; ‘
e Strong interpersonal skills and communication skills
|e Excellent organizational and administrative skills’
|e Facilitation and meeting skills


















4
4

k
i



RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Assists the Director of HR/Training and the HR Manager
Assists with Training duties and programmes

Assists with HR duties and research projects © ;
Assists in the planning and execution of all social/employee events i
Disseminates internal information to personnel as required
Composes letters, memos and reports

Prepares Training Certificates of Participation/Attendance

Compensation package will include a competitive salary, depend-
ing on experience, together with a comprehensive range of
benefits.






Send resume no later than March 3, 2006 to:

Director of HR & Training
= ) FIDELITY |

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than
Monday, February 27, 2006 and addressed as follows;








51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: info@fidelitybahamas.com

DIRECTOR
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD
NASSAU. BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR, OPERATING SYSTEMS


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE



Resort worker claims she
was unfairly suspended

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - A female
‘worker at Our Lucaya
"Resort claims she was unfair-

‘ly suspended and refused
‘help by a union representa-
:tive at the Bahamas Hotel
‘Catering and Allied Work-
ers Union.
' Hair-stylist Sandra Mader,
who is employed at Senses
-Spa, is claiming she was sus-
pended for 90 days after she
was out.sick from work for
Six days.

Ms Mader went to the

Snion *s office on Thursday
‘to seek help, only to be told
‘that there was nothing they
‘ould do to help her.
«< “I was in awe at what I was
being told,” said the moth-
er-of-four. “I was very dis-
appointed because I had
been paying union dues for
four years.

Employed

Ms. Mader. was initially
employed: as. a hair-stylist at
‘the; spa in 2001. She was
demoted to locker room
attendant after she was
allegedly accused of damag-
ing:a customer’s hair in 2003.
": She says she has been a
professional hair-stylist for
20 years.'Ms Mader said her
‘boss explained that she
‘would only be reinstated if
‘she received re- certification
‘training. © . rs
__ Ms Mader Slain she was
not, reinstated as a hair-styl-
ist even ‘though she under-
went a two-hour re-certifica-
tion trainin.










@ SANDRA Mader, four-year employee at Our Lucaya and Lionel Morley, BHCAWU.

After being taken ill with
the flu for six days, Ms Mad-
er returned to work and pre-
sented a three-day sick slip
to her boss. She said she was
suspended after she failed to
present a sick slip for the
additional three days.

Ms Mader turned to the ~

Labour Board for assistance.

She said a labour official
had advised the resort they
could either issue a two-
week suspension with pay or
without pay, but not a 90-day
suspension.

The labour official and Ms
Mader are expected to meet
with mane semen ‘on Mon-
day.

Senses Spa manager Chris-
tine Hays told The Tribune
that she did not wish to com-
ment on the matter..."

Union’ official "Lloyd
Cooper could not be reached

on Friday. -

Lionel Morley, BHCAWU
executive board member,
criticised the union for not
supporting Ms Mader.

Elections

Mr Morley said he intends
to contest an executive posi-
tion during union elections
in May. He claims that union
representation of workers
has deteriorated.

“The core objective and
purpose of the union is to
protect and preserve the
rights of its members. And
right now the union is in its
weakest state today.”

Mr Morley said he will
continue to,support and rep-

resent union members:in

need, even though the. union
had threatened to lock him
out of his office.

(Photos: Denise Maycock)

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YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

SENIOR MANAGER
_ECONOMIST, REGULATORY

for comment up to press time ; : sth za oy § os : oa
; ‘ The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified

individuals for the: et of SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST in our Regulatory Department.
JOB SUMMARY

le
ny. =) Exe cutive To develop and apply various telecommunications regulatory requirements to economic efficiencies
including interconnection issues, market analysis and pricing methodologies, quality of service standards
; te : and customer codes of practice.
Growing publishing company requires a
proven sales executive. Big $$$ are easy with DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
The Tribune wants to hear ;
from people who are
making news in their
Â¥ neighbourhoods. Perhaps
{| you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. f
If so, call us on 322-1986
_and share your story.

good performance. Advertising or graphic

Provide specialist advice on the economic and financial performance of BTC as a regulated
arts experience preferred but not essential.

operator

Provide economic and financial analysis involving marketing research and changes in price
setting methodologies

Provide proficient application of economic principles to the licence compliance requirements
of BTC as a regulated telecommunications operator

Provide market research and other economic studies relevant to the current and future
development of BTC

Become proficient in knowledge of all necessary repaiatony documents including the
Telecommunications Act, Sector Policy and BTC's licence

Direct sales experience a must. Company
has good reputation, top publications and a
friendly, positive atmosphere with strong
work ethic. Flexible hours possible.

Call: 323-8888

or fax resume tO: 322-4527



SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST

Advise on and monitor PUC Rate Rebalancing Proposals and all epochs of BTC rates including
price regulated services

Advise on and monitor all relevant sector issues including universal service, price capping and
reference interconnection offer documents (RIO) including Public Consultations

Advise on and monitor all relevant interconnection issues e.g. revenue

To liaise with the Public Utilities Commission on all relevant compliance issues and to attend
to meetings and correspondence related thereto

To assist in the reporting of individual business units in the company on a line of business
basis for various services 3 8

To assist in the preparation of network and service development plans for the demonstration
of cost based pricing to assist with the determination of interconnection pricing

To assist in the development and implementation of strategies to keep the company competitive
and to secure its market share

Generally to assist with the division's objective of ensuing compliance with licence provisions
whilst ensuring that the company 4

To attend all staff meetings and prepare monthly status reports on tasks and assignments

STOP DAYDREAMING. uM TART TG RUISING

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Come in to Premier Travel on Saturday March 4th from

(I) _ Proficient in the application of economics to an operator/licence in a regulated
telecommunications sector

(Ii) Good experience in market research and regulatory methodologies

(iii) ~Some proficiency in accounting required

(iv) Computer skills in database, spreadsheets, statistics and word processing

(v) Membership in relevant professional associations

(vi) Master's degree in Economics

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SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST

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(vii) Ten (10) years experience required. Experience in telecommunications would be an asset
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Oo UE GE OR OD (viii) Strong leadership are essential organizational self-motivational and communications
tie BB TS PR ED “kills

PRE LO RE PE COT PO OP Fed LO RO Hat Neat 2 POL LO LOL BOP Sout ROE FOP Soet Rae bat Pet COR LO HOt TIN

All applications are to be received at BTC's Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy Drive, no later than
Monday, February 27, 2006 and addressed as follows:

* Deposit must be
paid on a cruise
booked with
Premier Travel
from December 1st,
2005 - March 4th,
2006 in order to

be eligible to win 7
day cruise.

DIRECTOR.
HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

#57 Collins Avenue
Tel: 328-0264 / 328-0267

RE: SENIOR MANAGER/ECONOMIST, REGULATORY




with the

B By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com_

IT COMES as no surprise
that lecturers, staff and stu-
dents at the College of the
Bahamas have raised a peti-
tion calling for the reinstate-

PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

4



ment of former president Dr
Rodney Smith.
aving just completed



4
t
)
1
\

DSL UPGRADE

In its continuing effort to improve its
telecommunications services, The
Bahamas Telecommunication Company
Ltd. (BTC) wishes to inform the public
and its valued customers that we will be
performing a DSL equipment upgrade
in the Eastern district of New Providence
on Tuesday, February 21st, 2006
beginning at 1:00am. As a result, some
subscribers in the Eastern district may
experience a brief disruption in their DSL
high speed internet service. Please note,
that telephone services will not be
interrupted, only 'DSL_ service.

‘

BTC apologizes for the inconvenience
caused, and assures the public that every
effort will be made to keep the disruption
of internet service to a minimum.






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| Amd Xp Segipran 2800+



COB, I can assure you that
these notions have existed
under the surface for quite

_ some time. In fact, since short-

ly after Dr Smith’s resignation
in early August, 2005.

The fact that the petition
bears more than 400 signa-
tures serves as a show of no
confidence in the present lead-
ership team.



looked them and begun the
search for someone from over-
seas to lead this institution to
university status. Now they are
just keeping the house until
they locate its rightful occu-
pant.

Students have been grum-
bling for months about what
they see as the cold atmos-
phere since Dr Smith’s depar-
ture.

Both the ‘acting president,
Dr Rhonda Chipman-John-
son, and her colleague, Dr
Pandora Johnson, are COB
stalwarts, but they are not



“While I'm not pressing for
Dr Smith’s return, I do admit
he did wonders for the college.
During his tenure, morale was
boosted, new ideas permeated
the atmosphere and students
felt like they were important
and not just seen as cash

cows.”



Just this week, The Tribune
reported that COB council
chairman Franklyn Wilson
had indicated that they were
still paying the rent -$4,000
per month - for the former
residence of Dr Smith on
Eastern Road.

This can be interpreted as
the council’s way of telling
local presidential candidates
with their own homes that
members have already over-

expected to lead the college
to university status.

While I’m not pressing for
Dr Smith’s return, I do admit
he did wonders for the col-
lege. During his tenure,
morale was boosted, new
ideas permeated the atmos-
phere and students felt like
they were important and not
just seen as‘cash cows... .
Dr Smith made it a point to
meet with the studentsand

peau

Sa Williams oR



r

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COB can stil attain university status

hear their queries. He always
presented himself as a man
who was approachable and
steadfast in his belief that a
college/university can only
come to fruition with its stu-
dent body.

It is evident that Mr Wilson
must find someone with an
attractive persona and an evo-
lutionary outlook.

I disagree with my former
lecturer Felix Bethel’s notion
that it would take the college
another 20 years to become a
university.

It is my belief that if the
right person is at the helm of
the college, it can still attain
university status, maybe not
in 2007, but shortly thereafter.

Having been a student at
COB during Dr Smith’s pres-

THE TRIBUNE

at the helm

idency, I confirm that morale,
work drive and visionary out-
look of both staff and students
were at an all-time high.

The question now becomes:
Does it take Dr Smith to
return to fill this void or do
we find an outsider to rein-
vigorate the college? The lat-
ter seems more likely, because
as an historian, I know the
harsh, embarrassing implica-
tions of plagiarism or ‘any
notion that plagiarism had
occurred.

As things stand, the admin-
istration at COB is far from
appealing. I urge’ Mr Wilson to
think on these things and
make a decision that is in the
best interest of the college -
not popularity, politics or oth-
erwise.



“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”










THE TRIBUNE os MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE iS,

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006



FROM page one

already relayed to the press,
was solely the result of previ-
ously scheduled medical tests
and evaluations at the Cleve-
land Clinic in Fort Lauderdale
which I had already been
forced to postpone once due to
pressing business and which I




<

&

Invite application for the position of:

DIRECTOR OF FOOD & BEVERAGE

Applicant must be experienced in their field,
excellent communication skills, written and oral;
Team building and management skills; position
offers attractive compensation packages, competitive
with relevant experience. .

Director of Human Resources
P.O. Box CB-13005 ’

Email: cmajor@srb.sandals.com

Royal Bahamian Resort & Spa

was reluctant, indeed unwill-
ing, to postpone again.

“TI am pleased to advise
that my doctors have found
me to be in good health,” he
said.

He also said that Mr

Christie was suffering from a
lapse of memory. He had
asserted that he had not read
about or heard about an














YOUR CONNECTIO

FO THE WORLD

LOCAL NEWS

opposition leader not attend-
ing the opening of parlia-
ment, but it had happened on
more than one occasion.

“How poorly the prime
minister’s memory serves
him. He certainly appears to
have forgotten that twice, in
1992 and again in 1993, the
entire opposition bench,
including his good self and
his then leader, Sir Lynden,
absented themselves in what
they termed a boycott from
the reading of the Speech
from the Throne at the open-
ing of parliament under an
FNM administration.

“And he appears also not
to recall the central role that
he and his co-deputy leader
played in 1996 in planning a
third PLP boycott of the
opening of a new session of
parliament. Action. which he
took in the absence of his

leader, who was not present —

due to ill-health,” Mr Ingra-
ham said. :
Mr Ingraham produced a
newspaper article from
August 16, 1993, which fea-

tured a press conference

where then PLP deputy lead-
ers B J Nottage and Mr
Christie explained why the
PLP would not be attending
the opening of that session of
parliament.

VACANCY NOTICE



The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for the position
of Senior Associate/Database Administrator in our IT Technical Services Department.

JOB SUMMARY:

‘

The Database Administrator (DBA) is responsible for maintaining the health of BTC Oracle, DB2:and SQL databases. The
DBA implements databases, develops backup ‘and restoration procedures, performs databases tuning, ‘and manages the growth
and performance of the IT databases. The DBA utilizes diagnostic tools to determine system:performance problems and
implements database and indexing changes as needed in order to maximize database performance. The DBA also researches
patches and implements database upgrades and realeases to keep the database environment current. In addition, the DBA
serves as the resident expert on data retrieval and management through an expert knowledge of SQL and stored procedure,
providing technical support to developers as needed. The DBA works closely with the Manager of Data Security to implement
prescribed security rules and policies as determined at the database level. The DBA performs special application tuning duties
to improve performance on application systems for billing, accounting and customer service and other applications. The DBA
acts as the organzier, planner, problem solver and overall leader for the BTC IT databases. This position requires regular
interactions with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that service levels are being
met effectively and on time. The DBA maintains adequate documentation and communication of all related system upgrades,
outages and modifications, keeping Business Partners well informed of changes in policies and procedures. This position,
interfaces frequently with other IT staff to resolve issues, implement upgrades and deliver solutions.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

o © @ © 2 2 © @ @ @

data is comprehensive copied
Manages and configured database storage, monitors space, plans for future growth and manages the growth and
performance of the IT databases ,
Works closely with the Manager of Data Security and implements prescribed security policies and procedures
Acts as tier 2 Help Desk support to troubleshoot and resolve: database issues in a 24 x 7 environment
Implements systems diagnostic and alarming tools for early detection and notification of potential problems
Stays current with new system offerings and technology, analyzes new technology and makes recommendations

where applicable.

Manage the day to day health of the IT Oracle, DB2 and SQL production! databases

Implement and support various test and training database instances as required

Installs new databases, configures them, tunes them and monitors performance

Utilizes diagnostic tools and explain plans to identify database performance issues

Modifies the database schema where required to implement application system upgrades
Maintains database currently through migration of releases and patch implementation
Researches database patches to determine their suitability for implementation on specific. systems
Troubleshoots database problems and performance issues

Works with developers to design and create new application databases
Works closely with the Backup and Archival Specialist to implement database backup procedures to ensure that

Works closely with System Administrator Operating Systems, and Systems Architect to provide and maintain a
comprehensive IT technical architecture
Manages and tracks all reported issues received and escalated from the IT level 1/2 Service Desk
Regularly interacts with internal customers to understand their existing and strategic business needs and that
support service levels are being effectively and on time
Communicates policy and procedural changes: develops, reviews and updates standard operating procedure
manuals for the hardware and software platform support
Escalates and notifies management of all organization issues or situations that affect the overall operation
efféctiveness of the technical architecture

Perform other job-related duties as assigned by management ~

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Engineering, Information Systems,
’ Management Information Systems or equivalent industry experience in related fields

7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaing Oracle databases

7+ years experience managing, implementing and maintaining DB2 databases

5 years experience with AIX, OS 400, Windows and Linux operating systems

Strong leadership ability

1 year experience utilizing a storage area network (SAN)
Strong working knowledge of systems support and maintenance processes (includes problem management

and tracking, SLA management, release/version management, escalations and notifications)

Strong working knowledge of formal project and development methodologies (includes SDLC processes, change
management discipline, and project management processes).

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES REQUIRED:

Working knowledge of OS 400, AIX, WIndows, Solaris and Linux. operating systems
Strong leadership ability with the ability to lead and take charge of a technical area
Strong knowledge of database security, knowledge of Peoplesoft security is a plus
Ability to utilize performance tools to identify application system performance issues

Ability to monitor and tune database to maintain maximun performance

Expert knowledge of SQL and stored procedures
Working knowledge of UNIX security, OS 400 security, Windows and Linux Security mechanisms

Ability to extablish organization standards, operating procedures, SLA’s and develop guidelines

Kowledge and experience with trouble management, systems management and remote administration tools and

technologies

Knowledge of project management processes, applications (MS Project) and disciplines
Strong written and verbal communications skills :
Ability to effectively communicate complex technical concepts and ideas in a non-technical, simple manner
Proficient skills utilizing MS Office tools and applications.

All application are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F, Kennedy Drive no longer than Monday, February 27,

2006 and addressed as follows:

DIRECTOR

THE HUMAN RESOURCES & TRAINING
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD.

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR



“In what dream world does
the prime minister exist? I
recommend that in the future
he might exercise his memo-
ry and ensure that his brain is
in gear before he speaks,” Mr
Ingraham said.

He said he was surprised
to learn that his absence from
the reading of the Speech
from the Throne so distracted
members of the government
that they permitted their
attention to be diverted from
the real business at hand -
their legislative agenda for
“their final 15 months in
office”.

“T am bowled over to learn
that the governing party
holds the office of leader of
the opposition in such high
esteem; and further consid-
ers the presence of the leader
of the opposition so central
to the government’s business.

“This is news to me. After
all, this is the same govern-
ment that routinely invites
the leader of the opposition
to formal government func-
tions by telephone on the
night before the function - as
was the case for the recent
demission from office of the
former Governor General
and the oath-taking by the
new Governor General, and
as was the notification of the
official arrangements for the
funeral of our late colleague,
George Mackey.

“Of course, this is par for
the course. The governing
party continues to give great-
est attention to form over
substance. They have no real
appreciation, respect or
understanding of and for the
true functioning of a parlia-
mentary democracy.

“For example, they do not
appear to know that the pro-
rogation and opening of a
new session of parliament in
a functioning democracy is
not a secret,” Mr Ingraham
said. |

He said that in a function-
ing democracy, parliamentary

courtesy ensures that consul. -



es-place prior. to
prorogation to determine
whether the opposition has
matters of interest they would

â„¢ leader slams PM

wish to have addressed prior
to prorogation or otherwise
carried forward to the new
session of parliament.

“But the governing party
does not understand or prac-
tise these basic democratic
principles. That is why they
could see fit to prorogue par-
liament on January 31 with
no prior notice to the oppo-
sition and leave some 60
questions, with as many as
200 sub-parts, put to the gov-
ernment by members of the
opposition unanswered.

“In a functioning democra-
cy.a government answers
questions put to it by the
opposition,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the gov-
erning party did not observe
any of these democratic
norms. Instead, they deter-
mined “in secret when the

‘House would be prorogued

and when the new session
would open.”

He said: “The absence of
consultation prior to proro-
gation meant that a number
of members of the opposition
found ourselves unable to
rearrange our schedules to
accommodate the secret
schedule of the governing
party.

“Then the leader of the
PLP pretends as if the
absence of a member, a justi-
fied absence, meant to send
no messages explicit or oth-
erwise, constitutes a threat to
democracy.

“T ask all of us, where is the
greater threat to parliamen-

. tary democracy? When on

prorogation and the sum-
moning of a new parliament,
the person who represents
himself to.be the alternative
PM does not appear, does not
come out, his deputy does not

appear and does not come : —

out, and they have not pro-
vided notice or excuse to the

parliament or to the Speak-:

er?” Mr Ingraham said.

He said the public will be
aware that there is no parlia-
mentary rule or custom that.
dictates that a member.
inform the Speaker of his/her
intended presence or absence
at a sitting of parliament.

ASSOCIATED BAHAMIAN DISTILLERS & BREWERS LTD

DIVIDEND NOTICE
TO ORDINARY SHAREHOLDERS

We are pleased to advise that a Final Dividend
for 2003 of $0.30 per share shall be paid on 16th
February 2006 to Ordinary Shareholders of record
as at 31st December 2004. Having paid an interim
dividend of $0.50 for 2003, this makes the total
dividend paid for 2003 $0.80 per share.

The payment will be made in the usual manner,
on 16th February 2006, through Colina Financial
Advisors Limited, our Registrar and Transfer

agents.

Barry Newman
Company Secretary










a

"The material was very informative and will
definitely add value to me and my company. To
have the ability to resolve internal disputes in
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"Material was excellent. Instructors very
effective. I work for the U.S. government and I
believe this course would be of benefit."

_ Dennis M. Weir, Federal Bureau’ of Prisons; Tuscon, USA Z



Negotiation ana Mediation skills |

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4 day Certificate ADR Workshop - March 21-24, 2006

Presented by the Stitt Feld Handy Group.
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_ would be absorbe



THE TRIBUNE




PLP women’s

branch chairman
FROM page one

“If it isn’t a good reason, I
think that we ought to be con-
cerned about that. Additionally,
he ought to be considering relin=
quishing the position if he isn’t
prepared to fulfil the mandate
of the position,” said Dr
Sawyer. th

She stressed that, if Mr Ingra-
ham had a good reason for not
attending, there was no debate:

With the upcoming general
election, Dr Sawyer said she is
moving up a notch, from “cruisé
control to full speed.” a

She said she is sure if the
organisation works hard, it will
be able to attract the women. =

“We want to get out there
and talk about the Progressive
Liberal Party, talk about the
issues that we feel strongly
about and how we would want
to see them handled and to pre=
sent our approach to them.” ;

She said the PLP’s philoso-
phy was concern for the peo-
ple.

Cabinet

FROM page one








left until a genera
to be calleds 3

Mr Christie said:-a't
initiative. was: du
ence to the econom
rity and safety of Bai

According to other 1 ts,
Minister of Immigration an
Labour Vincent:Peet w.
transferred to Fittancial Ser
vices. Shane Gibson maybe
moved from Housing. an¢
National. Insurance: tq :









gested the



istry of Finance.. ae
_ Alfred Sears. is expectec
remain as Minister of Educ:





.Dr Marcus Bethel is expectet
to head National Insurance witli
DrB J Nottage taking over: ag
Minister of Healths-.-22. 0°) 3¢

V Alfred Gray’s portfolio will
reportedly include local gov-
ernment, mailboats and post
offices. :
He would be relieved of Agri-



- culture and Fisheries, which

would be taken over by Leslie

Miller, who would retain Trade

and Industry under his portfo-
lio. wi

Fred Mitchell is expected to
remain Minister of Foreign
Affairs but will also take on
responsibility for international
trade, which would include
FTAA, CSME, LNG, and
PetroCaribe.

Obie Wilchcombe will report-
edly remain as.Minister of
Tourism and Bradley Roberts
is expected to retain responsi,
bility for the Ministry of Works
and Utilities.

Neville Wisdom will report-
edly remain Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture and Glenys
Hanna-Martin is also expected
to stay as Minister of Transport
and Aviation. a

It has also been claimed that
Pleasant Bridgewater may be
in the running for a Cabinet
post and that Michael Halkitis is
being considered for the post
of Minister of State for Finance,

,
a

s














to be held at the British
Colonial Hilton Nassau



¢ learn how to deal with tough bargainers
earn how to mediate disputes, saving time and money
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 15.





2

SPEL MUSIC CHANNEL F;

rye

gospel Music Chann

it

Gospel Splash, featuring
international gospel music
stars Anointed and Mary
Alessi, along with home-

the Bahamas and are certain to
put on a memorable show for
the Bahamian audience.”

The headline performers are
well-known in the gospel music
field. Anointed has been a pop-
ular gospel music group for
more than a decade and Mary
Alessi has been gaining recog-
nition as a worship and urban
vocalist.

Anointed has been celebrated

multi-ethnic following. Siblings
Da’dra and Steve Crawford,
while still masters of the
smooth, pop/R and B-flavoured
gospel their longtime fans have
come to know them for, also
give the urban, groove-driven
facets of their musical person-
alities plenty of space to shine in
their music. The resulting mix is
familiar but still fresh, as well
as new and innovative—and all

Artists turning up to
spread the gospel

HURRICANE Wilma’s
appearance last October may
have delayed the hosting of
one of the most anticipated
0.0, ii a ‘| gospel music events — but the
storm certainly could not stop

boardist and speaker, Mary
Alessi has released her second
independent album, More, a
live recording that features
many of her own songs.

A proud sponsor of Gospel
Splash, Joy 101.9 FM, will also
be giving listeners chances to
win free tickets during their
broadcasts.

Gospel Splash has also



grown inspirational music sen-
sations Shaback, TaDa and
Nehemiah Hield, will be held

Royal Bahamian Resort.
Doors will open at 8pm.
Angela Cannon, senior
marketing manager of Cable
Bahamas’ Gospel Music
channel, said: “Our artists are
raring to go! Both Anointed
and Mary Alessi are truly
thrilled about performing in



= BAHAMAS Heart Foundation chairman R E Barnes presents the Lady Sassoon Golden Heart

Award to Andrea Archer for exemplary community service on Saturday at the 42nd annual Heart
Ball. The Bahamas’ first school social worker, Mrs Archer was also lauded for her work with the
PACE and SURE programmes for the nation’s youth.

HUNDREDS showed their
support for children with heart
disease at the annual Heart Ball
on Saturday.

Organisers deemed the Ball,
in its:42nd year,.a.great.success...

A highlight was the announce-

ment of the Lady Sassoon Gold-
en Heart award. This is presented
to a person who has given exem-
plary service to other people. This
year’s recipient was Andrea

..Atcher, deputy permanent. sec-

retary in the Ministry of Health.

(Photo: Andrew Aitken)

A silent auction and a grand
raffle featured more than
$30,000 in prizes.

Supporters were entertained
with music from the Soulful

Groovers,.the Police. Pop Band. ..

and the Ed Brice Orchestra.

Digicel to enter Guyana
cell phone market

- o~-

“Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

Seema Ure E ric

Betas

Mee TH IT Ca MU ee

for breaking down barriers of
genre, styles and markets, and

on February 25 at Sandals in the process building a broad,

3 months (13 weeks) $

rable.



For delivery of the leading Bahamian
newspaper, call The Tribune’s
Circulation Department at 502-2383
or visit our offices on Shirley Street
td sigh up today!



45.95
$ 84.95
$ 160.00

6 months (26 weeks)
1 year (52 weeks)



instantly accessible and memo-

As a singer/songwriter, key-

received the support of local
companies such as KFC, Pepsi
and is fully supported by Gospel
Music Channel.

“Home delivery of The Tribune
is convenient and gives me a
head start on my day. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

HAROLD ANTOR
INSURANCE EXECUTIVE

Tribune

wf DZ oe St ee az?
~ Yup FLOUSOa er
> 3




PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS |

Members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity

| F r ater nity helps got to work at the Simpson Penn School

for Boys on Saturday as they continued a

to clean up campaign to clean up school environs
school campus







@ N’KOMO Ferguson, a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc, along with volunteers gave a
helping hand on Saturday at the Simpsom Penn School for Boys by cutting grass



Si

os ott



= MEMBERS of the Sigma Beta club of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity move old beds on Saturday
at the Simpson Penn School for Boys



& MEMBERS of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, along with
volunteers, give a helping hand on Saturday at the Simpson
Penn School for Boys by cutting grass, as part of a sustained

&
campaign to help clean up schoois and public spaces ol ] nh a

wit. coling.coi







Because dreams can be wrecked,
stolen or go up in smoke.



@ MEMBERS of the Sigma Beta club of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity paint the walls of the cafeteria on Saturday at the

Simpson Penn School for Boys

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff) ‘ | | i : W fe a |e ie it Le lf Le fo | yO u e



HOME ® MOTOR © LIABILITY
CASUALTY ® CONTRACT WORKS
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ® MARINE

Tel: 325-3809
Rosetta Street
info@colinageneral.com

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

MONDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 2006

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street






Insurance Le.



Credit union questions:
‘Where’s our red carpet?’

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM
Tribune Business
Reporter

he Teachers and
Salaried Workers
Cooperative
Credit Union told
The Tribune that
it feels the “carpet has been
pulled from underneath" its
proposed $3-$6 million invest-
ment for Inagua, and is urging
the Ministry of Financial Ser-
vices and Investments to seri-
ously consider its proposal.

Phase III set
to generate
$100m
operating
income

By NEIL HARTNELL.
Tribune Business Editor

KERZNER. International
expects the Phase III expan- —

sion on Paradise Island to gen-
erate $100 million in operating
income from its first full-year in
operation, a Wall Street ana-
lyst has noted. —

Lawrence Klatzkin, an ana-
lyst with Jefferies & Compa-
ny, said in a report for investors
following Kerzner Internation-
al’s fourth quarter results that
‘the Phase III expansion, which
was “proceeding on time and
on’ budget”, and scheduled to
open in April 2007, would gen-
erate an extra $7.10 in value
per ordinary share.

_ This was based on a rate of
return of 19 per cent on capital
invested by Kerzner Interna-
tionalon Phase WI.

Mr Klatzkin said of the
Phase III expansion: “Kerzner
plans on making the resort
‘more of a theme park with
more water rides and a new
‘Swim with the Dolphins’
encounter, which should help
the luxury mass market as
management has indicated
there has been a large demand
for a better lodging product at
Atlantis for families who want
to stay where the water activi-
ties are.”

In addition, he added that .

SEE page 5B



The call comes after hearing
the Government's renewed
commitment to paving a
smooth road for Bahamian
investors in last week’s Speech
from the Throne, through the
creation of a Domestic Invest-

ment Board to remove ‘red |

tape’ from the approvals
process.

After initially introducing
their $3 to $6 million Mayagua-
na proposal to the Ministry ear-
ly in 2005, a credit union
spokesman said that to date,
they have gotten no further
than an initial meeting with

ml JAMES CAMPBELL

brings
contempt
case
against



CFG duo >

@ By A FELICITY
INGRAHAM —
Tribune Business
Reporter

CONTEMPT of court -
proceedings instituted
against Colina Financial
Group’s (CFG) two prin-
cipals, Emmanuel Alexiou
and Anthony Ferguson, by
their former business part-
ner James Campbell have
been adjourned until this
Thursday.

Mr Campbell's attor-
neys, Philip Davis and
Arthur Minns, indicated
that $9 million was paid by



SEE page 5B

Pension funds execute
Royal Oasis ruling

‘i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE hotel pension funds have executed a judgement that °

requires all the monies owed by the still-closed Royal Oasis
resort to be paid when the property is finally sold, The Tribune has

learnt.

The judgement was executed by the deputy Provost Marshal,
and means that when an agreement is

concluded for the resort’s sale, the
two pension funds - the Bahamas

SEE page 7B

Micronet

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# 56 Madeira Street, Palmdale
P.O. Box SS-6270 Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242.328.3040 _Fax:242.328.3043 e-mail: info@micronet.bs



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officials.

The proposal is designed to
complement proposed major
investment on Mayaguana by
the Boston-based J-Group,
which has engaged in a 50/50
joint venture partnership with
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas.

The credit union aims to pro-
vide affordable housing units,
assisting islanders and descen-
dants with first and second
home constriction through cre-
ating three housing divisions in
Pirate’s Well, Abraham’s Bay
and Betsy Bay. It will also pro-

vide mortgages to homeown-
ers.

Other parts of the invest-
ment include creating a Busi-
ness Centre in Abraham’s Bay,
through providing shops and
rental facilities, and building a
shopping mall.

The credit union’s proposal

said: “The situation (in

Mayaguana) is likely to change

in the immediate future with
the developments proposed by
the I-Group of investors, to
whom the Government has giv-
en ‘approval in principle’. It is

also anticipated, and certainly —

Ties Par

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
' Tribune Business Editor |

BAHAMIAN employers will have to
undergo a “cultural change” by making
on-time contributions on behalf of their
employees under the proposed National
Health Insurance scheme, with the plan’s
advocates telling The Tribune that a
nationwide Information Technology (IT)
system will cut down fraud and eliminate
the need for a large bureaucracy.

Etoile Pinder, a health financing spe-
cialist with the National Health Insurance
(NHI) Implementation project, told The

expected, that the Teacher's

credit union would be given the ..

opportunity to partner in this
development." _

However, a spokesman said
the credit union’s Board was
disappointed, because instead
of having the red carpet rolled
out for them as with the I-
Group, the “carpet has been
pulled from underneath" them.

He claimed that several’
. scheduled meetings with Dr

Baltron Bethel, the Hotel Cor-
poration’s managing director

‘and deputy chairman, and a

representative from the Min-

istry were all cancelled, and a
fixed date for the meeting has
yet to be given to the credit
union.

Speaking specifically about
the newly-heralded Domestic
Investment Board, the credit
union spokesman said: “I see
the Domestic Investment
Board as a non-entity, another
means of setting up red tape. If
you have institutions like this

_union, the Bahamas Develop-

ment Bank, and BAIC, there is

_SEE page 7B

Itural change’



r National Health Insurance IT system

months later.

“We need the money and we need itina
timely fashion,” she explained.

Under the current NHI proposals,
monihly contributions would be pace 5:3 -

»

te pcr
We aE



Tribune that companies would “have to
. become used”. under the NHI scheme to
paying contributions on behalf of employ-
- ees on time, rather than three to four

seen as fraud and bureaucracy cure-all

per cent of an employee’s earned wages.
This would be split 50/50: between the
‘ employer and employee, with the latter
contributing 2.65 per cent of their own

salary, and the employer making a match-

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_ SEE page 10B



consulting
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



TAA Ls



& By Fidelity Capital as more than 50,000 shares four remained unchanged.
Markets changed hands. The market Volume leader for a second
saw eight out of the 20 listed consecutive week was Com-
IT was another active trading stocks trade, of which one monwealth Bank (CBL), with

34,615 shares changing hands
and accounting for 69 per cent
of the total shares traded.

The big advancer for the
week was also CBL, whose
share price increased by $0.19
to end the week at a new 52
week high of $9.29. On the
downside, J. S. Johnson Com-
pany’s (JSJ) share price
declined by $0.35 to close at
$8.75.

The FINDEX advanced 0.47
points for the week to close at
595.28.

week in the Bahamian market advanced, three declined and







International Markets

FOREX Rates






Weekly % Change
-0.26
-0.13
0.35










1.1501
1.7417
1.1936

CAD$
GBP
EUR















Commodities

Weekly % Change COMPANY NEWS
Crude Oil $59.88 -3.17 Kerzner International
Gold $554.00 -1.65 (KZL) -



For the 2005 fourth quarter,

International Stock Market Indexes: million compared to $8.4 mil-






% Change



Weekly






11,115.32 1.80

S & P 500 1,287.24 1.60
NASDAQ 2,282.36 0.91
ikkei 15,713.45 -3.35






Quality Auto Sales Ltd
PARTS DEPARTMENT
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
MARCH 1 thru 4

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday)

We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 6.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other departments

will be open for business as usual.

QUALITY it

East Shirley. Street 323- 3529/323-3709

“ Club: development.



_ THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST IN.

SCHOOL OF CONTINUING STUDIES
COUNTRY CONFERENCE SERIES
June 8-9, 2006

CALL FOR PAPERS
BEYOND WALLS: MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES

The Bahamas Conference:
' A multi-disciplinary conference focusing on issues relevant to
The Bahamas

| INVITATION

| — The School of Continuing Studies has established a Country Conference Series focusing
| on non-campus countries of the UWI system. The overall aim of the Country Conference
| Series is to stimulate and highlight research in each country by academics in the country,

| and scholars with interest in Caribbean studies.

| OBJECTIVES
The Country Conference Series has the following objectives:
¢ Increasing research on matters of relevance to the country
¢ Enhancing the quality of public discourse on matters relevant to local development
¢ Contributing in a stimulating manner to intellectual activity in the country

° Espangue the quality and scope of the outreach programmes of UWI

The conference series would achieve its goal by bringing together scholars who have
a research interest in The Bahamas.

rc with an interest in The Bahamas. Conference

| Submissions are invited from pie
| presentations will be 20 minutes long with 20 minutes for discussion. Submissions should
| include:

A cover sheet containing the title of the paper, the author’s (or authors’) address
(email address/fax number), institution and a 25-word summary suitable for
publication in the conference programme

One page with a 250-word abstract of the paper

One page with a 50-word biography of each author

| For further information, please contact Donna Nicolls at (242)323- 6593, 424-4786 or e-
| mail: uwibahamas@hotmail.com.

| SEND SUBMISSIONS TO:

Ms. Simone Augier
School of Continuing Studies
University of the West Indies, Mona Jamaica
E-mail: mailto:saugier@uwimona.edu.jm Fax: 876-977-3443
SUBMISSION DEADLINES:

Abstracts: March 3, 2006
Full Papers: April 21, 2006

| The conference presentations are made available on the web following the conference and
| the papers are edited and published for distribution.

KZL posted net income of $7.1 °

Appeal to

be heard
on $175m
development

THE Save Guana Cay Reef Association will today appeal

_ a Supreme Court decision that turned down their request
for discovery and cross-examination of witnesses in the
dispute over the $175 million Baker’s Bay Golf & Ocean

Both the developers, Discovery Land: company, and the
Government defendants - the Prime Minister, Treasurer
and Cabinet Secretary Wendall Major - had resisted
attempts by the Association and its attorney, Fred Smith,
to cross-examine their witnesses. _

Mr Smith’s application for an injunction against the
Crown and the developers, plus the discovery request and
|. permission to cross-examine witnesses, was refused by
Supreme | Cour Justice Carroll. -



lion for the same period in
2004. However, on an adjusted
basis, net income was $13.2 mil-
lion compared to $9.7 million in
2004.

Revenues increased by $33
million or 23 per cent to total
$177 million, while costs and
expenses rose by $38 million
or 28 per cent to total $176 mil-
lion. Income from operations
stood at $1.2 million versus $6.3
million in 2004.

Atlantis, Paradise Island con-
tributed net revenue and
EBITDA in the 2004 fourth
quarter of $124.9 million. and
$29.8 million, respectively, as
compared to $108 million and
$25.1 million, respectively, in
the same period in 2004.

The increase in net revenues
was driven mainly by gains in
food and beverage and casino
revenues, which rose by 23 per
cent and 22 per cent respec-
tively.












The Bahamian Stock Market |

YTD 7.84%








FINDEX 595.28%

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
PRICE CHANGE

411%





BISX
SYMBOL


























AML $0.70 $- 1500
BAB $1.15 $-0.02 2000 4.55%
BBL _ $0.70 $- 0 0.00%
BOB _ $7.00 . 0 0.00%
BPF $10.48 $- 0 0.77%
BSL $13.25 $. 0 3.92% |
BWL $1.26 $- 0 0.00% |
CAB $9.53 $- 0 0.21%
CBL $9.29 $0.19 34615 1.98%
CHL $1.70 $- 5304 3.66%
CIB $10.95 g 0 0.64%
CWCB $4.69 $0.36. 0 8.31%
DHS $2.79 $-0.07 4200 28.57%
FAM $6.21 $- 0 2.64%
FCC $1.15 $: 0 0.00% |
FCL $10.05 §: 1100 -3.31%
FIN $10.95 $- 0 0.46%
ICD _$9.95 §. 500 0.00%
ISI $8.75 $-035 1000 3.31%
KZLB $6.73 $0.16 1.75% |
0.00% _|

$10.00 $- 0

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:




¢ ICD Utilities (ICD) declared a dividend of $0. 135 per eh
- share payable on February 16, 2006, to all common share- a
holders as at record date February 2, 2006. a




° ‘Commonwealth Bank (CBL) declared an extraordinary |
dividend of $0.12 per share payable on April 28, 2006, to all
common shareholders as at record date April 15, 2006.






¢ FOCOL Holdings will hold its Annual General Meeting . |
on February 23, 2006, at 10.30.am in its Board Room, |
FOCOL Holdings Corporate Office, Queens ey
Ereepert, Grand Bahama.






e FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) will hold its
Annual General Meeting on February 26, 2006, at 6pm at
the British Colonial Hilton, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. |




INES fel aa

mela tree et Tite]
ma facts Le et
on gibi



THE AIRPORT AUTHORIT

VACANCY

The pines Authority is seeking suitably aualies Bahamians
to fill the positions noted below:-

INSPECTOR- (SECURITY DIVISION)

The Inspector of Security is generally responsible for a shift
and is therefore required to effectively manage, motivate and
coordinate the regular deployment of staff as well as to assist
them in their professional development.

The successful applicant must therefore be self-motivated
with excellent communication and inter-personal skills, ten
(10) years working experience; the last five (5) at the
Supervisory level in addition to tertiary level academic
qualifications. Tertiary level qualifications and experience in
Police or Security related duties and investigations will be
considered an asset.

NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

Applicants should possesses a Bachelor of Science Degree
in Computer Science or Computer Technology, a Microsoft
Certified Professional Certificate, proficiency in Computer
Software and a minimum of three (3) to five (5) years
experience in installing and maintaining Information Systems
Network.

Qualified Bahamians should submit their Resume, no later
than 24th February 2006 to the

Manager, Human Resources

The Airport Authority

Nassau International Airport



P.O. Box AP 59222
Nassau, Bahamas
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3B

onsultants get



Pusiic NorIice

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSED ARCHITECTS

Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliment 1994
P.O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street, Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act, 1994 empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons
qualified to practice as Professional Architects in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person
shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or aneees in public practice unless he is the holder of a valid licence.”
Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offence and is liable on summary conviction to a fine,
imprisonment or both.



Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects
Board” to practice as Professional Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2007.

set to ASSESS NHI

NAME ADDRESS LICENCE # NAME ADDRESS LICENCE #
Rodney W. Braynen Phone No. (242) 393-1874 001 :
FILB.A. B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1423 Donald A Dean Phone No. (242) 352-4835 057
Nassau, Bahamas Ee Soe “
reeport, Grand Bahama
John W. Darville Phone No. (242) 394-2600 002
@ Dip. Arch., R.I.B.A., .B.A. P.O. Box N-4556 Bruce LaFleur, A.P.A., A.A. Phone No. (242) 328-7240 060
Nassau, Bahamas B.Sc. Envin. Des, M. Arch. ao Se
J jassau, amas
Amos J ee Phone No. (242) 393-0079 003
Fl. BAA P.O. Box SS-6261 Michael J: Moss, 1.B.A. Phone N No. (242) 356-5913 061
B. Arch., ML “Arch jassau, Bahamas
, fiseaa, Sohumas i
i Gerald L. L. Higgs Phone No. (242) 356-2740 004
B. Arch. Tech. ro Boxee Garth W Sawyer oat wis (242) eu 063
* jassau, amas x N-1
Nassau, Senannes
Anthony J Jervis, |.B.A. | Phone No. (242) 323-2628 005 |
B.E.D.,B. Arch. M. Arch. P.O. Box N77 Enrique Roldan Phone No, (242) 304-6306 064
jassau, Bahamas »O. x Ne
Nassau,
Alvan K. Rolle 1.B.A, Phone No. (242) 326-8141 006
B. Arch. Tech P.O. BoxN-7401 Neville Bostield Phone No, 242) 322-1900 065
jassau, Bahamas . Arch. .O. Box
Nassau, Bahamas
Douglas R A Smith, R..B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-2600 007
1.B.A., Dip. Arch., BSc., MSc. fo Box tbe Wesley G R Thompson pone Se No. (282) 557-3718 066
jassau, Banamas
Exuma, "Lahanas
, F Gordon C Major, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 357-8741 008
@ By NEIL HARTNELL that the National Insurance the NIB’s. B. Arch. Tech P.O. Box N-3326 ; Leo D Ferguson Phone No, (242) 924-5566 067
Tribune Business Editor Board’s (NIB) administrative Critics of the proposed NHI Se meee hese Bchencs
i ae ft Te costs were still too high forthe scheme have argued that the PO Box hearag Timothy H Nell, P.LB.A. Phong No, (242) 366-9110 ani
A TEAM of foreign consul- NHI scheme to be feasible. economic assumptions under- Nassau, Bahamas Dip. Arch. CO Ban oe
tants will arrive in the Bahamas : pinning it and cost estimates Beer Ac at ‘A, Phone No, (242) 393-8893 OO DA ht Ea Endo ue cae fa
“in the next three months” Pr oposed are unrealistic, with the plan pA ccna ee Mec ey Le: PO Box E28076 i 9
ei orae . ; ; 1 1 jovernor’s Harbour,
assess the economic impact if ; unsustainable financially in the Michael C Alexiou, .B.A. Phone No. (242) 325-7363 oi; eevemen
the proposed National Health The NIB is proposed as the long-term due to an increas- B. Arch. Att gE Albeno 6 Suichi LAG”. Phone fie. An or eaes as
Insurance (NHI) plan is intro- arm of government to collect ingly older Bahamian popula- spb lvieiabaldats ae calc tau etna oi | Pha P.O. Box CB-13177
duced, The Tribune was told. | NHI contributions and admin- __ tion and rising healthcare costs. Bea eee een Box E6704 wks sy:
Dr Stanley Lalta, the NHI _ ister the scheme, but its admin- Dr Lalta toid The Tribune Nassau, Bahamas Pigonirnnee eet ee senna! Ont
project manager, said: istrative costs for 2004-thelast that the costings had been ne Behagg, R.LB.A., B.A. phohe Hed ao oie 013 Nassau, Bahamas
“We have preparedatermsof year for which accounts were based on the Bahamian econo- Nassau, Bahamas Tyrone Burrows, |.B.A. Phone No, ( No. (242) 382-0611 075
: * 2 - . Arch. x N-
reference for a team to come in available - were 23 percent of my achieving a 1.5-2 per cent Gaetano A Bonamy, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 367-2496 014 Nasau, ln
and help us to look at all the . contributions. average per annum growth rate B. Arch. Riven eaten hesba Dwight M-Thompson, LB.A. Phone No. (24a) say aoo0 ons
ic j j -5 j 2 ‘ B.Arch. P.O. Box CB-13826
macroeconomic impacts from The NHI report said these over a 40 0 year period, some sve Bobtui IBA“ hche WeSioAay SOA eas ang ore
the NHI. This is an important costs needed to be at least 10 thing it had been able to B.A., M. Arch P.O. Box N-8244 shi Saat
part of the whole thing - the per cent of revenues, or else _ achieve historically. Ree Renae ry rg cae Al —tdeg 8 ort oF
: Victor R Cartwright, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 324-1896 016 Nassau, Bahamas
impact on employment, wages, the proposed health care P e t d noe g ore ee 2
prices and savings.” financing scheme would “not roj ecte Nassau, Bahamas Livingston Forbes, B.A. Phone No; (242) 356-9798 078
He added that the consul- __ be feasible”. In comparison, Winston G Jones, R.LB.A. Phone No, (242) 325-1520 019 toe Nassau, Bahamas
tants would be brought in with- | administrative costs in the He added that the NHI’s SE aT eo eee hens sine thoethag Phone NO. (242) 373-1257. ave
: : : : Wi Dip. Arch. Tech P.O. Box F42707
in the next three months, once Canadian and French social projected $235 million total Kenneth VLan, RIB, LBA Phone No, 2 242) 906-2114 a p Pooport Gri aha
their appointment was con- health insurance systems were __ cost, it if had existed in 2005, MBA. P.O
oat ° : Nea Bahamas Pier Baldacci Phone No. (242) 323-4764 080
firmed at the policy level. less than 1 per cent of rev- was just the recurrent costs of As P.O. Box N-4574
Business groups and individ- _ enues. healthcare. It did not include ere ey boca = Hessen Babeniee
ual companies have long In response, Dr Lalta said _ capital spending on healthcare Nassausbanames Rawrence Chisholm Se 082
expressed concerns about how _ the Social Security Reform infrastructure, the Govern- dohn L MoKenzie, LBA. Phone No. (242) 308-8416 022 Nassau, Bahamas
the proposed NHI would Commission’s recommenda- ment’s Budget allocation to Rag Nassau, Bahamas Bruce M Stewart IBA, ALA. Phone No, (242) 323-8800 083
impact the Bahamian econo- tions on NIB reforms includ- _ health care, or the administra- Ginn Wipeagy Phone No. 242) 424-1469 on Pe Neen eames
: j 1 j 1 j 1 j . Arch. .O. Box EE-17989
my, viewing it as another tax eda series of targets aimed at __ tive costs of the public sector. Newco Ganaaae Michael A Digais Phone No. (242) 394-1886 Gai
that would act as a drag on _ reducing its costs to 10 per cent Many doctors and insurance B. Arch. : P.O. Box N-120
: i ts : : Andrew O sai RBA. ALA. ee re Rashes 393-7883 024 Nassau, Bahamas
both the economy and individ- of revenue. companies had queried the B, Arch. PO
ual incomes. In addition, he said that the $235 miition figure as a gross Nassau, Bahamas slyesarcly eed poe er oS
e A NHI scheme “would buy incre-. underestimate, arguing that the Ree he pe Been en 025 Nassau, Bahamas
Financing mental services from the NIB”, truer cost of healthcare in the Nassau, Bahamas Dirk K Saunders Phone No. 242) 341-4197 - 087
: - s le x Cl
meaning that no new offices | Bahamas was nearer $400-$500 Welington Woods, B.A. Phone No, (242) 323-7042 026 Nassau, Bahamas
: a ae ch sbi
oe a ne and Etolie ve . = aac million. fee eta Goodwin Cargill Phone No. (242) 356-0216 088
inder, a health financing spe- ter and collect contri aEHONS. Benjamin M Albury Phone No. (242) 393-3552 027 | Nassau, Bahamas
cialist with the NHI imple- As a result, the NHI’s costs SEE 6B B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1731
° jassau as
mentation team, acknowledged would be “much lower” than page or etre Robert Whittingham Phone No. 242) 322-6591 089
Frederick D Albury Phone No. (242) 325-5916 028 P.O. Box CB-13846
4 * BY Arch, . Nae phere Nassau. Bahamas
lassau, Bahamas .
WEY Michael Foster, 1.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-3385 032 Stephen J Bain Phone No. (262) 356-6029 090
B.Sc., B. Arch. P.O. Box N-119 B. Arch. P.0.Box N-1008
3 jassau, Banamas jassau, Bahamas
\ Henry AHepbum, R.I.B.A., A.A. Phone No. a 341-9389 033 Jeremiah Moxey Phone No. oe 341-4846 091
B. Arch. M. Arch, M.U.P. P.O. Box N . Arch. P.O. Box CR-54501
Nassau, ponanad Nassau, Bahamas
Sean R Mattews, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 356-4538 035 C Bernardo Deleveaux Phone No. 242) 325-5103 092
Dip. Arch P.O. Box SS-19909 P.O. Box 77
: Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
Charles J Moss Phone No. (242) 352-5204 036 Lawrence C Smith Phone No. (242) 427-1565 093
a
B. Sc. Arch. PO. Box F-41247 PO. Box N-14t2
reeport, Bal amas jassau, Banamas
Alicia C A Oxley, 1.B.A. Phone No. ian 394-3251 038. Harold S Johnson Phone No. eS 364-4694 095
B. Arch., M. Arch. ie Box » aleve B. Sc. Arch. Tech. ne Se :
assau, Bahamas: assau, Banamas
David $ White Phone No. (242) 324-1547 039 | Mark W Henderson, RL.B.A. Phone No. (242) 327-3274 096
R.1.B,A., RAC P.O, Box N-101 B. Sc. B. Arch. PO. Box CB-12496
lassau, Bal anes jassau, Ganamas
Daniel W J Davies, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 332-2012 040 Kevin R Bryce Phone No. (242) 356-4538 097
Dip. Arch. P.O. Box EL-25056 ‘ B. Sc. Arch. Eng. P.O, Box SS-19909
poverete Harbour, Nassau, Bahamas
jeutnera ‘ 2 7
Mark A Smith, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 323-0486 098
Douglas A Minns, |.B.A. | Phone No. (242) 394-4736 042 B. Arch., M.L.A. P.O. Box SS-6888
4 fo Box Te (908 Nassau, Bahamas
jassau, Banamas
Copeland Moxey, |.B.A. | Phone No, (242) 457-2107 os9
E aa Wane erpool, 1.B.A. Bote Me ea 356-7723 043 B. Arch, ¥ : Co Box iS 12689
. Arch., M. an esign .O. Box N-3! jassau, Banamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Carlos J Hepbum, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 394-5166 101
R John Paine, R.A.I.A. Phone No. (242) 322-2945 044 B. Arch. P.O. Box CR-54090
B. Arch. ro. Box & : -11499 Nassau, Bahamas
jassau, Banamas
Timothy F Johnson Phone No. (242) 364-7813 103
D Monty Knowles Phone No. (242) 326-2646 046 B. Arch. P.O. Box SS-6906
B. Arch. fe Box - eae Nassau, Bahamas
lassau, Bahamas
Tariq J O'Brien Phone No. (242) 328-1705 104
Gerard P Brown, I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 377-0027 047 B.A., Dip. Arch P.O. Box N
B. Arch. no Box ee Dip. Urban Design Nassau, Bahamas
lassau, Banamas
Mark M Braithwaite Phone No. (242) 327-7259 105
Jackson L Burnside Il, B.A Phone No. (242) 394-1886 049 | B. Arts, B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11454
«Arch. .O. Bo: = jassau, Banamas
Nassau, Bahamas
Stefan P Russell Phone No. 2. (242) 94 341-4982 106
Larry Forbes Phone No. (242) 322-2021 050 B. Arch. P.O. Box C
B. Arch. Nee Box Bs ol Nassau, Sakon
lassau, Bahamas
; Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson Phone No. ig 362-6306 107
7 Leslie Johnson, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 393-8415 051 B.E.D.S. P.O. Box N
Re e a li Z e Our Home Equity Loan Plan can make your B. Arch. Fo, bor Ee eed Nassau, Bahamas,
‘ “oO % Kesna M. Hunt Phone No. (242) 352-4835 108
dreams come true with RATES AS LOW AS 7 ‘ 5 Yo P Curtis Malone Phone No. (242) 327-8045 052 | B.Arch. P.O. Box F-43578
: a Box eee Freeport, Grand Bahama
assau, Bahamas
and REDUCED LEGAL FEES! We can show you how : lan Brent Creary Phone No. (242) 394-1886 109
é Jason P Lorandos, |.B.A. Phone No. (242) 393-4372 055 B. Arch. P.O. Box N-3857
: to make your home pay for: B. Arch., M. Arch. he aya ee Nassau, Bahamas.
° lassau, Bahamas
. Samuel R. Williams Phone No. (242) 393-1923 110
. David K Griffiths, R.I.B.A. Phone No. (242) 559-7200 056 P.O. Box CR-54335
ream S / Home Improvements & Landscaping Dip. Arch. P.O. Box F-40257 Naseau, Bahamas.
; Freeport, Grand Bahama Registrar
/ Debt Consolidation ~ 8 February 2006

with our
HELP!

/ Furniture & Hurricane Shutters
/ College Education Or Any Worthwhile Purpose!

WE CAN ALSO HELP BY FINANCING YOUR
LEGAL AND CLOSING COSTS!

_ PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994 «.

Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board”

to practice as Professional Architectural Technicians until January 31, 2007.

NAME ADDRESS LICENCE # NAME ADDRESS LICENCE #
5 = . Wayde C. Russell Phone No. (242) 341-6144 T013 | Lockhart W Phone No. (242) 337-1086 T038
When approved, you’ll be automatically entered to win P.O. Box GR-12976 Tumquest Queens Highway
k h ‘ x f Nassau, Bahamas Deadmand Cay, Long Island
itt rorhomei r
@ room makeover or home Improvement project o you Henry A. Delancy Phone'No. (242) 334-0485 T016 | Solomon J Smith poe Mi aa perl TO45
me 1 : Whymms Bight .O. Box N-
choice*. Apply today! Our mortgage specialists are ee as Naseau Bahames
f ‘
waiting to HELP you! Michael A. Jones Phone No. (242) 325-0114 To18 | Wilfred B Dorsett’ Phone No. (242) 324-6529 1047
P.O. Box N-3049 P.O. Box N-842
*Valued up to $5,000. Offer ends March 31, 2006 ce oe
alue . Offer en ar i }
UP HO. 22. ; SMG ahs Laurin L. Knowles Phone No. (242) 337-0025 To2z6 | Coralyn T Phone No. (242) 341-1247 To49
‘ Mangrove Bush Adderley-Dames P.O. Box GT-2315
Long Island, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
Bertram Carey Tarpum Bay 7027 Jermaine Evans ehh Ne. Caan T051
“UO, xX Fel
Eleuthera, Bahamas Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bye er phone Ne eee ree 7028 | trevor Butterfield Phone No. (242) 352-7154 T053
. Sc. Arch. 0. 1. Box Radon
: Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Freeport, Grand Bahama
Livingston V. Evans Coke T030 | Brent Key Phone No. (242) 367-4143 T054
Freeport, Grand Bahama oe aes
RBC C. Jenkin Williams Phone No. (242) 352-2500 To32 Abaco, Bahamas
P.O. Box F-44107
Fi | CO Freeport, Grand Bahama
RBC 5 Registrar



8 February 2006
PAGE 4B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

aoe e a ee eee eee a eee eer nan eee

@ PICTURED seated from L to R are Jennifer
Frizelle (observing the meeting as TOG chief
operating officer); Greg Haycock (Bermuda,
chairman) and Theo Bulimore (Cayman
Islands). Standing from L to R are Joe Schembri
(Malta); Ralph Palm (Netherlands Antilles,
observer); David McGarry (Isle of Man);
Raphael Gordon (Caricom); Jonathan Hooley
(Channel Islands); and Tracy Knowles
(Bahamas).

JPMORGAN TRUST COMPANY
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Career Opportunity for a

SENIOR FIDUCIARY OFFICER

Qualifications:

LLB degree, Certified Public Accountant, or Bachelor’s degree with
strong business analytical or legal components, ACIB/STEP or other
professional qualifications.

6-8 years in trust business or legal practice

Proficiency in PC skills

Fluency in Spanish and Portuguese an asset.

Personal Quaiities

Ability to work independently as a member of an integrated team
of bankers, investors and capital advisors
Experience in client contact

Ability to manage complex structures

Knowledge of investment products

Risk assessment and risk management skills
Excellent leadership skills and ability to influence
Results oriented

Commitment to service excellence

Strong organizational skills

Effective written and oral communication skills...

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and
benefits packages. Interested applicants should submit their
resume/curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential’ to
the Human Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.




Colina

Financial Advisers Ltd.



HPricing Information As Of:

H17 February



10.8183
2.3241



BISX ALL SHARE INDE X - + 3 y
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Provious Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol.

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
**- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/ **

recto



TS



RADE CA



Daily Vol.
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Kerzner International BDRs

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

YTD% Last 12 Months
1.2085 Colina Money Market Fund 1.272793”
2.0704 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.6262 ***
10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 10.8183*****
2.1660 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.324145**









1442177" es

ET



ec =

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

- Number of total shares traded today

** - AS AT NOV. 30, 2005
- AS AT JAN. 31, 2006/






FEB. 03, 2006/ *

** AS AT JAN. 31, 2006



BUSINESS



=) FIDELITY.

EPS $

THE TRIBUNE.





Bahamas hosts

KPMG Offshor



Group event

THE Board of Directors for KPMG’s Off-
shore Group (TOG), a sub-region of KPMG
practices, held its board meeting in Nassau on +
February 13, 2006. The Board is made up of
senior partners from the KPMG practices in

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps —
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

H area or have won an -
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







Div $

Yield %

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask §$ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





Bermuda, -the Channel Islands, the Cayman
Islands, CARICOM, Isle of Man, the Bahamas
and Malta. It has overall responsibility to provide
high-level guidance and decisions on matters
affecting the sub-region. ;

BUSINESS MANAGER
NEEDED

One of our Firm’s clients, a progressive law firm, requires
the services of a business manager. The qualified applicant
must possess experience working in a law firm along witha .
working understanding of accounting. Excellent benefits are.
available and all responses will be treated as confidential.

Responses should be sent to the address below:

Paul Andy Gomez
Managing Partner
GRANT THORNTON
Chartered Accountants
P.O. Box N-8285
Nassau, N.P.,

The Bahamas

Fax No. (242) 322-7517
Email: pgomez@gtbahamas.com

OWN ann ee soceyaueniony

An immediate opening is available for the position of:

-ACCOUNTS CLERK-

Applicants should posses the following qualities:

Demonstrate the ability to multi task

Strong interpersonal skills and self motivated
Organized and detail oriented

Working knowledge of the following:

¢ Accounts Receivable

¢ Accounts Payable

¢ Payroll functions

Interested persons should possess the following
qualifications:

¢ An Associate Degree in Accounting and two years working
experience or equivalent

¢ Computer literate- proficient in Excel and Microsoft
Word, experience with ACCPAC a plus

Applicant should fax their resume to
394-8573 or email to burrows.suntee@batelnet.bs
THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 5B

ee BUSINESS =
Phase III set
to generate

$100m

operating
income
FROM page 1B

his $7.10 estimate for the
additional per share value
that Phase III would gener-
ate’ for investors in Kerzner
International, did not include
the possible contribution
from the Residences at
Atlantis. That is the joint
venture with Turnberry
Associates.on the $225 mil-
lion, 495-unit condo hotel.
Mr Klatzkin said Kerzner
International would still have
about.90 acres available for
further expansion on Par-
adise Island once Phase III
was completed. This could
be: used for timeshare, con-
dominium and real estate
projects, with prices around
$219. million per acre.
“Meanwhile, Mr Klatzkin
backed Kerzner Internation-
al’s'view that the $1.6 billion
redevelopment of Cable
Beach by Baha Mar Devel-
opment Company, in con-
junction with its partners
Starwood.and Harrah’s,
would also benefit Atlantis.
He added: “We also
believe this project will prove
to be beneficial for the
Bahamas, and it should
result‘in more flights to the
Bahamas, currently a limiting
factor, and additional visitors
to Atlantis, as the Atlantis
expansion is set up to han-
dle outside visitors to use its
outside water park. Baha
Mar will add to the poten-
tial base of customers.”
During a conference call
with Wall Street analysts,
Butch Kerzner, Kerzner
International’s president,
said the company was “very
enthusiastic” about the Baha



















































Campbell brings
contempt case
against CFG duo

FROM page 1B

cheque to their client after the Court of Appeal
ordered the CFG principals to pay the funds
“forthwith".

The $9 million was the final part of Mr Camp-
bell’s $12.5 million pay-off, which represented
the valuation placed on his 45 per cent stake in
CFG. He was ousted ina bitter dispute with Mr
Alexiou and Mr Ferguson, the latter two owning
the remaining 55 per cent stake between them.

Although the $9 million was paid by cheque
just after the ruling was handed down from the
Court of Appeal on February 8, Mr Minns said
his client was still going ahead with the applica-
tion for committal for contempt of court.

He explained that in January, Justice Anita
Allen, who is now hearing the. committal appli-
cation in the Supreme Court, ordered that $9
million be paid to Mr Campbell forthwith.

Mr Minns said the funds were not paid within ~

the required 21-day period, and it is his and Mr
Davis' contention before the court that Mr Alex-
iou and Mr Ferguson “willfully" did not follow
the court’s order and should be held in con-
tempt.

Mr Alexiou and Mr Ferguson attempted to
appeal Justice Allen’s ruling on the payment,
but the Court of Appeal rejected this. The latter
court also rejected their bid for a stay on exe-
cuting the judgement.

Neither of the two CFG principals was present
in court. Mr Alexiou's attorney, Colin Callender,
told the court his client had sent a letter, explain-
ing that he was out of town and would not be
returning until the beginning of next week.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF LAWSON ROLLE
late of Dew Gardens off Cow Pen Road in the
Southern District of the Island of New
Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Banamas, deceased.

Mr Davis asked for a warrant of arrest to be
issued against Mr Alexiou, because he should not
have left the jurisdiction, pending criminal pro-
ceedings.

Mr Callender replied, suggesting that Mr Alex-
iou was sufficiently represented by him. How-
ever, Justice Allen pointed out that for criminal
proceedings, the defendant must appear before
the court.

Mr Ferguson's:attorney, John Wilson of McK-
inney, Bancroft & Hughes, indicated that his
client was absent because he was told court was
to begin at 2pm.

Justice Allen said she had to reschedule the
session to 12pm on Friday at short notice, and
therefore would not move to place any penalties
against the defendants.

When court resumes on Thursday, the first
issue to be dealt with is for Justice Allen to
decide whether or not Mr Alexiou was proper-
ly served by a policeman, summoning him to
court.

Mr Davis brought a policeman to court, who
was prepared to take the stand and state that he
personally served Mr Alexiou, although the
defendant claims he was not served.

Also, on February 23, Mr Minns plans to have
Mr Alexiou put on the stand, to be cross-exam-
ined about information he submitted to the court
in an affidavit on February. 15.

According to Mr Campbell’ s attorneys, the
court has three options. Justice Allen could
decide to commit the men to prison for a speci-
fied period, she could impose a fine, or she’could
let the men go with a stern reprimand.

Established Bahamian Company

is seeking to fill the position of

Assistant Financial Controller

The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum requirements:

- Experience in all aspects of financial
accounting including inventory control

- Proficient knowledge of accounting
principles and standards

- Excellent computer skills

- Good communication and management
skills

Duties will include:

- Preparation of complete set of financial
statements

: Management reporting

- Budget preparation, business plans and
special projects, as assigned

Position will include regular travel to Family
Islands.

If interested, please send detailed resume and

cover letter to afcposition@yahoo.com.























We are looking for a MEP Coordinator/Superintendent for a mid - rise luxury
condominium project now under construction on Paradise Island, Bahamas. This is a
one year contract assignment. The individual must have 5 to 10 years experience in a
similar field, proficient in the reading and interpretation of drawings, specifications and
construction Manager and will be responsible. for the monitoring of Construction
Installation, Field Coordination, Problem Solving; Project Completion including Startup,
Testing, Commissioning and Acceptance. The candidate must be skilled in Microsoft
Office, Word, Excel and Project.

Mar project.

He added: “Development

on Cable Beach is good for
the destination. The moré
things that happen in the |
Bahamas, it’s good for all of
us. We consider it a very
good thing for the island.”
- Mr Klatzkin added that |
Kerzner International also
had “a very strong chance”
of gaining a licence from the
Singapore government to
build a casino on Sentosa
island.

« This would be a “very
fucrative” investment for
Kerzner International, and
the Singapore authorities are
expected to make a decision
Before the end of 2006. A
Request for Proposal (RFP)
process is expected to begin
th March.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any
claim or demand against the above Estate are required
to send their names, addresses and particulars of the
same certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 10th day of March, A.D., 2006 and if
required, to prove such debts or claims, or default be
excluded from any distribution; after the above date
the assets will be distributed having regard only to the
proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall

have had notice. Please respond by email to: info@pbwlbahamas.com

Fax: 242.363.1279
Mail to: ‘ PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386
Nassau, Bahamas

And Notice is hereby given that all persons indebted
to the said Estate are requested to make full settlement
on or before the 3rd day of March, A.D., 2006.

‘SYDBRI LEGAL SERVICES
Attorneys for the Executrix
245 Baillou Hill Road
P.O. Box EE-15075
Nassau, Bahamas

PBWL SECURITY - MAIN GATE
Ocean Club DRIVE & Harbour Way
Paradise Island

Delivery By Hand:








Dr. Sharon A. Thompson

Practice Relocation

Please join us in welcoming the latest



5 TERRA OPE SP TELE SNE ALOR

addition to our center of highly

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

“qualified physicians in the



~ Renaissance. Medical Building.

‘TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY OF B1 FUEL SUPPLY LINE -
GREEN TURTLE CAY, ABACO

Tender No. 588/05

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for
the supply, fabrication, installation and commissioning of a new 3” EI fuel
supply line from the Government dock to the Green Turtle Cay Power Station
fuel bund facility.

» Dr. S. Thompson received her Doctor



‘of ‘Medicine dégree from Howard
‘ University College of Medicine in
é ‘Washington, D.C.

2

* She completed her Obstetrics and

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Adniinistration Office, Blue
Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

; Gynecology Residency at Rochester
-. General Hospital in Rochester, NY,

- where she served as Chief Resident / Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. 302-6852

: from 2000 - 2001. Dr. Thompson is
- American Board Certified in

iW OE ae BT uso
way Om UT, American College of
Obstetricians and Gynecologist

_ Obstetrics and Gynecology and has

Tender are to be hand- delivered on or before 03 MARCH 206 by 4:00 pm
and addressed as follows:

- enjoyed serving her Bahamian
community since 2001. Her practice,

- St. Elizabeth Women’s Medical
Center, will be Opening January 30, 2006. She looks forward to continuing to

The General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
provide Individualized and Specialized Care for Women. Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 588/05

“B1 FUEL SUPPLY LINE - G.T.C., ABACO”

St. Elizabeth Women’s Medical Center
- 155 Shirley Street (opposite Oriental Cleaners)
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 322-383 1/323-7477
www.acog.org/member-lookup

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE:



aaa aaa ae

Consultants get set to assess NH



impact ‘in next three months’

FROM page 3B

But Dr Lalta said once the
methodology behind the $235
million had been explained,
two Bahamian health insurance

companies were more recep-
tive to the costings.

In 2001, health care cost $343
million in total in the Bahamas,

_and this was likely to have now

increased to $360-$370 million

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BIRMORE HOLDING CORP.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, BIRMORE HOLDING CORP., is in dissolution

as of February 16th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

FRIEDRUN PROPERTY S.A: °

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, FRIEDRUN PROPERTY S. A., is in dissolution |

a of February, 16th, , 2006.

” Ttehiational Ligidator'S Servides Limited situated: |

at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize city, Belize is

the Liquidator.

Liquidator

per annum.

Ms Pinder said the Bahamas
was in the middle of a five-year
exercise to enhance its health
care system; with NIB financ-
ing something called the

Health Infrastructure Plan. .

This included building a new
Rand Memorial Hospital in
Freeport, plus other clinics.

When questioned why NHI
was seen as the best option for
the Bahamas’ healthcare
financing needs, when similar
systems in the UK and Canada
were experiencing long patient
waiting lists and lack of funds,
Dr Lalta said waiting lists had
always been an issue for the
UK.

He added that this was.

linked to large. elderly popula-
tions that were common in
developed countries. In the
UK, the percentage of the pop-
ulation aged over 60, accord-
ing to the 2005 World Health
Organisation (WHO) report,
was 20.8 per cent, while for the
Bahamas it was 8.8 per cent.
However, the NHI’s own
2004 study warned that the
number of Bahamians aged
over 65 would increase six-fold
over the next 60 years, growing
from 5.2 per cent of the popu-

“,..This is an important part
of the whole thing - the

impact on employment,

wages, prices and savings.”
— Dr Stanley Lalta

lation in 2000 to 22 per cent by
2060.

Dr Lalta said the relatively
small population size in the
Bahamas, and capacity of the
public and private sector,
should combat the problem of
waiting lists under the NHI. In
addition, the Bahamas also had
the ability to send patients to
the US.

Dr Lalta added that NHI
was seen by the Blue Ribbon
Commission as the best option
for healthcare funding in the
Bahamas on both taxation and
equity ground.

He explained that because
personal incomes “seem to be
rising much faster than the abil-
ity of government revenue to
pump funds into the public sec-

’ tor”, income tax was seen as

the best funding option.
This also brought equity with
it, as there would be a “sharing

of resources, pooling of risk”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LULU BUSINESS LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, LULU BUSINESS LTD.., is in dissolution as oF

. February . 16th, 2006.

“fhternational Liquidator Services Limited situated
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

Liquidator

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #39, BIk#12,
Seabreeze Estates Subdivision situated in the Eastern District on the
Island of New Providence one of the islands of the Commowealth of
the Bahamas. Situated thereon-is Vacant Land.

Property Size: 10,400 sq. ft:~

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1485”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Town House Apt #5,
Delaporte Condo situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Condominium consisting of (2) Bedrooms, (1)
Bathroom.

Unit Size: 1,800 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 9267”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2005.

NOTICE |
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites.tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #147, Garden
Hills Estates #1 situated in the Southern District on the Island of
New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence consisting
of 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms alone with a 1-2 Bedrooms, 1
Bathroomm Apartment.

Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 2,100 sq. ft.

‘This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a
Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded ‘in writing in a sealed envelope,
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 0735”. All
offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday
27th February, 2006.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of larid being Lot #142, Garden Hills
Estates #1, situated in the South-western District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

. Situated thereon is a Single Family residence consisting of (3) three

bedrooms, (2) two Bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,125 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 9821”. All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006.



with both high income and low
income persons contributing.

“Those that are better off
will share the cost with those
not so well off,” Dr Lalta said.
You still have a large gap
between those in quintiles four
and five, and those in quintiles
one and two.”

He acknowledged, though,
that the 5.3 per cent contribu-
tion rates to the NHI system
were not fixed, and might have
to be increased to cope with
any substantial rises in health-
care costs. Dr Lalta said this
was unlikely to happen for 30-
40 years.

Ms Pinder also acknowl-
edged that efficiency in the
public health system was “not
where it needs to be yet” for
the NHI scheme to be feasible.
She added that both the
Department of Public Health
and the Public Hospitals
Authority were implementing

information management sys-
tems to improve this.

While most would agree that
something needs to be done to
aid the poor and indigent with
healthcare funding costs, critics
of the NHI proposal hive
a it is not the best way,to

"Ollie: studies have included
the Catastrophic Health Insur-
ance Fund idea that was looked
at under the former FNM
administration. However, this
was not looked at in detail-by
the NHI Blue Ribbon Com:
mission.

Ms Pinder said nathing, in
regard to the proposed: (NHI
plan was “set in stone”, and
there was no timeline for. its
introduction.

“We are trying to re as
broad-minded as possible:and
not stuck in the box,” :she
added. Shon

Nevertheless, critics of the
NHI scheme are likely: to
remain unconvinced of its mer-

its, with some branding ‘it as

‘too good to be true’. Others
believe it has only. been resus-
citated by the Government.due
to the impending general elec-
tion next year, as it will appeal
to a number of voters.

Legal Notice.

NOTICE

ALLEGRA OVERSEAS LTD.

In Voluntary PAguiciation:

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000, ALLEGRA OVERSEAS LTD.), is in dissolution

as of February 16th, 2006.

International Liquidator Services Limited situated |
at 35A Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is"

the Liquidator.

Liquidator

RBC
FINCO

_ NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invités tenders for the purchase of the followings

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 80, Corlet Road
situated in the Southern and Western Districts on the Island of New:
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas!
Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment consisting of - 1-2 two bedrooms; i
(2) bathrooms and 1- (2) Bedrooms, (1)-Bathroom. =

Property Size: 5,864 sq. ft.
- Building Size: 1,727 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED:

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, uilfied
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 0213”. All offers must be received by the

close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2006;

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot 171, Twynam Heights
Subdivision situated in the Eastern District on the Island of New
Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a Single family Residence consisting of 3 Bedrooms,
2 Bathrooms.

Property Size: 10,149 sq. ft.

Building Size: 1,517 sq. ft.

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage ,
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED. :

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed '
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Tender 1494”. All offers must be»
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 27th February, 2005.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 7B

BUSINESS





redit union |cosmuctonsERNTENDENT

questions:
‘Where’s our
red carpet?’

FROM page 1B

no ised for iether board. It's
just ‘another hurdle to put the
Bahamian through."
Nonetheless, the credit union
has: completed another fact-
finding mission to Mayaguana.
According to the credit union,
it'was clear that extensive land

had been given to the J-Group, ~

anda significant amount of
acreage was now being cleared
to prepare for the develop-
ment.

‘In addition, the credit union
spokesman said roads were
being cleared in all three major
settlements - Betsy's Bay,
Pirate's Well and Abraham's
Bay - and almost all the beach-
front property appeared to
have been given to the devel-
opers.

The credit union seid the sec-

ond visit was successful, in that
Mayaguana residenmts were
very receptive to its ideas,
designed to benefit all rési-
dents.
' On Friday, the credit union's
team returned from a third vis-
it. They have temporarily set
up office in a hotel room, as
residents were signing up to
‘join the union and looking for-
‘ward to having its proposals
implemented.

The credit union has $85 mil-

ae page 1B

lion in assets to date, with near-
ly 10,000 registered members.
Its sister company, the
Teacher's Real Estate Hold-
ings Ltd, is reportedly doing
well for its second year in exis-
tence.

Through the Teacher's Real
Estate Holdings Ltd, the cred-
it union has invested in a shop-
ping complex on Harrold
Road, has another under con-
struction in Freeport, and is
seeking Town Planning
approval for a third on the east
side of Ridgeland Park.

The credit union would also
like to open a branch in
Mayaguana, not only to pro-
vide a savings scheme for resi-
dents there, but also to facili-
tate Bahamian entrepreneur-
ship by way of reasonable
loans, especially for tourism-
related services.

"We are terribly soneemnied
about what the Heads of
Agreement with the I-Group
will entail," said the

‘ spokesman. “It means Bahami-
‘ans will have to spend quite ‘a

bit of money to purchase land
in and around the beautiful
beaches in Mayaguana.

“That is another reason why
the credit union is in:there; so
thosé who want to buy prop-
erty before all is consumed by
the I-Group to build homes on

the waterfront, can do so
through the credit union."

The credit union is prepared
to invest about $3 to $6 million
over a period of five years.

“While the credit union is
unaware of the concessions giv-
en to the group, it is fair to
assume that under the Heads
of Agreement to be
announced, there will be the
gtant of considerable Crown
Land to cause the proposal to
be successful," said the credit
union. "This, for all intents
and purposes, is standard oper-
ating procedure. A modus
operandi and provision we
believe are also available to
Bahamian companies willing
to take advantage of such con-
cessions.

“As a part of the lessons
learned from previous Heads
of Agreements, we are not
aware that any Bahamian
counterparts have been given
concessions, nor were they
invited to provide concessions

for the communities which ©
might not have been part of -
the agreement which, when put

in place, would have trans-
formed those communities to
the point where Bahamians

could own and operate.many -
of the local businesses along- ~

side their foreign counter-
parts."



‘Hotel and Allied Industries Pension fund and its

equivalent for’ managerial staff - will effectively

‘be-sat around the negotiating table.
- Thus when a sale is agreed, the parties
involved (buyer and seller) will have to come to
-an arrangement where the funds owed to the
‘two pension funds - totalling in the millions of
‘dollars - are paid in full. However, the issue will
‘not impede the sale.
‘ers**private equity arm, which is the Royal
Oasis’s financial backer and de facto owner, is
Jooking for about $45 million for the property
once its insurance claim - dating back to. the
2004 hurricane season - is settled.

That has been embroiled. in US court pro-

The Tribune understands that Lehman Broth-

ceedings, but is said to be near a resolution.
- The action by the hotel pension funds the-lat-
est headache for Lehman Brothers. Driftwood
(Freeport), and its affiliates, which act as the
holding companies for the Royal Oasis and its
casino, have also been served with a demand
for payment by Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny. The latter is owed at least $500,000 by the
Royal Oasis, whose holding companies were
given 21 days to pay up. That deadline is fast
approaching, and failure to meet it could see
Grand Bahama Power Company petition the
court to appoint a receiver/liquidator for the
Royal Oasis.

If this happened, it would complicate Lehman

Brothers efforts to sell the resort.

PRICEWWATERHOUSE(QOPERS

. Position of General Manager

One of our clients involved in the retail business is seeking an energetic experienced

General Manager for their Freeport, Grand Bahamas operations.

Interested candidates

should have a proven track record of accomplishments and a desire to advance a chain of
Drug/Convenience Stores and Perfume stores into a new era of growth and development.

;-The qualified candidate must have a minimum of five (5) years hands on experience in
‘multiple store management, preferably in convenience and perfume store retailing and

paVARLCB OH to the Chief Operations Officer. The General Manager will be directly
“:zesponsible for the stores’ management teams and he or she will lead them in the delivery |
-'of high standards of customer satisfaction, achievement of aggressive sales targets and to

drive the profitability of the business.

Proven track records in inventory control, merchandising and excellent communication

_ skills, are essentials the individual must posses. The ability to effectively provide a level
of customer service that exceeds customer expectations, and the expertise to train and
motivate sales staff in exceeding company sales targets are also a must.

An excellent remuneration and benefits package is offered, including generous
performance bonuses, medical, dental, and life insurance.

Interested candidates should submit their resumes to either of the addresses provided
below (by hand or mail) no later than Wednesday, February 22, 2006.

Resident Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
Regent Centre East — Suite A
P.O. Box F- 42682

Freeport, Grand Bahama
The Bahamas

Re: GM

‘Human Resource Partner
PricewaterhouseCoopers
East Hill Street

P.O. Box N- 3910

Nassau, The Bahamas

Re: GM

BAHAMIANS NEED ONLY. APPLY



We require a superintendent(s) for a mid-rise luxury condominium sient now under
construction on Paradise Island, Bahamas. This is a.one year contract assignment. The
applicants must have a minimum of 5 to 10 years experience in similar construction.
The successful candidate must be capable of coordinating the activities of the various
trade groups, be proficient in the reading and interpretation of all drawings and specification.
Responsibilities will include communication with trades and suppliers; ensuring schedule
compliance, inspection of material and equipment delivered and to be installed are in
accordance with drawings and specifications. Skilled in the Microsoft Word, Excel and
Project is an asset. Demonstrated leadership ability is essential. The superintendent will
report directly to the Construction Manager.,

















Please respond by email to: tito@ phwibatamas.comn

Fax: 242.363.1279
Mail to: PBWL
P.O. Box SS-6386

‘Nassau, Bahamas

PBWL SECURITY - MAIN GATE
Ocean Club DRIVE & Harbour Way
Paradise Island

Delivery By Hand:









BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

TENDER FOR THE RENOVATION AND UPGRADE
OF OFFICE BUILDING - CENTRAL ANDROS
Tender No. 595/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders to undertake
the renovation and upgrade of its office building at Fresh Creek, Central Andros.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting:-
; Mrs Delmeta Seymour...
Administrative Officer 14 &
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads '
Nassau, Bahamas

Phone No. 302-1158

.Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 24 February 2006 by 4:00pm and addressed
as follows:

The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 595/06
“RENOVATION & UPGRADE OFFICE BUILDING - CENTRAL ANDROS”
t

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006-. THE: F








Visit our website at wwwie

UING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES |

PREREQUISITE: ABA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized cllegeluniversity orar minimum of 5 years as a parc
e yy N | A I ES e De PUT supervisor or trainer, COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet’ ”. Sang r:
Begins: Spring and Fall. Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm en “Duration: 3 TERMS
What is your goal?
PROMOTION

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master challenges in decis
Y QUALITY SERVICE
Y SALARY INCREASE











































making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory skills, or persons who have
promotedand wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management. This programme entails essential training for pers
wishing to become an associate manager.




/ NEW CAREER
TERM1 : TERM 2 3
CAREER ENHANCEMENT CPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV.900, Supervisory: Mana (f
: : : : ini WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 _. ETHC900 Ethics:and Prof: Resp sibility-' $25
help yon eh van coal, eduemlon'and reininigs CPS 901 Accounts- $300 -CPM 903 Professional: ef Devslonhe Seminar- o00
. ? TERM 3

; CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600

i q
Call for an interview today! CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

For your convenience, the majority of classes are held on Saturdays, 8am — 12noon. : PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervison/Managér or Trainer an naval De:
Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department can help you achieve See: Sering ae Fal COMP956 OTs A palaare ee and The a 3 TERMS

your career goal! A wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification and licensure are offered. You can become a pioneer ?
in setting performance standards in your organization. Success is at your finger tips. We have secured partnerships with leading international : CERTIFIED PROFESSION. AL SECRETARY REVIEW. PROGRAMME Ph

institutions to help you accomplish your career goals. You can attain your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas. ? The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Ass tion of;
Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career goals... ? (IAAP) is a9 month course ¢ oF study designed to prepare administrative professionals and)





‘ Certified Professional Managers Programme , : ee
. Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant : nee) Xi rm ts- $300 TERM 2
. Certificate Programme In Learning Disabilities : $3 CPS 909 Basins a ication- $300
° A+ Computer Technician Certification : y Business Lommurication:
‘° Certified Computer Operator (Microsoft Office Specialist- MOS) 3 ; a Mecnek
: Certificate In Law i TERM 3
5 Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Becker Conviser CPA Review 3 CPS 903 Office Technology- $500 _ WRS 900 Writing and Resmaicl Skills. $350 (Spring) CPS 91
Certi ? Managing Physical Resources- $200 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. ies oie $250 (Summ
. ertified Human Resource Managers Programme CPM 903 Prof 1 Devel tS $210
¢ Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management : PRERE a. a opment Seminar- D aYisiE , :
. Journeyman Plumbing License i QUISI yrs. Experience or an AA Degree+3:Yrs, ixperience
: oi : COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows:afd The’
‘ Master Plumbing License i 3 S d Fall ; Day/Time: Sat. Bote
. Certified Security Officer ' i egins: pring and Fa ay/ Time: Sat. Gam! pm
. Managerial Accounting For Non-Financial Managers 4.8 J OURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE
: Ethics And Professional Responsibility i The Jourrieyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students prepari
: Writing & Research Skills a interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage
° . Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet " aut f supply. and‘distribution, use of materials and ‘tools, ‘repairs ¢
No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International programmes available. Sr eoat aie f rt lic Works. At the end of the course, candi





CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME AY

This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management at James Madison ane.

Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers, and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed

for today’s management challenges. A comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high sgt 0

performance.

TERM 1 TERM 2

CPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 CPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHCOOD Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 _¢:
CPM 903 Professional: Development Seminar- $100

z TPM. Sumeyitan Pluthbiig- $800
3 ETHC900 ae and Prof. aurea 50




) Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)
_ Seminar. $












‘Plumbing. Examination. Students should have abo:
e systems, storm drainage disposal system
Is, repairs 2 and maintena

LIMBS is, Aelia to. assist student

TERM 3
and'skills in the following 2 areas: interpretation 0

CPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300 ‘ ‘ b Gt
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an Associate Degree or a B. A. Degree from an accredited or
recognized college/university; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm “Duration: 3 TERMS

( SUPV900 i is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT iP PREREQUISITE: "Students should have working knowledge and’ skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainag
With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks’/Office Assistants’ role has evolved as one of the most important support factors in nthe ? systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, us
operational management process. In an effort to equip the support level staff to function efficiently in the work environment, CEES is pleqsed: od materials and tools, repairs and maintenance:
















































‘CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100

: HB obo Master Plumbing. $950
: : SUPV 900 Supervisory Management-$500

(ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility” 2s













to offer a proficiency programme in basic office skills. “2 Begins? Fall.” g payin: Tuesdays _ Dutation; 1 TERM
TERM 1 TERM 2 . i eae cea gl 4 :
CPS 909 Business Communication- $300 Es CPM _903 Professional Development’ Seminar- $100...“ IMoe |
caine: concepts; ‘princi

readsheet i is’an essential ski
ind ‘Sxannples that aid the studé



WRS 900 Writing & Research Skills- $350 CPS 911 Records Management- $200‘
; ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility $250.



profess yhals and savaproféssionals CPS901 covers ina very’stu
learning experience: This course also helps to prepare candidates to write external examinations.
CPS:901 Accounts- $300 wh
PREREQUISITE: None ed ert

BEGINS: Perdemand ~ Day/Time: Sat/T! hurs/T ue. Bam-12: iSpik OR- com. ‘9pm Ben Duration: 10 Weeks.

TERM 3
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
CPS 903 Office Technology- $500.
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $200
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience in a clerical position and 3 BGCSE’s- Grade C or above; / ,
COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet ? ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY |

Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of ethics and ethios. :

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN LEARNING DISABILITIES i cases will be explored to support. a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics and professional responsibility

P important in all aspects of society.
The Certificate in Learning Disabilities Programme is designed to equip teachers with the skills necessary for working with diverse learners. ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250

d i
Participants are trained to use the basic techniques to identify students with learning disabilities; analyze and examine disabilitieS related to | PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet





bl : ‘ oo
on oe canara ae develop strategies that can be used with students who have been diagnosed as learning disabled.. The i Begins: Perdemand — Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/T ve- - 6pm. 9pm, hide Duration: 8 Nets, ay
TERM 1 TERM 2 i EA cg sae
SPED 900 Introduction To Learning Disabilities- $84 SPED 903 Strategies and interventions I- $168 : WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS
SPED 901 Diagnosing Learning Disabilities- $168 , SPED 904 Strategies and interventions II- $84 i? This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writings hese nd critical thinking s skills to prepare = them for:
SPED 902 Individual Education Planning- $168 ETHC900 Ethics & Profess. Responsibility.- $250 into CEES’ professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also strated ‘to provide enna candidates with the skills neces
TERM 3 , ‘ 3 to successfully write position and research papers. vi
SPED 905 Assessment- $178 : ? WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills - $350

ms , : PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows aiid The Internet :
Se HTIA TE A Doe mn note i Begins: Per demand _ Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon' or Thursday/Tue- 6pm

PREREQUISITE: AA Degree with a Teacher’s Certificate or a BA Degree;



; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet ? INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET ‘ ebay
Begins: Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm - Duration: 3 TERMS ‘+ £ This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using eine compl jorge
A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION ? Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage person | files and folders ae they creat Gat

COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None : ‘
Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon At. dei “Duration: 3 Weeks:,.

TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardwate APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROG
PREREQUISITE: .COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Intemet All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offeréd:in conjunction with foreign institutio
Begins: Per Demand B Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS : requited to to contact the CEES Office for information on éxternal application and examination fees: RNY

CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) i Telephone (242) 325-5714/328-0093/328-1936 | Fax: (242) 322-2712. ‘ee
This course of study is designed to train students how to.master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Outlook, and; vise :

PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design. skills, the instructor provides easy to understand notes and conducts live ; OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon successful completion of the external international examinations, the ? PRES :

This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the intemational A+ Microsoft Certification
Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning
experience with lab exercises that help the student to apply theory to practice.











TERMI. Office Specialist: (MOS) Certification is awarded. The proptasnane eomnais me Modules and two companion Courses: : 1. COB Registration / Je $40.00 (one-time a

COMP906 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 ETHC900 Ethics & Professional Responsibility- $250 i eee : oer (oe ne Poe

Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 : 4. Techn ology ‘Fee ‘i $75

Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3 : : o ie ;

Microsoft Outlook COMP 506 Microsoft Office Specialist- $610 i z POs a S00 a Goa a for prices

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 i +, Bxtemal Aaplice es ees 2 By éase check with i y.

PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet : PP ey eet ey agit Ra : :

Begins: Spring and Fall : Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE: Effective Summer 2005, basic’ computer and Internet skills will Ke required ofall studen
TIFI Assessment for exemption from COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof, of a certifica

CER CATE IN LAW from an authorized provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency i ‘ tudents fail

This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives (ILEX), Bedford, England. i :
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at the paralegal level. the competency test will be required to take the Introduction To The, intemet Windows and | nt

Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers, for all programmes or single courses.












Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justices of The Peace, and all persons interested in acquiring.an impressive array of legal office skills, the : Workshop Title: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The inert
Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include: : Tuition: $200
TERM 1 TERM 2 Day: , Saturdays: 12noon - 3pm (5 contact hours per day
. WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills “$350 . ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250 LAW900 ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS
The Legal Environment -§600.00 iii LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00 ? Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:
‘ - CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210 i é The first four pages of your Passport
NE Options ore subjert to chan z , ; . Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts
. Opti ge 3 . b d ; » et
LAW 903 Company Law . . LAW 906 Law of Mortgages : Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.
LAW 905 Employment Law LAW 908 Work of The Magistrate’s Court ; ? OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION :,

LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience, COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am - 12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS ;

THE BECKER CPA REVIEW
The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition from a gencil -and-
paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus -.broadening the scope of auditjand attest
areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and communication, The new exam also has increased emphasis'on.

Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you'! will be bi
Non- Bahamians add $50 to each course/wo

Bop

“At the first class session, ALL student
of his/her stamped receipts representi

PROF ESSI AL DEVELOPMENT AND,

A edmpulsory: professional ‘development seminar is offered:for all’ candidates’ ‘enrolled in professional development programmes. Seminars 4












general business knowledge and information technology. a ? and workshops address important issues that are vital to the adult students’ earning experience; Enrollment is‘also open to the general public...’
CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520 < ? Thisis Js als designed tc to facilitate consis chica pois for professionals’ applying for peeprifcation in.their repediive disciplines te
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465 a Ed a i
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21 credits hours in sALOUTtInG. i ‘ requir
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am - 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks pee : See eK will be $210.
CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Hides dE
Offered in conjunction with Columbia Southern University, Orange Beach, Alabama, this nine months programme is designed for Thee j
_ individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through the ranks in the HR field. a 4
TERM 1 TERM 2 j he
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250 | Secure Your ra B
HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200 MP BSW EE p ; tact The Centre’ ter ‘





HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 ; : HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $100 ;



Call (242) 325 725 03 8-1936 Fax: (242) 322-2712 ©





Aenea Labour Management Relations- $300 “Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit C: Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300 ) “Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Sehedhle And Course Materials

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

’ neh \
NN
BUNE BUSINESS





EDUCA]

Computer Offerings — Spring 2006

R APPLICATIONS |
Perec eytTSTea Sore Lo bere ers. and does not understand how it wor

software using: (1) Microsoft Office — Word

CRUE A See CLE pO

ROO Grecia OL DD)
SATU

IS Computer Lab

cel nT Nae 010)

XH NVein Ram ie OH UCT ASOLO
and Wed.. 20 Feb.. 2006
Duration: 12 weeks Sra
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II :
SAU oN Deen UCU AOrTr MOM Ton H far Nese Cem UOLCU SOONG LINN SUN Sea LL SOLES Lag of various software using: (1)

BPN AiMO jie teem MOK ante aETD YLLSO CLL pace MIRSTES NO AY RTOFUNCOd ta exec tice BETH SCaY FULCRUM
Fryers) BL TeLG COR
, 23. February: 2006

i HATIROR CO ML eanAeLU BOD
omputer Lab

Duration: 12 weeks
CHO L0H Boy
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRE ATIONS y S
This, workshop is designed to provid icipants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses on developing
effective and dynamic PowerPoint presemiations. : ; :

Thursday. 9 March 2006 Hae

Misatae URN Cce NCO
Grey pre Cle ex Fees: $160.00

DTrace

IN MATION TECHNOLOGY I
Course Description: This course covers basic concepts of Information Technology. The course provides training in the following areas:
Basic Hardware Proficiency. Application Features Proficienes, Operating Svstem Proficiency, Internet and Email KOLA

eet Nyssa UG ND mee LTR

aKa user CISCO) (came
Fees:$450.00

Duration: 12 weeks

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Course Description: This course i

nto technology systems for use.i'information environments. The course will
cover the following topics: Basic i :

ystems. Troubleshooting and Repairs.

sahands-on introduct!
Hardware, Operating
dav. 21 February 2006
Thursdays
Mom econ raved orb

« Pre-requisite:None
Time:6:00pm — 7:30pm
Duration: 12 weeks Pare
QUICKBOOKS: :

- Course Description:This course is de MU COR UTI IOSUA TIC NGT
organize and‘manage their accounting activities using QuickBooks
chart of accounts, budget, customers, vendors and employees.

small business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to
software. Students will learn how to set-tip their company fi

Pre-requisite:None: ~ Begins: Tuesday, 28 February 2006 b STROH I eRCR a)

~. Duration: 6 weeks Venue: CEES Computer-Lab Rota

UPGRADE PUNY AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC WORKSHOP ; ; i

This workshop is a hands-on introduction to uper: MAUUreyUes osararesU DSA MSTESCOLCU exer 00 Cc Key (exgcoce el ef Kom beta LCN
operating systems, troubleshooting and rej E ; :

Pre-requisite:None See
Duration:1 day :
WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP.
Course Description: This course. w : i

Seas sue nnretne clio ap WAG Omura VT COY SSSR ROCCO ROTEL CUT oe eT TLS Multimedia, Forms and Tab
oe etas

and hosting of web

por Keeiee UT cool esva tC raUT INNA nS CUED OLET LLORAS
ea Seno Nean EK A if)
* Venue:CEES Computer Lab

HEALTH AND FITNESS

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTI-

This is an introductory course for learning bi
_ Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniqu
Contraindications, Serving Special Populations <
Starting: Monday, February 27. 2006

Tuition Fee: $465.00

FTN CH NATAUI Nel Oreo LOSS
A CONUaTeNV BUNT INUIT) (oa
SAKURA INS IISE COMICS
AOC E AUT
Venue: The College.of the Bahamas

TICS RUENOHOH TUS
; URI AS
I DTU rTeCC ARO NMS

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS

This is. an advanced course for le:

hydrotherapy; spa and body treatments: the |
and hot stone therapy.

and its many benefits. Major topics include introduction to
ny-fundamentals or essential oils: relaxation and meditative methods,

CRUSE AAU bn “Duration: 10 Weeks

Starting: Thursday, February 23, 2006
:The College of the Bahamas

Goan case eNO
GROUP. FITNESS INSTRUCTOR

ission will include basic anatomy and physiology.
and how-to teach group exercise.

ANH OSIAUATLUKerelMTa Cola CoN esate )UTRCmea TOU PTS ERT NY ice Or eresre GIT

choreography and cueing; the five components of fitness. nut

. Starting: Thursday, February: 23. 2006
Tuition Fee:$400.00

Ia SONNE DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS

SUPERIOR (CUSTOMER SERVICE
This workshop is.designed to provide p
customer value, ACHE ETERS

Duration:10 Weeks

Pthe fundamentals of superior customer-service. lt focuses on

:9:30am = 4:30pm

Date:Thursday, 23 February 2006
Tuition:$170.00.

Venue:Choices Restaurant; Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre
~ » EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRES TIONS
This. workshop is designed to provide partici
effective and‘dynamic PowerPoint presentations.

Date:Thursday, 2 March 2006 Teco ea Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Muss Road

PUTiion eI AOLe

HUMAN RESO ICE MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP ~
This two-day workshop i Uren oee RUT
professionals with the theory. tools and techniques

wreanizations and enhance the skills of current Human Resource

Date:Thursday & Friday, 2nd — 3rd aL
Venue:Choices Restaurant, Bahamas Tourism and Training Centre

UPGRADE REPAIRE, AND TROUBLESHOOT YOUR PC ee aie
This workshop is.a tiands-on introduction to upgrade repair and troubleshooting your personal computer. Topics covered are basic hardware,
(oyoferettfnteah ASC oa UROLUL eS ICULON ear Cee De : pass ! teeta)

oes ACM MIU N Pe UR Fae aN [ir Cee NUN hee EU po Aorsxeel sierra Utcateels

Tuition:$250

WEB PAGE DESIGN f 5s
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HIME. Persons who enjoy fiddling with computers and ROeHe)
THU ReM ONCcrccre CoM ATCT TCCO UNCC EM TET COMT cr CNUTrerered nC Cer ey Ca eRe CUTS FUCCon reninara Ur roam Gripe PeNG UL CMe RODE UG
MU Uo) oeenar CesT ACO ANS naa i f

Date:Thursday & Friday 2nd» 3rd March. 2006 TSOP ease et PU
Tuition:$550.00

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

‘The following, Personal Development courses have been approved by the Academic Board for COB credit courses equivalencies.

Venue:CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

ACCA9D0- Accounting for Beginner |
B AYGCUU TT ites Coe BOUT
-Human Resource M
MGM L901 HMuman-Resource {
os) eA Demx xu secre ULES
= SPA 90K - Conversational Spanish TI

FAP OSU PTAA CeOPCURI DIU Oa CU CORRS AUTO
Ae

SITU GH ea TMH N TOIT MITA CD ULL CUA Cre Sree CSS ARO KGN Tua pare
recoenition that these courses have been equated to courses taken toward ¢ desiree pr

er Webpage creations

is with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It focuses:on developing



| CUST900

; EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT

‘| HEALTH &
FITNESS

ny

‘

A

;|MGMT900__ 1.04
L i

MONDAY,



i







COURSE DESCRIPTION



a
[AGCA900 [01 _ | ACCAFOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00pm __| Mon/Wed
ACCA901 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00-8:00pm MiWed 10 weeks | $275

ACCAG02 101 |-ACCAFORBEGINNERS Il | 6:00-8:00pm___, Tue/Thur 10weeks | $300

Ce =|
/BUSI900 «| 01 ~——s| CREDIT & COLLECTIONS |

ac SUPERIOR CUSTOMER

01 SERVICE WIS. one
INTRODUCTION
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS ||
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |
COMP902 4 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 11
COMP903 1 INFORMATION TECH. | __
COMP 941 1 QUICKBOOKS =
COMP953 1 ‘PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR

f
q



‘eb | 10 weeks... {$225



72 Weeks | $450
12 Weeks | $450
12 Weeks
12 Weeks
12 Weeks
6 weeks
12 Weeks

——+

6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-9:00pm
6:00-7:30pm

_28-Feb
21-Feb

1 Day
9-Mar

2 Days

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WEB PAGE DESIGN

WORKSHOP
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04 9:30am-4:30pm_j Thur i
$550
[9:30am-4:30pm_| Thur/Fri

COMP930 01

COSM802___|01__| MAKE-UP APPLICATION

COSMs04 MANICURE & PEDICURE

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01__| INTERIOR DECORATING | |
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ENGLISH AS A SECOND‘LANG | 6:00-9:00pm _| Mon/Fri
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410 weeks $250



MASSAGE THERAPY m i 1 $465
ESSENTIALS At fu :+Â¥}-6:00-S:00pm 10 weeks
MASSAGE THERAPY - 1 ' | $620
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GROUP FITNESS

INSTRUCTOR

MASG900_°
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SPA900___| 01
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MGMT.

6:00-9:00pm_ [hr
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6:00-9:00PM | Thur
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| Tue/Thur

: Mon/Wed 10 weeks
"| Tue/Thur 10.weeks' | $225
___} Mon/Thur 10 weeks | $250

“V Mon/Wed | 70 Weeks | $225

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE |
CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE 1
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH |
CONV. SPANISH II 7
T CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH |

6:00-7:30pm
{ 6:00-7:30pm
6:00-7:30pm

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HUMAN RESOURCE $250
MANAGEMENT...
HUMAN RESOURCE.
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12 Weeks

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12 Weeks . | $300



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MEDICAL
01



MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY | 6:00-9:00pm 23-Feb La weeks [32285

i

BASIC OF FREEHAND
CUTTING | 7
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CUTTING Il

DRAPERY MAKING |

28-Feb | 10 weeks | $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING I]

TOweeks | $225
27-Feb



TO weeks | $260
23-Feb i













22-Feb | 10 weeks | $250
UPHOLSTERY MAKING | Lie 22-Feb | 10 weeks | $225.4

ae cS: Contact the Co-ordinator at ‘Vel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-U093/ 328-1936 or
email All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time) .
When submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport.
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course
Materials 42 ;

Prospective
EG.

Call Dr. Bondurant
at 302-4508 to register!

Open to everyone in the
community — all schools — all
bands — come and learn, have

fun and network with
international musicians as well!

in coltaboration
“with

* WHEELOGK,

Scholarships available!



SOCIAL SCIENCES
~ FORUM

st Social Issues 219
presents a lively forum concerning the
~ current D+ average of our National
Exam Scores. Learn about the factors
_ responsible for students’ poor
‘performance and the proposed solutions
to this growing deficiency.

‘Wednesday Feb 22, 2006 at 6pm
Room 8, Bahamas Tourism
Training Centre, Thompson Blvd.

GUEST SPEAKERS |
¢ Ida Poitier-Turnquest . ;
- Pres of The Bahamas Union,of‘Leachers:
e Dressler Sherman’ *' *»""
Pres of The Bahamas Principals Association
e Latasha Sherman- Young
COB Psychology Major on

- PHONE PROBLEMS

The Office of Admissions
Pee soe lenioiatiits
(302-4499)
is not working.

Calls eu be channeled to
302-4319, 302-4367, 302-4394,
1 =. 302-4377 or 302-4376.

We apologize for
any inconvenience caused.

FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9B

| _
oo

“yy








PAGE 10B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006






















swt c
“OWLMK ONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
\ 2005/CLE/equi/001137
TN THE SUPREME COURT
Equity Side

> Jane §
' separating it from land generated to Sarah Whewell and WEstwardly |

'

‘

t

He

1

‘ and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to |
, be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of the said

} Act.

t
)
f
t
t

» Nassau, eae:





seb eemisr 29 2a eco



' ALI THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing Tea (10) acres |
; situate in the vicinity of the Settlement of Kemp’s Bay on the Island
’ of Andros being Crown Grant F-2 at page 148 to Robert Woodside |
and bounded Northwardly by vacant land Eastwardly by a Thirty (30) |

| Act. 1959 to have its Title to the said land investigated and the nature |

Copies of the field plan may be inspected during normal office hours |

' at

Notice is here by given that any persons having Dower or right to
dower or any adverse claim not recognized in the Petition shall before

|} tae 2apire

i undersigned statement of such claim. Failure of any such person to |
| file and serve a statement of such claim within Thirty (30) days of the |

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NATASHA DEAN, of
the Fire Trail Road, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change
my name to NATASHA CAMPBELL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box
N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.







y Do

“FOR SALE

AS 400 E SERVER ae

“DEVICE PARITY PROTECTION-ALL
-V.24/51A232 20FT. PCI CABLE
-OPERATIONS CONSOLE PCI CABLE
-4317 LOAD SOURCE SPECIFY:
-125V 14-FT. LINE CORD |
.NTERACTIVE CAPACITY CARD
-MODEL 270 PROCESSOR
-PCI RAID DISK UNIT CTLR
-ENGLISH
-256MB MAIN STORAGE
-8.58GB 10K RPM DISK UNIT
-CD-ROM .
-16GB 1/4-INCH CARTRIDGE TAPE
-PCI] WAN IOA
-PC TWINAXIAL WORKSTN IOA
-PCI 100/1OMBPS ETHERNET IOA |
-TSP SPECIFY CODE
-SOFTWARE VERSION V5R1
-ALT IPL SPECIFY FOR 16GB
-SYS. CONSOLE ON OP. CONSOLE

SEND SEALED BIDS TO BAHAMAS
DEVELOPMENT BANK, P.O. BOX N-3034,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS NO LATER THAN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land |
containing Ten (10) acres situate in the vicinity of the Settlement of |
Kemp’s Bay on the Island of Andros being Crown Grant F-2 at page |
148 to Robert Woodside and bounded Northwardly by vacant land
y by a Thirty (30) Links Road Reservation separating it from |
cup Southwardly by a Twenty (20) Links Road Reservation |

Basi ward

tur







‘ by vacant Crown Land.
IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959
iN THE MATTER OF the Petition of IZM GROUP LTD.

NOTICE OF PETITION

', Link Road Reservation separating it from Jané Sturrup Southwardly |
iby a Twenty (20) links Road Reservation separating it from land granted |
to S: ar ah Whewell and Westwardly by vacant Crown Land. The Petitioner |
IZi GROUP LTD claims to be the Owner of the fee simple estate in |
| Pos session of the said lot of land hereinbefore described and the
' Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the |
: Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles |



a. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, Bank Lane, |

«« Chamber of Douglas Sands & Associates, Ltd., East & Shirley |
Strect, ¥.O. Box N-8566, Nassau; Bahamas; 4

c. The Attorney General’s Office, East Hill Street, Nassau, The Bahamas,

‘omraissioner’s Office in the Settlement of Kemp’s Bay, Andros,



‘ion of Thirty (30) days of the receipt of this Notice file in |
gisiry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner of the |



receipt of this Notice will operate as bar to such claim.

DOUGLAS SANDS & ASSOCIATES, LTD.,
Chambers
2nd Floor, Columbus House
East and Shirley Streets
P.O. Box N-8566
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



BUSINESS

Employer
‘cultural change’

FROM page 1B

The National Insurance
Board (NIB) has experienced
problems with some companies
not passing on contributions
deducted from their employ-
ees’ salaries, and the NHI pro-
ject team is pinning its faith in
the power of IT to ensure this
is not repeated.

Ms Pinder said all Bahami-
ans and residents would receive
an NHI membership card, and
upon seeking treatment, this

-‘would be scanned to determine

whether contributions - from
both the employer and employ-
ee.- are up to date. If Bahami-
ans were not up to date with
their-payments, then they
would be charged user fees to
meet healthcare costs, as the
NHI would not cover them.

Manager
Dr Stanley Lalta, the NHI

project manager and health
economist, said IT would
enable the NHI to avoid
employing compliance inspec-
tors, as NIB does, thus min-
imising costs.

Employees

It would also enable employ-
ees to avoid having to confront
employers over an alleged non-

payment of contributions on

their behalf.

“We have to have enforce-
ment,” Ms Pinder said. To
ensure employer compliance,
the NHI is looking at measures
already under exploration by
the NIB.

These include non-renewal
of business licences for compa-
nies that are not making pay-
ments on behalf of employees,
and refusal of foreign exchange
control approvals allowing
them to import goods into the
country.

The NHI scheme also

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
In Volunt ary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given fat i in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000)
- ELSON INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, is. in dissolution.

CONTIENTAL LIQUIDATORS INC. is the Liquidator and can
be contacted at No. 2; Commercial Centre Square, P.O. Box #71,
Alofi, Niue Islands. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before, March

17, 2006.

_ For: Continental Liquidators, Ihe.’

Liquidator |



PROPERTY
FOR SALE

Lot Number 14, in the

Southern vicinity of ,
Westridge N orth Subdivision

Western District of :

New Providence

Being sold pursuant to

Power of Sale
Mortgage dated May 14, 2004
Appraised value $140,000

Interested parties,

please submit Bids to

British American Insurance
Co. Ltd,
Independence Drive
P.O. Box N-4815
Telephone: 461-1000

believes that membership cards
and IT will ensure a higher lev-
el of compliance from self-
employed Bahamians, again
eliminating problems that NIB
has experienced relating to
compliance from this sector.
The NHI scheme’s own 2004
report revealed that the NIB
was collecting contributions
from just 15 per cent or 3,500
out of 23,000 self-employed

‘workers who were supposed to

pay contributions.

But Ms. Pinder said the NHI
hoped to achieve greater com-
pliance because health care was
something all Bahamians need-
ed to some point in their lives.

She added: “If you don’t con-

tribute, you don’t get the ser-

vice. That’s the most important
thing for the self-employed

“If you don’t have a mem-
bership. card, don’t contribute
or your contributions are out
of date, you have.to pay the
full cost. It’s not a subsidised
user fee. Theére’s an incentive
to start with.”

Dr'‘Lalta described the IT
system as “the prerequisite”
for an NHI system to be imple-
mented in the Bahamas.

“We're looking at-an IT sys- ’.

tem to provide real-time online

claims processing,” he added.. .
This system, which Dr Lalta’

told The Tribune already exist-
ed in France, Jamaica and
Puerto Rico - countries that
have similar social health insur-
ance schemes - would validate
patiént'memberships and pro-

vide both public and private
healthcare providers with’ ~

assurances that.claims would

be met by NHI. :

Avoiding
“fn addition’ to ‘avoiding the
need for a huge claims depart-
ment and staff, Dr Lalta said

the proposed IT system would
enable bank transfers for

immediate..payments. by the.....
my, the MAB expressed’ con-

NHI to healthcare. providers.
In comparison, he’said that,
in some Caribbean countries,
healthcare providers had to
wait between 20-40 days for
their claims to be settled by a
social health insurance scheme.
However, the Bahamas does
not have an Automated Clear-
ing House (ACH) yet to settle
real-time transactions between
customers of different banks.
“Once we see that IT system

THE TRIBUNE



in place and what it’s going to
mean, there’s no need for a
huge bureaucracy,” Dr Lalta
said.

Ms Pinder said the IT sys-
tem would enable the NHI
management team to conduct
utilisation reviews, health care
provider audits, information
sharing, and deal with each
provider’s terms of contract.

She added that it would also
help to combat fraud and mis-
use by healthcare providers. In
one Caribbean country, an IT
system had shown that doctors
were increasingly recommend-
ing and performing Caesarean,
sections rather than normal
births for patients, simply
because the former was more
expensive and would earn them

. greater revenues. .

Status _

~ Both Dr'Lalta and Ms Pin-

“der éxpressed hope that the

NHI would have quasi-
autonomous status, and be
operated with some degree of
independence from govern-
ment, reducing the chances of
political interference.
However, critics of the plan

“are likely to be unconvinced.

Bahamian employers across all
industries are worried that it
will impose another tax burden
on their companies, making

. them. even-more uncompeti-.

tive, while employees are like-
ly to view contributions as an
income tax. that will reduce
take- home pay.

’ The Medical Association of
the Bahamas (MAB), whose
support and co-operation will

-.be needed to-get the NHI

scheme off the ground, has
already said the plan as pro-
posed “will adversely affect the
quality of healthcare received
by all Bahamians and curtail
timely access”

Apart from.a “negative
impact”, on the. overall econo-

cerns. that the NHI scheme
would transfer management of
healthcare financing from pri-
vate insurance companies to an
inefficient public sector.

It urged the Government to
continue on the public-private
partnership role, adding that
throwing more money at
healthcare was not necessarily
the answer to better equality
and access in the Bahamas:

Construction Company Seeking

CONSTRUCTION ~
SUPERINTENDENT

Responsibilities Include:

- Supervise the Field Construction of a project,
including its organization, planning and scheduling
to complete the work on time, within budget and

specified quality.

- Coordinate, direct, and monitor the activities of .
subcontractors, suppliers, direct labor and material.

- Develop and implement project schedules

- Enforce a project site safety and security program

- Direct, train aad evaluate field staff

- Perform other duties and responsibilities as required

Qualification:

Applicants should possess the following qualifications:

- Minimum of 12 years building construction

experience

- Thorough knowledge and understanding of the
general and subcontract documents, SAYINES and

specifications.

- Extensive knowledge of construction means,

methods and materials

- Experience in field engineering and surveying

- Computer skills and knowledge of construction

software programs

- Strong management, caceisp and interpersonal

,» Skills

Competitive Salary, Health and Life insurance and other

attractive benefits.

Interested Persons should send resume to:

~The Manager
P.O. Box SS-5580
"Nassau, Bahamas

RE: Construction Superintendent Position


‘THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
MONDAY EVENING

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 1

WOOD-YOU

REAL WOOD FURNITURE FOR LESS!



s like getting two,
pieces of furniture
for the price

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Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

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Bring your children to the
Mctlappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of February 2006.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

i'm lovin’ it




THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



_ “Copyrighted Material
——« __ Syndicated Content
.. Available from Commercial News Providers”


TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY,

Colchester give Chelsea a
scare before FA Cup exit






“Copyrighted Material

‘Syndicated Content
ewailable rom Commercial News a



—
PAGE 14B, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

TRIBUNE SPORTS





owles



in final for second year

= TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

IT WAS déja vu for Mark
Knowles and Daniel Nestor as
they lost for the second straight
year in the final of the Open 13 in
Marseille, France.

Seeded in the same position as
they were last year, number one
Knowles and Nestor fell victims
to the Czech Republic No.4 team
of Martin Damm and Radek
Stepanek.

Last year, they were beaten 7-6
(4) and 7-6 (5). This year, the
result was 6-3, 6-7 (6), 10-6.

Despite the gallant effort they
turned in, Knowles admitted that
the Czechs were just a little bit
more prepared for the final than
they were.

“We had a few chances at the
end, but they beat us in the tie-
breaker,” Knowles reflected.

Served

Damm (a part of the world’s
No.2 ranked team with Leander
Paes from India) and Stepanek
(who is not ranked) served
extremely well, according to
Knowles.

“We played better in the sec-
ond and the third went to a tie
breaker. But it was just a couple
points at the end where they were
able to pull it off,” he said.

Coming off their first two losses
in January in Australia, Knowles
and Nestor went into the tourna-
ment with their first victory under
their belt in before they went to
Europe.

As for losing another tourna-
ment, Knowles stressed: “Obvi-
ously, we’re disappointed.”

But he said they can take solace
in the fact that “this maybe is one
of those tournaments where we
have to give some credit to our
opponents.

“] think they played at a level
that they are not very comfortable

in playing at. They did a good job.
But we did our best to fight back.
So yeah, we’re disappointed
because we always want to win
another doubles title.”

Knowles and Nestor will now
head to ABN AMRO World Ten-
nis Tournament in Rotterdam this
week where they hope to redeem
themselves.

Last year as the top seeds, they
got into the quarterfinals before
they were ousted by another
Czech team — Cyril Suk and Pavel
Vizner in the semifinal. The
Czechs eventually lost in the final
to Jonathan Erlich and Andy Ram
from Israel.

Knowles and Nestor have been
drawn to play Erlich and Ram in
the first round of the tournament
this year.

“We've been playing well and
had a good streak going. Unfortu-
nately, we didn’t pull it out,”
Knowles noted. “We are going
back to the drawing board this
week and hopefully we can
advance and win the tournament.”

Like Marseille, Rotterdam will
be another of those tournaments
that will use the new format for
doubles.

According to the changes, when
you get to deuce in the first two
sets, it’s just one point to decide
the outcome. But in the third set,
instead of playing a normal point,
the match is decided by the first
team to score 10 points.

It’s a format that Knowles and

_ Nestor don’t particularly like, but

one they are trying their best to
make the necessary adjustments
to.

“T don’t think we will ever like it
because I don’t think it’s fair to
these type of tournaments,” he
stated.

“We can’t change it, so we just
have to focus on playing it the way
it is and get more used to it.”

The new rule is intended to
speed up the matches and gener-
ate a lot more interest in the game.

“We just have to try and make it
work,” Knowles summed up.



a MARK KNOWLES (pictured) and Daniel Nestor were defeated in the Open 13 final

(FILE Photo)

The Rattlers ‘are more than



prepare d



& BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE CI Gibson Rattlers are look-
ing forward to defending their title
this year in the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic for
senior boys.

The tournament will get started
today at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um but, up until Sunday, the schedule
had not been released by the organ-
ising committee at the AF Adderley
Junior High School.

Speaking with The Tribune in an =

interview from Fort Lauderdale on
Sunday, Rattler’s coach Kevin ‘KJ’

“Copyrighted Material
= Syndicated ‘Content

. wr lie :

Johnson said they are more than pre-
pared for the tournament, having got
off to an 8-0 start in the Government
Secondary Schools Sports Associa-

‘tion’s regular season.

“We worked hard to get prepared
and be prepared. We want to stay in
shape because the tournament is a
grueling tournament and you have to
be shape to give yourself a chance to
compete,” Johnson stated.

“We’re doing that and hopefully
we will continue doing it and hope-

fully we will be successful again this

year.”

This year’s tournament, however, is
slightly different in that all of the
games will be played at the Kendal

Isaacs Gym instead of just the final
four and championships.

The move from the AF Adderley
Gym was made possible through a
request that was made by the Grand
Bahama schools.

Involvement

But, even though there was con-
troversy surrounding the involvement
of-the Grand Bahama teams this
year, Johnson said they still have to
come.to New Providence to play.

“J felt the tournament would have

‘gone on (with or without them) and

we would have still been successful, 7
he proclaimed.



- >
Available from Commercial News Providers”

w Si

Campbell

The way his Rattlers have been
performing this year, Johnson said it
will have to come down to a self-
destruction on their part for them
not to pull through.

“We just have to remember to do
all the right things that we have to
do,” he projected. “Once we do all
that stuff, we will give ourselves a
chance to be successful in terms of

getting back to the championshap and

winning it.’

While most of the teams will be
relying on their bench’ to pull them
through, Johnson said his Rattlers’
bench is definitely going to be their
strength.

“If one of the starters get in trou-

_ ble, we could go to our bench and

not miss a beat,” he stressed.

Difficulties

If there’s any weaknesses, Johnson
said it will probably come at the free
throw line where some of his players
have had some difficulties during the
regular season.

Seniors Deniko Bowles, Lavardo
Hepburn, Sidney Deveaux, Darrel
Rolle and Terino Mackey are expect-
ed to lead the way for CI Gibson.

“Hopefully the younger guys in
grade 10 and 11 will step up and help
out,” Johnson noted.

They include David Baylor, Nem-
man Strachan, Danny McKenzie and
Jermaine Storr.

“I’m looking for all of these guys to
step up,” Johnson stressed. “The key
is being mentally prepared on the
defensive end and, if we are in a posi-
tion to do that, we will be able to
stop the teams. If we don’t, we will be
on the outside looking in.”

Based on who they’re matched
against pool II, Johnson is confident
that CI Gibson will once again be a
team to watch this week.

They have to get through the
Catholic High Crusaders and Sun-
land Lutherans from Grand Bahama,
Nassau Christian Academy Cru-
saders, St John’s Giants, Government
High Magicmen, Queen’s College
Comets, Old Bight from Cat Island
and Mangrove Cay, Andros in their
pool.

The tournament will run through
Monday when the championship
game will be played.



' —_ 7 i .
. ev
Tn :
ee
ower —
o>
— — —

“Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
and share your story.
TRIBUNE SPORTS . MUiseAi,
SPORTS

LwMiUAHY cu, cUU0, FAG



= - - oa -* =_—_— - = =>-_— <—.—— &- —

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vi 4am ON

Dravid pig See Content

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rm rege
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re GY) Ve whe de yi iS co gyi dubbed? CE ‘a

Visit our website at www.cob. edu. bs ae Pouceine » Te AEN

CARIBS @

Monday, Feb 20
: vs Sunshine Auto Riders at DW Davis Gym

Wednesday, Feb 22
vs D’Albenas Team at DW Davis Gym
7pm

Friday, Feb 24
vs Y-Cares Wreckers at DW Davis Gym
7pm

For more information contact Sean Bastian at 302-4591

Come and support the COB Caribs! :


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



Tonigque ends her indoor



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



ENT



season with a victory

Track star will not take part in Wor

lM TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS.
Senior Sports Reporter



AFTER losing her season open-
er at the Norwich Union Indoor
Invitational last month, Tonique
Williams-Darling closed out her
indoor season with a victory at the
Norwich Union Indoor Grand
Prix on Saturday.

Williams-Darling ran a season’s
best of 51.58 seconds, going
through the first 200-lap race in
24.43 as she improved on her sec-
ond place sub-par performance of
53.48 in Glasgow on January 28
behind Russian Olga Zaytseva
(50.62).

Her nearest rival in Birming-
ham on Saturday was Claudia
Marx of Germany in 52.09.

“For me, it was an average
race,” said Williams-Darling, who
was Off her national indoor record
of 50.87 that she set in Budapest,
Hungary in 2004.

Training

“T felt like I took control of the
race and just ran. There were
some things that I had to do. I did-
n’t start like Inormally do and I
think that was a reflection of
where I’m at in training. I haven’t
been able to peak. I just flat out
ran and was pretty strong.”

Already turning down her spot
on the Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation’s team to the Common-
wealth Games that kicks off the
outdoor season in Melbourne,
Australia, March 15-26, Williams-
Darling has now declared that she
will not participate on the
Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations’ team at the IAAF
World Indoor Championships in
Moscow, Russia, March 10-12.

“That was my last competition
for.indoor season. I’m pleased
with my indoor. I had two fairly
good meets and I’m pleased with
my conditioning and where I’m at
this time of the year,” she reflect-
ed.



@ BASKETBALL

TEM Old

“Coming off that win and run-
ning the time that I did yesterday,
I’m just very pleased with my
indoor season. But I had no intten-
tions of doing the World Indoors
at all this year. So I’m calling it
quits for the indoors and just con-
tinuing my training for my first
meet outdoors in June.”

Last year, Williams-Darling said
she and her coach, Steve Riddick,
had made a decision that they
would have skipped the indoor
season, but they eventually
changed their plans slightly at the
beginning of the year.

But he said the World Indoors
and the Commonwealth Games
were not in. their plans.

“I only took on the two meets
because they were no pressure
meets,” she stressed.

“It was just to help me with my
conditioning and strength to see
where I’m at and to break up
some of the routines and
give me a break from all the train-
ing.
“But I decided that. after two

indoor worlds, two outdoor:

worlds, the Olympics and World
Championships in the last three

_ years, I wouldn’t do a major cham-

pionships this year.”

Williams-Darling said her plans -

were to use this year as one for
her to rest a little and recuperate
as she prepares for the outdoor
season and to defend her title at
the World Outdoors next year.

“To be able to run that kind of
time with no competition, I’m real-
ly happy,” Williams-Darling stat-
ed. “I’ve been holding back on
some of my training. I haven’t
been working on my speed, so it
was a pretty good time.”

Also at the meet, Jackie

Edwards soared to a sixth place |

finish with a season’s best leap of
20-feet, 9 1/4-inches in the wom-
en’s long jump as.she prepares for
the Commonwealth Games.

The event was won by Concep-
cion Montaner of Spain with a sea-

- son’s best of 21-4, the same mark

posted by Kelly Sotherton of
Great Britain for second.



ndoor Championships




“Copyrighted Material _.
Syndicated Content &

a — EE z .
Available from Commercial News Providers”

NPABA DOUBLE HEADER

THE Real Deal Shockers stunned the Y-Care Wreckers 91-88 and
the College of the Bahamas Caribs got by Copy Maxx Sharks 85-58 in
the New Providence Amateur Basketball Association men’s division IT
double header on Saturday night.

In the Shockers’ victory over the Wreckers, Keyrand Brice scored 25
points and Rarif Ferguson matched the game high 25 in the loss.

And in the Caribs’ victory over the Sharks, Latario Brooks scored a
game high 28 points in the win. Darvin Dean came up with.a side
high 18 in the loss for the Sharks.

In the men’s feature contest, the Coke Explorers won by default over
the Y-Care Wreckers.

@ BASKETBALL
NO NPWBA GAMES

The Johnson Lady Truckers won by default over the Junior All-Stars
to improve their second place record to 9-5 behind the front-running
two-time defending champions Cleaning Centre Angels (12-1) in the
New Providence Women’s Basketball Association action over the
weekend at the DW Davis Gym.

With the loss, the All-Stars remained at the bottom of the pile at 1-
12.

And the Sunshine Auto Cheetahs took sole possession of third ’
place at 8-6 and a half game ahead of the College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs with a defaulted win over the Royal Bahamas Defence Force
Bluewaves in the other game scheduled.

With the loss, the Bluewaves sit in fifth place at 2-11.



;

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Bahamas Heart Association



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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006



The Tribune







The stories behind the news





ie







he Bahamas is
now a country

“

with only “a
veneer of civilisa-
tion” - a place

where political nastiness and
workplace treachery abound,
and common decency is in
retreat.

Who says so? A leading

Bahamian academic who sees -

himself as part of a rearguard
minority who, he feels, need to
become more vocal in defence
of national honour and integri-
ty.

As things stand, he claims,
the Bahamas is so steeped in
corruption, violence, dishon-
esty and venality that “it is a
case of every man for himself
and.God for us all.”

What’s worse is that, in his
eyes, few in power appear pre-
pared to make:a moral stand -
or even to state what the
Bahamas represents in terms
of everyday standards of
behaviour.

“When this government says
it is going to get to the bottom
of something, it’s really saying
it wants to know who took the
pictures, and who leaked the
story,” he said.

Bahamian religion, he added,
is all about “currying favour”
with God. “It is a question of
all for me — God is the cus-
toms officer who will fix you
u Ba

This damning appraisal of
the modern Bahamas follows
a long line of incidents which,
in the eyes of many, suggest
that there is now virtually no
accountability in the country.

An “anything goes” malaise
has descended on the land
which - according to the acad-
emic - will ultimately lead to a
social implosion.

The situation is exacerbated
by a glorification of material-
ism by the “haves” in a society
where the “have nots” are
barely scraping by.

“All the time poor people
see things around them they
cannot buy, so they take them.
Then you have young black



Buy a large 3-topping Pizza and



Le 0) =

Former prime minister
Hubert Ingraham and FNM
deputy Brent Symonette were
castigated in the House of
Assembly last week Wednes-
day for not attending the
opening of a new session of
parliament in what Prime
Minister Perry Christie (left)
described as the “most scan-
dalous experience” he has had
in his entire parliamentary
career... ,

concerned for his health last
week as they watched him refuse
food to. avoid what he thought
was an attempt to end his life
with poison. Ashley Newbold,
charged with the murder of 601
night club manager: Joy

Cartwright, reportedly went on

Family members and friends of
a death row inmate at Her
Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill, were




a hunger strike...


























‘ber of murders for the year ie at 10, ee are
concerned that the Bahamas has got off to a “bad start”
when it comes to violent crime...

He oe oe Rs

At the opening of a new session of parliament last
week, Government outlined new initiatives to produce
unprecedented economic advancement and social change
for the Bahamas. After inspecting the colour guard,
newly appointed Governor General Arthur D Hanna
was greeted with tremendous applause as he took his seat
on the throne to read. the speech prepared by Prime
Minister Perry Christie’s government...















Response to last week’s
article about the detention
centre, and specifically the
alleged attack on a foreign

journalist, shows that many
Bahamian citizens are now
seriously concerned at the
downward turn the country
appears to be taking.
INSIGHT reports...

men and women who are dis-
qualified from working because
of poor attitudes, bad educa-
tion and a whole pile of testos-
terone.

“Parents are not coping and
they are in over their heads.
You have a government which
keeps talking about big invest-
ments, but the average
Bahamian can’t work out how
this affects him.

Politicians

“The politicians are not
attending to the social situa-
tion here. They now have an
initiative to protect tourists
because the thugs have hit Bay
Street. Meanwhile, government
officials and‘the police want to
keep the truth from the media
because they fear its effects on
the industry.”

The alleged beating ofa for-
eign journalist by a Defence
Force officer in broad daylight
has conjured up new, unpalat-
able images of the Bahamas in.
the minds not only of many
Floridians, but right-thinking
Bahamians as well.

Whatever happens at the
detention centre is being done.

“in their name - and they don’t

like what they see. “If a guard

can beat a foreign newsman in
daylight OUTSIDE the com-
pound, what is he doing
INSIDE the compound in the
dead of night?” they ask, and
with good reason.

A country which carefully
cultivates alluring impressions
of blissful living in a sun-
splashed paradise is now
engaged in a life-or-death
struggle with the squalid reali-
ty.

While colourful posters pro-
claim the legend “It’s getting
better”, more and more
Bahamians are convinced that,
on the contrary, things are get-
ting worse. Much worse.

With no official condemna-
tion of the act, no genuine
expression of moral outrage,
an impression develops that
brutality against innocents
receives implicit sanction from
those in power. There is a
growing suspicion that the gov-
ernment has neither the will
nor wherewithal to act, seem-
ingly infected by institutional
paralysis.

Last week, the esteemed
Wall Street Journal turned its

sagacious eye on the Bahamas

SEE page 2C



get any bread side-

Cheesy Bread,Bread Sticks & CinnaStix for 99¢



@ THE alleged attack on Mario Vallejo —a reporter with Univision - by Royal Bahamas Defence

Force (RBDF) officers has left many Bahamians worried.

call us today!

East Bay
393-8000

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(FILE photo)



~ Harbour Bay
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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE:





Are we a civilised nation:

FROM page 1C

NicDonald’s





with a comment which should
make every decent Bahamian
reflect earnestly on their coun-

try’s fate.
“The Bahamas is part of the
British Commonwealth and,

ew

the last time we checked, a
civilised place,” it said.
Now, it added, would be a

‘good time to prove this by

releasing two Cuban dentists
who have been held at the
detention centre for the past
ten months, having been
picked up by the US Coast

_ Guard while making a dash for

freedom.

What the Wall Street Jour-
nal didn’t state is that the den-
tists, like many Bahamians in
varying circumstances, are
caught up in a mish-mash of
indecision and procrastination

which seems to typify this gov-

ernment’s approach to every-
thing.

Blurring issues and hoping
they will disappear before their
eyes now appears to be part of
the government’s policy. It
seems to observers that nothing
ever gets done.

A Tribune reader said last
week: “There is only one thing
this government is good at, and
that’s travelling. They’re always
travelling.”

In the last two or three
weeks, disturbing incidents
have occurred which have
tended to underscore the Wall
Street Journal’s doubts about
Bahamian ‘civilisation’.

One was the aftermath of the

’ Fox Hill Prison breakout, when

two prisoners were pictured
lying prostrate in a blood-
smeared cell. Another was the
attack on the Cuban journal-
ist. Then came.a plaintive cry
from a prisoner at Fox Hill who
fears an attempt will be made
on his life to silence him
because of his alleged involve-
ment in a high-profile murder.

What all three cases have in
common is an apparent brutal-
ising or intimidation of indi-
viduals by uncaring authority, a
situation common in totalitari-
an countries but indefensible
in a supposedly free-thinking
democracy. .

This lack of compassion, mis-
use of power and selfish grasp-
ing for material riches. are,
according to the academic,
products of a growing realisa-
tion that the Bahamas’ current
prosperity cannot last.

“A lot of Bahamians believe
in their bones that what is hap-
pening now is not going to hep

tion who are seriously con-
cerned about the nation’s
moral bankruptcy. They are
wondering where it is going to
lead.”

One reader inspired to react
by last week’s INSIGHT wrote:
“With some exceptions, the
police force is corrupt. Many
law enforcement officers are a:
threat to the community rather
than protectors.

Profession

“Many get into the profes- _

sion so they can run drugs or
assist their criminal friends.
Others join with good inten-
tions, but after a while of seeing .
that the system is corrupt, they
too change. Some become
power happy, trigger happy
criminals themselves.”

The reader said that once the
Haitian immigration situation
had been factored into mod-
ern Bahamian life, the scenario
was far from reassuring.

“They (Haitians) have been
mistreated and ridiculed and
now they are becoming pow-
erful enough to do something
about it,” she said.

Pervasive Bahamian amoral-

‘ity combined with Haitian

volatility does not bode well
for the country’s future, par-
ticularly as there appears to be
no-one.in sight with the stature,
gravitas and credibility to lay
the groundwork for a new kind
of society.. -

One reader, also an acade-
mic, said: “Bahamian society
needs rebuilding from the
foundation upwards. But there
needs to be a real will on the
part of the decent minority to

become more vocal and get |

involved.

“At the moment, there is.a
sense that many politicians are
in it for themselves, either for
self-aggrandisement or to line
their own pockets. What we
need is a true statesman who
can counter the general air of
sleaziness that prevails here.

“As things stand, there is no
long-term, national planning
and, because most politicians
are lawyers, very little entre-
preneurial or business savvy.

“It is interesting that no-one
ever stands up and states cate- .
gorically what’s wrong with the



integral part of the hip-hop .cil::
ture. Violence towards others:1s:
seen as cool, and even lauded
in lyrics, so it is no surprise that:
impressionable black youths.
roam the blocks with guns and.
knives. They know nothi ng
else.
That is why the responsé-
incidents like the alleged bea t:,
ing of the journalist, and’ the:
suspected brutalising of the F 4
Hill escapees, is so important in-
moulding public attitudes.
If prison guards can hammer









-prisoners'so badly that they are

left prostrate and helpless on
a blood-smeared floor, why
can’t youths. on the blocks
crack heads at will?

If a Defence Force officer
can split a reporter’s face with
a baton, then smash his head.
on a car bumper, why can’t a
gang: of louts set about a pass:
er-by? ms

If some politicians can
engage in sleaze with impunity,
why shouldn’t Joe Citizen. help:
himself from time to time? “+

In bigger first-world ‘cons:
tries, groups exist which lies:















tive of mee society on'tra
In the Bahamas, silence.
norm. §

Is this the result of long y'
of intimidation and victimis
tion under the first PLP gov::
ernment? Or are many if not
most Bahamians so divorced
from the concept of right. and
wrong that they genuinely fail:
to see the significance of such
events? ©

Petition

Last week, news broke of-a
petition from College of the
Bahamas academics, staff and
students calling for the rein-
statement of Dr Rodney Smith,
who resigned as president last.
year after admitting plagiarism.

They feel he gave the college
vision and a sense of direction
and want him back to re-ener-
gise what they claim is now an
apathetic institution.

What they fail to realise: is
that Dr Smith’s confession was
so fundamental to academic



_ principles that, whatever.his

attributes, there can be.no
going back.





. ios, pen indefinitely. modern Bahamas and what Calling for Dr Smith’s teins
a yh es needs to be done to put things statement is like the police:
Crispy Chicken Success right. force backing a commissioner

Laminate/Wood





; : at
Travertine/Stone

Pm lovin’ it

cae starting at

e Do Windows...
with Drapery Hardware

“Our success is directly relat-

ed to the implosion of Cuba as.

a tourist destination. A lot of
people are focused: on accu-
mulation of wealth at all costs
while the going is good. But I
think there are about five per

-cent of the Bahamian popula-_





a
DAY

y SHIPPING!

“That’s because many politi-
cians here have no moral
authority themselves. Some are
afraid to take. moral positions
because they know how squalid
and rancid their own lives are.
Itisa sad and depressing situ-
ation.”

With children now begetting
children, and feral boys being
spawned in fatherless homes,
the new generation offers lit-
tle hope. The 24-year-old
grandmother is a reality in the
modern Bahamas, and it does
the nation little credit.

Increased violence in schools
is another. symptom of social
meltdown., With no father fig-
ure or discipline at home, wild
boys are strutting their stuff in
an increasingly feminised soci-
ety, living out their entire early
lives overseen by women.

‘On television, ex-druggies
are revered as rap stars.
Reformed gangsters are an



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

convicted of robbery.
While academics in first-
world societies would not con-

template such a petition, and

recognise fully the untenability
of such a move, a COB lobby
group pushing for Dr Smith’s
return simply failed to grasp
the point.

According to INSIGHT’s
two academic sources, therein
lies the problem of Bahamian
society. First, you have to
recognise wrong-doing for what
it is, and then react according-
ly. Without that recognition,
the veneer of civilisation is,
indeed, so thin that the rough
wood of lawlessness and unac-
countability shows ‘through.

Perhaps now is the time to
take stock before it’s too late.

e What do you think? Fax
328-2398 or e-mail jmar-
quis@tribunemedia.net













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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 3C

H ACCUSED OF MURDER -
Melba Munroe, 25, of

Carmichael Road, was last week
charged in Magistrate’s Court
with murdering Dean Archer,
who was,reportedly stabbed in













WITH only a month and-a-
half into 2006 and the number
of murders for the year already
at 10, police are concerned that
the Bahamas has got off to a
“bad start” when it comes to
violent crime. “This does not
bode. well for the future. We
are’ extremely concerned about
this,” Chief Supt Hulan said
last week.

FORMER prime minister



Actual
Size





the heart on February 12.

Hubert Ingraham and FNM
deputy Brent Symonette were
castigated in the House of
Assembly last week Wednes-
day for not attending the open- .
ing of a new session of parlia-
ment.in what Prime Minister
Perry Christie described as the
“most scandalous experience”
he has had in his entire parlia-
mentary career.

Opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham then criticised Prime
Minister Perry Christie for not
announcing the opening of a

(FILE photo)

new session of parliament in
time for members to adjust
their schedules to attend.
Speaking from Ft Lauderdale
where he was undergoing a
physical check-up at the Cleve-
land Ciinic, Mr Ingraham said

that the prorogation of parlia- _

ment is no state secret.
He said Mr Christie called
him only the day before the

swearing-in ceremonies for Mr —

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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006

THE TRIBUNE



Re: Arthur D Hanna
as Governor General

WHILE I applaud Mr
Arthur Hanna for his stand
against the Pindling govern-
ment in 1984, it has to be noted
that it took an awfully long
time to make up his mind.

It was apparent many years
before then which way the PLP
government was going, yet Mr
Hanna hung in there. However,
credit where it’s due. He is a
man of honour and therefore a
worthy symbol of the Bahamas.

— GM Pratt

















aekok ok

ARTHUR HANNA will be
receiving a handsome salary
and, presumably, a hefty pen-
sion as a result of his tenure as
Governor General.

While I’m sure your senti-
ments are correct, and that Mr
Hanna might well have some-
thing to impart to Bahamian
society at large, it’s possible
that his acceptance of the
appointment might well be
linked to the remuneration on
offer.

— JB Rahming

ens) FINANCING



fs os os fs os

THE piece on Hanna was
powerful, as usual, and gave
interesting background infor-
mation on the Bahamian polit-
ical situation in the 1960s.

What the Bahamas needs are
more people of high principle.
At the moment, there seem to
be few standards young peo-
ple can look up to, and that
must be considered part of the

| : cyl,

ons cecal



country’s problems.
— JL Lowe

Safe he cfs fs fs

Re: Alleged beating

of foreign reporter
outside detention centre

KEEP the heat on. Innocent

| people are suffering and politi-

cians should be forced to stand
on principle once in a while

FROM page 3C <

Arthur Hanna as the new gov-
ernor general to invite him to

attend. ©
safe fe as fe ok

FAMILY members and
friends of a death row inmate
at Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox
Hill, were concerned for his
health last week as they
watched him refuse food to
avoid what he thought was an
attempt to end his life with poi-
son. Ashley Newbold, charged
with the murder of 601 night

hands.
—RG

ONCE again, an excellent
INSIGHT piece which hit
every button. The Bahamas’
good name as a civilised west-
ern society is at stake here. I
wonder if our politicians are
actually intelligent enough to
realise that.

— George L, Grand Bahama

2 of Ak eof

K IN REVIEW

club manager Joy Cartwright,
reportedly went on a hunger
strike. His lawyer, Michael
Hanna, last week Monday told
The Tribune that his client had
been refusing food for the past
10 days.

os Hs oi ks

AT the opening of a new ses-
sion of parliament last week,
Government outlined new ini-
tiatives to produce unprece-
dented economic advancement
and social change for the
Bahamas. After inspecting the

IT is clear we need indepen-
dent commissions to look into
many aspects of Bahamian life
at the moment, and the deten-
tion centre and the Defence
Force aretwoofthem. |:

However, how do we
appoint independent commis-
sions when everyone is com-
promised by political or reli-
gious considerations? It ig a
. very worrying thought.

— Concerned





colour guard, newly appointed
Governor General Arthur D
Hanna was greeted: with
tremendous applause..as he
took his seat on the throne to
read the speech prepared by
‘Prime Minister Ree Christie's

government. on
aR AB Ak sete 4

MELBA Munroe, 25, of
Carmichael Road, was'last
week charged in Magistrate’ 8
Court with murdering Dean
Archer on February 12. The
victim was stabbed in the heart.

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THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

ISSUES & IDEAS

INTERNATIONAL EDITION “SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2006 6C

<>



A LOOK BACK AT
THE WEEK OF FEB. 12

IRAQ ,
e The Iraqi Interior Ministry has

launched an investigation into an

alleged police death squad. Iraq’

Sunni Muslim minority has claimed
for more than a year that members
of Iraq’s Shiite Muslim-dominated
security forces intimidate, kidnap
and murder Sunnis, but the probe

was triggered by Iraqi soldiers’

chance discovery of 22 lraqi men

in police uniforms allegedly
preparing to kill a Sunni man.

e As of Thursday, at least 2,272
members of the U.S. military hav
died since March 2003, accordin
to an Associated Press count.

GUANTANAMO

e The United States should close

the prison at Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba, immediately, U.N.
human-rights investigators said i
a report released Thursday. The
report recommended that the U.
government either put the
detainees on trial before an
international tribunal or release
them. The report also found that
excessive violence against
detainees “must be assessed as’

amounting to torture” as defined

in the international Convention

Against Torture. White House

spokesman Scott McClellan

dismissed the 54-page report as

“rehash of allegations” made by
~ some detainees’ lawyers.

BOLIVIA

e Ina major concession to
President Evo Morales, the Bush
administration has agreed to |

in

Ss

e. |
g |



S.

HAITI

a



CUBA

e@ Cuba’s parliament speaker on
Thursday offered support to his
















| e A young man flips into the pool of the Montana Hotel in Port-au-Prince on Monday. Supporters of René |
i Préval had burst through the gated entrance of the Montana, where the Provisional Electoral Council hadits.
: center, demanding election results. Early Thursday, the council defused a political crisis and declared
i front-runner Préval the outright winner of the previous week’s presidential elections. Eight of the nine council .
i members signed an agreement to distribute the high number of blank ballots among the candidates according
to their percentages of the regular vote, giving Préval the outright majority he needed to avoid a runoff. Préval
i had just shy of 49 percent of the votes tallied before the counting process was stopped amidreportsof
missing ballots and allegations of fraud, and the redistribution of the blank ballots pushed him to 51.15 percent.



DENMARK

e Consumer boycotts of Danish
goods in Muslim countries in



reconsider its anti-drug trafficking
programs in Bolivia and is even
hinting it could allow more coca
farming. Concerned that more
coca could mean more cocaine,
Washington has so far balked at

visiting Iranian counterpart in an
escalating international dispute
over the Miiddle Eastern nation’s
use of nuclear power. “No one has
the right to monopolize any
source of energy fundamental for

protest of the publication of
caricatures of the Prophet
Mohammed are costing Denmark’s
companies millions. From Havarti

P cheeséto Lego toys, Danish

products have been removed from

easing a 30,000-acre limit on

Bolivia’s legal production of coca.

The cap is bitterly opposed by
many poor farmers who helped
Morales gain the presidency.





’ | humanity,” National Assembly
president Ricardo Alarcon said at
the start of a meeting with Iranian
parliament speaker Gholam Ali
Haddad Adel, who was beginning
a two-day visit to. the island.

EDITORIAL EXCERPTS :

On mistreatment of protesters in Iraq

i From Aftenposten,
Oslo, Norway:

ot just the British

army but all of West-

ern society faces a
serious challenge after the
release of a video showing
British soldiers abusite Iraqi
youth.

It makes little difference
that the video shows the
young people first throwing
stones at the soldiers. It
should make little differ-
ence.

The behavior was unac-
ceptable. ..

oe mistreatment reveals

-high stress level of sol-
dies in the pressed situa-
tion.

But it is precisely in such
situations that ethics and
morals, understanding right
and wrong, should kick in.

Soldiers must bring with
them a heavy ballast of val-
ues, values that are strength-
ened in training.

In addition, the military
command structure must be

. ety can afford or have the

stores jin Saudi Arabia and other
countriés around the Middle East
as Muslims. await an apology for
the cartoons, which the
Copenhagen ae has said
it cannot give.; :



WORLD VOICES

developed and trained so
that the morals of a group of
soldiers cannot break down
when things get heated.

We have already seen,
especially at the Abu Ghraib
prison near Baghdad, how
wrong things can go when
education, training and
‘unclear leadership signals
all pull in the wrong direc-
tion.

Such failings aresome-
thing no army and no soci-

right to commit.

On conflict over Muhammad cartoons



From Jyllands-Posten,
_Viby, Denmark:

believed that it was

fair game to lunge at a
small country like Denmark
with a trade boycott, threats
and insults.
. Ofcourse it is not ina
civilized world, and it is
symptomatic that leaders in
the Muslim world are tem-
pering the outrage as Den-
mark’s support in the West-
ern world is reaching full

strength.

S ome have mistakenly

The European Commis-
sion’s head, José Manuel
Barroso, was the latest to
come on stage with his unre-
served and wholehearted
backing to Denmark and the
freedom of speech...

It is especially notewor-
thy that Germany and
France, which split the Euro-
pean Union by taking their
own stands in the action
against Saddam Hussein,
were among the first to
come to Denmark’s rescue
without reservations of any
kind in the present Muham-

mad crisis.

It is valuable that there is
no doubt that the EU, in
such a serious situation,
stands united behind funda-
mental democratic values.

It could turn out to be
more important than a paper
with a treaty that cannot
gather full support in the
European hinterland. This
could lead to a new and bet-.
ter beginning that can give
new meaning and that also
can get the EU to concen-
trate on important initia-
tives in a global context.

On reprocessing of nuclear fuel:



From Yomiuri Shimbun,
Tokyo:

he U.S. Energy
Department
announced its Global
Nuclear Energy Partnership
on Feb. 6, reversing a dec-
ades-long policy against
reprocessing nuclear
fuel.

This decision will affect
the atoms-for-peace pro-
grams of not only Japan
but many other coun-
tries.

The sarhieesnip would
be a grand initiative to
establish a global recycling
system to separate energy
elements — uranium and

plutonium — from spent
fuel and turn them into new
reactor fuel.

Nuclear power plants are
very effective in alleviating
the energy crisis as well as
battling global warming.

We support the new U.S.
policy and say Japan should
cooperate with the partner-
ship in developing a new
technology.

If the GNEP were set up,
many countries would be
relieved of the burden of
dealing with spent reactor
fuel.

The potential fly i in the
ointment is that countries
with nuclear reprocessing
capabilities, including the

United States, would gain a -

hold over the nuclear plants
of countries that are depen-
dent on their fuel recycling A :
services.

Japan holds a special
position in this regard as the
only non-nuclear nation in
the world that is approved
internationally to reprocess
nuclear fuel, a technology it
promotes as a national pol-
icy.

Japan must achieve
nuclear fuel recycling , _
quickly and transmit tolthe: vy
world the fact that it has safe
nuclear technology and a
strong commitment to the
peaceful uses of atomic
energy. pe

pe Massachusetts, but youngsters did





WASHINGTON, D.C.

e The White House won two
national-security victories in the
Senate on Thursday, as the Patriot
Act cleared a major hurdle that.
ensures it will be renewed soon
and a compromise eased
Republican objections to a secret
domestic-wiretapping program,
probably ensuring that there won’t
be a congressional investigation of
it. The Senate voted 96-3 to move
toward final passage of new civil
liberties protections to the Patriot
Act, which the White House
negotiated with a handful of
Republicans.

e President Bush said Thursday
that he thinks Vice President Dick
Cheney handled his shooting
incident “just fine,” and authorities!
in Texas declared the case closed. |
Speaking publicly about the
matter for the first time, Bush
endorsed Cheney’s decision to
wait about 18 hours before
publicly acknowledging that he
had accidentally shot a hunting
companion during a Saturday
outing in South Texas. The
- president offered his views a few

hours after the local sheriff's

department absolved: Cheney of
any wrongdoing.

e A detailed federal study of
college completion has concluded
that undergraduates who take
. more than:a,semestér' break from
their courses are at great risk of
not graduating at all. “Continuous
enrollment... proves.to be
overpowering,” the report said.
‘TIt] increases the probability of
degree completion by 43 percent.
The: investigation of.what
happened: to 8, 900:students who
graduated from high school in
1992 by the federal. government’s
leading r ollege- -completion
i Iman, also
' iscoveréd that those who did not!
lleg within,a ear of
leaving high school were far less
likely to get degrees, but that the
freshman year of college was not
the make-or-break predictor of
college completion that many
experts had thought.

CARL JUSTE/MIAMI HERALD STAFF



THE NORTHEAST ©

e Drivers shoveled out their cars,
marooned travelers waited
impatiently for trains and planes to”
get back to full service, and utilit
crews struggled to restore powe
Monday after a record-breaking
snowstorm across the Northeast.
Hundreds of schools canceled
classes from West Virginia to








not get a holiday in New York City,
where subways ran and streets

were plowed despite aerec d- eu
breaking 26.9-inch snowfal





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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006





SPEECH ae THRONE
HIS EXCELLENCY THE HONOURABLE

ARTHUR D. HANNA

GOVERNOR-GENERAL
OPENING OF PARLIAMENT, 15th FEBRUARY,
2006



Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the
Honourable House of Assembly:

We meet early in this New Year to begin a new session of Parliament, the
second since my Government was elected to office in May of 2002.

The session we inaugurate today will continue my Government's efforts to
provide safe and secure communities, alleviate poverty and to provide growth
and prosperity for the Bahamian people.

My Government shall give primacy, therefore, to meeting the following chal-
lenges: eee

© To grow our economy so as fo provide ever increasing benefits and prosper-
ity for all our people throughout our archipelago;

© To protect and secure our borders against illegal immigration;

© To provide the Ids, policies, resources and fools necessary for the success-
ful campaign against crime and lawlessness and for the more efficient delivery
of judicial services;

© To-create the necessary policies and legislation fo modernize, advance and
meet the needs of essential public service delivery in the areas of poverty al-
leviation, health, education and housing;

© To support and protect the most vulnerable in our society, particularly the
poor, the elderly, the disabled and those in special needs;

© To protect and preserve the environment;

© To create a comprehensive system of land use planning; and

© To provide training programmes relevant to our developmental needs.

In broad terms those are the aims to which my Government intends to apply
itself with special determination and vigour during the new parliamentary ses-

sion we open foday.
RE-INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Madam President and Honourable Senators,

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will reintroduce for early consideration the following Bills
tabled during the last session of Parliament:

© ABill for an Act to enable The Bahamas to become a Member of The Inter-

national Development Association.

© ABill for an Act to amend the Supreme Court Act.

© A Bill for an Act to Protect Persons Appearing as Witnesses in Judicial Pro-
ceedings. ;

© A Bill for an Act to provide for The Establishment and Conferment of No-
tional Honours and for connected purposes.

© ABill for an Act to Institutionalize the Recognition by a Nation of the Contri-
bution made to its Emancipation and Growth by its National Heroes.

© A Bill for an act fo Repeal the Police Act.

© A Bill for an Act to Prohibit the Payment out of the Consolidated Fund of
a Prime Minister's Pension while any former holder of that office is still in
Parliament.

© ABill for an Act fo amend The Professional Engineers Act.

© A Bill for an Act to Amend the Rent Control and to Increase the Ceiling on
Controlled Rent.

THE ECONOMY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The Bahamian economy is in remarkably robust condition today. This is not
the result of accident. It is due instead to a variety of factors not the least of
which is the disciplined and prudent management of public finances to which
my Government has studiously adhered since May of 2002. Equally note-
worthy is my Government's promotion of economic expansion through sound
and sensible policies that have had wide appeal fo investors both foreign and
domestic over the past 3” years.

Indeed, my Government’s guidance and management.of the economy in that

period has been instrumental in making The Bahaiiias one of the most buoy-

ant and competitive economies in the region.

Astrong economy provides the launching pad for substantial improvements in
the living standards of all Bahamians. A strong economy means more and bet-
ter employment opportunities and more and better opportunities for business
development for Bahamian entrepreneurs.

A strong economy also means rising Government revenues which can be al-
located to progressively relieve the tax burden on lower-income Bahamian
households and to expand the range and quality of essential Government
services.

Indeed, since 2002, rather than increasing the burden of taxation by introduc-
ing new taxes, my Government confinues instead fo put primary emphasis on
maximizing revenue collection from existing taxes and duties and decreasing
the burden of taxation. The recent amendments fo the Stamp Act represent
an ae example of this emphasis and have already achieved impressive
results.

My Government is committed to strengthen revenue administration through
improved use of technology and analysis. Where considered necessary, amend-
ments will continue to be made to existing revenue laws to close loopholes, to
erhance the revenue collection process and to reduce leakages of revenue.

GOVERNMENT TO THE PEOPLE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government reaffirms its commitment to providing government's services
orine through The Bahamas Government On-line Initiative.

The Registrar General’s Department is already on-line. Other Ministries and
Departments will follow.

Special programmes will be put in place so that government will regularly ac-

count to the people.
ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will continue its strategy of attracting high quality international
and domestic investment but greater emphasis will now be placed on provid-
ing incentives and concessions for the more rapid development of Bahamian
entrepreneurial talent.

My Government is determined to spread the economic blessings of our land
amongst the widest number of persons possible. This will enable a new cadre of
Bahamian entrepreneurs with the talent, the drive, the management expertise
and the financial backing needed to succeed not only locally but in the highly
competitive global environment.

A new Domestic Investment Board will therefore be formed to act as the prima-
ry catalyst for the management of applications for assistance from Bahamian
entrepreneurs. The Domestic Investment Board will cut red tape for Bahamians
investors. Small businesses will also be supported by enhancing the relation-
ship between the Development Bank, BAIC, the various government loan guar-
a gal the government sponsored venture capital programme and
the Board.

FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Our Financial Services industry continues to hold vast, untapped potential for
the Bahamian economy and the Bahamian people.

My Government will therefore:

© Continue to focus on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Investment
and the Strategic Plan for Financial Services; and

© Continue to partner with the private sector to bring to market a new array
of financial products and services that will maintain the competitive advantage
of The Bahamas in international private banking, estate-planning and private
wealth management.

To give further support fo the industry, my Government intends to place before
you a Bill for an Act to Regulate Private Trust Companies. A Bill for a new
External Insurance Act is also expected to be laid before you.

My Government will continue to be vigilant in its goal of being a “One-Stop-
Shop” for investors, both local and foreign. In addition, my Government will

continue fo review its application procedures with a view to further expediting

the processing of applications.

HOTEL CORPORATION OF THE BAHAMAS
Madam President and Honourable Senators; °°
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government has successfully ‘completed the privatization of its Cable Beach
holdings with Baha Mar Development Co. Lid. for the development of a mega
world-class resort destination.
The Hotel Corporation of The Bahamas will focus in the immediate future on
securing suitable investors to develop its extensive properties in Andros and
Eleuthera and other Government-owned sites in other Family Islands, consistent
with my Government's anchor resort policy for major islands.

The Report On Poverty shows that the greatest incidence of poverty occurs in
the southern Bahamas. This fact was a catalyst in my government's decision
to enter into an historic public private sector joint venture between The Hotel
Corporation of The Bahamas and the | Group of Boston. *

The joint venture entity, to be known as Mayaguana Island Developers Lid.,
will spearhead the orderly development on the island of Mayaguana of an
ecc-sensitive resort community at the island of Mayaguana. It will have all
the infrastructural, social and educational facilities expected of a development
of this magnitude.

\
Awhole new range of economic opportunities for Bahamian families and entre-
preneurs, building and service contractors, and resort workers will open up as
a result of this pioneering venture in Mayaguana.

An initiative to develop Inagua as an eco-sensitive destination is on-going.

During this session, a bill will be laid before you for the establishment of a
Tourism Development Corporation to replace the Hotel Corporation of The Ba-
hamas. The role of this new corporation will be to engender greater ownership
of Bahamians in the tourism industry, whether as owners of resort properties or
as providers of goods and support services.

TOURISM

Madam President and Honourable Senators,

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The Bahamas achieved a second record-setting year in total tourist arrivals in
2005, receiving more than five million visitors.

Demand for the Islands of The Bahamas remains high.

Over the course of this session of Parliament, significant improvements in the
following areas will reap rewards for The Islands of The Bahamas.

© Downtown Redevelopment, including the Straw Market;
© Expanded and improved airport facilities;
© New or expanded cruise port facilities;

On the service-improvement front; renewed focus on the training and re-train-

Ling of persons employed in the fourism sector and Awareness Programmes for

the general public will be undertaken.

A new Time Share Act will be introduced to expand the time share business in
The Bahamas.

My Government will also introduce a bill for a Film Incentives Act to stimulate
the expansion of this sector f the tourism industry and to create greater op-
portunities for Bahamians in the film industry.

NATIONAL SECURITY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government continues to be committed to ensuring the safety and security
of our communities and to the maintenance of the territorial sovereignty of The
Bahamas.

My Government will therefore spare no effort to reduce crime and lawlessness
in our land and to better defend our borders against illegal immigrants, drug
traffickers and poachers and the possibility of terrorist acts.

THE TRIBUNE

5

ROYAL BAHAMAS POLICE FORCE

My Government will continue the process of modernization of the Royal Baha-
mas Police Force.

The enrollment of the Force will be expanded as will its involvement in school
policing, tourism policing, and the highly successful and internationally ac-
claimed Urban Renewal Programme, which has been proven to be effective in
the prevention of crime. :

My Government will lay before you a Bill for a Police Service Act 2006. Whilst
society can never compensate for officers injured or fallen in the line of duty,
this Bill will ensure that their spouses and. dependents are properly compen-
sated and maintained. It is also intended that this Bill shall have retroactive
effect for those fallen in the line of duty and that these provisions shall apply to
all law enforcement agencies.

My Government will also build on the capacity of the Police for rapid response
and high visibility in communities throughout The Bahamas.

My Government will effect improvements at the forensic laboratory, including
the ability to conduct DNA testing. Legislation will be introduced to effect this
initiative. ;

My Government continues to be concerned about the use of firearms.and illegal
weapons to perpetrate crimes of violence. As a consequence, My Government
will design and place before you a broad range of strategies and legislation to
combat crime. These will include amendments to the Bail Act.

My Government will continue to intensify. its efforts to interdict illegal drugs
and drug smuggling. pie daha

ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE

The Royal Bahamas Defence Force in our archipelagic. nation continues to
represent the front line in our ongoing war against illegal immigration and
poaching.

Having engaged in a review, measures will be taken to expand and deepen the
training capacity of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force.

The enrollment of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force will be increased as well.
Efforts will be made fo continue to bring Royal Bahamas Defence Force marines
more fully into the national effort to interdict drug trafficking.

Improvements in the conditions of service will be effected in the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION

My Government is deeply concerned about the problem of illegal immigration
in our country. We understand and appreciate the mounting concerns of the
on people over this issue: We shall resolutely protect the integrity of
our borders. :

Creative and innovative’ measures will:be faken in this regard, including the
amendment of the Immigration Act to make provision for the following mat-
fers:

- To more effectively combat the illegal trafficking in human persons that has -
grown so significantly of late; ss" vis os :
- To increase the punishment of persons who assist in the illegal landing of

aliens; and

- -To increase the punishment of persons who employ illegal immigrants without
> ©» obtaining thé’ requisite work permit.

Policies and strategies will be implemented to address the circumstances and is-
sues arising from the existence of communities of illegal immigrants. Steps will
he taken to eliminate the illegal occupancy of land throughout The Bahamas.

Legislation relating to the management of refugee and or asylum claims will
also be introduced.

PRISON SECURITY

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will continue the process of modernization of Her Majesty's
Prison.

My Government will lay before you The Bahamas Department of Corrections Bill
(2006) to replace the Prison Act.

The Remand Court in the vicinity of the Prison will be completed by the end of
2006. This will eliminate the need to transport persons on remand along the

streets of New Providence.

My Government’s initiatives will enhance security systems at the Prison and
increase training resources as well as enhance conditions of service for Prison
Officers.

My Government will also continue with the necessary planning for a new, mod-
ern, maximum security prison. a

IMPROVING THE DELIVERY OF JUDICIAL SERVICES

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government recognizes that access to an efficient and fair justice system is
essential to our democracy and the rule of law.

My Government will provide every support to the Judiciary in implementing
its case management systems, using information technology, revised rules and
improved facilities and resources to address the backlog of cases.

My Government remains resolute in protecting the judicial process from any
interference or intimidation of witnesses. Therefore, my Government will pro-
ceed with a Justice Protection Bill in this session of Parliament fo:criminalize
acts which impede the co-operation of persons as witnesses in court. This new
measure will also establish a Witness Protection Programme to provide protec-
ua and safety for witnesses who may be the object of intimidation and threats
of harm.

My Government will bring to Parliament very early in this session an amend-
ment fo the Jurors Act to provide for alternate jurors in criminal trials in the
Supreme Court. This will avoid the loss of time and resources when a juror, for
whatever reason, has to be excused.

Further, my Government will establish a career path within the Public Service
for Court Reporters, to improve the efficiency of the recording of judicial pro-
ceedings.

Initiatives will be taken to address the rights of victims of crime.

The hard work and diligence of my Government have led to the removal of The
Bahamas from the monitoring list of the Financial Action Task Force (“FATE”).
My Government will continue to increase the resources and capacity of the
Office of the Attorney General to respond in a timely manner to judicial and
regulatory requests for international co-operation.

Further, my Government is committed to improving the terms and conditions of
service of legal officers.
THE TRIBUNE

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

The per capita income in The Bahamas is $17,883, one of the highest in the
region - an indication of our strong economy.

The 2001 Bahamas Living Conditions Survey, received by my Government in
2005, has for the first time provided a factual assessment of the level of poverty
in our country. The survey found that more than 50% of the country’s poor are
children 14 years or younger.

Atthe same time 1 in 12 residents in New Providence and Grand Bahama and 1
in 5 in the Southern Islands are living under the poverty line of $2,863 per an-
num. Five percent of households in The Bahamas live below the poverty line.

My Government finds this state of affairs intolerable and unacceptable.

My Government has, therefore, designed policies to address this issue and will
resolutely continue our innovative empowerment and support programmes.

My Government shall also present initiatives to assist families experiencing
challenges with the support and control of children and fo increase the effi-
ciency of rehabilitative efforts and to promote alternatives fo the sentencing of

/juveniles, including the mandate that the child and parent attend parenting or
counseling sessions.

The following legislation will be introduced: -

(i) Affiliation Proceedings (Amendment) Bill

(ii) Domestic Violence & Sexual Harassment (Amendment) Bill

(iii) Children & Young Persons {Administration of Justice) (Amendment) Bill

don » EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY FOR THE DISABLED

My Government, after consultation, will also introduce legislation fo protect the
rights of persons with disabilities.

LAND POLICY

«Madam President and Honourable Senators,

My: Government: has.also initiated a project that will address key land issues

Mr: Speaker.and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government, in consultation with all stakeholders, including the Bahamian
public will create a new land policy. This land policy will address, amongst
other things; availability of land for current and future generations of Baha-
mians and beach access. The policy will also include a regulatory framework,
environmental components and monitoring mechanisms.

including: the development of a modern: land registration, system, the better

- utilization of commonage and the availability of Crown Land to Bahamians.

My Government is finalizing Master Development Plans for the Islands of Eleu-
thera, Exuma and Mayaguana:’A:plan:for, New.Providence is expected to be
completed by the end of 2006.: :. sores gu

AVIATION

Madam President and Honourable Senaters) 6 ee i : be
Mr. Speaker and Members-of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Legislation will be laid before Parliament for the.renaming of Nassau Interna-

tional Airport as The Sir Lynden Pindling International :Airpostin-tribute to the -

memory of the late Founding Father of our Nation.

My Government recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Vancou-
ver Airport Services, a company with worldwide airport management experi-
ence, for the operation, management and re-development of Nassau Interna-
tional Airport:-for a term of 10 years. Nassau International Airport, a principal
gateway fo our nation, will be transformed into a world-class facility.

Legislation will also be introduced to support airport development and enhance-
ment, including the creation of a Civil Aviation Authority.

My Government will install and inaugurate the ASR-9 Radar which was recently
acquired at a cost of more than $8 million.
METEOROLOGY

‘Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

“My Government will improve its preparedness to combat the effects of natural
weather disasters by the use of the Doppler Radar System. My Government will
further enhance its capabilities by a Direct Readout Ground Station which will

-¢ollect and post information from 14 major islands on the Internet.

MARITIME AFFAIRS

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government is committed to the modernization of legislation governing
maritime affairs. My Government will introduce legislation to amend the key

maritime laws. A commercial Watersports Bill to provide regulatory oversight
for commercial watersports activity in The Bahamas will be introduced fo the

Parliament.

ROAD TRAFFIC

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government will introduce legislation to create a unified bussing system.
‘My Government is concerned about road safety and will introduce a series of
initiatives and legislation, including seat belt and breathalyzer provisions to

+ address this critical matter.

PUBLIC UTILITIES
. WATER & SEWERAGE CORPORATION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

i SineeMay 2002, :my Government has demonstrated its commitment to the

implementation of a Long-Term Strategic Plan fo ensure that each and every
citizen of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas has access to a high quality, reli-

: able potable water supply system and a modern sewerage collection, treatment
‘-and.disposal network in compliance with local and international standards.

My Government will continue to provide adequate supplies of potable water in
New Providence and the Family Islands: through public private sector partner-
ship.

BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD.

My Government is pleased to: report that The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited has been able to reduce its Domestic Long Distance Rates
by some fifty-five (55%) percent and its International Long Distance Rates by
some 70%.

My Government remains committed to the privatization of The Bahamas Tele-
communications Company. ;

My Government is committed to enabling affordable, reliable communication
across The Bahamas. This will be accomplished by BTC’s fibre-optic cable link
of the entire Bahamas and by cable television services. These links will also
enable the entire Bahamas to receive cable television service.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

During 2006, the Bahamas Electricity Corporation, at a cost of some $21.8 Mik
lion, will conclude the installation of three additional generators. The addition
of these units to the BEC and Paradise Island network will increase capacity and
improve reliability and efficiency. Substantial cost savings should also be real-
ized through lower fuel costs. These savings will be passed on to consumers as
indeed was done for the first time in 2003 under my Government.

PUBLIC WORKS

The maintenance and continued expansion of public infrastructure is a major
priority of my government. Major road construction works presently in prog-
ress in New Providence, Grand Bahama, Bimini, Russell Island, and mainland
Eleuthera will be completed. The hurricane restoration project throughout the
Family Islands as well as in the western portion of New Providence will also
continue.

. The other important elements of my Government's ongoing programme for

infrastructural development, whether in terms of roadworks, bridges, health
care facilities, docks or other construction activity, will be laid out in detail.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Recognising the right of Bahamians to decent, affordable housing, my Govern-
ment has constructed more than eight hundred (800) homes since assuming
office and is now in the process of constructing an additional one. thousand
homes (1,000) in New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands.

My Government will also continue the construction of additional rental units

and will develop new housing initiatives, particularly in islands experiencing
rapid economic expansion.

In tandem with these initiatives, my Government, through The Bahamas Mort-
gage Corporation, will provide assistance to the Ministry of Housing & National
Insurance with financing of subdivisions totaling in excess of $42 million dollars
and for the completion of a corporate office complex to house the Bahamas
Mortgage Corporation, the Department of Housing and the Ministry of Hous-
ing.

’ URBAN RENEWAL PROGRAMME ©

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

Recognising the success of the Urban Renewal Programme and its positive effect
on cemmunities and citizens, my Government will allocate more resources to
expand the programme to communities across The Bahamas.

EDUCATION .

Madam President and Honourable Senators,

‘Mr: Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government recognizes that education is the: primary means to sustain and
advance the economic, social and cultural growth and development of The Ba-
hamas. Far reaching initiatives will be introduced to continue the transforma-
tion of the system of education.

My Government, determined to give all Bahamian children a head start, will

continue its expansion of pre-school education by building additional pre-school:

units in New Providence and the Family Islands.

Reaching out to children of special needs, my Government will continue to imple-
ment the recommendations of the National Commission on Special Education,
especially in relation to early identification, implementation and remediation.

The infrastructural requirements of the education system will be addressed by
the construction of new schools, the modernization of existing schools and a
dedicated maintenance programme.

My Government reaffirms its commitment fo provide quality and equity in the
delivery of education throughout The Bahamas. A National Distance Education
Programme will be established. A Bill for the establishment of the Accreditation
and Equivalency Council will be introduced

~~ Legislation will’also be introduced to accredit all institutions of learning.

My Government appreciates the requirements of aligning technical and voca-
tional education and training to industry demand and the rapid expanding
economy. The Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute will be restructured
to improve the delivery of technical and vocational education and training, and
major initiatives to equip Bahamians, particularly those who are presently un-
employed,will be established.

My Government will continue to transform the College of The Bahamas into an
accredited university.

HEALTH CARE

~ Madam President and Honourable Senators,

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government remains convinced that health care is a basic right to which all
people are entitled as a matter of moral imperative.

Therefore, my Government will continue with its announced programme of
building modern community clinics and mini hospitals across The Bahamas.
Major improvements will also be made to the Princess Margaret and Rand Me-
morial Hospitals and‘to the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre and other health
care facilities.

The Healthy Lifestyle Initiative will be introduced throughout The Bahamas.
THE ENVIRONMENT

My Government will continue to assiduously pursue policies to protect our pris-
tine environment, a gift from God for generations of Bahamians yet unborn.

Legislation will be introduced to enhance and strengthen the regulatory and
enforcement powers of the BEST Commission.

NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly:

My Government is convinced that a fully functioning, sustainable system of
National Health Insurance is necessary.

My Government will continue with extensive public consultations in this regard
and has mandated an independent review of the costing.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2006, PAGE 9C
I ne ek ae ee Si ea i ps Se he

PUBLIC SERVICE

Madam President and Honourable Senators
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly;

In furtherance of my government's new training thrust, an Institute for Public
Service Training will be created.

A comprehensive review of the system for engagement and pensions for all
classes of public employees will be conducted. .

Legislation will be introduced to amend the Parliamentary Pensions Act

FOREIGH AFFAIRS

My Government will also amend the Passport Act. My Government will pur-
chase a system for machine-readable passports which will introduce a signift-
cantly higher level of security for Bahamian passports.

My Government will cause Foreign Service Orders to be laid before you to estab-
lish and regulate the terms and conditions of service for diplomats and Consular
Officers who serve at home and abroad.

YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Honourable Members of the House of Assembly:

itis the intention of My Government to erect multi-purpose facilities, inclusive of
Track and Field, Softball, Baseball, Basketball, and Volleyball, on a scheduled
basis in the Family Islands.

My Government will immediately commence the construction of sports facilities
at the Doris Johnson High School and the C. V. Bethel High School.

My Government has successfully completed a pilot project towards the estab-
lishment of a National Youth Service and is committed to expanding the pro-
gramme.

My Government is committed to creating opportunities for our youth to maxi-
mize their potential so as to enable them to participate fully in the social and
economic life of our country. In this regard, we will continue to pursue initic-
tives to empower them.

CULTURE

Culture touches every facet of our national life. It contributes more than any-
thing else fo the consolidation of our national identity and an awareness of our
uniqueness.

My Government will redouble its efforts fo find and support Bahamian novel-
ists, playwrights, poets, artists, musicians and actors. -

The Clifton site has been purchased and is now being developed into a National
Heritage Park.

My Government will place before you legislation fo establish a National Endow-
ment for the Arts.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT,
AGRICULTURE & FISHERIES; CO-OPERATIVES

Mr. President and Honourable Senators, datiacnrehan
Madam Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly,

Amendments to the Local Government Act will be introduced to enable the sys-
tem of local government fo operate more efficiently.

Regulations to give effect fo the Cooperatives Act passed in 2003 will also be
promulgated.

The Food Safety legislation will be modernized to meet the current world situ-
ation with respect to international trade and new and emerging food safety ”
concerns.

The Animal Control Act will be amended to create greater responsibility and
accountability of owners of animals,

The Public Slaughter House Act will be amended to permit the designation of
locations other than New Providence as approved slaughter facilities and to
allow for the licencing of facilities as necessary. s

My Government will also introduce a number of initiatives within the area of
agriculture in.an effort to effect rapid and significant results. Of particular note
in this regard, my Government will establish a demonstration and training farm
at North Andros. This demonstration and training facility will be associated
with the Ministry Agricultural Fisheries, the College of The Bahamas and the
National Youth Programme.

My Government will expand the cascarilla industry in the Southeastern Baha-
mas.

CONCLUSION

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Honourable Members of the House of Assembly:

The measures that | have outlined to you today will in their fotality move the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and its people fo unprecedented heights.

Unprecedented heights may be measured by the strength of our economy.

Today, my government challenges all Bahamians to another measure - a mea-

sure where the weakest amongst us is safe and our society is secure, cohesive

and strong - a society where no Bahamian is left behind and persons who may
have failed are empowered fo seize the opportunity of a second chance.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly;

If we are to be successful in this effort, we must become our brother's keeper
and each Bahamian regardless of race, denomination or gender, experiences
their God-given meaning, dignity and value.

Each Bahamian must also accept the challenge to fully develop their God given
talent.

Madam President and Honourable Senators,
Mr. Speaker and Members of the Honorable House of Assembly;

As we move forward, upward, and onward together let every section of the Ba-
hamian orchestra - the Church, private sector, charity groups and Government

’ come together to create symphony that will resound the length and breadth of

The Bahamas - a symphony that will cause all to acknowledge The Bahamas as
the hest little nation in the world.

May Almighty God rest upon your counsels
and guide your deliberations.




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Nuclear armed Iran a threat to more than Mideast



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LER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR | JOE OGLESBY, EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR / a JAMES L KNIGHT (1909-1991)



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